Old Bailey Proceedings, 30th April 1794.
Reference Number: 17940430
Reference Number: f17940430-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the City of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 30th of April 1794, and the following Days; Being the FOURTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. PAUL LE MESURIER, Esq. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY , PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, and Published by Authority.

NUMBER IV. PART I.

LONDON: Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No.63, Snow Hill. PRICE ONE SHILLING and FOUR-PENCE.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable PAUL LE MESURIER , Esq. LORD MAYOR of the city of London: The Honourable LORD LLOYD KENYON , Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: The Honourable SIR BEAUMONT HOTHAM , one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer: The Honourable SIR ALEXANDER THOMPSON , one other of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer: SIR JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Serjeant at Law. Recorder of the said City: JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common Serjeant at Law of the said CITY; and others, His Majesty's Justces of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William Barnfield

Thomas Brass

Thomas Winkworth

William Meadows

James Fenn

Edward Robinson

William Curl

John Davis

John Potter

Launcelot Hoggat

John Vevan

Thomas Sherwood

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Hobbs

George Weatherston

John Rutt

John Howard

Anthony Newman

John Groom

Nathan Smith

Henry Lewis

Richard Chaston

George Dotson ^

Abel Chapman

William Roberts

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Sitch

John Moffatt

Henry James

William Fisher

William Tongue

John Sandiford

Richard Williams

Thomas Newman

James Smith

Charles Williams

Joseph Cooper

Mark Stacey .

^ Anthony Clark served on Monday in the room of George Dobson

Reference Number: t17940430-1

230. ABIGAIL JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of January , eleven pair of silk stockings, value 4s. the goods of Moses Samuel .

MOSES SAMUEL sworn.

I deal in second hand silk stockings ; I did rent a lower apartment in Mansfield-street , and there I sold second hand silk stockings. On Saturday night, the 18th of January, I opened my shop after our Sabbath was over, and there I hung up my stockings, there were about ten dozen of stockings there, dirty and clean, I had hung them up for sale, on two lines inside of the window, I put a gimblet in the window, to fasten it down, and I went over the water to see my father, and I left my wife alone in the place.

Q. What time did you leave your wife at home? - About seven o'clock.

Q. How soon did you come back? - About ten in the evening.

Q. You did not know any thing that they were missing till you came home? - No.

Q. Have you ever seen them since? - Yes, the prisoner offered some to sell to me the Wednesday following, she offered me first one pair, and then another pair, and then two pair; I asked her if she had any more? she said she had not; says I then, good woman I must stop you with these, because these are my property.

Q. Where was it this woman offered them to you to sell? - In Rosemary-lane, in the street.

Q. Had she any other goods to sell besides these stockings? - Not that I know of.

Q. Is she a dealer in goods there? - I suppose she is, but I don't know.

Q. She offered them to you as such? - Yes. When I told her that I must stop her; she says if you will go with me to Petticoat-lane, I will shew you the person that I bought them of. As we were going along, she said, she did not know the person rightly, but if I would go with her to her father's in Winfield-street, he knew the person; I went with her down to her father's, in Winfield-street, into a back place, and when I came there I again asked her if she had got any more? she said she had not; at the time I spoke to her she had her apron tied up, as all these women have; as soon as we got into the door she whispered something to her father, and I had some suspicion, and I saw her throw seven pair down into the kitchen. I told her what a wicked woman she must be to tell me she had no more, and yet had more concealed; I went down the stairs and picked them up, and I went with her and them into Petticoat-lane, and I gave them to the officer.

Q. Were all the articles that you gave to the constable the same you took from the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. Is your wife here? - No, she is very big with child, she could not come here.

Q. Did you ever see that woman in your house yourself? - No, not to my knowledge.

Q. You never learned from her, or her father in her presence where they came from? - No, she told me she bought them, that is all.

WILLIAM BOX sworn.

I am a constable; I produce eleven pairand one odd stocking, I believe it is, I never opened them; some of them are silk stockings, some pieces, and some stockings, some only half stockings, legs. and one thing and another; I received them of Samuel, he gave them to me at a place called Stone-lane, Petticoat-lane, the woman was with him; this was on a Wednesday.

Samuel. I can swear to this pair, this dark brown pair, they are such a remarkable pair, they had been mended so in the leg; these are not the whole of what I lost, I lost nine dozen and a half, some new and some old stockings,

Q. How long had you had them old pair that you speak to? - A fortnight or three weeks, it is a remarkable ribbed stocking, and mended with yellow silk in the leg.

Box. This woman deals in the fair with stockings. I asked the prosecutor what I was to do with this poor woman, She said she thought she could find the person that she bought them of, by the next day, and by the prosecutor's agreement I took her word, till next day eleven o'clock, when she came and delivered herself up according to her word.

Prisoner. I wish my witnesses to be called in that see me buy the stockings.

MARGARET JONES sworn.

I was in the fair, and knowing of the prisoner I went up and spoke to her, she lived in Whitechapel; she had got these old silk stockings buying of when I went up to speak to her in the fair; this was about three weeks before last sessions began, I cannot tell the day.

Q. What did she give for them? - Just as I was coming away I see her gave the man two shillings, whether she had any change out of it or no I cannot tell.

Q. Are they not worth more than two shillings? - I only see them in her hand.

Q. How long have you known this woman? - About six years, I never heard any thing of her but what she bought and sold stockings , that is her business.

Court to Samuel. I understand you she said she would tell you where the person was that she bought them of? Where did she tell you? - In Petticoat-lane.

Q. Is that by the fair? - No.

Q. She took you to her father's, was not that by Petticoat-lane? - Just by Petticoat-lane.

The prisoner called three other witnesses who gave her a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-2

231. ALEXANDER LORAINE was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on the 6th of January , on William Salts , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 2l. his property .(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WALTER WILLIAM SALTS sworn.

On the 6th of January last I was coming through Crown-court, it is facing of Compton-street, in Little Pultney-street ; as I was passing along, there was a large

confectioner's shop, which cast a great light, and there was a great mob of people, by which I could not cleverly pass, and the prisoner stepped up to me.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - No, the prisoner stepped up to me, and with his left arm pushed me against the wall, I gave him a punch of the breast, you villain, says I, what do you mean, and at the time I saw his other hand under my coat it was a large coat, buttoned at the bottom, and I felt my watch drop out of my pocket, he rapped it out.

Q. Then you felt it pulled out instead of dropping out? - O, yes, very plain, it was in my fob, my watch pocket; O says I, my watch is gone, there were two other boy s standing by my right hand side, and they said just as the prisoner was turning off.

Q. Did he hear what the boys said? - Yes. says the boys.

Q. Which of them spoke? - They both spoke together, the very same words, says they, follow me, I know the man very well, I followed them the length of the court, and see the prisoner right before me, they were running rather faster than me, I went after them to the end of the court.

Q. Did you over take him? - I did not, he went after than me, but the boys kept with him.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner at the bar again? - Not till I came to Bow-street.

Q. How long was it after the robbery? - Four or five days.

Q. What did you lose besides the watch? - A black ribbon and a key.

Q. What is become of that watch, have you ever seen it again? - No, I have not.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar now, and tell my lord, and gentlemen of the jury, whether you are sure that is the man? - Yes, I am sure of it.

Mr. Knowlys. Your name is Walter William Bates ? - It is.

Mr. Knowlys to Court. It is alledged, in the indictment, that the prosecutor's name is William Bates .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-3

232. JOSEPH CHALK otherwise WALLING and THOMAS SMART , was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , a bay gelding, price 10l. the goods of James Moss .

JAMES MOSS sworn.

I lost a horse the latter end of October, I cannot exactly ascertain the day, it was lost from Kilburn , I was out of town at the time, it was a bay horse, sixteen years old, fourteen hands three inches high.

Q. Have you recovered the horse? - I have, I recovered it about the middle of February, the 20th or 21st of February, it was at a livery stable near Ratcliff-highway, I went there in consequence of an advertisement I observed in the paper.

Mr. Knapp. I believe you never before the magistrate, or at any other time, attempted to identify your horse? - Yes, I did before the magistrate.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar? - No, never in my life before.

Q. Perhaps you have heard that he is a horse dealer ? - I think it was mentioned before the magistrate.

Q. Your horse was lost in October? - It was

Q. When was the prisoner apprehended? - I saw the horse advertised the 13th of February.

Q. Then from October till the 13th of February, the prisoner at the bar was at large? - I cannot say any thing to that.

HENRY SURETY sworn.

The horse was sent to my mistress, to Kilburn, to grass.

Q. Who was it taken by? - By Mr. Moss I believe.

Q. Do you recollect when the horse was taken from grass? - About the 28th of October I missed him.

Q. How lately had you seen it before you missed it? - The night before I missed it on the morning.

Q. When did you see it again? - About four or five months afterwards I saw it at Shadwell.

Q. Did you make any enquiry, or do you know of your own mistress making any enquiry after the horse, after it was missing? - Yes, we put out hand bills, it was a dark bay horse, fourteen hands high, a swiss tail, with a blaze down the face.

PETER WILKINSON sworn.

I went to the livery stables in Back-lane, to prove the horse to be Mr. Moss's property, sometime in February, and I found this horse there.

Q. Whose livery stables were it you found it at? - I really cannot tell, it was just by the turnpike in Back-lane.

WILLIAM DEWER sworn.

I know no more than the prisoner at the bar, Chalk, and that lad, Smart, brought four horses to my stable, the sign of the City Arms, at the top of London-street, Ratcliff; on the 6th of February last, they brought them for sale, and exposed them for sale at different times in public, in the street.

Q. Was you ever acquainted with the man before? - About a week before he came to me to know whether I could accommodate him with stabling for four or five horses? I told him yes.

Q. Was Mr. Moss's horse one of them? - It was.

Mr. Knapp. You say you did not know the prisoner before? - No.

Q. You have heard that he was a horse dealer? - Yes.

Q. He put the horses into your yard to be sold publickly? - Yes.

Q. He did not attempt to secret them? - Not at all.

EDWARD LUCAS sworn.

On the 11th of February I received an information against the prisoner at the bar, and me and Mayne went down to the City Arms, the corner of London-street, and apprehended the prisoners.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-4

233. JOSEPH CHALK otherwise WALLIN and THOMAS SMART were again indicted for stealing, on the 28th of October , a black gelding, price 8l. the goods of John Carter .

JOHN CARTER sworn.

I lost a horse, I missed it on the 18th of October, I found it the 13th of February, in Shadwell, I really don't know what sign.

WILLIAM DEWER sworn.

This horse was brought at the same time as the other.

EDWARD LUCAS sworn.

I found it at the same time.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-5

234. THOMAS PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, and causing to be falsly made and counterfeited, and did willingly act and assist in falsly making and counterfeiting on the 3d of April 1792 , a certain deed, purporting to be signed by one Joseph Constantine Clapue , and to be sealed and delivered by him, with intention to defraud one John Bell .

Indicted in a second COUNT, with uttering the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

Indicted in a third and fourth COUNTS, with forging and uttering the same, with intention to defraud Joseph Constantine Carpue .

In a fifth and sixth COUNTS with forging and uttering the same, with intention to defraud one John Gosden in his life time.

(The case opened by Mr. Raine.)

(The witnesses examined separate at the request of the prisoner.)

THOMAS MARTIN sworn

I am the steward of the Manor of Barnsbury at Islington.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Carpue being admitted to certain copy hold premises in that Manor? - Yes, he was to two pieces of ground, as a trustee.(The admission produced and read from the court roll.)

Q. Who is the surrender by, and when dated? - The 29th of August, in the twenty-ninth year of his present Majesty.

Q. Whose surrender is it? - The Reverend Thomas Powell 's.

Q. Do you know any thing of a letter of attorney being afterwards produced? - Yes, this is it.

Q. Who produced it to you? - The prisoner at the bar, on the 4th of April 1792.

Q. On what occasion, and for what purpose? - Mr. Phillips had sold the remainder part of that little field to Mr. Bell, they came to me to be admitted, and he produced this in order to empower him to transfer them premises that are mentioned in it, on behalf of Mr. Carpue to Mr. Bell, and which was presented to the homage by me, and I took the surrender accordingly.(The letter of attorney read by the clerk of the court.)

Court. Then you took the surrender in consequence of the letter of attorney? - Yes, and this is the letter of attorney; that was produced at the court.

Q. When was the surrender? - The 4th of April 1793.(The surrender read by the clerk of the Court, from the court roll.)

Mr. Raine. The surrender was made in consequence of this letter of attorney? - It was.

Q. Who appeared with that surrender? - The prisoner, Thomas Phillips , with this letter of attorney, as from Joseph Constantine Carpue .

Q. Mr. Bell was admitted in consequence of that surrender? - He was on the 9th of May 1792.(The admission read by the clerk of the court.)

Q. Had you any notice not to admit him before he was admitted? - Yes.

Q. From whom? - From Mr. Gosden.

Q. What did you do in consequence of that notice? - I applied to Gosden's attorney, but I could not let the estate lay open and my lord to have no tenant, Mr. Carpue had sold the estate to Mr. Bell and Mr. Bell, was not admitted, therefore I did admit him notwithstanding the notice, I admitted Mr. Bell on the

9th of May; I did not know, that Mr. Golden had any thing to do with it, not it did not appear that he had any thing to do with it on my records.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe Mr. Bell continues the tenant to this estate to this present hour? - He does.

Q. Did Mr. Gosden, in his life time, ever venture to file a bill against my lord for admitting Mr. Bell or any body else for him in his life time? - No, never nothing, only this notice.

Q. Was not Mr. Gosden present at the time that this surrender was made by Mr. Phillips? - No, not on this power of attorney, I am sure he was not.

Q. Did not he come with Mr. Phillips? - Not to my knowledge. Gosden says, in his notice, that he was in the country.

Q. Was you present at any time that Mr. Gosden wished Mr. Bell joy of his purchase? - No.

Q. Was not Maynard, Mr. Phillips's Clerk with him? - I do not know him, he was not there to my knowledge.

JOSEPH CONSTANTINE CARPUE sworn.

Mr. Knowlys objected to his evidence being received because he was alledged to be defrauded by this transaction, which the court allowed.

ANN GOSDEN sworn.(Shewn a deed executed between the prisoner and John Gosden .)

Q. Whose hand writing is that? - This is very much defaced, but I believe it is my husband's hand writing.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you believe it to be your husband's hand writing? - I believe it is, it is very much like his hand writing, but hardly any one could swear to such a thing as that.

Mr. Raine. To the best of your recollection and belief, do you believe it is his hand writing? - I do not know what to say in that point.

Q. As much as you do see of it do you believe it is his hand writing? - As much as I can see of it, I do believe it is.

Mr. Knowlys. You say hardly any body could swear to such a thing as that, you also say it is very much defaced, now I want to know whether in this present defaced state, you can venture to say that that is your husband's hand writing? - I would be sorry to say that, I do not know that I can.

Court. Do you believe it? - It appears very much like it, but it is in such a state I should not choose to swear to it in the state it is in.

Q. Do you mean to say you cannot form a belief whether it is his hand writing or not? - I cannot.

SARAH GOSDEN sworn.

I am the daughter of the last witness.

Q. Look at that hand writing? - I think it to be my father's hand writing, to the best of my knowledge, I have frequently seen him write.

Mr. Knowlys. You say to the best of your knowledge? it is very much defaced? - It is, but he writes rather a remarkable hand.

Q. Can you venture to say that you believe that is his hand writing in this defaced state? - Yes, I can.(The deed read by the clerk of the court.)

Court. What is the date of it? - The 26th of September, 1789.

Q. When was the surrender of Powell? - The 29th of August, 1789.

WILLIAM FISHER sworn.(Shewn the deed)

That is the hand writing of the prisoner at the bar, I am well acquainted with it.

JOHN MAYNARD sworn.

I have done business as clerk to the prisoner at the bar several times.

Q. Do you happen to be acquainted with he hand writing of the late Mr. Gosden? - No, I do not.

RICHARD EDWARDS sworn.

Q. Do you know Mr. Carpue's hand writing? - I never see him write in my life.

John Maynard . I was clerk to Mr. Phillips.

Q. That instrument the letter of attorney purports to be signed by you, is it your hand writing? - No.

Q. The name John Maynard ? - No.

Q. Can you undertake to say whose writing it is? - It looks like the writing of Joseph Phillips , the prisoner's brother.

Q. Whose writing is that. Clerk to Mr. Phillips. That is the prisoner's writing.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner's hand writing? - Very well acquainted with it.

Q. Have you any doubt about these words being his hand writing? - No, no doubt in the least.

Q. Do you happen to know Carpue's hand writing? - No, I do not.

Q. Do you know any thing about the execution of that letter of attorney? - I never saw it executed.

THOMAS BALLAD sworn.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe you are an executor to Mr. Gosden deceased? - Yes, I am.

Mr. Ralne. Do you happen to know Mr. Carpue's hand writing? - No, I do not.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-6

234. THOMAS PHILLIPS was again indicted in six COUNTS for a similar forgery and uttering, with intention to defraud Richard Brewer , Joseph Constantine Carpue , and John Gosden in his life time .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-7

235. JOHN PEALING was indicted for stealing, the 22d of February , 10s. 6d. in monies numbered , the monies of James Drabwell .

JAMES DRABWELL sworn.

I keep a public house , the Red Lion, in Charles-street, Long-acre . This here James Gilbert , who is here, wanted change for half a guinea, he gave me the half guinea, the house was very full, I brought him the silver, and put it on the table, and I said, here, who wants change for a guinea? I turned my back, and in turning my back I see the prisoner take the change up, and saw him put it in his pocket; I immediately says to him, what do you want with that half guinea? I cannot find silver for every body, give me the half guinea; he makes answer and says, I did give you the half guinea; I says, you cannot say positively that you gave me the half guinea, you must be joking. The other man, Gilbert,

says, I gave you the half guinea, I says, I am satisfied you gave me the half guinea, and therefore I shall give you the silver; I then gave Gilbert the half guinea worth of silver; and I then says to Peeling do you mean to give me the half guinea? you be satisfied that you did not give it me. I had but one half guinea in my pocket, I pulls out my money and lays it on the table, and there was but one half guinea, then I says no more about it; I told him I should see about it on a future day. I let it pass till the Monday following; he had been in the house in the course of the time before. On Monday night I saw him not in my house, but in another house, and I took him up I took a constable with me; well, says I, Mr. Peeling, am I to have this half guinea? says he, what half guinea? I don't know you; you don't know me, says I that is very odd indeed; and I said to the constable, that is the man, and I wentout immediately, and I went home.

Prisoner. You know that I gave you the half guinea. I put it into your left hand, there were two people saw me give it you.

Court to the Prosecutor. What is the prisoner? - A sawyer .

Prisoner. I am very innocent of the matter charged against me. I gave him the half guinea into his left hand.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-8

236. THOMAS STUNNELL otherwise STONEL was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Edward Lawson , on the King's highway, and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a pair of leather saddle bags, value 6s. two linen shirts, value 8s a cloth coat, value 3s. a kerseymere waistcoat, value 1s. two pair of cotton stockings value 8d. a pair of worsted stockings, value 4d. a leather pocket book, value 9d. and five guineas, the goods and monies of the said Edward Lawson .

EDWARD LAWSON sworn.

I was robbed last January. I live at No. 5, Little George-street, Westminster. I came from Wales. I was at last coming from Salt Hill. it was about half after nine in the evening, it was nine o'clock when I was at Salt Hill. I had another gentleman with me, he is not here, I believe he is abroad; we were in a post chaise I was coming between Brentford Bridge and the Magpye near Longfoot-lane . The chaise was stopped by five footpads together, two of them opened the doors, one of each side, and thrust their pistols in; they struck the other gentleman and they struck me against my side, and they afterwards searched my pockets and took five guineas out of my right hand breeches pocket. I lost a pair of saddle bags, it was underneath the seat of the chaise; they came in strait up and pulled them out, there was a grey frock coat in them, a kerseymere waistcoat, a pair of jean breeches, three pair of stockings, and two and three shirts,

Q. How long might they stay with you? - I suppose on the whole about three minutes, or not quite so long.

Q. Were they disguised? was any thing over their faces? - No.

Q. What sort of a night was it? - It was a moon light night, with a light haze.

Q. Could you distinguish any of their countenances? - No, I could not, not to be able to swear to them.

Q. Did you ever recover any part of your property? - I was sent for to Bow-street about three weeks afterwards, and saw several things, part of my property.

Mr. Wentworth You say there were a number together who attacked your post chaise? - Five together.

MARY FOSBROOKE sworn.

Mr. Edward Lawson is a lodger of mine, and has been so for this three years, I have had the care of his linen and I can swear to a pair of stockings, I know nothing of the robbery.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

On Sunday the 9th of April I went there. On the Saturday, previous to that, I had received an information, where I should light of ten gentlemen, at a place called the Hope, White Lion-street, Islington. I went on Sunday evening and apprehended the prisoner and six more together. There were eight of us in all. Mr. Mac Manus Townsend and others, and that gentleman at the bar was rather saucy, and Mr. Mac Manus was obliged to cut him in the chin a little. We took and put them in New Prison, and the prisoner he would not tell where he lodged, and so I watched to see who came after him, and there was an old man who came to him who was his father, and I took him into custody, and he told me his son lived in New Court, Fetter-lane; I went there and searched the place and found a pair of stockings, which I now produce to your lordship, and a vast quantity of other linen, I searched the room, could find no pistols, but on the mantle piece I found a pistol key.

Mrs. Fosbrooke. I know these stockings to be Mr. Lawson's, I know them from my own work in mending them, there were marks on them, but they have been picked out.

WILLIAM BACCHUS sworn.

I know no more than that the prisoner lodged at my house about four or five months from this time.

Court to Lawson. Were these stockings in your saddle bags? - They certainly were, I can swear to them for certain.

Mr Wentworth. When you went to the office had the saddle bags any thing else in them than the stockings? - Nothing else.

Q. It is possible that these stockings might have been mislaid? - It is not a very possible case when I had them in my journey.

Mr. Wentworth to Jealous. You went to Stannell's house, where did you find the saddle bags? - I found no saddle bags at all, there were none found.

Prisoner. I bought them stockings last May in Birmingham, and nobody mended them but my mother, for when I brought them out of the country there was no mending on them at all.

The prisoner called four witnesses to his character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-9

337. WALTER SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , a yard of woollen cloth, value 7s. the goods of James Duberley privately in his warehouse .

(The case opened by-)

GEORGE PARIS sworn.

I live with Mr. Duberley, he is an army clothier , he lives in Soho square, his warehouse is in Dean street , I am his clerk, I know the prisoner Walter Smith , he was employed as a cutter in the warehouse; on the fourth day of March, just before six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the bar, Walter Smith,

coming out of the cutting room and through the counting house, and I followed him down stairs, and I put my hand down to his left hand pocket, and I said, Smith, what have you got here? he made no other reply than I will take it out; I said, don't trouble yourself I will take it out myself, with that I put my hand into his left hand pocket and took out this piece of cloth which I have now got in my pocket, at the time I took it out I marked it with the initials of G.P.

Q. Do you know to whom it belongs? - To Mr. Duberley.

Q. Do you know it by any marks? - No, I have no other reason than finding it in his possession, and his coming out of the cutting room.

Q. Did he say any thing? - He said he never took any before.

Q. Had you made him any promise or threats? - No, none of any kind, it was all voluntary.

Q. Are you sure that he said that he had never taken any before, or that he had never taken any? - He said something of that sort.

Mr. Wentworth. Has there not been some difference between you and the prisoner? - Never, it is all a malicious report.

Q. What sort of a report? - I suppose it must be a report by your speaking of it; I never heard of it before.

Q. Where did you miss that cloth from? - I suppose it was missing from the board he cuts out on.

Q. He did not hesitate to take it out when you told him? - He did not.

Q. How do you pretend to say that that is Mr. Duberley's? - He did not go from the board where he was cutting out on without my keeping my eye on him.

Q. What time of the day was this? - About five or six o'clock.

Q. Will you, on your oath, say that it was not between three and four o'clock? - Yes, I will, it was a little before six.

Q. What is the value of it? - It is valued at seven shillings, but it is intrinsically worth more.

Q. Where did you suppose he was going? - Out at the street door, he was going the broad way for it.

Q. However he made no hesitation to shew you what he had got? - He did not.

Q. Do you ever recollect refusing to let the prisoner have his beer? - I recollect that they used to have beer coming in at all times of the day, and it impeded the business very much continually, and I spoke to Mr. Duberley about it, and he said that they should have it brought in at stated hours of the day, but as to this prisoner at the bar, I never spoke particularly to him.

Court. Did you miss any cloth at all from the warehouse? - It is impossible to miss a piece of cloth like this in our warehouse, there is such a quantity there.

GEORGE DUBERLEY sworn.

I am an Army Clothier, the prisoner was employed by me as a cutter. Among the thousand yards of cloth we have it is almost impossible to identify any, but this particular piece of cloth I can. In consequence of the scarcity of cloth, I had this cloth dyed in town; and it is seldom that I look at a piece of cloth or see it, but this piece coming from the Dyer's not so good in point of colour as we had used to have it, it made me examine the cloth very minutely, this was about two or three days before it was taken, I observed the fag end of the piece particularly torn in this manner, and another circumstance in the dye of the cloth itself, on a minute inspection, it will be found full of little

black dots, which is almost imperceptible unless closely looked into, which induced me to dye no more in town.

Jury Is it customary for to give a piece of cloth to cut so many garments? - No

Q. How are they employed as cutters? - They cut all by patterns which they have of a person who superintends that branch of the business, and the prisoner was the only man that was cutting this species of cloth, at that time as this was found upon him.

Mr. Wentworth. I believe usually you do not give the cutters a whole piece of cloth to cut from? - I deliver nothing myself, there is hardly any thing delivered but a whole piece, except by accident.

Q. Then it is possible that this man might have part of a piece given him to cut out from? - On the contrary, because I can swear to its being a whole piece.

Q. Will you undertake to swear that that piece of cloth was delivered to the cutter? - It was, because I see him cutting the cloth, going in by accident at the time, and seeing the cloth, not liking it at all.

Q. There are other Army Clothiers in town, and there may be the same cloth? Is it not possible to find cloth of the same kind and dye in other parts of the town? - Yes, it is possible, but not with these marks upon it.

Q. He worked with you for four years during the American War, I believe? - He worked some time, I cannot say how long.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Three witnesses were called, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 52.)

Of stealing but not privately in the warehouse .

Imprisoned eighteen months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-10

238. JANE WARNER was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , a silver watch, value 1l. 10s. two stone seals, set in silver, value 3s. and a steel watch key, value 2d. the goods of George Turner .

GEORGE TURNER sworn.

I lost a silver watch last Wednesday, at the Sugar Loaf, in King-street, Drury-lane , it was about half after five in the afternoon.

Q. How came you to be in that house? - I was out a walking with my uncle, and one or two more, and we came by that street, and Jane Warner was standing on a step of a passage in Parker's-buildings I came along close by the side of her and she asked me if I would give her some gin? I said I did not mind giving her a glass of gin, she said come along then, and I went along with her to the Sugar loaf, where we drank a glass of gin a piece.

Q. How long did you stay there? - I did not stay with her five minutes that time. We made an agreement to go out of the public house and to go to her apartment, and we stopped there about five minutes; I was to give her a shillings, I had no shilling about me, only half a guinea, and I said, she might hold my watch while I went down to change the half guinea; I gave her the watch and went to the public house and got change at the bar with the landlord, when I came back I gave her the one shilling that I owed her, and she gave me the watch again. I put my watch into my pocket and went into the public house again and sat down with my company that I at first went into the house with, and she came and sat down at the end of the same box, and we had something to drink more, some beer and some gin; we stayed there till between six and seven o'clock in the evening; my uncle then asked me what o'clock it was? and I pulled my watch out

of my pocket and told him, and put the watch on the table that he might see, she sat the outside of the box, and took the watch up, and went out to the door with it, I got up in less than a quarter of a minute after, and went out to see for her, and there being two doors to the tap-room, I chanced to go to the wrong door, and I did not see her afterwards, nor have not seen the watch since.

JOHN BIBBIN sworn.

I am the uncle of the last witness, I see the watch put on the table, what became of it I do not know, I did not see any body take it up.

Q. Was you at the table? - Yes, I was at the table at the same time.

THOMAS JENNINGS sworn.

I was present at the Sugar Loaf, in the same box, I saw the watch in this woman's hand, it was between five and six o'clock.

Q. Was it immediately before she went out of the room? - It was.

Q. Did you see her go out of the room? - I did not, while I turned round she went away, she was gone in an instant round the corner.

Prisoner. Wednesday evening I was standing at the Sugar Loaf door, and this man came up and asked me if I would have any thing to drink? and it being a public house we all went in together; afterwards he asked me if I had got a room of my own? I said yes; says he, if you will go up stairs I will give you a shilling, and I being a poor woman, a shilling was very acceptable to me; and having a child to keep; and I said to him, I will go up with you, and then before any thing passed, I asked him for the shilling, and he said he had not a shilling, only a half guinea, and he gave me the watch to hold while he got change for the half guinea, so afterwards he went and got change for the half guinea, and I gave him the watch out of my pocket. Now, says he, come in along with me and I will treat you, and I went in and sat along with him and his companions, and we had about six half pints of gin, and six pots of half and half, after that, being disguised in liquor, I went and laid myself down by the side of my child, and Mr. Ash, belonging to the public house, came and took me up.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-11

239. MARY VALLENCE was indicted for stealing on the 24th of April , ten yards of printed callico, value 10s. the the goods of James Good .

ROBERT TAYLOR sworn.

I live with Mr. Good, he is a linen draper , in Newport-street, Leicester-square .

Q. Do you know of his having lost any printed callico? - Yes. On the 24th of April he lost somewhere about ten yards, I cannot say exactly, I was serving in the shop, and a neighbour came and told me that a person had took a piece of callico away from the door; I asked him the description of the person; he described her as a person with a red cloak; I pursued her and overtook her in about half a minute, it was the prisoner, and she had a piece of printed callico under her cloak.

Q. Had you seen her in the shop? - She was not in the shop, the callico hung at the door.

Q. Can you take on yourself to say that that callico had been hanging at the

door just before? - I had seen it just before.

- HAMILTON sworn.

I took the prisoner into custody from the prosecutor, and the linen at the same time.

Taylor. The linen has our private mark upon it.

Prisoner. I had just come home from selling brockery and asparagus ; I had got a young child that was very bad with the small pox, and I went down into the market to buy a bit of meat, and I met a woman that asked me to hold this linen for a minute or two for a few halfpence? and I held it for the few halfpence, because I was very much in want of the money for the sake of my children, and while I was holding of it, one of these gentlemen came and took hold of me. It was a strange woman in the street that met me and gave it to me to hold.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-12

240. GEORGE RHODES and MARY RHODES was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , a silver watch, value 2l. 5s. a linen apron, value 1s. a linen handkerchief, value 1s. half a guinea, and 20s. in monies numbered , the goods and monies of Thomas Price .

THOMAS PRICE sworn.

I live in King-street, Spitalfields.

Q. When was it you last see this property? - The 13th of March, I was coming along George-street, Spitalfields , I was coming home, and I was surrounded by some girls and pushed into a house.

Q. How far from the street you live in? - About the third of a mile.

Q. Was you pushed by force or did you go voluntary? - By force, as near as I can recollect, for I was in liquor, it was about nine o'clock at night. I had been drinking down East Smithfield. I found myself robbed the time that I was being pushed.

Q. What became of you when you got into the house? - I came out again as soon as I was robbed.

Q. How long did you stay there? - I did not stay any longer than I could help, I was not sober.

Q. What part of the house did you miss your watch from? - I cannot recollect nothing but the entry; the girls that shoved me in I suppose robbed me, I did not go further than the entry; I struggled and would not go any farther in.

Q. Who you saw in that house you cannot tell? - No, I cannot recollect.

Q. Where was your apron, and your handkerchief, and your money? - In my pocket.

Q. When did you miss them? - I missed them all when I got out.

Q. What did you do? - I got home as fast as I could and got the second evidence to come up with me.

Q. Did you ever see your watch, handkerchief, and apron again? - No, never.

Q. What do you know against the two prisoners at the bar respecting this? - I don't know, but there was the master

of the house and I thought I might come to some knowledge of it.

THOMAS DUNN sworn.

The prisoner had been drinking so much that I don't believe he could tell any thing hardly of any person. I saw him come home very drunk, I went back with him to the spot where he said he was robbed, I could not find any particular person that he could fix upon.

JOHN CRAYDON sworn.

I went to Mr. Price's house when the prosecutor came home, I suppose it might be near ten o'clock, he was in a very stupified condition indeed; I went with him, and he did not know the house, nor the persons of any one, nor any thing of the property was never found.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-13

241. WILLIAM WALKER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering, the dwelling house of James Parker , no person being therein, about the hour of ten in the forenoon, on the 17th of April , a man's hat, value 5s. a cloth coat, value 10s. two cotton waistcoats, value 6d. a pair of velverett breeches, value 12s. a pair of leather shoes, value 6s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 2s. the goods of the said James Parker .

JAMES PARKER sworn.

I live in the parish of Harmsworth near Colnbrooke , my house was broke open by some men on the 17th of April; I have a mother and brother that lives with me, they were gone out; I went out about four o'clock in the morning at my labour, I returned about twelve o'clock in the day.

Q. Was your mother or brother, either of them in the house when you returned? - No, my mother was gone a little way to a neighbour's house. My house was riffled, there was a window broke, and three quarries of glass.

Q. Was the window open? - Yes, a little distance.

Q. What did you miss? - I missed a frock and two waistcoats, and a pair of breeches, a pair of stockings, and a pair of pumps or shoes.

Q. What was the value of all this property? - The value of two pounds.

Q. You have not over rated them? - No, I have not, I am sure they were of this value.

Q. Did you by any means acquire the knowledge who had done this fact? - I don't know the person.

Q. Have you recovered the property now? - Yes, I have it in my custody now.

ELIZABETH PARKER sworn.

I am mother to the last witness. I was at my son's house, the seventeenth day of this month.

Q. He has told us that he went out to follow his daily labour about four o'clock in the morning, you was then in the house? - I was; I left the house about ten o'clock, my son was gone out too, I left all my doors and windows shut when I went out, and the door locked.

Q. What time did you return? - About eleven, before my son James came home; when I came home I found the lower window as I left it, but in the upper window, three quarries were broke, and the window open.

Q. After you returned home at eleven, did you stay in the house, or what became of you? - I stood just out at the gate, till my son came home.

Q. Do you know by whom this violence was committed on the house? - No, I do not.

Q. How soon was it afterwards that the person that stands at the bar, was taken up? - The same day, I was not present when he was taken, but the alarm was made, and he came by the place where I was.

THOMAS HIBBERT sworn.

I live not a quarter of a mile from Parker's house; I was at Parker's house, and the barn door stood open, and somebody was in the barn; this was within a very little of eleven o'clock, rather before, as nigh as I can tell, I asked if there was any body in the barn.

Q. Was there any answer made? - No, but there was somebody appeared, and I desired he would come out, and go about his business, he did not come out when I desired he would; and I called for assistance, Samuel Harman being nigh at hand joined me, and we followed him out of the barn.

Q. Who did you follow out of the barn? - The man at the bar, whom I had seen come out of the barn, and went on to the Common, I was first after him, he ran very little, and we overtook him, I think in about two hundred yards, he throwed a pair of shoes out of his pocket into a ditch of water as he was going on, I took them up, and have them here, and while I was seizing the shoes out of the ditch, Mr. Harman went by me, and he took him himself, and I went to him and assisted him.

Q. Did you search him? - No.

Q. Did you find any thing else about him? - No, nothing but this frock and waistcoat; which was found on his back, I see him pull it off; they are here.

Q. Did you see any thing of the hat or breeches? - No.

Q. Did you know the man before? - Never knew him before.

Prosecutor. These are my shoes, waistcoat and coat, which was in the house when I went out.

Prisoner. There is a waistcoat there among them things, that I would be very much obliged to you to let me have it, it is my own.

STEPHEN RIMINGTON sworn.

Q. Did you make any search in the barn that day? - Yes, I was sent for to take him into custody, and he said he had left his own coat and waistcoat in the barn, he had only made a change, I searched in the barn, and I found a pair of stockings, a pair of velverett breeches, and a cotton waistcoat, this waistcoat, that he claims, and this hat.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of your Lordship and gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 28.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-14

242. JOHN SWINDEN was indicted for that he being a person employed in sorting letters in the General Post-office, sent by the post to the said General Post-office, on the 20th of August last, on the said day, a certain letter sent to and in the said General Post-office , then lately before, by one Peter Wedd of Cambridge, and directed to one Robert Wedd of Gerard-street, in the parish of St. Ann, in the liberty of Westminster; containing a bank note, No. 3461, dated London, the 6th of April 1793, signed and subscribed by one William Dunn , for the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, for the payment of fifteen pounds, came to his hands and possession, and that afterwards on the same day, at the parish of St. Mary Woolnoth. being so employed as aforesaid, then and there having the letter, containing the bank

note in his possession, he feloniously did secret the said letter, then and there containing the said bank note, being the property of Robert Wedd .

Indicted in three other COUNTS charging him with the same offence, only varying in the manner of charging it.

(The indictment opened by Mr. - and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

PETER WEDD sworn.

I am a merchant, I live at Cambridge. On the 19th of August, 1793, I inclosed a fifteen pounds bank note in a letter, No. 3461.

Q. Did you take any memorandum of the number of the note, at the time that you enclosed it? - Yes.

Q. To whom did you direct the letter? - To Robert Wedd , No. 5, Gerard-street, Soho; when I had sealed the letter, I put it into the post office myself, the memorandum of the number of the note, was taken by one Stephen Giber .

Mr. Knowlys. Therefore you rely on his taking the number only.

STEPHEN GIBER sworn.

Q. Did you live with the last witness, Mr. Wedd, in August last? - I did.

Q. Did you receive of him a bank note, in order to take down the particulars of it? - Yes.

Q. Did you take it down in his presence? - I did.

Q. When you had taken it down did you give back the note to him? - Yes, I did, and he inclosed it in a letter.

Q. In what book or paper did you enter the description of this note? - In this book.

Q. What book is that? - This is a book where we enter all notes, our bill book.

Q. What entry did you make there? - I copied it from the bank note.

Q. What is the number? - 3461, the gentleman's name I received it of, is John Oakly , fifteen pounds payable to Abraham Newland , William Dunn by whom drawn, April 6, 1793, entered William Garratt .

Q. Look at the note, do you believe that to be the note? - Yes.

Q. Is that the same that was sent to Robert Wedd ? - It was, that is the note that I returned to Mr. Peter Wedd , the last witness, after I had made the entry of it.

(The note read by the clerk of the Court.)

WILLIAM ROLFE sworn.

I am clerk to the Post office at Cambridge, and was so on the 19th of August last.

Q. When were the letters of that day which were addressed for London, forwarded to London? - On the evening of the 19th.

Q. Was the bag sealed at Cambridge before it was delivered to the mail coach? - It was never sent unsealed to my knowledge the bag was sealed and delivered to the guard in the yard.

Q. According to the course of the post, when would that mail arrive in London? - Early the next morning of the 20th.

JOHN SPRINE sworn.

I am clerk in the General Post-office in London.

Q. Was the Cambridge, bag the morning of the 20th of August, received safe in London? - It was.

Q. Sealed in the usual manner? - I will not swear it was sealed, but nothing struck me but what was in the usual manner, and the course is that they should arrive sealed.

ROBERT WEDD sworn.

I am an attorney in Gerard-street, Soho, and brother to Mr. Peter Wedd .

Q. Did you receive either the letter or the bank note? - Neither, it never came to my hand, I never saw the bank note till I saw it at the Bank, which I believe was on the 3d of September.

- FERGUSON sworn.

I am an inspector of the letter carriers.

Q. Was you so on the 20th of August last? - I was.

Q. At that time was the prisoner at the bar employed in the Post Office? - He was.

Q. What was his employment in the Post Office the 20th of August? - As a letter carrier, and he assisted in subsorting of the letters .

Q. What was his duty in that character? - The letters are sorted first by twelve sorters in twelve divisions.

Q. When they are sorted by the twelve sorters to whom are they delivered? - To the letter carriers, who subsort them into the different districts to deliver them.

Q. Was that part of the prisoner's duty on that day? - Yes.

Q. Did the letters directed for Gerard-street fall among those that he sorted? - It might or might not.

Q. Is his walk to carry letters in Gerard street? - No, it is not. There are one hundred and ten districts and twelve divisions; and there were ten districts in this division that he forted. The first sorters make them into twelve divisions, when the postage is tolled and the letters are delivered to the carriers, and they are subsorted by the letter carriers of that division, and they are subsorted by the letter carriers of that division, and they subsort them, and each one take to deliver to their own district; one of them divisions are delivered out to the letter carriers, who subsort the letters for their own districts; there were ten in this division.

Q. Was Gerard-street in that division in which that man was one of the ten to sort? - Yes.

Q. Then Gerard-street must be among them sorters? - Naturally speaking it must be, but it might be given to others, being put in wrong by the first sorters under a mistake.

Q. Is there any particular period in which the letter carriers make their payment at the Post-office? - Every other day.

Q. What are the days? - Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.

Q. In the week in which this 20th of August fell, was the prisoner at the bar regular in making his payments on the Monday, Wednesday, and Friday-(Produces a memorandum book.)

Mr. Knowlys. Are the entries in that memorandum book, made by yourself? - They are. On the 21st of August he was deficient eight pounds and four-pence on that day, Wednesday, by two o'clock.

Q. When did he in fact pay it? - Not till the day following, Thursday, it was paid into the revenue on the Friday following, but I think he paid it on Thursday.

Q. What is the consequence if a letter carrier does not make good his payments? - The post master's order is, that he be suspended till such times as it is paid.

Q. According to the rules of the Post Office when would he have been reported? - On Friday, if it had not been paid.

Mr. Raine. If I understand you right, there were nine others into whose hands these letters might have fell? - Yes, there were.

Q. There are a great many persons by at the time that this process takes place? - Yes, I believe one hundred and ten.

Q. Is there any strangers admitted? - Yes, sometimes they come in enquiring for letters, and when the gates are opened they will come in to enquire for letters, but not in general till the sorting is all over, except an old woman, that supplies the letter carriers.

Court. Are there any other sorters in the room besides these ten sorters of this division, when they are sorted by the letter carriers? - All the divisions are sorted in the same room, they are three rooms, but they are all connected together.

Q. So that all the sorters have access to all these rooms? - Yes.

Mr. Raine. If I understand your description right, there is a class of sorters, and a class of subsorters? - There is.

Q. At this time the prisoner at the bar was employed as a subsorter, and not as a sorter? - It was so.

Q. In these twelve divisions it sometimes happens that a mistake happens, a letter gets into a wrong division frequently? - It is impossible to avoid that.

Prosecutor's Counsel. When a mistake happens what is done with the letter? - There are boxes for each of the twelve divisions, they are thrown off to the division it belong to.

THOMAS SHILLCOCK sworn.

Mr. Garrow. You are sworn Mr. Shillcock? - Yes.

Q. What employment was you in, the 19th or 20th of August last? - I was waiter at the sign of the Southampton Arms, in the road that leads from Tottenham Court, to Hampstead.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner at the bar? - About seven or eight years.

Q. Do you recollect being examined at the office at Bow-street? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember any bank note being produced at the office at Bow-street, when you and the prisoner was there? - Yes, there was a bank note produced.

Q. Of whom had you received that bank note? - I received it of the prisoner at the bar,

Q. When did you receive it? - On Monday night.

Q. Did you state the time correctly at Bow-street? - I think I did.

Q. Can you tell us how long it was before you was examined at Bow street? - I might be about three weeks.

Q. Can you tell us what day of the month it was that you received it? - I cannot.

Q. What time of the day was it? - I am pretty sure it was in the evening.

Q. Where was it? - At the Southampton Arms.

Q. For what purpose? - There was a little money between Mr. Swinden and me, he owed me twenty-seven shillings, and I received the note, and I was to get it changed; it was a fifteen pounds.

Q. Did you return him the difference after taking what was due to you? - I did.

Q. Who did you deliver it to? - To a person of the name of Bailey, who lives in the Terrace, on Tottenham-court-road.

Q. Do you recollect whether the prisoner was with you twice on the day after that you had the note, or whether he came but once? - He came twice, the first time he came I had not got the change to give him; I think it was between one and two that he came and gave me the note; I delivered the note the same day to Mrs. Bailey.

Q. And which note you received from the prisoner? - I did so.

Q. How long had the debt of twenty-seven shillings been due to you? - A fortnight, or there away.

Mr. Knowlys. To the best of your recollection this was on Monday night? - I think it was on Monday.

Mr. Garrow. I did not understand you to speak with any certainty about the day? - No, I think it was Monday.

Q. Was it the same day you give it to Mrs. Bailey? - Yes, it was, I had business to go to Tottenham-court road, or else I should not have given it to her.

LYDIA BAILEY sworn.

Q. Where did you live in the month of August last? - No. 2, in the Terrace, Tottenham-court-road.

Q. Did you change a bank note for Shillcock at any time? - Yes, it was either on Tuesday or Wednesday, I think it was Tuesday.

Q. What month? - I cannot say.

Q. How long before you was examined at Bow-street? - I think about five or six weeks.

Q. What did you do with that note? - I took it to Mr. Underwood, and got it changed.

Q. How long after you received it from Shillcock, was it you changed it with Mr. Underwood? - Within two hours.

Q. What did you do with the change? - I carried it to Mr. Shillcock and gave it him.

Mr. Rains. You have a very imperfect recollection of the day in which this transaction took place? - It was either on a Tuesday, or a Wednesday.

Q. Or a Thursday perhaps? - No.

Q. Recollect yourself Mrs. Bailey, when it ought to have been more recent in your recollection, you was more doubtful concerning the day? - I think it was on a Tuesday, or a Wednesday.

Q. Recollect yourself, in short you cannot at all remember precisely the day of the week, so it might have been on Monday.

Prosecutor's Counsel. Was it the same day you changed it with Underwood? - It was.

SAMUEL UNDERWOOD sworn.

I keep a public house.

Q. Did you give cash at any time for a fifteen pounds bank note to the last witness, Mrs. Bailey? - It was on the 20th or 21st of August last, as well as I can recollect.

Q. How long did you keep it in your possession? - Till the 26th, I paid it then to Messrs. Hill and Rickards.

Q. Was it the same that you received from Mrs. Bailey that you paid to Mr. Rickards? - Yes, it is, I am positive.

Mr. Knowlys. You are not positive as to the day you received it? - I am not quite accurate.

Q. It might have been the 19th for what you know? - I know the day I paid it away, but I cannot say the day I received it.

Court. Do you happen to know the day of the week? - No, I do not.

Mr. Garrow. Do you happen to know how many days you had it in you possession? - About five.

GEORGE RICKARDS sworn.

Q. Did you receive that note of Mr. Underwood? - Yes, I received it on the 26th.

WILLIAM DUNN sworn.

I am one of the cashiers of the Bank of England.

Q. Was you so in August last? - I was.

Q. By whom is that bank note signed? - By me, for the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

Q. Was that note out standing on the 20th of August? - It was.

ROBERT WEDD sworn.

Q. I believe you was present at Bow-street when the prisoner was in custody on this charge, and when he was apprehended? - I was with Miller when he was taken.

Q. Did you hear him say at any time where he had received this note, or how he came by it.

Mr. Knowlys. Was it taken down in writing? - No, there was some memorandum making.

Mr. Garrow. At his own lodgings did he say any thing? - Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Before he said any thing of this sort, did any body tell him he had better give some account of it? - No.

Mr. Garrow. Was there any thing before that said to him, either to induce him to say it, or to threaten him to say it? - He was in bed when we went to the house, and Shillcock by the direction of Miller, desired him to come down; when he came down stairs, he was asked by Miller what he had done with the fifteen pounds bank note? he hesitated some little time, but however by interrogating him with some degree of spirit, he said it was all gone different ways, and said if we would let him alone, he would make it up in the morning; very little more passed then, he put his clothes on, and we took him away in a coach, and we brought him down to the Brown Bear, the next morning he was examined at Bow-street.

Mr. Knowlys. At Bow-street there was some memorandum made in a book? - I will not take on me to say positively there was.

Mr. Garrow. But as to the time you was going to speak of, was there any thing in writing taken down at that time? - I rather think there was not; it was what I did not much attend to.

EDWARD LAVENDER sworn.

I am one of the clerks to the public office at Bow-street.

Q. Did you examine the original minute book to see if there was any examination of the prisoner taken? - There was only three or four words, a sentence begun but not finished, no more than that it begins, "the prisoner saith that."

Q. The question was not what the clerk had writ on any subject, but on your search did you find any one syllable which imported to have been said by the prisoner? - No, I did not, nothing only,"the prisoner saith that."

Court to Wedd. What was done with the letter? - I put it in the Post Office myself at Cambridge.

Mr. Rolse. I keep the Post Office at Cambridge.

Q. Who assists you in it? - Nobody, but my wife occasionally.

Q. Have you a memory of any such letter as that coming into your office? - That is impossible; I generally keep it myself, sometimes my wife, but that Monday evening the 19th, I was at home and my wife had no part of the business at all.

Q. How lately in the evening had you sealed that bag that night? - At the time that the Wisbich Mail comes in, that commonly comes in a quarter after ten, sometimes sooner, and sometimes later, I delivers it to the guard. I put the letters into the bag before, I shut the box at nine o'clock; it is a bag sealed for London only.

Court to Peter Wedd. You say you put the letter in the Post, did you pay any thing with it? - No.

Q. What time did you put it in? - Between eight and nine.

Q. Where did you put it in? - Into the letter box.

Rolfe. I saw Mr. Wedd go to the box, and had some particular conversation with him afterwards.

Q. Therefore if Mr. Wedd put it in you are absolutely certain you forwarded it in proper time? - I am.

Prisoner. I am conscious of my innocence, I was out nine weeks on bail, and

twice surrendered myself, and my bail even persuaded me to be absent if I was guilty; I told my bail I was not guilty and I would take my trial like a man.

Mr. Garrow. It is certainly true that this man did twice surrender himself, after having been out twice upon bail to take his trial.

The prisoner called twenty-one witnesses who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY. Death . (Aged 36.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of his general good character, and his surrendering himself, and also by Mr. Wedd .

Reference Number: t17940430-15

243. WILLIAM STOUT otherwise SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of November , fifty pounds weight of raw sugar, value 1l. the goods of Samuel Mac Dowel and Thomas Twenlowe .

THOMAS HUNTER sworn.

