Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th September 1794.
Reference Number: 17940917
Reference Number: f17940917-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 17th of September 1794, and the following Days; Being the SEVENTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. PAUL LE MESURIER, Esq. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VII. PART I.

LONDON: Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill, PRICE TWO SHILLINGS.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, & c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable PAUL LE-MESURIER, Esq. LORD MAYOR of the City of London: The Honourable Sir WILLIAM ASHURST, Knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: The Honourable SIR BEAUMONT HOTHAM, Knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: The Honourable Sir GILES ROOKE , one other Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE, Knt. Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

First London Jury.

James Bennett

Alexander Harper

Richard Chater

Eleazor Chater ^

Robert Crawford

Michael Leming

Thomas Seville

John Lake

John Garton

Joseph Peel ^

Richard Price

Robert Scotharm

First Middlesex Jury

John Dalby

Thomas Bull

Robert Fogg

John Allum

John Gildar

John Fisher

Thomas Hill

Henry Timberling ^

Henry Humphries

John Jenkins

John Taylor

William Hurwood .

Second Middlesex Jury.

James Smith

Ralph Jackson

George Gow

George Mitchell

Francis Perrigall

Thomas Young

Charles Vaughan

Abraham Skeggs

James Senior

William Pilling

Christ. Smithwaite

William Payne .

Second London Jury.

John Coward

Joseph Dale

Thomas Gladhill

John Wragg

James Clay

William Ewsters

James Speight

William Nelson

Richard Hall

T. Oldmeadow Gill

John Pope

Christopher Thomas .

Francis Rybot , John Rathbone , and William Harper , served part of the time for those marked with a star; and Charles Ward served part of the time for Henry Timberling .

Reference Number: t17940917-1

460. JOSEPH STRUTT was indicted for that he, with divers others evil disposed persons, to the number of twenty or more, whole names are unknown, on the 17th of August , with force and arms, did unlawfully, riotously, and tumutruously assemble together, to the disturbance of the public peace, and that he did feloniously begin to demolish and pull down the dwelling house of William Ostliss .

The indictment opened by Mr. Raine, and the case by Mr. Attorney General.

WILLIAM OSTLIFF sworn.

I keep the King's Arms, in Charing Cross .

Q. Tell my lord and gentlemen of the jury what happened at your house the 17th of August? - Between nine and ten on Sunday morning the 17th of August, a very great quantity of people assembled at the door, and some of them unhinged the front of the door.

Q. Tell the manner of their behaviour? - They were very riotously throwing stones, and insisted on having some recruits out belonging to the Norwich regiment, that I had there; I suppose there was a hundred people there. I have a middle door, which I barricadoed with a water butt, after they had taken off the hinges of the door at the end of the passage; the door of the house was a very weak door. After they had taken the passage door off the hinges, they took it out into the street, and they had a great difficulty to get it to pieces, and that diverted them some time, they broke it to pieces; after that they had the sign taken down, which they broke also; there was an application then made to the police office, to get the assistance of the military. I remained in the house all the while, I durst not get out for my life myself; I dispatched a man for the military; before the military did come, they came up the passage and brought the pieces of the outer door, and threw it over the middle door, at the windows, and broke the windows and the fashes, and swore they would get in; I had a military officer with me in the house, we threatened to fire at them.

Q. In what way did you convey this threat to them? - Over this middle door, which is six feet high.

Q. Did you say it yourself? - I did; they were forcing at the door at that time.

Q. What effect had this threat of your's? - They went back two or three times, and they came up again, and said, never mind, they cannot kill above two or three of us; we will be in the house, and have it down.

Q. Do you know the person who said these words? - I do not.

Q. After this, what past then? - The military came, and we opened the door, and the gentleman that I had with me from Northampton who desended the door got over the leads, and went and seized

the prisoner at the bar, but I never saw him till I saw him at the police office.

Q. You have said already that the sashes of your windows were broke? - They were; there is one of them here present

Q. How long might this riot continue at your house, before the time that you was relieved by the arrival of the military? - About an hour.

Q. These expressions you speak of, you are very certain were made use of, "we will be in and have it down"? - I am; they said, come along, my lads, we will be in and have it down.

HORNBY MORELAND sworn.

I am quarter master of the royal Lincoln regiment, commanded by colonel Edward. I came from Lincoln on this business last Saturday morning. I was at Mr. Ostliss's the morning when this affair happened; I had been there all the night before, and I went to bed at four o'clock in the morning, all was very quiet then; at ten o'clock I was alarmed again, they ran up to call me, I rose immediately, at first I came down stairs naked, and I enquired what arms they had in the house, and if the pistols I had the night previous, were ready; a person of the name of Ewings was then in the house with some Norwich volunteers; I desired him to apply to the police office, for the assistance of the military; at the time they came down, they had forced a door of the passage contiguons to the street, and I heard them, as I supposed, breaking it in pieces, for I heard the wood crack repeatedly; when they had broke the outer door, there is a door at the far end of the passage, which is open upwards; they came with various pieces of the outer door, which communicated with the street, and with stones, which it seems were brought for the purpose of throwing at the house, and threw them over the middle door; the stones were blue flint stones, such as could not be had in the street, and also various brick bats, with which they demolished the first floor windows almost entirely, there were very few squares left unbroken.

Q. How many persons could you judge were in the passage at the time this not took place? - There were several; I could see many people through a hole which I made in order to fire a pistol the night before; I was told by the neighbours there were two thousand people at the front of the house; the passage was full.

Q. Were you able to distinguish any persons there? - Not at that particular time, afterwards I did.

Q. Will you be so good as to tell us what you did observe? - The passage was almost full of people, whose persons I could not distinguish; I looked over the door and threatened to fire at them, and then they returned back, and I had a cutlass, which I held over the top of the door, and when they attempted to get over the top of the door, I drove them back with it repeatedly; I then could discover through the hole that I had made, one more particularly riotous than the rest, who rallied the mob as often as they retreated; at that time I made enquiry of the people at the windows, whether the man had succeeded in obtaining the military assistance? as soon as I heard that the military assistance was coming. I then went and disguised myself in a great coat, so that they should not know me, for I supposed that they would know my person by looking over the door; I had remarked this Strutt repeatedly to rally the mob, and I recollected his voice; the prisoner is the person, I am positive of it. I then disguised myself in a great coat with a black collar, so that they should not have any suspicion that I was the

man that had desended the house; I went up stairs and broke the lock of the one pair of stairs door, and went out at the one pair of stairs window, the window was demolished, I believe; I lifted up the sash and got on the leads.

Q. How much was it demolished? - I cannot say.

Q. Did you push open the sash to get out? - I did, I pushed the sash up, and got out on the leads, on to a little office that is contiguous to the house, I went into the one pair of stairs window of a Mr. Turner, and out into the street at the front door of his house, and so down into the passage, and so I got to that man; I was in the great coat, and told him in this manner, the horse guards are coming to assist the people of the house, as a friend, I advise you, pray desist; the prisoner said, b-gg-r your eyes, d-mn the horse, we will be in, we will be in, come on my lads, we will be in. Previous to that I had heard this man crying out hurra, down with it! down with it! I am positive as to the man and voice; for I took this step in order to be positive to the man.

Q. Where was you when you heard that? - On the inside of the door. I then got back out of the passage entry, and went over to the horse guards, I went to the ordinary sergeant; says he, the horses are ready to come out of the stable; with that I came back about twenty yards before the horses, and I went along the side of the houses and got into the passage again, and when I got in, this man was standing with the rest of the mob, encouraging them to commit further acts of depradation, by saying, come on my lads, we will yet be in, or we will be in. I then went across the street to the guard and back again; as soon as I discovered the horses heads, I seized this man, he was amongst the foremost men, in the front of the mob, I said, you are the ring leader of the mon, and I said to the officer, who was then got up to me, sir, I have secured the ringleader of the mob; two of the guards came up to my assistance just at the door; he made a violent struggle, and his coat tore where I had hold of him all the way down, but I got hold of him again till the horse came, and he was secured, and then he was secured; and I took him myself to the watch-house, escorted by the horse; when he got to the watch-house, there was only an old man in the watch-house and a woman, and they were afraid of him, because the horse did not come in, they were on horse back; there was a great mob following him of six hundred people, and they said, d-mn him, I will have him yet; and they did nearly kill me the next day, I escaped to a miracle, (some stones produced) I can swear to these two; this stone hit Mr. Ostliff over the head.

(Some pieces of the door produced, and a sash partly demolished.)

Mr. Ostliff. It is my door, the only guard I have to the house, it is fixed at the end of the passage.

SAMUEL EVANS sworn.

I was present the time the mob were assembled the 17th of August.

Q. What damage did you see them do? - They broke the door down, the front door of the passage at the street, and they had the sign down, and broke that, and then they came into the passage; we prevented them coming into the other door, we barricadoed it up with a water tub and other things, but they forced out one of the under pannels, and threw the stones in; and thereby the glass, and part of the frames of the windows were demolished, and when they did that I went for the military, and went down to the Horse Guards, and told them the situation the inhabitants of Charing-cross were in; and they told me I must go and

get an order from the magistrate, and I went down to Mr. Kitby's house, and he gave me an order for the military.

Q. Did you hear the mob say any thing? - I heard them say, down with it, down with it, b-gg-r and bl-st their eyes we will have them out, and this Mr. Moreland and a corporal belonging to a regiment that was there, stood with their swords, and if it had not been for them they would have been in.

CHARLES ALEXANDER CRAIG sworn.

I am examining clerk to the board of works; I went and surveyed the premises; the outer door next the street seemed to me to be wrenched off its hinges, I have no doubt, but I saw the remains of it laying in the court yard, but that I am not positive; at the end of the passage there is another door, which I conceive belonged to Mr. Ostliff, and two other adjoining houses, at that door there was a little hole made, which seemed to be cut by a knife, and I presume now from what I have heard, that it was cut for seeing the mob, but when I surveyed the house, I took it as done by the mob, for seeing who was inside; when I surveyed the house, the sash of the one pair of stairs floor was taken out; there was a sash or sashes in the room of the one pair, which I did suppose to come from those window frames; the brick work had been struck in two places by stones, there was a joiner repairing the sash frames; the sash over the door, the glass was broke, all, except three panes, or only two, there were six panes of glass broke over the door, and there were five in the room on the left hand side of the door, there was a room on the right hand side of the court, which I considered as a parlour to the public house, one of these panes were broke, and part of the wood covering on it was injured trifling.

Q. Was the situation of the house such on your inspection of it that it was your opinion that it was begun to be demolished? - I think I may say that the house was began to be demolished, in as much as the sashes were so far injured, and that I saw a joiner repairing the sash frames, which I suppose had been injured by the mob.

Q. To Ostliff. Is that your sash that is broke? - It is.

Q. Was it so hroke by the mob at the time? - It was, and the sash frames were broke, only I happened to go down to Norwich, and I gave orders for the joiner to repair the house.

Prisoner. I had been into the City for a parcel, I had been to Snow-hill, coming back I called at my washerwoman's, I had not been long out of the country, I have no friends; four years ago I had a kick by a horse on the head, and I was sent to the hospital, and after that I went into the country, and when I got well, I being fit for nothing else, I was advised to go to labouring work, in consequence of the burt in my head, being fit for nothing else, and I went to labouring work, and afterwards I came to London, and I had not been long in London, I came up to get some labouring work, I worked for Mr. Wilson at Bow two months, all my friends are in the country; this day I was going from Snow-hill to Covent-garden, I had a handkerchief, shirt and a pair of stockings in my hand, and I met the mob, and they shoved me about very much, and asked me why I did not go along with them? I was rather in liquor, and went along with them, and the mob went to this house, and the gentleman, my prosecutor, he went for the horse guards, and they came with the horse, at the same time I stood at the corner of the court, and all the mob ran away, and some gentlemen stood by, and asked me why I did run? and I said I had not done any thing

to run for, and they took hold of me, and took me up to St. Martin's watch-house, and there I was confined till they had me to Tothill-fields Bridewell. I have not a friend in town, except down in Essex, near Rockford, where I lived several years.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 34.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940917-2

462. ANTHONY WARNBECK and RICHARD PURCHASE were indicted for that they, with divers other evil disposed persons, to the number of twelve or more, on the 20th of August , were unlawfully, riotously and tumultuously assembled, to the disturbance of the public peace, and that being so assembled, with force and arms seloniously did begin to demolish and pull down the dwelling house of Robert Layzell .

(The indictment opened by Mr. Cullen and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

ROBERT LAYZELL sworn.

I live at No. 120, Holborn , I keep a servants office, and a recruiting office likewise, I was at home on the 20th of August, about eight o'clock, or half past eight as nigh as I can guess, I heard a great noise of brick bats and stones throwed at the windows, breaking the window shutters and glass, and so they went on for a good while.

Q. Whereabouts was you at that time; - In the lower apartment, at supper with my family; they continued so for some time, for about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and then I went up stairs and left my family below, and told them to hide themselves from the brick bats and stones, that they might not be knocked on head, and I sent Sams to inform the Lord Mayor that the mob were about the house, in order to demolish it; I dare say it was half an hour before the guards came to my assistance.

Q. Did you hear any thing said by any of the people? - I did not, there was so much noise, I left my house, I first got my family out at a back window, then afterwards I went out at the same window.

Q. Did you see the persons that were assembled? - I did not see any one concerned.

Q. Could you distinguish from the noise, whether there was many persons assembled? - I saw a great number by going up to a one pair of stairs, and looking out at the window where they broke in.

Q. How many persons might you think there were there? - I suppose there might be two or three or four hundred.

Q. In what situation was your house before you left it? - The window shutters were broke in, and some part of the door.

Q. How long was it before you left your house from your first hearing the noise? - I suppose it might be near half an hour before I got out myself.

Q. Where the military arrived at that time? - Not that I heard.

Q. Before you left your house you say the shutters were broke in? - They were.

Q. When did you return to your house again? - When the military had dispersed the mob.

Q. In what condition did you find your house when you returned? - The shutters were almost entirely consumed, with the frames and glass.

Q. In what situation was the door? - The pannel of the door quite entirely

broke in, and the knocker at the door broke.

Q. I believe you are not able to speak at all to either of the prisoners? - No. I am not, I did not get in till after the mob were dispersed.

THOMAS SAMS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Layzell; on the 20th of August last I was in Mr. Layzell's house, in the evening about half past eight there was a vast mob gathered together, and were then at supper, and there came some stones in.

Q. Where is your house situated? - Two doors this side the Black Bull, near Hatton-garden in Holborn. We got up from the table, and Mr. Layzell locked the door the door before not being locked, and Mr. Layzell told me to go out the best way I could to Shoe-lane, where the Lord Mayor was present; I went, and the Lord Mayor made me answer there should be some people there presently; before I went out I heard a vast many people saying, pull the house down, pull the house down.

Q. What other noise or disturbance took place before you went to the Lord Mayor? - They broke the shutters by throwing stones, there is about five panes of glass broke in the front room, the lower room, the door was totally broke, the top part of it, the shutters and the second and third floors received some damage, and the windows of the second almost broke in.

Q. Hearing of this noise and confusion what did you do? - I jumped out of the back room of the kitchen, and went to the Lord Mayor, I came back, and they said there is one of them (I suppose they meant me as one of the recruiting party) if you can get at him kill him.

Q. Do you know what became of any of the broken frames of the windows? - I can produce some of them here.

RICHARD HOLLIER sworn.

I am one of the marshals of the City of London.

Q. Was you called upon to give your assistance on occasion of this riot? - About half past nine, a few minutes more or less, I was in Shoe-lane with my Lord Mayor, I received orders from the Lord Mayor to proceed immediately to a house in Holborn, which I understood to be the house of Mr. Layzell, a few doors beyond Hatton-garden; I went and took some constables, and the Lord Mayor attended with the military, I suppose about twenty paces in the rear of me, there was a deal of noise till I got near the spot, when I got as near as I could to the house, as I am to that bench, I put my mace behind me, and stood for a minute, or a minute and a half, in order to fix my attention on some that were most active in the riot, there were four or five hundred people there, I heard the glass breaking just in the front of me, and the stones falling about me; at last I saw three persons very busy at the door of the house, in attempting to break the door, they had got hold of a shutter, or part of a shutter, two on one side of it and one on the other, the prisoner Purchase and another were on the left side, Purchase nearest to me of the second, Warnbeck had hold of the shutter on the other side, they were using it, endeavouring to force the lower part of the door, the upper part was at that time broke; the fan light over the door was like wife broke, and most of the window frames and shutters were broke or pulled down, and I believe most of the windows of the house, but this I did not so particularly notice; having observed these things, and seeing those men so active, I immediately sprung forward, caught Purchase in my left hand, and Warnbeck in my right, while they had in their hands

the shutter, trying to break the door open; having laid hold of them I immediately delivered Warnbeck into the possession of two constables, who were close by the side of me, to support me, and said, take him to the Compter; Purchase began to struggle a good deal, whom I had in my left hand, and I kicked up his heels, in order to prevent him from making so much struggle; there were one or two constables near me, and I delivered him to one Streating, but seeing so considerable a mob, while I was going to deliver him, and while he was getting up, I received a blow on the back part of my head, and just at the same instant I heard somebody say, d-mn him, go it, we will have him off; what it alluded to I don't know, whether they meant to have me from him, or refuse him. By this time the military had marched up, and I desired Streating, as he seemed to be so very obstreporous, to take him into the front of the line, thinking there would be no attempt to rescue him there; they were afterwards delivered fase to the Compter, and brought before the Lord Mayor the next day, and then were committed; I have not the least doubt but they are the persons that were in that act.

Mr. Const. What time was this? - It was about half after nine, I think.

Q. Who did you say you gave Purchase to? - To Streating, and Warnbeck to Pierrpoint.

Q. You did not know these persons before? - I did not.

Q. Nor did you see them from that time till you see them before the Lord Mayor? - Warnbeck I did not see after that time, but Purchase I saw for near half an hour.

Q. When you went there first, you say, you did not perceive any thing particular, you stood still? - I said, when I went there I saw a large concourse of people, to the amount of four or five hundred; I stood still for the purpose of making observation, and my observation sell on these two men.

Mr. Knowlys. Though you did not see Warnbeck till the next day; had you any doubt about him then? - None in the world.

Q. If I understand you right, you took them both in the same instant? - I did; one in my right hand and the other in my left, and the reason I gave up Warnbeck immediately, was, because I had the mace in my right hand, and I could not so cleverly hold both.

GEORGE STREATING sworn.

I am ward beadle of St. Andrews, Holborn; I am an engraver by trade; I took charge of Purchase, the young man on this side.

Q. How long was he in your custody? - To the best of my thinking, about three quarters of an hour.

Q. You are sure that is the young man that was in your custody? - Yes, I am quite certain; I received him from the hands of Mr. Hollier.

Prisoner Purchase. I was going up Holborn to my uncle's that lives in Walpole-court, he lives at No. 5, I crossed Hatton-garden, and I saw a great mob; when I came to that house, some pieces of a shutter took me by the foot and throwed me down, and before I could get up, the gentleman took me into custody.

Prisoner Warnbeck. On this Wednesday night I was told by a person there was a great riot in Shoe-lane, and he was going to see it, and I said, I would go with him, and I came to Shoe-lane, and could not get in, and I could not get back again to go home, and the mob carried me up Fleet-street, and then I came down Shoe-lane to return home; and as I was going to turn off to come down Holborn, there was a mob assembled to break the house; I stood in the road side for about a minute and a half; when the city officers came

up, and Mr. Hollier took hold of a person by the coat, and he gave a kind of a twist round to get away, and he made a kind of slip off; and then Mr. Hollier stood and looked me in the face, and said, you are one of them; I said, I am not. He took hold of me, and he said, he would keep me; by that means he took and delivered me into the custody of two officers, and I went very peaceably along.

Court to Hollier. Warnbeck says, you aimed at another man first, and he slipped away, and then you laid hold of him? - I am positive that Warnbeck is one that had hold of the shutter. With respect to the attempt to get away, he did attempt it, but I again grasped him, before he got from me, and gave him over to the officers. I am sure that Warnbeck had hold of one side of the shutter, and I am sure that Purchase had hold of the other.

The prisoner Warnbeck called eight witnesses; and the prisoner Purchase called four, who gave them exceeding good characters.

Anthony Purchase , GUILTY . Death .(Aged 21.)

Richard Warnbeck , GUILTY. Death.(Aged 18.)

Jury. We beg leave, by reason of the youth and good characters we have heard of the prisoners, most earnestly to recommend them to his majesty's mercy.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-3

462. THOMAS OSBORNE and THOMAS BIGGETT were indicted for that they, with divers other persons, to the number of twelve, or more, on the 20th of August , in the parish of St. Giles, without Cripplegate, were unlawfully, riotously and tumultuously assembled, to the disturbance of the public peace, and that being so assembled with force and arms, seloniously did begin to demolish and pull down the dwelling house of Luke Case .(The indictment opened by Mr. Cullan, and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

LUKE CASE sworn.

I live in Golden-lane ; I keep the sign of the Black Raven , in the parish of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, in the City of London. I was at home, on Wednesday the 20th of August, the whole evening; about four o'clock a gentleman, a neighbour, sent for me to come to his house. In the evening there came by twenty or thirty women rather before ten o'clock, they cried out, Mr. Cafe, for Christ Almighty's sake get out of your house, for the mob is coming; there were several people in my house drinking, they all rose up; I told them I was not in the least dread of the mob's coming; I continued there till the mob were within ten or fifteen yards of me.

Q. Did you see the number of persons there? - I should suppose there were an hundred. One of them came up to me, and laid hold of me by the coat, and said, d-mn my eyes, if you don't run off you will certainly be murdered else. I was about two or three yards from the steps, my wife called out, for God's sake, take take off your child; I said, Susan, go out of the house immediately. I went out and returned to my house between one and two o'clock the next morning.

Q. In what condition did you find your house? - All the front of the windows pulled down.

Q. Do you mean the windows or the sashes? - The glass, and that that contains it, the wood work, and I observed the wainscotting torn off in the tap room.

Q. In what situation were the window shutters? - The window shutters were down when the mob came, and when I left the house.

Q. How were your windows? - The bars of the windows every one of them were broke, and then the frames destroyed; the bottles containing different sorts of liquor, totally destroyed; in the kitchen there was not a bit of furniture to be seen, only part of the jack, the frame of the kitchen window that leads to the parlour, that was totally destroyed.

Q. In what situation was the house above stairs? - There was nothing destroyed above stairs only the pannel of a door of a closet, split in two.

Q. When you left your house that evening were these things in the situation you have now described, or were they all whole? - They were all whole.

SUSANNA CASE sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness. On the 20th of August last I was at home.

Q. Do you recollect any thing taking place that was particular? - Yes; I was going up stairs between eight and nine or ten o'clock, I went up to fasten the room windows; I came down again, a parcel of people came into the house.

Q. How many do you think? - Eighteen or twenty; and I went to the end of the back door, leading from the passage to the bar, and I saw Biggett and some more young men come in, I never saw him before in my life; that is the man at the bar with the red hair; I said, young man, what do you want? Biggett made me for answer, are you mistress of the house? I was rather fearful to say yes, but I did say yes; he asked me where my husband was? I said, I don't know; he said, I must go and setch him; I said, I could not go and fetch him, for I did not know where he was; and he proceeded to the bar, and took out a stone cask of gin, and put it on the top of the bar door, and turned the cock to let the liquor out; I turned it off, and he turned it on again, and I turned it off again, and he turned it on again; and I said, gentlemen, drink the liquor or give it away, do what you please with it, but don't let it run about.

Q. What was going on at this time to your knowledge in the inside of the house? - They were breaking and destroying in the tap room.

Q. Do you know what they were doing without the house? - I do not.

Q. Describe what was doing inside of the house while Biggest was at the bar? - They were breaking, destroying, and pulling down the place, and the furniture, as fast as they could.

Q. Did they do any thing at the bar? - The bar is entirely broke down.

Q. Was Biggett there during the whole of that time? - I don't know that he was, I did not see him when he went out; he was there when the mob were breaking down the bar.

Q. Describe in what manner Biggett behaved, and the rest of the people behaved? - While this mischief was doing I saw nothing of Biggett, only taking out the jar and turning of the liquor on. The mob below broke all the windows, and window frames in the bar.

Q. Did you see any body else? - After that I went out to the back door; I could not get out at the street door for the concourse of people; I went out at the back door, and went up in the court, and I could not get down at the end of the court, and I came in again, and just

as I came in at the back door; I found somebody push or was pushed against me; I suppose I was out about the space of five minutes, and when I came back, I found some one push rather against me, and I looked up to see who it was, and I saw Osborne; knowing him, at first I was rather glad to see him, and I said to him, I thought that you would not have used me so; the answer be made me, was, I was pushed against you. He never passed any more words, good, bad, or indifferent; he went into the kitchen, but what became of him I don't know, I did not see him come into the house, nor did I see him go out.

Q. When he went down into the kitchen, what was going on in the kitchen? - All the things were breaking in the kitchen, but I did not see him do any thing at all; I heard the noise, but I did not see any thing.

Q. Where did Osborne live, that you had an opportunity of knowing him? - About a minutes walk from our house.

Q. Had you seen him often? - I have seen him several different times, coming in for a pint or a pot of beer. I know him perfectly well.

Mr. Knapp. The mob were pulling down the bar at the time Biggett was speaking to you? - Yes, destroying the tap room.

Q. He was not in the tap room? - He was in the passage at the bar.

Q. He desired to know where your husband was? - He asked me where he was.

Q. All that Biggett did was in overturning this stone jar? - It was turning the cock, in which stone jar was gin.

Q. That was all Biggett did.

Mr. Cullen. Excepting that when you turned the cock back, he turned it going again? - Yes.

Mr. Dowers. At the time this happened it must be dark? - I believe it was, it was between nine and ten o'clock.

Q. At the time that some body pushed against you, you was at your back door? - I was, coming in.

Q. Had you any light? - I had not, but they had plenty in their hands.

Q. You had known Osborne for some time? - For the space of two months, ten weeks or more.

Q. And you was glad to see him? - When I first saw him I was rather glad that I saw a face I knew, being in distress.

Q. You apprehended he had come to assist you more than to destroy. You don't know that he did you any mischief? - I don't know, I did not see him.

Mr. Cullen. It was very light. How came it to be so light? you can describe that well? - There were five or six candles light up at a time, or more, and put on some part of the wainscotting that they broke down in the tap room; and at one time we were all in the dark, till the men went out and got lights. When they heard the horse were coming, they cried out, here are the horse coming, put out the lights.

HANNAH CLIFFORD sworn.

I am the servant to this public house. There were ten gentlemen drinking some porter in the tap room when the mob came about the door of our house, they all ran out.

Q. How many do you think there were of the mob? - They were all about the door; the shutters were not up; there was a great concourse of people, they were swearing, and saying, where was the Black Raven? there were some stones came through the window and knocked the candle off the tap room table on to the floor, and all the window and frame almost came in together; they said, d-mn their eyes, if they would not kill Case, if they could catch him. Then I got off my seat where I was sitting, when I saw the candle fall, and I immediately

ran between the cellar door and the bar door, where there is a little passage, I went there, and there were five gentlemen, quite gentlemen, came in, and asked me who I was? I told them I was the servant; they asked me where my master was? I told them he was out, they asked me where my mistress was? I told them she was up stairs, and they made a kind of whistling, and the people came in.

Q. Was you able to distinguish any of the persons that came in? - No. Then the gentlemen asked me who was up stairs? I told them there was nobody up stairs but the lodgers, and they cut some candles out of the bar, and they kept some themselves, and chucked the rest to the mob.

Q. What do you think may be the number of the mob, twenty or thirty, or more? - More than that. They went up stairs with me, and my mistress was then going out at the back door with a bundle in her hand, and then Biggett came in, I did not see him come in, but I turned about and saw him in the bar; it was that young man in the red hair, I never see him only in the bar, till I see him before the justices the next day. I saw my mistress with him, with the bundle in her hand, and rather quarrelling with him, but what was said I don't know, I saw him knock down a bottle in the bar while he was moving the gin cag.

Q. Did you see what he was doing at all with the gin cag? - I did not see any more of him at all, I only saw him at that time. Then these gentlemen bid me go up stairs with them, I went with them to the one pair of stairs, and I begged and prayed that they would not break any thing in my mistress's room, for they were all favourite things of her's, they stooped to look under the bed; while we were going up stairs, they below, were breaking down the bar, and the settles in the tap room; when I desired the gentlemen not to break any thing in my mistress's room, they said they would not break any thing, they were only in search of somebody; they came out, and I thought that I would not go away from my mistress's door till they came down, they had asked me who was up stairs further? I told them only a man and his wife, lodgers; coming down stairs, John Osborne, I did not know his name before, but I knew his person by being a customer in the house; he said to a chimney sweeper that was with him at the one pair of stairs landing place, d-n her eyes, push her down, for that is where the men are, or knock her down, I don't know which now.

Q. Who did he mean? - Me.

Q. What followed then? - I told him he need not knock or push me down, for the gentlemen had been in and searched the room, and immediately he hit me on the head, and made me rather stagger; I turned about and I pushed him, he had a stick, and in turning round there was a splinter in the stick, and it made my arm bleed, the stick went against me, I don't know whether he went to hit me or not; he went into the kitchen afterwards, I believe he then went down stairs and was pushed against my mistress.

Q. Then all this had taken place before he was pushed against your mistress? - Yes. When I came down stairs I saw him pushing into the kitchen, my mistress was standing at the back door, and the chimney sweeper asked me, if we had any beer in the cellar; I was afraid to say no, and I said yes, and he had a gallon pot in his hand, and my mistress said, go and draw some, and I heard the people outside saying the horse guards are coming, we have done enough here.

Q. What became of the people in the house, when this alarm was of the horse

guards? - I was drawing the beer, and I began at the stale bull, Osborne went down with me, and while I was drawing at the stale butt, he pulled out the cock of the mild butt, and set it all a float.

Q. How long did the mob stay in the kitchen after this alarm of the horse guards? - The alarm was made while I was going down stairs.

Q. How long do you think that might be after Osborne made his way into the cellar? - They staid in it till I came up with the gallon pot three parts full of beer; they made their escape on the guards arriving; I came up with the beer, and said, here is some beer, and one of them took it out of my hand, and gave it outside. I am certain of Osborne.

Mr. Knapp. All you see Biggett doing was with respect to this stone jarr? - That was all.

Mr. Dowers. You did not see Osborne break any thing, or do any thing of mischief of that sort? - No, I did not.

Q. Don't you sometimes go by another name than that you have now? - No.

Q. What reward do you get by coming here to day? - None.

Q. And you have never been promised a reward to swear so stoutly against Osborne? - No.

Q. This happened on the 20th, and Osborne was not taken up till the 23d? - He was not.

Q. Do you know how that happened? - I do not.

Q. Did you see him between the 20th and 23d? - Yes, I saw him on Thursday morning, and I told my mistress, my master was not at home.

Mr. Knowlys. When you saw Osborne before the justice had you any doubt of his being the man that struck you, and asked you as you have described? - No, I have no doubt at all, I am very sure he is the man.

The prisoner Biggett called Alice Augur , John Fox, Mary Eland and Mary Roberts , who gave him a good character.

GEORGE GUNSTON sworn.

I live in Cupid's-court, Golden-lane, the prisoner Osborne was a lodger of mine seven months.

Q. Do you know where he was on the evening of the 20th of August between the hours of seven and ten o'clock? - At home.

Q. What time did he come home? - Between the hours of eight and nine.

Q. What became of him afterwards? - He went up to his apartment; I never see him come down till he was called the next morning, between five and six o'clock.

Q. Did he continue to lodge with you till the time he was taken up? - Yes; and went to his work backward and forward as usual.

Mr. Knowlys You live in Cupid's-court, Golden lane? - Yes.

Q. Do you know where you was the night the riot took place in the lane? - In the lane.

Q. When did you go into the lane first? - At half after ten o'clock.

Q. You had heard of the riot? - I heard that they were going to Cafe's house.

Q. Had you the curiosity to go and see what past? - Yes.

Q. How long did you stay and see what past? - I might be out a quarter of an hour or better.

Q. And you come here to swear that Osborne was in the house, and could not get out all that time? - He could have got out, but he never did.

Q. What part did he lodge in? - In the two pair of stairs.

Q. You had the curiosity perhaps to go up and see him? - No, I did not; but my wife was in doors all the time, and if he had come out, my wife must have seen him.

Q. Your door was not locked at this time? - No, it was not; I locked it when I came in again, and nobody came in again after me.

Q. Did you not see this young man till the next morning at all? - I did not see him till the next morning, when I came in to breakfast.

Q. How do you know that he had been in his room all night? - He was called up to go to his labour.

Q. Did you call him up? - No, somebody that he was at work with.

Q. Have you any other lodgers? - Yes, one John Dugdale, he came in about ten o'clock.

Q. Is John Dugdale here now? - No.

Q. Does he lodge with you still? - He does.

Q. When was you applied to be a witness on this occasion? - His father and mother came and asked me on Sunday, as Mr. Cafe took him up on Saturday.

Q. Was he taken up in your house? - Yes.

Q. Did you know what he was taken up for? - Not till I went before the justice.

Q. Did you tell him the same story? - I did.

Q. You did not go near Cafe's house, did you? - No, there was too much mob, I did not try to do it.

Q. There was a very great mob at the time? - There was.

Q. What time in the next day was it that you saw Osborne? - The next morning after he came in from his work, about eight o'clock.

Q. What time of the evening before did you see him? - Between the hours of eight and nine, or near nine; as he past he said, good night to me and my spouse.

Q. He did not stop with you and your spouse? - No, he went up immediately.

Q. Where was it you saw him? - In the passage.

Q. Was it light or dark? - Between one and the other.

Q. Where was the other young man that evening? - I don't know.

Q. What time did he come in? - About ten o'clock; my door was open then.

Q. Perhaps it was open considerably later than ten? - It was later, because I went to the door.

Q. Will you swear that you was not out till eleven that evening? - I was at the end of the court till eleven that evening.

Q. And. I suppose a considerable mob at the end of the court? - There were neighbours; I have asked them since, whether they had seen this man pass or repass? and they said they had not.

Q. Then he might have passed, gone out, and gone in again without your seeing him? - While I was absent it might have happened.

Q. It was so likely to have happened, that you asked your neighbours whether they had seen him or no.

Mrs. GUNSTON sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness; I know Osborne, he is a lodger of mine. On Wednesday evening the 20th of August, between seven and eight, he went up stairs, I see him go up.

Q. Are you sure that he remained there during the night? - I am certain of it, till between five and six in the morning he was called up.

Q. And he could not have gone out of the house without your knowledge? - No, he could not.

Q. What part of the house do you dwell in yourself? - In the kitchen below stairs, on the ground floor.

Q. Describe the situation of this kitchen? - It goes down two or three steps in the yard before the door.

Q. Do your lodgers pass through that kitchen in order to go up stairs? - There is an entry that does not communicate with the kitchen, through which the lodgers pass.

Mr. Knowlys. You had the curiosity to go out about this riot? - I did not quit my premises, my husband went out.

Q. What time did your husband come in? - He came in about half past ten.

Q. Had you the curiosity at all as this young man went up between seven and eight to go to his room between that time and the time your husband returned home? - I did not go up stairs to see, but I was sure he was up stairs.

Q. He was at home the night before? - Yes, he is a very civil man and he always comes home to his time.

Q. Therefore having come home you did not expect him to go out? - No, he never came down at all.

Q. There was a great riot? - Yes, but he never was out of his room to see it.

Q. Where was the door of this entry? - In the kitchen, I was sitting in the kitchen, I never was out of my own place.

Q. You had occasion to go into the yard about your family business? - Yes.

Q. Then while you was in the yard, about your family business, a man might have slipped down and you not have seen him? - I am perfectly sure he never did.

Q. Is it not possible a person might have done so while you was in the yard, without your perceiving it? - They might to be sure.

THOMAS HUDSON sworn.

I am a slaughterman.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I have seen him in Golden-lane, I know him by sight.

Q. Was you at Case's the night of the riot? - I was there just after the affair happened.

Q. Did you see Osborne there? - No. The maid opened the door for me.

Thomas Glover , Peter Wilmot, George Leminster and Thomas Owen , gave Osborne a good character.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn.

I have known him for some years, I never knew any harm of him. One day as this maid of Mr. Case's was getting in the pots in Golden-lane, I heard her say to a woman, what am I to have for swearing these men's lives away? the woman said nothing at all, and the maid said my, mistress has promised me a handsome reward if I will swear hard to it.

SARAH GIDNESS sworn.

I work for Mr. Jenning's in Cloth-fair, I have worked for him very near two years, and he knows me before.

Q. What relation are you to Osborne? - I don't know him, I cannot say that ever I saw him before; as I was going up Golden lane last Monday, the maid of the Black Raven was coming down, there was a woman along with the girl, and the woman said to the girl, what are you to go to speak against these unfortunate young men? she said, yes, the woman said to the girl, I don't think you are capable of taking an oath; and the girl said to the woman directly, my mistress promises me a new gown and cloak, she says she will take care that I shall be well rewarded, and the woman said, ah, fie upon it, and went away shaking her head, and I turned to the woman and said, it is a pity that girl should be suffered to take an oath for the

sake of a gown and coat. This is the girl(pointing to Clifford.)

Court to girl. Did you ever see that woman before? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. On the oath that you have taken is that she has said, or any part of it, true? - Not a word.

Court to Mrs. Case. Did you ever make any promise to your girl if she would swear against these people? - Never in my life, I always said this to the girl, Mary, don't say a wrong thing of any one, for you know it will be nothing to me.

Mr. Knowlys to Gidness. Where do you live? - In Golden-lane, about the middle, in William Guilliford 's house.

Q. Did you live there the time you had this conversation? - I did.

Q. Where was it this conversation took place? - About three doors from the Black Raven, the woman was between the girl and me.

Q. Did you see where the woman went to that had this conversation? - She crossed, and went up Brackely-street.

Q. What sort of a woman was it? - A very good looking woman. I turned about to her and said in this manner, it is a very bad thing that this girl should go to take away any man's life.

Q. When did you first speak about this? - I happened to speak about it when I went home that day, and they sent for me this blessed morning, or else I should not have been here, I mentioned it to Mrs. Guilliford and to several neighbours, not thinking they would have brought me on it, or else I would not have mentioned it.

Q. Why is it not a very proper thing to mention that the girl was meaning to swear away two young men's lives, did not you tell them you would come forward and tell the story? - No, I did not say such a thing.

Q. You see where this girl went to? - She went into her master's house, the house in the front was shut up, and she went to the house up the alley.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Case or Mrs. Case that you heard her say so? - No, I am acquainted with Mrs. Case and Mr. Case too, they have been friends as far as I am a customer.

Q. Did not you go to them, and say, dear what a bad story this girl is telling of you? - I have not been in the house these five months, because I have not my beer there now.

Q. Why did not you tell Mrs. Case, be cautious about this girl? because you are to give her a new gown for swearing? Did you know Osborn? - No, I never knew him in my life.

Q. You never knew that he had been accused of this fact? - I did not, till it was mentioned, and the neighbours said it was a pity that I should not go to speak the truth.

Q. And yet you never offered to come till you was applied to this morning, and you would not have come if they had not sent for you? - I don't know that I should have troubled my head with such a troublesome affair.

Q. I hope we have not many such women in this town; my good lady, can you at all tell what sort of a woman this was that she was speaking to? - The woman was close by me, and passed me.

Q. Did not you say to this woman, what a desperate girl this is, that is going to swear a man's life away? - No, but the woman shook her head, and said, ah, fie upon it.

Q. Have you ever endeavoured to find out this woman, or get any information who she was? - No, I cannot say that ever I have.

Q. Did the woman appear to be acquainted with the girl? - I don't know.

Q. Did not the woman say to the girl why you should not do so? - The woman only said fie upon it.

Q. If you was to hear me say that I meant to go and swear away a person's life, would not you say I was a very wicked fellow? - I only tell you what I heard.

Q. Did she see you do you think? - I don't know.

Biggett. This is not the first life that that girl has sworn away, if she swears away ours, because she has a brother-in-law transported.

Osborne. This girl was drawing gin in the back kitchen, and giving it away to every one that came in.

Thomas Biggett , GUILTY . (Aged 17.) Death .

Thomas Osborne , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940917-4

463. JOHN KERR and JOHN RUGGLES were indicted for feloniously making an assault on Edward Barrett , in the dwelling house of John Kerr , on the 30th of June , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 2l. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 1l. 10s. a cloth jacket, value 1l. three silk handkerchiefs, value 10s. two cotton shirts, value 8s. a pair of leather pumps, value 3s. a felt hat, value 6s. a pair of muslin trowsers, value 5s. a pair of velverett breeches, value 5s. and seven shillings in money, the goods and monies of the said Edward Barrett .

The case opened by Mr. Knapp.

EDWARD BARRETT sworn.

I am a sailor , I have been in the sea faring line ever since I was nine years old; in June last I was discharged from the Hospital at Deal, I came from Deal to London, I was met by an old woman on London Bridge, and I said I would give her a pint of beer to get me a night's lodging, she brought me up to a public house, there somewhere over London Bridge.

Q. How far was it from London Bridge? - A good way.

Q. How long was it after you saw the old woman before she brought you to a house? - About an hour.

Q. Did you walk to that public house? - I did.

Q. How far did you walk with the old woman after you met her? - A little way, I was only a little while in going, but I don't know the place, because I am a stranger here; when we got into the public house, I looked about to give her a pint of beer, and she was off.

Q. Do you know where this public house is situated? - I don't know, it was in the dark, and I was a stranger.

Q. What happened to you there? - There was a very good entertainment, there was one captain there said he was from Barbadoes, another from Jamaica, and another from Martinique, and some from Saint Le terre, which I took last war, and when I got in one of them said, will you have a glass of wine? and I said, I will have a pint of porter, I am tired of wine, and one of these captains said, will you sleep along with my mate, and I was walking to bed, and this pretended mate got up and shewed me into the room to bed, I know him very well if I was to see him, I

says to him why don't you shew me the light, and as soon as they got me inside they locked the door on me, and it was all dark, and there were three bars at the window, I was used very cruel, I saw the bars at the window in the morning, and four or five padlocks on the door, that was a pity; I heard them open three or four of them in the morning. I will fight for my King and Country while I am able.

Q. Did you sleep there all night? - I did not sleep a wink, the next morning there were one of these jail keepers came up and opened the door, and asked me how I found myself? I asked for God's sake for some drink, some ale, he said he would give me some directly, and he kept me there till it was dark night.

Q. Then you staid there all the day? - I did, and in the middle of the next night they transported me to this place in Whitcomb-street.

Q. Did you have any ale? - No, not a drop; the next night they came and threw me into a coach, there were about ten of them about me, they threw me in like a cat, and they used me very cruel; the coach drove on at the rate of three knots an hour.

Q. Did all the ten go into the coach with you? - No, only two.

Q. After you was in the coach how long was you in the coach before you got to Whitcomb-street? - A good while, half an hour or an hour I believe it was; in about an hour I arrived at Whitcomb-street , and when I got into the house I began to sight in the house, before I would go up stairs, they wanted me to go up stairs; why should I be kidnapped in that manner; and when I shoved one of them from me there was a rope stung about my neck, threw down the stairs, and catched it as God happened it, in my left hand here, and they dragged me up stairs by it, then when they dragged me up stairs, they got about and stripped me stark naked, and them two men were holding me, and the rest were stripping me, one of them was agent in my time, and the other, the landlord of the house, they were two wicked ones; was it not a shame gentlemen to serve me so? they took away my property, took my watch and my clothes, and there was the dust of the road on my buckies, and they thought they were not silver, they were silver, I paid two and forty shillings and six-pence for them, and half a gallon of porter besides, and they took from me seven shillings and six-pence in silver, and some halfpence, they took all away from me; they did not leave me a halfpenny in the world, and also my discharge and tin box, three silk handkerchiefs, three pair of silk and cotton stockings, and two cotton shirts, and my pumps, and all that I had, and if I had had a million of money they would have taken it all away.

Q. What discharge was that? - A discharge from the navy office that captain Roberts and Willoughby gave me; they afterwards threw me into a coach, and put the blinds up, and drove me away to the Banbury road.

Q. How long did you stay in this house, in Whitcomb-street? - A fortnight locked up and fed with bread and cold water.

Q. Was you locked up in that room all the time? - I was in the back part of the house up stairs.

Q. And you never was permitted to come down stairs? - No, never.

Q. How high was it, a one pair of stairs, or a two pair of stairs? - Three pair of stairs, and half a stair.

Q. You was telling my lord that you was put into a coach to go to Banbury. Why was you to go to Banbury? - I don't know, your honour, why I was to go there. I would go to sea to serve the king, if I was well, sooner than go to Banbury.

Q. Do you know of any paper presented to you before you was put into the coach? - They brought in a paper, and I was obliged to sign that paper or else die that moment.

Q. Who brought it in? - There, that very man.

Q. You was put into a coach to go to Banbury? - I was, and they blinded the coach that I could see nothing.

Q. The blinds of the coach were up? - Yes, I could not see no light, and they drove me away, and I take it the coach went about three knots an hour, about three miles an hour.

Q. How far do you suppose they carried you in the coach? - They carried me a great way.

Q. Did they take you out of London? - O, yes! a great way.

Q. How long do you suppose they were driving you that way? - About three or four hours. Then they threw me into a waggon, and the waggon carried me about fifteen miles. Indeed I cannot tell you all what they did. Afterwards when I could not walk and keep up with the party, they flogged me, and whipped me to make me go along.

Q. What party do you mean? - The kidnapping party.

Q. Had the party of kidnappers come from that house? - They had; they used me very ill.

Q. They went with you all the way? - Yes, all the way to Banbury; I was obliged to go or die on the road.

Q. Then you never was out of the kidnapping house in town, till you was put into that coach? - No.

Q. And after you was put into the coach, you went immediately to Banbury? - Yes.

Q. Do you know who the persons were? - Very well I do, if I could see them all I would shew them all.

Q. Do you know who the persons were that went with you to Banbury? - There are none of them here, a party of kidnappers went with me, but they are not here now.

Q. After you got to Banbury what next happened? - When I got to Banbury all the gentlemen took my part, the justices and all. I asked the quarter master, when I went down to Banbury, what sort of a man are you? Says he, I am a quarter master. When they carried me down to Banbury, they kept me in prison to transport me, and I would be in a good ship of war now, if they had let me alone; they wanted to make an East India soldier of an old sailor.

Q. When you went down to Banbury, they kept you in prison to transport you? - Why what else were they going to do with me? Well, then the justice of peace at Banbury, and the Mayor and all the gentlemen there got up, and they took my part, and brought me up here again.

Q. How did they bring you? - With a coach; they brought me up very decent. Look here, see they knocked out half a tier of teeth. The man in the brown did that (Ruggles.)

Q. How long did you stay in Banbury after you got there? - I was three weeks there, I believe.

Q. Pray are you at all certain whether it was in June or July that you got to town? - I don't know what time it was.

Q. How long ago? - I cannot say. They kept me three weeks in Banbury, and three weeks in town, and I was about eleven days coming up from Deal; I was too bad to get into a coach, and I did not keep any day or hour in my pocket.

Q. I believe you went before the Mayor of Banbury, and gave information of this? - Yes, he came to me.

Q. How long after you arrived at Banbury was it the Mayor took your examination? - The second night, I believe.

Q. Then the Mayor of Banbury, and gentlemen there, heard your complaint, and, I believe, they support you in this prosecution? - They do.

Q. Are you sure that the two persons at the bar, that you see now, are the two persons that you have described? - Indeed they are the two; I would not tell you a lie.

Mr. Fielding. I say, my honest fellow, I want to have a few words with you? - I have spoke to my lord, the judge, and I cannot say any more.

Q. How long was you in Banbury before you told your story to the Mayor or justice? - Not long. They came to me soon, the gentlemen of the town did.

Q. When you got to Banbury you did not like to be looked upon as a soldier? - I am a sailor and not a soldier.

Q. And that you did not like; then you told your story to the good people there, as much like as you have told here, but they insisted on it that you was a soldier, and when you came to Banbury, you found yourself as a soldier; and you thought that by your story you should get your discharge from the situation in which you found yourself? - They took away my discharge.

Q. When you got to Banbury, they wanted to tell you that you was a soldier there, and you did not like it, and you gave this story; they gave you countenance and protection there, and you thought that you should get out of their clutches? - Certainly; I cannot serve three kings at once.

Q. How many people went to Banbury with you? - There was some poor old men that they kidnapped.

Q. Was not there a good large party? How many in number? - I don't know. There was a woman that saw the second robbery made on me of my buckles, but they transported her out of the country.

Q. How many marched into Banbury with you? - There were about twenty-eight on the road.

Q. What sort of dress had you on at the time? - They put a blue jacket and a pair of trowsers on me, and I could not button them about my lame legs.

Q. Then you was in this miserable condition when you got out of the waggon? - I was.

Q. Was there any of these recruits with you in this waggon? - No, they were able to walk.

Q. Was there any recruits in the coach? - Yes, there were two thieves with me.

Q. Neither of the two thieves at the bar? - No, these two gentlemen one, of them was agent in my time, and the other was landlord.

Q. I am now speaking when you went from their house in Whitcomb-street; There were two I believe with you in the coach, where they kidnappers? - Kidnappers! I would shew them to you if they were here.

Q. You went down the road and then you was put into a waggon? - Yes, and then when I was out of the waggon, I was not able to walk, and when I got on the road one of these kidnappers came and took a faggot of prickles and whipped me on my legs. When the justice wrote up a letter to try whether my name was in the navy books, my name was open on the books, and whereof the colonel got a letter, and he wrote down a loving letter to me, that I should be cleared when he came down, in about five or six days, he came down to the Red Lyon, and when he came there he was not a minute there, and these people that were kidnapped all together about the door.

Court. You said, that you never was out of the kidnapping house from the time that you came in, till the time that they put you in a coach to carry you to Banbury? - Never.

Q. During the time who was in this room with you? - No, nobody but the jailer, and he left a pot of water with me and a bit of soul bread. I cannot think on it all, my lord.

Mr. Fielding. So you was in this room for a fortnight and nothing to live upon but bread and water, saw nobody hardly during that time? - No, only the turnkey.

Q. What did they keep you in this room for? - Because I would not swear before a justice; that man used to bring up a pint of beer, and I used to ask the servant for a pint of beer, and I used to say, for God's sake, good woman, will you give me a pint of beer.

Q. Then you never went before a justice? - No, only in Banbury, and justice Bond, at Bow-street.

Q. Look towards the bench and see if you recollect the face of any person that fits there, just by my lord. (Justice Kirby stands up)? - No, I never saw the man in my life.

Q. You never went before him and altelted yourself? - There was a wooden handed justice came into that man's house in Whitcomb-street, he says, take this book into your hand, and I said, band me that book out of your starboard hand; and he handed it to me out of his larboard hand; and I said, I was as loyal a subject as any man, and I was knocked down by that man there.

Q. Now to your best recollection you never saw that man there (pointing to justice Kirby)? - No.

Q. You never went before any magistrate, to be attested, in your sober senses? - Never in my days.

Q. Now we will travel with you a little from the beginning of this system; how long had you been in Deal hospital? - About three weeks.

Q. How came you up from Deal? - I walked, I was afraid of going into a coach or waggon for fear of shaking my bones.

Q. You saw in Deal a good many seafaring people there? - Yes.

Q. What business had you in London? - To come up for my money, that was due to me from the Inflexible.

Q. Could not you have got the money at Deal? - I thought to have got my money and go into an hospital here.

Q. How long was it since you had received any pay? - I did not receive any pay at all yet, I only got a note; I had not received any money for a great while before.

Q. How much money had you when you left Deal? - I had three guineas in my pocket, captain Roberts gave me one guinea, and the admiral gave me another guinea.

Q. Did the captain give you the money when you went into the hospital? - No, when I came out captain Roberts gave me two guineas, and admiral Beaconfield I believe, or something like it, his fleet lies in the Downs, he gave me one guinea.

Q. What is the admiral's name that gave you the guinea? - Some cross name, I cannot think on his name.

Q. You had no money till captain Roberts gave you the two guineas? - O! yes, I had money in my pocket.

Q. How much had you before? - I had only some silver in my pocket; when these people met me, I had about seven shillings and six-pence in my pocket.

Q. How came you by the silver? - Do you think my poor father had not sent me no money?

Q. Where did he send you the money to? - To Deal, from Ireland, he always sends me money, he sent me money in the American way.

Q. What age are you? - I believe I am about thirty.

Q. When your poor father had sent you some money, what made you apply to captain Robert or the admiral? - captain Roberts was a good man, and knew me.

Q. Your father had contrived to send you money to Deal? - My father sent me money the last American war.

Q. What is he? - He is a wine cooper.

Q. What money had you then when you came out of the Hospital that your father sent you? - I cannot recollect.

Q. How did you get at it? - I got it from the man that brought the letter; he gave it me out of his pocket.

Q. Was it a bank note? - No, it was only three guineas.

Q. How came he to bring you the money? - This man came over passenger.

Q. In what ship? - In the Mary brig.

Q. And he found you out at Deal? - He did, because I had wrote to him.

Q. Where did the Mary brig come from? - From the City of Cork.

Q. And there was a sailor from on board that ship that brought you this? - No, he was a landsman.

Q. How came you to say this moment that he was a postman that brought you it with this letter? - He was all the same as a postman.

Witness to Court. My lord judge, am I to answer this man? - Yes.

Mr. Fielding. What time was it you received these three guineas? - I was pretty sure I was all the same as a dead man, in the Hospital.

Court. How long was the money brought to you before you left the Hospital? - I was not above two days in the Hospital when the man came to me; I wrote from Portsmouth before I came to Deal.

Q. How came you to know that the ship was going to Deal? - Because that was the place that we had got orders to steer to.

Q. So then you wish us to be contented with that story, that you sent your letter to your father at Portsmouth, and two days after, when you arrived at Deal, this man brought you the money? - You want to confuse me. I wrote from Portsmouth, and was some time coming round Spithead.

Q. Well, two days after you had been at the Hospital, you got three guineas, what became of that money? - Spent it; I spent all the money I had.

Q. Was all this money gone before you applied to captain Roberts or the admiral? - No.

Q. And you had got a watch left, and a pair of silver buckles? - Yes.

Q. You applied to captain Roberts for two guineas, and the admiral for one? - Yes; and if admiral Barrington was here he would give me ten. I wish to God I could see him here!

Q. So you set out with your watch and your silver buckles in your shoes? - Indeed I did; and a lady coming along, Sir Charles Everett's wife, on the road, said she would give me a lift in the coach; but I was afraid to get into it, I was afraid of the horses shaking me to pieces.

Q. Whereabouts was that on the road? - I cannot tell; she told me she was Sir Charles Everett 's wife. Would not any gentleman take a liking to a sailor, seeing me walk lame on the road. If I was in a ship, the ship would ride fair and easy; that would do very well.

Q. How long might you be on the road from Deal to London? - I was a good while; I could not walk above four miles, five or three miles a day; I was about

eleven days coming from Deal. I was bothered so much the last American war by the shot hurting my hearing, and this leg and thigh was condemned once to be cut off.

Q. You are not very deaf now? - No, I am not.

Q. Did you talk with any body on the road? - I did not ask any body any questions at all, only walked along till I came to London-bridge, there I saw an old woman.

Q. When you came to this old woman she was the first person that you spoke to about your journey. How came you to speak to her? - Because I thought she was a friendless woman, whom I could speak to. My good old mother, says I, can you tell me where I can get a lodging? she said, she could shew me a very pretty house.

Q. This old witch had slown away when you came to this public house? - O, Yes! she was an old rogue; what did she bring me into that wicked house for? that was no honest lodging.

Q. So this old woman took you to this place, and as soon as she had shewn you there, away she went? - And I thought to give her a pint of beer for it, and she flew away instantly.

Q. What condition was you in that night? - I had my stick in my hand and my seafaring clothes on.

Q. Was you weak and lame as you are now? - I was lame, but not as I am now.

Q. Was you weak? - Shew me before a doctor, and I will tell the doctor how I am.

Q. Was not you surprised when you came into this house? - How do I know but you are a parcel of honest gentlemen.

Court. So you never have recovered of this illness from that time to this? - No, I am afraid I never will. Is it not bad usage to use any sailor so, to make a sol dier of an old sailor?

Q. How did you get this lameness? - This leg was hurt the last American war, it was splintered, and this other leg was hurt this war.

Mr. Fielding. Honesty, you see I call you by a fair name? - I am an honest man for Old England.

Q. Did you halloo when you got into this place? - What use was my hallooing at the back settlements of a house, there was nobody would hear me, it was as good hold my tongue, it would be of no use. May the great God strike me dumb, deaf, and blind, if I was not asking in his(Kerr's) house two hours, before I got a pint of beer; that man used to take the drop of beer, and sling it into my face, and lock the door on me. Drat it all gentlemen, my life is nothing.

Q. When you got into the coach and came from the first house, did you make any hallooing then? - It was no use then.

Q. You knew you was got into the hands of enemies? - Yes, they were worse than the French. Did not I do as well as I could? I hallooed as well as I could; there was nobody came to my assistance.

Q. When you came to the door of the house in Whitcomb-street, you must have got out of the coach? - There were ten of them people about had hold of me as I came in, because I did not like to go up stairs.

Q. And then they kept you in this room for a fortnight, and you see nobody but this jailer? - There were three or four jailers used to come up.

Q. In the situation in which you are now, you will certainly remember this question, during the time you was in Whitcomb-street, did any person come to examine you? - They had a surgeon of their own, and a wooden handed justice of their own.

Q. Was there in fact then, during the the time of your staying in Whitcomb-street, any body in the character of a surgeon that examined you there? - I saw no surgeon; I saw a wooden handed justice.

Q. Did you tell him at the time how you had been used? - When I came to that wooden handed justice there, in the one pair of stairs, there was his starboard hand off, he had a billet of wood on, and he paid me with it about my breast very much.

Q. Did you see any gentleman who examined you, as a surgeon? - No, I did not.

Q. Did you, during the fortnight that you was in the house locked up, see any more people than what you have already described; the jailor that opened the door, and the man that threw this beer about your face? - There were ten or twelve about me, pulling me to pieces.

Q. Notwithstanding you had been locked up in this first house where this old woman had carried you to, yet you brought all your things safe to Whitcomb-street, you had got your watch, buckles, clothes, &c.? - Yes.

Q. Had you changed any part of your dress in the first house? - No, they would not let me; they kept me locked up.

Q. Had you shifted any part of your dress where the old woman had left you? - There was a party of knidnappers that came along with me to strip me. I would shew you them if I was to see them.

Q. Did you shift your dress at all in this house? - No.

Q. Then you went to the house in Whitcomb-street in the same jacket as you arrived in town with? - Yes, in a quarter master's jacket.

Q. Did not you put on this jacket at the first house? - Was not I obliged to put it on.

Q. Did you or did you not? - I did not till I came to Whitcomb-street, Gentlemen, give me fair play. My lord judge, there are two many against me; it is a pity, my lord, but to see a sailor righted; consider a sailor, my lord.

Q. Now tell me if whether you was ever attested in your serious moments, at a time that you had every opportunity of examining for yourself? - Never.

Q. Can you pretend to say that you lost any part of your property in this house? - They stripped me start naked.

Q. You made no complaint of any thing of this kind till you arrived at Banbury? - I did not, I saw nobody but a poor farmer on the road, and he would be knocked down if he came to take my part, he would be killed.

Q. Who was it cut your hair off? - The barber; he is not here; I see him at the outer door, and when he see me, he ran away. Gentlemen, it is a pity you don't see me rectified. I beg of my lord judge to shew me some lenity. You think better of them than you do of me, and that is a pity.

Q. Do you recollect when you was examined before the magistrate, did not you say there, that Kerr was the person that cut your hair off? - He was holding me while the barber was cutting it off.

THOMAS SLEATH sworn.

I attended for Mr. Davis, at Bow-street, at the time this examination was taken, I remember the man perfectly well.

Q. Look at that and see if that is the information to which that man swore? - it is.

Q. Did you see Mr. Justice Addington sign it? - did.

Q. Did you see Barrett, the witness, sign it? - I did.

Barrett. Did you see me? - Yes, at the office in Bow-street.

(Reads from the information.)

"That he declares that the master of the house, namely, John Kerr, now pre

sent, once beat him and cut his hair off, during which time he was held by two other men; and further says, that he did not at any time knowingly enlist as a soldier, nor was he ever taken before a magistrate, to be attested, nor sworn as such."

JOHN SHEPHERD sworn.

Q. I believe you are the person attending the office in Queen-square, in which Mr. Serjeant Kirby is one of the magistrates? - I am.

Q. Do you remember any person of the name of Barrett being brought there to be attested as a soldier? - There was a person brought there by a man of the name of Watson.

Q. Was Watson a military man? - I cannot recollect; he brought him there as appears by the book.

Q. Was that proceeding entered in the book as a proceeding taking place regularly at the office, as the attestation of Edward Barrett ? - Yes.

Q. Was that attested in the usual way as persons are attested? - I always enter them in the book before I give the attestation to the person who brings them.

Q. Is it the usual way for the magistrate to see the person that comes to be attested? - As soon as they bring any one in to be attested, I take him immediately to the magistrate, and the magistrate asks him how long he has been enlisted, whether he has been enlisted twenty-four hours? and often examines them whether they are sober. (Reads)

"Monday the 7th of July. Edward Barrett brought by Watson, and attested for Colonel Roberts 's company."

Q. What questions do you ask? - Whether he has been enlisted twenty four hours, usually; then if the magistrate is satisfied he desires we would administer the oath.

Q. Do you administer an oath to the person that comes to be enlisted? - We administer two oaths, one is the oath of attestation, the other is to be true and obedient to the King, and the officers that are set over them

Q. That oath was taken in this instance? - Certainly.

Q. Be so good as to look at the man, and see if you have any recollection of him? - I do not recollect the man's person, but from his manner of giving his evidence, I think it is the same, because of his made of speech, and by his behaviour here, because he behaved exactly the same there, but his person I cannot swear to.

Mr. Knapp. You have a great many persons attested there, of course Irishmen as well as this man? - Irishmen make blunders as well as this man.

SERJEANT KIRBY Sworn .

This is my hand writing, but it is impossible for me to recollect this man, because we have sworn in since January, two thousand one hundred.

THOMAS WATSON sworn.

Shepherd. I know this man by coming to the office.

Barrett. That is one of the men that used me so ill.

Mr. Fielding to Watson. Watson, did you go with Barrett before Mr. Serjeant Kirby for his attestation to be taken? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember the justice's clerk, Mr. Shepherd, being there? - Yes.

Q. Was that the attestation at that time that was made? - This is the attestation, and there is Barrett's own name that he wrote there.

Barrett. I was obliged to it or else you would kill me.

Mr. Fielding to Watson. Is that the man that was before Mr. Serjeant Kirby? - yes, that is the man; I have not seen him since.

Q. Was that attestation taken in the regular way? - It was.

Mr. Knapp. How was Barrett carried to the justice's? - In a coach.

Mr. Fielding. You was the man that enlisted this man? - I enlisted him, I then lodged at the Sun and Sword, Church-lane, Whitechapel, I now keep the house, I have since married the widow; this man came in to me, in the tap room, in a very distressing situation, and he says, by Jesus, man, will you enlist me for a soldier, I then looked at him, and said, my lad you are an irishman, and I said it is Colonel Roberts 's order that I should enlist no irishmen; not only that, but I said to him, you appear to be sickly; by Jasus, says he, I am as well as ever I was in my life, and I can jump up to the cieling.

Q. Did he appear to be lame at all? - No, he did not, he said he was foot foundered; I made him walk backwards and forwards in the tap room, to view him, and he did jump, and as he jumped one of his shoes came off, that was tied by a bit of cord, or rope yarn; I then said, my lad, if you are not ill, I will enlist you, I then took half a crown piece out of my pocket, and I put it into his hand, and I said, now my lad, you are free, willing and able to serve his Majesty, in the Birmingham volunteers, now laying at Banbury, in Oxfordshire, and I will make this up five guineas and a crown; he says, then by Jasus I will go to the bounds of b-gg-ry with you, I then gave him a supper, and a pint or two of porter.

