Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th September 1793.
Reference Number: 17930911
Reference Number: f17930911-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the City of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 11th of September, 1793, and the following Days:

Being the SEVENTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY , PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VII. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

PRICE ONE SHILLING.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable SIR JAMES SANDERSON , Knt, LORD MAYOR of the City of LONDON: The Honourable SIR HENRY GOULD , one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: The Honourable SIR JOHN HEATH , one other of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: The Honourable SIR NASH GROSE , one of the Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: SIR JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City: JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Robert Beverly

William Green

Joseph Harris

Thomas Cole

John Hill

William Norris

Stephen Wolfe

Richard Packer

Gabriel Smith

Matthew Russell

Joseph Buck

Aaron Hale

First Middlesex Jury.

George Smart

Samuel Hayes

Richard Ryan

John Draycott

Frederick Miller

Ralph Lonsdale

John Crouch

Edward Myers

William Mortlock

Peter Vineing

Thomas Weaver

James Fisher

Second Middlesex Jury.

Giles Lawrence

Benjamin Whippy

Matthew Cook

James Morris

Abraham Tibbott

Gabriel Dodd

Robert Rubard

Thomas Willymot

Thomas Clarke

Gabriel Barnard

Edward Stevens

Samuel Cliff

Second London Jury.

Robert Sangster

Henry Bamford

John Atkins

Thomas Scarlet

John Benham

Joseph Vere

John Bye

Thomas Thornton

Mark Webster

John Chadsey

John Dennis

Henry Hart .

Reference Number: t17930911-1

548. MARY CRAMMANT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of August , two silver tea spoons, value 5 s. a man's linen shirt, value 2 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the goods of Giles Sparrow .

MARY SPARROW sworn.

My husband's name is Giles Sparrow . I lost Two tea spoons; they were stolen from me; the prisoner came to my house to wash for about two months; I live at Mr. Dundas's office, Whitechapel , I missed the articles on the 12th of August, on Monday at tea time, I have seen two tea spoons since at the pawnbroker's, Mr. Wright, in the Hambury; I saw them on the Friday after, I left them there, I have seen nothing else.

JAMES KIMBER sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Wright, the pawnbroker; I produce two tea spoons, one pawned on the 9th of August, and one on the 16th, I have kept them ever since, they were pawned by the prisoner; I know her very well, I have known her some years.

Prisoner. I did not steal them.

ANN WOODYER sworn.

I live in the house of the other lady; I am no relation. On the 20th of August, Tuesday, Mrs. Sparrow came to me, and told me that on the Monday afternoon she had missed some tea spoons, as she had had some company; and she asked me to go to the prisoner's house, and ask her if we knew any thing about these spoons. On the Friday following we went to the prisoner's lodging, and after that to Mr. Wright's, in the Hambury; and they produced two spoons. That is all I know of it.

Court to Sparrow. Why do you charge the woman with taking the rest of the property? - I went down to her house on Monday the day I missed them, the 19th, and before I missed them; I have missed the other things since I found the tea spoons. I cannot say any thing further about the other things. I believe them to be my spoons, the one I brought from Somersetshire, and is marked in my maiden name, the other is marked in my husband's mother and father-in-law's name; my name is in a cypher, the other is in initials. I have no doubt about them at all.

Q. Has this woman any children? - I do not know at all.

Prisoner. I worked for her, and I was distressed for some money, and she owed me some, and I said to her, madam, if you please I want a triffle of money; says she, I am rather short of cash, take these spoons and pledge them. I had pledged things for her before, and I went and pledged these spoons for her, for three shillings, and kept the money. At this time Mr. Sparrow was gone out of Town; my mistress gave me the spoons to pledge.

Court to Mrs. Sparrow. On your oath did you give her these spoons to pledge? - No, my lord; I never pawned a thing in my life.

Court to Pawnbroker. In what name were they pawned? - In the name of

Mary Harris ; the name she always went by.

Prisoner. That is my maiden name.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned three months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-2

549. MARY ANN ROBINSON , the wife of Thomas Robinson , was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , a cloth great coat, value 1 l. 5 s. a silver tea spoon, value 8 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 10 s. and two pair of silk stockings, value 5 s. the goods of Thomas Holroyd .

THOMAS HOLROYD sworn.

I am in no business; I lost these Articles; I live at No. 20, Gerrard-street, Soho ; and Mary Robinson was left in care of my house while I went into the country; I put her in to take care of my house; I first missed the things on Tuesday the 23d of July, the day I was going to return again, as I came to Town on the Monday, but it being a wet day I went to look for a great coat, and when I went to the spot where they were, there was never a one to be found; I naturally asked where my great coat was? she said she knew nothing at all about it; I said she must find them, or must have had improper people in the house, or must have made away with them; at ten o'clock at night she gave me an account it was pawned, and gave me the duplicate.

