Old Bailey Proceedings, 30th October 1793.
Reference Number: 17931030
Reference Number: f17931030-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the City of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 30th of October, 1793, and the following Days;

Being the EIGHTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VIII. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

PRICE ONE SHILLING.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable SIR JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of LONDON: The Honourable SIR BEAUMONT HOTHAM , one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer: The Honourable SIR JOHN HEATH , one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: SIR JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City: JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Samuel Bracey

John West

Thomas Meymott

William Hall

Thomas Leggatt

Richard Kerrington

Thomas White

William Shrub

James Pateman

John Fisher

William Brookes

John Knight

First Middlesex.

Thomas Gerald

Ralph Morris

William Eldridge

James Stewart

Thomas Gibbs

Thomas Shurman

Thomas Smith

Richard Welch

John Hull

George Howell

Martin Dorrell

James Collingsbridge

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Cheek

Thomas Mills

Richard Davis

Edward Scott

John Whitworth

John Parker

John Jackson

Thomas Whitworth

Charles Ashby

William Dalton

William Batt

William Burdon

Reference Number: t17931030-1

673. MARY JENNINGS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Joel , the said Henry and Sarah his wife being therein, between the hours of five and six in the forenoon of the 3d of July , and stealing therein, a man's linen shirt, value 5 s. four pair of mens leather shoes, value 5 s. a woman's black silk cloak, value 15 s. a muslin neck handkerchief, value 2 s and a check linen apron, value 1 s. the goods of the said Henry Joel .

HENRY JOEL sworn.

I am a cordwainer at No. 4, East Smithfield ; my house was broke open on Tuesday morning the 3d of July, between five and six.

Q. What time did you go to bed the night before? - About half after ten o'clock.

Q. Who went to bed last in the house? - Lewis Harris . I and my wife were in bed when my house was broke; they wrenched off the lock of the back kitchen door

Q. Was this girl a servant of your's? - I never saw her before in my life.

Q. What was the first thing that give you an alarm? - Lewis Harris came on the stair case and called me before six; he had taken Mary Jennings with the property in her lap, and I went down when he called me and I saw it, she had all the property in her lap which I have got here, but it is not half the property that I lost that morning.

Q. What past between her and you? - She said she thought it had been a shop, she came to sell them, she had bought all the things at the outside of the door for two shillings.

Q. Was any part of the house broke open? - The back kitchen on the ground floor was, the lock seemed to be wrenched off.

Q. Where does this yard lead to? is it in the street or how? - It is a thorough fare.

Q. Your wife and you had not been out in the course of that night? - We had not, we were in bed and asleep.

Q. What may be the value of the things altogether? - About thirty shillings, I took them out of the girls apron loose, Haris has had them in his possession ever since, he brought them here; I can swear to the slippers they are my own making, I left them on the window the over night before I went to bed, I know the shirt, it is my own, there is no name to it, but I had only pulled it off the same morning; I know the muslin it is a neck handkerchief, I had worn it myself.

MARY JOEL sworn.

I am the mother of the last witness; I slept in the house this night and I came down between five and six in the morning, and when I came down I went to open the kitchen door and it was locked, and I went across the road to Mr. Harris for the key; I knew that he layed there that night, and that he had gone across the road, I stopped there, it may be twenty minutes or half an hour, and when I came back again with the key in my hand, Mr. Harris was with me, I saw this girl coming out of this house very fast with a bundle, and I took

hold of her arm and asked her where she had been? When I went out in the morning I left the kitchen door locked and the street door on the latch; I went out at the street door.

Q. Was the street door left open by Mr. Harris? - I cannot tell what he did, but I found the kitchen door locked and the street door on the latch, I came back with Mr. Harris with the key of the kitchen door in my hand; then I saw this girl running out of the street door of the house, she said, will you buy a bit of edging? I said let me look at it, and I saw this here apron hanging out of her lap on one side, and I said what have got here? she made no answer to that, I said you have got some of our property here, directly I took hold of her and we found the lock was taken off the kitchen door and the door was wide open; the lock was not quite off but loose.

Q. You say you went over the way for the key, as you was in the house, could you not get into the kitchen without going over to Mr. Harris? - No, I could not; how could I get in without the key?

Q. Did you go to the kitchen door before you went out that morning? - Yes, I went to get into the kitchen in the first place.

Q. Does this kitchen door look into the passage, or is it an inside door? - It is a door inside of the house.

Q. Is there any other door to the passage? - There is.

Q. How was the door to the passage locked or unlocked? - I cannot say, the door that was broke open was an inner kitchen door.

Q. When you went to this kitchen door before you went out was it light or not? - It was light.

Q. Are you sure that door was locked? - I know it was fast, but when I returned it was quite open.

Q. Do you know these articles taken from the girl? - I do; I am sure the shoes laid on the window the night before; the apron is my son's wife's, but I had washed it myself.

Q. Do you believe them all to belong to the prosecutor? - I am positively sure of it, the apron has aquasortis on it.

LEWIS HARRIS sworn.

Q. When you went down that morning did you observe the kitchen door? - I did, I locked it myself, I went out about five o'clock.

Q. What was the state of the door of the passage? - They got in at the front door, the street door, which was left on the latch.

Q. How was that door which was in the passage in the back yard, how was that? - I look upon that to be locked.

Q. Did you leave the street open? - No, I pulled it to; I went out at five o'clock, and Mrs. Joel came over to me for the key, and I returned with Mrs. Joel before six o'clock.

Q. Was it day light when you locked the kitchen door at five o'clock? - O yes, it was quite day light; when I came over with Mr. Joel I found the prisoner coming out of the street door with some edging in her hand; I took all the articles from her at the door and sent for an officer and gave charge of her, and have kept the articles ever since they were before the magistrate.

Q. Did you observe the lock when you came back? - It was forced open, and from the force of the lock the window was broke; there is half a glass window to the kitchen door.

Prisoner. I was desired to sell these clothes by a woman in Rosemary-lane, and when I came into the passage this

woman came and stopped me, and said I had robbed the house.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing only. (Aged 15.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-2

674. ANN LOWMAN and ELIZABETH ROGERS were indicted for feloniously making an assault in a certain field, in an open place, on Mary Lane , on the 23d of August , putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person and against her will, a cloth coat, value 2 s. a cotton gown, value 1 s. a flannel petticoat, value 6 d. a muslin cap, value 2 d. a silk hat, value 2 d. a pair of worsted stockings, value 2 d. a check apron, value 2 d. a cotton handkerchief, value 2 d. the goods of William Lane .

WILLIAM LANE sworn.

Mary Lane is dead.

STEPHEN RIDDINGTON sworn.

I took the prisoners both of them on the 23d of August. I am a constable; I never saw any thing of the robbery. They had all the things on them that they are charged with.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-3

675. ROBERT DELLEMOTTE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a pair of leather boots, value 12 s. six pair of mens shoes, value 1 l. 15 s. six pair of soles for shoes, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of John Dizney , privately in his shop .

JOHN DIZNEY sworn.

I was not in the shop at the time the things were taken.

ROBERT SIMPSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I know the prisoner at the bar. On the 2d of October he brought a pair of boots, he pawned them for seven shillings and six-pence; I have them here, I am sure it is the same man, I had frequently seen him before; he came the next day and had a shilling more on them; he had eight shillings and six-pence in all; that is all I know.

Dizney. I am a shoemaker in Duke's-court, Drury-lane, in the parish of St. Martin's .

Q. Did you ever employ the prisoner? - No.

Q. Do you know the prisoner coming to your shop? - He came to me that afternoon, for me to go with him to get him into the militia; he came also on the next day, it was the next day that he committed this robbery; he came Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.

Q. When was the last time you saw these boots? - On Wednesday afternoon, I saw them in the window, I left him sitting in the shop till I returned from putting a letter in the post office; when I returned I found my shop door open, and my boots taken out, I had seen him frequently before, I have known him for many years; the boots are here.

Simpson. These are the boots.

Dizney. I can swear to them boots, they were for sale, they had not been sold to any body.

Q. What is the value of them? - Twelve shillings.

Prisoner. I have known the prosecutor for a long time, he perfectly well knows it is the first time I had been guilty of any offence of the kind, I did it through mere want; he knows me

perfectly well, and my little family; I have three children, I lost my wife two years ago.

Dizney. I did understand that he had some children in the workhouse, but when I went to enquire I found he had defrauded the master of the workhouse out of fourteen pounds.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 42.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-4

676. RICHARD COLLINS was indicted for stealing on the 25th of October , an iron spade with a wooden handle, value 1 s. a pair of hay steel yards, value 1 s. an halter, value 2 s. a leather cropper, value 6 d. a leather belly band, value 2 d. a leather wanty, value 2 d. a pair of plough chains, value 1 s. 6 d. a tame live hen fowl, value 6 d. a live cock fowl, value 6 d. the goods of Elizabeth Stevenit .

JOSEPH STEVENIT sworn.

I am the son of Elizabeth Stevenit ; she is a farming woman ; I locked the stable up the 24th of October between seven and eight in the evening; I missed the things the next morning between two and three, I was the first up, I saw the stable door, and I missed one of the horses first and part of an harness, a spade and a steel yard; the steel yard was in the barn adjoining to the stable.

Q. Did the prisoner work with you? - No.

Q. Did you ever see him before? - No.

Q. Have you got any things here? just produce one or two of the things. - I can swear to them by the weight, I can swear to the spade by this mending here, it cost eighteen-pence mending.

RICHARD GASS sworn.

I am a watchman and headborough; I took the prisoner on Friday the 25th of October, just a little before two o'clock in the morning, in the parish of Acton, close to the King's Head. I found this property on him, that spade, steel yard, and all in a bundle; the fowls hung at one end, and the spade and bundle at the other.

Prisoner. I had not had a bit of victuals for two days, I was drove out for hunger; I did it for want.

GUILTY (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17931030-5

677. JAMES GILBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of September , six pair of silver shoe buckles, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of Joseph Flint privately in his shop .

JOSEPH FLINT sworn.

I was not in the shop at the time.

ROBERT BEDNELL sworn.

My master is a slop seller , No. 362, Armitage-street, Wapping ; I remember seeing the prisoner in the shop.

Q. What business had he in the shop? - I don't know, I was not attending of him; I see him standing in the shop, and I heard my fellow servant say to him if he would take the breeches, he said he could not pay for them till night when he should have settled with his captain.

Q. What time of the day was this? - About two o'clock, and about three o'clock I missed the buckles, they were packed up in paper whity brown and brown; I missed them then, wanting to

put them up in another parcel, to be sent to Portsmouth with other goods.

JOHN WEAVER sworn.

The things were delivered to me at the office, and the man along with them, by a gentleman here, they have been in my possession ever since.

SAMUEL KNIGHTLY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in East Smithfield; the prisoner at the bar brought the six pair of buckles into my shop; I never saw him before, he said he wanted twelve shillings on the six pair of plated buckles, he did not pawn them; I stopped him and the buckles.

Court. Then you did a very right thing, the public are very much obliged to you for it.

Flint. I am positive of their being my property, by a private mark, which is a greek character.

Q. What day was it you lost them? - On Monday the 16th of September.

Court to Knightly. What day was it he came to you? - The same day.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing but not privately. (Aged 50)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-6

678. ANN ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , three linen sheets, value 8 s. a copper tea kettle, value 1 s. a linen counterpane, value 2 s. two check linen bed curtains, value 3 s. the goods of George Beston , in a lodging room .

GEORGE BESTON sworn.

I live at No. 43, Fort-street, Westminster ; I let lodgings to the prisoner about a week before Michaelmas, or a fortnight; I let a room to this Ann Andrews , and Susannah Taylor , at three shillings a week; it was a two pair of stairs room forwards; they stayed one week, they paid me that week, and the next week they robbed the lodgings and set off with the key of the door.

Q. Which of them came to the room? - They both came and lived there, and they both took it together.

Q. Who paid you? - Susannah Taylor.

Q. When did you take the prisoner? - On Sunday, Michaelmas day, the 29th of September; my wife and I were walking in the park, and we see her, and gave charge to the constable.

Q. What did you miss from your lodgings? - Two sheets, two curtains, a tea kettle, and a coverlid.

Q.Did you recover any of these things? - None but what the pawnbroker has. One of the sheets was taken out of another room.

Prisoner. I wish to ask her whether I had any hand in taking the room, giving earnest, or paying the rent? - They both took it together, and they both came.

LYDIA BESTON sworn.

I know no more than the prisoner locking herself in while the other woman was gone out; I wanted an iron and a frying pan, and she would not let me have it; when I asked her, she would not open the door.

Q. What day was this? - On the Friday, the day before they went.

JOHN MOORE sworn.

On the 29th of September the gentleman sent to my house, I did not know justly for what, when I came he said it was to take this woman into custody; I searched her, I found two duplicates for two sheets, one was two sheets out of the room that she rented, and the other out of a different apartment.

- TURNER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I have got the things here, they are sheets.

Q. Who did you take these sheets of? - I believe the prisoner at the bar, but I cannot positively swear to her person.

Q. Do you recollect when? - The 27th of September.

Q. Did she pawn them in her own name? - She pawned them in the name of Evans.

Q. Did you take any thing else of her? - Nothing but these two sheets.

Mrs. Beston. I know one of these sheets was in the room.

Prisoner. The person that I lived with was to me as a mistress, I was learning her business of her; I never pledged these things, but on Friday before Michaelmas the woman gave me these two tickets, and desired I would keep them till she called on me for them.

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-7

679. SARAH BURLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of October , a globe glass lamp, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Hudson .

ELIZABETH HUDSON sworn.

I am the daughter in law to Thomas Hudson , he is a boot closer . I was gone from my own home about a quarter of an hour, and on returning again I found the prisoner in the passage, and I asked her who she wanted? she said she had been up to one of our lodgers, I said we have no lodgers; I tried one arm and I could not see any thing under that, and I was trying the other and she ran back into a back yard, and went to put down this globe lamp, and I took it from her; it belongs to a religious society, and my father has the care of it; it was fixed there in a little round brass plate where the beam of it goes in, and it will take out with all the ease in the world; the lamp was there when I went out; it stands loose in a socket, it has no screw at all, there is nothing to fix it. Sarah Price was with me, and see me take the lamp from her.

SARAH PRICE sworn.

Promiscuously I went home with Mrs. Hudson, and I saw Mrs. Hudson take the lamp from the prisoner.

Prisoner. I was coming along very much intoxicated, a woman was coming out of this house, and she asked me to stop with this lamp while she went backward, I stopped a great while, I thought she was gone to ease herself, with that these two women came to the door while I was standing there with the lamp, and that gentlewoman that stands there beat me and used me very ill; I said don't use me ill, if I have done any thing amiss there is justice to be done. I have no witness at all but God and myself.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-8

680. SUSANNAH BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , an iron frying pan, value 1 s. a woollen blanket, value 1 s. the goods of Stephen Ring in a a lodging room .

STEPHEN RING sworn.

I live in Cable-street, Wellclose-square, St. George's in the east ; I let lodgings to the prisoner on the 30th of July, a one pair of stairs front room, at three shillings

week; she stayed a fortnight, and two or three days, I cannot say which, she paid one week, she went away and sent the key by a stranger; I went immediately and looked into the room, and missed a frying pan and a blanket; the officer has got them here, they were in the room when she took it; she had them for her use.

Prisoner. Ask him who took the room? - She took the room, and a man with her, they were not married, but I put both their names down.

Jury. Do you accustom yourself to let out lodgings to girls of the town.

Court. To be sure gentlemen he does himself no credit.

JOHN TAPLIN sworn.

I have got a frying pan and a blanket, I found them in a room which the prisoner had taken in Petticoat-lane; the prisoner was not in the room, but the prisoner told me where to go to find this property in the room; I found it the 3d of October.

Ring. I can swear positively to the frying pan by my own mark S. E. K.

Prisoner. This here young man whom I was with took a room at Mr. Ring's, and he took me into keeping, and he ill used me, and beat me and turned me out of doors; and I have not seen him since. Mr. Ring told me when he took me if I could tell where the things were he would not hurt a hair of my head, so I knew where the young man had taken a room, and I told them where they might find the things.

Court to Ring. Did you make any promise that you would not hurt her? - I did not.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-9

681. MARY COOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , a pair of mens leather shoes, value 4 s. a pair of iron shoe buckles plated with silver, value 2 s. the goods of John Sweatman .

MARGARET SWEATMAN sworn.

I am the wife of John Sweatman . I live in Great Earl-street, Seven Dials . The prisoner entered our shop at ten o'clock in the morning, on the 21st of September; I had left the shoes there myself, I went into another room; I had not been out ten minutes, I saw the prisoner, and I took hold of her by the arm, she was in the shop, and I found the shoes and buckles under her arm, she was not in the shop when I went out of it. I have the shoes here, I can swear to them to be my husband's property.

Prisoner. I am a woman that gets my livelyhood by shoe blacking, and I happened that morning to have a drop in my head, and I mistook the house.

Court. Did she use to black shoes for your house? - No, I never see her before.

GUILTY . (Aged 57.)

Fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM

Reference Number: t17931030-10

682. CHARLES LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , three pint pewter pots, value 2 s. the goods of Robert Sherbone .

ROBERT SHERBONE sworn.

I was at home when my pewter pots were stole; it was on the 13th of September. I keep the Spread Eagle in Old North-street, Red Lion-square ;

I saw the prisoner come out of a house opposite where I live, with something under his arm, and I rather suspected that he had something that did not belong to him, and he went away towards the square, and I followed him, and asked him what he had got? he said nothing belonging to me; I said I suspect you have, and I took three pots from him, one from under his arm, and two out of his coat pockets. I used to supply that house with pots, that he came out of, they had them the evening before.

Prisoner. A gentlewoman asked me if I would be so kind as to take these pots over to the public house; I told her I would.

Prosecutor. He was got more than sixty yards from my house, I never saw him before.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-11

683. JOHN MACARTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a cotton gown, value 2 s. two check aprons, value 1 s. a linen apron, value 6 d. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a muslin apron, value 2 s. a pair of fustian pockets, value 6 d. two muslin caps, value 6 d. a silk cloak with capes, trimmed with narrow lace, value 1 l. a muslin apron, value 2 s. a linen shift, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. the goods of Jane Clarke , three linen shifts, value 3 s. three cotton aprons, value 3 s. two muslin caps, value 1 s. a muslin petticoat, value 6 s. two pair of dimity pockets, value 6 d. two pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. five linen napkins, value 2 s. 6 d. a muslin binder, value 3 d. and a muslin tucker, value 3 d. the goods of Almeria Giles .

JANE CLARKE sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Howard. I suspected the things were gone; Mr. Howard lives in Hawnorth-street, Bedford-square ; I had left the things in the pantry on Monday night, I missed them on Tuesday morning; I left them the 22d of this month, the prisoner was employed in painting about the house a fortnight before; I know nothing of his taking them, nor I don't know how they were lost, I know the house was not broke open; the things are here; Almira Giles is a fellow servant of mine.

JOHN MILLER sworn.

I am one of the officers belonging to Bow-street. I have got the property here which I found in the prisoner's lodgings the morning after he was apprehended; I found them on the 23d in his room; I apprehended him in the playhouse, and I fetched him out.

Clarke. I know the gown by its being pieced.

Prisoner. I am innocent of the matter that is alledge to me. I have got two or three witnesses.

JEREMIAH DAILEY sworn.

The prisoner lodged with me a little time.

Q. Do you know where he was on the 22d of this month? - No, because I am a watchman.

Prisoner. Ask him whether I was not in bed on Tuesday at eleven o'clock.

Court. You are not charged with any particular time.

Prisoner. The things were not in my possession, they were not found in the room where I lodge, they were found in a girl's room that I used to frequent.

Court to Miller. You said that you found these things in the prisoner's lodgings? - It was not in this man's lodgings, it was Church-street, St. Giles's, in a room that this man rented and lived with a girl.

Prisoner. I have sent for a witness that see another man carry the things into that room.

Court to Clarke. Had any strange woman any access to this house about this time? - No.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-12

684. MARY ODDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a black silk cloak, value 6 s. a muslin apron, value 5 s. the goods of John Hughes .

MARY HUGHES sworn.

I am the wife of John Hughes . I lost a black silk cloak, and a muslin apron, I missed the muslin apron on the 27th of September, and the black cloak on the 4th of October.

Q. Where did you keep them? - The black cloak was in the upper room, and the apron in the lower room of the house; the prisoner was a lodger of ours, she lodged with me till the time that she absconded. If she had lodged with me to the Saturday, the day following, that she went on the Friday, it would have been three weeks. I accused her with the apron on the 27th of September, and she absconded immediately; I found the duplicate of it at Mrs. Edwards's house, and money to fetch the apron out.

ELEANOR EDWARDS sworn.

This Mary Oddy gave me the duplicate and some money to give to Mrs. Hughes to fetch the apron out; I believe it to be the 4th of October. I had only the duplicate of a cloak, but I had the money to fetch both apron and cloak, as I understood her husband had the duplicate of the cloak. She has a brother that is a man of great property, and he allows her a guinea and a half every month; and it is generally paid at my house. She makes sailors jackets, and slops, so it is called.

JOHN TAPLIN sworn.

I found the duplicate of the cloak at Mrs. Edwards, and Mrs. Edwards went with me to find the prisoner.

Prisoner. My husband and I had a few words, and I left the house, and when I left the house Mrs. Hughes lent me the gown and apron to pawn; as soon as I took my money I paid Mrs. Edwards seven shillings and six-pence I owed her, and left the money for Mrs. Hughes, for the things; Mrs. Edwards has got a son that is transported, and she said she would get forty shillings by me likewise; he is here in Newgate now, and has got two children.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-13

685. DENNIS PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of September , a silver desert spoon, value 5 s. the goods of John Willymott .

JOHN WILLYMOTT sworn.

I only come to prove my property.

MARTHA DAVIS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's wife where the man came to sell the spoon; the prisoner was the person, he came to me I believe on the 14th of September on Saturday morning; the spoon being defaced, and the arms being endeavoured to be taken out, I thought it was stole, and I stopped the spoon and the prisoner; I sent for an officer from Bow-street, and had him taken to Bow-street; and I saw this gentleman's carriage come to Bow-street, and I saw the same arms on the carriage as on the spoons, although it was defaced.

Willymott. I believe this to be my spoon.

Mr. Wentworth to Davis. Was that the article the prisoner brought to you? - Yes, it was doubled together that I might not see what arms was on them.

Q. What was it gave you the suspicion? - By this being defaced, and being bruised in the manner it was. The woman that lives with the prisoner brought the bowl of the spoon the evening before.

Q. You have produced the bowl of the spoon? - No, I have not, I produce only what the man brought; if you can find a bowl to that then I produce a bowl.

Q. Did you put any questions to him? - I did, I desired him to come into the parlour, and asked him how he came by it? he said it was given him. When Treadway came I desired him to speak the truth, he said he found it in a cess pool; I then asked him how he came to get the arms out? he would not make me any answer to that.

Mr. Wentworth to Willymott. Do you know this spoon to be your property? - I have more of the same.

Q. Can you positively swear to this being your property? - I can.

DINAH KITCHEN sworn.

I know I had the spoons in my possession on Saturday, and he was apprehended the Saturday following; he was a carpenter at work repairing the house.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 52.)

Imprisoned three months .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-14

686. JEREMIAH STEPHENS and RICHARD CHINNERY were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , a flannel petticoat, value2 s. 6 d. a check apron, value 2 s a linen apron, value 6 d. the goods of Catharine Humphries , and a linen apron, value 6 d. the goods of John Whealey .

HANNAH WHEALEY sworn.

I am the wife of John Whealey ; I know the prisoner at the bar, my husband is a carpenter , the property was in the yard hanging on a horse, the prisoners were in the house during all the afternoon; I keep a public house.

Q. What do you know of their taking these things? - I don't know any thing of their taking them; I saw them between eight and nine in the evening in the yard, of the 14th of October; I missed them at eleven o'clock at night when we shut up; I missed only a coarse apron my property, the rest belonged to Catharine Humphries my servant .

JOHN TAPLIN sworn.

I am an officer; I produce the things, I found the things in Leadenhall-market; they were in a little shed, about the middle of the market concealed. I don't know to whom the shed belonged.

Q. Do you know how they came there? - Jeremiah Stephens took them there, he told me so.

Q. Did you or did any body else make him any promise if he would confess? - Yes, I did myself. I went to his house about five o'clock in the evening, he was in bed; I asked him if he had such and such things in his house? he told me they were in Leadenhall-market in a shed; he took me to the place.

Q. Was Chinnery present? - He was not; I know nothing of Chinnery taking the things only what Jeremiah Stephens told me.

Mrs. Whealey. This apron is mine, I made it.

Prisoner Stephens. This man asked me about twelve or one o'clock in the day to drink a pint of beer with him at this woman's house, and I found this parcel in the street about ten o'clock at night when I came from that house.

Court to Mr. Whealey. Do you remember Stephens coming into the house? - Yes, he was there that day, he had nobody in company with him but Chinnery.

Jeremiah Stephens , GUILTY . (Aged 55.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Richard Chinnery , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-15

687. WILLIAM STOLLARD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September a hundred and sixty-four silk handkerchiefs called bandanno handkerchiefs, value 20 l. the goods of James Legrew and John Peltrau , and

MARY KIRBY was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN PELTRAU sworn.

My partner's name is James Legrew , we are silk manufacturers in Stewart-street, Spitalfields ; the prisoner Stollard was a porter , he had been with us about six weeks, the prisoner Kirby was apprehended before I received any information, and I found her with the officer, and she confessed.

Q. Had you made her any promise of any favour? - No.

Mr. Knowlys. The man was brought to your house first? - He was, but it was after I had gone to the apartment of Mary Kirby ; I desired her to tell the whole of it, and she said she would, if I would have a little patience; she was crying and frightened, I asked her what she had to say?

Mr. Knapp. What did you say to the man? - After I had asked her what she had to say, she said he had given her thirteen or fourteen pieces of bandanno handkerchiefs, but he had only taken two of them from me, the remainder he had bought in the street.

Q. Did the woman or the man say any thing else? - No.

Q. Do you know whose lodgings they were? - I don't.

Q. When you went back to your warehouse, or before, did you miss any property? - Before I had not, but after he was examined the first examination, I found by our number book that we had lost what is in the indictment; there were some produced by the pawnbroker but the marks were cut off.

Mr. Knowlys. Have you no other partner except Mr. James Legrew ? - No, no other.

Q. You was examined before the magistrate? Did you mention a syllable of the man's having said any thing to you before the magistrate? - I did, I made two

depositions, I think the first was before Mr. Floud.

Q. Did you sign more than one examination? - Not more than one.

Q. Look at that and tell me if that is your signature? - It is.

Q.There is not a word of that circumstance of his confession in it.

Court. What was the first magistrate's name? - Mr. Floud.

Q. What was the second? - There were two, Mr. Floud and Mr. Colquohon.

Mr. Knowlys. This man was living in your service at this very time that he was taken up? - Yes.

Q. He was going with a parcel to an inn when he was apprehended? - I believe he was.

Q. Could you then say, Mr. Peltrau, that there was any property of your's missing? - I could not discover it till we had taken stock.

Q. Have you taken stock since that time? - I have, and missed those.

Q. Can you say that there are some missing that have not been sold? - Yes, I can, I examined every number and these were missing.

Q. The first time you saw him was in the custody of Armstrong I believe? - It was.

Q. Had your partner seen him before that time? - No, he had not, he was taken to Mr. Legrew's house, it is in the way from her apartment to the office.

Q. Are you sure that Mr. Legrew had not seen him before you saw him? - I am.

Mr. Knapp. You say you was examined twice, was it before the same magistrate or different? - It was before different magistrates.

Q. This conversation that you have stated to the court of both the prisoners, was it at the first examination or the second? - At the first examination.

Q. So that if it was on the first examination, and not at the second, it would not appear here in this deposition? - I mentioned it myself in the second as well as the first.

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I am my father's son, I live at No. 121, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel; I produce two handkerchiefs, I received one on the 24th of August, and the other, the 12th of July; I received one of Mary Kirby the 12th of July; I am not certain of whom, I received the other of Harriot Bole or Mary Kirby , I don't know which.

HARRIOT BOLE sworn.

I know the prisoner Kirby; I lived with her, she took me in when I was sick about three months ago; two or three days after I came to live with Mary Kirby , I saw this man the prisoner, bring some bandanno handkerchiefs, he came every day, he brought some every day.

Q. To whom did he give them to? - To Mary Kirby .

Q. How long did he continue bringing handkerchiefs? - All the time I was there.

Q. How long was you there? - About three months. He came there sometimes twice a day and brought a few every day, sometimes twelve in a piece or seven in a piece; he said he travelled the country when he first brought them, and two or three days after that he said, he had ruined his master and he should go to sea; they were chocolate colour and blue birds eyes.

Q. How soon did you give the information against him? - I was taken up, and then I told all this.

Mr. Knapp. Did you do any thing with the handkerchiefs yourself? - I went to pawn several of them.

Q. At what pawnbroker's? - At a great many, but I cannot mention their names; I recollect Mr. Davis, in Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Did you see your mistress do any thing to the handkerchiefs first before you went to pawn them? - I see her sometimes cut off the fag end, and sometimes I cut them off; when there was a fire I was to burn them, when there was no fire I was to chuck them down the necessary.

Mr. Knowlys. You was taken up about some butter? - I was.

Q. Was that the first time you was taken up? - It was.

Q. Do you mean to say you was never taken up on a charge of felony before? - Yes, I was taken up once.

Q. How long before this was it that you was taken up? - I cannot say how long it was.

Q. What became of you when you was taken up then? - I went along with a parcel more, and I was turned up.

Q. What is being turned up? how long have you been acquainted with these terms? - The gentlemen discharged me.

Q. What was it for? - I was accused of a watch.

Q. Now we will come to this butter firkin again, did not they know that you had pawned some of these handkerchiefs? - Yes. Q. You never made any discovery till you was taken up? - No, never.

CHARLES FRENCH sworn.

I am servant to a a pawnbroker, to Mr. Warner, No. 14, White-row, Spitalfields; I have got two handkerchiefs, I received one of Mary Kirby , and the other of the last witness, Harriot Bole, that of Mary Kirby on the 16th of July, and that of Harriot Bole on the 13th of September.

MARY LACEMAN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I produce one handkerchief, I took it in, I don't recollect of who.

Court to Harriot Bole. Do you know French, that was just now examined? - I do.

Q. Look at that handkerchief, do you know that handkerchief? - I do, I remember pawning it with French.

Q. Was it after you came to live with your mistress? - It was.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the police office, Shoreditch, I apprehended the prisoner Kirby in Dillon's-court, Petticoat-lane, I found nothing in her room at all.

Q. Was there any conversation passed between you and the prisoner Kirby? - There was, I told her my business, and told her to tell all that she knew about it.

Q. Did you hold out any promises to her? - I told her it would be better for her.

Q. Then we must not hear it?

SAMUEL HARPER sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner Stollard by his master's door; I took him to Mary Kirby 's room, she was with me when I did apprehend him, for I asked her if he was not the person, I searched him, but I found nothing on him but what his master knew. I produce some fag ends which were found in the privy joining her door almost. Mr. Armstrong and I had a man of that profession to drag the necessary, and there these fag ends were found.

Mr. Knowlys. This privy was for the common use of all the rest in the house? - I suppose it was, and I believe common to all the rest in the court, there is nothing to hinder them.

Court. Did you tell Stollard it would be better for him to confess? - I never told him so, I knew better.

Court to Armstrong. Did you tell Stollard it would be better for him to confess? - No.

Mr. Knowlys. Did not you tell the woman so in the presence of Stollard? - I did.

Court. Did he confess at that time? - He did.

Q. Did you tell her before him that it would be better for her to confess? - I cannot say I did, I might; I was not in the possession of what I am now, or I should not have done it.

JAMES BAILEY sworn.

I am an handkerchief printer; I print handkerchiefs for Messrs. Peltrau and Legrew; I generally puts the initials of every person's name that I do for, at the fag end of the piece of the handkerchiefs.

Q. Be so kind as to look at these fag ends, and see whether you should know them to be your work or not? - Here is one done at my house, it has my mark on it, L. P.

Q. What do you put L. P. on there for? - To denote the initials of Mr. Peltrau and Legrew's name; here is another that appears like it, but the name is defaced nearly; I verily believe they were done at my house.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe you would not venture to say that these would match the pattern of any handkerchief here produced? - That I cannot nor no man living can in the state in which they have been in.

Q. What are they marked with? - With a type and ink, prepared on purpose, for which I have a patent.

- READ sworn.

I am an excise officer.

Q. Look at these fag ends and see if you know any of them? - Yes, one piece was stamped by me for Mr. Bailey, before they came to the prosecutor's.

Mr. Knowlys. You as an excise officer, stamp all that are brought to be stamped? - Yes.

Q. And they cannot sell them without being stamped? - Not legally.

Q. And you stamp for all the World? - Yes.

Prisoner Stollard. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Prisoner Kirby. As for that girl Bole, she is a common prostitute, it is not the first false oath she has made by a great many; she was a witness against her own sister, and received five guineas of Mr. Armstrong. As to this privy it is made use of by a dozen misfortunate girls besides me.

The prisoner Stollard called two witnesses to his character.

Court to Peltrau. Had William Stollard access to this place where these handkerchiefs were deposited? - Yes, always.

William Stollard , GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Mary Kirby , GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-16

688. JAMES SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , two silver tea spoons, value 12 s. the goods of John Walker , Esq .

WILLIAM WATSON sworn.

I live with Mr. Walker; I know he lost two spoons the 5th of this month; I saw them in my master's kitchen about

eleven o'clock, I missed them going out of my pantry; I saw James Simmons take the spoons out of the kitchen window and conceal them in his apron.

Q. What was he doing in the house? - He came down as a fishmonger's servant; he turned about and saw me; he asked me if we wanted any fish from the fishmongers? I asked him what fishmonger's he came from? he said he came from the fishmonger's out of Clare-market that supplied Mr. Walker with fish; I asked him his master's name? he could not tell me, with that I shut the door on him, and asked him what he did with the spoons? he said he had got none, I held him by the collar with my left hand, and took the spoons out of his apron with the right; they were my master's spoons I am sure of them, they are not marked with my master's name, they formerly belonged to Alexander Hender , and he was a bankrupt, and my master bought the house and every thing that was in the house at the time; they have on them A. T. H. I had observed these letters on them before I gave the the spoons to Wightman the constable.

- WIGHTMAN sworn.

These are the spoons that Watson gave me, and I have had them ever since.

Prisoner. I was passing by that gentleman's master's house, and he came up the area steps, and laid hold of me, and said that I had stole his master's spoons; there was a man in a blue coat came up the very minute before the footman, and crossed the field; I have got nobody here at present.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-17

689. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Esau Alfred , Jane his wife, and Eleanor Duck being therein, about the hour of ten in the forenoon of the 14th of October , and stealing therein a man's blue coat, value 7 s. a cotton gown, value 3 s. a damask napkin, value 1 s. a woman's check linen apron, value 1 s. the goods of the said Esau Alfred .

JANE ALFRED sworn.

I am the wife of Esau Alfred, my husband is a labouring man , No. 2, Castle-lane, Westminster .

Q. Do you remember being in the house when it was broke open? - The street door was on the latch. I was gone backward into the yard, and my front parlour door was on the latch, Mrs. Duck was up stairs, she is a very old woman, that very seldom goes out; the prisoner opened my front room door, and went through my front room into my bed room, and took my husband's property; I saw them through a window.

Q. Do you know the door was shut? - I shut it after him.

Q. How long before? - Not half a minute, I am sure it was on the latch.

Q. Can you swear that positively? - Yes, I am positive.

Q. What makes you so positive? - Because I latched it again; I saw the prisoner in my room, I did not see him open the door to come in; I looked through the parlour window, and when I saw him in the room I turned round and met him at the parlour door, and he had got my husband's blue coat, &c. I hallooed stop thief! he ran out of the door before me, and was taken in less than four or five minutes, not more; my son followed him directly on my calling stop thief; I saw him try to fling some things over some pales into a garden, and they hitched on some of the pales on the top, and I went and took them immediately;

I gave them to the constable.

JACOB ALFRED sworn.

I am the son of the last witness; I was standing at my own door at ten o'clock in the morning I live on the other side of the way. When he got facing my house my mother cried out stop thief! I was close to him all the time and took him directly; he attempted to throw the things over, but they hitched on the pales.

JOHN LLOYD sworn.

I am a constable; I have got a bundle, I received the bundle of Jacob Alfred when I took the man into custody, they have been in my possession ever since.

Jane Alfred. I will swear to the check apron it rolled in the kennel, the things are all over dirt; I can swear to the napkin, and to the gown by a piece that I put in under the arm.

Prisoner. I have nothing at all to say in my defence; I have not let my friends know any thing at all about it.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 19.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-18

690. EDWARD BARNES was indicted for making an assault on the King's highway, on Thomas Day on the 18th of October , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will a steel chain, value 1 d. a steel seal, value 1 d. the goods of the said Thomas Day .

THOMAS DAY sworn.

I saw the prisoner last Friday evening the 19th of October, between five and six o'clock, rather before I met him just at St. Martin's-court ; I was alone, I was going from the City home to Vine-street, Piccadilly; I had not been in the court more than five yards before I saw that man coming, he came up to me and takes his hand and pulled me about, and he seized my watch, and he carried off part of the chain and seals, and away he ran, and I called out stop thief! and he was stopped in a very little time indeed, in St. Martin's-court; I saw the people about him, and I went up to him and said you are the villain that snatched my watch.

Q. Then it was not dark at that time? - No.

Q. Then I have only to ask you whether you are positive? - I am.

Prisoner. As I was going through St. Martin's-court, I heard this gentleman cry out stop thief! and with that he comes up to me and says, you have got my watch; I said I have not got the watch; I see a man run before me. He up with his hand and with his cane gave me a knock on the head; I said don't ill use me; and there was a parcel of people surrounding me, and I was taken to Bow-street; I have no witness to call. When they took me up to Bow-street, I says to the gentleman, I beg you will look to see if you have not got the watch, he said if I have got the watch, you must have played a slight of hand trick, accordingly he felt and he found he had got it in his pocket.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing but not of the Assault. (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-19

691 CATHARINE JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a cloth coat, value 10 s. two woollen waistcoats, value 8 s. a kerseymire waistcoat, value 6 s. a cotton waistcoat, value 3 s. a pair of thickset breeches, value 5 s. a linen shirt, value 6 s. two muslin neckcloths, value 1 s. 6 d. a linen handkerchief, value 4 d. a leather powder bag, value 6 d. a pair of steel scissars, value 6 d. two powder puffs, value 3 s. a razor case, value 6 d. two steel razors, value 4 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. a cloth brush, value 1 s. a man's hat, value 4 s. the goods of James Vallans , in a dwelling house of persons unknown .

JAMES VALLANS sworn.

I am a servant , I lost some property the first of October at night, it was in Lukener's-lane , at a house.

Q. At whose house was it? - I don't know, they were in my hand.

Q. Did any body take it from you? - If your lordship will give me leave to relate the story I will relate it. The 1st of October at night, I was going up Holborn and I met two women, the prisoner at the bar, and one who named herself Ann Brown , they asked me to give them a glass of liquor? which I complied to, and afterwards asked me to go home with them? they took me to Lukener's-lane; they took me up stairs, and I agreed to sleep with Ann Brown , and the prisoner at the bar was in company at the same time, she withdrew from the room; in about a quarter of an hour Ann Brown agreed to sleep with me; I asked her if the door was fast? she said it was; my bundle was left in the chair, and my wearing apparel that I had on was left hanging over the chair.

Q. Had you been drinking? - I had a little, I was a little intoxicated, I had been drinking so far as to be merry; I had had a glass or two of spirits; then in the morning when I awoke I looked about me and saw my bundle was gone, and likewise my wearing apparel; part of it is in court.

Q. What do you know of the prisoner taking it? - I found my property on her in the morning of the 2d, between eight and nine, at Cow-cross.

Q. Where was she? - She was walking with the bundle down Cow-cross, when I catched her, I secured her with the bundle, and took her to the constable.

Q. Then you don't know of her taking it? - I don't know for a certain; the other girl was discharged before the magistrate.

Prisoner. I was walking down Cow-cross, and a young woman came out of a pawnbroker's shop, and she had a shilling in her hand and a duplicate, and she asked me to hold the bundle for her.

Q. Where was the other woman when you got up in the morning? - She was with me.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-20

692. THOMAS KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , a cotton handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of John O'Brian privately from his person .

JOHN O'BRIAN sworn.

I am a servant , I was out of place at the time I was robbed, it was the 7th of October, between eight and nine o'clock at night, it happened in Oxford-road ; I was going up Oxford-road, my wife and I were together, she had hold of my arm; I saw two men after me, they were coming on pretty close, I drew my

wife in towards the houses, for to make way for the two young men that were coming on, and I looked on before me and I did not see them pass.