Q. Where did he say he came from? - He never told me a word where he came from.

Q. What day was this? - It was the latter end of June, or the beginning of July, I am not particular, I did not set it down.

Q. Where did he remain after that? - After supper he said he wanted to go to bed, for his feet were very sore? I told him we had no lodging rooms in our house, but there was another recruit at the Swan and Anchor, Butcher-row, East Smithfield, with whom he might go and sleep; he then repeatedly said, that he would go to the bounds of b-gg-ry with me; I then took him to the Swan and Anchor myself, and left him with that recruit, and I did not see any more of him till the next day, the next day I called on him, and he was cloathed in a red jacket and a slannel waistcoat tied with strings, and a pair of muscato long trowsers; they were the uniform of his regiment, Thomas Dunlap 's, I did not clothe him, serjeant Inkingbottom cloathed him, this was his rendezvous.

Q. So then you had turned him over to that sergeant? - Yes.

Q. How came he to be cloathed in a uniform that did not belong to your regiment? - I was informed that he sent for a jew to buy his clothes; the next day I asked him how he was? by Jasus, says he, never better in my life, only I am foot fore, or foot foundered, I believe was his term; I know nothing more of him with regard to enlisting of him, only that I had him attested a few days after that, I saw nothing more of him till I saw him at the White Horse, in Whitcomb-street, sergeant Inkingbottom went with him there and another recruit.

Q. You observed his jumping and his shoe coming off, and that it was tied with some rope yarn; had he any buckles in his shoes? - Nothing of the appearance of a buckle in his shoe.

Q. Who is Mr. Ruggles? - He is clerk to an agent, that pays the money.

Q. And therefore attends at this house? - He does.

Q. Who is the other man, Kerr? - He is the man that keeps the White House in Whitcomb-street, he keeps the house only, I never saw him interfere with any recruit whatever.

Q. Is it customary to have a man examined as to his state of body by a surgeon? - Yes.

Q. Was you present when the surgeon examined him? - I was not, I called two or three days afterwards and I saw him in a state of intoxication, not sit to go before a magistrate.

Q. Had he been attested before he went to the White Horse? - No, I believe it was six or seven days before we could get him sober enough to go before a magistrate; I then applied to Mr. Ruggles, and begged of Mr. Ruggles to let one of his servants keep him from drinking; he said he could not, for he would be down in the tap-room; Mr. Ruggles desired me to call early some morning, very likely then I might catch him sober; I called two or three days after that, and asked him if he would go and be attested? by Jasus, says he, let us have a drop of the creature first, I afterwards asked him what the creature was? and he said, sure man alive it is good whisky; I then took him to the magistrate's, before serjeant Kirby, and there he was attested; I then carried him home. and never see any thing more of him till this day.

Mr. serjeant Kirby. Though I cannot swear to this man, yet I have a sloating idea of a man that I particularly examined whether he had been in the Navy, and I remember that the man that was so examined, gave me an account of his having been discharged, and I remember that that man did give an account of his being at an hospital, and ill for some time, and he pretended the circumstance of having had money of a captain or admiral, but he stated that he had been at Deal some time, and I remember the circumstance of his meeting an old woman, and he talked of going through a very old way, through Thames-street, to try to be enlisted; I have tried the best I could to bring the circumstance to my recollection since I have been in court; whether the witness remembers more than I can, I cannot tell, or whether it applies to that man, I cannot tell.

Mr. Fielding to Watson. When you went to him to the house of Kerr, and he was intoxicated, did he pretend that any ill usage had been given to him? - Not a word.

Q. Did he say he had been in the navy? - No, but I think since Mr. serjeant Kirby has mentioned it, he wanted to make some excuse.

Q. I suppose it is no uncommon thing when they have got the money, to want to get off? - No, when they have got eight or ten guineas, they will say they have been kidnapped.

Q. What room did you leave him in? - In the one pair of stairs, a very large room, and saw him sometimes in the tap-room.

Q. Do you know any thing of the different recruits going off when they went to Banbury? - I did not see that.

Mr. Knapp. You are a recruiting sergeant, and keep a public house? - I did not at that time, I have married the widow since.

Barrett. This is one of the men that molested me along with these people there.

Court to Barrett. Do you insist on it still that you never went before the magistrate at all? - I was obliged to sign that paper, or die that moment, and this very man pretended to be the justice of peace, and he struck me about with his wooden hand, and every stroke he gave me went to my heart.

Q. You say you never went before the justice? - I never was, till I came before the justice of peace at Banbury.

Q. Then you did not sign this paper before the justice, Mr. sergeant Kirby? - No, never did; here is the man that made me sign it, I never was before the justice.

Q. Look at it? - That is my name.

Q. Where did you sign it? - In Whitcomb-street, in that man's (Kerr's) house.

EDWARD INKINGBOTTOM sworn.

Barratt. There is another of them my lord.

Mr. Cullen to Inkingbottom. Where do you live? - No. 5, Maypole-court, East Smithfield.

Q. Do you recollect that man coming to your house? - Yes, his name is Edward Barrett , I keep the Swan and Anchor, it is a rendezvous house.

Q. What time was this? - The latter end of June, or the beginning of July, I know it was in the morning part of the day, about seven or eight o'clock.

Q. Where did he sleep that night that he came to your house? - He slept along with a recruit, Peter Moses ; then the next morning I got up and gave him a shilling, and he told me that Mr. Watson had enlisted him, he said the captain had enlisted him.

Q. Was Watson attending at your house at this time? - Watson, Mr. Noble and I, were in partnership at the same time.

Q. Then he went to bed with Peter Moses ? - I believe so, I did not see him in bed, I left the house between ten and eleven o'clock, I don't live in the house, but close by, the man when I saw him the next morning, I searched him, to see whether he was found or not, and I approved of him, we always make it a rule when we enlist men to see that they are not ruptured, or any bruises on them; I found nothing but what I approved of.

Q. How was he drest? - In an old brown jacket, like a sailor's jacket; the next morning when I searched him I gave him some clothes to put on, the morning after he had enlisted I think it was, I gave him some jackets and trowsers that I had to spare of Sir Thomas Dunlap's independent company.

Q. What became of his old clothes? - He sold them to a shop keeper, who now lives at No. 16, East Smithfield, I don't rightly know his name, he is here, he has got the shirt that he bought of him with him.

Q. Did you see his shoes? - I see every thing.

Q. Did you see whether he had any buckles in his shoes? - He had neither buckles nor any money, only what I gave him, and half a crown that I saw next morning, that that gentleman gave him, he had shoes, but very bad ones, they were tied with strings, with rope yarn; he had no money, because I always takes care when they sell their clothes, to examine their pockets, and take every thing, out, and give it them.

Q. How long did he remain in this house? - About three days, it was the evening when he came in, and I think he went away about eleven or twelve o'clock the third day, he went from there to the White Horse, Whitcomb-street.

Q. Who went with him there? - I think it was Peter Moses , and another that belonged to the same regiment; I think Thomas Noble , the other partner went besides, and myself.

Q. Did he go willingly? - Very willingly, but he wanted a drop of the creature, and Peter Moses was as wet as he; we went in a coach.

Q. When you got to Whitcomb-street did you leave him there? - I did, about three o'clock the doctor came, he used to come about two, I saw the doctor there, and I saw him cloathed before I

left him there, in the uniform of his regiment.

Q. How long did you remain in Whitcomb-street? - To the best of my knowledge, three or four hours, I was not in company with him; he was in the taproom, I saw the surgeon examine him, he is here at the door.

Q. At the time that he was there, was he used well, and was he willing to be there? - Directly as he was passed I treated him with a shillingsworth of rum and water,! and gave him half a crown, and he was called in to Mr. Ruggles, to know what bounty he agreed for, and Mr. Ruggle paid him, I don't know what Mr. Ruggles paid him.

Q. Was he perfectly free and unrestrained then? - As perfectly free as any man in the world.

Mr. Knapp. This man was very much intoxicated at various times? - He was.

Q. I want to know whether from the general state of intoxication in which he was in, and also from your observation of him, at different times, he did not appear to be deranged? - No, if he had not appeared very well to me, I should not have passed him, nor the doctor.

Mr. Knowlys. When he is very drunk he is not in his senses? - No, I know I am not.

HENRY JOEL sworn.

Barrett. I never see this man in my life.

Joel. I remember seeing Barrett at the Swan and Anchor in East Smithfield, the beginning of July, Mr. Inkingbottom came to my house, and said that he had a man that had enlisted, and came for me to come and buy his old clothes, I went, and saw him at the Swan and Anchor; I see him there, he brought down his clothes, a brown jacket, an old blue jacket and a check shirt, and a pair of trowsers, and a pair of old shoes.

Q. Was he drest at that time in any military uniform? - He was drest.

Q. Had these shoes any buckles in them? - No, strings, he asked me half a guinea for them.

Q. What sort of strings were they? - I think they were yarn, I cannot say rightly; I told him they were not worth that money; then, says he, I will not sell them to you at all, except you call for half a pint of gin; I told him I would not buy them, they were too dear; says he, if you will call for half a pint of gin I will take less; with that I bought them of him for six shillings and half a pint of gin, and I gave him the money into his hand, and after I paid him for them I left two of the garments behind me, they were not worth taking away, I took nothing away but the brown jacket and his check shirt.

Q. Did you look how he was drest? Had he any buckles in his shoes that he had on? - No.

Q. Had he any watch? - No, I think not, I will tell you why I can say so, I had a very handsome chain hanging to my watch, and he took notice of it, says he, I will buy it of you if you will wait till I get my bounty; says I, it is not worth my while to go after you.

Court to Joel. Shew Barrett the shirt.

Barrett. May the great God strike me dead if ever I wore that shirt, or ever saw it before.

ALEXANDER HENRY HARBIN sworn.

I am the surgeon, and have the employment of examining the recruits, to see if they are sit for service.

Q. Do you remember being at the house kept by Kerr? - Yes.

Q. Look at that man that stands by you, Barrett? - It is impossible for me to recollect every man that passes my hands, I do not absolutely recollect the man at present.

Q. Do you remember examining any man in company with sergeant Inking-bottom? - There are a variety of sergeants that bring them, and I pass over my business to see if they are found men, and then I have done with them.

Q. Let him look at the attestation? - This is my signature.

Q. Did you examine the person whose signature that is? - I never sign any without examining.

Q. Did that person make any sort of complaint to you, of any ill usage he had received? - I never heard any one man do it.

Q. You attend this house, Did you ever see any restraint at all? - Never.

Q. That young man, Kerr, keeps the house? - He is the landlord of the house, and Mr. Ruggles is the clerk to the agent who pays the money as bounty.

Q. Where do you live? - In Dean-street, Soho.

Mr. Knapp. If I understand you now, notwithstanding my learned friend has asked you about Barrett, you are not able to identify the man; then whoever this signature relates to you don't know.

Mr. Fielding. You know that your signature to that attestation is a confirmation of your having examined the man attested? - It is.

MARY GARLAND sworn.

Q. Was you a servant to this public house in Whitcomb-street? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember that man Barrett being there? - Yes.

Q. When he was there what part of the house did he use to be in? - He had the liberty of the house.

Q. Did you ever see him in the Taproom? - Yes.

Q. Had he the same liberty of the house as any other person of the house had? - Yes, precisely the same.

Q. Did he ever make any complaint of being confined in a room whatever? - Never.

Q. Had he the same liberty of walking about the house as you have? - Just the same as I myself have.

Mr. Knapp. They are all locked up at night in the room? - No, they are not.

Q. Did you never see Barrett locked up? - Never.

JOHN COOPER sworn.

I know that man, his name is Barrett; I was enlisted in Colonel Roberts's company, I am not in it now, I was with Barrett in Whitcomb-street.

Q. Was he ill used there? - I never see him ill used.

Q. Had he the same liberty of the house as you had? - Yes.

Q. Was he imprisoned or tied round with a rope, or any thing of that sort? - Never.

Q. Had he the liberty to eat and drink the same as you had? - Yes, he was always intoxicated with liquor.

Q. He was never confined to bread and water? - Never.

Q. I believe you went with him to Banbury? - I did not go till afterwards; they had no clothes to fit me. I was taken up at Banbury, he swore there that I held him while Kerr cut his hair off.

Q. Did Mr. Kerr cut his hair off? - No.

Q. Who did cut it off? - I cannot tell, I did not see it cut off.

Q. You never held him while it was cut off? - No, I never knowed when his hair was cut off nor nothing about it; he came to me in the prison and shook

hands with me, and told me that he was very sorry for it, that he had wrongfully imprisoned me, that he meant to imprison the one that had beat him with the faggot stick.

Q. But he swore against you? - He did, and I was committed and laid there seven weeks in heavy irons.

Mr. Knapp. So the justice committed you for this robbery, why you have now come up by Habeas Corpus from Banbury? - I have.

JOHN RITCHY sworn.

I am a recruit, I know Barrett, he came to the White Horse in a red jacket and a flannel waistcoat tied with strings, and a pair of trowsers and some shoes tied with strings; I was at the White Horse drawing beer.

Q. Where did he lay at night? - In the garret of the White Horse.

Q. Did you see him after that? - I did not.

Q. How was he used while he was there? - He had liberty to go up stairs, and down stairs, just as he liked.

Q. Did you see any thing of him afterwards? - I did not, when he went away, I stopped to draw beer.

Q. Did you go to Banbury afterwards? - Yes, and when I was there on the parade, one night, he came with a constable, and took me and Cooper out of the ranks, and took us before the town clerk, and the town clerk wanted our officer to put us in the guard house, and there was no guard house to put us in, and then we were put into Banbury gaol until the next day, and then we were taken out and examined again, and he accused me of a pair of silver buckles, of taking them from him at the White Horse in Whitcomb-street, they then again wanted the officer to take care of us and put us in the Guard house, and they told them they had no guard house, and then we were committed to prison again, and after we were committed Mr. Wharfin, the Solicitor for the prosecution, said, I don't want to hurt these two poor creatures if I can lay hold of them in London.

Q. Did the town clerk say any thing to you? - No, no more than that.

Q. How long was you in prison? - We were in prison seven weeks.

Q. And you was brought up here by Habeas Corpus? - Yes.

Cooper. When we were committed Mr. Wharfin came round and said, this lad it would be better for him to turn King's evidence, and that would clear him and cast them in London.

Q. Who did you understand Mr. Wharfin to be? - I understood him to be a lawyer in London.

Q. Did he appear to have any concern with Barrett? - He took it in hand to go through with it for him.

Jury. We are perfectly satisfied without going any farther.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

William Barrett was ordered by the court to be committed for perjury.

Reference Number: t17940917-5

464. JAMES RAINBOW , THOMAS BIGGETT WILLIAM RIDLEY , HENRY TODD , and WILLIAM BERRY were indicted for that they, with divers evil disposed persons, to the number of twenty or more, whose names are unknown, unlawfully, riotously and tumultuously on the 20th of August , with force and arms, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, did assemble together to the disturbance of the public peace, and that being so assembled together, unlawfully and fe

loniously did begin to pull down the dwelling house of John Wheeler .

The indictment opened by Mr. Raine, and the case by Mr. Attorney General.

JOHN WHEELER sworn.

I live at the Old Sash, Middle Moorfields . About half past ten, the 20th of August, at night, my house was shut up; a Mr. Hansel, a constable, came and knocked at the door, and he told me the rioters were coming to my house; I let Mr. Hansel in.

Q. When you had let Mr. Hansel into your house, was the door shut again? - The inner door was, and the outer door was on the jar. He desired me, if I had got any property, to take care of it; I went up stairs and I laid my hand on a little writing desk, and Mr. Hansel called out again, and said, for God's sake make haste, for here they are; with that my wife took the child out of the bed, wrapped up in a blanket, and ran off; I followed, went down immediately with this desk under my arm; then I made my best escape out at the door, and by this time the bricks were flung in at the windows.

Q. Which way did you go out, at the back part of the house or the front? - There is only one door to the house, the front. When I came out at the front door, the prisoner at the bar, of the name of Berry, was there, and a shorter one, and the rest of the mob were situated opposite to the pile of bricks, at the front of the house; I suppose when I first came out, there might be twenty or more.

Q. Was it as soon as you came out of the door that you saw Berry and the other? - It was immediately; they were rather within the door; I was going out at the door as they were coming in.

Q. Did they go into the house beyond your situation? - I did not stop to see; then the other took me by the collar, and asked me if I was not a crimp?

Q. Can you point him out amongst the prisoners? - He is not in custody.

Q. How near was Berry to you at the time he collared you and asked you this question? - Not a yard from me; there was just room for me to pass between. I went immediately to a friend's house with this desk.

Q. What answer did you give him? - I told him I was no crimp.

Q. Did any thing more pass in the passage between you and that man that had hold of you, and Berry? - Nothing more.

Q. Then you was anxious to get out of the house? - I made the best of my way to a friend.

Q. Tell me what you observed when you got out of the house? - They were slinging in brick bats through the windows.

Q. How were they behaving themselves, quietly or otherwise? - They were in a riotous manner, hallooing out, this is the house! this is the house! d-mn him, we will kill him, if we can find him, or something to that purpose.

Q. Was that the language of this party of people so assembled? - It was. They were joined at last by two hundred at least, in about fifteen minutes.

Q. Where did you go to when you had escaped from your house? - I went to a neighbour's house, of the name of Cocket, in Mulberry-court, about one hundred and fifty yards from my own door, up an alley; then I returned back to my wife's mother, to see if my wife and child were safe; they had got out of the house before I had.

Q. Did you leave any other persons in the house when you came away? - The maid was in bed, and the lodger and the boy; that was all the people that were in the house.

Q. When you returned from this neighbour's house, did the neighbour go with you or any body else? - The neighbour was not at home; I gave the box to his lodger to take care of it. I returned by myself; the light horse association had been there, and were there; I got into my house before they went away.

Q. Tell me how soon after your return to the spot, you got into your house? - I suppose in about five minutes.

Q. Did you make any observation on what was passing while you was near the spot, before you went into your house? - I could not, there were a crowd of people flinging at the house, and a great many people in the house spilling of the liquors.

Q. Tell my lord and jury every thing that you observed, when you returned from your neighbour's house. what they were doing, and how they were acting, and how many people appeared to be there? - When I returned there were two hundred, as I said before; when the horse came they drove them all away. I believe there were one or two taken; I don't know which at that time. When the light horse came, they all ran away and hid themselves in the quarters.

Q. Did you go into your house? - I did; but before I went in I met the prisoner Berry, in custody with an officer, about ten yards from the door.

Q. At that time did you know him to be the man that you had seen when you fast attempted to get out from your house? - Yes, I did very well.

Q. Did you say any thing to him about it? - I told him that he was the man that first knocked at the door; it is this nearest to me, I believe; he had a black beard on then, and a brown coat and black hair; I believe that is I cannot swar to him not.

Q. Is there are there that you - There is Rainbow, the man on the right hand, I found him in the cellar the next morning.

Q. But before I get to him, you will inform my lord and jury, what was done to your house? - The windows and shutters were all but to pieces; likewise the window frames, the best part of them, not all, and every thing in the house, of glass or bowls, broke to pieces; there was in the one pair of stairs some of the inner window shutters broke, and likewise the windows, and there were three pannels broke out of the door.

Q. Was any thing done to the outer street door? - No, only the hinges loofened; but the inner door was broke all to pieces.

Q. What do you mean by the inner door? - The door that goes by a pulley, always latched.

Q. Was that below stairs? - Yes.

Q. What was done with the stairs? - Some of the railings were broke, I cannot say how many.

Q. Did you get into your house while any of the people were there? - I did not go in before the officers came and the mob was cleared away.

Q. Was any body in the house but Rainbow when the mob went away? - I did not see him then.

Q. How were the chimney pieces? - The chimney pieces were broke up one pair of stairs, and likewise in the back room.

Q. How long might they have continued in your house doing this sort of business, before they dispersed the first time? - They were about a quarter of an hour, or twenty minutes. I was not in the house five minutes before they returned again.

Q. Had the light horse gone away? - They had.

Q. What number do you think there were this second time? - I cannot say; I

ran away as fast as I could; I ran up to the watch-house, where the light horse were gone.

Q. Had you an opportunity of observing what they were doing at this time? - They went behind the bricks; there was a hole dug out for a foundation, and there were a great many down there. I ran up to the watch-house as fast as I could, and there were the light horse gone up to guard the prisoners to the watch-house.

Q. Had you an opportunity, so as to speak to your own knowledge, how long they might be in the second attack? - I went up to the watch-house, and told them the rioters were doing more mischief than they were before; they came down again as soon as I could make them sensible, and dispersed the mob again.

Q. Did you come back again with him? - I came back with the constable; there were a great many in the house, and they cried out, there is the horse coming again, and they rushed out again; I see them slinging the bricks, but I could not distinguish one from the other; they were soon dispersed, we searched the house, but we could find nobody in it.

Q. Did any thing more happen to you that night? - Nothing more happened that night? - Nothing more happened that night, till the next morning.

Q. What was the state of your liquor and other articles of that kind, that you might have in your house? - What was in the bar was spilt, four cags of spirits, a dozen of white wine, &c.

Q. Did they meddle with your cellar? Not at all, only Rainbow tumbled over a cask of are, that he might got behind it.

Q. Did your wife come home again that night? - No, not till the next morning.

Q. Did you lay in your house yourself? - I set up with a lodger that was in the house, and a boy, and two or three of the officers of the night; there was one of the name of Lipthorpe.

Q. Carry your attention back to the time you saw a man in the charge of a constable, and you challenged him with being the man that you saw in your house, when you first came out; who was that officer that had got that man? - Harper.

Q. Now, Mr. Wheeler, I will ask you about Rainbow; did you see any thing of him in the course of that night? - Not at all.

Q. When was it you first discovered he was in your house? - About seven o'clock in the morning.

Court. What part of the house was he in? - In the cellar.

Q. He had been there all night, I suppose? - He told me he was pushed down by the mob, the last night.

Q. Did you find him out by going into the cellar yourself, or by hearing any noise? - It was the maid went down into the cellar to draw some beer, about seven o'clock; she is not here; the boy is here; she came running out of the cellar, and said, there is a man in the cellar; I see him coming up the stairs of the cellar.

Q. What did you say to him, or he to you? - I asked him what brought him there? He told me he was pushed down by the mob, the last night; I asked him his name? he would not tell me; then I asked him his business? he said he was a razor grinder; I desired him to sit down, and I desired the people of the house to take care of him, while I went for a constable; but he did not know I was gone. I did not talk to him any more.

Q. What did you say about a cask being overturned? - That was where he hid himself in the cellar.

Q. How was the cask overturned? - There were three casks, two, and one on the other two.

Q. Were they empty? - No.

Q. What were the contents? - Ale. There was a partition in the cellar, and by his turning over the partition he overturned the casks; the partition had been made on account of the water coming into the cellar, and in order to hide himself, this cask was overturned.

Q. Then when you had provided an officer, I suppose, Rainbow was taken into custody? - Yes. During the time I was gone, there were a number of people came to the house, and he got into the front room, and said, that he was kidnapped.

Q. Did you hear that? - I did not. I went when the constable came, with Rainbow to the watch-house.

Q. Can you speak to seeing either of the men at the bar about your premises that night? - I can only say to him in the black hair, to the best of my knowledge, that is Berry.

Q. Was that man that you saw in the hands of Harper, the same man that you had seen in your house before, with the person that collared you? - He was, to the best of my knowledge.

Mr. Knapp. I will ask you a question or two. From the deplorable state of your mind, I should think on such an accident, that you was a good deal confused? - I was.

Q. Very much flurried? - I was.

Mr. Fielding. Was you able to account for this attack being made on your house? - I did not know of it four minutes before it happened.

Q. Was you able to guess at any cause why they should attack your house? - Not in the least; I never expected it.

Mr. Knapp. We had got to the length of your acknowledging that you was in a considerable flutter of mind, very much distressed? - It was enough to make me so.

Q. I think so too; that makes it more likely you should not recollect the persons of the people? - That man, Berry, I took particular notice of.

Q. What time of night was this? - It might want about a quarter to eleven.

Q. It was dark, I take it for granted? - It was.

Court to Wheeler. Look attentively at all the five men; examine them at your leisure; tell us who it is that you suppose to be Berry? - I cannot say now; this is Berry in the green coat; I would not wish to swear to him now; I cannot.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn.

I am one of the officers belonging to Worship-street, near Shoreditch Church; I was at the Sash public house after the prisoners were secured. I secured Berry.

Q. Who is Berry? - That black complexioned one in the green coat and yellow waistcoat. I took him after the gentlemen horsemen had been there, and before they came in. I was surrounded with the mob, for I was near the man's house.

Q. What time of the night was it you came to the house? How soon after the mob being collected? - Very soon after.

Q. What were they doing when you came to the house, before the light horse came there? - They were tearing the house to pieces, and some of them in the house, breaking the windows; but who they were in the house, or did it, I don't know indeed.

Q. How many do you think there were in the whole? - A great number, and they were like lions, they roared like lions, and extremely riotous.

Q. How many do you think there were? - I dare say there was a hundred; I cannot positively tell.

Q. You say the light horse came and dispersed part of the mob? - Yes, they did.

Q. Was that before or after you apprehended Berry? - The light horse had been there and dispersed part of the mob, and I myself was then released from the mob, for I was before surrounded with them; then I withdrew from the door a little way; I was nearer to the door of the Sash public house before; and when I thought the mob was pretty well dispersed, I then went towards the Sash again; there were a great many people there then; I got pretty near the sash to the mob, and I saw the prisoner Berry, come from the mob; I says to him, what have you been at? I really don't know what answer he gave me; but I told him, seeing him come from that mob, he should go with me to the watch-house; and in taking him along from there to take him to the watch-house, I met Mr. Wheeler.

Q. What dress was the prisoner in at that time? - In a working dress; not as he is now. Mr. Wheeler came up to him, and said, I will swear that is the first man that entered my house; the prisoner declared that he was in bed, and he got out of his own bed to join the mob; I asked Mr. Wheeler to aid and assist me; and we took him to the watch-house, and there we secured him; that is all I know of Berry; I know no harm the young man did, because I never see him do any thing.

Mr. Knapp. We are pretty well ac- quainted with you in this Court? - O yes!

Q. At this time, you say, the young man did nothing? - I did not see him.

Q. You are certain as to his answer, that he got out of bed to join the mob? - He told me so.

Q. How long have you been an officer of justice? - Eighteen years.

Q. Did not you think it odd he should tell you so? - So it was; I had not time to think about it.

Q. Ay, but you have thought of it since, pretty much? - I cannot give you any other answer; so it was.

Q. Now try your hand a little in answering this question; might not be say that he was called out of his bed on the alarm of fire, and how that he had got into this mob where he supposed the fire was? - Upon my oath, he did not, nor nothing like it; but the very words that I have expressed.

Q. So that the words you have expressed was fact, and his being called out of bed was not true? - Not that I know of.

Q. Have you not heard it? - No, I never saw him before to my knowledge; I saw him the night that I took him and put him in the watch house, and I know that the man that I see the next morning was the very man, and that the man that stands there, is the very man that I took.

Q. Then you mean to swear to the jury that you never knew him before this night? - I did not.

WILLIAM BLACKITER sworn.

I am a peace officer belonging to Worship-street police office. I was in Moorfields watch-house, Wednesday, the 20th of August, about ten o'clock.

Q. Was you called out from thence? - I was not; Mr. Hansel and I went out together, to go to Mr. Wheeler's; we got there about half past ten; I called to Mr. Wheeler; and Mr. Wheeler came to me, and I observed the house all quiet, and nothing broke; when I went in I told Mr. Wheeler to get any thing

that he had of any property to take it away, because I heard the mob were coming to his house; with that Mrs. Wheeler came down with the child in her lap and went away; I went out with Mrs. Wheeler, but another officer conducted her away with the child; I went back again to fetch Mr. Wheeler, about half past ten, it was all in about three or four minutes; when I returned I called out to Mr. Wheeler, why don't you come down, they are all a coming; just as we came out at the door, Mr. Wheeler had a little desk in his arm, as he came out at the door, one was in long clothes, and the other in short clothes, in a waistcoat.

Q. Did you know the man? - It is this man in blue; I believe his name is Todd, I believe; but I was so bad the next day that I fainted away.

Q. Do you know the other? - I don't recollect the other. The other man said to Mr. Wheeler as he came out, here comes a crimp; I said, he is no crimp; then he says, d-mn you, you are a crimp; and I turned away to look for some of my fellow servants, and I had my staff in my hand, and I held my staff this way, and I turned about to look for some of my brother officers that I expected from the watch-house, and I had not gone ten yards from the door, when I was knocked down with a brick bat.

Q. Do you know who threw that brick bat? - I thought it was Todd, because I saw nobody behind me but Todd; I was quite flunned with the fall, and I catched hold of a man behind me by his apron, and it happened to be Todd, and I pulled myself up by him, and I laid my head over his shoulder, and I had a cutlass in my pocket, and the handle of it came out, and they said, d-mn his eyes, he is a crimp, he has got a cutlass.

Q. Was that man at all active in the riot? - I did not see him active at all, only he was in the riot.

Q. When you had raised yourself from the ground what followed? - I had hold of him, and he cried out he is a crimp.

Q. That man that you laid hold of, was the man that came into Wheeler's house? - He was, and I saw nobody behind me; in a minute's time they all came flocking about the house, a great crowd, and the windows were all knocked out.

Q. How many do you suppose there were? - I was not sensible, because I was knocked down the second time and carried away.

Q. When you had raised yourself from the ground, by taking hold of his apron, what followed then? - Another man with a white jacket came and gave me a blow upon my head, which brought me to the ground senseless; then I could do no more; I was carried to the watch-house; in a short time he was brought to the watch-house.

Q. Were any other persons brought there? - Yes, Mr. Harper brought a man there, and that was the man that came first up to Wheeler's house.

Q. Besides that man that Harper brought, what other man came? - The next man that was brought was Todd; I thought I knew him, that is the man, I believe that cut me.

Q. Had you any doubt that that was the man that you had had the scuffle with? - I could not tell; I said, at the time, that was the man that cut me.

Mr. Const. You have told us that when Todd was brought to the watch-house, that you even then could not tell exactly whether he was the same man or not? - Not exactly; I said he was the man; I got up and could hardly stand, and I said then, here is the man.

Q. In short you was very much hurt? - I was.

Q. And although you have been in this employment a number of years, yet

you was so much affected that even the next day you fainted away, when the matter came on again? - I did.

Q. You say likewise there were at least two men dressed in the same way you have described, and it is natural enough that at that time of night you could not distinguish one man from another, but all that you speak of with tolerable certainty, is, that if it was Todd that served you so, he permitted you to rest on his shoulder, to support yourself? - It is so.

Court. Do you take on yourself to swear that you do or do not know the man positively? - I do not.

Mr. Const. Although you did at the magistrate's say, on your first impression, you cannot keep to that positive evidence, but you have since altered your opinion? - And I desired the constable to look at his jacket, to see whether there was any blood on it, and there was not.

GEORGE SLATER sworn.

I am a headborough; I was called out on the 20th of August, about ten o'clock, I got up and went out; I was told there was a riot in Old-street Road; when I got to the Lying-in Hospital, I was informed that the mob had gone up the City-road; we went to Mr. Wheeler's house with the guard, or at least with the volunteers; they drew up in front of the house, I did not go into the house, but the first person I see come out of the house was a servant of Mr. Wheeler's; I took him by the collar and asked him what he did there? I was informed he was the servant of the house; I then let him go. The next person I saw was Todd, the prisoner at the bar, in the blue coat.

Q. What was he doing? - I did not see him acting; he opened the door to come out of Mr. Wheeler's house, he shut the door after him, and I took him into custody, and took him to the watch-house.

Q. Did you see any person in the way to the watch-house, that you had any conversation with at all? - Some person assisted, but who it was, I do not know.

Q. Did you see Mr. Wheeler at all? - I did not see him at all till the examination.

Q. Did you see Todd do any thing at all? - I did not.

Q. Did you see any thing of Rainbow? - I did not.

Q. Did any conversation take place between Rainbow, Todd, and any body in you presence, in the watch-house? - No, except Mr. Blackiter, when I brought him into the watch-house, he got up and said, that is the villain that cut me; his head was bleeding. He was then locked up, and I saw no more.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Slater, you told my lord and gentlemen of the jury, that Todd was not active in the least, that he merely came out of the house, shut the door, and that you laid hold of him; I believe Blackiter, in fact, had fixed on somebody else? - He had, as I was informed.

LAWRENCE SMITH sworn.

Q. Look at these five men and see if you know either of them? - I cannot say that I can swear to any one of them.

Q. Is there any one there that you think you can speak to on your belief? - I cannot swear to any one of them.

JOHN DICKSON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Wheeler.

Q. Do you recollect on the 10th of August the prisoner Rainbow being taken at your master's house? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember hearing him say any thing while your master was gone for a constable? - He came out of the

kitchen and went into the parlour, and he spoke out to the people that were round the door, and said that he had been chained in the cellar all night.

Q. By whom he did not mention any body's name, he said they wanted to kidnap him for a soldier.

Q. Did he say who? - He did not.

Q. Did he say how he came to the house? - He seemed to say how the mob shoved him down the cellar.

Q. Where is the cellar, is the door outside of the house? - The cellar door is inside of the house.

DANIEL WEBB sworn.

I am a constable, I went to the Sash in Moorfields, on the 20th of August, about nine o'clock in the evening, two men, I believe they were Irishmen, went by my door, they said there was some rioting in Shoe-lane; I went up to the office in Worship-street first, from there I went along with two or three officers down to the watch house in Moorfields, and staid there for some time, it may be part of an hour, we stood on the steps, and we heard some people coming along Moorfields, and hallooing out, hurra, the old Sash! the old Sash! we were not sufficient to cope with them, being only three of us in number; there were twenty or thirty went down with the first gang, down by the watch-house, for the public house; almost immediately after that, there were forty or fifty in a gang came along, there were numbers continually going down for a good while; the officers were more got together, and I, and Mr. Harper, and Mr. Armstrong went down, and got near the house, the mob turned on us, and drove us all back, just as we were drove back the horse association came, they went down, and turned themselves before the door, and we went down with them, as soon as I got to the door, I called out for a light, the lights were all out in the house at that time, a gentleman that lives near brought me two or three candles, there were two of the gentlemen got off their horses, and went to the door, but whether they went in I cannot say; I went into the house, and I took this Thomas Biggett in the passage, him in the red hair, in the passage of the house, just at the bottom of the stairs almost; I took him to the watch-house, the corner of Finsbury-square, and had him locked up in the lock-up-house, then I returned down to the Sash.

Q. When you took him, did he go readily with you? - He said he would resign himself to me, and go peaceably; then I went back to the Sash, and went with Mr. Wheeler, the landlord, over the greatest part of the house, and there were the window shutters broke very much to pieces, and some of the inside broke; I asked Mr. Wheeler whether he would go into the cellar? poh, poh, says he, there is nobody in the cellar; when I came out Mrs. Holder calls out, for God's sake come this way, she said there is a person in the yard, there was the prisoner Ridley, the middle one, in the yard; Mrs. Holder asked me to take charge of him. I replied, I am not an officer, and therefore I don't know that I can take charge, but I will take him to the watch-house safe; before I took him out of the yard I observed he had but one shoe on, I asked him how he came to have but one shoe only? he observed to me that he had lost the shoe on the top of the tiles, the tiles of the shed.

Q. How near is the shed to Mr. Wheeler's? - I cannot say, the shed is between the two houses, as near as I can tell.

Court. If I understand you right, the prisoner Ridley was in Mr. Wheeler's yard? - No, in the yard of Mr. Holder, the next door but one or two; I asked him how he came over there? he observed that he had got a fore leg, and the horses

came down so fast, he was afraid they would hurt his leg.

Q. Did he say how he got into that yard? - He said he got over the tiles, for fear his legs should be hurted by the horses.

Mr. Const. With respect to Ridley, the yard that he was taken in, was Mr. Holder's? - He was in Mr. Holder's yard.

Q. Therefore you know nothing at all of it, no more than what you heard from Mr. Holder? - Nothing at all.

Q. That is a house or two from the Sash? - It is so.

Q. Do you know that there is a narrow passage next Mr. Holder's? - There is.

Q. You have said that in the account he gave you of his having lost one of his shoes, that he had a sore leg? - He did.

Q. Did not he tell you that his shoes was slip shod? - No, he did not, he said that coming to see what was the matter, he heard the house coming down.

Q. That he must have heard in the street? - Yes.

Q. And the reason he gave for going away, was for fear the horses should hurt his leg? - It was.

Q. And that in making his escape, he went down this passage, and he got on the tiles to secure himself from the crowd? - I did not hear that.

Q. These tiles adjoins this passage? - No, not on the passage side, they are on the other.

Mr. Knapp. All you know about Biggett, is that he readily agreed to go with you? - He did, in the passage.

Mr. Knowlys. In the passage you described to be next to the stair case? - He was just at the stair case before he came to the tap-room.

CHARLES ALEXANDER CRAIG sworn.

I belong to the board of works, I went to this house to examine it.

Q. Was Mr. Wheeler there with you? - He was, the whole time; many of the sashes were broke to pieces, of course the glass; in the one pair of stairs front room, two of the pannels of the front shutters are broke, and likewise of the door leading to the stairs; the stone mantle of the chimney piece is broke in three, that of the back room is broke in two; on the landing of the stair case, on the second pair of stairs floor, there are six turned ballusters removed, and in the flight thence to the one pair of stairs, there are two and part of a third, and two on the one pair of stairs floor.

Q. Should you or should you not have any doubt to say that this house was began to be demolished? - I have not the least doubt in the world.

Mr. Fielding to Wheeler. You have heard of the circumstances spoken of by Mr. Craig? - I have.

Q. Was your house in compleat order before that time? - It was.

Q. All these things were done by the mob? - They were.

JOHN ROBINS sworn.

I am a goldsmith; this man Ridley has worked for me these twenty years, he was first an errand boy, from an errand boy I took him apprentice; I live No. 13, Clerkenwell-green, he is the best of characters, I could trust him with the best of property I have, he is a very hard working man; the very day this affair happened, he had his breakfast and dinner at my shop, I see him about a quarter before eight, when he left my shop; he is a married man with five children; he is one of the best men I ever had in my life.

JOHN LATHAM sworn.

I live at No. 8, Paul's-alley, Red Cross-street, I work in the same shop with Ridley; he went to work with me in the morning at six o'clock, I came away at my dinner time, which is one o'clock, and I left him, when I went back at two I found him there, at night when we

came away together, it was dark, about a quarter before eight at night we went home, he lives No. 8, Paul's-alley, I lodge with him, in the same house.

Q. How long was you in this house? - I staid at his house, and he said he was going to the George public house, to get a pint of beer, this was the same night, about a quarter before eight o'clock.

Q. Who keeps the house? - Mr. Bridgewater.

Q. Did you go with him? - I did not.

HENRY BRIDGEWATER sworn.

I keep the George public house, Paul's-alley; on the night of the 20th of August, Ridley came there, it might be eight, or between eight and nine, he staid there till half past ten, he had two or three pints of beer, I know not exactly, but thereabouts.

Q. Do you know what time the riot was on that night? - I know not, I only know that some person came in, I was very busy in my business, Ridley was then in my house, a person came in and said, there was a mob of people, I think, going along Barbican.

Q. Was it after that time he went out of your house, it was about half past ten.

Q. I don't know whether you know what became of him afterwards? - I only heard him say that he would see what was the matter.

Q. That was the way he conducted himself? - It was, he went merely out of curiosity, and it was a customary thing for him to come after work into my house, he bears an excellent character in the neighbourhood, a very honest sober and good neighbour, a man of a large family and decent family.

HENRY JOHN LYNES sworn.

I live at No. 15, Paul's-alley.

Q. Do you remember Ridley's being at the George on the 20th of August? - I was in there, and left him there about twenty minutes or half after ten, says I, Billy, I am going home to bed, says he so am I.

Q. Had you any doubt of his sincerity when he said he would go home? - No, none at all in the least.

The prisoner Ridley also called two more witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

The prisoner Todd called ten respectable witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

The prisoner Berry called nine respectable witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

The prisoner Rainbow called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Biggett called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

JOHN GLANDFIELD sworn.

My father is a wine and brandy merchant in St. Martins-le-grand.

Q. Who do you come to speak for? - For Henry Todd , he was at our house till ten o'clock, on the night of the 20th of August, just as he turned the corner to leave our house the watchman was going past ten.

Q. When was this? - The night before he was taken up.

Q. How long did he stay at your house? - About ten minutes.

Mr. Fielding. Whereabouts is your father's house? - No. 17, the corner of Old Round-court, St. Martins-le-grand.

All Five Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-6

465. MARY ROBBINS , MARY LILLY , and CATHA-RINE ADAMSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , in the dwelling house of Sarah Taylor , a metal watch, value 2l. a cornelian seal set in gold, value 10s. a steel watch chain, value 2d. three guineas; a leather pocket book, value 1d. a bill of exchange for twenty-eight pounds fifteen shillings, another bill of exchange for twelve pounds four shillings, and another bill of exchange for seventeen pounds eight shillings and four-pence, the goods, monies and notes , of Frederic Staheschmidt .

FREDERIC STAHESCHMIDT sworn.

I know the prisoners, I passed by their house some time in the evening, they asked me if I would not treat them with something? accordingly I went into the house, and sent for something; I live in St. Giles's in the East; I am a sugar broker; it was the house of Sarah Taylor, neither of these prisoners, it was the 26th of May, the house was in East Smithfield; as I past the house the two youngest of the prisoners, Mary Robbins and Catharine Adamson were at the door.

Q. You went in considering them as women of the town? - I did.

Q. How long did you stay in the house? - Five or six minutes, there was a great many people besides these prisoners in the house, some men; to my best recollection it was between nine and ten in the evening; when I came out of the house, I found I had lost my watch and money mentioned, the pocket book and the bills in it.

Q. How long have you been in England? - About eight or nine years.

Q. Then you are not a stranger to the custom of the town? - No.

Q. What money did you lose? - Three or four guineas.

Q. What was your watch worth? - About three or four pounds.

Q. What was in your pocket book? - The three bills of exchange. The next morning an officer and I went to the house, and there we found the pocket book on a kind of a dining table, the watch and money was not to be found.

Q. Were the notes in the pocket book? - Yes.

Q. Was it in the room you had been in the night before? - The very same room; there was besides the prisoners, a great many men, as well as women in the house.

Q. Then you cannot swear that either of the prisoners were the persons that took the things? - No, I cannot.

Q. And you did not find any thing on any of these prisoners, only in the room? - No.

Q. Who was the officer that was with you? - Robert Dawson .

All three Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-7

466. MICHAEL MITCHELL was indicted for that he, on the 24th of January , on John Collings , an officer of the excise , on shore, in the due execution of his duty, in seizing for our Lord the King, four gallons of spirituous liquors, liable to be seized, unlawfully and violently did make an assault, and hinder, obstruct, and oppose him against the form of the statute, and against the King's peace .

Indicted in a second COUNT, for the like offence, only omitting to charge the seizure.(The indictment opened by Mr. Knowlys, and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

JOHN COLLINGS sworn.

I was supervisor of the excise at Lewes, in Sussex. On the 24th of January, my being a supervisor, I had been to a little town called Huckford , and I was preceeding from thence to Welldon , and as I passed on, I was on horse back, I saw two men in a field, with each of them a pair of tubs on their back, slung together with cords, across their shoulders, on which I called to them, and told them to sling them on the ground, that I should seize them; on which they ran a little distance, and threw them on the ground and withdrew a few paces, having each of them in their hands a very large stick, nearly as big as a common man's wrist, and I should think about four feet long, I knew one of them, Michael Mitchell, the man at the bar, I had seen him many times before, I knew him perfectly well; on which I asked them what the casks contained? I do not recollect that he made me any answer what was in the cask; on which I perceived one of them, not the prisoner, drawing round behind me, and I had a small sword in my hand, and with which I struck on one of the casks, in order to stave it, to satisfy myself perfectly what liquor was in it, and could not the first time, and I saw then a peg in one of the casks, which had been bored, I suppose in order that they might drink a little, to refresh themselves by the way; on my stopping down to pull out the peg out of this cask, in order to prove the quality of the liquor, to make the seizure, they immediately struck me with both their hands with these large sticks on my head; I was obliged to strike the cask the second time before I could stave it, and the li

quor rushed out in a very violent manner, by the time I had done this I had received several violent blows on my head, and across my arm, on which I said to the prisoner, do you mean to murder me? and I attempted to run, and fell to the ground, and they continued beating me in that manner across the head, and I put my arms over my head laying on the ground, I attempted to get up three times, and did get up on my feet three times, and I was scarcely up but what I received blows that I fell to the ground again; on which I entreated them not to murder me, in the most supplicating manner I could, and I thought they said, when I was laying on the ground, d-mn him, it is too good for him, and they continued beating me till I was quite senseless, and I laid some time in that manner, and when I came to myself I began to get up, I put my hand up to my eyes and found the blood, and I had two or three cuts in my head, cuts three or four inches; it is impossible for me to describe what I suffered on that occasion, I attempted to rise, and I perceived the prisoners at a distance, I thought they were turning towards me, on which I got on my feet, and made the best of my way to a little house, not far from the place, where a Mrs. French resides, on which I prayed the woman to let me in, for the door was fast, she looked out of the window, and said, who are you? - I told her my name was Collings, that I was a supervisor, and how I had been used, and she admitted me into the house, which I was like to saint going in, and had liked to fall against the wall when the woman opened the door; when she let me in to the best of my recollection, she first got a chair for me, and afterwards she got a bed down, and threw it on the floor, and I laid on that bed the remainder of that evening, when I was carried up stairs by two or three gentlemen farmers in the neighbourhood, I was quite unable to move my hand, or stand upon my feet; I was in that situation, suffering most excruciating pain for four days, before the doctor would permit me to be removed home to my own house, at Lewes; my arms were dreadfully bruised indeed, so that I have not the use of this hand to this day, a bone was broke in this hand.

Q. How long was it after you got to Lewis before you was capable of pursuing your business? - Upwards of nine weeks.

Q. Are you sure that is the man? - I have not the least doubt but that is the man, if I was to die to morrow; when I arrested him it was at a little cottage, at his own house, and the man seemed very much alarmed, and screamed exceedingly, I said to him, Mich, how could you think of using a fellow creature as you did me; on which he said, I am very sorry for it, I have had no peace of mind ever since, the other began first, or else I should not have done it, you know I was running away.

Jury. You say you fell, was the prisoner at the bar the man that struck you after that? - A great many times, I had so many blows that I cannot remember, I was black entirely from head to foot, I was all over bruises.

Prisoner. I am very sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned two years in the House of Correction .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before

Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940917-8

467. JAMES RUNNIGS, otherwise PENDEGRAST was indicted for that he, on the 19th of July , nine pieces of false counterfeit milled money and

coin, each and every of them counterfeited, to the likeness of the milled money and silver coin of a good shilling, and thirty-three pieces of false counterfeit milled money and silver coin to the likeness of a good six-pence, the same not being then cut in pieces, unlawfully and feloniously did put off to one Isaac Page , at a lower rate and value than the said counterfeit and milled money did import to be for, that is to say, for half a guinea .(The case opened by Mr. Fielding.)

ISAAC PAGE sworn.

On the 18th of July last I went to the sign of the Plume of Feathers, King-street, Seven Dials , one Mr. Mullein keeps the house, and I called for the pint of porter, when I had called for the pint of porter, I asked Mr. Mullein if Mr. Pendegrast was there?

Q. Did you see Pendegrast at that time? - I did, he asked me what I wanted? I told him I wished he could accommodate me with a packet of whites; says he, who informed you that I deal in them? says I, I am recommended by a person that keeps a public house in Monmouth-court; says he, was you at my house this morning? I said, no, but I told him I had been at that public house, and I would wish to be accommodated with half a packet of whites, for I was going into the country the next day, and that might be the means perhaps of paying my expences; he asked me then what I wanted? I told him to let me have some six-pences; he said he had none then, but he should have some the next morning, for he should have plenty then, but he had none at that present time; of course the next morning I went, when I came there I asked the landlord whether Mr. Pendegrast was there? he desired me to set down, that he expected Mr. Pendegrast would be there soon, I sat down, and had a pint of ale, during the time I sat there his daughter came, as the landlord told me she was, but she has denied it since; after I had been there some time the landlord told me I might go into the parlour; I did not see Mr. Pendegrast that morning at all, I saw him the same Saturday night at half after eight; I went there again on Saturday evening, and he said, I thought you was gone into the country; no, says I, I thought I might as well have another half packet as not, if you can accommodate me with it, I had had some before that morning of the daughter, as they said, but it will not prove to be so; her name is Hannah Donniagton ; then he takes me to a back parlour, or kitchen, and his wife and this Hannah Donnington seemed to be there drinking tea together, and they asked me if I would have a dish of tea? and I refused, and he said to his wife, have you got any of them there? and she produced some of this sort of money, and he counted out three and thirty sixpences, and nine shillings, for which I gave him half a guinea, here is the parcel I purchased of him for one half guinea, his spouse then said, the gentleman has been an extraordinary customer to us to day, having laid out a guinea with us, suppose we treat him with something to drink, and he took me to the bar, and treated me with a glass of rum, I parted with him at that time, and I went and informed my brother officers of it, and they came and took him into custody immediately.

Jury. Did you receive this parcel from the prisoner himself? - I did, from no other person but himself.

Mr. Knowlys. What are you? - I keep the sign of the Three Pidgeons, in Long-alley, I have kept it nine months, I have been a master tradesman for fifteen years in the hat way.

Q. You never was in the employ of one of the keepers of one of the prisons? - Never.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with one of these officers? - Ten or a dozen years.

Q. Is this the first piece of business you did for them? - Yes, the very first of that sort; I never was in their company no otherwise than as an extra officer, and to do my duty.

Q. I think these things must take you a great deal from your employ of keeping a public house? - No, I was on my duty in this business.

Q. This public house is not the only way you get your living? - No, I get a deal more in my own hat trade.

Q. Whose custody has these pieces been in since? - In my custody.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn.

I am an officer, I went with Page, Harper, Ray, and Mr. Harper's son, we went to a public house in St. Giles's, and we waited there all but Page, until Page came back to us, and told us he had bought some whites, and then we went in company together to the Plume of Feathers, in King-street, Seven Dials, a public house, and I says to Page, point out the man; and he pointed the prisoner out, without his hat, from a number that were present, Harper being close along side of me, I said, I have a warrant to take you into custody, I am a king's officer; we took him into custody, and conveyed him to a coach, I did not search him, Harper did.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn.

I am an officer, I was of this party, in apprehending the man, I did not search him in the house, there were several people in the house, and we were glad to have him out of the house, I did not search him till I got him to prison, there I searched him; when I came to the prison gates, I believe the gates were open, and my son was in the coach with me, he went out of the coach first, and the prisoner at the bar next, there was another prisoner in the coach, a woman, that we took from the same house, and she had a young child, I was careful of getting the poor woman out of the coach, on account of the child, and thereby the man, the prisoner at the bar, was inside of the gates before I was out with the woman, and when I got inside of the gates, I saw the prisoner at the bar shoving his hands behind him, at the same time one of the turnkeys was close to him, I says to the turnkey, what is that fellow a shoving? I says to him, if you do any thing that is wrong I will get you punished for it, as sure as you are born; I then takes the turnkey and prisoner at the bar both into the lodge, to the candle, I laid hold of the turnkey's hand, and in the turnkey's hand were all these shilling and six-pences, seventy-five six-pences, and one shilling; I then searched the prisoner; on his right hand side breeches pocket, there were eighteen or nineteen guineas in gold, I believe, I am not quite sure, and four half guineas, and I think a twenty pounds bank note, and I found about three shilling and six-pence good money in his waistcoat pocket; as I was not searching for good money or bank notes, all the money was put into the hands of the keeper of the prison, by his desire; after my searching him, my son, who is not an officer, was there, and he got these halfpence from him.

Mr. Knowlys. On the person of this man you did not find even a single piece bad? - Not to my knowledge.

- sworn.

I am one of the turnkeys of the New Prison; the coach came up to the door, and young Mr. Harper came out and the prisoner, I saw the prisoner go behind the door and put something down, I went

to him and took something up, and Harper came to take it out of my hand, he put it down behind the door, behind a box; I have never seen it since Harper had it from me in the lodge.

Q. Did he put it down on the ground? - No, on the table, Harper said, what has he been doing there? I said, he has put down this; he said, give it me; I said, I would not, come to the light and I will give it you; and I went into the lodge and gave it him there.

Harper. This is the bundle I took from this man's hand.

Mr. Knowlys to the Turnkey. It was very dark? - I believe it was.

Q. You did not see him put it down? - I see him put something down.

Q. And you told the officer immediately of it? - Mr. Harper came in, and I told him what I had got was in my hand.

Q. Did you tell him so directly, remember Harper is in hearing? - He asked me to give it him, and I said, come to the light and I will give it to you.

Q. Recollect he has been examined before? - Yes, but what I speak is truth.

Q. Then perhaps what he speaks is not true, did you give him in an account directly? - I did as soon as possible I could.

Q. Was not there a complaint made by Harper at the office, that you had refused to give him the money? - As soon as he came to the light I gave it him.

SAMUEL HARPER , junior, sworn.

Pendegraft and I went in first inside of the gates, and I went out to see if my father was coming in with the woman, and when I looked in again, Pendegraft and the turnkey were up in one corner, when my father came in he said to the turnkey, what is that he has given to you? he said, he had given him nothing; my father said, I insist that you have some thing, and if you don't give it me I will get you punished; he then made answer and said, come along in, meaning to the lodge, I have got something; I see my father take the sixpences out of his hand, and I saw Pendegraft, the prisoner, in the mean time chuck this paper under a chair in the lodge, I went immediately and took them up, and they proved to be halfpence, which I gave to my father.

Harper, senior. These are the same I received from my son.

Armstrong. (Shewn the shilling and six-pences which Page had of the prisoner for the half guinea.) They are all bad, and such as pass every day in the town.

Mr. Knowlys. Has any one of them at all the appearance of being milled at the edges? - No, I do not observe that.

Mr. Knowlys moved the court that the allegations in the indictment, in avering that the crime was for counterfeiting milled money was not sustained, which point the court saved for the opinion of the judges.

GUILTY

Judgement respited

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-9

468. HANNAH DONNINGTON was indicted for that she, on the 19th of July , eight pieces of false and counterfeit milled money, each and every one of them, counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, and twenty-four piece of false, counterfeit milled money, each and every one of them counterfeited to the likeness of a good six-pence, the same not being cut in pieces, unlawfully and feloniously did put off to one Isaac Page, at a lower rate then the same counterfeit and milled mo

ney did import to be for, that is to say, for half a guinea .(The indictment opened by Mr. Treheck, and the case opened by Mr. Fielding.)

ISAAC PAGE sworn.

On the 19th of July last, Saturday morning, at half after eight o'clock in the morning, I went to this public house to meet Mr. Pendegraft according to appointment the day before, I called for a pint of ale and waited for the space of an hour, till I was quite out of patience; I then spoke to the landlord, Mr. Mullein, and he says, you may as well go into the parlor; I went to the parlour, and I told the young woman, whom I understood was doing business for Pendegraft, I should be glad to speak to you, and she came out to me, and I told her what I said to Pendegraft, and she said, I can do nothing just now, I have got no whites, she said she expected Mr. Pendegraft presently, and I went and sat down again, I sat there for the space of half an hour or more, then I went into the parlour and sat there some time with them, where she was very busy serving out this money, there were some score of customers, at last as I was sitting in the parlour, she asked me how many six-pences I would have? I told her I would have as many as she could let me have, I left it to her, I told her I wished to have some of all sorts, and she gave me eight shillings and twenty-four sixpences, and sixty halfpence, and I gave her half a guinea in gold for them.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Page, in the first place did you know the prisoner at the bar before? - Never saw her before.

Q. I believe she is the wife of Pendegraft, don't you know that? - Just as much as you do.

Q. Don't you know that she is the wife of the last prisoner Pendegraft? - No, I do not,

Q. Have you never heard that? - Never in my life time, on my oath.

Q. Don't you know that she is a relation of the last prisoner? - I do not, the landlord said so, but she denied it to me.

Q. She said she could not do any thing till Pendegraft returned? - She did so, but she did do without Mr. Pendegraft coming.

Q. She did not attempt to make any bargain with you till you spoke to her? - By no means.

Q. Therefore you encouraged her to deal in this sort of way? - I did not, the landlord went in to inform her I was there.

Q. You asked her for some whites, and before you asked her she did not attempt to put off any to you? - No, by no means to me, but she did to others, a great many.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I went in company with Page, to King-street, Seven Dials, and I went into the room with Page, he pointed out the prisoner at the bar to me, I see a paper lay before her on the table, instantly as Page said that is the woman, I catched up the paper.

Mr. Knapp here proposed the same objection as Mr. Knowlys on the former trial.

GUILTY. (Aged 19.)

Judgement respited .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-10

468. MARIA EDKINS was indicted for that she, on the 6th of April , being then married and the wife of George Edkins , at St. James's Clerkenwell , feloniously did marry and take to husband William Slark , junior, the said George Edkins , her former husband being then alive .

Indicted in a second COUNT for that she on the 11th of August, in the 29th year of his Majesty's reign by the Name of Maria Jones did marry the said George Edkins , and that being so married afterwards on the 6th of April last, in the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell, feloniously did marry and take to husband James Slark , the said George Edkins, her former husband, being alive.(The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

SAMUEL BRIDE sworn.

I am the parish clerk of St. James's, Westminster; I have the register of the marriage with me of George Edkins and Maria Jones .

Q. Who witnessed that Marriage? - Samuel Bride and Jane Wilson.(Reads the register.)

" George Edkins and Maria Jones , both of this parish, were married by bans this 11th day of August, in the year of our lord 1789, by me, Robert Stainsby, curate. This marriage was solemnized in the presence of Samuel Bride and Jane Wilson ."

Q. You have no memory of the persons, I suppose? - Not the least in the world.

JANE MOORE sworn.

My maiden name was Denbigh, I was afterwards Jane Wilson, and now Jane Moore ; I know the young woman at the bar very well, she was married to George Edkins, in St. James's Church, Piccadilly. I was present at the marriage; that is my name in the book, I will swear to my hand writing.

Q. How came you to be present at the marriage? - The prisoner used to come backward and forwards to where I lodged; I did not know much of her; she went by the name of Maria Jones.

After the marriage where did they go? - They went to one Mrs. Gibblett's; I went with them and drank a glass of wine with them that morning.

Q. When did you see her husband, George Edkins, after that? - I see him about two years ago, in Chapel-street.

Q. When this young woman was apprehended, did you see this George Edkins then? - Yes.

Q. The same man that she married? - Yes. She was apprehended the 29th of August last, and then I went back and see him,and I am sure it was the same man that married her.

Prisoner. I don't know her, I never saw her before that night I was taken up. I would wish to enquire about her character.

Mrs. GIBBLET sworn.

Do you know that young woman at the bar? - Yes; that is the same woman that went by the name of Maria Jones ; she lodged at my house; when she came to my house, she came as a widow, by the name of Jones, and she said she had twenty pounds a year to live on, and worked at her needle besides.

Q. Was she visited at your house by any man of the name of Edkins? - Yes; he came as a music master; I remember their being married; it was on a Tuesday in August; she was a lodger of mine at the time; they came back from the church to my house.

Q. Did the last witness Mrs. Moore, come there? - Yes, and the man came with her, she came into my parlour, and said,Mrs. Gibblet, I have been married, you shall drink a glass of wine with me; and she went up stairs, and brought down a bottle of wine, and we drank together. I have not the least doubt in the world of her having been married.

Q. Have you seen Edkins lately? - I have not seen him.

Q. You was not at the justice's? - I was not.

Prisoner. Did Mrs. Moore come home with me to your house? - Yes, she did, and you went up and fetched a bottle of wine and asked me to drink a glass.

EDWARD PARRY sworn.

I am a schoolmaster in Down-street, Piccadilly; I know the young woman at the bar, I knew her in the Year 1789, by the name of Maria Jones .

Q. Do you know whether she was married at any time or not? - I did not see her married.

Q. Did you go by her directions any where that year? - I went to the church of St. James's by her directions, the day she was to be married to give her away, but she did not come while I waited, and my time was expired at ten o'clock, and I went away and did not see her married.

Q. Did you see her afterwards? - Yes.

Q. How soon did you see her husband? - I never see him till lately.

Q. By what name did she pass after that time that you waited at the church? - By the name of Mrs. Edkins.

JOHN GARTH sworn.

I am parish clerk of St. James's Clerkonwell, I have the register book of the marriages at that parish. (Reads) No. 1600. William Slark , of this Parish, and Ann Maria Wettenhall, of the same, were married in this church by bans, this 6th day of April, in the year of our Lord, 1794, by me Robert Jegan , curate. This marriage was solemnized between us William Slark and Ann Maria Wettenhall, in the presence of John Garth and William Chapel , clerk and sexton. I remember Mr. Slark very well; that is the young man.

WILLIAM SLARK sworn.

Q. Look at the young woman at the bar, was you married to her at any time? - Yes, on the 6th of April last.

Q. Was Edkin's living at that time? - Yes, and living now.

Q. I believe he was living in the same house with her at the time your situation was communicated to your father? - He was, and I have seen him since that, he came down after the examination, to our house, when she was committed, to ask my father where she was.

Q. Was he not at Bow-street when Mrs. Moore had an opportunity of seeing him? - Not that I know.

Mr. Fielding to Mrs. Moore. You went from the magistrate to the house where the search was made, for the papers of this young woman? - I did.

Q. Did you see Edkins there? - Yes, I did; and he took hold of my hand and begged I would not say any thing.

Prisoner to William Slark . Did not you threaten me, and force me to marry you? Did not you say that you would make away with yourself? Yes, my dear, you did, you are my husband.

Slark. I did not do any such thing.

Prisoner. You want that lady with the five thousand pounds fortune, that is all you want. I never have been married but once, and that was at Paris, with Mr.

Wettenhall; I was never married to Edkins. The reason that that woman appears here, is in consequence of an advertisement of so much reward if any body of the name of Wilson would appear. I would be glad to know her character, and how much money she had of Mr. Slark for doing this.

Prisoner to Mrs. Wilson. Pray how much money have you had of Mr. Slark? - None.

Q. How much are you to have? - None.

Q. Pray are you married yourself? - I am.

Prisoner. I never knew Mr. Slark had any thing, and I never asked him for a farthing of any thing, so help me God. And he worried me every day of my life to marry him; I knew he was nothing but an apprentice to his father,and therefore I had no fortune, and I could not marry him for the sake of fortune; and he knew what I was; it was no secret to him.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-11

469. WILLIAM COUSE was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Andrew Primrose , in the dwelling house of a person unknown, on the 9th of July , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, three guineas, his money .

The case opened by Mr. Knapp.

ANDREW PRIMROSE sworn.

I am a hat maker ; I live at present in St. James's street, Piccadilly; I know the prisoner at the bar perfectly well, I have known him five or six years; he has been at my house, and he one time assisted me about three or four hours, in doing a little business, trimming some childrens hats, and he carried them home, and received the money for them. On the 9th of July, I saw him at seven o'clock in the morning, in Covent-garden, he was passing the Hummums, the sash windows was open, there were two gentlemen sitting there, and he said, Sodomites; for God's sake, said I, don't say so, it is dangerous; says he d-mn your blood, what do I care, I will blow up for a sodomite, for half a farthing. Then we walked on as towards Hatton-street, as I was going that way home; and the prisoner said that he would go home along with me, for he must have some money of me; I said, I had none about me; he said, then I must go home for it, and he would go home with me, and if I did not give it him, he would go home and blow me up. I then, through fear, went and obtained three guineas; I thought he might stain my character in calling me a sodomite. I did not go home, I went near home and turned back again, and went to a public house, the Cock, on Snow-hill, that was where he waited, while I went for the three guineas; I did not go home for the three guineas, I went to a friend and borrowed it.

