Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th September 1799.
Reference Number: 17990911
Reference Number: f17990911-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON; AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY, the 11th of SEPTEMBER, 1799, and following Days, BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable SIR RICHARD CARR GLYN, KNIGHT, LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON:

Printed and published by W. WILSON, No. 15, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1799.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE Sir RICHARD CARR GLYN, Knight, LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; the Right Honourable Lord ELDON, Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; the Honourable Sir GILES ROOKE, Knight, one of the Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir SIMON LE BLANC, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY OF LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Joseph Bellamy ,

George Yeeud ,

Thomas Hepburn ,

Richard Bate ,

Thomas Perryman ,

William Lane ,

James Hartlett ,

Benjamin Hathway ,

John Lonsdale ,

Joseph Case ,

John Holt .

First Middlesex Jury.

John-Henry Rigge ,

Thomas Harrison ,

Edward Kendrick ,

John Savigny ,

Charles Eades ,

John Coates ,

Henry Robins ,

Edward Master ,

William Robinson ,

Joseph Snuggs ,

Jacob Roberts ,

Lewis Gillies .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Charles Rymer ,

Matthias Bilger ,

William Bailey ,

George Long ,

William Grocock ,

Adam Dunsord ,

William Clarke ,

John Marshall ,

Joseph Whitaker ,

Charles Smart ,

George Fise ,

John Young .

Reference Number: t17990911-1

384. JAMES GOODMAN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Clement Sharp , he and others of his family being therein, about the hour of four in the forenoon of the 18th of June , and burglariously stealing three linen sheets, value 30s. and a man's shirt, value 8s. the property of the said Clement.

(The watchman being dead, and there being no witness to prove the property ever to have been in the possession of the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-2

385. THOMAS CLARK was indicted, together with John Haines, for maliciously shooting at one Henry Edwards , on the 10th of November, 1798 .

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

HENRY EDWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a Bow-street officer : On Saturday, the 10th of November, I went with Dowsett and Jones, two other officers, in a post-chaise; we left London about seven o'clock in the evening, and went to Smallberry-green, where we met the chaise that took us up; we went in the chaise to Bedfont-lane, by order of the Magistrate, in order to put a stop to the depredations that had been committed there; we arrived at Bedfont-lane about nine o'clock at night, as near as possible; I saw two men drinking on horseback at Bedfont; the chaise was going very quick, we could not see their faces; in about a quarter of an hour after that, two men came up riding very fast on horseback; they both came up to the near side of the chaise; they both rode past the chaise; one of them rode by the boy, and knocked him off his horse upon the lead horse; he d-d his eyes, and told him to stop, or he would blow his brains out; the other came back to the chaise-door, after turning his horse about, and tapped at the chaise-window with his pistol; he swore a bitter oath, and demanded my money; I desired him not to be in a hurry, nor use me ill, and I would give it him; I sat on the near side of the chaise, the same side that the person was that demanded my money; the man that was at the horses' heads then said, d-n your eyes, Jack, give it to them; I had my hand to the window to pull it down, and had a shot sired under my arm; I instantly returned the fire, broke the glass, and sired in an oblique direction at that person, and at the same moment, before I recovered my hand, the person at the horses' heads fired at the chaise, which came in at the front of the chaise, between Jones and me; we afterwards cut the ball out of the lining of the chaise, Dowsett has the ball; I instantly desired them to take off the horses from the chaise, and go after the man that had rode away, for I was sure I had hit the other; I instantly jumped out of the chaise, and looked back for the other, but could not find him.

Q. How were you certain that you had hit one of them? - A. Because he was so close that I could not miss him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Best. Q. You were examined once before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give the same account then? - A. I believe I did.

Q. Did you tell the Judge and Jury any thing about his knocking the boy off the horse? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Have you any notion of the persons of either of the men? - A. None.

Q. Was it dark? - A. It was.

THOMAS DOWSETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was one of the Bow-street officers who went in the chaise; when we came to Bedfont, we observed two men drinking on horseback, at the Bell, that gave us a suspicion; about a quarter of an hour afterwards we had got down the lane, I suppose about a mile and a half, I repeatedly looked out at the window, and then observed two men coming after the chaise; I immediately said, here they are coming, one on each side; in about a minute they both came up nearly together, one rode violently past the other, and ran against the post-boy, knocked him off the horse upon the lead horse; he said, d-n your eyes, stop, or something of that sort; the other tapped the pistol against the glass, and said, money, you b-rs, money; Edwards then replied, gentlemen, do not be in a hurry, and I will give it you, at which moment the man at the horses' heads said, d-n your eyes, Jack, give it them; he spoke very quick, as if he was aware who we were.

Q. What was the christian name of the man that was convicted here? - A. John Haines; at that instant the pistol was fired from the man at the side of the chaise, it came in at the side glass, and went out at the front off glass, taking a bit of the frame of the wood with it.

Q. Are you able to say, from the effect, whether it was loaded with ball? - A. Very clearly,

because it took a piece of the wood with it; Edwards then returned the fire, and said, I have hit him; I said, I am sure you have hit him; momentarily, the fire of the man at the horses heads came in at the front of the chaise, I have the ball,(produces it); it went into the lining just over Edwards's head, it had rolled itself up in the stuffing; I pursued the men but could not overtake them.

Court. Q. Have you any notion of the persons of the men? - A. No; except the colour of their clothes, and their horses being nearly alike; the horses were both dark bays, or rather brown bay; this is exactly the colour of the coats that they appeared to have on; the man at the horses heads, I thought, did not appear to be quite so tall as the other man; I got this coat from the Windsor-castle, at Hamersmith, where I got the mare.

Q. Who delivered you the mare? - A. The ostler, he is here.

THOMAS JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a Bow-street officer: I went with Dowsett and Edwards when the chaise was stopped.

Court. Q. Have you any recollection of the persons of the men that stopped the chaise? - A. No.

Q. Nor the horses? - A. Not at all.

JOSEPH HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you know him? - A. I never saw him above once before.

Q. What are you? - A. I was a labourer in the India-House, I am now in the portering-work; any thing I can get to do.

Q. Did you know Haines? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean the man that was convicted in this place? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any application to you by the prisoner Clark, or by Haines in the presence of Clark? - A. The prisoner at the bar came, on the 8th of November, with Haines, to the house where I lodged, the Moguls's-head, in Drury-lane; I believe it was on a Friday, I am not certain, it was about four o'clock in the afternoon.

Court. Q. Are you sure it was the 8th of November? - A. Yes; Haines applied to me to get him a horse; I told him I would ask a person at the west end of the town of the name of Coles, whom I knew, I would try to get him one; and the next morning I got him a horse from Mr. Brown's in Clipstone-street.

Q. Did any body go with you to Brown's for the purpose of getting a horse? - A. No.

Q. Did any body go with you to Coles's? - A. No, not up to the house; the prisoner at the bar, and Haines, went to a public-house just by; Coles lived near Mr. Brown, but he was not at home.

Q. Where did Haines and Clark wait for you? - A. At a public-house near Fitzroy-square, I do not know the sign of it; I returned to Haines and Clark, and told them I could not get one; I then went to Brown's, and left Haines and Clark at the public-house.

Q. It was on the Friday you went to Brown's? - A. Yes, the day after they applied to me.

Q. Did you do any thing the day that they applied to you? - A. No, I did not till the next day, and then they went with me to a public-house near Fitzroy-square.

Q. How far is Clipstone-street from that public-house? - A. A very little way; I got a horse there, and took it to them at the public-house where they were waiting for me, that was about five or six o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. What colour was that horse? - A. A brown horse; I delivered the horse to Haines at the end of a street leading into Piccadilly, they walked with me from the public-house; Clark was with Haines at the time I delivered the horse to Haines.

Q. Did you learn from Haines, or from the prisoner Clark, where they were going with the horse? - A. No, I did not; I had hired the horse to go to Croydon, Haines told me he wanted a horse to go to Croydon that night.

Q. Was Clark on foot, or on horseback, when you delivered the horse to Haines? - A. On foot; they both went away together.

Q. How soon after did you see Haines, or the prisoner? - A. On the Friday following I saw the prisoner at the bar in St. George's-fields, about the middle of the day, just beyond the Obelisk.

Q. Was he alone at that time? - A. No, he had another person in company, who it was I do not know.

Q. Was it by accident that you met him there? - A. I had been to Clark's house to enquire for him, he lived in the Walworth-road, a little below the Elephant and Castle; Clark said he was going up to Islington to get a doctor.

Q. Did you say any thing to him before that? - A. Yes; I told him I wanted to see Haines particularly, because Mr. Brown would look to me to bring the horse back again, or something similar to that; he said he was going to Islington to meet the doctor, and he would shew me where Haines was; I went with him some way up Islington, and then he directed me to Union-square, Islington.

Q. For what purpose did he direct you to Union-square? - A. To see Haines.

Q. Did you go there? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the number of the house? - A. I think No. 4,

Q. Who kept the house? - A. Mrs. Jewry; I went up stairs, and there I found Haines up stairs in bed.

Q. How long was it before you saw Haines? - - A. He came in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, with the doctor; the doctor and the prisoner Clark had some private conversation, but what it was I did not hear, I came away soon after.

Q. Before you came away, and while Clark was there, did you make any enquiry of Haines, or Clark, respecting the horse you had had from Brown? - A. Of Haines I did, Clark was in the room at the time; I told Haines I should Certainly get into trouble if there could be no step taken to let Mr. Brown have the horse.

Q. Did Haines, or Clark, say any thing in answer to that? - A. Haines desired that Clark would go and see if there had been any intelligence given at Bow-street about it; Clark told Haines that he would go and see about it, as Haines was very ill, and could not give any answer about it; he seemed very bad.

Court. Q. Was Haines in good health on the Friday when you saw him? - A. Yes; he seemed very well when I delivered him the horse.

Q. Did Haines, during the time Clark was present, give any account what had happened to him? - A. In the conversation with the doctor, he said, he was certain it was the Bow-street officers that shot him, as the windows of the chaise were all up.

Q. Did Clark hear what he said to the doctor? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you apprehend that both Clark and the doctor heard it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear any other conversation that passed? - A. Yes; the prisoner said he had had a good deal of trouble with Haines in coming over the stones in the chaise, or something of that kind.

Q. Do you recollect any thing else? - A. No; soon after that, I came away and went home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have told us you were a labourer in the India-House? - A. Yes.

Q. You resigned your situation I suppose? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. No.

Q. Do not you know you are saying all that you say here upon your oath-were you not turned out? - A. There was a committee held, and I was dismissed.

Q. Can you tell me the period when you were turned out of your office? - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. When were you at work there last? - A. I was at work there in November.

Q.Probably some time before the 8th? - A. Yes.

Q. After the 8th you could not very well work there? - A. No.

Q. You were taken up, and put into the House of Correction? - A. Yes.

Q. A very good place for you-you were taken up for this very business? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, when you were taken up, you thought it a good thing to give evidence against somebody else; it was a safe way you know? - A. I did not speak any thing but the truth.

Q. You thought it a more convenient thing to give evidence than to be tried? - A. I hired the horse.

Q. Were you in the habit of hiring horses? - A. Not much.

Q. You have hired horses of Coles before? - A. No.

Q. How came you to think of going to him? - A. Because he deals in horses.

Q. Were you ever at Bristol? - A. Yes; I lived in Bristol.

Q. Was there any time that you could not follow your occupation in Bristol? - A. No.

Q. Were you never in jail there? - A. No.

Q. Will you swear you never were tried there? - A. Never.

Q. When was this committee held that turned you out? - A. Very lately.

Q. But you have been out of the House of Correction these three weeks? - A. Yes.

Q. And they would not let you come back to work? - A. I have not been at work since.

Court. Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. I had seen him once or twice before he came with Haines.

Q. In what way of life was he? - A. I cannot take upon me to say; I heard that he belonged to the lottery.

SARAH MORRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you live servant with Mr. Hammond that keeps the Nag's-head, at Hounslow, in November last? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the person of Haines who was afterwards hanged? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing him in your master's house in November? - A. Yes.

Q. About what time in the evening did he come there? - A. About four o'clock.

Q. What day in November was it? - A. I think it was the 10th of November, it was on a Friday.

Q. Was that the day before the people were shot at, in Bedfont-lane, in the chaise? - A. Yes.

Q. What time on the Friday did you first see him? - A. About four o'clock, and on Saturday night at nine o'clock; he slept at our house on the Friday night.

Q. Did any body come with him? - A. Yes; another man.

Q.Look round, and tell us if you see the man

that was with him? - A. That gentleman at the bar.

Q. Did they sup together, or in different rooms? - A. Yes; they had pork steaks together for supper.

Q. How did that gentleman come to the house, on horse-back or on foot? - A. I do not know I am sure; he came in before the other a good bit.

Q. Did you see the gentleman at the bar go away the next morning? - A. No; I saw Haines go away.

Q. Had Clark any great coat with him? - A. Yes, a brown one.

Q. What did he do with it in the morning before he went away? - A. I went to take the breakfast things away, and he held up his great coat, there were several places that appeared to me as if they had been shot through; he said to Haines, if it had not been that he had been shot at, the coat would not have been shot at; he said so to Haines when I went to take away the breakfast things.

Q. What did Haines say to that? - A. He said nothing in my hearing.

Q. Had Haines said any thing first? - A. They were holding the coat up when I went in; Clark pinned it up to put behind the horse, as tight as he could.

Q. Did you see it put upon the horse? - A. No; it was done up as if it was to be put upon the horse.

Q. Where did Clark keep his horse? - A. I believe he kept it at our place, but I do not know.

Q. Did he go away from your master's on foot, or on horse-back, that morning? - A. I do not know, they went both together out of the parlour.

Q. Now look at the great coat? - A. This is the coat.

Q. Did you see the holes in it? - A. Yes.

Q. Point out any of them-(The witness put her singer to several holes in the back).

Q. Was it fore in the way it appears now to be when you saw it then? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Best. Q. This was on Saturday morning that you observed this coat? - A. Yes.

Q. The holes were in it in the morning were they? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you live long at this house? - A. No.

Q. I believe you have not been to be found lately? - A. I have lived at Putney.

Q. Where have you been living at Putney since? - A. At the Duke's-head.

Q. How happened you to get into the House of Correction? - A. They sent me there.

Q. For what? - A. I do not know.

Q. Upon your oath, do you mean to tell these gentlemen you do not know what you were sent there for? - A. No; I could never see any body.

Q. How long have you been out of the House of Correction? - A. This morning.

Q. Who sent you to the House of Correction? - A. The Justice.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you hear some charge against you when you were sent there? - A. One of the officers took his oath that I had received ten guineas from Clark's father that I might not appear against him.

Q. Have you been living all this time at Putney? - A. Yes; at the White-lion, and the Duke's-head.

Q. Which did you go to first? - A. The Whitelion.

Q. Where did you come from when you went to the White-lion? - A. I had been at home at my aunt's.

Q. All the time? - A. No.

Q. How long were you at your aunt's? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Where had you been beside your aunt's, before you got to the White-lion at Putney? - A. No where.

Q. You do not mean to swear you had been at your aunt's the whole time-upon your oath where had you been? - A. I have been no where but at those two places.

Q. I am asking where you had been after you left the Nag's-head, before you went to the Whitelion? - A. No where.

Q. You have told us that you have not been at your aunt's all the time-now where else have you been? - A. At those two places.

Q. Do you know where the Barracks at Hounslow are? - A. Yes; but I never was in the Barracks in my life.

Q. Was there not, upon your oath, some time at which you were not at your aunt's before you went to the White-lion? - A. I was at my aunt's two months.

Q. Do you mean to say that you have been in place ever since you left your aunt's? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen Clark before at the Nag's-head? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you ever see him before at any other place? - A. Yes, at the Three Kings in Piccadilly, several times.

THOMAS LATHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a carpenter, at Ashford, in Middlesex, about a mile and a quarter from Bedfont-lane across the fields.

Q. Do you remember the night of the attack upon the officers? - A. It was on a Saturday evening, but I did not take any account of the month; I was going over the Common, and heard some pistols fired, I am not certain whether it was two, three or four.

Q. At what time was that? - A. I am not positive, it might be between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. Where did the report of these pistols appear to come from? - A. From between Staines and Bedfont, I believe they call it Bedsont-lane; I then went to the King's-head, at Ashford, and mentioned that I heard the pistols fire.

Q. Did you hear any thing besides pistols that drew your attention? - A. I thought I heard a horse galloping towards me.

Q. Did the horse come up? - A. Not then, it might be about half an hour afterwards; a gentleman on horseback apparently came to the door, and asked for a glass of spirits.

Q. Was the place where you heard the pistols nearest to Bedsont, or the public-house nearest to Bedfont? - A. Very little difference.

Q. If you had been at the public-house could you have heard the pistols? - A. I think I could.

Q. Had the gentleman something to drink? - A. He had; I went to the door at the time he was served.

Q. Was it dark? - A. Yes; I had a candle in my hand, and lighted the landlord to serve the liquor, I was close to the man on horseback.

Q. Were you enabled, by the assistance of the light, to see what sort of a man he was? - A. I looked at him in the face, and observed that he was a stout made man, with a cast in his eye, as I thought; I said, dear Sir, how your horse swears.

Q. Was there any other observation that you made upon his face? - A. No.

Q. Now look round and see if you can see the man that you saw upon the horse that night? - A. The prisoner might be the man, but I cannot say positively.

Q. Do you believe that to be the man? - A. He was not dressed in the same manner then that he is now, he had a pair of striped corderoy breeches, and boots.

Q. What coloured horse was it? - A. A very dark bay, or brown.

Q. Was there any thing particular in the saddle that you took notice of? - A. There was a coat, I think, buckled before his saddle.

Q. Do you recollect the colour of that coat? - A. No, I do not; it might be done up in something, I think it was.

Q. What sort of a horse was it? - A. It seemed to be a large big-boned horse, or a mare.

Q. In what condition was the horse that this person was upon? - A. He did not seen in very good condition, he seemed warm, and sweated.

Q. Did you, in consequence of what you addressed to him, and seeing that his horse was warm, did he say any thing upon that - A. No.

Q. How long might the landlord be serving him with the brandy? - A. Not two minutes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You say you cannot swear that the prisoner at the bar is the person you saw upon that horse? - A. No.

- ADAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am ostler at the Nag's-head, at Hounslow.

Q. Where is Hammond? - A. He is very ill, and could not come.

Q. Were you ostler there in November last? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Did you see the mare at the Windsor Castle? - A. No.

Q. Was there a mare kept at your house before the 10th of November? - A. Yes, it was kept there for four or five days.

Q. What became of that mare? - A. A gentleman took her away the next morning, with another gentleman; they came over night.

Q. Do you know who left her at your house? - A. No, I never saw the gentleman before.

Q. Was she taken away the morning of the day that this business happened? - A. Yes.

Q. What kind of a mare was she? - A. A brown mare, very much out of condition, a middiling size mare, about fourteen hands high as nigh as I can guess.

Q. Have you seen that mare since? - A. No.

Q. Did these two gentlemen both go away on horseback? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they go away together? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the person of either of them? - A. No; one of the gentlemen said to the other when they were going to mount the horses, where shall we dine to-day?

Q. Did you see whether there was any thing on the saddle of that mare? - A. Yes; there was a brown great coat fastened to the saddle with a white tape.

Q. Did you take any notice of it, so as to be able to know it again? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Bist. Q. You did not know the prisoner? - A. No.

Q. You saw the gentleman who rode away that mare? - A. Yes.

Q. He went away with another person? - A. Yes.

JAMES PIGGOT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was ostler at the Nag's-head, at Hounslow, in November last.

Q. Do you remember on the day that the officers were fired at, seeing any body at your house? - A. Yes, two persons; they came to the house on the Friday night.

Q.How were they mounted? - A. The one

came on a horse; the other came, I think, by the coach.

Q. What sort of a horse was the one that the person came upon? - A. He was a little brown bay horse.

Q. The one that came by the coach, had he a horse at your house at that time? - A. Yes, a mare.

Q. What coloured mare was that? - A. A dark bay mare.

Q. To whom did that mare belong? - A. To the man that came by the coach.

Q. Had the mare been any time at your house? - A. Yes, it had been there from the Saturday before.

Q. Had the person to whom that mare belonged used your house for any time before? - A. I had seen him once before.

Q. Did you know his name? - A. No.

Q. Did the persons that came there on the Friday sleep at your house? - A. Yes, they went away in the morning about eleven o'clock.

Q. Did they go away together? - A. Nearly together; they were not a minute apart hardly.

Q. Did you know either of the persons? - A. Yes, I think I know the person that left the mare there.

Q. Now turn round, and look if you see any person who answers your idea of the person that left the mare there? - A. Yes, I have a knowledge of the prisoner at the bar.

Court. Q. Is he the man that left the mare? - A. Yes, I think he is.

Q. Have you any doubt about his being the person? - A. No, I have every reason to think that he is the man.

Q. Do you know the person of the other man? - A. No.

Q. Did you afterwards see that mare? - A. Yes, I saw the mare at Bow-street.

Q. Upon your seeing her, have you any doubt that that was the mare that you had left with you at the Nag's-head? - A. It was the same mare.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Edwards). Q. Do you know what mare it was that was shewn to that man? - A. Yes, the same mare that the man was upon that stopped us; I had it from the Windsor-castle.

Mr. Best. Q. It was dark-you do not mean to say it is the horse that stopped you? - A. Yes, I had a very great opportunity of seeing the post-boy myself, and the mare, that stood by him; it was a remarkable chested, crane-necked mare; I picked her out from twenty others.

Court. Q.Which man was it that rode that mare? - A. The man that was at the horse' heads, and fired the second shot.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am ostler at the Windsor-castle, Hammersmith.

Q. Do you remember the mare coming to your house? - A. Yes, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening of the day that I was informed the officers were shot at.

Q. Did you see the person that came with the mare? - A. Yes, but it was so dark, I should not know the person again.

Q. Was there any thing upon the saddle of that mare that was brought by that person to you? - A. Yes, a brown a great coat, tied on to the saddle before with white tape.

Q. Did the person who brought that mare ever call again for it? - A. No.

Q. Who was it at last delivered to? - A. Perry and Dowsett, two of the officers of Bow-street.

Q. Do you know what became of the man that brought the mare? - A. No; the person that brought it told me to take care of it all night.

Q. How long was it before it was delivered to the officers? - A. I cannot say whether it was the second or third night afterwards.

Q. Have you seen that mare since? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Dowsett). Q. Was the mare that was delivered to you by Smith, the ostler, after wards shown to Piggot, the ostler? - A. I do not know that Piggot saw it after the Monday; I took it away on Monday.

Q.(To Piggot.) Did you see the mare at Bow-street? - A. Yes, the mare and the horse both.

Q. Was the mare which you saw at Bow-street, the same mare that had been left at the Nag's-head? - A. Yes.

Court. (To Dowsett). Q. Do you recollect this man looking at the mare? - A. This man saw it among others; the mare was shewn at Bow-street upon different days.

SARAH THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I keep the Windsor-castle, at Hammersmith.

Q. Do you remember this business of the officers? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any body coming to your house on that day? - A. Yes, I remember a gentleman coming in the evening after dark, he came on horseback, I believe; he told me his horse was in the stable.

Q. Had you ever seen that person before? - A. I think I did see him once before, but I am not quite certain of that.

Q. Should you know that person now if you were to see him? - A. That is the person I saw at Bow-street.

Q. Was that the person that told you his horse was in the stable? - A. I took so little notice that I cannot swear to that.

Q. Do you recollect any body else coming to your house on that evening? - A. Yes, a man in a post-chaise.

Q. Did he get out of the post-chaise? - A. Yes, and went through the passage into the kitchen, he appeared to be very ill.

Q. Where was the other man at that time? - A. Standing by the kitchen fire.

Q. Was there any conversation between that person and the person you have before described, that you heard? - A. I did not hear any; there was sixpenny-worth of brandy and water I carried in to the man that was ill; I asked him what made him so ill; he said, he had had an accident, and fell from his horse; they had no conversation before me whatever; there were two sixpenny-worths of brandy and water drank, one by the post-boy, and the other by the man that was ill.

Q. Do you remember the man that was ill going away? - A. Yes; he went up to the person that was ill, and asked him leave to go in the chaise with him.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a post-boy belonging to Hounslow.

Q. Do you recollect the evening that this business happened taking any person from the Nag's-head to London? - A. From the Red-lion I was sent for to the Nag's-head, that was about a quarter or ten minutes before ten, there I took in a gentleman; the landlord desired I would drive as near to the door as I could, because the gentleman was lane.

Q. Where did that person direct you to drive to? - A. He did not speak to me at all; the landlord desired me to drive to Smithfield; as we were going through Hammersmith, he saw a light at the Windsor-castle, and called to me; he said, stop, here is a light, I want something to drink; after having remained a little time in the chaise, he went into the house; the landlord brought me a glass of liquor, and I had drank it, and was standing by the fire with a newspaper in my hand, a man came up, and asked me if I could take him to town; I told him, yes, I had only a single gentleman, and if he had not any objection, I had not any, and he walked away from the door, was gone the space of a minute, I suppose; he came back and said, the gentleman was agreeable, and gave me a shilling.

Q. Had you, at any time, an opportunity of observing him, so as to be able to recollect him again? - A. No, for I had broke the glass that contained the liquor, and was stooping down, when he gave me the shillings, to pick up the pieces; then they both got into the chaise, and we came away; as I was driving on this side of Kensington, the man who appeared to me to be the well man asked me to stop at the first house that was open; I told him there would be none open till we got to Piccadilly; just before I came to Hyde-park-corner, the same man let down the glass again, and asked me if I could not drive through Westminster, and go by the Obelisk, in St. George's-fields; when I was going through Westminster, the same man stopped me again, about one hundred and fifty yards after I had got into the street, I believe York-street, he got out of the chaise, and fetched some other man to the chaise; he was in the chaise about two minutes, and then he got out; I went on again; then I drove till just on this side the Obelisk, as he was getting into the chaise, and I was shutting the door, he said, I must stop at the Obelisk again, for he must get some assistance for the gentleman, who had dislocated his collar-bone by a fall from his horse.

Q. Did you afterwards stop at the Obelisk? - A. Yes, he stopped me about fifty yards before I got to the Obelisk; he got out, and called somebody by name, but I did not hear what the name was; then he said he would not take him any farther, he would get a coach for him, and get some assistance.

Q. Were there any coaches near that you could perceive? - A. No, I did not perceive any at all; he discharged me there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Best. Q. Your first directions were to drive to Smithfield? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any orders to stop at the Windsor-castle? - A. Yes.

Q. He saw a light, and gave that as a reason for his stopping that he wanted something to drink? - A. Yes.

Q. Then he applied to you first, before he applied to the gentleman? - A. Yes.

Q. He had a great coat on? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he take that great coat into the chaise with him? - A. I cannot say, I did not take notice whether he had it on or off afterwards.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Dowsett). Q. Did you receive the great coat here produced, at the same time with the mare, from the Windsor-castle? - A. Yes, from Smith, the ostler, and the white tapes were then on the saddle.

Prisoner's defence. May it please your Lordship, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am totally innocent of the charge, and I shall leave the case in your hands.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Best. I am a barber, in Lambeth parish.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Clark? - A. I have known him a great many years.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the 10th of November last? - A. I saw him and shaved

him in the evening, between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. You are sure it was on the 10th of November? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long have you known Clark? - A. A great many years.

Q. He had been an old customer of your's? - A. Not a constant customer; he has called when he has come that way.

Q. When did you shave him before the 10th of November? - A. It might be five or six months.

Q. When did you shave him after the 10th of November? - A. Never.

Q.But you are sure this was the 10th of November? - A. The day after Lord-Mayor's Day; and about eight or nine or ten days after that, I saw him advertised ten guineas reward.

Q. Was any body else there? - A. Yes, my wife, she is here; when I saw the advertisement, it mentioned the day, the 10th of November, ten guineas reward for committing a robbery, or stopping a post-chaise on Hounslow-heath, and shooting at the runners.

Q. Was this nine or eleven days after? - A. Yes, and I knew directly it was that Saturday night.

Q.Saturday night is a slack night for business with a barber? - A. Sometimes it is.

Q. Upon your oath, is there any night that you can name in the week more crowded than a Saturday? - A. No; only I have sometimes had as many of a Wednesday night.

Q. Was this the only man you shaved that night? - A. Not by many.

Q. How happened it that there was nobody else in your shop of a Saturday night? - A. My customers in the winter time drop in early in the evening.

Q. Was it not a fortnight or three weeks after that this advertisement appeared? - A. Nothing like it.

Q. How came you to recollect so particularly that it was Saturday night, the 10th? - A. Because I had not shaved him for so long a time before.

Q. You made no memorandum of it? - A. No.

Q. Did you employ any body else in your business? - A. No.

Q. Who was in the shop at the time? - A. Only my wife.

Q. Does she generally attend in the shop? - A. We often sup in the shop in the winter.

Q. Perhaps you were at supper when this man came in? - A. Yes, my wife and I were at supper upon bread and cheese and beer, and asked him to drink, and he would not drink, because there was some bread in it, and he sent out for a pot; my wife went out for it.

Q. You had some conversation with him, I suppose? - A. All the conversation was, he wished I lived near him, I should always shave him.

Q. You have been a companion of his? - A. We have drank together before.

Q. What public-house did your wife fetch this beer from? - A. The Three Compasses and the Artichoke are both customers of mine; I don't know which she fetched it from.

Q. How many customers might you have come in after he was gone? - A. Several; they came in now and then till eleven o'clock at night.

Q. There was nothing remarkable in the day to six it upon your mind? - A. No, but I am sure it was on the Saturday.

Q. It might be Friday, perhaps? - A. No, I am sure it was of a Saturday night; I always go to have Mr. Mills, in Lambeth-road, and then my wife generally gets a pot of beer, and we have our supper, and he came in while we were at supper.

Q. Then there was nothing particular to six it upon your memory? - A. I said, as soon as ever I read it, that he was the man that I shaved that night.

Court. Q. Where does he live? - A. At Newington; his father has got two houses in the parish.

Q. What way of life is he in? - A. I understood he was in the Custom-house or the Excise.

ANN WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Best. I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Clark? - A. I do.

Q. Have you known him any time? - A. Yes, a good while.

Q. Did you see him on the 10th of November? - A. Yes, it was past eight o'clock, and before nine, I cannot say particularly.

Q. Where did you see him at that time? - A. At our house in Lambeth parish; he came in to be shaved.

Q. What fixed it in your mind that it was the 10th of November? - A. It was the day after Lord-Mayor's shew.

Q. Did you afterwards see any advertisement? - A. I heard of it.

Q. How long afterwards was it that you saw the advertisement? - A. I cannot say exactly; I thought it was very hard he should be accused elsewhere, when I knew he was there; I have a great Judge to come before, and I know the consequence of an oath.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How many customers did your husband shave that Saturday night? - A. I cannot pretend to tell you that.

Q. It is a busy night, is it not? - A. Yes, sometimes people come in unawares to be shaved.

Q. But this particular day, and this particular man, you are sure of? - A. Yes, I am very particular as to the day.

Q. It made no impression on your memory, I dare say, till after the advertisement? - A. No.

Q. And then it struck you all of a heap, I suppose? - A. It did.

Q. It would not have made any impression upon your mind if you had not seen that? - A. No, for I had never heard any thing of the kind of him.

Q. He had been at the shop a good many times before? - A. Yes.

Q. He had been there in the week before, had he not; had you seen him? - A.Certainly I had.

Q. How often do you think your husband had shaved him the week before? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Will you venture to swear that the week before he was not shaved? - A. No, I cannot say.

Q. Before the 10th of November, how many times, in the course of the last two months preceding this; was it more than four times or six times? - A. I cannot tell you.

Q. Was it more than once within the two months? - A. He might and he might not.

Q. Did not you see him shaved more than once in your shop within two months? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Upon your oath, how many times had you seen Mr. Clark shaved by your husband in the course of two months? - A. Very likely he might come, and I not see him.

Q. But, when you did see him, did he come more than once in that time? - A. He has been shaved a great many times.

Q. With in the two months? - A. I cannot tell you whether he was or not; but I can tell you the day that he was shaved there.

Q. Is he a tolerable good customer of your husband's? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen him shaved in the course of two months previous to the 10th of November? - A. I will not swear either one way or the other.

Q. And yet with respect to that day, you will swear? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you sup that night? - A. We were at supper when he came in, and my husband asked him to drink with him, and he would not, because there was bread in it, and I went out and got a pot for him.

Examined by the Court. Q.How long might he be there? - A.Drinking and washing himself he might be a quarter of an hour.

Q. And can you recollect how long before you had seen him there? - A. I cannot tell, he said, whenever he came that way, he would come to be shaved, and he wished my husband lived nearer, because he shaved so well.

Q. Had he been there within a month? - A. I cannot say, he might.

Q. Had he been within three months? - A. I really do not know.

Q. Within four months? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. And yet you say he came frequently? - A. Yes, there was an estate repairing in our neighbourhood, as much as twelve months ago, and then he used to come very often; he was a promiscuous customer.

Q. What do you mean by saying he was frequently at your house-have you or not seen him within three months at your shop? - A. He might, and I not see him.

Q. Tell the Jury whether you did see him within three months? - A. I cannot.

Q. How came you to tell the Jury that he was there the week before the 10th of November? - A. When he came that way, he used to come.

Q. Then how lately before the 10th of November had you seen him there? - A. I cannot tell if I was to die upon the spot.

Jury. Q. Was there any body else in the shop at the time? - A. No.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 28.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17990911-3

86. THOMAS DURHAM and JOHN DURHAM were indicted for that they, on the 20th of May , in the King's highway, in and upon John Reynolds , did make an assault, putting him in sear, and taking from his person three leather pocket-pooks, value 6d. a gold watch, value 8l. 8s. a gold seal, value 10s. 6d. and 3s. the property of the said John Reynolds.

JOHN REYNOLDS sworn - I am a calico-printer , at Staines: On Monday the 20th of May, I was coming from Staines to London with a friend, in a single-horse chaise; in coming across Twickenham-common , about seven o'clock as near as I can conceive, the sun was not set, as I entered upon the Common, I observed two men riding in an angle towards the centre of the Common, they got upon the road, I suppose, about one hundred yards before I came up to them; soon after I had passed them, they both came up on one side the chaise, and d-d both our eyes, and bid us deliver our money; Mr. Fourdrinier was with me, they presented pistols to our heads immediately; I did not immediately obey their commands but drove on, upon which one of them told me if I did not stop immediately I was a dead man, upon which I stopped; he asked for my watch, which I gave him; he then asked for my money; I told him I had no money worth his acceptance; upon which he swore at me, and told me to give him what I had, which I did.

Q. How much was it? - A. I believe only three

shillings; he then demanded my pocket-book; I told him I had none; upon which he swore that I had; I having no great coat on, I was conscious that he must see the books in my pocket, and therefore I gave them to him, they bulged out in my pocket; there was a Tyburn-ticket in one of them which I was going to purchase; there were two pocket-books, and a small book with asses-skin leaves; I assured him the books were of no use, and requested him, when he had perused them, to send them to my address, which he would find in the books; after that, he insisted upon my standing up in the chaise for the purpose of rifling my pockets; upon going away he waved his hand, and said, upon my honour I will return you your books; in about a week after I had one book brought me by a letter-carrier.

Q. Did you know the men? - A. One of them; I cannot swear to both.

Q. How long was it before you saw the books again? - A. In a week, they were found in a ditch upon the Heath.

Q. Which of the two men is it that you know? - A. The one next me, John Durham.

Q. Are you positive that he was one? - A. I am certain, I am not under the least apprehension in the world; I have not forgot the man since he robbed me, he was impressed so forcibly upon my mind.

Q. On which side was he? - A. On my side of the chaise; the other was so disguised, that neither my friend or I could swear to him; but the man that robbed me had a handkerchief over his face, and when he came up to me he pulled his handkerchief off, and I saw his face as plain as noon day, the sun had not set.

Q. Did you find any of your things after? - A. Yes; my watch was found by one of the Bow-street officer; the watch and seal I can swear to.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not know the prisoner at the bar before? - A. I never saw him in my life before.

Q. How long a time did the robbery take up? - A. I cannot say, but I should suppose three or four minutes.

Q. I take it for granted you were considerably alarmed? - A. Yes; the surprize was great, undoubtedly, being so early in the day.

Q. You were very much alarmed? - A. I was not so much alarmed as surprized.

Q. Being so surprized, and considering the short time that the transaction occupied, do you mean to swear positively to his person? - A.Certainly I do.

Q. How long a time was his face covered, and how long a time do you think it was uncovered? - A. I am sure I cannot tell, it was the greater part of the time uncovered, he could not enforce his language without.

Q. Mr. Fourdrinier was with you? - A. Yes.

Q. He could not swear to either of these men? - A. No.

Q. Did he not say more, that he did not believe they were the men? - A. He did not.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - I belong to Bow-street, I apprehended the prisoners on the 29th of May, in Oxford-street, they were standing at a public-house door, I believe the sign is, the Man loaded with Mischief, about nine o'clock in the evening; we went after them in consequence of informations that had been lodged at Bow-street, Mr. Reynolds's information was one; Limerick took one, and I took the other, in a coach; Limerick took a watch from Thomas Durham, which Mr. Reynolds swore to, and I took another watch from John Durham; we took them to my house in Bow-street.

Q. Did you see Limerick take any thing from the other? - A. I held Thomas Durham's hands while Limerick took the watch from him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This robbery is charged to have been committed on the 20th, and this apprehension did not take place till the 29th? - A. No.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - I belong to Bow-street; on the 29th of May we apprehended the prisoners at the bar, and upon John Durham I found this watch, (producing it.)

Mr. Reynolds. I can swear to the watch, I am sure it is mine, I know it by the number and the name, and also the outside of the case; I had it cleaned but the week before; I got the number and the name from the watch-maker, Mr. Chater, in Cornhill; but, independent of that, I can swear to it by the outside of the case, by the device, doves, and arrows, upon the back; it is a lady's French watch, and I know it by the chain.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. Have you ever seen a French watch before? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you never recollect seeing a French watch with a device like that before? - A. I never saw any like it before; I wore that watch for a considerable time, I can swear to it without any hesitation.

JAMES LIMERICK sworn. - I belong to Bow-street; I was at the apprehending of the prisoner, Thomas Durham; I took this watch from his sob-pocket, one of the seals belongs to the prosecutor; there are two seals and a key to it.

Mr. Reynolds. Here is one seal I am almost positive came off my watch, it has no particular mark upon it, but I have no hesitation in saying it is mine; there was no device upon the stone, but there has been another stone put in.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. It is of a size and shape that other people might have? - A. Yes; I cannot speak so positively to that as to the watch.

WILLIAM BACON sworn. - I belong to the pastol of Bow-street, I was in company when the prisoner were apprehended: I took a gold hunting watch from John Durham, which I have in my pocket, and which has been sworn to by Sir Henry Every.

John Durham's defence. The small watch that Mr. Reynolds speaks to I bought, and the seal I gave my brother, it was on my brother's watch, and when this gentleman came to Bow-street, he said the seal belonged to him.

Thomas Durham's defence. My brother gave me the seal.

The prisoners called three witnesses who had known them from their infancy till within a year and a half of the present time, and gave them an excellent character;

John Durham, GUILTY Death . (Aged 26.)

Thomas Durham, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17990911-4

387. JOHN WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a piece of leather, value 2d. and forty-eight upper leathers for womens' shoes, value 30s. the property of Samuel Miller .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL MILLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a shoe-maker , and live in Cornhill , the prisoner was a journey man of mine: On the 13th of July, in consequence of information, I discovered I had lost some upper leathers, and the sole of a shoe; I got a peace-officer, and went to his lodgings in St. George's-row, St. George's-fields, the prisoner was at home at work on his seat; I asked him first what work he had by him, he appeared very much confused, and trembled exceedingly; I charged him with having a quantity of upper leathers that did not belong to the work he had by him, I insisted upon seeing the work; he opened a box, and was very much agitated; he then, in consequence of my repeatedly insisting upon it, took out all the work he had.

Q. Did he know you had a peace-officer with you? - A. Yes; I looked at the upper leathers, and found them to be my own; there were twenty-four pair of upper leathers besides fifteen or sixteen pair that he ought to have had.

Q. Are you sure that he had not had them for the purpose of his business? - A. Yes; he could not have had them without the bottom stuff, and those had not; we often deliver out bottom stuff without upper-leathers.

Q. But never upper leathers without bottom stuff? - A. Very rarely; my man is here that delivered them out, his name is Simpson; the upper leathers have the initials of my name, 8. M.

Q. Does any other person deliver out besides Simpson? - A. It is usually by him, it is rarely other wise.

Q. Did you find the sole of a shoe? - A. Yes, at Mr. Godwin's, near the Obelisk, to whom the prisoner had sold it.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Whether you here confident that no body has given out the work besides the person appointed for the express purpose? - A. I before stated that I am not confident of it.

JAMES SIMPSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Miller: I delivered out the work to the journeymen.

Q. Have you seen the articles that were found at the lodging of the prisoner? - A. Yes, they are upper leathers.

Q. Were those upper leathers your master's property? - A. They were.

Q. Had you delivered them to the prisoner for the purpose of working them up? - A.Not to my knowledge.

Q. Do you deliver upper leathers with the bottom stuff to journeymen? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you ever deliver them without the bottom stuff? - A. Never.

Court. Q. Is it out of the ordinary course of trade so to do? - A. It is.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q.Can you positively say you never gave out any upper leathers, to any person that works for Mr. Miller, without the bottom stuff? - A. I cannot positively say that.

Q. Do you not remember your having some returned to you by a person of the name of Lediard, that you had given over the number? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you remember John Bell returned upper leathers in the same manner? - A. I do not remember any such thing.

Q. Can you be confident that you did not give me those upper leathers by mistake? - A. I cannot be confident.

Mr. Knapp. Q. With respect to Lediard-had those articles the bottom stuff delivered with them or not? - A. They had not.

JOHN LUKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am foreman to Mr. Godwin, shoe-maker, in Blackfriars-road.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember buying any leather of him? - A. Yes, Boreham has got it; I bought eleven pair of shoes of him.

- BOREHAM sworn. - (Produces two pair of shoes.)

Luke. I delivered those shoes to Mr. Miller, they have my mark upon them.

Barahem. These are the shoes I received from Mr. Miller.

Miller. These are the shoes that I had from Luke, one of the soles has my stamp mark upon it, by which I know it to be my property.

Q. Had you delivered to the prisoner that sole? - A. To manufacture for me I certainly had.

Prisoner's defence. May it please your Lordship, Gentleman of the Jury, as I am called upon for my defence, I shall endeavour to he as concise as I can; near two years since I began to work for Mr. Miller, and from that time to this I have every reason to believe I did him all that justice which he could expect from me as a journeyman; about the middle of January, or March last, these very upper leathers I am charged with stealing, were given to me in addition to the usual quantity of work; he gave me out a dozen upper leathers with half a dozen of bottom stuff, I made up the work; I conceived it was done for the purpose of trying my honesty, but certain I was that either that was the case, or it was a mistake; in a short time the same circumstance occured again, and I declare I am as innocent of the charge as the learned Judge upon the bench; they were given out to me in that manner I positively declare; and with respect to the sole, your Lordship will pardon me, I am sure it is better calculated to provoke the mind of any man rather than to alarm; I would ask, how could I steal one sole? I declare, all the time I worked for Mr. Miller there was not one sole in the shop, how could he insinuate that I came by that one sole? I believe he has taken upon him to swear to that sole, but it is a very difficult matter, for there are slaws in soles, so that it is impossible; and I caution Mr. Miller, the prosecutor, how he encourages himself to persist in it, for I am persuaded he will have enough to do to stifle the stings of his own conscience; there was no sole leather kept in the shop; in the name of God then, how could I steal it? the leather is given out in large pieces, according as the shoe runs, and when that piece of leather is designed for eight or nine pair, it will sometimes turn out to such advantage that it will sometimes deceive ourselves, and then do they ask this to be returned? certainly they do not. When I began my defence, I told you I should be concise; my defence is somewhat incorrect from the agitation of my mind; I now return you, my Lord, my most hearty thanks for your manner of examining the witnesses, and I wait with heart-felt impressions the verdict of the Jury.

Court. (To Miller.) Q. Do you never sell leather after it is stamped? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Are the soles given out in a piece of leather, or cut out in soles? - A. It is frequently given out in a piece of leather.

Q. Then, is it not possible he might have stretched the leather so as to get a pair of soles out of them? - A. It is possible by paring them close.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-5

388. JOHN ORRELL, otherwise LANZEMORE , and DANIEL, MACKAWAY , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Read , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 13th of July , with intent to steal the goods therein being, and burglariously stealing forty-five shawls, value 4l. 17s. 6d. fifty-four buss shawls, value 7l. 8s. 6d. twenty-one coloured bordered muslin handkerchiefs, value 1l. 6s. 3d. twenty-four linen handkerchiefs, value 24s. twenty-nine yards of muslin, value 2l. 3s. 6d. thirty-six yards of printed calico, value 2l. 14s. seventy-one yards of other printed calico, value 7l. 2s. seventy-three yards of white calico, value 3l. 19s. 1d. six yards of striped marcella, value 27s. five yards and a half of coloured marcella, value 35s. 9d. four yards of coloured jean, value 16s. twenty-three yards of coloured kerseymere, value 6l. 18s. twenty-seven yards of woollen cloth, value 54s. twelve yards of blue woollen cloth, value 3l. fifty-eight yards of brown woollen cloth, value 29l. twenty-three yards of superfine blue and black woollen cloth, value 18l. 19s. 6d. twenty-seven yards of thickset cloth, value 3l. 16s. 6d. twenty-one yards of fancy cord, value 3l. 10s. twenty-four yards of velvetten, value 4l. twenty-three yards of coloured calico, value 12s. fifty-nine yards of corded dimity, value 7l. 4s. 8d. two pieces of clouting, value 30s. twenty-seven yards of diaper, value 3l. 0s. 9d. three hundred and fifty yards of Irish cloth, value 33l. 10s. 10d. and eight pair of leather shoes, value 24s. the property of the said James Read.

(The indictment was stated by Mr. Pooley, and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. I am a linen-draper at Twickenham. On the 13th of July my house was broke open; I left every thing secure when I went to bed about eleven o'clock the night before. I was alarmed between two and three o'clock in the morning; I got up and found two of the shutters and the shop-door wide open; the bar of the door, which fastened the shutters, had been taken out, and a square of glass in the window cut. I found every thing in the shop in the greatest confusion; I looked round the shop, and observed a great quan

tity of goods taken away, and the remainder in confusion.

Q. How far is your house from the river? - A. Very near.

Mr. Knowlys. It was day-light when you got up? - A. Yes.

RICHARD WHITTAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know Mr. Read's house at Twickenham ? - A. Yes; between one and two o'clock in the morning, on a Sunday, as I came through the church-yard, I saw two of the shutters standing right against the window, and the door wide open. I immediately went in; I then went round the corner, and thought something had happened more than ordinary; I found a square of glass had been taken out; I directly alarmed Mr. Read.

Q. It was hardly light when you discovered it? - A. No.

JOHN LAWRENCE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. Do you recollect, on the 13th of July, being desired to watch upon the River Thames? - A. Yes; we rowed after one boat, and that was not the boat, and afterwards we saw the boat coming with the property in it.

Q. What time was that? - A. It might be about four o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you see any thing in the boat? - A. Yes; I saw some men in the boat, but could not say who they were. We pursued the boat, and jumped into the boat; they got out of the boat into Mr. Wood's craft, at the end of Northumberland-street, and ran up towards Craven-street.

Q. What did you find in the boat? - A. Two bales; I do not know what they contained, they are things of linen-drapery; I found also an iron crow, picklock-keys, some bullets, and a bundle of matches, in a basket, and a coat, (produces the basket;) there was a knife in the coat, with a broken blade; I did not find it, but I saw it shewn in St. Margaret's church-yard.

GEORGE TAYLOR sworn. - I am a dust-man; I live at No. 41, Charles-street, Westminster; I was employed at Mr. Roils's, in Scotland-yard.

Q. Do you recollect on Sunday morning, the 14th, any thing particular happening? - A. Yes; a little after five o'clock I heard the alarm of stop thief upon the water; I immediately ran down to the water-side, and saw three men run away from the boat, and run up Mr. Wood's wharf; it was a boat loaded with goods; they ran by me and I followed them through Northumberland-court, across Craven-street, up Hungerford-market, into Charles-court. I called out stop thief, and two soldiers followed them, and caught one of them in New-street, Covent Garden.

Q.Have you any doubt that the person so stopped in the street, was one of the persons you saw running away from the boat? - A. I am sure he was one of them.

Q. Which was that? - A. John Orrell .

Q. Do you know the other prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; he was the last person that came through the gate, and he laughed at me as he passed by me; the other man escaped.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. There were three men left the boat? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. Did either of them escape? - A. They all three got away from the boat till they got to Covent Garden, and then one was taken.

Q. Then the other two, whoever they were, escaped entirely? - A. Yes.

Q. You had never seen any of the three before? - A. No; but I marked one particularly.

Q. They were running very fast, and you were running very fast? - A. I was running after them.

Q. How long did you see the face of any one of them? - A. I stood and looked at them as they passed by me.

Q. That could not have been half a minute? - A. I followed them.

Q. How long had you an opportunity of seeing their faces? - A. Not a minutes.

Q. And there were three persons to draw your attention for that minute? - A. Yes, there were three.

Q. How long afterwards was it that you saw Mackaway when he was taken; was it less than a fortnight or three weeks? - A. I cannot rightly tell.

Q. You are a dust-man, I think, and live at No. 41, Charles-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what these men were charged with when you went to Bow-street? - A. No, not before I was brought to them.

Q. They were charged with committing a burglary, you know? - A. Yes.

Q. You know, I take it for granted, that, if a person is convicted of burglary, there is a reward of 40l. to be distributed? - A. No; that I know nothing at all about.

Q. I will have another kind of answer? - A. They told me so afterwards, that there were twenty guineas for the reward of the goods.

Q.Besides which, you know there is 40l. reward for each of the men? - A. Yes.

Q. Now, you are in no higher situation than that of a dust-man? - A. I am at work for my father; I have been in a higher situation, I am no higher now.

Q. Of course, sixty pounds would be a very valuable thing to you? - A. It would be none to me, because I have got money of my own.

Q.Would not forty or sixty pounds mend your situation in life? - A. It would if I had it.

Mr. Knapp. Q.When was it you went to the Magistrates? - A. The next day.

Court. Q. Were there any other people about those streets at that time in the morning? - A. Yes, there were; but I did not offer to stop them, nor the watchman did not offer to stop them.

Q. Did you, at that time, make such observations of their persons, as to know them again? - A.Yes, Daniel Mackaway particularly, because he has a bump upon his nose, and grey eyes.

WILLIAM HUTTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. - Q.You are in the guards, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect pursuing any man with the last witness? - A. Yes; on Sunday morning, about twenty minutes past five, I heard the cry of stop thief; I had just come off guard, and was in the Strand, I went to the street-end that the cry came from, and saw three men coming up; I do not know what street it was; it was a street leading down to the river. Taylor was crying out stop thief; he said, soldiers, those are the three, why do not you stop them?

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing their persons? - A. Yes; they came close by me, and bad got about eight yards from me when I began to pursue them. Two of them took up the courts that go into Round-court, and the other ran a little higher up. Before he turned up, I went after the two together into Bedford-bury, from there to St. Martin's-lane, then to Bedford-bury, then to St. Martin's lane again, and met him in New-street. I never lost sight of them all that time; I collared Orrell, and brought him back.

Q.Did you see any thing of the other man? - A. The other took across St. Martin's lane, and made towards Piccadilly.

Q. Which was the other man that ran with Orrell? - A.Mackaway; I took particular notice of his face when he passed by me, by his nose and hair, he has got a large bump upon his nose.

Q. Have you any doubt upon earth that he is the man you saw coming up the street from the water? - A. No, I am sure he is the man; I took him down to Scotland yard, and they told me the boat was gone to Westminster-bridge, and I took him to St. Margaret's watch-house; they would not take him in there, they said I must take him to Tothill-fields, and I lodged him there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The persons pursued by you were running? - A. Yes.

Q.Therefore you had not much time to see their faces? - A. I stood there I suppose above a minute before they came up to me.

Q.Two of them took up one court, and the other up another? - A. Yes.

Q.The person whom you pursued crossed Bedford-bury again and again, and then taking a different course, met with the person you after wards took? - A. Yes.

Q.Then going up New-street, and the other person going up Bedford-bury, you of course lost sight of him? - A. Yes, I lost sight of him three minutes.

Q. And then you met Orrell, and thinking he was the person you had been pursuing, you took him? - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw Mackaway for above a fortnight afterwards? - A. No.

Mr. Pooley. Q.Have you any doubt that the man that you saw in New-street was the same man that you saw running up from the water? - A. It was the same man.

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a private in the guards, I was with Hutton; there were three persons coming up Charles-court into the Strand.

Q. Upon your seeing them come, did you pursue them? - A. Yes, for about twenty minutes, till we took one in New-street, Covent-garden.

Q.Which was that? - A.Orrell.

Q. Who was the other person with Orrell? - A.Mackaway.

Q. Are you sure as to his person? - A. Yes, he got into another court, and I lost sight of him.

Q. Have you any doubt with respect to the person of Orrell? - A. No.

Q.Have you any doubt that Mackaway was the other person? - A. No; he smiled at me as he came up Charles-court, and I observed a dent on his nose, and that he was of a fair complexion.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long time had you an opportunity of observing the person you now suppose to be Mackaway? - A.Not above half a minute, if it was that.

Q. You had never seen that man before in your life? - A. No.

Q.And you did not see Mackaway for a fortnight afterwards? - A. No.

Q.When you did see him at Bow-street, had you any doubt that Mackaway was the man you had seen with Carpmeal? - A.None at all.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. Q. I believe you had some goods that were delivered to you? - A. Yes, I received them from the four watermen.(Lawrence ordered to stand up.)

Carpmeal. He was one of them. (Produces the property, as also a dark lantborn, three crows, a chissel, matches, picklock keys, gunpowder, and balls.)

Q. Did you find any knife? - A. Yes, in the pocket of the great coat, and a gimblet; the great coat was found upon the top of the basket. (Produces them.)

Q.Are these such instruments as you have found upon persons guilty of these kind of offences? - A.They are.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. These were delivered to you by these persons, not in the presence of any of the persons now charged? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. (To Lawrence.) Q. Was the basket in the boat where you found the goods? - A. Yes.

Q. And from which you saw the three men run? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Who did you deliver the goods to? - A. I left them at Westminster-bridge with the three watermen that are here.

Carpmeal. They were all together when I had the goods from them.

JOHN OSLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you deliver the goods and the box to Carpmeal? - A. Yes.

Q.Were the goods found in the boat? - A. Yes.(The goods produced.)

Mr. Read. Here is a piece of clouting which I know to be mine.

Q. Was that in your house at the time your house was robbed? - A. It was, it has my private mark upon it.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. Sixteen shillings.

Court. Q. Have you before looked at all these things since they have been taken? - A. Yes, I have taken an inventory of them myself.

Court. Q. Now how many different articles can you swear to as being your property? - A. I can swear to the whole of them.

Mr. Knapp. Q.And to their having been in in your shop the night of the robbery? - A. I can very perfectly.

Q.Whereabout is the amount of the goods taken? - A. One hundred and sixty pounds I believe.

Court. Q. Did you yourself see, the night before you went to-bed, that the doors and the window shutters were fast? - A. I did.

JOHN PEACOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Pooley. I live at the Magpie and Stump, at Chelsea; I have the management of that house, for Mr. Elliott; I belong to Mr. Elliott's brewery.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Beckett? - A. No.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, I recollect Mackaway being at our house; there were four gentlemen came in on the Saturday evening about eight o'clock, and asked for some bread and cheese and onions; four I am sure of, but I think there were five; they were in the little room that stands by the river; I told them we could not get any onions; they said, it did not signify, their waterman was gone for some; after having staid some time, they were going to pay the reckoning; I went over to take the reckoning, and the money was lying upon the table, and wished me good night, and they said, let us push the boat off, or something to that effect; I am sure Mackaway was one of them; they went away before ten.

Q. Which way was the tide then? - A. Running down.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. There were five people, you think; you were sure there were four? - A. Yes.

Q. They came at a little after eight, which, on a Saturday night, is a seasonable hour, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. They left it before ten? - A. Yes.

Q. And the tide then running down? - A. Yes.

Beckett called in. That is one of them, I remember him perfectly well.

WILLIAM BECKETT sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Bullet, a waterman and lighterman; I ply the City side of Blackfriars-bridge at the lower stairs.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar, Orrell and Mackaway? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known them? - A. Orrell I have known about three months, and Mackaway I knew by sight; I used to take coals to Orrell's; my master keeps a coal-shed, and he served him with coals.

Q. Did they apply to you to go in a boat any where? - A.Orrell did, about twelve o'clock, on Saturday, the 13th of July; he said, he had been looking for me a day or two, he wanted me to go up to Battersea; accordingly I told him I would take him; he said he was going over the water, and he would go when he came back; I told him I might be gone out with a fare, I would go with him; I went with him to Duke-street, leading to the Borough-market; he told me to go to the Bell public-house; he said he was going to see for Mackaway, and he told me a bean was as good in my pocket as a stranger's.

Q.What did you understand by a bean? - A. A guinea: I went to the Bell, and he went to seek for Mackaway; I staid there an hour and a half, or near two hours, and he came to me; I understood that he had seen him, and he asked me to go to John Wade 's, who lives with his mother, a shoemaker, in St. Saviour's-college; he told me to go and ask him whether they were done or not, as he wanted them, I supposed he meant shoes; Wade said, he would come in a few minutes afterwards, and he did come, and had some discourse; I heard Orrell say, I must have them to-night, for I am in great want of them; Orrell and Wade

then went out together, and I with them, and going through the Borough-market, there was a man that they knew they called Dick, and they went into the Plough and Harrow, the corner of Stoney-street, and had some beer; we left Dick there, and went by George Smith's door, and there we met Mackaway coming up; Wade said, he must go to work, and he would meet us; then we went to the Waterman's-arms, Bank-side, and had some beer there; I went to launch my boat, and Mackaway went away; I went back to Mason's-stairs, which leads to the Waterman's-arms, and might stop a quarter of an hour, when Mackaway came in with another man to me and Orrell; about seven o'clock, Orrell, and Mackaway, and I, and a strange man, got into the boat; Mackaway went for a basket, and this stranger brought it down to the water-side, and told me to put it in a dry place.

Q. Look at this basket? - A. It was such a basket as this, sewed over so, that the things in it should not jingle.

Q. Did you put any thing else on board the boat? - A. No; we set off about five minutes after seven, it was just at stood, the wind blew very hard down the river, I did not know where I was to go to till they got into the boat, and then Orrell told me we were to go to Twickenham, and I made no objections to it; we stopped at the Magpie and Stump, at Chelsea, we went into the white house, like a summer-house, opposite the other house, and we had bread and cheese, and gin, and onions; we staid there about an hour, or an hour and twenty minutes; then we got into the boat again, and me and a stranger rowed above Kew-bridge; Mackaway and Orrell took a spell to row, they said they were cold and shivery; I went to a place they said was Twickenham, I never was up so high before; when we got to Twickenham, Mackaway, or Orrell, I cannot say which, asked me for the basket; this was about twelve o'clock, or between twelve and one; they took the basket upon the grass plot, and took some things out of it, but what it was I did not know, I heard something jingle.

Q. What did they do with the basket then? - A. The stranger threw it into the boat; they might be gone three quarters of an hour, or an hour, and desired me to wait till they came back.

Q. Was it light or dark at that time? - A. The moon was going down, and shaded in and out behind the clouds; Orrell returned in about twenty minutes, or half an hour.

Q. You never were at Twickenham before; did you land near the church? - A. There was a building which I took to be a church, and there was a gravel causeway that I heard them run down with the things; Orrell brought two pieces of linen cloth, and he said something concerning the cloths, and ran away again instantly, and then Mackaway and the stranger came down several times one after the other, three times, or they might go four times, and brought something with them every time, and threw them into the boat; they brought some white parcels, and a bundle done up in a kind of linen, and put in the boat.

Q. Did Orrell return after the first time? - A. Yes, they all returned backwards and forwards; Orrell went about twice, I believe, or three or four times.

Q. How long were they performing this? - A. They might be about half an hour, or better, before they quite finished.

Q. When they all came back, and the thing was finished, did Orrell or Mackaway say any thing about it? - A. One of them said, shall we have any more, I cannot tell which of them it was, I did not hear any answer given to it; then they all came into the boat, it might be about two o'clock.

Q. Was it dark then? - A. It was dark when they came into the boat; the stranger said, they might as well go and do a thimble crib for about forty pounds.

Q.What did that mean? - A. A watchmaker's shop; I made answer that it was high water, and they had better go down; by their discourse I found what they had been about.

Court. Q. Did you discover it then for the first time? - A. Yes, I judge so.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Was there any other conversation? - A. Yes, Orrell said, there was a good swag.

Q. What did that mean; a good weight, I suppose? - A. A good load, I should imagine.

Q. Was there any other conversation? - A. Yes, they all said, they wished they had some sacks, and when we came to Kew-bridge, the stranger said, there were some sacks hanging upon a barge's quarter, and he went to see, and came back, and said, they were not sacks; then we went on, and stopped below the Red house, at Battersea, for some sacks, at the mill, they wanted some sacks there, and I told them they would be seen, and they shoved me ashore several times, and I would not land them; then Orrell and Mackaway rowed through Westminster-bridge; there were some men ashore, and I saw Orrell's countenance change; one of them said, who are they; I said, I believed they were the Marine Police-officers; I then saw that Orrell and Mackaway had got pistols, which they put into their breeches.

Q. Was that the first time you observed that? - A. No, I observed them glittering just after they came from Twickenham, when they put them

in their breeches, and when they came to row, they shifted them again; then a boat came off after us, and I begged they would put me ashore, and I was put ashore upon Mr. Wood's craft, in Scotland-yard.

Q. Who did you leave in the boat? - A. Mackaway, and Orrell, and the stranger, and the property.

Q.Which way did you go when you went on shore? - A. I went up towards Parliament-street, and went over Westminster-bridge; I heard the cry of stop thief; I made the best of my way, and did not look behind me; a few days after that, I went and delivered myself up at Bow-street, and Mackaway was taken by my account.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. That you were at Twickenham, there is no doubt? - A. Yes.

Q. One of the persons with you talked of a bean in your pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there no explanation of that given at the time? - A. No, I understood it before.

Q. You went to Twickenham at a perfectly seasonable hour of the day? - A. No, it was night.

Q. Although you went there at twelve at night, you had no suspicion that you and your companions were going on an improper purpose? - A. I had not till they came with the things.

Q. That you swear? - A. That I swear - when I landed them.

Q. You had no suspicion before that? - A. No, I had not.

Q. You thought they were going on a party of pleasure? - A. I had no doubt, for I did not know who the stranger was, he said he lived at Richmond, and they hired me as a waterman.

Q. Now, for taking any body to Richmond, should you expect a bean? - A. Yes, it is a long row.

Q. When you came back, you discovered they had been plundering somebody? - A. No.

Q.Then I dare say you pushed off your boat, and said, these goods shall not come into my boat? - A. No, I did not.

Q. No fit of honesty of that sort seized you? - A. I did not know that they were stole till they came down with their discourse.

Q. You did not think, even when they brought these things into your boat, suspect any thing? - - A. No, I did not.

Q.And you went a few days after, and delivered yourself up at Bow-street, you gave this account, and then Mackaway was taken? - A. Yes.

Q.Now, upon your oath, when you first went to Bow-street, did you tell the story you have told now? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you not deny all knowledge of either of the persons in the boat? - A. I did not.

Q.Were you not yourself committed for trial? - A. No, I was not.

Q.Were not you committed? - A. No.

Q.Were not you in jail? - A. I was in jail, but not for trial.

Q. Was not your master committed to jail for harbouring you as a felon? - A. I do not know what my master was in jail for; I heard he was in jail.

Q. Were you not present when he was committed for harbouring you as a felon? - A. No, I have not seen him since.

Q.Where have you been since? - A. In the House of Correction.

Q. How soon after you were sent to jail was it that you were brought up and examined again? - A. I was brought up several times backwards and forwards.

Q. And you thought it a pleasanter thing to hang other people, than be hanged yourself? - A. No.

Q. Did you not, when you were first brought up to Bow-street, and examined, deny knowing any of the persons in the boat when the robbery was committed? - A. No, excepting it was the stranger, I did not know the stranger.

Q. When did you give in your examination - did you give it in the month of July? - A. Yes.

Q. Did it correspond with the account you gave now? - A. Yes.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

Orrell, GUILTY Death . (Aged 33.)

Mackaway, GUILTY Death. (Aged 29.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-6

389. CHARLES CLEAVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July, a black gauze laced cloak, value 9l. 9s. a silver punch ladle, value 5s. and a silver salt-spoon, value 12d. the property of Thomas Bye , in the dwelling-house of John Solloway .

FANNY BYE sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Bye . In July last we lived in Charterhouse-square ; a fire happened at the next house to our's on the 11th of July, between one and two in the morning. I lost a black gauze cloak trimmed with French lace.

Q.What was the value of it? - A.About nine pounds; I had seen it in the house that evening, in a drawer in the bed-room; I saw it the next day in the constable's possession. We lost a great number of things, and, amongst them, we lost a silver punch-ladle and a salt-spoon.

Q.You did not yourself remove this cloak from where you had left it? - A. No.

Q.Was the drawer locked? - A. No.

JOHN RITTSON sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the parish of St. Luke's.

Q. Do you know in what parish the house is in which Mr. Bye lived? - A. Yes; in the liberty of Glasshouse-yard, in the parish of St. Botolph. I was upon duty at the watch-house; I heard an alarm of fire; I went to the fire, and pulled out my staff, to keep the mob off, that the engines might play. In about ten minutes after, I saw the prisoner come out of the house; he had a wash-hand bason-stand and an old pipkin in his hand, or a glass, I do not know which, and he called out, where am I to put these things? and the mob cried out, between the rails; meaning the rails of the Square. I then took him by the arm, and said, if you have any more property, throw it down like a man, and go about your business. I had a little pocket-staff in my hand at that time; says he, I know you. I said, never mind that; if you have any property, throw it down. He said, search me, I have none.

Q. When was it that he said he had none? - A.When I first took hold of him; then I ran my hand down his waistcoat and his breeches, I found nothing there; I then took off his hat, and found this property in it, (producing the cloak, salt-spoon, and punch-ladle.) I found them between the lining and the crown of his hat, in what they call the false crown. I then got assistance from the Gentlemen of the Association, and took him to New Prison.

JOHN ELLIS sworn. - I am a watchman of the parish of St. Luke's. I heard the alarm of fire; I went, and Mr. Rittson desired me to stand along with him; and the prisoner came down with a wash-hand bason-stand and a glass. He told him if he had any thing more about him, to put it down like a man. He said he had nothing, and then he searched him; I saw him pull the things out of his hat.

Q.(To Mrs. Bye.) Is that your cloak? - A. It is; I know it by the pattern of the lace and the pattern of the gauze: there are the initials of mine and my husband's name upon the ladle and upon the salt-spoon.

Q. When had you seen the ladle and the salt-spoon? - A. On the same day, in the morning.

Prisoner's defence. I went to this fire to give every assistance I could; I came down with several loads; I found a cloak in the two part of stairs room, and put it in my hat, that I might have my arms at liberty to carry the other things; he would not give me the least time in the world, or else I should have put the things down, but I had not time; and I was so exasperated at his saying search him, when he knew me, that I did not know what I did.

THOMAS BYE sworn. - Q.Whose house was this? - A. Mr. John Solloway's; we only had the first floor.

Q. Did he live in the house at the same time that you and your wife did? - A. Yes.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS FOWLER sworn. - I was at the fire, at the next door but one; nobody could wake the woman of the house, and the prisoner climbed up the lamp-iron, and got in.

Q. Then it was through his means that the people of the house were preserved? - A. Yes, I would not have got up upon any account; for, if he had fell, he must have fell upon the iron spikes.

The prisoner called his master with whom he worked for two years up to the present time, and three other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The Jury having retired about an hour and twenty minutes, returned a verdict of

GUILTY Death . (Aged 28.)

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his good character.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOK.