I am a constable to the West India merchants; Captain Hamilton is gone to Sea, and it is impossible he can appear before next sessions.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM

Reference Number: t17940430-16

244. MARY THORPE was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a gold watch, value 6l. another watch, value 2l. four silver tea spoons, value 6s. a gold ring, value 5s. a mourning ring, value 5s. a tea caddy, value 6s. a silk cloak with black lace, value 3l. a muslin dimity gown, value 1l. a worked muslin gown, value 1l. two cotton gowns, value 10s. astuff petticoat, value 3s. a white marseilles petticoat, value 10s. two dimity petticoats, value 10s. a muslin petticoat, value 10s. three muslin aprons, value 2l. two linen aprons, value 4s. a dimity bed gown, value 5s. five linen shifts, value 10s. a cloth cloak, value 5s. a silk cloak, value 5s. six linen handkerchiefs, value 4s. a silk handkerchief, value 2s. six muslin handkerchiefs, value 1l. a muslin shawl, value 10s. half a muslin shawl, value 4s. two shawl handkerchiefs value 4s. six yards of muslin, value 1l. a linen table cloth, value 5s. a wax bead necklace, value 6d. two muslin frocks, value 10s. and two pair of womens linen gloves, value 1s. the goods of John Cook in his dwelling house .

JOHN COOK sworn.

I live at Twickenham , I am a brewer , the prisoner was my servant , she was with me only three days.

Q. Had you a character with her? - No, there we were deficient.

Q. When was it this happened? - On the 26th of March last we did not hear her so soon in the morning as usual, either I or my wife, and we waited some time and heard nothing of her, and after some short interval of about twenty minutes, her mistress went into her room hearing no answer to the bell, and found she was gone, and her box and a great deal of property missing. On Sunday week I went down to King's Langley, in Hertfordshire, in consequence of a letter having been seen in her box, dated from that piece. I found that she had been down there in a post chaise on the Saturday,

subsequent to the robbery, and I traced her back to Watford, she there took another post chaise and came to the Green Man at Islington; but I should tell your lordship first, that I saw the boy at Watford that drove her, and he told me that there was part of the property left at the Green Man at Islington, which I have got here and can swear to some part of it.

Q. Was the prisoner at the Green Man when you found the property? - No, she had been gone some days; the property was brought forward by the landlord and landlady of the house, the landlord's name, I believe, is James Thomas.

JANE COOKE sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. On the 26th of March I understand this woman quitted your service, did you then miss your property? - Yes.

Q. Was the property that you missed from any one particular place, or from different rooms in your house? - From different places.

EDWARD MILES sworn.

The prisoner took a place at our coach office for Kingston, from Kingston to London, she booked the place on the 26th of March in the evening, outside, she came up by the coach on the 27th of March, she came to the Angel, the back of St. Clement's.

Q. Had she the bundle with her then? - I did not see the large bundle, that she did not carry, but she had a small bundle then in a small silk handkerchief; and she went back with me to Stones End to know if the bundle was come by the other coach. She went with me on the box to the Stones End, to the Horse Shoe, where she found it was come to the Cross Keys, in Gracechurch-street; but I bought a watch of her in the day time. left her at the Horse Shoe.

Q. Where did you buy that watch? - Between the hours of one and two on the 27th.

Q. Where was it you bought it? - At the Crooked Billet, the corner of Wych-street, I went with her from the Angel Inn to there, it was only across the way.

Q. How did it happen, had you had any talk about that watch? - She had something of a twist about her finger, and I asked her about it, and she said she was at play the night before, and had broke her ring, and she pulled her housewife out of her pocket to shew me a ring, and she could not find it; but she found a mourning ring, which she said was her grandmother's; she then opened her bundle and took out a tea caddy, she then took out two watches, one was a plain gold one, and the other was a green studded case watch. I asked her if she would sell the plain gold watch? she said, I should have it if I chose; I asked her what I should give her for it? I told her I did not know the value of such a thing, but I would give her what she pleased for it; she said it was a very old watch, much battered and bruised, and it was her grandfather's; but if I had it cleaned it would go well, and I should have it for my own price. I said if she would I would give her three guineas for it; she said I should have it. and I bought it of her.

Q. Did you know it was gold then? - I did not. I took it to the Angel Inn, and shewed it to one of our clerks, and he said it was not worth more than fifteen shillings, but afterwards it was shewn to a watch maker, and he said the outside case was worth two guineas; we went then to Stones End, in the Borough.

JAMES THOMAS sworn.

The prisoner came to my house and was there the biggest part of the week; I

keep the Green Man, at Paddington. Mr. Cooke made a mistake in saying I slington. She came to me the latter end of March, the day I cannot say, it was on a Saturday, and she came away the Saturday following; she said she had been in search of her brother, and her money ran short, and she wished to leave a few things that she had got, and desired to have a guinea and a half on them, and she would send for the things in a day or two.

Q. Had she any bundles with her at that time? - Yes, I cannot say to more than one, and that I can hardly say, only I see the porter have it on his back when she went out of the house, she left a piece of muslin, a blue sattin cloak, with black lace, and a check apron she gave my servant, and a mourning ring.

Q. Was the muslin not made up, or was it in a gown? - Not made up.

WILLIAM WALE sworn.

I was sent for last Thursday, about seven o'clock in the afternoon, to take the prisoner up, I went to the Horse Shoe, at Stones End.

Q. Had she any thing with her at that time? - Yes, I took these things from her back, and two rings from her finger; here is a black silk cloak, a pair of leather gloves, and a half shawl, and some other things, a muslin half shawl, here are three in all found, and only one owned.

Mrs. Cooke. These are my things, my cloak, I made it myself, I know the muslin also

Mills. This is the watch I bought of the prisoner, I know it by the number,(811.)

Q. How long had you had it in your custod? - From Thursday to Saturday night about eight o'clock, when I went and left it at Union Hall, with the magistrate.

Wale. I bring it here.

Mrs. Cooke. This is my husband's watch? - I know it to be his.

Mr. Cooke. This is my watch, I know it very well, I had it about eight years, I prosecuted two guards about the same watch, robbing me on the highway. I broke the pendant the night before the robbery, in consequence I did not take it up stairs that night as I used to do, but I left it on the chimney-piece. It cost me nine guineas, I bought it as second hand; I suppose it is worth now six or seven guineas, the cloak cost about four pounds, the muslin cost three shillings and six-pence a yard, the rings are worth three pounds.

Prisoner. I have got nothing to say.

GUILTY. Death . (Aged 19.)

Recommended by the Jury .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-17

245. MICHAEL BALL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Ward , about the hour of three and four in the night, of the 8th of March , and burglariously stealing therein fifty pounds weight of iron, value 4s. 2d. the goods of the said William Ward .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM WARD sworn.

I live in Old Brentford, in the parish of Eling . On the 8th of March last my house was broke open; I believe I was last up, I cannot pretend to say rightly whether I was or was not, because we all went to bed together.

Q. How many is your house composed of? - Six.

Q. Are you a married man? - No.

Q. Who was in the house? - My apprentice and journeyman, and three of my sisters.

Q. What part of the house do you step in? - The garret.

Q. How many garrets had you? - Three.

Q. Where does your apprentice and journeyman sleep? - On the first floor backwards, and my sisters sleep on the first floor forwards.

Q. After you went up to bed, how soon was you alarmed? - Between three and four in the morning.

Q. Who alarmed you? - George Jenkins , my journeyman, he came up to my room, then I got up, and George Jenkins and I, and my apprentice, we went down to my shop, George Jenkins and I did, when we got to the shop we saw a light.

Q. How is the shop situated? - It is down at the bottom of the yard.

Q. Before you went out of the house, did you unlock all your doors? - Yes.

Q. Did you find them all fast? - Yes.

Q. When you came down to the shop, how did you find the shop? - Locked.

Q. How did you get into the shop? - I unlocked it, I had got the key.

Q. When you came into the shop what did you see? - When I was outside of the shop I saw a light in the shop, but on opening the door, I found the light put out, I did not see it put out, but I found it go out.

Q. What did you do when you got into the shop? - George Jenkins went forwards, and felt about for the man.

Q. You was then in the dark we understand? - Yes, George Jenkins went forwards, and found the man out, and called out to me not to let the man go out.

Q. What did you do on that? - I stood at the door till such times as he had found him, then he told me to come to him, and I went to him.

Q. When you went to him what did you observe then? - I saw nothing but a man, we brought him out of the shop, and we took him to the cage.

Q. Who did this man turn out to be? - Michael Ball , the prisoner at the bar

Q. Did you make any search in this house, in this workshop? - Yes, directly after I had taken him to the cage.

Q. When you went to this shop had you a light with you? - Yes.

Q. Was it dark when you and Jenkins went to the shop the first time? - Yes.

Q. Was it dark the second time? - Yes, and then we found half a dozen of tiles taken from one corner of the shop, at the roof.

Q. Was there any buildings adjoining to the shop? - Yes, a shed.

Q. Did you observe any other part that was broke about the shop? - No.

Q. Was this break large enough to admit a man to get in? - Yes.

Q. What else did you observe in the shop? - There was a bag containing about fifty pounds weight of iron lay under the place, directly where the tiles were taken off, and a string tied to the bag that contained the iron, all doubled up together.

Q. Then it was not tied to any part, of the building? - No.

Q. Do you happen to know, or had you made any observation whether the tiles had been off the night before you went to bed? - No, they were not off when I locked the shop.

Jury. What tiles was it covered with? - Pantiles.

Court. Where was the bag? - On a shelf, directly under where the tiles were taken from.

Q. Had you put a bag with the iron there the night before, or any time previous to this? - No.

Q. Had you put any iron on your shelf at any time before this? - Sometimes.

Q. Had you to the extent of fifty pounds weight? - No, never.

Q. Did you look at this iron that you put in this bag? - Yes.

Q. Was that iron your property? - Yes.

Q. Have you got it here? - Yes.

Q. What did you do with that iron? - I took it down from the shelf, and took it before the justice.

Q. Now who took that bag with the iron, before the justice? - The constable.

Q. Did you send for a constable? - Not then.

Q. Did you deliver it to a constable? - Yes, as soon as it was day-light.

Q. Did you deliver it yourself? - Yes.

Q. Was that the same bag that you found in the shop, and was on the shelf? - Yes.

Q. Did you see that iron before the justice? - Yes.

Q. Was that the same iron that you had seen in your shop? - Yes.

Q. That iron you say was your property? - Yes.

Q. What is the value of that iron? - Four shillings and two-pence.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner at the bar after you had brought him out of the shop, at any light? - Directly afterwards, we took him to the cage, we got a light from the watchman.

Q. Are you sure that is the same man that you saw in the shop, that you took to the cage? - Yes, we never let him go.

Q. I understand from you, you had put no part of that iron in the shop? - It was in the shop the same night.

Q. When had you ever seen the iron before? - I cannot pretend to say.

Q. How lately had you seen any iron there? - There is always iron there.

Q. What sort of iron is it? - Old iron.

Q. What part of the shop did the iron use to lay in? - Some all over the shop, in different parts of it.

Q. Where had you any iron laying that night that you know of? - There was some iron where this bag was, in a loft.

Q. Is there a loft in the shop? - Yes, where the iron is.

Q. Did you lock up the shop yourself? - Yes.

Q. What time of the night did you lock up the shop? - My apprentice locked it, but I was present when the shop was locked.

Q. What time of the night was it? - Six o'clock; he locked it and gave me the key.

Q. Might not that bag be in the place before the shop was locked up? - The smith can say (James Knott.)

JOHN PAGE sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Ward. On the 8th of March I locked up the shop.

Q. Who was with you? - My master.

Q. What time of the day did you lock it up? - Six o'clock in the evening.

Q. Your master is a wheelwright, is not he? - Yes.

Q. He has a good deal of iron about his shop has not he? - He has.

Q. Is there a loft in his shop? - Yes.

Q. Was there any iron in that loft? - Yes, laying loose.

Q. How lately had you been in that loft before you locked the shop up? - I had not been in the loft, the smith had been in the loft.

Q. Then you did not observe the tiles before you went out of the shop at all? - I shut up all the windows but I did not observe the tiles at all.

Q. You was alarmed with your master and Jenkins? - By Jenkins.

Q. Did you go to the warehouse on this alarm? - No, I was sent to the back part of the shop.

Q. Did you see these tiles afterwards? - Yes.

Q. Where were the tiles taken from? - From one side of the corner of the roof, and laid on the roof.

Q. Then no tiles had tumbled down? - No, they were laid on one side of the hole.

Jury. Where there any laths broke? - No, I cannot say that there were.

Q. Do you know what distance the laths were from each other? - Eighteen inches.

Q. Was there room enough for a man's body to go through? - Yes, there was.

Q. Had you the curiosity to see whether any part of the house had been broke open? - No, no part.

Q. Windows nor doors? - No.

Q. Do you know this iron? - No.

GEORGE JENKINS sworn.

I am journeyman to Mr. Ward, I was alarmed between three and four o'clock in the morning, I heard he dog bark, it was quite dark, I got out of bed and got up to the window and see a light through the tiles of the shop, I immediately got up and alarmed my master and John Page the apprentice.

Q. Where did you and your master go? - We went down into the shop.

Q. How far is the shop from the house? - About sixteen or eighteen yards, more or less.

Q. Is it surrounded by any fence or wall? - All round by a tence, the fence goes compleatly round all.

Q. When you and your master came down to the shop, did you find the door secured, was it fastened? - Yes.

Q. Your master had the key had not he? - Yes; when we came down to the shop I looked through the crack of the door and I could see a man, I could not distinguish who it was.

Q. Was you able to discern what this man was about? - I could see him with a bit of iron in his hand and I could hear the iron rattle; he had a light, his back was towards me stooping down; we went to unlock the door, and as soon as the door moved the light was put out, when I got into the door, I bid my master stand at the door, and I rushed in towards where I saw the light, and I laid hold of the man in the dark, and pulled him down on his back, and called for my matter to come.

Q. Where was he when you did this? - In the shop; I had seen him with a light.

Q. What did you do with the man? - We took him to the watch-house, to the cage.

Q. Who was that man? - The prisoner at the bar, I had known him for years before this. After I had got him in the cage went back to the watchman, got a light, and see who it was, and went afterwards with the light to the shed and we looked to see how the prisoner had got in, and we see half a dozen pantiles were off, over the lost where some old iron lay.

Q. How many pantiles do you think were taken off? - Six.

Q. By means of the pantiles being off could any man come in through the laths? - Yes, there was room for them.

Q. What became of the tiles? - The tiles were laid on other tiles on the roof of the shop.

Q. None had dropped to break? - No.

Q. What did you observe in the building? - A bag of iron was under the hole where the tiles were taken off on a shelf, where we lay old iron.

Q. Was it old iron that was in the bag? - Yes, old iron that was collected from different parts of the shop.

Jury. How do you suppose the man got in? - I cannot tell, there were buildings adjoining, there was a double roof and a gutter between the buildings.

Q. How lately had you been in this lost? - In the afternoon to look out for a bit of iron for the blacksmith.

Q. Do you use in general to keep your iron in bags? - No, loose in different parts of the shop.

Q. Had you the day before seen any iron of your's on the shelf? - No, we had no such kind of bag, it was not our bag, we had no such bag belonging to us; there was a large string at the mouth of the bag about ten yards, one end tied about the middle of the bag.

Q. How high was the roof from the ground? - The top of the roof was about sixteen or eighteen feet from the ground up.

Q. How many feet do you think the floor of the lost is to the roof? - About five feet.

Q. How many from the shelf to the floor of the lost? - About two feet. I looked into the bag directly, and saw the iron.

Q. How much did the bag contain? - About fifty pounds weight, it was a little bag and nearly full.

Q. Now, looking at that iron was you able to say whose iron it was? - Some of it; I could say to one piece I had in my hand in the day time before this happened that I could swear to.

Q. Where had you seen that piece in the day time before? - One of the men brought it in out of the yard and put it in the lost, I tossed it up.

Q. Was that the only piece of iron that you could speak to? - I did not take particular notice of any other piece.

Q. Where did you take this piece of iron out of the bag in order to look at it? - In the shop, and afterwards I put it into the bag along with the rest and tied the bag up.

Q. Did you see it again before the justice? - Yes, and I am certain it is the same piece.

JASPER POLYCUT sworn.

I am a constable to the parish of Eling. I was sent for on Sunday morning, the 9th of March, by Mr. Ward, I went to his house, and the bag was delivered to me by Mr. Ward, that is now present in court, and I took it before the justice, and the bag was delivered to me again there, and I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q. Did you take the prisoner before the justice? - Yes, and he was committed.

Jenkins. I know this piece of iron it is a locking plate to a waggon, it is Mr. William Ward 's property.

Q. Is that the same piece that you had delivered to you by a person in the yard, and that you put into the lost? - it is the very same.

Q. Is that the very same piece of iron that you found in the bag and took to the justice? - It is.

Q. Do you go up a ladder to the lost, or how is it? - We go up some steps.

Court. What is there about that iron that you can swear to it by? - I took particular notice of it, for when the man

gave it me, he said it would serve Michy if he came there that night, meaning the prisoner.

JAMES KNOTT sworn.

I am a smith, I work for Mr. Ward.

Q. Do you know that iron? - I know it well, I had several pieces of them in my hand that same day; here is a piece been in the shop these three years, it is belonging to the shaft of a cart, we commonly call it a capping iron, here is another piece of the same sort, with a narrow end to it, they have been both in the shop these three years.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - Yes, knew him very well.

Court to Ward. Of whom do you rent your house? - Of Mr. Julion. My father and mother are both dead, and my grandmother she conducts the business for me.

Q. How is it your iron, you don't carry on the business? - It is mine, only she answers her name for me.

Q. Then it is your grandmother's house? - No, I pay the rent, and pay every thing.

Q. Then your grandmother has all the business? - No, Mr. Jenkins can explain it.

Jenkins The grandmother lets him have money to go on with the business.

Q. Where does she live? - At Hounslow.

Q. Did you live with the father? - No, I did not.

Q. How long has the father been dead? - Eight years, come August, his grandfather hired me to carry on the business for him, he was living at that time.

Q. With whom have you accounted for in this business? - To the grandfather while living, and then to the grandmother.

Q. What age is he now? - In his wentith year.

Q. You live in the house? - Yes, and have ever since I have been there with him.

Q. In what name is the trade carried on? - In Ward's name, the grandfather's name is Judd.

Q. Why is this trade for his benefit, there are three sisters as well as he? - They all have the benefit alike.

Q. How are the bills made out? - In William Ward 's name, the grandmother takes the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-18

246. MARGARET DONNIVAN was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , a guinea, half a guinea, and four shillings and six-pence in monies numbered, and twelve halfpence, the monies of James Naylor , privately from his person .

JAMES NAYLOR sworn.

I am an upholsterer ; a journeyman; I live at No. 54, South Moulton-street.

Q. Did you lose your money at any time? - Yes, Saturday night, at ten o'clock in the evening, it happened at the corner of Bond-street; I was going past there about a little business, this person called to me, and asked me a few questions, asked me to treat her with a glass of liquor, which I complied with, and went along with her, and treated her, I took her to the next house, the corner of Bond-street .

Q. Do you know the name of it? - I do not; we had each of us a glass of liquor a piece, and in that mean time she picked my pocket of about six pennyworth of halfpence.

Q. What room did you go to? - No room, only stood in the lobby.

Q. What liquor did you treat her with? - Gin.

Q. How many glasses did you drink with her? - One.

Q. How long was you in the lobby with her? - About five minutes.

Q. What time did you miss your money? - I missed what I had in my waistcoat pocket at the time I stood in the lobby.

Q. What did you keep your money in your waistcoat pocket? - I kept about six penny worth of halfpence, and sixpence in silver. I returned with her to the corner of Bond-street.

Q. When you missed your money did you lay any thing about it? - I did not, I supposed I had put it in another pocket, and I said nothing about it. I went out with her to the corner of Bond-street, and there she picked my pocket of about six and thirty shillings. I was in no other persons company but her's.

Q. When did you first miss your other money? - I went down about the small business which I had to do, which was to buy a lock. I left her at the corner of Bond street.

Q. Did you give her any money before you left her? - No.

Q. Did you take no liberty with her? - No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - Yes.

Q. How long might you be with her? - About ten minutes.

Q. Then all this time you never told her that you missed any thing? - I did not know it myself. As I was going to buy this lock I felt for my money, and found I had loss it; I missed my money in Oxford-street.

Q. What sort of money did you miss? - I had a guinea, half a guinea, and about six pennyworth of halfpence, and the rest in silver.

Q. What else did you miss besides what you missed from your waistcoat pocket. I missed a guinea and half a guinea and some silver.

Q. What was the silver? - It was six and thirty shillings, I had about me I know.

Q. Can you say exactly what silver? - I cannot say, but I had a guinea and half a guinea.

Q. Where did you keep this guinea and a half guinea and silver? - In my fob.

Q. Had you your watch? - No, I had no watch about me at that time.

Q. When had you last seen this money that you talk of? - I had some of it and the remainder I received about seven o'clock last Saturday evening, between seven and eight o'clock; I put it into my fob, I had a guinea in my fob before, and I put eighteen shillings more in, there was half a guinea in gold, and the remainder in silver.

Q. What sort of breeches do you wear? - Thickset.

Q. You felt her take this money then did not you? - No.

Q. Was your breeches loosened ever? No.

Q. Will you swear that? - I will.

Jury. Had you no fall? - None at all till I secured her.

Q. You say your breeches were not loosened at all, how was it possible for that woman to get the money at the bottom of your fob without your feeling it? - She had done it, for it was turned inside out.

Q. Have you never found any of your money? - Yes, the constable that examined her found part of it.

Q. Can you swear to that part that is found? - I do not swear to any thing only one halfpenny.

Q. Was you drunk or sober? - I was sober.

Q. Are you sober now? - Yes, I am.

Q. Have not you been drinking any liquor? - No, far from it.

Q. How soon did you see her again? - In about twenty five minutes after.

Q. Did you challenge her with it? - Yes, and she said, that she had never seen, nor knowed any thing of me.

Q. Had you ever seen that woman before? - Never before.

Q. Are you certain it was the same woman? - I am confident it was the same woman.

WILLIAM POWEL sworn.

I am a constable. Mr. Naylor came to me when he brought the prisoner, Saturday last, about eleven o'clock. I was constable of the night then.

Q. Where is your watch-house? - In Mount-street, he charged her with stealing about six and thirty shillings in gold and silver and halfpence.

Q. Was she examined? - Yes.

Q. Did she say any thing about it? - She denied it entirely, having any thing of his money at all.

Q. Did the say any thing about him? - Yes, she did not know any thing of him; she was searched and there was found three shillings and six pence, and fourteen pence farthing, besides a halfpenny that Mr. Naylor swore to.

Q. Did he say how long he had had that halfpenny in the presence of the prisoner? - He said he could swear to that halfpenny, as soon as ever it was thrown out.

Q. Did he describe it before it was produced? - No, we were counting it over he seed the halfpenny himself.

Q. What time was she brought to you? - About eleven o'clock.

Naylor. I had this halfpenny about three days, it was in my waistcoat pocket, I can swear to that.

Prisoner. I was coming along about twelve o'clock last Saturday night, I go out to scower pots, I was going home, this man came up and asked me to have a glass of something to drink? I told him I did not want to have any thing to drink; he said he would treat me, and he changed a shilling, and gave me three pennyworth of halfpence, and I wished him a good night; about two o'clock in the morning afterwards, he came up to me and knocked me down, I had a young child along with me, and I had only three shillings that I worked hard for, and two shillings I had before. He sent word to me to day if I would send him nine and twenty shillings, he would make it up.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever offer to make it up with her? - I never did, no farther than this, I said I should he very sorry if any woman should suffer for my sake, I said it to a friend of her's.

Jury. Did not you tell the friend of her's that you would make it up for a certain sum? - I never did, I said it must be left to the option of the gentlemen.

Q. Did you take any change in the house? - Yes.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner since last Saturday night? - Yes, I saw her about three hours ago, in Newgate.

Court. How came you to make this a capital charge against her? - I left it entirely to the gentlemen who drew the indictment, I gave no directions at all.

Jury. Did you give her three pennyworth of halfpence? - No, I did not, nor yet any money whatever.

The prisoner called two witnesses to her character.

GUILTY, Of stealing one halfpenny only .

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-19

247. ESTHER HACKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , a pair of callico breeches, value 5s. a callico waistcoat, value 5s. ten callico shirts, value 2l. 5s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 8s. a muslin gown, with lace robbins, value 7s. a linen jacket, value 1s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. a callico petticoat, value 1s. a linen jacket, value 6d. a pair of cotton drawers, value 6d. three pair of cotton stockings, value 3s. four linen caps, value 3s. six linen caps, value 3s. a cotton jacket, value 3s. a cotton handage, value 3d. a twild callico napkin, value 1s. a cotton petticoat, value 9d. six other muslin handkerchiefs, value 6s. a muslin caul and head piece to a cap, value 1s. two muslin sleeves of a gown, value 6d. a pair of silk stockings, value 1s. a mounted fan, value 1s. 6d, half a yard of printed linen cloth, value 4s. a small piece of sheeting, value 6d. a yard of corded dimity, value 1s. 6d. five pillow cases, value 5s. and one pebble box, value 2s. the goods of William Prescott , Esq . in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM PRESCOTT sworn.

I live at No. 5, Hind-street, Manchester-square , I reside there, I was in that house when I discovered I had been robbed, the articles were kept in that house, the prisoner was a servant ; on Wednesday the 16th of April, I turned the prisoner away from my service, I ordered my butler to collect her things together and put them in the entry, and put them in a hackney coach. I had not been in the habit of visiting many of my servants

trunks when they left my service, but perceiving if I did so in this instance, it might lead to the unfolding something very unfortunate that had happened in my family, I determined to discover what was in her trunk, I therefore demanded of her, her keys, she refused to give them, I called up my servants that they might have the testimony of what I did, I told her it was in vain to deny, for the more she denied the more I would persist, and she at last gave the keys up to the butler, the trunk was opened, and the first thing that discovered itself was the callico breeches and waistcoat of mine, they are of a very fine description of cloth called, Isares. On this I went to the police office in Marlborough street, for a constable, I did not choose to proceed farther of myself, a constable, of the name of Hamilton, was sent with me, and he examined and found all the articles contained in the indictment, which are my property. I have undervalued them considerably in the indictment.

Q. Had you missed any articles before this time? - Never, not during this woman living with me.

Q. How long had this woman lived with you? - She had lived with me two periods, and I took her back the second time because I thought her an excellent character, she had lived with me formerly as a nurse maid, she attended on me in my illness; the last time she came to attend about the house, occasionally to attend my wife, the first time she lived with me fifteen months, the last time about two months; I took her in again merely because I thought her an excellent character, and as such I should have given her to any other place had I not found this out.

Q. Before you found these things in the box, had you missed any of them? - None, I had not a suspicion of the kind.

Q. Had you any reason to open the box? - Yes, I had reason, but not expecting or suspecting any thing of this.

Q. Was there any thing in the trunk besides your things? - Yes, there were some articles of her own.

Q. Had she any articles there which she claimed to be her own? - Yes, she had some.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn.

I am a constable belonging to Mary-le-bone; I saw the box opened; it was the prisoner's, she was standing by and acknowledged it to be her's, there were some little things of her own in it, and the greatest part of the articles, which I produce here, were found in that box, some I found in another box up stairs, which had never been removed.

Q. How do you know the box above stairs was the prisoner's? - Because she brought it down herself into the entry where the other was. It was a small paper box.

Court to Prescott. You say that the articles which were delivered to the constable are belonging to you; and all the articles are put in the indictment? - They are, I believe them all to be mine; I can swear them all to be mine. The fine shifts are marked I. B. with a cross, they have never been marked since they were washed in India; I can at all times tell things that have been washed in India. I do not conceive, from the circumstances I have collected in my family, that the prisoner could have taken all these things at one time.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 30s. (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-20

248. PRISCILLA BOSWELL was indicted for stealing the 10th of March , seventeen yards of printed callico, value 1l. the goods of Joseph King .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS sworn.

I live with Mr. Joseph King , he is a linen draper . On Saturday the 12th of March, between the hours of four and five in the evening, the witness, Mrs. Stragnell, informed us that the prisoner had taken from the door a piece of callico, on which Richard Morgan and I went out and stopped the prisoner a small distance from the door; we desired her to come back, being informed she had got a piece of print; she said she had nothing, on which we brought her back into the shop; and on holding up her gown or apron, this piece of print was found hid under her clothes, she gave it me into my hand from under her clothes; I can swear it to be Mr. King's property, by the mark that is on it, it was laid on the outside of the door, with the other prints, with a string tied across.

Q. Where had you last seen it before it was missing? - Outside of the door on a box, there was a string across, but the prisoner slipped it from under the string, and put it under her cloak; they were not very fast.

Q. How long had you seen it before it was taken? - In the morning, or perhaps it might be an hour before, they were left out all the day, we never all leave the shop at once, the mark is P. N. with two crosses underneath.

Q. By whom was the mark made? - I cannot swear to the hand writing, but it is one of our young mens that is not here, I know the mark, that is our mark that we usually mark goods with.

Q. Did you miss a piece of that size and pattern by the information of Mrs. Stragnell? - We did not miss it any otherwise, we have had a dozen of pieces of this pattern or more; the only thing I know it by is the mark.

Mr. Wentworth. You say that she slipped it away, and put it under her clothes; how do you know that? - By finding it on her.

Q. How do you know that she slipped it away? - By the information of Mrs. Stragnell.

Q. This was on the 10th of March; did you observe any body with her that day? - I did not.

Q. Pray had you ever seen the prisoner in your shop yourself? - Not that day, I cannot say that I ever saw her before in my life.

Q. You cannot swear to that mark, who made it? - I cannot.

Q. You have not a vast number of them pieces in your shop? - I have.

Q. What distance might you take the prisoner from the door? - About fifteen or twenty yards.

Q. She was with Mrs. Stragnell? - No, Mrs. Stragnell came and informed us.

MARY STRAGNELL sworn.

My husband is a carpenter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at any time? - I think I remember something of her face; I was going by, and I saw her take that piece of printed cotton at the door, it was laying with other pieces on the board outside of the door.

Court to Nicholls. Is it callico? - It is.

Stragnell. This is a piece I see her take it from the door.

Q. Was it tied to any thing, or was it loose? - I cannot say to that.

Q. What did you do then? - I see her take it off, and put it under her clothes, and cover it over, and walked gently by the door, and I went into the shop and informed them, and Mr. Nicholls and the young lad went out; it was rolled on the

wrong side so, but I believe this is the piece, I did not notice it much.

Q. Did you see it taken from her? - I did.

Mr. Wentworth. You say that the prisoner covered it over? - She covered it with her gown, I believe, to the best of my memory.

Q. Can you swear to her person? - She was not out of my sight till the gentleman brought her back and took it from her.

Prisoner. I leave it all to my counsel.

The prisoner called two witnesses to her character.

GUILTY. (Aged 31.)

Judgment Respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-21

242. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , a black silk bonnet, value 2s. the goods of William Mac Donald .

WILLIAM MAC DONALD sworn

I live in Clement's-lane .

Q. Did you at any time lose a black silk bonnet? - It was part of my wife's wear.

JANE MAC DONALD sworn.

I came home from the chambers between nine and ten o'clock, on Saturday night, the 12th of this month. I am a laundress, in Gray's Inn, and put my cloak and bonnet where I always do, in my room where I live in Clement's-lane, and then I went out of the room, and went into the shop where my husband was, and I was coming back again into the back room where I put my bonnet and cloak, and I met this man coming out of the door with my bonnet.

Q. Was there light enough for you to distinguish his person? - There was a light in the shop, and a snuff of a candle in the back room.

Q. You had light enough to see him? - Yes, I had, I perceived the bonnet in his hand, and I asked him what he wanted? and he asked me for some name, I don't know what name; but I said directly he was a thief, and he had got my bonnet, and he took and throwed the bonnet out of his hand, when I called for a light on the stairs, when I went into the back room to see if he had got any thing else, and he was stopped immediately by Mr. Evans; I stopped him myself, but the man shut too the door and kept him in; the cloak was taken away the same night, but he had not got the cloak, the watchman stopped another man in the street with the cloak; I am certain this is the man.

Prisoner. There was no light in the passage when I went into the place.

GUILTY . (Aged 30 .)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-22

250. JOHN CAMPBELL and THOMAS BAKER were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , two wooden wheelbarrows, value 6s. the goods of Samuel Rhodes .

JOHN HAGGER sworn.

I am a wheelwright, Mr. Rhodes is a Brickmaker , I do not live with him.

Q. Do you know of his losing two wheelbarrows? - There were two wheelbarrows brought to my shop, but who brought them I cannot say, I was out at the public house smoaking my pipe.

Q. Did you know whose the wheelbarrows where? - I do not. They asked me to lend them half a crown on the barrows till the next morning, when they should know who were the proprietors of them.

Q. Did you lend the money on them? - No.

JOB CLEWES sworn.

I am the man that works with the barrows, I left the barrows in the field the over night, and in the morning they were gone.

Q. Do you know who took them? - No.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-23

251. JAMES FIRMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, the 6th of April one hundred and forty four half pence, value 6s. the goods of John Pennel .

ESTHER PENNEL sworn.

My husband's name is John Pennel , he keeps the coach and horses, Piccadilly , I catched the man taking the halfpence out of the till, the 6th of April; the prisoner was a soldier , and billetted at our house; in the morning I had suspicion of him, and I watched him down stairs, as he was going on the parade to shew his linen. I followed him down stairs, and I heard him force the bolt of the bar window, and shove it up, and I heard him open the till, and heard him put his hand in and take some halfpence; and I heard the halfpence rattle as he put them in his pocket, and he went to do it a second time, and I went and opened a door and catched him, he was not in the bar, he was outside with the window up; I saw him take the halfpence out of the till and put them into his coat pocket, a shortish coat he had on. I told him I had catched him at it, and he never answered me, he came into the tap room, and I called my husband, and before my husband came down stairs he went out of the street door and pulled the door after him, and he went on the parade, and my husband went to him. He took a bottle of rum out of the bar, and a glass, and an ale pint, and put it down on the floor.

Q. Did you look at the till? - Yes, it was wide open, and some halfpence gone. There were a quantity of halfpence in it, I did not count what was left.

Q. When did you see him again after he went out? - He came to his quarters again in the afternoon; this gentleman happened to be there, William Steward , and I told him of it, and to apprehend him, and he took him away to the watch-house, he acknowledged before this man that he had taken them.

Q. Did you make him any promise if he would acknowledge it? - I asked him what he thought of himself? he said he did not know; he confessed that he had opened it twice before then; I asked him how much he took that morning? he said not above six shillings.

Q. Can you undertake to say that there were six shillings worth of halfpence in the drawer? - Yes.

Q. Did you find any quantity of halfpence on him? - No.

Q. Was he searched? - My husband went to the parade to him.

Q. Was the till locked over night? - I cannot say, I don't think it was.

WILLIAM STEWARD sworn.

When I came in I searched the prisoner, but found not a halfpenny on him, it was about nine in the evening, I was sent for; I am an officer of Bow-street.

Q. Was you present when he said any thing about these halfpence? - I was present when he acknowledged that he only took six shillings that morning.

Q. Was any promise of favour made to him? - Not that I heard.

Prisoner. I am very clear of what is laid to my charge.

The prisoner called his Serjeant to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 24.) Fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-24

252. THOMAS HUNNY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a live sow pig, value 12s. the goods of Henry Walker .

HENRY WALKER sworn.

I live in King-street, St. George's, Middlesex . I lost a sow pig, on the 27th of March, I found it on the prisoner, in his sack, dead, the same day, between five and six in the evening; he had a sack on his back, and the pig being fresh killed the blood was running out behind, he had only part of it in the sack, the two quarters of one side, and half a head and two feet; he was in the street when I stopped him close by my own door, I missed the pig about half an hour before; I know the prisoner, he belongs to Mr. Morgan's brewhouse, it goes by the name of Picard's now; I examined him concerning the pig, and he owned that the property belonged to me.

Q. Did you make him any promise, or use any threats to induce him to discover? - First of all when I stopped him, he said that he knew the property was mine, and begged I would not expose him in the street, if I would go home with him he would give it me, he said there were three others concerned, and then he would send for the other three, and they should pay me what I pleased to charge for the property; I made answer, that if he would pay me for the property, on account of his family, I would not hurt him.

Mr. Knapp. You say you knew the prisoner at the bar? - I did, he is a brew-house servant .

Q. Mr. Picard employs a great many servants? - He does.

Q. Your pigs are running about in the street? - Yes, they are.

Q. Have they never strayed into other persons premises? - They might stray in the brewhouse for what I know.

Q. When a pig strays into the brew-house, don't the brewhouse servants think it belongs to them, and immediately cut it up.

Court. I shall not take such a question.

Q. When this man came up to you he was coming up to your own door? - He was taking the pig home to his family; he has four children, and his wife ready to lay-in again.

Q. At that time did you say any thing to him, that it would be better for him to tell all about it? did you say any thing to him till he got home to his wife and family? - He owned at the time that it was my pig.

Q. You say it was a side of pork? - It was quite hot.

Q. When you saw a side of pork it had been scalded? - But there is a difference between my scalding a pig and them that don't understand it. I can give you the description and marks of the pig likewise, a bit cut out of the ear and off the tail, only the Sunday before.

Q. Do you know how long he has worked at this brewhouse? - He has lived there twice, six months each time.

Q. I believe this man had maintained an extreme good character in the brew-house? - I never heard any otherwise.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Privately Whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-25

253. JOHN HALL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , a pair of leather boots, value 5s. the goods of Timothy Adshead .

TIMOTHY ADSHEAD sworn.

I am a taylor ; I lost a pair of boots, the 8th of last March, I had just been cleaning them, and they laid on the counter in the shop.

Q. Did you see the prisoner in your shop? - No, I went into the shop hearing the carriages go by more than usual, and I perceived the door was open, and looking on the counter I perceived my boots and shoes that I had been blacking were gone, I went about the shop in Rosemary-lane where I dwell, and I could not find them for a considerable time, and then I went up another way, up the end of the new Road, and I see a young man looking at a pair of boots, and I conjectured they were mine, and I went into the shop, and I asked who had them boots to sell? they told me that young man, the prisoner; I looked at the boots and I ascertained them to be mine, I said to the prisoner, you have stole my boots; he replied, no, he had not; I then laid hold of him and asked for a constable, in order that I might secure him.

Q. How long after you had missed them did this happen? - Within an hour. I have the boots here.

Q. Was your shop below? - Yes, and I was in the back room. These are the boots, they are mine, and I found them on the prisoner in the man's shop.

THOMAS SANDERS sworn.

On Saturday the 8th of March, the prisoner came into my mistress's shop and offered a pair of boots to sell, he offered them first to her for sale, and asked seven shillings for them, he came about nine o'clock at night.

Court to Prosecutor. What time did you miss your boots? - About nine o'clock at night.

Court to Sanders. Are these the boots he offered to sell? - Yes. My mistress was very suspicious of him, and she called me out of another part of the shop, and desired me to ask particular questions about them, and whether they were his boots; I asked him his name; and he said his name was John Hall , and I was going to turn the boots down to see if John Hall was inside of the boots, he said, your mistress knows me very well, my father lived at Stratford, Mr. Adshead then came in.

Prisoner. I bought the boots just by where they were lost, and I was going to make some money of them; I have got no witnesses.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.) Whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17940430-26

254. JOHN BENNET and EDWARD JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a Kidderminster carpet, value 1l. 8s. the goods of John Southam .

JOHN SOUTHAM sworn.

I am a broker , in Charles-square, Hoxton . I lost the carpet the 2d of April, from the rails before my door, I was not at home myself when it was missed, I was told it was about twelve o'clock,

I went out about nine o'clock, I hung it out then, it was missed during my absence, I returned about five o'clock in the evening, I never saw the prisoner till the Friday, this was on Wednesday; I never saw it again till I saw the prisoner at the police office, I had a little boy who saw it, but the friends of the prisoner have taken him away, and secured him somewhere where we cannot find him, his name is William Kemp .

THOMAS BURROWS sworn.

I live in Charles-square, Hoxton, with Mr. Southam, the little lad came and told my sister that two men were stealing the carpet.

Q. Did you see any thing of the prisoners? - Yes, I followed them.

Q. About what time of the day was it? - About twelve o'clock. I ran out and ran round Charles-square, and down Pitfield-street, I turned myself round into Old-street road, and saw the thieves running with the carpet, these were two of them, one had the carpet, I saw it.

Q. Who were these persons that were running? - I don't know their names, them there are the two fellows, they were running together.

Q. Which of them had the carpet? - I cannot tell, but I believe the biggest had it. I hallooed stop thief! and they dropped the carpet directly, they ran on about twenty yards after they had dropped the carpet, and they were stopped.

Q. Did you pick up the carpet? - No, a gentleman picked it up and took it into another gentleman's house in Old-street-road; I saw the person pick it up. As soon as the men were stopped they were brought back by some young man.

Q. How far were they stopped from the place where the carpet was dropped? - About twenty yards, I did not see any more of them till they were brought back, I went to take care of the carpet. I am sure that is the carpet they dropped, because I know it, and have seen it.

Q. How do you know that that is the carpet, that either of the prisoners dropped? - Because there was never another on the road besides that.

Q. How far was you from the carpet when it was dropped? - About two hundred yards.

Q. Did you go up to the carpet as soon as it was dropped? - Yes.

Q. Did you see the carpet after it was dropped by one of the prisoners, and before any body picked it up? - Yes, I ran to pick it up, and the gentleman he ran before me, and picked it up first.

Q. When it was picked up did you examine the carpet? - Yes.

Q. Was it a carpet that you knew very well? - Yes.

Q. How long had it been usually hung at your master's door? - About a week or a fortnight.

Q. Did you look at it for the purpose of enabling you to say whether it was your master's carpet or not? - Yes.

Q. Was it opened? - No, it was rolled up all of a heap; I am sure it is Mr. Southam's carpet, and I did undo it a little, to look at it, but not all.

Q. But how are you sure that that is the very carpet, that one of the prisoners dropped? - I am sure it was, I saw it again as soon as the prisoners were taken in Old Street-road, in another gentleman's house.

Q. Do you know the size of the carpet? - Three yards by three and a half.

Q. When you received the alarm, did you observe that the carpet was gone then from the door? - Yes.

Mr. Wentworth. I am for Bennet. When you first missed the carpet and ran out, did you see Bennet? - No, not either of them, but when I see them in Old-street, I never lost sight of them till I got to them.

Q. I believe you don't know which had the carpet? - Yes, the biggest had the carpet, (Bennet.)

Q. You say you was about two hundred yards from them at the time the carpet was dropped? - Yes.

Q. You are very positive that Bennet had it? - The biggest had, I am positive.

Q. You had never taken any particular notice of the carpet before? - Yes, as it hung out at Mr. Southam's door, I saw it had a dark colour and a light colour, and was a kidderminster.

Q. How long had it hung out at the door; can you be positive, had it longer than a week? - I cannot say, it might hang more, I think it was about a week or a fortnight; I know this is the carpet, there is a piece set in the middle, and this is the same pattern.

ROBERT BOND sworn.

On Monday, the second of April, I was crossing Old-street-road, about twelve o'clock in the day, I heard the cry of stop thief several times, I turned round and I saw the two prisoners come running, first they were coming down Pitfield-street into the road, they were running gently together, I made a stop the space of half a minute; I should have wished to have run after them, but my hands were tied with several articles that I had in my hand, and I could not, and I delivered the articles into my wife's hand, and I pursued them before ever they dropped the carpet. I saw the carpet drop before I could get up to them.

Q. Did you see who dropped the carpet? - Not punctually. I could not with to swear to that; before I could get up to them they were taken.

Q. Did you see the carpet picked up? - Yes.

Was that boy there when it was picked up? - I cannot say whether he was before or behind; my being a particular acquaintance of Mr. Southam's made me officiate in the business. I was told it was his property before I ran after the man. I saw the carpet drop and I ran after the prisoners, and I saw the boy go and claim the carpet. I assisted in taking the prisoners before the magistrate, and I was bound over.

Mr. Wentworth. The prisoners were running gently when you see them? - Yes, when I first see them, but afterwards they mended their pace.

Q. You cannot say who had the carpet? - I could not wish to say that.

Q. The boy did not claim the carpet at the time? - It was not taken up nor dropped at the time, I almost got the start of them, but they were taken before I quite came up.

Court. They were running as in company? - They were side by side.

Southam. When I first purchased this carpet, I purchased it from a gentleman in Little St. Thomas Apostles, and it was cut to sit the room, the fire place was in the corner, and it made the carpet very aukward for another customer, I therefore took off the corner that projected out and made the carpet a square one, and there had been a hole burnt in it, and a piece that I cut off from the corner, I grafted in myself with my own hands; I had purchased it a considerable time, but I had hung it out for sale for about a week or fortnight. I can positively say to that being the carpet, I put out that morning.

Q. How long have you had it back again? - From Friday, the 4th of April, the day that they had their second hearing, and Mr. Colquohon desired I would take it home, it was hung out on my premises where I always hang out things.

Prisoner Bennet. I leave it to my counsel.

Prisoner Jones. I know nothing of this young man here.

The prisoner Bennet called five witnesses, and the prisoner Jones two, who gave them good characters.

John Bennet . GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Edward Jones . GUILTY. (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-27

255. ELIZABETH CRUMPFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , one guinea , the goods of James Bicknell .

James Bicknell was called on his recognizance.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-28

256. WILLIAM HILBURN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , five trusses of straw, value 3s. the goods of Samuel Wagg , Esq .

HENRY SAUNDERS sworn.

I bought a load of staw of William Hilburn 's master the 29th of March, and paid him, I bought it for Mr. Wagg, I was in Mr. Wagg's service, I bought it going through Acton , William Hilburn was to take it to Mr. Wagg's stables, I gave him a note.

Q. Did you see it loaded? - No, I bought it on the cart as it was loaded.

Q. Did you count the trusses? - No, I did not.

Q. Was you present when the straw was brought home? - No.

JOHN RICHARD sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Wagg, on the 29th of March at twelve o'clock, the straw came to Mr. Wagg's stables.

Q. You had not seen it before it came home? - No.

HENRY YATES sworn.

I keep a cook's shop in Islington, on the 29th of March I was going by Mr. Morgan's house, and I saw the man, that is at the bar now, offering the straw for sale, he offered it to Richard Morgan for six-pence a truss, it was about noon, as near as I can recollect, he asked Mr. Morgan at first nine-pence, he said, he would not give any more than six-pence; after he bought it he said, he had got a very good bargain, he wished he could get such a one every day.

Court to Saunders. What time of the day did you purchase this? - I believe it was after nine o'clock.

Q. Was the straw going to Mr. Wagg's house in town or in Acton? - In Acton.

Court to Richard. What time did the cart come to Mr. Wagg's house? - About twelve o'clock.

Q. How far is Islington from Acton? - About five miles.

Court to Yates. Where does Morgan live? - In St. Giles's.

Q. How far is it from St. Giles's to Islington? - About a mile and a half.

Q. You say this was in the middle of the day? - Yes.

Q. There was a great number of people passing and repassing? - Yes.

Q. It was a very public thing? - Yes.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KLNYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-29

257. WILLIAM HOLMES and ROBERT HOLMES were indicted for stealing, thirty live conies, value 1l. 10s. the goods of William Hall .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-30

258. MATTHIAS KNUCKEY was indicted for stealing on the 19th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 6d. three linen sheets, value 5s. a cotton waistcoat, value 1s. a cotton gown, value 10s. a stuff petticoat, value 2s. a linen shift, value 1s. two linen frocks, value 2s. a dimity petticoat, value 6d. a pair of flannel trowsers, value 3d. the Goods of John Sedgeworth .

RACHAEL SEDGEWORTH sworn.

My husband's name is John Sedge worth , I live at No. 3, Little Windmill-street . I wash and gets up linen, and sells a few things in a front room. My things were taken Saturday the 19th of April, I locked my door and went into a neighbour's apartment, and took the key of the house with me; my neighbour's daughter alarmed me about three quarters of an hour after, her name is Maria Porter , I was in her mother's room, she went out and called to me, and told me my door was open; on this I answered her my door was locked, and ran out immediately. I was on the same floor, only the passage parted the two apartments. When I came to my own door, I saw the man run out of the front door of the house.

Q. What door was it you locked? - My own apartment on the ground floor, that was the only door that I locked; there were other lodgers in the house.

Q. You say something about his being stopped, was he stopped near the door, or where? - I ran after him, he was stopped down the court, an officer belonging to Queen's-square stopped him; he is here.

Q. Did he run all the way till he was stopped? - Yes.

Q. Who was the man that was stopped? - The man at the bar.

Q. Did you see any part of your property brought back? - When I returned to my apartment, I found my drawers opened, and a good deal of property taken out.

Q. What did you miss? - Not any thing, every thing was there, they were put on the bed they had been taken out of the drawers, a silk handkerchief, three linen sheets, one gown, two waistcoats, one petticoat, two child's frocks, one child's petticoat, a woman's shift, and a pair of flannel drawers.

Q. Where were these articles left when you went out of your apartment? - In one and the same drawer.

Q. Was the drawer locked? - No.

Q. How lately had you seen them there? the same day, I had occasion to go to the drawer.

Q. When they were laying on the bed were they tied up or laying loose? - Laying loose, one on the top of another, and one sheet taken off the bed and laid on a chair by the side of the bed.

Q. Was your apartment broke open, or how? - I cannot say that the lock was injured at all. I am very sure I left it locked, and there was no appearance of violence to it.

Q. Was it an upper or lower drawer? - It was the top but one, not the top, but the next to it.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of the man who ran out of the house? - No, never did.

MARIA PORTER sworn.

Q. I understand you are a neighbour of Mrs. Sedgeworth's? - Yes. About a quarter past four, on the 19th of April, Mrs. Sedgeworth, was in our room, the adjoining room to her own apartment, in the same house, and directly I went out I see her door open, directly I hallooes out, Mrs. Sedgeworth! your door is open; I did not see any body myself that minute, directly she comes out and said, my door is double locked; I pushed against the door, and the man directly came out and knocked me down; he doubled his fit and hit me over the eye.

Q. Then you had no opportunity of taking much notice of the person of the man? - Yes, I saw the man quite plain.

Q. Did you see any man afterwards brought back? - Yes, I followed him all the way with Mr. Sedgeworth.

Q. Did you lose sight of him till he was apprehended? - No.

Q. You see the constable stop him, did you? - Yes.

Q. He was accidently going by I suppose? - Yes.

Q. Who is that man that was so stopped? - That is the man, the prisoner at the bar.

Q. You see the things, I suppose, laying on the bed? - Yes.

Prisoner. I only wish to know whether I had not turned a corner about fifty yards, when three curriers laid hold of me? - He never turned a corner out of my sight, I was after him all the way.

JAMES CREEDLAND sworn.

