Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1799.
Reference Number: 17991204
Reference Number: f17991204-1

PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 4th of DECEMBER, 1799, and following Days, BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE, ESQ LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY, AND published by authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W. WILSON, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1799.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE HARVEY CHRISTIAN COMBE , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; Sir NASH GROSE, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM, Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir ALAN CHAMBRE, Knight, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

First London Jury.

Thomas Howes

Henry Chapman

Thomas Simons

Thomas Morris

Joseph Burton

John Abraham

Christopher Wright

Henry Wadsworth

Thomas Martin

Thomas Hayter

Thomas Metcalf

William Downing .

Second London Jury.

Peter Davey

John Burnby

John Strahan

Thomas Wiltshire

Joseph Ferne

Joseph Carter

John Isleton

Richard Martin

Hugh Wynne

Thomas Lawrence

Henry Lewis Galabin

Thomas Brown .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Tregent

William Nias

Charles Scott

Joseph Warburton

George Downing

John Lejeune

Francis Roberts

Thomas Boswell

Robert Martin

Giles Hemmings

Robert Russell

Wallis Graham .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William White

Richard Moorby

Thomas Ellis

Francis Glossop

John Edmunds

Thomas Knight

Peter Thompson

Noah Brocklesby

John Aldy

John Heron

John Theobalds

William Philips .

Reference Number: t17991204-1

1. MARY WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November a cambric handkerchief, value 2s. a lawn handkerchief, value 2s. and two muslin, handkerchiefs, value 2s. the property of Sarah Lewin , spinster .

SARAH LEWIN sworn. - I am a single woman; I live at Hackney; I was on a visit at my uncle's,(Mr. Gibson) the prisoner was a servant in the house; I lost the articles in the indictment from a box in my bed-room, the box was locked; I missed them sometime in November; the same day we desired the servants to open their boxes, the prisoner opened her boxes, and I found my property there; she had two boxes, I found some in both; the property was delivered to Ray, the officer; she pleaded for mercy, and said, she would not do so again if I would forgive her.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street, (produces the property); I received them from the last witness; the prisoner said it was the first time, and she would not do so again; she was asked how she got them; and she said, she found the keys lying, and she unlocked the box and took them out. (The property was deposed to by the prosecutrix).

Prisoner's defence. It is the first time I ever committed any crime.

Mr. Gibson. The prisoner lived servant with me about four months; I had a good character with her, her friends live at Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Confined two months in the House of Correction , whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-2

2. THOMAS GANER and CATHERINE GANER were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , two silver table spoons, value 20s. and four tea-spoons, value 8s. the property of Elisha Pearce , and the other for receiving the same knowing them to have been stolen .

ELISHA PEARCE sworn. - The, prisoner, Thomas, came to live with me as coal-porter , at nine shillings and sixpence per week, on the 15th of July; I live in Litchfield-street, Soho ; at the back of my dwelling-house I have a shop, in which I retail coals, he had no business in the dwelling-house, but found an opportunity of getting in down the back area; on the Monday, a table-spoon was missed, and on the Wednesday following another table-spoon and four tea-spoons; on the Thursday morning he came to his work as usual; I went into the back-shop to secure him, and saw a table-spoon drop from him; I took no notice of it; I told him, I wanted him to carry a note for me; he picked up the spoon and went to a stable that I have, and and about half an hour after the spoon was found by the constable among the dung; I accused him of stealing the spoon that I saw him drop, he denied it at first, but at last confessed it was under the manger; then he confessed he had left another spoon at a pawnbroker's; two of the teaspoons he said were at another pawnbroker's, the third was at his mother's, and the other, he said, he had got drunk, and got among some girls, and lost it.

JOHN HAWTHORN sworn. - I am a constable of St. Ann's: on the 18th of July, I was sent for by the prosecutor to take his servant into custody; I took him to the watch-house, and he directed me where the property was; he said there was a tablespoon under the manger, another at a pawnbroker's, a tea-spoon in his breeches under the bed, where he and his mother had slept, and two other tea spoons at a pawnbroker's; I went there but could not find it; I searched the mother, and found this tea-spoon under her left arm-pit; I found the table-spoon in the manger. (Produces them).

Prosecutor. There are no marks upon them. but I have had them fifteen years, and am confident they are mine.

JOHN MORRIS sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 10, Rose-street, Soho; the boy at the bar came to me with a table-spoon, on Wednesday the 17th of July, he asked me four shillings upon it,(produces it); I asked him whose it was, and he said it was his mother's; I asked him where his mother lived, he said, at a baker's, No. 30, Crown-street; I knew there was no baker's there; I told him I would go with him, but before I could get round he was run away; in the afternoon the mother and the boy came; I asked her what she wanted, and she said that spoon which her son had brought was her's; she said she lived in Charlotte-street, Rathbone-place; she said, afterwards, it was her mistres's; I asked her then, if her mistress had given her leave to pledge it; and she said, yes; I said I should have no objection to take it, provided she would send her mistress; then they went away, and the next morning the prosecutor and constable came to our house, and I shewed him the spoon.

This is the fellow spoon to the other, confident it is mine.

Thomas Ganen's defence. I found them in the stable.

Catherine Ganen's defence. I have nothing to say, he told me he had found them, and I thought they were his.

Thomas Ganen , GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Catherine Ganen , GUILTY. (Aged 60.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-3

3. JOHN NEWTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a wooden cask, value 2s. and three gallons of anniseed, value 25s. the property of Alexander Gordon , Charles Gordon , William Knight , and Edward Spackman .(The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)

ALEXANDER GORDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a distiller in Goswell-street, in partnership with my son Charles Gordon , William Knight , and Edward Spackman; the prisoner was our carman , we had a very good character with him, he had been with us six weeks.

WILLIAM PEACH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a Police-officer belonging to Worship-street; I was in company with Harper, about half past six on Sunday evening, the 17th of last month, in Petticoat-lane; I saw the prisoner, he had in his hand a basket, I asked him what he had there; he said, he would let me know presently what it was; he then opened the basket, took out a cask, and staved it; he beat the head in against a post, and the anniseed flew over me; I then secured him and took him to the watch-house; I asked him, whose servant he was, and he would not own to that, he told me where he lodged; I went there, I learned there that he worked at a distiller's in Goswell-street, and then, from the marks on the cask, I found out Mr. Gordon, and he came to the office on Monday and saw the cask.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The prisoner told you he would shew what it was, and took it out of the basket? - A. Yes.

Q. He staved the cask that the liquor might run out? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any permit with it? - A. No.

Q. Then you know he was liable to be seized as a smuggler? - A. Yes.

Q. Then he destroyed the evidence of the liquor as far as he could, by suffering the liquor to run into the street? - A. Yes; and then he ran away.

Harper produced the cask which was deposed to by Mr. Gordon.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You frequently send out casks that are not returned? - A. Yes; we lose a great many, we never sell any.

Q. Have you any other partners than those you have named? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t17991204-4

4. DANIEL ASH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Venables , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 7th of October , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing three time-pieces, value 6l. the property of the said George.

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, except that of the accomplice he was

ACQUITED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-5

5. WILLIAM LONGFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November the carcase of a sheep, value 21s. and 100 pounds weight of beef, value 21s. the property of George Lambley , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE LAMBLEY sworn. - I live in Castle-street, Westminster ; I am a butcher , my shop is in Tothill-street: On the morning of the 15th of November, about two o'clock, I was alarmed by the watchman, that the street door was open; I came down, and missed the carcase of a sheep, and a quarter of beef; I had seen them when I went to bed; I have stated them at a guinea each, they were worth more; I got up and went to the watch-house, where I saw the carcase of a sheep, except the two shoulders, that had been mangled off, and the beef hanging up; it was then about half after two; I had no doubt about the sheep being mine, I had had it three days hanging up in the watch-house; I am sure it is mine, I know it by the particular scores of my own upon it.

ROBERT GREENHILL sworn. - I am a patrole: On the 15th of November, about half past one, I was in the watch-house, and there came in a carcase of mutton, and a hind quarter of beef, upon a jack-ass, and the watchman with it, and he gave me a description of a person that knocked him down; I then went out, and found the prisoner about fifty yards from the watch-house; I charged him on suspicion; I found upon his right shoulder a large patch of grease, as if he had been shouldering the property; he used very ill language both to me and the Justices.

LEWIS MUSTARD sworn. - I am a watchman; about a quarter before one, I saw a jack-ass go past

my box loaded, that is about one hundred yards from Mr. Lambley's; I said what have you got upon this ass; the prisoner was with it, I am sure it was him, he was dressed as he is now; he knocked me down with a stick and ran away, and left the jack-ass and the property with me; I took it to the watch-house, and delivered it to the constable of the night.

ANN DENHAM sworn. - I only know my jackass again, that is all; I made an exchange with the prisoner for a little horse, and I gave him half-a-guinea to boot; it was a brown jack-ass, cut a little under the tail with the crupper; I saw the ass in a stable, one of the watchmen had it in custody; I knew it to be the same.

Mustard. I took the jack-ass to Mr. Cooper's yard; Mrs. Denham came to look at the ass, she called him Rabbit, and he turned his head round and looked at her.

MARY EVANS sworn. - I live in Pye-street; the prisoner said it was my husband's jack-ass, and I went to look at it in the watch-house, and it was Longford's own jack-ass; I had seen him riding the jack-ass, and Longford threatened if he got out he would give it to me, and would get my husband transported as well as myself.

Prisoner's defence. I had been out to Fulham to sell apples, and when I came back my stable was locked; I fastened up my ass while I went to get some hay, with the pannier upon him, and when I came back, the ass was gone I went to see after my ass, and the watchman laid hold of me and asked me if I knew any thing of the meat; I told him I did not, but I had lost my ass.

GUILTY. (Aged 16.)

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t17991204-6

6. LETTICE FOWLER and SARAH EMERY were indicted for making an assault in the dwelling-house of a person unknown, upon Mary, the wife of Edward Cole , on the 7th of November , and taking from her person five guineas, a half-guinea, and a crown piece , the property of the said Edward.

MARY COLE sworn. - I am the wife of Edward Cole ; I lodge at No. 7, Angel-court, Charing-cross ; the prisoners lodged in the same house, I lived in the parlour, and they in the one-pair: On Thursday, the 7th of November, about eleven o'clock at night, they asked me to go up and drink some beer with them; they were women of the town; I unfortunately went up with them, I sat in the room a minute or two and I drank with them, and then Emery took a knife out, and then she called two fellows in immediately, and then she cut my pocket off; my nutmeg-grater was in it, and five guineas and a half, and a crown piece; the two fellows held me down the while; then they all four went out of one room into the other; then I crept down stairs and called, watchman, loudly, and one of the fellows put a pistol to my head, and let the pistol off at my head; I have had a surgeon attending me these four weeks; the surgeon said, it was nothing but powder, or I should have been a dead woman; I cried out I was shot, and they all came down with their long brooms and candles, and struck me; the men made their escape immediately, and the women came and beat me, and I begged they would leave me my life; then I called to the watchman, and he came to my assistance, and then I was carried to the watch-house, and from thence to the work-house.

Q. Did they wound you with a broom? - A.They beat me all over to my fingers ends, I was black all over; the constable found the money upon the prisoners; they took a great number of duplicates from me of silver spoons, and things that I had pawned; they said they would burn them.

- DENTON sworn. - I am a watchman of St. Martin's parish; I was alarmed between one and two in the morning, the 8th of last month; I went to the house, they all live in the same house together; I saw Mrs. Cole standing bleeding at the door; I saw Fowler come down stairs, and she tumbled down one of the areas, she was intoxicated; she came up again, and went towards her own room; Mrs. Cole was bleeding at the nose and the head; Fowler then came down with a broom, and knocked her down; Mrs. Cole told us she had been robbed; I have seen her husband, but do not know any thing of him; I took Fowler, to the watch-house, and we left Mrs. Cole for dead; then I went and brought the beadle down, and we took Mrs. Cole to the watch-house, then we carried her to the work-house; I gave charge of Fowler; Donaldson took Emery the next morning.

NICHOLAS BEATTIE sworn. - I am a watchman; I came over to assist Denton in Angel-court; I found Mrs. Cole standing against the jamb of the door, all over blood; the first word she spoke was, I am robbed; I asked her by whom, and she said two fellows, and two women; we left her, and there was a row in Cockspur-street, and we went to their assistance, and went to the watch-house door; then we came back, and there was a cry of murder; Fowler came down with a broom in her hand and knocked Mrs. Cole down, she dropped over the threshold of the door; we seized her with the broom in her hand and took her

to the watch-house; I did not see either of them searched.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am constable of St. Martin's: On Friday the 8th of November, about eight in the morning, in consequence of information, I apprehended Emery, at No. 7, Angel-court, she was up; I asked her, where is the woman's money; there was a whole parcel of women there in confusion, and she said, let me go up into my own room, I went up; I then said, where is the woman's money; says she, here it is; she then went to something like a half chest of drawers, and she took the money out of the bottom drawer but one; she gave me five guineas, a half-guinea, and a crown piece; but says she, I was drunk, and I know nothing at all about it; I then took her to the watch-house.

Q. Were those the words? - A. I think they were.

Mrs. Cole. The money was in a work-bag, they did not take it out while I was there.

Prisoner Fowler's defence. Mrs. Cole and I had been drinking together in the evening at a public-house; afterwards Sally Emery came home, she had been drinking wine with a gentleman, and was very tipsey; Mrs. Cole came up and asked me if I would have some porter; Sally Emery said, she would have some too; I went out to get a pot of beer; Sally Emery had a handkerchief in her hand with a knot at the corner; when I came back Sally said, she had lost her handkerchief and a half-guinea and some silver, and said, that either I or Mrs. Cole must have taken it, for nobody else had been in the room; I said it must be Mrs. Cole; she directly said, you stinking bunter, will you dare to say that I had it; and then we went to sighting; and then she took up a patten and threw it at me; there was not a man in the house, nor there is not a woman in the house that has got a man, besides Mrs. Cole.

Prisoner Emery's defence. I had been with a gentleman in the city, and got two half-guineas from him; I had been drinking some wine, and was very much intoxicated; I had some porter, and got change, and I put the other half-guinea and some silver into the corner of my pocket handkerchief and tied it up; after I came home I missed it, I told Lettice Fowler of it, and she said, Mrs. Cole must have it; and then Mrs. Cole began to abuse us both, and she and this young woman went to sight; Mrs. Cole, tore her veil off her bonnet, and her gown was tore to pieces; she had a white dress on; after that I went to bed, and in the morning, when I went to put my things to rights, I opened the shutters, and the first thing I saw was this crown piece and two guineas; there were no men in the house; there is no woman in the house that cohabits with any man but herself; I went and asked my landlady what was best to be done, and upon her advice I took the money and put it altogether in a drawer, and when the man came for me, I took it out and gave it him, but as to her being robbed, it was no such thing; this young woman did take up the broom, when she threw the patten at her, but there was no other violence used to her.

Q.(To Mrs. Cole) Did you go to any public-house with Fowler? - A. No, never.

Q.Had you drank any thing that night? - A. No; only the porter up stairs.

Q. Were you at any public-house that night with two men? - A. No such thing; my husband is at Wandsworth, he belongs to the City Militia; I sent him a letter, but he has not got liberty to come up; I saw him at Bow-street, he got liberty to go to Bow-street to see how it was going forward.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-7

7. FRANCIS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , a woollen cloth coat, value 5s. the property of Edward Rodwell .

EDWARD RODWELL sworn. - I live in Martin's-lane, Cannon-street: On Friday evening last, I was taking tea at Garraway's coffee-house about half past seven; I took off my great coat and put it at the back of my seat; there was a public sale at Garraway's that night, and just as the sale was announced to begin, I observed my coat slide away; I thought somebody was taking it in a joke; I thought no more about the coat; when I got up into the sale-room, I saw a person putting on a great coat, I saw it was mine; I told him, I believed he had got my coat; he said, no; it was, I told him; I believed he had taken it from the coffee-room, and I should lead him down; he immediately cried out for mercy; he said, he was in great distress, and hoped I would not expose him; I I took him down stairs, and Mr. Howell, the master of Garraway's sent for a constable; I asked him, who he was, and he refused; he said, he was of a very good family, and he would not expose them; I could not get his name that night, although I felt disposed to let him go if he would; he was taken to the Compter, the coat remained in the bar till I took it away in the evening to my own house; I examined the coat, and found my gloves and my handkerchief in the pocket.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. In what situation was the seat with respect to the stairs? - A. Just opposite.

Q.Was it necessary to go into the sale-room to go up the stairs? - A. To be sure it was.

Q. Were there many people attending that sale? - A. Yes, a great many.

Q. Might not any persons, going up stairs, have brushed that coat down? - A. Impossible.

Q. Did I not, when you told me the coat was there, tell you, that I found the coat at my feet, and that I was in the act of taking it down stairs to deliver it to the waiter? - A. No; you cried out for mercy immediately, and was very much confused.

Q. How long did you miss the coat? - A. Not more than three or four minutes.

Court. Q. Could there have been any difficulty when he had taken that coat in going out at the door? - A.None.

Q. Do you know the situation in life of the prisoner? - A. He said, at the Mansion-house, that he was a second Lieutenant upon half-pay; that he had an annuity of forty pounds a year.

WILLIAM HOWELL sworn. - I keep Garraway's coffee-house; last Friday night the prisoner came in about a quarter before seven; I was in an office even with the coffee-room; I heard a noise, and found the prisoner and several others; he was at that time charged with the fact; then I took him into the office, and he refused to give any account of himself, saying, that he was born in Dublin; upon that, I gave charge to the constable, and he took him to the Compter; the coat was lest in the bar.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Did you not say that you had lost many things before, and that I should pay for all? - A. No.

Q. Did you not say that you were sure you had got a thief? - A. I said I had lost many things, but did not call you a thief.

WILLIAM WOOD sworn. - I am constable and patrole; I was sent for to Garraway's coffee-house I took charge of the prisoner; in the office the prisoner confessed to taking the coat, and begged for mercy.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, I expected the benefit of Counsel, I am very inadequate myself, I never was in a court before; all I can say, my Lord, is, I met a Mr. Barry, and I submitted that very question to my Counsel last night, whether until I could find out this Mr. Barry, it would not be necessary for me to put off the trial; he sent word this morning for it to go on; Mr. Barry was an old shipmate of mine, he was a lieutenant on board the Crescent frigate in the last war, I met him about four in the evening; I told him my situation was not the most pleasant; he desired me to meet him, and we made an appointment to meet at Garraway's coffee-house, where I never was, but once in my life before that, some year ago; I went there precisely at six, I stopped in the coffee-room from six till very near seven; I never knew it was a sale-room, but not seeing my friend, and seeing all these gentlemen leaving the coffee-room, I waited till the best part went up, and then I went up, thinking my friend might be there; in going up the stairs, at the bottom of the stairs, there was this coat; I took the coat up in my hand, went through the whole room, where I suppose there were one hundred persons, but saw nothing of my friend; I had the coat in my hand holding it up to the light to look at it, when that gentleman came up; I told him how I had got it, and that I was bringing it down with an intention to give it to the waiter; I have no more to add my Lord, I must submit to the Court.

Mr. Rodwell. He was in the act of putting the coat on when I came up to him.

GUILTY . (Aged 34.)

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t17991204-8

8. WILLIAM ELLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , four pounds of raw sugar, value 2s. the property of Thomas Bolt .

THOMAS WILSON sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Thomas Bolt , wharfinger and lighterman ; I have the care of Fresh wharf: On the 22d of November, I detected the prisoner with some sugar in his bat, which he had taken from one of the hogsheads, with the head out of it; I saw him take it; the head had been taken out for the purpose of plunder; when he saw me, he put the hat on his head with the sugar in it; I stopped him upon the hogsheads, as he was going to make off, over the hogsheads, towards the gateway, and gave him to a constable; Mr. Bolt had the charge of the sugar, it being upon his wharf; he has worked sometime at the wharf and received a hurt by one of the wheels, which has affected his hearing; I never had any reason to suspect his honesty before.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - I am watchman upon the quays: On the 22d of November, Mr. Wilson called to me, after he had stopped the prisoner; upon taking off his hat, we found the sugar in his hat; I put it into a napkin (it is produced); he had it pressed very hard in his hat.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner and the sugar.

Prisoner's defence. The sugar was given to me by a cooper at Wiggin's quay.

GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Confined two months in Newgate , fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t17991204-9

9. GEORGE HAYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a pound weight of cotton, value 1s. 4d. the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

ANTHONY BROWN sworn. - I live at No. 34, Crutched-Friars; I am a butcher; I saw the prisoner take a piece of cotton from Chester's quay , on the 13th of November, about half past four, or from that to five o'clock; he had worked a long time upon Galley-quay, he was going off with it when I stopped him; he got between two bags, and I saw him open them; he filled his breeches, and his shirt, and his waistcoat; a City constable was coming by and I gave him into his charge; I took part of it from him on the quays, from within his waistcoat; he was searched at the Compter, and more taken from him.

Prisoner. I was very much intoxicated.

Brown. He was slightly intoxicated.

JOHN SEALLY sworn. - I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner, he said he would not go to the Compter without a coach; I took some cotton from him at the Compter, I found it in his breeches; I knew him before, as working upon the quays.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much intoxicated, and must throw myself upon the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Confined two months in Newgate , publicly whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t17991204-10

10. DANIEL SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , three quarters of a pound of cotton, value 1s. the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

DAVID CROCKER sworn. - I am watchman upon the quays; I was coming up Ralph's-quay , where there were bags of cotton; I caught the prisoner in the very act of plundering the bags; it was about one o'clock in the morning of the 13th, the bag was cut, and I caught his hand in the bag; when he perceived me coming, he turned his back the other way; I searched him, and found this cotton in his breeches, there is about three quarters of a pound of it; I gave him in charge to Mr. Hunter, he seemed quite frightened.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner. (Produces the cotton.)

Prisoner's defence. I am very innocent of it.

GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-11

11. THOMAS SCOTT was indicted for, that he, in the King's highway, in and upon William John Arabin , Esq. did make an assault on the 31st of December , putting him in fear and taking from his person two guineas and eight shillings, the property of the said William-John .

WILLIAM- JOHN ARABIN Esq. sworn. - On the 31st of last December, in my way to town for the winter, about nine miles from town, on the Uxbridge-road , I observed a man on horse-back with a handkerchief over the lower part of his face, and he seemed in discourse with two men on foot; soon after, the same man pursued, and overtook my carriage, and jostled the horses, so much so, that I put down the glass of the window, apprehensive that my coachman might have driven against the man; I at that instant saw a pistol in his hand, and he made use of very violent expressions; be swore very violently, and stopped the carriage.

Q. What were his words? - A. B - t your eyes, give me your money directly, or I will blow your brains out; I said, do not be in a hurry, and I immediately drew my purse and gave it into his hand; he then said, d-n you, your pocket-book, and your watch; I answered, that I had neither, be repeated that two or three times; he said to my son, who was in the carriage, look another way, or d-n you, I will blow your brains out; don't look at me, look another way; he then looked up to the coachman and said, look another way, you b - y rascal, b - t your eyes, or I will blow your brains out, if you do not look another way, and upon turning his head, upon that occasion, gave me an opportunity of seeing all the bottom part of his face.

Q. How near was he to the chaise? - A. Close to the window; at half after three o'clock in the day, or nearly about that hour; the handkerchief fell down in consequence of the position in which he put his head, when he looked at the coachman, then he rode away a full gallop; I handed him some half-pence and silver, and walnuts; I said, I suppose you will not think of taking such things; upon which he snatched at them, and some of them fell, and also a watch, and he took that, but that was not my property; he took from me a purse, containing two guineas, and eight shillings; in consequence of a recent attack near the same spot, I attended at Bow-street, to identify three men, and upon that occasion I saw the prisoner, and know him to be the person that had robbed me upon the 31st of December; I have not the least doubt upon earth; I am confident that that is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This robbery was on the 31st of December last? - A. Yes.

Q. Almost twelve months ago? - A. Yes.

Q.Had the person who robbed you a round hat or a slapped hat? - A. A round hat, and that pretty low over his face.

Q. About half after three in December, it begins to be duskish? - A. It did not happen to be so that day, for it was a very great frost, and snow upon the ground, and there was sufficient light to distinguish his features.

Q. There has been no property found? - A. No.

Q. And you went to Bow-street with a full persuasion that you might find some persons there who had robbed you? - A. I had had a note to say that some persons were taken up who answered the description I had given.

Q. You had never seen the prisoner from December till October? - A. I rather think I did see him on the 12th of October.

- ARABIN sworn. - I was with my father in his carriage, on the 31st of December last, when this transaction took place; I was awaked by the stopping of the carriage, and a voice, exclaiming, b - st your eyes, I will blow your brains out; I almost instantly saw a man on horseback at the carriage-window; he demanded our money in the same menacing tone; I saw my father give him his money; he at the same time demanded mine, and swore he would blow my brains out, if I did not; I fixed my eye and my attention particularly upon the prisoner, so much so that he frequently b - d my eyes that he would blow my brains out if I did not turn my head another way; during the whole of the time I observed him, and I have no doubt that the prisoner at the bar is the man who robbed the carriage; I did not lose any money myself. He had a hat on not quite so low as his eye-brows; and he had a handkerchief, such as ostlers usually wear, a kind of a snuff-colour, tied over his chin, but it was so loosely tied, that from the motion of the horse, and his own agitation, it continually dropped off; I had then an opportunity of seeing the whole of his face, which was very strongly imprinted upon my recollection; I have no doubt in my own mind in the least, that the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were alarmed out of your sleep by this robbery? - A. I was napping.

Q. And you were alarmed? - A. I cannot say I was alarmed, for I am used to these kind of things upon that road.

Q. You had no more opportunity of observing the man than your father? - A. No.

Q. You had not seen the person of the prisoner until you came to Bow-street, at least not till September? - A. Not till September.

WILLIAM WALTERS sworn. - I was coachman to General Arabin , in December last: Coming from Drayton, a man came up to us on horseback, caught hold of the horses reins, and stopped me, and said to me, look the other way, two or three times over; he then turned his horse's head round and opened the carriage-door; he then said, your money or your life directly; he said, your money again; whether the General was asleep or not I cannot tell; he then said, your purse directly, and look the other way.

Q.Should you know the man again if you saw him? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. I think that is the man.

Q.Have you any doubt about it? - A. I am sure that is the man.

Q. You first said, I think he is the man? - A. That was a mistake; I have no doubt in the world that he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know there is a forty pounds reward, I dare say? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Are you now in General Arabin 's service? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I am an innocent man; I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 22.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-12

12. BARTHOLOMEW FOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , two guineas, the property of Isaac Pretty , in his dwelling-house .

ISAAC PRETTY sworn. - I live at No. 3, Bow-street ; I am a shoe-maker : On Thursday, the 31st of October, I sent my daughter to my desk to get a guinea; the prisoner was a servant of mine; she afterwards missed two guineas; and, on the 1st of November, I went after the prisoner, and brought him back, he said he had given his mother one guinea over night, and with the other he bought a n w silk handkerchief and a pair of stockings, and gave his mother the change; he is about fourteen years old: the prisoner and another lad were left in the room, and the other lad went out and left him by himself.

ELIZABETH PRETTY sworn. - I am the daughter of the last witness: I went to the desk on the 31st of October, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I took some money out, and went out; I left thirteen guineas in the desk; I returned home and found I had left the key in the desk; I then looked in, and missed two guineas; I then accused the prisoner with having taken the money; he denied i the first day; I accused him again the second day, when he had a new handkerchief and new

stockings, and then he confessed he had taken it; I made him no promises; he said he had given one to his mother, and bought those things with the other, and given his mother the change.

