Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th July 1797.
Reference Number: 17970712
Reference Number: f17970712-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY the 12th of JULY, 1797, and the following Days, BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable BROOK WATSON, Esq.

LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY WILLIAM RAMSEY , AND Published by Authority.

LONDON: Printed and published by W.WILSON, No. 15, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-street, Doctors' Commons.

1797.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE BROOK WATSON , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the CITY OF LONDON; the Right Honourable Sir SOULDEN LAWRENCE , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; the Right Honourable Sir FRANCIS BULLER , Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law, of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Thomas Davies ,

Edward Cave ,

William Thompson ,

Owen Jones ,

John Andrew ,

William Pugh ,

Henry Pearce ,

William Wilsher ,

William Flewel ,

John Newton ,

Edward Drew ,

John Watherstnoe .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Cole ,

Robert Stone ,

Arthur Bott ,

Edward Colemere ,

Robert Thorpe ,

William Shepherd ,

Peter Wallace ,

James Boyd ,

George Bifield ,

William Exhale ,

John Robertson ,

David Porter .

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Oldfield ,

Thomas Linton Rogers ,

Joseph Rawlinson ,

Thomas Briggs ,

James Spring ,

Henry Robinson ,

Alexander Waddel ,

James Brayley ,

Thomas Dutton ,

Isaac Stacey ,

John Shur ,

John Fox .

Reference Number: t17970712-1

409. PATRICK KEOUGH and HENRY IVES were indicted for that they, on the 14th of May , in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, in and upon John Shepherd , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, two iron keys, value 4d. part of a steel watch chain, value 1d. a metal watch key, value 1d. a cornelian seal set in gold, value 10s. and ten copper half-pence, value 5d. the property of the said John.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JOHN SHEPHERD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a private watchman in the service of the Sun Fire-Office ; I live at Pimlico: On the 14th of May, about twenty minutes after twelve, I was attacked about half way between the two watch boxes in the Park, about eighty yards from the stable-yard gate; I saw a soldier coming behind me, he came up, and said, give us a pot of beer, d-n you, give us a pot of beer; says I, I have no pot of beer for you, my friend, but it is not a pot of beer that you want, it is to rob me that you want; he then got pretty fast hold of me by my shoulders; I contested a little bit, and did not chuse to be robbed by him, and then out rushed two or three more from behind a tree; they were all in soldiers' dresses; and they all caught hold of me, and knocked me down, they got my face upon the ground, and bruised me pretty much, they likewise kicked me in the hollow of my thigh; upon that a serjeant came up -

Q. Did you lose any thing? - A. Yes; one of them got his hand in my pocket, and took out two keys; one of them was the key of Buckinghamgate, the other was the key of my own watch-box, and about five-pennyworth of halfpence, which were in the same pocket.

Q. Had you any watch at that time? - A. Yes; as I was down upon my side, one of them said, d-n him, here is a watch, we will have that; I told them for God's sake, to save my life, and they should have it; they snatched at the chain, and broke it; they took the chain, but left the watch.

Q. Had you any stick with you when you went into the Park? - A. Yes; they got that from me; the serjeant brought it to me afterwards, his name is Hemblin; when he came up, he said, d-n you, what are you about, is this you Mr. Keough, what are you robbing or murdering the man; says he, I know you very well, you will know me another time.

Q. Which of the prisoners is Keough? - A. The nearest to me. (Points to him).

Q. Did you hear the person he called Keough, make any reply? - A. He said, by the Holy Ghost, or some such thing, he did not know any thing of him; then there came up two of the patrols, and the soldiers all three ran away; I lost my hat and my stick; I got up as soon as I could, and ran after them; one of the patrols caught Ives, and had him away to St. James's watch-house; I was high enough to them to hear the patrol say, what is that you have dropped, he said, nothing; I saw him stoop and pick up something, but I did not see what it was; I went with them to the watch-house.

Q. Could you distinguish their faces? - A. Not perfectly, except Keough, he was the man that collared me.

Q. Is that man here now who collared you? - A. Yes; that is him. (Points to the prisoner).

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What sort of light was there? - A. The moon was just about rising, but it was darkish, the trees being covered with leaves.

Q. How long had Keough hold of you? - A. I suppose while we were contesting, near a minute; I did not think of any more people being there.

Q. When was Keough taken? - A. He was taken at his own lodgings, by the constable.

Q. How long after lves was taken to the watch-house? - A. About four o'clock the same morning.

Court. Q. Had you ever seen Keough before this happened? - A. Never.

Court. Q. When you saw him at the watch-house, had he been brought there? - A. I did not see him till he was brought to Bow-street.

Q. Did any body point out Keough to you as the man who had robbed you? - A. Justice Addington asked if I could pitch upon the man that first laid hold of me, which of the three, and I pointed to Keough, as being safe to take an oath of.

Q. Were there three before Justice Addington? - A. Yes; one of them was let go.

Q. Had any body pointed him out to you as being the man? - A. No.

JAMES HEMBLIN sworn. - I am a serjeant in the Coldstream regiment; I served in the same company on the continent, with Keough; I know him very well, and I have done duty with Ives, in Knightsbridge barracks: On the 14th of May, I was returning to my home near Tothil-fields, about twenty minutes past twelve; just as I entered the Park, at the stable yard gate, I heard something of a noise, which induced me to stop, when I heard a man begging very hard for mercy, but it was at the

distance of eighty or one hundred paces, that I could not perfectly understand; I waited a few minutes, and I heard a man say, that he was only a poor watchman, he had no money; and after that, I heard him say, for God's sake, spare my life, and take my watch; I then went to the spot immediately, and saw the prosecutor lying on the ground, and two soldiers on the top of him; then Keough lifted his head up, and the moment he held up his head, I knew his face; I said to him,"Oh master Keough, are you here?" upon that he got-up, and made use of an expression, by the mortal Saviour, says he, you are mistaken in the man; after that, he was coming up nearer to me, and I was afraid he was going to attack me,and I immediately struck him on the side of the head with this stick; the stick, with the violence of the blow, broke in the middle, so that I was left totally disarmed; after that, Ives got up, and I knew his face.

Court. Q. How near were you to Ives? - A. About three paces; when he got up, he had this stick in his hand, (produces it, the prosecutor's); I told him, it was of no use to resist, as I knew them very well, I was sure to have them, and they both held up their sticks to strike me; I was in plain cloaths at the time, and I told them I was a serjeant in the guards, and I should be sure to have them, and then Ives turned his back, and ran away from me, I pursued them, and then he turned about, and held up the stick again to strike me, and I alarmed the centinals in the park, but no one would come to my assistance, and I threatened one of them, that I saw, that if he did not come, he should be severely punished; upon my threatening the sentinel, he was induced to come; I told the sentinel, that if he attempted to pass, to run his bayonet through him, and then I seized him, and at that moment, two of the patrols came up, and he was secured; I took this stick from him.

Q. Have you any doubt of the persons of the two prisoners? - A. They are the two men; I did duty on the Continent with one of them, and in Knightsbridge barracks with the other; Keough made his escape.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of Ives? - A. Not at all; I never was farther from him than five or six paces: in the morning, I was going after Keough to his quarters, between six and seven, or somewhere about six o'clock, and there I met one of the officers, Patrick, and we went together to the house, where we had information that he was; when we got half way up stairs, I desired Patrick to go forward, which he did; I heard something pass up stairs, and I went up, and he had him in custody.

Q. Was Shepherd much hurt? - A. Yes; he was a frightful spectacle with blood.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Shepherd.) Q. Look at that stick? - A. This is my own stick that I have to watch every night with.

THOMAS AMSDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the patrols of Bow-street: About twenty minutes past twelve, I was coming through the Park with Harding, and we heard the cry of stop thief; I ran towards Spring-gardens, where the cries came from; when I got a little farther, I saw the serjeant running after Ives, and I got up to the serjeant just as he took the stick out of his hand, and I secured him; when I had got about forty or fifty yards as nigh as I can guess, I saw him put his hand in his pocket, and take out something that was bright, but what it was I cannot say; I said to my partner, search him, and upon that I heard something fall; Harding immediately picked it up, it was the key of Buckingham-gate, he has had it ever since.

RICHARD HARDING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was with Amsden when Ives was apprehended: Between twelve and one o'clock, on the 14th of May last, I heard a man cry out, sentinel, stop him, several times; we ran up, and when we got up, the serjeant had got hold of him, and we secured him; in searching his breeches, he took out something and dropped, which I stooped for, and found to be the key of Buckingham-gate.(Produces it.)

Shepherd. This is my key; I am very positive this is the key that I lost, I have had it eight years.

WILLIAM PEVERING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I apprehended Keough the same morning that Ives had been brought in about half past twelve; I went out of the watch-house between four and five, to the place where I was informed they were, in King's-head-yard, Broadway, Westminster; I found Keough sitting upon the bed, and a woman in bed; he said, before I spoke to him, I will go along with you; I said, you had better come with me, as there is an accusation against you for a robbery in the Park last night, along with Ives, and if you are innocent, come along and clear yourself up; he then said, who put me up, or who acquainted me where I was to come after him, or something to that effect; I told him it was very immaterial, and I tied him and one Dempsey together, that was discharged, and they came along very willingly.

The prisoner Keough put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

Justly conceiving the embarrassment I should labour under in the presence of this honourable Court, I have committed my defence to paper, having no

doubt but I shall meet with some compassionate gentleman who will take the trouble of reading it to this honourable Court. On the night stated in the indictment I had been drinking at the Greenman, in New-street, Covent-garden, till near two o'clock, and on my departure from the house, not being able to get into my quarters, and being for guard the next day, I went to Westminster, with an intention to sleep with a comrade, where I kept my best clothes, that I might sooner get dressed; and, in Tothill-street, I met with a girl of the town; being rather intoxicated, I went home with her to her lodgings in the Broad-way; while I was getting ready, I was apprehended by serjeant Hemblin, and others; I can only solemnly declare I am innocent of what is laid to my charge, and throw myself upon the mercy of the Court.

Q. (To Pevering.) Did you observe any marks upon Keough's face? - A. I observed one side of his face was swelled, the left side, but I did not take any particular notice; but when the serjeant, at Bow-street, told me he had struck him, I thought I observed one side rather larger than the other.

The prisoner Ives put in a written defence, which was read as follows:

On the night on which the prosecutor says he was robbed, I had been drinking in Paved-alley, St. James's-street, till twelve o'clock, and in crossing St. James's-park, in the way to my lodgings, I heard a noise as of men sighting, or struggling; being unwilling to be seen in the Park at that time of night, I made haste to get away, and stumbled over something, which I found was a walking-stick; I heard a cry of stop thief, and was stopped by the sentinel, when serjeant Hemblin, and the prosecutor, came up, and owned the walking-stick; I am entirely innocent of it. With respect to Keough, I had not seen him for twenty-four hours before.

Keough, GUILTY Death . (Aged 25.)

Ives, GUILTY Death . (Aged 24.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-2

410. JOHN TANN was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, on the 20th of June , in and upon Robert Sherborne , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a man's hat, value 2s. his property.

ROBERT SHERBORNE sworn. - On the 20th of June, between twelve and one o'clock in the night, I was coming down Holborn ; just before I got to Dean-street three men came up to me, one before me, and the others behind me; this young man at the bar laid hold of my little finger, and his left-hand upon my right-hand wrist, and screwed my little finger round, what became of the other two I do not know; I said, my friend, don't meddle with me, go along about your business, for I have neither money nor watch, he had put his hand into my breeches; then he let go my left-hand, and put his hand into my fob; after that, I told him to go along about his business; and just as I had got round the corner of Dean-street, before I had got two yards round the corner, I received a blow at the side of my head, which knocked me down into the middle of the street, but who gave me that blow I do not know, my hat fell over my face as I fell, and when I was down, I felt my hat taken from under my head; I then called the watchman, and he came up, and I asked him to go part of the way home with me; I had not been at home five minutes before the patrol came, and said he had got the young man; I went to the watch-house in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and there I saw the prisoner and my hat.

Q. Were you in a situation to see who took away the hat? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. So you neither saw the person that took your hat away, not the person who knocked you down? - A. No.

Q. What are you? - A. I keep the Spread-eagle in North-street, Red-lion-square, and have done going on fourteen years.

Q. Had you been drinking that night? - A. I had been drinking with some friends, six of us had drank about six sixpennyworths of brandy and water.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I cannot say I was perfectly sober; but sixpennyworth of brandy and water would not make any man drunk.

Q. You never saw the prisoner at the bar in your life before? - A. Yes; to the best of my recollection, I think I have seen him at my house.

Q. More than once? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Your hat fell over your face? - A. Yes.

Q. And then it was taken from you so that you could not tell who took it? - A. No.

Q. You know there is such a thing as a forty pounds reward? - A. I have nothing to do with forty pounds reward.

Q. You never heard of it? - A. Yes; but it is to be hoped not in this case.

Q. Yes, but there is? - A. It is to be hoped not.

ROBERT WHEELER sworn. - I am a patrol of St. Andrew's, Holborn, and St. George the Martye: On the night of the 20th of June, I saw the prisoner at the bar and Mr. Sherborne, and two other men, I was about two yards from them, the other two men went on the other side of Dean-street, the prisoner and Mr. Sherborne turned

round the corner on the left hand, into Dean-street, the prisoner up with his fist, and knocked Mr. Sherborne down.

Q. How far were you off then? - A. About two yards; and directly as he knocked him down, he snatched his hat from under his head, and ran away; Mr. Sherborne called out, watch; I followed him across Holborn, there was a watchman came out of a court, and the prisoner turned back, I was not three yards from him all the time; I thought, by his returning back, that it was only a bit of a frolic, I went a little further and met Mr. Sherborne, and he said, it was very odd, that neither watchman nor patrol were to be seen; why, says I, I saw you knocked down, and your hat taken away; I sent the watchman home with Mr. Sherborne, and went down Holborn myself; I had not got above forty yards, before I saw the prisoner whistling, I let him go past two lamps, that I might be positive to the man; I laid hold of him by the collar, and told him I wanted him; he said, what for, I said, the hat that he had taken from the man in Dean-street; he said, he had no hat but his own, I put my hand up to his hat, and found this hat upon his own, (produces it); I then took him to the watch-house with this hat in my hand.

Sherborne. This is my hat, I have had it ever since the latter end of last summer, I know it by this greasy part at the back of it, and the stamp I cut myself, it is neither round, nor square, nor oval.

Jury. Q. Do you ever wear your hair tied? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. (To Wheeler.) Q. Was the prosecutor sober? - A. Not quite sober.

Q. Was the prisoner sober? - A. Yes, as sober as I am now.

Prisoner's defence. I had been drinking, and I was coming down Holborn, I saw two or three men; Mr. Sherborne ran up against me, and two other men hustled him against me, and we both fell together into the mud; after I had gone away from them, I found I had got a wrong hat, and I was going back to see if I could find Mr. Sherborne to change it again, when the watchman took me, and said, he had seen me knock down Mr. Sherborne.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 19.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-3

411. JAMES SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , six silver table spoons, value 3l. six silver tea spoons, value 15s. and ten silver desert spoons, value 24s. the property of Peter Speke , Esq ; in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SUSANNAH SPEKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You live in Oxford-street ? - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Speke is one of the Supreme Council of Bengal ? - A. The prisoner had been my servant a year and a half; in consequence of some suspicion, I directed the plate chest to be examined on the 5th of April, he had left my service suddenly; the plate chest was under his care, and was kept in the room where he slept, nobody else had access to it, he kept the key; in the plate chest I found some pawnbroker's duplicates wrapped up in the list of the plate; I lost various spoons.

Court. Q. Have you such a recollection of the plate, to say that there were spoons of various sorts missing? - A. Yes.

Q. I believe resort was had to a Mr. Moore, a pawnbroker? - A. Yes; he produced some spoons which I knew to be mine.

Q. Were there any wages due to him, when he went away? - A. Five days after he went, his quarter became due.

Q. He did not apply to you for any wages, or any thing of that sort? - A. He applied to me about a fortnight before, to advance him some money to bury a child.

Q. Did you comply with this application? - A. I advanced him some money towards his wages, and afterwards made him a present of it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This poor man was in distress, and you were kind enough to assist him? - A. I did.

Q. Mr. Speke has been a considerable time abroad, I believe? - A. About twenty years.

Q. Do you know that he is living now? - A. I had a letter from him about four months ago.

MARGARET HULL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am housekeeper to Mr. Speke.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar a fellow servant of your's? - A. Yes; on the 5th of April, between eleven and twelve, I went into the pantry to tell him to get his plate ready, that my mistress was coming down to look it over; he said, very well, and asked me if my mistress was offended with him; and I said, I believed she was; he asked me if I thought my mistress meant to discharge him, and I told him I could not tell; he said, he hoped not, for if she did, he did not know what he should do, he then cried, and seemed very much agitated.

Q. Had you any other coversation with him? - A. Yes; I said, why did he offend his mistress, and stay out so; he said, he had been distressed, and

he had had a little business, which would be settled in a day or two, and then, after that, he would be very good; I saw him between one and two o'clock that day, and never saw him after, till I saw him at Bow-street.

Q. You were not present when the plate chest was opened? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The poor man has always borne a very good character before this? - A. I believe he has.

JOHN MOORE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, in Bird-street, Mary-le-bonne; the prisoner came to me on the 24th of September, and pledged these spoons, in the name of Samuel Saunders.

Q. What are the initials upon the spoons? - A. A.S.S. I have had them ever since.

Q. Are you sure as to the person of the prisoner? - A. Yes, I am quite.

Court. Q. Were they brought all at one time? - A. No; here are six table spoons, and six tea spoons brought at one time.

Court. Q. What did you lend upon them? - A. two pounds ten shillings.

Mr. Knapp. Q. They are worth more, are they not? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Mrs. Speke.) Look at these, and tell us if they are your spoons? - A. They are mine.

Mr. Alley. Q. How much is the amount of all the things that were pledged? - A. Four pounds.

Q. How much wages were due to him? - A. Five guineas.

HENRY CROKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street; I went down to Chatham, and apprehended the prisoner last Friday was a week, he had inlisted in the 51ft regiment, in the name of Newman.

Q. At the time you apprehended him, did he say any thing? - A. I asked him if he knew a lady of the name of Speke, in Oxford-road; he said, no; but there was another person with me, who identified him, and then he said he was the person that lived servant with Mrs. Speke.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

Mr. Alley. (To Mrs. Speke.) Q. What character did this poor man bear? - A. The best imaginable.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 30.)

He was recommended to mercy by the Jury and the Prosecutrix, on account of his good character.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-4

412. JOHN PURDY was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Holford , about the hour of one in the night of the 28th of June , with intent the goods in the said dwelling-house, burglariously to steal, and burglariously stealing a cotton gown, value 2s. a gingham gown, value 28s. eight cotton waistcoats, value 55s. a pair of nankeen breeches, value 8s. a linen bag, value 10d. two linen check aprons, value 2s. two cotton handkerchiefs. value 1s. a silk handkerchief, value 1s. two cotton shawls, value 6d. two cotton frocks, value 1s 6d. a gingham skirt, value 6d. a cotton skirt, value 6d. and three cotton stockings, value 8d. the property of the said George Holford .

MARTHA HOLFORD sworn. - I am the wife of George Holford, I live at No. 2, Queen street, Lower-street, Islington : On the 28th of June, our house was broke open in the night; I went to bed between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was the last up, I fastened the house and left all safe; I heard some little noise about one o'clock, as near as I can guess, but it did not disturb me, it was a sort of tumbling noise; I rose at six o'clock, and found the window of the wash house, and the wash-house door, wide open, I had fastened it the night before with iron bolts, the bolts had been burst open; the wash-house door goes into a back yard, there is a wall that goes over into several gardens.

Q. Do the gardens join to the road or street? - A. No; I lost a gingham gown worth twenty-eight shillings, eight cotton waistcoats worth two pounds fifteen shillings, a cotton gown worth two shillings, a pair of nankeen breeches worth eight shillings, a linen bag, two check aprons, two cotton neck-handkerchiefs, a silk handkerchief, two cotton shawls, two cotton frocks, a gingham skirt, and a cotton one, and three pair of cotton stockings.

Q. Are you sure all these things were in your house the night before, when you went to bed? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever find any of them again? - A. Yes; at the Police-office, in Harton-garden, the same week.

Cross examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I take it you slept pretty sound after one o'clock? - A. I was awake once in the night, my child cried.

Q. You did not wake again till six o'clock? - A. No.

Q. There were a great many walls to get over before he could get to your house? - A. No.

Q. It was not easy to get over these walls in the dark, though it might be in the light? - A. I cannot say.

Q. In what parish is this house situated? - A. In Islington parish.

Q. Is there but one parish in Istington? - A. Not that I know of.

GEORGE HOLFORD sworn. - I am the husband of the last witness, I am a hard-working man: I was not disturbed in the night, I know no more of the matter than my wife has said.

MICHAEL HEARNE sworn. - I am a watchman: This day fortnight, as I had done calling three o'clock in the morning, I observed the prisoner, he was not in a soldier's dress then; I saw him first in Douce-street, Foundling-hospital, he moved towards the fields, and him and I had a bit of a discourse; at last, I told him he was well loaded, and I must know what he had got there; he said he had got his own coat and waistcoat, and his child's clothes; I took out a waistcoat and found it damp; says I, you will be so kind as come along with me; no, says he, I wont; however, I brought him to No. 11, in Guilford-street, I knew the gentleman's servant had been out all night; I rung the bell, the while I was ringing the bell he ran away from me, he ran towards Grays-Inn-lane, and got over a sence to the Bluelion; he dropped his coat by the sence, and I called stop thief, and a man stopped him in Gray's-Inn-lane, and I took him in the Dust-yard; I delivered the property to Spriggs.

BENJAMIN SPRIGGS sworn. - On the morning of the 28th of June, the prisoner, Purdy, was brought to the watch-house, with a quantity of wet linen, by the watchman, Hearne, (produces it), I have kept it ever since; in searching of him, I found seven gentlemen's waistcoats on his back, which they did not discover, and within-side of the lining of his hat, I found two linen handkerchiefs and a silk handkerchief, and a child's frock, (produces them); and I found, likewise, in his breeches, this instrument, a large turnscrew, a large gimblet, and a knife. (Produces them).

Q. (To Mrs. Holford.) Are you a washerwoman? - A. Yes, I had these things to wash; I know them to be mine, they were left in the washhouse.

Spriggs. I found these lines upon him; I went to the house the next day, and tried this turnscrew with the place where the shutter was broke open; the line was cut in the garden, I took these lines with me and compared them, they corresponded exactly.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 40.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-5

413. EDWARD BURTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , in a certain out-house belonging to Robert Wyllie , and belonging to the dwelling-house of the said Robert, a Bank-note, value 200l. the property of the said Robert.

ROBERT WYLLIE sworn. - I live in Abchurch-lane ; I have an accompting-house behind the house, there is a gateway that goes into a court-yard; behind the court-yard is a pile of warehouses, and on one side is an office, where the note was lost from; it was a Bank of England note for 200l. it laid on a private shelf in the accompting house; the prisoner at the bar was a driver of a cart, employed by one of my servants: On the 28th of June, between the hours of one and two, I was in the yard, he came to me, and desired me to let him have his money; I told him to go into that office, and he went, and in the course of a minute or two, I was engaged in shewing goods to a merchant not three yards from the office-door, the man returned to me, and said, there is nobody in the office; I told him the clerk I suppose had stepped out, and I paid him his money; he stood some time at the door finding fault with the halfpence, and immediately afterwards we missed the note, but not till my book-keeper came in; he asked me if I had taken up the note; I told him I had not; we searched for the note in every part of the office; not finding it, we concluded it was stole; the next morning I went to enquire about this man, I asked him a few questions, and he answered me so innocent, and so simple, that I could not find in my heart to charge him with it; I took him three or four days after, when I found he had really stole it.

Q. Has the note ever been found again? - A. Yes, at the Bank, four or five days after.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This gateway which comes into your premises is not closed by gates in the day time? - A. No.

Q. It was open to any body that chose to come upon business? - A. Yes.

Q. How long had your clerk left the accompting-house? - A. Ten or twelve minutes.

Q. Did you observe the number of this note? - A. Yes; I have the number.

Q. Did you know it before you lost it? - A. No; but we will prove the note.

Q. Did you, before you missed it, know the number of this Bank-note? - A. No; we had it from Mr. Smith, in Broad-street.

Court. Q. Are you sure there was no person came in during that time besides? - A. Yes.

MARTIN LACEY sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Wyllie.

Q. How long had you been out? - A. From twelve to fifteen minutes; I missed the note immediately upon my return, I enquired of Mr. Wyllie whether he had taken the note and locked it up, as I had left it lying loose in the place, and he told me he had not; I concluded that somebody had stolen it, we continued searching about the accompting-house for the note; the next morning we had this carman taken up upon suspicion, and sent notice to the Bank of England to stop the note; he was

discharged, and taken up again four or five days afterwards, I believe, on the 4th of July, in consequence of some information that we had received.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Even the second time before the Lord-Mayor, he was discharged again, was not he? - A. No; he was discharged once before the Lord-Mayor only.

Q. Before an Alderman? - A. No; he was only interrogated by Mr. Wyllie.

ABRAHAM COLE sworn. - I am a constable: On the 30th of June, I received some information, in consequence of which I went and apprehended the two men that I understood had the note; one was Edward Burton, and a man of the name of Spicer; I took him before the Lord-Mayor, and the Lord-Mayor thought fit to discharge him; I heard no more of it till the 4th of July, when a Mr. Palmer, from Mr. Wyllie's, came to me; in consequence of which, I took Burton again, and one Nathan Levy; I took them to the Compter; they were examined next morning before the Lord-Mayor, and Nathan was admitted a witness upon his own recognizance; I never saw the note at all.

NATHAN LEVY sworn. - I do not know any thing about the note; I never saw the note.

Q. What brought you here? - A. I was bound over to come here; I know nothing about it.

Q. What account did you give before the Lord-Mayor? - A. None at all; I told him I did not know any thing at all about any note.

JOHN WEBB sworn. - On Wednesday, the 28th of June, I was going through Lime-street-square, Burton and Spicer followed me, and shewed me a note, and asked me what it was; I told him it was a two hundred pound note; I gave him the note again; I went about my business, and they went about their's; it was between half after one and two o'clock.

WILLIAM CLARK sworn. - I am a linen-draper: On Friday, the 30th of June, a Jew came into our shop in Oxford-street, and said he wanted some goods, to go into the country with.

Q. Was that Levy? - A. It is very much like him, but I cannot swear that it was him, he is so differently dressed; he bought different goods to the amount of forty-one pounds twelve shillings.

Q. Do you believe he is the man? - A. He is very much like him, he wrote his name upon the top of the bill, Maddox; he took out his pocketbook with a two hundred pound note and some small ones; I sent it to the Bank, and the young man came back with ten twenty pound notes, and I gave him fifteen pounds eight shillings and eight pence; my man that I sent with it, is not here; I put down the number of the note.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You never saw the man before? - A. No.(Mr. Price, one of the clerks of the Bank, produced the note).

Clark. This is the note, it has my hand-writing upon it.

Q. (To Levy). Look at Mr. Clarke, do you know him? - A. I do not.

Q. Upon your oath, were you or not, at his shop, upon the 30th of June? - A. Upon my oath, I never was, for I never was possessed of a two hundred pound note in my life.

JOHN WAINEWRIGHT sworn. - On the 29th of June, Mr. Wyllie sent for me to the accompting-house, in the Steel-yard; I asked him some questions, and he denied knowing any thing about what I asked him; I did not say any thing about the two hundred pound note.

Q. Did you see any thing of the prisoner afterterwards? - A. Yes; before the Lord-Mayor.

Q. Was the examination taken down in writing? - A. It was.

Q. Was the Jew before the Lord Mayor? - A. He was.

Q. Was his examination taken down in writing? - A. I believe it was.

Cole. I was there, there was no examination of the Jew at all; Mr. Knowlys, his counsel, advised him not to say any thing at all.

