Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd April 1800.
Reference Number: 18000402
Reference Number: f18000402-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 2d of APRIL, 1800, and following Days, BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , ESQ. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY, AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1800.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; the Right Honourable LLOYD, Lord KENYON, Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir NASH GROSE, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER, Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William Sumner ,

John Breasher ,

John Gwillim ,

Samuel Davies ,

John Austin ,

John-Mans Bury ,

Thomas Thompson ,

Edward Penny ,

William Rawdon ,

Thomas Dunning ,

Francis Barker ,

Hugh Gibson .

First Middlesex Jury.

Edward Haley ,

James Winwood ,

Thomas Wackerill ,

Thomas Tupp ,

Henry Delano ,

Thomas Wrightson ,

William Skelton ,

John Cock ,

John-Lewin Newman ,

Thomas Robinson ,

John Bellis ,

George Young .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Essex ,

Thomas Briggs ,

John Weedon ,

William Fisher ,

Thomas Collett ,

Benjamin Barge ,

Stephen Briggs ,

Thomas Church ,

William Colcher ,

William Gee ,

Thomas Young ,

Thomas Evans .

Reference Number: t18000402-1

244. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October, 1798 , a hempen sack, value 1s. 6d. and a bushel and a half of onions, value 3s. the property of Harry Stowe .(The case was opened by Mr. Trebeck.)

BENJAMIN POTTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Trebeck. On the 24th of October, 1798, I met the prisoner, about seven in the evening, in Chiswick-lane; he was servant to Mr. Stowe; he had a sack on his back, and when he saw me he threw it into a ditch; I then went up to him, and said, Will, what have you got here, and kicked my foot against it; I said they were onions; yes, master, says he; Mr. Stowe's foreman, Jefferys, was with me, and his son; he said he had them from Russel Bourne , and was going to take them to Joe Bates's; Jefferys's son said, father, this is our sack, it was in our warehouse when we locked the door; I said then we will go to Russel Bourne , and see where he got it from, and then he ran away.

JOHN JEFFERYS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Trebeck. I am foreman to Mr. Stowe, gardener and farmer: On the evening of the 24th of October, 1798, I was with Potts; I met the prisoner about seven o'clock at night; I had locked the door before I came out; when I returned, after I had been with Potts, I missed a sack of onions; I am sure it was my master's sack; he threw it into the ditch, and ran away; I carried them home and kept them for a twelvemonth, till they were quite rotten; the prisoner had worked for me about two months.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along and picked up these onions; I did not throw them into the ditch.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-2

245. JOHN NOTT , ROBERT GINGER , and JANE NOTT, otherwise ALLEN , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Harriet Dupree , widow , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 7th of February , with intent the goods therein being to steal, and burglariously stealing a silver salver, value 7l a silver teapot, value 3l. a silver milk-pot, value 20s. two silver salts, value 5s. three silver forks, value 10s. three silver table-spoons, value 15s. a silver teaspoon, value 1s. a silver tea-pot strainer, value 1s. a silver extinguisher, value 1s. a gold thimble, value 5s. an amber snuff-box, value 5s. two gold trinkets, value 10s. a satin gown and petticoat, value 10s. three petticoats, value 15s. a shawl, value 15s. two cloaks, value 21s. four Bank-notes, value 40l. two other Bank-notes, value 10l. and six other Banknotes, value 6l. the property of the said Harriet.

The charge not being brought home to the prisoners, they were All Three ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-3

246. CATHERINE RAFFEEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , seven yards of muslin, value 17s. the property of Charles Scott , privately in his shop .

CHARLES SCOTT sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in Cranbourn-street, Leicester-fields : On Monday the 24th of March, the prisoner at the bar and another woman with a child came into my shop, about three o'clock in the afternoon; I was in a back-parlour at the farther end of the shop; I stepped forward and set two seats for them; I walked back into the parlour; my young man was serving behind the counter; about ten minutes afterwards my young man informed me that he had missed a piece of muslin; the prisoner was then in the shop; I turned up her cloak, and there I found the muslin, with her gown-tail over it; I am sure it is my property.

THOMAS MALLAND sworn. - I am a constable:(produces the property;) I received it from Mr. Scott.

Scott. This is the same muslin that I found under the arm of the prisoner; it is mine.

JOHN WEBSTER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Scott: The prisoner and another woman with a child came into the shop; the other woman asked to look at some muslin; I shewed her some, and it was not the sort she wanted; I shewed her two or three pieces; she bought a quarter of a yard; the prisoner was very close to the counter; I turned round to cut off a quarter of a yard, and I saw her with her hands under her cloak, which gave me a suspicion; the prisoner wanted to look at some calico, and while she was looking at the calico I looked over the muslins, piece by piece, and missed the first piece I had shewn the other woman; I did not say any thing till I had cut some calico; by that time Mr. Scott came into the shop, and I told him I missed some muslin; I looked over the

wrapper again, but could not find it; I then said to the prisoner, I believe you have got it; she said, no, she had not; Mr. Scott then opened her cloak and I saw it under her cloak; this is the same piece of muslin. GUILTY. (Aged 36.)

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-4

247. EDWARD DAVIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jessica Davies , about the hour of four, in the night of the 26th of February , with intent the goods therein being to steal, and burglariously stealing a muslin handkerchief, value 9d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6d. a piece of patch-work, value 6d. a counterpane, value 15s. two window-curtains, value 1l. 10s. a pair of buckles, value 10s. a ring, value 1l. two silver tea-spoons, value 4s. a gold pen, value 5s. a bracelet, value 4s. and two china mugs, value 2s. the property of the said Jessica.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JESSICA DAVIES sworn. - I live at Haverstock-hill , in the road to Hampstead; I let lodgings; at the time of the robbery I had no lodgers: On Ash-Wednesday I left the house in a perfect state of security, the key of the street-door, and the key of the garden-wicket, I put in my pocket; I did not return to the house till the 9th of March; I took the keys out of my pocket to unlock the garden-gate and found the door open, the street-door open, the parlour-door open, and the articles mentioned in the indictment gone, and the drawers turned topsy-turvey; I saw, at Worship-street, a half-handkerchief, a pair of stockings, and a piece of patch-work of mine; I have not seen the other things since; the house had been plundered, to the best of my knowledge, to the amount of between two and three hundred pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have an indictment against other persons for stealing part of the things you lost from your house? - A. Yes, I have.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the officers belonging to Worship-street: I apprehended the prisoner at the bar, Mason and Ray were with me, on Sunday the 9th of March, at his lodgings in Plumbtree-court, Shoe-lane; he was in bed; and by the bed-side, in a bag, were these four iron crows; in a cupboard, in the same room, these two little crows, a dark-lantern with a candle in it, and thirty-one picklock keys, (produces them); on the 18th of the same month, these crows were delivered to Mason, and I received them again of him,

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You had taken Wright, the accomplice, some time before? - A. Yes, three days.

Q. He told you where to find these things? - A. Yes.

PETER MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was with Armstrong: There was some patchwork in the prisoner's lodgings which we did not take then, but went a day or two afterwards and took it; there was a net night-cap which Mrs. Davies owned; on the 18th of March, I went to her house at Hampstead, and tried these crows, they exactly fitted the front door, and there is the mark of the paint of the door-post on them; I myself opened the beauset, in the front parlour, with this picklock-key.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner's wife was taken up, and discharged? - A. Yes.

Q.And this piece of patch-work remained in her possession for two or three days afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q.So that she might have disposed of it, if she had supposed it improperly come by? - A. Yes.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.(Produces a piece of patch-work, and a pair of stockings): On the 9th of March I went with Armstrong and Mason, and saw a piece of patch-work; on the 11th I went again, and Mrs. Davis told me where she had carried it to; I went and got it.(Produces it).

Mrs. Davies. This is my property, it has my mark upon it.

Ray. I also found in the prisoner's apartment a number of duplicates, and among them a handkerchief for nine-pence; the pawnbroker is here.

THOMAS COTTERELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a pawnbroker: I took in this handkerchief of a woman, I cannot say who it was.

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I know the prisoner, and I know Mrs. Davies's house at Haverstock-hill: On Monday the 24th of February, I went with the prisoner to look for a house; we walked past the house, and saw it shut up; we went again the next day, and saw it shut up again; then we put some pebblestones in the door, by the post, to know whether any body came in or out; we went there again on the Wednesday morning between four and five, we found the stones in the door as we left them, and Davis unlocked the wicket-door with one of his picklock-keys; then we both of us went into the court-yard to the door of the house; Davis tried his picklock-keys to undo the door of the house, and they would not fit; then we came away from the door, and put some stones in, and bolted the garden-door; then we went away, and returned again on Thursday morning about four o'clock,

we found then that the stones were out; then Davis unbolted the garden-door, and went to the street-door, and opened it with the rooks; then Davis and I went into the passage, and Davis pulled out some phos, and lit a candle; then he pulled some keys out of his pocket, and with one of them he undid the parlour-door; then we went to the beauset, and took two silver tea-spoons out, a muslin handkerchief, a pair of cotton stockings, a counterpane, two window-curtains, a piece of patchwork, a pair of buckles, a ring, a gold pen, a bracelet, and two china mugs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Will you swear that the patch-work was taken that night? - A. I cannot swear it.

Q.You went there several nights with other persons? - A. Yes.

Q. It is rather extraordinary what Davis took you for, he did all, and you looked on? - A.He took me with him to help.

Q. How came such an honest fellow as you to get into such bad company - you were an honest industrious labourer? - A. I had been concerned in some robberies.

Q. You told the officers where you found these things that have been produced? - A. Yes.

Q.You did not leave them at Davis's lodgings yourself I dare say? - A. No.

Q.If you had not swore something against somebody you might have been hung yourself? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. Wright came to me, and said, I must be out of the way for a dog, the officers were oat to take me; and he brought these keys to my place, and left them there; I never was near this house with him; he gave the patch-work to my wife, and the crows and dark-lantern; and he gave her the handkerchief to pawn, I was ill in bed at the time.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-5

248. JOHN HANSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , six hen fowls, value 10s. and one cock fowl, value 1s. the property of Elizabeth Vaughan .(The case was opened by Mr. Vaillant).

CHARLES SIMMONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. On Monday the 3d of March, about six o'clock in the morning, just on the other side of Gunnersbury-lane, I saw the prisoner with a barrow, I was sure it was Hanson; I went up to him, says I, Jack, you have got to the old trade; no master, says he, I have not, I am going to London with some things for my wife; I said, I doubt you have been at the old trade, you had better have left it off; I told him I insisted upon seeing what he had before I left him; I walked with him some distance, and then he said he would tell me the truth; he told me he had got some fowls that he had bought at Chertsey-market; I said, Chertsey-market was on a Wednesday; and asked him why he had not disposed of them before; he said, he had bought them of Towers, of Purbright; I then took out my pocket-book and pencil, and put it down; he said Mr. Phillips, of Richmond, knew him; I said, it is a lame story, John; I walked on to Turnham-green, where I saw some more people, and I stopped him, and searched his baskets; there were four hens in the upper basket, and nine in the lower; he wanted to go to Walham-green; I got a constable, and took him into custody, and he was taken to Bow-street; I took the fowls to the constable's house, and found them quite warm; I took the fowls from Bow-street to Twickenham, sealed with my seal.

EDWARD BENSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am servant to Mrs. Vaughan, Montpellier-row, Twickenham; she lost five hens and a cock, on Sunday night, or Monday morning the 3d of March; I afterwards saw them again at Mr. Simmons's.

Prisoner's defence. I received the fowls from a man at Kew-bridge, to fell for him.

GUILTY . (Aged 49.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-6

249. JOHN BARNETT alias JACOB FARROW , and JOHN COLLEY , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Green , about the hour of seven in the night of the 26th of December , and burglariously stealing a silver watch, value 30s. a steel chain, value 2d. a glass seal, value 2d. a pair of silver salts, value 16s. two silver table-spoons, value 16s. four silver teaspoons, value 4s. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 4s. a pair of plated sugar-tongs, value 6d. a pepper box, value 5s. eighty-five guineas, a Banknote, value 20l. another Bank-note, value 2l. and another Bank-note, value 1l. the property of the said Charles.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

MARY GREEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of Charles Green: On the 26th of December last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I went out; I live at Stepney , my husband is a journeyman butcher , he went out early in the morning; I fastened the door, windows, and all; I returned about seven o'clock, and found the window-shutters broke open; they had tried the door in two

places, and broke the window; I went into the front room, and looked at my beauset, and missed a pair of silver salts, a silver pepper-box, two tablespoons, four tea-spoons, and a pair of tea-tongs; I went up stairs into the chamber, I missed a silver watch, and my money, there was about a hundred and five, or a hundred and seven pounds, in cash and notes; I sent for my husband immediately, and he came home.

JOHN COOKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell-office, (produces a silver watch, a pair of silver salts, two tablespoons, four tea-spoons, a silver pepper-castor, and a pair of silver tea-tongs:) I received these things from Jacob Jiggett, on Monday the 17th of February, in Essex-street, Whitechapel; I have had them ever since.

Mrs. Green. These are all my husband's property.

Cooke. I apprehended Barnett at the White Lion in Shadwell; Holebrooke and I detained him, and charged him on suspicion of divers robberies; Robus was not apprehended by any person; he came forwards voluntarily, and was admitted an evidence for the Crown.

JACOB JIGGETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a weaver; I keep a house in Essex-passage, Essex-street, Whitechapel: These are the same things that I delivered to Cook, the officer, the day after Christmas-day; the two prisoners and Solomon Robus came to me altogether with this property; they offered to sell it me; they said I could always make my own money again; they asked five shillings and sixpence an ounce; they pulled out some money and Bank-notes, and shared twenty-six guineas a-piece; they shewed me the Bank-notes, there were three or four; I said I was no scholar, and I could not tell what they were; and they put them back into their pockets; about two months afterwards Cook came to my house, and I delivered the things to him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Did Cook apprehend you? - A. Yes, and I have been in prison ever since.

Q.Were not you surprised when you saw the guineas? - A. Yes.

Q.Then you refused to buy the things, I suppose? - A. No.

Q.Then you gave information to the Magistrate, the next day? - A. No, I did not.

Q.How long have you been a weaver? - A. Since I was twelve years of age.

Q.Did you ever happen to be in trouble? - A. Yes, I was tried once in this Court.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What might you be tried for? - A. For manslaughter, and acquitted.

SOLOMON ROBUS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I went with the two prisoners to Mr. Green's at Stepney, on boxing-day at night, between seven and eight in the evening; we wrenched open the window-shutters with an iron crow; Jacob Farrow got in at the window, and Colley and I stood watching about the window; Farrow, brought down eighty-five guineas in gold, and a twenty-pound Bank of England note, a two-pound note, and a one-pound note; a silver watch, and two large table-spoons; four silver tea-spoons, two silver salts, a silver pepper-box, and a pair of silver sugar-tongs; they were sold to Mr. Jiggett; we shared the money between us at Jiggett's; twenty-six guineas a-piece; the notes were saved till the next morning; we offered to sell them to Jiggett, and he could not read them; we sold him the silver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You offered to sell the notes to Jiggett, did you? - A. Yes.

Q. What did you ask him for them? - A.Nothing at all.

Q. Did he ask you how you got the notes? - A. No.

Q. You have been in custody yourself ever since you were first taken? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You have been twice tried and acquitted? - A. Yes.

Barnett's defence. Jiggett makes it a practice to come up every sessions to prosecute men.

Barnett, GUILTY , Death . (Aged 23.)

Colley, GUILTY Death. (Aged 20.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-7

250. WILLIAM CAMPTON , alias DAY , was indicted for that he, in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, on the 28th of December , in and upon John Gurney did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a half-guinea, a seven-shillings piece, and a Bank-note, value 5l. the property of the said John.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN GURNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to John Wigstead , Esq. On the 28th of December I was sent with a load of hay to Whitechapel-market; it was sold for six pounds; I received the money; Thomas Smith , the carter to Mr. Nixon, was with me; I went with him into Mr. Brown's, and had a pint of beer.

Q.Did you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; I had seen him on the Tuesday in the Christmas week; he came into Brown's house, and Smith asked him to drink out of our pint of beer; he had a sinock frock on; I had a good deal of talk with him; he asked me if that was not Mr. Wigstead's team, I told him it was; I pulled my money out, and said I did not think Mr. Brown had settled

right for the hay; he looked at the Bank-note, and gave it me again; I went to Shoreditch-church, and left him in the house; he asked me where I was going with my hay; I told him to London-wall; I went on as far as Enfield-park by the side of my horses; it was not very dark; the prisoner came up to me with another man, and the other man up'd with a stick and knocked me down, and he fell upon me; then the prisoner came up, and picked my pocket.

Q. How far was he from the other man when he knocked you down? - A. A very little way, about as far as I am from you; he pulled my purse out of my pocket; there was a 5l. Bank-note, a seven-shilling piece, a half-guinea, and two shillings; he gave the other man the purse, and he got off me; then the prisoner came up to me again, and felt in my pocket again; he put his hand against my watch, and said, d-n you, here lies your money now, and he took out a loose sixpence that was in my pocket; then he laid hold of my hand, and said, young fellow, good night; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Did you say, before the Magistrate, that the prisoner was the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sober at this time? - A. Yes, as sober as ever I was in my life.

THOMAS SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am carter to Mr. Nixon: I went with Gurney as far as the Park-gate; the prisoner was drinking with us at Brown's house; I know nothing of the robbery.

JOHN ELLISON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I apprehended the prisoner at the Three Jolly Butchers, at Newington; he tried to get away from me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. He lives at Stoke-Newington, and there it was that you apprehended him? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I am a labouring man , and live at Newington; I was at home all that week ill.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 32.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-8

251. THOMAS ROBINSON , THOMAS JOHNSON , JACOB LAUGHER , THOMAS BUNYAN , and JAMES WITHERS , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , a heifer, value 12l. the property of Martha Flack .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM SAMUEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a labouring man, I am servant to Mr. Flack, of Waters-place: I was driving a heifer of his mother's on Sunday the 2d of March, Hall was with me; we got to Islington , and there these young chaps set the dogs at the beasts, and the heifer was separated from the rest; it was driven to St. John's-street.

Court. Q. How many did your herd of cattle consist of? - A.Four sheep, and one heifer.

Court. It would be too much, in this case, to say it is a felony; Gentlemen, you must acquit the prisoners.

All Four NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-9

252. ANN DENNIS, otherwise SUSANNAH DREW , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , ten curtains, value 1l. 10s. two counterpanes, value 10s. three petticoats, value 5s. an apron, value 2s. a frock, value 1s. three child's petticoats, value 3s. a cradle quilt, value 1s. two yards of muslin, value 5s. a night-gown, value 2s. three sheets, value 15s. a table-cloth, value 5s. three yards of lace-edging, value 2s. three yards of dimity, value 4s. and two pair of plated candlesticks, value 2s. the property of George Diggles , in the dwelling-house of Robert Diggles .

GEORGE DIGGLES sworn. - I live in Pump-court, in the Temple; I am the son of Robert Diggles , who lives in Dean's-yard, Westminster : I lost various articles from my father's, from the latter end of July to the 5th of December; I went out of town in September, or October, and on my return, I found the things missing, (ripeats the articles mentioned in the indictment); the prisoner was servant to me, in the capacity of nursery maid; I sent her to my father's with the child while I was in the country; I did not suspect the prisoner till some time after; she gave me some duplicates, by which means I found my property at the pawnbroker's.

SAMUEL- WILLIAM CHANNEREAU sworn. -I am a pawnbroker in the Great Sanctuary, Westminster: The prisoner at the bar pledged a number of goods with me. (Produces them.)

Mrs. DIGGLES sworn. - These articles are my husband's property.

Prisoner's defence. When Mr. Diggles charged me, Mr. Hindes was present.

For the Prisoner.

- HINDES sworn. - Mr. Diggles sent for me to go with him to Dean's-yard, Westminster; that his servant had robbed him, and he had me to go with him, which I did; there were about eighty-one duplicates taken from her; Mr. Diggles said, it was a dangerous piece of business, he must hang her; there were a quantity of ribbons and things, and I sealed up the trunk, and left it; I went to the Broad Sanctuary, and Mr. Diggles said, if she

will redeem them once within a month, then she may go at large; I never took her into custody at all. GUILTY. (Aged 25.)

Confined eighteen months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-10

253. WILLIAM ELLWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a wether sheep, value 30s. the property William Sherborn .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM SHERBORN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a farmer at Bedfont : I missed a wether sheep from a field, on the 15th of March; soon after six o'clock in the morning, my shepherd informed me of it; I went and observed that a sheep had been killed about twenty yards from the field; suspicion fell upon the prisoner; I got a search-warrant, and went to his house directly, he was not at home; we found the head and pluck in a chest of drawers, and the four quarters up stairs; I then sent my man to take the prisoner; I found the skin close by where the sheep had been killed, the skin had my marks upon it; I compared the skin with the carcass, and it tallied exactly; there was a piece of sat off of each shoulder in the skin, and when I looked at the carcass, I found Just such a piece out.

- WELLS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I informed my master that I missed a sheep, and he came and found the place where it had been killed, and then I went and apprehended the prisoner; the skin was compared with the carcass, and it fitted; the prisoner said he had found it.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to get a bundle of wood, and found it in a sack.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 38.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-11

254. ROBERT GOODWIN , DENNIS GREEN , and WILLIAM GOODWIN , were indicted, the first two for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Benjamin Holdsworth , about the hour of two in the night of the 22d of February , and burglariously stealing a silver gravy-spoon, value 5s. four silver table-spoons, value 10s. two silver desert-spoons, value 2s. five silver tea-spoons, value 3s. a silver wine strainer, value 3s. a silver skewer, value 2s. a silver toast-rack, value 10s. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10s. a silver pencil-case, value 1s. a cloth surtout-coat, value 1s. a cloth surtout-coat, called a spencer, value 1s. a man's hat, value 1s. a boy's hat, value 1s. a pair of leather boots, value 1s. a tea-chest, value 2s. seven linen table cloths, value 7s. five linen napkins, value 5s. two linen sheets, value 2s. a linen shift, value 2s. three cotton handkerchiefs, value 1s. three pounds of bacon, value 1s. and three pounds of starch, value 1s. the property of the said Benjamin; and William Goodwin for receiving, on the 24th of February , a silver toast-rack, value 10s. a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10s. part of the before-mentioned goods, knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

BENJAMIN HOLDSWORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On the 22d of February, I went to bed a little after ten o'clock, the windows and doors were fastened; my servant alarmed me in the morning about seven o'clock, I got up, and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, (repeats them); I had pulled off the great coat that day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you speak of the house being fastened of your own knowledge, or from the information of the servant? - A. I put out the fire, and I observed that the bolt of the lock of the kitchen-door was put in a little way, but not sufficient to resist; I saw it in a little way, but I cannot say how much; that was the door where they must have got in.

ELIZABETH WEBSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am cook to Mr. Holdsworth: I bolted the back kitchen-door on the 22d of February, before I went to bed; I got up the next morning about seven o'clock, and found the back door open; I went into the kitchen, and missed a pair of sheets, and some table-cloths, but I cannot say how many, and some napkins; I then went up stairs and informed my master of it.

FRANCES HUMPHREYS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Mr. Holdsworth: I cleaned four silver table-spoons, and a silver gravy-spoon, about ten o'clock at night; the 22d of February I put them in the knife-box, in the parlour; in the morning I found the lid of the box open, and they were gone.

WILLIAM CROUCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a pawnbroker, in Ray-street, Clerkenwell: On Monday the 24th of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, William Goodwin , came to me to pledge a silver toast-rack, and a pair of silver sugar-tongs,(produces them); he wanted 14s. on them; I looked at them, and saw a crest on the tongs; I asked him if they were his own; and he said they were; that he kept a house in Penton-street, Pentonville; I asked him what they cost him; and he said, the toast-rack cost him thirty five shillings, and the tongs fifteen shillings; he said, where he bought them he had the mark put on them, but he could not tell what the mark was; I sent for an officer,

and he was apprehended; I went to Hatton-garden office, and there he said that his brother gave them to him to make money of; he was committed for further examination.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.He made no resistance at all, but went very quietly? - A. Yes, he did.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-garden: I apprehended Robert Goodwin, and Green, in Daubigne's-placo, Pentonville; William Goodwin told me that was where Green lodged; I found Robert Goodwin , and Green, in bed, with another man, the next morning; I found a spencer, some table-linen, sheets, and some bacon, (produces them); the table-linen, and the sheets, I found between the sacking of the bed and the bed, and the other things I found in different parts of the room; I told them what we were come for, and Goodwin said to Green, we are dead men; then we took them to the office.

LEVI OBURNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I made a second search at the prisoner's lodgings: I found a quantity of plate in a hole in the wall, tied up in this handkerchief. (Produces it).

Mr. Holdsworth. The plate has my crest upon them; I know them to be mine.

Webster. This table-linen is my master's.

Mr. Gurney. Q.It was day-light when you came down in the morning? - A. Yes.

SAMUEL BURROW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I took William Goodwin from Mr. Crouch's, to the office; he begged me not to go to the office, he would give me any thing rather than I should take him to the office; he said his brother lived next door.

The prisoner Robert Goodwin called Captain Hawes , who had known him four months as a foldier in the West London militia, and gave him a good character.

Robert Goodwin , GUILTY Death . (Aged 20.)

Dennis Green, GUILTY Death. (Aged 19.)

William Goodwin , GUILTY. (Aged 23.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-12

255. THOMAS SMITH and SYLVESTER SMITH were indicted for that they, on the 11th of March , in the King's highway, in and upon Joseph Levien did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a gold watch, value 20l. a gold watch-chain, value 2l. a gold watch-key, value 5s. a silk purse, value 6d. and five guineas and six shillings, in monies numbered , the property of the said Joseph.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOSEPH LEVIEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On the 11th of March I was coming from Slough to London in a post-chaise and four, I was stopped by two men with white handkerchiefs over their faces; one of them demanded my purse; I instantly put my hand in my pocket, and gave him my purse; he had a pistol in his hand; they were both at the same door of the chaise; the purse contained five guineas, a shilling with a mark upon it that I took at Bristol, and another Queen Anne's shilling; they asked me for my pocket-book; I told them I was just come from France, that I had been a prisoner in France, and had no pocket-book; one of them d-'d my eyes, and said, if I did not immediately deliver it, he would blow my brains out; he told me not to palaver; I then repeated that I had no pocket-book; he then demanded my watch, which I gave him; it was a gold watch, with a gold chain, and a gold key; he then desired me to give him more money; I told him I had no more money; he told me to make haste; one of the post-boys turned round, I think, and told them they had better take care, there was a chaise coming up, or a stage; they answered they did not care; I then gave them some more money, it was silver; I then gave them an order upon Mr. Robert Kingston for four guineas, in favour of myself; they asked me again if I had no more money; I told them, no; then they wished me a good night, and God bless me; I have no knowledge of their persons at all, the transaction was so sudden; I wanted the post-boys to proceed with me to Bow-street, but they would not; I went to Hounslow and got fresh horses, and drove to Bow-street; I was robbed about two o'clock; I was very quickly at Bow-street; I saw my watch after at Bow-street; I am sure it was the same that was taken from me; I scratched my name in it with my own hands; I also saw the same purse that I had lost, yesterday, at Hicks's-hall; I had also produced to me a part of the order that I gave to the persons that robbed me.

RICHARD COOPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am stable-keeper at the Red-lion, Tottenham-court-road: The day before the robbery the prisoner, Thomas Smith , came to our yard, and hired two horses, for his master and himself, to go to Hampstead; he was to lead one, and ride the other, and to return the next day, about the middle of the day; I had often seen him at the yard.

HENRY WARE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am ostler at the Black-dog at Bedfont: On the 10th of March the two prisoners came to our house between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; the horses that I have seen since were the horses that they came to our house upon; they asked if I had got two good stalls for the horses, and asked if a

Mr. Edwards had changed there with four horses, and I told them, no; to the best of my knowledge they are the same persons; they went away about seven in the morning.

WILLIAM SCARLETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am waiter at the Black-dog: The two prisoners slept at our house the night before the robbery; one of them has got his finger off; his glove was on, but the finger of the glove was dropping.

MARY TILLIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of William Tillier, a shepherd, at Heston: I saw Thomas Smith, on the 11th of March, at ten o'clock, at eleven, and half an hour after one o'clock, and another gentleman, riding backwards and forwards by Butchers' Grove; Heston-lane goes up to Butchers' Grove, upon Hounslow-heath; my house is at the bottom of the lane; the gentleman that was with him was a taller man, a head or better, as he sat upon the horse; the last time I saw them they were coming from Butchers' Grove as hard as they could come by; coming up the hill one of their horses flagged; I saw nothing particular but the horse, and the black whiskers the man had got by the side of his head; and they had white handkerchiefs up to their mouths, or over their faces, I cannot be sure which; I observed them as they went along, pulling the handkerchiefs off from their faces and tuck them into their pockets, half in and half out.

GEORGE WATSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am just turned of sixteen years old: I picked up a purse in the hedge, in Beggar's-lane, the day of the robbery, between two and three o'clock; Beggat's-lane leads to Sudbury-green, about a mile on this side of Harrow; Mr. Crocker and Taylor came down to our house, and I gave it to them; I saw two gentlemen in Greenford-green tearing some pieces of paper; one was taller than the other; but I cannot tell who they were; I did not pick any of them up; but some days after I picked up some near the same place, and gave them to my father; my father is here.

JOHN WATSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. My little boy gave me some pieces of paper; I picked up two pieces myself, and he picked up the rest. (Produces them.)

SARAH MIDDLETON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of William Middleton; we keep the Swan, at Sudbury-green, two miles from Harrow, near London; I saw one of the prisoners once, and the other three times, before I saw them at Bow-street; they were together at my house the day before the robbery was committed; they were on horseback, they had a glass of brandy a-piece, the horses were very warm.

Mr. Levien. I know this to be part of the same order that I gave them, when I was robbed; here is my name in my hand-writing.

WILLIAM ADAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at the Swan, at Sudbury-green; the day of the robbery, I saw the two prisoners there together, about three o'clock; I have seen the horses since, and know them to be the same.

SARAH HOWARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of Thomas Howard ; I keep a public-house at Willsden, about five miles from Tyburn; the two prisoners stopped there and drank, they were on horseback.

THOMAS GATES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a labourer, I live at the Castle, Child's-hill, in the parish of Hendon, across the Harrow road; I saw the two prisoners there on the day of the robbery, about four o'clock in the afternoon, they staid about half an hour or rather better; I am quite certain they are the persons.

EDWARD CROCKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a patrole belonging to Bow-street; in consequence of information, I went to Paddington-turnpike; I apprehended Thomas Smith , about six o'clock in the evening of the day of the robbery; I saw him first coming down the Harrow-road, towards the Paddington-gate, he had another with him; they did not come down to the gate, but hurried off short by the White-lion, and went up Bell-lane; I, and Smith, and Taylor, ran round and met them; Smith and I stood at the side of a watch-box, Taylor walked along the path, Smith walked up towards them, and immediately seized Sylvester Smith 's horse's bridle, John Smith holloaed out, grab; Thomas Smith rushed forwards past me on horseback, Sylvester Smith's horse was loose, he jumped off his horse, I immediately mounted it, and pursued Thomas Smith down the New-road, from Paddington, into Portland-road, and from thence into Titchfield-street, and there I seized him; he struggled with me, and struck at me several times with this stick, (produces it;) I had a cutlass, with which I struck at him; I apprehended him, it was three or four minutes before any body would assist me; I took him to Mr. Carpmeal's, in Bow-street; I searched him there, and in his side-pocket, I found this dagger; in his outside great-coat pocket, I found this pistol loaded; in his great-coat pocket I found some bullets, and flints, and powder; I found on his neck a white handkerchief, and in his pocket, this white handkerchief, with a knot in it as you see it now; in searching his sob, I found this watch.

Mr. Levien. This is the watch I lost on that day; I am positive it is mine.

Crocker. I found in his breeches, between six guineas and a half, and some gold in his waistcoat, a half-guinea and some silver; in his right-hand

boot, a half-crown and one shilling, and in his coat-pocket I found this Welch-wig. (Producing it.)

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was with Crocker, at Paddington-gate; Taylor and I pursued Sylvester Smith ; I made him dismount, I secured the horse, and cried grab; he directly ran into a field, and I pursued him; he had a pistol in his hand; he threw his pistol away when I got close to him, and a white handkerchief; I picked up the pistol, and said, Sylvy, is it loaded, and he said it was not; I told him, he might as well tell me if it was, and then he said it was; I had known him before. (Crocker produced the purse.)

Mr. Levien. This is the purse that I lost on that day.

Sylvester Smith 's defence. I know nothing at all of it.

Thomas Smith 's defence. I saw two men riding speedily, with handkerchiefs, and afterwards this man came up and asked me to give him a list, as I had a led horse, which I did; I picked up the watch in the ditch; he is quite innocent of the robbery for any thing that I know.

Thomas Smith, GUILTY Death . (Aged 27.)

Silvester Smith, GUILTY Death. (Aged 39.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-13

256. ANN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , a sheet, value 3s. three aprons, value 3s. and a child's bedgown, value 1s. the property of Robert Levitt .

MARY LEVITT sworn. - My father is a bootmaker , No. 3, Packman's-court, Chandos-street ; between five and six o'clock on Sunday evening, the 23d of February, I had been of an errand, and as I was coming down the steps next door, I saw the prisoner come out at our door, the door shut after her with a pulley, she had a very large bundle in her lap; I asked her what she had got, and where she had been; she told me she had been up to the lodgers, and then she ran away, I ran after her and lost sight of her; then I came home, and went down into the kitchen, and saw that all the things were gone off the line, they were all there when I went out; the next morning I got up, and went out to see if I could see her at any of the old iron-shops, selling the things; I saw her go into a baker's shop, I am sure the prisoner is the same person, I knew her by sight before; I desired them to detain her while I fetched my father; she got away from the gentleman, and ran down the street; I called stop thief, and she was pursued and taken.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - On the 24th of February, I was sent for to come to Mr. Levitt's who gave me charge of the prisoner; I began to search her, and in the left-hand sleeve of her gown, I found a half-crown piece, two shillings and a penny; and in her pocket I found two shillings and three halfpence, in copper; Levitt then gave me six pieces of duplicates, and I put them together, they make two duplicates, and I put them together and two more duplicates; Levitt said, he picked them up close down by her side; I then went to Mr. Salkeld's in the Strand; one of the duplicates was for a child's bed-gown and a sheet, the other was belonging to a Mr. Howgill, a pawnbroker, for two apons.

ROBERT LEVITT sworn. - I picked up the pieces of duplicates by the side of the prisoner in my passage; I gave them to Donaldson, they were torn in five or six pieces.

ROBERT SIMPSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Howgill, Brydges-street, Covent-garden; this is the duplicate that I delivered to the prisoner, (produces a coloured apron and a coarse apron;) I took them in on the 24th of February, from the prisoner at the bar, in the name of Sarah Thomson, St. Martin's-lane.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Salkeld; this is the duplicate I delivered to the prisoner, (produces a coloured apron and a child's gown;) I took them in from the prisoner, on the 24th of February, between eight and nine, in the name of Mary Boyd , Off-alley, in the Strand.(The property was deposed to by Mr. Levitt.

GEORGE HAYNES sworn. - (Produces a sheet;) I took this in of the prisoner at the bar, on the 24th of February; I live with Mr. Brown, in Longacre, she pledged it in the name of Sarah Lake.

Mrs. Levitt. This is not mine, it is one I took in to wash.

Prisoner's defence. There were two men running, and to save my child I stood upon the threshold of the door; I had some coals in my lap.

Mary Levitt . She had no child with her.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY .

confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000402-14

257. LAZARUS JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a flannel waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. a pair of stockings, value 1s. a cradle quilt, value 6d. and two shawls, value 2s. the property of Daniel Jewson , the elder. Two pair of stockings, value 1s. the property of Daniel Jewson , the younger. Two pockets, value 1s. a frock, value 1s. a handkerchief, value 6d. and a petticoat, value 6d. the property of Mary Ann Jewson ; and two frocks, value 3s. a flannel petticoat, value 1s. two bed-gowns, value 1s. a

skirt, value 6d. a pin-a-fore, value 6d. and a pair of worsted stockings, value 3d. the property of Maria-Ann Jewson .(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

ELIZABETH KINGSNORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I have washed for Mr. Jewson three years, he lives in Black Swan-court, Tower-street .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. No, I think it was rather a taller man than that; I was at work in the kitchen; on the 4th of February, I think, on Tuesday, I saw a man's hand take a bundle out of the kitchen, I did not know what it contained, I ran out directly, and cried, stop thief.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of the prisoner till he was taken? - A. I cannot say whether I did or not.

Q. Do you know Mr. Stephens, the butcher? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in Mr. Stephens's custody? - A.No; I saw him take hold of somebody.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and say whether that is the man you saw Stephens take hold of? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you know what coloured coat he had on? - A. No.

THOMAS STEPHENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I keep a butcher's shop in Tower-street, the corner of Black-swan-court: On the 4th of February I heard a cry of stop thief, about half past seven in the evening; I pursued the prisoner at the bar; he was walking when he passed me, but the poor woman that gave the alarm, said, that was the man; she desired me to lay hold of him; I laid hold of him, and he ran from me; I pursued after him, and caught him by the corner of Water-lane, which is opposite Mark-lane, about a hundred yards from Mr. Jewson's house; I never lost sight of him at all, from the time that she said that was the man; when I first saw him he had two bundles in his hand; he threw them away from him after I laid hold of him; he then got away from me, and I followed him again, and caught him; it was a moonlight night; I never lost sight of him; the constable has got the bundles.

ANTHONY WOODLANDS sworn. - I am a constable: (produces two bundles;) I received them from Mr. Stephens, at his shop; I have had them ever since.

Stephens. These are the same bundles that I saw him throw away; Kingsnorth picked up the bundles, and gave them to the constable.

DANIEL JEWSON , sen. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 4, Black-lion court: (looks at the bundles;) part of them belong to my children, and the rest to myself.

Prisoner's defence. I have been in the habit of apprehending many persons, and bringing them to justice in this Court; I was coming by this court, and heard the cry of stop thief; I saw a man come out of the court as fast as possible, and throw the bundle down; I caught hold of the bundle to secure it, and followed after him; the butcher who is in Court laid hold of me; I told him I was pursuing the man, and he let me go; I pursued the man, and Stephens then came up again, and knocked the bundle out of my hand; they took me back; I was searched by the constable; I had nothing about me but this handkerchief.

For the Prisoner.

GEO. PINCHES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a boot and shoe-maker: I never saw the prisoner before he was taken up; I was in Tower-street when he was stopped; I went to Mr. Palmer's, to carry a pair of shoes home; I was going past a court where there was a butcher's shop at the corner; I saw a man run out of the court, and I heard a voice crying stop thief; the man that ran out of the court threw the bundle down; then I saw the prisoner pick up the bundle, and the man that threw the bundle down went across the road, and down Water-lane; a butcher stopped him at the end of the court, with the bundle, and let him loose again; then he went after him again, and he would have caught the man that dropped the bundle if the butcher had let him alone; the butcher said he would be d-'d if he would not give him a night's lodging in the Compter; I told him it was the wrong man, but he would not hear any reason.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where does Mr. Palmer live? - A. No. 21, Great George-street, Brick-lane; I live in White-court, Spitalfields; I was going into the Borough afterwards.

Q. What happened to bring you into Tower-street? - A. I was going with Palmer into the Borough.

Q. How long has he been a customer of your's? - A. I never made him but one pair of shoes; he is a watch-maker; he asked me if I would take a walk with him into the Borough; I told him I was going to Mint-street myself.

Q. The invitation came from Palmer to you then? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever take a walk with Palmer before that night? - A.Never; we had been in company before.

Q. You went next day before the Magistrate? - A. No; the business was over before I could get there, or else I would have done the man the service to speak the truth, that I have spoke now.

Q. What time in the evening was it? - A.Nearer seven than six, to the best of my judgment.

Q.Were there many persons in Tower-street at that time? - A. A great number of people.

Q. Were there a great number of people when the man ran away? - A. He was too light-heeled for that.

Q. How came you not to go in pursuit? - A. I was not very well in health that night.

Q. Who sent for you to be a witness here today? - A. I was subpoenaed by that gentleman.(Pointing to the solicitor for the prisoner.)

Q. How came that gentleman to know where you lived? - A. That I cannot tell; Mr. Palmer gave the prisoner his address and mine, at the time.

FRANCIS PALMER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a watch-maker, No. 21, Great George-street, Brick-lane, Spitalfields: I was in Tower-street when the prisoner was apprehended; Pinches was with me; he brought me home a pair of shoes; I mentioned that I had some business to do over the water in the King's Bench; he said he had some business over in the Borough, and if it was agreeable to me he would accompany me; as we came through Tower-street a man ran across the way from the court; to the best of my recollection the prisoner at the bar was coming the contrary way; he picked up the bundle and put it under his arm, and he turned short upon his heel and was directly laid hold of; the man let him go again, and he pursued after the man; that was a man considerably taller than the prisoner; and then the prisoner was stopped again; there were several people in Tower-street; the man that ran away went down Water-street; I told the people he was the wrong man, but I might as well have talked to a parcel of mad bulls; I heard somebody talk about giving him a night's lodging in the Compter, and I went to the Compter and made some enquiries, and left my address, and likewise Pinches's address.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you ever walk with your shoe-maker before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever walk into the Borough with him before? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. How often? - A.Never above three times; I have walked with him several times to the Plough in Fore-street, down from my own house.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. About six or seven months.