JANE HOLLIS sworn. - Mr. Pretty is my uncle: I went there in the morning of the 1st of November, and the prisoner's mother called, and he went out, and came back again with a new pair of stockings, and a new handkerchief; then we accused him again with taking the money, and he confessed it to my aunt and me.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 13.)

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-13

13. ELIZABETH PRACEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , sixty-nine yards of ribbon, value 10s. ten yards of ferret, value 10d. six yards of galloon, value 6d. a pair of cotton mitts, value 2s. a pair of cotton gloves, value 2s. three pair of leather gloves, value 4s. two pair of leather mitts, value 3s. a black feather value 2s. half a yard of black velvet, value 5s. three yards of silk persian, value 4s. a yard of satin, value 3s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 6s. half a barcelona handkerchief, value 1s. a stock stiffener, value 1s. a pair of leather slippers, value 3s. a pair of leather clogs, value 1s. a pair of list slippers, value 1s. two sans, value 1s. six pair of lamb's wool socks, value 2s. four yards and a half of long lawn, value 8s. a yard of linen, value 3s. three yards of diaper, value 3s. four yards of flannel, value 5s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 1s. sixteen yards of muslin, value 31s. nine yards of calico, value 10s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6d. fourteen yards of thread lace, value 20s. five pair of shoe roses, value 1s. 6d. six yards of straw plat, value 4d. half a pound of pins, value 6d. thirty yards of tape, value 1s. half a pound of thread, value 2s. half a pound of cotton, value 2s. half a muslin handkerchief, value 3s. eight painted medallions, value 5s. two pieces of china, value 1s. and two pair of leather gloves, value 2s. the property of John Lewis Comroux .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney).

MARY CAMROUX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the wife of John Lewis Camroux, I keep a milliner's shop, No. 9, Brinsley-place, Islington ; the prisoner was in my service: I missed the various articles mentioned in the indictment on the 1st of November; I examined her boxes, part of the articles she took out, and part were taken out by the officer; she took some things out of the first box before the officer came.

Q. Did you find a pair of cotton mitts? - A. Yes; I had lost them three or four, or it might he six weeks, before they were found in her pocket by the officer, with some black ferret; the mitts were lost out of a parcel.

Q. Were there any stockings? - A. Yes; they had my mark upon them when I lost them, but the mark has been picked out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Has your husband any partner? - A. No.

Q. Nobody else is interested in the business? - A. No.

PHILIP TANNIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a constable: I searched the prisoner's boxes, (Produces the property); it has been in my custody ever since.

Mrs. Camroux. This is a fan manufactured in our house, and unfinished, it is in a state in which fans are never sold; here is a quarter of a pound of darning cotton, with our private mark upon it; a quarter of a pound of thread, with our mark upon it; these stockings are mine, the marks have been picked out, except a part of the mark.

Q. Have you examined all these articles? - A. I have.

Q. Are they all your's? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left her defence to her Counsel, and called Mrs. Newbank, who gave her a good character. GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-14

14. GEORGE BAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , twenty-five yards of woollen cloth, value 38s. the property of the East India Company .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-15

15. MARTIN BRYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , a silver watch, value 5l. 15s. a pair of trowsers, value 5s. and a great coat, value 21s. the property of John Spokenburg .

JOHN SPOKENBURG sworn. - I am a Prussian: last Saturday was a month I was discharged from my ship, the Isabella; I came to St. Catherine's, and bought some clothes; I bought a great coat and a pair of trowsers; I saw the prisoner at Towerhill, I went to the Black Boy with the things, it was about ten o'clock at night; he said it was too late to go home to my lodging, and I went home with him, and paid three shillings for my

bed; I put my watch underneath the pillow, and my property upon the table; I went to sleep, and waked about one o'clock; he went to bed with me, and I felt that the man was gone with my property, I lost my watch, and the great coat and trowsers; on Monday I went for the Justice to look for him, and we went to the India-house, and there I saw the prisoner, and he had got these trowsers of mine upon him; I cried out in the street, hold fast the thief, hold fast the thief, and I gave him to the constable; I know the trowsers by there being a bit put in at the top, I am sure they are mine.

ALBERT FRANK sworn. - I am a Hamburgh man: Spokenburg and I saw the prisoner at the India-house, and he told him if he did not stop, he would give it to him; and then he cried out, and he was stopped, and we found these trowsers upon him; he said he made a mistake, and took his trowsers instead of his own.

CHARLES SANSUM sworn. - I am an officer: I apprehended the prisoner in the City.

Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. No; as I was taking him to the Compter, he said he was with the parties; he said the watch was pawned for two pounds, and he had the duplicate in his possession, but the watch was taken out.

Prisoner's defence. The Man asked me if I could get him a lodging, and there were four of us, there were two other men slept in the next room; I got up in a hurry and took the wrong trowsers, I left a much better pair behind than my own.

GUILTY (Aged 17.)

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-16

16. SUSANNAH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a silver watch, value 2l. 2s. the property of William Holt .

WILLIAM HOLT sworn. - I belong to the Woolwich tender: I met the prisoner about the middle of Rosemary-lane, about eleven o'clock at night; I was very much in liquor; she seemed to be very sober; I went to a public house with her and gave her a quartern of gin; then she asked me to go home with her; I did; I had fourpence halfpenny in my pocket, and I gave it her for gin, and she brought a quartern, and some bread and cheese; she asked me if I would not go to bed; I went to bed; I pulled off my trowsers, and she said she would put them under my head, and I had hold of one end and she the other; I felt her pull my watch out, and she ran away directly, and I followed her, and laid hold of her gown, but she got away; then I dressed myself, and was two hours looking for a watchman; I found a watchman, and took him to the wrong house; and then I went to the right house, but she was not there; I found her between twelve and one o'clock; the watchman and I looked round the room, and saw a loose brick, I took that out, and there I saw her in the chimney, naked, with the watch-case in her hand; and I found the rest of the watch was picked up, thrown over a brick wall.

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn. - Holt bought the watch of me.

Edward Cliffe , the constable, produced the watch, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.

The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-17

17. ELIZABETH JANE and ELIZABETH SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , sixty-six yards of black lace, value 14l. the property of Richard Green , privately in his shop .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

DAVID WATSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am shopman to Mr. Richard Green, milliner and haberdasher , in Marybone-street : On Saturday, the 2d of November, between five and six in the evening, the two prisoners came in together, they appeared to me to be in company, Smith desired me to shew her some white lace, she purchased three yards at five shillings a yard; after she had purchased that, I shewed her some more white lace; she said, this is pretty, we will have it; I then put them away, and Elizabeth Smith desired me to shew her some black lace; she had three yards of it cut; there might be thirty cards of it when I shewed it her.

Q. Did you shew this white lace and black lace to both of them? - A. I shewed the white lace to both, and the black to Elizabeth Smith .

Q. Did they seem to be acquainted at all? - A. Yes; they consulted together upon the patterns of all the laces that were purchased; Jane said to me that she recommended Mrs. Smith, and desired I would use her well.

Q. After these three pieces of lace had been purchased, who paid for them? - A.Elizabeth Smith. I observed Elizabeth Jane very busy; I suspected she was taking that that she had no right to do; I said nothing to Elizabeth Jane till I had received the money from Elizabeth Smith; then I asked pardon of Elizabeth Jane , and begged her to walk into the back room to satisfy me whether she had not got something that was not her own; she immediately put her hand into a small straw basket that she had in her hand, took out the card of lace, threw it down upon the floor, and I picked it up

immediately; she was not then in the room; I desired her to walk into the back room, that I might satisfy myself whether she had not something farther; she went into the back room; I was then desired by the mistress of the shop to send for a constable; I then charged her with having stolen some lace before, and she offered to pay for that, and likewise for the one she threw on the floor; the constable came, and took here into custody; Smith said, she hoped she would not detain her, as she was not the person who stole the lace.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. (Counsel for Smith.)

Q. Mrs. Smith bought three yards of white, and three of black lace? - A. Yes; and she paid likewise for a remnant that was purchased between the two; she paid two pounds, two shillings, and sixpence, altogether.

Q. What do you mean by purchasing it between them? - A. Mrs. Jane said she would have it, and Mrs. Smith paid for it.

Q. What was it she did say? - A. She said she would have it; they were both looking at it.

Q. They were looking over a great quantity of lace? - A. Yes; when a person asks for lace, we always shew them a great deal.

Q. Did not Mrs. Smith agree with you about the price of it? - A. She paid for it, but Mrs. Jane agreed for the price; I said nine shillings and sixpence, and Jane said she would give it, and the others did not object to it.

Q. Did you ask Mrs. Jane for the money? - A. I did not.

Q. After Mrs. Smith had paid you, you turned your attention to the other? - A. Yes.

Q. But you saw Mrs. Smith do nothing but bargain for the lace, and pay for the lace? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see Mrs. Smith at your shop before? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Have you not told half a dozen people that you never saw her in your shop before? - A. I do not know that I have ever been asked the question.

Q. There are many friends of your master and mistress who have heard you? - A. I never did say that.

Q. Will you swear you never said so? - A. Yes, I will.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Jane.)

Q. Saturday night is a busy night? - A. Yes, we are in general.

Q. How many fellow shopmen have you? - A. Men and boys, there were nine.

Q. They are not all here? - A. No.

Q. How long might they have been in the shop? - A. Half an hour, or upwards.

Q. How many partners has your master? - A. Not any.

Q. Does it not often happen that lace will fall off the counter? - A. Sometimes it will.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Was it possible for a card of lace to slip into the straw box? - A. No.

THOMAS DELIGHT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. (Produces the lace.) I was seht for by Mr. Green: I took the two prisoners to Marlborough-street; this card of lace was given me by Mr. Watson, and has been in my custody ever since.

Watson. This is the same lace that I picked off the floor; it is Mr. Green's property; it cost us more than fifteen pounds.

Jane's defence. I never offered to pay Mrs. Green for any articles that were lost before; she offered to let me go if I would pay for them, and upon my refusal, she sent for a constable.

Smith's defence. Mrs. Jane said, it was a pretty bit of lace, and then I said, I would have it; it was not Mrs. Jane that said so.

The prisoner Smith called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Jane, GUILTY. (Aged 49.)

Smith, GUILTY. (Aged 45.)

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-18

18. MATTHEW MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , an iron vice, value 10s. the property of William Wright .

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - I am a carpenter : I employed the prisoner to take a basket of tools to a fresh lodging of mine in Gun-alley: on Friday, the 13th of last month, about eleven o'clock; after he had delivered the tools, he took the basket in one hand and the vice in the other, and brought them out again into the street; I have never seen them since.

MARY STEVENS sworn. - I saw the prisoner take the things out of the basket, and put them into the cupboard; I left him taking them out, and went into another room.

EPHRAIM STEVENS sworn. - On a Friday, between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw him take the vice out of the cupboard and go away with it; there was another basket of tools there before he came with it; they were Mr. Wright's tools.

Prisoner's defence. I delivered it into the cupboard, and never saw it afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-19

19. JOHN YOUD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , two cotton waistcoats, value 7s. a linen apron, value 1s. 6d. a sixpence, and six pieces of copper coin, called threepence , the property of Joseph Tapper .

JOSEPH TAPPER sworn. - I live at No. 15, Bedford-square , I am servant to Mr. Williams: I lost the articles, mentioned in the indictment, from the pantry, the first room in the house, on the 10th of November, about ten o'clock; I was coming home, and saw the prisoner coming up the area; I asked him what he had got, and he told me he had got some cloaths; I desired to see them; he had them under his great coat; and he then attempted to make his escape; I caught him by the collar, and brought him back; I examined them, and found them to be my property; I sent for a constable, and he was detained; I found ninepence in the waistcoat pocket, which I had left there.

William Warren , the constable, produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-20

20. JOHN PROBART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , two linen sheet, value 6s. the property of George Martin .

GEORGE MARTIN sworn. - I am a victualler , I keep the King's-arms, in Shoreditch : The prisoner slept at my house one night; he paid sixpence for his lodging; he had a pint of porter, and went to bed at eight o'clock; he came down the next morning about half past nine, he came to the bar to pay for a pint of porter, and I sent up my servant to see if the sheets were safe; I heard her scream out, that they were gone; I bolted the back-door, and sent for an officer; the officer searched him, and found the sheets upon him, next to his shirt; I am sure they were my sheets; he had a gardener's apron tied over them.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - (Produces the sheets.) I am an officer; I searched the prisoner, and found these sheets under his waistcoat, next to his shirt; before I searched him, he said he had not got them. (The sheets were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

MARY SLOPUM sworn. - The prisoner slept at our house one night; I went up and missed the sheets.

Prisoner's defence. I had the misfortune to wet the sheets in the night, and I meant to ask the maid-servant to dry them privately.

Harper. The sheets were dry and warm.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

confined six months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-21

21. GEORGE PARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , a gold watch, value 27s. a silver watch, value 10s. and a telescope, value 1s. the property of Eliz. Macleish .

The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.

ELIZABETH MACLEISH sworn. - Q. The prisoner at the bar, I understand, is your brother? - A. He is: I live at No. 2, Bow-street, Covent-garden ; he had been with me about five weeks: On the afternoon of the 7th of November, I and my sister went out about four o'clock; I left a gold watch at the head of the bed, and a silver watch on the mantle-piece in the bed-room; the prisoner shut the door after us; we left a maid-servant in the house, and my foreman; we returned about half past five in the afternoon; we went up stairs to take off our clothes, and missed the gold watch from the head of the bed; and we then missed the silver one; when we came down stairs again, he was gone; I did not see him again till Monday evening, I saw him again at my father's; I asked him how he came to be so wicked as to take the watches out of our room; he made no answer; I then applied for a constable, and detained him; I saw the watches before Justice Floud, at Bow-street.

HENRY COLLIER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a wharfinger: The prisoner came to my house in Compton-street, Islington, on the Sunday in the evening; he said, Sir, I wish to speak to you privately; he went into the back-parlour, and cried violently, that he must have lost his senses, that he had robbed his sister of two watches, which he had pawned, and produced to me the duplicates for a silver watch and a gold watch; he said he was extremely sorry for what he had done, and wished me to intercede for him.

Court. Q. How long have you known this young man? - A. About two years.

Q. What is his father? - A. A gentleman who keeps the Equitable Assurance-office for Servants.

Q. What is his sister? - A. A printer.

JOHN ACKLEM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a pawnbroker in the Strand, the corner of Bedford-street: To the best of my belief, the prisoner is the person that I took in a gold watch and a telescope of, on the 7th of November.

Prosecutrix. I know this to be my watch, it has been twelve years in the family.

JAMES MORRITT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a pawnbroker in Fleet-street: I do not know the prisoner at the bar; (produces a silver watch;) I received it from a young man; it was pledged on the 7th of November, in the name of Jones.

Q.(To Acklem.) In what name was the gold watch pledged? - A. The same.

EDWARD DRUID sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I apprehended the prisoner; that is all I know of it.

Prisoner's defence. I am very sorry for it, but I am sure I could not be sensible at the time I did it.

GUILTY (Aged 19.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before, Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17991204-22

22. WILLIAM BATES was indicted for that he, on the 31st of October , being employed in the capacity of servant to William Emerson , did, by virtue of his employment, take into his possession 30l. for and on account of the said William, his master and employer, and that he afterwards fraudulently did embezzle and make away with the same .

Second Count. For feloniously stealing, on the same day, five guineas, ten half-guineas, fifteen seven-shilling pieces, twenty half-crowns, fifty shillings, sixty sixpences, and one hundred halfpence, the property of the said William Emerson .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS EMERSON sworn. - I am a cheesemonger in Oxford-street: I am the son of William Emerson ; the prisoner was a servant of my father's; I conduct his business; the prisoner was entrusted to receive money, and pay it; he had been so employed I am sure above two years, and I believe near three.

Q. Had he been in the habit of receiving money in the common course of business? - A. Yes.

Q. For goods sold? - A. Yes; and delivered by him to our customers.

Q. Do you know of the delivery of any goods by him to Mrs. Vaughan? - A. No; I know that he made out an account of them: Mrs. Vaughan's servant is here. I did not send him absolutely to receive the money, he went there in the common course of his business; I did not know that he had received this money for some time.

Court. Q. He was entrusted by your father to receive money for him? - A.Constantly.

Q. Had he a general authority from your father to receive money from the customers, and account for it? - A. Yes.

Q.Without any particular order from your father to receive those particular sums? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had he accounted to you, on the 31st of October, for any sum of money that he had received of Mrs. Vaughan? - A. No.

Q. So that if he had received any money of Mrs. Vaughan, he had not brought it to account to you? - A. No. About five o'clock the same afternoon, I saw the prisoner at a public-house in Oxford-street.

Q. How long before that was it that he had gone from your house? - A. He went away about noon upon business to an inn in Friday-street.

Q. Did he return to you again before five o'clock? - No.

Q. Was Mrs. Vaughan a customer of your's? - A. Yes, in Gloucester-place, Portman-square; I went to the Red-lion public-house, in consequence of information from a neighbour; I saw the prisoner there in the tap-room, with a man who went with him from our house at noon; I told the prisoner, that he was intoxicated, and desired him to go home; the other man was sitting in the tap-room, talking to a soldier; he came to me and begged my pardon for staying so long; then each of them took hold of a truck of goods that stood loaded at the door, and began to draw it towards home; I saw them through the window go out towards home; I went home almost immediately, and when I got to my own door, I found the truck there, and the other man with it; the prisoner was not there; I apprehended that he had absconded; I got home, I think, about half past five, as near as I can recollect; I then ran down a street, which I thought it was very likely the prisoner would take; but I did not find him; I came home again, and then went to Westminster, to a man that recommended him to us, and about an hour after that, I found him at a public-house, in Crown-street, Westminster; I asked him why he had staid out all day, and I asked him where the money was, which he had produced at the public-house in Oxford-street, he made no answer; I observed a watch chain hanging from his pocket; I asked him where he had bought that watch; I desired him to come home, and give up his accounts, and from his general conduct, I perceived I was not likely to get any account from him, either as to the watch, the money, or his accounts, and therefore, I immediately charged the watch with him; he was then taken to St. Margaret's watch-house, he then muttered something about, that he was coming home; he was searched, and some Bank notes taken from him, and a watch, apparently quite a new one; he there gave no account how he came by the Bank notes; I think the constable of the night asked him about them, but still he gave no account; I gave charge of him upon suspicion of embezzling property of my father's; I saw no more of him till the next evening, when I saw him at Queen-square.

Q. Was what the prisoner said taken down in writting? - A. I do not think it was.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to say, that the clerk was not sitting there, taking down the examination? - A. The magistrate himself took it down; but I do not believe that what was said by the prisoner was taken down.

Mr. Alley contended that it ought not to be received in evidence, but was over-ruled by the Court.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What account did the prisoner give before the Magistrate? - A. He said, the whole of the property that was found upon him, was the property of my father, and that the money also was the property of my father, and finally begged for mercy; he said, he had bought the watch on the night of the 31st of October, subsequent to my seeing him at the public-house in Oxford-street, with my father's money.

Q. Did he give any account where he had received any money? - A. No, not that I recollect at the watch-house; I saw three two pound notes, and three one pound notes, with some silver, and some halfpence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are not in partnership with your father? - A. No.

Q. Was the prisoner hired by you or your father? - A. My father.

Q. Be so good as tell us for what purpose was he hired? - A. To carry a large basket, and deliver goods out to different customers at the West end of the town, and attend occasionally in the shop.

Court. Q.Were you present at the hiring? - A. I cannot take upon myself to say.

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean to say, that this man was in the habit of any thing more that carrying out goods? - A. I do.

Q. Do you mean to say, that without a particular direction, he received money from the customers? - A. It depended on the will of the customers, when they chose to pay.

Q. At the time you took him into custody, he was about returning home? - A. He muttered something of that sort.

Q. How often did he make out his accounts? - A. He ought to have made them up every day.

Q. In the evening, after his day's business was over? - A. Yes.

Q. But upon this occasion you took him in custody, so that he could not return home that evening? - A. No.

Court. Q. Did you happen to know what the watch cost, from any thing that passed from him? - A. He said five pounds.

THOMAS PRICE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Red-Lion in Oxford-street; the prisoner was at my house on the 31st of October; he came with another man with a truck; the other man attempted o sit down, but he fell, he was drunk, and afterwards they both came into the house, and wanted a pint of beer; I told them, they appeared to have had a sufficiency of liquor, and they had better go home for it, it was growing dark.

Q. Did the prisoner produce any thing from his pocket, upon the tap-room table? - A. Yes; two two pound notes, a one pound note, and a five pound note, tore a good deal; he pulled them out, with an observation to the man that was with him, that he would never go home any more; that he would go to sea that evening; that he would give him, the other man, that was with him, twenty pounds to take the truck home, and then he produced the notes; and hearing that he lived with a cheesemonger near me, and hearing him make use of the name of Emerson, I went to Mr. Emerson, and informed him of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How much was the money that might have been produced? - A. I cannot say; there was one note that he had in his hand, that I did not see.

Q. And he being drunk said, he would give twenty pounds if he would take the truck home? - A. Yes.

JAMES BLY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was constable of the night, at St. Margaret's watch-house; the prisoner was brought there on the 31st of October, at night; I searched him, and found upon him, three two pound Bank notes; three one pound Bank notes, and a silver watch, with a silver chain, it is a new watch. (Producing them).

SARAH READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mrs. Vaughan, No. 37, Gloucester-place, Portman-square; she dealt with Mr. Emerson, and had done twenty years; the prisoner was Mr. Emerson's servant, and I used o pay him once a fortnight, but I paid him the last time from the 29th of July to the 6th of August.

Q. What was the amount altogether? - A. Between five and six pounds.

Q. Have you paid him any bill since August? - A. I have not; my governor has not been in town.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-23

23. WILLIAM KALLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , two pair of men's cotton stockings, value 6s. the property of William Glazbrook .

THOMAS PITT sworn. - I keep a hosier's shop, for Mr. Glazbrook, in Whitechapel : On the 20th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in to buy a pair of stockings; I shewed him a paper with five or six pair; I laid the paper before him; I asked him, 2s. 6d. he said, it was too dear, he wanted them to sell again; I then turned round to look for another paper, and immediately missed two pair from another part; the prisoner then said he would go out and come in again; I observed the stockings under his jacket; I did not lose fight of him; I

overtook him by the kirb-stone; I told him he had stolen the property, and brought him back; I sent for Mr. Kemp the constable, and delivered the prisoner, and the stockings, to the constable; he appeared to be a little in liquor, I don't know whether he affected it or not.

Edward Kemp. the constable, produced the property, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, I know nothing of it. GUILTY (Aged 36.)

confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t17991204-24

24. WILLIAM ANKLE and DANIEL SOLOMONS were indicted, the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , five cambric caps, value 30s. the property of John Woodgate , and the other for receiving part of the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

EDWARD JONES sworn. - Woodgate is my son-in-law; my business calls me out in the night, every fortnight; I work for Alderman Curtis: On the 6th of November, about five in the evening, I went out and left Ankle and a woman in the tap-room; I keep the Ship public-house, in Old Gravel-lane ; when I came home I was informed of the robbery.

MARY WOODGATE sworn. - I am the wife of John Woodgate ; my husband keeps the Crown, in Crown-court, Wapping ; the last time I saw my caps was on the 4th of November, my husband carried them to my father's to be clear starched; I can only swear to the property.

ANN EVE sworn. - I live at my father's, Edward Jones ; I saw the caps lying upon a table, in a whited brown paper, the clear-starcher brought them there; that was about five o'clock on the 6th of November; I saw them put upon a shelf, and did not see them afterwards till I saw two of them at the Justice's.

Mr. Knapp. Q. The clear-starcher is not here? - A. No.

GEORGE BALL sworn. - One of these caps was pledged at my master's on the 7th of November, by Elizabeth Hunt . (Produces it.)

Mrs. Woodgate. This is my cap, I know it by my own work.

JOHN FARROW sworn. - I am a pawnbroker; a cap was pledged with me on the 7th of November by a woman, but I cannot say who it was.

Mrs. Woodgate. This is mine.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn. - I am a constable belonging to Shadwell; I apprehended the prisoner Ankle, and Elizabeth Hunt, I took her in bed; I searched Solomon's house and found nothing.

ELIZABETH HUNT sworn. - I lived with Ankle as a wife, and he brought me home five caps, and said, he had found them; I told him, I hoped he would not bring me into any scrape, and he said, no; I took two of them to the prisoner Solomon's and sold them for two shillings; the next morning I sold another to him, I had two shillings for that, and I pledged the other two.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Ankle is a soldier in the Tower Hamlets? - A. Yes.

Q. You have lived with several other of the Tower Hamlet Militia? - A. No.

Q. Not with serjeant Grant? - A. I know him particularly well.

Q. Where you not taken up for this? - A. I was taken to the Shadwell-office.

Q. Have you never been at the Police-office before? - A. Yes; but never taken up in my life.

Q. Was it not upon the story of Mrs. Brockman? - A. Yes.

Q. You charged her with stealing pots? - A. There were some pots thrown down the necessary; it was laid upon her.

Q. And the magistrate discharged her, did he not? - A. Yes.

Court. (To Eve) Q. Was the prisoner Ankle at your house at the time you saw the parcel? - A. Yes; and a woman with him of the name of Eleanor Walker .

Court. (To Hunt) Q. When you carried the cap to Solomon's, did he enquire any thing about them? - A. No; I told him they were mine.

Ankle's defence. Eleanor Walker was in the house with me about some money, and she and her husband quarrelled; she had been lying upon the bench, and they went away; I saw this parcel lying under the bench, and I took it up, and carried it away.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know Hunt? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any good of her? - A. No.

Q. Would you believe her upon her oath? - A. No.

Q. Were the Magistrates of the same opinion, and did they discharge the woman that she brought in charge? - Yes.

DOROTHY BROCKMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you know Hunt? - A. Yes; she lodged a complaint against me for pot-stealing; she herself stole the pots, and conveyed them down the privy; I was discharged, the Magistrate would not believe her.

The prisoner Solomons called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17991204-25

25. EDMUND RABBATS and MARTHA his wife , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , four shifts, value 12s. and three shirts, value 12s. the property of Robert Mann , Esq.

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of William Gummer .

WILLIAM GUMMER sworn. - On the 11th of November, I went to fetch some linen from Admiral Mann 's, tied up in a basket; I don't know the contents; my wife has washed for Admiral Mann some time; I took it home and put it in the back part of the shop, while I served a person in the shop; I am a butcher , in Belton-street ; I missed it in about two hours, that was about nine o'clock; I heard nothing of it that night.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. About what time was it that you came home with this basket of linen? - A. It was between seven and eight.

Q. Can you tell me how late in the evening you had seen it safe - as late as half past eight, had you seen that safe? - A. Yes; I did.

ELIZABETH HUGHES sworn. - I lodge in the same house with the prisoner: On Tuesday the 12th of November, my landlady, Mr. Rabbats, wanted to speak to me; I desired her to come into my room; she came in, she shewed me two shirts and asked me what I thought they would give for them in pledge; I said, five shillings, or five and sixpence a piece; she asked me if I would take them in the evening; I told her, I would, but did not take them, and in the evening I went in again, and she asked me to take a shift-over to the ragshop; I asked her what she would take; she said, three shillings and sixpence; I took it to Mrs. Finch, she said, she could not afford to give so much; she asked me, how many there were; I told her, four shifts, and three shirts; she told me, if I would tell the person, if she would send them all, she could better tell what she could afford; I told Mrs. Rabbats of it, and she said, never mind; and in about half and hour the runner came up with a search warrant; they found the linen upon the bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You lodged in this house? - A. Yes.

