Old Bailey Proceedings, 30th November 1796.
Reference Number: 17961130
Reference Number: f17961130-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD-BAILEY, On WEDNESDAY the 30th of NOVEMBER, 1796, and the following Days, BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable BROOK WATSON, Esq.

LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MARSOM & RAMSEY, AND Published by Authority.

LONDON:

Printed and published by W. WILSON, No. 15, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1796.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, &c.

BEFORE BROOK WATSON, Esq. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; Sir RICHARD PERRYN Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; and Sir NASH GROSE, Knight, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

William Sturch ,

John Robertson ,

Stephen Twycross ,

Alexander Mackey ,

William Nurse ,

Jos. Falkner ,

James Jones ,

William Jackson ,

William Dew ,

James Sanger ,

Robert Bolton ,

Joshua Johnston ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Dodd ,

William Kelman ,

Henry Mucklow ,

Richard Hughes ,

Robert Harris ,

John Jackson ,

Robert Plumb ,

James Austin ,

John Staples ,

Philip Chrispus Smith ,

Edward Akers ,

Benjamin Saunders ,

London Jury.

Mathew Goodenough ,

William Howe ,

Joseph Harris ,

Josiah Roberts ,

Robert White ,

John Robert ,

Thomas Ord ,

William Lambert ,

William Randle ,

John Heaps ,

John Sanders ,

James Cross .

Reference Number: t17961130-1

1. JOHN HOLLERDAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , twelve desert knives, value 5s. and twelve desert forks, value 3s. the property of Richard Minns .

RICHARD MINNS sworn. - I am a cutler , at No. 24, Drury-lane: On Saturday, the 5th of November, Mr. Turner, a witness here, was offered a set of knives and forks, my property, by Mary August ; on the next day, Sunday, he came to my house and informed me of it, and I went to his house in Tothil-street, Westminster, and saw them; Mr. Turner has them in his possession, he has kept them ever since; I lost them out of a shew-glass in my shop, I did not miss them till they were produced to me, I then examined, and found they were missing; they are knives and forks with my own name on them.

THOMAS TURNER sworn. - I am a cutler, I know the prisoner; a woman that is now in custody, brought this dozen of knives and forks to me to sell, on the 5th of November, about a quarter after twelve; I opened the paper, and asked her how she came by them, she said, a young man made her a present of them; I saw the name of Minns upon them; I knew Mr. Minns, and thought they were stole from him; I told her she should not have them again till she brought the young man, she went away, and I saw no more of her; I went to Mr. Minns's house, on Sunday, to know if he had lost any knives and forks, he was not at home; I took them back again, and he came to my house in about an hour, and saw them; I have kept them to this time; the next day, Mon day morning, the prisoner came to work, he turned a wheel for Mr. Minns; Mr. Minns got an officer and took him into custody, and brought him to me, and asked if I knew where to find the woman who brought the knives, I did, and they were both taken into custody.

Mary August, the principal witness, not appearing, the prisoner was found

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-2

2. GEORGE DUCKHAM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Smith , on the 15th of September , about the hour of three in the night, and feloniously stealing twenty pair of iron spurs, plated with silver, value 3l. one iron spur, plated with silver, value 1s. and one dog whip, value 1s. the property of the said Joseph Smith in his dwelling-house .(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner).

JOSEPH SMITH sworn. - I am a sadler , No. 49, Long-lane, Smithfield , my house was broke open between Thursday night the 15th of September, and Friday morning; some draymen, passing by between five and six in the morning, rang the bell, and told me I was robbed, I immediately got up.

Q. Was it light then? - A. Yes, It was a little light; I found a great hole in the window-shutter, in the front of the shop window, and a great quantity of plated spurs, and a dog-whip gone, they were hanging up in the window; the hole was right opposite to where they hung; the piece taken out was large enough for any man to put his hand in; on Monday the 24th of October, as I was coming down Newington-causeway, I saw some spurs on the outside of a shop-window, exposed to sale, at one Mr. Kingsford's, there were three pair, and three odd ones.

Q. What was the quantity you missed? - A. I cannot tell, I suppose about four or five and twenty pair; they were iron spurs, plated with silver.

Q. Who was the last person up the night before your house was broke open? - A. My wife, she is not here; I saw the shutters up at ten o'clock the night before, it was all safe then.

Q. From the situation of the house, have you reason to believe, they did any more than take the spurs out of that hole? - A. No.

Q. Did they hang close to the window? - A. Quite close to the glass; the thickness of the window and shutter was about four inches; the constable has got the three pair of spurs, and the three odd ones; Mr. Kingsford led me to the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You found these at Mr. Kingsford's house? - A. Yes.

Q. He keeps that sort of reputable place, called an old iron shop? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you ask him if he had any more, and he denied having any more, and you afterwards found more? - A. I asked him the price of the pair, he asked me 3s. 6d.; I saw another pair, and asked him the price of them; I asked if he had any more, he said, no, only some odd ones.

Q. Did you find any more? - A. No.

RICHARD KINGSFORD sworn. - I am an ironmonger and broker, No. 9, Newington-causeway.

Q. Did you ever see Smith the prosecutor? - A. Not before he came to me; I cannot recollect the day he came; as near as I can recollect, it was an hour after dinner; he came to the door, and saw some spurs I had had near a fortnight; he took down a pair of spurs, and asked me what the price of them were, I told him the price of them; he asked me if I had any more; there were two pair more hanging at the door; he took them in his hand, and asked me if I had any more, I said, only for a odd ones; he took them in his hand, and said they were his property, he could shew me the fellows of the odd ones; he said they were taken from his shop, and asked me if I knew who I had them of; I said, I did, and he desired me to keep them till the morrow, and he would bring the odd ones; on the morrow, about dinner time, he brought the odd ones, and asked me to go with him, and show him the person I had them of; I went with him to Duckham's, he was not at home, we waited till he came home; I asked him how he did, he said, I don't know, somebody here has got me in custody; I desired him to come down to my house, he did, with the officer; I pulled the spurs out of my pocket, and said, these spurs you left with me a fortnight ago, I can get nobody to buy them, they are spoiling with me, I will give them back to you, he took them up; his wife came and said, my dear, you know nothing about these spurs; he put them down again, and said, no, I know nothing about them.

Court. Q. These are the spurs you received from him? - A. Yes; the same as the constable had, I had of him.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner on any other occasion, but this? - A. Not on any occasion like this; he worked for me some time.

Q. What did you give him for them? - A. I did not purchase them at all; I took them to sell for him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I know perfectly well you know this man, he is a brass and iron sender-maker, is not he? - A. Yes.

Q. You never had any thing of him of the like of this before? - A. No; nothing but what he made himself.

Q. What shop do you keep? - A. An ironmonger and broker's.

Q. An old iron-shop? - A. No; I am rather in the new way, I have a little old.

Q. If I was to ask for an old iron-shop, they would direct me to you, I suppose? - A. No, they would not.

Q. Will you swear it does not go by the name of an old iron-shop? - A. No.

Q. Don't you know it is called an old iron shop, have not you heard it so called-are you dumb all at once? - A. I do not deal in old iron.

Q. Don't you know that it is? - A. I tell you it is not called an old iron shop.

Q. Don't you know that is called an old iron-shop? - A. It may be called an old iron-shop, but not in the common way.

Q. Don't you know that it is called an old iron-shop, in your own neighbourhood? - A. I cannot say that it is called an old iron-shop.

Q. Don't you know that it is called an old iron-shop; there is some good reason, I suppose, for holding back an answer, don't you know old iron-shops get a bad character for receiving goods? - A. I believe so.

Q. Was any body present when you had these spurs from Duckham? - A. Yes, my wife.

Q. Is she here? - A. No.

Q. Do you deal in spurs? - A. I never bought a pair of new spurs in my life.

Q. This is the first time? - A. These were not bought.

Q. Have you any servant that assists you in the shop? - A. None; I had them from Duckham's house; he said, as they are knocking about in the drawer, they are no use to me, I wish you would sell them for me.

Q. How long has Mrs. Kingsford been ill, and kept her bed? - A. She is not ill, she is at home to mind the business.

Q. You are the only person we are to believe in this business? - A. Yes; I don't know any other person.

Q. Had you the curiosity to tell Mr. Duckham these things were challenged? - A. No; I went with the prosecutor.

Q. Did not you see his wife the very first day the person that lost the goods came to you? - A. No; I did not see her that day.

Q. How long have you kept this iron-shop where you are now? - A. Four years come next February or March.

JOSEPH WATSON sworn. - I am headborough of St. Luke's parish, Old-street: I was informed of this business of the prisoner at the bar, I went after him in the evening to Cannon-street, Ratcliff-highway.

Q. What day was that? - A. About six weeks after the robbery, two or three days before the last sessions; I found the prisoner there; when I went in. I told him my business, and said, I had a charge against him, and desired him to go along with me; as we were going along, I told him what it was for, for some spurs that had been stole, and less to sell over the water; I came to the public-house in Old-street, the Bull and Ram, when I came there, there was the prosecutor and Kings

ford; before I took him into the public-house, I went up into his own room with him, and Kingsford was in the room; he asked me to go up into his room before I went to the public-house; he had a child in his arms, we went up; he left the child, and Kingsford came up, and we went to the public-house.

Q. Did any thing pass about the spurs when Kingsford was present? - A. No; when we came to the public-house, we went into the parlour, Kingsford was there and the prosecutor, smoaking their pipes; when we had been there a few minutes, he produced the spurs.

Q. Was there any woman there? - A. Mrs. Duckham was there.

Q. Who produced the spurs? - A. Mr. Kingsford; he laid the spurs on the table, and said, I have brought these spurs back, I have no sale for them, I will return, them to you as I had them, he laid them down on the table; Duckham put his hand on one or two of them, and looked at them; I said to the gentlemen, I will look at them; I believe, if it had not been for his wife, Duckham would have taken them up.

Q. Did she say any thing at the time? - A. Yes; Mrs. Duckham said, my dear, what signifies your meddling with them, you know nothing at all of them; the prosecutor gave charge of Duckham and Kingsford, both.

Jury. Q. Did you find any property in Duckham's house? - A. No. (Produces three pair of spurs, and three odd ones).

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You told Duckham, before he came to the public-house and saw Kingsford, what he was in custody for? - A. As we were coming along I did.

Q. Then he wanted no information about them; you told him it was about the spurs before he saw his wife; did you tell him it was the spurs before they were together at the public-house? - A. His wife followed us all the way from where I took him.

HENRY TYLER sworn. - I am a carpenter and broker; Mr. Smith sent for me on the 23d or 24th of October, I was not at home, when I came home I went to see what he wanted; he acquainted me he had been robbed, and had seen some spurs over the water, and desired me to go with him; I went with him to Mr. Kingsford's, at the Stone's-end, in the Borough, Kingsford was not at home; we went to the Horse-shoe, and staid till Kingsford came home; he spoke to him about the spurs, he said, he had them of a man over the water, meaning on this side; Mr. Smith came with me, and we went to Brick-lane, Old-street, we waited three or four hours, and then the prisoner was brought in by a constable; the constable went out to see for Mr. Smith, he sat down in a chair, and asked Mr. Kingsford what he was called for; Mr. Kingsford said, for some spurs I had of you; by this time the constable was returned, and Mr. Smith.

Q. Did the prisoner make any answer to that? - A. He did not make any answer at all; Mr. Kingsford put his hand in his pocket, and said, here are some spurs I had of you, I have no sale for them, I will return them to you; the prisoner put out his hand and took one of the spurs, and was going to take the other; the constable said, let me look at them; Mr. Smith said, if you will say these are your spurs I will give charge of you; the prisoner's wife said, you know nothing of the spurs; and then the constable took charge of them; the officer, Warson, took the spurs.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The prisoner denied he had them of this man? - A. He did, after he took up one of the spurs.

Q. Kingsford was sent to prison? - A. Yes; the first night he went to prison.

Prosecutor. (Looks at the spurs.) I have got the fellows of these two in my pocket.

Q. Can you swear to the three pair? - A. Yes; one pair has got the shop-mark on them still.

Q. How do you know the other two? - A. I can swear I had spurs of that pattern in my shop; I believe them to be mine.

Court. Q. Will you venture to swear to them? - A. I will swear to the odd ones, and those that are marked.

Q. What is the value of the odd ones, and the pair marked? - A. About fifteen shillings; the marks of the others are taken out, they were marked with ink.

Q. Is there any thing that shows you there has been a mark? - A. No.

Q. What is the value of all the things you lost at that time? - A. I suppose six or seven pounds.

Q. Do you think you lost upon the whole the value of three pounds? - A. Yes.

Q. Has the dog-whip ever been found? - A. Watson, the constable, told me such a thing had been in his possession.

Q. He did not speak so particularly to it that you could know it? - A. No; I shewed him one in the window, he said it was like it.

Q. (To Watson.) Did you find any such thing as a dog-whip upon the prisoner? - A. No.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who deposed that he was very deaf, and gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-3

3. WILLIAM THATCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November ,

four bushels of oats, value 8s. the property of John Gaunt and Richard Gaunt .

RICHARD GAUNT sworn. - I am in partnership with John Gaunt , I live in Abingdon-street, Westminster: On Monday, the 7th of November, I lost some oats; I was informed of it on the Wednesday by William Orr .

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Have you any other partner besides John Gaunt? - A. No.

Q. You know nothing of this yourself? - A. No.

WILLIAM ORR sworn. - I belong to the first regiment of foot guards, the prisoner is a foreman at Mr. Gaunt's wharf, Abingdon-street, Westminster ; he ordered me to bring a sack up one pair of stairs, and he measured four bushels of oats, and put in the sack, from Mr. Gaunt's granary, up one pair of stairs; I asked him where I was to take them; and he replied, he would take them himself; he said, perhaps he might get a pot of beer, he had got one before for taking them; he took the sack on his back, and took them down stairs; he took them away out of the granary, and out of the yard.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You belong to the first regiment of guards? - A. Yes.

Q. What day did this happen? - A. Monday the 7th of November.

Q. I suppose you suspected he had stole them? - A. I had no suspicion at all at that time.

Q. When did you give information of this to your master? - A. On Wednesday; I went on duty on Monday night.

Q. How far does your master live from the wharf? - A. Forty or fifty yards.

Q. It was impossible for you to go those forty or fifty yards on the Monday? - A. I had no suspicion on the Monday.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Peacock? - A. Yes.

Q. He was in your master's service? - A. Yes.

Q. He has got into it again? - A. I don't know that he was ever out of it.

Q. Had not Peacock and you been talking of this? - A. No.

Q. Did not he advise you to give this information? - A. No.

Q. I believe he is foreman in the room of the prisoner? - A. I believe he is in the same place he was.

Q. Did you know where the prisoner lodged? - A. Yes; at the public-house.

Q. Did he stay at the lodgings till he was apprehended? - A. I believe he did.

Court. Q. You told me this man was foreman at the wharf; did you mean he was foreman to Mr. Gaunt? - A. Yes.

JOHN WINCHESTER sworn. - I am King's Messenger in the Admiralty-office; all I know is, the oats were charged to me; Mr. Gaunt sent me a bill, and I sent it back, I had not received the oats.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

Q. (To Mr. Gaunt.) What may the value of these oats be? - A. Eight shillings.

Q. Have they ever been recovered? - A. No.

Q. Is it possible for you to say that such a quantity of oats were missing? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. When this man left your service he continued at his lodgings? - A. Yes; in the same street.

Q. I believe you had a very good character with him? - A. A very good character.

Jury. Q. How long had he been in your service? - A. Ten weeks.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. How long had he been with the gentleman that recommended him to you? - A. Two years; he had been a year out of his service.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-4

4. WILLIAM MISSLING was indicted for that he, in a certain field, and open place, near the King's highway, upon James Chetham , did make an assault, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, on the 24th of October , a silver watch, value 3l. a steel watch chain, value 6d. a steel seal, value 6d. a base metal trinket, value 1d. and four guineas , the property of the said James.

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of William Chetham .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Gurney, and the case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES CHETHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. On the 24th of October last, were you going towards Pentonville? - A. I was, from Falconer-square, Aldersgate-street.

Q. At what time in the evening? - A. It wanted about ten minutes of nine when I set out from my father's house; I had passed through St. John's-square, Clerkenwell, and met with no interruption till I came to Rosoman's-row ; I then saw three men in dark great-coats before me, one man was taller than the others, they had their hands in their great-coat pockets, in this manner, (describing it;) they passed me, and looked at me earnestly.

Court. Q. Where were they at this time? - A. Just before me, in the street leading to the field where I was afterwards robbed.

Q. How far from the place where you were robbed? - A. I suppose, about a quarter of a mile; they before crossed me, looked me in the face, and I thought they were thieves, and then determined not to cross the fields; they crossed the fields, but took a circuit towards Sadler's-Wells, and I saw no more of them till I came within 150 yards

of my own door; when I came near the reservoir wall, three persons rushed from the side of the wall, I had then a stick in my hand, so they could not come in front of me, they sidled round, and laid hold of each arm, and clapped a pistol to each of my temples, one stood in front, a tall man, and said, no resistance; I made answer, you have taken away all power of resistance; they having my hand so, one asked me for my watch, I took it out, and gave it the man that stood in front; then another man on my left hand said, where is your money, I gave him the money, and counted it, and said, there are four guineas; about this time, my brother, who was with me, was much agitated, they said to him, don't be alarmed, we won't hurt you, these were the words; the tall man then gave the watch to the man on the right hand of me, and he put the watch, I think, into his pocket; I said, you won't do me any harm of course, they said, no, they would not; I had before heard somebody coming across the field, I said to the men, I am going to Pentonville, they said, I must not go there, for they were going there; I then asked them if I might cross the fields to Sadler's-Wells, they told me I must not go that way at this time, the tall man drew a handkerchief thus over here, just across his nose, and slouched his hat, I asked them(then I was rather hurt, they would not let me go any way), which way then am I to go, they said, you must turn back towards London; I then, in consequence of what they said, did turn back, two of them holding their pistols at me; I said, I certainly should turn back, as I should not like to have the contents of those in my head.

Q. What time did this transaction take up? - A. Above a minute.

Q. How were the persons dressed? - A. All in dark great-coats.

Q. Did they appear to be the same persons you saw in Rosoman's-row? - A. Yes, it struck me so.

Q. Was it a light or dark evening? - A. It was a light evening, a fine star-light evening.

Court. Q. Had you an opportunity of observing their faces? - A. I had a full view of them, especially of the man that stood in the front, I thought they had not been robbers, but drunken men; I should know the tall man and the little man that stood on my right-hand side; I had gone but a few paces before I met two gentlemen, Mr. Riley and Mr. Richardson, they asked if I had been robbed, I said I had, and we all joined in the pursuit; at that time two men were running before; I came opportunity own door, about 150 yards from where I was robbed, and found the prisoner in custody.

Q. In whole custody? - A. In the custody of Day; there were a number of persons round him before that, he said he was not one of the men that committed the robbery, he had none of the property about him; when I came up, I said, you are one of the men that robbed me; he said, he was not, he had none of the property about him, he said, search me; he was taken to the watch-house, and desired to pull his great-coat off, he then drew the handkerchief in the same manner as after he robbed me, upon which I exclaimed, you are the man that stood in the front of me and took the watch, I am positive of it.

Q. What distance of time was it, between your coming up to him, and the robbery? - A. About two minutes.

Q. Upon seeing this prisoner again and again, have you any doubt he is one of the men that robbed you? - A. The more I look at the man, the more I am convinced he is the man that robbed me; I have no doubt he is the man, because I had a full view of him, and from all the circumstances that happened, I am sure he is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you take any particular notice of him at the time? - A. Of him particularly, because he asked for my watch.

Q. Did the man in front hold a pistol? - A. No.

Q. You conclude, by saying you have no doubt of him? - A. I have no doubt of him.

Q. What did you say before the Justice? - A. That considering every circumstance, I had no doubt he was the man that robbed med; Mr. Bond said, he admired my caution.

Q. I believe you did say at that time you were not certain the prisoner was one of the men? - A. I did not say so; I said, when I consider all the matter, I have no doubt he is the man that robbed me.

Q. It is not from a recollection of his person then, but from the circumstances? - A. From his person.

Q. Where did you first meet with them? - A. In Rosoman's-row.

Q. After that, you met with them in the fields? - A. Yes.

Q. It was not the fields where they robbed you? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it not in the public highway? - A. There is a path through the field, it is a field belonging to the New-River-Company, there is no way for horses and carts, except the New-River-Company's with pipes.

EDWARD RILEY sworn. - I live at No. 4, Jermyn street, and keep a shop in the Strand; on the evening this matter took place, I was about ten yards from Mr. Chetham when this happened, I heard a voice say, don't be alarmed, I won't hurt you.

Q. Did any person make his appearance? - A. A little boy ran up to me, Mr. Chetham's brother, and begged I would come forward, for his brother was robbed; I said, take my parcel, my dear, I will assist your brother directly; Mr. Chetham met me, and said, sir, I am robbed; I said, there is no time to talk of it, but pursue directly; I followed the prisoner, and in ten minutes he sell, I mixed in the crowd, not wishing to have any thing more to do with it, not knowing Mr. Chetham; I carried the parcel I had, and then had the curiosity of going to the watch-house, and upon hearing the prisoner's voice, I said, that is the man that said, don't be alarmed.

Q. Are you of the opinion still that that is the man? - A. Yes; after the number of gentlemen had gone out of the place, and I came again to the watch-house, the prisoner said he hoped Mr. Chetham would have mercy upon him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Did you hear the prisoner say so? - A. I did.

Q. I believe at the time he made use of that expression if he did use it, the constable had hold of the handkerchief about his neck? - A. No; he was locked up at the time, and nobody with him.

Q. When you say you first heard the voice, how far might you be from where the robbery was committed? - A. Ten or twelve feet.

Q. If you were so near the place, you must have seen the robbery? - A. It was took dark for me to see the robbery, I could see there were a number of persons together, but what they were about I could not tell, but I was soon informed by the boy; when the child came up, I was upon the move, for I had said I believed there was a robbery.

Q. How long from that time was it before you heard his voice in the watch-house? - A. Four or five minutes.

Q. He did not repeat the same words? - A. No.

Q. Though he did not repeat the same words, could you swear to his voice? - A. Yes.

Q. So you undertake to say, though he did not repeat the same words that he was the same person? - A. I can.

Court. Q. You attended at the watch-house after the prisoner was apprehended; did you come to the watch-house twice, or only once? - A. I accidentally made use of these words, when I went into the watch-house, I said to the watch-house man, that was the voice.

Q. You heard him afterwards apply for mercy? - A. He said, he hoped they would have mercy upon him, and not touch his life.

Q. Did he say that as if he was conscious of guilt, or that they would not do him violence, supposing he was not the man? - A. I wish I could put the sense upon it, that they would not do him violence.

MARGARET METTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. - I live servant to Mr. Gifford, near to Mr. Chetham's, Pentonville.

Q. On the night this transaction happened, did you see any persons run up Penton-street? - A. Yes, two.

Q. At the time you saw these two persons running, did you hear any noise at a distance? - A. Yes; I heard a saint voice cry "stop thief."

Q. From whence did that voice come? - A. I thought it came from across the fields.

Q. Did any thing happen to either of the two men coming towards you? - A. No, not till they were past me; when they were past me, I gave the alarm to the watchman above our house.

Q. That watchman's name is Day? - A. Yes; the watchman stopped one of them.

Q. Did he fall down? - A. That I did not see.

Q. Upon his stopping him, did you go up to the watchman? - A. I saw him lay hold of him, and called to the watchman, and asked him if he had got him; he said, yes, safe enough.

Q. Was that one of the men that passed you? - A. Yes, on the side I was.

Q. Did you go up to the watch? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know his face? - A. Yes; I had seen him go past our house, on a Sunday, with two others.

THOMAS RICHARDSON sworn. - I live at West-Smithfield, I lodge at Pentonville.

Q. On the evening of this transaction, were you crossing this field? - A. On Monday, the 24th of last month, I was crossing the field from Rosoman's-row to Pentonville; about 100 yards before I got to the corner of the wall, a young lad ran and met me, and said his brother was robbed by three men; in consequence of which, I immediately gave the alarm of stop thief, and ran; in a short time I saw some people run from me, but the night being dark, they soon disappeared; when I came to Pentonville, I saw the prisoner in custody, and particularly noticed a red silk handkerchief round his neck in a very particular way; he was taken to the watch-house, I saw him lodged in the watch-house.

Court. Q. You pursued the man? - A. Yes.

Q. He was thrown down? - Q. That was before I came up to him, I had lost sight of him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You did not see any thing of the prisoner till after he was taken into custody? - A. Not knowingly so; the men were before me, it was impossible to discriminate, it was so dark.

Q. You say the handkerchief was in an unusual way; I suppose you sometimes put a handkerchief about your neck of a night? - A. Not in that way.

JOHN DAY sworn. - I am a watchman in Penton-street, Pentonville.

Q. On the night this robbery happened, did you hear any alarm? - A. I heard the cry of stop thief, from the bottom of Penton-street.

Q. Towards the field? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any persons coming towards you? - A. I turned myself round, and saw a man running.

Q. Did you see more than one? - A. Only one; before I got near him, he fell upon the ground, he got up again, and made for the other side of the way, I was so near him, I laid hold of him.

Q. Who was that man? - A. He said his name was William Neal, (looks at the prisoner), that is the man, he said he was not the man that had robbed the gentleman.

Q. Before he had said that, you had said nothing at all to him? - A. I did not speak to him; as soon as he had said that, the gentlemen came up, and one of them said, you are the man that has robbed me of four guineas and my watch.

Q. But before he said he was not the man that robbed the gentleman, had any body charged him with robbing any body? - A. No.

Q. Did you search him? - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing about searching him? - A. No; he unbuttoned his coat, and said he was not the man.

Q. Then you took him to the watch-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing at the watch-house? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q. When you stopped him, that was after you heard the cry of stop thief? - A. Yes.

Q. How near were you to the prisoner when you first saw him? - A. About three hundred yards.

Q. You cannot say whether he cried out stop thief? - A. It was a woman's voice I heard.

Q. You saw only him? - A. No.

Q. You were on the other side of the way when he sell? - A. Yes.

Q. When he got up, he came over the way to where you were? - A. Yes.

Q. He might have escaped from you if he had a mind? - A. Yes.

LEVI HOBURN sworn. - I am superintendent of the watch at Pentonville; I was in the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in.

Q. Do you recollect any expression of his? - A. After the charge was given of the man, and Mr. Chetham was gone, I said, my friend, you stand in an awkward predicament; he said, I do; I said, there is but one way to extricate yourself, by telling of the other men.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. After this promise was made to him, he said, he hoped mercy would be shewed to him? - A. Yes; it was after that, he said he was not the man.

Q. You live in the neighbourhood where the robbery was committed? - A. Yes.

Q. Is not that a thoroughfare, where persons drive horses and carts? - A. I have seen horses and carts belonging to the New-River-Company.

Q. Is it not a common thoroughfare for horses and carts? - A. No; I believe it is not.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel. - I have one thing to observe to you; directly they took me into custody, they throttled me; I said, have mercy upon me, don't murder me; I had not power to speak any thing, but that they had their hands in my handkerchief.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 22.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17961130-5

5. FRANCIS DUNN , otherwise DEPUTY , WILLIAM ARNOLD , and WILLIAM RYAN , were indicted for the wilful murder of David Brewer , on the 10th of November .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case was opened by Mr. Const).(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoners).

THOMAS COLTMAN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach. I am a patrol of the parish of St. Sepulchre's Without.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - A. Yes; I know them all three by sight.

Q. Do you remember seeing them at any time on the night of Wednesday the 9th of November? - A. Yes; one of them, the short man in black, he answered to the name of Deputy; at that time, as Bickham and I were going our rounds, we saw Denn in Pipe-makers-alley, Cow-cross: it is a very dark alley, and no lamp; I heard somebody whisper in the alley, we went up, and found two men standing at the door where they lodged, I believe; I asked them what they were, and what they were standing there for; Dunn made reply, what was it to us; I told them I was a patrol, and must insist on knowing what business they had there at that late hour; he appeared not willing to satisfy us from some impertinent answers, I cannot say what they were; I looked down, and in his right-hand I saw the blade of a knife shine, and I catched hold of his arm, and said, what have you got in your hand, a knife; he said, no; and he snatched his arm away from me; by that time, the man of the house where he lodged came down and opened the door, he drew himself into the door backwards, and dropped the knife.

Q. Did he drop the knife in the alley, or within the door? - A. On the mat at the bottom of the stairs; I called the watchman up, he brought his lanthorn, and I looked for the knife.

Q. What was the watchman's name? - A. Blower; I found the knife, and picked it up, and said to Dunn, is this your knife; and he said, yes; and I said to him, what intent could you have in having this knife drawn in your hand at this time of night; and he said he had it cutting his finger nails with.

Q. What sort of a knife was it? - A. I believe, a buckshorn handle, about seven inches long; my partner, Beckham, and I took him to the watch-house.

Q. Who was in the watch-house? - A. Mr. Brewer, he was the beadle; and the officer of the night, his name is Veal.

Q. Were there any other persons there? - A. Yes; after a bit, Charles Wilson and John Terry, they are the other two patrols that were to come on at twelve o'clock; I would have given charge of them and sent them to prison; Veal said, he did not think it necessary to send them to prison.

Q. Do you know Stevens? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he an officer on duty that night? - A. No, I believe not.

Q. What was the man's name you found with Dunn? - A. Toddy Osling.

Q. You would have given charge of them both? - A. Yes.

Q. How long were you in the watch-house altogether? - A. About twenty minutes; Brewer was present during the whole time.

Q. What was the reason you did not give charge of them? - A. The officer of the night said, as they had not done us any private injury it was not necessary.

Q. Did you see any thing more of the prisoner Dunn that night? - A. No; they went home to their lodgings; the landlord came forward and gave them a character.

Q. Did you see Brewer on Thursday night? - A. No; Friday morning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This knife was a common pocket knife, such as any person might have? - A. It was.

Q. The person with him that night was neither of the prisoners at the bar? - A. No.

Court. Q. Had Dunn that knife in his hand in the watch-house? - A. No; I had the knife in my possession.

Q. Did any thing pass before Brewer about that knife? - A. Nothing, I believe.

Jury. Q. Did you not tell Brewer you had taken the knife from him? - A. I told the officer of the night, in Brewer's hearing, that I had taken the knife from the man of the name of Deputy.

Court. Q. How came you by the knife in your hand? - A. I picked the knife up off the mat.

Q. After Dunn dropped it? - A. Yes; after I got the lanthorn from the watchman.

Jury. Q. Did you deliver the knife to the prisoner at the watch-house? - A. Yes; I gave him the knife before he went home.

Q. In the presence of Brewer? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure you gave it him? - A. Perfectly.

Court. Q. How came you to give him the knife again? - A. Upon the condition of the landlord coming forward to speak for him; as we gave no charge of him, I gave him his property again.

JOHN BECKHAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I was a patrol of St. Sepulchre's, the 9th of November.

Q. Did you go with Coltman to Cow-cross? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, Dunn; I did not know his name then.

Q. As you were on duty at Cow-cross, did you see him on Wednesday night? - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock, my partner and I were coming up Cow-cross, my partner saw two men going up Pipe-makerslley; I followed him, they were up close to the door; my partner said one had a knife in his hand, I laid hold of Dunn by the collar.

Q. Did you see the knife in his hand? - A. No; as I said hold of him, he dropped the knife down.

Q. Did you see it dropped down? - A. No; I saw the knife picked up.

Q. Did you hear the knife drop? - A. No; I am hard of hearing.

Q. Who picked the knife up? - A. Coltman, and we brought them over to the watch-house in the out part.

Q. Do you know who the other person was? - A. Toddy Osling.

Q. When you went to the watch-house, who was there? - A. Brewer.

Q. The deceased? - A. Yes.

Q. Who else? - A. The constable of the night, I forget his name.

Q. Willey? - A. Yes.

Q. Was Veale there? - A. Yes; that is the officer, he came in afterwards.

Q. Did you give any charge to the officer? - A. My partner would have given charge, he would not take charge.

Q. What was the charge? - A. For being disorderly.

Q. In consequence of that, they were discharged? - A. Yes; Shipway came to the watch-house, I did not hear what he said.

Q. What because of the knife? - A. My partner gave it to him again.

Q. Did Brewer see that? - A. He could not be off seeing it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. The officer

said, no harm appeared against them, and therefore he discharged them? - A. Yes.

Q. You saw none of the prisoners there but Dunn? - A. No.

JOHN VEALE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach.

Q. What are you? - A. I was constable of the night; I sat up the night this happened.

Q. Do you remember Coltman and the last witness bringing any persons to the watch-house? - A. Yes.

Q. What complaint did they make against them? - A. That they found one of the men with a knife in his hand.

Q. Who did they bring? - A. Two men to the watch-house; no charge was taken of the men.

Q. Should you know the men? - A. I should know one of them.

Q. Look round, and see if you see him? - A. I think that to be one of them, (pointing to Dunn).

Q. Is he the man they charged with having the knife? - A. That was the man that had the knife.

Q. During the time the charge was made, and while they staid in the watch-house, was Brewer there? - A. Yes.

Q. He had an opportunity of knowing the man? - A. Certainly, the knife was given to him, the landlord came, and gave him a good character.

Court. Q. Who had the knife? - A. The patrol brought the knife.

Q. Who was it given to afterwards? - A. To the prisoner Dunn.

Jury. Q. Are you sure the prisoner Dunn is the man? - A. I am positive of it.

JOHN TOMMS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach.

Q. What are you? - A. A watchman.

Q. Where were you on Thursday the 10th of November? - A. At the Sun, Cow-cross; I went about half after four in the afternoon.

Q. Were you at any club there? - A. Yes.

Q. Being at the club, did any thing happen? - A. Yes; because I would not sing, I was insulted by having my coat torn.

Q. Look at the prisoners at the bar, were they, or any of them there? - A. The person in black, Dunn; he tore my coat, because I would not sing.

Jury. Q. Had not you sung? - A. Yes; I would not sing again in consequence of my coat being torn; I quitted the room, and informed the watchman.

Q. Do you know the watchman's name? - A. Stevens, he was at the door; I informed him of the treatment of having my coat torn, and desired him to go up stairs.

Q. Did he go up stairs? - A. He did; I followed him to the door.

Q. Did any other person go up? - A. Yes; a patrol, Terry, went up, nearly at the same time.

Q. What did you do when you went up stairs? - A. I saw they were going to insult them, I believe I might just enter the door.

Q. Did you do any thing? - A. Nothing.

Q. Did you say any thing to the watchman? - A. Only what I told you before, of having my coat torn.

Q. Did you point any person out to him? - A. Yes.

Q. What part of the room did Stevens go to? - A. On the left hand, where I had been sitting; when I found they were going to assault the watchmen, I quitted the place.

Q. How, where were they going to assault the watchmen? - A. I did not stop to see.

Court. Q. How long did you stay there? - A. Not a second hardly.

JOSEPH STEVENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Were you a watchman of St. Sepulchre's parish? - A. Yes, at the door of the Sun public-house.

Q. Do you remember Thursday, the 10th of November? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see Tomms? - A. He came down stairs first, about half after ten o'clock, and desired me to go up stairs; I went up stairs, Terry and Wilson went up with me.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners? - A. Yes, the gentleman in black; his name is Francis Dunn.

Q. Do you know either of the others? - A. No.

Q. When you got up into the room, did you see any thing of Dunn? - A. Yes; when I got in, Terry asked Tomms if he knew the man that did him the injury, and he said he did; Terry said, point the man out; Tomms said he stood by the fire-place, which proved to be Dunn; when I went up to Dunn, he struck me, and tried to knock me down.

Q. He tried to knock you down? - A. He did knock me down with his hand, I got the advantage of him, and collared him with my left hand; in the course of a minute, I was struck at with pewter pots; there were about 26 in the room, they struck me with sticks and pewter pots; I let go the man, and made my escape out as fast as I could; I saw one man, who struck at me with a pewter pot; as I was going down stairs, a man struck me on the arm with a poker.

Q. Is that man here? - A. No.

Q. Do you know his name? - A. No; going down stairs, Mr. Brown's wife's mother conveyed me into a back room; I was cut over the head; the blood sprinkled like a mop as I went down stairs.

Q. They were put in a state of security, and afterwards you went away? - A. Yes.

Q. How far is the watch-house from Brown's house? - A. About half a stone's throw in the same street, the same side of the way.

Q. Whether you recollect any thing was said to you as you came down stairs? - A. In the condition I was, I cannot say.

JOHN TERRY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a patrole of St. Sepulchre's.

Q. Were you on duty on the 10th of November? - A. Yes.

Q. At the Sun public-house? - A. Yes; partly opposite the Sun. I heard some confusion, I saw a man in the passage; I followed the watchman up stairs; when we came near to the door, my partner, Wilson, said, keep the door, to the best of my knowledge; Wilson got in, I did not; some of the parties rushed out, one struck me in the face.

Q. Do you know any of those parties? - A. No.

Q. Have you seen any of them since? - A. No; I got down stairs into the street; I was in a gore of blood, my partner took me to the watch-house, and I was conveyed home.

CHARLES WILSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach. I am a patrole, Terry's partner.

Q. Do you remember going to the Sun public-house, on Friday night? - A. Yes; when I got to the door of the room, we endeavoured to secure the door to prevent the man that tore Tomms's coat from getting out; they were up in arms, and began to fight with sticks, Stevens was in towards the fire-place the left-hand side.

Q. Did you see any thing that happened to Stevens? - A. No.

Q. What happened to yourself? - A. I got several blows on my shoulder.

Q. Look at the prisoners; do you know any of them? - A. Yes; I know the shortest man in black, Dunn.

Court. Q. Did you go into the room? - A. I was within the door, not far in the room; I know nothing more of it.

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you live in Redlion-alley, Cow-cross? - A. Yes.

Q. How near to the Sun? - A. Nearly opposite.

Q. You are a housekeeper there? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at the Sun public-house, on the 10th of November, in the evening? - A. I was; I went about half after eight.

Q. Did you go to the club there? - A. I did.

Q. What is the name of that club? - A. It was called the Free and Easy.

Q. Where was it held? - A. Up one pair of stairs.

Q. How many persons was it composed of? - A. Upwards of twenty.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners there? - A. Yes; two of them, Arnold and Dunn; Dunn sat next to me, and Arnold next to Dunn.

Q. Do you remember Tomm's being there that night? - A. Yes; he sat next the fire-place; he was there before I came in.

Q. Tell us distinctly what was said then to Tomms? - A. A person called Tomms by the name of Ralph Day; he made up towards the person.