Q. What did he say before you gave him any money? - He said, d-mn your blood, I must have some money; and he told me what he wanted it for, that he was going down to Barnet; he said, he must have the money, or he would say I was a sodomite. I went to Mr. Stevens, a person in the City, for the three guineas, he is not here, he is abroad at present. When I got the three guineas, I went back to the Cock public house, and I found the prisoner there waiting for it and I gave it to him; he said, he would see me again to-morrow, and he would return the money; I told him the consequence of doing what he did; he said,

there would be nobody more hung for extorting money since the affair of judge Buller's son, for he was obliged to run away for bringing the men to trial, or words to that effect. I left him there at that time; I saw him again in about three days, as near as I can recollect; he sent for me to the Globe Tavern, in Hatton-Garden; I went there, and found the prisoner at the bar there; he was in the coffee room; there was nobody else there besides us two; he asked me to fit down; I refused it; he seemed very much offended; he asked me to drink; I refused it, but at last I did drink. He happened to turn his eyes round, and saw my partner at the door, through the glass; he asked me if that was my partner? I told him yes; says he, d-mn my eyes, I will blow him up too for a sodomite; I says to him, only consider the hazard you run, supposing he was to hear that; and he said, he must have some more money; he made use of the same words as before, he said, he would blow me up.

Q. What did you understand by that? - I understood it was more to terrify, than what he intended to do.

Q. Had that the effect of terrifying you, so as to part with your money? - Yes, it really had, to part with three guineas more.

Q. Had you three guineas with you then? - Yes, I had it in my pocket, but I went out to make him believe that I went out for it, because I had told him that I had none; he said, he should not think of gentlemen tradesmen not having money.

Q. How soon did you mention this business to any body? - I did not mention it to any body till I had him apprehended, which was the next day or day after, when he sent for me again to the same public house; then he stood at the bar and asked me to drink; now says he, I have settled my business all but making a compliment to my attorney; and then he was taken up, and I mentioned the business to the justice.

Q. Had you mentioned it to any body before you mentioned it to the justice? - No, nobody at all. He upbraided me then of being afraid of him; no, says I, I am not afraid, if I had I might have run away since the first time I see you; says he, if you had, I would have murdered you the first time I met you.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940917-12

470. WILLIAM COUSE was again indicted for a like robbery , on the same person, the 8th of July .

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17940917-13

471. ELEANOR DARKIN was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , a cotton gown, value 1l. a pair of womens stays, value 12s. a wollen blanket, value 2s. a man's linen shirt, value 5s. a boy's linen shirt, value 1s. 6d. a man's cambrick neck handkerchief, value 1s. two silk sashes, value 2s. a cotton bed quilt, value 6d. the goods of Thomas Curran .

MARY CURRAN sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Curran ; I live at Wapping ; my husband is a labouring man . I have known the prisoner fifteen or sixteen years or more; I put these things in a drawer, and when I came to look for them they were missing; my

daughter she the prisoner take them out of the drawer; I looked for them the same week, it may be two or three days after. I had her taken up by a warrant. I found my things at Mr. Matthew's, the pawnbroker, and then had her taken up by a warrant.

Q. What was the prisoner? - She has a husband to maintain her.

Q. Is your house open to lodgers? - It was my own little private house; I had no lodgers at the present time.

JONATHAN MATTHEWS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; by my servant's information, these things were received in pledge. I know the prisoner coming to our shop, I have known her three or four years, or more, I believe.

Q. Did she live near you? - She lived some time back in King-street, near Old Gravel-lane, where my shop is, I live at No. 154, Old Gravel-lane, Ratcliffe-highway.

JOHN BARNEY sworn.

I know Eleanor Darkin ; some time ago she came to our shop, to pledge a pair of stays, gown and blanket; the stays and gown I should know again.

Matthews. I have had the care of the bundle ever since.

Barney. I took in this gown of the prisoner myself, the gown is dirty; I lent half a guinea on it.

Q. You are positive as to that gown? - I am; she pawned it the 25th of September 1793.

Q. Did she give any account how she came by it? Did she pawn it as her own? - I don't recollect, it is so long back.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown, on my oath.

Q. When did you lose it? - I am no scholar, it was the very week that I had her taken up.

Was your drawer locked? - No, it was not.

Prisoner. This woman took me to her house the same as her servant, and she sent me out with this property, because she was a house keeper, and would not be seen with it, and sent her own girl with me; she got jealous of me with her husband; her own child was the person that she made take the things out of the box and go with me.

Court to Prosecutrix. Was she your servant? - I did not want a servant; I can hardly keep myself.

Jury. Was you in the habit of sending things to the pawnbroker's? - No, never.

Jury to Matthews. Was she in the habit of sending any other person to your house? - That I cannot tell you. These things being found with the ticket on them for forty shillings; I found out several other things, I went to Darkin to ask her whether she had pawned these things? She said she came along with a young person to put them in; but Barney would not take them in without they were in her own name.

Court to Barney. Have you known other things come from Mrs. Curran's house? - Mrs. Curran has pawned things at our house.

Q. Did she ever send her daughter with any thing? - Yes.

Q. Was there a child with her when she pawned that gown? - No, I don't recollect ever a child coming with her when she came to pledge any thing.

Q. Have you ever known Mrs. Curran's child to pawn things without the mother? - Yes.

Q. Before Eleanor Darkin pawned this gown? - No, since.

Q. Had Mrs. Curran before that time ever pawned any thing? - I do not recollect Mrs. Curran at all only since.

Q. When she pawned the gown, did she pawn any thing else at the same time? - No, nothing but the gown at that time.

Curran. I did not know that I had lost the gown till Barney asked me if I had lost such a thing.

Q. To Curran. How came she at your house? - She had asked me to let her come in, because I had known her so many years; and she said she had not lain in a bed for so long; I told her she might lay there for the present, but I should want my bed the next week, to get a shillings, to help keep my children, and by that time she might provide herself; she thanked me, and said, she was very much obliged to me.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-14

472. ANN FREEBODY was indicted for that she, with two other persons, whose names are unknown, made an assault on Ann Edwards , widow , in her dwelling house, on the 1st day of June , putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, two gold rings, value 18s. half a guinea; half a crown, and thirteen pence in monies numbered ; the goods and monies of the said Ann Edwards .

ANN EDWARDS sworn.

I live at Enfield , in a little place of my own; my family contains myself and a boarder, who has been with me going on fifteen years, and a little boy. On Sunday, the first of June, my boarder, and the little boy went to church, and afterwards they went out to take a walk, and I was left at home by myself; I bolted my gate, and fastened the door, and went up stairs; it was about six o'clock, or after; I have a very good clock in the house; I went up stairs and put on a gown, and heard my door chink, and I went down and unbolted the door, and when I unbolted the door, the prisoner at the bar came in, and threw over my head a thing that was made to draw like a sish apron, it stunk very strong of salmon, it almost stifled me, then I tussled with her, and as I tussled with her, I heard the words, be quick, and then somebody came over, and struck me over the head two or three blows; I thought my eyes flew out of my head.

Q. Whose voice was it said be quick? - The prisoner's; and then I received the blows. Then I don't remember any more, but that I fell senseless against the stairs.

Q. How long did you lay so? - I cannot tell; they tell me till it was near eight o'clock. When my boarder came home, she found me laying on the stairs; I did not recover till my boarder came home, and called several people in, and they thought I was dead. When I came to myself, I missed my ring off my finger and my pocket turned inside out; I had half a guinea, and half a crown, and one shilling in them, and I believe, two or three halfpence besides; the silver and gold were in one pocket, and the halfpence in the other; I had several more things in them, but they were found on the ground; I am certain I had that money in them.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - Yes.

Q. Often? - Yes; she did not live further than that ladder hardly, I perfectly knew her.

Q. Was the other person a man or a woman? - I could not say; they were behind me, and struck me; I took them to be women. When I was in bed the next morning, she hallooed out, b-st

the old b-ch, is not she dead? and said if I was not dead, that she would finish me, and all this, and used me in a very notorious manner indeed.

Mr. Knapp. What are you? - I am a widow.

Q. Do you follow any business? - No, none now. I did keep a shop, but now what little I have, I make a shift with.

Q. How many boarders have you? - Only a little boy that I have had eight years.

Q. How long had you had the rings that you have been talking about? - I suppose I might have wore them twenty or thirty years. One was a wedding ring; the other was a ring that I bought in London.

Q. On your oath, did you buy that ring? - Yes, and more that I have in my house.

Q. Do you always wear rings in the country at Enfield? - Yes, I always wear two.

Q. What sort of a shop did you keep? - I sold chandlery things.

Q. When did you take up this woman and charge her with the robbery? - I am sure I don't know the day of the month it was now. I had a doctor to attend me; I was not able to get out of my bed a great while. The high constable took her at Edmonton about three weeks after.

Q. How soon did you apply to a magistrate, or to a constable to take up this woman? - When I was in bed; and he said, I could not do it till I was able to go myself, and she still kept abusing of me.

Q. In fact you did not go before a justice till three weeks after? - I think it was so.

Q. Did not the prisoner at the bar stay in the parish all that time where she had been before? - Yes, and put me at defiance, and said I could not do any thing with her.

Q. You had a little quarrel with this woman, had not you? - She was always abusing me; I have bought sish of her many times out of fear.

Q. She is a sish woman, is not she? - She is.

Q. I am afraid that your cat played some tricks with her sish, on which she threatened to cut your cat's throat? - No, it was mine she threatened to cut.

Q. In consequence of this have not you exhibited articles of the peace against her? - Yes, but before that came on they did me this mischief.

Q. I believe you never indicted the prisoner at the last session? - I was not able, I was in bed.

Q. There was another person you charged, a Mrs. English? - But that was on another affair, that happened last November.

Q. Did not you take up Mrs. English, as well as Mrs. Freebody? - Yes; and I light of my mischief on the Sunday before the session came on.

Q. Have you found any of your things since? - No.

EDWARD LAKE sworn.

I went into the house, when I went in, the prosecutrix was laying with her head on the stairs, on her left side; and I heard the prisoner say that the old b-ch had gone to Hell, and the Devil had got her rings.

SOPHIA RING sworn.

On the first of June, I heard the alarm that the prosecutrix was almost murdered, and I ran over with my husband and saw her.

JANE SANDERS sworn.

I was at the next house; I heard the prosecutrix go down and unbolt the door,

and I heard somebody come in, I heard a noise, I did no go out to see what was the matter.

Mr. Knapp. You live with your uncle don't you? - Yes.

Q. You are sure you was not in bed at the time you heard this? - That I am very sure of.

MARY GOUGH sworn.

I work hard for my bread, I am a washerwoman, I have known the prisoner for this thirty years, she used to sell sish, I never heard any thing against her character, for not being honest.

Q. Do you remember seeing her on the 1st of June, the day this robbery is talked of? - Yes, and she was in my house, she left it about eight o'clock on Sunday evening, she came in about six, and was there all the time.

Q. How far do you live from this place? - Facing.

Q. Did you hear any thing of any alarm being given? - No, I never did, not till Mrs. Treebody came out, and said, that the rumination was, that Mrs. Edwards was a dying.

Jane Sanders. About a quarter before seven this Mrs. Freebody came out of Mrs. Gough's house with some salmon, so drunk she could not stand.

SARAH WILMOT sworn.

I live in Enfield, about thirty yards from the prosecutrix's house. On the 1st of June I see Mrs. Freebody about a quarter past six o'clock, go into Mrs. Gough's, and she continued in Mrs. Gough's house till the uproar was that Mrs. Edwards was dying.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Freebody come out till after this business had happened? - She never came out.

Q. If she had come out must you have seen her? - She could not have come out without; I have known her these twenty or thirty years, her general character is, that she is a woman that will make a brawling noise, but not to injure any one.

JOHN SANDERS sworn.

I am uncle to Jane Sanders.

Q. Do you remember on the 1st of June the business happening to Mrs. Edwards? - Yes.

Q. Was your neice at home with you at that time? - She was, and on the top of the bed, as I thought. Just right where Mrs. Freebody lives, there is a palisadoe fence, between three and four feet high, before you can come to the door.

Q. Do you know the prosecutrix, Mrs. Edwards? - I ought to know her, I have known her ever since she was born.

Q. What does she do for her livelihood? - God Almighty knows, nothing as I know of.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-15

473. MOSES ROBUS was indicted for feloniously making an affault on the King's highway, on John Glenfield , on the 18th of June , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a metal watch, value 2l. a silk watch string, value 1d. a cornelion stone seal set in metal, value 2s. and a metal watch key, value 1d. the goods of the said John Glanfield.

JOHN GLANFIELD sworn.

I live in St. Martin's-le-grand, I am a wine merchant , I was robbed the 18th of June, in Cheapside , at Alderman Boydell's door, I do not recollect the day of the week, it was about nine o'clock in the evening, I was surrounded by some men, the prisoner at the bar was one of them, he gave a violent shove on my left shoulder; I turned to remonstrate, and in that moment my watch was snatched out of my pocket.

Q. Did you feel it go from you? - I did.

Q. Did you see it go? - I did not.

Q. In what manner did these men surround you? where they going one way, or in different directions? - They were going the same way, as I went up Cheapside towards St. Paul's, or Newgate-street; there were some before me, and some behind me, there were four of them.

Q. Did any body touch you besides the man that gave you the blow? - Not to strike or hurt my person.

Q. Did the other people push you about at all, besides the man that gave you the shove on your left shoulder? - They did not.

Q. Did you receive the blow before your watch was taken, or after? - Before.

Q. Did the watch go instantly on receipt of the blow, or some time after? - Instantly.

Q. What happened to you after that? - The prisoner at the bar and the two that I conceived to be at the front of me, immediately ran across the way, the way between the coaches; I immediately called stop thief! at that instant, Woodman, a constable came up; he asked me what was the matter? I told him I was robbed of my watch; after I had called out stop thief, the prisoner was obliged to cross the way back again, on account of the mob, and I saw him at the top of Ironmonger-lane, after he had past the coaches, the same side of the way, where I had been robbed.

Q. Was this nearer to St. Paul's than where you was robbed, or farther distant? - Alderman Boydell's is at the corner of Ironmonger-lane.

Q. Then it was near the same place where you was robbed? - It was. After he was stopped they took him to the Compter; Woodman stopped him, I see him.

Q. Do which you know the man was dressed? - I came that.

Q. What did you kick about him, to know that he was SAILER sworn. that you saw at Ironmonger-lane you the shove on your shoulder? - I know his face, I had seen him in the it man before, but not to know him personally.

Q. Is there any thing else that you venture to swear to him by but his face? - That is the principal.

Q. Had he a hat on or not? - He had a hat on.

Q. Was it a round hat or not? - I cannot tell positively.

Q. Were the lamps light at this time? - It was getting duskish, I don't believe there were any.

Q. Did this man speak to you before he was taken? - Not before.

Q. Did you find your watch again? - Never.

Q. What sort of a watch was it? - Metal, it had a silk string, a metal key, and a seal.

Q. Look at the man, is that the man? - I am certain of it; the next day another party (Hyams) was taken, who has turned King's evidence.

Q. You say you are positive to his per son; I want to know whether you was as positive to this man's person before

you knew any thing of Hyams! - Yes, I was as positive, I have never conversed with Hyams on the business.

Q. I want to know whether before Hyam's account, you was positive that the man that you saw at the corner of Ironmonger-lane, was the person that gave you the blow? - Yes, I am.

Q. You told me there were four, do you mean to confine yourself to the number four? - I conceive that must be about the number.

Mr. Knapp. This Cheapside is a pretty public place we all know? - Yes.

Q. A people passing and .

Q. lamps were light or take on yourself to say?, it was good day light.

Was there a good many persons passing or repassing at that time? - No doubt of it.

Q. On that side of the way? - Yes.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner at the bar before in your life? - I have seen him, but never had any conversation with him.

Q. How long a time might it occupy from the time that you felt somebody shove you, to the time you lost your watch? - About a second.

Q. Then I should think the observation you could make would be very little indeed; you told the learned judge that whether he had a round hat on or a cocked hat, you cannot positively say? - I don't recollect that.

Q. How he was dressed you cannot positively say? - Not positively.

Q. Whether he had a great coat on or not? - I cannot tell.

Q. Where had you been spending your evening? - I had been dining with a friend of mine at St. Catharine's.

Q. Perhaps you had drank very freely? - I had not.

Q. Do you mean to say that you was perfectly sober? - I was perfect in my understanding, quite sober, I am quite certain of it.

Q. This prisoner, if it is the prisoner that you have been talking of, got out of your sight by running through the coaches? - Yes, and came back again.

Q. To the place where he had committed the robbery? - He had no other way of getting off.

Q. You never heard of your watch again? - Yes, I have by report, but I have not got it again.

JAMES JONES

Q. Have you ever been sworn in a court of justice before? - I was sworn before the Lord Mayor.

Q. What will become of you if you swear that that will be false? - I shall go to everlasting flames.

Sworn.

I was sent of an errand, and coming up Leadenhall-street, on the 18th of June, Wednesday night, about nine o'clock or a little after nine, this Morobus and three or four more with him, they were swearing together at Leadenhall-market; then afterwards they went up Cheapside, and at the corner of Grocers-alley, I got quite close up to them, and this Morobus kicked me on the shins; I asked him what he kicked me for? accordingly he d-mned me for a bastard, he said nothing more to me than that; at the corner of Ironmonger-lane I lost sight of him; I did not take any more notice of him; and there was a crying out of stop thief soon after I left him, and upon that I saw Morobus a running.

Q. Before you came to that, should you know any of the others besides

Morobus again? - Yes, I should know two of the others.

Q. What did you do on this cry of stop thief? - I did not do any thing, I only saw Morobus a running.

Q. Whereabouts did you stand at this time? - I was across the way, facing of Ironmonger-lane, on the opposite side of Cheapside, and I saw Morobus run round the coaches, he was running over towards the side of the way where I was, he kept running round the coaches, and then ran up Ironmonger-lane; when he came to the coaches, he ran round them, and through them, and then up Ironmonger-lane.

Q. Did you happen to see Glandfield at all? - Yes, I saw him, but I did not see him robbed, I ran over to Ironmonger-lane, and there was a man said, there was a thief at the corner, and Mr. Glandfield had got hold of Morobus, the prisoner, and he said, this was the man that hit him on the back.

Q. Are you positive that the man that you followed up Cheapside, and the man that Mr. Glandfield took at the corner of Ironmonger-lane is the same man? - I am positive, I have no doubt at all.

Q. Was the watch ever found? - No.

Q. What became of the other men? - One went up Ironmonger-lane, I don't know what became of the others.

Mr. Knapp. Little boy, this was very ill treatment of Morobus kicking you on the shins, it was very ill natured, was it not? - Yes.

Q. Did he hurt you much? - No, not much.

Q. He hurted you a little, did not he? - Yes.

Q. So after he kicked you on the shin, then it was that you told before the magistrate all the story that you have told to day? - Yes.

Q. You lost sight of him, you know nothing at all about the robbery yourself? - No.

Q. Mr. Glandfield said he was the man that hit him on the shoulder, he did not say he was the man that robbed him? - He did not.

Q. Was you examined on your oath before the grand jury? - Yes.

Q. Not at first you know? - No, not at first.

Court. Did you give any account of this before the grand jury? - Yes.

Q. Did any thing pats between you and him, by which you could collect why he gave you the kick? - Nothing more than what I told you.

RICHARD HILLIER sworn.

I am a peace officer of the City, I know nothing of the robbery; I saw the man in the hands of an officer, and he was brought up with the prosecutor to the Poultry passage, the prosecutor said, that coming along Cheapside, he was hustled by three or four people, that a man came and gave him a violent push, and at that instant he lost his watch; he said he turned round as soon as he felt the push, and saw the prisoner behind him; that is what he said, to the best of my recollection.

Q. Did he say at all who gave him the push? - He said he turned about and saw the prisoner behind him.

Mr. Knapp. The prosecutor said, that he received a push from a man, without naming any body, and he was not positive who was the person that took the watch? - He said, that he received a push and saw the prisoner at the bar close behind him.

Q. Was he searched? - Yes, he was, in my presence, in the usual way, and there was nothing found on him.

Q. So that if he had any thing about him, it must have been found by you? - I should suppose so.

JAMES WOODMAN sworn.

I am a constable, I was coming by at the time that the robbery was committed, just as the man was in custody, and took him to the Compter, I heard the noise in the street as I was coming by promiscuously.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there? - Yes, when I saw him, the prosecutor and another man had took hold of him.

Q. What was the charge against him by the prosecutor? - The robbing him of a watch, I took him to the Compter and searched him, but found no watch.

- HYAMS sworn.

I know the prisoner; I come here as King's evidence; I have been admitted as an accomplice by the magistrate; I have known Morobus for this fourteen or fifteen years; on the 18th of June in the evening towards darkish, there were four of us went out together, the other two were James Stokes and John Drew , we started from the Plow, in Cox's-square, in Spitalfields, we came into Bishopsgate-street, and came up to the top of Corn-hill.

Q. Where did you come from to get into Bishopsgate-street? - From Petticoat-lane, Cox's-square leads into Petticoat-lane, and from there we went through Catharine Wheel-alley, that brought us into Bishopsgate-street, from there we came into Cornhill, we came towards the change, then we met the gentleman, says Stokes, here is a sucky gorge.

Q. Was you, or was you not in Leadenhall-street that evening? - We never were near it that evening, though the boy said that he followed us from Leadenhall-market. Then we met the gentleman that lost his watch between the Change and the Mansion-house, us four were walking along talking of one thing or another, Mr. Glanfield was going up towards St. Paul's, and Stokes, says, there is a sucky gorge,(meaning a drunken man,) with that Stokes got before him, and we three were walking behind the gentleman, going along that way we missed Stokes. I thought we had lost him, we followed the gentleman from the Poultry compter till we came to Ironmonger-lane, then Stokes came and crossed the road from Ironmonger-lane, and ran against the gentleman, as we were behind the gentleman, and said to us, I have got it, (meaning that he had got the watch, as I thought,) with that there the gentleman did not miss it directly, he walked from the corner of Ironmonger-lane, to the corner of Queen-street, and then he missed his watch, he then said, I have lost my watch by some person, and he did not know by who, and he catched hold of a strange man that was going along the street, and then he made a catch to catch hold of me, and I asked him what he wanted with me? he said, he had lost his watch this instant, by somebody, by whom he did not know, and Morobus happened to come past, and he catched hold of him likewife, and let me go, and he challenged him with it, and he said he had lost his watch, and he believed he was one of them, a mob got round and he said that he had lost his watch, and by whom he did not know; and the prisoner said, that he was very willing to be searched, that he had no watch, nor knew of any watch, then the mob or constable took him to the Poultry compter; I did not stop to see, then I went on the opposite side of the way to the Poultry compter, and I met Stokes and Drew, I asked Stokes whether he saw the prisoner go into the Compter?

he said, yes, he had, I asked him where the watch was? he said he had it safe enough, he had hid it somewhere, I told him to go back and fetch the watch, where he had hid it; and he went back, and I went back with him, he went then to a court opposite Ironmonger-lane almost, where there is a pastry-cooks at the corner, and he put his hand between some water tubs that were full of water for the sake of water for the horses, there are five or six, and Stokes took it out, and gave it to Drew, Stokes did, then we all three, me, Stokes and Drew, went and sold the watch for a guinea at Mrs. Lee's a silversmiths in Shoreditch, and we went and parted the money.

Q. Then as soon as the gentleman let you go, you made off? - No, I made the other side of the way from the mob.

Q. Now I ask you whether the prisoner did not give the gentleman a blow or push? - He did not; Stokes ran against the gentleman and pushed the back of the gentleman against us two; the prisoner never touched him at all; I said the same before the Lord Mayor; the boy said, that he followed us from Leadenhall-street; and we were not in Leadenhall-street that night; and as for the prosecutor, he appeared to be rather in liquor.

Mr. Knapp. You told us it was duskish? - It was.

Q. Were the lamps light? - It was between.

Q. Stokes had left you; you know you never saw him again till he came rushing against this gentleman? - Yes, he did.

Q. You three had hold of each others arms? - I and the prisoner had.

Q. Robus never put up his hand to strike? - He never did, if I was to die this minute.

Q. You did not know any thing at all about the watch being taken till it was over? - No.

Q. The prosecutor took up a strange man first? - He did; he let him go and then he laid hold of me.

Q. Did you make sufficient observation to know whether the gentleman, the prosecutor, was drunk or sober? - Yes.

Q. Was he sucky gorge? - He was.

Q. Had the prisoner Robus any of the money? - I gave it to his sister to bring to him, on account that he was in trouble, because we went out together, I thought he was entitled to his there.

Court. What business did you go out upon? - To see what we could get.

Q. Did Robus take any part in this business at all? - No; neither did he know the robbery was committed, till Stokes ran past, and said, he had got it.

Prisoner. I was going up Cheapside, just after the robbery, the gentleman was to much in liquor he laid hold of me, and Hyams, and several others that he came nigh, and then the mob came up, and he had me taken to the Compter.

Court to Prosecutor. Will you say that you did not take hold of any body else? - I did not upon my oath.

Jury to Woodman. Was the prosecutor in liquor? - I really don't believe he was in liquor; he did not appear to be in liquor.

Mr. Knapp. Have you ever been a witness before? - Yes.

Q. Do you know there is a forty pound on this man's conviction? - Yes.

Hillier. The prosecutor did not appear to be perfectly sober, but so sober that he well knew what he said, because he told the exact story the next day.

Court to Glanfield. Is it true that you never said you lost your watch till you got to King-street; did you give

the account instantaneously or not? - Instantanecously.

Court to Jones. Look at Hyams; was that man one of them? - Yes.

Q. With regard to Leadenhall market, did you see these people in Leadenhall-market, or was you coming from Leadenhall street? - I did; I see them all there.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-16

474. WILLIAM ARCHER and BARNARD NICHOLLS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , a pair of leather boots, value 7s. the goods of Meredith Price , Esq.

The evidences called on their recognicances, and not appearing, the prisoner was.

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17940917-17

475. THOMAS BAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , six silver table spoons, value 2l.2s. six silver desert spoons, value 1l. 10s. eleven silver forks, value 4l. the goods of Mary Fitzherbert , spinster , in her dwelling house .

MARY FITZHERBERT sworn.

I lost some spoons and forks the 11th of last month, six silver table spoons, six silver desert spoons, and eleven forks; I know nothing more of the robbery than what I have from the servant. I know that the plate that was found on that prisoner, belonged to me.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Fitztherbert.

Q. Did your mistress, at any time, lose any spoons and forks? - Yes.

Q. Where were they missed from? - some from the dining table, and some from the side table.

Q. Where does your mistress live? - In Francis-street . The prisoner came to the door and rang the kitchen bell, and I opened the door to him; and he asked me if my mistress was at home? I told him she was not; he told me that he saw my mistress at Rathbone-place that morning, enquiring for a man servant to go into the country with her; I told him that she would not be long before she came in, and he might stop; I left him in the passage and went down into the kitchen, and about a minute or two after that I heard the street door shut, and I ran up stairs and found the plate was gone out of the parlour.

Q. How lately before had you seen the plate there? - A minute before. And I opened the street door and saw him at the bottom of the street; he was in China-street, and I thought he was looking towards me, and I told a person that was just opposite me, to go after that man in black, that he stole plate from our house, his name is William Reynolds.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS sworn.

On the 11th of August, between three and four in the afternoon, I was going up China-street, and I heard a woman call out stop that man in black, for he has stole our plate; on which I turned me round, and saw a man run at the bottom of China-street, whom I judged to be the person, and I pursued on Francis-street, and I saw him at the bottom of China-mews, and I gave the alarm to some coachmen, and they pursued him, and I ran down Gower-street, and he was stopped in Gower-mews, in Gower-street, and I came up and said

hold of him, I took hold of him by the arm on one side, and another man by the other, and we brought him back to to the house, from whence he had taken the property, and when we brought him into the parlour, he went on his knees and begged for mercy; on which the lady, being much frightened, said, do you think I will forgive such a man as you, that robs my house while I am out of the way? On that he got up and delivered the plate out of his inside pockets, and I took it up, and it has been in my custody ever since; it is here.

Prosecutrix. These was my property; they are the same that I lost from my house.

Prisoner. When he took me I was speaking to a coachman, asking for a place, in Gower mews; I was not running away.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-18

476. WILLIAM CASE was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of September , a carpenter's plow, value 2s. and five moulding planes, value 2s. the goods of Edward Haylock .

EDWARD HAYLOCK sworn.

I am a carpenter; I work at Holloway, I lost some tools, the 4th of this month, I lost one plow and five moulding planes out of a place which we use as a work shop unfinished; I had them in the morning.

Q. Why do you think the prisoner took them? - Because I have sufficient proof that he threw them out of his pocket running across the field; I did not see him; I was at dinner; I got the things again; I know them to be my property; they are here.

Q. Was the prisoner a fellow workman with you? - No; I never changed a word with the man in my life.

Q. How soon after was he taken? - In the course of twenty minutes, or it may be less.

JOHN DOWLEY sworn.

This Haylock works for me as a journeyman; at this time I was going home, and I perceived the shop door open, I went into the shop, and finding my back door open, I did not know but some one might have gone back for convenience; there was another person with me, and he presently hallooed out stop thief! and the prisoner was pursued by him; in the middle of the field he was seen to take something out of his pocket, I saw him; I cannot say they are the two planes, but I saw him take out somethings while he was pursued, and he threw them on the grass.

Q. How far from him was you? - About one hundred yards.

Q. Did you go up to the place immediately? - No, I kept in pursuit after him till he was taken, I did not see what he threw down till I returned with the prisoner, which might be full twenty minutes after, or more, and there were three planes in that place, two where I saw him take some thing out of his pocket, and the other at some little distance. The plow I did not see thrown down, but three of the moulding planes I did; Haylock was with me when I picked them up.(Produced.)

Haylock. They are all my property.

Mr. Knowlys. Was you present when he was taken? - I was not, I lost fight of him for some little time.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940917-19

477. JOHN GRIFFITHS and DAVID otherwise MICHAEL CLIFFORD were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , a man's cloth great coat, value 10s. the goods of Robert Dawson .

ELIZABETH DAWSON sworn.

On the 18th of last month the two prisoners came into my house, and called for a pint of porter; I had just taken my husband's great coat out of the parlour, and hung it up on the bannisters of the stairs which is in the end of the passage, with intent to take it up stairs; my husband keeps the King's Arms, in East smithfield ; there was a person came in and called for a glass of liquor, and I went into the bar to serve it, these two men had called for a pint of porter, and had got it, and I missed the great coat, and I called to my servant to know if he had moved it? he said, no, he had not seen it; by that time this man, this said Clifford, came out of the passage where I was standing, just by were I had lost my coat, and he says give me a glass of gin; I said, I cannot give you any gin, nor you must not go out of my house, because I have missed the coat, and there is nobody in but you, and the man that came in with you; and we went in, and it was found under Griffiths, he was sitting on it, rolled up in a little white apron, I stopped a few minutes, and my husband came in, and he thought proper to take them up before the magistrate.

Prisoner Griffiths. Is it a likely thing that I would be had enough to take away the coat when I went in for a pint of beer? the coat was in the bundle, when I went into the parlour, and this very man would not go into the door.

Prisoner to Prosecutrix. Did you serve me with the pint of beer? - The pint of beer was drawn, but there was no time to have the beer.

Prisoner. I know no more about the coat than the man in the moon,

Prisoner Clifford. Did you see me near the coat.

Prosecutrix. They both must pass the coat as they went into the parlour; when they came into the house I was standing between the door and the stairs, to go up stairs, with the coat in my hand.

EDWARD HEDGE sworn.

I was backward, I live with Mr. Dawson; mistress called to me, and asked if I knew any thing of my master's coat? and and I went into the room where these men were; and it was found under this man, Griffiths, he was fitting on it, tied up in this white cloth.

Q. Whose white cloth is it? - I cannot say, none of the people of the house know it.

Prisoner Griffiths. Did not you ask me what bundle that was? - When I came to take the bundle, you winked at me, and would have spoke, as much as to tell me, that you had it of that man.

Prisoner Clifford. I have nothing more to say, I never put the coat there, and this man never went into the parlour door.

Prosecutrix. This is the coat, I know nothing of the apron, the apron was never in my house before that day, it is a man's apron, I have not a person in the

family that wears any thing of that kind.

Prisoner Clifford. Mrs. Dawson said, I think it is very proper to stop you along with him, as you came in along with this man.

Prisoner Griffiths Mr Dawson after we were detained some time, brought two trappanners, and wanted us to enlist for soldiers.

Jury to Hedge. Were both the men in the room when you took the great coat from the prisoner Griffiths? - No, the other man was in the bar.

John Griffiths , GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

David Clifford , GUILTY. (Aged 28.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-20

470. ELIZABETH PANTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of August , a muslin apron, value 1s. 6d. a muslin gown, value 9s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. the goods of Thomas Farmer .

ELIZABETH FARMER sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Farmer, I lost the things in the indictment, the 22d of August, I went out in the morning, and left Mary Mellvill and Elizabeth Panton in the house, and when I came home again Mary Melvill told me that Elizabeth Panton had got a pair of stockings, and I looked about and missed a different quantity of articles, the prisoner was gone, and I found the other at home in her business; I was informed that she was gone down to the washerwoman's, and I let out to the washerwoman's after her, and the washerwoman said, that she had got what things she had there, and was gone the road to Brentford; I did not see any thing more of her till the 30th, when we took her, and then she owned to all the property; she had taken a lodging to sleep with me, she had been there a week.

Q. Did she come to your house back again? - No, never; we took her as a prisoner up at Grosvenor gate, she had two pair of stockings in her pocket, but we did not have but one of her, these I can swear to, the constable has got them. Mr. Jacobs, he belongs to Great Marlborough street.

Q. Did you find any other of the things? - No otherwise than what she owned.

Q. Was any thing said to her, to induce her to confess? - No, nothing at all, we had not seen any thing of her till then; she said that she pawned them somewhere by Swallow-street, but we could not find them out, but we traced them at two or three places, and heard of the things at several different places, where she had offered them to sell.

Prisoner. Was the gown your's? - Yes, it is.

Prisoner. The pair of stockings you have got I gave eighteen-pence for.

RICHARD MORLEY sworn.

On Saturday the 30th of August, Mrs. Farmer sent to the shop where I was at work, about four o'clock in the afternoon, and the man informed me that she had got intelligence where the prisoner was to be found, and desired if I would be so good as to come, to go with her at seven o'clock in the evening; accordingly I left work at seven, and came down to her house; she desired me to go up to Grosvenor-gate with her, I went, and accordingly the prisoner at the bar was at Grosvenor-gate.

Q. How far is Grosvenor gate from the place where the prosecutor lives? - Pretty nigh a mile, Mrs. Farmer lives at Knight's-bridge.

Q. Was she in any house by Grosvenor gate? - No, she was waiting there for a coachman that she had lived with; accordingly I then told her she must come along with me, for she had stole many things from Mrs. Farmer; I went across the Park, and Mrs. Farmer came up Park-lane, she came up soon after; accordingly Mrs. Farmer challenged her with the things that she had taken from her; then Elizabeth Panton directly said how that she had got the gown, and an handkerchief, and an apron, and two pair of stockings; accordingly Mrs. Farmer told her to let her have the things, for she wanted them, for the gown was not her own, then the prisoner began to cry, and said that she had not pawned the gown, she had sold it for six shillings in Brewer-street; she then asked her where the rest of the things were? she said they were at Richmond, she could not get at them that night, but if she would let her loose she would get them the next day; accordingly with this we walked on till we came as far as Conduit-street, for Marlborough street; Mrs. Farmer said she would have the things or duplicates; accordingly we went into a public house there, Mr. Jacob's, the Coach and Houses, and Mrs. Farmer desired me to search the woman; I pulled out of her pocket two pair of stockings, one pair Mrs. Farmer owned to, the other she could not.

Prisoner. Did not I say to you when you came up to me, that I was going to Mrs. Farmer's house? - No, I past her as I came to the gate, she was standing still with the woman that sells apples and things at a stall.

MARY MELLVILL sworn.

On the 29th of August, Mrs. Farmer went out and left Elizabeth Panton and me at home together; Elizabeth Panton sent me down to the public house; when I came back I see her take the stockings off the drawers, and I asked her whose stockings they were? she said, they were her own; and I see her put them in her pocket. She stood about an hour after, and seemed very bulky, and I said, what have you got in your pocket? and she put her hand so, and said, d-mn me, do you think I am going to rob the woman? And she staid in the house about half an hour after she had taken the stockings, and she said, she was going down to the washerwoman's; but she never came back again. In about an hour and a half after, Mrs. Farmer came home, and then I asked her if these were her stockings that were on the drawers, that Elizabeth Panton had taken? and she said, yes; and I never saw her from that time, till Saturday evening I saw her at Grosvenor-gate, I went with Mrs. Farmer there; there she acknowledged that she had taken the gown, apron, handkerchief, and two pair of stockings.

Prisoner. Did not you take a pair of stockings one day when you went to the Hospital? - I did not.

Prisoner. I would wish to speak the truth, and no more. I lodged with Mrs. Farmer one week; she is a very bad woman: one night, when she had two men on the bed with her, she sent me for a pot of beer; when I comes back, the door was locked; that woman the next day, took away a pair of stockings and handkerchief, and took them away, and desired me never to let Mrs. Farmer know; and she sold rags, and put the money in her own pocket; she has only done this

because I would not bring a parcel of men into her house, and do as she would wish. She cannot bring a witness out of the parish that will give her a good character; she, at night, has two or three men with her, and so has the other woman that is with her likewise, and that is the woman, I can be upon my oath, that took the things away. I have not been in London long, I have come from Richmond; I did not know but what I should be tried at the Hall, and so I have not sent for any witnesses here.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-21

480. SAMUEL ROYAL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , seven guineas, the monies of Pierre Antoin , in the dwelling house of Thomas Sunnocks .

PIERRE ANTOIN sworn.

I know the prisoner, I had no thought that the prisoner would go to my trunk, I lost seven guineas at Ratcliffe-highway , at the trunk maker's house, Mr. Sunnock's about four weeks ago, I bought a pair of new shoes, and put them in the trunk that I lost at the trunk maker's, and I put seven guineas in a bit of paper in the shoes in the trunk, and I took the trunk along with me.

Q. Did you lodge at the trunk maker's? - No.

Q. How came you to lock the money up at the trunk maker's? - I left the money at the trunk maker's, because the trunk maker's house was very near the house where I thought to move; the trunk maker did not know that I had left the money in the trunk, I had just bought the trunk, and left it at the trunk maker's, the trunk maker gave me leave.

Q. When did you miss your money? - In an hour after I left the money at the house

Q. Did you come back again to examine the trunk? - Yes.

Mr. Alby. Did you suppose that your money was very safe, when you left it at the trunk maker's? - Yes.

Q. Why did you return immediately almost to examine whether it was safe or not? - Because the landlord where I live, desired me to bring the trunk to his house, and said it would be very safe there.

Court. Where, to the new or old lodgings? did you look into your trunk, and miss the money? - Yes; I went back to the shop, and the people of the house told me that the man at the bar had been to the trunk, and opened the trunk, and took something out.

Q. And that led you to look? - Yes.

Q. You knew the prisoner before? - Yes, I knew him a few days before; I happened to meet him, and he was my interpreter to many places where I went, and as I had the money in my pocket, he advised me to put the money in the trunk, as it was safer.

Q. Did he see you put it in? - Yes, he was present, but I did what I could to put the money in the trunk without being seen by the prisoner, but I don't know whether the prisoner see me or not.

Q. Why did you wish to conceal it, when you was doing what the prisoner desired you to do? - Because I would not let any body know that I had money.

Q. Did the prisoner know how much money you had? - No.

Q. Was the money only missing, or the money and shoes? - No, only the money.

Mr. Alby. Had you a watch in the trunk also? - Yes.

Q. Where did you get this money? - The captain that I came with, gave me fifteen guineas, and fifteen shillings.

Q. Were there not twelve guineas in the trunk? - Yes.

Q. Were not there twelve guineas wrapped up in the same parcel? - Yes.

Q. And only seven were taken? - Yes.

THOMAS SUNNOCKS sworn.

I am a trunk maker, I live at Ratcliffe-highway, I know the prisoner, Samuel Royal, I have nothing to say of the robbery myself, my apprentice is here, and will relate the story, this man and the prisoner, bought the trunk at our house; on Friday I took the prisoner into custody myself, and only found a crown on him.

Q. How long after the trunk was bought was this? - The trunk was bought on Friday, and these people asked to leave it till Saturday, they were in and out two or three times.

Q. How soon after the money was missing did you take the prisoner into custody? - Not more than an hour and a half.

Court. Was you present when the trunk was sold? - No.

GEORGE BERRY sworn.

I am fifteen the 19th of next December; an oath is to speak the truth.

Q. Who will be angry with you if you don't speak the truth? - The Lord. I live with Mr. Sunnocks, I am servant to him.

Q. Do you know Pierre Antoin, that stands there, and the prisoner at the bar? - Yes, by seeing them coming to the shop; they came together when he bought the trunk.

Q. Do you know what day it was? - I do not.

Q. Who paid for it? - I don't know who paid for it.

Q. Who bought it? - I don't know which of them bought it, they were both together.

Q. Did you see who locked the trunk up? - I did not, when they first bought it.

Q. How long did they stay in your house, after having bought it? - They did not stay any long time; afterwards they bought some things, and put them in, I did not know what it was, it was tied up in a handkerchief.

Q. Did they go away together? - Yes.

Q. When did they come the next time? - It was the next day, they came with the shoes, both of them.

Q. who put the shoes in? - I don't know, they opened the trunk, I saw Pierre Antoin open the trunk.

Q. Did you see him put any thing in them? - No, I did not, but he had a pair of shoes in his hand when he came in.

Q. Did you see him have the shoes in his hand when he went away? - No, he did not take any thing away with him.

Q. You did not see him lock the trunk? - No, I did not. After he had gone, some time after, the other man came alone, and opened the trunk alone; he was a long time before he got it open, and when he got it open, he took a paper out, and took something out of the paper, and put the paper in again, and it was a good time before he could get the key out, he could not get the key out till the apprentice came and took it out for him; when he got it out, he put it in his pocket, and went away, he was in a very great hurry.

Mr. Alby. Have you spoke to any body about this business before you came to court? - No.

Q. You have not spoke to your master about it, nor your master to you? - No, only at the justice's, no farther than to tell me to mind what I said, that he said at the justice's.

Q. Did not be desire you to be very particular and exact in what you said in the court, since you was at the justice's? - Yes.

Q. And he repeated to you of course what you was to say? - No, he did not.

Q. You told your master the circumstance exactly, I suppose? - No, I never told him of it.

Q. Not speak to your master about it? Do such transactions often take place in your shop? - I have not long been in it.

Q. Did your master desire you to say in the court that he never spoke to you about it? - No, he never said any thing to me about it.

Q. There are a great number of black men in the neighbourhood of Wapping? - A great many.

Q. And they are always going backward and forward of course, and I suppose you cannot judge of the particular persons of the black men, as you can of white men, they have all got black noses, and it is more difficult to swear to black men than to white men? - Yes, but I know that is the man.

Court. Have you any doubt that that is the man that came to your shop? - Yes, that is the man, I am sure of it.

THOMAS GATES sworn.

I am a publican, the money was left in my hand by a black man, he was not in my presence two minutes, he left me five pounds nineteen shillings and sixpence.

Q. Where do you keep a public house? - Cannon-street, St. George's in the East, near Ratcliffe highway, I do not recollect the prisoner at all, the black man left that parcel with me, to take care of, while he called again, it was the 16th of August, between the hours of six and eight in the evening.

Q. Did he call again? - Never, I never see him afterwards.

Prosecutor. This is the paper the money was in, and the money is certainly mine, because that man had no money of his own, I had given him half a guinea the day before like this.

WILLIAM GRUNDY sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Sunnock. I know the prisoner at the bar, I know him to be the person that came with this man to buy the trunk, it was on a Saturday last month, about the 16th, the prosecutor locked it, and took the key with him, and paid for it, they came and brought some clothes two or three hours after, and put them in; they brought it about eleven o'clock, they brought the shoes about four o'clock.

Q. Who locked the shoes up? - The prosecutor, he pulled a parcel out of his pocket, and put it in the shoes, and he took the key; about half an hour after the prisoner came with two keys, as my mistress told me, I did not see him, I was called to take the key out of the trunk, and I took the key out.

Q. Was this the same key that you sold with the trunk? - I did not take any notice about that, I was obliged to after the lock before I could get it out, I don't think it could be the same key. When I got it out, he went away.

Mr. Alby. These locks are not of the very best manufactory of course? - Some sort are.

Q. How long is it since you and your master, and the little boy, has had any conversation about this business? - None at all, since we were at the justice's.

Q. You have spoken to your master now and then on the business? - No, not a word.

Q. Do you remember any thing of this kind in your shop before? - Yes, some time back a similar thing happened in our shop.

Court. What day did they buy the the trunk? - I believe it was the day before they bought the trunk.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice. ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-22

481. JOHN CATTIPODI was indicted for feloniously forging, and falsely making, and counterfeiting, and causing to be forged, falsely made, and counterfeited, and did willingly act and assist in forging, falsely making, and counterfeiting, on the 3d of July , a certain order for payment of money, dated Gloucester, the 21st of March 1794; with the name of J.R. Holland thereto subscribed, purporting to be directed for Robert Herries , Esq. Charles Sackville , David Maccullock, and Rober Herries, the younger, for the payment of 5l. to Henry Wilkinson, with intention to defraud Sir Robert Herries , &c.

Indicted in a Second COUNT for uttering a like forged order, with the like intention.

And in a Third and Fourth COUNTS for forging and uttering a like order, with intention to defraud Hugh Ramsden .

HUGH RAMSDEN sworn.

I am a cappillaire-maker , No. 7, Brook-street. I know the prisoner at the bar perfectly well; he came to my house the 3d of July, to the best of my remembrance; I would not take to myself to say it is the day, but it was the early part of the month; I think it was between the hours of twelve and one in the day time; he came to my house and gave me an order for two gallons of cappillaire in an hamper, and to be directed to lady Allen, of Finchley; accordingly I told him it should be fulfilled; he asked me the price? I told him; we agreed on the price, the price was twelve shillings a gallon. Accordingly after agreeing on the price, I says, I don't know that I can send it to day; he said, it would do tomorrow; I thanked him for the opportunity, being busy at the time; it was to be sent to the Horse and Groom, Finchley. Accordingly he tendered me a note; I took the note in this manner and looked at it; this is the note he gave me, to the best of my knowledge. He says, if you don't like the note you may take the money on delivery of the goods; I was not satisfied myself with not taking the money till the delivery of the goods, I rather preferred taking the note, therefore, without any doubt took the note, preferring it to running the risk of the money; I kept it till the next morning. On my bed, in the night, something struck me that the note that I had taken was a bad one; the next morning I sent my son to Sir Robert Herries with the note; he returned with the message to me that the note was bad; he returned the note to me.

Q. Was that the same note that you had received from the prisoner at the bar? - I cannot take on me to say; it was such a note, for the same sum, and in the same terms, and, as far as I know, corresponded to every thing; my son is here.

Q. Have you any doubt that it was the prisoner at the bar? - Not any doubt.

Q. Did you send the goods? - I did not. After finding the note to be a bad one, I wrote a letter to Lady Allen, of Finchley.

The prisoner was taken up afterwards, and committed on this charge; the goods were never delivered, nor never called for, but the money was given in change.

Court. Is that the note that you produce here to day? Is that the identical note that you received from your son when he came from the banker's? - It is.

RICHARD RAMSDEN sworn.

Q. Do you remember receiving that note of your father? - Yes, on the morning after my father took it. This is the note, to the best of my knowledge; I took it to Sir Robert Herries , in St. James's-street.

Q. Was the note paid? - No, it was refused payment.

Q. What did you do with the note? - I took it from their hand and put it into my pocket book, and brought it home, and gave it my father.

Q. Was that the note that he had given you before you went there? - To the best of my knowledge it is.

Q. You never had it out of your possession after your father had delivered it to you? - I only gave it to the servant at Sir Robert Herries's, and he gave it me back again.

Mr. Alby. You say this is the same note, at least a similar note, though you have no mark on it, I understand. Do you know a person of the name of Peter Cattipodi ? - No.

Q. Did not a man of the name of Peter Cattipodi call at your shop? - There was a man of the name of Cattipodi called at our shop.

Q. Do you recollect his putting any questions to you at that time, to know whether or not you could identify the person that came to your shop? - I do.

Q. I believe you took on you to say at that time, that you did not know the person of the prisoner? - I told Mr. Cattipodi that I did not think I should know him.

Mr. Knapp. I did not ask you whether you knew the prisoner at the bar, but this gentleman has. What do you think of the prisoner at the bar now? - I cannot be certain.

HUGH GOLDICUTT sworn.

I am a person employed in the house of Sir Robert Herries and Co. For fourteen years there has never been such a person as J.R. Holland keep cash at our house; the firm of the house is Sir Robert Herries , Knt. George Sackville, David Maccullock, and Robert Herries, the younger.

Q. I don't know whether you happened to be present when the boy brought the note? - Yes; I believe, I gave answer to it, because I took the direction of Mr. Ramsden that I might speak of it.

Q. Was it a good note, or did you pay it? - We did not.

Court You believe you received this note of that boy; did you return that boy the same identical note? - I did.

SAMUEL MUCKLOW sworn.

Q. Do you know whether there is such a person as Mr. Holland living at Gloucester? - I don't know there is.

Q. Did you make all the enquiry you could? - I did for this purpose, and I enquired at the post office, and I found no such person, and I enquired at the parish officers.

Q. How long had the post master been at the post office? - He has lived in Gloucester all his life time, and been in the office many years.

Mr. Alby. You did not examine the parish books? - I did not.

Q. Is not there a river runs through the town of Gloucester, and a number of shipping in that river? - Yes.

Q. Did you enquire at any of these ships? - No, but I enquired at the bank

ing houses; I enquired of a very great number of respectable people in Gloucester; I enquired of every person that was likely to give me information.

(The note read.)"No. 5757, 5l. Gloucester, March 21, 1794. Sir Robert Herries and Co. bankers, London, pay to Mr. Wilkinson, Esq. or beater, on demand, five pounds, value received. J.R. Holland. Five pounds. Entered, Thomas Williams."

ELIZABETH CATTIPODI sworn.

Q. Where do you live? - I am not at liberty to tell.

Q. Where did you live on Wednesday the 3d of July? - At Kentish town.

Q. Was you at home all that day? - I never was out during that day.

Q. Do you recollect any body coming to your house on that day? - I recollect one Thomas Moore coming about the hour of two; he asked me if I had provided for dinner? and I replied, I had not; he said he had ordered home some salmon. I remember his taking a bill out of his pocket, and some cash, and said, he had been to order some cappillaire, in Brook-street, Holborn.

Q. Are you sure this was the 3d of July? - It was.

Q. Where was the prisoner at the bar that day? - He was with me all the whole day, never was out of the house.

Q. And you say that you was yourself at home all the day? - I was; he never was out of the house.

Mr. Const. Are you any relation to the prisoner at the bar? - Yes, I am his mother.

Q. Then you are the wife of Mr. Cattipodi; you know who I mean? - I am.

Q. I wish to ask you very much where you live, and if your husband is at present with you? - He is not at present with me.

Q. He is not here? - No, he is not.

Q. You refuse to tell where you live now? - Yes.

Q. I don't know whether you are aware that I have power to apply to his lordship to insist on knowing where you live. Recollect, you have brought it on yourself. Where do you live at this present time? - In Angler's-gardens, Frog lane, Islington, No. 3, next door to Mr. Black.

Q. Does Cattipodi, the elder, live there? - No.

Q. Has he ever lived there? - Yes.

Q. How lately has he lived there? - A week ago.

Q. Has not he lived there within two days? - I cannot tell.

Q. You surely can tell that? - Yes, he has.

Q. Did not he live there yesterday? - Yes.

Q. Did not he sleep there last night? - Yes, he did.

Q. And yet you set off by swearing your husband did not live with you. You talk about Mr. Moore, you know Mr. Moore very well, if he is so domesticated as to come to your house to dine with you? - I knew him when he was a hatter, up at Highgate.

Q. Do you know his hand writing at all? - I do not.

Q. Do you know where he lives? - I do not indeed.

Q. Perhaps he lives with you? - No, he does not indeed.

Q. What sort of a person is Mr. Moore? - A tall thin man, rather darkish visage.

Q. Can you tell us where to find him? - No.

Q. He told you he had been to order some cappillaire? - He did, and said he was over charged.

Q. Have you applied to him to appear? - I don't know where he is.

Q. How long might it be since you see him last? - Really, to my knowledge, I have not seen him these three weeks, and then I met him in the street.

Q. How happened that? It does not occur to you? - It does not.

Q. It would be very material for you to prove that he was the person, and your son was not. Did not you ask him where he lived, and tell him that your son was in trouble for the very circumstance he mentioned to you? - I did tell him my son was in confinement for the cappillaire.

Q. Did not he offer to come forward and clear your son? - He did not.

Q. Did not you wish to know where to find him for that purpose? - I don't know where to find him.

Q. Did you ask him? - I did, but he did not tell me.

Q. Did you ask him to come here? - I did not.

Q. What sort of a man was this? - He is a dark man, black hair, black beard; he is quite swarthy.

Q. Is he likely to be taken for this man in light hair? - That I cannot say.

Q. A very different man by your description.

Mr. Alby to Richard Ramsden. Did not you tell Peter Cattipodi that the person who came and got this cappillaire, was a swarthy man? - I gave him no answer at all, for I told him I could tell him nothing about it, for I did not take notice; he asked me if he had not such breeches on? I told him I was not able to say.

Mr. Knapp. So he asked you a great many questions, what sort of a man be was? and you told them you could not tell him as you said in your first examination and they tried to make you do it? - Yes.

ISAAC CATTIPODI sworn.

Q. What are you? - I am brother to the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Where did you live Wednesday the 3d of July last? - I lived with Sir Robert Blackmore , Esq. in Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields.

Q. Where was you on the 3d of July? - I went to my father's, it was in Mansfield-place, Kentish-town, about twelve o'clock.

Q. Who was at the house when you went there? - My brother was there packing up some linen, because my father was going to move.

Q. How long did you stay there? - Till night, about nine o'clock.

Q. Can you take on yourself to say with any kind of certainty, whether the prisoner at the bar was in the house that day? - Yes, he was there all that time.

Mr. Const. Do you remember seeing Mr. Moore there? - Yes, I do, he came in about two o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Where is your father Peter Cattipodi ? - He is not in town, he has been out about a week.

Q. Do you recollect where he went to about a week ago? - I do not.

Prisoner. Thomas Moore was often at the place of my father's, in Kentish-town, even at the time of our moving he got a similar note changed with a person of that town.

GUILTY . Death (Aged 19)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-23

482. JOHN TILBURY and WILLIAM COLEMAN were

indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , three cotton quilted counterpanes, value 5l. the goods of Henry Newcomb .

JOHN ROSE sworn.

I am a carrier from Hackney to London; I had some property stole from me the 21st of July last, Monday, it was about five o'clock; I had a small box to deliver in Leather lane, Holborn , and I left my cart at the corner while I was absent; I lost a bundle, three quilted marfellies counterpanes, cotton, I left my cart about the space of ten minutes; it was a little before five in the afternoon; when I came back I immediately missed them; there was no direction on them at all; I took them from Henry Newcomb's, Devonshire-place, Oxford-road; I see them when I left the cart, I am sure of that; it is a covered cart. I see them on the Wednesday following, in the hands of George Longman, one of the officers belonging to the police office, Hatton-garden.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners near the cart? - No.

Q. When did you first hear of the prisoners? - On Wednesday, from one James Hall. I was going to take them from Henry Newcomb 's to Richard Newcomb 's the son of Henry Newcomb , at Hackney; they were going down to be washed.

Mr. Alby. What time was it you called at Mr. Newcomb's? - About three o'clock, or it might be between three and four.

Q. Who delivered them to you? - The housekeeper, in a bundle wrapped up.

Q. You immediately put them in your cart? - Yes.

Q. How can you take on yourself to say it contained counterpanes; you did not see them opened? - No; there was a cord tied about them, and I see them packed up.

PATRICK SHINE sworn.

I work at bricklayer's labouring; I came from a job belonging to my master, the 30th of July, to our cellar for some stuff, and I heard a rustling noise come into the passage, over my master's cellar; it is in Castle-street, Holborn; the passage runs between Castle-street and Dyer's Buildings; this was about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. How far is this from Leather-lane? - Not much more than across the street. I heard this noise come from Castle-street towards my master's door; and I heard a voice, d-mn your eyes, here they come in Castle-street; and I ran and looked up out of the cellar into my master's yard, and a man came and dropped a bundle, which afterwards I opened, and found it to be three counterpanes; and then he took hold of the door and pulled it to, and latched it, after he had dropped the bundle in the passage; he shut himself out, and he went out of the yard; he shut the bundle inside of the door, in the yard; when I saw him pull the door after him, I came out of the cellar as soon as I could, and I opened the door; there was him and another, as I supposed, to be just at the beginning of a run from the door, for Dyer's Buildings, and one of them said, d-mn your eyes, you have put them in the wrong place, and they turned back, both of them turned towards the door, and I pushed the door to as far as I could, and the force of the two against it, I could not push it so as to latch it; I was inside, they were outside, in the passage; I said to them, what have you put this bundle here for? I called out for master's clerk, and they ran off; he came down, and I took up the bundle and opened it, and found it to be to be three counterpanes, as they call them. When I opened the bundle, I

tied it up agian, and gave it up to my master's clerk.

Q. Who were the people that brought the bundles in this way? - That is the man in the red coat that laid the bundle down, Tilbury; I cannot tell who the other man was, because this man that was nearest to inside of the door I could see him, but the other that was outside I could not take notice of.

Q. After you had these counterpanes, how did you get at the men? - As I went with the stuff to where my bricklayer was at work, I was turning into a court into Fetter-lane, and I saw a publican that keeps the White Hart, at the corner of King's Head-court, Fetter-lane, and I was telling him what happened in master's yard, while I was away, and this man, Tilbury, came up, and said, I have kicked up one of their heels just now, I knowed him directly, and I asked him do you know one? says I, so with that I went up with the stuff to the bricklayer, and I went back to my master's yard, and there was this man in his shirt sleeves in the yard.

Q. How came you to leave the man if you knew him? - I brought the bricklayer down along with me to the White Hart, and the publican told us that this man shot into Holborn like a dart, and I found him in my master's yard, demanding these things in his shirt sleeves, and when I first saw him he had on a blue coat.

Q. Who was in the yard then? - Two clerks and a footman, and one or two of the labourers; I told our clerks to stop him, when he turned about and saw me, then he says, I will go and get my master and he shall prove the property; and I said, you are the man that put the property down, I will swear to it; and then he got off, and I did not see him again till Thursday week following.

Q. How came the other man taken? - In about a quarter of an hour he sent two men, they said he sent them, they came in and demanded the things as he did, Coleman was one of the two that came, him and the other man was stopped.

Q. Do you think you should know the counterpanes again? Was there any thing over them? - Nothing, over them but a piece of jack line I made no mark on them.

Mr. Alby. What are you? - I have worked at bricklayer labouring for this seven or eight years.

Q. I take it for granted you are a very faithful attentive servant? - I have a right to be so, my master pays me very well for it.

Q. You had been at work abroad? - Yes.

Q. You came home for some stuff and instead of attending to get the stuff you heard some conversation, and then you ran up to see what this conversation was? Was that the usual way you attend your master's business? - I ran up to see what the bundle was, I saw it in the yard from the cellar.

Q. Then I ask you how you came to know it was there? - I saw it put down by a man in the yard, while I was in the cellar.

Q. Some time after this you met the prisoner at the bar in the street? - He came up and stood where I was in the street.

Q. What was the reason you did not stop him then? - I was unable, after falling down the day before.

Q. Could not this landlord have taken them into custody? - I did not ask him.

Q. Why did not you ask him? - I don't know.

Q. I believe you told the prisoner at the bar, that this man was foolish in running away? - I told the publican so.

Q. Was not Tilbury by at the time? - I knowed him to be one of them.

Q. Why did you say they were fool sif you knew him to be one? - I was telling the publican, and he came up.

Q. How came you to mention this if Tilbury was by? - I thought he might come back to demand the things, and then there was somebody would stop him; a man in many instances may not have in his power to do what he would wish; and besides, how did I know but what that man might spend more money in the publican's house than ever I did.

Q. Do you think then the landlord would have refused you? - They tell me it is not a landlord's business, and one customer is as good as another.

RICHARD BLASSON sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Norris. On Monday, July the 21st, the prisoner Coleman, and another, came into Mr. Norris's yard, and another man, that is not here present, he is outside of the door, to demand three counterpanes; I asked him, from what authority he came? Tilbury had come first to demand them, but I had suspicion that he did not belong to them, and he said, he would go and get his master; I asked him whose they were? and the other man said, that he was master of the cart, and his name was John Rose; and I said, I did not know that, and I sent a labourer out to see if such a cart was standing as he said, at the end of Leather-lane; on that I refused to give him them, and I sent for an officer from Hatton-garden, and they were both taken into custody; the other man turned evidence; I delivered the things into the hands of the officer, and he took them before the magistrate, at Hatton-garden.

GEORGE LANGDON sworn.

I am one of the public officers at Hatton-garden; I know no further than I was sent for, Patrick Shine came down to the office, and wanted an officer, and I went with him to Fetter-lane, to a Bricklayer's yard, where they had secured the two prisoners before I went, when I went into the yard they had got the two prisoners in the yard, Coleman, and the other that is turned evidence, and there were three counterpanes that they suspected these men had stolen; I have had them in my possession ever since, I have kept them till now.

GEORGE EWERS sworn.

I am one of the officers belonging to the public office Hatton-garden; by the information I received of Stephen Taylor , I apprehended Tilbury, the prisoner at the bar.

ANN ABERDEEN sworn.

I belong to the house where these counterpanes came from, I am house keeper to Mr. Henry Newcomb .

Q. What day did you deliver these things to the cart? - The 21st of July, between three and four in the afternoon, three carpets; the carman's name was John Rose , they were only tied about with a cord, I should know them again.

Q. Were there any marks on them? - Not to the best of my knowledge, I can swear to the dirty state I found them in, they were going to be washed.

Q. Were there any stains on them? - To the best of my knowledge there were none; I know them by the pattern, and by the long time I have been used to them; I am positive they are the same I delivered to the carrier.

Mr. Alby. Are not these a kind of counterpanes that are generally in use in gentlemens houses? - Undoubtedly. I can

swear to these with a safe conscience, I am positive of it.

STEPHEN TAYLOR sworn.

Q. You have been turning King's evidence I understand? - Yes.

Q. Then you come here to save the prosecution of yourself; you must tell us the whole truth; how long have you known the prisoners? - I never was in their company before, I never knew any one of them, only by sight; I was standing at the back door of the Swan public house, in Field-lane, I saw Tilbury and Coleman coming down the passage; Tilbury came up to the door and says to the man that keeps the house, the things is good now; with that I went up to ask what they were; they said, they were three counterpanes, and they said, if I went after them, and said I was master of the cart, I might get them; they said they had dragged them out of a cart just by Leather-lane, Tilbury said that.

Q. Was that in the hearing of Coleman? - Yes; I had got on a silk handkerchief, and Tilbury proposed to let me have his white one, because it would make me look more like the master of the cart; I have got the handkerchief now in my possession; then Coleman and I went up Holborn, and as I went up Holborn, Coleman told me that he was not with him when they were stole; he took me to the place where they were, and went in first, and says, here is my master, with that I followed in afterwards, and they asked me if I was the master of the cart? I said no, I said I was the master's son, with that they said they should detain us, and send for an officer; and we were detained.

Mr. Alby. You say you did not know these men, till you met them on this day? - I did not know them, only by seeing them by sight.

Q. Then it must have been a very good natured thing, that these men should come and tell you they had taken things out of a cart? - I had spoken with Coleman. asking him how he did? I know him by sight.

Q. Did not you at this moment say you never spoke to neither of them before, only knew them by sight? do you think if you had robbed a cart you would come and tell me of it? - I never was with either of them in my life.

Q. Do you swear that positively? - I do.

Q. Give me leave to ask you whether you never was witness in a court before? - Never.

Q. Ever prosecuted in a court before? - Never was.

Q. Never a bill of indictment preferred against you before? - Never was.

Q. Where was you eighteen months back? - In place, and kept it till I had the accident to break my arm.

Q. Was not you accused of burglary yourself? - No.

Q. Do you wish your credit rested on that? - I never was.

Q. Did you ever tell Coleman so? - I never did.

Q. When did you see Coleman last? - Today.

Q. You have had frequent conversations with him since he has been in prison? - I never spoke to him but to day.

Q. Recollect, did you never tell Coleman that you had been indicted here for a burglary yourself? - Never to my knowledge, if I did I was wrong.