Q. The man is very infirm and weak, in a bad state of health? - A. Yes.

Q. Not able to carry a large basket of cloaths away? - A. I don't think he could; Mr. and Mrs. Rabbats were both at home that evening; I spoke with Mrs. Rabbats, at nine in the evening; she went out about nine o'clock, he came home to his tea about five o'clock, and staid at home till between six and seven, and they came home again between ten and eleven.

Q. Did you see them return? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they bring any thing home with them? - A. No, nothing in the world.

Q. Did Mrs. Rabbats tell you how she came by these things? - A. She told me that they belonged to an acquaintance of her's, that they wanted to dispose of them, and who asked her, if she could dispose of them for her; and she said, that she did not want such things herself, but would endeavour to dispose of them for her.

Q. Did she desire you to make a secret of this transaction? - A. No.

SARAH FINCH sworn. - The last witness came to me on the 12th of November, between one and two o'clock, with a small sized shift; she asked me three shillings and sixpence for them; I told her, I could not; she said there were some shirts, and she would go home to fetch them; while she was gone, I had some suspicion it might be Gummer's linen, from the description I had had of it; I sent to Gummer, and Mrs. Gummer came over; a search warrant was got, and the house searched; I live at No. 3, and they at No. 7.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am constable of St. Martin's in the fields; in consequence of a search warrant, I went to the prisoners' room and searched it, they were both present; Mrs. Gummer went in with me, and perceived either a shirt, or a shift, I don't which; when Mrs. Gummer cried out, here is part of the property; I then found on the bed, either a shirt or a shift; I then searched the bed, and intermixed-with the bed cloaths I found some more, either between the blankets, or between the sheets, like hid; and I found either a shirt or a shift upon the floor, by the side of the bed; on the mantle-piece, this skeleton key, it is part of it broke. (Produces the property).

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You searched the lodgers' rooms first, and though you went to the lodgers' rooms first, still you found the prisoners remaining in their own room? - A. Yes.

Q. That skeleton key is a broken one, and not fit for use? - A. Yes, it is, for I tried it.

CATHERINE GUMMER sworn. - I am the wife of William Gummer , I wash for Admiral Mann; On the 11th of November, a little after seven, my husband brought in the linen, it was missing about nine o'clock; I never saw the prisoners till I went to their apartments, I went with the officer; I saw a shift lying on the bed, Mrs. Rabbats took the shift and chucked it into the middle of the room, and asked if that belonged to me; I said it did, it belonged to lady Mann; all this linen belongs to Admiral Mann; I was present in the room when they were found; I think there were three or four shifts and shirts under the bed-clothes, and one by the side of the bed.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The quantity that

was brought to your house was a very large quantity, was it not? - A. No; there were four shirts, and five shifts; and, I believe, there were five table-cloths.

SARAH THOMPSON sworn. - I am housekeeper to Admiral Mann : I delivered the linen to William Gummer on the 11th of November, in the evening; I am clear this linen belongs to Admiral Mann .

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You know it by the marks, I suppose? - A. The marks are taken out except one shift, there is M M, which is my lady's mark.

Edmund Rabbats's defence. I know nothing at all of it.

Martha Rabbats's defence. I went out on the 12th of November, about twelve o'clock; upon the step of my own door I met a young man of the name of John Brown, he said he had got something that he thought would suit me; I then looked into the bundle, and there were three shirts, and four shifts; I told him they did not suit me; he said, could not I dispose of them for him; I told him I would try; and he said he would call the evening after, but I never saw him again; my husband never knew any thing about it till the constable came.

For the Prisoners.

CHRISTIAN PATCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at the Globe, in Dudley-court, Crown-street: I know the prisoner Rabbats.

Q. Do you know where he was the evening before he was taken up? - A. Yes; he came into my house first about five o'clock, he went away directly, he only left a leg of mutton, and then, I believe, he went to his tea; about seven o'clock I saw him again, and, I believe, he did not go out after that till between eleven and twelve.

Q. How came he to leave the leg of mutton there? - A. I do not know; he brought in a leg of mutton, and desired it to be dressed by a little after eight o'clock.

WILLIAM DOBSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a shoemaker, I lodge at Mr. Rabbats's; I supped at Mrs. Patch's the evening before he was taken up; I went in there about seven o'clock from my work, and saw him there; he was there from that time till past eleven o'clock, he was not absent one minute all that time.

Court. Q. What trade was he? - A. I always thought the gentleman lived upon his means; he has always bore a good character.

WILLIAM WALTERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Princes-street, Cavendish-square, I am a wheelwright: I have known him thirty years, he was brought up to the same trade that I was.

Q. What support has he? - A. His father left him independent; I went to this public-house about half past eight o'clock, and saw Rabbats there, and he was never absent till after eleven; I always heard a very good character of him.

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at No. 27, Crown-street, I am a plaisterer: I have known the prisoner a great many years; I went to this public-house about six o'clock, Rabbats came in about half past seven, and staid till eleven, or after.

Court. Q. What day of the week was it? - A. Monday; I do not know the day of the month.

The prisoner called five other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Both, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSe.

Reference Number: t17991204-26

26. WILLIAM WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , six ounces of nutmegs, value 6s. twelve bottles of Haarlcm oil, value 6s. 6d. seven phials of effence of peppermint, value 1s. two phials of Norris's drops, value 2s. three phials of Henry's magnesia, value 6d. four phials of lavender water, value 1s. twelve papers of court plaister, value 6d. two ounces of lint, value 6d. a bottle of Daffy's elixir, value 6d. and a phial, value 1d. the property of Alexander Maxwell .

ALEXANDER GORDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am superintending clerk to Mr. Maxwell, in Oxford-court, Cannon-street ; the prisoner had been porter to Mr. Maxwell about two months; Mr. Maxwell is a wholesale druggist .

Q. He does not sell by small articles? - A. He does not sell by retail at all: On the 28th of Novamber, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I observed him coming up the court towards the accompting-house door, where they enter into the warehouse; at that time he was much intoxicated, and as he had been once so before, I paid him his wages for the whole week, and desired him to depart from Mr. Maxwell's warehouse, but he did not immediately go away; about half an hour afterwards I observed him upon the first floor, leaning upon the counter; I did not say any thing then, but went up stairs to the other story, in the warehouse, where I remained some time, perhaps half an hour, looking over some rhubarbs, with Thomas Collins , one of the porters; Collins went down, and I was called down by Collins, between three and four o'clock, they had carried the prisoner down to the foot of the stairs upon the ground floor; they shewed me several articles mentioned in the indictment, under his clothes, (repeats them); I saw part of them taken from him, but some had been taken from him before I came down; they

were the same kind of articles that were in Mr. Maxwell's warehouse.

Q. You never dealt by retail? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. But you have sent out samples by retail? - A. No; Mr. Maxwell does not deal with druggists, but sends packages to the West-Indies.

Q. You do not take servants without a character into your house? - A. It has not been customary.

Q. He had been with you two months, and because he got drunk the second time, you discharged him? - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean to swear to any of those articles? - A. No; I examined the nutmegs, and found about a pound missing.

THOMAS COLLINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of Mr. Maxwell's porters: On the 28th of November last, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner was rather intoxicated, he was putting up some jars, I told him I thought he was intoxicated; between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw some nutmegs fall out of his pocket, and that led me to suspect him; they were in a paper, forty-six in number, weighing six ounces; I found five phials of essence of peppermint about his body, with some lint between his waistcoat and his shirt.

Q. Did you keep peppermint and lint in the warehouse? - A. Yes; there was a bottle of essence of peppermint in his breeches, and I cannot say what besides; I think there were some other things round his body, his pockets were completely full; all the things in this box were found about his person, (producing them); here are three bottles of magnesia that have got a figure of three upon them, in my hand-writing.

Q. From the appearance of the rest, do you believe them to be your master's property? - A. I do.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. These are quack medicines - now will you venture to swear that they are worth one farthing? - A. They cost money.

Q. How many bottles had you marked with a figure of three? - A. A great many.

Q. Have you not sold a great many with that mark upon them? - A. Mr. Maxwell has; they were made up but the week before.

Q. Is your master here? - A. No.

Q. Then, whether he has sold any or not, he is not here to say? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. The young man cannot swear to the marks on the bottles.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

confined two years in the House of Corection , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-27

27. JOSEPH STYRING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , forty yards of canvas, value 2l. 10s. the property of John-Robert Anderson .

JOHN- ROBERT ANDERSON sworn. - I am a Scotch factor : I lost the canvas from an outer court that we have, in Throgmorton-street , on Saturday last; I saw it again the same day about twelve o'clock.

JOHN GREGG sworn. - I am a baker: I was going into Mr. Anderson's house about half past three o'clock, on Saturday last, I saw the prisoner at the bar taking some canvas over the half door; I gave the alarm, and he was pursued and taken; I did not join in the pursuit; there was another man with him, the prisoner had a jacket on, I think it was a kind of fustian. I saw him again on Monday at the Mansion-house, he was at the bar; to the best of my knowledge he was the same man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are sure this is the man you saw at the Mansion-house? - A. Yes.

Q. But you will not be positive he is the man that you saw in Throgmorton-street? - A. He is to the best of my knowledge, but I did not take much notice of him.

Q. Did you see his face? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Had he the same dress on at the Mansion-house that he had on at the prosecutor's door? - A. It was a kind of a green fustian, or velveteen; it was like mine. (The witness had on a drab coloured great coat).

JAMES CHAMBERS sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Anderson: When the baker came on Saturday, he gave me the alarm; I went up Token-house-yard, and saw this man with the canvas on his shoulder; about ten yards before I got to him, he threw it off his shoulder and ran away; I then got before him, and he turned back the same way that he had come: my fellow servant cried, stop thief, and he was stopped, I never lost fight of him at all; the prisoner is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How far were you from your master's house when you first saw him? - A. About two hundred yards. (The constable produced the property, which was deposed to by Mr. Anderson).

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-28

28. THOMAS KEMP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , six shillings , the property of Benjamin Curtis .

BENJAMIN CURTIS sworn. - On Lord-Mayor's day I stopped in the crowd about half past three o'clock, the prisoner was right before me, I felt his hand draw from me; I immediately said I was robbed, and missed my money; he made through the crowd, and I followed him instantly; I collared him, and called for a constable; he then made a blow at my mouth, and struck me; at that moment I heard some of the money drop, I stooped down and made him see me pick it up, it was one shilling; I then took him to the Compter; I stated six shillings, but I had more; I had my hand in my pocket upon the money not a minute before I was stopped in the crowd; I never lost fight of him.

Prisoner's defence. I was standing by the window-shutters, and a young woman said I was a pickpocket, and they took me.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-29

29. ANN CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a mahogany table, value 7s. the property of Thomas Morris .

RICHARD MORRIS sworn. - I am the son of Thomas Morris , he keeps the Bedford-arms, South-street , Mary-le-bonne: On the 9th of November I went to the door, and saw the prisoner sitting by the table in the parlour, she used to come to our house, sometimes, for purl; I had occasion to go out again in a few minutes, and I missed the table and the prisoner, it was a little square mahogany table, with leaves to it; I went in, and told my father of it; my sister and I were in the bar, we could see the parlour from the bar; when I missed the table, my sister was in the tap-room; I went after her, and took her with the table, she lives at No. 25, Great Barlow-street, she was going quite the contrary way from home; Samuel Chapnell came up and took her, and I took the table home, and was at home first; we sent for a constable and gave charge of her.

SAMUEL CHAPNELL sworn. - I went after the prisoner, and saw Richard Morris stop her with the table, and I assisted him; I took the woman to Mr. Morris's house.

THOMAS MORRIS sworn. - I keep the Bedford arms: I saw the table brought back, I have had it ever since, I am certain it is my table; the prisoner was very much intoxicated.

Prisoner's defence. I was not properly in my senses, or I should not have done such a thing.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10d.

confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE .

Reference Number: t17991204-30

30. JAMES EMANUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , two pounds of soap, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Whitwell .

SAMUEL TUBBIE sworn. - Mr. Whitwell keeps a large soap warehouse at Bethnal-green: On the 21st of November in the afternoon, about two or three o'clock, I saw the prisoner take a cake of soap out of Mr. Whitwell's cart, as it was going down Whitechapel-road , he put it underneath his jacket, and walked away; I told the carman of it, and the carman and I went after him, and the carman took the soap away from him.

Q. Had he been out of your fight? - A. Yes, I dare say a quarter of an hour; I am sure he is the same man.

JOSEPH EDWARDS sworn. - I am carman to Mr. Whitwell: The last witness told me the prisoner had taken some soap, and we went after him down the New Road, and I found the soap under his jacket. (produces it); he could not have been gone above five minutes; I cannot swear to the soap, but I saw the place where it was taken from behind the cart; I had a ton weight, I was going to Aldgate.

Prisoner's defence. Neither the boy and the carman saw me take it.

GUILTY . (Aged 45.)

Publicly whiped , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17991204-31

31. JAMES TOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a pair of men's leather shoes, value 4s. the property of Henry Bell .

HENRY BELL sworn. - I am a shoemaker in High Holborn : On the 9th of November, the prisoner came in for a pair of shoes; he tried one pair and they were too dear for him, he said he could not afford it; I left them on the cutting board to look for some cheaper, I told him I had none; he then went away, and I immediately missed the shoes that he had tried on; I found the shoes at Mr. Chandler's, a pawnbroker, but he was just gone. On the 11th of November, the pawnbroker sent me word he was there; I went, sent for a constable, and detained him; I am sure he is the same man.

CHARLES TROUTBECK sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Chandler: On the 9th of November, the prisoner came to our house with a pair of shoes, he pledged them for three shillings; I have no doubt he is the man. (The shoes produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. They are very much mistaken

in the person, for I was never in either of their shops.

GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-32

32. WILLIAM CUMMINGS , ABRAHAM CHAPMAN , JOSEPH CLEGG , and SAMUEL BOND , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , an earthen bottle, value 3d. and half a gallon of soy, value 7s. the property of William Seymour ; and the other three for receiving, harbouring, and concealing the said William Cummings, knowing him to have committed the said felony .

WILLIAM SEYMOUR sworn. - I live at the corner of Sloane-street, Knightsbridge ; I am an oil and colourman : On Saturday, the 23d of November last, he came into my shop between ten and eleven at night; I had seen him in the shop four or five minutes before; I went out thinking the boy was there to serve him, he was not there, he was putting up the shutters at the time; when I found no one was with him, I went out to him, and he purchased a herring; he said, he was a bit of a tradesman; he said, he had a jar of oil to dispose of; he said, he did not know what sort; I shewed him a jar, and asked him if it was like that; he said, no, and pointed to a gallon bottle, and said, it was like that; I told him, that was not a jar, but a bottle; I asked him how he came by it; he said, he was at work at a gentleman's house and they had given him that; he went out, and in about five minutes returned with a half gallon bottle; I smelt it, and told him it was not oil; he poured some into my hand, and I told him it was soy; I then told him, I thought he had stole it; then he said, he had got it on board a ship; he said, he had been lumping; the watchman then came up; he kept the bottle under his arm; I turned round to get some, that I had like it, and missed it, I then found it was my own; he was then going to fell it to a coachman for one shilling and sixpence; I gave charge of him, and he was afterwards rescued, but I know nothing of that; he was quartered at the Marquis of Granby, at Knightsbridge.

Q. What was the value of this soy? - A. It cost me twelve shillings.

ROBERT EDWARDS sworn. - I am a watchman; I saw the prisoner offering a bottle for sale to Mr. Seymour, and hearing him say several times that he had stole it, I thought it was my duty to take him into custody; when I took him, he let the bottle fall; Mr. Seymour came out and said, it was his; I took him back to Mr. Seymour's, and there he begged pardon; he let him go, but Mr. Seymour missing some other things we pursued him to the Marquis of Granby; Mr. Seymour gave me charge of him, and then Chapman and Clegg, said, he should not go with me; I told them several times, that he had committed a robbery upon my beat, and I should take him to the watch-house; they said, he should not go without a proper constable, and they took him from me, and then they placed him in the tap-room; accordingly I sent for a constable, and while he was sent for in came the captain of the patrol, his name is Hardy; I charged him to assist me; we secured him, and took him to the watch-house; and then we went back and took the other three; Bond never interrupted me in the least; Hardy charges Bond; the house was very full of people, and none would help me; they said the next day, they were afraid of getting hurt.

Cummings. I was very much in liquor.

Edwards. He was as sober as I am now.

HENRY HARDY sworn. I am inspector of the patrol of Hyde Park Trust; I was going past the Marquis of Granby, I heard a noise and went in; as soon as I got in, the watchman said, Hardy, I am glad you are come in; here is a soldier who has committed a robbery on my walk, and these men have rescued him from me; I said, well, my good lad, you must go with me to the watch-house; Cummings immediately got up, and went with me without the least resistance in the world; I then went back and brought the other two men to the watch-house.

- HILLIARD sworn. - I was constable of the night; I took charge of the prisoner. (The bottle was produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Cummings's defence. I have been twice on the Continent serving my King and country, and when I have been taking a drop of spirits, it always affects me.

All four, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t17991204-33

33. EDWARD BURNHAM , alias THOMAS HALEY was indicted, for that he, on the 14th of December, 1791, by the name of Edward Burnham , did take to wife Ann Cordon , spinster , and afterwards, that is to say, on the 21st of January last, by the name of Thomas Haley , feloniously did take to wife, Jane Lawrence , spinster, his former wife being alive .

RICHARD SHRIMPTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am parish clerk of Long Crendon, in Buckinghamshire. (Produces the register-book of 1791; it is read).

'Edward Burnham, in the parish of Crendon,'Bucks, and Ann Cordon, were married at this'church, by licence, this 14th day of December,'in the year 1791; by me C. Klpling, minister;'this marriage was solemnized between us, Edward'Burnham, his mark; Ann Cordon , her mark, in'the presence of Charles Spencer , John Dodwell .'

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, that is the man; I was present at the marriage, his wife has left Crendon about five months; I saw her two or three times, about three days before she went away.

WILLIAM ASHFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am the parish-clerk of St. Giles's in the Fields, (produces the register book of marriages); reads, "21st of January, 1799, Thomas Haley , of this parish, batchelor, to Jane Lawrence of this parish, spinster."

Q. Were you present at the marriage? - A. I cannot say, positively, whether I was or not.

JANE LAWRENCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; I was married to him about twelve months ago, at St. Giles's church, in the name of Thomas Haley .

Prisoner's defence. The parish forced me to marry her, they took me up.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17991204-34

34. RICHARD PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , two shillings , the property of Thomas Alexander .

It appearing in evidence that the money had never been in the legal possession of the master, the Prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-35

35. MARY WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of July , a bolster, value 2s. two pillows, value 2s. two pillow-cases, value 1s. two sheets, value 4s. two blankets, value 4s. a rug, value 3s. two bed curtains, value 2s. a head-cloth, value 6d. two window-curtains, value 1s. and a looking-glass, value 2s. the property of Richard Hewitt , in a lodging-room .

MARY HEWITT sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Hewitt ; the prisoner lived twelve months in my house, she took a furnished lodging of me twelve months ago; the articles in the indictment were in the lodgings; the prisoner left the room about three months ago, and left the tickets in the drawers of several of the things; she left the room open, and the key on the table; I was not present when she was taken; I saw her on the Friday after, and she said she did not intend to take them.

ROBERT ATTERBURY sworn. - I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker, (produces all the property except one window curtain, and one sheet); they were pledged by the prisoner at the bar, in the name of Metcalf, at different times, and she said they were her own property. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Hewitt).

ESTHER TYRRELL sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, (produces a window curtain); I took this in of Mary Wilson, on the 19th of July. (It was deposed to by Mrs. Hewitt).

Prisoner's defence. A young man took the room with me, and he left the room; he said he would take the things out; I left the room a week before him.

Mrs. Hewitt. She took the room, and brought a man as her husband, and he was agreeable to his wife's proposal; she was gone a week before him.

Court. There is an end to this indictment clearly, the lodging was let to the husband.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-36

36. THOMAS BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , a cask, value 13s. the property of Richard Alvin .

RICHARD ALVIN sworn. - I am a victuller in Gray's-inn-lane ; I know the cask to be mine.

JAMES PRICE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Alvin: On Wednesday the 27th of November, between two and four o'clock, I saw the cask upon the prisoner's back in the street; I stopped him in Great Warner-street, Coldbath-fields; the prisoner was going in a direction from Gray's-inn-lane; Richard Alvin was on the cask; I sat the cask down at two o'clock to go out; when I stopped the prisoner he said he was going to Mr. Jones's to have it filled.

THOMAS GILES sworn. - I am a cooper; I stopped the prisoner in Elm-street; I asked him where he was going; he told me, he was going to Mr. Jones's to have it filled with small beer; then Mr. Alvin's man came up, and I stopped him; I took the cask back; I made it the week before last, and know it to be Mr. Alvin's. (The cask was produced and deposed to by Mr. Alvin.)

Prisoner's defence. I saw the cask standing in the street, and I was carrying it to the owner.

GUILTY (Aged 34.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-37

37. SAMUEL BUTCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a cotton sofa-cover, value 20s. the property of Henry Spencer .

There being no evidence of affect the Prisoner he was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-38

38. JAMES PANNEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , two shirts, value 10s. a round towel, value 1s. a pocket handkerchief, value 1s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 1s. a table-cloth, value 1s. and a napkin, value 1s. the property of Robert Hulme .

ROBERT HULME sworn. - I am a salesman in Leadenhall-market: On the 30th of November, about half past three, I saw a bag of linen delivered to my servant; I did not know the contents of the bag till they were brought back.

THOMAS FORDHAM sworn. - I work for Mr. Hulme; I am a day-labourer: I received a bag from Mr. Hulme; I was going home; I stopped at the Bull at Tottenham to refresh; the prisoner was there, and he rode with me as far as the White Hart at Tottenham , and then he left me, about nine o'clock; I then looked for the bag, and missed it; there had been nobody else in the cart; I then went to seek for the prisoner; I found him at a public house, the next day, he said he had got the things at home, and he would give them me again; I went with him to his house, and found part of the things behind the bed; there was a woman there, and he said, I am come for the things I brought home at night; ah, says the, I thought how it would be. I have got a shirt here; all the other things are left at Edmonton, at Mr. Hulme's house. The shirt was brought to me afterwards by the prisoner's wife.

JAMES BRLAR sworn. - I am a constable: (produces a shirt;) I received it from the last witness.

Mr. Hulme. I have no doubt that this shirt is mine; it is marked.

Prisoner's defence. We were both very drunk, and he was going full gallop all through Tottenham, and he lost his whip; I got out of the cart, and got a light, and found his whip; and as I was so near home, I did not get up again; and he set off full gallop again, and when I had got about half a mile, I found these things. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-39

39. JOHN WORRALL and SUSANNAH GREEN were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , seventy-seven prints, value 17l. thirty prints, value 30s. half a quire of paper, value 3d. five prints in gilt frames, value 2s. a glazier's diamond, value 10s. and various other articles, the property of Samuel-William Fores , in his dwelling-house ; and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

SAMUEL- WILLIAM FORES sworn. - The latter end of August, I employed the prisoner to paint my house; I live in Piccadilly ; I missed some things; I went to his lodgings, and found he had absconded; I traced him last Monday to his lodgings in Cumberland-street, Shoreditch; I found the two prisoners in the room, and all the articles in the indictment, except the diamond, and six small prints in frames, which were in pledge; he immediately acknowledged he had taken them, and hoped I would forgive him; he never attempted to deny it: I found the diamond and the six prints at the pawnbroker's.

Prisoner. You lent me the diamond.

Fores. I did, to cut a piece of glass in my shop; not to take it away.

GEORGE HALES sworn. - On the 9th of November I took in a diamond of the prisoner Green; I lent her five shillings upon it; (produces it.)

Fores. This is my diamond.

JAMES DEWER sworn. - (Produces six prints.)

I took them in of the prisoner Green, on the 10th of October.

Fores. I verily believe them to he mine.

MARY YOUNG sworn. - (Produces three prints.) I bought these three prints of the prisoner Green; she brought a respectable housekeeper with her; I gave her nine shillings for them.

Fores. The prints are mine; but not the frames or glasses.

PETER MASON sworn. - I am a constable;(produces a quantity of prints;) I found them at the prisoner's lodgings, No. 21. Cumberland-street.(They were deposed to by Mr. Fores.)

ELIZABETH BLACK sworn. - Mrs. Green asked me to put some prints into my room, and when I heard that they were stole, she said, if you think they are stole, take them down, for God's sake; I said no, they should remain up to be seen.

Worrall's defence. I took some of the caricatures, they were lying in a garret; I did not think them of any value.

Green's defence. I did not know that they were stole.

Worrall, GUILTY Death . (Aged 35.)

Green, GUILTY. (Aged 41.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17991204-40

40. BARNARD BARNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , a man's coat, value 12s. the property of Thomas Fownes .

THOMAS FOWNES sworn. - I work for Mr. Murdon; I drive a cart and two horses: Last Monday, between two and three o'clock, I was going to Brick-lane, I stopped the cart to see if my load was ready; I had fastened my coat to the spindle of the copses of the cart; the prisoner gave it a hitch, and then went on; then he turned back and gave it the other hitch; then I saw him take the coat, and put it in a sack that he had.

Prisoner's defence. I found it.

GUILTY (Aged 73.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-41

41. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , a wooden box, value 6d. a black silk cloak, value 10s. a silk bonnet, value 4s. four aprons, value 4s. five handkerchiefs, value 3s. four caps, value 4s. three pair of stockings, value 5s. six silver teaspoons, value 12s. a pair of shoes, value 3s. half a pound of tea, value 2s. and half a pound of sugar, value 6d. the property of Elizabeth Harvey .

ELIZABETH HARVEY sworn. - I live at Mr. Willis's, at Highbury Terrace: I left my box at the General Post-office till I got a place; I lately came from the country; I was at my place when the box was lost; it was to be sent for me; I left it in the apartments of Mr. Beak; it contained the articles set down in the indictment; they were there two months.

THOMAS WELDON sworn. - I am servant to the Islington carrier, Robert Redly: I received this box on a Friday in November, between one and two in the afternoon; I put it into the cart, and as I was going to meet my master at the top of St. John's-street, I turned to go down Compton-street , and I saw the box drawn quite back; I had put it close in the fore part of the cart; I had no other box in the cart; I had two chests of drawers; I then moved it to the fore part of the cart again, behind my back; and I had not drove five yards before I felt the box go from my back; I immediately got down, and saw the prisoner go from the cart with the box; I went up to him, and he dropped the box, and drew a knife immediately, about seven or eight inches long; a woman that keeps a green-stall sat upon the box while I went after the man; I followed him round the corner, but never lost sight of him; a gentleman on horseback, Mr. Cooke, put spurs to his horse, rode after him, and stopped him; I then returned, and delivered the box to my master; and the prisoner was brought to me; there was no direction to the box; (the box produced;) the chests of drawers that I had were for the same person; a smith came up to me as I was drawing my horse up, and I said I knew he was robbing me; he was close behind the cart when I saw him with the box.

RICHARD BENTLEY sworn. - I am a smith: On the 8th of November, I saw the prisoner take a box from a cart, and go away with it; I believe the prisoner is the man.