Q. Tomms was called by a wrong name? - A. Yes, in going up towards that person, his coat caught on the corner of the table, and Dunn put his hand on the coat, and pressed it to the table, and his coat tore then; in a few minutes after Tomms went down stairs.

Q. Before he went down stairs, had there been any singing in the room that night? - A. Yes, there had; Tomms sung, and Dunn sung.

Q. Do you remember any thing particular on his being called upon to sing, and refusing? - A. I do not; he appeared agreeable; he went down stairs, and returned with two patroles and a watchman, and gave charge of Dunn.

Q. Do you recollect what the charge was? - A. He said he was the person that ill-used him, then the watchman went to take Dunn into custody.

Jury. Q. The tearing of the coat was nothing but a frolick? - A. Nothing more.

Q. What watchman went to take him into custody? - A. I don't know his name; upon that Dunn struck the watchman, and knocked him down; as he was falling, I took the stick from him, then I saw a person of the name of Williams, who is not yet apprehended, that struck at the watchman likewise, and about that time, I left the room as soon as I could, and got down stairs.

Q. When he had got the stick from the watch-man, what did he do with it? - A. I saw him strike at the watchman, I cannot say whether it hit him; I live nearly opposite, down the alley; I went four or five yards down the alley, and came up the alley again, and saw the whole of them come out of the house.

Q. Do you recollect any one person that came down? - A. Only Williams, he was down before me.

Q. Do you recollect how Dunn was drest that night? - A. In a blue coat, I think white buttons; then I saw them go to the Compasses public-house, about three doors lower down.

Q. How wide is the street? - A. That I cannot tell you; then I saw them return; they missed one of their party; I heard them say, "call Bill," and one called Bill; then I saw them cross the way, and knock at the door of the Sun, the door had been shut against them; they knocked at the door, and

they could not get in at the door, they forced the two first windows up, and ten or twelve got in.

Q. Do you recollect seeing Dunn or Arnold at that time? - A. No, I don't recollect any body in particular; then they went into the house, and returned out the same way they went in.

Q. How soon? - A. That minute partly, when they found nobody was concealed in the house.

Q. Before they got into the window, did any of them make use of any expression particularly? - A. I do not know.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of William Lancaster ? - A. Yes; he went away before nine; then they crossed over towards the Compasses, passed the Compasses, and returned, to the number of near twenty, and they passed on the same side of the way I stood on, towards the watch-house.

Court. Q. How far is the watch-house from Brown's house? - A. Nine or ten doors on that side of the way.

Q. Did you observe any body particularly, as you saw them pass on to the watch-house? - A. I saw Dunn at the head of them, he went first; I saw Williams next to him, and I saw Arnold; they were the first three that I saw.

Q. Was there any body else you recollect seeing? - A. Yes, that followed.

Q. How near? - A. One, I believe, was six yards distance, of the name of Parsons; and I saw Russell in the croud; those were the only persons I knew.

Q. What next did you observe? - A. I saw them go towards the watch-house, and I saw them cross over the way to the watch-house.

Q. Were you on the same side of the way as the watch-house? - A. No, the opposite; I saw a number of them at the watch-house door, striking, as though they were striking over the hatch at somebody within; there was some night carts at the end of the alley, they prevented me seeing so much as I should.

Q. You saw several striking over the hatchway? - A. Yes; but could not point any one out.

Q. How long did they stay at the watch-house? - A. Three or four minutes; I then saw them return.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners return? - A. Yes; two out of the three, Arnold and Dunn; the other I never saw till he was apprehended.

Q. When they returned from the watch-house, did they pass you again? - A. They passed in the road-way.

Q. Had they any thing in their hands? - A. Not that I saw.

Q. Is this Cow-cross a narrow or wide street? - A. It is a middling street, neither wide nor narrow; I saw them pass me and go towards Peter-street, and I saw no more of them, on account of their turning to the right.

Q. Did you see a watchman at the end of Peter-street? - A. After they were gone I did; I went up to the end of Peter-street, and saw a watchman, he was standing, and was held up by one man; he appeared to me to have had a blow on the head with a stick, which, apparently to me, had drove in the skull.

Q. Who was that watchman? - A. Larcher, I believe; I did not know his name till afterwards.

Q. Do you know who the person was that was holding him up? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Do you know whether you heard the watchman say who struck him? - A. No.

Q. Whether this watchman had any other appearance of violence about him than on his head? - A. No; I thought he had a cut on his neck; I was told afterwards, there was no wound there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. There was no disturbance in the club-room till this ill-natured charge of Tomms? - A. No; I thought it a foolish charge, and blamed him for it.

Q. You were not able to see who were the persons at the watch-house door, or taking a part in it? - A. No.

Q. You saw the persons only once at the watch-house? - A. No.

Q. You saw nothing in the hands of Dunn or Arnold? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You saw Dunn and Arnold going and returning from the watch-house? - A. Yes.

THOMAS COUNT sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const.

Q. Where do you live? - A. Falkner's alley, Cow-cross; I am a stay-maker.

Q. Do you remember any thing happening there on the 10th of November? - A. At that time I lived right opposite the corner of Red-lion-alley; I was undressing myself and going to bed, I heard a terrible uproar in the street, I dressed myself and went down; I observed a number, ten or a dozen, run out of the public-house.

Court. Q. Did you know any of them? - A. No.

Q. Do you know any of them now? - A. Yes; the young man in black.

Q. Do you remember him there? - A. Not at that time; they ran over the way towards the Compasses, where some other persons stood, what I suppose had come out before; they were talking one among another; they said they had missed Bill, we will go back, and have him out.

Q. Did they go any where? - A. Yes; they went strait over to the Sun, it was shut up; they wanted to get in; the landlord, or whoever was inside, would not open the door; they threw up the window, and three or four got in.

Q. Did you know any of those three or four? - A. No; in a minute or two they came out, and said, we will go and see if he is in the watch-house, and ran immediately up to the watch-house; to the best of my knowledge, I saw one go up first with a stick.

Q. How many went up to the watch-house? - A. The first went up with a stick, and then three or four more.

Q. Did any more follow the four? - A. There were more in the middle of the street; I could see what passed, but did not know any of them; when they came to the watch-house, the door was open, and they immediately rushed in, and scuffle ensued.

Q. How many went in? - A. Two or three.

Q. How did you judge there was a scuffle? - A. They were tumbling about.

Q. How long did that scuffle continue? - A. A minute or two minutes.

Q. What became of them then? - A. They then came out, and some more came out of White-horse-alley, there had been a scuffle there; White-horse-alley is two doors nearer the Sun, from the watch-house; when they got together in the middle of the road, I heard them say, have you done it, Charley.

Q. Was this as they joined the other party? - A. Yes; I heard them say, have you done it, Charley, have you done it to your liking, and they gave him three cheers.

Q. Was there any answer made, when they said that? - A. There were three cheers given immediately.

Q. Did you see any body then you knew? - A. Yes, the prisoner Dunn passed by me.

Q. Did you see any other that you knew? - A. No.

Q. Did you see any thing else after that? - A. I immediately staid at the corner of Red-lion-alley, they immediately went on down the Cross; in the course of a minute or two, the rattle sprung, I then ran down to the corner of Peter-street; opposite the corner, I saw this mob beating the watchman, who was standing between the box and the post.

Q. Do you know who that watchman was? - A. Larcher; when I came up, he was just getting up from a blow, they knocked him down again several times; when they went away he had several wounds in his head, I was the first person that laid hold of him to take him up.

Q. Do you know any of the persons you saw there? - A. No.

Q. Were they of the same party? - A. I believe they were, they had passed me that way.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. Among the mob that went to the watch-house, you did not see Dunn? - A. No.

Q. There was another mob at White-horse-alley? - A. Yes.

Q. Not till after the two parties met, you heard the three cheers? - A. No.

Q. And the discourse about Charley was after they joined? - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BROWNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach. Q. You are master of the Sun public-house, Cow-cross - Do you remember the meeting of the 10th of November? - A. Yes.

Q. You went into the room? - A. I walked up just before Stevens.

Q. Describe what you saw in the room while Stevens was there? - A. Stevens went up into the left hand side of the room towards Dunn; Dunn put himself in a posture of defence against him, with his fist, and a number of them gathered round together, and began a scuffle, and I immediately quitted the room then.

Q. Did you see what happened to Stevens? - A. No, I did not; then they all went out of the house, and I fastened the door, and presently after they came and lifted up the sash of the window.

Q. Do you know who lifted up the sash? - A. No, I do not.

Q. How long after? - A. A very few minutes; as they lifted up the sash, I ran up stairs, I heard them say, damn his eyes, if we find him, we will do for him; I thought they meant me; I ran up, I got upon the top of the leads out of the back garret window, I and three more; I staid there seven or eight minutes, then I came down again, and they were all gone out of the house but Stevens the watchman.

Q. What did you hear? - A. I did not hear any thing further, the watchman was in the back yard, my mother-in-law had put him there.

Q. How do you know that? - A. By her saying so.

ELIZABETH STOCKWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. Facing the watch-house, Cow-cross.

Q. Do you remember the night of this unfortunate business happening? - A. Yes; I was looking out of my window about a quarter after ten, or half after ten; I heard a noise in the street, and I was speaking to Mr. Brewer, the deceased.

Q. Where was he then? - A. Leaning upon the hatch of the watch-house door; I saw three men run up the street as hard as they could run from the Sun, and when they got up by Mr. Terry's door, the public-house, the corner of White-horse-alley -

Q. That is close to the watch-house? - A. Yes, within one door of it; Mr. Brewes took and slammed to the watch-house door.

Q. Where were the three men at the time Brewer

slammed to the door? - A. Close to the public-house.

Q. Did those three men appear to you to be coming to the watch-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know either of those three men? - A. I cannot swear to any of them.

Q. Brewer slammed to the door-do you mean the whole door? - A. No, the top door, the bottom was shut; he drew the bolt, the three men ran up to the watch-house door, there were two short ones and a tall one; the tall man had got a stick in his hand, and he struck it against the door.

Q. How did he strike it? - A. As hard as he could, twice, and he pushed his elbow against it, and it came open; Mr. Brewer had hold of the end of the door, he stood at the corner of the door that flew open.

Q. You said he had hold of the door? - A. When it was open, he was at the corner of the door, one of the persons struck him on the head with a stick twice.

Q. Do you recollect sufficiently to know whether it was the tall person, or one of the short ones that struck him? - A. The tall one, the other two kept pushing him on the side with their fists, they kept crying, O damn him, he is backwards, they had got in when they struck Brewer twice.

Court. Q. Did they strike him before they got into the watch-house? - A. They were going in at the door.

Q. Did you hear them, or see them doing any thing to the deceased besides what you have described? - A. No; they came back again, after they were in the watch-house, to the door; one of them said, have you given him a good one, yes, blast him, said they, we have given him a good one, blast him, we have ripped him up; then, they said, we will give a good cheer.

Jury. Q. My Lord, we beg she may be asked, if there was a knife in one of their hands? - A. I could not see that.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How far was this window where you saw this, from the watch-house? - A. About as far as I am from my Lord.

Q. Was it opposite the watch-house door? - A. As right opposite as can be.

Court. Q. You said they did something after they had said they ripped him up? - A. They said they would give a good cheer.

Q. Did they give a good cheer? - A. Yes; they pulled their hats off and gave a cheer; then they went away, and Brewer came to the step of the door, and was wiping his face with his handkerchief, the blood ran down from his head, that is all I know.

Court. Q. Did you see any more persons than three? - A. I saw a great many after they were out.

Q. Were there more than three in the watch-house? - A. No, I saw no more than three.

ELIZABETH LEWIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 15, Cow-cross.

Q. Did you know Mr. Brewer, the decased, the beadle of the parish? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. What aged man was he? - A. An elderly man, about forty-seven or forty-eight.

Mr. Const. Q. Tell us what you observed on the night of the tenth of November? - A. About half past ten, I live next door but one to the watch-house, my house was shut up, I heard a noise in the street, I went to the door to see what was the matter; I went across the way, and saw a man our at the top of the house, I crossed over the way and went to the watch-house door to Mr. Brewer, he was leaning across on the hatch, I told him that I saw a man out at the top of the public-house; he replied, opening the hatch of the door, they have almost killed Terry; with that, he put to the door, and I just turned from the door and saw three men coming across the way.

Q. Were they coming on the other side of the way? - A. They were coming up the middle of the road.

Q. Did you know either of those three men? - A. I thought they were two patrols bringing a charge to the watch-house.

Q. Did you, afterwards, know either of them? - A. Yes, one, that was Arnold; (points him out); I knew him personally before, I had seen him up and down the neighbourhood some time.

Q. Did you know either of the other two? - A. No; I saw Arnold with a knife in his right-hand.

Q. What kind of a knife? - A. I don't know the size of it.

Q. Are you sure it was a knife? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see it open? - A. I saw the blade; with that, they rushed into the watch-house.

Q. Was the door shut? - A. The door was shut; Brewer shut the door to when I went away.

Q. Do you know who opened it? - A. No.

Q. When they rushed in, what did you see? - A. Some persons took me into my house, they said I should be killed in a few minutes; after I heard the street still, I said, I must go out to see what they had done, I returned from my own door and went to the watch-house; when I came there, I saw Mr. Brewer standing in blood.

Q. He was bleeding? - A. Yes; the blood was trickling down; before I had time to speak to him, I saw a great many people come up the street, coming to the watch-house; I heard them say,"damn his eyes, we will have him out."

Q. You did not know who they were? - A. No; with that, they rushed into the watch-house.

Q. Can you tell how many ran into the watch-house? - A. I don't know, twenty or more; as they went in I laid hold of one of the men's coats, and said, for God's sake don't murder the man.

Q. Do you know the man you laid hold of? - A. No; with that I heard a blow in the watch-house, but saw nothing.

Q. What coat had the man on you laid hold of? - A. I don't know; some of my friends came and took me into my own house again; after that, I heard a great bustle in the street, but did not go out till the street became quite still; then I opened the door, and met Mr. Brewer coming into my house, he came in all over blood, running down him, and said, they have almost killed me; he came in, and I sent for the doctor.

Q. Did you see Mr. Brewer after this? - A. I went to the hospital on Friday morning a little after seven, or about seven, I saw him fitting up in bed; I asked him how he did; he told me he was very bad; I asked him if he should know any of them-

Mr. Knowlys. Q. At this time, did he at all say he was likely to die? - A. No; I said nothing to him about that.

Court. Q. How long did he live after this? - A. He died on Saturday evening about half after nine-My Lord, I beg to mention to your Lordship, that on the Friday, the first day of my examination, I was so alarmed, and frightened, when I was at Hatton-garden, I saw the prisoner Arnold at the bar, and would not own to him.

Q. What did not you own to? - A. At the first examination on Friday, I did not own to the prisoner Arnold.

Q. Why did not you own to him? - A. I am a poor widow woman, and obliged to go out early in a morning to get my bread, and am up late at night in the shop by myself; I was afraid of my own life, for fear any of the party should come and injure me.

Q. That is the reason you did not own to Arnold? - A. That is the whole truth why I did not own to Arnold on the first examination.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You thought you would be asked that question? - A. No.

Q. At the second examination, the story you told was a very different story to what you told at the first? - A. Arnold said so.

Q. Were you sworn the first time, when you said Arnold was not the man? - A. I believe I was, I don't know; I was so alarmed when the Justice asked me if Arnold was the man, I told him not to my knowledge.

Q. You told us you knew Arnold's person very well, by his passing backwards and forwards? - A. Certainly I do.

Q. Were you examined twice the same day? - A. Only once; the next day after the affair happened.

Q. Were you examined the day after this took place? - A. Yes.

Q. Then you said you did not know that Arnold was the man? - A. Not to my knowledge, I was so much alarmed.

Q. When were you examined next? - A. The Friday following.

Q. Was it known there was to be a reward the next day after the affair happened? - A. No; I told all the secret before I knew there was any reward.

Q. Before you were examined the second time, was it not known that there was a reward published? - A. On the Jury, in the hospital, I told all the story.

Q. Before you were examined the second time there was a reward published; had you heard that there was any reward? - A. I had heard that there was a reward by the bills that were stuck up in the street.

Q. How much was it? - A. I don't know, I never paid any attention to it.

Q. You saw it in the bills up in the street? - A. No, only what people said; I am no scholar to read it.

Q. How nigh were you to Arnold the first time you saw him before the Magistrate? - A. As nigh as I am to you.

Q. Though you were so near him you did not know him? - A. I knew him perfectly, but I was afraid of my own life.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You knew at the time it was him, but you were so frightened you declared it was not him? -

Court. Q. I understand you to say, that you knew it was him, but was so alarmed for fear of the people he was connected with, that you were afraid to say it was him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you say this man was dressed in a light coloured coat? - A. I took no notice of his dress, I did not say that.

Mr. Const. Q. You have told us the truth now? - A. Yes.

Q. The next day, you have told us the reason why you did not own to him; before the Coroner's Jury did you say the same you have said now? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give them the same reason for not owning him before the Justice you have given now? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it true that you did know him then, and that what you have now said is the truth? - A. Yes.

HELEN COOK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach. I live at Mr. Daniels's who keeps the Red-lion in White-horse-alley.

Q. Do you remember the evening of the 10th of November? - A. Yes; the first I heard was a man in the court who had been used ill.

Q. Who was that? - A. Tomms.

Q. Did you see Tomms? - A. Yes; I came out and heard what he had to say, I went in again, and then we came out again, and heard the cry of murder; then I went down the court towards the watch-house, I went just to the watch-house door, there were four or five in the watch-house.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoner's in the watch-house? - A. One of them I know, that is the man, he goes by the name of Deputy, (Dunn).

Q. Where did you see Dunn? - A. Coming out of the watch-house, he kicked the skin off my ancle.

Q. What did you observe about Dunn when he came out of the watch-house? - A. He had a knife in his right-hand.

Q. Did you hear him make use of any expressions? - A. Yes; he damned his eyes, and said, he had cut his bloody eyes out; when I saw the knife, some of them cried out, a woman; they said they did not want the woman, they wanted the men; and then I ran away.

Q. Did you see any more? - A. Yes; when I got to the end of our court, I saw the watchman, Joseph Hubert ; I desired the watchman to turn back again, which he did not; I had not got two yards from him before he was knocked down.

Q. Do you know the person that knocked him down? - A. No; after Hubert was knocked down, I went to enquire after my master to Mr. Lewis's, there I saw Mr. Brewer walking about in blood, and wiping his face with his handkerchief; when I went in, he said, Oh they have killed me! I told him I was afraid they had; he said, he knew the man that had done it.

Q. Did he make use of any other expression? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did he describe the sense he had of his situation? - A. He was quite sensible, bleeding very much.

Q. Did you see him at the hospital? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. There was a great riot? - A. Yes.

Q. You were much frightened? - A. Yes; I kept my bed a week in consequence of it.

Q. You may be mistaken, in the bustle, as to the person? - A. No, I am not; I know his person.

SAMUEL BLACKFORD . - Mr. Knapp. Q. How old are you? - A. Twelve.

Q. You live in Greenhill-rents? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. No.

Q. Have you ever learnt your catechism? - A. No.

Q. Is it a good thing to tell a lie? - A. It is not.

Q. Do you know where people go to that tell lies, when they die? - A. To hell.

Court. Q. Do you know you have been sworn? - A. Yes.

Q. What will become of you if you swear falsely? - A. I cannot tell. - (Not examined).

JOHN ARCHER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp.

Q. Were you at Mr. Terry's door, Cow-cross, the time this happened? - A. Yes, half after ten at night.

Q. What is the name of the public-house? - A. The Green Man and Still.

Q. Where is it? - A. I believe the second door from the watch-house.

Q. While you were standing there, tell us what you observed? - A. As I was standing at the door, there was a mob coming from the watch-house, I saw Arnold.

Q. Was he among the mob? - A. He was among the mob.

Q. Was there any body else? - A. Yes, Deputy.

Q. That is Dunn, he was among the mob; did you see any thing done by them? - A. No; I went into the house, and saw no more of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Vaughan. Q. What number of people were there? - A. A great number.

JAMES M'GEORGE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I live at Pentonville.

Q. Did you happen to be at Cow-cross, the 10th of November, at night? - A. Yes; I was passing through that place in my way home.

Q. Did you observe any thing in particular? - A. Yes.

Q. What hour? - A. Shortly after ten, a person met me in a court, I don't know the name of it.

Q. Near Cow-cross? - A. Between there and Red-lion-street; he gave me an information of a riot; I was about to return with him to a house, where he said a murder was committed, or would be committed; he said, he had left that house; on returning back with him, several persons were coming up, appareantly armed with sticks, and something, I cannot describe what, just at the end of the court I was going through; they passed me, and went to the watch-house, the door appeared not to be locked, but partly secured.

Q. You were in sight of the watch-house? - A. Yes; I crossed the way, and stood opposite; it appeared to be secured by a latch or small chain; I saw them enter the place.

Q. How many? - A. To the best of my recollection, five or six; they had not been in but a little time, before they returned to the door, and were met by a number of others, I suppose the whole of them then was, at least, a dozen; they returned from the watch-house down Turnmill-street, that leads down to the Sessions-house; in their re

turn, I expected to be assaulted, and therefore I got out of the way, till I thought they were all gone.

Q. Did you know any of those you saw? - A. No.

Q. Do you know any more? - A. No.

Q. Did you see Brewer? - A. I did, and stayed with him about an hour, till he had assistance; then he was conveyed to the hospital.

CHARLES INGELFIELD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach. I am superintendant belonging to the watch.

Q. Do you remember the Thursday evening? - A. Yes; perfectly well; I saw nothing of the riot; first of all when I was going round the corner of Peter-street, about twenty minutes before eleven, I went from the corner of Peter-street to the first lamp, the corner of Sharp's alley, I heard the mob coming down; one of them said, the first bloody scout you meet, cut his bloody throat; I returned from there, and came back to the corner of Peter-street; they came down two by two; I look upon it there were about five or six and twenty of them; as I stood at the corner, one of them said, there is that bloody Ingelfield, cut his bloody throat.

Q. Did you take notice of any person in particular? - A. No; nor can I swear to any person; I stood on the other side, one of them came over, he had a knife in his hand five or six inches long.

Q. Did you observe the colour of the coat of the person? - A. A blue coat, and to the best of my knowledge, metal buttons.

Q. What colour were the metal buttons? - A. I believe they were yellow or white, I believe yellow, I cannot tell which.

Q. Did you observe any thing else? - A. He came up to me with a knife in his left hand, and cut me under the chin.

Court. Q. Do you know the person that cut you under the chin? - A. No; I was cut there, and he cut my coat in the side; after they got down Peter-street, about as far as the Bull's head, I sprung the rattle; they then all turned back upon me as fast as they could.

SAMUEL RUSSELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. On the Thursday evening, the 10th of November, you were at the club? - A. Yes.

Q. And afterwards went opposite the watch-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us what you observed there? - A. At the time I was opposite the watch-house door, I saw two people come out of the watch-house.

Q. Had you before seen any body come out of the watch-house, or had you seen any body go in? - A. I saw two persons go in.

Q. Do you know who those two persons were? - A. Yes; Deputy and Ryan.

Q. By Deputy you mean Dunn? - A. Yes.

Q. How many went in at the time Deputy and Ryan went in? - A. I saw no more go in.

Q. Did you see any other persons there? - A. There were about ten persons in the road.

Q. Do you know Arnold? - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Did you see him when the two men went into the watch-house? - A. I saw him on the side of the way I was, before me.

Q. You saw Ryan and Deputy go in? - A. Yes; and saw them come out.

Q. Do you know what happened while they were in? - A. No.

Q. What happened when they came out? - A. I saw Deputy with a knife in his hand when he came out.

Q. Ryan came out at the same time? - A. Ryan came out with him.

Q. Did you see any thing Ryan had? - A. Not at that time.

Q. Did you hear Dunn say any thing at that time? - A. Not a word.

Q. Did Ryan say any thing? - A. No; I saw a man go up and strike Ryan as he stood at the watch-house door.

Q. Was the knife you saw in Deputy's hand, open or shut? - A. Open.

Q. What sort of a knife? - A. A knife that shuts, a large pocket knife; I saw a man of the name of Atkins come up and strike Ryan over the head with a stick; they returned from the watch-house, and the mob halloaed in the road, and put about their hats, and cried huzza!

Q. You did not hear Dunn make use of any expression? - A. Not at the watch-house door.

Q. Where did you hear him say any thing? - A. I did not hear him say any thing; the mob returned towards Peter-street, there was Ryan and Dunn, Williams, and the man named Toddy; when they returned to Peter-street, Arnold was before me, on the same side of the way; at that time he neither had knife nor stick in his hand, in neither of his hands; I saw Ryan come out from the mob, and go to a man by the Compasses door.

Q. Do you know who that man was? - A. I think it was Toddy Osling; I think I saw him give him something, a weapon that he put under his coat, I cannot say what weapon; I cannot say what it was, I saw him put something under his coat he received from Ryan; with that they proceeded to the corner of Peter-street; I saw Deputy or Dunn go away single from the rest; they cut at the man superintendant to the watchmen.

Q. What is his name? - A. Ingelfield.

Q. Was the knife open? - A. Yes; the man stood between the post and the watch-box, with his hands before him, with his face towards Peter-street; I saw Deputy go singly to him, and cut him under

the chin; after he had cut him under the chin, he presented it to his body.

Q. Presented what to his body? - A. The knife; I then said, take the knife out of that man's hand, he has cut the man; the expression was then made use of, you bugger, I will cut you.

Q. Who made use of the expression? - A. I cannot pretend to say, I believe it was from Dunn's mouth; with that they went by me, and kept down Peter-street, by Bull-head-court; Ingelfield, our watchman, sprung the rattle; on springing the rattle, they returned with sticks; I observed, with Ryan, Deputy, Williams, and Osling, they particularly had sticks, they returned to this person who sprang the rattle, and I heard them say, give it him, give it him; I heard Orme's voice particularly; they beat the watchman, there was a boy under the shelter of a window, stooping down, he said, for God's sake, don't kill him, they beat him some time; they returned from beating him, and came down Peter-street, I followed them to Saffron-hill, there is a turn-stile, where they turned up; turning up, there was a gentleman in black, Dunn made an attempt at him with his knife, his hand went so to him, (describing him as putting his hand out towards his body,) he drew back; I did not know he had any hurt, I said, Williams, why don't you take the knife out of that man's hand, he has cut that man.

Q. You meant the gentleman? - A. Yes; I said, what is the use of cutting people that don't meddle with you, Williams called out, who is that mentions my name; I said, why don't you take the knife out of that man's hand, with that Williams turned round to strike me, they proceeded then to Hatton-Garden.

Q. Where was Arnold? - A. Before me, on my side, they were in the road way; I heard Ryan say, this is the roller stick.

Q. Do you know what he meant? - A. Yes, he held it up.

Q. What did he mean by the roller stick? - A. The patrole's stick; they proceeded to the corner of Hatton-Garden, Holborn, with Williams, Berry, and another person unknown to me, went down Holborn; Deputy Ryan, Orme, and Toddy Osling went up the hill; I saw Arnold running across the way, he said, why don't you go home, Sam; I said, I don't thank you for your caution, never fear me; they parted then, as I tell you, in threes and fours.

Q. Where did Arnold go? - A. He went up Holborn, that is all I know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. What is your way of life? - A. A dealer in bones, such as they collect at butcher's shops and cook-shops; I have been in that business two years.

Q. You are a member of this club? - A. I have been there once before.

Q. You were apprehended on this charge? - A. I surrendered myself up; the officers met me on the Tuesday morning, and asked me if I had been there, I said, I had, but to satisfy them, I would go with them, I went with them, the clerk not being there, they said they must take me to the New-Prison.

Q. They took you to the New-Prison? - A. Yes.

Q. You were admitted to give evidence for the Crown? - A. Yes.

Q. You come up here in custody now? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You went on Monday night without any application, and surrendered yourself? - A. Yes; on account that I heard people enquiring after me.

Q. You went away on Tuesday morning with the officer? - A. Yes, to satisfy them I had been there.

Court. Q. You had been enquired after? - A. As belonging to the club.

Prisoner Arnold. I understood he was apprehended, and on examination he was discharged; he was a second time apprehended.

Court. Q. Were you apprehended at all? - A. Yes; the officer took me up on the Tuesday.

Q. When were you discharged? - A. I was not discharged; they took me into the Hat and Tun, they said, there was no clerk there, they must take me to the New-Prison.

Court. Q. You are in custody now? - A. Yes.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Were you apprehended the second time? - A. The people met me; Willy said, the man has been up and discharged, the others said, I don't know that; I said, well, I will go with you.

Prisoner Arnold. He swore at Hatton-Garden he saw me come out of the watch-house with a stick in my hand, now he says I had no stick in my hand.

Russell. I saw him with a stick in the public-house, beating the man with it, and afterwards I saw him at Peter-street with a stick.

JHON SHARPE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const.

Q. You were in company with these people on the 10th of November? - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Tell us what happened after you quitted the ale-house? - A. After I quitted the ale-house, I saw one Thomas Williams run across the road, and cry, damn his eyes, he would break the house but he would have them out that were in it; with that he made no more to do, but ran to the public-house door, and when he found he could not get in there he went to the window, and then William Ryan joined him, and shoved up the window, and both

him and the man that went by the name of Deputy, jumped in at the window, and Thomas Williams went and opened the door, and a great many more went in, how many I don't know; when they returned out of the house, some of the mob said somebody was taken to the watch-house, with that they all ran up to the watch-house directly.

Q. Who do you mean by all? - A. William Ryan was one, and Deputy, and a vast quantity more, whose names I know well, William Arnold was one, Thomas Williams was one, Lancimo was one.

Q. What did they do, when they got to the watch-house? - A. Just before they got to the watch-house, some man ran out of the watch-house, and a great many of them ran after him up Whitehorse-alley.

Q. Were you situated as you could see what passed in the watch-house? - A. No; I could see them that came out of it.

Q. Who did you see come out of it? - A. Ryan, and Deputy, and Thomas Williams , nobody else I did not see come out of the watch-house.

Q. You were there only once, they might be there before? - A. I was there only once, they might be there before; I observed a knife in the hand of Deputy as he came out of the watch-house, he kept crying, damn his eyes, he had done it, but what I could not tell, wiping the blood off the knife on his other hand, with that they joined the mob, and halloaed out, huzza, and went down the street.

Q. Did you see any thing they did afterwards? - A. I followed them to the corner of Peter-street, where this Deputy ran to a man, and cut at him as he stood between the watch-box and the post.

Jury. Q. Whether you distinctly saw him wipe the knife on his hand? - A. Yes; he wiped it on one hand, and changed it to the other, and wiped it on the other.

Q. Are you sure you are not mistaken in the man? - A. Yes; I knew him very well.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Where have you been since you were first taken up? - A. In imprisonment.

Q. This is a public street; all that were there might see the wiping of the knife? - A. If they had a mind to look a it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q. You observed Ryan going to the watch-house? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you always told the same story? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you not say, at Hatton-Garden, that you did not see Arnold after he jumped into the window, and never saw him again till after the murder was committed? - A. I said I saw him go into the watch-house, and come out again.

Q. Did you not say that was after the wounds were given? - A. No; I did not.

Q. You seem to have been very active on the occasion; when were you taken up? - A. A fortnight ago last Wednesday.

Q. You were taken up yourself, and now you come here to speak against these men? - A. I come to tell the truth.

Q. Have you ever been examined here before? - A. Never in my life.

JOSEPH INWARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Leach. I am one of the officers belonging to the Hatton-Garden Office.

Q. You took Ryan? - A. Yes; I apprehended him on board the Sans Pareil, at Spithead; when he was called up upon deck, the first Lieutenant said, that is the man that has been entered here within these two or three days.

Q. Did you learn the name in which he entered? - A. I asked the first Lieutenant.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Was the prisoner by? - A. Yes; I asked him the name he entered by; he said, the name of Davis; I said to him, I believe you frequently have persons enter in a different name; he said, he believed they might.

Mr. Leach. Q. Did any thing pass between you and Ryan? - A. I said, ah, Ryan, how are you my boy; he said, you are very wrong, Sir, for you don't know me, I am sure; I said to the Lieutenant, I shall take him, for I am sure he is the man.

Q. What passed afterwards? - A. I brought him down and put him into the boat, and he acknowledged coming along, if I am hung -

Q. Had you told him it would be better for him to confess? - A. I don't recollect that I did.

Court. Q. Are you sure you did not? - A. I am pretty sure.

Q. Did you make him any promise? - A. I did not; he said, if he was hung, he should be hung innocent of the murder, for he did not murder the man.

Q. Did he say any thing else? - A. Nothing at all.

Q. Did he say any thing about the watch-house? - A. He said he was in the watch-house.

Q. What did he say about the watch-house? - A. He said that he was in the watch-house.

Q. What day was it that you apprehended him? - A. I believe the 18th of November, Saturday morning, about eleven o'clock.

THOMAS RAMSDEN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am assistant surgeon to St. Bartholomew's Hospital.

Q. You were called to attend upon the deceased? - A. I was, on the 11th of November, about eleven in the morning.

Q. Tell us the observation you made on the deceased? - A. He had received three wounds, one on the fore part of the top of his head, the second, from the left temple down to the chin, a third wound on his right side, a little below the right shoulder blade.

Q. From the observations you made on those wounds, with what sort of instrument was it that they were made? - A. With some very sharp cutting instrument.

Q. Of course you applied every thing necessary for the purpose? - A. The wounds were dressed; I found him with some inflammation about the wounds, and some fever; in the course of the afternoon the inflammation and fever increased; on the following morning, Saturday, the inflammation was so much increased, his head so much swoln, and all the symptoms so much aggravated, that I thought it necessary to consult with the other surgeons on the case: we held a consultation, but the symptoms continued to increase throughout the day, and in the evening he expired.

Court. Q. Did you consult the other surgeons? - A. I did.

Q. Have you any doubt the wounds so inflicted, as you describe, were the cause of his death? - A. Not any.

Q. One of the wounds you say was upon the top of the head, what was the depth of that wound? - A. Through the skull.

Q. The second wound on the left side of the face, what was the extent of that wound? - A. It penetrated the bone throughout its whole extent.

Q. The third wound, below the right shoulder blade, what was the depth of that? - A. About three inches, and one inch in width.

Q. What time of the day was it the unfortunate man died? - A. About nine in the evening; the body was opened on Sunday morning; the wounds were attended with a great inflammation; that inflammation was attended with a fever, that destroyed the deceased.

Q. Whether, from the situation this man was in, from his wounds and the fever, he had not a knowledge of his approaching dissolution, when you were with him? - A. I had no conversation with him; I conceive he was sensible of his approaching dissolution.

Q. Was he perfectly sensible? - A. At the time I first saw him, he was perfectly sensible.

Jury. Q. Whether you thought it impossible for him to recover? - A. It was too early to form an opinion when I first saw him.

Mr. Knapp. You have been asked by the Gentlemen of the Jury, whether you thought he could recover; as the fever increased and the symptoms increased, could you form a judgment of it? - A. We despaired of his life on the Saturday morning.

RICHARD WILLY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a patrol in the parish of St. Sepulchre's.

Q. You were not present on the Thursday night? - A. No, I was not.

Q. Did you see Mr. Brewer afterwards? - A. I went on Friday morning to see him in Bartholomew's Hospital; going along I saw the prisoner Arnold going across Smithfield.

Q. What time? - A. I believe a few minutes before ten in the morning; I saw him in the broad part between the penns and the Hospital in Smithfield, with a drover's stick and a dog; knowing the man, I said, Arnold, you played pretty tricks last night in Cow-cross; says he, I was not there; I said, I heard you were there, and he was all of a tremble at the time; well, says he, but I went away at ten o'clock; says I, I am glad to hear you did, and I left him; I went to Mr. Brewer, and the other people in the Hospital, and enquired of Mr. Brewer if he could tell who did it.

Q. You enquired after his health, what did he say to you? - A. He said he was a dead man, and he wished for God's sake I and every one else would apprehend the people, to do justice to himself and the country; I asked him if he knew who it was; he said, there was a man that was brought into the watch-house the over-night, that drew a knife to some of the officers, and was brought into the watch-house, and he said he was let loose the overnight; he said he was one, he believed; he believed him to be one that cut him, and that bad fellow, that drover, that cutting man, he believed him to be one too that cut him; he did not positively say they did do it, but he believed it; I said, is it Bill Arnold ? yes, he said, that was his name, and begged of me to apprehend him, which I did; accordingly I went and got some assistance, and took him out of Smithfield about half an hour after.

Q. What was Arnold? - A. He used to drove on Mondays and Fridays; when we apprehended him, I desired him to put his dog away, or I would cut him down, which he did, and his stick; when we apprehended him he had blood on one side of his face; how that came, I cannot tell; I had not power to search him, the number of drovers about him was so great, it was dangerous.

Q. Did you see Brewer afterwards? - A. I saw him several times after; I told him I had got him, and he seemed very well pleased that I had got him; I took some others, but none of the three prisoners but Arnold; he said they rushed into the watch-house upon him, several of them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. He never went further than saying he believed? - A. Never in my hearing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Vaughan. Q. What time was it you apprehended Arnold? - A. Friday, about half after ten.

Q. And in the place where he was about his business? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you apprehend any drovers besides him? - A. From the information of a woman, I apprehended three other drovers.

Q. The deceased wished you to apprehend all you could? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the other drovers you apprehended? - A. Three of them were discharged the same day.

THOMAS COLTMAN called in again. - Examined by Mr. Leach. Q. You told us the person you took to the watch-house was Dunn? - A. Yes.

Q. On Friday morning you went to Mr. Brewer? - A. Yes, between twelve and two; I went to see the other patients first; then I went into the ward where Mr. Brewer was; he saw me come into the ward, called me to his bedside, and says, Thomas, that man which you brought to the watch-house the night before last, with a knife drawn in his hand, is the man who has cut me, and will be the instigation of my losing my life.

Q. He said nothing else respecting any of the prisoners? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You saw him after Willy had seen him? - A. I don't know whether Willy saw him first or me.

ELIZABETH LEWIS called up again. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You told us before, in your original examination, that after this business happened, you went to St. Bartholomew's Hospital? - A. Yes, on Friday morning, about seven o'clock.

Q. Willy had not been there then, norany body else? - A. I don't know, I did not ask any questions.

Q. You had some conversation with Brewer; what did he say about the state of his health at that time? - A. He said he was very bad.

Q. (To Willy.) What time did you go to St. Bartholomew's Hospital on Friday morning? - A. A little after ten.

Mr. BALDWIN sworn. - Q. Is the hospital of St. Bartholomew in the City of London? - A. Yes.

Dunn's defence. I leave my defence to my Counsel. With respect to my being called Deputy, it is from my being Deputy Chairman.