Q. Did they pass you and your wife? - No, they did not, but I thought they wanted to pass, they were in such a hurry. A gentleman came up and tapped me on the shoulder, he said sir, you have lost your pocket handkerchief; the gentleman's name is Joet. Sir, says I, if you have got any handkerchief it is not mine, because I have not pulled out my handkerchief; no, says he, the two men that past you have pulled it out of your pocket, and if you will go with me I will shew you the way they went. I went with him, they got into the next street from Wardour-street; they walked on very smart before us, and when they found that we walked on smart after them they began to run.

Q. Do you know the name of the street? - Noel-street; they got into Wardour-street, and I bawled out stop thief! and I came up to the prisoner at the bar, and knocked him down at a building in Wardour-street.

Q. Was it this man you knocked down or the other? - This is the man, the other got on before me, he made his escape, he was not taken at all.

Q. Was any thing found on the prisoner? - I took my handkerchief from under his arm forcibly.

Q. What was your handkerchief? - A cotton one.

Q. How do you know it was your's? - It had three or four darns in it, and in taking it from him he tore it; I did miss such an handkerchief the very minute the young man spoke to me, I am sure it is my handkerchief.

Q. When had you last seen it in your pocket? - In Monmouth-street; he wanted me to let him go, and I said I would not, he turned about, and by the light of the lamp I see he drew a spring knife out of his pocket, and he cut me across the wrist.

Q. Did you lose sight of him after that? - I did, he got away from me after that, he cut me before he got away.

Q. What street was this he cut you in? - Wardour-street.

Q. How soon after did you see him after you lost sight of him? - In a very few minutes, near Wardour-street, in a public house.

Q. How did you know that was the same man? Was there other people in the public house? - Yes, there was many more; Mr. Johnson heard the word stop thief! and he pursued him as I am informed, and took the knife from him, and gave him to the runners.

Q. How came you to the public house? - There was a man that came to Mr. O'Conner's, the apothecary, in Wardour-street; I was there to get my hand dressed.

Q. Who came to you there? - I don't know. And he told me the prisoner was at the public house, and that I must come and make my appearance and know the man, or else the runners could not keep him, so I was obliged to run through the street.

Q. Did the runners point him out or did you know him? - I knew him by his dress and appearance and being pock marked; I had had him by the light of a lamp that I could see him plain by.

Q. What distance of time might there be between the time he cut you, and the time you saw him in the public house? - About five minutes. Then I went back to the apothecary, and got my hand dressed and stitched, and have been lame ever since; I have no doubt but that is the man that took the handkerchief from me, and that he cut me in my wrist.

JOSHUA JOET sworn.

I am an ironmonger; I was passing the street at the time, it was in Oxford-road;

I saw two men behind O'Brian and his wife.

Court to O'Brian. Did you feel his hand in your pocket at all? - No, I did not.

Q. Had you any suspicion of being robbed at all? - No, none at all.

Q. You felt nothing about you to induce you to think you was robbed? - No, nothing.

Q. What might the value of this handkerchief be? - I gave three and sixpence, three and nine-pence halfpenny we call it, about seven months ago.

Joet. I saw these men, the prisoner and the other man who is not here, who escaped, just coming behind O'Brian and I saw them keep looking back to see whether O'Brian noticed their having taken any thing from him, they had the handkerchief in their hand.

Q. Which of them? - I am not certain, but I think it was this man at the bar.

Q. Did you see either of them take it? - I did not; I went on making belief as if I did not notice them, then they crossed over the way, then I ran back and asked O'Brain whether he had lost his handkerchief? he felt in his pocket and found he had. so I went with him and went down Berwick-street and turned down Noel-street, and seeing this man and another before us, I said there were the men, just after I said so they set off running and turned round into Wardour-street, we caught this one just at the top of Wardour-street, O'Brian knocked him down.

Q. From the time that you saw the prisoner and the other man with the handkerchief, till the time you saw him knocked down, was he out of your sight? - Yes, he was while I turned round to tell O'Brian.

Q. Where did you first see him again? - In Noel-street.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner, the man that was knocked down, is the same that was in Oxford-street passing the prosecutor? - Yes, I am sure it was.

Q. What passed when you got to Wardour-street? - I see him knocked down by O'Brian, the prisoner got up again, and O'Brian took the handkerchief from the prisoner after he was up.

Q. Did the prisoner do any thing to O'Brian? - He cut his wrist, he made two attempts, he first cut his coat.

Q. Who kept the handkerchief? - O'Brian.

Q. What became of him, did he get away or did he not? - He cut him and then O'Brian was forced to let him go.

Q. Was he pursued by any other people? - I don't know who pursued him, he was pursued by other people.

Prisoner. Ask the witness whether he can swear which was the pocket that the handkerchief came from? - No, I did not see the robbery committed.

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn.

I am clerk to a banking house; I was at the end of Dean-street, I heard a cry and saw the prisoner running, coming from Wardour-street towards the end of Chapel-street; I made towards him, and while I was in the act of seizing him, I heard people say take care, take care, he has a knife, on which I was determined to secure him, which I seized him by the collar, and threw him to the ground with his face towards the ground, and putting my knee upon him I took this knife from under him; I did not perceive it till I suffered him to rise in consequence of the patrole coming up to take care of him; I delivered him into the patrole's hand, and desired search might be

made after the gentleman that was robbed, and consequently I ordered them to take him into a public house in Oxford-road, between Wardour-street and Chapel-street. Joet joined the pursuit and told me to take care of the knife; when the prosecutor came into the public house, I asked him if that was the man that had so cut and robbed him? he declared that it was.

SAMUEL SKEATE sworn

I am a patrole belonging to Bow-street. On the 7th of October, between eight and nine; I and two the same as myself, were on the beat in Oxford-road; and I heard the alarm crying out stop thief! behind me; I ran up and saw a good many people, and some came up and told me what was the matter, and Mr. Johnson had the knife in his hand, and he said this person has been cutting with this knife.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the ground? - I did not, he was on his feet, at the time the other two patroles had took hold of him, one of each arm.

Q. Was he carried to the public house? - He was, in Oxford-road.

Q. Did the prosecutor come there? - He did.

Q. Did he know the prisoner? - Yes.

DANIEL MACLARIN sworn.

I am a patrole of Bow-street; the first that I saw of the prisoner we were going down Oxford-road; I saw him first between Wardour-street and Chapel-street, in Mr. Johnson's custody, they were just tumbled down both together, as I got up Mr. Johnson happened to give him a throw, and they came down both together.

Q. Did you see any knife? - Yes, as I got hold of his collar to raise him up one Clark, a patrole, had hold of the other side; the knife was laying just under his belly, as near as I can guess.

Q. Was he carried to a public-house? - he was.

SAMUEL CLARKE sworn.

I am a patrole, I came up with Maclarin, I did not see more than he did, we were both together.

Prisoner. I had been to Swallow-street to see my aunt, at about half after eight I was coming down Berwick-street, and I heard an outcry of stop thief! a man in a blue coat runs past me and heaves an handkerchief down, and I walked on; this here gentleman, Mr. O'Brian, immediately catched hold of me and knocked me down, and said I was the man that robbed him, and took an handkerchief from my own pocket, and said how that was his handkerchief, another gentleman came up and brought his handkerchief, and said there was the handkerchief the man had stole.

Court to Prosecutor. In what manner was this handkerchief under his arm open or wrapt up? - He had it under his arm put outside of his coat, and had hold of it with the other hand; another handkerchief was taken from him after I had taken him.

Johnson. In going back to the public house this handkerchief, which was not the prosecutor's, lay on the pavement, and I picked it up.

Court to Prosecutor. Where was the public house? - In Oxford-road, below Wardour-street.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing but not privately from the person.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-21

693. DAVID DONNOUCHTY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of September , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH sworn.

I am a coal merchant . My pocket was picked in Bishopsgate-street ; I felt something touch my pocket; it was on the 18th of September; I put my hand in and found my handkerchief gone; I turned round to see who was next me, and two men immediately crossed over and ran up New-street; I cried out stop thief! and he was taken; he fell down, and as he was rising up from the ground, I found my handkerchief under him, and I took it up and gave him into the care and custody of the beadle, and took him before the Lord Mayor.

Q. How do you know it was your handkerchief? - By the mark T. S

Q. What did you do with the handkerchief? - I delivered it to the officer by my Lord Mayor's direction at the Mansion House.

Q. Had you kept it till then? - I took it from the ground, I delivered it within an hour afterwards.

Prisoner. I was walking down Wood-street, and I was collared by that man; he charged me with stealing an handkerchief.

Court. Is this one of the two men that you see cross over? - Yes, I am sure of that.

Prisoner. Two men came and charged me with robbing the prosecutor of an handkerchief. I am innocent of the handkerchief; I know no more of it than a child.

JOHN LANGLEY sworn.

I am a watchman; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, on Wednesday, between one and two o'clock, in Bishopsgate-street; the prisoner put his right hand into the gentleman's pocket, he ran away across the way, and ran up the street; the man that stopped him was a bricklayer's labourer; I never lost sight of him; I saw him knocked down by a man in a blue coat crossing from the India house; I saw an handkerchief under him.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn.

I produce an handkerchief which was delivered into my custody by order of the Lord Mayor.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Court to Langley. Did this man use you ill at all? He struck me in the face, he said he would take my life away if he once got clear.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-22

694. JOHN TATE was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of October , a linen handkerchief, value 2 s. 9 d. the goods of James Johnson .

JAMES JOHNSON sworn.

I am in the medical profession ; I was robbed on Monday the 7th of this month, about half past seven in the evening. I was in Cheapside walking along, going eastward, and I found this person's hand in my pocket, which I held there in my pocket till I made a gentleman that was walking along with me take it out. On searching my pocket I missed my handkerchief from the same pocket, it had been taken away previous to that, but I did not miss it before.

Q. You never missed your handkerchief till you got his hand in your pocket? - No. I took hold of the prisoner, and I and the other gentleman, and we went into a shop, and he produced another handkerchief and asked me if it was not mine? After coming out of the shop I continued having him in my custody till we came to the corner of King-street, when he drew a knife and

said damn me I will do for you. I found the handkerchief in the prisoner's pocket after this circumstance; he was examined first; I can swear to that handkerchief being mine by having two I's. I gave it to one of the officers.

Q. Have you got it here? - No, I have not.

Q. What may be the value of it? - Two shillings and nine-pence.

Prisoner. Did you take the knife out of my hand or out of my pocket? - Out of his pocket.

Court. Did you see whether it was the same knife that he drew upon you? - It was.

Q. Did he cut you? - No, he attempted to cut me, but I jumped on one side.

Prisoner. Ask him whether he took the handkerchief from me? - Yes, I did.

PETER LESBY sworn.

I am a wine merchant; I was present when this gentleman was robbed.

Q. Did you see him robbed? - I did not. Mr. Johnson called to me and said look here, and I saw this man with his hand in his pocket detained there by Mr. Johnson; I was in company with Mr. Johnson at the time; he was afterwards carried down Cheapside at the corner of King-street he pulled out a knife with which he attempted to run at Mr. Johnson; he requested that he would leave holding of him, and that he would walk along peaceably, and then we let go of him.

Q. When he attempted to use this knife had any body hold of him or had they not? - Nobody had hold of him then.

Q. At what part did he attempt? - I did not see that; I see Mr. Johnson run from him.

Court to Johnson. Where was it he attempted to cut you? - He threatened at my breast; he drew his hand and attempted to strike me with it, and I stepped on one side.

Court to Lesby. Was he examined by any body? - No further than I see four handkerchiefs taken out of his pocket.

Q. Who searched him? - I don't know; I saw the handkerchief in Mr. Johnson's hand in the street, and I saw the knife.

Prisoner. I leave myself entirely to the mercy of the court; it is no service speaking any thing.

LEWIS DESERMORE sworn.

I was present when this gentleman was robbed, I was passing; I saw the prisoner's hand in Mr. Johnson's pocket.

Prisoner. As I was going along Cheapside, that gentleman laid hold of me, and said that I picked his pocked of an handkerchief, which I replied to him immediately and told him I had no such thing about me but three handkerchiefs; he insisted on searching me and took me into a pastry cook's shop, and he found these three handkerchiefs, and he told me that neither a one of these handkerchiefs were his; which at the same time the pastry cook was afraid of his things being broke from outside of the door; some of the people brought an handkerchief in which that gentleman owned to be his handkerchief; I never had his in my possession.

The remainder of this Trial in the next Part, which will be published in a few days.

Reference Number: t17931030-22

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 11th of September, 1793, and the following Days;

Being the EIGHTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VIII. PART II.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE ONE SHILLING and FOUR-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

The Continuation of the Trial of JOHN TATE .

Court to Prosecutor. How many handkerchiefs did you find on him in the shop? - I did not find any in his pocket in the shop at all; I searched him when I saw him on producing the knife; he was not searched in the shop at all.

Q. How came he not to be searched in the shop? - The people of the shop turned him out, they would not let him stay there.

Q. He says that the handkerchief you claimed was brought into the shop, is that true or false? - It was not so; I am sure that the handkerchief I found in the street was mine.

Prisoner. I have no witnesses at all.

Jury to Prosecutor. Did you take the handkerchiefs out of his pocket the corner of Queen-street? - I did, and one of them was what I lost; besides when he was lodged in the Compter he gave in his name, James Johnson.

GUILTY . (Aged 39.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-23

695. THOMAS SALISBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a pound weight of sugar, value 11 d. and two pounds and a half of raisins, value 1 s. the goods of John Axford .

JOHN AXFORD sworn.

I am a grocer on Ludgate-hill . On the 20th of September, being informed I had lost some property of this sort I went and found it in my stable; there were

two bags of raisins and several lumps of sugar; I then took them into my apron and carried them all home; they were there an hour and a half or more; my buyer who goes into the sugar market, he came home, and -

Mr. Knowlys. Don't tell us what your buyer said. - The man confessed himself that it was my property.

Court. Before his confession to you what did you say to him? did you advise him to confess the truth? - I did not.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you hint any advantage to him? - I did not promise him any thing. I said, when I found the goods, where did you have these from? Sir, says he, I will pay you for them all if you will be so good as to let me go about my business.

Mr. Knowlys. Did not he first of all deny it, and then afterwards you threatened to send him to prison if he did not give an account of it? - Certainly.

Q. Do you know any thing more but what he said? - There was a direction given him on the 19th, which I asked him what became of it, and that direction was found on the 20th.

Q. Did not the key of this stable hang up in your shop? - Undoubtedly.

Q. You are not watching your key all the day? - Certainly not.

Q. Then any body might have taken the key that was in your shop? - Undoubtedly; but there is nobody has any business there but the carman.

Q. Have you that direction here that you spoke of? - The other evidence will bring it.

RALPH TALBOT sworn.

On the 19th of last month I went to take in nine trusses of hay that came out of the country, and I went up into the hay loft, and I was looking and there, up in the corner, laid a parcel of white sugar.

Q. Do you know who put it there? - I do not; it was in the hay rick, up in the corner.

- GOOD sworn.

On the 20th of last month, when I came home there was in the counting house four pieces of sugar, and sixty-eight pounds of raisins in two bags which had been found; we agreed to put them where we found them; on the next day we found they were removed, and we had a constable and had the prisoner taken up, and we made a further search in the stable and searched under the manger, and there they were; we brought them home and found they were half of them gone; when I came home I told the prisoner at the bar, I was sorry for what he had done. I am clerk to Mr. Axford.

Q. Did you find a direction with these things in the stable? - There was a direction found before in the parcel, which I have got in my pocket; this direction was given him the day before to take out; it was found by Talbot.

Q. Did you direct the prisoner to carry the things according to that direction? - I left word for him to go according to that direction.

Court to Talbot. Where did you find that direction? - In the bag where the plumbs were, which was found in the stable.

Mr. Knowlys. How long had you left the parcel on the counter before you took it out again? - Not long.

Q. Then whether it was in when you left it on the counter you cannot tell? - No, but I know I took it out.

- WARREN sworn.

I was the officer fetched to take the man into custody; I went home to his lodgings; I have got some sugar and raisins.

Mr. Axford. I cannot swear to any; I only go by his own confession.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

The prisoner called seven witnesses to his character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-24

696. SARAH CLIFFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of September , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the goods of John Steward

JOHN STEWARD sworn.

The property was taken out of the prisoner's pocket by the watchman.

ROBERT LEMAIRE sworn.

I am a constable. On the 27th of September the prisoner was brought to the watch-house on a charge by Robert Stewart , the watchman; the property had been taken out of the prisoner's pocket before she was brought into the watch-house; it was the watchman that, I believe, took it out of her pocket; I think I received the pot of the watchman and have kept them in my possession ever since.

ROBERT STEWART sworn.

I am the watchman. The prisoner past me on Friday night, or early on Saturday morning, between twelve and one, and she happened to have her apron full of bread; I asked her where she got it? She said over the way; I rather reflected on myself for letting her pass; so I followed her to the Queen's Head, the watering house, Bishopsgate-street, where she was talking to the waterman, and turning herself about I spies a pint pot stick out of her pocket; I said to the waterman, this woman is a pot stealer, for here is a pint pot sticking out of her pocket, and I took her to the watch-house strait, without ever letting her go away.

Steward. I keep the sign of the Paul Pinder ; the pots are marked G. E. the cypher of the gentleman's name that kept the house before I came to it; I can swear to the pot.

Prisoner. I had the pint pot out of his house full of beer, and I met a poor woman that was ill and wanted a coach, and had this bread to carry; I went to the coachman to speak to him, and this man, the watchman, came up, and he spoke something that I did not like; I spoke rough to him, I had the pint-pot by my side, intending to return it as soon as I got the poor woman into the coach; then he took me back to this man's house and he said he would have me transported if it cost him the bed from under him; I had been but one month up from Cambridge. The gentleman said, at my first hearing, that the pint pot was worth half a crown.

Court to Steward. Do you remember that woman being at your house? - No.

Q. Do you let people carry away pots? - No, nobody but my constant customers.

Prisoner. I have no relations nor friends; I have been five weeks in prison all but two days.

Prosecutor. They were pots that I never send out to any body, they cost me three shillings a pint.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Recommended by the Jury.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-25

697. SARAH PARR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a quart pewter pot, value 10 d. the goods of John Bowler .

JOHN BOWLER sworn.

I keep the Goldsmiths Arms the corner of Albion buildings, in St. Bartholomew the Great . I lost a pot on the 19th of September, at half past seven in the morning, they were at the house of Mr. Bullion.

JOSEPH HILL sworn.

I was standing by the stable, and I saw this woman come up the court, and there were two pots at the door, and she turns about and takes one; it was the 19th of September about half after seven, or nigh eight, it was in Albion-buildings; the pots were at Mr. Bullion's door, she took one and left one, it was a quart pot she took; immediately she took the pot I came out of the stable and went out after her, and said stop that woman, she has got a quart pot; and I ran to Mr. Bowler's house, and he ran after her and took her; she throwed away the pot out into the middle of the road as soon as I hallooed out.

Bowler. I know it is mine by the name on it; I have this only one left out of a dozen. I sent two pots the over night to Albion-buildings; I valued it at ten-pence.

Prisoner. Did you see me throw the pot away? - Yes, I did.

Prisoner. Then there must be a violent bruise on it.

MARGARET MACPHERSON sworn.

I was down in the kitchen of this house, and I saw this woman come into the passage, and I went up to see what she wanted, and I saw she had got a pot, and I cried stop thief, and I saw her throw the pot away, and I picked it up.

Prisoner. I had been to market and I asked the young woman to let me have the pot to get a little drink of water, and I put the pot down again.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Fined 1 s .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-26

698. FRANCIS HARDY was indicted for receiving, on the 24th of August , two brass candlesticks, value 5 s. a feather bed, value 4 l. a feather bolster, value 1 s. two feather pillows, value 5 s. a linen table cloth, value 5 s. two woollen blankets, value 15 s. five linen sheets, value 15 s. two mahogany pot stands, value 1 s. two copper stew pans, value 6 s. a copper coffee pot, value 6 d. thirteen table knives, value 3 s. eleven table forks, value 2 s. two damask bed curtains, value 5 s. two stuff window curtains, value 5 s. seven linen towels, value 3 s. the goods of Peter Square , of Hannah Shield 's, knowing them to have been stolen .

The record read of Hannah Shields acquittal in September Sessions last.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-27

699. JOSEPH SOUTHFLAT and RICHARD CAMPBELL were indicted for feloniously making an assault on Ann, the wife of Thomas Venables , on the 10th of September , and putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her

person, and against her will, twenty-five ounces weight of Brutia silk, value 2 l. the goods of John Garsed , Robert Wilkinson , Robert Merrick and Stephen Dowell .

Indicted in a second COUNT laying the property to belong to Thomas Venables .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ANN VENABLES sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Venables .

Q. Do you remember receiving any silk of Messrs. Garsed and Co. on the 10th of September? - I do.

Q. What did you do with it after you received it? - I took it home in an handkerchief, it was not for me, it was for my sister; as I was coming along Lamb-street, I heard something of a whistling behind me which caused me to turn about; it was within a quarter to ten, or not quite too much.

Q. Was it a pretty light night? - It was a pretty light night. When I got a little way down Wheeller-street , I heard the whistling again, and I turned and see it was the same two persons, and then I went on till there was a place very much floated, opposite to a grocer's shop, at which there was a great light, and I crossed over, and I looked over the way, and I saw them stand at the brink of that place, then I crossed again, because I lived the other side of the way; I live at the bottom of Wheeller-street; just down by the arch way where I live, they came up to me, one of them snatched at my bundle, just at that place he gave a snatch at my bundle, and I held it very fast, and the other gave me a blow on the side of my head with his fist, still the other could not get the handkerchief out of my hand I held it so fast, and then I had another blow which knocked me down, I held very fast, and I had about three blows while I lay on the ground, it was by the same person, and I held the handkerchief so fast that they tore the handkerchief, and had the silk out of the holes at the bottom; I cried out murder! and a gentlewoman from the corner house came out with a candle, and I had a full view of him that knocked me down, he was the last that left me.

Q. From the view which you had of the persons that committed this violence on you, should you be able to say who they were? - Campbell knocked me down, and the other took my bundle.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoners before? - Never.

Q. Are you sure now as you was then? - I am sure of them because I had a full view of them in Lamb-street, and I saw them follow me down Wheeller-street, and also I saw them at the grocer's shop.

Q. Let me caution you, these mens lives depend on your evidence, are you sure they are the persons? - I am quite sure, I would scorn to say it if I was not quite sure.

Court. How soon after the robbery did you see the prisoners, either of them? - About three days.

Q. Was there any body else present besides the prisoners? - Nobody.

Q. Was there any body else present when you saw them in custody? - No, Nobody.

Q. Did you know them directly? - I did.

Q. How soon did you give information? - The next day.

Prisoner Campbell. I should be glad to know whether it was a dark night or a light night when this woman was robbed? - The shops were all open, it was not a very dark night.

Prisoner Southflat. Was I in the same dress I am now? - When they committed

the robbery Campbell he had a brown coat with whitish buttons, and white stockings, Southflat had a blue jacket on.

Court. How near were they to you before they attacked you? - About half a dozen yards behind.

Q. Was there any lamp besides the grocer's? - Yes, all the way down Wheeller-street.

JOHN WARD sworn.

I belong to the house of Messrs. John Garsed , Robert Wilkinson , Robert Merrick , and Stephen Dowel .

Q. Do you know Mrs. Venables? - I do, she is employed as a warper to me, I weighed the silk out this day about two, but it was not her usual way to go away with it till nine o'clock at night, it was one pound nine ounces of Brutia silk.

SARAH BROWN sworn.

I live in this neighbourhood at the corner of the passage were this robbery was committed. On the 10th of September, about a quarter before ten o'clock, I was sitting at my table at work, it was about the middle of the room, I heard a scuffle which drew me to the door; when I came to the door, I says to my girl bring me a candle, and as I was opening the street door I heard somebody run, and when the door was opened I had the candle in my hand, and I saw a man pass me, and his face was turned from me, and he had got on a brown coat, with white metal buttons; he was about five feet high, a broad set young man, broad across the shoulders; I see no man but that, I heard the other man run, but I did not see his face, I turned about and I saw a woman on the ground, Mrs. Venables; I had heard several blows hit, one came against my shutter; I was very big with child, or else I might have taken more notice; I went to Mrs. Venables, and she said two fellows had taken away the silk from her; I see some ribbons and things, but the silk was gone.

JOHN ASMSTRONG sworn.

I belong to the office in Worship-street; I only apprehended Southflat on Thursday the 19th of September, at a public house in Fashion-street, Spitalfields; I searched him and found nothing on him.

Q. Did Mrs. Venables make application to you? - No, it was to Mr. Le Marr, the beadle of our office.

- FERRIS sworn.

I apprehended Campbell the 19th of September, at a public house in Shoreditch; I think it is the Three Pidgeons; I did not find any thing about him, but I went to his apartment, as he told the magistrate it was; he first of all told the magistrate that he lived in Westminster, but the magistrate thought it was not satisfactory enough, and he said he lived in Acorn-alley, Bishopsgate-street; in consequence of that I went to that loding, and I found some files, keys, and a dark lanthorn, and five bad shillings.

Prisoner Campbell. On the 19th of September I was apprehended by Mr. Ferris, who took me to the office; in about half an hour afterwards there was two women and a man came, one of the women looked through at me, and said that is one that robbed me, I know him by his coat; when at the same time I had a blue coat on, and she says that when I robbed her I had a brown coat on; Mr. Armstrong took her by the shoulders and said that is enough, come along; I was brought into the office in about ten minutes, and she swore that I was the man that knocked her down; she said there was no light at all, only she perceived us by the lamps that she passed; I was committed for further examination. I have an acquaintance and I asked her did not she remember my drinking tea with her on Tuesday the 10th of September,

I asked her would she come on my trial so and so? for fear she should not I have subpoened the woman to speak the truth as far as she knew; I have also two others who came out of their apartment, and to whom she said there were three of them, one of which pulled a hat over her eyes.

Court to Armstrong. Did you hear the woman say that she knew the man by his dress? - No, I did not.

Court to Mrs. Venables. Did you say that you knew the man by his dress? - By his dress and by his person.

Q. What was his dress? - He had a brown coat and whitish buttons and white stockings.

Prisoner Southflat. On the 19th of September I was apprehended and taken to Spitalfields watch-house; on the 20th I was brought before the magistrate and I was put into the lock-up room, two women came to the lock-up room then, and one of the women said that I was the person that knocked her down; she said, she knew me by my dress, in the mean time afterwards my father was in her company, and she enquired what colour my eyes were, and my eye brows were; and one of the runners asked her if she could swear to the prisoner Southflat? she said she believed that was the person, he said that will not do, then they took her away and presently she swore I was the person.

Court to Mrs. Venables. At the time you saw Southflat did you say that you knew him by his dress? - I did not, I said I knew him by his person.

ESTHER KIRBY sworn.

I am a narrow weaver; on Tuesday the 10th of September, Robert Campbell and his wife came up to my apartments, between five and six o'clock; he is a narrow weaver, they drank tea with me; they never went out of my place from that time till the watchman cried past eleven; my husband is a pewterer, and he was obliged to work four hours over time that night, and he did not come while they were there.

Q. And you are sure it was the 10th of September? what makes you so sure? - Because it was my child's birth day.

Q. What day of the month is to day? - I cannot tell the day of the month to day.

Q. What month is this? - September, is it not?

Q. What month is the month before September? - August.

Q. What month is this? - Indeed I cannot read, and it puts me to a stand.

Court. I suppose so? - It is November, is it not?

Q. How many days has September? - I cannot tell indeed, I am no scholar at all; it was my child's birth day or I should not have known any thing at all about it.

Q. How came you to know it was your child's birth day, when you don't know one day from another? - It is very likely such a thing might come up; that is the truth.

Q. How was he dressed? - He was dressed then in a dark blue coat and black stockings.

Q. Who was your companion besides? - A young woman of their acquaintance, Elizabeth Bird , I do not know where she lived, she was no acquiantance of mine, I never saw the woman before in my life as I know of.

Q. Did you appear before the magistrate? - No.

Q. When was you first desired to come here? - I was subpoened yesterday.

Mr. Knapp. Are you a married woman? - Yes.

Q. How long have you known Campbell? - About two or three years; I have known him by working with his wife, I worked shop-mate with her.

Q. Did he often drink tea with you? - No, only that once.

Q. Did he drink tea with you in the course of six months before? - No.

Q. How lately had you seen him before? - A day or two, I see him on Sunday.

Q. Had he a blue coat and black stockings on then? - Yes, he had.

Q. How soon did you hear that he was taken up for this robbery? - I heard it the Tuesday that he was taken up.

Q.How came you to hear that? - His wife came and told me.

Q. You told his wife then that he was at your house? - She was with me, I had no call to tell her that.

Q.After that he was taken up did you see him afterwards? - Yes, I see him in the lock-up room the day he was taken up.

Court. What was the name of your child? - Michael Kirby , it was four years old.

Q. How old was your child when it was christened? - About a twelve month old when he was full christened; he was half baptized first, and then he was full christened at Shoreditch Church.

Mr. Knowlys. You say you saw him on Tuesday at the lock-up house? - I am sure I don't know.

Q. Why you said so just now? - I know I did.

Q. Well was it the Tuesday that you saw him at the lock-up house? was you right in saying before that it was on a Tuesday? - I believe I was wrong.

Q. How many times have you seen him in Newgate? - I went with his wife there.

Q. How lately have you seen him in Newgate? - I went with his wife there.

Q. How lately have you seen him in Newgate? - Two or three days ago.

Q. How many times before that had you seen him? - Two or three times or half a dozen.

Q. During all these times had you no conversation about it, that you remembered that he was at your house the day the robbery was committed? - I cannot tell indeed.

Q. Cannot you tell whether you have had any conversation about this business at any one of the times that you have seen the prisoner in Newgate? - I don't know that we had.

Q. Now mind woman my lord is attending and so is the jury; will you swear that no conversation of this subject took place in Newgate? - No, I will not swear that.

Q. Have not you had conversation with the prisoner at the bar and his wife about this business. -

Court. Why don't you answer? - Yes, I have.

Mr. Knapp. Then how dare you to say that you never heard any thing about it? then perhaps you have told him. Why you know you was at my house at the time of the robbery; then you have had many conversations with the prisoner about this business before this subpoena was served on you, have not you? - Yes.

SARAH WARD sworn.

I am Thomas Ward 's wife; I am a weaver, I weave velvet, I know Richard Campbell by sight, I live on the premises where I heard the robbery done, I heard the found of murder, when I went out to my own door it was very dark, I saw a great mob of people, I went up, when I came up I heard a woman had been robbed; I heard the neighbours ask her if she could swear to any one? the answer she made was, she could swear to none.

Mr. Knapp. Then it was quite dark? - I could not see my hand before me.

Q. No light in the street at all? - Not where I live.

Q. No lamps at all? - Not where I live.

Q. You don't know who the woman was that was robbed? - No, I do not, I cannot say I knew her, I never saw her, I heard the found of murder, I run out as a many might run out, to see what was the matter.

Q. You don't know Mrs. Brown your neighbour? - I don't know any body about the place, I am a close neighbour.

Q. How long have you lived in the neighbourhood? - I have not lived a quarter of a year there.

Q. Who do you work for? - I work for one Mr. Ward, that lives in Bethnal-green parish, in Nicholas-row.

Q. When you went up to where murder was called, you did not see any body with a lighted candle? - I did not indeed, the candle might be out before I went out.

Q. Did you go out immediately on the cry of murder? - About ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards, it was about a quarter after ten when I went out.

Q. When you went up to this mob you had no curiosity to see who it was that had been robbed? - I had not, I went home again to my apartment.

THOMAS WARD sworn.

I am the husband of Sarah Ward ; I am a weaver; I worked shop-mate with this man, Richard Campbell , some time back, he was a weaver; he bears a very good character according to what my own knowledge will allow me to give; when I worked with him his master trusted him and me too among all the shop, and with all the tools.

Q. Was you at home when this cry was made? - I was.

Q. Was it light enough to distinguish a person you had known before? - Certainly.

Q. You would have known your wife if she had been before you? - Yes, I could.

Q. If you had seen any person at that time by the assistance of a lamp or a candle at a window, you could have known him again? - I could.

Q. Did you see any mob or croud about? - Yes, there was a mob assembled about where the woman was robbed.

Mr. Knapp. Where the lamps a light? - Yes, but there are but very few.

Q. Do you know any thing of a grocer's shop near there? - No, there is not one within some small distance, I believe the nighest is in shoreditch.

Q. Is not there a grocer's shop in Wheeller-street? - I believe not.

Q. Don't you know a grocer's shop in Wheeller-street at this time? - No.

Q. Nor in Lamb-street? - Yes, there is one in Lamb-street.

Q. Was there any candle burning there that you saw? - I cannot say whether there was or no.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Brown? - I do not.

Q. Have you seen Mrs. Brown here? - I don't know.

Court to Mrs. Brown. Did you see any thing of a mob? - Yes, a great many people.

Q. What sort of a night was this? - It was a dark night.

Q. Was there any lamps a light? - No, there was nothing else there but my candle.

Court to Venables. Do you remember while you lay on the ground, if any body asked you whether you knew the persons that robbed you? - Nobody asked me that question I am sure.

Q. Did you say at any time that you did not know the persons that robbed you? - I said I should know them again directly

if I was to see them, I said so the moment after they left me to the people that were about me.

Joseph Southflat GUILTY . Death . (Aged 18.)

Richard Campbell . GUILTY . Death . (Aged 22.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Prisoner Southflat. Campbell was not guilty of the robbery, the other man that did the robbery with me, was discharged before the justice.

Reference Number: t17931030-28

700. THOMAS HACKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , a hand saw, value 4 s the goods of John Hoppy .

JOHN HOPPY sworn.

I missed a hand saw on Tuesday the 15th of October, I used it in the morning between six and seven o'clock; I was at work at an unfinished house; I went to breakfast at eight o'clock, I came back between eight and nine, and the saw was gone; I saw it again the same morning in another house; in the same house after it was taken from the prisoner; a person asked me if I had lost a hand saw? I said yes, they said they had got the thief; I went up into a house in the same street where there was a matter of twenty carpenters, and the prisoner was with them, and there was the saw.

Q. How do you know it to be your's? - It has got a particular mark on the side of the handle, a mark, the remains of a knot in the wood.

Q. Did you see it in the hands of the prisoner? - No, I did not; the person that took it from the prisoner kept it from that time to this, his name is James Pugh.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at this time? - I never see him before this time.

Prisoner. The time that man came in he said the saw belonged to him, and he took up the saw, and beat me for the space of ten minutes and I laid down; and then he took the saw up again and beat me for the space of five minutes; I suppose he beat me for the space of a quarter of an hour in all; after I came out of the house they took and throwed me down to a pit and chucked a large bucket of water over me; then they let me go again, and they took up brick bats and knocked me down again with the brick bats, and this man came and kicked me on the stomach, and they were going to let me go, but a gentleman came up and told them not to ill treat me, and said that they would get money by prosecuting me.

Court to Hoppy. Did you beat him with the saw? - I did, but not much.

Q. Did the others beat him? - I cannot say, some of them did but I cannot say which.

Q Was there any gentlemen desired you not to ill treat him, but to prosecute him? - Yes.

Q. Did they throw any water on him? - I did not see any person.

JAMES PUGH sworn.

I stood at the door of the house where I was at work, and I saw this man going up the street, and I followed him along the road a good way, and I saw him come out of that house where he took the saw from, it was an unfinished house.

Q. Did you know the prosecutor? - I never saw him before; I saw him going along with a bundle under his coat and followed him along the road, we thought he was a thief, we are very often robbed there.

Q. Where about are these houses? - In a road almost by Mary-le-bone church. I followed him on the road a good way, and I overtook him, and asked him what he had got under his coat? he said nothing to me. I asked him to let me see it, he said no, and I took hold of his coat, and he unbuttoned his coat and takes this saw away from under his coat; I took the saw and him, and carried them into the house where we were at work; I kept him there till the man came from breakfast after eight o'clock, and then we all hallooed out if any body had lost a saw, and this here man said yes; Hoppy came then and he said it was his saw; I shewed him the saw, I have kept the saw ever since.

Q. Was this man beat with the saw? - Very little, I believe not hurt at all.

Q. Did any body jump upon him? - No.

Q. Was he thrown into a pit? - He was not.

Q. Did any gentleman come to you and speak to you about him? - Yes, the gentleman for whom I worked came, and we had got the water to throw on him, and he said we had better prosecute him. He said he found this saw in the gravel, when I overtook him in the road.

Prisoner. When that man came after me and took me, I never said that the saw was mine, I had the saw under my arm to shew it to any body; I told him I found it down among the gravel; I went and shewed him; this here man was the first that struck me, and that man was the next, after they had beat me for a quarter of an hour, one of them said d - n his eyes don't have patience to beat him with the saw, for I believe if I was you I should run it through his body, and when this gentleman came up and told them not to ill use me, they would get money for prosecuting me, they took me up directly.

Court to Hoppy. Was you told you should get money for prosecuting him? - We were not.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Publickly Whipped , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-29

701 JOHN DOWLING was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of October , three yards of muslinet, value 10 s. ten yards of printed dimity, value 1 l. two yards of kerseymire, value 10 s. two yards of nankeen, value 3 s. the goods of Alexander Stark privately in his shop .

ALEXANDER STARK sworn.

I am a taylor and mercer ; I was robbed on Tuesday the 15th of October, about eight o'clock in the morning, I have no evidence of the robbery, but the goods are clearly mine; I was out of my shop about half an hour, when I came in again the prisoner was in custody, and the things were on him.

JOHN SMITH

Q. Have you ever been sworn before? - Yes.

Q. What will become of you if you swear what is false? - Go to Hell.

sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Stark, it was on Tuesday the 15th of October when he was robbed, the prisoner came to my master's shop, and asked for Stamford, a taylor; I told him there was no such person lived there; then he asked if my master was at home? I told him no, then he told me to go and ask my mistress, and I left him standing at the door, and I went into the parlour to ask my mistress, and I returned from the parlour, I saw him running out of the shop with a parcel under his arm; I followed him and cried out stop thief! and he dropt the

things down in Castle-street; I picked up the goods, and laid them on the counter.

Q. What was done with the parcel afterwards? - They were taken and packed up in a piece of paper; I have had the care of it ever since, I have got it here now.

Q. Where were these articles laying? - In the shop.

Q. Where did you last see them before he came in? - They laid on the corner of the counter, and more with them.

Q. How do you know them to be your master's property? - I knew them to be in his shop.

Q. Look round and see if that is the man that came into the shop? - I am sure that is the man.

Q. Did you lose sight of him after he went out of your shop? - Only while he turned round Castle-street, but I am sure he is the same man.

JOHN PRESTON sworn.

I am a shoemaker. On Tuesday morning the 15th of this month, I heard a cry of stop thief! I see the prisoner run and drop a parcel; he ran across the way towards me and I took him, he ran down Castle-street; I did not see him in Mr. Stark's shop; the boy picked up the parcel, I saw him.

Prosecutor. I am certain they are my goods, I can swear to the particular pattern of the muslinet; I am well satisfied they are all my property.

Prisoner. I have nothing further to say than that I would be glad to serve his Majesty, either as a soldier or a sailor; I have had people here for my character but their business called them away, and they could not stay any longer.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing but not privately in the shop.

(Aged 19.)

Judgment respited.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-30

702. SARAH SLADE was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of September , six ounces weight of silk, value 8 s. and six wooden bobbins, value 2 d. the goods of Susannah Weedon .

Indicted in a Second COUNT laying it to be the property of Thomas Titchener .

THOMAS TITCHENER sworn.

I am a weaver ; I gave my silk to this Weedon to wind. On Saturday the 28th of September, I was sent for to Worship-street, I gave it to her on the 20th of September, I don't remember the day of the week; it was black silk.

Q. Did you give her any bobbins? - Yes.

Q. Is she answerable for it? - Yes, if she had lost it of course I should have looked to her for it.

SUSANNAH WEEDON sworn.

I had some silk to wind of Mr. Titchener; I had it of him on Monday; I lost it on Saturday in Corbet's-court, I am a lodger there, I did not see the prisoner take it.

Q. Did you lose any bobbins? - Yes, six; I went of an errand for my mother, as I was coming home I met the woman coming out of the house, and I asked her what she wanted? and she told me she had been in to make water and she ran off, and I went in and found my door had been opened, and I ran after her and took her with the property in her apron; there were six full bobbins and six full skains of silk, my master's mark is on the bobbins; Mr. Titchener knows what the mark is.

Q. Did the woman say any thing when you stopped her with the silk and the bobbins? - Nothing at all.

Q. What did you do with the silk after you took it from her? - My father John Green, took it into his care till we took her to the justice.

HANNAH KEEBLE sworn.