Q. How lately may he have made any shoes for you? - A. I suppose within these three months.

Q. How many pair has he ever made? - A. I believe two pair, and has mended several pair.

Q. He has not delivered you any shoes later than three months? - A. No.

Q. Was it before Christmas? - A. I cannot say.

Q. He has not delivered you any this year? - A. It may be on this side Christmas, I cannot pretend to say.

Q. It is three months, however, since he delivered you any shoes? - A. Yes.

Q. You were going to the King's Bench? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was Pinches going? - A. I do not know; he came to bring me a new pair of shoes that night.

Q.Was that three months ago? - A. It was on the 4th of February.

Q.Neither you nor Pinches ran after the man? - A. No.

The prisoner called eight other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-15

258. JOSEPH POUGHER was indicted for that he, on the 20th of March , two pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good seven-shilling-piece; and a piece of false and counterfeit milled money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good half-guinea; feloniously did put off to one Mary Mead , spinster, at a lower rate and value than the same, by their denomination, imported to be, that is to say, for four shillings in monies numbered .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

MARY MEAD sworn. - Mr. Alley. Q. Your name is Mary Mead? - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it since you were convicted of a felony yourself? - A. About six months.

Mr. Knapp objected to the question.

Mead. Examined by Mr. Knapp. I know the prisoner perfectly well: On the 20th of March last, I went to him in the Fleet-prison , by the direction of Mr. Powell, the agent to the Solicitor of the Mint; Clark and Lawrence went with me, I left them below and went up to the Coffee-gallery; I had in my pocket three half-crown pieces, and three marked shillings; the officers searched me before I went, they were marked by Mr. Clark, I had no other money but that; I then went up to Mr. Pougher's room, I knew him before, he was in bed when I first went in, there was a young lad there about the age of twelve, and an elderly man likewise; I asked Mr. Pougher whether he had any thing, meaning bad money; he said he had not; I asked him when he thought he should have any, and he answered, in the course of half an hour; I told him I was going as far as Shoe-lane, and I would call as I came back again; I came down stairs then, and returned back again in rather better than twenty minutes; Mr. Pougher was there, and

the old man, but not the boy; Pougher was then up; he asked me if I would have any thing to drink; I drank a glass with him; I then asked him whether he had any thing, and he said, yes; he asked me what I wanted; I said, some of each, some half-guineas and some seven-shilling-pieces; then he gave me a bit of paper with eight seven-shilling-pieces in it, out of the eight I took three, and then I gave the three marked shillings for them; then I asked him if he had any half-guineas, and he said he had a parcel in the room underneath him; he said, he expected them in every minute; very shortly after, I saw a man's hand put through the door, with a brown paper parcel in it; I staid in the room till the officers came up, which was in about fifteen minutes; Lawrence searched me, and took the three seven-shilling-pieces from me; the rest of the eight he put into the brown paper that the man's hand had given him, and he put them all next the sacking of the bed; I had the three seven-shilling-pieces in my pocket, and the other two, I had afterwards, with a half-guinea; the officers had five seven-shilling-pieces from him.

Court. Q. Was it not all one contract? - A. Yes.

Q. Made at the same time? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. The thing you first went for, was with respect to the seven-shilling-pieces? - A. Yes.

Q. That was completely at an end? - A. Yes, the money was paid.

Q. And then you entered into a fresh engagement for the half-guinea? - A. Yes; he gave me a half-guinea with a bit out of it, and said he had no more; and then I said, let me have two more seven-shilling-pieces; he then gave me five that I left, and out of the five I took two seven-shilling-pieces, that, with the half-guinea, came to four shillings, and I gave him two half-crown pieces; I asked him for a bit of paper, which he gave me; and then I wrapped them all up in it, and put it in my right-hand pocket, and then Mr. Lawrence came in directly.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.Where may you live now? - A.In Barbican.

Q. You do not mean to tell me seriously that you live there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you live in Bridewell? - A. No.

Q.Perhaps you live in Bridewell at night? - A. No.

Q.Perhaps you live in Bridewell at night, and at Barbican in the day-time? - A. I do live in Bridewell.

Q. Are you not in Bridewell at night, and permitted to go at large in the day? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know you are upon your oath? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you know the consequences of committing perjury? - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Are you not suffered to go about the town in the day for the purpose of detecting offenders? - A. No.

Q. For what purpose do you go about in the day? - A. Mr. Powell -

Q. The Solicitor of the Mint? - A. Yes.

Q. To hunt for prosecutions? - A. Yes; all coiners.

Q. Are you not every night in Bridewell, in custody, in consequence of a conviction for having uttered bad money? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you are suffered to go about in the day, instead of suffering the law? - A. Yes.

Q. How often have you been prosecuted yourself? - A. Once, no more.

Q. How often have you been in custody? - A. About twice.

Q. Have you ever been whipped for any offence? - A. No, I never was.

Q. When were you first applied to by Mr. Powell? - A. About three weeks ago.

Q. He got you liberty to go into the Fleet-prison? - A. Yes.

Q. He promised you, that if you prosecuted the prisoner, you should he liberated from all the enormities you have committed? - A. No.

Q. Were not you told you should be prosecuted? - A. No.

Q. What were you to get for going to prosecute the prisoner? - A.Nothing at all.

Q. I ask you, upon the oath you have taken, were you not permitted to go at large, with a promise that you should be yourself prosecuted if you could not convict him? - A. No, I was not.

Q.Were you not told that you should go at large? - A. No.

Q. Did you first apply to Mr. Powell, or he to you? - A. I applied to him.

Q. For what? - A. To take Mr. Pougher.

Q. Was it not for the purpose of saving yourself? - A. No.

Q. It was for the good of the public, I suppose? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. You have turned informer for the good of your country? - A. No; I was not an informer because I have done justice.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Addison? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a lady that keeps a shop where they sell medicines, in Fleet-market? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she not prosecute you? - A. No.

Q. Did you not buy some medicines there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not get change for a guinea? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she not charge you with ringing the changes upon her? - A. Yes; with changing half-a-guinea.

Q.How long ago was this? - A. About eight or nine months ago.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hilburton, a grocer, in Drury lane? - A. Yes.

Q.Has he charged you with ringing the changes upon him? - A. Yes, he has.

Q. Explain to the Jury what you mean by ringing the changes - it is taking a good half-guinea, and changing it for a bad one, is it not? - A. I did not do it.

Q. But that is what is called ringing the changes? - A. I do not know.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. Yes, I will.

Court. Q. Be cautious - do you mean to swear you do not know what ringing the changes are? - A. I have heard it, but I do not understand the meaning.

Mr. Alley. Q. How came you to answer my questions then, if you did not know what it meant? - A.Because you explained it to me.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not know it was imposing upon a person? - A. I did know it was imposing, but did not know it was ringing the changes.

Q. Did you know Elizabeth Else ? - A. Not by that name.

Q. Do you know a lady that lives in Fleet-street, a pocket-book maker? - A. Yes.

Q. Has she ever charged you with ringing the changes? - A. Yes.

Q. And you are permitted to go at large in the day, and at night locked up in prison? - A. Yes.

Q.There was an old man in the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he hear what passed? - A. No, I whispered to Mr. Pougher because he should not hear.

Q. That was your delicacy? - A. Yes, it was.

Court. Q. Did the old man see what was doing? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. You say they searched you? - A. Yes.

Q.Where did they search you? - A. All over.

Q. They did not put their fingers in your mouth for fear you should bite them? - A. No, they did not.

Q. Upon your oath, had you not a half-guinea and some seven-shilling-pieces in your mouth? - A. No.

Q.What have you a day for informing? - A. Not a farthing.

Q. How many other persons have you lodged informations against? - A.Nobody else.

Q.This was the first time you went into the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not tell me he was in bed? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you went to his bed-side and whispered to him? - A. Yes.

Q. What time was it? - A. About one or two o'clock in the day.

Q. And the prisoner in bed? - A. Yes.

Q. The old man must have seen the transaction? - A. No, Mr. Pougher sent him out for a pint of porter; Mr. Pougher did not serve me in his presence, there was nobody in the room but himself and me.

Q. He treated you with a glass of something, what might it be? - A. It was gin.

JOHN CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am one of the Marshalmen of the City: On the 20th of March last, I searched the witness in the Fleet-prison, she had no money about her but three marked shillings that I gave her, and two half-crown pieces; she went up to Pougher's room, and came down again; she went up again in half an hour; I very soon after went up stairs after her, and found her in Pougher's room, and in his left-hand I found one of the marked shillings that I had given to her; on the table I found a half-crown, and a shilling, which was of my marking also; I was desired so to do by Mr. Powell.

THOMAS LAWRENCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. On Thursday the 20th of March, I went with Mead and Clark to the Fleet-prison; Clark searched her, and she had no money about her, but the marked money that he gave her; I went up into Pougher's room, and found in Mary Mead's right-hand pocket, a paper, containing five seven shilling pieces and a half-guinea, and a half-crown, loose in her pocket; a half-guinea with a piece out of it, and a half-crown loose in her pocket, which I had seen delivered to her. (Produces them.)

Mead. That is the money that I received from Pougher.

Lawrence. I searched the apartments, turned up the bed, and between the sacking and the bed, I found this brown paper, containing fifty-seven bad sixpences, seventeen shillings, and three seven shilling pieces in a little bit of paper; I asked Mead how she came by them, and she immediately pointed to the prisoner at the bar, and said, she had them of him; she told me she gave one shilling a-piece for the seven shilling pieces, and two shillings for the half-guinea; after we had made the search, a man came into the room, which I understood was a prisoner in the same room; I asked him, in the presence of the prisoner, which was his bed, he pointed to a bed at the bottom of the room, where there was a bureau-bedstead, he said it was his bed; that was not the bed that I found the money under.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you stay in the lodge while Mrs. Mead went up stairs? - A. Yes, I searched her.

Q. You searched her as delicately as you could? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not put your hands into her bosom? - A. No, I did not.(A monier of the mint deposed, that the money was all counterfeit.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY Death .

The Jury wished strongly to recommend the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy, because he had been tempted into the offence.

The prisoner being asked what he had to say, why he should not receive judgment to die according to law, prayed the benefit of his clergy on his knees. On the part of the Crown, a counterplea was put in, which was read.

The prisoner pleaded that he was not the man who had been before convicted. The Jury were then sworn to try whether he was the man or not.

CALEE-EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to the solicitor for the Mint. (Produces a copy of the record of the conviction of Joseph Pougher , in April 1798.) I received it from Mr. Shelton's office; it was a conviction for felony, in putting off counterfeit gold, at a lower rate than its denomination imported; I have examined it.

Court. Q.What counterfeit gold? - A.Two counterfeit half-guineas, to one Mary, the wife of Cornelius Richardson ; I was present when he was convicted in April Sessions, 1798.

Q. Upon looking at the prisoner at the bar, are you sure he was the person who was convicted at that time, of what is stated upon this record, putting off counterfeit gold? - A. I have not the least doubt of it.

Mr. Alley. Q. Is that paper signed by Mr. Shelton? - A. I do not think it is his hand-writing; I did not see it signed at all; I had it from Mr. Fitzpatrick.

Q. Is Mr. Fitzpatrick's name to it? - A.Not that I know of.

Mr. Alley objected that there was no evidence of its being a copy of the record.

The original record was then produced by Mr. Shelton.

Pawell. - Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When was that man tried? - A. In April 1798.

Q. How do you know that - do you mean to say you recollect it? - A.Perfectly well, I had known him before.

Q.Without having seen the record, and having an opportunity of refreshing your memory, could you have said, that that man was convicted in that April sessions? - A. I don't know that I should have recollected that it was April; I referred to the indictment which I myself drew.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Did you prosecute that man for the offence imputed by this record? - A. I did, I am sure he is the same man.

Q. Was a man of the name of Rogers a witness upon that trial? - A. He was.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the Police-officers, of Shadwell; I apprehended the prisoner upon a charge of felling counterfeit gold, he was tried for it in this Court, with a woman, who called herself his wife, and was convicted in April 1798; I am certain he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When were you applied to to become a witness to-day? - A.Last Sunday, Mr. Powell told me it might be necessary for me to attend.

Q. Mr. Powell then told you he was the man that had been convicted? - A. I have the day of apprehension in my book.

Q. Upon your oath, could you undertake to say what the day was, without having had reference to that book? - A. I was positive it was either April or May, but when I looked at my book, I knew it was April.

Q. But you were not, before that, certain whether it was April or May? - A. No.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury, on behalf of the defendant.

The Jury returned a verdict that the prisoner was the same man.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-16

259. JOESPH FITCHETT and WILLIAM WHITE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , five pounds of hemp, value 4s. the property of William Neale .

WILLIAM NEALE sworn. - I am a rope-maker in the Hackney-road : Last Friday, I lost five pounds of hemp; I suspected the prisoners; they were taken in my warehouse with the hemp upon them; I saw some taken from each of them, they worked for me as hemp-dressers.

GEORGE STEWART sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Neale: I was sent up stairs in the warehouse to watch the prisoners; White was at work directly opposite where I was; I saw him take two parcels, two half-pounds, to the back part of the shop; but what he did with it I cannot say; I saw him go again to another part of the shop, he took up some undrest hemp, and took some drest hemp and put into his breeches; I did not see Fitchett take any thing; I went to my master and he was not at home, and I returned again till be was going away, and then I told him my master wanted him; the other prisoner and he were going out of the gate together; I sent for my master, and they were both searched at the watch-house; I saw two parcels of hemp taken from White, and two from Fitchert; it was concealed in their breeches.

SAMUEL HAPPER sworn. - Last Friday night I was sent for to take charge of the prisoners; I met them in Hackney-road, as they were coming along; I took them both to the watch-house; Lilywhite was with them; I asked them both if they had any thing about them; they both said they had not; I searched them, and found hemp in the breeches of both of them. (Produces it.)

- LILYWHITE sworn. - I am an officer: I was sent for by Mr. Neale; I went to his warehouse, where the prisoners were; (produces a quantity of hemp;) I took this from the coat-pockets of the two prisoners.

Neale. This is exactly the same fort of hemp they were working for me.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

White, GUILTY . (Aged 57.)

Fitchett, GUILTY. (Aged 26.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-17

260. MARY HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a pewter quart pot, value 14d. the property of Sarah Norman .

THOMAS FLAXMAN sworn. - I am a chandler: Mrs. Norman keeps the Star and Garter, Sloane-square, Chelsea : On the 9th of March, between eight and nine in the morning, in consequence of information, I followed the prisoner, accused her with having stolen a pot, and took it out of her apron; she was then going down Sloane-street, towards Knightsbridge; she was about two hundred yards from Mrs. Norman's; I have had the pot ever since; (produces it;) she told me she was going to fell it at some broker's; that she was in want.

Mrs. Norman's niece deposed that the pot belonged to her aunt, Sarah Norman .

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 55.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-18

261. JAMES HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , the carcass of a dead sheep, value 40s. the property of Samuel Johnson .

SAMUEL JOHNSON sworn. - I am a butcher in Oxford-market : I left my shop between six and seven in the afternoon, for about ten minutes; there were ten carcasses hanging up that had been killed; in the course of ten minutes after, I heard the cry of stop thief; I was standing by a neighbour's shop; I turned round and saw a carcass lying upon the ground, between my shop and my neighbour's; I looked, and it proved to be one of my carcases.

JOHN KIRBY sworn. - I am a butcher in Oxford-market; my shop joins to Mr. Johnson's shop: I just came down to light a candle; I turned round and saw the prisoner with the carcass; I said to him, what are you at; and he immediately threw it down at my feet; he ran away; I pursued him immediately into Oxford-road, and there we took him, and carried him back to Mr. Johnson's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you not lose sight of the person? - A. No, I did not.

Q. It was dark in the evening, was it not? - A. It was not dark.

Q. Did he not turn several turnings? - A. He turned round the corner of Market-street.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not lose sight of him while he turned the turning? - A. I did not; I was close to him all the way, till a man ran against him and knocked him down.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Confined eighteen months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-19

262. JOHN JONES and GEORGE COCKRAN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , two iron bars, value 14d. the property of May King ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

It appearing in evidence that the iron bars were fixed to the dwelling-house, and not being so charged in the indictment they were ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-20

263. JOHN JONES and GEORGE COCKRAN were again indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , six sacks, value 4s. the property of Richard Hodges and Mary Hodges ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

The Prosecutor not being able to identify the property, they were ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-21

264. JOHN JONES and GEORGE COCKRAN , were again indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March, four iron bars, value 2s. belonging to John Nicholson , and fixed to his dwelling-house ; and the other for feloniously receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN NICHOLSON sworn. - On the 3d of March, there were four iron bars stole from the back part of my house, they were fixed to the main beam of the house, in the area; they were wrenched off; I saw them on the 4th of March at Cockran's, Donaldson was with me; Jones told me he took them from the back part of my house, and sold them to Cockran.

Q. Did you say any thing to induce him to confess? - A. No; he said he forced them up with a large iron bar.

Q. Were there no threats, or promises, used, to induce him to confess? - A. No; as soon as he was taken he confessed it; I found the bars underneath the counter in Cockran's shop, among many other articles of iron bars and lead; Cockran owned that he bought the bars of the boy; I think he said he had given him a penny a pound for them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you think a little boy like that, or two or three little boys, could have forced up these bars? - A. I should think not; he said there were others with him.

Q. Little boys like himself? - A. Yes, some bigger and some less.

Q. Do you mean to say, that he said there were some bigger than himself? - A. No; there were fifteen of them.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he said there were fifteen? - A. No.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - In consequence of a search-warrant I went, on the 4th of March, along with Kendal, a constable, to search the house of Cockran, Mr. Nicholson was with us; among a parcel of leaden pipes, and iron, I found these four bars underneath the counter; as soon as I took them, and put them upon the counter, Jones said to Nicholson, directly, these are your bars; I took them to Bow-street, and Nicholson swore to them. (Produces the bars).

Nicholson. I took one of the bars off the same area, and took it to Bow-street, it was exactly the very same.

Q. Did you try the bars with the place from whence you supposed they were taken? - A. No; they were the same length, and the same size.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. There is a piece broke off of one of them; if you had gone and fitted that to the place, you would have been able to ascertain whether it came from your place or not? - A. Yes.

ISAAC KENDAL sworn. - I am constable of the night: I took this boy in charge, he was brought in by the patrol, or the watchman, I do not know which; there were no promises made him; he said there were fourteen or fifteen of them concerned; he mentioned several places where he had been taking iron from, I cannot say whether he mentioned Nicholson's or not; I went with him to Cockran's with Donaldson, Jones was present, and he said they had stole such and such iron from such a place, and such and such lead from such a place, and he pointed out this iron of Nicholson's; Cockran said, he had been in business but a little time, and it was an unfortunate circumstance, he hardly had been in that house three months.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Cockran is a shoemaker? - A. A boot-closer.

Q. This shop is kept by his wife? - A. I fancy it is.

Jones did not say any thing in his defence.

Cockran's defence. Jones brought the bars to me, and I asked him who he came from; he said his father had sent him with them; I asked him where he come from; he said from Round-court; then I weighed them, and paid him a penny a pound for them, and he went away; I knew nothing more of it till Donaldson came.

The prisoner, Jones, called one, and Cockran four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Jones, GUILTY . (Aged 11.)

Transported for seven years

Cockran, GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t18000402-22

265. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a pair of brass three barrelled pistols, value 30s. the property of Hector Essex .

HECTOR ESSEX sworn. - I deal in haberdashery, silver, and jewellery : On the 15th of March last, I lost a pair of brass three barrelled pistols, with bayonets, from my shop; on the 14th, in the evening, the prisoner called at my house, he told me he had seen a pair of three barrelled pistols in my window which he wished then to see, he was dressed in the habit of a naval officer; it was after dark, I believe somewhere about eight o'clock; he went away, saying he would call either on the morrow, which was Saturday, or the Monday; on the Saturday, a little before nine o'clock, between the three quarters and nine, in the evening, he called again; when he came in, I was busy with another person, I reached one of the pistols to him, I observed the door a jar and I pushed it to with my foot; he then said he wanted to look at the other; I reached down the other pistol, and put it down

on the counter, he had one then in his hand, and while I was opening the till to give another person two shillings, the prisoner opened the door, and ran away with the pistols; as to his person, I am certain of it, for he was nearly an hour with me the day before; as soon as I was robbed, I sent one man into the City, and another to the Westend of the town, to every shop where they were likely to be disposed of; on the Wednesday following, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, Mr. Windsor, of Whitechapel, sent for me; I went there, and saw this young man, whom I knew again immediately; they had stopped him, and the pistols were in the possession of the constable.

BENJAMIN CONSTABLE sworn. - I am a constable: On Wednesday night, the 19th of March, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was sent for from the watch-house to Mr. Windsor's, in Whitechapel High-street, I found the prisoner there; I stopped some time till Mr. Essex came, then Mr. Essex gave me charge of him; I received a pistol from Thomas French. (Produces the pistol).

THOMAS FRENCH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 19th of March, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, as near as I can recollect, the prisoner at the bar came to our shop, and brought a three barrelled brass pistol to pledge, upon which he wanted a guinea and a half; he had but one pistol; I told him I had had information of a pair of pistols, of that description, being lost by Mr. Essex, in the Strand; I enquired of him how he came by them; he told me they were given to him by a friend of his then at sea, it was about a year and a half since he gave them to him; I told him I must detain him while I sent for Mr. Essex, who had lost the pistols; when Mr. Essex came, he claimed the pistol; he stopped voluntarily with me till Mr. Essex came; this is the same pistol.

Essex. I have not the least doubt that those are my pistols; the prisoner's person I am very positive of, but as to the pistols, there are so many made like one another, that I cannot positively swear to this; when I went with him to the watch-house, he complained of cold for want of his great coat and boots; I said, if he would let me know where his lodgings were, I would go with the constable for his great coat and boots, and perhaps I might see my other pistol; I went to the lodgings of a Mr. Cardon, No. 15, Fenchurch-buildings, and sent the coat and boots; I got some information about the other pistol; I got a search-warrant, and found the pistol in Mr. Cardon's room, with whom the prisoner lodged.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-23

266. JAMES PENNYMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , three quartern loaves of bread, value 4s. the property of Alexander Weddell .

JOHN FREELAN sworn. - I detected the prisoner last Saturday, taking the loaves, in Harley-street , at the corner of Weymouth-street; I knew him before; he took three quartern loaves out of the baker's basket, one at a time; the basket was standing on a barrow; he was coming away with two quartern loaves under one arm, and one under the other; I went up to him and took him by the collar; he had got about five or six houses off; he asked me what I meant; I told him, what I meant was to take him to the man that owned the basket; I took him to the master baker's, in Devonshire-street; the constable was sent for, and he was taken to Marlborough-street.

HENRY GREENHILL sworn. - I am servant to Alexander Weddell: I left my basket of bread in the middle of Upper Harley-street; the prisoner was brought to my master's shop; I had desired the last witness to watch the basket; the prisoner was taken to Marlborough-street; I had only three loaves of bread in my basket; (the bread produced;) I know the bread to be my master's, by his marks.

Prisoner's defence. I took them merely from distress; I thought I should have been tried at Hicks's Hall; I have no friends here.

GUILTY . (Aged 52.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t18000402-24

267. JOSEPH PIERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , two silver tea-spoons, value 3s. a glass decanter, value 1s. 6d. two glass salts, value 2s. a bason, value 6d. a towel, value 6d. two butter-boats, value 6d. and an ink-bottle, value 1d. the property of Thomas Hodges .

MARY HODGES sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Hodges; I keep the Burlington-arms, Old Burlington-street : The latter end of January I missed three silver tea-spoons, a decanter, a bason, salts, and different articles; I suspected the prisoner; he was a servant in the house, to gather pots, and wash bottles; I know nothing of the robbery.

THOMAS COPE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Brown, No. 2, Panton-street, Hay-market: On the 6th of February the prisoner came to Mr. Brown's, and pledged two tea-spoons for three shillings, in the name of Thomas Matthews ;(produces them;) he said he lived at No. 23, Whitcomb-street; he told me he had bought them second hand, and they were his own property; I had never seen him before.

Mrs. Hodges. These are my husband's spoons; I had a dozen of them.

Prisoner. Q.Were you not very much in liquor two nights running? - A. I was never in liquor in my life.

Prisoner. She said she always carried the spoons about her, and that she had lost them.

ROBERT TOWNSEND sworn. - I am a patrole belonging to Bow-street: I was called upon to take the prisoner into custody; I took him to Bow-street. GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-25

268. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a cheese, value 2s. 6d. the property of Thomas Bell and Leonard Bell .

LEONARD BELL sworn. - I am a cheesemonger , in partnership with Thomas Bell; I live in Mint-street, in the Borough: this cheese, with others, was put into the cart to go to Canterbury; I put a mark upon them a day or two before.

RICHARD LEICESTER sworn. - I was unloading a cart at Chester-quay.

Q. That is in London? -

Bell. A. Yes, but the cheese was found in Middlesex.

Leicester. I heard the alarm that the cheese was gone; I pursued the man, but could not see him; I ran down Rosemary-lane, and met the prisoner coming up; I asked him if he had seen a man run that way, that was lame, with a cheese; I observed, at that time, that he was lame; he said he did not; he went to go away, and I said he must be the man; I asked him if he would tell me where it was; he said he could not; one Mr. Isaacs came up and told him to give the cheese up if he had the cheese, and if not he would send for a constable; he told Mr. Isaacs he would deliver the cheese up if they would not do any thing with him; I went with him to his lodgings in Rosemary-lane, and there we found the cheese; the prisoner said to a woman that was there, give the cheese up to them, and she did; Mr. Isaacs took the cheese to the Police-office.

MOSES ISAACS sworn. - On the 15th of March last I was going through Rosemary-lane; I heard an alarm that the last witness had lost a cheese out of his cart; I afterwards saw the prisoner and the witness in Rosemary-lane; he said he had not got the cheese; I thought he looked very suspicious, as if he wanted to get away; I told him it would be better for him to give it up; I went with him to Mrs. Keese's house, she is here; she was the person that delivered the cheese; she denied, at first, that she had the cheese; I told her she had better deliver it up, or I would get an officer and search the house; accordingly she spoke to a girl, and told her to bring it out of the back-room, which she did; the prisoner was present at the time; I then took him before the Magistrates at Lambeth-street.

MARY KEEFE sworn. - The prisoner knocked at my door; he had a cheese under his arm; and he asked me to weigh the cheese for him; I keep a rag-shop; I weighed the cheese for him, and he said, stop a bit; I did not see him when he went; but I missed him; and he left the cheese; then some people came, and demanded it; and upon my oath, I never denied having the cheese. (The cheese produced, and deposed to by Mr. Bell.)

Prisoner's defence. I had been at work at the water-side: I went up the gateway of Chesterquay to ease myself, and there was a cart coming up the gateway; I went to get out of the way of the cart, and there was some straw lying, and I happened to kick the cheese from under the straw; and I took it to Rosemary-lane: when the carman charged me with it, I said, if it is your's, come along with me, and you shall have it.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-26

269. OWEN COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , three leather boots, value 3s. the property of our Lord the King .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of William-Richard Baverley , Esq.

JOHN ELSEE sworn. - I was late a quarter-master of the Surry light-dragoons: I know nothing of the taking these goods.

WILLIAM PRIDDLE sworn. - I was in the Surry light-dragoons before they were disbanded; I was put in care of stores at Staines by Mr. Elsee: I saw the prisoner come about five o'clock last Monday morning, as near as I can tell; the stores were in an out-building; he came with a pitchfork, and pushed it through the hole in the door, and then he went in; he came out three different times, and took away a boot each time; there was one boot that had a scratch on it, and that he threw in again; he would not take that away; I did not speak to him at that time; I knew the man very well; I watched to see what he would do more. The property belonged to the King's stores; they had not been served out to any body; John Phillips was with me.

JOHN PHILLIPS sworn. - I was in the Surry light-dragoons; I saw the prisoner take up the

boots, one at a time, with a pitch-fork; I knew his person well.

Prisoner's defence. I saw three old boots lying at the door, and I thought they were belonging to the regiment that was disbanded; and I took them up till I could see some of the men.

Elsee. They were the King's property.

GUILTY (Aged 45.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-27

270. CHARLES YEOMANS and JOHN SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , four pair of sheets, value 3l. two cotton gowns, value 1l. 10s. a bolster, value 4s. two pillows, value 4s. 3d. a pair of blankets, value 1l. a bed-cover, value 7s. three tablecloths, value 2l. four shifts, value 10s. three muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 3s. a shawl, value 5s. a pocket-handkerchief, value 6d. a calico bed gown, value 2s. a dimily petticoat, value 3s. a calico petticoat, value 2s. a black calimanco petticoat, value 3s. two muslin aprons, value 2s. two waistcoats, value 5s. a yard of canvas, value 6d. a blue apron, value 1s. 6d. four stockings, value 6d. two towels, value 1s. a night-cap, value 6d. a silver-watch, value 4l. a tea-chest, value 2s. three tin cannisters, value 6d. and 4s. in monies, numbered, the property of Robert Winter , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS DUNCAN sworn. - I lodge at the Robin-hood and Little John, Charles-street, St. James's-square ; Robert Winter keeps the house; on the 17th of February, about dusk, I was in my own room, up one pair of stairs; I heard a noise at my room door, I heard a second noise, and then I went and opened the door, I perceived the two prisoners, each of them with a bundle upon their backs, one was lower down the stairs than the other; I saw the colour of their clothes, one said to the other, this is the way; I followed them down stairs, and called Mr. Winter, they were then going out at the door; Winter and I went in pursuit; I went up Charles-court, which is almost directly opposite our house, but I saw nothing of the prisoners there; I saw them both turn the corner of Charles-street, into St. Alban's-street; I went round, with an intention to interrupt them; I heard that the prisoner Yeomans was then taken; I cannot swear positively that he was one of the men that I saw upon the stairs; Yeomans had a brown coat, and the other a blue coat; about half an hour after that, I saw Smith; they were both drest the same as the two men that I saw coming down stairs; I saw the colour of their clothes very distinctly, when I opened my room door, and likewise when they got across the street.

ROBERT WINTER sworn. - I received an alarm from the last witness, on the 17th of February; upon coming to the door, Duncan was standing on the threshold, he desired me to follow those two men, pointing to the two prisoners at the bar; I pursued them immediately; they had each of them a large bundle upon their backs; I followed them till I got round the corner, into St. Alban's-street; I was then out of breath with running so fast, and immediately called stop thief; I was then within from twenty to thirty yards of the prisoners, they were, as near as I can recollect, six or seven yards apart; on calling out, stop thief, Smith, who had a blue coat on, turned his head round quite facing of me, and upon seeing me so near him, he threw down his bundle immediately; Yeomans turned round also to see from whence the noise proceeded; he carried his bundle five or six yards further, to the other side of the Strand; he threw it down in the kennel, just by the side of the pavement; he then ran as fast as Smith, towards Market-street, in going out of St. Alban's-street, I turned to the right; I pursued them a little further along Market-street; Yeomans, and another person, that ran with them, turned to the left hand, that was a person that I suspected of being an accomplice, he was in my house not half a minute, before Duncan gave the alarm; Smith turned to the right towards Market-lane; I pursued Yeomans into Norris-street, and there I recollected the goods, and I went back to look for them, about one hundred yards, and I found them where they had been thrown away; a soldier assisted me in carrying them; upon going up stairs, I found my own key in the room door, a back-room, up two pair of stairs; I found the room stripped of all the linen that was in it, and every thing, excepting the beds; a female servant had been the last person intrusted with the key; the next observation I made was, that one of the bureaus, there were three in the room, was broke open; I missed some new silver coin, to the value of four shillings, but I cannot say so many pieces; I then missed my watch off the window; I had laid it there when I got up, the key used to be kept in the bar; I can speak to the property when it is produced; as soon as I had secured the property, I came down stairs, and Duncan came in at the same time at the outer door; I was then informed that Yeomans was taken with my watch to St. Martin's watch-house; on coming there, Yeomans was sitting on a seat, I said, that is one of the men that had part of my property upon his back; there were a great number of other people there, eight or nine to the best of my recollection; I gave a

description of the maker's name and number, and a bruise in it; then the watch was shewn me, and I knew it to be mine; in about ten minutes after that, Smith was brought in, and I immediately said, that is the first man that threw down my bundle; I am very sure the two prisoners are the same men that I saw with my property.

Yeomans. Q.What coloured coat had I on? - A. I cannot take upon me to say the exact colour, it was a dark colour, something like a snuff colour.

Yeomans. Q. How was the person, you suppose to be the accomplice, drest? - A. I cannot say.

Q.You are positive to my being one of the persons that carried the bundle? - A. Yes, I am.

Jury. Q. Did you not say that he turned round and looked at you? - A. Yes; I saw his face at that time as plain as I see your's now; I was not then further than 30 yards from him, it was then nearly as light as it is now.

Q. Were the lamps lit? - A. No; I had never seen either of the prisoners before to my knowledge.

Q. Keeping a public-house, I suppose your outer door generally stands open? - A. Always.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn. - I live at No. 22, St. Alban's-street, with Messrs. Scott and Randall, apothecaries: On Monday the 17th of February, I think, a little after five, I am not quite certain; I saw two or three men on the other side of the way, in St. Alban's-street, two of them had bundles on their backs running fast; they were running from Charles-street; across St. Alban's-street, towards Market-street; I looked down the street, and saw somebody crying stop thief; a man ran first without a bundle, Yeomans ran next, and Smith a few yards after him; when they heard stop thief called, they each of them threw down their bundles about seven or eight yards distant from each other; they turned the corner, and ran towards Norris-street, Smith ran down Market-lane; I saw no one follow them, and therefore I followed Smith, calling stop thief, but no one ran after him but me; I pursued him round Pall-mall, and into the Hay-market; I then saw him reeling from one side of the pavement to the other, like a drunken man; I pursued, and called stop thief; as soon as he heard that call behind him, he looked round, and seeing me, he ran across the Hay-market, and down Little Suffolk-street; I pursued him, calling stop thief; a great many people were collected together, running after him; I pursued him down Great Suffolk-street, and there I lost sight of him, and did not see him again till he was in Mr. Amies's shop in Whitcomb-street; he was secured in Amies's shop.

Q. How long was it from the time you first saw him, till you saw him in Amies's shop? - A. Scarcely five minutes, for I ran as hard as I could; I can speak positively to the face of Smith; I cannot speak so distinctly to Yeomans', it was Smith that I followed; Smith had a blue coat on, with a velvet collar; the other had a brown coat on.

Q. Had he been reeling before he got into the Hay-market? - A. No; he ran as fast as any sober man could do.

Q.And that you are very positive was Smith? - A. Yes.

Prisoner Smith. How came you not to come to the second examination at Bow-street? - A. My master could not spare me from business; I was there at the first examination.

- AMIES sworn. - I keep a broker's shop, in Whitcomb-street: The prisoner, Smith, came into my shop about a quarter past five o'clock, he appeared very much agitated and frightened; I asked him who he was, and what he wanted; he gave me no answer; I asked him a second time what he wanted, and who he was, and then I seized him by the arm; at that moment two or three people came rushing into the shop, and Williams said, that is he, this is the man; there were a great number of people at the door, and several people asked him who he was, and he said he was a gentleman; and then he was taken out of my shop to the watch-house.

Smith. Q.Was I not very much in liquor? - A. He appeared very much agitated; I cannot tell whether it was from agitation or liquor, but he smelt of liquor certainly.

ROBERT RITCHIES sworn. - I am a watchman in St. Martin's parish: I was coming from the Hay-market, across St. James's Market, I heard a cry of stop thief; I looked up, and saw the prisoner, Yeomans, running; that is the man, (points to him); he was coming from the bottom of the Hay-market up James-street; I immediately pursued him, and about the middle of James-street, somebody crossing obstructed his running, and I immediately caught hold of him; when I had laid hold of him, I saw him throw away a watch; I saw the watch perfectly, he threw it into the middle of the street, near to the kennel, with his left-hand; the watch was picked up immediately, by some man who said, here is your watch, I cannot say who it was; the watch was brought to the watch-house by a person that is not here.

Q. Are you perfectly sure, that what the person threw from him was a watch? - A. Yes, perfectly.

Yeomans. Q. Did I not come up the east side of St. James's Market with you? - A. No; I never saw him till I got almost into James-street.

Yeomans. Q. Did you give the same account at Bow-street? - A. Yes, I did.

ROBERT ROSE sworn. - I am a constable: I saw

the prisoner, Yeomans, in custody of the last witness; it happened to be very near the watch-house, and I went up to see what was the matter, and he was then very refractory; I had very great difficulty to secure him and get him into the watch-house; in a very few minutes after we got into the watch house, a Mr. Brookes brought in the watch, and delivered it to me; I asked Mr. Brookes from whom he got it; the prisoner heard all that passed; he said, there was a great concourse of people, he could not tell who he received it from; in a few minutes after that, the prosecutor, Winter, came in; he said he had lost his watch, Smith was not there then, but he fixed upon Yeomans immediately; the watch-house was as full as it could hold, I suppose there were fifty there, and he pointed to Yeoman's, and said, that is the man; he told me the maker's name, and number of the watch, and I stepped on one side, and found it was as he described it. (Produces the watch).

Winter. This is my watch; Charles Heley , London, No. 1711; it is now without a glass, it was whole when it was in my room.

Rose. It had no glass when it was given to me.(The bundle produced).

Q.(To Winter.) Can you undertake to say, that every article in these two bundles came out of your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Among these various articles, what value do you set upon that property, independent of the watch? - A.The value I have set upon them is about ten pounds, but they are worth more than double that.

Yeomans's defence. On the evening of the robbery, I had been down to Pimlico to see a friend of mine, in Eaton-street, that keeps a baker's shop there; on my return home, crossing St. James's-square, I came up Charles-street, and getting towards St. Alban's-street I saw the watchman, and two or three people; somebody said, that is him in blue; and running along Norris-street, I crossed over the Hay-market, a considerable crowd of people were running, I crossed over into James-street, and crossing the bottom of Oxendon-street, a stout man, with an apron on like a butcher, caught hold of me by the handkerchief, and stopped me; says I, you are mistaken, my friend, and he let me go; I stood still, and presently after, this watchman, and two or three more people, came up and collared me.

Smith's defence. I have hardly any thing to say, I was fuddled; we neither of us expected our trials to come on so soon, and our friends are not here.

Yeomans, GUILTY Death . (Aged 28.)

Smith GUILTY Death. (Aged 28.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-28

271. THOMAS LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , two deal boards, value 4s. the property of Joseph Aldridge , and Edward Aldridge .

RICHARD MORGAN sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Joseph and Edward Aldridge , timber-merchants , No. 127, Brick-lane, Spitalfields : I heard an alarm given, on the 3d of March, crying, a thief; I ran round from our door to Mr. Scarr's; I found the prisoner at the next door, up a chimney; I did not find the boards.

JAMES DOUGLAS sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Scarr: On the 3d of March, I was coming through our back yard, and I saw the prisoner's father, Robert Long, standing at the garden-gate; I went up stairs, and looked out at our stair-case-window, and in about a quarter of an hour I saw the prisoner get over into the timber-yard; he handed out a deal, and his father took it of him and laid it down in our garden; then Thomas Long , the prisoner, set another up an end against the pales, ready to take away; I then came down stairs and told my mistress; the prisoner and his father lived close by; the boards are here.

ANN SCARR sworn. - I live adjoining the timber-yard: The last witness gave me an alarm, and I went into our back garden, and saw the plank lying there, and I saw old Mr. Long there; I asked him what business he had there; he was in the position of stooping.

Q.(To Douglas.) What time was it? - A. About half past eight o'clock at night; there are a great many weavers about there, and from the light of them at work I could see them distinctly.

Morgan. I have seen the board, and I am sure it is Mr. Aldridge's property; there was my own hand-writing upon it, 1l. 12s. 10d.

Donglas. The board that was shewn to Morgan, was the same that I saw reared up.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-29

272. JOHN NICHOLSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , two pounds of black tea, value 10s. two pounds of green tea, value 12s. four pounds of moist sugar, value 2s. two pounds of lump sugar, value 1s. a stick of Spanish liquorice, value 1d. two quires of common paper, value 6d. twelve penny-pieces, two hundred and forty halfpence, and twenty-four farthings , the property of Henry Bloomfield .

HENRY ALLEN sworn. - I am a watchman in Whitechapel parish: On the Fast-day morning, I

was going my beat at two o'clock, Mr. Bloomfield's house is in Swan-street , I perceived a light in the shop through a hole in the shutters, and I asked if that was Mr. Bloomfield, or any of the family; then the light was put out immediately, and I heard a rustling in the shop; I then alarmed the family, Mr. Bloomfield himself came down; I went in, and found three parcels, there was one upon the counter, and the other two upon another counter, tied up in a paper; two of them were opened, one contained moist sugar, and the other tea; I then went for an officer, and returned with him to the house, the prisoner lodged in the house; we went up to his room, and I told him he was my prisoner, and he must get up and go with me, for robbing the house; he told me he would not get up for me till day-light; I brought the officer up stairs, and he made him get up; after he got up, we searched the bed, and found four parcels under the bed, between the bed and the sacking; and in the bed we found one parcel of teas, to the amount of pretty near a pound; the four parcels under the bed were two quires of small paper, and two pounds of lump-sugar.

BENJAMIN CONSTABLE sworn. - I am a constable; Allen, the watchman, fetched me to Mr. Bloomfield's house; I went there, and made the prisoner get up; I first asked him where his clothes were, he told me they were on the ground; I took up his coat, and being weighty, I put my hand into the pocket and found a quantity of penny-pieces, and halfpence, amounting to eleven shillings and five-pence halfpenny; and in his waistcoat-pocket I found a stick of Spanish liquorice, and a paper of pins; I took the bed off the bedstead, and next the sacking I found two brown paper bags of lump sugar, one parcel of moist sugar, and a parcel of tea; I then went to the other side of the bed, and I found a parcel of tea in a paper which the watchman had seen in the bed; I then went to the drawers, and found a parcel of halfpence and farthings, to the amount of upwards of two shillings. (Produces the property).