Arnold's defence. I am innocent of the crime laid to my charge; they will swear any thing for the reward.

Ryan's defence. I am conscious of my innocence; I shall say nothing particularly; I leave it to my Counsel.

For Arnold.

WILLIAM FARMER sworn. - I am a pewterer, in Long-lane, West Smithfield; I have known Arnold about twenty years.

Q. What is his character for good-nature and humanity? - A. I never heard any thing against him in my life.

Q. You believed him to be a good-natured, humane man? - A. Yes, for all that ever I saw.

JAMES HARVEY sworn. - I am a tin-plate worker, servant to Joseph Lucas, in Long-Acre; I have known Arnold twelve months; he always behaved to me in a polite manner; whatever I have seen was good nature; the evening this happened, I was at his house; he went out in the afternoon, and came home about eleven at night.

THOMAS SIMPSON sworn. - I am a cabinet-maker, I live in Kingsland-road; I have known Arnold twenty years, ever since he was a child.

Q. What is his character for good nature and humanity? - A. I never heard any thing bad of him before.

Q. Did he bear the character of a good-natured man? - A. He always bore a good character that ever I heard of him.

JOSEPH WELLS sworn. - I have known Arnold about three months.

Q. What was the man's behaviour, goodnatured or otherwise? - A. Good-natured.

Dunn GUILTY Death . (Aged 22.)

Arnold GUILTY Death . (Aged 21.)

Ryan NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-6

6. FRANCIS WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , one pair of men's leather shoes, value 5s. the property of John Saden .

JOHN SADEN sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , I lost a pair of shoes off the rails; I did not see them taken.

ELIZABETH HAN sworn. - I live in Wheeler-street, the corner of White-lion-yard: On the 26th of October, at three o'clock in the afternoon, I was going down Wheeler-street , I saw the prisoner take a pair of shoes off the pags at Mr. Saden's door; there was another man-stood by the side of him, and he gave them to that man, and he ran away with them; I said to Mr. Saden, there is a man has taken a pair of shoes from your door, he is gone along with a crutch; he was immediately pursued, I saw him brought back; the prisoner is the man, he had not got the shoes, they were men's leather shoes.

Prisoner. The woman went down to the prison,

and said, she did not think I was the man; and said, she would never hurt me.

Han. I never said any such thing, I always said you were the man.

Q. (To the Prosecutor.) Who had the shoes; who did you receive them from? - A. I never had them again at all.

Han. The man that received the shoes was never brought back, nor the shoes.

Q. (To the Prosecutor.) Q. Had you any shoes hanging at your door, the 26th of October, on a peg? - A. Yes, about twenty-six pair; I missed one pair when she gave me notice, she shewed me the man; I was not well, I could not catch him.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing about the shoes, I was not guilty of it; I never had them in my hands.

Jury. (To Mrs. Han.) Q. What occasioned you to go to the prison? - A My landlady, where I lived, was taken up for robbing the India warehouse, I went to see her in prison; the prisoner beckoned to me, and said, I hope you will not say I am the man. That is the man I am sure.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-7

7. RICHARD CROFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , a damask table-cloth, value 4s. the property of Benjamin Crew .

BENJAMIN CREW sworn. - I keep a public-house in Red-lion-passage, Red-lion-square, Holborn ; the prisoner, who is a watchman , came to my house on Sunday morning, about half after one o'clock, for a pot of beer; all my servants were gone to bed, there were none up but myself, consequently I was obliged to draw the beer myself; the tap-room and bar were exposed to the prisoner, but in which place the table-cloth lay, at that time, I cannot say, it was in the one or the other; when I returned from the cellar I delivered the beer to him, and he tendered me a shilling, out of which I gave him change, and he went about his business; I went, almost in a moment, to look for the cloth, which I had in my hand at the moment he came into the house to wipe some dust from a glass, missing the cloth, a suspicion fell on the prisoner; I waited till he called the hour of two, then I called him in; I got him into the passage and immediately shut the door, and taxed him with taking the cloth; he denied it; I said, if he was an honest man he would let me search him; he refused it, unless I went to the watch-house; I then felt round him and thought I felt the cloth; on that, I unbuttoned his watch-coat, and, in his left-hand pocket, I perceived the cloth, which I took from his pocket; I called some gentlemen who were in the parlour to take care of him while I went for the constable of the night, who came with another constable, and I gave charge of him, the constable has the cloth; I know the cloth to be mine by a mark upon it, the letter C, with which all my things are marked; there is likewise a small hole near the edge of it; he said he had brought the cloth from home to take some victuals home in it; he told another story before the Magistrate.

- DAY sworn. - I am a constable; (producing the table-cloth); the prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner, I took him to the watch-house; I asked him how he came by the cloth; he said, he bought it of a woman for four shillings.

BENJAMIN SPRIGGS sworn. - I am watch-house keeper and night beadle: On Sunday night, about two o'clock, Mr. Crew came to the watch-house, and said, he had got one of our watchmen in custody, for stealing a table-cloth; I went with the last witness and brought him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence I am apt to be deranged in my mind, particularly after drinking; on Sunday last, an acquamtance had treated me with some purl and gin, I fell down and dirtied one side of my face, I went into this house to have some beer, seeing the cloth lying on the table, I took it to go backwards to wash my face, and the prosecutor took me into custody.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) Did the prisoner appear to be in liquor? - A. Not in the least.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 1s.

Fined 1s. and confined six months in Bridewell .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-8

8. FRANCES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. three guineas and fifteen shillings, in monies numbered , the property of Luke Verney .

LUKE VERNEY sworn. - I drive a post-chaise; I met with the prisoner in Long-acre, on the 1st of November, about eleven o'clock at night, we went and had something to drink together, and then I went home with her to her lodgings, in Parker's lane ; she was a stranger to me.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. Perfectly sober; I staid all night in her lodgings; I awaked in the morning about half past four, and found her absent, and all my money gone, it was in my breeches pocket, there were three guineas in gold, as to the silver I am not certain; to the best of my knowledge, there were fifteen shillings; I put my handkerchief

in the crown of my hat in a chair by the bedside; I went to Bow-street, and informed Thomas Mumford I had been robbed, and described the person of the prisoner; and they brought her to the Black-boy in Long-acre, in an hour's time, and asked me if that was the person; I knew her directly.

Q. What time was she brought to you? - A. Between eight and nine o'clock, I believe; I am not certain.

Q. You have no doubt she is the woman? - A. No; Mumford took money from her, but I could not swear to it; she was quite in liquor, and said little or nothing about it.

Prisoner. I had no money of him, but the half crown he gave me.

Prosecutor. I gave her half a crown, and eight or nine pennyworth of halfpence.

Q. You are sure you had the money in your pocket over night? - A. Yes; I saw it when I gave her something to drink.

- TREADWAY sworn. - I apprehended the prisoner on the information of Mumford, and brought her to Long-acre; he charged her with robbing him of three guineas, some silver and a silk handkerchief; she said he left the handkerchief behind him; on searching her, I found a guinea, a half crown and two shillings, five pennyworth of halfpence, two farthings and a silk handkerchief in her pocket; he could not swear to the money, and the Magistrate ordered it to be returned to the prisoner. (The handkerchief produced).

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief, I know it by the mark, it is marked with the letters L.V.I am sure it was gone in the morning, I could not find my cloaths, they were thrown about; I called the watchman up, and found all but my handkerchief; I am sure I left it in my that over night.

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I went with Treadway after this woman, and found her at the house where he said he was robbed; we searched her and found a guinea, half a crown, two shillings and sixpence, and some halfpence, we took a handkerchief out of her pocket; we met him as we were coming from the house with her.

Prisoner's defence. I am certain the prosecutor gave me a half crown piece, he said he had no more money, I must treat him out of the half crown; I said, it was too hard to treat out of it; however, I consented, and we went to bed together; when I got up in the morning, I went to light my fire, the silk handkerchief was left on the pillow; I had no more money than the half crown.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-9

9. ISAAC WARREN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , an half crown , the property of Mary Moore .( Mary Moore was called, but not appearing, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-10

10. ELIZABETH MINNING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , a silver watch, value 30s. a steel watch chain, value 6d. a metal seal, value 2d. a steel watch key, value 1d. and a silk handkerchief, value 1s. the property of William Innis .

WILLIAM INNIS sworn. - I am a mill-wright : On Sunday night, the 16th of October, between nine and ten, I came into town from Hatfield; being a stranger in town, I went into a public-house in St. Giles's, and called for a pint of beer, and enquired for a lodging, the prisoner came in and told me she could get me a lodging if I would go with her; I went with her, I don't know the name of the street she took me to; I asked the landlady of the house what she charged, she said, a shilling, I paid her; the prisoner brought a light, and shewed me the room where I was to sleep, she left me, and came and took the candle away when I was in bed.

Q. Were you drunk or sober? - A. Sober as I am now; the silk handkerchief and my breeches with the watch in the fob were on a chair by the bed side; in the morning, between five and six, I found I was robbed of my watch and handkerchief; I lay in a back room to which I went through the front room; when I got up in the morning, I found the door of my room locked on the outside with a padlock, I made a noise at the door, and the servant came and opened it, she told me nobody had been in the room but the prisoner; she went up stairs, and the prisoner came down and abused me in a very gross manner, she took a case knife in her hand, and threatened to take my life, if I offered to accuse her of any thing of the kind; I told her I did not accuse any body, but my watch I had lost since I came into the house; I went for a constable, and had her taken up, the constable found nine shillings and three-pence upon her, and the silk handkerchief at a pawnbroker's, he shewed it me the next day, the 17th, the watch has never been found.

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn. - I live in Bow-street, I am assistant to the officers; On the 17th of October, about eleven o'clock, the prosecutor came to me, and told me he was robbed; I went with him to a house in Dyor-street; we stopped some time below stairs, and the prisoner came in, he said, she was the woman that shewed him the lodging; I searched her, and found in her pocket

a nutmeg-grater and this duplicate, by the direction of which, I went with the prosecutor to the pawn-brokers, and found the handkerchief, the pawn-broker brought the handkerchief down to the Magistrates, and the woman was committed, the watch was never found, I found some money upon her.

GEORGE DOBREE sworn. - I am a pawn-broker, at No. 135, High-Holborn; the prisoner pawned this handkerchief with me the 17th of October, between ten and eleven in the morning, I lent her a shilling upon it, I have had it ever since; I know the prisoner, I am sure she is the person that brought it. (The handkerchief was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I was standing at the corner of Dyot-street, the prosecutor asked me to go and have a pint of beer in the public-house, I went, and we had two pots of beer, and he asked me to take him to my lodgings, I took him home, and he gave me a shilling for his bed; he said, he would give me two shilling to sleep with me, he gave me but one, and gave me the handkerchief for the other; I went to bed with him, but he behaved so rude and indecent, I could not stay in the bed with him; I went up stairs and slept by myself, and in the morning I pawned the handkerchief for the other shilling, as he had given me but one; when I was taken, they knocked me down, and used me very ill, I was eight months gone with-child, and their usage occasioned the death of the child; I had 12s. in money they took from me.

Q. (To the Prosecutor). Had you any connection with the woman? - A. None at all.

Q. Did you give her the money or the handkerchief? - A. No, I did not; I did not give her a penny.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-11

11. WILLIAM TURNER and JAMES BULL were indicted for having put off, on the 22d of October , to Christopher Dowling , two pieces of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of the coin of this realm, called half-guineas, at a lower rate than the same did import .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Cullen, and the case was opened by Mr. Fielding.)

CHRISTOPHER DOWLING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. I keep a public-house , the Queen's-arms tap, St. James's-street ; about June or July, William Turner came to my tap, and proposed to bring me ten guineas in half-guineas, in return for 5l. I told him I could not think of giving him any money, until such time as I saw what sort they were; I told him to bring me one or two, and let me see them, and I should be better able to advance money to him to make me some; he told me the next time he came to see me, he would bring me one or more to shew me; the next time he came, he brought two half-guineas.

Court. Q. How long was that after the conversation you had had with him? - A. I cannot justly say; when I saw them, I liked them very well, and he told me he would bring me ten guineas worth on the next Monday; after he was gone, I went immediately to Bow-street, to have advice in what manner I was to proceed; I went afterwards to the Solicitor of the Mint, and received directions what to do; the prisoner Turner came again on Saturday, the 22d of last month, about four o'clock; the prisoner Bull was with him; they sat down and had a pint of porter; then Turner said, Mr. Dowling, I want to speak to you; he and I went immediately out of doors into a long passage that leads to our house, between the tap and the street; he pulled two counterfeit half-guineas out if his pocket, and said, I have brought you some of them, and I asked him to let me see them; he took them both out of his pocket; I said I liked them very well; I asked him how much they would be; he told me 9s.; I consented to pay him for them, and told him to come in doors; he came in and sat down, and had something more to drink with Bull, and he asked me for the money.

Q. Was Bull present when he asked you for the money? - A. No; he came separately from Bull; when he asked me for the money, I did not know that Bull knew any thing of the business; when Turner gave them me in the passage, Bull was sitting in the house; I told him I would pay him presently, and he seemed very uneasy to get the money immediately; I told him if he would come on Sunday morning, I would pay him; this was Saturday evening; he declined coming, but wanted the money immediately, and said he would call for a shilling's worth of something to drink, if I would let him have the two half-guineas back again; I refused to do so, and went about my business out of the tap-room, and sent to the office for a couple of officers; they not coming immediately as I wished, I went to the back door, and Mr. Harding, belonging to Bow-street, happened to be there; I told him of the business, and desired him to come in; in about two minutes I went in, and told Turner that I would have but one, and returned him the other, and at the same time paid him down 4s. 6d. for the one I kept in my possession; Mr. Harding came in just at that juncture of time that I paid him the money; I put it down on the table, he took it up, and had it at that time in his right hand, he had the other half-guinea in

his left hand; the officer immediately took hold of him by the right hand, and asked him what he had got in his hand; he said, nothing; the officer opened his hand and took the 4s. 6d. out; he searched his pockets, and while he was searching his pockets, Turner turned round and threw the half-guinea that he had in his hand behind him; we heard it ring; I thought it was in the fire; I took a candle and found it on the hob; the officer picked it up, and took him immediately to Bow-street; I have the half-guinea I bought, the officer has the other; there was nothing found upon him, I believe, but a few sixpences and some copper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. When Turner came to you on the 22d, you desired him to let you look at these two half-guineas? - A. He told me he had got them, and we went out into the passage together, and he shewed them to me.

Q. Did you not ask him to let you see them? - A. Yes.

Q. He gave them into your hand? - A. Yes.

Q. And there you kept them? - A. I asked him how much they would be, and he told me 9s.

Q. Nothing further passed at that time? - A. No.

Q. You were to satisfy yourself about them, and he told you they would be 9s.? - A. I told him to step into the tap-room, and I would pay him in the tap.

Q. You were to satisfy yourself about the money? - A. I was satisfied, and was to give him his price for them.

Q. You did not give him his price, and he wanted them back and to go away? - A. Yes; he said he would call for a shilling's worth, if I would let him have them.

Q. You did not do it, and he sat there drinking? - A. Yes.

Q. You afterwards returned one to him? - A. I did.

Q. Had there been any agrement between you to part with one of them only, the agreement was to part with both or none? - A. No; I was to purchase what I pleased of them.

Q. The only conversation was relative to buying the two - did you at all converse with him upon the subject of buying one only? - A. No; only when I returned in, I said, I would have but one; he said, why then pay me.

Q. Do you mean to say that you did not, without any converse at all, return one, and throw down the 4s. 6d. for the other? - A. No; I had a good deal of conversation with him.

Q. Do you mean to say you did not return him one, and throw down the 4s. 6d. without any conversation about buying the one? - A. No; I came in and said, Mr. Turner, I will have only one of them, I will give you 4s. 6d. for one; he said immediately, let me have the money, and I paid him.

Q. Was any body present at the time that conversation took place? - A. Nobody but he and I.

Q. Have you a wife or any body that was in the room? - A. Yes; I have a wife.

Q. Is she here? - A. No.

Q. Have you any pot-boy? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he in the room? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he here? - A. No.

Court. Q. How came you to say there was nobody present but you and he? - A. I believe he was in the room; I did not observe him; I am not sure; Turner was sitting in one box and I in another; he was in a box separate from any other company; Bull was in another box.

Q. Where was you wife at the time? - A. She was backwards and forwards.

Q. Was not she in the tap-room at the time? - A. I cannot say whether she was in the tap-room, or in the cellar, or upstairs; she was about her business.

Mr. Cullen. Q. Was this conversation carried on so loud, that other people might hear? - A. No.

RICHARD HARDING sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. I am a patrole: On the 22d of last month, about four o'clock, I was sent for take Turner into custody, which I according did; I searched him, and found in his right hand 4s. 6d.; then I searched his breeches pocket, and found two sixpences, a bit of wire, and a bit of copper; in the mean time he threw something from his left hand, backwards; I heard the ring of it against the grate; I immediately got a candle to look for it, and on the left hand side of the fire-place I picked up half-a-guinea; I asked him immediately, what did you throw this half-guinea away for; he made answer immediately, I have no business with it, that man gave it to me, pointing to Bull; from that I immediately took Bull into custody, and searched him; I found one sixpence upon him, and a dozen of gold rings, and some copper trinkets gilt; from that I took them to the office, and had them examined.

Q. What did Bull say? - A. He did not say any thing to me. (Produces the property he took from Turner, and the half-guinea he threw in the fire-place.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether Turner and you were not at a distant part of the room when he said he had it from Bull? - A. I was just by the fire-place; Bull was in another box, smoking his pipe.

Q. Then Bull could not hear what he said? - A. Yes; he could hear him as well as he does me now.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fieldling. I belong to the Mint; I was present at the office when the prisoners were examined; the Magistrate before whom they were

examined was Mr. Ford; this is the examination of Bull, with his signature to it (producing it). The examination was read.

Q. Look at those half-guineas? - A. They are both counterfeits.

Court. Q. How do you know that? - A. From the experience I have in the Mint.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are not engaged in coining in the Mint? - A. No.

Q. You speak only as a common observer? - A. Yes.

Turner's defence. In the middle of February I happened to go to the Queen's Larder, I have used it for some time, I had a pint of beer, and four-pennyworth of meat; Dowling pulled a pair of buckles out of his pocket, and asked if I had any buckles; he said, he wanted a pair; I said, I had a pair in pawn; he said, if I would fetch them out he would buy them of me; I said, they lay in King's-head-court, Shoe-lane; I went and got them out, and brought them to Dowling; I said, they they are full-dress buckles, they stand me in thirty shillings; he said, what do you ask for them; I said, twenty-five shillings, you shall have them bargain; he said, I shall give you no such money, I will give you twenty shillings; I said, I am sorry I have been at this trouble, you take the advantage of me; he then said he would give me twenty shillings and two pints of ale; I agreed to take it, and he gave me the twenty shillings, and gave me three bad shillings in paying the money down; I said, here are three bad shillings, I can tell them by the ring; we drank together, and he said, can you help me to any thing of this sort; I said, no; he said, he dealt in that way; he said, these were three of the pieces; this is a dark kitchen, there is a great deal done here; he said, he had thirty-three shillings for a guinea; he said, you being a tradesman might get a little this way; I said, I did not understand it; he said, he had a good E O table, he had a partner belonging to the Lottery-office, and he said, I being a tradesman, if I wanted any encouragement, not to be at a loss, he would encourage me; he asked me if I could help him to any bad halfpence; I said I did not know any man in that profession; he said, he wondered, as a tradesman, I did not get into that line; he further said, there was a person used to serve him with yellows.

Bull was not put upon his defence.

Turner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

Turner GUILTY .

Imprisoned six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Bull NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-12

12. WILLIAM TURNER and JAMES BULL were again indicted, William Turner for the same offence, and James Bull as an accessary before the fact .

The prosecutor not offering any evidence they were both found

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-13

13. SARAH REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a quart pewter pot, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Mansfield .

JOHN MANSFIELD sworn. - I keep a public-house , the Horse-and-groom, Great Turnstile, the corner of Lincoln's-inn fields ; the pot was found in the custody of the prisoner.

ANDREW TEDEMAN sworn. - I am a constable of the Ward of Aldersgate: On the night of the 17th of this month, a pawnbroker's servant brought the prisoner to the watch-house, and gave charge of her; I perceived a bundle under her cloak, which she tried to conceal; I asked her what she had under her cloak; she said it was nothing to me; I forced the bundle from her, and found two quart pots in it; I asked her how she came by them; she told me she had found them in Long-acre; I looked at the directions on the pots, one proved to be Mr. Mansfield's, the Horse-and-groom, Lincoln's-inn-fields, the other belonged to Mr. Bolt, in Longacre; I took the pots from her, and went the next morning to Mr. Mansfield's; I have had the pot ever since.

DAVID PERRYMAN sworn. - I observed her to have a bundle under her arm; I asked her to let me look what it was; she put it on the counter, and produced some fragments of victuals.

Q. Were you at the watch-house? - A. Yes; I saw her attempt to conceal the bundle under the bench; I saw the officer take it from her, and take out two quart pewter pots, one was Mr. Mansfield's, the other Mr. Bolt's.

SAMUEL STEVENS sworn. - I am a watchman; Perryman gave me charge of the prisoner; I saw the pots taken out of the bundle, one with the name of Mansfield on it.

Prosecutor. I did not miss the pot till the officer brought it to me; then I looked and found there was one missing. (It was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I found the bundle with the pots in it, coming down Lincoln's-in-fields, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I never was in the gentleman's house in my life.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUITY . (Aged 37.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-14

14. JANE RICHARDS was indicted for putting off, on the 26th of October , to Hannah M'Gaun, three pieces of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of the coin of this realm, called shillings; and eight pieces of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness of the coin of this realm, called sixpences, at a lower rate than the same did import .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Ward, and the case opened by Mr. Raine).

HANNAH M'GAUN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Ward. I live in the King's arms garden, St. George's: On the 26th of October, I went to the prisoner's house, in Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane, Whitechapel , for half a guinea's worth of bad silver coin, with a marked half guinea, which I received from Cornelius Richardson; she told me she had not got so much in the house; she told me if I came again in the morning, I might have as much as I would; I came out and told Richardson and Rogers what she said, and they gave me half a crown and a shilling marked, they were bent, and two inches made on the edge, that was about six o'clock; I went again the same evening, between six and seven, and gave them to the prisoner, and she gave me three shillings and eight sixpences; I came to Cornelius Richardson, and he told me to keep them in my custody. I have them now, they have never been out of my custody.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am an officer belonging to the Public office, Shadwell: on the 26th of October, in consequence of orders received from the Magistrate, to look after people in the habit of passing bad money, I gave Richardson directions relative to in; he said he knew a woman fit for the purpose; and Richardson, and this Hannah M'Gaun and I went to the head of Blue Anchor-alley, Rosemary-lane, she went into the prisoner's house with a half-guinea marked, I saw her go in, and we waited at the head of the lane; she came out again, and we gave her a half-crown and a shilling, which I marked with the point of a pen-knife, both the edge and the middle; I handed them to Richardson, and he gave them to her to go and purchase some base coin with; she went, and returned in a few minutes; and Richardson, in company with me, went into the house, the prisoner was behind the counter, I searched her pockets, and found half a guinea in gold, and I think five or six shillings of good silver, and some halfpence, and the shilling which I gave Hannah M'Gaun; I did not find the half crown; (produces the shilling); I can swear this is the shilling I gave to M'Gaun, and found in the pocket of the prisoner.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you belong to the same office that you did? - A. I belonged to Worship-street office.

Q. How came you not to belong to Worship-street now? - A. One of the Magistrates recommended me to another office.

Q. Were not you discharged from Worship-street? - A. Not to my knowledge; Mr. Colquhoun recommended me to the Magistrates at Shadwell.

Q. You have known M'Gaun a long while? - A. I never saw her before that day.

Q. It was your scheme sending her in this way? - A. It was by order of the Magistrates.

Q. You never saw a shilling marked in that way? - A. Not exactly the same, I cannot say that I did.

Q. Did you never see a shilling with two cuts like that? - A. I may have seen shillings with cuts, but not exactly in the same manner as that.

Q. After M'Gaun returned, you went to the house? - A. I did.

Q. The half crown was not found? - A. No.

Q. How long was it from the time M'Gaun came out, that you went into the house? - A. In a few minutes within ten minutes.

Mr. Raine. Q. You were not an officer belonging to the Bow-street office? - A. No.

You were a supernumerary officer, till Mr. Colquhoun got you a better place.

CORNELIUS RICHARDSON sworn. - I am an extra constable.

Q. Do you remember the 26th of October, Rogers giving a marked shilling and half a crown to you? - A. Yes; and I gave it this woman.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - I am an officer belonging to Worship-street.

Q. Look at that coin, and see if it is good? - A. Here are three shillings and eight sixpences, they are all counterfeit.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What house do you keep? - A. A private house.

Q. You are not a silversmith? - A. No.

Q. You have no knowledge about coin, but by having the misfortune to give evidence against a great many people here? - A. No; but I have had a great deal of experience.

Q. You have no other means of knowing it, but by seeing a good deal produced in this Court? - A. None in the world; I have no doubt in saying they are counterseit, from my experience.

Prisoner's defence. I have kept shop between six and seven years; I did not pay any particular attention to the money; I took that shilling honestly in my shop.

GUILTY (Aged 32).

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Imprisoned three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-15

15. JANE RICHARDS was again indicted for the like offence , but no evidence being offered, she was found NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-16

16. RICHARD SIMMS was indicted for coining, on the 18th of November , a piece of false money, to the likeness of a halfpenny .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Ward, and the case opened by Mr. Raine).

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Ward. I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: In consequence of an information, on Friday, the 18th of November, I went with a warrant, to Dudley-court, St. Giles's ; I sent Peach about a yard or a yard and a half before me, to knock at the door; he knocked twice, he stopped about a minute between; I saw the window curtains drawn, and I went by the window; I was proceeding to push the door open, when a girl opened it; it was unlocked and unbolted, I heard the lock and bolt drawn; I went in and met Simms coming towards me, he had his cloaths on, but not buttoned; I then told the officers to secure him, which they did instantly; I went on to a passage, and observed the wainscot, pulled down two or three boards, and this rug hung part up and part down, I got under the rug and through the boards, I came to some stairs, and went down those stairs into a place that had been a bake-house, because there was an oven there, that was under the first floor; I found a fire alight, with this iron pot on the fire, with a net in it and a quantity of halfpence being boiled, to receive a colour; they boil them in a liquid, here is the liquid now, that takes the brightness of the copper off; I then saw a press with dies, fixed, and other dies by it, and a stamping press; one of the officers has the dies; in the left hand corner stood a table with these halfpence told up, apparently, in shilling's-worths; these are all coloured, and have been thro every process, and sit for circulation; then in one corner of the cellar, I found a quantity of clean sawdust, which is to dry them when they come out of the pickle; in the other corner there was saw-dust, apparently, with oil, black and greasy; there was a bottle of oil in the cellar, that is to take the dampness off, and keep them from cankering, I have always found greasy saw-dust used in this business; here is a bag which they are shook in, it is called a rouncing sack; they put some saw-dust in the bag, and then put the halfpence in and shake them backwards and forwards, which mixes the oil and sawdust among the halfpence, and puts a blackness on them, to make them look like old halfpence.

Q. That would put upon them the appearance of the halfpence you have produced, that were piled up? - A. Yes, I found this sieve where the press was; the sieve is to riddle them when they come out of the bag; it takes the saw-dust off.

Q. Do you or not know that a sieve is used in coming? - A. I have found them in all these places; this is an edging or rounding instrument, I found that fixed in a window up stairs, I took it down; when they are first cut, they have a rough edge, and this will make them smooth; here is a stocking with some misstruck halfpence in it; there were sacks nailed up to both the windows that went into the street, where any light could appear, to keep the light out, and deaden the found, I should believe, because these presses have a found; the door that went into the yard was locked, and we could not find the key; we broke it open; if that door had been open, any body in the next yard might have seen what was going on in the cellar; the prisoner being secured, said he paid eighteen guineas a year for the house; and the little girl's hands being in the same condition as her father's, I took her to the Magistrate, he discharged her.

Q. How were his hands? - A. Black and greasy, as persons are in that employ.

Q. From the appearance of the stamping press, do you believe or not, that it had been recently at work? - A. I believe it had been recently at work, the oil in the screw then was fresh.

Q. Did you examine the press particularly? - A. I left that to the persons who took it down, there were some drops of a candle upon it, I found no candle alight, there was a candle near the oven; I compared some of the halfpence I took out of the pot, with the dies, they appeared to tally; they have the same date, (looks at some of the halfpence), they are all counterfeit.

JOHN WRAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Raine. I am an officer of Worship-street; I went in company with Armstrong, and the rest of the officers, Harper, Ferris and Peach; I went into the cellar; I saw the press fixed, with a pair of dies in it; I remained in the cellar, and took the press down; the dies are here; I found three other pair of dies by the side of the press.

Q. (To Armstrong). Explain in what way the dies are fixed, and how the press is used? - A. A die is put in the bottom, and the sly is fixed on the top,

by which they work it, and it is fixed in the ground, that the found may go downwards.

Court. Q. The halfpence have all the same impression upon them? - A. Yes; all heads and women, there are none plain.

Q. (To Wray). You found the fly? - A. Yes; every thing was complete, it was in a state to work; there was a great weight at each end of the fly.

Armstrong. With those weights and the oil, it goes very easy, and gives the impression.

Q. You found a little girl? - A. Yes; her hands induced me to take her to the Magistrate; there was a girl bigger than her, and some little children; the biggest girl's hands appeared clean.

Q. Were there people enough in the house to work the press? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You have seen that sort of press before? - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any other use it can be put to besides coming? - Yes; a variety of uses, but then they must not have dies in them.

WILLIAM PEACH sworn. - I know nothing more than what Armstrong and Wray have said, only I knocked first at the door.(The implements were all produced in Court).

Prisoner's defence. I live in that house; I let my cellar and one-pair of stairs room to a man, who came to take it of me, and gave me a fortnight's money in hand; they wanted the cellar for the use of the oven they told me; my witnesses were here, but they are gone; I did not suppose the trial would have come on to night. GUILTY (Aged 46.)

Imprisoned one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-17

17. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a linen umbrella, value 8s. the property of Charles Price .

CHARLES PRICE sworn. - I live at No. 221, in the Strand: I lost an umbrella, on Monday last, between nine and ten o'clock; on being informed that a man had run away with an umbrella, my brother and I instantly pursued him; my brother took him in the Temple, and brought him and the umbrella back into the shop, in about three or four minutes after it was missed; my brother gave me the umbrella, it is my own making, I can swear to it, it hung on a hook at the shop window; I missed one as soon as I was informed it was gone.

Jury. Q. Has Mr. Effex any concern in your shop? - A. No; I took it of Mr. Essex.

DAVID PRICE sworn. - I live with my brother: I received information that an umbrella was gone, I followed the prisoner, and overtook him a little way in the Temple, he was walking with the umbrella under his right arm; I desired him to stop, and said that was not his property; he begged for mercy, and that I would let him go, that was all that passed; I brought him back; I marked the umbrella, and gave it to my brother.

Q. Have you any share in the house? - A. No; it is my brother's property; I can swear to the make, the stick and other particulars of the make of the article; there were seven hanging up at the door; one was gone; we make all the umbrellas that we keep ourselves.

JOHN WILLY (a bay.) - Q. Did you ever take an oath? - A. No.

Q. What will become of you if you say that which is false; have you never been told? - A. No.

Q. Were you ever taught your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you ever taught what will become of you if you behave ill? - A. No. (Not sworn.)

Prisoner's defence. As I was coming from Covent-garden, I picked up this umbrella about ten yards from this shop; it had blown away; as I was walking through the Temple, this man laid hold of me, and asked me how I came by it; I said I found it; he took me back to the shop, and sent for a constable, and gave charge of me.

Q. (To the prosecutor.) How came you to make the pursuit? - A. On the boy saying a man was gone off with an umbrella.

GUILTY . (Aged 23).

Imprisoned one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-18

18. SARAH JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of November , two cotton bed-curtains, value 20s. one linen bed-head cloth, value 4s. a linen vallance, value 2s. two woolen blankets, value 2s. two pillows, value 12d. a linen and wollen bed-quilt, value 4s. a looking-glass in a walnut-tree frame, value 2s. a copper teakettle, value 1s. 6d. two brass candlesticks, value 1s. a flat iron, value 6d. and a copper saucepan, value 12d. the property of Robert Stukey , the same being in a lodging room let by contract by him to the said Sarah Jackson .

ROBERT STUKEY sworn. - I keep a lodging-house, No. 10, Worship-street ; I let a lodging to the daughter of the prisoner, Mary Jackson , for the use of both the daughter and mother; the daughter came first, the mother came in the evening; they were to give 3s. 6d. a week; they came in a month ago last Thursday; I had a suspicion the things were gone, but could not get into the room till last Thursday night; when I went in, the prisoner asked me what I wanted; I told her

I had a suspicion she had taken the curtains away; she said, what of that, I mean to get them home on Saturday night; I immediately told her, if she did not deliver up the duplicates, or tell me where the property was, I would send for an officer; she gave me, in the course of a quarter of an hour, five duplicates (producing them;) when she had given me them, I told her that was not the whole, and sent for an officer; he said, she had got some more, and she said, it was a lie; he searched, and found a pocket-book in her bosom, with about fifty duplicates in it, seven of which were of my things, besides those she had given me; all the things, but the copper saucepan, are in Court now.

CHRISTIANA STUKEY sworn. - I was present at the letting of the lodging; it was let to Mary Jackson, the daughter of the prisoner, for the use of herself and her mother; they were to pay 3s. 6d. a week; we had a suspicion they had taken away some of the things, but did not go into the room till Thursday last; the first things we missed were the curtains from the bed, then we missed two pillows, and the rest of the things mentioned in the indictment; they were in the room when the lodging was let.(The things were produced in Court by the several pawnbrokers, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's defence. I meant to fetch the things out again, I did not leave the place.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 43.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-19

19. JOSEPH CUISINIERE , otherwise COOK , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of November , a pair of linen drawers, value 2s. four linen shirts, value 16s. two muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 3s. five linen pocket handkerchiefs, value 5s. two linen night-caps, value 2s. and five pair of thread socks, value 20d. the property of Julia Antoine du Bue Duserret .(The Prisoner being a foreigner, a Jury of half foreigners was impanelled, and an interpreter sworn.)

Names of the Jury.

James Dodd ,

John Ungerbickler ,

William Kelman ,

John Wilche ,

John Mutlow ,

Lewis Saurbrey ,

Richard Hughes ,

Robert Harris ,

John Christian Paull ,

John George Halentz ,

John Jackson ,

Nicholas Schlick .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JULIA ANTOINE DU BUE DUFERRET sworn.

Q. What is your name? - A. Antoine du Bue Duferrer; I know the prisoner at the bar; he came every morning to brush my cloaths; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; they were all at the house.

Q. Whether the prisoner had the care of your linen upon any occasion? - A. They were only given him to carry to the washerwoman; I found some duplicates in the room or kitchen where he was to brush my coat, and I accused him with pawning them; I did not tell him immediately that I had found the duplicates; when I told him, he did not say any thing about them; upon finding the duplicates, I looked and perceived I had lost my linen; I caused the prisoner to be apprehended, and made application to the pawnbroker.

Q. Whether you ever gave the prisoner, or any body else, any authority to pawn these articles? - A. Never.

Q. Whether you know any thing more of this business? - A. Nothing.

Cross examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Whether you are a single man? - A. A widower.

Q. Whether any body lodges with you in the same house? - A. No.

Q. How long the prisoner had used to come of a morning to brush your coat? - A. Ever since my arrival in London, two months very near.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before you employed him in this country? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Whether you follow any business in this country? - A. No; I came into this country on private business.

Q. What part have you of the house, or have you the whole of the house? - A. I lodge in the house of Mr. Phillow, No. 8, Edward-street; I have only an apartment, the second floor.

Q. How many other persons lodged in the house? - A. To my knowledge, none.

Q. Who else lived in the house? - A. The master of the house, his sister, and his brother.

Q. The kitchen was occupied by all those persons in the house, as well as yourself? - A. The servant of the house.

Q. They had all access to it? - A. The access in common.

Q. Whether there was a French woman lodged over you in the house? - A. I don't believe it, I believe the servant lies there.

Q. Whether you had any occasion yourself to go to a pawnbroker's shop? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Did you ever employ any person to go to a pawnbroker's on your business? - A. Never in my life.

Q. The prisoner's wife was your washerwoman? - A. Yes.

JEAN BAPTISTE DU BUE ST OLYMPE sworn. - I am nephew to Mr. Duferret; I came to his house after the duplicates were found; I had no

conversation with the prisoner about it till I came to Bow-street; I spoke to him there respecting the duplicates by order of the Justice.

Q. Was what he said taken down in writing or not? - A. I did not see whether any body took it down or not; I was there to interpret for my relation.

Q. Do you know whether the answers he gave to you were taken down in writing by the clerk? - A. I don't know indeed; I saw the clerk writing something.

Q.(To the Prosecutor.) Who has the duplicates that were found in your house? - A. I gave them to the Justice.

WILLIAM BAKER sworn. - I am a pawnbroker in Chandler's-street, Grosvenor-square; the prisoner pledged the property I have here on Thursday, the 17th of November; he asked me to lend him some money, he wanted 15s.; I looked at the things and lent it him without hesitation; whether he told me the name, or I asked him, I don't know; he said the name was Duferret, No. 9, Edward-street, Portman-square. (The things were produced in Court.)

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. He told you he wanted 15s.; he appeared distressed? - A. He stood in the shop some time; he asked me 15s.

Q. He did not give you a false description? - A. No; he said he lived at Mr. Duferret's, Edward-street.

Mr. Duferret. (Looks at the things.) The shirts are marked D. F. they are mine.

Mr. Knapp. Q. What wages did you give the prisoner? - A. Half-a-guinea a month.

Q. Was there any money due to the prisoner at this time? - A. None at all.

Prisoner's defence. I went to the pawnbroker's, and said the things belonged to Mr. Duferret, and he wanted 15s.; I wanted the things to be in but a very few days, and he would take the things again; I gave the name of Mr. Duferret, and where he lived.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-20

20. JOHN BURN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of November , six pounds weight of sugar, value 2s. the property of Robert Mallagan and David Mitchell .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Roderick Morrison .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of persons Unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - I am a police officer at Shadwell; on the 2d of this month, in the evening, I went with Hill, who is a Trinity officer, by direction of the Magistrates, to look after lumpers who plunder shipping; we saw a number of lumpers come out of a ship into a lighter, near Stone stairs; the ship was moored on the Middlesex side of the River; one of the lumpers called for a boat, and Smith, the waterman, rowed us close, under pretence of taking them, and immediately Hill jumped on board the lighter, and I staid in the boat; Hill took off the hat of the prisoner, in which he found a quantity of sugar, which is here (producing it;) we took him into custody, and when we came on shore at Stone stairs, I searched him, and in the inside of his trowsers, on the left leg, I found this bag of sugar concealed; I brought him to the office; he said he had been working on board the Bushy Park, and he found it on the deck; it is clean sugar, there is about 6lb.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You don't know yourself that this man worked on board the Bushy Park? - A. He came out of the ship.

