Old Bailey Proceedings, 19th February 1800.
Reference Number: 18000219
Reference Number: f18000219-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 19th of FEBRUARY, 1800, and following Days, BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , ESQ.

LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors's Commons.

1800.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir GILES ROOKE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir SIMON LE BLANC , Knight, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William Fassett ,

George Scott ,

William Wormsie ,

William Cork ,

James Donce ,

Andrew Carr ,

Thomas Brocksop ,

George Swinburn ,

Christopher Fothergill ,

Thomas Buckingham ,

George Cooper ,

Thomas Wood .

First Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Dale ,

Thomas Key ,

Zechariah Brocksop ,

John Brodie ,

William Humphreys ,

Edward Griffith ,

Robert Griffiths ,

John Goodfellow ,

James Newman ,

Samuel Nunn ,

Thomas Lord ,

Francis Denier .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Heppel ,

James Oldfield ,

John Spencer ,

John Brown ,

Matthew Feary ,

Joseph Henshaw ,

James M'Clellan,

James Butters ,

George Allen ,

John James ,

Robert Roberts ,

Edmund Lucas .

Reference Number: t18000219-1

160. JAMES SWIFT was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Tegg , about the hour of six in the night of the 23d of January , and stealing six silver tea-spoons, value 22s. an ink-stand, value 4s. two silver eye-glasses, value 6s. and two gilt lockets, value 4s. the property of the said James .

JAMES TEGG sworn. - I am a jeweller and perfumer in Long-acre : On the 23d of January, from a quarter to half past five in the evening -

Q. It was hardly dark then? - A. Yes, quite; we had had candles lit for twenty minutes, or half an hour; I was in the shop and my wife; I heard one of the panes of glass broke; my wife called out, there is a hand in the window; I attempted to run out, but found the door fast; after pulling several times, it gave way; I found a rope had been tied to the handle of the door, and fastened under the window; I got out, and several people were then in pursuit of the prisoner, calling out stop thief; I met them in a few minutes, coming back with the prisoner; I saw the prisoner searched at Bow-street, but nothing was found upon him; I lost six silver tea-spoons, a plated ink-stand, two silver eye-glasses, and two gold lockets.

WILLIAM WHITE sworn. - About twenty minutes after five, on the 23d of January, as I was coming from my work, I saw the prisoner run his arm into Mr. Tegg's window, up to his elbow; I was about fifteen yards from him when the window was broke; I thought it was a robbery, and immediately pursued him down Charles-street; I did not see any thing in his possession; he was never out of my sight till he was stopped by Stephen Cordery , about five yards from me; that was about three minutes after the window was broke.

CHARLES FOWLER sworn. - I picked up some of the property facing my door, between five and six in the afternoon; (produces six silver tea-spoons;) I heard a cry of stop thief, and saw the mob run past.

Tegg. These spoons have my own private mark upon them.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - I took the prisoner into custody, and searched him, but found nothing.

Q. (To White.) When you first saw him, was there any body with him? - A. Nobody at all.

Prisoner's defence. There were other people there, and in the scuffle the window was broke, and I ran away.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 16.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-2

161. JOHN-JAMES GASTENIEUX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , one hundred and seventy-one numbers of Harrison's British Classics, value 3l. 4s. 1 1/2d. the property of John Walker .

JOHN WALKER sworn. - I live in Rosoman-street, Clerkenwell ; I am an engraver and bookseller : On the 24th of January, a person of the name of Tibbetts brought to me a parcel of numbers of Harrison's British Classics, which belonged to me; there were one hundred and seventy-one numbers, sewed; some of them had been printed for me, and the rest I had purchased of the original publisher; they were in a warehouse adjoining the place where the prisoner worked.

Q. When had you seen them in that warehouse? - A. I cannot positively say that I ever saw them in that warehouse.

Q. Can you speak to having seen these identical numbers any-where? - A. I cannot; but my porter is here, who made a list of the numbers in the warehouse, and from which these were missing; on the 23d, I had observed this warehouse-door open about noon; I had seen it in the morning, when I was convinced it was shut; the door is not well hung, and unless it is locked, always swings open; I observed the door open about one o'clock that day; my Warehouseman Was then gone to dinner; I soon after went to the bottom of the garden in order to lock the door, but when I came there, I found the door was shut close; I clapped my hand against the door gently, it immediately gave way; then the warehouseman returned from dinner; I questioned him as to his being in the warehouse that day; he said he had not been there that day at all; upon further examination I found a nail put into the rabbit of the door, which operated like a spring, and kept the door close; on the day following the person to whom these books were sold came to me; I asked him a description of the man; I suspected the prisoner, and I took him to the place where the man lived; I found him at his lodgings near my house; he had worked for me from the 19th of December preceding, or thereabout; I sent for an officer and took him to Hatton-garden; the numbers are in Court; my servant has had them ever since they were delivered to him at the Magistrate's.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me in that warehouse at the time you mention? - A. No; I never saw him in that warehouse during the time he worked for me.

SAMUEL TIBBETTS sworn. - I am a bookseller in Baldwin's-gardens: On the 23d of January, about four o'block, the prisoner brought me, to the best of my recollection, one hundred and seventy numbers of Harrison's Classics for sale; he said he was going to Liverpool, he had been paying his coach fare in the City, and had no time to spare; I do not recollect what he asked for them, but I offered him a guinea, and he took it; he bought a bird and a cage of me for three shillings, and I gave him eighteen shillings in money; about six o'clock I looked them over, and found them to be odd numbers; I went to two booksellers to ask their opinion, and they were of opinion that I was taken in, that they were worth nothing to me but waste paper; but when I looked them over again, I thought there was something in it that was not fair, and I was determined to find out the proprietor; and I went about the next day form eight to one, till I found out Mr. Walker, and I delivered them to him; they were the same that I had bought of the prisoner; Mr. Walker took me to the prisoner's lodgings.

Q. Look at the prisoner; do you believe him to be the man? - A. I believe him to be the man, but my knowledge of him is but shallow.

Q. You saw the man that Walker took you to; have you any doubt then whether it was the same man? - A. An oath is a serious thing, but I believe it to be the same man.

Q. Can you say whether that man was the prisoner at the bar? - A. He has every appearance to me of being the same; I have but very little doubt that he is the same man.

Q. Was any thing said to him, by Walker, in his presence? - A. Mr. Walker asked him what he had done with the money; and he said he had made away with it.

FRANCIS BUNDY sworn. - I work for Mr. Walker, I take care of his work; the prisoner worked for Mr. Walker; these numbers were in a little warehouse adjacent to where he worked; I kept a list of those that were in bundles, and the odd numbers.

Q. When had you seen them last? - A. Some of them must have been there for a twelvemonth or more; I cannot speak to having seen them at any particular time; I had seen the bundles, but not to look them over, I kept the key of the warehouse; I was called into the parlour on the 24th of January, and there I saw the numbers, (produces them); I know them to be the same that were in that warehouse; there were eighty-seven of one number, and fifty of another; the next day my master and I went into the warehouse, and looked them over, and these two bundles were wanting; of No. 83, there are eighty-seven books, and of No. 118, there are fifty books, and a variety of odd numbers; eleven of No. 1, two of No. 10, three of No. 12, three of No. 13, and others; but I cannot speak particularly to them.

Mr. Walker. I examined these bundles with the last witness, I marked them off as he called them over, and found these particular numbers, that he has stated, missing from the warehouse; and these numbers were found in the bundle that Tibbetts brought to me, they are worth about two pounds ten shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I trust myself to God and yourselves, for the sake of my wife and children.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-3

162. THOMAS HASKWELL and MARY THORPE were indicted for that they, on the 21st of December , a piece of base coin, resembling the coin of this realm, called a shilling, falsely, deceitfully, and traiterously, did forge, counterfeit, and coin .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Raine, and the case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

The Court were of opinion, upon Mr. Knapp's opening, that there was not sufficient evidence to affect the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-4

163. JOHN HANSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th January , six hundred and fifty pounds weight of lead, value 5l. the property of Henrietta-Gertrude Hotham , spinster , affixed to a certain stable belonging to the dwelling-house of Sir James Pulteney , Bart.

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of the said Sir James Pulteney , Bart.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Vaillant, and the case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

JOHN NOKES sworn. - I live at Brentford, I am a higler: On the 14th of January, I was coming to Leadenhall-market; about five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner, it was moon-light, with two other men, Bowman and Golder, at the Three Pigeons, at Hamersmith, I knew them all before; Bowman came into the Three Pigeons, where I was having some purl, and called for a pot of beer; he looked round, and saw me; he said, good morning to you, Nokes, and went out; I followed him; then I saw them all three at the door together, drinking; I went in to speak to the landlord, and when I came out, there was nobody there but the prisoner, the other two were gone; I

went out again to look after my horse, and I desired the landlord to look what was in the prisoner's cart, his name was upon it; the landlord said there was nothing but two empty baskets in it; then we went on to Kensington, and there I saw Bowman and Golder again; he stopped at Knightsbridge to water his horse, I went past him, and stopped and had a glass of gin, and waited for them; and we went on again, and he stopped at the White-horse Cellar, to look for his uncle, he came out and said he was not there; we went on to the corner of Fleet-market, and they wished me a good morning; I said I was going that way, myself, too; we went down Thames-street to the foot of London-Bridge.

Q. How came you to follow them so? - A. I suspected the two men that were with the prisoner; he stopped at the foot of London-Bridge, and went to Billingsgate; I told him I would feed my horse, and take care of his while he was gone; I looked into the cart, and saw some lead; and when he came back, he said, fish was very dear, and he would go over into the Borough; I said, no, you will not, I shall stop you, for you have got lead in your cart; he said, was I in earnest; I told him, yes; then he said he was a ruined man; then he said he would tell me where he got it; he said he found it upon a dunghill at Butcher's-grove, just on this side of Cranford-bridge; he said he had got down to ease himself there; he said it was Monday afternoon, and he left it till Wednesday morning, and then took his horse and cart, and went and fetched it.

Q. What day of the week was the 15th? - A. Wednesday; he said he left Twickenham at three o'clock, and had been to Butcher's-grove, and loaded it; it is about four miles from Twickenham to Butcher's-gove, and about ten miles from there to Hammersmith, and he was at Hammersmith as soon as me; I could not get a constable, and a man came up, and he told him, that he had got some lead, and that I wanted to be busy, and had stopped him; the man asked if I had got a constable; and he said, no; then the man said, he could not stop me; the prisoner then said, he would knock me down if I offered to stop him; I told him, then I would follow him, I followed him in my cart, and he in his, over London-Bridge, where I got a constable, and took him.

Court. Q. You knew Hanson before? - A. Yes.

Q. What is he? - A. A fisherman.

- GARRETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable, I live in Bermondsey-square: I took charge of the prisoner and the lead, and took them to Union-hall; he said he found the lead on a dunghill, as he was going to ease himself, on the Monday, and did not go for it till the Wednesday morning.

Court. Q. Did he say where the dunghill was? - A. I do not recollect that he did; I asked him who the cart belonged to; he said it was his own; on the Monday following, I took the lead down to Twickenham , to Sir James Pulteney 's stable, I saw Mr. Simmons there; I tried the lead with the top of the stable, and it corresponded; there were two lengths of thirty-six feet, and two of seventeen, I think; I have brought two pieces of it here; there was about six hundred weight of it in all.

CHARLES SIMMONS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am a plumber, at Twickenham: On the 9th of November, I was at work on the stables of Sir James Pulteney; the lead was there at that time; it was on Monday the 20th I compared the lead that Garrett brought, and it corresponded in every part.

Court. Q. Could you state how recently it had been taken away? - A. That I cannot say; that Monday was a most snowy morning as ever was seen; there was between six and seven hundred weight of it.

SARAH PARRATT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Sir James Pulteney : On the 15th or 16th of January, I missed the lead from the stable; we saw a ladder which led to the lead being missing; there were two instruments laid in the gutter, which we supposed they dug it up with.

Simmons produces a chissel, and an iron pointed instrument).

WILLIAM RICHARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am a watchman, at Twickenham: On Wednesday the 15th of January, about half an hour after two o'clock, he asked me for a light, just by Twickenham church, at the watch-box that is there, my light was gone out.

Q. How far is that from Sir James Pulteney's stables? - A. I do not know.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to town to Billingsgate for fish, and I asked the watchman for a light, and I could not get one, and I was obliged to put my horse to in the dark; I met with two men, at the sign of the Crown at Twickenham, and they asked me to carry some loading up for them; I told them I did not know that I had time, for I should be late at Billingsgate-market; they said it was to have gone in a boat, but the man had not come with the boat, and then I took them up into the cart, and Bowman and I rode, and the other walked on; when we got to the half-way house, one of them got up, and drove to Knightsbridge, and then I drove; I lost them somewhere about the Hay-market, and I did not know where to carry the property, and I went to Billinsgate, and there Nokes stopped me; I was going to put my

horse and cart up at the White-hart Inn, in the Borough, where I always did put it up; I have never seen the two men since; I have used Billingsgate these thirty years.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-5

164. JOHN COLLIS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Craggs , about the hour of seven in the night of the 27th of January , and burglariously stealing a sheet, value 10s. three shirts, value 12s. two petticoats, value 14s. two shifts, value 8s. three handkerchiefs, value 6s. a muslin apron, value 5s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 4s. three women's caps, value 6s. four children's caps, value 8s. a child's petticoat, value 6d. two pin-cloths, value 6d. a pair of boy's shoes, value 3s. a morocco pocket-book, value 6d. a sixpence, and a silver penny, the property of the said Thomas .

THOMAS CRAGGS sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , I live at No.2, Crown-court, Butcher-row, St. Clement's : on the 27th of January last, I left my house with my wife, about a quarter past six o'clock, and returned again by seven; I left the lodgers in the house, from the one pair of stairs to the top of the house; as I was coming up the court, I said to my wife, I will go forward and open the door, and when I came to the door, I found a blanket, my apprentice boy's hat, and a looking-glass in the passage; the street door was open; I immediately heard my wife cry out, oh, I am stripped, there is a man jumped out at the window.

Q. What window? - A. My own parlour window; I missed my property in the course of five minutes; my wife can tell what things were gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you sleep in the house yourself? - A. Yes.

SARAH CRAGGS sworn. - I went out about a quarter past six, and returned with my husband about seven o'clock, when I saw a man jump out of the parlour window; I perceived he had either whitning on the elbow of his coat, or a hole torn in it; another man that stood by, said, d-n thee, Jack, as he jumped out at the window; we took hold of that man, but he got away; I had left the parlour door double locked, and the window fastened with two bolts on the inside, and there was a bar on the outside. but I had lost the pin that went through it, so that it was not fall; I found the parlour door open, and in the passage a blanket, a hat of the apprentice boy's, and a looking-glass, standing against the wainscot, the bed let down, and the sheets gone from off it; the parlour window was wide open; the box that stood under the parlour window was standing topsy turvey, and the things gone out of it; I lost a sheet, three shirts, two petticoats, two shifts, three handkerchief, a muslin-apron, two pair of cotton stockings, three women's caps, four children's caps, a child's petticoat, two pin-cloths, a pair of boy's shoes, and a morocco pocket-book, containing a sixpence, and a silver penny; the prisoner is the man, I remarked his long hair, his white buttons, and he had a red waistcoat on; I asked him how he could think of robbing such poor people as us, and he said, dear ma'am, let me sit down, I shall saint, and see what you have lost, before you take me to Bow-street; he was brought back in two or three minutes; I never recovered any of my property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you returned you found the door open, and was a good deal alarmed? - A. Yes; I had a young child in my arms.

Q. You say, you observed somebody getting out at the window; I take it for granted, it was not light enough to see the colour of his coat? - A. There is a lamp close by.

Q. Did you not say, at Bow-street, that the only means by which you knew him, was a white mark upon his elbow? - A. No, I never did.

Q. I am told your window was not fastened, when you went out? - A. Yes, I fastened it myself, with two inside bolts.

Craggs. I double locked the door, and I tried the shutters after my wife had fastened them.

JAMES EVANS sworn. - I live at No. 1, Crown-court, next door to Craggs': on the 27th of January, between six and seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner and another walking backwards and forwards by Craggs' window, and I thought they were after no good; the window was open; I saw Collis go up to the window-again; I watched them, I suppose, for a quarter of an hour up stairs, and then I saw Collis run away from the window, and I ran down, and pursued him and took him; I found nothing upon him, the other man ran away.

Q. Did you see whether he had any thing with him? - A. No, he had nothing at all with him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You saw two men walking near Craggs' door? - A. Yes.

Q. A man ran away, and he had nothing about him? - A. No.

Q. Nor the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. How far did you take him from the prosecutor's house? - A. Twenty yards, or may-be one hundred yards.

HANNAH BATEMAN sworn. - On the 27th of January, I saw the prisoner jump out at the window; I am certain it is the same person; I did not then know whose house it was, I do now; he had another young man with him, he ran away;

I was going down the court to buy some tea, and that other man looked me very stern in the face; then the prisoner immediately jumped out, and he looked me very sternly in the face; I said, my good man, how you have frightened me, and with that he fell laughing and ran away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The instant after he jumped out at the window, you saw the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any thing about him? - A. No.

Q. And this was at the time the alarm was given? - A. Yes.

Q. How long after did you see him in custody? - A. Two minutes.

Q. Did you give the same account at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. I took charge of the prisoner on the 27th of January, at night, Monday night I think it was, at Bow-street; Evans gave me charge of him; I searched him, and found half a dozen duplicates in this box, (producing them;) I then persued the duplicates, but found nothing.

Prisoner's defence. I was going of my mother's errand about twenty minutes before seven, she lives at No. 20, in the Old-Bailey, and when I was taken, I was coming towards the prosecutor's house, and they seized me, and took me to Bow-street; my mother buys and sells clothes, she is a widow. For the Prisoner.

ROBERT READ sworn. - I have known him ever since he was twelve years old, he is a very deserving character.

Court. Q. Where has he been for the last twelvemonth? - A. I am sorry to say that.

Q. Where has he been? - A. Under misfortunes, to my sorrow.

Q. What misfortunes? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Answer what misfortunes? - A. About matters that I am not acquainted with; I never visited him when he was in trouble, and therefore I cannot say. GUILTY , Death . (Aged 17.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-6

165. MARY POTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a yard and a half of muslin, value 7s. the property of John Jeremy and William Jeremy , privately in their shop .

JOHN JEREMY sworn. - I am a linen-draper in the Strand , in partnership with William Jeremy: On Saturday the 1st of February, about half-past six in the evening the prisoner came in and asked to look at a shawl, and several other articles which were cut off for her; she then made an excuse that she was going out for her bonnet, and she would be back directly for the goods; I requested that she would leave something upon the goods as we did not know her; she said she had forgot her money, but would go and fetch it directly, with that she opened the door and went out; the young man jumped over the counter. went after her, and brought her back; I desired her to see if she had not got something that she could leave to cover us, and then she pulled out an old pair of stockings, and an old shawl, that did not belong to us, and then I saw her drop a yard and a half of muslin from under her great-coat.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. Seven shillings; I gave more money for it; I picked it up, and have kept it ever since; it has my private mark upon it; I did not see her take it.

DAVID JEREMY sworn. - I served the prisoner with two shawls and other things, to the amount of two pounds six shillings; they were cut off for her and put on the counter; she went away under an excuse to fetch her bonnet; I jumped over the counter, and told her, as I did not know her, I wished her to leave something upon the goods; she said, she had left her money at home, and she must go and fetch it; I brought her back, and told her to look in her pocket if she had any thing to leave upon them, and she pulled out a pair of stockings and an old shawl that did not belong to us; we desired her to look further, and upon that a piece of muslin dropped from under her great-coat, which belonged to us.

Q. Had you shewn her that piece at all? - A. No; but it was in the same wrapper, I did not see her take it.

Prisoner. I do not deny it.

GUILTY. (Aged 19.)

Of stealing goods to the value of 4s. 6d.

Confined two years in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-7

166. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Barker , about the hour of six in the night of the 1st of February , and burglariously stealing sixteen muslin handkerchiefs, value 20s. four cotton handkerchiefs, value 4s. four pair of stockings, value 4s. six shirts, value 3l. a cotton counterpane, value 10s. and seven hundred and fourteen halfpence, value 1l. 9s. 9d. the property of the said James .

(The case was opened by Mr. Alley.)

JAMES BARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live at No. 19, Newcastle-street, Strand ; there are other lodgers in the house; I pay the rent for the principal part of the house; I pay my rent to Mr. Clayton, of Drury-lane.

Q. Does Clayton himself live in the house? - A. No; on the 1st of February, about six o'clock, I went up stairs to my own lodging, I found my room door broke open, that was between six and seven; I had not been in the apartment since the morning; I missed six shirts, four pair of stockings, four pocket-handkerchiefs, sixteen neck-handkerchiefs, a counterpane, and one pound nine shillings and nine-pence in halfpence; I had seen them the same morning; I immediately went to Bow-street for a warrant; when I returned, I saw the prisoner in the cellar, with a candle lighted; I saw him put the candle out, and saw him bring the goods out at the door, I was not a rod off him; I took him into custody going into his own house, with the property in his hands, (produces the articles mentioned in the indictment;) they have been in my custody ever since; I am confident they were all taken out of my house.

Q. Were your doors left fastened? - A. Yes, it appeared to be opened by a crow, and the boxes too, he confessed he had done it with a crow.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Before you say he confessed, let us know what you had said to him? - A. I wanted the bag of halfpence, and he said, if he let me know where the halfpence were, would I let him go, and I told him I would not; he told me where the halfpence were in the cellar, my man went down into the cellar, and brought them up to me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. Does not the prisoner lodge in the same house with you? - A. No, he lives in the next house.

Q. What part of the house does Clayton occupy? - A. No part.

Q. This house has a number of lodgers? - A. Yes.

Q. They have all access into the house? - A. Yes.

Q. Has not any body access to the privy? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not Clayton go up to see the room door? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not tell you, that the mark you supposed to be the mark of a crow, had been made a considerable time ago? - A. No.

Q. In the parish in which you live, I believe there is a particular reward offered for burglaries? - A. I believe so.

Q. You have got the bill in your pocket now, which you have exhibited? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not said to Coleman, or Clayton, or Drew, how much you should get if this man was transported, and how much if he was hung? - A. I may have said, there were twenty pounds for me, in case he should be transported.

Q. What did you say you were to have, if he were to be hung? - A. I cannot say that I did.

Q. Will you venture to swear that you did not? - A. I will.

Q. You were not up stairs after the morning? - A. No.

Q. Then, at what hour your door might have been broke open you can have no conception? - A. No.

Q. Have you been unfortunate enough to be robbed since? - A. Yes; I am confident I have been robbed, but I cannot tell by whom.

Q. Do you happen to have charged any persons resident in your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did these persons reside in your house at the time this robbery took place? - A. Yes.

RICHARD LIMBRICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am one of the patrols belonging to Bow-street; on the 1st of February I went with the prosecutor to his house, the door appeared to have been violently burst open by a crow; I examined the boxes, and they appeared to have been broke open; I then went to search the prisoner's lodgings at the next door, to see if there was any other property that he had lost before, but I could not find any. (The property was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

For the Prisoner.

WILLIAM CLAYTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am the landlord of the house in which the prosecutor lives.

Q. Do you occupy any part of it? - A. I have a warehouse in it, and a room with some furniture.

Q. You have a great number of lodgers? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it a sort of house to which a great many people have access? - A. Yes, the door is open at all hours; I was up in the three pair of stairs, from ten o'clock to one, when I went home to dinner, and returned between four and five; I then went into the room opposite Barker's, and staid till six; it was not then dark, and I must have heard if any body had broke it open while I was there.

Q. Did you see any appearance of force about the door? - A. Yes.

Q. Can you account for that? - A. Yes; about a twelvemonth ago, I let that room to a person that lost the key of it, and I was forced to break it open.

Q. Was that a mark that might have happened, from the time you broke the door? - A. No, there were some little shivers that were fresh.

Q. Have you ever had any conversation with Barker, about the reward offered by the parish? - A. I met him, and he pulled out a piece of paper, and said, I am entitled to this money, I said, I do not know, that is all the conversation that passed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You yourself live in Drury-lane? - A. Yes.

Q. I understand you to say, that you went away at one o'clock, and returned between four and five? - A. Yes.

Q. You went away before six? - A. Yes; I went from there to Bow-street, it was then light.

GEORGE GOODMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a confectioner by trade; I called upon Mr. Barker, with a person of the name of Drew, for the purpose of buying some salmon, and he began asking the prosecutor about the robbery, and he told me he should have twenty pounds if he was transported, and forty pounds if he was hung, and that made me know he did it entirely for gain.

CHARLES COLEMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I live in the same house with the prisoner; I heard the word thief, and I went into the parlour.

Q. Did you hear any conversation with Barker and Brown, respecting some halfpence? - A. I heard Barker say, if he would tell him where the halfpence were, he would forgive him.

Q. Are you quite sure of that? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are no acquaintance of the prisoner's? - A. No further than knowing him, and drinking a pint of beer together.

Q. Where was it that this conversation passed? - A. I heard him say so as he came out of the parlour; he mentioned it when there were twenty people there.

Q. Were there any of the persons there that have been called as witnesses to-day? - A. No.

Q. What brought those twenty people there? - A. I cannot say.

Q. All the people that were there heard it? - A. They might not hear as well as me.

Q. You, of course, went before the Magistrate, to tell this story? - A. No, I did not; I went to fetch his poor distressed wife home.

Q. Who told you to come here to-day, and tell of this conversation? - A. The good man's wife did.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the kitchen to turn the water off, with a light in my hand, and I picked up these things under the water-tub; I was coming up stairs with them, when the prosecutor laid hold of me, and he told me, if I would tell him where the halfpence were, he would forgive me; I told him I heard something fall, and if there were any, they were in the cellar, but my candle went out, and I could not tell what it was.

GUILTY of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-8

167. JOHN KILBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , seven fowls, value 7s. the property of Jane Brawn .

(The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)

SAMUEL BRAWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am the son of Mrs. Jane Brawn ; she lost seven fowls, I bought them myself: On the Tuesday I went to Marlborough-street, and was afterwards desired to attend on Friday, when the prisoner was brought up for examination; and on the Monday morning, about ten o'clock, I discovered a footmark near the hen-roost, soon after I was told the fowls were gone; I then went to the roost, it appeared that both shoes were tipped with iron, and upon the left foot the tip was wore away, and three nails put in its place; the right foot was in the same manner, but there were only two nails where the tip was wore away; the prisoner was desired by the Magistrate to put up his feet, which he did, and both shoes corresponded with the mark in the rick-yard, and there was no other foot-mark in the rick-yard; I gave a description of the fowls at the office, and they corresponded with the description I had given; I can swear positively that the fowls, that I saw at the office, where my mother's fowls; the seven are valued at seven shillings; I gave a guinea for nine, I kept two, and my mother had seven; I had seen them on the Friday, the 24th; I am in the habit of going to my mother's every morning, but Friday was the last day that I was there; I saw them then, and on the Monday I was told they were gone.

WILLIAM UPCHURCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. On Monday morning, the 27th, between nine and ten o'clock, I was sent for by Mr. Rhodes; I went to his yard, in the Hampstead-road, and found Mr. Rhodes and the prisoner standing together; Mr. Rhodes said, here is a man with a bag at his back, with fowls, which I have a strong suspicion he has stole; I then took him into custody, with the fowls.

Q. (To Brawn.) How far is Mr. Rhodes's yard from your mother's? - A. Between two and three miles; my mother lives at Kilburn, in the parish of Hampstead.

Upchurch. The prisoner told me he bought them at Highgate, of a man that came from Barnet; I asked him if he knew the man; he said, no; I asked him if he had a cart; he said, not that he knew of; I asked him if he had a horse; he said, he did not know. (Produces the heads of the fowls in a bag).

Upchurch. I shewed Mr. Brawn these fowls at the office, on Tuesday morning; they were all dead.

Brawn. These are the heads of the fowls that I saw.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the fowls at

Highgate, I gave two shillings a-piece for three, and twenty-pence a-piece for the other four.

GUILTY (Aged 26.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-9

168. BENJAMIN BRIND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , twelve silver tea spoons, value 30s. the property of Solomon Hougham .

DAVID PERRYMAN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 92, St. Martin's lane; I manage the business of Berry and Patmore: On Wednesday evening last, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner offered six tea spoons to pledge; I asked him where he lived; he told me he lived at No.12, Castle-street, that he kept a house, and that he was a jeweller by trade; from his manner of answering these questions, I suspected him, and sent my lad to the house to enquire; and while he was gone, the prisoner wanted very much to go, but I would not let him go till he returned; I asked him how he came by the spoons; he said he bought them at a shop in the Strand; I asked him if he could take me to the shop where he bought them; and he said he could not; he then said he did not live in Castle-street, and went out of the box; I ran round, and locked the door, and took him into the shop; I suspected he was the servant of some silversmith; I told him he need not hesitate, for I knew the mark upon the back of the spoons, I told him they belonged to Mr. Hougham; he said if I would let him go, he would take the spoons and put them from whence he took them; he said that he lived with Mr. Hougham, and hoped I would let him go, for it was the first time he had ever taken any thing; I told him I could not let him go; I sent for an officer, and he was taken into custody; the officer searched him in my presence; he said he had nothing more about him; but in his pocket he found eleven duplicates, eight of them were of spoons, which he said he had taken from his master.

SOLOMON HOUGHAM sworn. - I live in Aldersgate-street , I am a very large manufacturer of gold and silver plate : I have lately lost a considerable quantity of spoons out of the manufactory; last Thursday morning a messenger came to my house, to inform me that a man was stopped, and that I might see him at Bow-street, with some of my property; I went to Bow-street, and saw the prisoner there, and the spoons that are produced; I know them to be my property, they are in an unfinished state, never having been completely manufactured; they have the initials of my name at the back, and likewise the workman's mark, two dots, underneath; the prisoner worked for me several years.

Q. Had you missed these spoons? - A. Yes, I had; I have here no less than fifty duplicates, eleven of them were taken from his person, and the rest from his clothes in his trunk; they consist of fifteen dozen of spoons, among other things.

