Old Bailey Proceedings, 6th April 1796.
Reference Number: 17960406
Reference Number: f17960406-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO, The Goal Delivery FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT JUSTICE-HALL, IN THE OLD BAILEY, ON WEDNESDAY the 6th of April, 1796, and the following Days, BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MATORALTY OF The Right Honourable WILLIAM CURTIS, ESQ.

LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MARSOM & RAMSEY, AND Published by Authority.

LONDON:

Printed and published by W. WILSON, No. 15, St. Peter's-Hill, Little Knight-Rider-Street, Doctors' Commons.

1796.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Goal Delivery FOR THE CITY OF LONDON,&c.

BEFORE WILLIAM CURTIS , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; the Right Honourable LLOYD, Lord KENYON, Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM, Knight, one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; and Sir FRANCIS BULLER , Knight, one of the Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knight, Sergeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Sergeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and Country of MIDDLESEX.

First Middlesex Jury.

John Erwood

James Winwood

John Brown

Joseph Coleman

John Whitbread

John Bellis

John Linford

James Dickinson

William Cobbett

Edmund Whitehead

John Johnson

John Cock

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Briggs

Samuel Toseland

John Bagshaw

Stephen Briggs

Lawrence Rowe

Thomas Essex

Henry Briggs

Thomas Evans

John Weedon

William Fisher

William Gee

Emanuel Freethig

London Jury.

George Beauchamp

Joseph Horcomb

William Sutton

John Berry

Joseph Johnson

Thomas Wilkie

Ralph Newham

William Martin

John Davis

Thomas Maiden

Samuel Howe

Andrew Wilkes

Reference Number: t17960406-1

227. THOMAS CRAYFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , two pair of worsted breeches, value 30s. and a pair of thickset breeches, value 5s. the property of Joseph Sandall , the elder , privately, in his shop .

JOSEPH SANDALL , jun. sworn.

My father is a silk dyer and scowerer , No. 33, Wych-street : On the 24th of February my mother called to me, and told me, a boy was gone out of the shop; I followed him to the corner of Arrundel-street, and said, he had got something that did not belong to him; he said, he had not; I looked in his apron, and found three pair of breeches; two pair of stcoking breeches, and one pair of buff thickset; I never lost fight of him;(the things produced in Court), these are my father's property; I had seen them in the shop not ten minutes before the prisoner took them; they have our shop marks in the waistband.

- TALBOYS sworn.

I took these things out of the prisoner's apron.

Prisoner's defence. I was going along and saw these three pair of breeches lying upon the area rails; I enquired of a boy that I saw there, who they belonged to; he said, he did not know; and I put them in my apron, and this man came up.

GUILTY, of stealing, but not privately .(Aged 15.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-2

228. ELIZABETH PINK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , four yards of calico, value 3s. a yard of muslin, value 10s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 7s. two linen table-cloths, value 17s, and a yard of cambrick, value 15s. the property of James Aldred and Thomas Tapp , in the dwelling-house of the said James Aldred .

THOMAS TAPP sworn.

I am a linen-draper , No. 96, Whitechapel , in partnership with James Aldred; we don't keep house together; James Aldred keeps the house; the shop belongs to both of us: The things were taken out of the shop on Monday the 14th of March; we missed from a shelf in the shop about thirteen yards of Irish linen; and, as we had not had occasion for any from the Sunday, I suspected the prisoner; she was servant to Mr. Aldred; I mentioned it to her mistress; she sent her out for a few minutes, and went up stairs and examined her room; she brought down a parcel of linen; by its appearance, I thought it was the linen we had lost; I sent to the Police-office for a constable, against she came back, we searched her room, I was present, and part of the things were found in her room under the bed, and a part of them in her box; the other articles were under the bed; there were several other aticles, but these were what we could swear to, having our private marks; and she was taken to the office.

JOHN COOK sworn.

I am a Police officer: I found these thing in the prisoner's room; I have had them ever since.

Court. (To Tapp). Q. How do you know that this room was the prisoner's? - A. Her mistress told me she slept there.

Q. Was any thing said by her about this being her room? - A. Yes; she said it was her room, and she said where she took them from, from different parts of the shop.

Q. Did you make use of any promises or threats, to induce her to confess? - A. Certainly not.

Cross-examined by Mr. Trebeck. Q. Who said it was her room? - A. Herself.

Q. How many servants are there in the house? - A. One young man, but he never sleeps up stairs.

Q. The door is generally open, that any body may have access to it? - A. I cannot say.

Prisoner's defence. Every body in the house might go into that room.(For the prisoner.)

JOSEPH FLAMSTONE sworn.

I have known the prisoner seven years; she came to my house first, as a servant; she lived with me about three-quarters of a year; she was very honest while she lived with me, and she has been in my house an hundred times since, and I never saw or heard any thing against her.

GUILTY of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house . (Aged 21.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-3

229. JOHN CROSSBY and THOMAS MORRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , two live pigs, value 15s. the property of Hezekiah Denby .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

WILLIAM YOUNG sworn.

I am a baker, I live opposite Mr. Denby, in Enfield Town : On Saturday night the 26th of March, about twelve o'clock, or thereabouts, I heard a noise of a pig, or pigs; I went to my back window, and I still heard the squeaking of the pigs; I called up my men, Thomas Neal , and Thomas Bradshaw, and we went down to my back door, and I desired them to get over the gate, and meet me in Bloomfield-lane, which adjoins Mr. Denby's stables, and slaughter-house, and pig stye; I went out of my own yard, the back way to the corner of my house, facing Bloomfield-lane, and saw two men very near Mr. Denby's pig-stye; I could not at that time distinguish who they were; I went immediately to my yard, to my men, they were hesitating about taking a stick a-piece with them; when I came back into my yard, I found they were gone; I went instantly back into Bloomfield-lane; I called to one of my men and went up to Crossby's gate, the father of the prisoner, he lives with his father; as soon as we got into the gate, there were two carts standing in Crossby's yard; I saw Crossby standing between the shafts of the first cart, and I clapped my hand upon his shoulder, and said, ah! Jack, I am sorry it is you; I don't recollect that he made any answer; immediately upon that out ran a pig out of a sack; I took hold of the sacks, and found something heavy; I looked close by the sack, and there lay a pig hardly dead, quite warm; I went round the cart, and clapped my hand on Morris's shoulder, who was at the back of the other cart, and said, come with me, or words to that effect, and desired Bradshaw to take hold of him on the other side; we took no further notice of Crossby, till the next morning; when the constable, hearing what I had to say, took him into custody; I desired my man to take care of Morris, while I called up Mr. Denby, and the pigs were left with him; there were two live pigs in the bag, besides the slaughtered one, but one of them made his escape.

THOMAS BRADSHAW sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Young; I was called up by my master, about twelve o'clock; I went down to the back of our yard, and got over the gate, and afterwards into Crosby's yard; I saw John Crosby between the shafts of a little cart, and there was a sack lying under the cart, with a live pig in it, and a dead pig a little way off the sack, it was quite warm; Morris stood behind another cart; my master and I took hold of him by the collar.

HEZEKIAH DENBY sworn.

I saw the pigs safe in the stye in my premises the night before I was called up; Crosby's yard is fifty or 60 yards from mine.

Q. Did Mr. Young bring you any pigs that night? - A. Yes; one dead, and one alive, in a sack, they were my pigs; the dead one had a particular mark, it was a boar-pig, and I was going to cut him, but I thought the string was so swelled, it was not proper; the live pig I have no doubt was mine, from the size and age of it, and its mother took to it.(The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence).

Crosby, GUILTY . (Aged 34.)

Morris, GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Imprisoned six months , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The Right Hon LORD KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-4

230. HENRY JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , twelve pound weight of iron nails, value 3s. the property of John Pepwell .

JOHN PEPWELL sworn.

I am a smith and ironmonger , in Wapping : On the 24th of February, I was told the prisoner had robbed me; I sent for an officer, and as he went out of the shop he was taken and searched; I found his pockets filled, all of them, with nails, the weight of which was twelve pounds, the officer has them.

ROBERT WARREN sworn.

I am a constable; I took these nails (producing them,) out of the prisoner's coat pockets.

Pepwell. They were taken out of his pockets loose; I cannot swear to them, except that others nails of the same mould, that I have in the shop, correspond with these.

Court. Can you tell whether there was such a quantity missing? - A. I cannot.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-5

231. JOHN FAIRBROTHER , otherwise CORNWALL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a silver gravy spoon, value 30s. four silver table spoons, value 40s. six silver tea spoons, value 10s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 10s. two silver salt spoons, value 3s. two pounds weight of tea, value 15s. and one pound of coffee, value 6s. the property of Margaret Aldridge , spinster , in her dwelling-house .

MARGARET ALDRIDGE sworn.

I live in Great Russel-street, Bloomsbury ; I keep a private house there; I let a part of it; me and my sister live together.

Court. Q. Does she rent the house too, or you only? - A. Myself; I am the only tenant: On the 17th of February, about six o'clock, I lost a gravy spoon, four table spoons, six tea spoons, two salt spoons, a pair of silver tea tongs, two pounds of tea,

and a pound of coffee, they were taken from a closet in the drawing-room, there was a mustard pot with them, and that was left behind; I had used them in the afternoon.

Q. What was the value of the gravy spoon? - A. The silversmith that bought part of them, valued them yesterday at Clerkenwell; it cost me 3l. 5s; and the prisoner came and took lodgings of my sister for his master and mistress; he was footman to a family that visued a gentleman that had a part of our house; he lived with Mrs. Coles of Highgate; I have seen him come with his mistress very frequently, for this year and an half; he dined at our house that day, and said, his master and mistress would come in the evening.

Court. Q. How late did he continue after dinner? - A. He went for his master and mistress between six and seven, and never returned; our servants set up for them till one in the morning; the next morning, the lock where the plate was, was broke, and I missed the things I have before-named; I gave the information at Bow-street; he was taken by a gentleman he robbed in London-street.

- DONALDSON sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner on the 18th of February, in Duke-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields; upon going to Duke-street, with a gentleman of the name of Williams, that had been robbed, I searched him, and found a pair of silver tea tongs, a silver tea spoon, and this parcel of tea, (producing them), twelve guineas and an half, 8s. 6d. in silver, and 4d. in halfpence.

Mrs. Aldridge. The spoon don't belong to me, the tongs do, and the tea.

Court. Q. How do you know the tea belongs to you? - A. Only from my grocer's having sworn to it.

WALTER BRIDE sworn.

I am a silversmith; I had these four table spoons, and a piece of a spoon (producing them), from the prisoner at the bar, on the 17th of February in the evening.

Mrs. Aldridge. The four table spoons are mine, and this piece of a gravy spoon belongs to me; I have brought the fellow to it, (producing it).

The prisoner did not make any defence.

GUILTY Death . (Aged 68.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-6

232. ANTHONY STUART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , two pounds weight of tobacco, value 4s. the property of Christopher Court , and Thomas Eden .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of Thomas Boone , William Hay , Welbore Ellis Agar , Joah Bates , Sir Alexander Munro , Richard Frewin , William Styles , William Rowe , and Francis Fownes Luttrell .

Third Count. Laying it to be the property of Henry Stone .

Fourth Count. Laying it to be the property of certain persons unknown.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

RANDAL SUTTON sworn.

I am appointer of the weighers in the King's warehouse upon Tower-Hill ; I was going round the warehouse, on the 12th of March, and saw the prisoner in a dark part of the warehouse, taking up some leaf tobacco; Mr. Henry Stone is the keeper of the warehouse ; the prisoner used to carry beer to the men in the warehouse from a neighbouring public-house; I asked him what he was doing there; he said, he was taking a little tobacco; I took him by the arm, and he pulled what is in this bag (producing it.) from behind him, and some out of his breeches, which were unbuttoned at the time; I told him to go along, and I should mention it to my superior officer; he begged very hard that I would not; I told him I certainly should; and I went immediately, and acquainted my superior officer; there was a great quantity of tobacco lying in the warehouses out of their proper package.

TIMOTHY OSBURN sworn.

I am controuling surveyor of these warehouses; the last witness acquainted me of this business; Mr. Gordon, the principal surveyor, went out in pursuit of the prisoner, and he was brought back to the warehouse door; just without the door, I met Mr. Gordon and the prisoner, the prisoner was kept within the gates, and the constable was sent for; Mr. Gordon then went with the constable to the prisoner's house; I followed them very soon after, and went up to the room, which the people of the house said was Stuart's bed-room, and there was a box in the room which he had the key of, it was open, and there was a small -

Court. I don't see how we can connect this with tobacco taken somewhere else.

Witness. He said it was some he had taken for his own use.

Prisoner's defence. I only had a little bit in my hand, about an ounce or two, and they put the rest to it; I had lived in the house three years, and never did any thing bad in my life.

GUILTY . (Aged 65)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON .

Reference Number: t17960406-7

233. THOMAS SHUTTLEWOOD , otherwise SHUTTLEWORTH , was indicted for having feloniously intermarried with Ann Ludgate , on

the 24th of January , Catherine Hough , spinster , his former wife, being then alive .(The indictment was opened by Mr. Jackson, and the case by Mr. Raine).

THOMAS BIRD sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am parish clerk of Mary-le-bonne, (producing the register of the marriage of the prisoner, by banns, to Catherine Hough). I witnessed it myself, I don't recollect the party; it is dated the 14th of July, 1788.

MARGARET ROBSON sworn.

Examined by Mr. Raine. I know the prisoner at the bar, he married my sister, I was present at the marriage, it was in the year 1788; that is the man, I attested the marriage, and my hand-writing is in the book.

Q. Is your sister now living? - A. Yes, she is.

The Reverend GRIFFITH GRIFFITHS sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am curate of St. Paul, Shadwell, (Produces the register of the marriage.)

Q. Do you find in that register the marriage of Thomas Shuttleworth with Ann Ludgate? - A. Yes; (reads,) Thomas Shuttleworth, of this parish, a widower, to Ann Ludgate , spinster, married at this church, by banns, the 24th of January, 1796, by me Griffith Griffiths , curate. I have not any recollection of the marriage.

ANN LUDGATE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Raine. I know the prisoner at the bar; I was married to him on the 24th of January, at Shadwell church; Mr. Griffiths married me.

MARY GREENWAY sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jucksan. I was a witness to the marriage of the last witness to the prisoner, at Shadwell church.(The prisoner produced a written defence, which was read, as follows:)

My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. Under the pressure of my unfortunate situation, I do here, before you, and in the eyes of God, solemnly assort, I knew not of my first wife being alive, but had every reason to think her dead; I was well informed of the late Act, that made the crime I now stand unfortunately charged with, felony, when I married my second wife; and, if I assure you that she had nothing to bring me in marriage, I hope your Lordship will exculpate me from any finister views; all I have to hope is, from the mercy of your Lordship, and you Gentlemen of the Jury, who, I trust, will discriminate the intention of my action.

GUILTY , (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-8

234. WILLIAM DAVIES and WILLIAM YOUNG were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a cheese, value 3s. the property of John Turner .

JOHN TURNER sworn.

I live at Hadley, in Hertfordshire; I lost a cheese at Holloway , out of the cart; I came to London with flour, and took a loading back again; I had seventeen cheeses, I did not see it taken, a man told me the cart had been robbed; these two men were stopped by two gentlemen; the cheese was found in a ditch afterwards, and brought to me at Highgate; there is a mark of a G upon it, I knew it was one of the cheeses that was in my cart; the constable has got it.

JOSEPH ORTON sworn.

This cheese was delivered to me at Highgate, I don't know who gave it me.

WILLIAM FRENCH sworn.

I went in pursuit of four men, two of them got off; two gentlemen on horseback stopped them, they said they had been robbing the cart; I found the cheese within two hundred yards of the spot.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners have the cheese in their possession? - A. No; I took it to Highgate, and delivered it to the constable; the two prisoners said they were innocent; that it was the other two men that had run away.

Q. How far had the prisoners got? - A. About a quarter of a mile; they had run up a lane, and got into a field; they were near a quarter of a mile off.

- BANNISTER sworn.

One of the prisoners, Davies, was talking with the man that took the cheese; I saw it afterwards, in the possession of the short one(Davies), and they all went off together; they were talking to one another while the cheese was taken away.(The cheese was produced, and deposed to by the presecutor).

Prisoner Davies. I am innocent of the fact.

Prisoner Young. I know nothing of the cheese; I was taking a walk to Highgate, there were some people said somebody robbed the cart; he swore that I ran away; I have got a very bad leg, that I can hardly set my foot to the ground.

Davies, GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Young, GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-9

235. THOMAS PURCELL and JOHN BAILEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , fifty-four yards of silk ribbon, value 27s. the property of Ann Short , privately in her shop .

ANN SHORT sworn.

I live in Holywell-street , I keep a haberdasher's

and milliner's shop : on the 31st of March, I lost some ribbon out of my shop, between ten and eleven in the forenoon, I did not see them taken, my apprentice was in the shop at the time, Ann Crutchley ; the boys were brought back in ten minutes, by Mr. Stapleton, who is a stranger to me; he is here; the ribbons were brought back with the boys; (the ribbons are produced); they have my shop mark upon them.

ANN CRUTCHLEY sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mrs. Short: On Thursday morning last, the tallest of these two boys, Purcell, came into the shop and asked for some ribbon to tie on his hat; I shewed him some galoon; he said, that would not do, he must have broader; these two coloured ribbons were lying upon the counter at the time; I shewed him some broader ribbon; he said, he wanted eight yards, would I give him a pattern; while I turned round to reach the box down, he took the ribbons that laid on the counter; I did not see him take them; I did not know that they were gone till the boy was brought back to the shop.

Q. Look at those ribbons; are you sure those are the ribbons that laid upon your counter? - A Yes; they are our's.

JOHN STAPLETON sworn.

On the 31st of March, a little after ten, I was going to Covent-garden, about my own business; as I was going along Holywell-street, in the Strand, I met a man that I knew, and he told me there were two suspicious characters about; that there was one standing at the corner of the alley; I left him, and went past the alley, and saw him, that was the little one, Bailey; I passed him again, and stood at a few doors distance, and saw the tall one come out of Mrs. Short's shop, facing where the little one was standing; when he came out of the shop he walked slowly into the alley facing the shop, and then ran into the Strand; I pursued him, and he turned his head back and saw me coming; and I called out stop thief; I did not see him take any thing out of the shop; the moment I called stop thief he dropped the ribbons; those are the same ribbons; I picked them up; I pursued him, and he was stopped.

Purcell's defence. When I was first taken they took me to that gentlewoman's shop; this boy I know nothing of; I never saw him till I saw him in the shop when I was taken; they charged me with taking the ribbon; he took me to a public-house, there were two gentlemen, said, had I got any money; if I had any, or friends, they would soon settle it; I told them, I had no money, and very few friends, and they were very poor; "we will let you go if you can get as much money as five guineas;" these two men went to my friends, and could not get five guineas; they came back and took me to Bow-street.

Court. (To Stapleton). Q. Did any thing of this kind pass? - A. The man that gave me the information begged somebody to stop at Bow-street, while he sent for his friends; and out of curiosity went to one Mrs. Gibbons, she said, she did not know him, and she could not come down; I stopped a quarter of an hour.

Q. Was any thing said about compounding it for felony? - A. Not a word.

Purcel, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 15.)

Bailey, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON .

Reference Number: t17960406-10

236. THOMAS HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a woollen cloth great coat, value 40s. two cloth coats, value 60s. two cloth waistcoats, value 13s. a pair of velveteen breeches, value 20s. another pair of velveteen breeches, value 15s. a glazed hat, value 3s. a sustian frock, value 15s. two pair of leather breeches, value 1l. 1s. and one pair of leather boots, value 30s. the property of Peter Denys ; a leather portmanteau, value 5s. the property of William Heeley ; a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 40s. a pair of paste knee buckles, set in silver, value 7s. 6d. and a pair of leather shoes, value 7s. 6d. the property of Joseph Sherry , in the dwelling-house of the said Peter .(The case was opened by Mr. Raine).

PETER DENYS , Esq. sworn.

Examined by Mr. Raine. I hired the prisoner as my livery servant : On Saturday the 19th of January last, he went out to distribute some visiting cards, and he never returned again; the next morning all his livery was missing.

JOSEPH SHERRY sworn.

I am butler to Mr. Denys; The prisoner quitted Mr. Denys' service on Saturday the 19th; he was employed on that day to distribute some cards; it was after nine o'clock that I quitted the house; he stayed behind me; I was obliged to go; upon my return from the opera, with my master, and Captain Palmer, I found he was not returned; he did not return at all; I sat up till past one o'clock on Sunday morning; at half past eight I made a search, and missed the articles specified in the indictment; I found him afterwards at Woolwich, on Tuesday the 22d; I had heard that a person of that description had been about the Warren; I employed a constable, and he was taken up; he was then in regimentals, at drill, in the light artillery; I said, Thomas, I am sorry to see you in this situation; he said, I am not sorry at all; if you

take me to London I shall soon return; upon that, his brother fetched the plain cloaths that belong to my master, which he has on now.

Q. Had you said any thing to induce him to confess? - A. Not the least in the world; he signified that these were the cloaths that he took away from Mr. Denys; at the Marlborough-street office he acknowledged they were my master's.

Court. Q. Was it those cloaths that he has on, that he said he had taken from his master? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Where they his own livery cloaths? - A. Yes; and there was a new pair of boots, that I believe were Captain Palmer 's.

Mr. Raine. (To Mr. Denys). Q. Had you given those cloaths to your servant, or no? - A. By no means; he had only worn them about three months.

Court. Q. They were made for him, I suppose? - A. Yes.

Court. It may, perhaps, be too much to say, that a man going away with his own cloaths that were made for him, can amount to felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-11

237. JOHN RANDALL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Murray , about the hour of nine in the night, of the 15th of January, and burglariously stealing, a piece of linen handkerchief, containing eleven handkerchiefs, value 10s. the property of the said William Murray.

WILLIAM MURRAY sworn.

I live at No. 1, Little Windmill-street, St. James's ; I keep a haberdashery and shoe warehouse : My house was broke open on the 15th of January; I was not at home at the time; I lost eleven handkerchiefs; I understand they were taken out of the window; I had seen them the very day before, in the window; I went out about ten or eleven o'clock.

PHILIP WILLIAMS sworn.

I was passing by Mr. Murray's, a little after nine; I saw the prisoner and another loitering about; I got another person to assist me, and we watched them for a quarter of an hour, backwards and forwards; we observed the window cracked; we thought they were gone away, and we were going to tell the people about it, and saw them come again in a few minutes afterwards; they both went, in company together, to the window again; I saw a hand go through and take the handkerchief, but I cannot say which it was; they both stood together; (the handkerchiefs were produced in Court); I said to the witness, they have got the goods, now we will lay hold of them; this gentleman standing here took the prisoner, and took him into the shop, and unbuttoned his coat; the handkerchiefs were buttoned up in his coat; I took the other about eight yards from the window; the prisoner took to his heels and ran, and the other witness went after him.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the other man that you saw at the window? - A. I am positively sure. I heard the glass fly; I said to the witness, I believe it is broke.

Q. When the man put in his hand to take the handkerchief out of the window, did you hear any noise then? - A. Yes.

Q. There were no shutters up? - A. No; it was before they shut up the shop.

JOSEPH COLES sworn.

I saw the prisoner run by Mr. Murray's house; I was coming out of the house where I live; I stood at the door a bit; a person said, some chaps were going to rob Mr. Murray's shop; I watched them about twenty minutes; I saw them cross the way to Mr. Murray's shop windows several times, and they looked about to see if any body saw them; then they went away; and the other witness said, we had better go and acquaint Mr. Murray of it; then I saw Randall on the opposite side of the way; we turned back to a house near Mr. Murray's, and stood in the passage and watched them; Williams said, when we see them brake the glass we will go and take them directly; accordingly we heard them break the glass, and he took Williams, and I took Randall.

Q. Did you see if the window was broke when you were going to tell Mr. Murray? - A. We looked at it was cracked, but, I believe, no part out.

Q. How near did you take the prisoner? - A. About forty yards; I took him the corner of Crown-court.

Q. Was he out of your fight at all? - A. No.

JONATHAN DOWLING sworn.

I was beadle of the night; Williams and the last witness brought the prisoner to me; I took charge of him; Williams delivered the handkerchief to me; I have had them ever since.(They were produced in Court and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prosecutor. I had only this piece of this pattern in the window, and it was gone, the glass was whole; it was put in two days before, it had been broke by persons of the same description.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming from Carnaby-market; I saw two young men; I asked what it was o'clock; there was a cry of stop-thief, and they laid hold of me; the man that is bailed out,

said, the man that gave him the property was run away, he knew nothing of me.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 21.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-12

238. GEORGE ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , two pewter pint pots, value 16d. the property of James Lilly .

JAMES LILLY sworn.

I live down at the Hermitage-bridge , in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate ; I keep the St. Andrew public-house ; I lost two pint pots about the 10th of March; in the course of three or four weeks, I have lost two dozen of pots.

ALEXANDER CLARKE sworn.

I am a publican; the prisoner, George Allen , came to my house on the 10th of March, about eight or nine in the evening, and called for a pint of porter; as I was coming past him, I saw he had a pint pot in his pocket, I put my hand in and took it out; I asked him how he came by that, he said, he had been and carried a pint of beer up as far as Burr-street, to one of his fellow servants; I said, why did he not carry it back again, he said, he was going to carry it back in the morning; I challenged him about it, and he wanted to sit down, and I pulled another out of a bag he had between his legs; I ordered the girl to run down to Mr. Lilly's, and desire him to come up; they were both Mr. Lilly's pots, his name was upon them; when Mr. Lilly's came, he sent for a constable, and charged the constable with him.

MITCHENER sworn.

I am a constable; the pots were delivered to me at Mr. Clarke's house, these are the pots, I have had them ever since,(they were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I was at work at the Glasgow Whars; as I was coming up, I saw the two pots standing by a post, I took them up and meant to return them to the owner, I could not read the name on them.

GUILTY . (Aged 60.)

Imprisoned twelve months , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-13

239. THOMAS LOVAT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , four linen shirts, value 4s. a nankeen jacket, value 6d. a linen pin-a-sore, value 6d. nine linen clonts, value 5s. four pair of stockings, value 3s. a calico bed-gown, value 6d. a dimity petticoat, value 2s. and a linen pillow case, value 1d. the property of John Goodwin .

JOHN GOODWIN sworn.

I am the son of John Goodwin ; my father is ill, he has kept his bed these five months, he lives in Castle-court, Fulwood's-rents , the things mentioned in the indictment are his property; I saw them hanging to dry in the yard, about half after seven in the evening, on Thursday the 31st of March; about half after nine, I was alarmed by the dog barking; I went into the yard, and the things were in the possession of John Runnington; the lines were cut, and I saw a piece of cloth on the wall; I looked over the wall, and saw a part of the linen lie in the next yard; my sister took it up, she is here.

JOHN RUNNINGTON sworn.

I am a smith: on Thursday evening, the 31st of March, I caught the prisoner in Mr. Goodwin's yard, between nine and ten in the evening.

Q. Was it a dark night, or moon-light? - A. It was very dark.

Q. Did you see him do any thing? - A. I could not see him till the candle was brought, and then I saw the linen scattered about the yard; I laid hold of him, and asked him his business; he asked for a person of the name of Thomas, I said, there was no such person lived there.

Q. Did you find any thing upon the prisoner? - A. Not any thing; I saw some small things on a wall beside the house.

Prisoner. He said, at the Magistrates, he saw nothing of me, and did not see me take any thing till he laid hold of me.

SARAH GOODWIN sworn.

I live next door to my father's house: On Thursday the 31st of March, my mother came and knocked at my mistress's door, and asked me to go and see if there was any linen in the yard; I went and picked them up; I saw them hanging in the yard about five in the evening; I took the linen up and carried it into my father's yard, and gave it to my mother; it was thrown into the yard where I live, from my father's yard; there were four shirts, two pin-a-fores, a nankeen jacket, five clouts, and a linen roller; my mother is ill at home; there are all the things I picked up,(Producing them), they are my father's property.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn.

I received the things from the girl, I put them in different parcels before the Magistrate.

Q. (To Goodwin.) There was nothing found upon this man? - A. No; I saw nothing found upon him.

Prisoner's defence. I went into a public-house to get a pint of beer, I came out at the back door to make water; being in liquor, I went into this yard; I know nothing of the linen no more than the child unborn.

Q. (To Goodwin). Is there any thoroughfare in this yard, or was there any door broke open? - A. No; the gate was open.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-14

240. WILLIAM JOHN LANCASHIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , four pieces of cambrick, containing thirty yards, value 25l. the property of John Hounsom , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HOUNSOM sworn.

I am a linen-draper , in Fleet-street : On Friday the 12th of February, about half past three in the afternoon, I was told that two young men wanted me: I was writing in the counting-house; I went forward and found the prisoner, Lancashire, and another person, whose name I since find is Thomas Williams, in my front shop; Lancashire told me they came from Mrs. Newland of Clapham, a very old friend and customer of mine, for some patterns of striped ginghams, and striped calicos, for waistcoats and trowsers, that they were going to the East-Indies; I showed them what few I had, and offered to get, them some more, which they agreed to call for at half past five the same evening; they called about that time, and my servant came up to me, and said, they had called and asked if I had any message; I said, none but my compliments; On the Tuesday following, I wanted some cambricks, they were kept upon a shelf, in an iron safe, in the counting-house; I put my hand up, and there were no cambricks; I enquired of my two shopmen if they knew any thing of them; they searched every place and could not find them; in the afternoon, one of my servants said to me, Do you know that the two men, that came from Mrs. Newland's, wrote a letter in the counting-house?

Court. We must not hear what your servant said to you. - A. The next morning I went over to Clapham to learn the truth of their account, and found no such persons came from Mrs. Newland, and there were no persons of that description in her house; suspicion immediately sell on the prisoner; I took out a warrant at Guildhall for his apprehension on the same morning; I traced him to the Merlin's-cave, in Spa-fields, where he was taken on the Friday, and this piece of cambrick I have in my hand, was found in his lodgings by my servant.

Q. Did they obtain what they wanted for Mrs. Newland? - A. That was only some little slips for patterns.

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I am journeyman to Mr. Hounsom: On Friday the 12th of February, I was standing in the shop, the prisoner came, and a friend with him, of the name of Williams, and asked if Mr. Hounsom was at home; I called Mr. Hounsom, and the prisoner told him he came from Mrs. Newland's of Clapham, an old customer of his, and wanted some patterns of ginghams. and calicos for jackets and trowsers, that they were going abroad; Mr. Hounsom said, he had but sew, but as it was for an old customer, he would get some patterns, and send that evening by the post; the prisoner said their was no occasion to do that, they should be by in the evening, and would call for them; Mr. Hounsom sent me into the city to procure the patterns; I got them, and between five and six o'clock, the prisoner and Williams came for them; I went up to Mr. Hounsom, and said, they were come for the patterns; he said he had nothing to say to them, but give them to them, with the price and his compliments; I delivered them to them in the counting-house; the prisoner then said to Williams, you had better write your letter; he said, he would, it would save time; he asked me for a sheet of writing-paper, which I gave him at the desk; I staid while he wrote some part, and then gave him a waser, and lest them and went into the other shop; I did not suspect any thing then; they staid about twelve minutes, and then went away, carrying the letter with them; on the Tuesday following, Mr. Hounsom missed his cambricks, and asked me if I knew any thing of them, I told him no; I could not think what could be come of them; suspicion fell directly on the prisoner and Williams, as they were lest alone; I went with the constable and found the prisoner at Merlin's-cave, a public-house, in Cold-bath-fields, on the Friday; I gave charge of him to George Allen , the constable; we then went with him to his apartments, which were just by; when we came there and found the cambrick, the prisoner told me to take it out of his apartment at my peril; I brought it away to Mr. Hounsom, and he took it to Bow-street.

Q. Where did you find it? - A. On the table, between the two windows, under a glass; it lay folded up without any paper over it, in the same way as it was in our shop; I knew it to be my master's property, there is a private mark upon it in Mr. Hounsom's hand-writing.

Prisoner. Q. When you came to my apartments, where did you find the cambrick? - A. On the table, with a dozen or fourteen pair of silk stockings upon it.

Prisoner. Q. Was that private mark upon it at the time? - A. It was.

Prisoner. Q. When I was at the bottom of Cold-bath-fields, do you remember my putting a mark upon that cambrick? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Do you know your master's mark? - A. Yes; it is C D A.

Q. Have you any doubt that that property belongs to your master? - A. None in the world.

Q. What is the value of this property? - A. I suppose twenty pounds and upwards.

WILLIAM MARSH sworn.

I am a constable: I know nothing more than feeing the shopman find that piece of cambrick in the prisoner's apartment, on Friday the 19th of February, in a house near Merlin's-cave; Price took it away, and when we came to the bottom of Cold-bath-fields, the prisoner marked it.

Q. Do you know what mark the prisoner put upon it? - A. No; he marked it with a pencil.

GEORGE ALLEN sworn.

I am a constable.

Q. Do you know any more than the last witness? - A. No; only executing the warrant; I took the prisoner on the 19th.

(To Mr. Hounsom). Look at that property. - A. This is my property; My mark is on it now, it is C D A, with a stroke coming down; there was about seven yards and a-half in each piece.

Q. What is the value of the piece found upon him? - A. It cost me 5l. 15l.; and this was the lowest of all the pieces; the mark has been attempted to be rubbed out; there was a ticket at the end, which is torn off and gone.

Prisoner. My Lord, I beg to be permitted to read my defence, (reads); My Lord, and Gentlemen on the Jury: On Thursday, the 11th of February, about eleven in the morning, I and Thomas Williams , being engaged in the East-India service, went into the shop of Mr. Hounsom, for some patterns of ginghams and calices, and knowing Mrs. Newland, I made use of her name, in hopes of being used better: when we went into the shop we saw nobody but Price and another man; Price came up to me; I informed him I came from Mrs. Newland, of Clapham, and wanted some patterns of gingham for jackets and tsowsers; he made answer, they had no ginghams in the house; in the mean time Mr. Hounsom came into the shop; Price informed him who I came from, and what I wanted; Mr. Hounsom said, he would get some patterns, and send them in a Penny-post latter to Clapham; I said, they were not to go there, but I would call for them; he said, he would get them ready by four in the afternoon; I told him, I would call for them about that time; I went to the India-house, and called for the patterns about the time appointed, and saw the same two men in the shop; Price informed us the patterns were ready, and desired us to walk into the counting-house, which we did; Price went up stairs, and came down and delivered the patterns, with Mr. Hounsom's compliments; Williams asked Price for a sheet of paper, and the loan of a pen and ink; accordingly the paper was produced, and we were desired to walk into the counting-house, which we did, and Williams proceeded with writing his letter; Price was in and out several times while we were in the counting-house, and we were not there above ten minutes; I am positive, the cambrick was not taken while we were there; nor could be taken without his seeing it; and it was not missed till the Tuesday following; can Mr. Hounsom swear, that between the 11th and 16th, that Williams was not in the shop or counting-house, or with any other person besides me? or that he had not been there by himself? or can Price, when he is out about his master's business, can he say who has been in the shop? can a man, by seeing a person only once, swear that Williams, who was there with me, was not there at any time after? my Lord, may this impress your Lordship's mind, and the minds of the merciful Jury; we parted that evening, and I went on my way to the Haymarket: on the Monday afternoon Williams called upon me, at my lodgings, by Merlins'-cave, and begged of me to let him leave the piece of cambrick; he said, that he was going to take it to his uncle at Copenhagen-house; he left my apartment, and I have never seen him since; on Friday, Price, and the constable, Allen, came to me at the Merlin's-cave, I came to the door with them, and Allen said, I had better go to my apartments; he said, he had a search warrant to search them; I said, he was welcome to search any apartment I held; they found this piece of cambrick on the table, and Price took and put it in his pocket; they searched my trunk and chamber, and found nothing more; they told me I must go with them to Guildhall, because Price was going to take it to his master to see if he could swear to it; I told them I had no objection; as we were going along, in Cold-bath-fields, he took the piece of cambrick out of his pocket, and I put a mark upon it; that I might know it again; is it to be supposed, gentlemen, that if I had known the cambrick to be stolen, I should have been so ready to have my apartments searched, and having it marked, unless I was in hopes of being able to find Williams? that I shall leave to the determination of a Jury, where mercy will always prevail, and reason is always studied. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, after I had put the mark upon the cambrick, Price then left us and went to his master's alone with the cambrick in his possession, while the constable (Allen) and myself proceeded towards Bow-street, instead of Guildhall; that my friends were all disappointed when they went to Guildhall and found me not there; I might have had friends to have bailed me out; if

they had not so disappointed me at Bow-street; I gave every information in my power, that the constable might have found Williams, if he had not heard that the cambrick was found; Williams could have heard it was found, and has never been heard of since; I told the Magistrate the way in which I came by it; my Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, Mr. Hounsom could then find a private mark; Mr. Hounsom then said, that if I would tell him where the cambrick was, he would not hurt me; I told him I did not know, but if Williams was found, there would be a likelihood of obtaining it; that I was an entire stranger to it; and that if he had taken it from the counting-house, it must have been taken at some other time, I was a stranger to it; I was fully committed for trial; then Mr. Hounsom told me he was obliged to prosecute me; but he would do any thing in his power for me; and if I wanted any thing, if I would write to him, I should have it; I received a letter from him, in which he promised me 5s. a week, and desired me to send my wife for it any time after twelve o'clock, which he did; he desired her to call every Monday; he allowed it me for two weeks running; and one Thursday Mr. Hounsom visited me in prison; I asked him if he had heard of Williams; he said, no; he would make him suffer if he could find him; I asked him what I was to do upon my trial; says he, if you take my advice, which is that of a friend, when you are arraigned, plead guilty, that will save a great deal of trouble, and I will intercede for you; I told him I could not do that, for I should be injuring myself, but I would consider of it; he left me; on the Monday I sent to him for the gratuity which he had been so kind as to allow me; he stopped it from that time; and the only reason I could give for it was, that I would not plead guilty when I was arraigned. My Lord, and Gentlemen, I hope what I have said may have some pressure upon your minds, in favour of the unfortunate prisoner at the bar, one young in life; and, Gentlemen, the heavy losses and expences that have attended me, and my losing my former friends, and throwing disgrace upon my character, have turned their backs upon me, that I have been unable to employ counsel; I trust to your Lordship, where mercy abounds, and to that Jury, where mercy is ever shewn to an unfortunate prisoner.