Reference Number: t17990911-7

390. DAVID GRIFFITHS was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Clarke , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 11th of July , with intent to steal, and burgiariously stealing a jack-ass, value 40s. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn. - I live in Bowling-alley, Cow-cross, Clerkenwel : I lost a jack ass from my stable, about two hundred yards from my house.

Q. Does it communicate with your house? - A. Not to my house.

Q. It did not join to your house at all? - A.No.

Q. Is it under the same roof with your house? - A. No, it is not on the same side of the way, it adjoins to a house belonging to Mr. Taylor, he is the landlord of it: On the 11th of July in the evening, about half past nine o'clock, I left the jackass there, I was called out of bed about half past eleven the same night, and told my stable-door was broke open; I went to the stable, and found the ass at the stable-door, tied up, the stable was broke open.

Q.Was it the same ass that had been in the stable before? - A. Yes; I have had it twelve years.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. Two pounds; it is worth ten pounds to me, for I get my livelihood by it.

EDWARD M'CARTY sworn. - I am a watchman

near Mr. Clarke's: I was calling half past eleven, and a neighbour called to me to call him up at four o'clock, and as I was putting the figure of four upon the shutter, I heard the foot of the beast coming, and I put my lanthorn behind me, and the prisoner came up with it; I had known the ass four years, I knew him again directly; when I first saw him, he was about six yards from the stable-door; I know the prisoner very well, I spoke to him in his name, he went by the name of Foreman, I stopped the jack-ass, and while I was stopping the jack-ass, he threw the halter over his back and ran away, and I took the jack-ass back to the stable; then I called up Tyler, the landlord of the stable, he called up Clarke, and I told him who the man was; about one o'clock that morning the prisoner came by again, with two women; I did not stop him, because Clarke told me there was such a gang of them I should be knocked on the head.

JOHN KEENE sworn. - My partner told me, about half past eleven o'clock, that Mr. Clarke's stable had been broke open, and he asked me if I had seen Foreman, and told me what had happened; at one o'clock I saw Foreman with two women, and he asked me to give him some gin; that is all I know about it.

Prisoner's defence. I went to market and bought some goods, and when I came back, I was told Clarke had been to get an officer to take me up; says I, if I have done any misdemeanour, or any thing wrong, I will go to him directly; I went to him, and told him I would go with him any where, and I went with him to the office.

Q.(To Clarke.) Did he call upon you the next morning? - A. Yes; he called upon me, and said, Clarke, do you say I broke your stable-door open; I said, no, I cannot say you did, but there are people to prove you did; he said I was a d-d liar; he did not offer to go with me till the watchman came and said he was the man.

Prisoner. I staid there with him an hour.

Clarke. He did not stay ten minutes; I went to the top of our place to get an officer, and I could not get him, and then I went with him myself.

Prisoner. He went and left me there by myself.

Clarke. M'Carty was in the room, and my wife.

M'Carty. Clarke left me in the room all the time he was gone.

The prisoner called James Woodman, who had known him three or four months, and gave him a good character. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-8

391. ELIZABETH SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of April , a half-guinea , the property of William Barron .

WILLIAM BARBON sworn. - I am a stationer , No. 79, Strand : I think, about the 17th of April, 1798, I was standing in my shop, and the prisoner came in for a quire of gilt letter paper; my man served her with it, he was on the opposite side of the counter, it came to fourteen pence; she asked for change for a guinea, she put down a guinea; my shopman said, there was no half-guinea in the till; I went backwards into the accompting-house, and fetched a half guinea, I put the half-guinea down to her, she took it up; there was a seven-shilling piece the man put out of the till, besides the two shillings and four-pence; she said the seven-shilling piece was a bad one, and the two shillings were bad; I said to the young man, change them; he changed them; she again said, that the other seven-shilling piece and two shillings were both bad; a gentleman then came into the shop to whom I was speaking, she still persisting that they were bad; I said, give the woman her guinea again, and I saw the man give her the guinea again, she put down the paper, took up her guinea, and threw down some change; I told him to look and see that the money the had returned him was good; I saw the seven-shilling piece and the two shillings; says I, where is the half-guinea, I did not count it at the moment; says he, she has not put down the half-guinea, she was that moment gone out of the shop; I desired him to run out after her; I kept my eye upon her because the had done the same before, changing money in that way; I desired him to put the money into a paper, and write upon it the day of the month, but being, about two months afterwards, very much distressed for change, I took them out and paid them away; several months after, about July or August, she came again to the shop, and my shopman stopped her; she was taken to Bow-street, and got bailed; I attended here three Sessions, and she did not appear.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This is a transaction some time ago? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that she now surrenders to take her trial? - A. No, she was stopped at Bow-street; I was sent for, and at the desire of Mr. Flond I now prosecute her.

Q.When did you prefer your bill of indictment? - A.She was stopped in July or August, I went immediately before the first Grand Jury.

Q.Upon your oath, did you not know there was a Sessions here in September? - A. Upon my oath I did not know it; she got bail, and came to my shop after that to attempt the same thing again.

Q. One half-guinea is very much like another? - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know the reason that she was not tried before was that she had been lying-in? - A. I have been attending here for three Sessions

running, and it is impossible she should be lying-in each of them.

JOHN OLIVE sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Barron; the prisoner came into our shop in April, 1798, for a quire of gilt paper; I requested Mr. Barron to give her half-a-guinea; she refused the money I gave her several times; Mr. Barron desired I would give her her guinea back again, and she went away; when I took up the money, there was no half-guinea.

Q. Could it possibly have slipped off? - A. No, there is a glass case upon the counter, and Mr. Barron put it down upon the glass case, the rim of which rises about the 8th of an inch; I went after her, but she was gone; I could not find her; about the end of July she came to the shop again, she came for the same article, and with the same pretence; she gave me a guinea to pay for it; I gave her change from the till; she said it was all bad, the seven-shilling piece particularly; she said she used to pay but one shilling for it; Mr. Fentum, a gentleman who keeps a music shop next door to us, gave her another seven-shilling piece for it; I then sent for an officer to take her to Bow-street, and she attempted to force herself out between me and the door post, but I kept her in; she was taken to Bow-street, and I attended there.

Q. Could it not have slipped down? - A. No, there is no possibility of it, because there is a rim all round it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q.Were you present when the prisoner was apprehended? - A. Yes.

Q. There was no bad half-guinea found, I believe? - A. No.

GUILTY (Aged 20)

Tried by the first Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Fine. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17990911-9

392. JOHN KNIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , four pounds of raw coffee, value 4s. the property of Thomas Knight and Thomas Gurney .

THOMAS KNIGHT sworn. - I am a master tackle-porter , in partnership with Thomas Gurney ; we are jointly responsible for the property we lose: On Wednesday, the 19th of June last, I lost some coffee from Cox's-quay; there were a great many bags brought down to be shipped; they were forgot, and remained upon the quay all night; there was a watchman placed there; I had seen the bags of coffee there in the early part of the day; when I came down the next morning, they told me my bags had been plundered, and that they had got the man in custody; it was raw coffee.

JAMES ELBE sworn. - I am a merchant's watchman; I watch the quays: About half past eleven I was going round by the coffee, there were about two hundred and fifty bags in the whole, I found the prisoner upon his knees lying close under the bags, with a quantity of coffee between his shirt and his skin; I asked him what he was doing there; he said, he did not know what he was doing there, and wanted me to let him go; in the mean time the King's watch came up, Joseph Franklin , and he told me to detain him, which I did, and delivered him to a constable; he threw all the coffee out upon the stones; the bag where he was lying had been cut, and some coffee gone out, it belonged to Mr. Knight and Mr. Gurney, they had the care of it; the coffee was picked up, and is in Court.

JOSEPH FRANKLIN sworn. - I am the King's watch, belonging to the Custom-house; I saw the prisoner leaning upon the bag of coffee that was cut; he dropped the coffee out, and it was picked up.

JOHN FREER sworn. - I am a constable, (produces a quantity of raw coffee); I picked it up off the stones; I saw the bag that had been cut.

Elbe. This is the same coffee that the prisoner dropped.

Prisoner's defence. I had been down to Deptford to work, and the gentlemen gave me a pot of beer; I had had a pint or two more of beer than I should have, and I sell over the bags, and being so heavy in liquor, might have fell asleep, if the man had not come up to me.

Q.(To Freer.) Did he appear to be so drunk as not to know what he was about? - A. No, he was a little in liquor, but not much.

Q. Was he searched? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any knife? - A. No.

GUILTY (Aged 50.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17990911-10

393. THOMAS ALCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of July , eight half-crowns, two sixpences, and nine shillings , the property of John Stapp .

JOHN STAPP sworn. - I am a cheesemonger ; the prisoner was my porter : On the 22d of July, in the morning, I gave him twenty pounds worth of silver to clean with saw-dust; amongst it were thirty half-crowns, which I marked with the letter S; I gave it him in the accompting-house; the rest were shillings and sixpences, which I had not marked, but I was quite positive to the tail of them; when he brought them back, there were only eighteen pounds ten shillings, so that there were thirty shillings missing; there were only twenty-two half-crowns, so that he had kept back

eight of them; upon that I took him up stairs, and desired him to give me the rest of the money which he had taken from me out of his pocket, which, after some hesitation, he did; he produced eight half-crowns, nine shillings, and two sixpences out of his pocket.

Q. Where was he when he gave you the eighteen pounds ten shillings? - A. Opposite my accompting-house door, just where he had been cleaning the silver.

Q. How long was it afterwards that you took him up stairs? - A. About five minutes, (produces the money); the eight half-crowns I can positively swear to, because I had marked them myself; I had missed money before.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You carry on business upon Snow-hill? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you carried on business there? - A. About six months.

Q. You were not in business for yourself before that? - A. No.

Q.Where did you live servant? - A.With Mr. clark, upon Snow-hill.

Q. Who is your partner? - A. I have none.

Q.Who furnished you with money to go into business? - A. My friends.

Q. Was it lent you on bond, to have a share of the business? - A. No, it is a distant relation of mine.

Q. And he is not to participate of the profits? - A. No, any more than the regular 5 per cent.

Q. His name is Lovatt, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q. He lives in the same house? - A. No.

Q. Did he never make a proposal to you to participate in the profits of the business? - A. No more than you.

Q. Which is the freeman of the city of London, he or you? - A. I am the freeman.

Q. Did you make an application to him for the money, or did he offer to lend you the money? - A. He offered me the money.

Q. Mr. Lovatt comes into the shop, does not he? - A. Yes, I consider him as the only person capable of being intrusted in my absence.

Q.What do you pay him for the trouble he has in the shop? - A. He is only with me for a few months, he has no share in the business whatever.

Q. Does not Mr. Lovatt take every thing out of the shop that he wants? - A. If he wants butter, he does nothing else.

Q. And yet he has no share in the business? - A. None, no more than you have.

Q. Does he pay you for his board and lodging? - A. He does not board and lodge with me.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

Mr. Alley. (To the Prosecutor.) Q. You had this man from a very respectable house, where you had lived, I believe? - A. Yes, I had.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY (Aged 40.)

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Fine. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17990911-11

394. JOHN MONARDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , six yards of cotton, value 10s. a cotton handkerchief, value 12d. a child's cap, value 12d. a child's nightgown, value 12d. and a child's petticoat, value 12d. the property of Thomas Lingham , the younger.(The prisoner, being a foreigner, he was tried by a Jury consisting of half Foreigners and half Englishmen.)

Names of the Jury.

Charles Rymer ,

Dominico Corri ,

Mattbias Bilger ,

Moses Hugoni ,

William Bailey ,

Lorenzo Dupont ,

George Long ,

Leopoldo Michaeli ,

William Grocock ,

John Guder ,

Adam Dunford ,

John Christian Pauli .

THOMAS LINGHAM, Jun. sworn. - I live in the strand. On Monday, the 5th of August, I lost a pocket-handkerchief, containing the things mentioned in the indictment, about five minutes before nine. I delivered it to John Cox , the Greenwich coachman; the things were produced at Bow-street the following morning; he was taken within fifteen or twenty minutes after the things were lost. The Greenwich coachman overtook me in Parliament-street, and told me he had like to have lost the bundle; but he had taken the man and lodged him in the watch-house. I saw the things next morning at Bow-street, and knew them again.

BENJAMIN STRICKLAND sworn. - I keep a warehouse at Charing-cross, where the coach comes. Cox, the coachman, brought me a bundle, and said, he had got a thief that had stole a bundle out of his coach. He had got the prisoner with him and the bundle; it was in a white cotton-handkerchief; I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and gave charge of him.

Q. Did the prisoner talk English to you? - A. Yes.

Q. In such a way that you could understand him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it explained to the prisoner what the charge was? - A. Yes, I explained it both going along and in the watch-house. He said in English, as plain as I could speak almost, that he found the bundle under the coach.

Q. Did the coachman, in the hearing of the prisoner, give an account how he had lost the

bundle? - A. Yes, he said he had stolen Mr. Lingham's bundle out of the coach; the prisoner then said he had found it under the coach: the coachman said he had found it under his arm. I made answer, and said, if he had found it under the coach, it must have been very dirty; but it was as clean as it could be Mr. Lingham took the bundle that night to his family at Greenwich, and brought it to Bow-street next morning.

Q.(To Lingham.) Did you take the bundle to Greenwich that evening? - A. Yes.

Q.Have you had the things ever since? - A.No, I had them; but they have been in the hands of the Greenwich coachman.

Q. Do you know them to be your's? - A. Yes, they have my mark upon them.

Mr. Alley. (To Lingham.) The coachman is not here? - A. No.

Q.Therefore, whether the coachman might not have given him the bundle, you cannot tell? - A. No.

Court. Was sort of an evening was it? - A. Very dirty; if the handkerchief had fell in the street, it must inevitably have been very dirty.

GEORGE GOULD sworn. - I drive a hackney-coach: I was sitting upon my box, and saw the prisoner viewing the coaches, there were three Greenwich coaches; he crossed over between them, and about two minutes after I saw him come round the coaches upon the street-side: he opened the door of one of them, threw his body in, and reached the bundle out; the coachman was at the wheel of the coach, on the other side, at the same time; and I told the coachman of it, and he took it from him; he took the man by the collar, and he said he had picked it up in the street; the coachman delivered him to the book-keeper, and I saw no more of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a coachman? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it this was at noon-day? - A No, just before nine o'clock at night.

Q. It must have been dark then? - A. No, it was not; it was the 5th of July.

Q.Was it not the 5th of August? - A. I believe not.

Mr. Lingham. It was the 5th of August.

Gould. I am no scholar; it might be so.

Q. We all know it is pretty dark upon the 5th of August? - No, it was not.

Q. Upon your oath, was it not past ten? - A. No, it was not past nine.

Q. Have you ever been a witness here before? - A. If I have not here, I have elsewhere, before a Justice.

Q. You was never prosecuted yourself? - A. No.

Q. How many informations have you lodged before Magistrates? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. How long is it since you have been before a Magistrate except on this occasion? - A. Very likely I may be there before a week is out; sometimes people will not pay, and then we are obliged, and sometimes we charge too much.

Q. Have you never been in a gentleman's service? - A. Yes, Mr. Vaughan's, the tanner, over the water.

Q.What did he turn you away for? - A. I turned myself away.

Q.(To Lingham.) What time of night was this? - A.Within five minutes of nine; and it could not be above ten minutes past nine when he took me up in Parliament-street.

JOHN COX sworn. - I am coachman of the Greenwich-stage.

Q. Look at the prisoner - did you ever see him before? - A. Yes; the first time of my seeing him was at Charing-cross, on Monday night the 5th of August.

Q. Did you see Gould, the hackney-coachman, there? - A. Yes; Mr. Lingham came and gave me a bundle in a cotton handkerchief, I put it into the coach, upon the seat, and shut the windows up on both sides, there was nobody in the coach at all; about two or three minutes afterwards Gould came round to me, and asked me if I belonged to that coach; I told him yes, I did; he pointed to the prisoner, and said, that man had taken a bundle; I cannot say whether he heard him or not, he was nigh enough to hear him; he was on the other side of the coach, and I ran underneath the horses and caught hold of him; I said, holloa, my friend, where did you get this parcel; he made no answer; I opened the coach door, and missed the parcel; I then looked at it, and found it to be the same.

Q.What did he say to this? - A. He said something, but I could not understand what he said; I called for a watchman, but could not get one; I took the bundle, and gave it to Mr. Lingham, in Parliament-street; I delivered the prisoner to Mr. Strickland, and he was carried to the watch-house.

Q.(To Mr. Lingham.) Are the articles you have produced the same you had from the coachman? - A. They are.

Prisoner's defence. In going by, I saw a bundle, and picked it up.

GUILTY . (Aged 54.)

Tried by the second London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

[Fine. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17990911-12

395. JAMES BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , a bay gelding, value 7l. the property of George Carr .

GEORGE CARR sworn. - I am a butcher in St.

George's-market, Oxford-road: On Wednesday, the 19th of June, I lost a bay gelding, I missed it out of my stable in Mr. Dickinson's yard, in Oxford-road ; I missed it about eleven o'clock in the morning; I saw it again on the Friday afterwards in the King's Green-yard, in Whitecross-street; the prisoner owned to me that he had taken it there; I saw him in the Compter; on the Friday I went and found it there.

Q. Had you told him it would be better for him to give an account? - A. He told me where the saddle was, and the bridle was left with the horse; he told me had left the saddle in a stable-yard just by Conduit-street; Mr. Lovatt found it there.

Q. How did you know this gelding that you found at the Green-yard to be your's? - A. It was a bay gelding, and it had got one white foot; I had had the horse about a month.

Q. Do you think you can swear safely to the gelding by that mark? - A. Yes, I took him home.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not promise, if I would tell you where the saddle was, you would forgive me? - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner. It was six hours after I was in custody before I saw him, and then he told me he had got the horse.

Court. Q. I thought you got at the horse from the prisoner's information? - A. A neighbour told me where it was.

RICHARD LOVATT sworn. - I belong to the Public-office, in Marlborough-street; I know nothing of the horse; I went to the stables of Mr. Folkstone, Swallow-street, at the end of Conduit-street, to look after a saddle that was sold there; I went by the direction of Mr. Carr, and a person who gave the boy into my custody; I found a saddle in the possession of the ostler there, which Mr. Carr has sworn to.

Q. Is he here? - A. He ought to be here, he is on the back of the bill.

Q. Was this after the horse was found? - A. Yes, it was on a Monday. (Produces the saddle.)

HENRY WHITTALL sworn. - I am ostler at the end of Conduit-street; the prisoner at the bar came to me on the 19th of June, at the stables, between ten and eleven o'clock, and offered the horse for sale, it was a bay gelding.

Q. Should you know him again if you were to see him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there a saddle upon him? - A. Yes, he came to me as a near neighbour.

Q. Did you know him? - A. I never saw him before that I know of.

Q. The gelding being brought by such a boy, did you not ask him any questions about how he came by it? - A. No, I would not have any thing to do with it, I did not attempt it.

Q. Did you buy the saddle? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ask him any questions about the saddle? - A. He told me it was his own, that he had given half-a-crown for it; he was telling the people what the horse was to be sold for.

Q. What did you give him for the saddle? - A. Three shillings.

Q. Did you see the horse after? - A. Yes, before his Majesty, at Marlborough-street.

Q. Was that the same gelding that the boy brought? - A. Yes, it was.

Q.(To Lovatt). Did you see the gelding? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see it at the Green-yard? - A. No, I saw it at Marlborough-street.

Q.(To Carr.) Did you take the horse from the Green-yard to Marlborough-street? - A. Yes, I took it myself.

Prisoner's defence. Going through Major Foubert 's passage, I had no intention of selling the horse or saddle at all, but the witness pressed me very much to sell it, and I sold him the saddle.

Court. (To Carr.) Q. Where was this saddle? - A. Hanging up in the stable just by the horse; I had seen it in the stable that very morning.

Q.Had you left the stable door locked? - A. Yes, and I found it open.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. Yes, I have seen him about our quarter.

The prisoner was recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his youth.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 13.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-13

396. ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a cotton shirt, value 2s. a linen shirt, value 2s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 12d. a check apron, value 12d. a woollen apron, value 12d. and a napkin, value 3d. the property of Thomas Young , and a table-cloth, value 1s. 6d. the property of Edward Smith .

MARY YOUNG sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Young : On the 7th of March last I lost the things contained in the indictment, (repeating them); I had locked up these few articles for my husband to take to a club that he belonged to, to Edward Smith, for his wife to wash, and he took them; I saw the pawnbrokers at Bow-street delivering up some goods which I had lost.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am a gardener at Kensington; I belong to a benefit society at Hammersmith that Thomas Young belongs to; I received the bundle, containing some things, to take home to my wife to wash; I took the bundle home that night, I gave it to my wife, and she

opened it; I went out to work next morning, and when I returned home to my meal, the bundle was gone, I do not know how it was lost.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you lose any thing of your own? - A. Yes, a table-cloth, that was hung upon the line; I missed it at the same time that I missed the bundle; I afterwards saw the table-cloth at Bow-street, and knew it to be mine; it was brought there by Griffin, the pawnbroker.

JANE SMITH sworn. - I am the wife of Edward Smith; my husband brought me a bundle of things to wash, which I opened, and saw what was in the bundle, and then tied it up again; it contained the things mentioned in the indictment; they were tied up in a dirty diaper napkin; they were none of them marked; I am not quite sure whether I left them on the table, or the chair by the table, but they were there when I went to bed; my husband got up the next morning, and went to work between five and six o'clock; when I got up the bundle was gone; whether my husband fastened the door when he went out, I cannot say; I missed a table-cloth also that was hung up upon the line; I went to enquire after these things.

Q. When have you seen them since? - A. I had not seen them at all; I was not at Bow-street when they were brought there.

SARAH KETTLE sworn. - I rent a room at Kensington; Mrs. Smith is my sister; the things were lost on the Thursday, and, on the Sunday, I was going down to my sister's, and I met a person that from description had taken the things, that was the prisoner; I asked her if she had any duplicates to sell, that I had heard she had; she asked me how I knew that she had; I told her that a person that kept a clothes shop had told me so; she then put her hand in her pocket, and took them out, and gave me the duplicate of all the things; I then told her she little thought that it was my sister that she had robbed the Thursday before of all the things; I then went to a Justice who lived just by, Mr. Wigstead, and she was sent to the watch-house that night.

RICHARD CARTER sworn. - I keep a chandler's shop, and take in pledges, (produces a blue apron); I took it in pledge from a girl who came to me in the name of Ann Brown , on the 7th of March, in the afternoon; there is no mark to it at all.(Kettle produces a duplicate.)

Carter. This is the duplicate that I gave with the apron.

Mrs. Smith. I believe this to be the same apron that was sent to me to be washed.

Mrs. Young. I know this to be my apron, for I made it with green thread, and I never did such a thing in my life before, and the green is washed white.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from a relation's in King-street, in London, and it wanted a quarter to nine in the evening, and I met Mrs. Smith, and she asked me if I would call for her in the morning, that she wanted to speak to me; I called at seven o'clock on the Wednesday morning, and she gave me a blue apron, a check apron, a coloured shirt, a table-cloth, and that was all; the blue apron I pawned at Walham-green for one shilling, and the other things for four shillings and sixpence.

Q.(To Mrs. Smith.) Did you give her the apron for her trouble? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever know her before? - A. I cannot say that I have never seen her, but not to my knowledge. GUILTY of stealing the apron .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-14

397. HENRY CRACK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , a fustian jacket, value 10s. 6d. a calico jacket, value 10s. 6d. and a pair of fustian trowsers, value 10s. 6d. the property of James Jenkins .(The case was opened by Mr. Hovell.)

JAMES JENKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Hovell. The prisoner lived with me as groom , and in consequence of his conduct I discharged him, in the evening of the 25th or 26th of July last; in consequence of having lost some plate, and suspecting the prisoner, I was induced to search his room; I found no wearing apparel, but in the kitchen I found a dressing apron, which I bought for him, and in the pocket of that apron I found a quantity of duplicates; the prisoner was to come the next morning to settle with me; he came, and I told him I would not settle with him till I was satisfied that the property named in these duplicates did not belong to me; he said they did not belong to me; I then sent for a constable, and took him to the Mansion-house; when at the Mansion-house, I again asked him if he was guilty of taking my property and pawning it.

Court. Q. Had you made him any threat, or offer of favour? - A. I had not; he said they did not belong to me, and if I would take the trouble of inquiring, I should be satisfied they were not mine; I told him I hoped it would prove so; I then told him I would not press it any further at present, if he would call in a day or two upon me, and satisfy me that it was not my property, I would settle with him, and I let him go; I searched at the pawnbrokers, and found two jackets and a pair

of trowsers, (they are produced); I cannot swear to them certainly.

WALTER HEAD sworn. - I made these jackets for Mr. Jenkins, and delivered them accordingly.

Q. To whom? - A. I cannot say, because I sent them by a boy, who is not here.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.When was it you made them for Mr. Jenkins? - A. About the 30th of April.

Q.Whether they reached Mr. Jenkins's you cannot tell? - A. No.

Mr. Hovell. (To Jenkins.) Q.Did you ever see the prisoner wear them? - A. I have seen him wear such jackets and trowsers, but I cannot swear that these jackets and trowsers were ever given into the prisoner's custody.

Q. Can you undertake to say that these jackets and trowsers were delivered to the prisoner? - A. No, I cannot swear to these identical cloths.

THOMAS DOBSON sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: These two jackets and trowsers were taken in in my presence, but not by me, from the prisoner at the bar; the trowsers on the 6th of June, one jacket on the 31st of May, and the other on the 12th of June.

Mr. Jenkins. - Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. Be so good as tell me where you live? - A. On Dowgate-hill.

Q. In what way of business? - A.Manchester-warehouseman, and manufacturer.

Q. The prisoner lived with you - in what capacity? - A. As groom, and waited at table.

Q. He never did any extraordinary work for you- I will tell you what I think is extraordinary work, such as making beds? - A. He might for two or three weeks, when we were without a female servant.

Q. Did he never cook for you? - A. He might dress a mutton chop for me; he said he was very clever at a mutton chop, and so he was.

Q. You paid him no wages? - A. I agreed with him for twenty guineas a year, and provided him with clothes as long as he was in my service; he lived with me about three months.

Q.They were for the purpose of attending the stable as groom? - A. A part of them; she striped jacket could not, hardly.

Q.You turned him away on the evening of the 25th or 26th of July? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you examine the pockets of this apron the same evening? - A. Yes.

Q. These are all the duplicates upon which, after a great length of time, you have brought to found a prosecution? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go before the Lord-Mayor the next morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not take him up the next morning? - A. Yes.

Q. He called for his wages the next morning? - A. Yes.

Q. And then you took him to the watch-house; upon what charge? - A. In consequence of finding these duplicates.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you charge him with stealing some of your plate? - A. I did.

Q. So then, this servant of yours you took up with a constable, charging him with stealing your plate when he came to demand his wages, and then you tell the constable, in the absence of the Lord-Mayor, to discharge him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come the next morning, after he was discharged from the constable, to demand his wages? - A. He did.

Q. Did you pay him his wages? - A.Certainly not; for I had not time to run from Hyde-park-corner to Bermondsey, which was the extent of the duplicates.

Q. Did he come again after that for his wages? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, did he not call every day for his wages till you brought this fresh charge? - A.Every morning might amount to three mornings.

Q. And as you had not paid him his wages, he summoned you for his wages? - A. Yes; I went agreeable to the summons.

Q. Had he summoned you before the Sitting Alderman to pay him his wages? - A. Yes, surely.

Q. Did you that morning bring forward this charge? - A.Certainly.

Q. The very first morning? - A. Yes.

Q. That was the 3d of August, was it not? - A. I cannot speak to the day.

Q. He called upon you day after day for a long time for his wages? - A. He did, the long time of three days.

Q. Did you ever trump up this charge to any body living till he had summoned you to compel you to pay these wages? - A.Certainly; I told him I would be first satisfied how it was.

Q.Will you mention any one person to whom you mentioned this before you charged him? - A. Yes, I suppose to twenty.

Q. Did you make any charge before any Magistrate till you was summoned? - A. No; I told him I would wish to be satisfied, as I did not want to take him before the Magistrate if he was not guilty.

Q. And, perhaps, you owe him these wages at this moment? - A.The balance of the wages, undoubtedly, except 20s. that I gave him when he was committed, and the balance of accounts while he was in my service, that I cannot say.

Q. I dare say you are not so ignorant of the world, as not to know that this man loses these wages if he is convicted upon this occasion? - A. I suppose it is so.

Q. You have these sort of things made for your service? - A. Yes; I find them in clothes.

Q. Did you not give him reason to conclude that he would have these things for himself? - A. Yes, certainly, at the end of twelve months.

Q. But you turned him away at a much shorter time, and he told you he had pawned them? - A. No, he denied that any part of these duplicates related to any property of mine.

Q. Had you a very good character with this man? - A. No, I had none at all; he gave me a reference to a gentleman at the west end of the town, but I did not go, I was pleased with the man, and I found him the best servant I ever had, and I did not take the trouble.

Mr. Hovell. Q. In truth, then, you have been robbed of plate? - A. Yes.

Q. You suspected the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore you searched the prisoner's pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not make any charge to the Magistrate till you had found your property? - A. No; and then I did immediately.

Q. And you did not pursue further property, because you wished to prosecute upon this moderate scale? - A. I wished to prosecute upon a moderate scale.

Court. (To Jenkins.) Q. Can you say with certainty, that the apron, in which you found the duplicates, was the prisoner's apron? - A. Yes, certainly.

Prisoner's defence. I was very much distressed for money, I had asked Mr. Jenkins for money several times, when he has had company, to get some tea and sugar, and he has said he has had none for me, and that distressed me very much; I pawned my jacket and trowsers to support Mr. Jenkins's house.

Dobson. There was a jacket pawned by the prisoner which turned out to be his own, before the Magistrate.

Mr. Hovell. (To Jenkins.) Q. The prisoner says he applied to you for money when he was so distressed, and you refused it? - A. I never did refuse him.

Prisoner. I have denied Mr. Jenkins many times to trades-people round him, when he has been at home, that have come to him after money.

Jury. Q. When you asked him for the clothes, which he had had from you, what did he say? - A. He said he had them, but would not tell me where they were; he denied having pawned any thing himself, or that any thing in these duplicates belonged to me.

GUILTY (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-15

398. SUSANNAH DOUGLAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , a half-guinea , the property of Joseph Ash .

JOSEPH ASH sworn. - I am a journeyman carpenter , and a single man : On the 23d of July last, as I was walking along Cheapside , there was the prisoner, and five or six more women, standing at the corner of the Old Change; it was after one o'clock in the morning, I was sober, and perfectly recollected, I had been out all the afternoon; about six o'clock in the evening I came from Blackwall, I was coming home from Bethnal-green when I met her, it was near twelve o'clock when I came from there, I was alone; she came from the rest, and met me on the middle of the pavement, and asked me where I was going; I said, home; she asked me to go with her; I said I would not; while I stood talking to her, she put her hands on each side of me, and I found her hand in my left side coat-pocket, under my coat, it being open; she stood close to me, I pushed her from me, and she came towards me again; I found, after that, as she was talking to me, her hand in my left hand breeches pocket; as I felt her draw it out of my pocket, I asked her what she had in her hand, and she said nothing; I laid hold of her hand, and told her, if she did not open her hand I would take her to the watch-house; she would not open it, but fell down; I got her to the watch-house with the assistance of another person; I told the constable she had picked my pocket, and would not open her hand; I told him, if she had any property of mine in money, I could swear to a crooked half-guinea; he opened her hand and found it there, she did not make any objection to it, I cannot say what she said; she said I gave it her for a sixpence, the constable has had it ever since; I was not with her five minutes in the whole. I did not offer her any thing, I had nothing else but a seven-shilling-piece, and a shilling in silver; I had seen my money at the last place I had paid my reckoning, at Bethnal-green, and had had no conversation with any other woman. I was sober enough to know all that passed, I had been drinking some time, but I do not drink much; I was fresh, and knew every thing; I drank nothing but porter.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give it me instead of a sixpence? - A. No, I gave you no money at all.

- BRIGGS sworn. - I am constable of Cheap Ward: I produce a half-guinea.

Ash. It is a crooked half-guinea, and a pale one; there is a small mark, it is bent up on both sides, and there is a head, I did not notice it any further; it was an old one, and I cannot recollect whether it was a spade half-guinea or not, I had it in change.

Briggs. I took it out of the prisoner's hand in the

watch-house; Ash charged her with robbing him of half-a-guinea; she said, Ash had given it to her for sixpence, there was nothing freer than a gift, and she would keep it; I have kept it ever since; he told the same story the next day.

Prisoner's defence. I gave the half-guinea into the watch-house, he gave it me instead of a sixpence; between Queen-street and Bow-lane, two men met me, and asked me where I was going; one asked me to stop a-bit, as he was going to his friend to wish him good night, and he would come to me again; I stopped, and he came back; I am an unfortunate woman; I mean the prosecutor; we went down on the left hand side of Bow-lane; I stopped there, and asked him if he would give me a compliment, and he gave me, as I thought, a sixpence; I asked if it was all he was going to give me, as that would not buy me a breakfast; says he, I will give you a shilling, and he said, out of mistake I gave you half-a-guinea, and I said, nothing is freer than a gift; the man says, he was robbed in Old Change, I was taken in Bow-lane. GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-16

399. ROBERT CLASSON and THOMAS WHITTOCKS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , in the dwelling-house of Ann Bolton , widow , a writing-box, value 40s. a bottle, value 1s. a purse, value 6d. and a seal, value 5s. and three Bank-notes, each of the value of 1l. the property of the said Ann.

ANN BOLTON sworn. - I am a widow, I live in Clifford-street, in the parish of St. James, in the Liberty of Westminster : On the 20th of May last, I lost a writing-box, containing three single one-pound notes, three crooked half-guineas, in the shape of hats, an ivory smelling-bottle, a netpurse, with gold tassels, a gold seal, and several papers of bills and receipts; I went out of my apartments about nine o'clock in the evening, I returned about twelve; I had seen the box in the afternoon of that day; it must have been after four o'clock; it was my writing-box that I used every day; I had seen the contents that morning.

Q. Do you mean to say, upon your oath, that you had seen the particular contents of that box that very day? - A. I had; the three Bank-notes were wrapped up in Hodges's lottery scheme; I left the box in my bed-chamber, up one-pair of stairs; when I came home, I looked round the room, and missed my box.

Q. When did you again see your box? - A. Not till August, it was brought to Clifford-street, introduced by Mr. Madrill; it then contained only a smelling bottle; I am very sure it was the same smelling-bottle.

Q. Have you seen any of the articles that were contained in the box at the time you lost it, since? - A. Only an ivory smelling-bottle.

Q.Had you any knowledge of either of the prisoners at the bar, before this happened? - A. John Whittocks was a servant of mine.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Classon.)

Q.It was three months after you lost the property, before you found any of it again? - A. Yes.

Q.And you knew nothing of Classon before? - A.No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. (Counsel for Whittocks.) Q.Whitocks had lived with you as a servant for the period of nine months? - A. He had.

Q. He received, I believe, some rents for you? - A. He did sometimes.

Q.You were so well satisfied with his service, that I believe you twice raised his wages during the period he lived with you? - A.Once.

Q. At what time did he leave your service? - A. The 10th of May.

Q. That was ten days before you lost this desk? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you had a perfect good opinion of his honesty? - A. I thought so.

Q. Did you ever see him between the time of the robbery being committed and the time he was taken up: I believe he called upon you once or twice? - A. He did.

Q. I believe you kept several other servants? - A. Yes, a coachman and three maids.

ANN JACKSON sworn. - I live with Mrs. Bolton, as cook.

Q. How long had you lived with her before the 20th of May? - A.Six months: On the 20th of May my mistress lost a writing-desk from her bedchamber.

Q.Had you an opportunity of knowing what the contents of it were? - A. I saw it open every day, but I never examined it; I have seen my mistress using it, when she settled her accounts with me; my mistress gave me a one-pound note out of it on the 20th of May.

Q. Are you positively sure that you saw it on the 20th of May? - A. Yes, she brought a box with some other notes, and gave me a one-pound note from some more notes; there were several, but I cannot say how many; the box was missed about twelve o'clock in the evening; my mistress came home about half past twelve.

Q.Had you missed the box then before your mistress came home? - A. Yes.

Q.What led you up to your mistress's dressing-room? - A.Elizabeth Davis called me up stairs,

and I saw it was gone off the table where it always stood.

Q.When was the box found again? - A. Some time in August, but I cannot say what day; I saw it at Bow-street.

Q.Do you know, of your own knowledge, how this box was taken out of your mistress's house? - A. No; John Whittocks had come to my mistress's house on the 20th of May in the evening, about half past nine.

Q.Had he lived in your mistress's service before? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did he stay there? - A. Till almost twelve.

Q.Did you know the occasion of his coming there? - A. Yes, all his fellow-servants had asked him to come that evening to drink tea, and I as well.

Q. Did he go away before or after Betty Davis had called you up stairs? - A.Before.

Q. During the time that he was in your mistress's house, had you an opportunity of seeing where he was? - A. He was in the kitchen.

Q. Do you mean to say he was in the kitchen from the time that he came in till he went away? - A. No, he was not; he went out of the kitchen about ten, and staid about a quarter of an hour; I was in the kitchen during that quarter of an hour.

Q.Was any body with him? - A. Not that I saw; he went up stairs twice during that time; the first time he said he had got a friend, and he would go and tell him to wait for him at the public-house.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he went up stairs? - A. To the top of the kitchen stairs.

Q. Will you swear he went any higher up? - A. No, he might, I cannot say.

Q. How long was he gone the second time? - A.About five minutes.

Q.When he went up stairs, did he go with a candle, or without a candle? - A.With a candle both times.

Q. Was any body with him the first time he went up? - A. No.

Q. Was any body with him the second time? - A. Yes, a coachman, that came to see our coachman.

Q.What time did that coachman come to your mistress's house? - A. About nine o'clock, as near as I can guess.

Q. Do you know his name? - A. His name is Granger.

Q. Do you know that coachman when you see him? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen him lately? - A. No.

Q. What fellow-servants have you in this house? - A.Three women servants, and two men servants, a coachman and footman; the coachman's name is William Starkey, and that night we had no footman.

Q.Where were the women servants all this time? - A. In the kitchen.

Q. Where they all in the kitchen during all this time? - A. Except the lady's maid, she went up stairs to fetch something down; her name is Ann Bayne : I was in the kitchen the whole of the time; Elizabeth Davis was up stairs part of the time; she came down about ten; she was housemaid; the coachman was in the kitchen all the time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner came there in consequence of an invitation of your's and the rest of the servants? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe, when he came there, he said that he wanted to go away earlier than he did? - A.Not that I recollect; he said he had a friend in the street, and he would desire him to go to a public-house, and wait for him: he took up the candle immediately and went up stairs.

Q. At what time did the coachman go? - A. He went when Whittocks came back to the door.

Q. Had you two visitors that night besides Whittocks? - A. No, only one.

Q.Whittocks came to see you, I believe, after that? - A. Not till Mr. Madrill brought the box.

Q. Between the time the box was lost and the time when it was found, he called several times? - A. I saw him twice.

Q. I take it there was some noise about the box being lost the very next day? - A. Yes.

Q. It was perfectly well known in the family that there had been a box lost, about which there had been a disturbance? - A. Yes.

MARY BLAKE sworn. - I live at Westbournegreen, Paddington: I am house-maid.

Q. Where did you live upon the 20th of May last? - A. At Mr. Chares's, Westbourne-green.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners? - A. Robert Claffon is my fellow-servant, and has been near upon four months.

Q. Do you know Whittocks? - A. No farther than coming to see Robert Claffon.

Q. How long have you known him? - A. I suppose about five months; but I do not take notice of these things. - Oh no! it cannot be above two months.

Q. Upon your oath, how long have you known him? - A. It is impossible for me to say; we went to Westbourne green in May last, and I saw him just after, I saw him in May.

Q.Then how came you to tell me you had not known him above two months - Do you mean to swear you saw him in May? - A. Yes.

Q.And how many months ago is it since May? - A.Three.

Q. Did you ever see him before May? - A. Yes, I have seen him in April, I think.

Q.Where did you see him in April? - A. At Westbourne-green, Paddington.

Q. At whose house? - A. My master's.

Q. Did you ever see him before April? - A. No, I never did.

Q. Who brought him to your master's in April? - A.He came to see his friend Robert Classon ; he used to come frequently to see him, but I cannot say how many times.

Q.Did you see him there in June? - A. I cannot say that.

Q. Do you know any thing, of your own knowledge, about these goods of Mrs. Bolton's? - A. I cannot say any thing about what I do not know, till they were taken up from our house to Bow-street.

Q. The two prisoners were taken up from your house, were they? - A. Yes.

Q. When was that? - A. In June, I think.

Q. Are you sure it was June? - A. I cannot recollect, I am so flurried.

Q.Take your time, you shall not be flurried if you will speak the truth; nobody shall flurry you? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were the prisoners both taken up at your house? - A. John Whittocks was taken up at our house.

Q. Was Claffon taken up at your house? - A. He went to Bow-street, I believe.

Q. You must know whether they were both taken up at your house or not? - A. Yes, they were.

Q. Was there any box taken at your house? - A. There was a box at our house.

Q. When was that box brought there? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What part of the house was it in? - A. It was in Robert's cupboard, I think, sometimes; but it was not in our house long, for it went to be mended.

Q. How long was it there to your knowledge? - A. I cannot say.

Q. When did you first see it? - A. I think I saw it come home from being mended; I do not think I saw it before.

Q. When was that? - A. I did not think of being brought here, and I did not take any notice of the time.

Q. I do not ask you to a week or a fortnight, or three weeks; but, to the best of your knowledge, when was it that you first saw it? - A. I think in June.

Q.Where was it that you saw it? - A. In the kitchen.

Q.Whereabouts in the kitchen? - A. In a little pantry belonging to Robert Claffon.

Q. Did you ever see the inside of it? - A. I have seen it open, but there was nothing in it.

Q. Who opened it when you saw it open? - A. I saw Robert with it open in the kitchen.

Q. You did not see any thing in it? - A. No, only an ink-bottle thing.

Q. Where was this box taken to when it was carried from your master's house? - A. In the care of the runners.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say you are a fellow-servant with Classon? - A. Yes.

Q. What distance may it be from the house of Mrs. Bolton to your house; two or three miles is it not? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. You have told us that the prisoner Whittocks used occasionally to visit the other prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. That is a common thing among servants? - A. Yes: I know nothing of Mr. Whittocks; he is no acquaintance of mine.

Q. You told us you saw this box after it came home from being mended? - A. Yes.

Q.Classon made no secret of it, but exposed it in the kitchen? - A. Yes.

Q.Had there been any inquiry in the house, or had you known of the robbery at this time? - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether your master visited Mrs. Bolton's family? - A. I believe not.

PETER WALLIS sworn. - I am a carpenter and builder.

Q.Did you ever see Mrs. Bolton? - A. I saw her at Bow-street, on account of the box: I had some men at work at Squire Chares's, Westbournegreen; I went down one morning to see what they were about, and Robert Classon asked me whether I could get a key made to his box; I told him I would, and the box remained in my shop I suppose a fortnight; I then took it home, and delivered it to him.

Q. Had you any conversation with him afterwards? - A. Not till I came to Bow-street.

Q.Should you know the box again if you saw it? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. I take it your shop is a place of no secrecy? - A. No.

Q. And if you had supposed there was any thing dishonest in the transaction, you would not have received it? - A. No.

MISS MARGARET DOYLE sworn. - Q.Where did you live in May last? - A. At Charles Chares's, Esq. at Westbourne-green.

Q. Do you know any thing about these goods of Mrs. Bolton's? - A.There is a smelling-bottle

that I know something of; I received it from the cook, Ann-Coke.

ANN COKE sworn. - I am cook at Mr. Chares's, Westbourne-green; I went there on the 23d of May last; I know both the prisoners: Robert Classon was servant to my master; I never saw Whittocks till I had been at Mr. Chares's I believe about a month. Robert Classon gave me a smelling-bottle, which Mr. Madrill had from me.

Q.Did you shew that smelling-bottle to Miss Doyle? - A.When he gave it me, Mary Blake was sitting by me; Robert said he would make me a present of it; I was shelling peas, and I took no notice of it; Mary Blake took it up, and said, it was a very nice present. Miss Doyle afterwards said she should be very glad to have it, to have one made like it, and I delivered it up to her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. He did not give it to you in secret; he gave it you before your fellow-servant? - A. Yes; I had it again, and after that Miss Doyle asked me for it, and I gave it up to Mr. Madrill.

Q.I take it for granted your master never took a servant without a good character? - A. No, as far as I know.

Mr. MADRILL sworn. - Q. Do you remember getting a smelling-bottle from the last witness? - A. Yes; from Miss Doyle it was given to Mr. Bond, at Bow-street; it is now in the custody of the constable, I believe; I requested Miss Doyle to get it from the cook, suspecting it was Mrs. Bolton's property.

Miss Doyle. I delivered the smelling-bottle that I received from the cook to Mr. Madrill.

ELIZABETH WEBB sworn. - I lived at Mr. Chares's on the 20th of May last; Robert Classon was fellow-servant with me; the prisoner Whittocks came to our house upon the 20th of May, between eight and nine o'clock, I believe; I cannot be sure of the particular hour; he wished very much for Robert to go with him to see his brother, who, he said, was come to town from Bath: Robert went with him.

Q.With or without the leave of his master? - A. Without leave, I believe.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. How late did Robert stay out? - A.Till we were retiring to bed; near about eleven, I believe, as near as I can tell; I let him in.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say Robert went out without leave; will you undertake to say that you know he did not ask his master leave? - A. He might for any thing I know; but he did not that I know of.

Q. Did you hear the conversation about his brother? - A. Yes.

Q. He made no secret of it? - A. No.

STEPHEN CREEDLAND sworn. (Produces a box). I found it in Mr. Chares's house; I think it was on the 2d of August, in a closet leading into the kitchen, that did belong to the servant Robert, as the master told me.

Q. Was the prisoner Classon by at that time? A. He was; I asked him whether that box belonged to him or not; he told me it did; he opened the box, and put some halfpence and things in it, and locked it again; there were some ink-stands and other little things in it; I believe I have never opened it since I took it to Bow-street; I do not know whether they are now in the box or not, I have not the key.

Prisoner Classon. I have got the key, ( offers to produce it).

Mrs. Bolton. This is the box I lost from my bed room on the 20th of May, (unlocks it).

Q.What key is that that you have unlocked it with? - A. The key belonging to the box which I have had ever since; here is the smelling-bottle in it.

Q.(To Ann Coke .) Did you ever see that smelling-bottle before? - A. I did not take particular notice of it before, for I had it a very little while, and cannot swear to it; I did not open it when he gave it me.

Mr. Alley. Q. It is a common smelling-bottle that you may buy at all the Tunbridge shops? - A. Yes.

Madrill. This is the smelling-bottle that I received from Miss Doyle; I have no doubt about it.

Miss Doyle. This is the smelling-bottle that I gave to Mr. Madrill.

Mrs. Bolton. I am sure this is my smelling-bottle.

Q. Do you find any thing else in that box that is your property? - A. Yes, the ink-stand that was in it at the time I lost it.

Q.( To Mrs. Bolton). Are you sure there were three notes for a pound each in the box when you left it in the morning? - A. Yes, I am quite sure.

ANN BAYNE sworn. - On the 20th of May I lived in Clifford-street with Miss Bolton, I was Miss Bolton's maid.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Bolton going out that night? - A. Yes, she went out about nine o'clock in the evening; she came home, I believe about half an hour after twelve; I went to live with Miss Bolton in June, 1798; I was at home all the evening.

Q. Do you know John Whittocks? - A. Yes, he had been my fellow-servant; he came that evening to see the servants in general, about a quarter past nine; he staid till near twelve, if not quite twelve.

Q. Was Miss Bolton out that evening with her

mother? - A. Yes, two Miss Bolton's were out with their mother, and one was left at home.

Q. Were you much in the kitchen that evening? - A. I was very often up stairs, and was often in the kitchen; I saw my lady to-bed about nine in the evening, she was indisposed; I went down into the kitchen immediately after, and he was not then come; I went up stairs to my lady again, and stopped with her a few minutes, and upon my return I found him there then.

Q. How long might you be, taking all the times together, in the kitchen? - A. It is impossible to say; I staid half an hour at a time, and three quarters of an hour at a time.

Q. Was Whittocks in the kitchen all the time that you were? - A. He was absent one time, it might be about ten o'clock.

Q. Do ou know where he was at that time? - A. He went to the door to refer some friend to a neighbouring public-house to wait for him.

Q. Was that the only time that you missed him? - A. No, he went once more up stairs to let out a coachman that was there, that was a little after ten.

Q. Did you sit up till your mistress came home? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know any thing of the box being in your mistress's bed-room? - A. It was not in my lady's bed-room, and I had no business in that room, but when I went on messages; I know there was such a box there.

Whittock's defence. Elizabeth Bayne was backwards and forwards at the door that evening several times.

Ann Bayne . I never was at the door but once; I found the door was open, and shut it myself; I found the door was open by the blowing of the candle; I went down immediately, and mentioned in in the kitchen.

The prisoner, Classon, left his defence to his Counsel.

For the Prisoner, Whittocks.

ELIZABETH DAVIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.You were a servant of Mrs. Bolton's, at the time this box was lost? - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember Whittocks spending the evening with you? - A. Yes, he went away rather before twelve, I saw him out, and shut the door after him; the coachman went about a minute before him; I shut the door after them both.

Q. I scarce need ask if he had your mistress's box with him? - A. No.

Q. How long had you lived in service with this young man? - A. I lived nine months with him.

Court. Q. What time of night was it that he went away? - A.Half past eleven, or rather better.

Q. With the coachman? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in the kitchen the most of the night? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you up in your mistress's room during the night? - A. Yes, I was, two or three minutes; I missed the box about half past eleven.

Q. At what time had you been up previous to the time at which you missed the box? - A. I had been up not an hour before, but I cannot say whether the box was there then, I did not take particular notice.

Q.(To Mrs. Bolton.) Did you buy that box? - A. No, it was made a present by my daughter; she bought it at Bath; she is not here.

In consequence of an objection taken by Mr. Alley on the part of Classon, the Jury found a special verdict, which the Court were afterwards of opinion operated as an acquittal, and he was discharged . The special verdict was as follows:

We find that Robert Classon was not in or near the house, or near the door of the house, when the property was stolen, but that the box was afterwards found in his possession at Westbournegreen, two miles from the spot whence the property was taken.

Witttocks, GUILTY Death .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-17

399. JAMES SYME was indicted for the wilful murder of William Aldwin and William Grainger .(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

ROBERT FENN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a cabinet-maker at Uxbridge: On the 25th of July last, I was in company with the prisoner at the White-hart, Uxbridge, in the parish of Hillindon ; there was one Hayward there, a man of the name of Fox. Spicer, Aldwin, and several others.

Q. Which was there first, Aldwin or the prisoner? - A.Aldwin; I was in the tap-room, when the prisoner came into the tap-room from the parlour, and spoke to the landlord, Elijah Dunton ; I do not know what he said, but Dunton said, you would not go to do any such thing, and he immediately made answer, he would be d-d if he would not.

Court. Q. Was the prisoner sober, or in liquor, at that time? - A. He was in liquor, and appeared to be very much irritated, but what it was about, I did not know; they had been quarrelling among themselves.

Q. What time was it when you first came in? - A. A little past eight; he made use of a great many abusive words, cursed his king and country, and said he did not care a d-n for the king, any more

than any other man; and he said, any man that would call him a rascal, he would run him through.

Q. Had any body at that time, in your hearing, called him a rascal? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. You know nothing of the quarrel which first took place? - A. No.

Q. Nor of what passed afterwards? - A. No.

ELIJAH DUNTON sworn. Examined by Mr. Const. I keep the White-hart, Uxbridge; the prisoner and Aldwin were at our house with a number of others, the prisoner was upon a recruiting party, he came in the afternoon; about nine in the evening the deceased came in, and said, Danton, give me the dominos; I said, no, you shall have no dominos to-night, I am going to bed; then Aldwin went to Spicer, and said, old fellow, you have got some in your pocket, I will play you for a pint; then I said to my wife, I shall go to-bed, there is nothing to pay, see that every thing is paid as soon as it comes in, and I saw no more of it.

Q. Was Hayward there at the time you went to-bed? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. Aldwin was the man who first applied to you for the dominos? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not Hayward in the company of Aldwin? - A. Yes; they were in the same box together; Spicer lodged with me at that time.

Q. Did Aldwin begin to play with any body? - A. Yes, he played with Spicer for a pint of ale, and then I went to-bed.

Q. During that time where was Syme? - A. He had got a pot of ale in his hand.

Q. Not at all interfering at that time with Aldwin or Hayward? - A. No.

Q. This was about nine o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Robert Fenn being at your house? - A. He was there in the evening smoking his pipe, but whether he was there at that time or not, I cannot say.

Q. Had he been in your house more than once that night? - A. No.

Court. Q. Was Syme in liquor? - A. He was a little in liquor; but not so much but he could rerecollect what he was about.

Q.Did he say to you, he would be d-d if he would not do something? - A. No.

Q.Were you yourself sober at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Fenn sober? - A. As sober as any man in the county of Middlesex; I never saw him disguised in my life.

ANN DUNTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am the wife of the last witness.

Q.Do you remember, on the 15th of July, the prisoner being at your house? - A. Yes, the deceased was there, and one Spicer, and Fox, and Hayward, and Mr. Fenn and Spicer's son; I was in the other room; I heard the corporal call landlord; my husband was gone to bed; I went into the room, and he asked for a pot of beer, and said, he would pay for it, though this rogue and rascal had cheated him; the corporal was then in the tap-room; he said, though this rogue and rascal had cheated him, he would treat the company with a pot and pay for it.

Q. What did he mean by this rogue and rascal? A. He meant that Mr. Aldwin had cheated him.

Q. What age is Spicer's son? - A.About one or two-and-twenty I suppose; I turned out to fetch the beer, and I heard Aldwin say, can you make a rogue and rascal of me: I turned short round back again, the prisoner was gone out, and Aldwin was going out; I gave him a push, and said, for God's sake don't go out, Mr. Aldwin, pary keep in.

Q. Was Aldwin sober? - A. He was not sober, nor he was not drunk; he was between both.

Q. How was the prisoner? - A. I do not think he was drunk, he had been drinking for an hour or two with his comrades in the parlour; Hayward and Aldwin gave me a push back, and then they both went out after the prisoner; I shut the door and shut them all out, and went to bed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. - Q. You, upon seeing Aldwin wanted to go out, wished to stop him? - A. Yes.

Q. What prevented him? - A.Hayward and Aldwin both pushed me back.

Q. What were they going out for? - A. I suppose to see which could fight best.

Q. Was Aldwin in cool temmper or hot? - A. He seemed rather hot.

Q. Was Hayward in cool temper? - A. He was rather hot.

Q. Did it appear to you or not that Hayward went out as a friend and encourager of Aldwin? - A. He went out, to my thinking, to see that Aldwin was righted.

Q. Did any words pass between them? - A. The prisoner asked Aldwin if he would go out of doors and try.

Q.Was there the appearance of any friends or acquaintance of the prisoner near? - A. No.

Q. What was become of Spicer and the other people? - A. They sat still, and never got up.

Q. Where was Fenn? - A. He was gone.

Q. Do you remember any thing that passed between Fenn and your husband? - A. No.

Q. Or between the prisoner and your husband? - A. No, I never go into the tap-room unless my husband is gone to bed. Aldwin said, can you make me a rogue and rascal; the prisoner said he would go out and try whether he was a rascal or not.

THOMAS SPICER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I wasat Dunton's with the prisoner and Aldwin, Spicer, and others; I was there before the prisoner came in; he had three pots of beer, and drank it round with the company; then Aldwin and I made a bargain to play for one pot of beer, and I saw the butcher cheat the prisoner; I saw him cheat him again, and the soldier saw it himself the third time.

Q. How did he cheat? - A. They were playing at dominos, and he kept some of them back in his hand when he should have put them down; then the soldier said you are a scoundrel and a rascal, and I will not play with you any more; then the soldier told the landlord of the house to fetch a pot of beer, and he would pay for it and go home; then they went out of doors, and I cannot say any more about it.

Q. Who went out first? - A. The soldier; then Aldwin, and the gardener, Hayward.

Q. Did you hear Aldwin say any thing when the prisoner said he was a rogue and a rascal? - A. He said something, but what it was I don't know.

JOSEPH SPICER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I was present at the quarrel between Aldwin and the soldier: Aldwin was at play with the soldier for a pot of beer; Aldwin cheated the soldier; he put one of the dominos up his sleeve, and put it down again when he wanted one.

Q. Did the soldier see him do that? - A. I do not know, he told me he was cheating him; he said, you rascal, you scoundrel, you are cheating me! then he played for another pot of porter, and the butcher was cheating him again; then he called him rogue and rascal, and would not play any more; and then the soldier called for a pot of beer, and, before the pot of beer came, they were gone.

Q. Did the butcher say any thing? - A. Yes, he saidhe would knock his head off his shoulders.

Court. Q. Did soldier say any thing about going home? - A. Yes, he put his hat upon the table, and said he must go home.

Q. Was that before Aldwin said he would knock his head off? - A. No.

Q. What was his had laid upon the table for if he was going home? - A. I do not know; my father put his hat upon the bacon-rack, and then he went out; Aldwin followed him directly; before the pot of beer came out of the cellar, Hayward, the gardener, went out with Aldwin.

Q. Was Aldwin sober or in liquor? - A.He was in liquor rather.

Q. How was the soldier? - A. In liquor rather; Hayward was sober.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Did not the prisoner give this reason for wishing to go home, that it was drawing near ten, and he must be home by that time? - A. Yes, he asked, I believe, three times what o'clock it was; he asked first at half past eight, next time it wanted a quarter of nine, and the next time he asked it was nine; and then he went out directly.

Court. Q. Did he ask after he had said, you rascal you have cheated me? - A.Afterwards he said he must be at home before ten.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. From any thing you observed, did he appear to be desirous to get home? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear Hayward say any thing as they were going out? - A. No, he said he must go; after that, he said, you rascal you have cheated me, and then he would knock his head off.

Q. In what manner did Hayward seem to behave when he went out with Aldwin? - A. He tucked his apron up as if he was going to fight.

Q. Did Hayward say any thing when the soldier Aldwin was cheating him? - A. No, not a word.

Q. Did you observe Hayward take any part in the game? - A. No.

WILLIAM FOX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I was present at Dunton's house directly after eight; soon after, there was a rumour in the passage of the house, and, when I came to inquire, I found it was the prisoner and some of his recruits having words. Soon after, Syme came into the room, and looked very angry, and seemed disturbed in his mind, but to who I knew not; he called for a pot of beer, and was asking different people to drink; he was walking about, not sitting down quietly: after this, he challenged William Aldwin to play at dominos for a pot of beer.

Q. Had Aldwin been playing before? - A. Yes, one game with Spicer; they played one rubber without words; the corporal paid for it, and then said he would play him another game for another pot: I am not sure whether it was the first or second game he told Aldwin that he cheated him, and the prisoner made answer, and said, I will not play foul, I will play a fair, honourable game: they played a second game; then Aldwin cheated him again; he threw his cards down in a great passion, and said he would play no more; that he was a rogue and a rascal: he kept his seat, and then Aldwin, being aggravated, got up, and said, if he would not go ut of doors, he would knock his head off; the soldier was standing up at that time; he went towards the door, and Aldwin followed him directly, and then Hayward went out with Aldwin: in the course of this time, the corporal asked two or three times what it was o'clock, and said, if he was not home by ten, he would be locked out of his lodgings.

Q. Do you recollect at what part of the play the corporal asked what o'clock it was? - A. I made answer to them, by this dial it is a quarter past nine, that was after he had had the words; the soldier had a stick in his hand almost as big as a cane, it might be as much an an inch diameter, and his side-arms as the soldiers wear them; he went out without his hat.

Q. Can you account for his going without his hat? - A. It was in passion, I believe.

Cross-examined by Mr. Raine. Q. He took off his hat in a passion - did he not appear to have gone out and forgot it? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q.After he had accused this man of cheating, he asked what o'clock it was, and yo told him? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Was Aldwin perfectly sober? - A. He seemed to me to be sober; the soldier was not quite sober, but seemed enough of what he was doing.

- HAYWARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a gardener: I was at Dunton's the 25th of July, with the prisoner and Aldwin, and other persons; I went into the White-hard, and called for a pint of beer, about nine o'clock, William Aldwin was there, and the prisoner was there; Aldwin was sitting, and the prisoner standing up with his hands behind him, and seemed to be in a passion about something, but I did not take any notice of that at all; I had my pint of beer, and sat down in the corner of the room; presently after, I heard somebody call out for the dominos to be brought, but who it was I do not know, and the landlord immediately came in, and said, either that he had none, or he would not let him have any; there was a man of the name of Spicer sat by me, and I saw the dominos pass by him; after that, the prisoner and Aldwin sat down near me and played dominos, I believe, for a pot of beer, and the prisoner caught Aldwin out in cheating him.

Q. Did you observe that he did cheat him? - A. No; I took no notice at all of it, any further than the prisoner said he had cheated him; he threw the dominos down, and swore he would not play any more; then the prisoner called for a pot of beer, and said he would pay for it, and kept on quarrelling, but I did not pay attention to the words that passed; Aldwin got up, and said, if he called him so again he would give him a knock or a punch of the head, I do not know which it was.

Court. Q.Or knock his head off his shoulders? - A. It was either a knock or a punch of the head, as near as I can remember; the other still kept on quarrelling, and they challenged each other to fight.

Q. Do you mean to say that? - A. There was a challenge give between them, and they were both agreeable to go out to fight.

Q. Had the soldier enquired as to the time of night? - A. No; I did not take any particular notice of any thing that passed.

Q. You did not hear him ask what it was o'clock at any one time? - A. At no one time at all; then they went out to fight, the soldier went out first, and left his hat behind him upon the tap-room table, with a stick in his hand; Aldwin followed him, and I drank my beer, meaning to go off, but I followed them.

Court. Q. How long might you be after them? - A. As soon as I had drank my beer out, it might be a minute or two.

Court. Q. Not in less time? - A. Not in less, to my knowledge; when I went out, the prisoner was standing about ten yards from the door of Dunton's house, and Aldwin was standing near to the door, I observed them by the light of the candle through Mr. Tollit's window; I stepped before Aldwin, and said, do not you see the danger you are in, you shall not fight him; I asked the prisoner why he got so far back in the dark.

Court. Q. Did you explain to Aldwin what the danger was? - A. No, I did not tell him the danger.

Q. Now what was the danger? - A. I saw him with a stick in one hand, and a bayonet in the other; he still got further back, till he got from the light of the candle altogether; then Aldwin gave a slip by me, and said, you rascal, put up your bayonet; at the first examination, before the Magistrate, I was in a great fright, and had not the presence of mind to remember that word.

Q. Did you observe whether he did put up his bayonet? - A. No, I did not, he got into the dark.

Q. Will you tell me whether you believe he put up his bayonet or not? - A. I do not know whether he did or not; but I have great reason to believe he had put it up, for I did not see it when they were struggling together; they struggled across the street, and both fell down together; I did not go nigh them to his assistance till I heard some other person's tongue with them, and then I went across the street, and William Hayward was there, and John Young was there, there were many people came up, but I did not observe who; when I came up, I saw the prisoner, and Aldwin upon him, and as soon as Aldwin was lifted up, somebody else lifted up the prisoner, I do not know who; I saw the stick in Aldwin's hand immediately after he was lifted up.

Court. Q. Had Aldwin a stick when he went out? - A. No.

Q. The soldier had one? - A. Yes.

Q.Whose stick was it that Aldwin had? - A. I do not know; it appeared to me to be like the same stick, but I could not say whether it was or not.

Q.Had the soldier any when he was lifted up? - A. I do not know, for I was not looking at him, but asking Aldwin if he was hurt; I did not mention that at any examination that I asked him if he was hurt; he said he was not hurt.

Q. Did you observe the condition of the soldier? - A. No, I did not take any notice of the soldier; I then immediately heard the sound of a bell with a stick, but I could not say what it was it was very near to a tree; but I am not sure whether it was against the tree or the prisoner, but I rather thought it was against the prisoner; after that, I turned myself about, meaning to go home and not to follow them any farther; I saw the prisoner walk away upon the pavement, and immediately after that, before I got across the street, in the course of a minute or too, I heard an alarm given by the people, somebody said, the rascal has drawn his bayonet.

Q. Did you observe whether the prisoner and Aldwin were scuffing together or not? - A. No; after Aldwin had struck a blow with a stick, I saw no more of him that night.

Q. Have you never sworn, that after the blow with a stick, you saw Aldwin and the prisoner scuffing, and then you heard that the man had drawn his bayonet? - A. I never said, or swore such a thing; I then went under the gateway to take care of myself, I found a heath broom belonging to a poor woman, and I took that; I did not mention that in my examination, as he did not hurt me, I did not think it worth while to mention it; but as I came out from the gateway he was coming across the street with a bayonet in his hand, and he met me full; but there were many people in the street running about for fear.

Q.Were they saying any thing, or making any noise? - A. The prisoner run at me with his bayonet, and struck at me three or four times, and I struck at him several times with the broom, to try to knock the bayonet out of his hand; I found I could do nothing with him, I threw the broom away, and made my escape.

Q. Could you have made your escape sooner if you had chose it? - A. I could not in safety; I did not know which way to run when the alarm was given that the bayonet was drawn, and then I run up the gateway to get this broom in defence of myself.

Court. Q. Have you never said, that the corporal and Aldwin did fight together after they had got up, and after the blow was struck? - A. No, I never did, that was the only blow I saw struck, nor I did not see the prisoner do any damage to any person.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q.First of all, who were the people that called out the rascal has drawn his bayonet? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did that come from Youans, Hayward, or yourself? - A. It did not come from me, nor from them, to my knowledge.

Q. Who was it called out, d-him, knock his brains out? - A. That I know nothing of.

Q. How many people might be assembled when the call was made that he had drawn his bayonet? - A. I cannot say; there might be as many as a dozen or more, I cannot say, nor I do not pretend to say.

Q. And the object of them all was to attack the man because he had drawn his bayonet? - A. I suppose that every man might try at it.

Q. Was there any one man, in all this concourse of people there assembled, that seemed on the part, or the side of the prisoner? - A. I did not see any person against the prisoner or for him, any farther than the man he was fighting with.

Q. It was a minute or two before you followed Aldwin out of the house? - A. It might, I stopped to drink my beer; if they had not gone out of the house, I should have gone home.

Q. When you came out of the house, this minute or minute and a half afterwards; Aldwin was then nearer to you than where the soldier was? - A. Yes; he was gone nine or ten yards from the door.

Q. And when you came there, Aldwin rushed past you up to the soldier? - A. Yes, and said, you rascal, put up your bayonet.

Q.After that, you saw a stick in the hand of Aldwin? - A. Yes.

Q. Why did not you prevent Aldwin from following this man? - A. I had no business with it, it was all done in a moment.

Q.Was Mrs. Dunton, the mistress of the house, desirous to prevent Aldwin from following the soldier? - A. I know nothing of that.

Q. You did not shove Mrs. Dunton away from her attempt to stop Aldwin? - A.Not to my knowledge; I do not remember seeing Mrs. Dunton at all.

Q. Now supposing Mrs. Dunton has said that you did, has she said true or false? - A. I do not know any thing of it.

Q. Did you go out at the same moment with Aldwin? - A. No.

Q.How many people might there be at the time you laid hold of the broom stick? - A. There might be ten or a dozen people, more or less.

Q. You saw Aldwin strike a blow with a stick? - A. A blow was given by him.

Q. Did yo see the corporal return that blow, or offer to return that blow? - A. I do not know.

NICHOLAS MERCER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I came up during the scuffle between Aldwin and the prisoner on Thursday evening the 25th of July, I was coming through Uxbridge town on

horseback, I heard some of the populace cry out, a fight, a fight.

Q. How many people do you think there might be? - A. From a dozen to twenty.

Court. Q.What are you? - A. I keep a mill at Uxbridge.

Q. What time of the night might this be? - A. I think nearly about ten o'clock; when I came near enough to see, they got out in the middle of the road; there was one in the middle, a soldier; I did not at first discover that he had a bayonet in his hand; after a short space of time I discovered it, he brandished it, and they were all round him, eight or ten people, or more; it was exceedingly dark.