WILLIAM SPICER sworn. - I live with Mr. Barnjum; I was going along Abchurch-lane, I do not know what day, I saw the prisoner at the bar, and he asked me to help him unload his cart, and I went with him to Mr. Wyllie's, and unloaded the cart, and he went into the accompting-house for his money, and when he came out again, he shewed me the note.

Q. What sort of a note was it? - A. I cannot tell what it was, it was a Bank note, but I do not know what the value of it was; then we went along Lime-street, and shewed it to Mr. Webb, and he said it was a two hundred pound note, and then we went to Mr. Levy's house with it to get it changed; we went again next morning, and Levy said it was a twenty-five pound note, and he gave me one pound six shillings; and Edward Burton had one pound six shillings.

Q. (To Levy). You have heard what he says, is that true? - A. No; it is not true; I never had any note at all.

Spicer. Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where were you at the time you say this man shewed you the note? - A. I was in Abchurch-lane.

Q. Close by Mr. Wyllie's yard? - A. Almost.

Q. Was the yard open for such wicked gentlemen as you to run into if you were so disposed? - A. It was open.

Q. Could you have made your way in if you were so disposed? - A. I could have gone in.

Q. If nobody had been in the accompting house, you could have taken it away too? - A. I suppose so.

Q. You were before the Lord-Mayor, were not you? - A. Yes.

Q. How many times? - A. Twice.

Q. The first time you were there, you denied it shoutly, and said, you did not know any thing about it? - A. I said so the first time.

Q. The first time, you understood, I believe, that if you did tell of any body else that was concerned in it, you would not be punished? - A. Yes.

Q. And then you laid the blame upon this man? - A. I did not lay any other blame upon him than what he had done.

Q. You first denied having any concern in it at all? - A. Yes.

Q. The second time, you understood, you were to be saved, if you accused another person? - A. Yes, if I accused him right.

Q. Then you laid the blame upon this man? - A. I did not lay any blame upon him.

Q. You took a part of it? - A. Yes.

Q. You took that to be a very honest thing, did not you? - A. No.

Q. If you had been an honest man, do not you think it would have been your duty to have told Mr. Wyllie as soon as you knew of it? - A. Yes.

Q. I want to know your own opinion of yourself, did not you look upon yourself then as bad as the thief at least? - A. I did not take it.

Court. (To Levy.) Q. Did any body ask you any questions before the Lord Mayor? - A. I was asked if I knew the prisoner; I told my Lord, I did, by sight, but we had never any dealings together; my Lord Mayor asked me, if I had the note, and I told him I never had, if I had, I would voluntarily have come forwards.

Court. (To Webb.) Do you remember which of them had possession of the note? - A. Burton put the note into my hand.

Q. Was Spicer the person that was with him? - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 20.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-6

414. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Ellison , Esq. about the hour of three in the night of the 19th of May , with intent the goods of the said Richard, to steal, take, and carry away, and burglariously stealing a tinder-box candlestick, value 6d. the property of the said Richard; the said Richard, and others of his family being in the said dwelling house.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Gurney, and the case opened by Mr. Const.)

MATTHEW COURT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am butler to Mr. Ellison: On the evening of the 19th of May, between twelve and one at night; I secured the front door, I locked and bolted it, and put the chain across; I also bolted the lower door, which opens from the area, with four bolts and a cross iron bar; I also bolted the kitchen door on the passage side with one bolt.

Q. How did you find them in the morning? - A. About four o'clock in the morning I got up, and found the inner door forced open, the kitchen window forced from the lower hinges, and the outer doors were open also.

ELIZABETH KEMP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am servant to Mr. Ellison: On the night of the 19th of May, I fastened the kitchen shutters about eight o'clock at night; I went to bed about half past twelve, and left them fast then.

Q. What have you got in your hand? - A. A tinder-box candlestick that I left upon the shelf when I went to bed; when I came down the next morning, it was found in the passage.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You were not the last person up in the house? - A. No.

Q. Any other person might have carried that candle and tinder-box about? - A. I do not know.

Q. The shutters were closed? - A. Yes.

Q. So that of course, though it might be light out of doors, persons in the inside might be obliged to use a bit of candle? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Gurney. (To Court.) Q. Did you do any thing with that tinder-box before you went to bed? - A. No.

WILLIAM BARFOOT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am under butler to Mr. Ellison: On Saturday the 20th of May, about three in the morning, I was awoke by a noise in the house; I had to call up a gentleman of the name of Cookson, who was to go by the coach to Stamford, it was then light; I heard a noise and dressed myself, and I went to the servant's hall, and took two pair of shoes to go into Mr. Cookson's room, when I saw three men come out of the parlour, and I heard one of them say, d-n them, here they are coming; I saw the prisoner turn his head two or three times to call his dog, the door was unbarred, and every thing ready for them to get out; I followed them, I was never more than thirty yards off them; I followed them into Vigo-lane.

Q. How far is that from your master's? - A. I do not know; they crossed a great many streets.

Q. Did any body join you in the pursuit? - A. The watchman sprung his rattle; when I caught the prisoner the dog came and jumped up upon the prisoner.

Q. Did you lose sight of him at all? - A. Only when he turned the corners.

Q. Did you see any thing of the candlestick? - A. I saw one of the three, I cannot say which, set it down upon the bench in the passage; they left the candle smoking.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was it perfectly light when you got up? - A. Yes.

Q. Light enough to distinguish the countenance of any man? - A. I could.

Q. The candle they might have taken away if they had been so disposed, but they did not do it? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. They did not set it down till after they saw you? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What is the value of the tinderbox? - A. I cannot say.

Jury. It is not worth sixpence.

Mr. Knapp. Q. They have taken nothing away at all? - A. No, they had moved some things; they had moved a large kitchen poker.

Q. They had not taken any thing away? - A. Not that I know of.

PATRICK CONWAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a watchman in St. James's parish: On the 20th of May, in the morning, I joined in the pursuit after three men, they passed my box; I saw Barfoot in pursuit of them, and he held up his hand, and said, three robbers, and I sprung my rattle, and ran down Sackville-street, and there the prisoner made a sort of a seint, as much as to say he was not in company; Mr. Barfoot said he was one of them; I said, I would take him if he would swear that he was one of them; he said he would swear to him, he was the last of the three; he had a small spaniel dog that followed him as far as Vigo-lane, and there we left him; the other two made their escape.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. It had been day-light an hour before this happened? - A. No; about three quarters of an hour before.

Q. At the time you laid hold of the prisoner, did not he walk up to you? - A. No; I laid hold of him.

Q. Did not he hold some conversation with you, and the footman, before he charged him? - A. No; he kept on the other side of the street, at a distance from us.

Q. Did he not walk back to you? - A. Yes; he made a sort of seint as if he had not belonged to their company.

Q. He went very readily to the watch-house? - A. He was obliged.

Q. You know there is a reward of forty pounds in this case? - A. I do not know.

Q. You, being a watchman, do not know that there is a reward of forty pounds for apprehending a person guilty of a burglary? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. You never heard of it? - A. No.

Q. How long have you been a watchman? - A. One year.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from St. James's church to the Green-man and Still in Oxford-road, to go out of town to Uxbridge; I heard a noise in the street, I walked up Sackville-street, and saw a watchman and some people talking together; I asked what was the matter, and they said there were thieves, and asked me if I had met any men; I told them I had, and described them; I asked them what it was o'clock, and then the young man came, and said I was one of the robbers; I told him he was taking my character away; he said, if he was doing wrong his master would stand by him; I told him to take care of what he said; they searched me and found nothing but my watch.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 23.)

Of stealing the tinder-box, but not of the burglary.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-7

415. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , a leather pocketbook, value 3d. and a stamped piece of paper, value 6d. the property of John Beach .

THOMAS MILLER sworn. - On Monday, the 3d of July, I saw the prisoner take a pocket-book out of Mr. Beach's pocket, about half past twelve o'clock at noon, upon Ludgate-hill ; the constable has the pocket-book here; I took hold of him, and delivered him to the constable.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor's name? - A. Yes; John Beach.

JOHN VINIE sworn. - I am a constable: (produces the pocket-book); it was delivered to me by the last witness.

Prisoner's defence. I was walking along when this man charged me with stealing the pocket-book; I did not do any such thing.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 18.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-8

416. ELIZABETH BOSFORD was indicted for making an assault upon Michael Speare , in the dwelling-house of William Curtis, on the 29th of June , putting him in fear and taking from his person, a silver watch, value 40s. a silver seal, value 2s. a steel watch-chain, value 12d. a brass watchkey, value 1d. and a steel watch-key, value 1d. the property of the said Michael.

MICHAEL SPEARE sworn. - I work at the India warehouses : On the 29th of June, I was coming down King-street , it poured with rain, and I stopped under a gate-way, and this woman said, you may walk into my room if you please, it is a very honest house, and you will not be robbed; I had not been in the room above five or eight minutes before she got her hand in my pocket, and took out some half-pence, and then she took my watch out of my pocket, and gave it to another woman, who ran away with it; I took the prisoner the next morning in the same room; I have never found my watch again.

Prisoner's defence. I was at Covent-garden from two o'clock till six, and I never saw the man in my life; I am innocent of what he accuses me of.

Jury. Q. Were you sober or in liquor at that time? - A. As sober as I am now.

GUILTY of stealing the watch , (Aged 30).

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-9

417. RICHARD ATKINSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Cole , about the hour of six in the forenoon, of the 21st of June , Elizabeth Cole and others of the family being therein, and stealing a man's cloth coat, value 5s. the property of the said James.

JAMES COLE sworn. - I live in Swan-alley, Lower East Smithfield , in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate ; I was not at home at the time it happened.

ELIZABETH COLE sworn. - I am the wife of the last witness; at six in the morning of the 21st of June, my house was broke open; I heard the prisoner come into my apartments, I am sure he is the man; my brother lodges in my house, and as he passed, he said, are you awake, I said, yes, and just after, I heard somebody up in the two pair of stairs room, I heard a chest opened; a person went after him and brought him back, the witness's name is Thomas M'Gee; I saw him drop the property from under his arm as he went past my door.

Q. What property? - A. A coat.

Q. Was any part of your house broke open? - A. No; the outer door was upon the latch; my brother is here, he shut it when he went out.

JAMES COCKERFLL sworn. - I lodge in my sister's house; I went out about a quarter before six in the morning, as near as I can guess, I pulled the door after me, and left it upon the latch.

Q. Are you sure you fastened the door? - A. Yes. (The coat produced, and deposed to by the Prosecutrix.)

THOMAS M'GEE sworn. - I heard a cry of stop thief, I caught the prisoner, I found nothing upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down Nightingale-lane, I turned down by a sence, where there was a public privy; I went down to it, and that man came up to me, and told me, I must go with him; I behaved with no violence; I told him, I was going to my daily labour, and being the only man that was there, that woman said, that is the fellow; I know nothing at all about it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-10

418. WILLIAM EMERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a wooden door, value 5s. the property of Joseph Aldridge , and Edward Aldridge.

HENRY BARKER sworn. - I live with Messrs. Joseph and Edward Aldridge , timber-merchants , the corner of Long-lane, Aldersgate-street: On the 29th of June, the prisoner was stopped by the watchman in Bunhill-row, with the property.

- AUSTIN sworn. - At four o'clock in the morning of the 29th of June, I saw the prisoner with a door upon his shoulders, I asked him whose it was, he said it was his mistress's property; I told him he must go before the officer of the night to be examined; my fellow servant came up, and he wanted to treat us with something to drink to let him go, but I would not suffer it; I sent my fellow servant with him to the watch-house, and took down the door myself. (It is produced.)

Barker. This is my master's door, I had seen it between one and two the day before, it had been lying there before my master had the premises, my master had the key last quarter day.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming along, and saw this door standing against a wall, and I took it along till the watchman stopped me.

GUILTY (Aged 62.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-11

419. JONATHAN HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , two cotton gowns, value 34s. and a silk handkerchief, value 5s. the property of Sarah Mark , widow .

SARAH MARK sworn. - On Friday the 30th of June, I missed two gowns and a silk handkerchief from the Three Compasses, Orchard-street, Portman Mews: I lodge there, I had seen them the Sunday before; I found them again the 1st of July, at a pawnbroker's; the prisoner lodged in the same house.

JOHN WASS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Hyas, pawnbroker, in Nightingale-lane, (produces a cotton gown); I took it in of a woman, Ann Stringer, on the 28th of June, it was pawned for 9s.

Prosecutrix. This is my gown.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-12

420. MARY HEFFERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , a leather pocket-book, value 6d. three half-guineas, six shillings in money, and a Bank-note, value 5l. the property of Patrick Welch .

PATRICK WELCH sworn. - On Friday the 9th of June, I had been to Oxford-street, and on my return I went into a public-house, in St. Giles's , and there were some people in the tap-room; I did not chuse to sit down there, and I went back into the parlour, and called for a pint of beer, I had it before me; I was scarcely a minute or two there, when two or three men, and two or three women came in, one with a fiddle, and another with a German-slute; the landlord came up, they began to dance, and I called for another pint of beer, to look at the dance, to rest myself, and the prisoner began to lay out her distress, that she had pawned her cloaths, and that she was told I could be of service to get her some little business, and she sat down, and began to talk, and say a good many things; why, says I, if I should have it in my power to do any thing for you I will; I asked her at the door, if she would take a glass of gin, and she did; she went to a house where she said she lived, and I went with her; there were two rooms, with a broken partition between them, and some disorderly people there, and I came down stairs again; I gave her six-pence or eight-pence; I had a five pound Bank-note in my pocket, and a forty shilling one, I told her, if I had got change for one of them, I would have given her a trifle more; she told me there was another public house, the Black-horse, that was quite convenient, and she could get change there; the woman told me she had not it to give me; she then told me to go to another public-house, very convenient, Mr. Kelly's, I knew Kelly very well, and she would not go in there; I took it out of my pocket-book there, and I saw them both there; I asked him to give me change, and he gave me change for the small bill, I rolled it in a piece of paper, and put it in my waistcoat pocket, I put the pocket-book, and the five pound bill into my pocket; she said she would go to the Black-horse, and as I came back, I looked in at the Black-horse, and there I saw her sitting with another man, she came from his company, and sat very close to me, and began to talk and speak about one thing or another; I catched her hand about my pocket; I asked her what she wanted, and she said, I want to rouse you, you seem to be heavy; I went into the passage and took out my book, and laid it down; I had but just laid it down, and turned my head about again, and she had got the book in her hand doubled up, I got it from her, and untied it, and while I was untying it, she slipped the corner, and I did not see any more of her; when I opened it, the bill was gone, and the money out of my waistcoat-pocket.

Q. Were you sober or drunk? - A. I was sober enough.

Q. What time was it? - A. About ten o'clock, I believe.

Q. When did you see her again? - A. I went home very uneasy, and I got up early the next morning, and caught her standing at the very table where we drank the beer; says I, you robbed me last night, now I have you, you shall pay me my money back again; there were two women there, and they shoved me out of the room.

Q. Are you sure, when you got change for the forty shilling note, that the five pound was in the pocket-book? - A. Yes; it might then be about nine o'clock, and I am sure it was there about two minutes before she took the book, I saw it there.

Prisoner's defence. This man desired me to sit between him and another woman, and then he asked me if I would have a glass of gin, and I said, I did not care, if he would give it me, and we went into the parlour, and had two quarterns of gin, and we went away to another public-house, to get change, and then we came to the Blach-horse, there he had some rum, and he wanted to quarrel with an acquaintance of mine that was in my company, I never saw the note in all my life.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-13

421. JOSEPH HATELY was indicted for that he, on the 8th of March, 1787, look to wife one Hannah Smith , spinster , and was married to her; and that on the 5th of September, 1796 , feloniously did take to wife one Mary Bennison ,

widow , and to the said Mary was married, his former wife, Hannah Smith, being then alive .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MARY SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Walsall, in Staffordshire; my father is clerk of that place.

Q. Do you know Hannah Smith? - A. No further than I saw her at her marriage.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Who did she marry? - A. The prisoner.

Q. Were you present at the marriage? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the clergyman who married them? - A. Yes; the Reverend Mr. Rutter.

Q. Have you any doubt that he is the man? - A. That is the man.

Q. Is that Hannah Smith living, or dead? - A. She is living, I saw her about six weeks since.

Court. Q. You know her very well? - A. She is not any acquaintance at all.

Court. Q. You know her person? - A. Yes.

JOHN SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Walfall; I am clerk of that place.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know him in 1787? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Hannah Smith? - A. Yes; I saw her married to Joseph Hately .

Q. That Joseph Hately , or another? - A. I believe he is the man.

Q. Did you know him before he was married to Hannah Smith? - A. Yes; he was engineer of a steam engine.

Q. Produce the copy of the register? - (produces it); Mr. Rutter was the clergyman. (It is read).

Jury. Q. How long did you know him before he was married? - A. It might be a month.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Where did you know me? - A. You have been at our house many times.

Q. What is your name? - A. John Smith.

Court. Q. (To Mary Smith ). Here is Mary Smith signed as a witness to the marriage, was it you? - A. Yes; I signed it.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. No more than coming to the house to my father.

MARY BENNISON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; Joseph Hately .

Q. Were you ever married to him? - A. The 5th of last September.

Q. Were you a single woman or a widow? - A. A widow, with two children; I kept a baker's shop at West-Ham.

Q. Where were you married? - A. At St. Andrew's church, Holborn.

Court. Q. What did he pretend to be? - A. He was going into partnership at the Abbey, with some other people in the leather way, as people of property; he pretended to be a man of property.

Q. Did he pretend to be a man of fortune? - A. Yes; he told me he had money that he would settle upon my children.

Cross-examined by the Prisoner. Q. Whether she knew that I had property, or received any benefit from it? - A. I may have had five or six guineas, but I always paid him again.

Prisoner's defence. The prosecutrix of this indictment knew there was property left in her house of six hundred pounds; this six hundred pounds has been appropriated to her use, which I have appropriated to the creditors and other persons, for flour, and bills contracted from the 15th of October to the 19th of February last; for flour brought in from sundry people, but most particularly from Mr. Cooper, near Abridge, one hundred and twenty pounds worth; the consequence was, I found the money was not prepared from the trade for the payment there of; Mr. Cooper was solicited by Mrs. Bennison to arrest me; of all which I can bring forward proof from the person who did arrest me, in consequence there of; there were also sums of money appropriated to her use.

Court. Q. All this is no answer to the charge against you - you are charged with having married Mrs. Bennison, your former wife being alive.

Prisoner. It was not consistent with my knowledge that she was existing; I had not seen her for near five years; I had been credibly informed that she was not existing; all which she was apprized of before she married me.

GUILTY . (Aged 60.)

Imprisoned one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-14

422. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for that he, on the the 21st of December , did feloniously and falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain deed, with the name William Green thereto subscribed, purporting to be a bill of sale of one William Green, late a seaman on board the Rockingham East-Indiaman, of all his wages and pay due to him for his service on board the said ship, to one Benjamin Whitaker, in consideration of the sum of forty-two pounds three shillings and five pence, and to have been signed, sealed and delivered by the said William Green, with intention to defraud the said Benjamin Whitaker .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged.

Third and fourth Count. The same as the first and second, only with intent to defraud William Green.

It appearing in evidence that the prisoner had gone by different names, and there being no evidence to shew that he was not the William Green, who had actually served on board the ship, the Jury found him

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-15

423. HENRY GRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June, a linen handkerchief, value 1s. the property of John Avery .

JOHN AVERY sworn. - I am an organ-builder : On Friday se'nnight last, between the hours of nine and ten, near ten o'clock, I was going, in company with a Mr. Hebbins that is here, on this side of Temple-bar , when a man pushed against me, and I felt his hand in my pocket; I turned round, and said, here is a rascal has picked my pocket, and I caught hold of his hands with the handkerchief, which was not quite out of my pocket, but hung about three parts out.

Court. Gentlemen. Mr. Avery has been a little too quick; he had attempted to commit the offence, but had not compleated it.

NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-16

424. DAVID FERRELL and THOMAS GREGORY were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Skinner , about the hour of one in the night of the 11th of June , with intent the goods therein, being burglariously, to steal, and burglariously stealing a linen horsecloth, value 9d. and a hempen horse-cloth, value 3d. the property of the said William; and a woollen cloth coat, value 5s. the property of Rowland Richardson .

WILLIAM SKINNER sworn. - I live in Globe-yard, Old Bedlam : On the 12th of June, I was called up by the watchman a little before two o'clock, and informed that the stable was broke open; I found a horse-cloth lying at the stable-door, in the stable I found another horse-cloth, and seeking a little further, there lay a box-coat, which belonged to the hackney-coachman; we looked in the yard and found another stable broke open, but missed nothing out of that; I do not know any thing about the locking of the stable myself, I had seen the things there between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, when I fed the horses, I locked the door then, but it was opened for another hackney-coach afterwards; I directly went to the watch-house, and there I saw the two prisoners.

WILLIAM SOUTHGATE sworn. - I am a watchman: I found the stables all locked safe at one o'clock; at half past one I went down the yard again to let the hackney-coachman in with his horses, as usual; I found the lock off the door, it was a padlock; I immediately said, I can take my oath the lock was on at one o'clock; I turned round and saw the prisoner, Gregory, in the stable, and the hackney-coachman said, watchman, there is another man; then I looked, and there was the other prisoner at the further end of the stable; they said they were doing nothing there, that they only had a woman there, and then they tried to force their way out; I sent the hackney-coachman to get some hemp to tie them together, and while he was gone they used me very oddly for ten minutes, and then Gregory stripped himself naked, and got away from me by force; I secured Ferrel, and took him to the watch-house; Gregory was brought to the watch-house by another watchman.

JOSEPH WICK sworn. - I am a hackney-coachman: I was coming home about half past one o'clock, and the watchman was in the yard, he took the key to open the stable-door, and he said, here has been somebody here since one o'clock, for I will take my oath it was safe then; the lock was off the door, and gone; I went in, and there stood Gregory, the watchman laid hold of him, and asked him what he did there; I said, there is another of them there, that was Ferrell; the watchman sent me for some hemp, and I called another watchman; directly as I had called another watchman, our watchman called out, stop him; I then ran up and met Ferrell, and stopped him; just as I stopped him, the other man came by, naked, and then the watchman came up, and we took Ferrell to the watch-house; I saw the two horse-cloths lying, one at the stable-door, and the other in the stable.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I am a constable: On the 12th of June, between one and two in the morning, I had charge of Ferrell for breaking open Skinner's stables; Southgate, the watchman, gave me charge of him; I searched him, I found nothing upon him but a knife; in a few minutes afterwards Gregory was brought in, by another watchman, naked, he had a bit of a shirt at each wrist, but no coat nor waistcoat on; his clothes were brought in, he asked for his clothes, I shewed him them, and asked if those were his clothes; he told me, yes, he put them on; after his clothes were on, I searched him, and found in his pocket these keys, which I believe to be pick-lock keys, (produces them); after I had taken them both to the Compter in the

morning, about three o'clock, I searched the lodgings of Gregory, and in some drawers I found some more keys, which I believe are pick-locks. (Produces them).

Gregory's defence. I am a jobbing blacksmith by trade, these keys are half of them old keys that I had made new ones for, they are not for the purpose of thieving; I live in Bishopsgate-street; on Sunday evening I went into Moorfields, I was very full of liquor, I came down into Old Bedlam, I met with a woman, and she told me there was a place open there if I had a mind to go in with her; she said she had been in there with another man before; I am as innocent as the child unborn.

Ferrell's defence. I was not in the stable at all; I was going up Old Bedlum when the coachman stopped me, I had never been there at all; I was walking along at the same time as the watchman was, and he laid hold of me.

Ferrell called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Ferrell, GUILTY Death . (Aged 20.)

Gregory, GUILTY Death . (Aged 39.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-17

425. JOHN M'FOY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a hempen bag, value 3d. and thirty pounds of salt, value 3s. the property of George Bowley and William Bowley .

WILLIAM BOWLEY sworn. - I am a salt manufacturer , No. 180, Bishopsgate-street , in partnership with my father, George Bowley : I know nothing of the theft.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Is there no other person who has an interest in the business besides yourself and your father? - A. No.

JOSEPH GOODHART sworn. - I am apprentice to Messrs. Bowley, the prisoner was in the capacity of carman: On Monday, the 5th of June, he was sent to the water-side for a load of salt, about five o'clock in the afternoon, to Billinsgate-dock, I was there to take an account of what was delivered out of the vessel; having a suspicion of his honesty I followed him home, till we got to the London-tavern, he there stopped the cart, and put a lump of salt into an empty sack, he drove the cart on till he came to the Green-dragon Inn, he there took out the lump of salt and carried it up the gate-way; he then went on, and his wife went over from the other side of the way, and took it, she was with him during the whole transaction, she waited while he put it in the sack at the London-tavern; I apprehended her with it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had a good character with this man, I believe? - A. I cannot say.

Court. Q. How long had he lived with Mr. Bowley? - A. Two or three months. (The salt produced).

Mr. Knowlys. Q. It is not worth more than three or four shillings? - A. Not so much; it is worth very little more than from two to three shillings.

Q. Do you know whom he had worked for before? - A. I cannot say.

Court. (To Mr. Bowley.) Q. What character had you with him? - A. I did not hire him; I should suppose we had a good character with him, or my father would not have hired him.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn. - I know nothing of the robbery; I only had charge of the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. The apprentice ordered me to deliver a ton of salt in Bishopsgate-street, and this was a piece that I thought belonged to that ton; the lumps were in danger of falling over, and I took out that one lump, and was securing it in the sack; I desired my wife to take care of it while I went after the horses, as they were gone on.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Publickly whipped , and imprisoned one month in Newgate .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-18

426. ANN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , two child's frocks, value 2s. three linen shirts, value 3s. a straw bonnet, value 1s. a comb, value 2d. and a flannel petticoat, value 4d. the property of John Croft .

It appearing, in evidence, that the articles, stated in the indictment, were the wearing appard of the daughter of the prosecutor, between nine and ten years of age, and the Court being of opinion that they ought to have been laid to be the property of the daughter, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-19

427. MARY BRYAN and CATHERINE HARRINGTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , a dollar, value 4s. 9d. the property of Thomas Jacques .

THOMAS JACQUES sworn. - I keep a turner's shop in Leather-lane : On Wednesday the 28th of June, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoners came into my shop, and asked for some sugar-tongs, I shewed them three or four pair, I told them, that the price of the pair they had fixed upon was nine-pence, they gave me a dollar which I refused, and

then they gave me another, I laid it down on the counter, and said to Bryan, four shillings will be just the change; in a few minutes she returned, and said, I had given her a bad shilling, which I was confident I had not; while I was disputing about the shilling, it struck me, that they came with a view to defraud or rob me; I turned round to take up the dollar off the counter, and it was gone, I then charged them with it, and they both swore they had not got it; I told them, I was confident they had; I called one of my men out of the shop, and sent for the runners, and then they offered to give me the dollar again, if I would let them go, but I refused to take it; when the officers came, I gave charge of them, there were three of them, the other stood just in the door way, neither in nor out.

Q. Are you sure the prisoners are the two women that came into your shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Were they searched? - A. Yes; and two dollars, and one shilling and six-pence were found upon them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You did not know these women at all before, had they never been in your shop before? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Mary Bryan was the only person you had any dealings with? - A. She seemed to be the foremost.

Q. These persons, after you had made the charge, remained in your shop till the runners came? - A. Yes, they did.

Q. Did they not throw the dollar down in the shop, and the tongs too, and say they would have nothing to do with you after the dispute about the money? - A. No; I laid down the dollar myself upon the counter, and the tongs I took out of Bryan's hand.

Q. Forcibly, I take it for granted? - A. No; she did not resist at all; I said, you have got my money, but you shall not have my tongs.

Q. Did you not get your four shillings again? - A. No; I never got any thing from them but the tongs.

JOSEPH INWARDS sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Police-Office, Hatton-garden; I was sent for by the prosecutor, I searched the prisoners, and found upon Bryan two dollars, and one shilling and six pence on the other; I secured them, they said, if he would overlook it, they would give him the money; I believe both of them said so, I know that one of them did.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Bryan GUILTY (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Harrington NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-20

428. SARAH DRAPER , alias INGRAM, alias ANN WATSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a silver watch, value 40s. a steel watch chain, value 6d. a steel seal, value 6d. two metal watch keys, value 6d. three guineas and a Bank-note, value 5l. the property of Cornelius Andrews .