Q. (To Hounsom.) Did you allow this man any thing? - A. I allowed him 5s. a week for two weeks; he told me he was married to a young woman between eighteen and nineteen; afterwards another wife was produced, and I found he was not married to this woman; that was the reason I stopped it.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character).

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-15

241. ANN TROWBRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , thirty-six pair of women's leather gloves, value 36s. the property of Robert Price , and John Cook .

ROBERT PRICE sworn.

I am in partnership with John Cook : On Monday morning, the 7th of March, about a quarter before eight,(on Friday the 4th, a gentleman called upon me, and asked me if I had been robbed by any body belonging to me; I told him, not to my knowledge); I have a warehouse in Milk-street , Cheapside ; I watched and discovered the prisoner coming into the warehouse to light the fire; about two minutes afterwards the constable brought her into the warehouse, and detected her with three dozen of gloves in her apron,(the gloves were produced in Court).

Price. These are my gloves; I know them from the particular make and the shape of them; they are inserior gloves to be sold cheap; this paper of gloves was shewn to me three or four days prior to that, by our head warehouseman; and looking at them in a particular manner, I can swear they are the same gloves; there is the private mark of my warehouseman upon them, I know his hand-writing.

JOHN KITCHIN sworn.

I am a constable: Mr. Price desired me to look out after the prisoner: On Monday morning I saw the prisoner, when the porter opened the shop, go in and bring out a candlestick; while the porter was opening the shutters, she then went down to the Swan-with-Two Necks tap, in Lad-lane, to light it, and came back to the shop again; she was then, I believe, two or three minutes at most in the shop; she came out, and then I followed her, and I touched her upon the arm, and asked her what she had got there, and took this bundle of gloves out of her apron; it has been in my possession ever since.

JOHN WALL sworn.

I am warehouseman at Price and Cook's; I saw the constable take the bundle of gloves out of the prisoner's apron; I know the gloves to be ours; they are inferior gloves, to be sold cheap, and I can swear to the private mark.

Prisoner. He knows very well that I had been up and down in the house, and made use of the

waste paper to light the fire with, and this was amongst the waste paper.

GUILTY . (Aged 60.)

Fined 1s. and imprisoned for twelve months .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-16

242. JANE COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , three guineas, and two half guineas, the property of James Wells , privately from his person .

JAMES WELLS sworn.

On Sunday night last, about eleven o'clock, I was going up Holborn, the prisoner at the bar took me by the arm, nearly opposite Ely Place; she asked me to give her some money; I told her I had no coppers; I was going to leave her; she gave me a sudden pull by the arm, and put her hand round me; I got myself disengaged from her, rather suspecting that she might have picked my pocket; I put my hand in my pocket, and discovered that my money was gone; I had not three minutes before put my hand in my pocket; I had three guineas and two half-guineas; I immediately turned back, and took her by the right hand; I asked her where she lived; she said, in Covent-garden; I told her it was too far, but I would take her to a nearer house; I led her to the end of Fetter-lane; she turned up Fetter-lane, and seemed to wish to get herself disengaged from me, by pulling off her pattens, and various manoeuvres; I called the watchman, and delivered her to him; she was there searched; three guineas and an half-guinea were found in her pocket, with a sixpence, and some halfpence; on bringing her to the watch-house, the watchman said, he heard something fall; we searched, but could not find any thing.

Prisoner. I wish him to be asked for the money that he gave me, and then took away from me again.

Court. Q. Had you any toying with her, or any communication with her)? - A. I had not.

Prisoner's defence. He was in liquor, and he gave me the money out of his waistcoat pocket, and said he would sleep all night with me.

Court. Q. Is that so? - A. It is not, my Lord.

Court. Q. Nor you had no improper communication with her? - A. No.

Jury. Q. Were you quite sober? - A. Perfectly so.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 27.)

Tried by the London Jury, before The Right Hon. Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-17

243. WILLIAM BUCKTHORPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of March , a piece of printed calico, containing twenty-two yards, value 3l. 6s. the property of Mary Rutter , widow .

MARY RUTTER sworn.

I am a Calico-glazer , in Bartholomew-close : On the 2d of March, I lost a piece of printed calico; I had seen it there about nine o'clock in the morning, I missed it immediately after; I don't know any thing of it myself.

GREGORY HEELEY sworn.

I was in the kitchen getting my breakfast, and I saw the prisoner go several times to the door, and look in at the window; the kitchen is down stairs opposite the shop; and he got over the shop-window, and took the piece out, it lay at a very little distance from the window; I went up from my breakfast directly, and caught him with the piece under his great coat.

- ROSITER sworn.

I am a constable, (produces the property,) I received it from the last witness.

Heeley. This is the piece I took from the prisoner.

Mrs. Ruller. I know this to be my property.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Mrs. Ruller.) Q. Is not there somebody in the business with you; has not your son some share in the business? - A. No, nobody at all.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Fined 1s. and imprisoned six months .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-18

244. MATTHEW CROFTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , two pounds and three quarters of tobacco, value 6s. 6d. the property of Robert Haynes , and George Haynes .

ROBERT HAYNES sworn.

I am a tobacconist in Aldersgate-street , in partnership with my brother, George Haynes : On the 12th of March, Saturday night, (I had some reason to suspect the prisoner before), when the prisoner was paid his wages, I followed him out of the house, and shut the door; I had, previous to that, got a constable, he was at my hall-door; I told the prisoner I wanted to see what he had got; and in his breeches he had got two pounds and three quarters of tobacco; the prisoner had lived with me a very short time, two or three months.

Q. What reason have you to believe it to be your's? - A. I believe it to be mine, but I cannot swear to it.

- PHIPPS sworn.

I am a constable. On Saturday the 12th of March, about seven o'clock, Mr. Haynes sent for me, and said, he had a suspicion of his man robbing him; I took the prisoner, and searched him, and found the tobacco in his breeches, before and behind, as much as he could stuff in.

Prisoner. It was not Mr. Haynes's property; I was out ten minutes after I was paid; I have a wife and three children; I have very little wages, and I bought this tobacco of a coachman, or guard, I am not sure which; I thought I could get a shilling by it, and I wanted it to get bread for my children.(The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-19

245. NATHANIEL WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , 239 pair of steel snuffers, value 27l. 120 brass bed-caps, value 12s. 6d. and 24 pair of copper tea tongs plated with silver, value 1l. the property of James Lancaster .

JAMES LANCASTER sworn.

I live at No. 7, Craven-row, City-road; I sell by commission for a gentleman at Birmingham : On the 3d of March, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment: nineteen dozen of steel inuffers, ten dozen of bed-caps, and two dozen of tea-songs; Wood came with the mate of a ship, and desired me to take them to the Ship Tavern, and then to the Gun Tavern at Billingsgate; they were for a captain, he said, they were for the captain to look over them, and pay for them; he called him captain Riddle, but there was no such captain there. I sent them to the Ship Tavern, and then Wood and the mate said, the captain was gone to the Gun Tavern, and desired the goods to be sent for, and they were carried there; we had not been there long when the mate came to me in the tap room, and said, the captain was in the coffee-room, and was ready to look over the goods, and pay for them; I told him I would go up along with him; he said there was no occation, that Wood could take them up, and would take as much care of them as myself; I trusted them to him, and he neither brought me goods or money back; I staid upon the steps of the Gun Tavern ; Wood came and said they all looked well, the captain was looking over the goods and seemed to approve of them much; I stopped about half an hour, and then I thought I would go and see what they were about; he came back to me again, and said, the mate and captain were both gone on board, with the goods, to save the duty; I told him, I was afraid he had robbed me of my goods; if he had, he had ruined me, for I was a poor man; says he, you seem to be frightened at nothing at all, I will shew you where to find both captain and mate, he took me over Hermitage-bridge, into Wapping a long way, till about nine o'clock at night, enquiring for such a person, and could not find him; the goods were looked out between three and four, and I was to get them ready by six; it was about seven o'clock when we went to search for the captain.

Q. Has he ever informed you of the name of the captain? - A. He told me first it was Grittle, and then that it was Little; and that he lived at No. 4, Upper Garlick-hill, and no such person lived there; that is a merchant's house; he told me every thing false; he would have got a guinea of me if he could; I have never seen nor heard any thing of the goods since.

Prisoner. (Shows him a paper.) Q. Is that your hand-writing? - A. Yes; it is, (it is read)," J. Lancaster, No.7, Craven-row, City-road, all sorts of snussers."

Prisoner. I met him on the 3d of March, in St. Paul's Church-yard; he knew I had been in the hardware line; he asked me if I knew any body that wanted any; I told him I did not.

Court. Q. Have you known this man before? - A. I had the misfortune to accept a bill for a person and was arrested, and was in the New Compter, when he was there; that was all that I ever knew of him.

Court. Q. Did you know he had dealt in the hardware way? - A. No; he asked me first if I had any pocket books; I told him no, I had some snussers; and he told me he would help me to a good customer.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, you have heard the evidence, and I could almost say, I am sorry to say, it does not appear to amount to selony; it is obtaining the goods by false pretences, but the prosecutor parted with the goods to the prisoner under the idea, that he was to return either the goods or the money; I cannot state that to be selony, and, therefore, I must tell you, that you are to acquit him; whether they chuse to prosecute him afterwards, for obtaining them under false pretences, lies with themselves.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before The Rt. Hon. Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-20

246. DIANA JANE CARNS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , in the dwelling-house of Stephen Loosely , two dimity pockets, value 6d. his property, three Banknotes, each of the value of 20l. two Bank-notes, each of the value of 10l. a Promissory-note for the payment of money, value 7l. 11s. 6d. and another Promissry-note for the payment of money, value 12l. 7s. the property of the said Stephen.

STEPHEN LOOSELY sworn.

I am a butcher , in Aldersgate-street ; the prisoner was a servant of mine; she had been with me about six weeks: On the 15th of February, I lost three 20l. Bank-notes; two 10l. Bank-notes, two

Promissory-notes, and a pair of pockets; one of the notes was for 7l.11s.6d. and the other 12l.7s.; they were in a canvas bag, in my coat pocket, in my bed room; I had seen them there on the Sunday, the day before.

Q. Had she access to your room? - A. Yes; she had; I took them out with me on the Sunday, and on the Monday I put on the same coat, but did not miss them till the Tuesday; I then went up and examined, and was very much alarmed, and related the loss of them to every body in the house; I told her, she must have seen them, for they were in my coat pocket; and, she said, she had seen them, and had them in her hand; she was the only maid-servant we had; we had a man-servant; she did not assign the reason why she went to my pocket; but she would not then give an account of what she had done with them; I have never had any of them again; one of them has since come into the Bank; the pockets were found upon her; she consetsed, before the Alderman, that she had taken them away.

ALICE LOOSELY sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness, (produces a pair of pockets); they were found upon her when she was searched; I was present, and I told her she had a pair of my pockets on, and that she had no business with them; I was the second person that had seen her after the loss; I asked her what she had done with the notes; she said, she did not know, but Miss Alice, that is my daughter, saw them as well as her; I sent for my daughter, and asked her about the canvass bag; she went into the room for a constable's staff for her father; the prisoner was present; she said, she saw her put her hand into her father's pocket; she told her, she had no business to look in her father's pocket, or something of that sort; she confessed it to several people; I might say, if she would confess, I would be a friend to her, or something of that sort.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to what your daughter said in her presence? - A. No; she never denied having them.

ALICE LOOSELY sworn.

I am thirteen years of age.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - A. Yes; There was a woman beating a child facing our door; I said to my papa, that woman would kill the child, and my papa sent me up stairs for his staff, he is a constable; and I went up for it; he said, it was in his best coat pocket; I took it, and as I came round the foot of the bed, the maid had hold of the collar of his coat, and put her hand in the pocket; I told her she had no business to look there; and then I went down stairs; I did not say any more to her; I did not see her take any thing out; I left her with her hand in the pocket.

ANN STOBEY sworn.

I was present when the prisoner was searched; there was a pair of pockets found upon her; I heard her confess before the Alderman, several times, that she had taken the property, and given it to a woman who lives in Goodman's-fields, of the name of Allen; she was in custody several days, and was subpoened, but she was out of town.

Mr. Knapp. (To Loosely.) Q. I believe you have been to the friends of the prisoner, since she has been in custody? - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath, have you not said to them, it should be made up, if they would make you some recompence? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, after this woman was committed for stealing the notes that are charged in this indictment, did you not go to her friends for the purpose of making up this matter, and receiving the difference of your loss? - A. I went to them.

Q. Answer my question, sir; now did not you wish, in your own mind, to recover the loss you had sustained? - A. To be sure I did.

Q. Then, upon your oath, did you not go to the prisoner's friends for the purpose of recovering your loss? - A. I told them, I thought, as honest people, if they knew any thing, they ought to make a discovery.

Q. That was after you had been before the Magistrate, and the woman committed? - A. I don't know that it was.

Q. Will you swear that it was not? - A. It is a month or two ago.

Q. That it would be better for them if it was made up upon the payment of a sum of money? - A. No such thing.

Q. Then tell those honest men what you did go for? - A. I went to endeavour to find out my property; I left not stone unturned to recover my property.

Q. Then after this poor woman was committed, did you not go to her friends and offer to lose 10l. if you could recover the remaining part of your property? - A. I don't recollect that I did.

Q. Remember, this poor woman's liberty, and, perhaps, life, is at stake? - A. I recollect saying, if the property was restored, if it was 10l. short, I should be glad to have it.

JAMES BARRYMAN sworn.

The girl confessed she had taken the notes, on the evening that she had been taken up.

Q. After she had been examined by Mrs. Loose- ly? - A. Yes; -

Court. You must not tell us that.

THOMAS PHILPS sworn.

I am a constable: On Tuesday the 16th of February, Mr. Loosely sent for me about six in the

evening; he said, he had been robbed of notes; he gave me charge of the prisoner; about twelve o'clock at night, as I was taking her to the Comp ter, she confessed -

Court. That we must not hear.

WILLIAM LOOSELY sworn.

I heard of my brother's loss, and I went up and heard what the girl said, that is all I know.

NOT GUILTY , Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17960406-21

247. GEORGE PATERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , eight handkerchiefs, value 34s. the property of John Bloomfield , privately in his shop .

JOHN BLOOMFIELD sworn.

I am a linen-draper , in Newgate-street : On Saturday the 2d of April, between eight and nine in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked for some handkerchiefs; I fetched a wrapper, and asked him if he wanted some square ones, or corner ones; he said, no, he wanted some coloured silk ones; I then brought what silk handkerchiefs I had, and laid on the counter before him; I shewed him several; he said they were not so good as what he wanted; I shewed him another piece, a very good one, a twilled one, he said, no, he wanted India; I told him, I did not keep India ones; I shewed him another, and he said, they were not so good as he wanted, he repeated it three times; he went from the shop, and a Mrs. Fearne, who is here, was standing in the shop, and told me he had got some handkerchiefs; I ran after him, and also my young man, whose name is Brooks; he ran across the way; my young man saw him first, he was before me, a coach passed, which prevented my seeing him; I heard my young man call out, stop thief, and I turned out of the pavement and saw the prisoner run underneath the horses of one of the coaches at the stand, the corner of the Old Bailey; I ran up directly, my young man had hold of him, and I laid hold of him, a man says, here is the handkerchiefs, and gave them me; I don't know who it was; I did not see him take them, nor had any idea of it, till Mrs. Fearne told me so; they were silk handkerchiefs, eight in number; there was my private mark upon one of them, and they are not separate, they are all in one piece.

Q. Are you sure this very piece was shewn him upon the counter? - A. Yes; I have valued them at 34s. I gave more for them.

SARAH FEARNE sworn.

I am a distant relation of Mrs. Bloomfield's, I was there by accident to buy the shawl I have now on; I saw the prisoner in Mr. Bloomfield's shop on Saturday evening, about twenty minutes past eight; he asked to look at some handkerchiefs; Mr. Bloomfield asked him if he wanted some square ones, or corner ones; he said he did not want white ones, he wanted coloured silk handkerchiefs; he made a great deal of objection, he had several pieces shewn him; he said, they were not dark enough, he wanted one darker than the one he had on, and they must be India ones; he asked Mr. Bloomfield if he had no better, he said, no, he had not; he asked him again, three or four times; he then said, they would not do, and went out of the shop; when he had got about two yards from the counter, I said to Mr. Bloomfield, he had got some handkerchiefs, they were stuffed into the sleeve of his lame arm; I did not see him take them; I did not see them till he was about two yards from the counter, when I gave the alarm; and Mr. Bloomfield and his young man ran out of the shop; I staid till the handkerchiefs were brought back by Mr. Bloomfield, the man was not brought back; Mr. Bloomfield desired me to put a mark upon them.

Q. Did that appear to be the same piece of handkerchief that you saw in his sleeve? - A. It is impossible for me to say, it was of the same colour.

JOHN BROOKS sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Bloomfield; I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and my master shewed him some handkerchiefs; he objected to them, and said, they were too much of the Spital-fields sort for him; he said, he wanted a better sort; he then went out of the shop, and Mrs. Fearne said, he had got some handkerchiefs about him; the prisoner immediately ran out of the shop, I jumped over the counter and went out immediately; I lost sight of him for a moment, and at last saw him running by the side of Newgate; I immediately ran after him, and he ran between the first and second coach on the stand; he turned round, and saw me very close to him, and then he went through between the second and third coach; I followed him there, and he went through between the first and second again; when I got there, he got into the broad way, and I immediately cried stop thief; I was close to him when he was stopped, and he was then detained; a man came up, and said, here are the handkerchiefs, I have just taken them from him, and gave them to Mr. Bloomfield.

Q. Was that in the hearing of the prisoner? - A. Close to him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see the handkerchiefs about me? - A. No. (The constable produced the handkerchiefs).

Mr. Bloomfield. It has my private mark upon it, I believe it to be the hand-writing of one of my young men, it is my private shop mark; I had just been taking stock the 9th of last month, and this corresponds with my stock, within two, which

some of my young men think I have sold; it is an article I keep very few of, for they only bring me in such customers as these.

Prisoner's defence. I was going to Deptford, I am wounded in my thigh, and have got a pension for it, besides losing my arm; I have got one about my neck of the Spitalfields sort, and it is all gone to pieces, and I wanted something of the India kind, and in coming out, a young man was behind the lady, she cried out directly, the man has got something; I went out and cried holloa, you have got something; I could not run, I walked, and there was a mob, and a cry of stop thief; my friends are not here, and who could prove that I never had any thing on more than I have at present; I have been nineteen months in the French hospital, I never wore a book, or any thing of that sort, it is impossible that I could have put them into this sleeve; I will leave it to any gentleman whether my arm would uphold a hook, the French surgeons cut it six or seven times, and my thigh too; I did not expect my trial to come on till to-morrow.

N.B. (The prisoner had but one arm).

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately .

Fined 1s. and imprisoned twelve months .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-22

248. JUDITH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , a child's cotton frock, value 3s. 6d. the property of John Brown .

MARY BROWN sworn.

I am the wife of John Brown, I keep a house in Catherine-wheel-alley, Bishopsgate-street: Last Sunday, I sent the child to church, and I sent my little boy with her; as they were coming from church, the prisoner took the frock off the child; it is a child of two years old, the boy is eight years old, he is not here; it was in the evening, I should know it again, I have two like it; I never saw the prisoner before.

JOHN CHESTER sworn.

I am a weaver; I was going along Bishopsgate-street last Sunday afternoon, and heard the cry of stop thief; I stopped the prisoner, and she then threw the frock from under her apron, and the other witness picked it up; I saw the child brought home about ten minutes afterwards, without a frock.

- GOLDSBOROUGH sworn.

I am a waterman; I was in Bishopsgate-street, last Sunday afternoon; I heard two children crying out, stop that woman, and seeing her run, I immediately went after her, and told this young man to stop the prisoner, and she directly chucked the frock away out of her right hand from under her apron; I picked it up, and delivered it to the officer; I saw this child about two years of age with a frock off, it was this woman's child, who lives next door to the officer, Robert Rosoman.

MARY LANGDALE sworn.

Last Sunday, I was coming along, between three and four o'clock, it rained very hard, and I saw this woman running; I crossed over the way and saw the poor children in the middle of the road, in a pouring rain, crying; the young child had no frock on, it had a pin-a-fore on, and I took the child home to its mother.

ROBERT ROSOMAN sworn.

I am a constable, (produces the frock,) I received it from Goldsborough; I have had it ever since.

Prosecutrix. This is my frock; the child I have in my arms has got the fellow to it on.(The prisoner did not make any defence).

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Fined 1s and imprisoned twelve months .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-23

249. GEORGE MARTIN , SAMUEL JEN-KINS , and JUDITH DALY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , two linen shirts, value 8s. and two cotton stockings, value 2s. the property of Gilbert Small .

GILBERT SMALL sworn.

I live in Rose-lane, Spitalfields ; I keep a public-house open for Mr. Tickell, a brewer: On the 22d of February, I lost two shirts, and two odd stockings, they were in the bar; I saw George Martin taking them out; there were six of them in company, they had been four hours in the house.

Q. And you sussered these people to sit tipling in your house for four hours together, what could you expect but to lose your things; when you saw him take them, what did you do? - A. I went round to a passage, and told them of it, and they denied it; I sent to Spitalfields watch-house for somebody to take them up, and they would not come from there, and they went away; accordingly Mr. Ferris, and another gentleman, came in in about four or five minutes, and I told them what I had lost, and they took me along with them, and within three yards of the place we caught Martin and Jenkins, and they were taken to Spitalfields watch-house; I never got any of the things again.

RICHARD FERRIS sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the Public-office, Worship-street; Ray and I were out upon duty, and happened to come by this house; we met the two men prisoners just by the house; we went into the house, and he said he had been robbed; we went back with him and took them into custody; I searched them, but found no property upon them;

we took the girl out of another public-house at the bottom of Rose-lane.

Martin's defence. I went to this house to have a pint or two of beer, I came out, and the gentleman said he had lost something; I staid till it was time for me to go, and then I went home; I met Ferris, and they searched me, and wished me good night; and a few minutes afterwards they came and took me and this young man to the watch-house.(The prisoner Martin called six witnesses, who gave him a good character).

(The Court ordered the licence to be taken from the house).

All three NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-24

250. JOHN WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , a cloth great coat, value 5s. and another cloth coat, value 5s. the property of Sir John Leicester , Bart. and another cloth coat, value 1s. the property of Roger Peacock .

ROGER PEACOCK sworn.

I am a servant to Sir John Leicester, in the capacity of a footman , he lives in Piccadilly : I was going into the cellar, on Friday the 4th of March, to draw some small beer, I heard a rustling in the corner of the cellar; I looked behind me and could not discern what it was; I spoke twice, and nobody answered, and I came out, and kept looking behind me, and saw the prisoner start out of a corner; he went towards the beer barrel, and dropped three coats; I took my beer, he followed me, and I turned round and faced him; I asked him what he was doing there? and he said, nothing; I asked him what he was going to do with those clothes? and he said, nothing; I took him by the collar, and brought him into the kitchen; I delivered him up to my fellow-servant, and he took the prisoner, and I went about my business; I let the coats lay in the cellar till they all came to look at them.

Q. Whose coats were they? - A. Two livery coats belonging to Sir John Leicester, and the other a regimental coat belonging to me; we go out of the servant's-hall into the cellar; I never saw the prisoner to my knowledge before.

Q. You never employed him about the house? - A. No; he had a pick-lock key taken out of his left hand pocket, it is in Court.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON .

Reference Number: t17960406-25

251. RICHARD WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , a sash-saw, value 4s. the property of Joseph Forsdick .

JOSEPH FORSDICK sworn.

On the 4th of April, I lost a sash-saw from a new house, in Gray's-Inn-lane, I was gone to water; the prisoner was not at work there, he is a stranger to me; I saw a man that was at work in the house take it out of the prisoner's pocket, his name is William Turner .

WILLIAM TURNER sworn.

I was at work in the house, up in the two pair of stairs room; he came up and laid, he wanted a job; I said, they were gone to beer, and he went down stairs, and I saw him go into the front parlour; I followed him out, and got to the street-door, and he met Forsdick there, and he asked him if he would give him a job, and he said no; I took him by the collar, and said, before you go, let us see if you have any thing that does not belong to you; and I found a saw concealed under his coat, (the saw produced in Court,) I went to a public-house and got a constable.

Forsdick. This is my saw; I know it by two teeth being broke out, that I had punched out about two months ago, I have had the saw these three years; I had left it upon a bench in the front parlour.

Prisoner's defence. I bought that saw of Mr. Howell, in Coelsea; if it is mine, there is a tooth broke out near the handle, and another within two inches of the bottom; I was going to look for a job; I have been so long out work, that if I could not have got a job, I should have been obliged to fell it.

Forsdick. The Magistrates were not sitting, and we went to a public-house, and there he saw the saw, and the mark upon it, as it lay upon the table, there is Mr. Howell's name upon it; I am sure it is my saw, I have had it three years.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Publickly whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-26

252. ALEXANDER OGILVY and CA-THERINE GIBSON were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , a linen matrass, value 2s. seven check shirts, value 5s. one cotton and wollen bad-qullt, value 6d. one worsted waistcoat, value 1s. a fish-skin case, containing six mathematical instruments, value 2s. a pair of cotton trowsers, value 1s. and two pocket handkerchiefs, value 1s. the property of Elizabeth Hutchinson , widow .

Second Count. Laying them to be the property of Ralph Hutchinson ; and Catherine Gibson , for receiving, on the 23d of February , part of the said goods, knowing them to be stolen .

ELIZABETH HUTCHINSON sworn.

I live at Shadwell: About two months back I lost the things specified in the indictment; they were taken from on board the Nottingham; I had seen them about three weeks before they were taken away; the second day after they had been left there, my son took them on board; he is not here.

WILLIAM HARRISON sworn.

On the 24th of February, I had information that Mrs. Hutchinson had been robbed; in consequence of that, I went to a house in Back-house-yard, of Ogilvy's; I knocked at the door; they said, he was not at home; I went into the house; he was out of bed in his shirt, standing upright in a cupboard, and the woman in bed; I asked him how he came by this jacket, (producing it); he said, he had had it two years; I told him, I thought it was rather too small for him; I told them to dress themselves and go with me directly; they both dressed themselves; I searched their cloaths before they dressed themselves; I observed the woman go to a large arm chair; she put her hand under the cushion, and threw something out at the window; I ran down stairs, but could find nothing but some bits of cotton; I then searched her again, and found, between her shift and her back, this box, with a quantity of duplicates in it, which led to the discovery of the property, (produces the duplicates, they are read).

DANIEL HILL sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: Some of these are my duplicates; I have the goods here; I took them in of Catherine Gibson .

(They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix).

Q. (To Mrs. Hutchinson.) Is any body here that was on board the Nottingham? - A. No; my son is gone to sea.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-27

253. JOSEPH SMITH and WILLIAM PARROCK were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Nourse , between the hours of four and five in the night of the 9th of February , and burglariously stealing, one thousand yards of thread lace, value 400l. one thousand yards of thread lace, called edgings, value 200l. and six hundred yards of black silk lace, value 200l. the property of Clarke Hillier , Joseph Nourse, and Temple Hillier .

Second Count. Charging them with a like burglary, and stealing a sillagree silver housewife case, value 10s. a Queen Anne's shilling, a gold ring, value 20s. and a gold locket, value 10s. the property of Joseph Nourse .

Third Count: Charging them with a like burglary, and stealing a silver watch; value 5l. the property of Aries Nourse .(The case was opened by Mr. Const).

ARIES NOURSE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Const. I live with my uncle in Welbeck-street ; it is the dwelling-house of my uncle, Joseph Nourse , only; the partners in the house are Joseph Nourse , Clarke Hillier, and Temple Hillier.

Q. Do you remember, on the night of the 9th of February, any thing happening, and what? - A. Yes; on a Wednesday I heard a noise between four and five in the morning; I slept in the warehouse below stairs; I saw three men enter the room, one of whom came before the rest, with a lanthorn in his hand; he ran up to me, pushed me down in the bed, and told me, if I did not he quiet, he would shoot me; they then covered my head over with the cloaths, and asked me for the keys of the iron chest, which, I told them, were out of the house; they broke open all the locks, and took out the lace; and then they asked me questions where the key of the till was, which I told them was up stairs; they said, that would not do; they then asked me if that was my watch that lay upon the counter; I said, yes, it is, but, I am sure you will not take that; they said, no, they would not; but they did take it; after lying sometime, and asking me a few questions, they broke open the till, and all the drawers round; and they were quiet some time; I heard the man next me take one step from me; and I supposed they were gone; I got out of bed and holloa'd as loud as. I could, and the watchman sprung his rattle; I opened the street door, and ran round to the back door, and the watchman pursued them.

Q. Do you know either of the men at the bar? - A. The man in the brown coat, Smith, is the man who stood by my bed; the other man, Parrock, is the man that had the lanthorn in his hand.

Q. Are you quite sure of that? - A. I am.

Q. How soon did you see them again? - A. A very little time after; it might be a quarter of an hour, or not so much, at she watch-house; when I came to the watch-house our goods had been taken from them; they were both in custody; one at the Mary-le-bonne watch-house, and the other at the watch-house in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square.

Q. Who has the property? - A. Piddington.

Q. Should you know the property again? - A. Yes.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. I suppose Mr. Hillier occasionally sleeps in the house? - A. He is very seldom in town.

Q. But when he is in town that is his sleeping place? - A. Yes.

Q. And they pay the rent, jointly, out of the partnership, don't they? - A. I cannot tell; Mr. Hillier does not live in town.

Q. Is there a room on purpose for him? - A. No.

Q. There is a room which you consider as his room, when he is there, that you call Mr. Hillier's room? - A. No.

Q. This, you say, was between three and four in the morning? - A. Yes.

Q. It was dark? - A. Perfectly dark.

Q. I take it for granted, when you awoke from your sleep, by such a circumstance, you were under very considerable alarm? - A. I was sitting up in my bed.

Q. Of course you were under considerable alarm, a circumstance enough to alarm the bravest man in Europe? - A. Certainly.

Q. And therefore, whatever persons you saw, you saw them with all that terror upon your mind? - A. Yes; I saw them two minutes before they came to me; as if they were surprised to find me there; I had a full view of them from head to foot.

Q. For a short time, and that only by the light of a dark lanthorn? - A. They turned round, and were all over the room.

Q. Still you were under considerable alarm? - A. Yes.

Q. If a person was likely to be mistaken it would be at a time when under considerable alarm? A. When I awake from my sleep. I know what I am about, as well as if I had been awake a long time.

JOSEPH NOURSE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Const. I live in Welbeck-street; I have two partners.

Q. Is this house your dwelling-house only, or of them jointly? - A. It is my dwelling-house only.

Q. Over which they have no controul? - A. None at all.

Q. You heard this alarm given by your nephew? A. Yes; I had been disturbed for a quarter of an hour or more.

Q. Did you observe where the house was broke? - A. Yes; I ran into the street with a cutlass in my hand; I thought my nephew had pursued the prisoners, and went to assist him; I always make it a rule, every night that I am in town, to see that the doors are fast; and I can answer that every thing was safe; there were three or four hundred empty cards of lace lying about the floor.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You have two partners in your business? - A. Yes.

Q. Is the rent of the house paid out of the partnership account? - A. It is from the general account.

Q. The rent is paid from the joint account of al of you? - A. Yes.

Mr. Const. Q. To whom is the lease granted? - A. To me.

Q. Is the rent paid generally, or is it paid to you, by them, as a consideration for the trade? - A. It is paid out of the general account.

Q. Is the sum allowed out of the trade the sum you paid for the rent? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Still that rent is paid out of the partnership fund? - A. Yes; and so is every thing else.

Q. It arises out of the profits of that trade? - A. Yes; my nephew comes to town once a year, as a visitor.

Court. Q. And he does contribute to the rent when he comes? - A. There is no room appropriated to him at all; and when he comes to town, he always comes as a visitor.

Court. Q. Don't you conceive that all the partners have a right to sleep there? - A. No.

JOHN HOBBS sworn.

Examined by Mr. Const. I am serjeant of the patrole at Mary-le-bonne: On the 10th of February, between four and five in the morning, I heard an alarm of a rattle; I went towards it, and saw the two prisoners at the bar run across the road, out of Gay's-court, in Oxford-road; I was then in Stratford-place; I stopped them the corner of Davies-street; in the course of two or three seconds, Parrock snapped a pistol at me; holloa, says I, have you got fire arms; Parrock got off, and Smith tumbled down within a few yards of me; I took him by the collar, and sprung my rattle for assistance; I took him to the watch-house and searched him, and found a great quantity of lace and other articles upon him.

Q. You never lost fight of Smith? - A. No.

Q. Do you know Parrock? - A. Yes; I am sure he was the man that snapped the pistol at me; he was taken just after.

WILLIAM CRAIG sworn.

Examined by Mr. Const. I am a watchman, of Mary-le-bonne parish: I was present at the time of the alarm, on the night of the 9th of February, between four and five in the morning; I heard the alarm; I heard somebody running down Barrett's-court; I saw two men, and one of them said,"You old bugger, you shall not take me now;" but I cannot swear to the man; I ran down James street, and saw him hurl the property away from him; immediately I halloa'd out, stop thief; and I followed him up Chandless-street; I heard John Hobbs say to one of them, "if you don't stop I will cut you down, or to that effect;" he desired me to pursue after the other one; I came down James-street again into Oxford-road; I saw Hobbs

going to the watch-house with one of the prisoners; and in Davis-street I heard one of the watchmen say, "I have got the other prisoner safe enough."

JOHN PERRIN sworn.