I sell fruit at the corner, and I saw Hannah Weedon have hold of the prisoner, and I asked her what was the matter? and I went down to her, and had the silk, and put them into my apron, and took them up stairs, and put them on the table and left them.

JOHN GREEN sworn.

I heard a stir about the door, and I came out, and when I went again into my apartment I found the silk on the table in my own apartment, and I took charge of it, and have kept it ever since.

Court to Weedon. Did you put them on the table in your father's room? - No, I did not.

Keeble. I put them there on a round table.

Titchener. I can swear to the bobbins by T. T. being on them; I cannot swear to the silk, but Susannah Weedon had nothing but black silk to wind.

Prisoner. I have got three small children, and I went out to buy a pair of shoes for myself, I went up this court to make water and there lay this silk scattered about, I did not know whose it was, I picked it up and put it into my apron, I turned down Red Lion-street, and I heard the cry of stop thief, and I stopped; that young woman came up to me, and I said if it was her's there it was.

SARAH POOLE sworn.

I keep a house in Hart-yard, Rosemary-lane these five years; my husband is a shoe-maker; I have known the prisoner about a twelve month; her husband is a carman, and she does not do any thing particular only what she has to do at home.

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-31

703. THOMAS DEMPSEY was indicted for stealing, a linen bed quilt, value 2 s. a woollen blanket, value 1 s. 6 d. a linen sheet, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Francis Hunt , in a lodging room .

FRANCIS HUNT sworn.

I am a shoe-maker ; I am a house-keeper; I let a lodgings to the prisoner, I think it was on the 2d of May, I let him a bed and bedding, and every thing necessary in the room for two shillings a week, it was in Horse Shoe-alley, Petticoat-lane ; they came the same evening to lodge there, it was on a Wednesday; we don't live in the same house, we live three houses from it. I let it out to make the rent of it; I let the lodgings to the prisoner and his wife; I missed the things last Saturday was a week. They lodged with me till the Friday, the day before, but they kept the key till Sunday afternoon.

Q. Did you go in by yourself? - Yes, I went myself, I and my wife together.

Q. What did you miss? - A blanket, sheet and quilt.

Q. What is the value all together? - Five shillings.

Q. How came they to go away on Friday? - The wife was taken up for pawning a sheet for another man, and sent to Clerkenwell on Friday night. I did not hear of it till Sunday; I never saw the husband after the Friday, not till last Friday.

Q. Did you find any of this property? - Yes, it was all found in a pawnbroker's shop, in Nightingale-lane, at Christopher Higham 's.

Mr. Gurney. I believe this man was not the only lodger in your house? - No.

Q. A person of the name of Dorothy Lynes lodged there? - No, she went away three weeks before this happened.

Q. I believe your suspicion did not fall on the prisoner at first? - No, not in the

least. The prisoner came to me and brought me the duplicate last Saturday morning, and he said, here, Mr. Hunt, here is your duplicate.

Q. Your suspicions fell on Dorothy Lynes ? - Yes, they did.

Q. Did the prisoner assist you at all to take her up? - He was very active, and went about two or three hours to seek for a constable to take her up.

Q. You did find her out I believe? - We did, and took her before a magistrate. After that the officer said, you had better take the prisoner up too, for Dorothy Lynes throws it all on the prisoner.

Q. Pray what sort of a fastening is on that door? - Very slight; I believe with a slight shove it might be opened.

Q. What time was the discovery made that the things were lost? - On Saturday morning.

Q. And the prisoner had not slept there since Thursday night? - Not that I know of.

PATIENCE HUNT sworn.

I am a married woman, my husband is a shoe-maker, the last witness.

Q. When did you first know that any property was missing? - Last Saturday was a week.

Q. How came you to go to the room then? - Another lodger came and asked me if I knew any thing of Mrs. Dempsey? I said, no; she said her door was wide open, and the bed clothes were gone. This was on Saturday; and I went and saw the things gone off the bed.

Mr. Gurney. You found the door open? - Yes, I did.

DOROTHY LYNES sworn.

I sell old clothes in Rosemary-lane; I lived at the lower part of this house till last Tuesday was three weeks.

Q. How long had you lived there? - I believe a month or five weeks to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Whereabout were the lodgings of Dempsey? - In the one pair of stairs above me.

Q. What do you know about stealing these articles? - The prisoner at the bar brought me this property, and told me he was very much distressed, this was on last Saturday was a week, he brought the sheet, blanket, and quilt, and I went and pawned them for him for two shillings, I brought him the duplicate and two shillings before witness, and delivered them to him.

Q. Where did you pawn them? - In Nightingale-lane, all at one place in one bundle together.

Q. Do you know any thing more about them? - No, I do not, I was taken up last Sunday and kept till the Monday, because Sunday I could not have a hearing; the prisoner at the bar he wanted to leave me in the lurch, because my name was on the duplicate; I was taken and discharged before the magistrate, he was taken up on Sunday afternoon; I was not cleared till one o'clock on Monday, I was cleared when he had a hearing before the justice.

Q. When did you first give an account of these things being delivered to you? - I gave it to the justice when I was committed.

Q. Did you ever give any account of that before you was committed? - No, I never did.

Mr. Gurney. You pawned these things as your own property? - Yes.

Q. You told the pawnbroker they were your own property? - I did.

Q. Then you was taken up for stealing the things? - I was.

Q. And in order to save yourself you accused the prisoner? - Certainly.

Q. And till you was taken up and carried before the justice you never told this story? - I never did.

Q. Then when he brought you these things you thought they were his own

property? - No, I knew they were not, but it is a usual thing to pawn these things and get them out again.

Q. I think you said you are a dealer in old clothes in Rosemary-lane? - Yes, I am.

CHRISTOPHER HIGHAM sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I produce the things.

Q. Who pawned them with you? - Dorothy Lynes , on the 19th of October, in her own name.

Q. Did you give her a duplicate? - Yes.

Mr. Gurney. She told you they were her own property? - Yes, she said she was positive they were her own.

Two witnesses gave the prisoner a good character as to honesty.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-32

704. ELIZABETH MORLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of October , three linen shirts, value 5 s. a damask table cloth, value 1 s. 6 d. a damask napkin, value 1 s. a cotton gown, value 9 d. a marseilles petticoat, value 3 s. a pair of dimity pockets, value 6 d. a linen shift, value 2 s. the goods of Mabel Charlton .

MABEL CHARLTON sworn.

I am a widow ; I live at No. 15, Brownlow-street, just by St. Giles's , pretty near by the workhouse; I am a lodger there, all the articles in the indictment were in the kitchen.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take them? - Yes, she took them between six and seven on Tuesday night that I lost them, and I went to the pawnbroker's.

Q. Do you mean to say that you see her take them? - I did not see her take them out; it was the 8th of October; I see them again the next day, the 9th, at Mr. Wooden's, a pawnbroker, I found nothing at the pawnbroker's but this petticoat; I found the other things at Mrs. Morley's house, I saw there a table cloth and a shirt.

Q. How did you know it was her house? - The officers went to search her house; she did not send the petticoat to pawn herself, she sent another person, and they stopped her, and the woman took them to Mrs. Morley's house.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe whoever stole these things got them by force, they broke off a padlock? - No, they did not, the padlock was not broke at all.

Q. Oh, the staple was taken off? - No, they wrenched open the door at the bottom.

Q. Then it was more likely to be done by a man than a woman?

Court. Was you out or at home at the time the things were taken away? - I was at home.

Q. Did you hear the alarm at the door? - No.

ANN ORCHARD sworn.

I am a married woman; I washed at Mrs. Charlton's that day, when I went up to tea I believe it was six o'clock, I locked the kitchen door, when I came down I believe it was near seven, the door was wrenched out at the bottom and the property gone.

Q. Were all the things in the indictment missing? - Yes.

Q. Did you recover any of them at Bow-street? - I saw the petticoat and table cloth at Bow-street.

Q. Is it a marseilles petticoat? - It is a mock marseilles.

Q. Do you ever hear women call it a marseilles petticoat? - No.

Q. Do not women call it so in general? - No, they do not.

Q. Is it a damask table cloth? - I don't know.

Q. Have you seen any thing else? - Yes, but I don't know whether they are Mrs. Charlton's or no.

ELIZABETH HAWKES sworn.

I sent some things to be washed by Mrs. Charlton, Mrs. Charlton fetched them from my house, some of the things in the indictment; I lost two shirts, one of my husband's shirts, a small damask table cloth, a damask napkin, a callico bed gown, it is cotton, a mock marseilles petticoat, and a pair of dimity pockets; I should know them again if I was to see them.

ANN TOLLIN sworn.

I go out a washing; I carried the petticoat to the pawnbroker's for Mrs. Morley.

Q. Did you carry any thing else? - I did not.

Court. Then that is out of the question now.

JOHN CAHUSAC sworn.

I am a servant to a pawnbroker, there was a petticoat pledged with me.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

On Wednesday the 9th of October, between eight and nine in the evening, I was sent for to Mr. Wooden's, the pawnbroker, to take Mrs. Tollin into custody for a coat that she had brought there to pawn, and I went with her to Mrs. Morley's house, in King-street, Drury-lane; Mrs. Morley was not at home at first, she came in a few minutes afterwards.

Q. Who was it you first took into custody? - I took Tollin first, and I went with her to Mrs. Morley's house; the prisoner she was not at home, she came in about two or three minutes afterwards; when Mrs. Morley came in Mrs. Tollin said, I am stopped with this petticoat, Mrs. Morley said I sent her to pawn it for me; then I asked her if she had any objection for the prosecutrix to see if there were any other things of her's in the house, she said no, she immediately pulled out her keys and opened her drawers, and pulled out a shirt and this napkin, or small table cloth, and Mrs. Hawkes said they were her's.

Q. Who was present at this time? - Mrs. Hawkes and Mrs. Charlton, and Tollin was there.

Mr. Knowlys. This woman is a married woman? - Yes, the husband was in the house at the time, and her two sons, they have kept a house there this seven years; I knew the house directly as Tollin mentioned it.

Q. I believe you told Mrs. Morley, I have no search warrant, will you let me search? - It was so.

Q. What is her husband? - Her husband is a cabinet maker, he used to live in Hog-lane.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-33

705. ANN LOVELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , fifteen yards of linen cloth, value 7 s. the goods of George Wilkinson .

JOHN BLISS sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Wilkinson, a linen draper . On the 29th of September, Thursday, we lost the cloth; I saw it lay by my master's door about an hour and a half before, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, and as near as I can tell about six, or half past six, Mrs. Kirton sent for my master to send somebody to

her house, for there was a person that had offered some cloth to sell, which she looked upon to be the property of some linen draper; and my master sent me, and the prisoner at the bar had the piece of linen underneath her arm, at Mrs. Kirton's, which I can swear to be my master's property, and was at the door an hour an a half before.

Q. What was the piece of linen goods? - Fifteen yards of Irish linen cloth.

Q. How did you know that to be your master's property? - I unrolled the cloth and there was a private mark, the letter A. my own marking, a shop mark.

Q. Can you positively swear to that cloth by that mark? - Yes.

Q. Had you sold such a piece? - No.

Q. Was there any other servant in the house that might have sold it? - There is another young man besides my master. I have kept it from that time to this.

Mr. Peat. You said that was laying at the door, do you mean laying outside of the door? - Laying on a box, outside of the door, underneath the window.

Q. I suppose there were many other articles laying with it? - Yes, there were.

Q. And some of the same kind, if that is your's? - There was no more Irish linen.

Q. It was in a public street? - It was in Darton-street, Westminster.

Q. There were other servants in the house? - Yes.

Q. And besides your master serves sometimes? - Yes.

Q. Then I suppose you had not cloth of the same length and price? - Various lengths, but the same price.

Q. I presume you sell a good deal in the course of a year? - Yes.

Q. And marked in the same way as that is? - Yes.

Q. You missed a piece of cloth from the table at the door, whatever this is; what is the mark on that cloth? - It is the letter A. a small a.

Q. Is it made with a pen or pencil? - It is made with a pen.

Q. Is it made on the cloth itself? - It is.

Q. I suppose it is very customary for you to write on the cloth? - The private mark it is.

Q. Then you can tell your hand writing? - Yes.

Q. I suppose you could tell your handwriting on cloth equally as on paper? - I could.

Q. And if you wrote on sand perhaps it would be the same? - No, I don't know I should.

Q. Is there any thing particular in your hand writing, I suppose if there were fifty lives depending upon it you could swear to it? - I could.

Q. If you was to see a piece of it at York you could say it was your hand writing? - I think I could.

Q. You think you could, then you would have some difficulty in saying it was your hand writing? - I don't know but I might.

Q. This poor woman happened to have a piece of cloth under her arm that you think has got your mark on it, but in fact you lost a piece of that sort from the table at the door, and you have sold a great quantity of that cloth, and it is only a single letter that you can swear to it by.

Court. You have sold quantities of that sort of linen with the same private mark? - Yes.

Q. Was that exactly the quantity that you missed? - I cannot tell the quantity there was of it because we cut it at various times in the day; I missed the piece of cloth, but I could not tell exactly the quantity.

Q. Was it of that size and bulk that you missed? - It was.

Q. How soon after that you had last seen it, might it be that you saw this woman at the house of Mrs. Kirton's? - About an hour and a half after I had seen it, I saw it at Mr. Kirton's.

Mr. Peat. Supposing there had been a piece of cloth two yards longer or shorter, could you have distinguished it by the eye? - No, I could not.

SARAH KIRTON sworn.

I am a house keeper at Westminster; I have nothing but lodgers since my husband died. On the 19th of September, about half after six o'clock, the prisoner at the bar came and offered me this piece of cloth to sell at my own house; I have known her years, but I never knew no such thing of her; she seemed very much in liquor, I asked her where she got it, she said she found it in the street, and asked me if I would buy it; I thought in the day that I had seen the piece of cloth at his shop, and I sent to Mr. Wilkinson to know if it was his property; the prisoner has three small children.

Mr. Peat. She is a labouring woman? - She is, she sells water creases about; she told me she found it about half an hour after six.

Prisoner. I honestly found it; I was out with a few water creases, groundsel and chickweed, and I picked it up at the Cock-pit, Westminster; if it is opened the dirt will be seen on it, and I knew that gentlewoman, and I went to shew it that gentlewoman, and that gentleman came to the house and said it was his, the gentleman never saw me near the shop, nor I was never near the shop, nor knew where the shop was; I am a poor distressed woman, got a large family, and a poor had working man.

Court to Bliss. In what state was it? - Under her arm rolled.

Q. Did you see any dirt on it? - I did not.

Kirton. There is dirt on it.

Jury to Bliss. How far is the Cockpit from your house? - Not half a quarter of a mile.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-34

706. MARY MERCHANT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a linen sheet, value 2 s. two linen shifts, value 3 s. a check apron, value 1 s. a child's cotton frock, value 1 s. the goods of John Edwards .

JOHN EDWARDS sworn.

I live in St. Giles's ; I lost one shirt, two shifts, a coloured apron, and a child's frock, last Monday, the 19th of September; I lost them out of the yard belonging to the house where I live, my wife saw them there last; we found part of them at the pawnbroker's, my wife did the next day.

ELIZABETH EDWARDS sworn.

I know nothing of the prisoner taking the things, I never saw her before till after I found the property at Mr. Quick's.

JOHN QUICK sworn.

On the 20th of September, Mary Merchant came to my shop to pledge this apron; in about two hours afterwards, Mrs. Edwards came to me and gave me information of such property that she had lost; I shewed it to her, and she said it was her apron she was sure.

Mrs. Edwards. I can swear to the apron.

Prisoner. I washed for this man and he owed me a trifle of money, and he said

he would bring me something to pawn, and he brought me these things.

Q. Do you mean that the prosecutor gave you these things? - No, a man who lodged in the house where I lodged, he gave me these things to pledge for the money, and I went to a pawnbroker's that I knew.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-35

707. JAMES PAUL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , three linen sheets, value 15 s. the goods of James Brewer .

JOHN ANKINS sworn.

I am a servant to the prosecutor, James Brewer , he keeps the Swan with Two Necks, in Lad-lane . On the 16th of October, the prisoner Paul, came in and asked for a bed, accordingly I ordered the chambermaid to conduct him to a room, which she did, and in the morning I missed three sheets.

Q. What time did the prisoner go away? - I did not see him go in the morning, I cannot tell.

- sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; between the hours of seven and eight in the evening, on the 17th of October, I took in these two sheets, one for five shillings and the other for three shillings; I live with Mr. Meadows, Old Gravel-lane, I took them in of Sarah Demsel , she is here, she pledged them for eight shillings, she pledged them for her own property.

SARAH DEMSELL sworn.

On the 17th of October about a quarter before eight o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar met me at a public house where I got my bit of bread; I never saw the man before, I asked him if he would buy a pair of breeches that I had to sell? he said he had no money, he had just bought a pair of sheets, and he asked me if I knew of any place where he could pledge it safe? I took one to Mr. Meadows in the Minories, and pledged it, they knew me well, so they asked me no questions; there was another sheet, he came on the 19th day, but I would not do any thing with it.

Ankins. There is the Swan, Lad-lane, on the sheets, and James Brewer .

Prisoner. I was coming down from my daily labour, and coming along the street, this witness came up with two men, and they asked me if I knew any thing about a sheet? and I said no, they then took me to the rotation, where the justices sit, and they committed me to Clerkenwell; I never saw the woman in my life till she was sent for up to the rotation office.

Court to Ankins. Did you ever see that woman about your house? - No.

Prisoner. I had three witnesses yesterday, but I have none to day.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Judgment respited.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-36

708. JOHN UNDERWOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , a wooden butt, with iron hoops, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of Samuel Whitbread , Esq .

(The case opened by Mr. Leech.)

FRANCIS STRANGE sworn.

From some information I received, I went to Mr. Cleaver Simmons's wharf, on Saturday last, and there I saw the

prisoner at the bar, I asked him if he had taken one of our casks instead of an oil cask in a mistake? he said he had taken no cask at all for he had none to take, he went about his business then, and afterwards I called him on one side again, and told him the consequences of it, and that if he did not tell of it he might depend on a prosecution; and then he went over to Kent-street with me and shewed me the Butt on his own premises, it was under a shed in the yard.

Q. Was it opened or concealed? - The yard was concealed, but the shed was open.

Q.What do you mean? - The yard door was locked.

Q.Was it a yard in which butts are usually placed? was there any other butts there? - It was in an empty yard.

Q. Did you observe the marks on the butt? - There was S. W. and Chiswell-street, London; I know it to be Mr. Whitbread's property.

Mr. Knapp. When you first saw the prisoner at Cleaver's, was what you stated to the court all the conversation that passed? Did not he say that he had not an oil cask but he had an empty beer cask? - He did not say so at first, he said he had never a cask at all.

Q. Then he went with you to his premises and shewed you this cask? - He did sometime afterwards.

Q. And desired you to take the cask? - He did, and turned it out himself.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before? - I did not.

WILLIAM HODSON sworn.

On Friday last I had some beer come in, I went to the door and I saw a man have his hand on the butt, I thought it was one of my own men, but I cannot say it was the prisoner at the bar, it was a man in a white jacket, but I thought it some of our brewers.

Prisoner. I have an Impediment in my speech, my counsel will speak for me.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-37

709. CHRISTOPHER HICKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , two yards of Cambrick, value 12 s. the goods of Robert Harvey .

ROBERT HARVEY sworn.

I am a linen draper at No. 108, Oxford-road , the prisoner at the bar was a shop-man to me; on Sunday the 6th of October, I was informed of something, and from that I suspected the prisoner, I looked into a box of his in the shop, and I found a neckcloth with my mark upon it, but that is not the thing I mean; about eight o'clock in the evening I called in a watchman and I shewed the prisoner first the neckcloth that I found in the box, and I insisted on him opening his boxes that I might look into them, he had three; he opened a box and I found the first thing two remnants of cambrick my property, I know them by my own shop marks on them, N. D. it means nine shillings a yard, on the other A. M. eight shillings and three-pence; he said he bought one remnant in the country and the other in town, he had been with me eight months, he had a written character from Stockton.

Mr. Clifford. He made no difficulty in opening his boxes? - He did not.

Q. You have several articles in your shop marked the same way as these? - Yes.

Q. You might have sold these two pieces? - I don't think it is possible I could have sold them, I am confident I never sold them to Hickson.

Q. You might have sold them to somebody else and they might have sold them to him? - It is possible.

JAMES DART sworn.

I am a Watchman in Soho-square; I was present when these boxes were searched, I saw the cambricks taken out, he said that he had bought them in country and in town, and so he said of every thing Mr. Harvey found.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-38

710. ISAAC ROBLET and WILLIAM WOOD were indicted for stealing, on the 16th of September , two live tame ducks, value 2 s. the goods of John Starling .

JOHN STARLING sworn.

I live at Tottenham High-cross ; I am a labouring man , I kept four ducks, I lost two on the 16th of September, my son took the ducks on the prisoners, I know they were my property.

WILLIAM STARLING sworn.

There was a man coming by, he saw the two men chasing the ducks, and he came and told a neighbour, and the neighbour told his girl, and the girl told me, and I ran after him and took one man with this bag and two ducks in it, it was Isaac Roblet ; it was the 16th of September between eight and nine in the morning, I took him about four hundred yards from my father's house.

Q. Was the other with him? - Yes, when I followed.

Q. Did the other say any thing? - No, he went away, the other prisoner Wood, had nothing.

Q. Did you know them to be your father's ducks? - Yes, I could swear to them.

THOMAS WHITE sworn.

I was at home about eight o'clock in the morning, and I was eating a bit of victuals in my house, and a man came up to the door and he said White, if you don't mind you will lose your ducks, I made answer and said they were none of my ducks, they are my next door neighbour's; my little girl went into the next door neighbour's and told them; I did not see the prisoners do any thing; I went to my neighbour's assistance and we took James Roblet ; Wood I did not see, he was taken at Edmonton-statute.

Prisoner Roblet. I was going down to Edmonton-statute, and I saw this bag lay in the foot path, and in it there were two ducks, and this young man ran after me and said, they were his ducks.

Court to William Starling . Did he say that he found the ducks at the time you overtook him? - No, he said they were not mine, and he would not give them me.

Court to John Starling . Were these your ducks that were brought back in the bag? - They were.

Isaac Roblet . GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Publickly Whipped .

William Wood , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-39

711. JAMES CONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of October ,

a cloth coat, value 1 l. a linen waistcoat, value 5 s. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Thomas Montgomery .

THOMAS MONTGOMERY sworn.

I am a paviour by trade; I know the prisoner at the bar, I believe he was a labourer to the paviours ; I charge him with the coat, waistcoat and handkerchief, of which I was robbed out of my bed room; I found the handkerchief about his neck on Saturday; the prisoner lodged in the next room to me, I have got the handkerchief here, I can swear to it by one mark, that is here at the corner; I did not see the coat and waistcoat, he will not own to that.

Q. What did the prisoner say for himself when you saw this about his neck? - He told me that he took it out of the room the Sunday before; I asked for it, and he took it off his neck and gave it me directly.

Q. He works with you, did not he? - He did not work with me, he worked for the same master.

Prisoner. I do not disown that I took out the handkerchief the Sunday before, I was going out for a clean shirt, he was seeing me all the week, and he must know that I had it.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-40

712. MARY EASTER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of October , a linen shirt, value 6 s. a muslin neckcloth, value, 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Samuel Choice .

SAMUEL CHOICE sworn.

On Thursday the 3d of the present month, October, I was requested by Mrs. Choice to make out a list of some linen that she was about to send to the laundress, which I did, and made a copy of the same, that is all I know of the business; I know nothing of missing the linen.

ELIZABETH LIGHTFOOT sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Choice, he is a butcher in Newport-market. On the 3d of October I delivered to the prisoner three shirts, and three neckcloths, and five table cloths; she is a washerwoman's servant ; there was only two shirts returned, and two neckcloths, one shirt and one neckcloth being missing; that is all I know of the matter.

MARY BISHOP sworn.

I am the washerwoman for Mr. Choice, Mary Easter was my servant.

Q. Did Mary Easter bring you any linen from the prosecutor? - She brought me two shirts, two neckcloths, and other articles, I am sure of that.

DAVID ROSS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I produce one shirt, I had it of Mary Easter , the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Had you ever seen her before she pawned it? - Yes, I had.

Q. What account did she give? - She fetched something else out and left this for four shillings.

Bishop. It is like the shirt that used to come to be washed, but it has no mark on it.

Prisoner. I know that is not Mr. Choice's shirt.

Court. What became of the shirts that were delivered to you, it has been proved there were three, and you delivered but two.

Prisoner. What I had of Mr. Choice I delivered to my mistress.

GUILTY . (Aged 47.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-41

713. JOSEPH CROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , eight pieces of woollen cloth, value 2 s. the goods of James Cole .

ELIZABETH COLE sworn.

I am the wife of James Cole ; I lost some cloth the 16th of October; I lost several pieces, and the prisoner is the person that my servant swore to taking the property from her person.

HANNAH MACLEAN sworn.

I am a servant to Mrs. Cole, and she left me in the house to put the children to bed, I had put them to bed, and I heard the voice of a boy say mistress, there is a boy come out of your house with a bundle; I gets up to the door, and I saw this boy with the bundle under his arm; this was the 16th of October, in the evening, between eight and nine o'clock; he was about the fifth door up the court from Mrs. Cole; I ran up to the boy and took him and found this bundle under his left arm.

Cole. These are my things that I fitted up on Sunday, I left them on a great chest when I went out; I put out slop work, my husband is at sea, he has been there this seven years.

WILLIAM HANSON sworn.

I am the constable, Mrs. Cole gave me the things, and they have been in my possession ever since.

Prisoner. I was in Rosemary-lane, I had been in London about five days; I was asking my way to Whitechapel, and a young man in a blue jacket, asked me to carry this bundle; I told him I would, and he bid me to follow him; I thought he would pay me some halfpence for carrying of it, and while I was carrying of it this young woman comes and lays hold of me. I was born in Liverpool, and had been at work in Coventry, and I was going down to my parish; the gentleman was before me, and when he see the young woman come up he turned on the left hand side.

Court to Maclean. Did you see any body else with him? - Nobody but himself.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-42

714. ANN BANKS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Stephen Franklin , no person being therein, between the hours of one and two in the afternoon of the 28th of September , and feloniously stealing therein a callimanco gown, value 10 s. the goods of Ann Barnes .

ANN BARNES sworn.

I am a single woman .

Q. What time did you leave your house the day that it was broke open? - At half after eleven in the forenoon.

Q. Was any body in it? - No.

Q. Had you secured the doors and windows? - I had.

Q. Had you any lodgers there? - I was a lodger myself.

Q. Are you sure that none of Mr. Franklin's family were in the house? - No one was in the house.

Q. Had Franklin no child? - The child was out with Mrs. Franklin, and I am very sure there was nobody in the house.

Q. When did you return? - About five in the evening.

Q. What day was it? - The 28th of September.

Q. Was you the first person that came there after the house was broke open? - No, I heard of it before I got home by a neighbour.

Q. Who did you understand was the first person? - I was the first of the family that came home, that belonged to the house.

Q. How did you find the doors and windows? - They were secured.

Q. Was any part broke? - No otherwise than the sash wrenched up and put down after the robbery was committed.

Q. Could any body go in when the sash was put up? - Yes.

ELIZABETH FRANKLIN sworn.

Q. Are you the wife of Stephen Franklin ? - I am, this house is his; I went out with Mrs. Barnes, I stood at her door while she fastened her window, and I saw her go and try the sash before she went out.

Q. Did you leave any body in the house when you went out? - Nobody, I had a little girl but I took her with me.

Q. Did either of you know the prisoner at the bar? - No.

BENJAMIN BEVAN sworn.

I produce a gown, it was given me by Palmer along with the care of the woman, in Hatton-garden, it has been in my possession ever since.

- PALMER sworn.

On Saturday the 28th of September, I went home to dinner; I am a printer, I live next door, I went up on the leads, the leads of the two houses joins; as I was up on the leads, I saw the prisoner at the bar come up the court, she walked up and down, she had a basket on her arm, after she had walked up and down, and seeing nobody about she began to push the window of this house up, she was about twenty minutes getting it quite up; as soon as she got the window up she got in at the window, as soon as I see her quite in, I ran down stairs, and catched her coming out with the gown on her.

Barnes. I know the gown, I have mended it; I am a pensioner myself.

Prisoner. I know nothing at all about it, I have no witnesses at all, I have no friend in the world.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 3 s. (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-43

715. LUCINDA GREGORY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of September , a feather bolster, value 3 s. a feather pillow, value 2 s. 6 d. a linen sheet, value 3 s. and a cotton bed curtain, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Sarah Nisbett , in a lodging room .

SARAH NISBETT sworn.

I live in Smith's-street, Westminster . On the 3d of September the prisoner came to my house to lodge, and she continued in my lodging till last Thursday; I let to her two rooms on the first floor, last Thursday I had some reason to suspect that some part of my property was gone, on Friday morning I went into the room to examine, and I found the best part of the bed furniture gone away; the indictment states a pillow, bolster, sheet, and curtain, but that was not all I missed, I missed a great deal more, and I went to the police office, and she was put in the power of a constable, and the property found at a pawnbroker's.

Q. Had she quitted your lodgings? - She had not, I went on an information of a former lodging that she had served the same.

THOMAS HAYNES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I have a bolster, pillow, and sheet, brought to me by the

prisoner at the bar at different times, they were all pledged in the month of September, she pledged them in the name that I had seen her in our shop before, by the name of Mary Arthur.

Nisbett. They are all mine.

Prisoner. The things that I took out of this room would have been replaced, but she took the tickets from me, and said she would replace them; on Friday morning, she brought up some other women and imprisoned me, and did not give me an opportunity of getting the things back again, she knew they were to be replaced that day, it was necessity made me do it, I have done wrong to be sure, but I did not know the consequence of it; I did not apply to any body to come here for me.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you give her leave to pawn any of these things? - No, nor I never had any suspicion of it till Thursday last.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-44

716. STEPHEN LUCAS , JAMES LEMON , EDWARD HUDSON and WILLIAM ARSLETT were indicted for stealing on the 17th of February , six gallons of red port wine, value 2 l. 10 s. three gallons of madera wine, value 1 l. 10 s. and sixty glass bottles, value 4 s. the goods of Zachariah Foxall , Esq .

ZACHARIAH FOXALL sworn.

I live at Ashton , Stephen Lucas was sometime my labourer ; the night between the 16th and 17th of February last my cellar was broke open; Sir William Stubbs sent to me that he had a person in custody that gave information of my cellar being broke open, and he desired me to get a warrant for Stephen Lucas and James Lemon .

WILLIAM POSTMOUTH sworn.

I bottled the wine, and kept an account of it from time to time, I work for the prosecutor.

Q. Did you miss any wine? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember the cellar being broke open? - Yes, between the 16th and 17th of February; we lost between three and four dozen of wine, two dozen of port, and a dozen of madera; I know nothing of the prisoners taking them.

Q. Did you ever see any thing of them afterwards?

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-45

717. PATRICK SALT was indicted for stealing on the 7th of October half a gallon pewter pot, value 3 s. the goods of Thomas Dibble .

THOMAS DIBBLE sworn.

I keep a public house ; I saw the prisoner at the bar with this pocket about his neck come down under his smock frock, my servant drew him a pint of beer, I saw the pot there, he immediately turned and went down to the vault, and the vault door he could not shut it, and I stood and saw him put down this can and hid it behind the necessary door; I immediately went down and brought it up and took him before the magistrate; when he came before the magistrate he said if I meant to prosecute him so it was. I had half a gallon washed up with the gallon that day, and that was lost.

Prisoner. I was very much in liquor, and had been on board a ship, I had a couple of shillings when I came to this man's house, and I had a few pots of beer; I did not know what I was doing or saying, I was so drunk in his house, when I came in his house; I never did any harm before, I acknowledged this drunkenness, and leave it to the mercy of the court; it is the first time I was before any court.

GUILTY . (Aged 65.)

Imprisoned six months in the house of Correction and Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-46

718. ELIZABETH GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing on the 9th of October , two linen gowns, value 1 l. a worked muslin apron, value 4 s. a plain muslin handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of Mary Griffiths .

MARY GRIFFITHS sworn.

I live in Bloomsbury ; the prisoner was not my servant, I knew her; I know that I lost the things; I lost two gowns, a worked muslin apron, and a plain handkerchief; I live in lodgings.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the same house with you? - No.

WILLIAM CATER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce a worked muslin apron and a muslin handkerchief, I took them in of the prisoner at the bar, I knew her before for three weeks, she pawned them on the 12th of October, which was on a Saturday.

Court to Griffiths. Do you know the prisoner? - Yes, she is my sister, we used to work needle work together, my brother is the prisoner's husband; she was in the house at the time, she was there a week before I lost them.

Q. What is the prisoner's husband? - He is a sailor, he went to sea through her. I know the apron by a darn which I worked myself, and the handkerchief by a piece in it, the corner.

Q. Was your box locked? - Yes, it was.

Q. How was it opened? - By the nails being drawn.

Prisoner. I did not draw the nails, the box was open, and I was distressed for money to pay my lodging, and I took the things out, I thought I could make more free with her than with a stranger.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Recommended by the Jury.

Fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-47

719. WILLIAM PETERS was indicted for stealing on the 6th of October , eleven live tame hen fowls, value 11 s. and two live tame cock fowls, value 2 s. the goods of Samuel Redfurn .

JANE REDFURN sworn.

I am the wife of Samuel Redfurn ; I have lost some fowls, but I cannot swear to them.

WILLIAM LYLES sworn.

I live servant with Mr. Redfurn of Tottenham ; my master lost some fowls the 6th of October at night, he lost twelve or thirteen we cannot say which, they were kept in the hen house, I had seen them the evening and I missed them the next morning; we have got nine of them here, there is a man here who found them on the prisoner's back.

Q. Do you know them to be your master's? - I do, I have been used to them ever since they were young ones; I can swear to them, two of them particularly I can positively swear to.

FRANCIS WOOD sworn.

I was going to work in the morning about six o'clock, and I heard some fowls chattering, it was at Newington, about a mile, or a mile and a half from Mr. Redfurn's.

Q. Where did you see the basket? - It stood at the watering trough at the weavers arms, the bottom of Newington; at eight o'clock I heard of the robbery, and I recalled to my mind that I heard some fowls at an uncommon place but I did not see them, my mistress desired me to go in pursuit of these fowls, I went in pursuit after them, and I over took the prisoner with them tied to his back, a little on this side of Kingsland turnpike, and I followed him to the Fox in Kingsland road; I asked him to sell me a couple of fowls? whereof he told me he would sell me a couple of live young pullets at fourteen-pence a piece, he said he bought them at St. Ives market, he opened the basket to me, and the first I took out was an old hen, and then I took out another, and I said I have seen enough, and I took him and the property to my master's house, and my master gave charge of him to Mr. King; I know them to be my master's property, I am sure of it.

Prisoner. I bought them and paid for them, I never said I bought them at St. Ives; St. Ives is about sixty-two miles off.

JOHN KING sworn.

I received the fowls and the prisoner of Mr. Redfurn, and I put the prisoner in the compter. (Produces the fowls.)

Wood. I can swear to this one as the one I took out of the basket.

Lyles. I can swear to it too.

ANN FINCH sworn.

I am a carman's wife; my husband has lived with a gentleman sixteen years, I have known the prisoner about thirty years, he was servant to my father fourteen years.

Q. Was you ever at St. Ives? - Yes, about six weeks ago, I was down there a week, I went to take a child there to nurse, I came away five weeks ago to day.

Q. Do you mean St. Ives in Huntingdonshire? - Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there? - Yes, and he bought a great many dozen of fowls while I was there, I saw him buy them and pay for them, he has been a poulterer twenty-four years, and before he was that, he was servant to my father fourteen years; I cannot say he bought these there but he bought many dozen there, but I cannot swear that he bought these there, because I don't intend it.

Q. Where does he follow his business? - At Pendryton in Cambridgeshire, he lives there, I have known him to be a very honest industrious man and strove hard for his living.

Prisoner. I did not say that I bought these at St. Ives, I said that I bought a great many fowls at St. Ives, I bought these coming along the road.

GUILTY . (Aged 60.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the house of Correction and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-48

720. THOMAS FIFEILD was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of October , a pair of cotton breeches, value 3 s. the goods of William Kendall .

WILLIAM KENDALL sworn.

I did not see the prisoner take the breeches.

FRANCES DELEWAY sworn.

Q. Are you servant to Mr. Kendall? - No, I was in his shop; he is a pawnbroker, I saw the prisoner put his hand to the breeches and take them down and put them down by the side of him and carried them away, I told Mr. Kendall.

Kendall. I pursued him and over took him and took the property from him, they are my breeches, there is my duplicate on them, they were hung up in the shop to be sold.

Prisoner. I had been drinking along with an hackney coachman, coming along Brick-lane, Old street, he had a bundle under his arm which he said he had got from his sister; he says to me come into this pawnbroker's, I want to pawn something, accordingly I went along with him and I waited some time while he pawned his shirt, stockings, and some other things, he came out to me and brought a pair of breeches out, and said, take these breeches down to the coach stand, the bottom of Old-street-road, and I will meet you there. I had twenty pounds in my possession not two hours before, which I might have made away if I had been dishonest.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Kendall. I believe it is his first offence, he stood there quite stupid as if he did not know what to do.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-49

721. MARGARET ESSEX was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , a white linen apron, value 3 s. a check linen apron, value 2 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 2 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the goods of Esther Merry .

ESTHER MERRY sworn.

I live in Westminster , I am a servant , I lost these things in August, from a kitchen, I found them again in the pawnbroker's shop, I believe about eight weeks ago, I am not rightly sure, the pawnbroker has them here, the prisoner was about the house as a charewoman.

Q. Who do you live with? - With Mrs Dupree, she is a lady of no business.

GEORGE WAGGERLEY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I took in these things of the prisoner at the bar, two aprons and two handkerchiefs, on the 20th of August.

Merry. I can swear to these things, they have my marks on them.

Prisoner. I did not take the things, another person gave them me to pawn; the person who gave them me is gone out of the place; I have no witness that she gave them to me.

Waggerley. I believe the prisoner at the bar has pledged other things of greater value, that belonged to this young woman, the young woman did not live then where she does now, she lived then at Chelsea.

Court to Merry. Who was it you lived with? - I was out of place at my grandmother's house.

Q. Has she never been to see you where you are now? - No, never.

Q. Was you out of place in the month of August? - Yes, I was.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-50

722. JAMES ATWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of September , seventy-two iron handles for saucepans, value 15 s. the goods of Robert Howard , John Ford , and John Scholefield ; and

EDWARD MOORE was indicted for receiving twenty-four of the above handles, knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN SCHOLEFIELD sworn.

My partners names are Robert Howard and John Ford ; we carry on the business of tin plate workers ; we lost some kettle bales first, afterwards we discovered we lost some handles for saucepans, and then Atwell was taken to the office, he confessed.

Court. Did you tell him it would be better for him to confess? - I did not, nor did any one to my knowledge.

Q.Before you went to the magistrate did the prisoner Atwell say any thing about this business? was he in your service? - He was a filer and polisher of these handles; these handles that we found were finished; they were handles given out to be finished, and when finished were taken away privately.

Q. Where were the saucepan handles found? - At John Godfrey 's, in Chiswell-street, he is here; there are a dozen them in court.

Q. Did Atwell say any thing to you about this business? - When he found he was violently suspected by the other men, he confessed that he had taken four dozen at one time, and two dozen at another; in our counting house he said that he had given them to Moore, who had sold them for him; we sent the constable then by Atwell's directions to Moore, and Moore was taken up.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Godfrey's? - I did, and there I saw a dozen of handles, that are now in court,

Q. Who has had them in custody since Mr. Godfrey? - There are our people here that will know them to be our property.

Prisoner Atwell. Let the witnesses be examined separate.

- sworn.

I am the foreman to these gentlemen; I have seen the saucepan handles; I really believe they are the property of Mr. Howard and Co. there were no particular marks on them, but the man that made them was in court this moment.

JOHN GODFREY sworn.

I am a tin plate worker, I produce some handles here, I received them from Moore, about the 10th or 12th of September; I have had them in my custody ever since.

Prisoner Atwell. I knew nothing at all about it, till my master accused me of it; I was frightened and brought into the counting house, and he said if I would confess he would be a friend to me, and if not he could not do any thing, and I should be punished.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you tell him that he should be punished if he did not confess? - I cannot say.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-51

723. JAMES ATWELL was again indicted for stealing, on the 25th of September , eighty-four bales for kettles, value 7 s. the goods of Robert Howard and Co . and

EDWARD MOORE was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-52

724. WILLIAM PINK was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of July , a silver table spoon, value 10 s. the goods of Thomas Simkin , and

ANN WRIGHT was indicted for receiving the same knowing it to be stolen .

MARY SIMKIN sworn.