I am an officer of Queen's-square. On this 19th of April I was just coming home, (I live in the same street,) it was about a quarter before five, between four and five, and I heard a noise of stop thief! I stopped, and I saw the prisoner at the bar run by, he ran from a house, No. 3, and these two witnesses, the prosecutrix and the other, following him, then I ran out as hard as I could run after him, and he turned into Poultney-court, a short court in Little Windmill-street, there is a throughfare in that court, but there is some posts goes across, and that is how I catched him, because he could not pass the post so quick.

Q. You are very sure that the prisoner was the man that these two women were in pursuit of? - Yes, I am very certain it is the same man, I apprehended him; and he says, what do you lay hold of me, for? I told him I would tell him soon what I laid hold of him for, and I took him back to Mrs. Sedgeworth's room, and found the door open, and seeing this property, which I have got here, laying on the bed in one heap, one upon another, then I saw the other sheet spread on a chair, close by the other things, then I took and bundled it all up together, and have had it in my possession ever since.

Prisoner. The gentlewoman took the property from the constable; I had the privilege of going for a soldier, but having the venereal disease, they would not take me, till I was cured; I was taken away for two days.

Creedland. I did give them back to the woman for a short time, for about an hour or so, and she gave me the same articles back again.

Mrs. Sedgeworth. These things are all mine.

Prisoner. I was coming past this woman's house, and I had got about twenty yards from the door, and they cried out stop thief! I walked about fifty yards, and then three curriers took hold of me, and they took me back to the woman's place; I was going after a place where I had been to work.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-31

159. JOHN MARING and JOHN RANDALL were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , one bullock, value 13l. the goods of Thomas Turk .

THOMAS TURK sworn.

I live in Newport-market ; I am a butcher . On the 28th of February I lost a Sussex ox; I came home and asked my man if he had killed the bullock? he said it was gone from the premises, and was taken away. I saw the bullock afterwards at the Green-yard, I saw it the same morning, when my man informed me that the bullock was taken out.

Q. It had not been slaughtered had it? - No, I found it in the Green yard.

Mr. Knapp. So you found your bullock in the Green-yard? - Yes.

Q. The Green yard we all know is a place where strayed beasts are taken to.

GEORGE WESTON sworn.

I am a servant to the last witness, Mr. Turk; I have lived with him three years come next October. The 16th of February the bullock was taken out of our cart house, it was put in the 7th at night. In the afternoon we missed him, between the hours of twelve and one, Friday morning, midnight, we may say.

Q. Did you make any search after him? - The watchman came to me at that time, and called George, through that I immediately arose (the watchman's name is Campbell) he gave me some information about the bullock, and I immediately got up and pursued to the Green-yard, when I came to the Green-yard I knocked at the gate, and I said have you got ever a bullock brought there about half an hour or twenty minutes ago? they said yes; I said I should be glad if they would let me see the bullock? he said if I would describe the marks he would; I did not see him that night, I saw it the next morning along with my master; it was in the forenoon, about ten o'clock, I cannot pretend to say particular.

Q. Was the bullock then produced to you that which was your master's? - Yes. I see a lad at the Green-yard, when I went in the night, who is admitted an evidence, and these two at the bar.

Q. Had you any conversation with these two boys? - No, I said my lads, you have been doing it very nicely, taking my master's property away in this manner, and I asked if there was any watchman near, and I gave charge of them.

Mr. Knapp. The watchman who called you is not here? - No.

Q. The ox you found in the place where he would be if he had strayed, in the Green-yard? - I don't know that.

Q. Don't you know that if a beast is lost, it is customary to take them to the Green-yard? - It may be so.

ARNOLD COPELAND sworn.

I keep the Talbot Inn, in the Strand, the Green-yard is there.

Q. On the 27th or 28th of February do you recollect any beast being brought to your Green-yard? - Yes, it was brought between twelve and one in the morning of the night, between the 27th and 28th; I was in bed, my servant let it in, I heard a noise in the yard, and I got up without being called, and I saw the persons who brought it; I went down stairs, and I saw three boys, these two at the bar, and one that is outside here; they had just come into the house to have the bullock booked, it was just put into the pen as I come down stairs; in the mean while, just as I came down stairs, the gentleman came and knocked at the gate, and enquired after the bullock and he came and detected them in the house.

Q. The next morning the bullock was produced to Turk and Weston? - Yes.

Q. Was it the same bullock that the boys were getting booked? - The same.

Mr. Knapp. You are the keeper of the Green-yard we understand? - Yes.

Q. This beast was brought to you by these boys, it was desired to be booked, was not it? - We should have booked it, provided the owner had not come, but they came in the mean while.

Q. If he had been a stray bullock they would have brought him there? - They brought him there as a stray bullock, so my servant tells me, she went to the gate.

MARY GARDINER sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Copeland, I opened the gate to let in these boys and bullock, they said they found it straying in Oxford-street.

GEORGE EDWARDS sworn.

Q. Was you before the Grand Jury? - No.

Q. What are you? - A butcher.

Q. What an apprentice to somebody? - No.

Q. How came you to be a butcher? - I am not an apprentice yet.

Q. Are you in no butcher's employment? - Yes, I lived with one Mr. -

Q. Are these two young men butchers ? - Yes.

Q. Where do they keep their shop? - In Newport-market.

Q. Are you partner with either of them? - No.

Q. How long have they been in business for themselves? - I don't know, they jobb about the market.

Q. Do you jobb about it? - No.

Q. How do you mean jobb? - They are employed under other butchers.

Q. Do you know the barn, or cart-house belonging to Mr. Tuck? - Yes.

Q. Was you in company with these young men or either of them towards the latter end of February last? - Yes, on the 28th about twelve o'clock, we went to Mr. Turk's cart house.

Q. Who proposed to go there? - John Randall and John Maring both of them.

Q. Did not you propose it? - No. they asked me if I would go with them.

Q. What did they tell it was to do when you got there? - They did not say what for.

Q. Did you go? - Yes, when we came there John Randall got over the gate, he opened the door and turned the bullock out, and we followed him, and we took him to the Green-yard in the Strand.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-32

260. MARY WEBB was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a child's cloth beaver coat, value 3s. a child's cotton frock, value 2s. a stuff skirt, value 1s. a pair of leather shoes, value 1s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value s. a child's felt hat, value 3s. a pair of child's stays, value 6d. a flannel petticoat, value 6d. and a child's linen shift, value 1s. the goods of Mary Ann Field .

THOMAS FIELD sworn.

Mary Ann is my daughter, I know nothing of the robbery.

ELIZABETH HANNOCK sworn.

This child came up out of the country to see me, it is five years old the 25th of

March, I live in Spitalfields Market, in the parish of Christ Church.

Q. When did she come to you? - She came to see me on Wednesday, the same week that she was stole away on Friday, she is my neice, I believe it was the 26th of March. She staid with me till Friday, when she was taken away.

Q. Do you know what occasioned her leaving you? - No, I cannot say, she was at play in the market; I saw her about half after twelve o'clock, I missed her a little after, I recovered her about ten minutes after one; I found her at the bottom of Well-street, in Mile-end New-town, she was coming up Dean-street.

Q. Was she alone when you found her? - No, she was along with the prisoner at the bar.

Q. When you see her what passed between you? - I sat my self down on the stone steps, I was so glad I had found the child, I could not go any farther, and this woman came up with the child, holding the child in her hand.

Q. Was the child crying or distressed? - No, very quiet.

Q. Which way was she going with the child? was she coming towards where you live or the other way? - It was not towards where I live. On her coming up to the steps of the door, I said to her, good woman, where did you find this child? - She said, she found it in High-street, and in my flurry I did not know that she had enticed the child out of the market, and I asked her if she chose any thing to drink? she thanked me and said no, I took the child and came away with it towards my home.

Q. Was the child dressed as when you see it last? - Nothing was taken from her, no clothes off at all. I came along the street towards Well-street, with the child in my hand, and I said, Mary, how came you to go away? says she, aunty the woman took me from behind the broken pump; I was very sorry, there were several people about, I said if I had known she had enticed the child away I would not have let her gone, and somebody went back and stopped the woman.

- PIKE sworn.

I stood facing my shop on the 28th of March, I saw this woman going down the street with the child, and another child, and I see her turn round several times and speak to the child, and I said to my wife, I dare say that woman is decoying the child away; my wife said, go along you fool, Mrs. Hannock has sent somebody with it. Presently there was an alarm made about it, and I went to seek after it, I went up into Brick-lane, and came down Brown's-lane, and there I meets this woman, and she runs past me without the child, and I stopped and watched her almost all the way up Brick-lane, and at the top of Brick-lane I ran up and catched her and told her she must go back along with me; so I brought her back and we took her to the magistrate, and he bound us over.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-33

261. WILLIAM FREEMAN was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Stubbs about the hour of seven in the night, on the first of March , and burglariously stealing therein, four fancy rings, set in gold, value 1l. 10s. and three fancy lockits, set in gold, value 3l. the goods of the said John Stubbs .

JOHN BROKES sworn.

I live at No. 59, Red Lyon-street, Holborn , I am a calender and calico glazier, it was not my property that was lost, it is Mr. John Stubbs's property, I am the person that saw the transaction. I was going to a customer of mine in Lincoln's Inn-fields, on the first of march, about seven o'clock in the evening, in crossing of Holborn I observed the prisoner standing in a leaning posture over the shew glass of Mr. Stubbs, his shop is at the corner of Turn stile, I saw him in that posture which called my attention, and coming up to him and looking over his right shoulder, standing rather behind him, I observed his hand in the shew glass at the time, attempting to get a locket out, at that time the glass was broke.

Q. Had you seen him break the glass? - I see him break it further, he could not get it out with the hole that was then in it, and I saw him take out his hand and push in a bit more glass with his thumb, the hole being made bigger by pushing a bit more in, I see him take out a locket with a ticket to it, and a piece of cotton hanging to it, which he attempted to shake from it, and finding he could not shake the cotton off, he then made an attempt to put it in his pocket, or the folds of his apron, I cannot positively say which, he could not come at the place where he meant to put it, being in a leaning posture, he went to get up and he touched my shoulder with his, and he looked about and see me, and that alarmed him, and he turned towards me with an intent to go off, I laid hold of him directly by the collar before he got one step from the place, and a struggle ensued, he struggled very much, and in the struggle he kicked my leg, which I had a bad leg for several days, I says, you villain you have robbed the shop, he denied it, but still I kept hold of him, and called for assistance, and Mr. Stubbs's lad in the shop came out.

Q. Is he here? - Yes, we took him into the shop; and says I, it is very proper now to search him, we searched him and did not find the locket on him, that I see him take out; I says to the young lad in the shop, you go out immediately, for you will find the locket on the ground; he went out, and returned immediately with the locket in his hand; and then from that we searched him further, and we found a knife on him, and some duplicates, and that was all the property we found about him.

Q. You see nothing of any rings taken by him? - None at all.

Q. Nor only one locket? - Only one.

Q. This shew glass is on the outside of the house? - Yes, it is, it pushes out without the window.

Q. What time did it take him up doing this? - It might be the space of half a minute, it was done very shortly.

JOHN VINY sworn.

I live with Mr. Stubbs. On the 1st of March, I had been up stairs, I had been out of the shop about twenty minutes, Mr. Stubbs was in the back parlour, I came down stairs and was called out of doors, a person called and said, a man had been breaking the windows and taking out some things; I turned round and saw Mr. Brooks had hold of a man(who was struggling to get away) he begged me to come to his assistance, which I did, and brought the prisoner into the shop; Mr. Brooks said, he had the things in his pocket or apron; we searched in his belt and in his pocket, and nothing was there; Mr. Brooks said, then he has dropped them, for I saw him take out a locket; I took a candle and looked where the scuffle had been, and I found the locket and a paper, which belonged

to one of the rings, but there was no ring to it; I observed the shew glass broke when I came out of the door, I know what was in the glass, there were a variety of articles in it; I missed four rings and three lockets, including one that I found, I did not find any more than that one locket, and the rings were on separate papers, and the lockets like wife.

Q. How lately had you seen all the lockets and the rings? - I had seen them several times that day.

Q. You had not sold any of those articles that day? - No, I had not. The prisoner was secured and taken to Bow-street; this is the locket that I picked up.

Q. Do you know it to be Mr. Stubbs's? - It was sewed on the card as it is now, and there is the shop mark, and it is my own writing; there is also the paper on which the rings were put, it is my own writing likewise, I marked them all myself.

Prisoner. I was coming down in Oxford-road, going past this shop on Saturday night very late, I was looking into the shew glass as many other people were, and this gentleman came and laid hold of me, and said I had robbed the window; and since, this Mr. Stubbs has sent me word that this man has got so linked in with the officers, at Bow-street, that he would prosecute me for the sake of the reward.

GUILTY, Of stealing, but not of the burglary, nor in the dwelling house .(Aged 20.)

Transported for seven Years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-34

262. WILLIAM SMITH otherwise SPARKES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Sharp about the hour of two in the night, on the 4th of January , and burglariously stealing therein, a jack towel, value 2d. a worsted night cap, value 6d. a pair of worsted stockings, value 6d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6d. two iron chains, value 1s. 6d. seven pewter plates, value 5s. an iron wedge, value 1s. 6d. a brass dog collar, value 2d. the goods of John Sharp .

JOHN SHARP sworn.

I live at Fulham ; I have lived fifty-eight years in the same house. On the 4th of January, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I went to bed between ten and eleven o'clock, as near as I can recollect.

Q. What time of the night was you alarmed? - Not till I got up; I was very bad with a cold, and did not get up till between seven and eight o'clock, and my servant told me that I had been robbed; I went and looked at the back parlour, and I found these articles missing that the servant told me; the prisoner got into the door, by unhanging the asp; he knowed the way of my house very well, he worked for me some time, he left me the 28th of September; I missed the things that are mentioned in the indictment; I did not see any thing of them, I found nothing but this adze, that was taken in September last, I know my tool is lost, and many other things besides; I found my dog in his possession, and the collar took off the dog's neck, and this leather collar put on; the officer did not take him I believe for a month afterwards.

RICHARD OWEN sworn.

I lodge with Mr. Sharp. On the 4th of January, that man by some means or

other got up to the second floor, opened the sash, throwed down the window blind; I see him.

Q. What time was it? - Between two and three, I was as wide awake as I am now.

Q. How came you to be awake at that time of the night? - I had occasion to be awake, I sleep up one pair of stairs; I rose up and hallooed out to him, and he returned; this blind fell on my bed.

Q. Had you a fair view of him then? - I had a fair view of him, as much as the Element would allow.

Q. Did he take any thing away with him? - He did not take any thing either from me or out of the room.

Q. Do you know where these things were lost which are stated in the indictment? - They were lost that very night, for when I got up in the morning I related it to my master Sharp, and we went backward and saw these things missing. I know every one of these things, being in the house, all the articles in the indictment, Mr. Sharp found the adze on him.

Q. These things were all in the house the over night? - They positively were, all the articles that were missing the next morning.

Court to Sharp. I did not hear you say any thing about this adze? - I did not find it that evening. I got a warrant for him for not finishing his work, so when I went to serve him with the warrant he was at work with this tool, and he made his escape from the constable and me, and got across the water. I missed a great many tools out of my shop.

Q. All these things were lost in September? - No, only this adze.

Q. Have you recovered any of these things that were lost that night? - No, recovered nothing only this leather, I found on my dog's neck.

DAVID PRICE sworn.

I know nothing further than having an information of Mr. Sharp on the 6th of January, that this man had robbed him. On the 12th of March I apprehended the man in Maid-lane, in the Borough.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before

Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-35

263. JAMES NEW was indicted for stealing on the 15th of February two mens hats, value 15s. the goods of Richard Nock .

RICHARD NOCK sworn.

I live in Castle alley, Whitechapel . I bought two hats with Mr. Plastow, in Leadenball-street, they came home to me on the 15th of February, I was not in the way when they came home, I did not see the hats, I never see them at all.

WILLIAM PLASTOW , junior, sworn.

On the 15th of February I carried two hats home to Mr. Nock's, I delivered them to Mrs Nock, one was for Mr. Nock, and the other for his son.

Q. What is his son, a boy? - Yes. As I went down the alley with the hats, I observed a boy in the alley, behind me; the hats were in two boxes, when I was delivering in of the hats, he went by the door, when I came into Whitechapel again, he was behind me again, and he followed me home from there; our house is in Leadenhall-street. About eleven o'clock we heard from Mr. Nock, he enquired whether we had sent the hats home? we said we had sent them home; he said we had not, since we sent for them back.

Q. How near your house did you see the boy? - I saw him at Mr. Lane's, the bookseller's, three doors from our house.

Q. Now you had not sent for these hats at all back, had you? - No.

Q. Did you see any thing of the hats again? - Not after I delivered them.

Q. Who was that boy ? - The prisoner at the bar.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see him again? - On the 1st of March, I see him by chance at the Exchange, I was going to Piccadilly, and going by Exchange-alley, I see the boy, and a man with him; I recollected he was the boy directly as I passed him, he turned about and looked at me, and I did at him, and he turned up Exchange-alley.

Q. You had not seen him before this 15th of February to your knowledge? - Not to my knowledge; I directly followed him and collared him, and brought him to Mr Plastow's, and from thence we took him to Mr. Nock's, and from thence to the police office, and then Mr. Nock appeared in the evening at the examination, he did not see the boy before; I am very certain to the boy.

Q. Was he in the same dress when you saw him in Exchange-alley, as when he followed you? - Yes, in the same dress.

ELIZABETH WETHERALL sworn.

I live with Mr. Nock; about ten minutes or a quarter after master William Plastow had been with the hats, this here boy came and said that he was Mr. Plastow's servant.

Q. Did you see the hats brought? - No.

Q. Did you see Master Plastow at the house? - No.

Q. What day was it? - On the 15th of February, I cannot rightly tell what time of the day.

Q. Did you open the door to the prisoner? - No, the door was open; he says if you please when my master sends the hats, you will be so kind to send them back again, for he has made a mistake; and he asked my mistress to let him look at the hats; I was present and he took the hats out of the box one by one, and looked at them.

Q. Who looked at them? - The prisoner, and he said there was no name inside of them; and my mistress asked him what difference it could make, there being no name inside of them; he said if you please I will take them back; and my mistress let him take the hats.

Q. Did he say whom he came from, and who he belonged to? - No, that was all he said.

Q. Did he take them away? - Yes.

Q. How am I to reconcile this evidence of your's; that he said when Mr. Plastow sends the hats; and his asking your mistress to let him look at the hats? - My mistress told him that Mr. Plastow had sent the hats, and then he desired to look at them.

Q. Then he came as if coming from Mr. Plastow? - Yes.

Q. When did you see him again, after he carried away the hats? - I see him the 1st of of March again, when he was taken.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the boy? - Yes.

Court to Plastow. Had that boy any thing at all to do about that house? - No, I am certain of it.

Q. Who came from Mr. Nock at eleven o'clock at night? - Mr. Nock's son came to know why we had not sent the hats.

Court to Nock. How came you to send to Mr. Plastow's? - My wife told me that there had been a boy had come for the hats, from Mr. Plastow, because he had made a mistake, and I left it alone till eleven o'clock, when I sent to Mr. Plastow.

Prisoner. As I was going to the Exchange I saw that young gentleman; and and he comes directly after me, and hal

looes out stop thief, and he comes up and laid hold of me.

GUILTY. (Aged 15.)

Transported for seven years .

Recommended by the Jury on account of his youth .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before

Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-36

264. CATHARINE STUKELY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , five guineas, value 5l. 5s. and half a guinea , the monies of Daniel Brown .

DANIEL BROWN sworn.

I am a servant ; I was not in place at the time this happened, I was going to place the next day following.

Q. What day was this? - On Saturday the 5th of March, about twelve o'clock in the morning, at midnight; I lost my things in George-yard, Bow-lane ; I had been to the other end of the town, to spend an evening with my friend; coming home, along Cheapside, there were two girls standing in a door way, this girl came and took me by the arm; she asked me where I was going? I told her I was going home to my lodgings, and we walked together to George-yard; in George yard I felt her hand about me, she put her hand immediately away from me, and said, the watchman is coming? I felt her hand about my right hand breeches pocket; she put her hand against me, and pushed me away three or four yards, and I saw the other girl come from the corner of George-yard, and they stopped to speak to one another, and they passed one another, and I walked on till I came to Cheapside, and it struck me then that she had picked my pocket. I felt in my pocket and I found my money was gone.

Q. What money did you lose? - Five guineas and a half, it was in gold, lapped up in a bit of paper, I lost nothing else, it was in my right hand breeches pocket.

Q. Was that breeches pocket buttoned? No, it was not.

Q. When first you missed your money in what situation did you find your pocket? - I found my pocket unbuttoned, and and likewise one of the flaps of these breeches.

Q. When had you first seen your money there? - I had it in my hand in my pocket, when I was speaking to her. Immediately after I missing my money, I ran back and I saw the girl going down Bow-lane, I immediately got to the girl and laid hold of her, and the watchman was coming by, and I said to the watchman, I charge you with this woman, for robbing me of five guineas and a half.

Q. Did the watchman take her into custody? - Yes.

Q. Did he search her particularly? - I did not see her searched.

Q. Is the watchman here? - No, he is not; the constable is here.

Q. Did you go with her to the watch-house? - Yes, I did, and she was examined there by the constable.

Q. Did you see any money taken from her? - No, I did not.

Q. Then your money has not been found at all? - No, it has not, nor any part of it. She said she would give me a guinea if I chose to make it up with her.

Q. Where was it she said that? - In the compter afterwards.

Q. Had not you told her that you would taken it up, if she would give you some money? - I did, to hear what she would say.

Q. Was you drunk or sober? - I was sober.

A CONSTABLE sworn.

This woman was examined and nothing was found upon her, not any gold at all.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-37

265. MATTHEW FALKNER was indicted for stealing on the 14th of February , four pieces of serge, each piece containing twenty-four yards, value 5l. the goods of Joseph Green , William Green , and Luke William Walford .

JOHN WALFORD sworn.

Q. Do you know the house of Messrs. Green? - Yes.

Q. What is the name of the partner s? - Joseph Green and Luke William Walford .

Q. Were they robbed at any time? - Not that we know of.

Q. What do you charge the prisoner concerning? - On suspicion.

Q. Did you lose any property at any time? - Not that we know of. There were head ends of four serges found in Whalley's house, who kept a shop for the sale of stolen goods; they were originally our property.

JOHN FENNER sworn.

I am an officer of Cheap Ward, the Street Keeper. On Saturday, the 15th of February last, I was at the Mansion House, before my Lord Mayor, Mr. Walford was there, and I was desired to go with Mr. Walford; I went with Mr. Walford to his warehouse, in Little Winchester-street.

Q. Which of the Walford's was it at the examination? - Luke William Walford. I went to the house along with him, the man was loading the cart, Matthew Falkner , the prisoner. Mr Falkner gave me charge of him, and I took him to the Compter, first we examined the box in the house, there was nothing found there of any consequence to the gentleman; he had examinations before the Lord Mayor, and the prisoner was committed for trial. The prisoner was a porter.

John Walford . Here are the head ends of four serges that were found in Whalley's house that was tried last sessions.

Q. Did you see these things in Whalley's house yourself? - No, I did not; Robert Dawson brought him to the Mansion House.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before

Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-38

266. JOHN FINNY was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , two yards of cambrick, value 1l. 8s. the goods of James Webb .

JAMES WEBB sworn.

I am a linen draper . The prisoner at the bar was a porter of mine. On the 28th of February last, about nine o'clock I went into my own cellar, and his morning clothes hung up in the cellar, having some suspicion of him I had the curiosity to feel his pockets, and in his waistcoat pocket I found a little parcel, three slips of cambrick in this piece of paper, this was fast day, Friday; the Wednesday before I saw the piece that these came from, and had it in my hand, it was a remnant, two yards three eights; I saw it in my own shop; on looking at it I thought it was my cambrick. These that I have got in my hand are all slips cut off from that piece, the marked end and the fag end.

Q. What appears on them? - On one of them is my private mark, on the other is two yards three eights, and the third slip

has nothing at all; it is obvious for what they were cut off. I am perfectly satisfied it is my cambrick, I could swear to it see it any where; when I looked at it I thought it was my piece, and I took my stock book and found I had this piece, two yards and a half, we do not take the eighth; I sent for the constable and he was not in the way, I then sent to Mr. Kirby, and he sent me a couple of officers, and I gave him in charge; when he was taken in charge he said he found these pieces in the shop.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe you had his house searched where he lived? - I had, where he said he lived.

Q. It was where his wife lived? - Yes.

Q. You found nothing there? - Because it was too late.

Q. Did you search his box? - He had nothing in his box, his box was at our house, there was nothing there.

Q. This man was out at the time that you found this in his waistcoat pocket, he had leave to go that day? - He took leave and went out.

Q. You had no employment for him, and he went out, he left this openly in the cellar? - He certainly did to be sure.

Q. This was not wrapped up in any thing to conceal it? - It was secured up in a bit of paper very tight.

Q. There are not many yards? - He has taken care of the other part.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he has taken care of the rest? - There is no doubt of it, it strikes me so.

Q. Who sells in your shop besides yourself? - Only my son.

Q. If any body had bought a bit they might have dropped it in the shop? - There was none of it cut.

Q. Will you swear that, though your son is not here? - I will.

Q. Did you search the coat? was there any thing found there that you claimed? - No.

Q. Did you search the breeches? - There were none.

Q. I believe you had this man of Mr. Gedge in Oxford-street? - No, I had him of Mr. Moon or Mr. Maul, in Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Did not you go to Mr. Gedge for his character? - I did, and he gave him a good one, and he had a very good one of his last master.

Q. How came your son not to be here? - There was no occasion for him to be here.

- ROBERTS sworn.

I was sent for to apprehend this man, I did not search him, I searched his boxes, he gave me the key himself at the watch-house, I found, I believe, a waistcoat or two of his own, and their was a pair of ruffles found, but nothing that belonged to Mr. Webb.

The prisoner called six witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-39

267. SARAH SIMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , two pair of thread stockings, value 2s. six small pieces of ribbon, value 2d. a quarter of a yard of muslin, value sixpence, the goods of William Manning ; a linen apron, value 6d. the goods of Sarah Emerson ; and a muslin handkerchief, value 2d. the goods of Elizabeth Buston .

WILLIAM BROWN sworn.

These goods were taken in Mr. Manning's house, Mr. Manning is a West

India merchant , I lived with him as a butler.

Q. When were they missing? - I cannot exactly say; the prisoner was a servant in the house, she had lived there between a fortnight and three weeks, she was a kitchen maid; I saw the things when they were collected, that is all that I know of it; I saw them when they were laying all together; Sarah Emerson was the lady's maid , Elizabeth Buston was the cook .

Q. Where did you see these articles all collected? - In the housekeeper's room.

SARAH EMERSON sworn.

I am the lady's maid to Mrs. Manning.

ELIZABETH BUFTON sworn.

I am the cook. I know there were some things missing, and there was nobody else that we could suspect but the prisoner; the day they were missing was Thursday evening, the 3d of April.

Q. Why did you suspect this kitchen maid? - I believe one of my fellow servants saw her with something of the kind; the apron was found in her work bag; I saw that found there myself, that was the only thing I saw, that was the same evening that they were missing.

Q. Whose work bag was this? - The prisoner's.

Q. Where did she keep this work bag? - It hung up in the servants hall.

Q. How do you know it was her work bag, did you ever see her use it? - Yes, I took the apron out and delivered it to Sarah Emerson who said it was her's.

Q. Do you know any thing of the other articles? - They were taken out of her box, I believe, but I did not see them taken.

Q. What day was it you found the things? - On the third of April about seven o'clock; the prisoner said that she expected it to be a piece of new cloth that laid about, and she thought it was of no consequence.

Q. Then women, generally speaking of it, would not call it an apron, only a piece of linen? - Only a piece of linen.

Court to Sarah Emerson . Did you see the girls box examined? - Yes, the 2d of April, after my piece of linen was found in the bag.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner's box? - Below stairs in the servants hall.

Q. Did she always keep it there? - Yes.

Q. Was it locked? - Yes, I begged of her to open it.

Q. Who was present besides? - The house maid.

Q. What did you find in it? - Ribbons and muslin, six small pieces of ribbon, a quarter of a yard of muslin, a pair of thread stockings, they were all collected together and given to the constable.

Q. Do you know them again? - Yes. I believe the girl was very much distressed and that made her take them.

WILLIAM COOKE sworn.

I went to the house of Mr. Manning, I was not present when the things were taken out of the box, I have the things.

Q. Who delivered the things to you? - Sarah Emerson .

Sarah Emerson . These thread stockings have W. M. on them. Them three pieces my mistress had such, but whether they are the same I cannot say.

Q. Can you swear that she missed any? - I can.

Q. Can you swear to the quarter of a yard of muslin? - I can, it was taken out of my work bag, I missed it three days before she was taken up.

Prisoner. These things that they laid to being in my box they found under the meat screen, and not in my box.

Court to Emerson. Did you see the things taken out of her box, on your oath? - Yes, all them things, that I have mentioned.

Q. Do you know whether her mistress had a good character with her? - Yes, but not from the last place that she lived at.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 19.) Of stealing, one pair of stockings .

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-40

268. CHARLOTTE BUDMORE was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of February , five linen sheets, value 5s. and a woman's cotton gown, value 5s. the goods of Joseph Longcake ; five men's linen shirts, value 5s. a muslin neckcloth, value 1s. three pocket handkerchiefs, value 9d. the goods of Joseph Hayton .

JOSEPH LONGCAKE sworn.

I keep the Robin Hood and Little John, the corner of Webb-square, Bryant-street, Shoreditch ; I lost five linen sheets, the 3d of February, from my own house.

Q. How lately before the 3d of February had you seen them? - I had seen them the 1st of February, they were sent by the prisoner to get mangled, on the 3d of February to the best of my knowledge she took them to the manglers, and they were to be called for in the afternoon, and my daughter went for them in the afternoon and she had been before her, and taken them from the manglers and made them for her own use, I never see her again till she was apprehended, I found them at the pawnbroker's, his name is Mangar, she told me where to find the sheets, and I went there and found them.

Q. Did you make her any promise? - I did not, of any sort.

JEREMIAH MANGAR sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I have got five sheets.

Q. Of whom did you take these sheets? - Of a woman.

Q. Do you know who she is? - I cannot tell who pawned them, they were pawned in the name of Elizabeth Hall, the five sheets were pawned for fourteen shillings I took them in myself.

Q. Then you don't know whether it was the prisoner? - I do not.

JOSEPH HAYTON sworn.

I have lost five shirts, three pocket handkerchiefs and one neckcloth; I formerly was a lodger in this house, but not at that time, I had my property left there; I had seen some of it about three weeks before, I believe.

Q. Where did you find it again? - I found it among the pawnbrokers, several different ones, I cannot mention any of their names, they are all here.

JAMES CRAWFORD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I took in two shirts.

Q. Who did you take them in of? - I don't know, one took in the 1st of February, the other the 3d.

CHARLES FRENCH sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I have one shirt, and two handkerchiefs, I took them in

the third of of February, pledged in the name of Elizabeth Jones , of Vine-court, I don't know whom I took it of.

MICHAEL CONNOLLY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I have got two shirts, I took them in of one Mary Rawlins , one by the name of Mary Rawlins for James Egan , and the other by the name of Mary Rawlins .

JOHN ARNOLD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I produce a gown and neckcloth, I made the ticket for the gown, but took neither of the articles in, they were left by a girl of the name of Eskot.

ANN ESKOT sworn.

Charlotte Budmore asked me to carry a neckcloth to pawn.

Arnold. It was pledged the 20th of January.

Eskot. I should know the neckcloth again this is it, I pledged it with Mr. Arnold's master.

Arnold. I don't know any thing of it, I did not take it in, it was taken in by a servant which was in our service.

Court to Eskot. What had you for it? - Eighteen-pence.

Q. She gave you eighteen-pence for your trouble? - No, I had not any thing.

Q. How came you to pawn it then? - By her desire.

Q. Why did not she pawn it herself? - I knew her a great while, and I did not know it was got in any way dishonest.

ELIZABETH DAVIS .

Q. How old are you? - Going on thirteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - No.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-41

269. SUSANNAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of April , a black silk cloak, value 1l. two pair of shoe buckles, value 8s. six silver tea spoons, value 10s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6d. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. a linen apron, value 1s. the goods of William Purser .

WILLIAM PURSER sworn.

I live at No. 2, James-court, James-street, Featherstone-street, Old-street-road , near the Lying Inn Hospital. I am a brewer's servant .

Q. When did you lose these things in the indictment? - Easter Monday morning, about four o'clock, Monday morning Susannah Smith went out and left my wife; she had come to nurse her while she was laying in, she had been in the house from the Friday evening before; she went out about four o'clock Monday morning, and was gone some time, and then I came back again; I left the house Sunday evening.

Q. When did you return to the house? - I returned to the house the next day; I was at work in Bridge Water-gardens, pulling up beer for Messrs. Cox, King and Curtis.

Q. Did you go home then and find these things missing? - Yes, and I went down to the public office, and took a runner along with me.

Q. Did you find the prisoner at your house when you went there on Monday?

- No, I did not, I went in search of her, but we did not find her that evening, but I found her on Wednesday morning, in Allen-street, Goswell-street, laying on a bed.

Q. Did you go into the room where she was laying on the bed? - Yes, I said to her you must get up and go along with me; she said for what? what had she done? and the runner insisted on her coming along, and we took her to where I live, to my house, when I found her she had one of my handkerchiefs on her neck, a white muslin handkerchief, and a white pair of cotton stockings.

Q. Had you observed the stockings before you took her home or after? - I observed the stockings as she was laying on the bed; I asked her about my spoons and buckles; she said she had done nothing with them, but gave them to another girl to pawn.

Q. Did you make her any promise? - Something of that sort, the runner desired her to tell what she had done with them.

Q. Did the runner tell her it would be better for her? - I never heard any thing of that.

Q. I want to know what you meant by something of that sort? - There were many words passed between them.

Q. Were there any words that imported promise of favour? - No promise of favour.

Q. Did she mention the name of the other girl? - The name of Robinson, I think, and he said he should go and look after that other girl; I left it to the runner; he asked her where she had done the things? and she said she did not know, she had given them to another girl to pawn; then he asked what she had done with the other pair of buckles and silk handkerchief? she said she had pawned them in St. John-street, and we went to the pawnbroker's the same day, Higgs, in St. John-street; we took her there, and we found the silk handkerchief, and a small pair of child's buckles, and at Mr. Lowe's, the pawnbroker, in Clerkenwell-green, we found the spoons and the other pair of buckles; they are small womens buckles, my wife's.

Q. Did you find any thing else? - A check apron at the pawnbroker's, in Barbican, Mr. Burrows, who delivered that up as soon as the runner went in.

Q. These then were all the things you lost? - There was a black silk cloak that we found laying on a little table in the room, in which we took her from.

Q. How do you know that these things were in your house at the time that the prisoner absconded? - I had pulled out the child's buckles out of her shoes when she went to bed on the Sunday night before, and I laid them on the top of the table, in the room where my wife sleeps, I have but one room; I cannot say that the other things were there on Sunday evening, I did not see them.

Q. But do you know them to be your property? - The spoons are marked W. M. P. the child's buckles, one of them, has been soldered in two different places, the spoons were in the drawer, I had not seen them for three or four days.

Q. Do you know the cloak? - Yes.

Q. The cotton stockings were they your own or your wife's? - My wife's. The silk handkerchief is like that on my neck, I had not bought it above a fortnight, and had never worn it. The apron is an old check apron.

Prisoner. The prosecutor said, when he came into the room, that he had missed these things, and in short, I must have them, and if I would tell him where they were, he would not hurt me.

Prosecutor. I never promised her any favour, nor heard the runner, nor any

body else, I did say to her mother before I found her, that if I could find her, and get the things again, and find out where they were pawned, I would not trouble her any further about it.

Q. But then she did not come to you voluntarily, but you found her out? - I found her out.

Q. You found a pair of child's buckles and silk handkerchief at one Higgs's, in St. John-street; did she tell you they were at Higgs's? - She went along with me to Higgs's herself, and she went and took I and the runner to find the other girl.

Prisoner. The runner told me if I knew any thing of the things to tell him of it, for it had better be cleared up before I went to the justice.

WILLIAM BLACKITER sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Worship-street. The prosecutor came to me on Monday the 21st, and he told me that his wife's nurse had robbed him of several things, I found nobody on Monday, he came to me again on Wednesday the 23d, and told me that he had an information where she was, I went with him to Allen-street, Goswell-street, I went up into a first floor, and I found the prisoner in bed along with a man, and woman with her clothes on, as if she had been out all night, except her shoes and cloak. I told her to get up, and when she got up I searched her and found one duplicate about her; I asked her where the rest where? she said, she did not know.

Q. What promise of favour had passed between you and her? - I never promised her any thing.

Q. And did not the prosecutor say any thing to her? - Never. I asked him if he knew any thing that she had on? he said, he was not sure; and I took the woman to the wife's, and I took the handkerchief off her neck, the wife said, this is my handkerchief, the prisoner said not a word to it, I asked the woman if that was her cloak? - she said, yes.

Q. Was that cloak on her when she was laying on the bed? - No, it was laying on the table, about a yard from her, I told her to pull the stockings off and show the woman her stockings, and she did, and the woman said they were her stockings; she then said that she did not pawn the buckles and spoons, but Sal Robins had. I knew Sal Robins , and she said the handkerchief and buckles were pawned by herself, at Higg's, in St. John-street; then I went to Mutton Hill, to Sal Robins , which she said pawned the things; she was not at home.

Q. Did you find any thing there? - No, I did not search the house. Then I went up to Mr. Higgs's the pawnbroker's. in Clerkenwell Green, and I asked him if he had such things pawned there? he said, yes.

Q. What did you enquire after? - A pair of buckles, and six silver tea spoons. Then I asked for whoever took them in to bring them up to the office at such a time.

Q. What became of all the different articles found? - The pawnbrokers has got them, except the cotton stockings the cloak and handkerchief.

JAMES CRAMP LOWE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, on Clerkenwell Green; I produce six tea spoons and a pair of buckles, they may be wore by a man or woman; they were pledged with me by Sarah Robins the 21st of April.

Q. What did you lend her on them? - Eighteen shillings. I have seen her before and known her for three or four years.

JAMES GILMORE sworn.

I live with Mr Higgs, in St. John-street; I produce a silk handkerchief and a pair of buckles; I got them the 21st of April from the prisoner Smith, on a

Monday; the handkerchief she pulled off her neck; we had not the least doubt but they were her own property; she said she lived in Compton street, she pledged them by the name of Mary Williams .

Q. Did you give her a duplicate in the name of Mary Williams ? - I did.

Prisoner. It was not me that pawned the things, but Mary Williams .

Gillmore. The prisoner was the person of whom I received these things, who pulled off the handkerchief from her neck and the buckles out of her pocket.

Q. How much did you lend on them? - Seven shillings.

SARAH ROBINS sworn.

I live in Mutton-lane, Clerkenwell Green. This girl came to me about half after five o'clock, Monday morning, when I was in bed, and she asked me to take these buckles to sell for her mother; I had seen her about three or four months before that, I never spoke to her above a dozen times in my life; she brought a pair of silver buckles and half a dozen tea spoons; I told her she had better not sell them, she had better pledge them, then she might redeem them again, and I took them to Mr. Lowe's, Clerkenwell Green, and had eighteen shillings on them; I pledged them in my own name, she desired me.

Q. What are you? - I goes out to work; and I got my pocket picked of my money and all my duplicates; I don't remember I gave her the money; I don't know what I lost, for somebody took me home and put me to bed, it was seven o'clock when I awoke.

(The things produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. Ask Sarah Robins where she got the silk handkerchief and spoons, that she gave me on Monday morning, on Clerkenwell Green.

Robins. I never see them till she brought them to me, and called me, out of bed, Monday morning.

Court to Purser. How do you call the prisoner? - Susanna Smith, that is her mother's name, and she has been called so for years.

Prisoner. I met Sarah Robins on Clerkenwell Green, about seven o'clock, I was taken ill with a pain in my bowels, and I went out to get something to drink to carry the pain off, and I went down to ask my mother to know what I should get, and my mother told me to get a little lovage, and I went to get a little lovage, and I could not get it nearer than Clerkenwell Green, and there I met Sarah Robins , and she shewed me this silk handkerchief and small buckles, and she asked me to pawn them for her, and I made answer that I did not like to pawn them, and I had another young woman with me, and she said she would pawn them, and she had likewise a pair of large buckles, and six silver spoons with her, and she said she was going to pawn them; afterwards I met her again, and she told me she had pawned them at Mr. Lowe's, and had got in liquor and lost all the money.

The prisoner called Mary Johnson to her character.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.) Transported for seven years .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before. Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-42

270. SARAH COLLINGS was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a cotton gown, value 6s. a check linen shirt, value 2s. the goods of William Harwood .

WILLIAM HARWOOD sworn.

I am a house-keeper, No. 6, George-street, Spitalfields ; I lost a check linen shirt and a cotton gown. On the 14th of

April last, my wife agreed with the prisoner at the bar to come and nurse her, she had got a bad leg; on Friday following she set her to wash; I was robbed the 19th, on Saturday Sarah Collings brought the things in and doubled them up on the chest to be ironed; she asked my wife whether she should take the things in at the door? (we sell greens ) my wife told her she might, and in taking the things in she conveyed the gown and check shirt away, and went off with them; I was not at home, but I know they were missing; the shirt was on her when she came back, she chucked it on the bed, but I was not at home.

MARY BURN sworn.

I go out a charing. On the 19th of April, Mrs. Harwood called on me and said these things were missing, and the woman was missing; it was about eight o'clock, and desired me to go about to see if I could see any thing about it at the pawnbroker's, and I happened to go up the Minories and I saw the prisoner, and I spoke to her, and she went back with me; Mrs Harwood desired me if I see her, to stop her.

Q. Where did you carry her? - She went home to Mrs. Harwood's, and she had this shirt in her apron, and she slung it down on the bed instantly she she got into the room, she had it under her apron carrying of it.

Q. You did not see any thing of it till she came into the room? - No, I did not.

Q. Did you see any cotton gown? - No, I did not; she said she had pledged it; I heard her say so; I told her she had better give an account of it; I told her that before she got home, but she did not tell me, she told Mrs. Harwood, Mrs. Harwood told her that she knew that she had taken it away, and then she owned that she did.

Q. What was done with the shirt that was thrown on the bed? - It was given to the patrole at first.

Q. Is the patrole here? - No.

Q. Is the shirt brought here by any body? - Yes, after she came to the justice it was given to Mr. Harwood, and he gave it me to bring here.

HANNAH HARWOOD sworn.

I am the wife of William Harwood .

Q. Did you lose any cotton gown and apron in April last? - Yes.

Q. Who took it away? - Sarah Collings . I was on the bed and she concealed it under her petticoat; I saw them the last on the chest, just by the bed foot; she went out within two minutes after I saw it on the chest, I missed it as she went out, she had not been gone a minute before I missed it.

Q. Did you ever see the things afterwards? - The shirt I have, I see it again in about an hour and a half; Mrs. Burn brought the prisoner to my house and I see her lay down the shirt after she came in the house myself.

Q. Had you any conversation with her about it? - No, I did not say any thing to her; she told me she had pawned the gown.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - Nothing of the kind, she voluntarily told me that she had pawned it.

Q. Did you ever get this gown out of pawn? - No.

Q. Did not she tell you where it was pawned? - She did not tell me.

Pawnbroker. The gown is here.

Mrs. Harwood. I did not know.

WILLIAM - sworn.

I am a servant to a pawnbroker; I produce a gown, it was pledged with me the 9th of April, I cannot say the time of the day, in the name of Mary Brown ; I cannot say the person that pledged it.

Mrs. Harwood. This is my gown.

Q. The shirt the prisoner dropped, who has had the care of it, your husband? - My husband has took it to the office, and then I have had the care of it till it was brought up, and I gave it to Mary Burn to bring it up here; it is my husband's shirt, and I had never a one but that of that pattern.

Prisoner. I lodged a week and four days at Mr. Harwood's, and this woman, that he lives with, asked me for the last three or four days to go about for her; and last Saturday night, being in liquor, I made free with the gown; I lodged twelve months in the house when his wife kept the house, and I never had a miss word with her in my life.

Court to Burn. When you met her in the street did she appear very much in liquor? - She did not appear so to me; I don't think she was.

GUILTY . (Aged 47.) Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER

Reference Number: t17940430-43

271. MARY MAJOR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a cotton gown, value 5s. the goods of Richard Ferris .

MAGDALEN FERRIS sworn.

I am the wife of Richard Ferris , I lost the cotton gown the 19th of April last, on a Saturday, in the morning, about eight o'clock, I never saw the prisoner before in my life, the cotton gown hung up at the door; she came in at the door and took it; I keep a broker's shop in Long-alley, Moorfields ; the woman that I keep to do what I have to do she gave me the alarm, her name is Frances Broadway , she called to me, and I pursued her, I perceived her about a dozen yards from the door; she had the gown under her arm, under her cloak; the woman brought her back with the gown, I saw it first on her, under her cloak; my husband secured her, and took the gown from her, she said nothing; I have kept the gown till now, it is a very small pattern, dark cotton.

FRANCES BROADWAY sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Ferris; I had hung the gown up at the door, and I heard a person, and I turned round, and I heard the woman go out of the passage, and I missed the gown from the door, and I pursued her, and asked her what she had got? She said, nothing; I said she had got something, and I pulled her back again, and took the gown from her.

Q. Where was the gown taken from her? - At the street door.

Q. To Mrs. Ferris. Who was the person that took the gown from her? - This woman and my husband were both together.

(The gown produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was coming along Long-alley, and I saw a little bundle lay, I picked it up, and I thought it was no harm, and I was going along with it, I thought there would be no danger in it

for me. I have got no witness but God Almighty that is above.

GUILTY . (Aged 49.) Imprisoned three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-44

272. SARAH BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , four guineas and eight shillings ; the monies of Johan Kenrick Hotham .

AN INTERPRETER sworn.

The PROSECUTOR sworn.

Is your name Johan Henrick Hotham ? - My name is Johan Flathman Henrick .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-45

273. MARY WOODHOUSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , ten yards of printed callico, value 1l. 10s. the goods of John Wayte , privately in his shop .

RICHARD LEADBETTER sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Wayte, a linen draper , in Whitechapel , he was robbed on Saturday, the 15th of March. The prisoner was the person that robbed him, I did not see her take the goods, she came in for half a yard of callico, between five and six in this evening, and I was obliged to turn round to take the callico down from the shelf; when I turned round again I missed the goods, I missed two gowns, two pieces for gowns, it made ten yards of printed callico together.

Q. Where were these gowns laying? - On the counter.

Q. Was she near that counter? - She was.

Q. Are you sure that you observed nothing about her at the time, that could lead you to suppose she took it? - No, I did not. When I cut off the quantity that she wanted, I objected to the shilling that she put down to pay for it, I objected it not being good, that I might look on the shelf to see if I had put it on the shelf before I challenged her with it; I looked on the shelf to see that I had not laid it off from the counter, that I might not be mistaken before I laid hold of her; I then went round and lifted up her cloak and found the two pieces of callico under her arm.

Q. Did she say any thing about it? - Nothing at all.

Q. What may be the value of this callico? - Thirty shillings, it cost Thirty-one shillings and six pence within six months, as near as I can recollect.

Q. Have you kept that piece separate from the rest? - Yes.

Q. Before you produce it, were there any marks on it by which you know it to be your's? - There are private marks, one is marked B and S, and the other R and S. I had seen it on the counter not a quarter of an hour before. I can swear to it being ours.

Q. Was there any body in the shop at this time besides yourself? - Nobody, but myself and the prisoner.

Q. Have you any other witness? - None but the officer.

Q. Was their nobody at all about your premises but yourself? - Nobody at all.

Prisoner. I have got so far as this to say, on the Saturday I went to buy them things of this gentleman, some callico, and he told me it was a bad shilling, which I told him I took it at next door, I had an ounce of tea in my hand, he stood some time and said; it is a bad one and I will not take it; sir, says I, if you think it is a bad one I will go and change it, at last after a good deal he came round to me, and there was nothing on me, and he said he had missed some things the Wednesday before, and he kept me in his place I dare say for an hour and a half, and another man came down some time afterwards, and they sent for an officer, and none would come, I told them if they thought I was guilty I would deliver up my keys. About the evening there was a patrole the other side of the way, and he came in and they took me up to the office, I staid there very late that night, and on the Wednesday following I was brought up to have my hearing. I went home, and I gave my birds water, and I shut my shutters, and I returned to the office again by a quarter before four, I went in to have my hearing again, and the patrole said that I had several duplicates in my house, and if I would give them up I should be acquitted on Friday, and I was never carried to prison till one o'clock in the morning, on Saturday night.

Q. To Leadbetter. Was not she immediately committed? - The justice wished not to commit her till the week following.

Q. Did you tell the justice that you took the property from under her cloak? - I did.

Q. Had you ever seen her in your house before? - Yes, several times; she was not committed at the first hearing, she was kept in custody.

EDWARD EVANS sworn.

I am a patrole of Whitechapel High-street; this gentleman, he called me over to his assistance, to take the woman into custody; after I went over to take her into custody my brother officer and I came over, and we took her to the office, and she begged to go home; and we said if she would tell where she lived, we would take her home; this was between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, as I was going on duty, or it might be six; she was delivered to the officer at the police, and committed to Clerkenwell after she was examined, and never out of custody; that afternoon there I was a warrant granted to search her house, and we went to it, and found about two hundred duplicates, they are here.

Q. Did she go with you? - No.

Q. Did she say it was her house? - No, we found it out, we did not find any property at all, but duplicates, plenty of them.

Mr. Ledbetter, Mr. Wayte was in an adjoining room, within a glass casement.

GUILTY, Of Stealing but not privately .(Aged 33.) Transported for seven years .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-46

274. JOHN NAPPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , eleven hair brooms, value 11s. a hand brush, value 4d. three wooden bowls, value 3s. four pair of bellows, value 4s. a lawn sieve, value 4d. a wooden corn measure, value 4d. a clothes brush, value 4d. a wooden chair, value 4d. the goods of Jeremiah Hodges , and, JOHN GUMMELL was indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

JEREMIAH HODGES sworn.

I am a turner and patten-maker . I lost things various times, the last that I know of was on the 6th of March; the prisoner Napper is my apprentice , some time previous to the 6th of March, a neighbour of mine told me that he had seen such practices carried on.

PLANT sworn.

I am a plumber.

Q. Did you ever know Mr. Hodges was robbed? - On the 6th of March I see the prisoner Gummell receive the goods of John Napper .