Q. How were the people employing themselves? - A. They were attacking him, they knocked him down several times, and the man was extremely ill used.

Court. I have seen all the depositions, and after what this gentleman has said, there can be no doubt what this case is: it cannot be less than manslaughter, nor can it be more.

WASEY HAYCOCK sworn. - I am a surgeon: I examined the deceased.

Court. Q. What do you suppose to be the occasion of his death? - A.An inflammation, which terminated in a gangrene; there was a wound about an inch below the navel; he died about twelve o'clock on Saturday morning, the blow was on the Thursday night, it was a triangular wound, and I have no doubt of that being the cause of his death.

GUILTY of Manslaughter .

Confined three months in Newgate ,

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17990911-18

400. JEREMIAH BECK was indicted for that he, on the 20th of June , in a certain open place near the King's highway, called Kensington Gardens , upon Jane Gibbs , spinster, did make an assault, putting her in fear, and taking from her person a leather pocket-book, value 6d. ten guineas, a half guinea, and two seven-shilling-pieces , the property of the said Jane.

JANE GIBBS sworn. - I live at No. 24, Blandford-street, Manchester-square, I am a single woman , I am a servant out of place : On Thursday evening, the 20th of June, I went from home about two o'clock, to walk in Kensington-gardens for the benefit of the air, as I was poorly in health; when I came to Kensington-gardens it was almost three o'clock, I sat down in the second summer-house from H de-park-corner, against Oxford-road: I had sit there a little better than half an hour, or three quarters of an hour, I was darning a pair of stockings to employ myself while I was out; the prisoner at the bar came up, and sat on the other side of the box; the first words he said to me was, pray where do you live; I said, for what reason, I am not a girl of any disrespect, neither can I take any body with me; the next words he said to me was, it is very warm; I answered him, yes, Sir, it is very warm; then he said, I wish I had some ale; I said, Sir, you cannot get any ale here in the gardens, it is a wrong place for that; the next words he said to me again was, pray can you give me change for a shilling; I then drew the stocking off my hand, put my hand in my left-hand pocket, took out a little red morocco pocket-book, containing ten guineas in gold, eight of the old coin, and two of the new, a crooked half-guinea, a crooked seven-shilling-piece, and a plain seven-shilling-piece, I thought I had two sixpences, but I found I had no silver at all about me; I told him I had no change; then I put all the money into my red morocco pocket-book again, and put it into my left-hand pocket; the next words he said to me was, you are not to know any distress; I said, thank God, I am not in distress; then he asked me, will you chuse to take a walk; I answered, I don't chuse to take a walk with strangers; then there was nothing more passed, good nor bad, and another man came in and sat down; then they had a little talk together, but what they said I do not know, because I am rather shallow of hearing; I asked the second gentleman that came in to please to tell me what o'clock it was; then he drew out his watch, and told me it wanted about five minutes of four, then the man rose up and went out of the box; I did not stop above five or six minutes afterwards, when the prisoner at the bar rose up from the box, then he looked up, and he looked down; then he turned round and seized me by the two arms, then he slammed me down on the bench, and punched me with his knee, while he picked my left-hand pocket; he placed his knee upon my stomach; then, owing to my flurry, he put his hand into my left-hand pocket, and took out my red morocco pocket-book, with ten guineas, eight of the old coin, and two of the new, a crooked half-guinea, a crooked seven-shilling-piece, and a plain seven-shilling-piece; then, owing to my flurry and my fright, and my screeches and cries, I cried out, for heaven's sake, for God's sake, for Christ's sake, to return my money, it was all I had in the world; then he went behind the summer-house and looked all round, and saw nobody coming; then, owing to my screeches and my cries, he came to me, and held the pocket-book in his right-hand, and said, he only did it to frighten me, then he put it in his right-hand coat-pocket again; he never let me have it, but held it in his right-hand with the money in it, and put it into his pocket; then he ran all

across the gardens towards Hyde-park-corner; then I ran almost three quarters of a mile after him, till my hair dropped with water; then the first man that came to me was captain Willis's coachman, his name is Thomas, I believe, but I don't know his sirname; then I put my hand upon his hand in my flurry, and said, for heaven's sake, for Christ's sake take that man that is running in the blue coat and black collar, for he has robbed me of all my property; then I had no power, but dropped down, and that gentleman's servant stopped him, and asked what was the matter, and he cried out, a mad woman, a mad woman, a mad woman; I never lost sight of him at all; he spoke very loud; I was near enough to hear what he said; there were a parcel of haymakers at work, and they all came up to see what was the matter; there were two men stopped him, Thomas, and another person; I do not know what the other person's name is; then I pitched upon my knees to captain Willis, to hear what I had to say; when that rebel was brought up, I described the money to that gentleman; then the prisoner at the bar was brought up face to face, and a person that was there said, for God's sake, if you have got the money, give it to the poor girl, and she shall not hurt thee; then he put his hand in his pocket, he had thrown away the pocket-book.

Q.Had you seen him throw it away? - A. No, he put his hand in his waistcoat pocket, and in his right hand were ten guineas clear; in his left hand pocket there was a crooked half-guinea, a crooked seven-shilling-piece, and a plain seven-shilling-piece, plenty of silver, and a few halfpence; then he fell down upon his two knees to captain Willis, and owned the whole fact; he threw the money upon the grass, and pitched upon his knees for pardon; I did not hear what he said; then the gentleman, I believe, told him to take up the money; he picked it up, and put it in his waistcoat pocket again; the gentleman said, he thought if he forgave him, that somebody in the gardens would be murdered, and he ordered his servant to take him to Bow-street, and he went in a coach, and I in the coach with him: then the next word he said to me in the kitchen was, my dear lady, says he, forgive me; then I answered, you wicked man, you deserve to have some punishment; then the next word he said was, but will you forgive me: he said that to the gentleman's servant, and he said, he could not forgive him, he must obey his master's orders; then the prisoner said, I did rob her, I did take the money from her certainly; then the other man asked him what he would give me to make up the matter; he said, I will give her all I have in the world not to bring me to no shame nor disgrace; then he put his hand into his waistcoat pocket, took out all the gold, and threw it into my lap; I told him I could not forgive him, and then he was taken to Bow-street, and there examined.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. At this time you were a servant out of place? - A. Yes, I am.

Q. How long had you been a servant out of place? - A. Two years and a quarter.

Q.When did you put your money in your pocket-book? - A. I put my money in my pocket-book on that Thursday morning.

Q. The morning of the very day that you were robbed? - A. That very morning.

Q. And you counted it piece by piece, I suppose? - A. No, I kept it all in my box; I went in the morning to the pastry-cook's to get change for a guinea to pay my rent, and they could not give it me.

Q. I dare say you were a very industrious good girl; I went to take a walk for the benefit of the air, because I was poorly in health.

Q. There were several persons in the gardens who knew you? - A. There were several persons passed the box.

Q. You heard what some of those gentlemen said of you, perhaps? - A.Not at all, I am not a girl of any disrespect.

Q. Were you ever robbed before? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Did you ever think you were robbed before? A. I do not think I ever was robbed of one single halfpenny before that time.

Q. You never thought you were robbed at any time before? - A. No, I can take an oath of that.

Q. Now I ask you, upon your oath, did you ever accuse any body of having robbed you before? - A. Never, never.

Q. And that is as true as that you were robbed on this day? - A. I was robbed, if God were not to suffer me to live another moment; if I were to drop down dead directly I was robbed at that time.

Q. You never asked any gentleman to come into a box with you in Kensington-gardens, either that day or any other? - A. If I were to die before you this moment, I never spoke to a gentleman to sit in a box with me in my life.

Q. Did you never ask any gentleman about the Strand, or the Park, or the Temple, to go with you any where? - A. I never was agreeable to walk with any gentleman in any gardens, nor Park, nor any part of the town.

Q. You have been attending this Sessions several days, you know; - A. Yes, ten or eleven days.

Q.While you were sitting in that gallery, were you not reproved by a gentleman for behaving with great indecency only the day before yesterday? - A. To the best of my knowledge, I never spoke to any gentleman.

Q. I ask you, whether a gentleman did not find great fault with you for behaving indecently, and threaten to turn you out? - A. No; if you can bring that gentleman forward to swear that he knows me, I will suffer the law, which I am innocent of.

Q. Then you never have solicited any gentleman whatever to go with you any where? - A. No.

Q. You never have at all? - A. No.

Q. And that you swear? - A. Yes.

Q. Then I am to understand you to be a perfectly chaste good girl? - A. I have been two years and a quarter in Mary-le-bonne parish, and if any gentleman can bring any proof that I was a girl of any disrespect, or a thief, I will suffer the law.

Q. I did not ask if you were a thief, but you have been a perfectly chaste, modest girl - you have never been walking about the Temple, asking gentlemen to go with you? - A. No, I never walked with any gentleman about the Temple.

Q.Nor about the street? - A. No, I am a girl that keeps home.

Q.Nor in Oxford-road? - A. No, nor in Oxford-read.

Q.Did you never accuse any gentleman of having robbed you in Oxford-road? - A. No, I am not a girl of that disrespect, if I had, why had not this gentleman exposed me before this misfortune; I will swear by my God that I never was a girl that made known my distress to any gentleman, I never asked any gentleman for money.

Q. Look at that gentleman, (Mr. Brace, of the Temple) - Did you ever see him before? - A. Never; he is a wicked man if he dare say so.

Court. Q. If you have the misfortune to be an unfortunate girl of the town, you had much better own it? - A. I have spoke nothing but the truth.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you never ask that gentleman, Mr. Brace, an attorney of the Temple, whom we all know, for money? - A. I will take an oath, that I never saw that gentleman before to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you ever see that gentleman before? - (Pointing to a gentleman on the Bench.) - A. I will give an oath that I never saw that gentleman in my life.

Q. Is Mr. Griffin here? - (Mr. Griffin stood up)

Q. Did you ever see that gentleman before? - A. Yes, that gentleman came to me last Sunday was a week, and another gentleman, to examine me about this business, and that gentleman that sits there, (Pointing to Mr. Ramsey, the Short-hand Writer). was with him, and he held up a stick to me, I thought he was going to knock me down.

Q. Did you ever ask that gentleman, Mr. Griffin, for one shilling, in the street? - A. I will take a solemn oath I never saw either of them before in my life, there they are both together, there they are both together - Oh you wicked men.

Q. Is Mr. Bradshaw there? (Mr. Bradshaw stood up.)

Q. Have you never picked up that gentleman in the street? - A. No.

Q. Nor any man? - A. No, I have no occasion.

Q. This person, before he robbed you, looked up and down? - A. Yes, to see whether there was any body in sight, and there was nobody in sight then.

Q. Do you mean to say that the hay-makers were not in sight? - A. They were not in sight, but they heard the screeches.

Q. You did not cry out at first? - A. I screamed and cried out near a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you cry out while he was taking the pocket-book? - A. Yes, I did; I cried out murder when he punched me with his knee.

Q. Did he run away from the box the very instant he had got the pocket-book from you? - A. He did not stop above a minute, no longer than he had power to take it out of his pocket again; he ran as if he would tear the very earth up towards Hyde-park-corner.

Q. Did you keep crying out murder from the time he had taken your pocket-book till he was stopped? - A. Yes, and running all the time as hard as I could run from the very instant that he had robbed me.

Q. Be so good as tell me how you had got so much money, having been out of place upwards of two years? - A. I am not ashamed or afraid to tell you, I had it by a sister that died in Sodbury, knowing that I was shallow of hearing, that I might put myself apprentice to a mantua-maker; I did not get it by gentlemen.

Q. What was your sister's name at Sodbury? - A.Sarah Willis.

Q. Have you never sworn that that sister's name was Sarah Hill? - A. Her maiden name was Sarah Hill.

Q. Was her name Ann, ever? - A. No, I never said the name of Ann.

Q. Was she your own sister? - A. No, my sister-in-law; she left me all her clothes, and every thing she had, about two years ago, about a quarter of a year after I had been out of place; there was an old gentleman that allowed me half-a-guinea a week constantly for four months, a gentleman that was old enough to be my father, but never to be a girl of the town.

Q. How much did your sister leave you? - A. Twenty pounds, and her clothes, altogether about thirty pounds.

Q. You never pawned any thing to raise this

money? - A. I have pawned, because I would not break into this money.

Q. Have you never said that you had pawned things to raise part of this money? - A. No, I have pawned a few trifles to keep this money whole, because I would not break it.

Q. You heard all that this man said at the time he was stopped? - A. Yes, I had run all the way till I dropped down, and the people came to bear me up; I trembled like a leaf, I was the same as if I had been drawn through a river, when they told me he was taken.

Q. I thought you told me that you saw him taken? - A. Yes.

Q. Then what occasion was there for any body to tell you that he was taken? - A.All the haymakers ran to me to help me.

Q. How near were you to him when he was taken? - A. As near as to that wall, (pointing to the prison), or not so much; but when he was taken he was walking with his hands in his waistcoat pocket.

Q.Upon your oath, was it a quarter of a mile from the box? - A. It was above half a mile, and nearer three quarters.

Q. You are very deaf? - A. I am not very deaf, only with one of my ears.

Q. You could not hear the conversation between him and the other man in the box? - A. They whispered one to another.

Q. That gentleman, perhaps, may be here? - A. I wish he may, they were very gently in discourse.

Q. As he was as far off as that wall, how came you to hear all that he said to the people that stopped him? - A. He spoke loud enough to be heard; he said, a mad woman, a mad woman, a mad woman; you might hear him a great way.

Q. How many brothers have you? - A. I have got two brothers, and I have had two mothers; one brother lives now in the parish of Kennington, and the other in the parish of Sodbury, eleven miles on this side of Bristol.

Q. Is your brother, who lived at Sodbury, alive now? - A. I hope so, his name is John Gibbs .

Q. Had you ever more than two brothers? - A. Yes, three brothers and two sisters.

Q. Tell me the names of your three brothers? - A. There is one of the name of William, another of the name of Thomas, and another John.

Q. Which of them is the widower who lives at Sodbury? - A. That is my brother who is married, though they are both married.

Q. Is your brother at Sodbury married to his first or second wife? - A. He never had but one.

Q. He never did any thing wrong, I suppose, to induce him to change his name? - A. No.

Q. He never changed his name to Willis? - A. No; that did not concern any thing of the robbery; that is the man that robbed me, and I have no right to speak any further.

Q. Then your brother, who lived at Sodbury, has never changed his name to Willis? - A. No, my sister's name was Sarah Willis .

Q.Examined by the Court. Q. Have you had two fathers as well as two mothers? - A. No.

Q. How came your sister's name to be Willis? - A. By being married; she was a widow when she died; she changed her name from Willis in marrying.

Q. I want to know how this sister of your's came to be named Willis? - A. She married a person of the name of Willis.

Q. What was your brother's name that married her? - A. His name was Willis.

Q. What was her first husband's name? - A. I cannot say, I did not know her first husband; she had been travelling in almost all parts, and her husband, and herself, and child, are all dead.

Q. Her maiden name was Hill, and then she married? - A. It was not my brother, it was my brother-in-law.

Q. What was originally the name of the sister that left you the money? - A. She had been married twice, and buried both husbands; her last husband's name was Willis, but what the first husband's name was I never knew.

Q. Was Willis any relation of your's? - A. No, it was marrying from Gibbs; my name is Gibbs.

Q. Then your brother's name was Gibbs? - A. Yes, but this is my own sister that married two husbands.

Q. How came she by the name of Hill? - A. That is my mother's maiden name; my mother was a widow.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was this your own sister or sister-in-law that left you the money? - A. This was my own sister, that changed her name in marrying.

Q. How came your own sister's name to be Willis? - A. If I was to marry another man, I must change my name.

Q.But what would your maiden name have been? - A.Jane Gibbs.

Q. Then your own sister's name must be Gibbs? - A. Yes.

Q. And it was your own sister that left you the money? - A. Yes.

q. And her name was Sarah? - A. Yes.

Q. Was she any relation to you before she was married? - A. My own sister.

Q. How came you to tell me her name was Hill? - A. My mother's maiden name was Hill.

Q. You told me at first that her married name

was Willis, and that her maiden name was Hill? - A. I took you to ask me what my mother's maiden name was; my mother's maiden name was Hill.

Q. It was put to you, what was your sister's maiden name, and you said, Hill, and that she married your brother? - A. My father's name was Gibbs, and my sister's name was Gibbs; my mother's maiden name was Hill.

Q. Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you not swear at Bow-street, that the name of the sister, who left you the money, was Sarah Hill, and a widow? - A.Her name was Sarah Willis .

Q. Did you not swear at Bow-street, that it was Sarah Hill, a widow, who left you that 20l.? - A. Her maiden name was Gibbs, and from that to Hill, and from that to Willis.

Q. Did you not swear at Bow-street, that it was Sarah Hill, a widow, who left you the 20l.? - A. I swore at Bow-street, that my sister's name was Sarah Hill first, but she changed it to Willis; she has married to gentlemen; her first husband's name was Hill, and her second husband's name was Willis.

STEPHEN LEDIARD sworn. - I am coachman to Mrs. Reynolds, in Bedford-square, the lady of Dr. Reynolds: at the time this happened, I was coachman to the Rev. Mr. Thompson, Kensington-palace. I was walking along Kensington-gardens, about a quarter past four o'clock in the afternoon I heard a great noise of somebody crying out; I thoght it was the hay-makers, I walked a little farther, and heard the out cry of murder; I saw the prisoner at the bar run, and a woman after him, crying stop him, stop him. I ran directly to the woman; I asked her what was the matter; she said, that man had robbed her of all the money she had got in the world; I said, what man; she said that man that runs along there; he had just passed me then; I directly pursued him through the trees: when he had got between the trees, I lost sight of him; he went on one side of a tree, and I on the other; I could not see him through the tree, that was all that I lost sight of him: he then ran down into the valley among some ladies and gentlemen walking in the grand walk, and then he turned short round on his left hand, put his hands in his pocket, and walked on as solidly, and looked as honest and as innocent as could be; then I walked myself as though I had not seen him; I then ran and laid hold of him by the breast-collar; I laid hold of him by the handkerchief; says I, you are the person that robbed the lady on the other side of the gardens; he said I am innocent of it, I have not been on that side of the gardens; says I, you have, for I will swear to your being the person that run by me.

Q. Are you sure that that was the man you saw the woman pursuing? - A. I am sure of it; says I, let you say what you will, you are my prisoner, you shall go back to the woman; in going back, he said, I ran from her because she was crazy; then says I, what id you deny the running for, if you had not been not that side the gardens; I then brought the man to her; says I, is this the man that robbed you? yes, says she, and I will swear to him: I walked on a little farther, and captain Willis called her aside, and I let him go; another person, of the name of John Goddard , got hold of him; captain Willis said, good woman, what money was you robbed of; she seemed very much in a fright, she perspired very much; says she, I was robbed of ten pounds, a half-guinea, and two seven-shilling-pieces; captain Willis said, good woman, that cannot be, it must be ten, guineas; she then said, I beg your pardon, sir, in my fright it was ten guineas; she seemed very much in a fright.

Q. Had she described the guineas? - A. I cannot say; she said there was a crooked half-guinea, a crooked seven-shilling-piece, and a plain seven-shilling-piece.

Q. Did she describe the guineas, whether they were old or new? - A. I cannot say; no money had been produced at that time; some person came up and shook his right-hand waistcoat-pocket, saying, here is the money, I suppose; the prisoner directly put his hand into his waistcoat-pocket, and said, I have plenty of money, and pulled out a handful, and there happened to come a rop a crooked seven-shilling-piece and a crooked half-guinea; I said there is the money that the woman has described; he directly shot it down upon the grass, went upon his knees, and said, I did take it from her, pray let me go; he said again, I did take it from her, and I will give her the money again, and all the goods I have got in the house, and all the clothes I have, and every thing I have in the world, if she will not appear against me; I was very willing to let the man go: captain Willis made answer, and said, if this man is to come here and rob who he likes, my children are not safe to walk in the gardens; says he, if you let him go, I will prosecute you: who are you, he says; I told him my name was Stephen Lediard , I lived with the Rev. Mr. Thompson; says I, I am a servant, it is of no use my having any thing at all to do with it, I shall get anger from my master; says he, I will go to your master and tell him how it happened, and you shall have no anger at all; I will standin your defence; says he, your master is coming to drink tea at our house to night, and then I took the man down to Kensington; he had laid the money down in the grass, and I told him to pick it up again, and he did accordingly pick it up

again; some person called a hackney-coach at Kensington; I got in with the prisoner, and the girl, and John Goddard .

Q. Was Winter with you? - A. No, Winter was hay-making in the gardens the same time: going along the girl seemed very much flurried, and he said, it is a shocking thing for me to go to prison; I said, then he should not have done that that was bad; and, as we came up Piccadilly-hill, he asked me if I had any thing to lay to his charge; I said no, it was the woman, he had not done me any harm; he directly chucked the money into the woman's lap; I gave the woman a jog with my arm, and the money slipped down in the bottom of the coach. John Goddard made answer, and said, if you let him go, I will go to Bow-street, and inform against you. As we were going along to Bow-street, he cried and seemed very much hurt; when we got to the Brown Bear , at Bow-street, I picked up the money from the bottom of the coach, I called to some of the Bow-street officers, and said, here is a person that has robbed this woman in Kensington gardens; two officers took him out of the coach, and I called directly for another to be a witness to see me pick the money up; I picked up ten guineas and a crooked seven-shilling-piece; there was a hole in the bottom of the coach, that was all I could find; there was a crooked half-guinea and a plain seven-shilling-piece missing.

Q. Did you remark the guineas at all? - A. No, I have the money in my pocket now. (Produces it.)

Q.During all this time, was the money ever in the hands of the woman? - A. No.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. I am sure of that.

Q. From the moment you stopped him, till you picked up the money, you are sure it was never in her hands? - A. It was not.

Q. Has she, from that time to this, had an opportunity of examining it? - A. She has never seen the money since. (The money was handed to the Jury.)

One of the Jury. It is exactly as she has described it.

Court. Q. And are you positively sure that she has never had an opportunity of examining it at all? - A. She has not.

Q. That you are perfectly sure of? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q.Might she not have seen it as it lay on the grass? - A. No, she was not nearer to it than that place, (pointing to the bar.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Upon hearing an outcry, you pursued the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. And you out-run the woman? - A. Yes; she did not run much more than half way through the gardens.

Q. You lost sight of him behind a tree, and therefore I presume a person behind you could not see him so well as you could? - A. I don't know I might probably see him best; I think she must have been very nearly half a mile from where I took him; it might be more, or it might not be quite so much.

Q. Was she near enough to hear any thing that either of you said? - A.Certainly not; when I was bringing him towards the woman, she fell down and fainted away.

Q. That was some minutes after you had taken the prisoner? - A. Yes; I had taken him, I dare say, half a mile.

Q. He said to you, I have not been on that side of the gardens, and you said that he had? - A. Yes.

Q. Now, upon your oath, did you say one syllable of that at Bow-street? - A. I told some of it at Bow-street.

Q. Were you not sworn to tell the truth, and the whole truth? - A. Yes.

Q. Now I ask you, whether at Bow-street you said one word about it? - A. I did.

Q. And signed it as a part of your examination at Bow-street? - A. I am no scholar, I cannot read, and therefore I cannot say what they might put down.

Q. Was it not read over to you? - A. I am no scholar, and I cannot tell what they read.

Q. Had you ever seen this woman before? - A. Not to my knowledge; I will be upon my oath I never was in company with her; but if I ever did see her, it must have been once when I was going along with the carriage in South Audley-street, but I cannot say.

Q. Of course you can have no resentment against this gentleman, Mr. Beck? - A. No.

Q. Nor ever expressed any? - A. No, any further than that he was the man.

Q. Did you make use of any expressions of resentment no longer ago than last night? - A. I might or I might not.

Q. Suppose there was any thing like this - there is nothing but Beck talked of, but d-n him, I will hang him if I can? - A. A gentleman came to me, and began talking to me about Mr. Beck, and said, you are to give evidence against Beck; and I said, d-n Beck, I will speak the truth, it is nothing to me, if he is doomed to be hung, he must be hung.

Q. You did not say, d-n him, I will hang him if I can? - A. I don't know, I might say, d-n him, I will do all I can in my evidence; it was very impertinent in any body coming to me so, and I might say so.

Court. Q. How many days have you been attending here? - A. I came away from my place last Tuesday was a week, and left the family In great distress.

THOMAS WINTER sworn. - I am a labouring man; I was at work for Mr. Andrew Robinson , in Kensington-gardens; I saw the last witness and some of the hay-makers running after a man, I had been to get some beer for myself and the other men; I heard murder and stop thief cried; I put down the beer, and joined in the pursuit: as I was running, one of the roots of the trees which grow above the ground in the gardens, threw me down; I got up again, and when I came up, the prisoner was near the shruberry, and the coachman had hold of him, and brought him towards the bason; then the prosecutrix came up, and said, that is the man that robbed me, and then the prisoner said, no, I did not; he seemed rather terrified, and said, he would give her all the money he had in his pocket to get rid of her; he put his hand in his pocket, and pulled out a handful of money, and chucked it on the grass, to the amount of ten guineas, a half-guinea, two seven-shilling-peices, and about sixteen or seventeen shillings in silver, I cannot be rightly sure; there was a crooked half-guinea, a crooked seven-shilling-piece, and a plain one; he went upon his knees, and begged they would let him go, for she was crazy; she said, he was the man that robbed her, and she would swear to it; I did not see her till we got near the bason, what we call the larboard wood of the gardens.

Q. How long might all this be about? - A. It might be twenty-five or thirty minutes.

Q. Did you see her faint away? - A. No.

Q. You did not go in the coach with them? - A. No, I returned to my labour.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man you saw running? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been spoken to by any body since you have been attending here? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Your work was in the hay-making way? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember how far you were at work from the second box in the gardens from Hyde-park? - A. I suppose very near half-a-mile, we call them alcoves.

Q. Were there any person making hay round that way? - A. Yes, all our hay-makers were in Bayswater quarter.

Q.This man was extremely frightened when you came up to him? - A. I think he was; a man touched his pocket, and said, there was moeny; he said, he dis not want for money, for he had plenty of money.

Q. He tumbled all the money out at once? - A. Yes, with his right hand.

Jury. Q. Was she so near the money upon the grass, that she could say what there was? - A. Yes, any body might have seen it as it lay upon the grass; captain Willis said, there were ten guineas, a half-guinea, and two seven-shilling-pieces.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Captain Willis was examined as a witness at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Where does captain Willis live? - A. In the palace; he has the care of the King's linen.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. - I have been long anxious for the present moment, and have not felt any of those apprehensions that a guilty man usually does in my situation, I am standing here, charged with a crime as disgraceful as it is criminal; it rests with me to state to you, and I will do it in as few words, and as correctly as I can, the circumstances that took place between this woman and myself: On the 20th of June, I was at Kensington; about two o'clock i left the town to go into the gardens, I was going down the walk next the Uxbridge-road, this woman was sitting mending stockings, she beckoned me to her; says she, don't you recollect, me; I recollect you perfectly well, visiting at a house where I was servant; curiosity led me to ask the woman where she had lived servant; I sat down, and she told me she had been servant in a family at Twickenham; I told her I knew no family at Twickenham, I never recollected being at Twickenham but once, and then only passed through it; she asked me to give her some ale; I told her she could get none in the gardens; she asked me to go with her to a house in the neighbourhood, where she used to go; I refused; then she requested me to go, several times, among the trees, I suppose a dozen times; she told me she was not a servant out of place but an officer's wife; I thought if she was an officer's wife she was the wife of a gentleman, and I was inclined to relieve her; she told me she lived near Portman-square, but she could not take me home; she said she could take me to some house where she frequented every day, but, she said, instead of going there we had better go among the trees; I declined doing either; she pressed me very much to give her some money; I put my hand into my pocket and was going to give her a shilling, when she put her arm round my neck, pressed me very strongly to her bosom, and held me so tight, that she put her hand in my pocket and took all my money out; I expostulated with her, and she then gave me back the gold pieces, piece by piece, and then the silver; I told her never to mind the silver; I had passed through all the hay-makers (there were thirty of them I dare say) before she began to cry out; she then began to scream murder; I was alarmed, and expected that she would charge me with some improper liberties, and I ran, and said, the woman must be mad; I ran down to the great Mall; several persons said it was impossible it should be that

gentleman; then Lediard said, I shall have the reward, and my expences paid me; then another servant came up, who, I understand, has since ran away, and Lediard and he took me along towards the Palace, there we met with captain Willis; I was very much alarmed and irritated, so much so, that if I had given fifty pounds for a drop of spittle I could not have produced it in my mouth; Lediard said to captain Willis, this is the man that has robbed the woman; I said I had not robbed her; but I would have confessed almost any thing, having a wife and family, to have got rid of so disgraceful a business; when we got to Kensington, I begged for some water, Lediard was very ill-natured, and would not let me have any; there is a gentleman here who saw me in the box with the woman, who will tell you, that there were a great number of hay-makers within sight, and that if this robbery had been committed, it must have been in the presence of at least thirty spectators. When we had got in the coach as far as Piccadilly, the woman said to Lediard, I am willing, if he will give me the money, to let him go; Lediard said, for my part, I will let him go; no, says Goddard, I will take him to Bow-street, and then I shall have forty pounds reward; I threw the money into her lap, he knocked her hand, and the money went to the bottom of the coach; I was going to pick it up again, but Lediard held up his fist, and swore he would knock me down if I picked it up; I was taken to Bow-street, and nothing more transpired till I came before the Magistrate. Gentlemen, I have nothing more to say, these are exactly the circumstances that brought me here; and I solemnly declare, I am as innocent of the crime with which I am charged as the child unborn; and I do most solemnly declare before the Almighty, that I am innocent of this charge; I trust my case will be stated to you by a wise and impartial Judge; and I trust the Jury will sist, as much as they can, the facts of this case, when they consider that the life and character of a fellow creature is at stake.

For the Prisoner.

Mr. THOMAS BRACE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a solicitor in the Temple.

Q. Do you know that woman that you have heard examined to day upon this trial? - A. I do, certainly.

Q. Are you Under Sheriff for the County of Kent? - A. No; my cousin is, who is in partnership with me.

Q.Relate when you saw this woman, and what was the transaction between you? - A. I never saw her but once before she came to Bow-street.

Q.Have you any relationship, or acquaintance, with the gentleman at the bar? - A. I never saw him till I saw him at Bow-street. The transaction that took place between her and me is a considerable time ago; it may be a year and a half, or two years, or it may be rather more; I was passing, I think, near Charing-cross, leading up Cockspur-street, in the evening, it was not dusk, a woman came up to me and asked for charity, she said she was distressed, or something of that kind; I turned round, and said, I have nothing for you; upon which, she immediately exclaimed that I owed her money, or had promised her money, she repeated several words; her manner of speaking drew my attention so much, that I turned round and looked at her, from which I am able to say that she is the same woman.

Q. What time of year was it? - A. In the summer; when I looked at her, I really thought she was mad; and if she was not mad, I thought she had an intention of bringing a crowd round me; in consequence of which, I made the best of the way I could, and got from her; when I saw her at Bow-street, I there mentioned the circumstance.

Court. Q. How long was this conversation passing? - A. I did not stop at all with her, it was only as I was passing her.

Court. Q. It is nothing uncommon for a person to ask charity in the street? - A. What I allude to, particularly, is her manner.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was her manner such as to surprise you? - A.Certainly; I thought she was mad, or meant to get me into some disagreeable situation.

Jury. Q. Were you sent for to Bow-street? - A. No; I am concerned for Sir William Addington , he was not there that evening, and I attended.

Q. Have you the smallest doubt that that is the woman who made the attack upon you? - A. I have not the smallest, or I should not have picked her out at Bow-street.

Court. Q. Am I to understand that this conversation passed as you were walking along, and that you had not seen her for so long a time, and yet you picked her out at Bow-street? - A. It made such an impression upon me at the time, and I think it is impossible for me to be mistaken, from the expression of her face, I have not a single doubt of her being the same person.

Q.Have you heard what she has said? - A. Yes.

Q. And still you say, you believe she is the same woman? - A. I do.

REV. DR. FORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. We need not ask you who you are, we all know you too well I believe; it is by mere accident you are attending here? - A. It is.

Q. Have you seen this woman before who has been examined to-day? - A. An hundred times, at least, in point of time, I cannot authenticate it;

but either previous to Christmas last, or a little afterwards, I was going from a public-house in Hand-court, Holborn, to my own lodgings in Bedford-street, Bedford-row; when I had got nearly to the top of Brownlow-street, I was met by this woman; she stopped me in the usual manner in which women of the town do; I replied to her, I was not likely, either from my years, or my profession, to be a customer of her's; she used a number of arguments to induce me to go with her; I crossed from her, it was on the right-hand side coming up from Holborn, to go to the oil and soap office, the mistress of which I knew; I went over there to knock at the door, in order to get rid of her, or at least by knocking to intimidate her, for she began to be very riotous; she then laid hold of me by the collar with both hands, and said, you b-y thief, give me back the money you have taken from me; I said, immediately, you have changed your blandishments wonderfully, for you were very loving this moment; I was a little alarmed, I confess, because the woman was taller apparently than myself; I looked up and down the street, and saw no creature walking but myself; she then cried, watch; she took me by one hand, and put her hand to my pocket to feel for the money which she said I had taken from her, and said, you have it here; I immediately, with my right-hand, seized her by the right-wrist, in this manner, (describing it); and being left-handed, and pretty strong in my arm, I said, if you do not let me go, I will certainly knock you down; and I was going to knock her down, for I really thought, from the face and the manner, that it was a man in woman's clothes; I said, if you do not let me go I will knock you down, or words to that effect; for I had not the smallest idea of giving evidence here, till I happened to see the woman giving evidence, and recollected her immediately; she again called watch, and I wished very much that the watch had come up to have taken us both to the Compter; no watch came, and there was no creature walking; every body that knows Brownlow-street, knows it is very retired, though it was not nine o'clock, for it is very badly lighted, and worse watched; I said to her, I wish the watch would come up, I am just at home, I am extremely well known in this place, and it will be worse for you if you should charge me with the watch in this place; she then said, if I would give her something to drink she would let me go; to which I said, if there were a pump convenient you should have water enough, but as there is not I with you a good night.

Q. How soon did you see her after that? - A. The very next day, dressed as a quaker, in a lead-coloured gown, a close cap, and dressed exactly like a quaker; that was about eleven o'clock in the morning; I held up my first to her, and said, you know me; she nodded, and went on; and I have met her, I am sure, a dozen times in Brownlow-street, and know her face as well as I know the face of any gentleman I have the honour to know here.

Court. Q. Did she appear to you to be deranged? - A. Not in the least, because every word she said was delivered with collectedness, and in a bullying kind of style.

Q.You was not habited in your robes, I presome? - A. No, I had a little brown wig on.

Q.Have you any doubt in your mind that she is the same person? - A. I am as sure of it as that I am here myself; I have met her almost every day in my way from my lodgings into the City; her face is a very remarkable one; I observed that evening that I thought I could pick her out of a thousand; here is another gentleman, who has been sitting by me, who came into Court accidentally, and who also can give some evidence respecting her.

ROBERT- JAMES CLAYTON Sworn . - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am chief clerk to the Hon. Surveyors of the Navy.

Q. Did you attend here by subpoena from the friends of the prisoner? - A. No, I was here accidentally to hear the trial, and to know whether I should know the woman again.

Q. Have you any acquaintance or friendship with the prisoner at the bar? - A. I never saw him till about half an hour ago.

Q. Did you see the prosecutrix here this morning? - A. Yes, and I saw her yesterday in the gallery, and she noticed me as I sat in the city marshal's box, and laughed.

Q. You say, upon your oath, that you have a perfect recollection of the woman? - A. I have, I should know her among a thousand. About a month ago, near upon eleven o'clock, I was going home to my house in Pall-Mall-court, I had just crossed the street, and a little beyond Market-lane this woman overtook me, and said, how do you do, sir; I took no notice of her; she then laid hold of me, and said, why I know you very well, you are related to the Peun's family, I have just come from Spring-gardens from Lady Juliana Penn 's, I have often seen you at Mrs. Penn's, do not you know John? says I, what John; why John, the footman; says I, I do know that there was such a John lived there. It rather rained at this time, and I was walking on towards my own house; says I, I know nothing of you, good woman; she then asked me for some money, for she said she had a new gown and hat on, which she did not wish to get wet; I asked her where she was going, or where she wanted to go; she said she lived at

present in Baker-street, Portman-square; she said she was out of place; she seemed to be rather amorous, and wished me to go into a coach with her to see her to Baker-street, but said she could not take me to Baker-street; I told her I could not go any where with her, for I was a married man, and wished to go home to my own house; it still continued to rain, and I walked on, and said, I have no money, but I will go with you as far as Piccadilly, and see you into a coach: it began to rain pretty hard, and she said we had better stand up in a place under shelter; we stood up under shelter at the right-hand corner of St. James's-square: though she said she knew me so well, I could not get her to tell me what my name was; she said she had seen me very often at Governor Penn's; that she was nursery-maid there; it rained pretty hard, and I wanted to ged rid of her; says she, don't go, I have got something to tell you, I am very serious, I am very unhappy; why, says I, what is the matter? why, says she, I have got a cause coming on shortly at the Old Bailey: I said, why what is the matter? says she, I have been robbed of ten guineas by a gentleman; it immediately occurred to me that this was the woman who had charged the gentleman with robbing her of ten guineas in Kensington-gardens; I was very much alarmed, there being nobody about, and I thought I must contrive some method in order to get rid of her; I told her it did not rain much now, and I would walk with her as far as Piccadilly; I went into Piccadilly with her till I saw a watchman, who was going past eleven, and I thought then if she meant to make a charge, there was a watchman to see that I had no intention to rob her; and I left her then immediately, and never saw her again till yesterday.

Q. Did you know Governor Penn? - A. My mother-in-law is his own sister.

GERALD FITZGERALD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You have been an ensign in the army? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any acquaintance with Mr. Beck? - A. I never saw him but once before, and that was at his second examination at Bow-street.

Q. Have you heard this woman, Jane Gibbs, examined here to-day? - A. I heard a part of her examination.

Q. Did you likewise hear her examined at Bow-street? - A. I did at the second examination.

Q. Before that time, had you ever seen her? - A. Yes, I had.

Q. How long ago? - A. I think the latter end of February or March last; I have seen her twice.

Q.Have you any doubt about her being the person you saw in February or March last? - A. None in the least; I saw her about nine o'clock at night in the Strand; she was going down the Strand before me; I came up to her, and entered into conversation with her; taking her by the left arm, she said, I mistook her, that she was not a bad girl, that she was not that sort of girl, that she was a servant out of place, that she thought she knew me; she said she was not of this country, meaning London; she said she knew me very well, and thought she had been me in her country; I asked her my name, and she could not tell; when she said she was a servant, I asked her if she was in place or out of place; she said, out; she gave me several squeezes of the hand while she was saying she was not a bad girl, but having seen her face, I wished to quit her as soon as I could, as she was such an extraordinary looking animal as I had never seen before; I pushed her off, and said, take my advice, and go into place again; I meant to have crossed to the other side of the street, when she immediately closed up to me, and seemed to be very much agitated, much in the state in which she appeared this morning, and said, you rascal, you have robbed me, you have picked my pocket of a gold chain, and she called the watch; she repeated very loud that I had robbed her: I said, if she wished to make any charge, not to call the watchman from his duty, but to go down with me to the watch-house, and make whatever charge she pleased before the constable of the night: finding she was not to be intimidated, I remarked to her the dangerous consequences that would attend her in making any such charge, or endeavouring to extort money under false pretences; then she said I was nothing but a rascally servant out of place; then I crossed over the street, gave her a push, and got off.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you the smallest doubt that she is the woman? - A. Not the least.

Court. Q. Was the chain of your watch hanging out? - A. No, I believe not.

Lieutenant THOMAS BRADSHAW sworn. -Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a lieutenant in the Northamptonshire militia.

Q.Have you seen the woman that was examined here to day? - A. I saw her at the door as I came in.

Q. Were you at Bow-street when she was examined? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Are you going to speak of the very woman who was examined at Bow-street against this gentleman? - A. Yes.

Q.How long before the examination in Bow-street had you ever seen her? - A. Two evenings before, in St. James's-park, as I was going home to Sloane-street, from the play; it was late in the evening; I generally go that way through Buckingham-gate; I was walking up the walk

next the pales; she crossed over to me, and said, why, do not you know me, how do you do? I told her, I had not the honour of her acquaintance, but, upon looking at her, desired she would go about her business; then she took hold of my arm, and said, she would go with me: I told her if she did, she must walk very fast; she walked about one hundred yards with me; she began crying, and said, she was out of place, and very much distressed; she said, she had not a farthing to help herself; I put my hand in my pocket, and had no silver, but one or two half-crowns; I told her I had no silver, and insisted upon her going about her business; when she found she could get nothing, she turned off, and went about her business.

Q. Are you any acquaintance of Mr. Becks'? - A. I never saw him in my life till I went to Bow-street to wait for the half-play time.

Q. Did you ever see a woman like her before? - A. No, never, she is a very remarkable woman.

HATTON TURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What are you by profession? - A. A gentleman, residing in Bloomsbury, very near Mr. Knapp.

Q.Have you seen the woman that was examined here? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see her before? - A. I believe I saw her in the latter part of June, but I cannot be positive to identify her, I believe it to be the same person: in the middle of Oxford-street, I think the corner of Newman-street, I saw a bustle, and heard a very strong and violent altercation between a woman and a gentleman; she had hold of his arm, which she clasped with some degree of violence, and said, d-n you, you have stole my handkerchief.

Q. Is that the same woman? (Gibbs was called into Court.) - A. I have no doubt in my own mind, I think I have no doubt, but I would not under take to identify her; she spoke with a great deal of rancour, and, I believe, repeated it forty or fifty times that he had stolen her handkerchief; the gentleman seemed to be very glad if he could get rid of her, but she held him as firm as a rock; he said, for God's sake, good woman, you had better go about your business, and let me alone, for I know nothing of you, but the charge was still persisted in with great violence, d-n you, you know you have stole my handkerchief, till they came to a street, I think Dean-street, near Soho-square; the gentleman then gave her a most violent push upon the kirb stone, where she lay some seconds, and he bounded away like a shot from a bow; she got up and pursued him, and then I lost them: it made a strong impression upon me at the time, and when I heard the charge being made against Mr. Beck, I held it my duty to call upon Mr. Beck, and offer him my testimony, could it be of any service to him.

Q. Had you any knowledge of Mr. Beck before? - A. I do not know that I ever saw him in my life; it is very probable that I have, but I do do not undertake to say that.

Mr. RICHARD AUSTIN GILBERT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am assistant-clerk at St. Bartholomew's hospital; I live in Salisbury-square, Fleet-street.

Q.Have you been subpoenaed at all? - A. No, I came here induced by the singularity of this trial; I never saw the prisoner before, and I have been induced, from curiosity, to look at this woman.

Q. Do you recollect and know the woman again as to her person? - A. I think I do; I firmly believe this very woman made a peculiar attack upon me one evening coming from Spitalfields, I think in Sun-street, about twelve o'clock at night, seven or eight months ago, I had a person with me; this woman, as I believe, a person in female attire, however, seized me violently by the arm, and dragged me towards her with such violence, as I should hardly have expected from one of the foster sex, and, in a voice rather coarse, desired I would accompany her to her lodgings, and though I cannot be positive, I think from her motion she endeavoured to put her hand in my waistcoat pocket, however, I lost nothing; but, upon the first glance of the face, there was something so shocking to my ideas, that I as quick as I could got away from her, which was with some difficulty, and I am pretty strong too; I did, however, get away from her; I believe firmly that the person who so attacked me is the present prosecutrix.

Mr. THOMAS ANDREWS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are a student at law, attending here in the habits of our profession? - A. Yes, of Gray's-inn.

Q. Have you any knowledge of Mr. Beck or his connections? - A.None at all.

(Here Mr. Beck requested that he might retire for a moment.)

Court. Q.Gentlemen, do you wish to go on with this trial?

Jury. We are perfectly satisfied, and have been some time; no evidence can convince us more than we are convinced.

Court. If you have the smallest doubt, we will hear the rest of the witnesses, and I will sum up the evidence to you; but, to be sure, if you are satisfied, there can be no occasion.

NOT GUILTY .

One of the Jury. My Lord, I know the prosecutrix perfectly well; she once acted a similar part towards me.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-19

401. WILLIAM HARPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , a black horse, value 17l. the property of John Joel .

THOMAS JOEL sworn. - I am the son of John Joel , I live at Charvey-green, near Windson, in Buckinghamshire. A black-horse, of my father's, was taken off the Common, between Tuesday the 18th and Wednesday the 19th of June; I missed it on the Wednesday morning, and saw it again on the 21st, at the Saracen's-head, Aldgate-pump; I know the horse again, we had had him three years come Christmas: he was bald-faced, had two white legs behine, a little white over the fore leg, and an iron lock on his foot, and he was run in the shoulder by hard work.

Q.Had he this iron lock when you saw him at the Saracen's-head? - A. No; it had been taken off at the Saracen's-head.

Q. Do you mean to swear, positively, that the horse that you saw at the Saracen's head, was your's that you lost from the Common? - A. Yes.

ISAAC JAGGER sworn. - I am a farmer: I saw Mr. Joel's horse upon the Common on the 18th of June; I saw it again on Friday, about twelve or one o'clock, at the Saracen's-head, Aldgate-pump; I know it to be Mr. Joel's horse, a black horse, long tail, white face, some white under the foreleg, and an iron lock upon the near foot.

Q. Was he run in the shoulder? - A. I cannot say.

ROBERT MARTIN sworn. - I am ostler at the Saracen's-head, Aldgate: the prisoner brought two horses in, about five o'clock in the morning of Wednesday the 19th of June, one of them was owned by Mr. Joel; he told me to put them into the stable and give them some hay; he came in again about ten minutes before eight for the horses; when I went into the stable, I saw the lock upon Mr. Joel's horse; I asked him the reason that the lock was upon the horse's leg; he told me the horse had been to grass, and he had lost the key of it; I asked him whose horses they were, and he seemed quite confused, and could not tell whose horses they were; I told him I suppose he had stolen them, and he made no answer; I turned my back to lead a gentleman's horse into the stable, and he jumped upon Mr. Jagger's horse and rode up the yard as hard as he could ride, with both the horses; I thought he did not come honestly by them, and I took a horse out of the stable, and followed him; I went down Whitechapel and did not find him, he had been and got the lock taken off before I found him; I met with him in Whitechapel-road as I was coming back, it might be about twenty minutes after he set off from our yard; he had got both the horses with him then, he was then upon Mr. Jagger's horse leading the other; I stopped him, and had him detained till the Friday following, when Mr. Joel came to our house and de scribed the horse; I did not deliver him up till we had had a hearing at the office.

Q.(To Jagger.) Was your horse upon the same Common? - A. Yes; I found him at the Saracen's-head.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I belong to the Police-office, Whitechapel: On Wednesday the 19th of June, I took the prisoner from the ostler; I had two horses delivered to me, one of them was Mr. Joel's; and in searching the prisoner, I found this iron lock and key in his breeches, (producing them); I advertised the horses on the Thursday, and printed bills, and sent them down by the different stage coaches into the country.

Joel. I can swear to this lock, but the key is not mine; the lock is marked No. 2, and I have got the right key in my pocket belonging to it; the key is marked No. 2, as well as the lock.

Smith. The key which I took from the prisoner, appears to have been filed to make it fit.

Prisoner's defence. I am a sand-man by trade, and keep one horse and three carts; I used to let my horse and cart; I wanted two horses to work in my other carts, and a man overtook me on the road with these two horses; he asked me twenty guineas for them, I agreed to give him nineteen for them, and I paid him seventeen; I was to pay him the other two guineas at one month after date.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 40.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-20

402. THOMAS NAILER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , two iron sash-weights, value 10d. the property of Thomas Rice .

THOMAS RICE sworn. - The prisoner was at work upon my premises, doing some repairs to the brick-work; I missed two iron sash-weights on the 2d of September, I was from home at the time they were taken, I was sent for; I found the prisoner in the shop, he told me it was the first time he had ever done any thing of the kind, and hoped I would forgive him, my foreman had charged him with stealing them; he was taken to the Compter, and examined next day; there is no particular mark upon them by which I can swear to them, but I have every reason to believe they are mine.

Q. Are they like those which remained behind? - A. Yes.

Q. Is your store so great that you could not miss them? - A. It is impossible.

- sworn. - I am foreman to Mr. Rice: I saw the prisoner and the carpenter talking together, and as he turned away, I perceived some

thing in his breeches; I asked him what he had got there; he said, nothing; I said, I was sure he had got more than he should have; he said, no, he had not; upon his stooping, one of the weights projected out behind; the carpenter was behind him, he said, here is something else; then I took him back into the warehouse, he went down some steps into the cellar, and called for a light, and before the light was brought I saw him throw one of the sash-weights from his breeches, the other I took from his hands; he had pulled them both out of his breeches.

Q. Were they iron sash-weights? - A. Yes; they were wrapped up in a paper, I gave them to the officer; I sent for Mr. Rice, and when he came, he said he was very sorry for it, and hoped he would forgive him.

SAMUEL JONES Sworn . - I am a carpenter: I was by when the foreman stopped the prisoner; he went into the cellar and called for a light, I did not go into the cellar, but when he brought the prisoner up, he told me he had taken that property from him; the foreman brought the property in his hand.

Q. They were articles that Mr. Rice sold? - A. Yes, from the foundry.

Prisoner's defence. I was at work at a necessary drain, and I found these bits of cast iron in the drain, and I thought no harm in taking them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 24.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s. Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-21

403. THOMAS DOUGHTY was indicted for that he, on the 2d of November , in the King's highway, upon Robert Jones , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a watch, value 2l. a watch chain, value 6d. a seal, value 2s. and a watch-key, value 6d. the property of the said Robert.

ROBERT JONES sworn. - I am a journeyman bricklayer : On the 2d of September, about ten minutes past ten at night, I was robbed of my watch in Wood-street, Cheapside ; I had come from the Old Change, and was going home to Featherstone-street, Bunhill-row; the prisoner took hold of my arm, and walked with me a few yards from Cheapside down Wood-street, to the corner of the first street, and he asked me what it was o'clock; I pulled my watch out of my pocket, with a chain, seal, and key to it, I held it in my hand to look what it was o'clock; I said it was somewhere about ten, I could not tell to a few minutes; he then snatched my watch with one hand, and knocked me down with the other in a moment, and then ran away.

Q. Did you make any resistance? - A. No; it was so sudden, it was gone before I could know any thing about it; I ran after him as soon as I could, I lost my hat and my shoe; my partner, William Brown , went after him.

Q. Was Brown walking with you at this time? - A. Yes; he is a bricklayer, and works for the same master, we were going home together; when I came up, Brown had got hold of him upon the pavement, in Gutter-lane.

Q. Was there any lamp near you when you was robbed? - A. Yes, there was a lamp just over the place.

Q. Did you see what time it was by the light of that lamp? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe enough of his person to be able to swear to him? - A. Yes, he looked at my face several times.

Q. Did you find your watch? - A. No.

Q. Did he follow you, or pass you, before he spoke to you? - A. He did not pass me at all, he came up to me, and spoke to me, my partner had stopped to make water then; he had a white flannel jacket on, and I observed that he was very much marked with the small-pox, and had black straight hair.

Q. And did you take such notice of his person as to be able to swear positively that he is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I had been drinking with my partner, but I was not drunk.

Jury. Q. How long was the prisoner with you? - A. Not above ten minutes.

Court. Q. Do you suppose, if you had gone twenty miles from London the next day, and seen him, would you have challenged him as the man that robbed you? - A. If I had met him fairly I could.

Jury. Q. You have stated that you were in company with the prisoner ten minutes; - A. I cannot say positively how long.

Q. How were the ten minutes filled up, were you standing in conversation with him? - A. No; I was waiting for my partner.

WILLIAM BROWN Sworn . - I am a bricklayer: The prisoner joined us in Cheapside, and took hold of Jones's arm.

Q.Was Jones sober? - A. No, he was not; he joined us in Cheapside, near Gutter-lane; we all three walked on together down Wood-street, till we got as far as Goldsmith-street, and there I stopped; while I was stopping, before I had done, I saw the prisoner running down Goldsmith-street as hard as he could run; Jones came running up, directly, without his hat or his shoe, he cried out,

my watch, my watch; I pursued the prisoner, and cried stop thief; I lost sight of him at the corner of Gutter-lane; he stumbled over a post there, and a young man, a box-maker, stopped him, and when I came up, I found him under that young man; Mr. Shepherd, the constable, came up upon my crying stop thief, but neither the young man nor he are here; the constable of the night is here; he was searched in the watch-house, and nothing found upon him.

Q. Was the man that you stopped the same man that joined you and Jones? - A. All I know him by was his white jacket.

Q. Did you yourself know that the prosecutor was in possession of a watch? - A. Yes; I saw it when we were both drinking together at the public-house in the Old Change; it had a gilt chain, a seal, and a key.

Q. Did you live together? - A. No, I was going to see him part of the way home into Featherstone-street, because he was in liquor; the prosecutor came up directly after the prisoner was taken, and charged him with knocking him down, and robbing him of his watch, but he made no reply at all that I heard; he was searched in the watch-house, but nothing found upon him.

Q.(To Jones.) Where was you when the prisoner first came up to you? - A. In Cheapside.

Q. Now you being in liquor, can you take upon you to swear that the watch was taken from you in the manner you have described? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure you fell from the blow, and not from the darkness? - A. No, he cut me over the eye.

Q.(To Brown.) Did you observe whether he had any mark over his eye? - A. Yes, he was grazed.

ROBERT SAINSBURY sworn. - I was constable of the night: On the 2d of this month the prisoner was brought in by one Brown, Shepherd, and King, the watchman; he was dressed in a flannel jacket, round hat, and whitish waistcoat, and black breeches; Jones gave the charge; he said, he snatched it out of his hand, and he said, that was the man that robbed him, and knocked him down; there was a little bit of a mark above his eye, and down his check bone; he was without a hat, and only one shoe; I searched the prisoner myself, but found nothing at all upon him; I had all his clothes off, and searched the linings of his clothes; Brown and Jones said, that the prisoner came up to them in Wood-street.

Prisoner. Q. Was not Brown drunk too? - A. No, he was rather freshish, but very capable of going about any business; Jones was very tipsey indeed.

HENRY KING sworn. - I am a watchman in Gutter-lane, and have been twelve years; I was coming on my beat, and saw Mr. Shepherd and Brown dragging the prisoner along the ground; we took him to the watch-house, in Newgate-street; the charge was for stopping Jones, and snatching a watch out of his hand.

Q. Did he say any thing more? - A. I heard no more.

Q. Did he say any thing about knocking him down? - A. Yes, he said that he knocked him down.

Prisoner's defence. On that night I was coming through Cheapside, and the prosecutor was lying very drunk with his head against the step of a gentleman's door, and several people round him, without either shoe or hat on; Brown asked me to lend him a hand up with the prosecutor, for nobody would touch him; I led him to the corner of Wood-street, and a man ran away, I thought he had got something from him; I let him go, and pursued the man, and in running after him I stumbled against a stone, and they brought me back to the watch-house.

Q.(To Jones.) What may the watch be worth? - A. About two pounds.

GUILTY of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-22

404. ELEANOR M'INTIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , a tin-box, value 1d. two combs, value 6d. a ticket, called a smart ticket, value 1d. and four Banknotes, each of the value of 5l. the property of David Fitzgibbons .

DAVID FITZGIBBONS sworn. - I am a labourer , but was a King's man: On the 16th of July, I lived at William Welch 's, in St. James's-street; I was a marine on board a 74-gun ship; I had my smart ticket in a tin box; I lost my property in Lisle-street , some time between two and four, I cannot exactly say; I was in company with the prisoner at the bar, she is a countrywoman of mine; I met with her in the street; I went in to have a pint of ale with her, and when we came out she put her hand into my pocket and robbed me; she spoke to me first, and was telling me about my friends in the country; I cannot think how she found out what my country was; I went in to drink a pint of ale with her, but did not sit down.

Q. How long had you been talking to her in the street? - A. She did not say any thing till she came into the house, only she asked me to go into the public-house to give her a drop of drink, we had no talk at all.

Q. What was the name of the street? - A.According to what they told me, it was Lisle-street.

Q. What drink had you together in Lisle-street? - A. No more than a pint of ale.

Q. When you left the house, did you agree to go together any where? - A. No, I did not; when we came out of the house, she put her hands in my right hand pocket, and took out my tin box and my discharge, and my notes.

Q. How do you know she took them? - A. By feeling her hands come out of my pocket, and turning the corner with them; I was hardly able to walk, and I could not follow her.

Q. Did you ever find those things again? - A. Yes, the next day, in Little Wild-street, as they told me the name of the street was; she produced my smart ticket out of her bosom to me, and with her pulling it out of her bosom, a five-pound note dropped upon the ground.

Q. Was that one of your five-pound notes? - A. I cannot tell; after that mother Malony put her hand down into her bosom, or some part, and pulled out six guineas, and two seven-shilling-pieces; she said, if she had her property again, she would not part with it, and I found one of my combs upon the table by the bed where she slept; it was marked so, that if all the combs in London were brought, I can swear to my own comb; there was Fitz marked upon it with a wire red hot; there was nothing else that I could swear to but my comb and my smart ticket. (Produces the smart ticket, it is read).

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Where was the last place I parted with you? - A.Lisle-street.

Q. What house? - A. No house.

Q. Was it not at the White-lion, in Broad-street, St. Giles's, where there were plenty of men and women? - A. No, in Lisle-street.

Q. Were there not two of your fellow lodgers with you? - A. No.

Q. What company were you in when I parted with you? - A. Nobody as I know of but yourself robbing me.

Q. Had you not taken other people into custody before you took me up? - A. No.

Court. Q. Nor suspected any body? - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not say that you dreamed at night that I robbed you? - A. No, I never dreamed it at night.

Q. Did you never say so? - A. I could see very plain with my own eyes that she robbed me.

SARAH MALONY sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, very well; I went to No. 8, in Little Wild-street, with William Welch and David Fitzgibbons; the prisoner was there getting on her clothes; the prosecutor went in before me about fifteen minutes; I saw a comb in his hand, it had some mark upon it, but I cannot read, I do not know that I should know it again, it was like pricks with a pin, or a fork; I asked her if she had any of this man's property, to give it to him; she said, she was determined to go and bring him what she had; at last, after we had persuaded her a great while, she put her hand into her bosom, and pulled out a smart ticket and a five-pound note; she let the five-pound note drop upon the floor; William Welch picked up the five-pound note; then she came up close to me, and put into my hand six guineas in gold, and two seven-shilling-pieces; it was not all in guineas, but to the amount of six guineas; I counted it out upon the table; after that I begged if she had any more of that man's property, that she would give it up to him; Fitzgibbons said, if she would give him his discharge, he would make her a present of the property; she said, if she had what she gave back, she would give none; she then went to the window, and out of the ledge of the window she took a paper, and flung it out in the yard; a little body that slept in her room went down into the yard; she came up again, and said, that there was no such a thing; William Welch and Fitzgibbons, and she and I, went part of the way to Bow-street; we met one of the officers coming for us, and then we went to Bow-street, and I know no more of it.

Prisoner. She would eat the print off the Bible, for she was jealous of me at one time, and would swear any thing against me.

WILLIAM WELCH sworn. - I am a chandler, in Market-lane, St. James's: I went to Little Wild-street on the 17th of July last, and knocked at the door, Fitzgibbons was with me, Mrs. Malony, and another woman, were below stairs, a lodger of Mrs. Malony's; the prisoner's bed stood across the door; I saw her there, and I told Mrs. Malony I wanted that woman; I said to her, how could you take this poor man's property and keep it all night, the poor man is almost raving mad; she asked me what o'clock it was; I told her I believed it was nigh ten; then she said that she was coming down with it, but she had forgot herself lying to long; she then pulled the blanket over her head, and hid herself for a minute, and then asked what I wanted with her; then Mrs. Malony came into the apartment, and the prosecutor, and she went upon her knees, and told her they did not want to prosecute her, but only to give up the property; then she totally denied it, and asked what it was that they wanted; I said, you had better give it up, for if you do not, I shall certainly go and get a constable immediately; I then went to a public-house to enquire for a constable; afterwards I went up again, and she said she would use means to know what right we had there; I then

desired her again to give up the property, or I would get an officer from Bow-street; then Mrs. Malony said it was very proper that I should see, and she went along with me to Bow-street, but there was no officer there, but they told me Potter would most likely be the first, and they would send him; I returned, and when they opened the door, now, says I, the officer is coming; she said, I am very willing to go; she went towards the window, and pulled something out of her bosom, which seemed to me, by what the woman said, to be a smart ticket, and, at the same time, the note dropped; I picked it up, and found it was a five pound note,(produces it); at that instant, she put something into Mrs. Malony's hand; Mrs. Malony opened her hand, and said, you hussey, do you think I will accept of any poor man's property; Mr. Welch, see what is there; I reckoned the money up, and found it to amount, altogether, to six guineas and two seven-shilling-pieces; then I was very happy that I had got so much of the money; she said to me, now Welch, I will swear a robbery against you; she then said, she was willing to go to Bow-street; I said, you shall go, for I will not quit you till you do; we went along, and met Potter, the officer, and they took her backwards to search her, but what they found upon her I cannot be answerable.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. In what part of the town did you see me and Fitzgibbons together? - A. At my door, about the hour of four o'clock, on the 16th of July, at the back part of the Opera-house.

Court. Q. How far is that from Lisle-street? - A. About two hundred yards.

Q. Did you know either of them before? - A. Yes, Fitzgibbons was my lodger.

Q.Had you known Eleanor before? - A. Yes, for years.

Q. Had they been acquainted together before that time? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Have you any reason to believe that they had? - A. No; I have no reason to believe they had, because the man is but lately come from sea.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see Fitzgibbons and me going into the public-house? - A. No, I did not.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am an officer; I received the comb from the prosecutor, by the direction of Mr. Floud, the Magistrate. (Produces it).

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner? - A. No.

Fitzgibbons. This is the same comb that the prisoner took from me, I delivered it to Donaldson.

WILLIAM POTTER sworn. - I am a Bow-street officer: I searched the prisoner, but did not find any thing upon her relative to this business.

MARGARET BEARDON sworn. - I live in Little Wild-street: The prisoner came to me to a public-house where I was getting a pennyworth of beer, at ten o'clock at night.

Q. Did she produce to you a comb? - A. Yes, she gave it to me; Fitzgibbons said it was his, and took it away.

Q.Did you observe any particular marks upon it? - A. No; I should not know it again.

Q. Did you see any smart ticket; I saw a paper in my room; she slept there that night.

Q.Had you any conversation with her that morning? - A. No; only about family affairs, of men and their wives.

Q.Perhaps, among those family affairs, there was something about Bank-notes? - A. No.

Q. Nor combs? - A. No; only she said she had been to her brother's; and she gave me a guinea, a pocket-handkerchief, and a pair of stockings; and this was in a public tap-room.

Q. How long had you known Eleanor? - A. Between ten and eleven years.

Q. How long before this time had you seen her? - A.Either a month, or five weeks; I cannot say exactly.

Prisoner's defence. The property is all my own, I beg to have my property; I had got a basket of strawberries upon my head, when I met with two of Mr. Welch's lodgers, and two of his lewd girls, for he keeps half a dozen tit houses; we went together with this Fitzgibbons and Welch, and the other lodger, to this public-house, and we had some porter; this prosecutor bought a pottle of strawberries, and put them in one of these girl's aprons; and when I went away, going along, I picked up a piece of paper, I could not read, and I showed it to a person of the name of Patrick Ryan, he desired me to keep it, for it belonged to some poor fellow; and the next morning Fitzgibbons and Welch came and used me very ill, and said I had robbed the old man; I went with them to Bow-street; they broke my box open, and used me very ill.

PATRICK RYAN sworn. - I am a house-keeper, in Dartmouth-row, Westminster, I am a marketman: I have known the prisoner ten years.

Q. Did she ever ask you to read a paper? - A. I do not recollect it.

Q. Did you ever hear of her picking up a paper in the street? - A. Yes; I heard that in Darmouthrow, and I heard it at Leadenhall-market.

Q. Who did you hear that from? - A. From some of the market men; she has talked to me about it since she has been at Clerkenwell, but I do not remember it. GUILTY (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-23

405. ELIZABETH HAYES was indicted for making an assault, in the dwelling-house of a person unknown, upon William Hawkes , on the 4th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 2l. 10s. two cotton handkerchiefs, value 12d. and a pair of leather gloves, value 6d. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM HAWKES sworn. - I am a gardener , at Stoke Newington, I am a married man: I met with the prisoner in Drury-lane, on Sunday the 4th of August, about one o'clock in the morning.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. Not quite sober; I had had something to refresh me, I had been to Covent-garden upon business; I met the prisoner, and another woman, nearly opposite Russel-street, in Drury-lane, they prevailed upon me to give them something to drink; I went into a public-house to give them something to drink, I had never seen either of them before; when I came out, they prevailed upon me to go home with them, and I consented to go; I went with them to Salutation-court, Broad-street, St. Giles's ; the prisoner clasped her arms round me and confined me, whilst the other woman, and she, rifled my pockets, and took out of my pocket a silver watch, two cotton pocket-handkerchiefs, and a pair of gloves; the other woman ran down stairs immediately afterwards, and called to Elizabeth Hayes to know why she did not come away; I stopped the prisoner, and called the watch, and the watchman came to my assistance, and took her to the watch-house; another watchman went up stairs to search the room, and I staid at the bottom of the stairs to watch the door; the watchman found this basket in the room, which belonged to me, tied up in a pocket-handkerchief, it has got two empty bottles in it: there was another pocket-handkerchief found in there, the watchman has it, she tried to drop it.

Q. Do you know whose room this is? - A. No.

Q. Did the house appear to be inhabited? - A. No otherwise than by lodgers; the prisoner took out the key, and unlocked the door up one pair of stairs.

Q. Look at the prisoner; is that the woman that you have been speaking of? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that pocket-handkerchief again? - A. Yes; there is no mark upon it, but I know it by the make of it.

SAMUEL LEDWICH sworn. - On Monday morning, the 5th of August, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the bar and the prosecutor, they stopped a few doors before they came to Drury-lane, in Broad-street, coming back from Salutation-court, where she lived; Hawkes called to me, and told me he had lost his watch, and desired me to take her into custody; I then called to the next watchman, Dalton, to take her; I went up to her apartments, and found a basket tied up in a pocket-handkerchief; I then took it to the watch-house, where I found her; she was searched, and I saw a handkerchief taken out of her pocket, it was a cotton one, and Hawkes claimed it in the presence of the prisoner.

Q. What sort of a house is this? - A. A lodging-house.

Q. Does not the landlord lodge there? - A. No, he does not; I know the landlord very well.

PATRICK M'CARTY sworn. - I am a watchman: I saw the prisoner searched, and she began to be shifting and hustling; this handkerchief was taken from her, (producing it); I saw it, and took It away from her, Hawkes said it was his handkerchief; he swore to it before the Magistrate.

Q. What did the prisoner say? - A. She did not say for or against, in my hearing; I have had it ever since.

JOHN DALTON sworn. - I met Ledwich, and the prosecutor and the prisoner, in Broad-street; he called to me, and delivered up the prisoner to me, and I took her to the watch-house; she sat there for half an hour, I saw her searched, and that handkerchief found upon her, the handkerchief was delivered to M'Carty; she denied that she had any hand in it, but what the other woman did she could not tell. (The handkerchief was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. My landlady's goods had been all seized, and this other woman asked me to go and sleep with her, she had this man with her, he offered me four shillings to sleep with me all night; I told him I could not, for I had no lodging of my own, and he gave this young woman a shilling to get some liquor, and he gave me the handkerchief; he began pulling me about, and pulling me upon his knee, and said he would leave these things, which were worth more than four shillings; and then he said he was robbed of his watch, and his handkerchief, and a pair of gloves, and he gave charge of me to the watchman; I have never seen any thing of this young woman since.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-24

466. WILLIAM PARKHURST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a metal watch, value 39s. the property of John Higginson .