Examined by Mr. Const. I am a patrole: I heard the alarm of a rattle, in the morning between four and five; I and my partner went to assist; my partner went before me, and passed him, and I caught him, and called to my partner that I had got him; my partner came up directly and assisted me in taking him to the watch-house.

ARTHUR ROSE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Const. I am a patrole, I was with the last witness, I assisted him in taking him to the watch-house.

Q. Which of these men was it? - A The man in the light coloured coat(Parrock,) I was present when he was searched; the beadle and the constable were at the watch-house at the time.

JOHN ELLICK sworn.

Examined by Mr. Const. I took Parrock to the watch-house and searched him, I found some coppers upon him, and in his right hand pocket some phosphorus, in his breeches pocket 10s. in silver, and his coat pockets were loaded with lace, and then I took a silver watch out of his pocket, and foar silver trinkets.

JOHN PIDDINGTON sworn.

Examined by Mr. Const. I am a constable and watch-house keeper, (produces the lace,) when I was called down stairs, these things were in a handkerchief, these trinkets and this watch were taken from Parrock at our watch-house, which is St. George's watch-house, by Ellick.

(To Aries Nourse ). Look at these things. - A. This is my watch which was taken by them at that time; this lace was also taken.

(To Joseph Nourse). Look at these things. - A. These trinkets are my property.(Hobbs produces the property be took from Smith, a quantity of lace).

(To Aries Nourse). Look at that. - A. This is Mr. Nourse's property.

Joseph Nourse. These are my trinkets also.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Aries Nourse ). Q. Is there any particular mark about that lace, by which you can speak to it? - A. Yes.

Mr. Const. What is the value of those things, I believe it is only a small part of what was taken? - A. Only a small part; this I take to be worth about 20l.

MARY JOHNSON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Nourse: On the 9th of February, when I went to bed the house was fast; the next morning the bolt was wrenched off the front window in the parlour.

Q. Was there any other violence that you recollect? - A. No, the window shutter was broke.

Court. Q. Did you find the window open in the morning? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Could they get into the house by the window? - A. Yes; that window goes into the garden.

Court. Q. How did they get to the window, by a ladder, or how? - A. There is only two little stone steps.

Q. So that a man might easily get into it from the ground? - A. No, not without steps.

Court. Q. Were there steps there? - A. Yes; two stone steps.

Court. Q. Did it appear to you that they came in that way? - A. Yes.

Court. Q. Was there any mark of feet upon the steps? - A. Yes.

Smith's defence. My counsel is in possession of the particulars, I have nothing to say further.

Parrock's defence. I leave it to my counsel.

(For the prisoner, Parrock).

WILLIAM ROLFE sworn.

I am a coal-merchant, in Little St. Andrew's-street, Seven-dials; I have known Parrock about three years; I have not heard much of his character, the dealings between him and me were honest and just.

JOHN PLATT sworn.

I am a publican in Little St. Andrew's-street; I have known Parrock two years; I never heard any thing amiss of him; I have dealt with him about two years, he always behaved very honest and just.

WILLIAM TURNER sworn.

I am a butcher in Newport-market; I have known Parrock about fifteen years.

Q. What is his general character? - A. I never heard any thing to his diseredit in my life.

JOHN CULLINGTON sworn.

I am a publican in Mercer-street, Long-acre; I have known him two years and a half; I have always heard a very honest and just character of him.

ROBERT WYNNE sworn.

I am a publican; I have known him about fifteen years; I live the corner of George-street, Tottenham-court-road, his character is that of an honest, fair dealing man.

Smith. I will not trouble the Court with any body to my character.

Smith, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 30.)

Parrock, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 27.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-28

254. SAMUEL READ and JOHN RYMES were indicted, for that they, on the 4th of March ,

a piece of base coin, resembling the current coin of this kingdom, called a sixpence, falsely, deceitfully, feloniously and traiterously did colour with materials, producing the colour of silver .

Second Count. For that they on the same day, a round blank of base metal of a fit size and figure, to be coined into counterfeit milled money, resembling the current coin of this realm, called a sixpence, salfely deceitfully, feloniously, and traiterously did colour with materials, producing the form and figure of a sixpence, against the form of the statute, &c.(The case was opened by Mr. Cullen).

SAMUEL HARPER sworn.

Examined by Mr. Cullen. I am an officer belonging to the Public-office in Worship-street: On the 4th of March last, I went to Blue-anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane, we had had an information of coining going on, we went to search the house, and a little girl ran out into another house, where these two people were found, two doors from the other house; I followed her, she knocked at the door, and somebody opened that door; when I went into the house, the prisoner Read was sitting close by a table, and Rymes by the fire-side; Read was rubbing something close by that table where this board was,(producing a long deal board,) as soon as I went in, he got up from his seat, and went near to the middle of the room, there was a bed in the room, with both his hands behind him; I then called Ray in, and asked the prisoner Read, what he had in his hands; I took his hands from behind him, and the ends of his fingers and thumbs were white with the scowering-paper, I should suppose, or whatever he had been at, and the other part was very black; Ray searched the room, and I searched the prisoner; I saw Ray find some sixpences upon the table, close to where this man was sitting down; several pieces of sandy paper, and some cork, and a file, with the file dust in the teeth of the file; I saw all these things found, and I took care of the prisoners.

Q. Did you compare that file dust upon the file, with the counterfeit money? - A. Yes; and it exactly corresponded, and so it was upon the board; I did not find any thing else; I searched Read, and Rymes was all this time sitting at the fire; I knew him before, and I said, you shall go to the Magistrate too, says he, Mr. Harper, you won't take me, I am doing nothing; it matters none, says I. what you are doing, you are both in one room, he cannot work without your seeing him; and I hand-cussed both together; Ray found the other things in the mean time; there is a Mr. Sheen now in Court, that has many houses upon the spot, that I called in to my assistance.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson: Read's counsel.

Q. The door was opened immediately upon being knocked at? - A. Yes.

Q. It is a house of lodgers, you know? - At Upon my oath it is not to my knowledge, there was a bed in that room.

Q. Did you find the room door open or shut? - A. It was opened to the girl; the street door opens into the room, there is no other door, I slipped in behind the girl.

Q. In all your experience, who have taken as many coiners, as most men, did you ever see a person at work with the door in that situation.

Court. You cannot ask such a question, it is stuff.

Witness. The street door opened directly into the room, and one window was stopped up, and the other had a cloth before it.

Prisoner Read. There was no such thing.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Do you know what he was? - A. He said he was a carpenter and joiner.

Prisoner. A cabinet-maker? - A. Yes; a cabinet-maker.

Q. What sort of paper was it that you found? - A. Scowering-paper.

Q. Don't you know that that paper is used by cabinet-makers? - A. I don't know it.

Q. Was he cleaning a knife? - A. No.

Q. Did you take a knife out of his hand? - A. No; I did out of his pocket.

Q. Was there a child in the room? - A. A little girl, by Rymes, by the fire-side.

Q. Those pieces you spoke of were upon the table? - A. Yes.

Q. You found none upon the floor? - A. There were some in a bason upon the top shelf, so that nobody could see what was in that bason without getting up upon the dresser, as Ray did to get at them.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Rymes' counsel.

Q. You say Rymes was at some distance from the table at the fire? - A. Yes.

Q. Had he his hat on? - A. Yes.

Q. He had not any working dress on? - A. No.

Q. Are you in the habit of looking at coiners' hands.

Court. I don't know, Mr. Gurney, that you can make it betten for Rymes by your examination.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I belong to the same office; I went with the last witness and found the two prisoners and searched the house; upon a table there laid these sixpences (producing them,) that had been just fresh field, and this file by the side of them; and in the drawer, I found some brimstone, and some cream of rather, some scowering-paper and some cork; over the fire-place, I found in different papers, parcels of sixpences,(producing them,) these two papers I found likewise,

upon the mantle-piece; I then got up upon the dresser, and in a bason I found these, (a great number of sixpences,) and I also found the blacking faucer, (producing it,) and a leathern apron stained with aqua-sortis, (producing it,) two pieces of scowering paper that lay upon the ground, that had been worked with; the prisoner(Read) said, that apron belonged to him; I found also, a pair of pliers, and some composition file dust.

(To Harper). Look at those things. - A. This blacking is what they do them with, when they are almost finished, to make them sit for circulation.

Q. From your experience of these things, are those materials such as are proper to make counterfeit money sit for circulation? - A They are.

JOHN NICOL sworn.

I am one of the moniers of the mint.

Be so good as look at that money which is in a finished state. - A. These are all bad.

Be so good as look at those found upon the table. - A. They are bad also, and unfinished.

Mr. Jackson. (To Harper.) Q. You were in search for persons of that description, in the neighbourhood? - A. Yes.

Q. Did not his wife tell you, she had lately found an apron full of things of this description? - A. No.

Q. (To Ray). You found no difficulty in getting into the room? - A. No; Harper went in before me.

Q. Was Read in a working dress? - A. Yes.

Harper. He was at work, when I went into the room, at something.

Mr. Cullen. Q. You found his hands black? - A. Yes.

Read's defence. My Lord, I am entirely innocent of the charge; I am a cabinet maker by profession; my wife went to see her brother, and picked up these things tied up in an apron; I have a little girl at home subject to pull things about the room; and they were found in that situation; I am entirely innocent of the charge; Mr. Harper has said that which is false.(Rymes was not put upon his defence.)

Read, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 39.)

Rymes, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON .

Reference Number: t17960406-29

255. RICHARD CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , four quartern loaves, value 4s. and a sixpenny loaf, value 6d. the property of Thomas Woollacot .

THOMAS WOOLLACOT sworn.

I am a baker , at Whitechaplel: My servant lost the bread in the street; I was not present.

RICHARD GRIFFIN sworn.

On the 19th of February, I was out with bread for my master; I pitched my basket the corner of George-yard ; I left it five or ten minutes; when I came back I missed four quartern loaves, and one sixpenny one; I met a young man, and he told me they were gone over to the London Apprentice, which is about an hundred yards from where my basket was; I went over, and there was the prisoner with them; I know them by the make of them, and the marks both; he said, he took them in joke.

Q. Did you know him before? - A. Yes; I knew him by sight, but I had no acquaintance with him.

Prisoner. It was a very little time before that we were drinking together.

Witness. That is about six months ago, and that is the only time I ever was in company with him in my life before; he was with an acquaintance of mine, and we had a pot of porter together.

WILLIAM WARD sworn.

I saw the prisoner run from the basket, with four quartern loaves, and a sixpenny one, over to the London Apprentice; I waited till the young man came to his basket, and I told him of it; he ran with them as hard as he could run across the street.

Q. Was he dressed like a baker at that time? - A. He had a green coat on rather sloury.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn.

I took charge of the prisoner: I asked him, if he knew any thing of the bread, and he said, yes; he took it in pastime.

Prisoner's defence. What I said then I don't know, because I was frightened; I went to the public-house, and the young man asked me about his bread; I said, I might have taken it out of a joke, but I had not taken it; the bread was in the parlour; he went, and said, it was his bread; he went away, and the next day he took me up for it.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Publickly whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-30

256. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Baird , Esq. about the hour of eight, in the night of the 18th of February , and burglariously stealing, two linen aprons, value 3s. the property of John Prestand , and a check apron, value 1s. the property of Amy Jacobs .

JOHN BAIRD, Esq. sworn.

I live in Upper Guildford-street, St. Pancras : I saw the prisoner come up the area steps, out of the kitchen, on the 18th of February, about eight o'clock; I apprehended him and took him to the

watch-house, and there was an iron crow found upon him, but no property.

MARY PRESLAND sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Baird: On the 18th of February, I went out for some tea, and left my fellow servant, William White, in care of the kitchen; I shut the kitchen door, with a spring lock, and the scullery door with a latch; when I came back, I found the scullery door open, that opens into the kitchen, and the kitchen door shut; and the area steps door was open; we suppose he came down those steps.

Q. Is there any outer door from the scullery to the area? - A. Yes; I left that shut, and found it open; when I came into the kitchen, I shut the door after me again; I then saw that man come from the laundry door, at the back part of the house; he told me, he had come of an errand; I asked him a second and a third time, what he did there; he said, what did it signify to me what errand he came on.

Q. Did you know him? - A. No; I placed myself against the kitchen door, and told him he should not go without telling what errand he came on; and he told me, I might kiss his a-e; he went up stairs, and dropped two aprons of mine; they are not worth much; they are only sit for wiping candlesticks with; they are not worth above sixpence.

Prisoner. Q. Did you see me drop them? - A. No; it was too dark; I was the last person that went down, and he the first that went up; and there was nothing upon the steps when I came down.

WILLIAM WHITE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Baird; I was called up out of the kitchen at the time, I was along with my master, I left nobody below; my master called me up about a quarter of an hour after Mary Presland went out.

Prisoner's defence. I am a plaisterer ; I had been to put up a marble chimney-piece just by Queen-square, and when I had finished work, they gave me some of their strong ale; and being in a close room, and coming into the air, I was very much intoxicated; I endeavoured to lay hold of the top of the rails to keep my self up, and I suppose, the gate being open, I fell to the ground.

GUILTY of stealing goods to the value of 1s. but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .(Aged 55.)

Publickly whipped and imprisoned six months .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON .

Reference Number: t17960406-31

257. MATTHEW WYAT , and CHARLES SCAIFE were indicted for that they, on the 3d of March , on the King's highway, in and upon William Day , did make an assault, putting him in fear and danger of his life, and feloniously taking from his person 3s. his property .

WILLIAM DAY sworn.

I am a brewer's servant : On the 3d of last month, about a quarter before eight in the evening, I was stopped between Kensington and Bayswater , I was on foot, alone; two soldiers met me, and said, stand and deliver your money; I then told them I had not any, being a poor working man; but they said, they would have it; the tallest man held my arms, and the other picked my pocket of three shillings, and then they passed along, and threatened to shoot at me; one of them had got something in his hand, but I could not discern what it was; they stopped with me four or five minutes; the tallest of them(Wyat) is, I am sure, the man that held me, I can't swear to the other; this was on Thursday night; they were taken about the same place where they stopped me, on the Tuesday night following; I saw them the next day, at Bow-street.

Q. Should you have known them had you seen them any where else? - A. Yes; one of them I should have known; they were dressed the same as when they stopped me.

CHRISTOPHER CLEVELAND sworn.

I am one of the patroles belonging to Bow-street, and on the Uxbridge-road: On Tuesday the 8th of March, as I was going on my beat, a little on this side of Kensington Gravel-pits, I met the two prisoners; and hearing of a robbery committed upon that spot on the Thursday before, I had got so plain a description of the men, that I immediately took them into custody; I searched them; but did not find any thing upon them but a penny or threehalf-pence; they had no arms On the Thursday night, when the robbery was committed; I was coming by the end of Oxford-street, I saw these very men, whether they had watched me to see which road I took, I don't know, but I took the Harrow-road that night.

JOHN BAKER sworn.

I am a patrole; I know no more than my partner has said.

Wyat's defence. My partner asked me to go with him after a recruit, it was past eight o'clock; we did not know the way to Fulham-green; we had just past the patrole, and as we were coming back, the patrole stopped us.(Scaife was not put upon his defence).

Wyat, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 19.)

Scaife, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-32

258. FRANCES HUGHES , and ELIZA-BETH DOWNES , were indicted for that they,

on the 1st of March , in the dwelling-house of the said Frances, in and upon Ann, the wife of John Bagley , did make an assault, putting her in fear and danger of her life, and taking from her person, a cloth cloak, value 5s. a stuff petticoat, value 3s. a black silk bonnet, value 4s. a yard of blue ribbon, value 4d. a muslin handkerchief, value 18d. a linen pocket-handkerchief, value 12d. and sixpence in money , the property of John Bagley .

ANN BAGLEY sworn.

I am the wife of John Bagley ; six weeks ago yesterday, I was robbed in Lewkner's-lane , in the dwelling-house of the prisoner Hughes; I went to a public-house for a pennyworth of beer, where she was, and she followed me out, and introduced some conversation, I never saw her before; she asked me how far I was going, I told her I was going towards Clare-market; when I came into Drury-lane, she said, her lodgings were near there; I told her I had occasion to stop a few minutes; she said, I might go into her house; she took me into the back parlour, where the other prisoner and another woman lay upon the bed; the two women immediately got up, and asked me for money, which I refused to give them; I was very much alarmed, and then gave them one shilling, through fear, for they swore they would have money; they did not return me any change from the shilling, but asked me for more, that I refused, and insisted I would not give any more; they then took from me my cloak, and my bonnet off my head, a ribbon off my head, the handkerchief off my neck, and left me without any, and pushed me aside, and took off my petticoat; then they risted my pockets, and took every thing that was in them, my pocket handkerchief, a sixpence, and some halfpence; I asked for my things again, not to go into the street in that condition, and then they d-d me, and gave me an old petticoat, that I have here, I had no handkerchief at all, and an old ribbon that Downes took off her head and gave me; and then I got out.

Q. How do you know this was Hughes's house? - A. I went yesterday to enquire; I had never seen any of them before.

Hughes's defence. She came into my apartment and seemed rather in liquor; when she came in, I was lying upon the bed; she gave me one shilling to fetch three half quarterns of gin; I returned her sixpence, and then she wanted some more; and on the same day, she gave me a cloak an bonnet; I pawned it for two shillings the corner of King-street, and then three half quarterns more were drank; she abused me, and said I had got more money on the cloak than I gave her, and I went out of the place, and never went into it any more till the next morning; I left Elizabeth Downes , and another, in the room, and was not there again till the next morning.

Q. (To Bagley.) What had you been drinking that day? - A. Only a pennyworth of porter; and I had walked from Somers-town.

Q. Did she give you the duplicate? - A. No; I had neither duplicate nor money; when I came out, I threw the gown over my shoulders, without any thing upon my neck; and a person in the neighbourhood saw me, and sent a little girl to ask me in there.

Q. Did Hughes, or any body else, give you a duplicate for any part of your things? - A. No; the constable found the duplicate upon the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you ever give her the cloak? - A. No; I did not give her any part of the things.

Downes's defence. She gave this woman at the bar the cloak to pawn; she gave one shilling for liquor, and wanted more; she was so intoxicated in liquor that she could not walk; and she gave that woman the cloak to pawn to get more liquor.

Q. How came you not to have the constable here that found the duplicates? - A. I thought he would be here; I did not see after him.

Jury. My Lord, a circumstance struck my mind very sorcibly, in the evidence: she says, that upon the shilling being extorted from her she gave her no change; it struck me that no change could have been expected.

Court. She said, they would have money of her to get drink, and did not bring any change.

Bagley. My Lord, the woman is here that I lodge with, to prove I was not in liquor.

Court. (To the prisoners.) Q. You say that this woman was in liquor; now you shall have your choice, whether she shall be examined or not, as to whether this woman was in liquor.

Hughes. She certainly was in liquor very much; I cannot pretend to say what time she got home.

Hughes, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 25.)

Downes, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 22.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-33

259. SARAH GATHERCOLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , a cloth coat, value 10s. a cotton handkerchief, value 6d. a linen handkerchief, value 16d. a pair of leather gloves, value 6d. a linen shift, value 2s. a black silk cloak, trimmed with lace, value 20s. and another black silk cloak, trimmed with thread lace, value 10s. the property of William Atkinson .(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner).

WILLIAM ATKINSON sworn.

I am a taylor : The prisoner lodged with me; I

live in Shoreditch; I had lost property several times; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; I suspected the prisoner; I went to the office in Worship-street, and they sent an officer along with me, to search her lodgings; she said, she had no objection; the officer looked in a cupboard, and took out a black silk cloak; she had denied before that having any.

Q. Did any body else live with her? - A. Her husband, and she has got a son; there was also found, a pair of gloves that was in the coat pocket at the time it was lost, and a duplicate: I was present when they were found, and a handkerchief, that was lost on the 1st of September, was found in her drawer.

MARIA WILLIAMS sworn.

Mr. Arkinson is my father-in-law: I know they lost two cloaks and a shift; they were in the drawer on the Friday night; one of them was mine; I was present when the prisoner's room was searched by Mr. Atkinson and the officer; the cloak that they found was mine; her husband lodged with her.

Q. Was he there occasionally or daily? - A. Daily.

WILLIAM PEACH sworn.

I am an officer of Worship-street: I attended the search of the prisoner's lodgings on Monday the 22d of February; I found a black cloak in a cubboard next the fire-place; I then searched the drawers, and found a pair of gloves and this half-handkerchief, and a duplicate in a tea-chest, which she had the key of; she produced the key to me.

Mr. Atkinson. These are my gloves; they were in the pocket of the coat when I left it.

JOSEPH REEVE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, (produces a shift); this duplicate corresponds with the one on the shift.

Miss Williams. This is my mother's; it was lost on the 3d of December, at the same time that the cloak was.

Reeve. I can't tell who the person was that brought it; it was a woman, and it is in the name of Hannet Hand.

Prisoner's defence. On Sunday night I had two acquaintances come to tea and supper; and at ten o'clock my acquaintances were going home; this cloak was on the stairs, I said, I know who it belongs to; I thought they had company, and I did not open the door, but hung it over a washing-tub, at the top of the stairs; being in a hurry, on Monday morning, I thought nothing about the cloak, and when Mr. Atkinson and the officer came it surprised me; and I did not think of the cloak, I had forgot it.(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character).

GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-34

260. ISAAC GOWLETT and WILLIAM READ were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , a ewe sheep, value 20s. the property of Henry Weatherby and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

HENRY WEATHERBY sworn.

I am a poor man; I live at Iver , about two miles from Uxbridge: I had fifteen sheep, and lost two.

Q. Had you any information from Ody, about your having lost a sheep? - A. Yes; and I went directly to Iver Moor, on the 12th of February, about three o'clock, to see whether I had lost one or not, and missed a ewe sheep.

STEPHEN ODY sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am bailiff to Squire Higginson; I live within half-a-mile of Weatherby's

Q. Do you know Gowlett? - A. Yes; I have known him about a twelvemonth: On the 12th of February, I was going from Uxbridge towards Iver; I met him at the distance of forty or fifty yards from me, with a sheep, with a small cord tied round the horns, driving and dragging it along; the sheep had a very fine turned horn, with an old riddle mark across the shoulder; I helped to shear Weatherby's sheep, and I believe I have helped to mark them; I have been at the marking however.

Q. You were well acquainted with the appearance of his sheep? - A. Yes; and to avoid me, he took over the Moor, through a lake of water, I suppose, knee deep, up to a bridge that goes over the New Cut; and that was the last I saw of him.

Q. It was a singular thing, driving sheep through water? - A. Yes.

Q. That made you observe him the more? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any doubt whose sheep it was? - A. I had a thought it was Mr. Weatherby's; but I did not see his name upon it.

Q. Is there any thing particular about the horns of Weatherby's sheep? - A. Nothing more than that it is a fine turned horn.

Q. In consequence of that, did you give any information to any body? - A. Yes; as soon as I got home, I told my master, and he sent another servant to let Mr. Weatherby know.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q. You are servant to Mr. Higginson? - A. Yes.

Q. Not to the prosecutor? - A. No.

Q. Therefore it was not likely that a man should be afraid of meeting you on the road, with a sheep not belonging to your own master? - A. No.

Q. At about forty or fifty yards distance you first saw this sheep? - A. More than that when I saw him first; but the nearest I was to him was forty or fifty yards.

Q. You had been at the shearing of these sheep; were you at the last shearing? - A. No.

Q. When they are sheared, are the marks cut out? - A. Yes.

Q. And yet you mean to swear to that mark, at the distance of forty or fifty yards? - A. I swear to the mark I saw; it is a usual mark.

Q. Many other farmers use the same mark? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear to the crooked horn of the sheep? - A. I could swear to it, if I saw it.

Q. Then you swear to the crooked horn of this sheep at that distance? - A. I took that notice, that what I saw I will swear to.

Q. Do you know Norman, the constable? - A. Yes.

Q. Have you and Norman had any conversation about this sheep? - A. Yes, to be sure; that the sheep was gone so and so.

Q. Have you not asked Norman, before he went to the Grand Jury, what he said before the Magistrate? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Upon your oath. did not you ask Norman some questions, as to the manner in which he swore to this sheep? - A. I don't think I did.

Q. Upon your oath, do you believe you did not? - A. I cannot tell that I have had any conversation in that respect.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not ask Norman what he said before the Magistrate in the country? - A. No.

Q. I will ask you again, and remind you of the language, did you not ask him by what mark he had sworn to the sheep? - A. To the best of my knowledge, I did not.

Q. Did you not ask him, what kind of description he had given him, by the prosecutor, of this sheep? - A. No.

Q. Have you not said, that unless Norman would tell you what he had swore before the Magistrate, you would not undertake again to swear to the sheep? - A. No.

Q. Was this sheep dirty or clean when you saw it? - A. Very dirty.

Q. Have you not said it was so dirty you could not tell whether it was black or white? - A. I said, it had more the appearance of a black one than a white one.

Q. And yet you will swear to the marks? - A. No; you try me too hard there; I said, it had more the appearance of a black one than a white one.

Q. Upon your oath, will you, not with standing that, venture to swear to the mark, at that distance? - A. I swear to what I see; I said, I saw an old ruddle mark upon the shoulder, and a fine turned horn.

Q. But you don't mean to swear it was the prosecutor's sheep? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. My learned friend has asked you, whether it was likely Gowlett should get out of the way; likely or not, is of no consequence; did he in fact avoid you? - A. Yes.

Mr. Ally. Q. Have you never heard of a reward for prosecuting a sheep-stealer? - A. No.

Q. You never heard it from the constable? - A. No.

Q. Did you never hear it in your life? - A. Who can tell what one has heard in one's life.

Q. Did you never hear of such a reward? - A. I simply heard something of it to-day.

Jury. Q. Do you mean to say that it was black on account of the dirt? - A. Yes; being dragged over the Moor.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Are farmers used to change their marks? - A. No; he has stuck to that mark these ten years, to my knowledge.

Q. You immediately gave an account of this to your master; that he had got Mr. Weatherby's sheep? - A. He had some sheep which I thought to be his.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Weatherby.) Q. What marks had your sheep? - A. A mark of a W on the near side; a black pitch mark, and a ruddle mark, along the neck and across the shoulder.

Q. In consequence of the information you had had from Ody, where did you go to? - A. I went to Uxbridge to make enquirles what to do; I was a poor man, and did not know.

Q. After receiving any information, where did you go to? - A. I went to Mr. Bishop's, the Magistrate.

Q. Do you know Read, the prisoner? - A. Yes; he is a little butcher, at Hillingdon end of Uxbridge town; I went to his house before I went to Mr. Bishop's; I asked him whether he had not got a sheep brought to him; I did not mention Gowlett's name; then it was about four o'clock; he said, he had not bought any such thing for a fortnight; I said to him, sir, you have had one brought to you within about these two hours, or thereabouts; and I told him, Gowlett had brought it; says he, now Mr. Weatherby, I will tell you the truth of it; I met him in Cowley fields, and I bought it of him, and gave him 16s. 6d. for it.

Q. What is the value of that sheep? - A. About a guinea; she was big with lamb; it was not fit for marketing; we kept them, at that time, to breed.

Court. Q. Then no butcher would have bought

A. I should have thought so. Then I asked him to let me see it; then he humm'd and haw'd and said, he did not know where it was.

Q. Did he shew it you? - A. No; I never saw it at last; I asked him several times, and told him, if it was not mine I would not own it; but he would not shew it me, and I left him.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q. How long was it from the time you had seen the sheep, till you understood you had lost it? - A. The Thursday night, about five o'clock, I saw them there; and I lost it on Friday, between one and two.

Q. This man told you he did buy the sheep, and had given 16s. 6d. for it? - A. Yes.

Q. He is a butcher, in Uxbridge? - A. Yes.

Q. He has lived there these forty years, and been a butcher? - A. He has lived about Uxbridge several years.

Q. And has a wife and several children? - A. I am a stranger to that.

Q. This sheep was not, to yourself, worth more than a guinea? - A. No.

Q. Therefore, since it was in such bad condition, unfit for sale, it was a fair price, if he bought it to cut up among the poor people? - A. It was, but I did not intend to sell this to the butchers.

Q. To a butcher then, for the purposes of his trade, it was not worth any thing? - A. No.

WILLIAM NORMAN sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable, at Uxbridge; I was applied to, to execute a search-warrant at Read's house, he was not at home; I searched his house, and could find nothing in the house; he came down to my house at night, I had him into a little room, and Flack, the other constable, asked him what he had done with the skin of Weatherby's sheep, of Iver? he told me he had carried it to Rislip, and sold it to Mr. Newman's man, a fellmonger, which is about six miles from Uxbridge. On Wednesday morning he came down to me, and told me. he had not told the skin; he told me, it was in a little shop he had under the market-house, he told me to go and take it; I went with him to look at it, and it resembled the marks of the skin that I had had a description of; I took the skin, and kept it till I went before the Magistrate, but they would not swear to it; it is here, I put a particular mark upon it.

Q. Was the skin wet or dry? - A. Dry.

Cross-examined by Mr. Ally. Q. The prisoner was not at home when you first went? - A. No.

Q. And he came to you at night? - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore he must have known that this sheep had been lost? - A. Yes.

Q. When you asked to see the skin of the sheep that he had, he offered to give you the keys? - A. Yes.

Q. And shewed you where it was? - A. Yes.

Q. There is nothing particular about this skin? - A. Yes, a mark across the shoulder.

Q. You went away with the skin, and left the prisoner there? - A. He was taken afterwards by a Hillingdon constable.

Q. And he staid at his own house from the time you first made enquiry, till he was taken up? - A. Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen Weatherby's sheep previous to this time? - A. Yes; but never took any particular notice of them.

Q. Therefore, whether this was the skin of Mr. Weatherby's sheep you cannot say? - A. No.

Q. Did not Ody, when you were going to the Grand Jury, ask you if you recollected what you said before the Magistrate? - A. Yes; I believe he did.

Q. Have you any doubt of that? - A. No.

Q. Then if Ody has said he did not ask you that, he has told a falsehood? - A. I told him we were bound in a twenty pound bond to prosecute.

Q. Did he not ask you what you said about the marks of the sheep, and that if you would not undertake to swear to it, he was sure he could not? - A. He did say something as to that.

Q. Are you a constable of the town? - A. Yes; and a corn-chandler.(The skin was produced in Court).

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Whether you recollect the particulars of the conversation that passed between you and Ody? - A. He asked me, up at the Grand Jury, what we were sworn before the Bench of Justices, and I told him I was bound in a twenty pound bond to prosecute.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Weatherby.) Q. Is that the skin of your sheep? - A. No, it is not.

Q. Whether you ever kill your own sheep? - A. Sometimes we do.

Q. Whether the skin of a skeep killed on the Friday would be a dry skin so early as the Wednesday following? - A. No; it would not.

THOMAS COLE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Newman, a fellmonger, at Watford; I know Read very well; I never bought a sheep-skin of him in my life.

Gowlett's defence. Here is a man here that saw me buy the sheep; I have had it nine or ten weeks, I turned it upon the Moor.

For Gowlett.

JAMES BRYANT sworn.

I am a stone-sawyer; I saw Gowlett buy the sheep that they have brought the skin of, upon Hillingdon-hill, about the middle of the hill, against the mile-stone; he gave three half-crown-pieces for it; it is about two miles and an half from Iver.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. What kind of a sheep was it? - A. A little kind of a sheep.

Q. Whom did he buy it of? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it a wether sheep? - A. I don't know.

Q. Don't you know whether it was with lamb or not? - A. No.

Q. Had it horns? - A. Yes.

Q. Where does Gowlett live? - A. In Uxbridge.

Q. How did he get this sheep home? - A. He carried it upon his shoulder.

Q. It was a clean sheep I suppose? - A. Yes; as travelling sheep be.

Q. He had no occasion to go over Iver-moor to get it home? - A. No.

Q. If he did, he must have gone out of the way? - A. Yes.

Q. Two miles, perhaps? - A. No; nor half a mile.

Q. You don't know what day this was bought? - A. No; I believe it was somewhere about November.

Read's defence. Weatherby came to my house, and asked it I had not bought a sheep of Gowlett; yes, says I; I happened to light of this man; says he, I have bought a little sheep on the Moor, I will sell it to you; I told him he asked too much for it, I could not get any thing by it; however, he brought it down to the market-house, and I killed it; when Weatherby came, I told him I had; he went down and looked at it, and had two pints of beer with me, and he took a horse, and away he went.(The prisoner Read called Edward Spicer , who had known him twenty-seven years; and George Cribb , who had known him ever since be could remember, who deposed, that he has a wife and seven children, and gave him a good character).

Gowlett, GUILTY . Death . (Aged 20.)

Read, GUILTY . (Aged 54.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-35

261. JANE CHURN was indicted for the wilful murder of James Scofield , on the 23d of February .

She was likewise charged with the like murder upon the Coroner's Inquisition.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp).

MARGARET MATCHEM sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knapp. I know the prisoner at the bar, and I have known the man she lived with, that is dead, since Michaelmas; I was at her house about eight o'clock in the evening, on the 23d of February; there was Jane Churn , and another good woman standing talking together, in the house.

Q. How soon did the unfortunate man, that was killed, come in? - A. I went home and came back again, and then I saw the man who is dead; this other good woman. and her husband, went away; I took my loaf off the table, and wished them a good night; and he said, are you a going already, Peg? and I said, yes, Jem; with that, he said, Peg, I have got a job or two for you to do; with that, I turned back again to do the job.

Q. What job did you understand was to be done? - A. He did not tell me what; and he asked Jane Churn whether she had got any thread? but she gave no answer; and then he called her a bloody bitch, and struck her two or three times about the head; she rebelled off the chair, and then they both of them fell a fighting; and they fought for about a quarter of an hour, and he got her down, with his two knees upon her; and I cried out for mercy on both sides, because I thought there would be murder; they parted from fighting, about a moment, and then she went to the table, and took up a fork, and run it into his side; I cannot recollect which side it was.

Q. Did she say any thing at that time? - A. No.

Q. Did the deceased say any thing? - A. He said, Oh Peg, I shall die, and went down stairs; I took the candle and went down stairs after him; I left her in the room, and by that time he was dropped.

Q. Did the prisoner come down afterwards? - A. Yes; she came down with a poker in her hand, and hit him sortly over the back.

Q. How soon did this poor man die? - A. He was dead by the time I had got to the bottom of the stairs.

Q. What became of the prisoner? - A She sat down by him, and made a sad morning, when she saw what she had done; she said, O dear, what have I done, I have killed my poor Jemmy! she went into her room, and the constable soon afterwards took her.

Mr. Knapp. I shall now call the surgeon.

Court. There can be no occasion; there is no doubt that the deceased died of that wound.

GUILTY of Mansiaughter .

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-36

262. JOHN MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , twenty-six table-spoons, value 12l. a silver waiter, value 40s. eighteen silver desert spoons, value 40s. twelve silver tea spoons, value 20s. a silver soup ladle, value 25s. two silver skewers, value 15s. a silver marrow spoon, value 5s. and twelve silver table forks, value 5l. the property of Wyndham Knatchbull , in his dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WYNDHAM KNATCHBULL sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knapp. I live in Russel-place , at the end of Charlotte-street; I had a servant of the name of Geary in my service; he came to me some time in January 1795, and remained with me till the 27th of March last; on that day he absconded; I had given him warning the Friday preceding to go on the Monday following; he escaped in the night of Sunday the 26th; in consequence of an information, I missed a great quantity of plate; Geary had been my butler; I went down to the butler's pantry, where I missed a quantity of plate; a servant of mine brought me up a letter, which, upon opening, I discovered to be a parcel of duplicates; (producing them,) in consequence of finding these duplicates, I went to the pawn-brokers and found all the articles; I can swear to every article, they are in the hands of the pawn-brokers; I don't know any thing of the prisoner, I don't remember ever to have seen him in my house.

JOHN WHEELER sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am footman to Mr. Knatchbull: When Geary the butler went away, the cook went into the pantry and took a letter out of the press, and gave it to me, I took it to my master.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes, very well; he used to visit Geary at my master's house, he was mostly in the pantry with him.