Q. Do you know what the goods were? - A mop, a brush, and a long hair broom.

Q. Have you mentioned all that he gave? - Yes.

Q. Where did it pass? - At Mr. Hodges's house, at the door of the shop.

Q. Was you near enough to bear any conversation? - No, I was on the opposite side of the way.

Q. Do you live on the opposite side of the way? - Yes

Q. Did you at any other morning, or at any other time see him give him any property? - No, I followed the prisoner to his own house that morning, John Gummell , the receiver.

Q. Where did Gummell live? - He lived at No. 24, Gray's-inn lane.

Q. Has he any shop there? - He sells childrens toys, and various things, mops and brushes .

Q. What else passed? did you know him before this? - No, I never see him before.

Q. Have you ever seen the things since? - Only at the office at Bow-street, and just now.

Q. Should you know the things again? - No, I should not.

Mr. Wentworth. I am for Napper. You know Napper to be Hodges's apprentice? - I know by report, I never see the articles.

Q. You live opposite, perhaps you have seen the prisoner for these last four years opposite? - No, I have not, I have seen him there for about six months.

Q. And perhaps for about six months you have seen him come out of the shop and deliver goods to customers? - No, I never see him but once.

Mr. Knowlys. I am for Gummell. Mr. Hodges is very little employed in his own business? - I cannot tell that.

Q. Did you see any body else acting in the shop? - Not then, it was in the morning, when he was opening of the shop.

Q. There is no other person acting in the shop for the master, but this boy? - I don't know that.

Q. When you followed this man Gummell home, you found he was a man dealing in these sort of articles? - When I went to the shop, I saw various articles.

Q. Among various articles there were articles of this kind? - Yes.

Q. And there they were open for sale? - They were.

Q. You say you should not know these things again if you was to see them? - I should not.

Court. When was it you first gave information of this to the prosecutor? - The same morning, immediately after I saw it, about nine o'clock.

WILLIAM HARDING sworn.

I am a hair-dresser and perfumer; I cannot say that I know any thing of the loss; I saw this man frequently come of a morning, and I thought he was of a suspicious character. I mean the old man at the bar, Gummell; he used to come sauntering about the street of a morning. I live about three or four doors from Mr. Hodges, on the same side of the way; I told Mr. Hodges of it.

Mr. Knowlys. Don't you know that this man is a porter, and has frequent jobs that way? - I do not.

Mr. Wentworth. Do you know Napper? - Yes.

Q. Was you intimate with the family? do you know that he was intrusted with the shop? - I do not, I believe he was an apprentice; I only just as a neighbour gave the information to Mr. Hodges.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

I am a constable. On Thursday the 5th of March, I took the prisoners, Napper and Gummell, into custody, and having a search warrant, I went and searched Gummell's house, with Mr. Hodges, No. 24, Gray's inn-lane, and found that property that Mr. Hodges said was his, that is all I know. I took eleven brooms, four pair of bellows, three wooden bowls, a sieve, a wooden measure, a clothes brush and a band brush, and a wooden chair that was put outside of the door for sale; one of the wooden bowls was found in the back kitchen, which Mr. Hodges can swear positively to, the other things were found about the shop, and in the window, I think some of the brooms were found below stairs, I think one or two were fetched up.

Mr. Knowlys. You found these things disposed just as you would in any trades, man's shop? - Just as I told you.

Q. This man keeps a shop of this sort, and buys and sells old clothes, and china? - Yes, and all sort of things.

Q. One of these wooden bowls were found in the back kitchen? - It was.

Q. I fancy when you took Hodges first to Gummell's house, Hodges was not able to identify any thing? - He believed them to be his, but I was in a doubt whether I had a right to take them or no; then we took Gummell into custody, and I told Hodges we had better go to the magistrate, and have his advice, and then afterwards we went back and found a wooden bowl on the second search, and then he said he had not the least doubt about the things being his.

Q. Gummell himself acted as a porter I believe? - I don't know, I have known them some years, but I did not know that he kept such a shop as that before.

Court to Hodges. Napper was your apprentice? - He was.

Q. Did you give him the whole care of your business, or give him authority to do any business without your knowledge? - By no means.

Q. He acted as your apprentice? - As that only.

Q. Did he at any time put any of these goods that were lost to any account? - No, never.

Q. Did he ever sell goods when you was out of the way? - He did, and if any thing was had away on credit, he set it down on a slate, and when I came home I booked it.

Q. Was you very much at home yourself? - I was.

Q. With regard to these goods that have been produced by the constable, look at them? - I can positively swear to this bowl, having once sold it, and being returned; this broom I can swear to, having a remarkable large knot in the wood; I know this hair broom by a creese which the hook has made, in putting it out at the door. A mark is cut out, or scraped out of all the goods. The bellows I know to be mine; the maker's mark and my mark is cut out.

Q. Then the marks that are cut out, were all marked by you? - They were.

Q. Then you swear to the whole of this property produced? - To the best of my belief I can swear to every article.

Q. It appears by the evidence, that you had some intimation of this; how soon did you charge Napper with the offence? - In an hour after.

Q. Was any thing put on the slate in the course of that hour? - Nothing, I particularly asked him if he had taken any money? Not a halfpenny he said.

Mr. Knowlys. I take it for granted that you was always as sure of the property as you are now? - I had not a doubt of it at the first moment, only the marks being erased, I thought fit to ask the magistrate whether I should bring them.

Q. Then you never said to any body, that you could not swear to them? - I never said so.

Q. Did not you say that you was sorry that you had gone so far, because you could not swear to them? - Never.

Q. I believe you generally sit up late? - That is irreverent to the subject, and I am not bound to answer all your questions.

Mr. Wentworth. How long has Napper been your apprentice? - Six years.

Q. You have trusted him occasionally in the shop? - I have.

Q. How much has he took in a day? - Five or six shillings.

Q. Not a guinea? - He might.

Q. Two guineas? - No, never.

Prisoner Napper. I was intrusted in the shop, and I always accounted to my master for what I took. My master has often returned from drinking, and taken the money, and then gone to the public house again.

Prisoner Gummell. I wish the jury to consider this gentleman's propriety in swearing to the things; when he first came to my house, he could not swear to any thing, he went to Bow-street without taking a single thing with him; as to his swearing to the things having the marks scratched out, they are things that I have bought at different sales, and if they were marked with twenty marks, I should scratch them out, to put my own mark on. This gentleman has been employed in the lottery line, taking insurances.

WILLIAM WAITE sworn.

I am a journeyman to the prosecutor, Mr. Hodges.

Q. Are you his journeyman now? - Yes.

Q. You know the apprentice, Napper, the prisoner? - Yes, I know him very well.

Q. Do you know him to have the care of the goods, and occasionally entrusted to sell? - I do.

Q. Do you know any thing of the bowl, in which the money was put? - Yes, further I have known him to have the care of that shop ten hours out of twelve for several days together; I have known him in the course of two or three hours to take gold.

Q. Is it not possible that he might have taken three or four guineas a day, and don't you believe that he seldom took less than a guinea? You never considered Mr. Hodges as very attentive to his shop? - No, it was left there to the lad.

Mr. Knowlys. Has Mr. Hodges said any thing respecting the property since the prisoner has been in custody? - He has said that he has not lost the things that he supposed he might, and that he was very sorry for what he had done, and that he was persuaded to do it by his neighbours.

Q. Has he said that once or more than once? - I heard him mention it once, but to the best of my knowledge, no more than once.

Court. How long have you been his journeyman? - Ever since November.

Q. You have assisted in the shop sometimes? - I have, and have till within these two or three days.

The prisoner Napper called seven witnesses, and Gummell ten, who gave them good characters.

Court to Hodges. You have heard what your journeyman has said, is it true? - On my oath I never said such a thing, in my life, to my knowledge.

John Napper, GUILTY. (Aged 18.) Judgment respited .

John Gummell , GUILTY . (Aged 49.) Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-47

275. ALEXANDER LORAINE was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's high way, on Walter William Salts , on the 6th of January , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a silver watch, value 2l. the goods of the said Walter William Salts .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.) WALTER WILLIAM SALTS sworn.

On the 6th of January 1794, I was in Crown-court, Little Poultney-street . On twelfth Day at night, between seven and eight, I was coming along the court, there was a large confectioner's shop, and a very great light, and a great crowd of people, which I went to get by, quite close to the wall to avoid them, the prisoner stepped up to me, and with his left arm he struck me against the wall; I gave him a punch of the breast, and said, you villain, what do you mean? and the moment I struck him I turned myself, and I felt my watch drawed out of my pocket.

Q. Describe particularly how your watch went from you? - I felt it draw out of my fob, my fob was very tight, that made me feel, I put my hand so, and said, my watch is gone.

Q. Was any body by you, except the prisoner? - Yes, there were three or four by me.

Q. Did you see any motion of the prisoner's other hand? - No farther than his pushing me against the wall, and I see him turn up his other hand under my coat.

Q. Did you see any thing in his hand? - No. Two boys standing close by me, on my right hand side, when I said, my watch is gone, they said, I know him, that is the man that took your watch, and I turned in that way and manner,

and followed the prisoner along the court, and the boys followed him; the boys pursued the prisoner, and I followed him to the end of the court and the next street beyond, which, I think, is Brewer-street; they followed him close up all the way.

Q. Did the prisoner walk along the court? - He did, he never run. When I came into Brewer-street, I made a stop, and I thought myself perhaps there may be a gang of them collected, and so I went no further.

Q. Did you see him afterwards? - Yes, I see him go out of the court, into the street.

Q. After that where did you see him next? - I did not see him till I came to Bow-street.

Q.What sort of a watch was your's? - It was a silver watch with double cases, a ribbon, and one key.

Q. When you came to Bow-street, the prisoner was there? - He came.

Q. When did you see him at Bow-street, how long after your watch was lost? - It was four or five days, or more, I had been there some time, he came in, he was brought in, and some men came in with him.

Q. When you saw the prisoner at the bar there, did you recollect him again? - I did.

Q. Was he the same person that gave you the shove with his elbow? - That he was. I said then, that is the man, I know him particularly, when he struck me against the wall, I looked at him and I said, I knew him, by his eyes particularly.

Q. Are you sure now as you was then? - I am.

Q. Afterwards he was committed? - He was.

Mr. Knowlys. Pray whereabouts was it your watch was pulled out of your fob? - About the middle of the court, right opposite the pastry cook's shop, rather more towards Compton-street.

Q. I believe you described it to be under an archway, did not you? - No, it was in the court.

Q. Did not you say you was robbed in the further end, and under the archway? - No, I never said no such thing; it was right opposite the pastry cook's shop, more towards Compton-street, it was more towards the other end, not the end where the archway is.

Q. Are you sure that you never said you was robbed under that archway? - No, no such thing.

Q. You said there was a large crowd, a considerable crowd? - Yes.

Q. It was a very dark night? - Yes; but there was a very great light at the confectioner's shop.

Q. I believe you have the misfortune to have lost one eye? - Yes.

Q. Did not you describe it at Bow-street that your hat was pulled over your eye? - There was an offer, but I put my hand up just before I was robbed.

Q. Did not you say that your hat was pulled over your eye? - No, I am sure of that.

Q. Was that before you was pushed with the man's elbow? - Yes.

Q. Did you call out at all at this? - No, I tried to get by.

Q. You was at this time in the middle of the crowd? - No, I tried to get through close by the wall.

Q. How many yards do you think you might be from the consectioner's shop? - The court is not very wide.

Q. There were a good many people between you and the confectioner's shop? - Yes.

Q. So that you was a good deal hid from the confectioner's shop, because there were a good many people between you and the confectioner's shop? - They were so many almost as filled the court.

Q. You say that this person whom you describe to be the prisoner, you see him take the watch out of your pocket? - I see his hand go up here, and I felt the watch draw.

Q. Did you see the watch in his hand at all? - I did not.

Q. The man walked off, you say he did not attempt to run? - He did not.

Q. Did you call out at all? - I did not, I followed him all along into the next street.

Q. You went into Brewer-street, was there any crowd there? - I cannot say, there were four or five went after him, and the boys.

Q. I believe it was as much as eleven or twelve days before you went to Bow-street? - Not so much as that.

Q. Had not you the curiosity to follow this man to the end of the street? - No, I did not, I came back, to go home.

Q. When you came to Bow-street the boy, Mayne, was there; was not he? - He was.

Q. Was not Mayne standing close by you at the time the prisoner was brought in? - I cannot say; I think when the prisoner was brought in I was sitting down on the bench myself.

Q. Do you recollect any transaction of his, or expression, such as this, this is the man, or pulling you by the coat? - He did not say any thing to me, he was going to say something, but the prisoner at the bar began, and so he said no more.

Q. You say the only opportunity you had of seeing the prisoner was when you was pushed, and you listed up your face to him? - Yes, till he came to Bow-street.

Q. I take it for granted you was a good deal alarmed on this occasion? - When my watch was gone.

Q. Yes? - No, not at all.

Q. Did not that give you some alarm his attempting to pull the hat over your eyes? - No, none at all.

Mr. Knowlys. My learned friend has asked you something about an arch way, you don't know exactly where this arch way was? - I do not.

Q. My learned friend has asked you whether the boy was going to say something, did you hear what he did say? - No.

Q. Did the boy point the prisoner out to you? - No.

WILLIAM MAYNE sworn.

Q. How old are you? - Going of seventeen.

Q. Do you remember being in Crown-court the twelfth night? - I was just facing the pastry cooks, it was between seven and eight in the evening.

Q. Was there any light in the pastry cook's shop? - A good deal.

Q. Tell the court and jury what you see that night? - The first that I saw of it; A gentlewoman went into the pastry cook's to buy a twelfth cake, and when she came out Loraine and three more of his companions, shoved her and put their hands into her pocket; and Mr. Salts stopped there and he went and shoved him, he gave him a shove so.

Q. Was it with his right or left arm? - I cannot recollect that, then one knocks his hat over his eyes and he takes his watch.

Q. Who takes his watch? - Loraine.

Q. Did you see the watch in his hand? - Yes, at the time that he took it.

Q. Did you see what he did with it? - He took it up with him, and his other companions followed, and then he gave the watch to the other.

Q. Now what did you do on this? - I followed him all the way he went

down, he went through the passage, and them that were with him went into Little Windmill-street, and he went down into Great Windmill-street, and then I ran after him and cried stop thief I and I pursued him and catched hold of the flap of his coat at a passage going into Panton-square, I called out for assistance, and a soldier came up, and we brought him up, and there was a mob gathered together, and they said they were sure he was not the person, and they made me let him go, and then he ran down Windmill-street and I hallooed out stop thief! and I laid hold of him again once or twice, and he twisted himself round so that I could not hold him, and he ran down Coventry-street, and the patroles hearing me hallo stop thief! they took hold of him, and we took him to St. James's watch-house.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him from the time he committed the robbery to the time he was taken? - No, I was close to him, and I had seen him before he took the watch. He was about the place a good bit; I am sure he was the same person, and he is the same person that I saw at Bow-street, Jones was with me.

Q. When he was apprehended by the patrole did he say any thing? - The patrole said I had better go and seek for the gentleman; I left him when the patrole got him.

Mr. Knowlys. How broad is this court? - It is broader at one end than it is at the other.

Q. How broad is it at the pastry cook's shop? - As broad as from here to you.

Q. Did this happen at the pastry cook's shop or where? Was not the robbery done under the arch way? - Yes, under the arch way, not the very narrow part where the people were going through so thick, just under the end of the arch way, just against the linen draper's back door.

Q. How many yards do you think that is from the pastry cook's shop window? - About the distance of that desk to me,(the short hand writer's desk.)

Q. A good many people were between you and the prisoner at this time? - No, I was close to him, because when I saw what he had done to the lady I followed him close.

Q. It is rather dark under this arch way? - Yes,it is so.

Q. How many people do you think there were between you and the old gentleman, when he was robbed? - There was nobody between me, there was people passing through.

Q. You was standing close to the old gentleman's elbow when he took it? - Yes, I was.

Q. You have always said so? - I suppose.

Q. You might indeed have stopped him as he was taking the watch out if you had been so inclined? - I could have taken him directly, but I did not know what they were going to do.

Q. They had got a little way off before you told the old gentleman what they had done? - But I was close to him.

Q. You was perfectly well acquainted with the prisoner's person and dress? - Yes.

Q. Do you recollect being at Bow-street the next day when the prisoner was brought up for examination? - Yes, I do.

Q. I believe Mr. Bond asked you whether the prisoner wore a wig or his own hair? did not you say you could not tell? - I did.

Q. How happened it? - I did not mind his hair, I only minded his eye, when I looked at his face, I saw he had

but one eye, and could not hardly see out of the other.

Q. I mean the prisoner who committed the robbery, did not he ask you whether the prisoner wore a wig or his own hair? - I don't remember that he did ask me that.

Q. Did not he ask you how he was dressed? - Nor how he was drest.

Q. You know there were some other persons there who took the man, a man of the name of glover? - Yes, there was a man that came up at the same time that said he laid hold of him.

Q. Are you sure that Mr. Bond did not ask you how the prisoner was dressed, and whether he wore a wig or his own hair? - I do not remember that.

Q. Did he ask what sort of a man he was? - No, he did not.

Q. Do you mean to say that the prisoner was running when he was secured at last? - Yes, when he was let loose from Catharine Wheel-yard he ran; he was running.

Q. How near was you to the old gentleman that was robbed, at the time that the prisoner was produced at Bow-street? I believe you was standing close to the old gentlemen at the time that the prisoner was produced? - I was standing by the fire.

Q. What did you say to the old gentleman, when the prisoner was brought in? - I said nothing to the old gentleman.

Q. You was going to speak to him, was not you? - Not at the time that he was brought in, that I recollect.

Q. Do you recollect pulling him by the coat? - No, I am sure I did not; when he was in a little while, the old man says, that is him; yes, says I.

Q. What did you say before the old gentleman said any thing about the man? - I said nothing to Mr. Salts.

Q. Did not you pull him by the coat? - No, I did not touch his coat.

Mr. Knapp. How near was this archway? you lay it was as near as the short hand writer's desk. There was a good deal of light come from this shop? - It was light enough to see there.

Q. You say you did not pull Mr. Salt's coat at the office? - No, I did not.

Court. How long is this court? - About the length of this court, or a little longer.

Q. You had been looking at the pastry cook's, I suppose? - Yes.

Q. Was the old gentleman stopping to look, or was he going through? - He was going through.

Q. Was it open or arched over? - It was arched over.

Q. Had he gone through part of the court? - He was going through the court coming up towards the pastry cook's shop.

Q. How far was he from the part of the court that is opposite? - About as far as the short hand writer's desk.

CALEB JONES sworn.

I am going of fifteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - Yes; if I tell a lie I shall go to the Devil.

Q. Was you with Mayne on twelfth night last? - Yes, I was, in Crown court, it was between seven and eight, I saw Alexander Loraine and three more of his companions, they were in Crown-court, and they hustled Mr. Salts.

Q. What do you mean by hustling Mr. Salts? - One of them knocked the hat over his face, Alexander Loraine he shoved Mr. Salts up against the wall, I think it was with his left elbow.

Q. How far was this from the pastry cook's? - About three or four yards; I was close by the gentleman that lost the watch.

Q. After this shove against the wall, what did you see then? - Alexander Loraine took the watch out of Mr. Salt's

fob; I am sure it was Loraine, and he went on through the court, and his companions followed him with the watch in his hand, and I followed him, and he went in Windmill-street, and his companions they all went together, and then Loraine he gave a watch to one of his companions.

Q. Did he take it out of his pocket, of was it in his hand? - I don't know that. And they all said something I could not hear, and then three of them went towards Little Windmill-street, and Alexander Loraine parted company and went down Great Windmill-street, and I hallooed out stop thief! and followed him down Catharine Wheel-yard, he went down there, and finding it no thoroughfare, he returned again, and cried stop him! stop thief! there he is.

Q. What did you do then? - He hallooed out, where is my knife?

Q. Did he say any thing else? - He said possess me, gentlemen, the mob did not think he was any thing of the kind, and they let him go.

Q. Had you ever laid hold of him? - No, Mayne laid hold of him. Then he ran down Turnmill-street after this, and I hallooed out stop thief! again; and two patroles catched him the corner of Coventry-street.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing at the time that he was taken? - No.

Q. You see the prisoner before this, shove the prosecutor, and before he lost his watch. Are you sure that this is the same man that shoved the prosecutor, and took his watch from him? - I am quite sure of it.

Q. He is the same man that was at Bow-street? - He is.

Q. What part of the office was you in when the prisoner was brought in? - I was just by the fire.

Q. Was Mayne near you? - Yes, he was near.

Q. Do you recollect what part of the office the prosecutor was in? - He was standing just by the seats there.

Mr. Knowlys. The first time you was examined at Bow-street, when the justice asked Mayne whether the prisoner had a wig on or his own hair, he could not tell him? - I don't recollect that.

Q. Do you recollect his asking him how the man, that committed the robbery was dressed? - Yes, I recollect that Mayne said it was a brownish great coat.

Q. Was you close by the prosecutor when the prisoner was brought in? - Not close to him.

Q. You did not see what past between the prosecutor and Mayne? - I did not.

Court. Have you parents? - Yes.

Q. Do you live near Crown court? - I live in Crown-court with them, Mayne lives in New-street, he is an apprentice to a-book-binder.

THOMAS HENRY sworn.

I am a patrole of St. James's parish. On the twelsth night, I heard hallooed out, stop thief! while I was on duty, and I came towards the place, and this man was given to me into custody, and brought to St. James's watch-house; Cunningham was with me.

Court. Are these the two boys that cried out stop thief? - Yes, these are the two boys.

Mr. Knowlys. He had been stopped before you came up? - Yes.

Q. Was not he delivered to you by a man of the name of Glover? - No, there was nobody after him but the boys, I stopped him, he was walking very fast.

JAMES EVANS sworn.

I am a plater; I live in King-street, Drury-lane; I am a journeyman to Mr. Walker in Great Wild-street. On the 6th of January I was coming down Coventry-street, I heard the cry of stop

thief this prisoner at the bar was coming along side of me, walking, and I catched hold of him, a patrole came up directly, and laid hold of the other side, and Glover, the other witness, he laid hold of him likewise; the patrole came up behind me, and held the staff over my head, and told me to loose him; I told him I should not loose him; he asked me if I knew what that was? I told him I did not, nor did I care, and I kept him by the collar till I delivered him into the watch-house.

Q. Did you attend the examination before Mr. Bond the next day? - I did.

Q. Did you see that young lad there? - Yes.

Q. I understand something passed between Mr. Bond and the boy? - Justice Bond asked him what he saw concerning the business? he told him that the prisoner at the bar came behind the prosecutor, and knocked the hat over his eyes, and then with his right hand pulled she watch out of his pocket. Mr. Bond asked him what colour the watch was? he said he could not tell whether it was yellow, white or green, but that it was a watch.

Q. Did he ask him any questions about the person of the prisoner, or how he was dressed? - No, he did not.

Prisoner. He asked him in regard to the prosecutor, whether he knew him.

Court to Henry. Was this man there? - Yes, he came up in Piccadilly.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, I leave it all to my counsel.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 35.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17940430-48

276. WILLIAM WYBROW and WALTER MAY were indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ed. ward Gibson, about the hour of one in the night, of the 12th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, nine pieces of black wrought silk, called mode, value 80l. the goods of the said Edward Gibson .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOSEPH BELL sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Gibson; his christian name is Joseph; I livein Crispin-street , in Mr. Gibson's house, in the parish of Spitalfields.

Court. What is your master's name? - Edward Gibson .

Q. When was your master's house broke open? - Late on Saturday night, or Sunday morning, I don't know which, the 12th of April.

Q. On that night who was last up in the house? - I really cannot tell.

Q. Did you fasten the doors of the house? - Yes, I did.

Q. What time of the night did you go to bed? - As near as I can recollect about nine o'clock, or between nine and ten; I sleep on the other side of the house, to where the robbery was committed, but in that house.

Q. A journeyman of your master's slept in that house also? - He slept along with me, in the same bed, I was not alarmed till the morning, when I got up in the morning I went down into the cellar, and saw the place broke open, the cellar window is formed of wood and bars, there is no light at all comes into the cellar, it is a blank window, I saw the window had been broke into, and two bars laid along with the wood; I missed nine pieces of mode, all black; I really cannot tell the value of them.

Q. Where they worth twenty pounds? - Rather more, I believe.

Q. Where had you seen it last? - In the room where I sleep

Q. When? - In the afternoon, preceeding this robbery, part of it, I did not see it all.

Q. Have you ever seen these pieces again? - Never.

Q. Was this mode in the usual place where it is kept? - It was rather uncommon being where it was, being Saturday night.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you see Mason, the accomplice, about the house that day? - Yes.

Q. Did you see Mason's father about the premises that day? - Yes.

Q. Do you know what he and Mason the thief were doing together? - I don't know indeed.

Q. Did you see any of them removing the mode? - I did not.

Q. You see the accomplice's father about the house? - Yes, he was foreman to us.

Court. When was you last in the cellar? - On Friday night I think was the last.

Q. You had not been there on Saturday? - No, my lord, I had not.

EDWARD GIBSON sworn.

Q. We understand that you have a house in Crispin-street, the house that is broke open; let us understand a little what part of the house you occupy? - I let three rooms of it; two rooms I let to one of my journeymen, and one to a widow woman.

Q. This cellar had you let it to any body? - No.

Q. You never sleep in this house yourself? - No, only my servants.

Q. Do you let any part of the house to your apprentice? - I do not.

Q. Then all that you let, are these three rooms that you have described; you missed some mode? - I have, upwards of five hundred yards, nine pieces.

Q. Have you ever seen that again? - No.

Q. How soon did you hear that this burglary had been committed? - Between eight and nine o'clock on Sunday, the 13th of April.

Q. Did you go then down to the cellar? - I did, and I saw the boards and bars all down, I saw it indeed before I went down.

Q. Is that cellar window fronting the street? - It is, it had been a window formerly.

Mr. Knowlys. I think you write up Gibson and Co? - I had a partner formerly, but not lately.

Q. You never sleep in this house yourself? - No.

Q. Only your servants, they are not domestic servants? - They may occasionly go on errands.

Mr. Knapp. Where does the apprentice usually sleep? - He usually sleeps in the room where we deposit the goods of a night.

Mr. Knowlys. Had you given orders to Mason that the goods were not to be carried down in the cellar of a Saturday? - I cannot say that I have given him that orders, but I have given that general order that goods of that description should not go into the cellar of a Saturday night.

Mr. Knapp. What part of the house does the apprentice usually sleep in? - The front room, in the part of the house that is unlet, that I occupy myself.

Court to Bell. You said that you slept in the other part of the house that night, not the part of the house that was broke open; whom did you sleep with? - One of the journeymen.

Mr. Knapp. Did you sleep in the apartment of the journeyman, that Mr. Gibson lets part of the house to? - No.

THOMAS MATTHEWS sworn.

I am a journeyman to Mr. Gibson.

Q. Do you live at his house in Crispin-street? - I do not, I go there of days.

I see Robert Mason take down these very goods that were stole, the nine pieces of mode, on Saturday night about seven in the evening, as nigh as I can guess.

Q. Did you see what part of the cellar he put them in? - I cannot say justly what part, but I know them to be in the cellar.

Q. Was the cellar the usual place for these modes to be in? - Yes, at times, but on Saturday night I cannot justly say; I was going through the area at the outside of the premises, I saw the window which they broke in at to get these goods, safe that night; this was about seven o'clock five minutes after Robert Mason had carried the modes down into the cellar.

Q. On the 12th of April, was it dark at seven o'clock? - No.

Mr. Schoen. You saw Robert Mason take these goods down into the cellar on Saturday night? - Yes.

Q. Who assisted him? - Nobody but himself.

Q. Are you sure of that? - Yes.

Q. Where was his father at that time? - With me

Q. He did not assist him? - No.

Q. You was examined before the justice? - Yes.

Q. Did not you say there that Robert Mason's father assisted him in taking these goods down into the cellar? - No, I did not.

Q. Mr. Gibson has told us that he gave general orders that these things should not be removed there on Saturday night? - I cannot say any thing to that.

GEORGE DAVIDSON sworn.

I am a publican, I keep the Queen's Head, Paternoster row, Spitalfields, near Crispin-street, within a hundred yards; I saw both the prisoners on Saturday the 12th of April in my house, Mason came in about eight o'clock at night, he staid till past twelve and the other two came in about ten, May and Wybrow, they staid till past twelve, and they came and had a glass of rum at the bar and went out; Monday morning Mason came into the house a little before ten, and he told me to send to May, I told him I would send for one of the men, I did, and the man came, and they drank up the porter and went out, and I never saw him any more till Monday night.

Mr. Knowlys. May was there a couple of hours before any of the others made their appearance? - It was so.

Q. Saturday night is not an uncommon night for working people to be at a public house? - It is not.

Mr. Schoen. You had a raffle at your house that night? - We had.

Q. How far is your house from the prosecutor's? - About three hundred yards.

JAMES STARLING sworn.

I am a hackney coachman.

Q. Do you remember taking any persons up on the 12th of April? - Yes, I took some persons up, three men facing the Marquis of Gransby, Bishopsgate-street, it might be about ten minutes before two over or under.

Q. When you took up three men had they any thing with them? - One of them had a white canvas bag under his left arm.

Q. Where did you take them to? - I did not drive them, I put them into the coach, I was the driver of the coach that day, but I did not go with that job, Price went with that job.

Q. Should you know these men again? - I believe I should, I cannot say that I could be on my oath.

PHILLIP PRICE sworn.

Q. Do you remember driving a job for starling, on the 12th of April? - I am not take up any body, Mr. Starling you them into the coach, I was in the house, and the waterman called me out; so the best of my knowledge it was somewhere about two o'clock in the morning.

Q. Where was the watering house? - In Bishopsgate-street; I don't know who was in the coach, I was desired to go to the May Pole, East Smithfield; and when I came there, they made me go a little further, and I went to the right hand, about four doors beyond Nightingale-lane, and before I could get off my box, they were out of the coach, and the first that went off had a little bag under his arm, the last that got out paid me, I had no suspicion at all of the affair, and I did not observe the men.

SARAH CHILD sworn.

I keep the Bunch of Grapes, Little Paternoster-row.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoners at the bar, or either of them, and when? - One of them, the furthest, May, came in one morning, and the other two, Wyburn and Mason followed, how soon after the robbery I cannot particularly say; they came in and called for a pint of beer, and I gave them the beer, and they asked change for a guinea, and it lay on the table, and I laid the change on the table again.

ROBERT MASON sworn.

Q. You was a workman belonging to Mr. Gibson? - Yes.

Q. Was you so on the 12th of April, the day that the robbery was committed? - Yes, I was.

Q. Will you tell the court and jury distinctly, and go slowly, what you know about this business? - I will, to the best of my endeavour. About three or four months ago I became acquainted with Wybrow, by using the Black Bull, Dunning's alley, in Bishopsgate street; I had not used the house, more than the space of a week, before Wybrow asked me to go up to the other end of the town, he knew some girls.

Q. Confine yourself to this business of the 12th of April? - On the 12th of April, about seven o'clock or half after, I met May at the Black Bull, and we had some supper together, and we had two six-pennyworths of gin and water together; after that he asked me if I would go with him to the Queen's Head, in Paternoster-row, to a raffle there? I told him I would; he said he expected to meet Wybrow there; we went there, and had one pint of porter, and Wybrow did not come, I went out to seek for him, I went out to the Black Bull, and there I found him, I brought him to the Queen's Head.

Q. What time did you bring him? - About half after nine.

Q. Was May there when you came back? - He was. As we were coming along, we bought some bees and ham, and had it for supper; when we came there we joined the raffle, we staid there till half after twelve o'clock, and had a glass of rum, and went away, we went to Mr. Gibson's house, all three of us, with an intent to do the robbery; there were some pailisadoes before the house, and Wybrow shoved a good many times against the gate, but we could not open it, we then examined the bag we had with us, and we thought the bag was rather too small. May brought the bag, and a chissell; there being a great many people passing and repassing, and the bag was too small, we judged it expedient to go to the person that was to buy the property, to get a larger bag, we went to East Smithfield, to one Joel; Wybrow

threw up to the window, and Joel came down, and let us in, and we all three went up stairs, when he gave us a larger bag and a dark lanthorn. We then came away to Mr. Gibson's house again; (this was about half after one in the morning) then May got over the pallisadoes, and with the chissel he wrenched the boards down, that guarded the cellar window; he then came out, and Wybrow and I went in, I put the nine pieces of mode into the bag, and Wybrow held it; we then came out and pulled the outside shutter to, and handed the bag over to May, who was outside; after that Wybrow and I came out and we all three went together, and May carried the pieces.

Q. What sort of a bag was it? - A white canvas bag, it was properly of a canvas colour. We went as far as the corner of Catharine Wheel-alley, and then Wybrow went and fetched a coach, the coach came near to the end of the alley, and we all three went into the coach, May had the bag.

Q. Do you recollect particularly where you got into the coach? - I cannot say, it was near the alley. As soon as we got in the waterman shut the door, and I gave the waterman a shilling myself, we told him to go to East Smithfield, but he set us down near the end of Nightingale-lane; the coachman then came down to open the door; I took the goods myself and went down an alley, a few doors from where the coach stopped, and went into a necessary, while Wybrow threw up to the window, and broke several panes of glass.

Q. What was that for? - Joel told him before not to mind breaking two or three panes of glass, but to throw up hard, when he came. Joel came down and opened the door, then we all three went into the house, and went up one pair of stairs, and then we shut the door to, and he told us to be as quiet as we could, and they assisted me in cutting off the ends, and the marks off this silk; after that we agreed about the price for the goods, when we asked forty guineas for the goods; Joel he then bid twenty guineas; Wybrow he said he could not take less than twenty-four; (that was eight guineas a piece for the three) he said he would split the difference, and give us twenty one guineas, (that was seven guineas a piece, and he gives us one guinea on the table, and told us to call at two o'clock. We went down to Hornsey; I left them at eight o'clock and the next morning May gave me seven pounds; I went to the public house and sent for him.

Q. You forgot to tell us what you gave the hackney coachman? - May said he gave him five shillings.

Q. This is the truth of the business, is it? - It is. On Monday Mr. Harper and Armstrong were at our house, and they said they had a suspicion of me, because I put the goods down the cellar on Saturday night, and they apprehended me on Monday night.

Mr. Knowlys. I will not waste much time with such a witness as you, but I will ask you one or two questions. In the first place you say you supped at this place, at the Black Bull, and you went from there to the Queen's Head? - I did.

Q. The landlord is full as honest as you are, I dare say; the landlord swears that May came in alone? - He might be in first.

Q. Who do you think may be the better character? - I have no doubt at all.

Q. This was a deep laid plan. You knew very well that the goods were not to be removed of a Saturday night into the cellar? - I knew the goods were laid there every night.

Q. Now hear, man, don't you know that you was not to have removed the

goods there on Saturday night! - They have been put in the cellar before that time.

Q. Don't you know that there were orders that they should not be put there on Saturday? - No, I have not heard that.

Q. Upon your oath did not you put them there for the sake of robbing your your master? - To be sure it was done for that purpose. It is customary to lay them in the cellar every night.

Q. Except Saturday night? - I cannot say that.

Q. Where did you lay them? - They were spread on both racks as usual.

Q. You was called to an account about this before your master? - Yes.

Q. Upon your oath was you not promised that your life should be saved if you could convict any other person that was with you? - Yes.

Q. Therefore to save your life you must convict somebody, you accuse these men to save yourself? - I say the truth to save myself.

Q. Do not you come here and accuse these men, and believe that you shall save your life, by the accusation, and perhaps have some little reward besides? - I should expect it.

Q. Then I am done.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I apprehended May with a warrant. on Monday the 14th of April, at his father's house, in Crispin street, Spitalfields; I searched him and found nothing on him. On Tuesday, I was sent to Portsmouth, I and Harper, and Mason, the accomplice, to try to apprehend Joel, but we could not find him, and coming home on Friday, I met Mr. Gibson, on Fish-street-hill, and I told him I had heard where the dark lanthorn was, and I found it under a stone, about four doors from Mr. Gibson's house.

Mr. Knowlys. May's father is a master carpenter, in Crispin-street? - He is.

Q. You found him with his father? - I did.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn.

I apprehended Wybrow on Monday, the 14th of April, at the Queen's Head, in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields.

Q. Did you search him? - I did.

Q. Did you find any thing on him? - A very little trifle.

The prisoner May called nine witnesses, and Wybrow two, who gave them good characters.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-49

277. JAMES CLEGG was indicted for stealing on the 22d of March , 28 yards of printed callico, value 3l. the goods of John Christian Nash , in his dwelling house .

JOHN CHRISTIAN NASH sworn.

I live in Brewer-street , an upholsterer . On the 22d of March last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner, in company with another man, came into my shop, I was at the farther end of my shop, at the parlour door, with my back towards the door, hearing a noise I turned about and saw the prisoner and another man, the prisoner immediately ran away, I followed him to the door and hallooed out stop thief! he ran a few paces from the door and threw down a piece of callico, which he had concealed; into the middle

of the street; I see him do it, he ran a little further and was stopped, I picked up the callico myself. I am certain I saw him drop it, I took him then before a magistrate who committed him. I never lost sight of him, except merely in the action of picking the callico up. I brought him back immediately, the other man went away, I past him in following this.

Q. Had you left your shop open? - It was open.

Q. Have you the whole house as well as the shop? - Yes, the shop is a part of my dwelling house. The callico is here, my apprentice has it; I have kept it ever since myself.

WILLIAM MURRAY sworn.

I saw the prisoner at the bar there, and Mr. Nash coming out of his own house, the prisoner ran, and Mr. Nash hallooed stop thief! my house is about five hundred yards off, but I was in the street then; I saw the prisoner run about fifty yards, or not so much, and I saw him discharge the piece of callico from his hand, and throw it down on the ground; I did not stop him, I see him stopped, and see him brought back, I am very certain to the person of the prisoner, he is the same man (The callico produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. There was no mark on the callico before the justice, if there is any mark on it, it has been put on since.

GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

(Aged 20.)

Judgment Respited .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-50

278. WILLIAM REYNOLDS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Shaw , Widow , about the hour of eleven in the night, of the 22d of April , and burglariously stealing therein a canvas bag, value 1d. nine guineas, three half guineas, two half crowns, eight silver six-pences, the goods and monies of the said Mary Shaw .

MARY SHAW sworn.

I am a widow, I live in Brick-lane ; the robbery was discovered the 28th of April, between the hours of three and four in the morning.

Q. What time did you go to bed the over night? - About eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you happen to see whether every thing was fast before you went to bed? - I believe it was fast, I was last up, and I always look round to see that every thing is fast.

Q. Did you do it that night? - I did.

Q. Was you alarmed in the night? - I was alarmed in the morning about half past three, one of my lodgers that had occasion to get up and do his work, he went down stairs, and found the wash-house door open, I was alarmed by him, and got up immediately; and when I came down stairs I observed that the two doors were standing open, the door of the room, and the washhouse door.

Q. Are either of these an outer door? - Yes, the wash-house door is an outer door.

Q. Had that wash-house door been shut at night? - Yes.

Q. Was it broke at all, or only standing open? - Only standing open, not broke.

Q. From any thing that you see, could you tell how the door was opened? - No.

Q. What property did you lose? - About ten guineas, and some silver, the room behind the shop, from out of the bureau.

Q. Have you no more than one room on that floor? - No, only the shop and that room. I had seen the bag there on Sunday, and this was done on Monday morning, or Sunday night.

Q. Did you ever find any part of it again? - No.

Q. Was it loose money or in a bag? - It was in a bag, a kind of a little canvas bag.

Q. Did you ever get it again? - No.

Q. How high was you up in this house? - Up one pair of stairs.

Q. Is it your house, or do you only lodge there? - It is my house, and I let lodgings.

- HARPER sworn.

On Monday morning last, the 28th of April, a young man came from the prosecutrix, to tell me that there had been a robbery done, and I went to the prosecutrix's house, there were several of her friends there, the house had been broke open, and as the lodgers being there, I begged it as a favour that they had better go up to the justice's together, I got them altogether at the justice's and the justice thought the most blame laid with this man, and he postponed it till the evening, in bringing the man out of the office, one of his brother workmen was there, and I heard the prisoner say to him, it was hid (he did not say what) between the rafters and the tiles.

Q. What had you said to this man before he said that? - Nothing at all; when he told his brother workman that, I took that man to the justice, and told him that he should mention to the justice what that man said to him. However, I went with him to his workshop, and got on the top of this workshop, and went to the end, and the prisoner at the bar was there, in the workshop at the same time, and he said, you are too far to the left; and I looked about a little while, and then I came a little farther to the right, and then he said, now it is right over your head; I put my hand up there, and there I found this purse with this money, there is nine guineas, three half guineas, two half crown pieces and six shillings and eleven-pence. I came down from that place, came down to the workshop; the two witnesses that are here now, see me with the money, and I shew it before the prisoner's face; I shew the woman the money when he was examined before the justice. This shop is where the prisoner works, it is not in Mr. Shaw's house.

Court to Mrs. Shaw. The prisoner lodges with you? - He has, about eight months.

Q. That morning that you was alarmed, was he in the house then? - Yes, he was in the house at the time.

Q. Now you said that you had not seen your money since, it turns out that you have seen your money since? - I see it at the second examination.

Q. Is there any part of the money or bag that you can swear to? - No, I cannot.

Q. Do you recollect enough to say whether you had so many guineas, so many half guineas, so many half crowns, and so many shillings? - I cannot be certain to the sum.

Q. How was your bureau? - It was not broke at all, the lock seemed to me as if it had been put back with something, the lock is not broke.

Harper. I asked him afterwards how he came to do such a thing to a poor widow woman? - he said he did not know how he did it.

Mr. Knapp to Harper. Let us have a little of the truth of the matter, if we can. First of all when you went to the house,

the prisoner was at home at his master's? - He was.

Q. You told him that you suspected him or some people in the house, and that he must go with you to the justice's? - I told him I would be glad if he would go to the justice's, along with the rest.

Q. And he was so good, in the hearing of a public officer, to say that it was hid, and he was so good to say where it was hid? - He did indeed.

Q. You had said nothing to the prisoner to induce him to confess? - No, God forbid.

Q. You never say any thing of that sort; a shocking piece of business this? - I did, after I got the money.

Q. What do you say about saying it before? - I did not indeed, he had told me truth, or I had not found the money.

Q. Be so good as to recollect a little whether he did not say that this money was his own? - No, never, at that time.

Q. On your oath, did not he at any time say that that money was his own? - Yes, after he was committed, after he had been to gaol, and come up again.

Q. If it was his own he was the best person to tell where it was? - Certainly.

Q. I believe this young man was a good deal alarmed at first, when you came to take him, and charge him with the offence? - I did not charge him with any offence.

Q. Was not the young man, at the time you apprehended him, alarmed? - I did nothing to alarm him.

Q. Will you swear that he was not frightened? - I don't know.

Q. Did not he tell you it was his own that day? - He told me after he was committed that it was his own.

Q. Do recollect again, before you stand down, whether he did not say that it was his own before? - On my oath he did not.

Q. Did not he appear in such a fright that he did not know what he said? - He might be for what I know, he looked very pale and comical.

WILLIAM BERRY sworn.

I lodge in this house; I came down about half past three in the morning, to wet my leather, and when I came down one pair of stairs I saw this bureau open, and two doors, I goes and wets my leather, and turned about and saw a paper bag lay, I thought it had been tobacco, I picked it up and found it was halfpence; I called the man, and he came down in his shirt, and then Mrs. Shaw came down in her shift, afterwards the prisoner came down in his shirt.

Q. What part of the house did the prisoner sleep in? - Up one pair of stairs room, the even room with Mrs. Shaw. The prisoner went all about with us, to see if we could see where any body had broke in, and we could not see where any body got in or got out of the place.

Q. You was not the person to whom he said any thing at the justice's? - No.

Mr. Knapp. You came down in the morning? - I was the first that came down.

Q. The prisoner was in the house at that time? - He was.

Q. He came down? - He did.

Q. How long had he lodged there? - He lodged there eight months, I believe.

Q. He is charged with breaking into this house? - Yes.

Q. If he had broke into this house he would not have been in bed? - I should have thought not.

ABRAHAM LENOY sworn.

I am foreman to the master carpenters, the premises by the side of this house

of Mrs. Shaw's. The apprentice came to me about half after six for the key to open the shop door; when I came over, in about ten minutes after, I saw the apprentice, and three men standing, and they told me Mrs. Shaw had been robbed, and I examined the door, and it appeared to me to have been broke on the inside, it appeared as if the staple was wrenched on the inside.

Mr. Knapp. Is this shop a part of Mrs. Shaw's house? - No, it is by the side of it.

Q. You differ from the rest of the witnesses, because they think the house was not broke at all. You have not been talking to any body in the yard just now, as you came in? - Nobody at all; as to the young man, I never suspected him.

Court to Mrs. Shaw. I understand that this man has lodged with you eight months, what character hath he borne? - A very good one; I never heard the contrary.

Q. Had you ever any reason to suspect him? - I never had.

The prisoner called six other witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-51

279. JOHN WOODHEAD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of November , four yards of linen called Russia drab, value 6s. two russia duck frocks, value 6s. two pair of Russia duck trowsers, value 3s. four pieces of Russia duck, value 1s. two cotton shirts, value 6s. two yards of check linen, value 6s. three yards and three fourths of woollen cloth, value 15s. fifteen yards of other woolen cloth, value 2l. the goods of Edward Darby , in his dwelling house .

EDWARD DARBY sworn.

The prisoner at the bar was my porter , he came into my service the 23d of last May 1793, I live in Gracechurch-street, in the City .

Q. How long did he continue in your service as porter? - Till the 23d of November.

Q. When did you first have any intelligence to suspect that you was injured? - On the 25th of March last, in consequence of that I sent down Mr. Nott after him.

Q. On looking over your stock after you had received any intelligence, did you find any articles missing? - I did not immediately.

Q. After you had sent Mr. Nott down did you find any of your goods missing? - I did.

HENRY NOTT Sworn.

I am in the service of Mr. Darby, I have the management of his business; I went down to Gumersall, hear Leeds, in Yorkshire, to the prisoner's house; I did not find the prisoner there, I got a search warrant, and searched the house.

Q. Who accompanied you with that warrant? - John Kershaw , that is now in Court. The prisoner's wife informed me he was in London. The warrant was executed the 20th of March last; we found the things in the bed chamber, in a box the greatest part were, and some few of the articles in a closet, in the chamber. There are two striped cotton shirts, two remnants of Russia drab, two remnants of linen check, two Russia duck strocks, one pair of Russia duck trowsers, four pieces of Russia duck, in the shape of trowsers, three remnants of brown broad

woollen cloth, containing in the whole three yards and three quarters. This was all found in the box except the linen shirt which was in the closet in another box.

Q. Were the boxes locked? - They were not.

Q. In whose custody have they been ever since? - In the custody of Mr. Kershaw.

Prisoner's Counsel. It was the 20th of March that you put the warrant in execution? - It was.

Q. It was the 23d of November that he quitted Mr. Darby's service? - It was.

Q. All the time that he was in the service of Mr. Darby, there was no suspicions against him at all of any kind? - Not immediately on him, I don't know that there was.

Q. None were found, nor you never heard of any till you went down to Gumersall; when you went there you found only his wife? - He was gone up to London.

Q. You collected there that he had been in the woollen business before? - I had no such knowledge, I had heard that he had been in business, but I don't know what.

JOHN KERSHAW Sworn.

I am a constable, at Gumersall; I attended Mr. Nott at the search that was made at the prisoner's house, at Gumersall; I have got the things that were found, with me; I had them in my custody ever since.

Prisoner's Counsel. Have you known Mr. Woodhead long? - I knew him when he was a child.

Q. He had been in business for himself? - He was apprentice to a woollen manufacturer.

Q. How long had he quitted Gumersall before he came down the second time? - It it about this time twelve months, he sold wool, but I never heard that he was in the manufactory.

Q. Did not you know him when he lived at Blackburn? - I heard of his going there, but I don't know what business he was in there.

Nett. This is a piece of Russia drab, of the same fabrick that we had during the summer that he lived with us.

Q. Is there such fabrick to be found with other dealers? - O, yes! This is a Russia drab frock, it is an article that we supply, by contract, to government, for the navy; I know them by the measurement, we are confined to measurement in every part exactly.

Q. Have you sold any of them for common use? - To government only, we deliver them at somerset House; the sleeves are cut the cross way of the stuff, because in the very large quantity we cut it is a saving, which is not common, I do not perceive that they have any particular mark. Here is also a pair of Russia trowsers, which Mr. Darby furnishes, by contract, according to these dimensions, they are very uncommon dimensions in the trade; here is another remarkable thing, they have two seems in the legs, which seamen, in general object to, but we are obliged to make them so for government, and they have a mark on the waistband, which our people put the initials of their name on them, M. and made by Mrs. Moore.

JANE MOORE Sworn .

I work for Mr. Darby, these pair of trowsers are my making, the M. is made with my own hand.

Q. Do you make them sort of trowsers for any body else? - Only for Mr. Darby. They have been worn, but they have been damped to get the mark out.

Prisoner's Counsel. Is there any thing particular in the way of marking by you? - I can swear to my mark.

Nott. Here is a remnant of bottle green cloth, a yard and a quarter, it has no particular mark on it, I only know that we had cloth of that colour and quality at the time he was in our service; the next is a remnant of one yard and three quarters of drab cloth, I know it by the colour which is a remarkable one, the quality, the width, and the selvage; it corresponds exactly with part of the cloth which is now unsold in Mr. Darby's possession, which cloth is now at hand. The selvage is taken off all along but by chance there is one thread left on. Here is another remnant under the same circumstances; here are four pair of trowsers cut but one made up, cut according to our contract; the next is the remnant of linen check, they are the width, the quality, and the pattern that we supply the Navy by contract.

Court. Can you swear that Mr. Dalby has missed any property? - He has, I know it by taking stock, we miss a larger quantity.

Q. When did you take stock before this loss? - Christmas, 1792.

Q. When did you last take stock? - Mr. Darby took stock on receiving my letter, I was not present then, I came back the 22d of March, 1794. I examined the stock, I believe on Monday I found we were deficient in these cloths in particular. When I came back I afterwards went to the prisoner's lodgings in London.

Q. How did you ascertain them to be the prisoner's lodgings? - He was taken at his lodgings on Saturday night, and the search was made on Monday, April 24th 1794.

Q. What did you find at his lodgings? - Six or seven new coats, the fifteen yards of cloth which is in the indictment, it was made into coats.

Q. Are you able to ascertain that these coats were made of the cloth that belonged to Mr. Darby? - I do not mean to insist upon that point, in so altered a state.

Prisoner's Counsel. The last time the stock was taken was in Christmas, 1792, that was near six months before the prisoner came to live with Mr. Darby? - It was.