CORNELIUS ANDREWS sworn. - On the 7th of July, about half past ten at night, I met the prisoner facing Pear-tree-court, Shoreditch; she asked me, if I would give her a glass of gin, I was not disagreeable to it; I went down the court with her to her apartment, there was some discourse passed about sleeping together that night, the price that was asked, I gave, and she asked if we should have any thing to drink, I said, with all my heart, and we had some porter, then we pulled our cloaths off, and went to bed; I had just come home from sea, and had been receiving my money at Somerset-house; I awoke about half past three o'clock, and found no person in bed, and my breeches that had laid under that part of the pillow, that the prisoner said upon, were lying upon the pillow; I examined them, and found that I had lost my discharge from the navy, it was in a tin box made on purpose, a five pound note, three guineas, and my watch; I had observed my five pound note not a quarter of an hour before I met her; I searched the bedclothes, and every thing in the room, but did not find any thing, this was on the Friday evening; I saw her again the Monday after, at Worship-street, and there I saw my watch and my discharge box.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn. - I am an officer of Worship-street; Armstrong, and I apprehended the prisoner last Sunday morning; we found upon her two guineas, two half-guineas, two one pound notes, and twelve shillings and six-pence in silver, also a duplicate of a watch. (Produces it.)

- HARRISON sworn. - (Produces a watch.) Last Saturday in the forenoon, a woman, about the size of the prisoner, came into the shop, and offered to pledge a watch for seventeen shillings and six-pence.

Q. Look at that duplicate? - A. This is the duplicate I gave the woman.

Prosecutor. I will be upon my sacred oath, that this is my watch.

ESTHER HOLLEY sworn. - I saw this good man come in with the prisoner, I saw him in his shirt going to bed, he knocked us up in the morning.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the man before in my life; I have two fatherless children to maintain, I picked up the duplicate in Shoreditch.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-21

429. JOHN EVERARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , three pounds of mutton fat, value 1s. 3d. the property of William Smith .(The indictment stated by Mr. Watson, and the case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS BLEW sworn. - I am journeyman to Mr. Smith, tallow-chandler , Red-lion-street, Holborn .

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; he attended Mr. Smith as an Excise-Officer ; I let him in on the morning of the 7th of June, at half past four, he came to unlock the copper in consequence of the notice I had given him.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular that had happened when he came to make his survey? - A. He had a basket and trowel in his hand, he said he would leave it in our cellar; I had very strong suspicion that he robbed Mr. Smith, and determined to watch him; he surveyed and signed the specimen, and was coming up stairs and I drew back; he came up into the passage, and looked round him, upon that he muttered something to himself about the specimen, and went down into the cellar again, I followed him, and saw him stoop and pick up the sat which was spread about the floor in the cellar, he took it up and put it to his nose to smell it, and then put it in his pocket.

Q. What quantity of fat was there? - A. Three pounds; I then came up stairs, and stopped him at the bottom of the dining-room stairs; I laid hold of him, and he said, for God's sake, what are you going to do, for God's sake let me alone, I am a ruined man; I then called Mr. Smith, and he then pulled the fat out of his pocket, and put it into Mr. Smith's handkerchief.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This man, I believe, has a wife, and two children? - A. I do not know.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of this fat? - A. It is worth upwards of sixteen-pence, taking rough and good altogether.

Mr. Watson. Q. You said you saw him smell to it, what do you suppose he meant by smelling to it? - A. I should suppose, to know whether it was sweet or not.

Knowlys. Q. How many hundred weight of fat were there? - A. I suppose seven or eight.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I gave directions to my servant to watch the prisoner; I was called down stairs, and I got out of bed without putting any thing on, and directly as I came down, he went down up his knees, and said, for God's sake, forgive me, I am a ruined man; I said, no, I shall not, the prisoner then himself took the fat out of one pocket first, and then the other, and put it into my handkerchief.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. It was mutton suet, such as would make a pudding for a family, I suppose? - A. Beef suet is generally used for puddings.

Jury. Q. How long had he surveyed your house? - A. The latter end of January, or beginning of February.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called seven witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-22

430. GABRIEL GUIGNERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , eighty pounds weight of iron, value 10s. the property of William Smith , being part of a certain iron grate, fixed to a certain house and building of the said William .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - On the 23d of June, I lost a large iron grate that belongs to the area, it shuts down as a sence before the house; I was called up about six o'clock in the morning, by the man that took the prisoner; I had seen it in its proper place about eight o'clock over night; I suppose it to have weighed 120 pounds, I put it down at eighty, it was taken off the hinges.

RICHARD COX sworn. - On Monday the 23d of June last, about five o'clock, going past Mr. Smith's house, I perceived the area open, it struck me that they could not be up at that time in the morning, and I made a sort of a stand to see; I judged that somebody had taken it away, I stepped on a few steps, till I got to Half-moon-street, and there I perceived the prisoner with the grate upon his back, tied up in a wrapper; there was a young woman with him at the time, in a long white cloak; he walked on till he came nearly to Clarge's-street, and he went on some little distance till he came to an opening, where there were some pallisadoes, and there he pitched it to rest, the woman was on the other side of the way, and she crossed over to him when he rested; I gave information of it to Mr. Southern, and he pursued him down Dover-street; I had some business in hand that I could not leave at that time.

WILLIAM SOUTHERN sworn. - I went down Bond-street, into Stafford-street, and met the prisoner with a grate on his back; I asked him what he had got there; I found it to be the grate, and I took him back to the gentleman's house with it, and knocked them up; he came along with me very quiet to Mr. Smith's house.

Q. Is the grate here? - A. It is.

Q. (To Smith.) When Mr. Southern knocked

you up, did you open the cloth to see what what was in it? - A. No; not till we took it to the constable. It is produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Hyde-park-corner to see my wife in the hospital, I met with a man, who said, he would give me a shilling to carry it to Vigo-lane pitching-block, near Saville-row; I found it very heavy, and I set it down to rest, when this man came up and took hold of me, I turned back with him, and made no resistance at all; I have a wife in the hospital, and three children. GUILTY (Aged 46.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-23

431. SARAH HARSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a man's coat, value 10s, a linen waistcoat, value 2s. a pair of kerseymere breeches, value 3s. a man's linen shirt, value 4s. and two pair of silk stockings, value 8s. the property of George Sharman .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

GEORGE SHARMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a music master , at St. Alban's, the prisoner was chamber-maid , at Danton's Hotel , in Panton-square ; when I have business in town, I generally frequent that Hotel.

Q. Did you, at any time, leave any of your cloaths in the hands of this servant? - A. Yes, several times; I left my cloaths there, about the latter end of May; I left a coat and waistcoat, and a pair of kerseymere breeches, two pair of silk stockings, and a night shirt.

Q. In whose immediate care did you leave them? - A. I cannot say that I had left them in the immediate care of anybody; I have generally left them in the prisoner's care, and have always found them safe.

Court. Q. Was there only one chamber-maid? - A. I cannot say, I have seen another woman about the house, but I cannot saw who she is.

Q. When was it you had occasion to send to London for these cloaths? - A. I wrote, I think, on the 13th of June; I did not send for any thing but the kerseymere breeches and the stockings; I am not positive whether I wrote for the other things or not.

Q. Have you ever been able to discover them since? - A. No.

Q. What colour was your coat? - A. A blue cloth coat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you never found any of these things? - A. I have not.

Q. You had been accustomed to use this house, you have left things under her care, and always found them correct when you returned? - A. I have.

Q. Whether you left these things in her care, you do not know? - A. I do not recollect where I left them; I have sometimes left things loose and careless, and always found them right.

ROBERT HILL sworn. - I was servant at Mr. Danton's, the prisoner was my fellow-servant; I left Mr. Danton's on the 8th of June; I never saw Mr. Sharman till he was sent for on this occasion.

Q. Do you recollect being desired to brush any coat? - A. Yes; the prisoner at the bar desired me to brush a coat, two days before I left; it was a blue coat; she said she had a coat belonging to a gentleman that came to town once a month, and left his things in her care, and she asked me to brush it for her, as I was brushing a coat of my own, and I did brush it, and returned it to her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you ever recollect, during the time you lived there, having had a coat to brush before? - A. I was only there a week, and I believe I brushed another in the course of that week besides.

Court. Q. Is that a much frequented house? - A. Yes; by Frenchmen.

Court. Q. How many lodgers have they? - A. Only four when I was there.

Mr. Knapp. How came you to leave the service on the 8th of June? - A. Mr. Danton told me he had missed two table spoons, and should insist upon their being found, it was about half past twelve, and I told him if I had left them any where, it must have been in the lady's bed room that I had waited upon, and it was not then a proper time to go into a lady's bed-room, but I would look the next morning for them, but they could not be found.

Mrs. DANTON sworn. - The prisoner lived with me between five and six months, and lately I missed many things, and I suspected her, and sent her away on the 8th of June, on account of these two spoons; I delivered Mr. Sharman's coat to the prisoner, to put to the remainder of his things; after the cloaths were missed, I found her out, and asked her if she knew any thing of the cloaths, and she said she had left them in the drawers, in the room Mr. Sharman had slept in.

Q. Who delivered up the keys of these drawers to you? - A. The girl.

Q. Had any body else access to them? - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether she did, or did not leave them there? - A. No; I never opened the drawers.

Court. Gentlemen. You have heard this case, and you will dispose of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-24

433. MARY JENKINS alias LAWLESS and CATHERINE alias ELIZABETH MET-CALFE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , a cloth great coat, value 4s. a hat, value 1s. 6d. a pair of leather shoes, value 6d. a pair of plated shoe-buckles, value 6d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6d. a leather apron, value 6d. and 8s. in money , the property of William Skemp .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Both NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-25

434. HENRY KEMP and WILLIAM GLADMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , 37lb of iron nails, value 10s. and 15s. in money , the property of Henry Taunt .

The prosecutor not being able to identify the property, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-26

435. THOMAS LINGHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , two silver casters, value 30s. the property of Martha Higginson , widow .

- LITTLEFORD sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Higginson, No. 35, Harley-street , she is a widow lady: Mrs. Higginson sent me out to market on Monday, the 10th of this month, I returned between four and five o'clock, upon which I directly went up stairs to the dining parlour, as dinner was just ready to bring up; upon which I met with the prisoner up stairs in the dining parlour, standing by the side-board, upon which he met me very boldly, to my great surprise, and said, how do you do, my old friend, I have not seen you a long time; upon which he rather pushed me back into the passage away from the room, and said, do not you know me, and knocked a dish almost out of my hand, which I had a cucumber in; upon which I turned round and said, you are a thief, and he pulled the parlour door to, and endeavoured to turn the key; he went out at the street door and pulled it to with great violence; upon which I missed immediately a silver pepper and mustard caster with ladles; upon which I directly pursued him, and called out as violently as I could exert my voice, stop thief, and Mr. Lloyd, the corner of New Cavendish-street, was at his door, and stopped him; I only lost fight of him while he turned the corner; I came up immediately, and commanded him to be brought back to the house and searched; upon which the Duchess of Leinster's butler took out of his pocket one of the casters, and another man took the other, which I have got now about me, I saw it done, (produces them); I have always had the care of them ever since have been her servant, which is four or five days under three months; I know them to be her property.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You never lost fight of him? - A. Only while he turned the corner.

EDMUND LLOYD sworn. - I am a bookseller: I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner run, I stopped him, and took him back.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY (Aged 21).

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-27

436. JAMES LOWTHER and MARY WOOD , alias SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , a featherbed, value 10s. two pillows, value 2s. three blankets, value 3s. two linen sheets, value 2s. a cotton and linen quilt, called patch-work, value 1s. a brass sender, value 1s. a copper tea-kettle, value 1s. and a tin saucepan, value 1s. the property of Joseph Cavernor .

JOSEPH CAVERNOR sworn. - On the 24th of May, I was robbed, about two o'clock, I know nothing of the fact.

ANN LESTON sworn. - I live at the corner of Edward-street, and Duck-lane, Soho-square , next door to the prosecutor: I was coming down stairs, on the 24th of May, between one and two in the afternoon, and saw Lowther come out with a bed tied up in a blanket; he laid it down upon the pavement, and then put it upon his back and went away with it; about half an hour after that, I heard that their place had been stripped; I never saw the prisoner in my life before, but I took particular notice of him while the bed lay upon the pavement; I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. This was about one or two o'clock in the day; and he laid the bed down for some time upon the pavement, at noonday, in the public street? - A. Yes; it might lie there for a minute or two.

Q. This house is full of lodgers? - A. There was an old woman up two pair of stairs, and the prisoner, Mary Wood .

Q. Did you see any body in the passage delivering these things? - A. I did not.

JAMES COX sworn. - Mary Wood did lodge at Mr. Cavernor's, she came for a ban box that she had left, and I watched her as far as Brewer-street,

there she met James Lowther, he seemed to be waiting for her; I watched them all round the Park to Perkins's-rents, Westminster; I came home and told Mr. Cavernor, and went with him the next day, where the property was found.

Q. Do you know what was in the ban-box? - A. I believe it was her own property.

Mr. Alley. (To Cavernor.) Q. Before you searched the prisoner's lodgings did not he tell you that he had been employed to carry these things there, and that you were welcome to search his house? - A. He did.

Q. Did not the person who lodged there, and for whom he said he carried these things, abscond? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner never absconded? - A. No.

JOHN GARDINER sworn. - I went with Mr. Cavernor to search the prisoner's house, Mary Wood came down stairs, and I took her into custody; she asked me to let her have the key to fallen the door before we went away; he asked her how she came by it, and she said, what was that to him; Lowther said, he took it from her from a public-house at the Horse-guards; she said, she had bought it; he asked her where she got the money, and she said, what was that to him.

ANN CAVERNOR sworn. - I am the wife of the prosecutor: I went to the prisoner's house, he told me these things were mine, and desired me to take them away, and not say any thing; my husband went to get a search-warrant; I have not got all the things now; we found a bed and two pillows, a blanket and a sheet, a tea-kettle and a sender.

Lowther's defence. I was employed to carry them.

Lowther, GUILTY , (Aged 42.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Wood, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-28

437. JAMES TIPPITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a linen shirt, value 1s. 6d. and a linen pin-cloth, value 1s. the property of William Bartlett .

WILLIAM BARTLETT sworn. - On the 17th of June, I lost a shirt, and a child's pin a-fore, they were hanging out in the garden; I have never seen them since.

THOMAS DAWKINS sworn. - I saw the prisoner take the things off the line.

Prisoner. What time was it? - A. A little before ten.

Prisoner. What time was it when you came to take me? - A. A little before twelve.

Court. Q. Had you known him before? - A. Yes; I am sure he is the man, he lives at Haggerston.

Prisoner's defence. I was not out of my own house from nine o'clock till past twelve, when the watchman came to take me.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-29

438. WILLIAM RAINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , a dimity petticoat, value 3s. a linen shirt, value 2s. 6d. and a cotton handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Thomas George .

ELEANOR GEORGE sworn. - I am the wife of Thomas George, a weaver , at Bethnal-green : My property was hanging in the garden to dry, and when I went to take them in I saw a man taking them away over the wall, last Friday was a fortnight, a little after nine at night, he dropped them in the next yard; I holloaed to my husband, and he came out, and pursued him over the wall; I came through again to the street-door, and there I took him; a neighbour came up and assisted me, and I brought him in doors; I am certain he is the man.

Prisoner. She said, before the Justice, that she could not swear to me.

Mrs. George. I swore positively before the Justice that he was the man.

THOMAS GEORGE sworn. - My wife called out to me that there was a man running away with her property; I ran out, jumped over the wall, and got over the sence, before I could lay hold of him.(The property was produced, and deposed to by Mrs. George).

WILLIAM HAWES sworn. - I am a carpenter: Last Friday was a fortnight, as I was returning home from my work, I heard a voice crying out, Thomas; upon that, I saw a man coming over a sence, near the corner of a house adjoining the prosecutor's, the prisoner is the man; he then turned into the court where the front door opened; I followed him, and the woman of the house opened the door, she laid hold of him, and said, that was the man; he did not make any resistance; a neighbour and she held him while her husband went for an officer; I then left them.

CHARLES BARKER sworn. - Last Friday was a fortnight, in the evening, as I was coming down Princes-court, I heard a noise, and saw Mrs. George holding a man by the collar; I assisted to secure him till her husband got an officer.

Prisoner's defence. I had been at a shipmate's

house in Virginia-row, I heard a cry of stop thief, and they stopped me.(A person in the gallery requested to be heard by the Court. - He is sworn).

On Friday, the 23d of June, my sister-in-law came to me, and told me a man was taken up for stealing something out of the garden; I have lived four years in the neighbourhood, and never changed a word with Mrs. George; when my sister had told me this, I went to them, I said, I would advise you to get an officer, there is no sufficient evidence to prove that any body saw it, by all means get an officer; accordingly they got an officer; Barker and I were standing at the door, I said to him, how was it; why, says he, I went up to the door, and Mrs. George laid hold of him, and said, this is the man; says he, I laid hold of him too; let me go, says the prisoner; no, says he, I will be d-d if I let you go before the husband comes; then an officer was got, and they were soliciting him to own it; how it terminated after that I cannot presume to tell; I said, I should like to see how it was, for he seemed to be very innocent; says Mrs. George, he was on this board getting over into the other yard; it was so low, that she might have laid hold of his coat and pulled him back again; he might have gone four different ways, one towards the Bird-cage, at Hackney, with more case than he could have come round to the front of the house.

Court. Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner? - A. I never saw him before.

Court. Q. How came you here to-night? - A. Some of my neighbours said they should like to hear how it would go.

Court. You came here to serve your friend, and you have done him much more disservice than you imagine; because you have said enough to prove that she had a very good opportunity of seeing his person.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-30

439. JOHN HAINES and SAMUEL JOSEPH were indicted the first for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Strachan , widow , the said Ann, and others of her family being therein, about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 24th of June , and burglariously stealing a leather pocket-book, value 10d. a leather thread case, value 6d. three black silk handkerchiefs, value 10s. twenty-three yards of linen sheeting, value 46s. four diaper table cloths, value 40s. five linen towels, value 5s. eleven silver tea-spoons, value 20s. a silver salt-spoon, value 1s. 6d. a crape cloak, value 30s. a silk cloak, trimmed with lace, value 20s. five pair of silk stockings, value 50s. a muslin petticoat, value 40s. a muslin gown, value 10s. eighteen linen glass cloths, value 10s. two men's hats, value 30s. a pair of kerseymere breeches, value 10s. a pair of paste knee-buckles set in silver, value 20s. a mahogany knife case, value 10s. twelve forks, value 12s. an opera-glass, value 5s. a reading-glass, value 10s. a silver pencil-case, value 1s. 6d. a tortoishell toothpick-case, studded with gold, value 10s. a cornelian seal, set in gold, value 20s. a base-metal chain, value 12d. three iron keys, value 1s. 6d. a shagreen case of drawing instruments, value 40s. a metal tea-pot, value 2s. half an Irish lottery-ticket, value 4l. 9s. a box ganging-rule, value 4s. and twelve sticks of sealing-wax, value 6s. the property of the said Ann Strachan ; a silk cloak, value 7s. and three check aprons, value 3s. the property of Jane Grinstead ; and Samuel Joseph for receiving part of the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

ANN STRACHAN sworn. - I keep a house, in Craven-street ; I am a widow ; my house was broke open on the 24th of June; I went to bed about eleven o'clock, I did not see the house fastened.

RACHEL JONES sworn. - I was servant to Mrs. Strachan, but I had left her service; she had given me leave to put a barrow upon her premises; I am a laundress, and this was a barrow that my man wheeled the cloths home upon; I had the key to let in the barrow the back-way, I locked the door after me.

Q. What part of the house was broke open? - A. The back door, that I had locked between six and seven o'clock.

Q. Did you sleep in the house that night? - A. No; I put the key of the door where I had it from, in the bureau; I was not there again till Monday, and then I heard the news.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. How late were you in the house that night? - A. I left the house immediately after I had locked the door.

JANE GRINSTEAD sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Strachan; I saw the last witness lock the back door, there were three doors broke; I locked the stable door, and the inner door, I went to bed about eleven o'clock, and the doors were all fast then; I was the last person that went up stairs; I rose the next morning about seven o'clock; the writings out of my mistress's bureau were thrown about the parlour; I missed a large mahogany knife-case directly as I came down stairs, and then I called one of my fellow-servants, and we went down stairs together; when we went into the

kitchen, there was every thing thrown about there just the same; there were four aprons of mine, and a black mode cloak, my mistress's tea cloths, and a large tea pot taken out of the kitchen.

Q. What is the value of your cloak? - A. Seven or eight shillings.

Q. What is the value of your aprons? - A. Two shillings a-piece.

Q. Are you sure they were in the house the night before? - A. Yes; I saw them the night before; there were three table-cloths of my mistress's, one small one, and two larger; a piece of sheeting not made up, a muslin petticoat, and three mode cloaks of my mistress's.

Q. What was in the knife-case? - A. Eight or ten forks, I cannot say exactly how many.

Q. What are they worth? - A. I do not know, there were eleven tea-spoons out of the kitchen.

Q. Do you know the value of them? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. (To Mrs. Strachan). Do you recollect what there was? - A. A leather pocket-hook, worth 7s. a thread case, three silk handkerchiefs, worth 5s twenty-three yards of linen sheeting, worth about 2l. 10s. four diaper table cloths, worth about a guinea and a half, linen towels about a dozen and a half, a silver salt spoon, five pair of silk stockings, worth about 5l. or not so much, a muslin petticoat, worth two guineas, a muslin gown, worth about half-a-guinea; and a great many other articles.

Q. Did you ever find any of these articles again? - A. The gold seal was found upon the Jew, Joseph.

WILLIAM BLAND sworn. - I apprehended John Brown, Berridge, and John Haines ; Berridge has turned evidence; About a quarter before one in the morning of the 28th of June, by Islington, I found a crow, some picklock keys, a dark lanthorn, and some other things, upon Berridge, and the key which belonged to the cellar of Mrs. Strachan I did not find any thing upon Haines but a phosphorus bottle, and a small key and a knife.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn. - I went to featch the house of Haines, on Wednesday, the 28th of June, I found five towels, a black silk cloak, a reading-glass, some sealing-wax, and a check apron,(produces them); the while I was searched him, Joseph came in, we stopped him and searched him, and in his pocket was a gold seal took it from him in my prefence. (Produces it).

Q. Did you search the Jew's house afterwards? - A. No.

Mrs. Strachan. This is my seal, and the reading-glass is mine, the cloths have my own name upon them.

Carpmeal. I found in Haines's wife's pocket, this lottery ticket. (Produces it).

Mrs. Strachan. This is mine.

JOHN MILLER sworn. - On the head of Berridge I found this hat, which I understood came out of the house (Produces it).

Mrs. Strachan. I do not know it, it is my servant's hat.

WILLIAM SWANSEY sworn. Q. Look at that hat? - A. I cannot say whether it is my hat, it is the same number of the stamp, No. 39.

JOHN BROWN BERRIDGE sworn. - Haynes and I had agreed to go to rob this house; about twelve o'clock, on Saturday night, we went; he said there was a back door from the stable, and he could get in; he came back, and said the bottom bolt was shut, and about two, I believe it was, we got in and shoved back the bolt, this was the outer door, there was another door within that that I could pull away with my hands; there was a window opposite the door that we could get in at, then there was a door into the kitchen which had only a bolt at the bottom, that we opened, and then there was no obstacle at all to going all through the house; we went into one of the rooms, and there was a chest of drawers, that was opened by Haines with bettics as they are called, pick-locks; out of that we got several things, breeches, and five pair of stockings, fealing was, and a lottery-ticket, No. 12,702; and there was something taken out of a ban-box, a cloak and a bonnet, I believe, but that we did not take, we went into the parlour, and took a knife-case, there were no knives in it, there were about a dozen forks; there was a gold seal and chain, a small toothpick-case, three table-cloths, two large and a small one, four black silk cloaks, two hats, ten tea spoons and a small salt-spoon, and a great many other articles; we carried them to the stable first, and from there to Haines's house, Haines went and fetched Joseph the Jew, he called him Horne Tooke, he bought part of the things. Haines went for him on the Sunday evening, but I was not there, he said he would go.

Q. Did you ever see Joseph there afterwards? - A. Yes, when he bought the things; I believe it was on the Monday, or the Tuesday, I do not know which, about seven o'clock; he bought four cloaks and five pair of silk stockings, three tablecloths, a gold seal, two rulors, or gauging-sticks, a case of drawing instruments, a worked petticoat, and a new pair of breeches, Joseph asked where they were get; I said, first, in the country, and then I told him they were got not far from there he wanted to know what house it was taken from, but we did not tell him that.

Q. Was any thing said about there not being stolen? - A. No; because he did not care whether they were or not; he asked where they were got; for got, in these language, is just the same as stolen; and asked him three guineas for them; and be of

fered twenty-five shillings; we told him he should not have them; before he went, he said he would give thirty-six shillings; Haines went and fetched him back, and said, he should have them for two guineas; and then he fetched the things away in his bag.

Q. (To Carpmeal.) How came you not to search this man's house? - A. I did not know where he lived; I forgot to mention that I found, in Haines's house, this lady's chain upon Haynes's watch.(Produces it).

Mrs. Strachan. This is my chain, the watch is not mine.

Berridge. Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. How many times have you been tried yourself? - A. I never was in a Court of Justice in my life before.

Q. You have never been tried before, you are sure? - A. I am very certain of it.

Q. How often have you been a witness in this sort of way before? - A. Never before.

Q. You were taken up with some things upon you belonging to Mrs. Strachan, a key? - A. Yes.

Q. You were charged with this robbery? - A. Yes.

Q. You turned upon Haines to save being hanged yourself? - A. I knew that if I did not turn upon Haines, the Jew would have turned upon me, and hung us both.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you sell all these things to Haines yourself? - A. No.

Q. Were not you at Haines's house on Sunday morning? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you take all these things to him in a coach on Sunday morning? - A. No; I never was in a coach for a month before.

Q. Did not Haines give you four guineas for for all these things? - A. No; I did not sell them to him at all, he gave me nine shillings as part of the spoons; and I had a guinea out of what he sold the things to the Jew for.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

The prisoner Haines called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Haines, GUILTY Death . (Aged 26.)

Joseph, GUILTY (Aged 37.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-31

439. GEORGE PELL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Meredith , about the hour of ten in the night of the 2d of June , and burglariously stealing therein, two men's coats, value 2s. a cotton gown, value 5s. six linen frocks, value 2s. a linen cap, value 6d. a linen apron, value 6d. two linen handkerchiefs, value 1s. a silk bonnet, value 6d. a silk cloak value 1s. a hat, value 6d. a mahogany tea-chest, value 6d. a brass pistol, value 1s. an iron pistol, value 6d. three flannel petticoats, value 6d. two calimanco petticoats, value 3d. a silk handkerchief, value 6d. the property of the said Thomas; three cotton gowns, value 5s. and a linen petticoat, value 1s. the property of Harriot Hill .

THOMAS MEREDITH sworn. - I live at No. 15. Wilmot-square , Bethnal-green-road ; On the 2d of June, I went to bed about nine o'clock, I left my wife up; at about ten o'clock, the patrol knocked at the door, and said, the door was open, a lodger went down and fastened the door, and came to bed again, and the patrol, coming again the half hour, found the shutters down; we then all got up, and came down, and found the house was robbed, the lodger's name was Harris; I missed two coats of mine, they were lying on the chair before the fire in the parlour, two hats, only one of them mine, several children's frocks, and petticoats, a tea-chest that was taken from the table in the parlour, a pistol that was hanging over the mantlepiece in the parlour.

Q. Did you ever see any of these things afterwards? - A. Yes; I saw the coat at the office in Worship-street.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. A man of the name of Harris lodged with you, do you pay the rent yourself, or does he pay it jointly with you to the landlord? - A. Jointly with me.

Court. Q. Did Harris live in the house at this time? - A. Yes.