Q. Where the plate was kept? - A. Yes.

RICHARD CHAMBERS sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Knatchbull; I know Geary, he left our house on Sunday, and on the Tuesday morning after, the prisoner came to Mr. Knatchbull's; I saw him at the door when I went into breakfast.

Q. In consequence of directions from your master, you went to a public-house with him? - A. Yes.

Q. And there you staid drinking till the constable came? - A. Yes, and he took him into custody; he was searched, but not in my prefence.

EDWARD SWALE sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Turner, pawn-broker, in Panton-street, Hay-market, (produces four table spoons, five forks, three desert spoons, a soup ladle, two skewers, a marrow spoon, one spoon and a sork, ten table spoons, five table spoons and three sorks, three spoons and three sorks:) they were all pledged by the prisoner in his own name.

Q. Have you any doubt at all about the person who pawned these? - A. I am certain the prisoner was the person who pledged the whole of these articles, he has been known at our house six or seven years.

Court. Q. Were any articles redeemed by him? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were you not a good deal startled at a man bringing so much plate? - A. He lived with a gentleman in Lisle-street, from whom we knew he brought pledges, and he always said he brought it from that same gentleman.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar by any other name than Murray? - A. No other.

FRANCIS ROCHFORT sworn.

I am a pawn-broker in Jermyn-street, St. James's; (produces a silver waiter, and fourteen desert spoons); they were pawned the 1st of September, 1795, in the name of Robert Geary , by John Murray , the prisoner at the bar, he has been known at our house six or seven years.

Q. In short, you have no doubt of his person? - A. None; I am sure it was pawned by him, and on the 14th of November, four table spoons, by John Murray, for Robert Geary .

Mr. Knatchbull. I have not the least doubt in the world of these being my property, they have my crest; I never missed them, we were a great deal out of town, and always keep a certain quantity of plate out for constant use.

Q. You trusted to Greary, your butler? - A. Yes. Prisoner's defence. I received these things from Geary, he told me Mr. Knatchbull wanted money, and as he knew I was in the habit of pawning plate for a gentleman that I lived with, he asked me to pawn it; he thought if he went himself to the pawn-brokers, he should be stopped; I never brought a bit of plate out of Mr. Knatchbull's house, they were all brought to my lodging by Geary; I did not suppose I should be brought into trouble for this, I did it very honestly.

Court. (To Swale). Q. Were any of the articles he brought to your house redeemed? - A. I believe they have been.

Q. Redeemed by him or the gentleman? - A. By him; I have delivered him pledges.

Court. (To Mr. Knatchbull). Q. What may be the value of these things? - A. The value attached to them is 32l. they are worth, I suppose, 45l.

Court. (To Rochfort.) Q. There is a silver waiter and fourteen spoons pawned together, what is the value of them? - A. The waiter, I suppose, is worth about three pounds, and the fourteen spoons are worth about 3l. 10s.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-37

263. ANN COTTRELL was indicted for that she, on the 20th of February , in a certain public highway, called Leicester-fields , upon Mary the wife of John Parker , feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did make an assault, with intent, the garments of the said John Parker, which she the said

Mary, then and there wore, to deface, spoil, and burn, and that she, at the same time and place, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously, did deface,spoil and burn, one printed linen gown, value 20s. a muslin petticoat, value 11s. a stuff petticoat, value 8s. and a black silk cloak, value 5s. being part and parcel of the garments and clothes of the said John, which she, the said Mary, on her person, did, then and there, wear, to the great damage of the said John Parker , and against the form of the statute .

MARY PARKER sworn.

On Saturday the 20th of February, I went to Covent-garden, and came back again about a quarter before seven o'clock; as I came through Leicester-fields, the prisoner followed behind me, I had a muff in my hand; I took my hand out of my muff, and felt something come upon this hand, like scalding water; I turned round, and saw the prisoner go from me, and look into a pastry-cook's shop; she was close to me when I turned round, and there was nobody else near, except the two patroles, who were standing at the corner of the street, besides a little girl, who is in Court; I did not take any further notice, but my muslin petticoat dropped under my feet, by that time I had got to the top of the Hay-market.

Q. Had you said any thing to her? - A. No.(produces her cloaths.)

Q. Were these things whole before you saw her that evening? - A. Yes; there is a person in Court that saw me put them on; my hand was very red, but it was not blistered; she had insulted me on the Thursday before; as I was coming across Leicester-fields, at the corner of Bear-street, she was standing there, and a very ill-looking man along with her; she called to me, mistress, I want to speak to you, says she, how do you find money? I said, like all the world, sometimes I have some, and sometimes I have none; she asked me if I had any now, I said, no; she asked me to go with her to the wine vaults, in Castle-street; I told her I had rather not; she insisted upon my going with her, and as she was going along, she made a kind of a jump, as if she was about to jump upon his back; she put a pin into his shoulder, and then he turned round and drew a knife upon her; she went to the wine vaults and had some rum, she pulled out a shilling and asked me to toss up for it; I had a glass of carraway and paid for it myself; I had seen the woman before, and spoke to her once or twice.

Q. What is your business? - A. I wash and iron, and go to gentlemen's houses sometimes, and she insulted me with that on the Thursday; I met her about a quarter of an hour after; I left her at the wine vaults, and she followed me to my lodgings, and told my landlady I was nothing but a common woman of the town; she said, if she ever catched me going that way again to pick up gentlemen, she would give me a glass of aqua-fortis to drink, and there was a woman with her, but she has gone away, and would not appear.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurny. Q. You are the wife of John Parker? - A. Yes.

Q. Pray what is your husband's business? - A. A smith.

Q. Where do you live? - A. At Mary-le-bonne; we have been parted between two and three years.

Q. And you have got your living, since that time, by washing and charing? - A. Yes; my father allows me twelve shillings a week; and I keep my child.

Q. You had a muff and a muslin petticoat, and had been to Covent-garden and back again; upon your oath, have you no other way of employment than charing? - A. No other way.

Q. You were very much offended therefore with the prisoner, for charging you with walking the streets; your virtue was offended with such a charge? - A. Yes.

Q. You were particularly angry at this, because there was not a word of truth in it? - A. She had no right to charge me with it.

Q. Was it true or false? - A. It is true she insulted me with walking the streets.

Q. But is it true or not you did walk the streets.

Court. You must not ask that.

Q. A woman of character, however, of course, would be angry at being charged with it? - A. I did not mind any thing she said about it.

Q. Will you repeat that you were not at all angry at her charging you with walking the streets? - A. I was not at all.

Q. Did you speak to any body upon the spot upon the subject? - A. I did not.

Q. Did you, upon your oath, or did you not, speak to any body upon the spot, relative to this transaction? - A. I said, there was something the matter with my hand.

Q. Did you speak to a watchman upon the subject? - A. After it was done, I did; when I came from there to go to Bow-street.

Q. Did you call out to any watchman to take her up at the time? - A. I did not know she had damaged my cloaths.

Q. But in point of fact, you did not call a watchman? - A. No.

Q. Did you or did you not state to the watchman, that the prisoner was at that moment on the spot? - A. I said, this woman had insulted me the Thursday before, and insisted upon his taking her to the watch-house; and he said, he was particularly acquainted with her.

Q. I ask, whether, when you spoke to that

watchman, you did or not state to him that the prisoner was upon the spot, and desired him to take her into custody? - A. Not that very night.

Q. Did you not call out to the watchman as if the transaction had taken place but a moment before, and desired him to take the prisoner into custody? - A. I did not.

Q. How soon did you go to a Magistrate? - A. That very instant.

Q. Did you go to the Magistrate before you spoke to the watchman or after? - A. I cannot tell exactly.

Q. It is impossible you should have forgot? - A. I did before I went to the watchman.

Q. Did Justice Addington grant you a warrant directly? - A. No; the clerk of the office gave orders to two constables to go after her; one of them said, he had known her a long while; and I got no warrant till Monday morning.

Q. Do you recollect the conversation you had with the watchman, when you saw him? - A. Yes; I told him, he was a very odd sort of a man, not to take her when she was abusing me.

Q. You did not tell the watchman you could not swear that the prisoner threw this upon your gown? - A. I cannot swear to it now.

Q. Did you not tell him you could not get a warrant, because you could not swear positively to her? - A. I did say that.

Prisoner's defence. I am entirely innocent; I would be much obliged to my counsel to ask where she saw me last, and drank with me last.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You felt no particular inconvenience from this? - A. It did not hurt my hand a great deal, my eyes were very much damaged; I had wiped my face with my petticoat.

Q. The skin never came off your hand at all? - A. No.(For the prisoner.)

ANDREW CLUSE sworn.

I am early watchman of St. Ann's parish, in Leicester-fields: On the 20th of February, I saw the prosecutrix.

Q. Do you recollect whether it was before or after the prisoner was taken up? - A. It was as I began to call seven, or half past seven, I am not sure which; she desired me to take the prisoner; I told her, she had better go and get a warrant; and she said, you shall take up your acquaintance immediately; I said, I did not see her.

Q. What did she say the prisoner had done to her? - A. Burnt her cloak.

Q. What else? - A. After that, I told her, she had better go to the Justices; in about an hour I saw her again; she said, she had been to the Justice's, and he could do nothing in it, without she could swear that it was the prisoner that did it.

Q. In what way of life is that woman? - A. I really don't know.

Q. Do you frequently see her? - A. I have seen her at different times; I don't know her way of life.(For the prosecution).

ANN WILLIAMS sworn.

I was coming along Bear-street, Leicester-fields, I met Mrs. Parker; I saw the prisoner speak to Mrs. Parker; and Mrs. Parker turned round again, but did not hear her say any thing at all; it was at the pastry-cook's shop; and then she went to the corner and spoke to the patrole.

Q. Was it to the last witness that was here just now, that she spoke? - A. Yes; to the patrole.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You heard Mrs. Cotterel speak to Mrs. Parker? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her do any thing but speak to Mrs. Parker? - A. No; I was walking with Mrs. Cotterel; I met her in Bear-street; and I met Mrs. Parker; I walked with her to the corner, and then she spoke to the watchman.

Q. Did you see her do any thing to Mrs Parker? - A. No.

Q. If she had done any thing you must have seen it? - A. I did not see her do any thing to her or any body else.(The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-38

264. MARY BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a man's cloth coat, value 20s. a mersella waistcoat, value 10s. a man's hat, value 10s. a pair of men's French boots, value 5s. a neck handkerchief, value 6d. two iron keys, value 4d. a base metal seal, value 1d. a pen-knife, value 2d. and a pair of men's leather gloves, value 3d. the property of Robert Aitken , in the dwelling-house of the said Mary Bailey .

ROBERT AITKEN sworn.

I live in Clement's Inn, with Mr. Sharman: On the 16th of March, I went with Mary Bailey to her lodgings, and she asked me to stay all night; I did, and in the morning she went away with my cloaths.

Q. You slept with her? - A. Yes; I awoke a little after six, and the prisoner was gone.

Q. Were you in liquor the night before? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever get any of your things again? - A. The pawnbroker has them.

JOSEPH FELLOWS sworn.

I took these things in of a woman; I can't tell who it was.

Q. Was it the prisoner? - A. I cannot swear to to the person.

Q. What time did you take them in? - A. On the 16th of March; she said they were her husband's; she was quite in a different dress to what she is now.

THOMAS MARSHALL sworn.

I was constable of the night, in St. Giles's watch-house; the prisoner was brought by the prosecutor and watchman; he charged her with robbing him of his cloaths a night or two before; she said, the gentleman promised if she delivered the cloaths back, he would not hurt her; she delivered me a pocket-book, containing a duplicate of the waistcoat and breeches and a handkerchief.

Q. What day was this? - A. The 16th of March.

Q. (To the pawn-broker.) Look at that duplicate, Do you know it? - A. Yes; it is my writing.

VALENTINE LUMNEY sworn.

The prisoner told me she had sold two keys at an old iron shop, and told me where; I went and found it, it was delivered to Gregory, who keeps the shop, by order of the Magistrate.

ROBERT GREGORY sworn.

I am owner of the shop; I bought this key,(producing it,) of the prisoner, on the 17th of March.

Aitkin. This is the key of Mr. Sharman's chambers, which was in my pocket, and these are my cloaths.

Prisoner's defence. He came into my room, and said, he had been robbed of a guinea and a half by another woman; he asked me to let him stay all night, and he would let me pawn his things; he gave me one half-guinea, and said, it would be no object in the morning.

GUILTY of stealing goods to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-39

265. ISAAC BACKROW and LYON BACK-ROW were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , a straw basket, value 1d. 100 oranges, value 6s. two silver watches, value 3l. 10s. another base-metal watch, value 1l. 7s. six pair of iron shoe-buckles, plated with silver, value 7s. thirty-six pair of base-metal sleeve buttons, gilt with gold, value 1s. 6d. a linen handkerchief, value 1s. and ten ounces of rheubarb, value 4s. the property of Benjamin Davis .(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoners).(The case was opened by Mr. Jackson).

BENJAMIN DAVIS sworn.

I sell oranges and lemons, and slops ; I keep a stall in the garrison at Sheerness: On the 28th of February, I wrapped up in some brown paper, six pair of buckles, they call them plated, but they are not; two silver watches, and one metal watch; six cards of sleeve-buttons, six pair in every card; about ten ounces of rheubard, and some oranges in a basket; I put them up in a white handkerchief, in three papers; I put some straw over them, and the oranges at top; I packed the basket with a large packing-needle and packthread; when I was packing the basket up, a young man was eating some breakfast; I asked if he would earn 6d. he said, yes; I told him to carry it to the Gravesend-boat; he did, I went with him, it was the King George, lying at Billingsgate; I went there and left it between decks in the care of the mate; I think his name is Edwards, and I went home between three and four in the evening to get some victuals to put in my pocket, as I lived a great way off; I was going to Sheerness; when I came back, the boat had been gone about five minutes; I saw a boat coming along, and I got in, and overtook the Gravesend-boat; when I came along side the boat, I was told the property was gone; I desired the waterman to row me back as fast as he could, and when I came on shore, I was told Backrow had it; I went about, and enquired for Backrow; a young man said, he could shew me where he lived, and I went with him to Isaac Backrow's; I saw my basket there, and said it was my property, it had been opened; he said, it had not; I said it was, and insisted on seeing my property; he said, you shall not look, go along; I asked him again, twice, then he said, you shall look, and then I opened a basket, and said, I have been robbed; Isaac Backrow was there, and his wife and another man; his wife said, do not make a noise, if they had done any damage, they should make it good; with that I ran down stairs, and said, I had been robbed; when I came up stairs, the basket was closed, but the packthread was knotted; I had left no knots, and by that means I knew it had been cut open, the oranges, and all the property was then in it.

Q. Have you seen any part of that property since? - A. The oranges, but no other part; I am positive it was the same basket; I had made my own mark upon it, before I put it into the boat.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Keep up your voice, and speak as loud as when you cry had shillings? - A. Yes.

Q. You know what I mean by crying bad shillings? - A. I have heard many one call bad shillings, and many hundred ounces of bad shillings I have bought.

Q. You have dealt in bad shillings? - A. Never since I have been at Sheerness.

Q. How long ago is it since you were taken up

before Mr. Justice Kayo? - A. I was taken up for plated stuff.

Q. Upon your oath, were not your brothers taken up with you? - A. Yes; we were discharged directly, all of us.

Q. Were you not taken up on suspicion of being a smasher? - A. I do not know the meaning of the word.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you go about with a bag, and cry "any bad shillings"? - A. No.

Q. Though you are acquainted with this line of business, you do not know what I mean by the word smasher? - A. I do not know.

Q. You would be surprized, if I were to tell you a smasher means a putter off of bad money? - A. I never heard of it before now; I do not take notice of these things.

Q. You did not know Backrow before that time? - A. I might have seen him; but I did not know him till that time; when in town, I lodge at my brother's, which is not a quarter of an hour's walk from Backrow's.

Q. Don't you know he is a city constable? - A. No.

Q. How long have you lived at Sheerness? - A. Nine months; at Gravesend and Sheerness.

Q. How long ago since you were taken before Justice Kayo? - A. Eight or nine months.

Q. I take it for granted, that you were never taken up before? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Shephard, a constable, at Greenhithe? - A. No.

Q. Since the two Backrows have been in prison, were you not at Greenhithe? - A. No.

Q. Will you swear that? - A. Yes; I will be upon my oath.

Q. Do you recollect being turned out of that place by any body? - A. Never.

Q. Did you send this basket by a boy? - A. Yes; I went with him; I knew nothing of him, till he was eating his dinner; he saw me pack up the basket; and knew the contents; there was no direction upon it at all; I always go down with my own goods.

Q. Is Isaac Marks here? - A. Yes.

Q. Is he a witness for you? - A. He is a witness to speak truth on both sides.

Q. Did he appear before the Grand Jury? - A. No; Isaac Harris went with me.

Q. Did you make enquiry for him to give evidence? - A. No, never.

Q. And is not this the reason that he gave information, that you were carrying down bad silver to Sheerness? - A. He told my Lord Mayor so.

Q. Did you not take all the other persons that were bound over, but Isaac Marks , before the Grand Jury? - A. I did not take them, they came of their own accord.

ISAAC MARKS sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jackson. On Sunday evening I laid an information against Isaac Backrow, and one against the prosecutor; I went down between three and four o'clock, to see what time the tide served; I met the prosecutor, he wanted to know if Ben Solomon was gone down; I said, he went the Sunday before; he said, he wanted to know, for he had to take three pieces of bad halfpence down, (a piece means 30s.); and six dozen of bad shillings; and Solomon had threatened to lay an information against him; Isaac Backrow stood at the Platform till it was quite dusk, and the property came; I gave information to Isaac Backrow ; the other Backrow came down with him; Mr. Backrow staid till about a quarter before seven; and Isaac Harris went on board, and fetched the basket on shore; I was on board, and went to Gravesend; I don't know where it was carried to.

Q. What was Backrow waiting for? - A. Till Davis returned; he asked, two or three times, on board, who was the owner of the property; Harris saw Davis take it on board.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Davis.) Q. About what time did you go with the parcel, to the boat? - A. Between four and five; Barnard Elias was with me.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not stay behind for fear of being apprehended by Backrow, for having bad money? - A. I was not; I was never guilty of the fact; I was talking to a man in Darkhouse-lane, and waited to hear the high-water bell ring; and did not know that it was not rung on a Sunday.

Q. Upon your oath, did you see Isaac Marks that day? - A. I saw him when the boat was gone, and he told me, the Backrows had taken the basket out of the boat.

Q. Upon your oath, had you not seen him that day, before he gave you that information? - A. No.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Ben Solomon ? - A. I know many Ben Solomons.

Q. Did you ever hold any conversation with Marks about Ben Solomon? - A. Never in my life.

Q. Who went with you to shew you Backrow's house? - A. Wolse Marks; I asked him to go with me to find the bill; he said, he could have two guineas to keep out of the way; and unless I would give him two guineas, he would not come.

Q. Do you know that he goes by the name of Wolse Davis? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not say, when Backrows charged you with having bad money, that there was nothing but oranges in the parcel? - A. I never was charged with it in all my life.

Q. You never said to any body, that that basket contained nothing but oranges? - A. I did not.

Q. How long had you these watches in your possession? - A. It might be seven or eight days; they cost me 4l. 7s. 6d.; I bought them of Norton,(produces a receipt for them).

Q. How long had Norton been out of jail? - A. I don't ask people, when I buy watches of them, how long they have been out of jail.

Q. How long had you heard he had been out of jail? - A. I never heard that he had been in jail in all my life; he is my brother-in-law.

BARNARD ELIAS sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jackson. I travel the country with glasses: I was with Davis, at a cook's shop, saw him pack up a basket; he put in two silver watches, and one metal one; several cards of sleeve buttons, several pair of buckles, and some rheubarb; he wrapped them in brown paper, and put them into a white handkerchief, and then into the basket, with some straw; and some oranges were over them; and packed them with a packing needle; he gave me 6d. to carry it to the Gravesend boat, which I did, and put it on the seat myself.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Was the basket light oa heavy? - A. Not very light, nor very heavy.

Q. Did you know Davis before? - A. I had seen him before; I was sitting there at dinner.

Q. How many oranges were there? - A. I cannot say.

Q. He assisted in putting it on your head? - A. Yes; and he went with me to the boat.

Q. Was any body in the boat? - A. There were some knapsacks; I don't know whether there were any soldiers or not; there were two watermen on the deck.

Q. Where do you live? - A. In Black Horse-yard, Houndsditch.

Q. You have, perhaps, travelled in the country of Surrey? - A. Yes; crying about bad shillings; I cut them all; and I was laid hold of; that is a twelvemonth ago; the Justice sent me down as a vagrant; I found it a bad business when I was in the House of Correction.

Q. So you reformed in the House of Correction; that is the place for reformation, and you determined to be a good lad for the future? - A. Yes.

Q. It was in the House of Correction you took this sit? - A. Yes; I was very happy that I was taken there; I used to sell them all to Mr. Cox, in Little Britain; I had them all cut, I had, upon my foul.

JANE DAVIS sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jackson. I was at the house of Isaac Backrow, on the 28th of February; I saw Isaac Backrow there, and three other persons, with a basket of oranges open.

Q. Did any thing pass about packing it up again? - A. No further than I heard them send for a big needle; and then I went away; I went to him for a warrant.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You are sister to the prosecutor? - A. Sister-in-law; I keep an eating-house.

Q. You and your brother, and all of you, knew where Backrow lived? - A. I know him very well.

Q. He is very well known among the Jews; he is a Jew constable, is not he? - A. He is; I saw him in the morning, and told him I was going before the vestry in the evening; I was to be there before seven; and Mr. Backrow was to have come with the warrant; he did not come, and I went to his house, and there I saw this basket.

Q. How long before this had you seen your brother? - A. To the best of my knowledge it was about five o'clock when I saw him; he dined at my house, with the last witness, Barnard Elias .

Q. Did your brother eat very hearty? - A. Yes.

Q. If he has sworn that he never did dine at your house, nor that day, he has told a lie? - A. He has dined with me.

Q. Then I will tell you for your comfort, that he has sworn that he never did - Do you know your brother's business; did he cry about bad shillings? - A. I never heard of it.

Q. He made a secret of that, to you? - A. I never heard of it.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Did he take any victuals with him, for his voyage, to Sheerness? - A. He bought some roust beef of me, and a twopenny loaf, that he put in his pocket.

HANNAH MICHAEL sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am servant to the last witness: I was at Isaac Backrow's, on the 28th of February, about a warrant for my mistress, and saw a quantity of oranges upon the ground, and a white bundle in a basket; I cannot tell whether it was a white piece of cloth, or a white pocket handkerchief; but I am certain it was one or the other.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You were with your mistress at Backrow's? - A. Yes.

Q. You had not the basket in your hand? - A. No.

Q. Perhaps you saw Davis at your mistress's house, on Sunday? - A. No; I was up stairs at the time.

Q. Do you wait in the shop? - A. Very seldom; I did not that Sunday.

Q. Were you at home? - A. I suppose I was out; I was not at all in the shop that Sunday.

Q. Did you see Barnard Elias there that day? - A. I know him; but did not see him that day.

(Wolfe Marks was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated).

ISAAC HARRIS sworn.

I am a cloaths dealer: On Sunday the 28th of February, Mr. Backrow sent for me to assist him, as a brother officer, in taking a basket he had got an information against; by his orders, I brought the basket off from the boat, and brought it on shore; he desired me to take it under my arm, which I did, and I delivered it to Lyon Backrow; he took it off my arm; Lyon Backrow was with us on board the boat; they were both on board; and Lyon Backrow took it off my arm when I was tired of carrying it; I delivered it, and went about my business, to the public-house, where I lodge; and in about half an hour the prosecutor came in, and said, he had been robbed; but he did not say of what.

Jury. Q. Did you take any notice of the weight of the basket? - A. It felt very heavy; it was packed up, I don't know what was in it.

Court. There appears to have been neither a demand or refusal of this property; it may be a trespass, but I am clearly of opinion it can be no felony: it is not proved that he has applied it to his own use, and, therefore, I am of opinion, that they must be acquitted.

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-40

266. MARGARET REX was indicted for feloniously stealing, a printed cotton gown-piece, value 10s. the property of Edward Coates , March the 8th .

EDWARD COATES sworn.

I am a linen-draper , in Oxford-street : I lost a gown-piece from the outside of my shop door, on the 8th of March; the prisoner was caught by a Mr. Jackson, and brought back.

- JACKSON sworn.

On the evening of the 8th of March, I saw the prisoner unpin the cotton and walk a few yards beyond my door; she said, she had it given her by a woman; I told her, I saw her take it; she said, she had no husband, and several children; and begged I would let her go; I told her, I could not, and took her to Mr. Coates.

Prisoner's defence. I have been driven to the greatest distress; I have begged in the street for bread for my children; I was five months in place; I have no friend here, but God and the Jury.

GUILTY .

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-41

267. JEREMIAH NICHOLLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, ten silver table spoons, value 3l. six silver tea spoons, value 10s. a silver gravy spoon, value 10s. a silver sauce ladle, value 5s. a silver desert spoon, value 5s. and one cloth great coat, value 3s. the property of Thomas Parker , in his dwelling-house , March 5 .

THOMAS PARKER sworn.

I live in Northumberland-street : On the 6th of March, I returned home in the evening, about eleven, and I was told that the prisoner, who was my servant , was gone to bed, which led me to some suspicion; and I enquired if the plate was where it ought to be; Mrs. Parker immediately went down where the plate ought to have been, and I discovered that there were twenty spoons missing; some table spoons, some gravy spoons, and some tea spoons; I went up stairs to where he was in bed, and asked him where the plate was; and he told me, after some enquiry, that it was pawned; I desired the watchman to be called, and he to dress himself; and I sent him to the watch-house; he said, that his sister had pawned it.

Q. Did you make use of any threats or promises? - A. No; I did not.

Q. Was his examination taken in writing? - A. I cannot say; I went to the house in which, he said, his sister lived; and it was then past twelve o'clock; the house was knocked up, and I saw the sister; she produced some duplicates.

Cross-examined by Mr. Vaillant. Q. How long had the prisoner been with you? - A. Very near a twelvemonth.

Q. How lately before this had you looked over the plate? - A. I never looked over it myself.

Q. You cannot pretend to say but these various articles were taken at different times? - A. They might; it happened that we had had no company for three weeks; and if we had not the four spoons at the corners of the table, I made no enquiry about it.

Q. I believe a spoon is the largest article you have lost? - A. Yes.

Q. And that is not worth 40s.? - A. No.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in several articles of plate, and a coat, (producing them,)of one Sarah Nicholls .

Mr. Parker. These articles are of the description of what I lost.(The prisoner did not make any defence).

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The Rt. Hon. Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-42

268. JAMES OYENS was indicted for feloniously stealing a blue cloth coat, value 8s. the property of John Henry Upton , commonly called Lord Templetown , of the kingdom of Ireland, March 21 .

ROBERT PETERS sworn.

I live with Lord Templetown; there was a coat lost from the area of Lord Templetown's house, in Portland-place , on the 21st of March, it was carried there to be brushed; I saw the prisoner come down the steps about eleven o'clock, and did not see him go up again; I did not see the coat in the area, I gave it to my Lord's footman to brush; I can only swear to the coat.

JOHN MILLER sworn.

I live with Lord Delaware, I was behind my master's carriage; I heard the cry of "stop thief," and I leaped from the carriage, and took the prisoner the corner of Mansfield-street, he was running from towards Lord Templetown's house; he dropped the coat just before I got to him, within ten or fifteen yards; he was never out of my sight.

ALEXANDER WALKER sworn.

I am a baker; I picked up a coat on the 21st of March, as I was going along with my basket of bread; I saw the prisoner running as hard as he was able, with a coat under his arm; I caught hold of him and he dropped the coat; but having my basket upon my back, I lost the grip of him, and the last witness took him. (The coat produced in Court).

- BROWN sworn.

I am constable; I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; that is all I know of it.

Peters. This is my Lord's coat, his name is marked in it.

Prisoner's defence. As I was going across the street, I heard the cry of stop thief; and a great many people were running, and I ran too; I saw the coat lying on the ground, and I picked it up, and gave it to Mr. Walker; he let the man that had the coat run away, and then laid hold of me; I told him that was the man.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17960406-43

269. JOHN PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a pair of velveteen breeches, value 5s. a cotton waistcoat, value 3s. a pair of leather shoes, value 2s. two linen shirts, value 4s. and three pair of worsted stockings. value 1s. the property of George Moore ; a cloth coat, value 10s. a hat, value 1s. and a woollen jacket, value 4s. the property of James Burrin .

JAMES BURRIN sworn.

I lost a coat, a brewer's jacket, and a hat, from the Queen's-head, in Poultney-street , last Saturday week; I got up a little before six, and lest the prisoner in bed; my cloaths were in the room, I put the coat out to be cleaned; I went out with my dray, and when I came home the things were gone; I found them afterwards in Goodman's-fields.

GEORGE MOORE sworn.

I lost the things, mentioned in the indictment, from the Queen's-head; I left them lying in the room where I slept, the next room to Burrin; they were in the room when I went to bed, and I did not see them after; the prisoner slept in the same room that Burrin did.

WILLIAM DENNISON sworn.

I keep the Queen's-head; the soldier (the prisoner) is quartered upon me, these two men lodge with me; they informed me they were robbed, and they suspected the soldier; I found the property in possession of Mr. Dawson, an officer, on Monday the 28th of March last.

ROBERT DAWSON sworn.

(Produces the property). On Saturday, the 26th of last month, about half past seven in the morning, I saw the prisoner offering these things to sale in Rosemary-lane; I had a suspicion of him, and took him before a Magistrate.

Burrin. This jacket, coat, and hat, are mine.

Dawson. I did not find this hat upon the prisoner; but when he came before the Magistrate the second time he had it on his head.

Moore. All these things are my property.

Prisoner's defence. I brought these things out of the country; I was down on surlough for a fortnight, at Christmas, and I brought them up with me.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Judgement respited to go to the West-Indies as a soldier .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-44

270. MATTHEW RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a silver watch, value 20s. a steel watch-chain, value 6d. and a silver seal, value 2s. the property of James Blackburn .

JAMES BLACKBURN sworn.

I am very much afflicted with fits, I am a shoemaker ; and as I was sitting at work, eleven weeks ago to-day, I sell in a fit; I rented a room at Staines , the watch was hung up in the room, the prisoner was coming by at the time, and came in to assist me; I was not sensible when he came into the room; he called Mr. Gregory in to assist me, and as soon as I recovered, I found my watch was gone and he was gone out of the room; the prisoner lived with his father, in the town; I went and asked

him if he had seen any thing of the watch? he asked me if I had lost mine? he said he should know mine from a hundred.

Q. Did you ever see your watch again? - A. Yes; about seven weeks ago.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You never saw the prisoner in your room? - A. No.

Q. He is a very decent lad in the town? - A. Yes; I never heard any thing against him.

SAMUEL GREGORY sworn.

I was in the last witnesses room in the month of January, when he was in a sit; I was standing at my own door; when the prisoner called to me to assist the prosecutor, he was standing at the prosecutor's door; I went over, and found the prisoner in the room; we staid, there about a quarter of an hour, till the prosecutor recovered; I went out first and left the prisoner there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You know the lad and his father? - A. Perfectly well.

Q. He bore a very good character? - A. Yes; his father is a carpenter and joiner.

Q. Is the lad brought up to any prosession? - A. I believe he has been a little in the carpentering line.(The watch was produced in Court by the constable).

THOMAS ROBINSON sworn.

I bought this watch from the prisoner at the bar, about the beginning of February, I gave him fifteen shillings for it; I know his father, I cannot say I know him; as soon as I had any idea of its being the property of this man, I went to his father about it.

Blackburn. This is my watch; here is a mark upon the glass, and it is loose all round, and almost coming out.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-45

271. WILLIAM SEABROOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , two bushels of corn, value 16s. the property of Thomas Jordan and Robert Heath .

THOMAS JORDAN sworn.

I live at Stanwell I am in partnership with Robert Heath , we are farmers ; I lost two bushels of wheat, last February, from a barn called New Barn, it was threshed; I had seen it the day before in a sack, I missed it on the 25th; there were three sacks in the barn, and they had shot some out of two sacks, there were two bushels in the whole gone; I found it under the prisoner's bed, on the 7th of March; he lives about two hundred yards from the barn; he did not work with me, his father and mother live in the same house; I charged his wife with it, he was not at home; I saw him afterwards, and he said he could prove where he bought it.

- STOWELL sworn.

I am a constable, (produces the wheat); I had it from Mr. Jordan, in Seabrook's lower room.

Jordan. I really believe this wheat to be mine

Jury. Q. Did he take it in your sack? - A. No; the reason why I think it is mine is, that it is mixed with black dirt.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. You took the wife before a Magistrate did not you? - A. Yes.

Q. The Magistrate discharged her? - A. Yes.

Q. You afterwards took the prisoner before a Magistrate? - A. Yes.

Q. And he also thought fit to discharge him? - A. No, he did not.

Q. Are you sure of that? - A. Yes.

Q. Was he committed from the Magistrates to take his trial? - A. Not at that present time.

Q. You found some wheat under the bed? - A. Yes; in a sack.

Q. Whose sack was that? - A. I don't know; there was no mark upon it.

Q. How long was it between the time you lost some wheat out of your barn, and the time you found some under the bed of the prisoner? - A. I lost it upon the 24th of February, and found it upon the 7th of March.

Q. What makes you imagine it to be your's? - A. There is some black dirt among it; it grew upon black land.

Q. There is other wheat in your neighbourhood? - A. Yes.

Q. What kind of land does that grow on? - A. Different colour: hasle, or brown, some black.

Q. You don't know this wheat then, I suppose, by the taste, nor size, nor the colour? - A. No.

Q. Has not that the usual appearance of wheat all but the black dirt? - A. Yes; there is but one man that has any of that kind growing there.

Q. Not in the whole country, I suppose? - A. I don't know.

Mrs. - sworn.

Seabrook said he bought this wheat of me; I sold him about a peck and a half, six weeks or two months before the time this was lost.

Q. What sort of wheat was your's? - A. NOt the same as this.

DAVID PATRICK sworn.

I threshed in the barn, and I missed it when I went to work in the morning; it is very much like our wheat; but I cannot swear to it, because one corn is like another.

Cross-examined by Mr. Peat. Q. Has it not the same appearance with all the wheat that grows round the country? - A. Yes; but then the dirt and feed don't look like it.

Q. There is no dirt among the wheat of others at all? - A. No.

Q. The seed is imported from no particular part of the world? - A. No.

Q. It is the same, in size and every appearance? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose he eats like the rest of the country round? - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-46

272. JOHN WILLOUGHBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , two pieces of purple coloured glass, value 5s. the property of James Cadwalladar Parker .(The case was opened by Mr. Const).

JAMES CADWALLADER PARKER sworn.

Examined by Mr. Const. I am a plumber and glazier , in Spur-street, Leicester-square ; the prisoner was my servant : On Saturday, the 5th of March, between eight and nine in the morning, in consequence of an information from a young man that lives with me, I went into a room and found some glass hid behind some lamp-black; I ordered him to mark it, and left it where it was; it was purple coloured glass; it was in a place where glass was never suffered to go; I did not miss it from that time till after the men had left their work that night; I beg pardon, it was before they had left their work; it was too late to get a search warrant; I went to the prisoner's house, and could not get admittance; the next day I went to his lodgings, and he denied it; at last, he ordered his wife to give them me; she brought down, first, two small pieces; I said, that was not what I wanted; and then he desired her to bring the two large pieces from off the bed; Mr. Thomas Parker , who was with me, marked them; it was marked by my apprentice. with a Y, in each corner of the square.

CHRISTOPHER YELVERTON sworn.

I live with Mr. Parker: On the 5th of March I marked some glass, at his request, up in the lead shop, behind a barrel of lamp-black; I marked it with my diamond, with a Y, at the corner; I had them from Mr. Parker, the next day, at his house; this is the glass that I marked, (produces it).