Prisoner Coleman He told me so in New Prison? - I never told him so, to the best of my knowledge.

Prisoner. And he told me so before a young fellow's face, that he wanted to beat, because he would not go out and pick pockets with him.

Q. Was it this man and I that were together? - They came down the passage together.

Q. You know you stand here to save yourself, and you will be a free man if you convict these men, don't you understand it so? - Yes, I do.

Q. Then you will not acknowledge what you said to Coleman? - No, I will not acknowledge it.

Prisoner Tilbury. I never saw this man or the other with my eyes before I saw them at the justice's.

Coleman. I never was in company with this man in my life, I don't know the man.

Tilbury called one witness to his character.

Mr. Alby to Ann Aberdeen Is not this quilt wove? - It is quilted with the weaving.

Court. Have they the appearance of quilted counterpanes? - They are marseilles quilted counterpanes.

Q. Are they made in imitation of quilted counterpanes? - They are, they are made in a loom.

Q. Are they made in imitation of women's quilting or not? - They are not at all times.

Q. Are these made to imitate a woman's quilting or not? - Yes.

Mr. Alby. What is the distinction of the appellation that is given between quilting done with the needle, and quilting done with a loom? - What is done with a needle we call a quilted coverlid, but that with the loom, a marseilles quilted.

Court. Counterpanes that are made by women, are they made of linen, or cotton? - Just according to a person's choice.

Q. Then this sort of thing you would describe as a cotton quilted counterpane? - No, they are marseilles cotton quilted counterpanes.

The court here informed the jury that the indictment was wrong laid, and they must acquit the prisoners, and ordered a new prosecution .

NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-24

483. JANE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , a quart pewter pot, value 1s. 2d. the goods of Edward Wilson .(The case opened by Mr. Const.)

JOHN VINCENT sworn.

I live in Chandler's-street, Grosvenor-square, No. 8. On the 14th of August I was sitting at the door opposite my lodging, in Chandler's-street; the prisoner past a man who was just by me, and he thought she had some pots in her pocket, he stopped her, and called me to assist him, to take the pots from her, I held her petticoats while he took this quart pot; she had long pockets below her knees, and there was in it a quartern measure, cut with a knife, and the landlord and landlady desired I would take her into custody, because they knew her to be an old offender; and I secured her till the the watchman came and carried her to Mount-street watch-house.

Q. What became of the pot that day? - Mr. Wilson has had it in his possession; this is the pot, there are no marks on it, the gentlemen at Marlborough-street office gave it to Mr. Wilson, I put a mark on the pot as soon as I took it from the woman, I know it by the mark, and when I gave it to Mr. Wilson at the office I wrote my name on it.

Q. Did she give you any account of it? - She did not say any thing, but she

found it, that was all they could get out of her.

EDWARD WILSON sworn.

On the 15th of August a watchman came to me, and asked me if I had lost any pots? I told him yes, I had been in the habit of losing a great many pots, says be, if you go to Mount-street watch-house, I dare say you will see some there; accordingly I went, and I saw this pot there, it has my own name, and my own mark on the handle, three letters put on by the maker; it was delivered to me by the justice's order, and I have kept it intirely distinct from all other pots.

Q. How long have you kept that public house? - Nearly seven months.

Q. Have you ever sold any pots? - No, never.

Prisoner. As I was coming home I picked it up in the street, I don't know the gentleman that owns it, I never was in his house in my life.

Court to Wilson. Did you ever see her in your house? - Not that I know of.

Court to Vincent, How far was she from the house of Mr. Wilson when you took the pot from her? - I dare say full a quarter of a mile.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-25

484. JOHN CASS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , a watch, with the inside silver, and the outside tortoiseshell, value 1l. 5s. a steel watch chain, value 3d. a base metal watch key, value 1d. a steel seal, value 1d. a pair of shoe buckles, value 15s. and twelve shillings, in monies numbered; the goods and monies numbered of James Steward , privately from his person .

JAMES STEWARD sworn.

I am a master baker . On Monday the 21st of July, in the evening I was put into the watch-house, in liquor, this prisoner was also put into the watch-house in the course of the night along with me; and in the morning I missed my property, I was put into the watch-house about half past eleven o'clock at night, and the watch was found on the prisoner, directly as he was taken before the justice, about half an hour after twelve o'clock in the next day, it might be.

Q. When did you last see your watch? - When I was last put into the watchhouse; I had a pair of leather breeches on, and the money was taken out of the pocket.

Q. Had this watch a chain, key, and seal? - Yes.

Q. Did you lose a pair of silver shoe buckles? - Yes, out of my shoes.

Q. Did you ever find them again? - Yes, they were laying there in the watch-house, broke to pieces.

Q. Why do you charge the prisoner with robbing you of them? - He endeavoured to take them out of my shoes, and broke them in getting them out.

Q. Had he pulled your shoes off? - No.

Q. When you awaked in the morning, or recovered from your stupidity, did you find your buckles broke in your shoes? - They were taken out of my shoes and broke.

Q. If they were broke how came they to be left in the watch house? - I don't know.

Q. Did not you feel these things taken from you at all at any time? - No.

Mr. Knowlys. You was in a most beastly state of intoxication, was you not? - I was in liquor.

Q. So drunk you could hardly stand? - Yes, I could stand.

Q. Where did the watchman pick you up, to put you in the watch-house? - Just by the watch-house.

Q. What time was it that you was wandering about the streets, in this drunken way? - About half past eleven.

Q. Where had you been drinking? - In Red Cross-street.

Q. In what company? - In very good company.

Q. I don't know that you was sober enough to know what company it was; do you know who they were? - Yes, very well.

Q. Did any of them see you home? - Not one of them.

Q. When had you last seen your watch? - When I was in the watch-house the constable saw it.

Q. I ask you when did you see it? How much had you drank that night? - I did not measure it.

Q. Do you know what you paid for your liquor? - Yes, I know what I paid; I paid five shillings.

Q. Pray what was the liquor you had been drinking? - I had a supper too.

Q. What was the liquor? - Punch.

Q. You was so mortally drunk you hardly recollect what past at the time? - Yes, I do.

Q. Perhaps you recollect better when you are drunk than when you are sober? - No, I cannot; but I recollect very well what past that night.

Q. I believe the prisoner at the bar was searched by Blackiter, was not he? - Yes.

Q. He was searched by Blackiter first, and nothing was found on him? - Not by Blackiter first.

Q. His coat was pulled off, was not it; - I did not see it.

Q. Did not you understand it from Blackiter or from any body else, that he had been searched before, and his coat pulled off, and the watch was not found? - His coat was not pulled off till Blackiter found the watch on him.

Q. How long was there between the two searches? - I cannot say.

Q. Do you mean to tell these honest gentlemen, that you cannot tell what time elapsed, though you recollect so well the other circumstances? - I cannot exactly; it might be five or ten minutes.

Q. They went back to the watch-house to see whether the watch was there? - Yes.

Q. If they went back to the watch-house, it must be by your direction? - I told them two hours before I came out of the watch-house, that I had not got my watch nor money.

Q. On your oath, was it not more than ten minutes that they were gone from the watch-house? - I cannot say.

Q. Was it not an hour? - I cannot say.

Q. Was it not three hours? - I cannot say.

Q. Do you think it was one? - I cannot say.

Q. You must have recollected a great deal; and yet you cannot say whether it was an hour, two, or three hours? - I cannot say how long it was, because I was not in the lock-up-house with him.

Q. But you missed them while they were gone to the lock-up-house. Where was you while they went to the lock-up-house? - I was in the public house.

Q. How came you to be at the watch-house? - I quarrelled with the watchman.

JOHN GASS sworn.

I am headborough of St. Luke's parish. I was on duty at the watch-house the

21st of July, the prosecutor was brought to me for quarrelling with the watchman; he appeared very much in liquor; I could not get out of him where he lived, nor any thing else; I was obliged to put him in the Cage till the next morning. About one o'clock the prisoner at the bar was brought to the watch-house by the watchman, as a disorderly person in the streets; the prosecutor was brought between eleven and twelve; the prisoner came about one, in company with another.

Q. How was he, drunk or sober? - Sober. I told him it was troublesome times, it was not proper to be out that time of the morning; I searched him, and asked him if any body knew him to give him a character? and I would let him go; the watchman came and I let him go. About three o'clock I took him again, with some lead about him; I searched him and found a knife and key, and seven farthings on him; I returned him that money, but the key and knife I kept; I then put him in the Cage, where the prosecutor was for an assault. At twelve o'clock the same day, I took them both down to Worship-street; the prosecutor told me in the coach, before the watchman, that he had lost his watch, twelve shillings in money, and his buckles broke, and he shewed me his buckles there; I said, have you really lost the things; he seemed to smile, and said, yes. I have; the prisoner made answer and said, d-mn me, you will think that I have it presently; I said, there was nobody else could have it, if he had lost them. I took them to the office and called out Blackiter, and we took them to a lock-up-room to search the prisoner, and the first time we found nothing, but the second time we found the watch up the sleeve of his coat; it was a tortoise-shell watch case outside; Blackiter has the watch. In the presence of me, he says to the other, d-mn me, if I had known your buckles had been wedge(meaning silver) you should never have had them any more. I have something else to say: While the prisoner was in custody, the man was very unhappy about the watch; he says, I will make the officer find the watch, for putting in the thief along with me; with that I went back to the place, and searched all about the place, and did not find any thing, and we returned back, and searched him again and found the watch.

Mr. Knapp. You very fairly stated that the prosecutor was extremely drunk? - Indeed he was persectly drunk.

Q. Was you by when Blackiter made the first search? - I was.

Q. Will you state to the jury whether you made your search very strictly? - We did not.

Q. Did you pull his coat off? - We did not.

Q. How did you search him? - We searched his breeches, and round about him.

Q. Did the prosecutor appear to be tumbling about in the street, as drunk as that? - No.

Q. How came his buckles broke? - I cannot tell about that; it was done in the Cage, it was not done in the street, because they were not broke when I put him in.

Court. Did you see whether his buckles were safe when he was brought in? - They were in his shoes, and did not appear broke.

WILLIAM BLACKITER sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Worship-street. Gass brought the prisoner in the morning, to the office, and gave charge of him; the prosecutor told me that he had been robbed in the watch-house.

Q. Where did he say this? - In the public house, next to our office; and I asked him who had been in the watch-house with him? He said nobody but the prisoner at the bar; I said to Gass, we had better search the prisoner at the bar; and we went and searched him, and found eighteen-pence on him, in silver, but no watch; and I sent Gass back to the watch-house, for fear the watch was there; and when Gass came back we searched him again, and found the watch, we took his coat off, and we found the watch rolled up in his sleeve; I have kept the watch till now.

Mr. Knapp. Blackiter, how long have you been an officer? - Ten or twelve years.

Q. In that time you must have searched a great many people, in the course of your profession? - Yes.

Q. So you searched the first time, and had not the good fortune to find the watch? - It was so.

Q. You searched him in the usual way I suppose. How much time might elaple between the first and second examination? - Half an hour, not more.

Q. I believe the prosecutor was extremely drunk? - He seemed very ill used when I see him.

Q. Did not the prosecutor charge Mr. Gass, with having given him his watch, at the time he was in the watch house? - Upon my oath, I did not hear that.

Q. Now, you say, the second search was half an hour after the first search, and you mean to have these gentlemen believe that you, who has been an officer ten or eleven years, did not make your search in the usual way the first time? - We did the first time, but did not take off his coat.

Q. How happened it you was not so strict at this time as at other times? - I don't know.

Q. Did not the prisoner say, that the prosecutor said, that he had delivered the watch to Gass? - No, I never heard that till now.

Q. Then if Mr. Gass has been saying so in Court, you never heard it before? - I never heard it.

Q. Have you had any conversation about this business altogether? - I have had none; I did not want any conversation.

Court to Gass. Was this watch delivered to you by this drunken man the over night? - No, nothing at all was delivered to me. The officer was in a very great hurry when he searched him the first time, having business to do in the office.

Court to Blackiter. Had you the care of the buckles as well as of the watch? - No, the prosecutor has the buckles himself.

Prosecutor. These are the silver buckles, they are mine, I know them by the mark and pattern; they are the buckles I had in my shoes.

Mr. Knapp. How long had you had them? - About three years.

Q. Is there any other mark that you can swear to them but the pattern? - No, no other than that I swear that the buckles are mine. This piece has S. on it; I put it on about twelve months ago, to know one side from the other, to put the straps in right.

Court. Did you buy these buckles new when you bought them? - Yes, I did, It is a cross.

Mr. Knapp. Just now you told me that you should know it by an S. which does not appear? - I made a mistake, it is a cross.

Court. Did you mean the cross when you said the S. or do you mean a separate and different mark? - I meant the cross.

HUGH LUCY sworn.

I am a watchman. On this night, what I saw first and foremost was, Mr. Steward, he was very much in liquor, like a mad man, and was obliged to be carried into the Cage by hands and feet, the officer of the night said they had got a mad man in the watch-house, and asked me to come in to him.

Q. Was he sober? - I don't know, he could not stand, he was very obstreperous.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing about his watch the next day? - I did. When in the coach, he said, that he thought the officer had his money, and likewise his watch; and the prisoner made answer and said, d-mn me, I suppose you think I have the watch; and the prisoner was searched, and the first time he did not find the watch.

Q. Did he say any thing about having delivered the watch to Gass when he came into the watch-house the first time? - No, he did not.

Court to Prosecutor. Is that your watch? - It is, I have no doubt about it; I can swear to it by the maker's name, George Peters , No.14033; I have had it about three years; I bought it.

GUILTY, Of stealing the watch, but not privately .

(Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-26

485. MARY ANN OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , nine muslin handkerchiefs, value 13s. a callico gown, value 4s. a dimity petticoat, value 2s. a muslin apron, value 1s. a linen apron, value 6d. a pair of silk stockings, value 7s. a lace cap, value 5s. a linen shift, value 4s. a pair of stays, value 3s. the goods of Charles Picault .

CECILIA PICAULT sworn.

I am the wife of Charles Picault , I live in Jermyn-street .

Q. Do you carry on any business? - No.

Q. Do you know of your husband having lost any thing on the 3d of August? - Yes; we lost all the things in the indictment; I lost them from the bed room in which they were kept; it was the 3d. of August the things were found; she gave part to a person who detected her, and the rest were found in her trunk.

ELIZABETH DEWMAN sworn.

This person, the prisoner, brought a quantity of handkerchiefs to my house to wash them out, the 2d of August, which I suspected, from the marks, to be Madam Picault's, having the initials of her name on them in red ink; she was charewoman to my house; there was a cap, which struck me more than the rest, that I had made for the lady, and I took it to the lady, to enquire if she had given it her; and she said, she had not, she had stole it; and so the prisoner sent for a warrant to take me up, because I would not deliver them to her; which was the means of her being brought to justice.

Q. Do you live near Mrs.Picault's? - I live at No. 30, Broad-street, Carnaby-market; I work for Mrs. Picault.

Q. To Prosecutor. Did the prisoner work at your house? - She was called in to attend my husband; he was very ill.

Q. Was she dischargel from her atten lance at that time? - I fancy she was just left.

ELIZABETH ATKINSON sworn.

The prisoner brought the handkerchiefs to me to mark M. O. before the 2d of August, the latter end of July; all within one fortnight; the cap to make, and the petticoat to tuck; she said that she had had them in pledge a considerable time, and she had got a little money, and she had taken them out of pledge. There were several marked with red ink in the middle, some C. C. and some C. P.

Prosecutrix. They are mine.

Q. What was your maiden name? - Caddin. They were my handkerchiefs before I was married.

Prisoner. These stockings I sold to Mrs. Dewman, the 30th of June, and I had them of a valet, who lived in St. James's-square, for money that he owed me, when he went abroad with an officer to Valenciennes; the gown and part of the handkerchiefs I bought of some lady's valet or page, and never altered the gown till the time I took my money of Mrs. Picault. I formerly got my bread by service; I bought the lace when I lived at Sir Peter Barrel 's.

Court to Prosecutrix. Were these, the handkerchiefs, cap and other things that you have looked at, in your house about the 2d of August? - No, I missed them before that; but I did not know who took them, therefore I did not mention it; I missed them in the month of July.

Prisoner. I have sent to none of my friends, because that I knew I was innocent. When I nursed her husband, she gave me a guinea, and made me a present of four handkerchiefs, two whole and two darned; she sent me out for the nankeen to make the stays, and I brought the person for her to pay the money to, and she made me a present of the petticoat and shirt.

Prosecutrix. I never gave her any of the things; she told me she had things in pawn; but the stockings are marked with my name and the handkerchiefs.

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-27

486. ISABELLA WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , half a crown, and one shilling and six-pence in money ; the monies of Samuel Fox .

SAMUEL FOX sworn.

I had the money taken out of my pocket, and I suspected the prisoner, and I took her up, and delivered her to the watchman; there were two of them. The other one picked up this one's patten, which she throws off her feet to run up a court, with the money; the other one I took her to the watch-house first, to secure her, to find out this; and I came back, whereabouts I had lost my money in the street, and there I found the other one, (I live at No. 15, Wigmore-street, Cavendish-square) I took her by the hand, and held her, and charged the watchman with her; the watchman took her to the watch-house. On Monday morning, she went to Marlborough-street. and she offered to pay me the money, and his Majesty would not let her, she offered to pay me the same money I lost, which was one half crown, one shilling, and six pence; the magistrate said, he durst not do it, to let her make it up.

Q. The two persons then were together? - They came up to me together as I was going along.

Q. How did she get your money? - The prisoner dipped her hand into my waistcoat pocket, while she was discoursing with me.

Prisoner. I was going up Oxford-road last Saturday night was a week, going up as far as a court that leads into Oxford-market; I met the two women, and the prosecutor stood talking to them; I could mention their names, I knew them, and I asked them how they were? With that he cursed his eyes, and said, he had been looking for me these two hours; he said, I had robbed him of three guineas, and he would take me to the watch-house. I went with him to the justice's on Monday morning; and he said, I had robbed him of half a crown, one shilling, and six-pence, and he took me over to the public house, and said, if I would give him three shillings, he would make it up; with that I pawned the handkerchief off my neck, and my apron, and sent home for an old bed gown, to give him the money; and he went to the justice's to get me discharged, and he sent me here. The witn sses that were there were two constables, that saw me give him the money, the three shillings.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you know this woman before? - No, I never see her before.

Q. Was it light or dark? - Eleven o'clock at night; it was a thick cloudy night, not moon light.

Q. How soon afterwards did you take her up? - In one hour, it did not exceed an hour before I came back from taking the other to the watch-house, and I found her coming out of the court that she ran into.

Q. Was any body present when she offered you the money? - Yes, there was the watchman that I delivered her to; he is not here.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before

Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-28

407. CATHARINE WATTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a toilet waistcoat, value 4s. the goods of Hector Essex and Thomas Dobson .

THOMAS DOBSON sworn.

I am partner with Hector Essex ; we are pawnbrokers ; I lost a waistcoat, Friday the 1st of August, a striped toilenet, out of the shop; I had seen it there that day at the door, I hung it up last myself; about six in the evening, the prisoner at the bar, accompanied with a jew, came in to sell some ribbons, and she left the ribbons, and in about half a minute she came in for the ribbons again; I gave them her; she went to the door, and when she went to the door, she unpinned this waistcoat, and then she and the jew went away; and a servant belonging to Mr. Henderson, the sadler, opposite, came in and asked if we had sold the woman a waistcoat? I told him no. We pursued her; she was taken going into a public house, within three minutes after.

THOMAS JAMES sworn.

I saw the prisoner with two men, go into Mr. Dobion; they had been the space of about two minutes, and the prisoner came to the door, and put her hand up and unpinned something and I observed the waistcoat drop on the floor,

inside of the door; she withdrew short into the shop out of my sight; she came out with the two men in about two minutes. I sent over a young man to enquire of Mr. Dobson if he had lost a waistcoat? he said, he had; and he sent a young man after them. I did not see the prisoner afterwards, till I see her before the magistrate.

JOHN EDMONDS sworn.

On the the first of August, about six in the evening, I pursued the prisoner at the bar on information that we had lost a waistcoat; I took her, it did not exceed three minutes nor so much; I found the waistcoat wrapped up in her apron; I have got it here.

Dobson. This is my waistcoat.

Prisoner. This young man, John Edmonds, has spoke wrong, he was not by or present at all.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Right honourable judge, and gentlemen of the jury, give me leave to address you in behalf of the situation I now labour under. I have a small family, and labour hard to support them, and always through life had an honest and upright character till this affair happened. I called this day at this shop for some property that I had in their hands; but he not having time to answer me, desired me to call a second time, which I did; coming out of there two men asked me to go with them to drink, I went with them, and was standing at the public house door when the prosecutor came in and searched the two men, but found nothing; he likewise searched me, and sees plainly I had nothing about me; there were many people in the house, and the man went away, and the waistcoat was found under the table; I can give no further or juster account. Honoured gentlemen, this is the truth, and I hope you will consider it as such, in pity to my helpless children.

The prisoner called Samuel Lewis who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-29

481. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , three pair of worsted stockings, value 2s. the goods of William Mac Dowell .

WILLIAM MAC DOWELL sworn.

On the 17th of August, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I was in the back part of my shop, I live at No. 118, Tottenham-court-road , I heard something, went to the door, and saw the watchman bringing the prisoner to my shop door.

JAMES TIMSON sworn.

I am sergeant of the night. As I was on my duty, near ten o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner standing by the window of Mac Dowell 's shop, which occasioned me to stop a little while to see what he was after; I then saw him put his arm in and take a bundle; with so doing I ran up to him, in order to take hold of him; he ran into the road and threw the bundle down; I laid hold of the prisoner and brought him into the shop; some people of the mob picked up the bundle and gave it to me; I have got the bundle, it is three pair of stockings. The prisoner begged I would send him to sea, or for a soldier; I told him it was not in my power to do it. He was given into

the hands of a constable; I have the stockings.

Q. Did you charge him with taking them? - Yes.

Prosecutor. I know these stockings to be mine, by the mark, the price, I put on them, when I put them in the window.

WILLIAM WHITEMAN sworn.

I was the constable of the night; the stockings were given into my custody at the magistrate's, and I was ordered to take care of them, and they have been in my custody till now.

Jury to Timson. Did he break the glass, or take them out at the shop door? - He reached his arm in at the shop door.

GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-30

489. HENRY BRADFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , three linen sheets, value 12s. a cotton gown, value 8s. a cotton petticoat, value 2s. nine mens linen handkerchiefs, value 9s. two linen neckcloths, value 2s. four womens muslin handkerchiefs, value 5s. four linen caps, value 2s. two childrens linen frocks, value 2s. a pair of dimity pockets, value 1s. a woman's linen pocket, value 1s. the goods of Thomas Willis .

SARAH WILLIS sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Willis ; my husband is a porter ; I take in washing; I lost several things that were not my own, and several that were; I lost all the articles in the indictment; I went up stairs to dinner about twelve o'clock, Thursday, the 17th of July, a young man. John Lyle , came up and asked me if I was a washing? I said, yes; and he said, there was a stranger in the passage; and I ran down immediately, and I found the man with my property under his arm, going out of the door; I hallooed out stop thief! a person stopped him about twenty yards from the door; he had dropped the things, they were not taken on him; I have got the things; he took them out of the tub. I can swear to every thing but these foul handkerchiefs; they have been out of my sight, so I cannot swear to them.

- HUTCHINS sworn.

I know the last witness, and I know the prisoner at the bar, I stopped him; I saw him come out of the house with the property under his arm; I heard the cry of stop thief; he was about twenty or thirty yards off, he dropped the bundle, and then I ran after him, and stopped him.

JOHN LYLE sworn.

I saw the prisoner at Willis's house; I acquainted Mrs. Willis of it, and she ran down immediately, and saw the prisoner go out of the house.

Prisoner. I leave it entirely to your mercy.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-31

460. HANNAH DALBY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of August , three linen shirts, value 5s. the goods of John Watts .

JOHN WATTS sworn.

I cannot say that I know of the loss, I know that the shirts were lost; I know that I went to the pawnbroker's, and they had been pawned; I don't know the pawnbroker's name, he is not here.

SUSANNA WATTS sworn.

I missed the shirts on the 14th of August, four shirts and two neckcloths, I don't know who took them; the prisoner washed for me; I heard of them some few days before I went to the justice's, at Marlborough-street.

Q. How long after you missed them? - I believe three weeks. I found them at a person's house, where she told me.

SARAH PAGE sworn.

I bought the shirt that Mrs. Watts found at my house, of the prisoner at the bar, about three weeks ago; I gave her three shillings and six-pence a shirt.

Q. Did she give you any account of them? - No. I have got them.

Q. Are they new shirts? - No.

Prosecutrix. These are my husband's shirts; the mark is picked out; I can swear to them by the make of the linen.

Prisoner. I was in liquor, and I took them away.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940917-32

491. EDWARD DAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , an iron shovel, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Edward Brown .

EDWARD BROWN sworn.

I don't know the prisoner, I live at Knightsbridge ; I am a brazier, tinman, and ironmonger , I was not at home when the robbery was committed.

EDWARD BROWN , junior, sworn.

I am in my father's business, I know the prisoner, Thomas Dawson . On the 3d of September he came to my house with a whole handful of passes, my father being overseer, to be relieved, and a caution signed by the same magistrate; I told him my father was not at home; says he, if your father is not at home, you will do as well, and some of the women said, I will bed-mned if I go till we are relieved; then Mr. Gibbons called me out to see whether that was not our shovel that the man had got. I went out and took it from him, from behind his coat; I know the shovel, I marked it with the chalk, it is the way we mark them all, the value is eighteen-pence.

Prisoner. Did you see me take the shovel away from his place? - I did not.

ELEAZOR GIBBONS sworn.

I am church warden of the parish that Mr. Brown is overseer of, we are much pestered with vagrants, and on the 3d of September, the overseer not being at home, the prisoner came to my house about twenty

yards from Mr. Brown's, when he came there, I was on the opposite side of the way, not at my house, and I saw him pull a shovel out from under his coat and give it to a woman that had a child, and she could not conceal it, because of the child and she gave it him again, and he put it under his coat, and I followed him to the overseers and asked him what he had got? he said nothing to me, and we had a scuffle with him, and he sought and would have stabbed some of us if we had not got it away from him. I took it from him.

Prisoner. When he was coming into the shop I was putting the shovel down on the man's premises again.

Q. How came he to be found with this woman? - He had got a vagrant pass.

Prisoner. I go out to work at hopping. I have been under a sit of illness since, I met two men and they asked me to come and drink; and I went and we had several glasses of gin together, which made me almost intoxicated, I was not in the shop, the woman went in and fetched out a shovel, which she said she found on the road, and I went back again and carried it into the gentleman's house; if the gentleman will deny that I was not there with the shovel producing of it, then I am guilty.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-33

492. CATHARINE FLEMING was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of August , twelve pair of childrens cotton stockings, value 6s. the goods of Ralph Lonsdale .

RALPH LONSDALE sworn.

I was overseer of St. - parish , the prisoner at the bar came to my shop begging of me to give her an order permitting her to take her son from the infirmary; I refused her the order, having given her a similar one some time before; on leaving the shop she took the stockings.

Q. Did you see her take them? - No, the young man is here that see her take them.

Q. Did he belong to your shop? - No, a stranger.

GEORGE ALDUS sworn.

On Saturday the 2d of August, my wife and I was going to Carnaby market to buy something for dinner, I being very poorly for several days before, and the market being so thronged with people I rather staid on the outside till she came back, whereupon I discovered this woman taking the stockings from Mr. Lonsdale, I went over to Mr. Lonsdale's shop and informed him of it; he seemed at first not to give credit to it, the prisoner at that time got down the street, and I could not see her, on going down the street I met the woman, she came running past me, with that I followed the woman up to Mr. Lonsdale's shop, she took and turned herself round and went into the shop again, and I called Mr. Lonsdale out of the shop, and one of his friends came out and catched hold of the woman and brought her into his shop, then I gave Mr. Lonsdale my address where I lived, and where I worked; I am certain that is the woman.

JOHN CROUCH sworn.

On Saturday night the 2d of August, Mr. Lonsdale called on me and begged the favour of me I would step with him into George court, which I did, to a Mr. Fitzpatrick's where I supposed Catharine Fleming lodged, and in the yard on a wheelbarrow which stood there, I picked out this dozen pair of stockings covered over with straw.

Q. Was the prisoner taken up? - I believe so, Mr. Lonsdale said it was his property. I have had them in my custody ever since.

Q. To Lonsdale. What was done after the woman was brought to you the second time? - I sent her to the watch-house, my servant went with her.

Q. Why did you go to Fitzpatrick's? - Because she informed a friend of mine where they were, he heard her say where she lived, in my parlour, he is not here.

Q. Was you present when these things were found? - Yes, I was.

Q. Did you know she lodged at Fitzpatrick's? - Not till she told me so.

Q. Did any of them say that she lodged there? - yes, Fitzpatrick told me so himself.

Q. Have you ever had any conversation with the prisoner about it? - No, I have never seen her since till now.

Q. Did you miss out of your stock these stockings that are now contained in that paper? - Yes, after the young man informed me that she had taken them. I swear them to be my property.

Q. Within what time do you know that they were in your stock before you was told that some had been taken? - They came to me the night before from the manufacturers.

Q. You had never sold them to any body? - No.

Prisoner. Please you my lord I have got three children, one of my three children is in St. James's infirmary, (that is at the workhouse,) I applied to that gentleman to take my child out the Sunday morning till Monday, which he has always given me order for before, I had fish to sell that would be spoilt, as they would not keep over Sunday, so I went on Saturday night for the order, and he said he could not think of giving it me then, I left my barrow outside of the door, he said he could not think of giving it me that week, but he would the next, I came out to take the barrow home, I took it into the yard where I live in Cross-street, Carnaby-market, I wheeled my barrow into the yard where it always stands, and I saw the bundle of stockings in the barrow, and I thought that somebody when they had come for currants or apples had put it down; it was never touched, nor never untied, I took it up and put it down again as I found it, I went into the parlour, and I says, well, I will go for some butter, tea and sugar, I went for a quartern of butter, and came home with it, and went out again for tea and sugar, and that gentleman laid hold of my arm, and asked me for the stockings? I told him there was a bundle in the barrow, but how it came there I did not know; I went home to his house directly and he went to where I lived, and he took the bundle, and when he came back he charged the watchman with me. I have no witnesses, for it was all done in a few minutes; sometimes I have many things left in my barrow, which people leave, and come back again and have them. I have three children and never a father for them.

Prosecutor. When I took her, I told her if she would confess I would not hurt her, but she did not confess to me.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-34

493. THOMAS CROOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of July , a silver pint mug, value 2l. two silver table spoons, value 16s. six silver tea

spoons, value 12s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 6s. a linen table cloth, value 1d. two linen napkins, value 1s. the the goods of Sarah Nicholas , widow .

Indicted in a Second COUNT, for stealing the same, laying them to be the property of John Snooks .

SIMON LATTER sworn.

Sarah Nicholas is a pawnbroker , in Broad-street, East Smithfield, we were burnt out on the 23d of July; on the 24th the magistrate informed me that he had got some linen and plate, that he supposed to be ours; two table spoons, six tea spoons, a pair of tongs, and some napkins.

Q. In what house were they deposited? - I cannot say, we were obliged to move three times; I found the rest of the parcel, that was saved, down at Poplar; they were pledged in the name of Snook, by Elizabeth Holland, the 15th of April; she can identify the things.

Mr. Gurney. At this fire you had many persons to help you, some whom you did know, and some whom you did not know? - Yes.

ELIZABETH HOLLAND sworn.

I pledged some of these things with Mrs. Nicholas, the 15th of April, I pledged them for my own use; the property is my father's; this waistcoat that is with them is not ours; I pledged them in the name of Elizabeth Holland , for John Snooks .

GABRIEL JOHNSON sworn.

I am a fire-man, belonging to the new fire office. On the 24th of July, in the morning, after the large fire at Ratcliffe, I was on duty, then going down London-street, I met the prisoner at the bar, and saw something under his coat, underneath his arm, I thought he had something that did not belong to him, at that time of the morning, it was rather before five o'clock, the fire was still burning.

Q. How far from the fire was it? - It was almost to the sign of the Cricketers; I met him a great distance from the fire, I suspected that he had something that did not belong to him, I followed him into the public house, the Cricketers; he placed himself down on the bench in the tap-room, along side with his wife, as he said she was; and I went and stood by him for a minute, and I looked to see waht he had got under his coat; and I asked him what he had got there? he said, indeed, man, I have got my wife's sheets; I told him they did not look to be sheets, I insisted on seeing them, I told him I did not know but what it belonged to some gentlemen that were insured at our office, and he and I had a bit of a skirmish to get it from under his arm; when I got it from under his arm I see a table cloth, I asked him before I opened it, what was in the inside? he said he did not know, but whatever it was it was nothing to me; then I opened it, and took out his plate, I asked him how he came by them things? he told me he picked them up in the street; I looked on the cloth and found there was no dirt on it, and told him it was no such thing; then he said a genteel man gave them him, coming along the street; I asked him where the man lived? he said, he did not know nothing about him; then I called in one or two of my fellow servants, and we took him to the watch-house; as he was going along he tried to make his escape into a public house, below Limehouse, but we prevented him.

Mr. Gurney. The first thing that excited your suspicion, was, seeing him that time in the morning. Don't you know that he was burnt out that morning? - I don't know that.

Q. Did not you see his wife there in the public house, and his children? - I see his wife there as he said it was.

Q. Did not he desire you to stop a little, and that he expected for the man that gave them him to come there for them? - No, he did not, he told me I had no business with the property, it was his own.

JOHN COOPER Sworn.

I have known this man twelve or fourteen years, I was in company with the prisoner, Crooke and Housen that morning, in London-street, the 24th of July; there was a person gave him a bundle, and told him to take care of it, he said he would take it to the Cricketers, where his own things were; I know his house was burnt down.

Q. What sort of a bundle was it? - It was a bundle in a cloth.

Q. After he had received the bundle, which way did he go? - He went up London-street, towards the Cricketers.

Court. What time of the day was this? - A little after five o'clock in the morning.

Q. What sort of a man was it gave him the bundle? - It looked like a decent looking man.

Q. Had the man who gave it him an apron on? - I did not take notice.

Q. Had he his coat on, or only a jacket? - He had on a brownish coat.

Q. Had he a hat on? - Yes.

Q. Did he tell him to go any where with it? - He told him he would leave it where he had saved some of his own things, from the fire, at the Cricketers.

Q. Was this man that gave him the bundle, a tall man or a short man? - I don't think he was as tall as myself, I did not take much notice.

Mr. Gurney. How long have you known him? - Twelve or fourteen years, he is a very honest character, I would trust him with all I have.

JAMES HOUSEN Sworn.

I was in company with the last witness, Mr. Cooper, the morning after the fire at Ratcliffe, it was about five o'clock; I saw Mr. Crooke in London-street, I went to the bottom of London-street, towards where the fire was; Cooper and he were talking together, I had but very little acquaintance with this man, Crooke; he was telling Cooper how he was burnt out; he said he had saved a few things, and a man came up to him with a small bundle, it seemed to be a white bundle, and says to him, will you take care of this? I think you belong to the ballast office; he said he did, he said, will you take it to where these things of your's are, that you said you saved? he said it was at the Cricketers, in London-street, and he would take care of it, and presently after I parted with him.

Court. Did you take any notice of the man? Was he an old man? - He was a middle aged man, he had his hair tied behind, and a brownish coat on.

Q. Was he a working man? - He seemed rather better drest than a working man.

The prisoner called three witnesses besides to his character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-35

494. MARGARET MACARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , thirty yards of silk ribbon, value 15s. 6d. the goods of William Leaf and Benjamin Severs .

JOHN MACFALL sworn.

I live at 110, Fleet-street, I am a linen draper, I am a servant to William Leaf and Benjamin Severs. On the 6th of August we were robbed by this person charged at the bar, it was a Wednesday, between the hours of three and five o'clock; the prisoner came into the shop, and some Ribbons were shewn her by Charlotte Walworth; another of the witnesses here, Ann Leith , saw this person take a quantity of ribbons out of the shop where I was, and told me, I immediately went to Margaret Macarthy. I looked very earnestly at her, supposing she had taken the ribbon, and found she was a good deal embarrassed; seeing this, I immediately listed up her apron, and took a quantity of ribbon from under her apron; with this she withdrew from the counter, and another quantity of ribbon fell on the floor; in consequence of which I took that up also.

Q. Did the ribbon fell from her, or from the counter? - I suppose it fell from the counter, in consequence of her apron being withdrawn from the counter; she appeared so much confused, that she sat down, apparently, very much affected, whilst I called one of the partners, Benjamin Severs , and asked him what I was to do in this case? he immediately sent for a constable, that is here present, he came and took her to the Compter; the constable brought back immediately from her, some duplicates of some ribbons that that she had pledged at different places, they were patterns that were ours; she had made a practice of coming to the shop every day, I suppose six weeks before the the 6th of August, to have a yard and quarter of ribbon. I know these ribbons by the pattern, they are ribbons so well known, that they are not marked with the private mark.

Q. Had you any ribbon in the shop that belonged to any body else? - None.

Q. Can you say of your own knowledge that any ribbon was removed out of its place, except that that fell down on the counter, and that you took on removing her apron? - I cannot.

Q. Can you say that any were missing out of the drawer, of that pattern? - There was.

Q. How much in the whole might it be, that the prisoner dropped from under her apron, and that found under her apron? - The two pieces made thirty yards.

Prisoner. Did not I beg pardon of you when the ribbon fell on the ground, and you said, ask pardon indeed, and did not I stoop to pick it up as well as you? - She did ask my pardon as it fell down, and said she did not intend it, or something to the same purpose.

ANN LEAF sworn.

I was in the shop, I serve in the shop, I know the woman, she came into the shop on Wednesday the 6th of August, between the hours of three and five; she came into the shop, I was standing behind the counter, while she was looking at the ribbons; she applied to Charlotee Walworth, when she came in; I see her take the ribbon out of the drawer, one piece green and white, a striped ribbon, she put it under her apron.

Q. Was the whole drawer shewn to her at the same time? - Yes, all the drawer, I told it to Mr. Macfall, who came and took one from under her apron, and the other fell from the counter; I stood behind the counter and see them.

Q. Did that drop from under her apron? - One piece dropped from under her apron, that was green and white, but not the same pattern as the other; the

pieces were given to the constable, and he has kept them.

Q. Who picked them up? - Mr. Macfall, he kept them till the constable came.

Q. Do you recollect ever seeing her in the shop? - Yes, I have seen her in the shop before.

JOHN BONNER sworn.

I am a hair dresser by business, I am a constable of St. Bride's; the business was over when I got to the house, the ribbons were delivered to me in the same state as they are now, and the woman too. In searching her I found three duplicates, of pieces of ribbon, and they were found at the pawnbroker's, and they had them brought down, and they had them patterns on sale.

CHARLOTTE WALWORTH sworn.

Q. Did the woman come to you in the shop? - Yes, she asked me to shew her some ribbons.

Q. Did you shew her the drawer? - I did.

Q. Where these two patterns in the drawer when you shewed it her? - I am very certain of that.

Q. Did you see her take any out? - I did not.

Q. Had she bargained for any thing with you at all? - Yes.

Q. She had not taken them out by your leave to look at them? - No.

Q. Who first gave you notice that she had stole any thing? - I had no notice till I see them taken from her, and the other fell down from under her apron.

Q. Did you see them picked up? - I did.

Q. Can you swear to them? - I can.

Court to Macfall. What may be the value of these altogether? - Fifteen shillings.

Prisoner. I went to this person's house, the day I was committed, for half a skain of fourpenny thread, and some needles, and after I was served, there was some ribbons in the window, and I asked the lady the price? she said, seven-pence a yard; and I asked her if it was new fashioned? she said, no, it was old fashioned, butshe could shew me some very new fashioned ones, when the took out the drawer immediately, there was one ribbon there in particular, that she said was a very handsome one, and she unpinned it herself, and opened it, and asked me if I should like it? and she looked out one purple and green striped, at the same time she asked me how much I wanted (I had some currants in my apron eating at the same time) I told her a yard and a quarter; after she had cut me off a yard and a quarter, I paid her for it, and I paid her for the thread and needles; as I was turning about to go out, I felt something fall at my elbow; I said, I beg your pardon; and the man said, beg your pardons indeed, and they said I wanted to steal it, he took and laid it on the counter, and the other piece stood on the counter at the same time, and he said I meant to steal that too; they then sent for a constable, and took me to prison, and they took the yard and quarter of ribbon from me, that I had paid for. I hope you will pity my situation.

Court to Walworth. Did you sell her any thread and needles? - I did, and she paid for them, that she had first, and then asked for ribbon.

Q. Did you shew her either of these ribbons, or unpin them, and put them in her hands? - I did not.

Q. Did you put them on the counter at all? - I did not, I am perfectly sure of that.

Prisoner. I had fruit in my apron, and whether the ribbon was under my apron or no, I cannot say, the young woman

shewed me eight or nine pieces, before she picked out one that I liked.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-36

495. JOSEPH SAMUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10s. the goods of Joseph Bilson .

JOSEPH BILSON sworn.

I am a book-keeper to Mr. Cornelius Donnivall in Broad-street; I was robbed on Monday last, the 15th instant, of my silver buckles; I board with my son-in-law, Mr. Roberts, in Bishopsgate-street , and it is a customary way with me to buckle up my shoes of a morning, in my son's shop; this morning I put my buckles on the counter, going to buckle up my shoes, and sitting on a stool; the prisoner at the bar came in, and said, he wanted a knife; it was not quite eight in the morning. My son is a silversmith and engraver.

Q. Do you fell knives in that shop? - My son-in-law does. I told him that Mr. Roberts was not come down, but he would be down in a few minutes; I got up from the stool that I was sitting on, and rung the bell for him, but Mr. Roberts not coming down as quick as I could wish him, and the maid servant being in a room by the side of the shop, I left the boy in the shop, and went up one pair of stairs to call Mr. Roberts, I called him, when I got to the top of these stairs, and coming down the stairs, about half way, the prisoner darted out of the shop, immediately I see him, which gave me a suspicion that he had stolen something, and I hastened down stairs as fast as I could, the remainder part of the stairs, and got out of doors, and saw him running with all his might, along the street, then I called out stop thief! and he was stopped near the Bell inn, I saw him stopped, I saw a man take hold of his coat, and brought him forward; my next door neighbour, Mr. Trustee, and I seeing of that, went and met him and collared him, I brought him into the shop of Mr. Trustee, my next door neighbour searched him, I see him, and took the buckles from him out of his pocket; Mr. Trustee delivered him into the hands of the officer, whom I charged him with, Francis Bailey .

STEPHEN TRUSTEE sworn.

I know the prisoner vastly well, I see him in Bishopsgate-street, I see him go out of Mr. Roberts's shop, I followed, and took him by his left arm, and brought him back along with Mr. Bilson; when he got in doors I let go his arm, and he put his hand into his coat pocket, and I put my hand in along with him, and found a pair of silver buckles; Mr. Bilson said they were his, I put them into my pocket, till the constable came, when I delivered them to the constable.

FRANCIS BAILEY sworn.

I produce a pair of buckles that I had of Mr. Trustee, I have kept them ever since.

Prosecutor. They are my buckles, they were then on the counter, I have had them some years.

Prisoner. I was going with my brother to Spitalfields-market, to buy some pears, and I saw this shop where they sold knives, and I went in and asked for one; the gentleman went up to ring for his son, and a man at the door said to me, bring me them buckles to the Flower Pot , and I will give you six-pence, and I went to

give him the buckles, and the gentleman ran after me and brought me back.

JOHN HUDSON sworn.

I am an upholder, a house keeper; I have known the lad three years he was coming apprentice to me to learn the art and mistery of the upholstery business, I always thought him a very sober steady lad, his father keeps a clothes shop in Grub-street, No. 6.

The prisoner called two other witnesses to his character.

GUILTY. (Aged 12.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-37

496. FREDERIC PEYRON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , three oil umbrellas, value 15s. the goods of Thomas Hart .

THOMAS HART Sworn.

I am a hatter and umbrella maker , Bishopsgate-street . On the 8th of last May, between twelve and one, I came home and missed three silk umbrellas, when I missed them I enquired, and I heard in what manner they were lost; I had seen them in the shop before I went out, about ten o'clock in the morning, hanging up in the shop window, or on the counter

MARY MORRIS sworn.

I was servant to Mr. Hart at that time, but I am not now; my mistress calls me up out of the kitchen to go with this man to shew three umbrellas to some gentleman, my mistress was in the shop, she gave me the umbrellas, she did not say where I was to go but said, go with this gentleman to shew these umbrellas to some gentlemen, and bring me the money if any are sold; I went with the prisoner, and he took me to the Custom house, and when he came to the Custom house, he snatched them away from me, he says, I am going up into that room, to shew them to some gentlemen, and he went up stairs, which I went after him, he got into the room and the door was shut before I got up the stairs, when I got up the stairs I opened the door and observed a room full of gentlemen, whom I asked if there was not a man come in to shew some umbrellas? The answer they made me was, no; then I asked them what place it was? They told me it was the long room in the Custom house; which I went into the room and looked about, which there was no man to be found there, there was another door, which he went out at, which I was not acquainted with the place. The prisoner is the man.

Q. Did you ever see your umbrellas again? - No.

Hart. They have never been recovered.

Q. What is the value of them? - Sixteen shillings.

Prisoner. I promised to pay them when I received the umbrellas, I went to the shop of this gentleman, and the woman went along with me to the long room, and I told her I would pay her for the umbrellas when she delivered them to me.

Q. What countryman are you? - A Swede.

Q. Who did you tell that you would pay for the umbrellas? - The mistress's servant.

Q. To Morris. Your account is that he inatched them from you; did he say that he should pay you for them? - He did not. Before he spoke to me he snatched them from under this arm, and

said, I am going into that room; that was all the conversation that passed.

Q. You may have done a childish and foolish thing, in parting with these things to this man upon this promise of his; if you have you must say so? - He never said nothing to me, but snatched them from under my arm.

Q. To Hart. How did you find this man? - I made every endeavour I could to find him out; he was taken at Lloyd's coffee house, endeavouring to swindle a man about some china bugles; and he was advertised, and I took the girl before the alderman, and she swore to him, and gave the same account as she has now.

GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-38

497. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a hand saw, value 4s. a tenant saw, value 5s. the goods of Francis Hunt .

FRANCIS HUNT sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - I know nothing of him, only he has stole two saws out of my shop.

WILLIAM POWELL sworn.

I know the prisoner, John Smith; I am apprentice to Francis Hunt; the shop has a sore door and a back door; the shop is in Long-lane, West Smithfield; I was coming in at the fore door, and I see the prisoner go out at the back door, with two faws under his coat, on Friday the 6th of September.

Q. What is your master? - A carpenter . I ran after him, and called out stop thief! he threw the faws down, and was almost instantly secured by a young man that is here present.

Prisoner. I wish to know whether he saw my face or no? I am certain I never was in the place at all? - I am sure and confident of the person; he was taken directly within three minutes; I never was ten yards from him all the way.

Prisoner. There were two men running in green coats? - I saw none but the prisoner.

THOMAS RUGGLES sworn.

I was coming along, I heard the cry of stop thief! and I stopped this man on suspicion that he was the thief.

Q. Did he say any thing? - No, he did not speak a word to me.

Prisoner. I was following the man in the green coat, and I asked him why he stopped me rather than the man in the green coat.

Court to Powell. Whose saws were they? - The property of my master.

Prisoner. I was going down Cloth Fair, and I came to the back of this house, I saw a man running on before me, and then I ran as well as that man, turning the corner; I saw two saws lay before me, with that I ran strait on, not knowing which way the man went, and this other man says, stop thief! with that he stopped me, and I came along back with them; I asked them, says I, what do you stop me for?

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a character, and said, he was a cabinet maker, and had a wife and three children.

Jury to Ruggles. Did you see any other man running in a green coat? - Not a soul coming along that way.

GUILTY. (Aged 40.)

Judgement respited .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-39

498. WILLIAM FRANCIS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , a coachman's box great coat, value 1l. the goods of Thomas Black .

THOMAS BLACK sworn.

I am a coachman to Mr. Leverton; it was my coat that I had from my master that I lost; I saw the lad on the coach, taking the coat, just as I got off the wheel, and I went after him, and took him with the coat upon him, and after that I lost it again; this was the 28th of July.

JOHN PAYNE sworn.

I am a servant; I was desired to stand at the corner of James's-street, in the Hay market ; in the mean time this coachman drew up there, and wanted to draw round, and he got off the box to ask a hackney coachman to let him turn round, in the mean time he sees the prisoner on the wheel, stealing the box coat, he followed him, he got about twenty yards, and he took him with the coat on him, and while he was taking him to the watch-house, he ordered me to take care of the coat; I got on the box, and the coat was put there again; and there came a man and opened the chariot door, in order to steal the cushions and I got off the box to secure the cushions; in the mean time there was a man on the other side, took the coat again off the box, and I never saw no more of it after that.

Prisoner. They laid hold of me coming past, and said, I stole the box coat, and I never did any such thing.

GUILTY (Aged 14.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-40

499. JOHN RICHARD GITTINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , ten shillings , the monies of Henry Tibbs .

HENRY TIBBS sworn.

I was robbed on the 4th of August, at nine o'clock in the evening; I was going to Grosvenor-square; when I came in Lower Grosvenor-street , about the lower part, there were a number of people there to the amount of twenty or thirty, they stood part on curb stone, and part in the coach road, there was a quarrel, what the quarrel was about I could not tell, being lame, I thought that I could have got by before that they would come on the pavement steps, so as to interrupt me; but that was not the case, for they closed in upon me, on which I went to the rails, to get back on my crutches, to save my leg; I then was confined for a few minutes, there was a person pitched himself on my right hand side; I asked him what was the matter? Says he, some men have been a quarrelling; says I, that is a pity; so I stopped about two minutes; after that, I said, I will be much obliged to you to let me pass now, I think there is room enough; he said, you had better stop a little longer. When I went to go forward, and I felt something, and I said, what are you about, picking my pocket? No, says he, I am not, you had better stand still; with that he snatched his hand out of a sudden, and my pocket was turned inside out; with that he ran off; so with that I called out stop thief! and says I, I am robbed. In less than half a minute's time the prisoner was taken; it was not the prisoner at the bar that robbed me, it was one Shield that robbed me. I had just changed half a guinea, and had the ten shillings in my pocket, just before.

Mr. Knowlys. I would ask you, because I know you will tell us the truth,

did not you, at the watch-house, persist that he was not the man, and you had no charge against him? - I had not, but the other evidences have.

JOHN NICHOLLS sworn.

I don't so much as know the prisoner, I saw him at Marlborough-street, but I never saw him before to my knowledge.

JOHN GRUB sworn.

About nine o'clock on the 4th of August, I heard the cry of stop thief! upon which I immediately ran out, and when I came up to the mob, I saw the prisoner at the bar run up to a man, who was detained by several, he was taken hold of, he shoved up very close to the other man, and then burst away from him, on to the other side of the way; the people cried out this man has got the money; I immediately ran up to the man, and there were two men took hold of him; and he says, I am not the man, and then I was quite close up to the prisoner, and there was something dropped, which I took to he money, by the chink; he ran up Grosvenor-street, and he was catched in little Grosvenor-street; he said he was not the man, and he could laugh at us, because he was not guilty.

WILLIAM BULLOCK sworn.

There was a person of the name of Shields detained, and I saw the prisoner coming from Shields, in the middle of the street, nearer me, and somebody said, that is the man that has the money, and some thing tinkled on the ground like money, and he immediately ran off, and I pursued him, and overtook him at the corner of the first turning, on the left hand, in little Grosvernor-street, he said, he was not the the man; and said, come back then.

Q. How near was you to this person of the name of Shields? - About half a dozen yards.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-41

500. ROSE LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of September , a silver watch, value 1l. 1s. a steel watch chain, value 6d. a silver seal, value 1s. a metal seal, value 1d. the goods of Michael Cullen .

MICHAEL CULLEN sworn.

The prisoner Lloyd robbed me of my watch, I felt her take it out of my pocket while I was with her, Sunday night, I was in the Minories ; I was in the Minories, I was going home; I met her in the Minories, and she says, my dear, where are you going? and I said, what is that to you? I am going home. With that she followed me, and I asked her to go along with me, and asked her what she would have? She told me she would have a shilling; so I told her I would give her six-pence; and she took me up an alley, and I gave her six-pence, and as I was with her I felt her take the watch out of my left hand pocket; with that I charged her with it, and took her to the watch-house, and she denied the watch at the watch-house, and then the watchman insisted on searching of her; accordingly the pulled the watch out of her bosom, and the watchman would not let her go then, nor me neither, without I left my watch for security, to come on Monday morning eleven o'clock, which I did.

Prisoner. He gave me the watch on condition of going to a house with him, to take half a crown for myself, and a shilling for the room.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you give it her? - She picked my pocket while I was along with her; it was in my waistcoat pocket, I took it from my breeches pocket for safety, and put it in there; and there was a shilling in the pocket besides, and she did not take that; and directly that she took the watch, I asked her for it; and she said, she did not take it.

THOMAS COOPER sworn.

I am a watchman; I know the prisoner, Rose Lloyd; I took her up first, because I heard watch called.

Q. What did she say when you first took her up? - She denied having the watch; in the watch-house, when I prest on her, for her to be searched, she put her hand into her bosom and took the watch out, and gave it this Michael Cullen; She said, she would never do so any more; she said, that this Cullen gave it her as a pledge for half a crown, at some house.

Court to Cullin. You talked of an agreement for six-pence; did you give her the watch in pledge for two shillings and six-pence? - I never did.

Prisoner. I am an unfortunate person, and very poor, and I told the gentleman I knew a place for company, and he gave me the watch to take half a crown for myself, and a shilling for the room; and when he came into the watch-house, I honourably gave it him, before the company.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before

Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-42

501. PHILIP MAYLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of August , a silver watch, value 2l. a silver seal, value 1s. 6d. a metal watch key, value 2d. a steel watch key, value 1d. the goods of Ann Lamb .

ANN LAMB sworn.

I was robbed of a silver watch, on the 21st of August, with two metal keys, and a seal worth about forty shillings; I saw the prisoner, May and, in the parlour, I live in Great St. Andrew-street, Seven Dials .

Q. Had he any thing to do in the house? - No; I never see him before. The street door was a jar, and the parlour door stands just by the street door; I was gone across the way, and I saw him as I crossed back again, in the parlour where the watch hung; on that I called out what are you? you have robbed me; he ran out at the door, and I called out to a young man that is in court to stop him.

Q. Was he stopped? - Yes.

Q. When you went into the parlour, was the watch there or missing? - It was gone.

DANIEL SWINNEY sworn.

I heard a mob hallooing out stop thief! I went after them to stop the thief; as soon as I got up to him, he threw the watch out of his pocket and knocked it against the wall; I did not pick the watch up, but the woman that lodged with me, gave up the watch to this man that is here, thinking he belonged to the watch.

- BUSVOY sworn.

I was coming to work about eight o'clock, and I saw Mrs. Lamb, and she told me that a young fellow had robbed her of her watch; so by that I ran after a man that I saw before, and cried out stop thief! before me I came to him, that man, the last witness threw him down; so the prisoner threw the watch away, before

he was down, and there was a woman picked it up, and gave it me; I have got the watch in my pocket.

Prosecutrix. That is my watch, I know it by the seals, key, and all these things belonging to it.

Prisoner. I was coming across Seven Dials, about eight o'clock; coming along, that gentleman laid hold of me, and said, I was his prisoner, and said I had been robbing of somebody. They did not find any thing about me; they took me back to that gentlewoman's house. I am willing to serve his Majesty either by land or sea.

GUILTY. (Aged 15.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-43

502. THOMAS MALONY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , an iron bar, value 5s. belonging to Edward Glanvill , assixed to a certain building of his .

The case opened by Mr. Knapp.

EDWARD GLANVILL sworn.

I am employed under my father, as a carpenter and builder, my father's name is Edward Glanvill ; he lives in the Broad Sanctuary, Westminster; this bar was taken from a house of my father's in Delahaye-street, Westminster .

Q. What situation was this house in at the time you lost your property? - The prisoner was employed by my father to pull down this house.

Q. How far had he and others procceded in pulling down this house? - Very near to the basement story. The bar was situated in the basement story, to support one jam of the chimney, to support the brick work.

Q. Did you go any where in consequence of any information, to any house, and did you find any bar? - I went to a house in Duck-lane, Westminster, on Sunday evening the 20th of July.

Q. To whom did that house belong? - I understood to a Mr. Roach; he is here.

Q. When you came there, did you find any bar of your's? - I found a bar similar to the one that had supported our stack of chimnies; but I could not positively swear to it till afterwards. I took it with the constable, to the watch-house of St. Margaret's, and the prisoner he was in bed. I don't recollect the said any thing about it.

Q. Did you find the prisoner in bed, at Mr. Roach's? - Yes; I understood he lodged there. It was found in a out house, after we had been at the watch-house; the prisoner was locked up till the next morning, I left the bar there, and the bar was taken the next morning, with the prisoner, to the magistrate.

Q. Who did you leave the bar with there? - With the people of the watch-house; I left the constable there.

Q. Had he the custody of the bar? - I cannot say that; the bar was taken to Queen's-square the next morning, and I met them there the next morning, Monday morning.

Q. When you came to the magistrate's was the bar produced then? - Yes, I believe by the constable,

Q. To all appearance, was it the same bar that you had seen in the out house? - Yes.

Q. Was that the same bar that you said before was similar to the one that had been in your building? - It was.

Q. After it had been produced by the constable before the magistrate, what next did you do with the prisoner at the bar? - By desire of the magistrate, I took it with the constable or people that belong

to the office, to the building, and there I sitted it.

Q. Did it appear to tally exactly, and to fit the place that you tried it at? - Exactly; certain parts of the morter adhered to the iron and corroded iron to the morter.

Q. In short, from the method that you took to discover whether it was your property or not, are you able to state from the best of your knowledge, that it is your property? - I think I can safely say it is my father's property.

Q. After you had been in the house, and sitted the bar, and found it exactly tally with the premises, what did you do with the bar then? - I think it was taken back to the office, and I went with it.

Q. When it was brought back to the office, the prisoner was had up again before the magistrate, was not he? - He was, and committed, and the bar was taken to our house, and locked up in a wareroom.

Q. Who had the key of the wareroom? - It was kept under my direction.

Q. Had you the key? - Not the whole time.

Q. Had any body else access to the key, besides yourself? - Yes.

Q. Are these persons here? - Yes.

Q. What is the value of it? - Five shillings.

Court. Did you make observation enough, to say that the bar, that is now about to be produced, was the bar that was taken from the prisoner? - I think without doubt it is.

Mr. Gurney. You have sworn with very great solemnity, that when you found this bar you was present; you found this bar in the outhouse, who put it there you don't know? - I do not.

Q. This bar had been put into the outhouse before you came? - I don't know anything to the contrary.

Q. It was taken to the, watch-house by the constable, did you accompany the constable all the way? - Yes.

Q. In whole care did you leave it? - The constable's that I took with me.

Q. Who brought it the next morning to the office? - That I cannot tell.

Q. It was taken from the office to your premises, by whom you don't know? - I am not positive.

Q. It was put into a cellar, the key of which was kept by a publican yesterday? - Yes, it was, in the Old Bailey.

Q. Pray what particular mark is there on this bar, by which you will venture to swear to it? - I don't know whether there is a mark that I put on it when I examined it at the time that it was taken from the office to the building.

Q. Then between the time of having found the bar in the outhouse; and to this time that you took it to your father's house, it had been out of your sight, without a mark? - Yes.

Mr. Knapp. My learned friend has just now asked you who took this bar to your house from the magistrate? Did you go along with them? - I cannot swear that I was the whole time with them, I might be part of the time out of their sight, however they went to the building, and there I found them with the bar.

Mr. Gurney. With respect to this bar, I have not asked you who took it from the office to your ware room, where you kept it after it was examined? - I don't know.

Q. Did you accompany them? - I did not.

Mr. Knapp. Though my learned friend has been endeavouring to persuade the jury that you shall not be able to ascertain your property; after having made the trial to the best of your observation is this your father's property? - It is my father's property, to the best of my observation.

ANN MARIA ROACH sworn.

I am the wife of Nicholas Roach . I know the prisoner at thebar.

Q. Do you remember his bringing home any thing to your house? - Yes, about nine or ten weeks ago, between nine and ten o'clock at night.

Q. How did he bring it in? - He brought it on his shoulder, and I asked him what he had got? I said, what have you brought a log in? ay, says he, and you may burn it; I did not know then it was iron, or anything about it.

Q. Did it appear to be a light burden or a heavy one? - Heavy.

Q. Was it covered at all? - No, it was not.

Q. Did you see him do any thing with this when he brought it in? - No.

Q. Did you see him put it down? - I did, in the wash-house.

Q. When he had put it down, did you look at it? - No, I did not look at it at all.

Q. Did you see it again in the washhouse afterwards? - Yes, the next day.

Q. When you saw it again the next day, did you find it to be wood? - No, I did not know what it was, till I was told.

Q. You knew perhaps it was not wood? - I did.

Q. Was you present when Mr. Glanvill and the constable came to your house? - Yes, that was on the Sunday following; he brought this home Thursday or Friday.

Q. Did they find any thing there? - Yes, a piece of iron, and carried it away.

Q. The same piece that he brought in? - Yes, I am sure it was the same piece.

Q. Where did they find it? - In the wash-house.

Q. That was the same place that he had put it in, was not it? - Yes.

Mr. Gurney. How do you know it is the same piece. Come listen to me a little, let us hear your answer? - Because I know it is.

Q. How do you know this is the same piece of iron? - It looks very much like it.

Q. How can you positively swear that that piece of iron, that Mr. Glanvill found on Sunday night, was the piece of iron put there by the prisoner on Thursday night? - It was that piece of iron that was in my wash-house.

Q. I know it was in your wash-house on Sunday? - I have nobody to go to the wash-house but the lodgers.

Q. How many lodgers have you? - Only one more.

Q. Are there any marks on the iron? - I did not look at it.

Q. How do you know it is the same, if there are no marks? - Why it is so much like it.

Mr. Knapp. Whether it be iron or not, the same thing that was brought into your house, was the same thing that was taken out? - It was.

Court. Was there any other wood, timber, or iron, laying in the washhouse? - No.

NICHOLAS ROACH sworn.

I am the husband of the last witness; the prisoner at the bar lodged at my house; on Friday morning I looked into the wash-house, and I saw something in the wash-house that my wife told me came in the night before, she told me it was wood; I went afterwards in at twelve o'clock, and I found it was a bar of iron, in the room of wood; I left it there.

Q. After you made an enquiry about this iron, did any body come on Sunday? - On Sunday evening Mr. Glanvill came; I went down first and foremast, and he followed after, and he saw the very bar, and he sent the bar away with his man.

Q. Did he go away with his man and bar? - No, I do not think he did, he went up stairs and took the prisoner, who was in bed.

Q. That bar was afterwards taken and shewn before the justice? - Yes, it was, on Monday morning.

Q. When you saw the bar again before the magistrate, did you know the bar again? - I declare I would not positively say it was the same bar, but it was very much like it, it had been cleaned in the time.

Mr. Gurney. You saw this bar first on Friday noon? - Yes, I could not swear to the bar again.

THOMAS DENHAM sworn.

I went with Mr. Glanvill to Roach's house, on Sunday evening, between nine and ten o'clock; when we came there we knocked at the door, Mrs. Roach let us in herself; as soon as I came in I asked her if she would lend me a candle, and I took the candle out of her hand, and went backward with Mr. Glanvill, and saw this bar of iron in the wash-house, fronting the door.

Q. Had the bar any thing annexed to it? - Yes, beaters, to bear up the brick work, it has a claw at the bottom to stand upon; there was mortar about it; we carried it to the watch-house, and we went all as fast as we could, one after another; when we came to the watch-house, Mr. Glanvill gave the charge, for stealing the bar of Iron; the bar was left in the watch-house all that night.