Mrs. MEREDITH sworn. - I went to bed about eleven o'clock, I shut the door about half past eight, the shutters had not been down in the course of the whole day, for I had been washing; when I got up, upon being alarmed, I missed two coats of my husband's, the next thing was a cotton gown of mine, a black silk cloak, a bonnet, six children's frocks, five children's petticoats, a white apron, a laced cap, two men's half neck handkerchiefs, two men's hats, two pistols, and one silk handkerchief, my husband's coat was wet, and I had hung it before the fire to dry, the other coat I was to have mended, but could not, because I was washing.

Q. Did you ever see any thing of your things again? - A. Yes; the tea-chest.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - On Thursday the 15th of June, I went, in company with Blackiter, to a room where the prisoner was in bed.

Court. (To the Prosecutor.) Q. Did you examine your shutters and windows when you got up? - A. Yes; but I could see no violence.

Armstrong. I searched the room, and in a coat under the bed on the floor, were these two pistols, loaded and primed; I had the charge drawn. (Produces them).

Court. Q. Did he lodge by himself there? - A. There was a woman very heavy with child, drinking tea, he was in bed; on a chair by the side of the bed, I found these picklock keys, two crows, some files, a vice, and these cartidges, (produces them); I have had them ever since; he dressed himself readily, and behaved very well.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. These are not the sort of pistols that men commit robberies with, they are generally smaller? - A. I have taken them with both sorts.

Q. Do not you know that the room belonged to that woman, that he was only a lodger there? - A. I heard him say, that she was his servant.

Court. (To Meredith.) Q. Look at these pistols? - A. They are neither of them mine.

WILLIAM BLACKITER sworn. - I was with Armstrong when the prisoner was apprehended; I found this coat rolled up, under the bed, with the pistols in it, (produces it); and we found these two crows, and the other things, and a tea-chest, (produces it); I have had the crows and the tea-chest ever since.

Prosecutor. This is my coat, it is a coat I left my wife to mend.

Mrs. Meredith. This is the tea-chest I lost, I have the key in my pocket.

ROWLAND CHARTRES sworn. - I am a patrol of Wilmot-square; going half past ten, I found Mr. Meredith's door open; I alarmed them, and the young man came down, and fastened it; when I came back again, I found the window open, I alarmed them, and they found the place stripped, that is all I know about it.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY Of stealing the goods, but not of the burglary .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

440. GEORGE PELL was again indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Philip Gibbons , no person being therein, about the hour of seven in the afternoon of the 10th of June , and stealing therein, a cotton counterpane, value 30s. a pair of linen sheets, value 6s. five cotton gowns, value 3l. a cotton petticoat, value 2s. a cotton bed-gown, value 3s. a calimanco petticoat, value 6s. six tea-spoons, value 10s. a diaper table-cloth, value 1s. a cloth coat, value 20s. two cloth waist coats, value 14s. a nankeen waistcoat, value 3s. three muslin caps, value 6s. five linen cloth caps, value 5s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 3s. a silk handkerchief, value 3s. a silver breast-buckle set with stones, value 1s. a linen shirt, value 2s. a linen shirt, value 1s. a linen shirt, value 2s. a linen shirt, value 1s. a cotton check apron, value 1s. two muslin aprons, value 5s. two muslin neckcloths, value 2s. two linen cloth aprons, value 3s. a black silk cloak, value 3s. a pair of dimity pockets, value 1s. three pair of worsted stockings, value 3s. three pair of cotton stockings, value 5s. three dollars, value 14s. 3d. and 4s. in money , the property of the said Philip.

PHILIP GIBBONS sworn. - I live in the Dog-row, Bethnal-green : On the 10th of June, the street door lock was picked; I went out soon after six o'clock in the evening, and left nobody in the house; I locked the door, and carried the key in my pocket, when I came back I found the door as I left it; I went in, and missed my things, my wife knows most about them.

Mrs. GIBBONS sworn. - (Repeats the articles in the indictment); I was at work at Bethnal-green; I should not have been home that night, if I had not lost the property, my husband came and fetched me; I never sleep at home of a Saturday night.

Prosecutor. I went and fetched my wife, and she went about amongst the pawnbrokers to see for the things.

Q. Why did you suppose he went in by picking the lock? - A. There was no other way that he could get in.

Q. (To Mrs. Gibbons.) When was it you found any of your things? - A. On the Saturday night, the 10th of June, we were robbed, and on the Thursday after, I was informed somebody was taken, and I went down to the office in Worship-street, and there I saw a neckcloth that had been cut in pieces, belonging to my husband, a cloth cap, one muslin cap, a very old handkerchief, I have got the fellow to it in my pocket, and one pair of stockings, that is all that I have found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. All you have discovered is a neckcloth, and cloth cap, not worth above two or three shillings altogether? - A. They are worth very little, only a new pair of stockings.

Q. All put together are not worth four shillings? - A. No.

WILLIAM BLACKITER sworn. - Mrs. Gibbons went with me to search the prisoner's lodgings; I had searched his lodgings before, but Mrs. Gibbons saying she had lost some caps, I went back with her to search again, and this handkerchief she said was her's that the gown and coat were tied up in; I found a muslin cap and a pair of stockings, she challenged them directly, and said they were her's, I have had them ever since.

Mrs. Gibbons. This handkerchief I know to he mine, this new pair of stockings, there is no mark, but I know them by the shape of my husband's leg, I gave three shillings and three-pence for them, and he wore them but about three hours, the caps had my own mark upon them.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I tried this pick-lock-key with the prosecutor's door, and it locked, and unlocked the door.

Mr. Alley. Q. This is the woman's apparel? - A. Yes.

Q. The woman that this room belonged to has absconded? - A. No; she was before the Magistrate, and discharged.

SARAH JACKSON sworn. - I saw two men about my window, the prisoner was one; I live next door to the prosecutor; I was going to chastise my child, almost eleven years old, and the prisoner begged me not to be too harsh, this was on the 10th of June; I particularly looked at this man, I thought he seemed busy at my window; I work for a childbed linen warehouse, there were some caps laying about, and I put them in my pocket.

Q. You did not see him take any thing? - A. No.

MARY JACKSON sworn. - I saw two men walking about the door a considerable time.

Q. Did you see them go up to Gibbon's house? - A. I saw one man go into the house in a blue coat, that was not the prisoner, the prisoner was left standing by the posts, they had been talking to my mother under the window.

Q. Were the two men talking to your mother first? - A. Yes.

Q. One of the men that went into the house, was one of the two that was talking with your mother at the same time that the prisoner was? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see that man come out again? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You do not mean to say, that the other man spoke to your mother? - A. No.

Court. Q. You said, they were both speaking to your mother? - A. No; they were talking together, and the prisoner spoke to my mother, not the other man.

ELIZABETH LAMBERT sworn. - I saw three men come out of Gibbon's house on the 10th of June, about eight o'clock at night, as near as I can guess; I was standing at my own door, I really believe this gentleman is one of them, they had each a silk handkerchief tied up in bundles.

Q. Look at him again? - A. I really believe he is the man, but he has changed his dress, the shortest man of the three shut the door after him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You do not mean to swear he was one of the men? - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 24.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-32

441. JOHN CLESS and PETER SPUR were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , eight pounds weight of paint, called Dutch pink, value 4s. four blue painted satin pilasters, value 20s. a blue painted satin door-piece, value 7s. and six pounds weight of paint, called green colour, value 5s. the property of Robert Stowe , Thomas Hammersley , Robert Tyler , Samuel Brandon , John Cowley , Thomas Barron , and John Edwards ; and the other for receiving six pounds of green colour, value 5s. part of the before-mentioned goods .

WILLIAM CLEASE sworn. - I have the management of the manufactory belonging to the prosecutors, Robert Stowe , Thomas Hammersley , Robert Tyler , Samuel Brandon , John Cowley , Thomas Barron , and John Edwards , they are paper-stainer's : In consequence of some suspicion the prisoner's lodgings were searched on the 6th of July, I saw four satin pilasters, and a satin door-piece that I can swear to, at the Police-office, and some green colour which I cannot swear to; the pilasters had been put into two different sales, one at Mr. Willock's, and the other at Christie, Sharp, and Harper's, they have the marks of the sale upon them, which I have compared with Christie's catalogue, and they exactly correspond; they were unsold, and returned to the manufactory.

-PAUL sworn - I went with one of the officers who apprehended the prisoner, on the 6th of July, while he was in custody, to his lodgings, his wife was at home, she declared that she had nothing belonging to the manufactory in the house; upon searching a box by the bed-side, under several other articles were these pilasters, and several pieces of paint, which Bowyer has in Court, and which the prisoner afterwards confessed he had taken from the manufactory.

Q. Was any thing said to induce him to confess? - A. I might say it would be better for him to say whether he had or not.

THOMAS LAYTON sworn. - I had the arrangement of the pilasters preparatory for the two sales, they bear the number of both sales, and also correspond with our stock book.

WILLIAM BOWYER sworn. - I found these pilasters in a box in the prisoner's lodgings, he said there was nothing of his master's there; he said he had formerly stole things but not lately.

Layton. These are the property of Messrs. Stowe and Company.

Cless's defence. I found these pilasters in some rubbish that was swept out of doors, I never stole them at all.

Cless, GUILTY (Aged45.) Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Spur, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr.Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-33

442. SARAH VERRALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , a cotton gown, value 8s. two dimity petticoats, value 7s. three muslin caps, value 10s a muslin handkerchief, value 6d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1s. a pair of leather shoes, value 3s. a linen check apron, value 6d. and a cambrick handkerchief, value 6d. the property of Ann Cole .

ANN COLE sworn. - I live in New Compton-street , the prisoner came to lodge with me in June, she had lodged a week and two days with me when she robbed me: I went out at six o'clock in the morning to a day's washing, on the 21st of June, I left her in bed; I did not come home till eleven o'clock, I knocked at my door for twenty minutes, it was locked, and I was obligated to have it broke open; I never saw her again till the next night, she came home in a coach quite intoxicated with liquor; when I went in, upon breaking the door open, I found my drawer broke open, I had left it locked, and the things mentioned in the indictment were gone, (repeating them); I found my gown at a pawnbroker's last Monday, and that is all I ever found; there was nobody else left in the house but the prisoner.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Drury, pawnbroker, in St. Marrin's lane; A person brought a gown to pledge on the 21st of June, in the name of Cole, about two o'clock in the afternoon, it was a person very much resembling the prisoner, but I cannot swear it was her.

Q. How long was she in the shop? - A. It might be two or three minutes; I had never seen her before, and it is impossible, so many people as I see in a day, to recollect a person I had never seen before.

Mrs. Col. This is my gown that I left in the drawer when I went out on the 21st of June.

Q. Had you given her any authority to pawn it for you? - A. No.

ELIZABETH HILL sworn. - I took the room up one pair of stairs, at Mrs. Cole's, and on the 27th of June, I found this duplicate on the tester of the bed. (produces it).

Q. (To Mrs. Cole.) This woman came back, you say, intoxicated? - A. Yes, on the Thursday night; and she was then taken to the watch house.

Q. Was she in the room up one pair of stairs that night? - A. No; she never went up stairs.

Q. Did she lodge, while she was with you, in that room? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Price.) Is that the duplicate you gave her for the gown? - A. It is.

ELIZABETH GAGE sworn - Mrs. Cole was at work at my aunt's, on the 24th of June, from half past six till about half past ten at night, that is all I have to say.

Prisoner's defence. Mrs. Cole desired me to pledge this gown for her for half-a-guinea; she said, her landlord had threatened to seize her drawers for rent; I did not go till between three and four o'clock in the afternoon; I told Mr. Drury it was for a woman to pay her rent; I told him my own name as well as her's; he would not lend me but eight shillings upon it.

Q. (To Mrs. Cole.) You hear what she says, did you ask her to pledge it? - A. My landlord never asked me for a farthing; nor I never asked her to pledge any thing in my life, so help me God.

GUILTY ,(Aged 40.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-34

443. MARY CATHERINE BUCKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a pair of sheets, value 6s. and a linen counterpane, value 6d. the property of John Full , in a lodging let by contract to her , and another person unknown by the said John Full .

SARAH FULL sworn. - I am the wife of John Full ; I live at No. 3, Terrace, Tottenham-court-road ; I let a lodging to the prisoner, and another woman whom I do not know, about eight weeks before the transaction, which was on the 10th of June; the day before that, an officer, Mr. Batho, came and asked for her, he said they had got some things at the office, that she said she had pledged for me, and I must go and own them; they were pledged with Mr. Morris, in Crown-street; he went up stairs to her, and the went away with the officer.

JONAS BATHO sworn. - On the 10th of June, I searched the prisoner, and found this duplicate upon her; I took her to Bow-street, and she was committed for re-examination; I shewed the property to Mrs. Full, and she went with me to Mr. Morris's, the pawn-broker's; it is now lying in a bundle, which I am waiting to go before the Grand Jury about, for another offence; I thought I had got it in my pocket, but I have not.

-MORRIS sworn. (Produces a pair of sheets); I received them from the prisoner, on the 16th of May.

Mrs. Full. These are my sheets; I had the counterpane from another pawnbroker, he is not here.

Prisoner's defence. What I did I am very sorry for, I did not do it with intent to defraud; I sent the money and the interest to the pawnbroker, and he would not accept it, and I am ready to pay it now.

GUILTY (Aged 40.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-35

444. ANN THOMPSON , otherwise BRUCE, otherwise ROBERTSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , a pair of leather spring heel shoes, value 1s. 6d. a great coat, value 5s. and a cotton handkerchief, value 4d. the property of Thomas Vaughan .

THOMAS VAUGHAN sworn. - On the 9th of June, I sent an errand-boy that I have, John Colverwell, to Mr. Read's, in Gray's-inn-lane, to fetch a great coat and a pair of spring heel shoes, tied up in a white handkerchief with a red border.

JOHN CULVERWELL sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Going of ten.

Q. You kissed the book just now, do you know why you did it? - A. No.

Q. Do you know what is required of you when you take an oath? - A. I do not know.

Q. Is it right or wrong to tell a lie? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you not know that you appeal to God Almighty for the truth of what you say? - A. Yes.

Mr. Justice Buller. We can always judge best from their evidence, whether they are speaking the truth or not.

Culverwell. Mr. Vaughan sent me to Mr. Read's for some things, there was a green striped woman's coat, a pair of spring heel shoes, and two pocket-handkerchiefs, they were tied up in one of them; this woman met me at the top of Long-Acre, and told me I was to go back to Mr. Read's, and fetch an umbrella, and she was to go on to Mr. Vaughan's with this bundle.

Q. Had she asked where you had been? - A. No; she said I must go back to Mr. Read's, and she was to go on to Mr. Vaughan's with the bundle.

Q. Had you been saying any thing to any body that you had been to Mr. Read's? - A. No.

Q. Had you seen the woman before you met her? - A. No.; I went back, and Mr. Read gave me an umbrella, he thought Mr. Vaughan wanted to borrow one; she took the bundle and asked me where she should meet me, and I said I did not know; when I came back again I could not find her.

Q. (To Vaughan). Did you ever find your things? - A. No.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn - I am a constable of St. Martin's; I apprehended the woman upon another charge; I found a bundle about her with a a green coat in it; it was given up to her on the 16th, when we were bound over to prosecute upon the other charge; on the 17th I heard of this charge against her; I took her up first on the 9th of June, about a quarter before five, with a bundle, containing a woman's green striped great coat, a pair of spring heel men's shoes, and a white pocket handkerchief with a red border, and several other articles in another bundle; I asked her, in prison, where they were, and she gave me a trifling answer, and said, she did not know where they were.

Q. (To Vaughan). Describe what these things were? - A. A woman's green striped great coat, a pair of spring heel men's shoes, they were my own.

Q. Was there more than one handkerchief that they were tied up in? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I never saw the boy in my days; I know nothing at all of the property; the property that I had with me was my own.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 39.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-36

445. HANNAH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a guinea and a shilling , the property of William Love .

WILLIAM LOVE sworn. - On the 10th of June, I met the prisoner upon Saffron-hill; she asked me to give her something to drink, she intreated me very hard, and took me up a passage, and said we could get some down there; I went merely with intent to get something to drink, I thought it was a public-house, till I found myself mistaken; it was between eleven and twelve at night; I put my hand in my pocket, and took out a guinea and a shilling, and she snatched it out of my hand and knocked down the candle; I asked her what she did that for, she said, what was that to me; and there was a man in a smock-frock, the whispered to him to get away from me.

Q. Did you ever see her before? - A. No.

Q. You fly you went merely to give her something to drink; will you swear that? - A. Yes.

EDWARD M'CARTHY sworn. - I am a watchman: I heard the watch called, and I went upon the call, and met a man in a smock-frock, he told me I was not wanted; the prosecutor called again, I went, and he gave me charge of the prisoner; they had no light, and she said, she had no money but sixpence; I took her to the watch-house, and searched her, but found nothing upon her but a sixpence.

The prisoner put in a petition, stating, that she had been early seduced from the paths of virtue, deserted by her seducer and her friends; that she was under the necessity of seeking a precarious subsistence; that on the 9th of June, she met the prosecutor; that he asked her to take a glass; that she accepted his polite offer; that he asked leave to see her home; that he took no liberty whatever with her; that suddenly rising, he said, you b-h,

I gave you a guinea and one shilling instead of two shillings that I meant to give you; that she then received a violent blow from him, begged he would not murder her, and said, if he had lost such a sum it must be upon the ground; that during her cries the watchman interfered, that she readily went with him, and that, during her walk, though she was under the protection of the watchman, he kicked and beat her violently; that he searched her and found nothing; that she was, notwithstanding, committed, and, however innocent, was now an humble suppliant at the bar of that honourable Court, for a crime that she never was, or could be, guilty of; that she was innocent of the charge as well as of seeing any man in a smock-frock; that she solemnly afferrs, that no man entered the room, except the watchman, during her stay; further, that the prosecutor begged her to give him a guinea to shew his wife, and a week should not go over her head without its being madeup; that she throws herself upon the mercy of the Court, whose mercy and benevolent compassion she humbly implores; and, as the only atonement for a life-ill-spent, she means to throw herself at the feet of her deserted friends for pardon and protection.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-37

446. MARY SWINEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , a cloth coat, value 5s. the property of Leonard Vogle .

LEONARD VOGLE sworn. - Last Monday I was informed some person had gone up to my room, up two pair of stairs, at the Catherine-wheel, Whitechapel , and I went up stairs and missed my great coat; I went after her, and found her in Redlion-street, and she had left the coat at a pawnbroker's shop, she went to pawn it; she came out of the shop with it, and threw it upon Mrs. Mason.(Produces the coat).

MARY MASON sworn. - I was chairing at the Catherine-wheel; there was a wedding kept there last Monday week, and the landlord said there had been somebody up stairs, and gone out to the pawnbroker's; I went to Mr. Gough's, and told them not to take it in; as I was coming out to look for somebody to assist me the coat was thrown at me but who threw it I do not know; there were nine other people in the shop, but I did not know any of them.

ELIZABETH FENNILOWE sworn. - I saw the prisoner at the bar crossing Whitechapel, from Catherina-wheel-alley, with something under her arm, but I cannot tell what it was; the appeared to be going down Red lion-street.

FRNEST HUMBACH sworn. - The prosecutor is a lodger of mine; there was a cry of a strange woman coming down my stair-case, but I did not see who it was.

Prisoner's defence. I went into Mr. Gongh's to pawn this apron, I never saw the coat, I never was before a Justice in my life before; I have four small children, one lying dead of the small-pox; here is a letter that I received from that woman, Mary Mason ; I sold my bed for a guinea for her, because she said she would not come against me; I had the best people in the Minories to come in my behalf, but they came and told me, last night, they would not come against me; (the letter read);"I write this to let you know, that I cannot, nor will not swear to you."

Q. (To Mason.) Is that your writing? - A. No, I never saw that paper before; I was in the prison last night, and gave her a penny, and this woman gave her a penny to get a pennyworth of beer.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-38

447. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for being found at large, on the 27th of June , before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys)

JOHN RILEY sworn. - I am a Police-officer,(produces the certificate of the conviction of the prisoner); I received it from the Clerk of the Assize for the Midland Circuit.

Q. Did you see him sign it? - A. Yes. (It is read).

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - A. Yes; ten or twelve years ago.

Q. Did you see him tried at Leicester? - A. No; I was at the apprehending of him, this time, in the parish of Stepney, near Whitechapel, in the street, in company with Cook, between eleven and twelve at night.

JOHN PICKARD sworn. - I am the jailor of Leicester.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he in your custody in March, 1794? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he the man that was convicted there? - A. Yes; I delivered him on board the Staniflaus stoop, at Woolwich.

Prisoner's defence. I had a pardon from that, I saw it at the Justice's. (It is produced and read).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-39

448. JOHN TINSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , two woollen waistcoats, value 12s. the property of Abraham Rees .

ABRAHAM REES sworn. - I am a taylor and salesman : On Saturday night, the 3d of June, the prisoner, and two others, came to my house in St. Martin's-lane , a little after nine at night, under pretence to buy some cloaths; one of them bought a coat and waistcoat; the prisoner tried several waistcoats, one was taken from him afterwards, he had it on his body, I missed two; on the Monday following he came past my door, without the man that bought the coat and waistcoat; I told him he should step back, he would not, and I called stop thief; he was taken to the watch-house, and then he offered me half-a-guinea for the waistcoat.

GEORGE DONALDSON sworn. - I am a constable: On the 5th of June last, I was at the watch-house taking some charges up, and seeing a piece of work I went up, and Mr. Rees gave charge of him; this waistcoat I took off his back,

Prosecutor. This is my waistcoat, I have the fellow to it.

Mr. Alley. Q. He said he would give you half-a-guinea; perhaps he said this: sooner than I will be brought before a Magistrate I would give half-a-guinea for it? - A. I cannot take upon me to say the exact words.

Donaldson. The prisoner said he had bought the waistcoat of a young man, and rather than go before the Justice about it he would give him half-a-guinea for the waistcoat.

The prisoner called his serjeant, who had known him upwards of two years, and gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-40

449. DANIEL DALEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a silver watch, value 25s. the property of Lewis Smith .

LEWIS SMITH sworn. - The prisoner came to me and asked me if I could give him a job, I work for Mr. Rhodes, a scavenger, I employ both men and women for Mr. Rhodes; he came to me on the 5th of June, and I told him to go to work; after dinner I saw him walking about the road, I told him I thought I had ordered him to go to work; and he came to me to the public-house where I lodged, and asked me for a shilling, and I told him I would not give him a shilling because he did not go to work; I had seen my watch at a quarter past two, in the room, it was then hanging up at the bedstead; I missed it about five, when I went up to clean myself.

- KEIGHLEY sworn. - I was sent for by the prosecutor: I took the prisoner to the watch-house, I searched him, and found this watch in his breeches.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

The prisoner did not make any defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before

Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-41

450. THOMAS KENNEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , a silver watch, value 30s. the property of Michael Quin .

WALTER HADEN sworn. - On Monday, the 19th of June, I lost a watch from my kitchin fireplace, it was hanging up on a nail; it is my child's watch, his name is Michael Quin .

Q. How came your child to be named Michael Quin? - A. It was my wife's child by a former husband; the prisoner lodged at my house, I went to work at six o'clock in the morning of the 20th of June, and when I came home to breakfast, my wife told me the watch was gone

SAMUEL SEWELL sworn. - (Produces the watch): I took it in of the prisoner in the name of Thomas Martin.

CATHERINE HADEN sworn. - This is the watch I am positive, it is my child's; I saw it between six and seven in the evening.

Prisoner's defence. I had not slept there for two nights before; I bought the watch.

Mrs. Haden. He did not sleep at our house for those two nights, but he was there in the day-time.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-42

451. CHARLES CARTHY , THOMAS WOOD , and WILLIAM LANGFORD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , four guineas , the property of Christopher Fryer , and John Fryer .

CHRISTOPHER FRYER sworn. - I live in Fox's-lane, Shadwell; I am in partnership with John Fryer , tobacconist : On Saturday last, I was backwards in the manufactory, and was informed that three boys had robbed the till; I went forwards into the shop, the prisoner Carthy only was pointed out to me as having been in the shop; I searched him, and in his hand I found four guineas and six-pence.

JOHN FRYER sworn. - On Saturday last, I was in the accompting-house, I heard a rattling of money in the till, there was nobody in the shop; I immediately went out into the shop, and saw the prisoner Carthy go out of the shop, I did not see him behind the counter; I followed him to the door, and found him, he had joined the other two

prisoners; I seized two of them, and brought them into the shop, the third was brought in by a stranger, the till was examined, and I found four guineas missing; I knew there were five guineas, and two half-guineas in the till, and when I examined it, there was but one guinea, and two half-guineas.

JOHN RILEY sworn. - I apprehended him, I know nothing of the fact.

Carthy's defence. My father gave me that money to go on board a ship with.

Carthy, GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Wood, NOT GUILTY .

Langford, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-43

452. WILLIAM THACKERAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a pound of tea, value 2s. 6d. the property of the East-India Company .(The case was opened by Mr. Cullen.

THOMAS JOYCE sworn. - I am one of the Elders of the East-India Company's Warehouse: I was standing in the yard belonging to the warehouses, in Haydon-square ; on the 27th of June, I saw the prisoner pass me; as he passed me, I observed a large bundle under his coat behind, I went and called a King's officer, Mr. Booth; when I came in with Mr. Booth, the prisoner took a bag from under his coat, containing green-tea.

WILLIAM ROSE sworn. - After Mr. Joyce challenged the prisoner with it, he took it out, and said it was tea, he did not say where he got it from.

WILLIAM PALMER BOOTH sworn. - I am a King's officer; I had this parcel of tea from the prisoner. (Produces it.)

The prisoner said he was guilty.

GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Imprisoned one year and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-44

453. JOHN SADLER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Singer , about the hour of twelve in the night of the third of July , with intent, the goods therein being, to steal, and burglariously stealing two linen shifs, value 10s. two flannel petticoats, value 3s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2s. two cotton handkerchiefs, value 3s. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. a linen apron, value 2s. and a piece of linen cloth, value 1s. the property of the said Sarah.

Robert Carpmeal , the only witness on the back of the bill being called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-45

454. WILLIAM HUMPHREYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a wooden trunk covered with leather, value 12s. forty-eight women's woollen cloth coats, value 32l. 17s. 9d. and four yards of calico wrapper, value 4s. the property of Matthew Topham , and William Sowden in their dwelling-house .

MATTHEW TOPHAM sworn. - I live in Watling-street, I am a warehouse-man , in partnership with William Sowden ; I saw the trunk about six o'clock in the evening of Thursday the 29th of June, standing in the passage with some others; about a quarter before seven, a neighbour came and asked me if I had not lost a trunk, I looked and missed two.

ANN STRACEY sworn. - I live at the corner of Watling-street: On the 29th of June, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner at the bar went into a house, which I supposed to be Sir William Langston 's, but which proved to be Messrs. Topham and Sowden's, and brought out of that house a trunk, he went up the Old-Change with it, and I saw no more of him.

Q. Look at the prisoner? - A. That is him, I perfectly well remember him.

Q. Did you ever see him before? - A. Never; I took particular notice of a large scar upon his left check, I observed his dress in general, and at the time he committed the act, he had the waistcoat on that he now appears at the bar in.

MARTHA NORTHCROFT sworn. - I saw the prisoner at the bar, and another man, walking backwards and forwards past the door, two or three times; the prisoner stood upon the step of the door sometimes, and then Mr. Topham came out with another gentleman; as soon as Mr. Topham was gone, in he went into the passage, with a man in a red jacket; I went to give an alarm, supposing he meant to steal the trunk, and when I went down, he was gone off with it.

Q. Do you know how he got into the house? - A. The door was open, it always stands open in the day time.

THOMAS HILL sworn. - I am a glover, No. 11, Cheapside: On the 29th of June, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw two or three men place a trunk under Mr. Penny's window, they then left it under the window for the space of an hour and half.

