Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th April 1795.
Reference Number: 17950416
Reference Number: f17950416-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 16th of April 1795, and the following Days; Being the FOURTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. THOMAS SKINNER, Esq. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY , PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER IV. PART I.

LONDON: Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK, No. 63, Snow Hill. Price TWO SHILLINGS.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable THOMAS SKINNER , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of LONDON: The Right Honourable LLOYD KENYON . Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: The Honourable Sir ALEXANDER THOMPSON , Knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer: The Honourable Sir GILES ROOKE , Knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Knt. Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SYLVESTER , Esq. Common Serjeant of the said CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Goal Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Henry Terry

William Camage

Joseph Champney

Brownall Pearce

Jonathan Stirtevant

Thomas Wills

John Sayce

William Kenyon

Henry Smith

John Bryant

Edward Gardner

John Harris .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Marsh

Joseph Nicholl

John Patridge

William Richardson

Samuel Harrison

Tuffin Hobbs

Joseph Finch

William Geeve

Ralph Mitchinson

John Nicholl

Samuel Rutter

Edward Nicholl .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Hill

Joseph Crate

William AugustinMitchell

Richard Powell

James Vaughan

Joseph Welsh

Matthew Long

Edward Green

John Dell

Henry Young

John Taylor

William Matthews .

Reference Number: t17950416-1

WILLIAM GOLDSMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Elizabeth Shubert , between the hours of two and five, on the 11th of January , in the parish of Sr. John, at Hackney, no person being therein, and feloniously stealing therein, six silver tea spoons, value 12s. and a silk handkerchief, value 1s. 6d. the property of the said Elizabeth Shubert .

ELIZABETH SHUBERT sworn.

Q. Where is your house? - In Homerton, in the parish of Hackney .

Q. You are a widow , are you? - Yes.

Q. Was any violence committed on your house at any time, and when? - None at all, no violence at all.

Q. What did happen? - My house was entered, and three rooms were entirely rifled, on the 11th of January; nobody was in the house, I was not in the house all day.

Q. Did you sleep there the night before? - No.

Q. Was it the dwelling house in which you usually dwell? - Yes.

Q. What day of the week was the 11th of January? - Sunday.

Q. When did you first perceive what had happened? - Directly the man was taken and brought to me; he was taken coming out of the parlour.

Q. What time did you come to the house? - Between four and five o'clock.

Q. Had you received some information at that time? - Yes.

Q. So you came home in consequence of information? - Yes.

Q. You say you had not been in your house from the Saturday, which was the day before? - No.

Q. In coming to you house what did you perceive? - I perceived the things all thrown about the house, and two tea chests broke open.

Q. Had you left your house locked up? - Yes.

Q. Was any thing taken out of the house? - Half a dozen spoons out of one tea chest, and a silk handkerchief of my son's.

Q. What age is your son? - Turned of eighteen.

Q. Was the handkerchief his property or your property, worn by him? - The handkerchief was his, but the spoons were mine.

Q. Have you found the things at any time afterwards? - No.

Q. Do you know any thing about the prisoner at the bar, William Goldsmith ? - He is the person that was brought down to me, at the house where I was.

Q. You don't know of his having been in the house? - No.

Mr. Gurney. You had left your house the night before this happened? - Yes.

Q. Did you leave your house locked? - Yes.

Q. You found it locked as you left it? - Yes.

Q. You could discover no marks of violence on any of your doors or windows? - No.

JOHN SHUBERT sworn.

Q. Are you son of the last witness? - Yes.

Q. Do you live with your mother? - Yes.

Q. What do you know about this business? - I know about the business as far as this; I left the house locked up tween the hours of ten and eleven on Sunday morning.

Q. When did you see it again? - Between three and four, some where there away, it may be a little over four, I cannot pretend to say.

Q. In what state did you find it when you came again to it? - The back door was open, it was bolted with two bolts when I left it.

Q. Were these bolts undrawn? - They were, and the fore door when I went out I left locked, and when I came back I found it locked accordingly, and bolted on the inside with one bolt.

Q. Did you observe any act of force? - No.

Q. What was gone out of the house, was any thing lost? - Half a dozen tea spoons and a silk handkerchief.

Q. Of your own knowledge can you inform the gentlemen of the jury by whom the spoons were taken? Have you seen them since? - I have not seen either.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn.

I am a gardener by business; I went to see the young man that is now gone down, and I went and knocked at the door; it was about a quarter to four, as nigh as I can guess, in the afternoon; I went and knocked twice at the door, and then I heard the footsteps of two people in the passage, and I heard them as if going out of the back door, and I suspected it was somebody that should not be there, and I went round the house and caught them jumping over the pales of the yard, into a neighbour's yard.

Q. Who did you see? - This here Goldsmith, and another person with him.

Q. Do you know the other person? - No.

Q. Was that fence between Mrs. Shubert's yard and the neighbour's yard? - Yes, from Mrs. Shubert's into a little yard that joined the road, and so went to the house.

Q. Did you apprehend him? - Yes; I took hold of this person, William Goldsmith , and asked him his business? and he said he got over into the yard for his hat, his partner threw it over; and I told him I heard him in the house? he said it was no such thing; I told him that I should detain him till such time as further was seen into it; I detained him till such time as the constable come.

Q. What is the constable's name? - Griffiths.

Q. You delivered him to the constable? - Yes.

Mr. Gurney. The first time you saw the prisoner he was getting over some pales into the road? - No, into a neighbour's yard.

Q. Close by the road? - Yes.

Q. You asked him what he did there, he said he was getting over for his hat that had been thrown into the garden? - He said his comrade threw it in.

Q. Did he made any resistance? - He behaved civil, he rather pulled a little.

Prisoner. I was going along, and I met with three or four follows, one of them said to me, Mr. Goldsmith, I owe you a good drubbing, and he began to punch me about; says I what is this for? says he, d-mn your eyes, I will tell you for what, and he kicks me down, and took my hat off; says one of them when I got up and asked for my hat, your hat is over there, and I got over for my

hat, and as I was getting back again, that gentleman took me, and he asked me what I got over there for? I said I got over for my hat; he said you have been in the house, there is your companion running away; says I, I have no companion, I have done nothing, I shall not run.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character, said that he was in the callico business, but trade being dead lately, he had worked at coopering .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-2

160. JEREMIAH NICHOLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of January , two sixpences; one hundred and twenty-one halfpence; fifty copper farthings and a wooden till, value 2d. the goods of John Leat .

JOHN LEAT sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - No. 286, Oxford-street .

Q. What is your business? - My business that I follow is in the earthen ware line.

Q. When was it you lost your till? - The night before the 22d of January, about a quarter before nine; I was not at home at the time it happened; there was my daughter at home, who is the next evidence.

Q. When did you see your till? - I see it again the same evening, after the prisoner was at the watch-house. The watchman has it now.

SARAH LEAT sworn.

Q. You are the daughter of John Leat we understand? - Yes.

Q. Were you at home on the evening of the 21st of January? - Yes; I was in the parlour.

Q. Does the parlour join the shop? - Yes.

Q. About what time of the night was it? - I believe it was near nine; when the watchman was going nine.

Q. Did you see any body in the shop? - I see this person go from the end of the counter.

Q. Did you see him come into the shop? - No. I see him go out, but I did not see him come in.

Q. Were there candles lighted in the shop? - Yes, one candle. The door was open between the parlour and the shop.

Q. Who was with you in the parlour? - Only a little sister.

Q. Did you hear any thing that made you take notice of what was passing in the shop? - I see some body in the shop, and I went to see who it was.

Q. How long before this time had you left the shop? - About five minutes, I think.

Q. Had you left the shop door open of shut? - Between open and shut.

Q. When you saw the prisoner going out of the door, did you observe what part of the shop he came from? - He was going from the end of the counter.

Q. Did you see whether he had any thing with him at that time? - Yes, I see him with the till under his arm.

Q. On seeing him, what did you do? - I cried stop thief! and the watchman catched him, I fancy in about three or four minutes, or thereabouts.

Q. Did he bring him back to your shop? - Yes. He did not go out of my sight.

Q. Did you see him till the watchman stopped him? - Yes; and the watchman see him come out.

Q. Was there any money in the till when it was brought back? - No.

Q. Can you say what money was in it when it was taken away? - No; nobody knows what there was in it. I was the last person that put money in it, about five minutes before, as nigh as I can guess.

Q. Money which you had taken in the shop? - Yes.

Q. How much money had you put in about five minutes before? - It was a shilling; but I took it out again, and put it into my pocket.

Q. When you put the shilling in, and took it out again, was there any more money there? - There were some halfpence and farthings, and two sixpences. The watchmen picked them up.

Q. Had you observed that there were two sixpences in the till? - Yes; I can swear that.

Q. So that you would have known there were two sixpences there if the watchman had not said he picked up two? - Yes, I know there were two sixpences in.

Q. Will you undertake to say what quantity of halfpence there were in it? - No; I don't know.

Q. What happened when he was brought back? Was he searched? - Yes, when he went to the watch-house.

Q. Was any money found on him? - Yes, half a crown; but that was not ours.

Mr. Knapp. Have you always been as sure that the prisoner at the bar was the person that you have been describing? - Yes.

Q. Now recollect. You was before the justice? - Yes.

Q. Were you as sure before the justice as you are now? - Yes, I was.

Q. Why you told the justice that you was a good deal frightened and alarmed at the time. Now was you alarmed? - No, I was not when I was at the justice's.

Q. Were not you frightened at the time of the till going away? - I see the boy going out of the shop with the till; I was a little frightened, but I knew the boy.

Q. Was the boy 's back towards you, or the face? - The back was towards me, but then I did not lose sight of him till he was taken.

Q. But did you ever see his face? - No, I cannot say that I see his face.

Q. Then all you mean to tell the court and jury is this, that from the appearance of the person's back, and his being taken recently after, you think it is the same? - No, I am sure, because I never lost sight of him.

Q. I understand that when he was searched, there was half a crown found upon him that was not your's? - No.

Q. No sixpences found on him? - No.

Q. You was not present when he was stopped? - No; I see him stopped, and see him throw the money down, and the watchman picked it up.

Court. Your till was not locked? - No.

JOHN ELLIOT sworn.

Q. You are a watchman, I understand? - Yes.

Q. Did you receive any alarm on the 21st of January, in the evening? - Yes.

Q. Where was you at the time? - Close at Mr. Leat's door. The daughter cried out stop thief! and I closely pursued him; I see him come out of the door.

Q. Who did you see come out of the door? - That lad, the prisoner at the bar. I followed him.

Q. How far had he got from the door before you laid hold of him? - He got about forty or fifty yards, or a little more.

Q. Had you ever lost sight of him from the time of his coming out of the door, till you collared him? - No, never. The person that I laid hold of was the person that came out of the shop.

Q. Had he any thing with him that you see? - I see him drop this till in the half way, about the middle of the street, before I laid told of him; he ran immediately across the street.

Q. Did you pick up the till? - I did.

Q. Did you find any money thereabouts? - I found the money under the till, and all about the till, when I brought the lad back again to the till. Here is the till and money, fifty-one farthings, one hundred and twenty-one halfpence, and two sixpences; the till was upside down, and the money scattered about.

Mr. Knapp. This was at nine o'clock at night? - It was going the hour of nine; it was not dark, it was moonlight.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say in my defence particularly; I never see nothing of the till.

Prosecutor. I know the till by the cord and the lock, and the holes that I cut in it myself.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY. (Aged 15.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-3

161. MARY DRISCOLL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , a woman's cotton gown, value 5s. a woman's stuff petticoat, value 4s. a woman's woollen cloth cardinal, value 6s. the goods of James Cox .

BRIDGET COX sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Mary Driscoll ? - I do not know her.

Q. Have you any thing to say against her? - The pawnbroker has.

Q. Do you know any thing more than that the goods are your's?

JOHN PEATE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. On the 18th of March, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came with the goods that I have here, a white cardinal, a cotton gown, and stuff petticoat, to pledge them; she asked a guinea; I offered her fourteen shillings; she stood for fifteen, but at last took fourteen. The next day I was absent from home, and the prosecutrix, together with the prosecutor and the prisoner, came to the shop.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - I verily believe it is the prisoner, but I have my doubts about it, for she was then dressed with a black silk handkerchief about her neck, and a cloth cloak on, with a man's hat; she pledged them in the name of Margaret Murphy , whom I knew as a customer; but Murphy coming in soon after, I found my mistake.

Q. Did she say that Margaret Murphy employed her? - No, she passed herself as Margaret Murphy.

Q. You knew Margaret Murphy ; then you knew this woman was not Margaret Murphy? - Margaret Murphy wore a cloak and hat of this description, only she is a little taller of the two.

Q. You let her have the money? - I did.

Prisoner. He wanted my poor old mother to give his wife some money. I am sure he never saw me in his life till the constable took me up to his shop, and two more women, and she swore to one of the other.

Q. To Prosecutrix. Do you know the goods? - Yes, I know them.

Q. Are you a married woman? - Yes.

Q. What is your husband's name? - James Cox .

Q. What do you know the petticoat by? - By two knots at the string, and the cloak by a stain.

Q. When did you see these goods the last time before you lost them? - I missed them at four o'clock.

Q. What day of the month? - Mr. Peate can tell that.

Q. When had you seen them? - I went out about nine o'clock and locked the door after me, and see them then; when I came home the staple of my door was drew, and my clothes were gone from off the line.

Q. What day was it? - The day after St. Patrick's Day.

Q. Do you know what day of the month St. Patrick's Day is? - I cannot tell; I am no scholar.

Prisoner. I have got a very old woman a mother, and this gentlewoman came to my mother on Monday, and asked for my mother to pay the fourteen shillings, and then she would not appear against me; and my poor mother could not get fourteen shillings, and the neighbours made up seven shillings, and took it to Mr. Peate. and he desired them to give the seven shillings to his wife, and said she would not appear against me. As to the pawnbroker he does not know me from Adam.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROCKE.

Court to Peate. It becomes you to be a little more circumspect in future than you have been in this case; unless you are, you yourself will one day or other have to answer for an offence of a deeper die than this is. It is not to be conceived that a prudent man would not have taken more care than what you have done; you knew Margaret Murphy, and yet took these things of this woman under her name; it seems to me to be scandalous conduct; and you likewise hear what the prisoner has said, that you have now seven shillings in your pocket from that woman's mother.

Reference Number: t17950416-4

162. THOMAS FOX was indicted for stealing, on the 31 of March , a pair of leather breeches, value 10s. the goods of Francis Davis .

FRANCIS DAVIS sworn.

I was a servant to Mr. Shepherd in Boswell-court, Cary-street .

Q. Did you lose a pair of breeches at any time? - Yes; on Tuesday, the 3d of March.

Q. Where was your box? - On the top of the house, in the front garrett.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar live in the house? - No. There was a sale, Mr. Shepherd is become a bankrupt, and this was the viewing day before the sale; the prisoner was in the house, looking at the goods that were to be sold, and I had left my things up altogether on one side in my bedroom, in a box, at the Foot of my bed, and I had not any occasion to take them away till the last day's sale; the box was locked, and he broke open the box.

Q. How do you know he broke it open? - He went up stairs to view the things; I see him come out of that room, there was nobody else in the room; I was coming up stairs, at the top of the stairs, and I met the prisoner, and I see the strings of the breeches hanging out of his pocket, but I did not suspect they were mine not at that moment; he pushed by me at the top of the stairs to come down,

and I locked into the room and see nobody else there, and see my box that it was moved, and I turned again and ran down stairs as hard as I could after him to the bottom; I pursued him so close that he turned into a room at the bottom of the stairs, at the right hand, and as I turned in at the door, he turned to a little closet door on the left hand, and pulls out my breeches from his pocket with his right hand; I see him pull them out, and I followed to the closet, and apprehended him at that closet. The breeches are here.

Mr. Knowlys. When you found the breeches they were wrapped up in paper, were they not? - They were.

Q. That was not the way in which you left them? - Yes, they were rolled up in paper having come home from being cleaned.

Q. How many persons were there at that time? - That is rather too hard a question.

Q. A good many? - Yes.

Q. How long was it before this time that you had seen your box? - About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Many persons had access to the room as well yourself? - Yes.

Prisoner. I had occasion to buy some blankets; on the third of last March, I looked at the Daily Advertiser, and saw of this sale by auction; I went from home between twelve and one to the house of Mr. Shepherd, in Boswell court; I went into the ground floor, one pair, and two pair of stairs, and saw there was nothing would suit me, and I went into the upper story, and I think there were three rooms on a floor, and there were some blankets, which I examined, and marked those that would suit me in the catalogue, and was coming out of the room, coming on the lending place, I see Mr. Davis coming up the stairs, I had no idea who he was, I thought he came there for the purpose of viewing some furniture, I passed him and went down stairs, when I went down stairs and turned into a back parlour, and I went up to a window, and see a large closet in the room, and I was looking at some gentlemens tools in a chest that were in the closet, when the prosecutor came hastily into the room, looked wildly about him, rushed violently into the closet, when I observed him open a small cupboard in the closet, and take out a small parcel, and he says to me, how came this here? I asked him what he meant? he immediately answered God d-mn your blood, you have brought these down stairs, you have robbed me; I told him he should not impute such a charge to me, for I was entirely innocent, and willing to go before a magistrate. He sent for an officer, and I waited near half an hour before the officer came, when the officer came, he searched me, and found nothing about me but my own property; I had no kind of instrument whatever about me that I could force or pick a lock. When he brought the parcel to me, they were folded up in a piece of brown paper, there were no appearance of strings about them. It is impossible I could put such a pair of breeches in my pocket.

Prosecutor. The strings hung out of the paper; as to the tool chest, there was no such thing in the closet.

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Court to the Prisoner. Pray what has been your employment in life? - I have an allowance from my father, and my wife has an annuity.

Q. Where do you live? - In Holborn, I lodge there in my own lodgings, my own furniture.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-5

163. ELIZABETH NOBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , a silver watch, value 18s. a steel watch chain, value 6d. a metal seal, value 2d. a metal watch key, value 1d. the goods of Robert Gibson .

ROBERT GIBSON sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - In Lambeth-street, Whitechapel , I am in lodgings there.

Q. When was it you lost your watch? - The day after the general fast.

Q. Did you miss it that day? - Yes; I did not miss it, but it was missed that day, and the girl was taken up that same day.

Q. When had you last seen it before? - The night before.

Q. The night of the general fast? - Yes; I put it out of my hands underneath the pillow of the bed.

Q. Did you miss it the next morning? - It was missed the next morning, my wife can speak to it better than I can.

Q. Was it laid in your breeches or open? - Open, under the pillow.

Q. When did you see any thing of it again? - On the 27th, it was produced by the pawnbroker, his name is Pearson.

Q. Who has the watch now? Pearson. I have.

Mrs. GIBSON sworn.

Q. You are the wife of the last witness? - Yes.

Q. What do you know about the watch being missing? - The young woman at the bar came in in the morning, and asked me to lend her some tea and sugar for her breakfast; she lived up stairs in the same house with me.

Q. What morning was this? - The day after the fast.

Q. Had you before this time missed your husband's watch? Did you know it was gone? - No, it was in the house at the time, it was gone after that; I asked her to be so good as to shop in my place, and mind it while I went out of an errand, and when I came back I missed the watch.

Q. Did you give her the tea and sugar as she desired? - I did.

Q. Was this in your bed room? - It is all one room.

Q. How long was you absent? - About a quarter of an hour.

Q. When you returned was the prisoner in the room? - I met her at the door, the outer door of the house; when I came up to the door, she said, good by, Mrs. Gibson, I must go now, and I said, good by, Betsey; and when I went in I missed the watch.

Q. Where was the watch when you went out of the room? - Hanging over the mantle piece.

Q. Had you taken it from under the pillow after you had got up? - Yes, I had.

Q. And hung it up there yourself? - Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing more of the prisoner that day? - As soon as I missed the watch I pursued after her, and found her at her cousin's in Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Did you see any thing of the watch at that time? - She had pawned the watch.

Q. How long was it after she went away from the door, before you found her at her cousin's, in Bishopsgate-street? - About half an hour.

Q. How soon did you see your watch after this? - I saw the watch the same day, at the pawnbroker's, who is here.

Q. How came you to go to this pawnbroker's? - She went along with me to the pawnbroker's.

Q. Then she told you where the watch was? - Yes.

Q. Did she make any difficulty about telling you where it was to be had? - She made rather a difficulty.

Q. But at length she went with you? - Yes.

THOMAS PEARSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, No. 33, Nortonfalgate.

Q. Have you got any watch here? - Yes, I have.

Q. Produce it. When did you receive that watch, and of whom? - On the 26th of February, between nine and ten in the morning; the prisoner at the bar brought it in, she asked eighteen shillings on it; I told her I would lend her fourteen shillings; she said, lend me another shillings; I told her no; she agreed to take fourteen shillings; I asked her then her name? she told me Mary Barlet , and she lived in Half Moon-alley, that is just by where I live.

Q. How far is that where you live from Lambeth-street, Whitechapel? - I suppose it is half a mile or more; she said the watch belonged to her father or brother, but I think it was her brother.

Q. Did she say who her father was? - No, she did not, but I had seen her before several times in the neighbourhood, and at the shop; in the course of about half an hour after, she came in with one of the runners.

Q. Then you did lend her the fourteen shillings in the name of Mary Barlet? - I did.

Q. Was Mrs. Gibson with the runner and her when she came to your house? - Yes, I believe she was; they came in with intent to buy the goods, the runner did, he said the girl wanted to sell it, so I shewed the watch, and he shewed it to the prosecutrix, and she said it was her watch, and the runner desired I would take care of it, as it was stole; and I told him I would; and desired me to attend the next day at the office in Whitechapel, which I did.

Q. You have had the care of the watch ever since? - Yes, I have.

Prosecutor. This is my watch, I know it both by the name and number, and likewise by a dent on the spring, I have had it about nine years.

Q. Do you know the chain and key, and seal to it - Yes.

Prosecutrix. This is the watch I left hanging up in the morning.

Prisoner. She gave me this watch to make some money of unknown to her husband, and told me to give her the money unknown to him; and when I returned with the money I see him there, and I did not give it her; with that she came to seek after me, and took me up because I did not come at the time she expected me.

Court to Prosecutrix. The prisoner's defence makes it necessary for me to ask you whether you delivered the watch to her to pawn? - I never delivered the watch to her, or ever had any thought of delivering the watch to her.

Q. Did you ever tell her to make money of it? - I never did, or ever had a thought about it, she is a wicked girl to say any such thing.

Q. How long had she lodged in the house? - About six weeks, she is a servant out of place.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-6

164. ELIZABETH WATSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of

April , a black silk cloak, value 8s. a fox muff, value 3s. a fox tippet, value 1s. the goods of Stephen Twycross ; a black silk cloak, value 4s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. the goods of Eliza Twycross ; and a black silk cloak, value 8s. the goods of Elizabeth Twycross .

ELIZABETH TWYCROSS sworn.

On the 7th of April I went to drink tea and spend the evening with Mrs. Hodgson, in Bell yard, Cary-street .

Q. Where do you live? - Newcastle-street in the Strand; my daughters and me went to Mrs. Hodgson's, and the cloaks and muffs were taken up stairs.

Q. What are your daughters names? - Elizabeth and Eliza.

Q. Is your husband living? - Yes, he is here.

Q. What is his name? - Stephen.

Q. What cloaks, a muff, tippet, and muslin handkerchief; the cloak, muff and tippet belonged to me, and one cloak to each of my daughters, and the muslin handkerchief to my younger daughter, Eliza.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - Nothing at all; we were coming home about half after eleven o'clock, and they were not to be found any where.

Q. Who looked after them? - Mrs. Hodgson herself, and servants.

Q. Do you know any thing more of them? - We have seen them since; I see mine the next day, and the day after my daughters saw theirs, in the hands of the different pawnbrokers, they are here.

WILLIAM LANE sworn.

Q. Are you a pawnbroker? - Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Elizabeth Watson ? - Yes.

Q. What have you to say against her-She came on the 8th of April, and offered me this cloak to pledge, but I had suspicion she had stole it, and I stopped her.

Q. You did very well, you do yourself some credit.

Mrs. Twycross. That is my daughter's cloak, the elder, Elizabeth.

ELIZABETH TWYCROSS sworn.

Q. Look at that cloak, do you know it? - Yes, it is mine, I have darned it here, and here is a join in the lace, which came unsown, and I mended it that day, before I wore it.

Q. To Lane. When you stopped her what did she say? - She said, she brought it from a Mrs. Wood in Flassell's-place, Broad-street, Bloomsbury.

Q. Where do you live yourself? - In Holborn, No. 188. I offered for to send for Mrs. Wood, and then she said it was her own cloak; I received a bill about two hours before, and the cloak was described in the bill.

Q. Did you know any thing of the prisoner? - No, I never see her before.

Q. Did she bring any thing else with her but the cloak? - She had other things, but the officer would not search her in the shop, she offered nothing more.

Q. Did you send for the officer? - Yes.

-KEATING sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Loe, Broad-street, St. Giles's.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. What do you know of her? - I have known her this year and half, by using the same shop. On the 8th of this month she brought a cloak to pledge, she told me it was Mrs. Wood's, a woman whom she formerly used to come from.

Q. Have you got the cloak here? - I have got it, here it is.

Q. Did you advance any money on it? - I did, eight shillings; in the afternoon we had a bill delivered to us from the public office, Bow-street, and we gave notice immediately, and the person came and looked at it, and said it was her property.

Mrs. Twycross. This is my own cloak, it has been torn behind in the seam, and I have run it in three or four times.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

Q. What are you? - A constable of Bow-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - Yes. On Wednesday, the 8th of April, I was sent for to Mr. Lane's, the pawnbroker, to take her into custody; in searching her I found this muff and black silk cloak in her lap, and a duplicate of another silk cloak, pawned in Broad-street, with Mr. Lee.

Miss Elizabeth Twycross. This cloak is mine, here is a particular join across the lining.

Mrs. Twycross. I know the muff by the ribbon that is run into it.

Court to Treadway. Do you know any thing of the prisoner, where she lived? - No, I do not.

Q. To Mrs. Twycross. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - No, nothing at all.

Q. Did she tell you where she had them things from? - She said, they were given her by somebody, and afterwards she would not tell who it was, she would take it all on herself; and afterwards she said that the person was standing at the pawnbroker's window.

Q. Was there any body standing at the window at the time? - I believe there was a woman looking through the window.

Q. Did she afterwards tell you who it was? - No, she said before the magistrate that she did not know her.

-HODGSON sworn.

The prisoner once did live servant with me, about twelve months ago.

Q. Did she use to come to your house after she quitted your service, to visit there? - No.

Q. Have you known any thing of her for these last twelve months? - No.

Prisoner. The person that sent me with the things she and I had lodged six months together, she and I went together with the things, she asked me, and I went in with them, in the mean time I was stopped, and she was waiting at the door for me, and she saw the constable come in, and she ran away.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17950416-7

165. GEORGE WARE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , twelve yards of woollen carpetting, called scotch carpetting, value 18s. the goods of George Wells .

GEORGE WELLS sworn.

I am an upholster , in Castle-street, Long-acre . On the 19th of February I lost a roll of scotch carpet, I have two shops, one on one side of the way and the other on the other.

Q. Did you ever find it again? - In the course of five minutes after it was taken off my premises

Q. Was it on a shew board, or how was it? - It stood on a large mahogany side board table, within the shop door.

Q. Where did you find it again? - On the prisoner.

Q. In his custody? - Yes.

Q. Do you know any things of the prisoner? Was he employed by you? - No; I was in my shop on the opposite side of the way, and I see him go within the shop door, I got up, supposing him to be a customer, and see what passed.

GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Court to Prisoner. Were do you live? - In Gray's-Inn-lane.

Q. Have you been in any employment? - It has been a very hard winter, and I could not get full employment, I am a shoe-maker .

Reference Number: t17950416-8

166. JAMES MURPHY and JOHN RUSSELL were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , one guinea, and one half guinea , the monies of Dennis Callaghan .

DENNIS CALLAGHAN sworn.

I am a labouring man .

Q. Where do you live? - In Newtoner's-lane.

Q. Do you lodge there? - Yes.

Q. What sort of a labourer are you? - I work for the bricklayers.

Q. What do you say to the loss of this guinea and half guinea? - I went into a public house after a pint of two penny, for one of my lodgers that was very sick.

Q. What you keep a lodging house there? - Yes.

Q. What public house did you go into? - The Bull's Head, in Newtoner's-lane .

Q. What day was it? - The 22d of March, between ten and eleven o'clock at night. This James Murphy catched hold of me, and tore all my shirt.

Q. How long had you been in the house? - Not two minutes.

Q. What past when you went into the house? - This James Murphy and I had some words.

Q. What were you quarrelling about? - I don't know, I only meant to have this pint of two penny.

Q. How long had you known him? - This year and a half.

Q. Then you say he caught hold of you, where? - By the breast, and tore my shirt first and foremost; then I told him I would forgive him that, only to get rid of him; then after I told him I would forgive him, then he and John Russell attacked me, and knocked me down in the passage.

Q. Where was it he laid hold of you by the shirt? - Just by the tap room door.

Q. Then Murphy and Russell laid hold of you? - Yes, and knocked me down in the passage.

Q. Who laid hold of you? - Murphy did first, and the other assisted him, then one of them put his hand in my pocket, and took the guinea and half out, he was keeping me down the while, then after that I cried out for my money.

Q. Did you see what money they took out? - No, it was in the dark, but I felt it going, and I cried out for the money, and the mistress of the house she brought a light in a minute, and these men both absented themselves, they run away, and she looked for the money, for fear they dropped the money when they ran away.

Q. Was the money found? - There was a guinea and half found by another man, that went after them to the justice's.

Q. Was no money found upon the floor? - No, not a farthing.

Q. What became of the prisoners then? - They went off by themselves as fast as they could, when they had got the money.

Q. Now describe. Did the prisoners go out directly after? - Yes, immediately, before the light came at all.

Q. How soon after the money was taken from your pocket? - In half a minute, about a minute.

Q. What did you do that night? - I did not do any thing till the next day.

Q. You know both the prisoners? - Yes, I knew Russell about half a year, but I knew Murphy longer than that; they lived about four or five doors from me, in New Tower-lane. I did not do any thing that night, for I did not know but they would kill me if I went after them, for I had no assistance.

Q. When did you go after them? - The next day I went after the constable, in the morning, but I could not find any till eleven o'clock, and then we found one of them as he was coming home to his dinner, after twelve o'clock.

Q. Who was that? - John Russell .

Q. Was he in the lane? - He was in Drury-lane, in the Strand.

Q. What did you do then? - I staid along with him till I met the constable, and I shewed him to the constable, and the constable took him.

Q. How came you to meet the constable? - I had the constable waiting before that.

Q. Is the constable here? - No, I was after him last night and this morning, and I could not find him, I suppose they have see'd him.

Q. Did you take Russell at that time? - Yes, and took him to Bow-street, to the office, and then went after the other.

Q. When did you see Murphy? - It was past one o'clock, I found him at work near Lincoln's Inn-fields, at some stables that his master was building.

Q. What did you do with Murphy then? - Took him to the office.

Q. Had you any constable with you then? - Yes.

Q. Were they committed then at the same day, the Monday you found them? - They were committed to have their second trial.

Q. Was what you said taken down in writing? Was you sworn there? Was you examined there? - No, I was not the first, I was the second.

Q. Was it put down in writing there? - Yes, I believe they did put it down.

Q. Now tell me about this guinea; how did you know it was in your pocket at this time? - I knew it when they attacked me, I took it out of my pocket, for fear I should lose it when Murphy was at me first.

Q. That is when Murphy was at you first? - Yes, and they saw me take it out.

Q. Where did you take it from? - Out of my breeches pocket, and put it in again, and they were looking at me.

Q. Then you had taken the money out of your pocket, and looked at it, and put it in your pocket again? - Yes. Then when they saw that I had the money, that was the time they knocked me down in the passage.

Q. How soon after the time that they saw you put it in your pocket was it that they attacked you again? - It was half a minute.

Q. How soon after? - In a minute.

Q. How long had you had this money in your pocket? - I had the half guinea since Saturday night; I received it from Mr. Fuller, the master that I worked with, a bricklayer; and the guinea I had received on Sunday from one of my lodgers.

Q. Did your lodger pay you so great a sum as a guinea altogether? - No, he paid

me sixteen shillings, I gave him change for the guinea.

Q. What is your lodger's name? - One Jack Hoyle .

Q. How much silver did you give him out of the guinea? - Seven shillings, I believe.

Q. How many shillings? - Five shillings. There are plenty of witnesses at the time I gave it him.

Q. This sixteen shillings, what was it owing you for? - For diet and lodging, for about three weeks, he wanted to buy a pair of shoes the week before, and he took his wages once a fortnight from his his master.

Q. How long was your half guinea for that you received from Mr. Fuller? - I earned it the same week that I got it.

Q. Was that your usual wages? - No, my usual wages used to be twelve shillings, but I had not the eighteen-pence in my pocket, for I gave it in change, and the remainder I got from another of my lodgers, to make up the change for the guinea.

Prisoner Murphy. If you put off my trial till to-morrow morning, I can bring witness to prove the contrary.

Prisoner Russell. The Sunday evening before this happened, this man and me went into the public house to get a pint of beer, and we were drinking the pint of of beer, and this man came in, and one of the company drank to this man, and he drank to him, and he sat down, and the Sunday night before this old man Murphy, and he had some dispute; and they began to jaw one another about it, and this Callaghan took hold of Murphy by his breast, and pulled out the table and struck him, and they were parted first then after that, and he was going home along with one of the men, and his brother, Callaghan's brother, met him just at the door, and he told him how he was disputing, and said he had been robbed, and his brother made him turn back again and strike this old man; and when I see him going to strike the old man, I entreated him, and then he struck me, and knocked me down, and then we left him there, and we were carried home by the company that was backwards, he said he would stay all night in the public house; and the next day as I was coming home to my dinner from work, he had a constable in his house waiting for me, and he took me just facing his own door, in New Tower-lane, and he led me down to Bow-street, and then he went after Murphy, and then he brought Murphy to me, and then we went and had a hearing, and then we were ordered up for the Thursday following, for the second hearing; and between Thursday he took four guineas from Murphy's wife, in order to make it up, and he kept it till yesterday, when he went for two more, and she could not give it, and he went to day and had the bill found; he was with us yesterday and had some beer from us. There were two watchmen at the same time the now happened, and he never said a word about any money, and I am sure that was his time to cry out in the house.

Q. To Prosecutor. Were there any watchmen in the house at the time? - No, they came in when they went away.

Q. How soon after did the watchmen come in? - In about ten minutes.

Q. How many watchmen came in after they were gone? - Only one watchman.

Q. Why did not you make application to him? - I did but he would not go with me.

Q. That watchman is not here? - No.

Q. Was your brother there that evening? - He came in after they went away.

Q. Are you sure he was not in before? - He came in before, but he was gone out at the time that they robbed me.

Q. Had your brother and Murphy any blows passing between them? - No.

Q. Was your brother there while the quarrel was? - Yes, he was there, not all the time, he was there part of the time.

Q. Had he any words with Murphy while you was there? - I do not know that he had any words with Murphy.

Q. Did he at all take your part? - Not while I was present he did not.

Q. What money have you received from Murphy's wife, upon your oath? - Not a farthing; but I heard that she gave it to an acquaintance of her's and mine, and so I sent for that man to deliver the money to her again, and I would not accept to have it again after putting the gentlemen to trouble, I would not if I was offered to have a thousand pounds.

Q. What other people were there in the house at the time, besides Murphy and Russell? - Yes, there were two or three other people in the house, the man who keeps the house, one Carol, but the man was not up, he was in bed, but the wife was there.

Q. Was there any thing past besides, about any more money than the four guineas? - Not that I know of.

Q. Did any body do it by your desire? - Never.

Q. Did you direct any body to do it? - No.

ALEXANDER BRISTOW sworn.

I used to work at the saddle and cap making; I know the prosecutor, I live in the same neighbourhood, with my son-in-law, in New Tower-lane.

Q. When was this? - Last night, at the Old Bull's Head, at my son-in-law's, in New Tower lane.

Q. Was Callaghan there? - Yes; and he said he had sent to Mrs. Murphy for four guineas, and if she did not bring the money in an hour, he would go to day and swear and get them all hanged.

Q. Who was in the room with you? - Mr. Collyer, in Drury-lane, a bellows maker.

Q. Who else were there besides? - Two men besides, a butcher and milkman, strangers to me.

Q. What is your business? - I have a little, enough to live upon, I have left off business these ten years near upon.

Q. When did you mention this to any body? - I mentioned it last night after I came out, and this morning.

Q. Who did you say was present besides yourself? - Mr. Collyer.

Q. Who did you mention it to? - I mentioned it to my son-in-law, when I came out, he was in the bar; Callaghan and I came out together.

Q. When was you sent for? How soon? - Not an hour ago.

Q. The woman was not there at this public house? - No, not last night.

Q. To Prosecutor. Was you at this public house last night? - Yes, I was.

Q. And did you see that Bristow there? - I do not know the man.

Q. Do you know who was in the room besides yourself? - I sent for my wife to pay for a pot of beer that I had.

Q. Will you say that you did not see that Bristow there? - I do not know him, he might be there.

Q. What was it you said about Mrs. Murphy not bringing the money in an hour's time? - I said nothing of any such thing; I said nothing about money, only sending a little girl to my wife to send me some money to pay for a pot of beer, I was very dry, I had been standing at Hicks's Hall all the day.

Q. Might you not make a mistake about this wife? - No, I heard nothing about that, because they sent out Murphy daughter, and she could not find her, an

then he sent out a woman to see if Murphy's wife was at home.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-9

167. ROBERT SIMPSON and ROBERT ROBERTS were indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on Harriott Villebois , on the 24th of March , and feloniously taking from her person and against her will, a watch with a gold case, value 4l. 4s. a leather purse, value 6d. and three guineas; the goods and monies of the said Harriott Villebois .(The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

HARRIOTT VILLEBOIS sworn.

Q. Was you with Mrs. Villebois and Mr. Stone the 24th of March last? - Yes.

Q. Where do you live? - At Feltham, three miles from Hounslow.

Q. Was it in a coach? - In an open carriage; we were going to Hanwell, to an uncle that lives there; between Feltham and Hanwell we met the prisoners.

Q. What time of the day was this? - It was about a quarter of an hour after one.

Q. You say you met the prisoners. Did you know the prisoners? - Yes; I am certain of the prisoners. They immediately demanded our watches and money, and presented pistols to our bosoms.

Q. Had they both pistols, or only one? - They had each of them a pistol. I gave them my money and watch.

Q. Who was the person that applied to you? - Simpson, the man in the light coloured clothes.

Q. What money did you give him? - Three guineas.

Q. Was it loose in your pocket? - No, in a small red and green leather purse.

Q. Did you lose any thing besides this purse and money? - Yes, a watch I lost, a small gold watch and chain.

Q. Was the chain gold? - No.

Q. How long do you think the transaction of the robbing took up? - Three or four minutes.

Q. Were there persons near to you? - Close.

Q. Have you any doubt about the person of Simpson, of whom you first spoke? - Not in the least.

Q. Was you much alarmed? - I was.

Q. What became of them after they had taken your money from you? - They then robbed my mother, and after they had taken her money, they rode off towards Feltham.

Q. That is where you reside? - Yes. After they had robbed us they pulled their silk handkerchiefs off their faces, and I had a perfect view of them.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing the other person? Can you speak to him or not?

Court. How long did they stay by you after they pulled their silk handkerchiefs off? - A moment.

Q. How far was the silk handkerchiefs on their faces? - About half covered.

Q. About as far as the nose? - Yes.

Q. As you saw them both, do you speak to the same certainty of the other man as you do to Simpson? - Yes, I can.

Q. You say they made off towards Feltham? - Yes.

Q. Which way did the carriage go? - We immediately followed them, we ordered the coachman to turn about, and we had information of their going through Feltham.

Q. When you got to Feltham was any body sent in pursuit of them? - My mother sent the coachman and footman, William Nicholl and Daniel Bond .

Q. Have you seen your watch again, or any thing that you lost? - Yes, in Bow-street I was shewn the watch.

Mr. Gurney. During the time the robbery was committed, the persons who robbed you had silk handkerchiefs over their faces; the robbery took up three or four minutes? - Four or five minutes.

Q. Consequently while the robbery was carrying on, their faces being covered, you could not discern their countenances? - No, I could not.

Q. Then the reason why you ascertain their faces was, because you saw them uncovered a moment afterwards? - Yes.

Q. I think you state you was considerably alarmed? - I was.

Q. Seeing them but a moment, and being much alarmed, then is it not possible you might have some doubt respecting their persons? - No, not a shadow of doubt.

Court. How were they dressed? - Roberts had a blue coat on, Simpson had a light coloured coat.

Mr. Knowlys. Had you an opportunity while the handkerchief was on to see any part of the face? - I could see the eyes and the nose, and the upper part of the face.

FRANCES VILLEBOIS sworn.

Q. Be so good as to tell us the particulars, as coming within your observation of this matter? - About a quarter after one, on the 24th of March last, I was stopped by these two prisoners; Roberts, the man in black, took my watch, they robbed us, and were extremely abusive; after they were done, both of them just passed the carriage, and took the handkerchiefs from both their faces, and declared they would shoot the coachman, if ever they saw him again, and was a great mind to do it then.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing the faces of both these persons that were present at this transaction? - No, I did not, only Roberts's, I could not speak to Simpson as to any certainly, I could not, I was too much agitated to attend to the person of the man who had not robbed me, but the person that robbed me I have not the least doubt of, he staid so long by me that I could not have the least doubt; I then desired my coachman to return home, and I had no other way of getting home.

Mr. Alley. I believe the young lady who has been just examined, was the first who lost her watch? - That I cannot say, because I was busy, talking to Roberts, it was as near together as possible.

Q. Consequently you cannot ascertain who it was that took that lady's property?

ROBERT STONE sworn.

Q. Was you with these two ladies when the robbery was committed? - I was.

Q. Will you tell us what passed at the time? - We were going to take a little airing, Mrs. Villebois and her two daughters, and another young lady, and we were got but a little distance from Mrs. Villebois's house, and she observed how pleasant her house was, we had not passed but a minute, and Mrs. Villebois said, there is a couple of highwaymen; they came up, the prisoners at the bar came up with pistols, and demanded our watches and money; Simpson it was that robbed Mrs. Villebois. After that Simpson then demanded my watch and money; he says, now, sir, your purse and money, as to a watch I said I had none; sir, says he, you have, and I will send you to perdition if you do not deliver it; and

I got up upon my legs, and told him I had no watch; sir, says he, turn your pocket out; I said, I should not; with that they ordered the coachman to drive on, and pulled their handkerchiefs off their faces, and said, they were a great mind to blow the coachman's brains out, and if they met him again at any other place they would; this was because the coachman looked at them while they were robbing, they had told the coachman to keep his head the other way. I told Mrs. Villebois that she might as well pursue her pleasure, where she was going.

Q. Have you any doubt of either of them? - Not the least doubt.

Mr. Gurney. It was the person supposed to be Simpson that attemped to rob you? - It was.

Q. You had not the opportunity of observing the person of Roberts? - Yes, as good, because Roberts was at my left hand, robbing Mrs. Villebois.

Q. As Simpson attempted to rob you, your attention was particularly directed to him? - I had observed Roberts before that, he was robbing Mrs. Villebois; while Simpson and Roberts were robbing the ladies, their handkerchiefs were over their faces, it was about half way over.

Q. Then all the opportunity you had of observing their faces, was for the moment they took it off, and spoke to the post boy? - It was, but I am certain of them

WILLIAM NICHOLL sworn.

I am a coachman to Mrs. Villebois.

Q. Did you drive her upon the day of the robbery? - Yes, the 24th of March last.

Q. Tell us what you observed at the time? - Upon the 24th of March last my mistress ordered the carriage at half past twelve, and I got it ready as soon as I could, I believe it wanted about twenty minutes to one when I was at my mistress's door, she desired me to drive to Hanwell; and about a mile from my mistress's door, between there and Hansworth, I met Simpson and Roberts, Simpson had a handkerchief in his mouth, Roberts had nothing on his face, nor no part of his face.

Q. Who desired you to stop? - I rather pulled up my horses, thinking it was a friend that wanted to speak to my mistress, and I turned my head and see a pistol in one of their hands; I immediately whipped up my horses, seeing some men about three hundred yards off, plowing a field, and Mr. Stone desired I would stop, and I did stop, and they presented pistols, and demanded their watches and money, and repeated it different times.

Q. Now when Simpson came up to the coach, had he the handkerchief in his mouth? - He had it a little distance before he came up to the coach.

Q. What do you say to Roberts? - Roberts had nothing on his face; I turned my head to look at him, and Roberts d-ed me, and said he would blow my brains out if I turned my head that way, I saw Roberts had nothing on has face.

Q. Did you see the person supposed to be Roberts, while the robbery was going on? - I saw him, but I cannot say whether he had a pistol or not in his hand; immediately I looked, Simpson said be would blow my brains out; and I looked no more after that; they said they were robbed, they rode off; my mistress said she was robbed, I driving on, as I thought to go towards Hanwell, my mistress told me to turn round, and go the same way back again; I looked afterwards and saw the prisoners, on a trot, very fast; my mistress desired I would turn back, and go the same way home again, she would go no further.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing their faces before they committed the robbery? - Perfectly.

Q. Look round and see if you know these two persons? - That is Simpson, that one had the handkerchief in his, mouth; the other is Roberts, he was rather behind the other.

Q. Are you sure hat is the man that you met? - I am clear of it.

Q. Then you returned towards home? - I did, and made some inquiries after them, and we were informed they rode fast towards Belfound.

Q. In consequence of your inquiries, did you pursue the way that you was informed they were gone? - I inquired myself by Feltham church.

Q. Did you go in pursuit of the men? - After I got home Mr. Stone desired me and the footman to go after them; we went and put a saddle on each of the horses that I drove, and we went to Belfound.

Q. Where did you go next? - We went from there to Harlington; we went from Harlington across the country roads to Harrow, we went to Harrow, and inquired of a man who was a rope-maker.

Q. When you got to Harrow, did you meet with any persons like the persons that robbed you? Did you go to the King's Head, at Harrow? - I did.

Q. Who did you find there? - Young Mr. Foster, who I thought at that time to be a waiter.

Q. Did you go into the room, and who did you find there? - I went into the room with the two Mr. Fosters and Daniel Bond ; there we found the two prisoners in the room, we took them in the room; we had got a constable, who I spoke to before, and there we searched them.

Q. Now tell us what past then. What did you find? - After the handcuffs were put on them, Simpson says, here is the watch.

Q. Was there any conversation about a watch by any body? - I told them they were my prisoners; they said, they knew nothing of me; I said I was very sorry I knew any thing of them; then we got the handcuffs on them, and searched them, and Simpson said, here is the watch; he put his hand towards his right hand pocket; I told the constable and told the Fosters, how they had just stopped the carriage, and robbed my mistress, and I insisted on their being searched; one of the Fosters took the watch out of his pocket, and three pistols were found on them, I see them after they were taken from them, but I cannot say who had them, they were loaded. They were not examined then, but they were brought to Bow-street, and justice Bond examined them, and said they were loaded, all three.

Q. What became of the watch? - One of the Fosters had it that night.

Q. Do you know the watch yourself? - I may have seen it, but I cannot say I did know it.

Q. Did you find any thing else on them? - There was money found on them, but I cannot justly say how much.

Q. Was there a purse found? - There was a pocket book.

Mr. Alley. You seem to have laid a deal of emphasis on one thing, that is this, that at the time you looked at the men that robbed the coach, one of them d-ned his eyes, and said he would blow your brains out? - He d-ned me at the time.

Q. Had he not the opportunity of putting his threat into execution at the time, if he had been such a sanguinary man as you represent him to be? - He d-ned me, and told me he would, and I had no other reason to think but he would do it.

DANIEL BOND sworn.

Q. Are you a servant to Mrs. Villebois? - Yes.

Q. Did you go with the other servant to pursue? - Yes.

Q. Where did you go to? - To Harrow on the Hill, the King's Head.

Q. Who did you find there? - I found these two men in the room; these are the two, they were in the back parlour.

Q. Tell us what conversation past, and what you found there? - There was a watch found on Mr. Simpson.

Q. Was any thing said before or after the watch was found? - He asked us when we went into the room, what is the matter! what is the matter! I said I was very sorry to see that they were the men; I did not know them myself, and the coachman came in.

Q. What did they say when you said you was very sorry to see that they were the men? - They said they were not the men.

Q. What past then? - The constable handcuffed them, and then we searched them.

Q. What did you find when you searched them? - I found the watch on Simpson.

Q. Was any thing said about the watch to him, or from him? - He said I have got the watch.

Q. Had any body said any thing about the watch before? - No.

Q. What else did you find besides the watch? - About four or five guineas.

Q. Who was that found upon? - Mr. Foster took it, I did not rightly see from whom it was taken.

Q. Was there any thing else taken from him besides the money and watch? - They said there was a pocket book, but I did not see it.

Q. Any arms? - Yes, three pistols I believe, two on one, and one on the other.

Q. Were they loaded or not? - I did not see, I came home to let my mistress know.

Mr. Gurney. They did not offer to make use of these pistols when you apprehended them? - No, they did not make any resistance at all.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you see the watch when it was found? Did you know it? - Yes, I knew the chain, It was Miss Harriott Villebois's.

-FOSTER sworn.

Q. I believe you live at the King's Head, at Harrow? - Yes; I remember the prisoners coming to my father's house, on the 24th of March, about three o'clock, as nigh as I can guess; we had dined, but about three they came up to the door, and they asked for two gills of wine, which I served them with; then they asked if the family had dined? I told them yes, we had dined, and they asked it we had any cold meat in the house? I told them if they would please to alight from their horses I would see, and I served them with what we had, and a bottle of ale; before they had done Mrs. Villebois's servant came to inquire for these two men; I told them there were two such men there, and told them to follow me into the room, and my brother and I went up to Simpson, I told him I understood that there was a robbery committed, and I suspected they had done it, and I told them I hoped they would make no resistance, and then my brother and the footman and coachman and headborough took them, and they were handcuffed and searched, and I found a pistol, and the coachman said his mistress had lost a watch, and Simpson said it was in his left hand waistcoat pocket.

Q. What became of the watch after that? - I have got it, and have kept it ever since.

Q. Was there any thing else found? - There is four guineas and a half in gold, some silver and halfpence. (The watch produced.)

Miss Villebois. This is the watch and chain I lost on this occasion.

Q. Can you recollect either the name or number upon it? - No, I cannot.

Q. How long have you had it? - About three years.

Mr. Gurney. Is there any particular mark by which you know it? - Yes, there is a bruise on the outside, I know it from the whole general appearance.

Mr. Knowlys. And that you say you derive from three years use of it? - Yes, I am positive of the watch.

Mrs. Villebois. I am certain it is her watch, it is the watch she was robbed of.

Q. How long have you known the watch? - About seven or eight years, I gave it to Miss Villebois myself.

JAMES MARTIN sworn.

Q. I believe you are headborough of Harrow? - Yes.

Q. Were you present when these prisoners were apprehended and searched? - Yes.

Q. What did you find on them? - Two pistols, that is what I took from them, I took one from each.

Q. Do you know whether they were loaded at that time? - They were both loaded.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

Q. You are a constable of Bow-street? - Yes.

Q. Did you search either of the prisoners? - Yes, I did.

Q. Who did you search? - Both. On the prisoner simpson I found a guinea and two shillings, on the prisoner Roberts two pistol keys, this pistol bag, and three shillings in silver, and about ten-pence in halfpence.

Mr. Knowlys to Miss Villebois. What is the value of the watch? - It cost seven guineas.

Prisoner Simpson. I leave myself totally to the mercy of the court.

Prisoner Roberts. I refer myself to my counsel.

Roberts called three witnesses who said he was a hair dresser, and gave him a very good character.

Simpson said he had three witnesses there that morning, but he had sent them out of the way, not expecting his trial to come on.

Robert Simpson , GUILTY . (Aged 24.) Death .

Robert Roberts , GUILTY. (Aged 26.) Death.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17950416-10

169. PATRICK MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a miniature picture set in gold, value 2l. a red morocco leather case, value 6d. nine pair of silk stockings, value 1l. 10s. a cambrick handkerchief, value 5s. the goods of Rebecca Aguilar , in the dwelling house of Judith Aguilar .

ANN WILLIAMS sworn.

Q. I see this property stolen is the property of Rebecca Aguilar , in the dwelling house of Judith Aguilar ? - Yes; I live in that house.

Q. Are either of them here? - No; they do not think it necessary. I am housekeeper to Mrs. Aguilar.

Q. Is Mrs. Aguilar a widow? - Yes, she is.

Q. She is a jewess, I suppose? - Yes, she is.

Q. How old may the daughter be? - Two and twenty.

Q. Was Mrs. Agullar's house robbed at any time? - On the 23d of January, on a Friday. In going into the bed room up two pair of stairs, I see the prisoner standing up in the room.

Q. Where is her house? - In Devonshire-square . I asked him what business he had there? he said the footman sent him up stairs; I told him to walk down stairs and he should see the footman. He walked down stairs, and the butler came forward. All the articles in the indictment were in a drawer, in that bed room; they belonged to Miss Aguilar.

Q. Was any property removed, or taken away, or found on him? - There was a large quantity of linen and wearing apparel put under the bed.

Q. I see in this indictment there are laid a miniature picture set in gold. &c. the property of Rebecca Aguilar , is she a single woman? - Yes.

Q. Were they all in this bed room? - Yes.

Q. When had you last seen them in that drawer? - These things were in my care, in my bed room.

Q. When you came out of the room had you turned the key of the door? - I had not.

Q. How soon after this did you see these things? - The nine pair of stockings and the picture I found on him; all these articles were found on him.

Q. What were the sort of things that you found under the bed? - Two handkerchiefs and a cloak.

Q. Did you see these articles taken from the prisoner? - No.

Q. Then how do you happen to know that they were found on the prisoner? - By the officer.

Q. Was the door shut of this room where you found the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. Did you find him in the room? - Yes, rather confused; he stood up in the room.

-CATER sworn.

I live with Mrs. Aguilar, she is a widow lady.

Q. Did you ever see that man in Mrs. Aguilar's house? - Yes, I did, on the 23d of January, at one o'clock at noon; the house maid came running down to me as I stood in the hall.

Q. Who was the last witness? - Mrs. Williams, the housekeeper; I did not see her till afterwards; the house maid is not here; she asked me if I had let a strange man into the house? she said there was a strange man in the house; I then inquired where he was; she said he is coming down stairs; on his coming down stairs, I asked him who he wanted?

Q. Did you see the prisoner come down stairs? - I did.

Q. Was the last witness behind him, following him down? - Yes, she came following him down.

Q. What past when he came down? - I asked him what he wanted? he told me he wanted the footman, or words to that effect; I told him we did not keep footmen up stairs; I asked him what he had got in his pockets? he told me a few silk stockings. I then laid hold of him and desired the footman to go for an officer; I then took him into the parlour and desired he would pull out every thing out of his pockets; he pulled out nine pair of silk stockings, a cambrick pocket handkerchief, and a hammer with a crow at the end of it; we then took him into another parlour, and by this time the officer came, and we had him examined, and the officer found the picture up his sleeve in the palm of his hand.

Q. Were all these things delivered to the officer? - They were.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn.

I am an officer of Bishopsgate; I produce nine pair of stockings, one handker

chief, and a picture; I have kept them ever since.

Q. Look at the prisoner. Did you see him at Mrs. Aguilar's house? - I did.

Q. Did you take him into custody? - I did; and on searching him I found this picture, in his right hand pocket; his right hand was in his pocket, and I took his hand out, and this here was under his sleeve, in his hand. The other things were given me by Miss Aguilar.

Q. Was that in the presence of the prisoner? - No, it was not; he was in one room and I was in another. I found this crow laying at the prisoner's feet, I did not find it on him.

Q. To Williams. Was this room usually kent locked? - No, never locked.

Q. To Catir. Did the young lady see the things taken out of his pocket? - Yes.

Q. Did they remain in the same parlour, the things when the officer came? - No, they were taken into the back parlour, to the bell of my knowledge.

Q. Was you present when the young lady delivered them to the prisoner? - I believe I was, I was present all the time.

Q. Were the things left in her custody any time, out of your presence? - No, the officer took them.

Q. Then you have no doubt but they are the stockings, and the same handkerchief? - I have no doubt at all.

Q. As to the miniature picture is that the same? - It is.

Q. To Mrs. Williams. Look at that miniature picture. Is it the picture of any one of the family? - It is Mrs. Aguilar's son-in-law, set in gold; I think it cost her about thirty pounds, when she had it first, but the value is very little now; the stockings have the initials, R. A. on them.

Q. What may be the value of them? - I am sure I cannot say.

Q. Are they new stockings, or have they been wore? - They have been wore.

Q. What did they cost new? - About seven shillings, a pair.

Q. Now that cambrick handkerchief; do you know that? - Yes; there is the same name as on the stockings.

Q. What may be the value of the cambrick handkerchief? - About four shillings.

Prisoner. I had been very ill for about four weeks before that, and I got up in the morning, and I was quite almost out my senses when I went into this house, and I found this picture on the stairs, just as I was going up stairs, and I went up and put them stockings in my pocket, and they came up and took me down stairs, and asked me what I had go in my pocket, and I told him; I have been ill these thirteen weeks with the bad distemper.

Jury. Are all the stockings marked R. A.? - Most all; there is one marked J. A. they were a pair of stocking that were too small for Mrs. Aguilar, and she gave them to her daughter.

Q. Were there any number on them? - There were, but I do not recollect the number.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-11

170. WALTER STAMFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , a silk handkerchief, value 8d. the goods of John Paterson .

JOHN PATERSON sworn.

I am clerk in the Sun fire office .

Q. Was your pocket picked at any time? - Yes, on the 21st of February, Saturday, at about a quarter after six, in Fetter-lane .

Q. How did it happen? - By the prisoner rushing on me, and I immediately turned and collared him.

Q. How did he come up to you? - He was behind me; I parted with a friend at the corner of Fetter-lane; going up Fetter-lane I heard somebody behind me, supposing it was the friend that I had parted with, and when I came near to Clifford's Inn, the prisoner rushed on me, and consequently I immediately turned about, and collared him with my left hand, at that moment he was putting the handkerchief behind him, and I put my arm round and took the handkerchief from him, he had it in his right hand.

Q. Was it a linen or silk handkerchief? - Silk.

Q. You knew it to be your's? - Yes. I gave him and it in charge to the constable.

Q. Was it a coloured handkerchief? - It was. I had taken it off my neck not five minutes before.

Q. It was in your pocket, was it? - Yes, in my right hand pocket.

Q. Did any thing pass after this? - He tried to get away.

Q. But he did not hurt you at all? - No.

WILLIAM MARNE sworn.

Q. Were you in Fetter-lane that day? - No; the prisoner was brought to my house in Fleet-street; I am ward beadle; the prosecutor brought him down.

Q. Was any handkerchief brought there? - Yes; Mr. Paterson gave it to me.(Produced.)

Q. Have you kept it till now? - Yes.

Prosecutor. The handkerchief that I gave the officer was the handkerchief that I took off my neck.

Q. Will you swear that the handkerchief that you found in the hands of the prisoner, was the handkerchief that you took off your neck and put into your pocket? - It is.

Q. And that same you delivered to the officer? - Yes.

Prisoner. I was going up Fetter-lane to buy a bit of pork for Sunday's dinner, and I picked up that handkerchief, and a woman was quarrelling with me who should have it; and immediately that gentleman came up and said, it is my handkerchief; and I said, if it is your's, take it; and he said, I will not be positive whether you have picked my pocket or no, for I found it three or four times partly out of my pocket; and some people thereabouts said I should do for a substitute soldier; I said I was not fit for to serve my king and country; and they took me to the hall.

Court to Paterson. Did any of this conversation pass in the way that he puts it? - It did not.

Q. Did you doubt at all whether it was taken out of your pocket? - I did not.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-12

171. JAMES WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , eight pieces of cotton shawls, each piece containg ten cotton shawls, value 14l. the goods of William Nicholls , and John Thomas Stevens , in their dwelling house .

A Second COUNT, for stealing the same goods, charging it to be in the

dwelling house of John Thomas Stevens only.

JOHN THOMAS STEVENS sworn.

Q. Have you any partner ? - Yes.

Q. What is his name? - Thomas Nicholls.

Q. What business do you follow? - A Manchester and Scotch warehouse, No. 7, Milk-street .

Q. Whose dwelling house is it? - My dwelling house.

Q. Your partner does not reside there? - No, he lives over Blackfriars Bridge.

Q. Does he contibute at all? - He does, to the warehouse expence; the whole rent is paid out of the joint trade, and a certain sum charged to me for the house part.

Q. This place from whence the goods were taken, was that the part in which you pay in common? - It is in the part in which we pay in common out of the trade.

Q. The servants are joint servants in the trade? - Yes, the servants are.

Q. Did you lose any shawls at any time, and when? - On Saturday evening the 4th of April, I was up stairs at tea, at the time he was taken, and hearing the cry of stop thief, I got up and opened the dining room window, and looked out and saw a crowd coming towards the door, and I immediately went down stairs, and when I went to the door they were bringing the prisoner in to the door, these that had taken him.

Q. What else was brought in besides the prisoner? - Nothing else at that time; the property was taken into the next door, where the prisoner was taken up; when the prisoner was brought into the warehouse, our porter gave charge to the constable that came in with him, and he was at that time taken to the Poultry compter; it being Saturday night the Lord Mayor did not sit till the Wednesday following, and then he was committed; I went into our neighbours next door but one, Neale, Wright and company, and there I saw these eight pieces of shawls, which were taken up by one of them young men, they had laid them on the counter.

Q. Did you know these shawls to be your's? - Yes, I did, by my private mark being on them, they have been in my custody ever since, with the constable's seal on them, the constable himself I believe brought them to our house, from our neighbours, and tied them up, and put his seal on them, and then left them in our custody.

Q. You have told us you have a partner, have you any other partner? - No, no other.

Q. No other person having an interest in the trade? - No, no other.

Q. Where were these goods placed? - On a box, just at the entrance of the warehouse.

Q. The warehouse is at some distance from the house? - No, it is the lower apartment in the house, the ground floor, even with the street.

JOHN GLADWIN sworn.

I am porter to Mr. Stevens.

Q. Look at the prisoner. Did you miss any property at any time? - On Saturday evening, the 4th of April, I was shutting up the warehouse, and a man came up and asked me several questions about the way to Aldersgate-street; and I told him immediately which was the way, and he asked me whether the White Horse inn was there, and if the Norwich waggon did not go from it? I told him I did not know, but there was a White Horse inn, in Cripplegate; immediately it run in my head that something was going forward more than usual, and I turned my head and see the prisoner coming out of the shop with a quantity of shawls in

his arms, he had them before him openly I immediately cried stop thief! and ran after him, he carried them about ten or a dozen yards, and threw them down in the kennel, and ran away; I cried stop thief! and he runs up a narrow court that leads to Honey lane market, Robinhood-court, he was stopped there.

Q. Did you see him stopped? - No, I did not.

Q. How soon did you see him after he got away from you? - In less than a minute; the constable came up, and I laid hold of him, and he laid hold of him, and we two led him back to the warehouse.

Q. What became of the shawls, how many pieces were there? - Eight pieces.

Q. How soon did you see them again? - About ten minutes after, at our neighbours, Neale and Wright's.

Q. Were they the same as the prisoner threw down? - They were.

Q. Where did you see them? - On the counter; the person who took them there is here.

Q. Do you know them to be your masters property? - Yes.

Q. Should you know them again if you was to see them? - Yes.

Mr. Knapp. This was between seven and eight o'clock at night? - Yes.

Q. It was darkish? - Not very dark.

Q. Not quite so light as it is now? - No.

Q. So I should think. The person, had he a round hat on? - Yes, the shape of mine.

Q. Now it was dark, and he had a round hat on, and you lost sight of him, and he was stopped not in your presence; do you mean to tell the gentlemen of the jury that you swear to the person of the man? - Yes, I can.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - Not before that night, I had a perfect sight of him.

Q. Had you any lights in your warehouse? - Yes.

Q. He ran out of your warehouse you say? - I see him come out of the door.

Q. Had you any lamps near you? - There was not.

Q. What distance was you from the prisoner when he came out of the door? - I was within a yard of the door.

JAMES SCULTHORPE sworn.

I live along with Messrs. Neale, Wright and Co. as warehouseman. On Saturday, between seven and eight o'clock, hearing the cry of stop thief! I went to the door after our porter, and the porter ran down Milk-street, and I did not run at all, I set my feet immediately almost on the goods, that lay in the kennel.

Q. You did not see any body throw them down? - I did not.

Q. How far were they from your door? - The width of the pavement, directly opposite the door.

Q. What were the goods? - Purple shawls.

Q. What did you do then? - The porter that pursued the man, desired the shawls might be picked up, and I picked them up, and took them into our front warehouse, and laid them on the counter.

Q. Who were they delivered to after that? - To the constable that took the man.

Q. Did you deliver them to the constable or Mr. Stevens? - The constable took them I think, but I believe they were both present.

Q. Was it wet or dry in the street? - It was quite clean in the middle of the street, but some of them got into the kennel, and got very wet and dirty.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT sworn.

Q. Was you sent for on this occasion? - No, I was coming down Milk-street between seven and eight o'clock, and hearing the cry of stop thief! I ran as fast as I could, and seeing a concourse of people running in the court, I immedi

ately made round the other way, and catched the prisoner in the court, Robinhood-court.

Q. Was he running? - He was hardly running, when I came up to him there was so many people that he was partly stopped; I brought the prisoner back to Mr. Stevens and Nicholson's, and they gave charge of him, and I took him to the Compter; after that I went to Messrs. Neale's and Wright's, with Mr. Nicholson, and brought the shawls into his house.

Q. Were they dirty or clean? - Two parcels I believe were dirty, the others were not, they are here in court.

Q. What has been done with these shawls? - After that I then sealed them up, and left them at Mr. Nicholson's house.

Q. They were carried I suppose to the magistrate? - Yes.

Q. Did you seal them again there? - Yes, I sealed them at the Mansion House, before the Lord Mayor.

Mr. Knapp. You say the prisoner was running, and you stopped him? - Yes.