THOMAS PARKER sworn.

I was present at the prisoner's house when the glass was brought down; this is the same glass; I marked it at that time.(For the prisoner).

Mr. Const. (To the Prosecutor.) Q. Except on this occasion, that you were bound to prosecute, he had a very good character? - A. I have known him for many years, and I never had any thing against him; and I should not have prosecuted him, but to shew my people that they must keep themselves honest.

FRANCIS ILIFF sworn.

I have known him a great many years; I had a very good opinion of him; he bore a general good character, as far as I know.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-47

273. JOHN FISHER , otherwise GABRIEL , was indicted for that he, having been, at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden on Wednesday the 11th of December, 1794, tried and convicted of stealing goods in a dwelling-house, to more than the value of 40s. was then and there ordered to be hanged by the neck, till he was dead; that afterwards, his Majesty was graciously pleased to extend his royal mercy to him, upon condition of his being transported to the Eastern coast of New South Wales, for the term of seven years; and that he afterwards, on the 18th of February last, without any lawful cause, was found at large in this kingdom, before the expiration of the said term .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN OWEN sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I know the prisoner at the bar; I was present in December sessions, 1794, when he received sentence of transportation; he is the man, (produces the certificate of his conviction, signed by Mr. Shelton, the officer of this court. It is read).

CHARLES MARSER sworn.

I am a carrier: on the 18th of February, I was up with my waggon in Bond-street; I left the boy feeding the horses; when I came back there was a man had taken a box out of the waggon; I went after him and took him, and he cut me with a knife, very much, and two or three more; but we secured him; he cut my hand all across, and my head, very much; I almost bled to death; and one of the witnesses has lost the use of two of his fingers.

The prisoner did not make any defence.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 25.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-48

274. MICHAEL PARKER was indicted for that he, having been tried and convicted of grand larceny, at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden on Wednesday the 14th of January, 1795, was ordered to be transported beyond the seas, for the term of seven years; and that afterwards, on the 7th of March last, he was found at large, without

any lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JOHN OWEN sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the servants of the keeper of Newgate: I know the prisoner; I was present when he received sentence of transportation, (produces Mr. Shelton's certificate of his conviction); I saw Mr. Shelton sign it; (it is read).

JOHN NOLAN sworn.

I am one of the officers of the Public-office, Whitechapel: I apprehended the prisoner on the 7th of March, in a court that comes into Cable-street, St. George's; I was going along the street, he ran into a house, and I pursued him, and took him; he told me he would not go with me; I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's defence. I went out of this jail on Whitsun-Saturday; I went down with the coach to Gosport; and at Farnham they changed coaches and packages; and I was drinking there along with some ship-mates, and was left behind; they forgot me, and so I came to London.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 15.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17960406-49

275. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for that he, having been tried at the Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden on Wednesday the 25th of May, 1793. for a burglary, was found guilty of simple larceny, was ordered to be transported beyond the seas, for the term of seven years; and that after wards, on the 24th of March last, he was found at large without any lawful cause, before the expiration of the said term .(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JOHN OWEN sworn.

I know the prisoner; I was present when he received sentence of transportation, that is the man,(produces the certificate of conviction); I saw Mr. Shelton sign it. (It is read).

JOHN MILLER sworn.

I am one of the officers of Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of March last, at a public-house, in Holborn, at large.

Prisoner's defence. I have not any thing to say.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-50

276. JOHN TRAPWELL , and JAMES TRAPWELL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of March , a swansdown waistcoat, value 2s. a pair of linen trowsers, value 12d. twenty-three linen shirts, value 3l. two muslin handkerchief, value 2s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 4s. a flannel waistcoat, value 6d. a cotton waistcoat, value 2s. a pair of corderoy breeches, value 2s. a leather pocket-book, value 6d. a parchment pocket-book, value 6d. a man's cloth great coat, value 3s. a man's cloth close coat, value 10s. a pair of velveteen breeches, value 2s. and a wooden box, value 2s. the property of John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR sworn.

I live at Gregory's livery-stables, in Oxford-road; John Trapwell, who works under me in the yard, took away every thing I had: On Sunday night, the 27th of March, I lost my things from my lodgings, in Baker's-mews, and on Wednesday he was taken with the things upon his back; the prisoner lodged in the same room; he absconded that night, and I went in search of him, and did not find him till I found him at his brother's, at the Queen's-head in Hollis-street, Cavendith-square; he was in custody of Isaac Moreton , who brought him from Hammersmith; he had a great coat and a brown coat on him of mine, and two waistcoats and a shirt, a pair of breeches, a pair of stockings, and a bundle in his hand, of my property.

ISAAC MORETON sworn.

I am a coachman; I called upon the prosecutor, on Monday the 28th of March, and he informed me that he was robbed; I was going to Isleworth on Wednesday the 30th; I saw the prisoner, John Trapwell, with the prosecutor's cloaths upon his back; I knew them to be his, and I brought him back to London; I met with him at the Redcow, at Hammersmith; the other things were found in James Trapwell 's box, when his room was searched.(The property was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor).

John Trapwell 's defence. The other prisoner is quite innocent of it.

John Trapwell , GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

James Trapwell , NOT GUILTY .

Judgement respited to go to the West-Indies as a soldier .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The Right Hon. Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-51

277. WILLIAM PATCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , a cotton counterpane, value 10s. the property of George Hastings , and six linen shirts, value 6s. the property of Richard Coulthard .

ELIZABETH HASTINGS sworn.

I am the wife of George Hastings , I live in Chapman-street ; I missed the property on the 1st of April, they were taken out of a brown pan in the yard; it was put in water in consequence of a stain; when the girl got up in the morning it was

gone, and the marks of the prisoner's feet all over the yard; I had seen it there the night before; he was taken up the same night by the watchman; the same man had the shirts in his possession, the shirts were in the yard adjoining.

ANN COULTHARD sworn.

I am the wife of Richard Coulthard ; they were babies' shirts, they lay in the yard upon some railing, there were half-a-dozen of them; I saw them there a little after eight at night, I forgot to take them in.

WILLIAM HILLIARD sworn.

I am a watchman: On the 1st of April, I heard the prisoner in a garden, about one; I way-laid about there till two, and I saw the prisoner coming out of the garden; I overtook him with a coverlid in his bag, wet, and a woman's coarse apron; I I did not find the shirt upon him till I got to the watch-house.

HENRY GRAY sworn.

(Produces the property). I had this from the watchman.

Mrs. Hastings. This is my counterpane, I know it by the stain.

Mrs. Coultbard. These are my children's shirts, I made them myself.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . (Aged 43.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-52

278. SAMUEL EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 1l. a pair of worsted stockings, value 2s. and a pocket map of London, value 1s. the property of John Allnutt .

JOHN ALLNUTT sworn.

I live in Mark-lane; about the 12th or 13th of February, I was moving out of one house into another, from Cooper's-row to Mark-lane; I lost a pair of shoe-buckles; I suspected it was some of the workmen that were working in the house, and I desired the servant to keep a look-out; and on the 19th of February, in the morning, in consequence of some information that I received, the prisoner was taken before the sitting Alderman, and I went with the officer to search the prisoner's lodgings, in Butler's-buildings, East-Smithfield; I saw the constable take out of his wife's pocket, a pair of silver shoe-buckles; out of the drawer in the table, was taken a pair of worsted stockings of mine; and out of the cupboard in the room, a pocket map of London.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. At the time you went to Whitechapel, was the prisoner in custody? - A. He was.

Q. I was his wife these things were found upon? - A. Yes.

Q. Were not there other persons lodged in this house? - A. I never was in the house before, and I don't know any thing of it.

JAMES LAMB sworn.

I am a constable; I went with Mr. Allnutt to search the house; I did not execute the warrant, I was present at the search; in the table-drawer was found a pair of worsted stockings, some knives and forks hid under some coals, a map of London, a walking-cane, and some candles.

ROBERT COMBES sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the Public-office Whitechapel, I assisted the search-warrant; I found, in the prisoner's wife's pocket, these buckles; and a pair of worsted stockings in the table-drawer; and up stairs I found this map. (producing them).

Mr. Knapp. You do not know how many persons lodged in this house? - A. Only one.

CHRISTIANA BOWYER sworn.

I found some knives and forks hid under some coals, and I saw the prisoner take them.

Court. The property being found upon the prisoner's wife, and not upon him, I cannot state to you that there is any evidence to affect the prisoner with the crime of felony.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-53

279. MARSHAL TOM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , a hempen bag, value 6d. twenty-one pounds of moist sugar, value 15s. twenty-seven pounds of other of moist sugar, value 18s. and two pounds of tallow candles, value 1s. 10d. the property of Thomas Palmer and Archibald Palmer .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

JAMES ROBINSON sworn.

I am servant to Messrs. Palmers, grocers , in Fenchurch-street , the prisoner was in their service: On the 25th of February last, in consequence of some information, I went to the prisoner's house with a search-warrant; we found some moist sugar, some currants, candles, some bags, and a quantity of hazle-nuts; there was a mark upon the bag of"Lot 49, Norfolk;" it was a bag that came to Mr. Palmer's premises upon the 7th of August; and and there were some pieces of candles that appeared to be cut in two, they were sluted candles that Mr. Palmer had bought at a sale a very short time before; and some tea in a drawer; the bag I can swear is Mr. Palmer's property; but the candle and tea I cannot, because there might be other candles similar to them; it was about noon that we searched the house; after that, I saw the prisoner driving Mr. Palmer's cart up Snow-hill.

Q. Had he access to the place where this sugar

was deposited? - A. Yes. We followed him to Leadenhall-street, opposite the India-House; we called him, and took him to a public-house, and then to the Public-office, Lambeth-street; but in going to the Office, in the coach, from our house, we discovered a quarter of hundred bag under his shirt, it was a paper bag, he was taking a book out, which pulled his shirt a little open, and I saw this bag; it was an empty bag, made similar to some that we have; we searched him at the public-house in Lambeth-street, and found a quantity of sugar in his breeches, and some in his inside pockets, or somewhere about him, but I know the officers took a quantity out of his breeches, some in brown paper bags, and some in handkerchiefs; I told him it would be better for him to confess it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. This bag had"Lot 49, Norfolk," marked upon it? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you write that yourself? - A. No.

Q. Your bags, I take it, are all marked alike in your warehouse? - A. In different lots.

Q. Do you not know these bags were frequently lent out to any of the servants to take goods home from the warehouse? - A. They may sometimes take a bag to take things out in.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am an officer; on the 25th of February, in company with Mr. Robinson, I went to search the prisoner's house, (producing a bag, and some fluted candles).

Mr. Robinson. This is Mr. Palmer's bag; the candles are very uncommon ones, Mr. Palmer bought them at a sale at the King's warehouse; they came from America.

Mr. Knapp. Q. There were a great many others sold at the same sale? - A. I cannot say.

THOMAS RICHARDSON sworn.

I am a porter to Mr. Palmer; this is Mr. Palmer's bag, it has my mark upon it.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. In your warehouse the bags are very often lent out for the men to take home any thing in? - A. To take any thing out of my master's, or to bring them in; when we wanted a bag, we had it.

Q. In point of fact, had not you, before this time, lent him this bag? - A. I can't say to that bag; I might have lent him other bags.

(The prisoner called seven witnesses who gave him a good character).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17960406-54

280. MARY MEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a silk gown and petticoat, value 10s. a silk gown, value 10s. a silk cloak, value 8s. and a muslin apron, value 2s. the property of Silvester Lowdon .

(The witness were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner).

SILVESTER LOWDON sworn.

I live in Houndsditch , I keep a child-bed linen and stay warehouse ; I know nothing of the loss of the property.

ELIZABETH LOWDON sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness; on the 1st of March, we lost the things mentioned in the indictment, they were taken out of my bed-room drawers; the prisoner was my servant, I had seen them the day before; I went out about three, I returned about seven, but did not miss the things that night; when I came home, I went up stairs, and found my drawers had been opened, I had left them locked, but I did not miss any thing that night; the prisoner was in the house; I would not suffer any of them to go out, because I had several servants; and the next morning I went to take a gown out of the drawer and found it was gone, and then I missed the other articles; I told the prisoner I was sure she had taken the things, and she strongly denied it several times; I saw my property again before the Lord-Mayor, on the 3d of March.

- PROUDLEY sworn.

I am a pawn-broker, (produces a gown and coat, and a cloak); two women pledged them one night at my house, the prisoner was neither of them.

ELIZABETH LUXFORD sworn.

I am apprentice to Mrs. Lowdon; I know nothing of it, but that I saw the prisoner go through my mistress's shop, with a bundle in her hand; I don't know what was in that bundle, she went out alone, it was about four o'clock.

BENJAMIN LAWRENCE sworn.

I know no further than this, the prisoner and her sister called at my house, the 1st or 2d of March, between four or five o'clock, and they had a bundle, but what was contained in that bundle I don't know.

ELIZABETH THOMPSON sworn.

I am a pawn-broker, I took in this gown, (producing it,) from a person of the name of Mary Smith, it was not the prisoner at the bar.

RICHARD GIFFORD sworn.

I am a constable, I was sent for to Mr. London's on the 2d of March; I took charge of his servant, I searched her box, but found nothing of Mrs. Lowdon's property there; I interrogated a great while with her, I thought she was guilty.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-55

281. REBECCA BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of March , two pint

pewter pots, value 2s , the property of Christopher Merritt .

CHRISTOPHER MERRITT sworn.

I am a publican in St. Ann's, Soho ; the prisoner came to my house on the 21st of March, and called for a pennyworth of porter; she sat down some little time and drank it; after she had sat some time, she took an opportunity of going out to the back part of my house, where I usually put my pots; she came back and drank the remainder of her porter, and then went out; I did not miss the property immediately, but in the afternoon I missed two new pewter pint pots.

JOHN ISLIP sworn.

I am a constable of Vintry-ward: On the 21st of March, Mrs. Twitchell sent for me; I saw the prisoner in the passage behind the bar, at Mrs. Twitchwell's, the King's-head; I searched her and found one pot upon her, and three others she had in her hand, and one was fastened behind her, under her cloaths, (producing it).

Merritt. This is one of the pots that I lost.

GUILTY . (Aged 48.) Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before The Right. Hon. Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-56

282. SARAH HITCHCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , two pint pewter pots, value 1s. 6d. the property of John Biggs .

JOHN BIGGS sworn.

I am a publican , I keep the Blue-last in Black stairs; I lost a very number of pots; On the 24th of March, the prisoner was in the tap-room that evening about half past seven; in consequence of an information, I followed her on to Ludgate-hill, and caught her in a little court, just before the came to her own door; I found two pewter pots in her pocket, (the constable produced the pots).

Biggs. These are my pots.

Prisoner's defence I had two pints from the prosecutor that day, that I did not wish my husband to know; I saw the prosecutor afterwards, and told him I had them.

Q. (To Biggs). Did she tell you she had them? - A. No; she did not.

Prisoner. The prosecutor offered me a guinea if I would inform him how many pots had been stolen before.

Jury. Q. Did you offer her a guinea? - A. No, I did not. For the prisoner.

- DELAFONS sworn.

I have known the prisoner about four or five years, she bears a general good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 45.)

(She was recommended by the Jury for merrcy).

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-57

283. BENJAMIN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , ninety-five pounds weight of lead, value 16s. the property of Lancelot Burton .

WILLIAM BOYER sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Burton, plumber , Newcastle-street, in the Strand : On the 31st of March, about seven o'clock in the morning; I found in the passage leading into the coal cellar, a quantity of lead, which appeared to me to be hid; I sent the prisoner, for some coals, he came up again with the coals, and a few minutes after I went down, and I found he had not taken it away, but concealed it better than it was before; he came home in the evening, I let him in with the carter; I gave each of them a candlestick to take through the counting-house to go into the stable; I thought the prisoner was rather longer than he needed to be, and I went outside the shop door in the yard, till I saw him come out of the cellar; he met me in the yard, and said, he had as good go home; I told him to stop and help the carter a little; I then waited till the prisoner came out, and within twenty-yards of our gates, I stopped him with the lead upon him, which weighted forty-five pounds; when I found that it was hid, and that he was gone to Homerton, I went into the cellar and put a mark upon it.

Q. Do you know that that lead that was in the cellar was the property of Mr. Burton? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say, but throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY .

Confined in the House of Correction six months , and fined 1s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-58

284. JAMES MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing a quartern loaf, value 14d. the property of John Chipperfield .

JOHN CHIPPERFIELD sworn.

I don't know any thing of the robbery myself.

WILLIAM BOULTER sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Chipperfield; last Thursday I lost a loaf from my basket in the street in Whitechapel; I was not absent from the basket above two or three minutes; I saw the prisoner at the bar take it out of the basket; I pursued him immediately; I never lost fight of him, except turning the corner; I took him within two minutes

with the loaf upon him; I know it to be my master's loaf by the mark upon it.

JOHN NOLAN sworn.

I heard a cry of stop thief; I took this loaf from the prisoner, (producing it).

Boulter. This is the loaf, it has my mark upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I bought the loaf.

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Publickly whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-59

285. RICHARD PYMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , a cloth great coat, value 10s. the property of William Evans .

WILLIAM EVANS sworn.

I am a waterman ; my great coat was taken out of my boat on the 24th of March, at Allhallows-stairs , Thames-street ; I saw the prisoner at the stairs; when I landed my master, I went as far as Crooked-lane of an errand for a gentleman that I carried; I had put it under the tilt, and when I came back, the coat was missing; I found it in the possession of a person in Rosemary-lane, who bought it of the prisoner; I found it in about an hour or an hour and half after I missed it, (produced it); it is a gentleman's coat that was left in my charge; I am sure it is the same coat; I have had it in my charge these two years past.

JOHN FINLAY sworn.

I bought this great coat of the prisoner at the bar on the 24th of March; I gave him 7s. 6d. for it; I asked him if it was his own property, and he said, yes, he had just setched it out of pawn.

Prisoner's defence. I stood in Upper Thames-street, against Calvert's brewhouse, and a soldier asked me if I would sell this coat for him, and I went and sold it for 7s. 6d.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.) Confined in the House of Correction six months , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-60

286. WILLIAM PENTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , a cloth coat, value 20s. the property of Okey Balfour .

OKEY BALFOUR sworn.

I live at Surgeon's Hall ; upon the 20th of February I left my great coat in a chaise at the stables where I put up; I missed it in the evening; and on the Friday morning following I received a letter from the Magistrate at Worship-street, desiring me to attend there on the Wednesday; that a man was taken up on suspicion; I had my name written on a piece of paper on the back of it; I went on the Wednesday, and saw the man and the coat; I am sure it was my coat.

THOMAS PEARSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner at the bar offered me the coat to pledge; I asked him several questions; I thought he had not come honestly by the coat, and I sent for an officer; he told me he bought it of a Jew at Woolwich, on the 20th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening; when the officer came, he told me he had picked it up in Union-street, (produces the coat).

Balfour. This is my coat, it has my name in it.

Prisoner's defence. I am not guilty; I picked it up coming out of the gate at dinner time; I did not think any think of it.

GUILTY. (Aged 30.)

(The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.)

Privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17960406-61

287. WILLIAM BUNN and THOMAS CONSTABLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , a cloth great coat, value 8s. and two cloth spencers, value 12s. the property of Joseph James .

- MEDLICOTT sworn.

I am servant to Mr. James, in Finsbury-place; on Wednesday, the 25th of February, the things in the indictment were lost; I saw them at eleven o'clock at night when I fastened the doors; they hung in the hall where they always are; I missed them the next morning between seven and eight o'clock; I did not see the coats after till they were brought to the Sessions-house; I knew them again.

SAMUEL WHITEHEAD sworn.

I am a labouring man: On Thursday, the 25th of February last, I was going to work about three minutes past seven in the morning; I saw the prisoner Bunn come out of Mr. James's premises with a sack, which appeared to me about half full, but of what I could not tell; I did not stop him; I had no suspicion of him; I thought he had been to sweap the chimnies; I told the servants afterwards when I found they had missed the cloaths, that I saw a chimney-sweeper come out of the house with a sack about half full, and that I thought he must have them; I saw them afterwards at Worship-street.

- BRYAN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. James; I was going to work a little after seven in the morning on the 25th of February; I saw the prisoner Bunn come into the yard; Constable stopped at the gate while he got over, and then Bunn went from Mr. James's publie yard into his private yard, with a sack across his

shoulder, which appeared to me to be empty; I did not see them go away, nor I did not see him go into the house; he was making towards the house.

WILLIAM PEACH sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Worship-street: On the 25th of February, I was sent for to apprehend the prisoners; I searched them, but found nothing upon them; I took them to the Office; I afterwards learned where the coat and the two spencers were sold; the next day I found where one of the coats was sold again a second time, at a Mrs. Cannon's, in Field-lane, (produces a great coat.)

- BLACKITER sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I went with Peach to apprenhend the prisoners; Constable told me, after he had been there some time, where he had sold the coats, and we found them.

- STEVENS sworn.

I am a dealer in old cloaths and iron; I bought of the prisoner, Constable, a great coat, half a great coat, and a spencer; I gave him 7s. 4d. for them, about the 24th, or 25th of February, between seven and eight in the morning, at my house in Grub-street; I am sure he is the man, the other prisoner was with him; I paid the money to Constable. This is the coat and this is the spencer.

Medlicott. These are Mr. James's property.

(The prisoner did not make any defence, but called three witnesses, who gave him a good character).

Bunn, GUILTY . (Aged 26.) Constable, GUILTY . (Aged 22.) Confined in the House of Correction six months , publickly whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-62

288. SARAH SCOTT , otherwise CHAND-LER , was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Dingwall and Gerard Baillieu , about the hour of nine in the night of the 3d of December, and burglariously stealing a brilliant diamond star pin, value 92l. a pair of round brilliant diamond bracelets, strung with pearl, value 105l. 14s. a pair of brilliant diamond earrings, value 173l. another brilliant diamond star pin, value 159l. an octagon ring, studded with diamonds, value 8l. an octagonring, set with rose diamonds, value 3l. a pearl buckle ring, value 18s. a pearl ring, value 28s. another pearl ring, value 36s. a watch, with a gold case, value 8l. two gold watch chains, value 4l. a pair of gold ear-rings, value 48s. two gold seals, value 25s. a brilliant diamond necklace, value 200l. two pair of brilliant diamond ear-rings, value 250l. three brilliant diamond flowers, value 390l. a diamond fauffe montre, value 40l. a brilliant diamond hoop-ring, value 4l. 13s. an oblong brilliant ring, value 8l. 10s. another oblong brilliant diamond ring, value 9l. a round brilliant ring, with single brilliant in the middle, value 10l. 5s. a round ring, with hair in the middle, value 7l. 4s. a brilliant urn ring, value 4l. 10s. a pair of long brilliant bracelets, value 33l. 15s. a garter ring, value 40s. an octagon ring with a rose diamond urn, value 3l. two pair of enamelled bracelets, studded with diamonds, value 6l. 10s. a rose diamond and enamelled ring, value 3l. 13s. 6d. a diamond star, value 16l. a pair of pearl bracelet lockets, value 3l. 13s. 6d. a pearl cross, value 3l. 4s. a pearl trinket, value 2l. 12s. 6d. a pearllocket, value 3l. a round pearl ring, with hair in the middle, value 40s. a pearl buckle ring, value 18s. a pearl ring with a motto, value 28s. a pearl enamelled ring, value 36s. a pearl puzzle ring, value 10s. 6d. an oval ring, value 10s. 6d. two gold watch chains, value 8l. 18s. 6d. two enamelled watch chains, value 10l. 5s. three gold watch chains, value 6l. 5s. a gold neck chain, value 34s. a gold cornelian chain, value 50s. three other gold chains, value 4l. 15s. a gold gorget, value 30s. a gold anchor, value 28s. a gold locket, with hair in the middle, value 28s. another gold locket, with a blue composition, value 30s. three pair of gold ear-rings, value 5l. 6s. six pair of gold ear-rings, value 9l. another pair of gold ear-rings, value 20s. three gold seals, value 3l. two pair of gold bracelets, value 22s. three brilliant diamond urn rings, value 39l. a brilliant and ruby ring, value 16l. 16s. a brilliant and ruby diamond shirt pin, value 4l. a pair of diamond and enamelled bracelets, value 3l. a gold sillagree chain, value 40s. a sillagree chain, coloured, value 32s. and an ivory snuff-box, set with diamonds, value 50l. the property of the said John Dingwall, David Pratt Vernon , and Gerard Bailliant , in the said dwelling-house .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

GERARD BAILLIEU sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a jeweller , in St. James's-street , in partnership with John Dingwall, and David Pratt Vernon.

Q. Who are the persons inhabitting that house? - A. Mr. Dingwall, myself and my wife; the prisoner at the bar was my servant; she had been in our service about five or six weeks; On the third of last December, a little after seven o'clock in the evening, I went out, Mrs. Bailleu went out before me; I left Mr. John Dingwall , my partner, in the house, we had no other servant besides the prisoner, the articles in the indictment were generally locked up in the evening after eight o'clock, in an iron closet, very secure; the things were not deposited in this closet till after I was gone out; I left them to Mr. Dingwall's management; when I returned

I did not find the servant at home, Mr. Dingwall got home before me.

JOHN DINGWALL sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am partner with Gerard Baillieu , and David Pratt Vernon: On the 3d. of December, I left the house about a quarter after eight; I left the prisoner in the house and nobody else; I told her that I should return in the course of an hour; before I went out, I locked up the diamond and jewellery articles in a strong iron closet, the key of which we usually hang up in a room, which we call our jewel room.

Court. Q. Did you do so that evening? - A. I did, there were a few articles of no great value that we don't lock up; I returned a little after nine o'clock, I knocked several times at the door, and could not get admittance; I then enquired of a person in the neighbourhood, if she had seen the servant; I have never seen her since, till she was apprehended; about eleven o'clock, I got two neighbours to force open the door; when I got in, I observed one of the covers of the shew-glass turned, and the side of it broke, and several articles, ear-rings and other things stolen; I then went to the jewel room, where I had hung the key of the iron closet, and unlocked it, and missed the diamond articles that I had locked up before I went out.

Q. Were all the articles in this indictment missing? - A. They were.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of the whole? - A. between 15 and 1600l.

Q. Did you know any thing of this business till this woman was taken up? - A. A number of the articles were found upon Lee, in Dublin, who was convicted last sessions.

Court. Q. When you were in Dublin, did you find any of the property in the indictment, in the possession of Lee? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you present when this woman was apprehended? - A. Yes; on Sunday morning, the 28th of February, in a place called Lvey-street, St. Giles's; Carpmeal and Rivet were with me, and Baillieu; we found the servant in bed, she had no woman's cloaths there; when she got up, she dressed herself in man's cloaths; I saw Rivet find a pearl cross, and a pearl locket ear-ring, a cornelian necklace, and other articles, Rivet has them; and Mr. Baillieu found some of his cloaths; I believe these things were found in her shoe, in a box.

Court. Q. Did she claim that box as her property? - A. She did; I can speak to them positively, when I see them.

Jury. Q. Did you lock the jewel room? - A. Yes; I locked it when I went out, and found it locked when I came home; I had the key with me.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. In consequence of an information, I went to apprehend the prisoner in Ivey-street, Dyot-street, St. Giles's, about three o'clock in the morning, on Sunday the 28th of February, she was in bed; in searching a box in the room, which was not locked, we found a shirt of Mr. Baillieu's, (producing it), and some jewellery articles, which Rivet has.

JOHN RIVET sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am an officer of Bow-street; I went with Mr. Dingwall and Carpmeal to apprehend the prisoner, on Sunday the 28th of February, about three o'clock in the morning, in Ivey-street, Dyot-street, St. Giles's, up two pair of stains; we found the prisoner in bed with a man's shirt on; Mr. Dingwall being present, I asked him if that was his servant? and he said it was; I searched the box, and in the toe of a new shoe I found these articles, (producing them.) they were sealed up before the Magistrate, and they have been in my possession ever since; she dressed herself in man's cloaths when she got up.

Mr. Dingwall. This gold cornelian necklace, worth 2l. 8s. is my property, it was lost at that time; a gold neck-chain, worth 34s. that is mine; a pair of gold cornelian ear-rings, these are our's too, they are worth about two guineas; this pearl cross is mine, it was made in the house; all these articles are our's, they were all taken at the time the burglary was committed.

Prisoner's defence. I am not prepared for trial, and must beg for three or four days more; I have the certificate of my marriage with Lee coming from Dublin.

GUILTY (of stealing in the dwelling-house to the value of 40s. but not guilty of the burglary) - Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before The Rt. Hon. Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-63

289. JOHN BARNETT was indicted for felonionusly stealing a linen bed-gown, value 2s. the property of Sarah Belcher , widow , March 29 .

SARAH BELCHER sworn.

I live in Winfield-street; about Monday or Tuesday was fortnight I lost a bed-gown, whether I dropped it or whether it was taken away I cannot say, it was found at the pawnbrokers.

(The pawnbroker was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-64

290. WILLIAM NEWTON was indicted for the wilful murder of George Simmonds .

Second Court. He was charged, on the Coroner's

Inquisition with killing and staying the said George Simmonds .

WILLIAM RALPH sworn.

I know the prisoner, and I knew the deceased George Simmonds; I was in company with them on the 29th of March, I was out when the affair happened; I returned before he died, and went home with him in the coach.

STEPHEN SMITH sworn.

On Easter Tuesday, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was at Mr. Ralph's, the sign of the Duke's-head, Priest-alley, Tower-street; I went in about a quarter after seven, and called for a pint of porter; I found the prisoner and Simmonds there, they were quarrelling together, something about dictionary words.

Q. About the meaning of the words? - A. Yes; Simmonds asked me if I had got any porter; I said yes, a pint; he said he would be a pint with me, and make it a pot, and we drank together; Simmonds got up to Newton, and doubled his fist at him, and called him a foolish something, I cannot say rightly what the word was; I pulled him by the coat, and said, George, sit down; he sat down, and got up the second time; I said, do sit down; he doubled his fist at him the second time, and called him a foolish something again, I cannot say what the word was; Newton said to him, if you strike me I will enter an action against you, or serve you with a copy of a with; George Simmonds still shook his head at him; Newton said, if you do strike me, I certainly will strike you again; George Simmonds then said to Newton, come out; he stripped himself, and they went out into the yard, and I followed them; Simmonds was stripped, Newton was not; George insisted upon fighting; I said they should not; accordingly I went in between them, and said, if you will fight you shall both fall upon me, and when you have beat me enough you will leave off, they then went in doors, I went to make water, and before I was done, they were both out again beginning to fight; George Simmonds had his cloaths off, Newton had not; Newton said to him, are you in carnest? George said, yes; then, says Newton, I will give you something to mind me; George Simmonds threw Newton upon the ground, and fell upon him; the second time he served him the same, and fell upon him the second time; the blood ran down Newton, and Newton struck, as night as I can say, at the bottom of the breast, George Simmonds then fell backwards, and cut his head on the back, here, (pointing with his finger to the part), he turned on his right; side, and made a noise in his throat, as if he had the rattles; by that, somebody in the yard said, Newton you have killed the man; Newton said, if I have I will not run away; we put Simmonds in a chair, and rubbed his head with brandy.

Q. Do you know how long he lived? - A. No; I was not there when the surgeon was sent for.

JOHN BAILEY sworn.

I am a surgeon; I was sent for to Simmonds the day after the accident happened; I found him senseless; I examined the wound; the blow he received on the head produced his death; there was a small fracture in the skull.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-65

291. JOHN RANDALL was indicted for feloniously stealing twenty-five woollen cloth coats, value 30l. twenty-four kerseymere waistcoats, value 8l. six ditto, value 2l. twelve marcella waistcoats, value 4l. five jean waistcoats, value 5s. two muslin waistcoats, value 10s. a swansdown waistcoat, value 5s. a dimity waistcoat, value 3s. a flannel waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. eleven ditto, value 20s. a linsey waistcoat, value 6d. forty pair of velveret breeches, value 10s. a pair of velveteen breeches, value 10s. three pair of corderoy breeches, value 30s. three yards of linen cloth called Russia-duck, value 3s. thirty-three yards of ditto, value 18s. a pair of trowsers, value 3s. &c. the property of William Brounger .

Second Court. Laying them to be the property of William Brounger, and William Cheney Prosser , in their dwelling-house.

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner).

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys).

WILLIAM BROUNGER sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am a salesman in that part of Houndsditch which is in the city, in partnership with William Cheney Prosser; the prisoner was our porter; the partnership was dissolved on the 20th of last February, In consequence of an information the latter end of February, I can not tell the exact day, I found I had lost some of my property.

Q. Was that information before or after the dissolution of the partnership? - A. A few days after; I went with an officer, Mr. Sapwell, and took up the porter; he was searched, but nothing of any property of mine was found upon him; he was taken to the Compter, and the next day examined by the Lord-Mayor.

Court. Q. At the dissolution of the partnership what became of the property, did it become your's? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. When did you dissolve the partnership? - A. On the 20th of February.

Q. Did your partner dwell in the house before that? - A. He hid.

Q. Then he left it? - A. He did.

Q. Did you go any where before you went to the Lord-Mayor to make any search? - A. I don't recollect that I did; Sapwell, the constable, went with me afterwards to the prisoner's lodgings, Sparrow-corner, Tower-hill; we searched his lodgings and found two small pieces of linen cloth, upon one of which was my private mark, it was found in a room that had the appearance of a kitchen, in a drawer; I am quite certain it was my property; we did not find any thing else.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. You dissolved the partnership on the 20th of February? - A. Yes.

Q. How did you settle the matter? - A. I paid him his proportion of the profits, and took upon me the property, and all the debts; the agreement left the whole of the property with me; I was to pay for it as soon as the attorney had drawn out the deed, that was in about ten days, or a fortnight; I believe, not a fortnight.

Q. That was after the prisoner was in custody? - A. It was.

Q. You are in a large wholesale way of business? - A. Yes.

Q. You supply a great variety of shop-keepers with different articles? - A. I do.

Q. When had you seen this piece of cloth, before you saw it in his lodgings? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You are in the habit of selling large quantities of linen of that sort? - A. I do, when made up, feldom otherwise.

Q. Upon goods of the same description and price, you put the same kind of mark? - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot say whether you had sold this particular piece formerly or not? - A. I cannot say.

Q. You have a considerable number of persons in your employ? - A. Yes.

Q. There are a great many fragments about the house of course? - A. Yes; I had not missed the things.

Q. Whether they were taken from your house at one time, or separate times, you cannot pretend to say? - A. I cannot; I would have it understood, that all the property was not in the situation of this linen.

Q. When you sell your goods, you neither take off your marks nor your tickets? - A. No.

Q. Of course, if this had been sold, it would have continued its mark? - A. It would.

Q. This man has lived a number of years with you? - A. I believe six years, with a short interval.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Had you sold this linen to your servant? - A. Certainly not.

ROBERT GROSE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at No. 2, Sparrow-corner; I know the prisoner perfectly well, he did live in the house where I live, before me; I have known him six years.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Carey, who was taken up on this charge? - A. Yes; I saw Carey in the prisoner's apartment once, but the prisoner was not there at the time; I saw them once together in the street, last Christmas-day.

Q. Did you ever see them again on any other occasion? - A. Never in my life.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You are Mr. Brounger's cutter? - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of cutting out pieces, there are small remnants? - A. Yes, now and then.

Q. Remnants of duck sheeting? - A. Very feldom, sometimes there are.

Q. Do you ever give any of those articles away? - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. By Mr. Brounger's orders you may have done such a thing? - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of duck sheeting? - A. About 2s. 8d. now; it was sometime ago about 14d. a yard.

THOMAS WITHERS sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knapp. I have known the prisoner about six or seven years, and I know Carey very well; I drank with the prisoner and Carey at Mr. Thompson's, a public-house, the sign of the Bell, in Church-row, two or three times; the last time I drank with them was about four years ago, but I have not seen them together within these twelve months.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. You have known the prisoner six or seven years? - A. Yes; I never heard any hurt of him till now.