JOHN HIGGINSON sworn. - I am a watch-maker , at No. 38, Southampton-street, Covent-garden: I missed a metal watch on Monday the 15th of July, I had some business at the Bank, I returned in about three hours time and missed it, I thought I had had the watch with me; I had seen it that

morning before I went to the Bank, I cannot say whether I had it with me or not, but I suspect I lost it from my shop: a lady came to my shop in her carriage, a Mrs. Goring, before I went to the Bank, to look at this watch, and the prisoner came along with her as her coachman ; she looked at it, and went away about thirty yards, into Maiden-lane, to a silk-dyer's; while she was gone, the prisoner came in to have a little job done to his own watch, it rested there for a fortnight, or three weeks; I received a letter, in consequence of which, I got a Bow-street officer, and had him taken into custody; I saw the watch again at Bow-street, on the 9th of September; I know the watch again, it has my mark upon it, my own name, and Southampton-street; there is a number, but I cannot say what.

Jury. Q.Did you make the watch? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have made a great many watches, I dare say? - A. Yes.

Q.How long have you lived in Southampton-street? - A. Between four and five years.

Q. And you have made and sold a great many watches? - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted, you put your name, and Southampton-street, upon every watch you have made there? - A. Yes.

Q. What kind of a watch was it? - A. A metal watch.

Q. After this lady had been with you, you went to the Bank? - A. Yes.

Q. And, for ought you know, you took it out with you in your pocket? - A. I cannot say whether I did or not.

Q. You knew where the prisoner lived? - A. Yes; he told me that very day, that he lived in Queen-Ann-street, West.

Q. I believe you went to his mistress's house three days after? - A. I went the very next day, to tell her what had happened.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there? - A. I do not think I did.

Q. I believe, in a few days after, Mrs. Goring went to Brighton? - A. I do not know any thing about that the prisoner went with her to Brighton; I did not imagine that he had taken it, because, being a gentleman's servant, it would be ruination to his character.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner subsequent to the time of your having lost your watch, and previous to his being taken up? - A. Yes, he came to my house.

Q. Did he not tell you that he had heard such a thing rumoured that was so prejudicial to his character, and he was ready to go with you to Bow-street, or any where else? - A. He did.

Q. Did he not actually put his horses to the carriage, and drive you, and the Bow-street officer, to Bow-street? - A. He did, to take his oath.

Q. How long was it before you found your watch again? - A. About a month.

ALEXANDER YOUNG sworn. - I live at Mr. Dean's, No. 133, Oxford-street: A man brought me a watch to repair for him.

Q. Is the prisoner the man? - A. I believe he is, but I cannot swear it.

Q. Have you any doubt about it? - A. No.

Q. Are you satisfied that he is the man? - A. I am.

Q.When was it that he brought this watch to you? - A. On Tuesday the 6th of August, about two or three o'clock in the day; he came in, and said, he would be much obliged to me to look at his watch, for it stopped, it was a metal hunting watch; I looked at it, and saw the watch had had a fall, or a shake; I asked him if he could leave it for two or three hours; he then desired me to lend him another hunting watch instead of that, he left me his watch and took another away with him; the watch remained there till Thursday the 9th, when the Bow-street officer came to me, and produced my watch that I had given to the prisoner, and I carried the other watch to Bow-street. (Produces the watch in question).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You told my Lord you could not swear he was the man, and yet you say you have no doubt he is the man; how do you reconcile that? - A. From circumstances.

Q. Then it is from circumstances that have transpired since that you are induced to believe he is the man, and not from a recollection of his person? - A.Certainly not.

Q. Was your name in the watch that you gave the man? - A. No.

Q. By what means do you know that watch? - A.There is the name of Russet in the watch.

Jury. Q. Do you know the number? - A. No.

Q. If any other person had got into possession of that watch, could the Bow-street officers know, from the watch itself, that it belonged to you? - No, by no means.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - I am am officer of Bow-street: On Friday the 9th of August, I went to Mrs. Goring's house, with Mr. Higginson, about half past eight, the coachman came to the door with the coach; I enquired of him for his boxes, he had left his mistress at Brighton a day or two before, I believe; I said to him, Mr. Higginson has lost a watch, do you know any thing of it; he said, no, he knew nothing about Mr. Higginson's watch; I found myself awkwardly situated with his carriage and horses; says I, will you swear that you know nothing of it before a Magistrate; he said, I will; says I, will you drive to

Bow-street, he said, yes, and then Mr. Higginson and I got into the coach, and we went to Bow-street; I took him into the Brown Bear , and told him I was an officer, and searched him; he stedfastly denied that he knew any thing about it, and in searching him I pulled this watch out of his pocket, which I thought had been Mr. Higginson's; I asked him where he got that watch; he said, he bought it of a servant, and gave three guineas for it, but he could not tell where the young man was, at last he told me where he had this watch, and where Mr. Higginson's watch was; I went up to Mr. Young, and ordered him to attend at Bow-street directly; he has the one watch, and I the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had some conversation with the prisoner-Now, upon your oath did you not make him some promise of favour, or use some threat? - A. I did not.

Q. You found the watch-maker's watch upon the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. And it was in consequence of the candid disclosure of the prisoner, where he got that watch, that you discovered Mr. Higginson's watch? - A. Yes.

Q. You were examined at Bow-street? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say that you gave the same account of it at that time? - A. Yes, if I was to tell the story twenty times over, I should not very it I am sure. (The watch was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Young. This is the watch that he left with me, and this other is the one that I lent him.

Prisoner's defence. I am very innocent of it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-25

407. ALEXANDER TISDALL was indicted for the wilful murder of John Giles , on the 18th of June .

ELIZABETH GILES sworn. - I am the wife of the deceased; I saw nothing of him on the 18th of June till after he was brought home.

- PRITCHARD sworn. - I live at No. 8, Battle-bridge, in the parish of St. Pancras ; I heard a great noise about twelve o'clock, and I came out to see what was the matter; I saw the deceased tumbling over into a ditch from the side of the White-house.

Q. Did you see what occasioned his tumbling? - A. No, I was not soon enough; I then went up to the deceased, and I saw him get out of the ditch, and there I saw the other man naked behind him.

Q. Was the deceased naked? - A. No.

Q. Did you know that naked man? - A. No, I could tell him if I was to see him again; he came out of the ditch after the other; the deceased got out and made away to the public-house door, and said, I have had enough, I will fight no more.

Q. How far might it be from the ditch to the place where he got up? - A. It might be six yards; then the naked man shoved him away from the public-house, I did not know who it was, and struck him many blows in the face with his fist, then a scuffle ensued; the deceased rather returned the blows as well as he could; ne'er a blow that I saw reached so high as his face, it was like pushing him away.

Q. How long did that last? - A. I suppose not half a minute scarce before one was down; Giles, the deceased, got the naked man down first.

Q. Did you ever see him afterwards? - A. Yes, twice at Hatton-garden.

Q. Look round the Court, and see if you see the man? - (Looks round the Court.) A. I cannot say I see him.

Q. Did you ever see that man at the bar before? - A. I see him now, I was looking down before, that is the man that I saw naked; Giles got him down, and they both got up again, and Giles said, he would have no more; after that, by pushing and hitting one another about, Giles was thrown into a bit of a gutter.

Q. Do you mean each pushing the other? - A. Yes, they did, as well as they could; I believe Giles was thrown into a bit of a gutter by the side of the road, after the deceased laid down, and some people round about said, d-n him, kick him, serve him as he served you; then three very heavy kicks across the body were directly given by his antagonist; then Mr. Olive came and took hold of Giles, and said, old brutality through the piece, then he took him to his house, and got him a bowl of water, he washed his face, and then the deceased turned his head round with great sagacity, and said, is nobody here? - Mr. Olive said, yes, I am here.

Q. You saw nothing more that passed between the prisoner and the deceased? - A. No, about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after that I followed the deceased to his own door in a chair; I left him at his own door, and saw no more of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What are you? - A. A shoe-maker.

Q. You saw this man kick the deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. He had nails in his shoes, had not he? - A. I cannot say.

Q.Have you not sworn that he had nails in his shoes? - A. No, never.

Q. The battle had begun before you first came up? - A. I know nothing at all about that.

Q. Do you mean to say you do not know whether the battle had begun before you came up? - A. I cannot tell that; the first I saw was, Giles, falling into the ditch.

Q. Then though you saw one man stripped, and another falling into the ditch, you mean to tell that Jury that you don't know whether the battle was begun or not? - A. How should I know whether it had, when I was not there.

Q. You are known at this public-house that you speak of? - A. I cannot tell that rightly, I go there sometimes.

Q. Then have you any doubt that they know you? - A. I cannot say.

Court. Q. Can you doubt whether the battle had begun when you heard the deceased say, I will fight no more? - A. I did not see any blows.

JOHN OLIVE sworn. - I am a painter and glazier; I live very high the spot where this happened; I was standing at my own door, when the prisoner and the deceased came out of a public-house, about twenty yards from the door of the public-house, it was on Sunday, the 18th of August; about twenty minutes past twelve at night, the deceased came out, and the prisoner and three others, which were the prisoner's acquaintances, as far as I know.

Q. Why should you suppose they were the friends of one more than the other? - A. I have known the deceased a great many years, living in the neighbourhood, but I never saw these other persons before; when they came out of the public-house, the prisoner went up to the deceased, and said, you kick my a-e, it is not in your power to kick my a-e; upon that the prisoner went and put his hand to the deceased's face, and struck him on the left hand side of his face open handed; he then gave him a push, and sprung back in a position to meet him; then the deceased struck him, and they enclosed together for about half a minute I suppose, they fall down, and the prisoner was undermost, about two yards from the public-house door, in the public street; the deceased struck the prisoner two or three times while he was upon the ground, and they he kicked the prisoner; they got up together again, and they fought togethere again, and fell down again; the prisoner fell undermost the second fall; I believe, after the second round, the prisoner stripped.

Q. Then up to this time, they had both their clothes on? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner strip? - A. No, he did not; then they enclosed again, and fell down, I cannot say which was uppermost; the third fall they got up again, and met together again, and they had hold of one another; the prisoner was striking over the head, and the deceased was striking over the body, and as they were fighting, they both fell into the ditch together; the prisoner at the bar came out of the ditch first; the deceased made towards the public-house door, the Northumberland-arms; it is called the White-house, because it is stuccoed; as soon as he came out of the ditch, the deceased said, he had had enough, and would not fight any more; the prisoner at the bar said, keep the door shut, do not let him go in.

Q.This was immediately upon their getting out of the ditch? - A. Yes, immediately; upon that some man went to put his backside against the door to prevent the deceased going in; upon that the prisoner went up to the deceased as he was standing at the public-house, and he struck him two or three times in the face, or about the head, I cannot exactly say.

Q. Was that immediately? - A. Yes; then the deceased kicked at the prisoner to keep him off; then they enclosed together again immediately, they did not fall that time, but they were parted.

Q. Were there any blows given when they closed? - A. The prisoner gave the deceased blows, but I did not see the deceased strike any blow; they were parted, and then they enclosed again afterwards, and fell down just by the public-house door, and got up again, and closed again, and they tumbled both together again, and the deceased was undermost, and laid across a drain; then the prisoner struck the deceased two or three times over the face while he was lying upon the ground, and the prisoner at the bar kicked him two or three times upon the left side; upon that there was some voice expressed, why do not you kick him, d-n you, kick him, serve him as he served you, kill him if you can.

Q. How many people might there be collected together at that time? - A. There might be fifty or sixty people, I cannot exactly say how many; I then took hold of him by the arms, and lifted him up; he walked about the space of nine or ten yards nearly to my own door, and I went down stairs, and got some water, and washed his face, and he attempted to wash his face as well as he was able; then my wife came up stairs; I asked him into my kitchen, he staid about a quarter of an hour, and while he was there, we washed his temples with vinegar and water; and while he was in my kitchen, he said, oh! that ditch, that ditch! and trying to utter it a third time, he said, dish; I saw such a change in the man's countenance, that I thought he was dying, and I got some assistance, and he was carrying home in a great arm chair to his own

apartments; I went soon after while the apothe cary was there.

Q. How long did he live afterwards? - A. I suppose he was dead before he got to his own house; the apothecary was trying all means to recover him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you mean to say that you saw him at the very moment they came out of the public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say there were not attempts made to prevent the deceased attacking prisoner; and that he did not tear the man's coat that attempted to prevent it? - A. I did not see any such thing; there was some person said to the prisoner at the bar, don't fight, for God's sake.

Q. Do you mean to say no such thing passed? - A. I did not see it.

Q. Did you ever go by the name of Sandman? - A. No, I am a little higher character than a Sandman too.

Q. The deceased was a taller man than the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. And a more powerful man? - A. I cannot say as to that.

Q. Was not Giles the most quarrelsome man in the neighbourhood. - A. I know very little of the man, except living in the neighbourhood.

Q. Had he not some ribs broke about three weeks ago in a fight? - A. Not that I ever heard, and I live close by him.

Q.Were you near enough to hear any expressions the deceased made use of? - A. No, I did not hear him make use of any expressions.

Q. Were you near enough to have heard him if he had? - A. I was standing at my own door.

Q. How many yards was this from your own door? - A. About twenty yards.

SAMUEL HOLSTOUN sworn. - This happened about twenty yards from my own house; they had just got out of the ditch when I came up; I saw the deceased go towards the public-house door; he got to the public-house door, and the prisoner called out, don't let him in. Giles received several blows from the prisoner; Giles then kicked at him, but where he hit him, I do not know; after that Giles rushed at him, and then down he was; then they closed, and had one another down, and the prisoner was undermost; then they got up again; Mr. Giles said, he had had enough, and would fight no more.

Q.Was that after they had fallen and got up again? - A. Yes, then the prisoner had at him again; they closed again, and fell down again; then they got up again, and closed again, and several blows were struck about the body on both sides; then the prisoner threw him down across the kennel; then somebody made answer and said, kick him, d-n him, kick him, serve him as he served you; kill him if you can, but who it was I cannot say; then Mr. Olive said, you will kill the man, and he took him out of the kennel, and took him towards his own door, and fetched a bason of water and washed his face; after that he called me to help him to get him home; he said, O Sam! I am very sick, let me alone a bit; then Olive and I got him into a chair; then Olive washed his temples with vinegar; his countenance changed very much, and I thought he was dying; he was not above three or four minutes in his own house before he died.

ANN OSBORNE sworn. - I came down just as they had got to the last round; I saw them both fall over the kennel; I saw the prisoner kick the deceased several times while he was down; I was very near them.

Q.(To Elizabeth Giles). Did you see any part of this fight yourself? - A. I know nothing of it till I was informed he was fighting; I got to him just as Mr. Olive was taking him into his house; I saw by his face that he was a dead man, and I came away.

Mr. BIRCH sworn. - I am a surgeon, I attended the deceased about ten minutes after his death?

Q. Did you examine his body to ascertain the cause of his death? - A. Yes; I found three ribs fractured on the left side, and one of them had punctured the lungs.

Q. What did you suppose, from your examination of the body, was the cause of his death? - A. Two of them were large ribs, and one of them a small rib, at a distance from one another; it must have been occasioned by a violent fall upon some very hard body or other.

Q. Could you judge from the appearance of the ribs whether it had been done recently, or any time? - A. It was undoubtedly a recent case.

Q. Did you observe any thing else that could be the occasion of his death, except these fractured ribs? - A. Nothing particular; there was no external appearance.

Q. Was there any blows that could occasion his death? - A. Not to any external appearance; there was just a scratch upon the surface, which appeared to me from a brick-bat, or something of that kind, but it was very trifling; if it had been been done by the fist or kicks, there would have been external marks of violence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. - Q.There were a number of brick-bats in this ditch, were they fell, perhaps you may know that? - A. Most undoubtedly there are.

Q. Did you attend the deceased in consequence of any injury he had received from fighting previous to this? - A. Yes, about three months ago.

Q.What injury did he then receive. - A. A trifling injury on the left side.

Q. Did you know enough of the deceased to know whether he bore the general character of a quarrelsome man? - A. He did by some people.

Prisoner's defence. I was in this public-house with an acquaintance, and the deceased came in with some ducks, and we were talking about the ducks; I said I had one larger, and he said it was a d-d lie, and began to quarrel, and insisted upon fighting; I paid my reckoning, and solicited my friend to do the same to get away from him, but he would follow me out, and then the accident happened.

For the Prisoner.

SAMUEL SAVAGE sworn. - I am a watchmaker in Peartree-court; the prisoner is a watchmaker; I went out with him on Sunday the 18th of August; he complained of being rather ill, and said he would take a walk; we went to the White-house at Battle-bridge, the deceased came in with two live ducks; I said you have got two nice ducks there; the prisoner said they were but small ones; the deceased said the prisoner could not produce better; the prisoner said he had a duck that would weigh eleven or twelve pounds; the deceased said, is it an English duck; the prisoner said a drake you know we call a duck, but it shall not be a Muscovy duck, it shall be an English duck; the deceased then pulled a half-a-guinea out of his pocket, and said, he would lay him half-a-guinea he could not produce a duck of such weight; then the prisoner said, I will lay you a leg of mutton and trimmings that I do; there went on an altercation between them, and I was in conversation with another person, a stranger to me, in the room, till I heard the deceased threaten to kick the prisoner's a-e, and the prisoner laughed at it, and said, it must be a man to do that; the deceased then went away, and took the ducks with him; then he returned again in the course of half an hour, or better.

Q. Did he return apparently in better temper? - A. Yes; when we were going away, the deceased said, now, you sh-n son of a b-b, where is your ten pound duck now? the prisoner said, he could produce him; says he you are a d-d liar, and I will make a liar of you before I leave you; I left the prisoner and the deceased together while I turned the corner; some person said your friend is a fighting, I then ran in between them, and said, for God's sake, don't go to fighting.

Court. Q.Had they closed when you interfered? - A. No, they had not closed; they were striking at each other; I did not see who struck the first blow; the deceased then got hold of me by the coat, shoved me against the wall, and told me to go along, or he would serve me the same, and tore my coat as you now see it; then they went to fighting, and had several rounds in their clothes.

Q. During these rounds, was there any foul play on the part of the prisoner, or on the part of the deceased? - A. After the deceased had got the prisoner down, he knelt upon him, and beat him in the face several times; he was taken off by some people that were standing by; they got up, went to it again, and he served him the same a second time; then I lifted the deceased off the prisoner, and they got up again.

Q.During all the time of the fight, did you see any unfair conduct on the part of the prisoner towards the deceased? - A. Not at all.

Q. If there had been any unfair conduct of the prisoner, towards the deceased, must you not have seen it? - A. I must have seen it.

Q. And you swear there was not? - A. I do.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. About three years; he is a very peaceable, quiet man.

Examined by the Court. - Q. Did you see them when they got out of the ditch? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the deceased go towards the public house door saying, he would have no more of it? - A. No; he might say such a thing, but I was too far off to hear that.

RICHARD RHODES , sworn. - I am a broker, No. 1, York-street, Pentonville.

Q. Did you know the deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. What was his character? - A. A very quarrelsome man; he wanted to lick me.

The prisoner called another witness, who had known him nine years, and gave him the character of a quiet, peacable, and humane man.

GUILTY of Manslaughter .

Confined one week in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-26

408. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for the wilful murder of David Brewer , on the 10th of November, 1796 .(The Indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp, and the Case by Mr. Const.)

WM. HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach. I live at No. 15, Cow-Cross; on the 10th of Nov. 1796, I was at the Sun public house in Cow-Cross ; there was a club there that night.

Q. How many persons were present? - A.Twenty and upwards.

Q. Was Dunn there. - A. Yes.

Q. Was a man of the name of Arnold there? - A. Yes; and the prisoner at the bar was there.

Q. Do you remember Toombs? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a quarrel? - A. Yes; Toombs fetched a watchman up and gave charge of Dunn.

Q. What was the name of the watchman? - A.Stephens, and there were two other patroles; upon that several took an active part, I saw Williams strike at somebody; the pots were thrown at the patroles, and they were followed down stairs into the street.

Q. What time was this? - A. Soon after ten; I then crossed the way to go to my own home; I then observed Williams standing in the road way, with a drab coloured coat on.

Q. In what manner did they come out; peaceably or otherwise? - A. They came out in a hurry; then they returned towards the Sun public house several of them, and knocked at the door, but I cannot name any one that knocked at the door.

Q. How long had they been out of the house before they returned to the Sun public house door? - A. More than a minute.

Q. What did you see of Williams at that time? - A. I did not observe him at all.

Q. Did they get into the public house at all? - A. They shoved up the window and got in.

Q. Did you hear them make use of any expressions at that time? - A. They called out for one Bill, a person, I suppose, they missed.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Lancaster? - A. Yes; his name was William.

Q. Was Lancaster in the house that night? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did they continue in the public house? - A. I suppose half a minute; it was a very short space of time.

Q. Did you see them come out the second time? - A. I did.

Q. What number of them were together? - A. About 12 or 14; they then went towards the Compasses a second time.

Q. Did you know any of them? - A. No; I did not; they then returned from the Compasses and went towards the watch house.

Court. Q. Is the Compasses a public house? - A. Yes.

Q. How far is the watch-house from the Sun? - A. About ten doors distance; when they returned from the Compasses, I observed Arnold, Dunn, and Williams; Dunn went first with Williams, on one hand, and Arnold on the other.

Q. Where there any more than those three persons? - A. I dare say twenty.

Q. Did you know any of those who followed? - A. Yes; I knew Parsons and Russel; I stood at the end of Red-lion-alley, about 40 yards from the watch house, on the opposite side of the way.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing what passed at the watch-house door? - A. Yes; I saw a mob at the door, and I saw one man seemingly striking with a stick; I thought it was at somebody that was within; I did not go any nearer; I then lost fight of them by some night carts, and I did not take particular notice where they went to after that, till I saw them return back.

Q. Can you name any of those you saw return back? - A. I observed Arnold and Dunn, but did not see the prisoner; they went then towards Peter-street, and there I lost sight of them; I saw a watchman standing at the end of Peter-street, of the name of Larcher; about ten minutes afterwards I went down Peter-street, and found Larcher all over blood; he appeared to me to have had a blow on the head with a stick; I saw, as if the skull was driven in, nearly as deep as the bowl of a table spoon.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What business are you? - A. A case-maker.

Q. You were a decent tradesman, and were at this Sun public house? - Yes.

Q. It was a club, perhaps, at which many decent people resorted? - A. If I had not gone with a tradesman I should not have gone myself.

Q. I believe every thing passed very peaceably till somebody tore Toombs's coat? - Yes.

Q. I believe you said upon the former trial, that you thought it was a frolic, and that Toombs was a very ill-natured fellow, to call the watchman and make that disturbance? - A. I did say so.

Q. After that, Dunn, Arnold and Williams, and a considerable number of persons passed towards the watch-house? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you have said it was impossible for you to say who were the persons that stopped at the watch-house and took an active part? - A. I did.

Q. And when you saw a number of persons returning you did not see Williams? - A. No; I did not.

SAMUEL RUSSEL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a patten-maker; I was a the club when the riot took place; the prisoner was there.

Q. Do you remember what passed about Toombs? - A. Yes; Toombs went away.

Q. Do you remember trying to prevent Toombs going away? - A. Not that I remember; the watchman came into the room and went to the left side of the room where Dunn stood; when they had got there, one of the watchmen said, which is the man that insulted you, Toombs; and he pointed to Dunn; he immediately went to collar Dunn, and Dunn put himself in a posture to strike him, and he did strike him, he knocked him down; then the watchman got hold of his collar and a scuffle ensued, and they were all up in arms directly, the people in the room with sticks and quart pots.

Q. Was Williams one of those that were up in arms? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they know he was the watchman? - A. Yes; he had his watch coat on; then there was a fight between Ryan and Dunn, and Williams got between them.

Q. Was this before or after the watchman had been knocked down? - A.Before the watchman came in; I then came down stairs and saw the watchman that had been knocked down upon the stairs; I got out of the house as soon as I could, and went opposite the watch house; I was so slurtied I cannot tell who came down before me or after me; I then saw Ryan and Dunn very plainly go into the watch-house; I then saw ten people or more in the road way; then I saw Williams near the door of the watch-house.

Q. Were you so situated that you could see what passed in the watch-house? - A. Yes; from the light of the lamps, and the door being open.

Q. Did you see Mr. Brewer, the beadle, that was killed? - A. No; there are folding doors; that door was not open where I suppose he stood.

Q. Was there any body so near the door as Williams? - A. Only Orrell; I saw a knife in Dunn's hand, it was a clasped knife open; I saw Ryan and Dunn go into the watch-house, and I saw them come out again; they pulled off their hats and holloaed huzza; at the time that Ryan and Dunn went in, Arnold stood on the same side of the way that I did, before me; the mob went down towards Peter-street; I saw the prisoner and Orrel, and Dunn and Ryan, and a good many more, I followed them to the corner of Peter-street.

Q.Whereabouts is the Compasses? - A. About the middle of Cow-cross; I saw the watchman that stood with one hand across the other, and I believe a lanthorn, and Dunn with the knife he had in his hand, cut him under the chin; his name is Charles Englefield; he then presented a knife to his body; upon that I holloaed out why do not you take the knife out of that man's hand, he has cut that man; upon which Dunn made use of the expression, you b-r, I will cut you, and put the knife at me; after that, finding he was cut, they went away down Peter-street, to Bull-head-court, about half way down the street; there, either the watchman, or the superintendant of the watch, sprung a rattle, and passed me again; when they came up, Williams, Orrell, Ryan and Dunn, and others sell a beating the watchman, a man of the name of Larcher, he is dead since; there was a boy under the shelter of a window said, for God's sake don't kill the man; after that, they turned down Peter-street again, and left a man there, and turning down Peter-street again, they turned up Saffron-hill, where there is a turnstile, and there was a gentleman in black coming along.

Q. Was Williams one of the party? - A. Yes; Williams, Ryan, Dunn, Orrell, and a vast many more; Dunn presented his knife at the gentleman's body, but I do not know that he received any hurt; I said, Williams, why do not you take the knife out of that man's hand; upon which, Williams said, who is that calls my name; I again repeated, why do not you take the knife out of the man's hand, where is the use of cutting people that do not meddle with you; he turned round to me as if he was going to strike me.

Q. Did he say any thing to you then? - A. No; then they went through Turnstile, Saffron hill; I observed Williams put his arm round Dunn, and whether he shut the knife, or whether Dunn shut it, I cannot tell, but it was shut, and no more mischief was done; they proceeded along Hatton-garden, and when they got to Holborn, they parted in threes and fours; Berry, Ostand, and Dunn, and a great many more, went down the hill, and others went up the hill.

Q. Do you remember any conversation before they parted? - A. Yes; they said that was the roller stick.

Q. What did you understand by that? - A. The patrol's stick.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were a witness at the time Arnold, Ryan, and Dunn were tried? - A. Yes.

Q. You have, to-day, sworn that Ryan, who was then indicted, went into the watch-house-Did you not also swear, upon the last trial, that he went into the watch-house? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Ryan was acquitted, was not he? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever been accused yourself of going into the watch-house? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, were you not taken up as one of the three men that went into the watch-house? - A. No; I was taken up to support the evidence of John Sharp .

Q. Then am I to understand you, that the purpose for which you were taken up, was to support the evidence of John Sharp ? - A. I understood that he was the Crown evidence.

Q. Am I to understand you to swear, that you supposed, the purpose for which you were taken up, was to support the evidence of Sharp, or to be a witness upon the trial? - A. To be a witness upon the trial.

Q. I ask you, did you think, at the time you were taken up, that you were taken up for the purpose of being a witness? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know that you were yourself charged with she offence, and taken up for the purpose of being prosecuted, and that you then offered to turn witness? - A. I was not taken up, I surrendered myself in every respect; I went to the Magistrates in Hatton garden, and was discharged.

Q. You told me, at first, that you were taken up, and that the impression upon your mind was, that you were to be a witness; upon your oath, did

you not believe, at that very time, that you were taken up for the purpose of being prosecuted? - A. I never was taken up, I went voluntarily to the office.

Q. You went to the office the next day after the affair, I suppose? - A. No; I was in my business, and when I found that I was inquired after, I was told some people had been there, and I went to the office, where Mr. Blamire was sitting, and that was in the evening, at Hatton-garden; I went by myself, and there was another that was at the club as well, one Howell.

Q. How long after the transaction did you go to the Magistrate's? - A. Three days.

Q. You did not go then the next day and give information of what you had seen? - A. No; I was about my business, in the bone business, such as they collect at butcher's, and cook's shops, for the grease.

Q. What are you now? - A. A patten-maker.

Q. How came you to leave the bone business? - A. I was indicted for a nuisance; but I served my time as a patten-maker.

Q. Have you been in any other business? - A. In the coal trade.

Q. Any other business? - A. No.

Q. Were you never a watchman? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been in prison, perhaps, upon this occasion? - A. Yes, before the trial, without seeing any Magistrate at all.

Q. Upon your oath, how many times have you been in prison? - A. I cannot recollect; I never had a charge of felony against me of any kind.

Q. You know what the meaning of felony is? - A. I should suppose it is for a robbery.

Q. For stealing any thing - now, you understand it, upon your oath, were you never apprehended upon a charge of that sort? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. I cannot take upon me to say.

Q. Do you mean to say, you cannot tell whether you were ever apprehended upon a charge of stealing any thing; have you never been in the custoday of one Joslin, a City constable? - A. Not upon a just thing, that was upon suspicion of stealing.

Q. Then how dare you swear you had never been in custody but upon this charge? - A. Never to have a proof of any felony against me.

Q. There was a reward advertised of two hundred pounds for apprehending one of those persons? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was there not a very large reward offered? - A. Yes, there was a reward.

Mr. Const. Q. You have seen advertisements struck up about the town, for a year and a half together, for the apprehension of this man a well as of others? - A. Yes.

Q. You were asked about some charge of felony; what was it, and what became of it? - A.Nothing came of it; I was discharged before the Alderman, at Guildhall, I was never committed upon it; I have been tried before Lord Kenyon, for taking a man's head-stall off, many times, when I was collecting the tolls, for things that I distrained, but I never was tried for any thing else.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you or did you not, for the purpose of being accurate as far as you could in giving your evidence, buy the printed account of the trial a few days ago; have you not been reading it over and over again? - A. I bought it for Mr. Jeffs, of Turnmill-street.

Q.Jeffs gave you the money then? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not said, that you pawned your own handkerchief for the purpose of buying it? - A. Yes; I did pawn my own handkerchief, and I bought those papers for myself, as well as for Mr. Jeffs.

Court. Q. What did you do with them? - A. I delivered them to Mr. Jeffs.

Q. Did you read them first? - A. Yes.

Q. For what reason? - A. I have been threatened to be shut, people have been nights and nights after me; people have met me in the streets, and swore they would set me aside if this man was convicted; I said, it is not my evidence that will do it, to satisfy you, says I, here is the paper to look at; the two numbers came to one shilling, and Mr. Jeffs paid me a shilling again.

Q. You say you surrendered yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. You heard that the officers were out looking for you? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you went to the Magistrate before the officers found you? - A. Yes.

Q. And that is what you mean by saying you surendered yourself, and was not taken up? - A. Yes.

JOHN SHARP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a dustman: I was at the club at the Sun public-house; the prisoner was there, and Dunn, Ryan, and a great many more, to the number of thirty or forty, the greatest part of them I knew; there was a man there appeared to me to be a stranger, he wanted to sing a song, and his singing of it did not please the company, upon which, Ryan and Dunn shoved him about, till they note the skirts of his coat.

Q. Was Williams there? - A. Yes, sitting still at that time; after Toombs's coat was tore, he was going away, and Williams said, d-n your eyes, stop, you shall not go out, and cried out, where is the poker; Toombs then got out, and fetched a watchman; two watchmen came up, either watchmen or patrols, and upon their coming up, there was a general scuffle among the society belonging to the club, beating the watchmen.

Q. Was Williams concerned in that fighting? - A. I cannot tell; I was shoved from the top of the stairs to pretty near the bottom; before I could get to the door, I heard either a pot or a poker rattling down stairs, and a great number of them coming down stairs; I went and stood in the middle of the road, in the centre of the door; I saw some patrols come running down; they proceeded towards the watch-house; I saw a great number of the society, that was at the club, come out afterwards; I saw Ryan, Williams, and Dunn, particularly, come out; they came out all of a shutter and confusion, they got into the middle of the road.

Q. How was Williams dressed? - A. He had a light coloured jacket on; then they missed one of the society, whose name was Goldsmith; the landlord had shut the door, and there was an outcry among the mob, where is Goldsmith; somebody cried out, they had fastened him in the house.

Q. Do you know who it was that said so from the mob? - A. No; then I saw Ryan, Williams, and Dunn, go and lift the window up next the door; I saw them get in at the window, and come out again at the door; one of them said, he was not in the house, but I cannot say which.

Q. Did any body else go into the house besides these three? - A. No; then one of the mob said, that Goldsmith was taken to the watch-house; then I saw Ryan, Williams, and Dunn, crying out, d-n their eyes, we will have him out again, if he is at the watch-house.

Court. Q.Who was it that made use of that expression? - A. I cannot tell; but it was one of the society belonging to the club; I then left the middle of the road and went on to the pavement.

Q. What became of them then? - A. They went towards the watch-house, Williams was one of them; I went to the watch-house, and stood opposite the watch-house door, as near the pavement as; could get; I did not see any body go into the watch house, but I saw three men come our of the watch-house, Williams, Ryan, and Dunn; Dunn had a knife in his hand, he appeared to be wiping blood off it, as it seemed to me; Williams was quite close along-side of him, and Ryan too; when they first came out of the watch-house, they pursued a man up White-horse-court, but whether they caught him or not I cannot tell.

Q.Before they pursued the man up Whitehorse-court, did Dunn make use of any expression? - A. Yes; he said, d-n my eyes, I have done it, I have done it, and whiped the knife on his hand.

Q. Was there any particular noise at this time? - A. After they came out of White-horse-court, they gave three huzzas, and the greatest part of the society joined them in hazzas, three times, as they went down Cow-cross.

Q.Did you see Williams there? - A. Yes, but with no weapon that I saw, Dunn had a knife in his hand; then they went as far as the corner of Peter-street, where there was a watchman ringing his rattle.

Q. Was Williams with them at that time? - A. He was; then Ryan and Dunn knocked down the watchman, and Ryan took his stick from him, beat him with his own weapon, and then took it away; Williams was there at that time; they then went down Peter-street, and up Turnstile, and there Samuel Russel called out Thomas Williams by name; then Williams called out, d-n your eyes, what do you mention names for; then Russel said, I will not call you by your name any more; then they went up to Hatton-garden, and down Hatton garden, till they got into Holborn, and then they turned different ways, and I went up Hatton-garden home.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were a witness upon the trials of Dunn, Arnold, and Ryan? - A. Yes.

Q. You gave the same evidence against Ryan then that you have done now? - A. Yes, as near as possible.

Q. And, notwithstanding that, Ryan was acquitted, was he not? - A. Yes.

Q. You were sworn before Mr. Floud? - A. Yes, and I was in liquor.

Q. What time in the morning was that? - A.Between twelve and one in the middle of the day.

Q. How far were you from Williams when you were examined by Mr. Floud? - A.Nearer to him then I am now.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Floud reading over to you the printed trial? - A.Without a doubt it might.

Q. Don't you know it was? - A. I cannot say whether it was or not.

Q. Did he not read it to you as your evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. In which you had sworn positively you had seen Williams? - A. Yes.

Q. Now, upon the solemn oath you have taken, did you not positively swear that you did not know Williams? - A. No, I did not; if I did, I was in liquor; I said it might be the man, but I could not call him to my recollection, being in liquor; but I had since perfectly recollected that that is the man.

Q. Do you mean to say, you did not tell the Justice you could not recollect, because you were in liquor? - A. I told him I did not know whether it was the man or not, till I recollected myself, and got sober; I was quite in liquor.

Q. Do you mean to say that you were so much in liquor that you did not know what was going

on? - A. I did not know what was going on; I have recollected myself since.

Q. Do you remember swearing that you did not know that he was the man? - A. I swore he might be the man, but I could not be positive.

Q. Have you ever seen him since? - A. No, only riding in the coach with him.

Q. Perhaps you have been in prison then? - A. Yes, nineteen weeks in all, before and now.

Q. Have you had the trial read to you since you have been in jail? - A. Yes.

Q. By whom? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you know Rittson the constable? - A. No.(Rittson called into Court.)

Sharpe. No, that is not the man that read the trial to me; he asked me if he should read it over to me again, and I said, no, I don't want to hear it.

Q. Williams was in a jacket, you are sure? - A. Yes, to the best of my rememberance.

Q. Not in a rough drab great coat? - A. No, it was a jacket, not so long as my coat.

Mr. Knapp. Q.From the time of this affair, till he was taken up, had you ever seen Williams? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Had you known him before? - A. Yes, perfectly well before that.

Court. Q. Was there any other person of the name of Thomas Williams belonging to the club? - A. Not that I ever heard of; I had often seen him at the Compasses where I resorted; when I was apprehended, I gave a description of him.

Jury. Q. Were you sober the whole of that evening at the Sun? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you, when you were examined upon the trial of Dunn and others, name a Thomas Williams as being present? - A. I did.

Q. Do you know any other person upon earth of that name? - A. I do not.

Q. Had you given his description before you were taken to Mr. Floud's? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you mention, upon the last trial, that you had seen Ryan all the times that you have now mentioned? - A. Yes.

HELEN WILSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach.

Q. What was your name in November 1796? - A.Cooke; I lived at Mr. Daniel's, the Red-lion, White-horse Alley.

Q. How far is that from the Sun public-house in Cow-cross? - A. About forty yards; about eight or nine, on the 10th of November, 1796, the first that I saw of it, was loomb's coming up Whitehorse Alley; he said he had been robbed at the Sun public-house; I went in again; I had not been in two minutes before I heard the cry of the murder; I went our again, and went to go down he alley, and the mob pushed me before them right into the watch-house; inside the door of the watch-house, there were six or seven in the watch-house, at that time.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; I have some knowledge of his face, being in the watch-house.

Q. What did you observe in the watch-house? - A. I did not see any thing in the prisoners hand in the watch-house; the first that I saw was Deputy, with a knife in his hand, he said, d-n his eyes, he had done him; Deputy and I came out of the watch-house together, and he took the skin off my ancle.

Q. What do you mean by taking the skin of your ancle? - A. He crossed his legs to throw me down; somebody called out in the street, mind the woman; he said he did not want the woman, he wanted the man; when, I went home, I met the watchman, Joseph Hobart, I asked him to turn back, and he would not; he had not gone many yards before he was knocked down.

Q. Did you observe who it was that knocked Hobart down. - A. I think it was Ryan; I lodged at Mr. Daniel's; I went to Mrs. Lewis's and found Mr. Brewer all in blood there; I said, Mr. Brewer, I am afraid you are killed; he said, I am afraid I am.

Q. Did you observe any thing farther? - A. No. farther than the mob giving three cheers in the street when they had done it.

Q. Did you observe the persons of those who gave the three cheers? - A. No; there were so many of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What line of life might you have been in at that time? - A. A widow woman; I went out washing for my living at gentlemen's houses.

Q. You seem pretty well acquainted with the names of these men? - A. Only from the names they gave themselves.

Q. Do you mean to say, that you had no other knowledge of their names than while you were in the watch-house? - A. No; I never saw them till I saw them in the watch-house.

Q. There was a considerable confusion in the watch-house, was there not? - A. Yes.

Q. It was a dark night, was it not? - A. No; it was a moonlight night, and plenty of light.

Q. How came you into the watch-house, curiosity, I suppose? - A. No; curiosity brought me out, but I was forced by the mob into the watch-house.

Q. I take it, for granted, you went next day and told the magistrate their names? - A. No; not for a week after, and then I was fetched, and obliged to go.

Q. Your own regard for public justice did not lead you to do it? - A. There was too bad an ac

cident in the house for me to go out and leave the house; my master got cut the same night, by my going out.

Q. Did you, when you gave evidence upon the former trial say, you knew Williams? - A. No.

Q. Do not you know what the oath was, that you took, to tell the whole truth? - A. Yes; and I have told the truth; I was not asked any thing about Williams.

Mr. Leach. Q. You were asked only about those at the bar? - A. No, I was not asked any questions about Williams, nor Ryan, only about Deputy.

Court. Q. Do you mean to say you are quite sure that he is the person that was in the watch-house, or only believe it? - A. I believe he is the person, I am most sure of it, I am sure of his face, his face is not altered the least in the world.

Q. Do you mean to repeat that to me, that you are quite sure of it? - A. Yes; I can say that I am quite sure of it, with a safe conscience.

Q. After being cautioned? - A. Yes, I was very cautious before I came here.

Jury. Q. Have you ever seen him before? - A. No, never.

Court. Q.Nor you have not seen him since? - A. No.

Q. Then the only opportunity you had of observing him was in the watch-house? - A. Yes, and there was plenty of light there.

ELIZABETH COLTMAS , sworn. - I lived at No. 15, Cow-cross, in Nov. 1796, next door but one to the watch-house. On the 10th of Nov. I was in my own house, shut up, I heard a great noise, and I went out into the middle of the road and saw a man at the tap of the Sun public house; I went to the watch-house door; Mr. Brewer was leaning over the half-hatch, and I told him of it; I then saw three men come up to the door, I thought it had been two patroles coming to bring a charge, but when they came nigher, I saw one of them had a knife in his hand; upon that they all three rushed into the watch-house; I heard a noise, but saw nothing, one of my friends then took me away home; I afterwards went out again, in about a minute, and said I must go and see what they have done; when I came to the watch-house door, I saw Mr. Brewer, standing by the watch-house door, covered with blood running down him, but before I had time to speak to him, twenty or more came up; I heard one of them say d-n my eyes, we will have him out.

Q. Had the three joined them at that time, or were they separate? - A. I cannot say upon that, they all rushed into the watch-house; then I went into my own home and saw nothing more.

Q. You could not distinguish any one person, I believe? - A. No.

Mr. RAMSDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a surgeon; I saw Mr. Brewer at St. Baribolomew's-hospital; he had received some wounds, one on the sore part of the top of his head, a second on the left side of his face, and a third wound, which I cannot, at this distance of time, describe exactly, but I believe it was somewhere about the shoulder-blade.

Q. How long did you attend him? - A. We had a consultation on the case on the Saturday, and I think he died in the course of that night or Sunday morning.

Q. From his appearance, what do you suppose to be the cause of his death? - A.Those wounds.

Q. He died in the Hospital? - A. Yes.

Q. That is in the City of London? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you any personal knowledge that St. Bartholomew's-hospital is in the City of London? - A. I have not.

Court. Q. With what kind of instrument did this wound appear to have been given? - A. Some sharp cutting instrument.

Q. Were they such, as a knife would occasion? - A. They were.

THOMAS WATTS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am the renter of St. Bartholomew's-hospital.

Q. Do you know where this poor man died? - A. I do not.

Mr. Ramsden. It was in the Sailor's ward.

Mr. Watts. The Sailor's ward is in the City of London.

FRANCIS BRANDRUM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach. I am a watchman in the parish of St. Luke's; I apprehended the prisoner about ten minutes before eleven on the night of Monday the 15th of July last, I think it was; I was going to shut up a house the corner of Old-street-road, the Pitt's-head, and I heard a noise under the Charter-house-wall; I immediately went to see what was the matter, and I saw a gentleman on horseback, who said he had been used ill by three men that had been in the cart; the prisoner was then behind the cart, and the three men being out of the cart, the gentleman gave me charge to take the cart to the Green-yard; I had not gone far, before Williams jumped into the cart again; as we turned the corner of Barbican, he tried to get the horse out of my hands, by twisting the reins; he found he could not do it; he jumped out at the right hand side of the cart, and came round the horse's head to me, and said, the cart should not go to the Green-yard.

Q. You took him, at length, to the Public-office, Worship-street? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. A gentleman charged him with the assault, upon which you had him taken up, and the next morning the same gentleman said, he

had been punished enough by being confined all night, and he was dismissed? - A. Yes.

Q. And then it was discovered that he stood indicted? - A. Yes.

JOSEPH STEVENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. In November, 1796, I was a watchman of St. Sepulchre's, I was called into the Sun public-house.

Q. Did you say who you were? - A. Yes.

Q. And you told them what you were? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. At the time you went into this room, there was no riot? - A. No, there was not at that time.

Q. The riot commenced by your endeavouring to take Dunn into custody? - A. Toombs came down first, and said, he had been ill used; I said to Dunn, have you done any thing with the man's property; and I had not said half a word, before Dunn knocked me down.

Q. You had no warrant? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am entirely innocent of the charge. Sharp swore before the Magistrate, that he could not swear to me; such people will swear any thing for the sake of the reward; I have been told there was a great reward for apprehending the people that committed this depredation.

For the Prisoner.

WALTER MITCHELSON sworn. - I am a watchmaker, joining the Curtain-road: I was before the Justice when Sharp was taken up.

Q. Did he appear to you, from his manner of speaking, and from his conduct, to be a man in his sober senses, and who knew what he was about? - A. I am firmly convinced, from the manner of his giving his deposition, he was perfectly sober.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. Eight or nine years; he is a good-natured, friendly man, and I have seen instances of his forbearance; I never had any reason to suppose him a man of a blood-thirsty or revengeful disposition.

The prisoner called nine other witnesses, who gave, him the character of a humane, peaceable man, and several of whom deposed that he had worked on his mother's premises from the time of the accident till he was apprehended.

The Jury having retired about half an hour, returned with a verdict of NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before.

Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-27

409. SARAH ROSES , otherwise ROSS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , a linen sheet, value 10s. the property of George Whingfield .

GEORGE WHINGFIELD sworn. - I keep a lodging-house near Temple-bar , and the prisoner was to lodge that night in my house with a man that she said was her husband; she said he was a gardener, and the next morning I went into the room and missed the sheet; three days after the sheet was brought to me by the pawnbroker; I know the sheet by two particular marks in the middle, and it is a remarkable large one.

MARY SULLIVAN sworn. - I am a washerwoman; I had the sheet to wash for Mr. Whingfield; I delivered it home on the Sunday that it was missed on the Wednesday; I never washed a sheet of the size and quality for these seventeen years in England; there is a mark of a figure of 3, or a Z, I do not know which, and two stains in the middle.

SARAH BAKER sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Whingfield; there are two stains in the middle of the sheet; I did not see any thing of the prisoner.

JOHN WILSON sworn. - I am servant to a pawnbroker, Broad-street, Bloomsbury; the prisoner brought a sheet to pledge on the 17th of July; I am sure that is the woman; she wanted six shillings on it, and we detained her; I have kept it till now; she was taken to Bow-street, and in about three days afterwards it was owned. (Produces the sheet.)

Whingfield. This is my sheet, I know it by the marks.

Sullivan. This is the same sheet, I never washed such a one in my life before.

Baker. I know this to be the same sheet.

Prisoner's defence. I have two children, it was given me by a man to make a little money of.

GUILTY . (Aged 46.)

Whipped in the jail and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-28

410. JOHN HANKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , two steel saws, value 6s. the property of John Vickery .

JOHN-VICKERY sworn. - I am a sadler , No. 10, Tyson-street, Bethnal-green : On Wednesday, the 26th of June, or early on Thursday, the 27th, I lost two saws from my shop; I missed them in the morning, I made enquiry after them amongst some pawnbrokers; I went to Mr. Cotton's, in Shoreditch, and found them pledged there; I saw the prisoner and the saws at Worship-street.

JAMES SMITH sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Cotton: On Thursday, the 27th of June, about five in the evening, Mary Nunn brought these two saws to me, and pledged them for four shillings; she had been a customer to me several years, and pledged articles of the same kind before. (Produces them.)

MARY NUNN sworn. - I am the wife of Ed

ward Nunn; the prisoner brought the saws to me on Thursday, the 27th of June, and asked me to pledge them for as much as I could, between ten and twelve in the morning.

Q. Was he an acquaintance of your's? - A. I have a knowledge of him by my husband's sister cohabiting with him; his wife drives a barrow, and sells fruit in the street, and the prisoner sells fruit; Mr. Vickery applied to me, and I told him I had pledged them.

Prisoner. I never gave her the saws to pawn.

Mrs. Nunn. He did, if I was upon my deathbed this moment.

THOMAS HAYWARD sworn. - I work for Edward Nunn, a turner; I went into the parlour on the 27th of June, and there was Hankins there, and the woman that he lives with, he had got two saws upon his lap; he then carried them into Mr. Nunn's shop, and laid them down upon the turning-lathe; I looked at one of them, and saw the name of Patterson, as I thought; it was a tenonsaw; he took up the saw again, and said, no, it is Harrison; I looked at the saw again, and found it was Harrison.

EDWARD NUNN sworn. - I am a turner; I was not at home at the time; I was the means of apprehending him, that is all I know about it.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; the prosecutor brought Mary Nunn in custody to our office; she had pledged two saws at Mr. Cotton's, in Shoreditch, for four shillings; I had the duplicate from her, but I have lost it.

Q.(To Vickery.) Did you apprehend Mary Nunn? - A. No, she went voluntarily with me to Worship-street. (The saws were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. When I went up stairs, these saws were lying upon the bench, there was nobody there but Mr. Nunn's sister; I took one of them to look at, that is all I know about them.

GUILTY (Aged 41.)

confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-29

411. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , a gold repeating watch, value 5l. 5s. the property of James Wilson .

It appeared in evidence that the watch had been left by the prosecutor in a returned post-chaise drove by the prisoner; that the prosecutor had offered a reward of two guineas for the return of it, which was paid to the prisoner, and the watch delivered up; that the prosecutor afterwards applied to the prisoner to get back his two guineas, but finding he could not, he preferred this bill of indictment. The Court were therefore of opinion, that, under these circumstances, the prosecutor had, by his own conduct, assented that it was no felony, and therefore directed the Jury to find a verdict of

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17990911-30

412. JAMES JONES and THOMAS POWELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , seven plain gold rings, value 30s. and two gold mounted seals, value 9s. the property of Hector Essex .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM EDMUNDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Mr. Essex, in Bridge's-street, Covent-Garden ; the first time I saw the prisoners, was the 9th of July, about half past seven in the morning; they came to look at some gold rings; there was nobody in the shop but myself; I shewed them some gold rings; they were fastened to a velvet block; I do not know how many it contained; they did not buy any thing; they said they had no money, and they would call again; the next morning, the 10th, James Jones dropped a sixpence down the area; he came in and asked me to get it; I rung the bell for Mr. Webb to come down, and I told him I would go and look for it; he came down to the bottom of the stairs while I went to look for the sixpence.

Q. Did the situation, in which he was, command a view of the shop? - A. Yes; I delivered the sixpence into the hands of Jones in the shop; he remained in the shop while I fetched it; I did not see Powell at that time; then he went out, and in two or three minutes both of them returned; there was then nobody in the shop but myself.

Q. Were they able, from the outside, to observe whether there were more persons in the shop than one? - A. I do not think they could; Jones asked to look at some gold rings, the smallest we had; then I pulled out the fancy-ring drawer; they said, they were not the kind they wanted; then I put in the drawer immediately, and shewed them the other plain gold wedding-rings, which I shewed them on the block; then Jones bought one of them for 4s. and paid for it; he then asked to look at some gold seals, which we kept in a drawer; I shewed them some gold seals; they did not like them; and then they enquired after silver seals, and we had not any; then they went out.

Q. During the time you were serving these people, was there any other person in the shop but yourself? - A. No.

Q. Had you served any body before with rings? - A. No, never with these kind of rings; my bro

ther John came down in about two or three minutes, and missed the rings.

Q. You were not accustomed to serve in the shop? - A. No. On Saturday, the 13th, they came again; Jones came in about half past seven in the morning, and asked me if I would take some halfpence for silver; he then stepped to the door, and called Powell in; there was nobody in the shop but me; he asked for gold seals.

Court. Q.Did you take any halfpence? - A. No; Powell was looking at some gold seals, and Jones was counting out the halfpence; afterwards Powell went all round the shop, and looked towards the parlour, as if he wanted to see if there was any body there; then presently my brother came out, and shut the street-door, so that they could not get away, and they were taken; we never found the rings or seals again.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. (Counsel for Powell.) Q.Jones came on one of the days, the 10th, by himself? - A. He came in first, and called Powell in; he was in the shop about two or three minutes.

Q. Where was Webb? - A. At the bottom of the stairs.

Q. Had you been present either when you or your brother, or any body else, had taken an account of the goods in the shop? A. No.

Q. You did not know how many rings there were in the shew-glass? - A. No.

Court. Q. Who served in the shop the whole of the 9th of July? - A. I served nobody but them.

Q. Do you know how many customers came in that day? A. No.

Q. You did not shew any body else any rings? - A. No.

Q. Who served in the shop besides yourself that day? - A. Mr. Essex; my brother was very ill in bed that day; Mr. Essex served in the shop on the 10th.

JOHN EDMUNDS sworn. Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On the 10th of July, about a quarter before eight, or thereabout, I came into the shop, and saw some money lie upon the back counter, it was 4s.; he told me what had passed, and I immediately looked at the block of gold rings; I had not seen it for two or three days, for I had been confined to my bed; I compared the rings with the entry-book, which is here; we enter them in the book, and tick them off when they are sold; I missed eight rings, one sold, and seven that were stolen; and then looked at the seal drawer, and I examined the entry-book, and compared them, and found two missing; I had not taken any particular notice of the seal drawer before; the block of rings was full two or three days before, excepting four; it holds forty-eight; I communicated this to Mr. Essex, and, in consequence of his directions, I watched for these people again three mornings successively. On Saturday, the 13th, they did return again between seven and eight in the morning; my brother was in the shop; I was in the parlour; I rung the bell for Mr. Webb to come down and assist me; I saw Powell come round and look into the parlour; he looked over the curtain at the parlour window; I did not think he saw me, but he appeared very uneasy; then I went out to the passage door, and went round and shut the street door, and secured them within; I locked the street door, and I had provided myself with a pistol in case of resistance; I came up immediately, and laid hold of Jones, with a pistol in my hand; he wanted to know what I was about; I told him I knew perfectly well what I was about, and he knew perfectly well too; Jones made no resistance at all; he did not attempt to go away; Powell did resist; Mr. Webb was with me, and had a pistol also, and I told him, if he made any further resistance, I should certainly be under the necessity of discharging my pistol; he had endeavoured to wrench the pistol out of Mr. Webb's hand; I threatened him, and then he submitted.

Q. You never found the seals nor the rings? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Is your's a shop of considerable business? - A. Pretty well.

Q. You had been ill at this time? - A. Yes; I believe I was three days that I had not been in the shop; I had been in the parlour by the shop.

Q. Had you the custody of the things in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Before you were ill, were you present when an account was taken of the things in the shop? - A.Within a month before I had made an inventory of all the articles in the shop.

Q. That is a time when the town is pretty full? - A. No; it is a time when the town is pretty thin.

Q. I take it, in the course of that month, a great number of customers must have been in the shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you suppose half a dozen, upon the average, per day? - A. Yes; I dare say there were that.

Q. Will you satisfy the Jury, whether the articles might not have be sold or lost from your shop in the course of that month? - A. The rings were there three days prior; the seals I am not so positive of.

Court. Q. Do you speak of the number of rings that were on the block three days before from recollection of the number, or do you compare them with any entry? - A. From recollection.

Q. Did you number the vacancies upon the

block, occasioned by so many being off the block? - A. The vacancies are always left at one corner.

Q. Do you mean to say, that that is the practice of every body else? - A. Yes.

HECTOR ESSEX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This shop, in Bridges-street, is your's? - A. Yes: On the 10th of July I was made acquainted with this loss, but I cannot exactly say what part of the day.

Court. Q. Do you recollect whether you were in the shop on the 9th? - A. Yes, I might, just to see that things were right; I examined, and found deficient eight rings and two seals; one of the rings was accounted for as being sold.

Q. Was that one accounted for in the book? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it the practice of your shop to enter these articles as they are sold? - A. Yes, in the entrybook, when they are sold; and in the course of time, when we can get an opportunity, we tick them off in the stock-book; I directed that these people should he watched, and I actually watched myself two mornings; I went up every day as much as I could, while John Edmunds was ill.

Court. (To john Edmunds.) Q. Did you serve in the shop any part of the 9th of July? - A. I do not think I did; I was in the parlour frequently, but my leg was so bad, that the surgeon desired I would let it remain as quiet as possible.

Court. Q. But you had your eye upon the shop? A. Yes, I could see every transaction that was done perfectly.

- WEBB sworn. Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I did not serve in the shop; I know nothing but of the apprehension.

Powell's defence. When the gentleman put the pistol to my breast, I said, what have you got doing; upon which Mr. Edmund's said, you villains, we have got you; the man's hand that held the pistol to my head trembled so, that I desired him to hold it a little lower, for I was not going to make any resistance; I came from Birmingham, and was only in town three weeks.

Jones's defence. If I had had a notion of stealing, I should not have gone again a second time.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-31

413. ELIZABETH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , two steel watch chains, value 6s. and twenty yards of silk, value 30s. the property of William Henbethel .

WILLIAM HENBETHEL sworn. I am a hairdresser , No. 4, Charlton-street, Marybone; I keep the house, but only occupy the shop and parlour; the prisoner came to nurse my wife when she was ill; I missed the property on the 19th of July; I saw them again the next day in the possession of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Your wife and the prisoner have been on good terms, I believe? - A. I believe they have.

Q. Do not you believe your wife might have given her property? - A. How is it possible for me to believe what I do not know.

Q. Now, do you not really suspect that your wife gave it to her? - A. I should have a very indifferent opinion of my wife if I thought so; she was a good woman.

Q. How long had you seen her with these things that you have charged her with taking; how many times has she shewn it you? - A. She has not shewn it to me at all.

Q. Has she not spoke to you about the persons that she should employ to make it up into a gown? - A. No; nothing of that kind.

Q. You have visited her frequently, have not you? - A. No, I did not know where to find her.

Q. I believe there has been a little bit of cookery in this business; do you know any one of the witnesses, who has been prompting the others what to say; have they not been instructing each other what to say? - A. Not in my hearing.

Q. You and this lady at the bar were not upon very sociable good terms; did you never endeavour to win the lady over to become Mrs. Henbethel the second? - A. I have been a dying man these four years.

Q. I want to know if you have not been a dying swain, as well as a dying man? - A. I have had the asthma four years, the yellow jaundice twice, and the dropsy once.

Q. I fancy you wanted to get this lady's yellow coin; have you not now been endeavouring to win over this lady's affections? - A. No.

Q.Nor her sister's, in case she should not consent? - A. Her sister I have a respect for, and had before my wife died; she is about my own age; I felt myself very awkward as a single man.

Q. So do I; and you wished to change your condition? - A. Not with her; she had the yellow jaundice too.

Q. Then I think there could not be a better couple come together; you would be a better match for each other? -

Court. Q. How long were you robbed after your wife's death? - A. I missed it the very same night; I had seen the silk in the box after she died.

Q. What day was it your wife died? - A. I think it was the 16th; I told the prisoner I wished she would go with me to Marlborough-street.

Q. For what? - A. To be searched.

Q. What property did you charge her with stealing? - A. The silk and the watch chains.

Q. Is the prisoner any relation to your late wife? - A. She was her niece, as I have been informed.

Q. Don't you know whether she was or was not? - A. Yes.

SARAH BADHAM sworn. I lodge in the prosecutor's house; I take in washing; the prisoner at the bar washed some silk, and asked me to take it to be mangled; it was a raven grey, or a black, I am not sure which; she said she would go with me, and turn the mangle for me, and I did; it was on a Saturday morning; I cannot tell what day of the month it was.

Q. Was it after the death of the prosecutor's wife? - A. Yes; she said it was some silk that she had given her by a lady she lived with; I cannot tell whether it was this silk that she said she had given her, or whether it was some silk that she had to make up a gown; after it was mangled, she said, Mrs. Badham, I believe I have not got all my silk; she counted it, and, I think, there were either twelve or thirteen breadths.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had you known her before? - A. I have seen her once or twice; Mrs. Henbethel always told me she was her niece.

Q. The prisoner told you she had it from a lady that she had lived with; had it not the appearance of having been part of a court dress? - A. No, I did not take any notice of it; she told me she had given the silk to her aunt to take care of for her, and that she was to have a petticoat off of it.

Q. The prisoner lived in the prosecutor's house? - A. Yes.

Q. And she gave it to you, publicly, in the prosecutor's house, for the purpose of being mangled? - A. Yes, but not in the presence of the prosecutor.

Q. Did she make any secret at all of it? - A. Not the least in life.

- sworn. I lodge at the prosecutor's house; all I know about the silk is, Mr. Henbethel came to me with a bundle of silk, and said -

Q. Was the prisoner present? - A. No.

Q. Do you know any thing else about it? - A. No.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn. I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street; on Saturday, the 20th of July, the prosecutor brought the prisoner to me, at the Marlborough's Head, in Malborough-street, and gave me charge of her for robbing him of silk and watch chains; the prisoner had a large bundle in her custody, tied up in an apron; I took the bundle from her, and searched it, and found this piece of silk (producing it); the prosecutor said it was his property; I asked her where she got the silk; and she said, she got it from the silkdyer's; I said it would be material for her to send for the silk-dyer, as that would be of great use to her before the Magistrate; then she said she had the silk from some place in the country; I then searched her pocket, and found two steel watch-chains; the prosecutor said they were both his; she said, no, only the small one; I then asked her where she lodged; and she said she had had no lodging for two or three nights.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you recollect her saying she had it from her mistress, in a place that she lived in the country? - A. I do not recollect that; I know she said she had it from some county in England, I forgot what.

Q. You did not know the prisoner before? - A. No; nor the prosecutor.

Q. Were you ever present when any conversation has been had with the prosecutor, or any friends of his, to endeavour to settle this? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever hear, either from the prosecutor or the prisoner, that the prosecutor had sent friends to settle it? - A. I heard the prosecutor say, he had got a letter to compound it; indeed I have seen the letter myself; that was, I think, on Friday last, since we have been at the Old Bailey.

Q.(To the Prosecutor.) Do you know, of your own knowledge, whether that is the same silk that belonged to your wife? - A. She had a great deal of silk in her box; but I can swear that this is the silk, I saw it three times in the box after my wife's death.

Q. How do you know that to be the silk that was in your wife's box; - suppose I had produced that piece of silk at York, could you have sworn that that was the piece of silk that came out of your wife's box? - A. No, by no means; it is impossible.

Q. Then how do you know that this is the same silk? - A.Because I saw it three times in my wife's box.

Q. Now look at the chains? - A. These chains were in the same box; one of them I know perfectly well, for I had worn it fourteen years; I had put it by because it was broke.

Q. Were these seals upon them at the time you lost them? - A. They were not on them, but they were in the same box, lying in the same paper, I had put them by; I am not such a buck as I was fourteen years ago, I wear a piece of ribbon now.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did your wife keep her box locked up? - A. Yes, to a certainty, for I myself tried that.

Q. How lately before your wife's death had you seen the chains? - A. A very short time.

Q. Where was the key of the box kept? - A. In a private place, where my wife and I knew where to find it.

For the Prisoner.

ANN MATTISHALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor? - A. Yes; the prisoner attended his wife to nurse her.

Q. Did you know the prisoner to be in possession of any silk previous to the time that this poor woman lay ill? - A. Yes; a silk night gown, a petticoat, and some dyed silk.

Q. What was the colour of the dyed silk? - A. A sort of French grey, or a raven grey; I have a piece of it in my pocket. (It was produced, and corresponded exactly).

Q. Do you know any thing about any chains? - A. No.

Q. Do you know of any quarrel between the prisoner at the bar and the prosecutor? - A. No, I never heard of any.

Q. Do you remember the poor woman that died? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner was ever paid for nursing her? - A. No, she was not.

Q. Do you know of any gifts from the poor woman to the prisoner for nursing her? - A. No.

Q. Were you frequently going backwards and forwards to their house? - A.Frequently.

Q. Do you know any thing else about this business? - A. I know the silk perfectly well.

Q. Had you seen the silk in the prisoner's possession at the prosecutor's house? - A. No.

Q. Before the death of his wife? - A. She died on the 15th of June, and I had seen it in the prisoner's possession on the 6th of June.

Q. Did she ever make any secret, or concealment of it? - A. No; she has called upon me several times; I have lived with the honourable Lady Duncan twelve years.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. Twelve years, and better; she was cook at Mr. Rice's seven years; she always bore a very good character.

Court. Q. Did she ever tell you where she got it? - A. That she bought it of a lady's maid at Mr. Rice's.

MARY MATTISHALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am sister to the last witness: I know both the prisoner and the prosecutor; the prisoner attended his wife when she was ill.

Q. Were you in the habit of going backwards and forwards to her while she was nursing her? - A. Yes.

The Jury declared themselves satisfied, and immediately pronounced a verdict of NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-32

414. THOMAS LYNE stood charged with the crime of manslaughter upon the Coroner's Inquestion.

RICHARD YORK sworn. - I am a carpenter, in the parish of St. Sepulchre's: I was at work for Isaac Brooke, a master carpenter who was at work for Mr. Lyne the prisoner; the deceased was a fellow workman with me, he was there on the afternoon of the 30th, there were some words between Mr. Lyne and Houghton , the deceased, about some wood.

Q.Were the workmen allowed the waste wood and chips, or were they allowed beer in the room of it? - A. Lyne charged Houghton with giving the old wood away; and he said, as he had given away the wood he would take off his allowance of the beer; Houghton denied that he had given any away; Lyne said, he would knock his d-d old head off.

Q. Was Houghton an old man? - A. Fifty-five years of age, and rather hard of hearing; Houghton said, then let it be now; Lyne stripped off his coat immediately, and his hat, and they fell to blows immediately; it did not, altogether, last above two minutes.

Q. Did you observe any particular effect from any particular blow? - A. I observed one particular blow, which did not seem to affect the man much, it made him stagger; Lyne was first down; Lyne said, do not strike me when I am down; Houghton answered, I will not; Lyne then got up again, and they had another round; Lyne was driven into a corner, in a leaning position, that he could not well move, rather inclining to fall; he said, Bruce, I have got the rheumatism, I cannot strike; Bruce went to part them, and said, come, come, here is enough of this, put on your coat again; they parted, and the man went to the bench, and statted the heads of some nails.

Q. Did they part friendly then? - A. Yes, quite so; I thought the deceased had the best of it; he took the nails and went into the next house, where his work lay; about five or six minutes after that, it could not exceed ten minutes, some person came to me, and said, your partner is very ill; I went to him, and spoke to him, but he made no answer, he seemed to be quite ill; and I took him to St. Bartholomew's Hospital.

Q. How long did he live after that? - A. About a quarter of an hour.

JAMES LAWRENCE sworn. - Q. Do you remember a person in St. Bartholomew's Hospital of the name of Houghton? - A. Yes, on Friday the 30th of August.

Q. You were the dressing pupil of Mr. Blick, one of the surgeons of that Hospital? - A. Yes.

Q. You were called upon, and it was your duty,

to attend to the state of the man? - A. Yes; I found him very much convulsed, with a very great depression of breathing; I did not observe any external marks of violence, except a little skin rubbed off a part of the leg, and also the small of his back.

Q. Did you examine his head? - A. I did; there was no appearance of violence upon the head.

Q. Upon opening him, can you take upon yourself to swear, that his death had been occasioned by any species of violence? - A. I cannot take upon myself to say so.

Q. Is it your opinion that his death might have been occasioned without any violence, or any circumstance that you can lead to as the cause of his death? - A. It might.

Q. Can you state the real cause of his death? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. There was no appearance of violence that, in your judgment, could occasion the death? - A. There was not.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-33

415. SAMUEL CHAMPNESS and WILLIAM HILL , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of - Samuel Richard Gunnell , Ann Crucifix , spinster, and others of his family being therein; about the hour of one in the day, of the 21st of August , and stealing two silver table spoons, value 20s. two silver fast spoons, value 4s. and a silver tea spoon, value 2s. the property of the said Samuel- Richard Gunnell .

SAMUEL-RICHARD GUNNELL sworn. I live in College-street, Westminster . On the 21st of August, I lost the property in the indictment; my sister was in the house, Miss Crucifix, I can only prove the property.