ANN BLOOMFIELD sworn. - I am the wife of Henry Bloomfield: I saw my husband shut up the shop that night; he locked it up; there are sliding shutters in grooves upon the counter; and there was a little place where he got in, between the window-shutters; a little place that we could not suppose a man could get in at; there were no paper parcels in the shop when we went to bed; we were alarmed between two and three o'clock; I got up and saw some parcels containing tea and sugar; it had been put up in parcels in the course of the night; I had left a great deal of copper in the till, I cannot tell to what amount; there was enough taken out for me to miss them; there were a quantity of penny-pieces among them, I cannot say how many; the bag that the sugar was in I made up myself; the prisoner had lodged in our house thirteen months, he is a journeyman tailor.

Q. Look at these articles, and see if you know any of them? - A. I have every reason to believe they are mine; these are the same kind of bags that I make up; I missed both green and black tea, the canisters were not so heavy as they were when I left them the night before.

Prisoner's defence. When I went up to go to bed I found the halfpence and the pins and the Spanish liquorice concealed in the closet; I immediately took it up, and put it in my pocket, with intention to enquire about it the next morning, but was prevented by being distubed by the watchman; as to the tea and sugar, I never saw it till the watchman came to disturb me. As for the halfpence that I had in the drawers, I had taken some time before; they are bad halfpence that were not current.

Constable. The place was big enough for me to have got in.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-30

273. LETITIA PURCELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , twenty guineas, a Bank-note, value 20l. and two other Bank-notes, value 10l. the property of Aaron Pye , privily from his person .

AARON PYE sworn. - On the 20th of February I lost my property; I was at Peter Daniel's, the Black-bull, the lower part of New Gravel-lane, near to Wapping; I was in company there till twelve o'clock at night, with some captains of ships and ship-owners; I was coming out of the public-house; I went with the prisoner to an apartment that she took me to in Pratt's-buildings, where she said she lodged; I was a little in liquor; I staid there till two o'clock in the morning, when I was called out by two men; I can swear there were two, I am not sure whether there were not three; when I went in I had a twenty-pound note, two five-pound notes, and about twenty guineas in gold; but when these men turned me out, I had not got any money. I do not know who they were.

JOHN MILES sworn. - I am a watchman: I was going along a little after twelve o'clock, I met the prisoner and the prosecutor; we went into the Wheatsheaf, and he treated me with a glass of liquor, that is all I know.

JOHN FURNESS sworn. - I brought some goods

from Hoxton, that were bought with part of this money; there has been one note traced.

Q.(To Pye.) What was the number of the note that you lost? - A. No. 9615; it was a note for twenty pounds, dated 30th January, 1800; there was another note, 5711; that was another twenty-pound note which I think I shall get again, dated 27th January, 1800.

EDWARD LOADER sworn. - I am a broker: About the 20th of February two women came to my shop, I believe the prisoner to be one, but I cannot swear with certainly, I had never seen her before; the other woman, I believe, is a witness here; they came to buy some articles of chairs and bedsteads; I dealt with them to the amount of eight pounds, or guineas; for the payment of which I think it was the witness gave me a twenty-pound note; I sent out and got it changed at a neighbouring public-house; he is not here; he almost immediately paid it away to one of his brewers.

ANN HESLOP sworn. - The prisoner asked me to go with her of an errand, and I went with her, and she bought some goods.

Q. Can you describe the note? - A. No; I never had the note in my hand in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t18000402-31

274. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a half-guinea, and a Bank-note, value 1l. the property of Edward Cogin .

EDWARD COGIN sworn. - I work on board ship , and alongside the shore: I met with the prisoner between Rochester and Gravesend; we came to Gravesend together, and staid there all night, till the tide answered to come to Billingsgate; we arrived at Billingsgate about two o'clock in the morning; I went to bed there between three and four, and the prisoner sat up all night in the kitchen; he said he had no money, and I paid a shilling for his passage to Billingsgate; I got up about eight in the morning, and he was sitting below in the tap-room; he told me he had sat there all night; I told him I wanted to go to good quarters, and he said he would take me to some with himself; he took me to a house in Rosemary-lane ; he told me it was the sign of the Plough, but I could find no such house afterwards; we met with a woman and two children before we got to the house, he said they were his wife and children; and there was some bread and cheese and beer called for in the house; I believe there were five or six pots of beer drank between him and me, and the woman and children: I put my hand in my pocket, and pulled a one-pound note out of my pocket, and there was half-a-guinea in gold in the note; it was then between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, we went in about eleven o'clock in the morning; I laid the note out of my hand upon the table, the note was cracked a little by the half-guinea; he asked me how I came to use the note that way; I said, what harm; and he took the note in his hand, with the half-guinea in it; says he, this note must be put to rights, or settled, I do not know which, on account of the crack; then he went off towards the door, and I followed him and made a demand of the note; give me my note, says I, and my half-guinea; I will not, says he; he went outside the door then; and I said he must; he took up his fist and struck me on the bridge of the nose, and the blood gushed out; he stunned me; I made an enquiry, and found he was gone down another street with my note and half-guinea; it was a Bank of England note; I received it on account of money that was due to me from the Chatham-chest; I received it from Mr. Cook, who keeps the Flushing, at Rochester-bridge.

Q. Should you know a Bank of England note from a country Bank-note? - A. Yes; I had three from him, I spent and laid out the other two; I received the half-guinea in change of one of them; went down to Chatham after him, by land, two days after; I did not find him there; I staid in Rochester two days; I came to town again, and got an information that he was in St. Giles's; I found him last Tuesday morning was a week, in Church-lane; when he robbed me, he had on a brown jacket; and when I saw him in St. Giles's he had that coat that he has on now; I knew him directly, in about a moment I believe.

Q. Do you think that you can with safety swear that that is the man that robbed you? - A. Yes, I think I can.

Q. Do you remember, in Rosemary-lane, stopping and speaking to any person, with the prisoner in company? - A. I remember, as we were going along, I stopped and spoke to Daniel Holland ; I had known him before; I asked him to come and take a draft of beer, and he would not.

Q. Had you any body else with you? - A. I do not recollect that I had.

Q. Were you sober then? - A.Sober enough to have my senses about me; I was a little elevated, but not to be hurt.

Q. What had you in the morning? - A.Three or four pots of purl and gin.

Q. You came with him from Rochester? - A. Yes.

Q. Then do you think you could mistake his person? - A. I think not.

Q. Did you observe that any accident had happened to his hand? - A. Yes, I observed that he had lost his left hand. When I saw him at St.

Giles's I asked him his name, and he said it was Brown; I said I knew it was; and then he denied ever having seen me at all; I asked him if he did not recollect me in the road between Rochester and Gravesend; he said, no; I asked him if he had not seen me in the boat; he said, no; says I, do not you remember seeing me in Rosemary-lane, and running away with a note and a half-guinea; and he said he had never seen me before; he told the man of the house that there was a man going to swear his life away; I have never found my property again.

DANIEL HOLLAND sworn. - I live in Rosemary-lane: Cogin was a ship-mate of mine for a few months in the year 1795; I met him and another person in Rosemary-lane, he asked me to go and drink with them.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. That is not the man; he was a man about five feet ten or eleven; the person that was with him took off his hat, and he was not like the prisoner; I had never seen him before I saw him at Bow-street; they were both very much in liquor, and I was sober; I am a salesman; they said they would call in the afternoon, and buy some clothes.

Q.Then you had no acquaintance with the prisoner? - A. None; I saw the man that was with Cogin again the same afternoon; I saw him go into the Clothes-exchange and buy some clothes; I saw him with a coat that he had bought, a dark-coloured coat.

Q. But who that strange man was, you cannot tell? - A. No; he had a full head of hair.*

*The prisoner was bald.

Q.(To Cogin.) Were you sober? - A. I was sober enough to know him at any rate.

Q. Are you sure you did not change your companion between Darkhouse-lane and Rosemary-lane? - A. No; if I wanted to part with him he did not intend to part with me; he was too fond of me. When this man was before Mr. Bond, he said he had never seen the crown of his head.

Q.(To Holland.) Did you say any thing before the Magistrate about his head? - A. No.

Q. Why did not you, if there was so much difference as you speak of? - A. I was not asked about it, and I forgot it.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of the matter; I was not there; I know nothing at all of the man; I was in Salisbury at the time.

Holland. Last Thursday or Friday was a week Cogin came to me with a subpoena; and I said, if you say this is the man you were in company with, I must swear to it, and I do not like to go before a Justice; then he said I should have half the benefit if the man was hung; I made answer, no, I would sooner give you the money out of my pocket, than be taken before a Justice or a Jury, that I never was before in my life; he said, never mind, you shall have the benefit of it; you shall be well paid for your trouble; I told him I did not want any thing of the kind; then I went to Bow-street, and there I saw the prisoner at night about eight o'clock.

Q. Then you saw him without his hat? - A. Yes.

Q.And yet you did not take any notice to the Justice of the difference of the bald head? - A. No, I did not; I forgot it.

ARTHUR LEARY sworn. - I am a salesman in Rosemary-lane: On a day somewhere about the Fast-day, Cogin and another man came and shook hands with my man, the last witness; after he was gone away, I asked him what he had to do with that fellow; Cogin had lived servant with me formerly.

Q. Did you see who was in company with the prosecutor? - A. I saw him in company with a stout man, at about twenty yards distance, at a public-house door, the Blue-boar in Rosemary-lane; I saw them afterwards again; he was a very tall stout man; he was, I dare say, five feet eleven inches high; the prisoner at the bar is not the man that was in company with Cogin.

Cogin. I lived about sixteen months ago, with Mr. Leary; I was with him four days for one shilling a day, and he used me very well for that time.

Q. And you still persist in saying that the prisoner is the man? - A. I do.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-32

275. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , two saddles, value 1l. 10s. and two bridles, value 10s. the property of James Taddy .

JAMES TADDY Sworn. - On Friday morning, the 14th of March, I was in the country; I received information from my servant, that my stables had been robbed; I ordered him to make all the enquiries he could; in consequence of which, I found one of my saddles about a few hours after, at the office in Worship-street, between five and six o'clock the same evening; I have not found the rest; the prisoner was a stranger to me.

JOHN WHITE sworn. - I am a stable-keeper, in Worship-street: On Wednesday the 13th of March, the prisoner came down my yard, brought a saddle with him, and asked for me, I was out; I came in, and the prisoner was standing at the gate; he told me he had got a saddle to sell, he asked me seven shillings for it; I asked him how he came by

it, he said, he had bought it of a groom, in Camomile-mews; I asked him whose groom it was, he told me he did not know; I asked him the groom's name, he said, Joe Britt , I told him that I knew him; I told him to call again to-morrow, I had no money in my pocket, and I would pay him for the saddle; he called next day at eleven o'clock, I had not an opportunity of going out, I desired he would call again at two o'clock; I went out, and was informed of Mr. Taddy's loss; I went to Mr. Taddy, and he was in the accompting-house; I got Ray, the officer, of Worship-street, in waiting, against he came at two o'clock; I shewed Ray the prisoner, and he took him into custody; I gave Ray the saddle, I am sure the saddle I delivered to Ray was the same that I had from the prisoner.

JOSEPH ADAMS sworn. - I am groom to Mr. Taddy, in Fenchurch-street ; I missed the property on Thursday the 13th of March, towards the evening, out of the stable in Fenchurch-street; I saw one of the saddles the next day, the 14th, in Mr. White's yard, Mr. White shewed it me; I saw it afterwards at Worship-street, it was the same saddle, it had been and old, heavy, travelling saddle of my master's, and on the left side there was a stirrup leather broke, and a flat stirrup; I have been acquainted with the saddle very near a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; he has been as a groom; he came to my stables on the 7th, I did not see him again till he was taken up; he wanted to know if I knew of any place as he wanted one, and I told him I did not.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street, (produces a saddle;) I received it from White, at his yard the same day; I went to the prisoner's lodgings, he gave me the direction himself, and I there found this key, which undoes the latch of his room door, and also Mr. Taddy's stable door.

Adams. I tried the stable door with this key, and it opened it; this is Mr. Taddy's saddle.

Prisoner's defence. I was going with another young man through Finsbury-square, and we met with Joseph Britt; I bought the saddle of him, I went to sell it to Mr. White, to make my money again. GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-33

276. ELIZABETH, wife of JOHN ALLEN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a spencer, value 2s. a frock, value 4s. a a pair of stays, value 6d. two petticoats, value 3s. a shift, value 1s. a pair of stockings, value 6d. a pair of shoes, value 6d. a tippet, value 1s. a bonnet, value 2s. and a cap, value 6d. the property of Ann Margeson .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of James Margeson .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-34

277. HUGH HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a man's hat, value 5s. the property of Ebenezer Clark .

EBENEZER CLARK sworn. - I live in Whitecross-place, Finsbury-square: On the 6th of March, having business at Guildhall , I was waiting in the lobby, leading to the Council-chamber, and while I was waiting, in conversation, I had pulled off my hat, and put it on a table, which stood in the lobby; by chance, turning my head round, I saw the prisoner at the bar take my hat from off the table, and immediately walked away with it; I followed him, and charged him with having my hat, he seemed much confused, and trembled; I told him, I believed his intention was to steal it; he then dropped my hat, and pulled his own from underneath his coat, where it was buttoned and crumpled up; I then gave him in charge to one of the marshalmen, it was the day of the election for under marshal; I was a candidate, and was waiting for that purpose; I am sure it was my hat.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the place, and laid my hat down upon the table, and happened to take up that gentleman's hat by mistake.

GUILTY (Aged 34.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-35

278. JAMES CAVANAUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , seventy pounds weight of sugar, value 40s. the property of John Coope , the elder, John Coope , the younger, and Joseph Coope .

JOSEPH COOPE sworn. - I am a sugar refiner , in Whitechapel: I know nothing of the loss.

ELLIS WACKER sworn. - The prisoner was a labourer in the sugar house, he was house-keeper the night of the robbery, and it was his business to answer the bell at the gate; some person came to the gate and spoke to the prisoner, and then he gave him a bag out at the gate, and put it down by some dung; the man who took the prisoner brought him to me in the kitchen while he fetched the officer to take charge of him, his name is Wilpen.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have

you been employed in that house? - A. Twenty-five years.

Q. How long has the prisoner lived there? - A. Four months.

Q. The bag was not off the premises at the time you saw it? - A. No.

Court. Q. Is the sugar in your business usually kept in bags? - A. No.

JACOB WILPEN sworn. - I am a watchman at Mr. Coope's: On the 19th of March, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, I heard somebody coming out of the sugar house; then I saw the prisoner set down the bag of sugar against a lamp in the yard; then I saw him cover it over with dung; after that, he went to the kitchen, and stopped there a little while, I cannot say how long, I suppose four or five minutes; then somebody rung the bell, and he came out of the kitchen and opened the gate; I do not know who it was, but they talked together for some time, I did not hear what they said; after this, the prisoner laid hold of the bag, and took it up from the ground; I then laid hold of the prisoner, and sent for an officer; the last witness took the bag, and delivered it to me, I have had it ever since; it is the same bag. (Produces it).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a German? - A. Yes.

Q. In general, it is Germans that are employed in sugar-houses? - A. Yes.

Q. How many are there in this sugar-house who are not Germans - are there more than two? - A. No.

Q.You did not like this innovation that Englishmen should be brought to work in the sugar-house? - A. I do not understand you.

Q. Did you never make any complaint that Englishmen should be employed in the sugar-house? - A. No.

Q.Nor any of your fellow-workmen? - A.No.

Q. You do not know who this bag belongs to? - A. No.

Coope. This is the same sort of sugar that we had in our sugar-house.

Wacker. After the prisoner was taken, I went into the sugar-house, and missed a quantity of sugar from one of the bins; after I had looked at the pans and seen them full, I saw the bins full, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and this was about half past eight.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it.

Q.(To Coope.) What are your partners' names? - A.John Coope, the elder, and John Coope , the younger.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-36

279. JANE LYALL was indicted for the wilful murder of her male bastard child .

She was charged with the like murder upon the Coroner's Inquisition.(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

CHARLES HEBERDEN sworn. - I am a surgeon, in Great Hamilton-street: I was sent for to examine the body of a dead infant; and from the most strict examination, it is not in my power to say the child was born alive; Mr. Jephson was with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-37

280. JOSEPH HEWITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a silver table-spoon, value 10s. the property of Nicholas-William Middleton .

NICHOLAS- WILLIAM MIDDLETON sworn. -I live in the Strand ; the prisoner lived with me as porter ; I am a pocket-book and pencil-maker : On Saturday evening, the 1st of March, a constable came to my house with two pieces of a silver spoon, which were my property; the constable has got them.

THOMAS WALKER sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Parker, silversmith, in Fleet-street: The prisoner, on the 1st of March, brought a table-spoon in to sell; I inquired of him if it belonged to him, and he said, no, it did not, it belonged to his mother, and she lived at No. 39, in Shoe-lane; I sent down to inquire, but no such person lived there; then he said, a lady, dressed in black, gave it him at the corner of Shoe-lane; that he was to bring it to Mr. Parker's, in Fleet-street, and they would buy it of him; he pointed through the window to a lady in black, and said, that was her; I then sent for a constable, and had him taken into custody.

ALEXANDER AULD sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody, and found the property upon him,(producing it); I also found a small penknife upon him.

Mr. Middleton. This is my spoon; it not only has my mark upon it, but it has, by accident, passed through the fire, and therefore is the more remarkable; I cannot say when I had seen it before the prisoner was apprehended; the prisoner was in my service at that time, he had my knot with him.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-38

281. JAMES CATLING was indicted for the

wilful murder of George Catling , his infant son of seven months old, by pouring aqua-fortis down its throat .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ELIZABETH LEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 1, Shrewsbury-court, Whitecross-street ; I keep a little green-grocer's shop; the prisoner at the bar lived in the same house; In consequence of a conversation with his wife, I went up into his room on the 15th of February , and she staid below in my room; there was nobody in the room up stairs but the prisoner, he had one child, a boy about seven months old, its name was George Catling ; the child was lying in the cradle, dead, it was just dead when I went into the room; I had seen it alive in the course of that afternoon; the prisoner was sitting by the fire-side, crying; I asked him how the accident happened; he told me the child had been bad with the belly-ach, and his wife had told him to give it a little Dalby's carminitive, and instead of giving it the Dalby's carminitive, he had taken the aqua-fortis bottle, he had made a mistake; he had mixed it with water and sugar; that was the most that passed at that time, I was obliged to go down stairs again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Was not the prisoner a very affectionate father to this child? - A.Very much so, indeed; he was very fond of it.

JAMES RACKSTROW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was at work with the prisoner for Mr. Rice, an iron-founder.

Q. Did you take your beer with him on the Saturday, before this accident happened? - A. Yes, we had it at my master's shop; after he had received his wages, he went to a cupboard that was in the pantry, and took a phial out, and said, this is the way my money goes, with bl-d doctor's stuff.

Q. Was it a common phial? - A. I do not know what phial it was, I only saw it in his hand.

WILLIAM BALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am foreman at the shop where the prisoner used to work, Mr. Rice's, Whitecross-street, Cripplegate: On Sunday the 16th of February, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I met the prisoner at my master's shop-door, as I was going out to get shaved; he was crying, he had a bundle in his hand; I asked him, what was the matter; he said he had had an accident, his child was dead; I asked him how it came; he said he would tell me presently; he went up stairs to my lodgings in the foundery, we took a pint of beer up with us, and then he said, his wife persuaded him to make his escape; I told him, if he offered to make his escape, or run away, people would say he had done it wilfully; and being persuaded by me, he did not offer to go, he staid with me that day; then I said, I would go and try if I could not see his wife; I went to the place where they lodged, she was not at home, and I came and told him that she was not at home; he said he knew where she was gone to, and he went up the street with me towards his lodgings, and we met with her in Old-street, and all three came home to his lodgings together; she began to say what a sad accident it was, and she was in tears, and persuaded him to make his escape, in my presence, for she said she could not bear to see him any more in her sight; and the answer he made was, he should not make away with himself yet; he then left the room; I did not see the prisoner again, to speak to him, till the Tuesday evening following, the 18th; the Coroner's Inquest had sat that evening, I attended the Inquest, and after the verdict was given, I went, with one of the other men that works in our shop, to the prisoner's lodgings, his name is John Burbidge, he was not at the Coroner's Inquest; I called him by name, Jem; I will not be positive whether he answered the first time, or whether I called a second time, he was in bed, it might be then between ten and eleven o'clock; he raised himself up in the bed.

Q.Was that the same lodgings he had lived at before? - A. No, it was in a court in Golden-lane; he raised himself up in the bed, and I said, Jem, they have brought it in accidental; and he said, you are not a joking, are you; I put out my hand to him, says I, there is my hand, for truth; and to the best of my knowledge, he pulled out a book, whether from some part of the bed, or whether from his pocket, I cannot say, it was a prayer-book consisting of prayers, and he said, he had been reading of that in the evening; then he rose from the bed, and put on his things, and came with me and Burbidge away from that house to the end of Shrewsbury-court, where he formerly lived, and I went up to the door of his lodgings with him; I went into the lodgings, and he stopped at the door, his wife came out into the passage and spoke to me; after that, I gave the prisoner a shilling to get something to eat, he said he was in want, he then left me; he was gone, to the best of my knowledge, about half an hour; while he was gone, I had some conversation with his wife, his cousin, and his cousin's wife; and I saw Burbidge again before I saw the prisoner; I went to the prisoner at the Swan, in Whitecross-street, where he went to get his refreshment; I said to him, so, Jem, you have been and owned to it; I asked him how he came to own to it; did you do it, says I, for the purpose; he said, yes; I said, with what; he said, it was aqua-fortis; I asked him where he bought it; he said, at Macdonald's; and I said, no, you did not.

Q. Did you know the place he meant? - A.

Yes, perfectly well; it is a chemist's and druggist's; he said, yes he did, and I told him they denied it; then I asked him whether he asked for that stuff or no; he said, yes, he asked for two-pennyworth of aqua-fortis; I said, did not they say any thing to you about it; he said, no, he laid the two-pence down, and said, if you do not like them I will change them; then I asked him if that was the bottle that he took from our shop on Saturday evening, and he said, yes; then, says I, you thought of doing it he said, he had thought of that two or three months past; that is all that past, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did he appear at that time to be perfectly collected, and seem to have a recollection of what he was about? - A.Perfectly so.

Q. Did he appear to be at all in liquor at that time? - A. I did not see that he was at all intoxicated.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you ever seen him with this child? - A. Yes.

Q. He was always very fond of the child? - A. He seemed always remarkably fond of it.

Q. How long had he worked in this foundery with you? - A. Ever since the 15th of last July.

Q. He was a young man, very much liked among you, as a very worthy, civil, young wan? - A. Yes, a very civil young man, he always behaved very civil.

Q. He was not a sort of a person from whom you would have expected an act of cruelty or barbarity? - A. No, he was not, very far from it.

Q. You say, when you went to him, after the Coroner's Inquisition, he was at another lodging? - A. Yes.

Q. He was not concealed at all there? - A.From his wife.

Q. He and his wife had had some words, but you knew where he was? - A. No, I did not; only the man that got him the lodgings, Burbidge, I was informed by him where he was, and I went to him, thinking it would ease his mind.

JOHN BURBIDGE sworn. - I am a fellow-workman with the prisoner, at Mr. Rice's; I had my beer with him, on Saturday the 15th.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular that he did on the Saturday? - A. No; on the Sunday, I was informed of the accident, by Bell, the foreman; I then went to the prisoner's lodgings, but he was not at home, his wife was at home; I saw him in the afternoon of the Sunday, between four and five o'clock, or it might be sooner, I cannot say exactly; I saw him at the public-house, opposite the shop where we work.

Q.Was he at that time sober? - A. He appeared to me very sober, I did not see that he had been drinking any thing at all; when I went first into the tap-room, I did not see him till he spoke to me; he said, Jack, is that you? then I called him out of the box where he was sitting with some more men; he came and sat along with me, I said to him, for God's sake, Jem, what have you been doing at home; I said, Jem, were you drunk last night, or were you out of your mind; I then asked him what he had been about; then I asked him where he had got the stuff from, he told me, from Mr. Macdonald's; he said, he went there and asked for two pennyworth of aqua-fortis; I said to him, Jem, had you any thought of this? - Yes, he says, I have had it in my head a long time, but he did not think, he said, it would kill the child so soon; then I got up out of the box and left him; I had seen the child that morning, dead, it looked very much burnt, sadly burnt about the mouth, and on the left hand, I think, but I am not quite certain which hand; I left the box where he was sitting, I would not sit with him any longer; I staid in the house till about nine o'clock, in another box; about that time, he asked me if I would go with him to get him a lodging; I went with him, and got him a lodging; I left him at his lodgings in Golden-lane.

Q. Did you attend the Coroner's Inquest? - A. I was not before the Jury, but I was in the house; it was a public-house in Whitecross-street.

Q. As you were in the house, how happened it that you were not examined? - A. I cannot tell.

Q.Had you told any body of this conversation? - A. Yes, I had told Bell, and ever so many of my shop-mates.

Court. Q. And yet you did not offer to tell what you knew before the Coroner? - A. No, I did not; I saw the prisoner again on the Tuesday night after the verdict; Mr. Bell and I went after him, we found him in bed at his lodgings, in Golden-lane; either Mr. Bell, or else me, said, Jem, every thing is all right, and he could hardly believe it; and Bell offered his hand to him, as much as to say that it was the truth, and he made answer and said, thank God Almighty, for I have been here a praying, and I am very hungry; he had a book, but I cannot read, I do not know what book it was, he got up, and went along with Bell and me.

Q. Had he any money of his own, do you know? - A. I do not know; we then went to the end of Shrewsbury-court, and there I left him, very near his door, where he had formerly lived; I went to the house where my shop-mates were, opposite the shop where we work, that might be about ten o'clock at night; it was a public-house; I left that house, and I saw the prisoner again the same evening; I went with my shop-mates to the Swan, and there we found the prisoner; I asked

him, Jem, are not you glad that you got off in this manner, he said, yes; and I asked him then, whether he had an intention, or a thought to destroy the child, he said, yes, and then I left him, and went to another part of the house.

Q. Was Tuckey there? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Tuckey come to fetch her husband home? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing more after that? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The conversation you had with him on the Sunday, you told Bell, before the Coroner's Jury sat? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell Bell of it on the Monday or the Tuesday morning? - A. I mentioned it on the Monday, but I do not know whether I told Bell of it on the Monday or not.

Q.But you told Bell of it before the Coroner's Jury sat? - A. Yes; I told all my shop-mates of it.

Mr. Gurney. (To Bell.) Q.Before the Coroner's Jury sat, had Burbidge told you that the prisoner said he had had it in his head a long time, but did not think it would kill the child so soon? - A. Not to my recollection; I do not remember that he told me of it till after the Jury had sat, when he told me of it at the Swan door.

Q. But before the Jury had sat, he did not mention it to you? - A. Not to my knowledge; he might have mentioned it in the shop, but not to my knowledge.

Court. (To Barbidge.) Q. You say, you told your shop-mates of it on the Monday? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you remember whether Bell was among those shop-mates to whom you mentioned it? - A. I cannot rightly say; I do not remember who was there.

Q.What makes you sure that you had told Bell before the Coroner's Jury sat? - A. I cannot rightly say that Bell was there, when I told of the conversation that I had had with the prisoner.

Q.Where were your shop-mates at that time? - A. In the shop.

Q. Do you remember telling Bell of it, on the Tuesday night? - A. Yes.

Q.Then it is most probable you had not told him before? - A. I do not rightly remember my telling him of it on the Monday.

ABRAHAM TUCKEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a brother workman with the prisoner; I went to the Swan public-house on the Tuesday night, after the Coroner's Jury had sat; Burbidge went with me, I believe it was somewhere about ten o'clock, we found the prisoner there, he was talking to Burbidge; I heard him say he gave it to the child on purpose, I did not hear him say what; my wife came in just afterwards to fetch me home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.How long have you worked with the prisoner? - A.Ever since about a week before Christmas.

Q. Had you ever seen him with his child? - A. Many times.

Q. Did you ever see a man more fond of a child than he was? - A. No, never.

Q. Was he not a very worthy humane man; I never saw any thing bad of him in my life.

Q. He is not a man from whom you would have expected any barbarity? - A. No.

MARY TUCKEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am the wife of the last witness; on the Tuesday evening, after the Coroner's Jury had sat, I went over to the Swan, to my husband, and the prisoner was there, talking to his shop-mates; I heard him say he gave a drop out of the spoon, and then a drop out of the bottle; it gave me such a turn, that I turned myself away, and heard no more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.Had you ever seen him with this child? - A. Yes.

Q. He was a very affectionate father, was he not? - A. Yes, very fond of his child indeed.

Q. Did you think him a likely man to murder his child? - A. I do not think he did it on purpose.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer of Hatton-garden: The prisoner was brought to our office; the Magistrate had then left the office; I then took him to the Hat and Tun in Hatton-wall; he sat in the taproom some time, and I thought that was not the proper place to ask him any thing, I thought it was too public; we went backwards into the parlour with some more of his shop-mates with him.

Court. Q.Why were you to question him? - A. We thought he would tell us the facts that he had told the other men before.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.When you took him into the parlour, did you tell him he had better confess? - A. I believe some of his shop-mates did.

Q. Then you know nothing about the apprehension? - A. No.

THOMAS SOWDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a surgeon: In consequence of an application from the overseers of the parish, I went to see the body of a dead male child, in a court in Whitecross-street, on the morning of the day on which the Coroner's Inquest sat; the child appeared to be about six months old; the lips were discoloured; about the size of a small saucer upon its left breast, and about the size of a crown by the thumb, upon the back of the left hand; I then opened the body, but found that no part of the fluid which had stained the mouth and lips, and breast and hand, had got farther than the mouth; the appearances upon dissection proved the child to have been ailing; the liver was twice its natural

size, and must, even before the stomach was half full, have produced vomitings.

Q. Where you able to judge from your observations, what was the immediate cause of the child's death? - A. The fluid that had been put to the mouth I knew immediately was aqua-fortis; I then asked to examine the bottle that the fluid might have been in.

Q. If aqua-fortis got into the mouth of the child it might produce a suffocation from whence death might ensue? - A. I do believe it.

Q. And you believe the appearances upon the mouth of the child were the effect of aqua-fortis? - A. I do.

Q. Then are you inclined, upon the whole, to think that aqua-fortis put into the mouth of the child was the cause of the death? - A. I believe so, it appeared to me as if the child had lifted its hand up to its mouth to wipe off the aqua fortis; from the direction of the stain upon the hand, it appeared to me it had been done in that manner.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Look at those two bottles; is the one aqua-fortis and the other Dalby's carminative? - A.This appears to me to be what is called Dalby's carminative; but I am no farther acquainted with it than from its appearance.

Q. The colour of the one is not at all like the colour of the other? - A. In the appearance in which you now see them, they are not of the same colour; but the carminative will, I believe, upon standing, have a sediment at the bottom; and I believe the carminative itself will be of a brownish red.

Q. Even after it might have stood a considerable time, would it then have the appearance of aquafortis, as to colour? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I take it they would have both much the same appearance in the dark? - A. Of course.

Q. Supposing the two bottles had been of the same form, a person would not find out in the dark, the one from the other? - A. No.

Q. This supernatural swelling of the liver must have been of a dangerous tendency? - A. It must have produced other disorders.

Q. Are you able to state perfectly that the death of that child was owing to aqua-fortis? - A. I cannot perfectly state that; I would not presume to state that.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. From the appearance of the mouth, do you think aqua-fortis sufficient to produce early suffocation and death? - A. I think it is likely to produce suffocation.

Q. Did you see any natural causes, upon dissection, to which you could ascribe sudden death, independent of this aqua-fortis? - A.None.

Q. You did not open the head of the child? - A. I did not.

Q. The opening of the head might have enabled you to discover other causes, that you are now ignorant of? - A. It frequently has.

Q.Probably you have known instances of violent vomitings, producing suffocations, and ruptures of blood-vessels in the head? - A. Not suffocations; I have known instances of ruptures of blood-vessels in the head.

Court. Q. No part of the aqua-fortis had found its way down the throat? - A. No part.

Q. Did you observe that aqua-fortis had been used, before you were told any thing about it? - A. I had had no information whatever respecting it; but the moment I saw it, I knew it was aquafortis.

Q. Could that discolouration be occasioned by any thing else? - A. No; unless it was spirits of nitre.

Prisoner's defence. How the aqua-fortis came into the house I do not know; I did it accidentaily.(Mr. Miles proved that Shrewsbury-court was in the county of Middlesex.)

For the Prisoner.

JOSEPH MAYOW sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at Chesham, in the county of Bucks, I have known the prisoner from his infancy.

Q. How old is he now? - A. He is turned of nineteen.

Q. What character for morality and humanity has he maintained during all his life? - A. I never saw any thing amiss of him from his cradle.

Q. Has he been a humane good lad, or otherwise? - A.Entirely so.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-39

282. WILLIAM SMITH , THOMAS BREWER , and JAMES ENNIS were indicted for that they, in the King's highway, on the 26th of February , in and upon William Cumming did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 3l. a gilt watch-chain, value 6d. and a metal watch-key, value 2d. the property of the said William .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM CUMMING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am master of a ship in the Quebec trade: On the 26th of February, about a quarter or half past ten at night, I was in the parish of St. George's Middlesex; I had just stepped out of Dr. Morgan's shop in Ratcliff-highway ; he keeps a surgeon and apothecary's shop; when I was stopped by some persons that I took to be a press-gang; there were seven or eight of them: they asked me what I was, I told them a master of a ship; they told me I was no master of a ship, I was a mate; they asked me

for my affidavit, I told them I had not had one for nine years; they then told me they would take me away to the rendezvous; I called to Dr. Morgan's man, and told him to desire Dr. Morgan, when he went down, to send the ship's papers, as I had none in my pocket, for the purpose of satisfying them; they then took me away from the door, and when they had got me about ten yards from the door, they all got round me and hustled me; some held my hands, some took me by the collar, and listed me nearly off the ground with my hands up; I begged of them to let me walk myself, and I would go with them; they kept me in that way for the space of a minute, and then they all of them let go together, and I walked in the middle of them; and as soon as they let me go, I put my hand down and missed my watch; I did not miss it before; I told them they had robbed me; they d-'d me, and asked me if I was going to make robbers of them; I told them, no, they had done that themselves; then they all ran away, and I caught hold of the last man; a gentleman hearing the noise, came up and told me he would assist me; the man that I took I delivered to Wood, the watchman; we went on till we came to a watch-box, and there seeing the watchman, I charged him with this man, but he got away again; when we had walked the space of 200 yards, the pressgang, as I supposed, came up behind, and knocked the watchman down; they rescued the person in custody, and then they all ran away; then the watchman desired me to go down to the watch-house, which I did; I described the two persons that I saw between me and Dr. Morgan's light, when the young man brought the candle to the door; the prisoners Smith and Ennis are those two persons; they are the persons that laid hold of my arms at Dr. Morgan's door, and hustled me; I do not know any thing of the other prisoner; they were apprehended the next morning; I was with the officers when they were apprehended, about half past nine in the morning, not far distant from where they stopped me; they were just coming out of a public-house, and one man that was with them ran away.

Q. Are you sure before they hustled you, that you had your watch in your pocket? - A. Yes, I am well assured of it.

Q. How long before had you seen it? - A. Not ten minutes.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you miss your watch? - A. In a quarter of a minute.

Q. Are you sure that Smith and Ennis were two of these persons? - A. Yes, I am.

Cross-examined by Mr. Beville. Q.Did you ever see these men before? - A. I have seen their persons in the street.

Q.When was the last time you saw them before this happened? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you, at any time that you had seen them before, take any particular notice of them? - A. No, only when I see a press-gang it is natural to look at them.

Q. One press-gang is not like another then, I suppose? - A. No, no more than other men.

Q. Had you ever taken particular notice of the countenances of these men? - A. Yes, I am clear I had seen them before.

Q. Do you mean to say that you know the countenances of all the press-gangs you ever saw? - A. By no means; but I had seen these two before, and knew them again.

Q.Then you cannot tell us at what time you had seen them? - A. No.

Q. At what hour was this offence committed? - A. Almost half past ten.

Q. It was dark, was it not? - A. Yes, very dark.

Q.From what reason can you swear that these two men were the identical persons that robbed you? - A.When I saw them at Dr. Morgan's door with a candle at the door, I saw them between me and the candle, and am sure they are the same men.

Court. Q.What do you mean by their being between you and the candle? - A. So that the candle shone upon their faces.

JOHN COOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the Police-officers of Shadwell: I was with the prosecutor at the apprehension of those prisoners.

Q. In consequence of the information the prosecutor gave you, did you apprehend the prisoners? - A. Yes, he was in company with me and the other officers; he pointed out Ennis and Smith from five other men; I searched them, and found upon Smith, who was the master of the gang, a paper,(producing it;) he said he was authorised by Mr. Whiteway to press men; he stands upon Towerhill to get all the seamen he can.

Q. A crimp, I suppose? - A. Yes; I apprehended them, and took them before the Magistrates at Shadwell; and there the prosecutor swore positively to Ennis and Smith; he never had the least doubt about them; the watch has never been found.

JOHN WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was called to the assistance of the prosecutor: On Wednesday the 26th of February, about half past ten o'clock, I received in charge from him a stout man, apparently an Irishman, and he went with me a little way, and then he got from me.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, all of them; two I know particularly, Ennis and Brewer, I saw them in the street that

might; I was knocked down by three or four men, and the man that was delivered to me got away, but when I self upon the ground, I saw Ennis and Brewer run away; Ennis made a reply to his other comrades, come up this place, that was White's-yard; upon that I went to the watch-house and gave information; when the prosecutor gave me charge of the first man, I told him what gang they were, they used to go a pressing of a night.

Smith's defence. When I was before the Magistrate, he swore to me by my silk handkerchief, he did not know me any other way; I was at home in bed at the time the robbery was committed.

For Smith.

SARAH WILLOUGHBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. The prisoner at the bar lodges with me, and has done for some years; he was at home very soon after ten o'clock that night, and he was not out again that night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What day of the week was this? - A. On the Wednesday.

Q. Are you sure it was on the Wednesday? - A. Yes.

Q.What day of the month? - A. I believe the 26th.

Q. Of January? - A. I believe it was.

Q. You are pretty sure it was the 26th of January? - A. I think it was January; but I am very sure it was on a Wednesday.

Q. It was not in February, was it? - A. I think it was six weeks last Wednesday, as near as I can guess.

Q. He is out sometimes late at night? - A. Yes; according to what they are they are out late at night.

Q. What are they? - A. They belong to Dickenson the press-master, or something of that.

Q.They were out one night that week besides? - A. I dare say they were out every day.

Q. Can you tell my Lord what time they came home on Tuesday night? - A. No.

Q. Thursday night? - A. They were not at home all night on Thursday.

Q. Monday night? - A. I cannot say; but I am perfectly sure he was in on the Wednesday night.

Q. Did he come home by himself that night? - A. Yes.

Q.How soon after ten? - A. I cannot say particularly, because I had no clock; I think about a quarter past ten was as much as it was.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner since he has been in jail? - A. I saw him this morning.

Q. Had you any conversation with him? - A. Not many words.

Q. Did you talk about this robbery? - A. No.

Q. Nor about the day? - A.Not to-day.

Q. When was it that it was mentioned? - A. I cannot tell the day; I talked of it at home to my own mind.

Q. But who has talked to you to you about it's being Wednesday? - A. A great many of my neighbours.

Q. Name any of them? - A. Mrs. Cockburn.

Q. How came she to say any thing about the Wednesday? - A. I said it to her.

Q. Is Mrs. Cockburn here? - A. No.

Mr. Beville. Q. Then you are sure, on Wednesday six weeks, he was at home a little after ten? - A. I think it was Wednesday six weeks.

Court. Q. What time did you go to bed yourself? - A. Past eleven o'clock, I heard the watchman go.

The prisoner, Smith, called one other witness, who had known him seven years, and gave him a good character.

Ennis's defence. I was at the house of William Gilbert at the time.

For Ennis.

WILLIAM GILBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I met with the prisoner, Ennis, at the corner of Charles-street, on Wednesday night the 26th of February, about half past nine o'clock at the farthest, he went home with me, and continued with me till about half past ten, it might be rather less, or rather more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It was not more than half past ten? - A.No; I think not.

Q. Where is Charles-street? - A. Gravel-lane.

Q. That is near Rarcliff-highway, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q.What is he? - A. A sea-faring man, I believe.

Q. What are you? - A. I am a foundery-man, and he used to work at our shop, with me, since he came from sea.

Court. Q.How do you know it was the 26th of February? - A. The next morning I heard that he was taken.

SARAH GILBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. On Wednesday evening, the 26th of February, the prisoner came to our house with my husband, about ten o'clock.

Q. How long do you think he staid? - A. Upwards of half an hour.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did not he stay with you more than an hour? - A. I cannot say; he staid a good while.

Q. Had you no clock? - A. No.

Q. And you are so deaf you could not hear the watchman? - A. I did not that night.

Q. Have you been to Newgate since they have been in custody? - A. I have seen them, I saw them yesterday.

Q. Had you any conversation with them about Wednesday? - A. No.

Q.Was not the robbery a part of your conversation? - A. A few words.

Q. Was it not relative to Wednesday the 26th of February? - A. No.

Q. Your husband has sworn that he left your house about half after ten o'clock? - A. I told you he was there half an hour, or better.

Q. Where is your house? - A. In Anchor and Hope-alley, Old Gravel-lane.

Q. That is near Ratcliff-highway? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know know Dr. Morgan's house? - No.