JAMES HART sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at Bethnal-Green; I am a lawyer, and work for Mr. Ryson; I know the prisoner, and I know Carey; the prisoner lodged at the top of Tower-hill; I don't know the person that lives below stairs; it is the top of Rosemary-lane; about eight in the evening of the day that Mr. Carey was taken up, it was dark, I went with him to the prisoner Randall's house; he was not at home at first; we went away a little while, and Randall came in; he asked me how I did, and how Carey did, and then he and Carey went into another room; Mrs. Randall asked me to have some rum or brandy, and then we all came away together to Carey's house, No. 9, North's-place, Bethnal-green; Carey asked me to carry a bundle to Mrs. Patrick's, at the bottom of the George Gardens, Bethnal-green, and then Mr. Randall and I came back again, and Randall took

a bundle down to the George Gardens; he left it at the gate, and desired me to carry it in.

Q. What time was that? - A. Past eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you go alone the first time to Patrick's house? - A. Yes, then Randall went with the next and carried it to the gateway, and asked me to take it in, which I did; they were largish bundles.

Q. What became of Carey? - A. We left him at his house; we went back again, and there was another bundle; Randall took that to Mrs. Patrick's gateway, and I took it in; I could not tell what they contained; with the last bundle we all three went; I left them facing the Salmon and Ball in Bethnal-green road, and went home to bed.

Q. Did you ever learn from Randall and Carey what the bundles contained? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Randall did not know any more than you what they contained? - A. I don't know that he did.

SARAH LEMSDALE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. Do you know Mrs. Patrick? - A. Yes; I never saw the prisoner in my life; I know Carey, and I know the last witness, Hart.

Q. Do you remember when you were lying in bed with Mrs. Patrick, any body coming with any thing? - A. James Hart brought the bundles into the room; they were large bundles, and put them under the bed.

Q. Do you know what the bundles contained? - A. No.

Q. Don't you know now? - A. Yes; I knew they did not come honestly by them, that Carey brought them from Randall's.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. You know nothing about Randall? - A. No.

LYDIA PATRICK sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live at the back of the George, Bethnal-green road; I know Randall, the prisoner, and I know Hart; about six weeks ago, as nigh as I can recollect, about eleven o'clock at night, Hart brought three bundles of cloaths to my house; Randall brought them to the door; the first bundle, I was a-bed, and did not see; the other two bundles, I was up, and saw Randall at the door; they were fetched away from me by Mr. Tipper, a constable.

Q. Had you seen Randall at all before this evening? - A. Yes; twice before, with Mr. Carey; I cannot say how long before.

Q. What passed between you and them when you saw them? - A. Nothing at all; I met them once at Bethnal-green, and once at the Green Man.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. You were taken up, were not you? - A. Yes.

Q. Offering some things to pawn? - A. Yes.

Q. Where were you taken to? - A. To this gentleman's. (Mr. Brounger's).

Q. Was Randall at that time in custody? - A. Yes; and then I was taken to the Compter.

Q. But you hoped you should not be tried if you accused Randall? - A. Yes; but I did not accuse him wrongfully.

Q. What were you pawning when you were stopped? - A. A waistcoat and breeches.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you accuse Randall for the sake of escaping a prosecution yourself? - A. No.

Q. In point of fact, have you not escaped a prosecution, by accusing Randall? - A. Yes, I may, but I don't accuse him wrongfully.

Q. Did you not say you had these things from a man of the name of Chandler? - A. No, never in my life; I said they were my husband's; I have a husband in the fencibles.

Mr. Gurney. How long did the parcels remain in your house? - A. From Thursday night till Monday morning.

Q. You were not in the house all that time, were you? - A. Yes.

Q. You were not there when you went to the pawn-broker's? - A. No.

Q. Nor when you went to Mr. Brounger's? - A. No.

Q. Then you don't know what had been done to the bundles, while you were away? - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did the bundles appear to be in the state in which you left them, when you returned? - A. Yes.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn.

I am a constable: On Monday the 29th of February, I went to Mrs. Patrick's house, and under the bed I found two bundles, and in a little side-bed I found another bundle; I examined them, and found them to be cloaths of different sorts, coats, waistcoats, and breeches, made up for sale; I then searched the drawers, and found a bag of duplicates; Mrs. Patrick gave them to me, I have had them ever since, (produces them).

Q. (To Mrs. Patrick.) Were you present when the duplicates were found? - A. Yes; I gave them to Tipper.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. What are the names, on the duplicates? - A. There is Carey, Todd, and Donne on some of them.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a constable, I apprehended Mrs. Carey, the wife of Carey, now in prison, on Thursday the 25th of February.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner Randall? - A. Yes; at Mr. Brounger's, on Friday the 26th the next day; I searched him, but found nothing

upon him; I had a search warrant; I went and searched his lodgings in Sparrow-corner, in the Minories, near Rosemary-lane, at one Mr. Hoppe's, a tinman's; Randall was then in custody; I found two pieces of wrappers in a drawer; I afterwards went to Carey's house, in Globe-lane, Globe-fields, Bethgal-green, in company with John Ray, that was the next day, the 27th, I found there three tickets.

Q. (To Brounger). Are these linen wrappers your property? - A. They are.

Q. Had you ever sold, or given them to the prisoner? - A. No. (Looks at one of the bundles found in Patrick's house); they are my property, they are all my own making up, and are perfectly new; the garments I can swear to, the linen cloth is of the same fabric I possessed.

Q. About what is the value of that bundle? - A. It is rather a random guess, but I suppose, nearer sel. than 5l.

Q. Do you believe them to be worth 7l. or 10l.? - A. I should rather be within compass, and say, 5l.

Q. Is there any article of the value of 40s. in any of the bundles? - A. I believe not,(looks at another bundle); this Russia duck is mine, and has never been sold.

Q. What is the value of that? - A. Four shillings, it has a private mark of the price, I never bought any at this price before; I bought a large quantity, and have never sold any of it; I have looked at all the things, and know them to be mine.

Q. Had all these things been taken at one time, should you have missed them? - A. I cannot say that I should; my concern is more with the books than the goods.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. You said, that those were your property that were found in the house of Randall? - A. Yes.

Q. Do I understand you to swear those two pieces of cloth were at any time your property? - A. Clearly.

Q. Can you ascertain when? - A. Within two years.

Q. You cannot swear you had them after the dissolution of the partnership? - A. No.

Q. What is the value of this piece that has your private mark? - A. One shilling.

Q. With respect to the bundles of cloaths found in the house of Mr. Patrick, I understand you to be in the way of supplying shop-keepers wholesale with these goods? - A. Yes.

Q. If they were taken from those shop-keepers, they would appear in the same state? - A. They would.

Q. Can you swear you never sold them, except the piece of duck which has your mark? - A. No; I indulged him as I do every servant, with cloaths, at prime cost, for their own wear.

Q. You have no conception when you lost them, or by what degrees? - A. No.

Court. Q. Have you any certain knowledge, whether you lost these things before the dissolution of the partnership, or after? - A. No; I have not.

WILLIAM CHENEY PROSSER sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Were you, till lately, in partnership with Mr. Brounger? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever give your servant Randall, or sell him that piece of wrapper? - A. Neither.

Q. Did you ever sell him any large lots of goods? - A. Never.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You cannot tell to whom you sold that wrapper? - A. No.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You don't know that you ever-sold it at all? - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. The prisoner was your servant some years? - A. Yes.

Q. He bore a good character? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. That piece of duck, with the private mark, Mr. Brounger gave me, a fortnight before Christmas, to line a jacket; he was writing in the counting-house; I went and asked him for it; he told me to go up stairs, and ask above; I went up and asked Grose, he said, he had got none there, there were remnants enough below; I came down and took these two pieces, about enough to mend my jacket, and make pockets, and shewed them to Mr. Brounger, and he said it was very well.

Court. (To Mr. Brounger). Q. Did you ever give him that piece of duck? - A. I never did.

Court. (To the prisoner). Q. Did you speak of that found in your lodgings? - A. Yes.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character).

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-66

292. WILLIAM RAYNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March, two ingots of pewter, eleven pounds weight, value 4s. the property of Richard Joseph .

RICHARD JOSEPH sworn.

I am a pewterer in Little New-street : On Friday the 4th of March, I lost two ingots of pewter from my manufactory; the prisoner was my porter ; the constable, George Streaton, searched him in my shop, it was found in his breeches, he had been in my employment a little more than a fortnight.

GEORGE STREATON sworn.

I am a constable, I was called upon by one of Mr. Joseph's servants, on the 4th of March, about nine in the evening; I went to Mr. Joseph's, I searched the prisoner, and found this pewter in his breeches, next his skin, (they are produced in Court).

Joseph. I cannot swear to the ingots.

ROBERT KENNET sworn.

I am Journeyman to Mr. Joseph; these ingots are Mr. Joseph's property, they have my mark upon them, they were cast in our manfactory, they are in an unfinished state at present.

Jury. Q. Did you put the marks upon them before they were stolen? - A. Yes; before they were lost, they were under the shop board among the sweepings and rubbish; I missed them just before nine o'clock.(The prisoner called James Carter , and Jonathan Budd , who gave him a good character).

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before The Right Hon. LORD KENYON.

Reference Number: t17960406-67

293. JOSEPH NEAL and RICHARD NEWMAN , were indicted, the first for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February, seventy pounds weight of leaf tobacco, value 6l. 10s. the property of Sebastian Frydag , Esq. and five hundred pounds weight of other leaf tobacco, value 45l. the property of Jacob Israel Brandon , and Gabriel Israel Brandon , and the other for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen. (The indictment was stated by Mr. Gurney, and the case opened by Mr. Knowlys).

SEBASTIAN FRYDAG sworn.

Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am the Prussian Consul , I deal in tobacco , I rented a warehouse of Mr. Cooper.

Q. Do any other persons lodge tobacco in that warehouse? - A. Yes; Mr. Gabriel Brandon ; I cannot recollect the day on which I missed the tobacco, there were one hundred samples, each sample containing about two pounds an half.

GABRIEL BRANDON sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a tobacco broker , I had a large quantity of leaf tabacco in the warehouse, where Mr. Frydag's tobacco was lodged; I missed, on the 15th of February, a quantity of tobacco, they were samples of tobacco tied up, the principal part was in the King's warehouse, upon Tower-hill; I had orders for one hundred and ninety-five samples, and when I went to the warehouse, I missed some of the tobacco, which I should know again, if I saw it; the prisoner Neal, was a cooper in the King's warehouse, at Tower-hill; Francis Dring was a tobacco porter, employed in our warehouse.

FRANCIS DRING sworn.

Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a porter and cooper in the warehouse; and my father was employed in Mr. Frydag's, and Messrs. Brandon's warehouse.

Q. In the beginning of February, state any thing that passed between you and any body else, respecting the tobacco in that warehouse? - A. On the 6th of Feburary, I went to the warehouse of my own accord, with Neal; Neal did not go into the warehouse, he went with me; I took some samples of tobacco from Mr. Frydag's warehouse; I took them on my back.

Q. How many samples did you take out? - A. I cannot tell the quantity; Neal waited in St. Mary-Axe, at the corner of St. Helen's; I found him in the same place when I came out.

Court. Q. How far is that from the warehouse? - A. A little better than one hundred yards; within sight of him.

Court. Q. Did Neal know you were going to steal those samples? - A. Yes; he went with me to Houndsditch, to Mr. Newman's, the other prisoner; Neal staid in the street, about two hundred yards from the house, when I left him; the tobacco was lodged at Mr. Newman's house, I sold it to Mr. Newman, it weighted two hundred and twenty pounds, at one shilling per pound; I saw the prisoner Newman and his brother.

Q. How much money did you receive from Newman? - A. Eleven pounds; some I kept, and some Neal had; Neal had very trisling of that, but half-a-guinea.

Court. Q. What did Neal stay at the corner of St. Mary-Axe for? - A. Waiting for me till I came out.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson, (Neal's Counsel.)

Q. Do you come here in custody now? - A. Yes.

Q. How many times before has it happened to you to be taken up? - A. I never was taken in custody before for such a thing as this.

Q. Do you mean to swear you never was in custody before? - A. Yes, I was.

Court. You need hardly spend any time upon that, for the man has proved himself to be a very bad character.

Mr. Jackson. Q. I understand you to say he assisted you to bring this tobacco? - A. I did not say that.

Q. You carried it yourself? - A. Yes.

Q. He had no hand in carrying it? - A. No.

Q. And two hundred and twenty pounds weight you carried? - Yes.

Q. You mean to say that? - A. Yes.

Q. How far from the warehouse, where you stole

it, is the house of Mr. Newman? - A. It may be a quarter of a mile.

Q. You were servant to the prosecutor, were you not, with your father? - A. I used to do it with my father when I had nothing else to do.

Q. Was not the warehouse left to your father's custody, and yourself? - A. No; there were other persons, porters to the prosecutor.

Q. You know you had occasion to abscond from the service? - A. Yes.

Q. And I believe you afterward wrote a letter, offering to pay any damages if they would make it up? - A. No; I never wrote a letter upon that subject.

Q. What was the letter about? - A. No. further than that I was sorry for what I had done.

Q. What offer did you make it you should be admitted to turn evidence? - A. No offer at all.

Q. They solicited you to do it, perhaps? - A. No; the Lord-Mayor admitted me as an evidence.

Q. I believe, when these people were first taken before the Lord Mayor, his Lordship dismissed them; they were summoned, were they not? - A. I don't know.

Q. His Lordship dismissed them upon their word, to come again? - A. I cannot say.

Q. But continued you in custody? - A. I was not in custody at that time.

Q. The night that Neal was dismissed, did he not come to you and ask you how you could charge him with such a business as this? - A. He came to my father's.

Q. Were you present? - A. I was present on the Saturday that I was taken, he came twice.

Q. To ask how you came to charge him? - A. No; he did not ask that.

Q. But you were so good, I believe, as to say you were obliged to keep up to what you had said in the letter? - A. I only said in the letter that I was sorry for what I had done.

Q. But he had nothing to do with the tobacco, except receiving half-a-guinea, and you ten guineas? - A. Yes.

Jury. Q. How did you get that tobacco on your back? - A. In a basket.

Jury. Q. Can you get two hundred and twenty pounds weight upon your back? - A. Yes; when it is upon a chest.

Q. How did you get it upon the chest? - A. With my hands and knees.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp, (Newman's Counsel.)

Q. Do you mean to state that you carried two hundred and twenty pounds weight of tobacco yourself? - A. Yes; I did.

Q. You know, by giving your evidence here today, you are saving yourself from prosecution? - A. With intent to turn an honest person.

Q. Upon your oath, don't you know you are not to be prosecuted if you give evidence? - A. I know it now.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You had some conversation with Neal at his father's? - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us all that passed? - A. He and his wife came, and he cried; the particular words I cannot recollect; he said, he meant to behave true to me; he said, how could I come to bring him in question; he said, if I had behaved true to him, he would not have said a word about it; I told him of what he had received at different times; I don't recollect his saying any thing more.

Mr. Jackson. Q. Who was present at that conversation besides you and Neal? - A. My father.

JOSEPH NEWMAN sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I live in Houndsditch with the prisoner Newman; he is my brother.

Q. Do you know the witness Dring? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see him at your house? - A. I saw him once, he brought some tobacco.

Q. How much? - A. I cannot say, I was behind the counter when he came in.

Q. A small quantity or a large one? - A. About one hundred weight, as far as I can recollect; my brother was in the counting-house at the time; Dring went into the counting-house to My brother, and when he had been there a few minutes, he came out again, and took the tabacco away.

Q. Do you mean to say that he took that tobacco away again? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say that tobacco was not brought? - A. Yes; but he took it away again.

Q. Then it was not bought at all? - A. No; it was taken away again.

Q. Was it ever in your brother's shop again? - A. No.

Q. When about was this? - A. It might be six or seven weeks ago.

Q. Your brother never bought any tabacco of Dring? - A. I don't think he ever did.

Q. Are you sure he did not buy any tobacco of him upon this occasion? - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Do you mean to say no tabacco was left at your house? - A. Never that I saw; I never saw any but once, and that was taken away.

Q. Were your present when Sapwell, the constable, called at your brother's house? - A. Yes.

Q. He took away some tabacco, did not he? - A. Yes.

Q. When was that tabacco left there? - A. I don't know.

Q. Upon your oath, don't you know Dring brought that tabacco that Sapwell took away? - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you mean to say you don't know that

Dring brought that tobacco that Sapwell took away upon the search-warrant? - A. I do not.

Q. And you swear positively that tobacco was taken away? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say that before the Lord-Mayor? - A. I don't know indeed.

Q. Did you say before the Lord-Mayor that Dring took away the tobacco that he brought upon that occasion? - A. I don't know.

Q. Did you ever see Neal? - A. I never saw him till I saw him before the Lord-Mayor.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn.

Examined by Mr. Gurney. I am a constable; I went to the house of the prisoner Newman, on the 29th of February, which was on a Monday, with a search-warrant; I searched the house, and found some tobacco; I brought about six hands away with me, that is, six samples; (produces it); it is leaf tobacco; I found it in the cellar; this is all that I brought away; there was a great quantity in the ceilar like that, and in the shop.

Q. Did you observe a back-shed in the yard? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any there? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. You know that Newman deals in tobacco? - A. Yes.

Q. In the shop and cellar there was a great deal more of the same sort? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. (To Brandon.) Q. Is that part of the tobacco that was taken out of your warehouse; - A. I cannot swear to it, but it looks like part of it; it is sample tobacco, being tried by the string, the mark of the string shews that it was in samples, and it is like the quality we lost; I attended Sapwell with the search-warrant, and we found them in a dark place in the cellar, we were obliged to have a light to look into it; and then we found it covered with other tobacco.

Q. Of the same sort with that? - A. No; it was covered with cakes of other tabacco.

Cross-examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. Your's was a warehouse containing tobacco from a great quantity of tobacco merchants? - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You don't mean to swear to that? - A. No.

Q. Leaf tobacco from your warehouse, and any other warehouse, would be pretty much the same, I take it for granted? - A. Yes.(The prisoner Neal called six witnesses who gave him a good character).(The prisoner Newman called Mr. Skelton, a tobacco-broker, who bad known him seven years, and deposed, that he was a very honest man, that he pays from fifty to one hundred pounds a year duty; that his business has regularly increased every year; and that he would trust him with any thing).

Both NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17960406-68

294. ELIAS, otherwise ELLIS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , three pieces of printed dimity, containing eleven yards, value 27s. two pieces of jean, containing twenty yards, value 17s. the property of Matthew Parkinson , and John Wilson , in their dwelling-house .(The case was opened by Mr. Jackson).

MATTHEW PARKINSON sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a warehouseman , in Bow-church-yard , in partnership with John Wilson; we have missed some articles, particularly some jean, which we cannot speak to; they were taken from our house in Bow-church-yard.

JOHN CROUCH sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jackson. Q. I am a pawnbroker, I know the prisoner at the bar: On the 23d of March, in the evening, he came to our house, and offered to pledge a piece of white dimity; I asked him whose it was? he said, it was his own; I asked him how he came to buy so much? he said, he was a carpenter, and he and his two fellow-servants bought it to line some waistcoats; he said, it cost a shilling a yard, I knew it was under the value, and I told him I thought he did not come honestly by it; he said he bought it in Cloth-Fair, and he ran away, and we called out "stop thief;" and, at the bottom of Basinghall-street, he was stopped by a constable; he was taken to the watch-house, and some porters there knew him to be Mr. Parkinson's man; he had been at our house before that.

Q. Did he give any account of the goods when he was examined? - A. He was examined at the watch-house, but I cannot speak to what passed there, I was so much flurried.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I am servant to the last witness, I know the prisoner at the bar: On the 12th of February he came to our house with a piece of printed jean, which he pledged for seven shillings and sixpence; (produces it); On the 12th of March he pledged a remnant for five shillings; (produces it); and, on the 22d, he came with a piece of dimity, when he was stopped.

JAMES PRIOR sworn.

Examined by Mr. Jackson. I am a constable: On Tuesday, the 22d of March, in the evening, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and Mr. Crouch gave charge of him, on suspicion of having some stolen property; that he had brought some to

his house, and ran away upon being questioned. I searched him, and found nothing but a small key; I found that he lived with Mr. Parkinson and Wilson, in Bow-church-yard; I sent for them, and they said he was their servant; and from thence we went to Mr. Crouch's, there we saw some goods, which he said he believed was his; we went to his lodgings, and, with the key which I took out of his pocket, his wife opened his box; and, in that, I found three duplicates, one dated the 12th of March, for a piece of jean; another of some cotton, pledged at Mr. Purse's, London-wall; we went to Mr. Purse's, and Mr. Wakefield said, we should have the goods produced to us; Mr. Parkinson said, it was his; and Mr. Walkefield immediately said, the same man has been here to night with some jean; when I came back to the watch-house, I asked him how he came by the jean? he said, he had it at his master's warehouse.

Q. Did you say any thing to him to induce him to confess it? - A. No; I asked him if that was all he had? he said no, he had the whole piece, that he had cut in his master's warehouse; I asked him, as he had pawned only three yards and an half, at Mr. Crouch's, what he had done with the rest? he said he had given it to a man in Bow-church-yard.

WILLIAM WAKEFIELD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Purse, I know the prisoner; I received this piece of White dimity from him; it has been in the constable's possession ever since, but I put my mark upon it; it was pledged in the name of Thomas Roberts , I can swear to the prisoner; it was the same evening that Mr. Parkinson made application to me.

Mr. Parkinson. This piece of printed dimity I can swear to, by my own private mark; I cannot swear to the others, I believe my clerk can.

MATTHEW CALCRAFT sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Parkinson; this piece of printed dimity I perfectly well know; the mark of this piece of printed dimity, (another,) I can swear to, it has my mark upon it.

Prisoner's defence. (Handed a paper, which was read, as follows): - "The humble petition of Elias Jones; that your petitioner, duly sensible of the fault he has been guilty of, and the consequences that may attend the same, having a wife and family depending upon him, and always, before this unhappy affair, bore a good character, hopes your Worship, and the Court, will permit him to enter into his Majesty's sea service; and your petitioner, as in duty bound, will ever pray."

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 20s. (Aged 27.) Judgement respited to go as a soldier .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17960406-69

295. RALPH WITHERBOURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , a hempen sack, value 3s. and 112 pounds weight of clover seed, value 6l. 18s. the property of James Gardner .

JAMES GARDNER sworn.

I am a seed and hop-factor : On Monday the 28th, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I delivered 100lb. weight of clover seed to the prisoner in a sack; he was to take it to the Catherine-wheel-inn, in the Borough; I employed him to carry it there; I had two single 100 weights for him to carry; he was to take that and come back for the other, but he did not return; and I went over to enquire if it had been left there; I described the man, and they said there had been no so such person there, nor the goods; I saw nothing of the prisoner again till the 31st of March, when I saw him by the water side, on one of the wharfs between the Custom-house and the Tower; I went home to get a person to go with me; when I returned, I saw the prisoner learning over the rails upon Tower-stairs, looking towards the river; I desired him to come with me to my warehouse, which he did; I sent for a constable, and charged him with it; I asked him what he had done with the seed; he said he did not know any thing of any seed; he went with me very quietly.

Q. Had you ever employed him before? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - A. I am perfectly sure of it.

Prisoner's defence. All I have to say is, that I don't know any thing at all about it; I never received any seed from the gentleman.

Q. (To the prosecutor). What might the value of the whole of this be? - A. 7l. 1s.

Jury. If you had seen another soldier dressed in the same way like him, you might perhaps have thought it was him? - A. It was holiday time, and I saw 40 or 50 soldiers when I saw him; he said he did not know any thing of the clover seed, and he told the person with me that he did not know any thing of me.

GUILTY. (Aged 24.) Judgment respited.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-70

296. MARY CARROLL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a calico bed-gown, value 1s. 6d. and a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the property of Thomas English .

Mrs. ENGLISH sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor, a copper-plate printer , in Bear-alley, Fleet-Market : On Saturday morning, the 3d of April, I saw the things hanging on a line in the lower room on the ground

floor, between eight and nine in the morning; I found the prisoner concealed in that room on the ground behind a cradle, and I pulled the calico bed-gown and muslin handkerchief out of her pockethole, and threw them on the ground; I had not left the room above five minutes; I sent for a constable, and left the things lying on the ground; when the constable came, I delivered them to him, he has had them ever since.

Q. Were you out of the room at all? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you leave any body in the room? - A. Yes, several people; Martha Beck is here; I left her in the room; I know the bed-gown by the mark in it; I had mended it.

MARTHA BECK sworn.

I live next door to Mrs. English; I went into the house with her for a pail of water, she found the door open, and was very much frightened; she looked about and could not find any body, and then I saw a woman lying behind the cradle; I did not see any thing upon her; I went out to call some assistiance in; when I came in again, there was a calico bed gown, and a muslin handkerchief upon the floor; Mrs. English charged her with taking them, and she denied it.

ROBERT NEWMAN sworn.

I am a constable, (produce a bed-gown and a handkerchiefs); it was et. and when I searched her, I found this binding; Mrs. English gave charge of her, I found them upon the floor; (they were deposed to by the prosecutor).

Prisoner's defence. I went to enquire of this gentlewoman for one Mrs. Rigge; she said I was a thief, and looked among her things, and she struck me several times, and to be sure I abused her, and she sent for a constable.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Confined in the House of Correction six months , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-71

297. CHARLES CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a quarter of veal, thirty pounds weight, value 16s. the property of Richard Provost , and Richard Davis .

DANIEL HOPLEY sworn.

I am a butcher, porter to Mr. Davis; I hung up a quarter of veal about a quarter of an hour before it was missed, at my master's shop-door in Newgate-market ; Mr. Provost missed it, and asked me what was become of it, that was about a quarter before four in the morning of Saturday the 5th of March; the officer stopped the prisoner with the veal, about a quarter of an hour after it was missed; I am not certain that it is the same veal, I cannot swear to it.

Q. Is there any body that can? - A. I don't know any body that can; at Guildhall, the prisoner said, I could not swear that he took it, and I said, no, I could not.

RICHARD DAVIS sworn.

I am in partnership with Mr. Provost; I did not see the prisoner take the veal; there was a note put upon it when it was hung up; it was stole in less than five minutes after it was hung up; in consequence of information, I went over the water to the Rising-sun, the Surry-side of Black-friars bridge, with the constable, and saw the veal; I understood the prisoner was in custody, but I did not see him then; the paper was wrote on by my clerk, Thomas Jacobs; we sell by commission; this veal came from the country, it belonged to a person of that name in Wiltshire; this was the hind quarter, we had sold the other three quarters to a man in the Fleet-market; after we got it from the constable, the man who bought the other three quarters, bought that; my clerk is here to identify the hand-writing; I am satisfied, in my own opinion, that it is the quarter of veal that was taken from my shop.

EDWARD HEDINGTON sworn.

I am a constable; a little after four o'clock in the morning, on the 5th of March last, I saw the prisoner coming over Blackfriar's-bridge, with something upon his head; he was coming from over the bridge into Surrey; I walked by the side of him, I suppose one hundred yards, or thereabouts; when he found that I walked by the side of him, he went across the road; I then asked him what he had there, he said, he did not know, it was something he had picked up on the bridge; says I, then let us go and see what it is, and then he threw it away; I pursued him and called out to a watchman that was standing just by, and told him to stop that man, which he did, and brought him back; I ran back to secure the veal; I took him to the watch-house; I found this note upon the veal, stuck on with a skewer, (producing it), with Thomas Jacobs written upon it.

Prisoner. Q. Was not the veal wrapped up in a coarse cloth? - A. It was a piece of coarse sack, made like an apron, with two bits of packthread to it.

EDWARD TURVEY sworn.

I am a watchman; Hedingron called to me to stop the man that was running, and I did so; it was the prisoner, he dropped the veal in the road.

JAMES SQUIRE sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Davis, (looks at the note); this is my hand-writing, I wrote it, and the first witness put it upon the veal.

Hopley. I put this note upon the vcal that morning.

Prisoner's defence. I was out of work, and was going over Blackfriar's-bridge, and I picked up the property stated in the indictment, wrapped up in a coarse cloth, and I was going home, and was stopped by the officer. GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Judgment respited to go as a soldier .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-72

298. JAMES DAWSON was indicted, for that he, on the 6th of April , on the King's highway in and upon Fanny Davies , did make an assault, putting her in fear and danger of her life, and taking from her person, a pair of woman's stays, value 8s. a pair of jumps, value 12d. two hanks of fewing silk, value 6d. eight yards of tape, value 6d. a hank of thread, value 1d. a piece of buckram, value 1d. and a linen pocket handkerchief, value 2d. the property of the said Fanny.

FANNY DAVIES sworn.

I am a widow : On Wednesday night last, about nine o'clock, as I was coming through Palace-yard , over right the Hall, the prisoner came behind me, and snatched the bundle out of my hand, and ran away directly; he had the same cloaths on that he has now; I am sure he is the man; he had a handkerchief bound round his left hand.

Q. Was it light enough to see his face? - A. I saw his face coming over Westminster-bridge; I had been at Lambeth, and was going home; I live just beyond Westminster-abbey.

Q. You know one soldier is like another; are you sure that is the man? - A. Yes; I saw his face on the bridge, and I saw his face when he snatched the bundle from me; I am sure he is the man.(Edward Carter, the pawn-broker, was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated).

WILLIAM MESSENGER sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Queen's-square, Westminster: On Thursday morning, between eleven and twelve, I heard of two girls being stopped pledging a pair of stays; they said, they had them of a man that was then in bed, and I went and secured the prisoner; I found him in bed, and on a table in the room, I found a pair of jumps, and some sewing silk, which the prosecutrix owned; he was committed the same night, (the jumps and silk were produced in Court).

WILLIAM ATWOOD sworn.

I am an officer; I was with the last witness, when he apprehended the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. I had these jumps to mend, I am answerable for them.

Prisoner's defence. I went into the Rose, over Westminster-bridge; this woman came in, and gave me a share of seven pints of beer; she was very much in liquor, and desired me to carry the bundle for her; she slipped down several times upon the bridge.

Court. Q. Had you been drinking at all with him? - A. He was having a pint of beer, and I drank part of it; I thought he was a distressed man, and I gave him some.

Q. Were you in liquor? - A. No; I met him at that public-house by accident.

Q. Where is that public-house? - A. I don't know.

Q. Then you must have drank? - A. No; I had not.

Q. Did you give him your bundle to carry? - A. I did not; he followed me out of the house.

GUILTY of stealing, but not violently .

Confined one week in Newgate , and delivered to his serjeant.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-73

299. THOMAS KEEFE was indicted for feloniously stealing fifty pounds weight of lead, value 3s. the property of David Williams , fixed to a building .

DAVID WILLIAMS sworn.

On Sunday the 6th of March, about six in the evening, I went to a house that I was building, in Nottingham-street , and heard a noise at the top of the house, as if there were a great many people there; one of the witnesses took the prisoner coming out of the house; the lead was left at the top of the house; I did not go up to look till next morning, and then I missed the lead.

STEPHEN STEVENS sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Agar; I took the prisoner at the door coming out of the house, on Sunday the 6th of March, without any shoes; his hands were quite black, apparently as if he had been handling lead; he told me he had been drinking, and taking a girl home, and the girl had run into that house, and he had been in after her; I asked him where the girl was? and he said he did not know; he was then taken to the watch-house.

- BATES sworn.

I am a patrole of Mary-le-bonne watch-house: On the 6th of March, between six and seven o'clock, I took charge of the prisoner; he had no shoes on, his hands were very dirty, as if he had been taking lead; I searched him, but did not find any thing upon him; the next morning, about nine o'clock, I went to the house, and found the lead there, it was delivered to me, and I marked it; I put the lead down, and it sitted the place exactly, at the end of the gutter, but there was a great deal gone.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am a carpenter: On Sunday evening, as I was coming past, I heard a great noise; I called and asked if they were pulling the house to pieces; and then the noise ceased; I came past again a few minutes after, and I heard the same rending again; and I went to Mr. Williams's to inform him of it; I did not see the prisoner come out, but I saw him close by the corner when he was stopped.

Q. (To Williams.) Who was it that found the lead and shoes there? - A. A person who is not here; I don't know his name, he is a stranger to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-74

300. MARY PATMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March, a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the property of James Goode .

JOHN LEVER sworn.

I live with Mr. Goode, linen-draper , the corner of Gray's-Inn-lane . On the Ist of March the prisoner came into our shop to buy a piece of cloth; after I had sold it her, she asked to look at a muslin handkerchief; she asked the price of several, and at last I missed one; and in searching of her I found it, she pulled it out of her pocket - hole; I knew it to be our's, it was very dirty; it had been in our shop - window a long time; it is not marked, (produces it); It laid loose upon the counter when she took it.

Prisoner's defence. I never had it, nor never saw it.(The prisoner called James Wells , with whom she lived servant at the time of the robbery, and who gave her a good character).

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-75

301. JOHN DORIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a dimity waistcoat, value 1s. 6d. the property of William Ellis .

MARY ELLIS sworn.

I am the wife of William Ellis , I keep a cellar on Saffron-hill ; I missed a waistcoat off a hook that I hang my things out upon; I pursued the prisoner and he was stopped, and brought back; (produces the waistcoat).

JOHN KING sworn.

I am a watchman. On Thursday evening, about five o'clock, coming up Saffron - hill, I saw the prisoner take the waistcoat; I stopped him, and brought him back; the prosecutrix took the waistcoat from him.

JANE RILEY sworn.

I saw the prosecutrix run and take the waistcoat from under the prisoner's coat.

Prosecutrix. It has my mark upon it.

Prisoner's defence. I was coming down Saffron-hill very much in liquor, this woman came after me, and said I had got a waistcoat of her's; I don't know whether I had or not, I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , publickly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-76

302. MARY DAVIES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , a shift, value 12d. a check linen apron, value 6d. two linen bed - gowns, value 1s. 6d. a linen counterpane, value 12d. and a linen shirt, value 6d. the property of James Jones .

MARY JONES sworn.

I am the wife of James Jones , I lodge in Lewkener's - lane : On Saturday, the 13th of February, I went out, and left my things safe in my box; when I returned home, I missed them; about a fortnight after, I was going past a pawnbroker's, and saw my counterpane hanging up.

GEORGE PAUL sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; (produces a counterpane and a coloured apron); I took in a counterpane, on Saturday the 13th of February, of the prisoner, I knew her before; she pawned that in the name of Elizabeth Davies ; and, on the 15th, of the apron, in the name of Brown. (The counterpane was deposed to by the prosecutrix).

Prisoner's defence. This is not the counterpane that I pawned with this gentleman; there was a petticoat with it, the same as the gown I have got on, I sold it to him out of pawn; that is not the counterpane at all.

Paul. This is the counterpane I received from the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-77

303. MARY DAVIES was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March, a pair of women's stays, value 5s. the property of Patrick Macmanus .

MARY MACMANUS sworn.

I am the wife of Patrick Macmanus, I lodge at No. 10, Drury-lane : On Tuesday, the 15th of March, I lost a pair of stays; I left them at a quar

ter after ten in my own room, in a box, it was not locked; I returned about twelve, and missed my stays, and a bonnet; I found my stays a pawnbroker's, about four o'clock the same day.

THOMAS PERRIN sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street: On the 15th of March, between two and three o'clock, I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner. In Mrs. Macmanus's room they searched her, and behind her back they found this bunch of keys,(producing them); and among them, a key that opened her door; I had them from Mrs. Macmanus, there are eighteen of them; I found a duplicate in her pocket belonging to theseitays, which were pawned in Oxford-road; I took her to Marlborough-street, and she was committed.

JOSEPH FOLLOWS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Burnthwaite, pawnbroker, in Oxford-road, (produces a pair of stays); I had them of the prisoner at the bar; I had seen her before.

Q. (To Mrs. Macnanus.) Was the prisoner brought to your house afterwards? - A. No, I found her in the passage; she came, I suppose, to take some more things. I asked her what she wanted? and she said, she wanted to go backwards; a constable was sent for, and she was detained till he came; I searched her and found these keys upon her, and the duplicate; there was no violence done to the door. These are my stays, I had only wore them twice; there was a dirty lace in them, and they were made for me.