THOMAS COOKE sworn. - I am an engraver, at Shacklewell: On the 8th of November, I was coming to town, and saw a man and his pursuers; I rode after the man, and told him, if he was a thief he should not escape, and if he was an honest man he would turn back; he said he was no thief, he had only had a quarrel with his wife, and the parish officers were after him; I went back and told them that they were mistaken; then the carter came up, and said he had lost a box; I then pursued him; he turned down a narrow passage, and I after him, but it being paved my horse's heels flew up; he then took across a field, and I rode round by the turnpike road and met him; I had him in view the whole time, and then some people came up and caught hold of him; I did not see the knife, but I was told he had one.

JOHN RANGER sworn. - I am a tailor; I heard the cry of stop thief, I was at work upon my own board, in Corporation-row; I saw several people running, and a gentleman on horseback riding very fast; I came down stairs and put on my shoes, and followed, and I saw the prisoner with a knife in his hand; he said, d-n you, I will stab you; the prisoner made across the field, and I after him; he turned round to me, and said, d-n your eyes, what do you want, and presented this knife at me,(producing it), and swore he would stab me; I took this stick out of a boy's hand, (producing a large stick), and said, d-n your eyes, if you don't put the knife up I will break your arm; he said he had been to sea, and the gang was after him; I told him if that was so, I would see him righted; then he put up the knife, and went with me, when I got across the field, the gentleman on horseback came up, and forty or fifty people besides, and he was secured.(The property was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutrix).

Prisoner's defence; I had been into the Skin-market to get my knife ground, and a woman that I had cohabited with laid an information against me to get me to sea, and I saw her at a public-house door, and she said that is the man, and then I ran away.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t17991204-42

42. THOMAS SULLEN and JOHN KEFFORD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , three hundred weight of potatoes .

JAMES HARDING sworn. - I am an inn-keeper , at Edmonton : On the 15th of November, I missed a large quantity of potatoes from a barn at the bottom of my yard; Kefford was my ostler , and had been for twelve months, or a little above; and the other has worked for me, occasionally, nine years; Kefford was in my service at the time; I asked Kefford if he knew any thing of the potatoes; he said, no, how could he be there, he had no key I sold a Mr. Goodman a ton of potatoes, and in consequence of information from Mr. Goodman I got a search-warrant, and went to Sullen's house, where I found a quantity of potatoes which I knew to be mine; they are of a particular growth, I could have picked every one out that was mine from any quantity; they are grown in a particular kind of loom, that none of the farmers in our part grow them in; they both absconded.

Sullen's defence. I worked in the garden, and the gardener used to give me potatoes of a night.

Harding. Sullen came forward under a promise of mine to shew him mercy, and I have trusted him with considerable sums; I never had the least reason to suspect him of dishonesty.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17991204-43

43. JOHN WILLIAMS , otherwise CHARLES JOHN WILLIAMS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , two cloth coats, value 4l. two pair of kersymere breeches, value 20s. two waistcoats, value 10s. three shirts, value 10s. two cravats, value 2s. and two pair of stockings, value 2s. the property of John Keddie , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN KEDDIE sworn. - I keep a public-house : The prisoner lodged in my house from Friday week, he came home last Sunday evening very much intoxicated; he was apprehended on Monday night, between nine and ten o'clock, upon suspicion of taking the things mentioned in the indictment, I was present; he said we might take him to Newgate if we pleased, he was in bed; he said he would go with us any where, I had the peace officer with me; the trunk had been broke open which contained the things mentioned in the indictment, which I missed; I had not seen the inside of the chest for two or three months.

ROBERT WARREN sworn. - I am beadle of St. John's Wapping: On Monday or Tuesday evening I was at the watch-house, I was sent for to assist Mr. Brown the headborough; I went to Mr. Keddie's, the prisoner got up and dressed himself; he said he would shew us the girls that pawned the things, he mentioned the name of Mary Muckle; he took us through several turnings, and then we took him to a public-house, and left him in charge while we went to look after the girls; we came back again in about half an hour, and found the two girls there, they had come to the public-house where he was; I received these two duplicates from them.(John Bouren, the pawnbroker, was called, but did not appear).

CAROLINE BRIDGE sworn. - I live in East-Smithfield; I never saw the prisoner till last Saturday; the prisoner came home with a young woman that I lodge with; he asked me if I would go and pawn a shirt and a waistcoat for him, and I went with it, about three o'clock in the afternoon, to Mr. Murray's, in East Smithfield, and got seven shillings on it; I gave him the money and the duplicate; he said it was his own.(Jonathan Murray was called, but did not appear).

HUGH BROWN sworn. - I am headborough of St. John's Wapping: On Monday night Keddie fetched me to his house, and gave me charge of the prisoner, he was lying in bed.

Warner. (Produces two shirts.) I had these from the young woman.

Bridge. One of these shirts the prisoner gave to me, and I saw him give the other to Mary Muckle; he said I might make a shift of it.

Keddie. One of these shirts I know by the mark; I had not seen it for three months, my wife kept the key.

Bridge. I pawned a coat and a pair of breeches for him on Monday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, it was a snuff coloured coat, and the breeches were a light pair of kersymere; I pledged them at Mr. Baldwin's for one pound, and I gave him the money and the ticket; he gave me the ticket to take care of, and I gave it to the officer.

Keddie. I lost a brown coat and a blue coat, and the breeches; one pair was a light colour, and the other a brown.

Bridge. I pawned a blue coat at Mr. Murray's, for fourteen shillings, and while I was there he brought a waistcoat and a pair of breeches to pawn himself, the breeches were the same colour as the coat.

Prisoner's defence. I took that girl home to Mr. Keddie's, and I suppose she stole the things.

Q.(To Keddie.) Did he ever bring the girl to your house? - A. Never in this world; without it is by hearsay, she does not know where the house stands.

Bridge. I do not know where the house stands.

( Richard Johnson , the officer, produced a duplicate for seven shillings, for a shirt and waistcoat, in the name of Muckle).

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-44

44. WILLIAM BARLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , thirteen pounds weight of tallow, value 7s. the property of John Collier .

JOHN COLLIER sworn. - I am a tallow-chandler ; I live in Panton-street, Pentonville: On Tuesday evening last, Mr. Warley, a tallow chandler, in Gray's-inn-lane, and Mr. Smith, of Theobald's-road, with a constable, called upon me, to know if I had lost any tallow; I told them, I could not tell; they asked me, if I had any out of doors; I said, yes; I went out-side of the door, and the cask stood at the public-house, the next door to me where the prisoner was quartered; they looked in the cask, and they took a sample; it was a very large cask, and impossible to miss a small quantity.

RICHARD WORLEY sworn. - I am a tallowchandler: On Tuesday evening, about six o'clock, the prisoner at the bar brought a haver sack full of tallow to my shop, No. 17, Gray's-inn-lane, in order to sell it; I told him, we did not buy tallow; I asked him who it belonged to; he said, it belonged to himself; I asked him, what business he was, besides a soldier; he said none; I then asked him, how he came by that tallow; he said, it was his; I then observed to him, that none but a tallowchandler had a right to have such a thing in his possession; I saw it had been split up, after it had been marked, for a tallow-chandler's use, and it was English tallow; if it had been foreign tallow, I should not have had that suspicion; he then said, it did not belong to him, but to a comrade that was quartered with him; he then wished to take it away, but I retained it; he made a great deal of resistance; I told him, he should not take it away till he brought his comrade, or let me send for him; then he said, he would go for his comrade, and I sent my man with him; he said his quarters were in Covent-garden; then he attempted to snatch the bag away by force, he got away from me by force; I sent for a constable, he then went out of the shop in a hasty manner, and proceeded to the corner of Liquorpond-street; I turned back into my own shop and got assistance; he was pursued and brought back to my shop, and then he was taken to Hatton-garden; at the office he said, that his quarters were at the Belvidere, at Islington, and after the examination, I went to Mr. Collier's, knowing that his house joined the Belvidere, and there we learned that he had lost some tallow.

WILLIAM ANDREWS sworn. - I am constable of St. Andrew's Holborn (produces the tallow); the haver sack was at the office till yesterday, twelve o'clock; it looked very greasy, as if it had been used for the same purpose before.

Collier. Nothing in the world could be more alike than these two quantities are; I believe it to be mine.

Prisoner's defence. I found it in the road.

GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t17991204-45

45. THOMAS CUTLER and JOHN BUTLER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , eleven bars of iron of the weight of seven hundred pounds, value 30s. the property of John Thompson , and Thompson Bonnar .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Henry-William Hobbs , and John Addison .

Third Count. Laying them to be the property of certain persons, to the Jurors unknown.

HENRY- WILLIAM HOBBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a lighterman , in partnership with John Addison : On the 27th of October, there were four lighters at Paul's wharf , loaded with bars of iron, all belonging to Mr. John Thompson , and Thompson Bonnar ; I am in trust for the merchants and am responsible in certain cases, but I am not responsible in this case; between nine and ten, on Sunday evening, I received information that some iron had been taken out of my lighters; I got the assistance of Mr. Gottey, and other officers of the Marine Police-office, and I went with them, and the man that gave me the information, Mr. Williams, proceed to Paul's wharf; Mr. Williams pointed me out the barge of Mr. Jackson, where the iron was; she was twice or three times her length from my barge; she was loaded with coals, iron, and other goods; I went on board the large first; I went aft with a pistol in my hand; I found the two prisoners at the bar and three more persons on board; North, who is admitted an evidence, was one; there was one man, that was acquitted, Plumridge, who knocked down two or three gentlemen that were with me; we asked them where the iron was, which they had stole out of my lighter; one man jumped over-board, his name is Tridnall; the men at the bar were very quiet; I stood over them with my pistol, and swore if they were not quiet I would brow their brains out; and they certainly were very quiet; we secured Plum

ridge with cords, we tied him to the boat's bottom, and North was along with these two men; I had guard over the three; then we began to rummage; we asked them where the iron was, and they would not inform us, we were obliged to seek for it; we found it concealed under the bed place where the bed laid.

Q. Is that a place where goods are usually deposited? - A. No, I never heard that they were; I never saw iron deposited in such a place.

Q. How long have you been a lighterman? - A. I served my time to the water.

Q. What did you find? - A.Eleven bars of iron; I did not weight them, but as far as I can guess they are between six and seven hundred weight; I sent for Mr. Jackson, to where they were, and asked him if he would give up the iron, and he said, no he was sorry for his men.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You found North there? - A. Yes.

Q.Upon your going in you went in with your pistol? - A. Yes.

Q.These men were very quiet? - A. Yes.

JOHN GOTTEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am in the employ of the Marine Police-office; I went with Mr. Hobbs, on board a lighter, where we found the two prisoners; as soon as we came to the barge, Hobbs and I went on board; we walked over the goods to the after part of her, to the place they call the cabin; I think there was a man of the name of Plumridge standing, or lying upon the floor, covered with bedclothes; they afterwards turned out to be the two prisoners, the man that was discharged, and North who turned King's evidence; I asked Plumridge, where the iron was that was stolen, and brought on board there; I took hold of him, and told him. I must secure him till I found the iron; Mr. Hobbs looked under the batches and said, there is some of the iron, I know it to be my property; Mr. Hobbs then sent for Mr. Jackson.

Q. Did you see what the cargo consisted of? - A. There were coals and salt; Mr. Hobbs asked Jackson, in my hearing, if he had any iron stowed under the cabin floor, down that skuttle, pointing to the place where we found the iron; Mr. Jackson said, there was none there to his knowledge, if there was any it was unknown to him, they did not make any part of his cargo; then we secured them, and they were taken to the Marine Police-office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. These men were lying down? - A. Yes.

Q. They were, perhaps, as much undrest as workmen usually are? - A. I believe they were.

Q. JOHN NORTH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was servant to Mr. Edward Jackson , and the two prisoners were servants of Mr. Jackson: On Sunday morning, about one o'clock, Thomas Cutler, Thomas Tridnall , John Butler , and myself, and a little boy of the name of Hester, that was in the barge; we brought a barge out of White-friars dock, and brought her down to Mr. Anderson's, the next wharf to Paul's wharf, or the next but one; after securing the barge, I went and laid down upon the bed in the barge; I did not know at that time that Tridnall, Butler, and Cutler were going away with my master's punt; they went away and came back to the barge in about half an hour, and pulled me by the leg; they asked me to get up and lend a hand to get some iron out of the punt, which I refused; I laid down, and saw them, as they came past me, every time with the iron; they put it under the hatchway, close to where I lay; then they came and pulled me by the leg again, and said, would I go along with them, they had got a prize; I then got up, and Thomas Cutler , Tridnall, Butler and myself, got into the punt, and went to the lighters where the iron was, and Butler and Tridnall got into the lighter; Cutler and I staid in the punt, and they handed five bars into the punt; I suppose they might weigh, as near as I can guess, half a hundred each; and then we rowed back to our master's barge.

Q. How far was that barge from your master's barge? - A.About fifty or sixty yards from her dern; we put it in where the other was; we got back about three o'clock, and then every man laid down till day-light.

Q. What time at night was it that you were disturbed? - A. About ten or eleven o'clock at night; the Marine Police-officers came with Mr. Hobbs; Tridnall jumped over-board.

Q. Did Mr. Hobbs see the iron that you had taken? - A. Yes; he lifted up the hatchway where the iron was, he claimed it, and we were all taken.

Q. Was that the same iron that you had taken from the barge? - A. The same.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How often may you have been in a Court of Justice to tell a story of this sort before? - A. Never.

Q.This was the first time in your life that ever your moral conduct was questioned, nobody ever thought of accusing you of a thing of this sort before? - A. No, not that I know of.

Q. Is that as true as all the rest of your evidence; do you mean to say, you never were charged with any thing before? - A. I have been charged with several things that were not true.

Q. And was always as innocent as you are now; how long ago was it? - A. I cannot say; I never was had before a Magistrate but once.

Q. How often have you been charged with robbing one man and another? - A. I cannot say, how many times.

Q. Do you remember the wet linen at Henley-upon-Thames? - A. Yes.

Q. You remember the pig? - A. Yes.

Q. When you went and sold the man his own pig? - A. No.

Q. It was his next neighbour's? - A. Yes.

Q. You were a virtuous man that was seduced by getting into the company of these bad man? - A. No, all were together.

Q. You were so very sorry for what you had done, that you went to Mr. Hobbs and told him of it? - A. No, I did not.

Q. What did you do with yourself all day? - A. I was on board my master's barge.

Q. You were taken at night and carried to the Marine Police-office? - A. Yes.

Q. And sent to jail? - A. Yes.

Q. You come out of jail now, do not you? - A. Yes.

Q. You were brought up to be examined the next day? - A. Yes.

Q. When were you brought up to be examined the next time, Wednesday, or Thursday after, was not it? - A. Yes.

Q. When you were examined on the Monday, you did not say a word of this? - A. No.

Q. Then you were committed? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you began to think you should be hanged? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Transported then? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Upon your oath did not you expect to be hanged or transported? - A. No.

Q. You thought to get off with a whipping perhaps? - A. No, I could not think any thing of that.

Q. Upon your oath did not you expect to be hanged or transported? - A. Yes.

Q.And then you thought it better that somebody else should be hanged than you should? - A. I thought my life was as good as theirs.

Q. And then you swore the same sort of story that you have stated now? - A. Yes.

Q. Which of these two nights were you the watchman? - A. The same Saturday night.

Q. Tridnall jumped over board - what became of him, was he drowned? - A. No.

Q. The man that is born to be hanged is never drowned to be sure? - A. I do not know what is become of him. (One of the bars of iron produced).

Mr. Hobbs. This is the kind of iron that my barge was loaded with, there were no other barges at Paul's wharf loaded with iron of that description; I had four, all one person's property; we call it all Paul's wharf premises, there was other iron upon the wharf belonging to Mr. Bellin.

Mr. Gurney. Q. There is no specific mark of your's upon the iron? - A. No; it has the merchant's mark upon it.

Q. What was the quantity you had in these four barges? - A.Two hundred ton.

Q. Have you then ascertained by any means, that there is any deficiency? - A. The land-waiter weighs them; and he said there was a deficiency.

JOHN BELLIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I have been a wharfinger and iron broker fourteen years.

Q. Is the iron now produced of the same species as that on board this gentleman's barge? - A. Exactly, it is a very particular sort; it is what is termed in this country Russia tire iron, to distinguish it from common bars; I had never seen another sample of this sort of iron in the port of London before; I have no doubt in the world that it is Mr. Hobbs's, besides this; there were nine lighters loaded with iron in Paul's wharf; there was not room to stow the ninth, and that was stowed in a dock a few yards off, but there were no other lighters that contained similar iron to this of Mr. Hobbs's, and there was none of that kind landed at that time; there is but one other iron broker besides myself, and I think it is impossible that any of that sort of iron could have come to London without my knowledge.

Cutler's defence. I had come from Buckinghamshire with a barge, and I laid down and went to sleep; I never saw any thing that is laid to my charge.

Butler's defence. I laid in the barge, North and Tridnall were up, I saw nothing that went forward.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN LANGLEY sworn. - I am a barge-master at Marlow; I know North, I would not believe him upon his oath.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You never heard him sworn any where? - A. No.

Q. Then why would you not believe him upon his oath? - A. He is a wicked, blackguard, drunken fellow, he bears a very bad character; I never heard a worse in my life.

Cutler called six, and Butler four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-46

46. NATHAN NATHAN , alias NATHANNIEL NEWTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a silk handkerchief, value 1d. a gown, value 2s. 6d. a stannel petticoat, value 3s. a calico petticoat, value 4s. a shift, value 2s. 6d. a pair of stockings, value 2s. an apron, value 1s. 6d. a half-shawl, value 2s. two half-handkerchiefs, value 6d. four caps, value 2s. and two pocket-handkerchiefs, value 1s. the property of Mary Dowling , spinster .

MARY DOWLING sworn. - I live at Mr. Dilly's in the Poultry: On the 16th of last month I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); my mother lost them; I can only speak to the property.

JANE DOWLING sworn. - The last witness is my daughter; I rested upon a window in Cornhill with these things, I was going to Mr. Dilly's with them, about a quarter past five o'clock; I had them in two parcels, one under the left arm, and the other under the right; the right arm parcel was taken from me by the prisoner at the bar; when he was taken, he said, his name was Isaac Newton ; that young man that stands there, took them from me; he was standing there, but I did not suppose he was standing there to rob me; when he snatched it from me I turned round, and saw it was the same person that had been looking at me, and when he was brought back before me, I saw it was him, and the bundle was brought back immediately; it contained the things mentioned in the indictment.(Repeating them).

HENRY FOWELL sworn. - I am a constable: I was coming along Cornhill, I saw this poor woman fainting away, she told me, she was robbed; the bundle was brought back with the prisoner, and they were both delivered to me by Mr. James.

(Produces the property). It was deposed to by the prosecutrix.

Mr. Alley. (To Jane Dowling). Q. Did you not say before the Lord-Mayor, that you did not know whether he was the man or not? - A. No; I was confident he was the man.

GEORGE JAMES sworn. - I was in Cornhill looking for a person I expected to meet; hearing the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner run across the road and throw away a bundle, tied in a silk handkerchief; I immediately pursued him, and took him in the Royal Exchange; I did not lose sight of him more than a second; I am confident he is the same person; the bundle was brought back to the old woman before I brought the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I was going of an errand to my uncle's, there was a cry of, stop thief, and they took me; I am innocent of the charge, I never did any thing of the kind.

The prisoner called his master, and five other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17991204-47

47. EDWARD ROZIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , a woollen cloth coat, value 20s. the property of Robert Savage .(The case was opened by Mr. Kerwood.)

ROBERT JEWELL sworn. - I am servant to Robert Savage: On the 22d of November, I saw the prisoner take a coat off the nail at Mr. Savage's door, and conceal it under his coat; I stopped him and brought him back to the shop.

RICHARD NIBLEY sworn. - I am a constable(produces the coat): I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I received this coat from the last witness.

Jewell. This is the same coat.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, I know nothing about the coat; I am innocent of the charge.

Q.(To Jewell.) Q. Was he in liquor? - A. I cannot say whether he was or not; he might be a little.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 53.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-48

48. JAMES CHARLICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , two pounds of pewter, value 1s. 10d. and half a pound of sober, value 2d. the property of Thomas-Long Sheene .

JAMES SHEENE sworn. - I am the son of Thomas-Long Sheene; my father is a brazier in Holborn, facing St. Andrew's church ; the prisoner was an apprentice to my father: On Wednesday, the 6th of November, I was passing by the shop window, and not hearing the apprentices at work, I looked in at the window; I saw the prisoner; I stopped a little while at the window, and he came close to the window; I saw him open his right hand breeches pocket, and there was a great deal of pewter in his pocket; then he opened his pocket, and put another piece of pewter in; I immediately went up stairs, and told my father of it; I did not see where he took the pewter from, he had it in his hand when I first saw him.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You use pewter and solder to tin your copper vessels? - A. We use no solder, only pewter.

Q. Have you any other apprentices? - A. Yes; two.

Q. Before the pewter is in a proper state to tin your vessels, there is some labour required upon it? - A. He only melts it at the time he wants to use it, but he had made use of the pewter which he wanted the day before.

THOMAS-LONG SHEENE sworn. - I have lost a considerable quantity of pewter; in consequence of my son's information, I went down stairs and

asked the prisoner what he had got; he said, he had got nothing but a pair of snuffers, which he had in his hand; he said, he had nothing in his pocket; I searched him, and in his pocket, I found two pounds of pewter, and a pound and a half of solder; I then sent for a constable, took him before the Alderman, and he was committed; he has been with me five years, I took him out of charity and cloathed him, and gave him one shilling every Saturday night to keep him honest.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did he not tell you, that he had taken that for the purpose of tinning your own vessels? - A. I do not recollect that he said any such thing; he had not business to put it in his pocket, nor had he any use for it at that time.

Q. Are they not obliged to make use of some preparation before they can use it? - A. None whatever, except to melt it; it must be melted every time it is used.

Court. Q. What time of day was it? - A. About half past one, when all the men were at dinner.

EDWARD GEARE sworn. - I am apprentice to Mr. Sheene; my master called me to him, the prisoner was with him; I saw him pull five pieces of pewter out of his pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you not hear him say, at the time, that his fellow apprentice had taken away the metal that was appropriated for his use? - A. No, he did not; he said, he had taken it for his own use.

Prisoner's defence. I got some sal ammoniac and pewter, to tin a dozen of sauce-pans, which I tinned that day, I put it away to make covers for the sauce-pans; next day my fellow-apprentice insisted upon having the sal ammoniac; I said, he should not, and I put it in my breeches pocket, and my master happened to see me, and when he came up and asked me what I had got, I pulled it out immediately.

Sheene. He had no saucepans to tin that day.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Confined six months in Newgate , whipped in Jail , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t17991204-49

49. GEORGE MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , thirteen penny pieces, and ten halfpence , the property of Peter Priest .

GEORGE GOWLER sworn. - Mr. Priest keeps the Brown-Bear, the corner of Garlick-hill , he desired me to sit up, he found himself robbed of penny-pieces, and copper: On Saturday, the 15th of November, I went there, and went to bed; I got up at six o'clock in the morning and watched, and saw the prisoner go into the bar, he is servant to Mr. Priest; I did not see him take any money out, but I heard the till open, he might be there four or five minutes, I told Mr. Priest of it; Mr. Priest went to the till, and missed seventeen penny-pieces, and five pennyworth of halfpence; Mr. Priest then told him, he had got some money of his, and asked him what money he had about him; he said, he had got none, but what he had given him; Mr. Priest, then made him produce what he had got; Mr. Priest took from him six penny-pieces, and an officer seven; I was on the stairs, opposite the bar, when he went in.

PETER PRIEST sworn - I keep the Brown-Bear, in Upper Thames-street; I missed some money out of the till, I could not tell which way it went, and I got the last witness to watch.

WILLIAM COLES sworn. - I am a constable(Produces the money)

Priest. I had these penny-pieces in my till the over-night; I had marked them.

Prisoner's defence. I am very sorry for what I have done; I have neither father nor mother, nor any friends in the world.

GUILTY . (Aged 13.)

Publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17991204-50

50. ROBERT RAYMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , a handkerchief, value 1s. a petticoat, value 5s. a teapot, value 6d. a sugar bason, value 1s. and a creampot, value 6d. the property of John Alder .

MARY ALDER sworn. - I am the wife of John Alder; I can only prove the property.

MARY JONES sworn. - I work for the washerwoman that washes for Mrs. Alder; last Monday, I was in Wood-street , with a large barrow of clothes in several bundles; the barrow was before me, and a basket behind me, and there was a little bundle standing upon the basket; I was looking out some clean linen to take into another gentleman's-house; I looked round, behind me, and saw my bundle in the hand of a young man going up the street; he went up Goldsmith-street, and called out, stop thief; presently I went back again to the barrow of clothes, while somebody went after him; he was brought back to me, with a bundle, by Mr. Collins, he has had it ever since; it contained the property mentioned in the indictment (repeating it); I received them from my master's to take care of; I am sure the prisoner is the same man.

JOHN COLLINS sworn. - I am a confectioner, in St. Paul's Church-yard: On Monday, about a quarter past two o'clock, as I was coming up St. Martin's-le-grand, I heard the cry of stop thief,

and then I saw the prisoner run as fast as he could into St. Martin's-le-grand; I joined in the pursuit; I saw him turn into Bell-square; I ran after him across Foster-lane, past Goldsmiths' Hall; I was out of breath, and could run no farther, and at that moment a lad came up to me with the bundle, his name is Hall; the prisoner was stopped in Staining-lane; I took the bundle; the prisoner had been knocked down, and the mob were bringing him back, when I advanced up to him, and took hold of him; he had dropped the bundle; I laid hold of him, and gave him to an officer.

Mary Jones claimed the bundle.

WILLIAM HALL sworn. - I am a glazier: I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner running down Cary-lane, towards Foster-lane; then he dropped the bundle at the corner, and then he ran on towards Mould-maker's-row; I picked up the bundle, and gave it to Mr. Collins.

MARY WHEELER sworn. - I take in washing; I sent Mary Jones , last Monday, between two and three o'clock, with this bundle; Mrs. Alder lives in Lower East Smithfield; Mrs. Isherwood, Mrs. Alder's sister, desired me to carry this bundle for her

Mr. Collins produced the bundle.

Mrs. Alder. This is the property I left at Mrs. Isherwood's, for the washerwoman to bring to me; I can swear to the petticoat; the other things I cannot.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the bundle in the street; I saw the man that ran; but he was not a bit like me; I ran after him, but he got into some place, and I could not find him; I was coming back, and they charged me with it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-51

51. WILLIAM TELFAR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , an iron key, value 10d. the property of Thomas Gilbert .

WILLIAM MOLES sworn. - I am a book-keeper to Mr. Thomas Gilbert , who keeps the Old Bell in Holborn : On Saturday, the 9th of November, about three minutes past seven, I went into the office to settle with the Egham coachman; the wind blew rather cold, and I put the door to; I had been in the office about ten minutes; I heard some person pull the key out of the door; I instantly ran out into the yard, and saw the prisoner against the corner of the door, on the outside; I instantly seized him by the collar, and asked him what reason he had for taking the key out of the door; he denied having it; while I was asking him the coachman came out and took him by the collar, he denied it still; I presently saw him drop the key out of his hands; he then said, I have not your key, there lies your key on the ground; the coachman then said to him, I know it does, for I saw you drop it; he then turned rather round, and the coachman picked up the key; when it was picked up, it was wrapped up in a paper of soft soap; nothing appeared but the bow of the key; I then sent for an officer, and he was taken into custody.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What time of day was this? - A.Between seven and eight in the evening.