BENJAMIN-BAILEY THOROGOOD sworn. - I work at Mr. Hougham's: These spoons are my work, they were taken out of my box where my work is kept, I missed them last Tuesday evening; they were in the box on the Saturday before.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY (Aged 54.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-10

169. JAMES HARTLEY was indicted for the wilful murder of George Scott . He was likewise charged upon the Coronor's Inquisition, in one count, with the like murder, and in a second count, with killing and slaying the said George Scott .

THOMAS WALTON sworn. - I am beadle and constable of Paddington parish; on the 30th of January, I was sent for to the Black-lion, at Bays-water, near Kensington Gravel-pits , which is, I believe, pretty near two miles; they said there had been a murder there, and I found the man dead sure enough, and I took charge of the prisoner; they were both soldier s; I took him to St. Mary-le-bonne watch-house; as we were going along, he said he had murdered the man, and he was very sorry for it, but it could not be helped at that time; he said, he hoped the witnesses would say it came through a quarrel.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The man went very readily with you? - A. Yes; I tied his arms, and he went very quietly; the sword that the mischief was done with was broke in two.

HENRY KENDRICK sworn. - I am a soldier in the first regiment of guards, and the prisoner in the third; on the 30th of January, I was at the Black lion, at Bayswater, in company with Benjamin Rudkin , George Scott , the deceased, the prisoner, and William Davis ; I was quartered there; George Scott, and Benjamin Rudkin were the first that came in; they came about four o'clock, the others came in about seven o'clock; in the course of the evening we all joined company, George Scott desired that the prisoner might drink with us; the prisoner was unknown to me or any of the company; we drank porter from four till eight o'clock, we had had four pots; Hartley's brother-in-law then went away, then the prisoner said, I will drink along with you, he did not join our company till then; I objected to it; he said he would be his pot, I said no, you had better keep

your own company; George Scott said, let him drink with us, his pot of beer is as good as ours, upon which he laid hold of the pot to drink; we then sat till between nine and ten, and drank four pots of beer more; then Rudkin had to go to his barracks, each man paid for a pot; George Scott said, we will have a parting pot, which I went and drew immediately; Rudkin slung down his penny to pay towards it; I said, let us be pennys-a-piece, for short reckonings make long friends; James Hartley said he would see me d-d first; I said, there is no occasion to see me d-d first, upon that I said, we will pay his penny amongst us; George Scott jumped up, and said, I was the cause of his coming into your company, I will pay the money for him, only let me go out and make water, and as he was going towards the door, he thrust the sword into him.

Q. To the best of your recollection was nothing more said? - A. Nothing more on either side; he passed the prisoner, as he went to the door; the deceased turned to me, and said, oh Lord, Kendrick, I am killed, I am dead.

Q. Nothing had been said by the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. What sort of a sword was it? - A. A Dutch sword, that he had brought from Holland.

Q. Was the sword in his belt? - A. I did not see it in his belt, he had it in his hand.

Q. Had he it in his hand all the evening? - A. No, he gave it to me, and I returned it to him in about ten minutes after.

Q. What occasioned you to return it to him? - A. He asked me to bring his sword back.

Q. Did you see him draw it? - A. No, nor I did not see the blow given, but I saw him draw the sword from his body; the deceased made a stop, and fell towards the fire; he died in the course of a quarter of an hour, or thereabouts.

Q. Did you see the wound? - A. Yes; the prisoner turned about and offered to make his escape, and an old man, William Davis, knocked him down, he had the sword drawn, and I forced myself into the box to him, and hit him over the arm that he held up, which made him drop his arm; I then laid hold of the point of it with my left hand, and with my right hand to the hilt of the sword, wrested it out of his hand and broke it; the landlord came running out of the bar, and the landlady; he went for a surgeon, it was near an hour and a half before he got a surgeon, but the surgeon said he was dead; I carried him up stairs upon my back; we sent for a constable; as we were conveying him to St. Mary-le-bonne watch-house, I had a lauthorn in my hand, and his arms were tied, he came up to me, and said, you have no occasion to say all you know, do not hurt me.

Q. Before this happened, how were you as to sobriety? - A. We were all a little in liquor, but not to be in any way intoxicated.

Q. Was the prisoner intoxicated? - A. No; he was about in the same form that we were.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. About seven o'clock the prisoner and his brother-in-law entered the house? - A. Yes.

Q. He was upon a furlough going to Bandbury? - A. Yes.

Q. He told the landlord so, and requested a bed? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the brother-in-law drink with you? - A. No; the prisoner did not drink with us till he was gone.

Q. What had the prisoner to drink with his brother-in-law? - A. A pot of ale, and a pint of porter.

Q. Besides the eight pots? - A. Yes; but he took no part of the first four pots.

Q. What quantity of gin was drank in the course of the evening? - A. None.

Q. What other liquor? - A. No other, but a pot of porter.

Q. Had it been agreed that the prisoner should have a bed there? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe he gave you his knapsack and his sword, and desired you to put them by, soon after he got there? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it not in consequence of some dispute between you and the prisoner, respecting the last pot of beer, that he asked for his sword and knapsack? - A. No.

Q. Did you not tell him that he should not have a bed there that night, and was not that the cause of your getting him his knapsack and sword? - A. It was not.

Q. Was it not your own spontaneous act, fetching his sword and knapsack? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not tell him he should not sleep there that night? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a publican of the name of Davis? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear you never told any person that it was in consequence of your endeavouring to turn some person out of the house, that this accident took place? - A. No.

Q. Did he ask for his sword himself, or did you fetch it him without? - A. No, he asked for it.

Q. What other arms were produced? - A. None.

Q. Was there such a thing as a pistol produced? - A. Yes, by me; he asked me to let him look at it.

Q. How did he know you had a pistol? - A. Because he saw it in the place where I put his sword.

Q. How did you amuse yourselves? - A. By smoaking our pipes, and drinking porter.

Q. In no other way? - A. No.

Q. Was not domino played? - A. Not while the prisoner was there; we were at play before the prisoner came in, but not after.

Q. Did not the prisoner lay down upon the table to sleep? - A. Not till after the deed was done.

Q. That you mean to swear? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you never told any body that he was napping at the table, and that you awoke him to pay the reckoning, and that a quarrel ensued in consequence of his refusal? - A. I never did.

Q. How many blows passed that night? - A. None, till after he had given the wound.

Q. Who struck the prisoner? - A. Davis.

Q. It was in consequence of his refusing to pay his money towards the last pot of porter, that the quarrel ensued? - A. He refused to pay it, but there was no quarrel; Scott got up and said he would pay it for him.

Q. Upon your oath, did not Scott go out and return, before the wound was given? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Upon your oath, after the wound was given did he not say, by G-d I am afraid I have hurt him; send for a surgeon? - A. No.

Q. Nor you have never told any body so? - A. No.

Q. How long have you been in the army? - A. Between six and seven years.

Q. Did you ever belong to any other regiment except the guards? - A. Never.

Q. Have you always been with your regiment? - A. Yes, except when I was upon furlough.

Q. Have you never been punished for desertion? - A. No.

BENJAMIN RUDKIN sworn. - I went with the deceased to the Black Lion at Bayswater, about four o'clock; there was Kendrick there and the prisoner, and another young man that came along with us; they two drank by themselves till near eight o'clock, when the brother-in-law said he must go home to the barracks; he went away; then the prisoner said, sooner than drink by himself, he would chuse to come into our company, which Kendrick rather refused at first; the deceased said, what is the object, his pot is as good as our's, we are all soldiers alike; after that we admitted him into our company; I suppose we drank beer to the amount of four pots in the company afterwards.

Q. How much had you drank before? - A. I suppose three or four pots in the course of the afternoon; I said I must be going home to the barracks; the deceased said, let us have a parting pot; upon that Kendrick fetched a fifth pot in, and we drank part of the beer; Kendrick said, we may as well pay for the beer, short reckonings make long friends; Kendrick, the deceased, and I paid our pennys a-piece; Kendrick asked the prisoner for his, and he said, he would see Kendrick d-d first; the deceased said, there need not be any words about the money, it was my fault he came into company, and sooner than there shall be any words about a penny, let me go out and make water, and when I come in I will pay the money; upon that the deceased was going out to make water, and going by the prisoner, there was a sword lying upon the settle, he took it up and put it into him, about two inches from his navel.

Q. Did you see him draw his sword? - A. No; but I saw him draw the sword from him; upon that the deceased said, oh Lord God, Kendrick, I cannot live; he died in about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour.

Q. During the time you were there, did you hear any other altercation? - A. Not the least.

Q. Did you observe any quarrel at all? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are you a corporal or a private? - A. A private.

Q. Have you ever been a corporal? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to become a private again? - A. Through neglect.

Q. Has that happened to you more than once? A. Yes.

Q. And you got promoted again, and reduced again? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner came in, proposing to sleep at that house, did not he? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him give his arms to Kendrick to take care of? - A. No, I did not.

Q. When he joined you, he was sitting without his arms? - A. I believe he was.

Q. How many games at domino did you play? - A. Not any while the prisoner was there.

Q. How many games did you play at all that evening? - A. I did not play at all, I did not see any dominos there all that afternoon.

Q. Then Scott did not play? - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect any body saying it was a very shabby thing in the prisoner to refuse to pay the money? - A. Something was said, that it was not a soldier's behaviour not to pay the money.

Q. By whom? - A. I cannot say whether it was the deceased or not.

Q. Did you see Kendrick give him the sword? - A. No; I was not sitting in the same box; he asked for the sword.

Q. How came it to be returned to him? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did not Kendrick tell him he should not sleep there, he should leave the house? - A. Not in my hearing.

Q. When the deceased passed by him, was his face towards your's, or towards the prisoner? - A. Towards the prisoner.

Q. He passed the prisoner after somebody had said that it was very unsoldierlike behaviour of the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it not very possible for Scott to have pinched him by the nose, or brushed him in the face, his back being towards you? - A. He did not to my knowledge.

Q. Was it not possible for him to have done that without your perceiving it? - A. I do not think he could; I should have seen it certainly, if he had.

Q. Who was it that struck any blow before Scott went out of the house? - A. I never saw a blow struck.

Q. And you have always given that account of it? - A. I never saw a blow struck before Scott received the wound.

Q. Have you never said so? - A. I never have.

Q. Do you know Mr. Peisley, a broker and auctioneer? - A. No.

Q. John Davies , the publican? - A. No.

Q. Nor Mr. William Knight? - A. No.

Q. And you have never said so to any body? - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner rise from his seat to give this blow? - A. I think he was sitting.

Q. Was he sitting or standing at the time that he drew the sword from his body? - A. He was standing, I believe.

Q. Are you quite sure that no domino was played that evening at all? - A. Yes.

Q. Not from four o'clock? - A. Yes, in the afternoon there was; but not after the prisoner came into our company.

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn. - I am a licensed hawker; what I saw was after the man was stabbed: I saw nothing going forward, but I sat peaceable on my chair; after he was stabbed, Kendrick and Rudkin were pitying of him; Kendrick took the sword from the prisoner, and broke it; then he got the deceased upon his thigh; I thought it possible the prisoner might make his escape; I stood between him and the door, and struck him; then the landlord was called, and he went for a surgeon, and Kendrick and I kept walking backwards and forwards that he should not make his escape, till he was secured.

Q. How long had you been in the house? - A. I had been there I suppose from about dark; but I was not in the room where they were I suppose not a quarter of an hour before it happened; I had been sitting in the bar.

Q. Did you see any quarrel, or any blows struck between them? - A. I did not see any blows at all; there was something like a dispute about a penny. but I did not know then what it was about, it was so trifling it did not take any attention.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did the prisoner at the bar walk about the room, or continue sitting in the box, after the blow was given? - A. He sat in the box, and he drew towards the end of the box.

Q. It would have been in vain for him to have tried to make his escape, you would not have let him? - A. No; but he shifted to the end of the seat, and how soon could he have got up and ran away, if I had not prevented him.

Q. There were no blows given to the prisoner at the bar? - A. I struck him after the murder was done.

Q. For what did you strike him? - A. Because he was shifting, I thought, to get away.

Q. Did any body else strike him? - A. Yes. Rudkin struck him.

THOMAS PEAKE sworn. - I keep the Blacklion, at Bayswater; the prisoner at the bar asked me for a bed, I told him he could not have one; then he had a pint of beer, and paid me for it; then he and his brother-in-law had a pot of ale; he went away about eight o'clock; I went about my business, and I saw nothing more, till I saw the poor man on the floor; I ran off for a surgeon directly, I did not hear nor see any thing more than good company.

- PLUMMER sworn. - I am a surgeon, I was called in between eleven and twelve, I got to the house about 3 quarters of an hour after twelve; I found the poor man stabbed on the left side of the belly, about two inches from the navel, it appeared to me to have been done with a dagger, he had been dead about an hour and a half.

Prisoner's defence. I called at Portman-street barracks for my brother-in-law, and asked him to take a walk on the road with me, as I was going on furlough; he advised me not to go far that night, and we went into the Black-lion and had a pint of beer; I asked Mr. Peake to drink, but he said, if it had been ale, he would; they asked me to play dominos, and being in liquor, I played for half a gallon of beer; after that, I laid my head upon the table, and went to sleep; they then called upon me to pay for two pots of beer, and a part of two pots; then Kendrick brought out my knapsack and sword, and said I should turn out, I should not sleep there that night; he laid them down upon the bench, and struck me; after that, being in liquor, I tossed for three quarterns of gin, and then they asked me for a share of another pot, I said, I had not seen it; then Kendrick struck me, and Rudkin and the deceased struck me; the deceased went out to make water, and came in again, and struck me; I said, if they struck me again, I

would cut them down with the sword; they struck me, and gave me two black eyes, and the blood ran all down my clothes, I have got the bloody clothes in court now.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN DAVIES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep the Hoop and Horse-shoe, Queen-street, Tower-hill, the prisoner lodged with me.

Q. Do you know Rudkin and Kendrick? - A. Yes, I know them by going to Bayswater; after this had happened, I went there on the 31st of January, the second day after this happened; I went on purpose with John Peisley , to enquire into the affair; I went in and called for a pint of ale; I pretended that I did not know the prisoner or the deceased; I addressed myself to Rudkin, I went into the same box and gave him a glass of ale; he said, he was present at the time when they were all drinking together, and that the deceased had never given any provocation at all; I said, is it possible, that a man should come in and join the company in cool blood, and kill another without any provocation; says I, good God, the man must be out of his mind; says he, there were no disputes at all; a gentleman of the name of Knight was there, and said Davis, the hawker, had told him the whole story the day before; Rudkin said, that the deceased and the prisoner had played at dominos for beer, and he said that they had words and disputes about the reckoning; he acknowledged that they had words, and that they had disputes; he entreated me to go up and see the deceased; I went up with two soldiers of the Coldstream regiment; I said, here is one man killed, and another man charged with his life, be careful what you say before the Jury; I asked where Davis was; Rudkin said, he was not there, there was enough of them to do for him; I desired them to be very cautious of the truth; when he came down to the bottom of the stairs, he said the prisoner was a big villain, he has killed my comrade, and I will go one hundred and fifty miles to see him hung; upon that I went into the tap-room, and called for another pint of ale, with Peisley and Knight; I asked Rudkin to drink; the other soldier. Kendrick, was then present in the tap-room; the landlord tapped Rudkin on the shoulder, and took him out to speak to him, and I did not see him after; I had no conversation with Kendrick.

JOHN PEISLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an auctioneer and appraiser, in Ratcliffe-highway; I went with Mr. Davis to the Black-lion, at Bayswater; I saw Rudkin and another soldier; Davis called for a pint of ale; I mentioned what a bad circumstance had happened, they said, yes, and it was ail very quiet and cool, and one got up to make water, and the other ran a sword into him; I said, is it possible, without any quarrel, he said, yes; then Knight said, was there no quarrel, he said, there might be a few words, about a penny in the reckoning; I asked if they had not been playing at dominos, and he said, no, they had not; he said there were no blows struck; I asked him how the prisoner came by black eyes, for I saw him at Marlborough-street, and he was all over blood, he was cut across the nose, but they said it was after the deceased was killed.

WILLIAM KNIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a gardener; I was at the Black-lion, at Bayswater: On the 31st of January, I saw Rudkin there, I heard a conversation; Davis asked me some questions, whether there was any quarrel, and he said, he thought there might be some scuffling; I was there the day before, when Davis, the pedlar, and two soldiers were there, they told me a man was killed, and asked me to go up stairs and see him; Davies said there was some blows struck, but which struck first he could not tell.

JAMES BULL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am brother-in-law to the prisoner; I went with him to the public-house, at Bayswater; three soldiers and the landlord came in, Kendrick and Rudkin were two of them; they were playing at dominos; I was in there about two hours, and they were playing at dominos all the time; I went in about six, and staid till eight, and then I left him.

Q. Had he, at that time, any black eyes, or marks of violence? - A. No, he had not.

Q. Nor any blood about him? - A. No.

COLONEL PEYTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I belong to the third regiment; I have known the prisoner three years and a half; I had a particular opportunity of observing his conduct in Holland; I always considered his conduct as particularly quiet, more so than any man in the company.

The prisoner called his serjeant, and ten other witnesses, who gave him a good character, as a quiet, inoffensive man.

Court. (To Davis.) Q. You told us, after the mortal blow was given, you struck the prisoner-whereabouts did you strike him? - A. In the face.

Q. Do you suppose you fetched blood? - A. I am not positive, but I found some upon my waistcoat.

Q. Did you give him more than one blow? - A. I rather think I gave him two.

Q. Before the wound was given to the deceased, had the prisoner received any blows? - A. He had not.

Q. That you say upon your oath? - A. Yes.

Q. After you had struck him, you said, that one of the soldiers also struck him? - A. I am not very

certain, whether Rudkin struck him before me, or after me.

Q. Did Rudkin strike him? - A. I should think he did, from the posture he was in.

Court. (To Rudkin.) Q. Was it you, or Kendrick that struck the prisoner after the death blow? - A. I struck him.

Q. Upon your oath, had you struck him before he gave the death blow? - A. I had not, nor touched him; I sat in a different box.

Q. Did you see any body else strike him, before the blow was given? - A. No.

Q. When you struck him, had he any black eyes then? - A. I believe not, I struck him about the face.

Q. (To Kendrick.) Did you strike the prisoner? - A. After the blow was given to the deceased, I struck his arm, and made him drop his sword.

Q. Did you strike him before the mortal blow was given? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any body else strike him before that? - A. No.

Q. Was his face bruised, or had he black eyes? - A. Not that I saw.

Q. (To Peake.) Were there any spirits drank in your house that night? - A. Not a drop.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 29.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-11

170. JOHN HASWELL was indicted for the wilful murder of Evan Jones , on the 4th of February .

He stood also charged upon the Coroner's Inquisition, with killing and slaying the said Evan Jones.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM FARLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a surgeon, in Holborn: I was called in to attend the deceased, on Thursday the 6th of February; he complained of a pain in his belly, and a great soreness in making water; I ordered him what I thought necessary, but he died on the 11th, I saw him only till the 10th; when I saw him on the Friday I thought he would not live; I and Mr. Hodgson opened the body.

Q. Did you see any external marks that appeared to portend to you dangerous consequences? - A. None; upon opening the belly, we found the internal covering of the lower intestines very much inflamed, nearly approaching to mortification; the bladder was in a state of mortification, and had ruptured.

Q. To what cause did you ascribe his death? - A. Cold, fever, or drinking, might cause those appearances.

LURE HODGSON sworn. - I am a surgeon: I attended the deceased the last day, about nine hours before he died; his death appeared to me to have arisen from violence; I am really of that opinion.

WILLIAM UPSHOTT sworn. - I keep the tap at the King's-arms Inn, Holborn-bridge : The deceased came into my house about eleven o'clock at night, on the 4th of this month, the prisoner was in the house when he came in; they joined company together, and then played at domino till they were two pots each; then they played off, to see which should pay the whole; the prisoner keeping a domino back, the deceased saw it, and flew in a great passion.

Q. Was that fair, or cheating? - A. Cheating; the deceased put his right-hand upon the table, jumped over, and hit the prisoner in the face; the prisoner then said, you are fightable, are you; the deceased said to the prisoner, come along my lad; the prisoner came out of the box in the tap-room, and as soon as ever he was out, the deceased struck him again, and then they got to fighting, and, in the scuffle, the deceased got a hook in his hand; Mr. Lawrence, a porter in the yard, took it from him, and I threw it under the table; then they got to fighting again, and threw one another down against the tap-room door, they both fell down; then I begged and prayed the prisoner to leave off, which he did; the deceased then got up, and sat down in one corner of the tap-room; he seemed to me to be very ill, groaned very much, and seemed very full of pain; my wife went to him, and he laid his head upon her arm; she asked him if he wanted any thing to drink, and she fetched a glass of gin, and he drank about half of it; he staid about ten minutes, and then I assisted him; he walked stooping quite double, and groaned all the way home; he lodged in the same yard, and there I left him.

Prisoner. Q. When Mr. Lawrence took the hook from him, I said I would make it up, I would sooner pay a pot of beer than have any words with him that night? - A. I remember, very well, you wanted to make it up with him.

STEPHEN MILES sworn. - I am a waggoner: They were playing at dominos, and the soldier dropped one, and then the deceased got up and struck the soldier twice; and the soldier said he would give him a pot of beer to make it up; then the deceased got hold of the soldier , and threw him down; and then they parted them, and he got up again, and fell down again; I saw no blows struck till after they were down, the soldier struck the man when he was down; then there was a woman there, the soldier's wife, pulled the deceased by the hair; then Lawrence took the hook away from the deceased; he had stuck the hook into the soldier's head.

Q. Did the poor man, who is since dead, appear to be hurt? - A. Yes, very much.

Prisoner's defence. I work up the King's-arms yard, when I am off duty; we were at work late that night with a country waggon, and my mistress gave me a pot of beer and some bread and cheese; this man came in, and challenged the best man in the house for a pot of beer at dominos; I played him for a pot of beer; I saw he had got but six cards, and when I saw that, I dropped one; and when he saw me drop a card, he got up and struck me several times, and I said I would make it up; he stuck a hook into my head, in several parts, and in my forehead, that he took out of his bosom; Mr. Lawrence took the hook out of my forehead; he would not make it up, but would fight on.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY OF Manslaughter .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-12

171. SAMUEL WOOLLEY was indicted for the wilful murder of Thomas Hughes .

Q. RICHARD HARDING sworn. - On the 28th of January , I was in company with the deceased and the prisoner, at the India Company's warehouses New-street , they were both labourer s at work in the warehouses; while the prisoner was at breakfast, the deceased went up to him, and turned his victuals over with his hand, and then said d-n you, you b-r, you have got nothing but some bones that you have got out of some gentleman's kitchen; says he, I will get some matches for you, and set you up in business; that was at nine o'clock; he made no answer to him that I heard; I heard no more till twelve o'clock the same day; Woolley came form the place where he was at work, to where I was eating my dinner, and says he, Mr. Harding, what shall I do with that Hughes, he plagues me, and teazes me so, that I do not know how to bear myself; if he says a few words more I will give him a good lathering, or he shall me; as soon as the words were out of his mouth Hughes came in, with three bunches of matches in his hand, holding them in Woolley's face, and says, Dick, here is one for a farthing, and two for a halfpenny; directly after that, Woolley turned round, and struck him a blow in the face; Hughes said, that is a gallon of beer, but if you are for that, come on; and immediately gave him a second blow, and they immediately went to fighting; there were half a score blows, or a dozen, on each side; Woolley, while they were fighting; directly he received the blow in the side, he hung his head down, and at that time they had hold of each other, and Woolley struck him four of five blows while they had hold of each other; they were neither of them stripped; then Hughes went gently down upon one knee, upon the floor; Woolley never attempted to strike him after that, but he walked awy; then Hughes tumbled gently down upon his face, upon the floor; some of the men took him to the door for air; and after that, they took saw into the accompting-house by the fire, and I saw no more of him; after that, Woolley seemed very much concerned, and said he was very sorry for what he had done.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys.Q. Do you know a more harmless inoffensive fellow than the man at the bar? - A. No.

Q. Did he not bear a great deal form the deceased before he struck him? - A. Yes; he was always provoking him; I would not have borne so much, I could have suffered myself to have been killed first.

Q. There was no unfair fighting? - A. No. WILLIAM FURO sworn. - On the 28 th of January, I was called in to the deceased, about the middle of the day: I found two other professional gentlemen there, who lived nearer, and got there before me; when I saw him, he appeared to me to be dead; however, we naturally proceeded to do all that was reasonable and proper to restore him; but after making some experiments, we thoroughly agreed that no more would be of any use; he was dead at that time; we had him stripped, and put into a warm bath; we discovered no external marks of violence, no bruises, or any thing of the kind, except a cut in the upper lip; the next morning we met in order to open his body; we made a very minute examination, and we could discover nothing that could lead to that idea that a blow had been inflicted that could have caused death, if we had not been informed that the man had been killed by a blow; there was nothing that could have that appearance, excepting one circumstance, on taking out the stomach, and opening it, it was reported that it was in that part he received the blow; upon examining the coat of the stomach, there was one or more place of extravasation diffused over the inner membrane of the stomach; that, however, was by no means the cause of his death, however it might have been the effect of a blow; there was on other particular appearance that we could discover; it might eventually have caused death, but not immediately.

Q. If the violent concussion had affected the heart, it might have produced instantaneous death? - A. Yes, as it did in this case.

THOMAS MATTHEWS sworn. - I am a labourer in the India Company's warehouses: On the 28th

of January, about twelve o'clock, I saw Hughes with three bunches of matches in his hand, and he said to Harding, Dick, here are two for a halfpenny, and one for a farthing; I sat down to eat my dinner, and upon turning my head round, I saw them fighting; I did not see the first blow struck; after they had done fighting, Woolley went away into the accompting-house, I did not go in with him; Hughes was upon the ground, and was carried into the accompting-house from the first beginning of their striking one another; he was dead in the course of a minute and a half; the blows they struck did not seem as if they would hurt a child of ten years of age, they were so close to one another; he was as stout, able, a young man as could be any where; ever since Woolley came to the warehouse, Hughes has been always abusing of him, and calling him names, there is not a man in the warehouse that would have taken the ill behaviour that he did so long.

GUILTY of Manslaughter .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-13

172. ELIZABETH BOUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a a goose feather-bed, value 40s. a bolster, value 5s. two pillows, value 5s. three sheets, value 5s. a pair of blankets, value 3s. a counterpane, value 3s. a tent bed furniture, value 10s. a satin gown and coat, value 5s. a chints gown, value 5s. a coat, value 5s. a linen gown, value 3s. two cotton gowns, value 10s. a black silk gown and petticoat, value 10s. four petticoats, value 8s. two cloaks, value 7s. three damask table-cloths, value 3s. a large table-cloth, value 1s. six pair of stockings, value 3s. a silk petticoat, value 2s. 6d. a stuff petticoat, value 1s. four sheets, value 4s. a cotton petticoat, value 1s. five white aprons, value 2s. three shawls, value 1s. a pair of scripture prints, value 1s. eight small pictures, value 1s. eleven silver handled knives and forks, value 20s. two brass candlesticks, value 1s. an iron candlestick, value 3d. a mahogany tea-chest, value 1s. a silver tea-spoon, value 1s. a pair of silver buckles, value 5s. a mahogany dressing-table, value 3s. a japan tea-board, value 6d. a green umbrella and case, value 1s. and a Turkey carpet, value 10s. the property of Owen Lewis , in the dwelling-house of William Rasbrook .

ELIZABETH LEWIS sworn. - I live in Bowling-Green-lane, No. 4; I am the wife of Owen Lewis , I lodged at the house of William Rasbrook , in Liquorpond-street ; my husband has left me two years; I saw him last August, when I was in the hospital, I have never seen him since.

Q. Was the furniture your own? - A. Yes; I lost these things while I was in the hospital, last August; I used to clean Mr. Cecil's chapel; I left the prisoner in my apartments, she used to do a little work for me; I was in the hospital about a month, and when I came home, I found my lodgings stripped of every thing in the world (repeats the articles named in the indictment;) when I returned from the hospital, she was gone abroad after her husband, and she was not taken up till last Thursday was a fortnight; I found one of my boxes, when I came home, which I had left full of linen and bed furniture, empty, and it had been fired, and was burnt.

Q. Had you given any of those things to the prisoner when you went to the hospital? - A. No; the box that was set fire to I left locked, I had the key with me in the hospital.

JOHN TRINITY sworn. - The last witness lodged at Mr. Rasbrook's a pork-shop; I came to work at the house to repair it, with another bricklayer, it was in the month of August, but I cannot say what day; Mrs. Lewis was then in the hospital; I saw the prisoner go out with a table and a bundle, about four or five days after I had gone there to work; I had never seen her before to my knowledge; she carried them out, and asked me to carry them to No. 15, Summer-street, to a friend's house; I carried them there, and she paid me threepence-halfpenny for so doing; I do not know what was in the bundle; I never saw any thing of the prisoner before or after.

Q. Did you ever see her in Rasbrook's house while you were working there? - A. Yes, several times in the course of the day; she was up in the front garret; I never was in the garret.

EDWARD MILES sworn. - I keep a little horse and cart to do jobs with; the prisoner employed me some time in August to move some goods for her, it was on a Saturday; I lodge in Eyre-street-hill; I took them from a house in Liquorpond-street, a hair-dresser's shop, not Mr. Rasbrook's; they came form a house, No. 15, Summer-street; I took them to a house in a court in Long-lane in the Borough.(The officer deposed that he apprehended the prisoner, and searched the house, but found none of the property.)