Q. He was running towards you? - Yes.

Q. You know Robinhood-court? - Yes.

Q. One end of Robinhood-court leads into Honey-lane-market? - It does.

Q. Then if he had been inclined to run away, he might have run away into the market? - He had not got through the court.

Q. These shawls you received from Neale, and delivered them to Nicholson, that is all you know? - That is all.(The goods produced.)

Prosecutor. They are the same shawls.

Q. Have they your private mark on them? - They have.

Q. When had you last seen them, before this transaction happened? - Half an hour before, they had been shewn that day, and just put by in another place, they were marked No. 214, with a cross.

Mr. Knapp. That is no particular private mark of your's no more than another dealer? - No, no other than I know my own mark.

Q. Persons in trade do mark their goods with private marks sometimes? - They do.

Q. They are linen I believe? - They are cotton, all of them.

Q. What is the value of all these things? - About fourteen pounds, that is the price that I am every day selling them for.

Prisoner. I was coming through Honey-lane-market, and I was walking down this court, and two or three people run past, and I walked on, and a great many people came in a cluster together, and laid hold of me, and said I was the person; and I asked what it was for? and they said I had taken some shawls, and they took me back to this gentleman's house, I know nothing more.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 16.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-13

172. ROBERT BATTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 1l. the goods of William Yeatman .

WILLIAM YEATMAN sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - In Blackfriars.

Q. Did you lose any silver Buckles at any time, and when? - The 20th of February.

Q. Where did you lose them from? - Out of the bar, in a house in St. Andrew's parish , but I have since moved from there.

Q. You keep a public house , do you not? - Yes.

Q. Do you know by what means they were taken away, or by whom? - I cannot tell.

Q. Did you ever find them afterward? - Yes, in the possession of one Chandler, a pawnbroker, the evening that I missed them, the 26th of February, in St. Giles's.

Q. How they came there you don't know I suppose? - I cannot positively say.

Q. Are the buckles here? - They are.

WILLIAM LOCKE sworn.

I live journeyman with Mr. Chandler, pawnbroker, in Holborn; the prisoner at the bar brought me the buckles on the 26th of February, I think it was about twelve o'clock; they were a pair of silver shoe buckles; he brought them to me and wanted a guinea? I told him I could not lend him a guinea, I would lend him fifteen shillings; he said it would do.

Q. Had you known him before? - I had known him about a twelvemonth, he has pledged several articles at our house, of wearing apparel, coats and waistcoats that I have seen him wear, I am certain of the man.

Prosecutor. The buckles are mine for a certainty, I knew him about three months before he committed this transaction, he is a waiter I understand.

Prisoner. These buckles I bought of a person whom Mr. Yeatman knows as well as I; the person came up to me one day as I was walking, and said, young man, will you buy a pair of silver buckles? I said I had nor money to purchase a pair of silver buckles, they would be too much money for me; he said I should have them for a guinea; I asked him if they were his own? he said they were his own, and I went in and asked that gentleman if he would lend me a guinea on them? and he lent me fifteen shillings; the person that I bought them of, was a waiter at the Paul's Head tavern, in Cateaton-street.

The prisoner called on one of the Bow-street officers to give him a character.

Officer. He has called on me to give him a character; I know he was a soldier and deserter, and his associations are very bad.

GUILTY, (Aged 52.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-14

173. MARK CURTIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a cloth livery great coat, value 10s. the goods of James Webber .

Joseph Palmer and John Tatum were called on their recognizances, and not appearing the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17950416-15

174. SARAH HAMMET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , five guineas and five half guineas, and fifty shillings, the monies of John Burton , in the dwelling house of Richard Powell .

John Burton and Richard Powell were called on their recognizances, and not appearing the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17950416-16

175. JOHN HAYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , seventeen yards of black lace, value 14l. the goods of William Brand and, Michael Hayman , in their dwelling house .

ELIZABETH BRAND sworn.

Q. What is your husband's name? - William Brand .

Q. Is your husband in partner ship with any other person? - With Mr. Hayman.

Q. What is his christian name? - Michael.

Q. Where is your trade carried on? - No. 4, Goudge-street, Tottenham-court road .

Q. Who lives in that house? - Mr. Hayman and Mr. Brand.

Q. Is the shop a part of the house? - Yes.

Q. Is there an internal communication between them? - Yes.

Q. Do you pay between you the rent and taxes of this house? - I have not been long married to Mr. Brand, only in January last, but I lived in the house before, I lived with Mr. Hayman almost since an infant; I came with Mr. Hayman to the house about two years ago when he came, I think it is.

Q. Now having married Mr. Brand, who kept the house after the marriage? - It is kept in general between Mr. Hayman and Mr. Brand, there have been no separate expences shared, we live in general.

Q. Who pays the taxes and rent of the house? - Every expence is paid jointly.

Q. Now what have you to say against the prisoner at the bar? - The prisoner at the bar came into our shop, I was in the shop and no one else; it was Saturday four weeks ago, I believe the 14th of March, about four in the afternoon; he asked to look at some white cotton stockings, mens white ribbed cotton stockings, accordingly I opened some paper, as many as five, and there was a difficulty started by the prisoner on every one, but as he disapproved of one paper I put them under the counter, and opened another; he then seeing I was not very ready to open any more, he then asked me if I had not any brown cotton; I began by this time to be suspicious, shewing him so many; I clapped my hand immediately on the first I got hold of, and in turning round with this paper of stockings I see the man in a confusion, standing near the counter, where I was at, standing a little aside as it were, with a vast deal of quickness, putting something in a coat pocket, seeming very much confused, putting it in a pocket inside the coat.

Q. Was he dressed as a soldier then? - Yes, as he is now, but I think the coat was not so good. And I shewed him the stockings, and he said the stockings were too small; he asked me if I had any larger? I answered I would see, but my intent was not to see whether I had any more stockings, but to go round the counter to see if I could see what I had lost; I went round the shop to the other side of the counter, and as I advanced to the door I see the card of lace on the counter, so that I was satisfied I had lost something from the window; I went round to the other counter, being convinced that he could not take any thing from the counter I was at; when I went to the opposite counter, as soon as I fixed my eye on the window, I perceived the man making to the door.

Q. Did you miss any thing from the window? - I did not at that moment, I did afterwards; I told him he must stop, and threw myself across the counter, with a view of taking hold of his coat till I got assistance, but the man going back it was out of my power to reach him, but I called out very violently, Mr. Hayman was asleep in the parlour at the time I was calling; the man had got out of the shop, about to the next door, he ran out of the shop, at my screaming the man returned, and at the door, or about the step of the door, I observed him take the card

of lace from his coat pocket that he had put it in, and threw it on the counter, till then I knew not what he had got, he stood in the street and threw it on.

Q. You see him do this? - I did.

Q. Was the counter near the door? - They are both near the door. By that time Mr. Hayman came down stairs, and came out to the door to my assistance, and the man returned to parley about this lace.

Q. Was he brought in by any body in custody, or came he in of his own accord? - I cannot be positive; when he was in in the shop we sent for a constable.

Q. Now what opportunity was there for the man who came into the shop to examine the stockings, to go from the counter and take the card of lace from the window? - Only while I was turning my back to take down some more stockings.

Q. On his being brought back into the shop, what past? - Nothing more than he petitioned me to let him go; I cannot say exactly in what words, he pleaded that I would let him go.

Q. This lace was put up in the shop window? - It was.

Q. Who has got possession of it? - I have.

Q. What was done with it when it was thrown on the counter? - I had it, and I have had it ever since.

Q. What do you know it by? How many yards is it? - Seventeen yards and a quarter. I believe we only give it the term of black lace.

Q. You never missed it till you see it on the counter? - I did not.

Q. And that is the property of Mr. Brand and Hayman? - Yes.

Prisoner. I had no pockets about me but breeches pockets.

MICHAEL HAYMAN sworn.

Q. We have already learnt that you have a partner, and that you jointly occupy the house? - Yes, the lease is in my name, because I took it before I knew Mr. Brand, as to every thing else we live together and pay every thing jointly.

Q. What do you know about this business? - As Mrs. Brand observed, I happened after dinner to be asleep.

Q. About what time was it you was waked? - Between three and four; I went into the shop, and found the door open, nobody in the shop but Mrs. Brand, the prisoner was not there, she gave me alarm, and pointed me to the door, and as I was going out at the door to my great surprise the man met me; I had hardly got over the threshold of the door, he met me with that card of lace in his hand, he then threw it into the shop on the counter.

Q. Did you see him? - Yes. He said the lace had dropped and he picked it up; I knew very well that it was impossible; I was not satisfied with that, and I secured him. When the constable came he searched him, and he opened the coat and he had a pocket in the coat; there was nothing found on him at all, money or any thing, but he had a pocket in his coat, I am positive of that.

Q. Had you any knowledge of the lace yourself? - Do you mean as to its being in the window? I cannot pretend to swear to that.

Q. To Mrs. Brand. How do you know that to be your lace? - By the shop mark, S. N. the cost price, and the selling price.

Q. You had not sold that? - No, when we sell we cut that off.

Q. How long before this happened could you say that the lace was in the window? - I cannot say.

Mr. Hayman. If your lordship will give me liberty, I believe I can satisfy your lordship in that point. It is Mr. Brand's province to put the window to rights every morning; and I dare say

neither Mrs. Brand nor myself can take upon ourselves to say that lace was in the window that morning.

Q. To Mrs. Brand. Does it contain the number of yards that card says it contains? - I cannot say; I have not measured. I had not cut any, I am quite sure of it.

Q. When you sell lace, did you give the card on which it is? - When we sell the whole, and they request the card, we may do it, but I have never done it since I have been in the business, which is about seven years, I believe.

Q. Had you more cards of that sort of lace? - Not of this very pattern or breadth.

Prisoner. I went into the shop of this lady to buy a pair of cotton stockings; I asked her for a pair of very large ones, and the lady shewed several different papers, which were of quite a small size; I told her not to give herself any more trouble; going out of the shop, I heard the lady scream out, and I returned back again, and I see something lay on the ground, and I picked it up, and hurled it on the counter; I did not know what lace it was, and the gentlewoman said that I took away the lace out of the shop with me.

Hayman. Will your lordship permit me to say something in his favour? I received a message from a captain Rice, and the captain sent me word that he would wish to have him delivered up to the regiment, and he would punish him by the military law; they spoke of nothing against his character.

JOHN HASLAM sworn.

I am a sergeant in the coldstream regiment of guards; I have known the prisoner eight years, he has been in the regiment as long; he has been abroad on the Continent; he bears a very good character as a soldier .

Q. Was he in the company that you belong? - Yes.

Q. How came he by his new cloathing? - They were sent to him by his wife, to change himself for decency.

Q. Were they allotted to him as a soldier? - Yes.

Q. How came he to return here? - Through sickness; he came home in a violent fever. He was in the light infantry abroad, at home he is in the battalion, because we have no infantry.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 39s. (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-17

176. JAMES FREERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , an unmade cloth coat, value 30s. and a pair of unmade corderoy breeches, value 5s. the goods of William Peacock .

WILLIAM PEACOCK sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - No. 43, Portpool-lane ; I keep a tobacconist shop , and follow my own profession, a taylor. I was coming along the lane, Saturday, the 11th of this month, returning home, within a few yards of my own door I observed a young lad coming out of the shop with these clothes, and the prisoner stood to receive them in a basket, and I went up to the man, and told him they were mine; and he said, that lad has stole them, take him.

Q. What sort of a lad was this in the house? - He appeared to be a stripling,

between sixteen and eighteen years of age; as he stood within the door way, he put the clothes in the basket that this man held, and stood with his back in the door way, and held the basket within the door way.

Q. What things were they? - A superfine coat, and a pair of corderoy breeches unmade up. When I saw this done I called to him, and asked him what they had been about? and he turned to me, put his hand into the basket, and I took them out of the basket myself, and I said to the young fellow that took them out of the house, I will secure you; and he ran up a place called Bradshaw's-rents, belonging to Mr. Meux's Brewhouse, and I got hold of him, and the prisoner came up after me and said he would see me damned first, and struck me on the face; I brought him out of Bradshaw's-rents again into Portpool-lane, and I desired some of Mr. Meux's servants to take care of him; one of them said he would, and I delivered him into their custody, and they let him go, while I went to see for a constable, when I came back I asked where they were both gone? they said, the young lad was gone, and the prisoner at the bar was sitting in the public house; I found the prisoner at the public house in Portpool-lane, and took him there myself, and told him he must come along with me; says he, come along with you, what am I to come along with you for? says I, come along with me and you shall know, and we went to Hatton-garden, and got an officer, and he took him into custody, and he was taken to the office in Hatton-garden, and from thence to New Prison.

Prisoner. I want to know whether I was nigh his house, within fourteen or fifteen yards, when this matter happened? - Yes, he held the meat basket within the door, and received it from his accomplice.

Prisoner. This gentleman, when he came to me, he said, you know something of this young man, and he kicked me on the shin; and when the young fellow was gone, the brewhouse servants said, why did not you go away? the young fellow has gone; no, says I, I shall not, I shall go in where I came out of; and I went into the public house where he took me.

GEORGE LONGDALE sworn.

I know nothing further than I was sent for as an officer, to take charge of the prisoner. I have got the things, they were delivered to me by the prosecutor.

Prosecutor. They are my things.

Prisoner. I went to Kinghtsbridge, to the Swan, after a place of eleven shillings a week, and it was gone; I stopped there and watched a coach for six-pence. I came down Holborn, the nearest way to go to Clerkenwell-green; I goes into this public house, and had two pints of ale, I came out, and there were several brewhouse servants, and several drays, and I was talking along with them, and there came by a strange person that left a basket at my feet, and I took the basket up, and this prosecutor said that a lad had stole something out of his shop, and I gave him the things, and I went into the public house where I had before sat down, and the gentleman came in and said, you must go along with me, and I went along with him directly; he asked me where an officer lived? I told him of one Mr. Bridgeman, who lived in Clerkenwellgreen, I told him I was willing to go any where; I told him I was innocent, and I did not want to make any resistance at all, or else I could have gone away with all the pleasure in life. I have got but few

friends, and they live a great many miles off, at Liverpool, in Lancashire.

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17950416-18

177. RICHARD WARREN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , a wooden cask, value 2s. and five gallons of rasberry brandy, value 30s. the goods of Marmaduke Langdale and Thomas Langdale .

HUGH MORRIS sworn.

Q. You are servant to Messrs. Langdale? - Yes.

Q. Do you knew their names? - Marmaduke Langdale .

Q. Who is the other partner ? - No other that I know of.

MARMADUKE LANGDALE sworn.

Q. What is the firm of your house? - Marmaduke Langdale and Thomas Langdale , my brother.

Q. To Morris. Were you sent out on the 20th of January, to deliver some goods? - Yes.

Q. Do you know whether among these goods you had some rasberry brandy? - We had a five gallon cask.

Q. How were the goods conveyed? - In a waggon.

Q. What servant are you? - I go out with the cart; I do not drive the cart, two of us go together, I carry the orders and the bills of parcels.

Q. Had you any rasberry brandy but that five gallon cask? - Not on that day.

Q. Where was this five gallon cask to have been delivered? - In Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields.

Q. When did you first receive any notice of the loss? - Immediately after.

Q. Where was you when you first received any intelligence of it? - At the house of Mr. Sharp, at the corner of Newtoners-lane, Drury-lane ; I had three pipes of gin to deliver there.

Q. Do you know whether when you went into Mr. Sharp's, this gallon cask was in the waggon or not? - Yes, I am certain of it, and after I had been there; I observed it ten minutes after I had delivered the three pipes of gin out to Mr. Sharp's.

Q. When did you receive intelligence of any thing being lost? - I am certain it was not ten minutes after we had done delivering these goods of Mr. Sharp's; he generally gives us something to eat and drink, and we had just sat down, I am sure not ten minutes, and Mr. Hubbard, the baker, came in, informing us that a man, the prisoner, was taking the cask from the waggon, and that he gave it to another.

Q. Did you go there to the waggon and see what was missing? - Immediately I went to the waggon and found this cask missing.

Q. Was it the cask containing the rasberry brandy? - Yes, five gallons of rasberry brandy.

Q. When you received the information, what did you do? - We ran, but he was gone, we could not see any thing of him.

Q. Whereabouts was the value of this five gallons? - About thirty-five shillings.

JAMES HUBBARD sworn.

Q. You are a baker? - I am, No. 176, Drury lane.

Q. How far is that from Mr. Sharp's? - The adjoining house, the very next door.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Perfectly well; I have known

him seven years, as to his person, and character likewise.

Q. Do you remember the circumstance of Mr. Langdale's cart or waggon, being at Mr. Sharp's house? - I do, very well.

Q. Tell us what you observed then? - I observed nothing with respect to the prisoner till I see him on the front wheel of the waggon; I see him take out a cask of some kind of liquor, as I might suppose, by the manner in which he lifted it out, it appeared so to me.

Q. What did he do with it when he had taken it out? - He gave it to a person that was standing by.

Q. Did you know that person? - I did not.

Q. In what position were you to see this? - I stood on the top of my counter placing the heard about my shop; I was much about level with the prisoner.

Q. What became of him? - The prisoner went down Drury lane.

Q. Did you see where the man went to whom he delivered the cask? - I did not. Immediately after I saw the man on the wheel, I had a mistrust whether it might be a thief, or the men might have employed those persons to take the cask out.

Q. Had you any doubt that he was the man that took it? - Not the least in the world. I went to the door to see where it went to; I mentioned before I was not certain whether it was a thief; I, therefore, to satisfy my mind, went as far as the end of the lane, to see whether the man that had the liquor went past Mr. Sharp's back door, which he did; I was then perfectly satisfied that it was a thief; I then went and told Mr. Sharp's people at the bar, that the man belonging to Mr. Langdale's waggon had lost something out of the waggon.

Q. What became of the prisoner? - They ran down Drury-lane, I did not pursue them.

Q. Have you the least doubt that he is the man? - None in the least; I know the man perfectly for seven years past.

Court to Morris. Was any thing else missing from your waggon besides the cask of brandy? - Not at that time, we missed another when we went a little further on.

Q. At the time that you examined this waggon, and when you had an information that something was stole. Are you sure that two were not taken at that time? - I am not sure; I did not see this taken.

Q. Was one missing, or more than one when you was at Sharp's door? - We only missed one then.

Q. But then very likely the other was taken? - It may be so. There were two casks missed in all, both rasberry, both of the same size, within something under a gallon of the same contents.

Q. What day of the week was this? - Friday, the 20th of February, about a quarter before twelve.

WILLIAM IRONMONGER sworn.

I am one of the directors of the patrol. In consequence of information, on Friday, the 20th of February, I and Manning we went to a very infamous house in Parker's-lane, kept by Mapleback, know by the sign of the Bleeding Hart.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there? - We did; but there was a great deal of resistance among a set of thieves in the house; he jumped into a crowd of between twelve and fourteen, whom we knew to be thieves, and we were obliged to draw our hangers to secure him.

Q. Did he take any part in this resistance? - No, only flying for shelter for the others to protect him.

Q. What did he say? - He did not say any thing; but they all flew up directly, but I said, that the first that flew up I would cut his head off.

Prisoner. When that man there came in, I was sitting by the box at the door, just as you go in, he pulled me right by the fire, and I stood there; and if you put that man there to his oath, he cannot deny that I made no resistance, and nobody got up to assist me.

Witness. He attempted to make his escape.

DENNIS MANNING sworn.

Q. I believe you went with Ironmonger to this house of Mapleback's? - Yes, I was the first person that went in; he was in a little box, a man was between him and me, and I laid hold of him by the collar, and be endeavoured to get into a box, where there were twelve or fourteen, and we drew our cutlasses, he was very fractorious I assure you.

Q. However at last you secared him? - Yes, and some of the people followed us into Parker's-lane afterwards.

Court to Morris, Did you attend the cart the came that the rasberry brandy was put in it, till it got to Sharp's? - Yes, all the way.

Prisoner. This man, he swore against me at Bow-street, that he saw me stand on the shafts of the waggon, little thought I was going to do any thing, it being in the day time, and he immediately sees me take this keg of liquor out of the cart, and give it to another person, and if he was to see the other person again, he should know him, and that he went out to his door, and saw this man gone away with the property, and he thought he went into some house with it, and he immediately see me run up Drury-lane another way, that he immediately went into the house of Mr. Sharp, to ask the people if they lost any thing. I hope, my lord, you don't think it feasible, if this man saw me take the property out of the cart in the day time, but he would have stopped me, or called out stop thief, as it being day time, he might have got assistance.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-19

178. THOMAS FORD was indicted for feloniously, stealing, on the 21st of February , twenty-nine pounds weight of raw silk, value 1l. the goods of John Henry Grellier and William Nicholls , privately in their shop .

JOHN HENRY GRELLIER sworn.

Q. Are you in partner with any body? - With William Nicholls .

Q. What business do you carry on? - Fringe and trimming maker .

Q. Were you robbed at any time, and when was it? - The 21st of January.

Q. What day of the week? - I cannot exactly say to the day, about seven in the evening.

Q. Where is your house? - No.18, Crown-street, Finsbury-square, Moorfields We had gone to tea about seven o'clock in the evening and there was nobody in the shop at the time, my partner and I were both at the back room; we had not been there above three minutes before my partner returned into the shop, and found the door on the swing, and see the property there and went out of doors, and some time considering what he should do, he again returned, and on seeing a person return immediately pursued him, and took the property on him.

Q. Did you see the man brought into the shop? - I did; my partner brought him himself; I don't know any thing at all about it, my partner brought in the silk

at the time he had it, I believe in his hands, I cannot exactly say.

Q. Can you speak to that to be your silk? - Yes, I think I can.

Q. It is raw silk? - Yes, it is; it was but a day or two before that that I bought the silk, and it happened to be very particular, it was damaged silk, and some of the skeins were cut; I suppose I had seen it not above an hour before.

Q. What was done with the silk when brought back to your shop? - I don't know whether the man had the silk, or my partner had the silk, but we took him before the justice, but the silk has been kept at our house ever since, separate from any other property, my partner has it with him.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS sworn.

Q. What are you? - We are trimming makers. When I went out I observed the door just going on the jar, and I observed the back of somebody just going off the steps; on proceeding towards the door, I found two or three skeins of silk towards the steps, which I picked up and threw them into the shop, and then I walked up and down the door, and saw nobody at all for the space of ten minutes, in the course of that time I see the prisoner come and put his hand on the latch of the door, and coming in, and then I followed after him, and asked what business he had there? when he let go the door and returned into the street, then I followed him at some distance, and he turned down an alley, and went into a privy in the alley, a public privy where the property was hid; I found the property in his arms, coming out of the privy door, I took hold of part of the silk, and held his collar likewise, and a young woman opening a door facing, with a candle; he threw down the silk in the dirt, which I got the young woman to pick up, and go with me, which she did; I took the man to our shop.

Q. Did you go with the young woman all the time? - Yes, it has been kept separate ever since, I have it with me.

Q. What may be value of it? - I look on it about a guinea.

Q. Would it sell for that? - It would.

Q. It is a damaged silk? - It is, but there is a quantity of it, and silk is a dear article.

Q. To whom does that silk belong? - It is our joint property; here is a mark on this paper, the public sale mark, which we observed at the time it was brought.

Q. When had you last seen it? - I look upon it about an hour before the time it was stole.

Q. You did not see the property at all till he was coming out of this place? - No, not till I see it in his arms.

Prisoner. I picked it up in a necessary, at the back of a public house.

Q. To Nicholls. Did you ever lose sight of him? - No, I did not, from the time that he left the door, till I took hold of him.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 4s.(Aged 20.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-20

179. LEWIS LAVENBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , six pounds weight of lump sugar, value 5s. the goods of John, Joseph, and John Coope .

An INTERPRETER sworn.

JOHN COOPE sworn.

Q. What may you be? - A sugar refiner .

Q. What are your partners names? John, and Joseph Coope .

Q. Where do you live? - Osborne-street, Whitechapel .

Q. Did you lose any sugar at any time, and when? - I had frequently missed sugar from my sale room, which is behind the counting house. On the 18th of March I set one of my servants at four o'clock to watch who it was that stole the sugar.

Q. What day of the week was the 18th of March? - On Wednesday; I set my servant to watch under the desk; he had not watched a quarter of an hour before he saw the prisoner; he let him go from the premises; there was an alarm of thieves made, and the jailor of the police office, Whitechapel, met the prisoner, and brought him back to our yard; his name is William Cross ; on his bringing him back we gave charge of him, and he was taken before the magistrate, and committed; the sugar was taken by William Cross to the magistrate, part of which sugar I swore to, as belonging to my partners and me.

Q. When did you first see the sugar that he is supposed to have taken? - I see it first before the magistrate, in a bag.

Q. Who has kept the sugar from that time to this? - William Cross .

WILLIAM CROSS sworn.

I am jailor of the police office, Whitechapel; as I was going down Whitechapel I heard from the opposite side, the cry of stop thief! I observed the person, the prisoner at the bar coming strait toward me, I came forward to him, and he came running to me, when he came nigh hand me, I held out my hand to take hold of him, but I missed him, and turned round and catched him by the tail; as soon as I stopped him I said, I was an officer; I told him to stop till Mr. Coope's servant came up, as soon as Mr. Coope's servant came up, he said he had been robbed; I said to Mr. Coope's servant, then you must go back with me to your master; he had the sugar in his hand; and I told him he must take the sugar back likewise; I took the prisoner back to Mr. Coope's, and asked Mr. Coope what he thought to do with him, and he asked me what I was? I told him, and told him if he chose to give me charge of him I would take it, and I told him what time to come to the police office; I have kept the same sugar ever since, sealed up by the magistrate.

HENRY CALLCUTT sworn.

I am one of Mr. Coope's servants, a sugar baker. I saw the prisoner come into Mr. Coope's counting house, on Wednesday, the 18th of March; he pulled the drawer out, and took the sugar out of the drawer.

Q. Was the drawer locked? - No.

Q. Where did he put it when he took it? - Into the bag.

Q. What did you do with him? - I let him go out of the counting house, and then I told him to stop.

Q. Did he go into the street? - No, into our yard, and then he ran into the street; then he dropped the bag or sack.

Q. Who picked up the sack? - I picked up the sack.

Q. Did you give it to Cross? - Yes.

Q. Did you see the man stopped by Cross? - Yes.

Q. Whose sugar was it? - My master's sugar.

Prisoner. I drink nothing but tea.

JOHN TAPLIN sworn.

I am the constable belonging to Whitechapel; the prisoner was brought down to the office, and Mr. Cross not being a constable, he gave charge to me.

Q. Mr. Cross has had the care of the sugar? - Yes, the one parcel; I searched him and found two samples on him, wrapped up in a bit of paper.

Q. Where was he searched? - In a public house, near the office, that we use.

Q. Have you got the sugar that you found on him? - Yes.

Q. Where was it? - In his coat pocket.

Callcult. I cannot speak to the sugar nor to the paper.

Q. Was this man one of your work people, or a stranger? - He was a stranger.

Q. He is a german, is not he? - Yes, he is a german, but I never see him before.

Cospe. On these two papers the samples is my hand writing.

Q. Where did you leave that paper? - In the counting house.

Q. You knew nothing about this man before? - I never see him before the jailor brought him back into the yard.

Q. Can you swear to the sugar? - I can swear to one of the samples, and to the hand writing on both of the papers, and that in the great bag, I had put in some of it that morning, I believe it to be mine, I had that sort of sugar in the counting house.

Prisoner. I drinks tea, I don't eat much.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-21

180. RICHARD WEAL and BARWICK MARSHALL were indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling house of Susanna Weal , on the 30th of January , a red morocco pocket book, value 1l. 1s. two leather bags, value two thousand eight hundred louis dors, value 2730l. three hundred and fifty double louis dors, value 682l. 10s. a black shagreen case, value 10s. 6d. a diamond cross, value 73l. 10s. a pair of diamond ear rings, hung with drops, value 157l. 10s. eighteen diamond rings, value 735l. a rose diamond ring, value 42l. a hempen bag, value 2d ten half guineas; a diamond ring, value 84l. a diamond cross, value 73l. 10s. twenty one carratts of diamond, value 105l. eighteen carratts of rose diamonds, value 73l. 10s. four oval diamonds, value 31l. 10s. four carratts of yellow diamonds, value 8l. 8s. a ruby, value 2l. a gold snuff box, value 12l. 12s. a cross set with diamonds, value 73l. 10s. a gold pen, with a pencil belonging there to, value 2l. 2s. a diamond ring, value 84l. a pair of silver mounted spectacles and case, value 3l. a wooden box containing two razors and a strap, value 5s. two miniature pictures, value 5l. 5s. twenty fancy rings, value 105l. a bank note, value 100l. and a ditto, value 40l. the property of Colia De Lorme .(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

An INTERPRETER sworn.

COLIN DE LORME sworn.

Q. How long have you been in this country, and when did you come? - Three years ago, the 4th of May, for the first time, from Germany.

Q. When you came over to this country, at what time did you take lodgings? - At the Saracen's Head, Ludgate-street.

Q. But when did you take the lodgings in Castle-street? - The 26th of January last.

Q. At whose house? - The next door to the house where I was robbed.

Q. What number was it? - No. 71, Castle-street .

Q. Did you take any property with you to the lodgings? - Every thing that I had.

Q. In what was it conveyed? - In my chest, a trunk which I had made by Mr. Merrinan, which cost me five guineas.

Q. Did you take them to the lodgings? - Yes.

Q. What apartment had you in that house? - A bed room and a front room, up one pair of stairs, the first floor.

Q. What did you do with the property when you got it up stairs? - I put it in my bed chamber.

Q. How lately had you seen your property in the chest before you lost it? - At half after four, and at half after six it was gone.

Q. On what day? - The 30th of January.

Q. Has any property that you lost that day been found? - Nothing else but a razor case.

Q. Have you seen that razor case since? - They shewed it me at Bow-street.

Q. Was the razor case in the trunk? - It was in a drawer in a chest that was in the bed room.

Q. What furniture was there in the bed room? - A looking glass, a chest, my trunk, and chairs.

Q. What was particularly contained in your trunk when you went to the lodgings; describe them particularly? - Three bags, which contained three thousand louis dors, double and single, a red morocco pocket book, two girdles,&c.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge to whom this house belonged? - My landlady was Mrs. Weal.

Q. Who did you take the lodgings of? - Mrs. Matill.

MARY ANN MATILL sworn.

Q. Do you know Mr. De Lorme, the prosecutor? - Yes, I do.

Q. Did he come to you at any time? - I knew him these two years, coming to my house, he called on me a little after Christmas, he saw the bil in the window of Mrs. Weal's house.

Q. In consequence of that did you take any lodgings for Mr. De Lorme? - I have kept the parlour these two years and the first floor, I let out the first floor to Mr. De Lorme.

Q. Do you remember at the time that he came to take possession of these lodgings, his having any property with him? - Yes.

Q. How do you mean that you let it? - The furniture was my own.

Q. Where did Mrs. Weal live? - She lived in the same house, she occupied down stairs, the kitchen.

Q. Do you know of any property that the prosecutor brought to his lodgings? - He brought a trunk at eight o'clock, on Monday, the 26th of January, and he came up stairs, and he put it into the dining room, and he opened a trunk, and he took out a great coat, and he took out a bag, and said, I have got plenty of property.

Q. Did you ever see the property? - Never.

Mr. Garrow. Did you know him when he came over to England before? - No.

Q. Did he keep a good deal of company with his countrymen? - I never knew but one gentleman.

Q. All that you know with respect to his property was, that he opened it to shew you that he had plenty of property? - He said, it is my property.

Q. How many different persons might lodge in the house at that time? - There was an old lady lived in the two pair of stairs room, and there was a shoe-maker with his wife and three children; I have a parlour there, but I never occupied it, I only have funiture there.

ISABELLA HAWLEY sworn.

Q. Were you a servant to Mrs. Morgan in January last? - Yes.

Q. Where does Mrs. Morgan live? - In Castle-street, Oxford-market.

Q. Do you know the prisoners? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing them at any time in January last? - Yes, Friday evening between five and six o'clock, I do not recollect the day of the month.

Q. Was it soon after Christmas? - No.

Q. How long was it after or before the robbery was committed? - I heard of the robbery the same evening.

Q. You say you saw the prisoners. Where did you see them? - At No. 6, Cumberland-court, Tottenham-street, Tottenham-court road.

Q. Was there any body else with them? - There were two came in together, Marshall's brother was there before, and Nash's wife.

Q. What is her name? - Elizabeth Hunter, it was Nash's house.

Q. What did you see? - John Marshall sat and drank a cup of tea, and soon after Barwick Marshall and Weal, the two prisoners, came in about half after five; Henry Nash came in, he staid and drank a cup of tea, and after drinking the tea they went out into the bed room, and they all four went out together (only Nash went into the bed room, which is the adjoining room) in the mean while they went out, she asked me to fetch her a pail of water, and I went and met Barney Marshall in the court, and he said who is that? and I said, it is me, and he said, d-mn it, take care, here is the man with the property.

Q. Do you mean Barney Marshall , either of the prisoners? - Yes.

Q. Who was with Barney Marshall at this time? - He was running first.

Q. Who was behind? - John Marshall and Nash, with the trunk.

Q. Did you immediately see him? - Yes.

Q. Now you see John Marshall and Nash, which of them had the trunk? - Both of them, each carrying it by the handles.

Q. Was it light enough for you to observe the trunk? - Yes, it was a light evening.

Q. Had you a sufficient opportunity of seeing that trunk by the light of the evening, so as to know that trunk again if you was to see it? - Yes.

Q. What did they do with this trunk? - They went into No. 6, Barny Marshall went in first, and Nash and John Marshall with the trunk followed.

Q. Did you go in directly into No. 6, after them? - I went down for the pail of water; when I returned I went down to the kitchen, and I heard a great noise over my head, as if they were breaking something; they went to the parlour even with the street door.

Q. After you heard this knocking, what did you observe next? - In a few minutes the two Marshalls and Nash went out.

Q. Did you observe any thing, particular after their going out? - Yes, Mrs. Hunter called me up stairs, and gave me two razors and a little box, and a strap, and told me to throw them down the necessary.

Q. Into what room did you go? - Into the parlour.

Q. Was that the same room that the two Marshalls and Nash had gone into? - Yes.

Q. What sort of a box was it? - The little box that holds the razors.

Q. Did you throw them down the necessary? - Yes.

Q. Have you ever seen the razor case and the box, and razors since? - Yes.

Q. Is that the same razor case and the box and the razors that you threw down? - Yes.

Q. Did you see any other property? - I see a great number of papers burning, and a red morocco pocket book in her hand.

Q. What became of the red morocco pocket book? - She took it out in her hand, and went out of doors with it.

Q. Did you observe any thing more about the room? - She told me to look about the room to see if I could see any nails; I picked up some brass headed nails.

Q. You told us just now that you should know the trunk again if you was to see it. Had that trunk brass headed nails to it? - Yes it had.

Q. Is that all that you observed in that room? - Yes.

Q. Did you go out soon afterwards? - Yes, after she went out with the pocket book; in the mean time Richard Weal came into the room, and he asked me if Harry was at home? and I said, no.

Q. Who did you suppose he meant by Harry? - Harry Nash , and he told me to tell him, that he should see him as tomorrow morning; and after Hunter came in, and in a few minutes after Nash and Barney Marshall came in, and on their going out she asked me to go out with her to take a walk, which I did.

Q. Did you go to Cattle-street? - We did.

Q. While the two men were in the house after Mrs. Hunter had gone out, had these two men, Barney Marshall and Nash any conversation? - Yes, they went into the bedroom.

Q. Did you hear what that conversation was? - No, I did not.

Q. Then you went to Castle-street? - Yes, I crossed at Weal's door, and asked what was the matter? and I heard of the robbery.

Q. How soon afterwards did you give any information of this robbery? - I told it to a young woman the next morning, Mary Baxer .

Q. She is not here, I believe? - No.

Q. How soon afterwards did you go before a justice? - Saturday week.

Mr. Garrow On Saturday week you went to Bow-street? - I was took there.

Q. O dear! that is quite another thing. Look across, let those gentlemen hear you. Then from the time till you was taken, except to Mrs. Baxter, you never spoke about it to nobody? - No.

Q. You was taken into custody? - Yes.

Q. How long were you in close confinement before you told this story? - On Sunday.

Q. From Saturday till what time on Sunday? - Sunday evening.

Q. Locked up by yourself? - No, I was at Mr. Levy's house.

Q. What that gentleman that is the interpreter here to day? - Yes.

Q. O dear! who was in company with you in Mr. Levy's house? - There was nobody but his family in the house.

Q. A good deal of conversation between you and Mr. Levy in the course of the Sunday, before you told this story? - No, no conversation at all.

Q. Who was you taken before at Bow-street, Mr. Addington? - No.

Q. Who then, one of the magistrates? - I believe it was.

Q. Then you was taken to Mr. Levy's house? - Yes.

Q. Pray what reward was offered for the discovery of this property? - I was offered no reward at all.

Q. That is your answer? - Yes.

Q. Will you have the goodness to tell what reward was offered for any body who could gave information on the subject? - I don't know what reward was offered.

Q. Just that we may be sure we understand one another; do you mean that you never heard that there was a reward offered? - Yes, I heard that there was a reward offered in bills.

Q. Posted up in every corner of the town - I did not see them.

Q. What reward was offered? - I don't know.

Q. Do you mean to tell those gentlemen you don't know what reward was offered? - I do not.

Q. Then you do not, to this time, know what reward was offered? - I do not know particularly.

Q. Without knowing it particularly, perhaps you could help us to a guess of the amount of it? - No, I don't know.

Q. You have not the least idea of what reward was offered, not now at this time? - I have not seen any reward, no further than I heard people say.

Q. What was it you heard people say was the reward offered? - I never took any particular notice of it.

Q. Was it a large reward or a small reward? - I don't know what particular reward it was.

Q. What did the people tell you the reward offered was? - I have not been out of doors to hear.

Q. Who was the person that did tell you the reward that was offered? - I don't know, I was not told in particular, I only heard it talked about.

Q. Was it a thousand guineas? - I don't know.

Q. Have you not heard that there was a thousand pounds offered for information on this subject, stuck up in every alley and court in this town? we all see it ourselves. Upon your oath had you not heard that there was a reward of a thousad pounds offered? - Yes.

Q. You are the same Mrs. Hawley that has been giving me an account all this time. Pray, Mrs. Hawley, what way of life are you in? - Always been a servant.

Q. Been regularly in place without any interruption, and in reputable families? - Yes, I have always been in places ever since I have been from home.

Q. How long have you lived with Mrs. Hunter? - I did not live with Mrs. Hunter at all.

Q. Who were you a servant to at the time this transaction took place? - I was out of place.

Q. How long had you been out of place? - About a fortnight or three weeks.

Q. You was a lodger of Mrs. Hunter's perhaps? - No, I called there to drink tea, I lodge in Adam's-street.

Q. What at Mr. Abbott's? - No, there was such a person lodged there.

Q. What business is Mr. Abbott? What was his christian name? - James Abbott .

Q. You don't know where he is now? - No.

Q. When were you last in gaol with him? - I never was in gaol with him, nor ever see a gaol till this time.

Q. You never was in custody on no business with him? - No.

Q. You remember the circumstance of the great fire at Knightsbridge? - No, I do not remember that.

Q. Did you know Mr. Abbott about that? - No, I did not.

Q. Who did you live with before you was out of place at that time? - With Mrs. Morgan, in Castle-street.

Q. How long did you live with Mrs. Morgan? - I lived with her twice.

Q. What business is she in? - In no business.

Q. You observed you was invited by Mrs. Hunter to take a walk with her, Was it part of your business with Mrs. Morgan, to take a walk with her in an evening? - No.

Q. What way of business was Mrs. Morgan in? - I don't know.

Q. How long did you live with her? - The last time I lived with her was about three or four months.

Q. How long before? - I cannot say exactly; it may be about the same time.

Q. Was she a married woman? - Yes.

Q. Then perhaps you can tell what her husband is? - No, I cannot.

Q. Did her husband live with her? - No, he did not.

Q. She is a decent regular woman, for any thing you know? - Yes.

Q. And Mr. Abbott lodged in the same house? - No, he lodged in Cumberland-court, at Elizabeth Hunter 's.

Q. It was more accident that you lodged in that house? - I never lodged in that house.

Q. You have never gone by any other name than Elizabeth Hawley ? - Never in my life.

ELIZABETH MARSHALL sworn.

Q. You are sister to Richard Weal , I believe? - Yes.

Q. What relation to Marshall? - Sister-in-law to both the Marshalls.

Q. Where do you live? - 71, Castle-street.

Q. That is the house where this robbery was committed - Yes.

Q. Tell us what you know about this business? - I know nothing at all about it.

Q. You have been examined at Bow-street? - Yes.

Q. And your examination taken down in writing? - I don't know, I was not sensible at the time.

Q. Then you are not sensible that you put your name to an examination? - No, I was not sensible.

Q. Be kind enough to be a little attentive, You say you was at Bow-street, but you was insensible at the time you was examined there? - I was not sensible owing to the severity of my punishment during my confinement.

Court. Can you read? - Yes.

Q. Put the examination into her hands; Look at that. Did you sign that? - I believe I did; I never had the paper in my hand that I signed.

Mr. Knapp. Do you mean to swear that you never had the paper in your hand that you signed? - Yes, I will.

Q. Was it read over to you? - Yes; the gentleman read something over to me.

Q. Did you sign that that was read over to you? - Yes, but I cannot say what it contained now.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you signed that, that you did not know what it contained? Were you sworn? - Yes, I believe I was.

Q. Don't you know that you was sworn? - Yes, I was sworn.

Q. Now, you know Weal and Marshall, the two prisoners at the bar? - Yes.

Q. Now, on the night that the robbery was committed. You heard what time the robbery was committed? - I heard the gentlemen say.

Q. Did you see these prisoners together that night? - No, I did not see them together that night.

Q. Upon your oath, you never saw them together that night? - I did not.

Q. I ask you whether you saw the two prisoners together on the night of the robbery, to which you answered that you did not? - Not to my recollection I did not.

Court. These persons are persons that you are well acquainted with. Does that bring it back to you recollection whether you see him on the night the robbery was committed? - I do not recollect that I did see him.

Q. Do you remember seeing them together on Wednesday, the 28th of January? - Yes, I believe I did.

Q. Do you remember at that time any conversation passing between the prisoners at the bar? - I do not remember any conversation passing.

Q. There was no conversation passed respecting the gentleman above stairs? - Not with them that I heard.

Q. Then you do not recollect any conversation respecting De Lorme taking place between the prisoners at the bar? - I do not.

Q. That you mean positively to swear? - I do.

Q. Do you remember being in company with them at any one time when any conversation respecting this business took place? - I never heard any conversation respecting this business.

-MILLER sworn.

Q. You are one of the officers of Bow-street? - Yes.

Q. You produce a trunk here? - Yes, I brought it from Bow-street, where it has been for some time.

Q. Do you know when it came to Bow-street first? - It was some time in February last.

Q. Were you present when it was brought? - I was not.

De Lorme. My name is on it; I am very sure it is my property.

Mr. Garrow. What is on the trunk? - Collin.

Q. When did you first use the name of De Lorme for the first time? - Always; it is my own name.

Q. To Hawley. Look at that trunk; Is that the trunk that you observed John Marshall and Nash carrying? - Yes, it is.

Mr. Garrow. Have you received any money of any body about this business? - Never.

Q. You are quite certain? - Yes.

Q. You never received half a guinea? - I had half a guinea of Mr. Levy, to pay for my washing while I was in prison.

Q. Was Mr. De Lorme present at the times it was given to you? - Yes.

Q. When was it? - The last Friday of all.

Mr. Knapp to Miller. Did you go in consequence of any desire from the magistrate and find any thing? - In consequence of information that Hawley gave, we went to a house in Cumberland court, Tottenham-street, to Mrs. Hunter's house, and had the privy searched, and in the privy was this box of razors, this strap, and a pair of small curling irons were taken out.

De Lorme. It is mime; I have had it three or four years.

Q. To Hawley. That is the one that you received of Mrs. Hunter, and threw down the privy? - Yes, it is.

WILLIAM DAVY sworn.

Q. I believe you are one of the clerks at Bow-street? - Yes.

Q. You were present at the examination of the prisoner? - I was.

Q. Do you remember any letter being received by Mr. Addington, directed to him? - I have the letter in my hand.

Q. Who did it pasport to be signed by? Do you know the hand writing? - I do not.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-22

181. ELIZABETH MOORHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , three pint pewter

pots value 3s. the goods of George Anstey .

GEORGE ANSTEY sworn.

I keep the Duke of Cumberland's Arms, Cumberland-street . On the 17th of February last. about three o'clock in the afternoon, a servant that lived a few doors from my house came running in, and said-

Q. What is the person's name? - Martha Davis . On the information that was given I ran out; the prisoner took the pots away a few doors from my house, they hung on the rails.

MICHAEL CLARKE sworn.

Q. How old are you? - Fourteen.

Q. Where do you live? - I did live with Mr. Anstey.

Q. What do you know about any pewter pint pot of his? - I know the maid that lived at No. 21.

Q. What day was it? - The 17th of February; I called for the pots No. 21, Bryanston-street, I knocked two or three times, and the lady did not bring them out, and so I did not wait; I came home, and in a little while after I had been home, the lady came in, and said, there was a woman that had three of our pots.

Q. Who was the woman? - Martha Davis . I ran out to see for the woman, and presently I see her, just coming round the corner of Cumberland street, it was just going round the corner of Seymour-street, and then I asked her if she had not three of our pint pots? she answered me no; and then I said she had got three of our pots, and I would have them; and then she set them down.

Q. How many did she set down? - Three pint pots; she had them under her gown that came over her head, and then I picked up the pots, and took hold of her till my master came, and then I let go of her hand, and master took hold of her and the constable came, and she was taken to my master's house.

Q. Where she took these pots from you don't know yourself? - Yes, she took them from No. 21, because the maid came in and said so.

Q. What were done with the pots? - They were delivered to my master.

MARTHA DAVIS sworn.

Q. What do you know about taking these pots? - I heard the pots going off the rails. They were delivered out, I put them on the rails myself; I live at No. 21, Bryanston-street.

Q. Had they been brought to your house from Mr. Anstey's? - Yes, one was brought the over night, the other two that day.

Q. The boy has told us that he stood at the door for the pots, and could make nobody hear? - I was busy scouring the room, and I put them out afterwards, expecting the boy to come again and take them; I put them on the rails, on the outside of the house, about three o'clock.

Q. Did you see any body take these pots? - I heard the pots go off the rails, and seeing this good woman pass, I looked through the window, and see her pass from the door over the way, I did not see her take the pots.

Q. But the noise of the pewter made you look out? - Yes. I went over to the public house, and told them that the woman had got the pots.

Q. How far is the public house off? - About five or six doors off. The boy and master pursued her directly, and she put the pots down in sight of me.

Q. To Prosecutor. We understand that you followed your boy out in consequence of the information by Mrs. Davis? - Yes; when I came to the boy he had got the pots in his hand, and he had stopped the woman; I asked her what she was going to do with these pots, and she

could not make any answer not directly but presently she begs that I would forgive her; she said she was a very poor woman, and I took the pots and marked them, and took the woman into my own house, and from there to the office, and she was committed.

Q. Have you got the pots here? - Yes.

Q. You have had them in your possession ever since? - Yes.

Q. Look at them, do you know them to be your pots? - These are my pots, I put my mark on them immediately, my name is on one, and the other person's name that I succeeded is on the other two.

Prisoner. I had been sick a long while, and had not a friend in the world, and I was going through the street, and it was a very cold day, and I missed my way, and a boy came running after me, and said, what are you going to do with these three pint pots? I said, go along boy, I have no pots; and he had three pint pots in his hand; and so they took me away into the house, I have not a friend in the world, I leave it to the good God above and the gentlemen of the court. I never was guilty of it in my life; I am a foreigner, my husband is dead, he served the King many years.

GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Fined One Shilling .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-23

182. HANNAH RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , five pair of leather boot legs, value 8s. the goods of John Dutton .

JOHN DUTTON sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - In the Strand , a boot-maker .

Q. What do you know against the prisoner, Hannah Richards ? - The currier, the man who I bought these legs of, came with another man, to give me to understand that the boot legs were offered to sell.

Q. Are either of these men here in court? - I don't know that they are.

Q. Had you lost any leather boot legs? - Yes, I lost some at different times, but a person in custody acknowledged that she took them on the 6th of this month.

Q. You know the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. When was it you charged her with taking them? - When they informed me that these legs were my property, I inquired how they came by them; in consequence of that I found they had been sold by one Whitacre, who is now in court, to one Mr. Knowlys.

THOMAS WHITACRE sworn.

Q. Do you know any things of Hannah Richards? - Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of her having any boot legs? - She had five pair the last Easter Tuesday, I think it was; she asked me to sell them for her; I carried three pair to Mr. Knowlys's shop, and he gave me thirteen shillings for them.

Q. What are you? - A shoe-maker.

Q. So the prisoner brought these to you, and asked you to sell them for her? - Yes, and I gave her the money.

Q. Did you know any thing of the prisoner before? - Yes, seeing her about the neighbourhood.

Q. Do you know how she came by them? - No, I never had the presence of mind to ask her that question; and I went the next day to Mr. Shipwell's with two pair more, and he stopped the property, thinking they were stole, and the next day I heard they were Mr. Dutton's, and I went to Mr. Dutton's and told them who I had them of.

Q. How do you excuse yourself for taking these boot legs from this woman? - She asked me to do such a favour for her, and I did it without a thought.

Q. To Dutton. What are these three pair of boot legs worth? - I gave five shillings and sixpence a pair, and paid ready money.

Q. Is it possible for a shoe-maker to mistake the value, and go and sell them for thirteen shillings to another person? - He ought to know the value of them.

Q. Do you know them to be your own? - I do; she acknowledged taking them; I had not missed the legs before she came in and made a low curtsey; and I said, what is the matter? what do you want? she said, I have taken the legs, and I sent for a constable immediately.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY . (Aged 49.)

Imprisoned six month in the house of Correction , and fined 1s ,

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17950416-24

182. SUSANNA GARDINER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , a cotton counterpane, value 1l. and a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10s. the goods of Edward May , Esq .

JAMES STURGES sworn.

I live with Mr. May, No. 25, Baker-street, Portman-square .

Q. Are you a domestic of his? - I am.

Q. Did Mr. May at any time lose a cotton counterpane and a pair of silver shoe buckles? - Yes, he did, some time in February, out of the housekeeper's room; I see the shoe buckles in the room on the 19th of February, and 20th, or 21st.

Q. Did you miss the counterpane at the same time? - No, I did not.

Q. When did you miss them? - On the 23d of February.

Q. That was two days after you see them? - Yes.

Q. You are his valet? - No, I am his butler.

Q. Do you know what became of them of your own knowledge? - They were missing, and inquiry was made for them in that room, and they were not to be found, then Susanna Gardiner was taken up on suspicion, she was housekeeper .

Q. Was any search made after she was taken? - Yes, she was taken up to the watch-house that night, and to Marlborough-street the next day, to be examined, and there were several articles found about her.

Q. In consequence of any information, was any tidings had of these buckles? - The officer went to look for them, and found them.

Q. That was in consequence of finding the duplicates? - Yes.

Q. Where was inquiry made? - The officer went to her lodgings.

Q. Were you with him? - No.

Q. Are the buckles here? - Yes.

Q. How long had she been housekeeper? - One month.

WILLIAM BAKER sworn.

I am a journeyman to James Mulcaster , pawnbroker, in Chamber-street, Grosvenor-square. On the 13th of February the prisoner at the bar, Susanna Gardiner , pledged the counterpane with me for seven shilling and sixpence, and on the 21st of February she pledged the buckles with me for ten shillings and sixpence, she said she pledged them for one Mrs. Peckham.

Q. Did you know her? - Yes.

Q. Had she frequently dealt with you? - Yes, she had been two or three times since I have been with Mr. Mulcaster, but I knew her before, in Tottenham-court-road, when I was with Mr. Harrison.

Q. Have you got the buckles? - Yes. Sturges. I am sure they are Mr. May's, he has had them this twelve month.

RICHARD BULLOCK sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Gill, the upholsterer, in Oxford-road; in consequence of Mr. May being robbed, and having had a variety of upholstery goods from our house, I went to see the counterpane, to see if I should know it again, as far as I know, it agrees with the size and pattern.

Prisoner. When I went to live with Mr. May I was very short of money, I had been ill for three months, and they never advanced me a farthing of money to pay my own weekly bills, nor the buttler's, and I pawned my own things to advance the money for to pay the bills that came in.

Sturges. To the best of my knowledge she never paid a shilling for any bills, during the time she was in the house, she ran up bills at the public house in my master's name.

GUILTY . (Aged 52.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-25

184. GEORGE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , a gelding, price 2l. 2s. the goods of John Cart .

JOHN CART sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - In Islington .

Q. Did you lose a gelding at any time? - Yes.

Q. When was it? - I cannot tell you justly but if you will give me leave, I will tell you the short of the story. The man that brought the horse.

Q. Where was the horse? - I turned him into the field about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Of what day? - I cannot justly say, but I believe it was on a Thursday.

Q. What month? - I cannot say.

Q. How long ago? - I cannot say; I am no scholar.

Q. Was it a month or two months ago? - Nigh half a year ago.

Was it in the month of September? - I cannot say, for I did not take any notice.

Q. Do you know when you missed it? - I missed it the next morning.

Q. Was it in the last year? - Yes.

Q. Was it before or after harvest? - I am not sure whether it was not after Michaelmas. It was in grass time, the time we turn them to grass.

Q. What time is that? - It may be almost Christmas. The next morning I sent my man for him, and he was gone; I found him in about three days afterwards, in the Black Horse inn, in Blackfriars-road, I don't know the landlord's name; we have no witnesses here at all.

Q. Who is Joseph Centre ? - He is run from his place, having done what he should not.

Q. Is Joseph Chalk here? - No, he is cast for death, at Kennington.

WILLIAM WALE sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the police office in the Borough; I know nothing of the horse being stole; I apprehended the man.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17950416-26

185. JOHN LEONARD and JOHN BURKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , a wooden boat, value 1l. the goods of Isaac Woodford .

ISAAC WOODFORD sworn.

I stowed my boat, on the 3d of March, and thought it was safe at the New Crane, in the parish of Shadwell .

Q. When did you miss her? - The next morning, when I went to my labour.

Q. What are you? - An ancient Trinity waterman .

Q. When did you see her again? - The next morning, the 4th, I found her high and dry, at New Crane Stairs, along side with one James Rule 's boat; I cannot tell who took her away, I left her locked with a chain through the ring of the barge, and the skulls locked in her.

Q. Now, when you see her laying high and dry, was there any alteration in the appearance? - Only the blades of the skulls broke off; how it came I don't know.

JOHN JEFFRIES sworn.

I catched the prisoners in the boat as near to twelve o'clock at night as I could tell, them two were in one boat, and three or four more, the best part of them were men, but the biggest here fell overboard, and in saving of him we lost therest.

Q. Did you say any thing to them? - No, I did not say any thing particularly, I took them on shore directly to the watch-house.

Court to Mr. Kirby. Ask them if they are willing to go to sea, before we go any further in this business - Yes, they are both willing.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17950416-27

186. JOHN PERCIVAL was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , a live tame cock, value 1s. 6d. the goods of William Gelding .

WILLIAM GELDING sworn.

I live in Rodney-street, Pentonville . On the 29th of March, Palm Sunday, I came down stairs, about seven o'clock in the morning, I missed five hens, a cock, and a black bird, and in about an hour after the watch came to inquire if any body had lost any poultry; he came to my house, and I told him I had, and I described to him what I had lost; in consequence of that information I went up to the watch-house, but I could not

see my poultry; they told me they had a man and woman in custody; I see the hens at the justice's, and the cock; the hens were all killed.

Q. What is the justic's name? - I think it is the mayor, but Alderman Clark was there besides.

Q. Was the cock that you see there your's? - Yes, I am sure of it.

JOHN SANDERS sworn.

I am a watchman at Pentonville. It was Palm Sunday, I was crying half past four in the morning, this here good woman, Mrs. Percival, was coming down-

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar? - yes, I see him along the road.

Q. Had he any thing with him? - It was the woman that I see, I did not see the man at all.

Q. Do you know any thing of the man? - No, I did not see him.

Q. Was there any body with the woman? - No, nobody.

Q. You did not see Percival himself? - No; the woman was alone when I see her, I am sure of it.

DAVID POWERS sworn.

I am a watchman of Pentonville.

Q. Did you see any thing of the prisoner at the bar in the morning of Palm Sunday? - No, it was that gentleman's wife that I see.

Q. Did you see him on that morning? - No, because he was taken by the other man.

-MACARTHY sworn.

Q. You are a watchman in Pentonville? - Yes.

Q. Did you see the man at the bar, John Percival , there? - Yes, I see him there.

Q. What morning was it? - Sunday morning, about four o'clock in the morning.

Q. Where did you see him? - At Battlebridge.

Q. Who was with him? - No one but himself.

Q. His wife was not with him? - No.

Q. Did you find any thing on him? - No, I was one of the two that had him taken.

Q. Why did you take him? - On suspicion.

-OBERN sworn.

I am houseman belonging to Pentonville watch-house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Q. Did you see him on Palm Sunday morning? - Not till he came into the watch-house, after he was taken, after the the inhabitants got up, we made inquiry who lost the fowls.

Q. How came you to make inquiry of the fowls? - The fowls were brought in the time he was taken, five hens all killed, his wife was brought in before him.

Q. Did you make any search at his lodgings for any thing? - After inquiry Mr. Gelding said that he lost five hens, a cock, and blackbird; with that we went down to his lodgings, and when we came up to his bed room,this cock hung up at the foot of his bed, in a bag; I said, I believe here is the cock, and I touched it with my stick, and it moved, and I said, it is the cock; and I said, now we shall find the black bird.

Prosecutor. It is my cock; I had this cock made me a present by a relation of mine, and it has a cross bill.

Q. Is it a game gock? - It is.

Mr. Gurney. How do you know these lodgings were the prisoner's? - I know he lived there before, I see him there about a week before.

Q. What time of the day was it you went there? - Some time between ten or eleven, I cannot exactly say.

Q. What time was it the prisoner was brought to the watch-house? - I believe about half past four.

Q. Did you find the lodgings open? - Both the front door and the back door was open.

Q. You had not seen the prisoner at home that night? - No, I had not.

MARY MILLER sworn.

I live in Peter-street, Turnmill-street; I have know the prisoner about six years, he drives a jack ass in the street with eatables ; I never knew a fault in his character in my life.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-28

187. JANE PERCIVAL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of March , five tame live hens, value 5s. the goods of William Gelding .

WILLIAM GELDING sworn.

Q. You live at Islington ? - I do.

Q. The night preceding Palm Sunday, did you lose any fowls? - I lost five hens; I see them the day following at Hatton-garden.

JAMES SANDERS sworn.

Q. You are a watchman? - Yes.

Q. Did you, on Palm Sunday, see the prisoner at the bar? - Yes, at half past four; I spoke to her and said, it was a very dark morning, it was very foggy; and her cloak was wrapped over her apron, and I thought it was an unnecessary time to have any this time in the morning, and I went and got assistance of Powers and Macarthy, and others.

Q. When you got their assistance, what did you do? Did you follow her? - No.

Q. Did you pursue he? - No, they did.

DAVID POWERS sworn.

Q. You are a watchman are you? - Yes.

Q. On the morning of Palm Sunday was you called upon by Sanders, to assist him? - Yes.

Q. Who was with you? - Macarthy. I ran where Sanders told me the woman made off towards; he told me the woman by her name; I overtook the woman and brought her back to the watch-house.

Q. And when you came to the watch-house, did you search her? - Yes.

Q. What did you find about her? - Nothing but the sign of feathers in her apron, small feathers.

Q. Did you make any other search? - No other search.

Q. Had you any conversation with her? - No, none in the least.

-MACARTHY sworn.

Q. Did you pursue the prisoner in company with David Powers? - Yes.

Q. When you had apprehended the woman, did you find any thing about her? - I picked up the fowls in the same place where she was taken, large dead fowls, and carried them to the watch-house.

Q. Where did you pick them up? - In Collyer-street, where she was apprehended.

Q. How near to her person? - I cannot rightly tell that; about twenty yards or thereabouts.

Q. Had you called out stop thief? - No, but the woman was secured by these men when I came down, and I accidently came down and found the fowls in the place.

Q. Were the fowls warm or cold? - Quite warm.

Q. Did you make any observations on her apron? - Yes, when I went to the watch-house, she was there before me.

Q. What appearance was there in her apron? - There were some feathers in her apron.

Q. How were the fowls killed? were their heads pulled off? - No, they were not. only their necks broke.

Q. Did you see any body in the street at the time you apprehended her? - No, I did not.

Mr. Gurney. It was a dark foggy morning? - It was.

Q. How long was it after the woman was taken up, that you found these fowls in the road? - About five or six minutes, I believe.

Q. Whereabouts were they laying? - In the same street where she was taken; I had seen her taken.

Q. Did you see her at the very time that she was taken? - No; I did not.

Q. Did you see Power stop her? - Yes, I see Powers taking of her.

-OBERN sworn.

Q. Do you know nothing of the five fowls? - Nothing till they came into the watch-house.

Q. Were they produced to Mr. Gelding in the watch-house? - No, not till before the magistrate.

Mr. Gurney. Did you keep them in your custody all the time? - Yes, all the time, locked up.

MARY MILLER sworn.

I have known the prisoner eighteen months, I never knew a misdemeanor in her character before in my life.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-29

188. ANN TILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , seven pounds weight of base metal, value 4s. the goods of Joseph Nutting ; and

ELIZABETH HORNE for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

JOSEPH NUTTING sworn.

I live in King-street, Covent-garden ; I am a metal button-maker ; I am in the habit of using a great quantity of metal, and I perceived that I lost a quantity, and this put me on my guard to find out which way this metal could have gone; I instructed two persons whom I was in the habit of buying metal of; I told them to take notice and make observation from that time, what should happen in their way, and one of them brought me word-

Q. Did you, after this, miss any metal from your shop? - Yes, I did, on the 20th of March, one of the persons brought me an ingot of metal.

Q. Had you missed any before he brought it to you? - I had missed several ingots, I knew it because I made some private marks on some of them.

Q. You missed several ingots, how long before? - Six or eight, or ten days previous.

Q. Who was the person that brought it to you? - His name is Faulkner.

Q. How many ingots did he produce? - Only one, at that time he only brought one. I beg your lordship's pardon, the first ingot was received of Wild; that ingot I knew to be mine.

Q. What weight was that ingot? - About fourteen pounds. That was one of the ingots that I had marked with a small punch, the counter part of which I keep at Goldsmiths Hall.

Q. Had the prisoner Tiller any thing to do about your shop? - I employed her as a workwoman about my shop.

Q. Did her husband work there? - He had worked there, but not at that time; very shortly before he had.

Q. What do you with that ingot being brought to you by Mr. Wild? - I kept that ingot, and endeavoured to come at some other proof.

Q. You did not apprehend the prisoner on that day? - No, not on that day; and the next day they, by appointment, were to go to the prisoner Horne.

Q. Who do you mean by they? - By the witnesses; they were to go to buy some metal that she said she would have ready for them. The next day they brought me a piece of metal.

Q. Had you any other ingot brought to you besides that brought by Wild? - Yes, on the 21st.

Q. Who brought it? - Wild again.

Q. Did you know that ingot which he produced? - I had marked that the evening preceding; I then apprehended Tiller and took her before the magistrate, who granted me a warrant for the prisoner Horne. Now, they both being in the presence of the magistrate, the magistrate asked them-

Q. I suppose their examination was taken in writing? - Yes, it was. I swore to the metal, in consequence of which they were committed.

Prisoner Tiller. I was not in the way when the metal was missed.

Court to Prosecutor. Did she live with you at the time? - Yes.

JOSEPH WILD sworn.

I keep a toy shop, in Brick-lane near Whitechapel.

Q. What do you know about any ingot of metal? - I bought one piece of the old lady at the bar, Mrs. Horne, the 21st of March.

Q. When was the first time you took any ingot of Mr. Nutting? - I had that of one Jonathan Faulkner, on the 20th of March.

Q. Was that the same day as you delivered it to Mr. Nutting? - Yes.

Q. How had you it of him? - I asked Faulkner if this old lady bought this kind of metal; and he told me yes.

Q. How came you to go to Faulkner? - I had heard that he had some metal of the old woman, he went along with me to recommend me to an old lady to buy some metal.

Q. Did he go to her? - Yes.

Q. Where did she live? - In Newtoner's-lane.

Q. Has she a house there? - She had; when we came there she said she had a good deal of metal, but them that bought it must melt it down immediately as they had it; she said it was a woman that brought it, and it was brought from Covent Garden; when I went on the 20th, she told me that the metal was gone to Mr. Faulkner's, because she could not pay for the metal but when she was paid for it.

Q. Had you bought the ingot of Faulkner before you went to Hone's? - No, she told me it was gone to Faulkner's.

Q. But you said that Faulkner went with you to Mrs. Horne's, to recommend you to buy the metal? - That was before the 20th of March.

Q. How long before? - Not many days.

Q. What was said about this ingot that you bought at Jonathan Faulkner's? - I went to her dwelling after I bought the metal there.

Q. What have to say to prove that this Elizabeth Horne ever had possession of this piece of metal that Faulkner sold you? - I cannot positively say that piece, but I have a piece in my pocket that I bought of her.

Q. This was before you bought it of Faulkner? - It was when I had bought it of Faulkner I went back to her, and told her I had bought it of Faulkner; she said that she was very sorry that he had it, because she could have got a far thing a pound more; I gave Faulkner seven-pence a round for it, and he gave her sixpence three farthings for it.

Q. Am I to understand you that this buying was all with that view to assist Mr. Nutting in his discovery? - Yes, all with that view.

Q. Had you told Faulkner then about your suspicions that this was Mr. Nutting's metal? - Yes, he employed me on that business, for that purpose, and I bought it.

Q. What did you do with it after you bought it? - I took it to Mr. Nutting, and Mr. Nutting had happened to have marked it, and he knew it. After I had bought it of Faulkner I went to Mrs. Horne, and asked her when she should have any more metal; and she said she should have some more in the evening.