Q. Had you charge of the watch-house that night? - Not after twelve.

Q. During that time did it lay there? - It did.

Q. Who had the charge of the watch-house after that time? - Another constable.

Q. Is that constable here? - No, the next morning I went to take out the man, to take him to the justice's; I found the iron in the watch-house, where I left it, the prisoner was locked up in the hold.

Q. Was that the same that you had seen the over night? - To the best of my judgment it was.

Q. Was there any other bar of the same kind there? - No, not a bar in the place.

Q. Did you take that bar to the justice's? - No, I did not, I went with them that took it, as near as I could.

Q. Was you with them all the time, till they got to the magistrate's? - I was with the prisoner.

Q. When you came to the justice's, was it the same bar? - It was, to my thoughts.

Q. What was afterwards done with the bar? - Mr. Glanvill went down with the bar to fit it, I went with him, it was brought back to the office again, and the man was committed, and the bar was carried to Mr. Glanvill's house, and I have not seen the bar since, till yesterday I saw it in the cart, in the Old Bailey, and there was some mortar about it then, but it rubbed off in pulling it out of the cart, because it is a very heavy bar.

Mr. Gurney. You took the prisoner to the watch-house, and somebody else took the bar? - Yes.

Q. The next morning you found a bar like that at the watch-house? - Yes.

Q. At the justice's you saw a bar like it? - Yes.

Q. And you saw a bar like it at Mr. Glanvill's? - Yes.

GEORGE CARD sworn.

I am a labourer and carter to Mr. Glanvill; Sunday evening I went along with my master, Mr. Glanvill, the younger, to Duck lane.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there? - No, I heard he was in bed; I saw nothing at all till the bar was brought into

the passage, I was ordered to carry it to the watch-house, and I did.

Q. What sort of a bar was it? - I am no judge of bars, it is a very heavy bar to my certain knowledge; it had a parcel of mortar about it, it had a flat piece at top, and the same piece at bottom; I took it to the watch house, and I set it up against the wall at the left hand side, going in at the watch house door, till such time as my master came in, and the constable and prisoner; it was left there.

Q. When did you see the bar again? - I went out of town; it is not above a week ago, I saw the bar in my master's yard, it is the bar by the weight of it, and the look of it, I brought it in the cart yesterday with the horses, into the Old Bailey.

Q. Had it any mortar on then? - Yes, there was a little, and in getting it out of the cart, I knocked some off.

Q. Had it the same appearance about the ends of it as the other bar had? - Yes, it had.

Mr. Gurney. This bar had some mortar on; why if any bar had came out of a chimney piece, it would have had the same? - It would.

Q. You found it a very heavy bar, it made your shoulders ake? - It did.

Q. You see it in your master's yard, how came it there? - It was locked up in master's coach-house.

Mr. Knapp. Had it the appearance as if it had been taken from a building? - It had.

Court. You see it at the watch-house where it was left; did you see it when it was carried to the justice? - I did not.(The bar produced)

Glanvill. To the best of my recollection it is the same bar, there is a spindle at the bottom that fits into a back, and there was a mark on the stone where this flat piece of iron had been, the top part is a piece of wood, which is entirely taken away, therefore I cannot speak to that so well.

Q. Is that the same bar that was put into your coach-house, and brought here? - To the best of my knowledge it is.

Q. Is that the same bar that you found in the wash-house? - I really believe it is.

Mr. Gurney. I suppose that bar is like any other that is used for the same purpose? - I never see such a one used for such a purpose before.

Court. Was this man a labourer of your's at the time? - He was a bricklayer's labourer on Thursday the 17th.

Q. Would it be in the line of his business to remove such a bar as that? - Yes.

Prisoner. He says the bar fitted the place, when the piece is entirely pulled down the Saturday night, I worked fifteen years in the same parish, I worked nine years for squire-, and I worked three years two or three doors from Mr. Glanvill's, I sent master a letter and desired him to look into my character, if he thought that I took the bar.

GUILTY . (Aged 46.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the Second Middlesex jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-44

503. RICHARD PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of July , a hair trunk, value 5s. two pair of nankeen breeches, value 5s. two arnity waistcoats, value 6s. a woollen cloth coat, value 5s. three linen shirts, value 10s. and five pair of silk stockings, value 10s. the goods of Otto Bichner .

OTTO BICHNER sworn.

I am a taylor ; I lost a trunk the 31st of July last, on a Thursday, I was coming to town in a post chaise, and when I came to the top of Charing-cross the post boy stopped and looked back, and said, we have lost the trunk, while I was talking to the post boy, a man came running up to the post chaise, and asked if we had lost any thing? to which I answered, I had lost my trunk, and then I got out of the post chaise and went into a public house, the Anchor and Vine, at Charing-cross, and there they shewed me the trunk and the prisoner; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Q. Wherebouts was this trunk affixed before you missed it? - At the front of the chaise.

Q. Where had it come from? - From Dartford; it was the Dartford post chaise.

Q. Where did you put the articles in? - At Sittingbourn, I see them put some part in, that was were I slept.

Q. Now the trunk that you saw at the inn, did you know the trunk to be your's? - Yes, immediately, and the things.

Q. What was done with this trunk? - From there I was obliged to go with the prisoner to the watch house from the public house; it went to the watch-house to the best of my recollection.

Q. In whose care? - That I cannot tell.

Q. Was your name on it? - My son's name was, G.B. It is my trunk.

Q. What is your name? - Otto Bichner.

Q. No other christian name? - No.

Q. Where you lost this you don't know? - That I cannot tell, I took no notice of it till the post boy stopped.

WILLIAM MARTILL sworn.

When I am well I go with messages for the admiralty. On the 31st of July, I had been employed to take a parcel to Litchfield-street, when I came back I had a pint of beer, I was then going home, when I got to the Admiralty gateway, I saw a boy making gestures to the prisoner at the bar, who had this trunk; it wanted five minutes of ten o'clock when I came out of the public house.

Q. Did the boy make the gestures to the prisoner in the street? - No, under the Admiralty gateway, and when I went to look at him he wanted to hide the trunk with the slaps of his coat, which gave me a suspicion that he had stole it.

Q. How far was the prisoner from the trunk at that time? - He was close to it, and I went back again, and told Mr. Gillum, that keeps the Anchor and Vine, and then he came back with me, and he was sitting on the trunk, and we laid hold of him by the collar, as soon as we took the end of his collar, he got up and ran away, Mr. Gillum ran after him and brought him back, and we took the trunk into Gillum's house with the prisoner; in a very little while after Mr. Bichner and his wife, I believe it was, came to Mr. Gillum's house. and he said it was his trunk, and his wife, or whoever it was, seemed very much frightened and knew the trunk directly, and we took the trunk and prisoner to St. Martin's watch-house.

Q. Did you attend them to the watch-house? - Yes.

Mr. Gurney. You did not see the prisoner with this trunk? - I did not.

Q. In the time you went back to the Anchor and Vine, he might certainly have

run away with it if he chose? - If he had attempted it he certainly would have been taken.

Court. Was he in your sight all the time? - No.

GEORGE GILLUM sworn.

I am the keeper of the public house; I know the prisoner, I was sitting at my own door this evening with two Dover coachmen with me, and the other witness came to me, and I went with him and saw the prisoner sitting on the box at the Admiralty gateway, it was a hair trunk, I asked him what he had got there? He said he had got a trunk, he had found it, I told him, I believed he had found it before it was lost, and he attempted to run away, and I ran after him and catched him, I took the prisoner down to the watch-house and gave charge to the watchman.

Q. Did the prosecutor claim if as his? - He did; I saw a chaise about a hundred yards up, and I sent my man up to see whether it came from that chaise or not.

Mr. Gurney. When you found this boy he told you that he had found the trunk? - He did.

Q. And he did not attempt to run away till you frightened him, in telling him that you believed he found the trunk before it was lost.

- RICHARDSON sworn.

I am in the capacity of a chaise driver; I drove the prosecutor from Dartford, there was a trunk fastened on before the chaise, I saw it, I missed it close by the Admiralty office, rather nearer to Charing-cross.

Q. Did you come over Westminster-bridge? - Yes, it was tied on with ropes, and the ropes were cut, and part of them left.

FRANCIS CLEWLY sworn.

I am an officer of the parish of St. Martin's in the fields, I was on duty on the 31st of July last, and the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, and charged with stealing a trunk off a post chaise, I asked where the trunk was? And was told it was at the Anchor and Vine, where I went and fetched the trunk away, and have had it in my possession ever since; I searched him and found this knife on him; this is what the trunk was corded with, this was about it when the trunk was given to me.

Court to Richardson. Is this the cord that was cut? - No, this is the cord that was about the trunk for the safety of the lock.

Prosecutor. This is my trunk, it contains a woolen cloth coat of my son's, and two pair of Nankeen breeches of my own.

Prisoner. I had been to Westminster-bridge to see after a place there, coming back I was riding behind a coach, in the broad way Westminster, I saw a trunk on the side of the coach in the road, and I jumps down from behind the coach and picked it up, and took it to the Admiralty gate, and sat upon it, and the gentleman came and took me.

Court to Richardson. Did you go by the Broadway Westminster? - No, I came up Parliament-street, the direct road.

Prisoner. I mean Parliament-street.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-45

504. ALEXANDER SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , thirty copper plate prints, value 8s. 6d. a printed book, in sheets, value 1s. a pamphler, in sheets, value 6d. a quire of demy paper, value 1s. 2d. the goods of George Paramore .

GEORGE PARAMORE sworn.

I am a printer , a master, the prisoner worked as a journeyman to me at the time I was robbed; on the 25th of july, I was sent for to the prisoner's lodgings, I went there, in Christopher's-alley, Moorfields, No. 37, I live in North-green, Worship-street.

Q. How far is that from Christopher's-alley? - Very little way.

Q. How did you know they were the prisoner's lodgings? - Mrs. Pitburn, at whose house he lodged, sent for me, I had seen him there several times, I took the lodgings for him.

Q. What did you find when you got there? - Thirty copper plate prints, a a sacrament hymn book bound, when I found it, and a pamphlet in sheets, and a quire of demy paper, part of them were found on a table and part in a corner cupboard.

Q. What day of the week was the 25th of July? - On Friday; he returned to his lodgings on the Sunday following in liquor, and Mrs. Pitburn again sent for me, informing me he was there, I went there, he was exceedingly abusive, I charged him with having robbed me.

Q. Did you say of what? - I don't know that indeed; I got a constable and had him taken to the watch-house, and on the Monday following had him to the public house.

Q. When had you seen these things last that you found at the prisoner's lodgings? - About a month before.

Q. In what part of your house were they kept - In every part; the copper plate prints were in the room where we print in.

Q. He had no authority from you to take any of these things, nor in the line of his business? - No, none at all.

Q. What did you do with the books when you found them? - I left them in the room till they were sent for to the public office, Mrs. Pitburn gave them to the constable.

SARAH PITBURN sworn.

The prisoner lodged with me ten months, he lodged there the 25th of July. The reason that I had to suspect any thing of the kind, was, the prisoner was discharged from the master that he worked with the 24th of July, and when he came home, it was past eleven in the evening; I told him that I had been informed of his stealing from his master. As soon as I could get entrance, I looked about to see if I could see any thing of his master's; I got entrance there the Friday, the 25th, about nine o'clock, his room was all over litter of paper, he had light a fire in the room, and appeared to have burnt a deal of paper.

Q. Did you find any property belonging to Mr. Paramore, in his room? - Yes.

Q. Did you find thirty copper plate prints? - Yes.

Q. Did you find a printed book in sheets? - Yes.

Q. Did you find a pamphlet in sheets? - Yes.

Q. Did you find a quire of demy paper? - Yes.

Q. Who did you shew these articles to? Did you shew them to Mr. Paramore? - Yes, I sent for him.

Q. Was the prisoner present when Mr. Paramore came? - He was not; I had discharged him from the room.

Q. What was done with the things? They were left in my care; I kept them

by themselves; Mr. Paramore carried them to the justice; I delivered them to him, and they were given to my care again before the justice, and I have kept them ever since.

- sworn.

I live in the house with Mrs. Pitburn; I see the things in the prisoner's room, she called me in, Mrs. Pitburn left me in the room, after that she said she would send her brother, Mr. Paramore, to see them; Mr. Paramore was sent for; I went out before he came. I am sure these are the things that were in the prison's room.

Q. To Paramore. I understood from you that the things were put in your care before they went to the magistrate? - They were; but she took them to the office.

Mrs. Pitburn. We all went together at the same time, and I delivered them to Mr. Paramore, to shew before the justice.

Paramore. The copper plate prints I ascertain to be mine, because I printed them, and I missed things of that sort; I print them for the methodist preachers in the connection of the late Mr. Wesley, for Mr. George Whitfield .

Q. Had you delivered any of these? - I had not, that I am certain of. The printed book in sheets is bound now, it is the secrament bymns, it has my name at the bottom of it; the pamphlet in sheets, is printed for the same gentleman.

Q. Had you delivered any? - I had; I cannot swear to that. This quire of demy paper, it is the same sort of paper that we print the heads on, and the size.

Prisoner. I have only this to say, that these things being found in my lodgings, they were not in my possession, nor do I think they are the property of the prosecutor.

Jury to Prosecutor. Your name is not on this book, only as a printer? - No; but when I lost that, I had not delivered one to the bookseller.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-46

505. DIANA PARKER was indicted for that she, on the 21st of June , being big with a male child, did bring forth the same alive, in secret, and which male child, by the laws of this realm, was a bastard, and that she afterwards, not having the fear of God before her eyes. but being moved and instigated by the Devil, on the same day feloniously did make an assault on the said male child, and did put and force her finger into the throat of the said child, by means whereof the said child was choaked and strangled, of which choaking and strangling the child's instant death ensued; so the jurors, on their oath, say, that she the said child did kill and murder .

Indicted in a Second COUNT for the murder, only charging it to be done in the parish of Stepney otherwise Steboneth.

ALICE OSBORNE sworn.

I know the prisoner at the bar; she came to me on the 26th of August; she is married ; I have known her five or six years; she was married when I first see her.

Q. Has she always passed as such since you knew her? - Yes, since I knew her. She came on the 26th of August, about seven o'clock in the morning, she said oh, Mrs. Osborne, what shall I do? I asked her what was the matter with her? she said, that she had had a child, and she had put it down the necessary; she said, she could not rest night or day; she could

neither eat nor drink, or sleep; I asked her if it was alive? she said, yes. She never told me where she was brought to bed.

Q. Did the woman live with her husband? - No, she does not; he has been abroad between five and six years; she lived in service in Renelagh-street; I never knew her husband; they did live in Turk's-row, Chelsea.

ELIZABETH HARRIS sworn.

I know the prisoner, I have known her between six and seven years; she is a married woman; she lodged in the same house where I did; she was married when I first knew her. She came to me on the 26th of August, she said, she was so uneasy in her mind she could neither eat, drink, or sleep; I asked her what was the matter with her? she told me she had had a child, that it was alive, and she put it down the necessary.

Q. Did she say any thing whether it was alive when she threw it down? - She did not; she told me she was delivered in the kitchen by herself.

JOHN HARRIS sworn.

I have known the prisoner between six and seven years; she told me that she had had a child, and had put it down the privy, and that it was born alive; she said, she wished to be brought to justice.

GEORGE SANDERS sworn.

I know the prisoner at the bar. On the 26th of August, the last witness, Harris, came to me as the constable of Chelsea, and informed me that the prisoner had had a child, and had murdered it, and asked me what was best to be done? accordingly I told him I thought it was proper she should be taken up; this was about nine or half past nine in the evening; accordingly I went, and he informed me that she lived servant with one Mrs. Walker, in Beauset-row. We both went down to the house, but the gates were shut, they were gone to bed; there was a garden before the house, the doors were all locked, but they were not all in bed; I got over the rails of the adjoining house, and knocked at the door; and they looked out and asked me who was there? there were two servants, the prisoner was gone to bed, but the other was up; I told them my name was Sanders, I was the constable of Chelsea; and they opened the door, they knew my voice, I suppose most people know me at Chelsea. When the maid opened the door, the old lady came out, an infirm old lady; I told her not to be frightened, I was come for one of her servants, but she had not been guilty of any thest; she desired me to walk into the parlour. I then informed her that her servant had had connection with some man, and that she had had a child, and had made away with it; by which means they called her up; she was gone up stairs to bed; and she said as she was coming down stairs, she was very happy I was come, and seemed very willing and desirous to go with me; she called me by my name. I took her home to my own house, because being a decent servant, and I put her in the next room with me, and put her to bed, and fastened the windows, for fear any accident should happen. The next morning I took her to Bow-street, but on my journey, I stopped at No. 7, Renelagh-row , where she lived servant, at the time the matter was committed; and the prisoner and I went into the house, and she went with me to the garden, and pointed me to the vault, wherein she had put the child; she told me she made away with it the 21st of June, that she was delivered of the

child in the kitchen, and when she was delivered, for fear any person should hear it cry, she put her finger into the child's throat, to prevent it from crying, and carried it down to the vault immediately, and threw it in.

Q. Did she say what happened in consequence of her putting her finger into the child's throat? - She did not; she only told me that she put it in, to prevent the child crying. I went on to Bow-street, immediately after she informed me where the child was.

Q. How far is the necessary from the house? - About the length of this court, as near as possible. At Bow-street the justice committed her for further examination, till the child was found, to know if it could be found. As soon as I returned from Bow-street, I went and got two bricklayers to take up the vault, and they did so; I was there at the time; in about half an hour we found part of a child; the left leg and left arm was perished, separated from the body.

Q. Did you find the leg and arm? - No.

Q. Did it appear that the child was born without that leg, or did it appear to be naturally perished? - No doubt it had naturally perished, for the rest part was nearly the same way.

Q. Of course then you could hardly observe any appearance of any marks on the child? - No; I believe it was out of the power of any of the faculty to tell whether it was born dead or alive.

Prisoner. I did not mean to make away with the child, I did not know what I was about. Here are some things that I made for the child; a shift, cap, &c.

Sanders. That was what I was going to mention. When she went up stairs she shewed me a vast quantity of child bed linen, plates, clothes, and money; you see, says she, Mr. Sanders, I want for nothing; but I am an unhappy wretch; and I want to be out of the world. She asked me if I thought God would forgive her, and take her back again, if she took a book and prayed? I told her no doubt, my dear, God forgives every person that truly repents of their sins.

Q. Did she tell you the sex of the child? - She did not; I found it out after it was was washed and cleansed, it was a male child.

The Jury withdrew for seventeen minutes, and returned with

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-47

506. ROBERT ANDREWS was indicted for that he, on the 17th of August , not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the influence of the Devil, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously, and of his malice aforethought, did make an assault on William Pepper , and with a clasp knife, made of iron and steel, value 6d. which he in his right hand there had and held, at and against the said William Pepper , divers times did strike and thrust, and by such striking and thrusting as aforesaid, did give to him, on the left side of his left thigh, a mortal wound, in depth five inches, and in length half an inch, of which he languished from the 17th of August to the 24th of the same month, and languishingly did live, and on which 24th day he died; and so the jurors, on their oath, say, he, the said William Pepper, did kill and murder .

The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.

JAMES RUNNING sworn.

I was in Fenchurch-street on the 17th of August, I saw the prisoner there, it was six o'clock in the morning, there were two other men with him, one was a blacksmith, that was very much in liquor, the other appeared to be a countryman; they made towards Whitechapel, and Whitechapel Church, I did not follow them; I had suspicion that he was doing the man an injury, in regard of getting his money, by tossing for gin; they seemed to come towards Whitechapel church, and they passed me, and another that was with me; I was as far as the pump of Aldgate, before I lost sight of them.

Q. Where did you go afterwards? - To the Royal Oak, in Whitechapel .

Q. How near was that to the place where this unfortunate affair happened? - Near about a hundred yards. After I came out of the Royal Oak, I saw this man, the blacksmith, and several people standing about him, and the blacksmith was stripped, had no shirt on.

Q. Did you see the third man, that was with him in Fenchurch-street? - Yes, I think he was there, but I will not be positive; the blacksmith wanted to fight this prisoner, he charged him with a robbery, and would lick him whether or no; and I went to him, and I persuaded the blacksmith to go home, and the prisoner he came up to me, and asked me what business I had to trouble my head with it? I told him I had business, or any other person; he told me that the man had money about him, and he was such a man as he wanted to be with, and it was no use for such as he, to be with one that had none; after that, a man in the company came and taps me over the shoulder, and calls me on one side, and I went about three or four yards, and in the mean time I was talking to the man, I see the prisoner draw a knife, and he began flashing it about, all manner of ways, stabbing; I made up to him as soon as possible, to attempt to secure him from doing any mischief, I got him by the back part of his neck, as he was on the rising ground, and held him down to the ground, and put my foot on his hand, while another man, James Smith, took the knifeout of his hand.

Q. Did you see any thing done with the knife? - I did not.

JAMES SMITH sworn.

I am a bricklayer's labourer; I saw no more than just before I took the man, I saw the blood run from the deceased's knee; I was going down to the bricklayer, in St. George's-fields; and in Whitechapel I saw a croud, a mob, and saw them all a skirmishing.

Q. Did you hear what was the occasion of it at all? - I did not.

Q. Was that when they were endeavouring to take the prisoner? - It was.

Q. Did you see the man that was wounded? - I saw no more till he was taken to the Hospital; I was so busy taking the prisoner; I saw the blood running first, before I helped to take the the prisoner; I took the knife from the prisoner; that man stamped three times on his wrist, before I loosened it, and then I got the knife out of his hand.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing? - He said nothing just then; when I came up to the watch-house, there was nobody to take charge of him, and we took him up to Lambeth-street; and he said going along, if he had known so much, he would have cut my throat wide enough.

Prisoner. Did you see the blood run out of the man's breeches knee before I

was knocked down? - Yes, before I had hold of you.

STEPHEN DUCROIX sworn.

I am a plaisterer; I was coming up the road the same morning, on the right hand side of the road; I saw some people on the left hand, seeming to be at words. I crossed over the road, and the words I heard, were, you blackguard give me the money; the other, who was intoxicated with liquor, was challenging the prisoner with taking the money out of his pocket, he denied it; some few more words happened, and he put his hand into his waistcoat pocket, and I saw a knife in his hand; I said, good God, it is to be hoped he is not going to do mischief; he immediately opened the knife, and says, the first b-gg-r that molests me, shall have the contents of it; that was what he said, he had the knife in his hand, and began to cut about, I made an attempt to catch at his right arm; he turned about, and made an attempt against me, and missed me, and cut another person on the right arm; we endeavoured to get about him, to get him down; the deceased was assisting to get him down, and I perceived the knife to come with a rush blow, from the deceased's thigh, with a great vengeance.

Q. Did you see what was the consequence of it? - Not till I got him to the ground, then I said to him, good God Mr. Pepper, how you bleed, go to the Hospital, and get your leg dressed; I saw this in two minutes afterwards; I followed the people to the place where the prisoner was secured.

Q. Did you know the deceased before? - Yes, I knew him four or five years, his name was William Pepper.

Q. From your judgment, did it appear from accident, or design? - Entirely for mischief.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing? - Going along afterwards, he said if he had had the knife, he would have cut our throats, and bloody guts out.

Court. You see him brandishing about this knife, and you say it was purely for mischief; when you saw the wound, or rather the hand coming from that thigh, do you apprehend the would was given by the accident of the man being thrown down, or did he make the blow by design? - He was pulling backwards, it was not particularly for this man; the blow was intended for any body that came in the way.

Jury. Did you see him give the blow? - I see the hand come from him; I think it was given wilfully.

JAMES ADAMS sworn

I was present at this time, going down the road along with a young man that lodged with me, he was going to his mother's, and I meant to go with him; seeing a mob of people, we went to see what was the matter, and I heard the prisoner had robbed a man, but I don't know who; he went down the side of the pathway, and I and some more people followed, and Ducroix followed him, and he saw the knife in his hand, and he pulled me back, and he cut me across the arm.

Q. Did you go with intent to take him? - No. only hearing that he had robbed a man. He made for Ducroix, and he sell back, and I received the blow on my arm, it was about a quarter of an inch deep, and an inch and a half long; when I found he had cut my arm I came away, and went home to get my arm dressed.

Prisoner. Did not you hear many people talk about ducking me? - No, I did not, I just came up as you fell back.

HENRY STORY sworn.

I am an officer, the first of it that I observed was, that when I came up, I saw a man take hold of the prisoner by the coat; says he, this man has robbed me, and I see the prisoner put his hand into his left hand pocket, and pull some halfpence out, and give it to the man; after that some person cried out, take hold of him.

Q. What became of the man that was charging him with the robbery? - I don't know, he was quite drunk; he then immediately put his hand into his waistcoat pocket, and pulled a knife out, and opened it, and began to clear the way; the witness, Ducroix, went to catch hold of him, he made a stroke at him, and cut the last witness about the arm, Ducroix stepped on one side.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing while he was doing this? - I did not hear him; he still kept his knife in exercise, trying to run away, and get out into the middle of the road, and I observed the witness, Smith, catch hold of him behind, by the collar, and the deceased man ran in to assist him, and he got hold of him in the front, and the prisoner gave his hand a tug back, and the deceased man turned on one side rather, and the prisoner stabbed his knife into the deceased's thigh, I see him push the knife in.

Q. Did you know the deceased Pepper, - No, I did not.

Q. Did you see the wound? - No, I see the blood run, and he run away to the Hospital directly.

Q. Did you accompany the prisoner to the watch-house? - I went along with him; we went to the watch-house door, but there was nobody there; we went to a public house with him, but I did not go into the room with him, I only staid in the tap-room.

Prisoner. Did not you hear any thing concerning ducking me? - No, not a word; he was not used ill at all in my sight.

JOHN TAPLIN sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the public office, I had this knife of James Smith , it is in the same state as when I received it.

Smith. This is the knife I had of the prisoner.

ABRAHAM MARTIN sworn.

I am a pupil attending the London hospital.

Q. Was you in the hospital when the deceased, William Pepper , was received there? - No, I attended him the Sunday following.

RICHARD FLEMING HEDDINGTON sworn.

I am attending the London hospital in a medical capacity. I was there in the morning when the deceased was brought in, he had a small wound on the left buttock about half an inch wide, which poured out an amazing quantity of blood, it was examined and found to be about five inches deep, in a stanting direction, it was then laid open and found it had divided a very considerable artery; the man was then drest and put to bed, I attended him till Saturday morning when it was going on well, after which time I did not see him.

Q. Did the person appear in a good habit of body and apparently in a good state of health? - He was; he was brought in on Sunday, and I attended him till the next Saturday morning, Mr. Martin attended him after me; Mr. Richardson was present with me at the time.

- RICHARDSON sworn.

I am a pupil attending the London hospital, I was with Mr. Heddington when the deceased was brought in, the

man came in on Sunday morning, about eight o'clock with a puncture in the hip, which bled very prosusely, about five inches deep; I attended him till Saturday; he was a strong hale man, I did not see him so lately as Mr. Martin.

Mr. Martin. I attended him on the Saturday following that he received the accident, I did not perceive any thing amiss that day, I was called up on Sunday morning, and the man was labouring under a violent hemorrhage, a bleeding, I endeavoured to ascertain from whence the blood issued, but I could not, I made use of an application to stop the hemorrhage, which succeeded for a length of time, but at the end of four or five hours the hemorrhage began as rapidly as ever, from this same wound; I was sent for again, and I went and removed the dressing, and examined it very minutely, but could not ascertain it, I renewed the dressing and it stopped for the present, but it soon after began again; I then sent for Mr. Neale, he was out of town; as soon as he came he found the man in a deplorable state, with a sainting and coldness of the extremities, in a dying state; he died about twelve hours after the bleeding began.

Q. Have you any doubt the bleeding of that wound, and the wound was the occasion of his death? - No, I have no doubt.

Q. Was he a person in other respects in a good state? - He was.

Prisoner. It was about six or seven o'clock on Sunday morning, the 17th of August, the day the accident happened, I was going down Fenchurch-street, there was a couple of men standing there, one seemed to be a smith and the other a countryman, he says, which is the way to the Maypole, to East Smithfield? I says, I am going past the Minories, which is the best way, as I was going along towards the Minories, says he, I will treat you with a quartern of gin for your civility, accordingly we went into a house and had a quartern of gin, and he pulled out two or three shillings to pay for it, and he said he had no halfpence; and I said, change a shilling, and he said, you pay if you have any halfpence; accordingly he said he would not go down the Minories, he would go with me; we had not gone much further than we got near to Whitechapel church, now, says he, we will have another quartern, and I will change the shilling and pay you the two-pence halfpenny that you laid out at the other house; says I, do so; so we went into another house, and it being early in the morning, there was nobody up but the maid, and she had no change for a shilling, says he, have you got any more halfpence? Yes, says I, I have, and I paid for that quartern of gin, then we walked down the road, and just by the other side of the New-road, says he, I have got a clean shirt in my bosom, I will pull off my dirty one and put the clean one on, so he pulled off his coat and waistcoat and put them on the ground, and his wristbands were tied with strings, and I took the knife out of my bosom to cut the strings of his wristbands and he took off his dirty shirt, and put his clean one on, pulling up his cloaths, his waistcoat, some halfpence dropped out of his side pocket on the ground, I picked them up, I says, I will have these halfpence now for the amount that I have laid out, I don't chose to go any further, says I, I will keep them, and I put them into my left hand pocket; then he began to cry pickpocket, and a mob gathered about, some where for ducking me, some for hanging me on the lamp post, and some for knocking me on the head, says I, if I have done any thing amiss take me to some other place, for I will not be ducked, they insisted on it,

and they shoved me backward with the knife in my hand, which it was impossible to help my cutting the young man in the arm, at last somebody came behind me and took hold of me by the collar and pulled me back, and I was flat on my back, and instantly six or seven of them came treading on me to get the knife from me, and the deceased being nearest to me, I suppose he had the wound then, but he never had the wound before I was on the ground. I have no witnesses; there have been report about the streets in halfpenny papers that I stabbed the man on the highway, and I suppose seeing the reports in the papers none of them would come forward.

GUILTY. Of Manslaughter only .

Imprisoned six months in Newgate and fined 1s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-48

507. PATRICK MURPHY was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and instigated by the Devil, on the 23d of August , did feloniously make an assault on Isabella Mackay , spinster, an infant of eight years of age , and her, the said Isabella Mackay, did ravish and carnally know .

GUILTY . DEATH . (Aged 27.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-49

508. REBECCA LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , nine printed cotton shawls, value 12s. the goods of John Lawrence and Charles Jolland , privately in their shop .

JOHN LAWRENCE sworn.

I am a linen draper , my partner's name is Charles Jollands; was robbed the 11th of August, Monday, in the forenoon, about ten o'clock; I know not the circumstance; I have no other partner.

JOHN JEAVES sworn.

I live with Lawrence and Jollands, linen drapers, Ludgate-street ; on Monday the 16th of August, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner at the bar came in and desired to look at some shawls; in consequence I shewed her a variety; after that she requested to look at a particular piece, which was in the press behind her, which I reached her down, and found one of them at half a crown, she left the shawl in my possession, and paid me six-pence, and said she would call again and take it, I saw no more of the jewess. Thomas Ruggles came the same day about two o'clock, he is a constable, and he had some pieces of shawls with him which proved to be ours.

Q. Had you missed any till Ruggles came? - No.

Q. What was done with these shawls? - The constable has had them in his possession ever since.

Mr. Knapp. Your masters deals in a very considerable way, I believe, Mr. Jeaves? - Yes, they do.

Q. This jewess came in about ten o'clock, and it was not till two o'clock the same day that you saw the shawls, so that the were four hours elapsed before Mr. Ruggles came in? - Yes, there was.

Q. Had you yourself taken account of stock of your house before this? - I had not.

Q. I take it you have a good deal of this article of shawls in your shop? - Yes, we have.

Q. And a good many of the same pattern I take it for granted? - There were only two of one pattern, and one of the other.

Court. What pattern are you talking of? - One pattern that the constable had with him.

Mr. Knapp. I take it for granted that there may be a great many of those shawls in a great many shops as well as your masters? - I don't know.

Q. Will you swear there are not? - No, I think not.

Court. Ruggles brought in two pieces where these pieces of different patterns? - Yes.

Q. Did they correspond either of them with your's, or both? - We had one piece of one of the patterns in the shop but not of the other.

Mr. Knapp. You had many persons in your shop between the hours of ten and two, I take it for granted? - Yes.

Court. At the time the woman was in the shop at ten o'clock how many people were in the shop? - No other customers, there was Mr Jollands and my fellow shopman there, he is not here

THOMAS RUGGLES sworn.

I am a constable, I produce nine shawls, six in one piece, and three in the other piece. I was going along St. Paul's Church-yard, Monday, the 11th of August, between nine and ten, it might be about ten, and I saw the prisoner, she seemed to have something that she wanted to conceal, I followed her and she turned up a court in St. Paul's Church-yard, by Mr. Wllkie's, she stock broker, I just turned up the court, and I found her taking these shawls out of her apron, and just delivering them to a little boy, she ran past seeing me, as I was going up the court before I was aware of her, so I see her going past me, the boy had just got hold of them, I said, what have you got here? Says he, I don't know. The boy said the girl asked, him to hold them while she tied up her stockings; I took the things from the boy, he had them hardly in his hands when I went up the court; I have kept them ever since.

Q. How soon did you get the woman? - I went out and I asked the people that were passing if they saw any thing of a girl run that way? and some boys went after her, and I first saw her by the boys that went in search for her, just at the Compter; the prisoner is the girl.

Mr. Knapp. A little boy was charged with this offence, was not he? - He was taken before the magistrate and committed.

Q. You stated to the court that this was between nine and ten, and afterwards ten? - I cannot exactly say, I did not look particularly to the clock.

Court. If you see these things in possession of this woman, how came the boy committed? - The grand jury threw out the bill against the boy.

Prosecutor. I can swear these to be my shawls, I know this piece by my own marking, it is in a character, I know that we had that pattern, and we had not sold it, I can say that for certainty; the other piece has the same mark and character.

Q. Can you say for certainty that you had not sold them? - I think I can.

Q. Was you at home when Ruggles came? - I was.

Q. Have you examined your stock so that you can say you missed that property?

- Yes, I did examine, and they were missing; but we did not miss them before.

Mr. Knapp. How many journeymen may you have? - Two.

Q. How long is it since you last took stock? - About twelve months.

Q. Have you sold any shawls of that character and pattern since that time? - Not that I recollect.

Q. Will you swear that you have not? - No.

Q. The other journeyman he is not here, but he was in the shop at the time this girl was there? - He was.

Q. I take it for granted if you was to buy shawls to-morrow, you would put the same character on them as on these? - Not the same exactly, pretty nearly.

Q. The boy was committed for this affair, but the grand jury threw out the bill? - Yes.

Q. Then all that I understand from you, is, that you speak to the character, that is to the pieces of common shawls and the pattern; and the pattern, you told me just now, is as common as is to be seen in any shop in London? - It may to be sure.

Court. What may be the lowest value? - They cost us about eighteen shillings.

jeaves. I can swear that they are Lawrence and Jolland's shawls, from the patterns and marks.

Q. Do you know whether they were missing when Mr. Ruggles brought them? - They were not before, but after he had brought them we found them missing from the quantity of shawls which we have.

Mr. Knapp. You had not taken stock of these goods for above a twelve month before, so whether any body else might have sold these goods, in the course of these twelve months, you cannot tell? - Yes, I can swear that I did not sell them.

Q. But you will not go a little further and swear for your master and other shop-men? - No.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-50

509. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Peele , the elder, Robert Peele , the younger, Thomas Ainsworth , Joseph Peele , Jonathan Peele , Lawrence Gates , John Peele , Richard Yates , William Yates , and James Hallimall , about the hour of ten, on the 23d of July , George Petty, Josiah Rees, John Bradley, Thomas Waring , and Phillis Smith , being then in the same dwelling house, and feloniously stealing therein, nine pieces of muslin, containing ninety yards, value 20l. the goods of the said Robert Peele , &c .

JOHN BRADLEY sworn.

I am servant to Peele's and Co. I don't know all their names.

ROBERT PEELE sworn.

Q. What is the firm of your house? - Robert Peele, the elder, &c &c.

Q. Does any of the partners live in the house? - None of the partners. I have a servant that lives in this house, but the house belongs to the partnership, I should say rented by the partnership.

Q. None of your partners sleep there? - None of them.

Q. To Bradley. Was the house of Peele's and Co. broke open? - The door was shut on the latch, the 23d of July.

Q. Who were in the house? - Josiah Rees , George Petty , Phillis

Smith, the maid servant, and my self; I don't recollect any more. I was in the counting house, which lays at the back of the warehouse; I did not hear the door open, but hearing the russling of paper, I ran forward, and see the prisoner go out at the outer door; the door was shut when I left it. As soon as I had got to the front of the warehouse, I see him go out at the front door, and see goods under his arm.

Q. What time of the day was it? - Between the hours of nine and ten in the morning. I called out stop thief! and ran after him, till I came to the Old Jewry; and when I came to him, he threw down the goods.

Q. How long had you been in the warehouse before you heard the rustling of paper? - I was in the warehouse, in the counting house.

Q. How long was it after you left your other part of the warehouse, to go into the counting house? - Not ten minutes. When he chucked the goods down. William Batty and I stooped down together to pick them up; William Batty seeing me so near to them, he chucked them down again, in order for me to take care of them. I took the goods up again, and William Batty ran after the prisoner; I did not see any more of him till he was taken.

Q. Had the prisoner any connection with your house? - No, nothing to do with it.

Mr. Gurney. You was in the counting house behind the warehouse? - Yes.

Q. You see somebody run out; did you see the face of the person? - I cannot say I saw his face sufficiently to know him again.

Q. You lost sight of him, I take it for granted? - I did not lose sight of his head, I never lost sight of him till he turned the corner, to go up to the court.

Q. You did not see his face before he was taken, therefore how can you possibly swear that the young man is the person that you see with the paper under his arm, in the warehouse? - By the colour of his hair and coat.

Court. You kept him in view till Batty came up? - I did.

Q. Are you sure that the man Batty went in pursuit of, and who threw down the muslin, is the man that you saw in your shop? - I did not see him in the warehouse, I see him go out, and I saw the goods when I got out, I did not see it before, on account of the wainscot being so high. I am sure that the door was shut, and I heard the rustling of paper; and when I went forward I saw his head, and when I got to the door I saw the; muslin under his arm; and he still kept the bundle under his arm, till I see him in the Old Jewry, and see him throw it away.

WILLIAM BATTY sworn.

I know the prisoner; I was present when Mr. Bradley came out in pursuit of him; he had a bundle under his arm, he threw it down; I was close to him when he threw it down; I got the bundle immediately, and gave it to John Bradley .

Q. Who went in pursuit of him afterwards? - I immediately went after him; John Woodrow was rather before me, and I went up the next, close to him.

Mr. Gurney. Whereabouts did you take him? - In Church-alley, Ironmonger lane.

Q. While you stooped to take up the bundle, he must be out of your sight? - I never stopped half a minute; I never lost sight of him at all.

JOHN WOODROW sworn.

I know the prisoner; I was in pursuit of him before Batty; I overtook him just as he got to the bottom of Church-alley, just in ironmonger-lane; I laid hold of

him, and he fell down on the ground, I dragged him two or three yards, before we could make him get up, and then we took him to Mr. Peele's shop, and downed on his knees, and asked him to forgive him.

FRANCIS OSBORNE sworn.

I was at my own house when I heard the cry of stop thief! and I ran out and pursued the prisoner into Church-alley, and there was Batty and another dragging him along; I went with him to Mr. Peele's warehouse, and I had the charge of him and this parcel; it is what the prisoner had; I have had it in my custody ever since.

JOSIAH REES sworn.

I am the warehouseman; this muslin is the property of Peele and partners.

Q. What is the value of it? - Twenty pounds and upwards.

Mr. Gurney. How do you know it to be the property of Peele and company? - By the private mark.

Q. You have no patent for that mark, for ought you know your next door neighbour may make use of that mark? - They may; it has a pencil mark, a private mark of our own.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Of stealing to the value 39s. but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house.(Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-51

510. TIMOTHY SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on he 5th of September , fifteen pieces, of printed cotton, value 5l. the goods of Thomas Dunnell .

THOMAS DUNNELL sworn.

I am a linen draper ; I live at No. 32, Oxford-street ; I lost some goods, I believe on the 4th or 5th of September, on Thursday; I lost fifteen pieces of print, they were on the outside of the door, tied by a rope to the shutters; I took the goods on the man at a great distance from the house, about two o'clock, I was in a little parlour at the back of the shop; a witness I have got here, ran in, and asked me if I had lost any prints? I ran out and missed them; from the information that was given me, I heard he had ran up Newman-street; I did not see him till I got into Gouge-street, Newman-street is very long; looking to the right I see the prisoner at the bar, with these prints on his shoulder; I ran up to him as fast as I could, when I saw him, and took hold of him by the collar, and I said, you villain, you have taken these prints from my door; a stand of coaches being high, I put him into a hackney coach, and took him to Marlborough-street.

Q. How long before had you seen them? - I really cannot say, they were not put out of the door till eleven o'clock in the morning; I really cannot say that I saw them after that. These are the prints, I know them by the private marks on them.

WILLIAM THIRLBORN sworn.

I live at No. 35, in Oxford-street, between two and three o'clock, the 4th of September; I saw a man carrying this pile of prints before him, running, which I suspected to be stolen; it was not that man; I went and informed Mr. Dunnell that he was gone up Newman-street; Mr. Dunnell went after him directly; I did not pursue, I could not leave my shop, I see him while they were at the office in Marlborough-street; this is not the man that carried the prints by, when I saw them, they were changed.

Q. Did you see any man in company with the man that was running? - I did not.

MARY PEARCE sworn.

I was going to the bottom of Oxford-street, and I saw two men together, and I understood one to say to the other, now make haste, for there is nobody looking; I don't know that one was the prisoner at the bar, only by his clothes.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940917-52

511. MARY MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a quart pewter pot, value 10d. a pint pewter pot, value 6d. the goods of

Daniel Reeves .

DANIEL REEVES sworn.

I am a publican , I live in Castle-street , Long-acre. On Tuesday the 5th of August, about half after eight, as near as I can recollect, in the morning, I heard a calling, Mr. Reeves! Mr. Reeves! here is a woman stealing your pots; I immediately went to the door, and I saw Mrs. Russell, who was the woman that called, she said, there she goes up the street, she has got some of your pots; I ran after her, she turned up Hanover street, and she took the pots and slung them into the passage of the White Bear; I did not see her sling them from her; but I heard them fall, and the gentleman is here in whose house she slung them; and he picked them up, and gave them to me; I pursued the woman, and took her about two houses further; I brought her back to my own house, I sent for a constable, and delivered them up to his care; I did not lose sight of her at all; that is the woman.

SARAH RUSSELL sworn.

I was going out it the door to take down the shurter, and I had taken down one shutter, and I met the prisoner coming out of our passage with the pots in her apron, and I asked her what she wanted there? she said she had been to a gentleman in the first floor; I looked in her apron, and I saw both the pots; I held her by the arm, but she wrestled off my hand, and I called Mr. Reeves, and he came out, and followed her, I followed, but Mr. Reeves was before me.

Prisoner. I was coming down the court, and they said, that I had got some pots, and I had no such property when I was taken; I know nothing at all about it; the gentleman sent me word that he would have nothing to do with it, he did not think I was the person, and so I have not sent for any body.

Mr. Reeves. They are my pots.

Q. What is the value of them? - Sixteen-pence.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-53

512. JOHN WILSON , WILLIAM WARD ; FRANCES PRICE , and MARTHA JENKS were for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , three quart pewter pots, value 3s. two pint pots, value 1s. 6d. and a half pint pewter pot, value 6d. the goods of John Oram .

JOHN ORAM sworn.

I live in Dartmouth street, Westminster; I sent some pots the 5th of August to Ann Davis , into Dartmouth-court ; the next day, in the morning, I went to get in my pots; I went up stairs about eight o'clock, or a little after, into her room, and she was not at home, and I came down again, the girl, Ann Davis not being at home, I could not get any

pots there, and when I went home to my house, she was drinking with one of the prisoners at the bar, one of the men; I cannot say which; after she left my house I went down to the house again, I said nothing about the pot to her in my house; I had four or five places to call at first, and it made it about five minutes before I got to her house; this was about a quarter of an hour after the first time; I goes down the row, and got up to her room, and asked for the pot? says she, your little girl must have had them, and I went home to enquire, and she said, she had not, and I went down again; says she, the maid of the Bell was here, perhaps she has taken them; I went and enquired, and she had not, and I came back again, and tells Mrs. Stirrup, the landlady, and she said she would go up and enquire, whether they were affronted or pleased; she went up stairs, and came down again, and said, there were none at all in the house; I was very much surprised, and the girl, Ann Bailey , said, she was most certain they must be in the house; presently I went up myself to enquire at the two pair of stairs, whether they saw any pots standing in the one pair of stairs palsage? one of the girls, who I believe is in the middle was coming down stairs at the same time; they hummed and haughed; Mrs. Stirrups went up with me, and she goes into the room, and at the cupboard, in one corner, she found this pot, and brought it out to me, and asked me if it was my pot? and I said, it was; there was a man there that took a piece of paper off the table, and ran away; and behind the curtain in the window there was this little pot; she asked me if I was satisfied then? one of the men said, you had better look under the bed so she takes and looks under the bed, and found none there, and she listed up the bed quilt, and under the bed quilt she found this pint pot, which was the third; immediately she pulls up the bolster, and between the bolster and bed, there was these three pots, a quart and two pints, tied up in this shirt, and the shirt tied up in this handkerchief; the two men, who were in the room at first, were all gone out; immediately as I heard her say so, I runs down stairs, as hard as I could drive, and asked which way they went; immediately I saw them, they see me running after them, away they all set off, one of them set off down Dartmouth-street, the others went into Cartwright-street, and I called out stop thief! a witness, here present, ran after them, and they were taken, the prisoners are the two men that went down Park street into Cartwright-street; when we took them we went afterwards with the constable, and took the two girls in their own apartment.

Prisoner Wilson. I think about ten o'clock you missed these pots? - I did not say they were missed.

Q. What time Mr. Oram, where we in your house along with the prisoner Davis? - About ten o'clock.

Prisoner. The house where we made our escape from was let out in tenements, to one, two, and three women; what expression did you make use of first, when you came up stairs to the landlady? - I asked if any body had come down stairs, and whether you had seen any pots.

Prisoner. I told you I did not sleep there? - You made a hum and haughing, or at least some of you did.

Court. Do you know whose house this is? - Thomas Stirrups.

Q. Who lives in this apartment, men or women? - That I don't know about.

ANN STIRRUP sworn.

Q. Your husband keeps the house where this transaction happened? - Yes. On the 6th of August, Mr. Oram came twice to my house for pots; he

could not get any from that part that he went to, he went all over the house.

Q. Who lived in your house, in the one pair of stairs? - Ann Davis.

Q. Whose lodging was it where these people were? - Frances Price. I went up stairs to every place that was let, and asked of all the lodgers that were in the house, from the top to bottom, and I could get no pots; when I went into this room, there were three men at breakfast, and one of these two men that stands there, he laughs at me, and bids me look under the bed, I did not then, I went down to Mr. Oram, and told him there were no pots, and he was not satisfied, he said, if you please I will go up with you, and we went up again, and I went to the closer, and I found a quart pot, and I went to the window, and I found a penny pot, I turned down the coverlid of the bed, and I found another quart por, and I took off the bolster, and next the bed there were two pint pots and a quart pot; I gave them to Mr. Oram, they were tied up in a man's shirt, and a handkercheif, and when the man found that I was in search of these three pots in the handkerchief, they made their escape, and Mr. Oram followed them.

Prisoner Ward. When you came to enquire for these pots, we were at breakfast; do you know who came in about half after eight? - You and that young man came in, and then you went out again, and a little after that you brought in a two-penny loaf, and something in a glass tumbler.

Q. What was the expression that I made when you came to enquire for the pots? - Why you sell a laughing, and said, look under the bed.

Q. The other man, the third man, was a strange man, who was in the room? - No, you had all come in together, for two or three days running.

Court. What time was it you found these things in the bed? - About half after ten, or a quarter before eleven, the clock had not gone eleven.

Q. Have you got the handkerchief that you found? - Yes.

Q. Is there any mark on them? - No, there is none; they said before the justice's that it was none of theirs.

JOHN TOWNSEND sworn.

I am a master shoemaker, I live in Westminster.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Oram calling out stop thief? - Yes, I saw the two men at the bar running by; I saw them at a distance in the street; I took the young fellow with the handkerchief on, I took him in a court in the Broadway, he ran into a house, and I ran after him, and took him.

RICHARD MUNDAY sworn.

I heard the cry of stop thief! down in the Broad-way, Westminster; I think they call it King's Head-court; there I saw Mr. Townsend, with that man with the handkerchief in custody, he then told me there was another gone into that house, a house in the court; I then went into the house, and I desired some person to point out the man, who was challenged with the theft, and they pointed out that man in the right hand; he was on the stairs; I then followed him up stairs; and he was walking softly up, when he see me, till he got to the garret door, when he tapped at the door, one of the soldiers, that is not present, pointed out the man that I took into custody, I saw several men running, but I cannot on any oath say that this man was the man that was running.

ANN DAVIS sworn.

I live at Mr. Stirrops.

Q. Do you remember any beer coming in a pot with a spout to it? - Yes, I had it the 5th of August, in the evening, I kept it in the room till next morning between nine and ten o'clock, when I put four on the landing place adjoining my room; I then did what I had to do, and I went out to market to get some mutton chops for my dinner; I put out a plain pint, a plain half pint, a plain quart, and a spouted quart; as I was coming from market, going by the window of the two chairmen, Mr. Oram's, we see the two men at the bar, a young woman came with me from market, and we asked them to give us something to drink; they did; I thanked them, and the young woman and I went out at the back door; this was between nine and ten; I then went strait home.

Q. What time did you get home? - I cannot tell exactly. In a few minutes Mr. Oram came in and asked for the four pots; I told him to go and take them, for there were plenty; I said this in a joke.

Prisoner Ward. At the time you met with us, drinking at the public house, had you put the pots out then? - Yes, I had.

Q. At the time we were drinking with you, did any doubt arise in your mind that we were concerned in taking these pots? - None in the least.

Stirrup. They came first at half past eight, and they went out again.

Q. How long were they in, one hour? - I cannot say.

Q. Three? - I cannot say; it cannot be so much as that, because they were taken before eleven; it was not an hour.

Q. When they returned with that tumbler, what time was that? - Between nine and ten; and they stayed till we went up to look for the pots.

Prisoner Ward to Oram. Do you know on what day we came to your house? - The 6th of August.

Q. In whose hands were these pots lodged? - In my hands.

Q. I have a witness that they were lodged in the Old-bailey last night? - They were, but not left.

JOHN WILSON sworn.

I know nothing more to say than this, I was this day in the Old-bailey, and I saw the pots handed about to each other, I made mention of it; and Mr. Sharp, in the Old-bailey, said, they were lest at his house all the last night, tied up in two handkerchiefs.

Q. What are you? - I am a gentleman; I have fifty pounds a year, and if a man cannot live on that, it is very hard; it is an annuity, and it is not an annuity.

Q. Is it on your own life, or on any body else's? - On me and my wife's.

Q. Who pays it to you? - One Mr John Salter pays mepart of it, a gentleman.

Q. What is it settled on you and your wife by him? - No, by his beirs before him.

Court to Oram. Were they left at Mr. Sharp's last night? - No, they were not.

Prisoner Ward. I am a letter-founder by trade; I have travelled with a gentleman, and lived waiter at some of the most respectable houses in this Kingdom. Our witnesses were several here about six or seven o'clock.

Munday. I marked the pots at the office, and I can swear to them. Mr. Oram delivered them back again, but they have all the same marks as, marked. At the office they gave me these several directions. William Ward, letter founder, No, 15, Tenter-alley, Moorfields; John Wilson , callico glazier, No 14, Cloak-lane, lives with his father. Serjeant Kirby sent me to enquire about them; when I came to both these places, I went

to Cloak-lane, and there there seemed to be a very respectable gentlewoman answered me at the door, she said, she had kept the house for fourteen years, she knew no person of that description. I went to Tenter-alley, Moorfields, and it proved to be an iron shop, no such person was heard of there. As to this witness, Wilson, he has called up, he took me to pieces yesterday in the public house, and said, I was nothing but a thief catcher; but, however, I am a parish constable, my lord.

- SHARP sworn.

There were some men left some pots, in two handkerchiefs, last night, at our house, but I never see what they were; one was a red handkerchief; I cannot swear that it was this handkerchief.

Q. Did Oram leave them at your house? - Yes.

Q. To Oram. Did you leave them at this house? - I gave them to Mr. Munday, the constable, and he might leave them there, I got them this morning from Mr. Sharp's bar.

Q. How came you to say that you had them last night? - I had not them last night.

All four not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-54

513. JAMES BRAZIER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Simmons , about the hour of two in the night, of the 9th of May , and burglariously stealing therein, a base metal watch, value 1l. 10s. a base metal watch chain, gift with gold, value 3s. a base metal watch seal, gilt with gold, value 1s. a man's cloth coat, value 10s. a tollenet waistcoat, value 3s. a pair of worsted breeches, value 5s. a linen shirt, value 5s. a pair of mens cotton stockings, value 2s. a silk handkerchief, value 1s. the goods and monies of William Page .

Indicted in a Second COUNT, for that he, being in the said dwelling house, did steal the same goods, and that afterwards, about the said hour of two in the night, the said dwelling house feloniously did break, to get out.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn.

I am a plaisterer ; I went to Mr. Simmon's, house, he lives in Cross-lane, Long-acre .

Q. Do you know whether his lodgings were broke open at any time? - I do not; the things lost were my property.

Q. What day were these things missing? - The 19th of July last; they were in a box; I missed them about half after four o'clock in the morning; it was light. I went to lodge at Mr. Simmon's the 17th, that man came to sleep with me the same night, and he helped me to carry my box up stairs that same night, and we went to bed together that same night. On Sunday morning I got up and cleaned myself; the 17th was on a Saturday; on Sunday morning the man was very desirous to look into my box, as I sat up in my bed; I had a pair of buckles in my shoes, and he asked me if they were not silver? I told him they were not, they were a pair of my own making; he said, if I had not told him he should have thought they were silver. I came home that night and found he had been to bed from about eight o'clock; when I awaked the next morning at half after four, I turned about and found he was gone, and I looked under my pillow to see what o'clock it was, and I missed my watch

from under my head; it had a chain and seal to it; and I looked at my box, and I found all my things were gone out; I lost all the things in the indictment.

Q. Have you ever seen your things again? - Yes, the coat I found on him, and the watch he owned to; I found a pair of gloves in the pocket of the coat, and them I cannot swear to.

Mr. Dowers. Had you known the prisoner before this time? - I never see him before in my life.

Q. Do you know one Leary? - Yes, Leary was a lodger in old Round-court, in the Strand, at one Mr. Goodwin's.

Q. What colour coat was it you lost? - A brown striped, elastic cloth.

Q. It was near four months before you see it again? - Yes.

Q. Did you charge him with it? - I asked him if that was not my coat that he had on his back? - He said, no.

Q. And he then went with you very voluntarily to Bow-street? - No; one of the officers took him.

Q. When you arrived before the magistrate, you was not so clear about the articles in the indictment as you appear to be now? - Yes; I swore to the coat.

Q. Did not he say that he bought the coat? - Yes, he said he bought the coat in Rosemary-lane.

Q. How soon afterwards did you get an officer? - About half an hour after.

Q. Did he go with you to the officer? - No, I brought the officer to him, and he was conveyed down to Bow-street.

Q. You say that he owned to having stolen the watch? - Yes, he did, in the presence of the officer of Bow-street, and my master.

Q. Upon your oath, I ask you this question, did the officer or you tell him if he would confess it would be better for him, and they would endeavour to interest the magistrate to send him to sea? - I never spoke a word about it to him; he never denied the watch, only the coat. After that, going to the office, he consessed that he had pawned the watch; and in the coach, going down to Clerkenwell Prison, he confessed that he pawned it at Mr. Bechum's, in Holborn.

WILLIAM HAWKINS sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Bechum, in Holborn; I produce a watch, there is a chain and seals to it. On the 11th day of August last, I took it in pledge for one guinea; I cannot positively say that the prisoner is the man that I received it of, but I believe him to be the man; I gave him a duplicate.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - Not to my remembrance.

Mr. Dowers. What time of the day was it he came to the shop? - I cannot say, it might be in the evening.

WILLIAM COOK sworn.

I belong to Bow-street; I produce a coat I got from the prisoner, I took it from him at the Red Lion, Cross-lane, Long-acre; he had the coat on; I have kept it ever since; the young man, the prosecutor, said, it belonged to him.

Q. Was it in the presence of the prisoner? - It was.

Q. How came you to go there? - The boy's master came down to me, and told me that he had got the person that stole his apprentice's things.

Q. On his way to Bow-street, or in any conversation at Bow-street, was he told that if he confessed to taking the watch and coat, that you would endeavour to prevail on the magistrate to let him got to sea? - Mr. Steward put that question, and after he said he had pawned the watch and lost the duplicate.

Page. This is my coat, I know it by a particular mark, one of the skirts has two slits in the slap; I put it in my box the over night, before I lost it.

Mr. Dowers. The coat has been lost near four months; how long have you had it before that? - About six weeks.

Q. The coat is worn since, I suppose? - Yes, very much; I can swear positively to the coat, it is a very remarkable coat.

Court. Was the box left open or locked? - I had left it locked, I found it unlocked; it is a box that the lid falls down on the top, and when I awaked in the morning, I found the lid had fallen in.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who said, he was a shoe-maker, and gave him a character.

GUILTY, Of stealing the coat only, and not of breaking .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-55

514. ELIZABETH HUTCHINS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Lochtie , on the 16th of August , about the hour of ten in the night, and burglariously stealing therein, a woman's red cloth cloak, value 5s. a pair of stays, value 2s. a black quilted stuff petticoat, value 1s. the goods of George Lochtie.

GEORGE LOCHTIE sworn.

I live at St. Paul's, Shadwell ; my house was not broke open. On the 16th of August, I lost a red cloak, a pair of stays and petticoat, out of my window, late at night, being Saturday; and being Saturday I did not miss them, Monday morning I missed these things, and went and found the cloak pawned, on Saturday evening, by the prisoner at the bar.

Q. What time on Monday morning did you miss them? - About eight o'clock when I generally open; the cloak was pawned at Joseph Willington 's, he is here.

Q. Have you seen any thing besides your cloak? - No, because if I had, I should know them. The prisoner was a customer to my shop, I see her in the shop, about ten o'clock at night, my wife served her, I see her, she told me she had served her.

Q. Was not your house broke at all? - There was a small iron bolt taken out of the inside of the shutters, to get at this property, but that was inside the house, that could not have been done from without.

Prisoner. You served me this cap that I have got on my head, about twelve o'clock, and there was no foul in the shop but yourself.

JOSEPH WILLINGTON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce a red coloured cloak; I got it of the prisoner at the bar, on the 16th of August, Saturday, about ten at night, I gave her a ticket, she was a customer to our shop, she said it belonged to herself; it was pawned in her own name, Elizabeth Hutchins.

Prosecutor. It is my cloak, I know it by this stain, I can swear to it by that.

Prisoner. I went to the butcher's the the corner of Farthing-fields, to buy a piece of meat for me and my child, and a good woman asked me if I would go of an errand for her? it was to pawn that thing for her; I asked her what it was? she said it was this cloak, and I willingly did it for the sake of a few halfpence, says she, do you know that pawnbroker, and does he know you? yes, says I, then says she, put it in your own name as long as I have the duplicate it will be no object; I went and asked the pawnbroker half a

crown, I carried it to the woman, and she asked me whether I would have a quartern with her or the halfpence? I said the halfpence would be of most service to me, and if my prosecutor can swear that I stole the property, I am very willing to suffer what the laws of God and my country can instict. I never saw the woman before.

GUILTY, Of stealing the cloak, but not of the burglary . (Aged 36.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-56

515. MARY ELING was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a silver watch, value 2l. a silk ribbon, value 1d. a base metal watch key, value 1d. a plumber's rule, value 1s. a black lead pencil, value 1d. one guinea, two half guineas and two shillings, in monies numbered, the goods and monies of Richard Cartwright , privately from his person .

RICHARD CARTWRIGHT sworn.

I am a journeyman plumber , a single man, I charge that woman with taking my watch and money in Parker's-lane, Drury-lane , I light of her in Drury-lane, I went home with her to her lodgings in Parker's-lane, it was the 11th of September, about one o'clock in the morning.

Q. Was you drunk or sober? - Not drunk, nor very sober.

Q. Was you sober enough to know at all what you was about? - Yes, I laid down on the bed, when I awaked it was four o'clock.

Q. Was you undressed at this time? Did you go to bed with her? - Yes. When I awoke at four o'clock she was gone, and my watch and my money and all.

Q. Are you sure you had all these things in the indictment, about you? - Yes. When I laid down I would my watch up, and my money then was all in my pocket.

Q. Did you look at your money? - Yes.

Q. Did she see you have that money? - For what I know she did. And the other things were in my breeches.

Q. Where did you put your things when you went to bed? - Under my pillow.

Q. In the morning how soon did you find this girl after you missed your things? - About half an hour after, sitting at a door in Great Queen-street, at the corner of Drury-lane, about five or half after five.

Q. Was that the corner of the street where you sleeped with her? - No, about two hundred yards off.

Q. How long might you be with her before you went to bed? - About ten minutes.

Q. You being drunk went very soon to sleep? - Always very soon.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that the girl you saw the next morning was the same woman? - I am perfectly sure.

Q. What makes you sure? You did not see her above ten minutes, and you was not very sober? - I am perfectly sure it is the same woman. I charged the watchman with her and had her taken to the watch-house.

Q. Did you find any of your things? - No.

Prisoner. I met this man by the right hand side of the way in Long-acre, and I

asked him if he would give me any thing to drink? and he asked me where I lived? and he came over to me, and he had nothing but a crown piece, says he, I will go along with you and treat you, and he went with me as far as Charles-street, Covent-garden, and he changed the crown piece, and then he came home with me and gave me a couple of shillings, and went to bed, I did not stay with him five minutes, I left him while he was going to bed.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-57

516. SARAH RAESBACK was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , a silk cloak, value 15s. a cotton gown, value 10s. a muslin petticoat, value 5s. two muslin neckcloths, value 2s. a copper tea kettle, value 3s a flat iron, value 6d three yards of silk ribbon, value 2s. a brass cock, value 6d. the goods of William Mackintosh .

MARY MACKINTOSH sworn.

I am the wife of William Mackintosh , this woman was a chare woman , I hired her to help me to clean, I live in Off-court, Willow-street, Short's-buildings, No. 1. I hired her to help me to clean and remove, from Long-acre , to where I now mention, I lost the things from the 13th of August to the 16th, as near as I can recollect.

Q. Have you found any of the things since? - Only one simple muslin neck-cloth which I found at a pawnbroker's in Bow-street, that is the only thing I have been able to find.

Q. You did not see any of the other things in her possession at all? - No, I did not.

Q. Did you see any tickets found on her? - The constable has them.

Q. Has any thing been traced from these tickets? - Nothing but this one; She was left in possession of the house, during which time I lost the things mentioned in the indictment.

SAMUEL AVILL sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I produce a handkerchief, a muslin neckcloth, we distinguished them from neckcloths, by calling them half handkerchiefs.

Q. It is to wear about the neck? - It is; a person brought it to our shop, I cannot tell who, she used to send several people in her name.

Q. Was that pawned by her? - I cannot say.

Q. In whose name was it pawned? - Raesback her own name.

Prisoner. I know nothing about these things at all, as to the half handkerchief it belongs to my husband, I told him that I gave them all the liberty to search after these articles, I was not left in the house by myself, I was not trusted with the keys or any thing, or go up into the room without their going with me; I had not the liberty to be trusted where one thing was, not one thing. The prosecutor sent word down to me last Monday morning, that if I would even own to the things, he would say nothing at all about it, but let me clear; I would have done any thing to have got clear, for the sake of this child in my arms which is in a dying state, I have been in this dismal place for this month.