ANN CRUCIFIX sworn. I live in the house with Mr. Gunnell, as part of his family; there was one servant at home with me; I had been up stairs about one o'clock in the day, on coming down, I heard some glass shake on the side-board, in the front parlour; I then went to examine the parlour and saw a man looking over the rails; there were blinds to the window, and they were open; I went into the parlour and saw a man standing in the parlour; I had never seen him before, but I am sure I should know him again; the prisoner Hill, is the man; I asked him what he wanted there; he said, is the gentleman of the house at home; I asked him what he wanted with the gentleman; I do not recollect that he made me any answer; I turned round to look at the side-board and missed some spoons; I had put the spoons there myself in the morning; two table spoons, and two salt spoons, and the servant had put one tea spoon, which I saw there; the sash was opened, and the man at the rails called to the man in the room, and told him to knock me down.

Q. Was the sash open before, do you know? - A. I rather think it was; I then let him pass me, and I let him out at the street-door.

Q. Then he did not offer any violence to you? - A. No; there was a butcher just by the window; I desired him to stop the man; he was brought back again in about a quarter of an hour; two men were brought back, but I only knew one of them, that was the man that was in the parlour, Hill.

Q. Were they searched? - A. Not in my presence; I saw all the spoons at the Magistrates about a week after

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. (Counsel for Hill.) Q. This man was a perfect stranger to you? - A. Yes.

Q. How long might you have been in the parlour; about a minute perhaps? - A. I should think it must be more.

Q. And from this momentary observation will you venture to swear that he is the man? - A. Yes.

HENRY HARRISON , sworn. - I am a butcher; as I sat in my own counting-house, I saw a man get in at Mr. Gunnell's window.

Q. Had you observed the window before? - A. No; I live facing the end of the street.

Q. What sort of railing was there before the window? - A. A wooden railing; plain at the top, without any spikes; after the man was gone in at the window, I immediately saw Champness cross the street; I have known him many years before; he leaned with his arm upon the rails, while the other got in.

Q. Do you know enough of the room, to say, whether a person standing at the window could see into the room? - A. Yes; all over the room.

Q. Had you seen Champness or the other man, before he got in at the window? - A. I saw Champness (it might be eight or ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before, I believe) with the other man, for there had been an alarm before; in consequence of that, knowing Champness, I looked out, and saw Hill get in at the window, and Champness standing against a wall opposite, belonging to Doctor Swaby; I then ordered my man to go and assist, that my neighbours might not be robbed.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not know any thing of Hill before this day? - A. No.

Q. And how long might you have seen him on that day? - A. I never saw him in my life, to my knowledge; I did not see his face then.

THOMAS FINCH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Harrison; I was desired by my master to knock at Mr. Gunnel's door, to prevent their being robbed,

but I did not like to do it, because there were two of them; I went down College-street.

Q. Did you know any thing of either of them before? - A. I had seen Hill before, I did not know Champness; he was then standing at the rails; that is the man (pointing to him); Hill came out at the door just as I got to the house, he was in a snuff coloured coat, that is the man; Champness moved from the rails when Hill came out.

Q. How near together did they walk down the street? - A.Within a few yards.

Q. Did they speak to each other? - A. That I cannot say; I followed them; Mr. Wilkinson took hold of Hill.

Q. Did any body take hold of Champness? - A. Yes, Mr. Wilkinson, and let Hill go in consequence of a blow he received from Champness; I took hold of Hill, and held him till I got some assistance, and brought him back to Mr. Gunnell's house; in running after Hill, I left them taking care of Champness; as I was going after Hill, I saw him throw some property away; I was within a few yards of him in Bennet's-yard, going out of Tuston-street; he chucked it over some palings; I did not see what it was that he threw away; I went back to look after the property, and could not find it; in about half an hour, or less, Mrs. Sherry brought some property to Queen-square; I cannot say what it was.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have told my Lord, that you saw Hill throw away something? - Yes.

Q. Have you always told the same story? - A. Yes, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. What distance was it from the prosecutor's house? - A. About a quarter of a mile, or not so much.

Q. Did you not lose fight of him? - A. Yes, just where he turned the corner.

Q. Did you never tell the officer, that you did not see him throw any thing away? - A. No, I did not.

JAMES FALKNER sworn. - I live in Bennet's yard, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Gunnell's house; as I sat at dinner, I saw two men run across the window, about one o'clock; as soon as they ran past the window, I heard something drop upon the stones; my wife went out, and I looked out at the window, or the door, I am not certain which, and I saw a spoon lying there, before she could pick it up; it was a table spoon.

Q. She was not out of your fight at all before she brought in? - A. No, she was not; she gave it to me, and I gave it to her again; I looked to the top of the yard, and heard a man cry out, help; I thought it was but a joke; I went up the yard, and met Finch, coming down; he had left the prisoner, Hill, at the top of the yard, with the constable, and asked my wife for the spoon, and gave it to Finch.

Q. Had you taken such notice of the spoon as to say, that the spoon your wife gave you, was the same you had given her? - A. I dare say it was, but I took no particular notice of it.

MARY TINGEY sworn. - I live next door to Mr. Gunnell's; I was coming up College-street, about one o'clock, and saw Champness waiting at the rails before Mr. Gunnell's house; I am certain he is the man; I never saw him before; then I saw Hill come out, and they came down the street together, and past me; I never saw either of them before; I am sure Hill is the same man; as soon as Hill came out, he joined Champness, and they walked down the street together; I saw them afterwards brought back and put into a coach; I am certain they were the same persons.

Mrs. SHERRY sworn. - I am a widow, and carry on the business of a carpenter, in Marsham-street, Westminster; my back door opens into Bennett's-yard; my people knocked at that door to come in after they had dined; I shut the gate immediately, and, as I shut the gate, I saw a man in the yard; he had got over the pales; that was Finch, looking for something; I assisted him in looking, but we could see nothing; I let him out at the door, and, as I returned back again, at the corner of the saw-pit, there was a piece of quartering laid; and between that and the fill of the door, I saw two spoons lay; there is a paling in Bennet's yard on the other side of my yard; I picked up the spoons, and gave them to my son; I sent him with them to Mr. Gunnell's; he is not here, but I shall know the spoons again when I see them.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn. - I am a stone-mason; about one o'clock, on the last day of last month, I saw the two prisoners running, and Finch after them; I laid hold of Hill; as soon as I laid hold of Hill, Champness came up, and gave me a violent blow on the mouth; upon that I was obliged to let him go; as soon as I had recovered myself, I turned round to Champness, and secured him, and delivered him up to a person of the name of Lussman; I then went after Hill again, and took him; while I had hold of him, Finch gave me these two spoons.(Produces a tea spoon and a salt spoon).

Q. Are you sure it was Finch gave you these spoons? - A. I am positive of it; I took Hill to Mr. Gunnell's and from there to Queen-square.

Q.(To Finch). Did you give the last witness the spoons? - A. I cannot say whether I did or not in my slurry; I recollect seeing a small salt spoon under Hill's feet; I believe I picked it up, but I cannot recollect; I had two spoons that the carpenter picked up, and I gave them to him again.

Wilkinson. I am sure that Finch was the man I received them from in Bennet's-yard, near to the pales, I cannot tell to a yard, if I was there; I had Hill in custody at the time.

Mr. Gennell. I came home about one o'clock, just before the prisoners were brought back; they were brought back to my house, and I think five spoons shewn me, I knew them to be mine; Mrs. Sherry has two table-spoons to produce.

Mrs. Sherry. I received them at the Police-office, I am sure they are the same spoons that I found in my yard. (The property was all produced and deposed to by Mr. Gunnell and Miss Crucifix).

Champness's defence. I had been very ill treated by some watermen; I ran away from them, and made down College-street, when these people laid hold of me, and said, I was concerned in robbing the house.

Hill's defence. I was coming through College-street, and saw a number of people, and enquired what was the matter; they told me, there had been a house robbed; when I heard that, I went away about my business, and they followed me, and took me and Champness to Queen-square office.

Champness, GUILTY (Aged 44.)

Hill, GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Of stealing the goods, but not of breaking the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-34

416 JOHN SLOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of July , a deal board, value 5s. the property of George Ireland .

GEORGE IRELAND sworn. - I am a sawyer , in Plough-yard, Shoreditch : On Tuesday the 2d of July, between six and seven in the evening, I lost a deal board; as I was going home, I saw the prisoner in the yard; I went a little way back into the court and then I came forward, and went into my yard; the prisoner was looking about the yard, and he purchased a deal of me; he took it up, and moved it a little; why, says I, are you going to take it home with you; he said, no, he was not; he said, he should he back in a few minutes; I had some suspicion of him, and when he was gone I went to my compting-house, which is close by the gate; nobody could come in it without my seeing them; I stopped five or ten minutes, when he came back and took a five-cut deal, the property of Thomas Coxhead ; he took the deal and set it down by the gate, at the end of the saw-pit, and then he went to the gate and looked both ways, and then he came and took the deal upon his shoulder; he could not see me, but I could see him plain enough; before he was round the corner of the yard I came out, and saw him; I followed him and caught him, by the time he got into the main street, Shoreditch; I took hold of him; says I, you have stole it out of my yard; he turned round and said, I have made a mistake; yes, says I, I believe you have; the one that he had bought was about half the size of that, and only one-cut in it; that was three quarters, and the other was three eighths.

Q. What part of the yard was it in? - A. Not nigh where the other was; I told him, I lost two last week, and you are likely enough to be the man; he offered to pay me for it; I told him that would not do; he had got plenty of money in his pocket; he had got gold and silver, but I would not take any. Mr. Mason, the officer, happened to come by, and I gave him charge of him; he took him to the office; the prisoner told me he lived in Hackney-road, but we found out that he lived in Castle-street, at the back of Shoreditch church.

Q. Are you sure that the deal board you found upon this man's shoulder was the same that was in your yard? - A. I am sure it is the same; I never lost sight of him till I laid hold of him by the collar.

Q. How far is Castle-street from the Hackney-road? - A. About two hundred yards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You asked him where he was going with the board, and he told you he was going home? - A. Yes.

Q. You told him he had got a wrong board, and he told you he had made a mistake? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Did he take the one that he had bought besides? - A. No.

THOMAS COXHEAD sworn. - I am a cabinetmaker; I sent a hundred of deals to Mr. Ireland's; I sent my son to desire him to cut five deals in five cuts, and one of them was missing.

PETER MASON sworn. - I took charge of the prisoner from Mr. Ireland, on the 2d of July; I heard him offer to pay Mr. Ireland for it, saying it was a mistake; the board is here, and also the board that he purchased (they are produced); one is sawed in two pieces, and the other in six.

Q. Must the prisoner have known that the one he purchased was only cut in two pieces and not in six? - A. Yes; it was the thickness he asked for.

Mr. Gurney. (To Ireland.) Q. The ends are left fastened together, the saw is not carried through to the end? - A. No; the end that is loose is downwards, and he looked at it, and said, it was but two pieces that he wanted.

Prisoner's defence. I am perfectly innocent with respect to stealing the board, it was intrely a mistake; the rest of my defence I leave to my counsel.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before LORD ELDON .

Reference Number: t17990911-35

417. MOSES MARKES was indicted for that he on the 1st of September , being in the dwelling-house of Harriet Wilson , did feloniously steal a looking-glass, value 5s. the property of the said Harriet, and that he afterwards, about the hour of two in the night of the same day, the same dwelling-house burglariously did break, to get out of the same .

HARRIET WILSON sworn. - I keep a house opposite the Court-house, in Neptune-street, Wellclose-square .

Q. What business are you? - A. I have a yearly income. On the first of September, I lost a looking-glass from my parlour; I saw it in the evening before I went to bed, about ten o'clock; I missed it in the morning about seven; I have known the prisoner six years; I knew him when I was quite a little girl; he came to my house about ten o'clock in the morning very much intoxicated, and he sat down in the parlour, and said he was locked out from his own place; he is pencil-maker by trade; I know his master and mistress.

Q. Do you let lodgings? - A. No; after the prisoner had sat about, I told him, my lodger was gone out, and he might sleep in the up-stairs bed.

Q. Then you do let lodgings? - A. I did not let him the lodgings.

Q. But you have lodgers? - A. I have one, a woman; he said he should not go to bed that night, he should sit up in our parlour; upon that, I told the servant to let him sit there, if he chose, and to fasten the doors; I and my own servant went to bed together; the lodger came home about seven o'clock in the morning, and called out for Betty, the servant, we were fast asleep; the lodger came in (the door being open) and went into the parlour and said to Betty, where is the looking-glass; the came down first.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What rent do you give for this house? - A.Thirteen guineas.

Q. Have you known the prisoner a great while? - A. Yes and his master and mistress.

Q. You have known him all the time he has been apprentice? - A. Yes.

Q. Pretty intimately? - A. No; Knowing his master and mistress, no further.

Q. At this time he happened to be excessively drunk and found his way to your house? - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH BAKER fworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Wilson, I never saw the prisoner before that night; I have lived with Mrs. Wilson six weeks; the man slept in the house, and when I got up in the morning I found the door, open and missed the glass.

Q. What was the name of the lodger that came home that morning? - A. Ann Baker.

Q. Did you see the glass the night before? - A. yes.

THOMAS DOWNES sworn. - I am a watchman,(produces a looking-glass); I stopped the prisoner at the bar with this glass, in Rosemary-lane, on the first of September, about a quarter after two o'clock in the morning; I asked him where he got it from; he said it was his own, he had brought it from home; I teld him he must go to the watch-house to give an account where he had brought it from; I took him to the watch-house, and from there to the Justice's in Lambeth-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was he very much in liquor? - A. He might be the worse for liquor, but he was strong enough to carry the glass.

Q. He was half and half perhaps? - A. No; I do not know that he was.

Q. You have heard of a forty pound reward, perhaps, for convicting a man of a burglary? - A. Yes.

Mrs. Wilson. I lost a glass of that fort, it looks like mine, but I cannot be positive, it seems like the same glass, but I cannot say.

Baker. I think it is my mistresses, but I cannot positively say.

JOHN CLAWSON sworn. - I am one of the beadles of Whitechapel parish: On Sunday night, the 1st of September, I sat up at the watch-house, Mr. Dias was headborough for that night; two watchmen brought the prisoner to the watch-house with this looking-glass; he said he had it from his master that evening; Mr. Dias asked him who his master was; he said, Mr. Pike; Mr. Dias said he knew Mr. Pike very well it; he said he had been drinking at a public-house in Wellclose-square; I then asked him why he did not leave the glass at the public-house; he said he did not like to leave it; I sent one of the watchmen to Mr. Pike's and he was taken the next day before the Magistrate; he seemed rather in liquor when he was brought in in the morning; Elizabeth Baker went with me to the Magistrate's, and swore to the glass before the Magistrate.

ANN BAKER sworn. - I lodge with Harrier Wilson; I came home on the 1st of September about seven o'clock in the morning, I found the street-door open, and the parlour-door open; I opened the shutters, and missed the glass.

Q. Is that the glass? - A. I cannot swear to it, there may be another like it.

Prisoner's defence. I am quite innocent of the crime I am charged with; I was coming through Neptune street, Ann Baker was standing at the door, and asked me if I chose to walk in; we go into conversation; Harriet Wilson being in doors, hearing my voice, she used to call me Mo; she

seemed in a very melancholy mood; say she, Mo, I am very sorry to inform you that I am going off in a post-chaise to-morrow to be married; I had expended a great deal of money upon her; says I, Harriet, I could never have supposed you would serve me so; well says I, if this to be the last time we will be very merry, and we all sat drinking together till two'oclock in the morning.

The prisoner called his master, with whom he had been twelve years, and six other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

Q.(To Elizabeth Baker .) What did you do to the door when your mistress went to bed? - A. I locked it, and left the key inside.

Q. What time was that? - A. About twelve o'clock. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17990911-36

418. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , an oiled silk umbrella, value 10s. the property of Charles Pead .

HANNAH PEAD sworn. - I keep a sale-shop, I am the wife of Charles Pead: On Friday the 19th of July, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I lost an oiled silk umbrella from near the door, it was hung up for sale; I was behind the counter, and heard something in the street, I came out, and saw the prisoner standing at the window; I suspected him, having seen him several times before; I then heard the ring of the umbrella against the hook it hung upon; I immediately looked up, and saw the umbrella go off the hook; I ran round the counter, as quick as I could, to the door, and saw the prisoner at the bar with the umbrella under him arm, about three or four yards from the door; I then called my husband, who was coming down stairs, and I shewed him the prisoner with the umbrella, and he pursued him; he had thrown the umbrella away before my husband came up; this is the umbrella, I have kept it separate from the others ever since.

CHARLES PEAD sworn. - I saw the prisoner at the bar running with the umbrella in his hand, he threw it down a step or two before I came up to him; a little boy picked up and gave it me.

Prisoner's defence. I was going down Whitechapel-road and found it.

GUILTY (Aged 16.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-37

419. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of August , six pounds weight of soap, value 4s. the property of Benjamin Noton and George Eade .

The Prosecutors not being able to identify the property, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-38

420. WILLIAM HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a pint pewter pot, value 10d. the property of Thomas Gosling .

JANE BROWN sworn. - My husband is a tailor; Mr. Gosling keeps the Poulterer's-arms in Honey-lane Market : I saw the prisoner take something off the bench, I saw it was a pot, but could not tell what size pot it was; I cannot tell what day it was; he untied a bundle that he had, and put it in, and then tied it up again; I told Mr. Gosling of it immediately.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. How many people were in the public-house at the time? - A. There were six or seven people in the next box at dinner.

Q. Do not you know that this man is not in his right senses? - A. I do not know that.

Q. Do not you know he passes about the street for a man that is out of him mind? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. You saw him very plainly? - A. Yes; I sat in the box facing him.

Q. And with you sitting directly opposite to him, he put this pot in the bundle? - A. Yes.

NICHOLAS GODIN sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, and this bundle, (producing it), was delivered to me by Mr. Gosling; I took the prisoner before the Alderman.

Mr. Alley. Q. You knew nothing of the prisoner before? - A. No.

WILLIAM HODGES sworn. - I am an officer: Mr. Gosling called me out of the coffee-room into the tap room, and I opened the prisoner's bundle, and found a pint pot. (The pot was deposed to by Mr. Gosling).

GUILTY (Aged 53.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before.

Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-39

421. JOSEPH BRITTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , a handkerchief, value 3s. the property of Thomas Wood .

THOMAS WOOD sworn. - I am a currier : On Sunday the 21st of July, I was robbed in Smithfield , between nine and ten o'clock in the evening; I was walking along, and no other person near me but the prisoner; I found his hand in my right hand coat-pocket; I turned round, and saw him

with the handkerchief in his hand, he was pulling it out of my pocket, it was part of it in my pocket and part of it in his hand; when he was that I observed him he threw it down, it laid about a yard from me; I turned round, and picked it up with my left hand, and with my right hand I took hold of him by the collar; there was no watchman on at that time, but an officer came up, and I gave charge of him. (The constable produced the handkerchief, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. If I had been guilty, I should have ran away.

Prosecutor. He endeavoured to get away from me.

The prisoner called his master, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 32.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-40

422. JAMES JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , a purse, value 3d. a half-guinea, a shilling, and a sixpence , the monies of Augustus Roni .

THOMAS LAWRENCE sworn. - On Friday the 6th of this month, about nine o'clock, I was going round Smithfield , there was a great bustle about the Grey-hound door or the King's-head, I am not certain which; the prosecutor saw me, and pointed out the prisoner to me; I took him into the house and searched him; I found upon him these two pocket-books, or purses; the prosecutor then claimed this property in the presence of the prisoner; when I opened it, there was nothing at all in it, but just as it is now; I searched him again, and in his breeches-pocket I found a half-guinea, five shillings and sixpence in silver, and three halfpence; the prosecutor gave me a strict charge of him as the man that had robbed him, and I took him to the Compter.

AUGUSTUS RONI sworn. - I am the son of a merchant: On Friday, the last day of the fair, I was walking with a friend in the fair, and in a little time we happened to be in a very great croud; I perceived that the man at the bar was facing me, and squeezing me very hard in the croud.

Q. What countryman are you? - A. A Frenchman; I felt at the same instant a very great rubbing against my waistcoat, which made me, as soon as I came out of the croud, put my hand directly in my pocket, and I perceived that it had been picked, and I immediately told my friend of it; I met with some constables, related how it was, and begged of them to watch the man; I saw Lawrence take the man up, I pointed him out; and then we all went into a public-house, my friend, myself, the constable, and the prisoner; I then said to the constable, if this is the man that has robbed me, you will find a little red purse, containing a half-guinea, a shilling, and a sixpence, the prisoner was present; Lawrence then searched him, and found in his pocket a leather purse, and opened it directly, but no money was found in it; then he searched in another pocket and found some money; among the money was half-a-guinea, a shilling, and a sixpence, and there were two or three shillings besides.

Q. Is there any particular mark about the half-guinea, or the shilling, or the sixpence, by which you can particularly speak to it? - A.Not any; the purse I am as positive of as I am that I now stand here, but there being no particular mark to it I cannot swear to it; at the same time, I have every reason to believe, and have not the smallest doubt in my own mind, that it is mine.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner is the same man that pressed you so much? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How long have you been in this country? - A.This voyage, three months.

Q.How many times have you have been in England. - A. Only twice.

Q. During the time you have been in England, you have seen purses of the same sort? - A. I have, in the shops.

Q. Therefore, there is no mark at all upon this purse by which you are able to identify it? - A. No.

Q. The money was not found in the purse? - A. No.

Q. And none of the money had any mark by which you could speak to it? - A. No.

Q. The man that squeezed you was parted from you for five minutes? - A. Yes.

Q. Then it is possible that, in the course of that five minutes, any body might have given him that purse? - A. It is possible.

Court. Q. Where did you carry your purse? - A.In my waistcoat-pocket.

JAMES LANE sworn. - I am clerk in a mercantile house: I was in the fair with Mr. Roni, he told me he had been robbed; and in about five minutes after my friend said to me, that is the man that robbed me; we watched the prisoner several times afterwards to see his actions, for a few minutes we separated for that purpose; he was walking backwards and forwards till we saw Lawrence, and then he was taken; there was a leather case found upon him, and as soon as it was produced my friend said it was his case; then he was taken to another house, where the City Marshals were sitting.

Q.(To Lawrence.) Where was it you found the money? - A. In the breeches-pocket; I cannot recollect whether the purse was taken from the

breeches or the waistcoat-pocket, I rather think it was the waistcoat-pocket.

Court. (To Roni.) You have sworn to the person of the prisoner; was it pretty light? - A. Yes; I know him by his size, his face, and his clothes; I am sure the prisoner is the man that squeezed me.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 45)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-41

423. ROBERT RICHARDSON was indicted for being found at large before the expiration of the term of seven years, for which he had been ordered to be transported .

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - I was in company with Cooke, Browne, and Holbrook, who had received information that the prisoner had escaped from on board the hulks, at Langston harbour, Portsmouth, and on the 17th of August I apprehended him in Shadwell, High-street ; I knew him before his former trial; I was not present at the trial, I remember his commitment from Shadwell-office, either in January or February last; when I took him he told me, he was come to render himself; I met with him coming down Shadwell High-street towards me, as I stood by an ale-house door; it was about the middle of the day; I said, Bob, what the deuce do you do this way; why, says he I have come to render myself; he said he wished to go to Botany Bay, rather than be among them that he was among; I have the certificate of his conviction. (It is read.)

THOMAS SIMPSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Kirby, I was present when he was convicted in this court in February Sessions, 1799, he was tried for a capital offence, the capital part was taken off, and he was ordered to be transported; I attended the bar at the time; he went away from us on the 30th of July.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY Death .

The Jury recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his ingenuous conduct.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-42

424. THOMAS ROBERTSON and SOLOMON ROBUS were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Woon , about the hour of one in the night of the 18th of May , and burglariously stealing nine pounds of veal, value 6s. two gallons of peppermint, value 14s, two gallons of anniseed, value 14s. a glass case bottle, value 3rd. a quart of rum, value 1s. 6d. two wooden kegs, value 2s. a wooden till, value 1s. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. a cotton shirt, value 2s. two check aprons, value 2s. two cotton aprons, value 1s. 6d. two linen shifts, value 2s. 6d. a duck apron value 9d. a diaper table-cloth, value 5s. a plated cruet stand, value 3s. four glass cruets, value 4s. thirty penny-pieces, one hundred and twenty halfpence, and forty-eight farthings , the property of the said John Woon .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

SARAH WOON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowls. I am the wife of John Woon ; my husband keeps the portland-arms, in the parish of St. George's in the East , the next cut to Wapping church. On Saturday the 18th of May last, my husband and I went up to bed, between twelve and one; I fastened the house myself; it was the last day of Bow-fair; I screwed down the bar shutter; I rose about seven in the morning; I found the house fastened as I had left it (as I thought) I then went to take the bar-shutters down; when I took the second shutter down, I discovered a square of glass clean cut out.

Q. Are you sure that that windows was safe when you went to bed? - A. I am very sensible of it.

Q. Would that enable any persons who were so disposed to get into the house? - A. Yes; I immediately went in and looked at the bar; the first thing I missed from the bar was a breast of veal, and next my till, containing half-pence, penny-pieces and farthings; I suppose there might be pounds worth in it; I then missed two kegs of liquor, marked Booth, (meaning Mr. Booth of Cowcross) branded upon the keg, and my name in chalk; they contained three gallons of anniseed and three gallons of peppermint, and I missed a case bottle of rum; I saw the kegs and the case bottle at Shadwell-office; here is one of the screws that fastened the shutter, which I found in the morning broke. (Produces it.)

SARAH LEE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I lived servant with John Gorden , in White-house-yard, East-Smithfield. On the last day of Bowfair, Ann Gordan and Elizabeth Gordon , his sisters, went to the fair with him, the tall man(Robertson) came to John Gordon 's house that night; it was towards morning, but I cannot tell particularly the time it was, before John Gordon and his sisters came home; Mellish was with him, and another young man, that I did not know; they asked if Ann Gordon was at home, I said they were all gone to the fair, and then they went out again, they afterwards returned and left a bottle containing some sort of liquor.

Q. Was it spirits or beer? - A. It was not spirits, I tasted it, but do not know what it was.

Q. What sort of bottle was it? - A. There are so many bottles alike that I cannot say, upon my

oath, it was the same bottle I saw before the Justice; when Mr. Gordon and the two girls came home I gave it to them, and told them, it had been left for them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Counsel for Robertson.

Q. You have now the good luck, I believe, to be housekeeper to Gordon, who is a jack-ass man, is he not? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Booth? - A. No.

Q. Do you remember Joe the Lamplighter? - A. No; nor I don't know what you are talking about.

Q. Did you never know a man of the name of Burgamy? - A. No.

Q. Did not you know a man that was convicted lately in this country? - A. No.

Q.You never lived with Joe the Lamplighter? - A. No; I never lived with any man in my life.

Q. Perhaps I have mistaken the name of Booth, do you know a man of the name of Booth? - A. No.

Q. What sort of a character was Mellish? - A. I do not know; I never spoke to him; I have seen him come backwards and forwards to Gordon's house, but did not know what he was.

Q. Do you know how long it is since he was tried here himself? - A. No; I never heard of it.

Q. Have you lived with Gordon two years? - A. Yes.

Q. And never heard that Mellish had been tied? - A. I never heard any body say that he was.

JOHN GORDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at No. 10, White-house-yard. On Saturday, the 18th of May, the last day of Bow-fair, Ann and Elizabeth Gordon, went with me to Bow-fair; we returned between three and four in the morning; I left Sarah Lee in care of the house; when I came home, I found a bottle had been left for one of my sisters, it was carried up stairs, and, to the best of my remembrance, it contained rum; it was a case bottle. About three quarters of an hour after I came home, Mellish came to my house with Robertson, and Robus, Robertson and Mellish went up to Ann Gordon 's room, and Robus staid below, and fell asleep till the other two men came down and waked him; they had been up stairs about half an hour, and then they all three went away together. About a fortnight afterwards I had a case bottle down from Ann Gordon, but I cannot swear that it was the same; Mr. Cooke, one of the officers of Shadwell-office, had it from me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp, Counsel for Robus.

Q. It was between one and two in the morning that this bottle was left? - A. Yes.

Q. It was about two hours after that Robertson, Mellish, and Robus, came to your house? - A. Yes; thereabouts.

Q. Therefore for any thing you know to the contrary, Robus might not have been one of the persons who were originally at your house? - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Have you always been certain to the person of Robus? - A. I did not recollect him at first, but when I saw him again I recollected him.

Q. When were you first before the Justice? - A. It is about six weeks ago, I believe, now.

Q.This offence happened in May? - A. Yes.

Q. And the first time you were at the Justice's you did not recollect the person of Robus? - A. No.

Q. Robus did not go up stairs with them? - A. No.

Q. But having transacted up stairs what they thought sit, they came down, and he went away with them? - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH GORDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I went with my brother and sister the last day of Bow-fair; we came home between three and four in the morning, and found a square bottle had been left for us; I think it contained rum, I do not rightly know; about half an hour after we came home, Thomas Robertson and James Mellish came up stairs; our room is above my brother's.

Q.What conversation passed between you? - A.There was nothing at all said any more than, Robertson came up to give my sister the money for her child.

Q.What had you and your sister for dinner the next day? - A. A piece of veal; James Mellish brought it up and put it on the table.

Q. How long did they stay with you? - A. No time at all; I don't suppose it was half an hour.

Q.What became of the bottle? - A. My sister lent it to my brother, to fetch his beer from the club.

Court. Q. When Mellish brought the veal had you no talk with him at all? - A. No; I was between awake and asleep.

Q.Upon your oath you cannot recollect what passed? - A. No; I cannot.

ANN GORDON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I went with my brother and sister to Bow-fair; we got home about three in the morning, and found that a case bottle had been left for us; it contained rum, I had a glass of it, when we had been at home about an hour and were in bed.

Q. Was Mellish one of the persons that came up into your room? - A. Yes.

Q. I shall not ask you who the other person was; what had you for dinner the next day? - A. A piece of veal that Mr. Mellish put upon the table;

he staid in the room about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. What became of that case bottle? - A. I cannot justly say; I had two, and I lent my brother one of them to fetch his beer from the club; I saw a bottle afterwards at the Justice's, but I cannot say that it was the same; it was such another bottle.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. - Q. You have known Mellish formerly, and known his character? - A. I have known him ever since he was a baby; we were children at play together.

Q. Do you know what his way of life was? - No.

Q. Do you know that he has been tried here for a felony? - A. No; he was taken up, I know.

Q.Have you ever heard him make any declaration with respect to the prisoner Robertson? - A.Robertson is the father of my child. The witness had a child in her arms.

Q.Have you ever heard Mellish say what he would do to Robertson? - A. I have known him to owe him a spite and a malice; I have heard him say, that he would do any thing to him almost that he could.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.Have you any reason to believe that your sister or your brother bore him any spite? - A. No.

BARBARA STAR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Whitecross-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Robertson? - A. I know the person that came with Mellish.

Q. Look round the Court, and see it you can see him? - A.(Points to him.) That is him, I had seen Mellish five or six times before. Some time about the middle of May, at the end of the week, Mellish came in, and Robertson very soon after him; in about three or four minutes, he said he had some cordial to dispose of, and wanted to know if I would have it for my own use; Robertson was then present; it was in two small kegs, the one contained anniseed, and the other peppermint; each of the kegs was about half full; Mellish had passed himself upon me for a cloathsman; I bought an apron of him, and some other things. Some Police officers came to my house, and I delivered to them one of the same kegs; I believe the other had sell to pieces.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of George Pauling? - A. Yes; he is here; he was present at the time; he lives in my house.

Q. Did you see any thing of Robus upon that occasion? - A. I did not see any other man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q.What sort of a shop do you keep? - A. A sale shop.

Q. Cloaths are the only articles, I take it for granted, that you deal in? - A.In respect to wearing apparel.

Q.Spirituous liquors are rather out of your line? - A. Yes, but knowing the man, I did not scruple to buy them; I had known him six months.

Q. You did not know him, when he was convicted here? - A. No, I never heard of it in all my life; I wish I had.

Court. (To Mrs. Woon). Q.What was the state of the kegs when you lost them? - A.They were both full.

GEORGE PAULING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I lodged in Mrs. Star's house in May last, on Saturday, the last day of Bow-fair.

Q.Look at the prisoner? - A. I know the tall one, Robertson, and I know Mellish; they both came to Mrs. Star's house on the Sunday, the day after Bow-fair; they had got some anniseed and peppermint to dispose of, in two small kegs, marked Booth; I was there when the officers came; I had one of the kegs at my house at Hoxton, and I took it down to the office, according to their desire, the next day; I don't know what became of the other; when they asked me about it, at first, I did not recollect the circumstance.

James Mellish called in.

Mr. Knapp. There is a question I wish to put to this witness, with your Lordship's permission, before he is examined by my learned friend.

Q. You have been at the bar of the Old Bailey before? - A. Once, for what I was not guilty of.

Court. You must prove his conviction by the record.

JOHN COOKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the officers of Shadwell office; I apprehended the prisoner Probus, in consequence of an information from Mellish; I acquainted him with what I took him for, and he wished, if I could prevail upon the Magistrates to be admitted an evidence.

Q. Did you go to Gordon's house? - A. I did; Gordon delivered a bottle to Brown in my presence.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell office; I went to Gordon's house in consequence of an information that I received on the 10th of August last; I received a case bottle from Gordon(produces it), there is a dent in at the bottom of it; Haynes will produces the kegs.

Mr. Alley. Q. It is some accident that happened in the making, and not a private mark? - A. Yes.

Q. You know there is a reward of 80l. in this case upon conviction? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. It is not the less remarkable because it was done in the making, I suppose? - A. No.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. (Produces a keg). This keg was produced at the office by Pauling; he put his initials upon it when he delivered it to me; it has the name of Booth branded upon it.

Pauling. This is the same keg that I delivered at the office, and the same that was brought by Robertson and Mellish to Mrs. Star.

Mrs. Woon. This is the case bottle that I lost.

Court. Q. Recollect, that the life of one or both of these prisoners may depend upon the positiveness with which you speak? - A. I am sure it is my bottle; I know it by the dent at the bottom, and another mark near the top; and it has such a remarkable small neck, that a phial cork sits it, which you will seldom find in a case bottle; I had had it eight years.

Q. Upon your solemn oath, have you any doubt that this is your bottle? - A. I have not; I have many a time cursed the bottle when I have been mixing liquor, that it did not run fast enough, the neck was so small; I cannot swear to the keg; they had both of them the same mark that this has.(Mr. Fitzpatrick produced the file of the Sessions of February, 1797).

Q. Does there appear among the records of that session, an indictment against James Mellish? - A. Yes; here is an indictment against James Mellish , labourer, for stealing a watch and other things, the goods and chattels of John Williams - the Jury say guilty; he was ordered to be whipped, and confined to hard labour for two years.

Mr. Knowleys. Q. It was a clergyable offence that he was convicted of? - A. Yes.

THOMAS SIMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a turnkey, and assistant to Mr. Kirby; I was present when James Mellish was tried and convicted; he was sentenced to two years imprisonment, and I was present when he was publicly whipped in the Sessions-yard; the witness is the same man.(The Court were of opinion that he was not a competent witness).

Robertson's defence. I have not any thing to say, I must leave it to my Counsel; what I am here for, I am innocent of.

Robus's defence. I have nothing to say, I am innocent of it.(The prisoners, each of them, called two witnesses, who gave them a good character).

Robertson, GUILTY Death .

Robus, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-43

425. JOHN WILSON and JOHN CANNON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , 90 yards of printed calico, value 10l. the property of Abraham Francis , in his dwelling-house .(It appearing in evidence, that Mr. Francis had a partner in trade, and the goods being laid to be the property of himself only, the prisoners were both

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-44

426. JOHANNA QUINLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , a pair of women's shoe, value 6s and a silver fruit knife, value 12d. the property of John Murphy .

JOHN MURPHY sworn. I am a saddler and helmet-maker , No. 41, Great Portland-street ; I lost a pair of shoes and a silver fruit knife from my bed-room; the prisoner was my servant at the time, and had been three days, and she lived servant with me twelve months back. On Sunday, the 21st of July, I spent the evening at a friend's house, and staid all night; on the 22d in the morning, I was ill, not fit to go to work; I stripped and went to bed; my wife called me up, and informed me that she had missed the things; I went after the prisoner; I found her on the Monday night, between nine and ten o'clock at night, in St. Giles's, drunk; I desired her to come home and go to bed; accordingly she did; I immediately made the charge upon her of stealing a bank note, the shoes, and the knife; I made her turn out her pockets, and there I found the duplicate of a new pair of shoes that my wife had bought that morning, and one shilling and a sixpence she returned me, which she had not spent; when I found she had not got the knife, I suspected a man that was in company with her, and I went back to the house in search of him; he said he had nothing, and then he turned out his pocket, and there was my knife; the landlord of the house took it, and produced it before the Justice; and I have kept it from that time to this; I found the shoes at a pawnbroker's, Mr. Farr's, in Little Pulteney-street.

JOSEPH AVERY sworn. - (Produces a pair of women's shoes). I took in these shoes of the prisoner for two shillings, and I gave her a duplicate; I am certain the prisoner is the same woman; she pledged them in the name of Mary Carey.

JAMES HARRIS sworn. - I was constable of the night; the knife was produced before the Magistrate, and the prosecutor claimed it. (Produces it).

Prosecutor. I know this knife to be mine, I have had it a long while; I can safely swear to it; it laid on the table in my bed-room that very day; I know the shoes, there is Mrs. Murphy written in them by the shoe-maker; I can swear to his handwriting.

Prisoner's defence. He came to me, and told me he would make it up for a guinea; his wife gave me the shoes to pawn, and she gave me the knife for myself.

Prosecutor. The prisoner, I believe, is some distant relation, but I do not know exactly how; I believe my wife may have given her things, but I asked her in the presence of the prisoner, and she said, no, she had not given them.

GUILTY (Aged 20.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-45

HUGH MURPHY , THOMAS MORRIS , and THOMAS COX , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , two pint glass decanters, value 3s. four wine glasses, value 2s. a glass ink-stand, value 12d. a glass smelling-bottle, value 12d. a pair of cut glass salts, value 2s. two other pint decanters, value 3s. seven glass golbets, value 5s. twenty-five wine glasses, value 12s. 6d. seven other pint glass decanters, value 10s. 6d. two glass goblets, value 12d. two glass tumblers, value 8d. and four other wine glasses, value 2s. the property of Ann Hancock , and Samuel Shepherd ; and Thomas Morris, and Thomas Cox , for feloniously receiving part of the same goods knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

SAMUEL SHEPHERD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep a glass-shop in Cockspur-street , in partnership with Ann Hancock: The prisoner Murphy had lived with us as a porter ; the prisoner Morris kept an old iron-shop ; in consequence of some information, I took out a warrant against Murphy on the 25th or 26th of July, Dowsett and Carpmeal took him into custody; I made no charge against him till he was going to the watch-house; I told him I believed he had been robbing us ever since he had been with us, and he made no answer; the warrant was served upon him in our house; I was at the watch-house when he was searched, I found a pair of cut glass salts about him.

Q. Did he then say any thing? - A. No, he did not.

THOMAS DOWSETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I apprehended the prisoner, Murphy, in his master's shop, in Cockspur-street, and took him to the watch-house.

Q. Did he say any thing to you while you were with him? - A. Nothing; I searched him, and found a pair of cut glass salts; they have been kept in Carpmeal's house under my seal, which I have now broke; I afterwards went to the prisoner Morris's house, in Leicester-street, Warwick-street, No. 2, the prisoner Murphy occupied the two pair of stairs front room, Morris keeps an old iron-shop; I found at Murphy's lodgings two pint decanters, four wine glasses, a smelling-bottle, and an ink-stand, (produces them); I had a warrant to search Morris's premises, he was out at the time, and I waited for his coming home, it might he about three o'clock on the same day; Morris told me I was welcome to search wherever I pleased; I searched, and in Morris's house I found twenty-five wine glasses, seven glass goblets, and two pint decanters, that is all that I brought from there; I took them to Bow-street with Morris; I apprehended Cox the same afternoon, he keeps a cheesemonger's-shop, and a coal-shed, and sells glasses and earthen-ware , in Old Round-court; he said he had no objection to have his house searched, he had no stolen goods that he knew of; they had been exposed to sale at the door during the day, and part of Morris's the same.

Mr. Knowlys. I cannot carry it further as to Cox, certainly.

The Jury immediately found a verdict as to Cox, of NOT GUILTY .

JOSEPH SHEPHERD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am nephew to the prosecutor: I went to Murphy's lodgings with the officers, and picked the articles out myself.

Q. Had you sufficient knowledge of them to be sure they are the prosecutor's? - A.Quite so.

Q. Did you accompany Dowsen in the search at Morris's house? - A. Yes, Murphy lodged there; I saw Dowsett find these articles, that he has produced, in Morris's shop; I picked them out from, I believe, nine or ten dozen; I know them to be Mrs. Hancock's and Mr. Shepherd's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There were nine dozen of glasses exposed in the shop for sale? - A. Part of them out at the shop window.

Q. How many servants may you have in your matter's shop? - A. In all, there may be about fourteen or sixteen, or more.

Q. I suppose, the clerk is seldom out of the shop, but is there to give directions where the goods are to go? - A. Yes.

Q.Was it possible for the prisoner, or any other man, to have taken all these goods out at the same time? - A. It is impossible.

Q. Have you a vast quantity of other glasses of the same pattern? - A. Yes.

Q.And have sold a great number? - A. Yes. Mr. Knowlys. Q.Was the prisoner, Morris, a customer of your master's? - A. I never saw him before in my life, to my knowledge.

ELIZABETH STONE sworn. - I lodge at Mr. Morris's house, Murphy lodged in the front room of the second floor.

Q. Do you know whether Morris was acquainted with his situation in life, and where he worked? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Did you ever hear any thing pass between Mr. Morris and Murphy? - A. No.

Murphy's defence. I used to be cleaning and dusting up stairs, and when I was called away in a hurry, I frequently put the things in my pocket that I was dusting, and put them in their place again when I went up.

Murphy GUILTY (Aged 38.)

Transported for seven years .

Morris, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-46

428. WILLIAM YORK and CHARLOTTE JENNINGS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , two window curtains, value 6s. a feather holster, value 4s. two pillow-cases, value 6d. a pair of linen sheets. value 4s. a cotton counterpane, value 8s. a looking-glass, value 1s. 6d. a pillow, value 2s. and a bed-tick, value 10s. the property of Mary Simpson , in a lodging-room .

MARY SIMPSON sworn. - I live in the parish of St. Luke's , I let lodgings: The two prisoners lodged in my house two days, the prisoner Jennings took the lodgings; she came to my house on the Tuesday, about eleven o'clock at noon, and said she wanted a lodging for her husband, and said he was a sawyer; she agreed for a furnished room, at three shilling a week, up one pair of stairs, and gave one shilling earnest; she did not come that night, but she came on Wednesday morning, and he with her; they lodged there on Wednesday and Thursday; she came down and asked for the sheets and the counterpane, and I gave them into her hand, that was on the Thursday morning, he was with her then; I saw him go out of the passage on Thursday noon, I did not see him afterwards; and I saw her on the Thursday, but never saw her afterwards; I looked through the key-hole and saw the bed was gone, and the room stripped; I then opened the door, and found the feathers on the floor, and the tick gone; I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment, (repeating them): a week afterwards, I found the prisoner by accident at a public-house door; I saw nothing of the property till I came to the Public-office.

SARAH MITCHELL sworn. - I live in Church-street, St. Leonard, Shoreditch; I keep a broker's shop, I know the prisoner Jennings, she came to me in June, I cannot tell the day, it was in the afternoon; she came to me with a swing-glass, a feather-bolster, and a pillow-bier, with a very few feathers in it; she brought them to me for sale; I have known her many years, living in the neighbourhood; I have furnished rooms for her mother; she came to sell these things; I asked her if they were her own, she said they were; she desired I would give her as much as I could for them as she was in a great deal of distress; I bought them all of her at the same time; I gave her a separate price for each article, altogether nine shillings; she seemed dissatisfied with the price, and I told her, I had rather she would take them some where else, for I had offered her more than they were worth; she went away a few yards from the door, and in three or four minutes came back, and asked me to give her six-pence more for them; I told her, I could not, and then she took the nine shillings; I had them nigh upon a week for sale at the door; I sold the bolster some days after; Mr. Harper came to our house and enquired after these articles, I delivered them to Mr. Harper; after that I recollected that I had bought a pillow-case of the same person, and I went up stairs to look for it and found it in the feather-room; I believe it is the same, but I am not sure, for my man carried it up, and he has had the care of it.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - I am a constable belonging to the Police-office in Worship-street.(Produces a glass and pillow.) On the 18th of June, of a Tuesday, in consequence of an information, I took the prisoner York, into custody in Saunders's gardens, Kingsland-road; I took him in custody, and I took him to the office, the prosecutrix appeared against him, and he was committed for further examination. Some few days afterwards he was brought up and committed again for further examination, the goods not being then found; when he came up for the third examination, I found out where the father of the prisoner Jennings lived, and I found her near Gun-street; and in consequence of her directions I found some property at Mr. Cotton's, a pawnbroker, in Shoreditch, and at Mr. Francis's a pawnbroker in Shoreditch; Armstrong and I went to Mitchell's first with a search-warrant; I saw Armstrong find this pillow, and this glass (produces them); they have been in my possession ever since.

JAMES ROBERTSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Cotton, a pawnbroker in Shoreditch, (produces a bed-tick) I took it in pledge from the prisoner Jennings, on the 14th of June, for nine shillings, I had frequently seen her before.

Q.Did you ever see the prisoner York? - A. I have seen him with her, but not at this time.

WILLIAM-ALEX. SCULTHORPE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Francis, a pawnbroker in Holywell-street, Shoreditch, (produces two sheets, two curtains, and a counterpane); I took them in of

Charlotte Jennings , on the 14th of June for ten shillings; I had served her many times before.

Q. Do you know the prisoner York? - A. He was not with her.(The property was deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

York's defence. I have used the sea the greatest part of my life, and upon my return home last September in the Glatton, I came on shore among my friends, at the Three Neats Tongues, in Shoreditch; a man that draws beer there asked me if I wanted a girl, and he brought me this young woman; she took me to this room, and I staid there with her a day or two, till my money was expended, and I was backwards and forwards with this young woman several times, and then I left her; the prosecutor wanted me to give her three guineas, and Harper said I had better give her the three guineas, or it would be worse for me, and I should be in jail so long.

Jennings's defence. I have lived with this man above twelve months; I was on board a ship with him and he used me very ill and I left him, and he came back and said, if I would live with him he would not use me so any more, and he used me very ill indeed; he took out a knife and swore he would stab me if I did not take these things away; I told him they were not ours, and he must not, but he wrapped the sheets round his body and took them away with him.

Harper. As to making up the business with the prosecutor, I deny it upon my oath.

The prisoner Jennings, called four witnesses who gave her a good character.

York, NOT GUILTY .

Jennings, GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-47

492. CHARLES WHITE and RICHARD KING were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of June , fifty-three pieces of ribbon, value 30l. the property of Charles Miller .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Woodhouse . And

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons, to the Jurors unknown.

There being no evidence to affect the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-48

430. ELIZABETH CHARLESWORTH and ANN PRITCHARD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of August , a duck, value 2d. a hen, value 2d. and four chickens, value 9d. the property of Thomas Miller .

THOMAS MILLER sworn. - I live at Bowesfarm, near Southgate ; I farm a little land, and my wife keeps a shop. On the 5th of August, I had seen the property mentioned in the indictment running about the yard; I saw them again about three o'clock in the day; I was sent for, and told that two women had been stopped with them; I went to Mr. King's a farmer, about half a mile from me; I saw the duck, four chickens, and the hen; I had had the hen these five years, the hen I am very sure of, the duck and the chickens I cannot be sure of; the hen was dead when I found it, but quite warm; the duck and the chickens were alive, they were taken to the Magistrate's, and from there I took them home; the two prisoners had been employed about me as hay-makers; the weather had been bad, and I believe they were very much distrest; they lodged in a rick-yard close by me.

JOSEPH SEYMOUR sworn. - I was in the hayfield at labour for Mr. King, between two and three o'clock in the day, about half a mile from Mr. Miller's; Mr. King was upon his horse in the field, and he called out to me, the two women were following him, one of them had a bag, I cannot positively say, whether the two prisoners are the women; the bag contained four chickens, and a little duck; I took them out, and my master stood by me at the time, the other woman had a hay fork in her hand; my master sent me down to Bowes-farm, and several other places, to see if they had lost any.

THOMAS KING sworn. - On the 5th of August, I was in the hay-field, and I saw the two prisoners come along the road; I heard a noise of chickens, and I thought it was a very odd place to hear that noise; I rode up to the gate by the side of the road, and said, good women, what have you got there; they said, nothing at all; I told them, they had; they said they had not; I told them, I insisted upon seeing, for I knew they had; Charlesworth then opened the bag, it was covered up in her apron, and I saw the heads of some chickens; I went into the hay-field and they followed me; I called to Seymour to look what there was in the bag, and he saw the chickens and the duck; I sent them to my house by Seymour, and when he had got a little way he called out, Master, here is a dead hen; I told the women, I would keep them till somebody owned them; I sent Seymour to Bowes'farm; one of them, I think Pritchard, said, she gave three-pence half-penny for them, and that a man chucked the bag into her apron as she sat at breakfast under a hedge, and told her, there was some dinner for her; but I do not remember whether it was at the Justices', or where it was,

that she said that; that is all I know about the matter.

Pritchard's defence. We were coming to London between twelve and one in the night, and a man sold them to us for three-pence half-penny; Mrs. Charlesworth gave him the money.

The prisoner, Charlesworth, called two witnesses, who gave her an excellent character.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LA BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-49

431. ABRAHAM LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , a seven shilling piece , the property of John Campbell .

JOHN CAMPBELL sworn. - On the 24th of June, I saw the prisoner in Bedford-row ; he had seven oranges in a basket, I asked him the price; he said, I should have them for nine-pence; I told him, I could not carry them, I would not have them; he told me, I should have them for six-pence; I told him I would have them; I put my hand in my pocket and pulled out some money, and looked for a six-pence; while I was looking over the money, the prisoner put his hand into my hand and ran away with a seven shilling piece; I called out stop thief, and on the other side of the street he was caught hold of, somebody said, he has got it in his mouth; when they examined his month, there was a good guinea, two bad half-guineas, and a seven shilling piece bad (produces them); mine was a good seven shilling piece, but it is not there.

Q. Was he searched any where else? - A.Not that I know of; he was taken to Bow-street.

Q. Did you ever get your seven shilling piece again? - A. No, never.

Q. Are you quite positive he took the seven shilling piece from you? - A.Quite positive.

Q. How long was it between the moment that he took your seven seven shilling piece and the time he was taken hold of? - A. Only while he was running across into Princes-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I take it, it you had seen your seven shilling piece you would not have been able to have sworn to it? - A.Mine was a good one.

Q. But there are a great many good ones, you know? - A. Yes, mine was not bent.

Q. He was stopped immediately? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he searched in your presence? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe, before the Justice, you swore, that the seven shilling piece you found in his mouth, was the one that he had taken from you? - A. No, I never did.

Court. Q. Do you know where you got that seven shilling piece that you lost? - A. Yes; I received it from a person of the name of Friend.

Q. I suppose you are careful when you receive money, that it is good? - A. Yes; the one that I received from Friend was a good one.

THOMAS SHAW sworn. In the month of June, the particular day I cannot recollect, I was walking with a friend in Bedford-row, I heard a cry of stop him, stop him, he has robbed me, or words to that effect; I looked up and saw the prisoner running from the person, who just now gave his evidence; the prisoner had a small basket in his hand; Mr. Campbell was pursuing him, I assisted in the pursuit, and as he turned into Princes-street, I found he was seized; in an instant several people collected round; some person said, he has got the money in his mouth; in consequence of that, he immediately uttered the money from his mouth; there was a guinea, and I think, two half-guineas, and a seven shilling piece a little crooked; I advised him to take him to Bow-street, and I attended the Magistrate the next morning.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge alledged against me; I have a very large family and always worked very hard; I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Q.(To Campbell.) What became of the oranges. - A. I do not know, they were left in the street.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY (Aged 34.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before LORD FLDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-50

432. ELIZABETH KINSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August, three cards of white lace, value 30s. the property of William Hopwood .

The prosecuter not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-51

433. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of July , two dead geese, value 10s. the property of Samuel Thornton .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

MARY THORNTON sworn. - I am the wife of Samuel Thornton; I live at Stratford, in Essex, my husband is a poulterer . On Friday, the 19th of July last, I went to Leadenhall-market ; I took twenty geese to market, and six there were at market; I took them packed in baskets in a cart; I believe there were about sixteen in one basket, and the other four in another basket, with some ducks; the prisoner went with me to Mile-end, and there we took up a Mr. Robert Turner, a

salesman, who lives in Assembly-row, mile-end; the prisoner was servant to Mr. Thornton, he used to go up to London on every Friday to market; when I got to Lime-street, a porter unloaded the cart; I saw all the twenty geese taken out safe for sale; they were placed upon a board in the shop, at the latter part of the market; I cast up my goods, and found two geese deficient that was between seven and eight in the morning.

Q.What time did you arrive in the market? - A.About six o'clock; I supposed I had sold them all; the prisoner asked me if I would have all the geese up; and he told me I had got every thing up when the cart was unloaded; between seven and eight in the morning, the prisoner asked whether I had done with him; he said, if I had done, he would fetch his horse and cart and go home; I told him he might go; then he took hold of a basket that was in the shop, and took it out to the door with him; I asked him what he was going to do with that basket; he said, to carry it to Lime-street.

Q. Had you given him any directions to go to Lime-street for any purpose? - A. No; I desired him to leave his basket behind, or it would get lost, while he went for his horse and cart; it was the same basket in which I had brought the sixteen; I then ordered a person to look into the basket, Mr. Clark the poulterer, at Islington, and he searched the basket, it was then outside the door, in Leadenhall-market; when I opened it, I saw two dead geese lying at the bottom of the basket, but I did not touch them.

Q.Looking at those two geese, will you venture to swear they were your husband's property, and part of the geese you had brought to London? - A. They were.

Q. You opened the basket? - A. Yes; they are baskets made on purpose; it was a square basket, with a lid to it.

Q.Did Mr. Clark fasten the basket? - A. No; I went and called another gentleman to see the geese, Mr. Robert Turner , a salesman, and then I tied it up again as it was before; then I watched for the prisoner coming to fetch it away; I saw him return in a few minutes after and take that basket away.

Q. Had you any geese in your shop that did not belong to your husband? - A.No, I had not; I then ordered a person, of the name of Gregory Seally, to watch him and follow him; he took strait down the passage from Leadenhall-market, to go into Lime-street; I am sure that the geese I saw in the basket, were two of the geese that I had brought from Stratford that morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Where was your cart kept? - A. At the Ipswich-arms, in Cullum-street.

Q. The prisoner would, of course, go down Lime-street to go to Callum-street? - A. Yes, but he brings the cart into Lime-street to load.

Q. The baskets that were in the shop it was his duty to take away? - A. Yes; he took away three or four that day.

Q. How long has he lived with you and your husband? - A.Seven or eight years.

Q.And, I believe, he was taken at your husband house? - A. He was.

JOHN CLARK sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a Poulterer, at Islington: On Friday the 10th of July, I was at Mrs. Thornton's, in Leadenhall-market, she desired me to look into the baskets; I looked into two, and found nothing but straw; I looked into a third, and found two dead geese; Mr. Robert Turner was then fetched, and he saw them; I afterwards saw the prisoner take them away.

Court. Q. Could any person take up one of those baskets, with two geese in it, without being sensible, from the weight, that there was something in it? - A. I should think not; from their apperance, they never had been taken out of the basket.

Clark. They appeared to lay exactly as they came to market, they had not been unpacked.

Jury. (To Mrs. Thornton) Q. What enable you to swear that those two geese were your's? - A. I was two short of my number.

ROBERT TURNER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a salesman at Leadenhall, and live at Mile-end; I came to market with Mrs. Thornton; I was called to her shop, and saw a basket with two geese in it, packed exactly as they were when they were brought to market; in a short time after, I saw the prisoner take away the basket.

GAEGORY SEALLY sworn - Examined by Mr. Knapp I work for Mr. Tuner, in Leadenhall-market; On Friday the 10th of July, I was sent for by Mrs. Thornton, at near eight o'clock; I went to Whitechapel-road, I was desired to watch her cart, the prisoner was with it; I watched it as far as Mils-end-road; I there saw the prisoner get out of the cart, and take something out; he went into the Red-lion public-house, I was not near enough to observe what it was that he took out; when I got to the door the prisoner came out again, bottoning up his breeches-pocket; he then got into the cart, and drove away towards Stratford; I went into the public-house, but did not see any thing.

Q.(To Mrs. Thornton.) Had you given the prisoner any directions to go to the Red-lion public-house? - A. No.

Q. Had you given him any directions to sell any geese there? - A. No; nor any where else.

SAMUEL THORNTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. The prisoner was my servant: I never gave him directions to sell any geese at any time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were before the Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take a person of the name of Float there, the master of the Red-lion public-house? - A. Yes; an officer went for him, and he came.

Q. Have you subpoenaed him here as a witness for you? - A. No; we took him by reason I expected him to be a receiver.

Q. Do you mean to say he was not a witness for you upon that occasion? - A. No, he only came in his own defence; I believe he was examined as a receiver.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - A. I will tell you: this happened on the 20th of July, and the next morning I was coming to town, and coming past Mr. Float's door he bowed to me; I said, Mr. Float, do you know who those two geese were for that my man left here yesterday; upon that he seemed very much confused, and said, tell me the price of them and I will pay you; I said, I know nothing about the price, I would enquire of my man.

Q.Will you venture to swear, that before the Magistrate, he was either examined as a receiver, or that he was committed by the Magistrate as a receiver, or that you were bound over to prosecute him? - A. I was not bound over to prosecute him I accused him as a receiver before the Magistrate.

Q. Did you not make use of his evidence before the Magistrate against this man? - A. Not as an evidence.

Q.Upon your oath, was he not bound over to give evidence upon this trial? - A. That I don't know.

Q. Don't you know he was bound over to give evidence upon this business? - A.Not for me, for the man.

Q.Did you mean to swear, that the Magistrate bound him over to give evidence for the man? - A. No; I don't mean to swear that, I don't recollect.

Q.Was your wife bound over to give evidence? - A. I don't recollect that; I was bound over.

Q.Was Mr. Clark bound over? - A. I think so, I won't he sure.

Q. Were the other persons bound? - A. I believe they were not.

Q. Upon your oath, did not Float tell you that this man had left them, and said you would call for the money for them? - A. No, he did not; he told me he had ordered them of my man, either the Thursday or Friday morning.

Q. Upon your oath, did he not tell you that the prisoner said he did not know the price, and he was to pay you? - A. No; Mr. Float was very much confounded, and said, I will pay you, what do they come to.

Q. Upon the solemn oath you have taken, did not Float tell you, that you were to be paid for them? - A. No.

Q. Have you not passed his door every day when you came to town? - A. Yes.

Q. And though you knew he had been a witness before the Magistrate, you never called upon him to tell him the trial was coming on? - A. No.

Q.Did you not see him at Hicks's-hall? - A. No; I did not go there.

Q.Upon your oath, did he not ask you, no longer ago than Wednesday last, when your trial was to come on? - A. I saw him at his door, and he said, are you going to-day; and I told him, yes; that was all.

Q. Did you desire him to attend? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, don't you know that he did attend at Clerkenwell? - A. I have heard so since, and that he preferred some kind of a bill; I heard it at Leadenhall, or somewhere.

Q. You took the prisoner before a Magistrate in Middlesex, and were bound over to prosecute in Middlesex, the property having been disposed of at Mile-end? - A. I cannot pretend to say, I believe I was.

Q. This man has been attending at Hicks's-hall, and you have not fought after him, but preferred your bill in London? - A. Yes.

Q. Is your son here? - A. No.

Q. Have you never received any intimation from your son, that he or you were to call for the money? - A. My son had no business with it, and did not know any thing at all about it till afterwards.

Q. I ask you whether you have not been told, by your own son, that either he or you were to call and receive the price of these geese? - A. No.

Q. Have you ever had the curiosity to ask him whether he ever received the money? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner was taken up in your service, was he not? - A. Yes; he was taken out of my yard.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

For the Prisoner.(Mr. Fitzpatrick proved, from the recognizance, that Float was bound over to give evidence in the county of Middlesex).

SALOMON WYDROW sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Thornton, at Stratford: the prisoner has lived a great many years in Mr. Thornton's service; I never heard that he bore a bad character.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-52

434. WILLIAM FERBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of July , ten aprons, value 10s. two cotton gowns, value 20s. six caps, value 3s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2s. five pieces of muslin, value 5s. and a check bag, value 2d. the property of Elizabeth London .

ELIZABETH LONDON sworn. - I live in Parliament-street , at Mrs. Seton's; I am servant there. On Monday, the 22d of July, about a quarter past nine in the morning. I went to go up stairs about my business, and I left in the kitchen the articles named in the indictment; they were in a check bag; I had put a handkerchief in it, not a quarter of an hour before I missed it; they were hung upon a box, in a pantry belonging to James Benwell , where he keeps his cloaths; my fellow-servant called me down, to know if I had had a tradesman there; I did not immediately answer, upon which he repeated the words over again, and I answered, I have not; he directly said, then you have been robbed; upon which I came down, and saw no one in the kitchen; he was gone out; I looked round the front kitchen, but missed nothing; I then went into the back kitchen, and missed the check bag; I went up stairs immediately; I suppose I had been up stairs about five minutes, when James Benwell called to tell me he had got my property; I then came down, and saw the prisoner and the bag, which James Benwell had with him; immediately when I came down stairs, he fell upon his knees, and begged my pardon; the bag was lying upon the dresser by the prisoner and James Benwell; I asked him how he came to take those things from me; and he said, he was not the person that took them; he said, some person gave him half a crown to carry them; at the same time saying, the person that gave him them to carry, desired him, if any one came in pursuit of him, to run; he was then taken before a Magistrate; I counted all the things before I went to the Magistrate, before the prisoner's face, and it contained exactly the same as when I lost it.

Q. Could you swear to its being your's? - A. Yes.

JAMES BENWELL sworn. - I am fellow-servant with the last witness, at Mr. Seton's, in Parliament-street; I never saw the prisoner before that day; I am certain he is the man. On Monday, the 22d of July last past, about a quarter after nine, I am certain within two minutes, I had been out; on coming to the area, I met a very decent country young man coming up the area steps from my mistress' house; he had a large check bundle under his arm; he came up to the area gate; he had closed it; I pushed the area gate to open it, and he pulled it towards him; it was a sort of bundle that had been very familiar to me, as it always hung up in the pantry that I used, over my box; he asked me if he should shut the area door; I told him, if he pleased; he had pulled the nail out of the wall, and I saw the aprons coming out; I went down the area steps immediately into the kitchen; I had seen it not ten minutes before; I called out to the last witness up stairs, and ran out immediately; I was in the house four or five minutes, I think not more than four; I came out, and ran towards the Horse-guards; I saw nobody; I returned through King-street, and up Little Charles-street into Parliament-street again; I looked up Bridge-street, but saw nobody there; I went on to Palace-yard, and there I saw a man in a grey coat, with just such a bundle; I then gave chace, and overtook him in Parliament-place, by the gate where his Majesty goes in at, which is no thoroughfare; it goes to the water, and then there is nothing but a railing; I stopped him before he got half way down the passage; he said, are these your's, young man? I said, I dare say I could find somebody to own them, and he seemed to be in great agitation, and took him into custody; he had the bundle in his arm at the time I overtook him; they brought him home into the kitchen, at Mrs. Seton's; she opened them before him, and counted them on the dresser; I then sent for a constable, and took him before a Magistrate; I have had them ever since. (Produces them).

Q. Can you say, that the man you overtook, was the man you saw coming up the area steps? - A. I cannot say that it was the same person; he was in a different dress, and I certainly cannot say he was the same. (The property was deposed to by the prosecutrix).

Prisoner's defence. I was hired by a man to carry them.

GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-53

435. JOHN STAUNTON , JOHN AGAR , and WILLIAM LEWIS were indicted for that they, in the King's highway, in and upon William Gray , on the 1st of July , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a man's hat, value 6s. and a half guinea , the property of the said William.

WILLIAM GRAY sworn. I am a servant out of place. On the first of July, I had been to the Circus; I was going home to my lodgings, at Mr. Cadwell's, the corner of Charles-street, Leather-lane; about half past eleven at night, I was going down Field-lane , when Staunton, Agar, Lewis, and four or five more stopped me, hustled me, and

knocked me up against one of the houses in Field-lane; I knew Staunton before, then Agar came up to me.

Q. Did you know Agar before? - A. No.

Q. Was it a light night? - A. Yes; they hustled me, and Staunton put his hand in my pocket, and upon that Agar knocked off my hat.

Q. Did you see the face of the man you call Agar, so plain, at eleven o'clock at night, as to be able to swear to his person? - A. Yes, it was very light, and he was close to me.

Q. Were there any lamps there? - A. I cannot say; then one of the party picked up my hat, and I called out watch; upon that one of the party came up to me, and said, d-n you, if you call out watch again, I will cut your throat from ear to ear; upon the watchman coming up, I put my hand in my waistcoat pocket, and missed the half guinea directly; I am sure I had it within five minutes before I was attacked; the watchman came up, and I pointed out Agar, and told him that was the man that knocked off my hat; I did not see any of the rest then.

Q. Did you ever find your half guinea again? - No, as soon as the watchman came they all ran away; there were two of them taken that night, Lewis and Agar; I had seen Staunton the Saturday night before, at the corner of Fleet-market, as I was standing there.

Q. How long had you been out of place? - A. From the 21st of June; I left Mr. Parish, of Ludgate-street, mercer, and I had put into two offices, and attended every day; I lived with Mr. Parish three months; I had not been in any place before that; I had been to the East Indies in the William Pitt, as the surgeon's servant; and, after I came home, I lived with my father at Ramsgate.

Q. How came you to lodge at Mr. Cadwell's? - A. I had lodged there before I went to my place; I had seen Staunton the Saturday night before, at about half past nine, as I was standing talking with a woman that I knew; he came up to me, and said, b-st your eyes, you b-r, what business have you with that woman? it was a person that my father knew when he lived in the Minories; her name is Peggy Mills.

Q. Did you expect to meet her there? - A. No, I asked her how she did; I met her accidentally; I had not seen her before since I left the Minories, which is about twelve months ago, very nigh, I cannot be quite sure; she was standing at the corner, and another woman at a little distance from her that I did not know; when I asked her how she did, Staunton came up.

Q. Did she know you again, when you asked her how she did? - A. Yes, she said she was very well; I have seen her since that, about five weeks ago in the Strand; I do not know where she lives, I met her accidentally at that time, and have not seen her since.

Q. Did you then ask her where she lived? - A. No.

Q. That was after you were robbed, and yet you did not ask her where she lived? - A. No.

Q. Did you tell her you had been robbed? - A. No; she spoke to me about it.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you did not ask where you could find her? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see Staunton besides the night you were robbed, and that Saturday night? - A. No.

Q. When Staunton said, b-st your eyes, you b-r, what have you to do with this woman, what did you say? - A.Nothing, but he struck me a violent blow upon the breast; and, when I came to myself, he repeated the blow again.

Q. Did Peggy Mills see both these blows? - A. Yes, then I got away; when I met her afterwards in the Strand, she said, she hoped I would not hurt Staunton, that was about five weeks after I was robbed.

Q. Staunton had been in custody then about five weeks? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you did not ask her where she lived? A. No.

Q. Had you ever seen Agar or Lewis before that night? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. - Q. You are a servant out of place? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you footman at Mr. Parish's? - A. In the morning, I used to open the shop, and clean it out; I did up the breakfast things, attended dinner, and shut up shop.

Q. Did you give your master warning, or he you? - A. I did not like my mistress, Miss Parish, and I gave them warning myself.

Q. I take it for granted, you were so good a servant, that there were no complaints of you? - A. They asked me, whether I liked to stay or not.

Q. Perhaps there was a complaint, when you took an hour to go to Fleet-market? - A.There were no complaints of any thing else that I know of; my master used to mention that to me.

Q.Before you went to Mr. Parish's, how long was it that you had been returned from India? - A. A twelvemonth last February; my father then kept the Fountain in the Minories.