Q. The ships lie close together? - A. Yes, in the tier.

Q. You don't know then whether he came from on board that ship or the others? - A. He said he came from the Bushy Park; I asked him if he came from that ship; he said he did.

Q. You did not search him till you came on shore? - A. No.

Q. Might he not have disposed of the sugar if he had stole it, before he got on shore? - A. We watched him.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, did you ask him if he was working on board the Bushy-Park? - A. Upon my oath, I did; I said, that is the Bushy Park, were you working on board that ship; he said he was.

Q. Did not the mate say, that he did not know that any plunder had been committed on board that ship? - A. He said he did not know; we went on board afterwards, and he said there was some sugar taken.

Q. I ask you, upon your oath, did not the mate, in the presence of the men, and before the Magistrate, say, he did not know there was any sugar stole? - A. He said something to that effect.

Q. Were not some of the Customs-house officers examined? - A. Not in my presence.

Q. Whether the prisoner did not say, that he came through the Bushy Park from the other ships? - A. I did not hear him say any such thing; there was the name on the stern of the ship; I said, have you been working on board the Bushy Park; he said he had.

JAMES HILL sworn. - I am an officer in the employment of the Trinity-house, I was with

Rogers: On the 2d of November, I saw the prisoner, and some others, on board the deck of the Bushy-park, he was a lumper on board, as I understood; we let the boat we were in lie to, and waited till the lumpers came off the ship into the lighter to come on shore; immediately as they came into the lighter I jumped on board the lighter; I took the prisoner's hat off, and found this sugar in it as it is now, I gave it to Rogers; we brought him on shore and searched him, and found this sugar tied round his leg under his trowsers.

Q. Do you know that this ship is loaded with sugar? - A. Yes; I saw it unloading from day to day.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You understood he was working on board this ship? - A. He told me so himself.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - I know the ship Bushy-park.

Q. Who is the master of it? - A. Roderick Morrison; the owners are Robert Mallagan and David Mitchell .

Prisoner's defence. That man never saw me on board that ship.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-21

21. JOHN DALTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , nine pounds weight of sugar, value 3s. the property of Robert Mallagan and David Mitchell .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Roderick Morrison .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.

EDWARD ROGERS sworn. - On the 2d of November, I was in a boat with Hill, the Trinity-officer, at some distance from the Bushy-park; I noticed some lumpers coming from on board the Bushy-park, among whom was the prisoner; they called for a sculler, and Smith rowed along side the lighter, and Hill jumped out of the boat into the lighter and laid hold of Dalton, and close by him I saw this bag of sugar lying, close to Dalton, on the deck of the lighter, and Hill called out, he had dropped the bag, and I took him and the bag into my possession; it was close by his foot.

Q. Could it drop from any body else? - A. I believe not, I don't know; Dalton denied it before the Magistrate; it contains about nine pounds of sugar.

Q. Were there other lumpers? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. I understand you, that he was in the boat before you saw the bag? - A. Hill called out that he had dropped the bag, I looked over and saw the bag.

JAMES HILL sworn. - I am a Trinity-officer; I went to the lighter by the side of the Bushy-park, I saw the prisoner Dalton come out of the Bushy-park upon the lighter, as I was aboard the lighter; I apprehended the prisoner; when I laid hold of him, I saw this drop from him from under his jacket, I secured him with one hand, and the bag with the other, it contains clean sugar; the Bushy-park was loaded with sugar.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. There were a great number of lumpers on board the lighter? - A. There were four of five.

Q. He was so near the edge of the lighter, that he might have thrown it into the water? - A. If I had not prevented him.

Q. When you jumped into the lighter, he had time to throw it over-board? - A. Yes, if he had known who we were.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn. - Q. Who is the captain of the Bushy-park? - A. Roderick Morrison.

Q. Who are the owners? - A. Robert Mallagan and David Mitchell .

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel, and called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-22

22. CATHERINE MALBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , a counterpane, value 2s. the property of Samuel Davis ; a black silk cloak, value 4s. a calico gown, value 6d. and a muslin apron, value 2s. the property of Mary Sherrard .

SAMUEL DAVIS sworn. - I am a weaver : Last Tuesday, the 22d of November, I was at work, a person came, about two o'clock, and told me my room was robbed; I went home directly, and missed all the things mentioned in the indictment; I found some of the things the next day at the pawnbrokers; from the description a man gave me of a woman he saw come out of the house, I suspected the prisoner; I went to the her house, but did not find any thing there.

MARY SHERRARD sworn. - I am a weaver, I live in the house of Mr. Davis; I missed the articles mentioned in the indictment; I saw them the next day at the pawnbrokers.

JOHN GLENN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker, I know the prisoner; she pledged a silk cloak, and

a child's calico gown, with me, on the 22d of November, about two o'clock, for four shillings, and a muslin apron; I have had them ever since.

JOHN PRICE sworn. - I live with my father, a pawnbroker; I have a patch-work counterpane the prisoner pledged with me on the 22d of November, about two or three o'clock; I know her, I have seen her more than once.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn. - I am a shoe-maker; I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Davis's house, in York-street, Bethnal-green, on Tuesday, between twelve and one, with a bundle under her arm; I never saw her before, but I am sure she is the person, the bundle was under her apron; I did not suspect her at the time. (The things were produced, and deposed to by Mary Sherrard).

Prisoner's defence. This woman has known me a great many years, and never knew any harm of me; she sent me with these things in a great hurry to pawn.

Q. (To Sherrard.) Did you know the prisoner? - A. She worked for my brother; she came twice to me to ask me to get work for her, I did not like her, and did not do it.

Q. Did you give her any of these things? - A. No.

Q. Or any duplicates? - A. No.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-23

23. EDWARD HALLIGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , two hempen sacks, value 12d. and one hundred pounds weight of potatoes, value 4s. the property of William English .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of persons unknown.( William English was called, and not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-24

24. EDWARD HALLIGAN was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , an hempen sack, value 6d. and one hundred pounds weight of potatoes, value 4s. the property of John Whitbread .

JOHN WHITBREAD sworn. - I live at Edmonton; I have lost potatoes several times, the prisoner was servant to William English; I knew nothing of the business till I was sent for to the Justices to swear to my sack.

FRANCIS RILEY sworn. - I am a constable, at Edmonton; a search-warrant was brought to me the third of last month by English; I went to the prisoner's lodging and found two sacks full of potatoes, English was present, and the prisoner; I took the prisoner to Mr. Jackson, the Magistrate; he said, he could do nothing without he had the sacks; I went back, and the prisoner with me, for the sacks, two of them were full, one was Mr. Whitbread's, and the other Mr. English's, Mr. Whitbread's name was on his sack; I said, to the prisoner, you have acted very wrong in taking these sacks; says I, you knew they were not your sacks, you should not take them away without leave; he said, he did not suppose the sacks were of any value, he only took them for a certain time, and he meant to return them again; there was a person with him he said was his wife, I took her, and she said she was not his wife.

Q. What account did he give of the potatoes? - A. He said this woman picked the potatoes up; it is a very old sack. (The sack produced).

Whitbread. I never missed a sack.

Q. Did you know it was stolen? - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-25

25. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , two half-guineas, a gold rim value 10s. and fifty shillings in monies numbered, the property of Robert Smith , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT SMITH sworn. - I live at No. 12. Daker-street, Westminster ; I know the prisoner by his using my house, I am a publican , he is a carpenter and joiner by trade, the same as myself: On the 3d of November, I catched him in my bedroom, at half past ten at night.

Q. He had been drinking in the house, had he? - A. Yes; he came about six o'clock.

Q. When did you miss him out of the tap-room? - A. I did not miss him, my wife missed him about five or six minutes before.

Q. You found him in your bed-chamber; had the bed-chamber-door been locked? - A. Double locked; I immediately secured him, and found an iron crow upon him, with which he had broke open the chamber-door and the drawer, there are the marks of the crow on the door and the drawer; I missed two half-guineas out of this drawer at that time.

Q. Did you search him? - A. Not for the money, only for the iron crow; the watchman found one half-guinea upon him, the other was not found.

Q. How long before had you seen this money in the drawer? - A. On the Monday before was the

lettling day; we put money into the drawer at various times, we frequently put money in every day; on Wednesday night my wife put some in, and on that evening.

Q. Is your wife here? - A. No.

Q. What money did you put in the night before? - A. Two guineas; there were besides, three half-guineas, I believe; there had been one guinea taken out afterwards by my wife, before I found the prisoner there.

Q. What did the prisoner say when you found him in the bed-room? - A. He said he had made a mistake and got into the wrong room, that he thought it had been the club-room, he pretended to be in liquor; I said he was not so little acquainted with this room as to make that mistake. While I had hold of him, he wanted to persuade me that I had made a mistake, that he was not the person I laid hold of.

Q. You found the iron crow upon him; what did he say to that? - A. I asked no further account of him, but took him directly to the watch-house; there was half-a-guinea, and about half-a-guinea's-worth of silver left in the drawer when I found it.

Q. How much did you miss out of the drawer in all? - A. The sum total, as far as I can recollect, was about four or five pounds.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You first told me you had not seen the half-guineas from the Monday till the Thursday; that Monday was the settling day? - A. I had seen them over and over, but frequently giving change I could not say exactly what it was, but two half-guineas there positively were when I saw it in the evening.

Q. Your wife took out some money on Thursday? - A. Yes.

Q. She is not here? - A. No.

Q. You don't know what money she took out? - A. She informed me what money she took out.

Q. The half-guinea found on the prisoner your wife said, she believed, was not your half-guinea? - A. I said so myself.

Q. You won't swear to any money? - A. No.

Q. You had a club at your house? - A. A shoe-club.

Q. What is a shoe-club? - A. A club for people that want shoes cheap, to pay sixpence a week, and spend twopence.

Q. Did not the prisoner apply to you respecting this club? - A. He asked me if there was a club, and said he wished to be a member of it.

Q. What was he to pay to be a member? - A. Two shillings.

Q. Did not he offer a half-guinea to pay the two shillings, and your wife could not give him change, and returned it? - A. Yes.

Q. There was another sort of a club held in your house? - A. Yes; a raffling-club.

Q. Was not there an application to him from you or your wife, to become a member to raffle for a watch? - A. He put down 2s. or 1s. 6d.

Q. Was the raffle thrown that night? - A. Yes.

Q. How many people might be present? - A. About twenty-five.

Q. What sort of people composed this club? - A. Creditable people in the neighbourhood.

Q. Were there any soldiers? - A. I believe not many.

Q. How many soldiers were there? - A. I believe five or six.

Q. Were there any sailors? - A. No; except those concerned in the robbery; the window was opened by the prisoner, and there were people on the outside; there was a child in bed in the room, locked in.

Q. Were you in the room when the raffle was thrown? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner in the room where the raffle was thrown? - A. Not when the raffle was thrown, he was before and after.

Q. There was a candle on the stair-case? - A. Yes; it was put out.

Q. When you found him, he told you he had mistaken the room? - A. Yes.

Q. You found none of your property upon him? - A. None.

Q. The half-guinea you found upon him, you will not swear to? - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner go into the tap-room after that? - A. No; I left him at the bottom of the stairs, in the care of the tapster, while I went up stairs, to see what was the matter; when I came down, I found him in the same posture.

JAMES SHAW sworn. - I am a carpenter and joiner: I was in the house at the same time; I was coming out of the club-room, following the landlord up one-pair of stairs, I saw the bed-room door open, we stopped on the stairs to see who was in the room; the prosecutor called Smith, as he generally called his wife; the prisoner seemed shocked at it, and stopped in the room a bit; and then he came to the door, and pretended to be very much in liquor; he was as sober as I am now; I saw him very near the bed, the door was on the jar, when we came out of the club-room.

Q. Did you observe whether it had been forced open? - A. Yes, I did; I went in afterwards; the prosecutor questioned the prisoner how he came in the room; he said, he made a mistake, and went into that room instead of the club-room; the clubroom was on the same floor; when we brought him down stairs; I told the landlord I thought he had a crow in his pocket; the landlord felt the outside of

his pocket, and felt it; in about four or five minutes after, we got a light, and went up stairs, and tried the crow to the jam of the door and the drawer; the prosecutor and his wife were with me; before the Justice, he said he fell over the crow into the room, and took it up, and put it in his pocket.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you live at this house? - A. I lodge there.

Q. How many other persons lodge there? - A. Three or four besides me.

Q. Did you belong to the raffle club? - A. I did, as it happened.

Q. You were not the fortunate person? - A. No.

Q. Was the prisoner in the room? - A. Several times, but not at the time of the raffle.

Q. How many persons were in the room? - A. Twenty-four or twenty-five.

Q. There was a light on the stair-case? - A. Yes; but I suppose he had conveyed it away.

Q. Might not a man in the dark, get into the one room instead of the other? - A. - I cannot suppose that; besides one door was locked, and the other unlocked.

Court. Q. When you searched him, he produced the crow himself? - A. No; he denied it; he said he had no such thing about him; I told the landlord he must have such a thing, that he broke the door open with; the landlord insisted upon feeling in his pocket, the prisoner refused it; the landlord felt the outside of his pocket, and felt the iron crow; then he took it out, and gave it to me.

Mr. Knapp. Q. There was a half-guinea found upon him? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not Mrs. Smith say, she believed that half-guinea was his own? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any persons in the street at that time? - A. No; there were several people in his company in the house; when this happened, they were all gone.

JOHN BALL sworn. - I am a constable of St. Margaret's: the prisoner was brought to me between ten and eleven o'clock; I searched him, and found this turn-screw in his pocket, and half-a-guinea.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-26

26. JOHN DONAHOE and JAMES JOHNSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , 8lb. weight of sugar, value 3s. the property of Robert Mallagan and David Mitchell .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of William Jeffery .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown: and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .(The indictment was stated by Mr. Jackson, and the case opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JOHN RYLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a police-officer, belonging to the office at Shadwell: on Wednesday, the 2d of November, Joseph Holbrooke, Robert Brown and I went on board the Rubie, at Limehouse-hole ; I had previously pulled off my coat, and put a jacket and trowsers, to prevent my being discovered by the lompers; Johnson was the mate of the Rubie, which lay next to the Lord Sheffield, except a lighter between; there was nobody on board the Rubie, but Johnson and I; as I was walking the deck, I saw Donahoe come out of the Lord Sheffield; he came on board the Rubie, and went down immediately into the cabin, and was followed by Johnson; in conseqnence of that, I looked over the side of the ship, where Holbrooke and Brown were in a boat, and they came on board, and I went into the cabin, and they followed me; I heard them conversing together, but cannot tell what about, and discovered this hat with sugar in it, on the cabin table; Donahoe was standing by the cabin table.

Q. When Donahoe went into the cabin, had he his hat on? - A. Yes; he had no hat on when I went down.

Q. Did the hat with the sugar in it, appear to be the hat he had on, when he went down? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it clean sugar or sweepings? - A. Clean sugar; this canvas bag of sugar (producing it) I took from Donahoe, as he was taking it from under his smock frock; that is clean sugar also.

Q. Was Johnson, from the position where he stood, able to see him take it from his frock? - A. Yes; there were four pounds in the hat, and four in the bag; I asked the prisoner Johnson if this was Donahoe's hat, he said Donahoe brought it down.

Q. Do you know in what capacity Donahoe was employed on board the Lord Sheffield? - A. As a lumper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. (Counsel for Johnson.)

Q. Two parcels you say you seized; one in Donahoe's hat, and the other on his person? - A. Yes.

Q. Johnson had none? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. (Counsel for Donaho).

Q. You have said this man was a lumper on board the Lord Sheffield? - A. I heard so.

Q. You did not know it yourself, you only heard so? - A. I will take upon me to say he was on board that ship, I only know he was a lumper.

Q. You say, when you were on board this ship, that the prisoner Donahoe went down into the cabin, after that he came up, and you went down? - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear the man wore that hat? - A. No.

Q. Whether the man had that hat on you will not say? - A. No; it was lying there, but I don't know who brought it there.

Q. With respect to this bag of sugar taken from under his frock, how long had he been in the cabin before you went down? - A. Not a minute.

Q. He was down long enough to have got rid of that sugar? - A. He was no sooner down than I was down.

Q. How near were you to him then? - A. Closer than I am to you.

Q. With respect to the sugar in the hat, there was no observation made but by Johnson; Donahoe did not say any thing about it? - A. No.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Did you ever see him with any other hat? - A. No; I saw no other hat.

Q. Did I understand you to say, that Johnson was the only person on board in care of the ship? - A. Yes; he was in the cabin.

ROBERT BROWNE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a police officer belonging to the office at Shadwell: On the 2d of November I went on board the ship Rubie, in company with Holbrooke and Ryley; Ryley put on a jacket and trowsers before he went on board; Holbrooke and I staid in the boat; when Ryley had been on board ten minutes, he called us up into the Rubie; he went down into the cabin, and we followed him; Johnson and Donahoe were in the cabin; Ryley asked Johnson if that was Donahoe's hat lying upon the cabin table; he said, yes; the sugar was in the hat at that time, the same as now; Donahoe said nothing; I saw the bag of sugar on the table the same as it is now; it is clean sugar, in both the hat and the bag.

Q. While you were in the cabin, did Donahoe say any thing about the sugar? - A. I stood at the cabin door, but I cannot tell the words that he made use of; I went on board the Lord Sheffield; it was loaded with sugar.

Cross-examined by Mr Knapp, (Counsel for Johnson.) Q. Johnson was mate of the ship? - A. Yes, his duty is to take care of the ship.

Q. The bag, you say, as well as the hat, were in the cabin upon the table? - A. Yes, when I went down.

Q. They being both on the table, there was nothing at all in the possession of Johnson? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You told us the hat the sugar was in was Donahoe's? - A. Yes.

Q. There was a good deal of other sugar in that place, and therefore you cannot undertake to say that it was not Donahoe that purchased the sugar from Johnson? - A. Johnson said he bought sugar of Donahoe.

Q. To that, Donahoe made no reply? - A. No.

Q. With respect to the ship, are there not many ships laden with sugar? A. I don't know.

Q. Is it not the place where West-India ships lie? - A. I cannot say, there were different tiers.

Q. Upon you oath, were there not other West-India ships in the tiers? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Is it not the place where they usually lie? - A. Yes, it is.

Q. You admit this is the usual place where they lie, and will not say whether there were not the same sort of ships lying there? - A. I cannot say.

JOSEPH HOLBROOKE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am servant to Mr. Newport, of New Prison: On the 2d of November, I, in company with Ryley and Browne, was on the River. Thames at Limehouse-hole; we put our boat near the ship called Rubie; Ryley went on board the ship, and he had not been there above ten minutes, before he called Browne and me up; immediately I went into the cabin with Ryley and Browne, and saw the hat and bag of sugar lying on the cabin table; the prisoners, Donahoe and Johnson, were at the table at that time; Ryley desired me to take Donahoe into custody.

Q. Did Johnson say any thing about sugar before you? - A. Not a word was mentioned about it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. All the conversation you had with Johnson was respecting other things and not that? - A. Yes.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Were you as near to the table as Ryley? - A. Yes.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Do you know the owners of the ship Lord Sheffield? - A. Yes; Robert Mallagan and David Mitchell ; the captain's name is William Jeffery.

ELIZABETH MARSHALL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. My husband keeps the sign of the Glasgow Arms; he engages lumpers for ships.

Q. Do you know where Donahoe worked as a lumper on the 2d of November? - A. I cannot swear he was there.

WILLIAM TELEAM sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the clerks at the Police-office, Shadwell: I was present when Donahoe and Johnson were examined before Mr. Staples? the examinations are in Court.

Q. Was Donahoe's read over to him? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any threat or any promise held out to him to make that confession? - A. None at all.

Q. Was Johnson present at the examination of Donahoe? - A. Yes, he heard it read.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Was the examination attended to by the Solicitor for the prosecution? - A. No; this was the first examination taken the same night.(The examinations of the prisoners were read in Court by the Clerk.)

Mr. Knowlys. (To Ryley) Q. What is the value of this sugar? - A. There are eight pounds; it is worth about 8d. a pound.

Mr. Knapp. (To Ryley.) Q. Supposing sugar of the quality is sold before the duty is paid, what is it worth then? - A. I cannot say.

Mr. Knapp. (To Hunter.) Q. What is the price of that sugar before the duty is paid? - A. About 4d. or 4 1/2d.

Donahoe left his defence to his Counsel.

Johnson was not put upon his defence.

Donahoe called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Donahoe GUILTY . (Aged 39.)

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1s .

Johnson NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-27

27. JOSHUA GAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th on Nomvember , four shillings, one hundred and twenty copper halfpence, value 5s. in monies numbered the monies of Joseph Payne .

JOSEPH PAYNE sworn. - I live in Crooked-lane, St. Michael's ; I am a cheesemonger ; the prisoner was my porter : On the 5th of November, between twelve and one, I missed some money out of my desk in the shop; I marked some money and put in the desk; I locked it, and put the key in my pocket; between six and seven that evening, the prisoner came in, and I left him in the shop about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes alone; I then sent him out, and unlocked my desk, and missed some money out of my desk; I missed four shillings and eight pence at that time; I had missed twenty-one shillings before, as near as I can judge; when the prisoner returned, I called a constable, Andrew Davidson, and had him searched; he took this money from him, twenty-one shillings in crown papers of halfpence, and eight pennyworth loose; I examined them; the constable has them.

Prisoner. My friend went to the prosecutor, and gave him four guineas to satisfy him.

Court. (To the Prosecutor.) Q. Is that so? - A. I received four guineas from a person, I don't know who; the person said it was part of the money the prisoner had taken from me.

Q. Who did you receive it from? - A. I never saw the man but once before; he came since the prisoner has been in gaol.

ANDREW DAVIDSON sworn. - I am a constable; I was sent for on the 5th of November at night, between six and seven o'clock, by Mr. Payne; I searched the prisoner, and found a guinea's worth of silver upon him, a five-shilling paper of halfpence, and eight pennyworth; the prisoner said, he had taken none, and knew nothing at all about it. (Produces the money.)

Prosecutor. (Looks at the money.) Here are the four shillings that I marked; two of them are marked P on the head side, one is marked C on the head side, and the other P on the tail side.

Q. Have you the key of your desk? - A. Yes.(Produces it.)

Q. Could you tell whether it was done with a picklock or false key; - A. I am apt to think it was done by a false key, for I found a key afterwards about two feet from my desk.

Prisoner's defence. My wife gave me money to go to market on Saturday morning; the prosecutor took me up on Saturday night; I could not buy things to my satisfaction; I had this money to give to the prosecutor: I used to give him all the silver I could get; I had been out all day; I had been up to Mary-le-bonne, and from there to Mile-end, to Bishopsgate-street, and Queenhithe, and had not been at home a quarter of an hour all day; I used to save all the silver I could for the prosecutor on a Saturday; I have witnesses in Court.

For the Prisoner.

GEORGE CECIL sworn. - I have known the prisoner five years; I always knew him to be a hard-working, industrious man; he worked for Mr. Payne, and had the privilege of going at ten o'clock; he used to get up at three in the morning, and take a knot and go down to Billingsgate to do something for his family; I went to Mr. Payne's house on Saturday morning, between twelve and one o'clock; he was just going out; he desired me to stop a little; I waited till he came in, and then I told him I had brought him four guineas; I pulled the four guineas out, and gave to Mr. Payne, and he said he would be favourable to him for a little money.

Q. How came you to offer him the four guineas? - A. Because he signified to the prisoner's wife, that he had better have a little of the money back, and she came and told me.

Q. Who did you receive the four guineas from? - A. Mr. Gad, to give to Mr. Payne to be favourable to him.

Q. What did Mr. Payne say to you? - A. He took the money, and said he would be very favourable to him; that he did it on account of the poor woman and her children.

Q. Did he take the money on account of the poor woman? - A. Yes.

The prisoner called eight other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Mr. Payne. The man says he gave me four guineas, and asked me to shew him favour; I said it was too late, he had used me very ill, and was committed; he left the four guineas.

Jury. Do you think you lost four guineas by this man? - A. I have lost many pounds out of my desk within a few months.

Jury. How many? - A. I have lost 40l.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-28

28. JOHN BANNISTER was indicted for that he, on the 12th of November , in the King's highway, upon William Amour , did make an assault, putting him in corporeal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a canvas bag, value 1d. three guineas, a half guinea, and five shillings in monies, numbered , the property of the said William.(The Case was opened by Mr. Const.)

WILLIAM AMOUR sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. How do you spell your name? - A. I don't know.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see him first? - A. Three weeks ago to night, the 12th of November, on Saturday, about six o'clock, going with Rolse from London to Harrow.

Q. Who is your master? - A. Mr. William Burrows , at Harrow.

Q. What is Rolse's Christian name? - A. Ralph; Rolse was upon the poney, he drove, and I was in the cart.

Q. Did you get out of the cart? - A. Yes.

Q. What made you get out of the cart? - A. Rolse on the poney called to me, I got out with a fork in my hand, and the prisoner came directly to me with a pistol in each hand, he told me, if I did not lay the fork down, he would blow my guts out; then I told him I would not, I was afraid to strike him, being near the outside of the road; I fell back on the ground, directly he jumped over me, and stood across me while I was down, and told me he would immediately blow my guts out, if I did not deliver my money.

Q. Had he the pistols then in his hands? - A. Yes, one in each; I could not get the money out of my pocket, he said, he would blow my guts out if I did not deliver the money immediately; as soon as Rolse came back again, I gave him the money, three guineas and a half in gold, and five shillings in silver.

Q. Where was it then? - A. In a canvas bag.

Q. Did you deliver it to him? - A. Yes; Rolse was close to my assistance; I said, Rolse, he has got my money, but he has not hurt me; directly the prisoner tired at me, I had just got up then, I have the powder on my coat now.

Q. Did the prisoner hit you? - A. No, he singed my coat.

Q. How far was Rolse from you at that instant? - A. He was close to me then; the prisoner turned to look the contrary was to which Rolse was coming, and we were all three together the moment he fired; the first blow that Rolse gave him, shook the pistol, and hurt his hand, the next blow, he knocked him down; we could not take him then because he was so strong.

Q. How did you take him at last? - A. Rolse took up the horse-pistol he had dropped, and hit him three or four times; I said, hold, hold, the money dropped out of his hand.

Q. Did any man come to your assistance? - A. Yes, a man came up.

Q. Did you secure him? - A. Yes; we all three took him to a public-house, and he was brought to town.

Prisoner. He has mentioned a great many things that were not done, I never fired the pistol.

Court. Q. The prisoner would have me ask you whether he fired at you or not? - A. He could not but fire once, the powder is on my coat now.

Prisoner. I never offered to blow the man's belly out, I told him I would not hurt him.

Witness. He told me afterwards, he did not mean to hurt me, but only to frighten me.

RALPH ROLFE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. On the 12th of November, I was with Amour; as I was going from London to Harrow, near Chelseareach , the prisoner met me and demanded my money; Amour was in the cart, I was on the poney, the prisoner was on foot, he had a pistol in each hand; I told him, I had none; he said, if I did not give it him, he would blow my guts out; I called out to Amour, Will, Will, twice; the prisoner made answer, I don't care for Will nor you neither, for I will have your money; Amour came out of the cart to my assistance, with a fork in his hand; as he was coming along, the prisoner went from me to him, and told him to lay the fork down, he said, he would not, the prisoner said, if he did not, he would blow his guts out, and walked up to him; Amour drew back from him, near the outside of the road and fell down; I rode by him directly as hard as I could to catch the cart, the horses were gone on with the cart; I stopped the horses

and went back, when I had got back, he had just got his money.

Q. Did you hear or see any thing done? - A. No, not till I got back; when I came back, he took his leg from off Amour, and looked towards London; Amour said, he has got my money, but he has not hurt me; the prisoner at the bar turned round, and fired directly at Amour, I was near enough to knock him down when he fired; I hit at his head, and he held the pistol up to save himself; I knocked him on the hand, and the money dropped out of his hand; I hit him again two or three times, and Amour said, hold, hold, and then we took him.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, the blow that the man struck me on the right arm, caused the pistol to go off; I fired no pistol in my life; I never hurt any body, nor bought a pistol in my life time; that was the person that the pistol went off at, and the pistol dropped directly; I never offered to fire at them; I dropped the pistol and purse, they knocked me down, I lost the use of my arm, they laid on me with a dung fork as hard as they could, I begged for mercy, I was all over blood, one of them then said, don't hit him any more; they both got me up, I never offered to touch either of them, they took me to a public-house; I begged of them to wipe my face, the blood was caked on my eyes; I said, for God Almighty's sake, let me go as I am, I have not hurt you, I have not got your money; in the public-house, there came more farmers, I sat upon the bench bleeding a great deal, one came with his first, and knocked me along the bench; I then begged them not to strike me, for I had had enough before; some few minutes before that, they put me in the cart, and took me out again, a man in a brown coat, said, I would blow your brains out for a farthing, he took his first and and struck me on my side, and nothing but corrupted blood comes from me night and day, upwards and downwards; that did not do, I was hand-cussed in the cart, and that gentleman tied my two hands, he beat me on the back till I had not a free place upon me; I have been in the infirmary, and could never sit up in my bed; after I was in the cart, I never offered to stir the least in the world.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES POOLE sworn. - Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes, for two or three years; he has worked for me six months.

Q. Where did he live? - A. In Short's-gardens, near Drury-lane.

Q. In what capacity did he work for you? - A. My profession is colourman to artists.

Q. What character has he borne during the time you have known him? - A. He was an ignorant man, because he could not read nor write, but I would have sent him out with a 10l. note, I thought him to be an honest, hard working man; I was never more surprized than to hear what happened to him.

Court. (To Amour.) Q. What was it o'clock when you were met by the prisoner? - A. Six, as near as I can guess.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 45.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-29

29. WILLIAM BENTLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , six fur tippets, value 6s. the goods of Thomas Hannom .

THOMAS HANNOM sworn. - I am a haberdasher in Oxford-road ; the tippets were tied at the outside of my door; about six o'clock, I happened to turn round and miss them: I saw them there not three minutes before I missed them; I ran to the door, and said, I have lost some tippets; a person coming by at the time, said, there are two men run down the opposite street; I immediately pursued them, and saw a lad and a man together, and the tippets hanging out from under the lad's coat or apron; he dropped the tippets, I jumped over them, and called out to a person behind me to take them up, I pursued him and caught him.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner at the bar is the person from whom the tippets dropped? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him after you saw the tippets drop from him? - A. No; I caught him and took him to my house, I talked with him a quarter of any hour; I said; if he would tell his accomplice, I would discharge him; he first said he would, and then he would not, then I took him to the office, I have the tippets here. (Produces them.)

Q. Are these the tippets you saw hanging from his apron? - A. Yes, there are half a dozen of them; I am sure they are my property, they have my mark upon them.

THOMAS HUMPHRIES sworn. - As I was coming along Oxford-street, on Monday evening, I saw the prisoner and a stout man run away from Mr. Hannom's shop; I told him two men bad gone out of his shop, have they got any thing, he said, yes; I said, they went down Argyle-street; I ran before him, and just at the bottom, this young lad and the stout man were walking along slowly, I called halloa, or something of that sort, and Mr. Hannom came up; they began to run again, the big one stopped at the corner of Marlborough-street, and asked if I wanted any thing, upon that I said, no; by this time, Hannom came up, and I said, these are the men.

Q. Who dropped the tippets? - A. That boy;

I saw them in his apron, I picked them up, I believe they are the same, I saw the mark at Marlborough-street.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 13.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-30

30. DANIEL HARDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , two silver pint mugs, value 4l. a silver wine-strainer, value 10s. three table-spoons, value 30s. and one silver gravy spoon, value 8s. the property of Francis Aickin , Esq. privately, in his dwelling-house .

PHILIP DAVIS sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Francis Aickin , No. 5, Gower-street, Bedford-square : On Friday the 28th of October, about a quarter after seven, the prisoner brought a pair of shoe, and said they were for my mistress, I asked him where they came from, he said, Mr. Burgess, Oxford-road; I took them up stairs to my mistress, she said, she did not know any thing at all of them, I left the man in the passage, the parlour door was a little open; I brought the shoes down stairs again, and told him my mistress said it was a mistake, she knew nothing at all of them; he begged pardon, and enquired for No. 10; I went down stairs, and, in about an hour afterwards, missed two half pint mugs, a wine strainer, three table spoons, and a large gravy spoon; I had seen them an hour before, I am sure nobody had been in the house, I am quite certain the prisoner is the man that brought the shoes.

Q. Are you sure these things were all silver? - A. Yes; I had the care of them.

Q. You don't know the value of them, do you? - A. No, I don't rightly know the value of them.

Q. Whose house was this? - A. My master's house.

Q. He does not lodge there? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You are quite certain that is the man that left the shoes? - A. Yes.

Q. What length of time was it, from the time the prisoner was in your house, till he was taken? - A. About a week.

Q. You never spoke to him but when you went up stairs? - A. No.

Q. A week had elapsed, and though you had but a momentary glance of him, you undertake to swear the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes.

Q. You had never seen him before? - A. No.

Q. He had a round hat on? - A. Yes.

Q. You shut the hall door when the man came in? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that man's life is at stake? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. It is, and, after I tell you that, will you undertake to swear he is the same man? - A. I can tell by his face, I shut the door after him, but there was a light in the passage.

Q. Notwithstanding there must be a shade from the hat, and though you had never seen him before, you undertake to swear to the man? - A. Yes, by the length of his face.

Q. If you had seen another man with a face the length of his, you would have sworn to him? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Will you now swear to this man? - A. He is the man that brought the shoes.

Q. It was your duty to take care of the plate? - A. Yes.

Q. If it was lost, you were liable to a chastisement yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. When the prisoner was apprehended, there was nothing found upon him? - A. Nothing that I know of.

Q. You went up to the drawing-room to your mistress? - A. Yes.

Q. You were some time delivering your message? - A. Yes.

Q. If the prisoner had committed this theft, he might have run away while you were up stairs? - A. Yes.

Q. You don't know that the other servants had not been in the parlour? - A. I know there were no other strangers in the house.

Q. Will you undertake to swear to this man, after what has been said? - A. To the best of my knowledge, he is the man.

Q. You swear to nothing but the length of his face? - A. No.

Q. With respect to these things, were they silver or not? - A. Solid silver; there were the stamps upon them.

Q. This house belongs to Mr. Aickin; how do you know your master's name is Francis? - A. I cannot undertake to say.

Court. Q. You always understood his name to be Francis? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. When he was at Bow-street, he said, he did not miss a part of the plate till next morning.

Witness. I missed some of the things the overnight; in the morning, I found the others were gone; I am sure they were on the side-board in the evening.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-31

31. DANIEL HARDING was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , one silver tea-pot-stand, value 20s. one silver milk-pot, value 8s. one pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 5s. three silver tea-spoons, value 9s. and a linen damask table-cloth, value 5s. the property of Josiah Jackson , Esq. A man's hat, value 8s. and a pack of cards, value 3s. the property of George Jackson , privately, in the dwelling-house of the said Josiah Jackson .

GEORGE JACKSON (a black) sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Josiah Jackson, at No. 21, Baker-street, Portman-square .

Q. Are you a Christian? - Yes.

Q. Have you ever been baptized? - A. Yes.

Q. What have you to say against the prisoner? - A. The prisoner came one day with a pair of shoes for my mistress, October the 5th, about three o'clock in the day, my mistress was out, and I took the pair of shoes from him, and put them into the parlour, then she came home and tried on the shoes, and left them in the parlour and went up stairs; the man went away immediately, he left the shoes, and came an hour afterwards.

Q. Did you tell him your mistress was not at home? - A. Yes, I told him so, and he went away directly; at the time he came again, a coach came to the door, I went up stairs, he was standing at the servant's hall below, he came down the area steps.

Q. Did you take him through the area? - A. Yes, the area-door was open, and he came down the steps.

Q. Then you were called away from the door? - A. Yes; I was obliged to go up at the same time he was talking with me; I did not shut the pantry-door, I just shut it to, I left him in the hall; I brought the shoes, after the carriage was gone, and gave them to him, he went away directly; I did not miss the things till my fellow-servant came in; he went out to buy some things, when he came in to put them in the drawer he missed the things, he asked me what had become of them; I told him I could not tell, I washed them and put them in the drawer.

Q. What did you miss? - A. I missed a silver tea-pot-stand, three silver tea-spoons, a silver milk-pot, a table-cloth, and a pair of silver sugar-tongs.

Q. Were they all silver? - A. Yes.

Q. What else did you miss? - A. A pack of cards, and my hat.

Q. Were they all there when the man came? - A. They were all there a little before.

Q. How long? - A. About half an hour before.

Q. Had any body been in the hall? - A. No; in the place all the time.

Q. Do you say the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes; I remember his features very well, he stood up and talked with me.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - A. Yes, I am sure he is the man; I was sent for to Bow-street to know whether it was the same man; I came into the room and found my hat upon his head.

Q. How long afterwards was he taken? - A. I cannot rightly remember, I think two weeks after.

Q. Who was he taken by? - A. I don't know who took him.

Q. You say your hat was found upon him; how soon after this did you find the hat again? - A. The hat was not found till he was taken at Bow-street.

Q. When was that? - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Where is the hat that was found upon him? - A. It is here. (It was produced by the officer).

Q. Independent of the hat, are you sure of his person? - A. Yes; I am.

Q. Were none of the other things found upon him? - A. No; nothing else.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Your name is Jackson? - A. Yes.

Q. Your master's name is Jackson? - A. Yes.

Q. You are no relation to him to be sure? - A. No; I have been christened so.

Q. Have you ever learned your catechism? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any body with you when the prisoner called at your house? - A. Nobody at all.

Q. There were other people in the house? - A. There are always a good many servants in the house.

Q. The man told you he would call in an hour, and kept his word? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it from the time you say you saw this silver to the time it was missed? - A. About half an hour after I missed it.

Q. Have you never seen it since? - A. No.

Q. The servants were in the kitchen at the time this man was on the stairs going down? - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore it is not very likely that a man should go into the kitchen when the servants were there? - A. It was not in the kitchen; it was in the pantry, in a different part of the house.