Court to Prosecutrix. When was this woman committed? - About three weeks ago. I know this handkerchief, it was made by me, back runned instead of being hemstitched.

Q. What is her husband? - A coach harness maker.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-58

517. JAMES BOCQUET was indicted for stealing on the 25th of August , a hempen sack, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Charles Hamerton , Esq.

A second COUNT, laying it to be the property of our Lord the King .

The case opened by Mr. Const.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn.

Q. Do you remember going any where in search of some fowls? - Yes, to the house of Edward Collins, he is a labouring man, father in law to the prisoner at the bar; I went to the house with a search warrant.

Q. Did you find the fowls there? - I did not, I found some feathers in searching about the cellar; I found the sack with five others in it, and I knew that Mr. Hamerton had frequently lost sacks and flour; and his man had been employed about the mills. I am not certain whether he was employed by Mr. Hamerton, or Mr. Hamerton's Bargeman; he worked on the wharf, I was informed; so by the person that keeps the wharf; I took the sack and acquainted Mr. Hamerton of it. This is the sack, I have kept it till now.

JOHN SHEPHERD KILLICK sworn.

I am son in law to Mr. Hamerton, the sack is the property of the king, I superintend the mills, and I have looked at the sack, and know it to be the king's property.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I have seen him at times.

Q. Was he ever employed in the business of carrying meal? - He has once or twice, I have seen him in the barge.

Court. Do you know whether they ever sell any sacks belonging to the crown? - They never sell any sack, and this is a new sack.

Q. In what way has the prisoner been employed? - As an assistant in the barge, at the time of unloading wheat; we send away our barges empty, and receive them full of wheat, and return them full again, either with meal or flour; we receive the sacks from Deptford, in our own barges.

Q. Does this sack appear to have had meal or flour on it? - It appears to have had wheat in it the last time.

Q. Then from that circumstance you judge it has not been returned to the King? - It does not appear to have ever carried flour.

EDWARD COLLINGS sworn.

I keep the house in which several of these sacks were found, in the cellar in a box.

Q. In whose box were they found? - His own.

Q. Had you seen him bring any sacks into your cellar? - I heard him say that he had brought a sack of wood, but I never saw the sack, till it was shewn me at the Mermaid.

Court. Then the premises are your's? - Yes.

Q. Did any body else bring any thing into your cellar? - Not to my know ledge.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-59

518. GEORGE CARR and WILLIAM REYNOLDS otherwise BAT-CHELOR were indicted for stealing, on the 12th of August , a metal watch, value 8l. 8s. nine linen shirts, value 2l. 5s. a slannel waistcoat, value 5s. a kerseymere waistcoat, value 7s. two jean waistcoats, value 2s. eleven muslin neckcloths, value 1l. 1s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 5s. two pair of silk and cotton stockings, value 5s. three guineas and eight

shillings, in monies numbered , the goods and monies of William Spice .

WILLIAM SPICE sworn.

I am a coachman to Mrs. Bevan, at Dalton, in the parish of Hackney. On the 12th of August I lost my property out of the stable, I lost a double gilt metal watch, a stop watch with a gold seal; I lost eleven neckcloths, and all the articles in the indictment.

Q. When did you see them before? - I saw them that same day, Friday, at twelve o'clock, as I missed them at nine o'clock the same night; at nine o'clock I went to take out my money and watch, and then I missed the things.

Q. Where was it kept? - They laid on the top of the box, just inside of the lid, on the top of the other things; in consequence of my loss, I went to the public house, a little way off the village, to know if I could hear of them, I went afterwards to the public office, and I had hand-bills printed, and distributed about the town; I heard of them on the 28th, I was sent for to the office, I see this Ann Murphy sitting in the room when I went in, and I heard Mr. Armstrong asking her some questions, and I had got this mark in my pocket, that my linen was marked with, the letters of my name, set as they are now; then Mr. Armstrong shewed it to her, and she said, I believe I have got a shirt at home in my lodging, that is marked so; and that gave me a suspicion that the watch, which she had told Mr. Armstrong, that was then in pawn, was my watch; then Mr. Armstrong and I went to the lodgings, and we found this shirt; this Ann Murphy lived in the lodging of George Carr ; the shirt was in a bundle, it is my shirt, I have it here; then we went to Mr. Dexter's, where this Ann Murphy told us the watch was pawned, there we found the watch, and that proved to be my watch, that watch is here likewise; and then we came back into the office, and asked this Ann Murphy, if she knew of any more things? and she said, yes; and then we went to another pawnbroker's, Mr. Warner in Spitalfields, and we found a shirt, and a pair of silk and cotton stockings, marked the same as the other; then we came back again to the office, and I was ordered to go the next day morning to New Prison, at Clerkenwell, where these two prisoners were, and there I found both these two prisoners, and this Reynolds was called up, and I looked at his linen, to see if he had got any thing of mine, and there I found a shirt on his back, which was mine, the mark was taken out, the shirt is here; George Carr said, that this Ann Murphy had nothing to do with the watch, he pawned the watch himself.

Q. Was it recommended to him to consess any thing about it? - He was asked how he came by it? he said Ann Murphy knew nothing about it, he brought it himself.

Q. Was not this examination taken in writing? - Yes, it was.

Q. Did you find any more of your things? - Nothing more.

Prisoner Reynolds. When he came to the prison to me, he said, directly as I came up, that is not my shirt, that has got a frill, and never a one of my shirts has got a frill on. - I said it was not my shirt on account of the frill, but when I saw the place where the mark was cut out, I saw it was my shirt.

Q. He went into the room along with the young woman that is evidence against me, and he offered her five guineas if she would swear that she cut the name out of the shirt, and sewed the frill on? - I never offered her any thing, she owned herself that she let it out at the collar, it was not big enough for him.

Prisoner Carr. These things that are brought against me now, I bought of two jews together, in Rosemary-lane.

RICHARD FERRIS sworn.

I am an officer at the public office

Worship-street, I went to Clerkenwell prison with the prosecutor, to see Reynolds; he pulled off a shirt, and the prosecutor told me it was his, this is the shirt.

Prosecutor. This shirt is mine, it is one I lost, the name is cut out, the name was on the slap, it was marked besides, and that is picked out.

Ferris. Here is another shirt the prosecutor gave me.

Prosecutor. The mark is cut out, but besides there was a W. S. and N. the W. and N. is picked out, but the S. is remaining; I am certain it is my shirt.

Prisoner Reynolds. When I was called out of the prison, the prosecutor said it was not his shirt.

Ferris. No, I don't recollect he did say so.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn.

I remember going to Mr. Dexter's with the prosecutor on the 27th of August; I found a watch there, which Spice said was his. Mr. Dexter's is in Whitechapel-road, No. 125, on the right hand side of the infirmary; then I went to Mr. Warner, he lives at the corner of Rose-lane, Spitalfields, and there we found a shirt and pair of stockings; and I found another shirt, by the direction of Ann Murphy , in a bundle of her's, she had left in a shed; at the examination, Murphy said, that she had pawned them, and Carr said, he had bought them; this was said in Worship-street; there was no examination taken in writing; he said so of the watch, and shirt and stockings.

THOMAS DEXTER sworn.

I live in Whitechapel-road; I produce a watch; a woman of the name of Ann Murphy brought it to our house; she told me she lived in Mile-end-road, the brought it on Monday the 25th.

Q. On what day was it that Armstrong and Spice came to your house? - Thursday the 28th.

Prosecutor. This watch I saw at Dexter's, the chain is not mine, but the seal is, I know it by the glass being loose, I have had it for a twelve month; I am certain it is my watch; the seal is mine, it is a gold seal with a white cornelian stone plain; the seal was with the watch at the time I lost it, it is a stop watch.

MARTHA STRATFORD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Richard Warner , in Spitalfields.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Spice coming to your house? - Yes, and I shewed him a shirt, a pair of stockings, and a silk and cotton handkerchief; Ann Murphy brought them; I had seen her before, I took them of her.

Prosecutor. The shirt has my name on it, the ink mark is cut out, but the needle mark is left on, the stockings are marked with my name in length with ink mark.

Q. Were these shirts and stockings part of the goods you lost out of the box? - They are.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I am a peace officer; I went to Reynolds's, lodgings, I found in a closet, on a high shelf, these two dark lanthorns, and this iron chissel together; I know they were Reynolds's lodgings.

Q. Do you know any thing of this Ann Murphy ? - did she lodge with Reynolds? - No, one Mary Higgins lodged with him.

Prisoner Reynolds,. He said he found the two dark lanthorns and chissel together; the chissel was in the coal hole, my wife used to make use of it to break the coals with; the two lanthorns were

on the top of the shelf, publickly in the closet.

ANN MURPHY sworn.

Q. Look at the watch there, did you see that watch before? - Yes.

Q. Did you ever pawn it any where? - Yes, at one Mr. Dexter's; I got it out of the drawer at home.

Q. Who lived with you? - One John Carr .

Q. That Mr. Carr that is standing there? - Yes; as far as I know he bought it in Rosemary-lane.

Q. Look at the shirt and stockings, do you know them? - Yes, I believe I do.

Q. What did you do with them? - I pledged a shirt with one Mr. Warner, in Spicalfrelds, and I pledged the stockings, tied up in a silk handkerchief, in the same place; I cannot say particularly to the day.

Q. To Stratford. Is that the young woman that pledged the things with you? - It is; on the 20th of August the stockings and handkerchief, and the shirt on the 21st.

Prisoner Carr. That there watch, shirt, and pair of stockings, and this shirt which I have got on now. I bought in Rosemary-lane, about five weeks ago, there were two jews standing together, I was coming by, one of them said, young man, do you want to buy any shirts? Yes, says I, I do; says he, here are two shirts I will fell you for half a crown a piece, I took the shirts; and I gave her three shillings for the stockings; and for the watch I gave three guineas and a half; I took them to my lodgings, I put them in my drawer; and I also bought a pair of boots, which Mr. Arm strong has got; I told the young woman of it that I lived with; and since I have been in New Prison I told her to take the key of my drawer, and to go and pawn the watch, shirt, and stockings, which she did.

Prisoner Reynolds. I know nothing of the property, but that shirt that was taken off my back, which I bought about three weeks ago, as high as I can guess, and when I bought it the srill was on it, and as I examined it I saw a place sewed up in the slap, and the person let me have it the cheaper for that; the man asked me five shillings for it, and I bid him four; and by means of the place sewed up in the slap, he let me have it, he told me it had been tore; the young woman that they have got an evidence against me, is witness to my shirt.

SUSANNA HIGGINS sworn.

Q. Who do you come to speak for? - For Reynolds. I have known him for a year and a half; I work at gun-work; he brought the shirt to me between two and three months ago, he told me he bought it of a jew woman.

Q. Should you know it again? - Yes, I think I should; this is the shirt, and here is the piece I put in it to widen the collar, it was rather too little for him.

Prosecutor. That is the shirt that was taken off Reynolds.

George Carr. GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

William Reynolds . GUILTY.(Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-60

519. JAMES BOQUET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the

25th of August , a hempen sack, value 1s. 6d. the goods of William Smith .

JAMES GRIFFITH sworn.

I am a constable; I went to the house of Collins, the prisoner's father-in-law, to search for some fowls, and I found sacks in a box in the cellar.

Q. What was in that box? - A sack with about half a bushel of flour in it, which box I was informed was the prisoner's at the bar; I took it to Bow-street; Mr. Smith attended there, and owned the sack; the sack is here.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

I live at Hornchurch, in Essex; I have the malt mills, at Bromley; I was sent for to look at a sack at the magistrate's; it was my sack, and this is the sack; I asked the prisoner how he came by that sack? he said he found it; I asked him where? he said, in the Gravel-pits, by the side of the New Cut, going down from Bromley to Limehouse; I asked him if he did not know that sack belonged to me? he said, he neither knew me not the sack; I asked him how it came in his box? he said, he carried it home from where he found it, and put it in his box.

Q. Did you ever employ him? - Never. I told him. I wondered he was not seen to carry it through Bromley, where my mills are; he said he put it in another sack to prevent it being seen.

EDWARD COLLINS sworn.

Q. It is your house, I believe, where this sack was found? - It is.

Q. In whose box was it in, in the cellar? - In his own box; I never saw the inside of it.

Q. Had any body else access to his box? - Nobody that I knew of.

Prisoner. About three weeks ago I found two of Mr. Killicks sacks, in the river, and took them to his mills, and he said why did not I keep them, they were not worth above's pot of beer, and he gave me half a pint of small beer when I asked him for something to drink; and I was going down to Limehouse Cut, and I found this sack in the gravel pit, with the flour in it, I did not know whose it was, and I took it into our barge, and took it home, and I found a piece of wood and put in it and took it home to my mother, who is blind.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1s .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940917-61

520. HANNAH CHAMPION was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a gold enamelled watch, value 30l. a shagreen cafe, value 6s. a gold enamelled chain, value 10l. and a gold enamelled seal, value 10l. the goods of Richard Gorges , in the dwelling-house of John Davis .

- GORGES sworn.

I missed a gold enamelled watch with a shagreen cafe and enamelled chain and seal, the 11th of September, out of my box, in my bed-room in Mr. Davis's house in Oxford-street . I believe his christian name is John Davis , I am not certain what his christian name is; I had wore it the Sunday before, and Miss Comber put it in the box.

Q. Have you ever found it again? - No, I have seen nothing of it.

Q. Why do you believe the prisoner took it? - Because I had a suspicion and I heard she had been in my bed-room.

Mr. Knowlys. You wore it on the Sunday and you missed it on the Thursday following, and desired that young Lady, Miss Comber, to put it into the box.

SUSAN COMBER sworn.

I was on a visit to Miss Gorges, on Monday the 28th of September; I was there, and I saw the watch and I put it in a black shagreen cafe, and put it into a trunk belonging to Mrs. Gorges, in Mrs. Gorges's dining-room.

Court to Prosecutor. I suppose it was the watch you wore? - It was.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe there had been a bell-hanger in the room, had there not? - Yes, the same day that I put the watch in the trunk, and there was no lock on the box; he was there all the fore-part of the day.

Court. Was the prisoner a servant? - She was, a servant of the gentleman of the house, Mr. Davis.

MARGARET PATE sworn.

The prisoner came up stairs, it was on Monday week, it was after twelve.

Court to Miss Comber. At what time did you see it? - Between nine and ten.

Pate. She opened the trunk case directly, and took the watch case out.

Q. How do you know that she was there? - She took out the case to shew me, she held it up in her hand, and asked me is it was not very handsome? I said yes, she then said, here is a very handsome pair of golden-rings! I begged of her not to pull them out, and to put the watch in again, she then stooped down and took hold of some clothes that were there, and said, are these not handsome clothes? I said, for God's sake shut it down, she then shut it down, and she then went and stooped, and put something in her pocket, but I cannot tell your Lordship what it was.

Q. What was you doing there at this time? - I was there to clean the room, and the trunks were moved out of one room into the other room; as soon as ever she shewed it me, by her desire the door where the trunk was, was latched, by herself, or somebody else. I cannot tell which.

Mr. Knowlys. You desired her to put this watch back again, and she put it back again? - I did not see her put it back, I see her shut the trunk, but I never see put the watch in.

Q. This was in a box with the lid open? - It was.

Q. The washerwoman used to come to the house to wash? - Yes.

Q. You have never found the watch since? - No, I never see it before nor since, and if I was to see it now I could not swear to it.

Q. Was you present when she was searched? - I was, and there was nothing sound.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave her a very good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940917-62

521. JOHN BROWN, otherwise DALTON; otherwise DELFER , and JOHN BARBER , were indicted for stealing, on the 21st of July , one hundred yards of muslin, value 30l. the property of William Mountsey , and William Porthouse , privily in their shop .

WILLIAM MOUNTSEY sworn.

I am a linen draper . I have been a partner with William Porthouse, I know nothing of the robbery.

ABRAHAM JOHNSON sworn.

I am a fireman and peace officer of the city. I produce some muslin.

JONATHAN HOBDEN sworn.

I am fifteen, a linen draper, an apprentice to Mr. Mountsey.

Q. Was he robbed at any time of any muslin? - Yes, on the 21st of July, Monday, between the hours of three and four.

Q. In what manner did it happen? - I did not see.

Q. Do you know whether of your own knowledge they were in your shop on that day? - I don't know. I was in the counting house behind the shop when one came in. I saw one of the men come into the shop. I don't know the muslin was missing till the constable brought the man and muslin. The constable Johnson.

Q. Did he bring both the men in? - No, the one nearest the Jury, John Barber . The muslin was brought in this wrapper, under this cover that it has on now.

Q. Was you master at home then? - Yes, he was. And they took him to the counter.

Q. Had you ever seen him before the constable brought him in? - No, never.

Johnson. On the 21st of July, at half after three, I was standing at my plying place, at Bread-street, next to Cheapside, and I saw the two prisoners at the end of Bread-street, in company with another, and knowing of Delser, having had him in custody before, I directly went up to the top of the street, and crossed the way, and kept them in my sight till they came against Mr. Mountsey's shop or warehouse, in Cheapside, a little below Bow-lane, they passed backwards and forward three or four times, at last, I see Delser go into Mr. Mountsey's shop, he was in not above half a minute; Barber, while he was in, placed himself next towards Cheapside, a little from the door facing, and the other on the other side, then Brown came out with this bundle, in this manner, before him, I directly crossed the way, and before I got over, he gave it to Barber, and went to the third man, I was on the other side of the way. He gave it to Barber before I crossed the way, I followed Barber for fear I should lose the property, I overtook him at the corner turning round in Queen-street, Cheapside; I took him by the collar, and asked him where he was going? he said a man had given him the bundle to carry for sixpence, I told him he must go back again to the warehouse, and deliver it there, I brought him back to Mr. Mountsey's shop, when I got to the door, the lad met me, he did not know he had been robbed; I told him I got some property here, he said it belongs to my master, seeing the red mark on the wrapper. I took him to the counter before Mr. Mountsey came down stairs, told the lad that his master must come down to the counter. I delivered the goods into Mr. Mountsey's and Porthouse's hands; I put my mark on it, and sealed it. This is the seal I put on it, and my name on the outside wrapper besides.

Q. Who has brought it here? - Mr. Mountsey.

Q. How did you get the other prisoner? - A little time after I had him for picking of pockets, I had him one day this last week in Newgate, I know

him very well, I am sure he is the same man.

Prosecutor. This is my property, I tied it up before I went to dinner, that might be about three o'clock within a few minutes, and left it on the counter of the shop, it is muslin, nineteen quantities, one hundred yards altogether.

Q. What may be the value of them, not as if you was to sell them, but as if you wanted to purchase them? - Thirty pounds, here is the shop mark or back piece in letters, different letters, they were marked by myself.

Q. You had not sold that bundle you are sure? - No, I tied them up.

Q. When these goods were brought back to you, were they in the same wrapper as when you left them on the counter? - Yes, they were.

Q. To Holden. Were these goods tied upon the counter? - They were.

Q. How long had you seen them before the prisoner was brought in? - Half an hour.

Q. Was any body else in the shop? - No, my master was up stairs.

Johnson. I see him go in, and see him bring them out.

Q. Did you see them at all in any manner removed from the place in which they were? - I did not. I knew not the place where they lay till I was told.

Prisoner Brown. In the mean time that this selony was done, I was at home at my master's, he is in the yard, I fancy, to speak to my character, he was there all the day.

Court to Johnson. At that time that they were about the house did you see them talking together? - I did. I see them talking together all the way into Bread-street, and when they passed backward and forward, and locked in at the door, they all three talked together.

Jury. Was the door open or shut? - It stood open.

Prisoner Barber. I was catching from Mr. - , a painter and glazier, and as I was coming along Cheapside, a man tapped me on the shoulder and asked me if I would take this bundle to Queen-street, to the wine vaults there, and he would give me sixpence, and I took it, being glad to earn the sixpence, as it was in my road.

John Brown, GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

John Barber , GUILTY. (Aged 19.)

Of stealing, but not privily.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER:

Reference Number: t17940917-63

522. DAVID JONES and SIMON DOYLE , were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , sixty drest seal skins, value 30l. the goods of Oliver Owen and Henry Cartwright , and one porters knot, value 1s. the goods of John Reynolds , in the dwelling house of Walter Reynolds .

OLIVER OWEN sworn.

I am a currier . I have a partner Mr. Cartwright. I lost some drest seal skins. I sent the porter on the 13th of August, Wednesday, I sent him to Grub-street, I don't know any thing of the transaction, I sent him between eleven and twelve in the forenoon.

Q. When did you see them again? - Not till the next day, he sent a woman up about two o'clock.

Mary Reynolds . I am the wife of Walter Reynolds . On Wednesday the 13th of August, the porter , John Reynolds,

left the leather at our house, and desired I would take care of it while he called again. I am the wife of Walter Reynolds, I keep the Cock at Snow-hill , the public house. It was left, as near as I can say, about twelve o'clock in the day.

Q. Do you know what quantity of skins there were? - I don't know. About three o'clock in the afternoon, David Jones came in, and called for a pint of porter.

Q. In what part of the house were they left when he left them? - On the tap room table. David Jones is the short one at the bar, he sat about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, and got up and paid for it, and said to one Mrs. Reynolds, I am come for this leather. Not knowing the person that left it, I was dubious of delivering it, I asked him who sent him? he told me he was sent from Mrs. Pendergrast, and he was the porter that brought it. I made an objection to giving it him, and Simon Doyle came up, and said, Mrs. Reynolds, I know the man to be Mrs. Pendergrast's friend, and the man that brought the leather. You may deliver the leather safe, accordingly I told him very well, if he brought the leather, then take it; accordingly David Jones asked him to help him on with it on his back, he refused, and said he would not. A porter coming into the house with a load on his back, he pitched his own load, and helped on Jones's on his back, and Jones went out with it.

Q. Should you know the leather again if you was to see it? - Yes.

Prisoner Doyle. Did I either aid or assist in the property? - I don't say that you did.

Prisoner Doyle. While the man was helping me with the load on my head, she asked me if my porter was paid for? and not whether I was the porter that brought it.

JOHN REYNOLDS sworn.

On the 13th of August my master sent me out with the skins between eleven and twelve, to Grub-street, Moorfields; and as I was coming past my own house a person met me and told me that her husband was in prison, and asked me to go with her to the lawyer's.

Q. Where does the prosecutors live? - In Mercer-street, Long-acre.

Q. Where the skins taken from thence by you? - Yes.

Q. Were did you leave them? - I left them on a table in the tap room of the public house, the Cock, at Snow-hill, in Mr. Reynolds's care.

Q. Is that Reynolds any relation of your's? - No. I had never been in the house before that day in my life.

Q. What time of the day might this be? - To the best of my belief it was past twelve.

Q. When did you come back for your things? - I believe it was past two; and as I was coming back I met the skins on the porter's back, I did not reach as far as the house; they were on that short man's back; the first thing I knew was the cord that tied them up; the next thing I knew was my knot that I carried them with.

Q. To Mrs. Reynolds. Was the knot taken with them? - I don't know that he left his knot.

Reynolds. I took notice then of the leather, and I said to the man, that is my leather; and that tall man was with him and he said, d-mn it, drop it, and I will get a coach to carry the leather.

Q. Where did you see them? - They had just turned down the gate that goes to the George, on Snow-hill; that was the first place that I took notice of the cords; I had a gentleman with me, and

then when I knew the knot, I said to him, that is my leather; and then the tall man, Doyle, said to the short one, drop it, and I will get a coach directly; I was not five yards from them then; then for fear the man should damage the leather, I jumped forward and catched it in my arms, at his throwing of it down, I catched it between the side of my arm and the edge of the wall of the public house; then when the leather came to me I slipped it down at the side, and I held hold of the short man, and I said, for God's sake, secure that other man; and Doyle got off at that time; then I sent my friend to the Cock, at Snowhill, for the publican to come up, and it was half an hour before my friend came; in the mean time the tall man came along with the crowd, among some women, and came to the short man, and told him to mind what he said; then I laid hold of him; then there were two decent men going past, and I asked them for God's sake to assist me.

Q. What did you do with the skins? - I gave them to Samuel Roberts .

Prisoner Jones. The load was down when he came up to me, on the ground? - Instead of that I catched it in my arms.

Q. He asked me who employed me? I told him two men, one before me and another behind me? - It was not so.

SAMUEL ROBERTS sworn.

I know no more than being present in the public house, drinking a pint of beer, I went our and took the skins and prisoner into my possession.

John Reynolds . I know the cords; the curriers do not usualy send such cords as this about leather; I know the knot, it has a burnt place in it.

Q. To Owen. Do you believe these skins to be your's? - Yes, by the bulk and appearance.

Q. Have you ever examined the quallity since they were taken from that man? - I have not; there is no mark on them, only by the journeyman that dressed them.

MICHAEL PITTER sworn.

I stand as a porter in Fleet Market; this tall man applied to me first to do this business, to obtain this leather under the false pretence.

Owen. I packed up the things myself; I am certain they are the same.

Prisoner Jones. On Wednesday morning, I went to work till dinner time, when my master sent me of a message; going along I met an acquaintance, with whom I had a pint of beer; when I came out, and coming along I met Doyle, and he asked me to carry a load for him; he said it did not weigh above a hundred and a half; I was to carry it from Snowhill, to Long-lane, Smithfield, and then I was to have a coach. When we came to the Cock, says he, Mrs. Reynolds and me are at variance, and I don't like to go in for it; so with that I went in and had a pint of beer; and came out again, and he comes to me; and says, your load is ready, go in and ask for it, and I will shew you where to carry it; I did not tell Mrs. Reynolds that Mrs. Pendegrast sent me; I told her I came for the leather; so a porter put it on my head; going out at the door, she asked me if my porter was paid for? I said, yes.

Prisoner Doyle. This is propense malice against me, and I will tell you how it is. Pendegrast is one that was tried here for selling bad money this week, and I had told Mrs. Reynolds that this head man of the coiners, came there to sell the money, and I said, I would take him

out, and so? was judged in having a hand in having this Pendegrast taken. This day a man comes up to me, in my own room, and I was finishing a shoe for a customer of mine, and asked me to do some business for him; and I said, I will be down with you in about ten or fifteen minutes; and I goes down to Mrs. Reynolds's house, to meet him, and I did not see the man that came for me there, nor any body else; this man he comes in, and another man, and they had a pint of beer, and they stopped together and drank; this man speaks to Mrs. Reynolds, and he moves the leather from the inner part of the house, into the outer, towards the street; and Mrs. Reynolds delivered it to this man. I have another reason to mention, for the words I uttered to Mrs. Reynolds, I says, you know Mr. Pendegrast better than I do, and I suppose he would not send a wrong porter to you. Jones before had told me that he was the porter.

The two prisoners each called two witnesses to their characters.

Court to Prosecutor. What is the value of this leather? - Twenty pounds.

Prisoner Doyle. This gentleman that left the leather came and told me that if I was to pay the attorney his costs, that he would put a slaw in the bill; and wanted to extort money from me to make it up.

David Jones , GUILTY . (Aged 44.)

Simon Doyle, GUILTY. (Aged 63.)

Of the robbery, but not in the dwelling house.

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-64

523. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for feloniously being on the 5th of August , a hand saw, value 4s. the goods of Robert king .

ROBERT KING sworn.

I am a journeyman carpenter and joiner ; I lost a hand saw out of Jewin-street , in a house that I was building; I left it there on Tuesday the 5th of August, about two o'clock in the afternoon, as near as I can recollect; as I was on the scaffold at work, I saw John Clarke standing by the door, and by the appearance, at no good; I observed him to look up and down the street two or three times; then I saw him go into the house, and he remained there for the space of about half a minute, and he came out, and I came down from the scassold, and I went in and missed my saw, off from the trunks that we were going to put up the buildings; then I went in pursuit of the man, and took him in Jewin-street, and he had the saw on him, hid under his coat; I took it from him; he begged and desired of me to let him go; I said he should go and he should go to the Compter; with that he took up a stick that he had in his hand, and threatened me with it; he did not strike me with it; I catched the saw out of his hand, and told him if he offered to strike me, I would knock him down with the saw.

Q. What was done with the saw? - The saw was delivered to the constable,

William Clarke .

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn.

I got the saw in my possession, and I have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. It is my saw, there is a shake in the handle, which was in it when I bought it, I bought it about a fortnight before; there was no other in the building.

Prisoner. I was burnt out at the late fire, in Wapping; I am by trade a cabinet-maker; I was in Falcon-square this time, with a man I knew very well, and I told him I had lost my tools, and asked him to lend me some? he said he worked in Jewin-street, and if I would go with him, he would lend me a few tools; and I went with him to Jewin-street, and went into a building before him, and stopped till he came out, and he delivered the saw into my hand, and said, deliver me the saw again to-morrow, in the same place; I told him I would; and whilst I was carrying it away that gentleman came and took me. As to what he says about my offering to strike him, it is false, so help my God.

GUILTY . (Aged 46.)

Imprisoned one month in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-65

524. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , a man's cloth great coat, value 5s. a woman's cloth cloak, value 3s. the goods of William Lettis .

WILLIAM LETTIS sworn.

I am a house-keeper ; I live at No. 29, Well-street, Oxford-street ; I was robbed the 8th of this month, I was out at the time.

Q. When had you last seen the things? - I had seen them in the passage, hanging on a nail, at the time I went out, between the hours of eight and nine.

Q. What day of the week was it? - On Monday evening.

Q. How soon did you see them after that? - I found them laying on the curb, and he was pursued.

Q. How long was you out? - About three or four minutes.

Q. Is your wife here? - No; the prisoner was pursued by a friend of mine.

Q. At what distance from your house did you see the things? - About thirty yards.

Q. Did you see the prisoner any where in that neighbourhood at that time? - No, I picked up the things, and have kept them till now.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner after you saw your things? - I suppose in less than a quarter of an hour; he was brought to my house by the constable of the night, Price; and the watchman.

Q. Can you say with certainly that these things that you saw laying, were your's? - Yes, I know the coat by a mark under the cape with yellow silk, the cloak also I marked it, to know my own from other peoples.

RICHARD LEE sworn.

I am a servant. I was at the house of the prosecutor, he had been out for a pot of porter a few minutes before I missed the things out of the passage; I know the things to be the prosecutor's; and I saw him with the things under his arm, in Wells's-mews; this was near nine. I am not the servant of the prosecutor.

Q. How far is that from the house of the prosecutor? - I cannot exactly say, but I think about half a dozen or nine doors.

Q. Did you stop him? - No, he passed me, and dropped the clothes at the end of the Mews.

Q. Why do you think he dropped them? - He dropped them because he knew he stole them.

Q. Was there any cry of stop thief? - I gave the alarm of stop thief!

Q. Did you take him? - No, I see him taken.

Q. Did you lose sight of him at any time after he dropped the clothes? - No, I was close behind him; I am certain the prisoner is the person that had the clothes in his possession.

Q. Who took up the clothes? - The prosecutor.

Q. Did you see the prosecutor? - I see him when we returned back, after the prisoner was taken, with the clothes that he had picked up.

WILLIAM PRICE sworn.

I am the jailor of Great Marlborough-street, and I am an extra officer there; I was going on the 8th of this month, about nine o'clock at night, into Titchfield-street, I heard the cry of stop thief! I immediately runs across the way, and lays hold of the prisoner at the bar by the collar.

Q. Did you at any time see any thing on him? - No, I did not see the things till I brought the prisoners to the prosecutor's house; as soon as ever I laid hold of him, Mr. Lee said, that is the thief; with that I took him down to the watch-house in Well-street,

Prisoner. I should beg the favour of going for a soldier, although I am innocent of this affair, for which I am brought here now.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you leave the door open? - I am not certain whether I did or not.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Judgment respited.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-66

525. FRANCIS ROSS was indicted for that he, on the 15th of August , feloniously did make, forge, and counterfeit, a certain order for payment of money, dated Gloucester, 21, March 179. with the name of J. R. Holland, there to subscribed, purpoting to be directed to Robert Herries, Esq. Charles Sackville, David Macuillock, and Robert Herries the younger, bankers and partners, for the payment of ten pounds, to H. Wilkinson, with intention to defraud Robert Herries , Esq. &c. &c .

Indicted in a Second COUNT, for uttering the same, with a like intention.

In a Third and Fourth COUNTS, for forging and uttering the same, with intention to defraud Hecter Essex .

(The indictment opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Const.)

HECTER ESSEX sworn.

I am a silversmith , I live at the corner of Palsgrave-place, in the Strand.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I have seen him before in my shop. I remember he came to my house on Friday the 15th of August, in the afternoon, between the hours of four and six.

Q. Did he come alone? - He was in company with a woman. When the prisoner at the bar came into the shop, he asked to look at some pistols; that was an article for sale in our shop; the pistols were shewn him. He asked for pocket books likewise; they were shewn him; he fixed on a pair of pistols and a pocket book, the price of both were two guineas and a half. He said to the woman that was along with him, give us what you have got; have you got some gold about you? The immediate reply she made I don't know, because I was in a hurry.

Q. Did she give any gold to the prisoner? - Not to my knowledge; I did not

see any given. The prisoner presented the note which I have in my pocket; he laid it on the counter before me, saying, I suppose you have no objection to that; I examined the note, finding it to be a country note. I observed, that I had an objection to them in general; since the failure of country banks I had not taken them with that alacrity I had before done; I don't know he made any sort of reply. I took the note, and gave it to my apprentice. He is here.

Q. For what purpose did you give it to your apprentice? - To take it in for the inspection of my next door neighbour.

Q. Did your apprentice take the note away with him to your next door neighbour? - He did.

Q. After he had taken it into your next door neighbour, did any conversation pass between you and the prisoner Ross? - After the apprentice was gone, Ross and myself sell into some conversation. The first conversation was respecting the woman that was with him; she had two sad black eyes. I was commisserating the misfortune of the woman; Ross informed me, that she was subject to sits, and had fell down and hurt herself in that manner. Previous to my taking the note, he had observed, that he was in a very great hurry, going to set off in the coach, he was fearful he should be too late for the Sussex coach; he said he was going to Steyning. I should not have taken any further notice of it, but during the time my apprentice was gone, about five or six minutes, Ross seemed greatly agitated.

Q. Did he say any thing more about Steyning? - He represented himself either as a Custom house officer or a smugler, or words to that effect, either one or the other, residing at Steyning. After this he observed to me, if he was to drop me half an anchor of rum or Holland's, or some spirituous liquor, whether I would take it or no. I observed to him, that I should not take any thing of the kind; that I was certain it was worth no person's while to run any sort of a risk. My apprentice returned, bringing the note back; I observed that to be the same note that I gave him, saying, my next door neighbour said he should take it; Ross was by at this time; that Robert Herries was a very good house. I then took the note, desiring Ross to indorse it; he indorsed the note, Ross only, no addition to it. I then asked him for his address. I took down Ross, in Sussex; near Steyning, on a separate piece of paper, left any thing should transpire. After this I gave him a five pound Bank note, two guineas in gold, and five shillings and six-pence in silver; that, together with the sum of the pistols and the pocket book, made up ten pounds. Ross asked me to indorse the Bank note which I gave him. I told him, it was not necessary; it was not like country bills; it was payable any where; then he went away, and I sent the note to Sir Robert Herries' banking house within a few minutes by the same apprentice. His name is John Simpson.

Q. You say you see the prisoner write his name on the back of that note? - I did.

Q. Has that note been in your possession ever since? - It has the greatest part of the time.

Q. Are you able to say, that that is the same note? - I am, because I saw the prisoner write his name on it. I am sure it is the same note.

Q. How long afterwards did you see the prisoner at the bar? - On the Monday following.

Court. What was the result of your sending the nore to Herries for acceptance? - I hat it was a bad one, a sorged one; they refused the note. The note was brought back to me, refused pay

ment. On the Monday following I saw the prisoner at the bar again in the Poultry compter.

Q. When you saw him in the Poultry compter did any thing pass between you? - I told him I was sorry to see that he had been guilty of such a thing, and to see him in that situation he was in; he said, he was very unfortunate; it was the first thing he had ever attempted in his life; he had never been before a magistrate in his life, and that he had no intent whatever to defraud; that the notes were given to him by his brother-in-law, in an account standing between them of seventy five or eighty-five pounds, I will not take on me to say which. I then enquired of him if he had any other notes? he answered that he had. I told him I was sorry that they had not all remained in his possession, it would have saved me the trouble of coming there; I then asked him, as he had had so much money of me, where the pistols were that he had of me? he said the pistols were at a friend's, or words to that effect. I then enquired at what friend's, or where, if I could not get them? he then answered that he did not know, but he would send the pistols to me; I enquired where, he, the prisoner, lived, if I could apply at his house, knowing, by his being in prison that he did not live at Steyning; he then told me that he lived at the King's arms yard, High Holborn, No. 13, on the second gallery.

Prisoner. Bull and gate yard - It may be so; he told me the right place then, because I found it out. I went to his lodgings to enquire for his wife; I saw nobody there but three little children, who told me their mother was not come home. I went the following morning, which was the Tuesday morning; I was admitted into his apartment, where I had been before in the same yard, the same number where he had described to me before, where I saw the very woman who was with him at my shop; from the extreme misery that I saw of the man's family, I declined further pursuit till I was called upon by the banker. There was not a single thing in the room but the bed rolled up in the corner, and three naked children.

Q. At the Poultry-compter, or at any other time, was you present when the prisoner was searched? - I was not.

Q. How long after this was it that you was desired to attend at Bow-street? - I never attended at Bow-street at all; I attended at the Mansion-house; I believe it was the Saturday following; there I gave the same account that I have now related.

Mr. Gurney. You seem to be so inaccurate in this conversation, that you cannot tell whether he described himself as a Custom-house officer or a smuggler? - I was very busy at that time.

Q. While the apprentice was gone with the bill he gave you the reason why he was agitated; for fear he should lose his stage? - He told me so; and what makes me so correct in this business, I copied every thing that transpired, when I found it was a bad note.

Prisoner. I said Horsham, not Steyning. - I am certain to the place he mentioned; it was Steyning; because I looked at the Directory, to see what time the coach went off that time in the afternoon.

JOHN SIMPSON sworn.

I live with Mr. Essex. The prisoner brought the note into our house on the 15th of August. I wrote my name on the back of it; I took it to a neighbour, to shew it, and I returned it to my master, and he took it. I went the same afternoon to the house of Sir Robert Herries and Co. it was about ten minutes af

terwards. I was sent off as soon as possibly I could be; I presented it; they told me it was bad; they refused payment; on which I returned it back to my master. This is the note.

HUGH GOLDICUTT sworn.

I am clerk in the banking house of Sir Robert Herries and Co. the firm is Sir Robert Herries , Charles Sackvitle , esq. David Macullock, and Robert Herries the younger.

Q. Do you know the last witness, Simpson? - Upon my word I do not recollect.

Q. Do you remember a lad coming to your house, presenting a bill for payment? - I do.

Q. On what day? - I cannot remember particular dates; it was in August.

Q. You attended the examination of the prisoner at the Mansion-house? - I did.

Q. Was it the same transaction that you attended about that we are talking of now? - It was.

Q. Look at that bill; take it in your hand, and see whether you remember that bill being presented to you for payment? - I cannot speak particularly to this identical bill; but a great number of this description were brought; such a bill as this was presented for payment; it was refused payment.

Q. Of course you delivered it to the person who brought it? - Yes.

Q. He took it back again? - He did.

Q. You don't know it from any other bill of the like kind? - I do not; there were bills coming almost daily.

Q. It appears to be subscribed, J. R. Holland? - It is.

Q. Is there such a person keeps cash at your house? - No such person; nor ever did before or now to this present time.

Q. How long have you been in this banking house? - Fourteen or fifteen years.

Q. Had you any other bill presented to you with the same sort of signature as that? - They were all the same signature.

The bill read.

No. 503. & 610.

Gloucester, March 21, 1794.

Sir Robert Herries and Co. bankers, at London, pay to H. Wilkinson, Esq. or bearer, on demand, ten pounds, value received.

J. R. Holland.

610. Entered Thos. Todds.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I am constable; I was present when Ross was taken into custody on the same charge, and I attempted to search him at Mr. Crouch's; he said he wanted to go to the necessary. I went with him into the yard, and I attempted to search him in the yard; when I did that, he refused to go to the necessary then; he said, now he did not want to go, and we returned into the parlour of Mr. Crouch.

Q. You did not examine him then? - Not immediately; no further than the attempt. We took a coach, and going along in the coach, I told him that I should strip him naked when I got him to St. James's-street, for I suspected he had notes about him. On my saying that, he put his hand to the back part of the waistband of his breeches, took out this pocket-book, and gave it me. I examined it, and found two notes in it; there was also an order in it to press men, which I gave him up; he begged for mercy both of me and Mr. Crouch; I told him I did not wish him any ill, I must take him to the house where I was going. It was at Mr. Crouch's, a pawnbroker, in Fore-

street, a near neighbour, where he was stopped.

Mr. Gurney, The prisoner voluntarily gave up these notes, I believe, telling you that if one was sorged they were all sorged? - He told me he had taken them of his brother only.

Q. Did he not say they were all alike, or something to that effect? - I don't know that he did.

SAMUEL MUCKLOW sworn.

I am an apothecary, and live at Gloucester; I have been there the biggest part of my life time; I have been at Gloucester for the three last years for continuance.

Q. Do you know there is such a person as J.R. Holland living in Gloucester? - No; there is no such a person as I know of, or can find.

Q. Is there any banking house carried on in the name of such a person? - There is not.

Q. Is there such a banking house in which there is such a person in the firm? - No; I have made every enquiry, and I cannot find there is any such person in Gloucester.

Mr. Gurney. Do you mean to say, that there is no such person as Mr. Holland living in Gloucester? - Not that I know of.

Q. Did you examine all the parish books? - I did not.

Q. Now, sir, considering the large size of the city of Gloucester, can you take on yourself to swear, that there is no such a person as of the name of J. R. Holland living there? - Not to my knowledge.

Court. Did you ask the parish-officers? - Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Either from the enquiry that you made of the parish officers, and from other enquiries that you were able to make, you found no such person? - I did not; I was making enquiries for this very purpose.

CHARLES GROOME sworn.

I live at Steyning, in Sussex; I am a native there; I have lived there constantly these fourteen years.

Q. Then you are perfectly acquainted with the persons that in habit there? - Yes.

Q. Do you know of the prisoner at the bar living at Steyning? - No, not during the last fourteen years, I can positively say that.

Prisoner. These notes I received of my brother for money sent, seventy-five pounds eighteen shillings, at the Castle, in Devizes; there were gentlemen in the room in the mean time that the money was paid to me; and whether he might know that they were sorged or no I cannot say. I left one of the notes with Mr. Crouch from Saturday till Monday before I called for the balance of the note. On Monday I called for the note, and he told me, Mr. Ross come in; have you had any thing to drink this morning? I told him no; and he asked me to breakfast with him, and I went to breakfast with him; and at breakfast he says, Frank, I am afraid that the bill is sorged that you have left. I told him, I received it of my brother. My brother was going as captain's cook of the Argonant? he was a man cook, just paid off from the Syren. I was going to take an eating house with the money; and I told Mr. Essex I was going to take an eating house or public house at Horsham, and was going by the Steyning coach.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 32.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-67

526. CATHARINE NEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of August , fourteen guineas, a tin snuff-box,

value 2d. a silk purse, 3d. the goods of Thomas Norton , privately from the person of Catharine his wife .

CATHARINE NORTON sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I do.

Q. What have you to say against her? - Nothing at all; but she is the woman that robbed me; she took my money and all, and box out of my pocket, because when I felt her hand in my pocket they were all in her hand; she was asking for gin money, and I told her I was no drunkard.

Q. What was in your purse? - Fourteen guineas. I felt her hand in my pocket; I was in the room under my own place, in Crown court, Broad St. Giles's My occupation is carrying a basket for one Man, in Covent garden, and I earned the money honestly, and I have a fatherless child, please you, my Lord.

Q. What time was it you lost it? - Between seven and eight o'clock in the morning last Saturday was six weeks.

Q. In whose room was it? - In this woman's room, Mrs. Joyce's.

Q. What went you there for? - I went to Covent-garden between five and six in the morning, and I came home for another basket, for to work in the Garden. My husband is a very sickly man, and I have a fatherless child by another man. I went into this woman's room, and the prisoner was in the room; it was just on the stroke of seven when I came in, and this woman asked me what I was doing with myself in the house last night? and I up and told her.

Q. What was the prisoner doing? - She was sitting on this woman's bed; she see me put my money into the pocket, and this woman examined the money; I shewed them my money, when she asked me and all of them, and I put it into the purse, and I put the purse into the box, and put it all into my pocket afterwards.

Q. How soon after you put it into your pocket did your perceive the prisoner's hand in your pocket? - It was on the stroke of seven when I came in there. It was about half an hour afterwards.

Q. How soon after you put your money in your pocket did you perceive her hand there? - The precious minute I felt her hand there and felt her take it. I took and shook her hand in this manner, and when I could not take it from her, I took and cried to my husband, that was very ill a-bed, that did not work a stroke for six or seven weeks, and he did not come down, she went away with the box, and carried away all that I had; she went down below Drury-lane playhouse to Whitehart-yard, to one Macdonald's room, where I found her between six and seven in the evening, when I was informed she was there, it is about half a mile from where I live, it is below Drury-lane playhouse.

Q. Did you get the money? - No, she had time enough to dispatch it from eight o'clock in the morning till that hour in the evening; she got all my money, I could not purchase a hape worth of bread for my children.

Q. Did you find nothing on her? - No, nothing.

Prisoner. I never saw a sarthing of money belonging to her. Can you say that ever I received any money from you? I have got witness in Court that you said one of the young men took the money from you.

Prosecutor. You took it all at once.

Court. Was there any body else in the room but the prisoner and Mary Joyce? - Nobody but the prisoner's mother.

Q. Do you remember her being in the room with Catharine Norton at seven o'clock in the morning? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember at the time whether Catharine Norton had any-money or no? - Yes, she had; she pulled it out, and counted it, and put it into her purse, and the purse into her tin box; I don't know how much.

Q. Did the prisoner see her put it into her pocket? - Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner's mother see her? - I cannot say that.

Q. How soon after did she complain of having lost the money? - I went and pawned something for my husband's breakfast and my children's, and after I came back I heard her complain. I went out of my own room directly.

Q. How long was you out of your own room? - I cannot say.

Q. Half an hour or an hour? - How far off was the pawnbroker's? - As far as here to the gate out of the yard.

Q. How long did you stay at the pawnbroker's? - Till he gave me the money and duplicate; it may be about nine minutes.

Q. Did you go any where else before you got back again? - Yes, I went to the chandler's to get my breakfast, just by the same place.

Q. Did Catharine Norton go out of the room at the time that you went out? - Yes, she went out before I locked my door.

Q. And was it immediately after she put her money into her pocket? - Yes, she put it into her pocket just before.

Q. When she went out did she make any complaint? - No, not till I returned back.

Q. Did Catharine Neal go out at the same time that you did, or before? - They all went out together.

Q. Where did you find Catharine Norton ? - It was not my business to look after them; the first complaint was, that she came up stairs, and hallooed at my own door.

Q. You was got in your room at that time? - Yes, I was.

Q. What did she say? - She said she was robbed of her money.

Q. Did she say who robbed her? - No. she did not.

Prisoner. Don't you recollect that I went out before Mrs. Norton went out. I never heard any thing of this money till about two o'clock. I have got witnesses that she went to covent garden, the chandler's shop and coal shop, and never missed the money till after she came back, and laid it then on the man that she lived with.

WILLIAM MACARTHY sworn.

I keep a public house in Broad-street, St. Giles's, the corner of Crown court, where this pillage was. I know nothing of any robbery any further than by report; it was rumoured that Norton was going to Ireland, and that his wife took these fourteen guineas out of his pocket, to secure the money from his taking it to Ireland with him, and that she came down and had it in her pocket with her. There is nobody believes that she did lose the money.

Prisoner. Was any body else accused besries me? - There were two lodgers of Norton's came down to me, to ask me if I would let them a lodging; they said they were accused; they are in Court.

Court to Joyce. Did you hear her accuse any body herself but Catharine Neal ? - I heard her accuse nobody but the mother and daughter. I advised her to take up all the people in the house; I brought a constable to them, and had them all taken up, because if the money was lost he would find out who had it.

ELEANOR MAHON sworn.

I have nothing to say; I never saw the face of the girl in my life till I saw her in the bail-dock.

Q. You was not in the house at the time of the robbery? - No; I was not.

Q. To Macarthy. Did she accuse the prisoner at the bar with robbing her? - She told me it must be some of the party, the prisoner, and they that were in the room with the prisoner.

Q. Did she give you any account of the robbery how it happened? - I do not believe she was robbed. I thought she concealed the money from her husband. She told me it was taken out of her pocket by somebody that was in the room, either this woman, her mother, or Mary Joyce ; but she most suspected Catharine Neal, because she was a woman of bad character.

Q. Did she mention her feeling her hand in her pocket? - No; she never mentioned it till lately; she did not at the time.

THOMAS NORTON sworn.

I was in my room when my wife said that she had lost her money; she carried the money out between five and six o'clock in the morning; she took it out of the box before my face.

Q. Did you consent to her taking it? - Yes; I gave her the key.

Q. Why did she take it? - To give it into Mr. Macarthy's hands to keep for her. I heard my wife about seven or eight o'clock calling out in the room underneath (Mr. Joyce's room). Whether in the room, or in some place near the room, I will not swear; I was laying down on my bed at the same time; she cried out that she was robbed; she called me down and told me that Kit Neal had robbed her of her gold. She cried out I am robbed! Tom, says she, come down, I am robbed. I got up on the bed and put on my shirt, and my wife ran up to me, and I put on my breeches and shoes and went down stairs as fast as I could, and I could not find Kit Neal till six or seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. What did she say when she was taken up? - I carried the woman to Bow-Street.

Q. To Catharine Norton. You are positive you felt her hand in your pocket in Mr. Joyce's room? - I am.

Q. Who was in the room at that time? - No one at all but the prisoner, her mother, Mary Joyce , and me.

Prisoner. I was in the room this morning, and this woman came down, and she said that she had been wrangling with her husband, and that he said he would go to Ireland, and she said here is all the money I have got, and he should not take it to his wife there; because he is a married man; with that I left them; with that there is a witness that I have got here, she went with her to Covent-Garden and went to the coal-shed, and before ever she cried out about her money, it was twelve o'clock, and then she accused her husband, and she asked her man whether he took the money out of her pocket? Says the husband, I never took the money out of your pocket; then, says she, it is one of the lodgers.

Prosecutor. That girl's sister, she owned to Mr. Macarthy that she had my property.

Q. To Macarthy. Had you any hint given you that you was to keep this man for them? - I had not; they are neighbours, they all lodge in this house; the prisoner's sister told me she believed the money was lost.

MARY BRYANT sworn.

Q. Did you lodge in the same house? - I did at the time, and ever since till last night, and I left the lodging.

Q. When did you hear any complaint of this robbery? - I heard it between eight and nine.

Q. Who said they had been robbed? - The woman that lost the money, Ca

tharine Bryant, she is here, and her husband, no one else. She first charged the prisoner at the bar at that time; and secondly, she suspected some of her lodgers of taking the money, one James Mandy, it was between nine and ten, as near as I can recollect; she suspected the lodgers to have found it afterwards in her own room.

Prisoner. Did not she go to Covent-Garden, and give you some money to get some coals? - She asked me where the coal-shed was before ever I heard of the money being lost, and I went with Mrs. Norton to shew her the coal-shed between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. Was that before she lost the money? - I cannot say, because I don't know of her losing it.

Q. At the time that she made the complaint who was in the house? - Was Mary Joyce in the house? - I cannot say.

Q. Where was Catharine Norton at the time she made the complaint? - In her's and the prisoner's room; the prisoner, and mother and sister, had a lodging at her house.

Q. What became of the prisoner at the time that you heard this outcry of the robbery? - I cannot say.

Q. How soon after the cry of robbery did you see the prisoner? - Not till twelve o'clock, to my knowledge, and I had seen her a little before the cry of the robbery was; I see her at twelve o'clock, between twelve and one, between Mrs. Joyce's room and her own room.

Q. Was Norton and his wife there at that time? - I cannot recollect.

Prisoner. When I heard that she had lost her money I came home, and Mrs. Norton and her husband were in the house, and they never said any thing to me.

Court to Norton. Was you at home at twelve o'clock that day? - No; I was not; I was looking after his girl, and my wife was with me.

Q. To Mrs. Joyce. Was the prisoner Catharine Neale at home about twelve o'clock? - Yes; till twelve and one o'clock, better than half an hour.

JAMES MANDY sworn.

Did Catharine Norton accuse you with the robbery? - Not to my hearing.

- MALONY sworn.

Q. Was you accused of having robbed Catharine Norton? - I never was.

- sworn.

The prosecutor came up and asked me if I knew any thing about this? - I told her I had not.

ELEANOR MAHON sworn.

I will tell the truth, and nothing but the truth: this here boy and I are married, and we had parted, and I was asked to dine with Thomas Norton , of intention of seeing this man again, whom I was married to. When I went they spoke to me concerning this robbery, and I went to Clerkenwell, and she and her husband desired me to say after this manner, as they had no other friend but my husband; would I be so kind to do so and so; to declare against this girl what I never knew.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-68

527. MARY CHEESEHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of June , five pair of childrens leather shoes, value 7s. two pair of womens leather shoes, value 5s. a linen apron, value 1s. two linen handkerchiefs,, value 18d. the goods of James Cooley .

JAMES COOLEY sworn.

I am a shoe-maker , No. 43, Rosemary-lane; the prisoner was my servant , she

lived with me the months of May and June.

Q. When did you first miss any property? - Wednesday, the 18th of June.

Q. Did you miss all your property at one time? - I believe I did; they were missing from my shop.

Q. How come you to suppose this young woman, your servant, had got them? - I supposed it by missing a pair of tea-tongs. I immediately thought that my servant had made free with the other things; I went and searched the very next day, which I believe was the 19th of June, and the very first place I went to one Mr. Fordyce's, Shadwell Dock, where I found several pair of shoes; he is a pawnbroker. I found some more articles at Mrs. Crouch's, Ratcliff Highway, to the best of my knowledge; they were childrens shoes; a pair of red-morocco shoes, wrapped up in a South-sea handkerchief, belonging to me; they were left at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES BRUCE sworn.

I am servant to a pawnbroker in Cable-street, Wellclose-square.

Q. To Collry. You did not tell me of any property found there? - You did not give me time. I found some there.

Bruce. I produce one shawl pawned for 18d. I don't know the party of whom I had it; I gave a duplicate with it in the name of Mary Cheeseham; I have kept from that time to this.

Q. What day was this? - The 13th of June; afterwards the prosecutor's wife came and looked at it, and had a fresh ticket on it, and had it put in her own name.

WILLIAM FORDYCE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce four pair of shoes, childrens and womens, three pair of childrens and one pair of womens; I got them of Mary Cheese-him, the prisoner; they were pawned with me the 24th of May and the 24th of June, I have kept them ever since; I know her person.

Prosecutor. I can swear to this handkerchief, but not so positively as my wife can. I lost one of that sort; the shoes have not my private marks on then, but I can swear to them, because they tally with those that have my marks on them.

Mrs. Cosley. This handkerchief I had not missed at the time, but afterwards; when it was found I examined then, and missed it out of my bottom drawer; I had it by me these two years; I am sure it is mine.

JAMES CUBBAGE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce four pair of shoes and an apron, or South-sea handkerchief; I took them in of the prisoner the 30th and 31st of May; I know the prisoner.

Prosecutor. The handkerchief is silk and cotton, and worth hardly any thing; these red morocco shoes wrapped up in it have my private marks, a figure of I and a figure of 4.

Q. Had you sold these shoes? - I had not; here are three pair of black shoes marked with an 0 and 4, and a pair of womens with my private mark.

ALICE NEGUS sworn.

I am a poor working woman; the prisoner gave me a duplicate, and I gave it to the constable; she gave it me on a Saturday morning in June or July, I cannot say which.

REUBEN CARTER sworn.

I produce eight duplicates; I got them of the prisoner, I believe it was in the month of August; that is all I have to say.

Q. Did not you receive a duplicate from a woman? - Yes.

Q. Is that one of the eight? - No; I put it among this other parcel.

Q. Does any of the pawnbrokers know of these duplicates? - Yes.

Q. They are the duplicates of some of the things that have been produced? Are they? - Yes.

Prisoner. I was two days with my prosecutor when he began to make attempts to seduce me, and repeated it so often that it was with great difficulty I could do my business. I told his wife of it, and she told me to keep my distance, and he gave me these things to seduce me, but finding he could not, he had me apprehended as a thief. No sooner was I taken than he went to my father, in hopes of making property of me, told him that, as he was a constable, his daughter had been robbing in the Back-lane, and now was the time to save her; but he could not leave his work in time before I was committed. The prosecutor told me last Wednesday, that he would throw the bill out if I could give him a note of hand for value received, and actually went to buy a stamp for that purpose.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever give her any of these things? - Never.

Q. On your oath, you hear the reason that she has assigned, is it true or false? - It is entirely an invention. The father came to me, and begged of me to accept of half-a-guinea to make a slaw in the indictment. I immediately told him that I should forseit my recognizance if I did any such thing; I told him I could not do it, but I humbly ask for mercy for the prisoner if you can but grant it; I do not come here maliciously to prosecute her, my noble Lord, but I humbly beg, if there is mercy to shew, shew it to the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you ever give her any of these things, or ever offer to receive any sum of money? - Never.

Court to Mrs. Cooley. Was there ever any complaint made by this young woman? - No, never, on my oath; she never made one complaint to me.

The prisoner called three witnesses to her character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven Years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-69

528. ANN SPOONER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a calico bed gown, value 2s. two muslin caps, value 6d. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. a cotton handkerchief, value 12d. a linen sheet, value 1s. two linen shirts, value 4s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1s. and a linen frock, value 6d. the goods of Joseph Houghton .

JOSEPH HOUGHTON sworn.

On the 24th of July I lost some linen; it was from my own house, where I live. I lost two shirts, a sheet, two flowered muslin caps, a pair of white stockings, a check frock, a silk handkerchief, a cotton handkerchief, and a bed-gown.

Q. What may be the value of them altogether? - About 10s. or 12s. My wife on the 24th of May sent down the prisoner with part of these things to wash in the wash-house; in a little time after my wife went down, and missed her and the things too; directly after that we went after the woman where she said she lived, in Catherine Wheel Alley, Whitechapel; we could not find her out there.

Q. How came you to trust her with these things? - She was a charewoman; I sent my wife to Spitalfields to look or a woman to nurse the child, or to do about the house, and she brought the prisoner.

Q. Did you ever find the prisoner again? - Yes, in George's-Gardens, Bethnall-Green, and she had this bed- gown on her back; my wife can speak to it.

LYDIA HOUGHTON sworn.

I know the prisoner at the bar; a bed-gown was found on the prisoner's back; I cannot tell where she lives; she told me when I hired her in Spitalfields-market, that she lived in Catherine Wheel Alley, but I found her in George's-Gardens, Bethnal-Green.

Q. Did you find any thing on her besides this bed-gown? - Only three duplicates.

Q. In consequence of these duplicates, did you afterwards find any other things? Only the things at the pawnbroker's that answered to the duplicates, two caps, a pair of stockings, and a shirt.

- JEFF sworn.

I live with a pawnbroker in Barbican.

Q. Did the prisoner ever bring any thing to pawn? - I cannot swear that she did it; I have some things that were pawned that the prosecutor swore to, but I don't know who brought them.

Mrs. Houghton. I am sure the things are mine.

- MORRITT sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce a muslin cap; it was pawned at my shop; I cannot tell by whom.

Prosecutor. This cap is mine.

Prisoner. I was hired by this woman as a charewoman on Monday; I was to have six-pence a day, and to find myself; I was there chareing three days; the fourth day was the washing day, and I had the things in the wash-house to wash; on the fourth day I went to empty out a little dirty water, and a woman came to inform me that my child was very bad in the poor- house, and I went to see my child, and left the door open, because there was no fasten- ing to it; and when I went to the poorhouse I begged leave to stop that evening, which I did, and the next morning I returned to this woman again; after this I went into the country a fortnight to hay- making, and when I came back Mr. Houghton took me up on this charge, and took my bed-gown off my back, and said it was his property. I am a poor widow woman, I must leave it to God and your mercy.

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Confined six months in the House of Cor- rection , and fined 1s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-70

529. THOMAS PHINNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , half a guinea , the money of Thomas Garnet .

THOMAS GARNET sworn.

I know the prisoner. I live in Moors-street, St. Martin's-lane, I am commonly called a Strapper, in the yard, working in the yard, dressing horses, and sometimes go out with a glass coach. I had been to Darttord with a gentleman's's carriage the 9th of August, coming home I met with the prisoner at this side of New Cross turnpike, at the watering house, and asked him how he was? he told me he was very well, and he asked me how I was? and then I asked him where he was going? he told me he was going to town; says I, if you will call on me at master's yard I will give you some victuals and drink; which accordingly he did.

Q. When did he call? - That same night, and had some bread and cheese, and part of five pints of beer, and then he wished to go and see a friend, that keeps a public house in Little Norwich-street. He asked me to go along with him, I told him I would. I went; we had two pints of ale there, and in paying for it I gave the woman instead of six-pence, half a guinea, and she brought it back to me, and I said, I beg your pardon, and when she gave it me back, I took particular notice of the half guinea, and took the half guinea and gave her six-pence. When we had done that, I said I wanted to go and see a friend in Vine-street, we went there and had a pot of ale, and I paid six-pence for it, and had a penny out of it, I had had two sixpences in my pocket; from thence I asked him if he had any place to go that night? he said no. I then said I would put him into my stable; we went, he slept in the stable, I laid by him being rather intoxicated with liquor and tired, I fell down and slept. I was in liquor, I cannot say for him; then about midnight, it may be about one o'clock, a fellow servant of mine coming from the country, came and opened the door; (every one in the yard have all got keys,) he heard somebody asleep, and waked us with the whip, he waked first, and then awakened me, and we went up the stable, and I said I am very dry, and I clapped my hand into my pocket and missed my money, I said to him, you have not taken my money from me; he said no, I said I know where I had the last pot of ale, I'll go there, and while I knocked at the door and the girl answered. I said, what money did I spend here last night? they said only a six-pence, and I observed him working his hand underneath a board, and I said, what are you about? I am sure and certain that you have got my money, and put it there; accordingly as I was talking to him, a watchman came up, this was in Vine-street, by talking to him to, the patrole came up and asked the same question. I told him the same, says he, do you give a charge against this man? Yes, says I, I do; accordingly he took him to the watch house with him; he says, you stop by this hole till I bring a light; says the prisoner suppose you do bring a light there may be another half guinea as well as his. I went to the watch house, in about twenty minutes the patrole brought the half guinea down; says he, young man, would you know the half guinea if you was to see it? Yes, says I, if it is mine, it is a little crooked on one side; accordingly he shewed it me, and I said if I can swear to any piece of money, I can swear to that.

Q. How came you to pay for all these things, had the prisoner any money? - He said he had only two pence halfpenny, and I thought it was charity, knowing him before. I charged him with it, and he called me all the fools in the world.

Q. You was in liquor when you went to lay down in the stable? How was you you when you gave your first half guinea in payment? - I was rather in liquor then.

Q. Was you in a state of mind to take notice of your half guinea? - At that time I was perfectly.

Prisoner. Had not we a pot of ale at Jones's house, the last house we went to? Then we went and lay down in a binn, and there came a man, and whipped us up, and you missed half a guinea. Did not you say you would go back to the house? Did not I stand up against the wall a good while before I sat down? and did not you poke in the hole as well as I?

WILLIAM PENNINGTON sworn.

I am one of the patrole of St. Martin's lane. About half after three o'clock in

the morning; in the night of the 9th of August, hearing some noise in Vine-street, I went up to see what was the matter. I see the prisoner and prosecutor, the prosecutor said, that that man had robbed him of half a guinea, says he, I look upon it, it is in that hole; I said if it is there I will take you first to the watch house, which I did, and told the constable of the night, and he told me to go back with a light, and I went back and found the half guinea in that hole with a knife; I asked him, a young man, do you think you should know your half guinea, if you should see it? Yes, says he, I should.