The prisoner in her defence denied the charge.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-14

173. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , two pieces of muslin, containing, in length, ten yards,

value 30s. the property of Samuel Chaloner , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL CHALONER sworn. - I am a linendraper , at Smithfield-bars : On Monday the 10th of this month, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, and brought two children with her; she asked me to let her look at some cloth; I desired my young man to shew it her at the bottom of the shop; he came to me in a few minutes, and told me he missed two pieces of muslin; upon that I looked, and missed two pieces from the bottom counter, where the prisoner was; upon which, I came to the prisoner, as she was walking towards the door; I told her she had got more than she had paid for; she said she had not; I told her, I knew she had, and I sent my young man out for a constable; I took her back to the counter, and she took out one piece from under her arm, saying, that if she had got any thing, that was all she had got; I perceived another between her gown and her clothes; the constable then came in, and I gave him charge of her; she laid both pieces down upon the counter; I gave the muslin to the constable.

Q. Was there nothing done from which you could collect that she took this property? - A. I did not myself, my young man served her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Has any body any interest in your business, besides yourself? - A. No.

Q. How many persons serve in the shop? - A. Me and my young man, and occasionally Mrs. Chaloner, but she went out about half an hour before this, and just as the constable came, she came in.

CHARLES WINDSOR sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Chaloner; the prisoner came to the bottom of the shop, and I shewed her some cloth; she did not think the first I shewed her fine enough, upon which I went to the far end of the shop to get another finer; there were five pieces of muslin when I left her, she was close to the counter; on my return, I found but three pieces; I immediately informed Mr. Chaloner of it; I then went to the prisoner, and she bought some cloth immediately, which amounted to four shillings and eight-pence; after that, she was in a particular hurry to get away, she would not stop to have the cloth put in paper; Mr. Chaloner challenged her with the two pieces of muslin, and sent me for a constable; on my return with tho constable, she had delivered up the two pieces, which were given to the constable; they belonged to Mr. Chaloner, I know them by the private mark at the corner of each piece, in Mr. Chaloner's hand-writing, they are worth twenty shillings.

Q. Did you see her take them? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Was there any body in the shop besides you and your master? - A. There were several customers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Are you sure you did not see her take it? - A. Yes.

Q. But you saw her arm moving towards it? - A. Yes; I saw her arm drop from the counter.

Q. And that must have been the time that she took it? - A. Yes.

JOHN CARLISLE sworn. - I am a constable,(produces two pieces of muslin); I received them from Mr. Chaloner; I have had them ever since.

Chaloner. These are my muslin; the mark is neither letters nor figures, but it is a mark that we used to know how to sell our goods by.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Will you swear you had not sold any muslin that day? - A. I cannot; I know I had a bundle open that day.

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent of the crime that is laid to my charge.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 30.)

Of stealing the goods, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-15

174. DAVID TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , thirty-six handkerchiefs, value 3l. 9s. a yard and a quarter of linen cloth, value 7s. 6d. twenty-four yards of muslin, value 3l. 10s. 6d. two pieces of diaper, value 2l. 3s. eighteen damask napkins, value 6l. thirty-one yards of other linen cloth, value 4l. 13s. a table-cloth, value 14s. and four yards of other muslin, value 10s. the property of Samuel Brown and Edward Bacon , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Brown .

SAMUEL BROWN sworn. - I am a linen-draper , in Leadenhall-street , the prisoner was my porter : On Wednesday, the 5th of this month, it was discovered, between one and two o'clock, by my young man.

SAMUEL BURFORD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Brown: A gentleman called to know what empty chests we had; I told him Mr. Brown would be in in a few minutes, but he did not come in so soon as I expected; the prisoner came in in the interim; I desired him to go and shew the gentleman what chests we had in the cellar; Mr. Brown not being returned I went down with the gentleman myself; the prisoner said, there was but one chest that would suit the gentleman, and that was in the front cellar; I told him in the coal cellar there were some boxes that he might look at, but they were not of the description he wanted; I went

into the coal cellar, I said to the prisoner, here is one that will answer the gentleman's purpose; the prisoner took hold of this chest, and said it was broke all to pieces; I told him, from what I saw of it, it had no such appearance, and desired he would immediately pull it out; he immediately pulled it out with vioience, as if he would have thrown it upon our heads almost; I said, your behaviour is very extraordinary, could not you have thrown it as well upon the coals as upon us in that rude way; in getting the box out, there appeared to be something that impeded him very much, and I put the candle over his shoulder to see what it might be; I discovered upon that, a large parcel tied up in brown paper; I told him he might come up stairs, and perhaps the two boxes might suit the gentleman; in coming up stairs the person paid me for the two boxes, and Mr. Bacon sent the prisoner out immediately on a message; instead of going out, as he was desired, he returned immediately into the cellar, and came up again; Mr. Brown was returned, and I informed him of what I had seen; the prisoner came up again, and went of his message; I informed Mr. Brown of what had passed, and he returned with me to the cellar; the parcel was then thrown upon the other side of the coals, at the extremity of the cellar, with eleven yards of Irish without any paper; when the prisoner came in, Mr. Brown desired him to go and fetch up those two chests, the gentleman would send for them; Mr. Brown returned into the cellar with me, and desired him to fetch out that large parcel on the other side of the coals; he told him he saw none; Mr. Brown told him, if he would look he would see it fast enough, he could see it; upon which the prisoner went over the coals, and brought out two parcels, and we desired him to bring them up stairs; Mr. Brown immediately cut them open, and discovered the things mentioned in the indictment,(repeating them); except a part of them, which were in his box up stairs; the value altogether is about twenty pounds; the damask napkins were all in one piece, worth about six pounds, they are the property of Samuel Brown and Edward Bacon ; Mr. Brown only lives in the house; the constable was sent for, and his box searched, but I did not go up stairs; he was then taken into custody, and carried to the Mansion-house; there were no other servants but one maid servant in the house; I had missed these articles, and spoke to the prisoner, for three weeks or a month before this happened, about them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Brown? - A. Thirty odd years.

Q. The prisoner has lived some time with Mr. Brown? - A. Since September, or thereabouts.

Q. In all probability these things were taken at different times? - A. Most likely.

Q. Mr. Hunter has a share in the business, has he not? - A. No; he has been dead a good many years.

Q. Has not he a son in the business? - A. No.

Q. Have you not laid things in the way of the prisoner in order to detect him? - A. No; I never had the smallest reason to suspect him.

Q. I believe you have left an iron chest open, and not missed any thing? - A. No.

Q. Was not the prisoner in the habit of buying things of you? - A. He did buy one shirt, and one neckcloth, and one handkerchief, but he did not pay for them; he was to pay for them when he received his wages.

CHARLES BUCKLAND sworn. - I am a constable. (Produces the property, which was deposed to by Burford and the prosecutor).

Brown. I went up stairs with the constable, and saw the prisoner's box opened, he unlocked it himself; it contained balck silk handkerchief, remnants of Irish, and muslin handkerchiefs; I sealed them up by the direction of the Lord-Mayor, and the constable has had them till now.

Prisoner's defence. The parcel that was in the cellar I knew nothing at all about; and as for my box, it was not locked, there was no lock upon it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 23.)

Of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-16

175. JOHN HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a piece of hempen cloth containing twenty yards, value 22s. the property of Samuel Walker , the elder , and Samuel Walker , the younger .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN CLARKSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a lighterman: I was turning round the corner of Mark-lane , from Tower-street, I perceived a cart at a great distance, it was very dark, and no light near me; I thought at the time that the cart was moving; upon approaching nearer, I perceived a person on the opposite side of the way, considerably before me, go towards the cart very fast; I observed the prisoner jump up into the cart with a violent spring, and succeeded in taking away this property from the cart; the prisoner immediately returned from the cart, running much faster towards me than he did towards the cart, with the property in-his arms; I suspected he was after no good, and I immediately crossed the way, and met the man with the property on him; that person was the prisoner at the bar; he was just going to turn the corner of a passage, and he rather suc

ceeded in turning the corner before I laid hold of him; he immediately dropped a piece of goods, which lay down close by him; at the moment that I laid hold of him, I pointed to the piece of goods, and said to him, how dare you bring this piece here; the answer he made was, that he knew nothing about it; I immediately collared him, and he endeavoured as much as he could, by struggling, to get away, but did not strike me; I still kept my hold of him, and he continued struggling, till I got assistance; I said to him, why do you struggle if you are not guilty; he said, what business had I to take hold of him by the collar; he continued struggling, I suppose, from three to five minutes before I got assistance, when William Edwards came up, he is a servant to Mr. Sedgwick; I took him into Mr. Sedgwick's shop; before I could get any assistance, I threw him into the shop, which is about fifteen yards from this passage; there were several men in Mr. Sedgwick's shop, and I desired them to take care of him while I went to fetch the property; I found it in the very same spot where he had dropped it.

Q. What was it? - A. It appeared to me to be hammock cloth; when I had fetched the property to Mr. Sedgwick's, I learned that it belonged to Mr. Walker, at the next door; I carried it there, and it was owned by Mr. Walker.

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a servant to Mr. Sedgwick, locksmith, in Mark-lane: I came up to Mr. Clarkson's assistance, he was in his custody when I came up.

DANIEL JEWSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am under beadle of Tower Ward: I was sent for to Mr. Walker's, in Mark-lane; I took charge of the prisoner, and this piece of goods.(Producing it).

Clarkson. This is the same piece of goods, I put my name upon it.

SAMUEL WALKER , senior, sworn. - I am in partnership with my son: This was one of the pieces that was in my own cart, they were brought from Berkshire, and delivered to my carman.

Prisoner's defence. This piece of cloth was among a good many other rolls, and they could not tell which it was.

Court. (To Clarkson.) Q. Was this thrown among other parcels? - A. It was given immediately into Mr. Walker's hands.

Mr. Walker. I received it form Clarkson, and he immediately put his name upon it; I stood by the piece till the constable came.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-17

176. JOHN LAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , eight pewter quart pots, value 12s. and five pewter pint pots, value 5s. the property of Joseph Martin .

GRACE MARTIN sworn. - I am the wife of Joseph Martin , I keep the Essex-head, in Essex-street : On Wednesday the 5th of February, I lost eight quarts, and five pint pots; my boy was collecting the pots in the Temple; I did not know any thing of it till the boy brought them back.

JAMES HATT sworn. - I am pot-boy to Mr. Martin: On the 5th of November, about eight o'clock in the evening, I went to No. 1, in Elm-court, to Mr. Lasher's chambers, when I came down, I missed the pots, there were eight quarts, and five pints, upon a leather strap; I then saw Simon Dyke, the watchman, and he and I went down to Crown Office-row, and took him with the pots upon his back; he was going towards King's-bench Walk; he said he was going to take the pots home to the Essex-head.

Q. Did you know any thing at all of him before? - A. No; I had never seen him before, to my knowledge.

Q. How long were you gone up stairs? - A. Not two minutes; the pots all belong to my master. (Produces the pots.)

SIMON DYKE sworn. - I am watchman of the Temple; I went with the boy, and took the prisoner in Crown Office-row; we took him towards the Essex-head, and in Essex-court he turned rusty, and swore he would not go any further; he then drew a knife, and cut me across the hand; I called to my fellow-servant that was coming through the court, he took him by the arms behind, and secured him while I went to the doctor; I have not lost the use of my hand, but I have not been able to do any thing since; he threw the knife away, and it was found by my fellow-servant.

Q. What had he upon him when you found him in Crown Office-row? - A. Eight quart pots and a pint.

Prisoner. Q. Will you take upon you to swear that I was the person that cut you, when there were so many people by? - A. I am very positive of it, for there was nobody by but myself and the boy; I had thrown him down upon his back before he cut me, he cut me as he laid upon his back, upon some stone steps in Essex-court.

Q. Where was the boy at that time? - A. The boy had loosed him with the fall, there was nobody else near at that time, and my fellow-servant heard me say I was cut, and then he seized him by the arms behind.

EDWARD WATFORD sworn. - I was coming through New-court, into Essex-court, and I heard Dyke say, that the man that he had got there upon

the ground had cut him, and I immediately jumped behind him, and locked my arms in between his, and said he should not cut any more; a gentleman standing just behind me, said, here lies the knife; that was about a yard and a half from the prisoner. (Produces the knife.)

Prisoner. Q. Was the knife open or shut, when you picked it up? - A. Shut.

Q. Was there any appearance of blood upon it? - A. No. (The pots deposed to by Mr. Martin.)

The prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows: My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, on the 5th day of this month, I was going into the Temple, after I had left my work, to see a friend, and going along, I saw these pots lie in the court, not near any house, and two boys standing by them; I heard one of them say, as I passed by, put them in your apron till we can get a coach; hearing these words, I had a suspicion they were stolen from some house, where, I knew not; I took up one of the pots to see the inscription that was on it, and the boys, seeing me observe them both, ran away; seeing this, I was sure, within myself, that had stolen them; I saw, by the inscription, that they belonged to the Essex-head, Essex-street; I put them on my shoulder, and was determined, as it was all in my way, to take them there, and tell them how I got them; the pot-boy came up, I told him I had a suspicion they had been stolen, as I found them in the middle of the path-way, with two boys standing by them; this is the true state of the transaction, and as this is a Court of Justice, I hope and trust you will weigh the matter within yourselves, and the crime for which I stand here indicted, I am entirely innocent of, and trust in God you will think so too; and in regard to the watchman, I know nothing of it; he cannot swear I was the man that cut him, he found the knife upon the ground, near the place where I stood; but that was as likely to be dropped out of any other person's pocket in the scuffle, as from me; for if I had cut the man, it was impossible I could have shut the knife and thrown it away, as two persons had hold of my hands all the time, and if that knife had come from my possession, some one or other must have seen me with it; the Justice particularly asked him, if the knife had any blood on it, and it had not; therefore, Gentlemen, I hope you will consider within yourselves, that I am not guilty of the assault.

Signed John Lawson .

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

The Court immediately pronounced sentence of Transportation for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-18

177. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a pewter pint pot, value 1s. the property of John Roberts .

JOHN ROBERTS sworn. I am a publican , I keep the Weaver's-arms, in Aldermanbury ; I lost a pint pot last Friday evening; I did not see it taken.

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn. - I am pot-boy to Mr. Roberts; I was getting my pots in between five and six in the evening, last Friday; I was going up stairs, at No. 88, London Wall, and was informed that the prisoner had taken up the strap into his hand three or four times; then I saw him go to the pots, and when he saw me, he walked away; the strap was lying at the corner of Phillip-lane, the strap was left full of pots; I put the strap down again, at No. 14, London-wall, and I went to No. 10. and while I was knocking at the door, I saw him take a pint pot off the strap; I came up to him, and walked by the side of him, till I got to my own door, and then I called my master, and the prisoner took to his heels, and ran down Aldermanbury, and I went after him, calling stop thief, till a man knocked him down, and when they lifted him up, the pint pot fell from under his coat; I took it up; I have had it ever since;(produces it;) he was taken before the Alderman and committed.

Roberts. This is my pot; I went in pursuit, but the prisoner was got up before I came up to him; I did not see the pot picked up.

Prisoner's defence. I had been out all day drinking, I do not know any thing about the pot; I was not knocked down at all.

GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-19

178. MARIA DENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a silver watch, value 40s. and two guineas , the property of John Jennings .

JOHN JENNINGS sworn. - I am a labourer : On the 20th of January, I was walking up the Hay-market, about eight o'clock in the evening; I met with the prisoner; I went home with her to Prince's-court , Whitcomb-street; I gave her four and sixpence to stop with her all night, and when I waked in the morning, my watch and money were gone, and she was gone; I left my watch and money in my breeches-pocket, by the side of the bed.

Q. When had you last seen your money? - A. About four o'clock in the afternoon; I had not seen all of it after that.

Q. Was it two guineas in gold? - A. No, one guinea, and the rest in silver; I gave her half-a-guinea to take the four and sixpence, and she gave me change.

Q. Was there any body else in the room? - A. There was another girl in the room at first, but she went out before we went to bed.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was in liquor.

Q. Are you sure that you had your watch and money? - A. Yes; I wound up my watch by the side of the table, and put it back into my sob; I saw my watch at the office in Queen-square, the next day, the pawnbroker brought it.

Q. Are you sure that is the girl? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen her but that one time? - A. Yes, I had seen her once before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had got very tipsey? - A. Yes.

Q. You had been walking up and down the Hay-market, speaking to a number of woman? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. That is to say, you were upon the tit-up? - A. Yes.

Q. You know you were talking with them at the corner of every street? - A. No, I did not.

Q. This house in Prince's-court is a house where many women of this description come? - A. Yes.

Q. And the door was open? - A. Yes.

Q. Where any of these bad girls might have come in and picked your pocket when you were asleep? - A. They might.

- EVERETT sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Brown, pawnbroker, in the Haymarket:(produces a silver watch;) it was pledged by one Mary Fullham , on the 21st of January, between eight and nine in the morning; it was not the prisoner at the bar; I have had it ever since; I lent her a guinea and a half upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This Mary Fullham is a woman of the town, is she not? - A. No, she is a married woman.

- RHODES sworn. - On the 21st of January I was constable of the night; about nine o'clock the prisoner and another woman were brought to the watch-house; Jennings said the prisoner was the woman that he was in bed with, and that the other woman was in the room at the same time; I have a duplicate which was brought to me by a person that is not here. (Produces it.)

Jennings. The prisoner told me that was the duplicate of the watch, and she was very sorry for it.

Q. Had you told her it would be better for her? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do not you know that all the people found her said, give an account of the duplicate to the young man, and it will be better for you? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Look at the watch? - A. This is my watch; I know it by a dent in the case; it is a capped watch.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-20

179. CONDE-GROT MONDENO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , two deal planks, value 5s. the property of William Bough and John Holmes .

(The prisoner was a foreigner, but chose to be tried by an English Jury. An interpreter was sworn.)

WILLIAM BOUGH sworn. - I am in partnership with John Holmes , in cutting the Wet Docks in the Isle of Dogs ; these planks were lying upon the ground, marked out for the Wet Docks; we had two hundred and eleven of twelve foot, two inches and a half; they were brought there on the 1st of this month; on Friday morning, the 7th, between seven and eight o'clock, I missed eight of them; it was a frosty morning, and I could see where the planks had lain over-night, and likewise the tracks of the people who had taken them away.

Q. Did you observe whether there was the track of more persons than one? - A. Yes; or else that one had had two or three journies; we traced the footsteps to a lane called Arrow-lane, and then when we got into the road, we could not trace it any further: on Saturday night, the 8th, between six and eight in the evening, two men brought the prisoner down to me; I charged the constable with him, and desired one of the men to go and fetch two planks that they had taken off his back; and he was committed.

WILLIAM AUST sworn. - I am a workman employed in the Wet Docks: On Saturday evening, the 8th of this month, between six and eight, I met the prisoner in the road coming from Poplar to Blackwall, about one hundred yards from where the property laid, with two planks upon his back; I took him to the White Horse in Poplar, to Mr. Bough; that was about half a mile; we left the planks upon the road, where we took him, and afterwards went back to fetch them; we found them where we left them; there was the same mark upon them; we delivered the planks to Mr. Brandy, at the White Horse.

Q. Did you know the mark before you stopped the prisoner? - A. No.

JOHN BRANDY sworn. - I was at the White Horse, paying my men; I am a gardener: it was between six and eight; Aust and another man brought the prisoner to me, and gave me charge of

him, for stealing his planks; then I sent two men for the planks; they might be gone ten or twelve minutes; they have my mark upon them, I put it on at the time; I asked the prisoner what he was going to do with them; and he said, so that I could understand him, he was going to sell them for three shillings.

Q. Did he express himself clearly, that he was going to sell them for three shillings? - A. Yes; and he said he had taken eight the night before; I asked him what he did with them; and he said he had sold them to a shop; I asked him what shop, and he said stick-a-me-knife first, with a thump upon his breast; Mr. Bough was present; I took him the same evening to Mr. Staples's office.

Bough. I was present at the conversation with Brandy; he spoke very imperfect English, but he could answer any question in the negative or affirmative, as plain as I could.

Q. Could he speak such good English that you could be certain as to what he said? - A. No, I could not; when Brandy asked where he sold them, he said three shillings, and shop or ship, I could not tell which.

EDWARD WELLS sworn. - (Produces two planks.) I was going with Aust from Blackwall to Poplar; we met the prisoner with two planks; I believe these are the same planks, they have the same mark upon them; Mr. Brandy has had them in his care ever since.

Brandy. These are the same planks that I received from Aust.

Bough. These are my planks; they are the same that were lying in the Isle of Dogs; they have my mark upon them; I marked them with a centrebit.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty; I bought them of an unknown person, who came to me and asked me three shillings for these two planks; I do not recollect the day, but it was about seven o'clock in the evening of the day that I was stopped; I had very lately come from a foreign country, and I do not know any body here.

Q. (To Aust.) Was the direction in which he was going, towards the docks or from the docks? - A. From the docks.

Bough. I counted them again on the Sunday, and found twelve more gone.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-21

180. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , five quartern loaves of bread, value 6s. the property of William Wright .

There being no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was.

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-22

181. MARY BANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a pair of breeches, value 3s. and a waistcoat, value 2s. the property of John Hyett .

JOHN HYETT sworn. - I am porter to a leather-cutter , No. 1, Church-street, St. Martin's : On the 6th of this month I took her, because her character was gone; she is my wife's daughter; she has been in the Philanthropic Society two years; her character has been gone ever since last June; they put her out, somewhere about last April, to service; I found the duplicate of the breeches and waistcoat upon her, and then she acknowledged it.

Q. Did you make her any promise of favour? - A. No; she has been in this way for some years, more or less; she promised me, on the Tuesday before, she would be good, and not do so any more.

JOHN BROWN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 104, in the Strand: I took in a waistcoat and breeches, on the 4th of February, of the prisoner, I lent her four shillings upon them; (produces them;) she told me she lived in Church-court, and that her name was Mary Banks .

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t18000219-23

182. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a trunk, value 4s. a great coat, value 10s. four waistcoats, value 20s. two shirts, value 10s. four pair of stockings, value 8s. three yards and a half of kerseymere cloth, value 28s. a scarlet waistcoat-piece, value 5s. and two pair of shoes, value 9s. the property of Joseph Kay .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Joseph Redfearn .

JOHN EALING sworn. - I am servant to Joseph Kay ; he keeps the Angel in Fleet-market, and he keeps the tavern at the Castle and Falcon ; I am porter to him: Last Friday night I took a trunk from the Angel in Fleet-market, directed to Fairfax-court, in the Strand; I set it down at a door while I enquired where Fairfax-court was; it had come by the waggon from Trowbridge; I set it down in the street, and had my right hand upon

the top of it; it was rather behind me; I felt the trunk go, while my hand was upon it; upon that I turned round; I did not see the man, but I saw the trunk go; it was about half past eight at night; I saw a woman, and she directed me up a court; the man is here that took him; I saw the trunk in less than five minutes afterwards; the man that took him had the trunk in his hand; I took hold of the trunk, and caught the prisoner by the collar, and he went down upon his knees, and begged and prayed for me to let him go; we took him to St. Martin's watch-house, with the trunk; the trunk and the prisoner were there all night, and taken to the Magistrate the next day; the trunk was opened before the Magistrate; I saw some of the things; it was locked up again, and I have had it in my possession ever since.

Q. Is your master the proprietor of the waggon? - A. No; he is the proprietor of the inn.

JOHN JONES sworn. - I work at the army-elaboratory, as a labourer: I was coming home about a quarter past eight, I saw the porter, the last witness, with a smock frock on, in the Strand ; half his body was in the door of the shop, and the other half in the street, and the trunk standing by him; about two or three yards further, I saw the prisoner and another man standing together; I passed them about two yards; I turned round, and saw the prisoner look after the porter; then he went up to the trunk, and stooped, and got up again; he stooped a second time, and took the trunk, and carried it away before him, towards Southampton-street; I kept him in my eye all the way; there were three shops that threw a very great light; I went up to him, laid hold of him by the collar, and said, you scoundrel, you shall go no further with this; upon that he went upon his knees, and said, for J-s C-st's sake, let me go; I took the prisoner towards the shop where I had seen the porter, and I saw him come running; I told him, here is the trunk, and here is the fellow that ran away with it; I delivered him up to the porter, and other people and I followed to the watch-house.

JOSEPH REDFEARN sworn. - I am a sadler : I know nothing more than that the property is mine; I live in Fairfax-court; I had come to town before; I had packed it up myself at Trowbridge, to come by the waggon; all the things in the indictment were in it; (repeating them;) the Magistrate gave me liberty to take such things out as I should want; most of the things are in the trunk. (The trunk produced, and the property deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. There was a man standing by the trunk, and he asked me to give him a lift up; and then that man came up and stopped me; and the other man ran away, and he said he would do me.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-24

183. GEORGE ICOM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , four pounds of iron hoops, value 2s. the property of Stephen Offwood .

STEPHEN OFFWOOD sworn. - I am a cooper , in the Tenter-ground, Finsbury-square : On the 24th of January, a new iron hoop was taken from the prisoner, belonging to me; it had not been upon any cask; the value of it was about sixpence; we found some more in his apartments afterwards.

WILLIAM LEDGER sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Offwood: On Friday morning, the 24th of January, the prisoner came to our shop to work; he had worked for my master about two years and a half; I saw him doubling up iron in the morning in the shop; there was nobody in the shop but me then; and I desired the man that works next to him to watch him.

Q. Did he see you watching him? - A. No; I was concealed; I afterwards saw him put some into his side-pocket, and conceal some down his bosom; I then went in doors, and called my master, and he deteted him; I did not see him searched.

Q. Do you know it to be your master's iron? - A. Yes; I saw him take it from the cask in the shop, and bind it up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do not you know the prisoner was that morning to go to Mr. Mackenzie's house, to repair a tub? - A. I do not know it.

JOSEPH BAKER sworn. - I watched the prisoner and saw him put some pieces of bent iron in a bag that he used to carry his tools in; I did not see him go away.

JOHN HILLIER sworn. - I am an officer: On the 24th of January I was sent for by Mr. Offwood, to the lodgings of the prisoner, where I found this iron; I delivered it to Mr. Offwood.

Offwood. (Produces the property.) This piece of iron I saw my wife take out of his pocket; I had suspected him some time before, and I put a mark upon some of the hooping in his birth; and this piece has my mark upon it.

Mr. Alley. Q. I believe he has worked where you have been, for twenty-five years? - A. Yes, he has.

Prisoner's defence. I have worked upon these premises twenty-nine years; I instructed him in his

business all his apprenticeship, and since he commenced master I have worked for him.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY . (Aged 54.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-25

184. THOMAS PARISH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a shawl, value 4s. 4d. the property of Mary Dickinson .

MARY DICKINSON sworn. - I live at Tottenham : On the 18th of January I lost a muslin shawl; I had a strong suspicion of the prisoner; I had him searched by the constable; I saw it found in his coat-pocket; I keep a chandler's shop ; the prisoner came in to buy a three-penny loaf; I had seen him several times before; I lost it between seven and eight in the evening; I had hung it up in the afternoon for sale.

JOHN STORY sworn. - I am constable of Tottenham: I searched the prisoner, and found this shawl upon him. (Produces it.)

Mrs. Dickinson. It had a private mark upon it, but that is taken off; I am certain it is mine.

Prisoner's defence. I am a stranger here; I only came up for a job of work, or something like it.

GUILTY (Aged 55.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-26

185. JOHN TAGG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , four saddles, value 4l. 17s. the property of Thomas Hutchins .

THOMAS HUTCHINS sworn. - I am a sadler in Holborn : I lost four saddles on the 10th of this month; I had seen them in the morning, upon a horse at the door; I went out about three o'clock in the afternoon, I cannot recollect if they were there then; I returned between six and seven, and in consequence of information that I received, I went to Bow-street, where I saw the prisoner in custody, and one saddle that I could swear to.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Have you any partner in your business? - A. No.

JOSEPH MORGAN sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hutchins: I saw the saddles at the door at two o'clock on Monday, the 10th of this month; they were missed about six; the prisoner was brought in very soon after, with this saddle; (producing it;) it is one of the saddles that was lost from the door.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Is there any particular mark by which you know that saddle? - A. Yes, I repaired it myself.

GEORGE CROSS sworn. - I live in Little Queen-street, Holborn; I am a porkman and sausage-maker: About six o'clock I was in at a neighbour's, and saw the prisoner go by with a saddle upon his back; that was about four doors form Mr. Hutchins's; I suspected him; I immediately went out, and followed him into Lewkner's-lane; he had a saddle upon his back; I laid hold of him; it was the same man that I saw pass by my neighbour's door; I then secured him, with the saddle upon his back; he dropped the saddle; I then wished to pick up the saddle, and I gave him to one of the witnesses, Mr. Hewitt, to hold, while I picked up the saddle; he got away from Mr. Hewitt, and I pursued him into Holborn; he was secured in Holborn, and brought back to Mr. Hutchins's shop; I am sure the prisoner is the same man.

CHARLES HEWITT sworn. - I saw the prisoner with the saddle upon his back, in Lewkner's-lane, I am sure it was the prisoner; I saw Cross lay hold of him; he dropped the saddle, and then Cross put him into my possession; I took hold of him by the collar, he got away from me and ran into Holborn; I pursued him, and he was taken; I am sure he is the same man.

Prisoner's defence. I was going of an errand to the George and Blue Boar, to see for a parcel for my sister; and as I was returning back through Little Queen-street, I saw this saddle lying in the middle of the highway.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 16.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-27

186. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a great coat, value 1s. 6d. the property of Henry Pamphlin .

HENRY PAMPHLIN sworn. - I am a carpenter , in East-street, Manchester-square: I lost a great coat on Wednesday, the 17th of last month; I lost it out of my master's shop in Paddington ; I had seen it there between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; I found it on the Tuesday following, upon the prisoner's back, at the Green Man in the Edgware-road; he was grave-digger in Paddington church-yard; (produces the coat;) I am sure it is mine; when I took him to the Green

Man, he acknowledged that he had taken it while I was at the public-house getting my dinner.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-28

187. THOMAS AMBER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hakesley , about the hour of seven o'clock, in the night of the 29th of December , and burglariously stealing a muslin apron, value 5s. and half a yard of cotton, value 5s. the property of the said William.