Q. Did she give you the duplicates of the other articles? - None but two great coats. I thought it was not a proper time of night to let her go out. When she got up in the morning I desired her to empty her pocket, for I was doubtful that she had got other duplicates; she pulled out her things, and in a pocket book, which she pulled out of her pocket, I found near twenty-five or thirty duplicates, five of which referred to my own property, and according to these duplicates I went to examine at three different pawnbrokers, and found the things.

(The duplicates produced.)

Prisoner. He promised me pardon if I would give up the duplicates

Prosecutor. I did, but then I did not know that I had lost any more than the two great coats.

ELEANOR HOLROYD sworn.

I am the daughter; I was not at home; I prove the property in one article.

JOHN FARMER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a cloth great coat, a pair of sheets, a silver table spoon, and two pair of black silk stockings; I took them into pledge of the prisoner at the bar, they were pledged some in the name of Hart, and some in the name of Bailey; all four were pledged at different times; the first a pair of sheets were pawned the 9th of July; the 12th of July a table spoon; the 13th of July two pair of stockings; and the 20th of July the coat. I asked her if they were her own? she said they belonged to Mr. Bailey, who lived in Swallow-street.

Court to Mr. Holroyd. How came you not to put the other articles in the indictment? - Because the pawnbrokers delivered them up.

(The articles produced.)

Thomas Holroyd . I know the spoon, it has W. B. on it; the great coat I have had about half a year; the sheets

are marked T. A. H. My daughter can speak to the stockings.

Eleanor Holroyd . I know this to be my father's stockings by a piece of silk put in at the heel; I footed it myself.

Prisoner. At the time I gave up the tickets the prosecutor promised me pardon. I should have had some witnesses here for to speak for me, but they did not know what day my trial was to come on.

GUILTY ,

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-3

550. JESSEY YOUNG and HENRY BOCOCK were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Bryant , about the hour of ten in the night on the 8th of August , in the parish of St. Botolph, without Aldgate , and burglariously stealing therein, a feather bed, value 1 l. 10 s. an iron shovel, value 1 s. and an iron hammer with a wooden handle, value 1 s. the goods of James Bryant ; and

HANNAH HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, on the same day, knowing them to have been stolen .

HENRY BRYANT sworn.

I was not at home when my house was broke open; I did not lodge in that house at the time; there was a young man in the care of it; I did not lodge there for some months.

Court. Are you a bankrupt? - I was at that time.

Q. This was your dwelling house? - It was.

Q. And you was in possession of these things? - I was, and am still.

Mr. Knapp. Was not the messenger in possession? - He was always in possession.

Q. Was He in possession under the commission of bankruptcy? - He was partly. But there was a bill of sale, and my brother bought these things in again, and gave them me.

Q. Who paid the rent of the house at this time? - The assignees.

Q. What before this house was broke open? - Yes.

Q. Was the assignment made at that time? - It was not; but the sale was, and the goods were bought in for me.

Court. Who was the tenant of the house? - There was no other tenant but me; my brother was not tenant.

Q. Under whose right was the man in possession? - He was my clerk.

Q. Did he keep possession for any body? - He kept possession for me.

Q. Then he was not employed by the persons for whom this bill of sale was made? - He was not.

Q. Was there any assignees at the time? - There was. The man that they sent was out of possession long before this. I was in possession, and I employed this man to keep possession for me; I was not in the house, and all that I know is that the house was broke open, and the things taken away.

Mr. Knapp. How long had you been a bankrupt when this affair happened? - About two months.

Q. How many examinations had you passed before the commissioners? - I had got my certificate signed.

Q. Did you live in the house at the time? - I did not.

Q. How long had you ceased to live in the house? - Three months.

Q. Did you pay your rent yourself for that house? - No, I did not.

Q. Who did the landlord of the house look to for the rent? - I suppose they looked to the assignees for the twelve months rent.

Court. Who did he look to for the growing rent? - To me.

Q. Did you mean to come and lodge in this house again? - I did; I am there at this time.

JOHN DENNIS sworn.

Q. How old are you? - I am fourteen and three months.

Q. Do you know what will become of you if you take a false oath? - I shall be punished in this World, and likewise in the next.

Q. Was you in Bryant's house? - No.

Court to Bryant. In what parish is your house? - St. Botolph, without Aldgate.

Dennis. I was on the wharf that adjoins to the house, the house is near the water; I saw Henry Bocock shove the boards in with his foot, just by the necessary; he then went in and opened the door, and let the other in.

Q. Could he have got in without shoving the boards? - No.

Q. Was the necessary near the house? - Yes, it adjoins to it, it is part of the house.

What time was this? - Between nine and ten o'clock at night.