Q. What business is your father in now? - A. I cannot say; my mother keeps a boarding-school; my father has left the Fountain nearly a twelvemonth, as nearly as I can guess; I then went on board the Taunton Castle, and was discharged in

the Hope, because I was too slight; I was going before the mast; I was on board her seven or eight days; I then went to my father's, in Queen's-head-lane, Islington, till I went on board the Manship East Indiaman, from December to February; I went in her as far as the Nore, and was discharged because I was too slight; my father was then gone to Ramsgate, and I went to lodge at Mr. Cadwell's.

Q. How long is it since you were on board the William Pitt? - A.Three years come April.

Q. How old are you? - A.Twenty-three next May.

Q. Have you lodged at Mr. Cadwell's from that time to this? - A. No, I am now very badly situated, I am in the workhouse in Gray's-inn-lane, and have been ever since I came out of the hospital, about a fortnight ago; I lodged at Mr. Caldwell's about three weeks after I was robbed, and then I went to lodge at the house of a young fellow that I had known on board the Pitt; from thence I went to the workhouse, from the workhouse to the hospital, and then back to the workhouse again; I went there because I was in distress.

Q. Being in distress, you know there are different ways of relieving one's self; you have perhaps heard of a 40l. reward. - A. Yes.

Q.Then, of course, you have learned arithmetic enough to know, that three forties make 120l.? - A. I don't do it for that-God forbid.

Q. How came you by this half guinea? - A. I had fifteen shillings, a half guinea was lent me by the maid-servant that lives at Mr. Parish's; her name is Sarah Fox .

Q. You had been at the Circus? - A. Yes, my uncle and my cousin perform there.

Q. Then you got in for nothing? - A. No, I paid for going in at half price, and I came back with my aunt and my cousin, and one of the performers; I parted with my aunt and my cousin, at their house in Oakley-street, Blackfriars-road, and the other performer left me in Fleet-street, to go to Charing-cross.

Q. And you went along through Field-lane? - A. Yes, there were two girls behind me.

Q. These two girls being behind you, did they happen to get on each side of you? - A. No, that I am sure of.

Q. Nor you were not in company with them? - A. No further than they spoke to me.

Q. And you did not answer them? - A. Yes, I spoke to them; they asked me where I was going, and I said I was going home; they asked me if I would go home with them, and I said, no.

Q. As you were going from the Circus to the corner of Charles-street, by what strange fatality did you get into Field-lane? - A. I went that for the nighest way.

Q.Hatton-garden is a pleasant street enough to walk in at eleven o'clock at night? - A. Yes.

Q.Was it not a very dark night, the moon being but two days old? - A. It was quite that starlight, upon my oath.

Q. You saw their countenances then, by starlight? - A. I am sure of their persons.

Q. What sort of a hat had Lewis on? - A. A round hat.

Q. And yet you could see his face distinctly? - A.Lewis was only of the party, he did not lay a finger upon me.

Q. You were perfectly sober, I take it for granted? - A. I was as sober as I am now, that I am quite certain of.

Q. When you saw Peggy Mills in the Strand, what time of night was it? - A.Between two and three in the afternoon.

Q. You are sure it was not after eight in the evening? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you had those clothes? - A. I pawned my coat to get some tea and sugar, when I was in the Hospital; this is a coat I had from the workhouse, the waistcoat was given me by my young master, and the breeches I bought with my own money.

Court. Q. You came away from the Circus with your aunt, your cousin, and one of the performers? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever tell them of the robbery? - A. I believe my brother has; I have not seen them since.

- M'CARTY sworn. - I am a watchman. On the 1st of July, I heard watch cried; the prosecutor was at the corner of Field-lane, and Chick-lane; I came to his assistance, and he told me, he was robbed of his hat, and half-a-guinea; he pointed out that middle-man (Agar) as the man that took his hat; and he said, he felt one of their hands in his pocket, and he missed half a guinea; then my partner came up, and we both attacked them; there were five or six, if not seven in the gang; Lewis was at a distance, I did not suspect him to be one of the party; they all ran away, I ran after them, but lost sight of them; two of them were stopped and taken to St. Sepulchre's watch house, and from there we took them to Hatton-garden watch-house; when they ran away, they went off in a cluster, with a great laugh.

JOHN KEANE sworn. - After calling the hour of eleven at night, on the 1st of July, I saw Gray at the bottom of Chick-lane; he said, he had been robbed of half-a-guinea; there were a number of them standing there, and then they all took to their heels and ran away; two of them, Agar and Lewis, were stopped and taken to St. Sepulchre's watch-house; I went there, and we hand-cuffed them,

and brought them to our own watch-house; I did not see either the hat or half-guinea, and I really believe, in my heart, that Lewis is as innocent of the affair as the child that is unborn in the womb; I took Staunton the next day at the Castle, facing of Chick-lane.

Staunton's defence. I am very innocent of the charge; I have witnesses to prove that I was not there.

Agar's defence. I came out of the castle, on Monday night, with five or six more, and we met Gray, with a girl of the town on each side of him; then there was a cry of stop thief, and they took us; and searched us, but found nothing upon us; I am innocent of it.

Lewis's defence. I am perfectly innocent; I leave it to my counsel.

For the Prisoners.

EVAN JONES Sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live with Mr. Parish; I hired Gray for Mr. Parish; he lived with us about three months; I believe he was perfectly honest, but if we sent him out of an errand, it was a matter of great uncertainty when he would come back; he would be half an hour frequently going to Fleet-market, and for that reason he left our house; once he staid out all night without leave; he said he was intoxicated and would not come home, and Mr. Parish forgave him.

JOHN HOSIER Sworn - I was constable of the night. Agar and Lewis were brought to our watch-house; Gray charged them with robbing him; I told him to be very particular in what he said; he looked at them a second time and said, he could not swear to them; I did not know that they were to come before this Court till within these few minutes.

The prisoner Lewis called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Agar also called two, and Staunton four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

ALL three NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlcsex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-54

436. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , two yards and a quarter of velveteen cord, value 5s. a yard and a half of superfine blue cloth, value 8s. seven yards of black kerseymere, value 6s four yards of black worsted stocking, value 5s. three pieces of nankeen, value 10s. twenty-three gilt buttons, value 2s. and three pounds of thread, value 12d. the property of James Jackson .

JAMES JACKSON Sworn. - I am a man's mercer . The prisoner occupied a room in my house as a lodger, No. 3, Clement's-inn ; the goods were taken from the prisoner on Sunday, the 30th of June, but I had lost them before; the property has been in the hands of the constable ever since.

- BOLTON Sworn. I am foreman to the prosecutor; I detected the prisoner on the 30th of June, with a false key opening the ware-room door of Mr. Jackson; I saw the key in the door, and his hand upon it; I took him, and left him in care of George Murray, while I went to call Mr. Jackson; then we went into the prisoner's own apartments and found all the articles in the indictment in his possession; they were put into the hands of the officer; they were found folded up in his trunk, and in his drawers.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. He opened his drawers and his trunk himself, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q.Directly? - A.Directly.

GEORGE MURRAY Sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Jackson: On the 30th of June, I was secreted in an adjoining room, for the purpose of detecting the prisoner; we took him, with the key in the ware-room door; I waited with him, while the other witness called Mr. Jackson; we immediately went into his own apartments and found the goods charged in the indictment.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn - I am an officer(produces the property): On the 30th of June, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, and the property; I have had the goods ever since.

Mr. Jackson. This blue cloth I can positively swear to, it has the maker's name, and the number.

Mr. Knapp. Q.Any other person might have cloth with the maker's name? - A. Yes.

Q. And the number? - A. No; they number them as they make them, as I understand; I never Knew an instance of two pieces of cloth of the same number; the other things I can swear to, conscientiously, if I cannot legally; I missed them, and was in the constant habit of using them. From the extreme compunction of the prisoner, at the time he was taken (for he was agitated extremely), I have reason to believe it was his first offence; so much so, that it very much hurt me; he has came of a very respectable family, and therefore I wish to recommend him to mercy; he belongs to the most respecable family in the country that he came from.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness, who had known him from his infancy, and gave him an excellent character.

The Jury joined the prosecutor in recommending the prisoner to mercy.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction . and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-55

437. ANN TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a silver watch, value 26s. the property of William Hewitt .

WILLIAM HEWITT sworn. - I deal in old clothes ; I lost a silver watch on the 26th of June; about seven or eight o'clock I happened to get into a public-house, the sign of the Pigeons, in Storeditch, and had a pint or two of beer; not being used to drink in the morning, it overcame me; I got up about five that morning, I was in my senses, but not fit to go to work; the prisoner came in, and sat down in the same box, by the side of me; she said she had a very good room of goods and asked me whether I wanted a woman to live with; I told her, I must take a little consideration of that, I would go home and go to bed, and she went with me; when we got to my room, I said, if you are in distress here is a shilling, go and get some victuals, and I will go to bed; she went to buy some victuals, and I went to bed and fell asleep; I only pulled my shoes and stockings off; when I waked, I found my breeches unbuttoned and my watch was gone; I got up, and put on my shoes and stockings, and went in pursuit of her.

Q.Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. Never.

Q. What time was it when you laid down? - A. Somewhere about nine o'clock, it was about eleven o'clock or more, when I awoke; I went and searched all the pawnbrokers; I found it in pawn at Mr. Tyler's.

Q. What do you know it by? - A. The chain was part of a woman's scissars-chain; I have the other part of it in my pocket; the bolt of the inside case is broke, the picture on the inside of the out-side case, is the picture of St. Paul; after I had found the watch, I went in search of her, and found her at the Unicorn, in shoreditch; the same evening, I took her to the watch-house, and gave charge of her. (Produces the watch.)

JAMES- WILLIAM TYLER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker. On the 26th of June, in the forenoon, a woman of the name of Elizabeth Cork, came to our house and pledged a watch; the prisoner at the bar was with her, they came in together.

Q. Had you ever seen her before? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the same woman? - A. I am; the woman that pledged it said, it was her husband's.

JOSEPH CROCKER sworn. - I am an Headborough; I took charge of the prisoner at the watch-house, on Wednesday, the 26th of June, for stealing a watch from the prosecutor; I searched her, but found nothing belonging to this indictment,

Tyler. This is the watch; I took it in of the prisoner's companion.

Hewitt. This is my watch.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the prosecutor in my life, till he took me at the Unicorn.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-56

438. HENRY HARDING was indicted, for that he, in a certain field, and open place, near the King's-highway, upon William Broadfoot , did make an assault, on the 30th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 3l. a muslin handkerchief, value 12d. a pocket-handkerchief, value 12d. a pair of scissars, value 2d. two thimbles, value 2d. and 3s. the property of the said William Harding .

WILLIAM BROADFOOT sworn. - I am a journeyman tailor . On Sunday the 30th of June, I was robbed in a field, near Primerose-hill , about three o'clock in the morning; I was late going home to my lodging; I rapped at the door once, and found I was locked out, and being a fine morning, I thought I would take a walk in the fields, among the hay; I lodged at Mr. Hambler's, No. 7, Charlton-street, Fitzory-sqare; I came home between twelve and one, I did not leave the shop till eight o'clock, and then I went to receive my wages at the Black-horse, in Swallow-street; from there I went to the Robin-hood, in Windmill-street, and staid till twelve o'clock; I then went to my lodgings; I was not perfectly sober, but I knew what I did very well; I then went down Portland-road, by the Queen-and-Artichoke, till I got to the third field; I walked about for some time, I suppose about an hour, and then I laid down upon the hay, but did not sleep; when the prisoner at the bar came up to me, I was as sober as I am now; he and another man came up to me, I had never seen either of them before to my knowledge; they came up in a hurrying manner, and the prisoner speaking like an Irishman, asked me, what I belonged to? I said, I belonged to nothing, but I saw what he belonged to; then he began throwing hay over me; he asked me what countryman I was; I said, suppose I came from Newcastle; he kept throwing hay over me, and cried out to the other man, Tom, bring me some more hay.

Q. What countryman are you? - A. I was born at Limerick; he kept throwing the hay over my head, and was like to smother me; I got up and told him to be quiet, I was not disturbing them, and I did not know what right they had to disturb me; then the prisoner knocked me down with his fist; he struck me on the side of my head; I was a little stunned; he then took the handkerchief from my neck, and said, d-n you Tom, take that; I did not resist, because I was afraid they would kill me; the prisoner threw the handkerchief to the other

man; he then told me to take off my coat; he took hold of the cuff of the right sleeve, and tore it across; he got both my coat and waistcoat off; then he went a yard or two from me to the other man; he took the coat and waistcoat with him, and took every thing that was in the coat out of it, except a small button that was left in the corner of the pocket; there was a pocket-handkerchief, a pair of scissars, and a silver watch; I had put my watch in my coat pocket, because I thought it was safer there than any where else; he also took three shillings, two thimbles, and some half-pence out of my right hand waistcoat pocket; they took also a woman's huslif, that had the duplicate of a watch in it, which I had brought of a man of the name of Downer, who worked at the same place with me; it was pawned at Hill's in Brewer-street; one of them, I cannot say which, threw my coat and waistcoat back to me; the prisoner laughed at me, and said, that would learn me not to come out so soon in the morning again, and then they went away with the property. (Produces the coat torn across the sleve.)

Q. Do you mean to swear positively that it was the prisoner who tore that coat? - A. I do. On the 12th of August, I made an affidaved at Marlborough-street, and took out the watch, that the duplicate related to, which I lost. On the Wednesday morning after I had been robbed, I met with the prisoner upon the parade at St. James's, they were both soldiers, and were dressed in the uniform of the light company, the first regiment of Guards; I had been in the Park that same Sunday and Monday morning; on the Wednesday morning, the soldiers passed me once, and when they came up again, I saw the prisoner and knew him immediately; I had two officers with me, Treadway and Mumford; he was taken to Bow-street and searched, but nothing found upon him belonging to me; I first applied to Bow-street, on the Sunday morning, and from there I went to the Park; I am perfectly sure the prisoner is the man.

Q.Who was with you at the Robin-hood? - A. Mr. Johnson, he is here, and the foreman of the shop is here.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Who do you work for? - A.Messrs. Sitlers and Mathews, in Little Vine-street.

Q. Where is your pay-table? - A. The Blackhorse, in Swallow-street; I was there about an hour before I got paid.

Q. How came you to go to the other public-house, and leave your comrades? - A. I did not leave them, they went when I did; I drink at the other public-house every night; I left the Robinhood about twelve o'clock, and I did not leave the Black-horse till night eleven.

Q. Are there any other lodged in this house? - A. No.

Q. Were you ever locked out before? - A. No.

Q. How came you not to rap at the door a second time? - A. I had lodged there but a week, and it was a very fine morning.

Q. You were robbed of three shillings; what money did you receive at the pay-table? - A. One pound five shillings: I had a one pound note, but I cannot swear that I was robbed of it, because I did not see it; and I only speak to that I am certain they did take.

Q. Had you no stile, or ditch to get over, in the fields? - A. Yes.

Q. And you thought your watch safer in your coat-pocket than any where else? - A. Yes; I had often done so before.

Q. The watch you lost was a silver watch with two cases? - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of watch was it you got out of pawn? - A. A silver watch with two cases.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not swear before the Magistrate that watch was your own? - A. I swore that I had lost the duplicate.

Q. Is Downer here? - A. No; he was an apprentice at the shop I worked at, but he is gone away; he lives at No. 44, Cross-street.

Q. You did not think it necessary to bring him here to-day? - A. I did not know whether it was or not; and I could not afford to see Council to know what was right.

Q. These men came up to you when you were upon the ground, and began to throw hay over you? - A. Yes; and they felt all over me to see whether I had any thing in my breeches.

Q. Why did not you run away? - A. They could run after than me; and I had no thought that they meant to rob me.

Q. Not when they felt about your breeches? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, what did you think they meant? - A. I did not take much thought about it till they took my handkerchief.

Q. Was it day-light? - A. Yes; and they were both dressed in their uniforms.

Q. I take it, was only from the clothes that you knew the man again? - A. Yes, by his face and his speech.

Q.Then you did not know him till you heard him speak? - A. Yes, I did; but that made me the more certain; I went to the Orderly-room on the Sunday, and they told me to come on Wednesday, for the men would be all out that morning, and if I could see him I was to take him; I went on the Wednesday, and they were marching up to the Queen's guard, at Buckingham-house; he was apprehended in the ranks.

Q.How many shillings did you receive at the pay-table? - A.Five shillings and four-pence, and I paid my beer score for the week; I had about two shillings in my pocket before I received my pay.

Q.Court. Q.Perhaps you have heard of such a thing as a reward of forty pounds? - A. Yes.

Q.Had you heard of it before you were robbed? - A. Yes.

Q.When they took away your coat and waistcoat, did you see the things that they took out? A. No; I know I had the watch in my coat-pocket when I came past the Queen and Artichoke to go into the fields.

JOHN JOHNSON sworn - I am a tailor: I was at the Robin-hood on Saturday night, with Broad foot, he did not appear to me to be intoxicated; I went away between eleven and twelve, and saw no more of him that night.

ANDREW OLIVER sworn. - I am foreman at the shop where Broadfoot works: I was with him and the other men on the Saturday night when they received their wages; I paid him a one pound note, and some silver, and I think I left him there about eleven o'clock; I saw him on the on the Monday, and he told me he had been robbed by two men belonging to the first Regiment of Guards.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn - I apprehended the prisoner on Wednesday the 3d of July, as he was going from the Horse-guards to Buckingham house, Broadfoot said, that is the man that robbed me; we went with them to St. James's, they were drawn up there, and captaine kelly said to Broad foot, young man, one soldier is very much like another, consider the situation that the man stands in; and he said he was the man; the prisoner told captain Kelly he was at work, as a tailor, all Saturday night, and till eleven o'clock on Sunday mornning, at Mrs. Nash's, a widow woman, No. 12, in Shepherd's-market; that he had made a pair of breeches and a waistcoat for Mr. Barrett, a tailor, in Shepherd's-market; the prosecutor said, he was positive to the prisoner; he said there was another man with him whose name was Tom; I took him to the office, and told the Magistrate that captain Kelly said he was a clean soldier, and that he had sent for the parties the prisoner had mentioned; but they did not come forward, and the Magistrate ordered it to stand over till the evening; I went to Mrs. Nash, but she was not at home; then I went to Mr. Barrett's, but he did not come to the office; Broadfoot first came to the office on the Sunday morning, he left me in order to go the Orderly-room, and I did not see him again till Wednesday morning.

(Thomas Mumford, the other officer, confirmed the evidence of treadway).

The prisoner stated in his defence, that he was as work for Mr. Barrett at the time of the robbery.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN BARRETT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I am a master tailor, No. 19, Shepherd's-market, May-fair: The prisoner worked for me; he was taken up on a Wednesday morning, I believe, in July; the last work that he brought home himself was on the Friday before that; there was a person in Ryder-street, St. James's that employed him at the same time, but I don't recollect his name; he had then a pair of small clothes to make for me, which were sent home on the Thursday morning after he was taken; I have always found him with considerable sums of money. On the day that he was taken up, an officer come to me, and I asked him if I was compelled to go; and he said there was no compulsion, it was only to speak in behalf of the man, and my business was such that I could not go.

JOHN NASH sworn - I have known the prisoner four years, he has always bore an excellent character.

Court. Q.Are you any relation to Mrs. Nash, No. 12, Shepherd's-market? - A.She is my wife.

Q. Is there any Mrs. Nash, a widow, there? - A. No.

Q. When did the prisoner last work for you? - A. I cannot call it to memory, I have been out of the country, I was obliged to go over to Ireland; and I left the prisoner in care of my busness.

Q. When did you go to Ireland? - A. The last 10th of June was twelve months, and I returned home five weeks ago last Thursday; I am in the army.

The prisoner also called his serjeant, and three other witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-57

439. THOMAS-SHAFTOE VAUGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , two paintings in gilt frames, value 10l. four pair of silk gloves, value 12s. and two pair of men's silk gloves, value 4s. the property of Richard Law .

(It appearing in evidence that the property was obtained under false pretences, the Court were of opinion it did not amount to a felony). NOT GUILTY .

(There were two other indictments against the same prisoner, but the transactions appearing to be of a similar nature, the Court directed the jury to acquit the prisoner).

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-58

440. RICHARD CREEKS was indicted for sodomy . NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-59

441. ANN EMMISTON was indicted for that she, on the 19th of August , in the King's highway, in and upon Elizabeth Wright , did make an assault, putting her in fear, and taking from her person a black satin bonnet, value 2s. the property of the said Elizabeth.

ELIZABETH WRIGHT sworn. - I live No. 29, Crown street, Soho: On the 19th of August I lost a bonnet off my head in St. John's-street, Clerkenwell ; I had been to spend the evening with some friends in Old-street; it was a little after eleven o'clock at night, and I was going home alone.

Q. What was the name of your friend? - A. One Reeves; I left her about ten minutes before eleven, I believe; I was stooping down to tie my patten tight, it had been a wet night, when somebody came up to me, and gave me a push, and said, what are you doing here; I made no answer, and my bonnet was gone in an instant, I could see no more of her; I could see that she had on a black gown.

Q. How do you know that that woman was the woman at the bar? - A.She lisped, and I saw her afterwards with the bonnet on her head; the watchman advised me to go to the watch house, which I did; and in less than ten minutes afterward, the prisoner was brought in with my bonnet on her head.

Q. Had the woman that took your bonnet any thing on her head at the time? - A. I cannot say whether she had or not; I know the bonnet by my own work in it, I altered it from what it was when I first bought it; the constable took it into his charge, and has had it ever since.

Q. Was your bonnet pinned on? - A. No, it was quite loose upon my head, it was gone in a minute; when she came into the watch-house, I said, young woman, that is my bonnet; then she made use of a bad expression, and said d-n your eyes, how came you to say it is your bonnet; I bought it half an hour ago, and gave a shilling for it. I never saw her before; I told her I did not want her locked up, nor to do any thing to her but to have my bonnet; and she said, if she could get me out of the watch-house, she would not leave me while there was a rag to my back.

JOHN HADLET sworn. - I was the officer of the night: About half past eleven o'clock the last witness came into the watch-house, and said she had been robbed her bonnet; she told me the woman that robbed her had a black gown on; she said she should know her again if she was to see her; she sat down, and in a few minutes the prisoner came and made a noise at the watch-house door, damning and swearing, and breeding a riot; I desired the patrol to open the door and let her in; I asked her if that was the person that had robbed her, and if that was the bonnet upon her head; she said it was; I asked her if she had known her before; she said she had not; the prisoner said, she had given a woman a shilling for it; I asked her where the woman was, and she did not know any thing about her; in consequence of that, I thought it necessary to take charge of her; I kept her in the watch-house, took her before the Magistrate, and she was committed. (Produces a bonnet).

Wright. This is my bonnet, I know it by my own work.

Hadley. This is the bonnet that was upon the prisoner's head; she had a black gown on when she came into the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. I met a woman on the 19th of August, she said she was very much distressed, and I gave her a shilling for this bonnet.

GUILTY (Aged 19.)

Of stealing, but not violently .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-60

442. HANNAH GREENFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , a metal watch, value 20s. the property of John Washbourne .

JOHN WASHBOURNE sworn. - I have been in the public line, but am now in no employ; I lost my watch between eleven and twelve at night, on the 14th of July; I had been at one Mr. Meane's, in Bedfordbury, and was going home to Sommerstown alone; I did not see any body, nor enter into conversation with any body at all; the prisoner stopped me at the top of Drury-lane, and asked me if I would give her any thing to drink; I went with her to a public-house, and gave her a pint of beer.

Q. What public-house was it? - A. I do not know; I never was in it before or since; it was very near Drury-lane; I do not know that I staid there one minute scarce, no longer than to pay for the beer and come away.

Q. Did you know her before? - A. I did not.

Q. How came you to go with her then? - A. It was very imprudent in me so to do; when I left the public-house, and was going home, she followed me.

Q. Had you your watch when you went into the public-house? - A. Yes, that I am sure of, because I had occasion to look just before what it was

o'clock; she followed me from the public-house into Short's Gardens to make water, and she snatched the watch out of my pocket; I felt it go from me; she ran away, I ran after her along Short's Gardens, I followed her, and cried stop thief; she was stopped by the watchman; when I came up, I told the watchman she had robbed me of my watch; she denied it; she was searched, and the watchman found it in the tail of her gown; he took her to the watch-house; the watchman has got the watch.

Q. How old are you? - A. I am in the 57th year of my age.

PATRICK M'CARTY sworn. - I am a watchman; I apprehended the prisoner on the 14th of July; I heard somebody cry stop thief; I stopped her, I searched her. and found the watch upon her; Dalton and I always help one another; he came up just after I had found the watch. (Produces it).

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

- DALTON sworn. - I am a watchman, I watch on one side of the street, and M'Carty on the other, I came up just as M'Carty had taken the prisoner; he had taken the watch from her.

Q.(To M'Carty.) - Upon what part of her person did you find the watch? - A. Folded up in her gown tail, under her apron, and she gave me two or three pinches, I suppose to try whether I could keep a secret.

Prisoner's defence. Between nine and ten I met this man, and he insisted upon my going with him to the public-house; he gave me his watch till he got change for a guinea; and, when he had had satisfaction with me, he wanted the watch back again, and I was not going to prostitute my carcase for nothing.

Q.(To M'Carty). What did she say when you took her? - A. She denied having the watch at the Justice's, and before the constable of the night, she said, he had given her the watch to get a bed for herself, and he pulled out either a seven shilling piece or a half guinea, I cannot tell which, and said, I should sooner have given you this than my watch.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-61

443. THOMAS DOLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , two pair of leather boots, value 20s. the property of Baltis Ford .

BALTIS FORD sworn. I keep a shoe warehouse in Swallow-street . On the 23d of last month, I saw the prisoner, about five o'clock, on the outside of my door, where my boots hang, with a pair of boots in his hand; he then went about two yards from where I first saw him, and then I saw him take another pair of boots off the rail; he put them both into one hand, paused a bit, and then walked away; I followed him about as far again as the end of this Court, and overtook him; I took the boots out of his hand, and took him to Marlborough-street; when I stopped him, I told him one pair of boots might do, and he smiled.

Q. Are you sure they were your boots? - A. Yes. (Produces them).

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. - Q. When you stopped him he smiled and laughed? - A. Yes.

Q. He was not running? - A. No, walking.

RICHARD GREEN sworn. - I live with Mr. Ford, I saw the prisoner take a pair of boots from the shop window, and I told Mr. Ford of it.

The Prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY (Aged 23.)

Confined two months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-62

444. WALTER DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a quart pewter pot, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Elliot .

WILLIAM ELLIOT sworn. - I keep a public-house , the sign of the Angel, in Marybone-lane . On the 10th of September, I was at work in the cellar when the prisoner was brought into my house; I was called up, and my neighbour, George James , had hold of him; at the same time the prisoner was taking a quart pot out of his pocket; I know it to be mine; I went to Marybone-street for a constable; I had seen the prisoner several times before about the street; I asked him the reason he had been guilty of such a petty theft as to steal pots; he said, he took them on account of being in distress.

GEORGE JAMES sworn. - I am an umbrella-maker, opposite the prosecutor. On Tuesday morning, the 10th of September, I was standing at my shop door, I saw a strange person go in at my passage door; when I had hung up an umbrella, which I had in my hand, I followed him, and, as I got to the door, I met him coming out; I asked him who he was; he said he wanted Mrs. Brooke; I said no such person lived in the house; says he, I know that she lives in the next street; says I, how come you to call here then; he said he was in a great hurry, and wished I would let him go; I said no, I shall not let you go till I have seen what you have put in your pocket; I put my hand down his coat, and felt something like a pot in his pocket; I told him, I dare say that belonged to my neigh

bour opposite, he must settle that with him; he said, he was in very great distress, and begged I would let him go; I told him. I must take him over the way; when I had taken him over the way, I found this pot in his pocket (produces it); Mr. Elliott went for a constable, and we took him to Marlborough-street. (The pot was deposed to by Mr. Elliott.)

Prisoner's defence. I have two motherless children; I have made many applications to the parish, and they would never relieve me, nor take my children; I confess what I have done, but it was from extreme distress.

GUILTY (Aged 50.)

Confined two months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before LORD ELDON .

Reference Number: t17990911-63

445. WILLIAM CANNON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , two black silk cloaks, value 10s. 6d. two cotton gowns, value 15s. a cotton shawl, value 6d. a pair of child's cotton stockings, value 2l. and a lawn umbrella, value 4s. the property of Richard Webb .

ELIZABETH WEBB sworn. - I am the wife of Richard Webb, No. 9, New-inn-passage, Clare-market . On Friday, the 30th of August, about a quarter past eight in the evening, I undressed my child, and went up into the two-pair of stairs to put her to bed; I live in the one-pair of stairs; I had been there about two minutes; I heard a foot fall upon the stairs, which made a great noise; I immediately ran down to the one pair of stairs, and enquired of the person below if she had heard any thing; then I returned up stairs again into my room, and missed two gowns off a mahogany dining table; I then ran down stairs into the passage, and the first person I saw, was a person of the name of Thomas Pring ; in consequence of his direction, I ran after the prisoner, and so did Mr. Pring; I lost sight of them in Clare-street; I returned home then, and missed two cloaks; I then ran out again into Houghton-street, and there I saw Pring and the prisoner; he brought the prisoner into Mrs. King's apartments below stairs; the prisoner begged for mercy, and said, nobody could hurt him but Mr. Pring; Mr. Pring then delivered me the clothes from under his arm, (produces them); there was an umbrella, the child's stockings, and a shawl, that I had not missed; I had missed the rest.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to swear these things are your property? - A. Yes.

THOMAS PRING sworn. - On the 30th of August, I saw the prisoner come out of Mrs. Webb's house with something which I took to be a child; a woman came out and asked a child if she had seen any body come out; I said, I had seen a man come out, and I immediately ran up the passage; he was then out of sight; when I got into White-horse-yard, I observed the prisoner walking very leisurely; I asked him, what he had got there; he said, nothing but my own; I told him, if he had nothing but his own he would not object to my seeing; I immediately collared him, I took him back to the light, and he said, he would go with me very willingly any where, and so he did a second time; he went with me thirty or forty yards out of White-horse-yard into Stanhope-street; he then said, he would be d-d if he would go with me, and immediately a scuffle ensued; in the scuffle I threw him down, and the things all sell from him; I suppose, upon the alarm of the scuffle, a number of the neighbours came out; among the rest, I saw Mrs. Jolley, I desired her to pick these things up, and give them to me, which she did; I took them under my arm, and collared him with the other, and took them to Mrs. Webb's.

Q. Are you sure that the things Mrs. Jolley picked up, were the same that dropped from the prisoner? - A. Yes, I saw her pick them up; the prisoner begged my pardon, said it was his first offence, and that if I appeared against him he should be transported for house-breaking.

Q. Had you made any promise if he would confess? - A. No, I had not; I took him to the watch-house, and the next day I went to Bow-street; he was committed.

TABITHA JOLLEY sworn. - I live at No. 54, Stanhope-street. On the 30th of August I heard a noise at the window; I looked out, and thought it was going to be a fight, till Mr. Pring called out, you are the thief; I then ran out, and trod upon something that was very soft, and Mr. Pring immediately called out to me, Mrs. Jolley, pick up the things; I picked them up all in a lump, and put them under his arm; I went with Pring, and saw him deliver to Mrs. Webb, two gowns, and two cloaks, and an umbrella; the prisoner begged for mercy, and said exactly what Mr. Pring has related. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Webb.)

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the things, and that man came up and apprehended me; I told him, they were my own; I thought they were my own when I had picked them up.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before LORD ELDON .

Reference Number: t17990911-64

446. JOHN BROWN and CHRISTOPHER HOUSE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on

the 20th of July , eight three-penny loaves of bread, value 2s. the property of William Lawrence .

There not being a little of evidence to affect the prisoners, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-65

447. ANN HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , two linen sheets, value 9s. a cotton counterpane, value 10s. a cotton jacket, value 12d. and a linen cloth, value 2d. the property of Matilda Belgrave .

MATILDA BELGRAVE sworn. - I live at No. 32, Peter-street, Soho ; I was robbed on Saturday, the 9th of March, the prisoner was my servant , she had been with me three days; I met her in the street first of all, and took her out of charity; she met me frequently in the street, and asked me, if I had any thing to do for her; at last, I told her, I had a little washing to do. On the 6th of March, when I employed her, she came at seven in the morning, and washed the things; I told her, if she was out of employ, it would be much better to have a servitude; I agreed to give her two shillings a week; on the 9th of March, I went to market, and left her in the house; I was gone about three quarters of an hour; I came home, and found my door locked; I then went down to the people in the shop; I lodge in the one-pair of stairs; after making enquiries, I went up stairs, and saw the glitter of a key in a little slit upon the second-floor stairs; I then opened the door and went in; I had occasion to go into the bed-room, and missed all the things mentioned in the indictment, and others which are not found; I found my property at the pawnbroker's, his name is Hewitt, the corner of Queen-street, about seven weeks ago; the pawnbroker has them.

Q. When was the prisoner taken up? - A. At the time that I was told that my things were at Mr. Hewitt's, about two months after the robbery; I was yesterday obliged to take up the evidence, and had her bound over at Bow-street, because the prisoner had threatened her life; her name is Mary Simpson.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you lodge? - A. No. 32, Peter-street, Soho, I have lived there two years.

Q. How many servants have you taken in that time? - A. I never employ a servant, only I took this one out of mere charity.

Q. She was the first servant you ever had? - A. No; I have had servants before.

Q. How many? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. More than three or four, or five or six? - A. In all probability I might.

Q. How lately had you seen those things before? - A. I do not understand that word.

Q. How lately had you seen the things that you have stated yourself to have lost? - A. I don't understand what it means.

Q. How lately had you seen the counterpane and other things? - A. At Bow-street.

Q. How lately before you had seen them at Bow-street? - Not after I had lost them.

Q. How lately before that? - A. The very night the prisoner was ironing the things, when I went out.

Q. How many persons lodge in the same house with you? - A.Nobody but myself.

Q. What time of the day was it that you went to market? - A. Between seven and eight in the evening.

Q. Did you lock your door? - A. No; I left the prisoner in care of the house.

Q. Were you on terms of intimacy and visited the other persons in the house? - A. No; only saying, how do you do, not intimate by any means.

Q. You never saw the things for seven weeks afterwards? - A. No, till they were brought to Bow-street.

Q. It now and then happens that persons get into distressed circumstances; have you never pawned these things? - A. Upon my oath I did not.

Q. Did you not pawn any thing during these seven weeks? - A. I did not pawn any one single article.

Q. Are you in any business yourself? - A. Yes; I officiate in making these little straw-bonnets.

Q. That is your mode of livelihood? - A. Yes.

Q. And the only mode of livelihood? - A. Yes.

Q. And you have never pawned any single article either by yourself, or directing any other person? - A. No; I have not.

Q. That you are certain of? - A. Yes.

HENRY HARDY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Hewitt, in Greek-street, Soho; I took in a counterpane, a pair of sheets, a cotton bed-gown, and a napkin, from the prisoner, on the 9th of March; it was late in the evening on Saturday night.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - A. I had.

Q. In what name were they pawned? - A. Ann Hill, for Jane Carley .

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know Matilda, the prosecutrix? - A. No; I do not.

Q. You knew Ann Hill before? - A. She was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards.

Q. She pawned these things in the name of Jane Carley? - A. Yes; she laid it was a mistress of her's.

Q. You did not understand her to pawn them

for herself? - A. No; she pledged them for her mistress.

Q. How long have you known Ann Hill? - A. It may be about fourteen or fifteen months.

Q. Had she ever pawned other things in the same name and for the same person? - A. Yes; for Mrs. Carley.

Prisoner's defence. She sent me with these things to pawn, and desired me not to pawn them in her name, but in the name of a mistress I had formerly lived with, for fear the man that she lived with should find it out.

Q.(To Matilda Belgrave .) Upon the oath that you have taken, is there any truth in what she has said? - A. No, none.

Q. Did you give her these things to pawn, and desire her not to pawn them in your name? - A. No, it is as false as God is true; Mrs. Carley is a bawdyhouse-keeper; the property is mine, the sheets are marked C. B. they were made me a present of by Christopher Buckleto .

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-66

448. DANIEL ASH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of June , a coat, value 7s. three aprons, value 3s. a pair of stockings, value 2s. and a waistcoat, value 3s. 6d. the property of Benjamin Jessott .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-67

449. ESTHER MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a white muslin tambour cloak, value 2l. an India Bengal table-cloth, value 2l. three printed cotton gowns, value 2l. a gold fillagree worked timble, value 3l. a gold ring, value 10s. and a blue cloth spencer, value 16s. the property of Searles Wood , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Spirati .(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

MARY-CATHERINE- ROSINA WOOD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Of what country are you a native? - A. I was born at Stockholm, in Sweden, the wife of Searles Wood, chief officer of the Calcutta East Indiaman ; in the month of June and July last, I lodged at Pimlico , in the house of Mrs. Spirati; the prisoner was my servant ; she went away, I believe, on a Tuesday in July; I had given her warning, and she said, she was determined to go; she took the key away with her; I never saw the key till Mr. Luard, my attorney, sent a person for it; it was found in the area; two or three days after I was arrested by the prisoner; a day or two after that.

Q. Upon your being discharged, did you examine your wearing apparel? - A.I did the next morning, I believe on the Thursday, and missed the things stated in the indictment; I then applied to the office in Queen-square, for a warrant, and the prisoner was taken up.

Q. Had you ever given the prisoner permission to take any of these things out of the house? - A. No; never.

Q.Had you ever desired her to take any of them to pawn? - A. No.

Q. Did you even know the meaning of the word pawn, till it was explained to you by your attorney? - A. Never.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long had this servant been with you? - A. The 20th of last August would have made a year.

Q. I believe you formerly lodged with Mrs. Read? - A. Yes; that is the lady. (Pointing to her.)

Q. The prisoner was a servant to Mrs. Read, was she not? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take her from Mrs. Read's service into your own? - A. Yes.

Q. You missed all these things at once? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not look to see if any thing was missing till after you had been arrested? - A. No.

Q. You think this woman left you on the Tuesday? - A. Yes.

Q. She told you she was determined to go, and therefore she did not leave you without notice? - A. She did not stay the month.

Q. At the very time she left you, did she not desire you to settle her wages? - A. No.

Q. Did you see her the evening of that day when she left you in the morning? - A. Not till the next day.

Q. For what purpose did she call upon you the next day? - A. Saying she wanted her clothes.

Q. Where were her clothes? - A.In her room.

Q. Who had the key of that room? - A. She had.

Q. Did you refuse to let her have her clothes? - A. No; I sent word she should call the next morning at ten o'clock, and I would settle with her for her wages; and that I did not detain her clothes, for she had the key.

Q. Had she then the liberty to take away her clothes if she had been so disposed? - A.Certainly she had.

Q. Had you possession of that key before you were arrested? - A. No.

Q. Had she never offered the key to you? - A. No.

Q. Did she not offer the key to you, and tell you to look at that room, and to look at her clothes? - A. No.

Q. Did you not refuse to take the key, and did she not throw it down in your presence? - A. No.

Q. Be so good as tell me where this key was found at last; was it not found in the area of your own house? - A. Yes.

Q. Am I to understand you that you never knew of any duplicates till after you had taken this woman up? - A. I have not seen them now.

Q.Did she never give you a bill, or any body in your presence? - A. There was no bill delivered to me; there was one delivered to Mr. Luard, but I never saw it till after I was arrested.

Q.Did she never come to ask you for wages? - A. No.

Q. Did she not come to ask you for wages? - A. No.

Q. Did she not come to ask you for wages in the presence of this person who is sitting by me? - A. No.

Q. Then you never heard of any request of wages from her to you? - A. Never.

Q.Were you present when the constable opened the door of the prisoner's room? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he open it with the key which had been found in your area? - A. I believe so, it appeared so.

Q. Were there any duplicates found at that time? - A. The constable said so, I was in the room.

Q. Did you see them? - A. I saw a bit of paper in his hand, I did not look to see what it was; the constable said they were just the things he looked for; he said they were duplicates.

Q. Was the key in the box, or was the box broke open? - A. He broke open the box.

Q. Are you sure he broke the box open? - A. Yes, quite sure; I was not alone.

Q. Was there a key in the lock of the box? - A. No.

Q. Was Miss O'Hara with you, the daughter of the General, at that time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner never shew you any duplicates in the presence of Miss O'Hara? - A. No.

Q. And you are confident you never yourself pawned any thing? - A. No.

Q. Nor never were with your servant when she pawned any thing? - A. No.

Q. What I mean by pawning is, taking clothes to a shop and getting money upon them? - A. I never did.

Q. Nor you never saw her do any such thing? - A. No.

Q.Nor ever went with her for any such purpose? - A. No.

Q. I believe, on the Saturday, when you took her up, you sent for her yourself to come to your house? - A. No, the constable was to look for her; he asked me where she lived, and I could not tell him.

Q. At the time you were arrested, did you offer to give up her clothes if she would pay the costs of the action? - A. I did not.

Q. Then, till she left your service, you had not the least suspicion that she had pawned any of your property? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. If you wanted any money, where could you apply for it? - A. To Mr. Greenhill.

Q. Was he Mr. Wood's agent? - A. Yes.

Q.Whenever you wanted money did you apply to him? - A. Always.

Q.Had you always money when you applied for it? - A. Always.

Examined by the Court. Q.How long have you lived in this kingdom? - A. About nine years.

Q. When this girl came to you, did you make any agreement what notice she should give or receive before she left you? - A. A month's warning.

Q. Did you give a month's warning? - A. I did, and she went away the next day; she said she would not stay.

Q. Who arrested you? - A.Three men.

Q. Did you know what you were arrested for? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. It was the servant, certainly.

Q. Did those three men keep you in your lodgings, or take you from your lodgings? - A. They came first and burst the door open; the young person that opened the door they pushed in, and forced themselves up stairs.

Q. Where did they take you to? - A. They were to take me to a prison, but I was very much hurt, and one of the officers took me to his own house.

Q. How long did you stay in the officer's house? - A. Till Mr. Luard came to relieve me; I sent for Mr. Greenhill.

Q. How long might you be in that house? - A. They arrested me at nine at night, and at eleven at night Mr. Luard came and relieved me.

Q. If I wanted to pawn any thing, supposing it was this tambour cloak, I should take it to the shop of a person, and desire him to let me have the use of some money; then, when I carry him back the money, he lets me have the cloak; - do you understand me? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever do any such thing as that with any of these articles? - A. No.

Q.Nor did you know that your servant did any such thing till after she had left you? - A. No.

Q.And that you are positively sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever pawn any other goods in any other place, or upon any former occasion? - A. Never.

JOHN MARSDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an officer belonging to the Police-office, Queen-square: I was sent by the Magistrate's orders to search the prisoner's room, at Mrs. Wood's; here is a list of the articles that I found in that room, with my name signed to it.

Q.How did you open the door? - A. It was opened in my presence, I don't think I ever had the key at all; I found the prisoner's boxes locked, there were two of them, I broke open one of them, I opened the other with a key that I found in the box that I broke open; I found a duplicate in the first box, (produces a duplicate of a gold thimble for twelve shillings); I apprehended the prisoner the next day, in the road leading to Chelsea; before I searched her, she gave me this ticket. (Producing it).

Q.Before that, had you told her upon whose charge you were apprehending her? - A. I had.

Q.(To Mrs. Wood.) In what street did you live? - A. In Queen's row, Plimlico; it is likewise called Queen's-row Terrace.

Court. This duplicate is in the name of Mrs. Mason, King-street.

Mansden. When she gave me the ticket, I accused her with other things of her mistress's; she said she would take me to the place where they were in pledge, and that she had pledged them by her mistress's consent, and gave her the tickets. I went with her to the pawnbroker's.

Q.Was this after, or before you had searched her box? - A. The next day. After I had found the duplicates in her box, I went to the pawnbroker with her, and she called for the articles; I think there was a spencer and three linen gowns, a tambour cloak, and a ring.

Q. Had you then asked her whether she had any duplicates? - A. Yes, before that; she said she had given them to her mistress: I took her to Queen-square Office, and she was committed.

Court. Q. Were any other duplicates found, to your knowledge, besides those for the thimble and the cloak? - A. None.

Q. Did you find any ring upon her? - A. No.

Cross examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The very first time you questioned her about it, she said she had done it at the request of her mistress? - A. Yes, that is the account she always gave.

Court. Q. Do you know what she was going about when you arrested her? - A. She said she was going to Bow-street, to see her attorney.

Q.Did she tell you who her attorney was? - A. Mr. Combes; she was coming towards the Park.

Court. Q. You were present when the duplicate was found in the box? - A. Yes.

Q.Was Mrs. Wood in the room at that time? - A. Yes.

Q.Did she appear to understand what it was? - A. Not at that time, she did not; I explained to her that it was a duplicate of a thimble, and that it was in pawn; she told me that in a bill she received from the prisoner, there was something like a duplicate, and she supposed that was it. I understand the duplicate is of two articles, one belonging to the mistress, and the other to the servant.

JOHN DOBREE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mary Rochfort , Jermyn-street.

Q.Look at that duplicate? - (The duplicate of the thimble). - A. This is our duplicate, (produces a gold thimble); I took it in in the name of Mary Mason , No. 7. Jermyn-street.

Q.Does this scratch at the bottom stand for Jermyn-street? - A. Yes, it was done in a hurry, and it was late on a Saturday night when she pledged it.

Q.Do you remember the person of the prisoner? - A. Yes, she is the person that pledged it.

Q.Did she ever pledge any thing with you before? - A. No.

Q.Is it not very common for persons to pledge articles of their own in names that do not belong to them? - A. It is very common.

Q.It is a flag of distress that they don't chuse to display? - A. Yes.

NICHOLAS MORRITT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in York-street, Westminster. (Produces a white demity, petticoat, a muslin cloak, a table-cloth, a spencer, three gowns, and the duplicates).

Prisoner. The petticoat is my own.

Mr. Gurney Here is a table-cloth, 30th of March, for 4s. Mary Mason , No. 24, Ward's-row; another, on the 8th of June, a gown and spencer, for 7s. Mary Mason , Pimlico; another, 18th of June, two gowns, 7s. 6d. Mary Mason , York-street; 29th of June, a ring, 7s. Ann Mason , King-street, Pimlico.

Court. It seems to me rather odd that such articles should be taken in from such a woman, with different places of abode; it looks odd.

Mr. Knowlys. There is nothing more common than for persons to pledge goods in names that are not their own.

Mrs. Wood. They are all mine, except the petticoat.

THOMAS GREENHILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you ship the adventures of petty officers? - A. Yes.

Q.Are you the agent of Mr. Wood, of Calcutta? - A. I am.

Q.In the character of his agent, were you commissioned to supply Mrs. Wood with money, while he was upon his voyage? - A. Yes, without limitation.

Q.Whenever Mrs. Wood applied to you for supplies of money, had she them? - A. Yes; this is an extract from my ledger,

Q.Between the 30th of March and the 30th of June, had she any supply from you? - A. The 24th March, she had ten guineas; April 4th, ten guineas; May 16th, eighteen pounds, three shillings; July 8th, twenty-five pounds.

Q. If Mrs. Wood had applied for twenty pounds when she applied for ten pounds, would she have had it? - A.Certainly.

Court. Q. Did you ever refuse to let her have money? - A. Never.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you have now a great deal more money in your hands than you have paid? - A. A great deal.

Q. Upon Mrs. Wood being arrested, you were sent for? - A. Yes; but I was out of town, and Mr. Luard was sent for.

FRANCIS LUARD sworn - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am an attorney in Gray's-inn; on the 12th of July last, I was sent for by Mrs. Wood, I found her at the private house of a sheriff's officer.

Q. Was any bill delivered to you by the prisoner? - A.Yes, the next morning; I had heard of it the day of the arrest, for balance of account for wages, and money laid out in small articles of housekeeping.

Q.Was that the arrest? - A. No, the arrest was for the clothes of the prisoner, of the value of ten pounds and upwards, which she swore in the affidavit she refused to deliver. I desired Mrs. Wood to pay every thing that was justly due to her. I went the next morning; Mr. Armitage met me, and said the attorney was there with the bill; he was here just now: he calls himself Combes, but he is not upon the list. The bill that was delivered to me my agent has lost, since we have attended this Court; the last words of that account were, part of a pledge, half-a-crown.

Q. Was there any thing else about pledges in any part of that bill? - A. None.

Q. Had you any conversation with Mrs. Wood? - A. Yes.

Q. Did it appear to you, from that conversation, that Mrs. Wood understood what a pledge meant? - A. She did not; I had the greatest difficulty in the world to make her understand it; I spoke to her in the English language, and I spoke to her in the French; I put it in every possible shape before I could make her understand it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. A part of that bill was for part of a pledge, half-a-crown, that she had pawned, somehow or other, on account of some pledge? - A. Yes.

Q. And this was before Mrs. Wood had made any charge of felony against her? - A. It was.

Q. Therefore it was drawing Mrs. Wood's attention to the subject of pledges? - A. Not to my knowledge, or in my judgment; it drew her attention to something which turned out to be very bad.

Court. Q. This hill was delivered to you with the article, part of a pledge? - A. Yes.

Q.Was it in consequence of that article, that you advised any step to be taken? - A. To go to Queen-square, and get a search-warrant; she did so.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had heard of a demand of wages? - A. Yes, pending the arrest; before she was bailed.

Q. Had you heard from Mrs. Wood that there had been such a demand of wages? - A. I had.

Q. Then Mrs. Wood had been apprized of a demand of wages by her, before she was taken up? - A. I believe so, to the best of my recollection.

Q.Have you any doubt of it? - A. No; and when I say demand of wages, I mean a demand of the balance of a general account of money laid out, and wages together.

Examined by the Court. Q. Do you mean the demand of the bill, then? - A. Yes, the balance stated at the foot of this paper.

Q.Had Mrs. Wood signed that bill at that time? - A.

Q. In answer to Mr. Knowlys's question, you said you had heard from Mrs. Wood, that this woman had made a demand of wages upon her: now are you correct in that? - A. To the best of my recollection, I am.

Q. You say it was in consequence of your advice that Mrs. Wood went to Queen-square? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mrs. Wood shew any reluctance to follow your advice? - A.None.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime of which my mistress wrongfully accuses me; my mistress went with me to Jermyn-street, and stood just by the pawnbroker's till I came out again, to receive the duplicate and the money for the thimble; I gave her the duplicate and twelve shillings; she went to a fishmonger's shop in St. James's-market, and laid out two shillings of it in some salmon for Sunday's dinner; then she went to the poulterer's shop opposite, and bought a fowl at four shillings and sixpence, for the same dinner; the remainder of the money was to pay a grocer's bill that was at home, one pound, two shillings, and threepence-halfpenny. A lace cloak was pledged for one pound, in the beginning of last winter, my mistress gave it me from her drawers, to pledge; the lace is on her handkerchief that she has now round her neck; the money was not enough to pay the baker's bill, and she asked me to lend her my gown and petticoat, because there was not enough to pay the baker; his name is Drake. I pledged them for seven shillings and sixpence: the man brought a note from his master, saying, that he should summons Mrs. Wood if she did, not

pay it. Another time I pledged, a shawl for two shillings; the shawl will be produced that was pledged at the same time as the gown, petticoat, and ring were pledged: two shillings went for an ounce of tea and a pound of sugar: before I fetched the shawl home, I pledged a gown and a shawl for four shillings and sixpence, and that was to buy two shilling's-worth of oysters, and a pennyworth of cheese: she gave me one shilling of the money to fetch the shawl home, and I pledged a dirty handkerchief from my own neck, for one shilling, for some green tea, when she was going to have company; and a gold necklace she gave to a French gentleman to pledge at Mr. Turner's, in Panton-street: she gave me the duplicates to keep, as it would hurt her very much if any ladies should see them in her apartment: she went to this French gentleman's for a duplicate, he lived at No. 62, Swallow-street, a stationer's shop, and I brought it home, and put it in my box: she gave this French gentleman a silver tea-pot and stand, and five guineas and a half out of her own pocket, in gold, because the French gentleman was going to be arrested; she left herself without a farthing of money; at that time I bought her a quarter of a pound of bees-sausages, with three halfpence that I had in my pocket; this was somewhere about January: when I came away, my month was up and three days over, and she pushed me out of her apartments, and said I should not stay another moment in her house, nor I should not have my clothes nor my wages, and I now make a demand of my wages, four pounds, ten shillings, and sixpence, and a bundle of asparagus, four shillings and sixpence, which I did not put down in my bill, and I wish to have that, and my clothes. Before I got out of the house I turned back to ask my mistress if all the duplicates were safe; and she told me she had got them safe: all the things that are pledged now was to buy dinners and things when she had company: my mistress gave me two long-sleeve gowns to pledge, and I have got a witness here who was in the house at the time my mistress made me go out with them; she told me if I did leave her it should be the worst day's work I ever did, for she would ruin me and my family; I said, as to my family, she could not hurt them, and as to the duplicates, they were in my name, and I was very sorry for it; she might ruin me, but she could not touch my family. Miss O'Hara was in the room when I asked her if she had got her duplicates safe; I got to the door, and Miss O'Hara was in the room, with the door open: I hope Miss O'Hara will speak the truth between the prisoner and the prosecutor, as her evidence will be of great service to me.

For the Prisoner.

AURELIA O'HARA sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you have been an intimate acquaintance of Mrs. Wood's for so me time? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe when the prisoner was taken before the Justice, you were examined by the Justice? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. On the part of Mrs. Wood? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you know who sent for you to the Justice? - A. No.

Q. Are you subpoenaed to attend this trial by the prisoner? - A. I believe so.

Q. I believe you have received her subpoena inclosed in a letter? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not give directions to be denied, so that she was obliged at last to take that course, to subpoena you? - A. I did not give any directions to be denied; but I did not like to come here.

Q. Have you not endeavoured to avoid being subpoenaed on the part of the prisoner? - A. Not particularly on any part.

Q. I should be glad if you would explain what you mean, by not particularly endeavouring to avoid being subpoenaed? - A. I would not wish to come here on any part.

Q. Now you are here, I will beg of you to tell us all that you know respecting the questions I am about to ask you - Were you present when this girl was turned out of Mrs. Wood's service? - A. I was in the room when she went away.

Q. Did Mrs. Wood part with her in anger? - A. I do not know, I am sure.

Q. You must know whether she parted with her in anger or not. - A. I believe she did.

Q. There were words between them at that time? - A. They did not agree.

Q. Among the words, I will trouble you to recollect, whether the word duplicate was made use of? - A. Not that I heard.

Q. Be so good as to tell us all that you recollect, or all that you heard pass between Mrs. Wood and her servant? - A. I do not recollect that I heard any thing.

Q.Before the prisoner left Mrs. Wood, did you know any thing of her being in possession of any duplicates? - A. Yes, she shewed me a green box, and told me the contents of them were duplicates.

Q.Whose property was that green box? - A. I do not know.

Q.Had you ever seen that green box before? - A. No, not to my knowledge.

Q. Where did you see it last? - A. In Esther's hand.

Q. Did you never see it but once? - A. No.

Q. Have you never heard from Mrs. Wood whose green box that was? - A. No, Esther shewed

it me, and told me the contents were duplicates, and that they belonged to Mrs. Wood.

Q. How long before Esther was turned away was it that she shewed you this box, and given you this information? - A. I cannot say.

Q. As near as you can guess? - A. A few days before she was turned away.

Q. Did this surprise you at all, that these were duplicates of property belonging to Mrs. Wood? - A.I did not think particularly of it.

Q.Mrs. Wood was living in a way that you did not expect her to pawn things? - A. No.

Q. And you were as intimate as two young ladies could well be? - A. Yes.

Q. Did she lodge at Mrs. Spirati's house at this time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you communicate this surprising intelligence to Mrs. Wood? - A. I did not.

Q.Did you never ask your friend about this business? - A. Not while I was with her.

Q.But this servant knew that you were the intimate friend of Mrs. Wood at the time she told you this? - A. Yes.

Q.She could not avoid knowing that? - A. No.

Q. Be so good as to tell me where she communicated this information to you, in the kitchen, or where? - A. To the best of my knowledge, on the stairs.

Q.Was Catherine Hutchinson in her service at that time? - A. She was not there at the time she shewed me the box.

Q. But was she in the habit of coming backwards and forwards? - A. I do not know.

Q. You know Kitty Hutchinson? - A. Yes.

Q. Had she lived in her service? - A.When Esther went away, for a few days, and she has lived with her since.

Q. Does she live with her at the present time? - A. I do not know.

Q. Be so kind as to tell us when it was, for she first time, you told Mrs. Wood that her servant had given you this information? - A. Not till Mrs. Wood told me that Esther had pawned these things.

Q. And then you informed Mrs. Wood of it? - A. Yes, but not till Mrs. Wood had asked me.

Q. Did you know Mrs. Wood when she lodged at Mrs. Read's? - A. Yes, it was there that I first became acquainted with her.

Q. If you could. I should be very glad if you would recollect any of the words that passed between Mrs. Wood and her servant when she was turned away? - A. I cannot.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. - Q. You are the daughter of General O 'Hara, the Governor of Glbraltar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Esther ever say any thing to you upon he subject of duplicates in the presence of Mrs. Wood? - A. No.

Q. When Mrs. Wood spoke to you, as to having pawned these things. Mrs. Wood had then been at the Police Office, in Queen-square, I believe? - A. Yes, she had.

Q. At that time did Mrs. Wood inform you, that Esther had said, at the Queen-square office, that she had shewn a box containing duplicates to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon that it was, that Mrs. Wood asked you whether that fact had happened? - A. Yes.

Q. You were some time in the house with Mrs. Wood, and observed her manner of living? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any appearance of the want of money, that could induce you to believe that she wanted to raise 5s. by pawning things? - A. No.

Q. It may happen to any young lady, however opulent, when upon a visit, that she may want a guinea - Did she ever lend you any money? - A. Yes, she has.

Q.You have slept in the same bed with Mrs. Wood? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know whether Mrs. Wood had an acquaintance with a French gentleman? - A. Yes.

Examined by the Court. - Q.In what part of the house did you observe this green box? - A. Upon the stairs, in Esther's hand, and she said she was going to give it to her mistress.

Q. You did not see what was in it? - A. No.

Q.What sort of a box was this? - A. A small round box.

WILLIAM DRAKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a baker, at Pimlico; Mrs. Wood dealt with me for bread, she lived at Mr. Spirati's.

Q.Have you been paid readily, or have you had difficulty to get your money? - A. I have had difficulty, and made many applications before I could get paid; I used to send messages by Mrs. Wood's servant; I sent a note by my man.

Q.From whom at last did you receive your money? - A. From the servant. (Pointing to the prisoner).

Q.Did you ever see Mrs. Wood in person upon the subject? - A. No.

CATHERINE HUTCHINSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you live with Mrs. Wood at Mr. Spirati's? - A. No; I was at work there for her; I did not live there.

Q.How long did you work there before the prisoner was turned away? - A. I had been at work there four days.

Q.Had you ever been at work there before? - A. Not above twice or three times.

Q.Did you attend much to the state of her wardrobe? - A. No.

Court. Q.Were you enough about the house to know who paid the tradesmen's bills? - A. No.

EDWARD WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a soldier belonging to the first regiment of guards; I live at Pimlico; I am brother-in-law to the prisoner.

Q. Did you know her when she was in Mrs. Wood's service? - A.Yes, very well.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Wood when you see her? - A. Yes, I know the lady perfectly well.

Q. Did you ever see Mrs. Wood and your sister-in-law together in Jermyn-street? - A. I have.

Q. Upon what occasion was that; recollect as near as you can? - A. I cannot say upon what occasion, but I saw my sister-in-law go into the pawnbroker's, and Mrs. Wood was walking to and fro under the window at the same time.

Q. Was Mrs. Wood and she walking together? - A. Yes; they were talking together, and walking as close as two people could walk; the girl left her at the door, and went into the shop.

Q.Did you stay long enough to see whether she came out or not? - A. I stopped till she came out; Mrs. Wood was at the door, or within a few yards of it when she came out.

Q. When she came out, did you see any thing pass between them? - A. I saw the prisoner give something into Mrs. Wood's hand before they left the window.

Q. Did you see what became of them afterwards? - A. Yes, they crossed the street, and went a little further down to a fishmonger's shop in Jermyn-street, and there, I believe, bought some fish; I went as far as St. James's-square, and turned into the square, and there I lost fight of them.

Q. Do you at all recollect about what time it was? - A. To the best of my recollection, about eight or nine at night.

Q. What time in the year? - A. I think the beginning of June.

Court. Q. Mrs. Wood walked by the pawnbroker's window, the girl came out, and then they walked together to the fishmonger's shop? - A. Yes; and I saw them go into St. James's-square.

Q. And they did not go into any other shop after they came out of the fishmonger's shop? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.You are a soldier in the first regiment of guards? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been so? - A.Seven years.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. From a child; I married her sister.

Q. It struck you, as an extraordinary thing, to see Mrs. Wood accompany her servant to the pawnbroker? - A. I thought it an extraordinary thing for a person in the character of a lady.

Q. She might as well have sent her servant to pawn it? - A.She might not like to trust her.

Q. Did you ever mention this to any body? - A. I have not made a public talk of it; I have mentioned it to some people.

Q. Give the name of any one person you have mentioned it to? - A. No, I cannot, except since this.

Q. Can you give me the name of any person you have mentioned it to before you went to the Police-office? - A. No, except my own wife.

Q. Is your own wife here? - A. No.

Q. Then, of course, you never told the prisoner of it? - A. I do not recollect ever seeing the prisoner, to speak to her between that time and the time she was taken up.

Q. Did the prisoner see you at that time? - A. Yes, but I did not speak to her, because she gave me a signal, by which I supposed that lady was her mistress.

Q. Had you never seen her mistress before? - A. Yes, but not to take any notice; I have seen her many times before, but had not observed her features.

Q. How came you to follow her so far as St. James's-square? - A. It was a very few yards; it was not out of my road.

Q. But you stopped long enough to see them go into a fishmonger's shop and buy some fish? - A. Yes.

Q. What fish was it? - A. I cannot say.

Q. When did you first of all tell the prisoner that you saw this? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you ever mention it to her at all? - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Did you mention it to her more than once? A. I cannot say.

Q. Have you seen her often? - A. Yes.

Q. Was not this the subject of constant conversation? - A. No, very little, we had other things took our discourse.

Q. And you cannot say whether you ever mentioned it more than once? - A. I might, but I cannot pretend to say.

Q. Do you recollect what day of the week it was? - A. Upon a Saturday.

Q. Do you know what day of the month? - A. No, I never asked her.

Q. Who was it first came to ask you if you knew any thing about it? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you ever hear from any body, that you would be wanted as a witness, to prove what passed in Jermyn-street? - A. I never heard from any body.

Q. Did you not hear what passed at Queen-square? - A. No.

Q. How did you know it was material then that you should give evidence of what passed in Jermyn-street? - A. I knew, that all truth, upon necessity, was useful.

Q. How did you come to learn that this truth was material? - A. I did not want for any telling, my own knowledge told me that.

Q. That it was very material upon this charge? - A. I knew it was very material for any body to speak the truth upon such occasion.

Q. What time did you get home that night? - A. I was at home by ten o'clock.

Q. Where did you sleep? - A. I slept in Portland barracks.

Q. Did you go straight there, or stop any where? - A. I stopped to look at the pictures, or any thing on the road; I knew my time; my time is ten o'clock; I might delay the time in many foolish fancies, to hear a ballad sung, or any thing.

Q. Do you recollect that you stopped at any house? - A. I do not recollect any, except it was a little chandler's shop, near Portland barracks.

Q. What time did you leave home? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Had you any where else to go? - A. No, I I left home between six and seven, and went to Colonel Phipps 's to get a frank.

Q. Did you stop at any house before you got to Colonel Phipps 's? - A. I cannot say I did, not to the best of my knowledge; I might have stopped talking to the guard.

Q. Did you never call upon the prisoner at Mrs. Wood's? - A. No.

Q. Where had you seen Mrs. Wood? - A. At her own house; when she lived in Five-field-row, she lived at a little house, up in Five-fields, and there was a young man there; I cannot say what he might be, but he appeared to me to be something of a tradesman, and she was chucking his hat out at the window; he was running up stairs again, and they seemed very merry.

Q. Was this before or after you saw her, in Jermyn-street? - A. Long before.

Q. Did Esther live with her then? - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the only time you had seen Mrs. Wood? - A. I had seen her walking at times before.

Q. What time of day was it that the hat was chucked out? - A. In the evening.

Q. What time of year? - A. This present summer.

Q. Do you know what month it was in? - A. No.

Q.How long before you saw Mrs. Wood in Jermyn-street? - A. I cannot say, for I took little or no notice of it.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you often go to Colonel Phipps's to get a frank? - A. No.

Examined by the Court. Q. Do you know what your sister carried into the shop that night? - A. No, I do not.

Q. Did you never hear from your sister what it was she pawned that night? - A. No; I never asked her.

Q.And she never told you? - A. No.

Q. Was this fishmonger's-shop in Jermyn-street, or St. James's-market? - A. In Jermyn-street.

Q. You are sure of that? - A. Yes.

Mrs. READ sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner came into my service, and Mrs. Wood came to lodge with me, just about the same time.

Q.How long was the prisoner in your service? - A. Three months and two days.

Q. What was her conduct and character during the time she lived with you? - A. I never had any reason to suspect her in any respect; she gave me a month's warning; I complained she did not do her business as she ought to do, and she gave me warning; the prisoner at the bar and Mrs. Wood quitted the house together in August, 1798; I think, when Mrs. Wood went away, she asked me to come to see her, and I think, to the best of my recollection, it was No. 5, in the Five-fields.

CHARLES YEOMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q.Did you call upon the prisoner when she lived in the service of Mrs. Wood? - A. Yes; when she lived at Pimlico; some time the beginning of June, I had been to Chelsea, and on my return I called there; the prisoner opened the door; I went down into the kitchen; I had not been there above three or four minutes when she was called.

Q. Did you see that person, whoever it was, that called her? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Then I cannot make evidence of this.

Mr. Gurney. (To Mrs. Read.) Q. Do you know at what time Mrs. Wood left the Five-fields? - A. I cannot say.

FRANCIS EDWARDS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I keep a chandler's-shop, at Pimlico; I know the prisoner; I never heard any harm of her.

Court. Q.Did the mistress pay her bills, or did the prisoner pay them? - A. The prisoner paid them during the time of her servitude.

- BUCK sworn. - I am a green-grocer in the neighbourhood; the prisoner bore a very good character.

Q. Did she pay her mistress's bills? - A. Yes, she paid them; I never saw her mistress.

SARAH MASON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am sister to the prisoner; I frequently called upon my sister at Mrs. Wood's; about the beginning of May, I called there, and found her in a most dirty situation, and she told me -

Q. What did she do? - A. She told me -

Q. Did you see her do any thing? - A. No.

Mrs. Wood re-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.After you left Mrs. Reed's, you went to live in Five-fields? - A. Yes.

Q. When you left the Five-fields, did you come to live in the house of Mr. Spirati? - A. Yes; next November will be twelve months.

Q. Have you lived in Five-fields any part of this summer, which is now closing? - A. No.

Q. Have you heard the evidence which that man has given, of your throwing the hat out at window, and his running up stairs; is that true or false? - A. It is false.

Q. Were you ever, in June last, at the door of a pawnbroker with Esther Mason ? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever authorize your servant to go into a pawnbroker's in Jermyn-street? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever receive any thing from your servant at the door of a pawnbroker? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you the owner of a green box? - A. I have got one now.

Q. Is it a round box? - A. No, it is a square one.

Q. Doe's Miss O'Hara know that box? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you shew her the box? - A. No.

Q. Did Miss O'Hara tell you of this conversation with your servant? - A. Not till I blamed Miss O'Hara for not telling me that she had behaved so.

Court. Q.Was his after you had been at the Police-office? - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Mrs. Wood told me, she was a married woman, that she was married in Grace-church-street, and if I told any thing it would ruin her peace of mind, when her husband came home, and I wished to know if she was married.

Jury. (To Dobree.) Q. What hour of the day was the thimble pawned in Jermyn-street? - A. It was between eight and ten o'clock in the evening.

Q. What time of the year was it? - A.The 1st day of June.

GUILTY. (Aged 21.)

Of stealing, to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before LORD ELDON .

Reference Number: t17990911-68

450. WILLIAM MERCER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , eight yards of quilted cotton, value 2l. 8s. the property of Charles L'Oste .