Q. What became of that ingot that you received on the 20th? - Mr. Nutting had it in his possession.

JONATHAN FAULKNER sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - In Newtoner's-street, Holborn.

Q. What is your business? - An iron shop.

Q. On the 20th of March had you any transaction with Joseph Wild, respecting an ingot of metal? - He employed me to buy a piece of metal for him, I only bought one piece, and Mrs. Horne brought an ingot to my shop, and she said that a man had been to her house and offered her a price for the metal; and, says she, I want money, shall I leave it with you, and you pay me the money, till the gentleman calls; you pay me sixpence halfpenny a pound; I was to buy it for Mr. Wild; I paid her the money in part, I paid her sixpence halfpenny a pound, and I was to give her a farthing a pound more when the man came and fetched it away.

Q. What did he pay you? - He paid me seven-pence a pound for it.

Q. Do you know any thing respecting Tiller? - Nothing at all.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-30

189. ELIZABETH WILMOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , two guineas , the monies of Thomas Butler .

THOMAS BUTLER sworn.

Q. What have you to say against the prisoner at the bar? - I have to say as far as this; one night, the 19th of February, going down the Hay-market , about ten o'clock; I happened to be going to a place in the course of day or two after, as a servant , and had been to see my friends, and I don't know but I might be a little in liquor; and I met with this woman at the bar, I had a little conversation with her, and she gave me encouragement of coming with her to her private lodgings, in James's-street, to which through persuasion I went; and there was a black girl with us, who is a witness; they took me into a private room, which I paid money for the room, which was one shilling, I paid the money, and the girl I gave her half a crown; I believe I had some connection with the prisoner at the bar, being a little in liquor, and I had a little purse in my waistcoat pocket, and when I went to give her the half crown out, I had two guineas in it, and I don't know whether

I had any silver or not, that I will take my oath was in my pocket then; then I asked her if they would give me something to drink, and they took me to a public house adjoining; where the person was obliged to change the half crown to pay for the liquor; it was a particular piece of money, which my name was on it, and I wished to have the half crown again, and I offered to change the half crown, as my name was on it, and the prisoner at the bar said, that did not argusy, you shall not and I took out my purse from my waistcoat pocket, and I found one end of the purse open, and all the money gone out; and I was in no other company than this here woman, and that black girl.

Q. How do you know that the money was in your purse before? - I know it by having it in my hand, and when I gave out the half crown. And I gave charge of them, and they were taken to the watch-house, and they were there all night.

MARY HOLLWELL sworn.

I believe it was Thursday night, this gentleman was going down the Hay-market, and the prisoner picked him up and took him into a house in James's street; and he went along with her, and gave her half a crown, he gave her the half crown to have connection, and she did not lay on the sopha, she sat across him some how, and the mean while she picked the purse out of this man's pocket, and took the two guineas out, and wanted to give them into my hand, and I would not take them, I thought it was a sin to take it from him, and he had made a bargain with her that he was to have some drink out of the half crown; and when he came to the public house, he wanted to change the half crown, and he put his hand into his pocket to take out his money to change it, and he missed his two guineas, and a man advised her to give the man back his two guineas, and she said, d-mn his eyes and limbs, she would swallow it before he should have his money again, and she put it in her mouth and swallowed it, I see her, and told them so in the watch-house.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask her whether the gentleman did not give her the two guineas between the half crown piece and the shilling? - No, no such thing, I see her pick it out, and it was out of the man's right hand pocket that she took it, and she wanted me to have it, and I put it back, and gave her the money into her hand again; and she said, you black b-tch, say nothing, you shall not come to any harm; says I, you know you have got the money in your guts, give it the man; and she said he should not have the money any more.

Q. To Prosecutor. Did you hear Mary Hollwell say that she saw the prisoner take the money out of your pocket? - Yes, I heard her say so at the watch-house.

WILLIAM SILLER sworn.

Q. You are a watchman. On the the 19th of February, at a quarter past eleven, I was coming along from my watch box, and I saw this man and two women together, and he accused them of robbing him of two guineas; says I, will you give charge of the two women, and have them taken to the watch-house, and have them searched? with that the man says that he would wish to go back to me house with them; they went back, and I waited at the door, and presently I was called to have the charge of them, to take them to the watch-house; in going to the watch-house, the black woman says to the prisoner, you had better give the man the two guineas; and in going to

search her at the watch-house, she said that the woman has got the two guineas and has swallowed them.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17950416-31

190. JOHN LEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , a pewter pint pot, value 1s. the goods of Samuel Powell .

SAMUEL POWELL sworn.

I am a publican , I keep the Rose and Crown, Little Britan . On the 27th of February last, on a Friday, about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came into my house; he came to the bar and asked for a glass of gin, which was served him; on that he retired to the tap room; there happened to be but one person in the tap room beside himself, who was a working man having a pint of porter and some bread and cheese; the prisoner waited in the the tap room till the man was gone, and seeing me busy in the bar (the other man went out of the house, leaving the pint pot standing by the fire place, on the side of the fire, on the hob) he took my pot, concealed it and walked out of doors with it, the maid servant came out of the parlour at the instant, she seeing the man going out of the tap room, said, sir, have you taken the pint pot from the tap room? I said I have not; and she went to the door immediately, and caught the prisoner by the door, just as he was going off the step; the girl says to him, master, you have got a pint pot of my master's; he says, no such thing, how can you say so; I was directly close, and had hold of him; I said, my good man, it does not signify denying it, for I am positive you have it about you; and I took the man into the tap room, and sent for a constable to search him; I never quitted him; the constable came as soon as possible; in the mean while, before the constable came, the prisoner wanted to get from my hands, so as to get to a far box in the tap room; I would not quit him, and he twisted his hand, and drew the pot from under him, as though he drew it from his breeches, and put it down on the seat, before my face.

Q. You are sure you see this? - I positively did; I had him by the collar all the while; after that he began to ask my pardon, and beg for mercy; and if I would let him go he would pay me for the pot any thing that I desired.

Q. The constable has had the pot from that time to this? - I delivered it to the constable immediately. It has got my name and number on it.

Q. There were no pots in the house but what belonged to you? - There was not a pot on the premises to my knowledge, but what belonged to me.

MARY HAYNES sworn.

Q. Are you a servant to the last witness? - Yes.

Q. Did you see the pot by the fire side in the tap room? - Yes, I did.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the room? - Yes, I did; when he went out I stopped him, because he had got a pot of ours.

Q. Did you see him examined afterwards? - Yes, I did.

Q. You did not see him take it? - No, I was not in the place when he took it.

Q. When he was brought back again did you see it taken from him? - Yes, he took the pot from his breeches.

Q. What was done with it? - The constable took it, Mr. Phipps.

FRANCIS PHIPPS sworn.

I am a constable, Mr. Powell gave me this pot.

Q. Did you see it taken from him? - I did not, he desired me to search him, to see if he had got any more, and I found this file; I have kept the pot in my possession ever since.

Prisoner. I know nothing at all about it, I was very much in liquor when I went into the house.

GUILTY . (Aged 65.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-32

191. SIMON WORTH and JOHN ANDREWS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Henderson , about the hour of nine in the afternoon, of the 7th of March , the said Robert Henderson , Hannah Henderson , spinster, and Thomas Jones being therein, and feloniously stealing from the said dwelling house, two woollen cloth coats, value 3l. two memorandum books in a leather cover, value 2d. a bill of exchange, value 45l. 4s. another bill of exchange, value 25l. and one other bill of exchange, value 14l. the property of the said Robert Henderson .

ROBERT HENDERSON sworn.

Q. Where do you keep house? - No. 10, Foster-lane, Cheapside . On the 7th of last March, Saturday, while I and my sister were at breakfast, some person or persons went up two pair of stairs, into my bed room, backward.

Q. Did you see him in the bed room yourself? - I did not.

Q. Where was you at breakfast? - In the front parlour, up one pair of stairs.

Q. What is your sister's name? - Hannah.

Q. Was there a person of the name of Thomas Jones in the house? - He was. They took the two coats and two waistcoats.

Q. Had you any alarm given you? - None; I went up stairs after breakfast to shave myself, my hair dresser was not then come; I had not been there more than a minute before some coals came, and the man asked me for a few halfpence for some beer; I had none about me, and I went up stairs for some in my coat pocket, that I had pulled off the over night, and I missed-

Q. What time of the day was this? - A little before nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. What was missing? - Two coats and two waistcoats, from the two pair of stairs back room. In the inside pocket of the coat that I had pulled off the over night, was a little memorandum book, which contained three bills, to the amount of sixty-five pounds, some odd shillings.

Q. What in one of the coats you missed? - Yes; I immediately went to stop payment of the bills.

Q. Do you know who took these things? - I do not.

Q. You have described all that you have lost? - Yes.

Q. When had you last seen these things? - I had seen them all the night before; the memorandum book and my clothes that morning; I advertised the bills, and had hand bills distributed about, and offered a reward for their being returned, but I heard no tidings of them, till such time as the forty-five pounds four shillings became due, that was on the 29th of March; when Sir James Esdaile 's house, the bankers,

sent me notice that they had got two men there in custody respecting the bill; I went, Sir Benjamin Hammet told me that the bills had been presented that morning for payment, by a Mr. Thomas Powell , a linnen draper, who had taken it of two men the day before; Sir Benjamin Hammet told me that he believed they had got one of the thieves, or his accomplice (Simon Worth was present) but it was necessary that I should go in pursuit of John Andrews , and he advised me to take an officer with me, and get the best direction I could from Simon Worth , were Andrews was; I took an officer with me, and after a pursuit of two or three hours we got Andrews; Sir Benjamin took a deposition of Worth's at the time, which he desired I would take a copy of it, which I did; it was left at the Mansion House with Mr. Newman, to produce in court.

Q. Sir Benjamin Hammet did not act as a magistrate at that time? - I don't know, the examination was over before I got there.

Q. Who was the committing magistrate, that committed this man? - The Lord Mayor.

Q. Have you ever found any of the rest of your property? - No, no traces of the rest.

Mr. Knowlys. You say the Lord Mayor was the last magistrate who committed him. What I want to know is, whether the first commitment for further examination, was not made out by Sir Benjamin Hammet? Were they not brought up before Sir Benjamin Hammet at Guildhall? - Worth was taken from Sir Benjamin Hammet 's to the compter.

(The examination produced.)

Q. Do you know Sir Benjamin Hammet 's hand writing? - I cannot say that I do.

Q. Did you see him sign that? - I did not.

Q. You say this took place while you was at breakfast? - Yes, between the hours of eight and nine in the morning.

Q. Not later? - No.

Q. On the 7th of March? - Yes.

Q. You did not hear any thing of your bill till the 29th following? - I did not.

Q. Except this one bill, no other thing has been found? - No, nothing at all, the prisoner Worth was not searched in my presence.

THOMAS POWELL sworn.

I am a linen draper. Mrs. Llewyn, whose husband keeps a nursery ground, who lives in the New-road, Blacksriars-road, she and Worth came to our house, about two o'clock on Friday, the 27th of March, and Mrs. Llewyn told me that Andrews had bought three or four pounds worth of trees and roots in their garden of her husband, to send into the country, and Andrews offered Llewyn a bill of forty-five pounds, and wanted change, but Llewyn could not give the change, and she told me that Andrews wanted some linen drapery goods, and she said she knew a person she could recommend him to, and she came down to ask me if I would take the bill, and give him the change for about ten or twelve pounds worth of goods, and give him the difference? I told her if the bill was good I would take it, then they went back again, and in about an hour or an hour and half after they came again.

Q. Had they shewn you that bill? - No, they had not, Andrews had the bill; in about an hour after they all three came down, and Andrews shewed me the bill, of forty-five pounds four shillings, on Sir James Esdaile ; then I told Andrews that I would take the bill; but at the time that he was looking out the goods, I sent my young man to a banking house, to know if the bill was good; and the

answer was, that the bill was a very good one; then I gave him the difference of the bill, thirty two pounds twelve shillings, he had twelve guineas worth of goods; then they went away. The next morning I went to the banking house, and took the bill for payment, and they told me that the bill had been stolen, and they would not pay it.

Jury. You took the bill yourself? - I did; I was asked up to Sir Benjamin Hammet , and I informed him where I took the bill, and I was coming out of the banking house, and I saw Worth through the window, passing by the door, and I went out and collared him, and I told Worth, that the bill I took of him yesterday was not a good one, and it had been stolen, and he told me that he knew nothing at all about it; and he was taken up before Sir Benjamin-Hammet, and examined before him.

Mr. Knowlys. Worth was examined before Sir Benjamin as a magistrate? - Sir Benjamin swore me, and him likewise.

Q. When Mrs. Powell came, she represented the whole business, as laying with Andrews, and Worth as having no intent in it? - Yes.

Q. And that she represented in the presence of Worth? - Yes.

Q. Did Worth ever claim any property in the bill, or having any thing to do with it? - No.

Q. After Mrs. Llewyn had made this representation to you, then Andrews came and produced the bill? - He did.

Q. How long did Andrews stay with you while you was treating for these things? - Full three quarters of an hour; he staid all the while my young man went to the banking house and back again to inquire after the bill.

Q. It had never happened to you to hear of its being a stolen bill till the day after? - To be sure; if I had I should not have taken it. (The bill produced.) This is the bill; Sir Benjamin Hammet would not pay the bill till yesterday, and I was obliged to trouble them for the money. My attorney has had the bill.

Prosecutor. This is my bill.

Q. Was this room where it was lost, the room you sleep in? - It was.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning? - About eight, or rather after.

Q. Was it light then? - It was. The coat and waistcoat that the memorandum book was in, I pulled off the night before, about eleven o'clock, when I went to bed.

Q. Was this room locked? - It was not locked, but the door was shut; I recollect shutting the door after me very well.

Q. Were you the last person that came out of the room? - I was.

Q. You cannot say with certainty, that nobody went into this room but yourself, before you missed these things? - I cannot.

Q. You were at breakfast some time, so it is possible that some of your own people might have been in the room? - It might have been so.

Q. When you went up stairs, did you find the door open or shut? - I cannot recollect.

Court. I shall not put Worth on his defence.

Prisoner Andrews. On Saturday, the 7th of April, I accompanied my wife, by her desire, into St. Giles's, to the Red Lion, to see her daughter, she wanted to speak to her; within a few doors of St. Giles's my wife let go my arm, and she told me that she see a paper laying, which she thought to be a pawnbroker's duplicate, and she picked it up, and it proved to be a bill or a note wrapped up in this piece of red paper; that was about one o'clock in the day.

Q. Where did it happen, do you say? - Going into Broad-street, about five doors going out of Holborn into St. Giles's, on the right hand side; then we went to the Red Lion, and I opened the paper and looked at it, and I did not know what the circumstances were, not the value of it; I called for a pint of beer and told my wife I would go to Mr. Palmer's, an acquaintance of mine, whom I supposed might tell me what it was; I went directly to the Joiners Arms, Westminster-row, and there I see Mr. Palmer, and delivered him the bill, and told how I came by it; he told me he did not think it a matter of any great consequence, for very few tradesmen did chuse to be troubled with them; and he had it in his custody till eleven o'clock that same night. I never see any advertisement or ever heard of any, and kept it almost three weeks, and shewed it to a number of people, I suppose a hundred had sight of it. I happened to shew it to a person one day, and they told me they thought the bill was worth all the money, and they blamed me for not changing it.

JOSEPH PALMER sworn.

I am a carpenter, a steward to a gentleman in St George's fields, Mr. Meymott, the surveyor under the building act.

Q. What is the prisoner at the bar? - A carpenter; he has worked for Mr. Meymott ever since October; I employ him and pay him his wages.

Q. Do you know any thing of this bill in question? - Yes; Andrews brought it to me, I think on the 7th of March, Saturday afternoon, he told me his wife had found it.

Q. Why did he bring it to you? - I suppose because I was the only person that he knew; and I shewed it to several different people when he was by, and went into the parlour and shewed the company there.

Q. Was there any question about its goodness or badness? - I told him that it was a bill that I would not take for my master, and I would not have any concern with bills of that sort, because I had orders to the contrary; I think I told him that the bill was not worth a shilling, I am very sure I did.

Q. However, he shewed it publickly? - Yes, he did many times.

Q. Did he leave it with you at all? - Yes, I think I got it for an hour in the house.

Q. How long have you known him? - I have known him for these twenty years; he is a very good character.

Q. Would you employ him again? - Certainly I would. He is a very steady workman, very industrious; he has four children.

Q. How long had he been employed under Mr. Meymott? - Ever since the 27th of October last.

Q. What till he was taken up? - No, I believe he was out of work because of the hard frost, we could not get timber up the river.

Jury. Can he read and write? - I think he cannot.

Q. Who used to set down his time? - He used to set down his time.

PHILIP SERJEANT sworn.

Q. Have you the care of the Joiners Arms? - I have the greatest part of it, but I am not in business for myself; I have seen Andrews there frequently, know him to be a very sober steady honest man.

Q. Did you ever see him with a bill? - Yes; he said, Mr. Serjeant, I have found a bill; says I, what bill is it? says he, it is drawn on some banker or other in London, it is a country one, and he gave it me in the tap room; several saw it; and afterwards it was taken into the parlour and shewed publickly there.

Q. Did he say who found it, either he or any other person? - I don't recollect; he said it was found. (The bill shewn him) This is the bill.

Q. Did this happen more than once in the Joiners Arms? - I rather think it did twice; but the first time I see it was on Saturday afternoon, and I rather think it was on the 7th of March.

WILLIAM DELL sworn.

I am a glazier and painter, Westminster Road.

Q. How long have you known Andrews? - Two or three months, and by knowing him I know most of Mr. Meymott's work, and most of Mr. Meymott's journeymen; he has worked for me. I generally every Saturday night go to get change at the Joiners Arms to pay my journeymen; I saw Andrews there at that time this bill was brought and shewed to five or six different tradesmen that were there drinking porter, and I read it, and returned it with this circumstance, I said, you had better go to Sir Benjamin Hammet's, and inform him that you have got the bill, or keep it till it is advertised.

Q. Did you tell Andrews that? - I did not see Andrews; it was brought into the parlour, I was in the parlour waiting for some change.

ELIZABETH ROGERS sworn.

Q. Do you know Andrews? - Yes.

Q. Do you know his wife? - Yes.

Q. Where do you live? - Suffolk-street, near the King's Bench; I am a widow. Mrs. Andrews called on me with this bill.

Q. What time? - I cannot say.

Q. What day? - I cannot say, it was the morning part.

Q. About how long ago? - I cannot say; I believe it is about three weeks ago. (The bill shewn her) That is the bill.

Q. Are you a neighbour of Mrs. Andrews? - No, she lives some little distance from me; she shewed me that and asked me if I understood it? and I made answer and said, no.

Q. How long have you known them? - About two years; during that time I always took Mr. Andrews and his wife to be sober honest people.

The prisoner Andrews called three witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

Jury to Prosecutor. Is it usual for you to indorse your bills before you pay them away? - I had indorsed that the over night, because I intended to discount it the next day, at my bankers.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-33

192. FRANCIS GERALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a man's black silk waistcoat, value 10s. three kerseymere waistcoats, value 15s. two cloth great coats, value 2l. three marseillis waistcoats, value 10s. two linen shirts, value 5s. five dressing waistcoats, value 10s. a man's flannel waistcoat, value 5s. two dimity waistcoats, value 10s. four pair of silk stockings, value 10s. four mens flannel waistcoats, value 5s. fifteen pair of silk stockings, value 3l. and an ivory two foot measure, value 1s. the goods of John Parker Church , Esq . in his dwelling house .

JOHN PARKER CHURCH sworn.

Q. I believe you live in Sackville-street, Piccadilly ? - Yes. The prisoner at the bar was my valet for about eighteen or nineteen months.

Q. When did he leave your service? - About a month since; he did not leave

my service; I was determined to discharge him, and I gave him notice to get another place, that I meant to discharge him; I ordered him to go with a letter to his Grace the Duke of Portland; I had been out and got wet, and went to change my coat, and I called for him, he had my keys, and I went to my wardrobe to get another coat to put on, and to my very great astonishment I found there was none there to change; at last I found a coat which I had made an excursion in last summer; very much surprised at this deficiency in my clothes, I had a closet opened, to see if there were any clothes there. The next day I ordered him to quit my service, and to give an account of all my clothes to my butler.

Q. Did you afterwards examine into the state of your clothes? - No, I did not. I told him to give up the state of my linen and clothes to my butler, and when that is all right come to me and I will pay you your wages. When the account came to be looked into, I found a great deficiency of my linen and other articles; the man went away, and none of my servants could tell where he lodged. I sent my butler to the magistrates, at Marlborough-street, to apply for a search warrant, and the constable, who, I suppose, is here, went with the search warrant, and he came to me and brought one of my shirts with my mark on it; when he came to me, I went with him to this man's lodgings, and there I found a considerable quantity of my clothes, which, I suppose, are here to be produced, because the constable had charge of them.

Mr. Knapp. These things, most probably, if they were taken at all they must be taken at different times? - It is impossible for me to say.

Q. This man had lived with you eighteen or nineteen months, during that time he had been in the capacity of a valet. Had it, in the course of that time, been your custom to make presents to him of cast off clothes, or any thing of that sort? - It is impossible for me to recollect any thing of that sort. I have no doubt but I did make him some presents; I do not charge my memory with any.

Q. Perhaps you have made him presents of some of the same sort of things that were in this indictment; black silk waistcoats for instance? - I propably might.

Q. Kerseymere waistcoats? - I certainly did not.

Q. Will you give me leave to ask you whether during the time the prisoner lived with you, he had not the opportunity of making away with a Pocket book, with some bank notes in it of your's? - I cannot positively say.

Q. Did not he give you a pocket book, which had either by you been mislaid or dropped which contained bank notes? - During one time he lived with me I did leave my pocket book my in breeches pocket, but what sum of money was in it I cannot tell; when I got up in the morning I said, Francy, did you see my pocket book? Yes, says he, I did, there it is, and returned it; it certainly contained property.

Mr. Knapp. If you mean to inquire from this, whether I had the least suspicion of his dishonesty, I would tell you, no; that I had great confidence in him.

JAMES KENNEDY , sworn.

Q. I believe you are one of the constables of Marlborough Street? - Yes, 135.

Q. Did you go with a search warrant at any time to the prisoner at the bar? - Yes; I went to No. 132, Swallow-street.

Q. Who lodged there? - The prisoner at the bar.

Q. How do you know he lodged there? - Because I asked him to go to his apartments; and he went there with me.

Q. Did you execute your search warrant there? - Yes. The first I found I desired him to open the box; and he opened it very freely; and I told him there was a chest of drawers I must open.

He said he had not got the key; I said I must break it open.

Q. Did you break it open? - No, he gave me the key after that. I found this shirt there marked as the butler had described the property to me.

Q. To Prosecutor. Can you speak to the mark on your linen? - Yes: this is one out of twenty eight new shirts; which I had a short time before, eight of which are missing.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that you never gave away any of these? - Perfectly sure I never did.

Q. To Kennedy. What else did you find? - Fifteen pair of silk stockings.

Mr. Knapp to Prosecutor. I am given to understand that the prisoner at the bar had given him a good many silk stockings either by you or Mrs Church. - I know he has taken them.

Q. Be kind enough to answer my question? - I know it is no such thing.

Mr. Knowlys to Kennedy. Have you any kerseymere waistcoats? - Three Kerseymere waistcoats.

Prosecutor. They are certainly my property; and I certainly never gave them to that man.

Mr. Knapp. You never had any quarrel with this man? - Never in the world. I found him a good natured man, but I thought him an unthinking man, because I could not keep him at home.

Q. In short you did not think of parting with him for dishonesty? - I did not in the least.

THOMAS JEFFS sworn.

I am by prosession a dentist: I have known the prisoner six years; always bore a very good character.

GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 10s. (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by a Jury of half foreigners before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-34

193. JOHN WHITMELL and JOSEPH HAWE, otherwise HOW were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , five live came turkey cock, value 20s. and a live came turkey cock, value 5s. the goods of John Wilmot ,

JOHN WILLMOT , sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - At Tottenham High Cross .

Q. What do you know of the loss of any poultry at your house? - I know the loss of five hens and a cock, on the 21st of March.

Q. Do you happen to know of your own knowledge, whether they were safe the night before you missed them? - Certainly I saw them all the day till the afternoon between four and five o'clock, and they used to roost inside of a moot: I have a moot about my house, and we generally fetch them up inside there every night, and the next morning let them go where they like. I see them there that day: I was at work in the garden all the day. Between four and five they were walking along the road: at this time of year they will stray out a little from home.

Q. Was that your whole number, or only a part of them? - Only a part of them; some of them were on the decline of sitting, and they staid at home more.

Q. Did you ever see them again from the time that you missed them? - Not till they were dead.

Q. When was it you saw them dead? - The same evening my daughter pulled them out of the ditch where these two men had broke their necks.

Q. Did you see her take them out of the ditch? - I did not; but I see her draw them along the road.

Q. Did you see the prisoners about there that day? - I did not to my knowledge.

Q. How near was this ditch to where you lived? - Within near three hundred yards of my own house.

Q. What became of the turkeys afterward? - I took two of them to the justice's where the men were convicted from, and the others we made use of ourselves.

Q. Were there the same number missing as found? - The five hens we found that evening, or the 21st, on the 22d, my man found the head of the turkey cock within about one hundred yards of our house.

Q. How near to your house do you say the ditch was? - Not above four hundred or five hundred yards; they drove them till they drove them out of sight of the windows of my house, and then they broke their necks; I am sorry to say that my daughter saw them drive them, and she is not here.

Q. When did you see the prisoners first? - When they were taken, about an hour and half after in the same evening, or it may be not quite so much.

Q. Where was it you saw them? - I see them at Mr. Mitchell's, in Tottenham Road.

Q. Were they in custody when you saw them? - They were; they were taken into custody by the people who pursued them into the road; I don't know that I exchanged three words with them; then we took them to Tottenham to the justice's.

Q. How long had you had these turkies? - We hatched them.

Q. How old were they? - About nine or ten months old, I believe there might be one older among them; the cock turkey was two years old.

Q. Could you swear to the head of the cock turkey alone? - I think I could with a great deal of truth and justice, by the circumstances.

Q. How many turkies had you altogether? - We had eight.

Q. Then you had only two remaining? - No.

JOHN MARSHALL sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - At Hornsey, with my father, I suppose about half a mile from Mr. Wilmot's; I had been as far as Enfield Chace: this was on Saturday the 21st, and I was coming home from Enfield Chace, and coming across the fields that come from Wood-green Comman in Tottenham parish, and I saw this William Lucas in pursuit of these two men, the prisoners at the bar, running after them; I heard his voice before I saw him.

Q. You knew Lucas before? - O yes, he was crying out two thieves! and then the two men ran up an hedge, the other side of the hedge from me, the same side as Mr. Lucas was.

Q. Could you see through the hedge? - Yes, I could; the end of the hedge reaches into the river, then immediately they got up on the top of the hedge, turned round, and ran all along by the river bank, and Mr. Lucas told me to run and tell the people of the house on Woodgreen Common, to stop them from going over the Common, and I went there, and there was nobody at home, and then immediately I run after them myself, when they were running along side of the river bank along side of the Common, to go over the river bridge, and I ran after them as fast as ever I could; and Mr. Lucas ran after them across that bridge, and I had got to go half a mile round to another bridge, to get on the top of Mr. Mitchell's hill, to go after them, and before I could get at the top of the hill, I lost sight of them, and then I heard Mr. Lucas halloo, stop thief; I see Mr. Lucas, but I did not see the men, I ran to Mr. Lucas directly as I see him, and I did not see the men any more not till they were catched, I cannot say who took them, I see them after they were taken just the other side of Tottenham Wood; they had got one of them in hold then, Mr. Whitmell.

Q. How soon did you see the other prisoner?

- I did not see him before he was caught, about ten or eleven minutes after I see Whitmell.

Q. Who had got Whitmell at the time you see him? - Mr. Lucas here.

Q. Who had got Hawe when you see him taken? - He was brought to Lucas where Whitmell was, by Mr. Mitchell's coachman, I believe.

Q. Can you undertake to swear, that the two men that you saw, after they were taken, were the two men whom you had seen so running, and so pursued by Lucas? - Yes, I could. They are the same men, by their dress.

Q. Did you know either of them by sight before? - I have seen Hawe at the Cross Keys, St. John-street, Smithfield.

Q. Did you know it was Hawe before you saw him in custody? - No; I did not know him only by his dress. The other I never see before to my knowledge.

Q. You see nothing of any turkies? - No, I did not.

-LUCAS sworn.

I went to work on Saturday afternoon, in the garden of Mr. Wilmot's; he sent me in pursuit of these men; he said there were some men driving the turkies about the road; it might be about four or five o'clock, as nigh as I can guess. I ran out of the garden into the road, and got over into a field; I ran down by the side of the hedge for a considerable distance, and then got over the hedge into the lane again. As soon as I got to the lane, I was within a dozen yards, as nigh as I can guess, of three men close by the ditch side; as soon as they see me, one man ran away.

Q. Did you observe whether they were doing any thing by the ditch side? - Yes; one man had got a turkey in his hand by the neck, and was swinging it round; and the other had got a cloth, and was going to spread it on the ground. I have got a cloth in my pocket, which I suppose is the same, that was picked up in the New River, by the side where they ran. This man that had got the turkey in his hand, flung it down into the ditch, and ran away as soon as he stung it down; I never see him after he went away. The man that had got the cloth turned round and said, he would have a turkey for all me.

Q. How near was you to him when he said that to you? - Within half a dozen yards, as nigh as I can guess.

Q. Had you said any thing to either of them before they said this? - I asked them what they were doing there? then I turned round towards home and hallooed for assistance, and then they ran away, and I pursued them over the fields till they came to the river bank, and ran down the river bank afterward all the way till they came to Tottenham Wood. As soon as they came to Tottenham Wood, they ran into the wood, then I ran down to Mr. Mitchell's farm-yard, and called out for some assistance; and Mr. Mitchell's men went up some distance from the wood. There was a field between the wood and the farm yard; we went up this field into the wood, and I got over the hedge into the wood, and the first man that I see was Whitmell, laying down flat on his back. I went up to him, and told him to get up, he must go along with me. He got up, and one of Mr. Mitchell's men got hold of one hand, and I of the other, and we took him to the farm-yard. Hawe was catched by one of Mr. Mitchell's coachmen, I believe.

Q. Then you did not see Hawe in the wood? - No, not after he went in first, I see him go in.

Q. How soon was it that he was brought to where you was? - It might be about five or six minutes; I cannot justly say how long it was; it was within a short time.

Q. Is Mr. Mitchell's coachman here? - No, I believe not.

Q. Can you undertake to swear positively the two prisoners at the bar are two of those men that you see standing by this ditch that you described, and whom you afterwards pursued? - I can.

Q. Were either of the prisoners the man that was swinging the turkey about? - The man in the blue jacket, Whitmell.

Q. Who was the man that had the cloth? - Hawe.

Q. Was he the man that said he would have a turkey for all of you? - He was, I have no doubt.

Q. Did you know him before? - I never see him before, to my knowledge.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing them so as to say, through all the pursuit, they were the same men? - I had.

Q. Now, after they were secured, were you present that night? - No, but the next day I went up to Tottenham to the justice's.

Q. But were the turkies found before you went to the justice's? - Yes they were. I went to the very place the next day, where I see the men throw the turkies into the ditch, about three hundred yards from Mr. Wilmot's, as nigh as I can guess.

Q. Did you find any thing there then? - There were a great many turkey feathers in the ditch, and a little distance from that I found the head of a turkey cock, nigher to Mr. Wilmot's house.

Q. Was that in a ditch? - It was, but not where I see the men with the turkies.

Q. Did you shew Mr. Wilmot the place where the men were employed? - I did not.

Q. Is it possible for you to swear to the head of that turkey cock? - I can swear it was the head of a turkey cock, and the turkey cock was missed.

Q. Did you see the hens that were found dead afterwards? - Yes.

Q. Did you know them? - perfectly well.

Q. How many were there? - Five.

Q. Were they old ones or young ones? - I believe they were young ones. I am not much acquainted with ages, but I was well acquainted with them, by seeing them in the yard.

Q. How long had you known them? - Ever since they were hatched.

Q. Now, in what short space of time after Mr. Wilmot sent you out after the turkies was it you saw the two prisoners, and the third man? - In about five or six minutes.

Q. Did you see any thing of that young lad, Marshall? - Yes, I see him in a field, and told him to go to a house and call for assistance, but I never looked behind me, to see whether he was following me or not.

Q. You are confident to the persons of these two prisoners? - I am very confident of these two men.

Q. To Prosecutor. You were saying that you saw the dead turkies drawn out from some place by your daughters? - I did; that was the place where the five turkies were killed.

Q. Was that after you knew the prisoners were taken, or before? - Before.

Q. Did you see your daughters pull them out of the ditch? - No; they had just dragged them out of the place, and brought them into a place about the length of this Court, into the middle of the road, and said, there they were, all killed.

Q. Did you see the place which the last witness has described, where a quantity of the feathers were? - I did; I went immediately as I saw the turkies to the place. I see a few scattered feathers, that in their hurry had come from

the turkies, and I could see the print where they had knocked down the reeds and bushes.

Q. What distance might this he from your house? - About four or five hundred yards.

Q. Was there any way that the turkies could have got into that road? - They could not have got through the hedge; they were in a ditch by the side of the common, what they call the outside sence of a field.

Q. You saw nobody driving them? - I did not; I only took notice of the two waggons that were coming by at the same time that these men were coming by, these men being a kind of porters to the waggons, I immediately thought that they might be men belonging to the waggon.

Q. Had you seen the two men before? - I see several people with the waggons, but I did not take notice of them, nor my man; we were at work in the garden.

Q. Then how came you to send your man after these men? - Because my daughter were looking out of the window, and saw them driving the turkies.

Prisoner Whitmell. I went with the waggoner to drive the waggon on forward for him, and got some way on the road, and I got rather in liquor; I don't know how far I went, and laid myself in this wood to sleep, and this man came to me into the wood, and said I had been killing turkies, and I never saw a turkey.

Prisoner Hawe. I went out along with the waggon, to drive it while the man stopped to have a little refreshment, and then I turned off across the way to Highgate, and a gentleman's servant hallooed out to me, and said he wanted me; and I said, if he wanted me I would go with him, for I had done nothing that I was afraid of; and he said I had been killing the turkies. I never see these men before they were hallooing in the wood. I was walking along, making the best of my way to Highgate.

Prosecutor. I have one observation to make, this little road is three miles from my house.

The prisoner Hawe called two witnesses, who gave him a good character; said he drove a cart, and portered.

John Whitmell GUILTY. (Aged 22.)

Joseph Hawe GUILTY. (Aged 23.)

Judgement respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-35

194. JEMIMA BULLOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a gold ring, value 5s. the goods of Elizabeth Mayland .

ELIZABETH MAYLAND sworn.

Q. Are you a single woman ? - Yes.

Q. Where do you live? - No. 3. - street, Covent garden .

Q. Do you live with your friends or relations? - I do not live with my relations, but I have a friend that supports me. I live in the house.

Q. Have you apartments to yourself? - Yes.

Q. Were you robbed of a gold ring at any time? - Yes; on the 20th of March,(Friday) between the hours of nine and ten in the evening, I went down stairs to wish my hands, and I took my ring off my finger, and left it on a table in the kitchen, then I went up stairs and forgot my ring; in about ten minutes I went down stairs again, and there the prisoner was, with a little child about three years of age, and I asked her if she had seen it? she said she had not seen it. I suspected her, and I went up to Bow-street, and brought one of the officers, and he went with me to a place that she used in

White-house yard, Bridges-street, Covent-garden

Q. Where did you find her? - At her own lodgings; she was at a house at an acquaintance's; I don't know whether she lodged there, but we found her there.

Q. Did you ever find your ring again? - Yes, at a pawnbroker's in Bridges-street, the Monday after; he is here; he has it. It is a Bristol stone ring.

Q. How came she to be in the kitchen at the time. you wasned your hands? - She lodged there.

Q. In the same house you did? - Yes.

Q. How long had you known the prisoner? - About three months.

Q. Did you visit her on terms of friendship? - No, only lodge in the house.

Prisoner. I am innocent of it; it is a thing I never did. I wish to ask you whether you and I were not intimate acquaintances, and you and I had some words, and my landlady told you to do it out of spite? - I asked her about the ring, if she had it, or if she had made away with it; if she would tell me, I would take it out and forgive her.

Court to Prosecutrix. Had you any quarrel with her before you lost your ring? - Upon my oath I had not.

Q. There was no dispute but about the ring? - There was not.

Q. What is the value of this ring? - Five shillings.

WILLIAM KIRKHAM sworn.

Q. What are you? - A pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. Are you perfectly sure as to her person? - Yes.

Q. Had you seen her more than once at your house? - Yes, several times.

Q. Did she ever pawn any thing at your house? - Yes, on Saturday evening, the 21st of March, I received this ring in pledge from her.

Q. What did you lend her on it? - Three shillings and six-pence.

Q. What do you think the value of it may? - I suppose it is worth half a guinea to the wearer.

Q. What may the value of the gold he? - About four or five shillings.

Q. In what name did she pawn it? - In the name of Ann Giffen .

Q. Are you sure that she pawned it? - Yes, she has used the shop near a twelve month, backwards and forwards.

Prisoner. It was not me that pawned it, but somebody that used my name.

JOSHUA BAKER sworn.

I attend the office at Bow-street; I apprehended the prisoner last Monday, a court in that leads out of White Horse-yard into Charles-street.

Q. When you found her did the prosecutor charge her with taking this ring? - Yes; she told her she had got her ring, and the other denied it; before I took her to the office I went to the pawnbroker with the prosecutor and prisoner.

Q. How did you get to the pawnbroker? - I received that information from the prosecutor; she had found out by some means that the ring was there, by what means I don't know. I asked the pawnbroker if that was the person that had pawned the ring in question? he said it was.

Q. Did you see the ring there? - I did not till I came to the office.

Q. To Prosecutrix. How came you to find out the pawnbroker's? - I was informed to go there, because she used the house.

Q. Did you ever lend her this ring? - Never, I am perfectly sure of it.

Prisoner. I am innocent of it. If I had stole the ring I should not have carried it to a pawnbroker that knew me; I did not think a young woman of my acquaintance would have done such thing

to me; I was sorry to let my friends know that I was in such a predicament, and so I have nobody here.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-36

195. JOHN STUBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , twenty-seven pair of silk stockings, value 1l. 7s. and a silk handkerchief, value 3s. the goods of Samuel Woods .

SAMUEL WOODS sworn.

Q. What are you? - I am by profession a waiter .

Q. Did you at any time lose any silk stockings and handkerchief? - Yes; on the 13th of April, about half after seven in the evening, out of my bed room.

Q. Did you miss them at that time? - Yes.

Q. Where do you live? - At Hudson's Coffee house, New Bond-street .

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner at all? - No, I do not. My room was above stairs; going into the passage I see the prisoner going out into the area with them, down the steps; I asked him what he had got there? I see the bundle under his arm; he said it was a bundle the porter gave him; I could not immediately recollect of my own knowledge that it was my handkerchief or no.

Q. Did you let him go? - Yes, I did, and then I went up stairs to my room to satisfy myself.

Q. When you went into the room did you miss all the articles in the indictment? - Yes, I did.

Q. Did you pursue him? - Yes, I did.

Q. Was he stopped? - Yes, in Conduit-street; I see him stop him, the man that stopped him, stopped him till I got up to him, and I took the property from him, twenty-seven pair of silk stockings and an odd one, and a silk handkerchief.

Q. What may be the value of the stockings? - Twenty seven shillings.

Q. What may the value of the handkerchief be? - Three shillings.

Q. Did you know these stockings and handkerchief to be your's? - Yes, I did; I bought them of my master, a young man died, and my master was executor to the young man that died, and I bought the lot, about thirty four pair.

Q. Have they any letters or marks on them by which you can prove them to be your's? - Yes; Sir John Webber 's name is on two of the pair.

Q. Now, as to the handkerchief, was it a coloured silk handkerchief? - Yes.

Q. Was it a figured one? - Yes; there is a small burn in one corner.

Q. TELLY MACALLAUGH sworn.

Q. Do you live in this coffee house? - I did. When Mr. Woods see the prisoner going out of the coffee house he called me, and desired me to follow him, I did, I overtook him in Conduit-street, and he had the goods under his arm, and I stopped him till Mr. Woods came up, and Mr. Woods took the goods from him.

Q. Who has kept the goods ever since? - They lay in Mr. Hudson's Coffee house ever since; I brought them here.

Q. Are you sure you brought the same as you took from the prisoner? - Yes, I am.

Q. What were the goods? - Twenty-seven pair of silk stockings, an odd one, and a silk handkerchief.

Prisoner. The porter that lives where that gentleman does, is a very intimate and old acquaintance of mine, I had not seen him for a great while, and he over

took me a little before this in Piccadilly, and he asked me to go along with him, after I had took a share of a pot of beer with him, he bid me come down into the area, to take a little parcel for him to Conduit-street.

Court to Prosecutor. Is the porter in the house now? - No, he has been absent ever since that happened, nor I don't know where he is.

Q. To Macallaugh. At the time you took the prisoner, did he make any resistance? - No, he did not; he told me it was Joe, the porter, gave him the things.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-37

196. MARY ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a gallon pewter pot, value 5s. the goods of John Campbell .

JANE CAMPBELL sworn.

Q. What are you? - The wife of John Campbell , he keeps a public house , the sign of the Prince of Wales, in Holywell-lane .

Q. Did you lose a gollon pewter pot at any time, and when? - Yes, the 3d of last March, Tuesday.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take it? - I did not, my servant lost it, and he can give a better account of it than I can.

JOSEPH BARRETT sworn.

Q. Are you a servant to Mr. Campbell? - Yes.

Q. Have you the care of the pots? - Yes, I got them all in. On the 3d of March, Tuesday, I was getting my pots in the morning, and I had this gallon pot on my rope, and I laid them down under the cook shop window in Holywell-lane; I reckon it to be between eleven and twelve o'clock. In laying them down I put the gallon pot at the head of the rope, and while I went up the passage at the corner of the cook shop for a pot, when I came down again, the gentlewoman of the cook shop came out to the door, and asked me if I missed any thing? I told her I missed a gallon pot; she pointed to Mary Roberts, and said that that woman in an old red clock stooped to pick up something, she did not know what; I ran after her, and just by the Crown, I found her up in a corner, between two trees, inside of the palisades, with the gallon pot by the side of her, on the ground close by her; I took up the gallon pot, and looked at it, and saw my master's name on it; and I asked her how she came to take it? and she said she did it for want; I see a young woman, and desired her to run home and inform my master; when she came to my master, my master was out, and my mistress came and took the gallon pot from the side of her, and asked her how she came to take it? and she told her the same as she told me before, that she did it for want.

Q. Who has had the care of that pot ever since, you or your mistress? - My master and mistress together; they were ordered by the justice to put it up, and not to use it, and it has been laid by ever since.

Q. To Mrs. Campbell. Did you see the woman in this situation, with the pot by her? - I took the pot up from the ground.

Q. And you have kept it till now? - I have locked it up, my husband's name is on it.

Prisoner. I was going for some water, and it being hard weather, I took the pot to drive it out, as I was going to the

cistern for it; I had the pail in my hand, and took the pot, knowing Mr. Campbell I thought I might take the liberty of using it.

Q. To Prosecutrix. What did she say to you about the pot? - She said she was in great distress, and took it for want.

Prisoner. When Mrs. Campbell was sent for and came up to me, she took the pot from me, and bid me go about my business, and let me go about my business, and it was above an hour after, and I had brought my water home, before Mr. Campbell took me in my room,

Q. To prosecutor. Is that true? - It is.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a very good character, said she got her livelihood under the protection of her father.

GUILTY . (Aged 25)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-38

197. ELIZABETH HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , two pair of linen sheets, value 1l a linen pillow case, value 1s. a cloth riding habit, value 6s. a callico bed gown, value 18d: the goods of Mary Bailey .

MARY BAILEY sworn.

I live in St. Martin's-lane ; the prisoner lived with me about six weeks; I missed them articles from my own lodings.

Q. How lately had you seen any of these things before you missed them? - I believe it was about a fortnight before I missed them; the habit was put into a deal box and unlocked, the sheets were in a large trunk, which I always keep looked, the bed gown was taken out of the closet, I cannot tell whether it was locked or no.

Q. When did you see any of your things again? - I see them in about a fortnight after I missed them, at the pawnbroker's, he is here in court. The prisoner was a servant , I had discharged her about an hour before I found the things; they are not all found, only the riding habit, one sheet and bed gown.

Q. Did you find the trunk locked that you used to keep the sheet in? - Yes.

GEORGE WOOD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, No. 39, Green-street, Liecester-fields; I produce a sheet, a riding habit, and a bed gown.

Q. Where did you get these things? - Of the prisoner at the bar. On the 11th of February, she brought the riding habit for six shillings, to pawn; she said she pledged it for one Mrs. Byot, in St. Martin's-street.

Q. What name did she give herself? - Harrison. On the 19th of February, she brought a bed gown for eighteen-pence.

Q. Did you know her before this? - Not to my knowledge. She brought that for Mrs. Byot. On the 21st she brought a sheet for five shillings, for Mrs. Byot; that was the day she was taken up; I see her when she was in custody.

Prosecutrix. The riding habit I know to be mine, it is rather old fashioned; the sheet is marked, the bed gown is mine.

Prisoner. I don't know of any thing but that one sheet and the bed gown.

GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-39

198. THOMAS WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , a black bonnet, value 1s. the goods of Robert Moggeridge ; and SARAH WATKINS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

AMELIA ADSLEY sworn.

Thomas Watkins came into the shop where I live at Mr. and Mrs. Moggeridges;(they keep a milliner's shop in Glanwin-street ,) on the 11th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, he said he wanted to see a bonnet; I took one out of the window to shew him.

Q. Did you deliver it to him? - He wanted to take it out of my hand, and I refused letting him have it because I was afraid he would spoil it. He said he would not hurt it; then he pointed to another which was in the window, I took that out; he took it from my hand and ran away with it.

Q. Did he say any thing before he ran away with it; ask you the price of it? - No. I made an alarum, the people ran after him and pursued him, and took him into custody immediately.

Q. Where is the bonnet? - I have it here.

Q. Where did you get it from? - One of the officers of Marlborough-street brought it to our shop the day after.

Prisoner. She gave me the bonnet to look at: I did not take it out of her hand. It is the first fact I ever did in my life time, and poverty was the cause of doing it.

Q. Is Sarah Watkins your wife? - No, we are not married.

Thomas Watkins, GUILTY.(Aged 38)

Judgement respited .

Sarah Watkins , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17950416-40

199. HARRIOT COOPER, otherwise SUSANNA CLARKE , was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of Ann Capelen , spinster , on the 12th of March , a silver thimble, value 1s. 6s. a silk purse value 3s. forty-eight guineas, and two 10l. bank notes, the property of the said Ann Capelen .

ANN CAPELEN sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - No. 15, Steven-street, Rathbone-dlace .

Q. You are a single woman? - Yes.

Q. Did you at any time lose any property? - Yes.

Q. You occupy the whole house? - Yes, we lost a tea-spoon and other things out of the house before this robbery; but we did not suspect this woman.

Q. When was this committed? - On the 12th of March on the night I went to bed the money was in the beaufet, thirteen guineas in a caddy in a silk purse with gold tassels, and two bank notes of ten pounds each, and a silver thimble in a little box on the side board. I see her using it the night before though she did not ask me to use it, it was not my own, but a person lent it me, I was answerable for it.

Q. Was the prisoner your servant? - Yes.

Q. How long had she been your servant? - She had been my servant rather better then five months.

Q. Do you know by whom this property was taken? - I am confident it was taken by her and nobody else.

Q. Was any of it ever found afterwards? - No; we never got any of it. There was nobody up in the house when she quitted it.

Q. Was the prisoner in the house the night before, when you went to bed? - Yes.

Q. That was on the 11th? - Yes, and on the 18th she robbed me.

Q. Had she taken her clothes with her? - No, she left some part of her clothes in the room where she slept, and some in the kitchen.

Q. Had she taken any of her things away? - Yes, as near as I can guess, she had taken away a couple of gowns, and what she had on her back besides.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning? - I did not get up very early, because I was very unwell.

Q. When did you see her again? - Never till the constable took her; she robbed me on the 12th, and he took her on the Tuesday following.

Q. The time of her service was not expired when she went? - No, I hired her weekly, and paid her weekly, and agreed with her for a week's warning; and the Monday before her week was up, I had not silver to pay her, and when I had not silver to pay her, I used to let it go for a fortnight, that time her week's wages was not paid.

Q. Were you present when she was taken? - No.

Q. Were you present when any search was made? - Not when the first search was made; afterwards I searched her.

Q. Was any thing found on that search? - Nothing.

Q. What does your family consist of? - There are two lodgers, one person in the first floor, who had her own servant to sleep with her, and the witness Sarah Willis in the second floor, but neither of them were up when she left the house.

SARAH WILLIS sworn.

Q. You lodge in Mrs. Capelen's house? - Yes.

Q. How long had you lodged there before the 12th of March? - Four months; the prisoner came into my room early on the morning of the 12th, about half after seven.

Q. Were you in bed? - Yes. She asked me the hour; I told her I did not know, she might come to my bed side and look at my watch; she then made answer to me, and said it was half after seven, I told her she had taken care to get up early enough.

Q. What had been the usual time of getting up? - A little before eight, or eight. There was a woman coming to me in the morning, and she asked me if that woman was to come up to me? I told her, yes; and when that woman came, she came up with her, and went down stairs again.

Q. Did the woman that she brought up stay all the time in your room? - Yes, she then told me that she was obliged to go Mrs. Hatter's for her mistress before nine o'clock to fetch the clothes home that she had given her, I told her then she must go immediately, for it was twenty minutes after eight then, she then asked me if I please to want any thing brought in? I told her no, and I never saw the prisoner again till she was taken.

Q. Were you up that morning before Mrs. Capelen, or after? - Before.

Q. Were you up before or after the other lodgers? - I was up first, the maid was up before me.

Q. Did you go down stairs soon after you got up? - Yes.

Q. In what condition did you find the doors? - I found them all shut.

Q. Locked and bolted as usual? - No, I found the street door unbolted.

Q. Do you know any thing more of this business? - No, only I lost my cloak.

Q. You did not find it again? - No, I did not.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner at the bar was taken? - No, not when she was first taken; I was there when we stripped her, and did not find any thing.

Q. Who was it took her? - The runners, in Sussex.

Q. To Prosecutrix. Had you ordered her that morning to go to Mrs. Hatter's? - No; it was two handkerchiefs that she gave Mrs. Hatter the night before to clear starch, and she could not have done them by that morning, and I had desired her never to go out, or leave the house when I was out or in bed, on no account.

Mrs. HATTER sworn.

Q. How far do you live from Mrs. Capelen? - Not far.

Q. On the 12th of March, did the prisoner come to you in the morning? - No, sir, she did not; I see her at half past ten the night before, when I fetched the handkerchief that she said she was come to fetch; I know nothing more than that she lodged with me; and she said it would serve her mistress right to rob her; she had been with her once and went away, and went back, in the mean time she lodged with me.

Q. What were the very words? - She said, that she wished some body would rob her, that she had a great deal of money.

Q. Did not you remonstrate with her on this conduct? - I did not.

Q. Did you tell Mrs. Capelen of this? - I did not.

Q. Do you know where the woman came from? - I do not.

Prisoner. I live with Mrs. Adsley, No. 15, Steven-street; she used to receive company, and used to go to the play every night; there were two other lodgers in the house, which used to see different company all hours in the night, she came from the play the night before.

Court to Mrs. Willis. Had any strangers been in the house that evening? - There had not been a man in the house that evening, no stranger, I am certain of it.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-41

200. WILLIAM BIRD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Ellis , about the hour of ten in the night, on the 13th of January , and stealing two live sows, price 4l. and fifteen live pigs, price 4l. the goods of John Bastick .

JOHN BASTICK sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - In the East Lodge, Enfield Chace , with Captain Monro, I lodge on his premises, in the East Lodge; I am hired by the week at thirteen shillings a week; I look after his beasts ; I pay his gardener one shilling a week for my lodging; it is the gardener's bed; it is the captain's house, but the gardener has his lodging in it. I lost fifteen pigs and two sows the 13th of January, my own property.

Q. Where were they lost from? - Out of this Mr. Ellis's premises; he is a man that lives just by, facing the captain's gate. I gave a boy four shillings a week to look after them in the wood, where I had a right to turn them, and so the boy came to take them home at night; they were taken into Robert Ellis 's stables, that is where they were stolen from.

Q. How long was it you had seen them before they were taken? - Upon my word I cannot recollect.

Q. When was it that you received any information about their being lost? - They were lost the 13th at night, and I went up the 14th in the morning, and they were missing.

Q. Did you ever see them again after that time? - Not till I see them at Dagnam, in Essex.

Q. Who had them there when you see them? - One Biggs, a baker.

Q. Did you know them to be your's? - Yes.

Q. How long had he had them? - Very nigh three months; I cannot say how long.

Q. When did you see any thing of the prisoner? - I don't know that I see any

thing of the prisoner till I see him since he has been taken. This man sold them to Biggs.

Q. Were there the same number? - Yes, seven sow pigs and eight boar pigs, very remarkable; the boar pigs were not cut, and two old sows.

JOHN BAKER sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - In the parish of Westham, on the forest, at the forest gate; I deal in pigs; I buy them to sell again; I am a pig jobber; I bought one sow and fifteen pigs of Bird the prisoner, on the 14th of January, in the pens of Romford.

Q. About what time of the day? - One o'clock, as near as possible. There were two sows, but I bought one sow of another man that Bird sold it to.

Q. Then when you first see them there, were two sows and fifteen pigs together? - Yes. He said he had been at Walford market with them, and could not sell them, and came across the country to Romford.

Q. Did he tell you what his name was? - No, I did not ask him his name. He said he brought them from Enfield Highway. There was another man along with him, and they both said the same. He asked me first for the pigs eight shillings a piece; I told him that I thought five shillings was nearer the mark. He said he had been bid six shillings, and I told him I could not afford to give any more; and I was going away, and then he asked me what I would give him for the sow, and I bargained for the sow at eighteen shillings; and as I was going away, he said I should have the pigs at my price, five shillings a piece. After that the other man that had bought the other sow of me said, as you have bought all the rest, you may as well buy the other sow.

Q. Did you see him sell the other sow to the other man? - No. It was in the same pen along with the other. And he and I bargained for the other sow at seventeen shillings. Then we went into the King's Head, at Romford, altogether, for to pay for them. The other red haired man went with me that was with Bird, and my neighbour that is here now, and see me pay for them. When we got in there, I think we had three pots of purl and gin, and I could not pay him that I bought the sow of without changing a guinea; he said it did not make no odds, if I paid all the money altogether, and so the prisoner Bird took the money, five pounds ten shillings. Then afterwards, when we came out, I went to the pen, and sold the pig again to Mr. John Biggs, a master baker, at Tottenham.

Q. What did you sell them for? - Eighteen pence a head profit of the pigs, and the two sows for fifty shillings.

Q. That is a considerable profit, on them? - It is no more than I often get, or often lose. I went home to the baker's house to help him to drive them, and received the money for them at his house, and I came away home to my own house, I never heard any thing till that day fortnight, when I see two drovers who were going down the road, who had seen them in the market, and was going down to shew Bastick where the pigs were. He had offered two guineas reward for the recovery of the pigs. I went to Romford market, and this man that lost them came to me at Romford market, and told me that them pigs I sold were stolen.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again, how soon after? - I never see nothing more of him till last Friday, when I see him at the office in Hog-lane; I described him as well as I could, and they took him, and that was the man.

Q. You are very sure that you dealt with him for these pigs? - Yes.

Q. You had never seen him before this time? - Not to my knowledge. Bastick went two or three times after the pigs be

fore the man would deliver them, and then I returned the money to Biggs, what I told them to him for.

Prisoner. I am innocent so far, as they swear to the wrong man.

Court to Baker. How long were you with the prisoner bargaining about these pigs and paying him for them? - I suppose about an hour, or somewhere there abouts.

SAMUEL ONLEY sworn.

I live near Baker, in the parish of Westham, the forest gate, near the Eagle and Child. I went that day along with Baker from our own house to Romford that market day, and I went round the market and when I returned back again to him he was marking these pigs, he was talking with the prisoner at the bar, and another.

Q. What past in your hearing between the prisoner and Baker at that time? - Nothing further till we got in doors, no further than he bought a single sow of the butcher back again.

Q. At the public house what past? - Nothing no otherwise then I sat at the table and drank a little liquor, and I entered into conversation along with these two men.

Q. What past? - Nothing passed than that Baker paid the money to these two men.

Q. Was the prisoner either of these two men? - Yes; he received the money and sold the property.

Q. Did he pay him the money for both sows and pigs or for only one sow? - For both sows together.

Q. Did you hear any conversation pass between the prisoner and any other person respecting where the pigs came from and how he had them? - No further than he said they stood at a great deal of expence of keeping them in the winter and he could not get victuals for them to eat.

Q. Did he represent he had the keeping of them in the winter? - Yes; and they lost a great deal of money by them; he said if he had not sold them there, he should have sent them to Smithfield before he went home; and I was going home with another person, in a cart; and between the Coach and Horses, at Hollford, and the Three Rabbits, there is a white gate, which leads up to squire Hulk's, there I see four of them together, the prisoner and three more.

Q. Did you leave them in the public house? - No, I came out with them, and saw Baker sell the pigs to Biggs, the four men seemed as if they were parting their money.

Q. Had you seen any of these men before that day? - I thought I had seen one of them before, and I asked him a great many questions about Ponder's-end. I kept on, and left them.

Q. Had you any conversation, with the prisoner at that time? - No, I never spoke to him. The next day I told Baker I thought the pigs were stolen; and the fortnight after this, this man, Mr. Bastick, came after his property; he came and slept on Wednesday night in John Baker's house, then the next morning I went along with him to this captain Monro's.

Q. Did you ever go to Biggs, the baker? - Yes, I have been at Dagnan many a time.

Q. But did you ever go about these pigs? - Never.

Q. Did you ever see any thing of the pigs after they were sold to Biggs, the baker? - No; I went to captain Monro's house, and I lay there that night, the next day I went to Enfield highway, where the prisoner said he came from, at Romford, by our giving such a good description of the people, they gave us the best advice they could, whereabouts to find them, and we went then to Baker-

street, which is little way out of Enfield-road; we went to this other man's house, who was along with this man when he sold the property; we saw him at home at his own house; I would have taken him, but I had not a warrant. The prisoner was not there.

Q. Where did you go after? - We went to Mr. Spurrell, at Barton, and Mr. Spurrell granted out a warrant against this man, the prisoner at the bar. They gave us four names; by the description we gave, and he bearing but an indifferent character.

Q. Did you go to find him again? - I did not go after them again, but Mr. Spurrell sent the constable of Hilford, and Baker, and there they found him.

Q. When did you see him? - Never before last Friday, and then he was in custody.

Q. Do you mean that they gave you the names of four different persons which answered the description that you gave of the man, or four different names of one person? - Of four different persons.

Q. You never see the prisoner till last Friday, when he was in custody? - No.

Q. Then having not seen the prisoner the time it happened, till last Friday, will you undertake to swear that he is the man? - Yes, I can very safely; when he sold the pigs he had the smock frock on, and a silk handkerchief about his neck, and a high crowned hat on.

Prisoner. False swearing, my Lord.

GEORGE LAW sworn.

I suspected this man from the description I had given of him, and I took him; I am out of office, I took him last Thursday, in Enfield highway, he lived at Winchmore-hill.

Q. Where was he when you apprehended him? - Walking at the side of the road, at Enfield highway; I took him by the collar, and told him that I suspected that he was the person concerned in stealing the pigs; there had been different pigs stole.

Q. What did you say? - I told him that I was surprised that he should be about the neighbourhood, when he was suspected of stealing the pigs; and he told me that he did not know that he was suspected; he told me I was very busy, and when I took him by the collar he told me he would not go with me, without I shewed him my authority; I told him he was my authority, and he said he would not go with me, and he began to pull away, but I held him fast; he swore he would knock me down; I told him it was out of his power to knock me down; he told me I should be done; I told him it was out of his power, and I called a man out of the house, just by, one Boswell, a taylor; and he went in again, and two soldiers coming by, which I knew one of them, I called to one of them by his name, one Ralph, and told him I had got a thief, and one of them assisted me; and we met the headborough; I had sent for him; then I sent for Mr. Bastick, and took him to the cage; the next morning I brought him to town, and persuaded him to turn evidence, for I was sure he was concerned, by the description I had heard of him. There was no prosecutor appeared that day, only the person that bought the sow and pigs, and they said they could swear to him; they thought to admit him an evidence then, but afterwards one Pepper was taken, and admitted an evidence; Bird owned to me of the robbery after he came away from the magistrate's.

Prisoner. False swearing. I have nothing to say but false swearing; I have nobody here, I had not an opportunity of getting any friends.

GUILTY, Of stealing the goods, but not of

breaking and entering, or stealing in the dwelling house . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-42

201. LEWIS BONNEVENTO was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, being moved and instigated by the Devil, on the 2d of April , feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did make an assault on Jack Unscampraw ; and that with a certain large clasp knife, the said Jack, in and upon the right side of his back, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did stick, thrust, stab, and penetrate, thereby giving to him a mortal wound, of the depth of four inches, and of the width of one inch; of which he languished, and languishingly didlive until the 3d of the same month of April, and then died ; and so the jurors, on their oath, say, that he the said Jack Unscampraw , did kill and murder.

Indicted also for the same murder, on the Coroner's inquisition.

An INTERPRETER sworn.

THOMAS RAPOLO sworn.

Q. I believe you live near Artichoke-lane, in the parish of St. George's ? - Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner and the deceased lodge at your house at the time that this melancholy affair took place? - The deceased lodged seven months with me.

Q. Has the prisoner lodged in the same house? - Yes, one month.

Q. When did this business happen? - The 2d of this month, at supper time, about nine o'clock; the men were at supper altogether.

Q. How many together? - I cannot tell, because he just came in, and began to abuse, began to quarrel and use bad language to all, sometimes to one, and sometimes to another; then I went into the room, and begged, for God's sake, that he would be quiet, several times; he began then to abuse me with bad language, and then he got up and went to strike me; he did not strike me; the other men there laid hold of him, and prevented him from striking me, and pushed me into my own room; they took me and the man that died, and put us into my own room.

Q. Before these persons took you and the man that was killed, and put you into your own room, had any blows passed between Bonnevento and the man that is dead? - No; I sat there, and the man that is dead, and my wife, were trying to make peace, not to have a quarrel.

Q. How long did you stay there? - About half an hour. I cannot recollect certain, it is impossible. The prisoner then came and opened my door.

Q. Had he any thing at that time in his hand? - No, I never see nothing.

Q. Did he say any thing? - He never spoke, but opened the door, and Scampraw flew to the door after him.

Q. What happened then? - I never see any thing, only I heard a noise in the passage.

Q. Did Scampraw fly to the prisoner in a passionate manner? - Yes, as if he was going to quarrel with him.

Q. Was the noise which you heard in the passage, like the noise of people fighting together? - Yes.

Q. Did you judge from the noise you heard, that they were fighting together? - I heard them knocking down one another.

Q. What happened after that? - I sent for the watchman.

Q. Did you see Bonnevento and Scampraw at any time during the time they were scuffling together? - No, I did not.

Q. How came you to send for the watchman? - Because there was such a noise I thought they would make a mischief in the house.

Q. When did you first learn that any mischief had been done? - I opened the door, and a man just came out of the other room, and cried, I am dead! I am dead!

Q. Was that after you sent for the watchman? - Yes.

Q. When you heard the struggling in the passage, what means did you take to send for the watchman? Did you go through the passage? - No, my wife threw up the window. I called several times.

Q. Then you opened the door? - And somebody put Scampraw into my room again, and he said, I am dead.

Q. Did you hear Scampraw lay that before the watchman came in, or after? - I went down to open the door for the watchman, and I heard him say so, and and then I went and see him lay down in my room.

Q. You see him laying on the floor? - Yes.

Q. Was he bloody? - Yes, he was stabbed; the blood came from the right arm, and the back, in great quantities.

Q. When you first see this man, with the blood flowing from him, where was. Bonnevento at that time? - In the back room, and this was it the fore room.

Q. Did you see Bonnevento afterwards? - Yes.

Q. Had he got any weapon of any kind? - No, I never see any weapon, or any thing.

Q. What became of the deceased after he had received the wounds? - He was sent to the hospital, they told me he died at six o'clock; I never see him dead.

Prisoner. At the time we were quarrelling together, I stood in my own defence, and he cut me to pieces.

MARY RAPOLO sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Rapolo.

Q. These two men, Bonnevento and the deceased, lodged at your house? - Yes.

Q. What was the first that you observed of any difference between the deceased and this man? - I never observed any thing till the evening; I believe to the best of my knowledge it was about half past eight when the deceased came in to sup.

Q. Were there any other persons at supper with him? - Yes.

Q. How many other persons were in the house? - The table was laid for the compliment of lodgers that are in the house, the cloth was laid for the whole ten that lodged in the house at that time. I heard a dispute after they were at supper; my husband and myself were settling the accounts of the nine men that were going away, and my husband went in to demand peace, several times; I followed my husband into the room; finding the noise grew higher, and seeing one man of one side of the table, and one on the other, I cleared the table of the knives and forks directly.

Q. Who do you mean by one on one side and one on the other? - The prisoner and the deceased.

Q. Was there any dispute? - Yes, there was, the people in the room endeavoured to separate them.

Q. Had they then got together? - No, I never see them together. One of the evidences, John Doberwick , took the deceased in his arms, and carried him into my room, and I kept hold of him, I shut the door, and held the deceased by the hand, and said, dear Jem, don't go out again to have any more words; and he said, no madam, my passion is over; he

was about five minutes with us, and then he said he would go out; and I said, pray do go; and he went on the outside of the door, and the words he expressed were, that he was going to meet his wife. I was going to shut the street door after him, and I see him return to the door again; and I took hold of his hand and said, pray, Jem, don't go back again to cause more words; and he said, I must speak to Mr. Thomas, (he called my husband Mr. Thomas,) for he must go off the next morning at half after six. He came into the house, and the words he expressed were, he had left his beer on the table; and I catched him by the jacket, and I said, Jem, you shall not go into that room. He was going into the same room where Bonnevento was, but I pushed him into ours. I told him there was beer in our room, and he might go and drink there. He was not in a passion at all then.