Q. With respect to these different articles, the cotton shirts they are of a very common sort of a pattern, and may be met with any where? - But it is very seldom that two slop sellers cut so near alike.

Q. Mr. Darby is not the only Navy contractor? - Certainly he is, there can be but one at one time.

Q. With respect to the drab cloth, do you mean to say that that is the only piece of drab cloth that was ever made of that quality? Do they make only one piece of a sort and quality? - Very rare, I believe.

Q. Does it not happen very often that the selvage is not torn all off? - It is rather remarkable.

Q. It is so remarkable that you can venture to swear that these cloths were taken from Mr. Darby? - I can and do.

Darby. I can swear to the trowsers, they are the contract sort, I never sold any in my life.

Q. Did the prisoner purchase any things of the kind of any of these things? - Never; I can swear to the drab cloth, the two drab frocks I believe are mine by the dimensions.

Q. How long have you had the contract? - I had it June, 1793, I gave it up then, and put in the lowest for it and got it again.

Q. Of whom had you the character of this man? - Of one Mr. Bailey, he was in the cotton way.

Prisoner's Counsel. Did not you understand this man before he came into your service was in business for himself? -

He told me that he kept a livery stable.

Q. Did not you know when he left you, that he went down into Yorkshire in order to collect some debts? - No.

Q. He lived with you six months? - He did.

Court. Had you this contract before he went away? - I had.

JOHN MUMFORD Sworn.

I lived with Mr. Darby, I know this woollen cloth, it was Mr. Darby's, I tore the selvedge off myself.

Prisoner's Counsel. Does no other person tare selvedges off and leave a part on? - I cannot answer to that.

THOMAS PARROT Sworn.

I am one of the marshalmen, I know nothing but searching the prisoner's lodgings and finding these coats.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of 39s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-52

280. ANN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , seventeen pounds weight of bacon, value 7s. the goods of Joseph Gadsden .

JOSEPH GADSDEN Sworn.

The prisoner took the bacon the 29th of March, Saturday, between eight and nine o'clock, I was engaged with some customers, I see her take it, I followed her into the street and laid hold of her, and she dropt it, I picked it up and have kept it ever since.

Q. What did she say about it? - She denied taking it.

SAPWELL Sworn.

I took her into custody.

Prisoner. I was not out of the shop, I had only taken it up in my hand.

Prosecutor. She was about three or four yards out of the shop, and she had got it under her arm, under her cloak, and it was her denying it made me give charge to the constable.

GUILTY. (Aged 65.)

Recommended by the prosecutor .

Imprisoned a fortnight in Newgate and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before

Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-53

281. ERASMUS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , two pounds weight of raw sugar, value 1s. 6d. the goods of John Naylor .

JOHN NAYLOR Sworn.

I live in Thames-street , I am a grocer , I know nothing of the circumstance.

WILLIAM PLUMMER Sworn.

I live with Mr. Naylor, I took a parcel of sugar from the prisoner; on the 5th of April, I took two pounds out of his pocket; he was Mr. Naylor's porter in the house. In going out of the warehouse on Saturday, the 5th of April, I brushed against the prisoner's coat, I thought it felt hard, I examined it, and took a parcel of sugar out.

Q. By examining it you mean you felt in his pockets I suppose? - Certainly. I put the sugar in again.

Q. Was this coat on his back at the time? - No, it was hanging up, afterwards I called the men to receive their wages, and the prisoner came, and he put his coat on.

Q. What time was it you perceived the coat with the sugar? - Past seven o'clock in the evening. When we got the men into that part of the warehouse where they are generally paid, I accosted the prisoner about having some sugar about him, more than he ought to have; I asked him if he had not a parcel about him, which was not his own? he turned out one pocket, there was a bit of bread in that; I asked him what there was in the other? and desired him to take it out; he turned out a parcel of sugar in a paper, and in a paper bag likewise, I had before seen it, it was opened then, and I saw it contained sugar; we asked him what he took the sugar for? and he -

Mr. Knowlys. Did not you tell him it would be better for him if he was to tell how he came to take it? - No, I did not.

Q. Did not you tell him it would be better to confess? - No, I did not, I only asked him how he came to do it, and what was his motive? he muttered something, but I could not hear what he said exactly; the constable was sent for to take him to the Poultry Compter; the sugar I kept in my possession, it is impossible to swear to it, because there are sugars of all qualities, but we have sugar in the house exactly of that quality.

Q. And so may a great many people? - There is no doubt.

Q. Was these any thing in the bag that you could swear to? - No, I believe it was the very bag that he brought his victuals in the morning with.

Q. What sort of sugar was it? - East India raw sugar.

Q. It was impossible for you to have missed such a quantity as two pounds? - It was, Mr. Naylor is a wholesale grocer.

EDWARD JONES sworn

I am a porter to Mr. Naylor; I see Mr. Plummer take the sugar from the prisoner in Mr. Naylor's warehouse.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-54

282. HARRIOTT otherwise ELEANOR MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a silver watch, value 2l. a steel watch chain, value 2d. a metal seal, value 1d. two base metal watch keys, value 9d. the goods of William Owen .

WILLIAM OWEN sworn.

I am a milk-man , I lost a watch the 30th of March, I lost it from Porter's, the Rose and Crown in Tottenham-court-road , between two and three o'clock on Sunday afternoon; I had occasion to go to the necessary, and I went in there and called for a pint of porter, and I left my watch in the necessary; I did not miss it for about an hour, or an hour and a quarter before that; I went back immediately, left my yoke and pails, went back immediately, and saw my watch was not there; and I said to the landlady, have you heard any body find such a thing? she said, no, she said nobody but milk people had been in, and she would enquire in the morning; I told her it had my own name upon it,( William Owen ) a plain silver watch, with gold hands; I told the landlady to

give any satisfaction to any body that had taken it up; I went back the next morning, and she said she had asked every body, and nobody had seen it; after that as I was serving my customers, a letter was given me, and I went to Mrs. Murray's, and I found my watch at Mr. Dobree's, the corner of Tottenham-court-road.

Q. Did you go there in consequence of the letter? - No, I went in there accidently, I thought I would go in and ask.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner, or see her about it? - I went before I found the watch out, several times, and I told her I had a letter the very same evening, as I had done my work; she said she knowed nothing of it; after I found the watch I went to Marlborough-street immediately, and I laid the case before a magistrate, and he granted a warrant, and I took her up, it was pawned in her name, and where she lived; I know no further than she owned that she had pawned that watch, she acknowledged that before the justice, I was present.

Q. Was it taken in writing? - I believe it was; the prisoner is not the mistress of the house, she is a milk-carrier , she lives in Hog-lane.

GEORGE GOLDSWORTH Sworn.

I was in the office at the time, and I heard the woman confess that she had pawned it, I believe it was taken down.

SEPTIMUS SADLER Sworn.

I have got a watch, it was pawned with me the 31st of March, but who pawned it I cannot recollect, it was pawned by a woman.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-55

283. MARGARET CALLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , a cotton petticoat, value 1l. a muslin apron, value 10s. a silver tea spoon, value 3s. a woman's cotton jacket, value 5s. the goods of Nathan Cohen .

SARAH COHEN Sworn.

I am daughter to Nathan Cohen , I live with him, No. 51, Charlotte-street , Whitechapel, the prisoner robbed me of a jacket and coat, and my father of a spoon and apron.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - She was a chair woman , comes twice or three times a week about the house, she stole them Thursday, dinner time; we missed them that Thursday, the 27th of February; the things were brought down for me to put on, I was up stairs, and when I came down the things were gone, I missed them out of a back parlour, the first floor; I then missed my jacket and coat.

Q. Did you miss any thing else? - Yes, down stairs in the kitchen, when we were at breakfast.

Q. We had better begin at the breakfast before the dinners; what was it you first missed? - We missed the spoons about ten o'clock.

Q. How many spoons did you miss? - One; we thought when we missed the spoon, that it would be found again; we did not miss the apron till we came before the justice, when I was obliged to go for my mother to come to swear to her apron.

Q. In the course of that day what else did you miss? - My jacket and coat.

Q. How do you know she took these things? - because she was there about the house all day; we missed her about eight o'clock at night; she was to have come about four o'clock, but she did

not come, about eight o'clock at night we sent for her, and she was not at her lodgings, we did not see her till the next morning, she came by our door, and I called her over, between ten or eleven; we asked her if she knew any thing about the things, the jacket coat, and spoons? she said for a long time no, at last she confessed.

Q. Did not you tell her it would be better for her if she told? - yes.

Q. Then don't tell us one word what she said about it; were all the things found under that confession? - Yes, the things were found the next day at the pawnbroker's by my father, all the things were found together.

Q. Do you know when your mother's muslin apron was missing? - No, I cannot recollect, she had wore it the day before; I see the things again when I came before the justice, the pawnbroker brought them.

Q. Do you know any of these things? - Yes.

Q. Do you know your father's silver spoon, and your mother's muslin apron? - Yes, I know it, and she knows it too.

Prisoner. Ask her whether she did not call me up, and told me to go and pawn them, and bring her the sixteen shillings? - I know nothing at all about it.

Prisoner. At the time that I returned from the pawnbroker's, she was at the door; her father asked me where I had been? I told him I had been on an errand for Sally; I gave her the money and the duplicate? - I never gave her any authority to pawn them.

NATHAN COHEN Sworn.

I am the father of the last witness, I know I lost a tea spoon in the morning, and a jacket and petticoat of my daughter's, and a muslin apron of my wife's. I know the tea spoon was at the breakfast table, and it was taken away; I know the jacket and petticoat, I have a piece of the same in my pocket, and I have the rest of the spoons here.

THOMAS BIRD Sworn.

I live at No. 83. Whitechapel, with Mr. Broady; our young man took in these together of the prisoner at the bar, a jacket and petticoat, tea spoon and apron; they were all brought at one time, on the 27th of February, between one and two as near as I can guess.

Q. Did you know her before? - No, I did not recollect ever seeing her before, they were pledged in the name of Margaret Callaghan .

Q. What did you lend her on them? - Sixteen shillings on them altogether.

Q. Have you got them here? - Yes, we asked her if they were her own property? she told us they were.

Prisoner. When I went in with these things, they told me they had been in before that had; I said I did not know any thing about it, I was sent with them.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the tea spoon.

ESTHER COHEN sworn.

Q. Did you lose a muslin apron? - yes, I put it off on Wednesday night, and I did not miss it till I came to look among the things.

Q. Where did you put it when you pulled it off? - I don't know, I believe in the kitchen, I can swear to it by the ink spots.

Sarah Cohen . I had noticed these ink spots on my mother's apron before.

Prisoner. She told me that she suspected her daughter Sally, and if it was so to tell her, and she would take them out, and not let her husband know.

Court to Esther Cohen. Did you ever say any thing to the prisoner about suspect. ing your daughter? - No I indeed.

GUILTY . (Aged 43.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-56

284. ANN EVANT was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , a silver watch, value 1l. 18s. a steel watch chain, value 6d. a base metal watch key, value 1d. the goods of John Nutting .

JOHN NUTTING Sworn.

I am a victualler . On the 26th of January, I lost a silver watch, I was in my own house when I lost it; the watch was hanging at my bed's head; I found it again March the 14th, at the pawnbroker's, in the Minories, after searching about a long while; I did not see her till the 9th of March, when she came and said she would trouble me for taking away her character.

THOMAS HILL Sworn.

On the 14th of March, the prosecutor came to our house to enquire whether there was a watch pawned on the 27th of January, and I had taken one in of a woman by the name of Ann Day .

Q. Do you know who that woman was? - I cannot pretend to say; the watch was pawned the 27th of January, and I did not see her again till the 14th of March.

CHARLES ALLEN Sworn.

I am a headborough; Mr. Nutting sent for me to take charge of the woman, and the next day I took her to the magistrate.

Q. When did you take her? - I cannot recollect the day of the month; taking her there the magistrate asked me if I knew her husband? I said, yes; he said go and search him, if you can find any duplicates; I did, and could not find any; before he went to the justice he desired to speak to his wife, and I let him, and he asked her whether he knew any thing at all about her coming away from Mr. Nutting; says he, did I know any thing at all about your pledging of it? no, she said, he did not, and she was drunk, or she should not have done it. Then I took him into the magistrate, and the followed Mr. Nutting, and begged of him to be merciful, and her husband should pay for the watch as he could, if he would not put the law in force against her.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-57

285. THOMAS WARD and JOHN PARKER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , ninety pounds weight of bacon, value 2l. a hempen bag, value 2d. the goods of Thomas Hawkes and Henry Smith .

(The case opened by Mr. Jackson.)

THOMAS HAWKES Sworn.

I am a wholesale dealer in provisions . Henry Smith is my partner. I had one hundred and five bales of bacon come from Ireland, containing two hundred and ten hogs, they came about three or four weeks ago; but on the 18th of April my young man, my partner, came down to Holloway, where I live, and told me something, and I went to the public office, Worship-street, and I found some of my property there, bacon; when I

came down there I saw one Francis Cook , he was there in custody; I went home and took up the prisoner Parker; I took him in my own yard, he was my servant , he was searched in Worship-street, one William Blackiter searched him.

Q. What was found upon him? - Half a guinea; when he declared he had nothing at all about him, and Cooke swore to it.

Q. Did you afterwards proceed to Parker's house? - I did, me and one John Ray , I believe one of the police officers; we went to Parker's house; I stayed in the upper floor, and Ray went below, I heard Ray say, he had them, I saw Ray bring part of the bacon out of his cellar, the four quarters, Parker says to me, don't be angry with my wife, she knows nothing of it.

Q. Do you know that bacon to be your property? - I did, it is in court, the police officer has it, and has had it ever since the time that he was committed.

Mr. Knowlys. You have your bacon consigned to you from Ireland? - Yes.

Q. You have a great quantity at a time? - I have.

Q. The bacon, when it comes over, has packages, by which you know it? - It is so, the packages are two pigs in a packet, one hundred and five barrels contained two hundred and ten pigs.

Q. This quantity of bacon was taken from out of the bales of course; when this is taken out of the bales, I should think there would be no way of ascertaining the property? - Yes, Mr. Knapp, I tell you it is.

Q. I want to know how you can swear to this being your property? - I can, Waterford bacon, no man in Ireland has got this cut but myself, for these four years.

Q. Do you mean to say that nobody has got this cut but yourself? - No, no one has got this long hock but myself, I have made enquiry, and there is no long hock bacon in London but my own.

Q. How do you know what they send from Ireland? - I know all the Merchants in Waterford, and I have enquired.

Q. You can only learn of the Merchants here, who learn it of the merchants, at Waterford, in Ireland, what particular bacon has come from Waterford? - There has been no bacon come from Waterford to London but what has short hock, and I cut my bacon in Ireland long hocks.

Q. You mean that the persons that you employ cut it in the way that you direct, but how can you say they cut it so in Ireland while you are in England? You say you went to Parker's house, and in the cellar was found the bacon that you describe; you was not in the cellar? - It was John Ray ; he said, here it is; and I went to the top of the cellar, and see it.

Q. Is a cellar a usual place to keep bacon in? - It is a very improper place.

Q. But first of all there was found on him half a guinea you said, and then you say he was searched, and there was nothing found on him? - No, I did not say so, I say, he said he had nothing about him.

Mr. Jackson. Are you, who are conversant in bacon, able to distinguish this year's bacon from the last? - As clear as light from dark.

JOHN RAY Sworn.

I am a police officer.

Q. Did you apprehended Cooke in the course of April last? - I was not the first that apprehended Cooke, I was one of them, I was present after the first minute or two.

Q. Did you see any sack taken on him? - I did.

Q. Where was it you saw Cooke? - In Golden-lane.

Q. What was the contents of that sack? - There were two pieces of bacon in it; it was the 18th of April, about a quarter after nine at night we stopped him, and took him to the watch-house, he related his story but not to me.

Q. Did you afterwards take him before a magistrate? - I did, in consequence of information I received, there I apprehended Parker; I searched his house, I did not search his person; Parker was with me and the prosecutor; I went and took Parker into custody; and I secured him, and told him I was going to his premises; I secured him in Goswell-street, at Mr. Hawkes's, I told him he should go along with me, for I was going to search his premises; going along I told him I was going to search his premises for bacon; he said, that I might do with all his heart, for I should find no bacon there; I searched the first room, and found none; I then went down to the cellar, and there were a great number of butts, and I searched them all, and in a butt that stood up in a corner I found half of half a side of bacon; there were some boards over it, it was in a very dark part of the cellar, I took it out and brought it up stairs, and I said to his wife and parker, you have found yourselves deceived, for I have found some; Mr. Hawes was very angry with his wife, and the answer parker made was, don't be angry with her, for she knows nothing at all about it.

Q. You did not see the half guinea taken from him? - Yes, I did; he was searched in the public house adjoining the office, and half a guinea was taken from him.

Q. Did you hear him make any declaration previous to his being searched? - Yes, he said he had nothing but a few halfpence about him.

Q. Was the half guinea that was taken from him shewn to Cooke in the presence of parker? - Yes, it was.

Mr. Knapp. All the information you gained on this subject was from Cooke? - It was.

Q. He was charged with having stole the bacon? - He was.

Q. Cooke throwed it on Parker? - No, first of all he said he had it from Ward.

Q. Then he said he had it from Parker? - No, he did not.

Q. Do you know whether any body lives in this house besides Parker? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Do you mean to say that he occupies the whole house? - I don't know either one way or the other.

Q. Do you know what business he is? - He is a butcher, I believe; I asked Parker's wife whose cellar it was? Parker was present; she said the cellar belonged to them.

WILLIAM BLACKITER sworn.

I am a police officer; I am one of them that apprehended Cooke, I found two pieces of bacon.

Q. Where did you apprehend him? - In Golden lane; we asked him what he had on him; we found two pieces of bacon in a very course bag, it was on Good Friday, the 18th of April; I apprehended Ward the next day.

Q. Was you concerned in searching the house? - No. I searched Parker at the office, I asked him if he had got the half guinea about him that he had of Cooke for the bacon, the last night? he said he had got none, he had only three halfpence in his pocket; I searched his left hand breeches pocket, and found half a guinea in it, and nothing else.

Q. Did you shew that half guinea to Cooke in the presence of the prisoner? - Yes, and I asked Cooke what sort of a half guinea it was before I shewed it him; he said it was a strait one; that was all he said. I shewed it him in the presence

of Mr. Parker, and he said he believed that to be the half guinea.

Mr. Knapp. You asked Parker whether he had got half a guinea that he received of Cooke? - He said he had none that he had received of any body.

Q. The half guinea you attempt to say that Cooke knew it, because it was a strait one; it would have been as likely for him to have known it if it had been a crooked one? - I don't know about that.

FRANCIS COOKE sworn.

I am in the tobacco line; I work for Mr. Bailey, in Redcross-street. About a fortnight after Christmas last, I met with Thomas Ward, in Redcross-street, he asked me to buy some bacon that he had; I asked him the price of it? he said, three shillings a stone; which I told him to bring me some of it at night, as it was Saturday night, and I would take some of him, which he brought me as much as came to sixteen shillings, at three shillings a stone; the next day I cut a bit off and put it in the pot to boil, and it was not good, rather damaged, and on Monday morning my wife went to Ward and Parker, to fetch the bacon back; they fetched the bacon back on the Monday night following; they neither of them had the money to return me back; when they took the bacon away they ordered me to come the next night.

Q. About the 18th of April did you purchase any bacon of either of the prisoners? - On good Friday I purchased some of them. Ward came to me about two o'clock, and told me that this Parker had got some bacon to sell, which I asked him the price of it? and he said about a groat a pound; I told him that I would come up at night to the Two Brewers, Goswell-street; I went there; Ward came up with half an offall of pork, and some pork chops, Ward there got a fighting, and a man cut him over the head with a quart pot, which he went off then; and afterwards Parker came into the public house, and asked me if Ward had told me about the bacon which I said, yes; he asked me if he had told me the price? I told him he talked about a groat a pound for it; Parker made answer and said, it was worth six-pence halfpenny a pound, which I agreed to give him, provided the bacon was good; I gave him half a guinea in part of payment, and he fetched me the bacon, these two pieces; I asked him if he had weighed the bacon? he said, no.

Q. Where did he fetch the bacon to? - Into the street, near the Two Brewers, near his own house.

Q. Did he appoint to meet you in the street, in order to receive it? - Yes.

Q. Was there any thing about this half guinea that you should know it again? - I cannot swear to it, it is a very hard thing to swear to money. He told me that he would call on me the next day to weigh the bacon, and I was to pay him the odds at six-pence halfpenny per pound; and I was going home with it, and these gentlemen stopped me with it, Mr. Blackiter and three more that were along with him.

Mr. Knapp. You was taken up unfortunately for this business at first? - Yes, I was.

Q. You have the good luck to be a witness now? - Yes.

Q. So of course, you save being tried yourself by giving your evidence? - Yes.

Q. The half guinea, you say, you don't know at all? - It is impossible for me to swear to money.

Q. You dealt in bacon perhaps before? - Yes, at a former time, once

Q. Have you ever seen any Irish bacon before? - I am not a judge of it.

Q. Do you attempt to swear to Irish bacon, Mr. Cooke? - I would not.

Q. You would not believe any body perhaps, if they were to swear to Irish bacon? - Why, no, I cannot.

Q. Was you admitted an evidence before the justice? - Yes, I was.

Q. Perhaps you come here in custody? - No, I came with the officer.

Court to Blackiter. Produce these pieces you took from Cooke? - It is these two pieces, a middle piece and a hind piece.

Ray. I found the fore quarter, they all together make up one stitch.

Hawkes. These three pieces all belong to one side, and are my property.

Mr. Knapp. I would ask you whether you did not put a mark on this bacon before the magistrate? - I did, merely to compare the three pieces together, the first, second, and third.

Q. Then the only judgment that you have about this bacon being your property, is the one that you have described coming over from Waterford, and being your cut? - It is so,

Q. I will venture this question to you, whether you are not induced to swear to that property from the marks that you made before the magistrate, and not by the marks that you described to the jury before? - I swear to it by the long hocks, all others in Waterford cut the hocks short; there is not a side of bacon long hocks from Waterford but to me.

Jury. Have you not sold some of this bacon since you have had it, to some shop keeper? - Several of the same sort.

Q. then how can you take on yourself to swear that the long hocks are your property, and that you had not sold them? - As soon as ever this man was taken in custody the magistrate desired that we would see whether we had lost a side; we goes directly and undoes all the bales of bacon we have, which were one hundred and five bales; I was present, and when we came to count them, after we had undone them all, we found but two hundred and nine and a half side instead of two hundred and ten, and accounting for one hundred and sixteen, which we had sold.

Mr. Knapp. You swear to this bacon by its being a long hock, and by the cut; supposing by chance, in this great town there should be found exactly of the same quality of bacon with a long hock, should you be able to swear to it then? - I can swear to this by the cut and long hock.

Q. If you had seen this in the possession of other sellers of bacon you would not have known it to be your's? - I don't know that I should.

Q. You speak something about the cut, what do you mean by that? - It is a different cut to any other man's in Waterford.

Q. Pray have you not sold some of this bacon with long hock, and cut in that way? - I have sold one hundred and sixteen.

Jury. Pray who might you have sold them sides to? - To different cheesemongers, it is not every cheesemonger that knows the Irish from the English, when it is cut in that way.

Q. What is the reason of the long hock? - Because people have a preference for London bacon.

Q. Is there any difference in the price? - They will give a penny a stone more for the short hock than for the long hock, because of the weight of bone. These pieces make a whole side, except, I believe, the police officers had a bit to boil with some spinage.

Ray. It is a mistake, the police officers having the bacon, it was Parker's wife had a piece boiling with some spinage.

The prisoner, Ward, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Hawkes. Ward has lived with me five years, and I believe him to be a

very honest man, but I cannot say so of Parker.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-58

286. JOHN READ was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , a canvas bag, value 6d. and ninety-eight pounds of lump sugar, value 4l. the goods of John Gilbert , William Gilbert , and John Gilbert , the younger .

JOHN GILBERT sworn.

I live in Chiswell-street . On the 22d of March (Saturday) about eight in evening I was in our counting house, and I heard one of our shopmen say that a man had got a bag of sugar out of the shop; I immediately ran out, as did several of the servants, and came up with the man, whilst he was struggling with the shopman, who gave me the information; we secured him, and brought him to the shop again, it was the prisoner; we sent for an officer, and took him before a magistrate; when I laid hold of him the sugar was by him, he had put it down, it was close by the side of him when I first see it in the street, the sugar was in a bag, going into the country, with a direction it; I believe one of our porters took it up, and brought it back, and I have kept it separate from that time to this.

Q. Where had you last observed it before it was missing? - I did not particularly observe it before.

Q. Can you say certainly that such sugar was missing of your knowledge? - No, I cannot, no further than having seen it by the prisoner.

Prisoner. Ask Mr. Gilbert whether he saw me take the bag up, or whether he thinks that I was the person that took the bag up.

JESSE JAMES sworn.

I am a shopman to Messrs. Gilberts. The prisoner came into the shop about eight or nine o'clock, for a quarter of a pound of moist sugar, and a halfpenny-of allspice, which I served him, he gave me a shilling, and I gave him change, when I served him I expected he would go, but he seemed in no hurry; in that time there was four more young men much of the same appearance, came into the shop, and I had a suspicion of the prisoner, and when he went out I looked at the window, and I see him with this bag of sugar, in this manner, in his arms, and stooping, in going by the window, and when I looked through the window, he was looking me full in the face; I called immediately to our porter, and desired him to go after the man; he went out and did not go the right way, I ran out immediately after him, and got my eye on the prisoner, he got about thirty or forty yards, he had quitted the bag when I collared him; I did not lose sight of him after I got out, I don't know particularly what passed between him and myself at the moment, but I saw the bag at his feet, and his hand on it; he let the bag fall, I see him.

Q. Before you see him go by the window had you missed any thing out of the shop? - No, but when I saw it, I knew it was a bag which had been laying in the shop among some other bags. I, by the assistance of Mr. Gilbert, brought him back to the shop.

Q. Who brought back the sugar? - The porter, he is not here; the sugar was put in their shop again, there was a label on it, where it was going, into the country.

Q. Did you see the sugar brought back? - No.

Q. Are you sure that the sugar that was brought back, was the same that was in the street? - Yes.

Q. What was the label on that sugar? - I forget now, but I think it was John Doran , it was written by our apprentice.

Q. Do you know the hand writing? - Yes.

Q. Had you such a correspondent a customer? - Yes.

Q. Do you know whether this sugar was separated from the rest? - It hath been kept in a particular part of the shop ever since.

Q. Who brings it here? - Our porter brought it to the Old Bailey.

Prisoner. Don't you recollect a person coming into the shop, and asking for half a pint of raisin wine, and you said you could not serve less than a pint? - I said I could not serve less than a bottle.

ROBERT AYRES sworn.

I am a butcher, I recollect the prisoner at the bar is the man that I saw next door to me, with the bag; I live about nine or ten doors from Mr. Gilbert; I saw the prisoner at the ham shop door.

Q. What time of the evening was this? - I think about eight o'clock as near as I can recollect.

Q. What time did you first observe the prisoner? - I saw the prisoner with a bag, and I see him pitch it down, and push it under the window with his knees, which having a good light in the window made me see him very plain, I noticed him trying to push it with his knees, I thought he had a heavy load, and could not get it up again; in the space of one or two minutes I see Mr. Gilbert's man, and young Mr. Gilbert who is here, running after him, and they took hold of him and the bag that he had in his possession; I went as far as the door, and then came back about my business, it being Saturday night I was very busy.

RICHARD MUSPARD sworn.

I am an officer of the parish, I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner that stands at the bar; on a charge of felony, with stealing this sugar, I sealed the bag before ever I delivered the prisoner out of my hands, momentarily as soon as I quitted him at the magistrate's, I went back and sealed it at Mr. Gilbert's; it was in Mr. Gilbert's shop; I know nothing more than taking the man before the magistrate, and from thence he is come here, this is the self same sugar on which I put my seal.

Court to Gilbert. Did you know there was such a parcel going into the country? - I knew there was such a parcel but I did not put it up. I saw a bag of sugar lay by the prisoner in the street, and I saw a parcel of sugar brought in, which I know to be ours, by the bag and direction, this is the same.

Constable. I was obliged to call a coach to take him away, for fear of his being rescued.

Gilbert. This direction is in the hand writing of one of our young men.

Q. Has that sugar been kept separate from the rest? - It has.

Prisoner. I called at Mr. Gilbert's shop for a quarter of a pound of moist sugar, and a halfpennyworth of allspice, the mean time a person came in with an empty bottle for half a pint of raisin wine; he told him he could not serve less than a pint, and he went out of the shop, and there were three or four more about the shop door, it was Saturday night, and when I went out, he had

given me change for a shilling, and I had the change in one hand, and the sugar and allspice in the other, when I came out I saw a man run by with the sugar, and he put it down, and when I came up to it, I put my hand down to see what it was, and they came and took me, Mr. Gilbert's son said in the shop that they thought I was not the person.

Gilbert. At the magistrate's I did wish to soften the matter, and I said probably he might not take it out of the shop, and I wanted the magistrate to let him go for a soldier.

Q. What are the names of your partners? - My father, John Gilbert , William Gilbert , and myself, John Gilbert the younger.

Prisoner. My lord, take and weigh the master in you own breast, for I am really innocent. Mr. Gilbert's son would not come forward to prosecute me himself, and he came after the man half way down the street, to take him back again, not to appear against me.

Court to Gilbert. What may be the value of this sugar? - Somewhere about four pounds.

GUILTY. (Aged 28.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-59

287. MARY WILSON was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , a metal watch, value 2l. a steel watch chain, value 1s. a metal seal, value 1d. a metal watch key, value 1d. the goods of John Young , privately from his person

JOHN YOUNG sworn.

On Friday, the 28th of March, I was robbed, it was between one and two; it happened in a passage leading to the French Horn, in Holborn , I left a friend's house about one o'clock; I was quite sober (I am a printer ) going up Holborn I met with the prisoner at the bar, and stopped with her some time in this passage or court, and parted with her there, when I returned home I found I had lost my watch; I live in Plumb Tree-court, by Holborn bridge, about a quarter of a mile from the French Horn inn.

Q. Had your watch any seals to it? - Yes, a metal seal, metal cases, a plush steel chain, the seal was red, with hope engraved on it.

Q. When had you last seen this watch? - When I came out of my friend's house I looked to see what it was o'clock, and I put it in my left handwaistcoat pocket. I discovered it again, so far again as to know where it was pawned, by distributing hand-bills in the morning.

Q. Had you ever seen that woman before? - Not before that night.

Q. How long might you be in her company? - I suppose about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour.

Q. Where there any lamps thereabouts? - We were between two lamps talking in Holborn.

Q. Are you sure that that is the woman? - I am very certain of it.

Q. How soon did you see her again after that night? - It was about twelve o'clock, after I had been to Mr. Edwards's, the pawnbroker, I saw her coming from a passage by the door of Mr. Edwards.

Q. Was it the passage where you had been with her? - No, it was in Portpool-lane, they call it Tash-court.

Q. What happened? - I told her she had stole my watch; she denied it, she said she had never seen me before in her life.

Q. Did you take her into custody at that time? - Yes, and she was taken to the police office in Hatton-garden, and committed.

JANE WATSON sworn.

I go out to Needle work, the prisoner lodges in the same house as I do, in Portpool-lane, she called me up about eight o'clock on Saturday morning, and desired me to take this watch to Mr. Edwards's to pawn, she said that a gentleman had brought it to her and he had got no money. This is the watch, I pawned it for eighteen shillings, I asked her the gentleman's name? she said his name was John Scott .

JOHN EDWARDS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I received this watch of Jane Watson , the last witness, on the 29th of March, I think it was on a Saturday between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I have kept it ever since. About an hour after I had taken the watch, I received an hand bill. I interrogated the party whose watch it was, she told me it belonged to a person of the name of John Scott . I knew the woman that pledged it, she lives just opposite.

Court to Prosecutor. Where did you keep this watch? - In my waistcoat pocket.

Q. Do you always keep it in your waistcoat pocket? - No, not always.

Q. Are you sure it was in your waistcoat that very night? - I am very certain that after I had looked at it about one o'clock, I put it in my waistcoat pocket.

Q. Then you did not put it in your waistcoat pocket in the house, but after you left the house? - It was after I left the house.

Q. Before you saw the woman? - It was before I saw the woman, I mean to swear that.

Q. Then how came you to swear before that when you saw your watch the last time, it was in the house where you left your friends? - It might be in the door; It was about the time I was leaving the house.

Q. Then before that it was in your fob? - It was.

Q. How came you to put it into your waistcoat pocket? - I used to do it at night because I thought it was much faster of a night, because I buttoned my coat over it.

Q. You did not perceive it go from you at any time? - No.

Q. You have not the least idea of its going? - I have not.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that this account is the true account of it? - It is as exactly as I can remember.

Q. Do you think it ever dropped out of your breeches pocket? - I am very certain that when I went into her company I had the watch.

Q. Will you swear that it could not drop out of your breeches pocket? - I cannot take on myself to swear it could not drop out of my breeches pocket, it could not drop out of my waistcoat pocket unless it had been taken.

Prisoner. I know nothing of the man, never see the man in my life, I brought a gentleman home with me very drunk, and he staid with me all night, and he asked me to pawn the watch in the morning, and I called up that woman and desired her to go over to Mr. Edwards's and pawn that watch, he desired me to ask twenty-five shillings for it, the woman came back and asked what name? I asked him his name? he said John Scott , and she went and brought eighteen shillings, and after I had been out to market to buy a bit of dinner, I was coming home again and Mr. Edwards and that man was looking up the court; and Mr. Edwards said, that is the woman,

and when I came to him he said Ma'am, how do you do? I said pretty well, but you have the advantaige of me; he says, where is my watch? I said, I have not seen you nor your watch; I had a watch this morning but it was from a very different person than you, it was from a very lusty man; he said I had stole it from him; I said I was very willing to go any where with him, and I went with him without an assistance; I have sent to no friends because I never was suspected of any thing in my life. It is the more my misfortune, I am in an unfortunate line of life, and I have a child to maintain.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

Prisoner. I never saw this woman nor any body else since I have been in confinement, but on Saturday last there was a young woman came to me and told me that that woman, Jane Watson , had been promised her expences, and that the prosecutor said, that he would not have prosecuted me, but he expected to be paid.

Watson. I told the prosecutor I could not afford to lose my time, he said I should get paid, and he should get paid too.

GUILTY.

Of stealing but not privately .(Aged 33.)

Transported for Seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-60

288. ELIZABETH KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , a silver watch, &c. the goods of William Collwell .

William Collwell and Matthew Conway were called on their recognizances.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-61

289. CHARLES BOYLE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , one guinea , the monies of Daniel Keleen .

Daniel Keleen was called on his recognizance.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-62

290. JOHN JONES was indicted for that he, on the 14th of September , in the parish of Lumpeter Pout Stephen, in the county of Cordigan , Rees Price , an officer of the Excise on shore, in the execution of his office, in siezing twenty pounds weight of tobacco, unlawfully assaulted, forcibly, hindred and opposed him .

(The indictment opened by Mr. Trebeck and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

EDWARD EDWARDS sworn.

Q. Do you recollect being at Lumpeter in the month of September last? - Yes. On the 14th of September I went with another officer to John Jones 's house, the prisoner's house, at Lumpeter; we had a regular warrant, and we told him we had a warrant to search his house, I went into the house and I gave it to Rees Price to read, I went into an inner room, the

second room in the house, and I saw the bag of tobacco, under the bed; I called to Rees Price , and told him that the goods were there; Rees Price was coming into the room, he was the officer that was along with me; he was going towards the tobacco, and John Jones 's wife catched me by the ears, at the same time Rees Price came, and he went on towards the tobacco, and John Jones struck him till he was staggering; I seeing the officer going down, and supposing John Jones going to repeat his blow, I ran between the officer and John Jones , and then he struck me twice, he struck me several times; I stood in my own defence, and I encountered him a considerable time; after that Rees Price had got hold of the tobacco, when he recovered himself, while John Jones and I were encountering each other, then Price was taking it out of the door, and the woman was pulling him back the other way, and pulling the tobacco back, and strewing it along on the ground, then there came in some neighbours from about that part, and begged of them for God's sake to let us alone, as they were afraid they would murder us, and they assisted us; then the constable came and catched me by the arm, in order to take me out; and John Jones seeing this disadvantage, kicked me in my private parts, and it bled, and I put my hand down just as Mr. Price was going out with the bag, and assisted him to take the tobacco out; after that I got out of doors, and Price got off with the tobacco, and we had left our hats in the house in the skirmish, and we went for our hats, and Jones and his wife began throwing stones at us, one came very near to me; I was obliged to jump into the river, they followed us, then I was obliged to run off to Lumpeter, as fast as I could, and they followed; and we sent a messenger back for the hats, and Jones and his wife refused them.

Mr. Alby. You are an excise officer? - Yes.

Q. Who pays for these prosecutions? - I don't know upon my word, it is ordered by the board of excise

Q. You had no intention of prosecuting this man, for this casual affray, unless it had been advised to you by other persons? - The matter was reported to the Board, and they ordered the prosecution.

Q. I would ask you on the oath you have taken, was Jones in the house at the time that you came into the house? - I did not see him first, I saw his wife.

Q. What did you tell the wife you came about? - I told her I had a warrant to search her house for illegal goods.

Q. I believe you was not permitted to come into the house at the time? - Yes, the door was open.

Q. What is become of this warrant? - It is mislaid.

Q. Was it not above half an hour subsequent to your entering into the house, that the prisoner at the bar entered into the house? - No, it was not so much.

Q. Was it twenty-nine minutes do you think? - No, it was not so much, it was a very little time, I was in and turned round, and the man of the house had come into the house at that time.

Q. The wife and you entered into a scuffle was not this woman with child? - I believe she was, she has had a child since.

Q. And you sir, as a man pretend on your oath to say that she was able to assault you? - I did not raise my hand against her, because I knew she was pregnant.

Q. You have always sworn positively

that the prisoner at the bar and his wife assaulted you.

Q. Was not this unfortunate woman knocked to the ground in the scuffle? - No such thing by me, I did not see her at all on the ground.

REES PRICE sworn.

I am in the excise.

Q. Did you on the 14th of September go with the last witness, Mr. Edwards, to the house of the prisoner? - Yes, I went with Mr. Edwards, my brother officer, to search this house; and we went into the house, and the warrant was presented, at first I did not see Jones, but the wife only, I told her that I had a warrant to search her house for smuggled goods; she told us we were very welcome to search, that we might take her word that she had none; we proceeded to search; Mr. Edwards gave me the warrant, he had the warrant at that time, and went into an inner room, he said it was his duty to search, and went in in order to search, a little time after Mr. Edwards calls to me, and says, Mr. Price, come here, there is something here, I went into that inner room, as I was going in, Jones's wife took Mr. Edwards by his two ears, in her two hands, she said d-n your eyes Edwards, you are at some mischief always; Jones by this time was in that room, he came from without, he was not in the house before; he was by this time in the room where Edwards, and his wife were; Jones was sitting by a bench, by the bed side, and I took him by the hand, and told him he must get from there, that I might see what was under the bed.

Q. Did you do it with any violence? - No; then he struck me till I was reeling down, with his fist, Mr. Edwards by that time came between us; by that time I stooped down under the bed, in order to see a bag of tobacco there; by that time the wife came up to try to take the bag from me as much as she could, she broke the bag, and strewed it about the floor.

A. How much do you think there was in the bag? - The quantity I took from there, was seventeen pounds, if not more.

Q. After she strewed the tobacco on the floor, what more was done? - We went into a scuffle then, and she took me by the collar, and there were people came in to our assistance, and I was determined to lose my life or keep the tobacco.

Q. Did you know this man before? - Yes.

Q. Did he know you? - Yes.

Q. Did he know you and Edwards were excise officers? - Yes, perfectly well; we had made seizures there before.

Mr. Alby. She told you at first that you was welcome to search? - Yes.

Q. When you took up this tobacco, the tobacco bag was broke, and then you got into a scuffle? - Yes.

Mr. Alby addressed the Jury on the part of the defendant; to which Mr. Garrow replied.

Jury to Edwards. Was the warrant produced to the man or woman? - To both the man and woman, the other officer told them the particulars of it.

Court to Price. Did you shew the warrant to the man and woman? - I did, and read part of it, and told them, the contents in welch, they said they did not want to hear any more, they were content.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned in Newgate one year .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-63

291. WILLIAM SULLIVAN and HENRY PASMORE were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. the goods of Samuel Baxter .

SAMUEL BAXTER sworn.

I live in Cleveland-street, Frtzroy-square; I lost my handkerchief going to Cannon row, the foot of Westminster-bridge; I had been in the City, and as I was going by Westminster-bridge I missed my handkerchief, nearly, out of my pocket; at a considerable distance, from Temple-bar, I missed it partly out, but not quite, then I put it in, going on, partly to Charing Cross, I missed it partly out again; I put it in again; very near to Cannon-row, I observed the prisoners behind me, almost to Cannon row, in Cannon-row , very near to Bridge-street.

Q. Were they together when you observed them behind you? - Yes, I did not turn about to look particularly at them, but I observed them just behind, just at the end of Cannon-row, I had an occasion for my handkerchief, and I put my hand into my pocket to feel for it, and the prisoners immediately ran forwards before me, which gave me every reason to suspect they had got it, one of them. I run after one of them, and called, stop thief! they went towards the foot of the bridge, from Cannon-row; I laid hold of one of them, the tall one, which is Sullivan, and I told him that either him or the other had got my handkerchief; which he strongly denied, and he pulled a considerable quantity of handkerchief out of his pocket, but I perceived there were neither of them mine; I then took off his hat, and found the handkerchief concealed in the crown of his hat; the other was secured by the people about, at the time Sullivan was stopped; he did not run, he would have run if he had not been secured. From thence they were taken to the justice and committed, I have the handkerchief, there is a black stain nearly the middle, and several holes and white spots; the letters of my name are on it, in the midle, but I did not know it at the time.

Q. You are sure they were both together when you looked behind? - Yes, and they both ran forward together.

Q. How near did you take him after you pursued? - He did not run fifty yards, and the other ran with him.

Q. You had not seen any thing before the prisoners ran by you? - Not any thing.

Prisoner Sullivan. On this Wednesday I was going after two fellow servant s that had listed in an independant company, near Westminster Bridge; my inclination was to go along with them, to enlist with them, with that as I crossed the street, I saw an handkerchief lay down, I did not know who the handkerchief belonged to, and I picks the handkerchief up, and goes on a little way, and I met this young man, and I asked him if he could tell me where one Captain Ogleton lived over Westminster Bridge? No, says he; thank you, sir, says I, I am very much obliged to you; with that I walked on, and the man cried out stop thief! and stopped me close by the watermen.

Prisoner Pasmore. I was going over Westminster Bridge, and I met this young man, and he asked me where Captain Ogleton lived? I told him I did not know, and when I came to the watermen I was stopped; I did not see what it was for.

The prisoner Pasmore called Oliver Marsden and his mother to his character.

William Sullivan , GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Henry Pasmore , GUILTY. (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-64

292. SAMUEL otherwise WILLIAM TRAMP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , a wooden box, value 1s. two cotton gowns, value 1l a silk petticoat, value 1l. a dimity petticoat, value 6d. a silk cloak, value 5s. six pair of cotton stockings, value 6s. two pair of linen pockets, value 1s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 4s. two muslin aprons, value 10s. a dimity petticoat, value 3s. a linen apron, value 3s. two linen caps, value 1s. three muslin caps, value 5s. two linen shifts, value 4s. the goods of Richard Blissett .

JANE BLISSETT sworn.

I am the wife of Richard Blissett , he is a gold beater , he is in the Middlesex militia, the last I heard of him he was at Portsmouth.

Q. Did you lose any property last March? - Yes the 21st of last March, I I lost a box with two gowns, two petticoats, a couple of jackets, six pair of cotton stockings, &c. as in the indictment. The box was in Oxford-road, at my master's, the corner of James-street, Oxford-road, No. 217 , Mr. Strong, a wine merchant; my box was taken from the carman's cart, at the door, it was to be brought to the country house from the town house.

Q. When was the last time you saw it? - I believe it was near a month; I went down, and was to stay in the country.

Q. Where did your master live in the country? - At Kilburn, and it was to come down to Kilburn, but it was taken out of the cart, at the door; I see it that same night at Mary-le-bone watch-house, and it was taken that night to Bow-street. I never see the prisoner before that in Mary-le-bone watch-house.

JOHN GODDARD sworn.

I am a carman; I live with Mr. Moore, in St. James's Market. Jane Blissett asked me in the morning if I would bring her box from her master's town house to Kilburn? I called for the box the corner of James-street, at Mr. Strong's house, the 21st of March last, it was about two o'clock as near as I can tell, I put the box on the cart, and I went back into the house again, and I was watching my things on the cart, I saw the box moved on the cart, and I immediately goes out as fast as I could, and the prisoner had the box on his shoulder, at a little distance from the cart, running along with it; I had some other things in the cart, but they were nor touched; I pursued after him as fast as I could, and I soon overtook him, and as soon as I overtook him, he dropped the box and ran away, and I hallooed for the people to stop him, and they stopped him before he was out of my sight; I am sure that is the man. The box is here.

AARON BUXTON sworn.

I stopped the prisoner in James-street.

Q. Had he any thing on him when you stopped him? - No. I saw him cross Oxford-road, as if coming from Mr. Strong's, with a box on his back, and instantly I see him almost, I see this carman running after him, and he whipped him over his legs once or twice, and then he attempted to throw the box over his shoulder into the ditch, and the carman hallooed out to stop him, and I seized him.

Blissett. This is my box.

Gaddard. This is the box that I received from her master's house.

Buxton. This is the box I saw on the prisoner's back.

Blissett. This is all my property; I can swear to it.

Prisoner. I work for James Clarke , in Holborn, a master sawyer; in going

up Oxford-road a man came up to me the corner of James-street, and he asked me to carry this box to Winchester-street, and he would give me a shilling; and I was taken by this man and brought back to the house.

Q. To Goddard. Did you see any body else near the place? - No, I saw him with the box before ever he got into James-street at all.

Buxton. I saw him with the box before ever he was five yards from the cart.

Q. To Goddard. How long might it be from the time of your seeing the box moved in the cart, and seeing it on his shoulder? - I opened the door and ran out as fast as I could.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-65

293. WILLIAM CHADWICK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , twenty-six yards of irish linen cloth, value 1l. the goods of John Turner , George Whiteside , and Michael Turner .

Indicted in a Second COUNT for stealing the same goods, the property of Felix Oneal .

A Third COUNT for stealing the same goods, the property of Samuel Maskill .

FELIX ONEAL sworn.

I live with Mr. Maskill as porter , in Mitre-court, Milk-street, Cheapside, he is a glazer and calender . On the 21st of March last, I was going through Longacre with the horse and cart of Mr. Maskill's; I was driving the said horse, I was sitting inside of the cart, it is an open cart, I sat upon some callicoes, and there were thirty pieces of Irish in a wrapper, in the hind part of the cart, and luckily I happened to turn round to look at the goods, it was about half past seven in the evening; looking about I see the man, the prisoner, handing to the other, on the opposite side of the flag stones, a piece of cloth, I mean the flags on the other side of the street to where my cart was, and he was clapping it inside of his great coat, the receiver of the cloth was doing this; so that I should not perceive them if I happened to turn round; with that I hallooed out stop thief! my cart was going on when I saw this; accordingly he was pursued, they both ran when I hallooed out stop thief!

Q. Did they both run the same way? - Yes, as far as I could perceive; I staid by the horse and cart for fear I might lose the remainder of the goods, and it would have been an unlucky circumstance for me if the prisoner had not been taken, there is such a scandalous character of the porters; I staid by the cart till the man was brought back, which was in a short space of time.

Q. Which was brought back, the man that took it or the man that received it? - I cannot tell.

Q. Who brought him back? - Rowan. When the man was brought back I got the goods into my custody as soon as possible again, I think Crooks produced it to me.

Q. Was that piece of cloth that was produced to you, one that had been taken out of your cart? - That I cannot say; it was missed, but I cannot swear to that.

Q. Were there any marks on the cloth? - Yes, it is numbered, the man of the shop is here.

Q. Who is the man they brought back? - The prisoner at the bar; the porter is here that put in the thirty pieces, and when I got home there was

only twenty-seven, there is two pieces quite gone.

Q. Did you go directly home? - No, I went to Bow-street, and left the horse and cart at one of our customer's door, in Bow-street; Mr. Davis and one of his men sat in the cart during the time that I transacted business at Bow-street.

Q. Whose property was this? - I believe my master was answerable for it while it was in my custody, he had it to calender for Messrs. Turner and Whiteside's, in Fleet-street; I had taken up all the thirty pieces at Messrs. Turners and Whiteside's.

Q. Who put them in the cart? - Messrs Turner and Whiteside's porter, and I had seen thirty pieces counted.

Q. How long had it been put into your cart before you got to Long-acre? - I believe between two and three hours; I had been up as far as Oxford-street, Cavendish-square, and stopped to deliver out goods and take in goods.

HENRY FELLOWS sworn.

I live with John Turner , George Whiteside , and Michael Turner , they are linen draper s, in Fleet-street; Mr. Maskill does business for them. On the 21st of March, I remember looking some linen out for Mr. Maskill, they were put into Mr. Maskill's cart; I did not see them put in, I did not hear of the loss till the day after; Mr. Maskill was after his man the same day, thinking he had lost them.

Q. Do you know any of these pieces again by the marks? - I don't think that I should.

JOHN HARPER sworn.

I am porter to Messrs. Turner and Whiteside's; I remember, tying up thirty pieces for Mr. Maskill; they were tied up in Mr. Maskill's wrapper, in our usual way.

Q. Were the ends well secured? - They were, but in a large load the ends are easily untied; I delivered them to the cart myself.

Fellows. I looked out seventeen pieces of No. 11.

Q. Does this piece in question appear to be No. 11? - It does.

Q. What do you mean by No. 11? - It comes from Ireland No. 1, and I put a stroke on it and made it No. 11; I put a stroke on all the cloth I delivered to Maskill, all but six pieces.

ZIMRAN CROOKS sworn.

On the 21st of March, I was coming from Soho-square, about half after seven in the morning, I was coming up a street that leads into Long-acre, and I heard some body cry out stop thief! directly two men runs by me, and they ran down the street that I came up, I don't know the name of the street; it leads into Long-acre, and I sat out after them, and I hallooed out stop thief! and in about half way down the street I saw somebody had stopped one, and before I got quite up to him I picked up the piece of cloth, about twenty yards before I came up to him, where they were stopped.