MARY HAKESLEY sworn. - I live in Tothill-street, Westminster ; I am the wife of William Hakesley, a shoe-maker : On the 29th of December, my house was broke open; I left home about three o'clock in the afternoon, I left a lodger in the house that is now in Court, Ann Campbell ; I fastened up the house myself, the prisoner's wife had nursed me; I told her she should sleep with me that night, on account of my family, my husband was a prisoner at that time, in this prison, for debt; neither the prisoner nor his wife had lodged in the house at that time, she had dined with me that day; there were no other lodgers in the house but Ann Campbell, and her children, she is a married woman; I locked my room-door, and fastened the windows with a large bar; I found the windows fastened when I returned, I took the children with me to the prison, here, to my husband; when I returned at ten o'clock at night, I found my room-door open, that I had locked, and the box open that this property was in; I missed seven pounds in money, a silver watch, a silver table-spoon, a muslin apron, worth about five shillings, and a piece of my child's cotton frock, about half a yard, worth about a shilling, and other things; I have found nothing again but a piece of cotton, and the apron, I saw them at Marlborough-street; I can't find the wife.

Q. Was there any appearance of force to the door? - A. No.

ANN CAMPBELL sworn. - I lodge in this house: I observed Mrs. Hakesley's door open between six and half past seven o'clock in the evening; that is all I know of it.

Q. Was there any appearance of force upon the door? - A. Not that I saw.

SARAH DAVIES sworn. - I live in Compton-street, I go out a washing and chairing: The prisoner left a bundle with me, that is now in Court, on the 26th of January, he came to ask me if I had seen of heard any thing of his wife; I told him, no; and then he left this bundle, and told me he would call for it the next day; I delivered it to a young man of the name of Keeling, and desired him to take it out of the house, for I was frightened; I had heard that this man had committed a robbery, and I wanted it out of the house; I opened the bundle before I gave it him, and there was a coat, a pair of breeches, two razors, two pair of stockings, a muslin apron, and a little piece of cotton.

JAMES KEELING sworn. - I received a bundle from the last witness; she asked me to take it out of the house because she heard that the things were stolen; I did not take it out of the house, but put it in the back kitchen, and there it laid till the Sunday; and when I came home in the evening, I found Mrs. Davies gone to the watch-house, and I delivered it to Mr. Thomas Brown, who keeps a public-house.

THOMAS BROWN sworn. - I am a publican on Saffron-hill, (produces a bundle); I received it from the last witness: On the 2d of this month, he called for a pot of beer and gave me a bad shilling, he pulled off his waistcoat to leave with me for the beer, and I found some more bad money in it; I sent for a constable, but could not get one; I made him leave the bundle for the pot of beer, thinking to take him up when he came for it, and he was taken up the same night by Mrs. Hakesley.

Mrs. Hakesley. I took him up because he refused to give up the bundle.

Brown. I took it from him forcibly, in lien of the beer.

Q. (To Mrs. Hakesley.) How did you know he had the bundle? - A. Because of a letter that I received. (Produces it).

Q. Do you know the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. No; I have heard him say he could not write.

Q. Look at these things, and see if you know any of them? - A. Yes; I know the apron, and this piece of my child's cotton gown; I parted with the prisoner that same day, at three o'clock, at the Horse-guards, he was going into the country to see for work; before we went out, I told his wife, who was with him, that I had got twelve pounds to pay my landlord, that I had got seven pounds by me towards it, and I believed I should make what money I could of the remainder of the things that were stolen; she came to me at the prison at nine o'clock, she was to sleep with me that night, and went home with me; when I came home, I found my house broke open, and the things gone; when we parted at the Horse-guards, she told me I did not know what might happen, I had better take the key of my own place.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the country to look for work, I am a brick-maker: I was eight miles

off that night; she has left me and my wife in the house many times, while she has gone out.

Mrs. Hakesley. I never did but once, and that was the day after Christmas-day.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-29

188. WILLIAM ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , two metal watches, value 3l. the property of George Dowie , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH DOWIE sworn. - I am the wife of George Dowie , I live in King-street, Golden-square , we keep a public-house ; the prisoner was quartered upon us: My husband had two metal watches in our chamber up one pair of stairs, I had seen them about seven o'clock that evening; one was in a drawer, and the other outside; I missed them between ten and eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Do you know where the prisoner had been at that time? - A. Greatest part of the time in the tap-room; about seven o'clock I thought I heard somebody at the door, I suppose he did not know anybody was there; I opened the door and asked who is there, in the dark; he made me no answer, and I saw him go up stairs to his own room; I came out and locked the door, and came down stairs, my husband was in another room above; I saw no more of the prisoner that evening; when I went up stairs, I found the hasp that holds the lock forced off, the door was wide open, and the watches gone; he never came home after that night; the pawnbroker has one of the watches in Court, I found it about a week afterwards; the watch that was found my husband had had about four months, and the other about two years.

- DAVIS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in St. George's-fields, Westminster-road: On the 18th of January, a man with a blue jacket on pledged a metal watch with me for half-a-guinea, about a quarter after ten o'clock at night; I cannot swear it was the prisoner, being in regimentals now I cannot say, but I have not the smallest shadow of a doubt but what he is the man, (produces the watch); it is worth about three guineas.

Mrs. Dowie. My husband had it made on purpose for him; I know it by the maker's name.

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - On the 18th of January, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner came to my house and called for a pint of ale, I keep the Equestrian-tap, adjoining to the Royal Circus; he wanted change for half-a-guinea, and I gave him change; the next night, Sunday, he came again, between seven and eight o'clock; he said somebody had like to have taken his watch off, they had got the chain away; it was an oldish chain, he put it into my hand; a gentleman that stood there, took hold of it to look at it, and I saw no more of it.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police-office in Marlborough-street: On the 2d of February, I was sent for to take the prisoner in custody at the prosecutor's house, when the landlord gave me charge of him, for stealing two watches; the prisoner said, I will pay you for these two watches out of my pay; the landlord immediately said, constable take him away, for I shall give you charge of him for the robbery; then, as I was taking him out of the watch-house, I said to him, how could you think of robbing the landlord, who had been robbed but a fortnight before by two soldier s, and got his leg broke since; the answer he made me was, I was drunk.

Q. (To the Prosecutrix.) How came he at your house when he was apprehended? - A. The serjeant of the company had brought him, he was apprehended for desertion; I then sent for a constable; he told my husband, if he would not give charge of him, he would pay for both the watches out of his pay.

Prisoner's defence. I went up stairs on the 18th of January, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, to get a cap to lend a comrade, and I went out of the house with him, and was not in the house afterwards.

Jury. (To Harris.) Q. What dress had he on when you changed him the half-guinea? - A. An old blue jacket.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s.

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-30

189. ELIZABETH MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a sheet, value 8s. two petticoats, value 11s. a shift, value 6s. a curtain, value 12s. a gown, value 8s. three shirts, value 18s. two pocket-handkerchiefs, value 2s. four neck-handkerchiefs, value 4s. and two pair of breeches, value 9s. the property of William Cullum .

The pawnbrokers who were in possession of the property, not having been bound over, and not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-31

190. ANN BLACKMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a pound and a quarter of butter, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Francum .

ELIZABETH FRANCUM sworn. - I am sister to John Francum , he is a cheesemonger , in Little Queen-street, Holborn : On the 6th of February, the prisoner came in, my brother was busy, she took up a pound and a quarter of batter, and put it in her apron; I laid hold of her, took her into the parlour, and desired her to put it out of her apron, which she did; she had more things, which she gave no account of, she desired me to forgive her.

JONATHAN BICKERSTAFF sworn. - I am a constable, I took charge of the prisoner. (Produces the butter.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into the shop for half a pound of butter, and I had not been in the shop a minute, before the lady laid hold of me, and said, I had got the butter; I had never seen the butter.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-32

191. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , fourteen ounces of mace, value 14s. the property of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East-Indies .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of persons to the Jurors unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a commodore in the India-Company's warehouses, in Haydon-square , the prisoner was in the same situation with myself; about nine o'clock, on the 21st of January, in the morning, in consequence of what passed between me and one of the elders, Mr. Molleson, I went out, and returned about ten; I had seen a stocking the day before, placed inside a chest, it continued there till near two, at which time Jackson came up stairs, unlocked the door, and took out the stocking which contained the mace, I saw it in his hand; I had concealed myself; after he had done that, he came up again, and shut the loop hole door, which we take in goods at; then he went out, and locked the door after him; when I thought he was clear off, I left the place where I was, and went down another way, and gave information of it.

Q. Was there mace in the warehouse? - A. No. only some that was spilled about the chest.

Q. There was mace in other parts of the warehouse? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you, the day before, examined what was in the stocking? - A. No; it appeared to be full of something, as it is now, but I did not open it.

Court. Q. Had he any business in that room? - A. He was appointed to lock up that side, unlock it, and watch it.

JOSEPH MOLLESON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am assistant elder in the warehouses, in Haydon-square; as soon as I heard the stocking was gone, at two o'clock, I ordered the prisoner to go over to Mr. Visset, the head elder; I saw Jackson turn back in the square, I asked him where he was going, and he said, he wanted to speak to a man of the name of Jones; I told him he must go to Mr. Visset immediately, and then he attempted to run away; I followed him, and laid hold of him in Mansell-street; I called for the assistance of the gate-keeper, Simpson, and we brought him back; then he seemed very busy, doing something about his clothes, and at the fourth house in the square, Mr. Levy's, I saw him throw the stocking down the area, the same stocking that I had seen the day before, it was tied up with a piece of red handkerchief; I told Simpson, there it goes; I desired him to take it up, and I would return to him in a minute or two; I returned back, and Simpson gave it me, and I took it to the warehouse-keeper, Stockwell, where I saw it weighed, and the prisoner was then in the outer office; it contained mace, and weighed fourteen ounces.

Q. Was there mace in these warehouses? - A. There was; Stockwell then sent for an officer to the warehouses, and he was taken into custody.(Produces the property.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. These warehouses are in the City of London, are they not? - A. Some part of the warehouses may be.

Q. Do not you know it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You searched this man, when he left the warehouses? - A. I slightly rubbed him down, because I meant to have him searched by the King's officer.

Q. In his side there is no mace, I believe? - A. Yes, there is, he had the charge of that part of the warehouse.

Q. But not in that room? - A. Not open, it was nailed down, in chests, so that nobody can get at it.

JAMES SIMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the gate-keeper, I was applied to by Mr. Molleson.

Q. Do you know where the stocking was found in the warehouse? - A. No; I went to give Mr. Molleson assistance, and the prisoner threw something down Mr. Levy's area, which I took out, it was a stocking, I delivered it to Mr. Molleson.

THOMAS STEVENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am keeper of one of the warehouses.

Q. Do you know where this stocking was taken from? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether that part of it is in the City of London, or in the County of Middlesex? - A. No.

Q. (To Jones.) Whose house is next to that side of the warehouse, where the stocking was found? - A. Mr. Martyn's, an attorney, it is the corner of Haydon-square.

Simpson. I did not see the stocking found, but where Mr. Jones tells me it was found, is in the County of Middlesex; I never was in the room.

Q. Do you know the bounds of the County? - A. Yes; I saw them put up.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know which way the room turns, whether towards the boundary of the City, or the boundary of the County? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge, the prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-33

192. THOMAS SMITH and JOHN HARRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a silver tea-spoon, value 2s. the property of Thomas Piper .

THOMAS PIPER sworn. - I keep the King's-arms, in Arundell-street ; I lost a tea-spoon, on Saturday night last, about twelve o'clock, my company were gone; I was shutting up the half door when the prisoners came up and asked for something to drink; I told them they must be very quick, for I was going to shut up, and going to bed; Harris and a woman had a glass of liquor each, and Smith, the young man at the bar, refused to take any; Smith paid for the two first glasses, and the old man, Harris, paid for another glass, which Smith drank, and then they went away from the bar window, and in consequence of the information of my child, I charged Harris with having taken a tea-spoon, and he denied it; the child said, it was not him that took it, it was the man that went out; I told him, I should detain him, while I went in search of the other; he denied knowing any thing of the other; there was a lodger of mine in the tap-room; I desired him to mind Harris, while I went after the other man; I went in search of him for upwards of half an hour before I found him; I found him in the Strand, right opposite the street where I live, he was looking down; I then took him by the coat, on the left side, and asked him to go with me, he said, he knew nothing of me; I told him I knew something of him, and begged of him to go with me, it was only a few paces back; he went with me into the Sun; I had him by the left side, and the spoon dropped on his right side; I took the spoon up, and told him, that was my property, and he was my prisoner; I then gave him to the watchman, and he was taken to the watch-house, (produces a spoon;) I know it to be mine, I have the fellow to it. (Produces it.)

(The prisoner's daughter, a child of seven years old, was called, but not appearing to know the nature of an oath, she was not examined.)

JOSEPH ROSE sworn. - I am waiter, at the Crown and Anchor Tavern, in the Strand; I lodge at Mr. Piper's; I detained Harris, while Mr. Piper went after the other; he said, he lived in Castle-lane, Whitechapel; I asked him what profession he was of, and he said, go and look, you b-r; and when he found I was resolute upon keeping him, he shammed drunk.

Smith's defence. I had no spoon about me; he said, at the watch-house, that he could not tell whether it was his spoon or not.

Harris's defence. I met with a woman in the Strand, and the over persuaded me to have a glass of gin; the little girl said, there was a spoon gone; I did not see any thing of the transaction.

Harris, NOT GUILTY .

Smith, GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-34

193. JOHN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , two pounds weight of indigo, value 5s. the property of Solomon Israel .

SOLOMON ISRAEL sworn. - I live in Coleman-street : About the 28th of January, I lost a considerable quantity of indigo; on the 29th of January, the prisoner was employed by my clerk, and I understood from my clerk, that he could tell me something about the robbery; I insisted upon his going to the Lord-Mayor's; when I came back, my clerk told me, he believed this man was himself the thief, for he thought he saw him put some indigo in his pocket that morning; he was searched by the City-Marshal, in my warehouses, at Dyer's-hall, and a quantity of indigo was found in different parts of his clothes.

THOMAS WELLS sworn. - I hired the prisoner on the 29th of January, to work in Mr. Israel's warehouses; I saw him put some indigo in his pocket; I sent to the Mansion-house for an officer, and he was searched; I was not present when he was searched; I can only swear to the indigo.

RICHARD HOLDSWORTH sworn. - On the 29th of January, the prosecutor, Mr. Israel, came to the mansion-house, and informed the Lord-Mayor,

that he had got a man locked in his warehouse; who could give him some information concerning a considerable robbery that had taken place before; in consequence of which, I went to his warehouse, when I went in, I heard a paper thrown on the ground, and saw some indigo on the stairs; I took the prisoner into the warehouse, and in his hat found a small quantity of indigo, and in his pocket some more; the marshalman, who accompanied me, in his pantaloons, found a quantity in a linen bag; I took him to the Mansion-house, and he was committed.

Prisoner. Q. Did you take my hat off? - A. I believe I did.

JAMES HALL sworn. - I am a marshalman, (produces the indigo;) I saw this parcel taken from his hat; I searched his pocket, and in each pocket he had a quantity loose; in searching him farther I found this parcel under his trowsers, in his breeches.

Prosecutor. Here are samples of indigo, and my own hand-writing on the papers.

Q. What may be the value of it? - A. More than five shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I was ordered to sweep up the warehouse, and in sweeping I met with this indigo, I put it in my hat because I did not know where to put it, till my prosecutor came in, and when he came in, he charged me with stealing it.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who had known him nearly four years, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Confined one month in Newgate, and delivered to his serjeant .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-35

194. WILLIAM INNES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Buttenshaw , about the hour of seven in the night of the 10th of February , and burglariously stealing twenty-six yards of linen cloth, value 4l. the property of the said Edward .

EDWARD BUTTENSHAW sworn. - I am a linendraper in the Minories : On Monday the 10th of this month, about half past seven in the evening, as I was sitting in the parlour, behind the shop, I heard a violent breaking of the glass, in the window of my shop; I ran to the door, and saw some persons bringing back the prisoner at the bar; they informed me, that they saw him give a piece of Irish cloth to another man, who ran away with it; I secured the prisoner, and in about five minutes my young man returned with the cloth; the cloth has my private mark upon it, it is in the possession of the officer.

Q. Was the window so broke, that a piece of cloth might have been taken out? - A. Yes, almost the whole of the square was broke out; it had not been put in above a fortnight; I had it cut to pieces one night before.

EDWARD CAREY sworn. - I belong to the navy: I was coming from Tower-hill; I heard a smash of glass about half past seven in the evening; upon looking forward, I saw two men in the road, one of them had a piece of linen; I saw him give it to the other man that was with him, and, in a low tone of voice, said, take hold, take hold; the other immediately took it, and set off; the prisoner then came towards me on the pavement; it struck me that he had stole it, and I immediately laid hold of him, and took him back to the shop; I saw the broken square of glass in the window as I went past; I am not certain, but I think I saw him run from the shop into the road; I saw him about ten yards from the window; the prosecutor claimed the cloth when it was brought back.

WILLIAM LIVINGSTON sworn. - I am an artist.

Q. In what way? - A. Drawing: On Monday evening, the 10th of this month, about half past seven in the evening, I was coming up the Minories from Tower-hill, when I was within twelve yards of Mr. Buttenshaw's house, I heard a great noise of breaking the glass, and in two minutes saw the prisoner meet a man in the middle of the crossing, and give him a piece of cloth; he came towards Mr. Carey and me, and upon seeing him give the cloth to the other man, I supposed he was the person that stole it; I went after him some short distance back, when Mr. Carey collared him; I took hold on the other side, and brought him back to Mr. Buttenshaw's.

Q. How far was the prisoner from where you heard the noise of breaking the glass? - A. I suppose five or ten yards, I did not take notice of the window.

- BUTTON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Buttenshaw: I was in the back part of the shop, on the 10th of February, in the evening; I heard a violent breaking of the glass; I immediately ran forward to the door, and when I opened the door, I saw a very tall man running on the other side, crossing the road, not the prisoner; he ran down the Minories, about two hundred yards; I immediately pursued him all the way, he crossed Rosemary-lane, into Queen-street, and when he found that I gained upon him, he threw away a piece of Irish cloth that he had under his arm, it was Mr. Buttenshaw's cloth; I brought it back, and gave it to the constable.

Q. In what state was the pane of glass? - A. Hardly a bit of glass remaining in it.

William Cox the constable produced the property.

Prosecutor. This is my cloth, it cost me three shillings and three halfpence a yard, it is worth four pounds, it has my private mark upon it; about half an hour before, I had removed it to a small distance from the glass, and placed a candle between.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down the Minories, and the gentlemen heard the window broke, and they laid hold of me, and said I broke it.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 50.)

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutor .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-36

195. JOHN MAHONEY, alias MICHAEL RYAN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a piece of floor-cloth, containing seven yards and a half, value 18s. 9d. another piece of floor-cloth, containing five yards, value 20s. another piece of floor-cloth, containing three yards, value 12s. and another piece of floor-cloth, containing four yards, value 8s. the property of John Elliot .

JOHN ELLIOT Sworn . - I keep a floor-cloth warehouse , in Friday-street : On Tuesday the 4th of this month, the prisoner, who was my porter , went out to dinner, and my son met him with a piece of floor-cloth, and when he came back after dinner, I asked him where he was going with that floor-cloth; he said it was not mine, he did not take it out of my warehouse; he said, he met a man of the name of Michael Ryan , who, he said, desired him to carry the cloth for him; I asked him who Michael Ryan was, he said it was a man that worked at Mr. Buckley's; I told him I did not believe him, and that he had taken it from my warehouse, for I had lost a great deal of cloth, and I had desired him to look after the cloth, and he told me the would; I told him, if it was agreeable, I would go to his lodgings, he hesitated a little, and then said he would go with me, with all his heart; I had occasion to go upon business as far as Fleet-market, and I went with my son as far as there, and there I left them; about an hour and a half afterwards, I received a note from my son, in consequence of which, I went to a broker's shop, the corner of Denzell-street, Clare-market, where the cloth had been sold; I saw the cloth there, and five more pieces, my son can swear to four of the pieces, I cannot; the broker is here.

SAMUEL ELLIOT sworn. - I am the son of the last witness: On the 4th of February, I met the prisoner in Little Distass-lane, with a piece of floor-cloth; I did not suspect him in the least, I thought it was a piece that had been sold; when I went home, I enquired what floor-cloth had been sold, that I might enter it; I learned there was none; I then had a suspicion immediately; I communicated it to my father, and he taxed the prisoner very closely with it; after that, we went with him, partly at his own request, to search his lodgings, and when we came to Fleet-market, which was very near to his lodgings, he made a halt, and said, he had stole nothing but what I had seen him with, and he promised to bring it me home in the course of an hour; I refused to comply with that offer of his, and said, I wished to see his lodgings, that I might satisfy myself whether he had any more, and then he would not let me go to his lodgings, and said he had carried it to a house near Clare-market; he took me to a house, the corner of Denzell-street, Clare-market; he would not at first shew me the house, unless I stood out of sight of the house; I stood at a little distance, he shewed me the house, and then ran away as fast as he could, the sun being full in my eyes, I lost him immediately; I walked to and fro the house, and saw that piece, and some more of my father's property lying about the house; not knowing what steps to take, I wrote a note to my father, to desire him to attend immediately; my father came, and we went to the broker's shop, to enquire how they came by the goods, and there were five pieces of floor-cloth; the goods were deposited in a friend's house till they were taken before the Lord-Mayor, and the broker wrote his name upon them; they have been in my custody ever since.

JACOB MICHAEL sworn. - I keep a broker's shop, the corner of Denzell-street: The prisoner brought five pieces of floor-cloth to me, I bought them of him, but I cannot say when; I bought one piece of him the day that the prosecutor came to my shop; the prosecutor took them away; I marked them all, there were five pieces; I saw them again before the Lord-Mayor; they are the same, I carried part of them myself. (They were produced in Court, and disposed to by Mr. Samuel Elliot .)

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to the mercy of your Lordship.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-37

196. JAMES GREW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , two quartern loaves of bread, value 2s. 8d. the property of Samuel Barrow .

SAMUEL BARROW sworn. - I am a baker , No.4, Leadenhall-street: I lost two loaves on the 14th of this month; I know nothing of the robbery.

JAMES ANDERSON sworn. - I am servant to

Mr. Barrow: On Friday the 14th of this month, as I was serving a customer in Finch-lane , at a public-house, the basket was standing at the door, and I was standing at the bar; I saw the prisoner take two quartern loaves out of the basket, and run away; I ran after him, and laid hold of him; he threw them away, I never lost sight of him, they were Mr. Barrow's property; I took the prisoner and the loaves to my master's shop.

Mr. Barrow. The last witness brought the prisoner and the loaves to my shop, and I sent for an officer.

JOSEPH BASWELL sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I had been out of work; I have a wife and four children that were in want of bread, and I did it from distress.

Mr. Barrow. Upon his representing his distress, I went to his lodgings; I found he had a wife and four children, one of them very sick; I gave them what immediate relief I could; the wife has been with me since, with a young child at her breast, I promised to do what I could for her.

GUILTY .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-38

197. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , four pounds of raw sugar, value 2s. the property of Thomas Sheercroft , John Ratcliffe , John Wheeler , Fabian Philips , Thomas Morgan , Thomas Rowlands , John Wegener , and John Hendist .

THOMAS ROWLANDS sworn. - I am a gangsman , at-Cox's Quay ; my partners are Thomas Sheercroft , John Ratcliffe , John Wheeler , Fabian Phillips , Thomas Morgan , John Wegener , and John Hendist : On Monday the 10th of February, the prisoner was employed, with some others, to house some chests of sugar; he had been up about an hour, I had reason to suspect him before, and I kept my eye upon him; as he came down stairs, I saw some sugar upon his jacket; I immediately went to him, and asked him to let me see what he had got in his pocket; I laid hold of his pockets, and found them to be full of sugar; I made him take it out of his pockets and put it into my apron, which he did with his own hand; I asked him if he had any more; and he answered me, no; I put my hand to his breeches, and thought I felt something hard; I took him to the Quay, where some more of my partners were, and there, in his breeches, was a quantity more of sugar in a bag, which he pulled out, and I had him fast by the collar at the time; I sent for an officer, and gave charge of him; the officer has had the sugar ever since, it is worth about two shillings, it is saw sugar; I found the head of the hogshead broke open immediately after I had delivered him to the officer; I had seen the hogshead about half an hour before, and the head was not broke in then.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner and the property.(Produces it).

Rowlands. This is the same sugar.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s. Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-39

198. RICHARD SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a goose, value 5s. the property of George Piercy .

GEORGE PIERCY sworn. - I am a poulterer ; On the 28th of January, I lost a goose from off my stall, in Leadenhall-market , I think it was on a Tuesday, a little after seven o'clock in the evening; I saw the prisoner take it off the stall, I followed him, and in turning round the corner he slipped and fell; I immediately laid hold of him and the goose, it sell out of his hand as he sell; there was only that one goose on the stall.

JAMES PARDON sworn. - I am a poulterer: I saw the prisoner's arm take the goose from the stall, and run away with it; I did not go after him, I only saw his arm.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor.

Piercy. I think he shammed being in liquor.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-40

199. JOHN NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , three pewter quart pots, value 4s. 6d. and thirteen pint pots, value 10s. the property of William Meates .

WILLIAM MEATES sworn. - I keep the Coach and Horses in Greek-street, Soho : On the 3d of February, a little before six o'clock, the girl went out for pots; I know nothing of it myself.

HANNAH RAYMENT sworn. - I am a pot-girl; On Monday the 3d of February, I laid the pots on a step, they were on a strap, at the threshold of a door, in Church-street, I was there a short space of time; when I came down stairs, I observed the prisoner walking very quick, in a direction from my master's house, with the pots upon his back; I followed him as quick as possible; he swore at me, and said they were not my master's, and at last I got them from him; I took them out of his hand, and a stranger helped me to bring him back; my

master's name is upon them; the prisoner had got four doors from where the pots were.

JOHN HAWTHORN sworn. - I am a constable.(Produces the pots, which were deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I was very much intoxicated with liquor, and fell over them, and I took them up to put them out of the way that nobody else might fall over them.

GUILTY (Aged 36.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-41

200. JOHN SADLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , seven pair of women's shoes, value 28s. and two pair of girl's shoes, value 6s. the property of John Morgan .

JOHN MORGAN sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , No. 26, in Little Earl-street ; On Wednesday, the 22d of January, about seven o'clock, I went into the back room to tea; I saw the prisoner nearly upon his hands and knees in the shop, looking over the glass-door between the shop and parlour, watching me; I saw him run out into the street, that alarmed me, and I ran out after him; I kept sight of him till I fell down at the bottom of the street, I got up, and pursued him again till he was taken; I saw him stopped; there was nothing found upon him; he said he was no thief; I missed seven pair of woman's shoes, and two pair of girls' shoes; a lodger of mine picked up the women's shoes in the passage, and the girls' shoes at the door.

JOHN FLETCHER sworn. - I am a journeyman glazier; I lodge at Mr. Morgan's; Just as I got to the passage-door a man ran out of the passage, the prisoner is the man; I followed him till the time he was taken, I never lost sight of him.

LUCY HYAMS sworn. - I am a lodger to Mr. Morgan; I heard a noise in the passage; I heard Mr. Morgan cry out stop thief; I ran instantly with the candle in my hand, and picked up some shoes lying at the threshold of the door; instantly, a woman coming past, picked up two pair of girls' shoes, I asked her for the property, and she gave them to me immediately, and I gave them all to Mr. Morgan. (The shoes produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. If I had thrown them away, that man that says he stood at the door must have seen me.

Fletcher. It was quite dark.

GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-42

201. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , two shirts, value 10s. three pair of stockings, value 6s. two waistcoats, value 8s. a pair of shoes, value 2s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. a silk handkerchief, value 1s. and a cotton handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the property of George Wilson .

GEORGE WILSON sworn. - I am helper at Mr. Dean's yard ; the prisoner worked in the yard with me; I had left my bundle in a cupboard in the stables, he knew my property was there, it was not locked up; I missed it about seven o'clock at night, on the 17th of January, the bundle contained the articles mentioned in the indictment,(repeating them); he worked in the yard; he had fetched me a curry-comb, and a brush, out of that stable where the things were, that afternoon; I was very wet, and was going to change my stockings, and the prisoner dissuaded me from it; however, I did go, and missed my things; I have never found my things since; he has been taken up five weeks to-morrow.

ELIZABETH NEWBY sworn. - I am servant at the King's-head, in Conduit-street, where the prisoner lodged; the prisoner brought a bundle to our house, tied up in a red pocket handkerchief with a pink stripe, and fetched it away again in the evening.

Q. How far is your house from these stables? - A. I suppose, about twenty doors.

Wilson. My things were tied up in a red pocket handkerchief.

Prisoner's defence. The bundle that I called for, was a bundle of my own things.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-43

202. CHARLES SHEPHERD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , six trusses of hay, value 15s. the property of William Clements .

WILLIAM CLEMENTS sworn. - I am a cowkeeper , at Haggerstone : On the 26th of January, I saw the prisoner drive two carts with one truss of hay in each cart, out of my farm-yard at Haggerstone; he had been in my service for three years, as a carter ; he drove them to the Coach and Horses at Mile-end; there were two casks in the cart, one cart was to go to Stratford for distiller's wash, and the other was going to Bromley for grains; he took care of both carts while the other man took the money for the wash and the grains; I followed the carts out of my own yard and never lost sight of them till they came to the place where they stopped, the Coach and Horses; the prisoner had no knowledge of my following him; I saw the prisoner deliver the hay to the ostler at the Coach and Horses; I staid at the door while they drank part of a pot of

beer, then they came out, spoke to the ostler, and went on; I then went into the public-house, and asked the landlord where the ostler was; he said, he did not know; I told him there were two trusses of my hay lodged in his shed; I asked him to admit me to go in to see; and he said, he had not the key, the ostler had got the key; I waited there for an hour and a half afterwards, and the ostler was not to be found; I went away, and got Mr. Armstrong to see after the carters; they absconded and left the carts on the road, both of them loaded; the carts were sent home to me afterwards.

Q. Did you find your hay? - A. They would not let me in to see it; it was but five o'clock in the morning; I did not know but I might be knocked on the head.