Q. Was there any body with it to take care of it? - A. Nobody to take care of it; the prisoner

returned, and came to the door to thank me for taking care of the trunk; I told him I did not know that I had any trunk under my care; I then went to the door, and asked him who that trunk belonged to, he said it belonged to him; I asked him where he brought it from, he told me from the New Inn, in the Borough; I then told him I did not think he was the person that brought it, and therefore I should not deliver it up till the right owner came to claim it, he then said his master lived a great way off, and he wished the trunk to be carried to where he was going to take it to; he then lifted the trunk into the shop, and there it remained till half past eight, when the prisoner came, with another man dressed like a ticket porter, to demand the trunk; a friend of mine, of the name of Jones, was at that time standing in the shop, and he asked him from whence he brought it; the prisoner told him he brought it from the Nag's head in the Borough; Mr. Jones asked him where he was going to carry it, he said, to a Mr. Jones's, a hosier in Fleet-street; I then told him I should not deliver up the trunk till Mr. Jones came to claim it as his property; he then said, I might send any body with him to Mr. Jones's, in Fleet-street, and then I should be satisfied; my friend, Mr. Jones, said he would go with him, and accordingly they opened the door and went away together.

- JONES sworn. - I am a coal-merchant: I called at Mr. Hill's, where this man was with the trunk; as my name was Jones, and lived in Fleet-street, and not knowing any thing of Jones, a hosier, in Fleet-street, I said I would go with him, which I did, and with the other man, who said he was a ticket-porter; as I was going through St. Paul's Church-yard, they whispered something about Pater-noster-row, and turned up Pater-noster-row, which I conceived to be the wrong way to Fleet-street; I then beckoned to a stranger to follow me, I suspected they meant to run away; and when they got into Pater-noster-row, they did run away; the prisoner pulled a knife out of his pocket, with which he cut a butcher's lad, who came out to see what was the matter; I attempted to stop him, he ran on to the corner of Creed-lane, towards Thames-street, a number of people were passing, which rather checked him, and then he was stopped, and I charged Johnson, the constable, with him, whom I saw in the crowd; I did not see the knife at first, but I suspected it was something of that kind, as I had seen several people who attempted to stop him, draw back again; the box remained in Mr. Hill's custody at his door, the prisoner had not the box with him. (The trunk produced).

Mr. Topham. I am sure this is my trunk, I know it by the mark on the outside; it was going on board a ship the next morning; it was put in the passage ready to take off.

Mr. Hill. It has been in my possession ever since.

Q. (To Topham). What does it contain? - A. Four dozen searlet cloaks and some wrappers.

Q. What is the value of them? - A. Thirty-two pounds seventeen shillings and nine pence, they have my mark upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I positively deny the charge against me of the robbery.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 22.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-46

455. JAMES ATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a brass cock, value 6s. the property of Edward Smith .

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I am a copper smith : I do no know any thing of the transaction.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Fifteen: On Saturday, the 17th of June, the prisoner came to our house between twelve and one, and wanted a copper of about sixty gallons, he then wanted the particulars; while I was in the accompting-house, writing them, I saw him put something into his apron, he then went to the shop door, I followed him, and asked him what he had got there, he said, nothing of your's, and that he would show me, he opened his apron, and there was a brass cock, (produces it); I have had it in my desk ever since.

Q. He did not offer to run away? - A. No, he was upon crutches; he waited till I got Tipper, the beadle, he begged for mercy, cried, and wished he had been dead before he came into the shop.

Prisoner's defence. I went to ask for a copper, with a large cock, and this cock was lying upon the copper; I took it up in my hand, as I might any thing else, and in a few minutes he turned about, and said, that is what you are about, is it? he said he would send for a constable, and he had me insulted by the people, till I could searce stand upon my legs.

Q. What was the price of the copper he asked for? - A. About five pounds; it was a second-hand one that I shewed him, the cock was tied round by the top in his apron.

GUILTY . (Aged 57.)

Publickly whipped and imprisoned in Newgate one month .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-47

456. DANIEL WOODWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , thirty-two yards of silk ribbon, value 15s. the property of Richard Fisher , privately in his shop .

- HOULDITCH sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Fisher: On Friday the 5th of June, between

one and two in the afternoon, the prisoner came in for a cockade, he wanted blue, red and white, and was very particular in colours; I shewed him a great many, there were none that he seemed to like, he wished to take three pieces with him, saying, that he came out of the neighbourhood, and would return them immediately; I told him I could not suffer that, I would give him patterns; when I was going to cut the patterns, Mr. Fisher came, and thought he could find some that would suit him: I then left him, and went to another customer; I did not see him take any thing.

Q. Did he appear then as he does now? - A. Yes, and I think he had an apron on; after I was informed that he had taken the ribbon, I went out into Mitre-court after him, and told him, Mr. Fisher wanted him, and he immediately pulled out the ribbon, and said, he supposed that was what he wanted, and then he went down upon his knees, and begged for mercy.

ELIZABETH BISHOP sworn. - I was in the shop of an errand for my mistress; I saw the prisoner put a piece of purple ribbon in his pocket, and I informed Mr. Fisher of it.

Prisoner. Q. What pocket did I put it in? - A. His left hand pocket.

Prisoner. I had not a pocket. (The ribbon produced.)

Houlditch. I know these to be Mr. Fisher's ribbons; this piece of purple ribbon he took out of his pocket in Mitre-court; these other two pieces were found upon him by the constable.

Prisoner. I was very much intoxicated at the time; I have been in his Majesty's service many years, I have been wounded twice in my head, I was with the Duke of York the whole of the last campaign; I have had some splinters taken out of my side, which causes me to be delirious at times, especially if I get a little liquor.

WILLIAM SHALLCROSS sworn. - I am a hatmaker in Fleet-street; he worked with me about three or four days before this happened, as a hatmaker, he behaved very well; I understood he had a great deal of money coming to him shortly.

Q. Did you ever observe him deranged? - A. No further than talking a great deal of nonsense.

GUILTY, (Aged 56.)

Of stealing the goods, but not privately.

Publickly whipped , and imprisoned in Newgate one month .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-48

457. STAFFORD LETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a great coat, value 20s. the property of John Goldham .

JOHN GOLDHAM sworn. - The prisoner, with seven or eight others, came into my shop, I keep wine-vaults , No. 7, Fore-street : About nine o'clock in the evening, on Friday the 16th of June, they asked for some liquor; while I was serving them, one of them went into my accompting-house, and took my great coat off the hook, which I do not know, the prisoner was the only man that went out of the shop; when he went out, I suspected my coat was gone, and I went to look, and it was gone, all the rest remained in; I followed him out, and he began to set off directly, I pursued him, and he threw the great coat down, I called out, stop thief, and he was taken; I lost sight of him after he threw down the great coat; he was taken, I suppose, two hundred yards from where the coat was thrown away, down another street.

JOHN SHRUBSHAW sworn. - I am a book-binder; I heard the cry of stop thief; I went out and stopped him, and took him back to Mr. Goldham,(produces the coat); I received this from Mr. Goldham, when I took the prisoner to his house.

Goldham. This is my great coat that the prisoner threw away.

Prisoner's defence. I had just left work, and stopped to have a glass of anniseed; I had pulled off my trowsers with my money in them; I said, I could not have the anniseed then, I would go back and get the money out of my trowsers, and when I came back again, I heard a cry of stop thief, and they laid hold of me; I never saw the coat.

Jury. Q. How many people were there when you stopped him? - A. There might be sixty or seventy.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-49

458. THOMAS SHILLIE and HENRY FINCH were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , thirty-two pair of leather shoes, value 5l. the property of William Ormiston , Esq ; and the other for receiving twelve pair of shoes, part of the before-mentioned goods, knowing them to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Raine.)

GEORGE HEATON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am quarter-master serjeant to the North Middlesex Supplementary Militia, quartered at Hounslow; the shoes belonging to the militia were deposited in a chest, in a barn, at the George-inn, Hounslow ; on the 9th of June last, I counted sixty-five pair of shoes in the chest; on the 13th,

upon examining the chest, I missed thirty-two pair, we set a guard on purpose to watch the prisoner Shillie, at different places; I was myself guard at Mr. Saxton's, the Ship, and the landlord with me; he brought me six pair of shoes, I did not see where he got them from.

JOHN SAXTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I keep the Ship, at Hounslow: On the 14th of June, I went into my cellar for some coals, and saw the prisoner stooping in the yard, he came away directly, and afterwards some shoes were found there, by my little girl; and on Tuesday the 13th, at eleven o'clock at night, I saw some shoes lying under some faggots, in my yard, I did not know that I had any right to touch them, as they were not my property, and it was then very late.

Q. Whereabout was it that you saw Shillie stooping? - A. Close by where I had seen the shoes the night before; Shillie was quartered at my house.

Q. Were the shoes as easily seen the next day, as when you saw them the night before? - A. No; they were removed further under the wood.

RICHARD GOATLY sworn. - I am a grocer at Hounslow: The prisoner came to my shop on the 12th of last month, to buy something, and another man was in the shop; he pulled out a pair of shoes, and asked him if he wanted a pair of shoes; he asked him what he asked for them; he said five shillings; the man told him they were regimental shoes, and the money he asked for them was too much; they both went out, that is all I know.

JAMES FINCH sworn. - I am a shoe-maker at Hounslow: On Monday the 12th of June, the prisoner, Shillie, offered me a pair of shoes for sale, for four shillings and sixpence; I did not chuse to buy them, I told him they were regimentals; afterwards he offered me sixpennyworth if I would sell them for him; I told him I would not have any concern with them, because they were regimentals; he said, he had three pair forced upon him on the account of a guinea due to him from the regiment; he offered me again a pot, or sixpennyworth, if I would sell them for him, but I refused.

JONATHAN WILCOX sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am a serjeant in the North Middlesex Supplementary Militia: Shillie made a confession to me, and positively said, that he took thirty-two pair of shoes; I never saw the man in my life before to my knowledge.

Court. Q. What had you said to him to make him confess this? - A. I asked him plain, did he take these shoes; he said, yes, thirty-two pair.

Court. Q. Did not you say it would be better for him? - A. I did not indeed, I know better than that; thirty-two pair was his reply.

Court. Q. Did you make use of any threats? - A. No; I asked him where he got these shoes from; he said, he took them out of the chest, thirty-two pair; I will repeat it fifty-thousand times if your Worship pleases; thirty two pair; I speak very plain, Gentlemen.

Court. Q. Did he say what chest? - A. No.

Prisoner. Lord Almighty, Sir, it is the biggest lie that ever was told; he never was there any more than you were.

Mr. Raine. (To Heaton.) Had you any conversation at any time with the prisoner, Finch? - A. Yes; on Tuesday the 4th of July, I went up, and said, did you buy any shoes; he said, I did; how many pair? twelve; what did you give for them? one guinea.

Q. What is the value of those shoes? - A. About three shillings and sixpence a pair.

Q. Did you find any property upon Finch? - A. No; I asked him if he could know the man if he saw him again; he said, if he could see him again, and it was the man, he would swear to him.

Court. Q. Did he swear to any man? - A. No; when he saw Shillie, he said, he could not positively swear to the man.

Q. Look at these shoes; where were they found? - A. In Mr. Saxton's back yard, under the wood. I took them from there after he was taken; I had the care of the shoes, they were of this sort.

Q. Who is your Quarter-master? - A. Lieutenant Ormiston; he is answerable for the shoes.

Shillie's defence. These shoes have been in a very large barn in Hounslow, this chest of shoes lies open to coachmen, hackney-coachmen, and post-boys, and anybody, to get to it; Mr. Saxton said, before the Justice, that he had found twenty pair of shoes; and that man that says I confessed before the Justice, knows very well that he was not there at all.

Prisoner. (To Saxton.) Q. Was Wilcox at the Justice's? - A. I was not there the second day myself.

Prisoner. (To Goutly.) Q. Did you see Wilcox at the Justice's at all? - A. I believe the man was in the yard, but I do not recollect the Justice asking him any thing. Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-50

459. JOHN SNELGROVE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , a single barrelled gun, value 7l. the property of Richard Bannister .

RICHARD BANNISTER sworn. - I am a salesman in Brydges-street, Covent-garden : I missed a gun, on the 19th of June, from the inside post of the door, about two o'clock in the afternoon; I had some hand-bills printed, and sent round to the

pawnbrokers, and I had the gun sent home about eight o'clock the same evening; it had been pledged at Mr. Beauchamp's, in Holborn.

SAMUEL MORRIS sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Beauchamp, pawnbroker, in Holborn: On the 19th of June, about two o'clock, the prisoner brought a gun to pledge, he asked four guineas, and my master lent him three upon it; in consequence of that, I asked him his name; he said his name was Crouch, No. 34, Jewry-street, Aldgate; a hand-bill was left at our house, and I carried it home to Mr. Bannister's in the evening.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

FRANCIS PHIPPS sworn. - I am a constable: I was sent for to Mr. Berrie's, the pawnbroker in Aldersgate-street, and Mr. Bannister and the prisoner, and the other pawnbroker, were there, and I apprehended him. (Produces the gun).

Morris. This is the gun I took home to Mr. Bannister's.

Mr. Bannister. This gun is mine.

Prisoner. (To Morris) Q. Was not there a man with me in your shop? - A. Yes; a man came with him, after he had pledged the gun, with a gun-bag, left the gun should take harm.

The prisoner, in his defence, said, that another man had given him the gun to pledge.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character; one of whom deposed that he was very much deranged in his intellects.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-51

460. JOHN RIMES , ELIZABETH RIMES , otherwise BARRETT , JOSEPH SMITH , JO-SEPH BROOME , and JOHN BARRETT , were indicted for that they, on the 22d of June , a piece of false and counterfeit copper money, to the likeness of a halfpenny, did make, coin, and counterfeit .

(The case was opened by Mr. Cullen).

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. I am one of the officers belonging to Lambeth-street, Whitechapel: In consequence of an information received on Thursday the 22d of June last, I went with my brother officers to No. 7, in Baillie's-place , in the parish of St. Botolph Without Aldgate ; it was a kind of a shop with some stationary things in it; the outer door was open, I went down the cellar stairs, and perceived the woman at the bar coming up the stairs, I then laid hold of her, and looked at her hands, they appeared to me to be black, I passed her, and desired some of my brother officers to take care of her; I then went into the cellar and saw Mr. Rimes standing close by the rounsing-sack, which was fixed to the ceiling, and a candle burning close by him, I looked at his hands, and they were excessive black; I then took a candle, and went into another cellar, it is divided by a flight partition; in consequence of an information, I knew there was another cellar, there is a door from the one to the other, which was shut, I opened the door, and went in, there was a candle-burning in the collar of the press, and Barrett and Broome were both standing by the press; I observed their hands, they were very black, they were all undressed in their shirt sleeves, their coats were off; upon looking further round the cellar, I saw the tall one, Smith, in the blue coat, underneath the cellar stairs, concealed, his hands were black, and his coat was off; we secured them, and went to the press, and between the dies in the press, I found this halfpenny (producing it); it is not compleatly struck, I suppose, on account of the alarm.

Q. In what state was the press? - A. In a proper state for working, it must have been then at work.

Q. Describe now what you found in the cellar? - A. By the side of the press we found these halfpence (producing a large quantity), just as they sell from the dies, unfit for circulation, they were not coloured; on the other side of the press, a vast quantity of blanks ready for seeding the dies; those which are struck, we tried with the dies, and they correspond exactly; I found two pair more of dies, in the same cellar where the stamping-press was, they are what is called the Irish-harp (produces them); I found a vast quantity of halfpence corresponding with them, in the rounsing-sack; produces another die for a halfpenny), this is a George the Second's.

Q. Did you find any finished halfpence? - A. Yes; there are a vast quantity of harps, Mr. Knowland will produce them.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and the prisoners? - A. The three men, except Rimes and his wife, all acknowledged being there, and begged for mercy; they said we had caught them there, and hoped we would use them well; Mr. Rimes afterwards came in, and helped us to take the press to pieces; he said, I have been more used to it than you, I will help you to carry it up stairs, which he did.

Q. Was there any habitable part of the house besides? - A. The whole house was occupied by Mr. Rimes and his family.

Q. Did you search the person of any of the prisoners? - A. I did one of them, but found nothing upon them.

JOHN KNOWLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. I am another officer of the same office: On Thursday the 22d of June, I went, in company with the other officers, to No. 7, Baillie's-place, Aldgate; I went to the back door with Mr. Coomes, and the back door was opened for us by

the officers that went in in the front; I and Smith went into the back cellar, where we saw a candle lighted in the collar of the press; I looked round in the cellar, and saw Broome and Barrett standing close by the press, stripped in their shirt-sleeves, and both their hands black and greasy; I saw Smith in the other cellar concealed under the stairs, his hands were black; I asked Barrett what he was doing there, and he said, he was out of employ and was very glad to get any thing to do; I then searched his pocket, and found, some halfpence that correspond with all these dies. (Produces them)

Court. Q. What time of the day was this? - A. About one o'clock? - A. I then secured him, and examined the press; the dyes in the press were quite warm. After we had secured all the prisoners, I went up stairs with Mr. Coomes, and in the one pair of stairs, there was a turn-up bed tead, I searched the bed, and I found these harp halfpence, which are unfit for circulation, they exactly correspond with the Irish-harp dyes; we found an edging-tool, which is to make the edges of the halfpence smooth; and a sieve in the one pair of stairs, which is for sifting the halfpence after they are taken out of the rounsing-sack, to clean the saw-dust from them.

Q. Who is master of the house? - A. Mr. Rimes; I asked him, and he told me so himself; he said he had lived there four or five months.

Q. Is the woman his wife do you know? - A. I do not know, she may be for ought I know. (Produces the sieve and the press).

Q. From your knowledge of these things, are there a complete set of implements for coining, from the cutting out to the finishing state, fit for circulation? - A. There are.

ROBERT COOMES sworn. - I am an officer: the first thing I found was the rounsing sack, in the cellar, fixed to the ceiling; we found these halfpence, (producing them), mixed with saw-dust in it as it is now, they correspond with the harp dies; after they were secured, I went up stairs and found this rounding tool fixed. (Produces it).

Elizabeth Rimes's defence. My hands were clean; I shewed the officers my hands, they were quite clean, I had been shelling peas, and they saw the pea shells lying about.

The other prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

John Rimes GUILTY .

Elizabeth Rimes NOT GUILTY .

Joseph Smith GUILTY .

Joseph Broome GUILTY .

John Barrett GUILTY .

Imprisoned one year in Newgate , and fined Is.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-52

461. ANN CLAYTON and CHARLOTTE PHILIPS were indicted the first, for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a quart pewter pot, value Is. 3d. the property of William M'Carty , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM M'CARTY sworn. - I keep a public-house in Broad-street, St. Giles's : On Monday last, I found a quart pot of mine, in Clayton's pocket, she was sitting in the tap-room at the time, I did not observe her come in; I was informed she had one in her pocket, and I took it out myself; I took her to the watch-house, I have lost the pot since; I was taking her to Marlborough-street, and she said, she would go in to Mrs. Philips's and sell the pot before my face, which she did, and then I went for a constable to search the house, his name is Taylor, and while I was gone, she had did the pot somewhere, that we could not find it.

JOHN TAYLOR sworn. - I am a constable, I searched for this pot carefully, but could not find it.

Clayton's defence: I went to drink at Mr. M'Carty's, very early in the morning, and I drank too much, unbecoming of any person, and Mr. M'Carty detected me with this pot, as he certifies in this honourable Court; he desired me to go into Mrs. Philips's, and see if they would buy it, and I went in, and came out again directly with it; I dropped it upon the dunghill, he asked me what I got for it, and I told him, nothing at all.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-53

462. ROBERT WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , four linen shirts, value 20s. the property of George Troup .

GEORGE TROUP sworn. - I have apartments at Carlton-House, I attend the Prince's wardrobe; I missed the shirts on Saturday the 11th of February; I had not seen them perhaps for three weeks before; I learnt from Macmanus, about three weeks after I missed them, that they were pawned at three different pawnbrokers; I have seen the prisoner frequently coming backwards and forwards to the porter.

GEORGE TURNER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Panton-street, Hay-market, (produces two shirts); I took them in of the prisoner, on the 9th and 10th of February, in the name of George Thomas ; I am certain of his person, I perfectly recollect him.

JAMES CROCKFORD sworn. - I am a pawnbroker,(produces a shirt); it was pledged with me, on

the 10th of February, by the prisoner, in the name of George Thomas , which corresponds with the mark G.T. upon it.

JOHN CORDY sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, (produces a shirt); I had it from the prisoner on the 10th of February; he pledged it in the name of George Thomas , I know his person perfectly.

The shirts were deposed to by the prosecutor.

PATRICK MACMANUS sworn. - I examined the prisoner's box, which he admitted to be his, and found these three duplicates, (producing them, which led to the discovery of the property.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the shirts of a Jew.

GUILTY . (Aged 17)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17970712-54

463. RICHARD FULLER was indicted for feloniously endeavouring to seduce and entice one Matthew Lowe (the said Matthew Lowe being then a person serving in his Majesty's forces by land)from his allegiance and duty to his said Majesty .

Second Court. For maliciously endeavouring to incite and stir up the said Matthew Lowe to commit an act of mutiny, and to commit traiterous and mutinous practices against the form of the statute, and against the King's peace.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Abbott).

Mr. Attorney-General. Gentlemen of the Jury. This is an indictment founded upon an act of Parliament, which passed upon the 6th of June last, and which enacted that persons committing certain act described in that statute should be deemed guilty of felony. Gentlemen, the facts I have to state to you, as committed by the prisoner, happened on the 8th of the same month; the offence therefore follows very speedly after the act of Parliament, and in fact may form a circumstance that may entitle the prisoner to mercy; the Constitution of this country has provided that mercy may be applied for, and you perhaps may conceive with me, that it will not be applied for in vain.

Gentlemen, the circumstances, however, which form the subject of the present indictment, if I do not mistake the effect of them, constitute a crime in the law of England of so high a nature, that independent of this Act of Parliament would subject the prisoner to an indictment for a capital offence.

Gentlemen, the indictment charges. in the words of the Act of Parliament, that the prisoner at the bar, after the passing of this Act, feloniously did, maliciously, and advisedly, endeavour to seduce Matthew Lowe , the said Matthew Lowe being then a person serving in his Majesty's forces by land, from his duty and allegiance; and it then charges that the same person (again in the words of the statute) feloniously, meliciously, and advisedly endeavoured to incite and stir up the said Matthew Lowe , he being then a person serving in his Majesty's forces by land, to commit an act of mutiny, and to commit traiterous and mutinous practices against the form of the statute.

Gentlemen, this act passed at a period when unquestionably transactions were passing, which threatened the peace of the country-dreadful and striking examples of which we have fatal proofs every day, but which for the security and peace of the country have become necessary; and I am sure I need not state to you, that in a moral as well as a legal view, those persons, who excite to acts of such fatal consequences to themselves and to the country, act perhaps more unpardonably than those who are made the excitements to their own misery.

Gentlemen, with these observations, I proceed to state to you the circumstances of the case. On the 8th of June, a person, who will be called to you as a witness of the name of Matthew Lowe , a soldier in the Cold-stream regiment of Guards , was in his way from London to Kew, where I understand he was quartered when he was accosted by the prisoner at the bar; and not being at that time dressed in a military habit, but in the ordinary cloaths in which you find persons who do not belong to that character in life; he made enquiries of him (and this is a circumstance perhaps deserving of attention, whether he belonged to the military, or what his situation in life was; that enquiry led to a communication on the part of Lowe, that he belonged to the military, and was one of the Coldstream Regiment of Guards. After this had passed, the prisoner at the bar desired him to go into a public-house, and he would there treat him with some liquor; when they had retired to this place, the Pack-horse on Turnham-green, the prisoner at the bar produced a paper, which I shall take the liberty to read to you, as I have it now in my hand, as it was delivered by the prisoner to Lowe.

Gentlemen, your attention will probably be called to the circumstance, that the printed paper thus delivered by the prisoner is passed upon a thicker paper, for the purpose of preservation; what use was to be made of it, when it was so carefully preserved, will be for you to judge.

(Here Mr. Attorney-General read to the Jury the bill above alluded to: also another bill which was delivered by the prisoner to Lowe).

Gentlemen, the person to whom these papers were shewn, for the purposes that it will be your duty to collect from the whole of the evidence, felt that loyal indignation, which, to the honour of the British soldiery, has been unquestionably their characteristic; in consequence of this, without stating the indignation that he felt at the moment, he will inform you that he thought it his duty to secure this man for punishment; they accordingly went from this Pack-horse, on Turnhamgreen, till they came to Kew-green, where he produced these papers again to other soldiers; they will tell you the observations that were made upon them by the prisoner, and you will attend to the evidence that they will give.

Gentlemen, if the evidence, on the part of this prosecution, should be such as shall satify you that the charge is founded in truth, it will then be incumbent upon the

prisoner to answer it; and I have no hesitation in requesting that you will listen to all that is stated on the part of the prisoner, with a view to explain his intention, with the most humane wishes that can be consistent with public justice; on the other hand, when you have heard the case, I am sure you will recollect that the verdict you are to give, is that verdict, which the law that you are here assisting in the administration of, calls for at your hands; and it is the great blessing of a British constitution, that it has provided that, even after the decision of a Jury has been given upon the case of any individual, a temperate, a wise, and a humane attention is secured to every individual in the county, with respect to any particular favourable circumstances that may form a part of his case.

Gentlemen, when the Legislature passed this Act, they imposed a duty upon me, which I am bound to perform, to lay cases that are thus circumstanced before the justice of Juries of the country; when I have executed that duty, I repose the safety of the prisoner, and the safety of the public, in those hands which, as long as we are happy enough to be permitted to preserve them, will continue to preserve every one of us that portion of practical liberty, which perhaps does not belong to the nature of other human institutions.

MATTHEW LOWE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Garrow. I have been a private in the Coldstream Regiment of Guards somewhere about four years; I keep a house, No.11, Snow's-rents, leading out of York-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; on the 8th of June I was going from London to Kew, when he overtook me

Q. Were you in your soldier's dress? - A. No; I was in coloured cloaths.

Q. Was the prisoner a stranger to you? - A. I had never seen him in my days before; he looked me earnestly in the face, and asked if I belonged to the military; I told him I did; he said he belonged to the Buckinghamshire Supplementary Militia ; when we came right opposite the Pack-house at Turnham-green, we had walked a very little way together, he asked me if I would go in and have a share of a pint of beer; I said, I would, as I was on my travels, but I would not stop longer than one pint; I went into the tap-room, and the prisoner called for a pint of beer, it was brought in, and he asked me to drink; after I had drank and set down the pot, he asked me if I could read, to which I told him I could; says he, I have something to shew you, with that he put his hand into his coat pocket, and pulled out a printed bill pasted upon some thicker paper.

Q. (Shewing him a paper). Was that the paper that he first took out? - A. Yes; he pointed out parts of it, and told me it was a true copy of every man's heart that wished his country well; then I read a little of it, and thought it was not a proper place to read such a thing in, I desired the prisoner to put it in his pocket, which he did; when he had put this paper in his pocket, he said, he had got some more of a better sort, and pulled them out of his pocket immediately, and gave them to me.

Q. Look at these and see if these are the papers that he said were of a better sort? - A. Yes; these are them, they have my mark upon them, he turned over to one passage, and desired me to read it.

(It is read).

Lowe. When I had read it, he said it was a true copy of every man's heart that wished his country well; I told him to put it in his pocket, for I was afraid somebody would over-hear us, and that I should be apprehended along with him; I told him we would go to a more convenient place, near Kew; I thought, as I was a stranger, I might get killed among the country people; I thought I could not apprehend him myself, and so I got him to a public-house near Kew, he laid down twopence at the bar, and said to the woman, at the Pack house, give me my guinea, at which the smiled, and gave him a farthing; we went from there to the Star-and-garter, near Kew-bridge, I saw one of my comrades, William Leach, sitting there, I called for a pint of beer, and said we might as well all drink together; while we were drinking, I beckoned to Leach to come out of doors, and told him that that man had got some seditious hand-bills in his pocket, I desired him to come over the Bridge, to the Rose-and-crown, where I could send for serjeant Calder; we drank the beer, and went over the Bridge, the prisoner and I went to the Rose-and-crown, and Leach and Calder came there to us; serjeant Calder did not come in at first, but Leach sent me out to serjeant Calder, and I gave him information of it, then I came into the house again leaving Calder out; then I desired this fellow to let me look at one of the bills, in the presence of Leach, he gave me that with the word "Soldiery" at the top, and I gave it over to Leach.