Thomas Simkin is my husband; I have lost thirty-two spoons since February; I don't know when I missed this particular one, for sometime I have missed half a dozen at a time since February last.

Q. Did you find any of them again? - None but this one at the pawnbroker's; I lost a silver waiter on the 13th of September, I suspected the prisoner, he is a journeyman carpenter ; and at his lodgings I found several duplicates, one for six table knives and forks, and one for a table spoon I redeemed at the pawnbroker's on the 19th of September.

HENRY COOKE sworn.

I have got a spoon here, it was pledged with me the 16th of July last.

Q. Who pledged it with you? - The woman at the bar, Ann Wright , she pledged it in her own name, Ann Wright .

Q. Did you ask her any questions? - I did, she said that she brought it from one Mrs. Chilton, that she had half a dozen of them, and that she had pawned them at several different times; I never saw the man.

ROBERT BERISFORD sworn.

I am a constable; I took them up; Mr. Simkin sent for me down to take the man, he was stopped at his house; I went with him to his lodgings in Shoreditch, and among a variety of duplicates I found one that led to the discovery.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-53

725. CATHARINE JONES and WILLIAM MACCOY were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of October , two shillings , the monies of Robert Barry , Esq .

ROBERT BARRY sworn.

I was passing through the Strand on the 17th of this month, and I was accosted by the woman at the bar, who took me by the arm and desired to see me home; it was about eleven o'clock at night; I desired her to quit me, to go away frequently; she as constantly insisted on seeing me home, at last however she did leave me, she returned in about two minutes afterwards; a man that had been with her parted from her, and went to the other side of the way; she resisted every effort I made to desire her to go away; she took me by the arm a second time, and walked as far as Essex street, when I turned into Essex-street she pinioned me in this manner, she took hold of both of my arms suddenly, I could not suppose that she had any design to make any resistance, but at the same instant she gave me a very violent blow with her elbow, and that followed with another blow from her hand; I put my hand to my side immediately and missed two shillings that I had in my pocket, and having in the same pocket a bill of exchange of twenty nine pounds, fearful that she had taken it as well as the money, I ran to her directly and got hold of her wrists, and I charged her with robbing me; she denied it directly, from the manner in which she spoke I discovered she had the money in her mouth; I called the watch, she struggled very violently to get away before the watchman came, the watchman did not come though he was in sight, and a croud collected, they desired me to take her to the watchman; then I took her to the watchman, and told him that she had robbed me, and he desired I would give her into his custody, but I thought it not

safe to deliver her up to him; then says he if you will not give her in my custody I will not receive her; I desired to accompany her, he held her left hand and enabled her to get her hand to her mouth, and she spit the money out; I charged her with having it, doing so she said she had not spit the money out, and had no money of mine; the watchman said he was sure she had not, she opened her hands and shewed that she had not got it; I observed the watchman putting his hand to his pocket; the same hand that had hold of her hand, and I caught hold of his hand directly, and charged the watchmen with having the money, I held his hand, he struggled violently, him and I, he struck me, however I still held his hand, at last finding he could not extricate himself, he let the money drop out of his hand.

Q. Maccoy was not near you when she took the money out of your pocket? - No, he was not, he was only in sight.

Prisoner Catharine Jones . About half past eleven I was coming down the Strand, and just as I came by Essex-street, this gentleman was coming along by himself, and I fancy he was rather in liquor; so with that the gentleman stopped and asked me where I was going to? sir, says I, where you please; says he, my dear I live in the Temple; so I laid hold of his hand, and went down Essex-street with him, and he began to be very rude, and he made me a present of a couple of shillings, and he said he had not a penny more, and next night he would give me another shilling; he put his hand up my petticoats, and as soon as he put his hand up my petticoats he said, there was something there that was very uncommon, and he insisted on having the two shillings again; with that I put the two shillings in my mouth, and he said if I did not give him the two shillings, he said he would charge me with the watch, or take me to the watch-house himself; so with that he began to take me to the watchman, and give charge to the first watchman he saw, and he wrenched the two shillings out of my mouth. It is the first time that ever I was here, nor I never was guilty of any such thing in my life; I have not had a friend to see me all the time I have been in prison for this two weeks.

Catharine Jones , GUILTY . (Aged 20)

Transported for seven years .

William Maccoy , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-54

726. WILLIAM RICHARDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of October , a hempen bag, value 1 s. twenty-five pounds weight of linen rags, value 9 s. the goods of Joseph Coad .

Joseph Coad , &c. were called on their recognizances.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-55

727. JOHN WEST was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of October , a hay cutting knife with a wooden handle, value 7 s. an iron axe with a wooden handle, value 1 s. the goods of John Finch .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-56

728. THOMAS EYLES was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of October , 2 s. in monies numbered , the monies of Jonathan Stirtevant .

JONATHAN STIRTEVANT sworn.

The prisoner was a servant of mine; I lost two shillings the 16th of October. On the 15th of October I went to Mrs. Edwards and desired her to come to lay out some money with me in Newgate-street , and I marked some money in her presence, seven shillings for the articles that she was to purchase, pretty near the end of the shillings with the end of a fork, I cannot describe the marks any more than that, that this was on Tuesday night the 15th, we then agreed she was to call on the 16th before eight o'clock to lay out the money, she called and bought a pair of stockings, value three shillings, a pair of womens black hose, value two shillings, and a pair of leather gloves, value two shillings, that was seven shillings.

Q. Whose money was it you marked, her money, or your money? - It was my money In the morning on the 16th I went down from my shop in Newgate-street to my shop in Ludgate-street; as soon after as I thought she had been there to buy the articles, I came home between eight and nine, and I looked into the till and I found only five shillings; I had cleared the till over night on the 15th. These five shillings, were marked shillings; I had sent word for my brother to come down that he might see the same, he did come down, and immediately I went to Mrs. Ann Edwards to know whether she had been to lay out the seven shillings as desired, she said that she had been there, and had laid out the seven shillings; I returned back; other business called my attention directly, I had not time to have the prisoner taken up then; on the 18th I desired another gentleman to go and lay out some money with me, that money I

marked, and took it to him there marked, his name is Gough, he his here; I did not mark it in his presence, I marked that money with a fork at a different distance from the side.

Mr. Const. You say it was on Tuesday evening the 15th that you went to Mrs. Edwards; do you remember what time of the evening? - It was dark.

Q. You have a perfect memory of it? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember whether you gave the same evidence before the magistrate? - Yes, I did.

Q. You are sure? - I did to my knowledge; I remember I was not asked whether it was the evening.

Q. Will you venture to swear that you did not say that your conversation was with her on the morning of the Wednesday, instead of the Tuesday night? - It never was in the deposition because it was not so.

Q. When you came home after Mrs. Edwards had been there, you saw but five shillings in the till, and you expected seven, what did you say to him on that occasion? - Nothing at all, I had a mind to know whether there was seven shillings laid out or no, and when I returned the prisoner was gone to another house, and other business called my attention of consequence till towards the evening.

Q. Did you say nothing to him the next day or that night? - I did not till I took him up.

Q. And then you took him up to answer for it? - Not for that only.

Q. Having done this, having let all this time elapse for the sake of some good purpose no doubt, who searched him? - The constable.

Q. Who took the money? - The constable.

Q. On your oath have not you had it in your possession since? - I have.

Q. Did not the alderman tell you that it should not be so? - It was not.

Q. Now the marks that you talk of, you marked a great deal of money for the different persons? - Yes, half a guinea-worth of silver; I marked seven shillings for the lady to lay out.

Q. Did you never mark more on your oath? - Not this five, six or seven years.

Q. I mean did you mark more than the seven shillings which on that day you marked, did you after that time mark more? - I did, on Friday three shillings and six-pence; but it was a different distance from the sides.

Q. You swear that you did not refuse the constable to keep the money? - I did refuse he should keep it, that there might not be any alteration made in it.

Q. Have you ever been concerned in any of these prosecutions before? - One.

Q. On your oath was not you concerned in more prosecutions than one? - I shall not tell you.

Q. In point of fact how many people have you prosecuted for this same thing? - I don't chose to answer it.

Q. What will it hurt your feelings? as they are so nice I will not press it? - You warm me, when I first got up I was very cold.

Q. Have you told any body that you knew he was a thief before you hired him? - No.

Q. Pray have you had any conversation with Mr. Arnett? - Mr. Arnett brought him to me and recommended him to me.

Q. Have you had any conversation with him on this subject? - I see Mr. Arnett at the shop where he lives, and I had conversation with him.

Q. And you never told him so, that you knew he was a thief before you hired him.

Court. How long had you had this man? - About three weeks; a fortnight

in the shop where the robbery was committed.

Q. When was he taken up? - On Friday.

Q. Was he taken up in your shop? - He was taken up in my shop in Newgate-street.

Q. Was it from there that he had taken the money? - No, it was in No. 36, Ludgate-street.

Q. Did you see any money taken from him when he was taken, and how much? - Sixteen shillings and some halfpence, half a guinea and the rest in silver; there was one shilling of the marked money which the lady laid out herself, and two shillings of the marked money that Mr. Gough laid out.

Q. What past between you and him when you took the money from him? - The constable was going to take it out of his pocket, and he pulled it out and laid it on the table.

ANN EDWARDS sworn.

Q. Did Mr. Stirtevant call on you at any time? - Mr. Stirtevant came to our house on the 15th of this month.

Q. Are you a married woman? - Yes.

Q. What is your husband? - A perfumer.

Q. When was it he came, morning or evening? - About eight o'clock in the evening, to beg the favour of me to go to his house in Ludgate-street to lay out some money that he would mark for me in my presence; the same money I went with the next morning about a quarter past eight; he marked seven shillings with a fork rather on one side.

Q. Should you know the shillings again? - Yes, I bought a pair of cotton stockings, a pair of black stockings and one pair of gloves; I laid out the whole seven shillings with the prisoner at the bar, I laid the money down on the counter, I saw the prisoner take it up, I don't know what he did with it, then I came out of the shop and went home.

Mr. Const. You paid him the money, that money was not put in the till? - I don't know what he did with it, he took it up in his hand.

Mr. Const. He might mix it with his own money for what you know.

JOHN STIRTEVANT sworn.

On Wednesday morning the 16th of October, when I went down to the shop I asked the prisoner at the bar, how much he had taken?

Court to Mrs. Edwards. What time was it you went in the morning? - About half past eight.

Court to John Stirtevant . What time was it you asked him this question? - I suppose it might be about ten o'clock; I asked him if he had had any customers? and he said, he had; I asked him how much he had taken? he said, he had taken five shillings; I desired him to put the articles down in a book which we kept for that purpose; he put down two of three articles which he had sold to the lady; one pair of womens cotton, three shillings, and one pair of womens gloves, two shillings; which amounted to five shillings; I asked him if that was all he had taken or sold? he said it was; I put an article down which I had sold while he was away that he should not make any excuse; I also saw in the till that there was but five shillings in the till.

Mr. Const. You are brother to the gentleman that gave evidence just now? - I am.

Q. Are you correct as to the conversation that passed between you? - No, there was nothing else said to him.

Q. When you asked him how much money he had taken, did he say five shillings? - He said he had taken seven shillings; then I asked him whether he had included the two shillings that I had taken? he said, yes; then, says I, you

have taken but five shillings; he repeated the words to me.

Q. Now about the setting down these things. Are you sure you did set down the pair of gloves that you sold, or did he set them down? - I set down one pair, and he set down one pair.

Q. Did he or you set down the pair of gloves that you sold? - Will you give me leave to speak? and I will speak.

Q. Answer that question. - He did set down a pair of gloves.

Q And you, when you might have an explanation of the five shillings, you said nothing to him for two days, and when the thing is too late to explain then he is brought here? - He would put down the one pair I sold without my consent, but I made a memorandum of that pair of gloves being my selling.

JAMES WOODMAN sworn.

I am a constable; I was sent for on Friday the 12th of October; I took the prisoner out of the shop into the back room, and he took some monies out of his pocket and threw them on the table; with that I searched him further, and I could find nothing else on him. The monies were half a guinea, five shillings and six-pence in silver, and three-pence halfpenny in copper.

Mr. Const. When you took this young man into custody he was told that he had taken money that was marked, then he threw down the money immediately without coercion? - He did.

Court. Was he told that he was searched for money that was marked? - That I cannot positively say.

Mr. Const. Do you know what they said to him? - First he told him that he had a suspicion that he was dishonest; that were the words I believe.

Q. Was there any thing said about his having money that was marked? - I don't know particularly there was.

Q. You know that he put his hand into his pocket and threw down the money; you searched him and found that he had no more than that. At first did not Mr. Stirtevant say that all the money belonged to him? - I don't know that he said so; I remember, at Guildhall, that there was three shillings that Mr. Stirtevant swore to. I kept the man till next day, and produced it before Alderman Langston.

Q. The Alderman wished you to keep it; who prevented you? - Mr. Stirtevant.

Q. When it was produced the next day, had not you a shilling in your pocket marked just the same? - I had one the Saturday afterwards, and I really did say that I could not swear to money that was marked no more than they were.

Court to Stirtevant. Is that money you now produce, the same as was produced before the Alderman? - It is the very same.

Q. Is there any one that you can speak to? - That is the one marked for the lady.

Court to Jury. Look at this and see if you can ascertain it to be a shilling.

Jury. It is a French shilling.

Court. Then there is an end of this indictment.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-57

729. JOHN COOKE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , a silver watch, value 15 s. a piece of silk ribbon, value a halfpenny; a piece of brass, being part of a brass watch key, value a farthing ; the goods of John Goddard .

JOHN GODDARD sworn.

I am a baker . At the time this watch was lost this man lived with me as my

journeyman ; I had lent the watch to my other man Charles Dale .

Q When did you lend it him? - It must be before the 16th of August, some little time before that.

Q. How soon did you see it after it was missing? - It was four weeks within one day.

Q. In whose hands did you see it? - In the hands of one Peter Tuffs , he is here.

Q. Should you know it again? - Yes, my name is upon it in full length.

CHARLES DALE sworn.

When was it your master lent you the watch? - I cannot positively say the day; some little time before it was lost; I pulled it out of my pocket, and left it in the bake-house, the place where I bake.

Q. What day did you leave it in the bake-house? - Friday, between the hours of four and seven. I first missed it between six and seven to the best of my knowledge after I came home.

Q. Was it between the hours of four and seven in the morning or afternoon? - The afternoon. I missed it the same afternoon.

Q. Where did you first hear any more of it? - I heard the prisoner had sold the duplicate of a watch; I told my master, and he went and examined the watch, and he knew it; I have seen the watch, I saw it in the hands of the person that bought the duplicate, Peter Tuffs .

Q. How soon afterwards did you see it in his hands? - About a month.

SAMUEL SADLER sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Berry, in Aldersgate-street; I took in the watch of the prisoner on the 6th of September in the afternoon, I cannot positively say the hour.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - Never. I asked him particularly whether it was his own? he told me it was. I delivered it afterwards to Peter Tuffs by his producing the duplicate.

Q. Should you know the watch again was you to see it? - Yes, I should.

PETER TUFFS sworn.

I am a shoe-maker by trade. The prisoner came to my house and told me that he was out of place, when, I cannot justly say, it was the Sunday afternoon, five or six weeks ago, and said that he had the duplicate of a watch to sell; I bought it of him, and I fetched it out of pawn for fifteen shillings, from Mr. Berry's, in Aldersgate-street; I went to get the bruises out of the case, and the young man saw it, Charles Dale , and said it was his property; when they stopped the watch I went to the justice with it, and the prisoner was taken up.

Q. Who did you deliver the watch to? - To George Deary , the constable.

Prisoner. Ask him whether I did not mention to him that I found the duplicate wrapped up in a piece of paper when I came to his house? - He told me that when he was being taken before the justice. When he came first he said he was out of place, and that he had got a watch to sell.

Prisoner. I did not say that I was the owner of the watch.

GEORGE DEARY sworn.

I am a constable; I produce the watch; I happened to be in a public house the 16th of September in the morning, and Peter Tuffs came in to ask if there was any person there that could take out the bruises in a case of a watch? I got the watch of Peter Tuffs , I produce it now, I have kept it till now by the order of the magistrate.

Tuffs. I believe this is the watch that I fetched out of pawn at Mr. Berry's.

Jury. Are you sure that that is the watch? - Yes, it is the watch by the bruises on the case, and the name on the inside, Goddard.

Sadler. This is the watch that was pawned with me.

Goddard. This is my watch, my name is in full length on it in the inside.

Dale. I cannot positively say it is the watch, I did not take particular notice, I bad it but such a little time in my possession.

Prisoner. On Saturday the 14th day of September, in Golden-lane, on my travels I found, wrapped up in a paper, three half-pence and a shilling, and the duplicate of a watch; and knowing Mr. Tuffs, I mentioned that I had got a duplicate of a watch to sell, and it was fifteen shillings if he would buy it of me, with that he took the duplicate and said he would take it out and see what it was worth, and give me the value of it for the duplicate. I have no witness, I sent to Kensington Gravel-pits, but they did not come.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-58

730. GEORGE CLAYTON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , four pieces of printed callico, containing one hundred and five yards, value 10 l. the goods of Richard Yeoward .

JAMES SCULTHORP sworn.

I live with Mr. Richard Yeoward , he is a wholesale linen draper .

Q Do you know of his having lost any property in September last? - Yes, on the 26th of September he lost four pieces of printed callicos, he lost them out of the warehouse, from the counter in the front.

Q. Is the warehouse part of the dwelling house? - It is underneath the dwelling house, under the same roof.

Q. Can you get into the warehouse any other way than to the dwelling house? - No, only at the front door; the warehouse is on the ground floor; there is nothing there on the ground floor but a passage. I saw the printed callico there about an hour before, I happened to shew them.

Q. What time did you miss them? - I did not miss them till I took them on the prisoner's shoulder. This was on Thursday the 26th of September; I took him then that instant about thirty yards down Ironmonger-lane; I went up to him and tapped him on the shoulder, it was about thirty yards from our house; he had the linens on his shoulder.

Q. How came you to follow him? - I had some writing to do in the counting house and I saw something white, and I went to the door, and about twenty yards down the lane, or more than twenty, I saw the prisoner at the bar with the linen on his shoulder, and I knew one of the patterns, because it was the right side outward, and I followed him; the constable has them.

A CONSTABLE sworn.

This gentleman sent for me to take the prisoner into custody, and these things were hanging on the banisters when I went into the warehouse; they were delivered to me at the house.

Sculthorp. I am certain they are my master's property; this one piece has been in the house more than a twelve month, they are worth about ten guineas.

Prisoner. I hope I may be excused; I was in liquor.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Prisoner. I really have not words to express myself; I really was in necessity and very poor and distressed and had been drinking, or else I should not have been guilty of such a transaction.

Reference Number: t17931030-59

731. DANIEL CRAWLEY and JOHN GIBSON were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Brownless , about the hour of seven in the night, on the 2d of October , and burglariously stealing therein, a child's dimity petticoat, value 6 d. a muslin cap, value 6 d. a dimity pocket, value 2 d. and two pieces of muslin, value 2 d. the goods of Richard Brownless .

RICHARD BROWNLESS sworn.

I had my house broke open on the 2d of October, I was at work abroad, I have little to say in it; my wife is the chief evidence; I found some keys in the house afterwards.

ALICE BROWNLESS sworn.

I was at the outside of the door when it was broke open; it was about half after seven or a few minutes more.

Q. Was it so light then that you could distinguish the features of a man's countenance? - Not without a candle; we had a great many lights at the door, but we could not without those lights distinguish the features of any man.

Q. Suppose there had been no light or candle whatever, and you could only have seen before you by the light in the air, could you distinguish the features of a man's countenance? - I think I could. At my entering the house I opened the door, and I heard a noise, and I heard them come down stairs step by step; when I said three times, who is there? They did not answer but kept coming forward; there were three, but one made his escape, the other two we took; I gave the alarm to the next door, and I had assistance immediately; Mr. Austin, of No. 3, and Mr. Goodyear of No. 8, came out, and they brought back the two prisoners, they were not out of my sight; the first man that came out knocked me down. The things are here which they had about them; there are eleven keys also, three found on them, and the others hid in the house; I took hold of the man by the coat, and had them brought into the house to be searched.

Mr. Knapp. You was before the Lord Mayor, was not you? - No, before Mr. Alderman Gill.

Q. Did you make any charge of any thing being stole? - No, sir, only of the things being moved.

Q. Because I observed in Alderman Gill's commitment, the charge was with an intent to steal? - They were only removed from one end of the room to the other.

Court. That will do.

- AUSTIN sworn.

I was called to pursue the prisoners; I pursued them; I took Gibson before ever he was out of my sight; I believe there was nothing found on him, the constable searched; there were some keys found on one of them.

Mr. Knapp. Where did you apprehend Gibson? - On Snow-hill, just at the bottom of the court where Mr. Brownless lives.

Q. Where does Mr. Brownless live? - In Clarke's-buildings, on Snow-hill.

WILLIAM GOODYEAR sworn.

I am a neighbour to the prosecutor; I remember pursuing the men; I took Crawley, he was not out of my sight; I delivered him up to the constable; there was something found upon him, I believe it was keys.

JOHN TAYLOR sworn.

I am a constable; I was called in to search the prisoners; I found three keys on Gibson, two in his pocket and one he threw away into the passage, one is a pick lock key; he said, there is more besides these; I said, if there is more besides these I had better secure you first, and I secured him, and he told me of the pick lock key, mind you did not find that key in my pocket, and you did not find it on me.

ROBERT RAWSON sworn.

I am a tobacconist; I was at Mr. Spilsbury's warehouse, on Snow-hill, and I heard the cry of a woman, murder and thieves! I made an attempt to jump over the brick wall to her assistance, but it was too high, and I ran round, and I saw the man at Mr. Brownless's door taken.

JANE AUSTIN sworn.

Mrs. Brownless knocked at our door; I opened it, and she was holding her own street door by the key, and she said there was somebody in the house.

Court to Richard Bownless . What did you find up stairs? - At the bottom of the kitchen stairs, under the mat, I found four pick lock keys after the men were committed on the 3d of October. On the 6th of October my wife found four more on the shelf.

Q. As to the things above stairs, did you see your property after your wife left the house? - They were not in the same situation as when my wife went out; but my wife can give the best account of that.

Alice Brownless . I found four pick lock keys on the side of the sink where the men opened the window to try to make their escape out; but when I opened the door they made their effort to come out of it, and Crawley knocked me down, and when I got up this Mr. Goodyear had got a poker to defend himself; and was taking the prisoner.

Q. Do you remember in what situation these things were before the prisoner entered your house? - I left them on a chair on the further end of the parlour, and I found them on a table adjoining to the parlour door, scattered about.

Q. At what distance were they from the place where they had been left? - About two yards.

Mr. Knapp. Pray Mrs. Brownless what time did you go out and leave the house? - About four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Have you any servants in the house? - No, I have lodgers but they were gone out of town almost for a fortnight.

Q. How soon did they come home? - Not till the Friday after the robbery was committed, it was committed on Wednesday evening, and they came home the Friday following.

Q. Have you no person that has access to your house? - There is only one person that comes in to make her son's bed, Mrs. Matthews.

Q. Was she there that day? - Without doubt.

Q. Did her son sleep in the house previous to this robbery? - He did.

Q. Had he been in the house in the course of this day? - He came home after the robbery was committed.

Q. Do you know whether the person, the mother of the young man, came in to make his bed after you had left the house? - She had.

Q. Had she a key to let herself in? - She had, and she had a charge to leave the door as she found it.

Q. Where does she live? - By St. Sepulchre's church.

Q. Is she a married woman? - She is.

Q. Does she always come to make her son's bed? - She does.

Prisoner Crawley. I had been up to see an uncle of mine in Oxford-road; I got to Snow-hill about seven or eight o'clock, I heard a cry of stop thief at the end of this court, and some men followed me,

and the woman said that I was the man that went out of her house; when she went before the alderman, she said that the things were moved from the table on to a chair, and she said at first she lost some pictures.

Prisoner Gibson. I was sent with a letter from the Chapter coffee house, passing St. Sepulchre's church a man came and told me, and said I was his prisoner, and had committed a robbery up that court, and took me to that woman's house, they came and searched me, and found two keys about me, one is the key of my chest, and the other is the key of a shed that I had the charge of at Blackwell Hall.

ANN MATTHEWS sworn.

Q. Do you remember the day that Brownless's house was broke open? - Yes, I was there to make my son's bed, and I found the door fast, and I left it fast.

Q. Did you observe up stairs any child's dimity petticoat, a muslin cap, &c. - I saw none.

Q. Did you ever touch any thing of that sort? - I went to no apartment but my son's.

Mr. Knapp. Matthews, you make your son's bed, I take it for granted, every day? - Yes.

Q. Have you any manner of recollection of the very day of this robbery, except what you have heard since you came into court? - I heard there was an alarm in the house three men being in the house.

The prisoner Gibson called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

Daniel Crawley , GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

John Gibson . GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Of the Larceny only.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-60

732. MARY BLANEY was indicted for stealing on the 23d of September , a linen sheet, value 10 s. three linen sheets, value 12 s. a cotton gown, value 8 s. a stuff gown, value 15 s. a pair of stays, value 12 s. a cotton bed gown, value 1 s. and a cotton counterpane, value 8 s. the goods of Susanna Madden in her dwelling house .

SUSANNA MADDEN sworn.

I lost three shirts, &c. last month; on the 23d of September, they were up in the one pair of stairs room; I was sorting my dirty linen, and I went down stairs, and when I went up again I saw the prisoner with the things in her apron on my own stairs.

Q. Was she a lodger in the house? - I never saw her before.

Q. Did you stop her? - She went out of my own passage, and I followed her out into the court, and I saw the top of my own stays, O dear, says I, you have robbed me; I immediately laid hold of her.

Q. Then you lost sight of her? - Yes, I did, but I followed her and I saw the stays; she knocked me down, she gave me three blows.

Q. Did you secure her at that time? - I could not, she knocked me down in my own place, and made her escape.

Q. When was she secured? - The same evening.

Q. What became of the things? - She threw them down in my own parlour; I followed her into the court, and pulled her back when I saw they were my own things into the house again; I have got the things, they are in court.

PHILLIP JOSTLING sworn.

I got these things the next day after the robbery before the magistrate, with a black gown, which the magistrate told me to let the woman have, but I put my name inside of it.

Madden. My husband was buried on the Sunday as I was robbed on Monday, they are all my things.

Q. What value do you put on them? - I wish to be reasonable to the prisoner.

Prisoner. I was taken up on another affair, and this constable made the woman say that I was the woman, because I had a dark bed gown on, and some woman came to me and said, if I would give her two guineas to give the constable, she would forgive me.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-61

733. ARTHUR BARTLET was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of October , a printed book, value 2 l. another printed book, value 4 s. another printed book, value 2 s. a wooden box, value 3 s. ninety-four printed numbers, value 2 l. 7 s. a silk waistcoat, value 5 s. a jean waistcoat, value 7 s. a pair of nankeen breeches, value 7 s. a pair of cloth breeches, value 10 s. three linen shirts, value 4 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 6 d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. a muslin neckcloth, value 6 d. a taylor's iron, called a goose, value 2 s. 6 d. a wooden sleeve board, value 6 d. and a wooden notch board, value 6 d. the goods of Thomas Yarrell .

Thomas Yarrell , &c. were called on their recognizances.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-62

734 CHARLES ADLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of October , a woollen cloth coat lappelled, value 1 l. 10 s. another woollen cloth coat, value 1 l. 5 s. three quarters of a yard of velveteen, value 7 s. a quarter of a yard of kerseymire cloth, value 3 s. a pair of metal knee buckles, value 1 s. 6 d two pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. a muslin neckcloth, value 2 s. three yards of kerseymire, value 1 l. a cotton marseilles waistcoat piece, value 5 s. seven yards of nankeen cotton cloth, value 9 s. one other woollen cloth coat lappelled, value 1 l. 8 s. a silk and cotton toilenet waistcoat, value 5 s. a muslin neckcloth, value 2 s. a pair of black silk breeches, value 1 l. two yards of thickset, value 5 s. two yards of muslin, value 5 s. 6 d. a kersey-mire waistcoat, value 10 s. another kersey-mire waistcoat, value 10 s. a toilenet waistcoat, value 4 s. a yard and a quarter of toilenet, value 10 s. a yard of muslin, value 5 s. five yards of nankeen cotton cloth, value 5 s. and a kerseymire waistcoat, value 10 s. the goods of William Nash .

WILLIAM NASH sworn.

The prisoner was a servant of mine he has been a servant to me two years all but thirteen days. I am a woollen draper , and salesman ; I found him on the 15th of this month, on Tuesday morning about the hour of eleven, going up Giltspur-street with a parcel wrapped up in a news paper; when I went up to him and accused him of the property which he had there, he said it was his own, he said it was two shirts and other property; there was a hole in the news paper, through which I saw woollen goods, which he thought it not right that I should examine his property in that place, but I insisted on it, and found it was a coat, &c. they are all in the constable's possession; what is more remarkable this here coat is cut out fore part, and back part the wrong way, but the sleeves is cut out the right, by a mistake and error in the cutting.

JAMES HALL sworn.

I am a constable; there was a coat delivered to me, and the rest by different pawnbrokers before the magistrate.

Nash. This is the coat lappelled cut out the wrong way by one of my journeymen in a mistake, I am sure it is my property.

Mr. Peat. What are you? - I am a taylor, woollen draper and salesman.

Q. Who is your partner? - None at all, I never had any.

Q. You met the prisoner in the street? - I saw him in the street, he was on the opposite side of the way, I crossed over to him, he said he had got shirts there, and other things his property.

Q. Did he tell you he had them of a cousin of your's? - He did not.

Q. How much money have you given him since he was in custody? - What he demanded as his right, fifteen shillings.

Q. Did you take two guineas from the prisoner? - I did not, I took it out of a chest; I gave him fifteen shillings of it, which he demanded as his right, he said the rest was mine.

Q. What past when you gave him the fifteen shillings? - Nothing more particularly.

Q Do you know John Lawson ? - I do.

Q. Did not you make some promise to him if he would be a good boy? - I did not.

Q. You said nothing about the two guineas before the sitting magistrate? - I did not mention it, I am sure of that.

Court. Did you take the two guineas out of the chest? - I did, I asked him whether it was his or mine, he said it was mine, but fifteen shillings that was his own. I asked him if he had any more demands on me? he said no.

Q. Were there two guineas and fifteen shillings? - No, two guineas out of which I returned him fifteen shillings; I took out these buckles, neckcloth and stockings, and told them if they were his to take them; he said they were mine.

Mr. Peat. Was it before or after the promise you made him, that he told you that these buckles were your's, and this neckcloth? - I know nothing of any promise.

Q. Then it seems you made him no promise whatever, recollect yourself a little? - None at all.

Q. Let us understand what you mean by promise, perhaps you mean one thing by it and I another? - When I met him I asked him what property he had got? and where he was going?

Q. What did you say to him about confessing in the way of a promise? - Nothing to that purpose at all.

Q. Then it seems nothing passed about your cousin at all? - Very few word; nothing that I can bring against him.

Q. Did he say that he had received them of him? - He did not.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

JOHN LAWSON sworn.

Q. When was the first time that you was in company with the last witness and the prisoner together? - I cannot recollect the day but it was after he was taken.

Q. Did any thing pass about his forgiving of him? - By no means.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Prosecutor. My lord the prisoner being a youth of few years, I hope you will consider his mercy.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-63

735. ASHER JACOBS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of September , a canvas purse, value 1 d. two half crowns, a shilling, a six pence, a counterfeit six-pence, value 1/2 and four copper halfpence, the goods, chattels and monies of John Dando , privately from his person .

JOHN DANDO sworn.

I was robbed the 21st of September in the afternoon, the things were taken out of my jacket pocket unknown to me in Rosemary-lane , the pocket was inside my jacket; the purse was inside of the pocket.

Q. What was in the purse? - Two half crowns, a shilling, a sixpence, a sixpence that was not passable and some half-pence, I cannot justly tell how many; I had it in my hand not above five minutes before it was taken out of my pocket; I had paid for a pair of stockings that cost me seven-pence in Rosemary-lane.

Q. Had you paid for them in the shop or in the street? - I dropped a halfpenny out of my hand, and the prisoner picked it up and gave it to me, I put the money into my purse.

Q. Was it at that time that you put the purse and money into your pocket? - It was, and I turned myself round and a Mr. Pratt came and told me that I was robbed, and I felt and found my purse was gone, I did not know who had it nor did not know what was become of it; I and Mr. Pratt went up a little alley to see if we could find out who the thief was, but I could not find him, and I did not make any further enquiry that night.

Q. You did not find him in the alley? - I did not; I went home.

Q. Have you had any reason since to suppose that the prisoner has taken your property? - I have no reason at all otherwise than by evidence.

Prisoner. I know no more about it than nothing at all, I never saw the man at all in my life.

Court to Prosecutor. Had you taken observation of him enough to know him again? - He was standing right opposite to me while I was dealing for the stockings; and I dropped a halfpenny out of my hand, and he picked it up.

Q Is there any one time that you can fix that your money was taken from you? - No one time at all, I did not feel the least thing in the world of its going.

Q. What are you? - I am a coal heaver.

EDWARD PRATT sworn.

I was in Rosemary-lane, the time the prosecutor speaks of, I saw the prisoner at the bar follow Mr. Dando, and I saw him turn his jacket and take the purse out of his pocket, and had it in his hand, and then he ran away, I stepped up to the prosecutor and told him his pocket was picked, and told him where the man went, and as soon as we got to a little court we lost him for that night.

Q. What was the colour of the purse? - It was a brown dark canvas bag, dirty.

Q. Do you know what the prosecutor put in this bag when he put in the change? - I do not.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner after this? - On the Monday following, this was on Saturday night, on Monday we see him again.

Q. How did you know it was the prisoner you see? - I know it was the same person, I had seen him before then a good many times, I have no doubt of his person, none at all.

Q. Was any thing found on him? was he searched? have you any thing more to say about it? - No.

Prisoner. I never saw the man nor none of his money, if people will swear false I cannot help it.

Court. What may the prisoner's business be? - I don't know, I never saw any thing of his trade or occupation.

EDWARD HIGGINBOTTOM sworn.

I am a salesman in Rosemary-lane; on the 21st of last month I saw that young fellow running, he run against me in the lane just at the corner of the court, it was about five o'clock as nigh as I can guess when he ran against me; I saw two men running after him, one said that he was robbed; I know him, he dealt in the lane, I said to him he has gone up that court; I saw him on Monday morning much about the same place between five and six o'clock, rather more to the Minories way, I took him and carried him to the compter, and gave him in charge to an officer.

JOHN FENNELL sworn.

I am the street keeper in Cheapside, the prisoner was brought to the compter and kept there sometime before I was sent for; I found him at the compter.

Q. Was he searched there? - No, not by my seeing.

Court to Higginbottom. Was he searched? - He was not; as I was not an officer I did not think it was proper for me to search him.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing but not privately. (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-64

736. ROBERT EDGEWORTH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Peter Mellish and William Mellish , about the hour of two in the night of the 19th of October , and burglariously stealing therein, a cloth coat, value 4 s. a velveret waistcoat, value 1 s. a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. a clasp knife, value 1 d. a half crown, two shillings, ten copper halfpence, and one copper farthing, and a counterfeit six-pence, the goods and monies of Joseph Birch in the same dwelling house .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN LODGE sworn.

I am a journeyman butcher to Mr. Mellish, Shadwell-dock.

Q. What are their names? - Peter Mellish and William Mellish .

Q. Where is their house situated? - By the river's side at Shadwell-dock .

Q. Describe the situation of this house to the court and jury? - I sleep in a little house that goes in at the right hand side of the gate and my master's house is on the left hand side.

Q. Is there a wall that surounds both the houses? - Yes, there is.

Q. Is where you live within the gateway? - It is.

Q. You slept with Joseph Birch in the same house? - Yes.

Q. Where is that house? - It is in master's yard.

Q. Were there any great gates to this yard? - Yes.

Q. Is it within those gates? - Yes, it is.

Q. What fence is there about you? - A wall on one side of the house, and a river on the other.

Q. Are you inclosed on the side of the river with a wall?

Court. Does the wall go completely round? - From one side of the gateway to the other.

Mr. Knapp. Is there any other way into the street except through the gate? - No, none at all.

Court. I want to know whether that wall goes all round the premises? - It joins from our house to master's.

Q. Does the wall continue from your master's to the house you live in? - Yes, there are buildings all round, it is a square, it is one wall.

Q. Does it all belong to Mr. Mellish? - It does.

Q. It is completely enclosed, is it not? - It is.

Court. Then if I understand you right where you sleep is one side of the gateway and Mr. Mellish's house is on the other side of the gateway, and the wall connects both? - It does, and there is no possible way of getting out but at the gate, except they get over the wall, and that will take a man a deal of trouble to do.

Q. To what purpose is the house you live in used for? - For the butchers to sleep in that work for Mr. Mellish.

Q. Did you sleep in the same room with Birch? - Yes.

Q.Now what time did you go to bed at this night? - Some time between eleven and twelve, Saturday night, but I cannot tell the day of the month.

Q. How long ago? - I cannot say, I did not take any notice of the day of the month, about a fortnight or three weeks ago, or it might be longer or shorter; I was the last person up.

Q. When you went up stairs how did you fasten the door at the yard? - To the door in the yard there is no fastening at all only I put it to, and when I went up to the room where I slept, I latched it.

Q. You nor Birch does not pay any rent to your master? - No, none at all.

Q. Are you sure you locked the bed room door? - I am positive I latched it.

Q. So that any person to get into that room must lift up the latch to come in? - Yes.

Q. Was you present when the man was taken? - The man that took him came and called to me at the bottom of the stairs, and I got up from the bed.

Q. Who alarmed you? - Taylor.

Q. What time of the morning was that? - About a quarter before four, he told me it was.

Q. Was it light at that time? - It was moon light, it was not day light, I went to bed again; he asked me if I had lost any thing? I said no, and this man got out of bed and said that he had lost his coat and waistcoat that he had pulled off when he had gone to bed.

JOSEPH BIRCH sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Mellish, I sleep in the same lodge with the last witness; this happened last Saturday was a week, I went to bed a little after eleven o'clock.

Q. When you went to bed what did you do with your things? - I chucked them into the cupboard, a striped velveret waistcoat, and a cloth coat, and a white linen handkerchief in the pocket of it, with a red border, half a crown in the waistcoat, two shillings, and a bad six-pence, five-penny worth of halfpence, a farthing, and a knife.

Q. What may be the value of them altogether? twenty shillings? - No, not so much.

Q. When did you miss them? - I did not miss them till Thomas Spikes came and awaked me in the morning, he came and called my fellow servant, but I was awake and I missed my things directly I went to the cupboard, it was about four o'clock.

Q. Was it light or dark? - Dark.

Q Was the door shut or open at that time? - I cannot tell, I did not observe.

Q. How soon did you find them again? - A man came and told us that the clothes and the prisoner were up at the watch-house.

Q. Did you go up to the watch-house? - I did, I saw the things, they were all there as I had put them in the cupboard the over night.

Q. Are they here? - They are, I gave charge of the prisoner directly.

Q. Did you know him before? - I cannot say I did, I have heard him cry the hour but I did not take any notice.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing at the time? - He said nobody could confine him, with that I gave charge of him directly.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn.

I am a rope maker, I know the prisoner's face again since I took him; I took him on Sunday morning about half after two o'clock, I took him in Mr. Mellish's yard, at the post of the stair case where the men sleep.

Q. What business had you in the yard there? - I had been looking out for my father in law at Shadwell-dock stairs, he was to come to me at twelve o'clock, I stood at the stairs and I heard the prisoner at the bar go past one o'clock and two o'clock.

Q. Where was the man? - In the street. With that there I sat there, I was keeping the boat afloat, I made the boat fast at the stairs, and took the sculls to Mr. Mellish's yard; I went to get myself a glass of gin, and I met the watchman, the prisoner at the foot of the stairs of Mr. Mellish's house, where the men sleep; I said to him halloo, what have you got here? he makes no answer, but ran past, I saw a coat and waistcoat hanging over his arm.

Q. Was it light enough for you to see what sort of a coat and waistcoat it was? - It was not, it was quite a cloudy morning; I catched hold of him by the collar, and I said, what have you got here?

Court. Could you distinguish his face so as to know him at all? could you tell any man by his face? - No, I could not, I asked him if them belonged to him? he said no. I asked him where he got the property? he said he found them in a necessary, in Labour-in-vain-street.