Prisoner's defence. As I was coming through Smithfield, I met with another woman, that told me my husband would be at home in a fortnight or three weeks; we had no money, and she went and brought these stays, and pawned them; she left the duplicate upon the table, and I took it up; I went to enquire for Mr. Dawson, and this good woman came and asked me what I wanted; she took me up stairs, and used me very ill. I know nothing about the stays any more than the child unborn. I found the keys as I was coming from Chelmsford to London.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-78

304. WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March, three guineas , the property of Morgan Morgan , clerk .

MORGAN MORGAN sworn.

I am a clergyman , residing in South Wales: On Saturday the 26th of March, I was robbed; I came to town on Friday; I left my great coat and saddle bags at the White-house-Cellar , when I came in by the coach; I called the next day for them; I sat down in a box in the coffee-room, while the girl went out for change for a guinea to pay her for the care she had taken of my great coat and bags; I had bespoke a bed, though I did not sleep in it; during my sitting there, a person unknown to me(not the prisoner) addressed me, and said, you are a gentleman from the country; he said, he was lately come from the country himself, and he wished to be more acquainted with me; he said, he was a clothier, at Cheltenham, in Gloucestershire, and came once a year to town, and asked, if I knew Ross, that he used to buy a great deal of wool at Ross-fair; he asked me what part of the town I was going to, I told him, Aldgate; the waiter brought me change for a guinea; he said, he was going immediately, drank his glass, and followed me out to the door; I was going to take a coach. for I was unacquainted with the town, and he told me there was no occasion, for he was going my way, and he would go with me; he said, he was going to the Bell-Savage, which was part of the way, and he would carry my saddle-bags for me, if I was ashamed to carry them, as I was a clergyman; as I went along Piccadilly, by the side of him, he stooped, and picked up something. What is it, says I, it is only a bit of waste paper, I dare say; says he, there is some substance in it, I am sure there is something of value in it, and we will not open it here; we will go into some house, says he, we must not talk of it here; we are just before the Duke of York's house, and it may be a thing of very great value; we walked on to the first - ale - house we came to, which I believe was the George; we went into a room there, and he took it out, now, says he, we can examine the contents of it; he opened a brown paper, in which was a little morocco pocket-case, and pulled out a receipt for 3401 for a diamond cross; I said, that is a receipt, that is of no value; then he said, there is something more within, he opened it, and there was a diamond cross, which he just shewed me, and then shut it up in the pocket-case again; sir, we have found a very valuable prize indeed, says he, and then he shewed me the receipt and read it; he asked me, what we had best do; I told him, he had better go to the jeweller, whose name was to the receipt, by which he might have information who the proprietor was; just at that time, the prisoner came in; the man, who had been with me before, said, I do not think that adviseable; the prisoner came in with a pen and ink, as if he was upon business; I believe the prisoner had sat down before he had asked me what was best to be done; the man that was with me, said, as we were both strangers, we had better ask that gentleman what he thinks of it, and handed it across to him; he looked at the receipt, and read it, after putting on his glasses; the man then asked him what he thought was best for us to do in that case; the pri

soner said, I know the jeweller, and if I was worthy of advising you, I would not do so, or you will not have the reward that will be given; if you please to keep it a profound secret till Monday, you will see the advertisement in the paper what reward will be offered for picking it up; I said, I did not think that adviseable at all; I knew two or three jewellers in town, if he would go along with me, I would take it to them to know the value; no, by no means, says the prisoner, or else you will spoil all your fun or sport; I told him I had no concern in it, that I did not pick it up, if there was any reward for picking it up, it was for the other man.

Q. The prisoner was not at the picking of it up? - A. No, he was not; each of them answered, that I was entitled to one half, whatever the reward was; the prisoner further said, as we lived in different parts of the town, it was not proper that he should have it without depositing a sum of money in my hands; the prisoner asked the other man what money he would deposit in my hand if he kept the property till Monday, to meet at such an hour on Monday, and see the public papers, to see what the reward was for picking it up; I would not consent to that, because my stay in town was very short; he then asked the other man what he would put down if he had the property by him till Monday; he answered, he would put down any sum he proposed, to the value of thirty or forty pounds, that he had no money in his pocket, but that he would go out to his friend, and would be back soon; then he delivered up the pocket-case to the prisoner, and insisted on my not going out of the room till his return; during his absence, the prisoner addressed me, and said, I am a gentleman who lives in the neighbourhood, says he, you are equally strangers to me; I think you are an honest man, and I will see that you are rectified in this matter, that he shall not take this property with him, without depositing a sum of money to your satisfaction; he prosessed a very great friendship for me, as a stranger in town; says he, I have the property by me, and he shall not take the advantage of you, for he may not be a man of the best character, but I will take care of that, and if you want any money to put down, I will advance you any sum of money, to the amount of twenty or thirty pounds, for you, if he has none to put down; I thanked him for his proffer, and told him I would not be so troublesome; in the mean time, the other man returned, in about five or ten minutes, and the prisoner asked him if he had succeded, he said, no, his friend was not at home; then the prisoner said to me, what money will you advance, if you have the property in your care; he said, if I had not enough, he would advance for me, as from the conversation he had had with me, he believed I was an honest man; then they asked what money I had by me, I told them I had not much by me, but what paid my fare up, that I had three guineas and a half and some silver in my pocket, and that I was to receive some money before I went out of town; they asked me how much I had to receive, I told them, 241. I was going to the Governor of the Queen Anne's bounty, and it was then too late to wait on Mr. Stevens, and they asked me how I received it of Mr. Stevens, I told them I usually received it by sending a friend with a receipt, it is payable half yearly: then they asked me if I had any acquaintance that I could get some money of, before I went to Mr. Stevens, as it was not payable that day; I told them I had, but it was a good way off, and I preferred going to a jeweller, and if the cross was to that value, he might come along with me, and my friend would advance the money for me; but the man that went in with me, would not hear any talk about the jeweller, and the prisoner got up, and said, that would never do, he had 20l. and upwards in his pocket, and he would advance any sum of money, and give me credit, rather than we should quarrel about it, and asked me if I would deposit the three guineas and an half, that I had in my hands, he would take care of the man and the property till I returned from my friend; and then I gave him three guineas and an half, and I was to take a coach, and be back before six o'clock, at the White-bear, but they begged me not to disclose to any man what the money was for, and to come back alone, or else I should torseit the deposit money; and he said, if you are the man you prosess to be, you will return without mentioning what you want it for, and then we shall conside in you, that you will keep it a secret; they said, they must not lose time, got up in a hurry, and called a coach; I asked the coachman what the fare was to Aldgate and back, he said, 5s. Come, come, said the prisoner, don't lose time about the fare, and they both of them rose me up into the coach, shut the door upon me, and desired the coachman to drive on; I went to my acquaintance, and he gave me a check on his banker for 201. I returned by the same coach, near to the White-bear, Piccadilly, and at a little distance, I could see the prisoner on the other side of the street, looking into the coach, as I thought, to see if I was the person, and he then immediately came up to the coach door; he asked me if I had got the money, I told him I had; he asked me how much, and if I had told my acquaintance what it was for; I said, I told him that I had a use for the money, but did not explain what use, and that my friend made no farther enquiry what I wanted it for, but gave me a check payable to bearer; just at that time, the other man came

up to the side of the coach, and asked me if I had the money, I told him I had; yes, says the prisoner, he had got 201. he has done very well, he has not told his business; then they desired me to pay the coachman, and we would go in and settle the matter; I told him I did not intend to make any stay, and the coachman should take me back again; no, say they, pay him now, you may return back by another, we will get you a coach, and take you back a shorter way; I paid the coachman, and they took me into Panton-street, to a little ale-house there, the Union-arms; I told him I did not like to sit down in that house, that that was not the White-bear where they promised to meet me; the prisoner said, I need not be afraid, for he knew the man of the house very well; I told them I had got no cash; the other man seemed to be ignorant, and not to understand whether it was payable or not, and asked the prisoner whether it would do or not? yes, says he, it is very good payment, it is payable to bearer; the other man scrupled to take it at first. He then said, I should have the property if I would give him the check, and three guineas and a half, upon condition it should be sealed up with my seal, that I should not open it before one o'clock on Monday, nor disclose this business to any body, otherwise I should forseit all the money I had deposited; I begged leave to see it, and examine it; but they were in a great hurry, and wrapped it up in brown paper, and sealed it with three seals, left one should break, and gave it me into my hand, and they were to call on me on Monday noon; we then all went out together, and they walked with me to a coach; the prisoner said, he would see me restified, and would wait upon me with the other two on Monday at one o'clock, at Mr. Francis's, No. 63, Aldgate. I waited at home till one o'clock, and they did not come; I then told Mr. Francis I was afraid I had lost the check I had had of him. On the Wednesday following, I went to the Boltin-Tun, Fleet-street, to take the coach, to go out of town; I told the coachman I would go on to Oxford-road, and meet the coach there; and, as I was going from the inn, between that and Templebar, I met the prisoner; as he passed by me, he was in conversation with another person; when they had passed me, I told the young man that was with me, that that was one of the men that took my money; I turned back and addressed him, Sir, how do you do? and begged him to stop, he was in a hurry going on; I said, don't you recollect seeing me on Saturday evening? No, says he, I don't, you must mistake the person; I told him I knew him perfectly well; that I had reason to recollect him, if he did not me; I asked the gentleman who was in conversation with him if he knew the prisoner? and he said he never saw him before; I said he had taken my money from me on Saturday evening, and he was then walking away very fast, he would not hear the conversation; I turned back to keep my eye upon him, and the gentleman stepped on one side, and I saw no more of him; the prisoner said he would not be detained, that he was going upon business; I said, I would insist upon his going before a Magistrate; he said he would, but he would not be stopped in the street; I enquired for a Magistrate, and went over with him to a Mr. Wright's; he said he would not be detained; Mr. Wright was not in the way, but somebody there said, I will detain him; you are my prisoner, Sir, and then a constable was sent for, and he was taken before a Magistrate; the next day he was bailed.

Q. Was he in the same dress then that he was in on the Saturday? - A. I believe, chiefly; but I did not take so much notice of his dress as of his person.

Q. How long might he have been with you on the Saturday in the whole? - A. By one of their watches it was twenty minutes after four; when I came out of the house, to go for the money, I looked at my watch, I don't know what time it was when I came from the White-horse-Cellar; we might be in the publick-house about three quarters of an hour, or it may be an hour; when I met him on the Wednesday, I spoke to him, and from his articulate manner of speaking, I was confirmed that he was the person.

Cross-examined by Mr. Fielding. Q. In the first place, let me ask you, whether you were not apprized at the Magistrates office, on the second day, by the officers, of who Mr. Wilson is, and that they knew, as well as they know where St. Paul's stands, who it was that had played this trick upon you? - A. No such thing.

Q. Were you not apprized who Mr. Wilson was? - A. I believe him to be the person.

Q. Now let me try your feelings a little; do you or do you not feel you have injured that gentleman beyond the power of reparation? - A. I should have felt it if I had.

Q. Can you really persuade your heart, at this moment, after all you have heard, that he was the person? - A. He is the man that took my money.

Q. Was this the first time of your being in London? - A. Yes.

Q. Then of course you never heard of any thing of this kind? - A. Yes, I have, but it never occurred to me.

Q. You say the man produced a receipt for this thing first? - A. Yes.

Q. What became of this diamond cross? - A. I have it; (produces it).

Q. You advised them to find out the jeweller that had made this? - A. Yes.

Q. You had an opportunity of seeing who the

jeweller was by the inspection of the receipt? - A. I just had the inspection of it once.

Q. It was this third person that told you you were entitled to half with the finder? - A. Each of them did.

Q. Therefore all your solicitude about the jeweller fell to the ground when that was talked of? - A. I saw the receipt, and wanted a copy of it; if I had had it I would have gone to him.

Q. At what time was it that you opened it; because there is no apprehension of your forfeiting the deposit-money now? - A. I never opened it till the time was expired.

Q. You, I take it for granted, are a clergyman? - A. Yes.

Q. How was it, that this thing being found, and no right of property being in you, with the opportunity of finding out the jeweller, you did not take more active steps; what was your expection of advantage resulting from this business? - A. From the value of the property, as I thought, entrusted to my care, and I never had the examination of it.

Q. You were to be at all this trouble, and lay out all this money, merely to find its proper owner? - A. I conceived, if it was real, it was an equivalent value.

Q. But why was the owner to pay so much money as you advanced? - A. They both assured me that there would be more than that to each of us for finding it.

Court. Q. There is only three guineas in the indictment? - A. They returned me half-a-guinea when I gave them the check of twenty pounds.

Q. You did not open it till the Monday, and therefore you could have no anxiety about it on the Sunday? - A. No.

Q. What sort of a man was that other man that picked it up? - A. He was dressed like a farmer; he told me he was a clothier at Cheltenham, with brown lank hair, and pock-marked; he was booted and spurred, with a whip in his hand; he said, he was just come to town from Gloucester.

Q. All these prossers of friendship from the person you supposed to be Mr. Wilson did not astonish you at all. - A. Not at all.

Q. Did you get any fight of this rich jewel during the time you and the first man were talking together? - A. I cannot recollect; I believe I had a glimpse.

Q. And you thought it was full worth the money it imported? - A. I thought it was a real reciptly.

Q. Were you not assured, by some persons before the Magistrate, that this could not be the man? - A. No, I was not; I have heard since that it might be another man.

Court. Q. As it has been intimated to you that you might be wrong in the person, turning that intimation in your mind, are you now perfectly, satisfied that the prisoner is the man? - A. I am; that is the impression upon my mind.

WILLIAM HENRY FRANCIS sworn.

I live with my father, who is a butcher in Aldgate; me and Mr Morgan were going to the Boltin-Tun, Fleet-street, on Wednesday last, between ten and eleven o'clock, he took a place in the stage, and paid his fare, to Gloucester; Mr. Morgan had to call in Cavendish-street, and we went on before the coach, and met Mr. Willon and another gentleman; Mr. Morgan said, that was one of the men that had sharped him; and he went up to him, and touched his hat, and said, how do you do, Sir? - Mr. Wilson touched his hat, and said the same; and said, I think you are a butcher, are not you? I replied, and said, yes, I was; we walked down to the bottom of Fleet-street, all four of us; Mr. Morgan told him he was one of the men that sharped him of his money; Mr. Wilson said, he was wrong, he had made a mistake in the person. Just before we got to the bottom of Fleet-street, I turned round, and said to the gentleman that was with him, do you know any thing of this man; and he said he never saw him before in his life; we then enquired where we could get a constable; and I looked round for the gentleman that was walking with Mr. Wilson, and I lost him all on a sudden; we took Mr. Wilson over to Mr. Wright's; a constable was sent for, and he was taken to Guildhall, and from there to the office in Hatton-Garden.

WILLIAM FRANCIS sworn.

I am the father of the last witness; Mr. Morgan came to town on Good-Friday; he was at my house; he went out on Saturday morning, and returned about five o'clock, or a little after, and desired I would be kind enough to let him have twenty pounds, and I gave him a check upon my banker, payable to bearer, and on Monday, between twelve and one, he seemed to be looking out for somebody; I told him he had better walk in, that the air was cold; he said he was looking for a gentleman or two; and then he said he was afraid he had been taken in; and on Wednesday he left my house to return to Gloucester.

JAMES FAREY sworn.

I am a backney coachman: This day fortnight I saw Mr. Morgan, and another gentleman, in Piecadilly, near the White-bear; Mr. Morgan got into the coach about twenty minutes after four, I drove him to Aldgate; I think I should know the gentleman that was with him, if I was to see him; he was dressed in a drab coat, a little taller than me; (looks round); I do not see him here. I brought Mr. Morgan from Whitechapel, and then two gentlemen met him; I set him down near the Whitebear, about twenty minutes after five; I got off the box to let Mr. Morgan out on to the pavement,

and these gentlemen came to the off-side of the coach, and let him out into the middle of the street; Mr. Morgan paid me my fair, and they went towards the Haymarket. (Looks at the prisoner), I don't think that is the gentleman.

ARASELLA TIPPIN sworn.

I live at the George, in Piccadilly; I remember three gentlemen coming in to have some rum and water, two gentlemen came in first, and one afterwards; Mr. Morgan was one of the two, the other was in a blue coat; and then another man came in afterwards, in a drab coloured coat; I don't think I should know him again; it was between three and four o'clock.

ELEANOR EDWARDS sworn.

I am servant at the Union-arms, in Panton-street, Haymarket; there were two gentlemen at our house last week, along with Mr. Morgan, a little after five o'clock; we sent out for some ham and beef; I think I should know one of them, he had quite grey hair, and was dressed in a blue coat.

Q. Look at the prisoner; was he one of them? - A. It is very much like the face of the man, but I cannot say, he is altered very much in his dress, if that is him, for his hair was very much about his ears.(The prisoner being called upon for his defence, said, he should leave it to his counsel).

For the Prisoner.

JOHN SAYER sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am an officer belonging to Bow-street.

Q. You are no stranger to the trick of dropping rings, and so forth? - A. Certainly not; I was sent to look at a man in custody, at the office in Covent-Garden, to see whether I had any knowledge of him; or not; I saw the prisoner there, and I told the Magistrates I did not know him as being a man of that description.

Q. You said that in the hearing of Mr. Morgan, of course - A. I don't know that it was.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am one of the officers of Bow-street.

Q. You are acquainted with a great number of people who play these tricks upon the town? - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know any persons of that description who resemble the prisoner at the bar? - A. I do; I know two that have been in that line many years, that very much resemble him.

JOHN TOWNSEND sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding. After the prisoner was bailed, I had also the curiosity to go and see him, and the moment I saw him, I was perfectly satisfied that he was no sharper; and there certainly are two men that resemble the person of the prisoner, as much as one man can be like another; one of them was tried in this Court a very short time ago.

REV. DR. BELL sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I believe you were many years chaplain to the Princess Amelia? - A. Yes; and Mr. Wilson was gardener to her a very considerable time; I considered his character while he was in the Princess's family, as in every degree respectful; I never heard the smallest furmise that could at all impeach his character.

SIR JOSEPH BANKS sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding. I have known Mr. Wilson a great many years; he is one of the most respectable men in his profession as a gardener, and a man of the most unimpeached character; I have been in the habit of making myself acquainted with those gardeners who are the most respectable, and I know no man whose character is more unimpeached.

WILLIAM HEATON sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am gardener to his Majesty at Kew; I have known Mr. Wilson upwards of fourteen years; I never knew a man in my life of better character; I am fully convinced he is incapable of any bad action.

Q. I believe, but for this interruption, he would have been at this time, gardener to his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales? - A. I was applied to for a gardener for the Prince, and I know no person so proper as Mr. Wilson; I waited upon Mr. Wilson, and desired he would be at home on Thursday, and on the Saturday following; I called upon him on the Sunday, and he told me he had been waiting at home all Saturday, and was very much disappointed at my not calling.

ROBERT GRAY sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding. I have the honour to be employed about the person of his Majesty; I have been in habits of intimate friendship with Mr. Wilson, upwards of twenty-seven years; during that period I have never heard any thing disrespectful, either of his moral character or abilities in his profession, and I believe I know more of his pecuniary circumstances than any other man, and I know he has no outward temptation whatever; I verily believe in my conscience he is as innocent of this as any man.

HON. MISS HOWARD sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I have known Mr. Wilson ever since he was in the household of the Princess Amelia; his character is a most excellent one; he was respected by every body who knew him.

JOHN TURNER sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding. I was in the household of the Princess Amelia; I have known Mr. Wilson twenty-seven years, fourteen of which I

had the honour to serve her Royal Highness; his character is unimpeachable in every respect, he is incapable of any impropriety whatever.

- FORSYTH sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the King's gardener, at Kensington; I have known Mr. Wilson ever since July or August, 1767; his character is unimpeachable; we have been in the habit of communicating with each other in our professional line; I have visited him, and he me, and I believe him incapable of any thing bad.

CHARLES MINIER sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am a feedsman; I have known Mr. Wilson upwards of twenty-five years; I have been in the habit of doing business with him, and never heard a fault of him in my life; I can say no more of him than what has now so often been repeated.

WILLIAM MINIER sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a feedsman in the Strand; I knew Mr. Wilson when he was in the service of the Princess Amelia, and of Lord Mount Edgcumbe, his character is honest and unimpeachable.

FRANCIS MASON sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding. I am employed in collecting plants for his Majesty; I have known Mr. Wilson since 1772, he always bore an unimpeached character.

HUGH REYNOLDS sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am a nurseryman; I have known Mr. Wilson six or eight and twenty years; I always had the greatest respect for his honour and integrity; I have the highest opinion of him.

Mr. Fielding. Now I will prove the utter impossibility of his being the man.

JOHN BUNCE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding. I live in Brompton-row; I know Mr. Wilson perfectly well; I live at No. 6, and he lives at No. 3, in the same Row; he was at our house on Saturday the 26th of March, about three o'clock, a market gardener's cart generally calls upon its return from market; Mr. Wilson took particular notice of the horses, how fat they were, and my mother said, they were the finest horses that travelled that road.

ANN BUNCE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I am the mother of the last witness; I live at Brompton; I saw Mr. Wilson on the Saturday before Easter-Sunday, about three o'clock, at our house; we deal in coals, he came to pay for something that he had had; he asked me whose cart that was, and I told him; he said they were very fine horses; I said, I believed they were the best horses that went that road, and then he went away.

FRANCES WOOD sworn.

Examined by Mr. Knowlys. I was at Brompton on the Saturday, and saw Mr. Wilson coming out of his own door at Brompton, about five o'clock.

SARAH COLES sworn.

Examined by Mr. Fielding. Mr. Wilson lives at my house: On Saturday the 26th of March, I saw him from the morning till about four o'clock, he dined in the kitchen that day, which he did not usually do.

Jury. There is certainly no occasion to trouble the Court any further, we are perfectly satisfied.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-79

305. THOMAS MORGAN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Vint , about the hour of one in the night of the 1st of April , and burglariously stealing six copper-plate prints, framed and glazed, value 1l. 10s. one weather-glass, called a barometer, value 1l. 1s. a morocco, spectacle case, value 6d. a pair of spectacles, value 5s. and nine pounds weight of salted beef, value 3s. 6d. the property of the said Edward Vint ; two muslin aprons, value 3s. a linen cloth apron, value 1s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 2s. 6d. two muslin aprons, value 3s. a linen cloth shirts, value 2s. 6d. two calico shawls, value 5s. 6d. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2s. two cotton check aprons, value 2s. a linen gown, value 3s. a cotton gown, value 3s. a yard of black ribbon, value 4d. a cotton handkerchief, value 1s. and sixty halfpence, the property of Betty Holder , in the same dwelling-house .

Second Count charging him with the like burglary, laying it to be the dwelling-house of Mary, the wife of Edward Vint .(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner).

BETTY HOLDER sworn.

I live with Mrs. Vint; her husband's name is Edward, he is the printer of the Gazetter , in Ave-Maria-lane , the back windows look into Stationer's-court; I made the parlour window fast when I went to bed; on the 31st of March, I and my mistress both went out of the room together; at three o'clock in the morning we were alarmed that the house was broke open; I went into the parlour, and found that the parlour shutter was broke open, unbolted, and the sash up.

Q. Are you sure you fastened this window when you went to bed? - A. Yes.

MARY VINT sworn.

I live in Ave-Maria-lane; our back parlour looks into Stationer's-court; I went to bed at ten o'clock

on Friday night, the 1st of April, and was called up at three o'clock on Saturday morning; I went with the maid into the parlour, she fastened the window, and I put my hand to see if it was safe; I heard a ringing at the bell, at three o'clock in the morning, there was nobody in the house but the maid and me, all the rest of the family were in the country. I sent her down to know what was the matter; she came up, and said she could make nobody hear; I bid her go up to the top of the house to a trap-door, and call the men together; it is a double house, they work in the next house, there is a communication; the man followed her down stairs, and said the house had been robbed, for they found some of my property as they came into the parlour; I did not look at the window, but at the pictures which were taken down, six of them; and a pair of spectacles that I left in a wine-glass were on the side-board, and the case on a harpsichord.

Q. Did you observe the window at all? - A. No.

Q. Are you sure the six pictures that were taken down were hanging up? - A. I am.

JOHN BEAUCHAMP sworn.

I am a printer; I conduct the printing business for Mrs. Vint; I was up one pair of stairs in the printing-house where we do the paper for the Gazetter, I was reading some proofs, at the time, in my place; I heard a great noise below of some of our men, in the passage that goes into Ave-Maria-lane; two or three people ran down, and I ran down immediately after, and found that our own people had stopped the prisoner at the bar, in a passage coming up out of the cellar; almost immediately, before I could speak to the prisoner, one of the men picked up a bundle that lay in the passage.

Q. What is his name? - A. I believe, to the best of my memory, Peter Williams ; there were several things, I observed, in the bundle, particularly an haunch-bone of beef, and some of the cloaths of the servant; then the prisoner was secured.

Q. How near was this to the parlour that looks into Stationer's-court? - A. They are two houses, and there is a communication at the top, and at the bottom.

Q. What passage was the prisoner taken at? - A. At that which goes up to the printing-house.

Q. What time was it? - A. Between one and two in the morning; I asked the prisoner what business he had there; he told me he had been at two or three clubs, or public-houses, I cannot say which, that he wanted to ease himself, and thought that a proper place; and made his way up this passage to go and ease himself.

Q. Is the door of this passage always open of a night? - A. It was till then.

Q. Was it possible he could get into that house through that door? - A. Yes; he could not get into the dwelling-house that way, he might through the cellar; but he must have broke a large iron bar to get into the kitchen.

Prisoner. Did you not say the cellar-door was broke open? - A. No; when the bundle was found, I sent a person to see if the cellar was broke open, and it was not.

JOSEPH JONES sworn.

I am a printer; being at my business, between the hours of one and two, I came down stairs, hearing a noise, and saw the prisoner in the passage; I was the first that heard the alarm; he was coming up into the passage, up the cellar stairs; he stopped, and made no resistance; I asked him his business; he told me he had been to case himself; he stood some time, and others came down stairs from above, and one went for a watchman to take charge of him, and take him to the watch-house; some time after, I went down stairs, and found a knife, or chopper, near the kitchen door; I soon after, with others, when the maid was called up, went up to the top of the house, and went through the house, the maid came up and let us in that way; I went into the parlour, and saw the pictures, some hanging corner ways, the other things were disturbed; it appeared that somebody had got in at the window, the parlour window being open, next to Stationers court; then we went towards the kitchen-door, and found the pictures packed up in an apron, apparently for carriage, they were lying near the kitchen-door, in a small room at the bottom of the kitchen-stairs. There is a door out of the kitchen into the other house, but it was bolted on the contrary side to where the prisoner was; part of the things were brought out into the passage leading into Ave Maria-lane.

Q. I want to know how they were brought through? - A. I cannot tell.

PETER WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a printer; I heard a noise in the passage, and went down stairs; the prisoner had been stopped; a bundle lay in the passage; I took a candle and went down the cellar-stairs, and picked up a weather glass.

Q. Any thing else? - A. No.

Q. No bundle? - A. It lay in the passage before I went down, I saw it say there; I know nothing of the contenrs of it.

WILLIAM SHEPHERD sworn.

I am a constable; I received this bundle from Joseph Jones.

Jones. He did not receive it from me, the constable took it at the watch-house.

Q. (To Shepherd.) Who gave it you? - A. It was put on the table in the watch house; I do not know by whom. (Produces a bundle, a weather-glass, and six prints).

Q. Who gave you these things? - A. I am not positive.

SAMUEL FURNACE sworn.

I am a watchman; there was watch called between one and two, on Saturday morning last; I went, and took the prisoner to the watch-house; this bundle was found in the passage, and the prisoner in the house.

Q. Did you see the bundle in the passage? - A. Yes; we took it to the watch-house with the prisoner, and from thence to the Compter.

Q. Do you know who brought the weather-glass? - A. I went up with the bundle to the watch-house; when I came back from the Compter, I picked up a handkerchief and a spectacle case, outside of the door where the bundle came from.

Q. A silk handkerchief? - A. I can't be positive, it was a chocolate coloured spotted handkerchief; I found them on the outside of the house, in Ave-Maria-lane.

Q. All these things were found in the printing-house? - A. All but the handkerchief and spectacle case.

Q. Did you find how the persons got into the house? - A. Through Stationer's-court, into the window.

Q. (To Mrs. Vint.) In what manner did the persons get out from your house? - A. I fancy through the kitchen-door; it was barred when we went to bed; I suppose somebody must be left in to undar it, and let somebody out, and then bar it again. (The things were deposed to by the prosecutrix and servant).

GEORGE ATKINSON sworn.

I am employed by Mrs. Vint to read the Gazetteer; between one and two o'clock on the day stated, I was coming from the door that leads from the accompting-house, and I saw a man standing in the passage; I enquired his business, he then ran out, and I pursued him; no assistance being near me, he escaped.

Q. Is the prisoner the man? - A. No, that is not the man; I returned, and found the prisoner in the passage; that is all that I know.

Q. This stair-case leads to the back-kitchen? - A. Yes.

Q. In which back-kitchen there is a communication with the house? - A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I had been up to the other end of the town to work, I had been in two or three public-houses, I was in liquor; coming up Ave-Maria-lane, I thought this was a public-house, and went into it to case myself; a man asked me what I wanted, and said, that that bundle belonged to me, and I said, no, it did not.(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character).

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERGEANT.

Reference Number: t17960406-80

306. THOMAS LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , two black silk masks, value 2s. two black silk dominos, value 30s. and a hat and feather, value 30s. the property of Edward Thomas .

EDWARD THOMAS sworn.

I am a hatter and masquerade warehouseman , No. 316, Oxford-street ; I can only prove the property, I had seen them the morning they were lost, last Thursday.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. There was a masquerade that night, was not there? - A. There was.

WILLIAM WARD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Thomas: On Thursday evening, about eight o'clock, a man came to my master's, and ordered some dresses to No. 7, Mary-le-bonne-street; it was not the prisoner, it was a strange man, he said, they must be good ones; about nine o'clock, I took four dominos, two masks, and two hats; when I got into Holles-street, Cavendish-square, the prisoner met me, and asked me if I was going to Mary-le-bonne-street; I told him, yes; he took hold of the hats, and followed me to the house, No. 7; he went into the parlour, and tried two black dominos on, and two masks, he kept them, and tried one of the hats on, with a feather; he said, the dominos were not for him, they were for two other gentlemen; he said, one was up stairs dressing, with the hair-dresser with him, and the other was out; when he tried them on, I told him I could not leave them without the money; he said, he did not know what to do, he could not possibly speak to the gentleman; then he put on his hat, and said, he was going to the gentleman, he took the things under his arm, and said, he was going up stairs; he shut me in the parlour, I looked out, and saw that he was going out into the street, and when he saw me, he came back, and told me to follow, that I might as well go with him, and I followed him as far as Chandos-street; he took two black dominos, a mask, and a hat and feather with him; he went to a door there, and knocked; he told me to stop there, and then went off with the dresses.

Q. Did he go in? - A. No; he went away from the door with the things, and told me to stop; he walked as far as New Cavendish street, I followed him as far as Mansfield-mews; when he came there, he took the things, and ran away with them

as fast as possible; I cried out, stop-thief, and the watchman here stopped him, and then he dropped the things; a young man took up the things and gave them to me, they were not out of sight.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. They were your master's property? - A. Yes.

Q. Four dominos were taken first? - A. Yes.

Q. And he only selected two? - A. Two black ones.

Q. And he amused you in the sort of way you have described? - A. Yes.

Q. He wanted a little credit, you know? - A. There were a good many duplicates found upon him.

Q. That, you know, shewed that he was rather in poor plight in pocket? - A. Yes.

Q. He just took one for himself, and one for a friend? - A. Yes.

THOMAS GRIBNER sworn.

I am a watchman; I heard an alarm, I saw the prisoner running with something white under his arm, the boy ran very smart after him; when he saw that I was coming to him; he held out his arm to knock me down; he said he had the money to pay for them, but there was not a farthing in his pocket; I sprang my rattle, and took him.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You spoiled his chance of getting to the masquerade? - A. Yes; (the property was produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Q. (To Thomas.) I believe this young fellow, except being a bit of a coxcomb, and going where he ought not, is a tolerable honest sort of a fellow? - A. I wish to shew him all the lenity I can.

Prisoner's defence. On Thursday, a friend of mine agreed to go with me to the masquerade, I asked him to be so good as order the dominos; he said, he would, the boy was so long before he brought them, that I met him in Holles-street; I went with the boy to a friend's house, in Mary-le-bonne-street, being a respectable house, I thought it better to take him there; my friend did not come so soon as I expected; I sitted the dominos and masks, and made an excuse to the boy; I was thinking, if I did not meet my friend, I would leave the boy at a gentleman's house, to look for him; I told him, in five minutes, I would call and pay for the hire of the dominos; the boy, I believe, suspected something, and instantly followed me; I was making all the haste I could to my friend for the money; I had not sufficient in my pocket to pay for them, and the boy called out, the watchman was at my elbow, and the idea of being put in the watch-house made me run; I concealed my money, and told them I had none; I had two guineas and a shilling in my pocket; the watchman treated me extremely ill; I did not take them away designedly; if the person had called in the morning for the dominos, there would have been the money and the dominos.(For the prisoner).

WILLIAM TURTLE sworn.

I live at Lamberh, I am a timber-merchant; I know the prisoner's father and mother, they are respectable people, he was apprenticed to a hairdresser in the country; I have known him up to the present time, through knowing his friends; he has followed hair-dressing, and has since been in service; I always considered him a gay, volatile, thoughtless young fellow, but never heard any thing that was an impeachment of his honesty; the house in Mary-le-bonne-street is kept by his sister's husband, who lives in very great credit.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-81

307. JAMES KING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , a yard and a quarter of white silk lace, value 5s. a white silk veil, value 5s. a yard and a quarter of black silk lace, value 5s. a black silk veil, value 5s. four yards and a half of white thread lace, value 2s. two yards and a half of white thread edging, value 1s. four handkerchiefs, value 5s. a pair of silk mits, value 1s. and twenty yards of black silk ribbon, value 5s. the property of Sarah Jackson , Spinster .

SARAH JACKSON sworn.

I keep a house, No. 46, Bishopsgate-within ; I am a haberdasher and milliner ; I had missed several things out of my shop, the prisoner was my shopman , he had been with me eleven months and upwards; he used to be very extravagant in his dress, and that led me to suspect him, and I had him taken up, but previous to that I had discharged him: On the 8th of March, after he was discharged, I found some things concealed in the cellar, in the ceiling; he was taken up on the 14th of March; the rest of the articles mentioned in the indictment, were found in his box, but I was not present; I had a search warrant; the day that he was taken up, I saw one of his boxes opened, and a piece of ribband taken out, which I know to be my property, and some pieces of lace, but I did not see them taken out.

Q. How do you know the apartments were his? - A. He had left his address with a young woman, who lives with me, in case of any letters coming for him; I saw the box opened, and know it to be his box.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You had a very good character with the prisoner? - A. Yes; he lived with me eleven months.

Q. You had other servants? - A. Yes; two others.

Q. The things you found in the cellar then, was

not till after he had quitted your service? - A. No.

Q. He quitted your service six days before he was apprehended? - A. Yes.

Q. You discharged him upon suspicion; did you search his boxes before he went away? - A. I did not; he took his boxes away before I knew it.

WILLIAM ROWE sworn.

I am a constable; I had a warrant to search the prisoner's box; I searched his apartment; I was told it was his by the people of the house; I found this black veil, a white veil, a piece of laylock ribband, and a piece of garter blue ribband, a piece of black ribband, and a pair of black silk mits, a pocketbook, with running accounts in it, and some shoestrings; I have kept them from that time to this; we waited till he came home at eleven o'clock; I searched him, and found a yellow watch, thirteen guineas, and half-a-crown.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. His mistress had paid him 14 or 15l.? - A. She told me so.