Q. During the time the prisoner was at the steps, you went up to the coach? - A. Yes.

Q. Could you see into the kitchen? - A. No.

Q. Could you see any body go away? - A. No.

Q. Could any body observe any person go to this pantry? - A. No, they could not; the servants were all about, but not in my apartments.

Q. Where was this hat? - A. Hanging up in the pantry.

Q. The prisoner had a hat on when he went to your house? - A. Yes.

Q. Your hat was lost, and found upon his head? - A. Yes.

Q. You were rather suspicious that the man had stole the silver, as he went away with two hats? - A. He left his and took mine.

Q. Was any other person in the house? - A. Only the servants.

Q. You don't know how many hats the other servants have? - A. There is no man servant but me and another.

Q. You don't know whether he had two hats? - A. No.

Q. What kind of marks are there about this hat? - A. It is a plain hat.

Q. There is no mark about it? - A. It is a hat that was brought from the West-Indies, and my master gave it me; I took the hat and scraped the dirt off the inside.

Q. Yes, I suppose people scrape their hats when they are dirty - but there is no mark about it by which you can swear to it? - A. I am sure it is mine; I know the hat by experience.

Q. You will swear to it though there are no marks about it? - A. I know it is mine, he took it out.

Q. Upon your oath, Sir, did you see him take it out? - A. No.

Q. Was there a mark in the hat you lost? - A. Yes.

Q. But there was no mark in the hat you found; and will you swear it is your hat - do you know that man's life is at stake? - Now attend to that-upon recollection, as an honest man, will you undertake to swear to it? - A. It is an old hat, it was given to me, I know it is mine.

Q. The hat you lost was the hat you wore? - A. Yes.

Q. But whether this is that hat you wore you cannot undertake to say? - A. I have had it long enough to know it.

Q. Will you swear that that hat is your's though there is no particular mark about it, when that man's life is at stake? - A. That is all I know about it.

Jury. Q. Is not that the hat you lost? - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. With respect to your master, had he any other servant but yourself? - A. No; only one man servant.

Q. Did any body live in the house but your master? - A. Other servants.

Q. Don't his brother live with him? - A. No.

Q. What is your master's name? - A. Josiah Jackson.

Q. When were you told that? - A. I know it is his name.

Court. Q. Your master keeps this house? - A. Yes, he does.

Q. Have you any doubt about that hat? - A. It is my hat.

JOHN TING sworn. I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I took this hat off the prisoner's head, the 4th of November, at a public-house, the Brown-Bear, opposite the Public-office Bow-street.

Q. How came you to take it off his head? - A. By the Black coming out of the office, he said he had lost his hat.

Q. Did you shew him that hat? - A. Yes; I did.

Q. What did he say when you shewed him that hat? - A. He said, that is mine, directly, that is the hat; I have had it ever since.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. The man had that hat on at the Public-office? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Is there any appearance of the mark being taken out? - A. Yes; at the bottom, the lining is taken out.

Mr. Alley. Q. It is no uncommon thing for the lining at the bottom, you know, to fall out of a hat - nine out of a dozen do so, don't they? - A. Not if it is placed fast in.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you return the hat back again to me? - A. No.

Prisoner. Q. You did, in the Brown-Bear; I came up into the office with the hat on, I had friends there, and I might have changed it if I liked.

Witness. When I had it in my custody I kept it, he never had it again.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing farther to say.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 26.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-32

32. JOSEPH MALCOLM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Lewis Leslie , about the hour of one, in the night of the 7th of November , and feloniously stealing, nine live tame ducks, value 10s. the property of the said Lewis Leslie , in his dwelling-house .(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.)

LEWIS LESLIE sworn. - I live at the Half-way-house, in the Hampstead-road , I am a cow-keeper : On the 7th of November, about one o'clock in the morning, my family were all in bed, my wife heard an uncommon noise in the wash-house -

Q. Is the wash-house inside the house? - A. It is a lean-to, the kitchen door opens into it; my wife was alarmed and waked; with that she called my servant, who sleeps in the next room, desiring her to strike a light, for she was sure there was something the matter in the kitchen among the ducks, by hearing a noise of the ducks; there were milking pails and tin pails, which caused a great

the servant went down stairs, and opened the kitchen door; she asked the man what he wanted there -

Q. You heard this? - A. Every word; she asked the man what he wanted there, or what brought him there; she slammed the door to again, and bolted it; with that she went to the street door, the watchman was coming past; she called, Pitt! Pitt! different times, there is a thief in the house; the watchman's name is Pitt; mind the gate says she; then she came to the kitchen door again, and opened it, and went into the wash-house, and opened the washhouse door, and went into the yard, and called out, he is gone, he is gone up the yard; by that time I got down stairs, the watchman came into the gate, and was standing by him in the yard; he had either got down, or thrown himself down off the house; I found the prisoner lying at the wash-house door; I laid hold of him by the arm, and dragged him into the wash-house, and out of the wash-house into the kitchen, and secured him until the next morning, to go to Bow-street.

Q. Where were your ducks? - A. In the washhouse; after I secured him, I asked the maid to go into the wash-house, and see what damage he had done.

Q. How did the prisoner come in? - A. Through the roof of the house, it was pan-tiled and pointed.

Q. There was no ceiling? - A. No.

Q. How many tiles did he move? - A. Seven tiles, I think, off the place he stripped, and laid them on one side on the roof.

Q. It is not a very high building? - A. About ten feather edge boards high in front; it is higher behind where it leans to the house.

Q. How many feet high is it in front? - A. Something better than seven feet high; I have a milk-cart in the yard, he got the seat board and set it up an end, and with the support of that, clambered up; I will not be upon my oath, whether the man was sober, whether it was by liquor or not, that he fell from the house, I don't know, but I rather think the man was a good deal in liquor.

Q. Do you know any thing of him? - A. I do not know the man, he must certainly have watched about the premises, for no stranger could know where they were.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. There is no door that opens out of the wash-house into the house? - A. You were not there to see; I can give a better account of it than you can, I dare say.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. As you think I have asked you an impertinent question, I will not trouble you with any more.

Witness. I have as much humanity for the man as you have, be who you will.

Court. Q. Did I understand you right, that the maid opened the kitchen-door into the washhouse? - A. Yes.

MARGARET BUNN sworn. - Q. Are you servant to Mr. Leslie? - A. Yes.

Q. This night, the 7th of November, you were disturbed, called by your mistress, lit a candle, went down into the kitchen, opened the kitchen-door, and went into the wash-house? - A. Yes; I unbolted the kitchen-door, I saw Joseph Malcolm with a duck in his left hand, a white duck.

Q. What was he doing with it? - A. It was dead in his hand; I asked him what brought him there, or, how came he there, he made me no answer; I shut to the door, and bolted it, and run to the street door, and called the watchman, and desired him to mind the gate, there was a thief in the house; he said the gate was fast, he could not come out there; I told him to mind the yard, he was gone up there; I opened the kitchen-door, and I heard the prisoner fall; I saw the prisoner lying on the ground by the door.

Q. He was secured? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards go into the wash-house? - A. Yes.

Q. What had he done there? - A. Killed nine ducks out of ten; he threw four or five out of the wash-house into the yard.

Q. They were all alive the over night? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. When you went in, it was light enough to see the colour of the duck, if you had not had a candle? - A. What! at one o'clock in the morning! - the watchman was crying the hour.

WILLIAM PITT sworn. - When the servant of the house called to me, to run to the gate, I went to the gate, and said, nobody is here; she said, he has run up the yard, she held the candle out, I saw the man on the roof; I put the pistol through the gate, and threatened to shoot him, and he dropped down like a stone.

Q. Where did he drop from? - A. Off the roof; I opened the gate, and said, here he is; and he came, and we secured him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. He surrendered very quietly? - A. He never moved or spoke; I asked if any body was there but himself; he said yes, let me go and see for them; I said, no, you must stop here; he said, then, if they are gone, I am here.

HENRY CROKER sworn. - Mr. Leslie called on me in the morning, and desired me to assist; I went down in the morning and saw the dead ducks, and the place where the man broke in; I went to the watch-house, and took him to Bow-street.

The prisoner left his defence to his Counsel.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES MASSEY sworn. I am a master taylor,

in Holles-street, Cavendish-square; the prisoner has worked for me about a year.

Q. Where did he live? - A. I don't know; he worked with me till the Saturday night till eight o'clock, and I paid him twenty-two shillings the day before this happened; he was to have come on Monday, and I heard he was taken; I never heard any thing but that he was very honest; I know nothing of him but as a journeyman working for me.

EDWARD LLEWEN sworn. - I keep the Equestrain Coffee-house, joining the Royal Circus, opposite the Obelisk; I have known the prisoner two years; I never knew any dishonesty of him; he has three small children; he has worked for me, and I have lent him as much as two guineas at a time.

WILLIAM KETTLIN sworn. - I live at No. 94, Norton-street, Mary-le-bonne; the prisoner lived next door to me two years; I never heard any other but a good character of him; I have trusted him when he was out of work with coals and wood, he always paid me again.

THOMAS LEE sworn. - I keep a cook's shop at Ogle-street, Mary-le-bonne; I have known him six years, two of which he lodged in my house; I never heard any harm of him.

JAMES HUDSON sworn. - I live at No. 4, Norton-street, Mary-le-bonne; I keep a chandler's shop; I have known the prisoner sixteen months; he bore a good character as far as I knew.

JOSEPH THORNTON sworn. - I live at No. 4, Clipstone-street; I have known the prisoner eighteen months; he always bore a very good character for what I knew; I am a milk-man; and the week before this happened, I met him four mornings out of the six going to work at six o'clock in the morning.

ALEXANDER HOOD sworn. - I live at No. 74, Norton-street, Mary-le-bonne; I keep a public-house; I have known the prisoner nine months; he bore a good character; he has had, at several times, an opportunity of defrauding me, if he chose.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 27.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-33

33. JOHN QUICK was indicted feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , 40l. and 1s. in monies numbered , the monies of James Fitch .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JAMES FITCH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a cheesemonger , in Leadenhall-street ; the prisoner was in my service as porter ; I frequently missed money, and at one time ten guineas: On Wednesday, the 23d of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, I marked five shillings and three sixpences, and put them in the till; at that time he was gone up stairs to breakfast; there was no other silver in the till; afterwards I went over to a neighbour of mine, Samuel Paton , and gave him sixteen shillings and two half-crowns marked money, and asked him to go and buy a cheese of the porter; there was nobody else in the shop; I staid at his door while he went into the shop and came out with the cheese; as soon as he came to his door, I went over into the shop, and told the porter to go down to Wheeler's wharf; I then told the money in the till, and found only ten shillings and sixpence; when he came back, I said, John, can you lend me four shillings to give change for half-a-guinea; he reluctantly said, yes, and pulled four shillings out of his left-hand pocket; he gave them me into my hand, one of which I perceived was one of the marked shilligs; I said to him, John, go into the cellar for some cheese to weigh off, and while he was gone, I went and asked Mr. Paton if he knew that shilling, and, in consequence of what he said, I sent for a constable; upon searching him, there was a screw box found in his breeches; I told him, John, you are a compleat villain, I have turned away people from what you hinted to me, and you are the thief; he said, he never took any thing from me; I insisted upon his being searched; he said it was no use to search his breeches, for he had nothing in them; on feeling his breeches, we perceived this box in the inside of his breeches, not in his pocket; I said, John, what is this; and he said there were thirty guineas in it; says I, don't you call that property, and he made no answer; on that I insisted on his pulling his cloaths off, and in his sob pocket there were seven or eight shillings, among which were two marked shillings; he said, he never wronged me of a halfpenny; I said, it was in vain to deny it, there was proof positive, and I could swear it.

SAMUEL PATON sworn. - I am a neighbour of Mr. Fitch: On Wednesday, the 23d of November, Mr. Fitch came to me, and gave me a guinea's worth of silver, sixteen shillings and two half-crowns, which were marked in my presence, and desired me to go over to his shop, and buy a cheese; I went over to the prisoner, and told him I wanted a cheese; it came to six shillings and seven-pence halfpenny; I threw down seven shillings, and he gave me four-pence halfpenny; they were the marked shillings I received from Mr. Fitch; I took the cheese to my own house, where Mr. Fitch was, and he went over the way immediately to his own house; he came over about half an hour after, and said, he had taken the bait, and said, do you know the money you paid John; I said, yes; there

was one a South-Sea shilling; he shewed me a shilling, which I could swear was one I paid him; it is in the hands of the constable; after he was searched, I saw the South-Sea shilling, which was one I paid him.

JAMES GOBITUS sworn. - I am a constable; I was fetched by Mr. Fitch on Wednesday, the 23d of November, to take the prisoner into custody; the prisoner was coming down stairs as I went into the shop; as I was going with him into the counting-house, he made a kind of fumble; I went into the counting-house, and searched him; I took out of the inside of his breeches this box; there is thirty new guineas in gold in it; I found four shillings in his left-hand pocket, eight shillings and two sixpences in the fob pocket, two of them are marked; seven shillings in silver in the right-hand breeches pocket; three penny-worth of halfpence in his waistcoat pocket; I received one shilling form Mr. Fitch afterwards, which was put with the two marked shillings found in his fob.(The three marked shillings were produced and deposed to by Mr. Fitch; Mr. Paton deposed to two of them, as two of the shillings he received from Mr. Fitch, and gave to the prisoner.)

Prisoner's defence. I went into the cellar where the cheeses were; I had a box there with 30 guineas in it; and because my box had not a lock upon it, I put it in my pocket; I went up stairs; my master came into the shop and called me down, and the constable was in the shop; when I came first in the morning, I had bought some nails for my master, and there was but one shilling in the till to pay for them, and I put this money in my pocket to pay for the nails.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-34

34. PATRICK FALLON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , fifty pounds weight of sugar, value 16s. the property of Thomas Hibbert , Edward Fuhr , and George Hibbert .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of George Johnson .

Third Count. Laying it to by the property of persons unknown.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Jackson, and the case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

It appeared in evidence that the prisoner was a Custom-house officer on board the Generous Planter; that the captain going on board with some officers upon an information of the ship being plundered, the prisoner was found in the hold, where a quantity of sugar had been removed from some casks, and that the prisoner had come on board with a like information, and gone into the hold, and that upon the officers going down, a person made his escape out of the cabin window and swam away, the prisoner was found.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-35

35. JANE HEYDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , a silk cloak, trimmed with lace, value 4l. and three guineas in monies numbered, the property of Hannah Davis , in her dwelling-house .

HANNAH DAVIS sworn. - I am a widow ; I live at No. 34, Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane ; I keep a milliner's shop ; the prisoner was my servant : On the 26th of October, about twelve in the morning, I was going to clean myself, and left my pockets in the back-parlour; I had eighteen guineas in a purse in my pocket; I went up stairs, the prisoner was then in the parlour; when I came down; I sent her to market; while she was gone I counted my money, and missed three guineas; I had counted it the evening before; I was going to pay it away that morning; when she came in, I asked her to lend me her pocket, for my pocket had a hole in it; she said, she would fetch me clean pockets; I told her clean ones would not do, I would have her pocket; upon that she ran out of the parlour into the kitchen, and I ran after her, and said to her, what do you scruple to lend me your pocket, you have nothing in it; she said she had something in it belonging to her sister; I told her she should put it out, and lend it me; she then pulled out a cloth apron; she then took her pocket-handkerchief out with one hand, and turned her pocket out with the other, and said, there was nothing in it; I said, no, there is nothing in it, and desired her to pull it off; she had a paper in her hand, with two guineas in it; I told her this was my money; she immediately confessed it, and said, yes, it was; she said, she did not know that I should know how much money I had in my pocket.

Q. Had you told her it would be better for her to confess? - A. No; I told her she had another guinea; she said, no, she had not; I bid her feel in her other pocket, she then pulled out a gown, she said she had spent the guinea in cloaths; she had bought a gown for 9s. a petticoat for 9s. and an apron for 1s. 6d. and had spent the rest in apples; I told her she was a very wicked girl for doing so, and asked her if she had taken any thing else, she said, no; on the Monday following, I missed my cloak, and asked her if she had taken it, she said, no; afterwards, she confessed she took it on the

Saturday morning, and sold it to a lady in Fleet-market, for two guineas; and that she would stay with me and work it out: I asked her what she had done with the money, she said she had paid it away to people she owed money to; the cloak has never been recovered.

Q. At the time she told you of the cloak, had you told her it would be better for her to confess? - A. Yes, provided she got the cloak again.

Q. Had she told you she had taken the cloak, before you told her it would be better for her to confess? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of the cloak? - A. Four pounds, it cost me five guineas; I had not had it above a month.

Q. Whether you offered her any favour before she made a confession? - A. I am not positive of that.

Q. Were these guineas marked? - A. No; I could not swear to them, only by her own confession.

Q. As to the guineas, whether you had not told her it would be better for her to confess she had them? - A. No, I had not.

Q. Are you perfectly sure she declared these two guineas to be your's, before you offered her any favour? - A. Yes; I never said I had lost any thing till I said the two guineas in the paper were mine; and then she said she took them.

Q. How long had she lived with you? - A. A week.

Q. Had you a character with her? - A. Yes; from the Red Ball, in Red-lion-street.

Q. That is a public-house? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you lived in that house, in Cursitor-street? - A. A twelvemonth.

Q. How long have you been a milliner? - A. Ever since I lived in that house; my husband has been dead three years; I only come from abroad lately, I am a German; the officer that took her, found nothing upon her, and he was not bound over.

Q. Do you keep the whole house? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I hired myself to this place as a private house; when I got there, I found it was a disorderly house; I was to go to see my brother on Sunday, and she begged of me not to say any thing to my brother what sort of a place I was in.

Q. (To the Prosecutor). Is there any body else in the house besides yourself? - A. Two ladies.

Q. Are they women of character; how do they get their livelihood? - A. I cannot say, one of them I believe, has a friend.

Q. Have you any reason to doubt they are girls of the town, or one of them? - A. I cannot tell, I do not trouble myself about my lodgers.

Q. She says you told her not to tell her brother what sort of a house she was in? - A. Upon my oath, I never said any such thing.

Q. Did this girl receive any company in your house, or was she merely a servant? - A. No; she was merely my servant.

The prisoner did not call any witnesses to her character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-36

36. CATHERINE COOPER and FRANCES COSTELOW , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of November , a silver watch, value 30s. a base metal watch-chain, value 4d. and a base metal watch-key, value 1d. the property of John Pound , privily from his person .

JOHN POUND sworn. - I am a gentleman's servant , out of place at present: On Thursday, the 10th of November, about eleven o'clock at night, as I was passing out of Bow-street, Covent-garden, I was met by three women, two of whom are the prisoners; Cooper took me by the hand, and asked me if I would take a walk with her; I walked with her up Bow-street; I took out my watch, and put it in my coat pocket, because I thought she might take it; she asked me if I would give her any thing to drink; I gave her some halfpence, I believe three penny-worth; then we went into Broad-court , in my way home, I stopped there as much I suppose as a minute, not more, and I immediately missed the prisoner, Catherine Cooper; I put my hand into my pocket, and felt for my watch, and it was gone; I went to my lodgings; I did not know which way she went, as I did not know that part of the town; I missed her all at once; I thought it was in vain to go in pursuit of her.

Q. Where are your lodgings? - A. In Little Wild-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields.

Q. Are you sure that Catherine Cooper is the woman? - A. Yes; I am sure.

Q. You say you met three women, are you sure the prisoners are two out of the three.? - A. I am quite sure of that.

Q. You are likewise sure that Cooper is the person to whom you gave the halfpence in Broad-court, and with whom you stopped a minute or two? - A. Not a minute; I had no connection with her at all.

Q. As soon as you parted, you missed your watch? - A. Yes; I missed her all at once, I put my hand in, and did not feel my watch; my coat hung back in that manner, (describing it); I dare say she saw me put it in.

VALENTINE ROMLEY sworn. - I am watch-house-keeper in St. Giles's: On the 10th of last month, about a quarter after twelve o'clock, the

two prisoners at the bar, and Mary Thompson came to the watch-house; the prisoner Cooper charged Mary Thompson with assaulting and striking her; Mary Thompson made so much noise in the watch-house, that the constable of the night ordered her into the passage; Mary Thompson called out loudly, that Catherine Cooper had drawn a watch out of a man's pocket, in Broad-court, Drury-lane; I searched Catherine Cooper , but could not find the watch upon her; the prisoner Costelow stood at the end of the watch-house, as a spectator as it were; I had some suspicion in my mind, that she might have it about her; I asked her what she had got in her pockets, she said, nothing; I have no pockets about me; when I went to search her pockets, there was no pocket-hole in her petticoat at all; I put my two hands all round her, and searched her as decent as I could; I saw her hands down a fidgeting between her thighs, which gave me more suspicion she might have the watch about her; at last I put my hand between her thighs, and felt something hard like a watch; I said, what have you got here, she said, nothing; I turned up her outside petticoat, I felt her pocket between her thighs, and something in it.

Q. What did you find in it? - A. His silver watch; I asked her how she came by it, she said, upon my word, Mr. Romley, I don't know how it came there; so I secured her, upon suspicion of her receiving this watch, knowing it to be stolen; the other was charged for stealing of it; Thompson said she stole it; this is the watch I took out of her pocket. (Produces it.)

Q. What did the prisoner Costelow say, when you found it? - A. She said, she had it of the prisoner Cooper.

Costelow. I said no such thing.

Romley. Cooper said, she gave it her to take care of.

Q. Did Cooper say how she came by it? - A. Yes; she said she had it of a young man whom she knew very well, that he left it in her hand for half-a-guinea.

Q. Was Costelow in liquor? - A. Perfectly sober; Cooper was rather more in liquor, she had been fighting with Thompson; the prosecutor advertised the watch, by that means I found him.(The watch was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Q. You felt her sumbling about your person - she had her hands round you? - A. No; the minute she was gone, I had a suspicion.

Q. Something passed to create a suspicion? - A. I put my hand in my pocket and found it gone.

Q. She had her hand upon that side? - A. No; I cannot say I felt her hand.

Q. Did you feel her fumbling about you? - A. No.

Q. It was in the outside coat pocket, she had not her hand far from it? - A. She was close to it.

Q. Were you quite sober? - A. Quite so; I had not drank any thing the whole evening.

Q. The prisoner Costelow was not there? - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I can say no more, I know nothing of the gentleman; three of us women were in the watch-house for this watch; when he came before the Justice, he was asked which he could swear to, he said, he did not know which; with that he looked short at me; if I had been the robber, I should not have stood next to him; the Justice asked him if he knew the number of the watch, he said, no, neither the maker's name nor the number; Romley gave him the watch into his hand to look at it; I never was in company with him, I never saw him before; I have neither father nor mother in the world.

Costelow was not put on her defence.

Cooper GUILTY (Aged 21.)

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .

Transported for seven years .

Costelow, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-37

37. JOHN RIDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , three quart pewter pots, value 3s. 9d. and a pint pewter pot, value 9d. the property of Cornelius Steele .

REBECCA STEELE sworn. - A. I am the wife of Cornelius Steele ; my husband keeps a public-house , the Carpenter's-arms, Howel-street, Tottenham-court-road . On Friday the 28th of October, about seven in the evening, the prisoner came in and asked for a pennyworth of porter, he was served immediately; I went into the yard, and looked through the window, and saw the prisoner put four pots into his pockets, two on each side; I came into the kitchen again, he paid for his beer, passed me, and went out at the door; I immediately followed him, and cried stop thief, and a young man, Harry Weale , laid hold of his collar, and brought him back into the house again; I then sent for a constable, and one pot was found in his pocket, he threw the other three out in the street; when he was taken, my servant picked them up, and brought them in; I saw him throw them out, but did not see the maid pick them up, she brought them in instantly. (They were produced in Court by the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutrix).

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. Where were you

when you saw the man take these pots? - A. I was in the yard, he was in the kitchen.

Q. This was a dark night, and yet in the yard you saw him put the pots in his pocket? - A. Yes; there was a light in the kitchen.

Q. He ran out into the street? - A. Yes; I never lost sight of him.

Q. Why did not you have him stopped the moment he put them in his pocket? - A. I chose to let him go.

Q. You chose to let the man commit a felony when you could have prevented it, and then come here and ask a Jury to convict him? - A. I certainly meant to convict him.

Q. You might have prevented his going out of the house with them? - A. I gave him an opportunity to run out.

Q. How far might he be from the house when he was stopped? - A. About fifty yards.

Q. Did any body follow him besides yourself? - A. Yes; Harry Weale.

Q. You ran pretty fast? - A. I did.

Q. You were determined not to lose your man? - A. I was.

Q. What light was there for you to see him drop the pots? - A. The light of the lamps; it was very light.

Q. He might have thrown away the fourth pot as well as the other three? - A. No; the man laid hold of him.

Q. He could not throw it away then? - A. No; I am glad he could not.

HENRY WEALE sworn. - I am a Hackney-coach-man; I was in the Carpenter's-arms having a pin of beer when the prisoner went out with the pots, Mrs. Steele holloaed out stop thief, and I ran after him, he threw three pots out of his hand into the road; I took him by the collar and brought him back, he had a pint pot in his pocket; a constable was sent for, who took the pot out of his pocket; he would have taken it out himself but I would not let him; they were Mr. Steele's pots.

Prisoner's defence. I was hustled as I came out of the door; if the pot was in my pocket I don't know who put it in, I did not; the other three I know nothing of. GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Imprisoned one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-38

38. ALEXANDER STEERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , two linen shirts, value 4s. the property of Esther Lamb .

ESTHER LAMB sworn. - I keep a cellar, No. 15, Monmouth-street : On Saturday night last, these two shirts were pinned at the side of the door for sale; a little after twelve at night, I heard them pulled from the door, I ran out, and cried, stop-thief, and saw the shirts in the hand of a watchman, and the prisoner lying down in the middle of the street, he was taken to the watch-house; there is no particular mark on the shirts; I followed them to the watch-house, and marked them, that I might know them again; they are the very same I lost, the one was pinned to the other.

Q. Have you any doubt at all they were the shirts that were handing up, and were taken away? - A. They are the very same.

MICHAEL VAUGHAN sworn. - I am a watchman; just as I cried the hour of twelve, I heard a woman cry, stop-thief; I saw a man coming along, and he dropped the shirts out of his hand; I had the light of my lanthorn, and there was the light of the lamps and the windows, I could see him very plain; I ran towards him, and my partner ran to the other side; he fell down before him, and he laid hold of him, and I took up the linen; we took him to the watch-house, the woman came up, and took the linen out of my hand, my partner took it from her, and took it to the watch-house.

CORNELIUS CUTHBERT sworn. - On Saturday morning last, about a quarter after twelve o'clock, as I was crying the hour, I heard the cry of stop-thief, in Monmouth-street; I saw a man running, I went towards him, in order to catch him; I saw him drop something like linen, and directly he fell down, about five or six yards from where he dropped the linen; I came up to him and detected him, and took him to the watch-house; I took the linen out of Mrs. Lamb's hand, we put our marks on it, and left it at the watch-house all night.

Prisoner. He told me in the morning, as we were going to the Magistrate, that he could not hurt me, for he did not see me drop the linen.

Cutbbert. I saw him drop something white, which appeared to me to be linen or paper, I could not tell which.

Prisoner's defence. I was going home through Monmouth-street, somebody ran hard by me, and knocked me down in the mud, the watchman came up to me, and said, as there was nobody else, he wanted me, the other watchman brought the linen, and asked the woman if I was the man, she said, she did not know. GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-39

39. ANN KELBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , two diamond

rings, value 20l. the property of Edward King in his dwelling-house .

JULIA KING sworn. - I am the wife of Edward King, my husband is in India, he has been abroad five years, I took the house I live in: On Monday morning, the 10th of November, about four o'clock, I was alarmed by the watchman, the street door was open; I went down immediately, there was no appearance of force; I was last up the night before, the prisoner attended me; I sent her to bed at nine o'clock, I am sure the house was fast in the usual way; the diamond rings were in a drawer, in which my money was, on a side-board; there was near eight guineas in it, the drawer was locked; that drawer was broke open, every thing in it gone, and all the plate off the side-board; I had seen it all safe at eleven o'clock over-night; when I came down, I, went to the parlour door, and just looked in, and thought all was safe; I went to the door to the watchman, who wished to see that every thing was safe; I told him there was no necessity for that, every thing was safe; upon that he went up stairs again, and in about two minutes I came down, and saw that all the plate, and every thing in the drawer was gone, and the drawer lying on the ground; I then ran out into the street, and called out to the watchman, that the house was robbed, this was about four o'clock in the morning; there were several watchmen went by, they said, they did not know any thing about it, they said, it was not their watch; a few minutes afterwards, several watchmen came round the door, among whom was my own watchman, he said, every thing was safe when I was here; when I called out that the house was robbed, the prisoner came down immediately, she had her day cap, a shawl, an handkerchief, and an under petticoat on, she immediately fell on her knees, and said, that she hoped the Lord God Almighty would bring to Justice the offenders before this blessed day was over, and many other expressions to that purpose; I do not recollect having a suspicion of her, I had her brought before Mr. Bond; on searching her, two of my diamond rings that were taken out of the drawer, were found in the drawer of the kitchen.

Q. Have you ever seen your rings again, since they were taken from you? - A. I saw them when they were found in my own house, in the drawer of the kitchen, that was on the Monday after the robbery was; on the Thursday morning they were in a work-bag, among a parcel of old rags.

Q. Whose work-bag was this? - A. It was her's.

Q. Have you kept these rings from that time to this? - A. No; I delivered them to the person that found them, his name is Greatis.

Q. Will they be produced here to-day? - A. Yes.

Q. Was any thing else found besides the diamond rings? - A. Nothing but trifling articles not worth mentioning.

Cross-examined by Mr. Alley. Q. You have told us you have been married? - A. Yes; Mr. King is in India.

Q. I thought Mr. King was in company with you and the prisoner, after the offence was committed? - A. Is it necessary I should answer this.

Court. You must answer that question.

Mr. Alley. Q. There was a gentleman of the name of King in company with you and the prisoner after this transaction? - A. There was a gentleman, but not of the name of King.

Q. Did any person, of the name of King, live or lodge in your house? - A. No.

Prisoner. That is the man she lived with.

Mr. Alley. Q. Don't be affected, madam, because, if you live in an honourable way, as an honourable woman, nothing can be attached to you which is not true - one short question might save us a great deal of trouble, and you a great deal of pain - I believe, at Bow-street, you stated the things stolen to be the property of Julia King? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. This woman was committed for stealing this, as the property of Julia King ; if you are Julia King , you must state it? - A. I stated it, and Mr. Bond was perfectly satisfied.

Mr. Alley. Q. I don't dispute it; I must put the question, whether or not you are a married woman? - A. I am really married to the person I told you, and whose name I bear.

Q. I don't mean any affront; but there was a person of the name of King lived in this house? - A. Yes; there was a person.

Q. Edward King lived in this house? - A. Never.

Q. Edward King paid the rent of this house? - A. No; he has never been in this country near five years.

Q. James King lived in this house? - A. Yes.

Q. James King was in company with you and the prisoner after this transaction? - A. I said my name was King.

Q. But had not James King been in company with you and the prisoner after this transaction? - A. The gentleman you mentioned was.

Q. I don't wish to misrepresent you; is that Mr. James King ? - A. No.

Q. I believe after you gave the alarm, the prisoner came down stairs? - A. She did.

Q. The night before you gave her leave to go to bed early? - A. Yes; I staid up till eleven o'clock.

Q. Had you occasion to open the door after she went to bed? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. You let some person into the house? - A. Yes, I did.

Q. At what time was this? - A. About a quarter before eleven.

Q. You have told us you lost eighty guineas? - A. I am not quite sure as to the sum; it might be more or it might be less, I cannot say.

Q. Before Mr. Bond you said you lost Banknotes? - A. I did; four five-pounds.

Q. Are you sure the door was completely fastened by you after you let this gentleman in? - A. Yes.

Q. Did that gentleman stay in the house all night, or go out afterwards? - A. He staid in the house all night.

Q. Have you heard from your husband these five years? - A. Not for the last two years.

Q. You don't know whether he is alive or dead? - A. I could almost undertake to say he is alive.

Q. Have you had regular correspondence with him for these five years? - A. Not for these two years; I have received letters from him.

Q. You have not seen any body lately that knows him to be alive? - A. No.

Q. You have no reason to believe him to be alive? - A. I have.

Q. Has he done the duties of a good husband? - A. He is a man of very bad character.

Q. If so, I should think he is not alive now? - A. I don't know that.

Q. With respect to the servant, the moment you called her she ran down stairs? - A. Yes, I don't think it was a minute.

Q. You were alarmed at that time of night, though there was a gentleman in the house? - A. Yes.

Q. You know it was right and proper for her to come down stairs? - A. I should not think, when the house was robbed, it was proper to stay to dress herself, because I came down directly.

Q. It takes no time, you know, to put on a day cap, though it does a gown? - A. No.

Q. The prisoner breakfasted in the house after the robbery? - A. I don't know; she attended me at breakfast.

Q. You sent her out for mussins and other things for breakfast? - A. Yes.

Q. You sent her out again? - A. Yes, at dinner time, and she staid a considerable time.

Q. If she had staid a good while, she might then have went away with the things? - A. Yes; but I had so good an opinion of her, that I should never have suspected her, had it not been for persons telling me they had a suspicion of her.

Q. Eleven o'clock at night was the last time you saw the door fast? - A. Yes.

Q. The thieves, therefore, who took the other things, might have taken the diamond rings? - A. Certainly they might.

Q. She had this opportunity of escaping in the morning, as well as at dinner time? - A. She might.

Q. You had a good opinion of her? - A. Yes, from her behaviour towards me, which was extremely flattering and attentive, but every body else had a bad opinion of her.

Q. Where did you find these rings? - A. In a drawer in the kitchen, appropriated to her use, among the rags.

Q. That drawer was not locked? - A. No.

Q. It was open to any body? - A. Yes, if they went into the kitchen.

Q. I believe it was open when the diamond rings were discovered? - A. It was not locked.

Q. These things were found in that drawer, which any body, coming into the room, might have opened? - A. Yes.

Q. The girl was in the house after the robbery was committed? - A. Yes; three days.

Q. And the diamond rings remained there for that time? - A. Yes.

Q. She had sufficient opportunity to escape, and did not? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. I think you said you apprehended your husband was not dead? - A. I am almost sure he is not dead.

Court. Q. Was this house taken by yourself, or any body for you? - A. By myself.

Court. Q. Do you pay the rent? - A. I have not paid any rent; I have only been in four months.

SEBASTIAN GREATIS sworn. - I am a miniature painter: On Monday fortnight, after seven at night, I came to Mrs. King's, and went into the kitchen; in the drawer I found a bag, and at the bottom of the bag I found the two diamond rings, and a piece of linen, belonging to Mrs. King; they were in this work-bag. (Producing it.)

Q. Whose is that? - A. I don't know; it was just as it is now.

Q. Have you kept the diamond rings ever since? - A. Yes. (Produces them out of the bag.)

Prosecutrix. (Looks at the rings.) These are mine.

Court. Q. Are there any marks upon them? - A. Yes, there is, my own, one has hair in it.

Prisoner's defence. I know no more about the robbery than you; I was fast asleep in my bed; this gentleman, James King, sleeps with her every night; the house is open at all hours; several gentlemen visit her every day; James King lives in the city; they told me this morning not to mention his name; I had been out several hours of the day; I did not imagine they would suspect me; there are three brothers of them; he is jealous of her, and there is quarrelling and fighting every

night; he says, there are gentlemen there when he is out.

GUILTY of stealing the rings, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-40

40. MARY MURRAY , otherwise BARRINGTON , was indicted for that she, in the King's highway, in and upon Sarah, the wife of Daniel Plater , on the 14th of November , did make an assault, putting her in corporeal fear and danger of her life, and taking from her person a leather purse, value 2d. and eighty-two guineas in monies numbered , the property of the said Daniel Plater.(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

SARAH PLATER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the wife of Daniel Plater, of Woburn, in Buckinghamshire; I deal in lace ; I came to town the 13th of November, with some lace, and on the 14th of November sold it to Mr. Wells, in Fleet-street, for which I received, in the evening, between seven and eight o'clock, eighty guineas in gold, and half-a-guinea; I put it in a leather purse, and tied it up with a string, and put it in my left hand pocket; I called at Mr. Moore's, to buy some drugs; not having money enough to pay for them, without exposing my purse, I borrowed two shillings of my daughter; after that I called at a pastry-cook's, and bought a pie for my supper; there I pulled out my purse, and put it again in my pocket; while I had my purse out to take out a guinea, a man came in and called for a cheesecake, and stood behind me to eat it; he went out before me; when I came out, I had the money in my pocket, and kept my hand round it; when I came under the scaffolding in Fleet-street , a man ran between my daughter and me, and knocked my daughter one way and me another.

Q. Was that the same man you saw in the pastry-cook's shop? - A. I don't know; he had the same coloured cloaths on.

Q. Was his appearance like the man you had seen? - A. Yes; the prisoner was on my left-hand, next my left-hand pocket, my hand was then round my purse.

Q. Was it round your purse after the man pushed you? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure the man had quitted you before your and was off the purse? - A. Yes; I was then pushed almost down by the woman, as I judged.

Court. Q. The man pushed you against the woman, and then she pushed you again? - A. Yes; and then she laid hold on my cloaths, just by my pocket, and almost pushed me down, and obliged me to pull my hand out of my pocket to save myself; when I had recovered myself, in a moment, while the woman was by me, I missed my purse, and cried out, this woman has robbed me of eighty guineas and upwards; her face at that time was full in the light of the lamp.

Q. Was the woman by when you cried out you had lost your money? - A. Yes; she cried out, what are you at, what would you have; I said, I was ruined for ever; she went forward, and a man stood ready to receive her.

Q. At the time she spoke, her face was right against the lamp? - A. Yes; I saw her as plain as if I had held the lamp against her face myself.

Q. Are you able to speak positively to her person? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen her since? - A. Yes; twice at Hatton-garden; on Monday, a week after the robbery, she was taken in consequence of an information, and a description I had given of her to the officers of the Police.

Court. Q. You had observed her so much as to give a description of her person? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you see that person in Court now, that you gave a description of at the Police-office? - A. Yes.

Q. Where is she? - Go down and touch the person. - (The witness goes down and touches the prisoner).

Q. Is that the person you saw at the office? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure that is the same woman you saw that night? - A. Yes; I am quite positive of it.

Q. At the time you were robbed, your daughter was with you? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. Have you seen the man since that pushed against you? - A. No.

Q. You are not very much used to London, I believe? - A. Yes; I have come many years with my lace.

Q. You know, between seven and eight at night, there is always a great croud of people in Fleet-street? - A. Yes; but I never was interrupted before.