Q. Did you see any body drop that piece of cloth? - I did not, I was not nigh enough to see them drop it.

Q. Who was the man that was stopped? - I don't know only by seeing him at Bow-street.

Q. Can you say whether he was or was not one of the men that you saw running? - I cannot tell, no otherwise than by their stopping him, and his being in custody when I came up; I gave the cloth to the porter, and we all followed the cart together to Bow-street.

Oneal. When I turned about I saw my wrapper was undone, at the tail of the cart.

Q. Was there any board at the tail of the cart? - Yes, there was.

JAMES ROWAN sworn.

I live at No. 126, Tottenham-court-road. On the evening of the 21st of March, I was in Mercer-street, Longacre, about half past seven I heard the cry of stop thief! and saw the prisoner run down Long-acre.

Q. Was there any with him? - No, he was running very hard; I ran into the road, and immediately laid hold of him; he came from the pavement into the middle of the road.

Q. How far might this be from the top of the street which leads into Longacre? - About twenty yards; I saw the cloth underneath his coat, before he dropped it, he had it so when I first saw him, he dropped it the instant I laid hold of him; I saw it was a bundle, but I could not tell what it was till it was brought up by Mr. Crooks. He instantly gave me a violent blow on the side of the head, which made me stagger, but having hold of his coat I recovered myself, and took hold of his collar, and called for assistance, he had gone three or four yards further then in this time, from where he quitted the cloth; at that instant Mr. Watts came up to me, and we secured him; Crook brought the cloth immediately as the prisoner was secured; when I laid hold of him there was no other person in the street.

Prisoner. Can you swear that I am the man that dropped the piece of cloth? - Yes, you are.

WILLIAM WATTS sworn.

On Friday the 21st of March, I was in Mercer-street, Long-acre, about half past seven in the evening, I was with James Rowan , and I heard the cry of stop thief! I saw the prisoner run, and saw Rowan run and catch hold of him.

Q. Did you see any body else in the street at that time? - No, I saw the prisoner drop the cloth, I and Rowan secured him, and we conducted him to Long-acre where the cart was, and from there to the office in Bow-street.

Q. In the scuffle had you gone from the place, where the cloth had dropped. at all? - The prisoner had by some means or other got a little beyond the cloth.

Prisoner. Can you swear that is the piece of cloth that belongs to that young man?

Oneal. This is the piece of cloth given me, and I have had it in my possession ever since.

Q. Do you know that to be one of the pieces put into the wrapper yourself? - I cannot say that.

Q. Did you examine the wrapper as soon as the man ran away? - No, I could not; when the cloth was brought back I examined it then, and I can safely say that I lost no goods after that, because I watched the hind part of my cart very particularly.

Fellows. This is marked No. 11, like the mark that I made, but I cannot swear to it, and that is cloth of the same kind and quality.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say; I should be very glad to go and serve his Majesty, if he would permit me. I have no witnesses here; I am a very poor man.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-66

294. WILLIAM EVERSFIELD and ROBERT RAINE was indicted

for feloniously making an assault, in a certain field, near the king's highway, on the 5th of March , on Elizabeth Carter , and putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, a linen pocket, value 3d. a pair of spectacles and spectacle case, value 2s. a quarter of a yard of flannel, value 4d. a nutmeg grater, value 9d. a linen handkerchief, value 6d. three metal thimbles, value 6d. and two halfpence; the goods, chattels, and monies of the said Elizabeth Carter .

(The case opened by Mr. Const.)

ELIZABETH CARTER sworn.

On the 5th of March, I was coming from Islington , towards Sadlers Wells , about nine o'clock, I met them two prisoners there; they began speaking to me, they sidled me on to the grass, and the young one tripped me down, and the other took off my pocket.

Q. What is the young one's name? - Eversfield. He made use of a great many bad words; they said they would cut me open, and he gave me a violent blow across my nose and my eye; the justice saw what a terrible black eye I had; and then he ran after the other; I then got up and went and looked after the watchman, and could not find him, and a gentleman went to seek for him, and he came and found me; I went away with the watchman to look for my pattens, and went with him to his watchbox, and then while I was there this gentleman called out for assistance; then the prisoner was taken; the patrole went to him, and the gentleman came back holding the prisoner, the young man Eversfield; I said that is the person that has left me, that used me so, says I, the other is a thicker set person. He was secured.

Q. Did you go to the magistrate the next morning? - No, I did not go till the third hearing, Mr. Burrell appeared the first and second hearing.

Q. When did you see Raine after that night? - I did not see him till I came to the justice; when I was there the justice had him up.

Q. Did you know him again? - Yes.

Q. Did they produce any thing to you at the justice's? - The things that are set down; the officer has them.

WILLIAM KNIGHT sworn.

I am an officer; I got these things from Raine's pocket. On the 5th of March, I was officer of the night, I was on my duty at ten o'clock; Eversfield was locked up in the Cage, and the officer was gone to look after Raine; at eleven o'clock when I was going to take Eversfield to the watch-house, some of his friends said, it was a pity I did not go and seek after Raine, and I did go and take him.

Prosecutrix. These are the things that were in my pocket.

Mr. Wentworth. Where do you live? - In Northampton-street, in Wood's-close, the top of St. John's-street.

Q. What are you? - A single woman.

Q. You occupy an apartment in this house? - I do.

Q. Where had you been that evening? - I had been at a shop facing the Angel, at Islington, to ask for some of their stop work.

Q. What time of the evening was this? - About nine o'clock.

Q. Dark? - Yes, moon light.

Q. It was so dark you could not discern a person? - No.

Q. When you first saw the prisoners, were they not on the opposite side of the road? - No, they were on this side.

Q. On your oath, did you or did you not speak to Eversfield before he spoke

to you? - No, they came speaking to me, and then they sidled me into the field, as I before mentioned.

Q. You did not hesitate much to go into the field, Mrs. Carter? - They sidled me there, and then tripped me down.

Q. They talked with you very kindly, and then you withdrew with them into a field? - No, they sidled me into the field, and tripped me down.

Q. There was some conversation passed between you? - Not very much.

Q. How long did they keep speaking to you? - Not two minutes.

Q.Pray, ma'am, how do you get your living? what employment have you? - I have lived on a great many good things, since my husband died; I live by needle work when I can get it to do, and I had been to a shop to ask for work then.

Q. You have never offered to make this business up with the prisoners? - They came to me to make it up several times; I did not go to them, Raine's wife came to me and made me go to Newgate to see Raine; they were always coming to me, and would not be easy without I would go.

Q. Have you or have you not, at any time, now speak the truth, heard any thing like a reward, some money to be had provided the prisoners were convicted? - I never heard any thing about any money.

WILLIAM SOUTHEY sworn.

I am a patrole; I was so on the 5th of March, I was situated in Spa fields, the corner of New River Head; I go on at dusk, I went into Sadlers Wells fields, hearing of a robbery being done, and I found Mrs. Carter there, her nose and mouth all bloody; I said, mistress, what is the matter? she said, I have been ill-treated and robbed, and they are gone towards Pentonville; I had got hardly to my box and there was a cry of watch! watch! and Mr. Burrell had hold of young Eversfield by the collar, and I called out mistress; and I held up my lanthorn before his face, says I, don't be in a hurry, wipe your face, look at him; says she, this is the one that kneeled on me while the other got my pocket off. I went from there and we took him to the watch-house; going along, says he, it was Raine that snatched the bundle; I then had him locked up in the Cage; I then went that night after Raine, there was a light up in his room, but I could have no entrance, and I gave the officer information where to take him.

Q. Was you before the justice the time the woman came there? - Yes.

Q. Did she know then at the time? - She knew them directly they came in, she said there they were, she said, them were them before she came into the office, she made no doubt.

Mr. Wentworth. How do you mean, made no doubt? - She said at once they were the men.

Q. Did not she at the magistrate's say, it was a thick set man? - I don't know.

Q. You are a watchman, are you not? - A patrole.

Q. What is Mr. Knight? - Mr. Knight is a constable.

Q. You never had any conversation about any money? - The parish will pay me.

Q. You are a watchman, and with this superintendant of the night? - I don't see Knight but once a fortnight.

Q. Had you never any conversation about this highway robbery with him? - No, never with any one of them.

JOHN BURRELL sworn.

I belong to the Bank. On the 5th of March last, I saw both the prisoners;

I was going home, about a quarter before ten, as I passed the watch-box, going up to Spa-fields, just as I got through, the prisoner Raine snatched at my bundle, and tore my handkerchief, but did not take it; I called out to the watch, and Raine ran off, and I laid hold of Eversfield by the collar, and took him to the watchman, and the watchman held up his lanthorn to his face; and she said, that is the man that threw me down, and leaned on me while the other took my pocket. Says I, the other is gone off, he is a thick set man; she says, yes, the other is a thick fet man that took my pocket. This was a quarter before ten.

The prisoners called eleven witnesses who gave them good characters.

Prisoner. The woman has had a supper with my friends, and has received two guineas in part of six, that she was to receive to make this matter up.

William Eversfield, GUILTY . Death .(Aged 17.)

Robert Raine, GUILTY. Death.(Aged 25.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-67

295. MARGARET STEWARD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Wheeler , one Martha Sparks , spinster, and others being therein, about the hours of four in the afternoon, of the 3d of April , and burglariously stealing therein, two ticken mattrasses, value 10s. the goods of the said Richard Wheeler .

RICHARD WHEELER sworn.

I keep a house in Coleman-street ; my house was robbed on Thursday, the 3d of April, I was not at home, I went out between one and two; I returned about four o'clock, that was the first I heard of it; I lost two mattrass cases, I see them immediately before I left the house, in the warehouse; they are now in possession of the officer, his name is Ray.

JOHN HILL sworn.

I am a workman with Mr. Wheeler, I was not at home when he was robbed; in returning home I detected the prisoner coming out of the shop; the shop is in Holt-court, I stopped her and asked her what she had got there? she said it was nothing of mine; I desired her to come back, I examined her apron, and found the mattrasses concealed in her apron.

Q. I want to know in what manner the house was broke open; do you know any thing about that? - I do not.

Q. What was done with the things? - They were delivered to the constable, as soon as Mr. Wheeler came home.

SAMUEL GREEN sworn.

I produce two mattrass cases, which I

received of Mr. Wheeler, I have kept them ever since.

Hill. I understand them to be the property of Captain Dundas, sent in to be made, under the care of Mr. Wheeler.

Court to Wheeler. If goods are sent to be made, you are answerable for them? - Most undoubtedly.

Hill. I know them from this circumstance, when they were made up for Captain Dundas, there was one wrong marked.

Q. Had you seen them about the premises that day? - I had, they were laying in the shop.

Prisoner. I have no question; only be as merciful as you can. I never was brought before a bar, or a justice in the world before; I have no friend alive, they have been all dead long since.

GUILTY . (Aged 54.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-68

296. FRANCIS THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , a linen handkerchief, value 6d. the goods of Richard Seyer .

RICHARD SEYER sworn.

My pocket was picked the 22d of March last, Saturday, between nine and ten in the evening, in St. Paul's Churchyard ; as I was walking through St. Paul's Church-yard the prisoner came behind me, and by supporting himself to take my handkerchief out of my pocket, his left hand pressed against my back, I turned round, and I saw the prisoner run off, I pursued him, and in running after him I saw the handkerchief in his left hand, as he ran.

Q. Was it linen? - It was. In pursuing him he turned up an alley, to go into Paternoster-row, and I called out stop thief! and there was a boy that tripped him up in the kennel as he run; as the prisoner fell, I saw the handkerchief drop out of his hand, and I picked it up, and gave it to the constable.

A CONSTABLE sworn.

On the 22d of March, the prosecutor shewed me this handkerchief, and said the prisoner had robbed him of it; in searching of him I found this handkerchief, with a little blood on it, and this sharp knife, beyond the sharpness of a common case knife.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief.

Prisoner. Please you my lord I had been with my brother to receive some money; in St. Paul's Church-yard, I heard the people call stop thief! I ran the same as another person might, and they catched hold of me.

Prosecutor. I am sure I saw the handkerchief fall out of his hand.

GUILTY. (Aged 24.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER

Reference Number: t17940430-69

297. JOHN DILLON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of February , fifty-six pounds weight of elecampane roots, value 15s. four pounds weight of red bark, value 5s. the goods of John Towel Rutt .

(The case opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN WAINWRIGHT sworn.

I am a constable of Dowgate Ward. On the 17th of February, a little before nine at night, the prisoner at the bar passed me in Thames-street, near by Mr. Calvert's brewhouse, between Mr. Rutt's warehouse, and London Bridge, with a bag; I asked him what he had got there? he rather hesitated, and said, it was not nine o'clock; I asked him what he had got there? he said he had some bark, or drugs, he did not give me a clear answer; I asked him where he had brought it from? he said he had brought it from Rutland-place; I asked him where Rutland-place was, and asked him where he was going to take it to? he said he was going to take it into the Borough; I asked him what weight it was? he said he did not know; I asked him if he had got a bill of parcels? he said he believed it was in the bag, along with the other goods; I desired him to put it down, he did; I untied the bag, and I did not find any bill of parcels at all; there was a bundle that had some bark in it, that I thought was very slovenly tied, that gave me more suspicion, it was tied up nearly the same as it is now; says I, I shall be glad if you will go with me back to where you have brought it from.

Q. What else was there besides bark in that bag? - Nothing but elecampane roots and the bark; I told him I was afraid he did not come honesty by it; he said he had; he said he would rather I would go with him where he brought it from; I told him as it was very little way where he said he brought it from, he had better go back, I took him back, he went very quietly along with me; he walked along till we came to the Fortune of War, just by Paul's Wharf; says I, this is not the place where you said you brought it from.

Q. It was in the road there? - Yes, it is all the straight road; he said there was a man in there that saw a man give him a shilling in the morning, to carry it into the Borough; I told him that I did not choose to go with him into a public house; I brought him back till I came to our own ward, when I took him to the Compter; after I had been to the Fortune of War, I brought him back to London Bridge again, in order to carry him to the Compter. I asked him why he told me false? he told me that a man brought it in a boat to Paul's-stairs, in the morning, and left it at the public house all day, and he was there in the morning, and he gave him a shilling to carry it at night into the Borough; to the best of my knowledge, he said the man's name was Fox; I asked him what Fox was? he said he believed he was a smuggler, or a lumper, or something of that kind. I put him in the Compter, and he was up the next day before my Lord Mayor.

Q. How came you not to proceed on to the regular place? - He said that the Fortune of War was the place where he had it from.

Mr. Knowlys. Did not he tell you that he was going into the Borough, to carry it to a person of the name of Fox? - He did not.

Q. Now he offered at the Fortune of War, as you was going by, to go in and shew you a person who had given him a shilling to carry it; why did not you go into the public house? - I did not choose to go into the public house amongst strangers.

Q. Did not he tell you that he lived in Kutland-place? - He told me he lived somewhere near there; I asked him what? and he said he was a porter , and carried greens from market.

Q. You went along, my friend stated it that he told you there was a hill of parcels, but he only said he believed there was a bill of parcels; on searching it was found he was mistaken, there was none? - It was exactly so.

Q. He offered to take it to this very place where the man was to be found of whom he received this parcel? - Yes, he wanted me to go there, but I refused.

Q. So that in short you would give the man no opportunity to convince you whether he was taking it as he had told you or not.

Mr. Gurney. Your being alone, you did not choose to venture yourself into a public house? - It was so.

Q. You have kept the things ever since? - I have.

EDMUND LAWRENCE sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. John Towell Rutt . The prisoner had been constantly employed in Mr. Rutt's warehouse and mill, for two years. On the 17th of February he was at work till about eight o'clock in the evening, the usual time of leaving work.

Q. At that time do you know whether there were any elecampane roots in the warehouse? - There was.

Q. Was there any bark? - There was, of different sorts, some red bark powder, but none in the state this is in.

Q. How lately had there been any bark in that state? - A few days before; this is bark of the same quality, I believe, as was in the warehouse. The elecampane root in the warehouse was of the same sort, exactly.

Q. Did you miss any elecampane root at that time? - At the time that John Wainwright called, we weighed a cask, to which the prisoner had access, and we found a little more than a hundred weight had been taken out.

Mr. Knowlys. Pray when was the last weight of that cask taken? - The first or second of January, when we took stock, the prisoner assisted in weighing it.

Q. Then what was the weight at any intermediate time, between the 1st of January and the 18th of January, you cannot say? - I cannot, the cask was opened about the beginning of February, to take a sample out of it, I did not see it opened, but I went up and took a sample out myself. A few days after that there was two hundred weight took out, and put into a drying stove; there was none of it sold; and on the 18th of February we weighed the cask, and what was taken out to put in the drying stove, and the deficiency was a hundred and a quarter, and if we allow for the drying of the two hundred, it makes about a hundred and four or five pounds short.

Q. What does that weigh now produced? - I was told half a hundred and sixteen pounds.

Q. How much do you think there is there? - About half a hundred.

Q. That is not the whole quantity lost, nor is it to be identified by any of your master's marks, and it is a very common root? - This elecampane is much smaller than ever I saw any before.

Q. You do not attend the market to buy it? - Yes, I have several times.

Q. How many times? - Half a dozen.

JOHN TOWEL RUTT sworn.

This elecampane perfectly agrees with the sample; it is an importation from Holland, that grown in England generally is whiter.

Mr. Knowlys. You do not mean to say that article is only to be found in your warehouse? - No.

Q. This man was employed in your business for two years? - He was, I never suspected him before.

Prisoner. I leave it all to my counsel.

ROBERT WILLIAM GREY sworn.

I was a servant to a public house (the

Fortune of War) at the time that this man was taken up, but I have left it since.

Q. When did you learn that the prisoner was taken up? - Not till the next morning, the evening before that I see him.

Q. Do you know any thing of this parcel of goods, or how he came by them? - No, I do not.

Q. Was there any thing passed about those goods, in the morning, or that evening? - In the morning I heard say he was taken up, and I went to see him in the Compter.

Q. What do you know of this transaction? - He was called out to carry a load about half after eight at night, the night before I visited him in the morning; a man called out, and said, he wanted a porter; the prisoner went out of doors to the man, and came in again.

Q. What did the man ask for a porter for? - For to carry a load, I did not go out to see.

Q. You say the prisoner answered the call? - He did; when he came in again, he asked me if I would go to his club with him? I told him I would; he went out again to the man that asked for a porter, and they both went together, then I went on to the club afterwards, and I did not see him any more till the morning; I never see the parcel at all.

Mr. Gurney. When the prisoner came in again, he asked if you would go home to the club, and you told him yes; why did not you go with him? - Because he told me to go on, and he would come after me, but he did not.

Q.Pray how came it you did not tell this story before the Lord Mayor, when the prisoner was there? - I never was called.

Q. You was waiting in the house? - I was.

Q. Was the prisoner there in the morning? - I did not observe that he was.

Q. Did you see a Mr. Fox that morning? - No, I did not, there was a man came there in the morning to know if any thing was left there by the prisoner.

Q.This man did not leave his name at all? - No, he did not.

The prisoner called six witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Prosecutor. The prisoner did live in Rutland-place.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-70

298. RICHARD TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , twenty-eight yards of printed callico, value 2l. 5s. the goods of John Atkinson .

JOHN ATKINSON sworn.

On the 24th of February, Mr. Oliver of Holborn, sent two pieces of printed furniture, to my shop, to be glazed; they went home by two o'clock, and one of them was missing, on enquiring I could not find it in the shop; it contained twenty-eight yards; I missed it out of my shop, Blue Boar-yard; I had seen it about twelve o'clock in the morning, of the 24th; I missed it about half after one, I recovered it about three I suppose, in a manger, in an old stable, in Blue Boar yard.

Q. Did the stable belong to you? - No.

Q. Did you recover it by any person leading you there, or by accident? - By making a search for it.

Q. Did the prisoner work with you? - He did, before that time.

Q. How long before had he quitted your service? - I suppose three weeks or a month. When I found that piece again, I took that piece out, and put another in its stead,I went to Mr. Oliver. The prisoner came forward into the stable, about seven o'clock, and took it out, and I see him with it under his arm.

Q. Did you go into the stable? - I did not.

Q. Did you see him come out of the stable? - I did.

Q. How long did he stay in the stable? - I suppose about half a minute.

Q. Did you see him bring out any thing when he came from the stable? - I see him bring out this piece of callico, and the man laid hold of him.

Q. You say that a piece of callico was found in the stable originally, and the man who put it there, you knew nothing at all about; therefore any body else might have put it there? - The prisoner went exactly to the place.

Q. I ask you whether that piece of callico that was originally in the manager, you did not take it away, and substitute another in its place? - I did, I always said so.

ROBERT CROMWELL sworn.

I am a porter to Mr. Atkinson; at seven o'clock in the evening, the 24th of February, my master he desired me to go into this stable, where he had found the property, that he had missed out of his warehouse; I was not there above a quarter of an hour, and the prisoner came in, and went along through the stable, to the manager, and I thought I heard him making a noise with straw in the manger, he then turned out again to the stable door, and as he came up out of the stable, I laid hold of him, with this piece of cotton inside of his coat.

Mr. Knapp. All you know is that you was set by your master to watch who should take away that piece of cloth; which your master had put there for another piece that he found there? - I watched there, but I don't know who put it there.

RICHARD THOMPSON sworn.

I lived at Mr. Atkinson at that time, I was standing in the next stable at the time, I was set there to watch; when this man had got hold of the prisoner, I assisted him.

Mr. Knapp. You was set to watch this second piece of callico, which your master had put there? - Yes, I believe he put it there.

Q. And the prisoner came and took this piece of callico, which your master had put there? - Yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses to his character.

GUILTY. (Aged 23.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-71

299. HANNAH MARIA SCHREADER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , a cotton handkerchief, value 6s. a muslin handkerchief, value 6d. a linen shift, value 2s. a pair of silk stockings, value 2s. a muslin half handkerchief, value 8d. a linen towel, value 6d. and a muslin cap, value 4d. the goods of Elizabeth Wilson ; and

FRANCES SCHREADER was indicted for receiving, on the 12th of April , a cotton handkerchief, value 6d. and a muslin handkerchief, value 6d. being a parcel of the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

ELIZABETH WILSON sworn.

I live in Great Russel-street, Bloomsbury . On the 16th of April, I was going up into my garret and I picked up a duplicate, being in the name of Hannah Maria Schreader ; I am a lodger there; Hannah is a servant there, Mr. Wright's servant , I lodge in his house; I went to the pawnbroker, at the end of Hanover-yard, as a matter of curiosity, to see what such a child could pawn; I had missed nothing of my own then; I asked the pawnbroker to let me see what it was; I found this handkerchief there; I took it out of pawn, I went home, I asked her how she could be such a naughty girl as to take my handkerchief and pawn it?

Q. Where did you apprehend it was taken from? - Out of my room. She told me that her mother had persuaded her to do it; I immediately went up stairs to look over my things, and I found I had lost many other things; another pocket handkerchief, a muslin handkerchief, a shift, a pair of silk stockings, a cap, a piece of muslin, half a handkerchief, and one towel.

Q. Where were these things taken from? - I cannot say rightly.

Q. Where were they kept? - In the room. She was put in the watch-house that night.

Q. Was this the same day as you found the things? - Yes. The next day she was taken before a justice, at Bow-street, and I had a search warrant, and me and the constable went to the mother's lodgings, and we found two duplicates on her. She lived in Windmill-street.

Q. What did you do with the duplicates? - I went to two different pawnbrokers, one was in Princes-street; I found an handkerchief, in Princes-street, and I found a pocket handkerchief at the other pawnbroker's.

Q. How long have you lodged in this house? - About five months.

Q. Had this girl been there all this time? - Only three weeks to that day that she was taken to the watch-house.

Q. Then who took your stockings, shift, and towel, you cannot tell at all? they never made their appearance? - No.

Q. Do you happen to know whether the girl has got any father? - Yes, there is a father, he has been a gentleman's servant, I have heard the girl say.

Hannah Maria Schreader . I know nothing at all of these things, and them I found, and gave them to my mother, to wash.

ROBERT GASTREL sworn.

I am a constable belonging to Bow-street, I went with Mrs. Wilson, to the pawbroker's, it was on the 17th of April, I went to Mr. Priestman, and Mr. Freer's.

Q. Was you at the execution of the search warrant at the mother's house? - Yes, before we went to the pawnbroker's.

Q. Where was the mother's house, or lodging? - In Little Windmill-street.

Q. Did you understand she had a house? - I understood so. I found nothing but these two duplicates, I found them in the mother's pocket book, in her pocket; they were two handkerchiefs pawned for sixpence each, at different pawnbrokers, Mr. Priestman and Mr. Freer's,

JOHN FARMER sworn.

I live with Mr. Priestman, this is an handkerchief I took in to pledge of a woman,I cannot positively say of whom, it is pledged in the name of Smith. I saw no girl with her.

Prosecutrix. This is my handkerchief, I know it by several iron moulds that it has got at the corner.

JOHN CATHARINE sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Freer, I took in this handkerchief, the 12th of

April, of a woman, but I am not certain who it was.

Court to Gastrel. Shew the duplicate of Mr. Freer's things to this young man.

Q. Gastrel. Shew Mr. Farmer the duplicate.

Farmer. This is the ticket that was delivered.

Prosecutrix. This last handkerchief is mine, I know it, my nose had been bleeding, and it is rather bloody.

Q. What did you say to her, when you found the first handkerchief? - I told her it would be better for her to tell the truth.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17940430-72

300. SARAH BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of March , a man's cloth coat, value 1l. a linen table cloth, value 1s. and a man's linen shirt, value 3s. the goods of Jeremiah Sullivan .

JEREMIAH SULLIVAN sworn.

I live in Well-street, in the Minories . On the 17th of March last, I lost a coat, a shirt, and a table cloth; I lost them from my house on Sunday night, I put them in my box, and the next day they were gone; the prisoner she lived next room to me. I found the property at a pawnbroker's, the 18th of March, and that led me to suspect the prisoner. The things are here.

HUGH MACLANE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in these things, on the 17th of March, a coat, a shirt, and a table cloth; I took them in of the prisoner at the bar; the other young man, who was in the shop, first looked at the coat, I was by, she then offered me a shirt, and I took them both together, after he had offered money that she would not take, he said it was a coarse cloth, she said it could not be so, for the man that made them would not make them of a coarse cloth.

Mr. Tribeck. Are you the master of of this shop? - I am the servant.

Q. You always said that you knew who it was brought these things to be pawned? - I always did.

Q. Pray did the prisoner at any time come to your shop with a Mrs. Hill and with Sullivan? - They did come, I believe, the day after the things were missed, the morning after.

Q. You always said that you was sure it was the prisoner at the bar? - I did.

Q. What is your master's name? - Windsor.

Q. Is he not sometimes angry with you for making a mistake about the business of the shop? - No, sir, not to my recollection.

Q. Do you mean to swear that was the woman that pawned the goods? - I do.

Q. Your master did not swear to you and was angry, and did not say, you are always making mistakes? - He did not.

Q. How long was the prisoner at the bar in the shop, before you said it was the woman that pawned the goods? - I said it directly she came into the shop, the instant.

Q. Was your master there? - He was not.

Q. What made you recollect the prisoner? how was she dressed when she came? - I knew her person perfectly.

Q. How long was she in the shop? - She was in the shop twice, she took the things away once, and returned with them again.

Q. Where is your master? - He is at home.

Q. Was he never applied to to come? - He never was.

Q. He knows of this transaction, does not he? - He does.

Q. Had you never seen this woman before? - I had.

Q. Where? - In Fetter-lane, I lived there two years and upwards, I had frequently seen her there.

Court. What time of the day, what hour did she bring in these things? - I cannot recollect, I believe it was between two and six.

The prisoner called three witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , (Aged 24.) Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17940430-73

301. JOHN DENHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , a man's cloth great coat, value 5s. the goods of Stephen Gerot , and a wooden tea caddy, value 2s. the goods of John Penzattee .

JOHN PENZATTEE sworn.

I live in Great Titchfield-street, Mary-le-bone . On Thursday the 6th day of March, between the hours of five and six, I happened to be at my work, a little distance from my house, and a message came to me that a thief had been in the house and had stole a great coat belonging to my lodger, and a caddy of mine; I work about five hundred yards off, at a shop of Mr. Wilson's, as I heard the news I laid down my tools and went towards my house, and before I got to my house, between three and four doors off it, I met the prisoner at the bar, in custody of the constable, and the constable had the property; Mr. Gerot is a French gentleman, that lodges in my parlour. I am a mason .

MARY PENZATTEE sworn.

The last witness is my father. I saw the prisoner coming out of my father's house, with the tea caddy; I was not in the house at the time, I was about the door with the child; when he came out of the passage he had the great coat under his left arm, and the tea caddy open, not locked up, under his left arm.

Q. Where were these things kept? - in the front parlour that Mr. Gerot occupies. I stopped him in the entry myself, and he was detained till the constable came, I called the postman to my assistance, who was going by.

Q. How did the prisoner behave? - He said nothing to me; I said hold of him by the collar, and he begged my pardon, and that was all; he did not abuse me, he laid the things down on the mat in the entry of the passage. I am positive to the great coat, because it was in the parlour but a few minutes before, with the caddy; I see him delivered into the constable's hands, by the postman.

PRATT sworn.

I am a constable; I produce a tea caddy and a great coat, I received them and the prisoner likewise, in a house, about three doors from Mr. Penzattee's, at one Mr. Sealy's house, a grocer's.

Mary Penzattee . The great coat has got a hole or has been mended. Here is the hole as he told me. I am positive the coat had been in the room.

Prisoner. I was in the employ of a man at Edmonton, a very short time, before this circumstance happened, hearing a person wanted a man in the line, in which I am in, painting in water colours, I went to a house and knocked at the door, a man came out of the house, and immediately the gentlewoman came out and accused me of taking these things; I

resigned myself immediately, and suffered them to take me to a justice.

GUILTY. (Aged 21.) Judgment respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-74

302. THOMAS ROWE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , three linen shirts, value 7s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 4s. a cotton handkerchief, value 1s. the goods of Elizabeth Field , widow .

ELIZABETH FIELD sworn.

I am a widow woman. On the 6th of March, I was robbed, I keep a house at Mill Hill , and I hung out the things about seven o'clock in the morning, and I missed them about nine.

Q. Did you ever see them after you missed them? - Not till they took the prisoner. I went to the bottom of the yard, and I saw him with the things under his arm, going across the field from our yard, I hallooed out to him, you have got my shirts, and some people ran after him, and he was taken; I lost sight of him before he was taken.

Q. When he was in your sight, had he the things or had he parted with them? - He had not parted with them.

Mr. Wentworth. You say you hung them out about seven in the morning, and you missed them about nine; then they must be taken in that interval of time? - Yes.

Q. Your yard adjoins to the field? - It does.

Q. Don't you know that your yard is considerably above that field? - No, the bank of the hedge is higher than the yard.

Q. Then the yard is on a level with the side of the bank? - Not quite, it is almost as high.

Q. Still the yard is higher than the field? - No, not higher, the yard is rather the lowest

Q. There is a path way over that field? - No, only a gap, which people make where the hedge is broke down.

Q. People do pass and repass, otherwise how could he have seen your linen? This was the 6th of March, Friday, I think windy weather? - It might have been windy.

Q. I mean at the time that you lost these handkerchiefs? - It might have been so.

Q. And these things might have blown off this hedge? - I cannot say but they might.

Q. Have you ever, at any time missed any things that you hung on this hedge? - No, not before.

Court. Do you mean to say that these things were hung on a hedge or on a line? - On a line.

Mr. Wentworth. Might not these things, by any possibility, be blown out of this yard, by the wind? - They might.

Q. Do you know Leech? He acted as headborough when this man was taken, I believe? - He is out of his office now.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Craig? - He was the first man that was after the prisoner.

Q. Do you know of any difference between Craig and the prisoner? - No, none at all.

Court. When the prisoner was going across the field, what pace was he going, was he walking or running? - I cannot recollect.

Mr. Wentworth. You lost sight of the prisoner before he was taken? - Yes.

Q. How long? - I cannot recollect.

Q. Then you saw nothing of the prisoner, you saw a man passing with some linen under his arm? - No more.

Court. Do you mean to say that you don't know that was the man that you saw with the linen on him? - That

was the man that had the linen on him.

Mr. Wentworth. What distance might he be from you? - About half way across the field.

Court. Did you see his face when he was walking across the field? - Yes, I did.

SAMUEL BILLINGS sworn.

I work along with one Mr. Tinder, in digging ballast and gravel; when I took the prisoner he lay in a hedge, with his belly on the linen.

Q. Was that field near the woman's yard? - No, it might be fifteen or sixteen poles off, as nigh as I can guess.

Q. Who brought the linen out of the hedge? - I know not, the linen was given to me at the time; I have got the linen; the woman has kept it till now, I gave it to the woman, I brought the linen here from Mill Hill.

Q. To Prosecutrix. Did you give the man the linen that was brought back to you? - Not till he came on last Thursday, I did then. It is what I took in to wash; there is W.B. on two of the shirts, and Jones on the other; the cotton handkerchief is marked L. I have no doubt of the things.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

Three witnesses were called who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 20.) Judgment respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-75

303. JAMES JILLSON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , two dozen tea spoons, value 1l. 13s. the goods of John Fitzwater .

(The case opened by Mr. Gurney.)

JOHN FITZWATER sworn.

I had agreed to furnish Mr. Lavater's house with some spoons, at an entertainment; I sent in a quantity of plate, there were two dozen of spoons missing.

GEORGE BUST sworn.

Q. Did you receive any plate of Mr. Lavater, on account of that entertainment? - Yes.

Q. Did you receive any tea spoons? - Yes.

Q. What number? - I cannot tell, because they were up in paper.

Q. Where is Mr. Lavater's house? - In Grafton-street .

Q. On whose account did you deliver these spoons? - Mr. Jefferies and Jones's, and his man delivered them to me.

Fitzwater. I ordered them of Jefferies and Jones, and was to pay them for the use of them.

Q. Did you miss these spoons in the course of that evening? - When tea came on we had no spoons to use.

Mr. Knowlys. This was on the occasion of a dinner that was given at Mr. Lavater's? - Yes.

Q. A pretty large dinner? - Yes.

Q. There were a number of servant's admitted into the house? - There were a few admitted into the passage.

Q.How many? - I cannot say.

Q. How many short of thirty? - I cannot say indeed, they were ordered a pot of beer a-piece.

Q. How many couple were dancing that evening? - I don't know.

Q. Twenty or thirty? - I don't know.

Q. A gentleman does not forbid his friends servants from coming into the house? - No, he does not.

ELIZABETH LOWE sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Lavater, Esq. I was at Mr. Lavater's house, on the 8th of March.

Q. Did you see any silver tea spoons that evening? - Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner at Mr. Lavater's house that evening? - He looked at half a dozen spoons and put them down again.

Q. In what capacity did he come? - As an acquaintance of the servant maid's.

Q. What spoons were they? - Tea spoons.

Mr. Knowlys. How many spoons might he take up and put down again? - He took up four half dozen and put them down again.

Q. How many spoons did you take up and put down again? - I looked at them in the course of the evening.

Q. This man was not there for the first time this evening, there was not an evening in the week, that he did not come to see Betsey Tucker ? - I did not live in the house.

Q. Don't you know that he was a sweatheart of her's? - Yes, I believe he was.

THOMAS MILLER sworn.

I am not in business; I have seen the prisoner at the bar several times; he brought some spoons to me to sell, the 3d or 4th of March.

Q. Can you ascertain the day with any preciseness? - No. He asked me if I would purchase them; I looked at them, and would not buy them.

Q. What sort of spoons were they? - Plain tea spoons, six or eight, I cannot be sure which; he wished to dispose of them, for a friend or himself, I don't know which.

WILLIAM BURKITT sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Parker, in Princes-street; I know the prisoner, I see him on the 6th of March, in the evening, he came with thirteen silver tea spoons, for which he wanted six and thirty shillings. I asked him who they belonged to? I am not sure whether he said his name was Miller, or whether he came from Mr. Miller, I told him that I thought Mr. Miller was not in a situation to part with tea spoons, and should send there, and I sent to Mr. Miller; when Mr. Miller came he said that the tea spoons had been offered to him, and he refused to buy them; when Mr. Miller came he said they were his own, and he bought them at Brighton, and that he was not accustomed with pledging, and he had been with Mr. Mortimer, an auctioneer, who had sold a number of things for him, and Mr. Mortimer told him he might pledge them in what name he liked; he said he had exchanged the spoons at Brighton for a watch; I told him he might come honesty by them for what I knew, but I should detain the spoons, till I had further proof, how he came by them; and he said he would bring Mr. Mortimer, the auctioneer, to prove the spoons were come honestly by; about ten o'clock in the evening he came back again, and said that Mr. Mortimer was busy, and could not come, and he would come the next day; he came the next day, and he said, Mr. Mortimer was still busy, and that I might deliver the spoons; the day after he got an affidavit at Bow-street, that the spoons were his own, and brought a very good tradesman with him, and we delivered up the spoons to him, and have never seen them since.

Mr. TEARNEY sworn.

I am a master taylor, a housekeeper; I live at No. 75, Mortimer-street. I went with the prisoner to Mr. Parker's, to assist him in recovering some spoons.

Q. Do you know what is become of these spoons? - No, I do not.

Q. Did you ever see them after they came out of Mr. Parker's? - Never.

Mr. Knowlys. Don't you know that these spoons, or some spoons, were got in exchange for a watch at Brighton? - He told me so, I heard him say so two months before this happened.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-76

304. NICHOLAS CURTON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , a watch with a gold case, value 4l. a steel watch chain, value 6d. the goods of Charlotte Morin Vignette .

Two INTERPRETERS sworn.

The PROSECUTRIX sworn.

I am a widow , I keep a house, No. 34, Brewer-street, Golden-square ; I was robbed of a watch, I don't know when it was, but I know very well it was two months ago, I lost it from my parlour chimney piece, it was hung up there on a hook, the servant told me one day, that Curton was looking at it in the street, and in consequence of some information I went and fetched in an officer.

Q. Did you ever see your watch again? - Yes.

Q. How soon was he taken up after you lost your watch? - Two weeks.

Q. Did any body shew you your watch again? - Yes, the officer (Dawson) I know it by some pale gold, and some yellow gold.

Q. Was there any name on it? - No, it was a worked case.

Q.Was it pierced? - No.

Q. Was there drawings or figures on it? - No. The chain was made of steel, worked, a woman's chain.

Q. Can you by the appearance of the watch and chain, safely swear it to be your's? - If I was to see it I should; the constable has taken care of it. The prisoner lodged in the house at the time I missed it; when I missed it I did ask every body in the house immediately, I asked the prisoner in a minute, he said he did not know nothing about it.

Q. In what capacity was he? - He was lodging in the house till he could get a place; he was in the house when I came into the house, and I was not willing to turn him away; he had no fixed bed, sometimes he slept in one bed, and sometimes in another.

Mr. Knowlys. How do you spell your name? - Charlotte Onoare Vignette .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by a Jury half English and half Foreign, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-77

305. JANE GOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 2s. and half a guinea , the goods and monies of George Gilbert .

GEORGE GILBERT sworn.

I am a soldier , a private in the Coldstream Regiment of foot guards. On the 19th of April, last Friday, I went to see a comrade of mine, between three and four in the afternoon, he was going into the country, on parting he and I agreed to have something to drink, he gave me a bottle to go and fetch something to drink, on my return the prisoner stood at the door of her own apartment, for what I know, No. 44, Cable-street ;

with that she asked me whether I would give her some gin? I said yes, and she took me into her apartment, it was a lower room, on the ground floor; in the mean time I was pouring out the liquor, she took the opportunity of snatching the handkerchief off my neck, it was tied on my neck, she untied it, and snatched it off my neck.

Q. Was it silk? - Yes. With that I asked her what right she had to take the handkerchief from me, and she made an abrupt answer, and said, that she knew nothing at all of it; she concealed it; with that she had an acquaintance of her's come in, a young woman, and she asked what we were disputing about? and I said, that that young woman had taken that silk handkerchief off my neck; with that the prisoner replied she would give me the handkerchief, if I gave her some gin? I asked her how much? she said, half a pint, as there are three of us, it could not be less, putting my hand into my pocket, pulling out half a guinea and a shilling, and some halfpence, to pay for the half pint of gin, she took the opportunity to snatch the half guinea out of my hand, and ran back, and concealed herself, and the other slapped the door in my face; with that I applied to a constable, Mr. West.

Q. Are you sure that you had the half guinea in your hand? - Yes, I had the half guinea, shilling, and some halfpence. The constable not being at home, I was advised to leave it till the next morning, which I did; when I came the next morning, both that prisoner and her acquaintance were in the watch-house, for some misdemeanor, but what I don't know, she was cleared of that, and Mr. West, the constable, took her into custody for my offence, she was examined before the magistrate, at Shadwell, she was not searched in my presence; I have neither got the handkerchief nor the money.

Prisoner. Ask my prosecutor whether he did not come over to my door as I sat, and told me that he had been along with a woman down Murphy's-alley, and he had been robbed, but he did not tell me of what? - No, no such word.

Prisoner. He told me he would give me a glass of any thing to drink, if I could tell him of any officer, with that he went away, and I never see any more of him till the next morning, between nine and ten o'clock, and when I was in the lock up room at six o'clock at night, he asked me if I would give him five shillings; I asked him for what? he said if I would give him five shillings he would not send me to gaol; he then went away, and brought another man with him, and said, if I would give him five shillings that man should be witness, and he would not hurt a hair of my head; and he asked me if I would give him a glass of any thing to drink? I said no, I had had part of a pint of beer, and would not have any more.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you offer to make it up for five shillings? - Never saw the woman after she was committed till now; it is not true what she has said.

Q. Was you sober at the time you was there? - I was indeed.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-78

306. THOMAS CALE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , a hempen sack, value 2s. four hundred and eighty halfpence, value 1l. the goods and monies of Richard Houlditch , and George Holt .

RICHARD HOULDITCH sworn.

I know nothing of this case; I am in the corn and coal line, my partner 's name is George Holt .

CHRISTOPHER MARSHALL sworn.

I am a sail-maker, I saw the man take the things, on Tuesday, in the afternoon, the 25th of February, I was in my warehouse, attending my people, which were opening a sail, which having laid by some while in the house was dusty; I ordered them to throw my window open, soon after which I heard a carriage draw up the street, and pass by the warehouse, I thought it had stopped at my door, and might be goods for myself, it drew my attention to the window; soon after I saw the prisoner at the bar come to the off side of the cart, went to the off wheel, put his hand through the spokes of it, and with one hand took hold of a sack which lay in the cart, and in the other hand having a knife, he was cutting the tyer, or whatever it consisted of; in the act of doing this, he cast his eyes up to my warehouse window, which enabled me to take a full view of his countenance; in the moment it struck me, it was the carman robbing his master; I thought I would go and see who the cart belonged to, and drop them a line of their servant's conduct, but to my amaze, in about ten minutes time, I saw another person come up with a whip in his hand. I believe, I fogot to tell you, that after he had cut the sack, he took a sack out of that sack, and put it under his arm, and walked down the street; I observed there were letters on that sack, but what I could not tell, the man when he came up with the whip in his hand, had two other men with him; I called to him, and asked him if he was the carman belonging to the cart? he said yes; I said, my friend, your cart has been robbed; the man looked up with amaze at me, and he and one of the men that were with him jumped up into the cart, shoot the sacks that remained out of that sack that the prisoner cut open, and one of them said, d-n it be has got the money; I told him that I had taken very particular notice of the man that committed the robbery, that he was a tall man, very aukwardly made. I know him to be the prisoner, I can swear it; they got him and brought him to my house the next morning, and I told them that he was the man.

Prisoner. Did you see me cut the sack? - I saw him cut the tyer, a string of some sort, but what I cannot tell, off that sack, that he took the sack out of.

ELEANOR STANBRIDGE sworn.

The sacks and money were delivered out of my shop, to Mr. Houlditch's carman.

CHARLES JESSOP sworn.

I am the carman, I jumped up into my cart, and shoot the sacks out, and saw the sack of money gone.

Q. Are these bags of money put into a sack? - Yes.

Q. Can you say how many bags were taken in the whole? - Only one bag was missing.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - Yes, I had seen him before about the streets.

Q. How did you find him out? - I was told the appearance of the man, and I knowed the man, I found him in Chiswel-street, near Moorfields.

Q. Did you shew him that gentleman, the last witness? - Yes.

Q. Did he know him? - Yes, he said he knew him directly.

Marshall. At the time I described the man to him, he seemed to know the man very well, he said then it was Tom Gale .

Q. To Jessop. How came you away from the cart? - I went in to drink a pint of beer.

Q. In what street was this cart? - Bushell's rents, near the Armitage .

RICHARD MUSGROVE sworn.

I am a constable, I have got a corn sack and fifteen shillingsworth of halfpence; I took the prisoner and he took me to his lodgings, and he went and leaned over a bedstead with the bed on, and there he took these halfpence down, the bag was on another bed, and he took that from under two mens heads, in the same room, that laid on the bed, he gave me the bag and the halfpence.

Q. Then there were other men in that room? - There were.

Q. Where was this lodging? - On Salt-Petersbank.

Q. What time did you go there? - About nine o'clock, the man came to me, I suppose it was between eleven and twelve, by the time I got there, it was the 26th of February.

Q. Was it a lodging house, or what place was it? - It was a very infamous place indeed, it appeared so to me, one man was sadly cut indeed that lay in bed, the prisoner told me, at the time he gave up the sack, that he wanted the sack, and had he known the halfpence had been in it he would not have taken it at all; I have kept these things till now.

Prisoner. You say how that there were two men in bed, it was a man and his wife? - They were both without caps.

Court to Jessop. Was the halfpence in that sack? - Yes, four papers of five shillingsworth done up. This is the sack that was in the other, and lost out of the cart, I cannot speak about the papers of halfpence, but I know there were four.

STANBRIDGE sworn.

I am a corn chandler, I delivered the halfpence to this carman myself, four crown papers bound up in another paper.

Q. What was the carman to do with them? - To take them to his master, Mr. Houlditch, the prosecutor, he is in the corn way, we deal with him for corn, the money was in part of payment, for his servant to give to his master.

Q. You pay in halfpence sometimes? - I did on this occasion, and had done before; when the papers were first brought to our house they appeared to be the same, but it is impossible to know them now, because they are all to pieces.

Q. Who did the sack belong to? - It was given as one of Mr. Houlditch's, but it was given in mistake, but I did not know that till my husband came home, but a young girl that lives with me can swear to the sack, because she took particular notice of a mark on it.

sworn.

I live with Mrs. Stanbridge, that sack was delivered to the carman, the money was in it. I know it is the same by a red mark that is on it, a red star, I remarked it very particularly when it stood in our shop with some barley in it.

Prisoner. I was coming down the Wharf with a waggon load of coals, and this cart stood right facing Bushell's-rents, and the carman said to me, put that cart up, that I may come bye, and my

breeches being torn I took this sack out to mend them.

GUILTY . (Aged 34.) Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction , and Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-79

307. SAMUEL EVANS was indicted for breaking and entering, the dwelling house of John Noble , between the hours of seven and eight in the afternoon, of the 8th of April , the said John Noble and others being there in, and stealing forty yards of Lustring silk, value 7l. the goods of the said John Noble .

A second COUNT for burglariously breaking the same dwelling house, the same day and time, and stealing the like goods.

JOHN NOBLE sworn.

I live in Tavistock-street, Covent-garden , I was robbed Tuesday the 8th of April, I had been serving a customer, and as soon as I was done I stepped into the back part of my shop, and I immediately heard a crack at the window, on which I immediately ran to the door, supposing that some mischief must necessarily be done; as soon as I got to the door I saw a man running down the street, as soon as I got into the street I cried out stop thief! and followed him; on that it induced others to take notice also, and just as I came up to him some person on the opposite side of the way had taken him; I never lost sight of him till he was taken, in the act of stopping him this piece of silk fell out of his hand, the roll part, the loose part be kept hold of, there was about three or four yards unrolled, it was all in one piece, some of the silk was in his hand, and some fell out of his hand.

Q.Whereabouts was this silk in your shop? - It lay in the window for shew. When he was secured we carried him up the street, towards the office in Bow-street, in passing our own door I took the silk into our own house; I have kept the silk ever since.

Q. Was it light or dark at this time? - It was light enough to match colours for I had been matching some at the door just before.

Q. Could you distinguish his features? - His features I could; I did not see his face till I took him with the silk.

Q. Supposing after you had taken him and he had escaped out of your hands, was there so much light that you should have known him? - O! yes.

Q. What time of the day was it? - I apprehended it was about half afterseven, as near as I can calculate.

Q. Who was at home in your house besides yourself? - Mrs. Noble and the shopman; I left the prisoner with Mr. Lany while I went into the house and I came out again and went to Bow-street.

Q. What is the worth of this piece of silk? - Six or seven pounds; it is evident by the dirt it got in the street; it has my private shop mark on it.

Q. Was the pane of glass out? - It did not all fall out, it is a very large square, this silk laid directly behind that square.

Q. Do you think from the situation in which it lay, it was taken out from that window which was broke? - Clearly so.

Jury. Is it a private mark in figures or in characters? - It is in characters, the mark of the shop is Cumberland; it is in my own hand writing.

Court. Is it a lustring silk? - It Is.

Prisoner. Was not the window broke before? - There was a little crack in the square, but no part of the glass out.

Court. But suppose that little crack had been loose, would it have let out such a piece of silk of that size? - No.

FRANCIS DAY sworn.

I am a perfumer in Tavistock-street, I was standing at my own door, the same side of the way as the prosecutor, at seven doors from him; I heard the noise of some glass breaking, and I turned my head down that way and immediately heard the cry of stop thief! I perceived that man running down the middle of the street towards me, the nearer he came towards me the further I advanced in the middle of the street, in order to seize him as he came by me, but before I laid hold of him a man ran from the opposite side against him and turned him about, which turned his face to my face, I immediately seized him by his collar, and the other person seized him by the hair, he had a piece of silk hanging over his shoulder some part before and some behind, and while I held him by the collar somebody cried out, saying, he is getting something out of his pocket, I looked at his pocket, and I see his hand at his left hand pocket, out of which he produced a knife and swore that he would stab any one, if we would not let him go.

Q. Was the knife in his hand, or did he take it out of his pocket? - The prisoner took it out of his pocket, it was partly open in his pocket, only having but one hand at liberty, he could not get it quite open; I secured his arm above his elbow, in order to prevent his stabbing any person that was before him; while I held him by the elbow, a neighbour that is here forced the knife from his hand, by this time there was a number of people collected, and I left him in the hands of Mr. Lany, and Mr. Noble that was robbed, and went into my own shop, having no person in it but myself. I am very certain the prisoner is the man.

MOSES LANY sworn.