Q. Did you know Labour-in-vain-street? - Yes, it might be almost a hundred yards off.

Q. Did you continue hold of him? - I brought him outside of the gate, and I called out watch, not knowing him to be the watchman, he said I will take you to the watchman, with that I took him to the watch-house; I let him have the property all this time; when I went there was never a watchman in the place; the officer had gone his rounds, and he said he would take me to Mr. Thomas's, the officer's house; he had gone his round at three o'clock; we went to Mr. Thomas's, Mr. Thomas was not at home; coming back again I met with the officer of the night, Mr. Bailey, to whom I gave charge of the prisoner, then Mr. Bailey said that he would be bound for his appearance, I went home and awaked my father-in-law; Mr. Bailey kept the property; I left the prisoner and property in the watch-house with Mr. Bailey.

Q. What became of the property when you came away? did Mr. Bailey take it of the prisoner? - He did, and I went and awaked my father-in-law, and went with him to Mr. Mellish's to awake the people at Mr. Mellish's, we alarmed all the whole four of them that slept in the place, and there were none had lost any thing but Joseph Birch .

Q. Did you hear him say so? - I did, after that Birch and me, and my father in law, went to the watch-house, and we

see the prisoner there, Mr. Bailey was there.

Q. Did you see the property again, that you had seen before? - Yes.

Q. What did Birch say to the property? - He said he could swear to the property being his

Q. Did he look at it? - Yes.

Q. Did you give any charge of the prisoner? - Yes, I gave charge of him, having the property in Mr. Mellish's yard.

WILLIAM BAILEY sworn.

I am a watchman, belonging to St. Paul's, Shadwell; I was officer of the night, I remember meeting the prisoner and Taylor between three and four; between the watch-house and King David's-lane, on Sunday the 20th of this month; Taylor gave charge on suspicion that he had stole the coat and waistcoat, and Birch gave me charge afterwards; I have known the prisoner for four years, he was a watchman of the same parish, of St. Paul's, Shadwell, he was on the very night.

Q. Whereabouts is his beat? - His beat is by Shadwell Dock, by Mr. Mellish's; I took charge of him and the property, and took and locked them up and produced them on the morning of the 21st, at the office; this is the property, I have had it in my custody ever since, it was sealed up there.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing about it? - I examined the prisoner how he came by it, he made a slight answer, he said he found it, I asked him whether he knew what were in the pockets? he told me no, he had not felt, I asked Mr. Birch what he had lost? he told me a coat, waistcoat, &c. the prisoner was in the watch-house at the time.

Q. Did Mr. Birch, in the presence of the prisoner, claim the property to be his? - He told me that it was his property, and that he had pulled it off his back, and laid it in the cupboard before he went to bed.

Q. Do you know Mr. Mellish's premises? - I was in them to day.

Q. Do you know the gateway, is there one connected square of building and wall to make the square? is there a general building that makes the square, or is any part of it open? - To the best of my knowledge there is a little wall, but it is very high, that goes round and connects all the buildings.

Birch. This is my coat and waistcoat, I can hardly swear to the handkerchief, but it was the same sort of handkerchief that I lost; nor the money I cannot swear to, nor the knife so much.

Prisoner. I found them in Labour-in-vain-street, as I was going down at two o'clock in Mrs. Partridge's necessary, they were tied up in this white handkerchief, I see something white, and so put my hand on them, and I untied them and I had them on my arm, and this man met me and hallooed out watch, I told him he need not call out watch, for I was going to take them to the watch-house.

The prisoner called Mary Douglas to his character.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing but not of the burglary.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-65

737. WILLIAM ROSER was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , four pair of silk hose, value 1 l. three pair of cotton hose, value 6 s. the goods of Robert Hinksman .

ROBERT HINKSMAN sworn.

I am a linen draper .

Q. Was you robbed at any time? - I believe I was; when the prisoner was found out I was from home, I saw them at one of the pawnbroker's first, after I came home.

JOSEPH SIMMONS sworn.

I am a linen draper, I lived with Mr. Hinksman at the time these goods were stolen, I was called upon by Mrs. Hinksman in the absence of Mr. Hinksman, to know if I knew these goods; I saw them at a pawnbroker's.

Q. What time was that? - Sometime in the beginning of October; I know them to be the property of Mr. Hinksman.

- BECKET sworn.

The prisoner at the bar is my apprentice, and used to go and dress Mr. Hinksman every morning, he dressed himself on the 8th of September and went out, and I found these duplicates by lifting up the top of his bed, it was a bureau bedstead; it was Thursday eight o'clock in the evening; I have kept the duplicates ever since; here are seven; on the 24th my apprentice told a friend of mine that he meant to run away from me, to prevent his running away, I then on the 24th charged him with the constable, when I charged him with the constable, I than went to Mrs. Hinksman, and she and I went to several different pawnbrokers, and she said these things had all her shop marks.

Q. Did any thing pass between you and the prisoner about these duplicates? - Not a word.

- sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce two pair of white cotton stockings, one pair pledged the 8th of June, in the name of William Roser , and the other pair the 20th of May, in the name of John Mason .

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner? - No.

Q. Was you at home when they were pledged? - I was, when one pair was brought, but I did not take them in.

Q. Did you give duplicates with them? - Yes.

Q. Have you seen them since? - Yes, at Bow-street.

Q. Who produced them at Bow-street? - The master hair dresser.

Court to Becket. Shew this man the duplicates that you took from the prisoner.

Pawnbroker. One is my own hand writing in the name of William Roser; I know the hand writing of the other, it was wrote by a young man that lived servant with us, but has since left us.

HENRY BATT sworn.

I am a journeyman to Mr. Edward Fleming, of Newgate-street, a pawnbroker. At the time of the robbery I was a journeyman to Mr. Bechum, of Holborn; the things were pawned with Bechum; I produce a pair of stockings, they were pawned by a young man, who called himself William Roser , I believe it to be the prisoner, to the best of my recollection.

Q. When was it? - The 8th of February.

Q. Did you give him a duplicate? - Yes, the stockings are here.

Court to Becket. Shew the man the duplicate that belongs to these stockings.

Batt. This is the duplicate, it is my own hand writing.

ROBERT FERNE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, a servant to John Salkeild in Fleet-street; I produce a pair of silk stockings pawned by a young man, who called himself William Roser , I cannot take on myself to say who was the person; I gave a duplicate.

Court to Becket. Let the last witness look at the duplicates.

Fearne. This is the duplicate, it was pawned the 5th of February, it is my own hand writing.

Court to Becket. Can you recollect how long the prisoner had dressed at Mr. Hinksman's? - About the last two years and a half past.

- sworn.

I am a servant to John Morris , a pawnbroker, Holborn, I produce a pair of cotton stockings, pawned in the name of William Roser , but I don't know it was the prisoner; they were pawned the 20th of May.

Q. Did you give a duplicate? - Yes, I have got them here.

Q. Look at Mr. Becket's duplicates, and see if there is any one of your's? - This is my duplicate.

JOHN DALE sworn.

I am a servant to a pawnbroker, I took in a pair of silk stockings the 9th of February, I gave a duplicate, by the name of William Roser , but I don't know the prisoner.

Court to Becket. Shew him the duplicate? - This is the duplicate, it is my own hand writing.

SARAH VAUGHAN sworn.

I am a servant to Dobery in Holborn, I produce one pair of silk stockings, pawned the 8th of February, by one Roser; I believe it to be the prisoner at the bar, it is a great while back to recollect the person, I gave a duplicate.

Court to Becket. Have you any duplicate left? shew it to her.

Vaughan. It is my own hand writing.

Prisoner. I have no defence to make, I trust to the mercy of the court.

Hinksman. The articles have got marks on them, I believe the whole to be mine, there are my marks on them.

Simmons. I marked six pair of these stockings at Mr. Hinksmans myself, I did not the seventh pair.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-66

738. RICHARD TUART was indicted for that he, on the 18th of August , feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did make an assault on Lars Holmstans , and with a certain wooden stick, value 1 d. which he then in both his hands then had and held, in and upon the right side of the head near the right ear of him the said Lars Holmstans , then and there feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought, did strike and beat, giving the said Lars Holmstans , by such striking and beating with the wooden stick aforesaid, on the right side of the head near the right ear, a mortal fracture of his scull, of which said mortal fracture, he the said Lars Holmstans , from the 18th of August to the 20th of September, did languish, and languishing did live, on which said 20th of September, Lars Holmstans died .

Indicted in a second COUNT for the like murder on the coroner's inquisition.

The case was opened -

LAWRENCE LEYMON sworn.

I am a Swede.

Q. Did you know the deceased Lars Holmstans ? - Yes.

Q. On the 18th of August last where did he lodge? - At one Mr. Peterson's, who keeps the sign of the Three Foxes, at Limehouse .

Q. Did you lodge there? - I did not, but I was in the same room in the

evening between the hours of nine and ten, I think it was ten o'clock; there were about three gentlemen in blue coats came into the room, Holmstans and I were sitting on the bed, and several more followed them, I don't know how many more, they were in short jackets, Holmstans and I were sitting on the bed, and this gentleman came in and made mention of this word, here they are, and Holmstans was undressed going to bed, he had nothing on but his shirt and drawers, with that they came in and got hold of this man's shoulder and me immediately; they never asked what we were, nor who we were, but bundled us down stairs, and in the mean time they were shoving us down stairs, there were several of them struck both him and me over our heads as hard as ever they could with both sticks and fists.

Q. Did any thing pass in the room before you came down stairs? - Not that I saw.

Q. After you got down stairs what passed? - I was shoved out of doors, I saw no more of the affair, and three of them were jumping on my breast with their knees, and beating me over my head with sticks; I saw no more of the deceased, till I was brought into the house, when I saw a man laying over a chair, and all over a gore of blood.

Q What countryman was the deceased? - A Swede.

Q. Was there any violence used in the room, on the part of yourself, or the deceased, to these people that came in? - No, I saw no more of it than what I have told you.

Mr. Fielding. How many Swedes do you think were in this house, on the night that this happened? - A great many, above twenty as nigh as I can think.

Q. In what room where they assembled? - They were all in bed in the room that we were, except two; there was a great many in another room, but I did not see them.

Q. Had you lodged there any length of time yourself? - I had lodged there before, but at that time I did not.

Q. The man that died I believe could not speak a word of English? - No.

Q. How many were in the room where the deceased was? - There were not above three more, and all the rest were in bed.

Q. There were more besides Holmstans that was up, and the rest in bed; how many beds were in the room? - Either four or five, I am sure I don't know, either three or four I mean.

Q. Did they get up immediately? - There were three or four up.

Q. What became of them? - There was one of them cut in the head most shockingly, and he is gone to sea.

Q. You did not observe what was done with the other three? - I did not.

Q. My good man was not there immediately on the stairs a very considerble confusion, and a great many people come out in their shirts? - There was not that I saw.

Q. Do you know who made use of this expression, and when it was first made, as Swanskey come out? - After I came out in the street, I said for God almighty sake come out and help me, in English, and afterwards I said it in Swedish; and if a gentleman had not come from the other side of the way I should have been murdered.

Q. I ask you whether you did not hear the Swedes call out in this way? - In the street, but not before.

Q. On the stairs immediately at the entrance of the door did you hear no voice at all call out to the Swedes to come out? - No, I did not till I got out of doors.

Q. How many do you think were in the room, so as to force you and the whole down stairs? - There were three

gentlemen in blue long clothes, they were the three first, and several more which I cannot tell how many they were.

Q. Was there any light on the stairs? - There was light in the room where we were.

Q. Then all this was instantaneous, took up but very little time? - It was all done in a very short time.

Q. Therefore when you came out of your room on the stairs, did you observe whether there was any light or not? was it not all confusion on the stairs, a vast number of people there, Swedes and of others? - There were no Swedes that I saw; I was shoved down stairs as hard as ever I could, and got several blows.

Q. You say you don't know the gentleman at the bar, whether he was one of them or not? - Yes, he is one of the gentlemen.

Q. How do you know him? - By his face, just when he came into the room there was a light standing right before him, and he said, here they are, here they are.

Q. Now the language used, was here they are, how did you understand it? - I don't know what they meant by it.

Q. Did you hear any language at all made use of by any other man on the stairs, or was you quite ignorant of what passed till you got into the street? - When I got into the street, I said, I am a protectioned man, I have got this protection, and one of them hit me on the head and called me a Scotch buggar.

Q. How many Swedes have you reason to think were in the house at that time? - There were only three up stairs.

Q. How many do you think were in the house of Peterson at this time? - I don't know.

Q. Were there any other Englishmen there? - I don't know.

Q. English seamen did visit that house sometimes? - Yes, very often.

Q. Peterson is what they call a crimp? - Yes, he gets seamen for captains.

Q. And English seamen come under his view as well as you foreigners? now I want to know whether it past within your hearing or not, that they did not come for foreigners, they wanted to look after somebody else? - I did not hear that, neither in the room nor on the stairs, nor in the street at no way.

Prosecutor's Counsel. Did you know the prisoner before? or do you know him now only? - I recollect his face very well, he had a stick in his hand.

Mr. Fielding. I caution you to be a little aware; in the first place you said you did not know him, will you take upon yourself to say that that gentleman had a stick in his hand, supposing him to be the man? - I am sure he had.

Q. Did you ever say that that man had a stick in his hand? - I never see him before that.

Q. Did you ever say before to any body that he had a stick in his hand? - Every man that I see had a stick in his hand.

Court. You was examined before the magistrate, you gave in your information on oath before him? you have told us of your having been very much beat, and of your seeing the deceased struck by several of the gang? how happened it when you delivered in your account to the magistrate that you never related one circumstance of that sort, because I have your information here? - I don't understand you, please to explain it better for me.

Q. After the man was killed there was a coroner's inquisition held? - There was.

Q. You was examined before the coroner? - Yes.

Q. How happened it you did not tell what you do now, that you was struck, and that you saw the deceased struck? - I did say so then as I say now.

Court. I have here the information, you did not say a word of it.

ANDREW PETERSON sworn.

I keep the Three Foxes, at Lime-house. I know the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Have you seen him before? - I have seen him several times.

Q. Do you remember the transaction at your house, the 18th of August? - Yes.

Q. Had you known Tuart before that? - I had, he had often come with a gang to our house.

Q. Did he come on the 18th of August? - He and several more, Mr. Watts and others.

Q. Who came into your house first on that evening? - Watts.

Q. Any body in company? - The prisoner was the next to him, I stood in my bar, and I see them run back up stairs without saying a word, which I took up the candle and ran after him, I overtook them when they got to the two pair of stairs room.

Q. Who lodged in the two pair of stairs room? - Lars Holmstans and others.

Q. When they got into the room will you relate what passed there? - I went into the room, and had a candle in my hand.

Q. Was there any other light in the room before you came? - I am not certain there was.

Q. Did all the gang go up at once? - No, Mr. Watts and Mr. Tuart and another that I did not know, they three went up first, after they were up, Mr. Watts or Mr. Tuart called out to them to come up, he called one man by the name of Baker, and then all the gang came running up.

Q. Had any thing passed before the rest came up? - I took the candle in my hand then, and went out of the room, I was very bad with a cold.

Q. Did you see what passed below stairs? - I did not see till the gang and men were out in the street, when I saw Mr. Tuart beating the deceased, I went then to the street door, he was beating him with a stick in the street, the right side of the door.

Q. Did any thing happen to this man in the street? - In consequence of being beat he tumbled down, and then he came and crawled to the bar, and then he tumbled down again, and then he crawled to the stair case, and tumbled down again.

Q. Did you see Mr. Tuart after the deceased was in the house again? - Mr. Tuart came in, he said dear sir, dear sir, what is the matter, I said you are the man that has killed the man, and half murdered him; he said I have got no stick, I said that he was the man, for I saw nobody else strike him.

Q. When you told him that you had seen him, and only him strike him, what did he say? - Dear sir, I have got no stick.

Q. Had he a stick at the time of this conversation? - No.

Q. How soon did, this conversation pass after the beating with this stick? - I suppose two or three minutes at the farthest.

Mr. Knowlys. I take it for granted the having these people in your house was totally unexpected by you? - It was.

Q. Now I ask you, I believe you had some conversation with some of these people in the tap room before any alarm took place at all? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Do you mean to swear, man, that before you went up stairs with the candle in your hand, that you had no conversation with the prisoner at the bar in the tap room? - Not a single word in the tap room, except he might say, how do

you do? at the bar. We pass the tap room first, before you get to the bar.

Q. How long might he be talking to you? - He never stopped a minute.

Q. Who was with him when he said that? - Watts was with him, he did not speak a word, but I don't know whether Tuart spoke or not.

Q.Watts past you before you lost sight of Tuart? - They were all of them out of my sight till I got the candle.

Q. Did Watts pass before Tuart spoke to you? - Tuart followed Watts.

Q. I ask you whether at the time Watts was going up stairs, Tuart did not stop to speak to you? - They followed one another as quick as they could.

Q. Then Tuart did not stay a single minute speaking to you while Watts was going up stairs? - He did not, I am on my oath.

Q. I ask you whether you did not hear somebody call on the stairs before Tuart left you? - There was not, I swear that positively, nobody called out before Tuart went up stairs.

Q. You went up with a candle? - I did.

Q. Did you go into the room where these Swedes were? - I did.

Q. How many Swedes were there in that room? - I cannot positively say, there might be about twenty men at home at that time, but they were not all in that room.

Q. On your oath cannot you say there was a dozen in that room? - I cannot say that, I have only three beds in that room, and two men in a bed.

Q. Will you swear there were not a dozen Swedes in that room? - I never go up with the people to bed.

Q. Had Tuart, Watts, and the other got into the room before you came there with a candle? - They had.

Q. You carried that candle lighted down stairs? - I did, I was first down stairs, I was obliged to let the candle and candlestick all go just at the bottom of the stairs, because they came so fast after me.

Q. You say they were coming down stairs after you very fast? - Yes, they were.

Q. There was a croud coming down after you? - I cannot tell whether there were two or three, ten or twenty.

Q. Do you mean to say that, why did you go down stairs with this candle a light? - Why should I stay in that room when I saw a croud of people coming after me.

Q. A very good answer, on your seeing a croud of people after you, of course you made your escape as well as you could? - I did.

Q. In consequence of the croud coming it was that you put out the candle? - It tumbled out of my hand, I did not put it out.

Q. Do you recollect the expression, that when you was in the room, one of them saying to you, how is this, we don't want any foreigners? - They never made that expression to me.

Q. Was not that expression made use of? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. How came you first of all to say it was not made to you? - I did not give you that answer, I give you no further answer but that I tell you the truth.

Q. On your oath was it not your first answer to me? - I never heard them say so.

Q. Why did you tell me they did not say so to you? - I tell you to my knowledge what I know.

Q. Will you swear that that expression was not made use of, we don't want foreigners, or something like that? - I will swear it never was to my knowledge.

Q. Will you swear that? - To my knowledge I did not hear it.

Q. Will you swear that that expression

was not made use of? - I will.

Q. On your oath will you say that that did not pass in the room while you was in the room? - Yes, I will.

Q. Now, sir, on the stairs, when you got down, was not that expression made use of? - I never heard it.

Q. Who was it asked you for the candle? - Mr. Watts, he held one part of the candlestick and I the other, and I would not let him have it.

Q. Why did not you let him have it? - I was not insured a shilling, and that was the reason, I told him I would go up with him.

Q. What did Watts want the candle for? - He said there was a man that had gone up stairs before him and he wanted a candle to go up to see who that was, I said I would not lend him the candle, I would go up with him; I refused him the candle.

Q. Was there any scuffle ensued between you two? - Not at all, he let go the candlestick.

Q. Did not he tell you that he was sure that man that had gone up stairs was an englishman? - I judge that he supposed the man that was gone up was an englishman by the conversation I had with him.

Q. You was examined in the morning that these men were taken, when the man that was taken to the Hospital died? - Yes.

Q. You did not say you was so much frightened when you let the candle fall that you could not see how the transaction took place? - I did not.

Q. Who drove down the gang that came with these men? - I don't know indeed.

Q. You never said you knew who drove them down? - I never did.

Q. Then you never formed any opinion whether the press gang drove down the Swedes, or the Swedes drove the press gang? - I never did.

Q. Nor never expressed such an opinion to any body freely? - I never did.

Q. Do you recollect, you understand a little Swedish? you are a Swede? - I am.

Q. Do you recollect such an expression, Swanskey, come out? - I heard that while I was on the stairs, they said, Swedes come out. I was down on the stairs at that time and the rest were in the room. Watts stood on the landing of the second pair of stairs, and I stood on the stairs, he holding the candle in one hand, and I in the other; the cry was, Swedes. Swedes, come out!

Q. And then they came out of the room? - I don't know.

Q. Did not you call to them to come out? - I did not.

Q. On the oath you have taken, did not you call to the Swedes to come out? - I did not.

Q. That you speak on recollection? - I do.

Q. You never saw any knives, or poker, or tongs? - I did not; I positively did not.

Q. Perhaps none of the men who were with Tuart were cut with knives? - I don't know whether they were or not.

Q. Did you see Watts in the street? On your oath was not Watts's forehead cut across and bleeding at that time? - I did not see it.

Q. Upon your oath did not you, at any time, see Watts with his head tied up and bleeding? - The next day I saw him with his head tied up, but that night I did not.

Q. Did not you see him bleeding that night? - I did not, that I swear positively.

Q. Nor you see no knives? - I did not.

Q. No poker at all, nor any tongs? - No.

Q. You would have been very much disliked by the persons who frequent your house if it was known that you gave information to a press gang? - I never gave information in my life.

Q. Don't you think it would hurt you in your business a good deal? - I think I must be a very ignorant man to do it.

Q. It would hurt your favour with these people that frequent your house? - How is it possible I would venture my getting my living.

Q. To be sure it would be a bad thing, and they would resent it. You never had any conversation with Tuart or Watts, or any body in your house? - I have often treated the gang civilly in my house not to take them out. The night before that I went down Thames-street to buy some china, and I saw them at the door of the City of Bristol, and I went in and treated Watts and some others with a shillingworth of brandy and water.

Q. Then you never did, on that occasion give them any information of persons in your house? - I did not.

Q. You did not perhaps tell them of any persons that were on board the Lioness? - I did not.

Q. However after you had this conversation with them, the very next night they came to your house? - They used to come every morning and every night generally.

Q. You had none but Swedes frequenting your house at this time? - None but Swedes and Danes.

Q. Sometimes they do catch some body? - They catched a man drinking there one day.

Q. Then they at that time knew that you had only Danes and Swedes drinking? - I don't know what they knew.

Q. It was well known that the persons who appeared to be at your house, appeared like foreigners? - Yes.

Q. Yet they came that night? - Yes.

Q. They did not come after foreigners? - Yes, they often press the foreigners as well as others, to over haul them, to search them, to see whether they are or not.

Q. Had you any englishmen in you house that night? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. You never had such a thing as this happen in your house before? - No.

Q. On your oath had you any man in your house who was not a foreigner? - I am not certain.

Q. What do you believe? - On my oath I don't know that there were.

Q. What do you believe? - I believe in God.

Q. Do you on your oath believe you had an englishman in your house? - I am not certain; I was very ill; I cannot say.

Q. Peterson, mind well the answer you give on this occasion. Upon your oath had not you told some persons that there were some englishmen escaped out of your house that night that press gang came? - No, I never did.

Q. Nor out of the top of your house? - I never said any such thing.

Q. You know a man of the name of Miller, of the Green Dragon? - Yes.

Q. You know his wife perhaps? - I know her.

Q. Upon your oath did not you, to these two persons, declare that some englishmen escaped out of your house? - If I tell things at random, I tell at random, but when I am on my oath, I am on my oath.

Q. Did you then declare it at random or not at random? - I never did.

Q. Have you not declared that some sailors got out of the top of your house that night? - I never did to my knowledge.

Q. Nor any thing to that purpose or effect? - I don't know that ever I did.

Q. Have you ever had any conversation with Mr. or Mrs. Miller on this business? - I never had. I don't know that I had. I don't remember what I may say of one person to another in the street.

I get in the street talking to a man I forget it before the next day; I may remember it or I may not; how is it possible to remember it?

Q. You know this accident has made a great noise, and is a particular thing. Don't you know whether you have had any particular conversation about this remarkable subject? - O yes, I have heard often talking of one to another about it.

Q. Have you never given in the names of persons that got out of your house that night? - I never did to any body whatever.

Q. You took this man up at the City of Bristol, the inn called so. Did not Watts produce to you the names of four men that you had given information of at your house? - He did either produce it there or at the justice's, he said three names; but I never did such a thing; I never had such men at my house.

Mr. Fielding. Upon your oath don't you know, and verily believe this, that they came there in search of an englishman, and that the Swedes, to a great number in your house, being alarmed there was a great commotion, and that what happened was in consequence of this sudden affray? - I don't know what happened.

Q. Don't you know on your oath that they would avoid troubling in any degree a man that they knew to be a Swede.

Mr. Knowlys. Pray what have you paid towards the expences of this prosecution? - I have paid nothing; the government of Sweden pay it.

Q. I believe you have been in jeopardy two or three times? - Where?

Q. You have never been tried any where? - I was once for a falsity at Hick's Hall; a man came in with a firkin of butter to my house.

Q. Perhaps you was taken up for receiving stolen goods? - It was a heap of nonsense; they took me up, but what could they do?

Q. Was not you taken up afterwards? - There was something concerning smuggling some worsted over to France.

Q. You will say butter is not lead, it don't weigh quite so heavy? - How do I know about that; I was not tried for it.

Q. Your general way of getting your living is as a crimp? - I sell beer and brandy, and other things as a publican.

Q. I ask you do you act as a crimp? - Yes, they call it a crimp; landlord is the common name.

Prosecutor's Counsel. We have heard something about your being tried at Hick's Hall? - I was, and was acquitted without calling any witnesses for myself.

Q. Was you ever tried on any other occasion? - There was about the worsted, but I was not called.

Q. Is there any trap door on the top of your house? - There is no trap door, but windows only as to other houses,

Q. With respect to the expression that was used while you was on the stair case with Watts? - One of the men that were in the room said in Swedish, the same as I would in English you Swedes, but I did not hear any thing more said.

Q. Who was it made use of the expression? - I don't know, there were a great many lodgers in the room, it was by the lodgers.

Q. While you was in the room, was there, or was there not any resistance made use of? was there any language or violence, or any language like resistance? - No.

Q. Did you at any time hear any language to that effect? - No.

Q. The gentleman asked you who drove the gang? - I cannot tell.

Q. Was the gang driven down or not? - I don't know.

Q. Had all the gang gone up before you went up stairs? - Yes, they were all, I followed the three first, and all were come up before I went down stairs.

Q.Were this gang armed in any way? - They had sticks as far as I know.

Court. Watts followed a man that went up before him, did you happen to see that man? - I did not.

Q. Did you see a man go up? - I see there was a man went up before Watts.

Q. How long before Watts? - Just along with him, I stood in the bar and had a key in my hand to go to bed.

Q. When this scuffle was in the street how many people might be there, the gang, Swedes and all? - I cannot tell, all our lodgers there might be three or four.

Q. All the press gang could not be driven down by a very inconsiderable number; I ask you how many there might be in the street? - Three or four at most of the Swedes.

Q. This was at ten o'clock at night? - Near on ten o'clock.

Q. Was it dark then? how far from the door might this battle be? - Close by the door.

Q. Could you distinguish any faces? - Yes, I had a candle in the street, and I went in with it.

Q.How far was you from the deceased and the prisoner? - Close by them.

MICHAEL HEDGES sworn.

Q. On the 18th of August was you at Mr. Peterson's? - I was about ten o'clock at night.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes, he was there.

Q. Did you see any body else with him? - Yes, I saw them come into the house, and run up stairs without asking any questions, and then I went to the stair case.

Court. Are you a servant to Peterson? - No.

Q. Is there a stand of coaches at the door? - No.

Prosecutor's Counsel. What past afterwards? - I went to the stair case, and when I got there, there was a halloo given at the top, from whom I don't know, and a number of people passed me, and I went up stairs after them; I observed several of the gang, the prisoner at the bar, and Watts and Hingle, all pulling the deceased down stairs.

Q. Had they any weapons with them? - I did not see more than that they hauled him out to the door, and there was a number of them then beating him over the head with sticks.

Q. How many of the Swedes went down with the gang? - I cannot say, I only saw the deceased hauled down, but they were beating of him at the door, the man came in sometimes up and sometimes down.

Q. In what state particularly did you see him at the door? - A number of people beating him over the head with sticks, the prisoner was there, but I cannot swear that he struck him, after that the man came in as well as he could, he then dropped down at the bar.

Q. In what condition? - All over bloody.

Q. Did you observe whence that blood came? - Yes, from his head.

Q. What did you observe of him after he came in? - He fell down at the bar on his face.

Q. Was there any blows struck after that? - A man came in afterwards.

Q. Do you know who it was? - I do not.

Q. Did that man do any thing? - Yes, he took and struck him with his stick two or three times, and said get out you bloody thief, get out.

Q. What kind of appearance had the man that struck him? - He had a short jacket on, but I did not see his face.

Q. Had he a stick? - Yes.

Mr. Fielding. You see the state of the deceased in the street, but you don't know he received any blow from the prisoner? - I did not.

Q. Are you a sea faring man? - No sir, I am a waterman.

Q. How came you in this house at this time of the night? - Going to get a pint of beer.

Q. Had Mr. Peterson any signs of going to bed at that time? - Yes, the house was shut up.

Q. How many Swedes did you observe might come down stairs? - I cannot say particularly to the number.

Q. Will you swear there were not twenty? - Yes, I will swear there were not twenty.

Q. Was there a dozen? - I do not think there were.

Q. You say that when Watts went up stairs you had the curiosity to follow him? - I did to the stair case, and when the halloo was given, the gang went by me, and I went up afterwards.

Q. Did you hear Watts ask Peterson to lend him a candle? - I did not.

Q. Whereabouts must you have been? - There was a great noise and confusion.

Q. Was there any scuffle on the stairs? - Yes, hauling the men down.

Q. Did you hear the Swedes calling out one to another, in their language? - I did not.

Q. Then you did not hear any sort of word like this, Swanskey or Swedes, come out? - I did not.

Q. Did you go back to the tap room? - I went down stairs for fear of being shoved down, I could not see what was behind me, and out of my sight.

Q. So that you did not see the prisoner at the bar give the deceased any blow, but when this poor man had got into the tap room you saw him fall down? - I did.

Q. Did he fall on his face? - I think he did.

Q. Now I ask you a question, and I can prove it I promise you; how long was it that Mr. Tuart, the gentleman at the bar, was in conversation with Peterson before Watts went up? - They had no conversation of any length.

Q. I want to know if you heard this; that when they came in, addressing themselves to Peterson, they asked him where the four men were? - I did not hear that.

Prosecutor's Counsel. You describe a great noise on the stair case, do you know from what it proceeded? - I do not.

Q. Did you see any resistance from the Swedes? - None.

Q. Had they any weapons? - None.

ELEANOR NEWTON sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Peterson.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Q. Do you remember his being at your house in August last? - Yes.

Q. Had you known him before that time? - No.

Q. Do you remember his coming into Mr. Peterson's house? - Yes.

Q. Who came with him? - All the gang.

Q. What did they do? - When they came into the house first of all, they ran up stairs.

Q. Before they went up stairs, did any conversation pass between Mr. Peterson and the gang? - There was not.

Q. Where was you? - I was in the tap room, the bar looks into the tap room.

Q. Then from being in the tap room, are you able to say, whether there was or was not any conversation passed between

the gang and your master, before they went up stairs? - Not that I see.

Q. Who went up stairs? - The three press masters followed one another.

Q. Were there any other? - No.

Q. Had they any thing with them? - They had sticks.

Q. Had each of them sticks? - Yes.

Q. Did you go up stairs with them? - I followed them up two pair of stairs.

Q. Was you in the room where Holmstans was? - I was not, I was on the stairs.

Q. Was you in such a situation on the stairs that you could see or hear what was going forward in the room? - I was on the top of the stairs, but there I could see into the room.

Q. Could you hear at all what passed in the room while you was on the stairs? - I light a whole light of candles and carried them up stairs.

Q. What was the next thing you saw or heard? - I saw the shortest of the three press masters drag the deceased down stairs and out of doors, and beat him several times with a stick.

Q. Before this was the rest of the gang up stairs? - They all followed up, they made an halloo and the rest followed up.

Q. Did you see Holmstans dragged down stairs in the way you have described into the street? had Holmstans any weapon? - None at all.

Q. Did he make any resistance? - Not that I see.

Q. How many lodgers went down stairs with the press gang? - I cannot tell, a good many.

Q. In what way did they go? - I did not see.

Q. Had they any weapons? - They were all going to bed, they had not.

Q. Did they take with them any weapons? - They went down stairs and hid themselves in the kitchen and where they could, they were frightened.

Q. In going down stairs did the other lodgers strike the press gang? - Not at all that I see.

Q. Did any Swedish lodgers go out of doors? - I did not see any of them.

Q. How many Swedes went out of doors in all? - I don't know.

Q. Who went out with Holmstans? - All the gang went out together, I cannot tell who it was, they dragged him out and they struck him over the head with the stick, the short one of the three did, I did not see any one else.

Q. What did he strike him with? - A stick.

Q. What sort of a stick? - A thick stick, the short man chucked the deceased down at the door.

Mr. Fielding. You don't mean to say that the man at the bar struck the deceased? - I do not.

Court. You did not see him at that time? - I did not, but I see him go up stairs among the rest.

Prosecutor's Counsel. Where was he? - I don't know, he went up and down along with the rest.

Q. Did he remain in the tap room or go into the street? - He went among the rest, but I did not see him do any thing in the street.

Q. Did you see him in the street? - I did not, but I see him going out with the rest.

Q. Do you remember his coming in again? - I do not.

Mr. Fielding. I take it for granted you was a good deal frightened on this business? - I was, I went down before them they followed after in great confusion.

Q. You are very sure that you did not observe this man strike him at all? - I

did not, all the blows that I saw given was by the short man.

Q. Can you tell me how many Swedes there were in the house at that time? - There was a great many, there might be twenty or more.

Q. And they were all alarmed? - They were, they all came down stairs.

JAMES HEGG sworn.

I live opposite the Three Foxes.

Q. On the 18th of August was you at home? - I was.

Q. Did you hear any disturbance in the street? - I did, in consequence of that disturbance, I came out, and observed a number of men in the street, and Mr. Tuart was on the left hand side of the door, I spoke to him, I did not know him only by seeing him at that time, I spoke to him, and desired that he would command the people to go about their business, but my speaking was of no service, they did not go then.

Q. Was the deceased then in the street? - I never saw him.

Court. Do you happen to know whether the mob was composed of foreigners or englishmen? - I believe principally of englishmen, I did not see any foreigners except Lawrence Leymon .

SARAH CLARKE sworn.

I live in Limehouse, Narrow-street, four or five doors from Mr. Peterson's.

Q. Was you in this street on Sunday the 18th of August? - I was.

Q. Did you see Holmstans in the street that afterwards died? - I did.

Q. At the time you saw him in the street, who else did you see there? and what did you see done to him? - I heard a cry of murder! and I went out of doors, the first thing I saw was several candles, and I went a little further and the deceased was leaning over a post and there were two of the gang beating him with sticks over the loins; one I should know again if I was to see him, the other I should not.

Q. Do you know the name of that one that you should know? - I do not.

Q. In what situation was the man that afterwards died, when you saw these two men beating him? - He could not get away from the place where they were beating him, till he was fetched away by two men; I went and saw him after he was in the house.

Q. Do you remember Tuart coming into the house afterwards? - I don't remember seeing any of them, because they went away directly the man was taken in.

Q. Who else did you see in the street besides these two men and the deceased? - I saw some of the gang, but I should not know them; there was only one man that I minded in particular, that was a shortish man.

Q. Did you see any Swedes in the street? - Yes, I saw one of them looking after a shoe, with a candle in his hand after the gang went away.

Q. While the gang were there did you see any other Swedes? - I did not see any one but him they were beating.

Q. Did the deceased make any resistance? - No, he did not, he was not able.

EDWARD KIMPTON sworn.

I am a pupil to Mr. Blizard. I was at the hospital, and attended a person of the name of Holmstans on Sunday the 18th of August; he was brought in Sunday evening about twelve o'clock, in a state nearly of insensibility, on examining him, I found a wound appeared on the lower, and a contused one on the upper part of the left side of the head, it was rough and bloody.

Q. Had he any other wound? - No, except a bruise on his right arm; he died on the 20th of September, a month and two days after he was brought in.

Q. Did you examine his body after he died? - Yes, it was examined, I was present.

Q. Was the contusion the cause of his death? - The immediate cause of his death, was a disease and bleeding of the lungs.

Q. Are you able to say from what cause was that bleeding and disease? - It is likely to be from the injury that he received at the time of the bleeding of his head. On examination the lungs were found very much diseased, and contained a great quantity of matter; Mr. Blizard was the principal, and I attended.

Mr. Fielding. You see a blow on his head, could you say, or can you say that bore it an appearance, such as you could determine on your oath, whether it was received by a blow, or whether it might have been by a fall? - I cannot positively say.

- BLIZARD sworn.

I am a surgeon to the London Hospital.

Q. Do you remember attending the deceased when he was brought there? - I do.

Q. Did you open him after the decease? - I did. The immediate cause of his death was certainly a bleeding of the lungs; I suppose the lungs might have received an injury at the time he received the hurt on his head; he had a wound originally on the left side of the head, the symptoms impressed a strong suspion of a fracture, on opening the body a fracture was discovered very low down, under the right ear, and under such circumstances that induced me to believe that it was not received by a blow, but that in all probability it was from a fall, because it would be very difficult to induce a blow there, so as to give a fracture; in this fractured part there was a portion of wound intirely surrounded, and the fracture could not have been in consequence of a blow the opposite side of the head, but it must have arisen from a distinct blow, or hurt on that part.

Q. To which of the bruises do you ascribe his death? - I ascribe his death to the bleeding of the lungs.

Q. Was that complaint on the lungs likely to be produced in consequence of a blow on the head? - An inflammation might be produced there in consequence of violence, as well as from many other occasions.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-67

739. JOHN PERCIVAL and CHRISTOPHER SPILLER were indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , two hundred pounds weight of lead, value 2 l. belonging to John Buddle , affixed to a building of his .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JOHN BUDDLE sworn.

I am a carpenter , the proprietor of the premises on which the lead was stolen, they were a part of Camden Town ; I lost some lead about a month since, about two hundred weight; I lost them from the gutter on the roof, that part of it was on the hips.

Q. Was it fixed to it? - It was. I was informed of the lead being taken; I called on my plumber and went and looked at the building; I then went to the watch house and found a piece there; I don't know exactly the day, it was about a month ago.

Q. Did you fit it with the gutters and hips? - The plumber that I took with me, can swear positively to the piece that was there, I cannot.

Mr. Knowlys. You cannot swear how long it had been stolen? - No, I cannot.

BENJAMIN WALKER sworn.

I am a plumber.

Q. When did you find the lead? - About three weeks ago. I examined the lead and it fitted to the place; it was whole as I laid it down there.

Q. Are you able to swear positively that it is the lead? - I can say it fits the place exactly, but it was out of my sight for four or six months.

Mr. Knowlys. You cannot say when it was removed? - I cannot say.

THOMAS DURANT sworn.

I was at my work, and I saw them two men go up to a dunghill and fetch a load from it; I was digging a common fewer in the field the second day of this month.

Q. How far was this from you? - The length of one field. I saw the men take something out, but what it was I could not tell; I pursued after the men, and I went and spoke to the constable, and while I went to the constable, he went into the house, and I could not tell rightly where he was; I went to the dunghill and there I saw a piece of lead; from there I went to the commissioners of our town, and they granted a warrant, and we searched, and we found a great quantity in this man's house, where they live.

Q. Do you know whose lead it is that was found there? - Mr. Buddle has swore to some of the lead.

Q. Has he swore to that found in the dunghill or that found in the house? - That found in the dunghill.

Mr. Knowlys. Whereabouts was it you was at work? - At Sommer's town, about a quarter of a mile from Camden. This lead was in the dunghill about half way from Somer's town to Camden.

WILLIAM WEBB sworn.

On the 2d of this month I saw the lead.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-68

740. JOHN PERCIVAL and CHRISTOPHER SPILLER were again indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , six hundred pounds weight of lead, value 6 l. belonging to Richard Jefferies , affixed to a building of his .

RICHARD JEFFERIES sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I lost some lead, I cannot exactly tell the time; I lost a great quantity, about six or seven hundred weight affixed to the house, it was gutters, hips and ridges; I found it in Pancras watch-house the beginning of this month, about the 2 d; I don't know where it came from; I fitted it afterwards, and it fitted the nail holes and all; I have no doubt but what this is my lead; the Sexton was along with me.

Mr. Knowlys. How long it was gone from there you cannot tell? - I cannot.

Q. It might be gone for months? - No, it could not for months, it might for a fortnight.

THOMAS DURANT sworn.

Q. You have told us you see the prisoners go to the dunghill, carry away something, and that afterwards you went to their house; when did you go to their house? - When we had the warrant to search, about twelve o'clock the same day; I found some lead there in their back room.