Q. How do you know that the hay that came out of your yards was hay? - A. It was two different sorts of hay, one was clover hay, and the other marshy hay; I followed it to Mile-end, along-side the carts, all the way, for it was a very dark morning; they drove as fast as they could well drive, it is about a mile and three quarters, or near two miles; I saw some hay that same day, at Stepney, that I believe was mine, it was sold to a man that keeps a cow there (it was a particular kind of hay, marshy hay, with flags like, in it), about half a mile from the Coach and Horses, or scarcely so much.

WILLIAM HOLLOWAY sworn. - I keep the Coach and Horses at Mile-end; two men came to my house that morning, and had a pot of beer, and went away again immediately.

Q. When did your ostler return? - A. He has never returned since.

Q.Was your shed opened? - A. I employed a man to open it about eight or nine o'clock, but there was nothing at all there; there was a back door to it, and that had been opened.

Q. Could not you have got in at that back door yourself? - A. No.

STEPHEN READ sworn. - I was servant to Mr. Clements: On the 6th of January, the carter, Shepherd, set me to take these horses to Mile end-road, with two trusses of hay belonging to Mr. Clements; I went to get the money for the grains and wash, while he drove the horses out of the yard; and when I had received the money, I ran after the carrier; I met with him in the Hackney-road, past the George; he says to me, come along, and when he got to the Coach and Horses at Mileend-road, he called out, will, to the offer, and he came out and took the hay, and gave us one shilling and sixpence a-piece for those two trusses of hay; and we went into the public-house and had a pennyworth of purl and a pennyworth of gin in it; he put the hay into a shed, and we went on to go to Bromley, and came back again, and had some more liquor there; and asked Mr. Holloway to be so good as to send a man home with the horses and carts; that was, as nigh as I can guess, between eleven and twelve o'clock; and then we ran away.

Q. How came you to run away? - A. Because I was frightened, never having done any thing before.

Q. Did they tell you of it at the public-house? - A. Mr. Holloway told me my master had been there.

Prisoner's defence. He sent me out with the hay; he was the first that gave the hay out to the ostler, and whether the ostler gave him any money I can not say; I never received a farthing of it.

The Prisoner called his master, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-44

203. ANN COLESFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , a guinea and three shillings, the monies of Joseph Mills , privately from his person .

JOSEPH MILLS sworn. - I am a gangsman at Wiggins's-quay: On the 10th of February I was returning from the play about one o'clock in the morning, in company with Thomas Finlayson and William Warner ; coming down Cornhill the prisoner with another woman accosted us, and would walk with us; the other woman took hold of the arm of Thomas Finlayson, and the prisoner took hold of my arm; we kept on our own pace towards home some distance, and then they left us; after they had left us, Warner said he saw that woman's hand in my pocket; if you carry your money in your waistcoat-pocket, I doubt she has robbed you; I made answer, I did not feel her hand in my pocket; On stealing in my pocket, I missed one guinea and three shillings; then Finlayson said, we will go back and see if we can find the same girls; and we went back different ways; Finlayson laid hold of the prisoner, he met them first; saying that she had robbed his friend, which she denied; we insisted upon taking her to the watch-house, and having her searched; we took her to the watch-house; she still denied it; the constable of the night said he would search her, upon which she produced a guinea and four shillings, and said it was money she brought out to pay her rent; the constable asked her how she paid her rent, she said, by the week; he asked her how much she owed, and she said, a month; we talked of taking her to the Compter, and then she owned

it was my money, and said she was very sorry for what she had done.

Q. There was no mark upon the money? - A. Not that I can swear to.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Perfectly.

Q. How came you to be so late? - A. There was a friend of our's at the other house, and we agreed to meet and have some refreshment, which we did; we stopped no-where in coming home; we had a pot or two of porter, and some ham and beef; I was perfectly sober.

Q. Are you satisfied that that woman is the same? - A. Yes; the moon shone remarkably bright; I am sure she is the same person; the guinea that I lost was an old guinea.

WILLIAM WARNER sworn. - I am a hairdresser, No. 32, Great Tower-street: I was coming from the play with Finlayson and Mills; coming through Cornhill the prisoner and another woman came up, and the prisoner laid hold of Mills, and the other of Finlayson, and I walked by the side of them; I saw the prisoner put her hand in Mills's waistcoat-pocket; and when they left us, I told him of it; we pursued after them, and took them in Cornhill; she said she had got money about her to pay her rent; the constable asked her what she was going to pay her rent for, at that time in the morning; when the constable talked of sending her to the Compter, she confessed it was Mr. Mills's money; that she had picked his pocket of it; the money was given to the officer, and she was taken to the Compter.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am a constable of Cornhill-ward: (produces the money;) On the 10th of February, about a quarter past one, the prisoner was brought in by three men; Mills charged the prisoner with robbing him of a guinea and three shillings; she denied it; I told her I would search her; she said I need not search her, for she had got some money, which she produced, and put on the table; she put down a guinea and four shillings, she said it was her own; I asked her how she came to have so much money about her at that time of night; her answer was, that she was going to pay her rent; that she paid it weekly, and that she owed a month; when I said I should take her to the Compter, then she said it was the prosecutor's money all but one shilling, which was her own, and she hoped he would forgive her.

Prisoner's defence. The money was my own; I brought out the money to pay my rent, but happened to get a little in liquor.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privily . (Aged 35.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-45

204. THOMAS JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , two pewter pint pots, value 1s. 6d. the property of Isaac Hare .

ISAAC HARE sworn. - I keep the Golden Key, in Tenter-alley, Little Moorfields : On the 12th of this month my boy lost some pots.

HENRY LOVELL sworn. - I am pot-boy to Mr. Hare: Last Wednesday morning was a week, I was getting in my master's pots in Hartshorn-court; I saw the prisoner take two pint pots off the strap, and put them in his pocket; I immediately went home and told my master, and took the rest with me; the man walked on, and my master and I overtook him before he got far, in Butler's-alley, Grub-street.

Hare. I asked him where he was going, and he said, to the mason's; I told him to stop a bit; I sent the boy for an officer, and while the boy was gone for an officer, Mr. Pardon came up and put his hand to the prisoner's pocket, and said, what have you got here, my lad; and immediately pulled out two pint pots.

THOMAS PARDON sworn. - I am a publican: In consequence of information, I went out and saw Mr. Hare laying hold of the prisoner's collar; I immediately searched his pockets, and found one pint pot in his pocket, and then gave him in charge to the constable.

William Dean, the constable, produced the pots, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I had had two pints of beer from Mr. Seares's, at Cripplegate, and I promised to take the pots back again; and I sat them down while I wheeled some stones, and the girl took them away; and when I went back again, I took up these pots, thinking they were the same.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-46

205. RICHARD CHARLTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , eight pounds weight of beef, value 2s. 6d. the property of Lydia Barnes , widow .

LYDIA BARNES sworn. - I am a widow; I live in Fann-street, Aldersgate-street ; I keep a butcher's shop : Last Saturday night, as my son and I were standing in the shop, about eight o'clock, as near as I can guess, I heard something rattle upon the board; my son ran suddenly out of the shop, crying stop thief; I looked, and missed part of a rump of beef; in a few minutes my son returned with the prisoner in one hand, and the beef in the other; which I know to be my property; we detained him till we sent for an officer; I never saw him in

my life before, to my knowledge; my son saw him take it.

- BARNES sworn. - I am the son of the last witness: I was in my mother's shop about eight o'clock last Saturday night; as I was standing before the block, I heard a noise on the stall-board; I turned round, and saw the prisoner's hand upon the rump of beef; I saw him immediately run away with it as hard as he could; I followed him and never lost sight of him till I took him in Aldersgate-street; he said he did not take it; the beef had been thrown into the passage of the White Horse public-house; I am sure the prisoner is the man. I brought him back, and seeing the beef lie in the passage, I asked some one to give it me, and somebody brought it to me.

JOHN GASS sworn. - I am an officer: I took charge of the prisoner; I searched him, and found some halfpence upon him in a pocket-handkerchief.

Prisoner's defence. I was going along the street; I never saw the beef; I am innocent of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 16.)

Confined one week in Newgate , and privately whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-47

206. CATHERINE OHIE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of January , a watch, value 1l. 10s. two seals, value 10s. a watch key, value 2s. a gold pin, value 5s. and a silk handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Witke , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Dorey , widow.

JOHN WITKE sworn. - I am a German; I live at No. 14, Union-court, Broad-street , I am a merchant ; the prisoner was formerly servant in the house where I lodged; the house is kept by Mrs. Dorey, she is a widow.

Q. Where there any other lodgers in the house? - A. Yes, two.

Q. Men or women? - A. Men; I missed my watch on the 29th of January; I mentioned it to Mrs. Dorey, and she could find nothing; a search-warrant was got to search the lodgings of the woman that chaired at the house the day before, but nothing was found; the watch was found upon the prisoner afterwards.

CHARLES SMITH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Bunn, the corner of Wood-street and London-wall: On Friday, the 31st of January, I had information of a gold watch having been stolen; and on Saturday, the 1st of February, about four in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar offered me a gold watch to pledge, which answering, the description I had received, I detained the prisoner, and carried the watch to Mr. Witke's lodgings in Union-court, Broad-street; upon seeing the watch, he immediately said that was the watch he had lost; the came back with me to the shop, and gave charge of the prisoner; she wanted six guineas upon it; I did not ask her how she came by it; she said it was her father's; I asked her how long her father had had the watch, and she said, he had not had it long; I asked her if she knew what her father gave for the watch, and she said he gave twelve guineas for it; when I went to Mr. Witke's, I left her in the back shop with one of the boys; in the mean time Mr. Bunn's sister came in, and she pretended to her that she was very ill, and begged to go out for the air; and she, not knowing what she was detained for, let her go; but I came in before she had been gone three miniutes, and went after her, and brought her back; I am sure she is the same person.

JOHN READ sworn. - I am a constable; (produces the watch;) upon searching the prisoner, I found this purse, containing a gold pin, which Mr. Witke claimed; and this handkerchief I took off her neck, which Mr. Witke claimed; In taking her to the Compter, I asked her how she came by the watch; she said, it was given her to take care of for another person.

Smith. When she brought the watch to me, she told me her father was lately dead, and she was under the necessity of raising six guineas upon that watch, for that she had him to bury.

Witke. This is my, watch, but not the chain; this is a woman's chain; mine was a string, and two gold seals; I have not found the seals; the pin is mine, and the handkerchief.

Q. Is Mrs. Dorey here? - A. No.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge that she is a widow? - A. I cannot say.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent; in regard of the watch, it was another servant that lived in the house, that I had it from; she was taken up, but was discharged.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 20.)

Of stealing the goods, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-48

207. JAMES JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a pound weight of coffee, value 1s. 4d. the property of a certain person or persons, to the Jurors unknown .

FRANCIS HUNTER sworn. - I am a watchman upon Bear-quay : On the 15th of February, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I had some bags of coffee under my care; and upon perceiving three of four men round the bags, I went to see if they were safe; I saw the prisoner stooping down and filling his hat with one of his hands with coffee; I immediately took hold of him, with the hat in one hand, and him in the other, and gave him into custody of the officer; from thence he was taken to the Mansion-house, and committed; there was about a pound of it; he had a soldier's jacket on when I took him.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I am a constable: I took charge of the prisoner; when I returned upon the quays, I found some of the bags had been cut; the bags weigh about one hundred and a half a-piece.

Prisoner's defence. As I was going over the quays the coffee was scattered about upon the ground, and I was picking it up when the gentleman took me.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Publicly whipped on Bear Quay , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-49

207. THOMAS CAWDLE and THOMAS RUDD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a canvas bag, value 6d. and one hundred and twelve pounds of sugar, value 3l. the property of John Hammond and Charles Hammond .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JOHN READ sworn. - I am a city constable: I know the prisoners; I knew Rudd before this happened; on the 1st of February I saw them both with another person, between six and seven in the evening; I was going down London-wall; the prisoner, Cawdle passed me with a bag upon his shoulder, Cawdle is the tallest of the men; I went a few yards, and Rudd and another man passed me; I followed, thinking I knew their faces; I then turned back and came up to Rudd again, and the other person; I then looked at them, and I was thoroughly satisfied that they were the faces of men that I knew; upon that I made the best of my way to Cawdle; I laid hold of the bag, and said to him, my good fellow, what have you got there; he said it was sugar; I asked him if he had a bill or receipt of it; he said, yes; I then told him I was an officer; he said, d-n you, what was that to him; then up came Rudd and the other man, at the corner of Basinghall-street, the London-wall end, towards Wood-street; Rudd and the other had parted; one came before and the other behind me; I said to Rudd, you keep off, for I know you well; I then had hold of the bag; then the man that was with Rudd came up and struck me between the shoulders; some people then came down Basinghall-street towards London-wall, and Cawdle pitched his load upon me, but luckily missed me, or else it must have broke my legs, then they all three made their escape towards Fore-street; they all made off in one company; the bag I took home with the assistance of a porter. (Produces it.)

Q. How long before this had you known Rudd? - A. For two months.

Q. Can you possibly be mistaken that he is the man that was with Cawdle and the other? - A. I cannot.

Q. Are you sure Cawdle was one of the men? - A. I had my eye upon him for three minutes, and from his height and his face, I think he 1s. After I had taken the sugar home, I met Sansum; told him this story; On the Monday night following, about seven o'clock, I saw the same three men in Bishopsgate-street again, in company together, coming from the Bull Inn; we looked at them some time; they were following the Walthamstow errandcart, which goes from the Bull Inn; I immediately went up to Rudd; Cawdle perceived me before I came up to him; he went side to buy a halfpennyworth of apples; I went to look at him full, with the light before him; I went away again to Sansum who was about six yards off; they went on further then, as far as Old Bethlem; we saw them cross several times by the cart, and then we stopped them; we took Cawdle and Rudd, and the other made his escape, upon taking them, I asked them where they were on Saturday night, at ten o'clock; Rudd said, he was in Brick-lane, Old-street, Smoking his pipe, and Cawdle said he was in bed at that time, at a public-house, in Brick-lane.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What time of the night was this? - A. Between six and seven o'clock.

Q. It was then dark? - A. Yes.

Q. Cawdle you knew nothing of before? - A. No.

Q. I take it, you went, on the Friday morning, to my Lord-Mayor, and gave information of the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give their names? - A. No, I did not.

Q. And why did you not? - A. I told the Lord-Mayor how I had proceeded, and told him I should be able to get them.

Q.Had Cawdle a round hat on? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you mean to swear that you knew the man again? - A. He had his hat in his hand.

Q. On the Monday, while he was buying some apples, you went up to look at Cawdle, and therefore you were not sure that he was the man? - A.

Yes, I knew him, but I was willing to be thoroughly satisfied; I am sure Rudd was one of the persons, and I never saw two faces more alike than that man's, and the face of Cawdle; I never saw another man like him; I must be greatly deceived if that is not the man.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you any doubt but Cawdle is the other man? - A. No, I have not.

Q. Was there a light at this apple-stall? - A. Yes.

Q.Therefore you had a better opportunity of seeing whether he was the man that you had been on the Saturday night? - A. Yes.

JAMES-CHARLES SANSUM sworn. - I am a constable; I was in company with Read, on the Monday evening, when the two prisoners were apprehended; as we turned from London-Wall, towards the Bull-inn, Read and I saw the Waltham slow errand-cart in the middle of the street, going towards Shoreditch, and almost directly, we perceived the two prisoners, and another man, that they call Ginger, he got away from me, when I apprehended Rudd; we followed them on the pavement, as they were in the road, they were walking behind the errand-cart; I then turned short round to follow them, and observed that they came away from the cart, on the pavement; Cawdle went and bought some apples; Read went to the light, and looked at him two or three times backwards and forwards; he immediately said, that is he, and I seized him, and delivered him to Read, while I pursued after Rudd; Ruff had got a little way on; I seized him; little Ginger was before him, and I desired another man to lay hold of him, but he got away; I took them into a tobacconist's shop, to the light, and Read there said, they were the men that he had stopped with the parcel on Saturday night; I asked Cawdle where he was at ten o'clock on Saturday night; Cawdle said he was in bed, I think, and Rudd said he was smoking his pipe, in Brick-lane.

Q. Did you know the persons of Cawdle and Rudd before that time? - A. Rudd I knew well, and I have met Cawdle several times in the street.

Q. Was he a man whom you knew, if you saw him? - A. Just so; on the Saturday before this, I was going down Bishopgate-street, about six o'clock, and saw Cawdle, Rudd, and another man in company together, nearly opposite to the Bullinn.

CHARLES RAINFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I am in the service of Messrs Frampton and Company, they are wholesale grocers, in Leadenhall-street; on the 1st of February, about twelve o'clock in the day, I sent this bag to the waggoner 's, the direction on the package is my hand-writing, it is directed W. T. N. M. which means William Thorpe, New-market; it was to go by Hammond's waggon, from the Bull inn, Bishopsgate-street, I sent it by one of our carmen, I had a receipt of the book-keeper for it,(produces it); the package contains sugar.

JAMES MULLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a book-keeper to the Newmarket waggon, which goes from the Bull-inn, in Bishopsgate-street; I received this parcel on the 1st of February, this is my receipt for it, in my handwriting, there were four bags like this.

Q. What are the names of the proprietors of the waggon? - A. John Hammond and Charles Hammond .

Q. From being booked, I believe, they become answerable for the loss? - A. They do.

Q. Were they booked? - A. They were.

Q. About what time does the Newmarket waggon go off? - A. It went out of our yard between four and five in the afternoon, the parcel was delivered to the waggon in due course.

Rainford. The value of it is about three pounds.

Mr. Alley. (To Muller.) Q. You do not know, of your own knowledge, that the bags were not all delivered at Newmartket? - A. Yes, I do, for I found the rope cut, and one of the bags missing.

Cowdle's defence. I am intirely innocent of the robbery; at the time he says the robbery was committed, I was at a public-house, in Brick-lane.

Rudd's defence. I am quite innocent; I was at a public-house, in Golden-lane, at the time.

For the Prisoners.

SARAH CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. My husband is a shoemaker, I know both the prisoners; I heard that they were charged with committing the robbery on the 1st of February.

Q. Do you remember being any where yourself on the 1st of February? - A. Yes; at Mr. Dean's house, the Angel and Porter, in Golden-lane; I had the care of the house, it is a relation of mine that keeps it, my place is to serve in the bar; I saw the two prisoners in the tap-room; I saw them from five o'clock in the evening, till about nine, they were both in company; on the Monday following, I heard of their being taken into custody, I was very much surprised, and said, it was impossible it should be one the Saturday night, because they were in our house at the time.

Q. Were you in the bar during the whole of that evening? - A. Yes, I never go out; Cawdle went out backwards about nine o'clock, and came in again, and asked me for a glass of rum, for he had a pain in his bowels, and he would go home to bed directly; I said, what, would you go home so soon of a Saturday night, and he said, yes; Rudd staid some time after Cawdle was gone.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This public house is in Brick-lane, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. You mean Brick-lane? - A. No, Golden-lane.

Q. I thought it had - you have known these young men a long time? - A. Some time; Cawdle has lodged at a mother's of mine, for these six months; I have known Rudd for these twelve months, by fight.

Q. As a man, coming every day to your house? - A. Not every day.

Q. Had he been constant at that public-house, within the last three months? - A. Yes, backwards and forwards.

Q. Constantly for the last three months? - A. No, he was not a constant customer.

Q. Do you mean to say he was any thing like once a week, for the three last months? - A. No, I cannot say for the last three months.

Q. Were Cawdle and Rudd well acquainted with each other? - A. That I cannot tell you; they knew each other; they have sometimes been in, and drank out of a pot together; that is all I know.

Q. Were they acquainted together? - A. They have been drinking together.

Q. Upon your oath, were these two persons acquainted, aye, or no? - A. I have seen them drinking together, I cannot be answerable any further, they might be acquainted with each other when they drank together.

Q. Were they not frequently in company together? - A. No; they were that night.

Q. Had they never drank together before that? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Then how dared you to say they often drank together? - A. I cannot be answerable for that, they have sometimes.

Q. Have they frequently drank together in that house, aye or no? - A. They have drank together.

Q. As you were sitting in the bar, you could tell whether two persons, that came in together, drank together or not? - A. They did that night.

Q. But I am asking about other night? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you not know that they have often drank together? - A. Yes, but they have had separate pints of beer.

Q. How long have you known Mr. Ginger? - A. I do not know what you mean.

Q. Do you know a Mr. Ginger? - A. No; I do not know such a name.

Q. Was there any such person in their company on the Saturday evening? - A. Not that I know of; Rudd was smoking his pipe, and he was complaining of a pain in his bowels all the evening.

Q. All the evening? - A. Several times in the evening.

Q. When did he say that first? - A. About six o'clock; I warmed some beer for him.

Q. Was there any body else in the same box? - A. Yes; there was Mr. Stone, part of the time, in the same box; and afterward he went out and sat in another box.

Q. Was there any body else in the same box? - A. No; there was nobody else in the same box.

Q. As you observed them so particularly that night you must know? - A. I did not see anybody else there.

Q. What was there particular to draw your attention to Saturday the 1st of February? - A. Because we are always slack in the tap-room on a Saturday night, and I heard on the Monday that he had been taken up.

Q. Who told you they were taken up? - A. I cannot say; it was somebody that came in.

Q. Who is the owner of this house? - A. Mr. Dean.

Q. Was he there? - A. No; he has so much to do on a Saturday night, in the kitchen, amongst the brewer's servants, backwards, that he seldom comes into the tap-room on a Saturday.

Q. Was your mother there? - A. No, only myself.

Q. What business is Cawdle? - A. A jeweller.

Q. What business is Stone? - A. A glass-grinder; he has worked for Mr. Seddons seventeen years.

Q. What relation is Mrs. Dean to you? - A. Sister-in-law.

Q. Was she there? - A. No; Cawdle's brother came in about half past nine o'clock, and he was gone; I told him he was gone home very poorly.

JAMES STONE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a glass-grinder: I know both the prisoners by fight; I was at Mr. Dean's house when I saw both the prisoners, on Saturday the 1st of this month; I first saw Cawdle, between four and five o'clock, I was not particularly acquainted with him; I staid there till ten minutes before seven, he was there all that time, I left him there; and I saw the other prisoner there several times before seven; I returned to the public-house a little before eight, and paid him a shilling, that I owed him for a pair of gaters that I had contracted with him for; I did not stop then five minutes, I paid the landlord.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You paid the landlord? - A. Yes.

Q. He was in the bar? - A. Yes; at different times I saw him, but not so much as Mary Clarke .

Q. You are sure you saw him in the bar? - A. Yes, at different times; he is generally backwards on a Saturday; I paid him backwards.

Q. Did you not tell me that the landlord was

backwards and forwards in the bar? - A. Yes; so he was in the course of the day.

Q. Was he backwards and forwards at the bar in the evening? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Upon your oath, was he not in the bar? - A. I think I saw him once or twice; I could not swear whether he was or was not.

Q. Is Cawdle often there? - A. I seldom go only on a Saturday.

Q. Is Cawdle often there? - A. I do not think I saw him three times in my life, only that day in particular.

Q. How many months ago was that Saturday you speak of? - A. Not one yet; three weeks next Saturday; every Saturday night, at ten o'clock, my work is booked; I remember well that it was the 1st of February that I booked my work at night.

Q. How do you know it was Saturday the 1st of February above all other Saturdays; - what day is this? - A. This is Saturday.

Q. It happens to be Friday, I believe? - A. Our Saturdays are always Friday night, or Saturday morning: on the Tuesday following I went into that house, and heard that they had been taken up; I said, bless me, can that be the man that I bought my gaters of.

Q. Do you know when Cawdle was taken up? - A. I heard it on the Tuesday.

Q. How long have you known Rudd? - A. Only by seeing him that day, and once or twice before.

Q. How many boxes did you sit off from them that night? - A. The box they sat in was the next to the bar, it was a box or two off.

Q. How many else were there in that box? - A. I cannot say; there might be a shoe-maker, and a brewer's servant.

Q. In the same box? - A. I cannot say that.

Q. When were you applied to about this? - A. I spoke it open in the tap-room.

Q. How came you here to-day - did you tell the prisoners of it? - A. No.

Q. Did you go to them in jail? - A. No; Cawdle's mother came to me, and asked me if I was drinking with her sen on the Saturday; I said, no, I had not drank with him, I offered him a pint pot to drink, and he said he had a pain in his bowess.

Q. Have you no reason to know that this was the 1st of February but by your book? - A. No.

The prisoner, Cawdle, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Cawdle, GUILTY .

Rudd, GUILTY.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-50

208. GEORGE MORLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , a chest of tea, value 16l. 19s. the property of George Guernier , John-Calvert Clarke , and John Jones .

JOHN PITMAN sworn. - I am servant to Messrs. Guernier, and Company, who keep the Army Labaratory, in Great Rider-street, St. James's : On Friday the 7th of February, we lost a chest of tea from a cart, as we were going through the Strand , about two o'clock; the carman and me stopped at a public-house for a pint of beer, he saw the prisoner taking a chest of tea from the copse of the cart; upon which, I turned round and saw him myself, likewise; I then immediately ran out and secured him, at the distance of about three yards from the cart, he had the chest of tea upon his shoulder; when I stopped him, he stood about half a minute, almost, not knowing what to do; then he threw down the chest, intending to throw it on my legs; I secured him, and a number of people assisted me to take him to Bow-street, and he was taken there immediately.

THOMAS TEES sworn. - I was the carman: I stopped at the Spotted-dog, in the Strand, and I saw him, through the window, get up in the cart, and pull the chest over the copse of the cart; Pitman and I both went after him, and collared him, he had the chest of tea upon his shoulder; then we took him to Bow-street.

WILLIAM BALLARD sworn. - I was coming past the Spotted-dog, and saw the prisoner stopped by the two last witnesses; I assisted in taking him to Bow-street; as we were going along Wych-street, he offered me a one pound note to let him go; the one pound note was taken from him by the officer.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am a constable of St. Martin's in the Fields: The prisoner was brought, on the 7th of February, to the office, and I was ordered to search him, (produces the chest of tea); it is directed to the Military Hospital, at Gosport.

Pitman. This is the same chest.(Mr. Thomas Lucas proved the names of the Partners).

The prisoner did not say anything in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven year s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-51

209. MARTHA COTTERELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , twenty-one yards of lace, value 21s. the property of John Jones , privately in his shop .

JOHN JONES sworn. - I am a mercer , No. 11, Leicester-square : About eight o'clock on Tuesday

night last, the prisoner came in, with another woman, to buy some lace for a clock; I shewed them some lace; I saw the prisoner hold her hand upon her belly, outside her clock; I suspected she had got a card of lace; when I had sold some lace to the other person, the prisoner leant upon the counter, and sat down in a chair, with her hand in the same posture; I came round the counter, and said to her, that we had often been robbed, which I was afraid was the case now; I then put my hand under her clock, and took the card of lace from her, containing twenty-one yards. (Produces it).

Q. What is it worth? - A. Twenty-one shillings.

Q. Would you give that for it? - A. I gave three shillings and sixpence a yard for it; I had shewn them this very of lace; it has my private mark upon it.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - On Tuesday might last, I took charge of the prisoner in Mr. Jones's shop.

Prisoner's defence. I went to this person's shop with a lady to buy some lace, and she bought some; I had no intention of stealing any thing when I went into the shop, nor did I know that I had it.

The prisoner called five respectable witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 35.)

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-52

210. THOMAS DUNN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Wright and Michael-Memory Wright , about the hour of eight in the night of the 16th of February , with intent the goods therein being to steal, and burglariously stealing thirty musket locks, value 10l. the property of our Sovereign Lord the King .

Second Court. Laying them to be the property of he said Robert Wright and Michael-Memory Wright .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

MICHAEL-MEMORY WRIGHT sworn. - I am in partnership with Robert Wright, No. 50, Prescott-street, Goodman's-fields , I am a gun-maker ; we had a warehouse at the back of our house which communicates with the house, by a wall continuing on to the warehouse, which is about twenty yards from the house, and behind the warehouse is the Tenter-ground: On Sunday evening last, about eight o'clock, the warehouse was broke open; I had been close to the warehouse about a quarter of an hour before, it was secure and safe then; I received information that the warehouse had been broke open; I immediately want to the warehouse, and the observed the small partition, which was to give light, that ships backwards and forwards, taken out.

Q. Was that place large enough for any body to get in? - A. Yes, I could have got in myself; there was no other place open, they could not have got in by any other means; I missed a small parcel of musket locks, that were put by themselves, about thirty; they were worth about ten pounds; three of them were immediately presented to me by Crofts, which were of the same description with the thirty, they had the government mark upon them; I have no doubt but they were a part of those that had been in the warehouse; the prisoner was secured at my back door, in the custody of Crofts and Robertson; I took the prisoner and the; locks to Lambeth-street; the officers have had the locks ever since; I went round the ground with Crofts, and another gentleman, and there was not another person about the ground, it is entirely private property.

JANE NAIRNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the gate of the Tenter-ground; last Sunday evening, about a quarter before eight, I saw the prisoner at the bar and another man; the prisoner was dressed in soldier's clothes, and the other was not; I asked them where they were going, they said they were going to Mr. Wright's shop; about a quarter of an hour afterwards, the man that was with the prisoner, had slipped out at the gate, and a groom that came out, said, the man that was gone out had been a robbing, and said there was another in the ground, a soldier; I then shut the gate, there was assistance called, and the prisoner was apprehended.

JAMES CROFTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a gentleman's groom; I was going into the stable, in the Tenter-grounds, about eight o'clock in the evening, and going along the ground, I saw a man get out of Mr. Wright's shop, in red clothes, and another man had some musket locks under his arm, in a bag; one of the locks dropped from the bag, I picked it up; I went a little further, and picked up two more, which I afterwards gave to Mr. Wright; I picked them up close by where the men came out at the window; I went to the woman, and told her to lock the gate, and I went and got assistance; I got Mr. Robertson, and we took the prisoner in the ground, in soldier's clothes, it was the same man that I saw get out of Mr. Wright's shop, he said he had been with another man to see his friend; we asked him where he was, and he said he did not know, he had lost him; we asked him his name, and he did not know; then we took him to the hele where I

saw him get out, and we informed Mr. Wright of it, and he was delivered to the officer.