I heard the noise of the glass crack; I was standing at my own door, in the evening, between seven and eight o'clock; I heard instantly the cry of stop thief! I went out into the middle of the street; I heard the noise come towards me, and I ran out immediately into the street, and I saw the prisoner running down the street.

Q. Did you stop him? - I did not, he was stopped before I reached him; I took the knife out of his hand, he attempted to stab me with the knife two or three times.

Q. Whereabout did he attempt to strike you? - In the belly. I am very sure that is the man, I never quitted hold of him till I took him into the office.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

I am a constable, I produce the knife I got of Mr. Lany, on Tuesday, the 8th of April, with the prisoner at the bar, at the office; it is a common case knife; I took him into custody, locked him up, and took him to be examined the next morning. It is a new knife, very sharp.

Prisoner. I was going down to Tavistock-street, to Bedfordbury, to my father's; as I was walking along I heard the cry of stop thief! and I heard something heaved at me, and it hung across my shoulders, I did not know what it was. That there knife I was just eating some bread and cheese with it, and I lost the bread and cheese, as the gentlemen laid hold of me.

Lany. When he got the knife out of his pocket, he said, d-n you, I will

make you all stand off, and he was making the plunges about him.

Q. Did you see any bread and cheese about? - No.

Prisoner. I lost it.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 18.) Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-80

308. JOHN DAVIS , JOHN HALL , WILLIAM DILLON and PETER HOLDEN were indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , one guinea , the money of George Webb .

GEORGE WEBB sworn.

I was on board a ship a month, and in that time I received one pound-one shilling and six-pence(it was the Ocean, an East India-man) and I came up to town to receive my money, I came up on Sunday night, and on Monday morning I went and received it, it was the 3d of March; I went to the City Chambers; I went to the Jerusalem coffee house, to enquire where I should get this money, I lighted of Dillon, and he asked me if I wanted a ship? I told him I did, he said, I might go on board the King George if I pleased; I had received the money before this.

Q. What is Dillon? - I don't know, I never saw him before then, I went into the Jerusalem coffee house and enquired, and I went to go down to the City Chambers, and I passed this Dillon, and I was rather up to it; I was rather down upon it; I was rather up to his rig; and there I got my money, and there I light of this other fellow.

Q. Did Dillon leave you? - I am not certain of that.

Q. Did Dillon and you converse together, so as he knew you was to have a guinea? - He knew I was going for money, and going to the chambers, there I light of this other man, and he asked me if I wanted a ship? It was that man next to Dillon (Holden) I told him I did, I asked him what ship he would recommend? he had a handful of shipping notes, and he gave me one, and told me to come along with him to the captain; and he was going down the street, and I said, here is a rendezvous here somewhere, O! says he, if I take you to a rendezvous I will suffer my head to be off; so he took me to a house in East Smithfield , and there Davis filled up the shipping note for me, and gave it me again; I found John Davis there, he said, the captain is very ill; he gave the note to me again, and I had some victuals, and I had some beer, and after I had had some victuals and beer, I said, I must go to the other end of the town to see my friends, and I got up off my feet, and Davis catched me, and tumbled me down, and together they bawled me to two or three soldiers, I cannot say which, John Hall came in before they pulled me down, Davis said, here is one of your shipmates; he came in after I came in.

Q. Dillon, the first man that you spoke of, was he in the public house? - He came there after I was brought down there.

Q. Was he there before you was robbed? - O, yes! they were all in the public house when I was robbed.

Q. You went there with Dillon? - No, with Holden. They hauled me into a close parlour; Davis had the first hold of me, there he tumbled me down flat on the ground, and hawled me into the room on the floor.

Q. What passed when you was in the room? - I am not certain what, they did not talk to me, for I was crying out; when they let me, I got up, and tried the door.

Q. Did the men go into the room? - The soldiers were in the room, and the other men came into the room with me, I got up to try the door, and Davis gave me a knock, just in the throat, here, and knocked me flat down, and held me on the ground, he kneeled on me, and hit me in the chin, here; the landlord of the house he came in; the other three they held me; the landlord said he would have no such doings in his house, and soon after they let me get up; so says Davis to me, are you found, my breeches knee was unbuttoned, and he looked at my knee, and it looked very black; and after that they went out, Davis he came in again, and said, if I did not chuse to give them a guinea, I should go for an East India soldier; they went out, they threatened to put the hand-cuffs on me immediately, and take me down to the Navy, if I would not be quiet; the landlord coming in soon after, he found me on the ground, soon after I got up, and Davis came in, and said, if I would not give them a guinea I should go for an East India soldier, on which I gave them the guinea, and they gave me my discharge, and I came down, and they gave me a direction to go to another house, which was in the Butcher-row; and I was going down there, and there Dillon came out of a house, I am not certain of the house's name, and he said to me, there my lad, that is the house where you will get a ship; aye, but says I, I am not going there yet, and I went back, and went off as fast as I could, I was afraid, and the next day there was another gentleman in the same case as I was in myself.

Q.Has the guinea ever been found? - I saw no more of it.

All three Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER

Reference Number: t17940430-81

309. MARTHA FISHBOURNE, otherwise ANN LOW was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of December , two check muslin aprons, value 4s. two check linen aprons, value 2s. 2d. two cotton gowns, value 10s. 6d. two cotton petticoats, value 10s. 6d. three linen shifts, value 6s. one dimity petticoat, value 8s. two cotton bed gowns, value 3s. a cloth cloak, value 12s. 6d. a silk cloak, value 12s. a damask napkin, value 5s. a silk handkerchief, value 4s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. the goods of Thomas Thomas , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS THOMAS sworn.

I am a victualler , I keep the King's Arms in Arundell-street , I was robbed on Sunday morning the 29th of December last; the prisoner at the bar was my servant at that time; at a quarter past twelve on Saturday night, the prisoner, my wife, and me, went up stairs together to go to bed; my wife and me sleep up one pair of stairs, and the prisoner slept in the two, the prisoner went into her own room, I had called for the key of the room that she slept in about two o'clock that day. She came to me about the 14th of November, as near as I can recollect.

Q. Did she always keep the key of her own bed-room? - Yes; I had missed the coat that is now upon my back, and there were some drawers kept in that room which she laid in, and I found the coat in the room; I put the coat on my back and thought no more of it; she goes to bed that night, I heard her unlocking the door, and going into the room, and shutting the door of her own own room, in the morning when I came to call her, I found no answer, I run into my own room, and says to my wife, I cannot make the girl hear; her room door was left a jar; I then goes into the room, when I came into the room, from

these drawers which I had locked in the day before, all the things were gone; the articles in the indictment are only what was found again, but there were other things gone, which were never found; the Monday morning, the 30th of December, I went to Bow-street, and gave information to the office; the clerk of the office advised me to have same hand bills printed, and carried round to the pawnbrokers, and said that the expence would be seventeen shillings and sixpence, I had them printed. On the 24th of last April, I happened to meet the prisoner accidentally in the street.

Q. Did you find the prisoner before you traced any of your things? - I did. I met her in Monmouth-street carrying some liquor, she lived then at the Yorkshire Grey, in Little White Lion-street, Seven Dials; a public house; when I met her, I followed her up to the door and asked her, where do you live now? she made answer and said, who are you? I said I will go home with you; she said she would not go home; I then took her to Bow-street, and there she denied that she knew me, or any thing of me; I I went home, and my wife came, and two or three of the customers, and they knew her likewise; there was some of the property on her when she was searched. a handkerchief about her neck.

Q. Was it a silk handkerchief or a muslin? - I am not a judge, but the property is in court.

Mrs. Thomas. It is a muslin handkerchief

Q. To Mr. Thomas. Was any thing else found on her besides this muslin handkerchief? - Not of my property.

Q. She lived with you some time; have you any doubt at all about her person? - Not the least at all; for the other things there is a person that the magistrates thought proper to commit as a receiver, but we could not get the indictment this sessions.

ELIZABETH THOMAS sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness, the girl lived with me five or six weeks, I did not notice the day of the month, I am sure of her person.

Q. Was she in the house in the time that your husband described? - Yes, I followed her up, she went before me.

Q. Did you miss her the next morning? - I did.

Q. Have you seen any of the property since? - Yes, a good deal is here it has been traced since she was taken.

CHRISTIAN BARKER sworn.

I am a servant to Samuel Rodwell , No. 10, Black Friars, I produce two muslin aprons, one flannel petticoat, a cotton bedgown, a cotton petticoat, a shift, and a red cloth cloak; the shift and two muslin aprons, and flannel petticoat were pled ged by Brownwell, by the name of Ann Smith , who received them of this Ann Lowe , she is in custody as a receiver; one apron the 26th of March, the other the 10th of January, the flannel petticoat the 18th of January, the shift the 14th of January.

Q. They have all been pawned since December? - Yes, they have.

Q. Mrs. Thomas. Did you miss these things at once, or had you missed any thing before that day? - No, I had not, she took them all at once, I never missed any, nor had I a mistrust that she would take any; I am sure the muslin aprons are mine, they have been cut shorter since I ost them; it is no value at all unto the shifts, there is my own name on two of them.

Pawnbroker. It is worth half a crown. The cotton petticoat is worth four shillings and sixpence.

Mrs. Thomas. I know it to be mine, it was made for me.

Q. To Pawnbroker. Who pawned the other things; were they all pawned by

Smith? - No, by Ann Fishbourn; they have been redeemed several times, and pawned again, she bought the duplicate of Ann Smith , they were taken out at some other pawnbroker's and pledged at our house.

Mrs. Thomas. This cotton gown is mine, I had a coat of it, and since they have had it, they have made the coat into a bed gown, and here is a piece to match it, it is worth ten-shillings and sixpence; the cloth cloak is mine, it is worth twelve shillings, I know it very well, I received it from Margate the day before she took it away, I know it by the size and width; I know the flannel coat by a particular mark on it, it is worth one shilling.

Q. Do you know the bed gown? - It is the coat of the gown, I am perfectly sure of the pattern.

MARY PALMER sworn.

I bought a cotton gown of Ann Fishbourn , and I have it here now.

Q.When was it you bought it? - I cannot exactly tell, whether it was before Christmas or after Christmas.

Q. Are you sure it was in the month of December? - No, I gave her four shillings and sixpence for it.

Mrs. Thomas. This is my gown, it is worth four shillings.

JAMES LADD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant, I produce two bed gowns and a coloured apron, I have found one bed gown since the bill has been found.

Court. Put that out of the question.

Mrs. Thomas. They were not bed gowns when they were lost, she has made them into bed gowns; this bed gown in the indictment was made up out of one of the cotton coats.

Lad. The white cotton bed-gown was pawned the 15th of February last, the other cotton bed gown was pledged the 4th of April.

Mrs. Thomas. The coloured apron does not belong to me; that white bed gown was not in the indictment, but it is mine pawned by the same person.

Jane Goff . The bed gown was pawned in my name, the flowered one, it was made out of a petticoat, I bought the ticket of Ann Fishbourn , I went and fetched it out, because it should be in my own name, as I had bought the ticket.

Mrs. Thomas. I know it to be mine.

ANN FISHBOURN sworn.

I am in no business at all, my husband is a printer; I sold a bed gown to Mrs. Goss for the same money as I gave Ann Fishbourn, and I sold a gown to Mrs. Palmer.

Q. What are the things that you carried to the pawnbroker? - These things that are here produced; I never carried any thing to the pawnbroker belonging to them, I carried four articles to the pawnbroker's, and two I sold to these women I bought several articles, but they were not all separate, there was a gown and two petticoats together was one, and a cloak was two.

Q. Did you buy them of the prisoner? - No, I bought them of Mary Bromwell , two bed gowns, and this cotton bed gown.

Ann Fishbourn . I was called out of my own room by the prisoner at the bar and one that is in prison now, and asked if I would buy some duplicates, I cannot say what day, I look upon it, it was in January.

Q. Are you sure it was in January last? - Yes.

Q. Which of them had the duplicates? - They were both standing together at the table, they were in a very miserable situation, they said it was their mother's clothes.

Q. What part did this prisoner take in the conversation? - She said it was her mother's and her father was gone down into the country, into Shropshire, and she had all the management of them. These are the same articles I fetched out.

Q. These duplicates were purchased by you, did you ever pawn them afterwards? - Yes, I did, but I kept them at home at least three weeks before I pawned any; I had worn the gown for two months.

MARY HODGES sworn.

My husband keeps a chandler's shop; I produce two shifts and a cloak, I bought the tickets of Mary Bromwell .

MARY CAVE sworn.

I produce a white spotted dimity peticoat and a silk handkerchief, I bought them of Mary Bromwell and Ann Lowe , they were together, I was going out one day and I met them, and they asked me if I wanted to buy a petticoat? the prisoner told me that her father and mother had lived in the country, and were in very good circumstances, and that her mother had died and left her a good many clothes, I gave her six shillings for the petticoat, and four shillings for the handkerchief.

JOHN DELAFONTINE sworn.

On the 24th of last month being Thursday, Mr. Thomas put the prisoner at the bar into my charge, on account of that I searched the prisoner and found this handkerchief on her neck, which Mr. Thomas owns as his property.

Mrs. Thomas. Here is my name on it.

Delafontaine. I had orders to go to different people, inconsequenceof that, the girl told me that Fishbourn was her father, but he denied that, I requested to know what duplicates Fishbourn had got about him? I found about two hundred, but he informed me of this girl and told me that he was not her father.

Prisoner. I lived with Mr. Thomas about six weeks, when I lived there this young woman came to me and asked me if I could let her have any money? I said I could not; she asked me if I had any thing that I could make any money of? I told her no; and then she asked me if I had got any thing that I could pawn for her, I told her no; and if I had I did not know how I should get it out again; and she urged me for something to make up two shillings to get out something that she had pawned of a young man's, this was Monday, and she got this silk handkerchief of me on Wednesday, and promised to get it out again on Saturday. My master and mistress and I, had a few words, and I slipt over to this girl's house and asked her if she could not get that handkerchief out that she had to pawn? she said she could not get it me; I asked her what it was in for? she said three shillings, and I offered her part of the money to get the handkerchief out if she would but replace it, she said she had none but she would see what she could do, she did not get it out.

GUILTY, Of stealing the handkerchief only .(Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-82

310. JAMES BUNN was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a

hand saw, value 4s. the goods of Chapman Plaine .

CHAPMAN PLAINE sworn.

I am a carpenter , on the 7th of March last, I was working at an unfinished house in the Tabernacle-walk , for one Mr. Thorowgood; about twelve o'clock I went out to dinner, while I was absent from the building the saw was taken.

- WILLMOT sworn.

I am a carpenter, I work for Mr. Thorowgood; on the 27th of March I was going down to my dinner about a quarter after twelve, and I saw this young man come out with a saw in his arm, then he looked about and see no one passing, and he put it under his coat; I observed him come out of the house, opposite to where I was at work, in Tabernacle-walk; he came out of the back window, it is an unfinished house not inhabited at all, he went out of the gate into Tabernacle-walk; and walked on to Tabernacle-square, and I followed him into an acquaintance's house of mine, his name is Hazeman, that house is in Chapel-street, I asked my acquaintance if he saw any one run past? he said yes; says he, what do you want with him? I said he had stole some saws; and he opened the door, he was in the passage, and put him out, and he had the saw with him under his coat, this is it, I had never lost sight of him.

Q. Are you sure he is the man that got out of the window? - I am.

Plaine. This is my saw, I know it by a tooth broke out, and the maker's name. I am sure it was left in the building.

Prisoner. I went in there, and I saw this saw lay in the back window, and I took it out, I was going to work, and I had no saw just then. I have no friend at all in London.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-83

311. ELIZABETH WHEALY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a silk cloak, value 1l. a silk bonnet, value 6d. a flannel petticoat, value 1s. two linen shifts, value 2s. three linen aprons, value 1s. 6d. two pair of stuff shoes, value 2s. two caps, value 2s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1s. a stuff petticoat, value 6s. the goods of James Casidy .

MARY ANN CASIDY sworn.

My husband's name is James, this woman came to me for a lodging; I live at No. 29, Tower-street, Seven Dials , I keep only a room, and my husband is not with me; I let lodgings to single women, I have got two beds in the room; I let lodgings to her in March, as to the day of the month I cannot recollect; it was the 21st of March, she came to me and she said she was engaged to go to a place, and did not want to sleep with me but two or three nights, she lodged only two nights; she told me that she was disappointed of a place that she was to have; and I went out to get her some work, that might help her till she got a place; I was not away a quarter of an hour, I left nobody in the room but she, when I came back my door was open, and I found my trunk broke open, and I missed my cloak and bonnet first; it was about twelve o'clock I went out; with that I looked over my things, and I missed a great many things belonging to me,

and a great many belonging to another woman that gave those things in charge to me; I went after her, she had told me where her brother lived, I went to her brother's house, and he told me that he knew nothing about her for four months before that; I went and found her up in Hog-lane, near St. Giles's, lodging there, and after I saw my clothes there, I found on her a petticoat, shift, two aprons, a flannel petticoat, a muslin handkerchief and a cap. She began to abuse me very much with her tongue, and I went to Bow-street, in the time that I was gone to Bow-street, she took the things off herself, except the flannel petticoat, and the woman that see her do it would not come here, and I could not afford to bring her. When she was taken to Bow-street I told them my marks of my under petticoat, and my saying that, she told me to take that, that was mine; they are the things that I found at her lodgings.

Q. Did you know any thing of this woman before? - No.

Q.What age is she? - She said she was nineteen. I lost the things Saturday evening, I found them the next day.

Prisoner. She lent me two aprons and an handkerchief, as I had got a place to go to.

Prosecutrix. She never asked me, and I never thought of the like.

Prisoner. She had a person here before, for something of the same kind, and she then came into court, by the name of Doudle.

Prosecutrix. My name is Casidy, I did live along with a man of the name of Doudle, but my name is Casidy.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Imprisoned one month in the House of Correction and fined 1s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-84

312. DIANA YOUNG was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , three callico jackets, value 7s. 6d. a cotton gown, value 4s. a dimity bed gown, value 1d. a muslin handkerchief, value 6d. the goods of Daniel Nathaniel Wheadon .

- HUNT sworn.

I live in Baker's-row, Whitechapel way. The prisoner came to me the 4th of April last, about one o'clock nearly, a few minutes before or after, and pledged three callico jackets, a cotton gown, a bed gown, a muslin handkerchief; she told me that they belonged to a lady in Whitechapel, that had lately lain-in, of the name of Ann Green , and had got two twins, and if I could not lend her the money she asked, which was ten shillings, I must lend her as much as I could, for the lady wanted to make up some rent; I lent her eight shillings; on the following day I was informed that Mr. Wheadon had lost such and such articles by his partner.

Q. Is Mr. Wheadon married? - Yes. I told them I believed I had taken them into pledge the day before; I went to Mr. Wheadon's, and carried these articles.

Q. Are these the things that you took to Mr. Wheadon's? - I believe they are, I have no doubt about it; I left them with Mr. Wheadon, Mr. Wheadon was very desirous to know the party that brought them; on the Thursday following she was passing my door, and I stopped her. I am certain that is the young woman that pledged these things.

DANIEL NATHANIEL WHEADON sworn.

I am a brush-maker , I live in Whitechapel-road , about the 5th of April I was informed these things were missing out of my house.

Q. When had you last seen them? - I do not recollect any particular time

seeing them, they were wearing apparel, belonging to my wife, I was informed they were lost on the 5th; I have seen them on my wife's back; I cannot swear to the jackets at all, I can swear to the bed gown by a mark, M. D. for Mary Dickson ; my wife has always worn it every morning for this two years back.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-85

313. ANN KENT , ELIZABETH BURN and ELIZABETH MEAD were indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on a certain person whose name is unknown, being deaf and dumb, on the 18th of April , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a hempen, value 1d. a leather jacket, value 3s. a cloth waistcoat, value 6d. another cloth waistcoat value 1d. a cloth jacket, value 1d. a piece of woollen cloth, value 6d. a pair of corderoy breeches, value 2d. two pair of worsted stockings, value 2d. a looking glass with a wooden frame, value 1d. and a razor, value 2d. the goods of the said man unknown .

JOHN COOKE sworn.

I am constable at Shadwell. On the the 18th of April last (Good Friday) I I was at a public house, called the Virginia Planter, at Shadwell; Thomas Tillock , who is a witness on the bill, came to me with this deaf and dumb man.

Q. Did you know the deaf and dumb man before? - I never saw him before, I cannot find out where he came from, nor what his name is; he told me that the man had been robbed by some women in New Gravel-lane , in the same parish, and that they ran into a house in the same lane after they robbed him; I then went with the lad and man to the house in New Gravel-lane, and they pointed out the house where they were at.

Q.Who pointed out the house? - The deaf and dumb man, and the lad. Then the lad he described one of the prisoners particularly; I then desired him to go with the old man again up into the same house we had come from and I would enquire into the business; in about two minutes afterwards the two prisoners; Burn and Kent, and another that was discharged before the magistrate, all came up to the house, and I then took them into custody; the man, as soon as I took them to the Virginia Planter, he began to rave and point at them; and the lad likewise pointed to the prisoner Kent, that she was the person that hauled the bag off the man's shoulder; in a few minutes afterwards the prisoner Mead, came to see them, I asked her what she did there? and the deaf and dumb man immediately ran to her, she said to me immediately, I did not rob him, it was Burn and Kent that robbed him, I will shew you where the bag was. Burn and Kent were there at the time secure. I went down and found the bag on the landing place of the one pair of stairs in the same house where he pointed out, not in any room; as soon as he saw the bag, he ran to it directly, and there was a particular coat that he held up, and he made signs that it was his own. I searched all the prisoners and found nothing on them.

Q. How did he express himself? - He pointed to Kent that she took something off his back, and he made motion that he lost money; we shewed him a shilling, and he marked 33, and pointed to a yellow button. We shewed him half a guinea, and he put his finger on it, and held up one; and he made motion that he lost a quantity of halfpence; he cannot read nor write.

THOMAS TILLOCK sworn.

I am fourteen, my father is a taylor.

Q. Do you go to school? - No.

Q.Have you ever been to school? - Yes.

Q. Can you read? - Yes.

Q. Have you ever learned your catechism? - Yes.

Q. Do you know what you came here for? - Yes, to speak the truth.

Q. Do you know whether it is a good thing or a bad thing to tell a story? - Yes.

Q. Do you know that you will not only be punished in this world, but in the next, if you tell a lie? - Yes.

Q. Mind you speak the truth? - As I was going down our lane, Good Friday evening, between the hours of seven and eight; I live in Shadwell; I saw this woman, Ann Kent , hawling the bag off this man's back, and she ran into a house, and the man ran in after her.

Q. What did she come behind him? - Yes. Then she went up stairs, then when she got up stairs, I heard the cry out of murder! and there were two or three women standing at the door, and persuaded somebody to go up for the woman was being murdered; then presently Ann Kent came down stairs, and said, if the man came down he would bang her again, and then Kent ran away, then the man came down, and he made motions that the woman had been taking his money; then I was desired by a woman to go and ask for Mr. Cooke, at the Virginia Planter.

Q. Are you sure, in the first place, that it was Ann Kent, that did this? - I am; the other women were standing at the door.

Q. They did not do any thing to this man at all? - No.

Q.Was it a large bag? - Yes, I am sure this is the bag.

Q. What did he say? did he make any noise? - No, only hummed, he could not speak at all.

Q. Did he seem distressed much when his things were taken? - Yes, and immediately ran after her.

Q. Did you see her when she came down, where did she go to? - She went down the lane; the man I took to the Virginia Planter, and got an officer.

Q. Did you go afterwards where the bag was found? - No.

Q. When she came down, where was the bag? - I don't know, she swore he had been banging her, and he would bang her again if he came down, and then she ran away.

Q. Had she any marks about her? - Yes, and she shewed them to the justice.

Q. Did you know this man before? - No, never see him before.

Q. How soon did he follow her down stairs? - Close immediately.

Q. What sign did he make use when he came down? - He made signs in his pocket, that they had been robbing him of his money.

Q. Did she run away when she came down stairs? - When she found the people getting about the door, she ran down the lane directly.

Q. How soon did she return again? - I did not see her again till the officer brought her to the Virginia Planter.

Jury to Cooke. Were the things all in the bag? - Yes.

Q. Was the woman beat at all? - I think she said the man beat her.

Prisoner Kent. I went out to buy something for my supper at the tripe shop, as I came back I met this woman Burn, and we went up stairs, and this man followed us with the bag on his back, and he went up stairs with us, and he made motion that he wanted something to drink, and this woman went out for a pot of beer, and while she was gone he

wanted to be very rude to me, and because I did not like it, he began beating me, and dragged me by the hair of my head; so this woman and a good man, ran up and got me down stairs, and the other woman came down also, and we went over the way to get something to drink because I was so saint, and as we came back Mr. Cooke took hold of this woman and me, and said we had robbed the man.

Prisoner Mead. I was looking out of my own window, Good Friday, between seven and eight, and I heard the cry of murder, and I went up to see what was the matter, and after that I went up to these women to know if they wanted any thing, and Mr. Cooke took me into custody immediately.

Prisoner Burn. This man met this woman and me, and we went up together, and I went out for a pot of beer, and before I could come back again they were crying out murder! and there was a great concourse of people.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-86

314. BENJAMIN PROSSER was indicted for stealing on the 16th of February fourteen pounds weight of ginger, value 14s. the goods of certain persons unknown , and HUGH JONES for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN WAINWRIGHT sworn.

I am a constable. On the 16th of February, which was Sunday morning, about eight o'clock, I saw Prosser and another man walking on Thames street, towards London bridge, Prosser had this bundle under his arm; they went out of Thames-street into Little Bush-lane ; they went into a warehouse belonging to Mr. Jones, it was a small warehouse or shop, he has different articles in it; I cannot particularize them. When I got into the warehouse Prosser said, here is another of us coming, I asked him what was that he brought? he answered me, why, if it was mine, I might have it or take it; I asked him again, what it was? he said, it is ginger; he broke the paper, made a hole in the paper bag, and said, you see it is ginger; I asked him what he was going to do with it? I am not positive to the answer he made me directly at that time; but he said he was going to carry it to one Mr. Hanson's, Maid-lane, in the Borough. Mr. Jones said, Mr. Wainwright it is only fourteen pounds weight of ginger, it is not worth notice, and not of any account. Prosser said, he had brought it from St. Saviour's church yard; I told him I thought it very odd he should bring it from St. Saviour's church yard and have it to carry again to Maid-lane, almost there again. I told him I was not satisfied with that, I should take him into custody; I said Mr. Jones do you know the man? he said he knew him very well; says I, do you think he has come honestly by it? he said he did not doubt but what he had, I told him I was rather dubious of the matter, I should take him into custody; why then, says he, I have brought it from Smithfield, and I was to deliver it last night, and I am going to deliver it this morning, he said he was a porter there; I told him then you shall go with me to Smithfield, to know whether you have brought it from there or not, and then I shall be satisfied, we left Bush lane on that, and

we went till we came to Budge-row, where he said it is no use going to Smithfield, for he had been porter, there but he then was not; he said, if I would go with him to Mr. Jones's, in Gracechurch-street, I should see a person that would give me a good account of it; I told him as he had hesitated before, I should put him in the Compter, I put him in the Compter, and that is all that happened that day. Mr. Jones, I had not him in custody at all.

Q. Does this Mr. Jones deal in ginger? - I don't know, he deals in indigo and drugs , and twenty or thirty kind of articles, I can scarce know what he deals in.

Q. Have you found any body that has lost this ginger? - It has been advertised, but never owned.

WILLIAM HAMSON sworn.

Q. Do you know of any ginger being lost? - I do not.

Q. Do you know any thing of this transaction? - No, nothing at all.

Wainwrigt. Here is a note that Prosser produced before my Lord Mayor, where he bought it; before my Lord Mayor on Monday, he said he had a friend in the country that had sent him a letter out of the country, with an order to buy him fourteen pounds weight of ginger, and that he bought that fourteen pounds of ginger, and that he called on Mr. Jones, Sunday morning, to know whether he could get it ground, and he said he bought it of Mr. Hamson, Maid-lane; I asked him what he gave for it? be said he gave fourteen shillings for it, he said he had not got the receipt, but he believed he could find it; my Lord put him back till Tuesday, and ordered me to get Hamson, to know whether he had bought it of him or no, and Mr. Hamson said he had not.

EDWARD BIRK sworn.

Q. Do you know any thing of this transaction? - I know nothing at all about it.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT

Reference Number: t17940430-87

315. PETER SCAFE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2s. the goods of Isaac Israel .

SARAH ISRAEL sworn.

I live in Houndsditch . On the 2d of April, between six and seven, the dusk of the evening, I went down stairs for a kettle of water, and coming up again, I met the prisoner on the stairs, and I asked him what business he had there? he did not live in the house; he said he was sent by a man to fetch some knives to grind; there is nobody lives up stairs but a feeble old woman; and when I came into the room I missed my handkerchiefs, I had put them on a line, just done washing, and hung them up; I pursued him, and this young man catched him, he was stopped in Old Bethlem, he had the handkerchiefs in his right hand pocket, Tipper, the officer, has got them; I am sure that is the man that was on the stairs.

JOHN HARDING sworn.

I was coming home from work the 2d of April, about half past six in the evening, and a woman called out stop thief! and this man ran past me and I ran after him, and caught him and he had the handkerchief in his right hand coat pocket; I stopped him in Old Bethlem; I gave the handkerchief to the officer.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn.

I am a constable, I got these handkerchiefs from Harding.

Prosecutrix. They are my handkerchiefs, one I put three pieces on it before I washed it, and the other I bought the week before, I am sure they are the same that I hung on the line that day.

Prisoner. I was coming along there, and this woman cried out stop thief! and I was running hard and they catched hold of me, and they they said that I took these handkerchiefs.

GUILTY. (Aged 17.)

Judgment respited .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-88

316. JOHN O'NEAL , ELIZABETH O'NEAL , and ELEANOR RAY were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , a piece of muslin containing three yards, the goods of Edward Buttenshaw , privately in his shop .

EDWARD BUTTENSHAW sworn.

I live in the Minories , I am a linen draper , I keep a shop; John and Elizabeth O'Neal and Eleanor Ray their servant , on Friday the 25th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, came into my shop altogether, Mrs. O'Neal asked to look at some white callico; I asked them to walk in the back shop; which they did; I took some white callico to shew Mrs. O'Neal, she told me it was too coarse, I returned into the front shop again and fetched some more, when I came with that she told me likewise that that was too coarse, I returned into the front shop again for some more, while I was gone for the callico she asked one of my young men to shew her a fine muslin apron which hung up behind him; he took it down and laid it on some muslin that laid on the counter and left it, when I came in with the callico, I saw Eleanor Ray fumbling about her pockets as if she had taken something, Mrs. O'Neal asked me the price of the callico, and I told her fifteen-pence a yard, she bid me thirteen, I told her I could not take it, she then bid me fourteen-pence, I told her I could not take that; they all walked out of the shop together, I watched the maid very closely as she went out of the shop, I could not see that she had got any thing, Mr. O'Neal was the last of the three, I stepped past O'Neal and caught hold of the servant, I told her I begged her pardon, but I had reason to believe she had got a piece of muslin of mine, she immediately answered, I have; I took it from her, and sent for a constable and took them up.

Q. Did you know any thing of the people before? - No, never saw them before.

Q. You see this girl fumbling about her pockets? - Yes.

Q. Do you know any thing of Mr. Oneal? - No.

Q.Nor Mrs. Oneal? - No; Mr. Oneal downed on his knees and begged I would let his wife go, and keep himself in custody.

Q. Mr. Alby. Who is your partner? - I have no partner, I have a brother in Holywell-lane.

Q. You say these people came into your shop and asked for calicoes, and you shewed them several pieces, at last you brought some at fifteen-pence per yard, and she bid you fourteen-pence a yard, and when she saw she could not deal, she went away? - She did.

Q.When Mrs. Oneal asked you about the price of the callico, you saw the servant fumbling about her pockets? - Yes.

Q.How long were they in your shop? - About two minutes.

Q. They asked for no other articles? - No, they did not.

Q. You say there was another young man in the shop? - Yes, and an apprentice.

Q. When you followed the prisoners out, they willingly returned? - Yes.

Q. The servant acknowledged that she had taken it, and denied that her mistress had any concern in it? - She did.

Q. She said the same before the Lord Mayor? - She did.

Q. There was a considerable time from the time that this transaction took place and the constable arriving, they might have gone away if they pleased? - No, they could not.

JOHN RAINSDON sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Buttenshaw; the three prisoners came into the shop, and Mr. Buttenshaw met them just at the back shop door, and desired them to walk in, and when we asked them what they wanted? they wanted some callico; and he went out to get some callico, and there was a worked muslin apron hanging up, and they desired to look at it, and I went out to look after some thing at the door, and in about three minutes afterwards they all came to the door, and Mr. Buttenshaw took hold of the servant and said I beg your pardon madam, I believe you have got a piece of muslin, and he pulled her in, and the rest came in after; and Mrs. Oneal took hold of me, and wanted me to make silence, not to make any disturbance.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn.

I am the constable, I have got the muslin, it was given me by Mr. Buttenshaw, and I have kept it ever since.

Prosecutor. It is marked by my private mark.

Mr. Alby to Tipper. When you came the servant was only delivered into your custody? - She was; and I did not like to take her into custody, without I took the other two likewise.

Prisoner Ray. I am the only person that was guilty of it.

John Oneal, Elizabeth Oneal , both

Not GUILTY .

Eleanor Ray, GUILTY Of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 26)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-89

317. JOHN BRAME and HENRY BURKITT were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of February , a door knocker, made of iron and brass, value 9d. the goods of William Porter , affixed to his dwelling house .

WILLIAM COOPER sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Porter, the owner of the knocker, he lives in Copthall-court, No. 5 ; a brass knocker was taken from the door on the 20th of February; I did not see it taken, I only swear to the property, I last see it there the 19th.

THOMAS BUCK sworn.

I am watchman of Broad-street Ward; on the 20th of February, in the morning, hearing that many houses in the court had been robbed of their knockers and bells, I shut my box up to see if I

could see any lurking people about; about a quarter before seven, I saw the two prisoners at the bar lurking; I went past them, and went up into a corner, Burkitt he went on, and Brame stopped, I hid myself in a corner, and see them return to Mr. Porter's door, and then he wrung the knocker off, he broke it short; I followed him and I sprung the rattle, and called out, stop thief! he then dropped that knocker and two more, and Mr. Sparkes, that is here, stopped him in Trogmorton-street.

Q. Did you lose sight of him? - Only at the turn of the corner, I see him drop all the knockers, I am certain he is the man; Burkitt after he turned the corner, I never saw any more after that time.

Q. Was Burkitt, in conversation with Brame at the time? - He was with him in the court, but not by him when he wrung the knocker off.

Q. Did you hear them converse together? - No.

Q. Who took up these knockers? - this man took up one, and I took up one; the officer has got them.

- SPARKES sworn.

On the 20th of of February I saw the prisoner running at the same time as Mr. Buck speaks of, I saw him running in Throgmorton-street very speedily towards me, Brame was the man. When I seized hold of him, he dropped the knocker down by the side of him; I saw him, I picked it up.

Q. Had he any more about him? - No, he had a screw-driver, a small rule, and some little pieces of brass.

Court to Buck. I thought you said he dropped three? - He dropped one first, and one after, and one by Mr. Sparkes's feet, he dropped three in all; all the three were delivered to the officer, I picked up that that belonged to Mr. Porter.

Sparkes. The knocker I picked up was carried to the officer, and delivered to the officer in the watch-house.

JAMES LODGE sworn.

I am the officer, I received these three knockers of Thomas Buck , and have kept them in my possession ever since.

Cooper. This is Mr. Porter's knocker.

Prisoner Braine. That gentleman there has spoke very wrong in one thing; he said that he saw me drop one of the knockers; I had none about me when he took me, indeed.

Court. They all agree in that.

Prisoner Brame. You will take into consideration that I am very willing to serve his Majesty, and I should not have done this if I had not been out a drinking; this is my first offence.

John Brame , GUILTY. (Aged 24.)

( Judgment respited .)

Henry Burkitt , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-90

318. CATHARINE GRAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , two half crowns , the monies of James Loveday .

JAMES LOVEDAY sworn.

I am a journeyman upholsterer ; on Saturday evening, the 22d of March last, as I was going to Leadenhall market , the prisoner at the bar laid hold of me by the arm, slipt her hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took out two half crowns; when I charged her with it, she told me she had not got them.

Q. Where did this happen? - Going through Leadenhall-market.

Q. Did you stop to speak to her? - She stopped me.

Q. Did you know her at all? - No. I told her if she did not give me the money, I would send her to the watch-house.

Q. How did she stop you? - As I was going through the market, she came unawares on me, and laid hold of my arm.

Q. Did you feel her hand in your pocket? - Yes.

Q. Did you not lay hold of her hand? - I could not lay hold of her hand, I laid hold of her arm, and took her to the watch; she laid hold of my right arm, and my money was in my right pocket; she took the money with her left hand, as she put one hand under my arm, she put the other into my waistcoat pocket, and took the money out; I begged of her to give me the money, she said she had not got it; I told her if she did not give it me, I would send her to the watch-house; she told me she did not care, she had not got it; in going to the watch-house, she dropped half a crown in the street, I see her drop it, I picked it up and put it in my pocket, and when we came to the watch-house, I insisted on her being searched, which one of the watchmen was going to search her, and I see one of her hands shut, upon which he asked what she had got there; and he found half a crown in her hand.

Q. Did you miss a half crown out of your waistcoat pocket? - Yes, I missed two.

Q. Who was the constable that took the half crown out of her hand? - Richard Jenks .

Prisoner. Did not you ask me what country woman I was? - No, I did not.

Q. And he asked me if I would have any thing to drink? I said I did not care.

RICHARD JENKS sworn.

I am a watchman, the woman was brought to our watch-house, and I searched her, the prosecutor charged her with a half crown he lost; she said she had three halfpence and that was all the money she had, I perceived her right hand to be clinched, I asked her what she had got there? I found a half crown in it, he said that was his half crown, I have it in possession now.

Prosecutor. I cannot swear to it, I only believe it to be mine.

ABRAHAM BONE sworn.

I am a constable of the ward, this woman was taken to the watch-house before the watch was set, when I came to the watch-house and the watch was set, the watch-man gave me the half crown.

Q. To Jenks. Did you give it to this man that night? - I did, and received it again before my Lord Mayor.

Prisoner. The prosecutor said that he would give me something to go along with him, and there was a light a coming and be said, O! here is the watchman, no says I, it cannot be the watchman, it is not eight o'clock, and who should it be but the lamplighter, after that he dropped something, and I said hold, that is something dropped from me; no said he it is from me, and then I asked him to go to a public house; and he said no, we will go in here, and it was a little watch-house, and he put me in there, and there they searched me and found the half crown.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-91

319. EDWARD POWEL was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , seventy-five glass bottles, value 12s. a pint bottle, value 1d. two quart bottles, value 2d. two glass quart case bottles, value 6d. five glass vials, value 2s. five gallon stone jars, value 2s. three ditto, value 1s. seven gallons of rum, value 2l. 16s. seven gallons of brandy, value 4l. one gallon of hollands gin, value 8s. a pint of tent wine, value 6d. six gallons of red port, value 1l. 16s. a gallon of Madeira wine, value 9s nine. pounds weight of tallow candles, value 4s. fourteen pounds weight of lump sugar, value 7s. the goods of William Core .

WILLIAM CORE sworn.

I missed all the articles in this indictment; the prisoner was a servant .

Q. Did you miss them during the time he was in your service? - Yes, I lost them from my wine vaults in Newgate street , I missed the bottles out of a binn near Newgate-market. On the 7th of March I searched his premises with a search warrant, he keeps a lodging in No. 32, Shoemaker-row, he was then in my service, he had been with me near two years; I found there all the articles in the indictment he was not at home, he was in my service in Newgate-street, and we applied to know what apartment belonged to him, he had a kitchen, a parlour, and a bed chamber.

Q.Do you know all this of your own knowledge? - Yes.

Q. Did you find all these articles in these rooms? - Yes, some locked up in his bed chamber in a box, two bags of sugar and nine pounds of tallow candles. In one of the bags of sugar was a printed bill of my own, wrapped up with some of that sugar.

Q.Such bills as you have to carry on your business with, I conceive? - Yes, it is; in his bed chamber this bill of parcels was found on a file, signed William Black , but it is not his hand writing, he was a servant of mine, but his name was John Black , but he went by the name of William.

Q. The whole of this you say is not the hand writing of the prisoner? - Yes, I verily believe it is. In his parlour there was a large glass bottle of brandy which is in court, in a cupboard in that parlour was another such bottle of rum which we forgot to bring away, in the kitchen below there was a bottle of brandy, five bottles of rum, and one hullage bottle of tent wine, all the rest of the goods were in the cellar; these things have been in the constable's care ever since. The prisoner had a hearing before the Lord Mayor on the 8th.

Q. Can you identify this property? - I cannot positively swear; I have been robbed of a deal of property for more than a twelvemonth past, it is the nature of this trade that hardly any one thing can be identified, I have no doubt but the property is mine, but it is best to be cautious, I have tried the goods in regard to the strength and they are exactly of the same strength; I am sorry I do not stand upon better ground. I have been robbed seriously indeed.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-92

320. JAMES SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of February twenty-seven pounds weight of raw sugar, value 10s. the goods of Thomas Bolt .

CHARLES WOOD sworn.

I am a watchman of Smarts and Dice Key. On Monday, the 24th of February

I stopped the prisoner with a bundle of sugar, at seven o'clock in the morning coming down from Smart's Key , I saw him coming from a hogshead that was plundered, he had got some in his apron and part in his hat, it was between one and two and twenty pounds weight. I did not see him take it, but I see him turn round from the hogshead close to it, and he had a large lump of twenty one or twenty two pounds weight; and there appeared to want that lump in the hogshead. I went immediately to it, and took him with me, it appears to be the same sort of sugar, and I believe the constable took a sample of it; he said he had found it some little distance, but I see him come from the hogshead, and I had perfect knowledge of him before, the sugar was in the charge of the wharfinger , Thomas Bolt , he is liable to pay all losses. I gave the sugar to Hunter.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn.

I am an officer to the West India merchants, I produce the sugar which Wood gave me in charge.

Prisoner. I had been on board a ship, and the captain had a side board, which he wanted to sit to the cabbin, and going back with the dimensions, passing accidentally I saw this sugar lay almost all in a lump, almost by Billingsgate.

GUILTY . (Aged 19)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-93

321. HANNAH KENT was indicted for stealing the 19th of February , a silver table spoon, value 5s. the goods of Thomas Knibbs , and a cambrick handkerchief, value 4d. the goods of George Bell .

GEORGE BELL sworn.

I know of the things being stolen, I have apartments in the City Chambers, where she was.

Q. Was she a laundress there? - No, the handkerchief was found on her while they were searching for the spoons, how she came by it I don't know. Mrs. Knibbs brought the handkerchief to me.

ANN KNIBBS sworn.

The servant had been with me about a fortnight; I keep the Old City Chambers, Bishopsgate-street , I am the wife of Mr. Thomas Knibbs ; she had been with me a fortnight on the 19th of February, when I found her rather intoxicated with liquor, I desired her to look up her things, and go about her business; she brought down her bundle, and desired me to look and see she had nothing but her own; I told her it was unusual for me to look in servants bundles, but as she desired me I would, I found nothing there; I desired her then to turn out her pockets, which she did, and the first thing she pulled out was this handkerchief, which belonged to Mr. George Bell , she endeavoured to conceal it, by wrapping it up all of a heap in her hand; she dared me at my peril to take it from her, I told her peril or not, I should certainly take the handkerchief, it belonged to one of the Gentlemen lodgers; I then turned round to the servant that was by, and asked her whose handkerchief it was? and she said it was Mr. George Bell 's, he had six of them; I then told the servant if she would take these petty things, she would take more, I desired her to look if the plate was safe, the servant went and found one of the large table spoons missing; I found it in the dust the next morning, the officer has it here, it was broke up to pieces; she told me if I

could let her stay, and not send her to the Compter that night, the spoon should be forthwith coming the next morning. The officer has the handkerchief.

JAMES HALL sworn.

I have got the handkerchief and spoon, which was delivered to me; I received it of Joseph Green , the officer, who took the charge at first, he is gone as a quarter-master to join his regiment; it was marked when delivered to me, and I took it to Mrs. Knibbs, and she said it was the handkerchief she delivered to Green.

Prosecutor. This is the handkerchief I took from the prisoner, the two letters are marked with inking, J. R. there were six marked with the same mark, and the same pattern.

Bell. I have lost a dozen such, and I believe that to be one of the dozen; it is marked as mine were, I have no doubt about swearing to it in the world.

Prisoner. This here spoon was missing at nine o'clock at night, at eleven o'clock they took me to the Compter, I could not find it, she would not let me stop; the next morning the dustman found it in the dust; the handkerchief was a duster; she asked me for it out of my pocket, and I gave it her out of my pocket. I have no witnesses, I can send for some in half an hour's time.

GUILTY. Of stealing the handkerchief only .

(Aged 26.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-94

322. JAMES COOKE and JOHN CARTER were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , forty hundred weight of juniper berries, value 20l. and eighteen hempen sacks, value 4s. the goods of Anthony Fonblanque ,

ANTHONY FONBLANQUE sworn.

I lost some juniper berries, Cooke was my servant ; I am a merchant in all kinds of line .

Q. Where was this property kept? - In my warehouse, Water-lane, Tower-street ; I missed them from this warehouse, in consequence of that information I took my stock, about the 22d of March, and I missed from forty-eight hundred to all allowance for waste, I am sure that fifty, but to make forty hundred weight was missing.

Q. You missed eighteen sacks? - O, yes, and a great deal more.

Q. Have you ever recovered any of these articles? - Some of these bags have been found, part of them brought to me, which I refused to take in, they were brought about a week after I took my stock, I believe it was six that was brought, and a sample of berries, about a handful.

Q. Who has had these sacks since? - Kirk.

Mr. Knowlys. I am for Carter. Have you any partner in you business? - None at all, except that gentleman, who chose to become my partner unknown to me.

Q. Who did you employ to take your stock? - I do my business myself, and I employ Cooke, to take care of my warehouse.

Q. Who took your stock? - I took it myself.

Q. How long had you taken it before? - The Christmas before.

Q. Then you did not take stock from Christmas to March? - I did not.

- CUNDEN, junior, sworn.

I am a chymist and druggist; I know the prisoner, John Carter , under the name

of John Clarke; I had been out one morning, and when I returned I was informed that a person had left a parcel of juniper berries, and was to call again in the course of a day, this was in the beginning of December last, I cannot say whether it was the 3d or the 6th, I cannot say to a day, he called in the course of the day, when I was behind the counter, and he asked me if I had seen the sample? I told him I had, he said he was recommended to me from Mr. Price, over the way, to sell a parcel of juniper berries, which he had bought of a captain of a ship; I looked at them, and see they were not fit for the scale, they might do for distillers; I asked him what quantity he had? he said he had twenty hundred weight, at eleven and six-pence per hundred; he called a few days afterwards, and said, that he had got some more from the same captain, and on the same recommendation we took them also, and continued that from different periods, till I took thirty-seven hundred weight, from the 3d of December, to the middle of January; we weighed them, and they weighed on an average, an hundred weight in a bag, one with another.

Q. How many sacks might you have in all? - I cannot exactly say, I believe thirty seven.

Q. Did any body claim these goods as their own afterwards? - The police officer called at my house one morning, and asked me if I had bought any juniper berries? I told him I had; he asked me if I bought them of one John Carter? I told him I bought them of one John Clarke ; John Carter I knew nothing about. They gave me to understand that these berries, which I had bought, were stole.

Q. Did the officer, or Mr. Fonblanque, take away these berries? - No, they did not. When the officer came, part were sold, and part remaining on the premises, about seventeen hundred pounds weight, they are now in my laboratory.

Q. Are any of them brought here? - Not to my knowledge. A man has got part of the sack here, I believe a carpenter has got them, that I gave them to. I did not take particular notice of the marks, I gave them him, he asked for them, I gave him four, I said he was welcome to them.

Q.What is the name of this carpenter? - William Kirk .

Mr. Knowlys. This transaction began early in December? - Yes.

Q. In the course of December you received a considerable quantity of that which constituted thirty-seven hundred pound weight. In short, the whole of it you received in December and January. You took no notice of the sacks that were brought to you at all? - No, I never took particular notice.

Q. You are a druggist, you deal very large in these articles? - No, I never dealt in juniper berries before, but he being recommended to me, by Thomas Price , a grocer, in the minories.

Q. You gave what you thought to be a fair market price? - I bought them something under the market price, and if they had not been something under the market price I should not have bought them; I bought them with a view to sell them to a distiller, which I could as soon sell ten hundred weight as one. I never saw the man till he was recommended to me by a neighbour.

HENRY WESSELL sworn.

I am a Jew, I am a porter; one morning Carter called to me and asked me if I would carry a few loads, that was about Christmas, I took them from Thames-street, out of a warehouse, and took them to Mr. Cunden's.

Q. Are you sure this was before Christmas? - It was thereabouts or afterwards, I cannot tell.

Q. Do you know the sacks again? - No, I cannot read nor write.

JOHN TAPLIN sworn.

I am constable belonging to Whitechapel. On the 22d of March there was an information came to our office against Carter, I went and searched Carter's house and there was some bark found there; there was a sack found there, but no person could swear to it.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am an officer, I know nothing more than apprehending the prisoners, both of them; Carter I apprehended at his own house, Nag's Head Court Houndsditch. Cooke was in the house when we went there, we took them the 22d of March.

WILLIAM KIRK sworn.

I am a carpenter.

Q. To Taplin. Where did you get that sack? - From under the stairs in a closet, between the hours of five and six, the time that the prisoners were in the house; I went in company with Griffiths the same day.

Q. Were any thing said by the prisoners when you took that? - No.

Q. Is there any appearance of business carried on in the house of Carter, is there any shop or any thing? - No.

Prosecutor. I cannot say that that sack is mine.

Kirk. I have got some sacks four of which Mr. Cunden gave to me about the beginning of March, I had no other sacks in my house but these four.

Mr. Knowlys. Did Mr. Cunden tell you how long he had had these sacks? They were very old sacks, were they not? - They were old rubbishing sacks laying about the floor.

Cunden. The four bags that I gave to Kirk were what I received of the prisoner, I cannot speak to the mark of them.

Mr. Knowlys. Whether these had been in your warehouse before or after Christmas you cannot tell? - I cannot.

Prosecutor. Here is a bag I have no doubt belonging to me because I marked it myself, I marked it with an F in black ink, here are six bags in all.

Kirk. I brought two bags besides the four that Mr. Cunden gave me in all they make six, this one marked F was given me by Mr. Cunden.