Q. Did the prisoner see you give it over to Leach? - A. Yes; we were all three close together, he was reading it in the presence of the prisoner when serjeant Calder came in; upon which the prisoner said, how do you do serjeant, will you drink, for I am a comrade; upon which serjeant Calder drank, and then he asked what I had got there; I said, it was a paper I had got from that man, pointing to Fuller; then serjeant Calder read it distinctly aloud, and while he was reading it, he made use of the same words that I mentioned before, that it was a true copy of every man's heart that wished well to his country.

Q. Was that after Calder had got to the conclusion, or during the reading of it? - A. During the reading of it, several times; I said to him, be

so good as let the serjeant look at the other bills; upon that, I took that bill from serjeant Calder into my own hand, and he had the others from Fuller; serjeant Calder read them all through aloud, and then asked him if he had got any more; he said, no; serjeant Calder then said, you must consider yourself as a prisoner, and he took him prisoner.

Q. Are you quite sure he is the man? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You say that he pointed to your attention particular passages, do you mean to say that he read those passages? - A. I do not know that he read them, his lips seemed to move as if he read them.

Q. Did he read any one single syllable for you to hear? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Upon your oath, did he not say he could not read them, and ask you to read them for him? - A. He did not say whether he could read or not; he asked me if I could read, but I did not ask whethere he could read or not.

Court. Q. I think you say he pointed you out some passages to read? - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What reward had your regiment advertised at this time for any person you could take up upon this sort of charge? - A. I did not know of any reward at that time.

Q. Had not your regiment offered a reward at that time? - A. They had, but I did not know it.

Q. Seventy or a hundred pounds, was it not? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Don't you believe it was seventy pounds? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Do you believe it is less than seventy pounds? - A. I do not know.

Q. How long before had that reward been offered? - A. I do not know.

Q. Did not all your serjeants come forward and offer a reward? - A. I never saw any thing of the sort.

Mr. Garrow. Q. You have learned since, that they had offered a reward? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time serjeant Calder secured this man had you heard of any reward? - A. No; I only did it from the lucre of doing my duty.

WILLIAM LEACH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding Q. You are a private in the Coldstream Regiment of Guards? - A. I am.

Q. Do you know Lowe? - A. Yes, he is in the same regiment; On the 8th of June last, Lowe came with another man to a public-house at Kew-bridge, the prisoner is the man; they came into the tap-room and called for a pint of beer, Lowe saw me there, and came and sat down by me; Lowe asked me, is all well at Kew; I said it was; Lowe then called for another pint, the prisoner called for the first pint; Lowe asked him if he would take a walk over the bridge, which he consented to; he went over the bridge, and Lowe asked me to step to serjeant Calder.

Q. Before you went for Calder, had you said any thing to Fuller, or he to you? - A. Nothing at all concerning the bills; we went to the Rose-and crown the other side of the bridge, Fuller and Lowe went into a little room, and when I came in they had a pot of beer before them, I joined them before Calder came; I told Lowe there was one wanted to speak with him; upon that he went out into the passage to serjeant Calder, and I remained with Fuller, but he did not say any thing to me.

Q. How long was Lowe absent before he returned to Fuller? - A. He might be about two minutes.

Q. Did he return by himself? - A. Yes; and Lowe asked him if he had got any of these bills about him in his pocket; Fuller asked me if I could read; and I told him I could; with that he pulled the bill out with the word "Soldiery" at the top of it; the serjeant then came in, and Fuller said, serjeant, how do you do, will you drink, I am a comrade of your's; I was reading the bill at the same time, and the serjeant said, what have you got there; I said I did not know particularly, and gave it to him; the serjeant began to read it loud, and Fuller said, what do you think of that serjeant, I think it is a true copy of every man's heart that wishes well to his King and country, he repeated that about twice while he was reading it; he then asked him if he had any more, and he said, yes; but he did not think so much of it as he did of the other; and when the serjeant had read it, he asked him if he had any more; he said, no; and then he told him he must consider himself as a prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you know that an Act of Parliament had passed two days before this happened, making it death? - A. I do not know that it made it death, every man had signed his name to it.

Q. That was a bill offering a reward? - A. It was something concerning the army, and I thought it was very proper that I should assist in detecting him.

ROBERT CALDER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Abbott. I am a serjeant in the Coldstream Regiment of Guard; in consequence of some information that I received from Leach, I went to the Rose and Crown, into an apartment where Lowe was, he had come out and told me there was a man there with seditious bills, I went into the room a minute or two after him; when I went in, the prisoner said, serjeant, how do you do, I am a comrade; I asked him what he belonged to, he said, the Bucks Supplementary Militia; Leach had got a paper in his hand, I said, what have you got there,

Lowe said, it was a paper he had had from Fuller, and while I was reading it, he said, it was a true copy of every honest man's heart, who wished well to his country; I asked him if he had any more, and he gave me another, but he gave it me reluctantly, seeing my temper rather ruffled, and adverse to his principles; this paper, with the word soldiery at the top, I received from Leach, the other I received from Fuller.

(The bills read by the Clerk of the Arraigns.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

Evidence for the Prisoner.

EDMUND HOLDERNESS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at Colebrooke, in Buckinghamshire; I have known the prisoner at the bar from a child, he is by trade a shoe-maker , and lived with his father.

Q. Do you know whether he can read or write? - A. I do not believe that he can; I never heard that his father sent him to school.

Q. What is the state of his understanding, is he a sensible young man, or otherwise? - A. I do not call him a real sensible young man; I never heard any thing amiss of his character.

Q. Is he of a disorderly and riotous disposition? - A. I never heard any thing of the kind.

JOSEPH WISE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at Colebrooke, I have known the prisoner about fourteen years.

Q. Do you know whether he is able to read or write? - A; I never heard that he was, I have heard that he was not.

Q. Do you know any thing of his understanding, whether he is sensible or dull? - A. I do not think he is sensible.

Q. What has been his general character for peaceable behaviour? - A. I never heard any thing amiss of him before.

JOHN BAKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live in Baldwin's-Gardens; I have known the prisoner about ten years.

Q. Do you know whether he is able to read or write? - A. I have heard his brother-in-law say he cannot, I do not know myself.

Q. Do you know any thing respecting his understanding, whether he is sensible or otherwise? - A. I think he is not.

Mr. Attorney General. Q. Is that brother-in-law alive? - A. Yes.

Q. What is his name? - A. John Page .

JOHN CHESTERMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney, I live in Union-court, Holborn; I have known the prisoner about nine years; I have every reason to believe that he can neither read nor write; I was employed as a labouring man in the country, and some of my work-fellows used to come to me to learn to read, among the rest, Fuller used to come, and when he had come about twice, he told me his head would not take it.

THOMAS HAWKINS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I have known Fuller twenty-seven years; I don't know whether he can read or write.

Q. What do you think of his understanding - do you think he is sensible? - A. No. I think he is not.

JAMES HALL sworn. - I live at Longford; I have known the prisoner six years, I have heard his father say, he never put him to school.

Q. What do you think of his understanding? - A. I think he is a fool.

WILLIAM GREENSILL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I live at Colebrook; I have known Fuller from his infancy, I do not know whether he can read or write.

Q. What do you think of his understanding? - A. I don't think he is sensible.

Mr. Attorney-General. Q. When did you leave Colebrook? - A. Tuesday morning.

Q. Do you know Page? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see him last? - A. This morning.

Q. Has the prisoner brothers and sisters at Colebrooke? - A. He has sisters at Colebrooke.

Q. When did you see them last? - A. On Tuesday morning.

FRANCIS FULLER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. The prisoner is my son, he can neither read nor write.

Q. He is a militia man for the County of Bucks? - A. Yes.

Q. When he was attested, did he write his name, or make his mark? - A. He made a cross.

Court. Q. Can he read print? - A. No, he cannot.

The jury having retired an hour and a half, returned with a verdict of

GUILTY Death . (Aged 28.)

He was strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of the transaction having happened so recently after the passing of the act.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-55

464. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for that he, on the 19th of June , in a certain open place, near the King's highway, in and upon Sir John Buchannan Riddle , Bart. did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a French half-crown, value 2s. 3d. and 4s. in money , the property of the said Sir John.

Mr. Garrow. Gentlemen of the Jury. I have the honour of attending you upon the present occasion, as Counsel for a very respectable and honest Baronet, who has felt it his duty to institute this prosecution against the prisoner:

You have collected from the statement of the indictment that has been read to you by the Clerk of the Arraigns, that it imputes to the prisoner the offence of highway-robbery. Gentlemen, ordinarily speaking, I might content myself with staring, that that was the nature of the offence, and proceed to call the witnesses who are to substantiate the guilt of the descendant; but if nothing else had suggested to me the necessity of taking another course, the manner in which this prosecution is ushered in to your notice, upon the part of the prisoner, has rendered it indispensibly necessary, that I should state to you the circumstances rather more in detail. Gentleman, you have observed, that those of the other sex, who, from business, or curiosity, have been brought into this place, have, by the decorum of the learned Gentlemen, who is intrusted with the defence of the prisoner, been recommended to withdraw, and I understand, that before I came into the Court, an application had been made, that certain persons in the custody of the Sheriffs of the County, should be forth coming as witnesses on the part of the defendant; it therefore becomes my duty, a painful, but a necessary one, to state this case more at large than I should have been disposed to do, and I do it principally in mercy to the descendant, who now stands at the bar, that he may be apprized of the perils into which, by possibility, he may be about to place himself in, and that I may not be, at least a means of aggravation to his defence. Gentlemen, I shall present to you, in the character of the prosecutor, on this occasion, as honourable, as respectable, in one word, upon the subject of this prosecution, a man of as manly virtue as any in any part of the united kingdoms; I invite the most ample and scruinous inquiry into his character and conduct; I solicit, I intreat, I implore an opportunity of calling those, who unsolicited by him, persons of the highest rank in society have come to speak to his virtues and his character; I implore an opportunity which this prosecution, conducted in one way may furnish, of examining those persons, with respect to the character of the prosecutor. Gentlemen, unexplained, this may seem odd in a case of highway robbery, but I shall explain it satisfactorily. The prosecutor is a young Baronet of a family, of the highest distinction, as I have already told you: He, on the 19th of June, was going to see the state of the illuminations, as they were expected at Lord Malden's house, and it grieves me to have to address you, who had in the last discharge of your duty to witness an example of the loyalty, decorum, and the manly and soldier-like spirit of the Guards; it grieves me to be obliged so immediately to furnish you with a contrast of the depravity of a certain portion of that class; I hope to God, and I believe, that though the majority of them are of the description you have to day seen, and if they are of that character, we who value the constitution, have nothing to apprehend; I have to present you with the melancholy contrast; I am not instructed to conceal any thing that is indiscreet on the part of the prosecutor, the most honourable, the most sensible man may do a simple thing, and Sir John Riddell must excuse me, if I say in the introduction to this business, that he has done a silly thing, beyond that, I defy the tongue of stander itself. Gentlemen, when he had got rear a place, called the Laundry, Sir John Riddell saw some women at a window, he, as a young man, and though he is a man of rank and fashion, he condescended certainly to joke and say some silly things to these women; the prisoner was a sentinel near the spes, it was his duty to protect the King's sabjects, whether in the course of this investigation you shall be obliged to arrive at the conclusion irresistible, that some of those upon whom that duty is cast are employed in those situations, only for the purpose of pillaging such of the King's subjects as may fall into their hands, to attack that, which, to a man of feeling, is of more importance than any property that he carries about him, his feelings and his character, it must remain for the final result of this enquiry for you to determine.

Gentlemen, having overheard this silly conversation with these girls, the prisoner at the bar put himself in the way of Sir John, who, in passing the sentinel, said,"soldier, I suppose you would have no objection to do something to these girls;" there was some silly conversation of that sort; upon which the prisoner at the bar instantly, and you will judge whether it was by preconcert from the facts that immediately followed, he immediately asked how he dared to propose such a thing to him; I should not quarrel with it if it ended there; he immediately stated, that he would not suffer the prosecutor to depart, unless he gave him a present, presenting, at the same time, his musket and his bayonet; Providence enabled him to do that which does not happen to us all to do; Providence writes a legible character now and then, you will see the prosecutor, and seeing him you will judge for yourselves, whether the most scandalous, indecent, and infamous imputation cast upon him by this man, falls in with your notions of such a legible character; I think, what happened upon the occation, is a pretty strong mark of it; he knocked down this armed soldier who had presented his musket, upon which some persons, who are proposed to be called to you, came up, I hope, in mercy to the prisoner, they will not be subjected to my cross-examination. Gentlemen, upon his presenting his bayonet, he took out two or three shillings, and gave to him, saying, he did not chuse to be detained; he then charged him with having put his hand into his breeches, and felt his p-e p-s; Sir John then insisted upon his being taken with him to the guard-house, a guard came up, and he was conducted to the guard-house, where a very satisfactory investigation took place.

Gentlemen, in this case, I am not called upon to enter into any nice disquisitions on the subject of highway robbery, the law upon that subject is clear and wise, whatever doubts may have been suggested they are all now done away; but I am not put to any nice disquisitions upon constructive highway robbery, the true construction of highway robbery is obtaining goods, or money, by any the smallest degree of terror calculated to export it from a person without his consent; need I then before discreet sensible men, argue upon the propriety of presenting a musket, and telling him he should be detained there till he made him a present; need I ask you, if such conduct was not sufficient to make a man of ordinary firmness feel some degree of terror? Under such terror Sir John parted with his property. But now we come to that which I consider, viewing it

not as the question of the prosecutor, this honourable Baronet, but as that which I tender, much more the question of the public security.

Gentlemen, speaking always subject to the correction of his Lordship, I take it, that even if the facts were true, that the prosecutor had unfortunately, in a wretched moment of his existence, so lost fight of the character of his ancestry, so totally forgotten all that is due to himself, and to his own honour, had been so totally berest of all that belongs to man in society, as to commit the indecencies that this apparatus leads me to suppose may this day be imputed to him, it is no answer to this prosecution in point of law; but I have no difficulty in saying, if you believe that he conducted himself in the manner in which I am obliged to offend the chaste car of a Court of Justice, by, stating what the prisoner imputed to him, though, in point of law, it is no justification of that which was done, by opposing force to him, and taking his goods from him; if you believe the prosecutor to have been capable of the guilty act imputed to him, I take him to he a man not to be believed, and I do not ask you to believe him, upon his credit, or upon his character; upon his conduct stands the life of the prisoner; try him by the rules by which you yourselves would wish to be tried, or to try others, and there seems to me to be no difficulty in the case.

Gentlemen, there were other persons committed for the share they had in this transaction; and I am not sure that I have not some blame imputable to me, and to my learned Friend, that they are not now at the bar; because, I think, in the course of this inquiry, it is not quite impossible that the learned Judges may think they ought to have been submitted to the consideration of a Grand Jury of the country; I confess, judging as I do upon this subject, with the able assistance that I have, I thought, perhaps, it was difficult, upon this particular species of prosecution, to convict them; and I thought, perhaps mistakenly, that it would be more decorus, and might lead to a more satisfactory investigation of truth, not to prosecute those persons with the present prisoner for a capital offence, but to leave him with an opportunity, if it should be thought discreet and proper to avail himself of it, of resorting to that charge against the prosecutor, of which it might have been said we had deprived him of his proof, by indicting the witnesses to the fact; but I think, Gentlemen, that standing here, charged with a very solemn and important duty as I am, I should ill discharge that duty if I sat down without stating, and God Almighty forbid I should state it from menace, but I do it from the true spirit, I hope, of gentlemanly candour; God forbid it should be supposed to be a menace, that if it should be thought good to revive this charge, it will be my duty to lay before you, a Jury of the country, such evidence as must make it impossible, for a single moment, to doubt, that the charge made, or insinuated against the prosecutor, is unfounded, and infamous in the last degree.

Gentlemen, I shall call the prosecutor to prove the circumstances of this case; I will not insult him, or offend this chaste Court, by asking him, as a question from me, put by my able and learned friend to him, whether that charge is true or not; I shall wait till the season arrives, in which, if indiscretion should accumulate upon the aggravated case of this defendant, the question shall be asked on his part.

Gentlemen, I hope the prisoner will well weigh, before he embarks in a mode of defence, that may be, by possibility, extremely dangerous; the prosecutor comes here, because he believes it to be his duty; and I am perfectly satisfied, under the advice you will receive from the Court, that you will weigh this case in the scale of mercy, and having done so, if you feel the necessity of this prosecution, you will meet your situation with the fortitude of men, and will pronounce him guilty, because your duty to yourselves, to the prisoner, to the prosecutor, and to the public, all concur in requiring it.

SIR JOHN BUCHANNAN RIDDELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. On the 19th of June, I went to Astley's, over Westminster-bridge, in order to meet two ladies, whom I expected to see there, I did not find them there, and therefore left Astley's soon after ten o'clock; I relide in Bruton-street: I was going to an assembly at Lord Malden's, and when I got to the end of the street, I recolected that my coachman and footman were both at Astley's, I thought it would be of no use to go home, knowing I should not have the assistance of any of my people; I had been told in the morning, that Lord Malden's assembly was to begin very early, that it was to be held in the garden, and my Lord's house was to be lighted up on the outside next to the Green Park; I went towards the Green Park, when I got to the further end of the place, I looked towards St. James's Park, I then noticed a woman crossing from the place, of whom I thought I had some knowledge; I followed that woman across the stable yard, and lost sight of her in that corner of it which leads into the Park; when I got into the Park, I noticed an old woman standing close to a window, and I observed that she was in close conversation with two women who were within the house, the sentinel was then standing near the window, but not quite close to it -

Q. When you speak of the sentinel, do you mean the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes. I passed on, and went up the Park as far as Lord Grenville's garden; when I had got there, I recollected that possibly one of the women at the window might be the woman I had seen cross the stable-yard; I therefore returned to the window to lee whether it was so or not, and saw the old woman standing at the place at which I had first seen her, but the soldier had left the place where I had at first seen him; the old woman was in the Park, talking to two women, who were within the house; the prisoner was then standing behind the old woman.

Court. Q. What time might this be? - A. About a quarter after ten o'clock, either the old woman or the soldier had a mug in their hand; in order to see whether it was the woman or not, I entered into some foolish conversation with the women in the

house; there was likewise a man servant, I believe, belonging to the house, standing in conversation with them; during the conversation I had with these women, both the old woman and the soldier left the window. and went out of my sight.

Q. How long might any silly conversation, that you had, take up? - A. Three or four minutes; I noticed that when he was talking with the old woman, he had not his firelock upon his shoulder; as soon as I had done speaking to them, I went towards Lord Malden's garden a second time; when I had got as far as the steps of the Queen's Library, I noticed, as I passed him, that he looked in my face, and thinking that he was, perhaps, diverted at my speaking to the same woman that he had been speaking to, I said to him, as I was walking along, my friend, I suppose you would like to have something to do with those women; he answered, yes, that he should; on which, I said, then you had better go and ask them to come out to you, or do you wish me to go and ask them to come out to you; I am not certain which of the two phrases I made use of; while this conversation took place, he had followed me from the side of the steps where he was when I first saw him, to the other side of the steps, and the instant that I had said that, he seized me by the coat, and said, how dare you propose such a thing to me; I instantly struck him, so violently, that he very nearly fell to the ground, and dropped his firelock, his hat fell off his head; he at that time called for help, but in a very low tone of voice.

Q. At the time this conversation was passing, had you seen whether there was any person within any reasonable distance? - A. I am very certain that their was no person near; immediately a man ran past Lord Grenvill's garden, and laid hold of me by the right arm; that man. I believe, was Sharman.

Q. Do you know positively whether it was Sharman? - A. I have reason to believe it was him from his heighth; he called again for help, and a third man then came to his assistance, I think, of the name of Beeder, and he laid hold of my right arm also.

Q. Whether the tone of voice was at all raised in which the help was called for the second time? - A. I think it was, a good deal; the first that came to his assistance was a tall and a thin man, I may have made a mistake, and confounded the names; the second man was a shorter man; upon the second man coming up to the assistance of the soldier, the sentinel, Davis, said to him, take up my firelock; one of them answered, which I am not certain, you had better take it up yourself, but first load it; the firelock was taken up by somebody and given into Davis's hands, and when he had it in his hands, finding I still struggled with all three, one of them said, why do not you put your bayonet to his breast, or words to that effect; he accordingly did press his bayonet very strongly against my breast, so that I found a very strong pressure against my chest; he then said, God d-n you, I will not let you go unless you make me a present; I immediately put my left hand into my waistcoat-pocket and took out some shillings, I turned some out of my hand into his right hand, I believe three or four fell into his hand; he looked at them, and said, what is this, this is not enough; I immediately emptied the remainder that was in my hand into his, and was proceeding to give him some more; I was at that time so very much alarmed, that had I had a very large sum in my pocket I should certainly have given it all; I said to him, I had rather give all I have in my pocket than be detained; upon that a fourth man came up, dressed in coloured cloaths; I said to him, come here, and the soldier immediately called to him for help likewise; this fourth man walked up rather slowly, and as he walked it struck me he might possibly be a constable that I had seen sitting, in the day time, at the gate of St. James's Park; I said, is that a constable; two voices, from the four people then surrounding me, answered, yes, it is, but which of them it was I do not know; upon his coming up, he said, what is the matter; the prisoner said, that gentleman, or that rascal, or some such expression, that the person then in his custody, meaning me, had asked him if he wished to know a girl, and if his p-e p-s stood, and had put his hands into his breeches to feel, and grosser expressions than that; while he said that, my hand was in my pocket upon my money, I withdrew my hand from my pocket the instant that I heard that beastial accusation, and said to the constable, constable, instantly conduct me, with this man, to the Colonel of the Guard; the two men who first laid hold of me left me, and the man that I took for a constable took hold of my coat; I directed him to take me to the window where the girls were; he took me to the window, and they told the constable all the conversation that had passed, and the prisoner likewise told his story; I desired a second time to go to the guard; he said, that he would take me to the guard with a file of men, or, that a serjeant and a file of men should be sent for; I could not conceive why this constable had not authority to take me to the guard-house without waiting for a serjeant and a file of men; however, a serjeant and a file of men did come, he keeping me there; very soon after several serjeants came into the Park, and one of them desired to know what was the matter, serjeant Olive, to the best of my knowledge, came up first; upon his hearing the prisoner's account, I desired him to go to the window, and learn from the servants.

Q. How many people continued there? - A. The prisoner, the pretended constable, and the tall man, all surrounded me; the other was gone at my particular desire to fetch a serjeant and a file of men, they all staid in the Park; I went to the Mess-room, and asked for the Colonel of the Guard; some serjeants staid with Davis till they relieved guard, and then they brought him in, and two of the other persons concerned, the other had run away.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. I understand that you went that night to Astley's? - A. Yes.

Q. In returning home you went to see Lord Malden's house lighted up? - A. Yes.

Q. It was entirely accidental your being in the Park? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been in the Park any time previous to that? - A. Never in my life at that time of night.

Q. After you had spoke to these women you went away? - A. Yes; the prisoner went away before me.

Q. The conversation with the prisoner took place in the Green-Park? - A. Yes, in consequence of his looking me earnestly in the face.

Q. After you had nearly knocked him down he called for assistance? - A. Yes; after having lost his firelock and his hat.

Q. And you gave him some money? - A. Yes.

Q. After the constable came up, and it was asked what charge the prisoner had against you, he said you had put your hand in his breeches? - A. Yes.

Q. This conversation did not take place till after you had given him the money? - A. No.

Q. Did not you give him that money to get away, in consequence of having knocked him down? - A. No; but because I was in great fear in consequence of the assault, that assault might be an intent to commit murder, for any thing I knew; I was afraid of my life, I was afraid of my liberty, and I was afraid of my honour, because I thought, being seen in company with such persons in the Park, if any person had passed who knew me, it would have been a very disagreeable thing, and therefore I would have given him, upon that account, a great deal more money.

Q. Was it not, after you had knocked him down, that you gave him the money, and then a scuffle took place? - A. The scuffle was at an end before that, I was completely imprisoned.

Q. Who made the first accusation when the other man came up? - A. The prisoner; the constable asked what was the matter, and he said, I had asked him if his p-s stood, and had put my hand into his breeches.

Mr. Fielding. I have a great many more witnesses, but I will not insult the prosecutor, by supposing that his evidence wants any aid.

Prisoner's defence. I am innocent of the crime that is laid to my charge; I was posted at the King's guard at nine o'clock; about ten, there came an old woman that washed for the people in the house, she knocked at the window once or twice, the window was opened, that was about six yards from my post; about half past ten, this gentleman came through the gate, into the Green-Park, he looked at me very hard, he turned up towards the Bason in the Green Park, he turned back, and looked at me again, I did not know what he meant; I was very dry, and I went up and asked the women if they would give me some clean water, or table beer; they gave me some, and that gentleman came up to the window, what conversation they had I do not know; I did not think it prudent for me to stop there; I went to my sentry-box, and laid down my firelock behind my box, and soon after that, the gentleman came up to me, and said, "soldier, should not you like to have connections with these girls?" I said, I should not mind it in the least, if I had one of them here, and he made no more to do than to take hold of my breeches, "sentinel," says he, "do your p-s stand?" no, says I, if I had them here, I don't know but they might; he opened the slap of my breeches, and took hold of my t-s in his hand, I had my firelock in my hand, I immediately seized hold of his coat, and said, what did he mean by that; I called out for assistance, and then Sharman came up; I said, I insist upon your taking charge of this man, he accordingly took hold of him, he made a scusstle to get away; I called out again for assistance, and then there came up another man, and then Sir John was still, he put some money into my hand, and said, I will give you any thing before I will be detained; no, says I, I will take you a prisoner to the Guard-room, and I sent Sharman to the Guard-room for a serjeant, and a file of men; accordingly they came, and I laid my charge, that this gentleman did so and so with me; I shewed the Colonel the money he gave me, and I was confined all night.

The prisoner called his serjeant, and James Skirving, a publican, who gave him a good character for morality.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 22.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The LORD CHIEF BARON.

Reference Number: t17970712-56

465. JOHN HINDES was indicted for forging and counterfeiting, on the 27th of May , a certain order for payment of money, purporting to be the order of William Cavendish upon Messrs. Pybus, Call, Grant and Hale, bankers , London, dated Yarmouth, 1st May, 1797. for the payment of five guineas to George Wilkinson, Esq. or bearer, for value received, with intention to defraud John

Pybus , Sir John Call , Bart. John Grant and Pagan Hale .

Second Count. For uttering and publishing the same as true, knowing it to be forged.

Third and fourth Counts. For like offences, with intention to detraud William Ortman .

WILLIAM ORTMAN sworn. - I am a butcher : On the 27th of May, the prisoner came to my shop, and asked me for some rump of beef, I told him I had not got any; he purchased a leg of mutton, a fillet of veal, and three pounds of gravy beef, it came to thirteen shillings and five pence, I gave him change out of a five guinea note which he gave me. (Produces the note). it is read.

No. 976. Yarmouth. No. 976.

Messrs. Pybus, Call, Grant and Co. bankers, London. Pay on demand, George Wilkinson , Esq. or bearet, the sum of five guineas, value received Yarmouth, 1st of May, 1797.

William Cavendish.

Five Guineas. Entered, J. Jones.

Q. Did you ever get that note paid? - A. No; I carried it to Messrs. Pybus and Company, and they said they did not know any such parties.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - A. He told me he lived with one Mr. Atkinson, in Park-street, but that was not true, he did not say in what capacity; my man took the meat with him to take it home; he wrote the name, John Atkinson , at the back of it, as his master's name; I went to Mr. Atkinson's as soon as my man came back.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You had never seen the prisoner before this day? - A. No.

Q. What time in the day was it? - A. About half past four or half past five.

Q. It was between four and five? - A. No; between half past four and six, I am sure.

JOHN MONRTON sworn. - I am servant to the last witness; I went with the prisoner at the bar, into Queen-street, Westminster, with some meat, he went into a private-house in Queen-street, and gave me directions to take the meat to No.3, in Park-street, Mr. Atkinson's; when I came there, there was no such meat ordered, nor thev knew nothing of the prisoner; from Park-street I went to this house in Queen-street again, and he was gone; they said they did not know any thing of him.