Q.There was a great light in your yard? - A. Yes, there was a light at the coach-office.

Q. If he had meant to steal the key, you know it would have been much better to have locked you in, and then you could not have pursued him? - A.Certainly.

Q. Did you say, before the Magistrate, that you saw him drop it? - A. Yes, I did.

Q.Do you mean to swear that? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM WALKER sworn. - I am a coachman, I drive the Egham coach: I was settling my waybill, I heard a man taking a key out of the door; I told William Moles of it; he instantly ran out; I went out with him, and saw the prisoner; I asked him what he took the key out of the door for; he said he had not got it; I told him he had; upon that he turned himself round, put his hand against the door, and dropped it down; I saw him put his hand behind him and I heard it fall; I told him so when he dropped it; he said he had not; I stooped down to pick it up, and he turned round and said, there laid the key; it was squeezed up in a paper, all but just the ring of it; then we sent for a constable, and he was secured. I delivered the key to the officer.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Hatton-Garden: (Produces a key;) I received it from the coachman; I tried it with the door, and it fitted.

Moles. This is the key.

Mr. Alley. Q. The key belongs to you? - A.No; Mr. Gilbert.

Q. If you were to lose the key, through carelessness, would you not have to get another? - A. No, Mr. Gilbert would get another; he got that.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge; I never saw the key.

GUILTY (Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-52

52. ELIZABETH HATLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a silver table-spoon, value 8s. the property of Adney Carter .

- WHITEHALL sworn. - I am waiter at the Bolt and Tun, Fleet-street ; the prisoner was a chair-woman : On Wednesday, the 4th of November, I missed a table-spoon; I had seen all the spoons right that morning; and at night the spoon was missing; the prisoner went away in a very odd kind of way, she did not stop to ask for her money, or whether she was to come the next morning or not; the spoon has been since found at the pawnbroker's.

ROBERT ALLEN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: On the 5th of November I lent six shillings upon a table-spoon, to the prisoner at the bar: (produces it). I am sure the prisoner is the person.

WILLIAM MARCH sworn. - I am ward-beadle: I was sent for by Mrs. Carter; I took charge of the prisoner; I went with her to her apartments, she went up stairs and opened the box to put on her bonnet and cloak, and I saw this hussif lying there; I opened it, and found in it a duplicate of a spoon.

Prisoner's defence. I do not know what to say; I never was guilty of the like before.

Whitehall. This is Mr. Carter's spoon; it is marked W B A. Mr. Carter's name is Adney.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 37.)

Confined one week in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-53

53. MARY PIPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , a linen sheet, value 5s. and a linen shirt, value 1s. the property of George Fairfield , Esq. (The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ELIZA FAIRFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of Mr. George Fairfield , our house is in the parish of Shepperton ; the prisoner was my house-maid ; it wanted a week of three months that she had been in my service: I always make it a rule to give a written list of every article that I deliver to the servants to wash; I had missed a great deal of property, and on Sunday, I think the 26th of November, I found a sheet and shirt in her box; that was after she was committed, she was committed on Saturday morning; on Friday night I asked her what she had done things; she told me she had taken them other's; I asked her when, she said on the eceding the Friday she went to fetch the can; and her mother asked her how she came by them; she said, her mother told her she had better not have them; and that she told her mother that I had given them to her; and that she told her, it had a great appearance of untruth, for that as she was going out of my service, it was not likely that I should reward a servant, especially with household linen; as they were not articles of that kind that would ever be of any use to her in life, being too fine. I had been to her box before, but did not look over the articles. I told her I was sure she had nothing of mine, as I had always found her very honest; on the Sunday afternoon I searched her box, with a constable; he brought the keys, and opened the box; I examined, and found in a pillow-case, the two articles in the indictment; I had never delivered that to her; I had given her warning some time before, and her time was nearly expired; it was a piece of a shirt that is of no value, but has my mark upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hovell. Q. When did you first communicate your suspicions to her? - A. I stated it to her on the Friday that I was robbed; but I did not suspect her, I had a high opinion of her honesty.

Q. She opened the box very readily? - A. She did.

Q. The box was opened, and you might have seen the contents? - A. Yes.

Q. On Sunday the search was made? - A. Yes; she sent to have her things; she was then in prison; I thought it then a justice due to myself to examine particularly.

Q.What might you have said to her, in order to induce a confession? - A. The confession had nothing to do with these articles.

JOHN SANDERS sworn. - I am a constable: On Friday, the 22d of November, I apprehended the prisoner in the parish of Shepperton; I took her before a Magistrate on Friday; the prisoner gave me the keys of her box on the Sunday; I went to Mr. Fairfield's house; Mrs. Fairfield found a part of a shirt, and part of a sheet; (produces part of a sheet.)

Mrs. Fairfield. They have my mark upon them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Poole. Q.It is a part of a shirt, and part of a sheet? - A. The remaining part was in her box, made into things for her own purpose.

Q. The other parts you have not brought here? - A. No; they were made up into other things, and there were reasons why I thought it was not proper to bring them. I am sure they formed the remainder of the sheet.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Jury. (To Sanders.) Q.Had you the keys of

her box in your possession from the Friday to the Sunday? - A. No; I gave them to Mr. Fairfield's coachman to give to her parents.

The coachman was called, who stated that he delivered them to his wife, who was not in Court.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-54

54. MARY HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , a damask napkin, value 7s. two damask clouts, value 4s. a hand towel, value 1s. a pocket handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. a quarter of a pound of grounding thread, value 1s. and a ball of floss silk, value 3d. the property of George Fairfield , Esq. (The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ELIZA FAIRFIELD sworn. - I am the wife of Mr. George Fairfield; the prisoner was my nursery-maid ; in consequence of suspicion being communicated to her, she searched her box herself; I had determined to search the boxes of all my servants; I met the prisoner first, I told her I desired to see her box; she said she had not the key; says I, child, you have not been out; she felt for her key, and found it in her pocket; she then went to her box, and took out two damask napkins, two damask clouts, and a hand towel; she said, these are your's, you had a vast quantity of linen in the wash, how they came into my box I do not know; it must have been by mistake; but they are your's, take them; I then found some grounding bread; she said it was her's, if she was to depart the world that moment: I told her I had bought twelve pounds of it, but a short time before; I asked her if she had bought it; she said, no, it was given to her; she then said, it may be your's, take it; she then said, she had another box, would I wish to look at that; I said, yes; in that box I found a white pocket handkerchief which I knew from the make and appearance, to be mine; she said it was her's, at first; but afterwards said it was mine; she told me, when I was gone on a list to Kingston, she and Mary Piper took each of them a damask napkin; that each of them took two damask clouts out of the first large drawer in the wardrobe, and a hand-towel out of the bottom drawer; she took a quarter of a pound of thread which she said had been brought her by one of the children to mark stockings with, and she had not had an opportunity of returning it.

JOHN SANDERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a constable: (produces the property). received them from Mrs. Fairfield.(The property was deposed to by Mrs. Fairfield.)

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, not called three witnesses, who gave her an excellent character.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17991204-55

55. RICHARD ISLES and CLEMENITNA SOPHIA SPENCER were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , fifty-six pounds of lead, value 8s. the property of the East-India Company .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of John Poynder .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

And the other prisoner for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ROBERT MUSSETT sworn. - I am a labourer and watchman in the East-India Company's warehouses, in the liberty of the Old Artillery Ground : The prisoner is a plumber , working under Mr. Poynder, who is employed by the East-India Company in these warehouses; Parker was with me; the prisoner left work about six in the evening; he took a load of lead; they got it from the roof, and placed it near the wall.

Q. Who supplies the India Company with lead? - A. Mr. Poynder.

Q. So that it must belong either to Mr. Poynder or the Company? - A. Yes; there were three men at top, ready to throw the lead off, and there were two men at the bottom; then the three men at the top threw down three large loads of lead, it was cuttings; and then they all came down into the yard, to where the lead lay, five of them; the prisoner was one of them; then two of them went to the watch-box belonging to the bricklayer's labourer, and took out two large parcels more of lead; each man had his load of lead, all the five; I followed the prisoner, and all five walked out of the yard, into Cutler-street, and from there to Houndsditch, strait down Houndsditch to Bishopsgate-street; three of them turned to the right, and two to the left; the prisoner turned to the right; I followed them till they arrived in Steward-street, at Mrs. Spencer's; the first man that came up to the door is not here; the prisoner came up in a minute; I saw Mrs. Spencer in the parlour; a little girl opened the door; it was then getting duskish: the first man that went in he went directly right across the shop, into a passage; there was a light in the parlour, and the front of the parlour is all glass; Mrs. Spencer came out of the parlour with the candle, and followed him; I then turned

round and saw the prisoner I sles crossing the street to come up to the door, and Parker at his heels; I stepped off the step of the door directly, and let Isles up; the same girl opened the door, and let Isles in; I saw him go into the same passage with his load; my partner then went for a constable; I never left the door till the constable came, which was in about six minutes; we rang at the bell directly, the girl opened the door, and I saw Mrs. Spencer in the shop; I said to her, here are two men come in here loaded with lead; she said, no man had come in there that night; I told her I was very sure there was, for I had followed them from the Company's warehouses, and never lost sight of them till they entered the house; she still insisted that no man had come in; I told her I was sure there had; I told her she must give me the candle, I had no doubt but I should find either the man or the lead; then she gave me the candle; I proceeded into the yard instantly, I found there was no lead in the yard, nor no men; it is a very small paved yard; there was a sort of a hovel which I supposed this man might have gone into, I went up there, and there was a pair of stair-cases; but I found nobody; I came down again, and took the candle in my hand; I looked round and saw a large hole in the wall; I applied the candle into the hole, where I saw the lead in the cellar through the hole; I said to Mrs. Spencer, here is the property that the men have brought; I dare say I shall find the men in the cellar; she said, I was welcome to go into the cellar; upon that I turned to the right, where this lead was, in a coal-hole; the quantity was about five hundred weight, as near as I can guess; it was sheet-lead, quite new the greater part of it; there were some pieces which were not new; it was marked "No. 1, Party-wall," with a chalk-mark; from the folds, the double, and the size of it, I suspected that to be the lead; Parker then wrote my name upon it with a knife: then we went into the cellar, and hunted about, but could not find any body; there was a hole that went into the passage, that we suppose they could get out at; we then went into the shop, and found some more lead, with the chalk-mark; I left Parker and the constable, I went for one of the elders, Mr. Ware; I returned in about five or six minutes to Mrs. Spencer's; I went down with Mr. Ware into the cellar to see this lead, Mrs. Spencer went down with us; I opened the lead, and shewed Mr. Ware the mark"No. 1, Party-wall;" Mr. Ware and I and Parker went for the plumber, leaving the constable in the house; the foreman, Foster, came with us; and Mrs. Spencer went down with us into the cellar; he opened the lead, and said it had the marks that came from the shop upon it; he said, he had not the least doubt it was the property of the East-India Company; Mr. Ware told me to put a mark upon this lead; I took a knife out of my pocket and marked the lead with a W, every lot that was there, which amounted to twenty-eight, in the presence of Mrs. Spencer; when Mr. Foster said he had not the least doubt that they were the same marks, and if it was left till day-light he should be better able to tell the marks a great deal; there were eight pieces in the shop, I marked them with the same mark as those in the cellar, a W. There were some sheet-lead and some cuttings in the cellar and in the shop both; then, as we did not take the lead away, Mrs. Spencer gave her word and honour that nothing should be deficient till Monday morning; this was on the Saturday evening; then we went away, constable and all. I returned again on the Monday about eleven o'clock, with Mr. Ware, Mr. Foster, and Mr. Parker; Mrs. Spencer was at home; we went down into the cellar, and Mrs. Spencer went with us; we found the lead had been hauled about, and not one piece upon another, it was quite altered from the state in which we had left it; they were strewed about; the piece that we observed, on the Saturday night, to have "No. 1, Party-wall," was entirely rubbed out, nor a bit to be seen; the W's were all standing; Parker had wrote my name upon one piece, and that I found in the cellar; then we went into the shop, and the pieces that were marked "No. 1, Party-wall," had been rubbed out, and chalked planner; then Ray and Armstrong came, and took the lead away. Isles was not taken till the 21st, about eight or nine days after.

Q. He did not return to his work the next day? - A.No; then we took the lead to Worship-street; Armstrong and Foster and I then took a piece of lead to the building; the plumber thought it would match; the piece did not match there, but there was one place where it did match a little.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Isles.)

Q. One of the bits of lead did match? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore it appeared to you that some of that lead was cut that had been affixed to the house? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. It was the end of a gutter, was it not? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. (Counsel for Spencer.)

Q. This shop was, or has been a plumber's shop? - A. Yes.

Q.It had been shut up for a considerable time? - A. Yes.

Q. Mrs. Spencer's husband had carried on the business of a plumber there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear that there was a glass partition between the shop and parlour? - A. Yes.

Q. Recollect yourself; is there any thing more between the shop and the parlour, than four square

of glass, with a large nob in the middle of each? - A. Yes; the whole front is glass.

Q. Recollect yourself, because I understand the fact is not so; is there more glass than in the parlour door? - A. Yes.

Q. The shop window was shut up? - A. Yes, and the glass door outside.

Q. You know the house had been uninhabited for some time? - A. Yes.

Q. The windows were very dirty? - A. It was dirty, but I could see every thing clear.

Q. When you knocked at the door, the child opened the door? - A. Yes.

Q. She called her mother, did she not? - A. No, Mrs. Spencer met me coming out of the passage into the shop.

Q.And she told you that you were welcome to search? - A. Yes.

Q. She was not taken up, but voluntarily attended the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. She attended three times? - A. She did, and was afterwards dismissed upon her finding bail; she surrendered to take her trial.

CHARLES PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am employed by the India Company: I was with Muffett. I saw the prisoner, on the 12th of October, and four others, loaded with lead; I followed the prisoner to Mrs. Spencer's house, and saw him carry the lead into Mrs. Spencer's house I was not four yards from him all the way; we got a peace-officer, and then went into the house, I then saw Mrs. Spencer; I met her coming from a little room or passage, with a candle; I staid at the door till my partner said, here it is; and then I went into the cellar; I saw the lead, and that part which lay upon the prisoner's shoulder, which I particularly noticed, lay uppermost; it was the only piece that was doubled up in that form, an therefore I immediately wrote my partner's name upon it with the corner of my pocket-knife; the plumber was sent for, and he said he knew the lead, but he should know it more particularly when he saw it by day-light; the piece in the cellar that was marked "No. 1, Party-wall," the mark was rubbed off when I saw it on the Monday; and there was some lead in the shop.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Mrs. Spencer attended again and again before Isles was taken? - A. Yes.

Q. And she attended when Isles was taken? - A. Yes, and entered into a recognizance to appear.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was there not some lead found in the watch-box? - A. Yes.

Q. That was cuttings? - A. Yes.

Q. That had never been fixed to the freehold? - A. It had been laid down, and then cut off by the workmen.

JOHN WARE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an assistant elder to the India Company's warehouse: On Saturday, the 12th of October, Muffett came for me, and I went to Mrs. Spencer's house, and found a great deal of lead, five or six hundred weight, I suppose, or more; I saw Mrs. Spencer; I said, Mrs. Spencer, this is a very unlucky affair for you; your house has been shut up a great while, and I should not have thought of such a business being carried on; the Company are robbed very much in these articles, and I am very sorry you should bring yourself into this predicament, to buy this lead; she said, she had a family, her husband was in trouble, and she bought it to help maintain her family; she said she had not bought any that night, nor had any been there; nor was there any people there; I said, that being the case, it would be much to your honour not to disturb this lead till Monday, as it began to be eight o'clock at night; then I returned on Monday, Mrs. Spencer was at home, but I found the lead in a very different situation to what I had seen it on the Saturday night; there was a piece of lead with something chalked upon it, which was rubbed off when I came to see it again on Monday.

JOHN FOSTER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to Mr. Poynder: I saw some lead in Mrs. Spencer's cellar, of the same sort that was working at that time in the India Company's warehouses.

Court. Q. Was that lead any lead that had not been affixed to the warehouse? - A. It had been all laid down, and cut off afterwards to the right length, and taken away as cuttings; and then it is deducted.

Q.Then a great deal of it was cuttings, that had been cut off from that which was affixed? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You say you laid the lead down, and fixed it? - A. Yes.

Q. After it is so laid down and fixed, do you cut off any superfluities? - A. Yes; after the lead is opened out, we cut it to the size.

Q. Are those cuttings taken off before it is fixed? - A.It is laid down loose in the gutter, it is not fastened down.

Court. Q. In the cellar there was some cast lead and some milled lead? - A. There was some little milled lead and some old lead.

Mr. Knapp. (To Muffett.) Q. Did you observe cast lead in the cellar? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the cast lead in the cellar at the top or at the bottom? - A. At the top.

JAMES CHETHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was present at the examination before Mr. Brodie; when the prisoner was under examination, I saw the prisoner sign this paper; that is

Mr. Brodie's hand-writing; it was his own free voluntary offer, (it is read); "November 2, 1799, Ricahrd Isles being now charged before me Richard Brodie, Esq. with feloniously stealing a quantity of sheet lead, the property of the India Company, voluntarily confessed and declared as follows: that he is a journeyman to Mr. Poynder, a plumber, in Great Eastcheap, and was employed by him in putting gutter lead, and lead flats, upon the Company's warehouses, near Petticoat-lane; that he worked at the warehouses on last Saturday was three weeks, that when they left work this examinant, and one William, and some of the journeymen, took each some lead from the said warehouse; that the examinant, and the said William, carried their lead to Mrs. Spencer's, in Steward-street, near the Artillery-ground, where they left the same, with intention to call again for it; that Mrs. Spencer's little girl opened the door and let them in, the examinant asked whether her mother was at home, and she said her mother was not in the way; examinant said he did not want her, and he did not see Mrs. Spencer at all; examinant, and the said William, threw their lead into the yard, but not into the cellar, and they both came out again at the street-door." (Signed) " Richard Brodie ."

Witness, "James Chetham, "Falcon-square.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am one of the Police-officers belonging to Worship-street: I apprehended the prisoner on the 21st of October, in a house in Rose-lane, in the parish of Christ Church, Spitalfields; I saw the prisoner through the keyhole of the door, and I opened the door by force, and took hold of him; I had Ray and Mason with me; I told him I wanted him for stealing the lead from the India warehouses, which had been carried to Mrs. Spencer's; he said he had carried it there, but he was not paid for it; I went on the Monday to Mrs. Spencer's, and she told me we might take what lead we liked, and we took nine pieces; she came to the Magistrate's, and two gentlemen passed their words for her appearance, and she appeared again on Thursday; the lead is in Court.

Muffett. This is the same kind of lead that is upon the India Company's warehouses.

Isles's defence. I am innocent of the charge that is laid against me, and therefore I shall leave it to my Counsel.

The prisoner Isles called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Spencer put in a written defence, as follows:

"Gentlemen, I do assure you that I am perfectly innocent with respect to receiving this lead; I never have, at any time, bought any lead that I had the least reason to think was stolen; it is the custom of our trade to buy and fell both lead and glass supposing it honestly come by, giving a fair valuation for it; but the lead in question I knew nothing of till these men, and the beadle, came to ask for it; nor did I see the man that was charged with stealing it till my third appearance before the Magistrate, I then knew him in consequence of having known his master that he was apprenticed to, a Mr. Wildman, a very respectable plumber in Whitechapel, I have known both Mr. and Mrs. Wildman some years; I hope your Lordship, and the gentlemen of the Jury, will take into consideration the whole of my conduct upon this very trying occasion, that you and they will have the goodness to reslect that my conduct was very different from that of a guilty person; that if I had known that I had either bought or received any lead that had been stolen, I should not have suffered them to look wherever they pleased, which was really the case. I beg leave to inform the Court, that in all this affair there has been no warrant, that I went before the Magistrate voluntarily, and that whatever I did was free from any compulsion. My Lord, I have been all my life in the place I now reside in, and the adjoining parish, I have a large family of ten children, and we have been under some embarrasments lately through unforeseen misfortunes; at the time this affair happened, I was in a great deal of trouble, my husband was in confinement for debt. I will not any longer take up the attention of the Court, I have stated plain facts, and I submit my case to the consideration and clemency of this honourable Court; I should not have troubled the Court with a written defence, but that never having been in such a presence before, I should find myself unequal to the task of speaking, I thought I should not be so well able to speak. Clementina Sophia Spencer.

For the Prisoner.

FRANCIS JARVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the beadle of the Old Artillery-Ground.

Q. Do you know the situation of this house? - A. Yes; there is no glass partition between the shop and the parlour, there is a door with four panes of glass, and that is all the glass there is between the shop and the parlour, except a little sash behind, in the corner, by the accompting-house; I have known her fourteen years, and never heard her character called in question before.

The prisoner called fourteen other witnesses, who gave her an excellent character.

SARAH TRIGG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am sister to Mrs. Spencer; Mr. Spencer left the house about two or three days before Michaelmas-day, I had been there backwards and forwards.

Court. Q. Do you know if there was any lead

in the house? - A. Yes, there was a great quantity of lead and glass, and sash-frames, in the house.

Q. Are you much acquainted with the quality of lead? - A. No.

Q.Were you at home on the Saturday night? - A. No.

Q. Were you not there on the Sunday? - A. No.

Q. Were you there before the officers came on the Monday? - A. Yes; I was there about an hour before the officers came.

Q. Who was living in your sister's house at the time? - A. Nobody but my sister.

Q. Was she in the course of sleeping there every night, and living there constantly? - A. Yes.

Q. Who made up her family? - A. Nobody but herself, that I know of.

Q. How lately have you been there before? - A. On the Thursday before.

Q. Who did you then see besides her? - A.Three children at home; the eldest daughter is, I believe, about fifteen years old.

Q.How many were there on the Monday? - A. Only two.

Q. How many children has she? - A. Three.

Q. How many children has your sister had? - A. She has had ten.

Isles, GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Transported for seven years .

Spencer, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-56

56. MOSES GURNEY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Read , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 13th of July , with intent the goods and chattles, herein being, burglariously to steal, and stealing forty-five shawls, value 4l. 17s. 6d. fifty-four buff shawls, value 7l. 8s. 6d. twenty-one coloured borered muslin handkerchiefs, value 1l. 6s. 3d. twenty-four linen handkerchiefs, value 24s. twenty-nine yards of muslin, value 2l. 3s. 6d. thirty-six yards of printed calico, value 2l. 14s. seventy-one yards of other printed calico, value 7l. 2s. seventy-three yards of white calico, value 3l. 19s. 1d. six yards of striped marcella, value 27s. five yards and a half of coloured marcella, value 35s. 9d. four yards of coloured jean, value 16s. twenty-three yards of coloured kerseymere, value 6l. 18s. twenty-seven yards of woollen cloth, value 54s. twelve yards of blue woollen cloth, value 3l. fifty-eight yards of brown woollen cloth, value 29l. twenty-three yards of superfine blue and black woollen cloth value 18l. 19s. 6d. twenty-seven yards of chicleset cloth, value 3l. 16s. 6d. twenty-one yards of fancy cord, value 3l. 10s. twenty-four yards of velveteen, value 4l. twenty-three yards of coloured calico, value 12s. fifty-nine yards of corded dimity, value 7l.4s.8d. two pieces of clouting, value 30s. twenty-seven yards of diaper, value 3l. 9d. three hundred and fifty yards of Irish cloth, value 33l. 10s. 10d. and eight pair of leather shoes, value 24s. the property of the said James Read .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a linen-draper at Twickenham, in Middlesex , within fifty yards of the church, which stands close to the river; there are a number of trees round the church: On Saturday night, the 13th of July, I went to bed, I secured the doors, and windows myself; it is a rule with me to see all safe the last thing at night; between the hours of two and three on Sunday morning, I was alarmed by a labouring man knocking at the door, who said, come down immediately, for you have been robbed; I immediately came down stairs, and found two of the window-shutters and the shop door wide open; I went immediately into my shop, and upon looking round, I perceived a vast quantity of goods gone; I observed one of the panes of the window cut out, sufficiently large to admit any common size man through; I immediately called my brother-in-law, Mr. Dixon, and he took his horse and cart, and went to Westminster-bridge, and gave information; in consequence of which, I received a note from Bow-street, upon which I attended, and claimed my property.

JOHN PEACOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Magpye-and-stump, in Cheynewalk, Chelsea: On Saturday night, the 13th of July, a little before eight o'clock at night, four persons came to my house; I heard of the robbery on the Sunday, and this was the Saturday evening before.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. I do; he was there.

Q. Do you recollect either of the others? - A. Yes; I recollected that carrotty one, Mackaway, and I recollected the waterman, Becket.

Court. Q. Did the prisoner come in company with the others? - A. One came up first, but I saw them all come from the boat; I saw the prisoner come up the stairs, I did not see any body get out of the boat but the waterman; they all four came in one by one, and ordered some porter, some bread and cheese and onions; I told them, we had got no onions, but there was a greengrocer's next door and I would go and get them some; I carried them the bread and beer, and told them I was sorry, but I could not get any onions; they said, it did not signify, for the waterman was gone for some; then they had some tobacco and more porter, and then they had half a pint of gin; the reckoning came to two shillings and eightpence halfpenny; after they had paid the reckoning, one

of them said, it is time to put the boat off, or else let us push off, I cannot say which.

Q. Was it dark when they came? - A. No, it was quite a light night, the tide was running down, it had not turned; they staid till about twenty minutes before ten, they were backwards and forwards at the boat, I never saw them all sit down together; it was quite duskish when they went away.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was one of the persons that was at your house that night? - A. I am very sure he was one of the company.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This happened, you say, on the 13th of July? - A. Yes, of a Saturday night.

Q. How long was it before you saw the prisoner at the bar at Bow-street? - A. Not till a few days ago, the Magistrate sent for me.

Q. You had never seen him from the 13th of July, till a few days ago? - A. No.

Q. That is more than five months? - A. I have never seen him since.

Q. You know nothing of the men? - A. No.

Q. Did you mention that you should know any other man, when you were here in September? - A. I said, I should know two or three of them, and I did know Mackaway.

Q. Is there any reward in this case? - A.None for me.

Q. Is there a reward of forty pounds for the conviction of this man? - A. I have nothing to do with that.

Q. Do not you know that there is a reward of forty pounds upon conviction? - A.No.

Q. You never heard of it? - A. I have heard that there is a reward for the prosecutor and them.

Q. Do not you know that they shared eighty pounds among them? - A. No; I never heard how much it was.

Q. Is there not a twenty pounds reward by the parish also? - A. I never heard that there was.

Q. How was the tide? - A. Running down.

Q. Unfavourable to go to Twickenham, and favourable to go to London? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been in Piccadilly since? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not seen this man publickly attending at the White-horse Cellar, in his business? - A. No; I never was at the White-horse Cellar in my life.

GEORGE TYLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a dustman: On the 14th of July, I was in my master's yard, in Scotland-yard, adjoining to Wood's-wharf; about five o'clock in the morning I heard some watermen crying, stop thief, I immediately jumped over the pales belonging to my master's yard, and ran by the water-men; I immediately saw three men run away from a boat loaded with goods.

Q. Did you observe their persons? - A. I followed them till such time as Orrell was caught; I I saw Mackaway after he was taken.

Q. Do you know the other person? - A. I think the next person, the third, was rather stouter in the face, and rather a darker complexion than the prisoner; I cannot positively swear to the man, it is a long time ago.

Court. Q. How far were you from the person that you suppose to be of a darker complexion? - A. About five yards, and sometimes three.