Q. How soon could you get into Ratcliff-highway? - A.Some people walk faster than others; it might be a quarter of an hour, or some might take more.

Q. How long have you known Ennis? - A. Sixteen or seventeen years.

Q. What way of life has he been in? - A. He has worked in the foundery since he came from sea.

Q. Any thing else? - A. Yes, he belonged to the gang.

Q. Did he ever live pretty near where you are now - do you ever remember him living in that place behind the prisoner? - A. Not before this time.

Smith. Cook, the officer, was endeavouring to persuade the captain to swear we were the men; the captain was so drunk he could not stand.

Cook. It was no such thing, he was not the least disguised in liquor from the first moment to the least.

Mr. Beville. (To the Prosecutor.) Q.How long was it before you went to the door that you were hustled? - A. I was hustled after I had got to the door; I could not have sworn to them if it had not been for the candle at the door.

Q. You said you had seen these men before? - A. I had seen them in the street.

Q. Did you know their names before? - A. No; I knew that I had seen them in a press-gang.

All Three NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-40

283. WILLIAM DRACOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , two pair of cotton stockings, value 8s. the property of James Daykin .

JAMES DAYKIN sworn. - I am a serjeant in the Guards , the prisoner at the bar was quartered along with me at the Catherine-wheel, in Little St. James's-street : On the 25th of March, about seven o'clock, I got up, and left the prisoner in bed; and upon returning to my quarters, about ten in the evening, I learned that the prisoner was in St. James's watch-house; I went into my bed-room, and found my knapsack open, and two pair of cotton stockings missing out of it; I had seen them that morning before I went out, I had taken a clean shirt out to put on the next morning I went to the prisoner in the watch-house, and challenged him with stealing the stockings, and he confessed it.

Q. Did you tell him he had better confess? - A. No, I did not; he said he was drunk, and had taken them out of my knapsack, and given them to one Franklin to pledge for him, and that he had pawned them for three shillings; upon that, I went down to Franklin's, who is a soldier in the same company, and he gave me the duplicate; he is not here, he is sick in the hospital; and on Friday the 28th, at Marlborough-street, the officer went down to the pawnbroker's, and he produced the stockings, they were produced at the Public-office; the pawnbroker has them.

- EDWARDS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Brown, No. 2, Panton-street: On the 25th of March, a person of the name of Franklin, came to me with two pair of stockings to pledge; I did not know him before, he was dressed in soldier's clothes, he asked four shillings upon them. (Produces the stockings).

Daykin. These stockings are my property, the two first letters of my name are wove in them; they were made for me in Derbyshire.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor when I took them.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t18000402-41

284. JOSEPH CHADWICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , an earthen jar, value 1d. one hundred and twenty-five penny-pieces, and nine halfpence , the property of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL sworn. - I keep the assembly-house at Kentish-town : On the 28th of February, in the evening, the prisoner came in, with another person, and asked for a pint of ale, and asked what time the stage went to London; I told him about seven o'clock, or a little after; he desired I would take care of two places, one for himself, and one for his friend; the coach came in a few minutes, and I sent the boy in to let them know; his friend gave the boy a shilling to take for the pint of ale, and a halfpennyworth of tobacco; the shilling was carried to the bar for change, my little girl was in the bar, they got on the stage, and in consequence of what my little girl told me, I ran and stopped the coach, it had got a very little way, the two men were upon the box with the coachman; I got up upon the box, and felt round the box, but

could not find the jar, and I returned home; after that, I followed the coach again to Tottenham-court-road; I missed the jar of penny-pieces, I had had it in my hand not two minutes before, there were ten shillings and five-pence in penny-pieces, and four-pence halfpenny in new halfpence; I came up with the coach in Tottenham-court-road, and stopped the coachman, he said, I am glad you are come, for here is your tobacco-box, he thought he had taken my tobacco-box, for he had heard it rattle; I then opened the prisoner's coat, and there was my jar and the copper, (produces it); I have no doubt but it is mine; the jar that I lost had such a mark as this, (pointing to a mark in the jar); and there was the same quantity of copper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.You had not counted it before it was taken away? - A. No, I had not.

Court. Q.Is it usual for publicans to keep their money in a jar? - A. No.

LEWIS WYBER sworn. - I drive the Kentish-town stage: On the 28th of February, the prisoner, and another man, got upon the coach-box to come to town, the prisoner sat between me and his companion; Mr. Hall holloaed out, and I stopped; he went away again, and afterwards overtook me in Tottenham-court-road; I heard something rattle, and I thought the prisoner had stolen Mr. Hall's tobacco-box; there was a hole in the road, and I drove into the hole, which threw us all off the box, I had nobody in the coach, and then I was confident he had got something with money in it; when Mr. Hall came up, he opened his coat, and took the jar from him.

The prisoner put in a written defence, which his Counsel thought it unnecessary to have read.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-42

285. WILLIAM BRIANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , five pounds of mutton, value 2s. 6d. the property of William Lane .

WILLIAM LANE sworn. - I am a butcher , I live in Well-street, Wellclose-square ; I have a latch to my half-door, I was in a room that looks into the shop: On Thursday the 20th of February, just as the candles were lit, I heard the bolt of the door go, and I looked through the window, and saw the prisoner go to the back part of the shop and take a shoulder of mutton, he took it with his left-hand, and put it under his right-arm, and walked out of the shop, I followed him immediately; about thirty yards up Well-street he turned round, saw me behind him, and dropped the shoulder of mutton, I was then about ten yards from him; I passed the shoulder of mutton and took hold of him; he did not run, he made a strong resistance, I had him down, and he begged I would let him get up, and he would go quietly; he walked a little farther with me, and then went upon his knees, and begged I would let him go; I told him I would not; we went as far as the sign of the Black Horse, in Well-street, I had hold of him all the time; when I got to the Black Horse, he insisted upon going in there, saying the man knew him; I went in, thinking I should get assistance there; when I got in, the landlord said, holloa, holloa, what is the matter; I told him the prisoner had robbed me of a shoulder of mutton; the landlord swore we were both thieves together, and made use of very horrible expressions, and if we did not get out he would kick us out; I left the man then, for I thought I should get ill used, and walked out at the fore-door; I staid there it might be four or five minutes, and then I went in again; the prisoner was not there then, and the landlord said he would punish me, and bring an action against me, for attempting to breed a riot in his house, and then I went to the Magistrate's; I saw nothing of the prisoner till the Monday following, when I saw him at the Police-office in Lambeth-street.

Q.Are you sure the prisoner is the same man that you carried into the Black Horse? - A. Yes, I had seen him several times; the shoulder of mutton was brought to the office.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street, Whitechapel: I took the prisoner into custody, in company with Griffiths, on Sunday the 23d of February, we took him out of bed in a lodging-house in Cable-street; Griffiths called him by his name, and asked him how he came to be guilty of such a mean action, as to steal a shoulder of mutton; he said he could not tell what possessed him to do it, it was not for want, for he had received some money but a few days before.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I was with Nowlan when I saw the prisoner, I knew him; I ordered him to get up, for we wanted him; I asked him how he could have such meanness as to steal a shoulder of mutton; I asked him if he did it from distress; he said, no, he did not, for he had received a sum of money a very short time before, and he had a good deal more to receive; he said, the prosecutor had followed him, took him by the collar, and took him into the Black Horse, and that, in consequence of a quarrel between the prosecutor and the landlord, he got out at the back part of the house into another street; I took him to the office, and the prosecutor swore he was the man; I have

known him some years, but I never knew any thing amiss of him before.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming up from the coast of Wapping, and the man laid hold of me; I knew nothing of it.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-43

286. JOHN OVERTON , alias LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , a sheet, value 3s. two blankets, value 12s. a cotton counterpane, value 12s. and an apron, value 6d. the property of William Carter .

WILLIAM CARTER sworn. - I am a working jeweller and goldsmith , No. 13, Exeter-court, in the Strand ; I lodge on the second floor; I sent my wife out, I was finishing my dinner; I sat a few minutes, I thought I heard a noise, and went out, but saw nobody; I returned back to my dinner, I sat a few minutes more, and thought I heard the noise of a lock fly back; I went gently across the room, and saw the back room door a-jar, I rushed in, when the prisoner at the bar stood before me, in the back room; I took hold of him, and called him a thief, his hand was as close as could be to the bundle of bed-linen that laid tied up at the feet of the bed; I held him as strong as I could, but he dragged me into the passage, where I holloaed for assistance, but being too strong for me, I was obliged to let him go; he drew a knife, but whether it was open or shut I cannot tell, till he put it towards me; I let him go, and he ran down; I called stop thief, he was stopped at the door; he left the bundle behind him, it contained a sheet, two blankets, and a cotton counterpane, and an apron he dropped upon the stairs; the clothes had been left upon the bed, the bed was unmade; I saw them all on the bed, not twenty minutes before; he was a total stranger to me.

JAMES HUNT sworn. - I lodge in the same house; I heard the alarm, I ran down stairs, and saw the prisoner attempting to get out at the door; I collared him, and brought him back to the stairs, till the constable came.

JANE SIMPSON sworn. - I lodge in the first floor, and my door being open, I heard a noise up stairs; I saw the prisoner run down stairs, and heard Mr. Carter call, stop thief, I ran down stairs and called stop thief, and I saw the prisoner lift up a knife at the landlady, I do not know whether it was drawn or not, I was very much alarmed; he lifted up his hand, and swore by G-d he would knock the landlady down, if she did not let him out.

JANE LAVENDER sworn. - On the 15th of last month, I heard a noise up stairs, and presently the prisoner ran down stairs; I was sweeping the passage, and had no means of stopping him, but by shutting the street-door; he held up his hand, and swore by G-d he would knock me down; Mr. Hunt then came up, and he was secured. (The property was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I came to town from Blackwall; I went to see my sister, I understood she was gone to live at this house; I went up to enquire for her, and this man laid hold of me; I know nothing about the property.

GUILTY . (Aged 57.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-44

287. THOMAS EASTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a box coat, value 10s. the property of Ann Wintringham .

THOMAS CAPPS sworn. - I am coachman to Lady Wintringham, she is a widow lady: I lost a box coat from the stables, in Hind's-mews, Mary-le-bonne-lane , on the 14th of last month; the stable door appeared to have been forced open; the prisoner was stopped by the watchman, and I saw the coat at the watch-house the next morning.

- HOLDER sworn. - I am a watchman; I was crying the hour of nine o'clock, and saw the prisoner standing by Hind's-mews, in Mary-le-bonne-lane; I went afterwards half an hour after nine, and found this stable door open; I immediately ran round to Macdonald, the next nearest watchman; I told him to stand at the corner of Mary-le-bonne-lane; says I, I will go to the other end of the Mews, which goes into James-street; I went there, and saw the prisoner coming along, about four yards from the door, which I had seen open, with a box coat upon his shoulder; I stopped him, and called to Macdonald, I told him I had got one of them, there were two others ran away; I told Macdonald to pursue after the other two; I sprung my rattle, and with that he made a snatch at my rattle, then he struck me across the nose, and stunned me; I got up again and holloaed out stop thief; he had got about one hundred yards from me; when he got into Mary-le-bonne-lane, another watchman knocked him down, and I came up and collared him on the ground, he was just getting up from the ground, then I secured him,(produces the coat); it was picked up by a person who is not here, and brought to the watch-house; I know it to be the same coat by the livery, it is a blue coat, with white capes.

- MACDONALD sworn. - I was watching at one end of the Mews; I observed the prisoner at the bar with a coat upon his shoulder; I stopped one of them, and the Magistrate committed him as a rogue and vagrant.

Capps. This is my mistress's property.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Paddington, through the Mews, when the watchman stopped me; I know nothing at all about the coat.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-45

288. FRANCIS WRANGHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , three pounds and a quarter of base metal, plated with silver, value 9s. 6d. and half a pound of base metal, value 6d. the property of John Troby .

JOHN TROBY sworn. - I am a manufacturer of silver and plated articles ; I live in the Old Bailey : I have very frequently missed articles out of my shop; the prisoner was a journeyman of mine; I made a complaint to my journeyman and my apprentices, desiring them to do their utmost endeavours to discover the thief; and on Thursday, the 13th of March, one of my men, James Hoole, came down into the accompting-house, and gave me some information, in consequence of which I followed the prisoner out of my house, and brought him back; I sent for an officer and he searched him in the presence of me and of two of my men, and took from him a piece of base metal plated with silver, that we call clippings; and a piece of a canister-top was found in his lodgings; the clippings were in a kind of woman's pocket, so contrived as to be sewed inside his breeches; the constable has got it.

JAMES HOOLE sworn. - On the the evening of the 13th of March I was desired by one of the workmen in the shop to observe the prisoner, for he was secreting some metal about him; and I observed him put something as I thought into his waistcoat-pocket; I was at one end of the shop, and he at the other; I went nearer to him; I observed then that it was not into his waistcoat-pocket that he was putting the metal; I went down and informed my master of it, and when the prisoner went out of the shop from work, between seven and eight in the evening, my master followed him; he brought him back, and sent for a constable; the officer searched him in the presence of me and another man, and out of a pocket which was fastened to the inside of his waistcoat, there was some plated metal concealed; that pocket was concealed inside his breeches; I afterwards went with the officer to his house; I had been there before with him; and between the bed and the sacking we found a part of a canister-cover.

Q. What is meant by the half-pound of base metal in the indictment? - A. There were some pieces of metal that were not plated found in the pocket; I can swear to its being my master's property; there is one article found in the pocket which I can swear to having made myself.

CHARLES ROWE sworn. - I am a journeyman plater and silversmith: On the 13th of March I observed the prisoner at one end of the shop, secreting the base metal; when he went out I was called down, and I saw him searched, and the property taken from a pocket that was sewed to the inside of his waistcoat; I did not go to his lodgings; I can swear to the property being my master's.(The constable produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor and Hoole.)

The prisoner, in his defence, stated, that he had come from Sheffield at the age of forty-three, articled himself to Mr. Troby for seven years, that he had used him very ill, and had sent him to Bridewell for staying away from his work one day, to assist his afflicted wife and four children; and that he was driven by distress to commit this offence.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY (Aged 47.)

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-46

289. WILLIAM HOWARD , alias MASON , JOHN TAYLOR and JOHN DALY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a trunk, value 10s. a pair of boots, value 10s. a pair of shoes, value 6d. a pair of slippers, value 6d. two great coats, value 1l. a pair of clasps, value 6d. a boot-jack, value 2d. a shaving-pot, value 1d. a shaving-stand, value 1d. a shaving-box, value 2d. two canisters, value 4d. thirty-nine books, value 4l. a map, value 6d. and a bed-gown, value 2s. the property of Edward Moberly .

JOHN MOBERLY sworn. - I can only prove the property.

WILLIAM BARWELL sworn. - I am a firkinman; I buy table-beer and ale to sell again: I went to New Basinghall-street with some trunks from Mr. Moberley's, No. 12, Percy-street, Rathbone-place; there were two trunks, an empty portmantua, and some writing-desks; I took them on a dray, on Tuesday the 11th of March, about seven in the evening; I was going past the Old Bell in Holborn, and a man told me he would give me sixpence to take two prickles of bottles down

Chick-lane for him; that was a man of the name of Anstey; I took the bottles; then two other men came up, one of them got up in the dray, and another followed; I think the man that followed was the prisoner Howard; they said they would give me a pot of beer extraordinary to take up a bed; Anstey went alongside the dray; I do not know whether the man in the dray was either of the other prisoners; and as we were going up Snow-hill I missed the trunk, and then I stopped; the man that rode was gone, and the man that walked behind; Anstey kept on; as soon as I missed the trunk, I went back as far as Fleet-market, but could see nothing of them; I then returned to the dray, and detained Anstey; I thought he was concerned; I met with two constables just in Smithfield, and they went after the three prisoners, and took them; they told me to go on to Basinghall-street, which I did; they lodged the prisoners in the watch-house, with the trunk; the trunk contained the articles mentioned in the indictment; Mr. Moberly delivered the trunk to me; Mr. Moberly saw the trunk again at Guildhall; I lost the trunk about the middle of Snow-hill; I saw it twice after I left Fleet-market; I saw it again the next day at Guildhall; I am certain it was the same trunk; it was a smooth black trunk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.What is a firkinman? - A. I buy table-beer to sell again.

Q. You sell stale beer for good beer? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Who is Mr. Moberly, the prosecutor of this indictment? - A. A gentleman that is in Scotland, I believe.

Q. He has got all his property with him in Scotland, has he not? - A. No; the trunk is here.

Q. Could you have undertaken to say who that trunk belonged to, if you had not been told so at Guildhall? - A. Yes, I have seen the trunk several times before; I had lived servant with the family.

Q. A smooth black trunk is no uncommon description, there are many such about town? - A. To be sure there are.

Q. Had you seen Mr. Moberly pack up the trunk? - A. No.

Q. Then how came you to suppose they were his property? - A. I know the trunk was his.

Q.Supposing you had seen the trunk at any other part of the town, would you have said it was Mr. Moberley's? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Had you ever seen the contents of the trunk till you got to Guildhall? - A. No.

Q. You would have been answerable, would you not, for the trunk and its contents, if you had not found it, and brought this prosecution? - A. Yes.

GEORGE ANSTEY sworn. - I am a broker: On Tuesday the 11th of March last, about half past seven in the evening, I was standing at the Old Bell in Holborn, with some goods which I had bought at a sale; they consisted of two prickles of empty bottles, and a bed; I wanted the bottles taken to a bottle-merchant in Chick-lane; had been there but a few minutes when I saw a dray come past with a trunk and a box or two, and a boy riding upon one of the boxes; I called to the boy once or twice before he answered; at last he answered, and called his master; his master came up, and I told him I had some things to take to Chick-lane; the prisoner Howard was present, to the best of my knowledge; I told the man I would give him sixpence to take the bottles; the carman hesitated, and there were two men standing at my right hand; one of them said, you will take them, won't you, Tom; who he addressed I do not know; he then said to me, I will lend you a hand up with them, master; we then went to the bottles, which were standing upon the pavement, under the Belltap window, put them upon his back, and he put them on to the dray; that was Howard; but it being a dray, we had some difficulty to make them stand upright; he said, master, you had better jump up; I did not like to do that, for I had a bed lying there, and it being dark I thought I might lose it; he then said to his companion, which was Taylor, to the best of my knowledge, Jack, do you jump up; Taylor then jumped up into the cart, and held the prickle of bottles, while Howard and I fetched the other prickle; the last prickle was not like the other, it leaned forward and I expected the bottles would fall out, and I put the bed up to prevent it; Jack, as he called him, which was Taylor, got up in the cart, and Howard followed behind, and I kept along by the cart; as we were going down Holborn, the prisoner Howard asked me what part of Chick-lane the bottles were going to; I told him to Mr. Riber's bottle-warehouse; he said he knew it very well, and described it; as we were going up Snow-hill one of the empty bottles sell out of the prickle upon the stones; the prisoner Howard came forward to me, and said, master, you will lose all your bottles; with that I put my hand to the bed, and pressed it; immediately after that the drayman said, I have lost the trunk; I looked round, and the two men were both gone; I was then detained till I gave a satisfactory account where I bought my goods, and where I was going to take them; I know nothing of the prisoner Daly; I verily believe that Howard and Taylor are the two men, to the best of my knowledge.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.You and Howard have been old acquaintances? - A. No, I never

saw him before; I thought he belonged to the drayman, and the drayman thought he belonged to me.

Q. How was Howard dressed? - A. He had a jacket on.

Q. Do not you know that the man now called Hayward was taken within half an hour? - A. I believe he was.

Q. That man was dressed in a jacket? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that the man you called Howard, when he was taken, was dressed in a great coat? - A. He was.

Q. You say you had never seen him before? - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. What way of life are you in? - A. A broker; I had been buying goods at a sale of Mr. Winstanley's.

Q. What part of the town did you live in? - A. Pentonville; I bought these things at a sale in Wimpole-street.

Q. There was a charge against you for this business? - A. Yes; the man had a right to charge me, seeing them so familiar with me.

Q. And you did not attempt to charge Howard till after you were charged yourself? - A. No.

Q. At the time you saw him at the Magistrate's, did you venture to swear he was the man? - A. I said, as I say now, that I verily believe he was the man, but he was then in a different dress to what he was when he assisted me.

JOHN POPE sworn. - I am a constable under the Marshal's direction: On the 11th of March, between seven and eight in the evening, I was coming from my own house, in Robinhood-court, Shoe-lane, through Eagle and Child-alley, and I was obliged to come back, by a person coming through the narrow part of the passage, into Shoe-lane, and then I observed four or five men coming with a box; they crossed the way, and turned to the right-hand, towards Holborn; I then went on towards Smithfield, and in Smithfield I met with a parcel of people round a dray; I was told that a box was lost; I asked what sort of a one, I was told it was a large black trunk; we went back into Shoe-lane, and got intelligence of it; we found it in Plumbtree-court, Shoe-lane, No. 20, up two pair of stairs; Mr. Thrale opened the door, and saw the box, and the three prisoners in the room; Mr. Thrale said, gentlemen, we are come for this box; they desired us to come in, they behaved very quietly, and made no resistance; we sent the box away by a porter to Mr. Thrale's house, and we took the prisoners to the Compter.

Q. Is the porter here? - A. No.

Q. Did you mark the box before you sent it to Thrale's? - A. No, no further than putting a cord round it; I can almost swear it was the same box.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.They came very willingly with you? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean to swear to this black box by the tying of it? - A. I think it is the same box.

Q. Had not Howard a great-coat on when he was taken? - A. Yes, exactly as he is dressed now.

Q. And that was within twenty minutes after the offence was committed? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM THRALE sworn. - I am constable and beadle of the parish of St. Sepulchre's; on Tuesday the 11th of March, I was upon evening duty with the patrole; going down Snow-hill, there was a dray stopped, with a number of people about it, I enquired what was the matter; I then went in pursuit of the trunk, with Dennis; we went a little way down Snow-hill, and detained the man that was with the bottles; we then got intelligence, and went to Plumb-tree-court, Shoe-lane, No. 20; we went up two pair of stairs, there were the three prisoners in the room; Dennis had a cutlass drawn, we went in, and the men made no resistance at all; there was the trunk in the room; I sent the trunk to Mr. Ashmore's, the Ward-beadle, by Mr. Ashmore's porter; I did not see him take it there; I went with the prisoners to the Compter, then I went back to Mr. Ashmore's, and took the trunk into my custody, and have had it ever since.

Q. Did you know the trunk again? - A. Yes; I did not put any mark upon it, but when I found the trunk at the house, I opened it, and saw some of the contents, so that I am pretty sure it was the same; it was a black trunk with small nails, the top of the hasp was burst from the lid; I have had it ever since, except Dennis bringing it here backwards and forwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.How do you know that the contents of the trunk were the same? - A. I can swear to it, because there was a particular mark; there was a square book in the trunk, with two green strings to it, and that book was in it when I saw it at Mr. Ashmore's; I could not swear to the trunk; I suppose those that made it, could not swear to it.

JOHN DENNIS sworn. - I was present with the last witness, at Plumb-tree-court, Shoe-lane; the three prisoners were in the room, with the trunk; we sent the trunk to Mr. Ashmore's, by the porter; and I went with it, and helped the porter down with it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.The house you took them in was a common lodging-house? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. They behaved very well, did they not? - A. Yes, they did. (The trunk produced, and part of the articles deposed to by Mr. Moberley, brother to the prosecutor.)

Howard's defence. They were pressed several

times before the Magistrate to swear to me, and they would not, because, they said, I had changed my cloaths; I met with Daly, and he promised to give me a bit of paint to paint my box, and I went up into the room with him, and the trunk was in the room when we went up, and these gentlemen came in and took us away; I knew nothing of it.

Taylor's defence. Howard and I went into the market to buy something for supper, and met with this young man, and Howard asked him to give him a bit of paint to paint his box, and he said he would, if he would go home with him, and I went with them; I should not know the house again, if I was to see it.

Daly's defence. I met with these two young men in Fleet-market, and Howard asked me for a bit of paint; I went into the room, and saw the trunk there; I was going out of the room to enquire how it came there, when these gentlemen came in and seized us.

The prisoner Howard called one, Taylor one, and Daly three witnesses, who gave them a good character. Howard, GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Taylor, GUILTY. (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Daly, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-47

290. JOHN STAUNTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , a handkerchief, value 2s. the property of John Maberly , privily from his person .

JOHN MABERLEY sworn. - I live at No. 96, St. Martin's-lane: On Saturday last, I was going through Fleet-street , towards Temple-bar, about two o'clock, when a young man collared the prisoner at the bar, and charged him with picking my pocket, and immediately presenting a silk handkerchief to me, asked me if it was mine; I said yes, certainly; I knew itto be mine, I had my initials upon it, it was cut off the same piece with this, which I now have in my hand.

JAMES COOPER sworn. - I live at No. 29, Liquorpond-street; I saw Mr. Maberly going up Fleet-street, last Saturday, with a silk handkerchief half out of his pocket; the prisoner was close to his elbow at the time; I came close up with him; I saw the prisoner turning away from Mr. Maberley, I immediately collared him, he was between me and Mr. Maberley; he dropped the handkerchief upon the ground, which I immediately picked up, and called after Mr. Maberley; I picked up the handkerchief, and gave it either to Mr. Maberley, or the constable, I am not sure which it was, it was a blue handkerchief with white spots.

Maberley. I received it from Mr. Cooper, and gave it to the constable.( William March , the Ward beadle, produced the handkerchief, which was deposed to by Mr. Maberley.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of it, I never had the handkerchief.

GUILTY. (Aged 19.)

Of stealing, but not privately, from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-48

291. JOHN, otherwise GEORGE JONES , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , three pigs, value 10l. the property of David Lewis .

DAVID LEWIS sworn. - I am a nurseryman at Kingsland : On Friday morning, the 28th of March, I heard that my piggery had been broke open, and upon inquiry at the turnpikes, we learned that the pigs had been drove through Ball's-pond turnpike, towards Smithfield; I directed my man to go to Smithfield, where he found the pigs.

JOHN SAUNDERS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lewis: Last Friday week, I missed three pigs; I made inquiry, and found them at Smithfield, about half after ten o'clock, in the possession of Mr. Ingram, he is here; I took the pigs home to my master's house the same day; Mr. Lewis has had one of them about three years, another a year and a half, and the other about three quarters of a year; I have known them all that time, I used to seed them; I am sure they were the same; the middle one was half black and half white, the oldest black, with a white streak across the shoulder; the youngest pig was white, with two black spots in the forehead; I can swear positively to them; the prisoner worked upon my master's premises, in digging.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I am a City officer: On the 28th of this month, I was upon duty in Smithfield-market, I was called to take the prisoner into custody, he was sitting at the Belltap; I was charged with the prisoner, and three pigs; I delivered the pigs to the prosecutor by order of the Magistrates at Worship-street; the pigs were shewn to Saunders in the prisoner's presence; the prisoner said he was sorry for what he had done, it was all through a woman; John Read was with me.

JOHN READ sworn. - Mr. Ingram; the salesman, fetched Cartwright and me to take charge of the prisoner; I know no more of it than Cartwright.

MARK INGRAM sworn. - I am a salesman in Smithfield: I bought three pigs of the prisoner on Friday the 28th of March, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was to give him nine pounds for them, it was a fair market price; I did not know the prisoner before, and I did not ask him any questions about them; Saunders claimed them in about

ten minutes after I had bought them, and I called two officers, and gave charge of the prisoner and the pigs; there was one white one, and one black one, and the other half black; one of them was about two or three years old, another about three quarters of a year, and the other, as near as I can judge, about fourteen months; I am sure the prisoner is the man; he asked me fifteen pounds for them first, and agreed at last to take nine pounds; I did not pay him for them, I told him to go into the Bell, and I would pay him for them presently; and when the man claimed them, I took the officers in to the Bell to apprehend him.

THOMAS WILKINSON sworn. - I am a butcher: One of the pigs belonged to me, I had purchased it of Mr. Lewis, but it had not been delivered to me, I was to have had it the morning that they were stolen; I was informed they were in Smithfield, and I went to look at them; I knew the one that I had purchased immediately, which was the youngest of them, the white one.

Lewis. The pigs were brought home to me about five o'clock in the afternoon; I saw them at Smithfield before that; I knew them to be my pigs.

Prisoner's defence. Gentlemen, I must leave it to God, and your mercy, I have not a friend in the world; it was all through a woman.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-49

292. JOHN SPEAK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a trunk, value 5s. a bombasin gown and petticoat, value 7s. two table-cloths, value 2s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. a tinder-box, value 1d. and a penknife, value 2d. the property of Elizabeth Collier , widow .

ELIZABETH COLLIER sworn. - I am a widow, I live in Ratcliff-highway: On Saturday the 15th of February, I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment; about half past six o'clock in the evening, I sent my sister's apprentice with a trunk, from No. 110, in the Minories, I put the things in the trunk myself; about seven o'clock, he came to me, and told me he had lost the trunk, it is here; I saw it again on Monday the 24th, about ten o'clock in the morning, at Salt-petre-bank, in the possession of the prisoner; I sent for an officer; there was no particular mark upon the trunk, but I know the contents of the trunk.

WILLIAM JAMES WOOD sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mrs. Ford: I took a trunk of Mrs. Collier's from No. 110, in the Minories; I was to carry it to Ratcliff-highway, to Mr. Conty's; I had three other trunks on my knot, and this trunk in my hand; I met with Isaac Crosby , who is an apprentice at the bellows-maker's opposite to me, he carried the three trunks for me as far as the pitching-block in Ratcliff-highway , and there he put them down, and I put this one down upon the block along-side the other, while we drank a pint of beer; he fetched the beer out, and when we had drank the beer I missed the trunk; Crosby is not here, I know him very well; then I took the other three trunks to Mr. Conty's; I saw the trunk again the Monday week following, at Lambeth-street, I knew it again by the scutcheon, it is like a clock-case; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN DUNEAR sworn. - I am beadle of St. George's, Middlesex: On Monday the 24th of February, I was sent for by Mr. Conty, to go with his housekeeper to a house where he understood this property was; I went to a house at Saltpetre-bank, where I found the prisoner; I told him I was come to look for the trunk, and some other property; he said he had no trunk, nor any property of anybody's but his own; I went to look about the place, and there was a tinder-box upon the mantle-piece which the prosecutrix claimed, and then the trunk was brought out from under the bed.

JANE ENGLISH sworn. - I am a lodger of the prisoner's; I was there when he brought in this box on the Sunday morning, between ten and eleven o'clock; there was a pocket-book, and a good many papers, in the trunk, and a tinder-box, five counterfeit guineas, and a penknife.

Prisoner. Q. Were these bad guineas scattered about, or did they lie altogether? - A. They were scattered about.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see any gown in the trunk? - A. No; I saw no wearables at all in the trunk.

Mrs. Collier. I found nothing in the trunk belonging to me; the tinder-box is mine, and the penknife.

Prisoner's defence. The property is not her's.

GUILTY (Aged 35.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-50

293. THOMAS-DANIEL CRUMP was indicted for forging and counterfeiting, on the 5th of March , a sixteenth share of a lottery-ticket, numbered 9390, with intention to defraud Peter Richardson , Elizabeth Goodluck , and George Arnull .

Second Count. For uttering the same knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third Count. For that he, having in his possession a sixteenth share of a lottery-ticket, numbered 9390

feloniously did alter the o in the number 9390 into a 2, by which it appeared to be numbered 9392, with the like intention.

Fourth Count. For uttering the same knowing it to be so altered, with the like intention.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Gurney, and the case by Mr. Const.)

JAMES GODDARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am clerk to Peter Richardson, Elizabeth Goodluck, and George Arnull , lottery-office-keepers and stock-brokers, at Charing-cross, and Cornhill: On the 5th of March last, the prisoner came to the office at Charing-cross, to demand the sixteenth part of a one thousand pound prize, (produces it); it is now exactly in the same state in which he brought it; he presented it to the numerical book to be examined, I heard another clerk inform him that the figure had been altered; I examined the share to see whether it was drawn or undrawn, I told him that the figure o had been altered to a 2; he said it was in the same state as when he purchased it, he insisted upon its being a 2, and that it had been drawn a one thousand pound prize; by that time Mr. Richardson came into the office, and we gave him that share; Mr. Richardson desired him to walk into the back office, which he did, and I also accompanied him; Mr. Richardson informed him, that what he had uttered was of very serious consequence, and, if he persisted in it, it might affect his life; Mr. Richardson then asked him who he was, and who he lived with; he said he lived with a Mr. Moore, a tin-plate worker, and had been intrusted with a great deal of property, and could have a very good character; Mr. Richardson informed him that the figure had been altered, by whom he could not pretend to say, but if he would bring Mr. Moore with him, and some of the other members, for it belonged to a club, he would convince him of his error, by having such books from the City-office, that would convince him the original figure was an o, and that we did not share that ticket that it purported to belong to; he still persisted, and Mr. Richardson informed him, after what he said, that if he persisted in demanding the payment of it, that he must take him to Bow-street; he demanded payment of it, and of course he was taken there.

Q. I observe there is a bar above and under the o, which you suppose it originally was, are those bars above and under any thing but an o? - A. No, they are not; they are put to prevent its being altered to a 6 or a 9.

Q. Are they fixed in such a manner as an o can possibly be made to resemble a 2, as you make it? - A.Certainly not.

Q. Look at these; are these original tickets before the lottery began? - A. The two first are original tickets from the Stamp-office, they have been shared.

Q. Is the figure 2 ever made with a strait bar? - A. It is not.

Q.Now, in this which has been produced, the bottom of these two bars which is now made to be the bottom of the 2, is below the centre bar? - A. Yes.

Q.Is that ever the case in the genuine figures of 2? - A. It is always placed upon the line of the centre bar.

Court. Q. Is not the 2, both at the top and the bottom, made in the same line with the other figures of that number? - A. Yes; the figures in our shares may not be made so well as in the original ticket, but they are all made in one way.

Q. I observe the ink with which your figures are written is of a particular colour? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the object of that particularity? - A. To prevent the figures being altered or taken out.

Q. Is the connecting stroke of this o, and the lower bar, made with that ink, or a different ink? - A. With a different ink.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q.You are perfectly conversant with tickets, and all the different forms in which they are made? - A. Yes.

Q. This ticket being presented, it was impossible to impose upon you? - A.Certainly.

Q.What is the custom of the office when the shares are exposed? - A. They are never exposed but at the time of felling them.

Q. How many clerks might there be in the office at that time? - A.Three.

Q. Men or boys? - A.Men; there are two lads, but not in the share department.

Q. Is it not in their power to get at them? - A. No.

Q. Are there not pens and ink about the counter? - A. Yes, of course.

Q. Do your customers never come and use pens and ink? - A. Not upon the shares.

Q. The prisoner came to your shop with great confidence? - A.Apparently with confidence.

Q. He was immediately apprised it was a forgery? - A. Yes.

Q.He still persisted it was in the state in which he bought it? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Richardson advised him not to persist, but to go about his business? - A. Yes.

Q. And told him, if he persisted it might affect his life? - A. Yes.

Q.And, notwithstanding all this admonition, he did persist? - A. He did; Mr. Richardson refused to return him the share, or else I believe he would have gone.

Q. Do you know any thing about the registry

of these numbers that he had bought? - A. Yes, they were registered; we have a copy of the register. (Produces it.)

Q. Do you know when the registry was made? - A. I believe the 1st of February.

Q. A month before the drawing? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the share registered by you correspondent to this register, 9392? - A. Yes.

Q. And made a month before, at your office? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. When any body purchased that share was it registered as 9390, or 9392? - A. It was registered as 9392.

Q. Was it so registered when it was purchased? - A. I cannot say.

Q.When was it so registered? - A. The 1st of February.

Q. Was that the day it was purchased? - A. I cannot say; it might have been bought three weeks before, or it might have been that day.

Q. Is it not then the practice to register the share at the time they buy it? - A. In general it is the practice; but it is very often registered after it is bought.

Q.What is the purpose of registering? - A. To send an account when it is drawn, whether it is a blank or prize.

Q.Then a person may register a share that is not bought at your office? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the register you are now speaking of, 9392, registered as a share or a ticket? - A.As a sixteenth.

Mr. Fielding. Q.Have you inspected your book so as to know whether this ticket was not registered at the very time it was bought? - A. I cannot say.

Q.Have not you an opportunity to know from your books the day of the month when this was registered at your office? - A. Yes; but we cannot pretend to say the day of the month that it was sold.

Q. The 1st of February was above a month before the drawing of the lottery? - A. Yes.

Q.When were you first desired to look at your register of this ticket? - A. Before the prisoner came, we found that it had been registered wrong, knowing that we did not share the ticket.

Q. Upon finding that you had a wrong register, did you conclude that some mistake had happened in your shop? - A. No; we concluded that he called the o as a 2.

Q.When did you discover you had registered the wrong number? - A. Immediately upon the ticket being drawn.

Q.Upon the ticket being drawn, and your referring to your register, you would suppose of course that your office was liable to pay the one thousand pounds? - A. No; we did not share the ticket.

Q. Did you communicate this mistake to Mr. Richardson? - A. Yes.

Q.Upon the ticket being drawn, you say you found you had the register of 9392, but that you had not sold that ticket? - A.Just so.

Q. Did Mr. Richardson say any thing with respect to that? - A. He said we had called it wrong, or the prisoner had; or we had copied it wrong; Mr. Richardson sent to Mr. Arnull, and Mr. Arnull said it was a mistake; it was 9390 that we sold; people very often call a 2 for an o in registering, though they are not at all alike.

Q. This number was drawn on the 3d of March? - A. Yes.

Q.Did you tell this young man that you had discovered the mistake? - A. He was told it was a mistake.

Q. Had you any share registered from the party who registered this list of numbers, of 9390? - A. None at all; I can very easily account for the register being wrong; the prisoner mentioned at Bow-street -

Q. Was it taken down in writing? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you must not tell us what he mentioned. - When he came to the office, and Mr. Richardson saw him, did he communicate to him that you had discovered the mistake in the register, about that very ticket? - A. No, not a word.

Q. It was a month before the drawing of the lottery that this was registered? - A. It was.

Mr. Gurney. Q.Does the registering-clerk copy the ticket, or does the person holding the ticket tell him the number? - A. Sometimes one way, and sometimes the other.

Q. Is it possible the registering-clerk could take this for a 2, if he saw it himself? - A.Impossible.

RICHARD BANNISTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am clerk to Richardson, Goodluck, and Co.

Q.Did you share No. 9390? - A. Yes, I did; I wrote the shares.

Q. Have you the original ticket from which you wrote them? - A. I have; (produces it;) I brought it from the Stamp-office; here is the Stamp-office receipt of its being deposited for the purpose of sharing. (Producing it.)

Q. You wrote that very share? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it now in the state in which you wrote it? - A. No, it is not.

Q. In what does it differ? - A. It is altered by a line being drawn from the o, to the lower bar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. That ticket could not be imposed upon you for 92? - A. No.

Q. How was this ticket divided? - A. Into sixteen sixteenths.

GEORGE ARNULL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What is the firm of your house? - A. Peter Richardson, Elizabeth Goodluck, and George Arnull.

Q. Look at that share; is the signature to that share your writing? - A. It is.

Q. Is that in the same state in which it was when you signed it? - A. I signed it previous to its being numbered.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q.You signed this as being responsible for a sixteenth share of whatever number may be introduced by your clerk? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted any person in the office puts in the number? - A. By the person whose business it is to do it; this was done by Mr. Bannister; sometimes I do it myself: Mr. Bannister principally; but it is done by different persons in the office.

Q.Were you present when this young man came to demand the payment? - A. I was not.

THOMAS COXHEAD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a clerk in the Stamp-office, in the department of receiving tickets that are to be shared, and give them stamps back in return; we retain the original ticket; we keep the ticket three clear days after it is drawn, and then they have a right to demand it back.

Q. Do you do any thing to the shares to authenticate them before you deliver them? - A. Yes, they are stamped.

Q. Was this very ticket, 9390, shared? - A. Yes, into sixteenths; which sixteenths we stamped.

Q. Is this one of those that you so stamped? - A. I would not take upon me to swear that this did not pass through in the state that it now is; it was stamped, no doubt, by the stamper in our office.

Q. Do you happen to know whether 9392 was shared? - A. Yes, by Mr. Hornsby; and divided into two quarters, two eights, and four sixteenths, on the very same day that the other was divided by Mr. Richardson, the 29th of January.

WILLIAM NORMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a clerk in the Stamp-office; it is my business to enter the original ticket, with the number of shares into which it is divided, the day on which it is divided, and the name of the office-keeper by whom it is divided.

Q. Are they entered to see that no more shares than they purport to be, are passed? - A. They are.

Q. Look at that share; should you have passed that for 9392? - A. By no means, on account of the difference there is between this 2 and the 2's which are in general made.

Mr. Fielding. Q. You do not think it would pass upon you or any lottery-office keeper? - A. Certainly not, because there is no figure that has a bar to it but the o.

Q. HENRY FROST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding I am a registering-clerk in Richardson's office.

Q.Have you your book here? - A. No.(It was admitted on both sides that there was a register made by the prisoner on the 1st of February.)

Q. Do you happen to know who gave you the numbers so registered? - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether it was from the shares themselves, or from any other paper? - A. I cannot say.

Court. Q. Did you make the registry? - A. I did.

Mr. Const. Q.Look at that share; had that been put before you to be registered, should you have registered it? - A. I should have seen it had been altered.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You have now been told there is a mistake in it, or an alteration? - A. Yes.

Q. Did any body hint that there was an alteration till the ticket was drawn a prize of one thousand pounds? - A. No.

Q.Upon your oath, was not this a number registered by you as a number bought at your office, for which your office is responsible? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Is it not registered as a ticket bought at your office? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. As No. 9392, bought at your office, and which you were to pay if it became fortunate? - A. Yes.