Q. To Prosecutor. Have you ever sold any with that mark? - I don't think that I have, I had a great quantity of things to bring from on board of a ship, and I got up all the bags I could, and I remember this one going on board a ship to be filled, and if it did not come back Carter must have stole it.

Mr. Knowlys to Cunden. You never took any particular notice of the bag.

Q. That bag if it ever was in your warehouse probably came there before Christmas? - It might, I cannot say whether it came before or after.

Q. To Prosecutor. You say you believed that that bag has been out of your possession? - It certainly has been out of my possession or else Mr. Cunden would not have had it.

Q.Certainly it also has been out of your possession in the course of your trade? - Never till it went out at that time on board of ship.

Q. That letter F may of course be found on many bags? - It may, but I marked this myself.

Q. You yourself parted with a number of bags marked with F. - We sent a number of bags on board, and amongst which was this one marked F. I sent, I suppose, about a hundred on ship board; as to the juniper berries, it would be difficult for any man to swear to them.

Q. In point of fact you have never found any berries at Mr. Cunden's? - I have never been at Mr. Cunden's, but Mr. Cunden brought a sample before my Lord Mayor, that I should think were of the same quality of mine, being damaged berries, some oil having got among them.

Q. You had not taken stock from Christmas 1793? - No, not from Christmas 1792, and I had not taken stock in March, if it had not been for this information.

Q. To Prosecutor. How long had Cooke been in your service? - About six or seven months. Carter has never been my servant, I don't know that he ever had access to them.

Prisoner. I was informed Mr. Fonblanque, that you would with to make up your damage, and therefore you employed a parcel of soldiers, in order to weigh your stock; while these soldiers were weighing your stock, you was up stairs in the counting house; they called the weights, and as they called the weights, you put them down on a bit of paper; you took the weights from their assertion, and never saw the weights they alledged to you, and soldiers are men that know a little about half hundred weights, as many that are here know about pounds.

Prosecutor. I saw the greatest part weighed myself if not the whole, and I have made on allowance of almost twenty hundred weigh.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-95

323. ANN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , a clasp knife, value 2d. a silk handkerchief, value 6d. and two shillings , the goods and monies of George Wills .

GEORGE WILLS sworn.

I am a housekeeper, I live in Virginia-street, Ratcliff Highway. On the 20th of April, about half after nine, as I was coming round the corner of Black Horse-yard, in East Smithfield , the woman catched hold of me by the waist, and had her hands about me,and I felt her hands in my pocket; I lost a silk handkerchief from the pocket in which her hand was in. The handkerchief was in my right coat pocket, and the money was in my waistcoat pocket. I lost a knife, but I did not know that till she was taken into custody, and it was found on her; she was searched in a public-house in Church-lane, at the watch-house door in St. John's, Wapping; she dropped the silk handkerchief, and returned me part of my money. I see her drop it, I picked it up; I have had the handkerchief in my possession ever since.

Q. How came she not to be searched at the watch-house? - The watch-house door was not open, and an officer coming by, I gave her in charge of an officer.

Q. You see the knife taken from her? - Yes.

Q. Was it a clasp knife? - Yes.

Q.Did you ever find your money again? - I had four farthings and a penny returned; the silver I never got, we did not find it on her.

Q.Are you sure that you had two shillings in your waistcoat pocket? - I believe I had more, but that I am positive.

Prisoner. Please to ask him whether he did not pull me down an alley first, and give me sixpence farthing in money and the knife along with the halfpence? - It is not true, she dragged me off the pavement with her hands about my waist.

Court. Did you take her into your company? - I did not.

JOSEPH NASH sworn.

I am an headborough; on Monday the 2d of April I was coming down East Smithfield, and I saw the prosecutor and prisoner struggling together; I told him if he was robbed that I was an officer, and I would take and secure the prisoner for him; says he, you take hold on one arm, and I will take hold of the other; accordingly we took her into a public-house and searched her.

Q. What did he charge her with stealing? - He did not say any thing then, but I am robbed! I am robbed! in searching her I found these two knives, one of which the prosecutor claimed immediately as he saw it, and I found a few halfpence; she had no silver about her.

Prisoner. I was standing at this here alley last Monday night, and it mizzled with rain a little, and this gentleman came and pushed quite against me, and I said, I with you would give me something to drink, and he gave me some halfpence, and then I was going to the public-house, and he pulled me down the alley, and in pulling me down the alley he tore all my bed gown, and then he took hold of my wrist, and charged me to this gentleman, and this gentleman searched me in the ale house, nigh the watch-house; the next morning he had his own silk handkerchief in his pocket, and shewed it to the justice, and he went to give it to the constable, and Mr. Staples said, no, keep it yourself; and he told the justice that he found seven shillings and sixpence in his outside coat pocket next morning.

Court to Prosecutor. Was you in liquor at all? - I had been drinking a little, but I was not any ways forward.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-96

324. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , a truss of hay, containing fifty pounds weight, value 18d. the goods of Richard Kendall .

RICHARD KENDALL sworn.

I am a cow keeper . I did not see the transaction, Morley is my witness in this business.

JAMES MORIEY sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Kendall; this truss of hay was kept in a loft over the stable in Great Portland-street ; it was missed on the 22d of February, Saturday morning; I had seen it safe the evening before between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take it? - Yes, about a quarter before four in the morning; it was taken out of my master's yard in the New Road , I saw it on the man's shoulders, I saw him throw it from the loft into the yard, and carry it out of the stable door, and put it on his shoulder, and carry it on his shoulder into the New Road, and from thence up a very long passage, and put it down before a stable door, called Shaw's Stables; I followed him, he was not out of my sight all the time.

Q. Did you say any thing to him when he did this? - No, I did not; he was a carter , and he was going for a load of turnips, I knew him, he was a servant to Mr. Kendall.

Q. Could any use have been made of it for the purpose of his master? - Not as I know of.

Q. How far was this, where he threw it down, from your master's place? - Pretty nigh an hundred yards.

Q. Are you sure it was not put there for any purpose that related to his master? - It was not for my master's use, I am certain of that.

Q.When did you first tell the prisoner of it? - Not till he was taken the next morning.

Q. Why did you not stop him at the time? Why was not he taken up before? did he continue in the service? - I waited to see who took the hay, I stopped there and let him go for his load of turnips; I stopped there from about a quarter before four, till a quarter past six in the morning, and I kept walking backwards and forwards to see whether any body would come, and I happened to see one of my fellow servants, and I called him, and he came; and just before we got within two or three yards of the door, I saw this Shaw come and take this truss of hay in.

Q. Did you see Mr. Shaw put it in this place? - I did not see him take it into the stable; at the time I called my fellow servant, the man came out and it was gone; and I went and I said to Mr. Shaw, that truss of hay that you have got here on your premises, belongs to Mr. Kendall. He did not say a word.

Q. Did you ever go on his premises, and see whether the hay was there? - I never see the hay since; the prisoner was taken up the next morning after.

Q.Did you charge the prisoner with it? - No, I did not; my master charged him with it; he did not say one word, but only asked what is the matter? what have I done?

Q. To Kendall. I suppose you have never seen this hay since? - No.

Q. Do you know what quantity of hay was in your stable, so that you could say what was missing? - No.

Prisoner. I was up that morning just as the clock went two; I went down to my stable about ten minutes after two, and fed my horses the same as usual; and I never went out of the yard till the clock struck four, then I was getting my horses out as the clock struck, and I went out for my load of turnips as usual.

Kendall. He has lived with me as a weekly servant near three years.

Q. Did you impute any thing to him before this? - I should not have kept him if I had not thought he had been very honest; every man I keep I hope they are honest till I find them otherwise.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

Jury to Morley. Had there been any dispute between you and the prisoner? - Always very good friends.

Q. Have you ever lent Mr. Shaw any hay, or Mr. Shaw lent your master any? - No, never.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-97

325. JANE LACY was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , a pewter quart pot, value 1s. 6d. the goods of John Green .

JOHN GREEN sworn.

I am a vintner ; I keep the Angel, in Whitechapel, Bullocks tap house ; I lost a pewter quart pot, on Friday the 11th of April.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take it? - I did not; I missed the pot, I went into the tap room, and missed the pot;the prisoner had been in the house several times that day, for a penny worth of beer at a time; she had used the house for a long time, and a number of other houses that way. I then followed out the prisoner, who went up a passage. I called the gentleman who is here as a witness, I desired him to follow her, that I might not be at the back of him, and she might not see me, I supposed she had got a quart pot of mine, she went up to the top

of the alley and he followed her and went up to her, and took this quart from her arm, which she had covered over with her cloak.

Prisoner. I did not go out of the alley.

Green. This is the pot, my name is on it, and as soon as I took the pot I put a private mark on it, and it has never been used since, nor been out of my possession. When first I caught hold of her I asked her where she was going? and what she had got? she said she had had nothing; I then turned back her cloak, and found the pot. When she went before the magistrate she said she was going to the workhouse that evening, and that she took it for the purpose of boiling water in it; but when I caught hold of her, she said she was going to bring it back.

Prisoner. I was going to the workhouse that very night; I lived thirty years with one woman in the same place, and that woman died about a fortnight before this happened to me. I never was in gaol in the whole course of my life; one and another asked me to drink as I was going to the workhouse that night, and I was really over come with strong beer, and I did not know what I did.

GUILTY . (Aged 64.)

Imprisoned one year in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-98

326. GEORGE LOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , a copper tea kettle and cover, value 7s. the goods of Augustus Hoyland .

AUGUSTUS HOYLAND sworn.

I lost a copper tea kettle and cover, the 4th of April, I did not see the prisoner take it.

JOSEPH WHITEMAN sworn.

I am an officer of the parish of St. Pancras.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take this pot? - I did not, I found him on the 4th of April, I have forgot the day of the week, it was that day that the terrible thunder storm was; I believe it might be between two and three o'clock; I was standing at the Adam and Eve gate at Tottenham-court-road, and there was a man came over to me, and said, there were three men gone by, and had got a copper pot, in consequence of that I pursued them, and when I got to the Goat and Cups, which was about two hundred yards further. I turned my head, and I see this prisoner with the pot in his possession, in consequence of which I immediately went to him, and secured him, the other men I did not see; I took the pot from him, a copper kettle and cover; I have kept it to now; the prisoner said that he had bought it of a man that had been quarrelling with his wife, and he gave ten shillings for it.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor, Mr. Hoyland? - Yes.

Q.Where is his house? - In the upper part of Tottenham Court-road .

Q. Where did you lose this from? - Out of my shop.

Q. What is your trade? - A broker .

Q. What time of the day did you last see it in your shop? - Between two and three o'clock.

Q.Do you know that is your pot? - Yes, I have had it in my possession some time.

Q. How soon was it brought back that day after you missed it? - About a quarter of an hour after it was taken out of the shop.

Wightman. How did you know that it belonged to Mr. Hoyland? - The person who told me of this man said that he had seen such a one in Mr. Hoyland's shop,

in consequence of which I went to see.

Prisoner. As I was going up Tottenham Court road I saw two or three men together, an I one man had this pot to offer to sell, and he offered it to these two or three men that were standing by, as well as me that was standing by, and they said they did not want such a thing, and the man asked me to buy it?and I said I had not got money enough to pay for it, and I gave him all that I had in my pocket, and told him where I lived, and he said he remembered me coming out of the door, he believed I did live there, and would call there for the rest of the money.

Court to Whiteman. How far might he be from the house of Mr. Hoyland at the time you took him? - He might be about three or four hundred yards.

GUILTY. (Aged 16.) Judgment respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-99

327. MARY GATTING WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of February , a linen table cloth, value 3s. a diaper napkin, value 1s. 6d. an half cambrick handkerchief, value 1s three diaper towels, value 2s. 6d. two pair of linen sheets, value 7s. a blanket, value 2s. the goods of Jane Maughan .

JANE TOMLIN sworn.

Jane Maughan is a single woman , my aunt; she is very ill, and cannot attend; I lived with her six years, she keeps a house in Queen-street, Golden-square .

Q. Did you happen to see the prisoner take these things? - No; the prisoner was a servant at the time we lost the things; my aunt is a laundress ; I cannot say to the day, we lost them from the 17th of February to the 22d; she had lived with us six weeks.

Q. Have you ever seen any of these things since? - Yes, in the constable's hands, his name is Price.

HENRY DICKSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. On the 21st or 22d of February, two sheets were pawned by the prisoner at the bar afterwards, the constable redeemed them, on the 25th; I know the prisoner perfectly well.

Q. Was you at home when they were pledged? - Yes.

Q. Was it the prisoner that pledged them? - Yes, I am perfectly clear of it.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a pair of sheets and a blanket; I have got them here, pawned by the prisoner, in the name of Ann Jones .

Q. To Dickson What name was your's pledged in? - In the name of Ann Allen , of Little Silver street; the pair of sheets were pledged the 17th of February, the the blanket the 21st of February.

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I am a constable; all these articles here I found the duplicates on the prisoner, in her pocket; what was pledged at Mr. Dickson's I redeemed, the other pawnbroker I did not; these are what I redeemed at Mr. Dickson's, two sheets and a napkin, and here is a table cloth I redeemed of Mr. Freer; the articles are all here.

Jane Tomlin . These sheets I know by the mark that is on them; the napkin by a seam, the table cloth because there are four letters on it, the towels by the letters, one marked H.

Court to Dickson. Are these the same napkins and sheets that Mr. Price redeemed? - They are the same that were pledged.

Jane Tomlin . I know these produced by Chamberlain, I cannot swear to the blanket, but I can to the sheet, by the mark.

Prisoner. I am a woman that gets my bread by my labour; I had a fit of illness for a great while; I went to this gentlewoman's today-work as a laundress, and at length the engaged me as a sort of a servant, for five shillings a week, and find myself; I was very happy to embrace the opportunity; I did what I was hired to do, and I was distressed and summoned for twelve shillings; I was very hard pushed for it, and I had no opportunity to attend the summons; they then ordered me to appear; I had not the money to pay; I did take these things, but not meaning to defraud nor designing to steal. The very Saturday evening that these things were found, I received five shillings from my mistress and three shillings I had in my pocket, I purposed going after them, and I had not power when I was asked for them on Saturday night; on Sunday I was asked for them again, and was abused very much, I could not get them, I then went out to see if I could redeem the things, but I could not.

Court to Tomlin. Did she live in the house as a weekly servant? - Yes.

Q. Had you any character with her of any body? - Yes, we had. As to washing, she never did wash.

Q. Do you know any thing of her, in what situation of life she has been in? - No, we did not.

GUILTY . (Aged 46.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-100

328. JAMES CASTLE was indicted for stealing on the 3d of March , a mahogany writing desk, value 10s. a tin pomatum case, value 12d. two pair of scissars, value 5d. a steel cork screw, value 2d. a pomatum knife, value 2d. a pair of silver hair tongs, value 2s. a steel ear picker, value 2d. a steel breeches hook, value 2d. two steel penknives, value 12d. a pair of curling irons, value 3d. two glass bottles, value 2d. three horn combs, value 2d. a black lead pencil, value 1d. a looking glass, in a mahogany frame, value 12d. four razors, value 4s. one hose, value 6d. and a tooth brush, value 1d. the goods of James Williams , Esq . in the dwelling house of Thomas Sunnocks .

THOMAS SUNNOCKS sworn.

JAMES WILLIAMS is abroad. I am a Carpenter, and keep a trunk-maker's shop in Ratcliff-highway . On Monday the 3d of March, there was a writing desk brought to our shop to have a leather case made to it, from Mr. Cornwell's; while it was in our shop the case was stole, I don't know by whom, while the man, that worked in the shop, went to dinner.

WILLIAM GUNDY sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Sunnock. I know that to be the same box that I brought from Mr. Cornwell's house, I know it by two bruises.

- CORNWELL sworn.

I am a rope maker, in Sun Tavern Fields, I believe this to be the same box I delivered to that lad; Major Williams had slept but one night in my house, I had not taken particular notice of the the box.

THOMAS COLE sworn.

I worked at Mr. Sunnock's, at the time I made the leather case for this desk, and went to dinner and left it in the shop.

Q. Do you know whether that is the same? - I cannot say.

SAMUEL CORDELLE sworn.

I am a servant to Mrs. Wade, a Broker, in Moorfields, the prisoner offered this desk for sale the 3d of March, the instruments that were in it he knew nothing at all about when he brought it. He did not offer it to me but it was to another person in my presence. I don't know what he asked for it.

EDWARD LUCAS sworn.

I am an officer; I apprehended this man in Gravel lane, the 4th of March, I searched him, and took this vial and took an brush out of his pocket; I searched his lodgings and found these four razors in his lodgings and this hone; I took him up at the White Lion, facing the public office, at Shadwell; I sent for Major Williams, and he said it was his property. Of my own knowledge, I know nothing about it.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-101

329. DANIEL LEMON and ELIZABETH NEWTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Benjamin Messers , about the hour of ten in the night, of the 1st of April , and burglariously stealing therein, twelve pair of iron buckles plated with silver, value 14s. a reading glass, value 1s. and six pair of brass drawing compasses, value 3s. the goods of the said Benjamin Messer .

REBECCA MESSER sworn.

I am the wife of Benjamin Messer .

Q. Do you live with your husband? - Yes, he is a mathematical instrument maker , at Bell Dock, Wapping . On Tuesday, the 1st of April, between the hours of six, and ten, the shop window was cut, and these things were taken out, I was not at home between that time, I did not take particular notice, but I think it was done in that time; there were several pair of buckles taken out, and drawing compasses, and reading glasses, I cannot say particularly to the number, and sealing wax, and other things I cannot particularly mention.

Q. Did you see them afterwards? - Yes, at the justice's office. The following week we had the parlour broke in, on that account I sent for an officer, who found part of my property on one of the prisoners.

Q. Who produced the property to you? - Cooke.

Q. And had these things produced to you, your property, been in your shop the 1st of April? - Yes.

ROBERT MITCHELL sworn.

I am a mathematical instrument maker, I am a servant to Mr. Messer, I live in the house, it was I first discovered the robbery, I was taking down the shutters about six o'clock, Wednesday morning, the 2d of April, I saw the window cut when I got to the fourth shutter.

Q.Was the shutter cut? - No.

Q. Then the window had been cut before the shutter had been put up? - Yes.

Q. Who put up the shutters the over night? - One of my fellow apprentices.

Q. To Mrs. Messer. What time do you shut up your shop generally? - Usually before ten.

Q.To Mitchell. What did you find taken out of the window? - Buckles and drawing compasses, and reading glasses, and a two foot rule.

JOHN COOKE sworn.

I am a constable of Shadwell. On the 15th of April, I, in company with John Riley , apprehended the prisoner Lemon, in Shadwell; on searching him I found in his possession, in his jacket pocket, this reading glass, and in the fob of his breeches I found a duplicate of two pair of plated buckles, pledged for eighteen-pence, in the name of John Cross , by Elizabeth Newton , at the house of Mr. Findley, in Cable-street; I asked him if this duplicate concerned him? he said yes, he bought the buckles of a sailor in Rosemary-lane, and likewise the reading glass; the duplicate is dated the 3d of April, I proceeded to the pawnbroker's, and he shewed me the buckles, then I went and apprehended Elizabeth Newton , the same evening, I knew where she lived, I apprehended her in the New-road, St. Giles's, on questioning her about these buckles, she said she pawned them for Daniel Lemon ; I told her I had Lemon in custody.

- FINDLEY sworn.

On the 3d of April the prisoner Newton came in with these two pair of buckles into my shop; I asked her whose property they were? she said they were one John Cross 's, a sailor, with that I lent her eighteen-pence on the two pair of buckles. I am sure that is the woman.

JOHN RILEY sworn.

I am a constable, I in company with Cook, apprehended the prisoner Lemon on the 15th of April, and I see him searched, and the reading glass and duplicate was taken on him.

Findley. This is the duplicate, I wrote it myself.

JOSEPH SMITH sworn.

I am an optician, I know the reading glass to be one of my making, I cannot pretend to say who it was made for, I work for Mr. Messer, in Wapping, and other people.

Mrs. Messer. These buckles are my husband's property, I know them by a private mark, which I always mark them with; the reading glass has no particular mark by which I can swear to, I lost such, and have got such to match.

Prisoner Lemon. I had been at work from Monday till Thursday, on board a ship; as I was coming by about a fortnight or three weeks after this woman had said she lost her property, Mr. Cooke took me into custody, he searched me, and asked me how I came by this property? I told him I bought them of a sailor, and gave him three shillings for them, and he took and locked me up. I defy any body to say that ever I was guilty of the fact; when the buckles were pawned, I gave the sailor another shilling, this woman saw me give him the three shillings.

Prisoner Newton. I carried the buckles to pawn for three shillings and eighteen-pence; I got them of this man, and he paid me for going, and I gave him the duplicate. I goes out to work for my living.

Prisoner Lemon. I asked the sailor his name; he said his name was John Cross .

Q. To Findley. What time of the day were they pawned? - On the 3d. in the forenoon.

Daniel Lemon , GUILTY. Of stealing but not of the burglary .(Aged 24.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Elizabeth Newton , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-102

330. MARGARET BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of February , a set of linen bed furniture, value 5s. a feather bolster and pillow, value 1s. two woollen blankets, value 3s. a cotton counterpane, value 5s. a copper tea kettle, value 6d. a looking glass, value 1s. an iron poker, value 6d. a pair of iron tongs, value 6d. two flat irons, value 6d. a brass candlestick, value 4d. the goods of Thomas Higginson , in a lodging room .

CATHARINE HIGGINSON sworn.

I live in Stanhope-street, Clare-market , my husband keeps a grocer's and cheesemonger's shop , his name is Thomas. The prisoner came as a lodger to me, the 21st of December, she continued there six weeks, she then left her lodging, and took the key with her, she was gone the course of a week, and then we broke the door open, and we found the articles missing, that are mentioned in the indictment; we took a constable and searched after her, she came as a married woman, I let the lodging to her, her husband was not with her at the time.

Q. Did he live with her? - Yes, her husband and she came into the lodgings that day, she took them for herself and husband.

Q. What was it the husband pretended to be? - A taylor, she told me so.

Q. Did he continue there the whole time? - Yes, he did, they went off together in the morning; she told the constable he was pressed; I never found him.

Q. Why do you charge her more than him? - We cannot find him, she was the person that took the property away, the pawnbroker said so.

Prisoner. You know Mrs. Higginson, my husband came and looked at the room before ever I went into it? - Yes, he did in the morning, and sent her to give earnest.

Q. To Prosecutrix. What rent were they to pay you? - Three shillings and nine-pence a week; they owed a fortnight when they went away.

JOSHUA ALLEN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I live in Bridge's-street, Covent-garden. On the 24th of January. I received of the prisoner at the bar, a fire shovel, tongs and poker, on which I lent her a shilling, here is the duplicate, she pawned them in the name of Martha Brown , White Hart-yard; I knew her husband.

HENY COOKE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I live in Bridge's-street, Covent-garden. I took in these things of the prisoner at the bar, in December and January; the 27th of January she pawned a curtain for two shillings; on the 27th of December two curtains for five shillings; on the 28th of December, a counterpane for eight shillings; on the 24th of December, two curtains, for three shillings; the 1st of January, a bolster for half a crown; the 3d of January, a candlestick and flat iron for fifteen-pence; the 4th of January, a pillow for a shilling; on the 16th of January, a kettle for a shilling; the 18th of January, a blanket for three shillings; the 21st of January, a blanket for eighteen-pence; the 25th of January, a looking glass for a shilling; the 1st of February, a flat iron for eighteen-pence. I knew the woman before, she said, that she was married; I asked her whether they were her own property? she said they were, I have known her above a year and a half, and I knew her always by the name of Watson, these things are all in the name of Watson.

Prosecutrix. I believe them to be mine, the fire shovel my husband had a mouth put to it a day or two before, and the looking glass has a crack at the corner.

Q. When was she apprehended? - The 24th or 26th of January.

Prisoner. The week after I went to Mr. Higginson's house, my husband was taken ill, with on inflammation in his bowels, and he made me pawn these things, to get through his illness, he told me that he had some money coming to him in King Edward-street, Wapping, and he should get the things out again, and he went out to get this money, and he was pressed, and he has sent me a letter that he was on board the Minerva. I have no friend within four hundred and forty miles from here.

Prosecutrix. I see him there the day before they went off.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate , and fined 1s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-103

331. JOSEPH SAMUEL and JAMES RICHARDSON were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , seven printed bound books, value 7s. the goods of Joseph Downes .

Joseph Downes was called on his recognizance.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-104

332. MARY BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , two guinea, half a guinea, and eighteen-pence in monies numbered , the monies of Thomas Bott .

THOMAS BOTT sworn.

I am an oil skin manufacturer in the Strand, last Friday morning I was returning home about three o'clock, from Temple Bar, and I was met by the prisoner near Norfolk-street , she took hold of me, and before I could get a way from her, I felt her hand in my pocket, and I said she had robbed me, and I called the watch, the watchman came, she put her hand up to her mouth, I heard something in her mouth, and presently she made a swallow, the money I missed was two guineas and half, and eighteen-pence; the watchman took her to the watch-house, and I gave charge of her; I had been no farther than Temple Bar, and I had spent my evening with Mr. Hartley, and this happened near Norfolk-street; I was perfectly sober.

Prisoner. When you first came up to me, you said to me, I think you are the woman that robbed me; I said my friend I never see you before, you immediately seized my hands till the watchman came up; at first you said you lost two guineas and a half crown, and afterwards you said it was not half a crown, it was eighteen-pence. I have a witness that he said in the morning, that if I would give him a guinea, he would say no more about it, nor appear against me; I only put my hand to my mouth to wipe my nose, because they would not suffer me to take my handkerchief out of my pocket, he first said that he would make it up if I would give him the money.

Prosecutor. I never said any such thing.

- sworn.

I am a watchman, I heard the watch called about three o'clock, and I went up.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-105

333. SOLOMON ASKINS and JAMES SULLIVAN were indicted for making an assault on the King's highway, on Richard Gamble , on the 17th of April , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will two yards of woolen cloth, value 8s. his goods .

RICHARD GAMBLE sworn.

I live in ship-street, St. George's. On the 17th of April last, it may be about two o'clock, I set out from home in order to buy two yards and three quarters of cloth, which I bought of a draper in Aldgate, it was woollen cloth; and I went up Petticoat-lane to call at the Walton Cross, on James Sullivan , the prisoner at the bar, he was a slight acquaintance of mine, he was not there, the landlord sent for him, he came and we set down and had a pot of beer, and afterwards another; while we were drinking, Solomon Askins came in, I never saw him before in my life. James Sullivan , the prisoner at the bar, asked him to drink; he sat down facing of us, the opposite side of the box; when we had done drinking, we got up and paid the reckoning, we drank two pots of beer, and two quarterns of gin. We got up and came out, I took my leave of them at the door, Sullivan said, he would go and see me down the lane; I told him there was no call for that, but he did, and Solomon Askins followed us; after that when we got about the middle of the lane, Solomon Askins said to me, give me your bundle, I said I will not give you my bundle, I would not give it my father; I never lost a bundle in my life; he took it from me and turned back and went up the lane, James Sullivan he took hold of my arm directly, and hindered me from going back after him, or else I should have pursued him; when he laid hold of me he said, I should not go back after him, to let him go with the cloth; he said it was safe enough. Sullivan after went up the same lane, Petticoat-lane, while I was talking to two people about it, and they were persuading me not to go after it that night.

Q. These men you knew very well? - I went down to Sullivan to tell him that he had been in liquor and left earnest for a stall and had not come to it; that was all my business with him.

Q. Did you ever see your cloth again? - Yes, at Justice Davis's office, in Lambeth-street. When I went the next day they both strictly denied that they had the cloth.

Q. Was you perfectly sober? - I drank no more than what I have told you, I had nothing stronger than tea before I came to that public house.

Q. What did you do at Petticoat-lane? - As I came from the draper's I called there.

Prisoner Sullivan. Ask him whether he imagines that I am one of that kind to rob him, he knowed me ever since I came to London, ever since I came from the East Indias? - I have known him about six months.

Prisoner Sullivan. I have lived in the same house with him? - He did lodge up stairs in the house I lived in, along with another man.

DANIEL WEBB sworn.

I keep the public house, the sign of the Walton Cross, the top of Petticoat-lane, next to Bishopsgate-street, I know the two prisoners and the prosecutor. On the 17th of April, Gamble came into my house and asked me if I knew a person of the name of Sullivan? and I misunderstood him, I thought he meant Solomon Atkins, there was a man in the tap room he said he knew Sullivan, and went and

got him, in a few minutes after Solomon Askins comes in and his wife, I drawed a pot of beer for the prosecutor, he gave me a shilling, and I changed it and took for a pot out of it; I then went about some business that I had to do, and never saw them any more till the evening; the prosecutor had a bundle wrapped up in some paper, but I cannot say what colour the paper was of, and it might be four or past four, or near five, I cannot say which, when the prosecutor and the two prisoners went out of my house, they went downwards as though they were going Whitechapel way; then I saw no more till about seven, when the prisoner Askins came into the house, I heard him talking to a boy, but I cannot say particularly what their discourse was, and that was all that I know for that day. On Friday, being Good Friday, the prosecutor came to me again, and asked if Solomon or Sullivan had left a bundle or parcel in my bar, I told him no, there is nothing left there; he says it is very odd what they have done with it, he said down by Whitechapel they took it from me; this past till Saturday when Solomon Askins came in about seven o'clock, I served him a quartern and a half of gin, when I had served him a quartern and a half of gin, he said Webb, says he, you made yourself very troublesome with Gamble and his cloth, I have pawned the cloth and he shall never have it back again under a guinea.

Q. Did you know this prosecutor? - I never see him before the 17th in my life time, I know the prisoners they are both shoemakers.

RICHARD DUNBAR sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Holborn, No. 23; on the 19th of April I took in this cloth to pledge, to the best of my recollection it was of Solomon Askins , I was busy at the time, but I think it was him, I lent him five shillings on it.

Gamble. That is the cloth I am sure, this white thread was in the list when I bought it.

JOHN NOWLAND sworn.

I apprehended Solomon Askins , I asked him what became of the cloth? he said he knew nothing about it.

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am an officer, I apprehended Sullivan the 23d of April, Gamble came with me to the office, informing me that he had been robbed, and I with went him in company with Nowland, to No. 1, Gun court, Petticoat-lane, and took him down to the office. After that I was informed that Nowland had taken Askins. I went to different shops to see if I could find the cloth about Bishopsgate-street, but I could not find any thing of it, but in the course of two or three days afterwards, I was told that it was pawned at a shop in Holborn, I went there and asked for a piece of cloth pawned for five shillings; which the pawnbroker produced.

Prisoner Askins. This gentleman he came up for Sullivan, being an East India pensioner, he sent for him to drink a pot of beer with him, Sullivan goes down and I thought he had no money, I goes with my shirt sleeves into the tap-room, and the prosecutor was asking this man several questions as, why he did not get himself shaved? they asked me to drink, my shopmate had one pot and I another, and he calls for a pot, and there was three quarterns of gin called for, that was drank, and there were three more called for, that was drank, and he called for three more himself, and he invites this man to go down to get his pension tickets at the Rising Sun, at Wapping, and Mr. Sullivan asked me if I would go too, I said I would get my clothes on and follow them, by the time I got up to them they had both broke a pane of glass, they were both drunk, I came up, and there were a par

cel of Jews about them, they were both holding a test to have this glass paid for, and I takes them down to the coach stand, at the end of Petticoat-lane, and the coachman would not take him, he had no money; and he says come into the Bull's Head, the corner of Petticoat-lane, and take this cloth and get what you can on it; so I went and pawned it, and when I returned they were both gone.

Q. To Webb. Where they drunk or sober when they went out of your house? - I cannot say, I drawed them one pot of beer while I was there, what my servants drawed them after, I was out, I cannot tell. I know Solomon Askins to be a hard working man all the time that ever I knew him, which has been about two or three years, Sullivan has but just come there.

MARY STONE sworn.

My husband is a shoemaker, I deal in the street; as I was in Whitechapel, I saw these three men very much in liquor, and the prosecutor said to the man Askins, d-n your eyes, take this and get me a coach.

Q. How long have you known Askins? - No farther than by dealing in the streets.

Q. How long have you known the other? - As long as I have known the other, and I have drank with him as often as I have with the other.

The prisoner Askin called two other witnesses who gave him a good characer.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-106

334. NATHANIEL HOLNES was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , a cotton handkerchief, value 6d. the goods of Charles Horton .

CHARLES HORTON sworn.

I live with my mother, she lives on her income, I was robbed on Ludgate-hill , the 18th of March, Tuesday; about nine o'clock in the evening I was coming down the Old Bailey, and I was told that I had been robbed of my pocket handkerchief.

Q. At that time you was told that you had been robbed did you see any body near you? - No, I did not see any body.

Q. How did you get your handkerchief? - I came back, and see a man at the corner of Ludgate-hill, in the Old Bailey, I fixed on the man that they told me took the handkerchief out of my pocket, that was not the prisoner, it was another in a white jacket, the prisoner was close behind, somebody then came over to the prisoner and asked him if he had not got my pocket handkerchief? he said no, he had no handkerchief, and Mr. Graves took it out of his pocket, I missed my handkerchief when I was told that my pocket had been picked, I do not believe that this man took it out of my pocket, but the other one that was stopped first.

Q. Do you know your handkerchief again? - Yes, I know it very well, it is marked C. H. I believe it is cotton.

- GRAVES sworn.

I produce the handkerchief, there was a mob of people about, and some gentleman said that this prisoner had robbed this young man, I asked him if he had got the handkerchief? he said no, I then searched him and took this handkerchief out of his pocket, I asked the young

man the mark on it? he said C. H, No 11.

Prisoner. I was going to the other side of the water, and as I was going down Ludgate-hill, I saw this handkerchief lay by the Corner of the passage, and I picked it up, and this gentleman came up along with the prisoner and said that I had the handkerchief; and I was going to put my hand into my pocket to take it out, when they took it before me.

GUILTY . (Aged 54.)

Imprisoned twelve months in Newgate , and Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-107

335. ROBERT ARMSTRONG was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the house of Robert Burra , Henry Hogarts , and others being therein, about the hours of six and seven in the afternoon on the 7th of March , and stealing therein two pieces of printed callico, each containing 28 yards, value 4l. the goods of Anthony Rawlinson and Robert Burra .

ANTHONY RAWLINSON sworn.

I know nothing of the matter myself.

WILLIAM PEACH sworn.

I am a waiter in the Crown Tavern, in Bow-lane, passing by the posecutor's house in the evening on the 7th of March, between six and seven, I observed four or five men about the door, this house is in Watling-street ; I stood to observe them, I thought they were rather suspicious, I had not stopped long before I observed one of the men enter, and in about two or three minutes he came out again with a bundle. It is a wholesale Linen draper's shop.

Q. Was any body in the shop? - I don't know, there were no lights in the shop. When he came out with the bundle he gave it into one of the other men's hands, directly as I saw the bundle delivered into the man's hand; I pursued the man that had the bundle, I did not like to go in among the others; there were four or five of them; I pursued him till he was taken; but I lost sight of him by reason of a cart passing; I overtook him before I came to Queen-street; he was stopped by a man, James Rose . I came up within a second or two, he had nothing about him then, he had throwed it from him, I am pretty certain that he was one of the men that stood at the door, and the man that had the bundle. Indeed I have no doubt at all.

Q.Was any body else running at that time? - No, there was not.

Prisoner. Did you see me in the place? - Yes, I see you at the door.

Q. Can you say you see me with any bundle? - Yes, I see you receive it of the man.

JAMES ROSE sworn.

I am a callico glazier. I was coming up Watling-street, and I heard the cry of stop thief! and I see the prisoner running a distance from the rest, and crying as he went, these he goes, there he goes. and I looked behind me and could not see neither a soul but him, and I stopped the prisoner; he had nothing about him then.

JOSEPH ASH sworn.

I am a broker. About a quarter before seven o'clock, Friday evening, the 7th of March, I see two men shuffling by, and the cart stood close at the pavement, there was but room for one to pass at a time, and instantly I saw two

pieces of printed cotton drop from one of their arms; but whether it fell from the prisoner at the bar, or from his companion I will not swear, I attempted to stop them, but having the misfortune of being lame they past by me, and I saw the last witness cross over and stop one, and the other went down Aldermary Church yard. I am very sure it was dropped by one of them.

Court to Peach. You mentioned only seeing one? - No, not after I past the coach, but they all went away that way.

Prisoner. Did you see me with any property? - Yes, I see you, or how should I cry out, stop thief!

Q. Did you see me at the door? - Yes, or else how was you taken?

JOHN LOVEDAY sworn.

I am a weaver; I was coming by between the hours of six and seven, on the 7th of March, and I saw three men at the door of Mr. Rawlinson's and Burra, and I stopped about two minutes, and I see one of the others come out, and hand out two pieces of goods, and to the best of my knowledge, the prisoner at the bar is the man that received the goods of the man that handed them out, and I thought they were too many for me to encounter, and I stopped till the prisoner set off with the two pieces, and I ran into the house and said, stop thief! you are robbed! and then Mr. Peach came out of the Crown, the house opposite, and some more, and set after him, and in less than three minutes the prisoner was brought back. I swear positively to his being one of the four, and to the best of my knowledge, he is the man that received the two pieces. When I went in there was nobody in the front part of the warehouse, but when I called out there was one ran out of the counting house, and another came down stairs, and he that came down stairs said that he had been up to ask another to help him to shut up the shop.

Prisoner. Did you see the man give me any thing into my arms? - I swear to your being one of the four positively, and to the best of my knowledge, you are the person that received the goods.

Prosecutor. I keep a Manchester warehouse ; No. 26, Watling-street our warehouse is; my partner, Mr. Burra, lives there. On the 7th of March, I went out about six o'clock, over into the Borough, and when I came back I was informed that my warehouse had been robbed; understanding that Mr. Ash, who lives a little below, had got the property, I went down in the morning to look at it. This property I know to be mine, this piece was in the window when I went out in the morning.

JAMES WRIGHT sworn.

I am a weaver; I was coming past Watling-street, on the 7th of March, about seven in the evening; I saw James Rose following the prisoner and calling out stop thief! I stopped, at first I was going to lay hold of James Rose , just at the juncture of time James Rose tumbled the prisoner down, and I assisted James Rose in securing him, and took charge of him as constable of Cordwainers Ward.

GUILTY , Of stealing the goods in the dwelling house, but not of the house breaking.(Aged 24.) Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-108

336. JOSEPH GEORGE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Weightman , about the hour of eight at night, on the 17th of February , and burglariously

stealing therein, five silk handkerchiefs, value 1l. his property .

THOMAS WEIGHTMAN sworn.

I live in Newgate-street . On the 17th of February, this boy and another were looking at my window, about half past seven in the evening; I saw the boys standing there; in a very little time I heard the window crack; I went immediately to the door, and before I could get to the door, they had drawn out five silk handkerchiefs, by a wire or some kind of tool; however I pursued them both down Snow hill, but I lost them; I am certain the prisoner was one of them. On the Monday evening following, which was that day week, the very same boys came again; my boy ran out to the door and laid hold of this; that evening they got nothing, they had very near got a card of lace, but they did not get it out.

Q. Is your window an upright, one part no farther projects out than another? - No; it is exactly upright, within the upright of my house.

Q. It is not a shew glass that takes in and out? - No.

Q. And when you shut your windows at night, you enclose it within your house? - I certainly do.

Prisoner. Was the window broke before? - Never.

ROBERT SLATER sworn.

About seven in the evening, the 24th of January, I was standing behind our counter, tying up a parcel, Monday evening, and I heard one of the windows crack, with that I jumped over the counter and I opened the door, and I saw the prisoner at the bar and another run from the window; they attempted to make their escape round the corner, by Mr. Brewer's corner, and I pursued them and laid hold of this just by the corner.

Prisoner. I was walking down Newgate-street, and as I was coming down I was going to cross over at Snow-hill that lad catched hold of me, and said that I had been breaking his master's windows, and they took me into the shop and shewed me a broken window with a piece of tin against it, and the gentleman said that he put a piece of lace nigh there, thinking that he should catch some of us.

JANE CUNNINGHAM sworn.

I keep a poulterer's shop in Greek-street, Soho. The prisoner's father is a fishmonger, the boy is brought up to the same business, I have known him these ten years, his general character is good, he lived in Greek-street, Soho.

WILLIAM COE sworn.

I am a Shoe-maker, No. 8, Moor-street, Soho; I have known the prisoner above sixteen years, he is about nineteen years; of his character I never heard any harm; he used to occupy along with his father, his father is, what I call, a walking fishmonger.

The prisoner called four other witnesses to his character.

GUILTY. Death . (Aged 18.)

Recommended by the jury on account of his youth and general good character .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17940430-109

337. ABRAHAM ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Davis , he and others being therein, about six in the evening of the 12th of March , and stealing therein a piece of linen, containing twenty two yards, value 16s. his goods .

EDWARD OWEN sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Davis, he is a wholesale haberdasher , in Wood-street . On the 12th of March about a quarter before six in the evening, I and another young man was in the warehouse, we perceived a man lurking about the street and looking through the window two or three times; as there had been several robberies committed in that neighbourhood about that time of the evening, we suspected that he had a design, in consequence of that suspicion I went into a place myself on a stair case, which is situated exactly opposite the door, so likewife the other man secreted himself in another part of the warehouse, and we staid there a little time, when the prisoner at the bar came into the passage; he opened the door, which occasioned the bell ringing, (I am certain it was him) hearing of the bell he withdrew for the space of a minute or two, and finding that nobody attended to the bell he came forward again in a minute or two, and the door being before opened, he went to the counter, where there stood some goods, and took hold of a piece of linen, and was in the act of taking it away, when Mr. Walton, who is the other witness, came forward, the prisoner, when he heard him coming forward, he turned back and placed the piece of goods in the same place from where he took it; I saw him coming forward also, and pursued him; he had taken them up from the counter, and turned his back on the counter going off; the goods were in his hand, going out with it, and in going out Mr. Walton had come to the door and rather jammed to the door, which detained him. but having gone so far that we could not stop him there, I opened the door and rushed on them, and took him about two paces from the threshold in the street; I never lost sight of him.

Q. Mr. Davis lives there, it is his house? - It is. This is the piece of goods which he took up, and which I marked before the alderman.

Q.Was Mr. Davis at home at the time? - He was up stairs; he don't know any thing of the transaction.

THOMAS WALTON sworn.

I was with Mr. Owen about six o'clock when the prisoner came and opened the door, and the bell rang; I did not go then; in about two minutes after, the prisoner came in and took the piece of cloth from the counter, and turned about; I then moved to come forward, and he hearing of me turned himself again and put it down, and then I rushed forward and took him.

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

I know nothing more than the property is mine.

Prisoner. I was coming along, and a large dog caught hold of me by the collar and pulled me down, and that gentleman came and took hold of me, and I have got no witness; I have got nothing but a wife and two children.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 36.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-110

338. ELIZABETH DUDLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of March , a cotton gown, value 8s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 1d. one shilling; one sixpence; a lawn half handkerchief, value 1d. a wooden patten, with an iron ring, value 1d. the goods and monies of Lydia Stanton ; a linen apron, value 2d the goods of Abraham Taylor ; a sheet, value 1s. a stuff skirt, value 2d. the goods of Lydia Tyson , widow .

LYDIA STANTON sworn.

I live now in Bell-alley; I lived at the time I was robbed in Honey-suckle-court,

Moor-lane , on the 3d of March; Elizabeth Dudley came on the 2d of March to Mrs. Tyson's, where I lodged then, and she asked for a lodging; and we told her there was not room enough, and she said, sooner than go to a strange place she would sit up all night; I did not like to let her sit up all night, I let her sleep in my place, and I went and sleeped along with Mrs. Taylor.

Q. Did you know her before she had lodged there? - About a week before.

Q. Did you give her your bed? - Yes, for that night. Then she got up about half after six the next morning, and took the things away with her, a gown of mine, and eighteen-pence out of my pocket, and a pair of worsted stockings, and half a white handkerchief, and a patten; she left the other patten, because it was broke.

Q. Where were these things the over night? - I hung my gown across the chair by the fire, before I went to bed; I laid my stockings on the gown; I laid my pocket in the chair, at the foot of the bed; and my landlady found my pocket on the stairs in the same house.

Q.Then she got up before you was awake? - Yes, before I was awake. We found some of my things on her, I was present, the next day when she was apprehended; we found a pair of stockings of mine, and the patten she had on her foot.

Q. How do you know the stockings? - I had mended them a good deal, I know my own work.

SUSANNA TAYLOR sworn.

I lodge in the same house, in the two pair of stairs forward. Elizabeth Dudley came on Sunday and asked me if she could sleep there? accordingly I told her there was no room, with that Lydia Stanton said, she would make shift with my bed rather than let her sit up all night, and the next morning this young woman's things were missing, and likewise a check apron of mine was missing off the bed, and a sheet of Mrs. Tyson's, that lay along with the apron.

Q. You are a married woman, are you? - Yes.

Q. What is your husband's name? - Abraham Taylor .

Q. What time did you get up? - About half after seven and the things were missed. After that, I went out to a shop for some work, and I met this Elizabeth Dudley , and asked her to go home with me to see Mrs. Tyson, which she did, she went with me and I wished for her to own what she had done with the things, and she did not comply till the very last minute, and we sent for Mr. King, the stockings were on her, and Mrs. Tyson's skirt.

Prisoner. Ask her whether I did not return back and ask pardon, and said that I had made a mistake? - She went back very quietly, but she did not see me till I spoke to her, she did not ask pardon that day.

Court. What did she do with her own gown? - She put one on, and the cotton gown she took with her.

JOHN KING sworn.

I am a constable? - I produce the property that I took off the woman, a pair of black worsted stockings, a black skirt, and a duplicate of the gown that was pledged, she had it in her mouth chewing of it all to pieces, and some money, which the magistrate ordered me to keep it, that it might be produced to the girl, to get the gown out of pawn with.

GEORGE RUMBOLD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant, to Mr. Alexander Purse , in London Wall. On Monday, about ten o'clock he 3d of April, a woman came to master's shop, I cannot swear that to be the woman, but I believe it is, Monday morning is a very busy time with us from eight to ten; a woman

came and asked me half a guinea on this cotton gown; I looked at it and lent her eight shillings on it, and gave her a duplicate.

King. The duplicate is in a dozen pieces or more.

Rumbold. This is the duplicate I gave to the woman, and this is the gown.

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn.

On the 5th of March, Mrs. Taylor gave me charge of the prisoner, and gave me a sheet and apron, which she had in her hand when she gave me charge of the prisoner.

King. We were busy on the 3d. and she made her escape, and Wright took her again.

Q. To Taylor. Where did you find that sheet and apron? - She brought it up on the 5th of March, and asked pardon if we would forgive her. I believe the apron to be mine.

Stanton. This is my gown, and there are my stockings.

Prisoner. On the 2d of March I lodged with Mr. Taylor, which was on Sunday, I had slept there twice before, and paid her very honest, and I asked her if she would lend me a trifle of money; she said she had no money, I was welcome to take the gown and make something of it, accordingly when I got up on Monday morning, I went and pawned the gown, agreeable to her consent. She said if I could not make enough of her gown I was welcome to eighteen-pence more, which was in her pocket. The coloured apron Mrs. Tyson gave me to wear while I washed my own; the skirt and stockings I put on by mistake. On Monday morning I was coming to Mrs. Tyson's to ask pardon for what I had done.

Jury to Mrs. Stants. Did you give her leave to take your gown? - No, I never did.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before. Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-111

339. ELIZABETH LANGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , two pewter pint pots, value 1s. the goods of Robert Barwell .

ROBERT BARWELL sworn.

I live at the Red Hart, Shoe-lane , this good woman came in for a pint of beer between five and six o'clock, in the afternoon, I had a suspicion that she used to carry pots away before, I watched her, she stood with her back against a table, and I missedone then, I went to the fire place and watched her, and she takes hold of the pint that she had had her beer in, and says, here is your pint; when she went out of the house, I followed her, and I told her that I thought she had stole my pots, and on feeling about her I found two in her pocket, these are the pots.

- INNIS sworn.

I went into Mr. Barwell's in the evening, I saw the prisoner at the bar come in, I see her shove the pot about till she found an opportunity of putting it into her pocket under her apron, and Mr. Barwell came in, she paid for her beer and said she must be going, and Mr. Barwell said, and I will go out too, and he went out with her and brought her

back with the two pots in her pocket apron.

Prisoner. I went out with my things that day, and they made me drunk and I did not know what I did, I was very much intoxicated with liquor to my shame, I never was in gaol or prison before in my life. I leave myself to your mercy.

Q. To Barwell. Was she drunk or sober? - Sober.

GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-112

340. JOHN LETT was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , a mahogany plank, in length ten feet, value 1l. 1s. the goods of Joseph Rolfe .

JOSEPH ROLFE sworn.

I am a sawyer, and dealer in Mahogany ; our chief evidence is kept away by the party. I missed the plank in the morning, after it was stole in the evening. I did not know it was gone, the constable found it.

- ELDIN sworn.

On the 4th of April I went up to Bunhill-row, to a house there; when I went in, an old man said, d-n your eyes, here is one of the chaps come; they opened the door; as soon as I went in I saw the plank, and the woman told me it was young Lett that stole the plank.

- MUSGROVE sworn.

I know no more than Eldin has stated to you.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-113

341. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a cotton handkerchief, value 10d. the goods of Charles Dudge .

CHARLES DUDGE sworn.

I lost my handkerchief on the 27th of February, in Fleet-street , at the corner of Shoe-lane, I was going along, and Thomas Davis put his hand into my pocket, and picked it out, Mr. Hart see him do it.

THOMAS HART sworn.

I was coming down Fleet-street, and I see three young men together, and Thomas Davis was the first, and I see him make a motion to this gentleman's pocket, and picked it of his handkerchief, and I stepped up to the gentleman, and told him, and the gentleman turned round and catched him in his hand.

- sworn.

I am an officer, this handkerchief was given me by Mr. Dudge.

Dudge. This is my handkerchief.

Hart. This is the handkerchief I saw taken out of his pocket.

Prisoner. I belong to an India man, I have been had with an ague and fever a long time, and am really distressed.

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Imprisoned one month , and Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury beofore Mr. COMMON SERJEANT

Reference Number: t17940430-114

342. THOMAS BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , a pewter pint pot, value 1s. the goods of William Towers .

WILLIAM TOWERS sworn.

I am a publican , I keep the White Bear, Bride-lane , I cannot remark the losing of any pots, there was a pot found about the man that was detected by my servant.

- BOLLARD sworn.

I was sent for from the watch-house to take this man into custody, in taking him to the watch-house I saw this pot drop out of his pocket.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17940430-115

342. STANHOPE HILLER was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

No Evidence.

ACQUITTED .


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