Q. How many people were there when you were making your passage through this place? - A. I don't know, I believe there were more of the gang.

Q. Were there sixty or seventy persons passed through while you were in the passage? - A. No, there were not; there might be five or six.

Q. Do you mean to say there were not more than five or six persons about you? - A I saw nobody to take any notice of but the man and the woman.

Q. This man pushed you against the woman? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it not very natural for the woman, in those circumstances, to say, what is the matter, what do you want? - A. She had hold of my cloaths.

Q. You said she caught hold of you to save herself? - A. No; I did not say so.

Q. How was the woman dressed? - A. In a short black cloak, and a straw hat, and a black veil turned up.

Q. You had taken out your purse at Mr. Moore's? - A. No.

Q. Where did you take it out before you took it out at the pastry-cook's? - A. No where else.

Q. This man was at your back there? - A. Yes; eating a cheesecake.

Q. Did he see your purse? - A. I don't know.

Q. Was he in a position that he might see it? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your describing the person of the prisoner she was taken up - were any other persons taken up in consequence of that description? - A. Yes; there were three taken up that I was called to see: Mrs. Barnsfellow, Mrs. Barnet, and Miss Seymour.

Q. Your description must be pretty general to apply to three persons? - A. I said, I don't know.

Q. There were three taken up? - A. Yes; and a man.

Q. Which of the three did you say, to the Magistrate, was like the person? - A. Neither; I said the nose of Miss Seymour rather resembled her's, but I said neither of them were the woman.

Q. Did not you say Miss Seymour was like her? - A. She had not a feature like her except her nose.

Q. Did not you say she was most like her? - A. No.

Q. Were not you admonished not to be too positive? - A. I don't know; I was not positive at all, I knew she was not the person.

Q. Did any body admonish you not to be too positive? - A. I don't recollect any such thing.

Q. Do not you recollect sufficiently to know whether it was or was not so? - A. No; I said it was not the person.

Q. Was the woman that ran against you elegantly or meanly dressed? - A. Middling.

Q. When was she apprehended? - A. On Friday.

Q. Were you present? - A. No.

Q. You don't know whether your purse, or money, was found? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Whether, in the act of drawing your hand from your pocket, you might not draw the purse out? - A. No; I am sure I left it in my pocket.

Q. The man passed you, and the woman pushed you; it was all done in a moment? - A. Yes; the woman squalled out, what is the matter, what do you want.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You are quite sure you had your purse and money in your pocket after the man quitted you? - A. Yes.

Q. Three other persons were brought to the office, and you said, they were not the persons? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt of the prisoner? - A. No; I am quite sure she is the person.

SARAH PLATER sworn. - Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the daughter of the last witness; I was coming down Fleet-street with her, when she was robbed; I felt a woman at the side of my arm.

Q. Did you before that see a man? - A. No; I did not; we were coming along, my mother was leaning her right hand on my arm, and her left hand was in her pocket; the woman jostled me from my mother.

Q. Did you see her do any thing more? - A. No, I did not; I put my elbow back against the woman, and she screamed out, "what would you be at," or "what would you have of me."

Q. Did you observe the face of the woman? - A. Only as she passed me, I cannot swear to her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. Your mother said a man ran between you, and separated you? - A. A man ran between us after the robbery, I believe it was the woman that ran between us.

Q. Was it the man that ran between you first, or a woman? - A. I think it was the woman.

Q. Was there more than one man jostled between you? - A. I saw but one.

Q. How far were you under the scaffolding at this time? - A. About half way.

Q. While you and your mother were under the scaffolding, how many persons might pass you? - A. I saw none pass and re-pass at the time; afterwards, there were a great many, twenty or thirty.

Prisoner's defence. I have some witnesses I wish to be called; I have nothing to say, but I am very innocent; I never was charged with a crime of this sort, nor any other.

Jury. (To Mrs. Plater). Q. Did you feel the hand of the woman in your pocket? - A. I felt it against my body, I don't know whether it was in my pocket or no.

Jury. Q. There was another man passed you after the robbery? - A. I don't know.

For the Prisoner.

MARY WHITEHEAD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am servant to the prisoner, I have lived with her ten weeks.

Q. Do you remember Monday, the 14th of November? - A. Yes.

Q. In what state of health was your mistress on that day? - A. Very ill; she had been very ill some weeks before, but able to go out; but on that Monday she was never out of bed, but to have it made.

Q. Do you recollect the Sunday before the Monday; how was she that day? - A. Very ill.

Q. Was she out that day? - A. No.

Q. What was her situation on Monday? - A. In hysterics most of the day from fretting.

Q. Did your business lead you to be at home the greatest part of Monday? - A. The whole of the day.

Q. From six in the morning till ten at night, where was your mistress? - A. On the bed and on the sofa; she got up about five o'clock, and lay on the sofa, to have the bed made, and she was in bed the rest of the evening.

Q. What were her circumstances at that time? - A. Very low indeed; on the Thursday before she was taken up, I was obliged to pawn a petticoat for her subsistence; and a gown on Tuesday, and a petticoat on Monday; from want of fire to keep them warm, she was obliged to lie in bed, and have her child in bed; she was in the utmost distress through want and illness.

Q. Did you see any thing about her chambers of guineas, or a purse, all that week? - A. No; we were quite in want.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. What way of life is your mistress in? - A. She keeps company, she lives in Wharton's court, Holborn, and before that, lived in George-street.

Q. What was your mistress's illness? - A. A cold; she was in a sponging-house and got cold, and was very ill.

Q. On this day she had hysterics the greatest part of the day? - A. Yes; for fear of the bailiffs.

Q. Had she been in fits any day before that? - A. I don't know that she had, but she was in a very low way.

Q. Has she been in fits any other day after that? - A. I don't know that she was; on the Saturday night, the bailiffs were at the door, and the fear and dread she was in was the cause of the hysterics.

Q. On the Saturday she was out? - A. I will not charge my memory with that, as I was doing my business.

Q. How long before had she been out? - A. I believe not from the Friday.

Q. As she was ill, I suppose she had some Apothecary attending her? - A. No; her circumstances would not allow it.

Q. Who is the person that keeps the house? - A. Jane Massey.

Q. Is she married or single? - A. Married; her husband's name is Thomas Massey, he works at a shop, in Fox's court.

Q. Was Mrs Massey in the room any part of that day? - A. Yes; she was in the room several times in the day, I cannot say what hour.

Q. Any time in the forenoon? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was she there any time in the evening? - A. Yes.

Q. Yes! - I thought you would remember that; was she there after seven o'clock? - A. Yes; she was there before that.

Q. Did you see her there after your tea-time? - A. I believe she was in and out; she was there at six o'clock, and again before we went to bed.

Q. What time did your mistress go to bed? - A. My mistress was not up the whole day more than a quarter of an hour.

Q. Mrs. Massey was there after your mistress went to bed? - A. Yes, she was.

Q. Was she there after seven o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any other person there? - A. Yes; Mrs. Massey's sister, Phillis Stevens , who is servant to her.

Q. Did she see your mistress several times in the day? - A. Yes.

Q. Was she there in the evening? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was she there after six o'clock? - A. Several times.

Q. Was there any other person in the room during the day? - A. Yes; Ann Ireland, who is a little girl out of place.

Q. What time was she in the room? - A. She sat in the room while my mistress was up; she was in and out of our room several times.

Q. Was there any other person in the room? - A. Deodatus Brown, he is hair-dresser to my mistress, he has dressed her for some months; he came in about six o'clock to enquire after her health, as he had not dressed her for some time; my mistress asked him to stop and play at cards with the child, and he staid till ten at night.

Q. He supped with you, I suppose? - A. We had no supper to give him.

Q. What did he neither eat nor drink all that time? - A. No.

Q. After this you pawned some cloaths? - A. Yes; I pawned a petticoat on Monday, a gown on Tuesday, and another petticoat on the Thursday, for half-a-crown.

Q. Did you pawn a cloak and hat? - A. She had none to pawn, I had pawned them the week before.

Q. She went out on Friday, did she go out without a hat and cloak? - A. No; she borrowed a black beaver hat of Mrs. Massey.

Q. What makes you so remarkably to recollect this Monday? - A. On account of my mistress's illness.

Q. She was ill on Tuesday? - A. She was more ill on Monday; on the Sunday she was asked down to dinner with Mrs. Massey, she was taken so ill, she could eat none, and went up again into her room; on Monday morning, I found her in tears, and she went into sits.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Were those fits struggling or fainting fits? - A. Fainting fits.

Q. When you mentioned hysteric fits, did you mean such as you have now described, fainting fits? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. You were in total want all the week? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you continued with her? - A. Yes.

Q. You had no dinner on the Monday? - A. My mistress was low in pocket and health too; she was afraid of the bailiffs, and could not go out to do her business.

Q. How came you to recollect this Monday? - A. From my mistress's illness.

Q. How long had she been ill? - A. I cannot say; on the Monday, when I went in, she was in tears.

Q. What did you give her in her sits? - A. Hartshorn and water.

Q. Was that the first time you ever saw her in that way? - A. I cannot say it was; I have often seen her in a low way.

Q. What age is her child? - A. Eight years of age; I left him with her while I went for the hartshorn.

Q. What time in the morning was that? - A. About eight.

Q. Had she no friend with her? - A. None at all.

Q. Did not you give something to this Deodatus Brown? - A. No.

Q. He was one of the party at cards? - A. Yes.

Q. He had nothing to eat? - A. No.

Q. And you had nothing to eat that day but bread and cheese? - A. No.

Q. How long have you lived with her? - A. Ten weeks.

Q. What nourishment had your mistress on the Monday? - A. I made her some panado and some sago.

Q. Who was present when you made her the panado and sago? - A. Nobody but me and the child; (some duplicates shown her by Mr. Jackson;) these are the duplicates which I had for the things I pawned.

Q. Where did you pawn them? - A. In Fox's-court, Galley, I think, the name is; I pawned them in the name of Brown; sometimes I pawn them in the name of Murray.

Q. Your mistress had no hat and cloak? - A. No, she had none.

Q. How came you to pawn a hat and cloak? - A. I did not pawn a hat and cloak.

JANE MASSEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. You keep a house in Wha ton's-court? - A. Yes; my husband is a mathematical instrument maker; the prisoner lived with me a fortnight and a day before she was taken up.

Q. What was the state of her health? - A. She was very ill.

Q. How was she on the Sunday? - A. She was down to dine with me, and was taken very ill and obliged to go up stairs.

Q. On the Monday? - A. Very ill; I was up in her room at three o'clock, and again at six or seven, between six and seven, or near seven.

Q. Was she then in a state of body to go into the street? - A. No; she was hardly able to set up on Sunday; she was worse on the Monday, and was in bed all day, except to have her bed made.

Q. What lodgers have you in your house? - A. A man, Ann Ireland, a girl out of place, Mrs. Murray, and Mary Whitehead , who lives in the back garret, who is servant to Mrs. Murray.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. She had not been out for a week before this? - A. The last night she was out was the Saturday before this Monday; she went out to get some apples in the evening.

Q. When was she out before the Saturday; was the out on the Friday? - A. She might, I don't know.

Q. On the Thursday? - A. I don't think she was, she was so ill.

Q. Do you believe she was out on Thursday or Friday? - A. I believe not, I don't know.

Q. To the best of your belief, she was not out any day except Saturday? - A. I don't think she was.

Q. When she did go out, she used to go out in an evening; how was she dressed when she went out? - A. When she first came, she had a dark gown and coat, or apron; she borrowed a black beaver hat of me all the time she was there.

Q. Did she borrow it of you in the course of that week? - A. She had it always in her room.

Q. Did she wear that hat on the Saturday? - A. Yes.

Q. On the Sunday she was taken ill at dinner, and was worse on the Monday? - A. Yes.

Q. Was she up when you were there on Monday, about seven o'clock? - A. I was not in the room; I know she was in bed; the servant said, she was going to get her up; my sister went up for the mug between six and seven.

Q. Was your husband up there that evening? - A. No; he don't leave work till nine o'clock.

Q. Did the servant call you up any part of the day on Monday? - A. She said, she was very ill; I was not up; I sent up a bottle of salts.

Q. She did not go for any hartshorn? - A. Yes; I believe Mary Ireland went for the hartshorn; I don't know whether it was her or the servant.

Q. Was there any other person up there in the course of the day? - A. Yes; there was a man went up to dress Mrs. Murray's hair; I believe he drank tea with the maid and the child; I don't know that he did; he played at cards with the child.

Q. Was he there when you went up? - A. He was just gone when I went up.

Q. That was about seven o'clock? - A. Yes.

Q. How soon was she recovered to go out after this? - A. She was never out of the room till she was taken up.

Q. Had she any visitors in the course of the week? - A. No.

Q. You lent her her your beaver hat to go out on the Saturday; to your knowledge she had neither hat or bonnet? - A. No; she came in a black hat she had borrowed; that she had sent home.

Q. When she was taken up, what was the state of her health? - A. She was very ill.

Q. Did you hear any thing of bailffs the Saturday before the Sunday? - A. She was afraid of being arrested.

Q. What is she? - A. She took my lodgings, as a widow; she brought a little boy, and took the room to receive company.

Q. How did she subsist? - A. Things were continually pawning.

Court. Q. She took the lodgings as a widow-woman, for the purpose of receiving company? - A. Yes.

Q. You let your lodgings for this purpose? - A. Yes; I let her the first floor.

Q. At what price? - A. At half-a-guinea a week.

Q. She was very poor? - A. Yes.

Q. She had not even fire in either room? - A. No; she had the use of my fire sometimes to boil any thing; I believe on the Monday she boiled the kettle for breakfast.

Q. To your recollection, she boiled nothing that day but the kettle in the morning? - A. No.

Q. She had no sago or panado? - A. Nothing of that kind.

Q. If she had, it must have been dressed at your fire? - A. Yes; she might use the fire sometimes when I was out; I go out sometimes to mangle.

Q. Where is the mangle you go to; - A. At Mr. Allen's.

Q. Do you mean to say she might cook at your fire, without your knowing of it? - A. I was not out of the room that day above half an hour at a stretch.

PHILLIS STEVENS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am sister to Mrs. Massey, and live with her as servant.

Q. How long had the prisoner been at your house? - A. A fortnight and a day.

Q. What was the general state of her health? - A. Very poorly indeed.

Q. How was she on the Saturday? - A. She went out on Saturday to market to buy some apples; on the Sunday she was very ill indeed; she came down to dinner with my mistress; before she had done, she was so ill, she was forced to go up stairs; I saw her again in the evening, about seven or eight o'clock; she was then very poorly indeed.

Court. Q. What did she eat on the Sunday? - A. We had leg of pork and apple-pudding.

Q. Which did she eat? - A. Both, I believe.

Q. How soon after dinner did she go up stairs? - A. Before she had done dinner.

Q. How came she to go up stairs, she had eaten of both? - A. Because she was very poorly.

Q. You had all of you dined? - A. We had not quite done.

Q. Who was the last? - A. I don't know.

Q. Had not you done? - A. I had done.

Q. Had your mistress quite done? - A. I don't know.

Q. Mrs. Murray had quite done? - A. Yes.

Q. Who else were there? - A. My brother and Mrs. Murray's son.

Q. Had she taken any thing amiss that she went up stairs? - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Where did the maid dine that day? - A. Below stairs; she had some leg of pork and apple-pudding.

Q. Where did she dine on the Monday? - A. Up stairs.

Q. What had she? - A. I don't know; the servant fetched it.

Q. Where was it dressed? - A. Up stairs, in the dining-room.

Q. They generally dressed their dinners in the dining-room? - A. Yes.

Q. You are sure it was dressed in the dining-room on the Monday? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it boiled or roasted? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did not you see the maid bring it in? - A. No; she has the key of the street-door; I saw her bring something in in her apron.

Q. How much? - A. About two or three pounds, I suppose.

Q. You are sure it was dressed on the Monday? A. Yes.

Q. Who finds them in coals? - A. They find their own coals.

Q. They never dress at your fire? - A. No.

Q. As they have a fire up stairs, they boil their kettle up stairs? - A. Always up stairs.

Q. How was the leg of pork dressed? - A. It was roasted.

Q. At your own fire? - A. Yes.

Mr. Jackson. Q. On Sunday she went up stairs into her own room? - A. Yes.

Q. How was she on the Monday? - A. Very ill; I was in her room about one o'clock; I was in again about five or six, she was very poorly, indeed; I was up again about seven or eight, she was then on the sofa, the maid was making the bed;

I was up again about nine o'clock, and she was in bed.

Q. Deodatus Brown was there then? - A. Yes; playing at cards with the child.

Q. You say, the maid lets herself out - did you see her bring in any meat on the Monday? - A. I know she went out for something for dinner; I saw her bring something in, in her lap.

Q. How did you know she was going out for something for dinner? - A. She told me so; she said, she was going out to buy something for herself and the child.

Q. You saw something in her lap, was it meat, or bread and cheese? - A. It was meat.

Q. You did not see it? - A. No.

Q. She had access to your fire sometimes, had not she? - A. No.

Q. How was Mrs. Murray's health after the Monday? - A. Very poorly, she was never out of the room, till the gentlemen came and took her.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. There was a man there in the evening? - A. Yes.

Q. What time did he come? - A. About six, I believe.

Q. You saw him there till near ten? - A. Yes.

Q. He drank tea with Mrs. Murray? - A. Yes.

Q. You have been asked how you came to know this was meat that she brought in, why the servant told you it was meat? - A. Yes.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Mary Whitebread said, she was going for something for dinner? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. When she came home, she said, she had got meat? - A. Yes.

MARY IRELAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I live in Mrs. Massey's house, being out of place.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, by her lodging at the same house, I have been there a month last Tuesday.

Q. What was the general state of Mrs. Murray's health? - A. Very ill.

Q. Do you remember, about the 12th, 13th, and 14th of November - do you know how she was on the Saturday? - A. Very poorly.

Q. How was she on the Sunday? - A. She was down at dinner with Mrs. Massey.

Q. Were you down with them? - A. Yes.

Q. Who dined with you? - A. Mr. Massey, Mrs. Massey, her sister, and Mrs. Murray.

Q. Who else? - A. Mrs. Brown, and Mrs. Murray's servant.

Q. Who do you mean by Mrs. Browne? - A. Deodatus Brown's wife.

Q. Where was he that day? - A. I don't know, I am sure.

Q. You all eat of the pork? - A. Yes.

Q. What else had you? - A. Apple pudding.

Q. The servant did not dine in the kitchen? - A. No; she dined with us.

Q. What is her name? - A. Mrs. Whitehead.

Q. Are Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Whitehead two people? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say, that Mrs. Brown, and Whitehead are not the same person? - A. It is the same person.

Q. What is her real name? - A. Whitehead; she does not live with her husband now.

Q. How came you to say Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Whitehead both dined there? - A. I was thinking of Mr. Brown, they generally call her that - Mrs. Brown.

Q. You mentioned both; do you mean Mrs. Browne and Mrs. Whitehead are the same person? - A. Yes.

Q. How long was Mrs. Murray at the table on Sunday? - A. We had not near done dinner when she was taken ill, and taken up into her own room.

Q. Did you see her again that evening? - A. Yes; I went up in the evening to see how she did, and she was very bad then; I saw her that evening about ten o'clock, she was very ill; I was up about seven o'clock in the morning, and went and asked her how she was, she was very poorly then.

Q. Did you see her again in the course of the day? - A. Yes; I was there almost every quarter of an hour, she was taken a great deal worse after breakfast.

Q. Were you there in the evening? - A. Yes; from about six till seven, she was very bad, she was not up then; about nine o'clock, I was with her, the servant was making the bed, and she lay on the sofa, with a counterpane over her; I was by the side of her, she was very ill, then she went to bed in about five minutes after.

Q. Did you see her after that? - A. Yes, I went to ask her how she was; when I went to bed, about half after ten, she was very ill then, and was not out of bed till the men came to take her.

Q. Was she out on the Saturday? - A. I believe she was.

Q. How was she dressed, what hat had she? - A. A beaver hat.

Q. Whose hat was it? - A. Her landlady's.

Q. You never saw a hat of her own? - A. No; only a black bonnet that went to the milliners to be made up.

Q. Was she out of her room on the Monday? - A. No.

Court. Q. What are you? - A. A servant out of place.

Q. Do you know what house you are in? - A. Mrs. Massey's.

Q. She lets lodgings to unfortunate women? - A. Yes, I know her; we were brought up together.

Q. What had you for dinner on Monday? - A. A leg of pork.

Q. What had Mrs. Murray for dinner? - A. Nothing at all.

Q. She had no one thing, not even a dish of tea? - A. Yes.

Q. But that was only in the morning? - A. I don't know.

Q. Where did the maid dine? - A. She had her dinner up stairs.

Q. What had she for dinner? - A. I don't know.

Q. There was a fire in the dining-room? - A. Yes; I believe there was.

Q. Where did the child dine that day? - A. Down stairs along with the landlady.

Q. Where did Deodatus Brown drink tea on the Monday? - A. Up stairs.

Q. Did you drink tea with him? - A. No; Mrs. Whitehead drank tea with him.

Q. Where did they boil the kettle? - A. In the dining-room.

Q. How long did he stay there? - A. I don't know; I saw him there at eight o'clock; he came again afterwards, and staid till half after nine.

Q. He staid supper? - A. Yes.

Q. What had they for supper? - A. I don't know.

Q. They had a pint of beer, had not they? - A. Yes; Mr. Brown sent for it himself.

Q. You are a servant out of place? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been out of place? - A. A month.

Q. Where did you live last? - A. At Pleasant-place, Pentonville, with captain Rutley; I lived with him ten years, he is gone abroad, my mistress lives there now.

Court. Q. What age are you? - A. Twenty-seven.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Did you see any supper on the Monday? - A. I did not.

Mr. Gurney. Q. When did you live in Northampton-street, Clerkenwell? - A. Never.

DEODATUS BROWN sworn. - Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a hair-dresser, I dress Mrs Murray's hair.

Q. You called at Wharton's-court? - A. Yes.

Q. While she was at Wharton's-court, what was the state of her health? - A. She was very poorly; I called on the Saturday, she was very poorly; I asked her if she would have her hair dressed to-morrow; she said, no, as she was ill, and her apparel would not allow it; I called on Sunday, and she was very ill; I called on the Monday, about six or seven o'clock, she was sitting up on the sofa very ill, I staid there two hours I suppose; she said, as she was so ill, will you stop and indulge the child with a game of cards; I played an hour and an half, or two hours.

Q. What time did you go from Mrs. Murray's? - A. About half after nine in the evening, it was a very dirty night; I said, I might as well stop and indulge George, as I had nothing to do; I staid there, and she laid down again.

Court. Q. Where do you live? - A. No. 5, the Bird-in-hand-court, Long-acre.

Q. Have you any connection with the family? - A. No.

Q. Are you a married man? - A. No.

Q. Were you never married? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Mary Whitehead? - A. Yes.

Q. How came she to go by your name? - A. Because she lived with me as a wife; I never was married.

Q. You have drank tea with her since? - A. Yes; I drank tea with her that evening at Mrs. Murray's.

Q. You don't live together now? - A. No; business failed, and she went out to service.

Q. You did not dine with her that day? - A. No; I don't know that she had any dinner, from her distress.

Q. Had you any supper that night? - A. No; nothing but tea.

Q. It is not true then that you sent for a pint of beer? - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. If any body says so, they say that that is not true? - A. I don't know that I had any porter.

Q. If any body has sworn so, they have sworn that which is false? - A. God Almighty knows; I don't recollect having the porter.

Q. If Mary Ireland has said you had a pint of porter for supper it is not true? - A. I don't know that I had a pint of porter.

Q. You had tea, where was the kettle boiled? - A. I don't know; I don't know that there was a fire, there might be a fire.

Q. Where did Mrs. Murray drink tea? - A. They had had their tea, and asked me to have some tea.

Q. You don't recollect having the pint of porter? - A. As to the porter, I might have it, I don't recollect.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. If any body has said you had bread and cheese for supper that is not true? - A. I don't recollect having any bread and cheese.

Q. Will you swear you had not bread and cheese? - A. Upon my oath I don't recollect I had bread and cheese, nor porter. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-41

41. RICHARD WADDLE was indicted for that he, on the 25th of September, 1795 , upon William Walton an Officer of Excise , being on shore in the due execution of his duty, in seizing, for our Lord the King, one thousand pounds weight of tobacco, liable to be seized by him as such officer, unlawfully, and violently, did make an assault, and him, the said William, unlawfully, and forcibly, did hinder, oppose, and obstruct, against the form of the statute , &c.

Second Count. Charging him with assaulting the said William, without mentioning obstructing him in the execution of his duty.

Third Count. Charging him with obstructing him in his duty, without mentioning the assault.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Knowlys, and the case opened by Mr. Fielding).

WILLIAM WALTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you an Excise-officer on the 25th of September 1795? - A. Yes; I know the prisoner at the bar, Waddle, I knew him before this transaction.

Q. Was he acquainted with your person? - A. Yes; in consequence of an information which I had on that day, I went to Wye, and called on Mr. Hayward, an officer, to go with me for my assistance, it is about seventeen miles from the coast; about ten o'clock in the evening we sat out together, and rode to a place called New-Church, in the country of Kent, where we remained till nearly one in the morning, the 26th, when the prisoner, and George Hart in company with him, came along with a cart with two horses, which seemed very heavily loaded; I told Mr. Hayward what passed, and we immediately went in pursuit of the cart; on examining it, we found it was loaded with unmanufactured tobacco.

Q. What was it contained in? - A. Common sort of bags for this purpose; we seized it.

Q. Was any body with the cart? - A. Yes; the prisoner and Hart, at the same time; after that, Hayward called out to me, saying, that Hart was endeavouring to get the horse out of the shafts of the cart; to prevent him from doing so, I went round, and Hart held up a stick in a menacing manner, a scuffle ensued then between Hart and me; I afterwards drove Hart into the hedge, he then sprang from the hedge, and took me by the collar of my coat, and dragged me from my horse, and called Waddle to his assistance, they were both upon me, they beat me with their fists and their knees; Hart sat upon me with a very large knife drawn open in his hand, swearing, that if the goods and horses were not given up he would murder me; after that, Hayward came to my assistance, I was insensible by their sitting upon me; I was choaked by my handkerchief.

Q. How was that occasioned? - A. By their sitting upon me, and drawing the handkerchief that was round my neck very tight.

Q. How long was it before you became insensible? - A. About ten minutes; when I recovered myself, Waddle came back with the cart and two horses, and drove off.

Q. Where had they been with the cart? - A. They came back a contrary road to that which they were going before.

Q. Who was in custody of the cart, when they were beating you? - A. Mr. Hayward, who had taken the cart a little the other way; when I recovered my senses, Waddle came back with the cart.

Q. Where were you when they had got away the cart? - A. I was left lying on the ground, I don't know where they took it to, I never recovered it again; I got up about a quarter of an hour after.

Q. At the time Waddle came back, did you say any thing to them? - A. I told them I wished them to release me, when I could get the opportunity of speaking, because sometimes I was almost strangled; I got to a public-house as soon as I could; I was a month before I could do any business.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. I want you, if you can, to tell me, if Mr. Hart was on his trial, what the prisoner did; - where was the prisoner when you came up? - A. They were both riding on the top of the bags in the cart; it was full of bags.

Q. It was Hart that got down? - A. They both got down.

Q. Were any of these bags open? - A. I cut one open at the time they were getting down, and took out a sample.

Q. Had you time while they were getting down, to cut a bag open and take a sample out? - A. Yes; they did not get down immediately.

Q. You say, that afterwards Hart held up a stick to you? - A. Yes; upon my coming round the cart.

Q. You said that he used it in a menacing posture? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the meaning of the word you have made use of? - A. Yes.

Q. At that time, the present defendant was not near him? - A. No, nor came near to him, till Hart cried out for assistance.

Q. Why did he cry out for assistance? - A. Because he was dragging me from my horse, he had got down before he called for assistance; they were both afterwards upon me, and beat me; but only Hart sat upon me, with a drawn knife.

Q. Did they both set upon you? - A. They were both upon me with their knees; Hart far upon me, when the other left me and went away.

Q. Then of course, he was with you a part of the time? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you or Hayward hurt either of them? - A. He desired them to desist, or else he would fire.

Q. Did not Hayward actually fire upon one of them? - A. I know nothing but that Hayward threatened to fire.

Q. You don't know whether he did or not? - A. I cannot say.

Q. What became of Hayward? - A. He left me.

Q. Then these men had you in their power, did they do any thing more to you? - A. No; they let me go.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You said you were insensible for a considerable time? - A. Yes.

Q. They left you in that state of insensibility? - A. Yes.

Mr. Fielding. Q. Do you know whether Hayward fired the pistol? - A. No.

Mr. Const. Q. Were you in such a state of insensibility, that you did not know whether a gun was fired or not? - A. Yes.

THOMAS HAYWARD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am an Excise-officer; I was called upon to go with Walton, on the 25th of September, towards New-Church.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes; I saw him that night with a cart.

Q. What time was it the cart was coming by? - A. About one o'clock; I went to the fore horse, Mr. Walton was behind the cart, he said, stop the fore horse, for it is loaded with tobacco; I halloaed out to Walton, Hart is taking the harness off, and has run away with the reins, Walton turned immediately round, and rode after him; in the mean time I staid with the cart; then Mr Walton in a little time after, called out, Mr. Hayward! Mr. Hayward! with that, I turned back, and left the seizure, to the assistance of Mr. Walton; they had then unhorsed him; they were both upon him at that time.

Q. Did you see them get out of the cart? - A. Yes; both of them jumped out of the cart, they were both upon Walton, beating him and kneeing him; then I said, if you don't desist from beating Walton, I shall be under the necessity of firing; Hart said, "damn your eyes and limbs, fire and"be damned, we have fire arms as well as you;" upon that, finding they were still beating Walton, I fired, and shot Hart in the hip; Hart says, "damn"your eyes and limbs, I am shot, but I am not hurt;" the prisoner then came and snapped a pistol, but luckily, it did not go off, it only snapped.

Q. How near was the pistol to you? - A. Not more than three or four yards, at the most.

Q. What pistol was this? - A. I don't know; Mr. Walton had a pistol, and I supposed it was his; I found it was not in my power to get them from beating Mr. Walton, and I went after the goods, seized them and secured them; I came up with the cart, and drove it a small distance, it might be a quarter of a mile, two men came up behind the cart, it was moonlight, and said, "damn your eyes"and limbs, we will soon settle you."

Q. Who were these men? - A. Waddle was one, but I don't know who the other was; then I found it was impossible to maintain the seizure, my life being danger; I rode off and saw no more of it.

Q. At the time they were beating Walton, had you an opportunity of seeing his person, whether he was helpless or not? - A. He appeared to be insensible, for I called out, "Mr. Walton," and he could not answer me; I have no doubt at all of the person; the goods were then taken away, the cart was turned round and drove back.

Q. How long was it before you had an opportunity of seeing Walton again? - A. I got assistance, and he was put to bed at a public-house.

Q. In what situation did you find this poor man, at the public-house? - A. He was in bed there, in a bad state.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You seemed to have some doubt, when you were asked whose pistol it was? - A. Yes; I make no doubt but that it belonged to Mr. Walton.

Q. Are you sure you saw both of them unhorse Mr. Walton, or only one of them? - A. He was off when I came up, I saw them when they were upon him.

Q. As soon as you had fired your piece, you left him and went after the goods? - A. Yes; soon after.

Q. Was it a pistol you fired? - A. Yes; with shot in it.

Prisoner's defence. I leave it to my Counsel.

Court. (To Walton). Q. You say you have known the prisoner a great while, what is he? - A. He is a smuggler.

Q. What is his visible mode of life? - A. I don't know any thing else that he does.

GUILTY (Aged 25).

Confined to hard labour, two years in the House of Correction .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-42

42. JAMES WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , thirty-three pair of blankets, value 10l. one hundred and one coverlids, value 20l. ninety-four pair of sheets, value 20l. two hundred and ninety pair of worsted stockings, value 20l. thirty-one wadmill tilts, value 70l. two pair of leather shoes, value 5s. and a drum case, value 5s. the goods of our Sovereign Lord the King .

(The case was opened by Mr. Const).

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a constable belonging to Lambeth-street Office.

Q. Did you at any time go to the prisoner's house? - A. Yes; on Saturday the 29th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon; I went in company with another officer, to No. 3, Lemon-street, Lemon-row, Goodman's-fields, the prisoner's house; we knocked at the door and were let in by a woman who was in the house, we asked for Mr. Wilson, she said he was not at home, but she called Mrs. Wilson, who was below stairs; Mr. Wilson came up stairs, we told her we had a warrant to search that person's house, and asked her for the keys of the doors, the parlour door was locked, she said, her husband had the keys, she had got no keys of either of the doors, for she lived in the kitchen, and that was all the part of the house that Mr. Wilson allowed her; I went into the back yard, finding the parlour door was locked; I saw a quantity of casks in the parlour, through the window; I then listed up the window and went in, there I found fourteen casks all empty; I asked Mrs. Wilson what she did with those casks there, or something of that sort, and she said, Mr. Wilson bought them for fire-wood; I then came out at the window again, we asked her to shew us up stairs, we went up one pair of stairs, and in that room we saw a quantity of large tilts.

Q. What are they? - A. They are things to make tents with; we asked Mrs. Wilson who they belonged to, she replied, to a Quaker, an old gentleman who slept in the room; we then asked her to shew us up two pair of stairs, she said she had not got the key, it was locked; I went up to the door, and saw the padlock upon the door, I tried to open it but could not; I desired my fellow officer to go down stairs, and bring up a poker to break it open, he brought a poker up, I wrenched out the staples, and went in, there I saw 101 woollen rugs, or coverlids, 66 blankets, 295 pair of stockings, 189 sheets, two drum cases, and 31 tilts; we just looked over them and came down stairs again; some little time after, Mr. Wilson knocked at the door, and was let in; Mrs. Wilson informed him, that we had been searching the house, we walked down stairs into the kitchen all of us; I asked Mr. Wilson if he knew any thing of that property that was in his house, or where he had it; he said, yes, they were his property.

Q. Did you mention to him the articles? - A. No; I don't know that I did.

Q. Did you describe it to him? - A. No; I mentioned it as the property up stairs; he said they were his, that he had bought them; I told him I hoped he could bring the person forward whom he had bought them of; I asked him if he had bought them of a shop-keeper who dealt in them; he answered me, no; he had bought them of a person at the Camel, in the Minories; he said, he believed he could bring him forward, if he went out, he should be back and bring the person in half an hour; we told him, we could not let him go, and we got a cart and took these goods to the Public-office, Lambeth-street, Whitechapel, before the Magistrate.

Q. How many casks were there? - A. Fourteen, empty.

Q. The goods were found up stairs? - A. Yes.

JOHN NOWLAND sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a constable; I went with Griffiths to the prisoner's house; I saw in the parlour fourteen casks, all empty, and up stairs we found the things he has mentioned.

Q. Were you present at the conversation between the prisoner and the other constable? - A. Yes; we asked him how he came by them; he said, he honestly bought them, and paid for them, at the sign of the Camel, in the Minories; he believed the man came from Yorkshire that he bought them of, he lived there; these are the things produced here;(the articles mentioned in the indictment were produced;) I asked him if he had a bill and receipt for them; he said, no, he had not.

WILLIAM RUCK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am a carman; I keep seven carts to let out.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner at the bar hired a cart of you? - A. No, I cannot swear positively whether it was him or not.

Q. Do you know the man that hired the cart of you? - A. I do not; a gentleman came to me in Thames-street, about four o'clock, on a Friday, about six weeks ago, it was a holiday at the Custom-house, and asked me if I had a cart to spare; I told him, yes; I had just sent one home, and went after it; William Gould drove the cart; when I got the cart back, he told me to drive it into the Tower; I went with my man up as far as the White Tower, the further end; these goods laid on the pavement, and he told me to turn the cart round where the casks lay.

Q. How many casks were there? - A. Fourteen; I got up into the cart, and the man likewise.

Court. Q. Was this man there at that time that hired the cart? - A. I cannot say.

Court. Q. You told us just now, Sir, that the gentleman told you to drive the cart to the Tower; where was he when he told you that; did he go with you to the Tower? - A. He walked before the cart into the Tower.

Court. Q. How far did he walk with the cart into the Tower; as far as the casks? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Did you or not load the casks by his order? - A. He ordered me to set the cart round and load them there.

Court. Q. How dared you, Sir, not to give me a plain answer before; then he ordered you to set the cart round and load them there? - A. Yes.

Mr. Const. Q. How many casks were there? - A. Fourteen.

Q. Were they marked? - A. I don't know; I am sure I should not know them again.

Q. Did you cover them? - A. Yes, with a tilt, for fear it should rain a little.

Q. Who ordered that tilt to be brought? - A. I don't recollect.

Q. Who stood by and ordered them to be covered? - A. The man said, spread it; I said, there was no occasion for it to be spread.

Q. Where did you carry these casks when you had got them? - A. They were ordered to Lemon-street.

Q. Who ordered them? - A. My man told me they were going there, that they were ordered there.

Q. By whom? - A. I cannot positively say; my man went, and I told him to take five shillings for the cartage.

Q. Then you left them? - A. I told them not to go the same way out, because the way was too steep for the horse.

Q. How far did you go with them? - A. I went a little way and turned back; I heard no more till I went home at night.

WILLIAH GOULD sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am servant to the last witness.

Q. Do you remember on the 28th of October going to the Tower? - A. Yes, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; the prisoner at the bar came to my master, and said he wanted a cart to go into the Tower, upon which my master told me to go.

Q. Did he sell you where you were to go? - A. No.

Q. Did any body else? - A. The prisoner at the bar told me to follow him, which I did up into the White Tower, as it is called; when I came up to the top of the White Tower, the gentleman that hired the cart told me to turn the cart round, which I did; a pulley was put in the cart, and fourteen casks were rolled into the cart.

Q. Where were these casks when you first saw them? - A. Upon the white pavement in the White Tower.

Court. You say the fourteen casks were rolled into the cart; by whose order? - A. The prisoner's order; my master and I were going to tell the casks, thinking there were more than fourteen; the prisoner made answer and said, there were but fourteen of them, which my master and I loaded too much forward, and were obliged to put them backward, because they should not bear too hard upon the horse going down the hill; then the prisoner told me to drive to Chambers-street; then he afterwards said, drive to Lemon-street, and then he said to one of the men that had to unload the cart, you will go along with him, which he did, to Lemon-row, Lemon-street, Whitechapel, at the corner of Whitelion-street.

Q. Who did you see there? - A. When I untied the cart, the man who followed me took the first cask in; I took the next into a small new house lately built.