Q.Upon your oath, was it not registered at the very time it was bought? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You registered it yourself? - A. Yes, on the 1st of February.

Q. What day was that share bought? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Have you any doubt that it was bought the same day it was registered? - A. I cannot say.

Court. Q. It must have been bought before it was registered? - A.Certainly.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you mean to say you have any doubt that it was bought on the 1st of February? - A. I have no doubt, but I cannot say.

Q. Do you not enter in a book the day the different shares are sold? - A. No, not the shares.

Q.How many days after this was shared at the Stamp-officer, was it before it was sold? - A. I cannot say.

Q.(To Norman.) Can you say you passed the shares of 9390? - A. It was divided on the 29th of January; they were delivered to the office-keeper that day, from the entry in the book, I should imagine between one and two.

Q.(To Frost.) Did you register this singly, or with a number of others? - A.With a number of others, from the same person.

Q. I believe to the amount of ten? - A. I believe they were.

Q. When did the lottery begin drawing? - A. On the 3d of March.

Q.Were all the other numbers correct which you registered at the same time, except 9392? - A. I cannot say, I have not examined them.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner there at the time of the registry? - A. I cannot say.

Do you believe he was there at the time you registered them? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you not believe he was the man that registered these numbers with you, on the 1st of February? - A. Yes, I believe he was.

Q. Did he not give you his name and place of abode, to enable you to send him an account of what was the fate of that ticket? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You do not know that it is his real place of abode? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you any doubt that that was his real name and place of abode? - A. No, I have no reason to have any doubt; he said his name was Thomas Crump , at Mr. Moore's manufactory, Lambeth-road.

Q. You discovered the mistake of the ticket the very day it was drawn a one thousand pound prize? - A. Yes.

Q. That was the 3d of March? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you then send from your office an account that a wrong number had been registered? - A. No.

Q. Do you not undertake, and are you not paid to send, the earliest opportunity, an account to the owner, of the event of that share which he has registered? - A. Yes.

Q. You are paid sixpence every number for doing that? - A. Yes.

Q. What part of the day, on the 5th, did the prisoner come to claim his share? - A.After two o'clock.

Q. Did you, from the time that you discovered it was a prize till the time he came to claim it, send him any notice of it? - A. No, I did not; because I knew we had not shared that number.

Court. Q. I should be glad to know, for it wants a little explanation, when you found that this man had really registered this number, and then found that register a mistake, and knew where he lived; how came you not to inform him of it? - A.Knowing that he did not hold a share of that number.

Q.But you had taken the sixpence for registering that number, and therefore at the least you might have informed him it was a register of a forged share? - A. We did not know it was forged at that time.

PETER RICHARDSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. On the 5th of March, I saw the prisoner in our office; one of the clerks in the office came to acquaint me in the back office, that I was wanted in the fore office; in consequence of that, I went into the front office, the prisoner at that time was in an altercation with my clerk, seemingly warm; I therefore desired him to come into the back office, with Mr. Goddard; Mr. Goddard informed me, in the prisoner's presence, that he had brought a share of ours, the number of which had been altered; I received the share into my possession, and immediately discovered the alteration; I observed to the prisoner, that the had presented an instrument to me that would be attended with very serious consequences, if he came to demand payment for it, and desired that he would be very cautious in what answer he made me; he then told me that it was a sixteenth of a one thousand pound prize, and that he came for payment; I told him the number had been altered form 9390, to 9392, but that it had been altered in such a manner as could not impose upon us; I begged of him to bring his friend or any body that he thought proper, and it would be explained satisfactorily to them what the number of the share really was; he answered me, that he knew it to be 9392, as such he had bought it of us, it had not been altered since he bought it, that he had that number with others, printed on a card, and that he would not be hummed, or humbugged, that it was registered, that he had copied the numbers upon a piece of paper, and that he had so registered them; I told him, that in consequence of the o's having bars at top and bottom, they were very frequently read for 2's, that he must originally have made a mistake, but that mistake could transfer nothing to the real share; he persisted in the same over and over again, and I thought it proper to recommend it to him to wait till the next morning; but he observed, as I had threatened him with taking him to Bow-street, he certainly would go there, and I took him there.

Q.When you have registered tickets, you send notice to the persons so registering? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you not to give him notice? - A. There were very strong reasons to induce me to believe, that the prisoner or some other person had made a mistake in registering that number; I saw that number in the midst of nine others, all of which, excepting that number, were sold by us; I believe this was the strong circumstance which induced me to think that a mistake had arose in the registering; I therefore did prevent the letter from being sent to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You have told my Lord, that notwithstanding all your expostulations, and all your menaces, the poor fellow insisted upon it that he would not be harmed, and would go to Bow-street? - A. He did.

Q. Have you had an opportunity of seeing, by

your book, when that share was sold? - A. No; we have issued twenty-six or twenty-seven thousand sixteenths-alone, it is hardly possible to do it; whole tickets we do make a memorandum of.

Q. When the prisoner said it was so registered, did you refer to the register? - A. No; I knew before that it was a mistake.

Q. That register was made by your clerk; from what he made it you do not know? - A. No.

Q. That was made a month before? - A. Yes; it is impossible that the prisoner could have a design, previous to the lottery being drawn, nor could we.

Q. In fact, in that registery, there was no such number as the real number 9390? - A. No. (The share read. )

Prisoner's defence. The numbers were called over to that gentleman by another clerk in the same office, from the original numbers on the Saturday night.

For the Prisoner.

SAMUEL HARRISON Sworn . - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am in the tin line, I work for Mr. Moore, of Lambeth, the prisoner is a journeyman of Mr. Moore's; I went with him on Saturday evening, the 1st of February, to buy ten shares, at Mr. Richardson's office, which we did, they were registered as he bought them.

Q. Do you recollect how the clerk took the register? - A. He took the numbers from the clerk, who sold us the shares, he took them as we chose them, and called them over.

Court. Q.Of course, at that time of night it was candle light? - A. Yes; when we had chosen our numbers, they laid upon the counter till they were registered.

Q. Did the prisoner give a true description of himself where he lived? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Did you take any notice of those particular numbers? - A. Yes, that particular number I chose Myself.

Q. Did you take any particular notice about it? - A. I chose it because it was a nine thousand.

Q. Did you remark, whether it was written with one ink, or altered? - A. No, I did not take it up in my hand.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe there is no other nine thousand among them but this? - A. No.

Mr. Const. Q. Did Mr. Crump write the names on the paper before they were registered? - A.Not that I recollect; he wrote the casting up what they came to.

Q. Did he not take them down? - A. No; there was a card printed with the numbers, three weeks before the drawing.

Q. What was that card printed from? - A. A paper copied from the original tickets, (produces a card with the number 9392); I had this card three weeks before the drawing of the lottery.

MARY CRUMP Sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the sister of the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Do you remember his shewing, you any tickets? - A. Yes; on Saturday the 1st of February, after eight o'clock in the evening, at No. 2, Adelphi-terrace; he shewed me six sixteenths, and four eighths.

Q. Do you recollect the number of any particular share? - A. I can swear to the number 9392.

Q. Why do you remember that particular number? - A. I repeated them to my brother, and he took these numbers down as I repeated them, upon a piece of paper; after that I repeated them again-and they corresponded with the paper.

Q. Are you sure that one of those numbers was 9392? - A. Yes; after I had repeated them twice over, I particularly remarked that number to my brother, saying, Thomas, this is the date of the year that you and I came to London, 92.

Q. Did you come to London in the year 1792? - A. Yes, I did, and my brother likewise; the list that my brother took from the tickets, I gave to Edward Stinton, Mr. Cleland's butter, for him to get the list printed; he was one of the club.

Q. Do you know how many belonged to that club, to be entitled to the benefit of that share? - A. Twenty-nine people.

Q.How were they to be printed? - A.Upon cards, in order to be distributed to the different members for their satisfaction.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the sister of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. And you made an affidavit, in order to get him bailed? - A. Yes.

Q. This was an extremely important fact of the year ninety-two, being the year you came to London, how came that not to be in the affidavit? - A. I told Mr. Pincutt of it, if it is any neglect it is his.

Q. In point of fact, it was not in the affidavit? - A. I cannot say.

EDWARD STINTON Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am butler to Mr. Cleland, of the Adelphi-terrace, and have been so almost five years, the last witness is a fellow-servant of mine; I received that written list of numbers from her on the 2d of February, to get printed, and I took down the numbers as she called them over from her list; I gave them to a friend of mine, M. Glassington, to get it printed; the cards were delivered to me on the 10th of February. ( Produces some of the cards. )

THOMAS GLASSINGTON Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am publisher of the Morning Herald; I was applied to by the last witness, in the beginning of February, to get some-cards printed.

Q. Look at that card? - A. I have every reason to believe this is one of them; Mr. Brown, priner of the Morning Herald, printed them; I examined the card with the written list with him, and they corresponded exactly.

THOMAS MAYS Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am journeyman to Mr. Moore; I work at the next bench to the prisoner.

Q. Do you remember any shares of tickets that the prisoner had purchased? - A. I do; I took a list of them upon this piece of tin, from the shares themselves; (produces it;) I took them down on Monday morning, the 3d of February; when he brought the shares into the shop, he said it was very necessary that somebody should take down the numbers from the shares, for their own satisfaction, and I did it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Do you know when he bought them? - A. On the Saturday night before; I had not seen him till the Monday morning.

Q. Did any thing particular occur to you upon the shares? - A. No; after I had taken them down he wrote them upon a piece of board with chalk over the fire-place; and then we compared both what he had wrote, and what I had wrote upon the tin, with the original shares, and found they were correct; I was very particular about it.

Court. Q. Look at that share? - A. I can swear it is the same number; but I cannot swear it is the same sixteenth.

JOHN MOORE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. The prisoner has been with me near eight years; I enterained the highest opinion of him from the very first; I have trusted him upon all occasions; he has gone to my banker's repeatedly; and I have trusted him with my money concerns; he never committed a fraud in any way whatever, within my own knowledge; and when I heard of this, I said, I was sure he was innocent.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-51

294. JOHN-OSBORN DAWSON was indicted for that he, on the 15th of February , at St. Michael, Cornhill , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain Bill of Exchange, the tenor of which is as follows , that is to say:"£650. Bristol, 21st of Jan. 1800."

"Three months after date, please to pay to our own order, the sum of six hundred and fifty pounds, which place to account of M.D. as advised,""Thomas and Joseph Hellicar ."

"To Messrs. Parkinson, C. Reed, and Bell, London." (1260) With intention to defraud Richard Fuller , George Fuller , and John Vaughan .

Second Count. For uttering the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

There were several other Counts in the indictment, charging an intention to defraud John Parkinson , Charles Reed , and James Bell .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Corst.)

GEORGE FULLER, Esq. Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.What is the firm of your house? - A. George Fuller , Richard Fuller , and John Vaughan: On the 15th of February, about one o'clock, the prisoner came to our house; I did not know him before, I discounted two bills for him.

Q. Where did you see him first? - A.In the fore banking-office; my partner, Mr. Vaughan, had referred him to me, and at the same time gave me two bills.

Q.What were the amount of those two bills? - A. Six hundred and fifty pounds each, (Produces them); I have had them ever since, excepting when they were before the Magistrate, and the Grand Jury; when I received them, I desired the prisoner to endorse them, which he did in my presence; I then took possession of the bills, and gave him the money for both, deducting the discount.

Q. Do you remember how you paid him? - A. Yes; I gave him a one thousand pound note, two one hundred pound notes, a fifty pounds note, a thirty pound note, and seven pounds seventeen shillings and ten-pence in money.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Have you not recollected this from referring to your book? - A. The book is here, (produces it); I took the notes from Mr. Potts, who made the entry; I was present when the prisoner was apprehended the day following, Sunday the 16th, at a pastrycook's-shop, in Newgate-street; from that pastrycook's, he was taken to Mr. Burton's Finsbury-terrace.

Q. Did you hear from the prisoner where he lodged? - A. I heard him say, at the pastrycook's, that the notes were at his father-in-law's, in Finsbury-terrace; in consequence of which we went to Mr. Burton's; I went up stairs, and he desired them to be brought, and the notes were all brought down except the thousand pound note, and the thirty; there were others which I did not claim; the notes were delivered to Carpmeal.

Q.Have you seen them since? - A. Yes, I saw them at Bow-street.

Q. Were those notes part of the notes that you had paid to Mr. Dawson at the time you discounted the bills? - A. Yes; I asked him what had become of the thirty pound note -

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Had you not stated to him that he had better confess? - A. I believe, something of that sort might be said.

Mr. Knapp. Then we must not hear any thing of it.

Mr. Fuller. I received the notes at Bow-street, after the examination, they were delivered to me by Sir William Addington. (Produces them).

Q. Do you know any thing at all about the one thousand pound note? - A. Yes; at Finsbury-square I had a one thousand pound note delivered to me by Mr. Burton, the father-in-law of the prisoner.

Q. Was it the one thousand pound note that you had given to the prisoner at the time he produced the bills to discount? - A. It was.

Q. Was there any conversation respecting it, in the prefence of Mr. Dawson? - A. Yes; I asked for the one thousand pound note, and I was informed, by some person present in the room, that Mr. Burton had received that note, and was gone to look for it for me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Serjeant Best. Q.Which of your partners was it that you gave the six hundred and fifty pound bill to? - A. John Vaughan ; he is not here.

Q. When you delivered it to him, it was, of course, out of your possession? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Vaughan it was that originally gave you that six hundred and fifty pound bill? - A.It was.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether the bill was out of your custody or not, when it was returned; have you any doubt it was the same bill? - A. It is the same bill that I saw the prisoner put his endorsement upon.

JOSEPH HELLICAR Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. You have a release, I believe? - A. I have, (produces it); I live in Bristol, in partnership with my brother, Thomas Hellicar.

Q. Are you acquainted with Messrs. Parkinson, Reed, and Bell, in London? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at this bill; tell us if that is drawn by you or your brother, or any body authorized by you? - A. It is not drawn by me, and I verify believe it is not drawn by my brother, nor the endorsement.

Q. Is there any house at Bristol of which that can be the signature? - A.Certainly not; there are only two other gentlemen of the name in Bristol, my brother and my father, and my father is out of business.

JOHN PARKINSON , Esq. Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have a release? - A. I have.

Q. What are the names of your partners? - A.James Bell, and Charles Reed .

Q.Look at the acceptance upon that bill; does that appear to be done by you, or you partners, or any body authorised to accept for you? - A. It is not.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; he was formerly a clerk in our house, for two or three years; he left us in November last.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Are there no other persons interested in your house besides Charles Reed, James Bell, and yourself? - A.No other persons whatever. (The bill read).

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I was employed to apprehend the prisoner: I went with Mr. Fuller, about four o'clock on Sunday the 16th of February, to a pastrycook's-shop, of the name of Nicholl, I think, in Newgate-street; upon going into a back-parlour I found the gentleman at the bar, and a man with him; we put him into a coach, and took him to Mr. Burton's, at Finsbury-terrace, where he said he lived; I took him into the parlour where his mother, Mrs. Burton, was; I had been in the morning and searched the place, but could not find the notes; she said, that after I was gone, she had broke open a bureau, or a scrutoire, I don't know which, and took out these notes belonging to him; we waited till Mr. Burton came in, which was in about half an hour; there were several inquiries made of him where he had been, and he produced a one thousand pound note, and Mr. Fulier said it was not belonging to him; Mr. Burton said, he had received it in a note sent from the prisoner that morning, he said that in the prisoner's presence; he then produced another one thousand pound note, saying he had received it from the prisoner.

Mr. Serjeant Best. Q. Are you sure the prisoner was present at this time? - A. I have no doubt of it; that second one thousand pound note Mr. Fuller said was his; I said, very likely the other belonged to somebody else, and I should keep them both; I took possession of them, and of the notes that I received from Mrs. Burton, I kept them till we got to Bow-street.

Q. Look at this sealed parcel? - A. This is the parcel containing the notes, there are two of one thousand pound, two of one hundred pound, a fifty pound, two of twenty pound, and three of ten pound.

Mr. Fuller. The one thousand pound note, the two of one hundred, and the fifty, are part of the notes that I paid for the bills.

Prisoner's defence. There is one observation I wish to make: Carpmeal just now observed I was present at the time Mrs. Burton gave him up the notes; I was not present; for I never saw Mr. Burton from the time that he came into the house till I went out, for when these notes were given up, they were up stairs and I was below.

Court. (To Carpmeal.) Q. Was the prisoner present or not? - A. I believe he was.

Mr. Fuller. The notes delivered by Mrs. Burton, were delivered in the presence of the prisoner; the one thousand pound note delivered by Mr. Burton was delivered in his absence.

The prisoner called Mr. Whitfield, of Covent-

Garden Theatre, and Mr. Boulton, of Charing-cross, who deposed that his character had been perfectly honourable upon all occasions.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 23.) Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t18000402-52

295. THOMAS HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , a pocket-book, value 1s. and seven duplicates, value 3d. the property of William Illman , privily from his person .

WILLIAM ILLMAN Sworn. - I know nothing of the prisoner: I lost my pocket-book near Temple-bar , containing some loose papers of no value but to myself.

Q.Will you swear your pocket-book was worth a shilling? - A. Yes, it cost me more.

WILLIAM PEARSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 33, Norton-salgate: The prosecutor had pledged things with me, and he called upon me on the 25th of February, to stop the tickets, in case any body should offer them; Elizabeth Solomons brought me some of the tickets.

ELIZABETH SOLOMONS sworn. - I never saw the prisoner till the morning after he was apprehended; on the 25th of February last, I went to Mr. Pearson's, with a duplicate, to get the goods out of pledge; I had it of my father.

- SOLOMONS sworn. - The prisoner called upon me on the 25th of February, about nine o'clock in the morning; I never saw him before; and asked me if I would buy any duplicates of him; I told him, I never buy any dupicates, I must see the goods before I buy them; he must take them out first; he said he could not do that, because he wanted money; he left me the duplicates, and after he was gone a few minutes, he turned back and asked me how long it would be before he could have an answer what he could get for the goods, when I should redeem them; I told him he might call in the afternoon, I should send for the goods; I asked him if they were his own property, he said yes, they were; he came about four o'clock, and I told him my daughter was gone for them, and if he would come in again about seven, I would be there; my daughter came back, and said the duplicates had been stopped; the next morning the prisoner came about seven o'clock, and I detained him. (Produces four duplicates.)

Pearson. Here are three more duplicates that I stopped from Mr. Solomons's daughter. (Produces them.)

Miss Solomons. These are the duplicates I gave to Mr. Pearson; they are duplicates of things pledged with him by Mr. Illman.

Prosecutor. These are the duplicates that I lost; they were in a secret part of the pocket-book, sealed up.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up these duplicates, wrapped up in a piece of blue paper, in the Strand.

Prosecutor. It was a very large morocco pocket-book, as big as a bible; it contained papers of very great value to me, and two protested notes; the loss of them has been the ruin of me.

GUILTY. (Aged 49.)

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-53

296. SARAH BARTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a cotton gown, value 5s. and a cotton bed-gown, value 1s. the property of Henry Chalk .

LUCY CHALK sworn. - I am the wife of Henry Chalk , No. 18, Princes-street, Drury-lane : On Thursday, the 20th of March, I had washed and hung up in the yard to dry, a cotton gown and a cotton bed gown; about half past eight o'clock I heard a strange foot in the passage; I went out with a candle in my hand, and my child in my arms, and I saw a woman covering a gown and bed-gown over with her hands; she was just by the parlour-door, going out; I ran after her across the street; I called as loud as I could, stop her; she ran down Stanhope-street, and my apprentice went after her, and I returned home; she was brought back almost immediately; I am sure she was the same person; I had a candle in my hand.

THOMAS WALTERS Sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Chalk: I was at work in the shop on the 20th of March, in the evening; I saw my mistress get up in a hurry, with a candle in her hand; I saw a woman come out of the passage, and as soon as she got out she fell running; my mistress called out, stop her, stop her; I ran out, and she said, there she goes; she ran down Stanhope-street; I was close behind her, and she threw the things down; a lamp-lighter picked them up; I went on and laid hold of her, about five or six yards farther, and stopped her till my master came.

WILLIAM TUCKER sworn. - I heard the cry of stop her, and I stopped the prisoner; the last witness was after her at the time when I caught hold of her; she dropped the things, and I picked them up. (Produces them.)

Mrs. Chalk. These things are mine.

Prisoner's defence. I am very innocent of it.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t18000402-54

297. JAMES MACKENZIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , three shirts, value 42s. the property of Mary Younger , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MARY YOUNGER sworn. - I am a widow: I live in the gallery in the Bull-inn, Holborn ; there are stairs out of the yard that go up to it; I rent it of William Ladbrooke, and he lives in the inn; I take in washing: On Wednesday the 19th of February, about five o'clock in the evening, I hung some linen up in the first room in the gallery, an open lost; I missed three shirts about eight o'clock in the evening; two were marked with L, and the other D H, No. 7; I saw them hanging there after six o'clock.

SUSANNAH WEBSTER sworn. - I live in Fetter-lane; the prisoner was under-ostler at the Whitehorse: On Wednesday, the 19th of February, he brought three wet shirts to me about eight o'clock in the evening; he begged of me to dry them for him, for he had been having words with his washerwoman; two of them were marked with L, and the other D H, No. 7, marked with marking-thread; the next morning I sent a man to him to desire him to fetch them away, and he fetched them away the next morning at eight o'clock, before they were dry, for I was afraid of getting myself into some trouble; two of them were new, and the other had been worn.

Mrs. Younger. The shirts that I lost were two of them new, and the other had been worn.

Prisoner's defence. I bought them of a woman.

GUILTY. (Aged 35.) Of stealing goods, to the value of 39s.

(The prisoner was too ill to be brought up to receive sentence with the other prisoners .)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-55

298. GEORGE MARTIN and JUDITH DALY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , forty pounds weight of worsted yarn, value 3l. the property of William Crow .

WILLIAM CROW sworn. - Q. I am a carrier ; I live in the parish of Good Easter, in Essex; I carry goods from Good Easter to London, and back: I saw the worsted yarn in my cart on the 26th of January, after nine o'clock in the evening, at the Ipswich-arms, in Cullum-street ; the goods were my own property; I missed them at seven o'clock the next morning, the 27th; I applied to Mr. Galloway, that I had it from, and he and Armstrong found it; I saw it at the office in Worship-street, on Wednesday, the 8th of March; my wife can prove it to be my property; she packed it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was Galloway's property, you know? - A. No, it was not.

Q. You received it from Mr. Galloway, who were you to deliver it to? - A. To Mr. Galloway again, after it was spun.

ELIZABETH CROW sworn. - I am the wife of William Crow : I know the yarn to be my husband's property; there was about forty pounds weight of it; it was in the cart at nine o'clock at night, on the Wednesday evening; it was in a large bag; the bag was marked on one side with WOOL in large letters, and on the other side YARN; I did not see it again till the 8th of March.

Q. Was it in the same sack when you saw it at the office? - A. No.

Q.Whose property was it? - A. My husband's; if we lose it we are to pay for it; I am confident it is my yarn, because I can pick out every skain of yarn, and tell the person that spun every skain; there are some skains that are marked with speckled worsted.

Q. Did you find the same quantity of yarn? - A. I cannot tell, I have not told it up; but it looks like the same quantity.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where does Mr. Galloway live? - A. In the Borough.

Q. That is not in the city of London? - A. No.

Q.Where was this property found? - A. I cannot tell; Mr. Galloway can tell you that.

Q. Do not you know it was found in the County of Middlesex? - A. I do not know.

Q. Where was it you took it up? - A. At Good Easter, in Essex.

Q. Did you ever see it in the City of London? - A. Yes, I saw it at the Ipswich-arms yard, in the cart.

JAMES GALLOWAY sworn. - I was informed that Crow had lost his yarn; I made enquiry, and found it in Carter's-rents, George-street, Bethnalgreen.

Q. Is that in the City of London? - A. No; on the 28th of January, Macdaniel, a watchman at St. Luke's, brought a small sample of yarn for sale to a house in Carter's-rents, I think No. 9; I went with Macdaniel to the prisoner's house near Petticoat-lane, in order to buy the yarn; Macdaniel said to Martin, here is a gentleman will buy the yarn; I asked Martin if he had any more than the sample; he said, yes; I asked him if it was all coloured, and the woman said, no, there was some white; upon that Armstrong and Vickery entered the room; upon further searching the house, we found one skain of grey yarn.

Q. How much yarn did you see there? - A. Only one skain.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Macdaniel and Mrs. Davis have both been committed to gaol for this offence? - A. That I do not know any thing about.

Q.Where was this man committed from - the City of London? - A. No; Worship-street.

Q. That is in Middlesex? - A. Yes.

Q. Macdaniel and Davis were there as witnesses? - A. Yes.

Q.Do not you know they have been in prison ever since? - A. No.

Q. Do not you know that Macdaniel and Davis stood at the bar of Worship street, with the two prisoners, all accused of the same offence? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that they were admitted as witnesses, and sent to prison till the Sessions? - A. That I do not know.

WILLIAM MACDANIEL sworn. - I am a weaver: On Thursday, the 27th of February, Martin spoke to me at the Cross-keys in Wentworth-street; he asked me if I knew any body that used worsted; he had got about forty pounds to part with, and he gave me a sample to shew; I shewed the sample to two or three people, they did not want any thing of the kind, and I returned the sample back again; on Friday. the 28th, the next day, two men came to me at the Cross-keys, and Armstrong sent two men with me to Martin's house, to buy the worsted of him.

Q. What worsted did you find at Martin's house? - A. Only one little bit of worsted, that Armstrong found in a drawer; Armstrong took a sample out of my pocket at a house in Carter's-rents, where I went to shew it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were taken up for this yourself, were you not? - A. I was taken by Armstrong at the man's house where I went to shew the sample.

Q. You were taken for a theft? - A. Yes.

Q. You would have said it was me, you know, to have got rid of the charge yourself? - A. No, I told them it was Martin.

Q. You have been in prison ever since, have not you? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you expect to get at large upon the world again, when you have given your evidence? - A. I do not know what you mean by it.

Q. Do not you expect to get your liberty when this trial is over? - A. I do not know that any body told me so; I expect to get clear, for I never stole the worsted.

Q. Is Martin an old acquaintance of your's? - A. No. only from seeing him in a public-house.

Q. Do you mean to tell me, that Martin, at the public-house, told you he had got possession of this property? - A. He gave me the sample at the public-house. Q. Who saw him give it you? - A. Nobody.

SARAH DAVIS sworn. - My husband is a turner.

Mr. Alley. Q. The property was found in your husband's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there not a threat that your husband should be prosecuted as a receiver, unless you should appear as a witness against the prisoners? - A. My husband did not know the property was in the house.

Q. Was not your husband threatened to be prosecuted, unless you gave evidence against the prisoners? - A. No; Mrs. Martin brought a parcel to our house in a bag.

Q.Who do you mean by Mrs. Martin? - A. The woman at the bar; she went by that name; I never heard any other name for her; I did not know what the bag contained, nor I did not ask her; Mr. Armstrong took it away from our house.

Court. Q. When was it that this bag was left with you? - A.It was on a Friday, but what day I do not know; she told me it was her husband's work; that she had been to the warehouse to fetch it; she said she could not get in at home, and begged to leave it there while she went to her husband for the key.

Q. Where do you live? - A. I do not know whether it is King's-head-court or Queen's-head-court; it is in Spitalfields.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where do you live now; in the House of Correction, do not you? - A. Yes.

Q. You were charged yourself with having stolen this property? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Do not you know you were? - A. I know I was sent to prison.

Q. Were you not committed, upon the first examination, for stealing them; and did they not permit you, at the second examination, upon your saying who you had them from, to turn evidence? - A. Yes.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am one of the officers of Worship-street Office: On Friday the 28th of February I apprehended Macdaniel at a house in Carter's-rents, with this sample of worsted upon him, (produces it;) Galloway, and I, and Vickery, and another person, went to King's-head-court; then I sent Galloway and Macdaniel to Martin's room; after I had waited two or three minutes in Rose-lane, I met the prisoner Daly coming down stairs, I stopped her on the stairs, and took her in custody; I then took Martin in custody, and asked him if there was any worsted in that room, he said, he knew of none; I searched the table-drawer, and found this knot of worsted; I made further search, and in Mrs. Davis's apartment in the same house, I found this bag of wor

sted yarn, (producing it;) I then took Mrs. Davis to Martin's room, and took them all to the Magistrate's, they were all four committed, and a letter sent down to the prosecutor, and on the 8th of March, the prosecutor and his wife attended, and identified the goods; Macdaniel and the woman were sent to New-Prison as evidence, and the other two to Newgate.

JOHN VICKERY sworn. - I belong to the Police-Office, Worship-street; I went in search of some worsted yarn, to a house in Carter's rents; on Friday the 28th of February, Macdaniel came in there, and Armstrong stopped him, and out of his pocket he took some worsted yarn; he was asked where he got it, and he replied, he had it from a woman of the name of Martin, who lived in Rose-lane, Spitalfields; he went with us, and shewed us the house in a court, we went to Worship-street, and got another officer; then we went to Martin's house, Armstrong and the other officer entered the room some little time before me; when I went in, they had got Martin in custody, and out of a drawer in Martin's room, they took a skain of yarn; I then came down stairs and saw Mrs. Davis; Armstrong and I went to her apartment, and found a bag of yarn there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The drawer in which the skain of yarn was, was a common table-drawer not locked? - A. I do not know.

Armstrong. No, it was not locked. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Crow.)

Martin's defence What is laid to my charge, I know nothing at all about, I was at work in my room when the gentlemen came; I shoot worsted myself.

Daly's defence. I know nothing at all about it; I never left it in Davis's room, or ever saw it.

The prisoners called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Martin, GUILTY . (Aged 30.) Confined one year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Daly, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-56

299. JOHN MULVEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John-Johnson Evans , about the hour of nine, in the night of the 8th of March , and stealing a tooth-pick-case, value 2s. a silver tea-ladle, value 2s. 6d. seventy-one rings, value 20l. twelve pair of ear-rings, value 1l. 16s. and seven tooth-picks, value 12s. the property of the said John- Johnson Evans .

FRANCES EVANS sworn. - I am the wife of John-Johnson Evans, who keeps a house in Bishopsgate-street Within, in the parish of St. Ethelburga : On Saturday the 8th of March, about half past nine o'clock at night, I was sitting in the parlour behind the shop, and I heard the window break with a violent smash; I immediately went behind the counter up to the window, and saw a man's hand put into the broken window, and take out a number of rings; I was much terrified, and screamed out; I jumped over the counter to get to the door; I endeavoured to open the door, and found it fast; my sister, who was sitting in the parlour, was alarmed, and she came out; we pulled at the door till it gave way, and came open; I saw the man still at the window after I was over the counter, till I got out into the street, and then I saw no person near the door; I cried out that I was robbed, which brought out my neighbours; I heard the cry of stop thief, but did not go from where I was; after some people were gathered together, I saw some of the things thrown into the window again in a confused manner, upside down; seeing some of the most material things that I had seen taken out of the window by the hand, put back again, which was four cards of rings, I went into the shop behind the counter to take care of them.

Q. Are you sure they were taken out? - A. Yes; they were completely taken out by both hands, before I got over the counter; there were a number of smaller articles that were gone altogether, there were two tristing things picked up at a little distance from the house; the prisoner was brought back to the house by two watchmen, and I gave charge of him, James Rose was one of the watchmen; upon looking at the door, I found the pendant ring of the lock of the door broke off; I looked round, and to the scraper I saw tied a piece of new cord, and at the other end of it the pendant ring, it had broke in getting the door open.

Q. Are you quite positive you saw them go out at the window? - A. Yes; I saw a man's hands take them out.

Q. What are they worth? - A. They cost us more than twenty pounds.

Q. What shop do you keep? - A. A silversmith's and jeweller's shop; my husband is an optician by prosession; I am sure they are my husband's property.

JAMES FARTHING sworn. - I keep a public-house in Bishopsgate-street: About a quarter of an hour after the robbery happened, I went out and picked up a tooth-pick-case, about sixty yards from Mrs. Evans's, on the same side of the way; I took it to Mrs. Evans and gave it to her.

Mrs. Evans. I delivered it to the constable.

JOHN FLY sworn. - I am a porter: As I was going through Bishopsgate-street I saw the prisoner standing facing the window, on the other side of the path; I took notice of him, I thought he had been

a butcher that lived opposite; but seeing me look at him he went a little way back, leaned against a post, turned his head, and looked on the other side of the way; I went on about my business, I perceived he was not the man that I supposed him to be; I am sure he is the man; I went on for the space of ten yards, it might be more or less, and I heard the crash of the window; I turned round and saw the prisoner's hands in the window; I stood looking at the prisoner on the left-hand side of the path; he ran by me a little way and crossed over the way, I ran after him, and he was taken.

Q. Did you lose sight of him? - A. No, not at all; I saw him taken and searched, but did not see any thing found upon him.

Q. Did he run towards the London-tavern? - A. He ran towards London-bridge; I did not see him throw any thing down; I am sure the prisoner is the same man.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me break the window? - A. No; but I saw his hands in the window, and there was nobody else on that side of the way so High as me.

MARY JONES sworn. - I live next door to Mrs. Evans: I heard a great screaming; I ran out to see what was the matter, and I learned that Mrs. Evans had been robbed; I saw the glass broke, and I placed myself against the broken pane that nobody should put their hands in, that is all I know; I never saw the man.

JAMES ROSE sworn. - I am a watchman: I heard the alarm; I saw the prisoner running till he came near to me, and to get out of my way he went across the way, and came up against a gentleman's servant, and there I laid hold of him, and my fellow-servant came to my assistance, and we laid hold of him, and groped his pockets, but we could find nothing upon him; then we took him to Mrs. Evans, and she gave me charge of him, and I took him to the watch-house.

RICHARD ESTALL sworn. - I am a watchman; I was with Rose; I can say no more than he has said.

JOHN JANAWAY sworn. - I am a watchman: I received the tooth-pick-case from Mr. Farthing, and a tea-ladle from Mrs. Evans; I delivered it to Mr. Pearce, the constable of the night; I searched him in the watch-house, but found nothing upon him but a shilling, he said his mother had given it to him; he had no shirt on.

RICHARD PEARCE sworn. - I am constable of the Ward of Bishopsgate Without, (produces a toothpick-case, a silver tea-ladle, and a cord with the ring belonging to the hasp of the door); I received the silver ladle and the tooth-pick-case from the last witness, the cord laid upon the watch-house desk; and on the Monday morning, I received this large stone from Mrs. Evans, which she found inside the window. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Evans).

Prisoner's defence. I live in Fishmonger-alley, in the Borough; and on the 8th of March I went to see my mother, I parted with her at Spitalfields-church, at between nine and ten o'clock; and as I was going past Bishopsgate-street, two watchmen laid hold of me, and searched me, without my knowing what for; they took me to the watch-house, and a boy came and said he had seen me there; I had left my shirt with my mother to wash; I can prove that I was in Rose-lane after nine o'clock.

For the Prisoner.

ANN BLUFF sworn. - I live in Rose-lane, Spitalfields, I am in the silk business: The prisoner was at our house at nine o'clock, exact as Spitalfield's chimes played nine.

Q. That is not far from Bishopsgate-street? - A. No. GUILTY Death . (Aged 22.)

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty'smercy by the prosecutrix.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-57

300. SAMUEL SHAILER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , six ounces of tea, value 12d. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

Second Court. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS CLEMENTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am assistant elder in the India Company's warehouses: In consequence of information that I had received, on Monday the 10th of March, I went down into the privy, where I found marks of tea spilt upon the floor; the prisoner was a labourer in the warehouses; I summoned all the labourers together, the prisoner was among them; he produced to me a quantity of tea from his breeches, secreted in a small bag; he took it out himself upon my challenging the labourers, he came forward and said he was guilty, and produced the tea; it is impossible to say whose tea it is.

Q. Did you make use of any promise, or threat, to induce him to confess? - A. None.

Prisoner's defence. I am a young hand in the warehouses, I acknowledged that I had taken some waste tea, I did not know it was of any consequence; it was not tea answerable to the sample that was found in the privy; I have a wife and four children; I took it as waste tea; I leave it to your Lordship and the Jury.

GUILTY , on the Second Count, (Aged 34.)

Whipped one hundred yards in Seething-lane .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-58

301. WILLIAM HALFPENNY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , two ounces of tea, value 6d. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS CLEMENTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an assistant elder in the East-India Company's warehouses in Seething-lane : In consequence of information, I summoned all the labourers together, on the 10th of March; among them was the prisoner at the bar; upon him was found two ounces of gunpowder tea.

Q. Had you gunpowder tea in those warehouses? - A. We had; I examined his coat thoroughly; and then I desired him to unbutton his breeches, and the first thing I saw was gunpowder tea; he appeared frightened very much; the same kind of tea was spilt in the privy, it corresponded exactly; he has been eight years in the warehouses.

Prisoner's defence. I must acknowledge my fault; I hope your Lordship will have mercy upon me; I have a wife and family.

GUILTY . (Aged 49.)

Whipped one hundered yards in Seething-lane .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-59

302. WILLIAM TWEED was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , five shirts, value 10s. a sheet, value 3s. a table-cloth, value 2s. two pillow-cases, vlaue 2s. five pockets, value 1s. a napkin, value 2d. and a check apron, value 2s. the property of Christopher Harrison .

MARY HARRISON sworn. - I am the wife of Christopher Harrison , I live in Baker's-row, Whitechapel : I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment, on Friday the 21st of February, at five o'clock in the evening, they were hanging up in the yard; a gentleman took them from the prisoner, and shewed them to me at Lambeth-street.

JANE LEE sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Harrison, she keeps a public-house: The prisoner was in our house all that afternoon, till just before the clothes were lost; Mr. Griffiths brought them in about an hour after they were missing; I know them to be my mistress's property; I saw them about a quarter past four.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street: On Friday the 21st of February, about six o'clock, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, at Princes-row, Mileend New Town; I did not take him into custody then; I searched the house, and in the two pair of stairs room I found a quantity of linen, in the chimney-place, in a heap together; I took the linen to Mrs. Harrison's, in Baker's-row, she looked over it, and claimed it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. She first of all refused to own the things? - A. Yes; she was a long time before the Magistrate, and after some conversation she owned one of the things.

Q. Was not that conversation a threat to commit her? - A. Yes; the Magistrate asked her if she knew the consequence of not swearing the truth, that she was liable to be committed for perjury.

Q. Did not the Magistrate order her out for commitment before she would swear to any of the property? - A. She was ordered out with a young man that was with her.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am an officer of Lambeth-street: On the 21st of February, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I went to the prosecutor's house, in Baker's row; I found the prisoner in custody in a room adjoining the bar, he was delivered up to me, and I took him into the parlour, he was crying very much; I said, I am sorry to see you in this situation, your father being a respectable man in the parish; he said, he had been drinking with some sailers in that house for about an hour, and that he was very much in liquor or he should not have done it; he seemed as if he had been drinking.

Q. He was not so much in liquor as not to know what he was about? - A. I do not think he was; he said he did take them, and that he carried them home to his own house, but he did not think any body saw him.

Q. Had you made him any promise, or offer of favour? - A. None at all; he said he carried them up two pair of stairs, and threw them into the chimney-place; I asked him if he took them through distress; he said, he was very short of money, and what he earned would not support him and his wife; and that he had applied to his father several times, and he could not get any thing from him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were he and you the only persons in the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that you gave him no hopes if he told the truth? - A. I did not.

Q. You knew that his parents were respectable, and wondered that he could have done such a thing? - A. Yes.

Q. He seemed to you as if he had drank a great deal of liquor? - A. He did; he said he should not have done it if he had not been so much in liquor.(The property was produced).

Lee. These are Mrs. Harrison's; here is one of them marked A H.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You did not know these things before the Magistrate? - A. Mr. Tweed, and his friends, persuaded us not to own the things, because of hurting his son.

Q. Did you not swear, before the Justice, that you did not know that property? - A. Yes.

Mrs. Harrison. I know these to be mine; there are the initials of my own name and my daughter's upon them.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you not tell the Justice you could not swear to them? - A. Yes, because I did not look over them; the prisoner's father said, for God's sake do not look at them; but when I did look at them, I was sure they were mine.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 19.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-60

303. JAMES DEAKIN and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , eight silver table-spoons, value 6l. four desert-spoons, value 30s. five dozen silver tea-spoons, value 3l. two pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 15s. five silver watch-chains, value 30s. three silver watches, value 6l. a wooden box, value 1s. three double-bottom glass bottles, value 6s. three glass mugs, value 3s. two pair of glass bellows, value 2s. a wooden box, value 6d. three pieces of printed cotton, each containing twenty-one yards, value 10l. two men's hats, value 10s. and four pieces of silk handkerchiefs, value 40s. the property of William Mountain , John Wallis , Joseph Butt , Thomas Ennessy , Eusebius Dandy , and Richard Miller .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas-Dancer Markham .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Beville.)

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I apprehended the prisoners on Tuesday, the 11th of February, about seven in the morning; I found upon the prisoner Smith this watch, (producing it;) and this upon the prisoner Deakin; I searched their houses that day, in the back-road, Islington; I believe it is called Clements's-rents; they live in separate houses, at some distance from one another; other officers will produce the other property; they said they were their watches; they did not hesitate, they were very willing to have their houses searched; and in Deakin's house I found this gown, which is not in the indictment.

JOHN RAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I was with Armstrong on the 11th of February last; we apprehended the prisoners; I found, in Smith's house, a silver watch-chain, six tea-spoons, two table-spoons, and this gown, (producing them;) I found nothing at Deakin's house; on the Sunday following I went again, in company with Mason, to Deakin's house, and found a glass decanter which was owned by a man of the name of Seale, that was with us; then we went to Smith's house, and found another glass decanter, which was also owned by Seale; I searched the accomplice's house, Barnet Quinton, and found these spoons. (Producing them.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys, (Counsel for Deakin.) Q. You found nothing in Deakin's house relative to this charge? - A.Nothing.