Q. Did the deceased at that time appear to be in a passion? - Not the least. He went into my room very kindly.

Q. How long was he there before any thing took place? - I shut the door, and the evidence that is here, and another man, had been out to buy provision, what they call their sea stock, and they were to settle with me, and all the time Bonnevento was very noisy, and he is very troublesome in liquor, but when sober quite the reverse.

Q. How was the deceased with respect to liquor? - He did not perceive to be the least the worse for liquor. After we had settled the accounts of these two men, the evidence and another, and then the account of the deceased was just settled, when the prisoner came to the door. My husband ran to keep him from coming into the room, and the deceased followed him.

Q. Did either the deceased or the prisoner appear at this time to be in a passion? - The prisoner appeared to be in a passion; the deceased was in serious discourse with us about going away when the door was opened.

Q. But when the prisoner opened the door, did the deceased appear to be in a passion? - My flurry was too great to express that; but I endeavoured to catch the deceased by the collar, and he kicked me, but whether through haste of going away, or to prevent me holding him, I cannot say; after that, I found it was impossible to endeavour to separate them; they got into a hustle in the passage, and I threw up the sash, and opened the shutters, and jumped out of the window to call assistances.

Q. Were you present when the wound was given? - No, I was not present, nor in the house for above an hour after. I see the deceased when he was laying in the room, and I said, O Jem! and he said, O Ma'am! that was all he said.

Q. Do you know how long he lived after? - Not after half after six in the morning; that was the time that he exexpressed so often that he would go off.

Q. Did you see any knife? - I see the prisoner have a knife in his hand about a fortnight before.

Q. Did you see a knife afterwards? - I did, it was all blood by the appearance of it; I think it was the same knife I saw in the hand of the prisoner. I take my oath, and God forbid I should say false.

Mr. Knapp. You say that during the time that he had lodged with you, you had observed him to be of a good disposition when he was sober? - A very quiet man.

Q. What sort of a man was the man that he unfortunately killed? - A very peaceable man.

JOHN DOBERWICK sworn.

Q. Were you in the house at the time

Bonnevento and Scampraw were together? - I was.

Q. They had no words together at all? - I did not hear it. I see them sit on the chair and had a few words, and then the landlord came into the room, and persuaded him to be quiet, and the prisoner at the bar put his hand on the landlord, because he told him to be quiet. He was drunk, and the deceased took the part of the landlord. Then I took the landlord and brought him to the fore parlour, and then I took Jemmy, the deceased, and likewise brought him to the parlour; then Jemmy, after he was in the fore parlour, he would go to the next parlour, where we eat and drank likewise.

Q. In the other parlour where Bonnevento was? - Yes; then the mistress told Jemmy, the deceased, not to go there, but she would bring the beer to the room; then they staid a little while, and the deceased got up and opened the parlour, and then the prisoner was at the door.

Q. Did one parlour open into the other? - No, they both open in the same passage.

Q. Was the prisoner in that passage? - He was, then the deceased came out of the room, and they began to fight again in the entry.

Q. Do you know who struck first? - I did not see the first brow. They were fighting together, and some others endeavoured to part them from each other. They fought a very little time. Then Jemmy, the deceased, went into the other room; he had broke his buckle, and he put his foot on the chair; then the prisoner went to the room door, and he took a knife out of his pocket, and went into the room, and looked round, and began to strike him. He opened the knife at the door, it was a sailor's knife; he began to strike the deceased with his knife.

Q. In what posture was the deceased when Bonnevento struck him? - He had his foot on the chair to mend his buckle, and when he felt the stroke, he left mending his buckle, and I took the prisoner by the hand, and I said, what are you about, I ewy?

Q. Did you say that to Bonneveno before he struck him, or after? - After he struck him.

Q. What were the effect of the blows? - The first was in his arm, the next was in his bosom, and the third was below the breast, but the fourth did not touch him. On his jacket were four holes, but in his body but three.

Q. What became of the deceased after he received these wounds? - He went into the parlour where the master of the house was, and I pushed Bonnevento into a corner of the room.

Q. At the time that the deceased received the blows, was he speaking to Bonnevento, or did he see him? - The deceased said to this prisoner, in Spanish, I will have your life to-night.

Q. When did he say that? - While I was holding of him, before he received the blows.

Q. Did you see him when he died? - I went to see him to the hospital.

ABRAHAM MARTIN sworn.

Q. I believe you are one of the pupils attending the London Hospital? - Yes.

Q. Did you see the deceased? - Yes, about twelve o'clock at night, the day the accident took place. He had a wound on the lower and back part of the chest, which had penetrated the cavity, and wounded the lungs. There was a wound on the arm, which penetrated the substance of his arm.

Q. Which was the mortal wound? - That on the chest.

Q. And is it your opinion that that

was mortal, and occasioned his death? - It certainly is my opinion so.

GUILTY, Of manslaughter only . (Aged 46.)

Imprisoned one year in his Majesty's gaol of Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by a Jury of half Foreigners and half English, before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-43

202. WILLIAM BIRD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Beckett and Francis Ostliff , on the 10th of February , and burglariously stealing therein eight, live hogs, price 40s. the goods of the said William Beckett and Francis Ostliff .

WILLIAM BECKETT sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - At Enfield , a brewer , I have one partner, Francis Ostliff.

Q. Do you keep house jointly? - It belongs to us both; we live in separate houses; the premises belong to us both.

Q. Who lives in the house where the pigs were taken away? - Mr. Ostliff alone.

Q. What have you to say as to the loss of the pigs? - On the night of the 4th of February we lost eight of them.

Q. Whose property were they? - Joint property of me and Mr. Ostliff.

Q. Where did you lose them from? - The sty in the brewhouse yard, in the yard of the house where Ostliff lives.

Q. Do you know who took them? - No.

Q. When did you see them again? - On the Tuesday following.

Q. What day was the 4th? - I think it was Wednesday.

Q. Where did you see them then? - I received a letter from Mr. Cottrel, who is a contractor for Government.

Q. Where did you see them? - At a house in Kent-street, in the Borough, at the house of Thomas Bell .

Prisoner. I have nothing to say; I never saw the property.

THOMAS BELL sworn.

Them eight pigs I bought of William Bird , on the 5th of February, and another man that was along with him.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner is the man that you bought them of? - Yes, I am sure of it; he said he bought them at Guildford market on the Saturday before.

Q. What day of the week was the 5th? - On Thursday.

Q. What did you give him for them? - Seventeen pounds nineteen shillings.

Q. Were they full grown? - Yes.

Q. What is become of these pigs, where are they? - Mr. Beckett and Mr. Ostliff has them.

Prisoner. I am not the man, it is very false.

Court to Beckett. You say you lost these pigs on the night of the 4th of February, had you yourself seen them on the 4th of February? - I cannot call to memory, but I have a man here can.

EDWARD RAPLEY sworn.

Q. You are servant to Mr. Beckett? - Yes.

Q. When had you seen the eight pigs that were lost on the 4th of February? - The night before they were lost, I see them that night between five and six o'clock, when the boy fed them they were fastened up with a chain and iron pin.

Q. Have you seen the pigs since? - I found five pigs alive on Mr. Bell's premises. I am sure they are the same.

Q. To Beckett. Do you know your own pigs again? - This man knew better than I did.

Rapley. After I found the pigs, I went to the office and got a warrant, and went with two runners, and fetched the hogs, and locked them up till the next day.

Prisoner. I am very innocent of the matter; I never was on the man's premises in my life.

GUILTY, Of stealing, but not of the burglary .(Aged 30.)(See No. 200.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before

Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17950416-44

203. ANN ARCHER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Peter Exton , Lydia his wife, and Mary Perry , spinster, being therein, on the 21st of February , and feloniously stealing therein nine silk handkerchiefs, value 20s. the goods of the said Peter Exton .

PETER EXTON sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - In Brick-lane, Spitalfields .

Q. Have you a house there? - Yes.

Q. Have you a house all to yourself? - I have got two lodgers. I pay the rent of the house.

Q. Do you know of any thing being lost? - Not one rush; I know nothing but the property.

MARY PERRY sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - No. 10, Brick-lane, Mr. Exton's is No. 7. I was at Mr. Exton's on the 21st of February, about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Who did you find at the house when you was there? - Mr. Exton's wife. I was in Mr. Exton's shop.

Q. What shop does Mr. Exton keep? - A haberdasher 's.

Q. Was Mrs. Exton there at the same time? - She was in the back parlour, joining the shop; the prisoner came to the window; she did not come in; she looked at it for some time; she struck at the window, but did not break the first time; she struck it with her fist.

Q. How near were you to the window at the time? - Behind the counter, being near the window.

Q. She could see you through? - She did see me. She then went away; I then went to the door and looked at her; she got about three door off as I got to the door; she looked at me very earnestly indeed.

Q. You said nothing to her? - No. In about ten minutes afterwards I heard the break of the glass.

Q. You returned to the shop again? - Yes.

Q. Had you seen any body again before you heard the glass break? - No, I had not.

Q. You heard the window break? - Yes, and I looked, and I missed a piece of silk handkerchiefs from it.

Q. Did you see them taken out of the window? - No, I did not.

Q. Whereabouts where these laying, how near to the window? - On a board that lay slanting at the window.

Q. Were they within the reach of a person's arm from the window? - Yes.

Q. Was the pane entirely broke, or only a small part of it? - Entirely broke.

Q. Did you miss any thing? - No. I went to the door, and I see the woman running; I cried out, stop thief, and she was taken with the handkerchiefs on her.

Q. Did you see her stopped? - Yes.

Q. How far from the door? - I look upon it to be about one hundred yards.

Q. You did not lose sight of her till she was stopped? - No.

Q. Was she brought back to the shop? - Yes. The handkerchiefs were found on her; we had not dropped them.

Q. You see them found? - Yes, they are here.

Q. What did she say? - I did not hear her say any thing.

Q. Now you are very sure that she is the woman that first struck the window? - Yes, she is.

Q. Had you ever seen her before that you know of? - Not before that evening.

Q. What was done with the handkerchiefs? - They were taken to the Police Office; from there they were delivered to Mr. Yorke the person who took her.

THOMAS YORKE sworn.

On the 21st of February last, about five o'clock in the evening, I was standing in my own shop, and I heard the cry of stop thief.

Q. How near is your shop to Mr. Exton's-Mine is No. 11 and his is No. 7. I went to the door, and I saw the prisoner at the bar running about the space of ten yards past my house; I ran and I overtook her, and I found this piece of handkerchiefs.

Q. Which way was she running? - From Mr. Exton's shop towards Spitalfields church. I suppose she might run about seventy or eighty yards before I took her. I asked her where she got these handkerchiefs from?

Q. Were had she them when you stopped her? - Right open in her hand as I have got them now. I took them from her. She gave me no answer. I brought her back to the house; Mr. Exton was not within. I took her down to the office and she seemed to think very slight of it. She told me she knew who did it but she would never tell; but she told the magistrate afterwards that a woman persuaded her to break the glass.

Q. I suppose her examination was taken in writing, in course before the magistrate? - Yes, it was.

Q. What did you do with the handkerchiefs? - Kept them in my possession.(The handkerchiefs produced.)

Prosecutor. They are mine, I know them by the shop mark on them, marked to sell for five shillings and sixpence a piece.

Q. To Perry. Though you heard the window break you did not see any hand put in? - No, I did not.

Prisoner. I had been to Windfield-street, to an acquaintance of mine, and as I was coming home crossing Brick-lane I see these handkerchiefs, lay and I picked them up, and I carried them along open in my hand, to see if any body would own them.

GUILTY, Of stealing but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-45

204. JAMES JAMISON was indicted, for that he, on the 7th of March , with an certain offensive weapon and instrument called a pistol, which he in his hand had and held, on William Williams , in the peace of our Lord the King, feloniously and maliciously did make an assault, with intent to rob him of his goods and monies .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street , a supernumerary man, ever since last October. On the 7th of March I was going off from Smithfield . It was about half past eleven at night. I came to the corner of the New Compter, and I saw this man, and another, and two women standing, and a coach coming by, as soon

as soon as ever I came up, he turned about made a very bad expression, and said, who was I? and knocked me down directely, cut both my lips, and grazed both my cheek bones; it was not the prisoner at the bar, another man that was with him.

Q. What did he knock you down with? - With his fist of his left hand, I called out to the watchman, and he sprung his rattle directly. The prisoner he did something to the watchman; he seemed to be some where near the watchman, what he did I don't know, he had a hat box in his hand and off he ran. We closely pursued him, and he had his pistol in his right hand, and he said d-n your eyes keep off, or else I will shoot you.

Q. Did he present the pistol to you? - Yes he did.

Jury. Why did he present it to you? - We were pursuing him, knowing him to be in company with the man that knocked me down, and seeing him with a pistol we pursued him. We followed him as far as the Grey-friars and there we got to him.

Q. Did you lose sight of him? - Yes I did, but others see him and told me of him.

Q. Were did you find him? - Behind the corner of a dust bin, lying on his face, the pistol was found about twenty yards from him, between some casks that had some dry goods in them, something like some old sugar casks.

Q. What became of the other man and women? - I did not see. The prisoner he said nothing, only what he said when he presented the pistol to me. The man that knocked me down had an oil skin hat on.

THOMAS PURFIELD sworn.

Q. What are you? - A watchman at the corner of Newgate. The prisoner is the young man that the prosecutor gave me charge of, the other man got off. The prosecutor, Williams, was behind this young man and the other, and one of them turned about and knocked down the prosecutor. He immediately called out, watch.

Q. Are you sure that the two men were in company? - Yes, and two women besides.

Q. How long before Williams came up? - Yes.

Q. Were they in company with the women? - I am not sure the women were at the side of them, but whether in company I cannot pretend to say.

Q. What makes you say that the two men were in company with each other? - I did not see there were any but these two.

Q. Did you hear them speak to each other? - No, I did not; the prisoner got up, and he that knocked him down got off; I see him turn about and go, the prosecutor immediately gave me charge of the prisoner, and before I took charge of him, he gave me a blow and knocked me down, and I recovered, and got after him into Grey-friars, where he got over the rails, and got into a dust hole in Greyfriars, Newgate-street: how he got over the rails I cannot say.

Q. How soon was he taken? - In about two or three minutes.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner was the man that knocked you down? - Yes, he was the man that knocked me down; there was nobody there but myself and him at that time.

Q. But you lost sight of him after that? - I did, so far as this, I was very close to him, and kept all the way up to him till he came up to Grey-friars.

Q. Is there no thoroughfare there? - No.

Jury. How did he get over the rails? - I cannot tell; there was a cart going down at the time, I could not pass the cart till the cart came down.

Q. To Williams. What sort of rails are these? - Wooden rails.

Q. Rather close or open? - Close, there is a door way at the railing, what let the patrol in.

Jury. It is a palisade close to the door, and they must get over to get in.

Q. What became of the women? - I cannot tell what became of them.

Prisoner. I hope you are convinced that I did not molest the prosecutor.

JOSEPH DAMPIER sworn.

I am an Exchange-broker. On the 7th of March, as I was crossing Newgate-street, between the hours of eleven and twelve in the evening, I observed a man coming across towards me, and another man was coming up and presented a pistol to him, he presented a pistol to him, and he said some words. I don't know what; he made off up Newgate street some few minutes after, and I believe it to be the same man at the bar; the other man then came up, and at the same time he presented a pistol to Williams: he was coming up from behind the dirt.

Q. The first man you see was Williams, was he followed by, or was he following any body? - Williams was going down the Old Bailey this side, and there was some dirt, and it was by the lamps that that man presented the pistol to him.

Q. To Williams. Can you explain this? - I ran round the dirt, and I turned about from the other, and met him the other way, and when I came up to him pretty near, he did as I related before. I heard him utter some words, but what I cannot say.

Prisoner. As I was coming along the same time, I was coming along with two women, there was no man at all with me; I never clapped my eyes on Williams till he cut me with a cutlass; I have the cut on my hat at this time, this watchman came to me, and I cannot say whether I did not knock him down or no.

Q. What did you do with a pistol at that time? - I had no pistol on me at that time nor any other in my life.

Williams. I was never nearer the man than seven yards: when we found him there was on his hat.

Q. Had you cut him there? - No, I never was near him.

Jury. You are sure it was a pistol? - I am, I have got it in my pocket at this time; it was as light as it is now; it was about the full of the moon; says he, keep off or I will shoot you.

Q. Was it loaded? - Yes, It was, I let it off, there were two pistols, one found on him, and the other found between some casks near where the prisoner I did; a young man found that, and said, here it is. (Produces the pistol that was found on him.)

Jury. You found one pistol on him that was charged, and you let it off? - Yes, it was, and I let it off.

Q. Why not shew the other pistol? - The other witness has it.

-WILLET sworn.

Q. Where did you find the pistol that you have now? - Between the casks, about twenty yards from where the prisoner laid.

Q. What are you? - I am a patrol; I heard a rattle, and saw a mob of people in Newgate-street, against the corner of Giltspur-street, they turned into Greyfriars; the prisoner had got over some pales with some sharp pikes to them, he got inside there; I tried to get over, and I could not get over; I said, throw me over. I was thrown over; I took him and searched him, he had a knife and nine halfpence in his pocket; I took him over to the Compter, he said, he would wish to speak to me in the morning, he said say that I was drunk and asleep. The pistol I have was not taken from him, it was taken an hour and a quarter after, near the place where he was; I took it myself behind

a couple of oil casks within four yards from where we took him, the pistol I have; I took the powder out. (Produced.)

Williams. They are screw barrelled both of them.

HENRY RICE sworn.

I am a patrol, belonging to St. Sepulchre's parish. On the 7th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock on Saturday night. I and my partner, two of us were left in the watch-house, and we heard the rattle spring, and we ran out directly, and there was a cry of stop thief, and we see the watchmen run, and we ran after them, and when we came there, at the Grev-siyars, they said is the man here? there was no thoroughfare to go through; we see him by the watchman's lanthorn there, he was laying down, my partner and me when we got the gate open, we got him into custody and brought him to the watch-house, the pistols were fired off by the prosecutor; there were two pistols, one was brought into the watch house with him, and my fellow servant went out about an hour afterwards, and found another, and they seemed to be fellows.

Prisoner to Mr. Willet. Did you see any thing of this kind in my possession? - I did not, you had three halfpence and a knife; you made no resistance; I said, come along with me, or I will out you down, if you was my own brother I would say the same. I have spoke the truth.

HUGHES sworn.

I am a printer; I was constable of the night, the only thing I know about it, is the man being brought to the watch-house, and soon after one of the patrols went out and found a pistol, which I have.

Prisoner. I was in company with two women, there was no men in company with me, I never clapped my eyes on fire arms till he cut me, and he said that is the man, whether I struck or no I cannot tell.

Court to Williams. You was speaking that the prisoner had a hat box; had he that hat box when he was taken? - No, he threw the hat box down, and made off immediately; whether it was empty or no I cannot tell. The watchman had some bustle with him, but what I cannot say, whether he touched him or no, or knocked him down I cannot say. I did not see the prisoner at the time; the other man knocked me down.

Q. Do you know what became of the hat box? - I don't know, I was so bloody.

Q. Had you any cutlass? - I had.

Prisoner. Here is the cut on my hat now.

Williams. That was there when he was taken

Jury. Is there any body that knows what was in the hat box?

Willet. I understand from a man that there was some stolen property in the hat box.

Prisoner. I had no hat box.

To his character the prisoner called Mrs. Miller, who said he was a printer, and lodged in Noble-street, Goswell-street.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-46

205. JOHN BITTANY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 1st of April , half a guinea , the money of John Guy .

A second COUNT laying it to be the property of Elizabeth Williams .

JOHN GUY sworn.

I am in the coal trade in Warwick-lane ; the prisoner was in my employment not above ten minutes before he committed the offence; he was hired as a porter ; he

was sent by me with five shillings and sixpence, as change for half a guinea for Mr. Williams, he received the half guinea and ran off with it, it was in the fore part of the day.

Q. Did she know you sent the five shillings and sixpence. - She ordered the man to get change, he came back from her house to getchange, I had sent coals there by him.

Prisoner. As I was coming across the way, I dropped it out of my hand in Newgate-street.

Jury. He had your concurrence to get the half guinea? - Certainly he had.

MARY ALLEN sworn.

I am a servant to Mrs. Williams; I do not recollect the day of the month, the man brought me five shillings and sixpence, and I gave him half a guinea.

Q. Who did he bring that change to? - He brought it to my mistress.

Q. And you received it of him? - Yes, and gave it to my mistress.

Q. What did you give him the half guinea for? - For coals sent by Mr. Guy.

Q. When did you take the coals in? - On Saturday the same day.

Q. To Guy. What passed when He came back with the half guinea? - he never came back; I never see him till the constable took him, three or four days afterwards.

SARAH COVENTRY sworn.

I live servant in the house with Mrs. Williams, and I see the half guinea given to the prisoner as I was standing in the passage, and Mr. Guy sent over in about half an hour afterwards to know if the man had the money, and we said it was given him.

Prisoner. I cannot hear what has been said.

Court. They say you brought five shillings and sixpence, and they gave you half a guinea, which half guinea you never returned.

Prisoner. Please you, my Lord, I dropped it out of my hand, as I was crossing the horse road in Newgate-street; and I was ashamed to go back again.

Court to Guy. Did you know any thing of him? - Very little indeed; he had worked for me some time before.

Q. Do you know any thing of his character? - I do not like to say any thing; report is not very favourable.

GUILTY . (Aged 52.)

One month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-47

206. WILLIAM POPE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Croft , about the hour of seven in the night, of the 7th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, twenty yards of velveteen, value 3l. the goods of the said Robert Croft .

WILLIAM WOODLAND sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Croft; as I was shutting up the shop on Saturday night, the 7th of March, in Fleet-street, I heard the window break; I was gone for a shutter, I went out and saw a man, I asked him who broke the glass, he said it was a drunken man.

Q. Did you see that drunken man? - No.

Q. Did you hear a window break? - Yes.

Q. One of your own windows? - Yes.

Q. What is your master? - A taylor. I went out and asked who broke it; afterwards I stood at the hole till young Mr. Croft came and took all the things away from the hole; I then went back into a court where the shutters stand, and while I was gone for that shutter, he took the piece of goods.

Q. Who took the piece of goods? - I did not see who took it.

Q. How do you know the goods were missing? - I knew the goods were in the window before.

Q. When had you seen them in the window before? - About five minutes before I shut up the shop.

Q. What were the goods? - A piece of velveteen.

Q. How many yards? - I don't know, it was not a whole piece.

Q. What was it worth a yard? - I don't know; I shut up the shop as last as I could.

Q. Did you see the prisoner William Pope any where near the place? - No.

Mr. Knowlys. Was there light enough to distinguish the face of any man? - It was just getting dark, about ten minutes before seven on the 7th of March.

Q. Then there was light enough to distinguish the face of any man? - There was.

ROBERT CROFT sworn.

I am a taylor ; I was informed my shop was robbed.

Q. Is your son here? - No.

Q. Do you know any thing about it? - No.

Q. Do you know your property? - Yes, I have not seen it ever since.

Mr. Knowlys. Is your son with you in partnership? - No, he is but a child.

Q. Are you the only person that receives the profits? - Yes.

-WILKINSON sworn.

I live in Cock-court, Ludgate-hill, neighbour to Mr. Croft; coming down Fleet-street, near seven o'clock on the 7th of March, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Croft's shop; he put his arms through the window and took off the goods in a roll, it seemed to be about twenty yards; he put both his arms through the square.

Q. Was it a broken pane before? - I am not certain, I see him take out a roll of goods, and put it under his arm; I then laid hold of him by the collar of his coat, and asked him what he was going to do with it? he struck me on my face a violent blow, he tried to extricate himself, he did extricate himself and ran away. I cried out stop thief, and he ran up the street; and I apprehended that he made his escape; I turned into Mr. Croft's shop, and told Mr. Croft's son what I had seen.

Q. Did you see the man? - I saw the man, it is the prisoner at the bar; I am positive to his person.

Q. Was it that time of night that you could see a person by the light of the lamps? - It was opposite the door where I took him.

Q. Are you positive to the man? - I am very positive. I did not see him again till the Tuesday following.

Q. What day was this 7th of March? - On Saturday.

Q. Where did you see him on Tuesday? - I did not see him on Tuesday; Mr. Croft sent to me and told me he was in custody, and he would be examined the next day, and I went the next day to the office.

Q. Did you recollect him again? - I did.

Q. At what office did you see him? - At Bow-street: I am positively clear to him; I had him by his collar so long.

Q. How long? - I will not say; a minute; it was so long a time that I am positive he is the man.

Mr. Knowlys. The person you laid hold of on Saturday night you had never seen before that night? - I do not recollect I had.

Q. You had not hold of him above a minute before he got away from you, and you never saw any man like him till the Wednesday following, and on Wednesday

you wen in consequence of being informed that you should see the man that you laid hold of on Saturday; it was probable, therefore, that you would think that was the man that you laid hold of on Saturday? - I see him brought forward on Wednesday, the man that is there, and that is the man that I took hold of on Saturday.

WILLIAM HUGHES sworn.

I was going up Fleet-street, on Saturday the 7th of March (I am servant to Mr. Liddiard, goldsmith and jeweller, in Paul's Church-yard) I heard a cry of stop thief! the prisoner Pope was about six yards before me; I never see him come past me; I immediately ran after him, and he dropped something by his left hand, down on the pavement; I had a parcel in my hand, I could not go very fast; I kept pursuing him, crying out stop thief! I pursued him across the street, till I came to Fetter-lane; he crossed just at St. Dunstan's Church; he was running towards Temple Bar.

Q. Where was you when you first saw him? - About the middle of Fleet-street, near Anderton's Coffee House.

Q. Did you take him? - No, I did not. I am positive the prisoner is the same man; he had his stocking down on his left leg; I was close to him when he was taken. When he was first taken he was in Brick-court; the patrol took him; two or three more set on the patrol with sticks and beat him unmercifully indeed. I heard one cry out, d-mn my eyes, where is my knife? I believe it was the prisoner, I am not very certain; they beat the patrol very much indeed.

Q. How many patrols were there? - Only one. after that he got away again; he ran into Arundell-street, in the Strand, and there he was laid hold of again; I went up to him again; he was taken into the public house; I said that was the man that ran up Fleet-street; he said, how could I be so hard as to say he was the man?

Q. You say he dropped something out of his left hand; can you say what it was like? - Like something rolled up very close together.

Q. Did you see what it was? - No, I did not; one part seemed to be rather longer than the other.

Mr. Knowlys. It was as high as Anderton's Coffee house where you first see him? - Yes, at the brush makers.

JOHN PITT sworn.

A few minutes before seven o'clock, on the evening of the 7th of March, I was standing by the end of St. Dunstan's Church, I heard the cry of stop thief, and I saw the prisoner Pope, I immediately followed him down Temple lane into Brick-court; he ran up the steps of No. 5, in the court, and placed himself by a lamp; I laid hold of him, in bringing him down the steps I received a blow on the head, and after that, I suppose twenty more; they beat me while I was down, he with two or three more; they got two or three yards from me and called out, d-mn my eyes, where is my knife? I was quite exhausted and fatigued; I could not follow him any further; some gentleman came and told me that he was taken and in custody; I immediately goes there where he was, and we took him to Bow-street.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I was in the chambers, I live just by, in Elm-court. I heard a terrible cry of stop thief! I see three men run away, and heard the cry of murder several times; I ran out and goes into Brick-court, and I see the patrol getting up, I asked him what was the matter?

Q. Did you see the prisoner? - We overtook him just as we got in Arundell-street; when I came there I see the prisoner Pope; he looks round and made a horrible expression, and said, d-mn my eyes, Mill.

Q. Do you know what is the meaning of d-mn my eyes, Mill? - I do not. Then we walked gradually on to secure him; there were two or three with me; we secured him at last, and then took him to Bow-street.

Q. Did you go with him to Bow-street? - Yes.

Q. You did not know what he was taken for? - The patrol told us what he was taken for.

Q. Did he say any thing as he was going along? - No.

Q. To Hughes. Do you know the man that picked up the goods? - It was a soldier that took it up, he said he knew who the property belonged to.

Q. To Croft. Have you ever seen the property since? - I have heard of it.

WILLIAM WOOLCUTT sworn.

Q. Do you remember, about seven o'clock in the evening, on the 7th of March, picking up any goods? - I did not pick up the goods it was given me by a soldier; I was going after the news paper for my master, I heard the cry of stop thief, and a man running.

Q. What man did you see? Should you know him again? - Yes, I think I should.

Q. Look round. - I think that is the man, I will not swear to the man.

Q. Was it like that man? - Yes, it was. I work with Mr. Long, at Christ Hospital.

Q. What sort of stuff was it that was given you? - It was stuff that they make breeches of. (Produced)

Q. To Croft. Is that the same? - Yes, it is like it, only a little lighter.

Q. To Walker. You say the soldier picked it up. Did the soldier know to whom it belonged? - He said he did.

Q. Did he tell you who it was? - No, he did not.

Q. To Croft. What quantity was there that you lost? - About twenty yards.

Q. What is it worth? - About three shillings and ten-pence a yard.

Mr. Knowlys. Was this only a part of a piece? - What we call half a piece.

Q. Had you seen it in the course of that day? - I think I see it several times in the day.

Q. Had there been any cut off? - Yes.

Q. Then, perhaps, you cannot tell of your own knowledge what quantity there was remaining? - I am very certain there was not more then two yards cut off from it.

Q. You have a journeyman who might have cut some off from it? - No, it was my son.

Q. Then you know only from what he has said, and he ought to have been here.

Prisoner. Most noble lord, I leave it to my counsel; I have nobody here to my character of any sort.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 28.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17950416-48

207. WILLIAM LANGDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , twenty-one yards of fustian, value 3l. the goods of Samuel Swan ; and

WILLIAM LEATHERBY for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

SAMUEL SWAN sworn.

I live in Bread street, Cheapside .

Q. Were you robbed at any time of twenty one yards of fustian? - Yes, I believe I was. The first intelligence was last Monday night, it was found in a box belonging to Leatherby; I see it in his box; he is a servant to Mr. Gouty.

Q. Where was his box at that time? - I believe in Old Fish-street, at Mr. Gouty's, a dry salter.

Q. How came you to go there? - In consequence of an information given me by Langdon.

Q. Who had the property that you saw at Mr. Gouty's? - The constable.

Q. Was Langdon a servant of your's? - Yes, he was, about six weeks.

Q. What sort of a servant? - Not a very good one.

Q. Did he sleep in the house? - Yes, and boarded in the house; he carried out parcels.

Q. What is your business? - A Manchester warehouse .

THOMAS GREY sworn.

I am brother-in-law to Mr. Swan. By the promise given by the prosecutor to Langdon, that he would not hurt a hair of his head if he would confess his connections, which he cordially did.

Q. Did he say any thing about himself? - He did not say any thing about himself; he only gave information about one Townsend.

Q. To Swan. Are you brother-in-law to Mr. Grey? - Yes.

Q. I understood that you made a proposition that you would not hurt a hair of his head, if he would make a confession? - If you will give me leave, we will produce a piece that was found on Langdon.

Q. Are you talking about these twenty one yards of fustian? - The twenty one yards were not found on him.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-49

208. FRANCES MOLTON CRANMER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of David Levy , about the hour of nine in the night, on the 7th of September , and burglariously stealing therein, a silk gown, value 20s. a white flowered muslin gown, value 10s. a plain muslin gown, value 10s. a red and white cotton gown, value 10s. a dark blue cotton gown, value 10s. a black silk petticoat, value 10s. a white Marseilles petticoat, value 5s. a pair of womens stays, value 15s. a white corded dimitty petticoat, value 2s. two flannel petticoats, value 3s. a brown flounced stuff skirt, value 5s. a worked muslin apron, value 6s. a striped muslin apron, value 2s. two book muslin handkerchiefs, value 5s. two double lace caps, value 15s. a dress lace cap, value 10s. two pair of womens cotton stockings, value 2s. a large cotton shawl, value 2s. a pair of womens Callimanco shoes, value 2s. a black silk mode cloak trimmed with black lace, value 15s. a white Bath beaver coat, value 5s. a black silk bonnet trimmed with black lace, value 5s. a black silk bonnet trimmed with black lace, value 2s. a silk sash, value 1s. two white linen frocks, value 4s. 2d. a damask table cloth, value 10s. two huckaback table cloths, value 4s. two damask linen breakfast cloths, value 2s. two pair of linen sheets, value 3s. two pair of linen pillow cases, value 3s. four linen shifts, value 6s. five mens linen shirts, value 15s. three pair of black worsted stockings, value 3s. four pair of mens black stockings, value 5s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 3s. a check linen

apron, value 1s. a piece of worked silk, value 5s. an alarm clock, silver dial plate, and silver chased sides, value 10l. two silver tea spoons, value 2s. and a gold ring set with garnets, value 3l. the goods of the said David Levy .

A second COUNT, for that she on the same day, being in the same dwelling-house, about the hour of nine in the night, burglariously did break to get out of the same.(The Case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

MARY LEVY sworn.

Q. You are the wife of the Prosecutor? - Yes. I live in Green-street, in New Town, in the parish of Stepney .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes. The prisoner was my servant only nine days.

Q. On the day laid in the indictment, the 7th of September, on a Sunday, did you fasten the house? - I did, when the prisoner at the bar came home about half after seven.

Q. Did you fasten particularly the window? - I fastened the kitchen door, but the kitchen window I did not.

Q. Is there a passage that goes from your kitchen into the yard? - There is a door that parts off our passage.

Q. How was the passage door fastened? - With a padlock and staple, and then a peg drove down into it.

Q. How soon did you discover that this door and your kitchen door was open, and the property was gone that you missed? - About ten minutes after she was gone, about ten or twelve minutes after nine.

Q. When did you discover the kitchen door open? - I went up stairs to put my little boy to bed, and when I went up stairs, the prisoner at the bar was sitting in the kitchen with the kitchen window open.

Q. When did you discover your passage door open? - About ten minutes after nine, I had been up stairs putting my child to bed, our beer generally comes for supper about nine, and when the man brought the beer, the man says, do you know that your gate is open? I was coming down stairs and I heard it, and I went and saw it open, and I came back again and went into my kitchen and found the prisoner and the things were gone, all in the indictment

Q. In what part of the house had these things been used to be kept? - They were in the two pair of stairs front room in the drawers, the drawers were all locked, they belonged to me.

Q. You are the wife of the prosecutor? - I am.

Q. What was the value of these things, ten or twenty pounds? - Twenty pounds will not replace them again what she took away.

Q. Can you fairly and conscientiously say that twenty pounds would not replace them again? - I can, and more than that would not indeed.

Prisoner. My mistress set me to washing on Sunday between ten and eleven o'clock. There are two things quite wrong. You have mentioned shirts and table cloths in the indictment, that you know I am clear of, as clear as a child unborn.

THOMAS DOUHTY sworn.

I am a clock and watch-maker at York, I lived formerly at Wisbeach, in Cambridgeshire.

Q. Did you live at Wisbeach at the time of this business? - Yes. On the 10th of September last, or a few days before that a woman came to my shop with a square time-piece to sell, it is an alarm, she asked me if I would buy it, she told me she was recommended to me by a Mr. - , a hosier.

Q. Should you know the woman if you was to see her? - I should not know the woman positively, seeing her only but

ten minutes, and never seeing her since, I cannot positively say, I think she is the person; but from the difference of dress I cannot positively speak to her.

Q. Did you purchase this clock of her? - I did. I offered her two guineas, she at first refused to take the money, but at last she took it, I have it in my pocket.(Produced.)

SACKLING HOWE sworn.

I am a watch-maker, at Downam, in Norsolk.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Very well.

Q. Did she come to you at any time, and when? - She did not come to me, I have got some goods.

Q. Where did you get these goods from? - From the Queen's Head, at Downam, the prisoner had lodged one night at this house.

Q. How near to this time? - About the 19th of October.

Q. How long before she was apprehended? - The night before, I was informed so by the woman of the house.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner? - I did not.

Q. Who did? - I don't rightly know, but they passed the goods through two or three hands. I took them by the desire of the justice during her absence, and the night after she came to the same house again; and then they sent me word that the prisoner was returned, and I desired the constable that night to take care of the things.

Q. Did she claim them as her property? - She did, on the 22d of October.

Q. Did she say any thing else to you? - I told her there were some things in the bundle that I had got; I asked her whether they were her's? and she described a black handkerchief as her's.

Q. Did she claim the whole of the goods to be her property? - Yes. The whole of the goods that I have now in Court; she described many things that were in the bundle, told me of two different gowns.

Q. Who was present besides yourself? Was any body that is here? - No.(The things produced.)

Q. Were they packed up in that box together? - They were packed up in a large black handkerchief.

Mrs. Levy. That clock is my property; it is a present made to my husband, we have had it upwards of a twelvemonth in our possession.

Q. To Howe. Do you know the value of a movement of that kind? - They are things that are not saleable in our part of the country; it is an antiquated piece of goods.

Q. Is it worth two guineas? - Surely it is worth more to some people.

Mrs. Levy. Here is a mode cloak, I know it is mine, it is worth a guinea, but I do not value it at that. This silk gown valued at twenty shillings, but it is worth upwards of forty shillings; a petticoat worth half a guinea; these four gowns are mine, these shoes are mine.

Q. How lately before had you seen these things? - In the morning I was up stairs.

Q. How soon after did you miss them? - Within two minutes after she was gone. I found all my drawers broke open.

Prisoner. I lived servant with Mrs. Levy. She set me to washing on Sunday, and I asked her leave to go out; and mistress and I had words, on account of washing on Sunday, and I was very sorry in my mind, her setting me to washing on Sunday; and I asked her leave to go out about three or four in the afternoon, and I never returned no more home. I have never a friend in the world.

GUILTY , Of stealing the goods in the dwelling house. (Aged 17.) Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-50

209. JAMES GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , two silk handkerchiefs, value 4s. the goods of John Harrington .(The case opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN HARRINGTON sworn.

I live at 246, in the Strand . On the evening of the 12th I saw the prisoner at the bar, Thursday night. He came to my shop with a young lad about seventeen; he asked to look at some worsted gloves he asked for some blue washing gloves; there were some worsted gloves that lay in the window; the window from the door to the counter is enclosed with a little grating, and inside of this grate were laid some silk handkerchiefs, gloves, and several other articles. I saw the boy very busy at the grate and I suspected him to be a thief, and presently he cried out to the other, come on James, and went out. I knew he had taken something, but I did not see what he had in his hands. I immediately asked my wife what she had lost from the window.(The prisoner did not go along with the boy he staid talking with my wife,) she said the other handkerchiefs were lost.

Q. Was that in the hearing of the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. What did she mean by the other handkerchiefs? - I had part of the same piece stole on the Tuesday evening before.

Q. Were they silk handkerchiefs? - Silk. At the moment the boy went out of the shop, I charged the prisoner with being a thief, and an accomplice of the lad that was gone out, and I shut the door to at the same moment.

Q. What did the prisoner say? - He said he had no knowledge of him, he never knew him.

Q. Did they come in together? - The prisoner come in first.

Q. Did the boy follow him close? - As close as possibly he could be.

Q. The prisoner had been in your shop the evening before, was any body in company with him then? - The very same lad.

Q. What did they inquire for then? - The same articles.

Q. Did they buy any thing either on Tuesday or Thursday? - No, on neither of the days. He attempted to go from me; I said he should not go from me, till he had got somebody to give him a good character. I then sent for a constable and he searched him, he had a brass shilling, a good shilling and a knife that I found on him.

Q. When was it the prisoner tried to rush out of the shop, before you took the things from him? - Yes.

Prisoner. Did you search my fob there? - I did not see him search his fob; I did not take notice.

Mrs. HARRINGTON sworn.

Q. On the evening of the 12th did you see the prisoner at the bar? - I did; he came in with a boy; he asked me for some gloves; I shewed him some; he said he did not like them; I told him to give them back again if they would not do; I went round the counter to take some worsted gloves, to shew him and I see a silk handkerchief laying by the side of the gloves.

Q. How many handkerchiefs were there? - Two handkerchiefs were on the counter and the boy asked what was the price of them? I took the gloves and shewed them the prisoner, the boy had the handkerchiefs laying down by the side of him. The prisoner asked me the price of the worsted gloves; I told him fourteen-pence, that instant the boy went out at the door, and my husband came into the shop; he was not in the shop before, and asked me whether I missed any thing?

Q. Did you miss any thing? - I did, two silk handkerchiefs from where I

took the gloves; the boy in running out said, come along Jem, or come on Jem.

Q. You searched the prisoner, when he was taken? - Yes.

Q. To Prosecutor. What is the value of the handkerchiefs? - They cost four shillings and sixpence each.

Prisoner. I am a smith by trade, and my hands being chopped it being cold weather, I went in to buy a pair of gloves to put on. I asked the woman if she had any blue gloves? She shewed me some. I see a boy coming into the shop, and while I was talking about the gloves, I see the prosecutor come from the other end of the shop and he said to the woman, did you see the boy that run out take any thing away? and she said, she did not. He said to me, did you see the boy take any thing away? I said, I did not. He then said, you are an accomplice; they immediately sent for a constable, and searched me. I had half a guinea and six pence in my fob, which they did not search. I have several people to my character. I never was taken up in my life before.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-51

210. ELIZABETH ATKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , a silver watch, value 40s. a steel watch chain, value 6d. and a base metal seal, watch key value 1d. and half a guinea, the goods and monies of John Craxford , privately from his person .

JOHN CRAXFORD sworn.

I am a livery servant ; I was robbed on Thursday the 12th of March last, in the morning, about two or three o'clock; I cannot swear to the hour I was robbed; I was in liquor, coming down Holborn; this woman accosted me in Holborn, and asked me to go to her lodging. We called at a public house, and had a glass of spirituous liquors. I changed a French half crown. I went home with her to No. 4, Matton lane, Clerkenwell . I pulled off my boots and coat, and slept in the room, and in the morning I found this woman had left me, and I missed my watch, and likewise half a guinea in gold. With that, finding myself in the room alone, I called the watch, and the watch called the constable.

Q. Now, are you sure that you had your watch at the time you went into the room with her? - I am certain I had, because I looked to see what it was o'clock.

Q. What time was it when you awoke and called the watch? - About half after four, or near five.

Q. Did you find your watch? - I did not find my watch, I found some few halfpence.

Q. Did you see your half guinea when you went into the room with her? - No, I did not.

Q. Have you ever recovered any of your property? - None at all. I have seen my watch in the constable's hands about an hour after the same morning.

Q. How soon did you take her up after this? - About an hour after, the constable and watchman went in pursuit of her, and took her in Hatton-wall, Leather-lane.

Q. What distance is that? - Three or four hundred yards, I cannot justly say.

Q. Was she searched? - We searched her when we went into the public house, she said, she would go back to the same room, and see if she could find it. She went back to the room.

Q. Did she deny that she was the same person that had been with you the over night? - She did not deny that, but she

denled that she had got the watch; the constable took it from her. I heard the chain rattle; I see it in the hands of the constable. The constable says, here is your watch. I went to the justice, and the justice made me prosecute her. I wish to have my property again.

Q. Was it by your directions that this woman is indicted for a capital offence, or did you leave it to the officer? - I left it to the officer.

SAMUEL BURR sworn.

I am a headborough.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner, Craxford? - Never before that time.

Q. Were you called to this woman's lodgings? - I was called by the watchman.

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner's lodgings? - I did not know till I went there, and found the man there.

Q. What was it o'clock? - About five, or nearer six.

Q. What happened when you went there? - I found the watchman and this man here there. I found the watch, I see the prisoner take it from her side, and give it the watchman. I had searched her pockets before; I ordered her to strip herself to see if she had any duplicates I found seven shillings but no half guinea. The prosecutor said he did not wish to prosecute her at all.

ROBERT BEAR sworn.

I am a watchman.

Q. Were you called on this morning? - I was, on the morning about five o'clock. I went to this woman's room; the prosecutor was there; he said, he had lost his watch, and half a guinea. I sprung my rattle, and several watchmen came up from St. James's, Clerkenwell. I pulled the bed about, and found two pence halfpenny. I asked him if he knew the woman? He said he knew her very well; and on coming along Hatton-wall, I found her about seven o'clock. We went to her lodgings, and the constable searched the drawers, and bed likewise. We found the watch as she was going to prison.

Q. In the street? - No, in her room.

Q. Who was it produced by? - By the prisoner; she had it in her hands; the half guinea was never found at all. The constable has the watch.

Q. To Burr. Have you kept the watch from that time to this? - I have.

Prosecutor. It is my watch, No. 1396, Andrew Newton and William Kelly on the face of it.

Prisoner. I was rather in liquor, and I went to this house, because I knew it to be open. I wanted something to drink. This gentleman left his watch in the room. I took it to take care of it; and as to taking his watch to keep it, I did not. He has sent twice since I have been in confinement, if I could raise money he would not prosecute me at all, but I could not; I have no friends at all.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-52

211. JOHN DUNN was indicted, for that he, on the 4th of February , on Thomas Price , in the peace of God, and our Lord the King, then and there being, feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did make an assault, and that he, with a certain gun called a carbine, loaded with gun-powder and leaden shot, which he in both his hands had and held to, at and upon the said Thomas Price , did shoot off and discharge; and that he the said Thomas Price, by such shooting off and discharging, in and upon the right breast of him the said Thomas Price, did strike, penetrate and wound, giving to him the said Thomas Price , in

and upon the said right breast, a mortal wound, of the depth of eleven inches, and breadth of two inches, of which he instantly died ; and so the jurors on their oath say, that he the said John Dunn, him the said Thomas Price did kill and murder.

Indicted for the like murder on the Coroner's inquisition.(The case opened by Mr. Const.)

RICHARD FITZGERALD sworn.(The witnesses examined apart, by the prisoner's desire.)

Q. What are you? - I am a patrol in Castlebaynard ward.

Q. Do you recollect any thing particular taking place on the 3d of February? - Yes. There is another patrol besides me, and we were on our round between twelve and one. I was coming along Great Knight-rider-street. There was a coachman and coach there; it being frosty weather, the coach had got into a sort of bog. When I got to the end of Sermon-lane, I heard the cry of, Watch, and Murder! and I ran up to the upper end, where I heard the noise, and there was another watchman that was on that beat, that got into this house before me, (into this house where Mr. Dunn was) the corner of Sermon-lane . One Harvey, a bricklayer, inhabits it.

Q. Does the prisoner live in that house? - That is more than I can tell you. He was in the house, but it was the wife that I saw below stairs.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there? - Not at this time.

Q. Did you get into the house? - I did. The woman, Mrs. Harvey, stood in the passage, wringing her hands, begging of the watchman for God's sake to give her a light. I desired the watchman to open his lanthorn, and if he had a bit of candle to give her. He had none. She said she had plenty up stairs, but she was afraid to go up for it. I asked her what for? She said that her husband was crazy, and in liquor, and she was afraid he would murder her. I then called to another watchman to give her a light. Just as soon as we got out of the door, the prisoner followed us out with a pair of pistols, one in each hand, and he followed us out, it may be forty or fifty yards down the street, swearing that he would blow our brains out; so I turned to him, and asked him, what would you blow out my brains for? I am a servant of the ward.

Q. The woman said, my husband, who did you suppose she meant by that? - I don't know that. He wanted to know what brought us nigh his home; so after telling him I was the servant of the ward, he said, go along about your business, and the first watchman that I meet again coming nigh my house, I will blow his brains out.

Q. Was this in or out of the house that he said this? - Out of the house. As soon as I got down to the lane's end, I met two more watchmen, and consulted with them to see what was best to be done; and out of the Black Swan passage, just facing the corner of Mrs. Harvey's house, Price, the deceased, came out there, and he sprung a rattle.

Q. Had the prisoner then returned to Mrs. Harvey's house? - Yes, he was in the house then. He was at this time inside of the house, and the door shut on him. I went up to the man that sprung the rattle, and I clapped my left hand to his breast; says I, no more of that. Another of the watchmen followed me, coming up as far as the middle of Sermon-lane, springing his rattle after me. I checked him for that, and desired him to go along directly to his beat.

Q. Did you see the prisoner after? - Yes.

Q. Where did you see him? - I told Price, and a man of the name of Butler,

that is here (I met them going into the Black Swan passage before me,) and I says to them, now, mind what I tell you, if you do not, I will report you, each man keep to his beat, and make no more object of that house than any other house, and by the time we may be got round again, it may be about a quarter of an hour, and this man may be got to sleep. I sent Butler Sermon-lane way, and I went round the church-yard, with Price, the deceased. I turned down Paul's Chain with him, and we came along little Carter-lane. Now, says I, let me go before you, for he can see you when he cannot me; I did get a few yards before him, and the prisoner was at the first pair of stairs window.

Q. Was that when you were going to pass by Mrs. Harvey's house? - Yes; I was coming up towards it; when I came to Mrs. Harvey's, I see the prisoner at the one pair of stairs window, with the piece projected out of the window.

Q. You mean the fire-arm? - Yes.

Q. At that time was the deceased with you? - Yes. I turned back to the deceased again, and I told him, you must go the reverse round your beat again; for, says I, this man is like a fowler, with his piece levelled out at the window; and says I, leave me to watch his motion. In a few minutes after this, he came down stairs, the prisoner did, and he went along Carter-lane, for about the value of thirty or forty yards.

Q. Had he at this time any thing in his hands? - He had a pistol, if not two, but I will not take on me to say whether he had two or no, but he had one pistol, which I can clearly swear to, and he called out Watch, Watch, twice, where are you now, you thieves?

Q. How near were you at the time? - I kept as close to him as possible with propriety, perhaps about fifty yards. He came down along then, and faced Great Carter-lane, as if returning home, and passed his house, and faced off Carter-lane, and he called out, Watch, there in Great Carter-lane. There was a spare man that belonged to us there, and it was his second night of doing duty, and he came up to him, and said, he would blow his brains out.

Q. Did you hear him say so? - I did.

Q. Did you hear that watchman say any thing to him? - There were a good many words passed; he begged his life, and said he did not know him, and begged, for God's sake, he would not blow his brains out. The prisoner said he knew him, he was one of the thieves that was about his house. The prisoner left the watchman then, and faced towards home; and getting up Little Carter-lane, he fired a pistol wantonly, out of bravado, and then he got into his own house, if it be his house, or Mrs. Harvey's house. Then I gave the charge to all the watchmen, for every man to keep regularly round his beat, and not to crowd about the house; and then I came to the officer of the night, and told him what had happened, in the watch-house; and the other patrol, I desired him to make his off-set, and desired him to keep the watchmen separate, or else there would be mischief done; and then I went out no more that night.

Mr. Knowlys. This watchman, the deceased, I believe his beat did not extend to the prisoner's house? - No.

Q. When you first came to the prisoner's house, I believe you heard a considerable noise? - Yes.

Q. When you first came up to the house, and see Mrs. Harvey, did she not tell you (recollect as well as you can) that she was afraid to go up stairs, for she thought the man was crazy? - She said, he was crazy, and in liquor.

Q. Are you sure that she added, and in liquor? - I am sure she said he was in liquor.

Q. Are you sure that the woman, besides saying that he was crazy, said that

he was in liquor? - Yes, I am; and she said, he has got a pistol above stairs, well prepared. Indeed, mammy, said the little girl, he has got two and a gun.

Q. Did you go into the house? - I did.

Q. Did you observe any thing thrown about? - Yes, some tea-tackle.

Q. A considerable quantity laying on the floor, perhaps? - There may be between three and four cups and saucers, and a tea-pot broke.

Q. Did you observe any child's victuals scattered about? - I cannot say that I noticed that.

Q. Had you the curiosity to go into the bed-room at that time, either before or after this melancholy accident took place? - The next day I was up in the bed-room.

Q. Did you see the state in which the curtains of the bed were? - Upon my word, I cannot say.

Q. Did you see, among other things, a jug of water broke? - I cannot say, indeed; if I did, I do not recollect.

Q. You say this man, in Carter-lane, fired a pistol off wantonly, I want to know what you mean by wantonly; there was no person there to be fired at? - No, there was not.

Q. You more than once repeated your desire to the watchmen, that they might not go to disturb him? - Not to notice the house more than any other.

Q. That you thought necessary to repeat twice? - I did, if not more.

Q. Did not you add at the time, that you thought the man was crazy, and might do mischief? you yourself thought he was mad at that time? - As for madness I will not take on myself to say, but I know he was in a mad humour.

Q. You not only mentioned it to them and the constable of the night, but to several strangers; you mentioned it to the man that went out after you to give them the same charge? - I did.

Q. The man was calling the watchmen thieves? - His language was, you bloody thieves, the first I catch coming nigh my house, I will blow your brains out.

Q. He seemed to have no resentment against any person, but persons under the description of watchmen? - No, not that I conceived.

Q. You found that with good words, so far as yourself was concerned, you pacified him very easily? - Yes; when he had parted with me he went into the house.

Q. Did you find that fair words had effect on him? - Yes, that was what took effect on him, I could see nothing else take effect on him but that.

Q. Did you hear a gun fired out of the window at the time you was a good way from the house? - No; but after I got into the watch-house I heard the report of two, whether they were pistols or guns I cannot say.

Q. Did you not observe that the springing the rattles seemed to make the man wilder? - He was in the house when Price, the deceased sprung his rattle.

Q. I thought you said that Price sprung his rattle twice? - No, it was another man up Sermen-lane that sprung the rattle.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing what effect the noise of the rattle had upon his mind? - No, I did not see that.

Q. Did he come out of the house a second time before the noise of the rattle? - No.

Mr. Trebeck. If I understand you right, you heard three guns fired off, you saw one and heard two afterwards? - Yes.

GEORGE PUTNER sworn.

Q. You are also a watchman in Castle-baynard ward? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember going with Fitzgerald on the night of the 3d of February, on hearing some noise? - Yes, I went to Sermon-lane, to Dunn's house, where the prisoner lived; I heard a noise of murder, before I got to the door; after that I heard a voce say, watch! when Fitzgerald came up, he asked me what was the matter? the woman, Mrs. Harvey, opened the door; she told me afterwards she was Dunn's wife; she said to me and the patrol, come in; I walked in first, the patrol followed me; when I came into the room the woman had no light; the woman says to me, watchman, give me a bit of candle; I answered I have none but what is burnt; the patrol made answer, if you have a bit give it her; I immediately opened my lanthorn, in my lanthorn was a save-all, on that save-all was a small bit of candle, I light the candle, and gave the candle and save-all into the woman's hand; the woman made answer, I have light enough up stairs, but I durst not go after it, for I am afraid I shall be murdered; she said he kept a pistol up stairs loaded.

Q. What did you understand by that? - She said no further than that; a little girl made answer, yes, mammy, he has two and a gun; immediately I heard the footsteps of somebody coming up stairs in a hurry, I took myself out of the house into Sermon-lane, the patrol with me; and Dunn came after us down the lane, saying, you bloody watchmen, I will blow your brains out; we both went to the bottom of the lane, then we both turned round and faced Dunn, and Fitzgerald said to Dunn, what makes you to follow us, we have not affronted you, nor do we intend to affront you; he made answer again, you bloody watchmen, I will blow your brains out, he then at that time went back to his own house, and Fitzgerald and I we went round our

Q. After that how soon did you see or heard any thing of him? - I see him at a distance about a quarter of an hour after, in Sermon-lane, with a brace of pistols in his hand, when I saw the pistols in his hand, I thought I would keep out of his sight till my two hours were out, and I came to be relieved; I went round between the hours of one and two; I was coming down Carter-lane, three quarters of an hour afterwards, Price, who was then on the other side of Carter-lane, on the Old Change beat, says to me, partner, what had we best do in this matter? he said, I think it will be proper to acquaint Mr. Strutton with it; within a few minutes after this he came up after me, saying, you bloody watchman, I will blow your brains out; I ran across Carter-lane, into King's Head passage, Dunn followed me into the passage; I thought it would be proper to put my light out, I had no time to stop to put it out.

Q. Why did you put your light out? - To shun Dunn, thinking if he lost my light he might lose me; I shook my light out, and when the light was out Dunn did not come through the passage, but he stopped there; I went through the passage into St. Paul's Church-yard, to the opening of the Black Swan-passage, there a man came to me, one Mr. Simpson by name, saying to me, watchman-

Q. What did you do? - I then heard some voice coming up St. Paul's Churchyard, supposing it was some just come from the watch-house, that Price was gone for; they came no further than Paul's Chain, went down Paul's Chain, came up Carter-lane, I went down Carter-lane, expecting to meet them in Carter-lane, which was facing Dunn's house. When I came to the end of the passage they were not come up, I went a little way up the passage again, I then see

Dunn standing in Sermon-lane, a little way off.

Q. Had he at that time any thing in his hand? - He had a gun. When the man came up Carter-lane to Sermon-lane, they entered the opening of the lane, and just at the entrance of the lane Dunn presented his piece immediately.

Q. Who did he present his piece to? - I don't know exactly.

Q. Who was in the company? - I see Mr. Crickett for one, and Mr. Shutt for another, and Price, and one Green, as they drew nigh towards Dunn, Dunn fired the piece.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing at that time? - Not a word.

Q. What was the effect of that piece being fired? - Price immediately dropped to the ground after the report of the piece, I instantly stooped to Price, saying Price, are you shot? Price answered me slowly, I am; I immediately saw Price's coat on fire, on the right breast, I clapped my hand on it, to put the fire out; I put the fire out of his coat, and the blood of his body gushed out. He was a dead man within five minutes.

Q. Was Dunn secured on the spot? - He was, Mr. Crickett first took hold of him.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Putner, at the time that you first went to this house, you immediately saw Mrs. Harvey, the woman? - Within a minute or two.

Q. I believe she seemed to be in a considerable slurry and alarmed? - She did, she wanted a light, but she was afraid to go up stairs.

Q. Did she tell you why she was afraid to go up stairs? - She told me she was afraid to go up, for fear she should be murdered.

Q. Did she say any thing of this sort, that he was out of his senses, or that he was mad? - Not a word of the kind.

Q. Did she say any thing of this sort, that he was crazy? - Not a word of the kind.

Q. Was you with Fitzgerald at this time? - I was with him.

Q. You did not hear him say that he was crazy, and in liquor? - I heard her say that he had drank liquor, more than he ought to do.

Q. When you see Dunn, from the whole appearance of him, did you believe him to be a person in his senses, through his whole conduct? - He seemed a man very resolute; I cannot think the man any way crazy.

Q. Now, you said you would go to Strutton; what is he? - He is a hair dresser.

Q. Has he any other occupation besides that? - I don't know whether he has or no.

Q. Do you know that he is the keeper of a mad-house? - Not that I know of.

Q. Did you go into the room after Dunn was apprehended? - I was fully employed with the man that was shot.

Q. Did you go into Dunn's room, after the prisoner was apprehended? - Yes, I went there.

Q. Did you observe any thing there with respect to the appearance of the room? - Yes, there was a deal of furniture broken up, earthen ware chiefly.

Q. Did you go into his bed room? - No.

Q. Did you observe any boxes in the room? - I cannot say that I did.

Mr. Const. You was asked about Strutton. Perhaps you know Strutton? - Yes, I do know him.

Q. Has he any thing to do with the watch? - He has.

Q. It was for that purpose you meant to go to him? - It was.

CHARLES HUNDERDRY sworn.

Q. Were do you live? - In Carter-lane, No. 28, I keep the Black Swan.

Q. Do you remember any thing that happened on the night of the 3d of February last? - I do; about one o'clock I heard a great noise, and hear the cry of murder, from Mrs. Harvey's daughter; I opened the door, and looked out, and did not see the door opened, and I shut my own again, and a little after that I heard a very great noise, and the watch was called, and there was a noise in the house, with the watchmen and the prisoner at the bar as it appeared to me.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come from the house? - I see the watchmen come and the prisoner, he drove the watchman down Sermon-lane. I see him return and go in doors, after that the window was thrown up of the bed room and a pistol fired; I see the window thrown up, but I did not see the pistol put out of the window, I heard the report of it; I see the prisoner after that in my one pair of stairs room, and through one of the holes of the window shutters I see him load two pistols, when he had loaded them, I see him take hold of some other piece which I thought was a blunderbuss or a gun; while he was loading these pieces, he swore that he would shoot some bloody sons of bitches of watchmen or some damn'd fellow of a watchman. I cannot exactly repeat word for word; the girl cried murder, and begged her mother to stop him from going out.

Q. What girl? - Mrs. Harvey's daughter. I see him come out of the house with two pistols in his hand, and he held the pistols out in his hands with his arm stretched out and said, who set the watch, bl-st the watch, bloody watch, d-n the watch; b-gg-r the watch; the first bloody b-gg-r of a watchman that comes to me I will shoot him; this was in Sermon-lane that these expressions were made use of. He turned to the right hand and went down Little Carter-lane, towards the Old Change, repeating the same expressions as before.

Q. Did you see him do any thing there? - Nothing there, but going backward and forward, he returned back towards Great Carter-lane, still using the language about the watchmen as he did before; he got into Carter-lane, and there I heard some words with somebody, I supposed it was with some of the watchmen, he returned back again; he was about Mr. Simpson's door in Little Carter-lane when he fired one of the pistols off. He went down Sermon-lane, returned back again about the middle of Sermon-lane; he fired another pistol, the balls of which lodged in my doorpost; immediately after the second pistol was fired off the watchmen sprang their rattles; immediately after the watchmen had sprung their rattles, he came to the top of Sermon-lane and looked down Carter-lane, towards Paul's Chain he saw the watchmen and several people coming towards him, he looked at them, he went to the door of the house that he came out of where he lived, kicked with his foot and knocked with his elbow three or four times, he could gain no admittance. I see him put the two pistols down at the side of the house; I see him take the carbine from his side and put the piece to his shoulder, and called the people about him and swore he would shoot the first bloody b-gg-r that came nigh him; the people ran back towards Paul's Chain. I see a man come round the corner in a blue great coat, by the name of Bailey, a Plaisterer; the prisoner was standing just by his own door at the time that this person, by the name of Bailey, the Plaisterer, crossed over to him, the prisoner at the bar asked him what he wanted? he told him nothing; he asked him where he was going? he told him he was going home; he said

bl-st you, go home immediately. After this I see Price, the watchman , cross over the way to him, he was then about two feet from the muzzle of the piece as nigh as I could guess; and he said to him, you bloody b-gg-r of a watchman I will send you to d-nation or hell, I cannot tell expressly which words he used. I see him fire the piece, the contents of which went close to the watchman's right breast, the watchman immediately fell, the wadding was a light on the outside of his coat; the watchman when he fell said, O Lord, three times, I am shot; I heard the prisoner say no more till I got into the street. I immediately went down stairs and went into the street, the watchman was laying on his back; I went up to the prisoner and said you d-mn'd rascal, how could you shoot this innocent man? he told me the man could not be killed, for there was nothing but powder and wadding in the piece. They wanted to remove the dead body to my house, and I said it should not go there, where the tree fell there it should lay; I see the murderer come out of that house, and there the dead body should go in; I called some time and they would not open the door, and I said, if they would not open the door I would go home for an axe and break every pannel of the door in; when Mrs. Harvey opened the door I told her it was her fault, because she would not open the door when Dunn knocked, she said she was afraid to open the door because he would have killed her. I told her it was better to kill her then to kill an innocent man.

Mr. Knowlys. You see him fire off a pistol before this accident? - Yes.

Q. Was there any person at hand then? - No; I looked upon it he fired them off wantonly without any object at all, I looked down Sermon-lane both ways, and could see nobody coming.

Q. What time was this? - About a quarter before two, on the 4th of February as nigh as I can recollect.

Q. It was the girl that cried murder not Mrs. Harvey? - I never heard Mrs. Harvey cry murder.

Q. Was there any person within the reach of the man when the gun was fired off? - I see no person but Bailey, the plaisterer, and Price, the watchman, these were the only three persons in Sermon-lane.

Q. How long was he in this way wandering about the street? - Better than three quarters of an hour.

Q. At the time that the window was thrown up and the pistol fired out was the Lane empty then? - I presume there was no aim at any body then.

Q. So that was the third pistol fired without any aim at all. Did you hear Fitzgerald give any directions about Dunn? - Yes; I heard Mr. Birkwood desire him to go to bed. This was not in the street, it was when he was up stairs in the room at the window.

JOHN CRICKETT sworn.

Q. I believe you was present at the unfortunate place? - I was. I see the gun fired.

Q. I believe you secured the man at the spot? - I did.

Q. Is that the gun that was taken on him? (A gun produced) - I cannot say.

DAVIS sworn.

I know the gun, I took it from him, and these are the pistols.

JOSEPH HURLOCK sworn.

Q. After what we have heard it is almost unnecessary to ask you whether the wound was the cause of that man's death? - I found the wound had penetrated the chest and past out through the ribs into the sleshy part of the back,

where I found some wadding, and a considerable quantity of small shot.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

MARY ALMOND sworn.

I live at No. 12, Sermon-lane.

Q. Near where the prisoner lives? - Yes. I am married, my husband is a Cheesemonger.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in the night that this melancholy affair took place? - It was in the morning.

Q. How long before this melancholy thing happened? - As nigh as I can recollect three quarters of an hour. I see him come out of his own house, and he did not come into the Lane directly after, he went far away; but when he came into the Lane where I was, he fired one pistol before he came to my door, and then I lost sight of him till he met the watchman, and then he fired another pistol which I believe shot the man.

Q. Had you seen him before, as you live in the neighbourhood? - I see Mr. Dunn the day before and conversed with him.

Q. Knowing how he behaved before and seeing him that evening, what did you judge of the state of his mind that evening? - The day before, I believe, Mr. Dunn was in his senses the same as I am now, but on the night the accident happened I really don't think he was, that is my real opinion that the man was not in his senses, but what might be the cause of it I cannot tell.

Court. Do you make that conclusion from his conduct during the whole course of the night that the accident happened? - I see him the first when he came out of his own house.