WILLIAM HATTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a private in the guards; about five o'clock on Sunday morning, the 14th of July, I heard a cry of stop thief; my comrade, Harris, and I saw three men come running up a street from the water-side, I believe it was Hungerford-street; I did not know the name of the street, and a man running after them; the man said, those are the three men, soldiers why do not you stop them; Orrell, and Mackaway, crossed the street, and ran up the court, and a third man took up another court, and both the courts led into Round-court; I was so nigh to Orrell and Mackaway, that the prisoner could not get in between them and me; then he turned back into the Strand, and I looked strait at him as he turned back.

Q. Look round and tell us if you know the man? - A. I have no doubt that that is the man that I saw running; I have no doubt at all about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. This man has only been taken up a few days? - A. Yes.

Q. The transaction you have been speaking of was in July last? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you ever been walking along Piccadilly since? - A. No; I have been in Piccadilly but once since.

Q. Have you heard of a reward of forty pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you a part of the eighty pounds reward in the former case? - A. I had something for my trouble in taking Orrell.

Q. And if this man should be convicted you will get something more? - A. I expect to be paid for my loss of time.

Q. Do not you expect a part of the reward? - A. Yes; if there is a reward.

Q. Do not you know there is a reward? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a private soldier; I was with Hatton on Sunday morning, the 14th of July; I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw three men coming up the street from the river, Tyler was following them, and calling out, stop thief; they ran across the

street, up towards New-street, Covent-garden; I did not know them before.

Q. Were you upon the other trial? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Orrell one of them? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Mackaway one of them? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner, was he one? - A. Yes; he was one.

Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. I have no doubt about it.

Q. Had you a part of the reward upon the other trial? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you recollect how much you received upon that occasion? - A.Four pounds ten shillings, I believe.

Q. You do not often receive so large a sum as that? - A. Not without I earn it.

Q. That is a very considerable sum for a man in your station in life to receive? - A. I have received more at times.

Q. You were examined before, upon the trial of the other men? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect saying then, that you did not see the face of any one person more than a minute? - A. I saw it more thatn two minutes.

Q. How many minutes sight do you think you had of the third man? - A. I went two hundred and fifty yards side by side with the prisoner, as near as I can recollect; he was not running then, he was walking.

Q. Why did not you take him? - A. I called to Tyler, and said, this is the man, and he took a spring directly.

Q. Had you a view of his face more than two or three minutes? - A. No.

Q. And this was five months ago? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you not think you may very likely mistake the person of a man that you had seen but once, and that five months ago? - A. To be sure one man may be like another; but I am positively certain he is the man.

Q.Besides the reward in the other case, there is an additional reward if this man is convicted? - A. I have no doubt of it.

Q. Have you been often in Piccadilly since? - A. No.

Court. Q. At what time was it that you saw his face for two minutes, was it while you were going these two hundred and fifty yards by his side? - A. Yes; and the time that he passed me in the street.

Q. Had you a view of his face the whole of that two hundred and fifty yards? - A. Yes; I took a good look of him.

JOSEPH BECKET sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Orrell? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Mackaway? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you know the prisoner before the 13th of July? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know him now? - A. Yes; I have no doubt but he is the man; on Saturday, the 13th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, he came to me and Orrell at the Waterman's-arm, Bank-side, Southwark; Mackaway brought him to the Waterman's arms; Mackaway then said, he would go out and fetch the things; I did not know what things they were; then we all went out together, then Orrell asked me, whether I could borrow a fail; then Orrell and I rowed from Mason's-stairs, Bank-side, which leads from the Waterman's-arms, and went over the water; what became of Mackaway and the stranger I do not know, they went out; Orrell and I took the boat and rowed over to the Surry-side of Blacksriars-Bridge; then we walked from thence to the Waterman's-arms, at Masons-stairs, and we found the stranger sitting there.

Q. Who do you mean by the stranger? - A. The prisoner at the bar; Mackaway then came in, in a few minutes with a basket; we stopped there till about five o'clock, and one of them said, that we should go; then we all of us went to one Wells's in the Upper ground, as you cross the road to Blacksriars-bridge, and go towards the shot manufactory; we stopped there till it was near seven o'clock, and then me and Orrell went to the waterside to see how the tide was, to see whether it was stood; the prisoner and Mackaway stood upon the steps, the wind blew hard; I went back and told them it was not stood, and the prisoner said, he was positively sure it was stood, and insisted upon going; then one of them, I cannot say which it was, gave me a basket, and told me to put it in a dry place, and I put it in the boat's foreships under the head, the basket was sewed up quite close; one of them, I cannot tell which, asked me how long it would take to row to Richmond; I said, it would take two hours, or two hours and a half; the prisoner said it would be three hours and longer; then we all four went up to Chelsea; we set off about four or five minutes after seven o'clock at night, and stopped at the Magpye-and-stump at Chelsea.

Q.(To Peacock). Is this one of the persons that came to your house? - A. Yes; he was the last that came up.

Becket. We got there about eight o'clock; Mackaway, Orrell, and the prisoner at the bar went in first, and I stopped to hawl the boat up, and they called out at the window to me to get some onions.

Q. Did you get any? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before you returned to them? - A.In about ten minutes; when I went

in they had got some bread and cheese and beer upon the table, I gave them the onions; we stopped there as nigh as I can guess an hour, or an hour and twenty minutes.

Q. Was there any particular discourse? - A. No.

Q. Who paid the reckoning? - A. Orrell borrowed a shilling of me towards it; the reckoning I believe came to two shillings and eightpence, the money was put upon the table; it was two shillings and eightpence, or somewhere thereabouts; I do not know who paid the rest; then we all went away together, about twenty minutes or half an hour after nine; then we went up the river, and landed where there was a green grass-plat, and it appeared to me as if there was a church in it; the prisoner was the man who shewed me where to land; when we got there, one of them asked me for the basket that I had put at the head of the boat; I gave it to one of them, and they took it up the grass-plat; they all three went up the grassplat, and took something out of the basket, and then brought the basket back, and threw it into the boat.

Q. What time was that? - A. As near as I can tell, about twelve o'clock, it was just at high water.

Court. Q. How came you to be three hours going from Chelsea to Twickenham? - A. The wind blew very hard, and beyond Richmond the tide was very dead, sometimes it runs no farther than Kew; in about twenty minutes, or half an hour, Orrell came back with two pieces of woollen cloth, he threw them into the boat, and said something, I do not know what, and then he went back again.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Who came next? - A. I cannot say; they went backwards and forwards two or three times a-piece; the prisoner at the bar brought some white parcels, and put them into the boat, they were parcels of Irish cloth.

Q. Did Mackaway bring any thing? - A. Yes; they all brought something every time.

Q.About what time was the last time that they came? - A. They might be gone about an hour, or it might be more; they stood upon the grass, and I heard them say, shall we have any more; what answer was made to it I cannot say; then they came into the boat, and we rowed towards London, and just below Kew-bridge, the prisoner went ashore to get some sacks; one of them said there were some sacks hanging over a barge's side above the bridge; and the prisoner got ashore below the bridge, and returned without any sacks; then we rowed down till we came below the Red-house, and one of them observed that there were some sacks hanging out at a miller's place, and they wanted me to put them ashore; I told them they must walk through the water if they did, for I could not get near it for a hill that runs out; then we came towards Westminster-bridge, and just before we got about to Lambeth, Mackaway and Orrell took the skulls; before that, the prisoner and I had been rowing; before we got to Westminster-bridge, there were some people ashore on the Westminster side of the river, below the bridge; one of them asked me who they were; I told them I believed they were the Police-officers; I then observed Orrell and Mackaway to have pistols in their breeches, I did not observe the prisoner to have any; I desired them to put me ashore, and, after great persuasion, they put me ashore at the uppermost side of Wood's wharf; as I was getting out of the boat, one of them said, how frightened you are; I then left them all three in the boat, and went up the wharf.

Q. How long was it before you were taken up? - A. I was not taken up at all, I went to Bow-street and delivered myself up.

Q. When was that? - A. Six or seven days after.

Q. And then you were admitted a witness? - A. Yes.

Q. What time was it when you first came into their company? - A. About four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. And what time was it when they put you on shore? - A. About five o'clock the next morning.

Q. Having been in his company all those hours, speak fairly, and honestly if you can, whether the prisoner is the man? - A. I have not the least doubt.

Q. Have you ever had a doubt of him? - A. Yes; the first time I thought he was a swarthier man, but when I came to see him a second time, I was sure he was the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How long have you been out of prison? - A. I cannot take upon me to say, I was never in prison but that time; I have been out ever since Mackaway and Orrell were cast.

Q. You were the first man that got out of the boat, and away you ran as hard as you could run? - A. Yes.

Q. You heard a cry of stop thief? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew that could not mean you, and therefore you did not look back? - A. No.

Q.You tell my Friend you had a doubt - now I ask you if you did not positively say he was not the man? - A. I said he was a swarthier man, and a rounder face, rather a fatter face.

Q. Now I ask you this, and recollect there is such a thing as the pillory, for people that can be convicted of it, and transportation into the bargain; now, where not your words these, that is not the man, it was a man of a fuller face, and a swarthier complexion? - A. I might say so.

Q. Do not you know you said so? - A. Yes; I have no doubt but those are the words.

Q. Do not you know it; are you not sure of it? - A. Yes.

Q. You have told my learned Friend, that you were thirteen hours in company with the man, and therefore you knew the person, and you could not therefore possibly be mistaken? - A. I was not so positive of him at the first sight.

Q. You were sitting facing of him a part of the time? - A. A very trifling time.

Q. You were with him at different public-houses? - A. Yes.

Q. And it was light by three o'clock in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Now, having said he was not the man, because he was a swarthier man, how long was it before he was brought up again? - A. Three days.

Q. Was he not brought up, not having been suffered to be washed or shaved for those three days, that he might have the appearance of a man of a swarthier complexion? - A. He had a blacker beard than he had on Wednesday.

Q. Was not his face dirty from not having been allowed water? - A. On Saturday I was sure he was the man.

Q. On the Wednesday, when you said he was not the man, was your examination on oath then taken? - A.There was no examination at all then.

Q. Were not you then taken away by the officers, and the examination put off for three days? - A. Yes, it was.

Q. How many times have you had conversations with some of the people about that office? - A. I never had any conversation, only when I was up there.

Q. But you were up there, you know, on the Wednesday and Saturday? - A. I was not there half an hour on the Wednesday.

Q. Did you not dine with them on one of those days? - A. I did not dine with any of the officers.

Q. Nor drink with any of them? - A. Not with the officers; I drank with the soldiers that were witnesses with me.

Q. On Wednesday you were told the other man was taken? - A.They told me there was a man there.

Q.Did not you know before you went, that you were to find the man who had been concerned in the robbery? - A. Yes.

Q. And though you had been so told, you said that was not the man, for the man had a swarthier complexion, and a fuller countenance? - A. Those were the words.

Court. Q. In what way was the person, you supposed to be the prisoner, dressed? - A. A sort of a reddish snuff-coloured coat, and pearl buttons; he had a long beard on that day, when he went to Twickenham, and boots with clean tops.

Q.(To Peacock.) Do you recollect how the prisoner was dressed that night? - A. I think he had a brown coat and pearl buttons, and new boots.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You told me, you had heard that the other persons had had a part of the reward? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, had you not a share of that reward? - A. I had my expences; I had it at the Recorder's office, Carpmeal received it for me.

Q. Upon your oath, had you not a share of the reward; and did you not attend to receive a share of the reward? - A. I had only a two pound note.

Q. Do not you know that that was your share of the reward? - A. I did not know it.

Q. Did you not apply for your expences in Court, and where you not told that you were to have a share of the reward? - A. I expected to have my expences of Mr. Read.

Q. Upon your oath, were you not referred to the next Sessions for your share of the reward? - A. Mr. Carpmeal ordered me to come here, I did not know what it was for, I was sent for; I told Carpmeal he was welcome to that to share it among them, only to pay my expences.

Q. You did not know what you were sent for about - do not you know it was a share of the reward? - A. I gave it away; I told Carpmeal it was too much for my expences.

Q. Were you not standing close by the Recorder and his clerk at the time you divided the reward? - A. No; I was a great deal further from him than I am from you.

Q. Do not you know that that was your share of the reward? - A. I do not know; whether it was or not I meant to ask Mr. Read for my expences, and Carpmeal told me I was to come the next Sessions for my expences.

Q. Do you mean to swear he did not tell you, that you were to come for your share of the reward? - A. I don't remember that he did; I told him to take and share it among them, because I did not want any thing of the kind, I wanted only the expences.

Q. Of what kind? - A. I did not know then that it was a share of the reward.

Q. Is that as true as all the rest of your evidence? - A. I did not think it was a share of the reward of the men being hung.

Q. Do you mean to say, that, till the present time, you did not know that that two pound note was your share of the reward? - A. I did not.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Whether it was for a reward, or whatever it was you felt yourself satisfied for

your trouble and expences with less than forty shillings? - A. Yes; and I gave them the rest.

JOHN AUDSLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a waterman: On Sunday morning, I was at Wood's wharf; I saw some persons in a boat, between four and five in the morning; there were two fitting and two rowing, and the boat looked very deep; we had had information of the robbery; four of us stepped into a boat, and we pursued this boat, and the goods; they found that we came up with them, and they got upon Wood's wharf, and got ashore, and all ran away.

Q. Do you know either of their persons? - A. I know neither of them, but the waterman's boy; and I did not know that it was him till afterwards: we went on board a boat and brought her up to Westminster; we found many bundles of cloths and pieces of linen, and articles of that kind; the boat was taken to a place where I live, and there I took care of them till I delivered them to Carpmeal, the officer. I found also a basket in the boat, but I do not know the contents. There was Mitchell, Herne, and me took the goods out of the boat; we kept them from six to ten or eleven, and then Carpmeal had them; Lawrence took the basket out.

JOHN LAWRENCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I took the basket out of the boat: it contained an iron crow and some keys, a dark lanthorn, and some shot; I took the basket and Orrell to Tothill-fields; I delivered up the basket at Bow-street.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of Bow-street; I received the goods from the four watermen, and kept them till the last trial, and then they were delivered to Mr. Read, who produces them now: (Mr. Read produced a piece of Irish, with his private mark upon it).

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent as a child that is unborn, as to the charge alledged against me; I declare to my Maker that I never saw the prisoner's that they have charged me with being in company with, in my life, to my knowledge; last Wednesday, when I was sent to Bow-street, Becket said, it was a more swarthy man, and a rounder faced man; and when I was brought up again on Saturday, they would not suffer me to wash or shave myself; the soldier said, that he believed he saw me run across the street, but he could not tell whether I was running after the men, or whether I was one of the men, or not; after that, I saw Carpmeal and all of them in conversation together, but what they were saying I do not know; and in the evening Becket came forward, and positively swore that I was the man.

For the Prisoner.

HENRY WITHAM sworn. - I have known the prisoner four years; I am one of the proprietors of the Reading coach; for the last four or five months he has been backwards and forwards almost every day to the White-Horse Cellar; for the last two months, I do not think he has missed a day being seen there; I have always thought him a very honest man, and was doing all I could to get him a place; I have entrusted him with parcels of very considerable value; I have employed him several times occasionally to go to Reading and back.

The prisoner called eleven other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron CHAMBRE.

Reference Number: t17991204-57

57. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted, for that he, in a certain place called Windmill-court , near the King's highway, upon James Howell did make an assault, on the 2d of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a bag, value 9d. and six pair of silver watch-cases, value 3l. 10s. the property of John Johnson .

JAMES HOWELL sworn. - I shall be thirteen years old next May; my father is dead; my mother lives at No. 53, Leather-lane, and takes in washing: I was robbed last Monday; I was going through Windmill-court into Giltspur-street, to the flatting-mills; there were three of us together; I had six pair of silver watch-cases that I had fetched from Goldsmiths' Hall; I am errand-boy to Mr. Johnson, No. 38. Islington-road, a watch-case maker; the prisoner at the bar came behind us, and took me by the shoulder, and chucked me over his leg.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and say whether he is the person? - A. Yes, that is the man; he held me by the shoulder while another man took six pair of silver watch-cases from me, and ran away with them; they were in a white ticking bag; it was between four and five o'clock; it was not quite dark, it was light enough to distinguish a man's countenance; the prisoner ran across the square into Little Britain; the other ran a different way, and I did not see any more of him; then this man called out stop thief, himself; and I ran after him, and he was stopped.

Jury. Q. How long might you and the prisoner be together, before he chucked you over his leg? - A. I had observed him for a little time before that, behind me.

Q. Did you remark him before he threw you down? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any particular reason for remarking him? - A. Yes; he had a striped waistcoat on, and a black coat with a black velvet collar.

CHARLES CARPENTER sworn. - I was at No. 31, Little Britain, about five o'clock on the 2d of

December; I heard a cry of stop thief; I immediately ran to the street door, and saw the prisoner at the bar running; I immediately pursued him, and he called out stop thief; he ran, and I came up with him, but could see no person that he was following; I could see the whole length of the street; I told him to stop; I insisted upon his stopping, as he was calling stop thief, when I could see no person that he was following; then the boy came up, and said, that was one of the men that had robbed him of his watch-cases; there were three boys, they came up one at a time, and they all agreed that that was the man; the constable took him into custody, and searched him.

JOHN JOHNSON sworn. - I sent the first witness to Goldsmiths' Hall for six watch-cases, which he lost; I had some hand-bills printed, and I recovered them on Thursday night. (Produces them). They have my mark in them; here is a person in court that found them near the spot where I understood they were thrown away; I know them to be my cases, they have my private mark upon them.

- GRAVAT sworn. - I am going of thirteen years of age: Last Monday I was going along by the Hospital-gate into Little Britain; I saw something white lying up by a wall; I shewed them at the News' Hall, and then I took them home; my father kept them till he received one of the handbills, and then my father went to Mr. Johnson's; it was a bag containing watch-cases.

- GRAVAT sworn. - I am the father of the last witness; I am in the news business; my son delivered me the watch-cases on Monday night, soon after he had found them I received a handbill, and then I carried them to Mr. Johnson; these are the same watch-cases.

WILLIAM EWER sworn. - James Howell and I were together, and this man at the bar took him by the shoulder, threw him over his knee, and another man drew the watch-cases out of his hand; I am sure the prisoner is the man; we saw him before that, when he was behind us; I ran after him down the cloisters, and into the square; and in the square I tumbled down, and I saw him again just as he was going out of the square, and then I did not see him again till Mr. Carpenter had stopped him.

THOMAS READ sworn. - I am an officer: I was at work in Little Britain; I heard a cry of stop thief; the boys were making a lamentation of losing their property; I saw the prisoner and Carpenter together; I asked the prisoner what he was, he said he was a gentleman; I asked him where he lived, he said he was a master beaver-hat maker, No. 1, Red-lion-passage, Cloth-fair.

Prisoner's defence. That man wanted me to go about my business; he said he was convinced I had not any thing about me, and the mob would not let me go; I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 20.)

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17991204-58

58. MARY LOFTUS and SARAH EDWARDS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , five pounds of soap, value 3s. and a linen shirt, value 2s. the property of William Barnfield .

GEORGE OSBORNE sworn. - I am a porkman; I live next door to Mr. Barnfield; Last Wednesday evening, about half past five, I had a message from Mr. Barnfield, to take a situation in my two pair of stairs back room, that I might have a full sight of his yard and warehouse, who went in and out after that time; I was there about a minute; Mr. Barnfield and his shopman, and a young man came into the yard to borrow a pulley; about five or six minutes after that, the prisoner at the bar, Loftus, came out of the house; she was servant to Mr. Barnfield, he is an oilman; I saw her, followed by another woman, I cannot say who it was, and go into the warehouse; Loftus said to the other person, shut the door; it appeared to me that they had shut the warehouse-door, because I lost the light; I saw them go in; I gave information to Mr. Duffield, a friend of Mr. Barnfield's; I staid a little longer, and saw the prisoner Loftus come out, and another woman, but whether it was the other prisoner I cannot say; they came along the yard and went into the house, and I saw no more of them; the prisoner Loftus has lived four years in Mr.Barnfield's place, and I never heard any thing disrespectful of her till this time.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am an officer: on Wednesday night; about six o'clock. I perceived the prisoner Edwards come out of Mr. Barnfield's shop; I watched her some way up Bishopsgate-street, and I stopped her; I felt something hard in her pocket, and I took her into Messrs. Barnet and Cookson's, haberdashers; I there searched her, and in her right-hand pocket I found two cakes of soap; under her left arm I found a shirt, and some more things in her left-hand pocket, which are not mentioned in the indictment; I have had them in my possession ever since. (Produces them).

WILLIAM BARNFIELD sworn. - I am an oilman in Bishopsgate-street; the prisoner Loftus was my servant, the other prisoner is her cousin: I had some reason to think that I was losing my property, but I had so much confidence that I could not bring myself to think those parties were concerned; I had information, however, which made me think it necessary to take means to detect; I had been given to understand that the article of

soap was meant to be conveyed away, and I went and cut a notch in the soap, and put some peppercorns in, and closed the aperture up; when the soap was produced before my Lord Mayor, there were the pepper-corns in it. I sent a friend to ask Mr. Osborne to watch up stairs who went into my warehouse; I went to Mr. Duffield's house till Mr. Osborne sent over to inform Mr. Duffield of it. I then went out to watch her coming out, and I had Mr. Sapwell there ready, and he stopped the prisoner Edwards; this is my soap, here are the pepper-corns in it; I know the shirt by the initials of my name.

Q.(To Sapwell.) Did you find any thing upon the other prisoner? - A. No.

Loftus's defence. I have nothing to say, but to beg for mercy.

Edwards's defence. I beg the mercy of the Court, and leave the rest to my counsel.

The prisoner Edwards called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Loftus, GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Edwards, GUILTY. (Aged 26.)

Privately whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-59

59. THOMAS BREESE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , two pounds of cotton, value 3s. the property of Edward Hanson , John Pearson , Thomas Toyles , William Pearson , and Daniel Gossett .

DANIEL GOSSETT sworn. - I am warehouse keeper at the Steel-yard, in Thames-street , in partnership with Edward Hanson , John Pearson, Thomas Toyles, and William Pearson; When I returned from Change, on Friday, the 8th of November, about four o'clock, I was informed that a bag of cotton had been plucked, and that the prisoner was in custody of Wainewright, the constable; I saw the bag that the cotton was taken out of, and that is all I know of the business.

JOHN WAINEWRIGHT sworn. - I am a constable of Dowgate ward: On the 8th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming down Thames-street, just opposite the Steel-yard, and the prisoner was pointed out to me by one John Stevens, a master carman; I saw the prisoner go close up to the cart, with his face towards it, close to the wheel of the cart; I did not see him take any out of the bag; I went round, in order to lay hold of him; he walked on a few yards, I laid hold of him; he made a little resistance, and said he was left in care of the cart by the carman, while he was gone down the yard; I then saw some cotton round him, between his shirt and his waistcoat; I asked him how he came by that cotton, he said he picked it up about the cart-wheel; I then saw that the bag of cotton was cut; I took him down into the yard, and asked the carman if he had left him in care of the cart; the carman said he was not left in care of the cart, and he had no business there; I then took him to the accompting-house, took the cotton from him, and conveyed him to the Compter; I asked him if he had a knife, he said he had not, but I found one down by the side of his breeches. (Produces the cotton).

Gossett. It is not possible to swear to this wool; but it is the same kind of wool; there was much about this quantity missing; it is worth about three shillings.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say; I never cut the bag.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-60

60. JOHN READ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , one hundred and twenty pounds weight of sugar, value 3l. the property of Thomas Dobson , and William Harper .

THOMAS DOBSON sworn. - I am a warehouse-keeper , in partnership with William Harper; the warehouse is in Cousin-lane, at the bottom of Dowgate-hill : On the 4th of this month, I was called out of my bed about two o'clock in the morning; I got up, and was told that my warehouse was broke open, I live at No. 16, Bush-lane, and that the man was taken and in the Compter, and that the warehouse was secured again; I went to bed again, and in the morning about eight o'clock, I went to the warehouse; I found a padlock upon it, the old lock had been torn off; I went up into the second story, which was full of sugar, and found a hogshead very much plundered; I had the hogshead weighed, and the deficiency was one hundred two quarters and eighteen pounds; I saw the hogshead the night before, and it was not plundered then; we weighed the sugar and it weighed one hundred and twenty pounds; I took a sample out of the hogshead and compared with it, and it appeared to be the same quality of sugar.

BENJAMIN RAWLINS sworn. - I am a watchman; I cried the hour half past one last Wednesday morning, down Cousin-lane; I saw the prisoner come out of the warehouse, I did not then know whose warehouse it was, he had a white bag upon his shoulder; I saw him go into the dwelling-house opposite, and shut himself in; I said, my friend what have you got there; he would not answer, that was after he had shut himself in; I

then called John Rawlins my brother to assist, and left him at the door where the prisoner went in; I went and fetched two constables, Mackenzie and Williams, and we forced the door in upon him, and then they took him; they pushed him over the sugar, it was lying down by him in the passage; the lock of the warehouse was almost forced off, I minded the warehouse while they took him to the Compter; when the constable seized him he said he would go with them.

JOHN RAWLINS sworn. - I am a watchman; I saw the warehouse, the lock of the door was forced almost off; I was called by my brother about half after one on Wednesday morning, I sent my brother to get a constable and I and another watchman stood to mind the door, that the man did not come out; when the constables came we forced the door open upon him, and pushed him down over the sugar; she was taken to the Compter, and the sugar delivered to the constable.

WILLIAM MACKENZIE sworn. - I am a patrol; at half past one o'clock, the watchman came to the watch-house, and I went with the watchman to this house, where we found the prisoner; I forced the door open upon him; when she found that he could not keep the door any longer, she was making off, and tumbled down over the sugar, and I laid hold of him.

- WILLIAMS sworn. - I am constable of Dowgate-ward; I was sent for from the watch-house, we went to the house, forced open the door, and the first that I saw was the prisoner, lying down in the passage, and the bag of sugar along side of him (produces the sugar); I heard something drop from him, and looked and found this instrument (producing an instrument); one end of it answered the purpose of a crow, and the other as a claw hammer.

Mr. Dobson (Produces a sample of sugar). I believe it to be the same sugar; it is worth about three pounds.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

The prisoner called two serjeants, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Confined one month in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-61

61. MARY ROCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , an umbrella, value 3s. the property of Martha Hammond , spinster .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN KAY sworn. - I am an attorney; I have chambers in Great St. Helen's, Bishopsgate-street ; the prisoner at the bar waited upon me as a servant ; she is a servant belonging to a person who occupies the other part of the house; about three weeks ago I missed an umbrella of Miss Martha Hammond 's; I apprehended the prisoner the day before yesterday; I saw her searched in the evening, a variety of duplicates were found upon her, among them was a duplicate for an umbrella; I went to the pawnbroker's, but that duplicate did not relate to my umbrella; but in consequence of going to the pawnbroker's, I found the umbrella, which was mine; I borrowed it of Miss Hammond about a month ago; she is not here, her state of health is such, as to render it impossible that she could come out, but I had borrowed it of her frequently before, and I can identify it by various marks about it.

JOHN CAHUSAC sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Spinks of Gracechurch-street; an umbrella was pledged with me on the 16th of November, by the prisoner at the bar in the name of Ann Rock , this is the duplicate (produces it); I lent her three shillings upon it; I gave her a duplicate which has not been found since; Mr. Kay came to me with a duplicate of an umbrella for one shilling; I shewed it him, he said, it was not his; I then recollected that she had pledged an umbrella for three shillings, I brought him that; and he said, that was his property; she has pledged things at our house frequently, so that I am certain of her person, I have no doubt whatever; I gave the umbrella to the constable.