Q. Did he remain in custody from that time till the Sunday? - A. Yes.

Q. You found in Deakin's house the tools usually employed by a shoe-maker? - A. Yes; there was a form and tools, and some new shoes in a box up stairs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp, (Counsel for Smith.)

Q. The decanters found at Smith's, were owned by a person of the name of Seale? - A. Yes.

STEPHEN ADAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am a silversmith: On the 20th of November, 1799, I sent a box to Spalding, in Lincolnshire; I delivered it myself to my apprentice, to carry to the Saracen's-head, Snow-hill, to go by the coach to Mr. Thomas Broaderick, Spalding; they were ordered by him from me.

Q. Look at these spoons that were found at Smith's? - A. These are the spoons that I packed up myself in that box.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley, (Counsel for Smith.)

Q.These spoons have got a crest? - A. Yes.

Q. The spoons you lost were plain spoons? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How do you know they are your's? - A. By the Hall-mark, and my own mark.

Q.All the spoons you make have the same marks? - A. Exactly.

RICHARD PLATER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am an apprentice to Mr. Adams; I carried a box by the direction of my master to the Saracen's-head, Snow-hill; it was directed to Mr. Broaderick, Spalding, Lincolnshire.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The Saracen's Head is in London, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q.How long have you been an apprentice to your master? - A. Almost two years.

Q.Your master sells a great many spoons in the course of the year? - A. Yes.

Q. All the spoons he sends out into the world have his private mark and the Hall-mark? - A. Yes.

PETER MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am an officer of Worship-street: (produces two bottles;) I found one bottle in the house of the

prisoner Smith, and the other in the house of Deakin: I saw them on Tuesday, the 11th; but did not take them away till the Sunday following, the 16th.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Both their wives were left at home? - A. Yes.

EDWARD SEALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am a glass-blower, in the parish of Christ church, in Surrey: I sent a box of glasses to the Saracen's-head, Snow-hill, on the 30th of October, as nigh as I can guess, to go into Lincolnshire, to one Mr. Smith, at Moulton; I can swear that the bottles are my make, but I cannot swear that I sent these bottles in that box, because I have made a great many; they were to go by the coach; my brother carried the box to the inn.

Q. Did you ever before send a box to this Mr. Smith, at Moulton? - A. Yes, more than a month before; but I cannot recollect when.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did not Mr. Mountain, the prosecutor of this indictment, tell you that the bottles were broke in the country? - A. Yes, and that the coachman had thrown the box away; that was about three weeks after.

JOHN BOOTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am book-keeper at the Saracen's-head, Snowhill: On the 20th of November I received a box directed to Mr.Broderick, Spalding, Lincolnshire;(looks at his book;) I do not think Smith's box went that day; I do not see my entry of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are the book-keeper? - A. Yes.

Q.You do not assist in loading the coach? - A. No, we call the goods over and they are marked off; I deliver them to a porter, and he delivers them to the coachman.

Q. Can you therefore take upon you to say that this box was actually loaded in the coach? - A. I can swear that it was taken out by the porter regularly, and I have no doubt but it was loaded.

FREDERICK EVERARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I live at No. 8, Boot-street, Hoxton; I am a silver chain-maker.

Q.Look at that silver chain? - A. I made this chain for Mr. Adams; I made four for him; I delivered one on the 2d of November, another on the 11th, and two on the 19th of February.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Can you take upon yourself to say whether this was delivered in February or November? - A.No, I cannot.

BARNETT QUINTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. On the 20th of November the prisoner Deakin and I went out in a one-horse cart, and Smith went on horseback, down the Edmonton road; and just beyond Ponder's-end we robbed this coach; I cannot say what coach it was; we took seven boxes and a brown paper parcel from the boot behind.

Q. How did you get at them? - A. Deakin got in and put them out to Smith, and I took them to the cart; the coach was going on at the time; it was just after dusk in the evening; they were all brought to Deakin's house; one box contained three watches, a hunting-watch not finished, and a case of another; eight table-spoons, four small desert-spoons, five dozen tea-spoons, five watch-chains, a quantity of watch keys and watch-glasses, three gown-pieces, two pieces of silk handkerchiefs, a hat in a box, a hat in another box, and a bonnet; I do not recollect any thing else; Deakin had a dozen of small spoons and a watch; Smith kept a dozen, two large spoons, and a watch; I had a dozen also, and two large ones, and a watch; the remainder of the things were sold, and the money divided; I cannot say whether they are the same spoons or not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.How long have you been a thief? - A. I cannot say.

Q. I do not ask you to a year or two? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. You were concerned with a man who has since suffered the laws of his country, Galloping Dick? - A. No otherwise than the waggoner at Brixton-causeway.

Q.Did you not treat him with great cruelty? -

Court. Nothing can appear worse, with respect to his character, than his own account to-day; he ought not to be credited in a tittle in which he is not confirmed.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.You do not know what coach this was? - A. No.

Q. Nor what day it was? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was the 20th.

Q. You used to go out with a cart with other people to rob carts? - A. Yes.

Q. You used to go out with a man of the name of Ryland? - A. Yes, that I have answered for.

Q. Upon your oath have you always said these were the two men that were with you in this robbery? - A. I have always said so.

Q.Upon your oath did you not twice say they were not the men? - A. Never.

Q. Did you not say before the Magistrate, I know nothing against these men? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Nothing of that kind? - A.Never.

Q. How often were these men brought up for examination before you swore to them? - A. I was there twice without them.

Q. Do you not recollect the Magistrate telling you, all this amounts to nothing if you cannot speak to these being the men? - A. I always said they were the men.

Q.Did you not charge a man of the name of Ryland with this robbery? - A. No.

Q. The Magistrate discharged Ryland? - A. Yes; there were no owners for the things.

Mr. Beville. My Lord, there is a mistake in the indictment, in the names of the proprietors; I must now prove the property in the coachman.

THOMAS DANCER MARKHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Beville. I am coachman to the Boston coach; I drove it on the 20th of November to Royston, which is thirty-eight miles from Shoreditch-church; I never missed any thing at all; I knew nothing of the loss till the coachman came back.

Court. Q. Suppose these things are lost from the coach while you are driving, who is liable for that loss? - A. The proprietors.

Q. Who is answerable to the proprietors? - A.Nobody.

Q.Are not you liable? - A. No.

WILLIAM MOUNTAIN sworn. - I am one of the proprietors of the Spalding coach.

Court. Q.Should you call upon the coachman to make good any loss? - A. If we can prove any neglect.

Q. But suppose it is stolen from behind, and there is no neglect in him? - A.We never have called upon the coachman.

Deakin's defence. I am entirely innocent of what is laid to my charge.

Smith's defence. I know nothing of it.

For the Prisoners.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you present before Mr. Nares, the Magistrate, when these persons were called up in custody? - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember Quinton saying any thing respecting them? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever hear Quinton say, he could not say any thing respecting them? - A. We apprehended them upon his information, and before he was sworn, he said, he did not like to speak in the office, because the office was full of people, and he refused to be sworn.

The prisoner Deakin called one, and Smith five witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Deakin, GUILTY on the Second Count, (Aged 28.)

Smith, GUILTY on the Second Count, (Aged 27.)

Case reserved for the opinion of the Judges .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-61

304. WILLIAM SKINNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , a leather purse, value 1d. two guineas and a half-guinea , the property of Ann Haydon .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-62

305. JOHN HARVEY , otherwise DUMBEY , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Ellis , about the hour of one, in the night of the 24th of January , with intent to steal the goods, and burglariously stealing twelve leather black calf grain shoulders, value 30s. twenty-four pair of calf grain bellies, value 40s. three pair of cordovan boot legs, value 10s. a black calf grain skin, value 10s. eight pieces of binding leather, value 10s. two pair of men's-shoes, value 4s. and three leather calf butts, value 21s. the property of John Ellis; a pair of boots, value 10s. a cloth coat, value 2s. a silk waistcoat, value 1s. a jean waistcoat, value 1s. two cloth jackets, value 12s. and a pair of leather breeches, value 3s. the property of William Hackblock .

ELIZABETH ELLIS sworn. - I am the wife of John Ellis, I live in Providence-row, Finsbury-square, in the parish of St. Luke's : On the 24th of January I went to bed about half past two o'clock in the morning. I staid up later than usual on account of a suspicious noise that I had heard in the house; I had seen all the doors and windows fastened, I heard no noise after I went to bed, I was not the first up in the morning. I saw the yard and premises at twelve o'clock for the last time, while in the yard I heard St. Paul's clock strike twelve; I looked into the back shop and saw leather lying in various directions at that time.

Q. Is the back shop a part of your house? - A. No; I also saw a blue coat hanging on a nail; I shut the shop-door, looked at the back-door, which opens into Alfred-buildings, it was locked and barred with iron, and stapled in; I then came in, and went into the kitchen for a few minutes, and then into the parlour, we have a communication from that parlour to the back shop; while I was in the parlour, I heard a noise, which appeared to me to he either in the back shop, or the yard, which is altogether; the back shop opens into the yard and into the parlour too; for the moment I was much alarmed, and immediately went to the kitchen; as soon as I came into the kitchen, I observed a man looking down the kitchen area, in the front of the Row, it is a very private place; I expressed my alarm to the maid servant, and immediately locked myself in the kitchen, and staid there till near two o'clock; at length I saw no person in front of the Row, I went up stairs into my own bed-room, and looked out at the window which looks over the back yard and premises, hoping I might discover what the alarm had been, I did not observe any body; then I looked at Mr. Ellis's watch, it was ten minutes past two; I went to take my own watch to wind up; I looked out at the window, and heard voices distinctly, in low conversation, it appeared to me to he in Alfred-buildings, which is at the

back of our premises; after listening for some time I thought they were gone, and I went to bed.

Q.This shop is a continuation of buildings? - A. It is, from the front to the back, it leaves room for a passage and stair-case, it is enclosed at the end of the premises chiefly by buildings, and a wall ten feet high.

Q. Is there an immediate communication between your back shop and the house? - A.Immediately from the parlour.

Q.Is there a communication between the front and the back shop? - A. Yes, through the parlour; there is a glass light between, with a door, but the door is never opened; it is all inclosed with a brick wall, and buildings, which incloses the whole; there is a door out of the back shop into the yard; I shut that door, and latched it, but I cannot say that I locked it; the door that leads into Alfred-buildings was locked and barred with iron.

WILLIAM HACKBLOCK sworn. - I am foreman to John Ellis: I was in the yard about eleven o'clock at night, it was all safe then; I was in the back shop about eight o'clock, and the leather was there then; I sleep in the house; when I came down in the morning, between seven and eight o'clock, with intention to put on a blue jacket which I had left there, and found that my wearing apparel was gone; I heard nothing of the property till the 15th of March, when I saw them at the Police-office, Shadwell; I missed three pair of cordovan boot legs, twelve black calf grain shoulders, twenty-four pair of bellies, black, one whole black grain skin, some pieces of binding leather, two pair of shoes, three calf butts, and my own wearing apparel; I am sure they were all in the shop at eight o'clock.

SAMUEL MORRIS sworn. - I am an apprentice to John Ellis: I came down stairs between seven and eight o'clock, and went into the back shop with Hackblock, and missed the property; I can swear to some of them being my own manufacture.

JACOB JIGGETT sworn. - I am a weaver by trade, I keep a lodging-house in Essex-passage, in Essex-street, Whitechapel: About ten weeks ago the prisoner lodged along with me three nights, and the third night he did not come home all night, I cannot say when that was; he brought this leather in, in the morning, about seven o'clock, and asked me if I would buy it; I told him I did not want it; there were some boot legs, and some waste leather; he said it would serve to make shoes for my children and myself; I asked him if it was his own property, and he said it was, that he had bought it at a sale in Kent; he said he used to travel the country; that he gave sixteen shillings for it, and I should have it for twenty shillings; I bought it of him.

Q. Did not you think you had got a good bargain? - A. I did not know the-value of it; the prisoner never came near me afterwards for five or six weeks; I heard that there had been a quantity of leather lost, and I went to the office, and gave information where to find the prisoner, and he was apprehended; I gave Mr. Brown the leather; when I was at the office, the prisoner said to me, what business had you to say you bought the leather of me; and I told him I would not say any but the right person.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Shadwell-office, (produces the leather); I received it from Jiggett; the officers had been at his house about some other property, before he came to the office, and then he gave information of this, and the prisoner was taken.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, with Brown, on the 19th of February; I had been at Jiggett's before, and got some other property; and after that, Jiggett gave us information of the leather; I saw him deliver it to Brown at the public-house opposite the office. (The leather was deposed to by Hackblock and Morris).

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the property in my life till I saw it at the office; Jiggett fixed upon me after he was taken up himself, to make his evidence the stronger, because I slept in his house at the time. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-63

306. JOHN BREWER , JOHN COLLEY , and JOHN BARNETT , otherwise JACOB FARROW , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Robinson , about the hour of seven, in the night of the 17th of December , with intent to steal the goods, and burglariously stealing nine linen shirts, value 27s. two calico shirts, value 6s. two boy's shirts, value 4s. a silk handkerchief, value 1s. a waistcoat, value 6s. half a yard of cambric, value 1s. a mahogany tea-chest, value 1s. a sword, value 1s. and two tablecloths, value 6s. the property of the said Henry.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

HENRY ROBINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep a music-shop upon Tower-hill, I live in King Henry Yard, Burr-street : On the 17th of December, in the dusk of the evening, about four o'clock, or so, I left my house, and about two hours, or two hours and a half, afterwards, I heard that my house was broke open; I instantly went back, unlocked the door with the key, and went in; before I entered the house, I saw the window of the parlour open; and on entering the house I observed every thing scattered about the room; I am positive the window was down when I left the house, I had fitted the blind in myself, which I

found upon the ground; I found marks of men's feet upon a table that stood under the window; there was a tea-chest that I had left upon the table on the floor under the table; on examining it, I found it had been broke open, there was nothing in it of any consequence; then I missed another tea-chest; then I examined the closet upon the left hand of the window, which was broke open, and the lock hanging to a screw; then, on examining the closet, I found the papers and books pulled about; then I went up stairs, and found the clothes pulled off the bed, the drawers all open, and some old clothes in a heap on the floor; I examined the drawers, and found I had lost every shirt I had, except that which I had on; I missed a silk handkerchief, a waistcoat, half a yard of cambric, a tea-chest, and a sword, they left the scabbard behind; and I missed two boy's shirts, I have seen one of them since, it was produced to me by Cook, the officer; I had left them in the drawers in the one pair of stairs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was getting towards dusk when you left your house? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Was it light enough to see the natural face of a man? - A. Yes it was.

REBECCA LEVY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live at No. 3, St Catherine's-lane, my husband's name is Solomon Levy : On the 17th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, the three prisoners came to me, I had never seen them before; the prisoner, Brewer, came in first, five minutes before the other two prisoners came in, and he asked me whether I would buy some shirts; I asked him whether they were his; he said, yes, it was all the same; and then he went out of my kitchen into the street, and called Farrow, and then Farrow and Colley came in, and Brewer with them, I saw nobody else; Colley had a bundle under his arm, tied up in a black silk handkerchief; I opened the bundle, and there were eleven shirts in it, nine linen shirts, two calico ones, and two boy's shirts; Farrow asked me two pounds for them; I said I would give them a guinea and a half for them; I gave the money to Farrow, and they all three went away directly; I sold every one of them the next day, excepting a boy's shirt, which I took up to Shadwell-office on the 18th of February; the officers had been to my house.

Q.How long were they with you? - A. Ten minutes, or not so long.

Q. Have you any doubt of there being the same persons? - A.None.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. May I ask you where your husband is? - A.He is at home.

Q. Was he not taken up for having received these goods? - A. Yes; but it was wrongfully, he knew nothing at all about it; he was taken in the morning, and did not know what for; and I went up in the evening myself.

Q. You went up for the purpose of extricating your husband? - A. No, I did not; I did it for the good of the public.

Q. Does it happen to you to have been taken up for any thing of this sort before? - A. No.

Q. You made a quick sale of these shirts? - A. Yes.

Q. You had a very good bargain? - A. No; I got a shilling or two by them, and that was all.

JOHN COOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.(Produces a boy's shirt), I received it from the last witness on the 18th of February; I have had it ever since.

Robinson. I am sure this is my boy's shirt, the collar was too tight for him; and when he wore regimentals I used to put it on, and button it for him.

LUCY ROBINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the daughter of the prosecutor: I know this to be my father's property; I know it by the wristband, and a bit in the collar.

SOLOMON ROBUS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes; On the 17th of December, I went with them to King Henry Yard, in Burr-street, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the shutters were open, but the window was shut down; I hoisted up the window, and John Barnett and I went in, Brewer and Colley were watching about the door; we got in upon a mahogany-table, we jumped from that into the room; we went to the left of the fire place, and broke open a closet, there was nothing there; then we broke open a tea-chest that stood in the parlour; then we went up stairs, and stole thirteen shirts, there were nine linen, and two calico, and two boy's shirts, a black silk handkerchief, and half a yard of cambric; I took a coloured silk handkerchief off my neck and tied the property up, and went out at the window again; then we went to Mrs. Levy's, and they all three went in, and they brought out a guinea and a half, and we all shared alike; I had my fair share.

Q. Were you taken up? - A. No; I came voluntarily forward.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You went to the office, and gave information before you were taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. That you knew would save yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. How often have you come here? - A.Twice.

Q. As a witness? - A. No; as a prisoner.

Q. What were you tried for last? - A. For robbing one Riley.

Q.What before? - A. For house breaking.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Though you have been twice

here before, you have been twice acquitted? - A. Yes.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

For the prisoner, Brewer.

MARY COLLIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I have known Brewer from a boy: I never heard any thing amiss of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have known him all his life, and never heard any thing amiss of him? - A. No; he has been to sea.

Q. There are two ways of going to sea - don't you know he was transported? - A. I never heard it till just now in Court.

Q. You heard it before you came up to give evidence? - A. I never heard it till now.

Q. And yet you have sworn you never heard any thing amiss of him? - A. I do not know that he was.

Brewer, GUILTY Death . (Aged 25.)

Colley, GUILTY Death. (Aged 20.)

Barnett, GUILTY Death. (Aged 23.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-64

307. DAVID FRASER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a horse, value 5l. 5s. the property of John Ramsden .

JOHN RAMSDEN sworn. - I lost a black blind lame stone-horse from near where I live, in the parish of Limehouse, near Stepney-church ; I lost it either from the yard or the field; he was an invalided kind of a horse, and had the privilege of going either into the field or into the yard; he was with other invalided horses; I believe there were four in number; I missed him on Tuesday, the 25th of March; I had seen him on the Monday afternoon, after dark, seeding at a grain-bin; we have grain-bins as well as gram-carts in the yard; he was in the yard with the other horses then; I never saw him again alive; I saw his legs on the Tuesday following, which was last Tuesday, at a slaughter-house near Haggerston; and I saw his hide on the Thursday following, in the possession of Mr. Marsh, the proprietor of the slaughter-house; it was through the instructions of Daniel Hartshorn , the inspector of two boiling-houses on the spot, that I got intelligence of the horse, he is here; I do positively, in the face of this honourable Court, swear the hide and the legs are mine; I bred the horse, he was foaled upon my premises; he was six years old this grass, he had a blaze that was rather wide, it came down to a very narrow point within a small distance of the bottom of the note; three of the legs were remarkable, the off leg behind had a remarkable crease in the front of his foot, which proved what is called a gravy heel; there were a number of lumps upon the front of the foot, close to the hoof; he had had a fever which had contracted each fore foot with the pain, as it was represented by the farrier, and his hoof had got very long in consequence of it; I am more particular to the other two marks than to the white heel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was about a week after you lost the horse that you saw these legs and the hide? - A. A week to day.

Q. A blaze on the forehead is no uncommon mark? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear to the legs? - A. Yes; if they had been among five hundred legs I could have picked them out.

THOMAS ARCHER sworn. - I bought the horse that I afterwards saw the hide of, of the prisoner, on the 25th of March, between eight and nine in the morning, I did not know him before; I met with him coming along the road close by where I live, at Kingsland, he was leading the horse, it was a black, lame, blind, stone-horse; I saw it was a crippled blind horse, and I thought it was only sit for killing; I asked him if he would fell it, Mr. Marsh gives me so much in the pound for all I can get him; I asked the prisoner if he would sell it; he said, yes; he asked me two guineas for it; I told him I would give him thirty-five shillings for it; when I was paying for it, I asked the prisoner where he brought it from; he told me from Mr. Oldfield's, at the Bell at Edmonton, he was leading it with a penny cord, it was not a proper halter; he said he had broke his halter being tied behind a load of bay; after I had paid him for it, he said, give me a note of your name to take home to my master, and then, says he, he will know where to find you, if you have not given the full value for it, and put one shilling spent at the bottom of the note; with that I did, and called for half a pint of anniseed with it; then he left me; I did not see him again till I took him on Wednesday last; he had a kind of a gravy heel on the fore part of his leg, and a white blaze down his forehead; I sold him to Mr. Marsh immediately, for two pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You sold it to Mr. Marsh for two pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you tell my Lord, just now, that he allowed you so much in the pound? - A. That is what I sold it for.

Q. What business are you? - A. I keep carts and horses for moving goods and rubbish.

Q.This horse was traced into your possession? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were charged with having stole the horse yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you fixed upon the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; and by the description I gave Mr. Ramsden, he knew the person; I was coming our

of my yard after setting my people to work; it was about fifty or sixty yards from my own house.

Q. Did you take him to your house? - A. No; we went to a public-house, and there I wrote the note.

Q.You did not ask him how he came by it till after you had paid him? - A. No.

Q. And you had no suspicion, from seeing a cord instead of a halter? - A. No, he told such a good story; because if it was tied behind a load of bay, being lame, if it gave a snatch, it would break the halter.

THOMAS MARSH sworn. - I keep a slaughter-house for horses at Haggerston: On the 25th of March, Mr. Archer brought a lame blind black stone-horse into my yard, a little after nine in the morning.

Q. How far do you live from Mr. Archer's? - A. Not quite half a mile; he asked me two pounds for it, he would not take less; I bought it of him; it staid all day in the yard for our inspector to see it; when he had seen it, I sent that and another black horse up to the slaughter-house; the inspector's name is Daniel Hartshorn; the next day, Wednesday, the horse was slaughtered; we always bring the hides from the slaughtering-house to the place where I live; the hide of this horse was brought down; I shewed it to Mr. Ramsden, and he claimed it; Mr. Ramsden had picked out the legs from among others before he saw the hide.

DANIEL HARTSHORN sworn. - I am inspector of this slaughtering-house: I went down to Mr. Marsh's house on the 25th of March, Tuesday, and the horse was standing in the yard; I asked him who he had bought the horse of; he told me he had bought it of Mr. Archer, in Kingsland-road. On the 1st of April I went to the shed where they kill, and got intelligence that a person had been enquiring about such a horse; and I immediately went over to Mr. Ramsden: (reads his entry;) "March 25, 1800. A black stone-horse, six years old, fifteen hands high, blaze down his face, near heel behind white, long tail, from Thomas Archer , Kingsland-road."

Q.(To Ramsden.) Had you been at the slaughter-house before you saw Hartshorn? - A. Yes.

Marsh. I was not in the way; when I came home at night, my man told me a person had been enquiring about a black blind stone-horse; and that he had said there was no such horse; I told him there were three, and immediately sent the inspector to enquire who this gentleman was that had been making the enquiry.

Ramsden. The prisoner has been a labourer to me, and drove this horse at water-cart last summer for me; he lives within two hundred yards of my house; from the description Archer gave, I knew he was the man, and I apprehended him last Wednesday.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY Death .

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the Prosecutor, and also by the Jury, upon the ground of their personal knowledge of his good character.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-65

308. JAMES ETHERINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , a gold watch, value 6l. 6s. a metal chain, value 1s. a steel seal, value 1s. and a watch-key, value 2d. the property of David Court , privily from his person .

DAVID COURT sworn. - On the 17th of March at a quarter after twelve at night, I was at a friend's house, of the name of Pearce, in Silver-street, the corner of Marshall-street ; I heard the rattles spring, and I came out at the door into the street, and the prisoner was charged with the watch; I enquired what was the matter, and they said he had insulted the watchman upon his duty, and for so doing he would take him to the watch-house; there were three of them together; I presumed that one of the three was rather in liquor, and I pressed the watchman to let them go home to their families, that they might go to work the next morning; after I had intersered the prisoner drew near to me, and thanked me for speaking a word in his behalf, and I missed my watch immediately; the prisoner was quite close to me at the time; I did not feel it go, but there was something that led me to suspect, for I was surrounded, and I suspected that the prisoner at the bar took it from me; I grasped at his arm, but I could not lay hold of his hand; in so doing he put away my watch into another person's pocket; I did not see him do it; about a minute after, as soon as I could lay hold of his hand, I found he had a watch in his hand; I took him to the watch-house, having hold of his hand, and when we got to the watch-house I found it was a silver watch, instead of a gold one; I said it was not mine; another person, one of the three, Craighten, put his hand to his waistcoat-pocket, and fetched out my watch; he asked me whether that was my watch; he had lost his, he said, and he presumed that this must be mine; with that he gave me mine; I put it into the hands of the constable of the night, and charged James Etherington with robbing me and Craighton.

PETER CRAIGHTON sworn. - I live at No. 23, Noel-street, Soho: I have known the prisoner about three years; he has been a helper in a stable-

yard at the bottom of Swallow-street: On Sunday evening, the 16th of March, I happened to be in liquor and went into a public-house where he was, I was so intoxicated that I could hardly walk; he went, out of friendship, to see me home; that was nearly about twelve o'clock; there was another person with me whose surname I do not know, his christian name is Thomas; we went on to the corner of Marshall-street and Silver-street; we stopped round the corner, and there were the patrols coming along, and there being three of us, there was not room for them to pass, and I being in liquor interrupted one of them, and the patrol caught hold of me immediately by the collar; it seems I made some resistance, and he sprung his rattle; immediately some other watchmen came up, to prevent his striking me, as they told me afterwards; I was taken into custody both by the hands and by the collar, and hurried away among them; the prosecutor then came out of the wine-vaults, he came out without his hat, and wished to intercede for me, seeing that I was in liquor; the patrol told him I had interrupted him in his duty, and I saw no more of it till I had got near the bottom of Golden-square; one of them, in scuffing with me, I found had cut me on the head; I was not sensible of it at the time of receiving the wound; I asked the liberty to let me tie a handkerchief round my head; I was without my hat; my hands were then at liberty for the first time during the scuffle; I knew I had a watch, and as soon as my handkerchief was tied round my head, I clapped my hand down to my pocket to feel if I had got my watch, and I found my watch was gone; I instantly put my hands into my waistcoat-pocket, being frightened, and I found in this pocket a watch that seemed to be very small; I took it into my hand and felt it; I said to the patrol, surely this cannot be my watch, it is so very small; I then put it into this waistcoat-pocket, thinking no more of the matter, not being certain; and when I came to the watch-house, I said, surely gentlemen, this is not my watch that I have got in my pocket, by the size of it; I then pulled it out, and the prosecutor owned it, and at the same moment I saw my own watch lie upon the table; but how it came there I cannot tell; I asked the prisoner if he knew how that watch came to be put upon me, and he said he could not tell; he said he had taken my watch to take care of, that I should not lose it in the scuffle; I never saw this gentleman's watch till I got to the watch-house.

Mr. Court. I do not recollect seeing the last witness till I had got to the watch-house; I thought I had seen him in the crowd.

Q.Did he appear to you to be sober? - A. No, he was not; he was very drunk.

GEORGE-COURTNEY TURNER sworn. - I was going home about twelve o'clock; I heard a noise, and I heard Mr. Court's voice; I asked him what was the matter; he said the prisoner at the bar had taken his watch; I immediately secured one of his hands, and Mr. Court secured the other; Mr. Court had hold of him when I came up.

Q. How near was Craighton to Mr. Court? - A. I did not see him to my knowledge till we got to the watch-house; when we got to the watch-house I opened one hand, and Mr. Court opened the other; I thought I had got a watch in the hand that I had hold of, but it was only part of a chain, with the seal to it; I said, that is not Mr. Court's watch; the prisoner said he did not know any thing at all about it; then I saw Craighton come in, with his head wounded; I asked him if he had got it, and he said he had got a watch that did not belong to him; his was a silver one; he was very much intoxicated; I questioned him how he came by the watch; he pointed to several people that were sitting there, and said, that is the man; and afterwards he pointed to the prisoner at the bar, and said that was the man that gave him the watch.

Q.Did he say that was the man that had given him the watch? - A. Yes; and the prisoner did not deny it.

Q. I see you gave a different account before the Magistrate; there you say, you heard Craighton say, in the presence of Etherington, that he had taken his watch out of his pocket, to which Etherington seemed to agree? - A. That was afterwards; after the prisoner was in the watch-house, the prisoner said he had taken Craighton's watch out of his pocket to take care of it; when I made enquiry after Mr. Court's watch, Craighton gave up the watch very readily.

GEORGE HOLLIDAY sworn. - I am one of the St. James's patroles: I was going upon my beat, and the prisoner and two others were standing at the corner of Marshall-street, Silver-street, Golden-square; Craighton turned round and struck at me, he seemed very much in liquor; I sprung my rattle and the watchman came up to my assistance; the prosecutor came out of the wine-vaults, and wanted to rescue the prisoner away from me; in the scuffle we got about three doors from the corner, the prosecutor then missed his watch; the prisoner at the bar holloaed out to Craighton, that he had got his watch; the prosecutor went up to the prisoner, and challenged him with robbing him of his watch; I had hold of Craighton by the collar and the left hand, to the best of my knowledge; he seemed very much in liquor indeed; when we were going into Golden-square he missed his own watch, and said he had got a watch much smaller than his own, and could not tell how he came by it; when we got

to the watch-house, he produced a watch, and the prosecutor claimed it to be his watch.

WILLIAM PETHERICK sworn. - I am constable of the night: About half past twelve at night, on the 16th of March the prisoner was brought into the watch-house; I asked Mr. Court what offence the man had been guilty of; he said he was robbed of his gold watch; he had got hold of one of the man's arms; and in his hand he held the watch, and in the other hand he held the chain of a silver watch; I asked Mr. Court if that was his watch, and he said, no, his watch was a gold one; at the same time he said, you thief, you thief, you stole my watch; and before I had taken that charge, Craighton was brought in, and another man, one Thomas Charters; I asked what they were brought in for; Craighton replied to me, that he had been robbed of his silver watch; I then produced this watch to Craighton, which he said was his; then Craighton's hands were let go, and he put his hand into one of his waistcoat-pockets, and out he took the gold one; when the gold watch came out of his pocket, Mr. Court took hold of it, and said it was his; (produces it;) I asked Craighton, who was very much intoxicated, how he came by the gold watch in his waistcoat-pocket, and I told him, it looked very suspicious; says he, God knows how I got it, I don't know; but, says he, the person that has taken away my silver watch, must have put the gold one in my pocket; I took the charge, and kept them both in custody, and the next morning they went before the Magistrate.

JAMES LORN sworn. - I was going home, after twelve o'clock; I heard the rattles spring, and I came back to see what was the matter; and the patrol came up to Mr. Court's assistance; I helped to take him to the watch-house, and we were pulling and hauling, and Mr. Court came up, and said he would be his friend; the prisoner came up and said, Mr. Craighton, I have got your watch safe, do not be afraid of it; Mr. Court felt, and said, you have taken mine, you villain, stop thief, stop thief; and we took all three; the prisoner said, I have not got your watch, I have got no watch but my friend's; here it is, and I will take care of it; Mr. Court laid hold of his hand, and in it was a silver watch; the prosecutor said, that is not mine; afterwards Craighton produced a gold watch, and Mr. Court said that was his.

ARTHUR HAYDON sworn. - I am a patrol: I know no more than the other witnesses.

RICE HAMMETS sworn. - I am a patrol: I do not know any more than the rest.

Prisoner's defence. In the crowd I took Mr. Craighton's watch to take care of, as I knew he had a good watch; somebody made a snatch at it, and broke the chain; then Mr. Court came up and said, I had got his watch; I said I had not any but Craighton's, and that I would take to the watch-house; and they took me there; if I had had the gentleman's watch I might have gone, for I was not in custody till after I had got Craighton's watch from him.(The watch was deposed to by Mr. Court.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-66

309. ANN SYREE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , twenty-eight pair of shoes, value 5l. the property of William Gibbs .

WILLIAM GIBBS sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , I keep a shop, No. 5, in the Old-Bailey ; the prisoner and her husband have worked for me ever since the year 1798: I was in the shop, and the prisoner was in the shop; I thought I heard a shoe fall; I took no notice of it, but gave her the work that she was waiting for, and she went away; they were taken down from a nail that they hung upon; Mr. Holdsworth's man returned, and in consequence of information, I went to Mrs. Pearson's, a pawnbroker, and they produced me thirteen pair of my shoes, pledged by Mrs. Syree; I went to Patmore and Berry's, in Fleet-market, and they produced me nine pair more; I took the prisoner in custody, and summoned seven pawnbrokers, and four of them produced property.

THOMAS DAVIS sworn. - I am a porter: I was employed by Mr. Holdsworth to carry balcking-balls; I was at Mr. Gibbs's on Wednesday the 5th of March, about five in the evening; the prisoner at the bar had got a little parcel before her, and behind her were these shoes.

- PLIMPTON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker:(produces thirteen pair of shoes;) I took four pair in pledge from the prisoner at the bar; I knew her before; the other shoes were taken in by different shopmen; there are about two pair a month regularly; I took in one pair on the 5th of October, another on the 2d of November, another on the 14th of December, and another on the 26th of October.

JOHN HARRIS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant: (produces twelve pair of women's shoes;) five pair I took in of the prisoner, the others were taken in by other shopmen.

THOMAS COTTERELL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker:(produces a pair of shoes;) I took them in on the 7th of December last, from a woman very much like the prisoner at the bar.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker's servant: (produces two pair of women's shoes;) they were pledged with me by the prisoner at the bar; one pair on the 19th of August, and the other on the 5th of September.(The shoes were deposed to by the Prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about them.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-67

310. EDWARD WACKET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , ten pounds of flax, value 2s. 6d. the property of James Bryant .

JONATHAN EARLE sworn. - I work for Mr. Sills, upon the Hambro' wharf: The prisoner brought a load of flax to the Hambro' wharf , and as he was putting the last mat of flax out of his waggon, I saw him take this roll of flax out of the mat, and wrap it in a sheet that he had to cover his waggon with; I told Mr. Sills of it, and as he was going out of the yard with his waggon, he challenged him with it, and he said that he had done it; the flax was in the charge of the master of the waggon, Mr. James Bryant.

THOMAS PIGEON sworn. - I am clerk at the Hambro' wharf: The last witness acquainted me with what he had seen, and I saw this flax secreted in the covering that he had to cover his goods with; there is full ten pounds of it; it came from Mr. Walker, of Mark-lane, in Mr. Bryant's waggon; he is a carrier, and brought it to the wharf for shipping.

Earle. (Produces the flax;) I have kept it ever since; he had some loose in the waggon, but I saw him pull this out of the mat.

Prisoner's defence. I did not load the waggon, and I found this loose in the waggon; I had some loose flax to deliver at the New Inn in the Old Bailey, and I thought it belonged to that.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him an excellent character. GUILTY . (Aged 34.)

Whipped 100 yards in Thames-street, near the Hambro' wharf .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-68

311. JOHN PATMAN was indicted for that he, on the 15th of March , being employed in the capacity of a servant to Thomas Barnjum and Richard Rainsdon , did receive and take into his possession three shillings and sixpence of lawful money of this realm, on account of the said Thomas Barnjum and Richard Rainsdon, his masters and employers, and that he afterwards fraudulently and feloniously did embezzle and secrete part of the said money, that is, one shilling and four-pence .

Second Count. Charging him with stealing one shilling and four-pence, the property of the said Thomas Barnjum and Richard Rainsdon.

THOMAS BARNJUM sworn. - I am a carman , in partnership with Richard Rainsdon; the prisoner was our servant, he drove one of our carts.

Q.Was it his ordinary business to receive money for you? - A. Yes. On Saturday the 15th of March, he took some household furniture from Creechurch-lane, Leadenhall-street, to the Borough for me; I saw two shillings and two-pence booked for them, and then I went to the house and made enquiry.

JAMES ROACH sworn. - I am a labourer: I hired a cart of the prisoner to take some household goods from Creechurch-lane into the Borough; the prisoner took them there on the 15th of March, and I paid him three shillings and sixpence for the cartage, about two o'clock in the day.

Q. Did you know his masters? - A. No.

Q. Did you pay it to him for his masters? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM RAINSDON sworn. - I am brother to Richard Rainsdon; I am clerk to the prosecutors; I pay and receive money: On the 15th of March, the prisoner did a job from Creechurch-lane to the Borough; he had booked it two shillings and two-pence, and he paid me two shillings and two-pence; that was in the evening; he said it was all he received for the job.

Q.Can you speak from your recollection of the fact, independent of any reference to a book? - A. Yes.

Q.How came you to find out that it was wrong? - A. My master, in looking over the book, found it was not a satisfactory charge; it was not enough money; he had only three jobs that day; the other two were correct; we always settle with the carmen every evening; the prisoner had drove for us six or eight months.

THOMAS MERRIMAN sworn. - I am a constable: I apprehended the prisoner, that is all I know.

Prisoner's defence. This gentleman hired me upon the stand; he said there were a few boxes; I asked him if he wanted any help, and he said, yes; I fetched the goods down two pair of stairs, and I told him I would not take less than three shillings and sixpence; I charged him two shillings and two-pence for the cartage, and one shilling and a pot of beer for my trouble.

Q.(To Roach.) What did you agree with the prisoner for? - A. For three shillings and sixpence for the hire of the cart.

Q. Were you to pay him a sum for carrying the goods? - A. Yes; when I paid him the three shillings and sixpence, he asked me if I would give

him something to drink, I gave him a pot of beer; he did help me down stairs with some of the goods.

Rainsdon. They are generally paid something for their trouble; a pot of beer, or sixpence.

Jury. Q.What is the fare from Creechurch-lane to the Borough? - A. For household furniture we charge more; the regular fare is two shillings and nine-pence, but for household furniture we are paid so much an hour.

Q. If he was paid by time, do you think it would come to three shillings and sixpence? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you mean to say that that is a fair charge for time? - A. I think it is too much.

Q. Supposing you were to deduct one shilling and four-pence from three shillings and sixpence, would that be a reasonable charge? - A. No; it is not enough.

Q.(To Barnjam.) What would be a fair charge for carrying these household goods? - A. I think three shillings and sixpence a fair charge.

Q. According to the distance, or time? - A. According to the distance, and according to the time; household furniture is very different from merchandize, because it takes a great deal more time.

Q. Then you think it a fair charge? - A. Yes.

GUILTY . (Aged 28)

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-69

312. JOSEPH BUCKERIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , seventy-five yards of Scotch ticking, value 5l. the property of John Bennett , privately in his shop .

JOHN BENNETT sworn. - I am an upholsterer at Hammersmith , opposite the Black Bull: On Saturday, the 16th of March, the prisoner came to my house, and said he came from a lady, and wanted some carpets; in about half an hour the prisoner came a second time, I was writing in the kitchen, it is impossible that any body could come into the shop without my knowledge; hearing a noise in the shop, I went up stairs, and saw the prisoner within a very few yards of my door, with the ticking upon his shoulder; I pursued him, and at one time I was very near him, but he jumped over some pales, and tore his hands with the tenter-hooks; then I lost him for an hour and a quarter; I went to different public-houses, and gave information; the country people had stopped him, seeing his hands bloody, they thought he had committed murder; I afterwards found him in the taproom at the White-horse, Shepherd's-bush, about a mile and a quarter from my shop; I am sure the prisoner is the same man; it laid in the shop window where we put carpets; he must have gone quite round the door to take it.

Q. Are you quite sure he must have come into the shop? - A. I am quite sure of it; the prisoner told me that a gentleman had given it him to carry, at my door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. At the time this ticking was taken out of your shop you were in the kitchen? - A. Yes.

Q. You found nobody in the shop when you came up? - A. No.

Q. When you came up the man had run away, and you ran after him? - A. Yes.

Q. What opportunity had you then of seeing his face? - A. He turned, repeatedly, to see if I was coming after him, and when he got to the pales, I almost caught hold of his hand.

THOMAS PRINCE sworn. - I work in the brickfields: I saw the prisoner walking along with a piece of ticking on his shoulder, he was coming from Mr. Bennett's house towards town; I saw him drop it down and run away; Thomas Hatton picked it up, and took it to Mr. Bennett's house; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

THOMAS HATTON sworn. - I saw the prisoner with the ticking upon his shoulder, he threw it down when Mr. Bennett pursued him close; I took it up, and carried it to Mr. Bennett's shop. (It is produced).

Mr. Bennett. This is my ticking, I had had it three quarters of a year by me, it being too narrow for common mattresses; there is seventy-five marked upon it at the corner, it cost me seven pounds.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the Black-bull, and a porter said he would give me some beer to carry it for him; I had been to North-end to look for work; I am totally innocent of the charge.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-70

313. SARAH YATES , otherwise SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a seven-shilling-piece, two shillings, and a halfpenny, the property of Edward Sewell , privily from his person .