CHARLES GUBBINS sworn. - I am clerk to Messrs. Pybus, Call, Grant and Hale.

Q. Look at that note, and tell us if you have any correspondence with any house of that name? - A. This is a bill that was tendered to me by Ortman, on the 27th of May; I told him it was a forged note, and that we knew none of the parties; we had no correspondence at Yarmouth, nor did we know any of the parties.

Q. You have not any correspondence at Yarmouth, nor are you acquainted with any such names? - A. No, we are not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I suppose all you mean to say is, that you have no correspondence with any such person at Yarmouth? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Is there any body here that has been at Yarmouth? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. As I am in the presence of God, these witnesses are mistaken with regard to my person, as I hope to prove by upright and just witnesses.

Mr. Alley contended that it was essentially necessary to prove the non-existence of such a person at Yarmouth.

Mr. Justice Buller. We are now upon a question of evidence, and it must go to the Jury-let us see how the case stands:-here is a bill drawn by a person at Yarmouth, who prosesses himself to be a correspondent of Pybus, Call, and Company; a witness is called, who is a clerk in their house, and he swears that they had no such correspondent; then it is not a genuine bill, and what it imports to be.

Mr. Alley. Taking it that the instrument is a false instrument, then the prosecutors are to prove the averment.

Mr. Justice Buller. They prove that there is no man of the name of Cavendish corresponding with that house.

Mr. Alley. it is not the best evidence that the nature of the case will admit of, because they might have brought a person here from Yarmouth.

Mr. Justice Buller. The witness has proved that no such man corresponds with their house, that is a fact positively sworn to.

Mr. Alley. (To Ortman). I think you said before the Magistrate, that the person who called at your house, had his hair well dressed and powdered? - A. I did not.

Q. Did not you say his hair was powdered? - A. No.

For the Prisoner.

GEORGE GREATHEAD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Q. Where do you live? - A. I keep the sign of the Goat, in Stafford-street.

Q. Tell us if you recollect at any particular time, and when, seeing the prisoner at your house? - A. On Saturday the 27th of May.

Court. (To Ortman.) Q. What time was it when the prisoner came to you? - A. I cannot speak nearer than from four to six; he was with me a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes.

Q. How far is it from Queen-street to your

house? - A. About as far as from here to the top of Newgate-street.

Q. Have you any doubt about the person of the man? - A. I am positive to the man.

Court. (To Monkton.) Q. Do you remember what time it was when you went with the meat to Queen-street? - A. A little after five, I walked with him; he said he was going to drink a pint of porter.

Q. Did you walk and converse with him the whole way? - A. Yes.

Q. How long did you wait at the door in Queen-street? - A. About three minutes; he desired me to go to Park-street, and he would be home in three minutes.

Q. Did he stay no longer than to say that? - A. No longer.

Q. How soon after did you see the prisoner again? - A. On Monday the 29th; I took him in Pall-Mall.

Q. Did you meet him by accident? - A. Yes.

Q. (To Ortman.) When did you see him after he was taken? - A. My man brought him down to my house.

Jury. Q. Was he in the same dress then as when he purchased the meat? - A. No; on the Saturday he had half-boots on, and a white jacket and apron; he was all in a bustle as if he was just come off a journey.

Court. (To Monkton.) Q. Did you see him when he was bargaining with your master? - A. No; only about five minutes before he went.

Mr. Alley. Q. You do not recollect the person of every stranger that comes to buy a joint of meat? - A. I cannot say.

Q. If I was to buy a joint of meat at your house, you would not know me again? - A. I think I should, any body might know you again; I am positive of him.

Q. Did you think you should recollect any other stranger that was there that day? - A. I cannot say.

Q. When you met him he had two friends with him, I believe? - A. Yes.

Q. And he went with you readily, with his friends, and you had nobody with you? - A. Yes.

Q. And he did not attempt to escape? - A. No; I would have taken care that he should not.

Q. Had he powder in his hair on the Saturday? - A. Yes, he had.

Q. Was his hair tied? - A. No, loose.

Mr. Alley. (To Greatbead.) Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner at any time before this indictment was preferred? - A. Yes, on the 27th of May; he came into my house about half past three o'clock in the afternoon, and staid there, in company, till about six, or about ten minutes after six; he went out along with one William Fenwick, he returned again to my house a little before nine, in company with the same William Fenwick.

Court. Q. Who was in your house at the same time? - A. John Lee, William Fenwick, and a servant of Lord Macdonald's, came in a little before four, he staid there till about six o'clock.

Q. Where were you while they were there? - A. In the tap-room and the bar.

Q. How came you to know he was in your house at that time? - A. About a quarter before four, the boy always takes some beer to a shop in the neighbourhood, I asked him where he was going with that beer, and he said Mr. Fenwick and Mr. Hindes; and I am sure he was there before that, because I had spoke to him.

Q. How do you know he was there till six? - A. I was writing a letter to my brother at Egham, and I heard the bell go, it goes a quarter before six; I sent my boy after the bell-man with a penny, and instead of giving it to the bell-man he had put it in the Penny post-office; I asked him why he was gone so long; and he said the Post-office was half way up Bond-street; I sent him to get it back again, he got it, and I gave it to the bell-man; it was then past six, and while he was gone, Mr. Hindes and Mr. Lee, and Lord Macdonald's servant, were conversing about the letter, and offered to lay a wager it would go just as safe being put into the Penny-post, as if it had been given to the bell-man.

Q. Where were you all this time? - A. I had never been out of the house, I was no where but in the bar, and in the tap-room.

Q. Between the time of sending out the beer to this neighbour, and sending out the letter, had you seen the prisoner frequently? - A. Yes; he sat down directly under the dial, facing the bar-door.

Q. Do you mean to say, that during that time, he never went out? - A. I never missed him all that time, to the best of my knowledge; I do not think he could have gone out without my seeing him.

Q. How do you know it was Saturday, the 27th of May? - A. Because Mr. Hindes was taken up the very Monday after, and I had received an answer from my brother, that very morning, I have his letter with me. (Produces it).

Mr. Alley. Q. Do you recollect whether the prisoner was dressed in a jacket, or a coat, that day? - A. A coat.

Q. Did he wear powder that day? - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see him in powder? - A. Never in my life.

WILLIAM FENWICK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Alley. I live with Mr. Caldwell, No. 9, Upper Wimpole-street: On the 27th of May, It was in company with the prisoner, from a little before four, till half past ten in the evening; we were at

Mr. Greathead's till a little past six; from thence to Hyde-park; I had only been three days in town, and he went to shew me the places about; we went past the Serpentine River, into Kensington-gardens, within one hundred yards of the Palace; when we left there, it was between seven and eight o'clock, and we came down slowly to Mr. Greathead's, in Stafford-street, and stopped till half past ten.

Court. Q. What time did you get to Greathead's? - A. About half past eight, or a quarter before nine; he went away about half past ten to his lodgings.

Mr. Alley. Q. Had he hair-powder that day? - A. No.

Court. Q. Who was in your company at Mr. Greathead's? - A. I was a stranger; I do not know their names, there were two people there, Mr. Greathead himself was in the house.

Q. Were their names mentioned? - A. I do not recollect.

Q. How do you know it was a little before four that you went into Mr. Greathead's? - A. He was apprehended so shortly after, that I perfectly recollect the time; Mr. Greathead had sent his boy with a letter, and he had put it into the wrong post, the bell-man was then going about.

EDWARD MACKLIN called. -

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, it being a case of so much doubt, I do not think it necessary to go any further; it is certainly to be imputed merely to mistake.

Mr. Alley. I have five other witnesses to that fact.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-57

466. THOMAS DAWDEN , JAMES ANDERSON , and JOHN BAILEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , a child's frock, value 5s. the property of Elizabeth Michie .

WILLIAM MICHIE sworn. - I am the father of Elizabeth Michie, I keep an oil-shop: On the 22d of June last, I lost my child's frock, it was laying upon the top of a cask in the shop, my wife had laid it there, I do not know any thing of the loss.

JAMES BUTLER sworn. - On the 22d of June, I was fitting at dinner, I live about six doors from the prosecutor, and saw these three boys go to the prosecutor's shop; I saw the least of them (Anderson) go in, and then he came out with the frock under his coat, it stood above the lappel of his coat, and then he and the other went up to the big one(Bailey) and gave the frock to him; then they both returned into the shop a second time, and I went and secured them both in the shop; I went back, he denied knowing any thing of the others; I fetched a constable, and they were taken to the watch-house, they were searched, but the frock was not found.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You say the frock was not found? - A. No.

Q. Had any body taken them before you came up? - A. No.

HENRY BATES sworn. - I am a constable, I searched the prisoners at the watch-house; I found twenty-five guineas and a half upon them, twelve guineas, three dollars, and three shillings upon Dawden; upon Bailey the big one, I found thirteen guineas, and upon the little one, Anderson, I found a dollar and a half; I desired him to undo his cloaths, and half-a-guinea more dropped out of his cloaths; in the shoes of Dawden and Bailey, I found two pair of silver buckles; upon Bailey, a silver watch, and upon Dawden, a silver hunting watch.

The prisoners left their defence to their Counsel.

Dawden, GUILTY (Aged 11.)

Anderson, GUILTY , (Aged 10.)

Bailey, GUILTY , (Aged 14.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The LORD CHIEF BARON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17970712-58

467. ANN DILLON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , a silver soup-ladle, value 20s. three silver table-spoons, value 30s. three silver desert-spoons, value 15s. and two silver forks, value 20s. the property of Francis Plowden , Esq ; in his dwelling-house .

JONAS BATHO sworn. - I am constable of the Liberty of the Duchy of Lancaster: On the 31st May, I was called up by Mr. Joice, in Effex-street, about half-past three in the morning, to go after the prisoner; I went after her, and brought her back to her master's house, as soon as I let go her hands, she took out two silver four-pronged forks, she said they were her master's, I asked her who her master was, she said, Mr. Plowden was, and pointed him out to me in the parlour at the same time; I searched her pockets, and in a huswife I found a number of duplicates, and some in a nutmeg-grater. (Produces them.)

Q. What promises had you made her to induce her to tell you that they were her master's? - A. None; she took them out in the prefence of her master and mistress, and a young lady and me.

FRANCIS PLOWDEN , ESQ. sworn. - I live in Effex-street, the prisoner was cook in my house, upwards of a twelvemonth; I lost a vast variety of articles, those in the indictment are the only ones that I have been able to trace; she left my house, or rather eloped about a quarter before twelve; she

had been ordered to deliver what plate she had in her custody, to her mistress before she went away; I was in my study, and she told me she had delivered all, except a desert-spoon, which she said she was going out into the yard to look for, that some of the children had had it out in the morning at breakfast; she was gone a great while, I went to look for her, and concluded she had got over the wall to my next door neighbour, Mr. Richardson's; I immediately knocked at their door, and was informed that she had been let into their house by their servant two or three minutes before, and in great agitation, had gone through the house, and run into the street; I immediately charged the watch with having observed her going out, the watchman stands next to our door, and he denied that he had seen her the whole of the evening, when a quarter of an hour before that he had received her box, and which he then had in his watch-box; I roused several of my neighbours, and between three and four in the morning she was apprehended coming to the watch-box for her trunk; she was brought to my house and examined, in the presence of seven or eight different persons; upon her person was found these two forks, and the duplicates, by means of which we have treaced some of the property, which is in the hands of the pawnbroker.

Q. There were no promises made her of any kind, were there? - A. No.

Q. Look at those forks? - A. They are my property, I can swear to them, they have the crest of the person from whom I had them.

JOSEPH TEMPLE sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, No. 60, Wych-street, (produces two table spoons, and two desert-spoons); they were pledged with me for thirty shillings, on the 6th of May.

Q. Have you any doubt as to her person? - A. None; she has come three or four times a day sometimes, for these three months.

Q. You never suspected her? - A. No; she told me she was cook to a gentleman, and had brought them from her young mistress.

Mr. Plowden. These spoons have my own crest upon them.

Prisoner's defence. I had not money to keep on with to pay my little bills, and my young mistress used to give me these things to pay the bills with.

Q. (To Mr. Plowden.) What are the value of these forks? - A. Twenty shillings.

GUILTY (Aged 40.)

Of stealing goods, to the value of 20s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-59

468. MARY MADDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a cotton bed-gown, value 1s. a linen shift, value 9d. and a straw hat, value 9d. the property of William Cole .

It appearing, in evidence, that the articles in the indictment were the wearing-appard of the child of the prosecutor, and being laid as the property of the father, the Court were of opinion that the prisoner must be acquitted.

NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17970712-60

469. THOMAS TIMMS and WILLIAM ROBERTSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , a feather bed, value 8s. the property of John Sudbury .

Mrs. SUDBURY sworn. - I am the wife of John Sudbury, he is a plasterer , No. 27, Dyot-street : Last Sunday was a week, the two prisoners came to my house, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I keep a lodging-house, they asked me if I had two beds to let, I told them I had; I took them up stairs, and shewed them the beds; they asked me the price of them, I told them a shilling a piece for the night; they both went into their separate rooms; I told the tallest man to belt himself in inside of his door, and the other I locked in; about two hours after they made a disturbance at the room door which was locked; Sarah Child came and knocked at my room door, and asked for the key of the street door, to let them out, that was about a quarter before two in the morning; I gave her the key, and told her to he sure and lock the door after they were gone out; in consequence of something she told me, I went and called the watchman, and when I came back, I found the tall man, Robertson, in the passage, with the bed in his arms, and the other man lighting him; the watchman asked him what he was doing with that bed, he told me it was his property, and he had bought it for a shilling; the watchman told him he must carry it to the watch-house upon his back; he said, the watchman was the thief, and he must carry it; the watchman carried the bed to the watch-house; and my husband and another watchman, took care of the prisoners.

Q. Was he sober? - A. I am pretty sure he was thoroughly sober.

Q. Had he seen your husband in the house before? - A. No; he saw no man in the house at all before; upon our going to the watch-house, the shortest man said he would do us, for it was not the first bed that the tallest man had bought in that manner.

SARAH CHILD sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Sudbury: I was undressing myself to go to bed, and heard a great disturbance up stairs; I went and

knocked at Mrs. Sudbury's door, and told her the men up stairs were making a great distrubance, and she gave me the key of the street-door; I went up stairs, and the tall man desired the other to hold the candle while he tied it up, that the bed was his property, he had bought it for a shilling; I came down stairs, and knocked at Mrs. Sudbury's door again, and told her that the man said the bed was his, that he had bought it for a shilling; and she went and called the watchman; when she came in with the watchman, he was in the middle of the passage with the bed in his arms, and the other man with the candle in his hand.

PATRICK DONOVAN sworn. - Mrs. Sudbury called me, and I went with her, and saw that tall man with the bed in his arms; he said he had bought it for a shilling, and was going to take it away; I said, do you think Mrs. Sudbury would sell that feather-bed for a shilling; she must be a fool; he said she did, and he would have it; I desired her to call another watchman, and we took them to the watch-house.

Timms's defence. We had been drinking together, and we lit of two girls, and this man went up stairs with one of the girls, and I followed them up; and we were to give them a shilling a piece; and the girls wanted more money to lay with us all night than we were willing to give them; and they went again and knocked with their shoe-heels as they went down; he came into my room, and said he would not lay there; I told him not to make such a noise, and he said he bought the bed for a shilling, and he would have it; and he went down stairs with it; there was no candlestick, and I held the candle till I burnt my fingers with it.

Robertson's defence. Two girls took us to this house; the girls rapped at the window, and they let us in; we agreed for a bed for a shilling, and I gave her the money; the girls wanted more money than two poor men like we could give them, and they went away.

Q. (To Mrs. Sudbury). Had they any women with them? - A. Yes; two women they brought in with them.

Q. Your's is a common lodging-house, is it not? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. You let your beds to girls of the town, do not you? - A. I let them to any body that chuses to sleep there for a night, I do not ask any questions who they are.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-61

470. MARY GARDINER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a silver watch, value 30s. a steel watch-chain, value 3d. a base metal seal gilt with gold, value 1d. and a steel watch-key, value 1d. the property of Daniel Willis .

DANIEL WILLIS sworn. - I am a carpenter , in Charles-street, Grosvenor-square: I met with a woman in Cross-lane, St. Giles's , that took me up one pair of stairs into a front room, where I saw the prisoner with a child, the woman that picked me up left me there and went away; she took me into an adjoining room, and wanted me to stay the night with her; I saw the door bolted, and there was no other person in the room but her and me, and after a little time I heard her rattling the watch-chain; I told her to be quiet, and let it alone; and a little after she jumped out of bed, and ran away out of the room; I pulled my breeches from under my pillow and the watch was gone; in coming down stairs, not being used to the stairs, I fell to the bottom, and bruised myself very much; I lost her and never saw her after, till she was taken up.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again? - A. No.

Q. Were you sober? - A. I was at that time; I had been drinking in the day, but I was perfectly sober at that time.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn. - On Sunday last, between eight and nine o'clock, the prosecutor came to me, and asked me if I knew one Poll Pardon; I said, yes; he desired me to take her, and Mumford and I went after her, on Monday, and took her, he knew her directly; when she was committed, she told Mr. Bond that she would produce the woman and the watch in Court when she was tried.

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I was with Treadway, and we apprehended the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-62

471. JANE COLSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , a pewter pint pot, value 10d. and a cotton window-curtain, value 1s. 6d. the property of George Buckley .

ELIZABETH BUCKLEY sworn. - I am the wife of George Buckley, a publican in St. John's-street-road, Clerkenwell : The prisoner at the bar came into our house in a shower of rain, and asked leave to stand up for the shower; she went into the parlour and brought out a few flowers, and asked if I would have them; I said she might leave them if she would; she desired Lydia Rhodes, my niece, to ask me to give her a drop of warm beer, which I did; as soon as she was gone, I missed a curtain, my niece went after her presently, there was a crowd about her, and somebody said she had been robbing somebody again; I looked into her basket,

and there I found a pint pot of mine, covered over with some rags.

LYDIA RHODES sworn. - Q. How old are you? - A. Going on eleven; I am the niece of Mrs. Buckley: On the 6th of this month, the prisoner was at our house, the curtain was missing, I went out after her, I told her she must come back; and she said, no, she knew what I wanted, and pulled the curtain out of her bosom; the constable has got it.(The constable produced the property, which was deposed to by Mrs. Buckley).

Prisoner's defence. It is the first time I ever did any thing amiss in my life; I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined Is.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-63

472. ELIZABETH ALLEN , EDWARD M'GLUE , and MARY M'GLUE , were indicted, the first, for that she, on the 30th of May in the King's highway, in and upon John Morson , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person a leather pocket-book, value 6d. nine Bank-notes of ten pounds each, value 90l. two Bank-notes of two pounds each, value 4l. and three Bank-notes of one pound each, value 3l. the property of the said John; and the other two prisoners, for being accessaries before the fact . They were charged in a Second Count as accessaries after the fact.(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners).

JOHN MORSON sworn. - I was at the Threetons in Turnmill-street , between twelve and one o'clock in the day-time, while I was getting a few pints of beer with the prisoner M'Glue; his wife came in with the prisoner Allen, several times, and whispered together; I pulled out my pocket-book and changed a twenty-shilling-note, and put my pocket-book up again; some time after Elizabeth Allen came in and took me by the collar, she pulled me out of the house across the street by force, and up an alley, called Rose-alley, and in the course of a minute or so, my pocket-book was gone.

Q. She was alone at this time? - A. Yes; I ran after her down the alley, and was crying out about my pocket-book, and I met with the prisoner M'Glue's wife; she said, what is the matter with you; and I told her I had been robbed of my pocket-book; and she asked what it contained; I told her ninety-six pounds; she told me to go over to another public-house opposite, that she pointed out to me, and call for a pint of beer, and I should get my pocket-book again, and then I should go down to their house to dinner.

Q. What was in your pocket-book? - A. Nine ten-pound notes, two two-pounds, and three ones.

Q. When you changed the twenty-shilling note did you see the other notes in your pocket-book at that time? - A. Yes; I did not count them, but they were all there I am certain; I had counted them the night before.

Q. How came you to have so much money? - A. It was a part of some stock in the Three per Cent. Consols, that I had come to town and sold out.

Q. Were they Bank of England notes? - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to carry so much about you? - A. I was about to return into Yorkshire the next day. I went to two officers, and she was apprehended in the course of a few hours afterwards.

Q. What did M'Glue do? - A. He put her up to my having that property about me, for she did not see me pull out the pocket-book, and he did; they were whispering one to another, but I did not take any paticular notice of their discourse.

Q. Have you ever seen the notes again? - A. No.

Q. What sort of a pocket-book was it? - A. A red one.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I suppose, as this was so early in the morning, you were perfectly sober? - A. Yes; I was so sober that I knew what I was about.

Q. Do you mean to say you were not at all disguised in liquor? - A. No way but what I knew what I was doing.

Q. How many hours had you then been drinking there? - A. I cannot tell.

Prisoner M'Glue. Five hours.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Will you swear you had not been there five hours? - A. I cannot say how long I had been.

Q. Then you cannot swear you had not been in this public-house five hours? - A. No.

Q. You have here spoken positively to Allen; did you never say you could not swear it was Allen? - A. No.

Q. Did you never say you could not tell the woman? - A. No; as soon as the officers brought her to me I swore to her directly.

Q. Did you never tell a person of the name of Thompson that you could not tell who the woman was? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Perhaps you were too drunk to know whether you did tell him so or not; you must recollect whether you did tell him so or not? - A. No; I am almost certain I did not.

Q. Will you swear you did not? - A. No, I will not swear to it; I am almost certain that I did not.

Q. Have you seen Thompson between the time

you were at the Justice's and this time? - A. Yes; several times.

Q. Did you never ask him to say that you told him who the woman was? - A. No, I never did.

Q. Did you never ask of him any think to this purpose, to give better evidence here than he did before the Justice? - A. I did not.

Q. Nor any thing at all of that sort? - A. Nothing at all of that sort.

Q. Do you recollect who you had been drinking with? - A. Yes; only with M'Glue.

Q. How many men were there in the same box? - A. Only M'Glue.

Q. That you swear, during the whole time you were there? - A. I will not swear to the whole time, but the greatest part of the time there was nobody else.

Q. People, very early in the morning, do not usually go to sleep when they are sober; did you happen to fall asleep over your liquor that morning? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you go to bed over night? -- A. Eleven o'clock.

Q. This was done in a very forcible manner; this woman laid hold of your collar, and dragged you quite out of the house? - A. Yes, across the street.

Q. How often did you cry out for help? - A. Not at all.

Q. Did you see the landlord and landlady there in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. At the time this outrageous woman was dragging you so by main-force away, you could not resist at all? - A. I could not get from her.

Q. Did you ever see the notes again? - A. No; they made away with them.

Q. Have you brought any body here to tell us that you were possessed of so much property? - A. No; I could have brought enough.

Jury. Q. Who was your broker that sold out this stock? - A. His name is Morris.

Court. Q. Did you write your name there? - A. Yes, in the Bank books.

Q. Was it a large room that you signed your name in, or a small one? - A. A large room.

Q. How much might you have drank? - A. Five pints between us, that I paid for, and afterwards two or three more, that was all we had.

Jury. Q. How came you acquainted with that man? - A. I was asking the way to Islington the night before, and met with a woman, and she took me to this M'Glue's house.

Q. How came you to meet with him in the morning? - A. I slept that night in the house.

Q. With this woman? - A. No, by myself; in the morning, I looked into my pocket-book, and found every thing right; when I came down stairs, Mrs. M'Glue said, have you lost any thing, I said, yes, a guinea and a half; she said, that woman that came along with me had got it, M'Glue and his wife were both in bed; I asked him the way to Islington, and he said he would get up and shew me, and I sent for a pot of beer, and when he was dressed, I went with him to the Three-tuns.

Q. Had you ever seen Elizabeth Allen before? - A. No; she was a perfect stranger entirely.

Q. Are you quite positive Elizabeth Allen is the person that took the money from you? - A. I have no doubt in the least about it.

Jury. Q. Did you see her take it? - A. No; I kept it inside my waistcoat, between the lining and the waistcoat for safeness; I found it go from me, and she ran away directly.

Court. Q. Had you ever been in London before? - A. Yes.

Prisoner M'Glue. Q. Did you ever pull your pocket-book out in my house? - A. No; only I looked at it in the morning, and said, it was all right, except the guinea and a half.

Court. Q. When you went back to the Threetuns, did you find M'Glue where you had left him? - A. Yes.

M'Glue. My wife came to me, and told me to come away, that I was getting drunk along with that man, and I struck her, that was the whispering, if there was any.

MARY BAKER sworn. - I keep the Three-tuns, in Turnmill-street; the prisoner M'Glue, and the prosecutor, came into my house at near ten o'clock in the morning, and called for a pint of ale; Morson asked for change for a two pound note, I could not give him change; they drank five pints of ale, and he offered me a one pound note, which I changed; Elizabeth Allen , and Mrs. M'Glue came in several times.

Jury. Q. Was any body else sitting in company with them? - A. There were people backwards and forwards, but nobody in their company.

Jury. Q. How many hours might they be there? - A. From ten till about two.

Court. Q. What did Elizabeth Allen, and Mrs. M'Glue do when they came in? - A. They came in and went out again, I did not see them do any thing.

Q. Did you see Morson go away? - A. I did not.

Q. Was he sober? - A. I cannot say, he was a stranger to me.

Q. Did Elizabeth Allen , and Mrs. M'Glue drink with them? - A. I am not sure whether they did or not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You know Mrs. M'Glue, as a person in your neighbourhood? - A. Yes; but she does not frequent my house lately till that morning.

Q. Did you hear any riot or disturbance in your house? - A. No.

Q. No dragging, or hawling, or scuffle between any people? - A. None at all.

Q. If it had, you would have done every thing to keep it quiet? - A. Certainly I should.

WILLIAM HALL sworn. - I am a watchman; I was in the public-house at the same time, drinking, Mr. M'Glue and this man were sitting together about twelve o'clock, when Mrs. Allen came in, and took him by his coat, and they went out at the door together, and in a very little space of time, Morson came in, and returned to the place from whence she had taken him, he sat down, and put his hand up to his head, and fell a crying; I asked him what was the matter, he said, he had been robbed of his pocket-book, and I asked him what it contained, and he said, ninety-six pounds, I then left him, that is all I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys Q. You say, Allen took him by the coat, did not the man seem to be as willing as willing as her to go out? - A. Yes.

Q. He went willingly on his part? - A. I do not know any thing to the contrary.

Q. If she had pulled him out by main force, and he had resisted, you must have seen it? - A. Yes.

HENRY FORD sworn. - The prosecutor on the 30th of May came up to the Police Office in Hatton-garden, about five o'clock, and said he had been robbed; I went down to the Three-tuns, in Turnmill-street, with the prosecutor and another officer, there we saw Edward M'Glue in the taproom, we took him in custody into the parlour, and searched him, upon him I found a dollar, four shillings, two sixpences, and three-pence three farthings in copper; I then went in search of his wife, and Elizabeth Allen, and I believe it was about half past six, coming up the same street again, just at the end of Peter-street, I heard a voice say, Ford, do you want me? I turned round and saw the prisoner Allen, I said, yes, I do, Bett, you must go with me; says she, I heard you wanted me; before we came up to the Three-tuns door, I met with Mrs. M'Glue, I told her, she likewise must go with me, she refused, but I told her she must, and then she went, I took them both into the Three-tuns, and in the kitchen I searched Mary M'Glue, and on her I found a huswife, with some duplicates in it, an old pocket-book, with some duplicates, and a bad shilling, but nothing else on her; by that time, one of my brother officers, Rose, had come down to the Three-tuns, we found some silver upon her, but no notes; I went the next day to enquire about the notes to the broker that had sold out for him, and got the number of the notes, since that, there has been two of the notes come in, but we have not been able to trace them any further than one of the notes had got wrote upon the back, No. 20, but we cannot tell where, we had been about a great deal, but have not been able to trace any one of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe, in fact, you had enquired in the neighbourhood after Allen? - A. No; I had been in quest of her.