WILLIAM HANCOCK sworn. - I am servant to Mr. L'Oste man's-mercer . On the 11th of July, I was sitting in the back room writing a letter; I heard the boy, John Huddlestone , call out; I went to the door, and saw Huddlestone, he had got hold of the prisoner, and the piece of goods was lying by his feet on the pavement; I brought him back to the shop, sent for a constable, and the property was delivered to him.

JOHN HUDDLRSTONE sworn. - I am shop-boy to Mr. L'Oste, No. 2, Cornhill ; I was sitting behind the counter, and saw a person's hand come round the window and draw a piece of quilting out at the window; I immediately ran from behind the counter and caught him next door, with the piece of goods under his coat; it was the prisoner at the bar; I held him till Mr. Hancock came up; he threw the piece of goods down, and when I laid hold of him, I picked it up and took it into the shop; Mr. Hancock took the prisoner into the shop. (The property was produced by the constable, and deposed to by Hancock and Huddlestone.)

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down Lombard-street, there were several other people coming down at the same time, and this boy laid hold of me; I am innocent of the charge, I was not near the shop at all.

The prisoner called Elizabeth Fenning, who had known him nine years, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 18 .)

Confined six months in Newgate , and whipped in the jail .

Tried by the London Jury, before. Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-69

451. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a bag. value 1d. a half-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, and a piece of foreign silver coin, value 2s. the property of William Cork the younger.(The indictment was opened by Mr. Vaillant, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM CORK jun. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Vaillant. I am a drover , at Seven-oaks, in Kent. On Monday, the 9th of September, 1798, I was at the corner of Newgate-street ; my brother and I, and another man, waited to see the Lord Mayor's coach come by, to proclaim Bartholomew-fair; we all three got up behind a coach, there were a great many people collected, the coachman ordered us to get off from behind which we did, and then we stood behind it; and just as my Lord-Mayor's coach came up, there was a great throng of people close to us, which parted my brother and the man that was with him from me; I was pressed quite close up against one of the arms of the coach behind; I cannot tell who any of the people were; my intention was to look at the coach, and to look at no more; I was bent with my arm up, so that I could not get it down; a person cried out butcher,

take care of your pockets; I was not a butcher, and did not take any notice of it.

Court. Q. Had you a blue apron on? - A. Yes; the moment the Lord's-Mayor's, and some other coaches were gone past, I was going up towards Smithfield to see them go round.

Q.In what situation was the coach? - A. The coach was standing at the corner of Newgate-street, with the horses heads towards Cheapside, and the back of the coach towards Snow-hill, close against the pavement on the left-hand side of the road next Newgate; I was looking towards Snow-hill.

Q.Were you nearest the kirb-stone, or nearest the street? - A. Nearest the kirb-stone.

Q. What money had you about you? - A. You go beyond me to say what I had; I had in one pocket a half-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, and a French half-crown; a person followed me when I left the carriage, of the name of Sansum; he stopped me when I was sitting upon the coach; I had my hand upon my thigh where my money was; I am sure it was there then; I never saw it afterwards.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are talking of a transaction that took place a twelve month ago? - A. Yes.

Q. You are not more likely to be correct now than you were then? - A. No.

Q. There were two or three hundred people there for what you know, as nigh as you can guess? - A. I did not make any guess at them; my intention was to shew my brother and the other man what they could not see in the country.

Q. Your friend got beyond you, you could not tell him what money you had? - A. No; I had received money from several gentlemen to transact business for them at Barnet-fair.

Q. When had you last seen all your money? - A. At Hayes, in Kent, on the Friday before, at a quarter before eleven; the money was concealed in a parcel and put by itself.

Court. Q.How came the gentlemen's money by itself? - A. I always do; and just put enough in my pocket for spending on the road.

Q. You were never in Newgate, were you? - A. Yes; I have.

Q. You went there to see the prisoner? - A. Yes; I went with my wife to see the prisoners.

Q.And you saw the present prisoner, did not you? - A. Yes; but I did not know the man, only what people told me.

Q. When was that? - A. Either Friday or Saturday.

Q. You know Sansum? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he go in with you? - A. No.

Q. Nor he did not desire you to go in? - A. He did not say thee nor thou about it; my wife was with me, and I took her to see all the sights I could.

Q. Do you know any thing about this reward for apprehension? - A. I know nothing about the reward.

Q. Have you never had any reward for the other? - A. I was paid my expences.

Q.You went before the Grand Jury a year ago, and charged Coleman and Taylor with this robbery? - A. I charge them; I did not charge them, I did not know them.

Q.You went before the Grand Jury? - A. Yes.

Q. That bill was thrown out by the Grand Jury, was it not? - A. Yes.

Q. And at this Sessions, at such a distance of time, another bill of indictment is preferred? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. There was first a bill preferred against Taylor and Coleman, for privately stealing, which was thrown out.

Mr. Vaillant. Q. There was no bill found against Taylor before? - A. No.

Q. He was not in custody? - A. No.

Q.You know of no other reward than having received your expences, which were ordered by the Court? - A. No.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Mr. Cooper's, in Liquor-pond-street; he is a tripe-man, I drive his cart; I was with Cork at Bartholomew-fair last year; we posted ourselves behind a carriage that was standing towards Cheapside, it was at the corner of Newgate-street, by Newgate, and Cork's brother was with me; a number of persons came up and crowded in and seperated me from William Cork ; there was only one of them that I observed; I was on the left-hand of William Cork ; as soon as my Lord-Mayor's carriage was got by, I heard a person cry out, butcher, take care of your pocket; William Cork said, they were very much afraid of having their pockets picked; Mr. Sansum came across, as soon as the carriages were gone past, and made enquiry, and Cork at first said, he had lost nothing, and then he said, there was a seven-shilling-piece, and a French half-crown, (forgeting the half-guinea); then Sansum went after a man that went by the name of Anderson, and he was taken to the Compter; I saw him taken.

Q. Did you see the man who crowded in between you and Cork? - A. Yes, Coleman; the man who was convicted.

Q. Did you observe the face of any other person? - A. No, not to know them again

CHARLES SANSUM sworn. - I was on duty on the 3d of September last year, in Bartholomew-fair; I saw Cork, and two more, there was a great crowd round them; there were a great number of thieves, particularly Coleman, Anderson, and the prisoner, Taylor, I had known him about ten years; I saw

Cork, and two other, behind a coach; I heard a person, that I knew to be a thief, say to the coachman, cut behind; I saw Anderson go right before Cork, in front of him, Coleman was next to Cork, and he pressed against Cork so as to squeeze him against the arms of the coach; Taylor was along side of Coleman at that time; the state coach at that moment went by, I was then on the opposite side, and I lost sight of them for it might be a minute, or perhaps a little longer; I then crossed over to the same side of the way that they were on, I was along side of the horses of another coach, the horses' heads of one coach was towards Snow-hill, and the other towards Cheapside; I observed that they were then robbing the butcher; I called out, butcher, take care of your pockets; I then saw Taylor stoop down, I stooped down underneath the horses' bellies of the coach that I stood along side of, and I observed Taylor leaning towards the butcher's right hand pocket; Taylor stooped, I do not know whether he was on his knee or not, I saw his hand in the breeches-pocket, I think it was of Cork, and take out a bag, which he gave to Coleman, and then they all three ran away together; it looked like a dirty canvas bag; as soon as I could I pursued after the butcher, to ask him what he had lost; I then took Anderson, and took him to the Compter; I am perfectly positive that Taylor was the man that did it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are a constable? - A. Yes.

Q. This transaction took place so long ago as Bartholomew-fair was twelvemonth? - A. Yes.

Q. The fair had not been proclaimed? - A. No.

Q. There were other officers with you? - A. Yes, but they were separated from me; there was Backrow there.

Q. What time was this? - A.About ten o'clock.

Q. You did not take this man into custody at that time? - A. No; I could not catch him, or else I should.

Q. What was there between you and this transaction? - A. A pair of horses.

Q. There were as many people upon that coach as could croud? - A. There were three behind, or there might be more.

Q. You called out, butcher, take care of your pockets? - A. Yes; he had a blue apron on.

Q. And after that it was that the prisoner took the bag out of his pocket, as you say? - A. Yes.

Q. And you spoke loud enough for every body to hear? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet, after that, you mean to tell us this robbery was committed? - A. Yes.

Q. How many persons have been taken up for this? - A. One was taken up and acquitted; and one taken up and convicted.

Q. You told the same story before that you have done now with respect to Anderson, that he was one of the persons pushing down Cork? - A. Yes.

Q. And they did not believe you, and he was discharged? - A. He was never tried; he was discharged before the Magistrate.

Q. Do you know Anderson's father? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you had any conversation with him and his son? - A. Not upon this subject; I know what you mean, and I will explain it at once.

Q. You have drank with his father? - A. Yes, several times.

Q. I mean between the first examination, upon which he was committed, and the examination upon which he was dismissed? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw some of his money, I believe? - A. Yes, a guinea; after Anderson was discharged from the Magistrate's upon suspicion of committing this robbery, in taking him into custody he fought, and used me very ill, and likewise another person whom I charged to assist me; as the Alderman had discharged him, I detained him for assaulting me in the execution of my duty; his father had interceded, and promised me he should go to sea, and begged I would not commence a prosecution against him, but would be glad if I would relinquish it; then he told me he would make me a present of a guinea; before I took the guinea, I went back to the Magistrate, and told him what his father had said; the Magistrate said, if I chose to settle the assault before it came to be heard I might do as I liked; I took the guinea, and his father agreed to send him to sea.

Q. Did you or not drink with Anderson? - A. In passing through Newgate-street, in the coach, he called for some gin, and I might drink some with him.

Q. Upon your oath, did you or not, before Sir William Staines, exhibit a complaint against him for having assaulted you? - A. I did all the way through.

Q. Did you or not make a complaint to the Magistrate upon the first examination, with respect to the assault? - A. I did.

Q.How often were you before the Grand Jury? - A. Once now, and once in last November Sessions.

Q. Both times against Taylor? - A. Yes; the first time I did it he was indicted for stealing privately from the person, and I having seen it, the Grand Jury thought it could not be privately, and they threw out the bill.

Q.Upon your oath, did you or not tell the prosecutor he had lost his watch? - A. I might have mentioned his watch, for I did not know but they might have had his watch as well.

Q.Did you or not say any thing about his

watch? - A. I believe I did ask him if he had lost his watch.

Q.There was a reward offered for Taylor, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q.Who was the author of that bill? - A. I cannot tell who drew it up, I carried it to the printer's; it was drawn out while I was gone to the Compter with Anderson.

Q.Do you know a man of the name of Pollock? - A. Yes; I know several Pollocks.

Q.Do you remember a man of the name of Pollock being taken up about stealing some coffee? - A. No.

Q. Do you remember a man of that name being charged with felony? - A. No.

Q. On suspicion of felony? - A. No.

Q. Moses Pollock? - A. No.

Q. Do you remember a man of the name of English? - A. Yes.

Q.What did you take him up for? - A. For being discharged.

Q.What did the Magistrate say to you upon his being discharged? - A. The prosecutor appeared, and I attended myself, and filed the bill.

Q. Were you never reprimanded for your conduct in that case? - A. No.

Mr. Vaillant. Q.You were not the apprehender of Taylor? - A. No; Sharp and Armstrong apprehended him.

Prisoner's defence. Last Saturday afternoon the prosecutor came into the jail to me, and drank part of a pot of beer with me; he said, is this Taylor; I said, yes; he said, he was robbed; I told him I did not know any thing about it; he asked if I had any money to bear his expences going backwards and forwards to town, if I had he would not find a bill, as he did not believe any thing that Sansum had told him; I told him I would not give him any money, that I was innocent of the charge laid against me, and I would abide by the laws of my country; he immediately replied, that Anderson, who was discharged, he thought in his own mind, was guilty of the robbery.

Court. (To the Prosecutor.) Q. Was it after, or before the bill was found, that you went into the jail? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell him you thought Anderson was guilty? - A. No; I told him I did not know any man.

Q. Did you offer to stop this prosecution, and not appear, if he would give you some money? - A. No.

Q.Did you offer to go back into the country if he would give you some money? - A. No.

GUILTY (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-70

452. JAMES-WILLIAM ATKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , a Bank-note, value 2l. and another Bank-note, value 1l. the property of William Dunn .

WILLIAM DUNN sworn. - I am a baker , in Bell-alley, Wapping: On the 23d of July, William Dale brought my wife a letter. (produces it); and afterwards I saw my wife put up a two pound, and a one pound Bank-note, up in a letter, and give it to him.

WILLIAM DALE sworn. - I am a waterman: On the 23d of July, I was looking in at a picture-shop just by Union-stairs, when the prisoner came up to me; I never saw him before, but I am sure he is the same person; he asked me to carry a letter to a friend of his, Mr. Dunn, No. 7, Bell-alley, Wapping; he went with me as far as Wapping Church, very near the top of Bell-alley; he shewed me the alley, and desired me to tell Mr. Dunn that I came from Mr. Broad, and I was to bring an answer; he told me to tell Mr. Dunn, if he asked whether I worked at Mr. Broad's, to say, no, that I worked just by; he said he would wait till I brought him an answer, as he did not chuse to see his friend; I carried the letter, and delivered it to Mrs. Dunn; I told her I brought it from Mr. Broad, and was to wait for an answer; she asked me how Mr. Broad did; I said, they were all well as far as I knew; she said, you don't work there; I said, no, I work just by there.

Q. And you told them what the prisoner desired you, though you knew it to be false? - A. I did tell her so.

Q. Do you think it a right thing to tell that which is false, because another man bids you? - A. I acknowledge it is not right; but I did not know that there was any harm in it, because he said, he did not wish to see his friend; I waited about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, and then, either Mr. or Mrs. Dunn gave me a letter, sealed up, directed to Mr. Broad, and I delivered it to Mr. Broad, as I thought, I delivered it to the prisoner at the bar; I found him within twenty yards of where I had left him, he walked a-head of me about five or six yards; I did not see him open the letter, but when he had walked a little way before me, the letter came all in little bits behind him, he tore it and threw it away; then he said, we will have something to drink; we went into a public-house and had a pot of ale, and some bread and cheese, we stopped a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes; he wanted the landlord to give him change for a two pound note, and he could not, and then he pulled out a one pound note; then he put four shillings into my hand; I looked at the four shillings, and I looked at him, and said, I did not know that I ever earned four shillings so easy

in my life; he said, I was very welcome; we walked together as far as Tower-hill, and there we parted. On a Monday morning afterwards, between ten and eleven o'clock, Mr. Dunn stopped me in Wapping, and there was a man came up, that passed his word that he should find me whenever he wanted me; about an hour afterwards Mr. Dunn met me, and I went to the office, and was there till six o'clock, and then I saw the prisoner there; I had described him to Mr. Dunn, and I am sure he is the same man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. When you went with this letter, you pretended to come from Mr. Broad? - A. I did not know that it was not Mr. Broad.

Q.And yet you had no idea that you were assisting to cheat Mr. Dunn of his money? - A. I had not the least idea of it.

Court. Q. Did it not strike you as very extraordinary, that he should desire you to say that which was not true? - A. No.

MARGARET DUNN sworn. - I am the wife of William Dunn ; I have known Mr. Broad these twelve years, he is a gardener at Hackney: On the 23d of July last, Dale came to our house and brought a letter, which he said came from Mr. Broad, at Hackney, that he worked just by there; I gave my husband the letter, and asked him what I should do in it; my husband said, he dare say he wanted the money or he would not have sent for it.

Q. Look at that letter? - A.This is the same letter. (It is read).

Addressed, Mr. William Dunn, baker, Bell-alley, Wapping; dated July 23, and signed William Broad :

"My dear Friend,"I shall ever be obliged to you if you will have the goodness to lend me three pounds for two or three days, I have a gentleman with me at this time for a sum of money, and if you can let the bearer have it, I shall ever esteem it a favour, and enclose the money in this letter back; in doing which, you will ever oblige your's, William Broad."

I then took half a sheet of paper, and put up a one-pound and a two-pound Bank-note, put a wafer in it, and directed it to Mr. Broad, at Hackney; I gave it to my husband, and saw him give it to Dale.

Q. Had you any reason to suppose the letter came from the prisoner? - A. No; I thought the letter came from Mr. Broad.

William Dunn called again. I stood by while my wife put the notes up in a letter; there was a one-pound and a two-pound note; then she sealed up the letter and gave it to me, and I gave it to Dale. In two or three days time I began to suspect it was wrong, and in about five weeks after I met Dale accidentally, I tapped him on the shoulder, and said, did not you bring a letter to me? and he said he did; he described the person of the prisoner as the person who gave him the letter, and I found him at a house in Whitcomb-street. I told him I wished him to go before a Magistrate to clear himself; he walked with me to Charing-cross, and then we took a coach, and brought him to the Shadwell Office: Mr. Broad was with me; he told the prisoner that we had taken him in regard to a forged letter that was brought to Mr. Dunn some time back; he seemed to deny it at first, but after a little time he said, to say he knew nothing about it would be wrong, for he did know about it; he then proposed giving us the three pounds, and pay all expences; I told him I could not, for I had got the young man that brought the letter in custody, and then we brought him to the Shadwell Office.

Cross-examined by Mr. Hart. Q. How long have you known the prisoner at the bar? - A. Between three and four months.

Q. Have you ever employed him at all? - A. Never; he was engaged in a piece of business that I was involved in, but not by my employment, nor by my directions; there was a note got from me in a wrong way, and I told him if he could by any possible means get the note returned, I would pay him for his trouble; but he never got the note. A fellow that is in the Fleet obtained it from me.

Q. Provided he had got it back, what were you to pay him? - A. About a guinea and a half, I think he said he had paid to counsel.

WILLIAM BROAD sworn. - I am a gardener at Hackney.

Q. Look at that letter; did you write that? - A. No.

Q. Did you sign it? - A. No.

Q. Did you authorize any person to write it? - A. Never any thing of the kind.

Q. Did you know of its being written? - A. I did not; I had seen the prisoner twice, I saw him at a house in Fleet-lane, during the last Sessions here.

Q. Did you receive a one-pound and a two-pound note from Mr. Dunn, in consequence of that letter? - A. No, from no person whatever.

Mr. Hart took an objection that the evidence amounted to no more than a fraud; that it was obtaining the notes under false pretences, but could not be a felony.

Court. The circumstances under which this case stands, distinguishes it from the case of a false pretence; it may be a question to be submitted to the Jury, whether they are of opinion that this man, at the time he wrote and sent this letter, had or had not the felonious intent of obtaining from Dunn these notes for his own use, he, in the name

of William Broad, without any authority from him, writes this letter, which he sends, by Dale, to Dunn, the prosecutor; in consequence of this letter, Dunn parts with these notes to Dale, never intending to part with them to the prisoner at the bar; but thinking that he parts with them to Broad, the person in whose name the letter is written; so that he never parted with them to the prisoner at all, but to the messenger, under the idea that he was sending them to Broad. If therefore this man has made use of this letter as a trick and a device to procure possession of this property from the prosecutor Dunn, and afterwards converted it to his own use, I apprehend it will fall within the principle of the different cases that have already been determinded, where chalking under the hat, finding a ring, and a variety of devices of that sort, have induced a man to part with his property, thinking that he parted with it to a person who was to give him a share of the booty, which afterwards turned out to be worth nothing; so, in this case, Dunn has parted with these notes to the prisoner, under the idea that he was parting with them to Broad; I am, therefore, of opinion, that it ought to go the Jury. I will save the point certainly.

Prisoner's defence. On the 20th of June I received the note of the Rev. Mr. Footman, in the Fleet, drawn by him, and accepted by William Dunn ; this note was given to me to be discounted for the use of his nephew, to buy him out of the guards; I had the note in my possession fourteen days; I then gave it to Mr. Abrahams, a builder; I afterwards learned that it was rather doubtful whether it would be applied to the use it was meant for; I went to Mr. Dunn, and acquainted him that I thought they were playing tricks with him, and told him where the note was; I went with him to Howland-street, and a number of other places; it took up a great deal of my time, and I had been at two pounds three shillings expence; he gave me half-a-guinea on account, and told me he would pay me all the expences I had been at, and also for my trouble, provided he could get the note back undiscounted, he got it back in about eight days; Dunn and his wife both told me I might depend upon being paid every demand I might have; and Mr. Broad assured me he would see me paid; as I had acted like an honest man; when I found he had got the note back, I went to Mr. Dunn, and he told me, that those who employed me might pay me; says I, surely you don't mean to trick me in this way; he said, he thought it no tricking at all, he had been at too much expence already to be at any more. I cannot deny what the witnesses have said respecting the letter; when they took me along in the coach, Dunn said, I dare say my nephew is in this, and you had better own it; I said, he had no knowledge of it at all, and I acknowledged it myself; I offered to pay him the three pounds, and all expences; Mr. Dunn said, he would freely forgive me, and would not hurt me, only they wanted to know the truth of it, and as I had told them the truth, they would not hurt me; but, as the matter was before the Magistrate, it must be decided there. GUILTY (Aged 33.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Reference Number: t17990911-71

453. ANN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , ten yards of printed calico, value 20s. the property of Robert Mann and Arthur Harrison .

ROBERT MANN sworn. - I am a linen-draper in Parliament-street , in partnership with Arthur Harrison; I only prove the property.

JOHN PHILPOT sworn. - I live with Messrs. Mann and Harrison in Parliament-street. On Friday, the 30th of August, the prisoner came into our shop, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning; she said she was much fatigued, and wished to sit down; she said she had been bled the day before, and was afraid the doctor had taken too much blood from her; she sat down; I was dressing myself, and rang the bell for the other witness, Bryce; I continued dressing, while he was waiting upon her; Mr. Bryce went into the warehouse for some article, and she told me she had been among some paint, which had had a great affect upon her, and begged me to get her a little water; I did not like to leave her in the shop alone, and, instead of going for the water, I stood behind the place where she was, and I saw her draw a piece of printed calico from the place where we kept them; I told Bryce as he passed me, that I suspected her of having a piece of print; I then went for the water, and Bryce called to me to make haste; I can say no more till after Bryce has been examined; I was present when the print was found.

JAMES BRYCE sworn. - I live with Messrs. Mann and Harrison. On the 30th of August, I saw the prisoner in our shop; I had never seen her before; I was called by the last witness to serve the prisoner; she desired to look at some Irish cloth, and likewise some sheeting; she said the Irish was for herself; she desired ten yards to be cut off; I then shewed her the sheeting; she said that was for a Mrs. Miller; we having a customer, a Lady Miller, I asked her if it was for her, and she said, yes; she desired that eighteen yards might be cut off, and sent to Lady Miller with the Irish; when I asked her the direction, I found it was a Mrs.

Miller, who lived over Westminster-bridge; I took the direction, and, as she was going out, I went up to her, and said she had some of our property about her; she said she had not, but I perceived, under her cloaths, something that looked very large; she let it drop down, and said, it was a print that she had bought with us yesterday; she afterwards said she bought it in Leicester-fields of a man of the name of Miller; I picked up the print, but cannot swear it was our print. (Produces it).

Mr. Mann. I cannot swear that it is mine: I had the same pattern; there is no private mark upon it.

Philpot. I saw the prisoner take a piece of printed calico from the pile, but I cannot swear that this is the same; when I picked it up, and she said she had bought it, I asked her how many yards there were of it, and she said six yards and a quarter; I gave it to another young man to measure, and it measured ten yards, and there is a ticket upon it of ten yards.

Prisoner's defence. I cannot recollect any thing of the circumstance, because I am not proper in my head at times.

For the Prisoner.

BETTY SAW sworn. - I do not think the prisoner capable of knowing, at all times, what she does; she is affected in her head at times; she lives with her father and mother, and gets her bread by washing and ironing, and needle-work, and has done for five years; she is so afflicted every month or six weeks, and she runs away from her parents, and makes them very much distressed for a week or ten days at a time; I have not seen her so for the last six months.(The prisoner called her mother, and three other witnesses, who deposed, that she had been greatly deranged of times for some years back; her mother also deposed, that she had left home two days before this offence was committed, and that she did not know what was become of her.) NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Lord ELDON.

Reference Number: t17990911-72

454. REBECCA CLIFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , six sheets, value 40s. two check aprons, value 1s. 6d. three silk handkerchiefs, value 2s. ten muslin handkerchiefs, value 20s. and four shifts. value 12s. the property of Charles Crawford , in his dwelling-house .

The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

Mrs. CRAWFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at No.17, Palace-street, Pimlico ; the prisoner was our servant . On the 29th of April she left our service without any previous notice; she never returned till she was taken up; I missed the articles in the indictment; I found some of them at a pawnbroker's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are not the wife of Mr. Crawford? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner and you have been upon very good terms, I take it for granted? - A. No, we had a quarrel.

Q.There are about a month's wages due to her, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q.When had you seen these things? - A. On the 29th of April.

GEORGE MESSENGER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the officers belonging to Queen-square; I apprehended the prisoner in Northumberland passage, leading into Northumberland-street.

NICHOLAS MORRITT sworn. - I am a pawnbroker (produces a shift), a pair of cotton stockings, and a muslin handkerchief; they were pledged on the 17th of April, by a person of the name of Mary Sims ; it was not the prisoner at the bar.

Messenger. I found these duplicates upon the prisoner. (Produces a large quantity).

Mrs. Crawford. This muslin handkerchief is Mr. Crawford's property.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Messenger). Q. Do you know the hand-writing of Mr. Moser the Magistrate? - A. Yes, I saw the Magistrate write his name, and I saw the prisoner make her mark to the examination. (It is read).

"The voluntary confession of Rebecca Clift , touching the robbery of her master, Charles Crawford , About nine weeks since, she lived with her master in Palace-street, and, during that time, finding the door of the bed-chamber open, and the drawers unlocked, stole three sheets, a coloured handkerchief, a flat iron, a shift, and a pair of stockings; which said things are now pledged at the shop of Mrs. Mills, York-street, Westminster; she further confesses, that she cut the cape of a muslin cloak, and hid the said cloak in her pillow, and, when she left her master's house, took the key of the street-door with her. Rebecca Clift her mark."

Prisoner's defence. She has turned me out of doors at twelve o'clock at night, and used me very ill; she was almost always drunk.

For the Prisoner.

- WYAT sworn. - I have known the prisoner about three or four months; she bears a very good character.

Rev. OBADIAH BENNET sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a Protestant Dissenting Minister; I have not the least knowledge of the person I come to appear for.

Mr. Knapp. Then you may stand down.

PHERE PFCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

I lodged at Mrs. Crawford's; they were in trouble, and my husband and I assisted them with their boxes, and she charged me with a constable, and took me up; she is a most drunken infamous character; the Justice recommended me not to proceed against her; he said, our characters were too much established for such a woman to injure us.

For the Prosecution.

JOSEPH THOMFSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Brown, Strutton-ground, Westminster (produces a check apron and a silk handkerchief); they were pledged by the prisoner at the bar.

Mrs. Crawford. This is Mr. Crawford's property; I know it by my own work.

Rev. Obadiab Bennet called again. I know the prosecutrix; I am of a serious opinion, that she is by no means qualified to convict any person.

Court. Q.We do not sit here to hear opinions - What were you originally? - A. In the hosiery line; but, when I was out of my time, I went to a dissenting academy.

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-73

455. ESTHER FRALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , two blankets, value 2s. two pillows, value 12d. an earthen jug, value 3d. four china cups and saucers, value 12d. two earthen basons, value 4d. and a china butter boat and stand, value 12d. the property of Thomas Dunnagan .

MARY DUNNAGAN sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Dunnagan; I was in service at No. 12, St. James's street; my property was at No. 11, in Tothill-street ; I never saw the prisoner at the bar till I saw her at Queen-square office.

RACHEL RILEY sworn. - I live in Princes-street, Broken-cross, Westminster; I am the sister of Mrs. Dunnagan; I had the key of her place; I heard that it had been broke open; I went and found the lock safe; the landlord opened the padlock that was on the stair-case door that leads up to the cock-lost, which I had the key of; I went up and found the ceiling of my sister's apartment broke, and these things lying at the edge of the hole in the cock-lost; there was a blanket, some china plates, and earthen ware.

JAMES BLY sworn. - I am a constable of St. John's Westminster; Riley came to me to apprehend the prisoner; in consequence of which, I went to the house where she was, and took her to the pawnbroker's where the blankets had been pledged; I gave the prisoner to another officer, and went to the room; I found a large hole in the ceiling, big enough to admit me; the prisoner lived in that very house.

RICHARD OZELL sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Wright, pawnbroker, Almonry, Westminster; I took in a blanket on the 9th of July, and another on the 13th, and two pillows on the 30th; I took in the blanket on the 13th of July, from the prisoner; I did not take in the other things; I cannot say which of the blankets it was that I took in, for the tickets were taken off at the Magistrates; I know the prisoner very well.

ANN MORRIS sworn. - My husband keeps a broker's-shop in Dean-street, Westminster (produces a quantity of earthen ware); I bought them of the prisoner at the bar. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Dunnagan.)

Prisoner's defence. I had had these things more than a fortnight in my possession; I never could find who they belonged to; they were left in the house, and my landlady said, if nobody owned them they were mine; I found them left in the passage.

GUILTY (Aged 40.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-74

456. JOSEPH BRADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a mahogany corner wash-hand stand, value 10s. the property of Charles Barrett .

HENRY BARRETT sworn. - I am an auctioneer, in Queen-street, Golden-square ; I sold a mahogany wash-hand stand by public action, on Friday the 16th of August to Charles Barrett , a broker in Broker's-Alley; on the Tuesday following I saw it at an auction-room in Frith-street, Soho, belonging to Mr. Hemens; I did not then know that I had lost it, I wondered that it should be there so soon after I had sold it; nothing more passed till the following Friday; I desired the porters to get together every persons lots, as I was getting ready for another sale; in looking over the lots, I found the corner-stand missing; I immediately recollected that I had seen it at Hemens's room, on the preceding Tuesday; the prisoner had portered for me as a daily porter ; I went to Hemens's, and learnt that it had been put in there by Joseph Bradley, and sold to one Lowe, a broker, in Broker's-alley; I went there, and found it in the same state that he had purchased it; I gave him thirteen shillings and six-pence, which he had paid for it; this circular rim to receive the bottle, (producing it) has never been out of my possession at all; it matches exactly. (Produces the stand.)

THOMAS BRETT sworn. - I am porter to Mr. Hemen's in Frith-street, Soho; the prisoner at the bar brought this stand to me on Tuesday, the 20th of August, and asked me to put it into the catalogue

for that day's sale, and knowing him, I did so; I had no suspicion of him; it was sold to Mr. William Lowe.

WILLIAM LOWE sworn. - I am a broker, in Broker's-alley; I bought this stand at Mr. Hemens's in Frith-street, on a Tuesday, I believe, the 20th of August.

SARAH WILD sworn. - This was my stand; I sent it to Mr. Barrett's, with some other goods to dispose of.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the charge; if I had stolen this stand, I should not have put it into a public auction, where there are so many people coming backwards and forwards, and chiefly brokers.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 19.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-75

457. CATHERINE COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a cloth coat, value 4s. the property of John Jones .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner she was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-76

458. JAMES HARLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of June , two iron locks, value 2s. 6d. a jacket, value 2s. a trowel, value 12d. thirty pounds of lead, value 6s. fifty-six pounds of iron, value 10s. and an iron knocker, value 2s. the property of William Hulls .

WILLIAM HULLS sworn. - I am a builder : On Saturday, the 29th of June, I lost the articles stated in the indictment, from a factory in St. Luke's, Old-street ; it is now converted into buildings, and is called Hull's-place.

JAMES LIDGATE sworn. - I am a cotton and wool manufacturer; I saw these articles standing upon the top of a post in Ratcliffe-lane, St. Luke's, and the prisoner stood by them; I asked him if they were his, he told me they were; they were in a carpenter's basket; I observed the sleeve of a waistcoat hanging out. and I thought it was my friend Hull's by the colour; I told him, I thought they were not his property; and he said, he had found them; I called the watchman, and we took him to Old-street watch-house, about three or four hundred yards from Hull's place.

- WINDER sworn. - I am a constable of St. Luke's, I was upon duty, they brought to me at the watch-house, between three and four, with the prisoner; they have been in my custody ever since.(The property was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was at work for Mr. Hulls, it was late before I could get paid, and I was drunk, and going home there was a man with a basket, and I asked him what he had there, and he directly threw down the basket and ran away, and I picked it up.

GUILTY (Aged 22.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-77

459. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , a calio petticoat value 4s. the property of Mary Sheaf , widow .

MARY SHEAF sworn. - I am a widow, No. 7, George-street, Portland-place ; I lost a petticoat last Monday was a fortnight; I was going down from tea, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw something shake upon the line; I met the prisoner upon the kitchen stairs, I asked him who he wanted; he said, he wanted Mrs. James; I told him, I believed, there there was no such person in the house, but I would ask my landlady, and I directly laid hold of him, and he rushed from me into the street; I called out stop thief, and he was stopped; he was brought back in about five or six minutes with the petticoat; I take in washing, it hung up in the yard to dry; it was pinned upon the line in the yard, and it is tore away where it was pinned by being snatched. (The petticoat produced and deposed to be the prosecutrix.)

CHARLES NICHOLAS sworn. - I live at No. 19. George-street; I heard a noise in the street; I went out, and heard a cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner run away, I pursued him, he turned out of George-street, into Mary-le-bone-street, he went through the Mews into Charlotte-street, and then into Cavendish-street, and there I stopped him; I asked him, what was the matter; he said, a bad woman; I said to him, you must come back and let us hear what the bad woman has to say; I brought him back about thirty yards, upon which the woman met me; she said he had robbed her and got the property upon him, which he had; the next witness searched him and found it in his breeches.

- RAYSON sworn. - I took the petticoat out of his breeches and gave it to the prosecutor.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-78

460. ELEANOR MATHISON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of July , a half-crown, and 3s. the property of Thomas Cropper .

THOMAS CROPPER sworn. - I lost a half-crown-piece and three shillings, at the tap-room of the Dundee-arms, Wapping ; just after twelve at night, of the 26th of July, William Davis and I went to have a pint of beer, and the prisoner came in and asked me if the Jamaica Fleet was come in; I told her the Jamaica fleet was arrived safe in the Downs; upon that she sat down along side of me, and asked one Davis if we would give her something to drink; she asked if we had nothing better to drink than porter; the prisoner and Davis kept talking together for some time; I laid my elbow of my right-hand upon the table, and out of my jacket pocket she took three shillings, and a half-crown; I had a loose blue jacket on, I felt her nudging me, but I did not perceive her take it, she went away; when she was gone, I said to Davis we will go home; I went to put my hand in my pocket to pay for the beer, and my money was gone; I found out where she lived and took her to the watch-house, about three quarters of an hour after.

Q. Was you quite sober? - A. Yes, as sober as a judge; I asked her for the money she had robbed me of; a half-crown fell out of her pocket upon the bed but that was not mine, for it had a head on it; there was a young man with her and he took up the half-crown and went away; she was taken to the watch-house, and three shillings and six-pence found upon her; there was one of the shillings that I can swear to, I had described it to Mr. Dunbar before he found it upon her.

JOHN DUNBAR sworn. - I am a Headborough: on the 26th of July, about one in the morning, I was called up to take charge of the prisoner; I found three shillings and six-pence upon her; he described one shilling that he should know again.(Produces the money.)

Q. Was the prosecutor drunk or sober? - A. He told me he had been drinking peppermint with a woman; I never saw the man before, but I thought he had been drinking, the woman was very drunk.

Prosecutor. This is my shilling, it has a B. and a star upon it.

Prisoner's. defence. The prosecutor came to the prison-door and offered to make it up for a guinea.

Prosecutor. I never did any such thing thing; I went to the prison to her, with a young man who wanted me not to speak too hard against her, but I never offered to make it up.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-79

461. THOMAS PITSMAN, otherwise FITSMAN, otherwise HAWKIINS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a set of double cotton valance, value 10s. a bed quilt, value 2s. a pair of sheets, value 15s. and a pair of pillow cases, value 1s. 6d. the property of Mary Howell , widow, in a lodging-room .

MARY HOWELL sworn. - I am a widow , I live at Hackney ; the prisoner came to lodge with me on the 26th of April; I lodged in the one pair of stairs room furnished.

Q. How long did he lodge with you? - A. Not so much as two hours; he agreed to pay six shillings a week; he told me he belonged to the India-house, but I had not had an opportunity of enquiring; he came a little before eight o'clock and went out before ten; Sarah Harriott , in a few minutes went up stairs, and missed the things, I went up with her and found the articles in the indictment gone; I was in the room when he came and all the things were their own.

Q. Are you sure nobody else had been up in the room after he took the lodgings? - A. I am very sure of it; I never found any of the things.

Q. When did you take him up? - A. I did not take him up, he was taken up for another offence.

SARAH HARRIOT sworn. - I live with Mrs. Howell as a friend, near the Cat-and-mutton, in Hackney-fields; the prisoner came about eight o'clock on the 26th of April, to take a lodging and went away a little before ten; I did not see him, but I heard him go out in a very few minutes afterwards; I went up stairs and found the things gone; I am sure nobody else had been up; I am positive sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of these two ladies, and I throw myself entirely upon your mercy.

GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-80

462. JOHN WEAR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of August , a copper pump, with an iron handle, value 30s. an iron axe, value 2s. and ten pounds weight of iron, value 2s. the property of John Hutchins .

WILLIAM MENDHAM sworn. - I am a taylor; I live in Westminster : On Monday, the 19th of August, between five and six o'clock in the morning I got up and observed the prisoner in Mr. Hutchins's garden; I never saw him before to my knowledge; I saw him go up to a copper pump, he took the handle off and wrenched it down from the post it stood against; I saw him carry it into the adjoining yard; I then saw him go into

a shed and fetch out an axe and cut the pump to pieces; he then tied up that and some other things, and put into a bag; my wife called a young man of the name of Simmons, while I went and secured the prisoner; I caught him on the fence, he had left the things the other side of the fence, close to the fence; I delivered him to Simmons.

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 13.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-81

463. JANE WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a silver watch, value 3l. and a silk handkerchief, value 3s. the property of Christopher Reynolds .

CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS sworn. - I live in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles's; I met with the the prisoner about half past ten on Sunday, the 7th of July last, in Broad-street, St. Giles's; she asked me if I wanted a lodging, and she went with me to shew me a lodging in Dyot-street ; I asked the woman of the house how much the bed was, and she said sixpence, I gave her sixpence; I went to bed and did not know that the prisoner was going to bed, but she said she would go to bed; she stopped about ten minutes in the room, she did not go to bed, and then she took my watch from under my head and a silk handkerchief, and ran down stairs with it; my watch was in my breeches pocket, the handkerchief laid upon the bolster just by my head.

Q. Why did not you stop her? - A. She was too quick for me and she knew the stairs better than I did.

Q. Were you sober? - A. Yes; I only took a share of a couple of pots of beer with another.

Q. Your own lodging was in Buckridge-street? - A. Yes; I went home and they were gone to bed, and I had rather pay for my lodging than disturb them; I had lodged in that house going on five years.

Q. It was a common lodging house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did they always go to bed so early? - A. Yes; the pawnbroker has got my handkerchief, but the watch was never found.

Q.Was she not to sleep with you? - A. Yes; I agreed at last to give her a shilling in the morning.

Q. You did not agree to give her the handkerchief? - A. No, nothing but the shilling; I found her out the next day and took her up.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the same person? - A. Yes.

Q.Are you sure you did not give her the handkerchief? - A. Yes; I would not give it her, any more than I would cut my head off.

The pawnbroker produced the handkerchief, stating, that he took it in of the prisoner on the 8th of July, and which was deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutor gave it me.

GUILTY. (Aged 32.)

Of stealing the handkerchief .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-82

464. WILLIAM JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , a beak-iron, value 22s. the property of John-Clarke Steward .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I work for Mr. John-Clarke Steward, a cooper , at Blackwall ; the prisoner at the bar was in his employment: On Tuesday the 23d of July, about seven o'clock in the evening, I took the prisoner with this beak-iron upon him; in consequence of information I received, I followed him out of the shop, the back way, over the fields, where I stopped him; I asked him what he had got there; and he turned round, looked in my face, and said, this is Johnson's doings; he had it on his shoulders in a bag, it is in the same bag now; the beak-iron is too long for the bag, and the upper end of it was covered round with a leather apron; he then said, as I am in liquor, I am made a fool of by others.

Court. Q. Was he in liquor? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. This Johnson has run away from your service? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. John-Clarke Steward: I cannot speak to the property.

JAMES PHILLIPS sworn. - I am a workman of Mr. Steward's: I believe this beak-iron to be Mr. Steward's property; it is used for the purpose of riveting hoops, it has been in the shop a great many years.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Suppose you had heard nothing of this business, and I had shewn you that at York, do you think you should have known it to be Mr. Steward's? - A. As for that I cannot say.

Q. You cannot swear to it then? - A. No.

Q. And there is no mark in particular upon it? - A. There is the maker's name upon it.

Q. So there is upon all that he makes? - A. Yes.

Q. Has not every cooper in London such a one? - A. Yes; but this is larger than common.

JOHN BARBER sworn. - I work for Mr. Steward: I know this beak-iron to be Mr. Steward's; I have known the prisoner thirteen or fourteen years, he was at work for Mr. Steward the night that he was taken up.

Q.When the prisoner was detected, was there such a beak-iron missed? - A. Yes; I have no doubt but it is Mr. Steward's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Is there any mark upon it? - A.There is W L upon it.

Q. That is for the maker's name? - A. Yes.

Q. That is a fixed thing in the ground, is it not? - A. Yes.

Q.Then it is not like a plane, or a saw, that a man may know by the feel of it? - A. To look at it.

Q. Suppose you had never heard that Mr. Steward had lost such a beak-iron, and I had shewn you that at York, would you have sworn it was Mr. Steward's? - A. Yes, I should; I never saw one like it before.

Q. In what does it differ from all others? - A. By the wear.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did the prisoner bring a beak iron with him in the morning? - A. No.

Smith. He had not left the shop a quarter of an hour when I stopped him.

Jury. Q.When you go out to work at brew-houses and distiller, you take the beak-iron with you? - A. Yes.

Mr. Wright. He certainly bore a good character up to this time.

The prisoner called one witness who had known him thirty years, and gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-83

465. ELIZABETH STOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , three silver tea-spoons, value 9s. the property of James Hinton .

JAMES HINTON sworn. - I am a glazier , I live at No. 7, Baker-street, Westminster : The prisoner worked as a chair-woman for my wife fourteen months; about a fortnight ago I missed three silver tea spoons, I took the prisoner up upon suspicion, and upon searching the pawnbroker's I found one of the spoons pledged in the prisoner's name; I never found the other two.

- FULLER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in York-street, Westminster; I have known the prisoner three or four months; On the 22d of June, she pledged a silver tea-spoon with me. (Produces it).

Hinton. This is my spoon, I know it by a private mark upon the back of it.

RICHARD MUNDY sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner, that is all I know of it.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about the spoons.

GUILTY (Aged 26.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-84

466. JOHN BROWN was indicted for forging and counterfeiting, on the 27th of August , a certain Bill of Exchange , as follows:

Dated "Spithead, August 10, 1796.

"Gentlemen,"Fourteen days after date, pay to Mr. William Wilson, or order, the Sum of £45 15s. value received, which place to the account of your humble servant W. Hall.

"Lieut Col. of the 80th Reg."Light Dragoons.

"Addressed to Messrs. Collier and Son, Lisle-street."

With intention to defraud Messrs. Colliers ,

Second Count. For uttering the same knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Third Count. For forging the endorsement," William Wilson ," with the like intention.

Fourth Count. For uttering the same endorsement, with the like intention.

There were eight other Counts for a like offence, varying the manner of charging it.

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, with the knowledge of its being forged, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-85

467. SARAH GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , two silver table-spoons, value 20s. a silk cloak, value 20s. a linen bed-gown, value 2s. two cloth aprons, value 2s. a cup, value 12d. two pair of cotton stockings, value 4s. two petticoats, value 8s. a muslin handkerchief, value 2s. and two gowns, value 13s. the property of James Woodford , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES WOODFORD sworn. - I keep a house in Charles-street, Westminster , I am a tallow-chandler , the prisoner was my servant : On the 16th of july last, I came home about one o'clock, and was informed that the maid had been gone out an hour; she never returned, dinner was got ready, and then we missed two table-spoons, one she had taken into the kitchen that morning, and the other had been left there over night; I then went to Bow-street, and, with two officers, searched for her all over Westminster; then Mrs. Woodford missed the other articles; about a fortnight after, I wrote down to serjeant Linniker, belonging to the Coldstream

Regiment of Guards, who were at Barham Downs Camp, with a description of her, as we apprehended she had gone after some soldier; the serjeant took her into custody, and wrote to me to fetch her up, and Townsend and I went and brought the prisoner up to Bow-street; the spoons were pledged at Mr. Brown's, in Strutton-ground; Mrs. Woodford's cloak she pawned at Canterbury.

JOSEPH THOMPSON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Brown, pawnbroker, Strutton-ground: On the 16th of July, the prisoner at the bar pledged two silver table-spoons; I never knew her before, I am certain it was the prisoner; I lent her sixteen shillings upon them. (Produces them).

ELIZABETH WILCOX sworn. - I am a pawnbroker at Canterbury: I took a black silk cloak in pledge from the prisoner, on the 31st of July.(Produces it).

JOHN TOWNSEND sworn. - I am an officer of Bow-street: I apprehended the prisoner on Friday the 2d of August, with Mr. Woodford, I found upon her this apron, bed-gown, and cap, and a pair of black silk stockings, that she said were her master's property, that she had wore going down.

Mrs. WOODFORD sworn. - I am the wife of James Woodford: I know these spoons by the mark M W upon them; I know this cloak by the making and the mending of it, I did it myself; the cap is mine, the apron is mine; they are all mine.

Prisoner's defence. My husband is a soldier, he wrote for me, I was a great deal distressed, and I went down to him.

Jury. (To Mrs. Woodford.) Q. How long was the prisoner with you? - A. Only a week.

Q. Had you a character with her? - A. Yes, from the Hotel in Parliament-street.

GUILTY (Aged 23.)

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-86

468. JOHN WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , a pocket-book, value 4s. 6d. a miniature picture, value 1l. a Bill of Exchange, value 508l. 8s. and three other Bills of Exchange, each of the value of 2032l. 9s. 5d. the property of Thomas Killett , Esq.

The Prosecutor was called, but did not appear.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-87

469. JOHN HAYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , fourteen patten boards, value 2s. the property of John Knight .

JOHN KNIGHT sworn. - I am a patten-maker , at Smithfield-bars ; the prisoner worked for me. On the 10th of July, about four in the afternoon, the prisoner went across the shop to go out to get his beer, or whatever he has in the afternoon; I observed his pocket rather bulky, I had some suspicion of him; I called him to me, and asked him a few questions; his coat hanging loose, I did not perceive any thing project to challenge him with, but, as he was going out at the door, I observed him walk very oddly, as if the door way was not wide enough; I ordered the boy to call him back; I told him, I suspected he had something in his pocket which he ought not to have; I took hold of his coat, and took two pair of patten-boards out of his pocket; I searched the other pocket, and took out two pair more; I sent for a constable, who searched him, and took two more pair out of his breeches pocket, and, in the seating of his breeches, he had eight pair more; I know they are mine, by their being the article that he was at work upon, and by coming out of my cellar; he had worked for me about ten months.

Mr. Knowlys. Q.There was no private mark upon them? - A. No.

Court. Q. Have you any doubt about their being your property? - A. No.

Q. What did he say for himself? - A. He said, I must know what he was going to do with them; he said, he was going to knock them up, to be sure, that is, to put the rings and ties on.

- NEWSOM sworn. - I belong to the Lord-Mayor; I was sent for by the prosecutor on Wednesday, the 10th of July, between the hours of five and six; the prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner; I found two pair of patten boards, one pair in each breeches pocket; he then said, he wanted to go to the necessary; I told him, I must go with him; when he unbuttoned his breeches, he pulled out two large papers of patten-boards loose, and six pair tied up in a handkerchief; he said, he was very sorry for what he had done, and did not deny the fact. (Produces them).

Knight. These are my property.

For the Prisoner.

HENRY WHITE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a glazier, in Nightingale-lane; I have known the prisoner twenty-seven years, he lived seventeen years next door to me; he is a very industrious, hard-working man; he has worked from four in the morning till eleven at night.

The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 57.)

Confined one month in Newgate , whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-88

470. AMBROSE KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , two sacks, value 4s. the property of Thomas Blackburn .

THOMAS BLACKBURN sworn. - The prisoner was my servant ; he lived with me about eleven months and a fortnight; I am a corn-chandler , in Little Britain : About the middle of last March, I missed a sack from my mill, a very particular sack, and some time after I missed another; I found it in his possession, No.22, Holiday-yard, Creed-lane, in a cellar, where he kept a parcel of rabbits, I dare say there were 150; on the 28th of last May, I caught the prisoner upon the premises when I got up in the morning, I could not tell how he got in.

JAMES HALL sworn. - On the 20th of June, Blackburn came to Guildhall, and I went with him to Mrs. Lambert's, and, in the cellar, I found a sack full of bean flour; I went into another cellar, where a number of rabbits were kept, and found another sack; I then went home with Blackburn, to wait for the prisoner coming home; he came home, I searched him, and found upon him two keys; I asked him what keys they were; he hesitated at first, and then said, why, they are the keys of my lodgings, one of them is a key that opens Mr. Blackburn's private door, and the other is a skeleton key that opens Mrs. Lambert's door; I then took him with me to this cellar, where we had seen these things before; we went into his own place, where he keeps the rabbits, and he was asked how he came by that sack; he said, it was his own, it had nothing to do with Mr. Blackburn; I then went into the other cellar, belonging to Mrs. Lambert, where the full sack was; I asked him, if that was his; he said, it was; I asked him what it contained; he said, clover chaff; I told him, I must look what it was, and, upon opening the sack, it contained bean flour; Mr. Blackburn said, you do not call this clover chaff; the prisoner said, it is no matter to you whether it is or not, it is not your's; Mr. Blackburn said, they were his sacks, and he denied it, and said, they were none of his.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You call that a skeleton key; it is such a skeleton key as I never saw before? - A. It is a skeleton key.

Q. Did not one of these two keys open the cellar where the rabbits were? - A. No, the other key opened Mr. Blackburn's premises, and it is a very common key, it opened the door where the prisoner lodged.

ANN LAMBERT sworn. - I take in washing, and live at No. 22, in Holiday-yard: The prisoner asked me, one day, for the key of my coal-cellar; the prisoner lodged at No. 28, he hired a cellar belonging to my house to keep rabbits in, and had it locked up to himself; he asked me for the key of the coal cellar; I told him I would not let him have it; then I went with him down into the cellar, and he set down a sack of something there; I asked what that was; he said it was clover chaff, and he locked it up there; I told him I believed he could get into my house whenever he pleased; he told me it was a lie.

Q. Was it the same sack he put in, that Hall, the officer, took away? - A. Yes.

Q.Had any body access to the cellar where his rabbits were? - A. No; he always kept it locked up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did he ever give you any of the rabbits? - A. No.

Q. You were not very well pleased at having so many rabbits about the house? - A. Some of the lodgers complained very much.

Q. I should have thought you would have been pleased with him for having a key to let himself in and out? - A. No; it was necessary if the lodgers wanted a key that they should ask my leave.

Q.This sack being in your cellar might have brought you into a scrape, if he had not directly said it was his? - A. He could not say otherwise.

THOMAS SHIPLEY sworn. - Q.Look at this sack? - A. I know nothing at all about this sack, and this other, I could not swear to; it is a twelvemonth since I lived with Mr. Blackburn.

Prosecutor. I know this sack to be mine; it is a four bushel sack; it is darned with double twine near the bottom, and it is mended near the top with yarn, such as they make mops of; I would swear to it if I found it at Jerusalem.

Mr. Alley. Q. He, perhaps, had been stealing some of your flour, and borrowed the sacks to carry it home? - A. I missed it last Christmas, and he said he had given it to the horses.

Q. Did not he tell you he had brought the sack from Worcestershire? - A. No, he said he brought it from Peterborough, in Northampronshire.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave him a good character. ( GUILTY Aged 48).

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-89

471. WILLIAM MANCHEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , twenty-five yards of linen cloth, value 4l. 8s. the property of Richard Cooks .

It appearing that the property lost had been packed up in a box, but there being no evidence so shew what were the contents of that box, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-90

472. ROBERT JEWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , two trusses of hay, value 4s. the property of James Tarling .

JAMES TARLING sworn. - I am a hay salesman ; I live at Finchley Common. On the 25th of June, I had some hay come to Paul's Wharf ; I went down between five and six in the afternoon, and was informed that I had lost part of my clover; I afterwards found two trusses missing; there were but one hundred and six trusses instead of one hundred and eight, and, in consequence of some information, I found two trusses at a Mr. Smith's.

- WALLINGER sworn. - I am a waterman; I happened to be at Paul's Wharf; I saw the prisoner go past me with a truss of hay; I said, Jewell, that will not do, I will tell Billy Bazzel of you; he said he was in liquor; in a quarter of an hour I saw him take another truss of hay out of the stack upon Paul's Wharf; he could not go any way without passing by me; he went up St. Peter's-hill with it upon his back.

Q.(To Tarling.) Was there any hay belonging to any other persons upon the Wharf? - A. No.

Wallinger. He came back again; now, says I, I will go and tell Billy Bazzel, and I went into the White Lion, and told him of it, and he and I went down.

Tarling. I have enquired after Mr. Smith's servant who bought the hay of the prisoner, but he has absconded.

Prisoner. (To Wallinger.) Q. Why did he not stop me? - A.Because I did not think any thing at all of it; I was not told to stop any body.

The prisoner in his defence denied the charge.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Confined two months in Newgate , publicly whipped on Paul's Wharf , and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-91

473. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , two sets of brass castors, value 5s. the property of George Oakley and Thomas Shackleton .

JOHN BIRD sworn. - I am fourteen years of age, errand boy to Messrs. Oakley and Shackleton, cabinet-makers and upholsterers , No. 22, St. Paul's Church-yard. On the 10th of July, between seven and eight o'clock, I was coming round by Fleet-market , in my way to Saffron-hill, with four sets of castors in my pocket; I had got two sets in each pocket; there was a mob with a horse that had fell down; I stood looking on; I felt one pocket lighter than the other, and I turned round, and saw the prisoner half-way in the road with the castors in his hand; he went across the road to three more men in Bridge-street; and they all four went up Bridge-lane passage; I directly ran into the road; I met a major, and told him, that the shortest of those men had robbed me; he went after them, and, just before I got to the prisoner, he threw down a little clasped hymn book, and, when the soldier laid hold of him, he threw down my two sets of castors into the railing of a public-house; I picked up the castors and the book.

GEORGE BURLING sworn. I am serjeant-major in the East London militia. On the 10th of July, I had been drilling the gentlemen of the Loyal London Volunteers; coming back, I met the boy crying, just at the end of Bridge-street; I followed the person that he said had robbed him, which was the prisoner; he was with three others, and he turned down Bride-lane passage; going through there, he threw a small clasped book from him, the boy picked it up and gave it to me; he said he had lost some brass castors; he dropped them, but I did not see him drop them; when I laid hold of him, they laid close by him; I saw him throw the book away.

THOMAS UNDERHILL sworn. I am one of the beadles belonging to Bridewell Hospital, the prisoner was brought to me, I took charge of him, for stealing two sets of brass castors for Pembroke tables.

WILLIAM OLLIFFE sworn. - I am servant to George Oakley and Thomas Shackleton; I know nothing about the property.

Bird. These are the same castors I gave to the serjeant-major.

Burling. These are the same castors I gave to the beadle.

Prisoner's defence. I am quite innocent of the crime; I have lived in good families, and they always gave me a good character.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-92

474. EDWARD ELLIOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , fifty-nine pounds weight of printed paper in sheets, value 5l. the property of Glynn Wynne , Esq. in his dwelling-house .

DOROTHY KIRBY sworn. I live at Mr. Glynn Wynne's, No. 20, Lincoln's-inn-fields, Holborn-row . On Tuesday, the 30th of July last, about ten minutes after eleven in the morning, I heard the prisoner at the bar shut the hall door that goes into the fields; I looked to see whether it was him or the boy; I saw it was the prisoner with a parcel of paper rolled up under his arm; it was some time

in January or February last; there were two bundles of paper in a little room beyond the back drawing-room; when I went up the two bundles were opened, and the best part of them gone; I did not know it was printed paper till afterwards; I called out, and a woman, that is here, collared the man; her name is Ann Hayward; he was employed to white-wash the ceiling in the drawing-room, and he was there from the Wednesday till the Tuesday he was taken up.

Prisoner. Q. Did you not give me that paper, and tell me it was good for nothing but waste paper? - A. I never did, I never told him any such thing.

Prisoner. I sold it for twopence halfpenny a pound, and treated her with a pot of ale out of it.

ANN HAYWARD sworn. - I was at Mr. Wynne's house washing; I did not see the prisoner go out, but the cook informed me the man was gone out with a bundle of paper under his arm; I followed the prisoner into Holborn, up Little Queen-street; I saw him turn into a cheesemonger's shop, next door but one to Queen-street; I passed the shop, and saw the prisoner in the shop, and the paper lying upon the shop counter; I desired the person of the shop to take particular care of it, for it was stolen goods; I then went back to Mr. Wynne's to inform them where the paper was.

Q. Did you take notice enough of the paper to be able to say, that the paper you saw lying upon the counter, was the same that you saw him carry in? - A. Yes, it had a brown paper outside.

THOMAS PUGH sworn. - I am a cheesemonger in Holborn; the prisoner came to my shop on the 30th of July, between eleven and twelve o'clock, and asked me if I bought waste paper; I told him I did; he asked what price I gave for waste paper, I told him I gave from three halfpence to two-pence, and twopence halfpenny; he brought me seven pounds at twopence halfpenny; I gave him one shilling in silver, and fivepence halfpenny in halfpence; a woman came in, and desired me to keep the paper; I put it on one side; one of the Police officers, Cockin, called in the evening, and I took it to Bow-street.

Q. Was the paper that you took to Bow-street, the same that the prisoner sold to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

THOMAS RILEY sworn. - I am a cheesemonger in Drury-lane, the prisoner came to my shop with some waste paper; I purchased in the whole fifty-six pounds, which I gave him twelve shillings for; he came two or three times that week; I kept that paper till the first Friday in August, when the Police officers had it.

Q. How did you distinguish this paper from that that you had bought of other people? - A. I put it by itself, because it was larger paper than common; he told me he had it from the housekeeper that took care of the house, to sell for her.

ROBERT PERRY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Lewis, tobaconist in Drury-lane; on the 27th of July last, the prisoner brought about a pound and a half, of paper and asked me if they would be of any use to me; I told him I would give him two-pence half-penny a pound; he threw it in the scale, I weighed it and paid him four-pence for it; afterwards, on the same day, he brought about five pounds more, for which I paid him one shilling; I kept it till the officer Cockin came for it on the Saturday following; I believe about a week after.

Q. How do you know it was the same paper? - A. I had nothing of the sort in the shop besides that.

- COCKIN sworn. - I produce this paper belonging to Counsellor Glynn Wynne; I got fifty-six pounds of it from Riley, seven pounds from Pugh, and this bundle from Perry; some of it has been cut, it has been at the office ever since.

WILLIAM PICKERING sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner at the upper end of Bow-street, next to Long-acre, on the 30th of July, in the afternoon.

JOHN MUCKLEROY sworn. - I was at work along with the prisoner at Mr. Wynne's, he took me on to work with him on Friday about two o'clock; on Saturday evening he put some paper into a tub, he ordered me to go up stairs to fetch a tub down, and go to my master's house to fetch some size; I followed him up Great Queen-street to Drury-lane, and there he went into a tobaconist's shop; I did not go in with him, I had the paper in the tub, I put it down and went away and left it; I did not go in with him because I thought it was stolen; I waited till he came out, and instead of going up to my master to fetch the size, he went back to Mr. Wynne's again.

Q. What sort of paper was it? - A. A paper of this sort. (Pointing to the paper that had been produced.)

Cockin. It is a treatise on leases.

Q.(To Mrs. Kirby.) Did you ever give him any paper to sell, upon your oath? - A. Never, upon my oath.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you give me the old paper of the wall? - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner's defence. She told me, that that paper had laid there so long that it was only fit for old paper, and desired me to fell it.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-93

475. JOHN HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , two guineas , the property of Daniel Chatterton .

In consequence of the prevarications of the prosecutor, in the course of his evidence, the Court recommended it to the Jury to find a verdict of

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-94

476. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of John Fuller , on the 16th of August , a canvas bag, value 1d. three guineas, three half-guineas, two seven-shilling-pieces, and a bank note, value 5l. the property of the said John Mitchell.

JOHN FULLER sworn. - I am a cheesemonger and porkman in Orange-street, Bloomsbury-square , I keep a house there, the prisoner is a stranger to me; on Friday, the 16th of August, about ten o'clock in the evening he came in and asked for some Cheshire cheese; I cut him exactly two pounds; he desired I would send it home to No. 35, in Red-lion street, he slung down a guinea to pay for the cheese; I gave him nine shillings in silver and a half-guinea which he put in his pocket; he then asked me if I could give him two seven-shilling-pieces as he wanted one, he gave me the half-guinea back and the silver, I was laying down two seven-shilling-pieces; I had a canvas bag in my hand, and the prisoner made a snatch at the bag, took it out of my hand and ran off with it; the bag contained a five pound note, three guineas, three half-guineas, and two seven-shilling-pieces; I ran out into Red-lion-square, and called out stop thief, and he was stopped in Leigh-street, Red-lion-square, opposite to a butcher's shop.

Q. Did you lose sight of him? - A. Only while he turned the corner; I did not lose sight of him half a moment; when he was stopped he put the bag down and the money, exactly in the same state in which I lost it, into my hand, and said, Mr. Fuller, for God's sake do not prosecute me, there is your property.

Prisoner. Did I give you the money, as you say I did, in the presence of any body else? - A. There were five or six people about him, but they are not here.

Prisoner. Q. In what street was it you received the property back? - A. Leigh-street.

BENJAMIN SPRIGGS sworn. - I am watch-house keeper and night-beadle: On Friday, the 16th of August last, about ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, charged by Mr. Fuller with robbing him of a five pound Bank of England note, three guineas, three half-guineas, and two seven-shilling-pieces; he said he had served him with some cheese, and he had put down a guineas to pay for it, and Mr. Fuller gave him change; the charge was given him and he took the bag up a second time, and as he was going to put his hand in it he snatched it from him and run out of the shop with it; I searched him and found upon him ten shillings and six-pence in silver, and a penny and a farthing; when he was brought to the watch-house he had this brown wig on. (Producing it.)

Prisoner's defence. I admit I went in and bought some cheese of Mr. Fuller, I had dealt there for three months before, I lived six doors from him; I was going to Fleet-market to get something for my supper; when I got into Leigh-street I was knocked down, and a parcel of people came round me and took me to the watch-house, and then Mr. Fuller said I had given him the bag back; I never had it at all, there was no charge given against me that night.

Fuller. It is not true, I gave charge of him that evening.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-95

477. MARY ARMSTRONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a cotton shirt, value 2s. and a pair of cotton stockings, value 6d. the property of James Whelan .

JAMES WHELAN sworn. - On Saturday, the 11th of August, I lost a pair of cotton stockings, and a cotton shirt from my lodgings in Gee's-court, Oxford-road ; I left them on the mantle-piece in the chimney; I left the room door locked, I never saw the prisoner before; when I came home the next morning, I asked the mistress where the key was, and she said there were two women in the room; I went up and enquired where my things were; there was the prisoner and another woman there, the prisoner told me she had not them at all; she gave two women leave to search her, and they could not find any thing, and I would search her myself, and I found the stockings pinned to the shirt next her skin under her stays; her smock was over it.

Q. Do you know how she got into the room? - A. No, (produces them); I brought seven cotton shirts from Bengal in the East Indies, and this is all I have got left of them; I am sure the stockings are mine, but they have no particular mark upon them.

HENRY BATES sworn. - I belong to Mary-le-bone watch-house; I took charge of the prisoner and the property.

Prisoner's defence. I went to where this man lodges to get a lodging; I gave the woman six

pence for the lodging, and she took the padlock off the door with a poker; she said two men lodged in the room but they would not be at home till five in the morning; she said she had leave to let it when they were out; I was called up at five in the morning for them to come to bed, and the man belonging to the house, in the morning, proposed having some gin, and this man happened to hear me say I had found these things, and he said they were his; I told him he should have them if he would tell me any mark that was upon them; he said the stockings were brand new, and he knocked me down and used me very ill; he took them from me by force and took me to the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-96

478. JAMES EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , a pair of morocco slippers, value 2s. 6d. three instep leathers, value 3d. and a wooden last, value 3d. the property of John Brown .

JOHN BROWN sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , in Princes-street, Cavendish-square; I can only prove the property.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn. - I am a constable belonging to Marlborough-street; on the 26th of July, between two and three o'clock, near the end of Bond-street, I observed the prisoner and another man standing on St. George's side of Oxford-street , the other man was standing still; the prisoner went up to the other man, and I suspected them from their manner; then they crossed the road, I paid attention to them, and walked gently after them; the prisoner went very slowly past seven or eight shops; I missed him, I went about three shops before him, I was looking at him, and all at once he turned out from the pavement into the middle of the road up to a shop-window where there were five or six children standing, one of the children had a pair of shoes in her hand and a last; the prisoner went up to her, and stooped down to her, and snatched them out of her hand, and walked towards me; I let him pass me, and I spoke to the child; I told her not to be frightened, for I would take care that she should have them again; the child was following of him, and he went as far as Holles-street, which was the next street, he turned into; a public-house, and went into the further end of the tap-room; there was nobody there but himself, he had laid the shoes down at his right-hand; I went up to him and asked him whose shoes he had got there; says he, that is nothing to you, they are my own property; says I they are ladies shoes, are you a master shoemaker; he said that was no business of mine; I then told him it was my business, for I saw him take them from the child; I took the shoes up with one hand and him by the collar with the other, he made all the resistance he could to get away; I took him down to Marlborough-street, and sent for Mr. Brown. (Produces the property.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You saw him go and speak to the girl? - A. I saw him take them from her.

Q.How long was he with the girl? - A. Not a quarter of a minute.

Q. Did he not say he had been desired to go for these shoes, and that he had made a mistake? - A. He said he had made a mistake.

LUCY WILKINSON . - Q. How old are you? - A. Going on eleven.

Q. Do you go to school? - A. No; I used to go.

Q. Have you learned your catechism? - A. Yes, but I have forgot some of it.

Q. Is it a good thing, or a bad thing, to tell a lie? - A. A bad thing.

Q. Have you heard that you will be punished here, as well as in the other world, if you say that which is false? - A. Yes.

(She is sworn.) - My father is a shoe-maker, No. 24, Gee's-court, Oxford-road, he works sometimes for Mr. Brown, in Princes-street; I was carrying some shoes to Mr. Brown's, on a Friday, and that man that stands there took them away from me; he asked me if I was not going to Mr. Brown's in Princes-street; I said, yes; then he asked me if I was not Mr. Wilkinson's little girl; I said, yes; and then he desired me to give him the shoes, and call in the morning for the money; Mr. Jackson brought the shoes back.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley, Q. Did not you say, before the Magistrate, that you gave them to him? - A. No; I said he took them from me.

GEORGE WILKINSON sworn. - I am a shoemaker, the father of the last witness: These shoes are my making, I know them by my own stuff.

Q. Do you know the instep leathers, or the last? - A. Yes, here is a name upon the last; I sent them by my little girl to Mr. Brown's.

Mr. Alley. Q. Mr. Brown gave you the leather to make up, and he never had the shoes in his possession at all? - A. No.

Mr. Alley contended that the shoes were the property of Wilkinson, and not of Brown, inasmuch as there never was a possession in Brown, either absolute, or legal; but the Court held that Brown had a legal possession of the property.

Prisoner's defence. There is a Miss Flint here, that ordered me to call for a pair of shoes.

For the prisoner.

FRANCES FLINT sworn. - I live at No. 26,

Oxford-road, I am a mantua-maker: The prisoner at the bar, Edwards, called upon me on the 26th of July; I desired him to be so good as to call it Princes-street, Cavendish-square, to inquire if my shoes were done, at No. 6, his name is Meymott.

Q. Did he bring your shoes? - A. No, they were sent to me that same evening.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner? - A. I have known him these two years and a half.