THOMAS MERRIMAN sworn. - I am a constable (produces the umbrella); I received it from the last witness and have kept it ever since.

Mr. Kay. This is the umbrella that I borrowed of Miss Hammond, I am perfectly sure of it; Miss Hammond lives in East-street, Walworth, I know it by a black mark upon the handle, and from the general appearance of it, having frequently borrowed it before; I can swear most positively to the property.

Prisoner's defence. Mr. Kay had a very great dislike to me for some time past; there are four families in the house.

Jury. (To Kay.) Q. Did the umbrella lie loose about the house? - A. It was in a closet in my clerk's office.

GUILTY (Aged 50.)

Confined six months in Newgate , whipped in jail , and discharged.

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-62

62. JOHN COLLEY was indicted, for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon William

Riley , did make an assault, on the 25th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a linen pocket, value 1s. two shillings, and four halfpence , the property of the said William.

WILLIAM RILEY sworn. - I am a seafaring man : On the 25th of September, I was going home from the White-swan in Gate-street, with Francis Bracher , and just coming into Wentworth-street , there was a gang of them; one said, we will rake them, we will let them know we are the b-y crew; when we came near them, the prisoner at the bar caught hold of my hair and made a blow at me; I got loose from the prisoner, and Solomon Robus, who is not taken, run a knife in my face, over my eyes; upon that Moses Davis , that was cleared last Sessions came up, and with his fist knocked me down; he forced his hand into my waistcoat pocket and took out two shillings and some half-pence, and then they left me dead, as they thought, and I was carried home very much beat and bruised.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Davis was the man that knocked you down, and took the money out of your waistcoat-pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. You said so the last Sessions? - A. Yes.

Q. And the Jury acquitted the prisoner, though Davis was the man? - A. Yes.

Q. And you swore then as you do now? - A. Yes.

Q. You applied to the Court for your expences, did not you? - A. Yes.

Q. And you were refused them? - A. Yes.

Q.Perhaps you have heard of such a thing as a forty pound reward? - A. Yes; you told me so yourself.

Q. Do not you know that there is a forty pound reward if this man is convicted? - A. I do not want to convict him, I was bound over.

Q. You never found these halfpence of shillings, or looked for them? - A. No.

Q. I dare say you were perfectly sober? - A. I was not quite so sober as I am now, I knew what I was about; I had had nothing but part of two pints of porter to refresh myself in the day, and six-pennyworth of gin and water among two of us; there was a witness of mine, Bracher, that made a mistake, and swore that Robus was the man; he told me, after I had left the Court, that he had made a mistake.

Q. The first warrant that you took out was only for an assault? - A. Yes, at Worship street, and the Justices would not hear it.

Q. And you afterwards went to Lambeth-street, and got a warrant for the robbery? - A. Yes.

FRANCIS BRACHER sworn. - I am a tallowchandler; as we were coming along, I saw the prisoner come out of the Prince's-head; they first struck me, and then they struck Riley; that is all I saw.

JAMES BUSH sworn. - I work at Mr. Bolt's sugar warehouse in Thames-street; I was called upon to assist Riley, and got myself very much out; that was about five minutes after the robbery.

GEORGE GILSON sworn. - I know nothing of the robbery; I saw the prisoner stamp upon Bush, Riley was lying weltering in his blood, but I could not get to his assistance before I was stabbed in the side by a person who is not yet taken.

Q.(To Riley.) Are you certain to the person of the prisoner? - A. Yes; I knew him before; I have nothing to say against the prisoner at the bar, but he caught me by the hair, and I got loose from him.

Prisoner's defence. I did not molest any one.

The prisoner called William Stopford, who had known him three months, and gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-63

63. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , six coach-springs, value 15s. and one hundred and five pounds weight of iron, value 12s. the property of Jonathan Panther and Robert Giles .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

RICHARD HAYNES sworn. - I am a journeyman coachmaker; I work for Mr. Leader, of Wells-street, Oxford-street: On the 26th of November last, I was at the corner of White-lion-yard, about seven o'clock in the morning; I saw John Turner peep up the yard and then retreat back several times, for about five minutes; Messrs. Panther and Giles's shop is up that yard; then I saw Martin, the prisoner, come down the gateway, and beckon Turner up the yard; Martin turned round and followed him; then Martin beckoned with his hand, in this manner, for Turner to keep back; Turner then stepped back; he went to Mr. Panther's warehouse, and Turner followed him in; they might be in as much as ten minutes together; then I was joined by John Bolton; I desired him to stay for the purpose of watching them Turner then came out with two coach-springs, one upon each shoulder; he came down the gateway, turned to the right hand, and went across Oxford street; he stopped under the portico of the Pantheon; Martin soon after came out with four springs, in a short bag; he was followed by Thomas Jackson , who was servant to Messrs. Panther and Giles; Jackson came down with a bunch of keys in his hand to open the other gate; there was

only one half of the gate open before; Martin turned to the right hand, and looked for Turner; he observed him at the Pantheon; he beckoned Turner, and Turner came across Oxford-street to him; then they turned up Winsley-street, and went along Castle-street, and then down Market-street, into Oxford-street again.

Q. When they had got there, has they gone the nearest way? - A. Certainly not; then they went down Blenheim-steps, which is along side the Pantheon, and along-Marlborough-street, into Poland-street; I then left them to fetch Mr. Panther; Bolton was absent from them about a quarter of an hour; Bolton acquainted me, where he had left them, and then I followed them again; before I left them, I saw them go into the Goldenlion, the corner of Church-street; Bolton and I went into the public-house to hear the conversation, the landlord was not up, and we called for some purl, as well as they did, and we could not have it, they left the springs at the public-house door; I heard the prisoner say to Turner, do you know where you are going with these things? he replied, no; the prisoner said, go straight down and turn to the left, which they did; I saw them go into the Cock, in Graston-street, and then to an old iron shop in Graston-street, kept by Thomas Houghton ; I then left Houghton, and went to Mr. Panther's, but he was not stirting, and I afterwards went again; I saw Mr. Panther about nine o'clock, he went with me; we met the prisoner and Turner together in Belton-street, near Short's-gardens; as I was going to Mr. Panther the second time, I saw two of the springs lie in an old iron shop in short's-gardens; I afterwards saw Chantry, the Wheeler, bring out two, the prisoner two, and Turner two springs; they took them into Chantry's, the wheeler's shop, nearly opposite; I waited for their coming out, and they all three went into a public-house kept by Chantry, facing the wheeler's shop, and one of Chantry's men with them; Bolton and I then took Martin and Turner both into custody; we asked them where the springs were, that they had from Mr. Panther's yard; Turner said, he would go with us any where, for he was paid for carrying them; the prisoner seemed alarmed, and I did not hear him say anything; the first time he was examined at the Police-office, it was not taken down in writing; he said, he had bought them to put on a cart, which was at his shop in Wimpole-street; he said, they did not fit, and he sold them.

Q. Could he have gone to Windmill-street in your absence? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No.

Q. Did you know Jackson? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you know that he is a foreman to the prosecutor? - A. Yes.

Q. And Jackson being the foreman had the liberty to sell different articles about the premises? - A. Certainly.

Q.Jackson must have seen every thing that passed? - A. Yes.

Q.Turner was discharged before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. The springs were left outside the door that any body might have taken them? - A. Yes.

Q. Jackson is not now a witness? - A. No, he has run away.

Q. Do you not know that Jackson has sold things before this to the prisoner? - A. No.

JOHN BOLTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a coach-carver; I stopped with the last witness at the corner of Whitelion-yard, I saw Turner bring out two coach springs, crossed over to the Pantheon, and rested them under the portico, and then Martin came out with four springs in a bag; I staid to watch while Haynes went to find Mr. Panther; I watched them to Short's-gardens; then I heard Turner say, he would be d-d if he would carry the springs any further, without Martin, the prisoner, got rid of them; the prisoner said, come a little further, and then they put them up against a public-house, the Black-dog-and-still, in Short's-gardens; Haynes went for Mr. Panther, and Mr. Panther and I and Haynes, took them into custody in Short's-gardens.

JONATHAN PANTHER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am in partnership with Robert Giles ; I have a shop in White-lion-yard, Oxford-street.

Q. Before the 26th of November had you any coach-springs in that shop? - A. Yes; Thomas Jackson was my servant. I saw him on Tuesday morning about five minutes after I had lost these springs, and he has absconded ever since; Haynes and Bolton came to me, and in consequence of which, I went to Short's-gardens; we took Turner, and the prisoner, to Marlborough-street; when we had got about twenty yards from Chantry's shop, I just looked into Chantry's shop, and saw my springs there, and then I took them to Marlborough-street; I marked them in Chantry's shop before Chantry; I had forbid Jackson to sell those springs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Were these new springs? - A. No.

Q. Was Jackson in the habit, with your permission, of selling old springs, and other things? - A. Yes.

Q. Has not the prisoner purchased articles of Jackson? - A. Never that I know of.

DANIEL CHANTRY sworn. - I am a coach

wheelwright, I live in short's garden, Drury-lane: the 26th of November last, I met the prisoner, and another man of the name of Turner, in Short's-gardens; there were three coach springs in a bag and three open; I said what have you turned coachmaker; he said, no, they are springs that I bought at a sale, in a lot of iron; he said he was waiting for a cart to take them to his nailer's I asked him what his nailer allowed him for old springs in change, for I wanted four odd springs; he said his nailer allowed him fourteen shillings a hundred weight for them, in change; I said Martin, will give you thirteen shillings a hundred weight for them, ready money; and it was agreed upon; I paid my money directly, they weighted one hundred and twenty pounds; Mr. Panther then came and caught him in the street; Mr. Panther, and the officer, had them from me

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. you have had dealings with the prisoner before? - A. I have taken pounds of his money.

Q.Does he not make carts? - A. Yes; he makes carts and waggons, and I make wheels; I never bought any thing of him before.

Q. Did he not say he had bought for his own use? - A. No; he said he had bought them at a sale in a lot of iron, that they did not suit him, and he was going to send them to his nailer.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - Exanined by Mr. gurney. I am a constable, (produces six coach springs); I got them from Chantry's house.

Mr. Panther. These are my springs, they are all odd springs, there is not a pair among then; Mr. Chantry gave a fair price for them.

JOHN TURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. On the 26th of November, I carried these springs; I saw Martin the evening before that, at the Whitehart, in Windmill-street; he told me if I would come on Tuesday, about half past seven o'clock he would give me a shilling to carry something, but what he did not say; I was to go to Oxford-road, near the Pantheon; I met him there the next morning, about half part seven, the man had just opened the gates of White-lion-yard, and he went over directly; I stood over the way; I followed Martin, and he beckoned to me to keep back a bit, I kept back about five minutes; then he brought out springs, and put upon me, and then he brought out four himself, and we took them to Short's-gardens.

Q. Did you go to Windmill-street? - A. No.

Q. DId you try the springs upon any cart? - A. No; I was with him the whole time, except a minute or two, in Short's-gardens.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do you mean the Jury to understand you that you never left the prisoner, from the time that you left Mr. Panther's till you got to Short's-gardens? - A. Yes.

Q. You were taken up too, were you not? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Jackson, who was the foreman of the prosecuter? - A. No; but I saw him deliver the keys to the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I have dealt with Mr. Chantry, and bought wheels of him for a great many years; and I have old springs of Mr. Panther's foreman; I called and looked out these six springs and the foreman weighted them; they weighted one hundred and twenty pounds, and I gave him fifteen shillings and two-pence for it, that was thirteen shillings a hundred weight, which I always paid before.

Chantry. I paid him fifteen shillings and sixpence for it.

Prisoner. I bought these springs for a new cart that I was making, and I found that they would not do for the cart, and that was the reason why I told them.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN MADAN Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I keep a stand in the green line.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Jackson? - A. No. this day fortnight I was coming out past this yard, in Oxford-street, a man came out, and I saw the prisoner put his hand in his pocket, and pull out some money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. It was this day fortnight, was it? - A. Yes. MOnday.

Q. Where the man came from you do not Know? - A. No.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-64

64. CHARLES ABBOTT, otherwise JONES and GEORGE HENRY TANNER, otherwise GEORGE HENRY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , a mahogany knife-case, value 10s. twenty-three knives, value 10s. and twenty-four forks, value 10s. the property of Henry Robins John Robins , and George-Henry Robins .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.) JOHN ROBINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. knowlys. I am in partnership with Henry, and George- Henry Robins , my brother and my nephew, we are auctioneers , in Covent-Garden : on the 9th of October, the two prisoners were at a sale that we had; the prisoner, Abbott, purchased two lots of Knife-cases, two in each lot; one lot he purchased for a guinea, and the other half a guinea, making together a guinea andd a half; the articles that I charge them with were in the same

sale, they were purchased by a gentleman who gave in the name of George, but who was Major George Crump , for a guinea and a half.

Q. Was that lot afterwards missing? - A. It was; I heard nothing of that article till I saw it at Bow-street, upon the apprehension of these men.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You do a pretty considerable deal of business? - A. Yes.

Q. There is a considerable deal of hurry in doing that business too? - A.Rather so.

Q. It is nothing unsual that mistakes have happened of the sort we are now talking of? - A. It is very possible.

Q. It was not less likely that the goods amounting to a guinea and a half, and the other amounting to a guinea and a half, the sum being the same? - A. Very unlikely.

Q. Is it uncommon for persons to purchase in another name than their own? - A. It is not unusual.

Q. This Major Crump did not give in the whole of his name? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner had been persons frequenting your sales? - A. Yes, About in particular; they had purchased a great many things at our sales, and paid for them.

Q. A mistake never happened with them before? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. This was on the 9th of October? - A. Yes.

Q. And you have seen them at sales since that? - A. Yes, once I think.

Q. Did they purchase any thing? - A. I think they did.

Q. And paid for it? - A. They always paid for what they bought.

Q. To what amount do you think they had purchased? - A. Pretty considerably at different sales; they have bought of me, of my brother, and they have bought of my nephew.

Q. And they have always paid fairly and honestly? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not tell the Magistrate that you thought it was very likely to be a mistake? - A. I said, it was possible a mistake might have happened in the delivery.

Q. The articles purchased by Mr. George, was the knife-case containing knives and forks; and the articles they purchased were knife-cases? - A. Yes; after an article is sold, they are left in the room till they are called for; the knife-cases all stood together.

Q. Might it not be very possible that even the porter might have delivered it by mistake? - A. I think not.

THOMAS BAGSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am warehouseman to Messrs. Robins; the prisoner Abbot, came on the 10th of October, for the lots he had purchased; I looked them together, and placed the four knife-cases by themselves upon the table; he said, he could not take them with him then; we had a sale in the other room that day, and he went to attend the sale in the next room; and I saw the other prisoner, Tanner, in the next room, at the time Mr. Robins was felling; he said, he wanted to take them away; I then took the keys of the ware-room, and he went with me, I could not stay any longer; he said, Tanner was gone for a coach, I left him in the room; when I thought there had been time enough for a coach to be called, I went into the room again; I found Abbott there and the goods were removed.

Q. Do you remember if there was any mark upon the lot that Mr. George bought? - A. Yes; it was marked with chalk, lot 203; he went away, and I locked the door; a few days afterwards, Mr. George enquired for his lot, and I could not find it any where; a few days after he came to our sale-room; I asked him if he had taken the knife-case away in a mistake; he said, he believed not, but the knife-cases that he had taken away, he had sold to Tanner; he said he would enquire of Tanner about it; I saw him again afterwards, and he told me he had enquired of Tanner, and that he had not got the lot marked 203; I had given him the number of the lot upon a piece of paper; I believe I saw him as much as three or four times, or more, after that.

Q. How long after was it that he was taken to Bow-street? - A. I should suppose a month, or more.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. When you first spoke to the prisoner, Abbott, the other prisoner was not in company with him? - A. No.

Q. After these things had been missed, Abbott came several times to the auction room? - A. Yes.

Q. The two prisoners did not lodge together at this time? - A. He said he had sold them to Tanner.

Q. When he was taken into custody, he was taken to his father's house? - A. I understood so.

Q. You never attempted to take him into custody? - A. No.

Q. He said he had spoke to Tanner, and Tanner told him he had not got it? - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any other knife-cases in the room besides? - A. Yes, there was one other, containing knives and forks, which he purchased the day that he came to fetch the others away.

Q. When they are upon sale, you open the head, and shew the articles? - A. Yes.

Q. And when they are sold, you put down the head, and put them away? - A. Yes.

Q. I hardly need ask you if you can tell, when

it is shut down, whether it is full or empty? - A. No.

MARY-ELIZABETH COLLINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in the same house with the prisoners; it is Abbott's father's house; Tanner lived with Abbott; I came to live there about five weeks ago, and they lived there then.

Q. Do you remember their coming home in a backney coach together? - A. Yes, once they did.

Q. What did they bring with them? - A. I believe two waistcoat-pieces that they had bought.

Q. Have you ever seen any knife-cases in that house? - A. Yes; I saw some up stairs in Mr. Abbott's room; Mr. Tanner slept with him in that room.

Q. Did you see who brought these knife-cases into the room? - A. No, they were not brought there while I was there; the knife-cases were all laid up in a corner, and their dirty cloaths laid at the top of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Abbott was living in the house with his father? - A. Yes.

Q. And Tanner was acquainted with him, and lodged in that room? - A. Yes.

Q. And when the coach came, you are sure no knife-cases came then, but waistcoat-pieces? - A. I saw no knife-cases then.

Court. Q. Was there any chalk upon these knife-cases? - A. I did not look at them.

JOHN LIMBRICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the patroles of Bow-street: I apprehended the two prisoners on the 17th of November; Tanner was brought to my lodgings by a master tailor, and I took him into custody; I afterwards went to Abbott's lodgings, in Nell Gwynn's-buildings, Battle-bridge; and there I found this knife-case, and five more; (produces it;) it is marked at the back, 203.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The mark still remained at the back of it, though it was four or five weeks after the sale? - A. Yes.

Mr. Robins. This is the lot that was sold to Mr. George; there has been one desert-knife put into it to make the set complete.

Tanner's defence. I never had an intention to defraud Mr. Robins of his property; if they were taken away, it was a complete mistake.

The prisoner Abbott left his defence to his counsel, and called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Tanner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Abbott, GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Tanner, GUILTY. (Aged 19.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before. Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-65

65. JAMES LYNCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , four half-crowns, thirty-six shillings, and three sixpences, the property of John Belton , in his dwelling house .

JOHN BELTON sworn. - I keep the Spread Eagle, Broad-street, St. Giles's ; the prisoner lodged in my house: On the 17th of September, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I went out with some beer, and when I came back I found the prisoner in the bar, I was out about fifteen minutes; I went out again, and came back and found him in the bar; there came in some people to have some nourishment, and I served them, and in pulling out the till I missed some silver out of it; thinking my own family had put the silver away, I said nothing about it until Monday morning; and on Monday morning I made enquiry, and positively accused the prisoner; I sent for an officer and searched his box; there was a half-crown found in his box that I can swear to; and a shillings and a sixpence.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - I am an officer.(Produces four half-crown, thirty-six shillings, and three sixpences).

Belton. That is my half-crown; I had seen it about ten minutes before I went out; there are remarkable marks upon it: and I am sure that shillings and sixpence is mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your bar, I believe, is a place to which every person that comes into the house has access? - A. No, only friends; I admit nobody else.

Q. How many persons serve in your bar? - A. Only my wife and daughter.

Q. Did you not accuse a man of the name of Bryant with taking this money? - A. No, I did not.

Q. How many persons your wife might have given change to that evening you cannot tell? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I am as innocent of this charge as a child; that money was my own, that I have always worked late and early for.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17991204-66

66. DAVID WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , a saw, value 4s. the property of Edwards Meads .

EDWARD MEADS sworn. - I was at work in Bouverie-street : I left a saw in the building, and while I was at dinner I was sent for; I found the prisoner in custody, and the saw.

JAMES NASH sworn. - I was at work in that building; I came from dinner between twelve and one, and went into the next house; a neighbour facing told me a strange man was gone into the building; I pushed open the door, and met the prisoner in the passage; he had the day before asked me for a job, I told him I could not give him one; he went to push out, and I called to him and asked him what he had under his coat; he said nothing; I told him I was sure he had; he said he had a saw, but it was his own; I looked at the saw, and told him it was the man's saw that I had been at work with; I sent for Meads from the public house; a constable was sent for, and I delivered the saw and the prisoner to the constable.

THOMAS MASTERS sworn. - I am a constable(Produces the saw, which was diposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I called, at his own desire, about one o'clock on Saturday the 2d of November; I went in, the door was open; I saw this saw lying there; I told him when he came that it was mine, I had lost it before I went to work in the country. I had not the saw under my coat.

GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17991204-67

67. ABRAHAM JACOBS was indicted for uttering to one John Warren , on the 2d of December , a counterfeit half-guinea, knowing it to be counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN WARREN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Artillery-place, Finsbury-square; I am a sugar-broker : This day week I saw the Prisoner standing at the corner of Angel-court, Throgmorton-street , with a basket of oranges; he offered me some for sale, which I refused, saying they were not good; he said, master, master, they are very good; I told him if he would let me have nine for sixpence, I would take sixpennyworth; he was at last to last me have nine; I put my hand in my pocket and pulled out what money I had got which consisted of a half-guinea, a seven-shilling piece, and three shillings in silver; the shilling that I offered him first he returned, saying he did not think it was a good one; I gave him another, which he returned me, saying he would give me change for the half-guinea piece; I gave him the half-guinea, and he looked at it; he returned it me, as I supposed, back; he then said, I will give change for a seven-shilling piece; he must have seen them both in my hand; he put it to his mouth, bit it, and said he thought it was a counterfeit; and the half-guinea he objected to as being light; it was an old one; after that he agreed to take the shilling which he at first refused; he gave me sixpence in six penny pieces; I took the oranges and came away; as I was walking home, I put my hand in my pocket, looked at my money, and perceived that I had a new half-guinea, and that my old one was gone; I immediately turned back, and a boy stopped him in Finch-lane; I told him, you rascal, you have given me a counterfeit half-guinea and a seven-shilling piece, for my good half-guinea and seven-shilling piece; he made no answer to that; I asked him where my half-guinea and seven-shilling piece were, and he gave them to me immediately, but denied he had given me the counterfeit ones: after that, he was taken before the Lord Mayor. (Produces the counterfeit half-guinea and seven-shilling piece).

Mr. Parker proved them to be counterfeit.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for six months more .

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17991204-68

68. ELIZABETH FINCH was indicted for obtaining, under false pretences, on the 15th of August , two yards of muslin, value 7s. and two handkerchiefs, value 7s. the property of William Dalby and Richard Brown .

There being no evidence to prove that the pretences were false, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

(The same prisoner was again indicted, but the evidence being of the same nature, she was acquitted.)

Reference Number: t17991204-69

69. SUSANNAH PETLEY was indicted for feloniously receiving seven gowns, value 3l. four petticoats, value 15s. and a shawl, value 2s. the property of Catherine Hall , stolen by a certain ill-disposed person .

The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.

CATHERINE HALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. On Wednesday evening, the 2d of October last, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, from my mother's house in Belvidere-row, Lambeth; I went out about one o'clock, and left my property safe; I returned at nine in the evening; I had left them in two boxes upon the ground floor, one in the back and the other in the front room; when I returned my property was gone from my sister's box and mine; there was no violence used, nor I cannot form any judgment how they were stolen; on the Friday following, I found them at Mr. Brockfield's, in the possession of Susahnah Petley, in the Minories; she was shewing the gowns up to sale to the woman of the shop; I claimed them as mine; I asked her how she came by them, she said she received them of a man to sell for him; she said she did not know where he lived; she said she had sold for him several times, and that she lived in Rosemary-lane; I asked her again, and she said she lived in Holborn; I took her over in a coach to my mother's, and sent for a constable, and she was taken to Union Hall.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was not this done all in public open day-light? - A. Yes, it was.

Q.It was a public shop for the sale of clothes? - A. Yes.

Q. So that nobody upon earth could avoid seeing them, who came by? - A. The shop was wide open; she said she had not bought them, but she had them of a man for sale.

Q. Do not you know that the runners were sent by her direction, after the man of whom she said she had them? - A. Yes, but he had run away.

Q.This is a poor woman whose husband has deserted her, and left her to provide for her family? - A. She said so.

THOMAS POWELL sworn. - I am a constable:(Produces the property); I received it from the last witness, in the company of the prisoner, on Friday, the 4th of October, at the house of the prosecutor's mother; the prisoner came there in a coach, with the last witness and her sister; the property I found in the house; there was nobody else with them; there was a person examined at Union Hall, that she said was the wife of the man that she had them of.

The property was acposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Mr. Knowlys. addressed the Jury on behalf of the defendant, and called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17991204-70

70. JOHN FORBES , JOHANNA FORBES , and RICHARD FORBES , were indicted for a conspiracy .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

- HUDSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am clerk to Mr. Bolton, Filazer for Surrey. (Produces the affidavit of Mr. James Preston , upon which the writ issued); it is read.

RICHARD LINK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. (Produces a writ from the Sheriffs-office in Surrey.) " James Preston against John Forbes , returnable in fifteen days of Easter, 1797, and endorsed fifteen pounds and upwards:' a warrant was granted in consequence of the exigency of this writ.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are not certain whether you made out the warrant yourself? - A. No; unless I saw it.

Q. You derive your knowledge from a book? - A. Yes.

Q. That book is not here? - A. No.

STEPHEN PURKIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer of the Sheriff of Surrey; I received a warrant, I believe by letter, to take John Forbes . (Produces it).

Mr. Link. This warrant is in my writing, I granted it myself. (It is read).

Purkis. On the 20th of April, 1797, I received that warrant: On the 21st, in the morning, I went to the house of the defendant, John Forbes , the Falcon, in Falcon-court in the Borough, between eight and ten, my assistant Alexander Grace went in first, and call d for some porter, and I read the paper, and staid half an hour; I saw no man who appeared to be the landlord, but several women came and looked at me; I then left the house, and went to a public-house in the same court, the Bell, to enquire, and from the enquiries I made, and from information that I received, that the landlord was at home, I went again in the evening to the Falcon, and there I saw a person acting as landlord in the bar; that was the defendant, Richard Forbes , he was serving people, and taking money; I do not know that he took any money, but he took some out of the till, and put it in his own pocket for himself; at the time I went into the bar, he was serving something at the bar, and taking money.

Jury. Q. You just now said, you did not see him take money? - A. I cannot say what money it was, but he was in the act of taking some

money, and when I told him he must go with me, he took some money out of the till, and put in his pocket; when I first went into the bar, I said, how do you do, Mr. Forbes; he said, how do you do; I told him I was very sorry to inform him I had a warrant against him; I shewed him the warrant, the name I do not recollect, but it was the same warrant I have not produced; Mr. Chester, the attorney, and my assistant Alexander Grace were present, and Mr. John Welch.

Jury. Q. You shewed Richard Forbes the warrant, did he only look at it, or did he read it? - A. Mr. Chester took it out of my hand, and I think he read it.