Q. You had not seen any thing but that time? - No.

Q. You judge from his extraordinary behaviour? - I do.

EDWARD DUNN sworn.

Q. What relation are you to the prisoner at the bar? - First cousin.

Q. You have had frequent opportunities of course of making your observations on the state of mind of the prisoner at the bar? - Yes; I have worked with him better than a twelvemonth at Mr. Harris, the soap maker's. It is near now two years ago, sometimes he would take a fit and sit down, and would not work nor speak to me nor any body else; and sometimes he would work twice as much as at other times.

Q. Did he appear to be a man in his senses at all times or deranged? - Sometimes he would take fits and speak foolish, and sometimes not speak at all; perhaps, some mornings I could hardly get him up to go to work, and then perhaps he would take that sit no more. I know that part of his behaviour did not shew that he was a man in his senses at all times.

Mr. Const. Was it Mr. Richard Harris that you speak of that he lived with? - Yes.

Q. He lived there three years? - Yes.

Q. Was his behaviour such as his master knew it? - His master hardly ever see him, we both worked in a cellar together.

Q. Was there any other person employed by Mr. Harris except yourself that had an opinion that he was deranged? - I did not let any body know; we worked in the cellar together, and had our own part of the work to do.

JOHN DUNN sworn.

I am a porter to Mr. Whitefield that keep the books of the chapel in the city road. I am brother to the prisoner; I have lived four years and a half with him; I suppose it is about a year and a half since I left him.

Q. Tell us the deportment of the man, and what seemed to be his conduct during that particular period? - In general I have seen him in a state of lunacy which was the occasion of my leaving him, I could not stay any longer with him; I left him on that account about a year and a half ago.

Q. Tell us in what way that lunacy shewed itself? - I slept with him in the same bed. I have gone to work with him to Mr. Harris's, and he has been there in the morning, and I have advised him several things and he would not take my advice; and he has taken and tore his clothes in pieces, and I could not see any reason he had for doing it, and I see him have a kind of froth come out of his mouth when he was in a mad state of lunacy.

Mr. Trebeck. The time you speak of is the time that your cousin speaks of? - No, it was not, but it was in the same house, and the same employment below stairs in the cellar.

Q. Do you know whether any body in the house besides you and your cousin took notice of this? - I don't know, I don't think that they did.

Q. How many people were employed together with him in the service of Mr. Harris? - There never was employed in general but two in the cellar.

Q. Did he go about and mix with other people at that time? - No, that was his situation in the house.

Q. Did Mr. Harris see him occasionally? - Not very often.

Q. Who paid him his wages? - Mr. Harris paid him Saturday night, in the ounting house.

Q. You did not think it necessary to take any particular care of him, confine him, or any thing of that sort? - He was under the care of a doctor that lived at Dalmahoy's, at Ludgate-hill; he has gone to Dublin now, and in business for himself.

Q. After he left Mr. Harris's service, where did he go? - He went to live with one Mr. Yeate, who lives at No. 157, in the Borough, Chymist and Druggist, to carry out loads occasionally.

Q. How long was he employed by him? - I cannot justly say, as near as I can guess, half a year.

Q. Is that gentleman here? - I suppose he is here.

MARY HARVEY sworn:

Q. You lived in, I believe, the same house with the prisoner, in Sermon-lane? - Yes.

Q. You lived with him on an intimate footing? - Yes.

Q. As man and wife? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember his coming home the evening this melancholy affair took place? - Perfectly well. He went out about eight o'clock, and came home about twelve.

Q. How, was he in liquor or not? - He had not the appearance of being in liquor at all when he came home; he asked me if I had had my supper; I told him I had, he said then he wanted his supper; he then went to the cupboard, and took the victuals out, and he then let the victuals up again, and went up into the bed room, as I thought to go to bed, I was preparing to take the infant up to bed with me, the insant's victuals, some ponada stood on the table; he was gone up a short space of time, and came down again.

Q. What quantity of victuals were these? - There was a little better than half a pint; he came down and he reached to the cupboard, where a quantity of moist sugar was in a bason between half a pound and a pound, and he emptied it all into the child's victuals that stood on the table, then he threw it instantly against the grate, which surprized me, and I asked him if he was mad? he then reached to

the mantle piece, and broke all the china, and all the things that stood on it as fast as he could throw them down; he then went round to the shelves, and as he went round the room he broke all the things in the same manner; he then went to the window and took down a wash hand bason and pitcher of water, and emptied the pitcher of water about the room. The whole space of time he walked in such a manner that his legs were higher than his head, and as he walked round the room, he lifted himself, and put himself in such a posture, and when he threw down the pitcher, it so alarmed me that I got up to try to pacify him; he made no answer, but the blood and slabber ran out of each side of his mouth; this alarmed me so much that I ran into the passage, and he took the candle and ran up stairs. The street door was not quite fastened, I pulled it further open, for I see a light through the crevice of the door; I then see a watchman and patrol close against the door, I asked them to give me a candle, as I had no light, they asked me if I had no candle in the house? I told them I had plenty up stairs, but I was afraid to go for it for fear of Dunn; they were then lighting the bit of candle and the report of a gun went off up stairs: I ran up stairs, and met him coming down, and I heard him say how came his street door open, what business have you to disturb me in my own house, are you come to rob me? he then returned up stairs, looked out of the window, and opened the window, and put some powder in the gun, and put it out of the window, I was in the room with him then; he in a short space of time fired it off after he had looked out, he then threw it on the floor. The rattles sprung at different times, during this he looked out of the window and he said, the thieves are about the house, I see I must make them go; he then ran down stairs with the fire arms in his hands and returned again in a saw minutes; he then reached an old sword and began to cut the curtains of the bed to pieces, he then cut great gashes in the chest of drawers, and broke the sword in the wainscotting of the room, and broke the door to pieces; I then strove to pacify him; he seemed to recollect himself a little, I begged him to go to bed, and I unbuttoned three buttons in his waistcoat, I asked him if he meant to kill me? I meant by the fright; he said no, I was dearer to him than his own soul, and he killed me; during this the noise, and the rattles in the street continued, and he catched up the fire arms and ran down stairs with them; I heard a great noise in the street, and I heard the report of two pistols, somebody knocked at the street door with great violence, our lock is a spring lock, and it was double locked; I went and strove to open it, but I could not because I could not directly find the key, I then heard the report of a gun, and people crying in the street, the man is dead! I thought it was Dunn that was dead, and I strove to find the key to get the door open, at lad I got the door open, and then they brought in the deceased. When the corps was brought in, there were two men, Putner and another, set up all the night with the dead man in my room below, I had some occasion to go down for my ring, I said, Putner, had you hold of this man before the piece went off? he said he had.

Q. To Putner. Did you say to this woman that you had hold of the prisoner at the bar before the man was killed? - I never said so, nor no person had hold of him before the piece was tired.

Mr. Const. The prisoner lived with you as you have described for some time? - Yes.

Q. Do I conclude fairly that you mean that I should collect from your evidence that he was out of his senses at times? - I thought him so.

Q. At different times? - Once before. I cannot say to the time, it may be six months before.

Q. Yet having seen him in that situation you who were not married to him chose to live with him as his wife? - I did.

Q. You have told us of the manner in which he broke the sword; I believe the watchmen were up the next day in the room? - They were.

Q. Did you shew them the curtains and bureau? - I did not. I believe there were a great many saw that the sword was broke left in the wainscot.

Q. You say you recollect to have asked Putner a question which was very natural, the next day you must be more collected; did you shew any body the curtains or any thing that you have mentioned now? - I did not.

Q. Do you know where he spent his evening? - I do not, he told me different places; he never would satisfy me.

BLADEN sworn.

Q. This man lived with you, I understand, for how long? - I was at home at the time above a fortnight or three weeks.

ABRAHAM VOICE sworn.

Q. Did you live at any time in Mrs. Harvey's house? - Yes, twelve months.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Perfectly well.

Q. Up to the present time? - Yes.

Q. Did you ever discover about him any marks of insanity? - Never, I sometimes spoke to him three or four times a week.

Q. Did you ever hear of it? - Never, till on this present occasion.

RICHARD HARRIS sworn.

Q. I believe you are a soap boiler? - Yes.

Q. The prisoner lived with you a length of time? - Yes.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing him in common with the other servants? - Yes.

Q. Did you ever discover any thing that made you think that he was deranged in his mind? - No.

Q. Did you ever hear any thing of that sort? - I cannot say I ever did.

Mr. Knowlys. You see him but seldom? - yes, frequently; three or four times a day, sometimes more.

Jury. Was he regular in coming on the Saturday night for his wages? - Very regular and a very good servant while he was with me.

ROBERT WETHERALL sworn.

Q. You are constable of Castlebaynard ward? - Yes, I am.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner at the bar? - About two years, or thereabouts.

Q. Do you know how long he has been in that neighbourhood? - I don't rightly know.

Q. Ever since you have known him, have you ever discovered any appearance of insanity about him? - None in the least.

Q. Have you ever heard such a thing? - Never.

Q. Did you see him the night after this unfortunate accident took place? - I see him the next morning.

Q. Did you take him to be examined? - I did.

Q. Was there any thing passed when you took him to the Compter that made you think he was a man out of his senses? - There were several words took place between the prisoner and me, but nothing that led me to think he was insane.

Q. Did you talk on this subject? - Yes, a little.

Q. Did you see him after in the Compter? - No, only once, that was the day the Coroner's warrant went to him.

Prisoner. It is impossible that I could have any spite or malice against a man that I never saw in my life; this man I never see in my life, either dead or alive. There were people about my house some in watchmens clothes and some not, and there are witnesses that can prove, that I was beat with a slick before I fired my piece.

THOMAS HARCOURT sworn.

I was spending the evening, Tuesday evening, the 3d of February in Trinity-lane, on my return home about one o'clock, I see the prisoner. I heard a noise first of all, and I saw the prisoner walking about the street with fire arms. I then after that see him go to his own door and desired to get in; by some means or other he could not get in, and some watchman or other got hold of him. There was a kind of scuffle ensued. There were two or three watchmen, I did not pay any particular attention, and in the scuffle the piece went off.

Mr. Const. What are you? - I am a grocer in Dean-street, Holborn.

Q. Did you see Mr Cricket at that instant you describe? - I did not pay any attention to any person scarcely; I only see a kind of scuffle, and the piece went off, and then I went away.

Q. Did you see a man killed by this accident? - I was not very near. I see two or three men together and very odd kind of language was being made use of, and a kind of scuffle appeared to me as I stood at a distance, I did not choose to go near for fear something might happen to myself.

Q. After the scuffle and the piece went off, did you observe a man fall? - I observed a man fall, and a man knocked at the door and the deceased was taken.

Q. Do you remember how many persons were present? - There appeared to me to be four or five, or five or six. There were other persons walking about the streets; there were four or five different people at the time that accident happened with the prisoner.

Q. Then they of course saw all that you have now stated? - They appeared to be a watchmen.

Q. And then you went away seeing the man drop down? - A lusty gentleman knocked at the doors and desired the deceased might be taken in there, and I instantly went away. I asked no question whatever.

Q. How happened you to give an account of this? - They found me; I was a few days after at a public house, the house I use in Charles-court, in the Strand, and I saw in the paper that he was committed.

Q. Who? - The prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you know his name at that time? - I did not, but the circumstance struck me. I was saying what a shocking circumstance it was, and the master of the house or some person there asked me who I was, and where I lived, and whether I would choose to come here to relate that circumstance?

Q. What house was this? - At the Bell.

Q. Who was the person that asked you this? - It is a person I had some trifling knowledge of, but I don't know his name.

Q. Who applied to you? - The brother to Dunn; he said his name was Dunn.

Q. You did not inquire, perhaps, particularly? - No, I did not.

Q. How soon after did he apply to you? - I suppose it might be in the course of two or three days after I see it in the paper.

Q. Then it was in the course of a

week after? - It was. He came to me, and asked me if I knew any thing of the circumstance that happened on the 4th of February, in the morning? I said, I was coming past at the time and I saw some little of the transaction; and he said, my brother's life is in danger; it is a very disagreeable situation, will you come forward, if you are subpoenaed, to say what you know about it? - I said in such consideration as that, I would.

Q. Did he tell you how he found you out? - By being at this man's in Charles-court; in the Strand; I understood, that the man that keeps the public house knows Dunn's brother, Dunn's brother told me so.

Q. Then the master of the public house knew you? - Certainly he had some knowledge of me because he used to serve me with beer; he knew where I lived.

Q. Did you attend the Coroner's Inquest? - No; I did not take any further notice of it; I told him, when his trial came on, if I was subpoenaed, I would come forward.

Q. Are you sure that you did not speak to any body at the time that this affair happened? - There was nobody there that I knew. I might say, what an affair this is, as any other person might say when any thing happens in the street.

Court. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before that time? - Never see him in my life.

Q. How long had you known his brother? - I don't know his brother.

Q. There was no piece levelled at the man at all? - I was not near enough to see that. There was a scuffle and I cannot say whether he shot the man accidentally or whether it was levelled or no.

SAMUEL MATTHEWS sworn.

I live at No. 27, Cursiror-street, Chancery-lane.

Q. Were you in the neighbourhood of Great Carter-lane on the evening of the 3d of February? - In the morning of the 4th I was, about one o'clock. I worked in Seething-lane, at an India warehouse, and I staid in that neighbourhood till half past twelve o'clock, at Thomas Sams's, in Seething-lane; I staid from four o'clock, at such time when I left the warehouse, till half past twelve in the morning.

Q. And what did you observe? - I heard the report of some fire-arms go off; it was at the corner of Sermon-lane, and I see three or four watchmen; and as they were together, I heard the report of another fire-arm going off, but I cannot say who let it off.

Prisoner. Mr. Putner swore, that the daughter of Mrs. Harvey cried murder in that house; Mrs. Harvey or daughter never cried murder in that house.

Court to Fizgerald. You heard the cry of murder, can you inform us from what house that cry proceeded? - I was at one end of Sermon-lane, and I heard the cry at the other.

GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-53

211. THOMAS THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a bank note, value 50l. No. 3800, dated London, the 3d of June, 1794; another bank note, value 20l. marked 8030, dated London, August 1, 1794; another bank note, value 20l. No. 2170, dated 16th May, 1793; another bank note, value 10l. No. 8147, dated London, March 20, 1794; another bank note, value 10l. No. 6077, dated London, April 27, 1792; another bank note, No. 2445, London, 13th May, 1794; another bank note, value 10l.

No. 8881, dated London, 11th August, 1794; the said bank notes being the property of James Ireland and Phillp Protherow .

A second COUNT, for stealing the said bank notes, as the property of Richard Downes , Henry Thornton , John Free , and John Thornton , junior .(The indictment opened by Mr. Russell, and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

THOMAS HEMSON sworn.

Q. You are clerk I believe to Ireland and Protherow, in Bristol? - I am.

Q. Had you occasion to send any letters to London by the post, from Bristol, on the 3d of October last? - We sent two.

Q. To whom were they directed? - Henry Thornton, Esq . M. P. London.

Q. Did you make an entry, at the time when the property was put into the letters, of the numbers and dates of the bills? - I did.

Q. Tell my Lord what entry you made of these bills? - Ten bank, one hundred and ninety pounds. They were entered particularly by Mr. Fry; the copy of them in another book.

Q. Did you see the letter put into the post? - I did not; I delivered them to Mr. Fry, to put into the post.

THOMAS FRY sworn.

Q. You are clerk to Ireland and Protherow? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember, on the 3d of October, when some notes were enclosed in a letter to Mr. Thornton? - Yes? -

8881, August 41, 1794, ten pounds.

6677, April 27, 1792, ten pounds.

2445, May 13, 1794, ten pounds.

1417, February 25.

2170, May 16, 1793, ten pounds.

8147, March 29, 1794, ten pounds.

8039, August 1, 1794, twenty pounds.

3800, June 3, 1794, fifty pounds.

Q. When you made the entry of these notes they were enclosed in the letter? - Yes.

Q. Did you put that letter in the post yourself? - Yes.

Q. At what time? - Between a quarter after three and half after, before the office shut.

Q. On what day? - On the 3d of October; the bank notes were all in, one letter and cash notes.

Q. To Hemson. What is the firm of Ireland and Protherow? - James Ireland , Philip Protherow , Henry Bengoe , Joseph Haythorne , and Matthew Wright .

JAMES FRY sworn.

Q. Were you employed at the Post office in Bristol on the 3d of October last? - Yes.

Q. Did you make up the mail on the 3d of October? - I did.

Q. How did you do it? - I put the bundle of letters in the bag, tied it with a packthread, and then sealed it.

Q. Now, sir, when that bag is tied and sealed, is it put into another bag or sack? - It is put into a large leather sack.

Q. Was that secured any other way, that outer one? - It was tied, but not sealed.

Q. When you had made it up, to whom did you deliver it? - To Lewis Williams , the mail guard of Bristol, from Bristol to Marlborough.

Mr. Knapp. All that you know is, that you delivered the bag with the letters to go by the mail that day, to Williams, the mail guard; whether this letter or any other identical letter was in the bag, you don't know? - It is impossible.

Court. You put into the bag all the London letters that were put into the office? - Yes, I did.

THOMAS SMART sworn.

Q. What is your department in the Post office? - To take the bags out of the coaches that arrive from the country to London, in Lombard-street, and deliver them to the men who carry them to the inland office.

Q. Did the Bristol mail of the 3d of October, arrive in due course on the 4th? - Yes, to the best of my knowledge There were three mails came in a cart that day to the office. The guard accompanied the Bristol mail in the cart, from the Gloucester Coffee house.

CHARLES READ sworn.

Q. You are employed in the Post office in London? - Yes.

Q. Did you receive this Bristol mail, which arrived on the 4th, into the inland office? - I did.

Q. In what condition was the Bristol bag when it was brought to you in the inland office? - It was untied.

Q. Did it appear to have been tied and sealed? - No appearance at all; the sack, thread and seal was all entirely gone; I delivered it to the president of the office.

Q. What in consequence of finding it in that condition? - Yes.

LEWIS WILLIAMS sworn.

Q. Did you act as guard to the Bristol mail coach, on the 2d of October? - I did. I went from London on the 2d, to Bristol, with the coach; I went from London the whole way on that occasion, that is unusual; it is my department only to come from Bristol to Marlborough.

Q. You had been in London on the business of your own, and took that opportunity of returning? - Yes.

Q. Did you return with the coach from Bristol on the 3d? - Yes, I did.

Q. Did you receive the mail of Mr. Free, to bring to London? - I did.

Q. Was it as far as you could observe in the usual state? - I see the Bristol bag sealed, and put into a large sack, and the sack tied, not sealed; I brought it to the Bush tavern door, and and there it was handed up to me, and I put it into the corner of the box, the box under the guard's seat.

Q. How far did you come with the mail? - From Bristol to Marlborough.

Q. And then another guard supplied your place? - Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar. - That is the person that went out of London on the 2d; he went outside as far as the top of Speen-hill.

Q. Did he go the whole journey to Bristol? - Yes, but one part he went outside.

Q. After he had arrived in Bristol, when did you see him next? - I did not see him till after I went into a room in the Bush tavern.

Q. Did he return with the coach on the third? - He did.

Q. What time did the coach, which went from London on the second arrive at Bristol? - It arrived at Bristol about twelve at noon, on the third; it set out in return at four in the afternoon.

Q. In what way did the prisoner leave Bristol on the return of the coach? - On the coach box with the coachman.

Q. Did he continue there the whole of your part of the journey to Marlborough? - No.

Q. Where did he change? - A little of this side of Calne; he got first of all on the roof, and said he was very much tired, and I told him I did not care if herid three or four miles in my place; he got over into my place then, and I went on the box along with the coachman.

Q. How far did the prisoner ride in your seat? - About four miles and three quarters, as near as I can guess; we got

to a place called Backington, about six miles from Marlborough; I told him then I must have my own situation, he went over the roof on to the box again, and continued so to Marlborough.

Q. You got into your seat then, and at Marlborough there you delivered up your charge to Thomas Hawkins ? - I quitted the coach there, and he took it.

Q. How was the box at this time? - The box is not locked, it is fastened by an iron, that you shift upon it, a staple, that comes for a padlock to go through it, but it was not then locked.

Mr. Knowlys. Was the box locked when you stopped at Calne? - No, it was not; it was locked while I was gone to the Post office, at Bath, no other place.

Q. Then any persons about the coach might have got to the box at Calne? - No, I was not away two minutes, I am sure at the farthest; I jumps off when I comes to the office, and hands the bags out, and takes them to the post-master, and brings the rest and puts them in, and goes on again.

Q. During that time you necessarily leave the place? - It cannot be two minutes, because I jumps off as the coach goes along.

Q. The coach does not stop any where between Bath and Calne? - Yes, it does, at Chippenham, to change horses.

Q. The box was unlocked at Chippenham? - It was.

Q. Now the coach travels while it is on the road, eight and ten miles an hour? - About nine miles an hour.

Q. Would it not be a dangerous thing for any person to attempt the getting out this bag while the coach is moving so rapidly? - Not at all dangerous to me, for I have done it many times.

Court. While the coach is going on you mean? - Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. To a person not accustomed to shift the bags, as you are, it must be a dangerous thing? - A thin person may do it better than a person that is bulky.

Q. I ask you whether in your opinion, it would not be a dangerous thing to a person not accustomed to it? - Not so very pleasant to a person not used to it.

Q. You offered this to him as an easier place to ride in, he being satigued, going all night, and coming back again? - Yes.

Q. The consequence of his taking this place, was not from his asking you, but your offering to let him have the place? - it was; he said he was so tired, he did not know what he should do; he got on the roof of the coach, and it was not possible for any body to ride there, sleepy.

THOMAS HAWKINS sworn.

Q. Did you take the charge of this Williams? - I did, on the 3d of October last, at Marlborough.

Q. Where did the prisoner ride when he set out at Marlborough? - On the box, with the coachman; he rode in that situation about half a mile; he then left the box, and got on the roof of the coach; and as we are not accustomed to let any one ride there, we exchanged stations, he got into my seat.

Q. While the coachman was going on? - No, we always stop at the top of the hill, to give the horses a little wind, and then we changed places; we rode in that situation about twenty miles, till we came near to Thachum, there we exchanged situations again, he went on the box, and I took my seat.

Q. How long did you continue so? - Till we got to Reading; I then told him he might ride a few miles in my situation again; he rode in my situation to Hare Hatch, about seven miles; I there told him he must go again on the coach box; about a hundred yards from Hare Hatch, the coachman and I exchanged

situations, and continued so to Colnbrooke.

Q. You drove? - Yes; Mr. Thomas was then on the box with me. At Colnbrooke I got into the guard's situation again, and rode to London; Mr. Thomas rode all that way on the coach box; he got down at Hyde Park Corner.

Q. What became of him afterwards? - I don't know.

Q. Your coach stops at the Gloucester Coffee house, I believe? - Yes, it does.

Q. Did you convey the mail from Gloucester Coffee house to Lombard-street? - I did; I brought it in a cart provided for that purpose.

Q. As far as depended on you; was it in the same state as when you received it at Marlborough? - It was.

Q. Are you quite certain that Mr. Thomas, the prisoner at the bar, was the man that you saw there? - I have no doubt about it at all, I told him in the course of the Journey I had the pleasure of seeing his face often.

Mr. Knapp. There can be no doubt that Mr. Thomas was the person. I believe the prisoner was considerably. I satigued, and for that reason you offered him your place, I believe in point of fact he had very near fell off the roof? - He appeared to be going to sleep and in danger of falling.

Q. And therefore you offered him your seat not only once but twice? - Yes; once at Reading and once at Marlborough.

Q. When you got to Hare Hatch, then the coachman took your place? - Yes.

Q. And the prisoner came all the way from there to London on the box? - Yes.

Q. And the coachman came fifteen miles in the guards situation? - Yes.

Q. Is the coachman here? - I have not seen him in court, I believe he is not here.

HENRY THORNTON sworn.

Q. I believe you are of the house of Downes, Thornton, and Co. - Yes.

Q. Be so good to state to us the names of the partners? - Richard Downes, Henry Thornton , John Free , and John Thornton, the son.

Q. Were the Bank notes in question, or the letter enclosed ever received by your house from Messrs. Ireland's house in Bristol? - No; they were not.

Mr. Knowlys. The letter that contains these Bank notes are generally given to the hands of one of your clerks before they come to your hands? - It is generally the case.

Q. You mean to say this, that none of your servants or clerks delivered you any letter containing the Bank notes described? - No; but I received on the 8th some of the other notes.

Mr. Garrow. But not from Ireland's house? - No, they came from an anonymous person.

THOMAS BICKERSTAFF sworn.

Q. You are clerk in the house of Messrs. Dorset's, and Co. bankers, in New Bond-street, London? - Yes.

Q. Do you know the Prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Q. On what occasion did you see him? - At the Banking House in Bond-street, on the 7th of October, he came to open an account at the house.

Q. That expression imports that he had no account there before? - Yes.

Q. Did he open an account? - Yes; he did.

-SCOTT sworn.

Q. I want to receive from you the Bank notes that you have got.

-ASHLEY sworn.

Q. What are you? - I am clerk in the house of Dorset and Co.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar make any deposit at your house by way of opening an account? - He did, on the 7th of October.

Q. Be so good as to give in the particulars of the Bank notes that he deposited? - The first a Bank note of fifty pounds, No. 3800, June 3, 1794. The next is a ten pound, No. 7636; a ten pound, No. 5633; a ten pound, No. 5176; a ten pound, No. 89; a ten pound, No. 6677, April 27, 1792; a ten pound, No. 2449, May 13, 1794; a ten pound, No. 1417; a ten pound, No. 2170, May 16, 1793; a ten pound, No. 8881, Aug. 11, 1794.

Mr. Knapp. This deposit consisted of a great number of other bills and notes? - It did.

HENRY BARNES sworn.

Q. Had you any money transactions with the prisoner at the bar on the 7th of October? - Yes, I had.

Q. Did you receive from him that day this ten pound bank note? (Note shewn him.) - I received a ten pound Bank note.

Q. What did you do with it? - I paid it to Downes. Thornton and Free the same day.

Q. You paid it in discharge of an acceptance of your's that was then due? - I did.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn.

Q. You are clerk in the house of Messrs. Downes and Co. - Yes.

Q. Look at that note. (A note shewn him.) Did you receive that note of the last witness Barnes? - Yes.

Q. On what day? - I cannot say that, I know I received it from him, by his own name; that I writ on it at the time, on the face, in black ink.

Q. What is the Number of that note? - 8147.

Q. Have you not brought your book here, by which you can ascertain the day of receiving it? - Yes; I think it was on Tuesday the 7th of October.

Q. Can you tell what was the amount that was paid to you by Barnes on that day? - Yes, It was a hundred and fifty pounds ten shillings.

Q. Have you any doubt that the bank note on which you wrote Barnes's name, constituted any part of the hundred and fifty pounds ten shillings? - I am certain it did.

Mr. Knowlys. How long have you known the gentleman Mr. Thomas? - I suppose it may be four years. I never knew any thing but honesty of him.

Q. Have you had any dealing with him? - Certainly.

MATTHEW VERNON sworn.

Q. You are one of the cashiers of the Bank of England? - Yes.

Q. Authorized to sign Bank notes by the Governor and Co. of the Bank of England? - Yes.

Q. Look at that Bank note, is it signed by you? - Yes; it is No. 8147.

Q. This has Barnes on it, on the 7th of October; was that outstanding and due against the Bank? - It was. This is another of mine No. 6677, 27th of April 1792, ten pounds. This No. 2445, 13th of May 1794, ten pounds, is signed by Giles Collings.

Q. He is cashier in the Bank of England? - He is. The next is 2170, 16th of May, James Greenaway , ten pounds. The next 8881, 11th of August 1794, Henry Treckle, ten pounds.

Mr. Garrow. These are the notes that were paid into Dorset's Bank.

Q. To Scott. Where did you get these Bank notes that you delivered in? - The principal part of them I received through the channel of the Bank; I believe all that have been produced at this time in

consequence of their having been stopped on the 8th of October, they were brought to our house.

Q. How soon were you apprized that such notes ought to have arrived? - In the course of business we ought to have received the letter on the 4th, on Saturday.

Q. How soon did you learn that such letter had been sent that you did not acknowledge? - We suspected it on Monday, their letter written on Monday referred to one written on the third.

Q. The Bank notes have they ever passed through your house? - One of them has, the one that Mr. Barnes paid to our house.

-PARKIN sworn.

Q. How soon was the prisoner apprehended? - On Thursday the 9th of October, in consequence of information being given to the Post office. I went to the prisoner's house, in Denmark-street, St. Giles's, on the 9th, and told him of the circumstance of a Bank note having been traced to his hands; and I asked him where he received it? he said, that a person, a stranger to him, who made use of the name of a Mr. Wayman, came in his name and asked for change for the note, which he gave him; that the same person came again in a few minutes, and asked change for another note, which he gave him; that he returned a third time with other notes and made the like request; that he came a fourth and fifth; and, I think, he said a sixth time, on the same evening with the same request, that he gave him cash to the amount of one hundred pounds or upwards he believed; I thought it my duty to order him to be taken to the Public Office in Bow-street, and he was there taken on Thursday the 9th; and he was there examined before Mr. Addington; and at Mr. Addington's request, I took down in writing what he said; this is the original minutes that I have in my hand. After it was taken it was read to the prisoner, either by myself in Mr. Addington's presence, or by Mr. Addington.

Q. Did he make any objection to any of the facts stated as to the accuracy of them? - To no part of them at that time.

Q. When did you appear again before the magistrate? - In the evening of that day. Mr. Addington then said that he should read it over to him, and desired if it needed any alteration or correction, that he would mention it as he read it. After Mr. Addington had read about six or seven lines of it, the prisoner stopped him, and said that that part of it was not true, for that he had not been at Croydon Fair as mentioned in the examination, but had been at Bristol, on which Mr. Addington said he should not further proceed in reading the examination.

The examination read by the clerk of the Court.

"Middlesex. The examination of Thomas Thomas , of Denmark street, in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields, in the county of Middlesex, grocer ; taken before me William Addington , Esq. one of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace, for the said county, this 9th of October, 1794, who faith that he left his house about seven o'clock on Thursday evening last, and went ot Charing-cross, where the Croydon Coach goes from, and arrived at Croydon at twelve at night; was set down in the street; was booted, and went into the fair, and continued there till the morning, and did not go to bed; continued at Croydon till about eight o'clock on Friday night, and not being able to get a coach, he walked the whole way to town; stopped at a public house at Strutton about ten o'clock, and drank a pint of beer, and then came home, &c."

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-54

212. WILLIAM LANGDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , forty-two yards of fustian, value 6l. the goods of Samuel Swan , in his dwelling house .

SAMUEL SWAN sworn.

Q. Now with respect to these forty-two yards of fustian. This man was your servant ? - Yes. The second day of this month, on Thursday, a constable, Wainwright, brought him into my house, a little before eight o'clock; he had got the piece of goods wrapped up in a great coat; he opened the great coat, the constable did, and asked me whether that was my goods? I said it was.

Q. How much fustian was this? - Forty two yards. He said he caught him in Little Bush-lane, Cannon street, about the door of one Jones; when Langdon went into the house, Wainwright, the constable, followed him into the house.

Q. What is it worth? - About six pounds.

Mr. Gurney. This man was your porter? - Yes, about six weeks.

Q. Did he sell goods in the warehouse? - He did sell goods.

Q. And he has carried out goods? - Yes, he has.

Q. Has he carried out goods, and sold them by your desire? - No.

Q. Has not he sold goods and carried them out by your approbation? - No, never; our customers come to the house.

Court. Was he still a servant at your house when this happened? - Yes.

-WAINWRIGHT sworn.

I am a constable. The prisoner at the bar, about seven in the morning, on Thursday, was standing at Jones's door, in Little Bush-lane.

Q. What is Mr. Jones? - I don't know; he is a man that deals in dry saltery and a druggist. He had this piece of fustian when at the warehouse door, under his arm; he went into the shop. I followed him in, and very soon the parcel was put down on the cask or table that is in the warehouse, and a great coat; he had a knife in his hand, pointing to the parcel, as though he was going to cut the string; I asked him what that was he brought in? he rather hesitated about the matter; I said, what are you going to do with it? he gave me no particular answer; I said, where have you brought it from? he said, he had brought it from Old Fish-street, from Mr. Gouty, or some such name.

Q. Not from Mr. Swan? - No, I asked him what he was going to do with it? he said, he was going to carry it into the Borough; I asked him whether he had got a bill of parcels? he said, no; I asked Mr. Jones whether he knew any thing of this man, whether he knew he lived with Mr. Gouty? he said, he believed he did; I asked him if he knew any thing respecting the goods? he would not give any satisfactory answer, Mr. Jones would not. I then said, I would go back to Mr. Gouty, to Old Fish-street; he begged I would not take him back to his master, but that he would give me the piece of goods, and he would call the next day, or the day after, and make me every satisfaction I could wish; I then told him I was a constable, and all the satisfaction I wanted was, to carry it to his master where he lived; and then I

carried him to Mr. Gouty, and asked them if he was their servant? they told me he was not, (I had hold of the prisoner all the time) they told me he had been a porter, and had left them, and lived with Mr. Swan, in Bread-street. I then took him to Mr. Swan, and knocked at the door, and the maid said, Mr. Swan was in bed; I desired he might be called up.

Q. Did you see him? - I did, and shewed him the goods; and he said, they were his property, they had his private mark on them.

Jury. How came you to follow him to Jones's? - I saw him at the door, with this under his arm; I knew the house.

Q. How came you to know it?

Court. Constables generally know where bad houses are.

Mr. Gurney. I am desired to ask you this question; did you not tell him it he would give you the goods, you would let him go? - No, he offered the goods over and over again.

Court to Swan. Look at the goods. Where were they kept? - In the warehouse.

Q. When did you see it last? - I cannot tell when I see it last, having a quantity of these goods; if I had looked for it I should have missed it.

Q. Is there your private mark on it? - Yes, there is, it is an R. and dash, my own hand writing.

Mr. Gurney. It may happen you sell goods with these marks on? - I am very clear I had not, because of the number of the cloths.

Jury. You take stock regularly, I suppose? - Yes, about once a year; we took this stock about three months ago, and whatever is sold we mark off.

Q. Do you know this number was missing from your books? - Yes, there are more numbers missing besides this; here is a gentleman here that took stock with me.

-GREY sworn.

I took this account of the stock the second day before the prisoner was taken to the Compter, after he was apprehended, the second day after he was taken. The book is not here.

Mr. Gurney to Swan. Is that private mark peculiar to yourself? - No; other people may have the same mark.

Q. Do not you know other people make the same mark; does not Mr. Grey? - No, he does not.

Mr. Grey. I do, but Mr. Swan don't know it.

Mr. Gurney to Swan. The knowledge you acquired, whether you had not sold these goods, arose from your books from inspecting them? - No, more than that; we found that number missing.

Prisoner. I leave it entirely to my counsel.

The prisoner called Mr. Gouty, Mr. Grey, and two other witnesses to his character.

Court to Swan. Is the warehouse at all connected with the building? - Entirely, but we live up stairs, entirely one building.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 20.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-55

210. CATHARINE FAIRCHILD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a patched work bed quilt, value 5s. a linen sheet, value 2s. and a flat iron, value 6d. the goods of Joseph Asbury , in a lodging room .

JOSEPH ASBURY sworn.

I keep lodging; I let the prisoner a lodgings, on the 12th of March, for three shillings and sixpence a week furnished.

Q. Did you let her, with the lodgings, a patched work bed quilt, a linen sheet, and a flat iron? - Yes.

Q. How long was she in your lodgings? - Only three days. I had a suspicion that things were out of the room, and one of the neighbours told me that she laid a bed the greatest part of the second day; she came on Thursday the 12th, on the Monday following I insisted on coming into the room, and when I came into the room I found the bed quilt, sheet, and flat iron out of the room; I told her I insisted on knowing where they were gone; she said one was ar Mr. Parker's, Wood-street, and another was in St. Martins Le Grand. I have got the duplicates.

Q. Did she give you the duplicates? - She did.

Q. You did not force them from her? - No, I did not.

Prisoner. I only wish to ask her if she did not give me till twelve o'clock to get these things out, and I had not time to go to my friends to get the money.

-WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a sheet pledged for one shilling and sixpence, by the prisoner.

Q. See whether that is your duplicate? - Yes. I never see the prisoner before, but I am positive it is the prisoner.

Q. What day was it? - The 16th of March.

MORGAN NICHOLL sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce a quilt pledged for two shillings, by a woman in the name of Taylor, just at the dusk of the evening, and I really cannot recollect the person; I gave her a duplicate of it.

Q. To Prosecutor. Has the duplicate the name of Taylor? - Yes.

Q. Look at the things. - The quilt is mine; I will swear positively to it; there is a piece of my wife's gown on it; as to the sheet I cannot positively swear to it, it is not marked, I believe it is mine.

Q. What do you value it at? - Five shillings.

Prisoner. I can only say I have had a long sit of illness, and was brought to great distress, and my friends promised to put me in a good situation, but they neglected me, and I expected to get a little money, but could not.

GUILTY .

Fined one shilling and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-56

214. EVAN MORGAN was indicted for that he, on the 11th of February , being, a person employed in sorting letters in the General Post office, in London, a certain letter, then lately sent by one Samuel Read , by the post from Watford, in the county of Norfolk, directed to Mrs. Mary Harris , Birmingham, containing therein, a certain bill of exchange, dated Bradford, 6th February 1795, signed and subscribed by one Richard Leach , directed to one Thomas Leach , requesting the said Thomas Leach to pay to Mrs. Mary Harris or order, the sum of eighty pounds, value received; came to his hands and possession, as such person so employed as aforesaid; and that he did feloniously secret the said letter, then containing the said bill of exchange, the said bill of exchange being the property of Mary Harris .

Indicted in a second COUNT for the same offence, only calling it a packet instead of a letter.

And several other COUNTS, for the like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.(The case opened by Mr. Garrow.)

SAMUEL READ sworn.

Q. You are rider to Mrs. Mary Harris, of Birmingham? - I am.

Q. Did you, on Monday, the 9th of February, inclose any thing in a letter to her? - I did, from Bradford, in the county of Norfolk.

Q. How was it addressed? - Mrs.

Mary Harris , Edginston-street, Birmingham.

Q. What did you enclose to her? - A bill of exchange, value eighty pounds, like wise-

Q. Look at these fragments, and tell me whether this contains part of the bill that was enclosed? - I verily believe it is.

Q. Have you any account of the bill of exchange? - I have; here is the bill book; copy of the bill sent February 6, 1795; Leach on Leach, two months after date, eight pounds. I have nothing more.

Q. Who was it payable to? - Mary Harris.

Q. What was the name of the person that drew the bill at first? - Mr. Richard Leach , at Watford, to Mr. Leach, No. 29, some street, London.

Q. Did you put any mark on it? - I did not.

Q. Did you procure any money on it? - Yes, she paid me.

Q. Now, besides this bill of exchange, did you enclose any bank of England bills? - I did; three of ten pounds, two of twenty pounds, and one of five pounds; the whole amounting to seventy-five pounds.

Q. When you had made up your letter, what did you do with it? - I put into the office at Watford myself.

Mr. Shephard. You have told us this bill was directed to Mr. Leach, in London; can you tell us where? - I cannot perfectly recollect where.

Mr. Garrow. (looking at it) Have you any doubt that that is the bill? - I have not the least doubt about it.

Mr. Shepherd. Did you know Mr. Leech before? - Yes, I did.

Q. Mr. Leach of London? - No, I did not.

JOHN SWINDEN sworn.

Q. You are the Post master at Watford? - Yes.

Q. Did you make up the bag on the 9th of February from Watford to London? - I did.

Q. In what manner did you make it up? - The London letters and country letters by themselves; and the packers by themselves in three separate parcels.

Q. Therefore all that were to come to London, you made up as London letters? - I did.

Q. I don't know whether you happen to recollect the letter that was addressed to Mrs. Harris? - Perfectly I do.

Q. What makes you recollect that? - My wife being a Birmingham woman, and just coming from Birmingham about ten days before, and a letter was directed, on that night to Mrs. Harris, Birmingham, which appeared to me to have an enclosure.

Q. You sealed it up in the regular way? - Yes, I dispatched it at the usual hour to Hemel Hempstead.

Q. The weather was very inclement at this time, your mails did not travel very well, I do not know whether you know that? - They do not to Hemel Hempstead.

HARADINE sworn.

Q. You are of the General Post office at London? - Yes.

Q. How is the mail conveyed from Watford to London? - It is conveyed to Redbourn, and from thence in the Leeds mail coach to London.

Q. Did the Leeds mail coach arrive on that day the tenth, or the next? - It did not arrive till the morning of the eleventh.

LANGSTAFF sworn.

Q. You are employed in the general Post office in Lombard-street? - Yes.

Q. The mail that left Watford on the ninth, did it arrive at the General Post office on the eleventh in it's usual state? - It did.

Q. Was it regularly made up and sealed? - It was in the usual way.

Q. Of course delivered out to be sorted? - Yes.

DANIEL STOWE sworn.

Q. On the 11th of February, what was

the employment of the prisoner at the bar in the General Post office? - To open bags, the several bags that were delivered to him, and to take an account of them, to deliver in that account to the proper officer, and to sort the letters passing through London into the country.

Q. Are you in the General Post office? - Yes.

Q. So that if a letter from Watford to Birmingham had sell into one of his bags, it was his duty to sort it, in order to send it to Birmingham? - It was part of his duty to sort that letter.

Q. That would be sent of course, by the mail of that evening, to Birmingham? - It would so.

Court. Was he the only sorter for this bag? - No.

Q. Who was there besides? - I cannot exactly recollect.

Q. Was it his business to attend to the bag from Watford to London? - It was not. His business was to open bags and deliver them out; it was his duty, with eight or nine more gentlemen, to sort letters that were to go into the country; I don't mean to say it exactly belonged to the prisoner at the bar to sort these letters that came from Watford, but a letter which arrived from the country post on the morning of the 11th, and which was to go into the country on the evening of the same day, went through his hands in common, with eight others.

WILLIAM COULSTON sworn.

Q. You are a sorter in the Inland office? - Yes.

Q. Now, will you describe, to give a little more information to these gentlemen, in what manner the letters that come out of the country, and which are to pass through the London post, are separated, and what is done with them afterwards. What is the first thing that is done with them? - They are taken out of the bag and taken to be stamped, and then given to the sorters; then those that are to be delivered in London are separated from those that are not to be delivered in London.

Q. What was the business of the prisoner, on the morning of the 12th? - To open the bags and sort the country letters for their destination in the evening.

Q. How many do you think were employed in doing the same thing? - About nine or ten.

Q. Did you see him employed in that way that morning? - Yes.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular in his conduct? - I observed him take a letter and put it in his pocket, and from there he went out of the back door with it; and I immediately went and told Mr. Raymond of it.

Jury. Did he take the letter out of the bag? - No; from where he was sorting. Mr. Raymond went out, in about five minutes after I went out myself; I went up stairs and found Mr. Raymond at the privy door; Mr. Raymond said, it will not be necessary for both of us to stop here; he went further on, and I stopped there, and I see the prisoner come out, he went down the first landing from the privy; there are holes from the privy; I see him read a piece of paper; at that time Mr. Raymond had come up from the further end of the gallery to me, Mr. Raymond pushed past, and went down and followed him into the yard; when the prisoner got about the middle of the yard, I see the prisoner tear the paper and throw it way; I picked up them papers, me and Mr. Raymond did, and took them to Mr. Stowe and Mr. Slater.

Q. Did you make any observation on the paper you picked up? - The first piece I picked up had eighty pounds on it in figures.

Q. What time of the day was this? - In the morning, about eight o'clock, soon after the mail arrived.

Q. The stair case is a dark place, up three pair of stairs? - Yes, it is. I went out a second time and found some more in the yard, which corresponded.

Q. And you see Mr. Raymond pick up papers? - I did.

Q. Did you and Mr. Raymond deliver

the papers you picked up, to Mr. Howe and Mr. Slater? - We did.

Q. Did you pick up these papers which you delivered to Mr. How and Mr. Slater in the place where you had seen the prisoner throw away pieces of paper? - I did.

Q. Did you pick up all that you found? - I did.

Q. Was there any stamp on any part of what you picked up? - Not on any one I picked up.

Q. I don't know whether you see them put together? - I did not.

Q. Did you afterwards search the stair case? - Yes, we did; we took a candle out of the kitchen, Mr. Raymond and me, and in three or four of the bottom stairs we found two or three bits.

Q. Did these two or three bits assist in making up what was previously found between you and Mr. Raymond? - It did.

Mr. Shepherd. I understand you to say, this young man was employed to open bags? - Yes; and when there were no bags to open, to sort country letters.

Q. I ask you, this morning what was he employed in; did he receive bags or what? - He received them and opened them.

Q. And then delivered over these bags to other persons to sort them? - No; there is a messenger that takes them from him to the sorters.

Q. I understand you then to say, that he received bags and opened them, and then they were delivered to a messenger who delivered them to other sorters to sort them? - Yes.

Q. Who were the persons that were that morning the sorters of the letters? - I cannot mention all.

Q. Do you mean to say, that morning he was a sorter of letters? - Yes, after he had opened bags.

Q. Do you mean to say that the young man that morning after this happened, was employed in sorting of letters? - Not after this happened.

Q. This young man you observed him tearing a piece of paper in the yard? - I did.

Q. Had you any dispute with him before that? - We had a little dispute with him about a fortnight before, but there was not above six words passed.

Q. You had been on good terms since that? - O yes, we did not speak together for about a day, but not longer.

Q. Did you ever charge any body else with this offence? - Mr. Gage I did.

Court. What with taking this very letter? - No.

Mr. Shepherd. On your oath, did not you charge Mr. Gage, and was not Mr. Gage searched, and was it not in consequence of nothing being found on Mr. Gage that the charge was made against the prisoner at the bar? - It was a long while after that.

Q. Did not you charge Mr. Gage with having taken a letter out of the very case, and was it not after Mr. Gage was searched, and no letter found, that you made your charge against the prisoner at the bar? - It was a fortnight after that I saw Mr. Gage take a letter.

Court. Did you do it on that same morning on which you charged the prisoner Morgan? - No, it was a fortnight after.

Mr. Shepherd. Did not you charge Mr. Gage with having taken this letter or bill? - I never charged Mr. Gage with this letter or bill. I charged Mr. Gage with having taken a letter out of the box of the eighth division; it was above a fortnight after this.

Q. Whether it was this letter or no, you did charge him with taking a letter? - I said, to the best of my knowledge, I see him take a letter.

Q. Did not you apologize before the superiors of that Office, and beg Mr. Gage's pardon, for having so charged him? - I wrote two apologies and sent them to Mr. Gage, and told him that he might make it as public as he thought proper. To the best of my recollection, I see Mr. Gage take a letter, and put it into his pocket, about half an hour after. I went and told the president what I had seen. The reason that I did not go before, I thought that perhaps he might

suspect me, and hide it; and the president called him into their room, and examined Mr. Gage, and found no letter on him. Mr. Gage required an apology to be made, and I wrote to him an apology, and sent it to him, saying in it, that he might make it as public as he thought proper.

Q. Do you mean to state, that except that one day, you had no coolness or quarrel with the prisoner? - I do; which was, that I said I would kick him when he went out of the office; and he went and told Mr. Blagrave of it.

Q. The first bit of paper you picked up had eighty pounds on it; had it any thing else? - Not that I know.

Q. Did you deliver that to your superiors? - I did, along with the rest.

Mr. Garrow. This transaction, with respect to Mr. Gage, was a fortnight after this man was in custody? - It was.

Q. Not at all connected with this subject? - None in the least.

Q. Now, with respect to this man, had you communicated your suspicions to Mr. Raymond before you went out to watch him? - Yes.

Q. I take it for granted you never made any apology to the prisoner, though you did to Mr. Gage? - No, I did not.

Q. Now, at the time you stated Mr. Gage to have taken a letter, did you believe it or was it a false charge? - I did believe it; I was almost certain, but there was none found on him.

-RAYMOND sworn.

Q. Did Coulston communicate something to you with respect to the prisoner at the bar? - He did. I went out of the office supposing he was gone to the privy. I found the door shut. When I was standing there, Mr. Coulston came up. I then left my situation; and let Mr. Coulston stand there for some little while. When I returned back, I asked him who came out of the privy? he told me, that he saw the prisoner go down stairs, and on the second pair of stairs, take a paper out of his waistcoat pocket.

Q. Did you come in sight of the prisoner at the bottom of the stairs? - Yes, going from the privy into the yard.

Q. What did you see him do? - I see him tear some paper and throw it down. He walked along the yard towards the office door, tearing paper, and throwing it away which I immediately picked up.

Q. Now, did you pick up that second paper in such a manner as to be sure it was what he had thrown away? - I did.

Q. Did that constitute a part of what you afterwards delivered to Mr. Stowe and Mrs. Slater? - It did.

Q. Did you pick up in this manner that which you are sure came out of his hands? - Yes.

Q. Did you see Coulston pick up paper? - I did.

Q. Did you pick up other paper on your other search? - I did.

Q. Did you deliver it to Messrs. Slater and Stowe? - Mr. Coulston did, in my presence.

Q. Did you deliver all that you picked up under these circumstances? - I did.

Q. Did you deliver any thing but what was picked up? - No.

Q. Did you see it pasted on paper? - I did.

Q. Did any thing strike you before it was pasted on paper? - A one shilling stamp.

Q. Are these the fragments that were picked up by you and Coulston? - They are.

Q. Have you the least doubt that they were all thrown away by the prisoner after he came from the privy? - I have no doubt at all.

Mr. Knowlys. Them papers were thrown away in different parts of the yard? - The yard had just been swept; there was no other paper in the yard.

Q. They had been thrown in different parts of the yard? - They had.

Q. A quantity of paper did there appear to be? - No.

Q. How many pieces do you think there may be in all, two or three hundred pieces? - No; about a dozen, more or less.

Q. You seem to describe as if he was throwing away for some distance from the privy to the office door? - The last he threw away I picked up as soon as they came out of his hand.

Q. You did not pick up the first? - I did part of the first.

MATTHEW SLATER sworn.

Q. You are one whom they call a president in the office? - I am.

Q. Did Couston and Raymond bring you some fragments of paper? - They did.

Q. Be so good to look at that, and tell me whether that is what you put together? - It is.

Q. Did you put down all the fragments they brought to you? - I did, and nothing more.

LEACH sworn.

Q. Look at that bill, does it appear to be a bill drawn by you? - It is my hand writing.

Q. Did you do this in favour of Mrs. Harris, of Birmingham, on Mr. Leach, No. 29, Bread-street, London? - I did.

Mrs. HARRIS sworn.

Q. Did you receive any remittance of a bill of exchange of eighty pounds? - I did not.

Mr. Shepherd to Leach. Be so good to look at your book, and see how you describe it? - Leach on Leach, two months, for eighty pounds, drawn February 6. This was the bill. (The bill read in its present state.)

"801. Watford, February 6, 1795; Sir, tw - after date, pay Mrs. Mary Harris , or order, eight - value received, as advised by your's, Rd. Leach .

Mr. Leach, No. 29, Bread-street, London."(Read as drawn.)

"801. Watford, February 6, 1795.

Sir, two months after date, pay Mrs. Mary Harris , or order, eighty pounds value received, as advised by your humble servant, Rd. Leach .

Mr. Leach, No. 29, Bread-street, London."

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner's council offered to call witnesses to his character; but the Court was of opinion, that there was no occasion, as he must be considered to have a good character, or else the Post office would not have kept him in their employment.

GUILTY. Death . (Aged 16.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Recommended by the Jury, on account of his age; and also recommended by Mrs. Harris .

Reference Number: t17950416-57

215. STEPHEN BARNETT and JOSEPH GEORGE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a blue cloth coat, value 10s. the goods of Arthur Ahmuty .

THOMAS SMITH sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - In Tibbett-row, Queen Ann-street, East.

Q. Did you ever live with Mr. Ahmuty? - About a month ago.

Q. Where did he live? - No. 3, Russell-place .

Q. Do you know of his losing a cloth coat? - Yes; I had the brushing of it in the area on the 3d of March.

Q. Was there a gate to the area? - Yes; It was at the front of the house, My master's bell rung, and while I was gone up to answer it, and when I came back, the coat was gone; it was in the morning, about nine o'clock; I heard an alarm; I went up to the door.

Q. What alarm? - A pulling of the bell; I went out, and saw the coat in the custody of Mr. Croker.

Q. Did you see any body else? - Yes, Mr. Abchurch; Mr. Croker had got Joseph George, and Mr. Abchurch had got Stephen Barnett.

Mr. Wentworth. You had never seen Barnett before? - No.

-CROKER sworn.

I live in Tottenham-court-road; I am a constable of St. Pancras; I was informed of three suspicious persons in the neighbourhood. I was called out of my bed about half past six. In consequence of that alarm, I got up immediately, and I followed them, and I see Mr. Abchurch, and I shewed him the three persons, and told him my suspicions were of the two prisoners at the bar, two of these persons I believe, because I lost sight of them. Some time after I pursued, and ordered Abchurch to go before. I see them return back, and I see they were viewing the different areas. I went into a public house, and was not there above a minute before I heard that one had got into an area. I went out, and I observed George get out of the area of Mr. Ahmuty, with a coat. He saw me, and he dropped the coat immediately on the steps, and I ran to seize him directly. I was in the middle of the street, and he saw me drawing my cutlass from under my coat.

Q. Was it drawn out of its scabbard? - It was; he got out of the area, and ran for about two or three yards, I had my cutlass drawn, and I seized him, and I ordered a person to take up that coat, and bring it to me.

Q. Did you see Barnett in company? - No.

Prisoner George. This prisoner was not along aside of me, I never see him before till he was tied to me. I had been along with my sister; Mr. Croker came up to me, and says, that is right enough, seize him, Mr. Croker had the coat under his arm.

Stephen Barnett , Not GUILTY .

Joseph George , GUILTY (Aged 17.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17950416-58

216. SAMUEL GUNNER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , an iron Japan teaboard, value 1s. a pair of bellows, value 4d. a pair of iron snuffers, value 4d. and an iron Japan snuffer stand, value 2d. the goods of Elizabeth Wood .

ELIZABETH WOOD sworn.

I live in Bethnal-green, No. 2.

Q. Were you robbed at any time of a tea-board, bellows, &c? - I was under an arrest for the debt of repairing a vessel which partly belonged to me, I was not at home, the prisoner imagined, he might detain these things for some washing I had of him, I would not wish to hurt a poor man, his family is all starving.

Q. Did he keep them in his house? - Yes; he did.

Q. Did you apply to him for these artioles? - Yes; I did.

Q. What account did he give of them? - He said he would deliver them to me, when I paid him for the washing of the furniture of two beds.

Q. Who delivered them to him? - I delivered them to him at the time of the arrest.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-59

217. JOSEPH HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , sixty pounds weight of lead, value 5s. the goods of Charlotte Jackson .

CHARLOTTE JACKSON sworn.

Q. Are you a married woman? - A widow .

Q. Keep house any where? - Yes; in Sloane street .

Q. Were you robbed of any lead at any time? - I was of a piece of pipe, it was out of the shop.

Q. Do you follow any business? - A Plumber . I saw it in the shop on Wednesday, the 11th of March, in the evening.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take it? - No.

Q. When had you the first intimation of its being taken? - The 16th of March.

Q. Who brought you the information? - The constable, Black.

Q. When did you first see the prisoner after the information? - On the 16th, he was detained for the lead.

JOHN WARREN sworn.

I am a constable of Marlborough-street. I know the prosecutor, the repairs was done at my house.

Q. I understood that lead was taken from Mrs. Jackson's shop? - It was a piece of pipe took from my house to her house, and taken from her house at last by the prisoner.

Q. How much lead was taken from your house? - About fourteen pounds weight; I should know it again.

Q. Do you remember what day? - I cannot positively say, it was near eleven o'clock.

Prisoner. I hope the Court will not transport me.

WILLIAM PARKINS sworn.

I am a Plumber, Mrs. Jackson's foreman.

Q. Did you take any lead from Mr. Warren's to her house? - Yes, on the 12th of March.

Q. What sort of lead was it? - It was a pipe fifty pounds weight.

Q. Did you leave it when you took it; to Mrs. Jackson's? - I took it into the shop immediately.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take it? - No.

Q. What time did you leave it in the shop? - At eleven o'clock in the day.

Q. When did you first miss it? - I never missed it at all. It was thrown among the old lead.

Q. When did you miss it? - I was ordered to Bow-street.

Q. Did you see the lead at Bow-street? - Yes, in the constable's hands.

Q. How did you know that lead? - By the particular marks that there was in the joint to put in the water cock.

WILLIAM BLACK sworn.

I am a constable belonging to Bow-street; on Monday, the 16th of March, I went up to an old iron shop to get some screws for my own use, and the prisoner came in.

Q. Whose shop was it? - Mrs. Man's, at the top of York-street, Westminster. He asked the woman to buy some lead, he had sixty pounds to sell; he said he understood

by the husband, that he had spoke to before, that he would give but five farthings a pound for it. They said for that quantity it would not be worth while to give that for it. She said she would not buy it of him, but there was a person behind, pointing to me, that would buy it of him; I said if he would bring it to me I would take it; he said he would come with it about five o'clock in the evening. The same day, between five and six o'clock in the evening he came, he said, he believed it was cabbage; I asked him how he came by it? he said it was cabbage, that a man authorized him to carry it down there, and he would give him a shilling for carrying it, and he should have some more next week if I would buy it. After looking at it, I told him I did not think he came by it honestly, and that I was an officer of Bow-streets I took him there and kept the lead. After we went to the office, he told the magistrate that if I would go to Sloane-street with him, he would shew me the person who he had it of; and I asked him if it was not a man that his mistress put a good deal of confidence in? he said, yes, it was; but when he got near the house, he said I had it not of a man; it was a woman gave it me. He wanted to go into the public house, I would not let him go into the public house. He told me before that the person lived at a private house. I took him into custody, and took him that night to Tothilfields; and going down I learned that his wife lived with Mrs. Jackson, was her servant, and that it was from his wife he got the lead.

Q. Did he say his wife was a servant to Mrs. Jackson? - Yes.

Q. To Prosecutrix. Has this man a wife in your service? - She was in my service at the time.

Prisoner. I did not thieve it, a person gave it me.

Warren. I can swear to this pipe, this went through a part of the wall, and the cask was cut away the other side.

Perkins. I can swear to it by these two joints.

Prisoner. I had it given me to sell. I have no witnesses at all.

Q. To Prosecutrix. Did you know this servant had a husband? - Yes.

Q. What was his business? - I don't know.

Jury. How long was she your servant? - Five months. I always thought her husband and she were parted.

Court. What may be the value of this lead? - Twenty-eight pounds; about five shillings.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-60

218. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March three guineas, and a half guinea , the monies of William Charles Empson .(The case opened by Mr. Alley.)

WILLIAM CHARLES EMPSON sworn.

I live in Portland-street, Cavendish-square, I am an attorney ; I was returning home; I believe it was on Wednesday, the 25th of March, about one in the morning, very sober; I was accosted by the prisoner; she asked me where I was going? I told her I was going home. She walked down to the corner of the street with me, and I got a few yards off, and she asked me if I would give her sixpence to get something to drink? I put my hand into my right hand waistcoat pocket, where I had four guineas and a half in gold, and three shillings and sixpence in silver. I put my hand into my

pocket and felt for the sixpence, and when I had found it among the other money, I put it into her hand; I staid with her about a minute or two minutes and a half, in the street; and all of a sudden she began to abuse me, and told me I might have the sixpence again; I was induced to think from such an extraordinary circumstance, and from her having her hand round my waist, that she had been picking my pocket; on feeling in my pocket I found my suspicion was confirmed, for out of four guineas and a half, I had but one guinea and two shillings and sixpence left; she went off, I pursued her, and overtook her opposite the Pantheon.

Q. At the time the prisoner came up to you, are you certain you had four guineas and a half in you pocket? - I am very sure; I had been playing at whist, and I had marked with them.

Q. Were there any body else near you? - No.

Q. Am I to understand that there was nobody near you from the time you felt your money, to the time you missed it? - Yes.

Q. Have you ever found your money? - No.

Q. How soon did you overtake her? - It might be about five minutes.

Q. Did you take her? - I did; and desired the watchman to feel in her pockets, and he only found some halfpence, and a sixpence; I believe there was a shilling, but I did not take much notice.

Q. Was she searched after, at the watch-house? - Yes, she was a great distance, near a mile off.

Q. Was there any other girl with her when you overtook her? - Yes, and I think it was the same that was with her when I first met her, but I am not sure.

Q. You had her committed? - Yes.

Q. No property found at all? - No.

Prisoner. I had been to Mary-le-bone, to speak to my sister, and that gentleman met me, and said I had robbed him, and charged the watchman with me. I never see him before in my life.

Court to Prosecutor. Did I understand you to say there were two girls when she came up to you? - Yes; she left the other; the other stood three quarters of the width of the pavement off; the pavement was very wide.

Q. I understood you to say there was no other person in the street but her, at first? - No, at the time I felt for my money and found it was gone.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-61

219. WILLIAM HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a silver watch, value 30s. the goods of William Mannington .

WILLIAM MANNINGTON sworn.

I am a footman (in place at present) at one Mr. Chinnery's, Esq. in Cavendish-square. I lost my watch as I was cleaning myself at a gentleman's house, in January 1794; I was out of place then, I was going to get a place. It was at the prisoner's lodgings, in David-street, Portman-square .

Q. What was the prisoner? - He was a life-guardman , a lodger; I pulled my watch out of my pocket; I brought my box there that evening, I put it down on the table while I was cleaning myself, I went out and left it, I returned again in a week's time; the man and his wife both denied seeing it; I asked him several times, he always denied it, I urged him about three weeks back that he knew of

the watch; then I went to Marlborough-street and got a warrant, and took the prisoner up, and the prisoner had the watch on him at the time I took him up, the runner took it from him.

Q. Were you present? - Yes.

Q. What is his name? - Hamilton.

Q. Have you lived about town all this time? - I went to live at Kensington, at Richard Holboy 's. The number of the watch is 2620; it is silver, the name is Drughouse, Berkley-square.

Q. Was there any paper in it? - I cannot answer for any paper.

Q. Was there any key or seal? - No, I had lost the key; I took it out of my box to put it into my fob, for safety.

Mr. Wentworth. How long have you known Mr. Hunt? - In particular the last twelvemonth.

Q. Where did you first become acquainted with him? - In Bethlem Hospital.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Armstrong? - I do not.

Q. Do you know the name of the person that washed for you at the time you was in Bethlem Hospital? did not Mrs. Armstrong? - It was Hunt's wife, she passed for his wife.

Q. Where did you lodge then? - In Cousin's-street.

Q. Did not you visit Mr. Hunt? - I did.

Q. Did not you visit Mrs. Hunt? - I did not

Q. You swear that positively? - I do.

Q. Do you believe that she was then his wife? - Yes, she passed for Mrs. Hunt.

Q. How came you to take your box to Hunt's lodgings? - Because it was near my place; Hunt told me that I might take my box there if I liked.

Q. Hunt was at home? - Yes.

Q. That you swear positively? - Yes.

Q. You say you cleaned yourself there? - Yes.

Q. Did you go out and leave your watch there? - Yes.

Q. What part of the house was this? - The top part of the house, the back room.

Q. Then you never gave this watch to Mrs. Hunt, for money that was due to Mrs. Hunt or Armstrong, for washing? - No.

Q. That you swear positively? - Yes.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street. On the 1st of April I took this man into custody, and searched him, and found on him this watch. (Produced) I was informed by the prosecutor that it was seen about him; I had a warrant against him, I thought it my duty to take him to a magistrate, which I did.

Q. Did any thing pass? - I do not recollect two words.

Q. You have kept it till now? - Yes, I have.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Q. Have you any doubt? - No.

Q. What may the value of it be? - It cost me five guineas.

Prisoner. Ann Armstrong gave it to me, and told me to keep it, and wear it.

Court to Prosecutor. You said that you asked this man for your watch, was that at several times? - Yes, at different times; I left it about a week before, I asked her for it, and he and his wife were both present, and they doth denied it.

Q. Did you ever ask him and his wife after that week? - Yes, it may be three or four days in that week; I asked them both separately, and both together; I asked him in January and I asked him in February 1794, when he carried my box to the White Horse stables, Kensington.

Mr. Wentworth. Still you continued going to him? - I did.

Court. They washed for you after February 1704? - They washed for me after I lost my watch, about a fortnight.

Q. How long did you continue acquainted with him? - About a month after, or six weeks after I was at Kensington.

ANN ARMSTRONG , alias HUNT, sworn.

Q. Are you the wife? - No.

Q. What is your name? - Ann Armstrong .

Q. Do you know the prosecutor, William Mannington ? - Yes.

Q. For how long? - For fifteen months.

Q. Did you know him at the time that you was in Bethlem Hospital? - I did.

Q. You washed for him? - I did; he was frequent at Hunt's house.

Q. Did he generally make his visits when Hunt was absent? - He did, to me.

Q. Do you recollect his giving you a watch? - I do, on the 13th of January 1794.

Q. How long did you keep the watch? - Ever since.

Q. I ask you, on your oath, whether you told Hunt, on his inquiry about the watch, how you came by it? - I told him I had it before I knew him; I had it about thirteen months before I gave it him, I believe.

Q. He never knew where you got the watch till he was in custody? - No, he did not.

Q. How long did you wash for him after he gave you that watch? - About six weeks, never afterwards.

Court. Don't you pass for the wife of Mr. Hunt? - I live with him.

Q. Do they call you Mrs. Hunt? - Yes.

Q. Did not the prosecutor know you to be the wife of Hunt? - Yes, he thought I was.

Q. Did you ever receve any money for the washing? - Yes.

Q. What did he give you the watch for? - For the use of my body.

Q. Did he use to visit Hunt? - He came to visit me.

Q. Will you swear that he never visited Hunt? - Never, till after he was out of Bethlem Hospital.

Q. Did he ever ask you or the man for the watch? - He never saw me from the time he gave it me, till he took Hunt prisoner.