EDWARD SEWELL sworn. - I am a butcher , I am a single man : On the 25th of March, I was going down Holborn, about ten o'clock at night; I met with the prisoner, and she asked me if I would give her any gin, and I gave her some gin at a public-house; and then she asked me if I would go to the King's-head in Holborn ; I went in there with her, and had a shillingsworth of brandy and water, I paid for it, and when I was going to leave the room I missed my money; it was in a canvass purse; there was a seven-shilling-piece, two shillings, and a halfpenny.

Q. Were you in a public, or a private room? - A. In a public room; I was in her company about a quarter of an hour; I got up to go away, and missed my money; I said to her, you have robbed me; she had left the purse in my breeches-pocket, I had leather breeches on, but they do not button very tight; when I told her of it, she put her hand in her pocket and a halfpenny dropped out, it was a halfpenny that I had had for two years, I kept it in my purse; she was not searched till she got to the watch-house, but there was nothing found upon her except two shillings; I was perfectly sober, I had been at work all day.

Prisoner's defence. I went with him into the Six Cans, and there was another man with him, and and another girl; and we had three shillingsworth of brandy and water among us; then he gave me a shilling for myself, and when he was going, he said I had robbed him; I picked up the halfpenny as I was coming out.

Sewell. There was another man and another woman drank with us, but they were gone before she and I had the shillingsworth of brandy and water; I saw my money then, and gave her a shilling for herself.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-71

314. PETER ADDISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a guinea, and a seven-shilling-piece , the property of Mary-Ann Holland .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Henry Holland .

Third Count. Laying them to be the property of Benjamin King .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Myers, and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

MARY- ANN HOLLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. On the 28th of February, I sent a letter by the Post to Bury St. Edmund's, directed to Mrs. Holland, my mother.

Q. Look at that letter? - A. This is the same letter: I put a guinea, and a seven-shilling-piece, into it, wrapped in a small piece of paper; they put three seals upon the letter, one seal stamped in the middle, and a bit of sealing-wax at each end; and there is another seal upon it, but that was put upon it at the Post-office; I gave the letter to the Postman on the 28th of February.

Court. Q.Was it so covered that it was possible that the guinea and seven-shilling-piece could have sell out? - A. No; the paper was closed all round, that it was impossible it could slip out.

RICHARD RICHARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I am a letter-carrier, in the Finsbury-square division: On the 28th of February, I delivered at the Post-office all the letters that were delivered to me in that division.

Court. (To Mrs. Holland) Q. Where did you live at the time you gave this letter to the postman? - A. At Mr. Brookes's, in Finsbury-square; Richards was the man I gave it to.

JOHN-BAPTIST AUSTIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I was presiding officer in the Post-office: On the night of the 28th of February, being on the opposite side of the table to the prisoner at the bar, I observed him with a letter in his hand; I thought he was adjusting the sold of it, I thought the sold of the letter might have slipped out; I did not suspect any thing then, till I observed him put the letter on one side upon the table; he was a facer; the letters are thrown promiscuously upon the table, and they face the letters all one way for the convenience of receiving the stamp; they lay them before the stamp, and another person stamps them; he should have faced that letter, and laid it down with the rest; instead of which, he went away with it, and took it to the further corner of the office.

Q. How far were you distant from where he was first employed? - A. About the length of this room; I then communicated what I had observed to Marshall, and desired that he would send the prisoner into the West-India room; I went into the West-India room, and the prisoner followed me; when he came into the room, he brought the letter in one hand and the money in the other; there was a guinea and a seven-shilling piece; I told him what I had observed; he delivered the letter and the money to me, and said he was looking for me to give it me; I told him he had certainly not been looking for me, because I was near enough to him.

Q. Is that the letter that he delivered to you? - A. It is.

Q. Was the guinea and seven-shilling-piece wrapped up in a paper? - A. No; it was not.

Court. Q. When he delivered the letter to you, did he deliver it to you sealed or unsealed? - A. These two packets of wax were burst, the principal seal was entire.

Q.Then, how were the guinea and seven-shilling-piece got out? - A. I suppose, the sold being narrow, it was shook out at the end.

Q. Supposing it possible that it might be shook out at the end, is it possible that he might have taken it out for security? - A. He might.

GEORGE MARSHALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodfall. I am a messenger in the Inland-office at the Post-office: On the 28th of February last, in the evening, I told the prisoner Mr. Austin wanted him in the West-India room; Mr. Austin was not far from the prisoner, he turned round and went into the West-India room, and the prisoner fol

lowed him; and as soon as he went in, he presented Mr. Austin the letter, and the money separate from the letter; he said to Mr. Austin, he hoped he had no doubt of his having an inclination to secrete the letter; Mr. Austin said, he did not know what to think of the matter, for he had seen him with the letter some time before; Mr. Austin said, he was very sorry that he saw any thing of the kind happen; then Mr. Austin said, I must suspend you; and he would not suffer him to finish his duty, but sent him about his business, and desired him, in the morning to wait on Mr. Stowe, the superintending president; accordingly the prisoner at the bar attended the next morning, very early, to see Mr. Stowe; Mr. Austin was sent for, and I was sent for after; and then the prisoner at the bar related the circumstance to Mr. Stowe, and he ordered Mr. Austin and I to go to Mr. Parkins, the Solicitor for the Post-office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. He came voluntarily to Mr. Stowe's, as he was desired, the next morning? - A. He did, very early.

Prisoner's defence. It wanted then but ten minutes of seven; I had a letter in my pocket which was to go into the country, and if I had not delivered it to the carrier before seven it could not go that night; it is very customary if a letter comes to the office, with any thing in it, to shake it; I shook this, and the money dropped out; there are above twenty of us stand all in a row, it is hardly possible to secrete a letter, and I went round with letters to the sixth division; I am remarkably short-sighted, I could not see Mr. Austin, or a friend, six yards from me.

Court. (To Mr. Austin.) Q. Is it not recommended by the office to persons not to send money, but to bring it to the office, and they would be answerable? - A. Yes.

Mr. Const. Q. I believe there is the word single written upon the letter, is there not? - A. Yes.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS ROWNEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a wholesale warehousemen, upon Holborn-hill: I have known the prisoner twelve or fourteen years, and for the last three years he has been our regular postman; and has been in the habit of bringing from five to six hundred pound a week in letters; I always found him correct.

CHARLES KEGILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a subsurveyor in the Post-office: The prisoner came voluntarily to the Post-office on the 29th, in the morning, and assisted me in the office before he went to Mr. Stowe's; I have known him ten years, he has always borne a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-72

315. HENRY PIERS was indicted for embezzling and secreting a letter containing several Bills of Exchange, he being a person employed in certain business relating to the Post-office .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Myers, and the case by Mr. Fielding).

ARDEN HULME sworn. - Examined by Mr. Woodsall. I wrote a letter and sent to Manchester, on the 24th of March; there were seven Bills of Exchange in it, and a protest, (produces them); this is the letter, and these are the bills, that I put in that evening; I gave it my clerk, Mr. Emery, in the usual way, to put into the Post-office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You delivered it in the usual way? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you do not mean to confine yourself to that particular night? - A. Yes, I do.

JOHN EMERY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I am clerk to the last witness: On the evening of the 24th of March, this letter was given to me to take to the Post-office; I delivered it there.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you any other letter to deliver that night? - A. I delivered six or seven in the course of the evening; I delivered this after seven o'clock.

Q.What are Messrs. Lloyd, and Company? - Bankers.

Q. It is not an unfrequent thing for a banker to be inclosing bills to go to Manchester? - A. No.

Q. It happens, perhaps, daily? - A. Every day.

Q. Therefore, with regard to a letter containing bills, there is nothing remarkable as coming from your house to Manchester? - A. No.

Q. Other bills went to Manchester that day, besides? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Where did you deliver that letter? - A. In a place appointed for receiving letters after seven o'clock; they are given to a person appointed to receive them.

Q. Is there any thing paid for the delivery after that hour? - A. Sixpence.

Q. Is it at the same place that letters are put in that come before seven o'clock? - A. No, just over it.

CHARLES READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I am one of the officers employed in the Post-office.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect having seen him on Monday the 24th of March? - A. Yes; he was sorting letters as usual.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular in the conduct of the prisoner? - A. I saw him come across the office with a letter in his hand; when he came nearly by the side of where I was standing, he put it into his left-hand coat-pocket; in a few minutes afterwards Mr. Austin, the presiding officer of that

evening, came to me, and desired me to go into the West-India room, which I did, and then the prisoner and Mr. Austin came in; Mr. Austin accused him of concealing a letter, and desired him to empty his pockets; he took several things out of his pocket, and at last he took the letter out.

Court. Q. Where was he when you first saw him? - A. Coming from the sorting-table.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This is a public-office? - A. Yes.

Q. How many persons were there in the office when he came across the room? - A. The office was full of people.

Court. Q. What is your situation? - A. I receive the mails in the morning, and sort in the evening.

Mr. Knapp. Q. He was carrying it openly in his hand, so that every body might see it? - A. Yes.

Q. And when he came to you, you being able to see all that he did, he put it into his pocket as publicly? - A. Yes.

Q. There could be no difficulty in your seeing it? - A. None.

Q. Nor any body else, who had an equal opportunity of seeing him? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no attempt to secret it from you? - A. No.

Q. How long have you been in the office? - A.Fourteen years; and he has been there a great many years, almost as long as I have.

Q. There is a person appointed to receive letters that come after time? - A. Yes, there is.

Q.Would letters find their way that were so delivered? - A. Yes; the person that takes those letters is Samuel Hurst, he was sorting close by the side of the prisoner.

SAMUEL HURST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Myers. I belong to the Post-office, I am a sorter: On Monday, the 24th of March, in the evening, I saw the prisoner sorting at the table; I saw him go from the sorting-table with a letter in his hand, which I saw him put in his pocket as he was crossing the office by the president's desk, he might have been gone about two yards from the table; Mr. Austin sent me into the West-India room, and then came in with the prisoner; Mr. Austin charged him with having the letter, and desired him to empty his pockets; in emptying his pockets he pulled out a few things at first, and afterwards pulled out the letter.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This was in a public room, exceeding publicly done? - A. Yes; in the office.

Q. Have you known him some time? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever observed any thing particular with respect to the state of his mind? - A. I cannot say; I have heard different people say so, that he has been in that way that he has not known what he has been about.

JOHN-BAPTIST AUSTIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I was superintendant on the 24th of March, the prisoner was employed that evening as a sorter: About half past seven o'clock in the evening, Samuel Hurst , the last witness, came to me, and told me that Piers had put a letter in his pocket; I ordered the prisoner into the room; I spoke to the prisoner, and told him to come into the other room to me, he was then at the sorting-table; his duty is to sort them, according to their directions, to the several divisions, there are nine divisions.

Q. Is it his duty so to sort them at the table? - A. It is; I went with him into the other room, and I told him what Hurst had told me; I desired him to empty his pockets; he seemed to hesitate, and said, he did not know that he had done so.

Court. Q. Was that before you had desired him to empty his pockets, or after? - A. After; he said, he had no recollection that he had done it; after he had pulled several things out, he pulled out the letter in question.

Q. When he had so produced the letter, what passed? - A. Nothing particular; he was in liquor,(the letter produced); this is the letter; it was not opened till he was in the presence of the solicitor.

Q. Was it a customary thing for him to get drunk? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Hurst is not the money clerk? - A. No.

Q. Is that person here? - A. No.

Q. After being told by Hurst, you found him at the sorting-table, where you would have expected him to be found? - A. Yes.

Q. What time had elapsed between the time of Hurst giving you the information, and the time you found him at the sorting-table? - A. About three minutes.

Q. Long enough to have got out of the room? - A. Yes.

Q. He said he did not recollect that he had done it? - A. Yes.

Q. He was in liquor, and was addicted to liquor? - A. Yes; he seemed to be very stupid.

WILLIAM WEDLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. When Mr. Austin brought you that letter, did you open it? - A. I opened it by Mr. Parkins's direction, and marked every one of the bills with the initials of my name; they contained all these bills.

Mr. Hulme. These are the bills of exchange that I put up in that letter; they are all unsatisfied, except one upon ourselves.(One of the bills read).

Prisoner's defence. I detest the idea of doing any thing wrong, and I trust my innocence will be proved in the present case; and therefore I beg to refer it to my Counsel.

For the Prisoner.

Dr. WILLIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have known the prisoner at the bar twenty-five years: I have prescribed several times for him, and attended him for the purpose of assisting a derangement in his head; his relations and friends said he was very much deranged, and I have often perceived it myself; I exerted myself for him to the utmost of my ability; about two years ago, I believe It was in March, I was given over by my medical friends, I had an asthmatical complaint; Mr. Piers suddenly broke into my chamber, being in the habits of intimacy, he came in in a very wild manner, and clapped me upon my back, and as I lay, very weak and low, with my head upon the pillow upon the table, and said, Doctor, you are a dead man, you are a dead man; your friends do not know your complaint, or do not understand your complaint; nor I do not believe you think yourself so bad as you are; I was exceedingly startled, being low; and my wife was very much frightened, for fear it should take a bad effect upon me; it appeared to be a wild derangement of mind; about a fortnight before this affair happened, he met me in the Borough, just at the turnpike at Newington-causeway, he took and turned me round all on a sudden, being weak, and said, how goes the world with you, doctor; I said, I think it turns round with me at present; it was done with all that flightiness that one would expect from a deranged man; he answered, never mind, Doctor, It will turn round right for an honest man; I attended too at his last examination, at Mrs. Piers's earnest request, and I was then not well at all; I stood under the dial at Bow-street, and after the witnesses were examined, he was very much deranged, and stood like an ideot, picking his nose, and appeared very much deranged; it was impossible to have any other opinion of it.

Q.Having seen him at the time of his examination, are you of opinion that he is deranged? - A. Undoubtedly, at times; he seems at times a little sensible, but it goes off again very quickly.

MARY COXEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have known the prisoner seven years; for the last six or eight months I have seen him very frequently; his mind has been certainly much deranged at times; in the course of that time, about five months ago, I came to town from Beckenham, in Kent, and brought my daughter with me; Mr. Piers knew of my marriage, four years ago, with Mr. Coxen; I came to see his eldest daughter, that I had been particularly intimate with, and bringing my daughter with me, he asked me how I came by a child, where I had picked it up.

Q. Did he know that you had a child by your marriage? - A. Most certainly; it will be twelve months old to-morrow; he asked me who I was, where I came from, and what my name was, though he had seen me several times, at his own house, during my pregnancy; he asked me a number of questions, and then entered into a latin discourse, which he knew I was not conversant with, and then told me I was a fool for not understanding it; his daughter has some knowledge of latin, and she told me it was latin; so, from that time, whatever Mr. Piers has said to me, at different times, I have never answered, or took notice of, being quite inconsistent with any thing that is reasonable; I saw him about a month before this business occurred, he came home while I was in the house, his conduct appeared then exactly in the same manner as it had done for four or five months.

Q. Did it appear to you, from your observation of his conduct, that he had possession of his mind? - A. No; he certainly was deranged at times.

Q. Was his conduct, at the various times you saw him, wholly inconsistent? - A. Yes; within these eight months particularly.

Q. Can you recollect any particular expressions that he has made use of? - A. No; I paid no attention to any thing that he said, he was so inconsistent.

PHILIP ABSOLOM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am employed in the Inland-office as a sorter: I have known the prisoner about two years; he has several times spoke in a very inconsistent manner to me when I have asked him questions; particularly the night he was taken into custody, he came to me as I was sorting, and clapped his hand on my back, he said, in the course of a fortnight he should be made a duke, and then I should made post-master general; he said, I knew where to find the rogues; he then spake in a language I did not understand, and walked away; that was in the fore part of the same evening that he was charged with this offence.

Q. Have you any doubt, from your observation, that his mind was deranged? - A. I always thought his mind was deranged.

Court. Q. Did you ever communicate that opinion of your's? - A. No; it was public to every one in the office.

CHARLES CAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a sorter, and acting clerk, of the fifth division, and have been in that situation fourteen years; I have known the prisoner eight or ten years.

Q.Have you observed his conversation at any time? - A. Yes; I have had a great many conversations with him; his conduct has been totally irregular, and he flies off, and becomes confused; he has not the least rational way of connecting his ideas for any time.

Q. This was known to a great many in the office as well as yourself? - A. Yes; to those that have had the same opportunity.

Q. Was his conduct such as to induce you to believe he was deranged in his intellects? - A. In some small degree I should think so, at times; I recollect his observing to me, one morning, that when he was post-master general he would give me a better situation.

SAMUEL BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the presidents at the Post-office: I have known the prisoner at the bar a great many years.

Q. Have you observed him to be a man perfectly possessed of his reason? - A. I have observed him at some times to be completely deranged; I have observed a variety of circumstances; in fact, he has always shewn confusion and irregularity in his ideas and conversation, a flightiness and unsettledness, that has convinced me that his mind has been totally deranged at times; I have observed it down to the present time.

Q. Perhaps you can tell us why, under these circumstances, he has been continued in his situation? - A.From motives of humanity, the superior officer forbore to make a report; I believe he has been in the office upwards of thirty years.

Q. I believe he has a wife and six children? - A. Yes; he has maintained a very good character, so much so, that he has been put in very responsible situations in the office.

- BALLENTINE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk of the third division of the inland department of the Post-office: About September last, not being in the habits of speaking to the prisoner at the bar, the prisoner saw me at a little distance, where there is a gate to come in; he called to me, and said, here; which I remarked as very extraordinary, not in general speaking to him; there was a small piece of stagnated water before the window where I live, at Walworth; he asked me if I was found of fish; I said, yes; he said, what a fool you must be, here is plenty of fish; he said one of his sons had caught six pounds in a morning; when I returned, I made the observation at the time, that the man must be mad, for there was no fish there.

Q. Have you any doubt that he is deranged in his mind? - A. At times, certainly.

BRYAN BROUGHTON , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I belong to the Treasury: I have known the prisoner between twenty and thirty years.

Q. What has been his character for honestly during all that time? - A. I never heard that he was dishonest, I always looked upon him as a very eccentric and inconsistent character, a man that seemed to be at war with his own interest in general; I have known him refuse very good situations which have been offered him by his friends, from whim or caprice, though his children at that time might be wanting bread; I found that he was a man that could not be served, which arose from his eccentricity; at the same I believe him a man, when in possession of a found mind, incapable of doing an action morally wrong.

CHARLES-RUNNINGTON BROUGHTON, Esq. sworn. - I have known the prisoner at the bar upwards of twenty years; I have observed him to be extremely eccentric, and in a disordered state of mind; his character has been always that of a perfectly honest man; I have considered him to be a strictly honourable character; I have had an opportunity frequently of being employed to write in the Secretary of State's office; I employed him to copy a paper to be laid before Parliament, which I could by no means have done if I had had any doubts of his strict honour; that was about three years since; I should not do justice to the man if I did not say he is one of the last men in the world that would, I believe, be guilty of such an action as he now stands at that bar to answer for.

JOHN MADDISON , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I belong to the Post-office: I have known the prisoner many years, I believe thirty; when I was in the Receiver's office, I had an opportunity of seeing him every day; he then appeared to have the possession of his mind; I have not seen him since, except occasionally; it is now about fifteen years ago; I always found him a very honest man.

The Jury declared themselves satisfied that he was deranged at the time the fact was committed.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t18000402-73

316. MARY PARROT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , thirty yards of Irish linen, value 50s. and four linen handkerchiefs, value 6s. the property of John Dowler , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN DOWLER sworn. - I am a grocer : On Monday, the 17th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, and was served by my wife in my presence; a parcel of linen was lying upon the counter, containing thirty yards of Irish, and four pocket-handkerchiefs; as soon as I missed the parcel I pursued the prisoner, but did not find her; I then went to the office in Lambeth-street, and took two officers with me; I did not know where she lived, but I had seen her mother come out of Elephant-and-Castle-court, in Whitechapel, which made me suppose she might have gone there; I got Griffiths

and Osman, and took them with me; that was within half an hour after I had missed the parcel; when we came there the prisoner was sitting down upon a low seat, behind the door; I did not immediately perceive her; Griffiths made her rise up, and then I directly said that was the person; Osman then searched the room, and in a bed that was turned up, there was a great part of the linen; I saw him pull it out of the bed; and on a table or chest that was standing by, there was a smaller part of the same linen lay covered over; and in the same room, upon the floor, were found the four pocket-handkerchiefs; they laid near the fireplace; Osman took the linen and the prisoner to the office.

RICHARD OSMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street: (produces the property.) I found these things in the room where the prisoner was.

Dowler. My wife had bought it that afternoon, of Fawcett and Co. in the Minories; his servant is here; it was sent home between seven and eight in the evening.

THOMAS DREW sworn. - I am servant to Mess. Fawcett and Maycock, linen-drapers, in the Minories: I remember my master serving Mrs Dowler with some Irish linen, and I served her with the handkerchiefs; I cannot swear to the linen, but I can swear to these handkerchiefs; I sold them to Mrs. Dowler on the 17th of March; they are worth about six shillings; I took them home to Mr. Dowler's, and laid them on the counter; the linen and the handkerchiefs were in one parcel; it appears to me to be the same linen.

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent of taking it; I tumbled over it in the alley; I took my child out of the bed, and put the cloth in.

GUILTY. (Aged 31.)

Of stealing goods, value 39s.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-74

317. FRANCES GINGER , alias COOPER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a sheet, value 2s. the property of Martha Barrett , widow , in a lodging-room in her dwelling-house, let by contract to the prisoner, and to be used by her with the lodging .

It appearing in evidence that the contract was made with the husband of the prisoner, she was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-75

318. THOMAS HOLDHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , a cotton gown, value 5s. a silk cloak, value 5s. a shirt, value 1s. and a pair of stockings, value 6d. the property of John Anderson .

JOHN ANDERSON sworn. - I keep the Fleece, Marsham-street, Westminster : The prisoner and several others came into my house, the house was full of them, on Tuesday last the 1st of April , about twelve o'clock; they went into the kitchen and had some ale and some gin; then they went up stairs, and had two pots; when they were coming down stairs, my wife cried out, Anderson, we are robbed; I then followed the prisoner into the street, and he loosened his great coat, and dropped the things from under it; there were two gowns, a cloak, a shirt, and a pair of stockings.

JAMES BLY , an officer, produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutor asked us to go up stairs and have a game at cards, and that he had some very nice ale, and we went up stairs, and played at cards, there were some other people playing at cards, and as we were coming down stairs, the woman of the house I believe saw some things lying upon the stairs, and she said I had taken them.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-76

319. THOMAS DALTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , thirty-one penny pieces, and two halfpence , the property of William Davis .

MARGARET DAVIS sworn. - I am the wife of William Davis ; I keep a public-house the corner of Union-street : I was in the bar drinking tea, I heard a noise in a small bed-room over my head, I went up and found the door open and the prisoner in the room; I stood on one side to let him come out; I had never seen him before; I did not speak to him, I was so stunned; he went down stairs, and I followed; my husband was standing at the stair-foot, waiting to know the event of what I had heard; I said, take hold of that man, and he stopped him; the lock of the door had been wrenched off; I went to a writing-desk where we keep what money we have, and missed about thirty penny-pieces, and two quite new halfpence; I picked up a penny-piece on the floor, which had dropped and made the noise that I heard; my husband and three other men took him to the office, and delivered him to an officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is there any communication to this room but that which goes through the tap-room? - A. No.

Q. Do you know if any of your lodgers had been in the room? - A. No; nobody goes into that room but myself and my husband; I always make my own bed, so that the servant never goes into that room; I had been in the room not twenty minutes before.

HENRY LEVITT sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner, at the office; I searched him and found upon him thirty-one penny-pieces, two new half-pence, and a key which tallied with the marks on the door; I tried it.

Prisoner's defence. I had had them in my pocket some time.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY (Aged 40.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-77

320. MARY BURROWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a boy's hat, value 5s. the property of James Finnis .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-78

321. THOMAS LAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a linen cloth, value 2d. and seventeen pounds of butter, value 17s. the property of William Brooks .

WILLIAM BROOKS sworn. - I live in Spitalfields : I was not at home at the time the butter was taken.

ELIZABETH BROOKS sworn. - I am daughter of the last witness: Last Wednesday morning about eight o'clock I was in the room behind the shop, I turned my head and saw the prisoner going out of the shop, he had a cloth in his hand with the butter in it; he went towards Brown's-lane; I ran after him, and called out stop thief; he was stopped at the top of Church-street, by a young man who is here; I saw him throw the butter away, about four yards before he was stopped, and I saw a young man pick it up.

JOHN MILLS sworn. - I was going to work about eight o'clock in the morning; I heard an alarm of stop thief in Wood-street; I ran after the prisoner, and just before I came up with him I saw him drop the butter; it was in a coarse cloth; then I laid hold of him, and took him to the watch-house.

Prosecutor. (Produces a lump of butter in a cloth.) I know this to be my cloth, the butter came in it in the morning; there were seventeen pounds in all.

Prisoner's defence. I have followed the sea from the time I was very young; I had been out of employment a long time, and I did it from distress.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-79

322. RANDALL GAMBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a double bladed knife, value 1s. 3d. the property of Francis Laking .

The principal witness not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-80

323. JOHN GUERNSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , two paper bags, value 1d. and two pounds eleven ounces of tea, value 11s. the property of William Huson .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

The prisoner was tried upon two other indictments, but the evidence being to the same effect, he was ACQUITTED.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-81

324. SAMUEL LARKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a metal watch, value 20s. a stone ring, set in gold, value 2s. a gauze cloak, value 10s. 6d. a pair of stone shoe-buckles, for in silver, value 8s. a muslin petticoat, value 4s. a dimity petticoat, value 4s. two silver table-spoons, value 21s. and a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 10s. the property of Jane Hinton , in her dwelling-house .

JANE HINTON sworn. - I keep a house in the parish of St. Pancras : On the 30th of January, about half past twelve, I went out; I returned again about four; I had lost nobody at home except the lodgers; I live in the first floor; I locked the door, and put the key in my pocket; when I came home, I found the door unlocked; I examined, and missed the articles mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them;) I then went to Marlborough street, and on the 28th of March I found some of my property in the possession of the prisoner; I had two constables with me; we went to the prisoner's lodgings in King-street, Seven-dials; the prisoner was in the room; we found a pair of stone buckles, a gauze cloak, and some duplicates which led to some more of my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.You received some information from a woman of the name of Owell, of her wife Johnson? - A. Yes.

Q. When you asked the prisoner how he came by these things, did he not tell you that they had been left there by a woman? - A. No, he did not; a list was found in his apartments of all the property I lost; he said he had bought them.

Q.This was two months after you had lost them? - A. Yes.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - On the 28th of March I went with a brother officer to the prisoner;s apartments, No. 40, King-street, Seven-dials; we found him there; in searching the house, up two pair of stairs, I found in a drawer this pair of stone buckles, a black silk gauze cloak, a stone ring, and duplicates of other things; a great number of picklock-keys, and a list of the property that the prosecutrix was robbed of; I went to the pawnbrokers, and found the property; here is a pick lockkey that I tried on the room-door, and it unlocked it.

CHRISTOPHER LABB sworn. - I live with Mr. Lane, in Drury-lane: (produces a pair of tablespoons, a watch, and a pair of tea-tongs;) I took the spoons in of the prisoner on the 30th of January, in the afternoon, from the prisoner at the bar, I lent him seventeen shillings and sixpence upon them; I took in the watch on the 14th of February, I lent half-a-guinea upon it; and the tea-tongs were taken in on the 7th of February, for six shillings; they are all pledged in his own name; I had known him some time; I knew his connections.

CHARLES TROUTBECK sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Chandler, a pawnbroker, in Holborn:(produces two petticoats;) they were pledged with me in the name of Mary Williams , for seven shillings; but by whom I cannot say.(The property was deposed to by Mrs. Hinton.)

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called six witnesses, who had all known him upwards of twenty years, and gave him an excellent character. GUILTY Death . (Aged 27.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t18000402-82

325. WILLIAM SANGSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , two bed-curtains, value 6s. a woollen rug, value 1s. 6d. a holster, value 1s. 6d. and a pail, value 6d. the property of John Hodges , in a lodging-room let to him by contract .

MARY HODGES sworn. - I let lodgings; I keep a house in Lewkner's-lane : The prisoner took a lodging of me for himself and his wife; he left me somewhere about the 20th of March; I had not seen either of them for three or four days before; and in consequence of some information, I opened the window-shutters, and found the curtains taken from the bed; that was on the 25th; I went down to a Mrs. Floyd's, where I saw the prisoner's wife, and she ran into another room and hid herself when she saw me; she said her husband was out at work; I desired her to send him to me when he came home; then I went in the evening again, and heard his voice, and he hid himself; but at last he came out and spoke to me; he said his place was broke open on the Saturday night, and the things taken out, and if I would make a debt of it, he would pay me so much a week; I told him he owed me thirty shillings, and I thought that was a good deal; then I charged the watch with him.

Q. Did he tell you before he left your lodging, that he had been robbed? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. There was nothing to fasten the room-door but a padlock; this gentlewoman's son has opened it with a crooked nail; and the shutters could be opened on the outside; any body might get in; and I found the things missing, and my owing her some money deterred me from acquainting her with it. GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000402-83

326. GEORGE MITCHELL , alias RICHARD ASHLEY , alias JOHN ASHLEY , was indict for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , three pair of breeches, value 15s. two waistcoats, value 8s. a cloth great coat, value 10s. and a cloth coat, value 10s. the property of Robert Brathwaite .

ROBERT BRATHWAITE sworn. - I live with his Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland: I was absent from my lodgings from the 24th of March to the 26th; I lodge over my stables in Little St. James's-street ; I did not miss my property till Thursday the 27th; I missed two coats, three waistcoats, and three pair of breeches; I had left part of them in a box in my room, unlocked, and part of them hanging up in the room; the prisoner was helper to his Royal Highness's stables; while I was absent he had got his wages and absconded; I suspected him, and got a warrant; I saw him at a public-house in Woodstock-street on the Saturday following; I took an officer and a fellow-servant with me; I sent my fellow-servant in first, and the constable, and I went in after him; the constable went in, and asked if there was not a person there of the name of Mitchell; the prisoner immediately owned to his name; I was behind; the officer then secured him; he was sitting in a box on the left-hand side of the fire-place; he was taken to the watch house that night, and searched, but nothing was found upon him; after my fellowservant had gone into the public-house, and before the constable went in, I saw the prisoner stoop, and I thought he might have concealed the duplicates at that time, and I went on the Monday, and

the landlord gave me the duplicates of all my property, pawned at two different pawnbrokers, Mr. Ashman's in the Strand, and Mr. Wessel's in Parliament-street; when I came home I found my room-door locked.

SHERRARD HART sworn. - I keep the King's-arms in Woodstock-street: I have known the prisoner upwards of five years, he lived at the Marquis of Townsend's three years, and afterwards at Lady Langham's; I was not at home at the time he was at my house; after I came home, I found three duplicates, a letter, and a purse, under the seat on the left-hand side of the fire-place; I delivered them to Brathwaite.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am an officer,(produces the duplicates); I had them from Brathwaite; I have got a part of the property that was brought by the pawnbrokers to Marlborough-street; one of the duplicates is in the name of John Ashley , and the other Richard Ashley .

GEORGE JONES sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Ashman in the Strand. (Produces two pair of breeches).(The property was deposed to by Brathwaite).

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t18000402-84

327 . HENRY MILES , alias DEEPER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , twenty-five yards of linen cloth, value 2l. 4s. fourteen yards of calico, value 24s. twenty-eight yards of other calico, value 3l. 4s. fourteen yards of other calico, value 22s. and twenty-five ells of linen cloth, value 34s. the property of Jonathan Sills , the elder, Joseph Sills , and Jonathan Sills , the younger.

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of William Wallace . and John Harding .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN- WINTER PIGEON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am in the employ of Messrs. Sills, who keep the Hambro' Wharf ; their names are Jonathan Sills, the elder, Joseph Sills, and Jonathan Sills , the younger: On the 18th of December, I received a bale of goods from Messrs. Wallace and Harding, linen-drapers , in Cheapside: they were lodged in our warehouse on the wharf, for the purpose of being conveyed to Whitchurch, in Hampshire, by the Basingstoke canal, which was at that time stopped by the frost.

Q. How long was it before you missed any part of the bale? - A. The 10th of January; I discovered that it had been cut open, and a considerable quantity of it taken away; the prisoner continued at work as usual for a week or ten days after, and then he absented himself without leave; he was absent a whole week, and the Monday of the following week, in consequence of information I received, I went down to Great Marlow, in Buckinghamshire, to the house of Ellis Harvey , that was before Harvey had made any discovery; I got a search-warrant to search his house; we found nothing till we were coming out of the house, I saw that his child had a frock on exactly of the same pattern as a piece which I had brought down to ascertain whether they were the same goods or not; in consequence of that, I made a further search; I then went to the house of another witness, Mrs. East, a butcher, at Great Marlow, the constable has the property that I found at her house; I found some more at the house of Mrs. Plumridge, her husband is a bricklayer, she is a shop-keeper, the constable has that property; I found some at a pawnbroker's at Great Marlow; I found some more at the house of one Lawrence; some more at the house of a person of the name of Winter; neither Lawrence nor Winter are here; some at a person's of the name of Humphreys; others at a person's of the name of Crust; and others at a person's of the name of Clark.

ANN EAST sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the wife of Zachary East, a butcher, at Marlow: Mr. Pigeon came to our house, and found some linen; I had it from Ellis Harvey 's wife, on the 20th of January, ten yards and a quarter of dowlas, and two yards of printed cotton.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I have seen him many a time go along Marlow streets; he saw the stuff lie on the table; he asked me if I was making smock-frocks; he said he wanted one; he then gave me a touch on the side, and held up his hand; I took him to mean that I was to hold my tongue; I gave Mrs. Harvey one shilling and sixpence an ell for the dowlas, and twenty-pence a yard for the cotton; I delivered it to the constable; I bought it by patterns that she produced me.

Mrs. PLUMRIDGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep a shop at Marlow: On the 16th of January, I purchased of Mrs. Harvey nine yards of blue Irish, at fourteen-pence a yard; it was afterwards delivered to the constable: I had seen the prisoner twice, about two months before I bought this.

JAMES PUDDEFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a pawnbroker at Marlow, (Produces three yards of printed calico); on the 17th of January, it was pledged at my shop, but I do not know by whom, my wife took it in. (Produces the duplicate).

WILLIAM DAY sworn. - Examined by Mr.

Knowlys. Q. Did you ever see the prisoner? - A. Yes; I saw him at Great Marlow, in Buckingham shire, about nine weeks ago, I did not see any thing that he had; a day or two after that, I purchased of Mrs. Harvey five yards and a half of printed calico, at a place called Burrows-grove.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in company with Harvey, among other people? - A. Yes, I did; they seemed to be acquainted, they were drinking together.

Mrs. HARVEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the wife of Ellis Harvey, I live at Great Marlow, in Buckinghamshire: This is the printed cotton that I sent by my daughter to Mr. Puddeford's, the pawnbroker's; I delivered the duplicate of it to the constable; I had it from my husband.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; I have seen him several times at Marlow; he brought a bit of stuff to my house in a sack, I think it was a little better than a week before Mr. Pigeon came down, he left it all day at my house, till night; he fetched it at night, and brought it back again next day; there was a bit of cotton, and a bit of dowlas; he put it into a bag, and carried it away; I do not know what he did with it afterwards.

Q. Did you ever dispose of any thing to Mrs. East? - A. Yes; a bit of dowlas, and two yards of printed cotton.

Q.Where did you get that dowlas and cotton from? - A.From my husband, before the prisoner came, about a week.

Q.Had you ever any dealings with Mrs. Plumridge? - A. Yes; I sold her nine yards of blue Irish; that I had from my husband likewise.

Q.Was that before the prisoner came to your house? - A. Yes; Mr. Pigeon afterwards came to my house, and took notice of my child's frock; I had that from my husband.

Q. Who did you pay the money to, that you received from Mrs. East and Mrs. Plumridge for these things? - A. I brought it home, put it into a little wooden bowl, and my husband gave it to the prisoner at the bar several days afterwards.

Q. Had you any thing for your trouble in disposing of these things? - A. Only a little frock that my child had on.

ELLIS HARVEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I carry chalk in a barge as far as Egham, sometimes further: I know the prisoner at the bar very well; I came up to town in January, upon some business of my own; I went to the Bowl and Pin public-house, in Thames-street, and asked if I could sleep there; they said, and welcome; the prisoner, Miles, was there.

Q. Did you know who Miles worked for? - A. Yes, for Mr. Sills, at the Hambro' Wharf; he asked me to go to his lodgings, at the Cart and Horse, just by the Bowl and Pin; I went with him, and sat and drank with him till half past ten, and I went up to bed with him, and we talked a considerable time about this cotton; he got up early in the morning to go to work; and he took a large brown paper parcel off the bed, he asked me if I had got any money in my pocket; I said I had but ten-pence; he persuaded me to carry some of it to Marlow, and to send him up fifteen shillings as soon as I could; I took it to Marlow; I asked him how he came by it; he said he came by it very honest, he found it; he told me there was no danger to carry it, for he had cut the names off, so that nobody could swear to it, for my safety, if any body took me; my wife disposed of it, and I disposed of a little of it; he came to my house, at Marlow, with a sack upon his shoulders, about a week afterwards; he put it down under the table, and sat down by it, and said he was very poor; he asked my little girl to go and pawn a bit at the pawnbroker's, Mr. Puddeford's; the girl pawned it, and brought six shillings and three halfpence, and gave him.

Q.Was your wife at home at this time? - A. Yes; I believe it was pawned in my wife's name; she gave the duplicate to her mother, I believe; I was at home when he received the money, and he took me to the White-hart and gave me some ale; the things in the sack consisted of some dowlas, frocking for smock-frocks, and some children's frocking; he was backwards and forwards with me for a week, that I can swear for, I was in his company almost every day while he was there; he told me if I would bring a punt to the Hambro' Wharf he knew how to get some more out.

Q. Did he tell you how he got it? - A. Yes; he said he took it out of a small truss, put it in his smock-frock, and brought it home to his lodgings in the dusk of the evening; I was taken up, and had before Mr. Pigeon at the White-horse; I was confined one night by Mr. Pigeon's order; Mr. Pigeon took notice of a frock that my child had on; the stuff it was made with I had from the prisoner at the bar, part of what he gave me in London; I know that my wife disposed of what I brought from from London; my wife put the money into a little wooden dish, and I gave it into his hand, it was silver and halfpence, and a seven shilling-piece; it was kept apart from my own.

Prisoner. Q. He has been tried at Aylesbury himself? - A. Yes; a man at Langley swore against me for some fowls, and I was acquitted, at the sessions, before my Lord Temple.

Prisoner. Q. He has been tried four or five times? - A. I never was but once in my life in prison.

Prisoner. Q. The constable will prove it; did not you propose to me to leave the wharf for a night, and you would rob the wharf with a punt? - A. No such thing.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not propose to steal a watch belonging to a man of the name of Edwards? - A. I never did in my life.

Prisoner. Q.Were you not tried for stealing of iron? - A. No; not no other thing but the fowls.

JOHN GOLDSWAIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am deputy constable at Marlow. (Produces the different articles of property received from different persons at Marlow).

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; I have seen Harvey and the prisoner together at a public-house at Marlow; it was some time in January.

Q. Did you ever know Harvey accused of any thing? - A. Only once for some fowls, and then he was acquitted.

Q. Have you a duplicate to produce? - A. No; I had one, but I have lost it; I had it from Mrs. Harvey.

JOHN ABRAHAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am porter to William Wallace and John Harding, linen-drapers, in Cheapside, they have no other partners: I delivered a bale of linens and cottons on the 21st of December, to go to Whitchurch, for one Richardson, by the Basingstoke canal; I I took it to the Hambro' Wharf myself, and delivered it to one of the clerks; I saw it again about three weeks after, Mr. Pigeon shewed it to me, cut open, and some goods taken out; I packed up the goods myself; I missed from the truss a whole piece of printed calico, a piece of Hambro' rough, which is a coarse linen cloth, that they make smock-frocks and bags of; I also missed a piece of Irish linen dyed blue.

Q. Look at that piece.(The piece that was pawned)? - A. I have no doubt but this is the same; it is the same quality, and firmness, and of the same pattern; it is in every respect like it.

Q. Look at that piece. (The piece found at Day's)? - A. I believe this to be a part of the piece that was lost from the truss, it is fine calico; I really do believe it is the same.

Q. Look at that piece of blue Irish? - A. This is of the same quality and pattern.

Q. Look at these two pieces. (from Mrs. East's)? - A. I believe these to be the very same.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent of the charge laid to me as an unborn baby.

GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-85

328. ELIZABETH CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a cloak, value 1l. 11s. 6d. the property of Sarah Alder .

SARAH ALDER sworn. - I live at No. 12, Fell-street, Wood-street : On Wednesday the 26th of February, I missed my clock from off my bed between one and two o'clock in the day; the prisoner had been at our house that day; she came occasionally backwards and forwards of errands; about five o'clock in the afternoon I found it in the hands of the pawnbroker.

Prisoner. She lives in a bad house.

Q. Do you live with your father and mother? - A. No; a person of the name of Mary Levis keeps the house.

Q. Are you in any business? - A.I take to needle-work.

HENRY RICHARDSON sworn. - I am a page broker: (produces a clark;) I took it in of the prisoner at the bar; I lent her half-a-guinea upon on the 26th of February, about half past three o'clock; I did not know her before; I am sure she is the person; she pledged it in the name of Mary Alder .

JOHN NEWMAN sworn. - I am a constable: I went in pursuit of the prisoner; I went to the different pawnbrokers, and found the cloak; when I came back I found the prisoner, at No. 12. Fell street; she had been brought there from Whitecross-street; she had got but two shillings and a penny about her, she had spent eight shillings and five-pence of the money.

Miss Alder. I know this to be my cloak, by a join in the lining, and by the lace at the top; it does not meet; it is not quite finished.