Court. Q. Is this Tenter-ground a common road? - A. No, it is not.

Q. How high is this from the ground? - A. About a yard.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you any light with you? - A. Yes, I had a large glass lantern; the warehouse joins to the house, by a brick wall.

Q.Does that take it out of the Tenter-ground? - A. Yes.

DAVID ROBERTSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was called to the assistance of the last witness; I apprehended the prisoner; seeing a man in the Tenter-ground, in soldier's clothes, I thought he had no business there, and I took him,(produces a quantity of musket locks;) I found these locks the next day scattered about the Tenter-ground.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Lambeth-street; Mr. Wright, in company with this young man, brought the prisoner to me, and delivered me these three locks; they have been in my custody ever since; sometime after I had him in custody, I asked him how he came into the Tenter-ground; he told me he was going home to his quarters, in Blue Anchor-court, and met a young man that asked him to take a walk into the Tenter-ground; he said he asked him what he was going there for, and he said he was going to Mr. Wright's.

Mr. Wright. These are the same description of locks that were in my warehouse; I cannot have a doubt of their being mine, they are ordnance stores delivered to us from the Board of Ordnance.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-53

211. JOHN THOMAS and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Halliday , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 11th of February , with intent the goods therein being, to steal and burglariously stealing, three brass candlesticks, value 4s. a patent roasting jack, value 5s. a large bible, value 20s. a boy's coat, value 4s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2s. two cotton handkerchiefs, value 1s. a man's hat, value 2s. a handtowel, value 6d. a table-cloth, value 2s. a copper pot, value 5s. a brass kettle, value 2s. a plated milk-pot, value 2s. and two silver tea-spoons, value 2s. the property of the said Samuel .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL HALLIDAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Barking-dogs, Tabernacle-row : On the night of the 11th of February, I had been to the play with two country gentlemen, I returned about five minutes before twelve, and exactly at two o'clock I went to bed; I myself saw that every things was safe, and about half past three I was alarmed by the springing of rattles; I came down and found the back door burst open; the frame was so wrenched, that any person might put in his hand, and unbutton it; I then went into the wash-house, and found the wash-house window wrenched open; I then went out into the yard, and found different articles tied up in a table-cloth, and a skillet in a copper pot, standing on one side,(repeats the articles mentioned in the indictment;) I then went to the bar, and found the door wrenched open; I could not tell what I missed there; I went up stairs and found the staircase window open, and one dining-room window; then there was an alarm that one of the thieves had got into Mr. Harrison's necessary, three doors from me; I then heard an alarm, that there was a thief in my wash-house; he jumped off over the pales, and he was taken as he was jumping over, and brought to the door without his hat, that was Williams; he was taken to the watch-house, and when I got to the watch-house, I found the other prisoner there; Williams dropped some matches behind him, and some were found in his pocket, and a knife; I sat up the remainder part of the night.

Q. How far is the watch-house from your house? - A. About a quarter of a mile; the next morning I found, under the wash-house window, this instrument, which exactly sits the wash-house door where it was wrenched open.

SARAH SMITH sworn. - Eaxamined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mr. Halliday; the two prisoners came in, in the course of the evening of the 11th of February, and I served them with a pot of porter, they were in company together and went away together; they were together the whole time. except the time that one of them went backwards, that was Williams; they asked me for a knife and some salt; I asked them if they did not want a plate, and Williams said, no, they had nothing but bread and cheese and an onion; I went to the bar to get a knife, and Williams followed me to the bar, and was there as quick as I was, and leaned over the bar where we serve the liquors; when he went into the yard, seeing a stranger, I followed him, unbolted the door, and asked him if he would have a candle, but he refused it.

Q. What time did he come? - A. A little before seven, and they went away a little before eight; I told him it was the last door upon the left hand.

Q. There was a good moon, was there not? - A. Yes; it was very light; he was, I dare say, ten minutes in the yard; I am sure the prisoners are the same men.

Cross-examined by Mr. Miers. Q. These men you never saw before that day? - A. No.

Q. And saw them but an hour? - A. No.

Q. And yet you swear that these are the same men? - A. Yes.

Q. You swear with equal positiveness to both? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you swear to a them before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not say you could not swear to them? - A. No, I did not.

JOHN HARRISON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a pattern drawer, No. 19, North-street, St. Luke's, there is a paling separates Mr. Halliday's house, from North-street, and my house is the third door beyond the paling: On the 12th of February, between three and four in the morning, I was alarmed by the watchman springing the rattles; I looked out at the window, and saw two watchmen, calling out, thieves, they said there were two of them; I went to my back window, and saw the prisoner, Williams, without his hat, in the next yard but one to mine, and the next to Mr. Halliday's; I saw him walking among the paling with out his hat, in the shade of the moon, on the dark side of the paling, I saw him then go over the pales into Mr. Halliday's, yard, then he went out of my sight; I then went down stairs to see if my own house was secure; I looked round my own yard, but I could see nobody; I went to the privy, opened the door, and saw the prisoner, Thomas, sitting there; I shut the door immediately, and held it fast, and called out for the assistance of the neighbours, and they came; they took him to the watch-house; when the people got hold of him, he begged they would not use him ill; after he was gone, I was then without stockings, I put on my boots, locked my door, and went out into the street; I went down to Mr. Halliday's paling; I stood at the paling with Mr. Fleming and two watchmen; Williams at that time was in Mr. Halliday's yard; the people that were in search of him, cried, go round; the watchman went round, and Fleming and I stopped at the pales; at that moment, the prisoner Williams came over the pales, exactly between us, without his hat, and he was sent to the watch-house; I saw his hat lying in the skittle-ground.

Q. The person that came over the pales between you and Fleming-was that the same person that you had been walking? - A. Yes.

Mr. Miers. Q. You did not search him? - A. No, I did not.

JOHN BURLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of the parish of St. Luke's; I was waked out of my sleep by the noise of the rattles, on the morning of the 12th; I got up and looked out at my own window; I saw the watchman running; I live close by Mr. Halliday's, only a wall parts us; I brought two watchmen through my house into the yard; I searched my premises, but found nobody there; I got a ladder, and got over the wall into Mr. Halliday's yard; I searched the yard; we searched the necessary of the next house, and then Mr. Harrison called to us, that there was a man in his necessary; I went up and opened the door, and seeing his hand in his pocket, I was afraid he might have something; I held a poker up to him that I had in my hand, and desired him to come out, which he did; we took him to the watch-house, and delivered him to Hayward, the constable of the night; in coming back we met Thomas in custody; I then went to Mr. Halliday's yard, and took possession of the property which I had seen in the yard; there was a bundle in a table-cloth, a brass skillet and a copper pot; I took them to the watch-house; I heard Williams ask for a hat, which he said he had lost; a little boy had a hat in his hand, I took it from him, and gave it to the night officer.

Cross-examined by Mr. Miers. Q. Williams asked for his hat several times-did he not? - A. I believe he did.

JOHN CHAPLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was alarmed by my wife; on the morning of the 12th of February, I went up stairs and looked out at the staircase window into the yard; I opened the back door, and saw Williams run across my yard, and jump into Mr. Halliday's skittle-ground; he had his hat on, when he got upon the wall; I got upon the wall directly, and saw his hat lying in the skittle-ground, I picked it up, and gave it to a lodger of mine; he is not here; (produces the hat); I gave an alarm among the neighbours, and while we were searching, Mr. Harrison holloaed out, that there was one in his privy, and he was taken to the watch-house, that was Thomas; I said, there is another, somewhere, I am sure, because I have got his hat; we searched after him; I heard him jump down from the wall, and then I saw him jump over the pales, without his hat; I did not see him again till he was brought round to Mr. Halliday's door, in custody; Williams, at the watch-house, asked for his hat, he said a little boy had it; I gave it to Burland.

Burland. It was in a little boy's hand, I saw it in a little boy's hand.

Chaplin. I believe Mr. Halliday picked the hat up, and gave it to the boy; I took it from the boy and gave it to Burland, and Burland gave it to the

night-officer; he asked for it, and when it was given to him, he owned it.

THOMAS HAYWARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was constable of the night: The two prisoners were brought to me, and searched in my presence; I searched Williams, and found a knife in his pocket; and these matches were delivered to me by one of the witnesses; I do not recollect that Thomas was searched at all; I took them to Clerkenwell-prison; Williams was then without his hat, and I asked him if that was his; he said it was; I believe this to be the hat.

JAMES SAYER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a cheesemonger; I was alarmed about four o'clock, Thomas was then taken; just as I got to Mr. Halliday's, he had got over the pales; when he was taken to the watch-house, I saw Williams take some matches out of his waistcoat-pocket, and drop them down behind him; I did not see Thomas searched.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On Thursday the 13th, I went to Mr. Harrison's house, and found, under the coping of the pales, close to the necessary-door, this flint and steel.

(Hayward produced the property).

Halliday. I have looked at all these things, they are my property; they were found in my yard, close to the wash-house-door.

Williams's defence. I had been out late, drinking; I heard the rattles, and saw the people getting over the pales, and I got over the pales.

Thomas's defence. The flint and steel I know nothing at all about.

The prisoner, Thomas, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Thomas, GUILTY , Death . (Aged 25.)

Williams, GUILTY. Death. (Aged 25.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-54

212. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a ewe sheep, value 30s. the property of William Smith .

There being no evidence to prove that the sheep was the property of William Smith , he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-55

213. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a great coat, value 10s. the property of Joseph Levy , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH LEVY sworn. - I am a saleman , I keep a shop in Clare-court, Drury-lane : On Monday last I lost a great coat; I can only swear to the property.

SARAH LEVY sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness: Last Monday, about dusk, the prisoner came in, and tried on this great coat; he said it would not suit him; then he asked for a pair of because, I shewed him a pair which fitted him; then he desired me to shew him another pair, which I did; he then, asked me what I asked for the first; I asked him fourteen shillings; he bid me twelve shillings and sixpence, and then made towards the door; I allowed him the breeches for thirteen shillings, and on his going towards the door, I told him he should have them; he still kept going towards the door, and I exclaimed, good God! where are the breeches gone; he said he had laid them upon the counter, but they were not there, and I laid hold of him, but he was too strong for me, and got away; he was stopped directly, and brought back; I did not then miss the great coat, but it was brought back to my shop with the prisoner, by a young man that is here.

THOMAS NASH sworn. - I stopped the prisoner about three hundred yards from the prosecutor's shop; he was running fast; I heard the cry of stop thief, and I stopped him; he had a great coat concealed underneath his jacket; I took him back to the shop; I saw him drop it from under his jacket, and the lad is here that picked it up.

EDWARD LANGTON sworn. - I saw the prisoner, stopped; he dropped a great coat from under his jacket, which I picked up, (produces it); I carried it back to the shop.

Levy. This is my coat, I had had it about six days; it has my private mark upon it.

Mrs. Levy. This is the great coat which the prisoner tried on.

Prisoner's defence. I went into this gentleman's shop and asked for a pair of breeches; I tried them on, and I tried on a second pair of breeches; she asked me sixteen shillings for the first pair, and fourteen shillings for the next; there was a man bargaining for the great coat, at the door, when I came away, and he ran away with it, and threw it right across me; I gave myself up directly.

Q. (To Mrs. Levy.) Was there any man bargaining for the great coat? - A. No, there was not.

Q. What is the value of this great coat? - A. It is worth very little now, about three shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 3s. 6d.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-56

214. CHRISTOPHER SHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , eleven pewter pint pots, value 5s. 6d. the property of Elizabeth Woodhead .

ELIZABETH WOODHEAD sworn. - I keep the Castle, at Hampstead-heath , (Jack Straw's Castle); I know nothing of the loss.

DENNIS KELLY sworn. - I keep the Fex and Peacock in Gray's-inn-lane: The prisoner came to my house with a basket containing eleven pint pots belonging to Mrs. Woodhead; he asked me for a lodging, and I told him I had none; a soldier in the house said, if I would give him leave, he might sleep with him; he went up stairs, and left the basket below; I opened the basket and discovered these pots, with Mrs. Woodhead's name upon them; I ordered him down stairs again immediately, and sent for a watchman, who took him to the watch-house; the next morning I went to Mrs. Woodhead's to acquaint her of it.

GEORGE KIRRY sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Woodhead: The prisoner at the bar came to our house on the 4th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, and called for a pint of porter; he had two more pints, and he stopped till between five and six o'clock; I saw him near the place where the pots were taken from; I did not miss them, but when he saw me he walked off.

Prosecutrix. These are my pots, they have my husband's name upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I was going from Hampstead to Highgate, and found them standing against the foot path, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. (To Mrs. Woodhead.) Can you say you had missed these pots? - A. No, I cannot.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t18000219-57

215. ANN M'CARTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a Darlington Bank-note, for the payment of one guinea , the property of John Ridley .

(The Prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated) .

NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANCE.

Reference Number: t18000219-58

216. JOHN HINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , a steel coach spring, value 12s. a steel chariot spring, value 9s. and a steel chaise spring, value 9s. the property of Thomas Lycett .

THOMAS LYCETT sworn. - I am a coachmaker : I had lost a number of coach springs; about the 14th of 15th of this month, I was informed that six springs, that I had laid in a lost over the timber shed, were gone; they were old springs; I saw part of them again at the Rotation-office, a day or two ago; I sent my Smith and spring-maker to all the old iron shops in Wentworth-street, and he found them at the first he enquired at, Mr. Cohen's.

JOHN BATCHELOR sworn. - I am a springmaker: last Wednesday morning I went, by the desire of Mr. Lycett, to Mr. Cohen's, in Wentworth-street; I asked him if he had got any old springs; he shewed me some and I was convinced that they were Mr. Lycett's; I went and informed him of it, and an officer was sent for, and the springs carried to the office.

- COHEN sworn. - I am a broker, and collector of all kind of metals; I bought these springs of one Mrs. Bratt, in Whitechapel, on the 11th of February, there are three of them; I bought some other old iron at the same time, for thirteen shillings a hundred.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. Not at all.

ELIZABETH BRATT sworn. - I keep an ironshop in Whitechapel: I told Mr. Cohen three coach springs on the 11th of February, I bought them of the prisoner at the bar; I had seen him be fore, backwards and forwards; he lived with a person that was a cooper, some time.

Q. Did he deal in old iron? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. How did you conceive that he should have these coach springs? - A. I did not know whether he brought them on his own account, or anybody else's; I gave nine shillings a hundred for them, and sold them for eleven shillings.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - (Produces the springs); I had them at Cohen's shop: I apprehended the prisoner at ten o'clock at night; I asked him if any body was concerned with him in stealing Mr. Lycett's springs; he said, no, nobody stole them-but himself; I asked him how many he had stole; and he said he did not know, there were a good many.

(The springs were deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I never told Nowlan that I stole them; he asked me if I knew any thing about them; and I told him I did, and that I had sold them to Mrs. Bratt; I found them at six o'clock in the morning, as I was going to my work; I had a candle and lanthorn, and a man dropped a bag; I picked it up, and found it was springs, and I sold them to Mrs. Bratt.

GUILTY . (Aged 52.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and publickly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t18000219-59

217. ABRAHAM CHAMPNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , a trunk, value 6d. a gown-piece, value 7s. an apron,

value 5s. two petticoats, value 6s. a bed-gown, value 4s. a gown, value 2s. seven caps, value 7s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. a pair of stockings, value 1s. a quarter of a yard of cambric, value 2s. a quarter of a yard of muslin, value 6d. and a japan tea-caddy, value 6d. the property of Humphrey Hadley .

ANN HADLEY sworn. - I am the wife of Humphry Hadley ; he is a soldier ; I live at Chatham: Last Tuesday night I lost these things; I was coming in a coach from Knightsbridge to Charing-cross; there was the prisoner and two others in the coach with me; we came to the Golden Cross, Charing-cross ; the prisoner was billeted in the house that my husband and I lodged in; I did not know him before; I had a trunk in the coach with me; I had packed it up; it contained the things mentioned in the indictment; (repeating them;) the prisoner brought it in, and left it by my side in the tap-room; it was locked and corded; I got there about two o'clock, and the coach was to go off at six to Chatham; I got booked to go in the coach, and just before I got into the coach, the prisoner took the trunk, and said he would put it into the coach; I went to the coach about a quarter of an hour after, but my trunk was not there; I took a coach then, and went to the lodgings at Knightsbridge, and he did not come home all night; the prisoner came to the lodgings about six o'clock the next morning but one; I saw him coming down the stairs, and asked him what he had done with my trunk; he said he had left in the inn yard, and somebody ran away with it; I saw it again that same day; the constable went after it, and found it at Mary Clarke 's house; she is here; some of the things were gone; I got some of the things from her, and some a pawnbroker has got.

GEORGE PERCHARD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, Church-street, in the Borough: I do not know any thing of the prisoner; on the 18th of February, between six and eight in the evening, a dimity petticoat and a cotton bed-gown were brought to me by Mary Clarke; I lent her five shillings and sixpence upon them.

MARY CLARKE sworn. - I live in Kent-street; the prisoner was quarrered at the house where I lived servant three or four years ago: Last Tuesday evening, as near as I can guess between six and seven o'clock, he brought me a trunk and asked me if I would go on an errand for him; he said a woman lived with him, and he had lent her three pounds upon it; that he had slept with her three nights before she went away; I had not seen him for about six weeks before, or more; the trunk was locked when he brought it, I saw no string about it; he opened it while I was putting my husband's supper on; my husband was a-bed and asleep; he opened it with a knife; he took out a brownish petticoat, and a gown-piece, and something wrapped up in a paper; he emptied the trunk, and some of the things I have had ever since; the prisoner ordered me to take the petticoat to pawn, and a bed-gown; I took them to Mrs. Davis's, in Church-street, and pawned them for five shillings and sixpence; I put the other things into a drawer till the constable came and took them; only one of the caps I put on to go to the shop in, because I had not one clean.

RICHARD BROWN sworn. - I keep a public house in Kent-street: On Tuesday night last, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner brought me a duplicate of a gown-piece, and asked me if I would buy it; I told him no; I asked him where he got it from, and he said he lived with a woman and was pawning her things; he said if I would not give him a shillings for the duplicate, he would burn it; I then gave him a shilling; it was pawned for ten shillings and two-pence; that made eleven shillings and two-pence; I sent for the piece from the pawnbroker's; I delivered it up to the officer.

JONATHAN HILLIER sworn. - I am a constable: I took up the prisoner on Thursday morning, and I told him it would be better for him to tell where the things were.

Q. After that you must not tell us what he said? - A. I went to Mary Clarke , and found the trunk, and part of the property; (produces it;) and this gown-piece I had from the publican (Produces it.)

ROBERT WILSON sworn. - I am a patrole: I assisted the constable in taking the prisoner; we took him out of his bed at the Marquis of Granby, Knightsbridge; I assisted the constable in finding the things.(The property was deposed to by the prosecutrix)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor; I did not know what I was doing, or else I am sure I should not have done it.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t18000219-60

218. MATTHEW COATES, otherwise PETER BATH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , two brass candlesticks, value 2s. the property of Elias Corker .

ELIAS CORKER sworn. - I keep the Bunch of Grapes in Little Paternoster-row ; On the 6th of January the prisoner came in and called for a pint of porter, and my servant came in to enquire of me if I had taken away a pair of candlesticks; I said no; and I immediately pursued the prisoner,

and a gentleman who is here took him in Paternoster-row.

JOHN TOWNSEND sworn. - I am a dealer, in Spitalfields-market: I saw the prisoner running up West-street, into the market, and the landlord pursuing him, calling out stop thief; I laid hold of him the corner of South-street; he had his hat on when I saw him first; but he had lost it when I took him; I had lost sight of him two minutes I dare say, but I am sure he is the same person.

GEORGE CLARKE sworn. - I was standing in the market, talking with my fellow-servants; I saw the prisoner running, and as he ran past the tail of a cart, I knocked his hat off, and he dropped two candlesticks, which I picked up and gave to Mr. Corker.

Corker. I delivered them to the constable.(The constable produced the candlesticks, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I never handled the candlesticks, or ever saw them.

GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-61

219. SARAH CROSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a shirt, value 1s. and seven stockings, value 2s. the property of Elizabeth Pritchard , widow .

ELIZABETH PRITCHARD sworn. - I am a widow; I live in Pancras-street, Tottenham-court-road ; I keep a lodging-house : The door was open last Friday morning; when the prisoner came in, she asked me if I had seen her mother go out; I told her, yes; she told me Mr. Southgate was coming on Sunday or Monday, to pay me what he owed me; upon that I let her come into the parlour, and another witness came in after some time, and saw the shirt under her cloak; and the stockings were hanging half in her pocket and half out.

MARY FAWCETT sworn. - I was at Mrs. Pritchard's house on Friday morning, and saw the shirt hanging beneath the prisoner's cloak; and there were four stockings, I think, hanging half in and half out of her pocket.

CHARLES CHINNERY sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I searched her, and found one stocking in her pocket. (Produces it; it was deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner's defence. If I had them in my pocket it is more than I know; I had had rather more to drink than I should have had; and if I had them at all, I thought they were my own.

Chinnery. she had four other stockings in her pocket, which did not belong to Mrs. Prichard.

GUILTY (Aged 27.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-62

220. ROBERT REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a silver tea-spoon, value 1s. and a mahogany tea-caddy, value 5s. the property of Richard Kendall .

RICHARD KENDALL sworn. - I live in the New Road, St. Pancras ; I am a cow-keeper : I can only speak to the property.

PETER HICKIE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Kendall: On Saturday, the 1st of this month, I caught the prisoner in my master's house, a little after six o'clock in the morning; when I went in he stood behind the door, and I asked him what brought him there; he said he was come with a note from Mr. Bell; I told him to go to my mistress, and she would take it; he went under pretence of going to my mistress, and came back and said my mistress could not do without me; I went out, but I thought he was not upon a good design, and I turned back and took him by the neck and brought him out, and pinned him up against the wall, to make him stand up; I desired my mistress to go in and see if she missed any thing; she missed a silver spoon, and there was a tea chest lying upon the ground, about three feet from where I pinned him against the wall; and we were taking him across the road, and he pulled the spoon out of his coat-pocket, and threw it away; and a man that is here picked it up.

ROBERT DONOVAN sworn. - On the 1st of February I was called by Mrs. Kendall; I came up and saw the last witness had got the prisoner against the wall; and as we were taking him along, he threw away a tea-spoon.

- CRONEY sworn. - I picked up that spoon, which I saw drop from him; and Mr. Kendall said it was his property.

- PERRY sworn. - I am a watchman: I was called to assist, and in searching him I found in his pocket a small bottle of phosphorus; (producing it;) and this match.

The property was deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to work at six in the morning, and that man ran out and said I had robbed his mistress, and took hold of me; I know nothing of it. GUILTY (Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-63

221. JOHN PETTIT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a pair of boots, value 4s. the property of Thomas Laurin .

- SNOW sworn. - I am a foreman to Mr. Laurin, army boot-maker , the corner of Charles-street, Westminster : Last Saturday evening the prisoner came in for a pair of shoes, by order of his serjeant; he was served with the shoes, and went out; we did not miss the boots till the pawnbroker stopped them the same evening.

RICHARD OZELL sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Tothill-street, Westminster: On Saturday evening last, between seven and eight, the prisoner came to my shop, in company with a woman, and offered to pledge a pair of boots in an unfinished state; I asked him where he got them; he did not give a satisfactory answer, and I stopped them, and delivered them to the constable.

JOHN MARSDEN sworn. - On Saturday evening last the prisoner and the boots were delivered into my charge; (produces the boots;) and being a shoemaker myself, I told the Magistrate I thought, from the marks, I could find out who they belonged to; I went to Mr. Laurin's, and they turned out to be his, and Mr. Snow attended the Magistrate.(They were deposed to by Snow.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character. GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-64

222. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , five pounds of pork, value 2s. the property of Thomas Johnson and John Hastings .

THOMAS JOHNSON sworn. - I keep a pork-shop in St. Martin's-lane , in partnership with John Hastings : On the 30th of January, just before candle light, the prisoner came into the shop and asked the price of pork-sausages, and took up a hand of pork that was on the window-board, and gave it to another soldier that stood on the threshold of the door; the other soldier took it in both his hands, and ran up the lane; I went to pursue the other man, when the prisoner stopped me, and almost pushed me backwards; he asked me what I was in such a hurry about, he wanted some sausages; he stopped me from going after the man that had the pork, and therefore I detained him.

EDWARD RAVENHILL sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I had no soldier with me at all; when I went into the shop I asked for some sausages for my supper; and he did not know what had stood upon the stall-board till he called out his wife and asked her, and she could not tell for some time, and then she said it was a hand of pork.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-65

223. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , a shirt, value 2s. the property of John Smedley .

JOHN SMEDLEY sworn. - I am a soldier , I lost a shirt out of my knapsack, at the Bricklayer's-arms, Holborn , last Sunday night; I had had a bit of dinner there, and when I came to look at my knapsack it was gone; I found it the next day on the prisoner's back; I lost out of the same knapsack, my white gaters, a pair of shoes, and a black ball, he was in that house on Sunday evening.

EPHRAIM BOURNE sworn. - On Monday the 17th, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, at the Distiller's-arms, Saffron-hill; when I came down, the soldier gave charge of him, he said, he had robbed him of his shirt out of his knapsack; he had it on then; I took it from him.(Produces it.)

Q. (To Smedley.) How came you to suspect the prisoner? - A. A servant girl in the house had lost some of her clothes, and her sister happened to live at the house where he was taken up; she knew her sister's things, and sent for her, and I went with her, and by that means discovered my shirt.

Smedley. It has my initials upon the right side, and the regimental mark upon the left; I know it to be mine.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-66

224. CATHERINE CALLAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , a shirt, value 10s. the property of William Getlie .

MARGARET GETLIE sworn. - I am the wife of William Getlie , a publican ; I live at No. 9, William Warren's-square, Wapping : The prisoner came to our house as a customer for two or three days before the property was found upon her; I lost two shirts, between one and two o'clock on the 31st of January; I was washing some clothes belonging to a young man that was in a hurry, going to sea, and she asked me if she should help me; I did not contradict her, and she did; she

went away about eleven o'clock; she was to help me for two days, and when she had done I was to pay her for her trouble; she was left in the taproom with the servant, and the servant was sent out with a pot of beer; I left them to go to dinner, and in the course of about an hour, when I came back, they were gone; I sent for a constable and detained her, and he begged she would deliver the clothes, and there would be no more trouble in it; and she would not do it, and then I sent for two officers from Shadwell parish.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I was sent for to search this woman; the prisoner was in custody of a man who said he was a headborough; he said he had searched her; I understand she had been in at the next door; I went in there and searched, but found nothing; I told her I should be under the necessity of searching her; I desired her to loose her clothing; she seemed to be 10th to do that; she said, if I persisted it would endanger her life; and I called a woman to search her, and suspended between her legs, I found, in a pocket, this shirt;(producing it; it is deposed to by Mrs. Getlie.)

Prisoner's defence. She has perjured herself very wrongfully.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-67

225. SARAH BROWN and MARY JOHNSTON were indicted for making an assault, in a certain court called Mitre-court , near the King's highway, upon Thomas Morley , on the 16th of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a watch, value 3l. a watch-chain, value 6d. a watch-key, value 1d. and a watch-hook, value 1d. the property of the said Thomas .

THOMAS MORLEY sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Shipman, hosier, in Love-lane: I was robbed of my watch last Saturday night, about twelve o'clock.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I was not drunk, I knew very well what I said and did; I had been at two or three public-houses.

Q. Where did it happen? - A. I do not know the place.

Q. Were you so drunk you could not tell that? - A. I am a stranger in the place; I have not been in town above a week; I met with the prisoners in the street, and they desired me to go into a house with them, which I did; I went with them into a public-house; I am sure the prisoners are the same women; we staid a few minutes; we had a glass of something a-piece; it was some wine-vaults; when we came out, I meant to go home into Wood-street, and I thought I was going the right way; and as I went along, one got before me and the other behind me, and stopped me; the prisoner Brown got her hand under my coat, and took out my watch.

Q. Was your watch in your sob? - A. No; in my waistcoat pocket; I thought it would be safer, with my great coat on. I felt it go, and I laid hold of her arm, and she directly gave it to the other woman.

Q. Could you not have prevented her giving it to the other woman? - A. No; then the other woman gave it to Brown again directly; I called the watchman as hard as I could, and the watchman came and laid hold of them both, and took them to the watch-house.

Q. Were they searched? - A. No; I saw Brown drop the watch, as they were taking them to the watch-house; Mr. Hancock shewed me the watch at the watch-house; I know it to be mine; it is marked G.M. in the outer-case and the inner-case.

Cross-examined by Mr. Agar. (Counsel for Johnston.) Q. According to this account, Johnston did nothing? - A. The other gave her the watch.

Q. Yes, and she would not have it; she returned it again? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean to swear that Johnston ever offered to touch you? - A. She was behind me.

Q. She never attempted to take your watch? - A. No.

Q. You had been drinking a good deal? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, how many public houses had you been in? - A. I do not know.

Q. Now, upon your oath, were you not in several public-houses, drinking with these women? - A. I had been in two.

Q. Upon your oath, can you tell, within a pint, how much rum or brandy you had with them? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Had you been drinking before you met with them? - A. Yes.

Q. When Brown stood before you, did you know what she was about? - A. No, I did not; or I would not have suffered her to take it.