Q.Was that old lead or new lead? - It was lead that had been on the building.

Q. What became of that lead? - They have got it in doors.

Q. Were they at home when you was at the house? - Yes, they were both in the house when we went in.

Q. Did they say any thing about the lead? - They said they found it, and they

knew nothing about the robbery, and they did not know what to do with it.

Q. What is their way of life? - One is a brick-maker, and I don't know what the other is, he said he was a plaisterer.

Mr. Knowlys. It is Percival's house? - It is.

Q. Do you mean to say that Spiller lived there? - I don't know, they were together: he said he had been there about three or four days.

Court to Jefferies. Have you the very lead here that you fitted to the house? - Yes, here it is.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-69

741. LAWRENCE JONES , LEON JONES , JAMES SMITH , and JOHN SMITH were indicted for feloniously making an assault, in a certain house near the King's highway, on John Blagrove Campbell , on the 21st of September , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a leather bill case, value 3 s. the goods of the said John Blagrove Campbell .

Indicted in a Second COUNT for feloniously making an assault on the said John Blagrove Campbell , in a certain house near about the King's highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a warrant for the payment of money, value 34 l. 7 s. signed and subscribed by Mark Wood , bearing date the 13th of September 1793, and directed to Gerard Noel Edwards , Samuel Smith , George Templar , Richard Johnson , and John Wedgewood , by the name and description of Messrs. Smith, Edwards, Templar, Johnson, and Wedgewood, for payment to Messrs. Carmichael, Smith or bearer; and a bill of exchange of sixty-five pounds two shillings, signed and subscribed by Thomas Gill , bearing date at Pontefract, and directed to John Dalby , No. 105, New Bond-street, London, payable two months after date to Messrs. Beck and Singleton, on the back of which said bill of exchange, is an endorsement made and written, purporting to be the endorsement of the said Beck and Singleton, and on which said bill of exchange was an acceptance by John Dalby , the said warrant and bill of exchange being the property of James Vere , and John Lucadou and Co. and the several sums of money secured thereby, being unsatisfied to them.

Indicted in a Third COUNT being charged as in the first Count, only alledging the robbery to be in a certain house belonging to William Blasson , near about the King's highway.

A Fourth COUNT as in the Second with the same difference, alledging the house to belong to William Blasson , near about the King's highway.

A FIFTH COUNT stated as in the First Count, only alledging the robbery generally to be near about the King's highway.

A Sixth COUNT stated as in the Second, with the same difference, only alledging that it was committed near about the King's highway.

A Seventh COUNT charging them with the robbery of John Blagrove Campbell, and taking from him the bill case, warrant and bill of exchange,

charging it to be done in the house of Francis Bradshaw, Clerk.

An Eighth COUNT charging as in the Second, only instead of its being in a dwelling house, alledging to be in the liberties of Saffron-hill, Hatton-garden, and Ely-rents.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp, and the case opened by Mr. Garrow.)

JOHN BLAGROVE CAMPBELL sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Vere, Lucadou, and Co. bankers.

Q. Did you on the 21st of September go out on business for that house? - I did.

Q. Had you any occasion in the course of your business, to go to Hatton-garden, at No. 13 ? - I had.

Q. For what purpose did you go there? - To present a bill for one hundred and twenty pounds, drawn on Peter Mally .

Q. When you went there who did you see? - A tall man dressed in black, who opened the door and desired me to walk into the counting house. I took the bill of one hundred and twenty pounds out of my case, I gave it to the man that let me in; immediately a green cloth was thrown over my head and I was thrown on the ground; they took my book from me; there was a person behind the curtain, I did not see that person, I heard his voice; they took the book from my hand, and threatened if I made any resistance they would cut my throat; they put an handkerchief or something in my mouth to prevent my making a noise; the person that opened the door says to the other, where is Jack? he replied he was waiting in the passage; he said, why did he not come in? I heard the door open, they then lifted me up, and took me down into a back kitchen with this over my head, and put me by the side of the copper, and chained my hands and feet to the copper with a padlock which they locked; they then said there was plenty of grub if I made no noise, but if I made the least noise they would come down and murder me, they then left me; I remained in that situation for a length of time; by shoving my shoes off and putting my feet closer together, I extricated myself from one chain which confined my feet to the copper; I went into a small room, my hands were still confined, the chain that confined my hands was not fastened to the copper; I went into an adjoining room, lifted up the sash and made a noise, and somebody came at length and relieved me.

Q. What time did you go to Hatton-garden? - A little after ten, as near as I can tell, in the morning on the 21st of September.

Q. At what hour was it you so extricated yourself? - A little before four in the same afternoon.

Q. Now can you tell what was in your pocket book when they took it away? - Some bills I cannot recollect; there was a bill for sixty-two pounds two shillings upon John Dalby , in New Bond-street; and a draft for thirty-four pounds seven shillings on Edwards and Co. bankers, in Stratford-place; a note drawn by Macdowen for seven hundred and fifty pounds; there were also five notes of hand drawn by Philip Stimson, for the payment of seamens wages.

Q. What was the amount of the five? - I cannot tell.

Q. You say you did not see any other person but the person who let you in? - I did not; but I heard more.

Q. Have you since heard the same voice? - I have not to be positive.

Mr. Wood. I think you say you are sure the man that opened the door was not Lawrence Jones? - I think not.

Q. How many persons did you see? - I saw but one, but I heard one more.

Q. How long might you hear these persons in the house? - I might for a couple of hours afterwards.

Q. Might you hear them longer, think you? Can you be accurate? it was past ten o'clock when you got there? - About a quarter of an hour.

ROBERT TURNBULL sworn.

I am clerk to the house of Messrs. Vere, Lucadou and Co.

Q. Do you remember any person coming with bills at any time to your house? - There was a person came on the evening of the 20th of September, a few minutes after five o'clock in the afternoon, he came and enquired if Mr. Douglas did business in our house? and he had got a piece of an account of two bills of Mr. Douglas's, on Vere and Co. Mr. Charles Douglas did keep cash at our house, and I told him he did business there, and he left two bills, one was that that Campbell carried out the next day; the other I have got with me.

Q. Should you know the person again that produced these bills to you? - I cannot say positively, but that is most like the person in the blue great coat, Leon Jones .

Q. Are you able to say that that is the person that offered the bill? - I cannot speak positive.

JAMES HENDERSON sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Dalby of Bond-street.

Q. Do you remember on the 21st of September any body bringing a bill of sixty-five pounds two shillings, for payment? - I do; I have the bill here.

Q. Did you pay the amount of it? - I did.

Q. How did you pay it? - By a draft on Messrs. Pybus, the bankers.

Q. Do you recollect who brought the draft to you? - To the best of my belief Mr. Lawrence Jones is the man.

Q. What time was it brought? - About a quarter before two on the 21st of September. I see Mr. Jones again when he was taken up at Bow-street.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe you was examined at Bow-street; did you not say there, when you was asked the question in the first place, that he was the most like the man of any person there? - I did.

Q. And in the next place that you did not know the man, and that you could not swear to him.

Court. He does not swear to him now; I think it is the same as he said then.

Q. Did not you appeal to Eleanor Griffiths as being able to confirm you in your belief? - I did.

Q. Did she do that?

Mr. Garrow. I object to that; it is hearsay evidence; ask her, and then we shall hear what she says.

Mr. Knowlys. Was not that person a paler person than the person that appears at the bar? - That I did not observe.

Q. Did you not describe him as a person having a larger nose than the prisoner appears to have? - I did not; I took very little notice of the man's face whoever he was.

Q. Eleanor Griffiths was a servant in that house? - She was.

Q. Is she a servant there now? - She is.

Q. Is Eleanor Griffiths here to day? - She is not.

Q. I would ask you whether enquiry has not been made for Eleanor Griffiths at your house, and you have denied her being there? - I have not seen any body come for her.

Q. Don't you know of any denial? - I do not.

DANIEL BROOKES sworn.

I am a clerk to Messrs. Pybus.

Q. Do you remember on the 21st of September any draft of Mr. Dalby's being offered to you? - I do.

Q. Did you pay it? - I did; I paid it in nine bank notes, two fives, four tens and one fifteen. I have got the original book here, a five pound, No. 2,271, dated the 5th of August 1793; a five pound, No. 6,970, dated the 17th of May 1793, a ten pound, No. 9,590, &c.

Q. Are they the same as Carpmeal has produced to you since? - They are.

- CARPMEAL sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Bow-street.

Q. Where did you find the bank notes that you now produce? - I found them in the King's Arms Palace yard.

Q. On what occasion had you gone there when you found them? - We were attending the sheriffs, that brought us down there first, it was the 30th of September, I, and Kennedy and Townsend were together, Kennedy said to me I wish you would take care and search Jones when you get to him; he was in the right hand parlour, in the house which I have been speaking of, he was in the custody of Jealous and Macmanus, in the room in which I afterwards found these notes.

Q. In what part of the room did you find them? - They were in the fire place, between the fender and grate, squeezed up all of a heap.

Q. How many bank notes were there? - Four tens, a fifteen, and two fives.

Q. What else was there between these bank notes? - A draft of two hundred and twenty-three pounds, payable to Lawrence Jones , drawn by one Brookes on Langston; here is likewise a draft on Mark Wood , on the house of Smith and Co. bankers, Stratford-place, of the value of thirty-four pounds seven shillings, taken from Campbell's bill case.

Q. Where was the prisoner Jones at the moment you found these notes? - When Kennedy had told me that he thought that he had something about him, I gave notice to take care of him that he did not throw any thing away.

Q. Where was Jones in that room? - The back of his chair was fronting the fire place; he was there from twelve o'clock till about three; the fire was exactly behind him, and I went and looked into the grate, I went under pretence of spitting in the grate, to see if there was any thing there, and there was nothing there. About half an hour after I found these papers in the grate.

Q.Was there a fire in the grate? - No. I secured him; that is all I know; the notes have been in my possession ever since.

Court to Brookes. Look at these five bank notes. - They are the same bank notes that I paid.

Court to Campbell. Look at that bill of thirty-four pounds seven shillings. - It is the same as lost out of my case.

Mr. Wood to Carpmeal. How long was it after he was searched that you found these drafts? - I was not present when he was searched; he was just going into the coach when I found them, about three yards from the chair and fire place.

- ALLEN sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Gerard, Noel, Edwards and Co.

Q. What is their firm? - Gerard, Noel Edwards, Samuel Smith , (since dead, the firm was carried on in his name in September last, but he was then dead,) George Templar , Richard Johnson , and John Wedgewood.

Mr. Garrow. When did he die? - About six or eight months ago.

Mr. Wood the prisoner's counsel moved the court that it was necessary to prove this part of the indictment, and that these people were bankers and partners as alledged; to which Mr. Garrow replied, and the court were of opinion that it was quite correct, as the firm at that time was carried on under these names, though was dead.

(The bill read by the Clerk of the Court.)

"Stratford-place, No. 6, London, September 13, 1793. Messrs. Edwards, Smith, Templar, Johnson, and Wedge-wood, London and Middlesex bank, pay to Messrs. Carmichael, Smith, or bearer, thirty-four pounds seven shillings. Mark Wood ."

CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY sworn.

I am one of the officers at Bow-street; I remember having Mr. Jones in custody.

Q. Tell us all you know about it. - On the 30th of September last about twelve o'clock, I and Jealous were going to attend on the sheriffs at Westminster; in Bridge-street, I saw Mr. Lawrence Jones ; I then mentioned to Jealous, here was Jones; we went and took him into the King's Arms tavern, Palace-yard, when Jealous put him into a room which was very dark; he then went out, and there I remained with him some time, Jealous being away in that time he asked me to give him a glass of wine; I told him I would ring the bell, and the waiter brought in a bottle and two glasses; after that he wanted me sadly to tell him what he was taken into custody for, I told him I did not know, he said you do know, and I will give you half a guinea to tell me, I told him I was not to be bought, I did not know, and if I did I would not tell him; then after that he wanted me to get him a chamber pot, as it happened the waiter just came in. I told him to bring a chamber pot; and he took it and he turned himself towards the fire place, and there pretended to make water, at that time I did hear something rustle, I thought it was his linen, afterwards, he had another glass of wine, after that Jealous, Townsend, and some other officers came in, then I began to search him, I then searched him and found two blank checks, which corresponded to that one found filled up by himself; on his going out it occured to me that I verily believed I had not done all that might be done; on some suggestion of mine Carpmeal went back.

Q. How far had Jones got from the room? - Just got out; Townsend, I, and Macmanus, went with him in a coach to Peckham-rye-lane.

Carpmeal. I went back on what Kennedy said, but he remained there half an hour before I found the papers.

JOHN TOWNSEND sworn.

I was present with Carpmeal and Kennedy, after the prisoner Jones was apprehended; I was not present at the time he was apprehended, I was applied to by some of the gentlemen belonging to the banking house of Mr. Vere; it was not me that apprehended him, it was Jealous and Kennedy, I came into the room where the prisoner was, and I asked Kennedy if he had been searched, he said he had, I then said I would search him again; in searching his waistcoat pocket I pulled out a little bit of paper, which he instantly made a snatch at, to

tare it out of my hand; which looking at I found it was a direction to his lodging in Peckham-rye-lane; I found another of the same directions which lead us to discover where he lodged; Macmanus, Kennedy, and I, thought it right to get a hackney coach, and to go to that lodging, we left Carpmeal, and Jealous with the prisoner, we went in and we found there a quantity of papers, which were of no consequence, but there I found his brother Leon, together with another old man.

BENJAMIN CRABB sworn.

I live at the corner of Hatton-garden. I am a rope maker.

Q. Do you remember selling any ropes to any body on the morning of the 21st of September? - I think about nine minutes before nine.

Q. What was the application made to you? - A person came in and desired me to let him have a two-penny cord; he comes back again in about three or four minutes and said he must have two more, for that was not long enough.

Q. Have you ever seen that person since? - I do believe that to be the person there standing, Lawrence Jones ; I do not mean to swear positively, but I believe that to be the person, I am sure of the day and time.

Q. How soon afterwards did the alarm of the robbery reach you? - I did not hear any thing of it till a quarter after three, I verily believe that to be the man.

Mr. Knowlys. Had you ever seen the man that bought them before? - I cannot speak to that.

WILLIAM CRAVEN sworn.

I am a taylor.

Q. Do you know Lawrence Jones ? - I do.

Q. Do you remember to have seen him any time, and where? - On the 21st of September I saw him on Holborn-hill, about ten minutes before eleven o'clock in the morning, I spoke to him, nothing passed only good morning to you Mr. Jones, and good morning to you Mr. Craven; when I first passed him it was about Ely-place, I thought it was Mr. Jones, but I was not certain, and he went into the wine vaults, and I waited at the end of Ely-place to see whether it was him or not, he went down Holborn, and I followed him, and he see me following him, he turned back, and we met, he had an umbrella in his hand.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe you know that there were some persons meant to arrest him; therefore it would not be an imprudent thing for a man to deny his address, when he knows there are bailiffs after him; did you see him near that place? - He went into Peters's wine vaults.

Q. What was the amount of the debt he was afraid of being arrested for? - Fifty pounds.

WILLIAM STIMSON sworn.

I live with my father, captain Stimson, Gower-street, Bedford-square.

Q. Do you recollect any body coming to you on Saturday, anytime, with any bills? - I do not recollect positively, but I believe, to the best of my knowledge, it was the 21st of September; I remember a person coming with some bills, a person wanted payment of the bill, and I told him my father was not at home, and if he called at the Jamaica coffee house he might see him; this was near two o'clock.

Q. Was there any other conversation between you and him? - I had not much conversation with him, I just went to the door.

Q. Was the amount mentioned? - I did not hear.

Q. Should you know the person again? - I believe I could recollect him; Lawrence Jones strikes me as being like

him; I had not a perfect clear sight of him, from the best recollection I have of the person, I believe him to be the person.

Mr. Wood. How long might you have been with him? - About a minute or two.

Q. What time of the day was it? - Near two.

Q. You are neither sure either as to the day or the person of the man? - I did not take any notice of it till some time after I was sent for about it; I saw a man come.

Q. You live in Gower-street, Bedford-square? - I do.

ANN WATSON sworn.

I live a servant with Mr. Stimson, in Gower-street.

Q. Do you recollect any person applying with bills there? - Perfectly well, it was for ninety one pounds, some odd shillings.

Q. Do you know whether you can speak to the person or not? - My young master conversed with him, I did not; I have some recollection of the person, that is the person to the best of my knowledge, Lawrence Jones .

Q. Do you mean to state it as that which you have no doubt about? - I don't think that there is the least doubt that he is the person.

Mr. Knowlys. You see this man now at the distance from this place to that bar, I believe you see him at Bow-street a great deal closer; did not you swear at Bow-street he was not the man?

Mr. Garrow. Was you at that time sworn? - I cannot recollect it.

Q. What induces you now to say that he is the man? - I see him before, I believe at Hatton-garden; I have a perfect recollection of him, and then I knew he was the man.

WILLIAM BLASSON sworn.

I am the proprietor of the house, No. 13, Hatton-garden; I let it the 21st of September to a stranger of the name of Bradshaw, he took it for his father, he said he was a clergyman at Exeter.

Q. Had you before that been applied to by any body else for it? - Yes.

Q. Who was that person that applied to you and not succeeded? - Several people.

Q. Did any body that you have lately seen in custody? - I believe the prisoner Lawrence Jones has.

Q. Have you any doubt that he is the man? - I have no doubt that he together with another person applied, it was two or three weeks before, but I refused to let it, he said he wanted it for a friend of his; we had some conversation about the gentleman over the way that had a daughter married, and he seemed to know them very well, we might be ten minutes together; I did not agree with him, he did not attempt to take it then, they were to call again, and I asked a neighbour about him, and they did not like him. After this robbery I went to the house; there was an express sent down to me directly, I came to town; in the house I found what I have got here, I found these cords; this board and cords, so that putting this rope through the ceiling this board went up to the joists, and kept them up, or thereby the cords might be raised higher or lower.

Q. Did it go through more ceilings? - No, only through one; here appears to be the handle of a new auger; they are new two-penny cords; there were several round staples; and at the end of the cord there was a wire with a slip noose, so as to be able to put it about the neck immediately. These things were put in after I let the house to Mr. Bradshaw.

Mr. Wood. I believe you was examined at Bow-street.

Q. At that time I believe you was doubtful of his person? - I believe I said this, that he was not the person that took the house, that was all I said.

Q. Did not you say that you was not sure whether he was one of the persons that called on you before? - I said I was convinced he was.

Q. Did not you say that you did not know who it was? - I said he was not the person that took the house of me.

Q. You don't mean now to swear positively that he is the person that came? - I am well convinced that he was one of them.

Mr. Garrow. Mr. Blasson, the subject of your examination was confined to this, who took the house for Bradshaw? it was not with respect to whether he had spoke about the house before, you was not spoke to about that? - I was not. I was not asked the question; in short he was not the person that took it for Bradshaw; that was all I said there.

Mr. Garrow to Campbell. You told us you could not give the exact particulars of the bills on Stimson? - I know no more than they were five bills.

Mr. Garrow to Turnbull. Can you state what the amount of the bills were? - I saw them entered in the book; I did not see them delivered; I have got that book here.

Mr. Garrow to Crabb. Were those the sort of cords that were bought at your house? - These were not bought at my house, they are about a yard longer, than the cords that I sell, and a better colour.

Prisoner Lawrence Jones . I shall certainly say something in my own defence.

- WIMBOLD sworn.

I am a solicitor.

Q. Have you had any opportunity of seeing the prisoner Lawrence Jones write? - I have.

Q. Have you received any letter which you afterwards collected came from him? have you by seeing him write and corresponding with him, become acquainted with his character, and hand writing? - I have.

Q. Will you look at this draft which is produced, and see if it is Mr. Lawrence Jones 's hand writing?

Mr. Wood. I object to that question on this ground, because it is going into evidence with a view to prejudice, by supposing that Mr. Lawrence Jones may be guilty of some defrauds.

Court. No, it is only to shew that these notes were in his possession, because there is a paper found with them of his own hand writing.

Mr. Garrow. From your acquaintance with his hand writing, can you speak to the subject whether that bill is his own hand writing? - I paid him four hundred pounds in the year 1790, and he signed a receipt in my presence; I have received also many letters from him; I believe this draft to be his writing, and I have not the least doubt in the world but this name, Lawrence Jones , is his hand writing.

Mr. Garrow to Henderson. Are you acquainted with the hand writing of Thomas Gill , of Pontefract, and Mr. Dalby, of London? - I know them both.

Mr. Wood. Have you seen Mr. Gill write? - Yes, I have.

(The note read by the Clerk of the Court.)

65 l. 2 s. Pontefract, 19th of July 1793. two months after date pay to the order of Messrs. Buck and Singleton, sixty-five pounds two shillings for value received.

Thomas Gill .

To Mr. Dalby, No. 105. New Bond-street, London. Accepted I. D.

Q. What is Mr. Dalby's christian name? - John.

Prisoner. My Lord and gentlemen of the Jury, I beg leave, being charged with

so heinous a crime that I really as much detest as any other man in Europe, to address you, I hope there may be some allowance made for my situation at present that I am not able to speak as I otherwise might. A number of circumstances have been stated, both by Mr. Garrow and others, as to my situation in life; as when he asked Mr. Wimbold questions, which were totally improper against my character. I hope the Jury will consider that they are to try me from the evidence of the witnesses that have appeared this day, and that they will judge accordingly: and I hope that they will consider, that however heinous a crime is, except a man is proved guilty, he is not to be convicted of it, for the more heinous the crime is, the less chance there is of mercy after he is convicted by your testimony. The indictment, states that I have feloniously assaulted John Blagrove Campbell, and taken from him a bill case, containing notes of value at a house in Hatton-garden. To prove this I should humbly hope that it is necessary and incumbent on my prosecutors to prove that I have assaulted the said John Blagrove Campbell. When they call this John Blagrove Campbell instead of proving it, he proves that I did not take this property from him; that he does not know me, and tells you, gentlemen of the Jury, that he was robbed by some man that he saw there, and that I am not the man; that there was another person in company with this said person, whose voice he has heard; that they were about, after they robbed him for two hours, he of course swears positively that it was not my voice. At the time of my examination, Mr. Addington he did it, no doubt, for the sake of public justice; I have no right to suppose any thing else, he asked me simply this, did you or did you not commit a robbery in Hatton-garden? I must needs own the question was a very extroadinary one; I made a reply and said, certainly not; and spoke as any man in my circumstances would, agitated and flurried. Then the magistrate says to Mr. Campbell, Now, Mr. Campbell, at the time that you was robbed, no doubt, if by Mr. Jones, his voice must have been flurried; his voice on the present occasion is also flurried; do you recollect the voice? he then swore it was not the person to appearance, nor was the voice any thing like the voice of the party who robbed him. I therefore take it for granted that the gentleman of the jury will consider it such, that instead of the witness Campbell proving any thing against me, he convinces you of my innocence of this most horrid of crimes that is now laid to my charge.

The next witness is Mr. Henderson, who, when up at Bow-street, stood next to me, after stating that Bills had been presented for payment, for some sixty pounds, he was desired to look round and point out the person; he looked at me and my unfortunate brother, there were a number of other persons in the room, he positively declared, in the presence of Mr. Knowlys, that I was not the person. Mr. Addington pointed me out to him, he then says, that he cannot be positive that he did not take notice of the man, but he verily believed that the man that called on him was of a very different complexion, but, says he, our servant maid, a young woman that is present, she took a good deal of notice of him, she is below stairs, I should wish you would call for her. This was the evidence that was given by Mr. Henderson, in the presence of Mr. Knowlys.

Eleanor Griffiths , who was a servant maid to Mr. Dalby, was next called, being the very woman that was referred to by Mr. Henderson, she then swore that I was not the person; she said, that she took particular notice that I was not the man that presented the bill for payment; they were so good as to give me the name of the servant maid, Eleanor Griffiths , who

lived with Mr. Dalby; that I might be positive, and not be deceived in the name, or might forget, Mr. Knowlys was kind enough to take the name down; I sent to her at Mr. Dalby's, and the answer returned was, that Eleanor Griffiths never lived at Mr. Dalby's; I sent to her again, she was then taking in the milk, and the moment she see my nephew she goes back and wished to conceal herself; he asked her if her name was Eleanor Griffiths ? and caught hold of her arm and asked her if her name was Eleanor Griffiths ? and asked her would she come on my trial? she said, no; my nephew asked her if she had not been at Bow-street? she said she had, but she was not obliged to come to the Old Bailey.

The next witness that is called is Mr. Pybus's clerk; he tells you that he did not pay the draft to me nor to my unfortunate brother.

The next witnesses is Mr. Carpmeal, Kennedy, and those gentlemen who are interested in taking away the lives of their fellow creatures; to throw no reflection on these gentlemen, I believe you all know that it is just as much to them to take away the life of any man as for a butcher to kill an ox; for I declare that I am as innocent of this horrid crime, now imputed to me, as any one of you gentlemen of the jury: nor do I conceive that they have proved any thing that I have been guilty of.

The next witness was a Mr. Crabb, an oilman; he proves of some twopenny cord that he had sold to some person, which he also proves was not the cord produced by Mr. Blasson; therefore I have only to say that it was not me that bought the cord, nor did I ever see Mr. Crabb till I see him at Bow-street, but in effect he does not prove any thing in respect to the present indictment.

The next witness is Mr. Craven, a taylor, who knows me very well; he would wish to prove to you that at the very time, the delicate moment, when this robbery was committed, he saw me in Holborn; now Campbell he said, that they who committed this atrocious act, remained with him till twelve o'clock, at this time, ten minutes before eleven Mr. Craven sees me walking down Holborn, going into a brandy shop drinking a glass of brandy; is it possible that I should have been in a house in Hatton-garden from ten to twelve, and yet be seen by Mr. Craven walking down Holborn with an umbrella in my arm at eleven o'clock? This is the evidence that is called to affect my life, my brother's, and two other unfortunate men.

I know nothing with respect to the evidence of Mr. Stimson; unfortunate for me he did say that he believed me to be the person that presented the bill. You will please to observe that at Bow-street he stated some bill coming for payment, but he did not prove that they were taken from the book of William Blagrove Campbell; on the other hand, he says he never saw the bills, only he remembers the amount was ninety-one pounds; he was asked at Bow-street, whether he never had any bills in his hand? and he says now he never see any bills; he says also, it was about two o'clock when the person called, but he cannot ascertain the day of the month; any fact he does not prove, for he does not prove any thing of the person who robbed Mr. Campbell. Unfortunately for me the person that brought the bill to him did resemble me so much, but he says he only saw him a moment, and he believes me to be the person, but does not pretend to be certain. This is the evidence that is given to affect my life, and my brother's, and the lives of these two unfortunate men whom I know nothing of.

As to the evidence of Ann Watson it is the most extraordinary evidence that ever was given a court; it is the positive fact, that when she was asked at Bow-street whether she had any knowledge of my person, she said that she did not know me; Mr. Addington pointed me out, saying, is not this the man? she paid very great attention, and positively swore that I was not the man. This was in the presence of Mr. Knowlys. She came forward on the 9th of October at Bow-street, at that very instant she says, that Mr. Jones came to our house with bills for payment. Now it is very extraordinary if she had not been tampered with, how she would know me from any person present, when she had said on the 2d of October that I was not the man; and you have heard to day that what I have stated with respect to her testimony is true.

The next witness is Mr. Blasson; it seems he is the landlord of a house, No. 13, Hatton-garden; he proves that he has let his house to some person, and he proves that he did not let this house to me; it seems that very person is to be supposed the person that committed this robbery, or concerned in it; but he does not seem to state that I am the person; he does state that two persons prior to this had applied to him to rent the house; I declare I never have applied for the house, though I believe it would be no crime, nor would be counted such, except in my present situation, but at the same time I must declare that the first time I ever saw Mr. Blasson was at Bow-street; Mr. Blasson says that he did not chuse to let me the house. I humbly conceive in my former situations, prior to my misfortune in attending this bar, my appearance nor address was so despicable as not to have asked me what are you? and who are you? before, on such an occasion, I should have a denial. I verily believe that it is a very extraordinary circumstance, instantly to object to me as a tenant without ever enquiring into my character, good, bad, or indifferent. I repeat the declaration, I never saw him till I saw him at Bow-street, Gentlemen of the jury, this is the whole of the evidence produced by the prosecutors, in which I believe there are not grounds sufficient to convict a man of a common misdemeanor, much less of a capital crime which takes his life. I hope you will divest yourselves of every prejudice that might have been produced in your minds from the reports that have proceeded out of doors, or from the public papers; I do not say that these reports are to weigh in my favour, but that you ought to divest your minds of every impression that might be made previous to what you have now heard, and that you will judge mercifully this very day as you expect to find mercy yourselves.

I shall now prove to you gentlemen, from respectable witnesses, that I am an innocent man. I should leave my cause as it now stands was it not for my future situation in life; I wish to be honourably acquited, and convince you and the world, that I could not possibly commit such a crime; and if ever I could for a moment harbour the idea of committing such an attrocious deed may God deprive me of life. I hope, gentlemen, you will make some allowance for my present situation, for I must beg you will.

DAVID HART sworn.

I know the prisoner Lawrence Jones , I see him on Saturday the 21st of September last, in the morning, I saw him some time after eight o'clock, between eight and nine, I met him as I came down Holborn; when I met Mr. Jones I spoke to him, and I told him there

I have refreshed my memory, that now I can swear to the day.

Q. It is some time since you was first applied to, but your memory is got better, at first you had a good deal of doubt about the day? - I could not speak to the day positively till I saw the gentleman with whom I dined that day.

Q. Pray now how long have you been a half pay agent? - I am an half pay captain myself, and have been an half pay agent not quite two years; I have been reduced from a provincial regiment.

Q. What provincial regiment? - The Duke of Manchester was the general of it; I forget the colonel.

Q. There never was a captain yet but knew what regiment he belonged to? - Lord Mountague's regiment, he commanded it, and the Duke of Manchester he was the general of it.

Q. Is that the same corps that Mr. Jones was in? - It was not.

Q. You are not in service now? - No.

JOB MOORE sworn.

I live at Birmingham, in Warwickshire.

Q. Do you know Mr. Lawrence Jones ? - I do.

Q. Do you know any thing of a sale that he made at any time? - I saw him sell a pair of bracelets, they had diamonds about them.

Q. Do you know to whom he sold them? - I do not.

Q. Was you present when they were sold? - I was.

Q. Do you know what time it was? - Between four and five in the afternoon, on the 28th of September last.

Q. Are you clear as to the time? - I believe I am.

Q. Do you know how long ago it was? - Four weeks.

ELEANOR GRIFFITHS sworn.

I was a servant to Mr. Dalby's house; I was sent for to Bow-street at the examination of Mr. Lawrence Jones .

Q. He was shewn to you there, and you was asked there whether you recollected his person? - I was.

Q. You gave an account there on oath? - I did.

Q. You see Mr. Jones here? - That is not the man that brought the bill to our house.

Q. How came you not to come here till you was sent for? - Mr. Dalby, my master, told me it was not worth my while to come.

Mr. Garrow. When did you receive the subpoena? - On Monday last.

Q. You was very wrong not to come, and I am very glad that I sent for you now.

BENJAMIN HARRIS sworn.

Q. Did you see Mr. Lawrence Jones on the 21st of September? - Yes, there was another with him of the name of Hart; I see them together in Holborn, between ten and eleven, pretty near eleven.

Mr. Garrow. Which way were they going? - Coming towards this way, coming towards Hatton-garden.

Q. Where did you see them? - In Middle-row, Holborn.

Q. Did you see them as far as Gray's Inn-lane, or Fetter-lane? - I did not see them there.

Q. Middle-row, Holborn is on the other side of Grays Inn coffee house?

A. It is not.

Mr. Garrow. I beg pardon, it is not.

Q. Which side of the way were they walking on? - The side where the Church is, the left hand going from here to Middle-row.

Q. Had you any acquaintance with the gentleman that was walking with

him? - I know his name, I know him very well.

Q. Where did Mr. Hart live at that time? - I believe he lived at Portsmouth.

Q. Has he lived at Portsmouth all the time you knew him? - I cannot tell.

Q. Do you know where Mr. Jones lived? - Yes, I did lately.

Q. Since he was taken? - And before he was taken he lived at Pimlico.

Q. But where Mr. Hart lived in London you could not tell at all? did you never know any place where he lived about a year ago? - About a year ago he lived somewhere in Houndsditch.

Q. That we may not mistake our geography again, how long did Hart live in Houndsditch, how many months? - A great many years.

Q. Has he lived a good many years in London? - I believe so.

Q. Did you ever know any other house that he lived in in London, except the house in Houndsditch? - I cannot tell.

Mr. Hart. Is it about a year and a half ago that I lived in Houndsditch.

Garrow to Harris. Did you ever know him living in Pearl-row, Blackfriars? - I never did.

Mr. Wood to Job Moore. What was the date you gave to that transaction you spoke about? - The 28th of September.

Q. You say that there were a pair of Bracelets sold. Do you know the person to whom they were sold? - I heard the name mentioned of Grey.

Q. Do you recollect where it took place? - At the Bank Coffee house.

Q. What was the nature of the Sale? and what was paid? - He sold the bracelets for one hundred and twenty pounds.

Q. Do you know whether it was paid at that time? - It was paid at that time.

Q. Can you tell us how it was paid? - There were four ten pounds bank notes, two fives, a fifteen and a bill of thirty-four pounds seven shillings, nineteen guineas and a half in cash, in gold, and some silver.

Q. Do you know the number of these notes? - I cannot positively swear to them, but to the best of my knowledge there was one of them 2,271, and another 9,670.

Q. Have you ever seen these notes since? - No, never; nor before.

Mr. Garrow. Have you the memorandum you made of the transaction? - I have not.

Q. How many tens were there? - There were four.

Q. Are you quite certain as to the amount of the draft? was it thirty-seven pounds four shillings, or thirty-four pounds seven shillings? - It was thirty-four pounds seven shillings.

Q. This person was a stranger as well to Jones as to you? - I don't know, he might be or not to Mr. Jones.

Q. Do you know when this note was drawn? - I think it was drawn the 13th of September, to such a one and bearer. I think it had no time to run, it was due when it was first drawn I presume.

Q. Can you be quite certain of that? - To the best of my recollection it was; I remember there was on it, London and Middlesex bank; that was the reason I recollect it, because I never saw one of that kind before.

Q. What business are you? - A plated buckle maker; I have lived in Birmingham for near fifty years.

Q. And have bill transactions occasionally yourself? - Yes, I have.

Q. This happened on the 28th of September. You know the difference between a bill payable at sight, and one that is a week over due? - Certainly.

Q. You, as a man of business, would enquire what was the reason if a week was over due, whether the man on whom it was drawn had any assets or no. Did not you suggest that to Mr. Jones to enquire that before he took the bill? - I did not.

Q. Here is a pretty lot of bank notes, two, four, six, and seven bank notes. Did any body make amount of the number of them at the time? - They were casting up the amount; I cannot say whether they made any amount of it, Mr. Jones was looking them over and casting them up.

Q. Was you there when they began to treat for these bracelets? - I was.

Q. Who was called in to know the value of them? - Nobody.

Q. Did Mr. Grey give what Mr. Jones asked? - No, at last there was ten pounds difference.

Q. What was the number of those two you mentioned? - 2,271, and 6,970 to the best of my knowledge, and not 9,670.

Q. On your oath did not you repeat to this gentleman several times over 9,670?

HARRY PHILLIP sworn.

Lawrence Jones has occasionally dealt in diamonds, he has sold them at our rooms. I am Mr. Christie's clerk; he has sold diamonds to the amount of two hundred pounds in the years 1790 and 1792.

Q. Do you ever advance money on commission before the things are sold? - We do.

Mr. Garrow. Did you always find him deal like a man of business? - Our concerns have been only three transactions with him.

Q. Did he do business with the caution and care of a man of business? - He did.

Q. Do you know any diamond broker of the name of Grey? - None besides Mr. Grey, of New Bond-street.

PETER CHARMIN sworn.

I am a private jeweller, a working one, I live in York-buildings; I have known Mr. Jones ever since February was a twelve month.

Q. During that time did you know him to have any transactions in diamonds? - Yes, he has brought diamonds to me in order to ascertain the weight of them as well as I could without unsetting them from the silver. I have been conversant in it for near thirty years.

Lawrence Jones , GUILTY . Death . (Aged 40.)

The other three not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-70

742. JOHN SMARELEY and WILLIAM MILLS were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of September , forty-three ewe sheep, value 20 l. the goods of John Nokes .

SAMUEL GIBSON sworn.

I am a farmer in Burton, in Surry ; I had some sheep of Mr. John Nokes 's pastering in our farm.

Q. Were they ewe sheep? - They were; forty-three.

Q. When did you last see these sheep? - On Sunday the 29th of September.

Q. How far advanced in Sunday did you see them? - Between one and two o'clock in the morning; they were in a field of mine near the turnpike road to London.

Q. When did you miss them? - On Monday morning about six o'clock I went there.

Q. Did you afterwards see the sheep, after they were taken into custody? - I saw forty-one out of the three and forty that were lost.

Q. Do you know any thing of the man that is admitted an evidence or those men at the bar? - No, I do not know either of them.

Mr. Knapp. You had the complete possession of these sheep, you was answerable over to Mr. Nokes if any of them had been lost? - No, I was not.

Q. Supposing any of them had died by your negligence, or by your servant's negligence, should not you suppose yourself answerable for them? - No.

Q. How long had they been in your field? - About three weeks.

Q. Had you any other sheep in the same field? - No other sheep whatever.

Q. Had you frequent opportunities of seeing them? - I used to see them every day.

Mr. Knowlys. Were they Mr. Nokes's sheep or not? - They were Mr. Nokes's sheep.

MICHAEL NATHAN sworn.

I am a butcher at Lambeth.

Q. Do you know either of the men at the bar? - I had seen them both before.

Q. When did you see them? - The Monday before they were taken.

Q. Now can you tell us on what occasion you saw them? - I was going home and they met me, Mills met me, it was about four o'clock in the afternoon; he told me that his friend had got some sheep to sell if I would buy them; I told him I had no objection; he took me down to a public house in houndsditch where Smareley was; and he said, will you buy any sheep? I told him I had no objection; he said he had none then, but he would have some in the course of a day or two; Mills was present at the time; about Wednesday, I think, he said he should have them; and where should he bring them to? I told him he must be the best judge where he might bring them to, there were plenty of places at Islington, where the other farmers put up. Mills came to me on the Monday following, he came to me and said, come along, come along, says he, here are the sheep; I said, where? he said, in Fore-street; so when we got to Fore-street, he said, he made a mistake it was Broad-street; when we came to Broad-street I did not see any sheep, but I saw a little man in a blue jacket, and Mills said, there is the man that has got them in care; I said that is a man that I know. Mills takes me down a coach yard where the sheep was; so I and Mills together counted them; I said there were only two and forty; he said, that is right, there is one run over.

Q. How came you to expect there were three and forty? - Mills told me there were three and forty; I told Nathan, the other man's name that had them in care, he is a Billingsgate porter I believe, says I to him, take these sheep to Mr. Shannon, and tell Mr. Shannon, to take particular care of them till he sees me; I did not agree for any thing, he asked me fifteen shillings a piece, but I did not settle it.

Q. Who asked the fifteen shillings? - Mills. I then told him to go back with me to Smithfield; I had not cash enough about me to pay him for them; I went with him to the Half Moon, and told him to call for something to drink, and I went out and got a constable, and gave charge of him, because I suspected the sheep being stolen.

Q. Did you see these sheep? - Yes.

Q. Were the sheep in the usual condition, in which sheep were brought into market? - They seemed to be no judge of the price, and then they did not appear to be fit for killing at all, they were scarcely worth any thing for killing.

Q. After you had taken Mills what became of Smarely? - I did not see

Smarely that morning at all, I had seen him the Monday before.

Mr. Knapp. Nathan, had you known these prisoners before? - Never before.

Q. Did you know Pether the witness? - Never.

Q. Did they come to you in the day or night? - It was four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did they make any secret about it to you, that they had got sheep to sell? - They called on me in a public house.

Q. How soon did you see Smarely? did you see the prisoners both together? - Mills called me to Smarely, then Smarely seemed as if he was the person of whom I was to have the sheep.

NATHAN NATHAN sworn.

I am a porter.

Q. Do you know any thing of these sheep? - On the 30th of September, Monday morning, I was going to Billingsgate, I have worked there for these three and four and twenty years. I saw a drove of sheep, and a potatoe cart, in Fenchurch-street, and I saw three men driving them all of a row.

Q. Look round and see if any of these men are here? - Two men are here at the bar; that was about a quarter after five in the morning.