Q. Will you swear that? - Yes.

Q. Did he ever ask him for it? - No, he never knew he had it.

Q. To Prosecutor. This woman swears that you gave her this watch? - It is wrong.

Q. Did you ever give her the watch, or did you not? - No, I did not.

Ann Armstrong . He did give me that watch.

Prosecutor. I did not; I had money in my pocket; I had no occasion to give her the watch.

Q. What do you mean by money in your pocket? Did you give her any money? - No, only for washing.

Q. She says, you gave her money on purpose to be connected with her; is that true or is it false? - I never did.

Q. Now, since you have lost your watch, did you ever apply to this woman for the watch? - I did; she said she neither had it, nor her husband.

The prisoner called three quarter masters of the regiment he belonged to, and two-other witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-62

220. ELIZABETH HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , six yards of printed cotton, value 8s. the goods of Thomas Clarke .

THOMAS BOYD sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Clarke, linen draper , No. 171, Hospital . On Monday the 6th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came into our shop and asked to look at some cambrick; it was shewn to her by a young woman in the shop; she is here.

Q. Did you observe that yourself? - Yes. I then perceived her, directly after that, looking at some printed cottons; I took particular notice of her turning and shifting herself round, and working about her pockets, and thought she had some intention of stealing, if she had not stole some thing; we were exceeding busy at the time; after she had purchased some cotton, she asked me if I had got any work for her? I said, if she would walk up into the warehouse I would talk to her about the work. Instead of taking her into the warehouse I took her into the dining room, and there searched her.

Q. What did you find on her? - Printed cotton.

Q. What may be the value of it? - Eight shillings.

Q. Did you take it out of her pocket? - No, I laid my hand on her, and charged her with it; and she turned herself round and threw herself, with some degree of violence into the chair, and the cotton fell from under her petticoats.

Q. You see it fall from her petticoats? - Yes.

Q. Was it in a paper as it is now? - No, only the cotton.

Q. Do you know it to be your cotton? - Yes.

Q. Is there any private shop mark upon it? - Yes, my own marking; it is Mr. Clarke's.

Q. Was it one of the cottons that was shewn her, or only what lay on the counter? - The young lady will speak to that.

GRACE BARTER sworn.

Q Were you in the shop when that woman came in? - Yes.

Q. Do you serve in the shop? - Yes.

Q. Did you serve her at all? - Yes, I did. When she first came into the shop she asked to look at some cambrick, which I shewed her.

Q. What did you shew her besides? - Printed callico; among the rest I shewed her this print; she bought a small quantity of cambrick; she gave me a shilling and said she would call for it the next morning; she also bought some cotton for the child; she was to call for the things the next morning. I know nothing more than Mr. Boyd took her up stairs.

Q. You are sure that is the same that you shewed her? - Yes, I am confident it is the pattern, and has the private mark.

Q. To Boyd. Did you keep that piece of goods from the time you took the prisoner till now? - Yes.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

I searched her and found nothing on her but these duplicates.

Prisoner. I had been several times to the shop to ask for work, and gave three different places to go for my character, in Holborn, and likewise in Westminster; and they told me they would send me work if in case any came in, and they told me to call every other day; I called then as I wanted a bit of cambrick to frill a single man's shirt, that lodged in the house; I asked the young lady if there was any work? she told me there was something, and told me to call the next day; and I told them I would take it in

goods;, which would be as well as money; and that was the gown piece that I bought I was to have them things, and pay it at so much a week, and I was to work it out.

Court to Barter. You gave me an account that she purchased some cambrick and cotton for a child's frock, are you sure that she did not purchase this piece? - She did not purchase this; it was a different pattern she bought; I told her we had no work.

Q. Then that shilling was merely left with you that she might have the goods afterwards? - Just so.

Prisoner. All my masters were here on Saturday to appear on my character.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-63

221. ROBERT CHARLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , two live cock fowls, value 5s. and eight live hen fowls, value 4s. an iron hand saw, value 6d. the goods of George Toomer .

GEORGE TOOMER sworn.

I live in the parish of Fulham, at the sign of the Three Kings ; I am a Victualler . Early on the morning of the 14th of March, I had three lockers broke open between the hours of two and three o'clock in the morning, I had three lockers broke open, and out of one of these lockers were eight hens and two cocks roosted, and they were took away from that place, it was over the stable.

Q. Is the stable in an enclosed yard? - No, no further than there is a little gate sometimes open and sometimes shut; no proper bars to the gate. I see those ten fowls there on the 13th; in the evening they were all safe, they were at two o'clock; likewise a coal-shed locker broke open, and they took a hand saw.

Q. Is your coal-shed close to the stable? - No; my coal-shed leads into the kitchen, they never attempted the door that goes into the kitchen; the other room that lets for two shillings a week, they broke open that, thinking the fowls were there, that was joining the stable. They were common locks, one was broke and split in two.

Q. On the night preceding, were all the locks fast? - They were all three of them; they were all forced, the nails were drawn out.

Q. Why do you lay this to the prisoner at the bar? - I only know by the witnesses.

JOHN HUMPHRY sworn.

I am watchman at Beaufet-road, Chelsea, at one o'clock in the morning, on the 14th of March, the prisoner came by me in a cart; I then perceived it was the same person that put me in bodily fear, about three weeks before; I knew him again, I then followed him up into Little Chelsea; I then perceived he went towards Fulham, I then returned back again; I then sent to my Lord Moon's watchman and another, and then we went and searched after the prisoner, near the Loyal Wards, at Walham Green, I perceived the prisoner driving the cart under the fence; I then said to my partner, you keep close to the fence, it is the same cart that came past me at one o'clock; I then perceived the prisoner, he made his escape up the foot path; I stopped him, and took him by the collar; I told Turner, the other that was with me, to

jump into the cart to see what there was in it, and he found ten fowls, a hand saw, and a sack of fine polsard.

Mr. Knapp. Did you look into the cart? - I did.

Q. Did you see whose cart it was? was there any reading on the board? - There was; Robert Jellerd .

Q. Was you in this foot path? - Yes.

Q. Then he came direct into your hands? - He did not come into my hands without I had catched him.

Q. He came into your hands, and you laid hold of him? - I did.

Q. Was there any body with him? - There was not that morning, sometimes there were two of them, and sometimes three; they have frequented that road for two or three months.

RICHARD TURNER sworn.

I am a watchman, in the parish of Chelsea; I know of this business a good deal more than they wish for us to know to a certainty. On the 14th of March at one, the clock had struck, when the prisoner had passed in a cart towards the parish of Fulham. towards Milmans row, in a place called Little Chelsea. I spoke to my fellow servant, John Humphry , and I went to my Lord Moon's watchman; we agreed three of us to go and look out for this man, we went and saw the man. After crying the hour of three, and by hearing of us, he jumped off the shafts of the cart, and came round by the tail of the cart; I went and jumped into the cart and searched the cart; I found a sack with some poultry, ten fowls, a hand saw, a cutting knife, half a sack of fine pollard, and this sack was in the prisoner's hand. (Produced.)

JOSEPH BROWN sworn.

I am a watchman, I was at the taking of this man, on the 14th of March, at three o'clock in the morning.

Prosecutor. The hand saw is my property, here is a place that I have cut with a nail. The fowls I have seen, I bred them, the watchmen shewed them me.

Humphry. They were the same fowls I found, I shewed them him at the Magistrate's at Bow-street; two of the heads were cut off, they were all dead.

Prosecutor. The sowls were absolutely mine.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, I was going to work when these men stopped me, they asked me if the cart belonged to me? I said no; they said I am certain it does belong to you, for I see you jump out. I was not with the cart at all.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-64

232. FREDERICK MYER, otherwise MARRIOT , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , four oxen, value 100l. the goods of Joseph Allen .

The case was opened by Mr. Gurney, and the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17950416-65

223. LAWRENCE BURNE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , a twelve feet two inches and a half deal, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Joseph Shepherd and Abraham Shepherd .

FRANCIS WEBB sworn.

I am a sawyer, a foreman to Mr. Joseph and Mr. Abraham Shepherd, timber merchant s, at No. 166, Wapping .

The prisoner is a porter , a labouring man, works about the water side. I see him on Good Friday evening standing on the barge; I see him take the deal out of the barge, and afterwards take it on his shoulder, and walk on the green banks, which is near two hundred yards distant. I followed him, and never had him out of my sight; and as soon as he stopped, I laid hold of him. He asked me what he had done? when I took hold of him by the collar, I said, you know what you have done. He said, I only took it for a step ladder or else a toe board, that is a plank to walk on to the barges. It belonged to one Mr. Fletcher, of Coulchester; I put them on this barge, I am positive to the deal.

Prisoner. I was going up Green-bank, and going home. I meant not to make my property of it. Why did not he apprehend me on the barge if he see me?

Webb. I thought he was going to steal the deal; that was what I thought.

-BOWERS sworn.

I am a waterman. I see him take the deal out of the barge, and followed him till he pitched it.

Prisoner. Why did not you apprehend me at the time I was going home? there was a carman in great distress, it is a nasty bad street, full of holes, and a man had his horses down, and I gave him all the assistance I could. The man begged me to go and beg a pulley, what they use at the brewers drays; I went, and could not get any; and I went on dock, and thought of one of our ladders; there was never a ladder there; there was a deal plank, and I took it; and when I got back to the green, the cart and the man were all gone; they lighted me up with the deal, the street was so bad. I did not think to steal it, or make any property of it. That is the truth and nothing else. I have no witnesses but God Almighty, and you the gentlemen of the jury. He never apprehended me till I was about three hundred yards from the place. He knows me well; he has known me these ten or twelve years.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

One month in Newgate , and publickly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-66

224. JOHN HATFIELD , ANN SMITH , and SARAH EGERTON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , fifteen yards and a half of muslin, value 6l. 4s. eleven linen handkerchiefs, value 1l. 12s. the goods of Thomas Hand , privately in his shop .

THOMAS HAND sworn.

I live in St. James's street , a linen draper . On Tuesday the 24th of February, about three o'clock in the afternoon the three prisoners at the bar came into my shop, and asked for some muslin for neckcloths and cravats. I went into a middle shop, which we have on purpose for muslins, and took them there on purpose to shew them. They fixed on one, and bought it; they paid me for it, I think, eleven shillings. During my selling them that, I had great reason to suspect that they were had characters. After they had bought the muslin. they wanted some printed caliico that was in the front shop, and we went there. We had none of the pattern they wanted to match.

Q. Did they produce any? - No, only described it. The man asked if we had some stockings? I told him we had; I went and fetched some stockings, and they were not the sort he wanted; he wanted mens, and we had none but them,

and he went out of the shop. I mentioned it to our young man; and told him my suspicion that they were thieves. I sent him after them, after some little time, to make an excuse, that I had put up a wrong muslin for them, that I might change it, not knowing then that they had done any harm, only thought so. They were gone up a little street. I really was afraid of charging them with any thing. When they came to the door I told them the same story, that I had given them the wrong muslin, and wished them to come back. They came back pretty readily, and went in. As they stepped up the steps, and went into the shop (I being behind them,) just at the end of the shop, they dropped down eleven linen handkerchiefs, which I trod upon. I then was confirmed, and told them, that I brought them in, not for any mistake, but to examine them. I desired them to walk into the same shop where they bought the muslin, which they did. I then called one of the young women to search them. I see them searched; I stood on one side of the counter and they on the other, after she had felt in their pockets, she said, they had nothing. I said, I am certain they have something, and I came on the other side of the counter to them. As soon as I came near them, this piece of muslin was hanging on our feet.

Q. Who was it upon? - I cannot say. I see the piece of muslin under my feet, and trod upon it.

Q. Were they in company together? - They were. The neckcloths were for the man, and the woman were to look at them; both the women gave their opinion, but Egerton handed it to him, and gave her particular opinion.

Q. When they were buying this muslin for the neckcloths, were they all together? - They were.

Q. Where were the handkerchiefs lying? - On the counter; I had just been shewing them; they were in the front shop.

Q. Is there any private mark on these things? - Yes.

Q. I suppose you had not observed these things missing at first? - Not the least thought of it.

Q. You cannot form any judgment which of the prisoners took the things? No; all three of them stopped, and I stepped on the handkerchiefs.

Mr. Knowlys. Your shop is in St. James's-street, and you have so much custom, that you have many servants in the shop to serve? - Yes, five or six in the whole.

Q. Mrs. Egerton bought some muslin of you? - Yes, she did.

Q. What was the amount it came to? - Eleven shillings.

Mr. Knapp. You have told us that there were some linen handkerchiefs dropped as you came into the shop, you don't know who dropped them? - No. (The things produced and deposed to.)

-GRIMES sworn.

On Tuesday, the 24th of February, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, I had been up to a lady in Albemarle-street, and when I came back, I see the three prisoners in the shop with Mr. Hand; and another lady coming in, he desired me to shew the prisoner some prints, callico. She did not like the pattern.

Q. Who was that? - Egerton.

Prisoner Egerton. I only came with the lady that wanted to buy. She gave me half a guinea. Mr. Hand came up immediately, and I gave him the half guinea. They went out, and Mr. Hand came into the front shop, and told me he suspected them; and I followed them and brought them back; and see the prisoner Smith pull a piece of muslin out

from her cloak or must, I cannot say which, and put it behind her back. Mr. Hand called his niece to search, and when she came up, she dropped the muslin; I see it drop; and when his niece searched her, she moved off, and the muslin was picked up by Mr. Hand, I believe.

Mr. Knowlys. Where was Smith at the time you saw this? - In the middle shop.

Q. Where was you? - In the front shop.

Q. And you saw it at that distance? - I did.

Q. Mr. Hand was on the other side of the counter? - Yes.

Q. And they standing near the counter where the muslin was? - Yes.

Q. She standing near the counter the muslin might have brushed from the counter? - I see it drop from her hands.

Q. You would have seen it fall if it sell from the counter? - No, I think I should not, because they stood before me.

Court. They stood with their faces to the counter? - No, they stood rather of the side.

Prisoner Hatfield. On the 24th of February I was returning from Chelsea. I met with Mrs. Egerton and Mrs. Smith. She said she was going to buy some muslin, and handkerchiefs for her husband. I then told her I wanted one, and would be very glad if she would look at some for me. We went to this shop; they shewed us several pieces that we did not like, they were not fine enough. He shewed us some at last that would do; and then she asked to look at some cotton, and then she went into the other shop. I at the same time wanted a pair of stockings. I asked Mr. Hand for a pair of stockings; they brought two pair and shewed them; they were too narrow in the rib; I did not like them. We went out; I had not gone above twenty yards before we were followed, and told the woman had got the wrong muslin. I never was nigh the muslin, nor ever saw any thing of the kind.

Prisoner Egerton. I had been at Pimlico, to pay a quarter's rent, and I went into this shop to buy my husband a neckcloth. The gentleman shewed me one; I did not approve of it; the second I did approve of, and I paid for it, and I came out; and Mr. Hand came and said, I had got the wrong muslin; and I went and unsolded it, and laid it over my arm; and he said, that is not what I mean; I believe that gentlewoman has got something of mine. I insisted on Mrs. Smith being searched; she was searched; he found nothing; he then bid us go about our business. Coming out of the shop he called Smith back again, and said, there was a piece of muslin fell from her.

Prisoner Smith. The gentleman desired me to be searched, I said I had no objection, I laid my muss down, I then put up my petticoat and turned round; the young woman that searched me put her hand into my right hand pocket, and then into my left, and I had not a bit of muslin about me; Mr. Hand says, have you found any thing? she said, no, the woman has got nothing; Mr. Hand came from behind his counter then, and says, here is a piece of muslin; and I am sure I was then a yard and a half from the counter; the counter was full of muslin, and the woman said, she has nothing about her, she has no muslin indeed; I had not a bit, nor did I touch the muslin, as I did not want to purchase any.

The prisoner Egerton called four witnesses to her character.

John Hatfield , Not GUILTY .

Ann Smith , GUILTY . (Aged 51.)

Transported for seven Years .

Sarah Egerton , Not GUILTY.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-67

256. MARTHA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , four yards of printed cotton, value 7s. the goods of Joseph Craigg .

JOSEPH CRAIGG sworn.

I live in Holborn , a linen draper . On Monday, the 13th of this month, about eleven or twelve o'clock in the day, a young woman came in and told me that a person took a piece of cotton from the door; I went and saw the prisoner had tore this printed cotton from the string, and had it in her apron.

Q. Was the piece separated from the string? - It was; I see her, and I went and took hold of her hand, and took it out of her apron; she said she had not got it in her apron, she denied it; I never see her before that I can recollect.

Q. Did she walk off? - No, she stood there; she was in the act of putting it in her apron, and the other half was on the ground; she appeared to be in liquor.

Q. She did it openly and publickly? - Yes, several people see her do it, and told me.

Prisoner. I never went nigh the door at all.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-68

226. WILLIAM BURGESS , was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 16th of February , a certain paper writing purporting to be a promissory note, for the payment of five guineas, with the name of William Howard thereto subscribed, dated the 1st of January 1795, with intention to defraud Samuel Walpole .

A second COUNT, for uttering the same with the like intention.

And a third and fourth COUNTS, with forging and uttering the same with intention to defraud Robert Drummond , and Co.

SUSANNA WALPOLE sworn.

I live at the Red Lion, at the foot of Westminster-bridge, I come on account of a note that I gave change for on Friday the 6th of February; I gave change for a note to William Burgess , which has been refused by Mr. Drummond. I am sure it was the prisoner, I never see him before. He came in, and asked my sister change for a five guinea note, and she had not the change and I gave it; it was about seven o'clock in the evening, there was no name on the back, I sent it after him to put his name on the back, to the butchers, by a little boy, Thomas Matthison, he lived at the butchers in the neighbourhood, and knowing his master, I gave him change. I asked my sister if she knew the man, she said she knew the master. He took the note from the boy into a public house, and there it was signed by another person, and the boy returned it with a name on it. I kept it till the Thursday following, and then I paid it away to Mr. Parkinson, to the brewer's clerk, and he paid it, and then it was returned to me the next week again, not being good; I am sure that is the same note, there is on the back of it the name of John Tomlin , and a name that Mr. Parkinson put on it.

Q. Did you put any mark on it? - No.

THOMAS MATTHISON .

I live along with my father-in-law, he keeps a public house, the sign of the Queen's Head; I am thirteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - No.

Q. Do you know any thing about telling stories? - Yes; it is a bad thing.

Q. What will become of bad people, if they tell stories? - They will be unhappy and be punished.

Sworn.

Q. What do you know of this transaction? - I took a note from Susanna Walpole , and carried it to the prisoner's master; the master said the note did not belong to him, he would be in in a minute, my master called him in, and he took the note to the sign of the Bag of Nails, at Pimlico, I went with him, and he called another man out to sign the note, the prisoner told the other man to put his name to the note, he put his name to the note, he put his name John Tomlin , that was all that past, I brought it back and delivered it to Susanna Walpole.

Q. The note was not changed you are sure? - Yes; I am sure it was not changed.

Mr. Alley. You gave the man the note at the butcher's, therefore whether he changed the note during the time he was going to the public house, you can, not tell; did you see it in the hand of the prisoner all the way? - I did not.

Q. Will you take on you to swear that that is the same note then? - No, I will not.

Court. Did the other man change it? - No.

THOMAS PARKINSON sworn.

I received this note the 12th of February last, from my clerk, it is a never failing rule with me to put the persons name on that I receive notes from, and the day of the month; it was paid into our banker's, and returned to the house; that is the same note.

ROBERT MARSHALL sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Drummonds; there is no such person as the drawer of this in our house.

Q. You have no connection with any country bills? - No, none at all.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-69

227. WILLIAM ARCHER was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 16th of February , a certain paper writing, purporting to be an order for payment of money, and to besigned by one John Ireland , bearing date the said 16th of February, directed to Messrs. Devoyne and Co. for the payment of twenty pounds; with intention to defraud the said John Ireland .

A second COUNT for uttering the same, knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

And a third and fourth COUNTS for forging and uttering the same, with intention to defraud Gerard Devoyne , Alexander Kidd , &c.

JOHN IRELAND sworn.

I keep an upholstery warehouse . On the 16th of February last, the prisoner filled up a check, and Mrs. Ireland signed it.

Q. Who was it directed to? - To Devoyne and Co. banker s. When that was done he cut the blank check off, so that there was no margin left.

Q. Do you know that he had your check paper at that time? - Mrs. Ireland gave them him; Mrs. Ireland said so, I was in the country at the time; when the book from the bankers came home I see that was not my check; that was in March; when the check came home I took the check from the book, and I says to my clerk, this is not my hand writing; I looked in the bill book, and I found I had no such thing to pay,

there was no such bill in the margin; says I, it is very odd to me; in a little time I took my clerk with me, William Archer , says I, it is your filling up, it appears very had to me that you filled it up.

Q. Did you know the hand writing of the clerk to be his filling up? - I did. I thought it was very extraordinary; he says certainly you must sign it; I said, I did not sign it; he said if it was not my signing it could not be his hand writing; says I, don't you know your own hand writing? how can you tell me so? After that he said, I don't know whether it is my hand writing or not, says he, I cannot swear to it; I takes my check out of my book, says I, this is the same hand writing which you have filled up in these; he said he did not know it was his hand writing. That passed from that time till the latter end of the week, and then he owned he had done it.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe you said that it would be better for him to own it? - I cannot say that I did.

Q. Don't you rather believe that you did? - I don't know that I did; all that I said to him when he was in prison was, if you can but get off for a soldier or sailor, I should be very happy.

Q. Now did not you say that if he would confess, it would be better for him? - I don't know that I did, I am not positive, I rather think I did not; I desired he would tell me, and he denied it; I told him he had better confess it, because I supposed he was guilty, it would be more satisfactory to me.

Q. This was before you had that conversation in the latter end of the week? - It was after that.

Court. You told him he had better. confess, because you knew he was guilty; what he said was after that? - He did not tell me till the next day.

Q. Did you go to the banker's about this check? - My wife went to the bankers.

Mr. Knowlys. Was not he employed by you to fill up the body of the checks, and you and Mrs. Ireland used to sign them? - Yes.

Q. All the checks were filled up by him? - No, the major part were, but not all.

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I am a broker. On the 30th of March, Monday morning, Mr. Ireland's son-in-law sent to my house, No. 4, Little Portman-street; it was Mr. Brown; he told me that Mr. Ireland wanted to speak to me, he could not tell what Mr. Ireland wanted with me; then I went to Mrs. Ireland's house, and Mr. Ireland was in the shop; and the prisoner was in the shop; Mr. Ireland told me that Mr. Archer had been forging on him, and desired that I would take care of him,(I am a constable) Mr. Ireland walked about the shop two or three times, and says he, I must go up to the banker's, and tell them of it, and, he said I had better stop there with him; I said, I had better take him with me to my own house, which I did; we stopped there for a couple of hours, and then Mrs. Ireland came in; she told me that the banker was out of town, and they expected him in town about three o'clock; Mrs. Ireland said, that she hoped that they would do every thing in their power to save the prisoner, but it was a very bad thing in him to do so, it hurt her more than any thing that ever hurt her in her life. The next thing, Mr. Ireland came, I believe at about five o'clock, the prisoner was with me at that time; Mr. Ireland said he had been up to the banker's, and asked, him if he had any friends that could raise any money for him? Mr. Archer told

him that he had no friends, but he had some rent owing him, which was some pounds, and that he could not think of doing any thing of that sort; Mr. Ireland told him that it hurt him very much to think of hurting of him, and if he could raise ten pounds, and go for a soldier or sailor, he would forgive him; with that he agreed to go for a sailor on the morrow; Mr. Ireland still left this Archer in my care, with that I did not know how far it was right in that crime, I said to Mr. Ireland, if he would indemnify me for keeping him-

Mr. Knowlys. You must not say any thing about that. - The next thing we did we took him to the watch-house that night, and put him down below stairs, and did not charge him, with that he stopped there about a quarter of an hour, and then the constable of the night came. and he insisted on his being charged for the crime which he had done, or he would let him go about is business; with that Mr. Ireland and another gentleman went back; says Mr. Ireland, I may as well give charge, the crime is very bad; says he, constable, take charge for the forgery, not mentioning the sum of money. That is all that passed that night; then he was brought up to Marlborough-street, before Mr. Scott.

Mr. Knowlys. What passed there was taken in writing? - It was.

Q. So you suffered Mr. Ireland to compound felony? - No, I would not suffer him to do it.

Q. You kept the prisoner a couple of days? - No, I did not; only some hours.

Q. You should have taken him to gaol, should you not? - The man said he could do no such thing as raise the ten pounds.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-70

228. GEORGE HARDWICKE , JAMES HAYDON , JOHN HENLEY , JOHN DELANY , WILLIAM HANDLAND , SIMON JACOBS , JOHN SOLOMONS , WILLIAM TILLEY , and JOHN PHILLIPS , were indicted for that they, not having the fear of God before their eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the Devil, on the 4th of April , on Idswell Idswell, otherwise called Isdwell Isdwell , did make an assault; and that

George Hardwicke , with a certain gun called a blunderbuss, charged with gunpowder, and divers pieces of lead, and pieces of iron, did feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought, discharge to, at, against, and on the said Idswell, or Isdwell; and that he, the said George Hardwicke, out, of the said, gun, then and there, feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought, did strike, penetrate and would the said Isdwell, or Idswell, in and upon the right side of his back, near his left hip, giving him one mortal wound, of the depth of three inches, and the breadth of one inch, of which he instantly died ; and that

James Hayden , John Henley , John Delany , William Tilly , William Handland , Simon Jacobs , John Solomons , William Tilley , and John Phillips , at the time of committing the said felony and murder aforesaid, feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought, were aiding, abetting, comforting, assisting and maintaining the said George Hardwicke to do and commit the said murder ; and so the jurors, on their oath, say that he, George Hardwicke , James Haydon , John Henley , John Delany , William Handland , Simon Jacobs , John Solomons , William Tilley , and John Phillips did commit the said murder.

(The indictment opened by Mr. Trebeck, and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

GEORGE BURROUGHS sworn.

Q. You are a surgeon? - I am.

Q. I believe you was called upon to examine a wound of a man of the name of Day? - I was.

Q. On what part was that wound inflicted? - On the upper part of the head.

Q. When was it you saw it, what day? - I really don't know the day.

Q. How soon after this business happened? - The day after this had happened.

Q. On the 4th of April? - Yes.

Q. On what part of the head was it? - On the upper part, towards the side of the crown of the head, towards the ear.

Q. Was it a continued grazed wound? - It was continued.

Q. Could you form any judgment, whether that would was indicted by a gun shot? - I have an opinion on the subject.

Q. Was your opinion that it was? - It was.

Q. On your opinion, as a man of seience in the profession, it was indicted by a gun shot? - It was.

Q. I don't know whether you washed the wound or see it washed in your presence? - I did not. I directed it to be done; it was not done in my presence.

Q. You did not extract any thing from the wound? - I did not.

Mr. Const. When you say it was your opinion, did you form that opinion from the appearance of the wound only, or from such information as you may have received? - Merely from the appearance of the wound.

Q. You had, I suppose, heard at least, what passed? - Yes.

Mr. Garrow. That did not assist your judgment? - It certainly had a very different appearance from what we call an incised wound or a contused wound.

Mr. Const. You have seen many gun shot wounds? - No, I have not been in the habit of seeing many of them.

Mr. Garrow. Thank God there are not many practical surgeons of that cast.

Mr. Const. How long have you been in practice? - About ten years in practice; not all the time for myself.

Court. Which side of the head was it upon? - Upon my word, I have almost forgot on which side it was; I think it was the left, but I am not positive of that.

SAMUEL NEWPORT sworn.

Q. You are the keeper of a prison? - Yes.

Q. Of what prison? - New-prison, Clerkenwell.

Q. Have you the warrant of commitment that was made by Mr. Flood? - Yes.

Q. Be so good to hand it over; you know Mr. Flood's writing? - Yes.(The warrant of commitment of Isdwell Isdwell, otherwise of Idswell Idswell, dated the 14th of March, read.)

Const. Was he brought on the date of that warrant - He was.

Mr. Fielding. When did you last see him in your gaol? - It was on the Wednesday preceding the Friday; I was up at Bow-street with him at a re-examination.

Q. What Wednesday was that? - It might be the first of April, Friday was the third.

Q. Then you was with him at that time at a re-examination at Bow-street? - Yes, on Wednesday.

Q. Did he come back again in your custody? - Not in my custody; he came back in the custody of a servant of mine, named Roberts.

Q. When had you last seen him yourself? - I saw him the Wednesday at Bow-street; I left him at Bow-street in the

care of my servant; I did not see him afterwards.

Q. Where is Roberts? - He is at the door; he see him every day.

Q. Day was a keeper of the prison? - Yes.

Q. What was the particular appointment of him in the prison? - He was as an under servant, but he had not been above a year, or year and a half with me, and therefore he was not entrusted with the outer key, except at night, and then they took it in turns.

Q. Who is your principal man under you in the prison? - I consider Roberts as my principal man; but my principal turnkey, his name is Norman.

Q. Was Day an under servant to him? - He was.

Q. Was Day entrusted with the key every night? - No, not every night.

Q. Did it depend upon Norman, the principal turnkey, to entrust him, or did the trust come from your particular order? - It did not come from my order, but they settle it among themselves; three of them took it in turns.

Q. When he is entrusted with the key at night, of course he has the care of the outer gate? - Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Mr. Newport, had Day acquainted you that he had at any time received any presents from Isdwell? - No, he had not.

Q. Not of any sort, nor at any time whatever? - Not to my recollection.

Q. Had you ever the smallest idea that he meant to give Isdwell, or any other prisoner, any indulgence out of the walls of the prison? - If I had any idea of it I should have prevented it, you may depend upon it.

Q. Did you know of any person being admitted to him beyond the order of the magistrate? - I never knew it till after this happened.

Q. Day never acquainted you with it? - No; that came out at Bow-street; I never knew it till then.

Q. Therefore if ever Day did any thing of this kind, it was against his duty, and without your permission? - Certainly.

Mr. Henderson. How long has Day lived with you? - He has lived a servant with me about a year and a quarter.

Q. Did you ever know him before that time? - Yes, I have seen him sometimes, before I engaged him, and I went to inquire into his character.

Q. Did you ever see him in prison? - Never.

THOMAS ROBERTS sworn.

Q. You live with Mr. Newport? - I do.

Q. Did you attend Idswell to Bow-street on Wednesday? - I did on Wednesday the 14th of March.

Q. When was the last day that he was examined at Bow-street, before he made his escape? - I was not there the last examination.

Q. Mr. Newport has misled us then? - O yes, I was there the 14th of March.

Q. When was the day of his escape? - The 3d of April.

Q. What day in the week was it? - Friday.

Q. Then, on the Wednesday before that, there was but one day intervening between that Friday and Wednesday, the Friday of his escape? - Yes.

Q. The Wednesday before that Friday he was examined at Bow-street, was he not? - I was not there on that day.

Mr. Newport. Now I recollect it was Tuesday.

Q. To Roberts. Did you attend the last examination before his escape? - I was not there.

Court to Newport. Who brought him back from Bow-street? - Upon my word if Roberts did not bring him back, I cannot tell who did.

Q. To Roberts. Recollect yourself, if you was not there, it does not signify, did you see him in prison on the Wednesday after the examination? - I did.

Q. On the Friday he made his escape? - He did.

Mr. Garrow. Did you see him on any part of Friday before he made his escape?

Court. Then I must correct Mr. Roberts's evidence. You see him on Wednesday, was it on Wednesday after the examination? - On Wednesday, if the examination was on Wednesday; but I am not sure whether it was Tuesday or Wednesday, but it was the day when the last watch was delivered up to him.

Mr. Garrow. Roberts, was you there when the last watch was delivered up to him? - I was.

Q. And was the prisoner taken back to gaol, and was he continued there till Friday, when you see him? - He was.

Q. Then he was there on Friday the 3d of April? - He was.

Q. Have you seen the deceased since he died? - Yes, I have.

Q. Is that the man? - That is the man that I saw on the 4th, and that escaped from gaol.

Q. Mr. Gurney. Did Day ever disclose to you that he meant to give Idswell any indulgence beyond the walls of the prison? - Never.

Court. We must almost take that for granted.

Mr. Garrow. I will admit it.

Mr. Gurney. Mr. Tilley attended the prisoner Idswell in your custody? - He did.

Q. He attended Idswell in the character of his solicitor? - He did.

Q. There was an order for his admission from the magistrate that committed him? - The first time there was, and it continued.

Mr. Alley. How long have you been concerned in this gaol? - I believe about fourteen years.

Q. About three years before you came to the gaol, will you be kind enough to tell what you was then, or something about that period? - I do not recollect.

JOHN DAY sworn.

Q. Were you employed in the gaol when Idswell came there in custody? - Yes.

Q. Were was he lodged in the gaol during the time he was in confinement? - In a room over the lodge.

Q. Who attended on him while he was in custody? - I did chiefly, when I was in the way.

Q. Was there any particular order given with respect to permitting persons to have access to Mr. Idswell? - I believe there was; I cannot say.

Q. They were not given to you personally? - No.

Q. Did he make any application to you for any extraordinary indulgence? - Yes.

Q. What was the first application he made? - The first was that he pretended he had an uncle come out of the country.

Q. When was it? - I believe Sunday, the 29th of March; that if Crosswell and me would permit him to see him-

Q. Who was Crosswell? - A fellow servant. For the space of an hour, if we would permit him to see him, he would make us a present of a guinea each, Crosswell agreed that he should.

Q. Was the uncle introduced to him? - Yes.

Q. When, and with whom? - Mrs. Idswell.

Q. Who was the uncle? - They called him uncle Johnny.

Q. Mrs. Idswell passed as the wife of the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. Was that the widow Jones? - I believe it was. They staid about half an hour.

Q. At what time in the day or night was it they were introduced? - About twelve o'clock on Sunday night.

Q. About midnight? - Yes.

Q. They staid about an hour you say? - Yes; and then they went away. The next morning she came, and said her aunt was very ill in Artillery street.

Q. Who did she address that information to? - To Mr. Idswell.

Q. You was in the room then? - I was; she was always admitted to come to him.

Q. What were you doing in the room? - I was getting his breakfast. She said her aunt was so ill, she could not expect she would continue long, then said that her aunt was always talking about seeing Mr. Idswell, and said that if how he could see her, it would be the cause of her giving him seven or eight hundred, or a thousand pounds; he said, the last time he saw her she made him a present of a hundred guineas, and if I would ask Crosswell to conduct him to see her, he would make us both a very handsome present.

Q. Do you mean to ask Crosswell, for Crosswell to go? - Yes.

Q. Who usually kept the key? - Cross. well. I told him I would have nothing to do with it, it was a very dangerous piece of business.

Q. Had he paid you any compliment for letting in Johnny? - Yes; he paid us a guinea a piece.

Q. Who gave you that guinea a piece? - Idswell.

Q. When? - On the morning after the indulgence.

Q. That was the same morning when this lady brought up about the aunt? - Yes.

Q. You refused it first before you consulted Crosswell? - Yes; and he desired particularly that I would ask Crosswell; I asked Crosswell, and he refused it also.

Q. Did you communicate that to Idswell? - I did. She came again, Mrs. Idswell did, and said she was going to sit up with this aunt all night.

Q. Addressing herself to whom? - To me.

Q. Did she add any thing more? - No; she did not say any thing more. The next morning she came, and said she was still so very bad, that she did not expect to see her alive when she went back. The next morning they both asked me to ask Crosswell again.

Q. Which of them? - Both of them.

Q. Now attend without inquiring of you all that Idswell said to you, or Mrs. Idswell from time to time. Did you at any time before you went out of gaol with Idswell, see any of the prisoners at the bar? - Yes; this little man, Simon Jacobs, and Tilley.

Q. What did you see Jacobs do? - He used to come backwards and forwards with messages to Mr. Idswell.

Q. Now with respect to Mr. Tilley. he was the attorney, and was admitted whenever he chose to come? - Yes.

Q. Previous to the 3d of April, had you any conversation with Tilley on the subject of Mr. Idswell's going out of gaol? - No, I had not.

Q. Do you remember hearing any observation with respect to Mr. Moses, who is in custody in another gaol? - Yes.

Q. When was it that this conversation took place respecting Moses? - The Good Friday night, the 3d of April.

Q. Where was it? - I went up to get Idswell tea in the afternoon, and Mr. Tilley came up, while I was in the room.

Q. Was this before or after it had been agreed that Idswell should go out that night? - Before; Tilley came up in a great hurry, and said he had just been drinking along with Mr. Bryant.

Q. Who is Mr. Bryant? - He is a deputy

who belongs to the House of Correction, in Cold Bath Fields.

Q. Deputy to another gaol, where Moses was in custody? - Yes; Tilley says, I find that Mr. Moses is going home along with Mr. Bryant to night, to keep his passover with his wife and family. I did not hear him say any thing more; yes, he said, if you go about ten o'clock to night you may see him go out, I told him it was of no service to me, I should not go about it.

Q. Did you learn whether on this occasion, the keeping of the passover with his family, was the only instance in which Moses had been absent from prison? - I did not.

Q. What was the next circumstance that happened? - Mr. Tilley came down stairs. I left him in the room, he says, Mr. Day, your master wants you.

Q. Who did he mean by your master? - Idswell. I went up stairs directly, and Idswell asked me whether I had said any thing more to Crosswell? - I said, no, I should not say any thing more; he asked me to send for Crosswell up; there was nothing more past. I came down, and sent Crosswell up to speak to him.

Q. What was the next fact that took place? - Then when Crosswell went up, he had a rough great coat on, which he had worn the whole day. I went up stairs again, and I fetched some things out of pawn, that Idswell had given Crosswell the duplicates of, on Thursday night.

Q. In the result, was it agreed that Idswell should go out of prison that night? - Crosswell said so as soon as he came down.

Q. What was done after that? - About nine o'clock after the people were all locked up, and Crosswell had left that great coat in the room were Idswell was. -

Q. How do you know that? - When he came down stairs he had not got it on, and he went up with it on, A little while after, Mr. Roberts came in, and I believe Mr. Roberts staid till about eleven o'clock.

Q. When in fact did you come from the prison? - He went out as soon as Mr. Roberts was gone, I went out and see every thing was still; Crosswell went out, and asked me to go and see if every body was gone to bed; when I came in again, Crosswell wanted me to go directly, he said it was very safe then. Just as we were going to go out, I refused three or four times over; says Crosswell, I will load a blunderbuss for your safety; he loaded one, and I refused to go then, and he said that would be security for me, I might go safe enough with that, and master's servant came down in the place, and he was going to ask him for a cutlass.

Q. In point of fact, when did Idswell come down from his room, if he came down at all? - Near twelve o'clock.

Q. In what condition did he come down in? - In a rough coat that Crosswell had wore all the day.

Q. Had he his irons on? - He had his irons on.

Q. Had any thing been done with respect to them, they usually make a noise; don't they? - He tied them up with his handkerchief.

Q. Were was that done? - In prison.

Q. Before he came down stairs? - Yes.

Q. What then? - Idswell said, if you have any scruples of my coming back again, I will leave a hundred guineas, and all my property with you; at last, with great persuasions, I went out along with him, we walked as far as Smithfield, and then took a coach.

Q. That is a great way; is it not? - Not half a mile.

Q. Is that the first coach stand? - No, there was none on Clerkenwell-green.

Q. That was the first stand on which you found any coaches? - Yes. And I believe he rode as far as Arillery-street.

Q. How came you to go to Artillery-street? - This was where this aunt was.

Q. Who told the coach to go to Artillery-street? - Idswell did.

Q. The place to which you was to go to, being No. 13, Artillery-lane ? - Yes. When we got out of the coach, we asked the coachman where this No. 13 was.

Q. You got out of the coach without driving to the door? - Yes. Just as we got to the door, about ten yards from the door, Mr. Tilley I see come from the door, or it may be fifteen yards, and his wife with him; I said to Idswell, there is Tilley; says he, is there? so as soon as we got to the door, the door was ready open; when I got to the door, I said to the man that was at the door, there is Tilley, call him.

Q. Who was at the door? - A man of the name of Bowley; Bowley called him and Tilley came back, and shaked Idswell by the hands, and said, who should think of seeing you here, Mr. Idswell, at this time of night? he said something more to him, but what I could not tell; he then took me by the hand, and said good night, Day, don't be afraid of me; and Idswell goes into the house, and goes up stairs, I followed him up stairs.

Q. How close? - I might be three or four yards behind; he goes into a room on the left hand, on the top of the stairs.

Q. Was it a one pair of stairs? - A one pair of stairs. As soon as I got up on the stairs, I had not got quite into the room.

Q. You followed up too? - Yes. Hardwicke, the man in the blue coat, came from behind some curtains.

Q. In the room? - Yes.

Q. Could you see into the room at the time? - The door was not quite open: but I see him come from behind the curtains.

Q. Did he come singly, or others with him? - There were others with him.

Q. Did he do any thing? - He laid hold of my arm and pulled half my sleeve off.

Q. Had any thing, at this time, been said by any body that you heard? - As soon as Hardwicke laid hold of me, Idswell said, d-mn him, he has got a blunderbuss under his coat. Then that other tall man came up, I believe his name is James Haydon , they both got me down on the stairs.

Q. You said something about your coat? - My coat sleeve came off.

Q. Was that before Haydon came up, or after? - In the scuffle, in which both Hardwicke and Haydon were engaged.

Q. Was that before they got you down? What did Haydon do when he came up? - He laid hold of me and kicked me on this left hip; two others at the same time came up.

Q. Hardwicke came up to you and laid hold of you by your left hand? - Yes.

Q. Haydon came up on the other side and laid hold of you by your coat? - Yes.

Q. Two others, you said, at the time came up? - Yes; then there was the little man on the other side came up.

Q. Give us every thing that happened to you, in the order in which it happened. If any thing was done by Hardwicke by himself, before the others joined, describe that first? - No, they were all up together with me, before they got the blunderbuss.

Q. Point out those other two persons? - That is one on the right hand side, John Henly, and I believe that is the man behind Mr. Tilley, John Delany.

Q. These four persons being engaged with you, what did they do? - They got me down.

Q. You was describing something that somebody was doing to you with your hams? - It was Haydon, he kicked me down.

Q. What did the two last persons do with you when they came up? - They were scuffing along with me to get the blunderbuss from me.

Q. Hardwicke and Haydon being the two first persons with you, what did the two next persons do, after their coming up? - After they got me down, they came and held me down by the head.

Q. John Hardwicke and Haydon were the two first that came up in the manner you describe. Now, Haydon kicked you on the Hams, and by that means these two got you down? - Yes, While I was down, Hardwicke came on this side and got the blunderbuss away from me.

Q. Did he do this before or after the other persons, joined them? - After.

Q. Then after the two fall kicked you down, there two other persons came and joined them to hold you down? - Yes, just so.

Q. And then while you was so laying Hardwicke came and took the blunderbuss out of this right side coat pocket, the muzzle being in the pocket? - Yes. After they had got it away from me, Hardwicke said, d-mn him, I have got it from him; then they were going to throw me down stairs, and I catched by the banisters.

Q. Who were going to throw you down stairs? - These four.

Q. From whence do you infer that they were going to throw you down stairs? - They got me by the collar, and some were going to throw me down, and some were putting my feet forward's.

Q. At this time, had you seen any more persons than these four, and the man who opened the door? - No, I had not. I catched myself by the banisters, and then the light was put out, then they fired the blunderbuss off.

Q. At this time where was Idswell? - I expected he had been in the room.

Q. Where was the light at the time that it was put out? - On the top of the stairs.

Q. Without the room or within? - Without the room.

Q. Do you know how it came there, or who had it? - I do not.

Q. Was it in the hands of some person? - In the hands of some person.

Q. Was it in the hands of any of the four persons engaged with you? - No, it was not.

Q. Was it brought out of the room, or was it there when you first went up? - it was brought out.

Q. After Idswell went in? - Yes, after Idswell went in.

Q. As you did not see who brought it out, or who held it, perhaps you cannot tell how it was extinguished? - No, I cannot.

Q. But the light instantly vanished? - It was gone.

Q. How soon after Hardwicke exclaimed d-mn him, I have got it from him, was it the blunderbuss was fired? - Not a quarter of a minute.

Court. Then the blunderbuss was fired? - Yes.

Q. How soon? - Directly after.

Mr. Garrow. This was not a quarter of a minute after Hardwicke said he had it? - It was immediately done.

Q. This was immediately? - Yes.

Q. You told me that you expected that Idswell was in the room; from the time that Idswell went in to the time that the blunderbuss had been fired, had you seen any thing of him? - I had not.

Q. You supposed him to be in the room? - I did.

Q. You see afterwards the place where Idswell was found laying? - Yes, I did.

Q. Was that before you on the stairs? - It was before me.

Q. Could he have got to that place but by passing you, while you was in the scuffle? - I don't know that he could.

Q. Any other stair case there? - I don't know indeed.

Q. To your own knowledge, was there any other? - There was not.

Q. What position were you in at the time that the blunderbuss was discharged? - I was catching hold of the banisters of the stairs, I was with my heels up, tripped up, and laying hold of the banisters of the stairs to save myself; afterwards they broke my hold, and I went to the bottom of the stairs.

Q. Now, the instant that the blunderbuss was discharged, what was your situation then? - My head was bleeding, and they broke my hold, knocking my hands off the banisters, and I fell to the bottom.

Q. How far did you fall from the place in which you was standing in? - About two or three stairs; they knocked my hands a way, and my head fell within two or three stairs of the bottom, my heels laying above.

Q. Was the blunderbuss discharged from a situation above you or below you? - Above me. Then afterwards they beat me across the loins with the blunderbuss.

Q. Now, what was the first thing they said or did, after you so fell? - They beat me across the loins, with the blunderbuss.

Q. Can you form a judgment whether there were more persons employed in doing you a mischief than four? - I believe there were, because when I got to the bottom, I strove to get myself up, and I catched hold of a man's apron.

Q. While they were beating you do you mean? - Yes.

Q. How did it appear that the person to whom the apron belonged, was standing with respect to you? - Somebody was kicking me in the face, and I caught hold of his apron.

Q. If I understand you, while another, or others were beating you with the blunderbuss? - Afterwards they jumped upon me, and said, d-mn him, he is dead.

Q. Were there more voices, or more persons employed in that act of violence than one? - I am sure there were more than one. Then some of them went up stairs, and got a light with a bit of brown paper, and they could see that I was not dead, and they raised me up by the hair of my head.

Q. What was said or done? - As soon as I saw the light, somebody said, no, he is not dead.

Q. Who called out that? - I don't know indeed.

Q. Was it more than one? - No, I don't know that it was.

Q. Can you distinguish who that person was? - No; they afterwards came down and raised me up by the hair of my head.

Q. How many persons came down, do you think, and raised you by the hair of your head? - I think five or six. After they had raised me up, I began to fight as well as I could, and cried out murder, as loud as I could. They then got my handkerchief-

Q. Was there then, at that time, any other light produced except the brown paper? - No, there was not. I said, for God's sake, don't murder me, for my family's sake; they then got me down and hanged me in my handkerchief. They got me down again, and I had a silk handkerchief on my neck, and they put their hands between my neck and handkerchief, and they held me so till I was almost dead.

Q. This was after you begged them not to murder you? - Yes; there were people coming round about the house; I lay still on my face towards the ground.

Q. You heard an alarm from without? - I did; and I see a woman come to the

bottom of the passage with a candle in her hand.

Q. Did that turn out to be the woman of the house? - Yes; and said, for God's sake open the door, and let them out. As soon as they perceived the light come, they all ran up stairs.

Q. When the light first came, did you observe any man in the passage, whom you had not before seen, after you had gone into the house? - No, I did not.

Q. On the light coming, what state of things presented themselves to you? could you observe how many persons ran away from you? - I could not.

Q. More than one or two? - One or two.

Q. Now, the time of the light appearing in the passage, and the people coming in from the street, was almost instantaneous? - Yes. I got up as soon as I saw the light, and walked towards the street door, with my head and face bleeding. The door was opened.

Q. Who was the first person that drew your attention after you had light to make observation? - I believe it was a watchman that came to me first; then there were some more patrols. As soon as I got the door open, I stood against the door, and there was a woman came in her shift.

Q. The appearance of light, and their running up stairs, and the opening the door, was all done in an instant? - It was.

Q. Who opened the door? - I cannot tell.

Q. Then the watchman came in first? - Yes, the watchman; and patrols went up stairs with him. I see a woman come to the door in her shift.

Q. Do you mean, came in from the street? - Yes, in at the outer door, and said, there were two men on the top of their houses. I went with the woman, about eight or nine doors off, and found it to be Haydon, and John Henley.

Q. Was it on the same side of the way? - Yes; they went out of a window on other persons houses.

Q. Did you find them in the hands of a person of the name of Spencer? - Yes, Spencer was there present.

Q. What, were they on the top of the house? - On the top of Spencer's house.

Q. Did you go up to the top? - Yes, I went up to the top, and brought one down, and Spencer the other.

Q. Who did you bring down? - I brought Haydon.

Q. And Spencer brought down? - Henley.

Q. What did you do next? - We took them to the watch-house, and then the patrols brought all the rest in, except Mr. Tilley.

Q. Did you return at all to No. 13? - Yes, from the watch-house; I see a patrol, and he asked me what I wanted? I said, I wanted the prisoner. He said, he is dead; and then a patrol gave charge of me to go to the watch-house; I believe his name is Service.

Q. Did you see any thing of Idswell afterwards? - I did not till I came back from the watch-house. I see him sit down with his head down between his legs, just within the passage.

Q. He was alive at that time? - I believe he was; somebody oil say he spoke two or three times after that.

Q. Now, with respect to the persons that you have named, how did you get back from the watch-house the second time, after you had been sent to the watch-house? - The patrol gave charge, but they did not take any notice of me, and I went back again.

Q. Now, with respect to Hardwicke, Haydon, Henley, and Delany, are you quite sure that these are the persons? -

Court to Hardwicke. Stand forward.

Q. To Day. Are you sure that is the man that took the blunderbuss from you? - I am sure that is Hardwicke.

Q. Have you the least doubt at all about his person? - I am sure that is the person.

Court. Let James Haydon stand forward.

Day. That is the same.

Q. Are you sure that is the man? - He had a red waistcoat on at the time.

Q. Are you sure to his person? - I am certain to his person.

Court. Let John Delany and John Henley stand forward.

Q. To Day. Those are the two that joined and held you down before the blunderbuss was fired? - They are the two.

Q. Are you sure of it? - I am sure.

Q. Is there any other person there that you remember seeing in the house besides them and Tilley? - Yes, there is Jacobs; I see him in the passage.

Q. Did you mention Jacobs before? - Yes.

Q. You mentioned Jacobs as having come backwards and forwards to Idswell in the prison? - Yes.

Q. Do you say you see him in the passage? - Yes, I see him in the passage.

Q. In what part of the transaction did you first see Simon Jacobs? - In the passage, after it was over, after the light appeared in the passage.

Q. Before or after the door was opened for strangers to come in? - Why, it was before.

Q. In what part of the passage did you see him? - On the stairs.

Q. Near the bottom, or top? - Near the bottom of the stairs.

Q. How near to the place where you was lying? - Not a yard.

THOMAS SANDERS sworn.

Q. I believe you are a public officer? - I am overseer of the Old Artillery Ground.

Q. What time did you go to this house in Artillery-lane first? - As the watchman was going one o'clock.

Q. I will trouble you to produce the fragments of a blunderbuss; did you see them found in the house? - Part of them; I produce them as delivered to me.

Q. There are some sticks you have got there, where did you get them? - Two I found myself in the house.

Q. Where did you find them? - In the one pair of stairs, on the left hand, one in the bed-room, and the other in the front room, the parlour or dining-room. This stick was delivered to me by a man of the house at No. 13. In what particular part it was found I did not see. (Produces the pieces of the blunderbuss.)

Q. It has been in your custody ever since? - Yes, it has.

Q. When was it first put into your custody? - Between five and six o'clock on Saturday morning. This stock I took down to the watch-house myself, and these pieces Mr. Mitcheli got together, and gave them to me.

Day. They are the same.

Q. You have seen them before the magistrate? - Yes.

Q. And you have looked at them again now? - Yes, I have.

Q. That is the blunderbuss with which you was beat in the manner you have described? - Yes.

Mr. Const. I am for Hardwicke, Henley and Delany. Mr. Day, you have told us that you was the turnkey of this prison? - I was.

Q. You have likewise told us, that Crosswell was the other? - Yes, he was my fellow servant.

Q. Therefore all the applications that were made to you, Crosswell was privy to it? - Yes.

Q. You are aware, that if you are not believed in what you have told to the jury, of course the consequences of this man's escape, and his subsequent murder, you will have to answer for? - I have told nothing but what is true.

Court. He is certainly not liable to the consequences of this man's murder, if his evidence is true.

Mr. Const. Did I understand you that you were not certain that orders were given to prevent any body from seeing Mr. Idswell? - His wife used to come to him, and Mr. Tilley.

Q. Did you know that there were orders for nobody else to see him? - I am not sure. Mr. Brown see him that night the murder was committed, and uncle Johnny; I know there were many persons refused to see him.

Q. Did you know there was such an order given? - I have heard Mr. Roberts say, that there was nobody else to see him but Mr. Tilly and his wife; but he never gave me a strict charge, because I had not the key.

Q. I believe you said that his uncle, to gain admission, gave you a guinea a piece? - No, not his uncle, Mr. Idswell did.

Q. In the night that you went with this man, you say you walked part of the way? - Yes.

Q. What distance is the prison from the place where this unfortunate affair happened? - I cannot say exactly, because I am not used to that part of the town; the coach was a shilling fare.

Q. Cannot you guess at the distance that you went? - It was from Smithfield to Bishopsgate-street.

Q. When you went into the room, or followed Idswell into the room, you say that Hardwicke took hold of you by the arm? - He took hold of me by the arm, and tried to pull me into the room.

Q. Did you resist going into the room? - I hung back, and my coat sleeve came off.

Q. What did you do immediately, on your coat sleeve giving way? - I hung back, and Haydon laid hold of my right side.

Q. Did he come out of the room? - Yes, he did.

Q. Where was the light at this time? - In the room, so as I could see the others come from behind the curtains.

Court. So situated as to give live light to the stairs? - Yes.

Mr. Const. Then without moving the light in the room, there was light enough on the stairs to see what passed? Did any body else after that bring out the light? - Yes, while we were struggling on the stairs.

Q. These two persons who took hold of you on the stairs, whoever they were, besides Haydon, had done it before the candle was brought out? - The candle was in the room, but it was so as I could see them.

Q. Afterwards the candle was brought out; did you see who brought the light out? - I did not.

Q. Then Hardwicke did not attempt to take the blunderbuss when Idswell said, d-mn him, he has got a blunderbuss; but it was after when you was on the stairs? - Yes; they took it from me in the struggling, at the time during the struggling; there were then four on me, them that I perfectly know, if there were any more I cannot say.

Q. Was the candle put out at the time that he took the blunderbuss from under your coat? - At the time the blunderbuss went away, he said, d-mn it I have got it, and immediately the candle was put out.

Q. Then there could not be half a minute pass from the time you first attempted to go into the room, from the time that the blunderbuss was fired? - It might be half a minute, or it might be rather more, I cannot say exactly to a moment, it was almost instantly.

Q. You perfectly saw and observed, and was able to observe every thing so distinctly? - I see them four persons.

Q. Now, in that half minute, was it possible for Idswell to have passed you, and get down without your knowledge?

- I cannot say that. I cannot conceive how he did get down, I thought he had been in the room all the time.

Q. Then you knew not what happened to Idswell till you retuned? - I did not.

Q. You describe yourself as your heels being higher than your head, and your hands hold of the banisters, and your face towards the banisters? - Yes.

Q. Now did I hear you right, when I thought I heard you say, that they two persons were holding down your head? - I am sure them four were there, how many more I cannot say.

Q. When you talked of being beat with the blunderbuss, you did not tell who it was? - I cannot say.

Q. Do you mean to say that the blunderbuss was broke on you? - That is the blunderbuss that I took with me.

Q. Do you mean to say by the display of its being brought here, that this was broke about you? - I can say no more than this, the first time they struck me the blunderbuss broke.

Q. You knew that at the time? - Yes, I did.

Q. Then you do swear that this was broke on you, and in the way that you have described? - I will swear it was broke about me.

Q. Was it broke in the way that you have produced it? - I never see it till I see it at the watch-house.

Q. When you returned to the house did you see any of the pieces? - I did not; I never saw them till they were brought to the watch-house.

Q. How long was it afterwards? - I cannot say.

Q. Was it the same night, or the next morning? - I believe it was five or six o'clock the next morning, but I did not see it all then.

Q. Did you know either of the four persons before? - I don't know that I ever see them to my knowledge.

Mr. Manley. Where do you come from? - I came from Cornwell and Liecester.

Q. From what part of Liecestershire? - From Swandom.

Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Freeman of that country? - I have seen him.

Q. Have you been in his company often? - Never.

Q. Did you go to school to him? - I did not.

Q. How long have you left that country? - About two years.

Q. What were you before you came out of that country? - I followed my father's business, a harness maker and collar maker; I came up and followed my own trade for some weeks, and it began to grow very dead.

Q. Then had you any knowledge of this business before? - No, I never was in it but once.

Q. How came you to get the place? - I was recommended by one Mr. Ridgeway.

Q. Where do you come from now? who brought you hither? - I come from New Prison.

Q. What are you in your office still? - No.

Q. You come as a prisoner? - I do.

Q. Then you was committed for this felony? Have you been in confinement? - I have been in confinement.

Q. You come here now in custody? - I do.

Q. You received a guinea to admit this man's uncle to see him, and Mr. Crosswell another? - We did.

Q. Did you receive any other largeesses? - We received one guinea one night, and one guinea another.

Q. How many good things did you receive; not money, but monies worth? - When he first came to prison he wanted to send down a note to his house, in St. Mary-axe, Mr. Roberts see the note; I sent my wife with it, and the next morn

ing he asked me what I expected? - I said, nothing, he asked me how many children I had? - I told him I had got two; and Mrs. Idswell brought two yards of common cotton for my two children.

Q. Then Mr. Day, you received a guinea a piece besides these things that you have mentioned? - We received two guineas each.

Q. How many duplicates might you have received? - I did not receive any, Crosswell had some duplicates given him, that the times were almost out, a watch, ring, hat and coat. On the Thursday night, just before I went out, Idswell said to his wife, my dear, will you go and fetch these things out of pawn; and he gave me three guineas to get them out of pawn with, the hat, coat and watch, was in for two guineas.

Q. What did you bring? - A hat, a ring, a coat, and watch; I believe the interest and every thing came to two pounds seventeen, or two pounds sixteen and ten-pence, I don't know which, and Idswell said to me, do you take the hat and coat to your house, and bring me the watch and ring the next morning.

Q. Now, Mr. Day, had you not orders to permit no person to see this man, but his wife and attorney? - I will not say positively that I had, because I had not the key to let in any body.

Q. Don't you know that several persons were turned away? - Two persons were turned away.

Q. Do you mean to deny or admit that you had full knowledge that nobody but this man's wife and attorney, were to be admitted? - I don't know, I will not say positively that I had that order.

Q. He offered a large sum to be left? - He said, Mr. Crosswell, I will leave you all my money, watch and security, to the amount of a hundred pounds, if you are afraid I shall not return.

Q. So then you went out to see that every thing was quiet? - I did, by my fellow servant's desire.

Q. O, your fellow servant to be sure was all wrong; by his desire you went to see that all was hush and quiet, and then at twelve o'clock at night, you chose that hour to take this man out? - I did not choose it, it was not my will, I went against my will all the way, but through great persuasions.

Q. Then when you came to the house, what sort of a candle was in it? - I did not make that observation of the candle, but I see it was a candle.

Q. You had never seen any one of these four prisoners at the bar? - I do not recollect ever seeing them, I may have seen them, but not know them.

Q. When you came up to the landing place, where you say Hardwicke seized you, a pretty considerable scuffle ensued? - No, there was him, and then Haydon came in, and then the other man came out.

Q. And it lasted half a minute? - It might.

Q. The blunderbuss was in your side pocket? - It was in my side pocket.

Q. How long was it in your side pocket? - Not half a minute.

Q. May not the cock have gone off in pulling it out? - It was not off till it was out, not till the candle was out.

Q. Do you mean to say now, and mind what you are about; do you mean to say this, that that did not go off by accident, while it was pulling out of your pocket? - I say it did not.

Q. You swear that? - I do; because after he got it out -

Q. Now immediately after the person used that expression, d-mn him I have got it, what past then, was there not an immediate scuffle then? - It was all in a scuffle then, and the candle was put out.

Q. Was it not quite dark then? - It was dark when the blunderbuss was fired.

Q. And all in a scuffle? - It was all in a scuffle, and my heels were up, and head down.

Q. You cannot tell who fired? - God knows, I cannot say who it was that fired; I don't know, I did not see any body fire.

Q. But there was a great scuffle at that moment of the firing? - There was a scuffle.

Q. How were the persons serving you at that firing? - Two above and two below.

Q. Were you on the steps of the stairs? - I was.

Q. Two of them below you, and two above you? - There were.

Q. How far were they from you at the time? - Some of them had hold of me, and I had hold of the banisters at the same time.

Q. Then you will not swear now, to these gentlemen of the jury, that any man fired that instrument? - I cannot; because as soon as he said, d-mn him I have got it, the light was put out instantly.

Q. It had before been told by Idswell, that you had a loaded blunderbuss, and then it was answered d-mn him, I have got the blunderbuss away? - Yes; it was.

Q. Now, you say of Idswell, the deceased, when you returned, you was taken to the watch-house, and afterwards you found him sitting at the bottom of the stairs with his head down? - Yes.

Q. You tell us that you thought he had been in the room all the time, you never see him pass you? - I did not.

Q. Did you see any person pass except these persons that you have mentioned? - I did not.

Q. If he had been at the bottom of the stairs, when you was first taken to the watch-house, you might have seen? - I might see him.

Q. Why the man was dying, how could you avoid seeing him? - I tell you I did see him, I see him when the watchman came and laid hold of me; the patrol gave charge of me first, and the watchman did not take any notice of me.

Q. Then you mean you see him now before you went to the watch-house? - I see him when they brought the light.

Q. Then you mean to state, that as soon as the light was produced, and before you went to the watch-house, you see Idswell on the stairs? - I did not see him when the first light was produced, but when the people were coming in.

Q. Your answer to me first this moment, was, that you did not see him when the light was first produced? - I did not see him.

Q. How far was that from the place where you see Idswell? - It may be two or three yards; I lay with my head facing the woman that brought the light, and he lay against the door, and she said, for God's sake let him out.

Q. How long time might there be between the light coming, before the light came? - I cannot say, I was fighting with them till the light came.

Q. How long was it after the light came, before you see Idswell there? - When I was fighting, I was calling out murder all the time, till they got me by the handkerchief.

Q. How long was it after the bringing of the light that you saw Idswell there? - Almost directly.

Q. Did you hear any groans at that time, when the blunderbuss went off at any part? - I did not.

Q. Then you did not hear any thing like a groan of a person that was injured at the time the blunderbuss was fired off? Did you hear any groans before the candle was produced? - I did not.

Q. The man, we are told, died within

twenty minutes after? - I don't know when he died.

Q. You did not hear any groans, and yet the man was not five yards off from you? - Not three yards.

Q. There was no appearance of any person being wounded there? - None at all.

Q. Between your going into the bed-room, and the person coming with the candle, how long might it be? - Two minutes is a long time in the situation I was in.

Q. Will you say how long it was? - I cannot say.

Q. Will you say it was four minutes? - I cannot.

Q. Before that time you had never seen Haydon or Hardwicke, Henly or Delany? - I had not.

Q. Why you was a good deal confused and flurried when your coat sleeve went away? - To be sure, I was, but I was not so much alarmed, but I could tell the persons; I know them four.

Q. In the moment you were seized by your coat sleeve, you were in a considerable alarm and confusion? - I was.

Mr. Knowlys. I am for Tilley. The present that you received for admitting the uncle of Idswell, did you acquaint Mr. Roberts or your master? - I did not.

Q. Did you acquaint Mr. Newport that Idswell's uncle had ever been admitted into the prison? - Never, I did not indeed.

Q. Now you say you were requested several times to admit Idswell, to go to see this dying aunt of his? - I was.

Q. Did you ever acquaint Mr. Roberts or your master, or Mr. Newport, that any such request or desire, had been made to you or any body? - I did not.

Q. Did you know that it was not a thing for you to permit, or for him to desire of you. It was a wrong thing either of one side or the other? - I know it was a wrong thing for me to be guilty of.

Q. Or Idswell to ask of you? - It was.

Q. And you did not acquaint Mr. Roberts or Mr. Newport your master, that any such solicitation had been made to you? - I never consented to it till the very night it took place.

Q. And there was a handsome present to be made in case this was done, by Mr. Idswell? - Yes.

Q. What did you expect on this occasion? - There was no sum mentioned; he said he would make us a very handsome present.

Q. You expected, however, that it was something that they would come down handsomely? - We expected something.

Q. Why will not you answer my question; did you expect something handsome, yes or no? - We expected something. We expected him to be as good as his word.

Q. When you arrived at this house, on your oath, yes or no, did you ring at the bell, or was the door opened? - I did not ring at the bell.

Q. That you will swear most positively? - I see Mr. Tilley coming from the door, and I said to Mr. Idswell, there is Mr. Tilley, and when I got up at the door, the man had got the door against his shoulder.

Q. Do you mean positively to persist in it, that the door was not opened, but that you found it open? - We never rung nor knocked. Whether Mr. Tilley rung at the bell, and then came away when he see us come I cannot tell.

Q. Therefore, you cannot say that Mr. Tilley touched any thing at all there? - I cannot tell, I see him come along the door.

Q. If it was Tilley you saw, he had his wife hanging on his arm, was not she? - I did not see his wife hanging on his arm, they were both together.

Q. Did you observe whether the wife was pregnant or no at that time? - I did not; indeed.

Q. Upon your oath, did the person you say was Tilley, speak to you at all? - Not as he passed, but when I got up to the door, I said to the man that opened the door, there is Tilley, call him back, Tilley comes back, and said who should think of seeing you Mr. Idswell.

Q. Upon your oath did you ever speak to him? - When he got me by the hand, he said good night Day, don't be afraid of me; I said good night.