- HANCOCK sworn. - I am a hosier, in Milk-street: Last Saturday night, I was coming home, after the clock struck twelve; when I came to the end of Mitre-court, I heard a violent outcry of, do not rob me, do not rob me; I had the came in my hand that I have now, and I stepped into the court, and saw the man struggling with the two woman at the bar, it was rather dark; there was another little man with them, Morley was calling

out, that they had robbed him of his watch; the women began to call him fool, and said that he was drunk, and there was a scene of confusion; I enquired of the man who he was, and he said, he was a watchman; I then desired him to conduct them to the watch-house immediately; we got on with considerable difficulty to Aldermanbury, and there she dropped the watch down by her side; I picked it up, and went on with them to the watch-house; Morley there charged Brown with taking it from him; when it was communicated that I had the watch, he was asked if he should know it, he said, yes, it was marked G.M.; I produced the watch to the constable of the night, and the prosecutor claimed it; they were afterwards conveyed to Giltspur-street Compter, but they were very unruly both of them, and it was with very great difficulty that they were got there.

Prisoner Brown. Q. Could you distinguish whether it was dropped by the prosecutor, or by me? - A. I did not see her hand; I saw it drop by her side.

The WATCHMAN sworn. - I heard the prosecutor call, watch; I went up, and saw them scuffling together; I laid hold of Brown, and took her along, and the prosecutor took her along, as far as Lad-lane, and then the other watchman took her; he said, he had lost his watch, and they had it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Agar. Q. He was very drunk, was he not? - A. No, he did not stagger, nor nothing at all.

JAMES IRELAND sworn. - I am a watchman: I went with Johnstone to the watch-house; the watch dropped against my feet, but I cannot say who it dropped from.

JOHN JORDAN sworn. - I was constable of the night; I took charge of the two prisoners; Morley said, that Sarah Brown had taken his watch out of his pocket. (The watch produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Brown's defence. He wanted me to take half-a-guinea to go home and sleep with me; he took us up Mitre-court, and behaved in a very rude impudent manner; then he said, he had lost his watch, at another public-house; we went to two or three public-houses, and had a glass of pepper-mint at each, and he drank brandy; I know nothing at all of the watch, it must have dropped from himself.

Johnston's defence. I am perfectly innocent of it, I never saw the watch at all.

The prisoner Johnston called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Brown. GUILTY. (Aged 34.)

Of stealing, but not violently .

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Johnston, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-68

226. RICHARD COLEMAN and THOMAS HANNEGAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , three ewe sheep, value 3l. the property of Thomas Boys .

(The case was opened by Mr. Watson.)

JOHN HANNIKIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am servant to Mr. Boys; I drove these sheep from Islington to Smithfield, I penned them in Smithfield , a little after ten o'clock, I do not know the day of the month, it was last Sunday was a week; I draw'd these sheep lot from lot; there were twenty-six in one lot, and twenty-eight in another; I penned twenty of them in one pen, six in another pen, and eight of them, from which three were stolen, were in the same pen with the six; those twenty, from which three were lost, were all marked alike.

Q. Was any body by when you penned these sheep? - A. Yes, our man, John Hill ; I went away and left Hill at the pen; I did not return till we heard the outcry about losing the sheep, that was about four or five in the morning; I went to the pen, and there were only seventeen left.

Q. Did you afterwards see those three sheep that had been lost? - A. No; I sent my man up to see them, and I afterwards saw them myself at the watch-house, about eleven or twelve o'clock on the Tuesday.

Q. Are you sure-that those three sheep that you saw at the watch-house, are the three that you missed out of that pen of twenty? - A. Yes, I am perfectly sure of it; they were marked with a brand on the off hip, and a touch on each shoulder with oker.

JOHN HILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a drover, in Smithfield-market; I was employed as a drover, by Mr. Boys's servant, the last witness, he drove them in late on the Sunday night, ready for sale on the Monday morning; he came into the market about half after ten o'clock, with a stock of sheep, and I came with another; I saw the sheep after they were penned by the last witness.

Q. Did you see a pen of a single score? - A. Yes; the last time I saw them, was about half past one in the morning; I went into the house at that time, and I am sure they were all there then; about half past two, I heard the patrols breed an alarm in the public-house, the Golden-lion; I returned to the pen, and found but seventeen in that pen, there were three missing.

GEORGE GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a watchman, my beat is in West-street, it used to be called Chick-lane: On Monday morning, the 10th of February, about a quarter before three o'clock, or between two and three, I heard a noise like sheep driving down the street,

from Smithfield, and in a few minutes, I saw the prisoners with three sheep before them; I asked them where they were going with those sheep; home, said Hannegan; says I, where is your home; says he, you may go and see if you like it, and then turned the sheep round, out of West-street into Sharp's-alley; as soon as they had done that, Coleman made his way down Chick-lane; a St. Andrew's watchman came up just at that time, his name is Keene; I desired him to follow me, he did so, and we caught Hannegan, and the sheep just in Sharp's-alley; I desired him to lay hold of Hannegan, which he did, and I turned the sheep back again into Chick-lane; I told him to take Hannegan to our watch-house; when I had turned the sheep into Chick-lane. I saw Coleman coming back again; I laid hold of him; says I, I want you; I took Coleman, and delivered the sheep over to the care of Morgan, another watchman; then we took the two prisoners to the watch-house; Morgan gave the sheep to Brewster, and Brewster brought them to the watch house.

Court. Q. What watch-house was it? - A. St. Sepulchre's.

Mr. Watson. Q. Were the three sheep that you gave to the care of Morgan, the same that you took from the prisoners at the bar? - A. They were.

DAVID MORGAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a private patrol, in West-street: On the 10th of February, between two and three o'clock in the morning, three sheep were delivered to me by Griffiths, and I delivered them to Brewster.

-BREWSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's: On the 10th of February, between two and three o'clock in the morning, three sheep were delivered to me by Morgan, which I drove, myself, to the watch-house; I assisted in putting them into the cellar at the watch-house; they were three ewe sheep that were locked up in my care; I sed them both with hay and water.

JOHN KEENE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Watson. I am a watchman of St. Andrew's, Holborn: I saw Hannegan on Monday morning the 10th of February, Griffiths gave me charge of him; I saw him driving the sheep into Sharp's-alley; I took him to their watch-house; I staid there till the sheep were owned by Hill, which was in about an hour; they were then put into the cellar, and the two prisoners were in custody; Griffiths brought Coleman in.

Mr. Watson. (To Hill.) Q. Did you see the sheep at the watch-house? - A. Yes, between two and three o'clock on the Monday morning; they were three of the score that were lost out of that pen, they were all ewes; there was a dot upon the near shoulder, and a brand on the left hip.

Q. (To Hannikin.) Whose property were these sheep? - A. Mr. Thomas Boys 's; I saw the sheep on the Tuesday morning, before they were killed, at the watch-house, in the cellar; Brewster shewed them to me.

Brewster. The three sheep that I shewed to Hannikin, were the same three that I drove to the watch-house; they were marked with a brand upon the left hip, and a mark at the shoulder; they were ear-marked likewise, but what the letters were I could not make out; they were Lincolnshire sheep.

Hannikin. They were Lincolnshire bred.

Q. You are used to sheep? - A. Yes.

Q. Then tell these gentlemen whether you think it is possible for you to be mistaken? - A. I think it is impossible.

Coleman's defence. I had been out to look for work but could not get any, and when I came home I missed my dog; I went out again to call my dog, and two watchmen laid hold of me.

Hannegan's defence. I saw these three sheep straying down Chick-lane, and I went after them, but having but one leg, I could not get before them before the watchman laid hold of me; I told him I was going to take them back into the market.

Court. (To Griffiths.) Q. Did you know Coleman before? - A. Yes, perfectly well; I had seen him many times.

The prisoner, Hannegan, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Coleman, GUILTY Death . (Aged 20.)

Hannegan, GUILTY Death. (Aged 24.)

The Jury recommended the prisoners to his Majesty's mercy, on account of their youth .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-69

227. JOHN BIRD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January, fifty pounds weight of sugar, value 30s. the property of Richard Draper .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS COX sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Draper, grocer , in Bishopsgate-street: On the 27th of January, I went for twenty-four lumps of sugar, in a cart, to Mr. Travers's, in Queen-street, Cheapside; I went from Mr. Travers's, up Bread-street, to Mr. Nailor's, where I received some orders, and came down again into Watling-street; in Watling-street , at the end of Friday-street, I was stopped by a cart that was in the way; I called to the carman several times to remove the cart, but I could make nobody answer; I then left my cart, and went up to remove the other cart out of the way, thinking to go on; after I had so done, I came back to my own cart, and then I was informed my cart had been robbed, and I went in pursuit along Watling-street, till I got further information; I went on till I came up with a man with the sugar upon him,

just at Mr. Nailor's door; the prisoner at the bar is the man; he saw me coming, and he listed the lump of sugar up and threw it at me, and hit me on the arm; I followed him, and seized him by the collar, and held him till Mr. Nailor's door was opened, and I put him in there; Price took up the sugar; when I came back to the cart I missed it; I believe it to be the same that was taken from the cart.

Court. Q. How much did the lump of sugar weigh? - A. Nearly thirty pounds.

JOSHUA PRICE . sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On the 27th of January, between five and six in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner at the bar, and another man, in Watling-street; I saw the last witness's cart, loaded with sugar, at the end of Friday-street; I saw the prisoner, and the other man, go up to the cart, the carman was busy with another cart; one of them got up upon the wheel, I cannot say which of them, and took out a lump of sugar, and gave it to the other, who stood upon the ground; then he took one himself, and came down with it, they put them upon their shoulders and went away; I am sure the prisoner at the bar was one of those men; they went along towards Bread-street, and I followed them; they both turned up Bread-street, and I stood by a post to look at them; and while I stood there, a girl came up and told the carman, and he came running up to me, and I directed him after them, I ran after him; the other man threw down his lump of sugar and went up into Cheapside; the prisoner then turned round with his sugar, towards Cox, and threw it at him, as if to hit his head, and he received the blow upon his arm; then Cox sprung forwards, and laid hold of the prisoner by his collar; I picked up the sugar and carried it to Mr. Nailor's warehouse, in Bread-street; I gave it to a young man at the warehouse, who is here; the prisoner was never out of my sight at all.

RICHARD DRAPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a grocer in Bishopsgate-street: My servant sent Cox, by my direction to Mr. Travers's, for sugar for me.

Court. Q. Were you answerable for that sugar? - A. Certainly.

Prisoner's defence. There were two men running, and one of them let this sugar fall; I picked it up, and I had not picked it up a minute before this gentleman came up and laid hold of me.

GUILTY (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-70

228. GRACE COCKERELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , three pewter pint pots, value 2s. the property of William Jones .

WILLIAM JONES sworn. - I keep the Carpenter's-arms, James-street, Manchester-square : The prisoner was stopped, and I was sent for to Mr. Ferguson's; I went there, and saw my pots lying upon the table; I know them to be mine.

- FERGUSON sworn. - I keep a public-house in Cumberland-street: I took the prisoner with the pots upon her, in Cumberland-place, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Jones's; an alarm had been given that she had got some of my pots; she had two quart pots of mine, and a strap, and some pots of Mr. Jones's.(The constable produced the pots, which were deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I was very much intoxicated with liquor; I had lost my daughter, and could not hear any thing of her; I did not know what I was doing when I did it.

Prosecutor. I did not observe she was in liquor; she was very saucy, and impudent, and walked very well along with the beadle.

GUILTY (Aged 36.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-71

229. SAMUEL BIRCHLEY and THOMAS BERRY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , sixteen pounds weight of copper, value 12s. the property of Edward Penman .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES WRIGHT sworn. - I am a labourer in the prosecutor's yard; and the two prisoners were two working people belonging to the yard, which is in Wapping High-street: one was a caulker , and the other an apprentice to a caulker : On the 11th of January, I saw two pieces of copper taken off the stage by Thomas Berry , and handed to Samuel Birchley , who put them into an oil-house, which is upwards of ten feet from the stage that we worked on; there was a ship repairing near the stage; this was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; I acquainted Mr. Hicks of it, who is my master's foreman, three or four minutes after, and we went to look after the copper immediately, in the oil-house; there were two boys there at first, his fellow apprentice was one, and the boy that is here, Berry; we fought for the copper till we found it, we were obliged to have a candle and lantern; I left the house to fetch it, and when I returned I found Samuel Birchley there, he was not there when I first went; he was standing just by the door, inside; we found two sheets of copper in a

him, where they put oakum, and working tools; the copper was given to the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. There had been a bag of nails lost before? - A. Yes, I believe there had.

Q. And there was a wicked rogue or two, of the names of Birchley and Berry, that said you had taken them? - A. I heard amlost as much.

Q. That Birchley and Berry said you were the thief? - A. Yes.

Q. You said you would be up to them for that? - A. No; I don't know that I ever said such a word in my life.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not swear that you would be revenged of them for saying you had stole the nails? - A. No, I did not.

Q. What did you say about it? - A. I don't know that I said a word about it.

Q. Charged with stealing a bag of nails and not say a word about it? - A. I did not do it.

Q. What did you say about it when you were charged with it in the yard? - A. Upon my life I don't know that I heard them say so.

Q. Did you not say you would be revenged on them for it. - What makes you so long answering? - A. Upon my life, I hope you will excuse me, I am hard of hearing.

Q. What made you so long answering? - A. I know nothing about the nails.

Q. How long had you been employed in the yard? - A. Six weeks, or two months.

Q. Were you ever employed there before? - A. Yes.

Q. How long ago? - A. Upwards of two years.

Q. You have been to sea since, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to leave the yard; was it burning with ardor to fight for your country? - A. No.

Q. Then I shrewdly guess that you were turned away? - A. Yes.

Q. I have not a right to ask you whether you stole them, but, upon your oath, were you not turned away upon a charge of stealing bolts? - A. I was charged with stealing bolts.

Q. And Mr. Hicks turned you away because you were charged with stealing them? - A. Yes.

Q. And, two months ago, you told him you would leave off your old tricks if he would take you again? - A. No.

Q. When you were turned off, he brought you and the bolts together into the yard? - A. Yes.

Q. And, after this, you helped to find the copper that was stole; - hiders can find I am told? - A. I found it.

THOMAS HICKS sworn. - I am the prosecutor's foreman: On the 11th of January, I had been at dinner, and Wright informed me there were two sheets of copper hid; I went to the place where he told me the copper was, and there I found it; I did not find either of the prisoners there the first time; I went and got a candle and lantern, and went about one hundred yards, and when I got it I returned; then I sent the labourer, Wright, to get a light, when I returned, I found the prisoner, Berry there; he came in for something or other, I don't know what; Birchley came in while I was looking for the copper; at last I found it behind the bin, covered up; I don't know that it is the proper place for it; I charged the prisoners with stealing it, and they said they knew nothing of it.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-72

230. RICHARD HOUSEGOE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , four silver tea-spoons, value 6s. a great coat, value 7s. 6d. and a pair of shoes, value 3s. the property of Edward Sykes .

EDWARD SYKES sworn. - I live in Castle-street, Holborn : On the 18th of December last, the prisoner at the bar applied to me for a situation; I asked him where he had lived, he informed me he had lived with Dr. Rowley, at Malling, near Maidstone, for two years, that he left his service on account of his going abroad; I asked him if he had any person who could give him a character, he informed me there was a Mr. Rowley, who was a relation of Dr. Rowley's, who lived in the house during the time he was in his service, and if he would write to him, he would give him a character; I accordingly wrote, and I received an answer; I have a copy of the letter I wrote, but not the answer; I put the answer into a card-rack in the parlour, and in about two or three days I missed it; I made every reasonable search after it, and desired my family would also do so, but no account could be given of it; I then immediately suspected the prisoner had taken it; if it was here, I could not prove the hand-writing, nor is Mr. Rowley here.

Court. I must tell the Jury to put the letter intirely out of the question.

Sykes. That made us suspect him, and then I desired he might be asked where he had lived in town, and I found he had lived with Mr. Foss, in Essex-street, and upon enquiry there, I found he had lived there about six weeks; I discharged him, and after that, a washer-woman brought a duplicate, which she said she found in the pocket of his great coat; after which we found one of my great-coats missing; in consequence of which, he, not having taken the things away, which the

washer-woman had to wash for him, I desired, if he came, that he might be stopped, and that I might be sent for; he accordingly came about the 21st of January, and I was sent for; I asked him how he could think of being guilty of stealing so soon after he came, for the duplicate was dated the 1st of January, and he only came on the 24th of December; he said, he had done it for want, and that he intended to get it out again; soon after this, the constables came, and I gave charge of him; they searched his pockets, and found upon him, four tea-spoons, and a duplicate of a pair of shoes; upon the constable taking out the tea-spoons, I said, Richard, whose are these? they are your's, sir, said he; how came you by them? he said, he was very apt to put things in his pocket; I told him, so it seemed; he said, he had put them in his pocket by mistake, and that he came for the purpose of returning them to me; I told him, I thought it was a pity he had not mentioned it before the constable took them out of his pocket.

EMMA CLARKSON sworn. - I am occasionally employed to wash at Mr. Sykes's; I know the prisoner; he employed me to wash a shirt, a waistcoat, a cravat, and a pocket-handkerchief; I found a duplicate of a coat in the pocket of the waistcoat, pawned for seven shillings and sixpence; when I carried the linen home, I took it to Mr. Sykes; that is all I know.

SUSANNA NEVILLE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; I do not know the prisoner: There was a great coat pawned in the name of Housegoe, on the 1st of January, for seven shillings and sixpence; a young man pawned it, and called himself Richard Housegoe; I have no recollection of the prisoner; he never pawned any thing before with me.

Mr. Sykes. This is my coat, and he admitted to me he had pawned it; I missed such a coat; I have had it nine years.

MARY CARTER sworn. - I am house-maid to Mr. Sykes: I remember the prisoner coming to live there; he called on the 21st of January, for some things that he had left of his, between seven and eight in the evening; my master ordered him to be stopped when he came; I opened the door to him, and asked him to walk into the kitchen, which he did, and I left him there while I went into the parlour to acquaint my mistress, who was there; my mistress and another person went down to the kitchen, and they sent me for Mr. Sykes; he returned with me; about a quarter of an hour before the prisoner came, I had washed the tea-things, and four spoons, and laid them at the end of the shelf in the kitchen; as soon as the prisoner was taken out of the house I missed them; I was present when he was searched, and saw the spoons taken from him.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I am a constable belonging to Hatton-garden; I was sent for to Mr. Sykes's, on the 21st of January; I went to the kitchen, and Mr. Sykes said, that is the prisoner you must take care of; in consequence of that, I searched him and found four silver teaspoons in his left-hand coat pocket; (produces the spoons;) there was a key that Mr. Sykes said belonged to his stable; the other officer, named Rose, searched his breeches-pocket, and found two duplicates; we went to the pawnbroker's, and got a pair of shoes that Mr. Sykes believed to be his property, and the other was a duplicate before he came to Mr. Sykes's service.

SUSANNA NEVILLE sworn. - (Produces a pair of shoes).) On the 18th of January, a young woman, of the name of Ann Pratt , brought them, and pawned them for 2s. 6d. (The shoes were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, I have no witnesses.

GUILTY (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-73

231. THOMAS BUCKNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , four glass bottles, value 10d. and three quarts of wine, value 10s. the property of Francis Hicks .

FRANCIS HICKS sworn. - I am a calico-printer and wholesale linen-draper , in Bread-street : Thomas Buckney came to me as a footman , in December 1798; on Monday the 9th of September last, about half past six o'clock in the evening, I had occasion to go to the privy, which leads from the warehouse, towards the cellar, or to the floor on which the cellar is; I there heard a box unlock, which from the situation, I knew must be Buckney's box; I then heard somebody walk towards the wine cellar, and heard the door unlock; I went to the door as fast as I could, and heard the cellar door lock again before I got there; I had a candle in my hand, and I met the prisoner a few steps from the cellar door; I saw a lighted candle in his hand just a little before, but a little before-I came to the prisoner, his candle disappeared; I took him by the collar, and told him, I thought he had been about no good, that I should search his pockets; I put my hand in his pocket, and took from thence a candle that had been just extinguished, because it greased my fingures; I then took a bottle of red port wine out of his pocket, and in the bottom of his pocket was my key of the wine cellar; he then begged for mercy, and I brought him forwards towards the warehouse, and casting my eye under the cellar stairs, I saw three

other bottles lay, which from the appearance had held red port; I asked him if he knew any thing of them; he said, he took them from the cellar, and hoped I would forgive him; I then called for help, saying, I had detected a thief; several of the warehousemen then came, and I desired them to call a constable, who came and took charge of the prisoner; in the constable's presence, and the presence of the warehousemen, he asked for mercy; I told him it was a fit matter to come before a Magistrate; the cosntable asked him what he had about him, and asked him for his watch, which he gave him, and also his keys, among which was a key of my wardrobe; I then asked him where he got the key of the cellar, he told me, from the side-board, in the parlour, that day, after dinner; I asked him how it came in his box, that I heard unlock; he told me he had taken those three bottles first, that I found under the stairs, and that then he put the key into his box; that he then unlocked his box again, took the key, and went for the last bottle, when I saw him come out of the cellar; when the constable was taking away the keys and watch, I called the attention of those about me to the stairs, saying, as we had found three bottles in the faggots under the stairs, there might be more, which drew their attention, and I heard the prisoner run across the kitchen, which is on the same floor; I pursued him up stairs, but he was too fast for me; he opened the street door, and ran out without his hat, into the street; I have kept the wine ever since; this is the bottle I found on the prisoner, I put a paper on it, that I should know it, and this is another bottle which was in his box, and which he said was wine, but the wine was drank out; the constable put those bottles of wine into one of his boxes, and locked it up, and put a seal upon the key-hole, in my presence, with a piece of red tape, and in the presence of two or three other witnesses; the constable took the keys away with him, and left it locked up, saying, it was of no use to seek any further as he had absconded; the next morning I was informed there was another box, in which he said was all his valuables; the constable is since dead, who had the keys; his wife, on Friday last, brought the keys to me, and they are the same; Mr. Viney, and Mr. Peill are both here, who saw the box sealed and unsealed; Mr. Viney took the keys from the constable's wife, unlocked the box, and took the wine out, and gave it me, which has been in my possession ever since, except their bringing it into court for me; I went next morning to the Mansion-house, to ask for a warrant, to examine the box of valuables, there was one hundred and thirty-one one pound Bank-notes, and a watch and other things; I sent for the constable again, and he took the numbers, and sealed them up; I do not claim them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you any partners? - A. I have; Edward Longden M'Murdo.

Q. Did he live in the house? - A. No.

Q. The property of the house and goods were your joint property? - A. No, the wine is my own.

JAMES VINEY sworn. - I was present when the man was taken; I am warehouse-man to Mr. Hicks: On the 19th of September, I was at tea in the accompting-house, adjoining the warehouse, and I heard Mr. Hicks call out, here is a thief in the house; I went out into the warehouse, and found Mr. Hicks, and Thomas Buckney in his custody; Mr. Hicks had a bottle of wine, the key of the cellar and a candle in his hand; Mr. Hicks asked the prisoner how he came to do it, he begged for mercy, and under the stairs, in the cellar, we found three bottles more, which he acknowledged to have taken out himself, and also the one which Mr. Hicks had in his hand; he desired a constable to be sent for; he came, and asked the prisoner for the keys of his box; he searched the box, and found in it a silver watch; he found no wine there, only an empty bottle; there were no keys in the box; the prisoner gave the keys to the constable, and there was a key, which Mr. Hicks said, was belonging to his wardrobe; the prisoner ran away after that; the bottles, and the whole of his property was put into the box by the constable, and sealed up, he is now dead; I saw the same box on Friday last, I opened it in the presence of Mr. Hicks, and Mr. Peill, it contained the same bottles, I took them out, and gave them to Mr. Hicks; I brought two of them with him.

JOHN PEILL sworn. - I know nothing more than has been stated; I was not there the whole time, as I went for the constable.

Q. (To Mr. Hicks.) Do you know that to be your wine? - A. It appears so; these seals on the corks were put on where the wine was taken, there were no seals before, (tastes the wine;) this is port wine.

The Prisoner put in a written defence, which was read as follows. The situation to which I am reduced, does not weigh more heavy on me from any consequences that may affect myself, than the reflection that a family hitherto, without reproach, will be rendered miserable on my account, but as I know of no better amends in my power, than a true account of the transaction, I shall shortly state it; I had been employed by my master, in bottling some wine, and missed by some observations which were used, though from my present sense of my impropriety, I wish not to criminate other persons; I was certainly induced to secret two or three bottles of wine, to drink in the kitchen; I had never wronged him in any other

instance whatever, and have severely suffered from that hour to this, for having given way to such a temptation; so heavily, however, do I feel the fault I have committed, that I have, although at large, surrendered myself to take my trial, and suffer any punishment I may deserve.

Thomas Buckney .

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-74

232. JEREMIAH DEBAR , ADAM HARNISS , MARY GRIFFITHS , ESTHER HARNISS , ELIZABETH DUFFY , and ELIZABETH LONG , were indicted for making an assault, in a certain alley called Angel-alley, near the King's highway, upon Thomas Horton , on the 29th of January , and taking from his person, and against his will, a bag, value 1d. ten pounds, in monies numbered, a Bank-note, value 50l. another Banknote, value 30l. and another Bank-note, value 20l. of the said Thomas .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS HORTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I belong to the Royal Waggon Train of Artillery; I am a pay-serjeant : On the 26th of January I received a draft from Lieutenant Pettigrew, of eighty-two pounds, six shillings, at Chislehurst, in Kent; it was payable on the 28th; I came to town on the 28th, to get the money for it; I received it between two and three in the afternoon at Cox and Greenwood's; I received a fifty pound Bank-note, and a thirty pound Banknote; I dined at Charing-cross, with another serjeant of the name of Chapman; and then we walked about the town till we came to Bishopsgate-street: about three o'clock I met with Elizabeth Long , at the Cock, in Angel-alley ; she was with me till late in the evening, at different places; Serjeant Chapman parted with me about ten o'clock at night; I then returned to the Cock again, and in about ten minutes the prisoner Debar came in, with Adam Harniss , and joined my company; Elizabeth Long was then gone; I staid there an hour or more, till the landlord was going to bed; Debar was in regimentals, and the other was not; I was in my regimentals; being soldiers, I treated them with a gallon of beer, and told them if they wanted any thing else, I would treat them; I pulled out my purse; I had no money about me but what was in my purse; when the landlord shut up the house, I told Debar that I should go home; I did not say where; Debar insisted upon it, as it was so late, that I should not go home that night; I dare say it was twelve o'clock, or more; he said his mother lived a little way down that alley, and I should go there, and sleep with him; Harniss was by; I went with Debar and Harniss to the house, and found Duffey, Griffiths, and Esther Harniss there; Long was not there; they sent for liquor, and we all drank together; there were several other woman in the house; there was an old woman among them, but whether it was Debar's mother or not, I cannot tell; I found myself rather uneasy, and I was determined to go home; Debar said I should not, but when he found me resolute, he opened the door; I came out, and when I had got about fifty yards from the house, Dussey came past me; I had lest her in the house; Debar, Harniss, and the two other women followed; Debar and Adam Harniss laid hold of me; Elizabeth Duffey unbuttoned my jacket, and took my purse out of my waistcoat-pocket; the other two women were by at the time; I was going to pursue Duffey, but Adam Harniss , Debar, and the two women stopped me; Mary Griffiths said, d-n his eyes, take him; I told them I was robbed, and I wanted to go in pursuit of the woman; Debar and Harniss laid hold of me by the arm, and Debar pulled out his pass, and said, b-st your eyes, here is my pass, where is your's; I told him, them that had got my purse, had got my pass; they led me about fifty yards from the place before they left me; they dragged me along, and swore I was a deserter, and they would take me to the watch-house; they then left me, and I went back to this private house; a woman of the name of Boswell came up, I told her how I had been treated, and she told me she knew the parties, and would take me to the watch-house; Elizabeth Duffey then came out of the house, with Esther Harniss ; Duffey came up to me, and said, d-n your eyes, you young b-r, have I robbed you? I told her yes, and then she struck Mrs. Boswell, and made her bleed very much at the nose; Duffey said, if he is robbed, what is it to you? then the party dispersed, and Boswell took me to the watch-house; I staid there while a constable went after the parties, with Boswell; the constable found a thirty pound note behind the door; I saw it at the Mansion-house the next day; I am certain I had my purse, with the notes in it, when I went into that house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were ordered to go to Cox and Greenwood's, for this money, to pay the men? - A. Yes.

Q. Instead of which, you chose to go about drinking with whores, and such sort of people? - A. I was drinking with them.

Q. I take it for granted, you know you are accusing six people with a capital offence? - A. Yes.

Q. And you know also that there is a reward of forty pounds for each of them, if they are convicted? - A. No.

Q. You never heard of such a thing? - A. No, only from you now.

Q. You have told your story to-day precisely as you did at the Mansion-house? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You were more likely to know the truth of the case, then, than you are now? - A. I cannot say that.

Q. Perhaps you were not so collected before the Lord-Mayor? - A. No.

Q. He frightened you, I suppose; but you told the truth, however, in your confused way? - A. Yes.

Q. And you have told the truth to-day? - A. Yes; I am certain I have told the truth to-day.

Q. Elizabeth Long was not present when you lost your purse? - A. No.

Q. That you mean to swear positively? - A. Yes.

Q. You always said so, did you not? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not positively swear, before the Lord-Mayor, and that repeatedly, that Elizabeth Long was the person that took your money? - A. Elizabeth Long was not there.

Q. Did you not swear, before the Lord-Mayor, that Long was the person that robbed you? - A. I cannot say, I was so confused; I went to see Duffey in the jail, and then I was sure it was her.

Q. Did you not see them both at the bar at the Mansion-house? - A. Yes.

Q. And did you not then say, so recently after the transaction, that it was Elizabeth Long? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did not the Lord-Mayor caution you, over and over again, as to your swearing who was the person that robbed you? - A. I cannot say, I was so confused.

Q. How much liquor had you been drinking? - A. No great deal.

Q. Were you not drinking at all the public houses, as you came along, with Cahpman? - A. We stopped at several, it might be three or four; we had some peppermint, but no porter, except with our dinner.

Q. Upon your oath, do you mean to say that at ten o'clock at night you were perfectly sober? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Were you upon a bed with any woman that day? - A. Yes, at Elizabeth Long in house, with a woman that was with her; but I did not see her after ten o'clock.