Q. Are you sure they are the men? - I am sure of it, they have on the same coats as they had on at that time.

Q. What became of the sheep? - The way I got into the business was, one of the sheep was run over with a potatoe cart, so with that the prisoner at the bar he fetched up the driver of the cart, and says, you have run over one of my sheep; so I took the number of the cart, because he was going to knock him down, 39,397. After that the sheep was run over, one of them said, young man, have you any particular business to do? I said I was going down to Billingsgate, but if he would pay me I would go along with them; so I takes down one of my baskets and takes up the dead sheep in one of my baskets, and followed them to Houndsditch; I followed Mills and the other man to Houndsditch, then Mr. Mills said to me you must stay here for about a quarter of an hour, and he helped me down with the dead sheep, now, says he, you must follow me, Smarely was all the while behind; I followed, I went down Wormwood-street, and came just to Broad-street; says he, I must go to Smithfield, and you must stay here to take care of the sheep.

Q. Who said that? - Mills; Smarely was up and down Broad-street, at the same time, says he, this is a bye street, you can drive them up here, I drove them up there, and while I was there the watchman came to me and said, this is a great nuisance, the inhabitants will be vexed with it, if they should look out, says he, there is a coach yard, you may drive them up, I drove them up the yard, and all this time Smarely and another gentleman was walking up and down all the time, that other gentleman's name is Pether I believe; sometimes they went round Old Bedlam.

Q. Did you see any thing of the man of the name of Nathan? - Nathan came to me along with Mr. Mills.

Q. What time of the day was it that Mills brought Nathan? - About seven o'clock in the morning; I waited there a full hour; when Nathan came to me he said to me take these sheep, so and so, says I, who is to pay me for my trouble? Mills asked me what I wanted? I said I deserved half a crown; Nathan told me where to drive them, Smarely followed me all the way, and came full butt against me in Petticoat-lane; I delivered them to a butcher in Petticoat-lane, he goes by the name of one Mr. Shannon, according to the directions of Nathan, the prisoner Smarely followed me all the way from Fenchurch-street,

and paraded all the while up and down Broad-street, while I was there.

Mr. Knapp. Nathan, what are you? - I am a porter.

Q. Are you employed by butchers? - I have worked at Billingsgate for this last twenty-three years.

Q. Are you a relation to the last witness? - No, no more than you.

Q. This was early in the morning that you met them? - About a quarter after five.

Q. Do you know if these men are convicted that you will have part of a reward? - I like to be industrious.

Q. Don't you know if they are convicted you will be entitled to part of a reward? - I never was in such a snare in my life.

Q. Since you have been about this court have you never heard that there is a reward on conviction of sheep stealing? - No, never in my life.

Q. Did you get the half crown? - Mills said he had no more than a shilling about him.

Q. Did you ever get the remainder of the half crown? - A shilling is money.

Q. Did you ever get the remainder of the half crown that they promised to give you? - If they had given me the half crown I had a right to it, I had earned it.

Q. Did you ever get the half crown? - I was paid for my labour.

Q. Did you get the remainder of the half crown that they promised to give you? - I had half a crown.

Q. How soon afterwards did you get the half crown? - The same day after the gentleman paid me the shilling.

Q. Who paid you the one shilling and six-pence? - Mr. Nathan.

Q. You might have answered that question a long while ago, and you would have saved the time of the court, and the jury, you are an impudent fellow. What were the marks of these sheep? - All marked N. my name; that I could see in the dark.

Court to Gibson. How were these sheep marked that you lost? - With an N.

JAMES PETHER sworn.

Q. You confessed that you had a hand in stealing these sheep? - I stole them out of a field in Marden parish, the field was close by the road side, it belonged to one Mr. Gibson.

Q. How many sheep did you steal? - More than forty; I cannot say exactly.

Q. Who was with you at the time you did this? - Smarely only.

Q. Now tell us how you disposed of them? - On Friday Smarely called on me at my work before it happened, and asked me to assist him to drive some sheep to town; I denied him; Friday and Saturday he called again, and I went to his house on Sunday; Sunday evening between eleven and twelve o'clock we went into a field, took some sheep out and drove them away towards London, driving them along he said he must go and call William Mills , that was to take them to a person that was to receive them; Mills just at London-Bridge took the charge of them, and said that he did not want no more of me; I and Smarely followed Mills at a distance; coming along Fenchurch-street, one of the sheep were run over, Mills asked one man Nathan to assist him, he did, and drove them somewhere towards Houndsditch. Smarely and I were close by the sheep when it was run over, this Nathan had them in his care while Nathan went somewhere else; then Smarely and I came to the Pit's Head in the Old Bailey, and Smarely went from me, and I never see him again till last night I see him in this court; I was taken up a week afterwards on suspicion.

Mr. Knapp. Then Smarely and you were the only persons that were concerned in driving these sheep out of the field? - Yes.

Q. How often have you been a witness in a court of justice before? - Never before in my life.

Q. Don't you know a person of the name of Bureau that lives in Shoemaker-row? - I don't know such a person.

Q. Do you remember giving evidence against such a person? - I never was in court before last night.

Q. You came here to the Pit's Head, Old Bailey, pretty near the goal, was you ever in the Old Bailey before? - My name was never brought in any request in court.

Q. What are you? what have you been? - I have been a maltman most part of my time, but now within this twelve months I have followed sawing.

Q. How long ago have you followed a day's work at sawing? - I have been a month in custody, the Saturday before this job I worked for Mr. Hamilton, of Lower Tuton.

Q. Smarely does not live there, does he? - He lives at Case Horton.

Q. You did not engage in this job for nothing, did you? - There was nothing mentioned about that, I expected something, but I did not know what, there was no agreement.

Q. You expected to have your share of it? - I expected something.

JOHN GODDARD sworn.

I am a constable; I apprehended Smarely on Friday the 30th of September, about half past eleven; I was going to take a prisoner out of the New Compter, and going up the street I had information of Smarely, by Charles Parnell ; I found him two doors from Fleet-lane, he made no resistance; I took him before Alderman Langston.

Prisoner Smarely. That Pether called me up about eleven o'clock on Sunday night, and tole me that he could wish if I could prefer him to a little money, I had none myself, I know, says he, of some sheep that are in a field adjoining a turnpike road; and he took these sheep out of the field to London-bridge, and drove them himself, then at London-bridge I went to Mr. Mills, for him to call Mr. Nathan that was to buy them, he said he did not mind stolen property, he had told me he did not care how they were come by, so as he could have them worth his money. Pether was the man that drove the sheep, he drove them all the way from Marden to London-bridge; I know no more of the sheep than that. I am quite destitute of any witness, I was quite unprepared for any thing of the kind.

William Mills , Not GUILTY .

John Smarely , GUILTY . Death . (Aged 44.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-71

743. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of September , forty-one yards of fustian, called thickset, value 5 l. sixteen yards of cotton velveteen, value 2 l. twenty yards of velveret for waistcoats, value 2 l. 10 s. fifty yards of woollen cloth, value 18 l. twelve yards of printed dimity, value 24 s. the goods of Richard Roberts and Walter Hebden , in the dwelling house of Walter Hebden .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WALTER HEBDEN sworn.

My partner's name is Richard Roberts ; we are warehousemen and ironmongers ;

the prisoner was a porter of ours about three years.

Q. I believe you had occasion to send him out on Friday the 27th of September; I believe that was the day that he did not come home after he performed the errand? - He did not.

Q. In consequence of this had you any suspicion that you had lost any of your property? - Yes.

Q. Did you obtain a warrant of the Lord Mayor? - I did, we sent the warrant down to Liverpool, and the prisoner was taken there; the box with the property was brought along with him by the constable from Liverpool.

Q. Now about this dwelling house where this property was, is it your own dwelling house? - The warehouse forms a part of the house, it is the ground floor.

Q. Pray does the partnership account contribute to pay the rent of the dwelling house? - I allow to the trade for the upper part of the house.

Q. I believe you had a search warrant to search a person of the name of Rose? - We did, he lives in Brick-lane, Old-street; we found there two pieces of pillow fustian that is not in the indictment.

Q. When you was before the Lord Mayor was the box produced? - It was.

Q. Was you present at the time the prisoner was before the Lord Mayor? - I was.

THOMAS LAWRENCE sworn.

I was present before the Lord Mayor when the prisoner was examined; the box and prisoner were delivered to me at the same time, the prosecutor has had the box ever since, Mr. Hebden.

Q. Did you hear any confession made by the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Q. Was it taken in writing? - It was.

Q. Look at this and see if it is the Lord Mayor's hand writing? - It is, and I witnessed it; there was no promise made to him whatever, he voluntarily confessed.

(The confession read.)

The voluntary examination and confession of John Thomas , charged with felony, taken before Sir James Sanderson , Mayor, on the 21st of October 1793, who confesseth, and says,

"That the box, now produced by Richard Howard , is his, the examinant's property, and that the piece of thickset and all other goods therein, are the property of Mr. Walter Hebden and Richard Roberts , except the wearing apparel therein, with whom this examinant lived as a porter, and was stolen by this examinant from their warehouse in Ironmonger-lane, at different times, whilst he was in their service; that he, the said examinant, wrote the direction on the box, Charles Marshall , Liverpool, to be left there till called for, and his intent was to take the said box and goods therein to Ireland, and to dispose of them there." Taken and acknowledged before me, at the Mansion house, London, James Sanderson , Mayor.

A further examination on the 23d of October of the aforesaid John Thomas , who voluntarily faith;

"That about two months ago he sold to one John Nightingale, two yards and a quarter of velveteen, at the house of Mrs. Rose, in Brick-lane, Old-street, and that she was present when he so did it. Taken before me, James Sanderson , Mayor.

(The box and goods produced.)

Hebden. One piece in particular has got our name and number on it.

Prisoner. I leave it to your lordship, and my master's mercy.

GUILTY .

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house. (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-72

744. JOHN IRELAND was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of October , thirty-six linen shirts, value 4 l. sixteen pair of linen trowsers, value 2 l. 8 s. the goods of George Robinson .

Indicted in a Second COUNT laying them to be the property of the parishioners of St. Clement's Dane, in the county of Middlesex.

GEORGE ROBINSON sworn.

I am the master of the workhouse of St. Clement's Dane . On Friday the 25th of October, between seven and eight in the morning, I lost the shirts; I did not see the prisoner take them.

Q. When did you last see them? - I see the box near about that time, in which they were kept, and then they were put on a truck to carry home.

Q. Did you ever see them on the truck? - I saw them before they were put in the truck, I never see them on the truck myself.

Q. How soon did you see them after they were missing? - On Monday morning when he was taken up.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at all? - No further then his being in the workhouse a pauper. The things were sold immediately; I have never seen them since.

Q. Where was this box kept? - In a room we call the needle room, where the women work at needle work.

ELEANOR BRAMHAM sworn.

I am the person that looks after the work. On Friday the 25th of October, I saw the shirts put on the truck, they came out of the needle room that morning, fetched out by the prisoner and another.

Q. What was it the prisoner carried? - Thirty-six check shirts and two bundles of trowsers, there were more trowsers besides them, two dozen.

Q. Did you see him put them on this truck? - I did.

Q. Did you ever happen to see them afterwards on the truck that day? - I went along with the truck as far as Ludgate-hill, and then they went round St. Paul's, I went round the left hand, and they went round the right hand, till there I followed the truck.

Q. Did you afterwards see them on the truck? - Yes, I saw the quantity, but they were covered over.

Q. What was done with this truck afterwards? - It was to go to the warehouse.

Q. Was the prisoner the man that was to carry them? - Yes.

Q. Did you go with him? - Yes.

Q. Where did you go with him? - 'Till we came to St. Paul's, he turned on the right hand, and I turned to the left, and they went into Red Lion-court, Watling-street.

Q. Where was it he and you parted? - At St. Paul's; he went on the right hand as I went on the left; it is usual to go that way, and that was the way we generally made use of.

Q. Why did the man go one way and you another? - Because the truck would not go that way; I went strait on the City, through Cheapside to go to the warehouse, and instead of their coming that way they went down Watling-street, to Red Lion-court.

Q. Did you see them at the warehouse, or did he not deliver them? - I went to the warehouse, but the prisoner did not come there; I never saw him any more.

Q. How soon did you see him after this? - Not at all till after he was taken.

Q. Did you ever see your goods again? - Yes, some.

Q. Which did you see first, the prisoner or the goods? - A gentleman took in what was left in Red Lion-court for safety; I saw them in Red Lion-court I believe the same night; the gentleman sent word to the workhouse.

Q. In whose hands did you see them? - In one Mr. Cumberland's, a broker, I believe.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner after this? - Not till the Monday that he was taken on Sunday.

Q. Should you know the things again if you was to see them? - There is the parish mark on them, that is the mark we mark all the shirts by.

- GOLTHORPE sworn.

I am one of the poor belonging to the workhouse of St. Clement's Danes. This day week I called this Ireland up, and one Wood, to get the truck ready to carry some goods home to the warehouse, and they brought the goods out of the needle room, Ireland was one, and John Wood and James Addison was with us, and I packed ten bundles in the cart to go to the warehouse with them; I put the goods in and packed them in the truck.

Q. What were the goods? - Three bundles of check and three bundles of white; but what the bundles contained I cannot say, because I never opened them.

Q. Who took them away in the truck? - John Ireland , John Wood , and James Dodd , they were the three men.

JOHN CORD sworn.

I work sometimes in the trunk line, and some times I porter for Mr. Chamberlain. I was beating a carpet in Red Lion-court that morning, and three men left the truck in the court, the prisoner was one; it was then about a quarter past seven in the morning; two of the three took out a bag a piece; there being a hole in one of the bags I could see they were checks in it, but what quantity, or any thing else I know not; the person whom they left with the truck waited the return of these two persons from that time of the morning till three o'clock in the afternoon in the court, it was one of the three that stayed with the truck.

Q. At what time did the prisoner return, or the other man? - They never returned at all. That man stayed all the time I mentioned, that made the neighbours take notice of it, and Mr. Cumberland took the goods in and gave the man 6 d. to go home with. They only took out two bags.

Q. What time did Mr. Cumberland take the goods into his warehouse? - About half past three in the afternoon.

Q. Do you know the man's name that stayed with the truck? - No.

Robinson. He is not here; he is an ideot.

Court to Cord. Are you perfectly sure that there was check in that bag? - I saw a hole through the bag, and I observed check.

Q. Did you see the goods that were brought into Mr. Cumberland's house? - There were six bundles, what they were I don't know.

Q. What was done with these bundles? where they opened at all? - They were not.

Q. Did any appear to be check of that? - I believe they were all trowsers.

Q. What was done with the goods? - I don't know; I saw no more of them after that.

RICHARD DALE sworn.

I am a partner with Mr. Cumberland. A note was sent to our workhouse for them, I saw the note myself.

JOHN BASSETT sworn.

I am a butcher. On Saturday last the master of the workhouse came down to me into a public house, and told me he had behaved in a very dirty manner, and said that he had robbed the workhouse of shirts and trowsers, and told me if I should see him to stop him. On Sunday evening he was by our door, and I stopped him and delivered him to the beadle, and had him taken to the watch-house; he said he was sorry for what he had done, and that the other man had sold the trowsers and shirts, and gave him a guinea and a half of the money; I went up on Monday morning and acquainted the master of the workhouse that I had got him in the watch-house.

THOMAS CAUSTIN sworn.

I am an assistant to Mr. Darby, to take in work and give it out; he is a slop-seller, he gives out work to the workhouses to have it made up.

Q. To whom do they belong? - To Mr. Darby; he delivers them to the parish to have them made up. The property belongs to the parish, the master of the workhouse has them to make up.

Q. Who are answerable for them? - The parish.

Q. Suppose any are missing, is Mr. Robinson obliged to make them good? - He is to us.

Q. Now what do you know of these? - I only know that there were three bundles of shirts and one bundle of trowsers never returned to the workhouse.

Q. At what time were they missing? - They always bring them of a Friday, and they did not bring them last Friday at all.

Q. Where is your warehouse? - No. 30, Gracechurch street.

Court to Robinson. With respect to these things, the day they were missing, who were the persons that went to the house of Mr. Cumberland? Is it not ascertained what was the quantity missing? - The quantity missing were three bundles of shirts and one of trowsers.

Q. Do you know the quantity the man and Ireland had to carry? - Four dozen of trowsers and two dozen of frocks, beside those that were missing.

Court to Mrs. Bramham. Can you say the prisoner had the quantity of things delivered to him on the truck, mentioned in Mr. Robinson's bill? - I can; I tied them up with my own hand, and I received of Mr. Cumberland the things that were left last Tuesday.

Q. Who delivered them to you? - Mr. Cumberland with his own hand.

Q. Were the articles mentioned in the indictment the articles that were missing? - They were.

JOHN CUMBERLAND sworn.

I am a broker, Red Lion-court; I saw a truck there on Monday last, about nine o'clock in the morning; there was a lad with it, I looked on him to be stupid or an ideot.

Q. Did you make any enquiry of this lad? - I asked him several times where he came from? I could get no answer, but from the workhouse; I sent for the beadle of Cordwainers ward, and he said as it was a parish matter he would not have any thing to do with it; so I took the goods into my warehouse, and sent him home with a note in his pocket. In the afternoon of the same day Mrs. Bramham brought me the note; I delivered the things to Mrs. Bramham and another, two or three days afterwards.

Prisoner. I don't know any thing about where they were sold, or any thing at all about it.

Court to Robinson. He speaks as if he had been ill, does he speak commonly so? - He was taken with a stroke of the palsy some years ago, but he can speak better if he pleases.

Q. Does he know what he is about? - He well knows what he is about, he is quite intelligent.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Imprisoned six months in the house of Correction and Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-73

745. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of October , a watch with a gold case, value 5 l. a gold watch chain, value 15 s. two stone seals set in gold, value 10 s. a composition seal set in gold, value 5 s. the property of William Murray , commonly called Lord Viscount Stormont .

LORD STORMONT sworn.

Q. Did you lose a gold watch any time on the 12th of October? - Yes, I lost it out of the dormitory, at Westminster ; I had not worn it for some time; I lost it out of a bureau which was occasionally locked, but not always; I missed it the Thursday that I had put it the Tuesday before there.

Q. Did not you see the person take it? - I did not.

Q. Have you ever recovered it since? - I saw it at Bow-street, I believe it was the 25th of October, Friday.

Q. Who produced it there? - Justice Addington.

Q. Did you know it to be your's? - I swore to it.

Q. Is it a gold watch? - It is.

Q. Had it a gold chain? - Yes.

Q. Two seals set in gold? - Yes.

Q. A composition seal set in gold? - Yes.

Q. How did you know it to be your's? - I know the number of the watch now, I got it from the watch-maker, and had bills printed; I went to the watch-maker on the loss of it.

Q. Is the watch-maker here? - No.

Q. Then you did not recollect the number on it? - I did not.

Q. Was the watch-maker's name on it? - Yes, I know the watch generally, I could swear to the watch perfectly.

Q. Do you know the seals? - Yes, I did not see the seal till to day that I swore to.

Q. What was the seal? - A composition seal, a lion on it.

Q. What was the colour of it? - Blue.

Q. Have you any doubt that the watch and seals were your's? - I have not the least doubt.

Q. What might be the interval between the Thursday you missed it and the 25th of October? - I fancy the Thursday that I lost it was about the 26th or 27th of September.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at all, did you ever see him? - No, never.

Q. You only speak to the loss and recovery of it, you never saw it in his hands? - No, never.

JOHN BAXTER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, a servant to Mr. Cordy, Green-street, Leicester-fields; I produce a watch.

Q. Is there any thing with the watch? - A gold chain, it had no seals when brought to me.

Q. Who brought it to you? - A Mr. Lawrence.

Q. Did you know Mr. Lawrence? - I did not.

Q. Is he here? - No, he is not, it was brought on Monday the 21st of this month, I stopped it, he wanted four guineas on it.

Q. Did you stop. Mr. Lawrence? - Yes, he told me he had it of Mr. Coulthurst.

Q. Did you let him go then? - No, I did not, I told him I must detain him, and send up for a Bow-street officer, and we went to Mr. Mecklenberg, where Mr. Coulthurst was, and went with them both to Bow-street.

Q. What happened at Bow-street? was Mr. Lawrence discharged? - Directly.

JOHN COULTHURST sworn.

I am an officer in the half pay line; the young man at the bar, who is a brother officer of mine, I became acquainted with him at the Barracks at Chatham.

Q. Is he now in service? - He is in the marines, he is the first lieutenant; I believe I had not met him since the peace, till about two months ago I received a note from him, informing me that he was in London, and in very great distress, claiming my assistance, requesting me to send him a temporary assistance; I desired the boy who brought the note, immediately to conduct me to him; I was extremely unhappy to find a young man that I had known in good circumstances and in a genteel line, in so deplorable condition; I rendered him what assistance I could, and requested he would come to my lodging, I told him I should occasionally render him any little assistance in my power, I invited him constantly to breakfast with me, and about three weeks ago he came to my lodging, says he, you can put a guinea in my pocket without any inconvenience to yourself, I am sure; I said, I should be very happy to do it; he told me that he had a watch of his wife's in pawn for four guineas, and that if I was so good as to lend him four guineas to redeem it, he could very readily pawn it for five, I told him I should be happy to lend him any assistance in my power; I was in bed at the time, I told him there was exactly four guineas and some silver in my pocket, he was very welcome to take it for the purpose; he took it out of my pocket by my desire, by the time I was up and at breakfast, he returned with the watch in his pocket; I told him it was certainly worth much more, and if he pleased I would lend him the other guinea, and keep the watch as a security, which would save him the expence of pawning of it; but if I should happen to want five guineas in the interim before he paid me, he could have no objection to my sending it to a pawnbroker's. I wore the watch for several days in my pocket, and shewed it to several of my acquaintances, mentioning the circumstance; I mentioned it to several of my acquaintances, and on Friday week last a friend of mine, a very old acquaintance, a Mr. Lawrence called on me in the morning, begged the favour of me to lend him a few guineas in order to pay a bill, that he was bound to take up on that day; I told him I had not cash to spare, and pleaded an excuse, he told me his credit would be hurt, as his bill became due at twelve o'clock, and he had promised to pay it; this was I suppose about ten, and he intreated me to lend him what I could spare, I told him I could not spare a single guinea, he then suggested the idea of lending him Mr. Wheeler's watch, and he says I will pawn, and will give you my honour to redeem it, and let you have it by eight o'clock this evening; as he told me he had a pressing occasion for a little

money, I did not refuse him, I gave it him for the purpose of pawning it; in about an hour and a half he returned to the room where I was dressing in custody, he told me that the offer of the watch had been attended with a most serious consequence, that he was detained for its being a stolen watch. I was astonished at the declaration, and told him I will attend you immediately to the justice of the peace, and sufficiently exonerate you. I went with him to justice Addington's, and told justice Addington all the circumstance, and he was discharged, and so was I, and he told me it was necessary to take Mr. Wheeler, in order to justify myself, and at four o'clock that day Mr. Lawrence, and I took him into custody. I think it is three weeks ago to day that he come to me, for I had the watch in my possession for one week.

Prisoner. I wish to ask him whether on last fortnight I did not go with him, during the time of divine service in the afternoon to Westminster Abbey? - I do recollect our walking that way, and going into the Abbey.

Court. Was that before you had the watch or after - I think I had the watch at that time.

GEORGE WAKELIN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker at Mr. - 's, in York-street, Westminster. I produce a seal which was pawned with me on the 18th of October, it is a composition seal, it has the impression of a lion on it, it is blue, it was pledged by the prisoner for three shillings, in the name of Webb.

Q. Had you over seen the prisoner before? - Yes, I know his person perfectly well.

CHARLES DAVIS sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Bow-street, I went and took the prisoner in charge at Mr. Coulthurst's, I searched him, and found on him a duplicate of a seal; I went to the pawnbroker's, and found the seal corresponding with that duplicate.

Wakelin. This duplicate is my hand writing.

Baxter. I have got the watch, I have kept it ever since, it was brought me by Lawrence, and I stopped it.

Lord Stormont. It is my watch, it has the name of the watch maker on it, Francis Hobart . The seal is mine.

Prisoner. On Saturday the 28th of September, between the hour of five and six in the evening; I was coming along through the Bird Cage-walk in St. James's-park; I perceived against one of the large trees, a cross made with chalk, and at the foot of the same tree the leaves were heaped up higher than the rest, which lay about considerably, I immediately went up and kicked the leaves away, when I perceived something wrapped up in a white linen rag, I took it up, and in the rag was a gold watch, a gold chain, two gold seals, and one setting of a seal without any stone in it, I immediately took it up and converted it to my own use, as I was at that time in great distress; this is the whole state of the case, that is the simple way by which I came by the watch, and I trust, my lord and gentlemen of the jury, that though there are many stories told of this kind in court, that you will consider the watch might be taken out of my Lord Stormont's bureau and placed there for purposes, which I don't know, it was said in Bow-street, that the Lord Stormont had employed a carpenter to mend his bureau; the bureau has been left open several times, I understand from what his Lordship said. I was bred at Westminster school myself, I have received a liberal education; I am well known by many of the first respectability, who are now employed on his Majesty's service; I have been respected by all ranks of officers;

it is not very probable that I would throw myself in the way where the watch was stolen from, in a place where there is not an officer all about the Abbey but what knows me very well; I therefore trust you, gentlemen of the jury, will consider the circumstance, and make every allowance that the case will admit; and I trust my lord, to your mercy, and the uprightness of an English jury; I have nobody to call but Mr. Coulthurst.

Court to Coulthurst. Till this time has this man bore a good character? - I never knew it otherwise; among his brother officers he was certainly esteemed, and always considered a man of honour; I am sure I should not have rendered him the assistance I did, if I did not consider him the same myself.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-74

746. JANE COCKLY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of October , a linen pillow case, value 1 s. a cotton counterpane, value 5 s. four bed curtains, value 8 s. and two linen sheets, value 8 s. the goods of John Mitchell , in a lodging room , let to her by Elizabeth Mitchell .

ELIZABETH MITCHELL sworn.

The apartment is mine, and the contract was made by my servant, Eleanor Wantley , she lived in these lodgings, and was to pay me.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-75

747. GEORGE HOWARD was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the dwelling house of John Wills , on John Griffiths , on the 2d of October , and putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, eight yards and a quarter of pink sattin ribbon, value 3 s. and two muslin neck-cloths, value 2 s. the goods of John Griffiths .

JOHN GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am a linen draper . I was robbed on Wednesday the 2d of October last, between the hours of nine and eleven in the evening. On coming home through Lincoln's inn-fields, returning to my lodgings, I saw a person who looked very hard at me; my lodgings are in Mason's-yard, Duke-street, Piccadilly; he looked very hard at me, and I thought it had been some body that knew me, (this was in Lincoln's-inn-fields, that side next to Holborn, he met me, I was going towards Duke-street,) I turned back and immediately found it was nobody that I knew, and I walked my way home; he immediately came up to me, turned back from the way he was going, and came up to me, said what a fine night, and what fine girls were passing; and further said, if I chose I might go and spend the evening with two at his lodgings, which were in London-street, Tottenham-court-road; after some conversation I agreed to go with him.

Q. Do you keep a shop, or are you a journeyman? - I was a shopman at that time. We came to where he said he lodged, and then he said that he had forgot himself, there was a person there then that would not let him bring any girls in, but she would be gone presently, and he did not wish to go in till this same person was gone; he immediately asked me to take a walk up to the Adam and Eve, Tottenham-court-road, where we

drank six-pennyworth of negus, which I paid for; then we returned down towards London-street again. He then said, on recollection, he did not wish to go to his lodging that night, that he had an appointment at a house that he was well acquainted with, to spend the evening with some girls that were to be there, with which I then thought to return home. He persuaded me to take a walk with him as far as there; when we came to the house he knocked at the door; this was in Little Newport-street, Newport Market ; a servant opened the door, whom he asked whether their beds were engaged for the evening? He first of all told her as soon as two girls came there, which would be very shortly, to shew them up stairs; on which she shewed us up in the room, one pair of stairs; no sooner had she left the room than he goes to the door -

Q. Do you know who this house belongs to? - John Wells , by the best enquiry I could make. He went and secured the door by putting his back against it; says he, there is no girls here, and if you do not deliver what you have about you I will blow your brains out; on which I went towards the door, somewhat alarmed at that expression, because it was what I little expected; but there was a table standing near the door, on which was a candle, he comes up to the table and thurst his hand into my left hand coat pocket, and took from thence, two muslin neckcloths; he took these, and thrust his hand in again, and took out a roll of ribbon, about eight yards and a quarter, pink sattin; while he was taking that, I endeavoured to take out a silk handkerchief which I had.

Q. Did you make any resistance? - I did all in my power to prevent his taking any more.

Q. Did you try to prevent his taking what he did? did you struggle with him? - I could not.

Q. Did you let him put his hand in quietly into your pocket? - I begged him not to do it. While he was taking out the pink sattin I endeavoured to take out a silk handkerchief with some cash tied up at one end of it, to conceal it from him.

Q. There is no money mentioned in the indictment? - No, he did not take any, he perceived the handkerchief, and said, give me hold of that handkerchief; I did not give him the handkerchief, I put this handkerchief up under the back part of my coat, with the money tied up in it, he wanted to know if I had no money about me, I told him I had none but three-pennyworth of halfpence, which was in my waistcoat pocket, not owning to what I had in my handkerchief; he did not take that.

Q. Now at the time he thrust his hand into your pocket, did he lay hold of you in any way? - He laid hold of me by the side of my coat to the best of my knowledge.

Q. When he said he would blow your brains out, had he any pistol? - I saw none.

Q. Had he any thing in his hand? - I saw nothing.

Q. I suppose that is all that is lost? - All that I can recollect or swear to his taking away; he demanded my buckles, I made resistance, and he said he would not take them as they would be of little value; he then opened the door and walked down stairs.

Q. What time might it be you got there? - Between the hours of nine and eleven.

Q. How soon did you see him after that? - He walked down stairs; I followed him, and he told the landlord going down stairs, which I suspected to be the landlord at least, it was some man standing by the side of the stairs, that he was surprised the girls did not come, and when they did, desired they would wait

till he returned, then I walked on to go home as fast as I could, and went along Leicester-fields, where I was followed by this same person, the prisoner at the bar, there at the bottom of Leicester-fields he again took hold of me by the coat, and said, if you don't deliver up either the buckles or handkerchief, I will blow your brains out; on which I did not know what to do, I plucked off my coat from me, and I ran away from him, up the side of the Square, and up Leicester-street, then running along a street which goes along the top of Leicester-street, I went up Wardour-street, and along Coventry-street, till I came to the Hay-market, and went into Jermyn-street, and went on to Well-street, there I stopped quite out of breath, I could not run any further; in about a minute, or very soon after, he came up to me again, he said, I know you have property, and if you don't let me have something more, at another time I shall serve you the same sauce; he likewise said, he should know me, see me where he would; there was nothing passed but that, but he walked away from me, which is all I believe that passed at that present time, till Saturday the 5th of the same month, October, this was on Wednesday the 2d. I was going up to the Green Man, and Still, in Oxford-street, with a box, and turned down New Bond-street to the Green Man and Still, and I saw the prisoner, and called to my mind that it was the same person who robbed me, on which I kept my eyes on him, and I walked further down the street till I came to some house, which I thought I would go in to get assistance to take him; I went into a house somewhere in the street, and got the assistance of a person that was in the tap room, I don't know his name, he is not here, he was discharged at Marlborough-street, and I have not seen him since.

Q. Did you take him? - I did, and took him to Marlborough-street. When I first took hold of his collar, I said, you are the man that robbed me; after some words he said, pray loose my collar, and I will go along with you; I was first going for Bow-street, not knowing of Marlborough-street, till some people told me; turning the way for Marlborough-street he said, he would make me any satisfaction if I would let him go; on which I said, I wanted no satisfaction but to take him to justice. In going in at the door, when he found I would not release him, he said, then damn you, I will be revenged of you.

Mr. Peat. A very probable story you have been telling indeed. You never saw the prisoner before the time you met him in the Square? - Never.

Q. Is it usual with you to fall into conversation with a person going along? - Not usual.

Q. You lived at that time with some mercer? - No, I had lived in a shop, but I was out of place at that time; I was out of place since the 12th of January last, I was under a view of getting into a situation for myself; I was then going to my lodging.

Q. Where did you lodge? - With one Simkin, a coachman; he drives for a gentleman, a Mr. Dean, in Mason's-yard.

Q. Do you live there now? - No, I do not.

Q. He is as remarkable for telling probable stories as you are perhaps.

Court. Did you ever recover your property? - I did.

Q. Where? - When he was examined at Marlborough-street an officer, two of them at least went to where they found his lodgings, not in London-street, but in Titchfield-street, there with a search warrant they found the things; one

officer is here, Hamilton, with the property; the ribbon was found first of all.

Q. Did you describe your loss before the magistrate? - I did.

Mr. Peat. Was this your own property that was taken from you, or did it belong to any other person? - It was my own.

Q. How came you by it? - The neck-cloth I had in my possession when I left London, the ribbon I bought of my master the second day before I lost it.

Q. Is your master here? - No, he is not.

Q. Where did you get the other articles? - They were also bought to the best of my recollection, of the same person at the time I lived with them.

Q. I suppose your master recollects you bought all these articles of him? - No, I don't suppose he does, but the shopman recollects the ribbon.

Q. Then it seems you went along with this man for the very proper decent purpose of getting women? - It was.

Q. You did not, I suppose, without his assistance know any person of this description, you found women so scarce in this town? - Why yes, I could have done it.

Q. But it was better to get into their company through the means of a stranger that would not hurt your character? - I was not going with women, I was going that night home, and did not intend to go with any women till it was hinted to me by the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you drink any thing in the course of this progress that you have described? - Yes, I paid for it.

Q. Why did you complain of being short of cash when you had so much in your handkerchief? - I did not tell him I was short of cash.

Q. I suppose you did not desire him to make a little money of these things, nor did you put them into his hands as security for payment of the reckoning? - I did not.

Q. But what made you call out so at the time you gave him the things? - I made no alarm at all.

Q. It was your fear that made you call out so lustily? - I did not call out at at all.

Q. What past between you then past very quiet? - Yes.

Q. Why did you state to the man of the house that he had robbed you? - I know of no such thing.

Q. You followed him down stairs, and you had time so to have done.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-76

748. WILLIAM NICHOLSON was indicted for feloniously stealing in his own dwelling house, on the 22d of October , twenty-three guineas; the monies of Thomas Doughty , and a five pound bank note, also his property .

THOMAS DOUGHTY sworn.

I am a carpenter and joiner ; I was robbed last Saturday night at the Red Lion , William Nicholson keeps the house, I lost twenty-three guineas there, and a five pound bank note, I came from Southend last Thursday night, I slept there Friday night, and Saturday night, when I went to bed I paid for my bed, and three-pennyworth of rum and water, the landlord was close by the bar when I went to bed; I tried to lock myself in, but I could not get the key out of the lock, and so I could not lock my door; in the middle of the night I saw the landlord; I was disturbed by the breeches being taken from under my bolster, or else by the glance of the candle, I am not able to say which, when I awaked I saw the landlord standing by my bed side.

Q. Was there any light in the room? - He had got a light in his hand; I had not the presence of mind to see then whether I was robbed or not; he said, how are you? that was what passed at the present time; in the morning when I awaked I found myself robbed of all my money, except half a crown, and sixpence, and some halfpence, which was twenty guineas, and a five pound note.

Q. Did any body else sleep in the room? - No.

Q. How did you find your breeches in the morning? - I found them by my bed side taken from under my bolster.

Q. Where were they when you went to bed? - Under my bolster; I alarmed the house in the morning when I found myself robbed; I stated the business to the landlord what happened, and he told me that after I had gone to bed a man came up stairs, and the person came down again, and as such he suspected that this man might have robbed his house; I asked him why he did not stop that man? I told him he came up stairs, and came into my room; he said he came up for he thought the sheets might have gone off the bed; I asked him why he did not acquaint me of the business when he came into my room? he said the reason was that he was afraid that I should have no rest afterwards, supposing I found myself robbed.

Q. Did you ever find any of your money or note? - No, I came down in the morning, and when I was talking to him about the business, I told him I thought it was an odd kind of business, and he said he would go with me to seek about it, but I thought it was best to drop the acquaintace.

Mr. Fielding. You are a carpenter? - Yes.

Q. How came you by these twenty-three guineas and five pound note? - I had it of Mr. Holland. I had saved it with him; I put all my money in my fob when I came from Southend.

Q. How long was you in Mr. Holland's service saving this money? - Six or seven months.

Q. How long was it you had left Mr. Holland? - About ten weeks.

Q. How much money was you worth when you left him? - As nigh as I can tell I might have three, or four and thirty pounds.

Q. Did he pay you any money at the time you parted with him? - I had twenty nine shillings and two-pence a week.

Q. How much did Mr. Holland pay you the last week? - He paid me one pound nine shillings and two pence, the week's wages; I was foreman of the carpenters and joiners; he paid me not himself, but his clerk paid me this money.

Q. Had he paid you the money before? - Yes.

Q. How did you live? - I boarded myself.

Q. How much might your board and lodging cost? - Sometimes seven or eight shillings a week.

Q. And did you live on that? - Sometimes I had a pint or two; I was paid the first part of the summer for two extradinary days.

Q. When was it you applied to Mr. Holland? - I applied to Mr. Holland last Sunday, to state the business to him, and he desired me to go to Sir Sampson Wright; I saw Mr. Holland this morning, and he said he misunderstood me.

Q. I want to know what you said to Mr. Holland when you first applied to him? - I stated the business to Mr. Holland.

Q. Did not you ask Mr. Holland whether you could or could not recover the money against the landlord of the house, in which you was robbed? - No, sir, I did not ask Mr. Holland about it; I stated the business to Mr. Holland.

Q. Did not you ask Mr. Holland whether you could not recover the money? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you say any thing to that purpose? it is last Sunday only; now I ask you if the purpose of your business to Mr. Holland, was not to know whether you could get that money of the landlord by an action? - Not to my knowledge; Mr. Holland told me to go up to the office, and he told me that I could take the common law, if I could not do any thing else in the affair, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you never ask him whether you could ever recover or get any money of this man at the bar? - No.

Q. Are you a single man or a married man? - A single man; I have got a mother to support.

Q. Do you work with any body now? - I have got a rupture; I am waiting to go with a gentleman abroad. When I left that employ at Southend I went down to Suffolk.

Q. So you was ten weeks out of employ? - No, I worked some few jobbs for myself at Suffolk.

Q. Tell the name of any one person that you have done any work for in the last ten weeks? - I did some work for John Butcher , an uncle of mine; I went down to see my mother; I am not able to work now.

Q. Had you the rupture when you was last paid by Mr. Lawrence's clerk? - I had; I have now been waiting upwards of five weeks for a birth to go abroad.

Q. Have you any friends in town? - Yes, Mr. Fowler. I have no relation except one Stone, that keeps a public house in St. Paul's Church-yard.

Q. Have you any relation that lives where the gentleman at the bar does? - One Jones recommended me to him, he sent a man with me to him.

Q. When was the first night you slept there? - Last Thursday night, and I slept there about a month ago, I came up to town then, and I returned to Southend again.

Q. How long did you stay in town that time? - I stopped in town about three nights, then I went down to Southend again.

Q. Then on Thursday night it was you lodged the first time at this gentleman's house? - Yes, this second time. On Friday night I slept there again, and also on Saturday night.

Q. Did you sleep in the same room? - Yes; the lock and key was in the same state the first night as at the last, to my knowledge.

Q. Did you say any thing to Mr. Husband? - I thought this Mr. Nicholson's name was Mr. Husband.

Q. The first person you stated this business to was Mr. Holland. Now what was it you said to Mr. Holland? - I stated the business in what manner I had been robbed; Mr. Holland said to me, you must go up to Sir Sampson Wright's, and if you could not do any good there perhaps you may take the common law of him.

Q. Was you told at that house, that there had been a man there that evening, that had bilked the man at the bar, and run away? - He stated that business to me in the morning himself, and I asked him why he did not speak to me?

Q. You never then heard so from any body else? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. What sort of enquiry did you make about this business? - When I came down I stated the business to the landlord.

Q. Were there any other persons there? - I don't know that there were any other persons there, but the maid, the mistress might be in the parlour.

Q. You did not see a person in the house the over night, that very night? - Not that I suspected of any kind.

Q. Did you see any person whether

you spoke to them or not? - There might be another man.

Q. Did not you yourself go with the landlord to make a search for the person? - No.

Q. Nor did you see any person there? - No, I did not.

Q. Nor went to search for any person that had robbed the house? - I did not.

Mr. Knowlys. When did you receive this five pound note? - I received it the very first or second week after the five pound notes were first issued from the bank.

Q. Who had you the note of? - Of one of Mr. Holland's clerks.

Q. Did you never say that you had that note of one of Mr. Holland's clerks about nine weeks ago? - No.

Q.Did not you say to Mr. Stirling, the attorney, Craven-street, that you took the note about five or six months ago? - I never saw the man to my knowledge in my life.