Prisoner. Did not this man say he was coming back to see whether he had given his half guinea away? - What he had said to you before I came up I cannot say.

THOMAS ACTON sworn.

I was watchman there. I know no more than what has been said. I took the half guinea out with a knifefrom the dirt, it was underneath the side of a house in Vine-street; they stood both against the house.

Q. Was it underneath the boards or where? - Yes, I believe it was, on the outside, from a hole made I took it, like a a mouse hole.

Q. To Mr. Garnet. Whereabouts was it you see him siddling with the half guinea? - Within about a yard of the post door, it is boarded down, and comes down to the payement, and under this payement there was a hole where a mouse had run in.

Acton. That was the sort of place.

Prisoner. I was sent to the Three Jolly Post Boys, and I met the prisoner, says he, did not you once turn a wheel for Mr. Saville, of Pall-mall? Yes, says I, says he will you come and drink along with me to-night? Yes, says I, I will come, if you will find me somewhere to sleep; so I gave a boy sixpence to lead me to this man's place, and there I met with this man according to appointment; he took me to a public house and gave me a penny worth of bread and cheese, then we went to the sign of the Three Chairmen Little Warwick-street, Pall Mall; there were Mr. Saville's cutlers, they knew me, I drank a good deal, but was not in liquor at all; then we went to Mr. Jones's, where he says the money was found, there we had a pint of beer, before he had paid for the beer he said, I will take care I will not pay half a guinea; when we got to the door there were a parcel of people at the door, they said, what is the man blind? Yes, says he, and he came fifteen miles out of the country on purpose to see me, and I heard some money rattle then, and I thought it rattled in his pocket, we went home to his stable, and slept in a binn together, by and by, there came a man in, and whipping him up, and he missed his half guinea. I told him I would stand the search; he said he did not think it was I, so back he goes to this house where we had the last pot of beer, to see if he had given it away there, and I thought I would try if I could find any thing. I could not feel it out then, and whether I poked it into this hole I don't know. I am sure I never stole it in my life.

Prisoner to Prosecutor. Did not you come to me and say, are not you hiding my half guinea? No, I said, I am only picking up stones, and if I could have found it, I would have made him give me sixpence, because so far as I know, they can demand a shilling out of a pound for every thing that is found.

Court to Acton. When you found the half guinea was there any other money to gingle? - No other money.

Prisoner. I offered him to search me, and he would not search me. I come from

Farnham, in Kent. I used to setch and carry letters for the Bishop of Rochester's widow; I take all parcels from the stage coach, and goes on messages for all the gentleman all round. They don't know where I am now; I cannot send word because I cannot write. I was committed the 11th of September, but I was taken up the 9th of August.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-71

529. WILLIAM MAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a mahogany tea chest, value 2s. a pair of brass candlesticks, value 2s. and two pair of mens shoes, value 2s. the goods of Richard Talbot .

RICHARD TALBOT sworn.

I am a draper at Chiswick . I know the prisoner. On the 16th of August last, I lost a tea chest, two pair of shoes, and a pair of candlesticks. I was gone a journey out into the country of Essex. I locked the door and bolted the gate, and made every thing secure, there was nobody in the house. I cannot say to the day. I was gone a fortnight, and I returned on the 16th, and then I missed them. I went to the pawnbroker, at Hammersmith, and found the candlesticks pawned, his name is Lawrence. I went and setched my wife, and she swore to the property, we went to the justice's and took out a warrant on the information of the pawnbroker.

HUGH LAWRENCE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker at Hammersmith.

Q. Had you known the prisoner? - Yes; very well, for some years. He brought a pair of candlesticks on the 16th of August last, Saturday, for eighteen pence, he used to come to my shop, and his wife too; I had no suspicion.

Q. When he has pledged things has he redeemed them again? - Yes, and his wife too.

Q. Were the candlesticks that Mr. Talbot had of you, the same that the prisoner pledged with you? - They are the same, because I have had them in my possession ever since.

Q. Do you when things are pawned to you mark them with a ticket? - We sew a duplicate to them; they had, I have not a doubt.

Talbot. They are my candlesticks, I am sure of it.

Mr. Gurney. That is no artificial mark, it is occasioned by the candlestick falling on the ground? - It is.

Q. Then any other candlestick falling on the ground might have the same mark? Yes, but it may not fall in the same manner.

Q. Did not you say when they were first produced to you that you could not swear to them? - I setched my wife, and she did, and I could swear after her.

Q. Did not you say at the first time that you could not swear to them? - I did.

Lawrence. He is a very industrious man, I have known him for some years.

HENRY MEREDITH sworn.

I produce a tea chest and two pair of shoes. I am the officer that took him. I am the constable of Hammersmith. On

the 18th, Mr. Lawrence, and Mr. Tal- bot came to me; Mr. Talbot said he had been robbed, and that he had got the mark of his property; I took the prisoner, and had a warrant to search his house; going towards his house, he asked me where I was going to? I said I was going to search his house, for a tea chest, and two pair of shoes, he said, the tea chest he had not got; the shoes he had; going up towards his house, in the road to his house, I asked him where the tea chest was? he said it was not far, it was not out of the field.

Mr. Gurney. What did you say to the prisoner before any thing of that past? you told him it would be better for him to confess? - I did not.

Q. Or rather it would be worse for him? - I did not.

Q. Do recollect? - I do perfectly recollect. He then said he would shew me where it was; accordingly we went with him, and he went to a dunghill; he then said it is somewhere here, I cannot say exactly to the spot; he went about there parts up the dunghill, and he scratched with his hand and could not find it; he said, I believe I am too high, it is lower; accordingly he came lower and scratched up the dung and found it, and then we went to his house, and when we came there, he said, you need not search I will give you the shoes, they are no service to me; he then went to a cupboard, in the cupboard there was a bag, and in the bag there were the shoes, and he took them out, and gave them me into my hand; from thence we proceeded to the justice, and he was committed for re-examination, because Mr. Talbot did not know at the present time what he had lost.

Q. Did you tell him whose shoes you wanted? - Yes, mentioned Mr. Talbot's name. I said I was going to search for Mr. Talbot's tea chest and shoes.

Mr. Gurney. This is really a very pretty story. So you mean to tell us, that without your making any promise, or any threat on your part, he voluntarily told you all this story. It is very astonishing!

Court. This man has a wife and family, has he? - He has a wife and three children.

Q. What is he? - He works in the ground as a labouring man.

Q. To Talbot. Did you find your house broke open? or how had they entered into your house? - In at the kitchen window.

The prisoner called his master and another witness, who gave him a good character.

Prisoner. As I was walking in my master's grounds, I saw a man hiding something in the dunghill, not knowing what it was; but when I came nearer he seemed as if he was doing something for himself. I came up to him, and I said halloo, and he hallooed to me again; and he asked if I did not work in the gardening grounds? I told him I did; and he told me there were a couple of pair of old shoes if I would accept them; with that I took them shoes home, and got up the next morning to see what he was hiding, and I went to this dunghill, and I found the top of a candlestick at first, and afterwards another, and in pulling out the other I found the tea chest. I watched till nine o'clock the next day, to see if any body would come. On Saturday night I took the two candlesticks out of the dunghill, and took to Mr. Lawrence's for eighteen pence, when they took me, I was at my work, and shewed them where the things were.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-72

530. JOEL WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously entering the dwelling house of Edward Fisher , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 1st of September , with intent to steal his goods .

Indicted in a second COUNT, laying it to be the dwelling house of Edward Fisher and Samuel Maud .

EDWARD FISHER sworn.

I live at No. 9, East Smithfield , Samuel Maud is my partner, we are sugar refiners , we are partners in the house, and I live in the house only.

Q. Are there any of the servants of the the trade dwelling in the house? - Yes.

Q. Did any of them sleep there? - Yes.

Q. Was your house broke open at any time? - Yes, the first day of September, about twelve in the night; I went to the sugar house from which I had lost a deal of property, and when I came there I found a person in the house.

Q. Is the sugar house adjoining to your dwelling house, or part of your dwelling house? - There is a kind of a shed that goes from the dwelling house to the sugar house, it is all one building. He went over goods that were standing up at the window, and he fastened the window up, which the window lists up, and as such I went up to another building that leads to the first floor in the sugar house, when we happened to meet each other in the first-floor, he having gone up one stair case, and I the other, the prisoner at the bar is the person, I had one of my men along with me, there is a slap to the first floor, which when I came close to him he shut down the slap, so that I could not follow him quick enough to hold him, and as such he went over the goods again the same way as he came in through the window, and I followed him and got hold of his foot, but was not able to hold him, afterwards he went through the window and shut the window down again, I was not quick enough to take him before he got over the sence, there was a pair of shoes found after this, I did not see the shoes but one of my men did.

Q. How soon did you get the prisoner after this? - I went to the night officer, and he came, and we took the wife on suspicion, we took the prisoner the next day about ten o'clock, we got him in Tower-ditch, when he saw me he jumped down the Tower-whars, into the Towerditch, as such he was apprehended and taken to Whitechapel court.

Q. Did you take him at that time? - I did.

Q. It was quite dark when you saw him there? - It was quite dark, but so much light that I knew the person.

Q. Was there light enough to know his face? - Yes, I knew the person having hold of him, the person had worked for me before, he was one of my servants, I knew him very well.

Q. Was it moon light? - I will not pretend to say, I cannot recollect.

Q. How did he get in? - The window was opened, they are fastened by a kind of wooden buttons, we always fasten the windows, I looked over the house before to see every thing safe.

Reference Number: t17940917-72

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 17th of September 1794, and the following Days; Being the SEVENTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. PAUL LE MESURIER , Esq. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VII. PART IV.

LONDON: Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill. PRICE THREE SHILLINGS.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

The Continuation of the Trial of JOEL WILLIAMS .

Q. What time was this? - About nine o'clock, to my best recollection; there were a good many panes broke, but I cannot take on me to say whether he broke them or any body else.

Q. Could a man without breaking a pane of glass get into this window which was fastened? - The buttons were quite loose, and shaking of the sash they turn round and so the window was opened.

Q. How do you apprehend the window was opened? - By shaking the windows and forcing it some how or other, which the buttons will fly open, turn round.

Q. You did not see any violence done to the window? - Not to my knowledge, there were panes broke, but I cannot pretend to say that he broke them.

Prisoner. Can you tell any thing particularly in the clothes that I had on? - You had no clothes on; he was in his shirt, I see his shirt sleeves laying in the window when I came in.

JOHN TAPLIN sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the Police-officer, Whitechapel, I know nothing more than apprehending the prisoner the 2d of September.

Q. How soon did you apprehend him after the robbery? - Between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, in Postern-row, between the two Tower-hills, I believe he saw Mr. Fisher, the man ran down and jumped over into the ditch, which I believe is sixteen feet deep.

Q. Did he hurt himself? - I don't know, I asked him, he said no, he had not.

CHRISTIAN BROWN sworn.

When the news was over I got out of bed and I went to the sugar house to see what was done, and I found the shoes outside of the window.

Q. Are you a servant to Mr. Fisher? - Yes.

Q. How soon was it afterwards that you found the shoes? - Not ten minutes.

Q. Was it light or dark at that time? - We had a candle, I saw the shoes with a candle.

Q. Do you know to whom these shoes belong? - That I cannot say.

Q. What countryman is the prisoner? - I cannot say, I never was acquainted with him, I never see him before.

JOHN FERRIS sworn.

I am a cordwainer.

Q. Are you an officer? - No, all that I know is, that the desendant's wife came up to me, and asked me for my shoes, and I gave them to her; I asked her what she wanted with them. This was on the 1st of September, between the hours of one and two in the morning, between Monday and Tuesday. I live in the same dwelling with the prisoner. I gave her the shoes, and I asked her what she wanted with them? She said she wanted them for a minute or two, or three or four. I I immediately let her have my shoes. I came down in a few minutes, hearing of a noise, and I heard Mr. Fisher say, that he found the prisoner's shoes, as he believed it was. It might be then about two o'clock. I followed the prisoner's wife, and asked her for my shoes, which she gave me again, and which are the shoes on my feet.

Q. To Brown. You said you found a pair of shoes; what did you do with the shoes you found? - I gave them to Johnson, the officer; they are here.

RICHARD JOHNSON sworn.

I am Headborough belonging to the parish of St. John's, Wapping; between twelve and one, or half past twelve, Mr. Fisher came over to the watch-house to me, tole me he had been robbed, and wanted assistance; accordingly I called two watchmen, and went with him, and he said he knew the man, and where to find him; we went to his apartments, but the man was gone, and Christian Brown said that he had found a pair of shoes, which were delivered into my custody by order of the Magistrate, and I have had the care of them ever since.

Q. Do you know to whom these shoes belong? - No; I never saw them before.

- SEBECK sworn.

I am Mr. Fisher's Servant; working in the sugar-house I was with my master at the same-time, and I saw him go out at the window, and my master followed him. It was five minutes after twelve when we see him in the sugar-house; I looked at my watch by the light; there was light enough to see what o'clock it was.

Q. Was it moon-light? - No; I did not see his face, I was not close enough; but I see his back; he had no coat on, but I believe he had a shirt on. I cannot swear that that is the man; I see a man in the sugar-house, I can swear that that is the man.

Q. To Prosecutor. Was there light enough in your sugar-house to know a man? - I knew him by his appearance, by his shirt, face, and every appearance; I can take my oath that that is the person.

Q. But that will not do except we have a ground for it - Did you see his face? - Yes; I did see his face.

Q. Are you sure it was not moonlight at that time? - I will not pretend to say whether it was or not, positively.

Prisoner. That same night about nine o'clock that Gentleman and I had a few words, and I had not left him above four or five minutes before I met a friend of mine who was going to the East-Indies, and I went with him to his ship to get his chest up to our house, and I staid till it was day-light, about four o'clock in the morning, and the man was coming on shore with his chest and bedding and he got prest; then about five and six I went down to the keys about half after six I got a job, for which I got four-pence halfpenny, and I could not meet never another job. I was coming home again by Tower-Hill, and I heard that my wife was in custody, and I was told that they were looking for me, and coming along, seeing Mr. Fisher and the officer, I got out of the way.

Court to Fisher. Had you got the wife in custody? - We took the wife into custody.

Prisoner. I am as innocent of breaking open the house as a child unborn.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-73

531. JAMES PETTY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Stebbing , Esq . about the hour of ten in the night of the 18th of August , with intent to steal his goods .

EDWARD THOMAS sworn.

I live with Mr. Henry Stebbing ; in Chancery-lane . On Monday evening, the 18th of August, between the hours of nine and ten, being in the kitchen with my fellow servant, we were alarmed by somebody getting in at the parlour window. On that I immediately jumped up and ran up stairs; when I ran up stairs and come to the parlour door I was afraid of going into the parlour; I jumped out into the street and gave the alarm; I had not been in the street above a minute or two before out comes a man out of the parlour window, and in jumping out of the parlour window he came over the rails; immediately the rest of the gang surrounded him, (there were about six or eight) and throwed him off the rails into the street; with that I immediately jumped up to him, and laid hold of him; with that the prisoner at the bar appeared to me as if coming down from the steps of Mr. Stebbing's door. I secured this man that was chucked over the rails; with that the prisoner at the bar jumped down from the steps of Mr. Stebbing's house, and pushed me backward, and by that means I lost hold of him who stuck on the rails; on that I turned round and secured James Petty, the prisoner at the bar, and called out to my friend to come to my assistance, who was in Mr. Stebbing's house, his name is Jasmes Davis. With that we secured James Petty , and carried him to the watch-house in Bedford-street, and the next day he was carried before Mr. Bleamire, at the Police Office, and committed.

Q. You don't know where he came from, do you? - No; I do not.

Q. You don't know whether he was in the house or not? - I am not certain as to that.

Q. Do you know whether this parlour had been fastened up? - It had not; the window was open as it generally was.

Q. Was the shutter open? - The shutter was open; but the canvas blind was shut.

Q. Do you know whether the window was not open behind that? - It was open.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-74

532. HANNAH PURFORD , otherwise FRANCES PURFITT , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a red morocco leather pocket book, value 3s. the goods of Alice Baker, seven yards of black bombazet, value 10s. nine linen sheets, value 45s. one apron, value 1s. two linen pillow cases, value 1s. two linen table-cloths, value 5s. four pair of cotton stockings, value 4s. one oilcloth umbrella, value 2s. two linen shifts, value 4s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 4s. one silk handkerchief, value 2s. a linen towel, value 2d. the goods of Anthony Crowle , in his dwelling-house .

ANTHONY CROWLE sworn.

I live at Islington ; I can only speak by report; I was informed there was some property missing.

ALICE CROWLE sworn.

I am the wife of Mr. Crowle.

Q. Did you lose the articles in this indictment at any time? - Yes; in the dwelling-house of Mr. Crowle, between the 19th of June and 31st of July; the prisoner was an occasional servant to work at her needle.

Q. I see there is a pocket book, and several other articles; what were all these things kept in different parts of the house? had you any drawers broke, or any locks at any time? - None at all.

Q. Perhaps you have seen some of this property since it hath been recovered? - Yes.

Q. When did you first hear of it? - It is all in the hands of two pawnbrokers.

Q. Did you miss them before you heard any account of them at the pawnbrokers? - Yes; and on her being searched the duplicates were found in her apartment, and that they laid at the pawnbrokers.

Q. How came you to look to her? - Missing a considerable number of things and having had no other reason to suspect any other servant, we suspected her.

Q. When had you her taken up and searched? - I cannot tell; it was the beginning of August.

Q. Perhaps the person is here who searched her? - Yes.

Prisoner. I have no further to say, then that she said she would then forgive me, and you lent me the umbrella to go to Colbrook-row.

ALICE BAKER sworn.

I am a single woman; I lost a pocket book; I cannot tell the day I lost it; I believe it was in June.

Q. Where did you lose it from? - From a drawer.

Q. You lived in this family, did you? - I did.

Q. Should you know it were you to see it? - Perfectly well.

Q. Have you seen it since? - Yes, I have.

SAMUEL BARNARD sworn.

I am one of the officers of the Parish of St. Luke. I was sent for by the prosecutor on Monday, the 5th of August, or the 4th. On Tuesday he got a search warrant from Mr. Alderman Staines; I did not see the prisoner till she was in custody by the City Officer; I saw her when she was detained in her

room, which was her apartment, as I suppose, on Tuesday, between one and two o'clock.

Q. Where were her apartments? - No. 9, Red Cross-street.

Q. Was you present when she was searched? - Yes; in the premises I found sixty duplicates; they are all together as they were found; as they are all put in this identical cloth, so I kept them.

Q. Have you any thing else to say that is material? - We found them in a locker, where, I believe, some coals had been formerly kept under the window.

Q. It was locked? - No.

Q. In what part of the premises was it, in the parlour, or in the first floor front room? - In the first floor front room.

Q. Had she the whole house? - Not that I know of; I believe she was only an inmate; I saw her in this apartment myself.

Q. Have you any thing there besides duplicates? - No.

WILLIAM THOMPSON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Berry, pawnbroker, in Aldersgate-street; I produced a red morocco leather pocket book, seven yards of black bombazet, nine linen sheets, one linen apron, two linen pillow-cases, two linen table cloths, four pair of cotton stockings, one linen shift, one muslin handkerchief, and a silk handkerchief.

Q. Did you receive them all at one time, or at different times? - Different times.

Q. See if any duplicates found on her, correspond to this property? - Yes; there are twelve.

Q. Just look at the date of this; tell me which is the first and last date? - The 20th of June is the first, and the 25th of July was the last; the greatest part are in my hand writing.

ROBERT KITCHEN sworn.

I am constable of the out parts; an officer came to me the 5th of August, and said he wanted a search warrant. We then went to Alderman Staines; and got a search warrant; we then went to No. 19, Red Cross-street, and into the first floor, and searched them; the mother and two daughters lived together; they rent that room.

Court to Thompson. Who pawned all these things? - I believe the prisoner at the bar pawned all of them.

Q. You know her? - I do, I am sure as to her person.

Q. In what name are they pawned? - In the name of Ann Brown .

Mr. Crowle. What name did you know her by? - Frances Purfitt .

Q. And found these duplicates wrapt up in this piece of cloth? - Yes.

Miss Baker. This is my pocket book, I know it by the singularity of its make, and by its cut; here are a pair of scissors with silver bows, and one of the bows is broke, the pocket book is lined with green silk; I am sure they are mine.

Q. How long had you had it? - A very short time, it was the gift of a person that is since dead; I know the work of the lock, and the work about the book, I have no doubt in the least: I missed such a one.

Q. What is the value of it? - The young woman pledged it for three shillings and six-pence.

Q. To Mrs. Crowle. How do you know it? - The bombazet hath several notches in it; I am certain of it, there is seven yards of it, and it cost two shillings a yard.

Q. You think it is fairly worth ten shillings? - I should suppose so. Here are nine linen sheets, two of them, are marked; the linen pillow cases are all marked.

THOMAS SIMMONS sworn.

I am a cooper, I never knew any thing but what was just and honest in all her dealings.

ELIZABETH SIMMONS sworn.

I have known her ever since she was born; I was acquainted with her father and mother before she was born; I have entrusted her with my property many times in every thing, and never missed a farthing.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-75

533. LOUISA LESAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , a silver watch, value 2l. a metal watch key, value 1d. a black mode clock, value 10s. a dimity petticoat, value 2s. 6d. and two cotton shawls, value 5s. the goods of James Brocke , in his dwelling house .

MARIA BROCKE sworn.

I am a married woman, my husband's name is James Brocke, he is a private gentleman , he lives in Arebella-row, near Buckingham-gate ; the prisoner was a servant at the time I was robbed of my property; she lived with us about five weeks, she was an attendant on me.

Q. What was the day you first missed. these things? - On Thursday evening, on the 14th of August; the watch was missed first, I missed the other articles that night, it was the servant maid missed it, it was in her care, she is here, her name is Elizabeth Sutton ; the other articles were all missed at one time; the watch has been found; I see it the next Monday following, in the hand of the pawnbroker.

Q. Have you ever seen any of the other articles? - Yes, a few of them, they were in my room up stairs.

ELIZABETH SUTTON sworn.

I am servant in the family of Mr. Brocke, I have been a quarter of a year the 1st of October.

Q. Do you know any thing of the loss of the property, described by your mistress? - Every thing. A fortnight before my master went out of town, I asked him for a clock, and he gave me this watch, I had it in my possession a fortnight before he went out of town, I had it a month in my pocket; on Tuesday I put it out of my pocket, on the toiler table, in my mistress's bed-room; I cannot exactly say the day of the month, it was the day she robbed us.

Q. Were the other articles in this indictment missed from the same room? - Yes.

Q. Have you seen any of them since? - Yes, at pawnbrokers.

Q. Should you know them again as well as your mistress? - Yes.

Q. Did you see any of them in possession of that young woman? - No.

Q. Was she in the situation of a servant before she came to you? - Yes, as a lady's maid.

Q. Do you know whether your mistress had a character? - Not to my knowledge.

WILLIAM VALE sworn.

I am an officer, I produce a corded dimity petticoat, a silk cloak, a silk sash, I believe they call it; one cotton shawl, and these trinkets in this little box; the cloak and petticoat I took off her, and the petticoat, and other things I found in

her lodgings, the morning I apprehended her.

Q. How do you know they were her lodgings? - I had the key of the door, she gave it to Merry.

ROBERT MERRY sworn.

I am an officer, the prisoner was brought to my house on Saturday night, and while I was taking these things off from her, there was a gentleman there that could talk french with her, and he asked her for the key, and she gave it him. and my brother officer living close by, I gave it to him; I was not present when the shawl was taken from her lodging; she was in my care from Saturday night, till Monday morning.

Vale. I took her up to the pawnbroker's in the Borough, I was sent for by Merry, Saturday night, the 29th of August, or the 30th, I don't know which.

JOHN BALL sworn.

I live at No. 185, in the Borough; I am a servant to the pawnbroker; I produce a metal watch, a silver gilt watch, the out side case, and a metal watch key; it was taken in, of the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Had you ever seen her before that once? - No. She pawned it on Friday, the 15th of August; I am sure of her person, I have not the least doubt in the world; I gave her a duplicate; it was pawned at nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. To Prosecutor. Had you any character with that young woman? - She told me she had been two years in London, I had a written character with her.

Q. You did not see any person about her character? - I did not. This cloak is mine; I know the lace, I have had it a year; I have no doubt about it at all; I know the petticoat is mine; I am certain to the shawl, I have no mark about it; I don't with to swear to it, but I know it to be mine; he watch I know, it belonged to my son, it was made by Moore, of Dublin; I don't recollect the number; it has been in the family two or three years; it was lost just as it is.

Prisoner. I never was the servant of this lady, but it was this lady's husband that made me a present of the watch, when this lady was ill for a fortnight; after I was at her house the cloak was made a present of by the lady, and I took the other articles, I thought the lady would not want any more.

Court to Prosecutrix. Is Mr. Brocke in court? - No he is out of town, he went out of town some time since.

Q. Did he go before this young woman came to your house, or since? - About a fortnight after.

Q. Have you seen your watch in the hands of your servant, or on the toilet any were? - I was ill, I saw it on the toilet that day.

Prisoner. I knew the lady's husband a long time before I knew this lady, and it was this lady's husband who took me to this house.

Q. To Elizabeth Sutton . This girl has said, that a fortnight after she came, her master gave her the watch. Have you had the watch since that time? - It was not in the house a fortnight after she came; the master borrowed it of the child for me; he was at the boarding school.

Q. Do you recollect when the child brought the watch home? - I cannot rightly say when he gave it me, it was very near a fortnight before he went.

Q. How long had the girl been at your house at that time? - I dare say she had been a fortnight.

Q. After the watch was given to you by your master to take care of, had it ever been returned to him till it was missing? - No, there was a strange woman in the house, whom we had no character with, and I told the prisoner I would not put it out of my pocket, because I would

not lose it, and when I put it out of my pocket, this strange woman was gone, and I had no suspicion of the prisoner.

Q. Then your master had gone out of town? - He was.

Q. To Prosecutrix. What may be the value of this cloak? - It is not worth much, a crown; the petticoat half a crown; the watch about a guinea.

Q. Did you give her that cloak? - No, I never did.

Q. How did she leave your house? - She asked me to go to her washerwoman's, and never returned.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by a Jury half English and half Foreign, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-76

534. MARY WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of September , a linen shift, value 5s. and a cotton bed gown, value 1s. the goods of Elizabeth Spencer .

ELIZABETH SPENCER sworn.

I am a widow woman; that property that the prisoner had was mine, I don't know how she came by it; I live in Old-street.

Q. Did you miss the property before? - No.

HENRY COLE sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Wood? - had you ever seen her before? - Yes, at the public house, the sign of the Gey Hound, where she had the property on her; she had it about her, when she came into the public house, and she dropped it from her side; we asked her how she came by that property? she said she bought it; this was the 8th of September.

Q. Was it after you came into the public house? - Yes, she came in and called for something to drink, and the landlord refused her.

Q. In what public house was it? - The sign of the Grey Hound, in Old-street-road, facing the lying-in Hospital, about twelve o'clock in the day.

Q. Did she drop it wilfully or accidently? - I believe she dropped it accidentally.

Q. Why did the landlord refuse her liquor? - He thought she was rather in liquor. I see it fall from her; the officer has got the gown now.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I produce a gown and a shift, the shift was delivered to me by the landlord of the house, she is not here; this man saw the shift drop, and he picked it up.

Cole. I saw the shift and gown both drop from her; the publican said, that he did not think she came honestly by them, and she should be detained; and he went for an officer.

Q. Can you swear that is the gown she dropped? - Yes, I can; and I can swear that is the shift, it has got a frill.

Q. Is it unusual for a shift to have a frill? - I don't know that.

Q. You must not swear positively to property without being able to tell why. Are there not many shifts of the same appearance? - There may be; I believe it is the same. I don't know any thing about the gown, as to particular marks.

Q. Were they solded up in any thing? - No, they were not.

Q. Did you look at them at the time they fell? - Yes, and the landlord besides.

Q. After you had opened them, who did you deliver them to? - The landlord had them belonging to the public house, he is not here.

Ray. When I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, she had a pair of

milk pails, and the gown was in one of the milk pails, and I took it out of one of the milk pails, and I asked the prisoner then who the bed gown belonged to? she told me it was her own property; she did not say how she came by it.

Q. To Cole. How came that gown in the pail? - I don't know, they were both slung in the bar while I went for the officer.

Prisoner. That man was not in the house when the things dropped.

Prosecutrix. This gown and shift are both mine; the bed gown I wear myself, and as for the shift, it was my husband's grand mother's, and I know it by the frill, which is not commonly wore now; the bed gown I had seen it on the Monday before, in my chest, on the top of my clothes; I don't know when I had seen the shift; the chest was not locked. I had but lately come into the house, and the lock was broke.

Q. How near to the Grey Hound do you live? - About two or three turnings; being but lately come into it, I don't know the street's name.

Q. Do you stay at home in the day time, or do you go out to work? - I was out with the milk with her; she worked for me, and this same day she left me, and came home before me; it was yesterday was a fortnight.

Q. What time of the morning did you go out? - I think it was about seven o'clock, we went out both together.

Q. When did you return home? - As near as I can tell, it was almost ten; she came home before me, she was at home when I came home.

Q. How soon afterwards did she go out? - She staid about an hour after I came home; I cannot say particularly.

Q. Did you hear any more of her? - I heard no more till the constable came and acquainted me.

Prisoner. I was a carrier to this Mrs. Spencer, and we went out together that morning, and she lent me some things to put on; and coming down, we sell out, and she said, she would fasten me in Newgate, if I did not give her the things off. It rained very hard that morning, and we had two or three glasses of gin on the walk; then when we came home we had three half quarterns, and she told me never to mind the wet, I will give you two or three things to put on; and when I came to take up my pails to go out again, I looked and found things in my pail; and I said, God bless me, I did not know that they were in my pails; and I thought she put them in the pail for me to shift myself with.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever lend her these things? - I lent her a black gown that morning, to go to Islington in, but I never lent her these things.

Prisoner. I found the things in the pails. I have not got any friend in the world, but what you gentlemen please to do with me. I have got two small children to work for.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-77

535. WILLIAM VASEY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , a watch, with inside case made of tortoileshell, value 1l. 10s. and a wooden brackett, value 1s. the goods of William Dowton .

WILLIAM DOWTON sworn.

I live in Long-alley, Moorfields, in Shoreditch parish . On the 18th of September last, between the hours of ten and eleven in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the street door, on the steps, going out; I am a wire-worker ; I knew there was

nobody at home to give any answer below; I then came out of the work-shop, joining the house; I suspected that the person had been in taking something I came in the entry, and saw the watch and stand gone off the mantle-piece; I then followed the said person, and it was the prisoner, and took him hold by the collar, and took both the watch and stand from under his coat. The outside case of the watch was of tortoiseshell; the inside of silver. I am positive it is my watch; I asked him where he got it; and he said, he picked it up in the entry.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I am a constable. I produce a watch and stand. I took the prisoner into custody, and it has been in my possession ever since.

Q. To Prisoner. How old are you? - Going of twelve. I was going down Long-alley, and this door was open, and I saw the watch, and I took it up, and the gentleman ran after me and took it away from me without any officer; he took me by himself, and if he had not torn my clothes he might have took me to the justice by himself, for I knew that I found it.

GUILTY. (Aged 12.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-78

536. JOHN TILBURY and JOHN COLEMAN were indicted for stealing on the twenty-first of July , three Marseilles cotton counterpanes, value 5l. the goods of Henry Newcomb .

John Rose , Hatrick Shine, Robert Blasson , George Longdon, Ann Aberdeen, and Stephen Taylor, were severally sworn, and gave the same evidence as on the former trial, No. 482.

JOHN BOUKER sworn.

I keep an upholstery warehouse on Tower hill. I am waiting on another trial.

Q. Did you expect this trial to come. on? - Not a bit.

Doorkeeper. He insisted upon coming; he knocked at the door very vehement.

Bouker. These now produced are Marseilles bed quilts.

Q. Are they counterpanes? - They are not; these are a more valuable thing than a counterpane; the difference is very great. A counterpane is tusted, and these are quilted in a loom.

Q. Then the counterpanes are not quilted in a loom? - They may. I do not know how they are done.

Q. What is the use of a covering? - It is a white covering for a bed; we use it for the same purpose as we do a bed quilt.

Q. To Ann Aberdeen . What name do these things go by? - I always call them Marseilles cotton counterpanes; another person may call them different. I have lived in other families, and they have called them the same.

Mr. Alby. Do you suppose yourself as good a judge as an upholsterer? - Do you with to confuse me; possibly I may not be.

Q. Do you know any thing of the manufacture? - I am a stranger to manufactures, it is not my profession.

The prisoner Coleman called three witnesses to his character.

John Tilbury , GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Transported for seven years .

William Coleman , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-79

537. HENRY CREMER was indicted. The indictment states, that Abraham Barker had served our lord the king as a seaman on board the Leviathan, and that certain wages were due to the said Abraham Barker from our lord the king, and that he, on the seventeenth of July , in the parish of St. Bride's, Paul's wharf, did appear in his proper person before Samuel Pearce Parsons, doctor at law, and there did produce the last will and testament of the said Abraham Barker , bearing date the thirtieth of April, 1782, and before the said Samuel Pearce Parsons , doctor at law, unlawfully, wilfully and feloniously did take a false oath, that is to say, that he, the said Henry Cremer , was the father and executor of the said Abraham Barker, named in the last will and testament, he, the said Samuel Pearce Parsons, then having sufficient power and authority to administer to him such oath, whereas, in truth and in fact, he was not the father and executor, and well knew that one Abraham Barker was the father and executor of the said Abraham Barker , deceased, and that he did so in order that you might obtain the probate of the will of the said Abraham Barker, and receive the money due from the king to him .

Two other COUNTS, only varying the manner of charging them.

The indictment opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Fielding.

SAMUEL INMAN sworn.

I am clerk of the Navy-office. It appears by the books of the Leviathan, that Abraham Barker, a seaman on board of that ship, died on the first of June, being killed in action; it appears that eleven pounds two shillings and fourpence were due to his representatives. The wages amounted to eight pounds fourteen shillings and fourpence, and the produce of his clothes that were sold, made up the eleven pounds two shillings and fourpence.

Q. Do you know from what ship he came to the Leviathan? - No, I do not, I have a book of the Atlas, that Abraham Barker was on board in April, 1782, an able seaman.

ROBERT HARRISON sworn.

I am clerk in the Prerogative office. I produce a will, purporting to be the original will of Edward Barker .

ADMIRAL GENERAL VANDER-BERG sworn.

Q. Your name is there a witness to that will? - I certainly witnessed it! I do not remember the man's person, but that is my hand writing.(The will read.)

DAVID BEAVAN sworn.

I am clerk to Mess. Bevett and Townly, proctors, in Doctors commons. I know the prisoner at the bar; I saw him on the seventeenth of July last, to the best of my remembrance, between one and two o'clock, in the day time; he brought an original will of Abraham Barker. This is the will that he brought.

Q. When he brought the will did he come to you? - He did. I asked him if he was the father and executor of Abraham Barker deceased? he said yes. On that, another clerk in the office wrote on it what we call the jurat; then I took it to the surrogate, Doctor Parsons, to be sworn.

Q. What is the affidavit? - Abraham Barker swears, that he is the father and sole executor of the deceased, and that his effects does not amount to twenty pounds.

Q. What is Doctor Parsons? - Surrogate to Sir William Wynne, who is the judge of the Prerogative court of Canterbury, and master keeper and commissary.

Q. What is his Christian name? - Sa muel Pearce Parsons. When I came to the surrogate, I told him that that was the will of Abraham Barker ; and the person along with me was the executor; with that he administered the oath to him that he was the father and sole executor of the will of Abraham Barker deceased; after he was sworn, I told him what he had to do; and then I sent it to be inspected by Mr. Bennington; I cannot recollect whether I sent it by a messenger or by the penny post.

Q. What became of the prisoner at this time? - The prisoner went away and left the will in my possession, to be sent to the inspectors.

Q. I understand you to speak positively to the man? - I believe; I cannot be positive.

HENRY CRANSTON sworn.

Q. I believe you are the inspector of the seaman's wills? - I am.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, and see if you recollect him. - I do.

Q. Have you seen this will before? - Yes; on the seventh of July the prisoner at the bar, I think, between eleven and twelve came to the Navy office.

Q. Do you speak with precision as to him? - With perfect precision; and he produced a will, which he asserted to be that of his son Abraham Barker. I asked him what wages he claimed on that will; he said, his son had since entered on board the Leviathan, and had been killed in the action of the first of June.

Q. Do you recollect any thing he said where his son had been before he entered in the Leviathan? - It appeared from the will that he belonged to the Atlas; he did not represent that from his own mouth, but I remember the circumstance of his regretting the loss of his son.

Prisoner. That was my own son.

Mr. Fielding to Cranston. Did you understand it to be the son of Abraham Barker ? - I did, and no other. I sent over to the Navy office for a search, and on this being returned, I found it was more than ten pounds due; I then informed the prisoner that the will must stop to be proved in Doctors-commons.

Q. I believe it is the custom of the office not to pay any more money than ten pounds without the will is proved? - Yes; or letters of administration. I gave the will to one of the junior clerks, to enter in the proper book; he is not here. I then made the usual noration on it myself, which is inserted in the office for inspecting seamens wills, to which I signed my name. I then stamped it with the official seal on the office, and delivered it to the prisoner, in order to obtain a probate of it.

Q. How long was it afterwards that you saw the prisoner again? - On the morning of the 22d of the same month of July; I believe it was Tuesday. He claimed the certificate, the probate being in the office.

Q. On receiving that certificate he becames entitled to the produce of the pay? - He does. I made out the usual certificate on parchment, and delivered it to him, giving him directions where to apply for the payment.

Q. In the mean time you had received the probate? - The probate had been sent the night of the 21st, or the morning of the 22d.

Q. Do you know whether he was paid at all? - I cannot speak to that.

Q. To whom did you direct him to apply? - To Mr. William Taylor .

Q. When did you see him afterward? - About three weeks after; I have reason to believe it was the 9th of August. He produced two indentures, which he said where the indentures of two who had gone from his service; they were indenures of apprenticeship.

Q. By what name did he pass at that time? - The indentures were made out in the name of Jacob Buckea , which he asserted then was his name, and that they had gone on board the Andromeda; he wished to know what measures he was to take, to recover the wages due to these boys?

Q. Would he, representing himself as master of these boys, be entitled to their wages on producing these indentures? - I believe he would. It is a different department to ours. I had a perfect recollection of having seen him before; I recollected under what character, but not under what name; I asked him if I had not seen him before in that place, and if he had not claimed the wages due to a son. He said he had been there before. I asked him what his son's name was; he said Abraham Barker . I then enquired how it was possible he could be the master of these two boys, who was named in the indentures as Jacob Buckea ; he made some absurd answer, that he had always two names. At the moment, I was speaking to him the inspector, Mr. Bennington, came into the office. I mentioned the circumstance; Mr. Bennington had him detained.

JOHN BENNINGTON sworn.

I am one of the inspectors of seamen's wills and warrants of attorney. On the 10th of August I saw the prisoner in the hall of office, before his conversation took place with Mr. Cranston; I am not confident how long before. The prisoner presented me papers, which were marked C. B. indentures, the same as Mr. Cranston speaks of. I perceived they were indentures of apprentices, and I found considerable difficulty in comprehending what the prisoner had said; I therefore desired him to state his case in writing. I afterwards went down stairs to the office of Mr. Cranston, the last witness, and I observed to Mr. Cranston, that I found considerable difficulty in comprehending what the prisoner said or what he wanted, or words to that effect. Mr. Cranston, in answer said, that there was something extraordinary in the business, or words to that effect; for that it appeared that the prisoner at the bar had been sworn in by the name of Abraham Barker , mentioning the ship; on which I referred to the probate of Abraham Barker's will; they are all kept in the office as vouchers; and finding the case to stand as Mr. Cranston stated it, and thinking the prisoner at the bar was very deaf, I went to him, very close to his ear, and asked him, in a loud voice, what his name was? and he said his name was Jacob Buckea ; and as he then had the appearance of applying for wages in that capacity, or under that name, and had been sworn under another name, and received wages, I observed that there was something so very extraordinary in his conduct that I should send to a public office for an officer, and have him examined; bfore a magistrate he uttered something which I did not rightly understand; and there was the wife of a sergeant sitting down on the bench at the same time, whose husband had been killed likewise in one of these actions, and as I had my hand in the bag, at the same time, the woman observed to me that the man was run away. She said, sir, the man is run away, or words to that effect; on which, as the prisoner appeared to me, either through ignorance or design, to have been guilty of a great offence, I did not think it agreeable to my public duty to let him escape; I followed him, and he got up to the top of Somerset-stairs, nearly out of Somerset-house, but he stopped before I came up to him on my calling to him, and a messenger passing by at the same time, I desired him to take him into cus-

tody, and he was afterwards taken up to Bow-street, and committed.

WM. TAYLOR the younger, sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I have some recollection of him. He came to me at the office of the treasurer of the navy; I am the clerk of that office; he brought me a ticket signed by the clerk of the navy office, and a certificate of a probate of a will. The ticket was made out Abraham Barker, a seaman on board the Leviathan, and the certificate of the probate of the will, that he was the father of Abraham Barker .

Q. On the production of that did you pay him any thing? - I paid him ten pounds eleven shillings.

Q. In what character did you pay it to him? - As Abraham Barker , the father and executor. The gross sum was eleven pounds, two shillings, and four pence, and there were some small deductions which made it ten pounds eleven shillings; The deductions were to pay the attorney and proctor, and one shilling the navy search. The deductions were eleven shillings, the proctors expences are always deducted, and afterwards paid by me.

Q. So that the prisoner could have no pretence for deducting proctor's fees, for you had paid them? - He had not, he received ten pounds eleven shillings.

Q. Did he give a receipt for the money? - He made his mark, which was witnessed by George Dawson.

Q. Do you know this receipt? - I wrote it myself.

Q. Did you see him make his mark? - I did.

Q. Is that his mark? - It is.

Q. Is that the hand writing of Dawson? - Yes, it is.

GEORGE DAWSON sworn.

Q. Look at this receipt, tell us whether that is your hand writing? - It is.

Q. Was you present when that receipt was given and signed? - I was. It was signed by the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Do you recollect the person of the prisoner at the bar? - I believe I do. That is the man to the best of my knowledge.(The receipt read.)

ABRAHAM BARKER sworn.

I live in Spittalfields work-house.

Q. Had you a son on board the Leviathan? - Yes.

Q. What became of him? - Dead, I am told.

Q. Where was your son before he went on board the Leviathan? Did he ever serve on board the Atlas? - Yes.

Q. Did you ever receive any will of your son? - Yes.

Q. Who did you give that will to that you received of your son? - It is a great many years ago.

Q. Did you ever give it to Cremer, the man at the bar? - Yes, since I heard of his death. I suppose six weeks or two months ago, I gave it him to receive the money, he said he could do it.

Q. Had your son left you all his money? - The will empowered me to take it.

Q. Did Cremer ever return you the money that he was to get for it? - He returned me seven guineas.

Q. Was that all you had of him? - Yes.

Q. What did he say to you? - He said how he had got the money; and says he, now I shall give it to you.

Q. Did you give him any thing for his trouble for getting it? - No.

Q. Did he ever say any thing about what you was to give him? - He did not.

CHARLES BARKER sworn.

Q. Are you a brother of Abraham? - Yes. He was killed in the action of

the first of June, on board the Leviathan.

Q. Do you know that he served on board his Majesty's ship the Atlas? - Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Cremer? He is not your father? - No.

Q. Did you ever know him by any other name than Cremer? - None at all.

Q. Did you ever know him by the name of Buckea? - No.

WILLIAM BUCKEA sworn.

Q. Was you a sailor on board the Leviathan on the glorious first of June? - Yes.

Q. Do you know old Barker there? - Yes.

Q. Was his son a ship mate of your's on board the Leviathan? - Yes, for better than a twelve month.

Q. What became of him on the first of June? - He was killed, he was the last man that was killed in our ship.

Prisoner. I am a poor distressed old man, and not able to see a counsel, and as your Lordship is to be my judge, I humbly hope, also, you will please to become my advocate. My case really is as follows: About three months ago one Abraham Barker , who belongs to the workhouse of Spittall-fields, called on me, and my not being at home, he left word requesting that I would call on him; I went to him and found him ill; he told me that he had received intelligence that his son, in his Majesty's sea service, was killed by the enemy, and requested I would go and receive his son's wages for him, which I did undertake, and I was told at the office that as it exceeded ten pounds I must administer; I accordingly went and administered as they directed me, and received the money in Barker's name, having gone by his authority, and gave him the money. Some time after this, one Buckea, of Spittal-fields, hearing that I had got the money for Mr. Barker, came and requested of me to go to the navy office to enquire what wages was due to two sons of his apprentices. I went to the navy office, and the clerk recollecting that I had been there before, gave him some suspicion; sent for a constable, and brought me before a magistrate, and Barker was there, who said that I gave him the money that I received, and Buckea only sent me to know what he could do with his apprentices. That is my lamentable case, and I hope it will appear to your Lordship and Court, that I had no criminal intention in view. I went by Barker's direction, and gave him the money, as to Buckea, I made no claim of any, and did not think that the making such enquiry would be deemed criminal. I am now upwards of seventy years, and never brought before a court before, and humbly hope that your Lordship in the midst of justice will shew mercy to me. Mr. Barker desired me to do the business for him; my having a son dying at sea, I had a great deal of trouble to get his money; I was about three quarters of a year getting it, going backwards and forwards to the navy office, and there was a gentleman told me he could get it for me; accordingly I gave him a letter of attorney, and he got the money, and went off with it. Mr. Barker knowing this, said get this money if you-can for me, make use of my name. He says Esq. Hopkins will give me a character.

Court to Taylor. Did this assigned ticket apply to this particular of Barker's? - Yes.

Prisoner. This person Barker, came to me to do the business, and said he would satisfy me well, and gave me an order to do it, and said I might make use of his name.

Jury to Barker. Did you make any agreement with the prisoner at the bar to pay him any money? - I never did.

Q. Why was he to do it for nothing? - Before he brought the money, I said satisfy yourself for your trouble.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 72.)

Recommended to mercy from motives of humanity and compassion to an old man, labouring under particular infirmities.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-80

538. ANN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of July , a cotton gown, value 9s. the goods of Rosamond Bowyer , half a yard of ribbon, value 6d. a silk hat, value 4s. a check apron, value 4d. an earthen ware tea pot, value 6d. an earthen ware cup and saucer, value 2d. and a brass candlestick, value 6d. the goods of Thomas Bowyer .

THOMAS BOWYER sworn.

I was robbed the 17th of July.

Q. Why do you charge the prisoner with robbing you? - Because she had my apron before her, and my hat on her head. I see her with them.

Q. What is the name of your husband? - Thomas Bowyer.

Q. Whose cotton gown is this? - My daughters. I found my apron afterwards, and the hat she made away with, but I see it on her head.

Q. Was any thing else lost out of your house? - Not to my knowledge. I lost a silk hat and apron, and a brass candlestick, and my daughter lost a gown, it never had been worn.

Q. Where were these things? - In my drawer.

Q. Then you never found any thing but the hat and apron? No. I never found any thing but the apron, she made away with the hat, because the apron would not fetch nothing.

Q. Where is the apron? - The officer has got it.

Q. What became of the earthen ware, and the brass candlestick? - I never saw them more.

Prisoner. I know nothing about them.

NATHANIEL UPTON sworn.

I am the officer. I produce the apron. The woman was given in charge to me in the street, by Sarah Bowyer, and took her before the magistrate, and the magistrate ordered me to take the apron, and I have had it ever since.

Mrs. Bowyer. This is my apron. It has a patch on one side of another sort.

Q. Did you miss all the things together? - Yes, all one day.

Q. Where was she when she had this apron on? - She was at the Black Horse, Well-street.

ROSAMOND BOWYER sworn.

Q. Did you at any time lose a cotton gown? - Yes, at the same time.

Q. What reason have you to charge the prisoner with it? - My mother saw the apron on her side, I was out at work while the place was stripped.

Q. To Upton. Was you present when this woman was taken up? - She was brought to me to my own door; the woman said she had had her door broke open, and lost the keys, and she has found this apron on her sides.

Prisoner. I was very distressed one day, and this very apron that is before me I pledged for one shilling, and I went and gave three pence for that apron, and if you please to see if that is not the full value of it; and if I had stole it, I would not have gone and wore it in that place where I did.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-81

539. CATHARINE LENER was indicted for feloniously stealing, the 29th of July , a pair of cotton stockings, value 1s. 6d. the goods of Joseph Craig .

GEORGE BROWN sworn.

I am a shopman to Mr. Craig, No. 363. High Holborn . The prisoner came, the 29th of July, between five and seven o'clock: she bought half a yard of muslin, and then asked to look at some cotton stockings; when she was gone away, I missed a pair of the stockings; she did not buy any; I called her back, and desired her to let me see her pocket, she had got a pair of stockings, and when I looked into her pocket, I found this pair of stockings in her left-hand pocket.

Q. What is the value of them? - Eighteen pence: I know them by the private mark of the shop.

Prisoner. All that I have to say, them stockings I know nothing of, I picked them off the ground, the shop floor; when I was detected, there had been a woman in the shop to buy three different sorts of table linen and some stockings; when I came out, he called after me, he suspected me and the other woman made off; he found the stockings on the ground, and he charged me with the stockings, and charged a constable with me.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Confined six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-82

340. SARAH GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , a silver watch, value 40s. a steel watch chain, value 6d. a base metal watch key, value 6d. a pair of men's silk stockings, value 2s. and one shilling and six halfpence, the goods and monies of Peter Daley , privily from his person .

PETER DALEY sworn.

On the 8th of June I had been at a friend's house; I stopped there till past twelve o'clock; I live in Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn Fields.

Q. Where was your friend's house? - In-street, Clare Market. I met Esther Jackson in the street, I went home with her, and she wanted some money for sleeping with her, I was not satisfied to give her any that night, she and I rather disagreed there, and she sent the prisoner at the bar in to me; I did not see her before she came into the room, and wanted money of me, I did not like to give her money at that time, till the morning, and I lay on the bed with my clothes on; I soon fell asleep, I was not very sober, nor yet very drunk; I had my recollection so as to know what passed. When I waked in the morning I missed my watch, and my money out of my pocket, and a pair of silk stockings out of my coat pocket. I awoke about three or four o'clock, my clothes were on me; I missed also some money.

Q. Was all your money gone? - No.

Q. How much was missing? - One shilling and three-pence.

Q. And how much left? - Seven shillings and six-pence. They were in the room when I awoke, cursing and swearing, asking how I came there?

Q. Who were they swearing at? - At me, for being there. They each of them denied knowing any thing of my coming there; and then I had them taken to the watch-house, and gave charge of one, and not the other; I gave charge of Esther Jackson. I had her to Bow-street in the morning; I could not swear that she took the watch out, but I lost the watch in the room in her company. I heard

no more of it till Mr. Gastrel, the constable informed me of it. I have seen it since at Bow-street.

ROGER GASTREL sworn.

I produce a watch.

Prosecutor. This watch was made for me; I know the maker's name and number.

Gastrel. I am the constable. I had this watch of Mr. Peacock, a publican, who keeps the King's-head, in Wych-street. The prisoner, Esther Jackson , quarrelled with the prosecutor, and I had a warrant to execute against Jackson, and that was how I found out where the watch was.

JOHN PEACOCK sworn.

I keep the King's-head, in Wych-street, On the 19th of June, Whitsun Monday, the prisoner came to my house in the morning, about half an hour after eight she came in and called for a pint of purl, which I made her. There were several people there; I suppose as many as a dozen. She took the watch out of her pocket, and asked if any of them wanted to buy a watch, she had got one to sell; they took and looked at it, most of them round the tap-room; she asked two guineas for it; and none would give her the money. Then she came to me, and asked me if I wanted it; she said it was her own, at least her husband's, a person, that she called her husband, a young man that was a carpenter, but at that time had enlisted for a soldier, he called at my house the night before; he went away for Staffordshire; and she said that he had given her the duplicate of the watch, and she had been this morning to get it out of pawn, and she thought she could make more of it than letting it be there, and she seemed much distressed for want of her clothes. I laid her down a guinea and a half upon the table for it, before all the people that were there; I looked at the watch before I bought it, and saw Mr. Perigal's name on it, and said, I knew Mr. Perigal; and I took the watch to Mr. Perigal's that evening; and he said he made it for one Daley. I bought the watch of the prisoner.

ESTHER JACKSON sworn.

I know the prisoner very well; I know nothing of the watch. I was informed by the old woman Murphy what became of the watch, and that was the way we found which way it was made away with. I never saw the watch in my life till I saw it in Mr. Gastrel's hands.

Prisoner. This woman was in my apartment, and was in trouble, and sent for me, and gave me this watch to make money of, and I carried her the guinea and half back again. I never saw it in my life till Mr. Gastrel had it in his possession; the time that the watch was sold I was in custody for it in Tothillfields.

GUILTY. (Aged 32.) Of stealing; but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-83

541. WILLIAM CROXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , 49 yards of satin, value 5l. the goods, wares, and merchandizes of Michael Brunswick , then being in a certain ship called the Maria Elizabeth, on the navigable river of the Thames .

A Second count laying it to be the property of Charles Steers .

- KIRBY sworn.

I only own the property; I know this is one piece that was lost; I don't know what day it was shipped, it was the latter

end of July; I know nothing more about the loss more than the piece is my marking.

WILLIAM ELLIOTT sworn.

I am partner in the house of Grote, Myer, and Co. in Leadenhall-street; the ship Maria Elizabeth, Captain Brunswick, bound from London to Hamboro', in the latter end of July I believe she made sail, the 29th or 30th she was wrecked in Blackwall Reach . The shippers appointed a Committee for the consultation of the cargo. The cargo was under the necessity of being relanded, and that Committee gave me the management so far as to take care of it. On Saturday, the 2d of August, the men whom I employed on board to work the ship, among whom the prisoner was one, taking the goods from the wreck into lighters; in the evening, when they had finished their day's work, they were returning on shore, the prisoner, after leaving the wreck, was stopped by one of the King's officers with a piece of satin concealed under his shirt. What I mean by it is, it was covered under his shirt. When the officer had taken it from him, I requested that he might be taken into custody by a constable.

Mr. Ager. Did you see every thing that you have been stating? - Most certainly.

Q. Did you see him coming on shore? - No; I meant to say, that they were returning from on board the wreck to come on shore; that they had left the wreck, and were on board a lighter, as if returning on shore.

Q. Did you see him leave the wreck? - I did.

Q. Did you see him come on shore? - I came on shore with him when he came on shore.

Q. Did you come in some of the lighters? - The lighters did not come on shore; they were lashed along side, and there they remained. He got into the lighter lashed to the wreck, and I see him there, and gave charge of him.

Q. Were not the officers of the Custom-house on board the lighter? - They were.

Q. And he came on board the lighter where the officers were, and he stated he had a bit of silk, which he suspected to be smuggled? - I never heard that before the re-examination.

Q. He asked for the Custom-house officers; did not he? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. He might, and you not know it? - I don't know it.

Q. What did the defendant say? - Not a word, to my knowledge.

Q. I believe he was not committed the first time? - He was committed for reexamination; I not knowing whose the property was, I did not hardly wish to have the man committed.

Q. When he was brought up the second time he stated, that he was carrying up this piece of silk with intention to give it the Custom house officer? - I don't know that.

Q. He came from the ship into the lighter where the Custom-house officers were? - Just so.

Q. Where was this vessel wrecked? - On what is called Blackwall Reach, a little below Greenwich.

Q. Now you stated who are the consignees of this cargo? - She is a borrowed vessel; when she comes to London she is addressed to Grote, Myer, and Co.

Q. They shipped this silk? - No; it was shipped by Charles Steers .

Q. Is she insured? - I don't know; if she is, she is insured in Hamboro', and not in London; I believe she is insured either in part or in whole.

Q. You say this ship is wrecked at Blackwall Reach? - Yes.

Q. Whenever a ship is wrecked of course she falls to the underwriters? - In some cases it is.

Q. Is the ship totally wrecked? - She is so totally wrecked, as she is condemned by the surveyors as useless.

Q. Do you know, in point of fact, whether this loss falls on the underwriters? - No; I do not.

Q. However, from the state of the cargo in which you saw it, there is a partial loss or a total loss, which? - It cannot be called a total loss when things are saved out of it.

JAMES HUGHES sworn.

I produce a piece of satin; I took it from the prisoner; it has been in my custody ever since; I am an officer of the Custom-house.

Kirby. It has my own hand-writing; it is Charles Steers's property; it was manufactured by one of his journeymen.

Q. Was it put on board by him, or any of his people, as his property? - Yes; for Hamboro' to our Correspondent Sylick and Moll, they bought it of Mr. Steers.

Mr. Ager. These goods were consigned to the house of Grote, Myers, and Co.? - I only know it is Mr. Steers's property.

Q. This cargo was insured? - I know nothing about nsurance.

Q. At whose risk was the cargo shipped? - I don't know.

Q. Is it usual to send away ships in time of war without being insured? - I cannot say.

Q. Is it ever done? - I don't know.

Q. Has Mr. Steers any partner in trade? - No; he has not.

Q. Is there any body connected with him in trade? - Not that I know of.

Court. Did you say that Sylick and Moll purchased the cargo, or bespoke them? - Bespoke them. We took the order; they are never paid for on delivery; they were ordered by letter.

Q. Do you know to whom the bill of lading was sent? - Here is the bill of lading.

JAMES HUGHES sworn.

I was not present when the man was attacked with the satin; I was on board the ship; I had charge of the man as an officer.

Mr. Ager. What are you? - Headborough of Poplar and Blackwall.

Q. When this man was stopped he said he was bringing this silk to the officers that were on board the lighters? - I heard him say so at the office.

Q. Do you know any thing about the character of this man? - I never saw the man in my life only at the time.

Q. Have you any ground to suspect that this man wanted to steal this? - Not in the least; I did not observe him.

Court to Elliott. You said it was on the second examination that he said that he meant to give the satin to a Customhouse officer. Did he offer to give it to the Custom-house officer? - Not to my knowledge.

Mr. Ager. He might for any thing you know to the contrary? - His intentions might be so.

Court. You said that the ship was wrecked in Blackwall Reach; do you know in what country it was? - I do not; till I went there about this business I never was there before in my life.

Q. Did you see afterwards which side of the water it was? - It was a little below Greenwich, and at low water the wreck ebbed almost dry, but not quite, on this side of the river.

Q. To Hughes. Do you know what county it was where this wreck was? - Blackwall Reach is in the country of Middlesex; the other side of Bow Creek is in the county of Essex.

Mr. Ager to Kirby. Is Steers a British subject? - Yes, he is.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17940917-84

542. CHARLES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of August , a quart pewter pot, value 15d. two pint pewter pots, value 10d. the goods of Mary Brown .

MARY BROWN sworn.

I am a widow ; I keep the Queen's-Head, in the Strand ; I was robbed of two pint pots, and one quart.

DEBORAH HALL sworn.

I am servant to the last witness. The prisoner opened the door with his left hand, and I took him with my right; it was the 27th of August, on Thursday, between seven and eight in the evening; I took hold of him, and I found the pot in his pocket.

Q. How came you to examine his pocket? - My fellow servant told me of it; James Ponton brought him back as he was going out at the door; he took out one pot himself, a pint pot on his right hand.

Q. Did you see any quart pot taken from him? - Not till my mistress asked him if he had got no more; and he said yes; then he produced the pot and the pint; he had one in his right hand pocket, and one in his left.

Q. To whom did they belong? - To my mistress.

Q. Was her name on them? - Yes; and the name of the house.

Q. Had he had any liquor there that day? - He had a glass of ale, and paid for it, and did not drink the ale; he was not there ten minutes before he did the robbery.

Prisoner. Did you see me produce the quart pot? - I did not; my mistress did; I found a pint pot in your right hand pocket.

JAMES PONTON sworn.

I am servant to my mistress; I am the pot boy; I stopped the man; I detected him putting the pot in his pocket; I see him produce two pint pots and a quart pot.

Q. To whom did these pots belong? - To Mrs. Brown, my mistress.

Q. Where did the first pint pot come from? - From his right hand pocket.

Q. Where did the other pots come from? - One came from under his apron; we thought it was in his breeches; the pot was very warm; and the other was in his coat pocket.

Prisoner. Was there not a crowd of hackney coachmen in the house? - There were but three in the house.

Prosecutrix. I have kept the pots; there is one pot that was produced after I came to him, and there was one laid on the table before I came to him.

Q. Were these three pots kept separate? - Yes; they were kept tied up with my own hand, and ever since in my own possession; I have them now; they are mine.

Q. Is there the name of the house on them? - Yes; the Queen's Head, in the Strand.

Q. How long have you kept that house? - Four years.

Q. There were no pots in that house but what were your's? - No.

Q. Nor ever sold any? - No.

Q. Can you say that any were missing? - I could not tell that they were missing; I cannot tell justly the number I have.

Prisoner. Though I am innocent of what is alledged against me in the indictment, yet I am willing to serve his Majesty, if the Court will grant me that indulgence.

GUILTY. (Aged 28.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-85

543. ANN TALBOYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a cotton gown, value 6s. three linen shirts, value 6s. two check aprons, value 2s. a muslin neckcloth, value 1s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 2s. a damask napkin, value 1s. the goods of John Chambers .

JOHN CHAMBERS sworn.

I rent a house; I am a brewer's Clerk .

Q. Were these articles lost from your house? - Yes, they were; where my wife is; she is on her death-bed now; she did not know any thing at all about it till these duplicates were lost and found again; I hired her as a servant; I gave her so much a week.

Q. Were these things missing while the woman was with you? - I never missed them till the duplicates were lost and found again.

Q. How came you with the duplicates? - She went out that night and lost them, and a fellow servant went out that same road and picked them up.

Q. Were the duplicates in her name? - They were all in her name.

Q. Are the pawnbrokers here? - Yes.

JAMES CAHUAC sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I am a servant to Mr. Netley, Leather-lane, Holborn.

Q. To Prisoner. Where is the house that you rent? - In Horn's-alley, Liquorpont-street, Gray's-Inn-lane.

Cabuac. I produce one cotton gown, a muslin neckcloth, two salts, a pair of ribbed hose, and a damask napkin. I did not take them all in, I only took two of the articles of that woman at the bar; the muslin neckcloth the 26th of August, and a napkin the 6th of June; I knew her person, she had used the shop for some time; they were pawned in her own name.

Q. Do the duplicates which the constable has got correspond with the other two things; namely, the two shirts and the gown? - Yes.

Prosecutor. I know this neckcloth to be mine; I will take my oath of it before any justice in the world; I am sure it is my neckcloth; it has no name on it; it is the size, and I missed such a one; it is gone out of my house.

Q. What do you say of that napkin? - As to the napkin I will not swear to it all; I missed such a thing, but I will not swear to it at all.

JOHN EDWARDS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce a shirt, and two coloured check aprons, pledged by the prisoner at the bar at three different times; the shirt the 17th of September, a coloured apron the 2d of September, and a coloured apron on the 11th; I have known the prisoner above these ten or dozen years.

Q. Did you give her a duplicate? - Yes; they were pledged in her own name.

Prosecutor. This is my son's shirt; I could fetch the woman that made it, she could swear to her work; it was gone out of my house by this here woman; the two check aprons I missed; I missed all the things that are here, and I did not miss any thing else.

BENJAMIN BEVIT sworn.

I am an officer of Covent-Garden; I took the woman into custody, and in her pocket I found this duplicate of a shirt pawned for 3s. Last Thursday I took her, and the prosecutor swore to it when I came before the Magistrate; it was pawned at Edwards's.

Prisoner. I went with this here woman, hearing of her, and being at variance with my husband; my mistress lent me

these articles to go out and see if I could get my husband and me together; and I had gone after him several times, nights after nights, and could not find him; and it was to be unknown to my master, and I meant to take them out again when I received my wages of my master.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Confined twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-86

554. ANN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 12th of September , a gold watch, value 24l. a gold watch chain, value 4l. 4s. three cornelian seals set in gold, value 3l. 3s. three guineas, half a guinea, and twelve shillings, and a linen handkerchief, value 2s. the goods of George Jones .