Q. But you are sure you told him it was a warrant to apprehend him? - A. I made my caption of him in the bar; Mrs. Johanna Forbes was in the bar; I said now the beer is drawing and going out, it is a pity to take you away for so small a sum, I'll take your word till the morning, if you can bring a couple of friends and give me a bail bond; his answer was, no, I'll have it settled at once; we then went with him to a lock-up-house, kept by Mr. Newton, the St. George's Coffee-house, in Suffolk-street, near the King's-bench; Mr. Welch, Mr. Chester, Alexander Grace , Richard Forbes, and myself went into a room together, we set down, had a tankard of porter; Richard Forbes called for brandy and water; I said that is a very good house of your's Mr. Forbes, you seemed pretty busy; yes it is, says he, I have been sitting up the skittle-ground; I asked him if he had not better send his wife word that he should not be at home all night to prevent her being uneasy, and offered him a sheet of paper for that purpose; his answer was he could not write; Grace offered to write for him, which he did; Grace read to him what he wrote, and went with it; Plenty of brandy and water was drank; two or three ladies came to see him, and he was very liberal with his brandy and water, but paid nothing; the next morning several came to see him, one a younger brother, and a person of the name of Crawley, and several others; from circumstances which appeared to me suspicious, no bail being offered, I sent for Mr. Wyatt, the attorney for the plaintiff, to send somebody to identify the person; his clerk came over, and from him I understood that I had not got the right person; I then did not know what to do; I went in and asked him if his name was not John Forbes, and he said that was no matter; I cannot exactly say; when he was let out, for he was let out when I was not at home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. And after you had been informed by the clerk of the attorney that he was not the man, still you ran the risk of keeping him? - A. The clerk said it was not the man, but if they were in the habit of personating one another he could not tell.

Q. You do not recollect the name of the plaintiff? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you do not recollect the name of the plaintiff, for whom you served that writ? - A. Really for the moment I cannot; if you will give me leave to look at the warrant, I can tell.

Q. Does it happen to you every day that you have actions against you for a mistake? - A. Once besides this since.

Q. And you mean to say you do not recollect the name of the plaintiff? - A. In the other instance, I have an execution for the money now.

Q. Have you consulted Mr. Chester about trying that gentleman for a conspiracy? - A. No, because he behaved like a gentleman; Mr. Forbes never said he was not the man, and that gentleman did immediately.

Q. Do you mean to say that either you or Mr, Chester explained the warrant to him? - A. He read the warrant to him but not loud.

Q. Where were you standing when Mr. Chester read the warrant? - A. In the bar.

Q. And you heard him read every word of it? - A. I do not know that he read every word, but he explained it to him.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he read and explained it to him? - A. I do not mean to say he read every word; but he told him he must go with us.

Q. Do you mean to swear that it was explained to him that it was a writ against John, and not against Richard Forbes? - A. It was explained that John Forbes was in the writ.

Q. Was Grace there at the time? - A. Grace was in the passage, it was all done in a minute or two; he was in a very great hurry to come out; to speak within compass, it was not five minutes altogether.

Q. You are sure Chester read John Forbes ? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect now what is the name of the plaintiff? - A. No; though I read the warrant this morning.

Q. Who desired you to read it, Mr. Chester? - A. No; I did not see Mr. Chester till I came to the Old Bailey.

Q. Was not he with you when you read it? - A. No, I read it in St. James's-park; I live at Chelsea.

Q. Will you give hese gentleman any reason why you read it this morning? - A. No, no more than if I had read any thing else.

Q. This man acted as landlord, you say? - A. Yes.

Q.Will you swear that you saw him take any money of any one customer whatever? - A. He was standing at the bar in the act of taking money; I saw the money.

jury. Q. Will you say you saw him take money? - A. I have witnesses here that he took money, and that he served with liquor.

Q. The two defendants are just of the same height, I think? - A. No; but I had not seen either of them.

Q. At that time Mr. Chester was not an attorney, but a bailiff's follower, is that so? - A. No; but that I might have a sufficient witness from the character I had heard of them, I asked the favour of Mr. Chester to go with me; Mr. chester and I have been intimate fourteen years.

Q. Had you not your assistant with you? - A. Yes; but I asked Mr. Chester to go to be a witness, whether he was the landlord or not.

Q. Who was the attorney in the cause? - A. Mr. Wyatt.

Q.Not Mr. Chester? - A. No; I went to the Bell, which is kept by a Marshalsea-court officer, and there I was told that they were a very bad set; that there were three brothers of them, and I must be very careful; Mr. Chester called upon me that evening, and I asked him as a favour to go with me.

Q. You were never told that this man did not owe a farthing in the world? - A. No.

Q. That you mean to swear? - A. I never was.

Q. Did you desire the clerk to the attorney to attend you in this caption? - A. No, we had rather be without the clerks, for they very often spoil the business, especially if we have shy people to deal with.

Q. We have heard a great deal about the persecution you have endured, in this prosecution being brought against you; did he not offer to make it up if you would give a bottle and a bird, or a treat? - A. No; I had Richard Forbes afterwards locked up in my house, and I believe John; but I am not certain: and I think John must be locked up, because Mr. Poole, the brewer's clerk, came there to him; however he was in the house: we talked the business over in my lock-up house; Mr. Poole said, let me undertake the business for you, and he went with me to Mr. Bland, the attorney, in Racquet-court, the attorney in the action against me for false imprisonment, and we could not settle it; then Mr. Poole's clerk left me, and said he was ashamed of the business.

Q. Then you never did receive such an offer? - A. No, I offered five pounds, and we could not settle it.

Q. Then it was never proposed to you to pay the costs, and the reckoning? - A. I will not take upon me to swear that they did not; I said I would go as far as five pounds.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you refused that offer? - A. I did refuse that offer, in consequence of the costs being more than five pounds.

Q. Did you take the trouble to enquire of any friends that called upon this man in the lock-up house? - A. No, I did not; I had not the least suspicion that I had got the wrong man.

Q. Do you mean to say that Grace was within hearing when Mr. Chester explained the warrant? - A. I do not think he was; I think he was in the tap-room.

Q. Will you swear he was in the tap-room? - A. I will swear he was in the house.

Q. Was he within your sight at the time Mr. Chester was reading this warrant to Forbes? - A. I cannot say.

ALEXANDER GRACE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was formerly assist to Purkis, and am now assistant to Mr. Long, sheriff's officer; I went with Purkis to the Falcoun Falcon-court, in the Borough, to arrest the landlord of the Falcon, John Forbes ; Mr. Chester and Mr. Welch went with us, about eight in the evening; we had been first to the Bell to make some enquiry, and then we went to the Falcon; when I went into the house, I called for a pint of beer; the man who was then in the house was Richard Forbes , having the appearance of a landlord, he was in the tap-room; I said, landlord I want a pint of beer; he brought it to me, and I paid him for it; I had got the beer before Purkis came in; I think I went in first, and they came in immediately after them; Purkis spoke to Richard Forbes , who was then gone into the bar; he told him, he had a writ against him and produced it to him, upon which he seemed satisfied, and said he would go away; I was not close enough to hear whether it was read to him or not; Richard Forbes seemed in a hurry to come away; before he came away he pulled out the till and took something, which I supposed was money, and he went home to Purkis's lock-up-house, a public-house in suffolk-street; we went in and sat down, and I asked Richard Forbes what was his name; his answer was, that you have to find out; somebody in the company asked him to declare what his name was, as it was rather a doubt whether he was the man or not.

Court. Q. Do you mean as soon as you got to the house? - A. Yes; it was proposed that he should write home to his wife, that we might see how he subscribed his name; he said he could not write; I proposed writing for him; I wrote a note, desiring that she would not be uneasy, and subscribed it John Forbes ; he said, that would do, he was

satisfied with what I had wrote; and said he would thank me if I would take it to his wife.

jury. Q. Did you understand whether he could read or not? - A. I do not recollect whether he read it or not.

Q. Did he look at that paper as if he read it? - A. I thought so; I went immediately to the house, and delivered it to a woman, not the defendant, but, I believe, the wife of Richard Forbes ; I returned immediately to the room, and saw Richard Forbes; he was frequently asked his name, and always refused, he was liberated about four o'clock the next afternoon; Purkis was not at home at that time; the clerk from Mr. Wyatt came to identify that he was not the man, and he was liberated immediately.

jury. Q. Was it not in your power to have ascertained, from the people in the house, whether it was the landlord? - A. No; if I had made any such inquiry in the house, it would have created an alarm immediately.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How many people were there in the tap-room? - A. There were a good many.

Q. Mr. Chester and Mr. Purkis were in the bar? - A. They went up to the bar immediately.

Q. Then you had him in such a situation that he could not have escaped, and yet you did not take the trouble to ascertain whether you were about to arrest an innocent man? - A. I had not that presence of mind.

Q. For what purpose was it that Mr. Chester, the attorney, went? - A. Because there were a great many Irishmen used the house, and Irishmen are very fond of taking one another's parts.

Q. And that was the only reason that was assigned? - A. Yes; that I know of.

Q. Was not the reason that Purkis assigned, that he wanted Mr. Chester as a witness, in case a trick was played upon him? - A. I never heard any thing of the kind.

Q. How many people were there? - A. There were a good many men and women.

Q. How many men? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were there twenty? - A. I don't think there were.

Q.Had you an opportunity of seeing all that passed at the bar? - A. I came up to the bar latterly.

Q.Purkis had the writ, and shewed it to the defendant? - A. He shewed it to him at the bar.

Q. That you could see yourself, very plainly? - A. They had the writ amongst them, I cannot say who had it.

Q. What was the purpose for which you went to the bar? - A. To see what was doing.

Q.Did not you know who had the writ? - A. I suppose it was Purkis who had it; but it is a very customary thing to give part into the defendant's hand.

Q. Purkis read the writ to him? - A. I cannot say.

Q. And you read it to him? - A. No.

Q. Did Mr. Chester? - A. I cannot say.

Q. If it had been read to him, you must have observed it? - A. I did not come up till the latter part; if it had been read aloud I must have heard it.

Q. You went for the very purpose of keeping an eye upon them? - A. Yes.

Q. Where was Welch at that time? - A. In the tap-room.

Q. Upon your oath, if it has been sworn that you were not in the tap-room, part of the time that Purkis was there, is that true, or is it false? - A. I think I was not out of the tap-room.

Q. If it has been sworn that you were out during any part of the arrest, that must be untrue? - A. I was not out.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you been to the Falcon public-house in the morning? - A. No, I had not.

Jury. Q. What was the answer to that letter? - A. The answer was, that it was very well.

JOHN WELCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a boot and shoemaker, in Jermyn-street, St. James's: I went to the Falcon with Mr. Chester, Purkis, and Grace; as near as I can judge, about eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Had you been there in the morning of that day? - A. No, I had not; I never was there in my life before; I was requested, as a favour, by Mr. Chester, and Mr. Purkis, to go with them; Purkis requested that me and Mr. Chester would go first, which we did; when I went in, agreeable to what Purkis had requested, the first thing was to ascertain which was the landlord of the house; and in order to ascertain that, when I went in, I saw a man with an apron on, who appeared to be the landlord; I said, landlord, bring me a pint of beer; Forbes said, yes; he brought a pint of beer, and Mr. Chester and I sat down and drank it; Mr. Chester then took a shilling out of his pocket in order to pay for it, and said, are you the landlord; to which this gentleman answered, yes; he then put his hand into his pocket apron, took out some halfpence, and went to the bar and got a sixpence to give change; Mr. Chester then went to the bar to him, and asked him if he knew Mr. Preston, or some such name, I am not sure, but I think the name was Preston; he replied, yes; Mr. Chester then told him that he had got a warrant for the amount of the debt that he owed him; Richard Forbes then asked Mr. Chester to let him see it, and Mr. Chester shewed it him; Mr. Purkis then came in, he had not been in before; that he might be in the passage, for as I sat in the taproom, I could not see the passage; it was agreed that Mr. Chester and me should go in first, and then he was to come in afterwards.

Q. Did Grace come in with Purkis? - A. I think they both came in together; at least, when I saw them, I saw them both together; then I heard Mr. Richard Forbes say to this lady, the defendant, my dear, do not be alarmed; she seemed much frightened, and he, in his hurry, opened a little till that they had in the bar; and what confirmed me and Mr. Chester was, that he put his hand into the till, and took out some silver as if it had been his own; he then said to this lady, I shall not be long, and he then came away with Purkis and Grace, Mr. Chester and I followed him; Purkis said to him, the debt is not very considerable, you may be put to some inconvenience, and you may bring your friends forwards to-morrow if you like; I heard something about a skittle ground, but I cannot perfectly recollect what that was.

Q. Where was Richard Forbes at that time? - A. In the bar, just before the caption was made; then we went to the lock-up house, and Mr. Richard Forbes began to call for brandy and water, or rum and water, and was drinking pretty freely; Purkis sent Grace in with some paper, saying, you had better write a note to your wife, and let her know where you are, which he declined doing; I think I heard Richard Forbes say, I think somebody will have to pay for this, and he asked me to drink with him; I said, how do you mean; his answer was, that is nothing to you; there was other conversation, but I was in and out, backwards and forwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you ever in a lock-up house before? - A. Yes.

Q. You are a shoemaker? - A. Yes.

Q. What else? - A. Nothing else.

Q. Did you ever assist in a thing of this sort before? - A. No.

Q. Have you known Purkis long? - A. About two years; I came to know him by his arresting a man that Mr. Chester sued out a writ for.

Q.How long have you known Mr. Chester? - A. Between three and four years; he is my attorney.

Q. What time of the day did you meet with this worthy gentleman? - A. Somewhere about five or six o'clock in the evening; I went to Mr. Chester's, and he was not at home; I then went to Mr. Purkis's to see for him, as I had some business to settle with him.

Q. Where was it that Purkis gave Mr. Chester the warrant? - A. In the lock-up house, before we went out, and he was in the act of reading it to the man in the bar when Purkis came in; Purkis requested me to pay particular attention to the whole of the transaction.

Q. And therefore you particularly attended to the reading of this warrant? - A. I did.

Q. Did Grace attend particularly to the reading of it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Where was Grace? - A. He came in with his master from the passage.

Q. Are you certain that Grace was not in the tap-room at the time that Mr. Chester held this conversation with him? - A. I think he was not, I am not certain.

Q. How far were you from the tap-room door? - A. About two yards.

Q. And you did not see them come in? - A. They might be in and I not see them.

Q. You pitied that poor woman very much? - A. I am never without the feelings of humanity.

Q. She cried very much, did not she? - A. She seemed very much intimidated.

Q. Did she not cry? - A. I did not see any tears flow.

Q. Did not that strike you as a little remarkable? - A. I thought her eyes were dryer than women's eyes in general are that are in trouble.

Q. I dare say you said some soothing words to her? - A. I never spoke to her.

Q. I thought you might, as you felt for her so much, and being so very humane a man? - A. I might, but I cannot be certain.

Q. Richard said to her, my dear, do not be alarmed, it will soon be over? - A. Yes.

Q. Recollect, as well as you can, the very words that Richard used, when he was speaking to her? - A. Do not be alarmed, my dear, I shall be back soon.

Q. The warrant had been read to him? - A. Yes; in her hearing.

Q. And, therefore, she could not but be acquainted that the arrest had taken place upon his person? - A.Certainly.

Q. Did the wife seem to recover her spirits, and appear less agitated, after that? - A. No, I think not; he then asked her for some money, and said, do not let me go without any money; she happened to be in the bar at that time.

Q. When you first came in, Mrs. Forbes was in the bar? - A. When I called for a pint of beer, I saw the defendant, Richard, in the tap-room, standing by the fire, and this lady in the bar.

Q. Be so good as look at the lady, and be sure that that is the lady? - A. I am confident of it.

Q. Do you think Purkis expressed himself with as much concern and good nature? - A. He is used to things of that sort, and his feelings, of course, must be more callous.

Q. How close was she to Purkis at the time the warrant was reading? - A. I suppose two or three yards; I was paying attention to the warrant being read.

Q. Did the woman say any thing to Purkis? - A. Not that I recollect.

Q. Do you recollect any chat between them? - A. No.

Q. They were some time in chat together, were they not? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. How far was Purkis from the man at the time he asked the wife for the money, and said, do not let me go without some money? - A. He was either in the passage or the tap-room; Purkis was in the passage when the warrant was reading.

Q. Where was Grace when this man asked the wife for some money? - A. With his master.

Q. The wife had seen all this, you say? - A. Yes.

Q. How came any body to be foolish enough to suggest, that a note should be written to let the wife know where he was? - A. Mr. Purkis sent Grace in with a piece of paper, and a pen and ink, for him to write to her.

Q. The man began to write, but afterwards would not go on with it? - A. I think not, I think be said he could not write.

Q. How came you to go back to the lock-up house? - A. I went to smoke my pipe; I thought I might as well go there as any where else.

Q. And you having to go to Jermyn-street? - A. That was all in my way.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand that this conversation, between the wife and the husband, took place at the Falcon? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the wife go with the husband to the lockup house? - A. No.

Q. It was not till after they got to the lock-up house that the paper was produced for him to write? - A. No.

RICHARD BLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an attorney. (Produces a posten).

Q. What is the action? - A. An action of false imprisonment, and an arrest against Robert Taylor , Esq, the Sheriff of Surry, Henry Chester, and Stephen Purkis ; I was attorney in that cause for Richard Forbes , verdict for plaintiff, thirty-eight pounds twelve shillings, damages one penny, and costs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was there not a proposition made before the writ of enquiry was executed? - A. Yes; Purkis made an application.

Q.It was agreed that the costs should have been paid, and a dinner afterwards? - A. Yes; Forbes said, if they would pay him the costs, the cause should be ended, but my costs were not paid; Purkis came to me in the evening, and promised to call again in two hours, and pay the costs.

Q. Did you understand from Purkis that he had agreed to those terms? - A. Certainly I did.

Q. I believe he moved the Court the very next day to set aside the judgment, for irregularity? - A. Yes; I received a copy of the rule late that night.

Q. I believe there was some irregularity, owing to Mr. Chester not having put in the bail regularly? - A. Yes.

Q. And the defendant had to pay the costs? - A. No, the costs were to abide the event.

Mr. Knapp. Q. This that you have now produced, is the record at Nisi Prius, before Lord Kenyon? - A. Yes.

Q. The questions that have been put to you by the learned Gentleman all belong to the writ of enquiry? - A. Yes.

RICHARD JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. On the 21st of April, 1797, I was in company with the defendant, John Forbes , and Mr. O'Brien, at the Black Swan, in Bartholomew-lane, behind the Bank, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the forenoon, I knew them before; while I and John Forbes, and Mr. O'Brien, were together, Richard Forbes came running in, in a vast heat, and said, the b-y rogues, or b-y thieves, I cannot tell which, had been there, meaning at his brother's house; Mr. O'Brien, who pretended to be an Irish barrister, was asked by them, if they took the wrong person whether they could not punish the person for taking him; Mr. O'Brien said, yes, the officer will be obliged to pay debt and costs; the two brothers then said, that they would do him.

Q. Do who? - A. The officer.

Q. Do you remember who asked the question? - A. It was asked by both of them.

Q. Do you recollect either of the Forbes's going out, after the conversation? - A. Richard went home, and John took me, I believe, to a court in Bartholomew-lane, he was about buying some winepipes; and then he left me.

Q. Was any thing said, as to what Richard should do when he got there? - A. He was to appear as landlord.

Jury. Q. Are you sure he said as landlord? - A. He did not make use of the word landlord.

Q. Are you certain that the word landlord was not made use of? - A. I cannot say; I understood he was to appear as landlord of the house, and personate his brother; that I am certain was the determination.

Q. Did you know John Forbes to keep the public-house, the Falcon? - A. Yes; I was there the day he was appraised in.

Jury. Q. Whether Richard Forbes was ever in the habit of serving the customers of that house? - A. I have seen him draw beer as assistant to his brother.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This is not the first time that you have appeared as a witness? - A. No; I was a witness in the Court of King's Bench, in the same cause.

Q. When was it that that cause was tried? - A. In last May.

Q. That was 1799? - A. Yes.

Q. When did this happen? - A. The 21st of April, 1797.

Q. Are you sure it was the 21st of April? - A. To the best of my knowledge.

Q. Recollect yourself-will you swear it was not the 19th of April? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever say, positively, before, it was the 21st? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say, that you swore, in the Court of King's Bench, that it was the 21st. - A. I said, the 21st, or thereabouts.

Q. The 19th is thereabouts? - A. It could not be the 19th; the next day I saw John Forbes, and he told me that his brother was taken.

Q. Did you not, upon your oath, say, in the Court of King's Bench, that John Forbes was out of the way? - A. Yes, he certainly was; he was in another county.

Q. You have been familiar, perhaps, with being out of the way? - A. I have had the misfortune to be out of the way myself, and was at that time.

Q. Who were the parties present at that time? - A. John Forbes , Richard Forbes, and O'Brien.

Q. Was your wife there? - A. No; no woman whatever was there.

Q. Then you are the only person who was present at that conversation, besides these defendants? - A. Yes.

Q. Did this conversation take place in the public coffee-room? - A. Yes.

Q. What drew you there that day? - A. An inclination to drink some porter.

Q. They tell me you have been out of the way ever since? - A. No, I have not.

Q. Do you know the face of that gentleman? - A. I do.

Q. Be so good as tell us the words you made use of in the Court of King's Bench-do you mean to swear that you said any thing upon that trial about the one brother personating the other? - A. I swore there as I have done now.

Q. Do you mean to say that you swore, in the Court of King's Bench, that the one agreed that the other should personate him? - A. I swore to the same purport.

Q. Did you say any thing more than that they consulted this gentleman, whether an officer could be punished for taking the one brother instead of the other? - A. That is the same purport.

Q. Is it from those words only, then, that you collect the agreement of the one to personate the other? - A. I collected it from that conversation.

Q. And then drew the inference? - A. Yes.

Q. Richard came in, and said, either the b-y rogues, or the b-y thieves, had been there? - A. Yes.

Now, as this happened in the year 1797, were you acquainted with Mr. Chester at that time? - Yes; I suppose a twelvemonth, or two years ago.

Q. How long after that did you see Mr. Chester on this business? - A. Some time.

Q. Two years? - A. No; the law-suit has been in hand these two years.

Q. How long after this conversation was it you saw Mr. Chester? - A. I cannot say; it might be six months.

Q. Upon your oath, did you ever mention it to Purkis, or Mr. Chester, within six months? - A. I mentioned it to the prosecutor immediately afterwards.

Q. Who is the prosecutor? - A.Purkis.

Q. Had Purkis any writs out against you at the time of this conversation? - A. Yes, for debt.

Jury. Q. What are you now? - A. I keep a hair manufactory, in Chandos-street.

ELIZABETH JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the wife of the last witness. I know the defendant, John Forbes , he kept the Falcon, in Falcon-court, in the Borough; in 1797 John Forbes was the landlord; on the 21st of April, I think it was, 1797, I called at John Forbes 's house to leave some money for a person that was to call for it, that might be about six o'clock in the evening; I was asked by John Forbes 's wife to sit down in the bar, that is the lady, (pointing to her); there was a conversation between Richard Forbes and the wife, and John Forbes, and one or two people more, that I do not know in the bar; from the conversation, I understood that they expected one Purkis, and officer, to arrest her husband; Richard Forbes was then acting the part of the landlord, as they said they were in hopes Purkis would come in, and take him for the brother, and Richard was to put an apron on, that he might look more like the landlord, to deceive the officer; I cannot recollect whether he did put the apron on or not; Richard Forbes and Mrs. Forbes were in high glee, they seemed to be very cheerful, and said, that if Purkis should take the brother, he would be glad to make it up if he paid the debt for him; I wished them a good evening, and went away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What business is your husband? - A. He is in the liquor trade.

Q. How long has he been in the liquor trade? - A. A great many years.

Q. That is the way he gets his livelihood? - A. Yes.

Q. Where has he lived? - A. Near Vauxhall, very near two years.

Q. Was he at home all that two years? - A. He

had occasion to be from home very often, upon business.

Q. Was Purkis an acquaintance of your's? - A. No.

Q. You had never heard of Mr. Purkis before that day that you were at the Falcon? - A. I had heard of him.

Q. You were not acquainted with Mrs. Forbes? - A. No, I had never seen her before.

Q. How long, in the course of the two years, has your husband been absent from Vauxhall-has he not been at hide and seek during the whole of these two years? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, has he not been continually out of the way to avoid the bailiffs? - A. He has once or twice.

Q. Has he not repeatedly, up to the present day, been avoiding the bailiffs? - A. I cannot say; he has been out of the way.

Q. Do not you know that he is and was, every moment, avoiding this gentleman, Mr. Bowerbank, for one? - A. There is about three pounds, odd, due to that gentleman.

Jury. Q. Is your husband in the liquor trade and that only? - A. He has taken a house for a hair manufactory, in Chandos-street, but he has not entered upon the business yet.

Court. Q. Have you any warehouse there? - A. There are some cellars underneath.

Q. Have you any manufactory in the house - any goods of that sort? - A. Yes, different sorts of hair, which have been in the house two months; hair takes a long while in preparing; he has a man at work in the house now, but it is not in readiness yet.

Mr. Alley. Q. When were you first applied to, afterwards, about this business? - A. I told my husband what had happened, and some time after that Mr. Purkis brought me a subpoena.

Q. As to this apron, do not you know that John Forbes is a wine-cooper? - A. Yes.

Q. How long before you attended the trial at Guildhall was it that you were subpoenaed? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. You recollect perfectly the conversation that took place two years ago, and you cannot recollect what took place last May? - A. I cannot.

Mr. Knowlys addressed the Jury on behalf of the desendants, and called four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

John Forbes , GUILTY .

Richard Forbes , GUILTY .

Confined one year in Newgate , and to find sureties for one year longer .

Johanna Forbes , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: s17991204-1

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT proceeded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows: Received sentence of Death-4.

Thomas Scott , Bartholomew Foley, John Worral , John Russell.

Transported for fourteen years - 1. - Catherine Ganer .

Transported for seven years - 15.

Daniel Sullivan ,

Nathan Nathan , otherwise Nathaniel Newton,

William Telfar,

William Longford ,

Elizabeth Jane ,

Elizabeth Smith ,

John Youd ,

George Parr,

Edward Burnham , otherwise Thomas Haley,

Susannah Green,

William Clarke ,

John, otherwise Charles-John Williams,

Mary Howard ,

Richard Isles.

Last Sessions.

William Kempstone .

Confined two years in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 5.

William Watson , Thomas Ganer , Elizabeth Pracey, Charles Abbot , otherwise Jones, George- Henry Tanner , otherwise George Henry.

Confined two years in the House of Correction, and publicly whipped - 1. - Robert Raymond .

Confined one year in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 1. - Barnard Barnard .

Confined one year in Newgate, and find sureties for one year longer - 2.

John Forbes , Richard Forbes .

Confined six months in Newgate, and whipped in the jail - 2. - James Charlick , Mary Rock .

Confined six months in Newgate, and publicly whipped - 1. - David Williams .

Confined six months in Newgate, and find sureties for six months longer - 1. - Abraham Jacobs .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and publickly whipped - 2.

John Probert, Thomas Baker .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 3.

William Kallan , Ann Clark , James Towers .

Confined three months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1. - Francis Jones .

Confined three months in Newgate, and whipped in the jail - 1. - Joseph Styring .

Confined two months in the House of Correction, and whipped in the jail - 1. - Mary Wilkinson .

Confined two months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1. - William Ellis.

Confined two months in Newgate, and publicly whipped - 1. - George Haynes .

Confined one month in Newgate - 3.

Edward Rosier , John Read , William Barlow.

Confined one week in Newgate, and whipped in the jail - 1. - Elizabeth Hatley .

Publicly whipped, and discharged - 3.

George Miller , Martin Bryan, Jones Emanuel.


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