Prisoner's defence. This is a very bad house; my mother put me there, and I was to have what the gentlemen would give me when they came to these ladies, for lighting them out; and this young lady took away all the money from me, and never would let me have any, and I took the cloak to get some money.

Q.(To Newman.) Do you know this house? - A. Yes; it is a very quiet house, there are only two girls live there; I never saw any thing but quiet of the house.

Q. Did you ever see girls of the town go backwards and forwards? - A. I have not; only in the day-time I have seen them go in and come out: I do not know that they are girls of the town, they are very decent young women.

Q. Do you know really that they are girls of bad character? - A.They may be of bad character some people say so; I never saw any thing bad it them.

Q.(To Alder.) Are there any young women in the house that see company? - A.Not that I know of.

Q. Is there another young woman in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Does she get her bread as an honest woman? - A. I cannot say.

Q.What is the master and mistress of the house?

- A. He belongs to the East-India warehouses, I believe. GUILTY (Aged 12.)

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-86

329. WILLIAM THOMAS, alias THOMPSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , a pound of coffee, value 1s. the property of James Casino .

JOHN- WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am servant to my father, who is one of the Skinners porters upon the quays: On Tuesday, the 1st of April, we had forty bags of coffee sent down to Cox's-quay , the property of James Casino ; they were sent down for shipping in their name; they were under my care for the space of an hour; I was called to by a person of the name of Charles Brightwell , that one of the bags of coffee had been cut; I went and found the bag cut, and the prisoner's hat with coffee in it; we had no other coffee but Mr. Casino's.

CHARLES BRIGHTWELL sworn. - I am a wharsinger's man at Cox's-quay: On Tuesday, the 1st of April, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner raking the coffee out of the bag into his hat with his hand; when I came up to him he was going to put it on his head with the coffee in it; I called Mr. Chapman to take him; there might be near a pound of coffee in his hat.

JOHN TANNER sworn. - I am a constable:(produces the coffee;) I received it from Chapman in the man's hat; it was the same sort of coffee that we had. GUILTY (Aged 24.)

Whipped one hundred yards in Thames-street, near Cox's-quay .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-87

330. RICHARD TUCKER was indicted for feloniously stealing an earthen-ware tea-pot, value 4d. and four earthen-ware tea-saucers, value 3d. the property of George Bacchus and John Ogden .

GEORGE BACCHUS sworn. - I live in Thames-street, in partnership with John Ogden ; we employ eight men; I missed some articles, and desired the warehouseman to watch.

WILLIAM MORRIS sworn. - I am warehouseman to Messrs. Ogden and Bacchus: I was desired to watch in the cellar; the prisoner came down about a quarter before one in the day, and I saw him put a tea-pot into his pocket, and four tea-saucers; I acquainted Mr. Bacchus with it, and he desired me to watch his coming out to dinner; in the mean time, a constable was sent for, and when he came out to go to dinner, we laid hold of him and took him into the accompting-house, where he delivered the things into the constable's hand; he went down upon his knees and begged for mercy.(The constable produced the property.)

Prisoner's defence. They are all broke and damaged; they are not saleable; I picked them out of the damaged goods.

Bacchus. I found the tea-pot in a suspicious place two days before, and I marked it and put it in the same place again.

Court. Q. Were they damaged goods? - A. The saucers are what we call faulty, not broke; but the tea-pot was complete. GUILTY (Aged 26.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-88

331. JOHN HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a cheese, value 14s. the property of John Hartshorn .

WILLIAM HEWLETT sworn. - I am servant to John Hartshorn, cheesemonger , in Tower-street : On Tuesday evening, the 11th of March, I was busy weighing cheeses; I was informed that a boy had stole a cheese; I went after him immediately, and saw him with the cheese in his hand, about a hundred yards up Mark-lane; he dropped the cheese, and I picked it up; I never lost sight of him till I put him in the watch-house.( Joseph Fennell , the constable, produced the cheese, which was deposed to by Hewlett.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY (Aged 16.)

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-89

332. WILLIAM POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , four pair of list shoes, value 4s. three cribbage-boards, with dominos in them, value 40s. six pair of gloves, value 8s. eight tobacco-stoppers, value 4s. a cotton handkerchief, value 6d. and a linen bag, value 6d. the property of Owen Williams .

OWEN WILLIAMS sworn. - On Sunday, the 2d of March, I was coming out of the country, I stopped at the Black Bull at Highgate about six o'clock; I was coming to Camden Town; the prisoner at the bar followed me from the Black Bull, as far as the Green Dragon at Highgate ; I turned into the Green Dragon, and the prisoner followed me in; I left my bundle upon the table in the tap-room, and went to call for a pint of beer at the bar, and when I came back the prisoner was gone, and the bundle, which contained the things mentioned in the indictment, in a bag; on Wednesday, the 5th of March, I saw the prisoner and some of the articles at Hatton-garden Office.

MARY WEBB sworn. - I keep the Edinburgh-castle at Barnet: The prisoner came into my house with some pork steaks, and asked me to dress them; he asked me if I wanted any dominos, I told him, no; he said he had come out of a French prison, and had got some to sell; he went into the bar and sold some; he went away, and came back again with some gloves to sell; he asked me if he could lodge there that night; I told him, yes, and I took three pair of gloves for his reckoning; the constable has the gloves; I saw the dominos in the bar, they were broken ones, I think I should know them again.

EDWARD WINTERS sworn. - I am a pork-butcher: I was at Barnet on the 3d of March, it was market-day; a man came into Mrs. Webb's, I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not; he had some dominos to sell; he said he got them from a French prison; he asked me three shillings for a box; I offered him two shillings, and he let me have them. (Produces them.)

ROBERT BELAMAY sworn. - I keep the Black Bull at Highgate: On Sunday, the 2d of March, Mr. Williams came to my house with the light coach; he got off the coach and gave me his bundle; I put it backwards for him, and when he went away he took it with him. On the 4th of March he came again to my house, and said he had lost his bundle at the Green Dragon; I said I had not heard any thing of it; and in less than ten minutes after, some post-boys came in, and in consequence of their information, I immediately went to Barnet at past ten o'clock at night, and found the prisoner at Mrs. Webb's; I took a constable with me, and we found the prisoner; he told us where most of the things were; Mr. Gravestock, the constable, took him to his house, the Red Lion at Barnet, and there his hat sell off, and a bag and a cotton handkerchief sell out of the crown of it.

HENRY GRAVESTOCK sworn. - I received three pair of gloves from Mrs. Webb; a cotton handkerchief and a bag fell out of the prisoner's hat. (Produces them.)

Williams. These are my dominos; I brought them from Norman-cross Stilton-barracks, Huningdonshire; they were made there by the French prisoners: I know all these things to be mine; I had been down to see my mother, and bought these things in my way home.

Prisoner's defence. I found them.

GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-90

333. HENRY NOWLAND and BRYAN NOWLAND were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , seventy-five earthenware plates, value 25s. six small earthen-ware plates, value 1s. two cut glass salts, value 4s. a plain glass salt-cellar, value 6d. and a pen-knife, value 1s. the property of George Phillips .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ANN BOSWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. My husband and I live in Adam and Eve-court, Oxford-street; the two prisoners both lodged in my house, in the same room: On Monday, the 24th of February, I saw some blue and white china plates in a canvas cloth, under the bed, and knowing that they worked for Mr. Phillips, an earthen-ware dealer , near the Pantheon, I told my husband of it; and he informed Mr. Phillips; they had lodged with me between seven and eight months.

GEORGE PHILLIPS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live next door to the Pantheon, in Oxford-street; Henry Nowland has been in my service about sixteen months, and Bryan came a few months after Henry: On Monday the 24th of February, in consequence of information, I went to their lodgings in Adam and Eve-court; Boswell went up with me into the back room up one pair of stairs, where I saw a bundle tied up in a coarse cloth, containing twenty-four blue and white plates; I found it near the bed, rather under it; there was a box in the room, which I just poised, and found it excessively heavy; I then went to Marlborough-street for a search-warrant; I then went again with an officer; I called at home and desired the prisoner, Bryan, to take a basket, and follow me; when we had got over the way into the court, I told him a discovery had been made of some earthen-ware in his apartments, and it would be necessary that he should give an account of it; the officer untied the bundle, and took out the plates; I then desired Bryan to open the box; and he said it was his brother's, and he had not the key; the officer then broke it open, and we found in it all the rest of the articles mentioned in the indictment, except the pen knife, which was in a bundle of dirty linen upon the box; the officer took possession of the property; they were all new plates, quite bright and clean, they had not the least appearance of having been used, but they were interspersed with small straws; we had unpacked, within a few days, a great many goods from both our manufacturers, and on account of the quantity, they were put upon the shelves without wiping them, as we usually do; I have no doubt that they were a part of my stock; there were two cut glass salts, and a plain one, the cut glass salts were of the same pattern, but different in size from each other; with respect to the large one, I had, a little time before, written to my manufacturer to send me twenty-four a little larger, and they had arrived three or four days before this discovery; I had

put them in a glass case in the accompting-house; the prisoner, Bryan, used to light the fire in the accompring-house before the clerk came; I had not sold any of them; I went home and examined the cut glass salts, and found but twenty-three instead of twenty-four; they were wrapped up in a greyish kind of paper, very different from any paper used in our shop; and the one that I found in the prisoner's box was in a paper exactly resembling that paper; I have no doubt but that was one of the twenty-four; the pen-knife I had missed about ten days before, and made a good deal of inquiry after it but heard nothing of it. (William Jackson, the offer, produced the property).

Phillips. I am sure this knife is mine, there is a small bit chipped off the end of it on the ivory part; after I had returned home, the other prisoner came in; I told him some earthen-ware had been found in his apartments; I asked him for the key of the box; he said he had not had it, for several days past, and appeared exceedingly confused; I desired him to go with me over to his lodgings; he went with me to the door, and there he ran away; on the Wednesday following I took him again at the lodging; he was taken before a Magistrate; Bryan had declared, with many oaths and imprecations, that he knew nothing about it, and wished his brother at the devil for running away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I believe one of the prisoners had lived with a Mr. Minton, in the same business? - A. He had; that was Henry.

Q. You had not counted over the number of plates in your house? - A. No; I could not.

Q. They might have been stolen from Mr. Minton for any thing you know? - A. No; Mr. Minton's brother supplies him entirely.

Q. When you took up Bryan first, did he not say, that his brother Henry was totally innocent, and knew nothing of the transaction? - A. He did.

ARTHUR MINTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner, Henry, lived with me formerly, he went from me to Mr. Phillips's; Mr. Phillips did not ask me for a character of him, if he had I should have given him a most excellent one; after this discovery was made, he called at my house, and told me that there had been some things found in his brother's lodging, and his; I then asked him if he knew any thing of them; he said, no, he did not, and wished me to go to his master; I told him if I could be of any service to him, as an honest man, I would; but if he was guilty, I would certainly assist in bringing him to justice.

Q. Look at those plates, have you any patterns of that sort in your stock? - A. Not exactly; my brother, and several others, make of the same pattern, with the only difference of their being different manufacturers.

Mr. Alley. Q. He might have stole them from you? - A. He had opportunities enough.

Henry Nowland 's defence I am as innocent as the child unborn; I know nothing about it; he had the key of the box as well as me; they were not in the box on Sunday night, they must have been put in the day my brother was taken.

Bryan Nowland's defence. The property is mine, I bought them, and paid for them, this man knows nothing at all about them.

The prisoners called one witness, who had known them from the time they came to London, and gave them a good character.

Henry Nowland, GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Bryan Nowland , GUILTY. (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-91

334. CHARLES SPRING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , six penneyweights of silver, value 1s. 6d. the property of Lewis Pamin .

LEWIS PANTIN sworn. - I am a silversmith in St. Martin's-le-grand; the prisoner was my porter : On the 31st of March, he did not come to work as usual; he had never missed his duty before, and I was very much surprised; I went out, and on my return, I learned that I had been sent for to Worship-street; I went there, and found the prisoner at the bar in custody, on suspicion of having stole some silver; the silver was produced, but there was but one very small piece that I could swear to, and that was drawn in a particular swage, which I hold in my hand; I had often lost silver, and never knew whom to suspect.

WILLIAM WORSLEY sworn. - I am a painter and glazier: On the 30th of March, last Sunday was se'nnight, I had been to the prisoner's house; he followed me out, and offered me some silver at four shillings an ounce; I said, I don't think you come honestly by it, and I will have nothing to do with it; upon that I charged the watch with him; I saw a cunister drop from the prisoner, and some of the silver fall out; the watchman picked it up, put it into the canister again, and took it to the watch-house.

- WEST sworn. - I am a watchman: On Sunday evening, the 30th, I was going past eleven o'clock, in Bunhill-row; I heard the alarm of a thief, upon which I caught hold of the prisoner; he strove to get away from me, and when he found he could not get away from me he dropped the canister which the silver in it, I picked it up; there were two or there pieces sell out, I put them in again, and delivered it to the constable of the night I marked the canister.

JOHN BULMER sworn. - I am constable of the

parish of St. Luke's; I was constable of the night on the 30th of March; I received this canister from the watchman, it contains silver. (Produces it).

West. This is the same canister.

Pantin. Here is one piece of silver that exactly fits the swage; the swage was made for me by my own people; I should conceive it impossible that there can be such another.

Prisoner's defence. I found it in Bunhill-row.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped one hundred yards in St. Martin's-le-grand .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-92

355. THOMAS STRETCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a pair of boots, value 10s. the property of Thomas Meredith .

THOMAS MEREDITH sworn. - I am a shoemaker ; the prisoner was my porter : On the 1st of March I came to town, and was informed I was robbed; I found the prisoner in the custody of Nowlan.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Can you swear that you missed a pair of boots? - A. I did not; when he was before the Magistrate, he fell down upon his knees, and hoped I would forgive him.

Q. Did he not desire that you would not send him to prison; was not that the expression? - A. I cannot tell the particular expression, but it was to ask forgiveness for what he had done.

Q. Did he not, at the same time, deny stealing the boots? - A. He did not; he offered to serve his Majesty.

JOHN RYLAND sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Meredith: On Monday the 3d of March, I went to identify a pair of boots at the prisoner's lodgings in Bethlem-court; he was in our service at the time he was taken up; I found a pair of boots unfinished, with my mark upon them, and I brought them away with me; I found them in a corner of the room by the bed-side; they had never been sold from our house; I put my mark upon them before they were manufactured; they are an article that we do not fell, they are manufactured for the West-India trade, they were made in January last; on the 18th of January, when we took stock, these boots were taken up stairs, with other goods of a like description, there might be four or five dozen, I missed only this pair; this pair had a particular mark upon them, a double ten, because the men should not be deceived, they being awkward sized legs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.These boots were found when the prisoner was not present, but in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. It is a common lodging-house, is it not? - A. Not that I know of; there is another person lodges in the same room.

Q. Will you swear that you had not put a double ten upon a pair of boots within a month before? - A. No, I had not.

JAMES CORNWALL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Meredith: I recollect seeing this pair of boots previous to the 18th of January, they were carried up stairs; and I can take my oath that I never sold them out of the shop. (The boots produced.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. These are old boots, I see? - A. Yes; they were new when they went out of the shop.

Q. You must have observed these boots if you had seen him with them on? - A. I never saw him with a pair of boots on in my life.

Q. And he was at work at your house every day in the week days? - A. Yes; but he might walk in them on Sundays.

Q. Do you suppose, that in ten days they could have been worn down in that manner? - A. I think they might; he was three days gone down to Gravesend.

Mr. Meredith. These boots are my property; I know them by my man's mark inside; they are made for a particular trade; and in two days they might have been in the state in which they now are; they are made very flight for that trade.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge; I never saw the boots to my knowledge; I had opportunities if I had wished to steal from Mr. Meredith, he has trusted me with large parcels, and with money to his banker's. GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000402-93

336. RICHARD FIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , nine ewe sheep, value 9l. the property of Samuel Tingey .

The indictment was stated by Mr. Watson, and the case by Mr. Gurney.

SAMUEL TINGEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a salesman ; I attend Smithfield Market : On Monday the 10th of March, I had some sheep at Smithfield Market, separated into different pens.

Q. Where there any pole ewe sheep? - A. Yes; nine of the lot that were missing; they were penned in a pen by themselves, about eleven o'clock in the day, after which I did not give any body authority to take them away; I sold them to a man of the name of Taylorson; I have not been paid for them.

Q. Is it the custom of Smithfield Market to deliver the sheep before the money is received for them? - A. No; sometime after two o'clock I dis

covered that the nine pole ewe sheep were gone; they were marked over the loins with the country mark; with oker; there was no brand in particular that I observed.

Q. Whose pen of that day was this pen near to? - A. It was near to Mr. Hebb's, opposite to it.

Q. After you had so missed the sheep, did you see any thing further of them? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you see any part of them after they were slaughtered? - A. Yes; I saw one skin at Islington; I am sure that that was one of those nine pole sheep that I lost, it was produced by the constable; I saw none of the live ones.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe the removal of sheep to and from the different pens is conducted by the drovers? - A. Yes.

Q. This young man was a drover? - A. Yes.

Q. This was on the 10th of March? - A. Yes.

Q. Does Mr. Hebb constantly attend Smithfield Market? - A. Yes.

Q. How long after was it that this young man was taken up-was it not a fortnight? - A. Not quite, I believe, I cannot say exactly.

Q. Was not this lad there, in the market, on the Friday following, and the Monday after that? - A. I cannot say; I did not see him.

Q. He carries on the business of a drover under his father and brother? - A. Yes.

Q. And when a purchase is made, the drover is generally directed to what pen he should drive the sheep? - A. Yes.

Q. And then the drover takes them where he is directed? - A. Yes.

Mr. Watson. Q. Was the prisoner employed, as a drover, by you, on the 10th of March? - A. No.

Q. This was on the Monday? - A. Yes; and he was taken on the Saturday in the week following, I believe, but I cannot say.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. At the time he was taken, he was attending at the Police-office? - A. Yes.

Q. Had not a man been taken up before for stealing these sheep, of the name of Filaster? - A. No; he was not taken up, he was only charged with it.

Court. Q. After you have sold sheep, do the drovers remove them from one pen to another? - A. Yes; it is done by my own drovers, and by my own orders.

Q. After they are sold? - A. Yes; to make room for other.

Q. Were these sheep moved by your orders, after they were sold? - A. Yes; by my drover, and Taylorson, to another pen that I had, the same day, opposite Mr. Hebb's; my pens were all fronting of Mr. Hebb's.

Q.Upon your oath, did you not, upon their being lost, actually pay Taylorson for them as Taylorson's sheep? - A. No, I did not.

WILLIAM HEBB sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a salesman in Smithfield: On Monday, the 10th of March, my pens were opposite to Mr. Tingey's; between half past one and two, which we call late in the day, I observed some sheep in a pen which was next to mine, they were small pole-sheep, I supposed them to be Nottinghamshire sheep; I cannot say whether they were ewes or not, as they had no butcher's mark upon them; that is a mark put upon them by the butcher soon after they are bought, I looked upon it that they were unsold; and several butchers asked me the price of the sheep; there was a saint mark upon them, that appeared to have been on for a month or six weeks; it was an oker mark across the loins; they had the appearance of being from eight to twelve sheep, but the particular number I did not notice; about half past one, or from that to half past two, I cannot be particular to half an hour, I had sold four sheep to a person of the name of Worrall; somebody asked me if those sheep opposite mine were mine; I said, no; and in about half a minute after that, I saw the prisoner go into the pen and drive these sheep out; there were a number of drovers about; just at the close of the market it is very common for the drovers to assist in clearing the way.

Q. Have you seen the skin since? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it the skin of one of those sheep that you saw drove out? - A. I cannot swear that; it was like it.

Q. Was Mr. Tingey there at that time? - A. No; I did not see any body there that belonged to him at that time, or after.

Q. Are you quite sure it was the prisoner? - A. Yes, he was a butcher's drover; I had seen him for about six months before it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This was done when there were a great number of drovers about, in the open market? - A. Yes; Smithfield is always open.

Q. Every person there must see what he was about? - A. Yes.

Q. The man that was with him was not the prisoner's brother? - A. I do not know that it was.

Q. Is it usual for sheep that are sold to have the butcher's mark put upon them? - A. It is very common.

Q. These sheep had not the butcher's mark? - A. No.

Q. Then if they had been sold to Taylorson, they would have had his mark? - A. It is not a certain rule.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner in the market since that day? - A. No, I have not, to my knowledge.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Before these sheep were driven away, had they any butcher's marks? - A. They

had not; there is one set of drovers to the salesmen, and the other butchers drovers, to drive the sheep to where the butchers live; but the butchers drovers do not assist the salesmens' drovers in removing sheep from one pen to another.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you see the prisoner at the Police-office? - A. Yes.

Q. He came there voluntarily, did not he? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was he standing at the bar? - A. When I was there I saw him standing at the bar, by the side of his brother.

Q. Was he not there to see his brother, who was charged with she offence? - A. I do not know what he came for; I saw him at the bar, and then I pointed him out to the Magistrates.

JOHN ATKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I keep the Goat at Ponder's-end, on the Enfield-road; I am brother-in-law to William Field , the brother of the prisoner.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on Monday, the 10th of March? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you see any sheep at your house that day? - A. I did not see any sheep in particular, there was a large drove of sheep there; it might be between six and seven o'clock, or later, on Monday, the 10th.

Q. Were there any sheep stopped at your house all night? - A. Somebody holloaed out from the door to leave some sheep for William Field; I was in the bar; I did not see who it was.

Q. In point of fact, did they leave any sheep? - A. I believe they did; I never saw any in particular, any fasther than a large drove before the bar-window.

Q. How many did the drove consist of? - A. Six or seven score.

Q. How many sheep were left with you? - A. I do not know.

Court. Q.Recollect you are upon your oath, and before a Court that have the power to commit you if you do not speak truth? - A. I do; I was out all day on Tuesday, and did not see any delivered.

Mr. Watson. Q. You take in stocks occasionally there? - A. Yes.

Q. Who paid you for those that were taken in? - A. I never take any money but what is spent in the house.

Q. How much money was taken in the house that night for these sheep? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did that ever happen to you before? - A.Repeatedly.

Q. Were there any other cattle of any other description that night? - A. There might be, I cannot say; the stable were open.

Cross-examined by the Court. Q. Recollect yourself, and mind what answers you give me; have you ever said at any time, the number of sheep that were left? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Recollect yourself; I will have a positive answer-did you ever, at any time, mention the number of sheep that were left? - A. I did not.

Q. You never did? - A. I do not believe I ever did.

Q. Let me caution you? - A. I have heard people say there were nine sheep, and I may have said so.

Q. Upon your oath, did you never swear that nine sheep were left? - A. I never swore that, to my knowledge.

Q. What, do you swear without knowing what you swear? - A. I never swore it, to my knowledge.

Q. Were you examined before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever say to whom they were delivered? - A. I was not at home at the time.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, whether you did not say to whom the sheep were delivered? - A. No.

Q. Look at that; is that your hand-writing? - A. It is.

Q. You were sworn to that, and you signed it? - A. I signed a paper, but I never saw it, at the Mansion-house.

Q. How could you sign it, if you did not see it? - A. I never read it; they told me to put my name down.

Q. Was it ever read? - A. I do not remember any thing being read particularly.

Q. Will you, upon the oath you have taken, swear that that deposition, taken before the Lord-Mayor, was not read to you before you signed it? - A. No, I will not; they were all read over.

Q. Were you not desired to attend to it? - A. Yes.

Q. Now I ask you again-did you not mention the number of sheep? - A. I cannot say.

Q. I will have a positive answer; did you or not swear before the Lord-Mayor, to the number of sheep? - A. Upon my word I cannot take upon me to say.

Q. I will have a direct answer, or commit you? - A. I believe I said something about nine sheep before the Lord-Mayor.

Q. You were sworn before the Lord-Mayor? - A. Not the last time.

Q. But you were when you signed it? - A. Then I must have sworn to the nine sheep; if I swore there were nine sheep I did very wrong, for I never saw them.

Q. Did you not swear to whom they were delivered? - A. No.

Q. Did you not swear not only that there were nine sheep, but that they were delivered to H

man; recollect yourself? - A. To the best of my knowledge I did not.

Q. That will not do, I will have a positive answer; you shall not escape justice in that kind of way; did you or did you not swear that the nine sheep were delivered to Harman? - A. I could not swear to it.

Q. I ask you whether you did or did not? - A. I cannot say; I might swear it, but I cannot say.

Q. Do you account so little of an oath that you do not take notice what you swear; this was read over to you, and you swore to it, and signed it? - A. Yes.

Q. Then upon your oath do not you recollect? - A. I do not recollect, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. I expect an immediate answer whether you swore that before the Magistrate? - A. I dare say the paper is right.

Q. Then how came you to tell me just now, that you did not know the number of the sheep? - A. I never saw the sheep.

Q. How came you to say there were nine? - A. They told me to swear it.

Q. Who? - A. The Lord-Mayor's clerk, him that wrote it down, told me to swear to what was wrote there.

Q. Did he not take it down from your own words? - A. I was not examined that day at all.

Q. He asked you if what you signed was true, and you said, yes? - A. Yes.

Q. You were examined the day before? - A. Yes.

Q. It was put down upon paper, and read to you the next day? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you had time to recollect yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew the prisoner's voice very well? - A. I have been in his company two or three times; I am very intimate with his brother.

Q. Then it is your practice to take in from any body that comes, any articles they choose to bring? - A. If they say who they come from.

Mr. Shelton reads - "Informant says, that nine sheep were brought to his house at Ponder's-end, late on Monday evening, the 10th of March, and the next day delivered to Joseph Harman."

Q. Is that true, or not? - A. The nine sheep I cannot say; the other part I believe is true; my wife told me they were delivered to Joseph Harman .

EDWARD KINGHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a butcher, at Ponder's-end; I live close to Atkins's house.

Q. Did you see any drove of sheep on Monday the 10th of March, in the evening? - A. Yes; I had to draw some out of them.

Q. How near to the Goat did you see that drove? - A. Between my yard and the Goat; they drove them up there to catch my sheep.

Q. Who drove them? - A. Richard Field, and a man that the Fields employ as a drover.

Q. What is that man's name, do you know? - A. No; I heard Richard Field call out to ask, Atkins to let him leave some sheep there.

Q. Did he say for whom? - A. No.

Q. Where was Atkins at that time? - A. In his bar.

Q. Where was Richard Field at that time? - A. Almost against my door, and the man was with him; he said he might leave them if he pleased.

Court. Q. What number of sheep had he with him? - A. I cannot say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This young man and another man were with the stock? - A. Yes.

Q. The stock consisted of more than nine, I take it? - A. Yes.

Q.Nearer six or seven times nine? - A. I dare say there were.

Q. I take it you did not attend particularly to what was said? - A. No.

Q. William Field is older than this young man? - A. Yes.

Q. Might he not have desired to leave them for William Field , without your recollecting it? - A. He might so, to be sure.

Q. Might it not happen that the man desired them to be left, and not the person now at the bar? - A. I cannot say; I was busy drawing my sheep at the time; I rather think it was Richard, but I cannot be positive.

Court. Q. This bar is adjoining the road? - A. Yes; I saw Atkins through the window; it was candle-light.

Q. Did he open the window? - A. No.

Q. How came you to hear what passed? - A. They spoke very loud.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you drive any other sheep out besides your own? - A. No.

JOSEPH HARMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I live at Enfield-highway: I was at the Goat at Ponder's-end, on Tuesday the 11th of March, in the afternoon, about five o'clock, as nigh as I can tell; I went there for nine sheep for William Field .

Q. What sort of sheep were they? - A. Small pole sheep.

Q. Were there any other sheep there when you went for these nine sheep? - A. I did not see any other.

Q. Who did you have them from? - A. Mr. Atkins's horse-keeper, I do not know his name, he has lived at the Goat some time; I see him every day; I drove them to my house.

Q. Did the horse-keeper know you? - A. He must know me from seeing me very often there.

Q. Had you any order in writing for the delivery of these pole sheep? - A. No; only from William Field's word of mouth.

Q.What was done with these nine sheep, when you got them to your house at Enfield Highway? - A.William Field, and Mr. Grover's son, the butcher, came to draw five.

Q. What became of the other four? - A. I killed them.

Q. Had you paid for them? - A. No; nor I did not know the price of them; William Field, and Mr. Grover's son, drove the other five away from my premises.

Q. Were they in Atkins's yard? - A.Atkins's yard is open, they cannot keep any thing in there; they were in a kind of hovel, I look upon it to be a stable, there is a manager in it.

Q. How large is this hovel? - A. As big as this Court is; it will hold, I suppose, twelve or fourteen horses.

RICHARD GROVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the son of William Grover , a butcher, at Cheshunt: On Tuesday the 11th of March, I went to Harman's, William Flood went with me, I brought five pole ewe sheep from Harman's; I took them home to my father's, and killed one that night; the next day George Robinson, and his son, came and claimed them.

Q. They were the same that you received from Harman? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM GROVER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a butcher at Cheshunt: I sent my son for five pole ewe sheep from Old Mr. Field's; William Field got up into my cart, on Monday, coming from Smithfield Market; they were claimed by Mr. Robinson, and his son, drovers, for Mr. Tingey; one of them had been killed; I delivered the skin to Robinson's son.

Q. Had you paid for them? - A. No; I was to give the market price.

GEORGE ROBINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am Mr. Tingey's drover: My master helped to put some sheep into his pen; there were nine of them, they were marked over the loins, they were pole ewe sheep; I missed them about two o'clock; Mr. Taylorson came and asked me for the sheep; I went down to Cheshunt on the Wednesday, and found five of them at Mr. Grover's, four of them alive, and one dead.

Q. Have you any doubt that they were Mr. Tingey's? - A. I have no doubt about it, I am sure of it; I saw the skin hanging up with the woolly side outwards; it is here, the constable fetched it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The drover is the person who usually takes the sheep out of the pen? - A. Yes.

Q. If your master were to direct you that he had bought sheep in a pen, and desired you to drive them, you would take them out? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known this lad in the market? - A. Ever since he was a baby.

Q. He was attending in the market several market days before he was taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. Appearing publicly in the market? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How many sheep markets have you in a week? - A.Friday and Monday.

Q. When was the prisoner taken up? - A. He was detained at the office the Saturday week after, when he came to see his brother.

GEORGE ROBINSON , junior, sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am son of the last witness; I assist him as a drover: I went with my father on Wednesday the 12th; we found four pole ewe sheep alive, and one killed, at Mr. Grover's; they were part of some that Mr. Tingey lost.

JOHN SPINNING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am constable of Clerkenwell: This skin was brought to me by young George Robinson.(Produces it).

Robinson, junior. I brought this skin from Enfield.

Tingey. I believe this to be the skin of one of the sheep that I lost.

Robinson, senior. I believe this to be the skin of one of the sheep that was lost; it is marked exactly the same as mine were, and they were all pole sheep.

Court. (To Harman.) Q. What did you do with the skins? - A. I sold them; I am a fell-monger.

Q. After you had heard that they were stole? - - A. No.

Q. Are you sure that they were pole ewe sheep? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent of the fact I am charged with.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN PAGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a salesman.

Q. Do you think it possible for sheep to be taken out of the pens in Smithfield by mistake? - A. I think it is possible for them to be taken by mistake.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. He bears an excellent character.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. If a man makes a mistake, what is the next thing he will do? - A. Return them, I should think.

Q. Not sell them, and slay them? - A. No.

The prisoner called sixteen other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 15.)

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth, and general good character.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000402-94

337. SAMUEL SEABROOK was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .(The indictment having been read by the Clerk of the Arraigns, Mr. Alley, as Cormsel for the prosecution, stated, that he should not be able to maintain the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000402-95

338. ROBERT-BARTON WOOD was indicted for a fraud .

CHARLES NAYLER sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Isacc Estridge, Spencer Wood , John Littlewood, and John Stevenson , coal-merchants , in William-street, Bridewell Precinct: On Tuesday the 18th of March , the prisoner at the bar came to the accompting-house, and inquired for Mr. Spencer Wood; I told the prisoner that Mr. Spencer Wood was very poorly, that he had not been out since Christmas last; that if he had any communication to deliver, that it should be delivered to Mr. Spencer Wood, and he should have an answer; the prisoner said, that if in case he was certain of having an answer on the morrow, or the next day, he would leave a letter, which letter he gave me, and I sent it to Mr. Spencer Wood; this is the letter, (producing it); in the course of the next day I received a letter from Mr. Spencer Wood, that in case the collector for educating the children of insolvent debtors should call, I was to give him a guinea. (The letter is read).

"The committee for educating the children of confined insolvent debtors, return their most grateful acknowledgements to Mr. Wood, for his former benevolence to the above charity; having increased the number of children to two hundred, and wholly providing them with food, clothing, and education, beg leave to request the honour of a repetition of Mr. Wood's humane subscription to this laudable institution."

He called on Friday the 21st, and addressed himself to me in the accompting-house, and asked if I had got an answer to pay the subscription; I told him if he was the proper collector I would pay it; upon which the prisoner pulled out of his pocket a subscription, or collecting-book, I do not know which he called it, and asked me to write Mr. Wood's name in the book, amongst a number of others; I told him, I was not authorized to write Mr. Wood's name, but if he would give me a receipt I would pay him the money; he asked me for a piece of paper, which I gave him; he wrote the receipt, and I paid him one guinea in gold. (Produces the receipt, which is read.)

"March 21, 1800.

"Received of Mr. Spencer Wood one pound one shilling, being the annual subscription for educating the children of insolvent debtors. J. Barton.

"School in the Borough, No. 86."

He did not say what he was; then he asked about Mr. Thomas Wood ; I told him I had no instructions from Mr. Thomas Wood ; he said, perhaps Mr. Thomas Wood would wish to be waited upon by letter in the same way; and he wished me a good morning.

RICHARD STIFF sworn. - I am the collector appointed by the society, to receive subscriptions for the education of the children of insolvent debtors under confinement; I have been collector above twelve months; there is one school at the Stones End, and I do not recollect that there is any number to it; and another in Dorset-street, Salisbury-court, Fleet-street; the committee meet every second Tuesday in the month; I have no knowledge of the prisoner; there are no collectors besides myself, I have my appointment in my pocket, signed by the gentlemen of the committee; Mr. Wood is one of our subscribers, I received Mr. Wood's subscription on the 25th of January last.

Q. What book have you got there? - A. A book containing the resolutions of the committee at the time I was appointed, which was in March 1799; Mr. Grassfer was collector before me.

Q. Look at these papers? (Shewing him the letter, and the receipt.) - A. I know nothing of them in the least.

Rev. ROWLAND HILL sworn. - I am one of the committee: I come only to assert, that Mr. Stiff is the only person appointed by us to receive any subscriptions whatever; a vast number of these kind of collectors have done us prodigious injury; I know nothing of the prisoner.

JOHN LITTLEWOOD sworn. - I am a partner with Mr. Wood: I had the prisoner apprehended in consequence of a suspicious letter.

- UNDERHILL sworn. - I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY , (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000402-96

339. CATHERINE FRANCES, alias DUNN , MARY DUNLAP , ANN MINCHER , and JAMES ELTON , were indicted for uttering, on the 6th of March , a counterfeit shilling, to one Mary Locke , as and for a good shilling, knowing the same to be counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MARY LOCKE sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Locke, who keeps the Bell, in Warwick-lane : The Prisoner, Dunlap, came in, about six o'clock in the evening of the 6th of March, for a quartern of gin; I served her; she drank part of it herself, and part she took to some people that were standing at the door; she put down a shilling for it, I gave her change for it, and put the shilling into the till with the rest of the silver; I gave her a sixpence in silver, and three-pence halfpenny; then the other two women prisoners came in, and Mincher asked for a quartern of gin, and gave me a shilling; I gave her change; I called Mr. Locke directly that the women went out; I shewed him the two shillings, and he said they were both bad; and then the man came in for a half quartern of gin, and he put down a shilling; my husband looked at it, and said it was a bad one; he then put a good one down, and I gave him change for it; I gave the two shillings to my husband, and he gave them to the constable.

THOMAS LOCKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep the Bell in Warwick-lane: My wife shewed me two shillings, which I knew to be bad; directly after that,

Elton came in, and tendered 2 shilling for a glass of gin; I told him it was bad; they seemed to be all exactly of the same make; I said it was a bad one, and he without putting his hand into his pocket to feel for more money, put a good one into my hand; he went away, and I followed him, and saw all the three women prisoners standing together at the corner of Rose-street, in Newgate-market; and when they got towards Giltspur-street from Newgate-street, they all joined company and conversation; they all went to the door of the constable, who keeps a public-house near the corner of Hosier-lane; they staid there in conversation I suppose a minute; they left that house without going in; I went in and enquired for an officer, and he said he was an officer; I took him with me, and we watched them to another public-house in Hosier-lane, kept I believe by a Mr. Pettit, the Coachmaker's-arms; I saw Mincher and Elton standing at the door; Ladbroke took them into custody, and I went into the house; the prisoner Dunn had a screw-box in her hand, and a shilling lying before her upon the barcounter, of the same make; Dunlap was standing by the side of her; then they were taken into custody; I delivered the two shillings that my wife gave me, to the officer; I marked them with the letter I before I gave them to him.

- LADBROKE sworn. - I am an officer: (Produces the two shillings.)

Locke. These are the two that I delivered to the officer, which I received from my wife.

Mrs. Locke. The same shillings that I gave to my husband, I received from the prisoners.

Ladbroke. I keep a public-house the corner of Hosier-lane: I went with Mr. Locke and apprehended Elton and Mincher at Mr. Pettit's door; the other two were in doors; I waited till Mr. Locke brought them out; I searched the man and the woman that was at the door; I found upon Elton one shilling, and as soon as I laid hold of it, I said, this is a bad one; and he had some small change in his pocket, which I knew was good, which I returned to him, there were about eight or nine-pennyworth of halfpence as near as I could guess; Mincher had a sixpence and some halfpence, altogether to the amount of about one shilling and sixpence; the other two I did not search till I got them to the Compter; Dunlap had change, in halfpence, to the amount of nine-pence or ten-pence; they were good, and I returned them; upon Frances I found about eighteen-pence, sixpence in silver, and the rest in halfpence; they made use of very ill language, and said they would go along with me, but I should not find any thing about them; and some person holloaed out that I had not got the right of the swag; but it being dusk, I could not see who it was.

Mr. WILLIAM PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. These shillings are both counterfeit; they are both newly coloured, and both of the same manufacture.

(Ladbroke produced the shilling he found upon Elton.)

Parker. This is a counterfeit of the same manufacture; they appear to be all alike; they have not been in circulation since they have been coloured.

Dunlap's defence. I took it in the street; I go out with a barrow of cats and dogs' meat; I took it of a footman, but I do not know the family he lives in.

Frances's defence. I was very much in distress, going to the parish to get some relief if I could; my child was crying for bread, and I was crying, and a gentleman in Smithfield gave me that shilling.

Mincher's defence. I pledged an apron for one shilling and sixpence; and received that shilling at Mr. Berry's, upon snow-hill.

Elton's defence. I had taken that shilling over night; I did not know it was a bad shilling.

Dunlap called her landlady, who gave her a good character. All Four GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for their good behaviour for six months more .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: s18000402-1

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT procceded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 19.

Joseph Pougher ,

John- Osborn Dawson ,

John Mulvey,

Richard Field ,

Edward Davis ,

John Brewer ,

John Colley ,

John Barnett , alias Jacob Farrow ,

William Ellwood ,

Robert Goodwin,

Dennis Green,

Thomas Smith,

Sylvester Smith,

Charles Yeomans,

John Smith ,

David Fraser ,

Joseph Buckeridge,

Samuel Larkin ,

William Campton, alias Day.

Transported for fourteen years - 2.

William Goodwin, George Cockran.

Transported for seven years - 16.

Hugh Holmes ,

William Howard , alias Mason,

John Taylor ,

John Staunton,

Henry Miles , alias Deeper,

Robert- Barton Wood ,

John Hanson ,

John Jones,

Robert Johnson ,

Joseph Pierson,

John Overton , alias Lloyd,

Thomas Easton ,

Thomas Harris,

Thomas Dalton,

Henry Nowland,

Bryan Nowland .

Confined two-years in the House of Correction, and whipped in the jail. - 1.

John, alias George Jones.

Confined eighteen months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 2.

Ann Dennis , alias Susannah Drew , James Hawkins.

Confined twelve months in Newgate, and publicly whipped - 1. George Martin.

Confined twelve months in Newgate, and privately whipped - 2. Francis Wrangham, Ann Syree.

Confined twelve months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 2. John Patman, Thomas Stretch.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 6.

William Davis , Catherine Rasseedy, Owen Collins, John Nicholson , Joseph Hewitt , Mary Parrott.

Confined six months in Newgate, and privately whipped. - 1. Richard Tucker.

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and privately Whipped. - 3.

William Brown , Mary Hamilton, William Tweed.

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - 4.

Joseph Fitchett, William White , James Cavanaugh, John Speak.

Confined six months in Newgate, and find sureties for six months more. - 4.

Catherine Dunn, Mary Dunlap, Ann Mincher, James Elton.

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 12.

Ann Evans , James Pennyman, Thomas Long, William Dracott , Joseph Chadwick, William Bryant, Sarah Barton, Thomas Lawsoa , William Sangster , William Powell, George Mitchell, alias John, alias Richard Ashley, Thomas Holdham.

Confined three months in Newgate, and whipped 100 yards in St. Martin's-le-Grand. - 1. Charles Spring.

Confined three months in Newgate, and privately whipped. - 1. John Hall.

Whipped 100 yards in Seething-lane. - 2. Samuel Shailer, William Halfpenny .

Privately whipped, and discharged. - 2. Elizabeth Clarke, John Smith .


View as XML