Q. You take the money away from them the first thing, don't you, when you apprehend the prisoner? - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any information of any money being taken? - A. No; I had the Magistrate's orders for it.

Q. Upon your oath, had you orders from the Magistrate to take his money before you went to him? - A. No; I told the Magistrate I had the money.

Q. Upon your oath, had you any authority to seize the money? - A. No.

Q. Then how dared you to seize all the money a man has; now we will see how these officers conduct themselves; had you any-complaint that this lady had lost a watch? - A. No.

Q. Had you any orders from the Magistrate to take that? - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not take the man's watch, and have kept it till this hour? - A. Yes.

Q. And are you a constable? - A. Yes; of Hatton-garden.

Q. How long have you seen so? - A. Ever since it was established.

Q. And that is always your conduct? - A. Yes; if I have done wrong, I beg the Court's pardon; it was not demanded, we did not know what there might be against him.

Q. Upon your oath, has there been any charge against him since that relative to a watch or money? - A. No.

Mrs. JACKSON sworn.

They all belong to me; but this is the only one I can identify, on account of the marks being taken off; here is a yard and a quarter of black silk lace, I have a corresponding piece, which nothing but of scissars have parted, and they match exactly on each side; the pattern and threads match exactly where I cut them asunder; I had missed it, and likewise some of the other property, which he told me had been sold, it was cut out of the middle.

Mr. Knowlys. Q. You swear to that, because it corresponds with a piece you have at home? - A. Yes; it was cut through the middle.

Q. Is it an uncommon pattern? - A. I don't know that it is.

Q. Do you think there is any haberdasher's shop in London in which you could not find that pattern? - A. Most likely you would; you would in some there is no doubt.

Q. Therefore, I take it, that would match precisely with any of the same breadth? - A. No; because we cut it in equal lengths, and it depends upon the length of the piece.

Q. If it was cut in the same place, a piece of a similar length? - A. Yes.

Q. Any other piece, cut in the same way, in the same place, would match just as well? - A. Yes.

Q. There had been no scolding, or a little quarrelling between you, had there? - A. It is a very impertinent question.

Q. Had there or not? - A. No; there had not.

JOSEPH INWARD sworn.

Q. I went with Rowe to the prisoner's lodgings, I assisted in breaking open his box; these, I believe, are the things that were taken out of his box.

Jury. Q. Were all those things taken out of the box? - A. No; this piece was not. (The piece produced by the prosecutrix).

Prisoner's defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury; the crime I am accused of I plead innocent to; I had the goods in my possession before I went to live with Mrs. Jackson. The rest I leave to my counsel.(The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character).

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 1s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-82

308. JOHN LEVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a silver watch, value 2l. 12s. 6d. a steel watch-chain, value 6d. a stone seal set in base metal, value 1d. a base metal watch-key, value 1d. and a base metal watch-book, value 1d. the property of John Hall .

JOHN HALL sworn.

I am a watchman of St. Paul, Shadwell , and have been nineteen years; I was robbed the last day of February, between nine and ten o'clock at night; a tall man came to me and offered to mind my house for me.

Q. Is that him, at the bar? - A. I am so blind as

not to be able to know a man's face; between four and five I came home, and undressed myself, and went to bed to him; between six and seven I waked, and the prisoner was gone, and he had stole my watch; he had forced open two doors; here is a witness here that took him with my watch.

Q. Have you had any conversation at all with him since he had been taken up? - A. No.

Q. Then you cannot speak to him from his voice? - A. No.

ISAAC BACKROW sworn.

On the 1st of March, between eight and nine in the morning, I was coming along Houndsditch, and saw the prisoner and another soldier together, shewing a watch to a cloaths-man, the soldier said he would not take less than a guinea for it; that soldier was the prisoner at the bar; I crossed the way, and got hold of the watch as they were shewing it; I asked them how they came by it, the other soldier ran away directly, and I secured the prisoner, the watch was in his hand; he went to pull it out of my hand and broke the chain; he said I had no business with it, it was his property; I said, I will take you before a Magistrate, and we will see whether it is your property or not; I took him to the Compter, and examined the watch, and found the watch-maker's name in the case; I went to him, and he informed me who the owner of the watch was; I took him before Alderman Wright, and he committed him for trial; I have had it in my possession ever since.

WILLIAM BOUFFLERS sworn.

I sold this watch to Mr. Hall, about two years ago, the inner part of it is silver, and the name and the number I entered in a book; the name is Davis, and the number is 40.

Q. (To Hall.) Do you remember what it was that was upon the seal of your watch? - A. No; I do not.

Q. What colour was it? - A. I believe it is red; there is a head, or something of that sort, upon it.

Backrow. My Lord, this seal is red, and has a head upon it.

Prisoner's defence. On the 1st of March, I was going to work, and a young man asked me to go with him to sell the watch, I did not know it was a stolen watch; I went to seek to sell it, and he went with me; I offered it to a cloaths-man in the open street; if I had known it was stole, I should not have offered it in the open street for sale.

(The prisoner called Lewellin Davies, his serjeant, who gave him a good character).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-83

309. RICHARD GEAST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , a musical instrument, called a piano forte, value 10l. the property of James Longman , and Francis Fane Broderip .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of William Blake , William Bloxam , Josiah Banger , Muccio Clementi , and John Wood , Esqrs. (The case was opened by Mr. Trebeck).

DAVID DAVIES sworn.

Examined by Mr. Trebeck. I am superintendant of the works of Longman and Broderip; I have lived there near ten years; their names are James Longman , and Francis Fane Broaderip ; these effects are in possession of assignees, in trust for the benefit of the creditors, under a Commission of Bankruptcy, May 25, 1795.

Court. Q. When were the assignees appointed? - A. I cannot say; it was during the last year; we missed, repeatedly, a great number of things, though we could not identify the property; at William Phillips 's, at Tower-hill, from the 14th to the 18th of March, I cannot exactly speak to the date, I saw a piano forte of the manufacture of our house; he is a music-seller.

SAMUEL ALLEN sworn.

Examined by Mr. Trebeck. I am in the Somerset militia, I obtained a furlough to leave my regiment, and came to London; I hired myself to Messrs. Ellison and Oakley, musical instrument makers, in Fountain-court, they make instruments for Longman and Broderip. I have seen Baskerville and Geast together at different times, but never to take notice of their conversation. In the month of March, I believe it was, I was drinking at Anson's, a public-house, in Fountain-court, and Baskerville came in, and called me out to take an instrument away for Mr. Geast; when I first saw it, it was out of doors, about half-way down the arch way; Mr. Geast, the prisoner at the bar, helped me up with it on my knott; I don't know which way Baskerville went after he called me out; Geast directed me to take it to a butcher's-shop, in Noble-street, he said it was his own lodgings; I saw the butcher in the shop, and his wife, the butcher helped me up stairs with it, I was not paid for carrying it; I saw Geast several times afterwards, he told me he had no silver, he would pay me on Saturday night one shilling, for taking the instrument away; it was a square piano forte.

WILLIAM PHILLIPS sworn.

Examined by Mr. Trebeck. I am a music-seller, in Manor-row, Tower-hill; I know the prisoner, I have seen him very often, I know him very well; I bought a piano forte of him in the month of February. Sometime previous to the purchase. I was at Mr. Longman's warehouse, I saw Geast, he was tuner there; he asked me if I wanted a piano forte cheap, as he knew a person who had one to dispose

of; I enquired who it was; he told me his name was Longate.

Q. Do you know who that Longate is? - A. No; in about a week, or ten days, after this, he gave me a direction to call at Longate's, in Union-court, Holborn, but I had not an opportunity of going there; a day or two after that, I saw Geast, and told him I had not been able to go up to Longate's; he told me Mr. Longate wanted him to draw the strings up for the piano forte; a day or two after, a porter brought me the piano forte, the prisoner came with him, this was on Saturday, the 19th of February, about ten o'clock; he wanted the money for the piano forte; he said, that the man was very much distressed for it; he asked seven guineas; I agreed for six guineas; I told him, it Longate would step down in the morning, he might have the money as soon as he pleased; Geast came in the afternoon, and brought a receipt, as from Mr. Longate. (Produces it; it was read):

Received, February 20, 1796, of Mr. Phillips, the sum of 6l. 6s. for a piano forte.

Federick Longate.

It was a new one since the introduction of the grand piano fortes; the small ones have grown of less value. I thought I have a fair price for it.

Q. Have you ever been able to find out any thing about Longate? - A. I have not been able to find such a person. Mr. Davis called at my house, it might be a fortnight after, and saw the instrument the Geast sold me.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Geast represented himself as the agent of Longate? - A. Yes.

Q. And produced the receipt of Longate? - A. Yes.

Court. (To Allen.) Q. Did you take that piano forte from Mr. Ellison's premisses, or Mr. Longman's? - A. Neither; I took it from the court.

Court. There is no proof that this property was lost from Mr. Longman's. Gentlemen of the Jury, it is stated by the Counsel, that the accomplice is a man of infamous character; an accomplice cannot be received unless a foundation is laid for the felony; and in this case, without the accomplice, there is no proof at all, as against the prisoner at the bar, that this piano forte was a piano forte in which he had any concern; and that the piano forte is the piano forte of Messrs Lon man and Broderip-Under these circumstances you must acquit him.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

320. RICHARD GEAST was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a musical instrument called a spinnet, value 3l. the property of the same persons.(The case was opened by Mr. Trebeck).

THOMAS BIRCH sworn.

Examined by Mr. Trebeck. I live at the Two Brewers, London-wall; I know Geast, he used to to have his beer at my house; I have paid his rent once, and his goods, together with a spinnet, were brought to my house; Geast has seen it at my house, and always acknowledged it was his, it came in on the 25th of June. Mr. Davies called, and saw the instrument at my house; Geast told me, some time after it was brought in, that he had got a fresh lodging, and begged I would let it stand there till such time as he had paid his rent.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. That is three quarters of a year ago, or rather more than that? - A. Yes.

Q. And it was brought in by his wife? - A. Yes; she helped the man in with it. (The spinnet was produced in Court).

Birch. This is the spinnet that was in my house.

DAVID DAVIES sworn.

This, I believe, was Mr. Longman's property, but it is not our manufacture.

Q. Did it ever belong to Mr. Longman? - A. I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

311. RICHARD GEAST was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , a musical instrument, called a violin, value 16s. and five violin bows, value 18s. the property of the same persons.(The case was opened by Mr. Trebeck.)

GABRIEL JOHNSON sworn.

I am constable; I apprehended the prisoner, and searched him, but found nothing at all upon him; I found nothing at his house; I found a duplicate in Bates's pocket which led me to the house of a woman of the name of Martha Davis .

MARTHA DAVIS sworn.

My husband is a pawn-broker, I live in Elizabeth's-place, St. George's-fields, (produces a violin, and five bows): on the 22d of January, I took them in of a woman of the name of Woodward, whom I had seen before.

REBECCA WOODWARD sworn.

I know Mrs. Davis the pawn-broker, I pawned a violin there and five bows; I had them of the prisoner Geast; I had them in my room several days; he brought them to play on himself.

Mr. Knowlys. How long is it ago since he gave you them? - A. I believe four or five months from this time.

WILLIAM FIGGS sworn.

I have seen this violin in Mr. Longman's wareroom, the bows I cannot be positive to.

Q. Do you know how long before that? - A. No; I cannot say to any time.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Three or four years for ought you know? - A. I cannot say to the time, but it is less time than that.

Q. Within a year, do you think? - A. I cannot be certain to the time.

Q. Do you know whether it had been missed? -- A. I cannot tell for what purpose it went.

DAVID DAVIES sworn.

Q. Did you ever sell that violin to Geast? - A. Never.

Q. Did you ever sell any violin to Geast? - A Never.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. You don't know how many times it might have been sold over since it left Mr. Longman's shop.

Court. Q. Do you know if it was in Mr. Longman's shop? - A. I cannot say.

THOMAS BASKERVILLE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Trebeck. I know the prisoner at the bar; the first transaction I had with him, was a spinnet, the next was a portable grand piano forte, the next was a square one, we had three square ones afterwards; two siddles were taken away; Geast took one out of the warehouse, and I took one to Piccadilly, that he gave to me out of the warehouse; I cannot tell the time; the first that was taken was carried to Bates's; I could not swear to it, it was taken out of the siddle-room, the next was a siddle, taken out of the siddle-room, he sent me with it to Piccadilly, and he was to meet me; I staid till eleven o'clock at night, and he did not meet me; then I carried it to Holborn, and sent Bates for it the next day.

Q. Do you know of any bows? - A. Only one,(looks at the bows); I know nothing of them.

Q. Do you know about the time that this was taken? - A. About Christmas.

Cross-examined by Mr. Knowlys. Q. Did you see Geast take these siddles? - A. I saw him take them out of the siddle-room.

Q. You swear that, do you? - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear that is the siddle? - A. No, I cannot.

Q. You don't know that he ever, took that siddle? - A. No.

Q. This gentleman has told us about your being one of the greatest villains in England, is that true? - A. I hope not.

Q. You think he is out in his calculation, that you are not one of the greatest villains in England? - A. Yes, I think he is.

Q. What class of villains do you think now you may rank among, the higher, lower, or middle? - A. I don't know any thing about the lower.

Q. You are beyond that, you are a villain, you know you have a spark of virtue enough to confess that you are; what do you think about it, (the witness hesitates), does it choak you, it is what your own council says of you? - A. I speak nothing but the truth.

Q. Are you not now a very considerable villian?(hesitates), what you don't like to tell your own true character; then I must go to my friend for your character; if I were to tell you a very great villain was going to say something, would not your answer be, then I shall not believe him.

GABRIEL JOHNSON sworn.

(Produces a duplicate), I found this duplicate in Bates's pocket.

Q. (To Mrs. Davies). What is that a duplicate of?

Court. That is certainly not evidence, it was not found upon the prisoner.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing more to say, my Lord, than that I have been entirely drawn in by the evidence, Baskerville.(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character).

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

312. RICHARD GEAST was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a musical instrument, called a piano-sorte, value 8l. the property of the same persons.(The case was opened by Mr. Trebeck).

DAVID DAVIES sworn.

I have superintended the business of Longman and Broderip, near ten years; they have a warehouse in Fountain-court, and another in Trinity-lane; their affairs have been deranged, and their effects in the hands of assigness; we have lost various articles from the warehouse; we lost a piano-forte; the prisoner was a tuner at our house at the time, (it is produced).

JOHN JENKINSON sworn.

I bought this instrument of Mr. Clebow; I sold it to Mr. Perry, the brewer; I know it by certain things inside, by my name being in the inside, and by the desk not sitting.

Court. Q. How is your name put? - A. There being no name on it when I bought it; Mr. Perry gave me leave to put my name upon it, where the maker's name is put, it is in my hand-writing, wrote upon the wood with ink, and there are some splinters in the case, that I know it by, and by a slip on the front.

Mr. Gurney. Q. When did you buy this of

Clebow? - A. About the 11th or 12th of December.

- PERRY sworn.

I am a brewer; I bought this instrument of Mr. Jenkinson, on the 12th of December, I know it by a bead being put on the outside.

Q. Did you see Mr. Davis and Mr. Holland at your house, after you bought that instrument? - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner with them? - A. I don't recollect; I remember Mr. Davis very well, and I believe Mr. Holland; the instrument was taken from my house by a person that I don't see here, he was here just now, I don't know his name; it was taken from my house last Saturday.

GABRIEL JOHNSON sworn.

I was at the house of Mr. Perry on Saturday last; I am a constable; I took away this instrument from there, and George Anger , and Joseph Ray , assisted me; I know this instrument by the name on it in front, and my name marked in the inside, which I put upon it when I first saw it, it has been locked up ever since; the first time I saw it, Geast went with us; Mr. Davis, Mr. Holland, and Allen, and myself.

GEORGE ANGER sworn.

This is the instrument, I assisted in bringing it away from Mr. Perry's.

HENRY HOLLAND sworn.

I do the business for the house; I am in the organ line; on Wednesday the 20th of last month, I went with Mr. Davis to the house of Mr. Perry; Mr. Davis, and Johnson, and Geast, the prisoner, went with me; Geast went to identify the property of Mr. Longman.

Q. When you took Geast, you know you told him it would be a very good thing for him, if he told all about it? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Who did? - A. Nobody, in my presence, I am sure.

Mr. Trebeck. Q. What induced you to go to Mr. Perry's house? - A. The prisoner consefsed to me that he had stolen a great quantity of instruments from Mr. Longman's; that was in the coach, as we went to Mr. Perry's; that he was very sorry for what he had done; that he had committed a vast variety of these kind of things, and hoped he should be got off for transportation.

Q. Among the variety that he confessed he had stolen, did he point out where any one of those he had stolen was deposited? - A. This is one, he said, that had been sent to Clebows; I, and Geast, and Mr. Davis, and Johnson, all went in a coach to Mr. Perry's house, and when we came there, he examined this instrument, and said, that was it, and I put my initials upon it.

Mr. Davies. I was present at Mr. Perry's house, when Geast and Mr. Holland were there; I was present when this confession was made, and I put my name upon the instrument.

(Clebow was called upon his recognizance, and not appearing, it was ordered to be estreated).

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17960406-84

313. WILLIAM GATER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February, a musical instrument, called a piano-forte, value 12l. the property of James Longman , and Francis Fane Broderip .

Second Court. Laying it to be the property of William Blake , William Boxam , Josiah Banger , Muccio Clementi , and John Wood , Esqrs.

(The case was opened by Mr. Trebeck).

DAVID DAVIES sworn.

I am manager of the affairs of the assignees of James Longman , and Francis Fane Broderip , who became Bankrupts the 25th of May, 1795, the assignees were appointed some little time after; I cannot say exactly, but it was in the year 1795; we had lost several piano-sortes from Cheapside, and from Trinity-lane; the prisoner was an organ-builder, employed by us; he had been with us sixteen years.

JOSEPH WALKER sworn.

I belong to the Custom-house; I live at Hackney; I know the prisoner, he lived in Hackney-road; I bought a piano-sorte of him, about the 14th or 15th of February; I gave him ten guineas for it, he asked me twelve.

Q. At the time you bought it, did you pay for it? - A. No, not till he brought it home; I paid for it the day after.

Q. Look at that, and see whether, when he brought it home, and you paid for it, he brought that paper with him? - A. He gave it me at his own house, (it is read); February 18, 1796; received of Mr. Walker, the sum of 10l. 10s. for a piana-forte. William Gater .

Q. Is that the prisoner at the bar? - A. Yes.

Q. What is this man, what shop does he keep? - A. I don't know; there was a paper in the window, a piano-forte to be sold, a month before I thought of buying it for my daughter; he said, he had it to sell for a lady; I took a gentleman with me, to see what it was worth, for I did not know any thing about music, and what he said it was worth, I gave for it.

HENRY HOLLAND sworn.

I am an organ-builder; in the month of February last, I was employed in the organ line for

the assignees of Longman and Broderip; I know the prisoner; he was in our employ as an organ builder; I took him with Peach and Davis to Mr. Walker's house, on Tuesday the 22d of last month.

Q. Had you, by any means, given him to understand, in any way; it would be better for him to confess? - A. No such conversation passed; there was not a word of the kind mentioned to him; when we first took him, he said, there were two square piano-fortes taken from Mr. Longman and Broderip's, one he had sold to Mr. Walker, of Hackney, and the other to Mr. Cooke of Cooke's-court, Lincoln's-inn-fields; Mr. Davies, and Peach, and I, went with him to Hackney, and we saw this instrument that is now here; the prisoner looked at the instrument, and said, that was the instrument that he had stolen out of Mr. Longman's warehouse; this is the instrument, I know it by marking it with my initials.

Court. Did he make use of the words stole? - A. Yes, he did; and cried a great deal.

Q. You are sure you said nothing to induce him to confess? - A. No.

Mr. Davies. I was present at Walker's, when Peach and Mr. Holland were there; I heard the confession that the prisoner made; this is the instrument that he confessed he had stolen from Mr. Longman's; I put my name in it at the time.

- PEACH sworn.

I am a constable, I marked this instrument at Mr. Walker's, at Hackney.

Prisoner's defence. I am not able to make any defence, I beg to leave it to the mercy of the Jury.

Mr. Davies. He has lived with Mr. Longman sixteen years; he was under my immediate direction four years, and always behaved extremely well.

Mr. Holland. If he was out of work to-morrow, I would give him a job.

(The Jury recommended him to mercy, on account of his good character).

GUILTY . (Aged 47.)

Fined 1s. and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERGEANT.

Reference Number: t17960406-85

314. JOHN BATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a musical instrument called a piano forte, value 10l. the property of James Longman and Francis Fane Broderip .

Second Count. Laying it to be the property of William Blake , William Bloxam , Josiah Banger , Muccio Clementi , and John Wood , Esqrs. (The case was opened by Mr. Trebeck.

DAVID DAVIES sworn.

I am superintendant of the concern of Longman and Broderip, and the assignees; I had missed the instrument in question from the warehouse of Longman and Broderip, about two months back, as far as I can say, because our mark has been desaced; I had missed it some time, and could not account for it; about a month back, I think, I saw it in Bond-street, at Mr. Turner's, No. 54; the prisoner acknowledged that the instrument was sent there.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You made him no promises? - A. No.

Q. Nor threats? - A. No.

Q. You had not told him it would be better if he did tell you? - A. No.

Q. Nor worse if he did not? - A. Neither.

Q. Where was this acknowledgment made? - A. At his house in Melina-place, near the Obelisk, in St. George's-fields; he told us where it was, and accompanied us to Mr. Turner's; he said, he sent it there; when we came to Mr. Turner's, he saw this instrument, and said, that was the instrument that he had sold to Mr. Turner, that belonged to our house; he did not say how he came by it; Mr. Holland, and Johnson, the constable, were with me at the time. I put the initials of my name in the instrument.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. Is that piano forte of the make of Longman and Broderip? - A. It is; there was originally a number upon it; there is part of it now remaining; it appears to me to be a seven.

Q. That seven may be a part of any number, you know? - A. Yes.

Q. Then it cannot be by the number that you swear to it? - A. No; I missed such a one as this exactly.

Q. When you went to Bates's, was it to you that Bates said this instrument was sold to him upon sale or return? - A. He did not say any thing like it in my hearing.

Q. Do you recollect his saying this was brought or sent to him by Baskerville to sell? - A. I don't recollect any thing of the kind.

Q. Where that number is crased, is that the place where Longman and Broderip generally put their marks? - A. Always; it is stamped.

Q. Were you in the habit of sending out instruments upon sale or return? - A. We have done it, but not lately.

Q. Whether you never sent any instruments, even to Bates, upon sale or return? - A. I believe we have, before the bankruptcy.

Q. What is Bates's business? - A. A musician.

Q. He kept a shop in Melina-place, did he not? - A. There was a shop in the name of Jones.

Q. There was a shop for the sale of music there? - A. Yes.

Q. Has any instrument been sent from Longman

and Broderip, upon sale or return, since the commission? - A. I don't think there has, since the commission.

Court. Q. What connection has the prisoner with your shop? - A. None at all.

Court. Q. Are you sure it is your manufacture? - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure you never sold it from your house? - A. I don't recollect selling one for these three months; it is what we call a short two stop; a shorter instrument than we generally make, and one stop less; we only make them for orders.

JOHN TURNER sworn.

I live in Bond-street, I know the prisoner; I bought one instrument of him, and I had had some little transaction with him before; this is the piano forte that came from my house, and which I bought of the prisoner; I bought it at his house in St. George's-fields, it was brought to my house the next day following, a person brought it, and Mr. Bates was with him. (Produces the receipt for the instrument.) Mr. Bates gave it me at my house, at the time he accompanied the piano sorte to my house; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Q. Do you recollect, at any time, seeing Bates in company with Mr. Holland and Mr. Davies afterwards, at your house? - A. I do; the prisoner said, this is the instrument, without any thing more; I gave eight guineas; and another instrument which he reckoned at six guineas; the receipt is for fourteen guineas.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I scarcely need ask you whether any part of Bates's conduct shewed he had sold any thing that was stolen? - A. Not the least.

Q. He kept a shop for the sale of musical instruments? - A. Yes.

Q. It was exposed publickly for sale? - A. No; it was in the back part of the house.

Q. There were other instruments in the house for sale? - A. Yes; and, I believe, the reason this was not in the shop was, there was not room for it to stand.

HENRY HOLLAND sworn.

I went to Mr. Turner's, in Bond-street; Mr. Bates told me he had sold an instrument to a gentleman that he had had from Mr. Longman's, that it came from Baskerville, and the others.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What conversation had passed before this, respecting what he might hope for, if he would say any thing upon the subject? - A. Nothing at all.

Q. No promises or threats? - A. Neither; he said it was an instrument that came from Longman and Broderip's; then I went there, and he shewed us the instrument; he said, that was the instrument he had had, and that he had sold to the gentleman.

Q. Whether the name of Baskerville, and others, were mentioned or not? - A. I cannot recollect; this mark, in the front of the instrument, is the usual mark of Longman and Broderip upon their instruments; I will swear to the man's hand that wrote it; this is where the number is, but the most part of it is erased out.

Q. Do you know whether any instruments were sent to Bates's from your house upon sale or return? - A. I don't know any thing of these transactions.

THOMAS BASKERVILLE sworn.

Examined by Mr. Trebeck. Q. Give us an account of all the wicked practices you have been guilty of that apply to this case; do you know Bates? - A. Yes; I don't know that instrument from any other.

Q. Did you ever take an instrument of that sort to Mr. Turner's? - A. No.

Court. I would have you take care what you are about, you are in a very perilous situation; because if you don't speak the truth, you may depend upon it I shall watch you very narrowly; you will find yourself in a sad scrape, I assure you, if you don't.

Mr. Trebeck. Q. Do you know of any transaction in which you, and the man at the bar have been concerned? - A. Yes; he came over to me one night, as I was going from work, and asked me if I knew of any piano-forte sent to his house, between Geast and I; I told him I sent it, and told him what I received for it; he told him, he had sent it, and he aked me if I would consent to have any dealings with him; I told him I would, we had a long talk.

Q. When was this, and where? - A. It was in Fountain-court, Cheapside, at Longman's warehouse, I was porter and packer there; the first instrument he ever had from me, was a grand piano-forte, the next was a square piano-forte, taken from the warehouse in Cheapside; I took it out of the warehouse; when I had got it out of the warehouse, I took it over into Gutter-lane, Bates went a small distance before me, I pitched it under a wall, in Gutter-lane, and left Bates with it, while I went for a porter, from Lad-lane, to carry it; a porter came, and Bates and I helped it on his back, where they went with it, I don't know; a few days after, I asked Bates about it, and he told me he had sold it, he did not say to whom.

Q. How much money did he give you? - A. I had nothing upon that, it was a small piano-forte, like this, I don't know whether this is it or not, it was almost a new one, or quite, I am not certain, it was made by Gib, it was standing up an end in the warehouse, just within the door.

Q. Did you open it? - A. No.

Q. Had you seen it opened before? - A. I am not certain.

Q. Had you any other transaction with him about one of Gib's piano-sortes? - A. No.

Cross-examined by Mr. Gurney. Q. I think you did not come into Court the usual way a witness does; which way did you come in? - A. Through the door behind.

Q. You came out of Newgate, did not you? - A. Yes.

Q. That is the fittest place for you a great deal; how long have you been there? - A. Nine or ten days.

Q. You were taken up for stealing this piano-forte? - A. I don't know what I was taken up for.

Q. Upon your oath, don't you know what you were taken up for? - A. I was taken up upon suspicion of it, I suppose.

Q. Upon your oath, were not you taken up for plundering your masters of piano-sortes, as many as you could lay your hands upon? - A. Nothing else that I know of.

Q. Your attachment was confined to piano-fortes? had you no affection for harpsichords? is this the only instrument you play upon? - A. I don't play upon any.

Q. What do you steal? we have heard of some violins, you know, that were stole? - A. There was a violin stole.

Q. When you were taken up, you know, you stated that if they would let you go, you would swear against some people or other? - A. I did not say any such thing to any body.

Q. But you wanted to be at liberty, and would swear against somebody, and then you should go free? - A. No, I did not.

Q. Upon your oath, did you not send that piano-forte to Bates upon sale or return? - A. I did not.

Q. Do you expect to be believed upon that or not? - A. You may believe me or not, as you please.

Q. You positively swear you did not send it upon sale or return? - A. I did not.

Mr. Gurney. We have your oath for it to be sure.

Court. Q. Who was present besides you, in Fountain-court, when you took it out of the warehouse? - A. Nobody else but Bates, who was in the court waiting for it.

Q. Had you settled which instrument it should be? - A. We had settled for a piano-sorte.

Court. Who was the porter that carried it? - A. I dont know, he was a ticket-porter, I hired him from the Crown in Lad-lane.

Q. (To Davis). Look at that piano-forte, and see if it is made by Gib? - A. Yes, it is.

- PEACH sworn.

I am a constable; I got this piano-forte from Mr. Turner's, I marked it.

Prisoner's defence. My Lord and Gentlemen, the principal witness, Baskerville, I have been acquainted with about four months; I told him that I meant to apply to Mr. Longman for a few instruments, upon sale or return, which I shall prove is the habit, and has been the continual practice of that house for many years, and when those instruments are sold, they pay the money, and what are not sold, they return; I spoke to Baskerville, I had spoke to Mr. Longman first; he could not do it without the consent of the assignees; Baskerville said, he would speak to them for me; I told him, I would be much obliged to him; in a few days after, I met Baskerville, and he said, I might have two or three instruments, as I had had instruments before, and paid for them regularly; he said, the vans were all gone to Tottenham-court-road, and they had ordered him to carry it; he took this piano-sorte, and carried it to the spot that he has said; he went to fetch a porter, who carried it to my house; I sold it for eight guineas and an half, and a short piano-forte, which I afterwards sold for three guineas and an half; he said, if I would give him the money, it would be better, as I did not know any of the assignees, and he would take care that I should have credit in the book; I have had a vast number of instruments upon sale or return; he told me he had applied to the assignees for me.

Court. (To Baskerville). Q. Did you receive any money for this piano-forte? - A. Not a halfpenny.

for the Prisoner.

THOMAS YOUNG sworn.

I live in Old-street-Road, I am a harpsichord and piano-sorte maker; I have known the prisoner eleven years, he always bore the character of an honest man; I was formerly in the employ of Messrs. Longman and Broderip; I have had a great number of instruments from them upon sale or return, it is the custom of their house.(The prisoner called ten other witnesses, who all gave him a good character).

GUILTY. (Aged 32.)(The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his good character).

Confined twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERGEANT.

Reference Number: t17960406-86

315. PHILIP TOOLEY was indicted for obtaining, under false pretences, twenty-eight pounds of mottled soap, value 20s. the property of Richard Harris , the elder , and Richard Harris , the younger , Feb. the 15th .

RICHARD HARRIS , jun. sworn.

I received the order from Michael Peters; I understood he came from Mrs. Stanton.

MICHAEL PETERS sworn.

I am a porter; I ply sometimes in Fleet-street, and sometimes in Covent-Garden: the prisoner at the bar came to me, and asked me to take a note for him, I be

lieve sometime in February, but I am not certain; he gave it me at the end of Fleet-makert; I had seen the prisoner before, I am certain he is the man that gave me the note; I took the note to Mr. Harris's, in Fish-street; it was to fetch a quarter of a hundred of soap; I gave the note to Mr. Harris, the elder; young Mr. Harris was not present; he told one of his porters to weigh me a quarter of a hundred of soap; he weighed it me, and put it in three brown pieces of paper; I put it on my knot, and brought it as far as the Blue-Last, Blackstiars, there I met the man that gave me the note; he told me to go a little farther with him; I went to the end of Water-lane, Fleet-street, and there he took the soap from me, and I charged him sixpence porterage; I saw no more of him from that time till he was taken up; I am sure it is the same note that I delivered to Mr. Harris, that I received from the prisoner.

Harris, jun, called again. I am in partnership with my father Richard Harris: On the 15th of February, when I received the note, I desired the man to weigh the soap, and give it to the porter; I asked him if it was from Mrs. Stanton; she had been a customer of our's several years; (produces the note, it is read).

"Sir, Please to let the bearer have 28lb. of mottled soap, tied up in paper; please to send a bill; when I want more, I will call. Sarah Stanton .

Bell-yard, Temple-bar."

I weighed the soap, and gave it to the man; I saw nothing of the prisoner till I saw him before Alderman Pickett, at Guildhall.

SARAH STANTON sworn.

I live in Bell-yard, Temple-bar, I am a shop-keeper; I have dealt with Messrs. Harris some years. (Looks at the note). I don't know any thing of it, it is not my writing; I never sent a written order in my life.

Q. Had you the soap? - A. No; I have known the prisoner seven years, he served his time with the tallow-chandler that serves me, Mr. Wood, in the Butcher-row, with candles; he has been out of his time about three or four months; he has left his master about four months; I never saw him after, till I saw him at Guildhall; he used to come to my house most days to bring goods, and take orders.

EDWARD STRAP sworn.

I am a constable: Mr. Harris came to me on the 12th of March, Saturday night, and said, he had had an order come to his house, a false note, for some soap; and he recollected, the man that fetched it was a porter; I found him on Sunday, and took him into custody; not this porter, but another; he said, he was not the man that fetched the soap; I went and found him out, and he found the prisoner; we took him in the Butcher-row.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing of these porters: I know nothing of the crime I am charged with; I am innocent of it.

Q. (To Stanton). Do you know any thing of Peters at all? - A. No, I don't.

Jury. (To Harris). Q. Did you take the note yourself, or your father? - A. He gave it to me, my father and I were close together; I read it to my father.

Court. Q. Did you know nothing about Peters, what kind of a man he is? - A. No; I understand he gets his living by porters' work.

Mrs. Stanton. The prisoner, about last November, asked me where I dealt for soap; do you deal with such a one in St. Giles's? do you deal with such a one, do you deal with such a one? I said, no; says he, then you deal with an oilman; no, says I, how came you to think of that; I deal with Mr. Haris in Fish-street.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERGEANT.

Reference Number: s17960406-1

The SESSIONS being ended, the COURT proceeded to GIVE JUDGMENT, as follows:

Received sentence of Death - 15.

Jane Cooper ,

Sarah Chandler ,

John Fairbrother ,

otherwise Cornwall,

Thomas Purcell ,

John Randall ,

Joseph Smith ,

Wm. Parrock ,

Matthew Wyat ,

Frances Hughes ,

Elizabeth Downes ,

Isaac Gowlett ,

John Gabriel ,

Michael Parker ,

Thomas Smith , and

Samuel Read .

Transported fourteen years - 1. William Read .

Transported seven years - 18.

W. John Lancashire ,

Thomas Collier (tried last Sessions)

John Randall ,

Wm. Rayner ,

Tho. Morgan ,

James King ,

Richard Geast ,

Thomas Crayford ,

Anthony Stewart ,

Tho. Shuttlewood ,

William Davis ,

William Young ,

John Welch ,

Mary Bailey ,

Jeremiah Nichols ,

James Ovens ,

William Patch , and

Mary Davies .

Fined 1s. and imprisoned one year - 7.

Ann Trowbridge , George Paterson , Judith Williams , Rebecca Brown , John Bates , George Allen , and Mary Patmore .

Fined 1s. and imprisoned six months - 8.

William Buckthorp , Sarah Hitchcock , Mary Carrol , Philip Tooley , and John Crosby , Thomas Morris , Benj. Thomas , Richard Pyman ,

Publickly whipped, and imprisoned six months - 4.

William Thompson , Thomas Constable , William Bunn , and John Dorin .

Imprisoned one week, and delivered to his Serjeant-t. James Dawson .

Publickly whipped and discharged - 3. Richard Clarke , Richard Williams , and James Moore .

Privately whipped, and discharged - 5.

Elizabeth Pink , Sarah Gathercole , William Penton , John Willoughby , and Matthew Richards .

Judgment respited to go into the Army or Novy-2. John Palmer , and John Tropwell . The Sessions were adjourned till Wednesday, May 11, 1796.


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