Q. Whose house was that? - A. I don't know; the prisoner was there and received the goods from me, and helped them down from off my back; the prisoner said, at the time when I let one down, not to let them down so hard, that I should have the heads out of them; after they were taken in, I took the tilt in that was over them, and then I asked the prisoner for my cartage; he asked me how much it was? I told him five shillings; he made answer, that he thought it too much; he then gave me five shillings; then I left him.

Q. Have you any doubt whether that is the man that called the cart, and loaded the things? - A. I am sure it is the man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. This was in the day-time, was it? - A. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. When you say these goods were on the pavement, you mean in the open air, not in a room? - A. Yes.

Q. In the common way, where every body walk? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. This pavement is in the Tower; it is not in the common way? - A. No.

DANIEL WILSON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am clerk to Messrs. Trotters, contractors for stores for government, Soho-square.

Q. Can you tell whether those blankets were furnished by Messrs. Trotters? - A. Messrs. Trotters furnished similar blankets to these to the Board of Ordnance.

Q. Do you furnish other people with the same? - A. No. we do not; they are expressly made on purpose for the Board of Ordnance; we make no other of that sort.

Q. What is the difference between them and others? - A. They are made to a particular length and breadth.

Court. Q. You cannot swear positively that these have been delivered to the Board of Ordnance? - A. No; only we make such for them; (looks at the sheets), the sheets, and every circumstance similar to the blankets, convince me that they are made on

purpose for the Board of Ordnance, and for none other by us; (looks at the coverlids), the coverlids I cannot speak positively to, they are made for different services, it is an article of common manufacture;(looks at the drum case), the drum case I know, and will be very ready to swear positively to.

Court. Q. By what do you swear to it? - A. From the make and size, and to the lines that are in it; this drum case was made by Mess. Trotters, on purpose for the Office of Ordnance.

Q. When did you deliver them? - A. I cannot say; we have delivered them at different times to the Office of Ordnance, at the Tower.

THOMAS PORLEY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. I am partner with Richard Carpenter Smith and Company, in the Borough, who have contracts for the Board of Ordnance, to serve them with hosiery.

Q. Can you tell whether those were furnished by you? (looks at the stockings). - A. It is the very same kind and quality we serve the Board with.

Q. Where did you deliver them to? - A. Into the tent-room, in the Tower.

Q. Do you furnish any other people with the same stockings? - A. No; here are two sorts we serve the Board with; one we call common, the other we call fine.

Q. You serve no other persons besides with such? - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether any such are made any where else? - A. I do not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. The proper place in which these things are deposited, is in the tent-room, in the Tower? - A. Yes.

MICHAEL CLARK sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. - I am a sadler.

Q. You contract with the Board of Ordnance, and furnish it with wadmill tilts? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you furnish any such as these any where else? - A. No where else but at the Tower.

Q. Have you delivered any such to the Board of Ordnance? - A. Yes; they are such as I have furnished them with; they are made for no other purpose.

Court. Q. What are wadmill tilts, are there any such tilts used by any other persons? - A. Not that I know of.

Mr. Const. Q. Do you know whether there is any particular make in them? - A. They are made two yards wide.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You delivered them in the tent room? - A. Yes, I did.

JOHN CRISP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const.

Q. You are clerk of the tent-room, in the Tower? - A. Yes; (looks at all the articles); I can swear to their being similar to those served in the Tower.

Q. Do you know of any others made exactly same for any other purpose? - A. No.

Q. Are all the things you have of peculiar scriptions, different from common use? - A. I cannot tell.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This tent-room is the place where these things are brought from the different manufacturies? - A. Yes.

Q. What time of the day is the tent-room left? - A. There is no particular time of the day.

Q. How many persons are to be in the tent-room? - A. Myself and four labourers to do the general duty.

Court. Q. Were these things put in the tent-room? - A. They are not always in the same part, they are put in different parts.

Court. Q. What is the tent-room, is it a common room, or is it like a tent? - A. It takes the name, I believe, from having tents in formerly, it is like any other warehouse.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long time in the day is it your duty to be in the tent-room? - A. From ten in the morning till two are the regular hours.

Q. And when after? - A. From four to six.

Court. (To Gould). Q. What time was it you went into the Tower with the cart? - A. Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon.

Mr. Knapp. (To Crisp). Q. If I understand you right, from ten till two, and from four to six, is the usual time for somebody to be in the warehouse? - A. So I understood it, I never had any notice, it is the general practice.

Q. In those hours is any thing left without any body being there? - A. Not without labourers.

Q. At other times they are left, and then locked up? - A. Yes.

Mr. Const. Q. Was the 28th of October a holiday at the Tower? - A. There are no holidays.

Court. Q. How far is the tent-room from the White Tower? - A. About thirty yards, I cannot speak positively, they go immediately from the broad walk to the tent-room.

BASIL WRIGHTON sworn. - Examined by Mr. Const. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - A. I know him from being clerk to Mess. Hodgson and Hayters, packers.

Q. You are cooper, and furnish them with casks? - A. Yes.

Q. You have seen the fourteen casks that were found in the prisoner's house? - A. Yes.

Q. Are those the casks you furnished to Messrs. Hodgson and Hayters? - A. Yes; they are the same identical casks.

Mr. Const. My Lord, I don't mean to call the accomplice, as I submit to your Lordship, the case is sufficiently made out against the prisoner.

Mr. Knowlys. This, I believe, is the first in

stance where the Crown has received any person as an informer (from whom the case originated), and made that person a witness for the purpose of prosecution, and withheld on the trial, the examination of that witness.

Court. I don't know whether it ever has been so before, but I always dread to hear the evidence of an accomplice, for he comes in such a suspicious situation, generally shifting the guilt off his own shoulders upon another; and I never find fault with any Counsel for the prosecution, when an accomplice is not called; for his evidence is worth nothing of itself, nor is it to be taken into consideration, unless it is corroborated by other evidence.

Mr. Knowlys. That evidence upon his examination, which they have made use of to six the guilt upon the man, I assert, would prove the case to be of a different description to that now given; as he is upon the back of the bill, I would make use of him; and I think it not candid to withhold him.

Court. I will call him, and any body shall examine him, as the man is upon the back of the bill; I make it a rule to call every body, for I have known instances in which a single witness has said that which has acquitted the prisoner; but when there are Counsel they know best whether there case is proved, and I leave it to them.

Mr. Const. It is a novel doctrine indeed, that the Counsel for the prisoner shall say in what manner the Counsel for the prosecution shall conduct his case, it is entirely unprecedented; he being a suspicious person and concerned in the robbery, I determined not to call him, as I found the fact proved without him; and if I thought I had conducted myself uncandidly, I should be very sorry, but when I have a case, full, complete and convincing, I am not obliged to call a witness to contradict the witnesses already produced, under the idea of promoting justice; and therefore I am to use my discretion whether I shall call a witness or not, whom I am suspicious of, when I have called those upon whom I can depend.

Mr. Knowlys. This being the case, it comes entirely upon us; he has been made their witness, and has been thought proper to contribute to the purposes of justice, and having made him their witness, now an idea has occurred to them, that he will after the case, that witness is withheld; I would therefore call him on the part of the prisoner.

Court. Let him be called.

Prisoner's defence. Sharpe was the only person who had the conducting of the business, totally so.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS SHARPE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I believe you were admitted King's evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed in this tent-room? - A. Yes; I was one of the labourers.

Q. Where did these goods, produced here in the fourteen casks, come from? - A. Out of the tent-room, where they should be deposited when I was to take care of them.

Q. Was the open pavement the place where they should be? - A. No; the tent-room is at the top of the buildings; they were removed from the tent-room to the pavement, by Thomas Spencer , who was there, and put them out at the loop-hole.

Mr. Const. Q. Was you there? - A. Yes; Wilson went for a cart at the time, he knew they were lowering out of the warehouse.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were he present when any thing was done? - A. He came into the warehouse before Spencer and I had finished packing the goods into these casks.

Q. Was he at all present assisting in packing these things in the casks, or lowering them down? - A. He was not assisting either in packing the goods or lowering them down, he only brought the cart to carry them away.

Q. Did you tell all this story to the Magistrate? - A. Yes; and a great deal more.

Court. Q. Then you and Wilson agreed that these things should be carried away by this cart, and in consequence of that agreement, the cart was brought and the things put in? - A. Yes.

Q. Did Wilson know who they belonged to? - A. Yes; he knew they belonged to the Board of Ordnance.

Mr. Const. Q. Wilson was there when you began to lower them? - A. Yes; before we finished packing them.

Q. Therefore he went for the cart? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys My Lord, the facts are different to what I supposed, I thought his evidence would have made Wilson out to be only a receiver.

GUILTY . (Aged 47.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-43

43. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , two quart pewter pots, value 4s. and there pint pewter pots, value 3s. the property of Thomas Rickson .

THOMAS RICKSON sworn. - I am a publican , I live at Carnaby-street : On Monday evening last, the prisoner at the bar came into my house between eight and nine o'clock; in the course of that evening, I took a pot from under the seat where he was sitting, he came in as a customer; the next morning, two patroles came to my house, informing me that two quart pots and three pint pots were at the watch-house, and desired me to be there at ten o'clock; I went there, and owned the five pots, after standing in the watch-house sometime, the prisoner was brought up, as soon as he saw me, he

made towards me, and said, I will give you ten or twenty pounds if you will not appear against me; I told him to offer me no money, for I had suffered so much by pot-stealers, I would not take any money; I have the pots here; I saw them the evening before, I missed them the next morning after the patrol called, for I count them when they are washed, they called before they were washed, I delivered them to James Daveney, the officer.

JAMES DAVENEY sworn. - I am a constable in the parish of Hanover-square, it was my turn to be at the watch-house that night; the prisoner at the bar was brought in at two in the morning, by Thomas Pack, and Marmaduke Miller , patrols, as a suspicious person; I searched him, and took out of his pockets, three pint pots, and two quart pots, I believed they were the property of Mr. Rickson, and I told the patrol to go to Mr. Rickson in the morning. (Produces the pots).

Q. Is Mr. Rickson's name on them? - A. Yes; I kept the prisoner in custody.

Prosecutor. They are all mine, my name is in full length on one of them, the others I know by my cypher, I have no doubt about their being mine.

MARMADUKE MILLER sworn. - Thomas Pack and I apprehended the prisoner, by hearing the pots rattle in his pocket, as he passed by at the end of Conduit-street, in Bond-street.

Q. How far is that from Carnaby street? - A. About 400 yards; it was about a quarter or twenty minutes after two o'clock in the morning, we followed him, and took hold of him, and asked him what he had got in his pockets, he said, nothing; I took hold of his left side pockets, and gave his coat a shake, and pots rattled, which convinced us, that he had in his pocket something which he should not have.

Court. (To Rickson.) Q. You told us the prisoner came into your house between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, how long did he stay? - A. Till between ten and twelve, or it might be something past twelve, but I don't exactly know.

Q. Were all the pots right the morning before? - A. Yes, they were.

Prisoner's defence. I was in the prosecutor's house about ten o'clock, I called for a pot of porter in the tap-room, I left a soldier about half to drink, I enquired what noise was in the parlour, they told me a club, I said, of what cast, they said, shoe-makers and mechanics, I said, if it is no harm to go in, I will go; they asked me to sit down, I called for a pipe of tobacco, which was granted me, they asked me to introduce a song, which I did, I staid there in company with them; I saw several pots under the seats, but did not take any notice of them; Rickson's house was the last house I was in; the door was fastened, I asked them to let me out; going along the street, these men came up to me; (if I was guilty, I should have endeavoured to run away); they asked me what I had got in my pocket, I said, rather saucily, what is that to you; they said, you have pots in your pocket, they shook my pocket, and the pots sell out; I don't know who put the pots in my pocket, if I had been guilty of any thing like that, I should never have lived where I have, in many gentlemen's houses; I have been trusted with chests of plate; I have been in the public line myself, my friends keep a brewery in Northampton, I have been keeping the house for them, and came up to London again to stay a little while.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Imprisoned one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-44

44. JOHANNA YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a cotton gown, value 10s. the property of William Stevenson .

BRIDGET STEVENSON sworn. - I am the wife of William Stevenson, I live at No. 10, Noble-street, Old-street , I list the cloaths for the East-India-Company, I bind it over for the dyers: The prisoner came into my house on Monday week, the 21st of November, about three o'clock, to see a towns-woman of her's, who lodges in my house up stairs, she staid some time, and came down into my room.

Q. How long did she stay in your room? - A. About an hour and a half, she sat in an arm-chair till near dusk; afterwards two women came in, they did not stop, they never sat down; afterwards the prisoner asked me to lend her a pair of crutches for her master, I knew her master, I had one in the lower room, and one in the kitchen, I went into the kitchen for the other, I left a child about seven years old in the room with her; when I came up she had got to the door with one crutch, and I gave her the other at the door, my husband came in as she was standing there; the Friday after, I went to look for my gown and could not find it; I had seen her twice after the Monday before the Friday, she came into my room but did not sit down; when I could not find it, I called to her country-woman to know if she knew where it was; I had not seen the gown after Monday; I went to Mr. Raymond's, the master she lived with, I asked him where Mrs. Young was; he said he had not seen her since Monday night; I found the gown afterwards at Mr. Griffin's the pawnbroker's.

- GRIFFIN sworn. - I am a pawnbroker: I took this gown in on Monday evening, the 21st

of November, of the prisoner at the bar, I lent her six shillings upon it.

Q. What is it worth? - A. About half-a-guinea; I have known the prisoner some time, I am sure she pawned it.

JOHN GLASS sworn. - I was sent for, with another officer, the 26th of November, to take charge of the prisoner, she owned where she pawned the gown, and we took her there; the pawnbroker looked at his book, and produced the gown, it was brought forward before the Magistrates at Worship-street.

WILLIAM MUMFORD sworn. - I was in company with my brother officer, the 26th of November, we were sent for by Mr. Stevenson to apprehend the prisoner; she told us where she had pawned the gown, we went to the pawnbroker and he produced it.

LYDIA POLLARD sworn. - I was in Mr. Stevenson's room at the time the prisoner was there, on Monday week, about four o'clock; I saw the gown there when I came out.

Prisoner's defence. I went to Mr. Stevenson's house to borrow the crutches, she lent them me, she was a little in liquor; she asked me if I could treat her with any thing, I said, no, I have but one bad sixpence; she said never mind that; I gave her the sixpence, she sent the child for some gin; after that, she asked me to pledge the gown for her, and I pledged it in my own name.

Court. (To Mrs. Stevenson.) Q. Did you give her the gown, and tell her to go and pawn it? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Did you send for any gin? - A. No.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-45

45. SARAH WILKINSON , otherwise SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a cambric cap, value 3s. 6d. and seven yards and a half of lace, value 15s. the property of Richard Bouler , privately in his shop .

JANE BOULER sworn. - I keep a piece broker's and sale-shop , in Holiwell-street, in the parish of St. Clement's. On Monday, the 28th of November, the prisoner at the bar came into the shop, and asked me if I had got a child's cap to sell; I shewed her one, she said, that would not do; she asked me if I had any more, as she wanted them when she had money to buy them; I shewed her three or four, and she picked out one, I told her the price, and she agreed to have it; she asked me if I had any edging, like lace, to put round it; I shewed her two remnants of edging, I told her it would take a yard and a quarter to go round the cap, and that it was two shillings and three-pence a yard; while I was going to measure it, she asked me how much it would come to; before I had reckoned it up, I perceived her put her right-arm under her apron, and lean herself upon the counter, seemingly as if she was very tired; when I told her what it came to, she turned sharp round by the counter, and made towards the door; perceiving that, and not paying the money, I looked for the first remnant of edging, and I missed it and the cap; the cap cost me three shillings and sixpence, there is seven yards and a half of the lace.

Q. That was not the lace she was bargaining for? - A. No; they were both on the counter at the time she was there, she had been looking at them; seeing her run to the door, and open it with her right-hand, I had suspicions; I ran from behind the counter and caught hold of her shoulders before she got out of the shop, I pushed her to the farther end of the shop; then I perceived her, with her left-hand, throw something away which was white; I returned to the door, and on the threshold, I picked up the remnant of lace, and on the step of the door, the cap.

Q. When she threw away something with her left-hand was that in the direction to the door? - A. Yes; she threw it out as if she meant to throw it on the threshold; I talked to her, and was very much vexed; I detained her and had her committed; I took up the lace and the cap, I have kept it ever since; the lace is worth fifteen shillings, I gave that for it; the articles are both as good as when I bought them.

Q. At the time her hand was leaning on the place, did you perceive her taking any thing? - A. I saw it by her hand, I thought she was pregnant.

Q. Did you perceive, by the motion of her hand, that she was taking any thing? - A. She was only leaning on her arm, there was nobody but her and me in the shop, it was between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, she gave no account of it.

Q. Is there any thing about it by which you know it? - A. Yes, the quantity of it; I had cut some off that morning, I know it by the figure and the flower that leads from one to the other; I know the cap to be my property by the work, the spot, and the size, I bought it about three weeks ago, and pinned it up in the window.

JAMES TALBOY sworn. - I am one of the officers of St. Clement's, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; I searched her, and found nothing upon her but a bad shilling, and some halfpence, and about six duplicates.

Q. (To Mrs. Bouler.) What was the price of the things she was to purchase of you? - A. Seven shillings and three-pence.

Prisoner's defence. I am a mantua-maker; I was going to Tooke's-court; going along, I saw this cap; I said, I wanted it for my sister's child, and should want it altered; I asked her the price of it, she said, 7s. 3d.; I said, it was too much, and bid her a good night; she took me into the parlour and pulled me about, and went into the shop; there were some things lying about; she brought in the lace and cap, and said, I had stole them; I said, I would send to my friends, and they would inform her I was no such person; instead of that, she sent for a constable.

Q. (To the prosecutrix.) Did she say it was for her sister's child? - A. No.

The prisoner called three witnesses who had known her many years, and gave her a good character.

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 4s. 6d. (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-46

46. GEORGE CLEAVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , three pounds of raw coffee, value 1s. the property of Andrew Cornish .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM STROUD sworn. - I am one of the lockers of the Custom-house, in the warehouse of Mr. Cornish: On the 10th of November, the prisoner was at work there; I saw him with a candle in his hand, walking about the warehouse, between twelve and one o'clock at noon; he went to the further part of the warehouse, and there is a window next the alley, which he shut, among the casks of raw coffee; this raised a strong suspicion in my mind; he came backwards and forwards two or three times in the warehouse; that determined Mentor and me to rummage him as he came out; he slipt out of the door; Mentor followed him down the steps immediately; I stopped at the door; there are five steps down to the street; Mentor called, Cleaver, I want to speak to you; he turned short about, and said, what do you want with me; and then he brought him up the steps again; Mentor laid hold of him by the collar, and I rummaged him, and said, he had coffee about him; he said, he had none; in rummaging of him, I found he had coffee in his breeches, in a bag; he got in by me into the warehouse, and he pulled his hat off and threw some coffee out of his hat, and said, there is the property, what do you want with me further; I suppose his hat would hold two or three pounds; we went forward, and he pulled the bag out of his breeches, and shot the coffee close to the side of him, and threw the bag away over the casks; he said, now you have got all the property again, let me go about my business, you cannot hurt me now; an officer was sent for, and he was committed to his custody; the officer has the coffee.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The value of this property may amount to one shilling? - A. Yes.

Q. You got all the coffee back? - A. Yes.

Q. What coffee is it? - A. Raw coffee.

WILLIAM RICHARDS sworn. - I am a constable (produces the coffee;) I got this coffee from Mr. Stroud.

Q. (To Stroud.) Did you deliver the same coffee that came from the prisoner to the constable? - A. Yes; there are three pounds of it; it is the same species of coffee that was in the warehouse.

Mr. Knapp. Q. There is a good deal of dirt and nails among it? - A. There may, but I don't know.

Jury Q. Was there any coffee upon the ground, before the prisoner threw it down? - A. There was no coffee on the ground to my knowledge; it was all in a heap where he threw it.

WILLIAM MENTOR sworn. - I am the Excise locker attending the warehouse; I saw the prisoner take the bag out of his breeches, and throw the coffee on the ground; there was none of the ground before, except what he threw out of his hat.

WILLIAM WETHERELL sworn. - A. I am clerk to Mr. Andrew Cornish ; this warehouse belongs to him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, but called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 41.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-47

47. JOHN SIMMONS , SARAH SIMMONS , RICHARD SIMMONS , and ANN SIMMONS , were indicted for feloniously and traitorously making, forging, and counterfeiting a piece of false money and coin, to the likeness of the coin of this realm, called a half-crown, against the form of the statute, &c .

Second Count. For in like manner making a piece of false coin to the likeness of a shilling.

Third Count. For in like manner making a piece of false coin to the likeness of a sixpence, October 26th.(The indictment was stated by Mr. Cullen, and the case opened by Mr. Fielding.)

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. I am an officer belonging to the Police-office: In consequence of a warrant from my Lord-Mayor, on Wednesday, the 26th of October , I went to No. 13. Warwick-court, Warwick-lane ; I had left Samuel Harper to watch the back part of the house; I, with Wray, Ferris, and peach, went into the court; as soon as the door of the house, No. 13, was opened, I went into the house; I passed Peach, who had been in first; a woman, which afterwards appeared to be Mrs. Sarah Simmons , the wife, was standing then in the entry with Peach; I said, I have a warrant to search this house; I went through the bottom apartment, the kitchen I believe it is, but I soon returned; I then proceeded to go up stairs; the woman then, it might be the alarm of seeing four of us, just touched me with her hands; I followed up stairs, hearing Ferris say, here, here; I came up three pair of stairs to a garret door from the street door; the door appeared to have something which kept it fast at the bottom; Wray and Ferris being at the back of me, I did get in; I was shoved in by their force and my own; when I came in, I found the prisoner, the father, just half bent, or had got up, I don't know which, and from that I believed it might be his keeping the door; I saw no spar nor nothing against it.

Q. Did you attempt to open the door before you got in? - A. I did not; the father, son, and daughter, were in the room; I then acquainted them I had a warrant to search the house; with that a scuffle ensued between me and the father, and kept on, I dare say, for ten or twelve minutes.

Q. What sort of a scuffle was it that continued for ten minutes? - A. A fair fight between him and me; on the left hand there was a fire-place, with a fire made of coke, I believe it is, with an iron plate on it, with some round pieces of the size of shillings and sixpences; they got kicked off.

Q. Did you observe the colour of those pieces on the plate? - A. They appeared white; after the three prisoners that were in the room were secured, on the right-hand side of the room I found this trough, with stuff, called black mould, or sand, in it, and this half mould on it, with these filed and round impressions complete in it; at that time, before it had been disturbed, it was all complete; by taking them to the different examinations, they were rubbed.

Court. Q. The impressions were more perfect than they are now? - A. Yes; the round impressions were; on the floor, within about a yard where this trough was (producing the frame the other side of the mould,) was this laying; it his the mould; it laid with the mould apparently kicked or fell out, with this money lying by the side of it, (producing some shillings and sixpences;) these are, I believe, the pattern shillings and sixpences, with this half-crown; there are two sixpences that appear to have some of the mould or sand on them.

Mr. Cullen. Q. All this money you have now produced, are all of them good money, and you call them pattern shillings and sixpences? - A. Yes; this counterfeit half-crown (producing it,) I found in the rough, that is unfinished, among the coals, after we put the fire out.

Court. Q. By unfinished, you mean unfit for circulation? - A. Yes, it bears the date of 1745, with the word Lima, and I believe, from all the observations I could make, it might be cast from that good half-crown; in one corner of the room I found these, which I believe are called blue pots, filled, (producing them;) there are four of them; they are filled with grease and bits of cotton, or something of that sort; I have lit one of them to try, and they will burn like a torch or candle; they are used, I believe, for what they deem it smoaking the mould, to dry it, that it may make a very fine impression, otherwise it would be damp, and the impression would not be fine and clear; here is a bag, (producing it,) I found in the same room; I believe it has fine rotten-stone in it; the bag is shook, because the mould would not be so fine as this; it is done over any thing they wish to cast; here are three pair of tongs, (producing them;) the fire being exceeding hot, and the plates, when listed on and off, must be done with these tongs; these two pair, I believe, are to handle the blue pots that may have metal in them; here is a fine sieve,(producing it,) which, I believe, the mould is run through with the hand this way (describing it shoved about with the hand;) these two screws, when the metal is poured in the moulds, are to press down and make the two sides of the mould keep close together.

Court. Q. Pressing that together, the impression both on one side and the other is left? - A. Yes; here is a pot, (producing an iron pot,) with a quantity of fat in it; this was in the same room in the corner where the blue pots were; here are three odd frames for moulds, unfit for use; they have been broke.

Q. Did you compare the impressions made upon the mould you first produced, with any of the silver produced? - A. No; I did not presume to do that, least I should break them, but in the face of this Court (the shillings were laid on the mould, and shewn to the Jury.)

Q. Did you observe the condition of the prisoners' persons? - A. Yes; the men were then without their hats, in waistcoats, and slippers, with

no buckles in them, and dirty hands; the girl was in a bed-gown; I know nothing of her hands; I never saw the mother in that room.

Q. What was the kind of dirt on their hands? - A. As if they had been handling the moulds; by my handling the stuff, my hands got like theirs.

Jury. Q. Had these implements been apparently in use recently? - A. Yes, they had; I was by in the room while the things were found by the other officers, but have had them in my care locked up ever since.

JOHN WRAY sworn. - Examined by Mr. Ward. I am an officer: I went with Armstrong and the other officers to the prisoner's house, on the 26th of October; I went up into the garret with Armstrong and Ferris; Armstrong got into the room first; I went in next to him; I observed three of the prisoners at the bar in the room very dirty and very black; the elderly man had a pair of very dirty trowsers on; his face, and hands and arms, were prodigiously black; I think, to the best of my knowledge, he had his shirt sleeves tucked up; he had no coat nor hat on; I immediately turned myself round upon the left hand, I saw a fire, and on that fire there was an iron plate covered apparently with base money; there was a great deal of what they called coke lying down by it; we endeavoured to secure the two men, and in doing that a scuffle ensued; I observed the girl then go to the fire, and kick up her foot against the iron plate on the fire; I went immediately and got hold of her, to keep her from going to the fire again; while Armstrong and Ferris were engaging with the men, the girl was very mischievous; I did not like to use any violence while I had hold of her to keep her from going to the fire; the son had got away from Ferris, and came and knocked me down; I got up again; he was coming the second time, and I knocked him down; he then was secured; I then went to the fire, and raked out some base money, which I have here; I believe here is one shilling and three sixpences, which are good; they had sell into the crevice of a brick by the fire; here is a base half-crown that was lying close to the fire on the cinders.

Court. Q. Whether this which you say is a base half. crown, is fit for circulation? - A. I believe it is; here is another half-crown I took out of the fire; while the son knocked me down, the girl went to the fire immediately and kicked it very violent with her foot two or three times; we then secured the girl, and, with the tongs, I got this crucible out of the fire full of metal, just sit for pouring. (Producing it.)

Q. Except that it was fit for pouring, it was in the state it is? - A. Yes; there had been something apparently broke in the fire; by the side of the fire upon the floor, there was a great deal of blanched copper; there had been a phial thrown in the fire; here is some more base money which I took out of the fire; there are four among them which appear to be patterns; we secured the prisoners, and they were taken to prison; I returned to the house in company with Armstrong, and Mrs. Simmons; we went back with her, there being a large fire, to see that all was safe; under one of the windows in the garret, apparently one of these moulds had been upset or kicked up; it was broke into pieces, into quarters; I picked up a piece, and on it were two King George the Second's shillings, both heads; Mrs. Simmons was then in the room.

Q. Could you clearly perceive the mark of George the Second? - A. Very clearly indeed, they were very perfect; I found a bottle in the fire; there had been a half-pint phial thrown in the fire, which had had something in it, but I could not tell what; the ashes were wet.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. You say in the part of the mould you could clearly distinguish the two heads of George the Second? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any shillings that answered to that? - A. I believe there were some found, I did not find them.

Q. This was not at the first search? - A. No.

Q. None of the shillings now produced answer to that mark? - A. I did not find any.

Q. Did you find a half-crown? - A. I did.

Q. Did you find any impression in any mould that answered to the half-crown? - A. No.

Mr. Cullen. Q. The mould had been overset? - A. It had.

Q. Did you produce any counterfeit shillings? - A. No, I did not.

WILLIAM PEACH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. I am an officer: On Wednesday, the 26th of October, I went, in company with Armstrong, Wray, and Ferris, to Warwick-court; it was proposed I should go to the door first, I knocked at the door, and stopped about a minute, then I knocked again, and Sarah Simmons drew up the one pair of stairs window, and looked out, she, seeing me at the door, asked me what I wanted; I made answer, I wanted to ask her a question if she would step down stairs; she then shut down the window, came down stairs, and let me in, the other officers were not in fight of the door, or window; then I kept her in discourse till they came, which was almost directly; then Armstrong came in first, he went out of my fight backwards, he then returned to me, and desired me to keep the prisoner, Sarah Simmons, below stairs; I took her into the front room on the ground floor; immediately as I got

into the room I observed a bundle tied up in a silk handkerchief facing the inner door; the prisoner then went towards the fire-place, there was a small fire, I took the bundle off the dresser in my hand, and put it on a table that stood by the fire-side; I then went to search the prisoner, and immediately she whipt this bundle up, I took it from her and put it on the table again; I then searched her, but found nothing upon her; I then looked at her hands, and the inside of her hands were black, the palm of her hand was more black than her fingers; I then asked her whose handkerchief this bundle was tied up in; at first she said, it did not signify whose handkerchief it was, but asking her the second time, she owned it was her's; I then opened it, and it contained two parcels of blanched copper.(Produces it).

Q. What is the use of it? - A. I cannot speak to the use they make of it; I then waited with the prisoner, Sarah Simmons, in the same room till the other officers came down with the other prisoners.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You never saw the wife up stairs in the room with her husband? - A. Never.

Mr. Cullen. Q. You have been asked whether you ever saw the prisoner, Sarah Simmons , up stairs? - A. No; only in the one pair of stairs.

Court. Q. You observed her hands, that they were black? - A. Yes.

Q. Was it a colour that appeared to be by something lately done, or had it been a long time on her hands? - A. By something lately done.

Jury. Q. Whether that blackness could not have proceeded from handling the shovel in the fireplace? - A. I cannot speak to that.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Was it a blackness that proceeded from cleaning fire-irons? - A. It is more likely from cleaning the fire-irons.

Court. Q. Did it appear to be a black that might proceed from cleaning the fire irons? - A. More likely to have proceeded from cleaning the fire-irons than handling the poker or tongs.

Q. Whether it proceeded from doing what was done up stairs? - A. It might, I could not judge.

RICHARD FERRIS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Ward. I went with Armstrong, and the rest of them, to the house of the prisoners at the bar; I went up stairs first, when I got up to the garret-door, I looked under the door, and there I saw the father and son on one side of the room where the flask was, the daughter was near the fire very busy there; I called out, here, come up here; directly comes Armstrong and Wray, and then the father and son got right up against the door, I tried to push it open with my staff and could not get it open; then us three pushed against it, and Armstrong got in first; then I caught hold of the son, and Armstrong hold of the father, we were going to handcuff them, and got the hand-cuffs part of the way round the hands; directly they parted, and begun a scuffle; I threw the son down and I fell upon him, he turned me over some how, and got up first, then he ran towards the fire-place and struck Wray; then I got hold of him again, and got him up into the other corner, and there I knocked him down; then he said, he would not make any more resistance, and Armstrong at that time had knocked the father down; we helped him up, and then we handcuffed them together; in the scuffle, some how, one of the moulds was kicked up; when we first went in, the mould that was kicked up had shillings and sixpences upon it.

Q. Had you an opportunity of perceiving that clearly? - A. I had; then we went to the fire-place, for, in the mean time, the daughter had kicked up all the money on the plate into the fire, I tied her with a handkerchief to the father; then I begun to get what I could out of the fire of the money, it was all, apparently, white before it was kicked into the fire; we searched about the room, and found the things that are produced; this is the plate that had the money on when it was on the fire; there were several other plates in the room, but not on the fire; (producing them); here is a pan, it was almost full of liquor, I don't know what it was that was kicked down; here is a pair of shears that were found in the room; I found some money; (produces it); there is one, I believe, a good shilling, and one a bad one, I found them all about the fire-place.

Q. Did you find any counterfeit shillings fit for circulation? - A. I don't think there is one fit for circulation; here is a Queen Ann that is a counterfeit; here are many different sorts of bad shillings which were all on the plate, on the fire, when I first went into the room, they appeared very white then.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. Did you find a shilling or a sixpence fit for circulation? - A. I did not, to the best of my knowledge.

ARMSTRONG called again.

Mr. Cullen. Q. You have had a great deal of practice and experience in apprehending coiners? - A. I have.

Q. From your knowledge and experience in these things, and looking at all the implements and things now produced, do the whole make a complete set of instruments and apparatus for casting coin fit for circulation? - A. I should believe so.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. With respect to the wife, you have told us she never was up stairs? - A. I never saw her there.

Q. She never had any communication with any

body up stairs? - A. Not to my knowledge, if she had, I must have seen it.

Q. I understand as to the mould or flask, one part of it was perfect, the other imperfect? - A. Yes.

Q. Then it was not fit for use? - A. One part was; while I was engaged with Mr. Simmons, the other part was kicked down.

Court. Q. How long had you been engaged with Mr. Simmons? - A. Ten or twelve minutes.

Mr. Const. Q. The money you produce, saving one half-crown, is all good? - A. Yes.

Q. Not one of the base ones are fit for circulation? - A. No.

Q. Did you find any piece of base money fit for circulation? - A. I did not.

Q. There is a half-crown, is that in the state it was found? - A. Wray found it.

Q. There was no other calculated to be passed but that? - A. I produced all I found; no other but that.

Q. There is no mould or impression fit for casting a half-crown? - A. Here is a piece in the middle knocked out.

Q. What that was for you don't know? - A. No.

Q. You found no mould for casting a half-crown? - A. No.

Q. Was that space in the mould large enough for half-a-crown? - A. Yes.

Q. Is it not as big as the palm of your hand? - A. Yes; much larger than half-a-crown.

Q. That is surrounded by what you call the impression of shillings? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any thing in the other part, any impression that answered to a half-crown? - A. I could not see any.

Q. I don't know whether you knew the business this man was of? - A. No; I did not know.

Q. Did not you know he was a buckle-caster? - A. No; I saw in one window, which was dusty, seven or eight rims, without tongues or chapes; I saw no moulds or impressions, or any thing like it, that induced me to think he was casting rims for buckles.

Q. I asked you whether you have any reason from any thing you did see, to know what was his business? - A. I saw rims, from six to eight.

Q. If he was a buckle-caster, or caster of any thing, were not every one of those things, except the mould, calculated for that business? - A. I believe they were.

Q. In answer to a question, whether that was a complete apparatus for coining, you said, yes? - A. I said, I believe so.

Q. Is not aqua-fortis used? - A. There is a pickle used.

Q. Of that you found none? - A. There was some wet on the floor, but I don't know what it was.

Q. Is not rubbing necessary, with cork? - A. I never did find cork at any place where there was casting.

Q. You found none here? - A. None.

Q. You do not, to your knowledge, think that necessary? - A. I do not.

Q. Is a file necessary for filing that that is cast all round? - A. I don't know, I found none.

Q. You did not ever find any file when you have apprehended other coiners? - A. I never took but one before, where there was casting.

Q. Then all your knowledge is acquired since you took these people up? - A. Yes; I never saw the same apparatus before.

Q. Do you understand that those shears are sufficient to cut a piece of metal round and perfect? - A. I suppose the spray is cut off by these shears.

Q. (Shewing him the base half-crown). Could a pair of shears cut that base half-crown as round, as smooth, and as polished as that good one is now? - A. I believe, after the spray is cut off, it is rubbed on the edge.

Q. Do you know how it is rubbed? - A. I have seen other money rubbed on a thin board; I have seen in some places, rounding engines, and in other places, boards, on which they are rubbed; I saw a piece of sack nailed or laid down on the ground, so wet with the liquid, that I could not form an idea of the use of it.

Q. There was no rounding engine or board found here? - A. No.

Q. Is there not a reward upon the conviction of coiners? - A. I have had the share of a reward.

Q. What was that? - A. The share of forty pounds.

Mr. Cullen. Q. Would rubbing it in soft sand on a board make it complete for circulation? - A. I should believe it would.

Q.With respect to this mould, I understand when you saw it first, you saw some patterns lying upon it? - A. No, Ferris saw that; I only saw some lying by the side.

Q. JOHN NICHOL sworn. - Examined by Mr. Cullen. I am one of the Moniers of the Mint.

Q. Look at this money, and the other shillings produced by Armstrong, as patterns, are they good? - A. I don't see any bad.

Q. Look at these four half-crowns, and say which of them are good, and which are bad? - A. There are three bad and one good.

Q. Do you think that is in such a state as to be fit for circulation? - A. I have no doubt of it, I should take it myself without particularly observing it.

Q. Look round the edge, and say if any part is

more unfinished than the rest, is there any projection that feels rough to the hand? - A. Yes.

Q. Would that have remained there if a file had been used to it? - A. Very probably a file would leave a rougher mark than that.

Q. Look at those shillings? - A. Here are three bad and two good.

Cross-examined by Mr. Const. Q. The half-crown is such, that skilled as you are, you should have taken it? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. Do you think that is an apparatus sufficient for coining? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Might those shillings have been cast in that mould? - A. I think it possible.

The prisoners all left their defences to their Counsel.

Mr. Cullen. (To Wray). Q. Did you observe when you were in the room, some silver laying upon the surface of the moulds? - A. I did.

Q. Did you observe that any of those pieces were shillings, sixpences, or half-crowns? - A. They seemed to be some of all, shillings, sixpences, and half-crowns.

Q. You mean to say that they appeared to be shillings, sixpences, and half-crowns, you are positive in that? - A. I am, it did appear to me so.

Court. (To Armstrong). Q. You produced the mould where the vacancy is, did you ever see the part that was to be on that place, in a perfect state? - A. No; it was kicked up.

Court. (To Wray). Q. Did you see the part that was to be put in that vacancy in the mould, in such a state so as to know what it was? - A. I picked up a part of it.

Q. Whether there was any impression upon that part, of a half-crown? - A. There was not, that I could see, there were shillings on it.

Q. Was there any vacancy on the mould, where the impression of a half-crown might have been? - A. I could not perceive it, for a great deal of it was trod upon to pieces

The prisoners called George Anthony , John Davis , John Falkener, George Spears , Mrs. Deal and Joseph Wild , who gave each of them a good character.