Q. It had been noised about? - A. Yes.

Q. Then, instead of your finding out Allen, she found you out? - A. Yes.

Q. She might have escaped from you, if she had not called out to you? - A. I should not have seen her.

Q. You have never been able to trace any of these notes to Allen? - A. No.

Q. I believe Allen subpoened you? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn. - I know nothing more than apprehending the parties; I told the prosecutor to be particular, and asked him if these were the people that robbed him, he said, that is her, pointing to Allen.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. It was known at the public-house, that she had been charged? - A. Yes.

M'Glue. Q. Was not I very much in liquor when you took me? - A. Yes.

M'Glue. Q. Was not Morson drunk? - A. Yes, more so than you were; Allen, before the Magistrate, charged you with picking his pocket of a guinea and a half.

M'Glue's defence. The prosecutor never produced any pocket-book in the public-house at all, I never saw any such thing; after he had got it changed, he said, I will go; I went to another box, and played at shove halfpenny with a great many people while he was gone; Mrs. Baker does not say she saw any pocket-book, and I could not form any idea of robbing a man that I never knew had any property.

Mrs. M'Glue's defence. I saw Morson and M'Glue smoaking their pipes together, and I begged of him to come home, and he gave me a punch in the face; sometime afterwards, I saw this man a crying, I asked him what was the matter, and he said, he had lost all his property, knowing he had been in company with M'Glue, I desired him to go back, and try if he could hear any thing of it; I never saw Bett Allen at all, and he would not have known the public-house again if I had not taken him there.

Allen's defence. I went into the house for a pint of beer, and the prosecutor asked me to have some ale, and I said, I had rather not, and that man, the watchman, said, if it was gin, I could drink it; the prosecutor was very much in liquor, and he asked me if I could accomodate him with a place to sleep in, he was reeling about the street very

drunk; I left him, and some time after, I was coming up the street, and I was told that Mr. Ford wanted me, that a man had been robbed of 500l. and I went to Mr. Ford, and tapped him on the shoulder, and asked him, and he said, yes, he did want me, and I was taken into custody; he was so intoxicated that he would have sworn to any woman.

For the Prisoners.

RICHARD THOMPSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are a soldier, quartered at Mr. Baker's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the man who says he lost these notes? - A. Yes, by sight; I came off duty that very day.

Q. Did he give you any account of Allen, or the way in which he had lost them? - A. No; Mr. Morson, and M'Glue were standing in our taproom, and his wife along with him; Morson was lying with his head on the table asleep, very much in liquor, and M'Glue said, come drink; Morson said he could not drink any more; M'Glue said, will you have some gin, he said he could not drink any more; then Betty Allen came in for a quartern of liquor, and he went out after her, he came back again in a quarter of an hour, and said, he was robbed; he was asked how much he was robbed of, and he said, ninety-six pounds; I asked him if he knew the person that robbed him; he said, no, I do not know her; there were some people in the house that mistrusted he had not lost this property, and they qustioned him, and they found by his talk, that he had lost it; says I, I shall come off duty again to-morrow, and if you will convince me that you have lost this money, I will find the parties that you were in company with; he said, he could not tell the person that robbed him, nor he could not tell the house that he went into.

Q. Did he describe that he went into a house with the prisoner? - A. Yes; he said, he had gone halfway up stairs.

Q. Are you sure he described himself to have gone half-way up stairs with the person who took the property from him? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you had any conversation with him since you were before the Justice? - A. No, none at all.

Jury. Q. Did he give you to understand, that it was the woman he went out with that robbed him? - A. No.

The prisoner Allen called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Elizabeth Allen GUILTY (Aged 25.)

Of stealing the goods, but not violently.

Transported for seven years .

Edward M'Glue, NOT GUILTY .

Mary M'Glue, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The LORD CHIEF BAROS.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17970712-64

473. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for that he, having been convicted as an incorrigible rogue, afterwards, that is so say, on the 30th of May , did in like manner offend again as a rogue and vagabond, for that he, on the said day was apprehended, and at the time when he was so apprehended, unlawfully and feloniously had about his person, one crow and seven picklock keys, being implements of house-breaking . (The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES REEVES sworn. - (Produces a copy of the record of the conviction of John Hughes , by which he was adjudged a vagabond in December Sessions, in the 34th year of the King). I got it from Mr. Selby, the Clerk of the Peace, at Clerkenwell; I examined it with the original record, it is a true copy.

Mr. Ward. Q. Did you see the Clerk of the Peace sign it? - A. I did.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you an examined copy of the record, by which he was adjudged an incorrigible rogue? - A. Yes; I had it from Mr. Selby, I saw him sign it. (It is read).

JOHN WOODWARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. - I was servant at the House of Correction in 1792.

Q. Did you ever attend the prisoner at the bar, at the Sessions? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you know whether he was ever in your custody in 1792? - A. Yes; I am very clear of it.

Q. You have the warrant of the Justice's in Queen-square? - A. Yes. (Produces it.)

Q. Is that the same man that was committed to your care? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of him after he was committed by Mr. Pye? - A. He served his time out, and was discharged.

Q. Was he ever committed into your custody after that? - A. Yes, by Mr. Conant and Mr. Scott, on the 5th of December, 1793. (Produces the warrant). Sometime after he had the judgment of the Sessions, he received a pardon.

HENRY CROCKER sworn. - I am an officer: On the 30th of May, about twenty minutes after two o'clock in the morning, I was going up and down different streets in our parish, near Fitzroy-square, along with Keighley, and in Russell-place, I saw a man walking very fast; I went up and saw Hughes, and seized him immediately, and Keighley came up in an instant, and hold him fast by the hand while I searched his pocket on the spot; he had a great coat on, and a coat under that; in his coat pocket I found a brace of pistols, these picklock keys, seven of them, an iron crow, a dark lanthorn, some matches and phosphorus. (Produces them).

Court. Q. Were the pistols loaded? - A. Yes; with powder and ball; Keighley and I put him in the watch-house, and brought him to Bow street.

ARTHUR KEICHLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was with Crocker on the 30th of May; Crocker and I were taking a walk round the streets; about twenty minutes after two, Crocker saw a man walking quick, he stepped across and said, d-n you, Jack, is that you, I know you; I thought from that it must be some thief; I immediately jumped across, laid hold of his wrist, and Crocker took these things from out of his pockets.

Prisoner's defence. I found these articles tied up in a handkerchief, which Crocker took out of my pocket when I was apprehended.

GUILTY , (Aged 44.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-65

474. WILLIAM GREENWITH was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Dewdney , about the hour of nine in the forenoon of the 7th of July , the said William, and others of his family being therein, and stealing a gold bracelet-buckle, value 3s. and a pair of stone bracelets, value 3s. the property of the said William.

WILLIAM DEWDNEY swron. - I keep a perfumer and jeweller's shop , in Fleet-street : On the 7th of this month, about nine o'clock in the morning, an alarm was given by a lad belonging to the Courier office, that two people were cutting our window, I looked through the glass door, and saw the prisoner at the window; I missed the things directly as the boy was taken into custody; I examined the window, and the glass was broke about the size of a crown piece, these things had laid close to the hole.

Q. What is the value of them? - A. About six shillings.

EDWARD - sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. Dewdney: Yesterday week, a little after nine, a lad came to our house and gave the information that two people were cutting our glass, I was in the work-shop, at the back of the shop; I went out and saw the prisoner standing near the broken square of glass; I had seen the window at eight o'clock, when I opened shop, it was perfectly found then; I charged the prisoner with breaking the window.

Q. What was he doing? - A. Standing looking up and down Fleet-street, and in at the shop door; I laid hold of him, and he was taken before the constable, and searched, but we found none of our property upon him.

CHARLES BARTLETT sworn. - Yesterday week I saw the prisoner and another coming up Fleet-street; they stopped at Mr. Vale's, the persumer's, a few minutes, they saw somebody in the shop, and came away again; then they went up to Mr. Dewdney's, they were walking backwards and forwards from the picture-shop and thereabouts, near an hour; I saw the other that was with him, run his hand along the glass several times, I do not know what he did, the prisoner stood before him all the while he did it; I saw that, and ran down stairs directly; I went over to Mr. Dewdney's, and saw there was a hole cut in the window, and I informed Mr. Dewdney of it.

Prisoner's defence. I was going along about my business; I happened to stop looking at some rings in the window, when they laid hold of me; they know I was by myself.

GUILTY. Death .(Aged 14.)

He was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his youth.

Tried by the London Jury, before The LORD CHIFF BARON.

Reference Number: t17970712-66

475. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of June , a silk handkerchief, value 6d. the property of a certain person unknown.

ROBERT DAWSON sworn. - I am one of the officers of the Marshalsea Court: On the 27th of June, I saw the prisoner, and several others, in Fleet-street, attempting to pick the pockets of several persons; at length, one gentleman they had followed a considerable distance, and just as he had crossed over Fetter-lane, the prisoner, covered by the others, took this handkerchief out of his pocket, he was going towards Fetter-lane, one of them was before the gentleman, and turned round in the gentleman's face, and the other two behind the prisoner; to prevent any body seeing it, he concealed it under his left arm pit; I took him before Sir William Plomer ; one of them was dressed like a servant, in a blue livery trimmed with silver lace.

Prisoner's defence. The handkerchief is my own.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-67

476. WILLIAM BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a gold chain necklace, value 1l. the property of John Benjamin Cole , privately in his shop .

JOHN BENJAMIN COLE sworn. - A. I was from home at the time of the robbery.

Mrs. COLE sworn. - The prisoner came into my shop on the 13th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, and asked for some gold drops; I took out a parcel to shew him some, I took out two pair; he seemed to make choice of one, I took all the rest away; he then asked to look at some gold rings; I left them on the counter while I went round to the other counter to shew him the

gold rings; I took out half-a-dozen, and he seemed to object to them, he said they were not well made, they were not round; I told him I had none better made; and then he said, they were not the size; I went to get out some more, and, I suppose, at that time he took the gold chain; he said, I must send them to No. 7; I asked him where No. 7, was; he seemed a great deal agitated, and not knowing where it was himself; he said, it is over the way, and immediately went away; I missed the chain immediately after he was gone, I ran out to the shop-door, and saw him running up Barbican, I called out stop thief, Mr. Hayward, a neighbour, ran after me; I told him that was the man in the brown coat, and he was brought back, but nothing was found upon him.

WILLIAM HAYWARD sworn. - I live opposite Mr. Cole, in Barbican: I saw Mrs. Cole run out to the door in a hurry, she desired me to follow that man in the brown coat; I pursued him till he was caught.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Clerkenwellgreen when I was stopped, I never had been in the shop at all; I was armourer on board the Middlesex East-Indiaman, since that, I have been to America, and one voyage to the West-Indies.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 37.)

Tried by the London Jury, before The LORD CHIEF BARON.

Reference Number: t17970712-68

477. ANN LANGDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , a diaper table-cloth, value 4s. the property of Mary Hargrave , widow .

LUCY CALDERWOOD sworn. - I am servant to Mrs. Mary Hargrave, a publican : About eight o'clock, on the 8th of this month, I waited in the parlour, and the table-cloth was then on the table, at supper; about half past eleven I removed it from the table and put it upon the bar-door; it was not missed till the next morning.

ELIZABETH GARNER sworn. - The table-cloth was missing on the Sunday, and I suspected the prisoner; I went to the pawnbroker, Mr. Patmore's, upon Ludgate-hill, and there I found it; the prisoner and her husband were both at our house that evening.

Q. (To Calderwood.) Did you see the prisoner and her husband there? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did the husband leave the house? - A. I did not see him leave the house.

CHARLES SALMON sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Patmore, (produces the table-cloth); the prisoner at the bar brought it to us on the 10th of this month, she told me it was her own. (The cloth was deposed to by Lucy Calderwood.)

Prisoner's defence. My husband drives a dust-cart, he found it amongst some rubbish and dirt, and I pledged it.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Reference Number: t17970712-69

478. WILLIAM BLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , a linen handkerchief, value 10d. the property of Lewis Davies .

LEWIS DAVIES sworn. - On the 2d of June, I lost my handkerchief out of my pocket in the Old-Bailey ; there was a crowd of people, and a lady going into a coach, I was looking at the lady, and missed my handkerchief; I turned round and saw the prisoner with his back towards me, going away, and the corner of my handkerchief hanging out of his pocket; I immediately secured him.( Thomas Tinley , the constable, produced the handkerchief, which was deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I picked up the handkerchief, I did not take it out of his pocket.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before The LORD CHIEF BARON.

Reference Number: t17970712-70

479. HENRY GRAY was indicted for that he, on the 30th of June , unlawfully did force, and put his right-hand into the coat-pocket of John Avery , against the will of the said John, with intention the goods and chattels of the said John feloniously to steal, take, and carry away .

JOHN AVERY sworn. - I am an organ-builder , in St. Martin's Church-yard, Westminster: On Friday, the 30th of June, I was walking through Fleet-street , near Temble-bar, in company with Mr. Ribbons, and about a foot or two before I got to Temple-bar, I felt a man's hand in my pocket; I instantly turned round and caught hold of it, my handkerchief was in his hand, and about three, parts hanging out of my pocket; I turned round, and said to Mr. Ribbons, here is a rascal has got his hand in my pocket, and I secured him; this is the handkerchief. (Produces it.)

JAMES RIBBONS sworn. - I was walking in company with Mr. Avery on Friday fe'nnight, in the evening, when he turned round, and said, here is a d-d rascal picking my pocket; I turned round, and he had got hold of the prisoner; upon that, we took him to the watch-house.

Mr. Avery. I enquired into his character, and found it so much against him that I determined to pursue the prosecution.

Prisoner. I have had a bad character, but I work very hard for my living now.

GUILTY (Aged 49.)

Confined six months in Newgate .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-71

480. WILLIAM ATHILL was indicted for that he, on the 18th of February , unlawfully, unjustly, and for the sake of wicked lucre and gain, did receive, and have, from a certain person, thirteen pounds and four ounces of raw silk, value 9l. 58. 6d. the property of the East India Company , knowing it to have been stolen .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Knapp, and the case opened by Mr. Rous).

ROBERT COMMES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am one of the Police-officers of Lambeth-street: On the 18th of February, between four and five in the afternoon, in consequence of an information, I went, in company with Richard Perry, to No. 3, Saunder's-street, Widegate-alley, Bishopsgate-street, it was the house of Debbenham; I waited an hour, or an hour and a half, when I saw Mr. Athill go in, I did not see who let him in; I staid immediately opposite the door till he came out, which was in about a quarter of an hour; when the door was opened, he stood in the passage, and flung this bag over his shoulder, and came out,(produces it); I followed him into Bishopsgate-street, and he turned into a Pork-shop, purchased a little bit of pork, tied it in his handkerchief, and went towards home; I followed him a few yards, and took him into custody; I told him I wanted to know what he had in that bag; he said, some silk that he was going to carry to the throwster's; he said it was his own property, and he would punish me for taking him into custody; I then called a coach, and took him to the office, with the silk; I went back to Debbenham's house, and searched, but found nothing; Debbenham denied ever knowing Mr. Athill, or seeing him; I took him into custody, and he was admitted an evidence for the Crown. This is the silk, I have had it ever since, it contains thirteen pounds and a quarter of silk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. This man whom you watched into Debbenham's, staid there about a quarter of an hour? - A. Yes.

Q. After that he came out? - A. Yes.

Q. And took the bag upon his shoulders? - A. Yes.

Q. Afterwards when you attacked him and asked what he had there, he immediately said it was silk, he was carrying to the throwster's? - A. Yes.

Q. And he said he would punish you for what you were about? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not take him back to Debbenham's house, that they might see one another? - A. No; I took him to the office.

RICHARD PERRY sworn. - I was with Robert Coomes: On Saturday the 18th of February, I saw Mr. Athill go into Sandys-street, to Debbenham's house, he remained there about a quarter of an hour, he had nothing with him, when he went in, he came out with this bag, I saw him throw it over his shoulders, and come into the street; we then followed him into Widegate-alley, where he bought some pork, and then Coomes took him into custody.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am one of the officers belonging to Lambeth-street; I went, on Saturday the 18th of February, with Smith, to No. 3, Old Montague-street, Whirechapel; Mr. Athill's house we searched, and in the one pair of stairs room we found a great quantity of silk of the same kind with this, some in a closet, some in a drawer, and different colours besides.

Q. Had you any other reason to know that this was Athill's house, but from the information you had received? - A. Nothing more.

Q. What time was it? - A. About eight o'clock in the evening, after Mr. Athill was brought to the office.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Mr. Athill is a weaver, is not he? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. How many looms did you find in the house? - A. I did not observe any, I was not in every room; I was informed there were some looms, but I did not see them, I had the care of a great many things.

EDWARD SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Rous. I was with Griffiths; Mr. Athill called me, after he was locked up at the office, and after the officers were gone, and said, you have not got the key where the silk is, and he then gave me the key of a closet up one pair of stairs; he said, up one pair of stairs, behind the bed, there is a little closet, and this key will open it; I opened the closet and found this silk, there was no loom in that room.

Q. Did you go into any other room? - A. I went into the kitchen and the parlour, but there was no loom there.

Q. How many rooms on a floor are there? - A. Two below, and I believe but one up stairs.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know Debbenham? - A. Yes, perfectly; I am superintendant of the Bengal Warehouses, in New-street, Bishopsgate-street; Debbenham was employed in those warehouse up to the time that he was apprehended, and has been for several years, ever since the year 1791.

Q. Look at that silk, and tell us if that is the sort of silk that the India-Company have in their

warehouses? - A. It is, exactly; it is Bengal raw silk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. There is a vast deal of it in different shops that have bought of the Company? - A. Yes, no doubt.

Q. It is a sort of silk, which the officers sometimes bring over for themselves? - A. I do not know.

Court. Q. All you know is, that that is like the silk that the Company import? - A. Yes.

Q. And nobody else imports it from Bengal? - A. No.

CHARLES DEBBENHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Rous. I lice in Sandys-street, Widegate-alley; I have worked at the Bengal warehouses, in New-street, twelve or thirteen years.

Q. Do you know Mr. Athill? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What is he? - A. I believe he is a weaver, he came to me, on the 18th of February, for some Bengal raw silk, which I got from the Company's warehouses.

Q. How did you get it from the warehouses? - A. When I could find the best opportunity, I unpinned the lugs of the bale, and brought it away in my hat and breeches.

Q. Did he know where you got it from? - A. He knew I worked at the warehouses, and he knew it was stolen; I had often told him of the danger I was in, in getting the silk; in the year 1793, when I was about to leave the warehouses, he asked me how I got the silk, and I told him I would not tell him.

Q. What was the price that he had paid you for the silk? - A. Latterly, ten shillings per pound; he used to give me eleven and six-pence before, there were thirteen pounds and a quarter of this; he gave me a receipt in part of payment for three hundred pounds that I had borrowed of him upon a note of hand.

Court. Q. How long ago was that given? - A. Sometime before Chirstmas.

Q. How much remains due now? - A. Two hundred and six pounds, I owe him now.

Q. Have you paid him any of it in money? - A. No, I have paid it in silk.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. How long have you been in these warehouses? - A. Twelve of thirteen years.

Q. And a thief all the time? - A. Yes; except ten months when I was in the country.

Q. And you owe this poor fellow two hundred and odd pounds? - A. Two hundred and six pounds.

Q. When was it that the officers paid you a visit at your house? - A. On the 18th of February in the evening.

Q. You heard that poor Athill was in custody? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Thief as you had been all that time, the Company did not chuse to prosecute you? - A. NO.

Q. Do you know the reason of that? - A. No.

PETER CORBETT sworn. Examined by Mr. Rous. Q. You have been many years in the service of the East-India Company? - A. Upwards of fifty years.

Q. Do you know Bengal silk? - A. Yes.

Q. Be so good as look at that? - A. This is the kind of Bengal silk, of which I have now many hundred weight under my care.

Q. What is the value of it? - A. From thirteen to fourteen shillings the small pound.

Q. (To Coomes.) Is this silk thirteen pound four ounces by the great or small pound? - A. By the great pound.

Court. (To Debbenham.) Q. Do you know when Mr. Athill was taken into custody? - A. About half an hour after he left my house, Coomes and Perry came and apprehended me, they told me he was in custody.

Court. Q. You were not at home, when Mr. Athill had this silk? - A. Yes, I was, I weighed it myself, and delivered it to him, he always called twice a week of an evening for silk.

Q. Had you any other silk in the house at the time he called? - A. No; he had all except two skains, and that the officers did not find; I had it all from the Bengal warehouses.

Q. How much did you use to bring at a time? - A. Three or four pounds.(Mr. Fielding addressed the Jury in an animated speech, in behalf of the Defendant.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-72

481. MARGARET LONAY was indicted for that she, on the 12th of June , a piece of false and counterfeit money to the likeness of a shilling, unlawfully did utter to Edward Isaac Henman .(The case was opened by Mr. Ward.)

EDWARD ISAAC HENMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Ward. I live at No. 26 Duke-street, Aldgate ; I am a fish salesman , at Bilingsgate: In the afternoon of the 12th of June last, about four or five o'clock, the prisoner came for some mackarel, and asked the price, I told her thirty-two shillings per hundred; she said, can I have fifteen for three shillings, which I acceded to; it is customary in the market, to receive the money, prior to telling the mackarel up, she immediately put me down two good shillings, and two bad sixpences; immediately upon receipt of which, I observed to her, here is a very bad sixpence; before she had an opportunity to give me another sixpence in lieu of that, I discovered that the other sixpence was a bad

one, I gave it her back, and she gave me a bad shilling for them; I turned round, caught her by the arm, and told her, from the state of the money that she had in her hand, she certainly had a quantity about her; she said, "sure, how could she be getting that money, she could not tell;" there was a great crowd about, she ran away, and left her cloak behind her, she was called to come back, but did not, she was then pursued and taken.

JOHN BAILEY sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Selby, in Billingsgate-market: On the 12th of June last, I saw the prisoner run away from Billingsgate, I followed her, and in the way picked up six shiland sixpence that laid on the ground, and a bit of rag laying by it, between two empty casks; the constable has had it part of the time, I had it from him, (produces it): there are two shillings, and the left in sixpences.

- BOLLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Ward. I am a constable; this is the money I gave back to Bailey; I searched her, and found some good silver upon her, but none bad.

Q. (To Henman). Have you had this shilling ever since? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Ward. I am a silversmith.

Q. Look at that shilling, (the one she gave the prosecutor), is it a good one or a counterfeit? - A. It is a counterfeit.

Q. Look at that six shillings and sixpence? - A. They are all bad.

Prisoner's defence. I took that shilling for a good one; I work very hard, I never dealt in such a thing in my life; what made me run away was, that he he told me, if I did not run away, he would throw me into the river.

GUILTY .

Confined six months in Newgate , and find sureties for her good behaviour for six months more.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-73

482. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for having obtained, on the 3d of March , under false pretences, 3lbs. weight of nutmegs, value 4l. the property of Abraham Newman and William Thwaites .

WILLIAM HODGSON sworn. - I am warehouseman to Abraham Newman and William Thwaites, grocers , in Fenchurch-street: On the 3d of March, the prisoner brought an order in writing, and gave it me, I looked at it, and said, you want three pounds of nutmegs for Beacherost and Company, he said, yes; I told him to go over the way to the accompting-house, and get a bill of parcels for them, which he did; he went over the way, and Mr. Thwaites was in the accompting-house; Mr. Thwaites asked him what his name was, and he said his name was John Brown; he came back again to the warehouse, and I weighed him the nutmegs; he then went away.

Q. Who are Messrs. Beachcroft and Company? - A. Beachcroft, Sockett and Company, I believe they live at Queenhithe.

The orler read. - Gentlemen, Please to send to Beachcroft and Co. 3lbs of fine nutmegs, and you will oblige, for Beachcroft and Co. S. Smith.

Q. Who is Smith? - A. I do not know.

Q. It is not addressed to your house? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Do not you know Beachcroft's hand writing? - A. No.

Q. Were they customers of your's? - A. Yes.

Q. You did not give him the nutmegs, did you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he take them away? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect what the words were that he said? - A. He did not say any thing, but gave me that order.

WILLIAM THWAITES sworn. - Q. Upon what ground did you deliver him these nutmegs, in consequence of what he said, or in consequence of the note? - A. In consequence of both; when he first came into me, he said he was sent from the warehouse, to have a bill of parcels of them; I then asked him, why should Beachcroft and Company send for three pounds of nutmegs; he said, because they wanted some large ones for shipping; I then asked him what his name was, and he told me it was John Brown, upon which the bill of parcels was given him.

Q. What is your partnership? - A. No other person has any interest in the business but Mr. Abraham Newman.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. If this man had come without this written paper, you would not have delivered them? - A. No

Q. Then it was only in consequence of his bringing that paper, that you delivered the goods? - A. I should not without asking a great many questions.

Court. Q. It was both together that induced you to deliver them? - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17970712-74

483. WILLIAM JONES was again indicted for an attempt to commit a fraud .

WILLIAM THWAITES sworn. - On the 10th of June, the prisoner brought another order, and presented to Mr Hodgson, and he called me.

WILLIAM HONGSON sworn. - The prisoner brought this order to me for some moist-sugar for Mr. James, Mr. James did not deal regularly with us; I looked at him, and knew him to be the man

that had the nutmegs from us; I went over to Mr. Thwaites, and he was taken into custody.

Q. Are you sure that is the man? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. At the time he came with this he made the same sort of story, did not be? - A. No.

Q. Did not he say he was sent by those people? - A. He said, afterwards, that he lived with Mr. James.

Q. But suppose you had not discovered the fraud, would you have given the property to him unless he had added that he was the servant of Mr. James? - A. No, I do not know that I should; Mr. James having no account at our house made me suspect it the more.

THOMAS JAMES sworn. - I am a grocer in St. Thomas's, Southwark.

Q. Look at that paper; did you send it? - A. I did not.

Q. Nor you do not know any thing of it? - A. No, not till Mr. Thwaites sent to me.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes; I have known him between two and three years, he was servant to me about a year and a half ago.

KELLY sworn. - I am a constable: The prisoner acknowledged that he wrote this note himself.

Jury. (To James.) Q. Do you think this is the prisoner's hand-writing? - A. I think it is.

Mr. Alley. Gentlemen, I am sure I should but insult you and the Court, by saying that there has not been an attempt to commit a fraud in this case; I will content myself with calling the witnesses to the character of the prisoner, and that, I am sure, will be the best way of appealing to the mercy of the Court.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined three months in Newgate .

Tried by the London Jury, before

Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: s17970712-1

The SESSIONS being ended the COURT proceded to GIVE JUDGEMENT as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 14.

William Humphreys ,

William Greenwith ,

George Pell ,

John Haines ,

Edward Burton ,

William Barker ,

James Saunders ,

David Ferrel ,

Patrick Keough ,

John Tann ,

Thomas Gregory ,

Henry Ives ,

John Purdy , and

Thomas Davis .

Transported for fourteen years. - 1. Samuel Joseph .

Transported for seven years - 19.

Stafford Lett ,

John Everard ,

Mary Catherine Buckley ,

Thomas Dawdon ,

Elizabeth Allen ,

John Holmes ,

Robert Williams ,

Gabriel Guignery ,

Ann Thompson ,

James Anderson ,

Mary Bryan ,

Thomas Lingham ,

Thomas Kennedy ,

John Bailey ,

Sarah Draper ,

John Holmes ,

Charles Carthy ,

John Hughes ,

Ann Dillon , and

Confined one year in Newgate, and fined 1s. - 7.

Joseph Hately ,

Joseph Smith ,

William Thackery ,

Joseph Brown ,

Jane Colson ,

John Rimes , and

John Barret .

Confined six months in the House of Correction, and fined 1s. - 8.

Elizabeth Bosford ,

William Raine ,

William Emerton ,

John Cless ,

James Tippet ,

Sarah Verrall ,

James Lowther , and

Daniel Daly .

Confined six months in Newgate - 1. Henry Gray .

confined three months in Newgate - 1. William Jones .

Publickly whipped, and confined in Newgate one month - 3.

John M'Foy , Daniel Woodward , and James Atkins .

Privately whipped - 1. John Jones .


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