GEORGE JONES sworn.

I am in the army ; on the night of the 12th of this month, the prisoner met me, in the neighbourhood of Holborn; she brought me to her lodgings; I think they were in Star-court , some where in the neighbourhood of Holborn.

Q. What time of the night was it? - Between ten and eleven, I suppose half after ten; I took off my coat, and waistcoat, and put it at the back of the chair.

Q. Was it a great coat? - No, it was not; in my waistcoat pocket were four guineas; my watch was in my coat pocket, I cannot exactly say whether my watch was in my waistcoat pocket, or coat pocket; I had no great coat on at all.

Q. Do you mean four guineas in gold, or three guineas and two half guineas? - Three guineas and a half in gold, and twelve shillings in silver; the linen handkerchief was in my coat pocket.

Q. How came your watch in your coat pocket? - As I was going up stairs I took my watch out of my fob, and put it in my coat, or waistcoat pocket, I cannot say which; the prisoner went to my coat and waistcoat pocket, and carried off my watch, money and handkerchief; the handkerchief I see in her hand, the watch and money I heard rattle, when she went to my coat, I had no idea at that moment, that she had taken my watch or money; she went down stairs, and in the course of a minute after, I went to my coat, and on searching for my watch and money, I found they were carried off, and I went down stairs, and took the light in my hand, that was in the room, and on looking up the court, I perceived a watchman at the head of the court; I called him, and told him what had happened, I described the woman to him, and he told me that he had seen a person of that description, at the time I mentioned, passing up the court; the woman I found in the same house, in the evening; I am certain it was the same woman; on searching that evening after wards I found my handkerchief, the evening I saw the woman; I brought her to the watch-house, and returned with some of the watchmen; and on searching the prisoner's room, I found the handkerchief that was taken from me.

Q. Did you see any body at any time in that room but herself? - No; at the time I took her, she had another person with her, her husband, or some friend of her's; I found the handkerchief in a small cupboard in the room; nothing else has never been found.

Q. What rank have you in the army? - A captain.

Q. Had you been in any company that evening? - Yes.

Q. Was you in liquor? - I cannot say that I was, I drank no more than I usually do, that very evening, I knew every well what I was about.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman that you see take your watch? - I am perfectly sure.

Q. How long might she be in your company altogether? - A quarter of an hour.

Prisoner. I know nothing of the prosecutor, I never see him till he took me; as for the house, it is a common lodging house.

JAMES MANDAY sworn.

I am a watchman; about a couple of minutes before the clock went eleven, the 12th of this month, Friday night, I met this woman coming out of this court, the clock went eleven directly after; and I went up the court to cry the hour, and he came down the court, Star-court, Cross-lane; coming down, he left the candle on the step of the stairs, the second step, he came down into the court, and met me, and said, watchman, I am robbed; by whom? says I; by a woman, says he, that came out this very moment; well says I, I see a woman coming out about three minutes ago, out of the court; then he brought me into the room where he was robbed.

Q. Did you go with him? - I did.

Q. Did you search the room? - Not that night, the next night I went and searched the room with the gentleman, and two more gentlemen with me; the prisoner was there, and a gentleman, whose name is Mr. Neale, he is in prison now; she goes by the name of Mrs. Neale, and her name is Ann Walker; and we found nothing but the handkerchief in a small cupboard in the corner; we took the woman into custody.

Prisoner. Ask him what knowledge had he ever of me?

Watchman. By all account she is a very bad woman; she robbed a gentleman just before of three or four guineas.

JOHN MANNIS sworn.

I am Mr. Jones's servant, I bought this handkerchief a few months back, for Mr. Jones, and it was found in the prisoner's room; I know it by the pattern, and a particular stain that is in the corner of it; I am sure it is his.

Jones. This is my handkerchief that I was talking of, I value it at a shilling.

Prisoner. The house were I was taken was a common lodging house, and any body goes in that will, that can pay so much a night for sleeping in it; therefore that night I was taken, I had a lodging, and being distressed, I paid a shilling for to sleep there along with the man that was taken with me. I have no friend on earth that I know of.

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940917-87

555. WILLIAM MOLYNEUX was indicted for that he, on the 4th of September , a certain house of one Esther Moon , feloniously, voluntarily, and maliciously did set fire to, against the form of the statute, and against the King's peace .

Indicted in a second COUNT, for that he, on the same day, and same place, a certain house, of the said Esther Moon, feloniously, voluntarily and maliciously did set fire to, and the said house feloniously, voluntarily and maliciously did burn and consume, against the King's peace.

(The indictment opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

ROBERT BANKS sworn.

Q. I believe you are a bricklayer? - Yes.

Q. You live next door to the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Q. Was you alarmed at this fire which happened on the 4th of September? - Yes, I was alarmed by the watchman, and then by Mrs. Moon's coachman, before I could get my clothes on.

Q. Did you go to Mrs. Moon's house? - Yes, I went to the forward side of the house, and there I saw a light of a fire; and then I went to the back of the house, and then I saw, as if it was from Mr. Molyneux's house; I then went to Mrs. Moon's house, and I knocked at the door, and there were several more together, I went and when I got up stairs to the upper room, the top gallery, three pair of stairs, which is built of wood work, above the brick work, there I observed a smoak.

Court. You had better produce the plan of the house if you have it there.

B. COOPER sworn.

Q. Produce the plan of the house.(Produces it) - This is the side of Mrs. Moon's house, that comes against Molyneux's roof, it is weather boarded and painted; in Molyneux's roof there is an aperture of thirty-eight inches in length, and eleven wide, so that any person might get out of Molyneux's house, and command about eighteen inches of Mrs. Moon's house, above where the weather boarding began; this part of Mrs. Moon's house, which come against Molineux's roof, and where the hole was made, has a gutter all covered with lead; when I went to these premises, I went into the man's chamber, Mrs. Moon's servant, which is here in the inside, that was that part of the house that was raised by weather boarding, and, as I understand, was wholly raised after the house was first built, they cannot build in that manner now; I soon discovered by going into the chamber, the mode by which the string was done; I then desired that a carpenter might be sent for with some tools, to take down some timber; the witness, Osborne, came to me, being Mrs. Moon's carpenter; he got into the gutter, and cleared it, for all the materials had been cleared out of Mrs. Moon's into this gutter; on looking at the lower board of the weather boarding, I clearly discovered the mode by which the fire had been communicated.

Q. Did it appear to you to be done on purpose or accidentally? - Certainly, on purpose; I had not been there five minutes, before I could determine that perfectly; the board is in court. (Produced.) It has been kept sealed up in this box ever since the time it was taken down by my directions.

Mr. Alby. Did you see these boards taken down? - They were taken down by my orders, and I here wrote on each of them, that I might know them again; these are the bottom boards that lay against the front of the house, weather boards; when I came to look at this boards; I observed that here it was cut away by a knife, and that this board, as well as the other, had been cut in that way; the fire had not got any higher than this, for it went in a sliding direction above this part, by which means the mode in which this was done, was not concealed; this is the bottom board, on which these boards lay, and here is the place where the fire actually commenced; this is the bottom part of the brace, the partition which is shewn by the model, as your worship will see, the slope of it here, and which I have no doubt at all, was burnt by a poker, or red hot iron, because without some additional heat, it

would not have burnt so rapidly, as to set the whole on fire.

The jury shewn the model.

Jury to Mr. Cooper. Did you observe any combustibles inside? - Yes, I did; this man's chest and a portmanteau flood close against where the firing was, the skin of the portmanteau was burnt off, and if it had not been for that, the poor coachman must have been burnt in his bed, for the heat of the plaister had actually burnt the skin of the portmanteau off, and had actually fired the board, so that it was with difficulty they prevented it breaking into the room violently. Here is the piece of a brace which stood in this manner, and which evidently shews to be burnt with a hot iron, or poker, or something of that sort, in order to continue the flame. (the portmanteau produced) There is the back of the portmanteau, if this had not lain very close to the plaistering, it must have been very fatal indeed.

Court. In what position was Molyneux's house? Was there any fire in that? - None at all. This opening of the roof of Molyneux's house was evidently done from inside, it looked as if the tiling had broke in by something falling on it. When I had got in, this man Osborne, had cut away these different matters, and searched the gutters for things that had been thrown in, I found amongst other things, these, here are some matches, some burnt and some unburnt; here is a piece of tarred oakum or rope that was laying there by it; the roof had all remained just in the same state at the time that I saw it; there was a variety of more, but it was unnecessary to bring a large quantity. In going at another time into the prisoner's house, while I was making the observation of the mode in which a person might get through to the roof, a person desired me to go into the front room, and there was in the front garret this handful of tared junk, in a hole of the plaister stopped, it is oakum very much tared; it was this, but when picked out very fine it made a very large bunch; this was placed between the plaister, and part hanging out between the rafter; if the fire had got to any considerable height here, it must have fell through the roof in Molyneux's house, where there was a quantity of shavings, perfectly clean, and which must have been lain there very recently, because every thing else in his house was very dusty.

Q. What business is Molyneux? - A mason.

Q. Were these shavings near the oakum? - No, it appeared as if they had dropped somewhere on the gutter, some lay in the passage loose by the hole, and some partly burnt; it appeared that those that were burnt had fell from this place.

Q. Were the burnt shavings and clean together? - The clean ones were in this place, and some clean ones in the passage; but the whole part of the house of Molyneux upper part, was like a gentleman's house, not a particle of dirt all about; the plaister likewise, where this tar junk was set in was evidently cut away, very recently for it lay on the floor, so that it was evidently laid there within a short space of time, it was evidently newly broke; by the mode in which combustible matter had been placed, the fire had ran on each side of the brace, it had burnt both sides of it, and this is a quarter which had been burnt totally about this, and had communicated to a piece called an intenslice, which prevented the progress of the fire; it requires very little examination to see how it began, and what part; in one of these bars, and in another that matches, it proves the hole was cut, and the combustibles dropped in here, and an hot iron

applied to the brace, and the fire was communicated to it underneath by means of this hot iron, or a candle. These boards which came from the bottom is evidently cut with a sharp knife, so as to avoid being heard by making any noise.

Jury. Supposing any body for a moment might have dropped a candle in, would not that have fired the place? - It appears very evident from every thing that fire had been placed from the outer part, and not from the inner, for there is the mark of some kind of liquid put outside, as that board will shew you considerably.

Jury. Was not that possible to run out of the deal? - The deal was painted, and therefore not very probable; this is the piece of timber that has the appearance of being burnt with the hot iron; it is an outside piece, and the skirting board on the inside was very much burnt.

Mr. Fielding. You have described pretty accurately the situation of these parts of the premises; according to your observation of the whole in Molyneux's house, how many tiles did there appear to be removed in order for this aperture to be made? - As to the number of tiles I should suppose there were fifty; the aperture was thirty-eight inches, by eleven; but every lath was evidently broke from withinside, and the bottom laths were evidently bent considerably, by a person standing on them to get out.

Q. How were the tiles placed that were removed? - Merely as they had slipped down, they were in the gutter.

Q. You of course being called in some time after the fire, other people had seen the situation of the two houses before you come? - Certainly.

Court. With regard to the aperture, I think you say, that the ceiling of that part was broke through too? - Yes, so that a person might get out of the garret very easily; I could get out myself; I have got out of openings through buildings less than that, many times.

Mr. Alby. You certainly seem to have paid a very laudable care in the examination into this business, you say the place where you suppose the fire to have originated, was a place in which a poker might have gone in, because of the appearances of the wood, is it not possible that a knot of the wood might have fallen out, and that to appearance would it not have made a similar mark? - No, it would be quite a different appearance, and when I view the boards, and see the nature of the materials, there is scarcely a knot in them.

Q. It is impossible to judge from one part of a board whether there may not be knots in the other? - This board was so very near the place if you examine it, you will find it so.

Q. You observe that this trunk was inside of this aperture? - This chest and trunk.

Q. And you observe also that on the sloping boards there are marks of something having run out as from that place; might not the appearance be some liquid substance that run out from the inside? Supposing this combustible matter had been placed behind here, would not this liquid naturally have oozed out? - Not so much.

Q. I do not mean that this might have oozed out from the boards, but out of the combustible matter? - No, that, is a very different kind of matter; and if it had oozed out of that, it would have had a very different appearance; what is on the boards has the appearance of some kind of strong turpentine.

Q. You say that at the time you made the subsequent enquiry, you went to the prisoner's house and found these things? - I did.

Q. How long was it afterwards? - Six or seven days.

Q. In point of fact you found it there a number of days after the fire happened, consequently if he had put it there he might have removed it? - He was taken into custody before.

Q. That aperture in the prisoner's house was immediately under the place where the fire had been light; and such a one that he might have gone in and out for the purpose of cleansing the gutter? - Yes, for any occasion.

Q. These premises we have heard are insured? - I have only heard so.

Q. If this had been done by the prisoner in consequence of a resentemnt, which we have heard of by the learned gentleman that opened the prosecution, to Mrs. Moon, if that resentment had been in his mind, and he had purposed to have done it, would it not have been done with no more execution by first setting fire to his own house? - It would have been less likely, because it is four feet nine inches above his brick wall, where this timber begins.

Q. Then supposing. Mr. Cooper, the prisoner had purposed doing it, in order to secure to himself the amount of the insurance he had on his house, could he have done it with more effect, and with less probability of discovery, by setting fire to his own house? - I think it would as effectually have fired his own house as if he had done it in this way, for in a very short time it must have fell into his own house, because there were dry shavings, and it must have caught to whatever part of the timber was there, which was very light, and very dry; there is no boards under this place but only joists; and I am only astonished that the ceiling did not fall in, that it did not take fire and run all through the house.

Q. Was it not possible, and more than probable to suppose, in case he had a mind to consume the building, that he had best to set fire to some part or other of his own house? - If the fire had fell in there through the house, and come in with a body of slame, this tared oakum would have took fire immediately.

Q. Do you know whether he kept any servant? - I never see him till I see him before the magistrate; I knew neither party till I was sent for. I don't know that it is proper for to mention an opinion, but the fire after burning his house would have taken away all suspicion from him, and that, I should hope, was the sole motive.

Q. You will observe, and the principal ground where upon you have been led to form your opinion, that the fire began outside is, because that in some parts there appears a greater aperture outside than inside. Do not boards sometimes burn uneven according to the quality of the boards? - Certainly.

THOMAS HOLT sworn.

I am a watchman.

Q. You know the prisoner Molyneux's house? - Yes.

Q. And Mrs. Moon's house? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 4th of September last, in Mile End New Town, of being alarmed by any thing, and at what time? - Yes, five minutes after four o'clock, I was going my round, calling the hour of four o'clock, and I discovered a fire.

Q. In what house was it? - I then thought it was Molyneux's house; I went to his door and rang the bell.

Q. How long did you continue knocking and ringing? - Not long; I went further to alarm the neighbourhood.

Q. Did you go to Mrs. Moon's? - Yes, and knocked there.

Q. When you knocked at Mrs. Moon's door, did you alarm any body there? - Yes, I alarmed Mrs. Moon herself, and she opened the window to me, and I told her there was a fire.

Q. After you had knocked at Mrs. Moon's door and alarmed her, did you

go back to Molyneux's door? - Yes, some time afterwards; I went to the other people first.

Q. How long was it after? - Ten minutes after, or upwards.

Q. What did you do then? - I knocked at the door and rang the bell again.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar then? - I saw him soon afterwards, he opened the door.

Q. Afterwards, when he opened the door, what did he say or do? - I told him there was a fire; he said, he knew it; I told him his house was on fire; he said, it was not.

Q. Was Molyneux dressed or naked? - He was dressed the same as he is now.

Q. What else did you see or do at that time? - I went to get the night engines out, and to get the waterman to turn the water on, and such like as that.

Q. Was Molyneux half dressed, or completely dressed? - Completely dressed.

Mr. Alby. You say you first left Molyneux's door, and then you went to Mrs. Moon's door, and afterwards you again returned to Molyneux's door in about ten minutes; then I take it for granted he had sufficient time to dress himself? - Certainly.

Q. And he told you it was not his own house on fire? - He did.

Q. What family has the prisoner at the bar? - A wife and two children.

Q. What age are those children? - Quite small children.

Court to Holt. How long did you stay by Molyneux? - Not long.

Q. When you talked to him and told him his house was on fire, and he said, he knew it, did he appear alarmed? - He spoke very composed to me.

Q. When you spoke to him did he come out of the house to you, or did he stay within? - He was within, I left other people following him into the house directly.

Q. Did he come out at the door? - I cannot say that he did, there were other people at the door besides me.

Q. Did he know in what part of the house the fire was? - I do not know that.

THOMAS EMERY sworn.

I live in a stable close by the prisoner, directly of shorte.

Q. you armed on this occasion? Tell us what past? - The first I heard of it was by the watchman's rattle, I laid just opposite, I got out of bed in my shirt and found Mrs. Moon's house all in flames, it appeared so, I went out and I knocked at Mrs. Moon's door, there was no entrance there, I went to Mr. Molyneux's door and knocked with a brick till I broke it in pieces, then after I knocked at Mr. Molyneux's, I saw the maid at Mrs. Moon's door in her shift, then I spoke to the maid, and I told her that I thought the house was on fire, she said it was not her house, it must be next door, I went next door again and there was no appearance of any body coming, I went over the way, I crossed and came back again.

Q. How long did that take up? - I do not think the whole course of time was ten minutes, when I came back I put my coat and waistcoat on and returned, I found the door not opened, then I went up in Mrs. Moon's house, up stairs, where there were three or four people in the room were the servant's bed was, one of the young men that was up there, took the bed from the bedstead and chucked it out of the window into the garden, I looked to see where the bed was a going, and I saw Mrs. Molyneux standing at the bottom of her yard in a bed-gown, which I thought from the appearance that somebody was a washing.

Q. Where are those gardens? - At the back of the house, there are gardens to both the houses.

Q. Did they appear to be dressed? - They were both completely dressed to all appearance, there was a child, the child had a red bed-gown on, and she was dressed in black.

Q. What age was the child? - About five or six years old, and Mr. Molyneux at the same instant was carrying something towards them, a kind of a bundle, but what it was I cannot say.

Q. How did Molyneux appear as to his dress? - He was dressed in a blue coat.

Q. Was he dressed completely? - Yes, as far as I could see of him, he had a coat on, I returned from the window and went towards where this mother appeared, which as soon as the bed stead was turned up, the people pulled away some trunks, and when the trunks were pulled away then the fire was seen through the plaistering; the trunk is in court.

Q. How close was this to the servant's bed? - There was only a chest that stood between; the chest stood at the feet of the bed. Then I bursted the plaistering and made a hole right through with my hands, and I got a blanket and dipped it in a pail of water, and put it through the hole; as soon as we could assist with water sufficient to pull the fire away, I made a hole in the top of Mrs. Moon's room, which was on fire, and got out into the gutter.

Q. You had not put the fire out enough to go out at the window? - I had it put out so far as to go out through the hole but the fire was most generally on the outside, and after I got outside, I got the fire out, by pulling down the boards and the assistance of the people bringing me the water, and when I got out I saw a hole in the roof of Molyneux's house about two feet long and one broad; I perceived that before I was out, in getting through, I stood on the roof of Mr. Molyneux's house, and I pulled off the weather board that was hurning, and by the assistance of water that came, I put the fire out; after it was put out I went through the hole back again, that I had got through before. I went down stairs, and got into Molyneux's yard; the door was open, and I was called in to aid and assist to take him into custody.

Q. Did you hear any thing between Mrs. Moon and Molyneux? Did you say any thing to Molyneux, or Molyneux to you? - Not any thing at all.

Q. Did you see Molyneux taken into custody? - Yes.

Q. How long was it after the fire had been put out? - Immediately afterwards.

Q. After you had entinguished the fire did you go to Molyneux's house? - Yes; I went into the parlour first.

Q. Tell us every thing you have seen and observed there. - There was a deal table stood against the wall, and there was part of a glass or a kind of frame of a picture hanging on the side of it, and five or six plates in the cupboard. I looked at the fire grate, and there was a piece of wood on the fire about half consumed; there were two tongs at the side of the grate, and two pokers under it. I went from that to the door of the back room, and all that I saw and could find was two hat boxes, one upon the other. No more furniture at all.

Q. In what room did you see the deal table? - In the parlour a kind of a deal table.

Q. Did you go up stairs? - I did not; I returned to the garden, and the constable told me to aid and assist.

Q. Did you go in his garden? - Not quite down to the bottom; there was linen and furniture down at the bottom of the garden; and I saw a cradle stand.

Q. How long was it before you got into his house from the time that you came first to Mrs. Moon? - I suppose it was the best part of an hour.

Q. What furniture did you see in the garden. - I saw linen and a candle; I did not take particular notice.

Q. Then there may be chairs for what you know? - There might, but I did not perceive any.

Q. Did you make any observation when you was about extinguishing the fire in the weather boarding? - Three holes; two of them rather small, and of them a largish hole, that I could put my thumb in; it appeared to me to be made as if a poker or something hot had been run into all the three.

Q. What size were the other two holes? - Not quite so big.

Q. From the judgement that you formed on the spot, with all the circumstances about you, did it or did it not strike you, that the fire was by these means? - Yes; it appeared to be done with something of a poker or a piece of iron of the same size, burnt in.

Mr. Alby. You observed, that after you perceived this fire, you got up a brick bat, and knocked at both these houses, Mrs. Moon's and Mrs. Molyneux's? - I I knocked at Mrs. Moon's with the knocker.

Q. Some time after this Mrs. Moon's servant came to the door? - Yes.

Q. You then went into the house, and so out along to the garret, where the fire was particularly observed? - I returned over the way first, where I had lodging, to put my clothes on.

Q. When you came up to this garret, you pushed out a parcel of these boards that were on fire? - No, when I came up, there was a young man putting a bed out of window.

Q. In point of fact. You pushed something out of window; you pushed against these boards that were on fire, of consequence part of these boards must have fallen down into the gutter, and likewise all these things might have fallen down with the boards for any thing you know? I take it for granted, that pulling out these boards made a number of holes or apertures in these boards? - It was a part that I pushed out where I had seen these holes.

Q. You saw the man in his garden, saving some of his furniture? - Yes.

Q. You have said something about a piece of wood in the parlour grate? - Yes.

Q. Therefore there was no danger to be apprehended from that. You asked for a light I understand? - I was not the first person that entered Mrs. Moon's house.

Q. Did not you ask for a light there? - I did not.

Q. After you had rapped at these doors, and after you had gone back to your own house, and came back again, you then observed, that the prisoner was endeayouring to save his furniture; and that his wife and children were at the end of the garden, and also endeavouring to carry away furniture? - No, his wife and children were not.

Mr. Knowlys. Have you the least idea that your pushing against these boards could have occasioned these three holes? - Not in the least.

ROBERT BANKS sworn.

I was alarmed on this night by the watchman; I got up into Mrs. Moon's apartment; I looked about, and see no fire, but smoke; I got out at the front window, which was the garret, and went on the parapet to Mrs. Molyneux's gable, and got to the ridge of the gable end, and there I saw the fire. It had the appearance to be lighted on the outside in three places.

Court to Emery. What occasion had you to make a hole? - Because we could not get into the gutter without getting down six or eight feet.

Banks. I went out of this window to see where the fire was; I goes then from this place again into Mrs. Moon, and

told her, it was not Molyneux's house, it was her house, on fire, which I conceived was set on fire; the fire seemed to come from three places; and I then run down to my own house.

Court to Emery. You saw three holes. How far did they appear apart from each other? - About five or six inches apart.

Court to Banks. You say the fire appeared to be in three places. At what distance did they appear from each other? - I cannot tell the distance; it looked to be light in three places, and they soon consumed together. After I had been home I came back again, and they seemed to have damped the fire, and I went down again, and told my wife to stop taking the things away, for the fire was mastered. I was employed to point the tiling of her house three or four weeks before this happened; I saw that hole in Molyneux's house on the 14th of August last, because we were above there on her building.

Q. Was there any thing to cover that hole? - There were two bits of boards put together, and a bar laid across it.

Q. You saw these premises after the fire? - Yes; and then the door laid by the side of that hole, when I saw the flames not covering that hole, but by the side of it, I could see the hole plain, I said it was set on fire on the outside, but I cannot say who set it on fire. It was impossible for any body to get into this gutter without a ladder of thirty feet long, or else a person must have come out of Mrs. Moon's premises the way I did, and get down six or eight feet, or else through that hole in Molyneux's house.

Mr. Alby. You seem very positive that this fire must have been on the outside. You cannot be positive sure? - Yes, I am. I saw it burning outside, and not within, and nothing but smoke in the room.

Q. You seem also to have said, with not a little emphasis, that when you perceived the fire, you was at your own house? - I did.

Q. The prisoner's house is between you and Mrs. Moon's? - It is.

Q. Did not you, when you went to the prisoner's house, ask for a light? - No, I never went into his house at all.

Court. You say it must have been set on fire on the outside. Could they get there from your house? - No, they could not; there are no parapets, they are old houses.

ESTHER MOON sworn.

I live at Mile-end Old Town.

Q. The prisoner lived next door to you? - Yes.

Q. That was your house that you inhabited? - Yes.

Q. How long might he live a neighbour of your's next door? - I suppose about four years.

Q. On Wednesday night, the 3d of September, did any thing remarkable strike you. - Yes.

Q. What time? - At ten o'clock in the evening.

Q. What was the circumstance that happened to take your attention? - I was going to bed, which is the general hour I go to bed, and my family likewise; before I get to bed, I always make it a constant rule to look out at my bedroom window, to see that all is safe; and when I was looking out, I see the prisoner Molyneux with a lighted candle in his hand passing to and fro, from a little wash-house that adjoins his dwelling to the further end of the shed, at the bottom of his garden, and some person with him, who appeared as a woman, I apprehended he meant to move off, and go away. The shed stands in a narrow place, about the width of this table; there was some person with him, by the hand it appeared to me to be a woman's; and I only see the hand, handing of

things to him; it struck me at that time he was moving off. I rather was curious in seeing what he meant to do; it obliged me to fit up till almost two or three o'clock; I missed him several times in the night, and I saw a light glimmering in some part of his windows, sometimes in the back part of his house.

Q. Did any thing more particular strike you? - I was apprehensive, my stable being broke open before.

Q. The charge now is whether that man set fire to your house; he is not charged with any one thing beside, therefore do not tell us of any suspicion. - I do not know any thing about that.

Q. When was it you was alarmed with any call of fire? - About five minutes after four.

Q. From whom did you first receive the alarm? - From the watchman knocking at my door very violently.

Q. What is your family? - Myself, one maid servant, and one man servant.

Q. Do you know what the family of the prisoner consists of? - He has a wife and two children, the oldest about four, and other about two, both girls.

Q. When you was alarmed by the cry of fire what did you? - When the watchman knocked at my door I instantly got out of bed, and I said, Holt, what is the matter, he said there is a fire next door; and as I was running to my next room, I called to my servants directly to go down and open the door.

Q. In what room did the fire make this apperance? - In the room where the boy slept, and the adjoining room, where my maid slept.

Q. Did you go into the room yourself? - No; all was done by other people that came in when the door was opened.

Q. Do you know any thing of the man, or his wife, any farther than living adjoining to them? - He went away two years and a half from the premises; in his absence the children were always still and quiet.

Q. Had you an opportunity of going into the house, to see how the furniture was? - I did not.

Q. Did you speak to Molyneux at all that morning? - After some neighbours had got into the yard, and they seemed not very hasty in taking him, I said, Oh! you wretch, you have done it, for I have watched you till three or four o'clock this morning.

Q. Did they either of them make any answer to you? - None at all.

Mr. Alby. You say you keep two servants; I take it for granted they are very attentive of course? - Yes.

Q. It seems so, because the very moment you called them they came down stairs; I take it for granted they could not be very fast asleep at the time you called them. You say you don't know any thing of these people before, only neighbours? - No, only neighbours.

Q. Then in point of fact you never had paid a debt for the prisoner at the bar? - Yes, I did.

Q. Then how can you pretend to say, that you never knew them before? - I have got no further to say, than that they only asked me that favour.

Court to the Counsel. She told you that she did not know any harm of them, and that they behaved peaceably before, and you are not satisfied with that.

Mr. Alby. Have you ever gone to the prisoner's house since he left it. - Yes.

Q. Do you ever remember having any conversation with the wife of the prisoner at that time? - I went to speak to her, and I gave three shillings and sixpence for the rellef of her and her children.

Q. Did not you say to this woman, that if you did not convict the prisoner for this indictment, that you would prefer some other against him, and endeavour to transport him? - No, not to my recollection.

Q. Did you ever say any thing like it? - I do not recollect.

Q. Will you take on yourself to swear, bat you did not say so? - I will not; here was nobody but her and me in the room together.

Court. You say you set up till two or three o'clock watching. How late did you perceive any light in the prisoner's house? - Not till after two, and I fancied I see a glimmering.

Q. Did you see a light about two? - Yes; it was in his own bed room window, it shaded against the rails, that is round my garden.

Q. About ten you observed the light in the wash-house and shed? - Yes.

Q. And until eleven it was in the washhouse or shed, passing from one to the other, you perceived after eleven? - No.

Q. Where was it you did perceive it come from? - It came from his house; I could not tell from where, it came from his house on the rails that are round my garden.

Q. How late did you see it? - I saw it several times in the night; it moved about, I suppose the last time I saw any light was about the hour of two.

Q. Did you own light move about? - No; I put my own light in the next room, my drawing room.

Q. Does the window of the drawing room look into the garden? - No; it looks into the road.

Q. Were your own people gone to bed? - Yes; I always see my servants a bed before I go to bed myself; I always see every candle put out.

Q. Are you positive that these lights that you saw playing about in your garden were from his house? - I think it was so; I did not open my window.

Court to Mrs. Moon. Whose house is this? - It is my own house; I do not pay rent for it.

MARY BLAND sworn.

I was a servant of Mrs. Moon, at the time this fire happened.

Q. What time did you go to bed the night this fire broke out? - Just after ten o'clock; I was alarmed about four o'clock on Thursday morning, the 4th of September, by a violent knocking at the door; and getting out of bed, I heard my mistress call out very violently indeed for me to make haste down; I had before been alarmed; as I was coming out of my door I met Henry Pettit coming out of his door; the two doors are both on one landing place, and he went down stairs, and I followed, and I said to him as he was going down stairs, Harry, your room is full of smoke. He went down stairs, and I went down after him; with that, my mistress gave me the keys, and told me to go down stairs, and open the street door; with that, when I got to my mistress's door, my mistress said, Mary, they don't hear at the next door; with that my mistress rattled the rattle out of window, and I went to mistress's room window, and looked out, and there I saw Mrs. Molyneux standing in the yard, and her little girl Nancy by the side of her; she was quite perfectly dressed, had on a black stuff gown, quite dressed, with a round eared cap, with a little bow knot. The child was likewise perfectly dressed; it had can a little red bed gown. I did not see the other child; the one is four, and the other is two; that was the biggest that I saw.

Q. When did you see the prisoner? - When I went down to the street door, Harry had just taken the chain down, and I saw Thomas Emery run into the parlour, and I went up to my mistress's room window, and there I saw Molyneux in the yard, quite dressed; he had on a blue coat, that was before his door was opened.

Q. How long after the alarm was it that you saw Molyneux? - I fancy about five minutes after I had been alarmed.

Q. Quite dressed, and before his own door was opened. - Yes.

Q. What else past; did any body in your house speak to any of them? - My mistress called out very violently from the window to them; she called out, Oh! you wretches, it is you that have done it; I have watched you from ten o'clock last night to three this morning.

Q. Did any body answer to it? - No; but Mr. Molyneux turned, and she turned her head, and they looked very much confused, one against another.

Q. What time in the morning was this? - It was long enough before the clock went five.

Q. Was it light? - It began to draw peep of light.

Q. Where was you? - In my mistress's bed room.

Q. How far were they from you? - About half a dozen yards, or somewhere thereabouts.

Q. You was above them; had Molyneux a hat on? - Yes, he had.

Q. Had she a bonnet on? - No, she had not.

Mr. Alby. At the time that you discovered these people you say it was near five o'clock? - No, it was not five o'clock.

Q. And you can be so exact as to the how, she had no her cap, and the colour of the child's frock? - yes.

Q. And also as to the confusion of their countenances at the time? - Yes; it was light according to the time of the morning.

HENRY PETTIT sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Moon.

Q. You had the misfortune to sleep in this garret? - Yes.

Q. What time of the night was it you waked or was alarmed? - About four o'clock in the morning; mistress called me; by her calling me I got out of bed, and I saw the room was in a very great smother.

Q. From whence did it come from? - I could not rightly perceive at that time.

Q. What did you do after this? - I ran down stairs to my mistress, and got the key of the street door, and opened my door; and I goes next door but one, to Mr. Banks, the bricklayer.

Q. When you went out did you observe any thing at Molyneux's door; - Yes; I observed Thomas Emery knocking and ringing very violently at Molyneux's door for three or four minutes.

Q. Did any body answer? - Not while I was there.

Q. After that what did you do? - I returned, and came into the garret after Mr. Banks. I got out at the garret window, and I saw the boards on fire outside.

Q. Did it proceed from the outside? - Yes, it did.

Q. Did you observe any part of the weather boards more than the other on fire? - I could not really perceive any one part, but I see it in a blaze.

Q. Did you observe the exact place? - Yes, on the board. It seemed to me to be set on fire right opposite the hole underneath, in the prisoner's house, in the top of the roof.

OSBORNE sworn.

I went to Mrs. Moon's house on the alarm of the fire; Mrs. Moon's door was open; Mr. Molyneux's was not; I went up stairs, and see Mrs. Moon on the stairs in very great distress. I went up to the back garret, and the room was full of smoke; the fire was then penetrating the roof; as soon as it was convenient I got through, and put the board that was on fire into the gutter; I put it there, and then I searched about, and I found a hole above the near board that lies on the top of the brick work; that hole was made by some instrument, by what I

cannot tell; it was on the top edge of the near board, and the bottom of the weather board, and I instantly broke the board, to see if there was any fire put in there, but there was not. It was out then.

Court. There had been a fire in that hole then? - Yes, there had. As soon as the fire was out I perceived a light coming up from Mr. Molyneux's house; it was Mr. Molyneux himself, and two or three more evidences, and I went through that hole into the prisoner's room.

Q. At that time was you able to get through, was it large enough for you? - Yes.

Q. Look at these boards first of all; are these the boards that you discovered? - That is one; that is the near board; this is part of the board that I broke, that is the other. This was whole before I broke it.

Q. Are they in the same state in which Mr. Cooper first examined them? - Yes, they are.

Q. Then you went through the hole into the prisoner's house? - I did.

Q. What observation did you make there? - I went into the garret, and did not see any thing at all there.

Q. What did you observe on the outside of the prisoner's house against the hole; was there any thing against the hole at that time? - There was a kind of old door, or shutter, laid just by.

Q. Did it lay over the hole, or just by? - No; not over the hole.

Q. Did you observe any thing in the garret? - I did not see any thing at all in the gariet, I did not search closely. In the front dining room there was a bed, in the back kitchen there were some wooden wares, in a couple of boxes in the wash house adjoining the shed there were plates and dishes, and saucers.

Q. Were any boxes near? - Yes, two or three boxes or chests; and when we came into the kitchen there was a chest locked, which Mr. Thirlwall insisted on having opened, and that was packed with every kind of linen. It seemed as if it was quite full; I did not take the things out; this was in the kitchen.

Q. Who was with you when you opened it? - I did not open it, the Reverend Mr. Thirlwall and others that were in the kitchen opened it, I only looked on; there were a part of the goods in the further end of the garden.

Q. What was there? - I cannot say what was there, for I did not go to them.

Q. Did you see whether there were any chairs? - There was tables and bedding, and several kinds of furniture; I observed them in the garden when I first put my head out of the hole that the fire had consumed. After that chest was opened, and we came out, the man was given charge of.

Q. Did you find any thing in the gutter of the house? - Not at that time.

Q. At what time did you find any thing in the gutter? - When Mr. Cooper ordered to get out at these boards, and then he ordered me to search the gutter, and then I found three matches and a little bit of oker, one of them the brimstone was burnt off, and the others were not.

Q. Where did you find them? - Directly under the hole where the fire was.

Reverend Mr. THIRLWALL sworn.

Q. You live in that neighbourhood, I presume? - I do.

Q. What time was you alarmed? - About twenty minutes past four, as near as I can recollect. I went to the spot; I immediately went up Mrs. Moon's stairs into the garret where the fire was supposed to have communicated. On inspection of the premises a very violent suspicion was immediately impressed on my mind that it was the effect of design beyond all question. I went down stairs,

went into Mr. Molyneux's house and saw a woman in the yard, and found it was Mrs. Molyneux; she was with her two children, and seemed to have some kind of bed clothes in the yard. I enquired where her husband was? she informed me he was in the house. In searching for him I was informed that he was up stairs shewing one or two persons the premises. As soon as I got to him I immediately gave him in charge to the constable.

Q. Did you say any thing to him, or he to you? - Nothing, only which is Mr. Molyneux? I am, says he, I gave him charge, and the constable took him immediately.

Q. Did you observe the condition of the house, whether there were articles of furniture about in different places? - I examined the house very minutely, and that confirmed my suspicion; out of nine rooms there were seven compleatly empty.

Q. What were the articles that you noticed in these rooms? - In the one pair of stairs there was one bed, in a very miserable condition; it seemed to have been a post bed, but there were no posts, and the bedding in a confused state, as if it was wrapped up with the intention of being taken out, and a broken chair or two.

Q. Did you observe any box that you directed to be opened? - Yes, it was in the back kitchen. I afterwards went into the back kitchen, there I saw a box; I directed it to be opened, and found it full of clean linen, and removed from the wall.

Q. How large might it be? - Considerable large, as much as two men with difficulty could carry; the linen all clean, and packed in that box that stood in the kitchen.

Q. Did you make any other observations of what there might be there, or in the shed? - I went into the shed that communicates with the back kitchen, and found there some china; there was a trunk which I directed to be opened, and found it contained his papers; he is a professional man as an engineer; paper and other things of considerable value; and in that shed there was a door through which it could have been conveyed if there had been any apprehension of the fire spreading: all these things could have been conveyed through that door without any difficulty into the garden.

Q. Out of the garden could they have been conveyed? - O, yes! Indeed his wife begged that the greatest care might be taken of these papers, because they belonged to her husband, and they were of great value.

Q. During this time you did not hold any conversation with him? - Not at all. I desired immediately another constable to go with him, because I felt it my duty to have the woman apprehended also, and desired that no communication might pass between the man and his wife till they were brought to a Court of Justice.

Q. The woman was taken to the watch house? - She was in charge of a constable, and in the course of the day taken before a magistrate.

Mr. Alby. When you saw the house on fire; undoubtedly you was angry and irritated, supposing a man capable of doing such a transaction? - The fire was extinguished before I arrived.

Q. Still resentment continued? - No. I never knew the man, I thought it my duty to act wherever a suspicion would have harboured in my mind, I would have taken you up if I had any ground for suspicion, but I had no agitation of mind than what arose entirely in the mind of any man.

Court. You see these things ready to be removed and packed; was there any thing in the appearance of these things which led you to think they might not all

he put in that condition in the course of a few hours? Might not the linen be packed in that trunk, and the china be so placed in the course of half an hour, if they knew there was a fire in the house, and they wanted to remove them? - From the time that the fire was said to happen, and from the time that I was in the house, there might be time, but it appears to me there were people in the house a quarter of an hour before me.

Q. Might not these things he packed up in the course of half an hour? - I think they might.

WILLIAM BODIDGE sworn.

I live in that neighbourhood. I went to the prisoner's house on the occasion of this fire; the fire was extinguished when I got to the prisoner's house, I got up stairs before Mr. Thirlwall came to the house, when I first went into the house, the prisoner at the bar was in the yard just at the back door, our night constable was standing by. I asked the night constable if they had been up stairs.

Q. What time did you get there? - I suppose it was about twenty minutes, or half past four, and the prisoner came into the kitchen and struck a light.

Q. The prisoner then had the night constable by him? - He had, he was not in custody, the constable's name is William Good ; the prisoner was in the garden, and he went into the kitchen and got the tinder box, and began to strike a light; they had none when I went in, and with his striking a light, I said Mr. Molyneux I wish you would make haste; the answer was, I will make as much haste as I can.

Q. Was it not day break? - It was light.

Q. What did you want a light for? - To go up stairs; he got a light, and I desired the prisoner to walk up first, and he did; and the night constable I desired to follow him; I then followed the night constable; I looked into each room as I went up stairs, the first, second, and third floor; as I turned to look into the room on the third floor, somebody says, here is the room where the fire has been, I turned myself short round and see a hole cut in the roof of the house between two rafters, the lath and plaistering cut away just opposite where the fire was on the third story over the landing place, I then went to the place and put myself out of the hole, and see where the fire had been, I immediately turned round, and I said to the prisoner, Mr. Molyneux, what was this hole for?

Court. You observed this hole in the rafters? - Between two rafters, the lath and plaistering cut away, and the tiles off, I then asked the prisoner what that hole was for? he told me to go out to repair the top of the house, or words to that effect. I told him Mr. Molyneux this has a very bad appearance, and much about that time Mr. Thirlwall came up stairs.

Q. Did Molyneux make you answer to that observation? - No answer at all.

Mr. Alby. I believe the prisoner got this light when you desired it? - He did not hurry about it, he did get it.

EDWARD MARTIN sworn.

I am a surgeon and apothecary, I went to the prisoner's house this day. On Thursday morning, a little after four o'clock, my bell rang very violently, I got out to my window, and they told me there was a fire in Mr. Moon's, or the next door to it. When I went to Molyneux's, the door was just opened, and the night constable and several more going in; they had requested Molyneux to strike a light which he hesitated very much about.

Q. You desired him? - No, he was desired, not by me.

Q. Was you present when he was desired to strike a light? - I was. When he got the light struck he went up stairs.

Q. Did he take the light with him? - He took the light.

Q. Did you accompany him up stairs? - I, and the night constable, and him altogether went up stairs. We looked on the first floor, went into the room on the first floor; there was nothing particular there; we then went up to the second floor, there was nothing particular there; he then made a stand, and hesitated about going up further, saying, how there was nothing more to be seen than what we see there.

Q. Was this after the fire was out? - It was.

Q. You know the fire to be out at the time? - They told me the fire was just extinguished.

Q. Did you persist in going up stairs not with standing this? - We did.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing else when you did persist in this? - I don't recollect he did.

Q. Did the prisoner go up stairs? - He went up stairs; we went up to the upper story immediately, on the landing place we discovered a hole big enough for a person to get out; some one person asked him for what purpose that hole was made; he answered it was for repairing the house. He was then asked how long it had been there? - he first said two months, then on being asked by somebody else, he said three or four months, we see then evidently through that hole where the fire had been applied.

Q. Describe particularly the appearance of the hole. - The hole was made in the roof, between two joists, against, it there was a gutter, and at the other side of the gutter was Mrs. Moon's house weather board, at the bottom of which there appeared to be some holes made for some reason or other, apparently by some hot iron, or something of that kind.

Q. Did you observe the prisoner and his wife and children at that time? did they appear to be dreft? - They were.

CHARLES GILBERT sworn.

Q. We have heard of Molyneux as an engineer? - Yes, he is by trade a mason, but I understand that he has acted these three last years as an engineer at Swansea.

- EBBARD sworn.

I am one of the firemen.

Q. Did you go to this spot and make examination? - Yes. In the fore garret Mr. Molyneux's house, I found a hole between the rafters of about nine inches in length and three inches in width, in that hole was some oakum.

Q. Was that while the fire was burning? - No, about half past ten o'clock the same morning.

Q. Whereabouts in the garret was it you found the oakum? - Almost opposite the hole.

Q. Tell me what the articles were that you found? - It seemed to me to be a piece of new picked oakum and tarred.

Q. What quantity might there be? - The value of half an ounce, or an ounce, I cannot say how much.

Q. Did you see any thing else? - Nothing else.

Q. Did you see any thing else in the gutter, or any thing? - No.

Q. Be so good as to describe particularly where this; hole was in which you found the oakum? - It was in the front garret, the cieling runs up in this manner, and in the opposite part to where the fire was, in the cieling, there I found this oakum in this opposite side to where the fire had happened in Mrs. Moon's house.

Q. Was it immediately opposite? - No, as I went up stairs, I went into the hole, and this was in the garret.

MICHAEL BIGGS sworn.

Q. Do you know where the prisoner lived? - Yes.

Q. In August last did you see any goods that were removing from his house? - About the 28th or 29th of August I see goods taken away from the back part of his premises, they were removed by a hand cart, a cart with two wheels, made to draw by hand.

Q. Can you speak of the articles that were taken away? - There were bed quilts, that is all that I know.

Q. Can you speak to any other things? - No, only bed quilts, and some bed posts I see.

Q. Did you see Molyneux at that time? - I did not. I see things removing from his premises.

ROSE ARNOLD sworn.

Q. You was servant to Mr. Biggs? - Yes.

Q. Will you tell us what you know about this prisoner? - On the 1st of September I saw a broker's cart standing at the back door of Mr. Molyneux's house.

Q. Did you see any thing in it? - Yes; I see a copper, it would hold two pails of water.

Q. Had you ever observed any thing before this time? - Yes; I saw something before, the last week of August.

Q. Did you see the same cart? - It was the same kind of cart.

Q. Did you observe what was taken at that time? - No, I did not.

Q. You are sure there was a copper the first of September? - Yes, I am.

RICHARD PHELP sworn.

Q. You are the appraiser to the Royal Exchange Assurance? - I am.

Q. Did you see the goods at the prisoner's house? - Yes; the same evening that the fire happened in the morning.

Q. Tell us what was the value of them? - The utmost was seven pounds; I think I should not like to have given quite so much for them. What I see in the house, and what I see in the shed adjoining the house.

Q. Do you include in that the linen? - I did not take any account of the linen but what was on the bed.

Mr. Alby. You don't usually appraise goods with the same value as an individual would put on them? - I set a value on them as I would give for them.

MATTHEW WARD sworn.

Q. I believe you are one of the Royal Exchange Assurance? - I belong to the office there. I have the insurance here. William Molyneux, of Mile End, eighty pounds on his dwelling house, and twenty pounds on his household furniture.

Q. Do you know the man? - To the best of my recollection the prisoner at the bar is the person that gave me the order.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

Q. I believe you took the examination of the prisoner before the magistrate? - I did not take it; I was present; it was read to him.

Q. Did you see it signed by the prisoner? - I did.

Q. Did you see it signed by the magistrate? - I did.

Q. (An examination shewn him.)-Look at that part which purports to be William Molyneux 's examination. Did you see the prisoner sign that? - I did.

Q. Did you see the magistrate make his signature to it? - I did.

Q. It was taken by the magistrate in Whitechapel office? - It was.

Q. Was it read to him before he signed it? - And an alteration made in it by the prisoner there.(The examination read.)

Public Office, London.

Middlesex to wit. The examination of William Molyneux charged with feloniously and maliciously, &c. setting fire

to the house of Mrs. Moon, &c. says that he is by trade a mason, keeps a house in Mile End road, has lived there about four years, has worked three years in Swansea; no alarm of fire has lately been in his house; cannot account for the fire this morning. He went to bed last night between ten and eleven, has a wife and two children; that his children went to bed between eight and nine, his wife went to hed before ten; he knew nothing of the fire till he was knocked up; he got up immediately, helped his wife to her clothes, then took his children up; no part of his house was on fire; carried some of his goods into the garden; at this time it was very dark; says, that before he helped his wife to her clothes he opened the sash, and asked the people without what was the matter? who told him there was a fire; that he went down and opened the front door, and then went down and got his clothes, called out fire, but used no means to extinguish it.(Signed) William Molyneux .

WILLIAM REYNOLDS sworn.

I am a watchman; I took the prisoner to the watch house.

Q. Did any conversation pass between you and the prisoner while he was going to the watch-house? - Not between me, it was between his wife and him. After the constable was given charge he charged me to aid and assist. I went into the yard with him; he said he wanted something to say to his wife; when he got to her he told her that he was going to the watch house, and as soon as the people were gone out of the place to shut the door up and come with him to the watch-house; he then went, as if he was going out to the road, and he then went back again and asked her for some money; she gave him a shilling, and then he went out; as he was turning again she said this is all through you; he immediately turned back, and says this is not a time to have any words.

Jury to Emery. I wish to know whether that stick that you saw in the grate, in the parlour, was on fire? - It was not to my appearance; it appeared to have been on fire, and about half consumed; but it was not on fire then.

Q. Was it warm? - I did not feel.

PETER MULLEN sworn.

I live in Cumberland-street, Mary-le bone; I am a mason; I have known the prisoner upwards of twenty years; I never knew any thing of him but an upright man.

Q. He was not such a kind of man as you would think would be guilty of such an offence as this? - No; I never could have thought it.

SAMUEL RIVETT sworn.

I live in Crown-street, Finsbury-square; I am a cabinet-maker; I have known him five years; I never knew any thing of him but an upright sober character.

Prisoner. I leave it to my Counsel; I am totally innocent of what I am charged with. My friends are all out of town; I was employed by the Trinity House to go to Swansea, and get the act passed; I am one of the witnesses on the act, and Squire Morgan the other.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 48.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ROOKE.

Reference Number: t17940917-88

546. JOHN BARNEY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , a linen shirt, value 3s. the goods of Jonathan Matthews .(The Case opened by Mr. Knapp.

JONATHAN MATTHEWS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker , No. 154, Old Gravel-lane ; the prisoner at the bar has lived with me better than four years.

Q. Had you an occasion at any time to take the contents of your stock? - I had on the 12d of June last. It is customary for us to take it once a year; we are assisted by five or six of the trade; I found my stock four hundred and odd pounds at the time deficient of the sum it should be of the money that I had taken in trade that year.

Q. In consequence, did you search any box or trunk in your shop? - I recollected Barney's telling me the Sunday morning, that there was a trunk that contained clothes and other things for nine pounds nine shillings of his taking in.

Q. Did he say any thing else but what there was a trunk? - The trunk had a ticket on it for nine pounds nine shillings in the name of Cooper, in Barney's hand writing; when we opened the trunk, which we were obliged to break open, what should it contain but chiefly his own wearing apparel, and other things, his property; a watch, and a pair of spurs, and other things.

Q. Was there any property particularly that did not belong to him? - There was a shirt that we found; the shirt is here; I brought it here; it has been in my custody ever since.

Q. Do you know whose that is? - It is my property; it has been worn.

Mr. Knowlys. You took stock the 22d of June? - I did.

Q. When did you accuse Barney of this offence, for which he is now indicted for? - I spoke to him in the Hospital.

Q. Any thing but an answer on your oath; when did you accuse this young man at the bar of stealing this shirt? - Before the magistrate.

Q. How many months after the 22d of June? - Directly after his discharge.

Q. How am I to know when he was discharged, or the Jury, or any body else? - To the best of my knowledge, the 3d of August. He was in the Hospital for a broken leg, which he got in his pleasure, and I could not accuse him while he was in the Hospital; I went before the magistrate and spoke of it.

Q. Upon you oath, man, did you go before a magistrate and give any information about your suspicion of stealing the shirt till the 3d of August? Now we are on tender ground let us go on quietly? - I do not recollect.

Court. I understand you that you did not accuse him till the 3d of August, because he was in an Hospital for a bad leg? - I was at the justice's before this to accuse him of making false pawns, but as to the shirt I did not accuse him of.

Mr. Knowlys. Then you was before the magistrate, and accused him of several other things, but not of this till the 3d of August? - I did; and you was present, I believe.

Q. If the reason of your not accusing him was being in the Hospital, how came you to accuse him at all of any thing? - Because he told me that there was a parcel for nine pounds nine shillings, which when opened consisted of nothing but his own clothes. My son discovered this shirt before we went to the justice.

Q. Your son did. You never saw that shirt in your possession till your son accused him of taking it, and told you it was your's? - I never saw the shirt in my possession till my son found the parcel, and compared it with other shirts.

Q. And yet here, before the Gentlemen of the Jury, you have already positively sworn it is your shirt? - I never saw it in my life.

Q. Then you come here and call God to witness, that you never saw it in your life? - I saw it as soon as it was found in the trunk.

Q. And yet you swear positively on your oath it is your's. On your oath, did you ever live in this No. 154, Gravel-lane? - Almost seventeen years ago; in general I sleep there two or three nights in a week.

Q. On the oath that you have taken, has there been any two persons on worse terms than that young man and your son? Has there not been continual quarrels between your son and that young man? - I don't know of any quarrels between my son and the prisoner; I know he has been very disturbing to me.

Q. Don't you know that they have been on very bad terms, and have been so for a long time? - Not that I know; I am sure it is quite new to me; I don't understand your meaning; my son did no business in my shop.

Q. Do you mean to say that your son has not always spoken unfavourably of him, and he of your son; has not he complained of ill usage from your son? - My son does not interfere at all in the shop in Gravel-lane; he is at the shop in the Minories.

Mr. Knapp. The reason you did not make your accusation of him before, was because he was in the Hospital with a broken leg? - That was my sole motive.

Q. Had you taken out any warrant against him for stealing this shirt? - I had.

Q. When was that? - About the 1st of August; I shewed him all the favour I could.

Court. You had taken stock the 22d of June? - I did.

Q. The prisoner was there at the time? - He was.

Q. When was this shirt found? - On the 25th we opened the trunk, that was on Wednesday, and the shirt was not found till the 27th, by my son's information.

Q. Was the shirt found in your presence? - It was in my presence, with other things, and he had it in wear.

Q. Who was present besides you? - My son, and William Pomfret; I believe; I think he was.

Q. Where was the prisoner at that time? - He was in the Hospital.

Q. When did the prisoner go to the Hospital? - He got his leg broke on Sunday, the very day that we took stock; we cannot do it on another day in our business, because the people coming in and out so; he broke his leg on the 22d in the afternoon, he went out on his pleasure.

Q. Was you present when this shirt was found? - I was present when the trunk was broke open, and the first thing I took up was this shirt; it belongs to a pledge; it is a particular made shirt; a foreign made shirt, and the sleeves are strait sleeves.

Q. How many shirts were pledged with it? - Four shirts and two waistcoats, all for a guinea; they were pawned last January was a twelvemonth, they are my property now, because they are unredeemed, and the person is dead.

Q. Had you taken it into your stock? - It had been entered as part of my stock. I have not got that book, because it is a book so long back that this pledge was put down in.

Q. Your son he carried on the pawnbrokering business for you in the Minories? - Yes; he carried it on for me there, No. 105.

Q. He had not any thing at all to do with this shop in Old Gravel-lane? - No, only assisting me to take stock.

Q. He never took in pledges nor made entries in your books? - No; and when I missed so much property as four hundred pounds, I was determined to follow the business no longer.

Q. Then all you know is, that this is made like the others? - Yes; the gussets are made down low in the shirt.

Q. When you receive these pledges you make an entry in a book? - When we receive a pledge of five shillings we make an entry in a book, and put them up in some part of the warehouse.

Q. And then you keep your book which refers to the different pledges, and when these are forfeited you take off the different duplicates that were on the goods and enter it as so much stock? - Yes.

Q. This had been in your warehouse locked up safely for a year and a half? - This had been in my warehouse, but I never had any account of it; it was, as I judge of it, concealed by the prisoner.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS sworn.

I am the son of the last witness.

Q. Do you remember being with your father when you opened any trunk? - I was present; I brought it down stairs.

Q. What are you? - I am a pawnbroker in the Minories, No. 105. On Wednesday, the 25th of June, I opened the trunk; the first thing I see was this shirt rolled up; going a little further I found a coat; I found different things, some things I knew to be his.

Q. Did you know that shirt to be his? - No; I know it to be one belonging to a parcel that I found afterwards.

Q. Had you ever any thing to do with this business in Gravel-lane? - Never in my life.

Q. Was there a ticket on this trunk? - There was for nine guineas, of the name of Cooper.

Mr. Ager. How many people have you and your father prosecuted this Session? - Not one except Barney and Curling.

Q. Have not you prosecuted a woman this Session? - No.

Q. Will you swear that? - I did not give evidence against any one; but my father has.

Q. Pray is there any one individual in his business that he has not one time or other prosecuted? - No other than these three.

Court. How many parcels did you tumble over in this warehouse? - This was the first parcel I opened.

Q. How did he know what parcel to tell you to bring down stairs? - Barney told me in the morning that there was a trunk of nine guineas, and my father said bring it down stairs and I will look over it. There were a great many pledges there besides this one.

Q. But you was so unfortunate as to hit on this first? - There were cupboards in this warehouse where this was found, and household furniture in the same warehouse; this trunk laid in a chair out of the cupboard; the ticket was pinned to the waistcoat.

Q. How long has this been written? - January 1793. January 14, 1793, Sarah Laws, four shirts and two waistcoats, one pound one shilling and a halfpenny.

Q. Where is Sarah Laws? - She is not here. I issued out a subpoena out of the office; she was before the magistrate.

Jury. Your father said the person was dead? - She pawned them for a man that is since dead.

Q. Where is the book? - It is not here; it has been sold among some more old books.

Q. How do you know that shirt? - By its remarkable make.

Q. How did you find out Sarah Laws? - My father found her out; I did not.

Q. You did not take in that pledge at all? - I never did any business there.

Q. To Matthews the elder. How long have you been a pawnbroker? - Near seventeen years.

Q. You did a great deal of business in Gravel-lane? - We did some business; we took in about one hundred things a day.

Q. How did you find out Sarah Laws? - I found her out by enquiring at a chandler's shop; she lived two doors from a public-house in Anchor and Hope Alley; after we discovered that this shirt was taken I was advised to go and seek after her.

Q. How came it you did not put down the description where she lived? - I told my servants constantly to take notice where the customers lived.

JOHN JOHNSON sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Matthews.

Q. Do you know any thing of this shirt? - I know it to be the prisoner's property, because I was in the shop the present time when he bought the shirt.

Q. Has there been any dispute between your young master and the prisoner? - There has been a dispute some time between the master and prisoner.

Q. Look at the shirt? - That is the shirt I see the prisoner purchase in the shop, as near as I can guess, about four or five months back; I cannot justly tell to the time.

Q. Where was it that he bought it? - In Mr. Matthew's shop, in Old Gravel-lane.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940917-89

547. JOHN BARNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , 30s. the monies of Jonathan Matthews .

JONATHAN MATTHEWS sworn.

I suspected the prisoner after I had taken stock, and found four hundred pounds and odd short. I have nothing to say particularly; I was not willing to lay the indictment capital, because I did it out of tenderness; I have no other evidence to prove that he stole my money than this.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940917-90

548. WILLIAM ANTHONY CURLING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , 38s. the monies of Jonathan Matthews .

JONATHAN MATTHEWS sworn.

Q. What reason have you to accuse this young man, independent of your suspicion, and the idle mode of their living? - There was a milk pot taken in for pledge for twelve shillings and six-pence, and it was ticketed for five pounds; it is a false pawn. When they found I was going to cast up my stock, they knowing of course what they had done, they made up all these false pawns to deceive me in the stock, that I should not know what they had done.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940917-91

549. JOHN ELKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a deal board, value 3s. the goods of Robert Webb : and

JAMES HAYWARD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, on the same day, knowing it to have been stolen .

The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

WILLIAM HERBERT sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Robert Webb , in Great Distaff-lane ; the pri

soner Elkins is a journeyman of his; Mr. Webb is a box-maker .

Q. Tell us what past the 25th of August, what time did he come in the morning? - Five o'clock in the morning.

Q. Who let him in? - My fellow apprentice.

Q. Did you see him come? - No, I did not; I see him there.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular after you came into the warehouse? - No.

Q. Do you know any thing about a board? - He went up into the lost to work, and took a board, and he put a board down, a deal twelve feet three inches, with one cut in the middle; he put it down from the lost, and he came down the steps and put it down into the cellar, and I was getting out of bed at the same time, and went across the place to make water, and I said, Elkins, mind you shut the slap up; he said, very well, and I went to bed again.

Q. Where did he put it? - He put it against the lost ladder on the floor, then he went down the cellar, and I don't know what he did there, and I went into bed.

Q. When did you get up? - About an hour afterwards. I did not see any thing at all of the deal after.

Q. Was it missing? - Yes.

Q. What became of Elkins? - He came in doors just as we were getting up, and then he said he did not like to disturb master, for fear of making us get up.

Q. What did he mean by that? - I really cannot tell you. He was to have done work below, in making a door, and therefore he went up into the lost.

Q. What time did you get up? - About half after six, between six and seven.

Q. Should you know that deal board again if you was to see it? - Yes.

Q. Have you seen it since? - Yes.

Mr. Knapp. So then he brought down a deal from the lost, and put it down into your master's premises, and what became of it you don't know; you went to bed not seeing of it, and when he came back again he was to have done some work, but he did not like to disturb his master.

JAMES COMBLEY sworn.

I am a carpenter; the prisoner Elkins worked for me in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine; I was in Mr. Webb's shop the time he was taken up.

Q. What time of that day did you first see him? - About ten minutes past five in the morning, as I was standing at the corner of Little Carter-lane, I see him come round Distaff-lane with a twelve foot three inch deal on his shoulder, with one cut in it edgeways; it was about sixty yards from his master's house where I stood. I had a suspicion of him, I ran to Mr. Webb's house to see if Mr. Webb's shop was open, I saw the door was about an inch open, I ran and followed him; he pitched the deal against the Cock in the Corner, at the court called Cock-court; the mark of the deal was outwards when he first pitched it, and before that I saw the mark on his shoulder; he went into this public house, I imagined to get something to drink; he came out and took the deal on his shoulder, and I walked on this side of the way up the Old-bailey, following him to see where he would go with it; and he went and pitched the deal against Mr. Hayward's door, in Fleet-lane, the middle door, there are three doors to the house; I think it was the middle door, he has three houses made into one I think it is. Seeing him pitch the deal there, I went back to acquaint Mr. Webb, he walked backwards and forwards before Mr. Hayward's door for some time, but the house was not open. I came back

Mr. Webb, I sent for him to a neighbour's house; it was nine o'clock before Mr. Webb was stirring, and I informed him what I had seen; in consequence of that we went back to Mr. Hayward's, and went to the door where we saw the deal pitched up, and the deal was in the passage of that house, leading to the stairs.

Q. Could you then tell it was the same deal? - Yes, on account of the particular mark.

Q. About what time did you get to Hayward's house? - About five minutes past nine. Mr. Hayward was offering the deal to fell to Mr. Wessell, at the corner of Fleet-lane, in the Old-bailey; Mr. Wessell said it was too thick. Mr. Webb thought he would go and offer to buy it himself; I did not go in; when he came out, he said, that is my deal, I will swear to it. It was Mr. Wessell said, it was too thick; Mr. Hayward said he had got thinner.

Q. After having shewn Mr. Webb the deal you left him to do the best he could? - I did. I went to fetch a constable, I came back with the constable, and Mr. Webb gave charge of Mr. Hayward to the constable.

Q. Did Hayward say any thing at that time? - Nothing further than that he would go with him. I am positive it is the same deal, it is marked with a stroke on the top with red chalk. The deal is here to be produced.

Herbert. This is the same deal he put down by the ladder.

Mr. Const to Combley. I understand that this deal was put into the passage, and not into the house? - It certainly must form part of the dwelling house, because it leads to a pair of stairs.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge that these premises belong to Mr. Hayward? - It is my belief.

Q. On your oath, do you know of your own knowledge these were Hayward's premises? - I cannot tell indeed.

Q. You past a cart of deals in the Old-bailey? - Yes, they were loading at Mr. Trinder's.

Q. Were there not some such sorts of deal in this cart? - No, his work was prepared work, going to a job, framed doors and partitions that were put into that cart.

Q. Had you ever seen that deal before? - Not till I see it on Elkins's shoulder, and I see it when it was pitched up in the corner, the Cock in the Corner.

Q. You knew it directly? - I did, it was not out of my sight a moment.

JOSEPH WESSELL sworn.

I am an apothecary and surgeon, in the Old-bailey. The prisoner Hayward sent me word by a messenger he had got some deals to fell. I went to Hayward's house, I saw one in the passage, which, I said, was too thick; it did not suit my purpose.

Q. Was that passage part of Mr. Hayward's premises? - I cannot be positive; I have no doubt o