Court. Did you never see Mr. Stirling? - I believe I did see that gentleman.

Q. Did you say to that gentleman that you had that note five or six months ago? - Not to my knowledge, I cannot say whether I did or not.

Mr. Fielding. Can you swear you did not? it was but last Saturday, just a week from this day that you was robbed? - I might say I had the note, I cannot say how long.

Q.This was on Thursday last you saw this gentleman. On your oath did not you say that you had that bank note five or six months ago? - Not to my knowledge, I might say it to some gentlemen.

Q. On your oath did not you say so to that gentleman? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Why, man, you must know what you said the day before yesterday.

Court. Swear Mr. Stirling, and ask him that question.

- STIRLING sworn.

I saw this man at Bow-street on Thursday last, I asked him if he could tell me the number of the note, in order that it might be traced; he told me then that he could not tell the number, that he had had the note between five and six months; I am very positive these were the words, and more than that I repeated them to Mr. Roberts, and several gentlemen that were in the office at Bow street. This was on Thursday in the morning.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-77

749. RICHARD LAWLESS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 13th of October , on Elizabeth, the wife of Christian Sideport , and her, the said Elizabeth, did ravish and carnally know .

Elizabeth Sideport , &c. were called on their recognizances.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-78

750. WILLIAM WATTS and HENRY HINGLE were indicted for

that they with Richard Tuart , did feloniously make an assault on, and murder Lars Holmstans , on the 18th of August .

No evidence.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-79

751. ROBERT BLUNDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of October , three cotton window curtains, value 3 s. the goods of Matthew Bland ; a corderoy pair of breeches, value 3 s. a white linen shirt, value 3 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. a linen pocket handkerchief, value 4 d. a silver breast buckle, value 1 s. an iron key, value 2 d. a pen knife, value 2 d. and 2 s. in monies numbered ; the goods and monies of Robert Salmon .

ROBERT SALMON sworn.

I was robbed on Monday morning the 6th of October; I was robbed of a pair of breeches, a waistcoat, shirt, neckcloth, breast buckle, pocket handkerchief, and knife; this happened to me at the leaping bar, at Old-street , the prisoner slept with me the over night at Matthew Bland 's house.

Q. Was any body else in the room besides him? - No, only him and me.

Q. Did you see those things in the room over night? - Yes, I pulled them off, it was Sunday night, I went to bed between ten and eleven, I got up between six and seven, about a quarter before seven, he asked me when he came to bed the over night, whether I was heavy to sleep in the morning? I told him I was; he said he was a going in the morning to a place in the Vinegar-yard; he was gone when I awoke, I awoke between twilight and daylight, and he was gone, and my things were gone too.

Q. Did you recover any of them again? - No, never.

Q. When was he taken up? - On Monday last.

Q. Did you tax him with it? - No, Matthew Bland did.

Q. When you was present? - No, when he was taken I was sent for to the office, Hatton-garden.

Q. Is Bland here? - No, he was here this morning.

Matthew Bland was called on his recognizance.

Prisoner. I went to sleep there on Sunday night, a young man and I were both together there. In the morning between five and six o'clock I awoke, the chamber door was open, which I shut when I went to bed; I spoke to the young man; there were a great many lodgers in the house, but not in the same room, the door was open when I awoke, I supposed it was done by some lodgers down stairs.

Court to Salmon. Is there lodgers in the house? - There is, but they are all creditable people, and have lodged there for several years. He says he called to me, but he did not; he only lodged there one night before, about a week ago. I went to the Vinegar-yard, and they knew nothing of him.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-80

752. SARAH ENGLISH was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of October , a silver watch, value 18 s. and 2 s. in monies; the goods and monies of

Richard Morgan , privately from his person .

RICHARD MORGAN sworn.

I am a labouring man .

Q. Do you live in London? - Yes, I lost a watch the 2d of October last, it was a silver watch. Coming down Whitechapel I met with this here woman between nine and ten o'clock in the day, this woman took me into this house, and I paid her so much for my lodgings, and when I awoke I missed my property.

Q. Between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, where did you go? - I went to Sarah English 's house in Whitechapel.

Q. How long did you stay there? - About three or four hours, and when I awoke I found my watch was gone.

Q. Had you any money? - Two shillings.

Q. Was you in bed? - Yes.

Q. Are you sure you had the watch and money when you went to bed? - Yes, I carried them into the house.

Q. Did you see any body in the house but her? - There was another woman there, but I know nothing about the other woman, the woman that took me into the house, my evidence, was in the house.

Q. When you awoke what became of the prisoner? - She was not in bed with me, but the other woman was in bed with me; she told me she saw her take it.

Q. Did you ever find it again? - Yes, the officer that took the prisoner shewed it me before the justice, and I saw my property.

Mr. Knapp. Did you ever know the woman before, that took you to this house? - No, I never saw her in my life before.

Q. You met her in the day time, in Whitechapel. What sort of a house is this that she took you to? - I am sure I I don't know.

Q. This is a house of ill same, is it not? - She keeps lodging beds.

Q. You say you found your watch afterwards; who had your watch? - Mr. Allen, the constable.

Q. Have you heard that the watch was found in the bed? - I did not find it there; I heard the officer say that it was found in the bed.

Q. There was nobody else with you in the room but this woman and yourself? - No.

Q. You asked the woman about the watch, and she said she knew nothing about it? - She said so.

Q. Was you drunk or sober when you went there? - I was not drunk.

Q. How much had you been drinking? - A couple of pints of beer, and one thing and another.

Q. And perhaps a glass of gin or two. Do you mean to say you was perfectly sober? half seas over perhaps? - I was not drunk, but I was not perfectly sober.

HANNAH SCUTTLE sworn.

I saw Sarah English take the watch out of Mr. Morgan's pocket.

Q. Where was you when you saw this? - I was on the bed.

Q. What did you say to her? - I desired her not to do so.

Q. Was he awake or asleep? - Asleep.

Q. Did you awake him? - I awaked him, and Sarah English awaked him, both of us awaked him afterwards.

Q. What did she do with it? - I don't know. We came both down stairs, I desired her to give him the watch; she said she knew nothing of it. I awaked him as soon as I could; he had got a drop in his head.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-81

753. JOHN BARBER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of September , five silver tea spoons, value 16 s. the goods of Elizabeth Hawkesley .

ELIZABETH HAWKESLEY sworn.

I live at No. 10, Great Portland-street , I lost five silver tea spoons on the 24th of September, out of a beaufet in the parlour.

Q. Have you any reason for suspecting the prisoner? - A person met the prisoner coming out of the room. I did not see any thing of it myself.

MARY FACY .

Q. How old are you? - Turned of thirteen.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - Yes, it is to speak the truth.

Q. You know the consequence of not speaking the truth? - Yes.

Q. You go to church? - Yes.

sworn.

Q. Do you live with Mrs. Hawkesley? - Yes, on the 24th of September I went to the next door on an errand, between eight and nine in the morning, and I left the door on a jarr, and the prisoner went in, and when I came back I see him coming out of the parlour.

Q. Was there any body in the parlour? - No, that gave me a suspicion of him; I made an alarm, and some people took him, and he delivered the spoons to me out of his pocket, he had turned the corner, I followed him.

Q. Do you happen to know whether these spoons had been in that parlour? - I see them there when I went to the beaufet.

Prisoner. I should be very happy to serve his Majesty by land or by sea.

JOHN PEACOCK sworn.

I followed and took the man, and saw him give the spoons to the little girl, I have got the spoons here.

Mrs. Hawksley. These are my little spoons, there is no particular marks which was on them before they were stole, they had a private mark which was put on them by the justice.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-82

754. MARY ANNESSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of October , a silver table spoon, value 8 s: two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. the goods of John Perry , Esq .

- INGLIS sworn.

I live with Mr. Perry.

Q. Do you know of his having any spoons? - Yes, he lost one about the last of September, and I missed it the 1st of October, and I missed some before that, there were six in all gone.

Q. From where did you miss them? - From the place where I kept them, below stairs in a cupboard; I had seen them on the Monday before they were taken, the prisoner was the only person that I thought could have them because she was a charewoman in the house, I went and found some spoons at a pawnbroker's in Berwick-street.

- BAKER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I have got two spoons, a table spoon and two tea spoons; I took the table spoon of the prisoner at the bar; I questioned her at the time she brought it, who she brought it from, she said from one Mr. Clark of Margaret-street. I had known the prisoner for years by using the shop.

Q. Do you recollect when that was? - On the 30th of August; I took in the table spoon, there was a tea spoon that was taken in the 9th of May; I did not take in the other tea spoon.

Inglis. I know these spoons to be Mr. Perry's spoons, because they had a particular mark on them.

HENRY CROCKER sworn.

I went with the servant to apprehend the woman; in searching of her lodging I found a duplicate of this spoon at the pawnbroker's, and another pawned at another pawnbroker's, the other pawnbroker did not recollect the woman.

Prisoner. A lady, one Mrs. Clarke, sent me to pawn the spoon for ten shillings and six-pence, and I pawned it for nine shillings six weeks before he missed his; a lady I worked for these three years.

Court to Inglis. Do you know any thing of a Mrs. Clarke? - No.

Court to Prisoner. Who is Mrs. Clarke? - A lady of the town that I have worked for these three or four years, and she sent me with things to pawn; at first she lived in Wells-street, then she lived in Margaret-street, and at last she lived in Jermyn-street.

Court to Inglis. What does Mr. Perry's family consist of? - Two women servants and myself, his sister keeps the house, he is not a married man.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Inglis. My master desired me to recommend her to mercy, because she had suffered enough.

Fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17931030-83

755. THOMAS PEPPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , twenty-three woollen rugs, value 6 l. 18 s. the goods of David Richardson .

DAVID RICHARDSON sworn.

I am a slop-seller , No. 72, Wapping . On the 8th of October the prisoner at the bar came to my house, and said he was a stable keeper in Gray's Inn-lane; he looked at some horse sheets to cover horses, woollen rugs, and said he should want twenty-four of them, he agreed for them, he took one with him, for which he paid 6 s. and desired a bill of parcels might be made of the twenty-four, substracting that six shillings from the bottom of the bill, and desired me the next morning, to send them up to his livery stables, and he would pay the remaining six pounds eighteen shillings to my servant.

WILLIAM YOUNG sworn.

Thomas Pepper came to my master's house, on the 8th of October, in the afternoon, to Mr. Richardson's; I sold him the rug at six shillings, he paid Mr. Richardson, and wanted twenty-three more, to be sent up the next morning; Mr. Richardson sent them the next day with me, and two lads; when we came up there his man was waiting, he said, you want Mr. Pepper; I said, yes, I have brought these rugs, and they are to be paid for on delivery; his master was not in the way, and I went with the servant to the prisoner, at the sign of the cheese; he was sitting in the tap room by the fire side; I told him that there was the bill according to his agreement, with six shillings deducted at the bottom; he said, very right, come round with me here, and I will get you the cash; he takes me round to Mount Pleasant, the back of the Sessions House, to Sharp's-alley, No. 7, where he told me going along, that the man owed him some money; when we came, the man told him he could not pay him then, that he would pay him in the evening; so he told me,

you can come up again in the evening, or the next morning; I told him I could not, my master's orders were to bring back the goods or the money; he said he had not the money, if I would come up the next day he would pay me; he said there was a bill, it has five days to run, for seven pounds seven shillings; I told him I knew nothing about the bill; I immediately suspected, to myself, that they wanted to rob me of the goods; I got him to come out of the house to go back with me to get me the goods again, coming out of Cow-cross, I told him I must either have the goods or the money; I left the goods on the fresh promise of payment, on his saying that he would go with me to get the money, that made me leave the goods; he told me he had business to do; I got him at last at the house in Cow Cross-street, with that he began to go over the way towards the Sessions House.

Q. Did you ever consent to leave the goods? - No, I never consented to leave the goods.

Prisoner's Counsel. Where did you leave the goods first of all? - In his stable.

Q. Who was in the stable? - His man. I had orders from my master either to bring back the goods or the money.

Q. Did you ever return back to the stable? - Yes.

Q. Did you demand the goods of his servant? - I did; I asked his servant for them. The prisoner would not return them, he told me I might get my money how I could, he was disappointed in getting his money, and I must be disappointed too.

Court. Did you go afterwards the next day? - I did not. That day I went back to the stable, and told the man I must have the goods, for his master would not have them, and I sent to my master by one of the lads.

Q. What justice did you take him to? - To Mr. Graham at Hatton-garden.

Q. What reason did he give for not paying? - That he could not get the money of the other man.

Q. Did you demand the money of the prisoner? - I did, and the goods, he said, I had delivered the goods and I might get the money how I could.

Prisoner. I offered him a bill that had but five days to run. - I would not take the bill.

Court to Young. What was the prisoner? had he a stable? - He had no stable.

Prisoner's Counsel. Did not he come and surrender as soon as the warrant was out against him? - He did not, he committed the fraud on the 9th, and I did not see him at the office till the 17th.

- sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner in behalf of this swindling business, at Islington.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-84

756. CATHARINE ARTHUR was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of September , a yard and three nails of cambrick, value 8 s. the goods of William Wood .

WILLIAM WOOD sworn.

Q. Do you know any thing of this transaction yourself? - I detected the prisoner taking it; I am a linen draper, she was with another lady that I had been selling some articles to; I saw her take it and put it into her pocket.

Q. Was she in company with the other woman? - The other woman bought several things and paid me for

them to the amount of seventeen, eighteen, or twenty shillings.

Q. What is the value of this cambrick? - Eight shillings. I charged her with it and desired her to give it up; she took it off the counter, I was on one side of the counter and she was on the other; I charged her with it and desired her to give it up; she would not, she was searched in the parlour and it was taken from her.

Mr. Knowlys. This is a very young woman, I see she came into your shop with Mrs. Sweeting who is a woman of character? - She is, and I believe the young woman's friends are respectable.

Q. The person that came to you had bought goods three or four times the value of this cambrick? - She did.

Q. This cambrick of course being only a yard and a quarter and three nails, lays within a very narrow compass; you thought you saw her, and perhaps you did see her put it into her pocket, I believe she said at first she had not got it? - She did.

Q. I don't know whether you know how it was found? - I did not see it found.

Q. It was not a common shop lifter that she was with? - It was not.

Q. Did not you see this young woman lay her handkerchief on the counter? - I don't know.

MARGARET BOLTON sworn.

I did not search the prisoner, but I was present and saw the cambrick taken from her pocket handkerchief.

Q. What did the prisoner say? - She seemed very much frightened when it was found.

Mr. Knowlys. This piece of cambrick is an article that lays in a very small compass; I would ask you whether it might not be enclosed in an handkerchief very innocently by an innocent person? - That I cannot say.

Q. Is it not possible? - It is not impossible.

Q. This young lady desired to be searched I believe? - The person that was with her desired she should be searched, to which she made no objection.

Q. On searching her you found nothing but this cambrick? - No, the person in the room said, let us look at this handkerchief? and opening it the cambrick came out.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave her an excellent character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-85

747. JANE RANDALL was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of October , a linen sheet, value 1 s. a marseilles petticoat, value 1 s. 6 d. a diaper table cloth, value 5 s. the goods of Thomas Cross .

SUSANNA CROSS sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor, a publican , a victualler , in Shadwell .

Q. Was the prisoner your servant? - No, I was up stairs at the time of the robbery.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner in your house? - No, my husband see her, she had a pennyworth of beer of him.

THOMAS CROSS sworn.

I saw the prisoner at the bar in my house, the 18th of October, about three o'clock in the evening, she came in and called for a pennyworth of beer, she said she was very much tired, and asked if she

might sit down? I said, there was plenty of room in the tap room; I was very busy, I did not take any particular notice; she went into the back room, and the boy brought her a pennyworth of beer; she drank part of it and went out; my wife came down stairs a few minutes afterwards.

Susanna Cross . After this woman was gone I missed a table cloth, a marseilles petticoat, and a sheet, out of the back room; Joseph West was sent after her, he took her, and she was taken to the office.

JOSEPH WEST sworn.

I pursued the prisoner, and took these things on her; they have been in my possession ever since.

Susanna Cross They are my things, I made them and mended them.

Prisoner. I went into the house for a pennyworth of beer, there was nobody there, the servant, the young man, brought the things in, they had just come from the mangle, and the young man told me to hold them; I was only gone next door to the butcher's shop.

Susanna Cross . They came in from the mangle about half an hour before.

Court to West. At what distance did you apprehend her? - Mr. Cross apprehended her at a butcher's shop, about a hundred yards off, she owned that she sold the table cloth for four shillings, she was much in liquor.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - No.

Prisoner. Mr. Cross came to me in the butcher's shop, good woman, says he, what have you got in your apron? I said, you may see, he said, take them up in your lap and come along with me; and he took me to Mr. Staple's office, he said he would not prosecute me.

GUILTY . (Aged 43.)

Fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Prosecutor. She has four small children and a husband at home a hard working man, gets his bread by the water side; I recommend her to mercy.

Reference Number: t17931030-86

758. CATHARINE HICKEY was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , a silver desert spoon, value 5 s. the goods of Samuel Scattergood Kemp .

LYDIA KEMP sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor, my husband is a wine and brandy merchant , I know the prisoner at the bar very well, she was first of all my charewoman, and afterwards my servant ; I did not know at the time the spoon was lost that she was the person that took it, but I suspected another servant that we had parted with; I know the spoon to be mine, it was pawned in her own name to Samuel Sadler .

WILLIAM COLE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Kemp, I produce a spoon I had from Mr. Berry's Aldersgate-street, Mr. Sadler is foreman to Mr. Berry.

Q Was Sadler present? - Yes, he was. It has been in my possession ever since.

SAMUEL SADLER sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Berry, a pawnbroker; I myself took this spoon in of the prisoner at the bar, I had known her

some years before that time; I took it in on the 19th of July.

Q. Did she tell you how she came by it? - She did not, I took it in from the knowledge I had of her.

Court. It was very bad behaviour to take such things of a charewoman.

Mrs. Kemp. It is my husband's property, W. M. K. is on it, for William Marsom Kemp .

Prisoner. I never pawned the spoon; this lady and gentleman have entrusted me with a great deal of property, I am a widow at present with six children; I never wronged them of a halfpenny.

Mrs. Kemp. She has six children, three of these children I assisted in putting to the parish, and they are better away from her than with her; since I lost the spoon I find she has the basest of characters.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17931030-87

759. ELIZABETH SHIRLEY was indicted for uttering, a sixpence knowing it to be counterfeit .

Indicted in a second COUNT for having in her custody another six pence knowing it to be counterfeit.

The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.

ROBERT TOWERS sworn.

The prisoner came to my bar with an elderly woman along with her, and they had two glasses of liquor poured out to them; the prisoner at the bar offered a six-pence.

Q. Who was it called for the glass of gin? - The prisoner at the bar; my son said he believed it was a bad sixpence, I looked at it and I said, this is a bad one.

Q. How did that six-pence come into your possession? - I took it from the woman, and afterwards gave it her back again; she had not drank any liquor, and I did not care if she went about her business; they did not drink the two glasses of gin till they see whether the six-pence would be taken or not.

Court. Who asked for this gin? - I cannot be positive.

Q. Was the gin paid for or no? - It was not.

Q. Was it offered to be paid for? - It was, with this six-pence, this woman offered the six-pence, I gave it her back again and told her it was a bad one, and I did not chuse to take it, she said she had taken it of a baker in change of a shilling where she had bought the two-penny loaf which she had in her hand.

Q. Did she tell you the baker's name? - No, I asked her what she had done with the remainder of the change, she said she had laid it out in necessary articles as she was coming along.

Q. Are you sure that she said that she had parted with the change as she was coming along? - Positively.

Q Out of that change from the shilling she must have received ten-pence, would that have paid for the gin that she asked for? - It was only two-pence for her to pay. I told her that I believed that she was a very bad kind of woman, and that she was putting off this money; she said it was no such thing, and was rather pert; I told somebody to tell Jostling to step in; he was in the house, and Jostling stept in, and said he thought he had some knowledge of her face, Jostling said, I will search her, I said do as you please about that, the other woman she got off, Jostling laid hold of this woman first and searched her.

Q. Was she asked any questions about money before Jostling searched her? - Jostling said he knew her face very well, and she was a putter off of bad money. She said she had no more money about her.

Q. Are you sure of that? - I am positive, she said so before Jostling came in, and after too; when Jostling came to search her he found the four pennyworth of halfpence.

Q. Did you see Jostling search her? - Yes, I was on one side of the counter and Jostling the other, he took first out of her pocket four-pennyworth of halfpence loose which would more than have paid for the gin; Jostling says, what is in this purse? she did not seem to know what was in it, a purse? she said, she did not know any thing about it, I believe she said so.

Q. Did you see Jostling draw the purse from her pocket? - Yes, and he opened the purse before her, and there was in it six six-pences of the same sort that she had produced.

Q. What became of the first six-pence she tendered to you? - I took it out of her hand myself, and have kept it ever since.

Q. What became of the other sixpences that were taken from her? - Jostling has them and the purse.

- JOSTLING sworn.

I am constable; I took this woman in Towers's house, I happened to be in Mr. Towers's tap room, and I heard of some women offering a bad six-pence; directly I came into the bar and I thought I knew this woman, when I went into the bar Mr. Towers asked her whether she had got any more money about her? she said no, the prisoner is the woman, I searched her, and found a purse with six bad six-pences, that was all I found in the purse; there were four-pennyworth of halfpence loose; then I took her into custody, and had her before a magistrate.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn.

I am the person employed in the mint prosecutions, for the purpose of ascertaining whether money is good or bad; this six-pence is a bad one, it has been rubbed, it never has been in circulation before since it was coloured; these six six-pences are every one bad, they do not appear to have been in circulation, they appear to be all of one make.

Court. In what line are you employed in the mint? - To prove the money in mint prosecutions.

Q. Why do you think they have not been in circulation? - Because they are capitally finished, and if they had been in circulation they would have been rubbed.

Prisoner. I was going through Clare-market and coming back again I picked up the purse with this money in it, and I changed a shilling for a loaf, and I took that six-pence in exchange, my mother-in-law was with me, and asked me to lend her a few halfpence till next day, and I said yes, I was going to give my mother-in-law the four-pennyworth of halfpence.

GUILTY ,

On both counts.

Imprisoned in Newgate for one year and to find security for two years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17931030-88

760. PATRICK BRADY was indicted for uttering a bad shilling .

Indicted in a second COUNT for having another about him.

RICHARD FINCH sworn.

I live at No. 5, Long-lane, Surry. I was at Billingsgate-market on Sunday

the 9th of June last; I act there as a salesman, we are allowed to sell mackarel on Sunday by act of parliament; I know the prisoner at the bar well, I have known him for some years, he buys fish occasionally, when he has nothing else to do; he has been a patrole and watchman; I have seen him often at market; it was between six and seven in the morning, he came and asked the price of a hundred mackarel, I told him six and thirty shillings; he bargained for a quarter of a hundred, that was nine shillings, he gave me nine shillings in my hand, and the first shilling I looked to was a counterfeit one, I gave it him again, I said this is a bad shilling, he took it in his hand and said it was a very good one; while he was looking at it I perceived three more, and I took it out of his hand immediately, from between his fingers, I took it altogether, and I said I shall charge a constable with you, and shall take care of you for the future, for I think you have more about you, I doubled the money up in this very paper, then I perceived him shove some money out of his breeches pocket into his breeches; I saw him do that, I received some information, and I looked and I saw him shoving something from his breeches into the lining of the breeches, or his fob, or something I could not perceive clear.

Q. How was he drest? - Much as he is now.

Q. Had he trowsers on? - Not that I know, I was very busy at the time, and I could not get out of my place, I sent for Mr. Peat, the officer of the market; I told him to take him into a public house and search him, accordingly he did.

Q. You did not take any more bad money than that bad shilling? - Yes, I have got four, he tendered them into my hand for payment, he gave me nine shillings, four bad and five good ones, I gave him none back only one; I never returned the other eight to him, I have kept them from that time to this.

Prisoner. I received the money in the streets for goods, two or three days before, I thought they were all good.

THOMAS PEAT sworn.

I am a constable, the officer of the market; I was applied to by Finch, the last witness, to take the prisoner into custody, and found five shillings, which was not concealed, all good, I found it in his right hand breeches pocket.

Q. Have you kept it apart from the rest that you found? - The good money was loose.

Q. Did you search further? - I then proceeded to search him, and I felt him up and down his thighs, and I found there was a lump, and I unbuttoned the knees of his breeches, and he had got a pair of drawers under his breeches, there I found this paper of bad money, the good money was all loose.

Q. Was there any good money among these? - There was not.

Q. Did he say any thing at the time? - Yes, he requested of me to let him go, and to walk along with him to the London Spa, where he had obtained change for a guinea on the Saturday evening before I took him into custody.

Prisoner. I had no paper nor any thing like, he found the good and bad together.

Peat. It was separate, it was not mixed together.

Prisoner. He might as well take my life away at once, he will swear any thing.

WILLIAM PARKER sworn.

Of these nine shillings here are four bad, they are exactly of the same manufactory; I do not imagine they have ever been in circulation. Of these

found under his drawers here are seven of them, every one are of the same manufactory as the four, they are all exactly alike, except one is bent.

Q. Do they appear to have been in circulation since they have been coloured? - I don't imagine they have, it is a very easy operation to make them appear like this. The other money found about him are all good.

Court to Peat. Whereabouts did you find afterwards this paper? - Between his breeches and his drawers, when I unbuttoned his knees I took out that paper.

Prisoner. I received all this money for my goods in the street; this Sunday morning that I went to buy a quarter of a hundred of mackarel I paid him nine shillings out of my pocket, and I thought it was all very good as ever I had in my life, and I was putting the money into my fob, and it went inside of the lining, Mr. Peat took none from my pocket, it all sliped down that I had, there was no paper about me, and if I had any bad money about me I would not pay it to any salesmaster of Billingsgate, who are counted the sharpest men in London.

Court to Finch. Had you any reason to suspect him before? - I had not.

Q. How long have you known him? - Pretty near a year, he deals sometimes in the market, and sometimes get other employ, where he can get the most money.

GUILTY .

Of both counts.

Imprisoned a year in Newgate , and to find security for two years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER,

Reference Number: t17931030-89

761 FRANCIS GIBBS was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

Francis Hobler , &c. were called and did not appear.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17931030-90

762. DANIEL MENDOZA was indicted for a fraud .

(The case was opened by Mr. Gurney.)

HARVEY NATHAN sworn.

Q. You was in May last in partnership with Jacob Levy ? - I was.

Q. In what business? - In the linen-drapery line.

Q. Where was your shop? - It was a warehouse in No. 8, Bevis-marks, St. Mary-axe .

Q. In any day in May last did you see the defendant Daniel Mendoza ? - He came to my house along with a gentleman of the name of Decosta, and he wanted some handkerchiefs, and Mr. Mendoza looked out three dozen handkerchiefs, and said that he would call at twelve o'clock and pay for them.

Q. Who said that? - Mr. Mendoza; I cannot recollect whether he bought any that same day or not; he came two or three days after, and he knocked at the door, somebody opened it to him, and the young man that I have got at home came and told me, Mr. Mendoza wanted to speak to me, I was in the counting house, when I came to him, he says to me, I am come for six dozen of handkerchiefs, Mr. Decosta has sent me for them, I cannot exactly say the word, whether I must have six dozen, or I am come for six dozen, or give me six dozen; but I know he said Mr. Decosta has sent me for them. After that I went up stairs, took him up stairs into the warehouse, and he looked out six dozen

of handkerchiefs, I did let him have those handkerchiefs, and my partner he came into the room himself about the same time while I was in the place with Mr. Mendoza, and I told him.

Q. Whatever you told him did you tell him in the presence of the prisoner? - On the contrary I took him aside.

Q. Did any thing more pass in the presence of the prisoner? - - Nothing more than I let him have the handkerchiefs, and he went away.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Nathan, in the first place I take it for granted you know Mr. Decosta very well, you live in his house with him? - I beg your pardon, he lived in my house when he was in town.

Q. As you know him perfectly well perhaps you have had many dealings with him? - I have known him for a number of years, I knew him abroad and I knew him in England.

Q. Do you happen to know his real name? - Gabriel Newnes Decosta .

Q. You have told my lord exactly what Mr. Mendoza said to you when he came the second time? - Then he said I am come, or I must have some handkerchief, Mr. Decosta has sent me for them.

Q. You are sure that was it? - As nigh as possible.

Q. Did he ask for six pieces or six dozen? - He asked for six dozen, and not six pieces, I am most certain. To take me on my oath I cannot say whether pieces or dozen, but to the best of my knowledge it was dozen.

Q. He had bought some of you? - He had, Mr. Decosta has lent me several hundred pounds, I thought I could not refuse Mr. Decosta, and as he came along with Mr. Decosta I could not refuse him.

Q. How many transactions have you had with Mendoza by the desire of Mr. Decosta? - I don't know that ever he came above twice in his life.

Q. Will you swear that he never came above twice? - I will take my sacred oath that he never came but twice in one day.

Q. How many times has he came without Mr. Decosta, and as he said by Mr. Decosta's orders? - He never came but that time with Mr. Decosta's orders, the other times Mr. Decosta was along with him; the first time he came, he came from the country with Mr. Decosta, and Mr. Decosta remained in town the same day, and he returned and paid me for these handkerchiefs.

Q. Then in the afternoon Mr. Mendoza came again? - He did, and paid for what he had in the morning.

Q. When did he come again after he had come twice that day? - A few days afterwards, whether it was two or three days I cannot say.

Q. Did not you give credit to him on Mr. Decosta having sent him, or on his saying that Mr. Decosta had sent him? - Yes.

Q. And that you had done twice before, once without Mr. Decosta, and once with him? - No, only once.

Q. Do you mean to say that the second time when he came in the afternoon, that he came with Mr. Decosta? - He came in, but Mr. Decosta was in the house.

Q. Was he present when he asked you for some pieces of handkerchiefs? - I cannot tell.

Q. Then you will not take on you to swear whether Mr. Decosta was present or not? - He was in the house, but whether he was in the room or not I cannot swear.

Q. He had the handkerchiefs on credit? - He had.

Q. The second he had also on the credit of Mr. Decosta? - I don't know whether it was on the credit of Mr. Decosta or not.

Court. What are you? - A jew.

Q. What business are you? - I am a dealer in all manner of goods, at the same time I am in partnership with Mr. Jacob Levy in London, a linen draper wholesale, we never sell less than a piece.

Mr. Knapp. Pray how long have you been in partnership with Mr. Levy? - Much about that time, just before that.

Q. What line of life had you been in before? - A dealer in all manner of articles, jewellery, watches and linen drapery, diamonds and every thing, and deal in them now.

Q. How long have you been in partnership with Mr. Levy? - Ever since sometime in May.

Q. You never have been a witness in this court before? - I never was, only I was called to the character of a man.

Q. Will you swear that you never was in this court only to give a man a character? - I will take my oath and ten oaths unless it was to give one man a particular acquaintance of mine, a character, that was an old man, his name was De Frize, he was here for finding a bank note, I gave him a character.

Q. What do you think of being a witness at Worcester? - I was no witness at Worcester, I was quite the contrary; a particular person found a saddle bag of letters, and brought them to me, and I think to my credit and honour I brought the whole up to Sir. Sampson Wright's, and delivered it up to Sir Sampson Wright.

Q. Was not you admitted on evidence for the crown, as an accomplice at Worcester? - No.

Q. Did not you give evidence at that trial afterwards? - I told the whole truth.

Q. Was not you taken up for the robbery yourself? - Who? I taken up! never in my life.

Q. Do you know Mr. Lee? - Yes, by reputation all the world know him; I know him very well.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Lee, and did Mr. Lee advise you to tell the story about the Worcester business? - After I came to town to surrender myself.

Court. You said you was not a witness at Worcester, but quite the contrary, what did you mean? - I went down to tell the truth against the young man that had given me the things; I went down by order of Sir Sampson Wright.

Q. Perhaps he sent somebody with you? - No, I went down by myself.

Q. You said also just now that you surrendered yourself? - I went down to Worcester to sell my goods, a young man knocked at the door where I was in the room, and told me that he had found something on the road of great value.

Q. You believed him of course? - He shewed me a great quantity of bank notes and other notes, I asked him how he came by them? He said he found them going along the road; I was very much frightened thinking that it belonged to the post office, and it turned out so.

Mr. Knapp. What did you give him for them? - How can you say that I gave him any thing for them?

Court. What did you do with them? - I came immediately to London, and told my father of it; my father says, if you will take my advice, I would have you go immediately to some magistrate, for I don't believe the young man.

Q. How long is this ago? - I am about twenty-eight now; this was about ten or eleven years ago. The young man then went away from me directly, and I went to Sir Sampson Wright's, and told him the things were given me so and so, and he made me sign a paper, and told me that I was to appear at the assizes at Worcester. He did not commit

me, nor take any security in the least; I don't know whether he asked my father about security it is so long ago.

Q. What did you mean by saying before, that you was not a witness, but on the contrary?

Mr. Knapp. You came from Worcester to London to surrender; you did not say any thing till you came to London. What did you not talk to the farmers on the road about this business, or did you come to London first, and stay till there was a reward offered? - No, I had no reward at all.

Q. Was not the young man taken up at Worcester; and afterwards you surrendered in town? - I don't know whether he was taken or not taken before; I don't know yet whether he was taken before or after.

Q. How came you not to go before a magistrate at Worcester? - Because I was very young, I did not know what to do.

Q. You was old enough to take care of that property that you found in that odd way? - It was brought to me by a person that did find it; Mr. Isaacs can tell you more about the business than I know.

Court. You was in partnership with Mr. Levy in May; had you articles? - We had, but we have destroyed them some time since.

Q. When was it dissolved? - About a fortnight or three weeks back; the business could not answer, it was in the linen drapery line.

Q. How came you to dissolve the partnership? - The trade did not answer in the least.

Q. You used to go about the country? - And before this revolution in France, I used to travel into Flanders and Brabant, but since I cannot go; I used to deal very much in the linen drapery articles, watches, and other articles, and used to buy some for sale.

Q. How long have you known Mendoza? - Ever since I was a child, this eight or nine years by sight, but never having any connection with him, any further than by reputation.

Q. Never dealt with him? - Never had any dealings with him in my life.

Q. Did you ever apply to him for the money of these handkerchiefs? - I did; I applied to him when I heard that Mr. Decosta had not sent him; I did not apply to him for the money, but for the goods; the profit was not so great, and I would as soon take the goods again; I let him have the goods on account of Mr. Decosta, and I sold them very cheap to Mr. Decosta.

Q. Did you sell cheaper to Mr. Decosta than to any body else? - I don't know that I did, but he is a man that has lent me great sums of money.

Q. Do you mean to say on your oath, that you sold to Decosta at a cheaper rate than to any body else? - If Mr. Decosta came into the place, and to say what he wanted, he might have it at prime cost for himself.

Q. Did you make any difference in the price of the articles you sold to Mr. Decosta, and those you sold to Mendoza? you sold three pieces to Mendoza before, did you make any difference of Mendoza's paying for them or Mr. Decosta? - He paid twenty-four shillings for them; the price depends on the fineness, in the same parcels we pick out some finer and some coarser, which makes a difference in the price.

Q. Did you write to Mendoza about it, and desire him to give you back the handkerchiefs? - I cannot recollect what I wrote to him; I remember some words that I wrote to him, instead of writing to him at first I did not, I went to a house in Duke's-place where he very often comes to; I said, if you do not give me back the goods that you have

taken from me under Mr. Decosta's name, I will get a warrant for you; he did not come with the goods; I saw him two or three times, and he made some frivolous excuse; at last he told me, if you ask me again for the goods, I will give you as good a licking as ever you had in your life. I always accused him of taking them in Mr. Decosta's name.

Q. Now look at the letter, and see if it is your hand writing? - It may be mine; I cannot tell that that is mine or not.

Q. On your oath will you swear that that is not your hand writing? - I cannot say it is not, nor can I say it is.

Q.What do you believe? - It looks like my hand writing; I believe if it is not mine it is well made after it.

Q. I will have an answer. Do you believe that to be your hand writing or not? - I cannot swear it is mine.

Q. I don't ask you to swear? - I believe it is my writing.

Q. What is the contents? - If he did not produce goods or money, I should get a warrant for him, and go to some magistrate and tell the case.

The letter read.

If you do not send me my handkerchiefs this day, which you have taken from me, on commission to return them the next day, or my money, I have plenty of witnesses, you will feel the effects; and be assured if you do not come by to morrow you will find the ill consequences of it yourself.

Harvey Nathan .

Q. Pray who is your witness? - Jacob Wolfe .

Q. How came Jacob Wolfe not to go before the grand jury, for he is not on the back of the bill? - After I had taken Mr. Mendoza up with a warrant I was threatened with his attorney, if I went on with the prosecution, and they would serve me with a prosecution. Mr. Mendoza writes to an answer. I am surprised at your impudence, writing to me for money or goods, I have none of your goods nor know nothing at all about you; if Mr. Decosta will apply to me, I will speak to him. From one that thinks nothing at all about you.

Daniel Mendoza .

Court. It is wonderful how your memory is improved? - I have read the letter over a great many times.

JACOB WOLFE sworn.

In May last I was a boarder at Mr. Nathan's.

Q. Did you on that occasion see Mr. Mendoza? - Mr. Mendoza came to the house of Mr. Nathan, I don't know the day, about four or five months ago, I cannot say exactly the month.

Q. Do you know the day of the week? - No, I cannot tell; Mr. Mendoza came to the house, and he asked for Mr. Nathan; on which Mr. Nathan met him in the parlour, he said he wanted six dozen of handkerchiefs. for Mr. Decosta, I was below stairs when he came.

Q. What were the words? - Mr. Nathan, you must give me six dozen of handkerchiefs for Mr. Decosta, for Mr. Decosta sent him. This was spoke in the parlour.

Q. Did any thing more pass? - Nothing more that I heard; I went about my business; I left him in the parlour; I supposed they were going into the shop.

Q. What do you call the shop? - Up stairs where they keep their goods.

Q. What kind of goods? - Linen drapery, and all kinds of goods. I have seen watches there, but not in the warehouse.

Q. What are you? - I lived in the house then as a boarder and lodger; I am

a watch-maker by trade, and I deal sometimes.

Q. Where do you follow your business? - I work for different kinds of people, I traffick and deal besides, I go to sales and buy goods, sometimes I buy a watch and alter it for myself.

Q. Perhaps you are an engraver too? - No, I am not an engraver; I served my time to watch making, to one Mr. Yeovill. I recollect exactly the words, because I heard a dispute about the handkerchiefs a day or two afterwards, that made me recollect the words.

Q. Did Mr. Decosta live with Mr. Nathan? - Yes, but he was not at home at the time.

Q. Then Mr. Nathan knew that Mr. Decosta was not at home at the time? - He was at Bethnall-green.

Q Who else lived there? - I lived there likewise.

Q. What did you pay for your board? - Four shillings a week.

Q. To this Wholesale dealer? How did you get your four shillings? - I work for different people; I can recollect fifty of them; I work for one Mr. Lazarus, in Wool-pack-alley; I formerly used to work for one Nokes, in Houndsditch.

Q. You recollect these words perfectly well, that he came from Mr. Decosta? - Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Do you know what christening a watch is? - No.

Q. Did you ever hear what christening a watch is? - No.

Q. How long ago have you done any work? - I worked but yesterday.

Q. What did you work at yesterday? - A watch.

Q. Do you live with Mr. Nathan now? - Yes.

Q. Have you boarded with him ever since? - Yes.

Q. You came with him now? - Yes.

Q How long have you boarded with Mr. Nathan? - About six months; I have lived with him about nine months in all.

Q. How came you not to go before the grand jury? - They did not think that I was wanted; Mr. Nathan did not.

GABRIEL NEWNES DECOSTA sworn.

I have known Mr. Mendoza for a little time, since May.

Q. Did you send him for any goods at any time? - No.

Q. Did you send him for any silk handkerchiefs, to Messrs. Nathan and Levy? - Mr. Mendoza to my country house at Bethnal-green, and we sat down and played at cards together, he asked me if I had any handkerchiefs? I said I did not deal in handkerchiefs, but I had lent money to Messrs. Nathan and Levy to go into trade; then says he, when I go to town I will be obliged to you to go with me to these gentlemen, to see if I can get those things I want. The next day I saw him again, he asked me if I was going to town? I said I was; then, says he, I will go with you, and he went with me, and he took three dozen of handkerchiefs the 24th of May, then after having taken them there he went there again, and got six dozen of handkerchiefs. I know no more about the matter.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17931030-91

763. WILLIAM IVES was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: o17931030-1

Joseph Osland , John Bonner , John Rumbold , Thomas Barrlett , and Joseph Henton , whose judgments respited at former Sessions, were put to the bar and severally received sentence of imprisonment in the house of Correction for six months and fined 1 s .


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