All four NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-48

48. JOHN SIMMONS , RICHARD SIMMONS , and ANN SIMMONS were again indicted for traiterously having in their possession, on the 26th of October , one mould made of sand, upon which was made and impressed the head side of a half-crown, against the form of the statute , &c.

Second Count. For having in their possession, one mould made of sand, upon which was made and impressed the reverse side of a half-crown.

Third and fourth Counts. The same as the former, stating it to have impressed upon it the head and reverse side of a shilling.

Fifth and sixth Counts. The same, only stating it to be to the likeness of a sixpence.

It appearing in evidence (see the evidence of the former trial), that haif a mould of sand was found in the possession of the prisoners, and only the frame of the other half, which not being a complete mould, and insufficient to produce the likeness of the coin of the realm, the prisoners were found

All three NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-49

49. HUMPHREY MOODY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , 49lb. of bacon, value 30s. the property of George Gouge .

GEORGE GOUGE sworn. - On Friday evening, the 28th of October, the prisoner stole a side of bacon from my door, I saw him pass the window; I was behind the counter, I saw him carry the bacon by; I desired the man to go out, that there was a side of bacon gone from the door, he pursued him about six doors, I followed; he laid hold of the bacon, and I pursued the man through several courts into Cursitor-street, I cried "stop thief," and Walker, the witness, secured him before I came up to him; he was sent to the watch-house, and then conveyed to the Compter.

Q. You never lost light of him? - A. I did, once, about a minute.

Q. Are you sure the man you saw with the bacon, was the prisoner? - A. Yes.

- WALKER sworn. - On Friday, the 28th of October, I was coming up Cursitor-street, about five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner rushed out of the court by the stone-mason's; as soon as I saw the prisoner come out of the court, I saw the prosecutor crying stop thief; I pursued the prisoner, he took Craven-head-court and got into White's-alley; when he got to the top of the alley, he turned round and struck me a blow under the right-ear; I then knocked him down, and kneeled on him till the prosecutor came up; he said, he had stole a stitch of bacon; he made a strong resistance, we could hardly take him to the watch-house.

Prisoner's defence. I was going up Fetter-lane, there was a cry of stop thief, I ran as well as other people, and when I came near Chancery-lane, they stopped me.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17961130-50

50. LEVI BENJAMIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a base metal watch, value 4l. a piece of silk ribbon, value 1d. and a watch key, value 1d. the property of William Thornhill , privately from his person .

WILLIAM THORNHILL sworn. - I am a student of surgery , in St. Thomas's and Guy's Hospital: On the 9th of November, about two o'clock, I was walking with a friend on this side Temple-bar , I was separated from my friend by a number of men, two of them passing before me and halting, I endeavoured to shun them by going out into the street; on my attempting that, some of them got on my left side and prevented me, and hustled me on to the pavement again; I was then surrounded so as not to be able to move without making use of some violence, I endeavoured to push through them to get into the middle of the street, on which one of them got hold of my right arm, saying, we must go that way, and pushed me back; I pushed the man down, and got among the coaches, and got clear of them; a gentleman then came up to me, and asked if I had not lost something; I searched my fob immediately for my watch, and found it was gone.

Q. Did you feel your watch go? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you perceive any attempt to take it? - A. No, I did not; at that moment a boy told me he saw the man that took the watch, the boy kept his eye upon the man while I called a constable, and he was taken in about five minutes after I missed my watch; when the prisoner was in custody, I saw my watch in the hand of a man of the name of Arnold.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were beset by a great number of people, but who took your watch you don't know? - A. No.

Q. Being pushed about, you were in some fear? - A. Yes.

Q. You were used with violence? - A. Yes.

Q. Somebody laid hold of your arm? - A. Yes.

Q. You were used with violence, and put in fear? - A. Yes.

EDWARD WILLIAMS . - Q. How old are you? - A. Twelve years.

Q. Have you ever been sworn? - A. Yes; at Guildhall.

Q. Do you knew what will become of you in the other world if you say that that is false? - A. No; I do not.

Q. Have you never been taught what will become of bad boys, that tell lies, in the other world? - A. No; I have never been taught that. (Net examined).

RICHARD ARNOLD sworn. - I live in West-Harding-street, I keep a chandler's-shop; I was standing at my door, I heard a running, I looked and saw five or six people, I saw the prisoner turn out of New-street, down West-Harding-street, that goes into Fetter-lane; he dropped on his side, as if putting something down, and went on; I immediately went to see what it was, and saw a watch, in a sort of an area, about a foot deep; at the very spot where he stooped, the patrol of St. Dunstan's was looking to see which way he went; I said, that is the man, he took him immediately; and I took up the watch out of the area, and went up to him, and said, this is the man that dropped the watch; I kept the watch in my possession till I had taken the number and marks sufficiently to know it again, then I gave it to the constable, Mr. Fidler; Mr. Pitt had hold of him before Mr. Fidler came up.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. How far is New-street, where you first saw the prisoner, from Fleet-street? - A. About eighty yards.

Q. You saw the prisoner stoop, but knew nothing about a watch being stolen till you came to the area? - A. I had a suspicion, I saw him drop something, I did not know what.

Court. Q. Was the prisoner going in a direction from Fleet-street? - A. Apparently so, towards me.

JOHN PITT sworn. - I am a patrol: The first I saw of it was, I saw the prisoner, and two more, running out of Fetter-lane down Featherbed-lane, the other two took down Pemberton-row; one of them said, damn your eyes brush round here, that was round the corner of the other street, which he did; I had a sack of wood on my back, I threw it down, and followed him; I turned the corner and laid hold of him, and said, come back with me; he said, I have done nothing, let me go; I said, he must come back with me, as I had heard a cry of stop thief; two or three persons came to my assistance, Arnold was the second person that came up, with the watch in his hand, which he said he had picked up out of a window; we took him to the watch-house, and searched him, but found nothing about him; the prisoner did not say any thing.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. - Q. At the time you stopped him, he said, let me go, I have done nothing? - A. Yes.

Q. This was Lord-Mayor's day? - A. Yes;

the procession proceeded that way; there was a great croud of people in Fleet-street.

Q. And people running up the court to get different ways? - A. I cannot say.

JOHN FIDLER sworn. - I am an officer; the prosecutor was pointed out to me in Fleet-street, by a person, who said, he had been robbed of his watch; I followed the prisoner down Fetter-lane, and called stop thief, and Pitt ran after him and took him; Arnold said, he saw him drop the watch in the area; I saw Arnold take it out; I have had it in my possession ever since; I took the prisoner into custody from Pitt. (The watch was produced in Court).

Prosecutor. This is my watch; I know it by the ribband, by its having a sunk wheel, and the maker's name, Thomas Hunter , of whom I purchased it; there is a particular mark; there is an addition which is common to watches, of which this is deficient.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You don't mean to swear to this dirty piece of ribband? - A. From all the appearance of the watch, I believe it to be mine.

Q. I don't understand you to swear positively to this watch? - A. No, to the appearance of it; there may be watches like it in the world.

Q. From the appearance of the watch, do you mean to swear this is your watch? - A. To the best of my belief.

Court. Q. It was shewn you five minutes after you lost it? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long have you had the watch? - A. About a month.

Q. You have not had an opportunity of being much acquainted with the watch? - A. Yes, by taking it out every day.

JOHN PENN sworn. - I am upper servant to Mr. Kensington: On the 9th of November I saw the prisoner and seven or eight more walking up and down by Temple-bar; I saw Mr. Thornhill come along, and a gentleman laying hold of his arm; some of them got before him, and some behind him, and made a stop; the prisoner was one of them; after that I saw Mr. Thornhill, and went to him, and asked him if he had lost any thing; the prisoner went off towards Fetter-lane.

Q. Was the prisoner near enough to Mr. Thornhill to take the watch, or to assist those that did? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I am a hard-working fellow; I was going to my master's; Pitt laid hold of me; I asked him what he wanted with me; he said, I must go with him, and he took me to the watchman; I am innocent of this charge.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY

Of stealing, but not privily from the person .(Aged 34.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-51

51. CHARLES HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , eleven pair of cotton stockings, value 30s. the property of Henry Pearson .

MARTHA CLEMENTS sworn. - I live with my son-in-law, Henry Pearson , who is a hosier , No. 445, the corner of Lancaster-court, in the Strand : On the 1st of November, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was in the shop alone; the prisoner came in, and snatched a parcel of stockings off the shew-board in the window, and ran away with them; I went to the door, and called out stop thief, and he was brought back with the stockings in about three minutes.

JOHN ATKINSON sworn. - On the 1st of November, coming up the Strand, I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutrix's shop, with a bundle under his apron; the prosecutrix gave the alarm that she had been robbed of a parcel of stockings; I pursued the prisoner, and took him in Church-court; I saw him drop the stockings; Price picked up the stockings, and I brought him back to the shop.

- PRICE sworn. - I am a waiter at the Blue Anchor, Church-court; I saw the prisoner drop the bundle of stockings and picked them up; I delivered them to a person that stood by, and went about my business; I don't know who the person was.

Q. (To Atkinson.) Who were the stockings delivered to? - A. I don't know; the stockings that were brought back to the shop. were the same Price picked up; they were delivered to the constable.(The constable produced the stockings, and they were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-52

52. WILLIAM HOLYOAK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October, a live

cow, value 25l. the property of Louisa Murray , Countess of Mansfield .

There being no evidence to identify the cow, the prisoner was found

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-53

53. MARY KNOWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , a cloth great coat, value 10s. and four yards of muslin, value 10s. the property of John Satchell .

JOHN SATCHELL sworn. - I live at Limehouse-hole, in the Hamlet of Poplar, and the parish of Stepney : On Wednesday last, the 30th of November, I was fitting in my kitchen, which is on the ground-floor; there is a hill in the garden, from which there is a bridge or platform to the back-parlour, which is over the kitchen; as I was sitting there, I heard a foot over-head; I desired the maid to go up stairs, and see who it was; while she was gone, I saw a woman go along the platform into the garden; she went down the hill into the deal-yard, and made towards the great gate, which leads into the road; the maid immediately followed her, and ran down the hill, and caught her close to the pales; I saw her pulling something back, which proved to be the prisoner; I got up and followed them, and saw the maid standing close to the prisoner, with the great coat and muslin in her hand; I sent for the headborough, and gave charge of her.

Q. Did you know her before? - A. No; I think I recollect something of her face loitering about the back-gate; the great coat and muslin were mine.

MARY SUTHERLAND sworn. - I am servant to Mr. Satchell; I heard a noise of feet up stairs; I went up and saw the prisoner going down the hill by the counting-house.

Q. That is over this bridge, as you call it? - A. Yes; I followed her, and took hold of her, and asked her what the wanted in the parlour; she told me she had got songs to fell, she had a basket; I asked her to come back with me, and she swore she had got nothing belonging to me, though I had not charged her with any thing; and, as she spoke those words, the wind blew her cloak back, and I saw the muslin; I told her that belonged to my mistress; then she dropped the great coat my master has on now, and the muslin, at my feet; I kept hold of her and took them up; my master came, and took her into custody.

Prosecutor. This is my great coat, it lay in a chair just by where the prisoner came in.

Q. (To Sutherland.) Is that your mistress's muslin? - A. Yes; my mistress and I were both working on it.

Prisoner's defence. She followed me, and asked me what I had got; I don't know where the house is; she took something off the ground; what it was I don't know, it was not from me; I go about and fell songs and godly books; I never was in the man's house in my life; I am as innocent as the child unborn.

GUILTY (Aged 56).

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17961130-54

54. WILLIAM CHAMBERLAYN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , ten pounds weight of new bar iron, value 20d. the property of George Ilsley .

GEORGE ILSLEY sworn. - I am a tire-smith ; the prisoner worked with me as a journeyman : On Thursday, the 17th of November, at half past twelve, the prisoner, and the rest of his shopmates, left work to go to dinner; about half an hour after I was informed there was a thief in the passage, leading to the work-shop; I went to the passage, and saw the prisoner, and said, William, what do you do here at this time of day; he said, he did not know; not know, says I, you have got something here that don't belong to you, it is my opinion; he was buttoning his breeches up; when he had done that, he stooped down and picked his apron up, with this piece of iron wrapped up in it; I immediately seized the apron with the iron it, and said, O, you villain, have I caught you at last; I collared him; he begged and prayed I would let him go; he said, it was the first time; I said, no, I would not let him go, I had been robbed so much, I would punish him as much as was in my power; I then sent for a Police-officer; I then said, how could you rob me, who have placed so much confidence in you; he went down on his knees to beg me pardon; I said, that was due only to God; then, he said, he got it by the water tub; I have a great quantity of iron of that fort; I cannot say that I should know it was mine, if it was out of the shop; there is the iron mark upon it.

Q. Does the mark prove it to be your's? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. What are you? - A. A tire-smith and coach-spring maker.

Q. Have you any partner? - A. No.

Q. If it had been any where else, you would not have known it was your's? - A. No, most affuredly.

Q. It was in the passage you had this conversa

tion with him? - A. Yes; the passage to the shop, not of the house.

Prisoner's defence. I came back to ask my master for a few shillings; as I came in, I kicked my foot against this iron; I was going to take it up, and my master laid hold of me, which surprized me.

Court. Q. You said he was tying up his breeches, what do you mean by that? - A. I suppose he took it out of his breeches, and put it in his apron, it is only supposition.

The prosecutor and another witness gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 54.) Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-55

55. WILLIAM BISHOP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , six pair of men's leather shoes, value 12s. a pair of women's leather shoes, value 1s. 6d. a pair of girl's leather shoes, value 14d. the property of John Clymer .

JOHN CLYMER sworn. - I am a shoe-maker , at No. 40, Monmouth-street ; a person called upon me in the middle of January last, and asked me if I had lost any shoes, and if I put any particular mark upon them; I said, yes, the initials of my name, J. C.; the prisoner worked for me at that time; in consequence of the information I received, I went to the house of Mrs. Jones, in Bird-street. Oxford-road; I took Hamilton, the officer, with me, and from there we brought away eight pair of shoes, which I alledged to be my property, stolen out of my shop; the officer brought the woman and the shoes before the Magistrate; they were marked by the officer, and delivered to my custody, because the prisoner had absconded, and I put them on a shelf; some of them have been sold by my wife, while I was out of the way.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Have you any partner? - A. I have none now.

Q. When had you a partner? - A. At that time in another shop.

Q. Were these goods considered as the property of both of you? - A. No; they were my own; my brother had no concern in this shop; the shop we were partners in was in St. Giles's.

Q. They were not marked till they were in possession of the constable? - A. Yes; they were marked before that, J. C.; I mark all my shoes so when I am in the way.

Q. You sell them with that mark on them? - A. Certainly.

Q. These shoes may have been sold out of your shop, and come back again? - A. Shoes never come back in the same state.

Q. How is it possible you can swear these shoes have not been sold by your wife, or somebody else, since January? - A. I know I lost these shoes out of my shop; there is a witness to come forward that can swear she bought them of the prisoner.

Q. You allow that your wife has sold some? - A. Yes.

Q. Your wife has sold shoes with the mark J. C. upon them in the course of trade? - A. Yes, many.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn? - I am an officer of Marlborough-street: On the 16th of January, the prosecutor came and told me he had been robbed, and I went with him to a house in Bird-street, Oxford-road, he pointed out some shoes that lay on the stall-board in the street, and some others in the shop-window, as being his; I brought them and the woman to the office, the prisoner was not then in custody, I marked them, and delivered them to the prosecutor, (looks at them), my mark is on them now; in consequence of her information, I went to the prisoner's lodging, but could not find him.

Mr. Knapp. Q. They were publicly exposed to sale? - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH JONES sworn. - I deal in ladies wearing-apparel, and second-hand cloaths; last January, Clymer and Hamilton came to my house, and claimed eight pair of shoes; I bought them of William Bishop , he told me he bought old shoes and repaired them, and sold them to shops, having no other employment.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person? - A. Yes; some I gave 1s. 6d. for, some 14d. and some a shilling a pair, they were all old shoes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. The price you gave for them was a fair price? - A. Yes; I bought some of them in December, and some in January.

Q. Then you had seen him more than once? - A. Yes; he has repaired shoes for me.

Q. You could not undertake to say, that these are the identical shoes? - A. No, I cannot possibly; they have been out of my possession ever since January.

Court. Q. Have you any reason to suppose they are not the shoes? - A. I don't know; I cannot recollect them.

Court. Q. Were not you before the Magistrate? - A. Yes, at that time.

Court. Q. Were they not marked before the Magistrate? - A. I don't know; I did not see it done.

Court. Q. Will you swear they were not marked? - A. No; I cannot do that.

Prisoner's defence. These shoes I never had in my possession; I only went to shops where they gave me out work to do, I always delivered if safe to my master.

Q. (To the Prosecutor.) This was not an apprentice, was it? - A. No; he worked for me four or five months.

Q. When was he taken up? - A. Three or four weeks ago.

GUILTY (Aged 17).

Imprisoned one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-56

56. JOHN GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , a pair of leather breeches, value 5s. a pair of silver sleeve buttons, value 2s. a cotton waistcoat, value 3s. a man's regimental hat, value 10s. a silk hankerchief, value 1s. a leather shoe, value 2s. a regimental cloth coat, value 10s. a regimental belt, value 2s. and 2s. in monies, numbered , the property of John M'Neal .

JOHN M'NEAL sworn. - I am a soldier in the 27th regiment: On the 4th of November, about eleven o'clock at night, I went to lodge in a house in Great St. Ann's-lane, Westminster ; I laid my things in a chair; about three or four in the morning, I was waked by a rap at the door, a young woman, who was in bed with me, said, who is there, the prisoner said, open the door.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - A. Not to my knowledge; he was in regimentals, she desired two or three times to know who was there, he said it was Goodwin, and ordered her to open the door, she said, she could not; he said, if she would not, he would find a way to get in, he came against the door with great force, but could not get it open; then he went to open the window-shutter, I said, friend, you don't know what you are at, if you have any business here, I will open the door, you can have no demands with me, or I with you, as we are unacquainted with each other; I said, if he had any demands on the woman, I would let him in; I opened the door, he had a bayonet in his hand, he gave me a cut on the eye, which put me into a great stagnation, I gave a jump to get into the street, he made a stab at my body, I put out my hand to prevent the bayonet entering my body, and received a wound in my hand; I got into the street, and the prisoner followed me with the bayonet; when he could not catch me, he threw something after me, I don't know what it was; I went to friend's house, and got on some cloaths, and returned back with the watchman to the room, on coming into the room, I found the articles mentioned in the indictment missing.

Q. When you went out, you left the door open? - A. Yes; I was obliged to fly for my own life; I took the woman up, and she declared she knew the man; the coat and belt were picked up in the street, the serjeant found the other things, they were found almost immediately.

JOHN WARWICK sworn. - I am a serjeant of the Coldstream regiment: On the 5th of November, I went to examine the cup-board in the ammunition-room, in the Savoy guard, I found a pair of leather breeches, a white cotton waistcoat, a black silk handkerchief, and a round hat; I asked the men on guard, if they knew how the things came there; I took them to the ordnance-room, and left them till the 8th of November, and then M'Neal asked if we had found a bundle of things, I told him I had, and produced them, and he told me they were his property; I was ordered to keep them in my possession.

Q. You never knew, of your own knowledge, that they were in the possission of the prisoner? - A. No.

JOHN BALL sworn. - I am a constable of St. Margaret's parish, Westminster: On the 5th of November, the prosecutor came to the watch-house, and gave an information to me, that he was robbed, about four o'clock in the morning; a shoe was brought into the watch-house, by one of the watchmen, which he found in Dartmouth-row, about half a mile from where the robbery was committed; in the morning I went to the Savoy, and found the prisoner, the serjeant gave him into my custody till the time of the relief of the guard; I took him to the Police-office, Queen-square, and searched him, I found 2s. in silver, and some halfpence in his pocket, the shoe that was found by the watchman, was the fellow to the shoe the prosecutor had.

Q. (To the Prosecutor.) You told me you detained the woman, what became of her? - A. She got her liberty, after the prisoner was taken, and was bound over to appear, but has never been heard of since.(None of the property being traced to the possession of the prisoner, he was not put upon his defence.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-57

57. ALEXANDER LEAKE was indicted for that he, on the 12th of November , upon a certain person to the Jurors unknown, did make an assault, and had a venereal affair with the said person, and him did carnally know, and commit the detestable crime called Buggery .(The evidence upon this Trial being so indecent, is unfit for Publication.)

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 53.) Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-58

58. JOHN PURDY , otherwise PILKINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , 22lbs. of sugar, value 10s. the property of William Mashiter , George Byng , Edward Jenson , and Thomas Platt .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of persons unknown.

THOMAS MARSHALL sworn. - I am clerk to the proprietors of Iron-gate wharf .

Q. Who are the proprietors? - A. William Mashiter , George Byng, Edward Jenson , and Thomas Platt : Sometime previous to the 17th of November, I discovered at several times, sugar taken out of hogsheads; I had reason to suppose it must be done by some of the labourers employed in the warehouses; at half after four o'clock, on Thursday, the 17th of November, I had left off work in the coffee-warehouse, the Excise-officers were gone; it getting a little dark, I thought it a good opportunity to see if I could discover any body; I went up into the upper story of the warehouse, there is a hole into the lower stories of the warehouse, by which I might discover if any body was among the sugar, for nobody had any business there at that time; I waited ten minutes, at the expiration of that time, I heard somebody as if in the act of climbing up out of the lower warehouse, I waited, and after a minute, or thereabouts, I perceived it was the prisoner, who had been at work in the day among the coffee; when he came up to me, and I saw who it was, I asked him what he was doing there, knowing he had no business there, he said, he was looking for a few hoop sticks to take home to light his fire, and hoped there was no harm in it; I told him he could not think I could believe what he said was true, that he must be after something else; he said it was true, he was after nothing else, nor had he ever taken any thing out of the warehouse; I desired him to walk down stairs, I followed him close out of that warehouse into the next warehouse, on the same floor, and there I found some other of the men who had finished their work, and just shutting the door, I thought it a good opportunity to search him, I called him back, and asked him what he had got, he came back, and said, I was welcome to search him, for he had got nothing; I felt on each side, where I thought his pockets were, then I felt behind, and then before, and under his smock frock before, between his things; I found this bag of sugar under his frock, he then began to beg for mercy, and hoped I would pardon him, he never had done any thing before, and hoped I would excuse him; I told him I could not do it, and in consequence of it, had him taken up.

Prisoner. Q. Was there any sugar in the warehouse where you stopped me? - A. No.

Q. Was there any sugar in the way leading to it? - A. The way he might come there was sugar scattered.

Q. You did not see me in the sugar-warehouse? - A. The sugar-warehouse was locked up.

Court. Q. Are these persons answerable for the goods stowed in the warehouse? - A. Yes; if any are missing, they are obliged to pay for them.

JOHN BRUCE sworn. - I am a labourer at Iron-gate wharf.

Q. Did you see the sugar on this man? - A. Yes; I was going to leave work, it was nigh five o'clock; I went to the garret, this man passed me by the middling loop hole, I saw nothing upon him; Marshall came after him, and said, come back, let me search you, the prisoner came back, and said, you may search me, you are very welcome, for I have got nothing about me; Mr. Marshall searched his pockets and found nothing; he searched him in the front, and under his smock-frock he found a bag of sugar, fastened some how round his middle.

Prisoner's defence. I had been working that day in the warehouse, till three in the afternoon; Mr. Marshall then ordered me to go down to the wharf, where we landed some whale-bone, the master ordered us to the warehouse; going to the warehouse, I stopped to make water, and found this bag of sugar lying by the post where I stopped, I took it up and carried it to the warehouse, they were loading some rice, I asked if they wanted any assistance, they said, no; I went to get some hoop-sticks; as I found this sugar in the street, I was going to take it home, I thought I had a right to it; I saw Mr. Marshall in the warehouse; he asked me what I was doing, I said I was getting some hoop-sticks; he called me, and said he must search me, I said he was very welcome, as I had no property belonging to him, as I conceived the sugar I found was my own property.

The prisoner called his serjeant and another witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, to the value of 4s. 6d. (Aged 39). Imprisoned six months and then to be delivered to his Serjeant.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-59

59. JAMES ROTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , a wooden cask, called a pin, value 2s. 6d. four gallons of twopenny, value 2s. the property of Crotchrade Whissing ; and a hempen sack, value 1s. the property of William Burgess .

GABRIEL FERRY sworn. - I am night beadle of the Hamlet of Ratcliffe: Last Thursday morning, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner coming up the Butcher-row, near Ratcliffe, with a sack upon his back; I asked him what he had got there; he eased it off his shoulders on the payement, and seemed in great agitation of mind, and at a loss for an answer; I told him it was my duty to see what he had; after a little time the sack was opened, and he said, well then, hang me for a little small beer; I said, his agitation of mind, and evasive answer, made it necessary for me to stop him; in the sack was a pin, which contained four gallons of two-penny; it has been in my possession ever since.

Q. Did you find to whom it belonged? - A. The prosecutor heard, before I was up in the morning, that I had taken a man with a pin belonging to him.

SAMUEL MYER sworn. - I am clerk to Mr. Crotchrade Whissing, brewer , Queen-street, Ratcliffe-cross; (the pin and sack produced); that cask belongs to Mr. Crotchrade Whissing, there are the initials of his name in four places; the sack belongs to William Burgess, a lighterman, his name is upon it.

Q. Did you miss such property? - A. From the number we have in the brewhouse it is impossible to tell exactly; the prisoner was directed to attend the brewhouse, as watchman, that night, they do it in turn when there is not a regular watchman; we had not a regular watchman at that time.

Q. How long has that man been with you? - A. Three years; he had a very good character, we had not the least suspicion of him; we have lost the liquor out of the cask carrying it backwards and forwards.

Prisoner's defence. This cask I found just by the brewhouse, between two and three in the morning, going home from my work; I met the constable of the might and he stopped me.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 51.) Of stealing to the value of 2s. 6d.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-60

60. ELIZABETH WARREN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , four yards of calamanco, value 4s. the property of William Hopwood .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn. - I am an apprentice to Mr. William Hopwood, who lives in Duke-street, Manchester-square : The prisoner came in to buy some cloth, about a month ago, she bought nothing; but just as she was going out, I perceived this, (producing the calamanco), in her apron; I was to my fellow apprentice, and asked him if had bought any thing of him; he said, no; he was to her and looked at the stuff, he looked at the private mark we have, and knew it to be our stuff, and brought her back, that was immediately upon her going out; my fellow apprentice brought the four yards of calamanco back with her, and he has kept it ever since.

Q. Can you swear that to be your master's property? - A. Yes; it was lying upon the counter loose, she was near enough to reach it; we had shewn it to a person in the course of the day, and left it there; it was the only bit we had at a shilling a yard in the house.

Q. Is there any private mark upon it by which you know it? - A. Yes; S. D. T. I don't know whose writing it is.

CHARLES BROOKE sworn. - I was in the shop at the time the prisoner came in, I did not take any notice of her till just as she was going out, and then did not see her face; my fellow apprentice came running to me, and asked me if I had sold any thing to that woman, she was then gone out of the shop; I told him I had not, and immediately ran out after her; I brought her back into the shop, and called my master down stairs; she told us she bought the stuff in Oxford-road, near the Pantheon; my master told her he would enquire more into it, and told me to get a constable, she had the stuff wrapped up in her apron; she was taken to the watch house, the stuff is marked S.D.T.I had not seen it in the shop that day, I cannot be certain I ever saw it before.

Q. How do you know that is your property, have you that mark upon all your goods? - A. If it is that price we have that mark.

Prisoner's defence. I met with a person in Oxford-road, an acquaintance of mine, and she had a piece of stuff she left in my care to make a gown; we went into a public-house, in Duke-street, to drink, I went into this shop to see a piece of cloth, I had the stuff in my apron when I went in; I can take my oath the stuff I brought out in my apron I took in with me.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY (Aged 33.)

Of stealing to the value of 10d.

Confined twelve months, in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17961130-61

61. ROBERT DAVIDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July, 120 pieces of leather, called basil skin, value 10l. the property of James Esdaile and John Esdaile .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JAMES ESDAILE, Esq. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Your name is James Esdaile ? - A. Yes.

Q. Who is your partner? - A. My brother John; I live in Bunhill-row; the prisoner was my servant , employed by me, as my clerk, to give out goods unmade, and to receive them back when made.

Q. What is your business? - A.Army accoutrement-maker .

Q. How long has the prisoner been in that situation with you? - A. I believe eight years.

Q. You had placed a considerable considence in him? - A. Very great.

Q. Did you employ a person of the name of Keene as your currier? - A. I did; he is the son of a Mr. John Keene, who had had our business many years back; he was employed soon after the death of his father.

Q. The basil skins, the subject matter of this indictment, had they occasion to be sent to your curriers? - A. Never.

Q. For what purpose are those basils used? - A. For covering a particular kind of tin-box called, by the Officers of Ordnance, magazine boxes, that is the only purpose for which they are used by us; they are used by other people for caps.

Court. Q. They were the property of the partnership? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. From some intelligence that you had lost some skins, you were led to Mr. Graves's? - A. Yes; he is a leatherseller on Fish-street-hill.

Q. Did you find any skins? - A. I never found the skins; I found there had been a sale there of skins of that quality.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Has it never happened that when basil skins have become mouldy, or are injured, that they have been sent to the curriers to be put in a proper state? - A. I cannot say that; a currier cannot do them any good if they are damaged very much.

Q. Keene was your currier? - A. Yes.

Q. He is a witness? - A. Yes.

Q. To the time of this information, whether you had not the best opinion of the prisoner? - A. Certainly; he had our full confidence, a general good character.

Q. Keene is to be called as a witness-do you give him a good character? - A. I certainly thought well of him, or I should not have employed him.

Q. He was the first person you meant to be the object of your prosecution? - A. Yes.

Q. He was admitted a King's evidence? - A. Yes.

Q. You appeared before the Magistrate to prosecute Keene? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. It was in consequence of Keene's evidence that you were enabled to lay hold of any facts against Davidson? - A. Just so.

Q. If the skins are mildewed, you can brush it off, and would not lend them to the currier? - A. No, I should not.

JOSHUA GRAVES sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Where do you live? - A. At No. 4, Fish-street-hill; I am a leather-seller.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Davidson? - A. No; I never saw him in my life.

Q. Do you remember in July last buying any basil skins? - A. Yes; I attend Leadenhall Market every Tuesday; Keene was there; he asked me if I wanted any basil skins.

Q. Do you recollect buying any skins of Keene? - A. Yes; I perfectly recollect it.

Q. When was it? - A. About the 12th of July last.

Q. Do you recollect what you gave for them? - A. Yes; 15s. a dozen.

Q. What sort of skins were they? - A. Black basils.

Q. Were they in a mercantile condition? - A. Yes, in very fair condition; some a good deal tumbled.

Q. What became of these skins? - A. I sold them in my shop.

Q. Is 15s. the market price? - A. Yes.

Mr. Esdaile. I gave 30s. 6d. a dozen.

THOMAS KEENE sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have been admitted an evidence for the Crown? - A. Yes.

Q. The Court and Jury expect the whole truth from you - you were a currier, employed by Messrs. Esdaile? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Davidson? - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you been employed for the house of Messrs. Esdaile? - A. About three years, or rather better.

Q. Do you remember selling any black basil skins to Mr. Graves? - A. Yes.

Q. How many? - A. Eight or ten dozen.

Q. What price did you get for them? - A. Fourteen or 15s. a dozen.

Q. Where did you get those basil skins from? - A. From Mr. Esdaile's warehouse.

Q. Who did you get them from? - A. Davidson and I together picked them out of a parcel in the warehouse, because there were some of them spotted and damaged, and some were mildewed.

Q. Did you receive any sum of money from Graves upon that account? - A. Yes; I took them to Mr. Graves, and he kept them two or three days.

Q. Did you receive the price afterwards? - A. Yes.

Q. How much did you receive? - A. Six pounds ten shillings, or seven pounds ten shillings.

Q. What did you do with that 7l. 10s.? - A. I don't recollect what I did with it.

Q. Did you keep it all yourself? - A. I am apt to think I did; I paid for the skins before.

Q. Who did you pay for them? - A. Davidson, before I received the money of Mr. Graves.

Q. What did you pay him? - A. At the rate of 18s. or 20s. a dozen; some were 18s. and some 20s.

Q. Did you pay him the whole of the sum, or any proportion dividing it between him and you? - A. He had 9s. or 10s. a dozen; I paid him the whole moiety; I paid him at the rate of 18s. a dozen; I paid him the half.

Q. They were black basil skins - were you in the habit of taking black basil skins to curry? - A. I had about a dozen and a half from Mr. Esdaile to black about three years ago, but they were quite a different sort.

Q. Were these skins sent you that Mr. Graves had - did you ever have skins of that sort to curry? - A. No; they are always ready done.

Q. You received a great many things from Mr. Esdaile as a currier? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you say this man sold you basil skins at 9s. a dozen? - A. No; I did not say he sold them me; we took them out of Mr. Esdaile's warehouse.

Q. Did you not say the prisoner sold you the basil skins? - A. No.

Q. How long were you employed by Mr. Esdaile? - A. Above three years.

Q. Was Mr. Esdaile a good friend to you? - A. He was.

Q. A kind friend to you? - A. Yes.

Q. Did he relieve you from difficulties by lending you money? - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you come from last? - A. New Prison.

Q. Were you in irons? - A. Yes; not since I was there.

Q. As you are bound to tell us the whole truth, can you help us to guess how much you have defrauded him of? - A. Between 4 and 500l.

Q. Between 4 and 500l. you have defrauded him of? - A. Yes, in the whole.

Q. Did you frequently go to Mr. Esdaile's warehouse? - A. Very often; sometimes three or four times a day.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You have stated to the Court and Jury, that you have been the means of defrauding Messrs. Esdaile of 4 and 500l. how long have you been acquainted with Davidson? - A. Before I was in the business.

Q. Who introduced you into the business? - A. Davidson told me what step to take to get it.

Q. What business? - A. As currier.

Q. In the course of defrauding Mr. Esdaile of 4 or 5001. had you any communication with any other person in the house than Davidson? - A. No other person at all.

PATRICK COLQUHOUN, ESQ. sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You are a Magistrate for the Country of Middlesex? - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner and Keene were both examined before you? - A. They were.

Q. You took down some examination of the prisoner Davidson, on what day was that? - A. On the 20th of October.

Q. Before you took that examination, did you apprise the prisoner of the consequences of making any confession? - A. I have the minute in my book in these words -

Mr. Knowlys. (To Mr. Esdaile). Q. Before the examination was taken down, had not you, in the presence of a Mr. Wyatt, promised to the prisoner, that if he would tell you the truth, you would not appear against him? - A. I certainly said something of that sort; I told him I had a suspicion he had sent some hides from my house improperly.

Q. Did not you promise him say at he confessed the transaction? - A. I certainly and, and sent him about his business.

Court. Q. That promise was not relative to the present subject of enquiry? - A. No, not at all.

Q. Did you, when you promised him favour, specify any particular charge against him? - A. I did; I said, he had sent hides of mine to Leadenhall to be re-sold, this was on Thursday the 27th of October.

Q. In what manner did you promise him that favour? - A. Upon suspecting Keene of having sent some hides to Leadenhall-market; I went with another person to Keene's, and charged him with the fact, which he denied, and afterwards confessed, I then said, he must have an accomplice, he said, he had an accomplice, who was it? he said, it was Davidson; I said, he must go with me to my house; Mr. Wyatt and the witness and I went to my house; I sent for Davidson, and told him I had information that he had sent some hides improperly from my house, he denied it; I said, he had better confess it, as I had sufficient proof of it; he solemnly denied knowing any thing of it; I produced Keene to him, and then he acknowledged it, and begged for mercy; I took one to one side of the house, and the other to the other and dismissed them, and hoped I should never see them more.

Mr. Knowlys. It appears from what this gentleman has said, that he promised him favour if he would discover the transaction.

Court. I have taken it thus, that he made a promise of favour if he made a discovery of a transaction respecting some hides.

Mr. Knowlys. Mr. Esdaile, in that conversation, charged him with delivering hides to the currier, and promised him, that if he related the truth of the transaction he would be kind to him. The charge here, is delivering hides to the currier.

Court. The indictment is for basil skins.

Mr. Knowlys. Basil skins are hides.

Mr. Esdaile. No, they are not.

Court. This circumstance, of the basil skins, was not known nor Heard of at the time.

Mr. Esdaile. It was respecting the hides, they both protested they knew of no transaction besides.(Mr. Colquhoun then read the minutes from his book of the examination.)

Mr. Knowlys. (To Mr. Esdaile.) Q. Did not you see Davidson the night before the examination? - A. No.

Q. In the morning, before the examination, did not you say you would admit him King's evidence? - A. No; I had no communication with him.

Mr. Knapp. (To Mr. Colquhoun.) Q. Was there any examination taken down at the prisoner's final examination? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Mr. Lord, the evidence against the prisoner is that of an accomplice perfectly unconfirmed.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

Court. Gentlemen, the evidence of the accomplice not being confirmed, you must acquit the prisoner. NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: o17961130-1

Pardoned on condition of being transported for the term of their lives - 3.

John Gardiner , George Wilmot , and William Holmes .

Reference Number: s17961130-1

The SESSIONS being ended the COURT proceded to GIVE JUDGMENT as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 5.

William Missling,

John Bannister,

Daniel Harding,

Joseph Malcolm , and Alexander Leake .

Transported for seven years - 11.

George Cleaver ,

Levi Benjamin,

Elizabeth Minning,

Sarah Jackson,

Joseph Cuisiniere, otherwise Cook,

Catherine Cooper,

Ann Kelly,

William Bentley,

James Wilson,

Sarah Wilkinson, otherwise Smith,

Charles Harris.

Imprisoned two years, fined 1s. and discharged - 3.

Sarah Reynolds, Catherine Malby , and John Donahoe.

Imprisoned one year, fined 4s. and discharged - 6.

James Brown ,

John Burn,

John Dalton,

George Rider,

John Wilson , and

William Bishop.

Imprisoned six months, fined 1s. and discharged - 7.

Joshua Gadd,

Humphry Moody,

Mary Knowland,

William Chamberlayn,

Alexander Steers ,

Francis Ward , and

Johanna Young.

Confined to hard-labour in the House of Correction two years, and discharged - 1s.

Richard Waddle .

Imprisoned one year in Newgate, fined 1s. and discharged - 1.

Richard Sims.

Imprisoned six months in Newgate, fined 1s. and discharged - 1.

William Turner.

Imprisoned three months in Newgate, fined 1s. and discharged - 1.

Jane Richards.

Reference Number: s17961130-1

Pardoned on condition of being transported for the term of their lives - 3.

John Gardiner , George Wilmot , and William Holmes .


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