Q. Did you not make them presents? - A. Yes; a bonnot, a ribbon or two, and a cap; I cannot say how much money I spent; I had seen my purse at that shop about ten o'clock at night.

Q. Do you recollect talking of a post-chaise to go to St. Alban's? - A. No; I talked of a post-chaise to go to Chistehurst.

Q. Do you recollect saying you were a French prisoner, and had made your escape? - A. No.

Q. Did you not offer to take any of the ladies with you? - A. I told Elizabeth Long that she might go with me.

Q. Did a post-chaise come? - A. After I was robbed, I was told that a post-chaise was waiting.

HARVEY-CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is that your handwriting? - A. Yes.

Part of the examination of the prosecutor, before the Lord-Mayor, read at the request of the prisoner's counsel. - "And all the prisoners, except Elizabeth Long , followed him out into the court, and two or three of them came round him; when Elizabeth Long came up to him and took his purse out of his waistcoat-pocket, containing the said notes and cash, and ran away."

Q. Did not your Lordship give that witness a particular caution, as to the person he would swear to? - A. Certainly; it was a very complicated examination, there being so many prisoners; and he, from his own account, had been in that state of intoxication, that he appeared to me incompetent to know any thing about it; he was perfectly sober at that time.

Court. Q. (To Horton.) Look round at those two women, and tell us which of them is the person that took your purse? - A. That is the woman.(Pointing to Duffey.)

SUSANNA BOSWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street: About half after one in the morning, Horton was crying out in the alley, that "he was robbed, and was ruined for ever;" I told him that I knew two parties that I saw run; the first was Mary Griffiths; she ran out of the alley from where this young man said he had been robbed; I have known her for years.

Q. In what way of life are you? - A. I get my living by selling things in the street. The next that I saw was Elizabeth Duffey , she was running the same way; the next that I saw was Adam Harniss standing in the court; he came up to me and said, d-n your eyes, Suke Boswell, what is it to you; I had been saying the man should have his property again; the next I saw was Jerry Debar , and he threatened me very much; the next that I saw was Adam Harniss 's wife; Debar went out of the alley, and was missing for some time, it might be ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour; he then brought in Elizabeth Duffey , and said to me, d-n your eyes, Boswell, you have robbed the young man, and want to lay it upon an innocent person;

I replied, if I had, we would go to the watch-house together; upon that I was shoved about by the two men till Duffey got an opportunity of cutting me across the nose, and then she ran away; I bled very much; Debar then said to the young man, d-n your eyes, shew your pass, I have got mine; and if you do not, you shall go for a deserter; Debar then called for aid and assistance to drag him; I said, if I lost my life, wherever the soldier went, I would go; Debar and another person that was in the court dragged him for some yards, and then they left him; I took Horton to the watch-house, and delivered him to the constable of the night; I gave an account of every one of the people; I had known them for years.

Q. Did Debar's mother live in that house in which the young man had been? - A. No; his mother-in-law.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What sort of commodities do you fell in the street, at two o'clock in a morning? - A. None.

Q. You never walk the streets at two o'clock in the morning? - A. No, I never pick up any body.

Q. Were you never before the Lord-Mayor, but upon this occasion? - A. Only for a warrant; I never was there for whoring nor for thieving.

Q. Have you not been lucky enough to be sent to Bridewell? - A. It was for no harm, it was for getting drunk; I have been there twice for getting drunk.

Q. Have you never heard of a reward of forty pounds? - A. No.

Q. If they should be convicted, perhaps you would not take it, if it was offered you? - A. I hope they will not.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you hope they will not be convicted? - A. I do.

Q. Did you not swear before the Lord-Mayor, that it was Debar that cut you with his bayonet? - A. No; I never said that Debar cut me.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Harris? - A. Yes; she is my next-door neighbour.

Q. Then, of course, you have had some conversation with her upon this subject? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, had you no conversation with her, on Saturday night last, about the evidence that was to be given here to-day? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not mutually accuse each other of coming here to forswear yourselves? - A. No; I said, if she swore the man's hat was taken off his head and put on again, she would swear that that was wrong.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am constable of Bishopsgate Ward: On the 29th of January, I was called up; and in consequence of information that I received, I went to a house in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street, where Mary Griffiths lodged with her sister-in-law; I broke open the door; I thought I heard somebody whisper, I found Adam Harniss standing upon the stairs, and behind the street-door I found Mary Griffiths; I went up one pair of stairs, and in the back-room I found Esther Harniss upon the bed, as if she was asleep, she had her clothes on; I searched them, but found nothing upon them; behind the street-door, where Mary Griffiths was standing, which I broke open, I found a thirty pound Banknote, (produces it); at the next door I apprehended Long, in bed, and to all appearance, fast asleep; she got up, and dressed herself, and I searched her and the room, but found nothing; Duffey, the next day, sent to me, and resigned herself up; I sent two men, and a constable of the night, upon Boswell's information, for Debar, and he came with them; I had seen him drinking with his wife, his mother, and some friends, but I had not suspicion of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You found these persons upon the spot? - A. Yes.

Q. And Duffey sent to you to tell you where she was, if you wished to take her into custody? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Horton). Q. Look at that thirty pound note? - A. This is the same that I lost; I got the number the next day from Messrs. Cox and Greenwood's.

GEORGE NESBITT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am clerk to Messrs. Cox and Greenwood, army agents, (produces a book): On the 28th of January, a draft was paid to Thomas Horton , for eighty-two pounds six shillings, drawn by Lieutenant Pettigrew, of the Royal Waggon Train, but the Clerk who made the entry is not here.

Debar's defence. The prosecutor came into the Cock public-house, and we drank together; he said he was a French prisoner, and sent for a postchaise to go to St. Alban's; the public-house shut up, and he asked me to let him go to my mother's house till the chaise came.

Adam Harniss's defence. I went to look for my wife, at Mary Griffiths 's, and I was coming down stairs again, when Mr. Sapwell met me.

Griffiths's defence. I am entirely innocent of it.

Duffey's defence. If I had been guilty, I should never have sent to Mr. Sapwell to take me into custody; I sent for him to a place where I have worked, and have been trusted with hundreds and hundreds.

Long, and Esther Harniss , were not put upon their defence.

The prisoners, Debar and Adam Harniss, called their serjeant, and one other witness, who gave them a good character.

The prisoner, Duffey, called one, and Griffiths three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

All Six NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-75

233. JOHN HOUSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , an earthenware jug, value 1s. the property of John Harrison and Thomas Burn .

THOMAS BURN sworn. - I keep a glass and Staffordshire warehouse , in Barbican : On Tuesday the 18th of February, my servant informed me that the prisoner at the bar had entered upon my premises, and took thereout a quart jug; I saw it taken from him.

SAMUEL CHURCHYARD sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Burn: I was at work in the yard, in Barbican; I saw the prisoner come in and take something off a truck that stood there, and put it under his coat, and went out of the yard; I directly run after him, and caught hold of him, and asked him what business he had in the yard to take any thing out; he delivered the mug to me, and said a man had given it to him; there was no man in the place at the time but him; I took him into custody.

THOMAS OAKELL sworn. - I sell earthenware in the street, on a truck, my truck was in the yard; I came down stairs from over the way, and the man called me, and asked me if I had given a man a jug; I said I had not given a jug; I went to my truck, I had two jugs, and I missed one; he had took the man with the jug. (The jug was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along last Tuesday in the afternoon, and was looking at the things, and asked a man what he asked for that; he said, sixpence; I told him it would do for my wife, and I gave him sixpence, and walked off; I was gone near five minutes, I don't know who the man was; there were people round the door that saw the man give me the pot.

GUILTY . (Aged 45.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-76

234. FRANCES WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , two pewter quart pots, value 2s. and two pewter pint pots, value 1s. the property of Samuel Lacey .

SAMUEL LACEY sworn. - I keep the Swan and Sugar-loaf, in Fetter-lane : On the 29th of January, a person brought the prisoner to my door, with four pots, and asked me if the pots were mine; I told him I believed they were; but as to further circumstances I know nothing. I recollected, after I had seen the prisoner, that she had been in the house three or four days before, but I did not suspect her.

The CONSTABLE sworn. - On the 29th of January, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, I had information that there was a pot-stealer gone to No. 6, in White's-alley, and that they were then in the act of melting pots down; I went and knocked at the door, which was opened by a woman; as soon as they heard my voice, the woman of the house came, and while I was making the nature of my business known to her, the prisoner was making her escape by me, out of the house, with those two quart pots, and the two pint pots, tied up in her apron; I stopped her, and took her into custody; they were not melting any thing down; this pot I took out of the privy; I took all the woman up; I searched the house, and found this iron ladle, which I suppose is for melting the pots down in; it was like an old iron shop, which, I think, is only to deceive people.

Prisoner. Q. Did you take them from me? - A. Upon my oath, I took the two quart pots, and two pint pots, from you, tied up in this apron. (The pots produced, and deposed to).

Prisoner's defence. I picked them up in Castle-street, in that blue apron; there were two quarts, and two pints, in that blue apron; I was going to this Mrs. Wild's that she should read them for me, because I cannot read or write; and then I was going to take them to the landlord's house; I did not know what was in the bundle as there is a just God in heaven.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-77

235. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , twenty pounds weight of sugar, value 10s. the property of Thomas Bolt .

HUGH HUMPHREYS sworn. - I am warehouseman to Mr. Bolt: On Saturday the 25th of February, an officer came, and told me he had taken up one of my men, for stealing sugar, and I went and looked; I did not see him take it; the house is at Trigg-wharf, Upper Thames-street ; the man had been working for me all that day long; he has worked there two years, backwards and forwards; I paid him off about four o'clock, and this was about six o'clock, in the afternoon.

- SAMPSON sworn. - I am a constable: On Saturday the 25th of January, I and Reed were out together; going along Upper Thames-street, I observed the prisoner and three more men, near Mr. Bolt's warehouse; I observed the prisoner and one

other go to the gate of the warehouse, and I saw the prisoner stoop, and then he came away and went up a court; it was so dark, we could not see whether he had any thing in his hand or not; then he came back again, and brought something from underneath the gateway, up the court, on the opposite side of the way; we stopped at a distance to watch their coming out of the court; after being up the court two or three minutes, the prisoner and another soldier came out of the court, each had a bag in his hand; I went over to them, and asked what they had there; I took hold of this man; the moment I spoke, down went the bags, and the other man came up to me, and gave me a blow in the stomach, and I fell down; the prisoner was secured, and told me who they were, that they had each a bag, and that they worked on the premises that day, and got it out of the casks, and put it at the gate-way ready, and there is a great deal, some in stockings, and some in handkerchiefs; it was wide enough at the bottom of the door to get it out; I went back to the warehouse to examine it; he told me the others had a bag a-piece, this man behaved very civil, the other did not.

Prisoner's defence. What he has said is very false; as soon as I came out of Mr. Bolt's, I went away home, and the man ran after me; my master was satisfied, and never knew me to take half a pound of sugar in my life; I have been there five years; I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge, I had no concern with it at all; I worked there all the week, my master searched me that night, and gave me my money, and I went away; I never offered to take a bit, and he never found a bit upon me.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-78

236. ELIZABETH CROUCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a shawl, value 8s. two pair of stockings, value 7s. and a pair of shoes, value 3s. the property of William Bicknell .

WILLIAM BICKNELL sworn. - I am a school-master , and live at Ponder's-end; I was in London in January, and received a parcel of linen; I found several articles missing, but I knew nothing more till the prisoner was apprehended; I was sent for to the Mansion-house, and I saw my daughter's gown on the prisoner's back, that is all I know.

MISS BICKNELL sworn. - The things were sent to town for me by the errand-cart, on the 6th of January; I packed them myself in a box; when I opened the box, I found the things missing that are mentioned in the indictment; the box was taken to Mr. Shepherd's, who takes in parcels from the coaches and errand-carts, in Bishopsgate-street; I wrote home to inform my friends, and went to Mr. Shepherd's, who said, it certainly could be nobody in their house, it must be the errand-cart people.

JOHN SHEPHERD sworn. - I live at No. 90, in Bishopsgate-within , and am a trunk and boxmaker; parcels are brought to my house by the errand-cart; two of the parcels were delivered in the same manner as I suppose I received them; I cannot say what was in either; I cannot swear to the property; the prisoner was my servant , she had not lived three weeks with me; on the 28th of January, Mr. Lavie, of Tottenham, applied to me about a bag he had sent up, and out of the bag he had lost an old gown he had given half-a-crown for; I told him, there was such a thing that Mrs. Shepherd had found in the girl's bed, who said it was not her's, but there before she came; I shewed him the gown, and then took him into the kitchen, and said, I suppose, that is the person, who stole your gown, and then she owned to the rest of the things; it had been found three or four days before up stairs, it was then in Mrs. Shepherd's possession, she found it under the quilt of the girl's bed, and the girl said, it was there before she came; the shoes and shawl, and two handkerchiefs were found by the side of the bed, by Mrs. Shepherd, who is not here, because she is very near her time; I suspected the prisoner, in consequence of Mr. Lavie's information; he described what sort of gown it was, and that it had a patch on one side; when I saw the patch on the side, says I, that is the girl that took Mr. Bicknell's property; says Mr. Bicknell, tell your master whether you have taken the other property; says she, I have of course; I sent for a constable, this gown was upon her, she was committed; the shoes I found myself, in the bed, and the shawl she had round her neck; (The property was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-79

237. JOHN WELLS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 2d of January , two Spanish mahogany boards, value 2l. 16s. and two Honduras mahogany boards, value 12s. the property of Thomas Hacker , knowing them to have been stolen .

The principal witness being absent, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t18000219-80

238. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , a deal box, value 5s. and one hundred and fifty pounds weight of thread, value 20l. the property of Andrew M'Whirter , and William M'Whirter .

ANDREW M'WHIRTER sworn. - I am a muslin and thread manufacturer , and live at Paisley, in Scotland: On the 31st of January, I was in the coffee-room at the Axe Inn, in Aldermanbury ; and between six and seven o'clock a waggoner came with three boxes of thread, in a cart, for me, he came with a bill to receive payment for the carriage; I went to the gateway, and there were only two boxes; the waggoner said, there was one stole while he came to enquire for me; the alarm being given, we went, some one way and some another; a gentleman and I went up Basinghall-street, as far as London-wall, but could see nothing of the prisoner; as we came back, we looked into every passage, and I saw the prisoner standing in one; I went up to him, and he seemed to interrupt me from going into the passage, which was a thoroughfare; he looked me straight in the face, and asked me if I knew him; I said, I did not know that I did; he was standing by the box, with his coat-tail over it; when he found I would go on, and that I saw the box, he then run off; the other gentleman pursued him, and I stood by the box; he was taken and brought back; the constable came and took him into custody; I can swear to him; I don't know the name of the passage, being a stranger; the box is not here, but there is some of the thread, which is marked with my name.

THOMAS COLE sworn. - I am a muslin manufacturer: I was in the coffee-room when the alarm was given that the box was stole from the cart; I pursued him with Mr. M'Whirter and when he ran away, I ran after him, and was very few yards from him all the way, I did not lose sight of him; I brought him down, and delivered him to the constable; that is all I know.

THOMAS TEASDALE sworn. - I am porter at the Axe Inn: ON the 31st of January, a carman brought three boxes; he came to the accompting-house and asked for Mr. M'Whirter; the boxes were at yard and a half long, and a yard board; the carman was desired to go into the coffee-room, where the gentleman was, and he went; the book-keeper says to me, Tom, you had better run down the gateway, for I don't believe there is any body with the cart; I run down, and saw two men at the side of the cart; says I, halloa, what are you doing there; one run up the Bury, and the other down; then I run up the gateway, and said, carman, carman, you will be robbed; the waggoner run to the cart, and said, Lord, one of the boxes is gone; by making the alarm, Mr. M'Whirter and Mr. Cole came out of the coffee-room I ran one way, and they ran anothter; they took the prisoner.

JAMES FLETCHER sworn. - I am a carman: I know no more; but a box was lost out of the cart on the 31st of January, which I saw at the Mansion-house next day.

JAMES PRIOR sworn. - I am a constable: I produce some of the property taken from the prisoner.(The thread was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I had been for my master, who is a brush-maker, to London-wall; and in coming home, I went down this street, and was standing at the corner of a court to make water; as soon as I got there, they came from over the way and looked me in the face; says I, do you know me; my wife had been with me, but she went on before; I then went away, and they called out, stop thief, and they stopped me, and brought me back; I have nobody to appear for me; my master would, but he has not been out of his bed these three months.

Jury.(To Prosecutor.)Q. When you first saw the prisoner, was he making water? - A. No; he was standing with his hands at his sides.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-81

239. ANN WATCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a pair of breeches, value 12s. and a jacket, value 11s. the property of Thomas Laycock and John Tyler .

ADAM KNOPE sworn. - I am a cutter-out of Messrs. Laycock and Tyler's, in the slop-way : On Wednesday night, the 5th of February, the prisoner came into our shop, No. 75, in the Minories , and brought some work home; she said, here, German, here is some work; I said, put it down; she asked me if there was any more work; I said, there was not for her then, but to go about her business; she would not go; and I saw her push a garment from a parcel that lay on the counter; I went and looked what it was, and found it was a fine jacket; she went backwards and forwards in the shop, and then came again to my counter; I saw her putting her hand behind her, and take something, I could not tell what, but I saw the fine jacket was gone; I acquainted Mr. Prouter, our clerk, and then I went to Mr. Laycock; he asked me if I was sure; I stood still, and Mr. Laycock took the jacket from her, it was tucked up in her apron; I know it by the mark I put on it, which was No. 5; it was then given to the constable.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This poor woman has worked a long time for your master? - A. Yes.

Q. She has brought some work home, and laid it on the counter? - A. Yes.

Q. You had not paid her? - A. No.

Q. Was this jacket one of the articles she brought home? - A. No; quite a different article.

Q. It is nothing uncommon for the work-women to take up work in the shop and look at it? - A. They never do.

Q. She had never attempted to go cut of the shop? - A. She was going; Mr. Laycock stopped her just as she was going.

Q. Was she not looking at the work? - A. No.

Q. You went out of the shop to Mr. Laycock? - A. No; he was at the other counter.

Q. Upon your oath, was not she examining the sleeve of the jacket? - A. Quite entirely the contrary.

Q. Do you recollect her being overpaid twelve shillings and sixpence? - A. I do.

Q. Did she return that? - A. Yes; but we suspected something of this sort before, as there was a good many things missing.

Court. Q. Do you know any thing of the breeches? - A. I do know about them, but I cannot sw

Q. Did you miss, at this time, any breeches? - A. We did not.

PHILIP PROUTER sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Laycock and Tyler; I was in the shop at the time the whole business was transacting: On Wednesday the 5th of February. Knope came to the accompting-house, and told me Mrs. Watch had taken a settee; I told him to go behind the counter to Mr. Laycock; and I went to her, and took the flushing coat, and set it down in the workbook; she was then going home, and went towards the shop-door, which, as she opened, Mr. Laycock stopped her, and asked her what she had there; I don't know the answer she made, but he looked into her apron, which was tucked round her, covered with her red cloak; he opened it, and pulled out the article mentioned in the indictment; after that, I took her to the back part of the shop, and asked her for the duplicates of the three pair of trowsers we lost on the Tuesday; I found the duplicate of a pair of breeches upon her; I went next morning to the pawnbroker's, with the officer; I know them to be my master's property.

HARRY DAVIES sworn. - I am an officer; I took the prisoner into custody.(The jacket produced, and deposed to by Knope).

Prisoner's defence. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Prouter. I beg leave to say, she was very much in liquor, and that she has worked for us eight or nine years.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character. GUILTY (Aged 50.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and privately whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-82

240. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , one carcass of mutton, value 1l. 12s. the property of Richard Davies .

WILLIAM PEACHY sworn. - I have the care of Mr. Richard Davies 's business: On Thursday morning last, when I went as usual to Newgate-market , between six and seven o'clock, I found nine sheep for sale; I went into the accompting-house, and when I returned, I found one sheep was gone; I saw it again about nine o'clock, when a man brought it back with the prisoner; I could swear to it from the marks on the carcass; I had sold between fifty and sixty of the fellows to them; they were scored down the shoulders in the butchering of them; scarce two butchers score alike; I am sure I could not be mistaken. When the prisoner was brought back, he laid hold of my arm, and said, God bless you, I beg pardon; I had seen him some months before; he used to be porter to a person of the name of Spraggs.

WILLIAM RANDALL sworn. - When the sheep was missed, Mr. Peachy said to me, and my fellow-servant, go and search for the man; I went towards Snow-hill, and up Holborn, where I met another man, Elliott; I then got information, and at last found the prisoner in a public-house, he was standing in the tap-room by the fire; it was at the White-horse, in Rupert-street, near the Hay-market; my fellow servant called for a pint of beer, and nodded to me, as much as to say that is the man; he immediately spoke to the man, says he, Mr. Davies wants you, in Newgate-market; he answered, does he want me for; to work, or something, you must go and see, along with me; for, says he, you have stole a sheep from our shop; soon after, the landlord told me the sheep was down in his cellar; he went down in the cellar and shewed me the sheep; I brought it up, and it was known to be the sheep; the prisoner then carried it back upon his own shoulders to Newgate-market.

CHARLES COLESON sworn. - I remember the prisoner bringing a carcass of mutton, last Thursday, to my house; I shewed it to the last witness about ten minutes before eight o'clock; I had taken it down into the cellar, and hung it up; I saw him bring it to my house upon his back.

Prisoner's defence. They paid me for carrying it back again; they gave me some gin and beer in the way.

Rondall. He had a glass of him on the road, which my fellow-servant gave him; we asked him to carry it back, and he did immediately.

GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and publickly whipped in Newgate-street .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-83

241. SARAH HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , a silk cloak, value 2l. 10s. the property of Thomas Waithman .

THOMAS WAITHMAN sworn. - I live in Newgate-street , I was not at home when the article was stole; I know it when I see it.

CORNELIUS GILL sworn. - I am a factor in Basinghall-street; going along Newgate-street, past Mr. Waithman's door, I saw the prisoner just coming out, and she was pushing a black cloak under a red one she had on; I immediately suspected she had stole it, from the manner in which she brought it out; I watched to see where she would take it, and she went into Ludgate, the next gateway to the door of the Compter; Mr. Waithman's is two or three doors round the corner; as soon as I saw her there, I though she was safe, and then I went to the shop, and enquired whether it was bought or not, they said, it was not; I told Mrs. Waithman, if she would come along with me, I would shew her where the woman was that had it; I went to the corner to watch, whilst Mrs. Waithman got a gentleman to go with me after the woman; I then saw her come out, and she was walking up the street; I kept my eye on her, and followed her till the gentleman came up; then we both went up to her, and found the cloak upon her.

JOHN LORD sworn. - I am a glover, and live next door to Mrs. Waithman, who came and beckoned me in a violent hurry; I ran out, and she requested I would go up Giltspur-street, and a gentleman would point out the person who took a cloak; I did, and Mr. Gill pointed out the prisoner; I went and laid hold of her; I saw part of the cloak hanging from under the red one; we kept her till Mrs. Waithman came up, she took it from her; I have had it in my care ever since.(The cloak was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. As I was coming along Newgate-street, I met a woman, an acquaintance of mine I had not seen for some time; she asked me if I would drink, I did so, and living very low, having three small children, it took a great effect on me, and as I was going along, I imagine that cloak fell down from the door, and

I picked it up: I was not quite sober to know what I was doing.

Mr. Waitbman. It was hanging inside the door a yard and a half. GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and privately whipped .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-84

242. JOHN WALTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , five pounds and three quarters of nails, value Is. 3d. the property of Jonathan Sills , Joseph Sills , and Jonathan Sills the younger .

JOHN-WINTER PIDGEON sworn. - I am clerk to the prosecutors, the prisoner worked in the yard: On the 29th of January, we discovered thirty or forty pounds weight had been taken out of the warehouse, on Paul's Wharf , belonging to the East-India Company, where they have a watchman; this bag had been pilfered two or three times, and I knew none of our people had been down; I had a strong suspicion that the prisoner was the man, being very frequently down there; I told the watchman to suffer him to go down, and then inform me; that same evening, about five o'clock, he went down, as he had been before, and went to the gate and stopped him, and sent for a constable; we searched him, and found in his right-hand pocket the nails; he said, it was the first time he had ever done so; I know they are our nails, by comparing them with the others in the bag.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Those nails are similar to those you had lost? - A. Yes.

Q. You had lost thirty or forty pounds, and the prisoner had only two or three pounds? - A. Five pounds and three quarters.

Q. Nailers that made those nails, did not make them for you only, but for others as well? - A. Certainly.

WILLIAM MACKAY sworn. - The prisoner came to the wharf, and told me he worked for Mr. Sills, and waited there for business, he did so often; at last, Mr. Winter Pidgeon told me the nails were pilfered; says I, there is a man that comes here often, and will come again; he did come, and I found the nails on him; he said, it was the first time, and he had never done so before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were you as sober then as you are now? - A. Yes.

Q. Much about the same? - A. I hope I am sober now.

Q. Are you what you call sober now? - A. I am quite sober.

Q. Have you heard any thing of a reward of twenty pounds? - A. Not to my knowledge, so help me God.

Q. Upon your oath, is there not a reward of twenty pounds? - A. Not to my knowledge at that time.

Q. Have you not heard since? - A. I have heard since.

Q. Don't you expect to get a share? - A. No.

Q. You know there is such a thing? - A. If it is offered, I shall take a share, but not to make a demand of it.

Q. Was the warehouse shut? - A. No.

Q. You know he has a wife and four or five children? - A. I have understood he has four children, but I cannot say he has a wife.( George Keene , the constable, produced the nails.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked them up out of the kennel. rolled up in an old handkerchief. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t18000219-85

243. FRANCIS TURPIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a book, value 1s. two guineas, four half-guineas, a waistcoat, value 10s. 6d. a pair of breeches, value 15s. and a shirt, value 7s. the property of John Buckler , in the dwelling-house of Charles Wood .

JOHN BUCKLER sworn. - The things were taken from Charles Wood 's house, No. 39, in White-cross-street ; I don't live there now; they were taken out of my bedroom from the box, which was unlocked, and locked again; the prisoner lodged in the same house, but not the same room: On Monday the 13th of January, I put the things into the box, and put the money into my pocket-book, being four guineas; two guineas, and four half-guineas; there was a waistcoat, a pair of small cloaths, and a shirt; I missed them on the 15th, about eight o'clock, and on the 24th, I believe the prisoner was taken; he left the house on Monday morning, and never was seen in it afterwards; he was taken at the Crown and Cushion, in London-wall, on the 24th; I saw the small cloaths and shirt, the waistcoat was not found; the constable has got something from him; there is no mark upon it, but it is such money as I lost; the prisoner told me, if I would not prosecute him, he would let me have my things again, and money too; I made him no promise.

SOPHIA FIELD sworn. - I washed for the prisoner for eight or nine months; he is a shoe-maker , as he told me, he came to me as a stranger, I cannot tell where he lived; on Friday evening, he knocked at my door, No. 3, Draper's-building, London wall; says he, so you are washing, mistress; yes, says I; says he, wash this shirt for me; so he gave me a dirty shirt, and slung down the small cloaths, and says, take care of that, and then went away; my girl, my child says, what is it the shoemaker has slung down; I picked them up, and in picking them up, the pocket-book tumbled out; in the space of three minutes after, I heard the cry of stop thief, and a neighbour says to me, that is the man you wash for; I put the dirty shirt and pocket-book in my apron, and carried them to the Crown and Cushion; I found him there, and left the articles with the officer; I opened the book, but there was nothing in it.

JOHN COX sworn. - I am a constable, and produce the small cloaths, the shirt and pocket-book, which I received from Mrs. Field; I have had them in my possession till now; I searched the prisoner, and found two guineas, three half-guineas, three shillings and three halfpence, which I have got. (The property was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. The landlord and I had differed where I lodged; he charged me one shilling and sixpence a week, and I told him I would leave it on Monday, and so I did, and I was going along London-wall, and a man took my hat off, and then ran after me, and took me in possession; they knew I had no property of theirs, or no book of no kind; I went into the public-house to get a glass of gin, when they took my hat off.

Cox. The prisoner struck the Landlord, and knocked a boy down, and his had was lost in the affray.

GUILTY. (Aged 35.)

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: s18000219-1

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT proceeded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 7.

William Innes , Richard Coleman , Thomas Hannegan , James Swift , John Collis , John Thomas , and John Williams .

Transported for seven years - 24.

Mary Williams , David Turner , John Hall , John Mahoney alias Michael Ryan, Ann Colesford , Catherine Ohie , Thomas Cawdle , Thomas Rudd , John Bird , Richard Housegoe , John House , Elizabeth Crouch , Thomas Buckney , Robert Smith , Abraham Champney , Elizabeth Bough , Francis Turpin , William Brown , John Jackson , George Morley , Thomas Dunn , Matthew Coates alias Peter Bath, Robert Reeves , and Elizabeth Sells .

Confined two years in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - Thomas Smith , John Sadler .

Confined two years in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - Sarah Brown , Mary Potter , Martha Cotterell .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - John Hind .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 5.

John Jones , John Tagg , William Allen , William Clarke , and Grace Cockerell .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped. - John Hughes .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 12.

Benjamin Brind , John Kilby , Mary Banks , George Icom , Thomas Parish , William Taylor , Ann Blackmore , John Neale , Charles Shepherd , Sarah Crosby , John Pettit , Catherine Callum .

Confined six months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - Frances Watkins .

Confined one month in Newgate, and publicly whipped in Newgate-street, opposite Newgate-market. - Wm. Hunt .

Confined one month in Newgate, and privately whipped. - Ann Watch , and Sarah Hughes .

Confined one month in Newgate, and fined 1s. - Wm. Hunt , Wm. Hall , Thomas Jenkins , George Taylor .

Confined one week in Newgate, and privately whipped. - Richard Charlton .

Whipped on Bear Quay, and discharged. - James Jackson .

Publicly whipped, and discharged. - Richard Smith .

Fined 1s. and discharged. - James Grew .


View as XML