Q.Perhaps he lives in the same house with you? - A. No, he does not.

Q. What is he? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Not know what he is? - A. I have known him in different circumstances.

Q. What has he been during that two years and a half? - A. I cannot tell you exactly; he was a linen-draper about three quarters of a year ago.

Q. And kept a shop? - A. No, he lived servant.

Q.Where? - A. He never informed me where.

Q.Nor the persons's name? - A. Nor the person's name where he lived.

Q.What was he besides that? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You were not very intimate then? - A. No; he is not any particular acquaintance.

Q. How came you to send a person you had so little acquaintance with for your shoes? - A. I asked him if he would be so kind, as he was going that way.

Q. You did not tell him to take any chance pair of shoes he might meet with? - A. No.

Q. He did not take your measure as he went along? - A. No, they were ordered.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-97

479. ROBERT GUERNSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , a hempen sack, value 6d. and a pig, value 10s. the property of William Legge .

WILLIAM LEGGE sworn. - I am a labouring man , and live at Hammersmith : I had two pigs; and on the 14th of August, when I got up in the morning about four o'clock, I found the boards broke down by the side of the barn-door, and the pigs gone, and two sacks, they were about eighteen weeks old; the patrol stopped the prisoner in the street with a pig; both the pigs had been killed in the barn.

GEORGE SOLOMON sworn. - I am a patrol: On the 14th of August, about half past three, I met this man with a sack upon his shoulder, at the corner of West-street and Graston-street, in the parish of St. Ann's, Soho; I asked him where he had it from; and he said he had a brother lived near Uxbridge, and he had sent a pig as a present among three of them; I took him to the watch-house, and the next day to Marlborough-street.

Legge. I saw the pig at Marlborough-street; it was just the same as it was, except the life gone out of it, for the hair was on, and the entrails in it; I can swear to this sack, it was upon my premises the same time that the pig was.

JOHN HAWTHORN sworn. - I was constable of the night: The patrol brought the prisoner into the watch-house, with a sack and a pig in it, it was warm; he said it was sent from Uxbridge, and he had brought it in a cart to go to Clare-market; he said he was a shoe-maker in Clement's lane; I searched him, and found a knife; he said it was his property; I looked at it by the candle. and it was all over blood, (produced it); I locked him up, and in the morning, as I was going with him to the justice's, he said, what he told me last night was all lies; now, says he, I will tell you the truth; I found the sack in a ditch on the other side of Tyburn-turnpike; but, says I, what will you say about the knife; and he said he found the knife sticking in the pig's throat.

Prisoner's defence. I had been working at Oxford, but finding work getting slack I came to London; I had no money when I got to Uxbridge, so that I was obliged to walk to London; about three o'clock in the morning, I saw something lying in the road, I found it was a sack, and a man came up to me, and asked me what I had picked up; I said I did not know; I opened it, and there was a pig in the sack, and this knife; it was my full intention to have had it advertised; my friend, that saw me find it, has been attending here several days.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN PEARSON sworn. - I am a labourer, I live at No. 2, Norfolk-row, Lambeth: On the 15th of August, I was going to Uxbridge, a little before three o'clock in the morning.

Q.What business do you follow? - A.Barge work; I was at coal work last.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - A. I never saw him till that morning; I saw the prisoner coming towards me, a little before three o'clock, between Bayswater and Tyburn-turnpike.

Q. How far from London? - A. It might be half a mile from Tyburn-turnpike, very near; I saw him pick up something in the road, I saw it was a sack, it seemed very heavy; he opened it, and there was a pig in it, and a knife, which he took out before me, and put in his pocket; I asked him where he was going; he said he lived at the White-hart, in Clement's-lane; I was going to Uxbridge to work.

Q. How long did you stay together? - A. About six minutes; I went on, and the prisoner went the other way; a cart had drove by very fast just before, and I told him I thought it fell out of that.

Q. Are you sure there was nothing else passed? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell him your name? - A. No; after I came to town again, I went to the White-hart, and enquired for him, and they called his wife up, and wanted to know my business; I told her I saw him pick up a pig; and she told me he was confined for that same thing, and begged I would appear in his behalf, to declare what I saw.

Q. Then it was by mere accident you called there? - A. Yes.

Q.What did you want of him? - A. To see whether he lodged there or not.

Q.What was it to you whether he lodged there or not? - A. It came into my mind as I was going that way.

Q. Are you sure it was the 15th? - A. Yes.

Q.How do you know it was the 15th? - A.Because I took notice of it, and the woman desired me to attend here.

Q.(To Solomons.) Did you see any other man near him? - A. No.

Q.(To Pearson.) You are sure it was not the Hammersmith road.? - A. Yes.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-98

480. LEONARD HOLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , fifteen ounces of tobacco, value 3s. the property of Thomas Seal .

THOMAS SEAL sworn. - I am a tobacconist , I live in Whitechapel-road; the prisoner was a servant of mine about two or three months, I am not certain of the time: On the 21st of June, I had some suspicion I had been robbed, and I ordered the men into the accompting-house, when they were leaving work, in order that they might be searched; I found upon the prisoner, when it came to his turn, about fifteen ounces of tobacco, in his waistcoat-pocket; I took the tobacco and folded it up in a sheet of paper, and gave it to my shopman; I then sent for an officer, and he took him into custody, and upon his examination next day, I was bound over to prosecute; he begged that I would forgive him, and for God's sake that I would not take him into custody, I do not recollect the precise words; he begged that I would have mercy on him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you have known the prisoner some years? - A. I have.

Q.And, in consequence of the good character he has maintained, you took him to be an honest man? - A. He has certainly bore a very good character; he has been an unfortunate, but I believe an honest man.

- ABBOTT sworn. - I am shopman to Mr. Seal: I did not see the tobacco taken from the prisoner; Mr. Seal gave it to me. (Produces it).

Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you had it ever since in your possession? - A. Yes.

Q. It was left at the office was it not? - A. Yes, and I went for it; it was sealed up, and I know it to be the same.

Seal. The tobacco delivered to Abbott, I am sure, was my property.

Abbott. This is the tobacco I received from Mr. Seal.

Prisoner's defence. It was tobacco that I had saved up from what was given me of an evening, to make a present of.

Seal. The tobacco we give them is perfectly finished, and cold; the tobacco I took from him was warm, and the same description of tobacco he had been at work upon; and there is a particular smell that betrays it at once, whether it is just took off the stove or not.

Q. A man being at work near the stove, with tobacco in his waistcoat-pocket, it might produce nearly the same smell, I should think? - A. It might in some degree.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who had known him from twenty to thirty years, and who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY .

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-99

481. THOMAS HAGEN was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, on the 6th of July , in and upon Hugh Charlton , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a watch, value 1l. and an umbrella, value 5s. the property of the said Hugh.

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-100

482. ELIZABETH KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , a cotton gown, value 10s. the property of David Lloyd .

DAVID LLOYD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker , No. 178, Drury-lane . On Tuesday, the 9th of July, about two o'clock, the prisoner came to my

shop with a cotton gown and a shawl; she said she wanted to pledge them for twenty shillings, as she asked so enormous a price, being twice the value of them, I would not take them in; upon some occasion, I turned round to my desk, and was informed that a woman had taken a gown from within the door where I bang things for show; in consequence of this woman's information, I immediately went over the counter in pursuit of the woman; my house being the corner of a court, I looked up the court, and perceived the prisoner running; I pursued her, and took her within about 10 yards from my door; the court was not a thoroughfare; she went to the end of it, finding it was not, she returned, and I took her; I saw her throw the gown from her; I then took her to Bow-street with the gown, and she was committed (produces the gown); it has my own private mark upon it; I had seen it at the door less than two minutes before; it was almost momentary.

MARGARET SULLIVAN sworn. - I was in Mr. Lloyd's shop; the prisoner at the bar was there with a gown and a shawl, and she asked twenty shillings for it; she went away with them in her apron, and went as far as the door; this gown was hanging the very next to the door; she took it off both the hooks, and went up this little court, and I told Mr. Lloyd of it, and he went after her, and took her to Bow-street; she chucked the gown away from her in the passage, and he picked it up; it was a gown of this colour, but I cannot swear to it.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all about the gown. GUILTY (Aged 35.)

Confined two years in the House of Corection , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-101

483. THOMAS KING and JOHN WRIGHT were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , two three-inch deal boards, value 6s. the property of William Mountford , and the other for receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-102

484. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , a jacket, value 10s. a pocket-book, value 6d. a shirt, value 5s. a silk handkerchief, value 6d. and a pair of stockings, value 12d. the property of William Mead .

WILLIAM MEAD sworn. - I am ostler to Mr. Davis, the Golden-lion, St. John's-street : I lost the articles stated in the indictment, part of them from the stable, and part of them from an apartment over the stable; the silk handkerchief and the shirt were not mine, they belonged to another man that left them in my care; the prisoner had been at labour for me two days, assisting me in the stables; I missed them on Tuesday, the 27th of August, about four in the morning; I told him that morning I should not want him any longer; he said he should go to harvest work; I pursued him; I missed my things directly; I knew nobody else had been there; I found him in about five minutes after he had got out of the yard; he might be about twenty yards from my premises; the jacket was found upon his back, under his coat, the shirt and handkerchief were in one coat pocket, the pocket-book in the other, and a pair of stockings in a small foul bag, that he had got a foul shirt in; he had it under his arm; I have kept them ever since.

THOMAS DAVIS sworn. - I am a watchman, I saw the prisoner deliver all the things up to Mr. Mead, at a public-house, except the stockings.

Prisoner's defence. I slept all night in the stable, and how these things came in the bag, I do not know; I picked up the jacket, and could not find an owner for it.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , publicly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-103

485. WILLIAM DOVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , four yards of woollen cloth, value 30s. the property of William Warberton .

WILLIAM WARBERTON sworn. - I am a woollen-draper in the Strand; the prisoner was my shopman ; I was out of town, but, in consequence of a suspicion of my brother-in-law, who wrote to me, I came to town, and found a duplicate in the prisoner's box in his presence; he gave me the key of his box, and I found it in his pocket-book; in consequence of that I interrogated him a good deal.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him to confess; did you hold out any threat or any favour, if he did or did not make any discovery? - A.Neither one nor the other.

Q.Nothing that he could construe in that way? - A.Nothing; after I had found the duplicate, I took him to Bow-street on the Wednesday after; I took stock, and missed two quantities of two yards each.

Q. Is the pawnbroker here? - A. Yes.

JONATHAN M'CARTY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Collins, a pawnbroker, in Long-acre.

Q. Did you know the prisoner? - A. I never saw him but once, but I am sure he is the same man; he pledged with me four yards of cloth, on the 16th of July, sometime in the evening.

Q.(To Warberton). When was it you found the duplicate? - A. On Thursday the 3d of August, about eleven o'clock, probably.

Q.(To M'Carty). Look at that duplicate, is that the one you gave the prisoner? - A. It is the same, it was pledged for two guineas; I asked him if it was his own property, he told me, yes; he pledged it in the name of John Jackson.

Warberton. I have no doubt but they are the same, but I cannot very well tell by candle-light; I have patterns in my pocket of both (produces them), that quantity was just deficient, and I have the same cloth now in the house.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I take it the same maker will make two pieces exactly like? - A. So I suppose, very frequently.

Q.Both in colour and cut, and every thing else? - A. I agree with you perfectly.

Q. Then supposing you had not found any deficiency in your stock, but had been shewn these two pieces of cloth, could you have stated that this cloth came out of your shop? - A.Certainly not.

Q. You lost two pieces which corresponded with the quantity you missed? - A. Yes, both in list and colour, and every thing else.

Q.This young man comes from Cumberland, I believe? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. When did the prisoner come to live with you? - A. On the 18th of February last.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called Mr. Edward Sutherland, a wine-merchant, who had known him from his infancy, and deposed that no man could have a better character.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , whipped in the jail , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-104

486. MARY SKINNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , two shillings and a sixpence , the property of Elizabeth White .

ELIZABETH WHITE sworn. - I have no friends in London, I do what I can for a livelihood; the prisoner lodged in the room over me; my landlord and landlady were in confinement, and she came to help me; I had the care of the children; I am subject to fits, and instead of helping me, she took the money out of my pocket and ran up stairs, and locked herself in; it was on a Friday, I think, in the afternoon; when I asked her for the money, she called me every thing that was bad, and would not give it me; I had seen my money about ten minutes before, and there might be about four shillings in silver, besides halfpence; when my sit was over, I went to get something to relieve me; I put my hand in my pocket, and found I had no money left; I went up stairs to her to ask her for my money.

Q. How came you to charge her with stealing but half-a-crown? - A.Because that was all the money that I could swear to that was marked; there was an infirm man in the place at the time, but he could not help me; the constable has got the money; he found the money upon her; one shilling has got an E upon it, and another an N, and the sixpence has a B upon it; I had saved this money to buy me something, I had had it about three days.

GEORGE MESSENGER sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Queen-square-office: On Friday, the 28th of last June, a person came to the office for a constable to go to No. 28, Dartmouth-row, and the prosecutrix gave me charge of the prisoner; I searched her, and found some money upon her; I kept two shillings and a sixpence, which the prosecutrix swore to; the rest I gave back to the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. I can swear to this money.

Prisoner's defence. The money was my own, and it is only spite, because I refused to fetch a gown and petticoat out of pawn for her; and there was a little boy she brought before the Justice, and told him she would give him a penny if he would say what she bid him, that he saw me take the money out of her pocket, and if he did not, she would beat him and turn him out of doors.

JOHN WATERS called. - Q. Do you know what will become of you if you tell a story? - A. I shall go the naughty man. (He is sworn.)

Q. Did Mrs. White tell you to say any thing against Mary Skinner? - A. Yes; Mrs. White said, if I did not say that I saw her take the money out of her pocket, she would lather me.

Q. Did you see it, or did you not see it? - A. I did not see it; and Mrs. White wanted me to say that I did see it; and Mr. Moore said, he would give me a halfpenny if I would say so; Mr. Moore and Mrs. White both said, they would lather me if I did not; Mrs. White was in fits when she was going to dinner, and all dinner time; Mrs. Skinner and Mr. Moore dined together.( Elizabeth Waters deposed, that the prisoner was very honest, but that both she and the prosecutrix were women who saw company.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-105

487. ELIZABETH MITCHELL , otherwise NEWTON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , two guineas, three half-guineas, five shillings, and one hundred and twenty halfpence, the property of George Williams , in the dwelling-house of William Young .

GEORGE WILLIAMS sworn. - I am a sailmaker : On the 31st of July I went into a house in Duck-lane, Westminster , between eleven and twelve at night.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. I had been at Walworth with a relation upon some business; I had been drinking, but I was not drunk; I was going home, and met with a woman, not the prisoner; I went in with her, I did not see the prisoner during that night; when I got there, I sent out for some gin; I staid the remainder part of the night; I pulled off my clothes, put them on the chair, and went to-bed, and the woman that I went in with along with me. In the morning, about two o'clock, I was awoke by the prisoner; she asked me what I did there; she said, I was lying upon her bed, and she wanted to come to bed; then I looked for my property, and it was all gone; my property was in my coat-pocket, and I lost out of my pocket-book two guineas, three half-guineas, and five shillings, and the halfpence were in my coat-pocket; I found the pocket-book in the room upon the table, empty.

Q.Have you seen any of your property since? - A. No, except a shilling, which I know by the mark that was upon it; it was taken from her by John Marsden; I saw it as soon as it was taken from her.

Q. Do you know whose house this was? - A. The man's name is Young, I do not know his christian name.

JOHN MARSDEN sworn. - I searched the prisoner on the 31st of July, and found three shillings in a nutmeg-grater, (produces them); Williams came to me about ten in the morning, and went with me to a house in Duck-lane; I found the prisoner there, I took her into custody; I asked Williams if he should know any of the money again; he said, yes, there was one shilling that he was sure he should know again; I put the shillings into my hand, and he picked it out, and he said, I will swear to that, there are two W's upon it, one on each side, and a sort of a cross-bar. (The shilling was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. The woman that this man was in bed with gave me that shilling to get some drink with, and when I got to the watering-house, it was shut up.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-106

488. GEORGE ALSOP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , a pewter quart pot, value 16d. and a pewter pint pot, value 8d. the property of William Craig .

WILLIAM CRAIG sworn. - I keep the Tower, in Tower-street, Seven-dials ; on Sunday morning, the 23d of June, I was standing at the door, and in consequence of some information, I laid hold of the prisoner and sent for a constable; he had not got out of the door; the constable came and searched him, and took a quart pot out of his coat pocket; he was taken to the watch-house, and there he was searched again, and I saw a pint pot bent together, taken out of his breeches.( Christopher Cooper , a constable, produced a quart pot, and Edward Crocker a pint pot, both of which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much in liquor, and how they came into my pocket I don't know.

Q.(To Craig.) Was the prisoner drunk? - A.Perfectly sober.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and whipped in the Jail .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-107

489. MARY SWINNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , two children's frocks, value 12s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 2s. and four night-caps, value 12d. the property of Thomas Hilliard .

SARAH HILLIARD sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas Hilliard ; on Friday the 16th of last month, I brought down the articles stated in the indictment, and put them in a chair in the kitchen; I went into the yard to get a little water to damp them, and when I came in I missed the property; I saw them again at Worship-street in about half an hour.

LYDIA LOVAT sworn. - I live in the Curtain-road; I saw the prisoner go up an alley on the 16th of August, she sat down at No. 4, Chapel-street, I saw her tuck a handkerchief in her bosom, and a cap into her pocket; I asked her what she had got there? she made an oath, and said she would knock my eye out; a mob came round, and I took the property from her; she went on, and the mob followed her; I took the property to the office, and they went after her, and took her: I am sure the prisoner is the same woman.

Q. Do you know how far it is from the place where you took the things from her to the house of Mrs. Hilliard? - A. About a quarter of a mile.(Produces part of the property.)

WILLIAM PEACH sworn. - (Produces a muslin handkerchief.) When I apprehended the prisoner,

I found this concealed in her bosom. (The property was deposed to by Mrs. Hilliard.)

Prisoner's defence. The woman gave them to me to go and pledge them for her, and we went in and had a quartern of gin together, and she was to give me sixpence for myself.

GUILTY . (Aged 54.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-108

490. MARTHA CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , a sheet, value 8s. and two pillow-cases, value 4s. the property of James Dyts .

JAMES DYTS sworn. - I keep the Talbot Inn, in the Strand ; I know nothing of the robbery. I was called out of bed between eight and nine in the morning of the 28th of June; I found the prisoner standing under my gateway; I saw her searched, the property was found pinned to her under petticoat: she had slept at my house, with a gentleman, the night before.

Q. Is it not the practice of your house to admit men and women promiscuously? - A.If I was to ask them for their certificates, they would not shew them.

JAMES DALE sworn. - I am waiter at the Talbot Inn. On the 27th of June, between eleven and twelve, the prisoner came to our house, with a man, and wanted a bed, and I shewed them into a bed-room; I cannot swear to her; I had never seen her before.

MARTHA PRESTON sworn. - I am chambermaid at the Talbot Inn. I always make it a rule to look at the rooms after company, before they go away; when the prisoner came down, about nine in the morning, I asked her which room she came out of; she told me the door faced me: I asked her to wait while I locked the room; she would not, but ran away from me. I went up stairs and missed the pillow-cases; I pursued and took her myself, facing the New Church, in the Strand: I brought her back, and a constable was sent for; I then went up stairs, and missed the sheet; when I came down, she was in the care of the constable.

JAMES TALBOYS sworn. - I am an officer.(Produces a sheet, and two pillow-cases.) I was sent for, and found the prisoner in the gateway of the Talbot Inn. I searched her; she had the pillow-cases in her hand, and I found the sheet wrapped round her as a petticoat, under her petticoat. I have had them ever since.(The property was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I was very much distressed. I never was in a court before.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-109

491. THOMAS WRIGHT was indicted, for that he, on the 22d of July , in and upon Thomas Edwards did make an assault, putting him in fear, and feloniously stealing a silver watch, value 3l. two metal seals, value 2s. and a gilt watch-key, value 1d. the property of the said Thomas.

The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS EDWARDS sworn. - I was a staymaker; I now live as footman at Lady Mary Cooke 's; at the World's End, Little Chelsea. On Thursday, the 18th of July, I went to Turnham-Green, about two o'clock, and returned at seven in the evening, with a young man, who is here, that drove the Chiswick stage; we got to the Three Kings in Piccadilly , between eight and nine; I was perfectly sober; I brought a few tools that I used in my business with me from Chiswick, tied up in a bundle. When I got down I went under the gateway to make water, the prisoner came up to me, and said, lend me your bundle and umbrella, I will hold it for you; I gave it to him, supposing him to belong to the yard; he went up and sat down upon a bench under the Three Kings tap, I lost sight of him for a minute, I came up to the bench, and saw that the prisoner had no bundle or umbrella, he told me it was safe; I asked him what he would like to drink for his civility, in taking care of them; we had part of a pot of porter together, which I paid for: I pulled out my watch, and said, now it is time for me to go home, and asked him for the bundle and umbrella; he said he would see me d-d and blasted before I should go home, and he would not give it me. He then appeared to be drunk; I did not observe it before. I asked him what he meant, and made my way towards the gateway; he followed me, and just under the gateway, he laid hold of me side-ways, and slammed me right up against the gateway; he then forced my watch out first, and then pinned me against the gateway, and ran away up Piccadilly. As soon as I recovered from the alarm, I ran out and called watch! stop thief! I lost sight of him among some postillions or coachmen, and I did not see him till the Saturday morning, when he was taken up. I was in pursuit of him all the next day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Where did you live last, as a stay-maker? - A. At Mr. Button's, Paradise-row, Chelsea; I left his service about four months ago.

Q. How long did you stay at the Three Kings? - A. I don't suppose I was there twenty minutes.

Q. You were not asleep while you were there? - A. No.

Q. That you mean to swear? - A. Yes.

Q. The gateway of the Three Kings must have been as public a place as any in London, at that time in the evening? - A. Yes; it was not dark, it was dusk.

Q. You went back to the house, I suppose, and told them you had been robbed? - A. No, I went strait home.

Q. Did you not see plenty of people in the house? - A. There were some.

Q. Where there not twenty? - A. I suppose they were all such sort as himself; I did not go into the house.

Q. In the judgment of charity you supposed them to be all thieves? - A. I did not know; I thought it was best not to go back.

Q. Did you suppose the landlord a thief? - A. No.

Q. Did you suppose your comrade, the coachman, a thief? - A. No; he was gone home with his coach.

Q. Was there no other coach there? - A. No.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. On the Saturday you had the prisoner apprehended? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to the Three Kings on the Friday? - A. No; I was in the neighbourhood enquiring for him. I took him just by there, on the Saturday; he was attending the coaches at the Gloucester Coffee-house, next door to the Three Kings.

Q. He was taken to Bow-street on the Saturday and discharged by the Magistrate, was he not? - A. Yes, I was to get another witness; and I took him again, on the Monday, before Sir William Addington .

Q. Upon your oath, was he not discharged twice before he was committed? - A. No.

Q. Where did you find him on the Monday? - A. Turning a hackney-coach round, just on the same spot.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not heard of a reward of forty pounds, if you can convict this man of a highway robbery? - A. Yes, I heard of it the day that he was committed.

Q. And not before? - A. No.

Q. On the day you did not know of it, he was discharged? - A. Yes.

Q. The day that you did know of it, he was committed? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM KIRBY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I drove the Chiswick-coach on the 18th of July, I took up the prosecutor at Turnham-green, and set him down opposite the Three King's-yard, in Pimlico, he was perfectly sober; I saw him make water under the gateway, with the bundle and his umbrella in his hand, and as I was driving off I saw them in the prisoner's hand.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q.What time was this? - A. About seven o'clock, or between eight or nine.

Q. There are a great assemblage of coaches there of an evening? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A.Yes; he drives the Richmond coach from Picadilly to the Spotted-dog in the Strand, and back again.

Q. I believe about half past eight the mail coaches stop at the next house? - A. Yes; it is a very public house.

JOHN COCKIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am an officer belonging to Bow-street: On Monday, the 22d of July, I apprehended the prisoner in Piccadilly, he was turning a hackney coach round, almost by the Three King's; he went very willingly, I searched him but found nothing upon him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Did you search his lodgings? - A.No, the prosecutor's father belongs to Bow-street, and he searched his lodgings.

Q. He was brought up on the Saturday and discharged? - A. Yes; upon condition that he should be taken up again if any thing should be found.

Prisoner's defence. I drive the Richmond coach ten times a day from the Gloucester coffee-house to the Strand; I held his bundle and umbrella while he bought some strawberries, he was very much in liquor and called for a pot of beer, and left me to pay for it, and then he wanted more; the landlady told him he had had enough, and would not let him have any more; he went to sleep and I waked him; I told him I was obliged to leave him to go with the Richmond coach, and I told him to take care of his bundle.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES GENDENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I look after a gentleman's pair of horses at the Three King's. On the 18th of July, the prisoner came into the tap-room, and Wright before him with a bundle and umbrella in his hand; they sat down together in a box; Wright fell into discourse with some other person, and the prosecutor fell asleep; he wanted more beer, and the landlord would not draw him any, he said he had had enough before; the prosecutor was asleep nigh upon three quarters of an hour; Wright was called out to go with the Richmond coach, and he tapped the prosecutor twice on the arm, and told him to take care of his bundle and umbrella, for he was obliged to go; I did not see him again that night; the prosecutor staid about twenty minutes

afterwards, and when he was going away was very sick in the passage, he was there altogether about an hour or an hour and a quarter.

Q. Do you know any thing of his bundle? - A. He took it away with him, and his umbrella under his arm, and as he was standing reaching, I thought I saw the seal of a watch hanging down, whether there was one or two seals I do not know; I had not known the prisoner above a fortnight or three weeks.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You only speak to what passed in the tap-room? - A. No.

Q. What passed upon the bench in the yard, you could not see? - A. No; I was not there.

Q. How many persons were there in the taproom? - A. Four; all post-boys belonging to the yard.

Q. You are sure there were not twenty? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the landlord here? - A. No.

Q.When were you first applied to become a witness? - A. Last Monday, by George Sandeford; I had mentioned it to him before.

Q. Were you sober that night? - A. Yes, as sober as I am now.

JACOB PULAH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I keep the George-inn, Drury-lane, the prisoner lodged at my house: On the evening before the officers came to search the house, (which I believe was on a Friday) the prisoner came home a little after ten, he was a little in liquor and went to bed soon; it was his regular time for coming home with his coach; he lodged with me about six months, and slept in my house every night till he was taken up.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before. Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-110

492. JOHN BAYLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July, a pocket-book, value 1d. a knee-buckle, value 12d. a Dutch stiver value 1d. and 4s. the property of Sarah Bratt .

Sarah Bratt was called, but not appearing, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-111

493. WILLIAM CRAWFORD and PETER SPARKES were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a leather saddle, value 4s. two stirrups, value 2s. a snaffle bridle, value 2s. another bridle with plated bit, value 5s. a leather horse-collar, value 12s. and a pair of iron plated spurs, value 2s. 6d. the property of Joseph Lifford , and the other for feloniously receiving part of the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

There being no evidence to affect Crawford, with a felonious taking they were Both ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-112

494. JOHN JAMES and WILLIAM LYCETT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , a seven-shilling piece, thirteen shillings, and a one pound bank note , the property of Sarah Lee .

SARAH LEE sworn. - I am a widow , I live in Stepney-green passage. On the 26th of July, about eleven o'clock, I met the prisoner James; he came along side of me, and said, he knew this place when there were not so many houses; I said it was very possible, for I was a stranger there, I knew nothing about it; he went on a little further, and stooped down and picked up a brown paper, and in the brown paper was a red pocket book; he said to me, there may be something of consequence in it, and, as I was with him when he found it, I was entitled to half the reward; we came a little further, and he said we had better go into the public-house, the White-horse; we went in, and he called for a glass of beer, he opened the pocket book, and took out a receipt for either one hundred and fifty pounds, or one hundred and eighty pounds, I cannot say which, from lady Spencer, for a brilliant diamond cross, bought of one Mr. Smith, a jeweller; and then another man came in; I cannot say that it was the other prisoner; and he asked him whether he knew such a jeweller as Smith; he said no, he did not, for he was a builder at Stepney; I have my beer every day from that house, and I told the girl to be sure not to forget my beer; then James said directly, we had better go to some other house and settle it; and sure enough I went with them to the sign of the Ship, and it was to be advertised; as he was going away, the builder said, as the woman was with you when you found it, you should leave her some security; he went out to see for a friend to get some money; but that friend was not at home; then the builder said, what money could I make up; I said about two guineas; I went home and got a one pound note, a seven-shilling-piece, and the rest in silver; when I came back, James was gone, and the builder said he had settled the business; I was to give him the two guineas, and he would call upon me; I gave him the money, and never had the cross at all; I only saw it.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You gave the money to the

other man, not to the prisoner James? - A. No; but he did not call himself James; he called himself Thomas Wilson.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-113

495. JOHN JAMES and WILLIAM LYCETT were again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , a seven-shilling-piece, two half-crowns, eight shillings, a ten pound bank note, and two other bank notes of five pounds each , the property of Mary Shackle .

MARY SHACKLE sworn. - I live near Stepney. On the 12th of May, I had been at my grocer's and coming down Whitechapel-road, the prisoner, Lycett, came up and talked with me about country affairs; and, just as we got to Mile-end turnpike, there was a little red book lay, and he said, we had better go into the public-house, and see what it is; he opened it, and said, here is a pin for lady Spencer, with a receipt; I think it was for one hundred and fifty guineas; and then another man came in, and that was the other prisoner, James; says he, what, was that lady with you when you picked it up, he said; yes; then, says he, she is entitled to half of it: no, says the other, I don't know that; but, says the other, I insist upon it, and she shall have it; then Lycett went, and pretended to take a bill; and, when he came back, he said the gentleman was just gone out; the other said his name was Pratt; I said I had got a son, whose wife was lying-in with the twelfth child; and he said it would be a good thing for me; and I thought he was taking my part, and I thanked him; then Pratt said, have you got any money about you; I said, oh! yes; I happened to have a guinea in my pocket in silver, a seven-shilling-piece, and some half-crowns, and I gave it to him; he then asked me how much more money I had got; says I, I have got about twenty pounds by me, that is to serve me till July, till I receive some more money; so, he said, go and fetch that, and we will go to my house and settle it; I went and fetched him a ten pound and two five pound notes; and, when he had got it, now says he, we will go to my house, and he gave me a direction in the name of Pratt, facing Whitechapel church, an ironmonger; I went there, and found one Mr. Pratt, poor old soul, but I saw it was not the same Mr. Pratt, and then it struck me directly that I was cheated.

Q. Then you have got the pin for your twenty pounds? - A. Yes, (produces it); I am sure the prisoners are the same men; I looked at the pin, and my eyes were rather dim; but I thought it only looked like a bit of Bristol stone.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Your eyes are rather dim? - A. Yes.

Q.Then you may be mistaken in their persons? - A.No; I know them perfectly, as well as if it was yesterday.

Q.The shops were all open were they not? - A. Yes; I went to get some raisin wine.

Q. You are certain it was the 12th of May? - A. Yes.

Q. That you are sure of? - A. Yes.

Q. The 12th of May was Whitsunday? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was on a Monday.

JOHN RAY sworn. - I apprehended the prisoners: I found upon Lycett this small pocket-book, and upon James this large one, (producing them); I apprehended James first; Lycett went into a public-house; when he saw me following James, he went into the privy; after I had secured them both, I went to the privy, got a light, and found part of a receipt purporting to be a receipt from Lady Spencer; James said he knew the man that had done the trick, but it was not him.

The prisoner, James, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

For Lycett.

- LEONARD sworn. - I have known Lycett five or six years, he has bore a very good character; he married a woman with fourteen hundred pounds property; I have put him in possession a great many times, and always found him very honest.

Court. Q. You are a man that is well known - do you mean to say, that you have put Lycett into possession of effects? - A. Yes, a great many times.

Q. Do you not know, that he has been sent abroad by this Court? - A. I believe he was innocent of that, and the people at Bow-street think so too.

Court. But knowing that he had been sent out of the country by this Court, how did you dare to come here to give him a good character; for shame, you disgrace yourself very much.

James, GUILTY (Aged 44.)

Lycett, GUILTY. (Aged 55.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-114

496. JOSEPH TAYLOR was indicted for a rape on the body of Margaret Steele , an infant of thirteen years of age . NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-115

497. THOMAS ROBERTSON and FREDERICK SMITH were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Welsford , about the hour of one in the night of the 16th of June , and burglariously stealing one hundred and eight yards of calico, value 81. the property of the said John Welsford , and John-Cobley Welsford .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN-COBLEY WELSFORD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a wholesale warehouseman in Lad-lane , in partnership with John Welsford; we keep our goods in the warehouses, partly under the dwelling-house of my partner, John Welsford, and partly under the dwelling-house of another person, but that warehouse has no communcication with the other dwelling-house, there are communications from all the warehouses to the dwelling-house in which my partner resides: A long stick, with a hook at the end of it, was found in our lower warehouses; and then we discovered, from our stock, that some pieces of goods had been taken out; the stick was afterwards delivered to Cook, the officer, of Shadwell-office; there was a square of glass broke, and we suppose, that by means of the crook stick being put through the iron bars, the calicos were pulled out; there appeared to me a deficiency of six or seven pieces, but I cannot exactly say.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Whether there was a deficiency of stock, or not, you cannot say, without having resort to your books? - A. Not to a certainty, we cannot.

Q.Have you got your books here to-day? - A. No.

JOHN COOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the officers of Shadwell-office: I took up Mellish, the accomplice, on Sunday the 16th of June, in the evening; and, in consequence of his information, on the 24th, I went to Mr. Welsford, and received this stick, with a hook at the end of it, (produces it); on Monday the 17th, I went to the house of Mrs. Hayes, in Golden-lane, and there a piece of calico was delivered by Mrs. Hayes, to Haynes the officer, in my presence; I apprehended the two prisoners at St. Catherine's, on Monday the 17th, Haynes, Holebrook, and Brown were with me; we secured them, and Brown searched them. As we were conveying them to the office, we found, upon Robertson, a hook, similar to that which has been produced.

ROBERT CULLEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Messrs. Welsford; This is the stick that I found in our warehouse, about a fortnight or three weeks before the officers came to our house, it laid upon the calicos in the warehouse; the square of glass had been broke some weeks before the robbery.

JAMES MELLISH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. About the beginning of June last, me, Robertson, and Smith, agreed to go to a house in Lad-lane; we went, and tied a handkerchief round a stick, to break the window without making a noise, that was between nine and ten o'clock; we then went away from the house to the Wilkes's Head, in Wilkes's-court, without doing any thing further, and there we remained till half past eleven; then we returned to Lad-lane, and concealed ourselves in an alley, till the watchman went past one o'clock; then we fetched the stick which we had concealed in the alley, and went to the house of Mr. Welsford, where we had broke the square of glass; we took the said stick, and hauled up two pieces of calico, while the watchman was going his rounds; I put the calico into a bag, took it to Honey-lane-market, and concealed it there; we returned to Mr. Welsford, and the watchman was sitting at the door; we walked a little way up and down Cheapside, till the watchman went off at four o'clock; then we returned to the said house again, and hauled up another piece of calico, with a hook and a stick; I am not positively sure whether we hauled up any more or no; we immediately went to the concealment, and took the goods away; Robertson and Smith took them to one Mrs. Hayes, in Golden-lane, to dispose of, between five and six o'clock in the morning, and they told me that Mrs. Hayes had given them ten-pence a yard; they said Mrs. Hayes opened the back door and let them in with it; they said there were twenty-one yards in each piece; they brought some money, and were to call for the remainder in the course of the day; we went to the same house three or four times afterwards, and we lost the stick, it was dropped down into the area, through the same square of glass that was broke; this is the said stick, and the said hook, and no other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. What trade are you? - A. No trade particular; I used to get my livelihood by the sea, two or three years ago.

Q. How have you got your livelihood since that? - A. I have been two years in confinement for that that I was never guilty of; people swore against me, and said I had stole a watch.

Q. That was a sad charge against an honest man? - A. Yes.

Q.But twelve honest gentlemen thought otherwise and convicted you? - A. Yes; but I was green at that time, or I could have proved an alibi.

Q. You got your back flogged, I believe, besides two years confinement? - A. Yes.

Q. And then you returned to your old trade again? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Joe the lamplighter? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath? - A. No, I did not.

Q.You are in custody now? - A. Yes.

Q.And you will get discharged if you hang these men? - A. It is not my wish to hang them; I wished to retrieve my character to the Magistrates, and go to sea again.

Q.Were you never a soldier? - A. Yes, I was once; it was about six or seven months back, when I enlisted, and I did not join the regiment.

Q.But you took his Majesty's money? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you never an old clothes-man? - A. No; I have passed for an old clothes-man.

Q. Did you charge any body else when you were before the Magistrates? - A. Yes, three more.

Q. They had been concerned with you in other robberies? - A. Yes.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer of Shadwell-office: I apprehended the two prisoners at St. Catherine's, on Monday the 17th of June, at a house where girls of the town, and people of that description resort, it is not a public-house, they were sitting together; we handcuffed them in the room, and in bringing them to the office, I perceived Robertson trying to pull something out of his right-hand waistcoat-pocket; I immediately stepped round him, put my hand in his pocket, and found this hook, which he was endeavouring to get out of his pocket; it had a cork at the end of it. (Produces it).

Q. Would it be too sharp to carry in the pocket without a cork? - A. I should think so.

JOSEPH HAYNES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer belonging to Shadwell-office: On Sunday the 16th of June, I apprehended Mellish, in company with Cook and Holebrook; the next day, in the morning, I went to Mrs. Hayes's, in Golden-lane, in search of some calicos; I found one piece with a bit taken out of it by some sharp instrument or other. (Produces it).

MARY HAYES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the wife of Henry Hayes, No. 6, Golden-lane: I delivered that piece of calico to Haynes, the officer; I bought it of the prisoner, Smith, I believe I had seen him before; I bought it, with more calicos, between six and seven o'clock in the morning; there was another man with him, but I don't think I should know him again; there were three pieces in the whole; I gave them one shilling a yard for it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I take it for granted you are married? - A. Yes; and have been near ten years.

Q. Have you kept a shop all that time? - A. No, about nine months; I deal in old and new clothes.

Q. And if an odd piece of calico is brought before your shop-hours you will buy it? - A. I did then.

Q. Were you not taken up as a receiver? - A. No; they sent me a note, and I went to the Magistrate's.

Q. If any body has said you gave but ten-pence a yard, it is false? - A. I gave a shilling.

Q. What is it worth? - A. I leave that to your judgment.

Q. Upon your oath, what is it worth? - A. I should suppose about twenty-pence.

Q.Have you ever been threatened to be prosecuted for receiving stolen goods, unless you appeared here to-day? - A. Yes, I am sensible of it.

Mr. Walsford. There is no mark upon the calico; we generally mark them in this part which is cut off; it appears to be of the exact quality of that which we missed; it is worth about twenty-one pence per yard.

Robertson's defence. I am quite innocent of what I am charged with.

Smith's defence. I am as innocent of it as the child unborn; I never saw the man in my life.

Robertson, GUILTY .

Smith. GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-116

498. THOMAS ROBERTSON and FREDERICK SMITH were again indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Rothwell ; one David Jones, his servant, and others of his family being therein, about the hour of four in the forenoon, of the 16th of June, and stealing one hundred and eight yards of calico, value 5l. 8s. the property of the said Richard.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

SAMUEL ROWLANDSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Mr. Richard Rothwell ; he has no partner. On Tuesday, the 18th of June (the goods are generally deposited in the warehouse under the house in which Mr. Rothwell lived); I examined the warehouse, and found two pieces of calico deficient about twenty-eight yards each, from very near the window; the window is in the area, and rises a little above the stones; David Jones always sleeps in the house.

DAVID JONES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am shopman to Mr. Rothwell; I slept in the house on the 16th of June.

MATTHEW BRIGGS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable of Cheap-Ward; I was on duty, on Sunday, the 16th of June; between four and five in the morning, I saw three persons, as near as could be, about Mr. Rothwell's door; I was standing in Cheapside, at the corner of King-street; I saw the two prisoners and Mellish; I speak to them with certainly; they separated themselves in such a way, as gave me a suspicion they were about no good; I went down King-street, and into Cateaton street, but could see nothing removed; in returning back from Cateaton-street, Mellish and Smith followed me with some threatening words; but what I cannot take upon me to say; I then went to the watch-house in Bird-in-hand-court, Cheapside, for assistance; I got sight of Mellish and Smith again in King street; I pursued them into Coleman-street, and I lost them there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I take it for

granted you knew the prisoners before? - A. No, I did not.

Q. And do you mean positively to swear that these are the persons? - A. I do. I was standing at the end of King-street; Mr. Rothwell's house is about the center of the street.

Q. And yet you mean to say, though you saw them at the distance of half King-street, that they are the same persons? - A. I have reason to know them again.

ROBERT BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the constables belonging to the Public-office; Shadwell; I apprehended the two prisoners in company with Haynes, Holebrooke, and Cook, on Monday, the 17th (Mellish was taken the night before), between ten and eleven, at St. Catherine's; they were sitting together; in bringing them to the office, I perceived that Robertson was taking something out of his right-hand waist-coat pocket, I immediately stepped round, and took hold of his hand, and found him taking this book out of his pocket, with a cork at the end of it; we took them to the office, and, in consequence of the information of Mellish, we went to Mrs. Starr's, who lives in Whitecross-street; that was before we took the two prisoners, and there we found tied up, in a large shawl, two pieces of calico.

JOHN COOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the officers of Shadwell-office (produces two pieces of calico); I found them in the house of Mrs. Starr, in Whitecross-street; I have had them ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Mrs. Starr is, what we call in plain English, a fence? - A. Yes, they call her so.

Q. She is a common receiver? - A. Yes.

GEORGE PAULING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a leather-dresser; I sometimes live at Mrs. Starr's, and I have a house at Hoxton besides. On the Sunday before the officers came to our house, Mellish came about eight in the morning, as near as I can recollect; I was taking down one of the shutters; be brought a sample of calico, and asked me if I would purchase it; he came again about in an hour afterwards, or an hour and a half, with Robertson; they took the calico through the shop into the parlour; and Mrs. Starr went to them; I remained in the shop; I did not hear what passed between them; I saw Smith in the course of that day, I believe, but not while they were there; I saw Mellish afterwards receive part of the money; he came singly for the remainder of the money.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. It was Master Mellish that brought the calico? - A. Yes, and Robertson together.

Q. Do you know what she gave for it? - A. Nine-pence a yard, and I think money enough.

Q. You have no connection with Mrs. Starr's business? - A. No.

Q.But you do an odd job for the lady now and then? - A. Yes; any thing to serve Mrs. Starr.

BARBARA STARR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On Sunday, the day before the officers came to my house, Robertson and Mellish brought the calico to me, and I gave them the price they asked form it, which was nine-pence a yard; it amounted to four pounds. I was very busy at that time, and Mellish asked me to lend him five shillings, and he would call in again for the money. Mellish called by himself for the money, I paid him three pounds ten shillings; he owed me five shillings for a pair of shoes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You were taken up for receiving this calico? - A. I did not know it was stolen.

Q. Do you usually keep open shop on a Sunday? - A. Till church-time we do.

Q. You bought some gin, did you not, of Master Mellish? - A. Some peppermint.

Q. And that he had stole from somewhere else? - A. Yes.

Q. And you have been lucky enough not to get protecuted yourself at all? - A. Yes.

JAMES MELLISH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. On Sunday, the 16th of June, the two prisoners and I went to Mr. Rothwell's, in King-street, Cheapside, about four in the morning, just after the watchmen had gone off their duty; it was then day-light; we showed a window back belonging to a warehouse underneath the house, where we saw some calico lie; we immediately fastened a book on a stick, and drew up one piece of calico first, and put it into a bag which Robertson had in his hand, and then we were disturbed, a man came by, and we thought it was a watchman; I and Smith went up Trump-street into Honey-lane Market, and Robertson went down the said alley, where the man came up; and in turning back, I saw a watchman and some more along with him at the top of Cateaton-street; they pursued after us as far as the end of Coleman-street, and there they left us: me and Smith went up to my place in Whitecross-street, where I used to live, and he lent me his coat and I lent him mine, and I pulled off my blue apron and put on a white one, and returned back to Honey-lane Market, where we used to conceal our things, and I found Robertson had been there, and left one piece of calico; a few minutes afterwards, me, Smith and Robertson met again where the guines were concealed; while Robertson was absent, me and Smith got up three more

pieces of calico, and took them to the place where Robertson had concealed the first, When we all met together, we agreed to go and shut the window the same as we found it, which we immediately did: then Robertson and Smith went and concealed the goods in another place that we had on the other side of Cheapside; then we went and got it all out of the concealment, and put it into a bag; there were four pieces of coarse calico, one the first time, and three the last: then we returned to the place where I lived; I took the goods up into a room where I used to keep company with a girl; we all three agreed that I should go out and look after somebody to buy it. I went to Mrs. Starr's, between seven and eight o'clock, and George Pauling was taking down the shutters, I produced to him a piece cut off the fag end; he told me if I would step out a few minutes, he would take it up to Mrs. Starr, and shew it to her; I told him 9d. was the lowest I would take; he then shut the door, and I stood outside; he came down again and told me Mrs. Starr said I might bring it: and then I returned to my lodgings, and found Robertson and Smith lying down upon my bed; I awaked them, and told them what had passed; Robertson then went with me to Mrs. Starr's; that might be about eight o'clock: to the best of my recollection it came to between three and four pounds; she let me have 5s. and desired me to come about twelve o'clock, which I did, and she paid me the remainder of the money.

Q. Look at that hook? - A. To the best of my knowledge this is the same hook; it was a hook exactly of that kind.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are the same honest gentleman that we had last night? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you sleep last night? - A. At Shadwell.

Q. What, did they let you out of Newgate? - A. I have not been in Newgate, I have been closely locked up in a lock-up room at the Shadwell office; I was at Coldbath-fields till the first day of the sessions.

Q. Did you make any charges against any body else since you have been there? - A. No.

Q. It was you that made the bargain for 9d. a a yard? - A. Yes, me and Robertson.

Q. You had sold a great many articles to Mrs. Starr before? - A. I had sold her some before.

Q. As honestly come by as these? - A. Just the same.

Q. You are the same man that deserted from the militia, joined a regiment, took the King's money, and then ran away? - A. Yes.

Q. And they have not been able to find you? - A. Yes, they did once, I was taken to the Savoy, and made my escape.

Q. This was a dark night, was it not? - A. No, it was day-light.

Q.Do you mean to say that you had the audacity to no this in open day-light? - A. Yes.

Rowlandson. This calico is of the same quality with that which I missed from the warehouse, there is no private mark upon it; it cost one shilling and a halfpenny per yard.

Robertson's defence. I am quite innocent of what is laid to my charge.

Smith's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Robertson, GUILTY Death , (Aged 20.)

Smith, GUILTY Death. (Aged 22.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-117

499. WILLIAM GOODEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , a wooden cask, value 10s. and ninety-six gallons of oil, value 30l. the property of George Allen Aylwin , and Thomas Chapman .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

GEORGE-ALLEN AYLWIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am in partnership with Thomas Chapman, we are oil and fruit coopers, brokers and agents ; the prisoner is an oil-porter ; I received in July last, 72 casks of oil from Hamburgh, they were lodged in a cellar belonging to us, under the Coal-exchange; in consequence of some information that I received, I went about the 2d of August, to the house of Mr. Hubbock, who shewed me a cask of oil, I am confident it was one of the casks that I had received in the consignment from Hamburgh; the original brand mark was totally chipped out, the brand mark was the Hamburgh mark was in part defaced, that was what they call a spade mark, part of that still remains on the cask; on the bouge, on the opposite side of the bung was 66; there was a large P marked with red oker on the head; the gauage was marked 144, 66 is the number of the cask, as part of the 72; I took a sample of the oil which Mr. Hubbock shewed me, it was new Gallipoli oil, it was as nearly like the oil that I received from Hamburgh as it is possible for one cask to be like another, it was worth ninety pounds a ton; the prisoner had access to the cellar where it was deposited, and I had given him no direction or permission to take it out.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You have no knowledge yourself of that oil being in your cellar? - A. No.

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am in partnership with Mr. Aylwin; we received seventy-two casks of oil from Hamburgh (produces a book); these are the gauges which I took on the 14th of July, in our values under the Coal-exchange, the numbers were progressive from

one to seventy-two; there was a spade mark upon all the casks; the cask No. 66, was marked one hundred and forty-four gallons, and there was the mark of sixty-six on the opposite side of the bung; there was a brand-mark of C.K. with a C. underneath, and a large P on the other end; we received some information from Mr. Hubbock, upon which I missed the cask No. 66, it was an ullage cask, we only take the contents gauge, and not the ullage gauge; that cask is here, the mark is totally out, the spade mark is obliterated at both ends, and the middle remains, and the sixty-six and one hundred and forty four still remain.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. At the time you gauged these casks, was the prisoner in the warehouse? - A. No; his partner Thomas Cooke, was; he called me over the numbers and gauges.

Q. Have you ever sold any of that oil since? - A. No; we have sent one cask into the country, to our correspondents at Bristol.

Q. Have you since examined how much oil remains in your cellar? - A. No; the quantity of casks are not yet filled up, they are not all delivered; we fill the casks up as they go away.

Q. That operation is performed either by the prisoner or his partner? - A. Yes.

Q. What quantity of oil has been sent out you cannot say? - A. No.

Q. I believe the prisoner and his two partners are answerable for any deficiency? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe, by way of securing yourselves, you hold a balance in your favour in your hands? - A. I know nothing of that.

Q. Have you not at this time in your hands one hundred and thirty or one hundred and forty pounds, belonging to the prisoners and his partners in your hands? - A. I know nothing of that.

Q. Upon your oath have you not a very considerable balance in your hands now? - A. I don't know as to the exact sum, we have some money of theirs.

Q. Upon your oath is it not upwards of one hundred pounds? - A. I supposed it may.

Q. The value of the oil supposed to be lost, is thirty pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. Have they not upon every occasion, regularly and honestly, paid every deficiency? - A. They have.

Q. If even an umbrella was lost have you not made them pay for it? - A. My predecessor I believe did.

Q. Can you, even now upon your oath, undertake to say that there is a single gallon of oil missing, out of the seventy-two casks? - A. We cannot say; the parcel is not filled up.

Q.When did you prefer this bill of indictment against the prisoner? - A. I don't know the date, it was this sessions.

Q. Did you not after you had found the bill take the man out of his business by a bench-warrant at mid-day? - A. I did not like to see the man lie long in jail before trial.

Q. Did you not suffer him to continue and carry on your business for six-weeks, after you had meditated a prosecution? - A. Yes.

Q. When accidents happen in the cellar, has it not been usual for the poor men to collect together, or wipe up with a fox's tail, the oil that is spilt? - A. Not Gallipoli oil.

Q. Have you not, yourself, sold oil so collected for the benefit of the prisoner and his partners? - A. Never.

Q. Do you remember a jar of forty-four gallons being broke? - A. No.

Q. Do you not know that the prisoner and his partners paid fifteen pounds to Mr. Sheriff Price, for an accident that happened to the oil? - A. I know nothing of that.

Q. Do you know Mr. Patterson? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that paper? - A. It is my handwriting.

Q. It is a bill making a charge upon you for nine guineas for a jar of oil, supposed to be missed? - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that, is that your hand-writing? - A. It is.

Q. Is not that twenty-two pounds two-shillings and nine-pence, part of a loss of sixty odd pounds? - A. Yes; he had the care of the warehouse, and we never could trace it.

Q. Before a Magistrate you know the prisoner would have been heard in his own defence? - A. Yes.

Q. Before a Grand Jury the poor man could not be heard in his defence you know? - A. Yes.

Q. It was out of pure mercy that you did not take him before a Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. And it was also out of pure mercy that you went behind his back before the Grand Jury? - A. Yes.

Q. How long ago is it since it was proposed to take your partner's brother into the business of the prisoner? - A. I know nothing of that transaction at all.

Mr. Gurney. Q.Accidents frequently happen in carrying out oil? - A. Yes, with jars of oil; but I never knew an accident with a cask of oil.

Q. Had the prisoner informed you of his having had any accident, with any of these seventy-two casks? - A. Never.

Mr. Aylwin re-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Has there ever been any proposal, or plan, for putting your brother into the business of the prisoner? - A. Never; I never intended my brother as any thing else but un assistant, to superintend the

landing of the goods at the water-side, as well as to overlook those men that I might place as warehouse-men.

Q. Did you intend by that to supersede the prisoner and his partner's as oil-porters? - A. No such thing; it was my intention about two years ago, to have taken the oil-porters away, but upon some friends of theirs interceding for them, I continued them.

Mr. Aylwin cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys.

Q. Then these people were not to be partially deprived of this business, but were completely to be turned away? - A. Yes.

Q. Then this brother of your's, in the character of assistant, was to derive the profits which they derive? - A. By no means; I was to derive the profits to myself.

Q. That of course begot no very great good will between you and the porters; did they not apply to your employers about it? - A. Yes.

Q. And this scheme of yours for turning them away was rejected by the merchants? - A. No such thing; the oil-men spoke to us that they might continue.

Q. I take it for granted you join with your partner in saying you cannot ascertain that you have lost a single gallon out of those seventy-two casks? - A. I cannot.

Q. Do you agree with your partner that you call upon them to make up every deficiency in the warehouse? - A. No; I agree with him that if there were five jars in a hundred missing, I should charge them with it; but as to quantities, we never did charge them with it, because of the liability to leak.

Q. Will you undertake to swear that you have lost a single gallon of oil? - A. By no means.

Q. Did you ever call upon this man to explain this business before you indicted him? - A. I never spoke to him about it; had it been any other oil but Gallipoli oil I should not have done as I have.

Mr. Gurney. Q. I ask you, upon your oath, what was your reason for not taking him before a Magistrate? - A. For no other reason in the world but that he should not lie longer in prison than necessary, it was so clear.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you not sold some oil for them? - A. I have: when they have had accidents, I have sold several jars.

Court. Q. Have you ever made them pay for the cask, as well as the oil? - A. No; nor for any cask-oil, to my knowledge.

Q. When there was an accident with a jar of oil, did you make them pay for the jar, as well as the oil? - A. No.

THOMAS HUBBOCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. - I am an oil and colour-man in Re-lio n-street, Wapping. The prisoner called upon me on the 1st of August, for payment of a cask of Gallipoli oil which my brother had bought; I gauged the cask and settled his bill; he was satisfied with the contents, as I computed it. (Produces the bill.) It is read,"Messrs. Wm. and Thos. Hubbock,"Bought of Oil-Porters,"Gallipoli Oil, at 70 per ton, £31 9 0"

Q. What was the market price of Gallipoli oil at that time? - A. Upwards of 90l. per ton; my brother acquainted Mr. Aylwin with the business, he is now in Yorkshire.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This was done regularly in the course of trade, and the bill made out "Bought of Oil-Porters"? - A. Yes.

Q. You knew perfectly well that he worked at Aylwin and Chapman's warehouses? - A. Yes, I have received oil from him there.

Q. There was no secret at all made of it? - A. Not in the least.

Q. These persons also work on the quays, do they not? - A. Yes, in Mr. Aylwin's service.

Q. They purchase, do they not? - A. I never knew that they did.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You have, I believe, a sample of the oil? - A. Yes. (Produces it.)

Jury. Did you suppose, when you were buying oil of the oil-porters, that they had a right to sell oil? - A. They have perquisites; the drainings of the casks, and the fox-tailings.

Mr. Gurney to Mr. Aylwin. Q. Are there such things as perquisites to the oil-porters from the draining of the casks? - A. None whatever.

Mr. Alley. Q. You missed a cask; do you not hold the porters responsible for it? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. This was oil that we had collected at various times and various periods, by misfortunes with jars of oil, with the fox-tailings, and likewise a quantity of Gallipoli oil, part of a cargo that was stranded at Dice-quay, which we put into two casks; it leaked and refined itself, and we sold it to Mr. Hubbock.

JOHN AYLWIN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I had sent out forty-five of these casks; there was one cask gone which I did not put down, because it was posted No. 73, and there was no such number.

Q. Had you sent out No. 66? - A. No, I had not. I had sent all the forty-five casks to Bristol.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Can you undertake to swear, from the quantity sent out and the quantity remaining, that there is one single gallon of oil missing? - A. No.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS COOPER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Myself, Lawrence, and the prisoner at the bar, are the only oil-porters in London; we are

responsible for every deficiency: if a cask or a jar was lost, or any spilt, we should be called upon to make it good; when oil is spilt, we always take an empty cask to put it in; we wipe it up with a fox's tail; we always take it for our own advantage, and whatever the gentlemen please to charge us for the article, we have always paid it. When it is put into a cask, it refines itself.

Q. Do you recollect, some time ago, a ship being tranded? - A. Yes, it might be six months ago; I cannot say to a month: the oil that was on board was bought by different persons in the oil trade.

Q. Do you recollect the oil that was sold to Mr. Hubbock? - A. Yes; it was accidents from jars, and the leakage of casks. It stood in the warehouse open to Mr. Aylwin or his partner, or any other person.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I ask you, upon your oath, whether you were ever allowed by Mr. Aylwin or Mr. Chapman, the privilege of leakage? - A. No, I never was.

Q. Did they ever know of your taking any such perquisite? - A. I don't know that they ever knew of it; I never concealed it from them.

Q. Did they ever allow it you? - A. Never.

Q. You shared, with Gooden, the amount of the money that was received from Mr. Hubbock? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you venture to swear that any part of that was from the ship that was stranded? - A. Yes, the oil was landed at Dice-quay.

Q. Did you ever pay Messrs. Aylwin and Chapman a farthing towards that oil? - A. No.

Q. Was not the whole of the oil landed from that ship perfectly congealed? - A. Some little of it was not; a part of the oil sold to Mr. Hubbock was oil that had been concealed, and melted again, which we had gathered off the ground; it was not fit to put in again: the cask entirely fell from the oil.

Q. How much of it did you take for yourselves, one gallon or ten? - A. It might be more than one or ten either; some part of that oil we had collected from accidents with jars; we had been two years and upwards collecting it.

Q. What proportion of it came from the jars, one gallon or twenty? - A. More than twenty, or twice twenty, I should suppose.

Q.Where did the rest come from? - A. From leakages, by fox's tails, from casks.

Q.Will you venture to swear that a drop of Gallipoli oil came from the jars? - A. No.

Q. Look at that sample; is that Gallipoli oil? - A. I am not judge enough of oils to say.

Q. Which is worth most, Gallipoli oil, or jar oil? - A. I believe there are some in jars that are as bad as Gallipoli oil.

Q. The jar oil is for eating, is it not, for sallads? - A. Yes.

Q.Gallipoli oil is sent round Wiltshire and Bristol, for the use of the clothiers? - A. I believe it is.

Q. Did you send out this cask? - A. I helped to get it out of Mr. Aylwin's vaults.

Q. Were you ever called upon by Mr. Aylwin to pay any sum of money for deficiency of oil by regular leakage? - A. No.

Q. Then what you pay them for is for accidents, not for leakage? - A. Yes.

Q. And you swear that the oil sold to Mr. Hubbock, was a mixture of jar and Gallipoli oil? - A. Yes.

Q. Gooden had sold oils to Mr. Hubbock before this? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Did you not receive a share of fifteen pounds in February last, for a parcel of oils sold to Mr. Hubbock? - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Q. You have not paid any thing to Messrs. Aylwin's on account of this oil? - A. No.

Q. Have you not called upon Mr. Aylwin to make up their accounts, and have they not refused to furnish you with their accounts? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been in this place? - A. Four years and a half.

The prisoner called eight other witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY .

Confined two years in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17990911-118

500. MARY MEAD was indicted for unlawfully uttering, on the 20th of August , a counterfeit half-guinea, to one Mary Fairfax , knowing it to be counterfeit .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Cullen, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

MARY FAIRFAX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to the shop of Mrs. Oliver, in Fleet-street, in August last? - A. Yes; it is a kind of a toy-shop and silversmith's-shop; a lady came in to buy a pair of scissars, they came to one shilling and sixpence, and she put down a guinea; I went to Mrs. Else's to get change, I got a half-guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, a half-crown, and one shilling; I laid down the half-guinea before her, and it rung very well at first, but when she rung it again, it rung like a farthing; a constable was sent for.

Q. What became of the bad half-guinea? - A. I do not know.

Mrs. ELSE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Fleet-street: I gave the last witness change for a guinea, I gave her a half guinea, a seven-shilling-piece, and some silver.

Q. Are you sure the half-guinea was a good one? - A. Yes, all the money was good; the half-guinea was brought back to me as a bad one; I went back with it, and said it was not the half-guinea I had given, and gave charge of the prisoner to a constable.

WILLIAM ROSS sworn. - I went to Mrs. Oliver's with Mrs. Else: I knew the prisoner before; I said, in the hearing of the prisoner, I can account very well how the half-guinea is changed, I have detected this lady twice in the same thing; she said, me, Sir; and I said, yes; and I told her if she did not give me the half-guinea immediately I would send for a constable; I accordingly sent for a constable, and when he came, I saw the good half-guinea, and the bad one was gone; it was an old half-guinea in the place of the new counterfeit; I did not see it changed.

WILLIAM AULD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. I am a constable: I searched the prisoner; when I was called in, the prisoner at the bar put down a good half-guinea; Mrs. Else said, there was a bad one somewhere, which I could not find, but she gave it me afterwards; it was concealed in her mouth. (Produces the two half-guineas, and the silver).(Mr. Caleb-Valentine Powell proved the half-guinea to be counterfeit).

Prisoner's defence. The young woman brought me change, I did not much like the half-guinea; I refused it, and they carried it back, and the gentlewoman said she did not send that half-guinea.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for her good behaviour for six months longer

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-119

501. ELEANOR WELCH was indicted for unlawfully uttering, on the 10th of August , a counterfeit shilling, to one William Talbot , knowing it to be counterfeit .(The case was opened by Mr. Cullen.)

WILLIAM TALBOT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am servant to Mr. Hillman, ironmonger, in Foster-lane : The prisoner came to the shop on the 10th of August, in the morning, for some nails, she wanted a pennyworth; I looked them out, and she gave me a shilling to pay for them; I thought it was a very bad one, I filed it, and found it so; my master desired me to send for a constable, which I did.

JOHN OSBORNE sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for to Mr. Hillman's, on the 10th of August; I searched the prisoner, and when I had searched her, I saw the edge of a shilling in her mouth; I made her open her mouth, and there were two bad shillings in her mouth; I found no good money about her but a halfpenny. (Produces three shillings).(Mr. Powell proved them to be all counterfeit).

Prisoner's defence. I had taken them the day before, and put them in my mouth before his face.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for her good behaviour for six months longer .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-120

502. JAMES NEWLAND was indicted for unlawfully uttering, on the 26th of August , a counterfeit sixpence, to one Phebe Bowley , knowing it to be counterfeit. (The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

PHEBE BOWLEY sworn. - My brother, Thomas Teasdale, keeps a public-house in Smithfield : The prisoner came to our house on the 26th of August, and asked for a glass of gin; I served him with it, and he gave me a bad sixpence; I called my brother, and told him of it, that the man had come several times, and always offered me bad money; he came twice in one day, and offered me a bad sixpence each time; I gave the bad sixpence to my brother, he gave it me again, and I gave it to the constable.

THOMAS TEASDALE sworn. - On the 26th of August, my sister called me up to this man, and I called a constable, who searched him; he was very obstreperous, and resisted very much; I was obliged to get a second officer.

HENRY CARTWRIGHT sworn. - I am an officer; I searched the prisoner; my partner and I were obliged to get him down upon the ground before we could secure him; in searching him, I found a leather bag (producing it), containing a half-guinea and some silver. (Produces the sixpence.)

Mrs. Bowley. This is the same sixpence that the prisoner offered me.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I attend the Mint, upon prosecutions for bad money; this is a counterfeit sixpence.

Q. Now look at all these produced in the bag? - A. They are all counterfeit.

- FURSE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. when the prisoner was in the public-house, he kicked the skin off my leg in the scuffle, he wanted to throw the bag away, but we got it from him; I found a bad shilling in his pocket and a knife.

Prisoner's defence. I picked up that little bag in Cow-cross; I went in for a glass of gin, and took the sixpence out of the bag as I had found it; I thought I had as much right to it as any body else.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for his good behaviour six months longer

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17990911-121

503. LUCY CLAREY was indicted for unlawfully uttering, on the 9th of September , a counterfeit shilling, to one Dennis Foley , knowing it to be a counterfeit .

The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

DENNIS FOLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. I am a porter at Billingsgate : On the 9th of September, the prisoner at the bar came to me, she wanted half a bushel of oysters, and I was to get a penny for my labour; in going down to fetch them, she gave me five shillings for half a bushel of oysters; there were three shillings, and four sixpences; I went and gave the money to the man in the boat for the oysters; he rubbed the money and found it all bad but one sixpence; I carried it back to her, and she said she did not know any thing about it; she was employed by a woman to carry the oysters home; then Shropsall charged the constable with her, and she was taken to the Compter.

WILLIAM SHROPSALL sworn. - I am an oyster drudger; the last witness came to me for some oysters; I thought the money looked whiter than usual, and I went to rub it, and I found the colour come off, it was some sort of composition; he took me to the woman that he had it of, and she owned to the money immediately; she was searched, and there were six shillings in good silver tied up in one corner of her handkerchief.

JOHN JACOB sworn. - I am a constable; I asked the prisoner how she came by it; she said, she had it from a woman that sits at the bottom of Fleet-market for oysters; I asked her if she had any more money; she said she had only sixpence, that was all she had earned that day; I searched her and found upon her six shillings in silver at the corner of her handkerchief (produces it); the bad money was delivered to me (produces it); I also found about eighteen penny worth of halfpence in her pocket.

Prisoner's defence. I had the money from a a woman that sits at the bottom of Fleet-market, to buy her some oysters at Billingsgate.

For the Prisoner.

ANN EATON sworn. - I keep Fleet-market; I have known her three years and a half; she is a very honest woman; I was upon Holborn-bridge, when the woman gave her the money to get some oysters; she has not been at her stand since this woman has been taken up. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: s17990911-1

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT proceeded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 11.

Frederick Smith ,

Thomas Clark ,

John Durham ,

Daniel Mackaway ,

John Orrel , otherwise Lanzemore,

James Butler ,

Charles Cleaver ,

John Whittock ,

William Harper ,

Robert Richardson ,

Thomas Robertson .

Transported for seven years - 26.

Henry Crack ,

Susannah Douglas ,

James Jones ,

Thomas Doughty ,

Joseph Britten ,

William Turner ,

John Taylor ,

Ambrose King ,

William Brown ,

Eleanor M'Intire,

William Parkhurst ,

Samuel Champness ,

William Hill,

Hugh Murphy ,

Charles Jennings ,

Abraham Levy ,

Ann Hill,

Esther Mason ,

Thomas Pitsman ,

John Wear ,

Sarah Green,

John Mitchell ,

James Edwards ,

Robert Guernsey ,

John James ,

William Lycett .

Confined two years in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1. - William Gooden .

Confined two years in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 1. - Elizabeth King .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 5.

John Monardy ,

Johanna Quinlan ,

Edward Elliot ,

Mary Swinney ,

Martha Clarke .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and publickly whipped - 1. - John Williams .

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction, and whipped in the jail - 1. - William Dover .

Confined six months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 2.

Thomas Nailer , William Harvey , otherwise Harley.

Confined six months in Newgate, and whipped in the jail - 1. - William Mercer .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 14.

Ann Brown ,

John Hankins ,

William Robinson ,

Thomas James ,

Ann Emmiston ,

Hannah Greenfield ,

William Cannon ,

Esther Frayley ,

Joseph Bradley ,

James Harlow ,

John Harris ,

Jane Watson ,

William James ,

Elizabeth Stokes ,

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and whipped in the jail - 2.

Elizabeth Sullivan , George Alsop .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and publickly whipped - 2.

William Ferby James- William Atkinson .

Confined six months in Newgate, and fined sureties for six months longer - 3.

Mary Mead , Eleanor Welch , James Newland .

Confined three months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 1. - James Syme .

Confined two months in Newgate, and publickly whipped on Paul's-wharf - 1. - Robert Jewell .

Confined two months in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 2.