Q. Upon your oath, did you call him back to speak to you or not? - I told Bowley to call him back, and he did.

Q. What did you tell him to call him back for? - I had no inclination to call him.

Q. Then you told him to call him back without any inclination? - I knew him to come backwards and forwards to Idswell in the prison.

Q. Upon your oath, did not you say to somebody there, for God's sake don't you say that you see me here? - I did not.

Q. Then that was not your reason for calling any body back? - I had no other reason than seeing him come backwards and forwards to him in prison. Tilley shook me by the hand, I never said such a word. Tilley shook me by the hand, and said good night Day, don't be afraid of me.

Q. I take it for granted you would not liked to have been seen there conveying a prisoner out of goal? - I should not indeed.

Q. You know you would have been liable to punishment if you had been observed? - Yes; but I was not so well acquainted with it as I am now.

Q. You are sure that you did not desire any body not to tell that you was seen there? - I did not.

Q. I ask you, then Tilley and his wife if it was he, went away? - They did.

Q. They were going in the contrary direction at the time you desired him to be called back? - They were going in a direction from us.

Q. Now, have you been in the same room with Bowley, confined in the room since this happened? - No, I have not, I slept in one room, and he in another.

Q. Were you permitted to see one another? - Yes.

Q. On you oath, have you ever conversed with him from that time to this? - I have never conversed with no one, no other than speaking open to them all.

Q. Have you, or have you no, conversed with him? - I have discoursed with him as well as other people.

Q. Upon you oath, have you never conversed in private? - Never; because he slept in another room to what I did, and there were four more in my room, and four or five in his room.

Q. In the day time you may have conversed together? - Yes, but there were ten or eleven of us more together.

Mr. Garrow. With respect to Mr. Tilley, being called back, how many times had Mr. Tilley been at the goal in that particular day? - Four or five, I will swear to four myself; because Mrs. Tilley came with him twice.

Q. The same person that you see in Artillery-lane? - The same person.

Q. Was it at the last of these visits that he communicated to you, that Mr. Moses was going to keep the passover at home that very night? - It was.

Q. Having disposed of that, I have but one more question to ask. You was asked, whether this blunderbuss did not go off by accident, as it was coming out of your pocket? it wounded you on the back part of your head, and killed Idswell; I need hardly ask it, it is so ridiculous-

Court. You was laying down at the time that the blunderbuss went off? - Yes my heels were up the stairs and I catched hold of the banisters.

Q. Was the coat pocket shot through?

- No, they had got it quite out before they shot.

Q. It was perfectly clear of the pocket before it went off? - Hardwicke had said, d-n him, I have got it, before it went off; I lay on the side on which the blunderbuss was.

Q. No part of your clothes were burnt at all? - Not at all.

Q. Were your pocket turned out in the business? - No, it was not.

THOMAS MITCHELL sworn.

Q. Do you live in Artillery street? - Yes.

Q. Near the house No. 12, the next door to it where this accident happened? - Yes.

Q. Do you recollect hearing any particular noise that took place on the 4th of April last? - Yes, I was alarmed by the cry of murder, and fire, as high as I can partly tell, about half after twelve, or a quarter before one.

Q. What did you do? - I ran to the door to hear what it was, in my shirt; I went back and put on my clothes.

Q. And you dressed yourself? - I put on a few things, not entirely all. I went back to the house, and a watchman was getting in at the window. When he got in, I desired the watchman to open the door, which he could not. I tried to force it open, the first time I could not; the second time I tried, it flew open. The first thing I saw was the man that was shot.

Q. In what posture was he in? - He lay on the ground with his back towards the door, about a yard from it. I observed that his clothes were on fire, which by some means I put out.

Q. Did you observe any other person in the passage? - I see a man, who they call Day, about a yard from me.

Q. Was there any light brought into the house? - The woman of the house brought me a candle as soon as I got in.

Q. What is the name of the person you met next? - I laid hold of Day, he said, for God's sake help me, or I shall be murdered.

Q. Did any person come to your assistance? - Just after that Mr. Jarvis, the night officer, came in.

Q. Did he give you and Day any assistance? - He ordered me to aid and assist, which I readily said I would.

Q. Did you find any body in the house? - Yes.

Q. Who were there? - We went up the one pair of stairs, and at the bottom of the second pair of stairs we saw two men and two women coming down stairs. I asked them what they did there?

Q. Who were they? - That man in the blue coat. Phillips The other is the man that is turned evidence, Bowley.

Q. Did you say any thing to them? - Yes, I asked them what they did there? The reply that that man made was, that they were lodgers, and came down to know what was the matter.

Q. Did you then take them in custody? - Yes.

Q. After you had taken them in custody, where did you go? - I went into the one pair of stairs bed room; I searched the room and the bed, and in the bed I see a pillow tied up at one end.

Q. Was any thing remarkable about the pillow? - It had a woman's cap on. I then was called down stairs, I believe by Jarvis. We went into the out yard.

Q. Did you find any thing in the house? - Yes; afterwards we went into the out yard, and we went round to the privy; there we found a man, I believe his name to be John Solomons . That is the man I mean.

Q. What had he to say for himself? - He said, that he had heard a noise, and was frightened, and had occasion to go there; Mr. Jarvis said, we should have occasion to bring him forward; as such,

we took him into custody, and took him to the watch house.

Q. Did you then return into the house? - Yes, we searched the house, and upon the house, and found no more.

Q. Did you find any thing in the house? - Yes; I found the blunderbuss in different parts.

Q. Do you mean in different parts of the house, or the blunderbuss in different pieces? - In different parts of the house. The but I picked up in the passage, and sent to the watch-house, the lock I picked up in the ashes of the one pair of stairs room, in the fire place, the front room; throwed quick behind, the lock was close to the sender.

Q. Was that the room where the pillow was? - No.

Q. Was the Room on that floor? - Yes. That other bit of the stock was with the handle, and this other piece, I believe, was in the window of the front room.

Q. Did you find any of these sticks?(some sticks shewn him) - Yes. This stick I picked up on the one pair of stairs landing place, on the floor, the landing place between the bed room and the front room door; the other was found in the house by Mr. Sanders, and other people, in my presence, and delivered altogether to Mr. Sanders; to the best of my knowledge, that crooked stick was in the garnet, picked up by Mr. Sanders. This one, that man that had the care of the house with me during the night picked it up in the bed room, I am certain of it.

Q. Do you know where the other was found? - I do not particularly.

Mr. Manley. Then this large stick was found in the bed room? - It was.

Q. In what part of it? - I think up at the bed's head, by the fire place.

Q. In the natural place where it would be expected to be? - It may be so.

Mr. Knapp. I am for Phillips and Solomons. When Phillips had told you we are lodgers, had he any stick about him? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Was he searched? - Not in my presence.

Q. Had he a stick in his hand? - He had not.

Q. With respect to John Solomons he had got into the privy? - He had.

Q. He hearing the noise? - I don't know what made him go there.

Mr. Trebeck. Was not the door shut when you came to the house? - It was, and double locked.

Q. Did you observe the state of the curtains in this room? - They were all drawn about the bed.

Q. Did you find any thing else in the room? - We found three hats, Mr. Sanders and I, and two or three more gentlemen. This is one.

Q. Did you attend before the magistrate at Bow-street? - Twice.

Q. Was there any body at the examination at Bow-street that claimed that hat? - Yes.

Q. Do you know who it was? - That little man behind owned the little cocked up hat, John Henley.

Q. Did any body own that hat, or another hat? - We asked round and that hat belonged to the keeper which was found on the prisoner that stands there behind.

Q. What is his name? - I don't know what his name is. ( William Handland )

Court. Where was that hat found? - The hat that he has now got was found in the house, and this hat he had got under his arm at the examination at Bow-street, which I was ordered, by Mr. Flood, to take.

Q. To Day. Had you left a hat of your's in Artillery-lane? - I went home without a hat.

Q. To Michall. This hat was taken from Handland at Bow-street, and a hat gave to Day, which was found in Artillery lane? - It was so.

Q. Was any thing said about that hat? - Handland said, he had bought Day's hat and gave nine shillings for it.

Q. Therefore he did not own either of the hats found in Artillery-lane? - No.

Q. To Day. Did you lose your hat in the scuffle in Artillery-lane? - Yes.

Q. You went home without it? - Yes.

Q. Is the hat found at Artillery lane your property? - I believe it is, it is not in the state in which I lost it now, because there was a stamp went across and a maker's name went across.

Q. You believe it is your's? - Yes, and I have no doubt about it.

Q. And you give this reason for it, there had been a flat stamp descriptive of the duty paid? - Yes, and a round mark descriptive of the abode of the hatter and a leather that went before.

Q. Does it appear to you that these are the marks of these things having been in that hat that are not in it now? - I believe that they have been in it, and there was a large twist band on it.

PETER JARVIS sworn.

Q. You are headborough of the Artillery Ground? - I am.

Q. What time was it you was alarmed and went to this house? - About a quarter before one o'clock.

Q. Did you go to the house by yourself, or in company with any body else? - By myself.

Q. Now, speak slow, and tell my Lord distinctly what you observed in order; was there any body at the outside of the door when you came up to the house? - There were several of the watchmen.

Q. Had any body obtained an entrance into the house at that time, or was the door shut? - The door was opened when I came up. but still some people standing on the outside.

Q. Did you go into the house? - The first person that I noticed standing at the threshold of the door was John Day .

Q. Was there a light there at that time? - There was a light in the passage.

Q. On the threshold of the door Day stood? - Day stood at the threshold of the door; he was standing with his hand up to his head and I see the blood running down by the side of his face.

Q. What did you next observe? - I immediately says to the watchman-

Q. Tell us the next person you saw? - The next person I particularly noticed was the deceased; he was sitting on the floor of the passage, with his head leaning forward towards his knees.

Q. How far from the door? - Just within the door, so as the door could open without touching him.

Q. Tell my lord what light it was that you was able to discern these people? - I cannot tell justly by what light, but the watchmen had candles on the step of the door.

Q. And some of them had got into the house before you went in? - Yes, they had.

Q. What was the third thing that took your notice? - After I had ordered the watchman to take care of Day, I passed over the deceased, after I had observed the situation he was in; there was a great quantity of blood on the floor; I passed over him towards the stairs.

Q. Did you stay there any time? - I made my way towards the stairs. I had a cutlass in my hand, which I then drew out of the scabbard.

Q. Did any thing particular take your attention? - Nothing, till I got up about half a dozen stairs; then I met Phillips, the first person I met on the stairs as I was going up; I had got up about half a dozen of the stairs.

Q. Did you say any thing to him, or he to you? - I don't recollect saying any thing. I immediately secured him. I

held the drawn cutlass before me, and secured him by the collar.

Q. Where was Mitchell at this time? - Just behind me.

Q. You did not hear him say any thing? - I do not recollect.

Q. Did you give him into custody, or Mitchell? - I delivered him to Mitchell, and, I believe, Mitchell to the watch.

Q. Did you go up stairs farther? - Close behind Phillips, on the next stair above him, was Barney Solomon , Bowley they call him; I then laid hold of him the same way as I had done Phillips, and gave him over to Mitchell, as I had done the other. Behind Barnard Solomon , on the stairs, were two women.

Q. How far above Bowley were they? - The next stair or two.

Q. What did you do with the women? - Secured them.

Q. One of the women had got a candle? - I cannot tell which.

Q. Had you an opportunity of going up any farther? - I did not go farther up at that time. There was a cry then when I had secured the two women, in the passage; I cannot tell from whom.

Q. Did you yourself observe any body else in the house? - I did not.

Q. What did you do with the women? - I handed them down to Mitchell, the same as I had done the men.

Q. Did you go farther up? - I did not. I returned down stairs, in consequence of what I heard in the passage.

Q. Was the deceased still in the passage? - He was.

Q. What became of Day? - I don't know.

Q. Was there any other that you see there? - There was one that I took out of the yard, John Solomons . When I returned down the stairs, I heard the cry in the passage, that there were some got into the yard. I went into the yard with Mitchell; there was a light, and came to the privy door, and it was fast. I then laid hold of it by a hole that was in the door to admit the light, and it came open, whether by my shaking it or not, I cannot tell; and that man was then sitting on the seat of the privy. I asked him what he did there? - he said that he had heard a gun go off; I think those were the exact words, and that he was obliged to come in there, into the privy.

Q. Did you take him into custody? - I did.

Q. Did you take any other into custody? - No; I did not. I saw no other prisoners till I came into the watch-house, where they all where.

Mr. Knapp. You was first before Mr. Mitchell? - I was.

Q. You did not hear Phillips say any thing at all? - I do not recollect.

Q. You was nearest to him? - I was.

Q. Phillips had no stick in his hand? - No kind of offensive weapons at all.

Q. With respect to Solomons, whether he opened the door, or whether you opened it, you cannot tell.

Q. There he was sitting on the seat, and said he had heard a gun fired? - Yes.

BARNARD SOLOMON sworn.

Q. Are you the person they call Bowley? - Yes.

Q. Be so good to recollect the only atonement you can make to public justice, is to let us know the whole truth here to day. Do you know the several persons now at the bar? - I do.

Q. Do you know them all? - Not all.

Q. Are you acquainted with George Hardwicke ? - Yes; I do.

Q. James Haydon ? - I cannot say I do. There is one man in the blue coat, I don't know his name.

Q. Were you acquainted with the late Mr. Idswell? - I was.

Q. You had been acquainted with him, perhaps, for some time? - I had been, but not intimately acquainted, till within a twelve month.

Q. Had you occasion to go to him while he was confined on a charge of having forged stamps? - The second day after he was in trouble.

Q. Mind the question; had you occasion to go to him while he was confined on a charge of having forged stamps? - I had not to my knowledge; it was a Mrs. Idswell's house I went to, the house where the late Mr. Idswell dwelt, in St. Mary-axe.

Q. Do you know a place they call New Prison, Clerkenwell? - I do.

Q. Had you occasion to go to New Prison, Clerkenwell? - After he was committed to the prison, I had.

Q. Be so good to attend to my question, because it will be material, you should. How often had you occasion to go there before he died? - I might once a day, sometimes twice, sometimes oftener, according as I was sent from Mrs. Idswell.

Q. Was Mrs. Idswell the widow of Mr. Lawrence Jones, who had been the uncle of Mr. Idswell? - She was.

Q. And therefore intimately acquainted? - She was.

Q. I don't know whether you was admitted to his presence at the prison, or only carried him necessaries that were wanted? - I could not see him.

Q. You remember probably the night on which Mr. Idswell was killed? - I do; Good Friday.

Q. Where did you first meet Mrs. Idswell. and any other persons, some of which perhaps are now here, on the evening of Good Friday? - On the evening of Good Friday, I went to my own house.

Q. Be so good to attend to my question, I don't ask you where you went home, but where you met Mrs. Jones, or any other persons that evening of Good Friday? - I met Mrs. Jones and some other persons at Jonathan Jones 's, and Benjamin Jones 's, in Fashion-street, the two brothers lived together.

Q. About what time of the evening might it be? - About half an hour after ten.

Q. Who did you find there, when you first went in? - There was Simon Jones, the prisoner at the bar.

Q. The man that goes by the name of Simon Jacobs ? - I mean that man. Mr. Tilley and his wife, Mr. Phillips, John Solomons , Thomas Hardwicks , the porter, as they call him. I used to call him the porter, because he removed the goods from St. Mary-axe, to No. 13, Artillery-street.

Q. St. Mary-axe , who lived there? - Idswell.

Q. Who was he porter to? - Jonathan Jones employed him.

Q. Was he the gentleman they call Johnny, the uncle? - Yes. There is that man behind in the blue coat, I don't know his name, (Haydon) he was there.

Q. What did you see on going in to any of these persons? - I see them all sit round, and I sat myself down next to Mr. Tilley and his wife; I then said to Jonathan Jones 's wife in our own language, bgad? as much as to say, how goes it? - she then answered me, you need not speak in Hebrew, you may speak in English, you need not be afraid of Mr. Tilley. I then said to Mr. Tilley, what do you think of this business that is going forward to night? Mr. Tilley then answered me as this, if they let him out at all there will be no manner of danger.

Q. Was that said by Mr. Tilley, in the presence and hearing of all the rest? - I spoke to Tilley slowly by himself.

Q. Did he answer to you in a tone; that you alone could hear? - No, they could not hear, I asked him slowly and he answered slowly.

Q. What induce I you to ask that question of Mr. Tilley-Because I was surprised at seeing Mr. Tilley there, and Mrs. Idswell told me that day that Mr. Idswell would come out.

Q. Without more explanation from you to Mr. Tilley, than what do you think of this business that is going forward to night he gave you that answer? - He did.

Q. After that what happened? - I went down into the kitchen, and staid there for some time; then I came up again, and when I came up again they were all gone except Mr. Tilley and his wife, and the women that were there, some little time after I came up again, and Mrs. Idswell came in along with her uncle Lyon Jones; which Lyon had a bundle under his arm, from that he says to me, come, Bowley, go along with me; on that Simon Jacobs's wife, and Mrs. Idswell said, come along with me, and Mr. Tilley had a stick in his hand, and I said to Mr. Tilley whether he would lend it me to take along with me, I did take it, he gave it me, and I took it into my hand along with me, and he said take care of it, and I went along with Mrs. Idswell and Simon's wife.

Q. Where did you go to? - We went to No. 13, Artillery-street.

Q. Did you take the stick with you? - I did.

Q. Which is it? (a bundle of sticks shewn) - I believe this to be the stick, it was a stick much like it.

Q. Had you had any talk while Mr. Tilley was present with Mrs. Idswell, or any of the other ladies about the absence of the other persons? - None at all.

Q. Then you and the other ladies went to Artillery-street. Had you been there before? - Yes, several times. I was employed there; I had half a guinea a week ever since the second day that Mr. Idswell was in trouble, first of all in St. Mary-axe, and then at this place in Artillery-lane.

Q. Who hired the place in Artillery-lane? - Jonathan Jones, I believe it to be so.

Q. Whose goods were carried there? - I fetched the broker for Jonathan Jones, at the time that he did live at Mr. Whitlings, in Leadenhall-street.

Q. By whose order were they carried? - By Jonathan Jones 's from Mrs. Idswell's house, in St. Mary-axe, at No. 13, St. Mary-axe.

Q. Do you know at that time? - I cannot be particular, I believe five or six days before this accident happened.

Q. What apartment first of all was taken in Artillery-lane? - When I was there they had the dining room and the back room, and the use of the kitchen and front garrets.

Q. Nothing to do either with the ground floor or the second floor.

Q. What was the nature of your employment, in Artillery-lane, after the apartment was taken? - I used to go on errands, she told me I was to be there till such time as Mr. Idswell was acquitted, or discharged; at the time I was in the house in the first place, I used to take care of the house.

Q. Now, after Good Friday evening, when you had taken leave of the parties, in Fashion street, and went with the ladies to Artillery-lane, what was the state of things when you got there? - On the road I heard Mrs. Idswell say. -

Q. Unless any of the prisoners now at the bar were present, you must not tell us what she said. You went to Artillery-street? - I went to Artillery-street. I rung the bell.

Q. You and the two women went together - Yes.

Q. Who opened the door? - The ser

vant maid opened the door, and I went up stairs into the bed chamber, when I first entered into the place, Simon Jacobs was standing by the fire; a little while after Hardwicke came in.

Q. When you went into the room, who was in the room? - Simon Jacobs , and the mother of the servant, the mother of Mrs. Idswell's servant, a little while after Hardwicke came in, then John Phillips came in; when they were in doors together, I said out of joke, who will be the sick aunt to night?

Q. Who was in the room then, when you said that joke? - There was only Simon Jacobs there, and the mother of the maid servant, then a little while longer I carried on that joke till Hardwicke came in. I said I did not care if I am the sick aunt, and one of them said I might as well be the sick aunt.

Q. Phillips was not there till you began to play the farce of the sick aunt. Was that in Hardwicke's hearing? - I want to know whether you went to bed to play the farce of the sick aunt before Hardwicke came into the room? - After Hardwicke came into the room I said, now I will be the sick aunt; and I put myself to bed, and somebody put me a night cap on.

Q. How long might you continue in bed? - Not above five or six-minutes; I got up immediately, and then I heard the bell ring.

Q. Did Phillips come in while you was in bed? - I believe he did.

Q. Can you be sure of that? - I cannot be sure of that; there were several came in.

Q. Can you ascertain who came in while you was in bed? - I could not, because it was a small room.

Q. Was there any preparations made for concealing persons in the room? - Before I got up?

Q. What did you mean by the question who should play the sick aunt that night? - Because the Wednesday night before this happened-

Q. Unless some person who is now at the bar was present on Wednesday night, you must not tell us what past? - Simon Jacobs was there.

Q. Who else? - Nobody else of that number.

Q. Tell us what had past on the Wednesday before that? - On the Wednesday before that, Mrs. Idswell came home to No. 13, Artillery-lane, and brought some apothecaries stuff home along with her, three vials of stuff, which she mixed in more vials, with a box of pills, and a plaister; some time after that she brought home a plate of silver, and she says to me-

Q. Was that in the hearing of Simon Jacobs ? - I cannot lay it was.

Q. Then there is no occasion to mention it.

Q. I understand you that Simon Jacobs was there on the Wednesday evening; you may tell us any thing that passed that evening? - There was nothing more passed that evening.

Q. In what condition was the room that evening? - I put up the curtains, and I put the bed to rights, and she brought in the stuff; and the Thursday morning following, Simon Jacobs and his mother both came, and his mother laid herself to bed, as if she was the sick aunt. Then Mrs. Idswell said she expected some of the gaolers to come along with a direction to that place, to see the sick aunt.

Q. What was to be done in case this gaoler was to come? - She told me then, that she proposed to give them fifty guineas to let Mr. Idswell come to see this sick aunt.

Q. Was Simon the man with her at the time when his mother laid down to represent the sick aunt? - He was there half an hour and went away again afterwards.

Q. Did he see her lay there as the sick aunt? - I cannot say whether he was in the bed chamber or the front chamber.

Q. Did any of the gaolers come to satisfy themselves to see whether there was a sick aunt there or no? - They did not come that day.

Q. Did any thing more happen with respect to any of the prisoners at the bar, on Thursday? - Not that I know of.

Q. Then we will come back again in to your arrival at Artillery-lane, on Friday. You said, that when you came there you went up stairs, and Hardwicke and Jacobs came in after you came in, while Simon Jacobs and Hardwicke came in you went to bed, several other persons came in, and one among whom was Phillips? - Yes.

Q. Now go on, and name the other persons that came in? - This tall man, this man in the blue coat, Haydon.

Q. Who else? - As to any of the other prisoners I cannot punctually swear to, because I never see them before this man, I see him at John Jones 's house, that makes me know him.

Q. It is one thing to swear positively to them. We understand as to those you have now named, Hardwicke, Haydon, Jacobs, and Phillips, you swear positively to? - I do. There was another man came in along with them, but who it was I cannot say; but if I am right and not mistaken, it is him in the whitish coat; I am not sure of it, (Handland) I said at that time, this man in the blue coat came in, Haydon; I am sure he came in.

Q. Are you sure that some man came in with Haydon? - I am sure of it.

Q. And that person you believe to be Handland, but you are not sure of it. What happened next? - Some time after I hear the bell ring.

Q. At the time you heard the bell ring, were all you in the bed room? - We were. I went down then and opened the door; when I opened the door, came on Mr. Idswell and Day, just at the threshold of the door; then Day says to me, Bowley.

Q. What do you mean by being just at the threshold of the door? - They were not on the step, but close at the door.

Q. Whether they were the persons that rung the bell, you cannot tell? - I can not tell, but they were very near to the door.

Q. What past on your first opening of the door? - Day says to me, Bowley; there is Tilley going, go and call him; I then went out about ten yards, and as I went Tilley came right up to me like; I then said to Tilley, there is Day wants to speak with you; he then came up to the door, Tilley did.

Q. Where did Day and Idswell stay at this time? - They were standing at the door while I called Tilley; Tilley came to the door, and shok hands along with Day and Idswell.

Q. Was any body with Tilley? - Not when I see him; he came up as I was going forward.

Q. You don't know whether his wife was with him or not? - No, I cannot swear that his wife was with him. He came up and shook hands both with Day and Isdwell. I cannot say that I heard what he said; he did speak, but what he said, I cannot be certain; but he shook hands with them both. Then afterwards Idswell went in first, Day followed him. I then stopped at the door for about a minute and a half; and I said to Mr. Tilley, why don't you come in? - and I said so to him twice or three times.

Q. What did he say or do? - He said, he would rather not. He did not go

he went about his business, went away. I after then shut the door; before I could rightly come up the first pair of stairs, I heard a wrangle.

Q. What do you mean? - The first pair of stairs where the bed chamber is.

Q. What did that wrangle seem to proceed from? - That I cannot say. I heard a wrangle, and I went to the second stairs.

Q. What you passed the bed chamber? - I did.

Q. When you went down stairs to open the door, where did you leave all the company? - In the bed chamber.

Q. They were not in the front room all that evening? - That I cannot say; they never assembled there; the rooms join each other; I cannot positively say; the landing place is as well to the dining room as it is to the bed chamber.

Q. The landing place! I do not understand you? - When you get up one pair of stairs, the first room that you come into is the bed chamber, and the room that goes right front is the dining room.

Q. Is that the same stairs lands you for the one, lands you for the other? - It does.

Q. In which of these two rooms were all the parties assembled? - In the bed room, where the sick aunt was.

Q. Was there any truth in that story at all, or was mere artifice? - There was no such aunt, no further than the pillow and night cap.

Q. Then you heard the wrangle, and what became of you? - I went up stairs towards the second stairs; I had not been but a few stairs before I heard the prisoner, whom I supposed it to be Idswell by the irons, running down stairs, as it appeared to me.

Q. Was there any light at this time, by which you could see the state of things? - I could not, for I removed further up stairs towards the garret; then I heard the noise of a gun, as I thought (that is now called a blunderbuss) discharged.

Q. How soon might that piece of fire arms be discharged, in your judgment, after you had heard the found of Idswell's irons? - I suppose it might be three minutes or so; I cannot rightly say. I went into the garret, when I went into the garret there was the servant and another woman, her mother, sitting on the sofa; but they are not here; but a little while after in came Phillips, and the man called John Solomons.

Q. Was that the same Solomons whom you had seen in Fashion-street that evening? - It was. A little while afterwards John Solomons was gone down, and I don't know where he went.

Q. Did any body attempt to get out of the window? - Solomons attempted to get out of window, but he could not; we heard the rattles and the officers all about the house.

Q. Before Solomons went down? - Yes. John Phillips and the two women remained up stairs some time after; I said to Mr. Phillips, it is no use our staying here, we may as well go down; and as we were going down we were taken by the patrols.

Mr. Gurney. I am with Mr. Knowlys for Tilley. You told us you was taken by the patrol? - I was by an officer.

Q. You was in custody on a charge for murder, some days before you was yourself admitted an evidence for the crown? - I was.

Q. In this conversation, which you say passed between you and Mr. Tilley, you spoke in a whisper to him? - I did.

Q. And you say that he answered you in a whisper likewise; therefore, whatever number of persons might before have been there, no one can contradict you? - They cannot.

Q. You say for shortness, they call you Bowley; do they ever call you any

thing else? - No other name but Bowley, or Barnard Solomon, but Bowley in short.

Q. Did any person ever call you Bowley Gunnuss? - Not that ever I heard, because I work hard for my bread.

Q. Pray, what is the meaning of Gunnuss? - It is a thief, but I never stood before any bar, nor ever was tried.

Q. Pray, were you ever suspected of any thing? - Upon my oath I never was.

Q. Were you never tried in your life? - I never was.

Q. Was you ever apprehended? - I never was.

Q. Was you ever taken up for any crime in your life? - I was taken up, which all the court may know, some years back, I was quite innocent; about twenty years ago there was a riot, about a hundred were taken up, and I was honourably discharged immediately.

Q. You never was taken up at any other time? - Not that I recollect.

Q. Did you ever happen to know a man of the name of Barnard Marks?

Q. You never was charged with robbing Barnard Marks of some silver? - Me! never was charged with robbing of any man of a shilling worth, never was.

Q. You never knew a person of the name of Barnard Marks ? - Never.

Q. How came you to leave the country all at once? - Never, unless I went to Holland or back again.

Q. What was the reason of going to Holland all of a sudden? - I traffick in all kinds of goods, I bought hard ware there, and I sold it here.

Q. You are a dealer in hard ware? - I have dealt in it.

Q. What have you dealt in lately? - I went out when I had nothing else to do; I got my bread in an honest livelihood, as well as I could, worked hard for my bread.

Mr. Manley. You say when Day went up stairs, Idswell went up stairs, and Day followed him? - He did.

Q. You were then at the door, standing at the door, and let them in? - I did.

Q. How soon was it after that that you went up stairs? - About a minute, or a minute and a half, I cannot say positively.

Q. Then you past the bed room close by it? - I did.

Q. And went up the two pair of stairs? - I did.

Q. Then when you past the bed room door, there was nothing happened at that time. Did you see any body laying hold of a man by the arm? - I see nothing of that.

Q. There was no sluster at that time? - Not at that time.

Q. Then the bed room was shut when you past it? - Half and half; I did not see them when I past; I cannot say that I did see either of them, Day or Idswell.

Q. If Day had been on that landing place must you not have seen him? - I dare say I must, but I did not see him. I am quite sure I did not see him.

Q. Are you not quite sure if he had been on the landing place, you must have seen him, must not you have brushed close past him if he had been there? - I must.

Q. Was Idswell there? - I saw neither of them. I saw neither of them after I went into the house.

Q. Then the whole stair case was clear when you went up? - It was.

Q. Are you quite sure that Idswell and Day went up before you? - I am quite sure.

Q. You followed them in a short space of time, and you are quite sure they were not there? - I am quite sure.

Q. Then you see no person pulling Day by the arm? - No. I saw nothing that happened of that kind.

Q. Pray, you say Haydon came there, had Haydon any things with him? - Not that I see, I saw none of the men have any thing with them that came.

Q. I will ask you now whether Haydon had any instrument of death, or any thing of that sort? - I see nothing at all by him, or any thing of the sort.

Q. You had no stick yourself? - I had that stick which I got from Mr. Tilley, I asked Mr. Tilley for it.

Mr. Knapp. You heard a gun go off? - Yes.

Q. You and the other two, Phillips and Solomons, went up into the garret? - I don't say that we went all up into the garret together.

Q. But you were all there? - We were, positively.

Q. Then the irons you heard rustling along down stairs, and there were other persons following, they all went away? - I cannot tell, I heard some following; I cannot tell further, because I was in the dark.

Q. You went up stairs, and afterwards John Solomons and Phillips? - No; together there was no difference in their coming up.

Q. Had they any stick in their hands, had they any weapon? - I see nothing by none of them.

Mr. Alley. You told us that at this night you heard the bell ring; at what time was this? - About twelve o'clock.

Q. Are you certain you heard the bell ring? - I am positive I heard it ring.

Q. Then if any body else has said that the bell did not ring, they must have said false; if Mr. Day, for instance, said the bell did not ring, he must have said false.

Court. Day said he did not ring the bell, whether Tilley might have rung it, he did not know.

Mr. Alley. You say when you went down stairs, and till the time you heard the bell ring, you left a certain number of persons in the room, and among the rest you left Jacobs? - I did.

Q. You went into the street after the bell rung about ten yards? - I did.

Q. You then stopped to speak to Mr. Tilley? - I called him.

Q. Then a considerable space of time must have been occupied from the time you left this room first, tell you came up stairs? - Yes.

Q. Then you cannot take on yourself to say that Jacobs was in that room? - I cannot be on my oath, who was in the room at that time.

Q. When the gentleman who stands near me asked you some question about yourself, you seemed quite at a loss; have you ever been at Amsterdam? - Several times.

Q. What occupation did you carry on there? - I told you that I went backwards and forwards as a dealer and chapman.

Q. Have you ever been imprisoned at Amsterdam for uttering bad coin? - Never, as long as I live; I never was in prison in a foreign country in my life, I was in prison for debt here.

Q. Now then, my good friend, I will ask you one question more; what is the reason that you have been called in general Bowley? - Because my name in Hebrew is Boruch, which they call Bowley.

Q. You have said that Jacobs has been several times at this house? - He has.

Q. Is not be a very near relation to Mrs. Idswell? - Yes.

Mr. Henderson. Soon after you got up some part of the second flight of stairs, you say you heard somebody run out of the bed room? - Yes; after I got up two or three of the second flight of stairs.

Q. Having passed the door which you say was almost shut, and there being no

light on the stair case you heard a wrangle as you passed by; as you was on the stairs, you than heard somebody rush out of the room and ran down, and you conjecture from the noise of the house that it was Idswell. Are you sure that others went with him? - I heard others following, but I cannot be sure who it was, because I was on the second stairs, and see nothing of it.

Q. How long is it you apprehend it was from leting them in, until they rushed out of doors? - It must be a very short time. It may be about a minute or two after my coming in doors. I stood at the door and spoke to Mr. Tilley, and asked him to come in, and I went afterwards up stairs, and past the door.

Q. A minute more had elapsed before the persons had rushed out of doors? - I suppose it was.

Q. Now, how soon was it after you heard them rush down stairs, was it you heard the report of a gun? - Very soon; I dare say, not a minute after, before I could reach to the garret, I heard the blunderbuss while I was going.

Q. Did you hear before the explosion of the gun or after, any person crying out murder? - I did not; I heard a sad noise and a racket.

Q. But if any one had been breaking a blunderbuss about the head of Mr. Day could you have heard it? - I was frightened in such a manner after I heard the report of the gun that I cannot say, I did not hear.

Q. Had you lost your senses so much as from the situation in which you was in on the stairs that you could not have heard? - After the explosion of fire arms, I was thunderstruck.

Q. Can you form any judgment from what part of the house the explosion came? - I cannot.

Q. Do you think it was on the stairs, or in the room, or where? - I cannot say.

Q. You cannot form any judgment whatever? - No, it is out of my power, I have not an idea of it.

Q. You say that none of these men at the time you see them, had any offensive weapons? - I never saw any.

WILLIAM SPENCER sworn.

Q. How near is your house to this No. 13, Artillery-street? - The house that I live in is ten or eleven doors off.

Q. What was the first alarm you received on this Good Friday? - I was alarmed by the noise of fire.

Q. Had you retired to rest? - I was in bed.

Q. About what time was it you was first alarmed? - About one o'clock in the morning, or nigh one.

Q. What did you do? - On that I got out of bed and got on the leads, which we have backwards to dry our clothes.

Q. What did you see when you came there? - When I got outside of the house I asked what was the matter, where the fire was? - the neighbours told me there was no fire, there had been an alarm, but there was none, there had been a murder committed, there were some thieves about.

Q. What did you see after that report? - I see a couple of men climbing over the tiles, near to my house.

Q. In what direction did they seem to be coming to your house? - From where the murder was done, No. 13, Artillery-street.

Q. What did you do on seeing this? - When I saw the men, I asked them what business they had there? - they told me they had been in pursuit of a jew, concerned in some stamps, they said they had been defeated, and they were running away for fear of being murdered.

Q. I believe you had not got any of your things on? - No.

Q. What did you say to the persons on the house? - The neighbours hallooed, there has been murder done, don't mind what they say, they are two thieves, take them into custody; accordingly I swore that if they moved any further I would shoot them; they begged me not to she, they would come and tell me all about it.

Q. Did you secure them? - I did.

Q. Did any body assist you in conveying to the watch house? - When they were on the top of the leads I called out for assistance, and Mrs. Spencer wented own stairs to get me assistance, and Day came up, and a watchman, and another person.

Q. Did you observe what condition Day was in at the time he came up? - He was without a hat, and his hand on his head, and the blood running from him on every stair he came up, he looked a monstrous ghastly figure, indeed.

Q. Who did these persons turn out to be? - I know their persons, I don't know their names; that man in the light coloured hair, and blue coat (Haydon) and the other is the black bearded man(Henley.)

Mr. Henderson. Did Day say, when he appeared in that manner, he had been shot, or beat? - He said he had been cruelly used, by being stamped upon. As soon as ever he came on the top of the leads he knew the tallest man of the two, he said he had been cruelly used, and there had been murder done.

Court. Who was that? - Haydon.

Mr. Henderson. He did not say he had been shot at? - He might have said o.

Q. Do you believe he said so? - Yes, I believe he did.

Mr. Garrow. Why do you believe it, that he said he had been shot at? - He said he was a keeper of the New Prison, he told me that on the leads, and that he had come out with a prisoner, and the prisoner had been shot, and says he, I was very near being shot myself.

Q. You was asked something which led you to answer, that he immediately recognized Haydon who was on the leads, what did he say to him? - He said this is one that was in the house, and he clawed holded him directly.

ELIZABETH CUMMINGS sworn.

Q. Do you keep the house, No. 13, Artillery-street? - Yes, I do.

Q. When were you first applied to let the apartment in question? - The 24th of March.

Q. Who applied to you? - Mr. Jones and his niece.

Q. Mr. Jones of Fashion-street? - He told me he lived in Red Lion-street.

Q. Is that the man that is called Jonathan? - That is the man called Johnny, I never heard him called by any thing else.

Q. You said he came with his niece, what niece do you mean? - Mrs. Idswell.

Q. What apartment in your house did they take of you? - The first floor, up one pair of stairs, the dining room, bed room, and top garret, and the use of the kitchen.

Q. How soon did they take possession of the apartment, by bringing in goods or other things? - On the 25th, Lady Day.

Q. They brought in their goods, did they? - Yes, and Mr. Jones see them delivered.

Q. Who was the porter that brought the goods? - One of those men, that middle one, with the blue coat on(Hardwicke.)

Q. After the goods had been brought in on the 25th, what was the next thing done by your lodger? - On the 25th Mrs. Idswell slept there, Mr. Jones staid till after nine o'clock.

Q. Between the time that Mrs. Idswell first slept there on the 25th, and the night on which this murder was committed, did you see any of the other prisoners at the bar, at the house? - Some of these prisoners came there some times, some of them came there frequently; one of them men was there every day, that has been, admitted an evidence (Bowley)

Q. Now give us the names of some of the others that were there occasionally? - I don't know their names, the porter was there (Hardwicke.)

Q. How often did you see Hardwicke there? - Wednesday and Thursday, I don't remember that I see him afterwards.

Q. You don't remember seeing him on Friday? - I don't.

Q. Did you ever let them in when they came? - Never myself.

Q. So that many persons might resort to the house without your seeing them? - Very frequently; there are two more jews that used to resort to the house.

Q. Who were they? - The middle person there, he was commonly there( Simon Jacobs ) he was there most days.

Q. Who was the other? - John Solomons, I never see any other.

Q. What were the state of Solomons visits, frequent or not? - Sometimes, I cannot say he was there many times.

Q. What was acting in their apartment I suppose you knew nothing of? - I was a stranger to the whole, they were very private.

Q. At what time did you go to bed on Friday evening? - About half after eleven o'clock.

Q. About what time were you disturbed, and in what manner? - At half after twelve.

Q. What was it alarmed you? - A very great bustle coming down the stairs.

Q. You occupied the ground floor apartment? - Yes, facing the street.

Q. Do you mean from Mrs. Idswell's apartment to the ground floor? - Yes, the first pair of stairs.

Q. Do you apprehend that that waked you out of your sleep? - Yes, with the cry of murder.

Q. Was that cry repeated? - The first cry of murder disturbed me, and I got out of bed, and it alarmed me, but before I could make the alarm, I heard the blunderbuss go off.

Q. Was that close on the bustle that you heard coming down stairs; immediately (as I understand you) together? - Yes, it was; and I immediately made an alarm in the street, I opened the window of my chamber immediately.

Q. Was that the first thing that you attempted to do after getting out of bed, and then before you could open your window you heard the explosion go off? - I did.

Q. As soon as you opened your window, what more happened then? - A gentleman came to my assistance immediately, who was passing the street, and insisted on the watchman's coming in, I and the gentleman likewise, they made as much haste as possible, and they came in at my bed room window.

Q. Do you know the gentleman's name? - Mr. Shelton; they gave me a light.

Q. As soon as you had got it what did you do? - I went and looked in the passage.

Q. Does your chamber door open into a passage? - Into a parlour, and the parlour into the passage, I was carrying the light with me.

Q. When you came to the passage was there any other than that which you carried? - I do not recollect there were.

Q. What did you see on looking into the passage? - On looking into the passage I see Day laying on the floor.

Q. Will you describe a little more particularly the manner in which he was

laying on the floor, he was laying apparently to me at his full length, with his head towards the stairs foot, over his neck. I cannot say who it was, but I believe it was a tall man behind (Handland) I believe that was the man that had his foot on Day's neck, and with his hand beating him at his head, as though he had a club or something beating of him with.

Q. Did you observe any body else near him at that moment? - No one at all. He made his escape to go up stairs, the man that was beating him did that.

Q. That is left him, and went up stairs. What became of the instrument, whatever it was, that he appeared to be beating him with? - I don't know; I did not see. Day rose immediately with violent cries.

Q. What were the nature of the cries he made? - As though he had been very much wounded. I returned in the same moment for further assistance, and saw no more.

Q. How near to the street door was Day at the time you see him laying in this deplorable condition? - He was not near the street, but near the middle passage door; there is a door that divides the passage into two parts, and he was near that door.

Q. Did you see nothing further that morning? - No, I did not.

Q. You did not see Idswell before he was taken out of your house? - Yes, I did.

Q. You had returned into your own apartment; when did you return again into the passage? - It might be a quarter of an hour. I went and dressed myself; I past through the passage, and I saw Idswell laying, or rather sitting in the passage.

Q. In what part of the passage was he at that time? - Very near the front door.

Q. Much nearer, if I understand you, than the situation in which you had before seen Day under the hands of this man? - Much nearer.

Q. Did he appear to be wounded? - Very much so indeed, as I thought.

Q. I believe he was soon afterwards conveyed away? - He was so.

Q. You did not take particular notice of his situation? - I believe I did not.

Q. You made no more observation that day? - I did not; but on the Sunday following I found a file and a punch.

Q. Where were they found? - At the back of the sofa in the garret.

Q. Will you describe to us what you mean by the back of the sofa? - Were they open to common observation, or concealed? - No, they were concealed between the back and the seat, pushed under a bit of the seat.

Q. Was that sofa part of your furniture, or something brought in? - It was Jones's.

Q. Who has got these instruments now? - I delivered them to one of the officers.

Q. Those which you found were the same that you delivered to the officer? - They were.

Q. You know a person at the bar who calls himself Phillips. Do you know that man? - I have seen him at my house twice.

Q. When might that be? - I think it was the Thursday before that accident happened.

Q. The day before? - Yes.

Q. Was he in company with any other person that you have made any observation upon? - I did not see him in company with any; he walked through the house and stood in the kitchen very silent to himself, and I see no more of him.

Q. Did he come as a visitor to you, or the lodgers? - To the lodgers; I had no such acquaintance.

Q. Was he a lodger of your's? - He was not.

Q. He was not a lodger in your house? - Not at all, never. I have no men lodgers in my house.

Manley. You say you was disturbed in the night.

Q. How long did that disturbance continue, that very great bustle? - But a very few minutes.

Q. Did it continue a few minutes? - And then the pistol went of.

Q. Did the bustle continue while the pistol went off? - I think it did.

Q. When you came out of your parlour, you say you see Day laying down on the floor, could you see to the street door then? - No, I did not see so far; I could, but I did not; I was standing at my parlour door, and I did not look to the street door.

Q. Are you sure that you did not look towards the street door? - I am sure I did not.

Q. Have you now sufficient recollection, so as to speak with certainty, that you did not look at the street door? - I did not look at the street door, I was at the parlour door.

Q. How far might the parlour door be from the street door? - There is another door that parts in the middle of the passage, that projects out.

Q. That door was open? - It was open.

Q. How far is that from the street door? - The parlour door is very near the back door, and it is a very long passage.

Q. The middle door being open might you not have seen if you had looked? - I might if I had looked.

Q. Did you hear any groans there at all? - I cannot say that I did hear Idswell groan, because Day's were so very loud.

Q. Then, in point of fact, you heard no other than those of Day? - I did not.

Q. Nothing, in short, that induced you to look to the house door; you was close by Day? - I was. Day's cries were so very violent, and the surprise was so great I did not hear any more from any other part.

Mr. Garrow. And you had not a foolish curiosity to go to look further, when you see a murder being committed. Attend to me a moment, will you? When you looked out, the object that prasented itself, was Day laying at his length with his head towards the foot of the stairs, and laying on his breast? - Yes; his head against the foot of the stairs, and his feet pointing towards the street door.

Q. Was he laying in the passage, clear of the stairs in the passage? - Yes, he was.

Q. You see afterwards the situation in which Idswell was sitting, after you came out the second time? - Yes.

Q. What were the relative situations of the places in which you see Day, with a man standing over him and beating him, and the place where you afterwards see Idswell? - He was sitting very near the front door, very near on the mat.

Q. How were they in respect to each other? - Idswell's head towards Day's feet.

Q. Supposing him to have been sitting or standing on the very spot where you afterwards see him sitting, would he have been in a strait line a head of Day? - Yes, very strait indeed.

Q. Supposing one had an object of discharging something through two points at the same time, could one have accomplished it by passing these two points at once? - Yes.

Q. Supposing I intended to do it from the bed chamber door, could I have done it? - From the turning of the stairs you could have done it.

Q. Could I from any place in which it was likely to have shot Idswell, have hit Day? - No, not where he was.

Q. They appeared to you to lay directly one in a line a-head of the other? - Yes, as they fell.

Q. From the top of the stairs, supposing

a man to be breaking in at your door, could you have shot at him? - I don't think they could.

Mr. Manley. Could they have been shot from the landing place? - No, not as they lay; Idswell could not have been shot.

Q. Could Day have been shot in that place? - No, no such thing.

Mr. Const. If I understand you, the stair case you talk of goes from a passage up a few steps, and then winds about to go up to the other pair of stairs room? - It does.

Q. Then the greater number of stairs are between this landing place and this one pair of stairs? - Yes, only three or four below it.

Q. Then if any body by discharging a blunderbuss near the door of the bed room, or any part of these stairs that go to the bed room, from the winding place, they could not have shot Idswell? - They could not, unless they had gone down two or three stairs, have shot him where he lay. There are two or three winding stairs where they might have stood on; there are three or four strait stairs and a winding stair or two.

Q. And they must have gone down all them before they could have directed the gun strait to the door? - They certainly must.

Q. How many stairs are there? - Three or four. They must have gone down all the winding stairs except two or three, before they could have shot him.

Q. How many stairs are there altogether? - Fifteen or sixteen altogether.

Q. I don't know whether you had the curiosity to examine whether there were any tracks of blood on any of the stairs? - Yes, there was quite up to the end of the passage of the dining room.

Q. Was the quantity of blood pretty equal? - The greatest part was in the passage itself.

Q. After you got clear of the passage, did the rest appear to be the tracks of people dragling up and down? - Yes.

Court to Day. Where was you, what part of the house, when the blunderbuss was fired? - I was within three or four stairs of the bottom.

Q. If I understand you right, after the blunderbuss was fired, they knocked you lower down still? - Yes.

Q. Then when you was found afterward, you was lower than when the blunderbuss was fired? - Yes.

THOMAS SKELTON sworn.

Q. You was alarmed at this night? - I was; I was passing on that night at the house, No. 13. Artiilery-street, there were three watchmen at the door, and Mrs. Cummings in her house, in her room on the ground floor, with the window open. I went in at the window; she was intreating for God's sake for some body to come in, for there was murder crying in the house; so then I addressed myself to the watchmen, and told them, I insisted on their going in to give assistance.

Q. Did you, in fact, go in at the window? - I did.

Q. And when you went in at the window, in what part of the house did you find yourself? - I found myself in the room on the right hand of the passage, on the ground floor.

Q. It was the parlour window you got in at? - It was. Mrs. Cummings at that time had a light.

Q. What took your observations immediately after you got in? - At the passage door the noise of murder proceeded, from, I see the deceased laying on the ground.

Q. Describe the situation in which he lay, according to the street door; how near to the street door was his situation? - I suppose it might be near two yard;

he was then sitting, apparently in great agony, at this time alive.

Q. How far from the stairs? - I cannot exactly say.

Q. Did you see Day? - I see Day at this time standing with his hands to his head.

Q. Whereabouts was Day standing? - Nearer the door.

Q. Did you see then any of the prisoners at the bar? - There was nobody in the passage then. The door was forced open just at this instant. I then, when I see there was assistance, I directed my thoughts in search of the persons. I went up stairs with two watchmen; and in the first pair of stairs, in the room opposite, where two men sitting; I can swear but to one of them, (Hardwicke.)

Q. He was sitting in the front room? - Yes, he was. I then gave charge of them immediately; while the watchmen were conveying them, two men came down stairs; the patrol came up with more assistance.

Q. I will simply ask you, whether you saw any other of the prisoners, that you recollect, in the house at that time? - There were four more coming down stairs, two men and two women.

Q. Are you able to point out who those two men were? - Him of the name of Phillips.

Q. He was one of the two men with the two women? - He was.

Q. Have you looked at the other? have you learned what the name of the other was that was coming down with Phillips? - I have seen him; that, I was told, was the other, but I cannot swear to him. When I found there was so much assistance, I desisted from exerting myself so much. After these people were secured, I went down stairs with the patrol; and in the privy there was a man, whole name was Solomons, a tall young man.

JOHN RAY sworn.

Q. According to your best knowledge, what time of the night was it you came to this house? - I was first called to the watch-house; it was a little after one in the morning.

Q. What did you see at the watch-house? - The first person I see was Day; he was then standing at the watch-house door.

Q. In the custody of any body, or by himself? - There was a gaoler with him belonging to Lambeth-street, Whitechapel.

Q. Besides Day, did you see any of the prisoners that are now at the bar there? - I see all of them at the watch-house, all but Mr. Tilley, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. What did you do afterwards? - Day shook hands with me, and said, Ray, I am glad to see you.

Q. Did you afterwards go to the house, No. 13? - No, not till I returned from taking the prisoners to New Prison.

Q. When was it you helped to take Idswell? - I had been at the watch-house about five minutes, and a coach came up to the watch-house, and the coachman said, the man is dead.

Q. That was before you went to the New Prison? - It was.

Q. What did you do with the body? - We got the key of the engine-house, and I helped to get the body out of the coach, and laid it in the engine-house.

Q. Did you make any search on the person of Idswell; did you take any thing from his pocket? - I did, I took three and fifty guineas from his pockets, and I took a pair of silver buckles, I took a gold ring, and eight watches. They are all here.

Q. Did you take any thing else from him but the watches, the guineas, the ring, and the buckles? - No, I did not; I took all that is in that bag.

Q. I see there are some papers in the bag? - I found them papers in his right hand breeches pocket.(Read by the clerk of the court.)

"This fellow, who goes with me, has a blunderbuss tied under his coat; so if you think it will frighten any of the family, put it off till another day. Your's, sincerely, I. I." No address.

Q. When you had taken these things from him, I suppose you deposited the body in the engine-house? - Yes.

Q. Did you go to the house of Mrs. Cummings, No. 13, Artillery-street? - No, not till after taking the prisoners to New Prison.

Q. After you had disposed of the prisoners, then you went there? - I did.

Q. Now, in looking over the house, did you find any thing there? - No, I did not find any thing in the house.

Q. Where was it there was a punch found? - That I did not have till Sunday morning.

Q. Where did you get it from? - I received it from Mrs. Cummings.

Q. To Mrs. Cummings. You gave a punch and file to Ray? - Yes.

Ray. That is the file; Mrs. Cummings made a mark on it before I took it out of her hand, and the punch.

Mrs. Cummings. It was found on the Sunday after, in the sofa.

Q. To Ray. Describe to the gentlemen of the jury what use is made of that punch and file? - Such a kind of thing as that is used to take the bolt out of the basil, to take the iron off, it drives out the rivet that goes into the ring on the small part of the leg.

Mr. Manley. There must be something else besides this to get the ring off the leg? - Yes, a hammer.

Q. And I dare say that may be used as well to any thing else as a basil? - It is such a thing as that that is used for that purpose. I have got an apron and stocking that I took off one of the prisoners, William Handland .

Q. When was it you took them from him? - I took these from the prisoner after taking them to New Prison; the watch-house being so full. there was not an opportunity of searching them before.

Q. How long do you think that was from the time that they were brought from No. 13? - I suppose, in about a couple of hours.

Q. Now, describe in what situation that apron and stocking was at that time? - Here are two or three spots of blood which is on this apron, which at that time was very fresh. The stocking, I was taking down the candle, and looking over his clothes, and I found his stockings very bloody indeed, and the shoes were all over soaked with blood; at that time I shewed it to two or three that see me take it off, and it was very fresh, and very damp.

Court. I want to know where Handland was taken.

Q. To Skelton. Mr. Skelton, you said, that you went up, with two watchmen, in the first pair of stairs room, where two men were sitting, Hardwicke was one of them, you did not speak to the other man? - I cannot speak to the other.

Q. You gave the watchman charge of these two men? - Yes.

Q. To Mrs. Cummings. You spoke of somebody whose foot was on Day's neck? - I cannot be positive who it was, but I think it was the man in the lightish coat.

Q. Did you see him on any of the subsequent transactions of that night? - I did not.

ANDREW JAMES CUMMINGS .

Q. What age are you? - Eight years old.

Q. Whose son are you? - Mrs. Cummings's.

Q. Do you go to school? - Yes.

Q. Do you go to church? - Yes.

Q. Do you say your catechism? - Yes.

Q. Read the bible? - Yes.

Q. Do you know what it is you are doing when you come to take an oath here to be sworn? - No.

Q. Do you know what it is to tell lies? - Yes.

Q. What will become of you, if you are sworn, and call God to witness the truth of what you say, it you should tell a lie, what will become of you? - I shall be a very bad boy.

Q. And what will become of you if you are so very bad as that? - I shall go to hell.

Q. Remember that, and, I dare say, you will remember it.

Sworn.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Idswell having lodged at your mother's house? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember any persons that used to come to the house, backwards and forwards? - Yes, I do; that little short man, the shortest of all.

Q. Who is that? - I don't know none of their names, Phillips.) He used to come very often, backwards and forwards

Q. Many times in a day? - It may be three or four.

Q. Did you see him any time in the course of the day that this accident happened? - No.

Q. The day before? - Yes, the day before.

Q. More then once? - I may see him twice the day before.

Q. And the day before that? - Yes, I see him three times I believe.

Q. Look about and see if you know any body else that used to come to the house? - Yes, that tall man of all( John Solomons ) used to come to the house every day.

Q. Did you see him the day this accident happened? - Yes, once.

Q. And the day before that? - Yes, he used to come every day.

Q. And more than once? - Yes.

Q. Did you see any other person? - Yes, the middle man, (Simon Jacobs)

Q. When did you see Jacobs? - I believe I see him the day before this happened

Q. Used he to come often? - No, I did not see him above four or five times in the whole.

Q. Do you know any body else? - Yes, here is this man down here, Bowley, he used to come every day.

THOMAS LOCKWOOD sworn.

Q. You was one of the watchmen that went to Mrs. Cummings's house on the alarm? - Yes.

Q. Were you one of those who got in at the window? - Yes.

Q. I believe you assisted in securing some of the persons that were found in the house? - Not in the house, out of the house, in the yard.

Q. How many persons did you secure? - Only one in the yard.

Q. Who was that? - Handland.

Q. Where did you take him? - In Mr. Steven's yard, in Gun-street.

Q. How near is that Steven's yard to the house where this death happened? - Almost opposite to the back part of Artillery-lane.

Q. What was he doing at the time that you first see him? - Getting out of the window of the one pair of stairs landing place.

Q. Of what house? - Of Mrs. Cummings's house, where the thing happened.

Q. Where was you while Handland was getting out of window? - I was making up stairs after them in the house.

Q. You had got into Mrs. Cummings's house? - Yes.

Q. You was making up stairs after him, and found him getting out of window? - Yes

Q. Did you stop him before he got completely out? - No, he got out before I could overtake him.

Q. What did he light upon when he got out of window? - I could not overtake him quick enough, I made up stairs after some more of them, then I went round to the watch, with two others, and came back to Mr. Stevens's house, and there he was standing against Mr. Stevens's back door.

Q. Did you know him again to be the man that you saw go out through the window? - Yes, he is the man, I got hold of his coat.

Q. What said you to him? - I did not say any thing to him.

Q. Did you say any thing to him when you took him? - No, we did not say any thing to him, but I took him to the watch-house directly.

Q. I don't know whether you took notice of his dress, whether he had an apron on? - He had an apron on at the time we secured him.

Q. I believe you went afterwards, after you had secured this man, with Idswell, to the watch-house, or to the hospital, with the deceased, did you not? - Yes.

Q. Where did you go from? - From Mrs. Cummings's house.

Q. He was in a coach with you and another watchman? - Yes.

Q. You went in order to convey him to the London Hospital? - Yes.

Q. When you put him into the coach, was he alive? - Yes, he was; he drew his legs up, to make room for the coach door to shut.

Q. Did you observe him expire while you were going towards the Hospital? - We found him going as fast as possible; we rung at the bell; we would not be satisfied without examination at the hospital; and the nurse, as I understood it was, gave an answear to us, said, take him back again, he is dead.

WILLIAM BLISS sworn.

Q. You are a surgeon? - Yes.

Q. Were you called upon to attend the body of Idswell after this accident, or to open the body? - I was called upon near about four o'clock on Saturday morning. He was dead then. There was the mark of some Instrument either bails or others entering the body.

Q. Did you open him? - Yes.

Q. Did he die of a gun-shot wound? - Yes, he did; I have got the bullets, there were eleven slugs.

Q. Whereabouts was he wounded? - At the bottom of the back on the side near the hip.

Mr. Garrow. This is all the evidence that we shall think of troubling the court with.

Prisoner Hardwicke. In regard to the evidence which Mr. Day has given, I assure you, it is totally false; I was in the front room, I was not in the back room at that time. I did not so much as lay a hand on him, or on his coat. As to the evidence of Bowley in what he has said, I never heard him say any thing about the sick aunt. I was only employed as a porter to move the goods on the 25th; there was another porter along with me, there are two people in court, and I should with to call upon them.

Prisoner Haydon. With respect to what is said against me, I am quite innocent of the matter.

Prisoner Henley I am quite innocent of the matter; I had no part in it; I had nothing at all to do with it; I was at work the same day.

Prisoner Delany. I am quite innocent of the matter. I never see the two men in the world till I see them after I was taken. I never was in the house at all I was drove into the watch-house; I went

up to the watch-house while they were taking some of the men in, and I spoke to one of them, and they drove me in and all with them. I leave it to the officers to say, whether they took me in the house, or about the house, any of them.

Prisoner Handland. I am quite innocent of the affair intirely. I have nothing more to say.

Prisoner Jacobs. I am the brother-in-law of the deceased; and the time he came into prison he sent me word, that as he was obliged now to leave all his effects to strangers, for me to come there often, to look about his effects, and that was the reason that I was there so often. As for my going down into the passage, the reason was, as Day tells you, after the light was there, hearing my brother was shot. He was then alive, and he told me Day has killed me; these are his dying words. He listed up his hand again, and pointed with his hand to Day, and said, this man has killed me. I have no more to say, I leave my cause to God and you.

Prisoner Solomons. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, some little time after the two Idswells were apprehended up at Bow-street concerning the stamps, Mr. Phillips, who is an intimate acquaintance of mine, came to me a little time after. He then told me, the solicitor of the Stamp office has sent for me, and he said, if I could put him in possession of the dies belonging to these stamps, he should have two hundred pounds. He then came to my house again, it was a few days after, and we went to Mrs. Idswell's house, in No. 13, Artillery-street. I see her at home, one morning it was; I told her, Mrs. Idswell, Mr. Phillips has been up to the solicitor of the Stamp office, and if you can put him in possession of the dies, it may be the means of liberating Mr. Idswell. She then told me, I should call again in a few days, and she would let me know more about it; which, accordingly, I called there on Wednesday morning, which, I think, was the 2d or 1st day of April, I will not be certain. I called there, and she told me to call again on Thursday. I called there on Thursday morning, with Mr. Phillips, and I told her, Mrs. Idswell, will you put me in possession of the dies? She says, I cannot do that, but, I believe, I can tell you where the die-maker lives, he lives in Islington-road, on the left hand side, near the turnpike. I have been with my husband once, and she said he never would take her into the house; he let her stand near the door. Accordingly, she told me then, if you call to-morrow evening, I believe it will be in my power to put you in possession of the dies; I cannot give them you now, but I can tell you where you may get them. I then went away with Mr. Phillips; and Friday night, about a little after ten, about a quarter past, I was sitting at home; I just put two of my children to bed; Mr. Phillips comes in, and said, now we will go to Mrs. Idswell, you know she appointed to meet us to-night, to put us in possession of these dies. We went to the house, No. 13, Artillery-street. We rung the bell, the servant came down; he asked if Mrs. Idswell was at home? Says she, she is not at home, but I expect her home very soon. From thence Mr. Phillips says to me, I dare say we may find her at her uncle's, in Fashion-street, at Mr. John Jones's. Accordingly I and Phillips went, past eleven o'clock, to Mr. John Jones 's house. I believe Benjamin Jones 's wife opened the door. We then inquired if Mrs. Idswell was there? She says, no, she is not here, but we expect her here very shortly. Accordingly, I and Phillips went in doors; we sat down till nigh on half past eleven o'clock. Then I says to Phillips, Mrs. Idswell don't come here, we will go along home. Returning down Fashion-street back again, which is my way home, and

Mr. Phillips went off home, then says Mr. Phillips, we will go in and see if Mrs. Idswell is at home now. We rang the bell, and the servant opened the door. Says we, is Mrs. Idswell at home? No, she said, she is not within, but she will not be many minutes, if you will walk up. Accordingly I and Phillips went into the dining-room. I see in the room the mother of the servant; says I, do you expect Mrs. Idswell home? Yes, says she, I dare say it will not be many minutes first; accordingly we sat on the chair. I sat down by the fire; the clock was very near twelve. I said to Mr. Phillips, Mrs. Idswell does not come, we will return home. He says, we will stop till the clock strikes twelve, and we will call again in the morning. Accordingly I says to Mr. Phillips, I will go down into the yard, I am very ill, and if she is not come when I come up, we will go home. I had not been in the yard scarce five minutes, when I heard a bell ring at the door, which I then thought Mrs. Idswell was come home. A very little time after that, I was going to get off the seat of the privy, and I heard the alarm of murder called, I could not tell where it came from; and I just got out into the yard when I heard the report of a gun go off, which I thought was in the house. I ran back into the privy again; I see the neighbours out of the windows from all parts of the yard, and they said, there has been a murder committed; there are some thieves. I thought there were thieves in the house, and I sat in the privy, and buttoned the door up till such times as I was apprehended by the two men. The two men pulled at the door, and I thought they would have pulled it open if I had not unbuttoned it; one of them held a naked cutlass across my breast, and I said, I will go along with you, don't use me ill. I have got a wife and four children, and I am as innocent as a child. I did not know such a thing was going on, or I would not have been in the house for five thousand pounds. I am innocent at this time, in this case, as an infant that never was born or its mother, and that I can prove by Mr. Phillips, for he will tell you the same. I never knew any of the family till Mr. Phillips brought me into the house.

Court. I think there is not enough to go to the jury on the part of Tilley.

Prisoner Phillips. My lord and gentlemen, when the two Idswells were taken into custody, the officers of Bow-street came after me; on which, when I came home, I heard that they had been after me; my wife was at home. I said, I knew nothing of the business, but I will go up to-morrow to Bow-street. On which I called at Mr. Solomons's, to know what was the matter, and what they wanted with me? which Mr. Solomons went up to Bow-street, and he went to know what was against me? They said, they cannot tell him; if I would come voluntarily to Mr. Lee, and if I will tell what I know of the business, I shall not be kept in custody. On which I went to Mr. Lee, from Mr. Solomons; and they told me, if I came up to-morrow to Bow-street, before the justice, and tell what I knew of the business, I should go back again without being taken into custody; which I did, and I was examined before Mr. Flood and Mr. Escot, the solicitor of the Stamp office; which I told him I knew nothing of the business. They told me, if I would make it my business to go among the family, to find out the business among the family, they would make it worth my while. On which I did go among the family, to find out what I could. I called on Mr. Escot, I went to him in his chambers, and I told him, if he will give me leave to go among their family, I thought it was in my power to bring something to light. On which Mr. Townsend went with me in a coach, to Old Bedlam, No. 9, where

Mrs Idswell was. Mr. Townsend says, if Mr. Phillips comes here as often as he likes, let him speak with Mrs. Idswell; and I went from there to her sister's, Mrs. Oswald, in Oxford-road. I could not find any thing there. Says I, if you will give me leave to go to the other Mrs. Idswell, perhaps I can find something. Accordingly I went to her, and asked her about the dies, to see what I could do for the Stamp office I called several times; I went there on Thursday morning. Says she, if you call in the evening, perhaps I can let you know something farther of the business. I did not see her. I went there on Friday morning; she was not at home. I called in the afternoon, and they told me that she was gone to her uncle's, in Fashian-street. I went there, and she called me out, and says, Phillips, if you will call to-night, I believe I can put you in possession of the dies. I called on Mr. Solomons to go along with me. We went about ten o'clock to the house, No. 13, Artillery-lane. She was not at home. From thence we went to Fashion-street, her uncle's house, and we staid there till very nigh twelve o'clock, and they told me they expected her that night. Says I, I think it is so late I want to get home. On which we came away, went to Artillery-street, and rang the bell, and asked the servant, if Mrs. Idswell was at home? She said, she expected her home every minute. - When I went up stairs, there was Mr. Bowley there, and several in the place. I was not in the house long before there came a ring at the door. Solomons says to me, he must go down to the yard. He went down to the yard, and Bowley went down and opened the door, and I went up stairs immediately; and I declare to Almighty God, as I stand here a sinner, that I knew nothing if Idswell's coming out, nor I never see any thing of the transaction. nothing at all, declare to God Almighty. I went up stairs; for I asked where the mistress was? There is Mr. Escot, he cannot deny that I called on him several times; he is in court now, he knows I have called, if he has a mind to speak.

The prisoner Hardwicke called ten witnesses, the prisoner Haydon called six witnesses, the prisoner Solomons called six witnesses, the prisoner Phillips called seven witnesses, the prisoner Henley called four witnesses, the prisoner Handland called five witnesses, and the prisoner Delany called three witnesses, who gave them all good characters.

All Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17950416-71

231. TIMOTHY LARA was indicted for that he, on the 27th of March , with a certain pistol loaded with gunpowder and paper wadding, which he in his right hand, then and there had and held, to and against John Caffery , wilfully, maliciously, unlawfully, and feloniously did shoot off and discharge in a certain dwelling house .(The case opened by Mr. Jackson.)

JOHN CAFFERY sworn.

I am a taylor ; I live in John-street, Golden-square, I work at Mr. Dignum's, Mary-le-bone-street . On the 27th of March, Friday morning, about eight o'clock, this prisoner at the bar came in, I was on the board, he called me by my name, he did not give me time to answer, but fired at me with a blunderbuss. I had seen him before, but no acquaintance with him.

Q. Had any quarrel taken place? - No, no quarrel.

Q. Had you on this, or any other occasion given him any provocation? - Not that I know of. After he fired on me, he pulled me off the board, and then the

neighbours came in, he said I was a deserter.

Q. Have you ever been in his Majesty's service? - No, never.

Q. What injury did you sustain? - He blinded me in both eyes, I have not been able to see since. I have not got the fight of one eye yet. There were two balls in the pistol, and they were found on the board where I work, after I was shot.

Q. Do you mean to swear whether they were in the pistol or not? - I cannot.

Q. What distance were you from him? - About the distance of three yards.

Q. What was it that hit you? - Powder.

Q. Did the wadding of the pistol hurt you? - Yes.

Q. He did not come in and ask your name, he knew your name? - Yes, he knew my name.

Q. What was he? - A hair dresser.

Q. Where did he live? - I don't know.

Q. You knew he got his bread by hair dressing? - Yes.

Q. You have been in company with him? - Never sat with him but once or so.

Q. You used to talk together when you met? - Yes.

Q. Where did you meet him? - Sometimes at the public house.

Q. Did you use the same public house as he did? - I have been in the same public house.

Prisoner. Did not you agree to desert, did not you receive money from major Brown and captain Dunn, and then made your escape by night; my lord I propose witnesses to prove that he has been a deserter.

Court to Prosecutor. You never enlisted at all? - No, never.

WILLIAM BOLTON sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Dignum; on the 27th of March, the prisoner came into Mr. Dignum's, and said, Mr. Caffery, I want to speak to you; and then he pulled out a pistol and shot him, Mr. Caffery fell, and he goes round the counter, and dragged Mr. Caffery after him, Mr. Caffery cried out, oh his eyes, and Mr. Hughes he came in

Q. Did Caffery make the prisoner answer when he said he wanted to speak to him? - No, he had not time to do it.

Q. Did Caffery in your presence give him any provocation? - No, he fell from the board directly.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing? - He said he was a deserter, he did from some regiment, but I forgot.

Court. This was done in a moment, he pulled out his pistol, and shot him immediately? - Yes.

Q. How near was he? - About the distance I am to this gentleman. (Pointing to a person before him.)

Q. Nothing more said? - No, not then.

Q. Do you know what the pistol was loaded with? - Yes; there were two balls, we found them where I was at work; I goes up and tells my master I found two balls; I have one.

Q. How near were you to Caffery, when the firing was? - Very near.

Q. Did you find the mark of any ball any where? - No, I looked, my master bid me, and I could not find any.

Q. Did it appear to you that the firing of the pistol in that man's face, was by accident or design? - He did it on purpose.

Q. Do you know whether the pistol was cocked or no? - No.

Q. Did you see him pull the trigger? - He pulled it out of his coat, and then it went off.

Prisoner. Did not you see Caffery take up a pair of scissars? - No, he had not time.

Court. Where were the balls found? - On the floor.

Q. Were there any scissars taken up?

-Mr. Caffery had not time to lift up his head to take the scissars, I could see the prisoner come in, but Mr. Caffery could not.

JESSE HUME sworn.

I am a potatoe merchant. On the 27th of March last, about eight o'clock in the morning, I see the prisoner at the bar, go into the house of Mr. Dignum. I stood at my own door, which is opposite, he had not been in above two or three minutes, before I heard the report of a piece, a pistol or gun. I see the flash, I immediately ran over, as soon as I got over, the prisoner had got hold of Caffery, dragging him by the collar, and the hair of his head, I said, what have you been about? he directly charged me to aid and assist, I said I think you want no assistance; what have you been doing? Mr. Caffery's eyes were as if so much foot had been thrown in, he was rubbing his eyes. The prisoner was dragging Caffery towards the door, he was then off the board.

Q. Did the prisoner assign to you any or what reason for his conduct? - No further, than he said he was a deserter, and charged me to aid and assist.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say more, than I charged him in his Majesty's name to aid and assist, as I could not get the prisoner to the door.

-HANKEY sworn.

I keep a stick shop in Mary-le-bone-street.

Q. Were you at Dignum's house on the 27th of March last? - Yes. I was up stairs at breakfast about eight o'clock in the morning, and my little boy called me down, and said there was something the matter at Mr. Dignum's. I went in and the prisoner at the bar had got hold of Caffery, and I said, what are you making a disturbance at this time of the morning? and he said this man is a deserter, and I will blow the brains out of any man that comes in my way, and he put the pistol up close to my face, it was so very nigh my nose I did not like it, and with that I laid hold of the muzzle of it, and drawed it out of his hand, with that he attempted to draw his sword. This is the pistol.

Q. Was there any ramrod in at the time you took it from him? - No, there was none. I wrenched the pistol out of his hand, and he attempted to draw his sword; he dragged it about a quarter of an inch out of the scabbard.

Q. You see him dragging Caffery? - Yes; and Caffery cried out, as soon as he heard my voice, says he, Mr. Rankin, I am shot; when the prisoner attempted to draw his sword, I said, if you draw that, I will blow your brains out, and I sent the boy out for a constable, and the watch-house beadle was coming by at the time, and I gave charge of him to the constable. While I was gone out, Mr. Dignum sent for the surgeon, and when I came back he was dressing his eyes.

Q. Did you happen to see the bullets found that came out of this pistol? - No, I did not, I was gone down to the watch-house.

TIMOTHY DIGNUM sworn.

On the 27th of March, I was just getting up at that time it happened, I heard a noise, and went down stairs, and I see the prisoner at the bar in my shop, and I desired to know his reason for coming in there in that uncommon manner, and some of my neighbours as I was undressed, desired me to go up stairs and dress me, and I went up stairs and by that time I came down some neighbours gave charge of him.

Q. To Bolton. Had you cleared down the board that morning? - I had cleared it down the night before.

Q. You are sure there were no bullets on the board then? - Yes, I am.

Q. What men had you on the board that morning? - None but Caffery and me, my master was not up.

Q. What clothes had been on the board? - A black coat we were making.

Q. Any old clothes mending? - Not one; nothing at all but the black coat making, my master very seldom mends.

JONATHAN BRAND sworn.

I am beadle of St. James's, Westminster. On the 27th of March, in the morning, about eight o'clock, I was going into Golden square, seeing a mob at Mr. Dignum's door, I asked the hosier, next door, what was the matter? I went into the house, and was told that a soldier had shot a man; when I went into the house, I see the soldier behind the counter, and Caffery by him with his head down, Mr. Dignum and Mr. Rankin were then in the shop, behind the counter; Mr. Rankin had a pistol in his hands, and he told me that he wrenched it out of the soldier's hand, he told me to take care of the prisoner; says the prisoner, are you an officer? says I, I am; says he, then I will surrender myself to you, if you will take care of my deserter; I told him that I would take care of him, and I took him to the watch-house, and Mr. Rankin and Mr. Dignum came and charged him with attempting to shoot the pistol at him.

Q. Did not you ask him why he shot the man? - I did not till we were going to the watch-house, he said he would shoot any that attempted to desert from him or to rescue, he told me that the prosecutor resisted and took the shears.

Q. Did you hear captain Dunn say any thing in the presence of the prisoner? - No, captain Dunn never saw the prisoner as I know of.

Court to Rankin. Did not you ask the man how he came to shoot? - I did not. I asked him what he made a disturbance there for? but I did not know that he had shot just at that time.

Q. To Hume. Did you ask him how he came to do this? - When I went into the shop, I asked him what he had been about? and he made me answer in the King's name to aid and assist him.

Q. Did you ask him how he came to shoot the man? - I did not.

Prisoner. I wish to call two witnesses to prove the information that I received of this man being a deserter. When I told John Caffery that he was my prisoner, I seized him across the shop board he catched up the shears, and it is true I pulled out the pistol the pistol went off in the course of the struggle and flurry, nor had I any malicious intention in so doing, I did no more than I think is the soldier's duty to do, whenever he hears of a deserter.

WILLIAM BIGGS sworn.

I was at captain Dunn's when serjeant Lara asked captain Dunn, if Caffery was a deserter, captain Dunn said he was, and he fully described the man.

Mr. Jackson. What are you? - A volunteer in the Louth Volunteers.

Q. The prisoner is an enlisted soldier in the Louth Volunteers? - To the best of my knowledge he is.

Q. Have you seen his inrolment? - I did not see him enlisted.

Q. Do you know that he is enlisted? - I have heard he is, I cannot prove it, because I did not see him enlisted, he has acted as a soldier.

Q. Is he of your recruiting party? - Yes, he is.

Q. Do you know whether he has been enlisted in your recruiting party or no? - I cannot tell.

Q. Where is your house of rendezvous? - At the Cooper's Arms, in the Borough.

Q. How long have you been enlisted? - About two months.

Prisoner. Did not you inform me that John Caffery strove to induce you to enlist with captain Dunn and another man, and likewise on receiving the bounty, to desert all three of them?

Mr. Jackson. How long have you been in the recruiting service? - About two months.

Q. Did you never enlist a man before these two months? - No.

Q. Did you ever have any thing to do with this house of rendezvous, till within these two months or not? - No, upon my oath.

JOHN RING sworn.

All I know of this business is, that this Caffery has asked me some time back, I dare say it was December last, to go and enlist with him with captain Dunn, and that we might receive the bounty, and then desert with it.

Q. Do you know any thing about this particular business? - No.

JOHN RING sworn.

I am a surgeon, in King-street, Hanover-square, I was called in to the assistance of Caffery, on the 27th of March, I found him with his eyes much inflamed in very great pain, in the lower part of the forehead there was some inflammation had already taken place, and it appeared to me to be a little singed, I extracted what powder I could, washed and syrenged the eyes, and left him in a much easier state than I found him.

Q. Did you see any of the wadding? - Nothing.

Q. Did the prosecutor's eye get better, or has he been blind? - It got better, and afterwards grew worse again.

Q. Is the fight hurted at all? - I think very little, I hope he will perfectly recover it.

Q. Has he been deprived of fight since the accident? - For a while he has not been able to open his eyes on account of the inflammation, there appeared danger of his losing his fight from the inflammation.

Q. There was no wound of any sort? - Not any, but it seemed as if the skin had been blistered. I should not have known that the pistol was loaded with ball.

Q. How near would you suppose it to be? - I should suppose about half a yard, I should certainly think that the distance was not great, because there was a considerable swelling, and a very great degree of inflammation on the lower part of the forehead, and it appeared in some degree to be circumscribed, there appeared not space for the powder to expand.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 24.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-72

232. WILLIAM MILLARD , and RICHARD GREENLOW , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Catmer , about the hour of ten at night, on the 14th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, two metal candlesticks, value 2s.6d. and a brass candlestick, value 6d. the goods of the said Henry Catmer .

SARAH SMITH sworn.

Q. Whose servant are you? - Henry Catmer's, he lives at No. 13, Little Moonfilds , a fan-maker ; I went of an errand, and I had occasion to go down for my bonnet and gown. It was on a Saturday, about a quarter before ten.

Q. You went down, where? - Into the kitchen for my bonnet and cloak.

Q. A kitchen underground? - Yes; I came up and locked the kitchen door.

Q. Did you leave the street door open? - No, I shut the street door to. It was a chandler shop, and to be left open; I left it on the latch, and when I came back again I found the kitchen door open; that I left locked.

Q. How soon did you return? - In about a quarter of an hour.

Q. How did you find the street door? - The street door was wide open. It very much alarmed me seeing the kitchen door open, and I ran and locked it, and I came up to my master, and told him, I was very sure there was somebody in the the place, for I heard their hands feeling about, and I heard the things rattle; and he came down, and they both stared him in the face.

HENRY CATMER sworn.

Q. You live in NO. 13, Little Moorfields. It is your house? - It is. I let the shop to my mother-in-law, who keeps the shop. When the girl went of the errand, I sent her off; she came up with fears; I asked her what was the matter? she said, she was sure there was somebody in the kitchen; she heard the things all rattling, and had felt somebody's hand feeling about the wainscot. On that I asked her where the key was? she gave it me, and I took a candle, went down and unlocked the door, and unlocking it, the two prisoners at the bar were fixed with all attention to look me in the face, which they did. On that, as soon as I see them, I said, you are two fine lads. I had scarce got the words out of my mouth, when Greelow momentarily knocked the candle and candlestick out of my hand. The candlestick was found at the stairs foot, and the candle trod upon. Instantly he tried to get by me in the dark. I drew back to the narrow part of the passage to hinder them coming by me, and called for a light. When the light came, I see them both standing before me; I took them both by the collar, one in one hand, and the other in the other. I asked them what they did there? they told me they thought it had been Mr. Warren's, the green-grocer's, which is in Fore-street; at that time the alarm was given, and the watchman came, and I was going to represent the circumstance to the watchman; says he, will you give any charge of them? I said, yes; and he took one in one arm, and me the other, and went to the watch-house with them. Then after that the constable asked me if I had lost any thing? I said, I could not tell. I went and took the watchman with me, and searched the room. When we came there, we found the things off the mantle-piece, all laying about the floor, and the cupboard doors all wide open, and these candlesticks by the door close under the chair which was on the mantle-piece, and a tinder-box and other things removed, here are three candlesticks which were removed from the mantle-piece, to the corner of the door. The watchman took Millard, and I followed with Greenlow He begged me not to take him to the watch-house. The constable searched them; there was a silk handkerchief found on each; one had a pair of hooks, which went by the name of Barrington's hooks, and nine shillings were found on them.

WILLIAM BURGESS sworn.

I am a watchman, I just got to my stand, was going to unlock my stand, when I heard a voice call out thieves! I apprehended one of them.

Q. Did you search either of them? - No, I did not.

WILLIAM MORGAN sworn.

I am a patrol for the ward of Cripplegate; I searched Millard, I found on him

three half-crown pieces, one shilling and sixpence, and, I think, five halfpence, and a bent wire, with two hooks to it, commonly known by the name of a drag.

THOMAS WILKES sworn.

I searched Greenlow; I found three shillings and some halfpence in his pocket, and this handkerchief about his neck, and this other handkerchief I took off the prisoner Millard's neck.

Q. Why did you take the handkerchiefs off the prisoners necks? - Because I took them to search them and Alderman Langston told me keep to them.

Prisoner Greenlow. I was going down to my father's house, and my father sent me to Mr. Madden's, in little Moorfields. Going along, I met with this young lad and he asked me what was the clock? and I told him, I did not rightly know; and he asked me to go into this house, to get some bread and cheese. Directly we went in, somebody locked the door, and we were very frightened, and by stamping with our feet, Mr. Catmer came down, and he said we knocked the candle out of his hand; it was no such thing.

Prisoner Millard. I was going along, I left my master, who is an hackney coachman on the stand; going home, I met this boy, and he asked me to go and buy some bread and cheese. I went us, and felt along for the door and somebody shoved me into the place.

GEORGE GREENLOW sworn.

I am a horse hair weaver by trade, I live in Whitecross-street, I am the father of the boy Greenlow's he is just turned of twelve years old.

Q. How long have these boys been acquainted? - I don't know; I sent him out of an errand, how he got into the acquaintance of this boy, I cannot tell.

SARAH MADDEN sworn.

I keep a house in the Borough; Greenlow is my brother; he has always behaved well, to my knowledge. I never knew nothing but this affair.

William Millard , GUILTY.(Aged 14.)

Richard Greenlow , GUILTY.(Aged 12.)

Of stealing but not of the burglary.

Judgment respited .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-73

231. WILLIAM BARNES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Gabriel Grover , about the house of ten in the night on the 2d of April , and burglariously stealing therein, a cornelian seal set in gold, value 1l. the goods of the said Gabriel Grover .

WILLIAM ROSS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Gabriel Grover, of Holborn , a silversmith . I saw a seal about the 31st of March or the 1st of April.

Q. What did you see the prisoner do? - I know of his cutting the glass; he came to the window; I was at the further end of the counter.

Q. What day was it? - On the 7th of April.

Q. You was standing in the shop? - Yes. I see him come to the window, and I had a suspicion that I see him one night before, when they attempted to take some silver buckles.

Q. What time of the day was this last time? - About ten o'clock in the morning, I watched him, and I thought I see the point of something go into the

putty, by the side of the frame of the window.

Q. What was it like? - I only see the point of it; I did not see what it was like; I thought he would make a hole by the side of the glass, by the frame, and then he walked away to a little distance, and came back again, Then he came back again and made another hole, and walked back again; and then came back, and put his instrument, or whatever he had in his hand, and wrenched it, and the glass cracked a little way; then he wetted his thumb, and rubbed up the glass, and the glass cracked as far as his thumb went; and he walked back again, and I jumped over the counter, and called out.

Q. Now, after he had rubbed his thumb along the glass, what did he do next, did he take the piece out? - No, be only cracked it up, he walked on, and he went to the next door and I did not let him go out of my sight, but I knocked to let my master hear, and the prisoner came back and went up a passage, and I went to him, and caught hold of the skirts of his coat and called out. A gentleman from over the way came to my assistance and brought him into the shop, and they began searching of him.

Q. Were you there? - I was there.

Q. Was any thing found on him? - He dropped a seal of mine, and it was dark in the shop, and I went to get a candle, and the constable see something and he kicked his foot on something, and kicked a seal behind him. I see him kick his foot, and I see the seal.

Q. Where was the seal before it was taken out of the window? - In a card in the window.

Q. How could he take it out if the glass was not broke? - The window was cut before, and the seal taken out then, on the second.

Q. When had your master lost a seal? - On the 2d of April.

Q. Are you sure that the seal dropped from him that was stole from your shop the 2d of April - Yes, I am sure, I sealed a letter with it on the 31st of March, or the 1st of April.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner there that day? - I could not say I did, but I thought I did.

Q. Then you have only a belief that you see him there the 2d of April? - No, I only believe it.

Q. But you are sure that the seal was lost the 2d of April? - Yes, it was lost at night.

Mr. Gurney. The last time you see this seal was on the 31st of March or the 1st of April? - Yes.

Q. You say you believe you saw the prisoner on the 2d of April? - I cannot swear that I did, I only thought I did.

Q. When you see this seal on the ground how far was it from the prisoner? - Just by him, it dropped from the prisoner.

Q. Did you see it drop? - No, but the constable see it drop, and I see the prisoner kick it behind him.

Q. He was moving about the shop? - No, he was standing still to be searched, and he kicked his foot, and hit it against the seal.

Q. What became of that instrument, did you find it? - A gentleman of the other shop brought it in, and said, a person threw it into his house like the prisoner.

-SINGLETON sworn.

I am a constable. On the 2d of April, at ten o'clock in the morning, or it might be turned of ten, as being a constable, I was sent for to this gentleman's shop, at Holborn-hill, and he gave me charge of the prisoner at the bar. I searched him. While searching him, he was very busy at work with his two hands; presently I heard something drop. I said to him, you have dropped something. No, says

he, I have not dropped nothing. He gave his foot a kick, and kicked the seal behind him; I stood and picked it up, and it was this seal, and I shewed it to the gentleman, and he looked at it, and the boy likewise said, this was the seal taken out on the 3d of April, when the pane of glass was broke.

Q. Was the prisoner by when he said that? - After that I had searched him, I examined his watch, this seal was added to it, and you may see where the other seal was broke off. Here is a duplicate of a key pawned for a shilling; I did not go to inquire about that; nor this other seal the gentleman of the shop did not own. This tool was brought in by a gentleman from the next door, who is a linen draper, it is a kind of a brad awl; and in searching him here is a key, to which I can say nothing, it was found in his breeches, it may be the key of his lodgings.

Mr. Gurney. I think you said you heard something drop while you was searching the prisoner? - Yes, it dropped close from him, down at my toes.

Q. He dis vowed all knowledge of that seal? - He did.

Q. Where was it you searched the prisoner? - At the end of the counter in the shop, between the parlour and counter, in rather a dark place, and the seal dropped from him, and I said, my friend, you have dropped something.

Q. It was a dark place near the counter? - Yes; but not so dark but I could see.

Q. Did you search all the dark parts of the shop? - I did not.

GABRIEL GRANGER sworn.

On the 2d of April I had my window broke, and a gold seal taken out.

Q. Do you know by whom? - I do not; I see some man looking about the window about a quarter of an hour before.

Q. What time of the day was it? - Ten o'clock at night.

Q. Was the shew glass without side of the house? - It was not the shew glass; it is the front upright glass of the the window.

Q. How near was the seal to the window? - It was a finger's breadth from the glass, I received it in about five minutes after it was done; I was selling a pair of buckles, and then after the glass was broke and the seal was gone; there was a small piece of the glass gone from the corner, a hole big enough to admit a small seal being taken out.

Q. Then there must have been a wire or something put in to take it out? - I conceive the hand could not be put in, but two fingers might.

Q. Then you heard no more of your seal from that time to the seventh? - No, not at all, till I heard it was found on the prisoner.

Q. What past at his examination when he was first brought into the shop? - I see him sumbling at something as if he was striving to conceal the instrument, with which he broke the glass; but afterwards I understood by the constable, that he found a glass seal.

Q. Did you see the constable produce the seal to you? - Yes.

Q. Did you hear any thing drop? - Yes, I did; I heard the watchman tell him he dropped something.

Q. What did he say to that? - I do not recollect.

Q. Is that your seal? - Yes; that is the seal I lost out of my window, on the 2d of April; I am confident of it.

Mr. Gurney. You did not see any drop? - I did not.

Q. What is there so very remarkable in that seal as for you to know it to be your property? - The impression.

Q. Was it cut for any body particularly? - No, it was not; I had a seal of that very impression.

Q. You bought it in the course of trade? - The seal was made at Birmingham.

Court to Ross. Do you know that seal? - I knew it directly the constable picked it up; I know it by the impression, and by the bars, and by the make of it.

Q. Had you ever had it in your hand before? - Yes, I sealed a letter with it either on the first of April or the 31st of March.

Mr. Gurney. You sealed a letter with a seal of this impression and make? - It was this seal.

Q. Supposing the same workman had made one exactly like it, you could not have known the difference? - There is some little difference.

Q. Is there any one particular mark on it? - Only the impression.

Q. This was the 7th of April, and you had not seen it from the 2d? - No, I had not. There was one bar in it had been loosened and was obliged to be taken to a town workman to be fastened.

Prisoner. I am entirely innocent of what I stand here charged with.

The prisoner called three witnesses to his character.

Jury to Ross. The window that was broke on the 2d of April, was that the same as the prisoner was breaking on the 7th? - No, the next pane.

GUILTY, (Aged 20) Of stealing but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-74

232. EDWARD BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 9th of February , an horizontel watch, both cases made of gold, value 30l goods of John Jordan , privately in his dwelling house .

JOHN JORDAN sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - No. 7. Throgmorton-street, by the Royal Exchange . On the 5th of February, the prisoner came to my house about three o'clock in the afternoon-

Q. What are you? - I am a watchmaker . I was confined to my room very ill at the time. My shopman came up to me and said there was a man below who wanted to give an other for a couple of gold watches, and he was recommended to me by one Mr. Goudge, I told him I was so ill I could not speak to him, and told him to take the order. He went down and came up again, and said I must come down and take the order, I was so ill I could not, I then desired him to come up to me.

Q. Did the prisoner come up? - He did, and I desired him to take a chair and to sit down, and he gave me instructions for a couple of gold watches, for forty guineas a piece, and that they must be ready in three weeks a time, that the ship was ready to sad that he was to go in; I took the order after shewing him watches of different forms; I had a number hanging up in my room before he came up. After I had fully agreed with him of the form and size of the watches, I proposed to take down his direction; while I was standing, half standing and half sitting, he made a snatch at one of the gold watches, and he made away with it down stairs.

Q. Did he take any when he made a snatch? - Yes, one of them; (I value it at thirty guineas. And immediately ran down stairs, my shopman came up at this time, and told me mere was a man down stairs that wanted me, to speak to me; I told him that the man that had come up stairs had taken a gold watch, and ran

down stairs. He had given me his name as Thompson, and the watches were to be sent to Dice's Key.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - Perfectly sure

Q. Did you ever see him before that? - Never before that time; I am perfectly sure he is the man; he snatched the watch, I looked immediately and the watch was gone; I was so ill at the time I could not follow him.

Q. How long was it after this that you heard of this man being in custody? - I cannot say how long, I fancy it must be about three weeks, I think it is thereabouts, but the person who took him is a person belonging to Bow-street.

Q. How often did you attend against him? - Once at Bow street, and once at Guildhall.

Q. How many examinations did he go through there? - Only them two I think.

Q. Did you swear to him each time? - Yes.

Q. Are you sure of that? - Perfectly sure.

Q. What distance of time were the examinations from each other? - I cannot recollect that; it was the first time in Bow-street, and the second time in Guildhall; it was just at the time of the sessions breaking up, the sessions before this. The alderman wanted me to attend the grand jury, but I was told that the session was broke up that time.

Q. Have you ever seen your watch? - No, never.

Q. Had you any bell near you? - I had, but I did not ring for fear of the servant not coming immediately, not knowing what I wanted.

Q. Did you cry out? - I cried out stop, and he said I will call to-morrow.

Q. Were you so ill that you could not attend to the features of the person? - Not so ill as that, I attended to his features every part.

Q. Who is in the business with you? - None, nobody but myself.

Q. How far were these watches from you at the time that the snatch was made at one of them? - It was three yards from me.

Q. Were you in bed at that time? - No. The watch was three yards from me, and he was standing at a right angle from me.

Q. Were you nearer the door than he? - No, pretty near the same.

Q. Did you see the watch taken? - I did not see the watch in his hand, I missed it and looked, and see the watch was gone.

Q. Do you make your own watches? Yes.

Q. Were these watches in the shop? - I was in the room up one pair of stairs, I have a shop below.

Mr. Knowlys. This is a base metal watch? - A gold watch, there was a stamp on it, both the cases were gold.

JOHN PITMAN sworn.

I work for Mr. Jordan. I know the prisoner, he came into the shop in the afternoon, on Thursday, the fifth of February, between two and three o'clock.

Q. Are you sure that is the man? - I am, he said he wanted two gold watches. I told him I did not think that we had any at present that were quite complete: he told me that he wanted some gold stop watches to take with him to India, and that he had been recommended to Mr. Jordan to make some for him I went up stairs to inform Mr. Jordan that there was a person wanted some watches; I came down and told the prisoner that we had none at present ready, and that we had some that would be ready in a short time,

had desired him to give me his address. He wrote his address "Mr. Thompson, at Dice Key, Thames-street," on a state which we had in the shop; he then desired me to go up again, and ask how long it would be before they were ready, as he should set fail in March; which I did, and came down, and desired him to walk up stairs; he went up stairs, and was with Mr. Jordan about the space of ten minutes, he then came down stairs, and went out in a hurry, as soon as he was gone, Mr. Jordan told me he stole a watch, he asked me to go and look after him, I did so, and came back and told him I could not find him, he sent me down to Mr. Bolt, the Wharfinger of Dice Key.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again? - I see him on the Thursday after.

Q. Are you sure then that is the same man that you see in your house? - I am certain.

Mr. Knowlys. Pray did not you go into Newgate to see if you could ascertain the man? - No, I did not; I went to Tothilfields.

Q. Was it to see this person? - No, it was not.

Kennedy. I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. I stopped the prisoner at the bar in consequence of this band bill, on the twentieth of January.

Mr. Knowlys. You found nothing on him at all? - No, nothing.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 25.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17950416-75

234. JOHN JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , nine pieces of wood, called putlogs, value 2s. two vicker baskets, value 6d. the goods of Philip Norris .

(The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ANN RAY sworn.

Q. You are a servant of Mr. Robert Parker , Red Cross-street.

Q. Is that near Jewin-street ? - About facing it.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. Was he a customer of your house? - He used to use the house.

Q. What is he? - A Bricklayer .

Q. Do you know Mr. Norris's Buildings? - Yes.

Q. Was he employed there? - No.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner on the 4th of March, on Wednesday? - I cannot say that I did.

Q. When did you see him then? - I don't know the day.

Q. Do you know the month? - I do not.

Q. Did you tell your master the same day? - Yes.

Q. What time of the day was it? - Between eight and nine in the evening to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Now, tell us where you see him, and what he was doing? - I see him bring something out of the building on his shoulder, but what it was I cannot tell.

Q. Was it stone or wood, or what sort of thing? - I cannot say, I see it only on his shoulder.

Q. Which way did he go? - He went down Red Cross-street.

Q. As you see him coming from this building, did you tell any body of it? - I went in, and told my master.

Q. Are you sure you see him come from this building of Mr. Norris's? - Yes, I am very sure I did.

Q. Which of the houses was it that it was taken from? - I cannot tell, they are not built up yet. To the best of my

knowledge it was the corner house, I am sure it was Mr. Norris's.

ROBERT PARKER sworn.

I keep the Fountain, in Red Cross-street.

Q. When was it that you had any information from your servant? - Between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. What day? - I cannot tell, my servant had been out with the persons beer I believe.

Q. In consequence of what she told you what did you do? - I went on the opposite side of the way after the prisoner.

Q. How far from your house were you before you saw him first? - About twenty or thirty yards when I first clapped my eyes on him, he was at Mrs. Fisher's, a green, stall in the same street, I see something on his back, but what I cannot tell.

Q. Did you at the same time come up to him? - I did not, I was not the same side of the way. I am a Bricklayer myself, and I know Mr. Norris very well, and I went to his foreman and acquainted him with it; I acquainted some man that did work for Mr. Norris.

Q. Had you the curiosity to go into Mrs. Fisher's? - I sent one Bolton into Mrs. Fisher's.

Q. Did you go in after him? - Yes, after one Bolton, and Jenkins went down to the buildings, the corner of Jewir-street, Bolton said Jenkins picked them up in the street.

Q. How long after Jenkins had been in? - About a quarter of an hour. I went into Mrs. Fisher's, after Jenkins had been in about half a quarter of an hour or ten minutes, and I found nine putlogs, and two vicker baskets.

Q. How long after this was it that Jenkins was taken up? - I don't know whether it was one day or two days. I desired Mrs. Fisher to put them down in the cellar.

Q. Are you sure that the things he had about him he went into Mrs. Fisher's shop with? - No, I cannot swear to that.

Q. Was he carrying the same sort of thing? - It was like that piece of wood.

JANE FISHER sworn.

I keep a green grocers in Red Cross-street, I know the man at the bar.

Q. Do you recollect the evening when Mr. Parker came to your house? - It was on Wednesday night.

Q. Did Jenkins come to your house that evening? - He came to my house between six and seven o'clock, and asked me if I would buy wood. To the best of my opinion it was the fourth of March.

Q. Had he any wood with him at that time? - No, he said he would fetch it, Between eight and nine he came again, he brought three pieces of wood.

Q. I don't know whether you know what a putlog is? - No. They were put in my passage up against the wainscot; then he went again and brought three pieces more, for which I gave him seven-pence.

Q. Were they the same kind of wood as the other three? - Something larger, but the same sort. He asked me if I would buy any baskets, and I understood it was chips that he had in these baskets.

Q. Did he bring any baskets? - Yes, two baskets, and three pieces of wood more.

Q. Were these of the same kind of the six? - Yes, the same kind and sort.

Q. After he had left these with you, how long did he stay with you? - Not long; I asked him what I should do with the baskets, they were of no manner of use to me, he said they would do for

firing, I told him they were of no manner of use to me, and they would answer for his own use.

Q. Who came with him? - Two young men, they came in, and he went out.

Q. Did these two men stay? - No, he went out to them, and he went away when he had spoke to them.

Q. How long was it before you see Mr. Parker after they were gone? - About five or six minutes after Jenkins were gone, then Parker came.

Q. Did you after that see any body from Mr. Norris's premises? - Yes; then when they came in they see Mr. Norris's name on it, they had a light, and went and see them.

Q. Did you see Mr. Norris's name on these pieces of wood? - Yes.

Q. Then Mr. Parker desired you to keep them? - He desired me to put them into my cellar again.

Q. Do you know Mr. Evans? - I do now, I did not then.

Q. Did he see these pieces of wood? - The next day he did.

Q. What time? - I dare say it was in the forenoon.

JOSEPH EVANS sworn.

I am foreman to Mr. Philip Norris.

Q. Had he any buildings going on in March last, in Jewin-street? - Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes, perfectly well.

Q. Was he ever employed in the building in Jewin-street? - No.

Q. You must have known that if he had? - I must, I am the foreman.

Q. Did you go to Mrs. Fisher's house? - I did on account of the information of Mr. Parker, about ten o'clock in the morning, I found the nine putlogs and two baskets.

Q. Were they vicker baskets? - Yes, they were.

Q. Were there any marks on any part of the property? - Yes, they were branded P. N. on every one of the putlogs. Putlogs are pieces of wood that goes from the ladder into the wall on which boards are laid, that which forms the flooring of the scaffolding.

Q. Are you sure whose property they are by these marks? - Certainly they are Mr. Norris's.

Q. Do you know what part of the premiles they were missed from? - It being so large a building, and not being all in one spot, I could not possibly miss them; I could not possibly say they were missing but by the information.

Q. Were there putlogs of that size employed on the premises in Jewin-street? - I could almost have sworn to them, if they had not been marked, I had used them two years on these premises.

Q. Are they worth a couple of shillings in that state? - Yes, they cost sixpence a piece when new.

Q. Do you know any thing of the vicker baskets? - I know the miss of them, by having three the day before.

Q. Do you believe them to be Mr. Norris's? - Yes; they were all over clay; we were carrying clay in them the day before.

JAMES WOOD sworn.

I am a labourer in Mr. Norris's buildings; I took the prisoner in the Strand, on the 5th of March, in the afternoon, As soon as we took him, he said he thought what we were upon.

Q. Was any body with you? - There was a gentleman; we told the gentleman.

Q. Had that gentleman told the prisoner? - No, I believe not. He was taken before a magistrate, and committed.

Prisoner. This gentleman took me in

the Strand. I told him, I know what you are come for; you are come for some pieces of wood that I took from the building in Jewin-street.

Evans. I know the pieces of wood; they are marked.

Prisoner. I was looking for a job; I have not had any work for ten weeks. I went up Jewin-street, and see this wood lay there, and I went up to this woman, and asked her if she would buy it? I sold it to her for old wood.

Court. What is your business? - A bricklayer.

Q. To Evans. What is the value of the basket? - Sixpence.

GUILTY . (Aged 29)

To go for a soldier .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-76

234. JAMES REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , twenty pieces of leather, value 10s. the goods of John Dutton .

JOHN DUTTON sworn.

I am a boot-maker , in the Strand . I cannot say how I was robbed; I missed pieces of leather at several times, in consequence of which my suspicion fell upon this man.

Q. Was he a servant ? - Yes; I went and searched his apartment, and there I found some leather. He lives out of doors, but he is my foreman.

Q. Where was his apartments? - In Hewitt's court.

Q. How far was that from your house? - Not above two hundred yards.

Q. Did you find twenty pieces there? - More than twenty; I have not reckoned them; the beadle has had them in his possession ever since.

Q. How do you know that to be your leather? - Upon my word, it is not an easy matter to swear to it. I have my doubts whether I can swear to the whole, I can swear to some.

Q. Is there any thing that you can be certain to? - There is a doubt on my mind. There are some pieces of leather here, but then they were not found in his apartment.

Q. Now, (the second parcel produced) where did that come from? - The next morning, which was a Thursday, a woman came to me, and said, a person brought some leather to her.

Q. You know nothing but from the information of that woman? - No. I have not a doubt but that the greatest part of this leather is mine, but then it was not found in his apartment, and the woman is not here.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-77

235. STEVEN STEVENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , a steel watch chain, value 6d. a metal watch key, value 3d. and a metal seal, value 1s. the goods of Joseph Withers .

JOSEPH WITHERS sworn.

I am a servant to the Duke of Bedford, a butler . I was going along Pallmall on Wednesday the 8th of April, about nine o'clock at night, and I felt my watch going out of my pocket.

Q. Where was your watch, in your pocket, or your fob? - In my pocket; and upon my stopping the watch in my hand, the chain broke. I put my right hand out and catched the prisoner, and catched part of the chain in his hand.

Q. In which hand had he it? - I am not certain.

Q. Was he facing you? - No, he was on my right-hand side, nearly opposite me.

Q. Were there any other people about you? - Yes, a good many.

Q. Did you stop him? - Yes; and directly called for the watch.

Q. Was the key and seal remaining on the chain? - Yes; the Bow-street officers took it from him; Croker took the chain. They were delivered to me next morning at Bow-street.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him after you had taken him? - No, I did not loose his hand till the officers came up.

Q. What may be the value of these things? - Not worth more than one shilling and nine-pence.

Q. When had you last seen your watch? - I had occasion to take the watch out about a quarter of an hour before, and from that time I had the chain in the slap of my breeches.

Q. You say there was a great crowd about you, was this a public day? - Yes, it was the night of the marriage of the Prince of Wales.

CROKER sworn.

I am an officer of Bow-street; I was present at the time the last witness was robbed; I heard that there was a person had picked a gentleman's pocket; I took him into custody, and took him to the public house. I see nothing of the robbery, only the prosecutor charged this man with robbing him. He said, that he had attempted to rob him, and produced a part of a chain, which, he said, he felt him draw from his pocket.

Q. What public house did you take the prisoner into? - I believe it is the Star and Garter, Pall-Mall.

Q. Did the prosecutor give you the chain? - Yes, he told me that was part of the chain he had lost.

Q. Did he say that in the presence of the prisoner? - Yes, we were together.

Q. What did he give you? - The key and seal, and part of the chain of his watch.

Q. What did the prisoner say to that? - I asked him for his address, and he refused to give it.

Q. Don't tell me about his address, tell me what he said? - I do not recollect.

Q. Did you take the address? - He would not give me his address till we took him before the magistrate, I then took him into custody, and part of the chain, with the key and seal.

Q. Where was he examined? - At Bow-street.

Q. Did you deliver the chain to him again? - I did at Bow-street; he said that was his property.

-BAKER sworn.

Q. Do you know any thing more about this than Croker? - No.

Q. Did you see it taken out? - No.

Q. Did you see the chain in the prisoner's hand? - No. (The prosecutor produces the property.)

Q. To Prosecutor. What is on the seal? - A snipe.

Prisoner. I have lived upwards of thirty years in this kingdom, and never did any thing that was bad before; the night of the robbery for which I am in custody, I came down Pall-mall; there was a great crowd; I endeavoured to get the other side; I could not, there were so many people. I attempted to go towards Westminster, pressing through the crowd. I fell at the curbstone of the pavement; a coach came by while I was down; I endeavoured to raise myself up, and I catched hold of any thing to save myself; whether I laid hold of that gentleman's chain I know not. I am confident that the prosecutor speaks the best he can, and I am also confident,

that I never intended to rob him; and there were several hundred people near when this gentleman took hold of me, and called for the constable, and took me to the watch-house. I am in circumstances very unfortunate; I was committed for re-examination as yesterday, and yesterday morning the turnkey of Tothill fields, where I was, asked me if I knew there was an indictment found against me? he said there was, the bill was found against me last Friday. I had made my wife believe, and my friends, that I should not be tried till next session, of consequence I am unprepared. I was only brought here yesterday; none of my friends know where I am, except, only at two o'clock, I sent to my wife. I have a respectable merchant in the city who can come to speak for me to-morrow. This is all I can say; I leave my cause in your hands, my lord, and the honest jury.

Court to Mr. Kirby. When was he brought here? - Yesterday; the turnkey told me that the man was committed for further examination.

Q. When was he brought in? - About eleven o'clock yesterday.

Q. To Prisoner. What countryman are you? - No way.

Q. To Prosecutor. Did you perceive this man was falling; was it an accident? - No, he appeared perfectly upright, and in no danger of falling. I was pressed with the crowd in close with him.

Q. Breaking your chain in this way, did he say any thing to you? - He never opened his lips at all; he did not deny any thing of the case.

Q. Did he say any thing of this kind that he was falling? - No.

Q. He says now he was falling? - And so he said at Bow-street.

Prisoner. I was not fell. I was perfectly upright, but I was afraid of falling. I was pushed off from the curb-stone; I was fearful of the coach going over me, and I endeavoured to save myself.

Court to Prosecutor. Were there any coach near him? - No, there was a rank of coaches standing perfectly still.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-78

236. JANE WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a diaper table cloth, value 3s. the goods William King .

WILLIAM KING sworn.

I am a porter .

Q. Did the prisoner ever steal a diaper table cloth belonging to you? - Yes. It was left in my box; I work for my master in Oxford-road , and sleep in his house.

Q. Was this woman a servant in the house? - Yes, she was.

Q. Where was the box? - In the front garret, and I slept in the back garret.

Q. How do you know that the prisoner took it? - My master heard that she took it.

Q. What sort of a servant was she? - She was very well till that time.

Q. What servant was she? - A servant of all work. My master had a suspicion of her, and watched her out, and lee her pawn my table cloth.

Q. Did you see this diaper table cloth afterwards? - Yes, my master told me of it afterwards, and I went down to the pawnbroker afterwards and see it; it was marked with my name, W, M and K.

Q. What day was it missing? - The 19th of February.

Mr. Knowlys. You have been a married man, I believe, and had lost your wife? - Yes.

Q. Now, you being a man without a wife, and she a single woman, over the fire, in cold winter evenings, you were very good friends? - I had a great deal of trouble when I had my wife.

Q. You were minded to try again; it is no great deal of value this table cloth? - Every body should know their own.

Q. Every body should know their own, but you have been very good friends, and may be very good friends again.

-SMITH sworn.

I am a soap boiler and tallow-chandler. The prisoner and prosecutor lived with me. I had some suspicion of her dishonesty, and I followed her out.

Q. Are you his master? - I was not at that time, but my father is since dead, and I have the business. I followed her round to the pawnbroker's; there is a glass door through which I see what she pawned. I could not positively say at that time what it was, it appeared to me to be a sheet or table cloth. I went the next morning to the pawnbroker and see the table cloth there.

Q. Should you know it again if you was to see it? - Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. You say you could not see whether it was a sheet or a table cloth, and whether it was the thing that she carried there that you saw afterwards; you don't know, but by what the pawnbroker told you? - No, I do not.

JOHN BAKER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I produce a table cloth, a diaper one, which I took in of the prisoner at the bar in the name of Jane Wheeler, on the 18th of February, at eight in the evening. Mr. King saw it the next day.

Q. Mr. Smith has seen it also? - Yes, he came the next morning.

Q. You have kept it till now? - Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar. - I have known her for some years.

Mr. Knowlys. She came in her own name? - Yes; she had pawned some things before that, and redeemed them when she could.

Q. Now what character doos she bear? - She is a widow woman. She pawned things with me and she always redeemed them. I know nothing against her.

Prosecutor. It is my table cloth.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe, if the prisoner would have carried the conversation a little further, you would not have done this. She has got two children you know? - And I have two myself.

Q. Then there would have been two and two together.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-79

237. SAMUEL SILK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a glass wooden sash, value 4s. the goods of John May Evans .

JOHN MAY EVANS sworn.

I have a house in Finsbury-square, Moorfields ; it is nearly finished; the house is worth nearly two thousand pounds. On the 4th of April, information was received from Worship-street of a person stealing a sash. I could not attend then; but I attended the Saturday following, and I see the sash there.

Q. Did you know it to be your sash? - Yes, from the number, and the form a it was marked No.7.

Q. Who had it in Worship-street? - The watchman who took it, William Riddle. The frame was marked No. 7,

and we took it, and it matched the sash and the sash lines.

Prisoner. I would wish you to ask him, whether he did not hold a bond of four thousand pounds in possession from my brother, and he has done this on account of keeping me in custody, that I may not be able to prove that it is my brother's.

Court to Prosecutor. Is that your house, or his brother's? - It is my house. I was unfortunate enough to lend his brother two thousand pounds on it, I have the bond.

Q. Is it your house? - It is.

Q. Then you take it upon you to say, that you have the bond? - I have.

Q. Is it a complete house? - Yes, it is; I have it for sale; I have been bid one thousand eight hundred pounds on it. I have no action against his brother.

Q. You have never let it? - No.

WILLIAM RIDDLE sworn.

I am a patrol of Finsbury-square; I am a labouring man by day. About half after eight in the evening, on the 4th of April, Mr. Bedford's servant came and called patrol! I immediately went and found the door open, the area gate, and likewife the kitchen window. I immediately went down to the kitchen, and on going down the kitchen stairs, I met the prisoner half way, with the sash under his left arm. I took hold of him; he begged for God's sake to let him go. I would not let him go; I told him, if he offered to stir, I would knock him down.

Q. Is it a glazed wooden sash? - Yes; I have had it from that time to this.

Q. Did you ever see what part of the house it belonged to? - I went along with the carpenter, and see it matched.

Q. Where did it match to? - To No. 7, the second pair of stairs.

Q. In whose house was it? - Mr. Evans's. (Produced.)

Prosecutor. I know it by the No. 7; we always mark the sash before we send it to the glaziers, and here is the mark of No. 7 on it.

Prisoner. Please your lordship, and gentlemen of the jury, I was at work just by Moorfields-square; it was then between seven and eight o'clock. I was at the corner of Sun-street, and went to get some cheese there. It is an open house, and I went there with a woman, and I stumbled against this sash; here is a letter which will satisfy your lordship about my brother's bond.

Court. You had better not have it read, it will do you no good.

Q. To Evans. When did you see this sash last in this place? - I did not particularly look at it, it might be a month ago.

Q. Where were the sashes put in the house? - They were not only put into the house, they were hung.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Fined one shilling .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-80

238. WILLIAM CHARLES and GEORGE WEBB were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Goodwin , about the hour of eight in the night, on the 16th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, a cotton gown, value 1s. two linen shirts, value 7s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 1s. a stuff skirt, value 6d. a cotton and worsted counterpane, value 1s. a muslin apron, value 3d. a muslin cap, value 6d. a cotton apron, value 6d. and a pair of cotton stockings, value 6d. the goods of Samuel Staples .

Mrs. STAPLES sworn.

I am the wife of Samuel Staples ; I keep the lower part of a house in Oxford-road .

Q. Who is the owner of the house? - Mr. Samuel Goodwin, who lives himself in the first floor. Last Thursday evening, about eight o'clock, this little boy was sent, by his mother, down stairs, to fetch some water from the area. While he was near the kitchen stairs, he saw a man go down into the dust-hole, which was a little cellar that we made a dusthole; he returned up stairs, and told his mother there was a man in the dust-hole. She did not believe it, and took a candle herself, and went down; but when she got nearly down, she see the glimpse of a man; on which she returned up, and gave the alarm to me, who was standing in the parlour, saying, Mrs. Staples, there is a man in the kitchen. I ran across the shop to the street door.

Q. What shop is it? - Mr. Staples's, a surgeon and apothecary. I turned round, and met Webb in the passage, the biggest of the prisoners at the bar. I asked him where he had been? He said, below stairs, to a convenience. I told him, that would not satisfy me; I would go and see if I had lost any thing. On which there was a gentleman passing by the door; I asked him if he would be so good to come in a bit? He did; and I took a candle and went down the kitchen stairs; and when I got near the bottom, I see the other in the area, buttoning up his clothes. I returned back and said, here is another; on which he followed me up stairs, and made the like excuse, the same as the other. I then took the candle and went down stairs, and unlocked the kitchen door. The lock was the same as I left it, a little bit of wood had slipped off on the inside, but the pannels beneath had been very much shattered, so much so, that I could have pushed the lower pannels in with my hand; they were not broke so about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Were they broke out? - No, they were tried to be pushed in; they were not pushed intirely in, but so loosened, that I could have pushed them intirely in. Going into the kitchen, I went to the bed, and I missed the coverlid and cotton gown, and stuff skirt off the bed.

Q. There is a cotton and worsted counterpane described in this indictment, is that what you mean? - Yes, it is. Then I turned round to the dresser, as you come in to the right hand, and there I missed the other things; they laid underneath the dresser altogether.

Q. These were all your's and your husband's property? - Yes. I then went out of the kitchen, looked into the dusthole, and found nothing. I then went up to the window, and there I found a pane of glass taken out; it was cracked before.

Q. About his crack in the pane of glass, do you think that that would enable them to get in? - I conceive that the least of these boys might get in; they could not reach the things else, either from the dresser or the bed.

Q. Do you conceive that they got into your house by means of this pane of glass being broke? - I am sure they got in no other way. The window I fastened down with a nail.

Q. When had you last seen this pane of glass? - About five o'clock the same afternoon.

Q. Do you think they could both pass through that window? - I have my doubts whether the biggest could or not.

Q. Does this window communicate with the area of the street? - With the area. I found a boy's working apron in the kitchen, which did not belong to me. The water tub was likewise emptied of its water, which an hour before was full, the water having just come in; and hanging about the tub and pipe, and in the tub I found all the things I missed.

Q. How came the water emptied? - I don't know; there was no one belonging to me emptied it.

Q. Whereabouts was this water tub? - Close by the window in the area. I then returned up stairs, and sent a young man that was in the shop for a constable. In the mean while Webb kneeled down, and begged for mercy; that I would forgive him; but having been robbed before, it rather made my heart hard, and I sent for a constable; on which the young man went to Marlborough-street office, and brought Mr. Brown, the constable; till he came I kept the street door shut, and then when he came I gave charge of them.

Q. Is the water tub in the area? - Yes.

Q. When you saw Webb in the passage, which way was Webb going? - Going out of the street door. We always keep the street door open, on account of the shop.

Q. How do you conceive they got out of the area into the passage? - They came into the street door, and there is a passage that goes strait along to the kitchen stairs; the kitchen stairs are at the end of the passage, turning to the left, and when you go down stairs, there is a door on the left that goes into the kitchen, and the door facing goes into the area. The area door was open. Webb I found in the passage, going out of the house up stairs.

Q. You say the things that were removed were all removed from the kitchen? - Yes; into the area.

Q. Do you apprehend that the people put the things by the water tub out of the kitchen through that pane of glass, and then have gone back again to the area? - Yes, I do.

Q. If I understand you right, from the situation of your kitchen, there was no other means by which they could have got into this kitchen? - None at all.

Q. And by your account you don't think it possible for any person to have got into this kitchen but by this pane of glass? - I am sure they could not; I tried the window and that was fast down.

Q. What might the time be when you found these lads? - A little after eight.

Q. You had light candles, I suppose? - Yes, I was at tea in the parlour at the time.

Q. Was it so dark you could not see a person's face? - Yes, it was.

Q. What day do you state it to be? - Last Thursday.

Q. You are perfectly sure that you had lighted candles, and you could not distinguish the features of a face? - I am perfectly sure of it.

Q. When had you last seen these things there? - About five o'clock.

Q. Do you know Mr. Goodwin's name is Samuel? - Yes; his wife told me so, and I had a receipt in his name for my rent.

SAMUEL STAPLES sworn.

Q. Are you the husband? - Yes.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Goodwin's name is Samuel Goodwin ? - Yes; I am satisfied that his name is Samuel Goodwin . I have a receipt in his name, and I have heard his wife and little boy say so.

Q. To Mrs. Staples. Were these boys examined in the house? - No, they were not examined till they were taken to the watch-house.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn.

I am a constable of Mary-le-bone.

Q. Were you sent for to take these boys into custody? - I was.

Q. Did you examine them at the watch-house, how soon after? - The instant I got them in.

Q. How soon might that be, a quarter of an hour? - Less than that.

Q. Did you find any thing? - Nothing only a duplicate, a handkerchief, and key.

Q. Nothing that relates to this lady? - Nothing at all. I examined the house, and found in what manner it was broke; when I knocked at the door, the door was shut, and these boys were both standing at the passage, and the lady asked me if I knew them? and I said, this is an old thief known every where; and I went down into the kitchen, and found about two inches and a half out on each side of the knob of the door, and each side of the pannel cut, but not forced quite through, so as a person could pass; the bottom pane of the window was entirely taken out, and there was not a bit so big as half a sixpence left in it.

Q. Do you think the pane was big enough to let in either of these boys? - Yes, it was. I went into the kitchen along with this lady, and I asked her what she had missed? and she said they all lay here as they were taken out of the water tub; there was an apron spread, and she shewed me them things; I took them; I have got the things here. (Produced.)

Q. To Prosecutrix, All these articles that are here produced, were removed from the place where you left them? - Yes, they were. Here is an apron made out of a gown of mine, that I know very well.

Prisoner Webb. I was going of a message for my father, and I was taken ill, and seeing this an open house I went in, thinking there was a privy there, and did not see any privy there, and coming out of the passage this woman met me, and told me to stop.

Prisoner Charles. I am a lad that works along with the plaisterers , and I was inquring for work, and I met with a man that gave me directions to this house for to get work, and I went down stairs and knocked at the kitchen door, and could get no answer, and was returning up again, and that gentlewoman met me, and she hallooed out.

William Charles , GUILTY . Death .(Aged 16.)

George Webb , GUILTY. Death.(Aged 17.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-81

239. ROBERT CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , a woollen cloth great coat, called a box coat, value 1s. the goods of William Green .

WILLIAM GREEN sworn.

I drive a hackney coach .

Q. Did you lose a box great coat? - Yes, on Wednesday, the 3d of April, between two and three o'clock, I left my coach on the stand, in Cornhill ; I went to dinner, I returned again and found my coat was gone; I inquired of the waterman about my coat; he said he did not know who had it; I went a little further up Cornhill, and I see a man going up Cornhill with the coat on his arm, and he said he was going to see if any body owned the coat; he was coming towards the coach; I spoke to him, and he said, is there anybody that owns this coat? and I said it was mine.

Q. Then he said that before you spoke to him? - Yes, he did. He said, he had seen a man go up St. Michael's-alley, and he followed him up into Gracechurch-street, and there he stopped him, and took him to the Poultry Compter.

Q. Do you produce the coat? - Yes.

Q. Have you kept the coat ever since? - Yes.

Prisoner. That men never see me; he cannt say I took the coat.

LYON BANKROW sworn.

I am a hatter. On the 8th of April, I was with my brother; I see the prisoner in Cornhill with a coat on his arm, Parrott was rather before me; I called to Parrott and said, I thought this man has got a coat that is not his own. Accordingly I followed him to St. Michael's-alley; I told Mr. Parrott that he had not got that coat honestly, he looked round so often; I and Parrott followed him into Gracechurch-street, and he went as far as the Spread Eagle Inn; he turned round and see me after him, and he dropped the coat, and ran away, and I picked it up.

Q. Who did you give the coat to after? - I kept it in my arm, and gave it at my Lord Mayor's Court.

Q. I thought you carried it to Green? - Yes, to Cornhill, I carried it to Green.

Q. You gave it to Green? - I did not give it to Green, I shewed it to him.

Q. To Green. Will you swear that you have kept that coat from that time to this? - From the day after.

Q. I understand you to say that the man delivered you the coat in the street? - No, he did not deliver it to me in the street; it was delivered to me at the Mansion House, before the Lord Mayor.

Q. To Bankrow. Should you know the coat again? - I put my mark to it; there is my mark to it; I know it to be the coat.

Q. What became of the man? - I never lost sight of him till he dropped the coat, and then I lost sight of him.

Q. How long was it before you see him again? - About a minute and a half.

Q. Where did you see him? - Mr. Parrott, and I brought him to the Sprcad Eagle Inn.

Q. Was he in custody when you see him again? - Yes, he was. Mr. Parrott and others had him in custody when I see him.

Prisoner. I never saw the coat no further than picking it up.

ISAAC BANKROW sworn.

Q. Did you see this man in Cornhill? - Yes; I, and Mr. Parrott, and my brother pursued him to Gracechurch-street.

Q. Did you see him throw down the coat? - Yes.

Q. Did you pursue him? - Yes.

Q. Did you lose sight of him? - No, I did not.

Q. Where did you stop him? - In Leadenhall-market; he ran through the Spread Eagle Inn.

THOMAS PARROTT sworn.

Q. Were you with the other two witnesses? - Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner throw the coat down? - I cannot say I did.

Q. Did you pursue him? - I did.

Q. Were he all the time in your sight? - I cannot say he was for half a minute. I pursued him, and I called out stop thief! and the butchers stopped him; I was present when he was stopped. Before I gave the coachman his coat, I asked him if there were any marks that he knew his coat by? he told me there was a hole in the pocket, and so there was.

Prisoner. As I was going through Cornhill, there were some gentlemen said, there lays a coachman's coat.

Q. Where was it laying? - At the corner of the court, near St. Michael's-alley. I took it on my shoulder, and I see somebody running, and I run, and they ran after me, and I thought they would think I had stole the coat, and I

threw it down, and they ran after me, and hallooed out stop thief!

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-82

240. VALENTINE WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , two pewter pint pots, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Samuel Phipps .

SAMUEL PHIPPS sworn.

I keep the Coach and Horses public house, in Westminster .

Q. Were you robbed of any pots at any time? - Yes, two pint pots; the prisoner came to my house on Sunday morning, in company with one Campbell, he had two pint pots of beer, and I missed the two pint pots after them; I got a police officer, and went to the prisoner's house.

Q. What day did you go? - I went the same evening.

Q. Where is his house? - King's Head-court, Norton Falgate.

Q. What time of the day was it? - Near half an hour after seven o'clock, on Sunday evening.

Q. What passed when you came there? - I knocked three times, the officer was with me; I asked the woman if her husband was not a glover? she said, yes; I told her I had a job for him to do. I went up stairs; I see the woman push the pan under the bed, I told the officer of it, and he cropt under the bed, there were two pint pots in it, there were nothing left to know them by, but my initials; the one was quite melted, the other is in three parts, there was nothing left but the handle with the initials of my name.

Q. Did you find any more about the house? - No.

Q. Had you missed any pots at this time? - I missed some almost every week.

Q. Have you ever sold any pots with your name on them? - I have not for these three or five years, I believe.

Q. Who took the pewter? - The officer, he has had the pewter in his possession ever since.

Q. The prisoner frequented your house before? - No, I never see him before that time.

RICHARD FERRIS sworn.

I am an officer; I know nothing of the business till I went to the house; I found a frying pan just taken off the fire, and put under the bed, and this here metal was in it, that is all I know.

Q. How many pots were there in the frying pan? - I look upon it to be two, I believe they were pint pots by the handle. (Produced.) I asked him if he had any thing belonging to Mr. Phipps? he said he had not, I might go up stairs and see.

Jury. Did you weigh the pewter? - I did, it is almost two pounds.

Q. To Prosecutor. Is it a pint pot, that with the name? - Yes, it is, there are three letters on the handle, S.S.P. for Samuel and Susanna Phipps.

Prisoner. On Sunday morning I went with Mr. Campbell, to the house of Mr. Phipps, we had two pints of beer, I was very much in liquor, and I had two pint pots put into my pocket, I went home, it was unknown to me that they were in my pocket, and I kept them in my pocket till that hour, which was about nine o'clock; not knowing I had the pots in my pocket, and I took them out, and because my wife should not know any thing of the bu

siness, as she was sick, I melted them down, not with an intent to hurt the prosecutor, it is not my inclination; I never did so before.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17950416-83

241. BRIDGET JOYCE was indicted for that she, ten pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, made to the likeness of a good shilling, and twenty-four pieces made to the likeness of a good sixpence, the same not being cut into pieces, unlawfully and feloniously did put off to Stephen Gillman , at a lower rate and value than they purported to be counterfeited for, that is to say, for half a guinea .(The case opened by Mr. Cullen.)

STEPHEN GILLMAN sworn.

Q. You are a labourer , I believe? - Yes.

Q. In consequence of an information did you go, and with whom, to the house of the prisoner at the bar? - I did, the last day of December last.

Q. Did any body go with you? - Yes, Mr. Cave and John Butts , I went to Cock-court, Snow-hill, No.1 ; and there I had a token to tell her that I came from one John Hurley .

Q. What past when you came in? - I asked her if she had any? she told me only that she had plenty, and she asked me how many I would have? and I told her I did not care, I would have half and half.

Q. What do you mean by half and half? - That is half sixpences and half shillings, she gave me ten shillings of shillings, and twenty two sixpences, and I gave her half a guinea, and she put the half guinea into her right hand pocket.

Q. Was it in gold? - It was; then she and I came out, and we went to the next public house, and we had a glass, she told me to take care of the money.

Q. Who did you deliver that money to? - I did not deliver the money to any body, I have it here.

Q. Did you tell her the money was for any body? - Yes, I told her the money was for one Daniel Hutley , he had had half a guinea's worth of her before, she said, yes, it is all right, and you take care of it. (The money produced.)

Jury. Have you had the money ever since? - I have.

Mr. Cullen. Are all these counterfeit? - I believe so, I don't know.

Q. You got all these for half a guinea? - I did.

Q. Did you look at the half guinea before you gave it her? - I did.

Q. Was there any mark on it? - There was.

Q. Should you know the half guinea again? - I should if I was to see it.

Q. Was she searched? - Yes, she was; I told Tom Cave to search her.

Q. What was found on her? - Six guineas, in a box. (The half guinea shewn him.)

Q. Now is that the same half guinea you gave her? - It is the same.

Mr. Knapp. How long has this poor woman been in custody? - I don't understand that.

Q. How long has she been in gaol? - Ever since the new year.

Q. By way of a new year's gift, you treated her with a gaol. You have found two indictments, one for a felony, and one for a misdemeanor. What are you? - A labourer.

Q. This is a pretty good job for you? - I cannot say that it is.

Q. Do not you expect to be paid, on your oath, for giving this evidence? - Upon my oath I cannot say. I expect to be paid for my time.

Q. You knew this woman before? - Never till this day.

Q. How came you to go with this false story, that it was for Mr. Daniel Hurley? - I went on purpose to have her taken up. I was told by him to say so.

Q. Why he was taken up? - He was; he is not here.

Q. No, he is behind the curtain. This is the prosecution of the Mint, is it not? - I don't know.

Q. Upon your oath did she offer you any money till you told her you came from Daniel Hurley ? - She did not to be sure.

Q. Why she would not have done it if it had not been for you? - If she had not by me she would by another.

Q. Who told you first of all to give her this half guinea, and to cheat this woman to commit a felony? - Hurley sent me.

Q. Had not you some conversation with these officers that you went with? - I was taken by the officers.

Q. Why were you taken by the officers? - Perhaps I was, I am not obliged to tell you.

Q. Were not you at Union Hall upon trial? - Upon my oath I was not but once, and the man never had a warrant against me.

Q. Was not that for a little smashing? Upon your oath what was the charge? - Why for nothing.

Q. They had the goodness to take you before the magistrate for nothing? - I was not taken there.

Q. Then after you had been cheating her, you gave her a glass? - I did not cheat her, she cheated me.

Q. Then she cheated you with your own consent.

JOHN BUTTS sworn.

I am an officer at Union Hall, I went to Gillman, and got him to go to the prisoner's house, and get the money.

Q. Did you take Gillman with you for the very purpose? - Yes, I did. We went to Cock-court, Snow-hill, and we waited in a coach at a little distance, while Gillman went and purchased the money, that was the first time when he came out, he told us that this Bridget Joyce was not at home; then we went in the evening.

Mr. Knapp. That is not evidence. - We went in the evening and took Mrs. Joyce, that is all I know about it, and taking the box out of her pocket.

Mr. Cullen. Were you present? - I was.

Q. You went for the very purpose? - I did certainly.

Q. You know this was a felony to put off this money? - I do.

Q. Is that the money you took? - I think it is.

Mr. Knapp. People are to be tried by oaths, and not by thinking. This was a notable scheme of your's, to set Mr. Gillman on to commit a felony? - We had information about a fortnight before that.

Q. You went, for the purpose of catching this woman, in a coach like a gentleman? - Yes, we cannot take them away without a coach.

Q. Did you ever see Mr. Gillman at Union Hall? - No, I did not. Gillman gave the information.

Q. Do you know of any connection between Mr. Gillman and Mr. Hurley? - I have heard something of it.

Q. Did you ever know any connection? - No.

Mr. Cullen. What you did was done by the direction of the magistrate? - It was.

Q. Look at that money, is it good or bad? - It is bad.

Mr. Knapp. Have you been in the Mint, or are you a silversmith? - No. The money is bad, any body can see it as well as myself.

Court. Do you know any thing of this Hurley at all? - I know he was brought to our office.

Q. Then there is such a man? - Yes.

THOMAS CAVE sworn.

I am an officer of Union Hall.

Q. Did you go on the 31st of December last, to the prisoner's house, in Cock-court, Snow-hill? - I did.

Q. I understand you went twice, speak only of the last time? - On the evening I went with Gillman I see him go into the house, and they both came out of the house together, the prisoner and Gillman and shaked hands, and bid one another good night.

Q. What house? - The public house. Gillman told me then he had bought the money. I immediately followed Joyce; when she got into the house, I searched her, and took the money, Gillman said the half guinea was in the box.

Q. Do you know the half guinea? - I do, by a mark.

Q. Who made that mark? - I did.

Q. Did you find any bad money about her? - No, I did not.

Q. Did you search the house? - Yes, we found no bad silver in the house.

Mr. Knapp. So Joyce and Gillman shaked hands this evening? - Yes, when they came out of the public house.

Q. The witness Gillman told us that he did not know the woman; did he appear to know her? - I see him shake hands, and wish her a good night.

Q. You had information at Union Hall, of some things against the prisoner at the bar; did you mark the half guinea at Union Hall? - No, we marked it in a public house.

Q. You marked it on purpose to draw the woman in? - We might.

Q. Was there any bad money in the house? - No; we found some good silver, about eight or nine shillings, and some gold on her.

Q. If you had not have gone there, this transaction would not have taken place.

Prisoner. My husband went on board a ship, a man of war, three years ago, I work very hard for my living, nobody can give me a bad character of any such thing, I have been four months in custody for that wicked man.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.


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