Q. Was it so light as to discover the features of a man's countenance? - Yes. I knew him very well, I was not so far from him as I am from him now; I knew him before.

Q. Did he live in the neighbourhood? - He lives in the back lane.

Q. Had you seen him often? - Yes. I saw him go into the house by shoving these boards with his foot, and he went in and opened the back door, and let in Jessy Young , and Jessy Young went in.

Q. Did you know Young before? - Yes, he used to work for our master Mr. Bryant.

Q. How long did they stay there? - I don't know rightly.

Q. Did you see either of them come out? - Yes, I saw Jessy Young bring a bed out on the Wharf, and Bocock brought out a fire shovel and the hammer, it is an iron hammer.

Q. Where did they go then? - I don't know, they went to sell it I suppose.

Q. How soon afterwards did you tell any body of it? - The next morning.

Q. Do you know any thing more of this business; - They came back and gave me two shillings not to tell.

PETER SHURLAND sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Bryant; I slept in the house, there was no person slept in the house at this time but myself; I fastened the door.

Q. Do you remember the boards of the necessary? - Yes, I fastened the boards up myself with a bit of string.

Q. Did you observe they were separated in the morning? - Not till Mr. Bryant told me; I was not in the next morning.

Q. Do you know any thing of a feather bed, an iron hammer and a shovel? Do you know whether they were missing? - Yes, they were.

Court to Bryant. Did you see any opening made there? - I found the house was broke open from the back of the necessary, some boards broke down.

Q. Could any body have got into your house by means of an opening at the back of your necessary? - Yes.

JAMES BRYANT sworn.

I know nothing of the robbery, only I bought some things in at a sale before; I don't know that it is the same.

ANN MOWEN sworn.

I keep a shop in Ratcliff-highway. Mrs. Hawkins had this bed to sell in an open shop, and I went in and asked her the price; and she told me six and twenty shillings, and I bought it; she said it was her own. I knew her before.

Mr. Knapp. You have known Mrs. Hawkins for some time before? - Yes; she keeps a shop.

Q. This bed was exposed to sale in her shop, the same as her other goods? - It was.

Q. You have been used to deal for beds before? - Yes.

Q. According to the value of that bed, was it a fair price that you gave for it? - I bought it for myself; I see the distress that she was in, and I gave her what she asked for it without any abatement. She has kept the shop for two or three years.

Court to James Bryant . You say you bought some things at a sale. Did you buy that bed? - I bought a bed, and as many things as came to eight or nine pounds; but I don't know the bed again.

ROBERT DAWSON sworn.

I am a constable. On Sunday the 11th, in the morning, Peter Shurland and two others informed me of this robbery; I went and apprehended Young; I went after that to the house of Mr. Hawkins, he is clerk to Mr. Bryant; I found Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins both at home, I asked Mrs. Hawkins whether she had bought a bed? she denied it, she said, no, she had not. I had information at the same time of a shovel, a pair of tongs, and a hammer; and seeing the shovel by the fire side I took it into my possession: I then proceeded to search the house, I found two beds up stairs, I asked if either of those beds was the bed they bought of Young? she said that neither of them were: I was then proceeding to take Mr. Hawkins out of the house, and then she acknowledged that she had, in the absence of Mr. Hawkins, purchased a bed, this shovel, and a hammer, of two men that worked at the same wharf where her husband worked, and described them, but did not mention their names. I know her husband very well, I cannot say that he worked at that wharf.

Court to Henry Bryant . Do you know the wharf? - It is Kendall's Wharf; I don't know whether they worked at that Wharf.

Court to Dennis. Do you know the Wharf where Hawkins worked? - No.

Dawson. I went then to Mr. Mowen's and found the bed.

Mr. Knapp. The husband was by all this time that you have been speaking of? - He was.

Q. He was apprehended on this business? - He was.

Q. The husband is a good deal at home when he is away from his work? - He is. I always took him to be a very honest man.

Q. Had you any other conversation with Hawkins besides this? - No.

Q. Was nothing said by him upon this business? - No, only urging his wife to tell where the bed was.

Q. Was there any promise held out to any of these prisoners, to induce them to say any thing? - I believe Mrs. Hawkins was told if she would produce the things she should be admitted as an evidence, but she never confessed any thing in consequence of that.

Knapp to Bryant. Can you swear to the bed by any particular mark? - No.

Dawson. It is necessary for me to mention that Bryant has said that he did not believe it was the bed, and his brother, and this lad said the same before the magistrate.

Court to Bryant. Did you ever say that? - Yes, I have said so; I believe it is not my bed; I am pretty sure it is not my bed; the shovel I believe is mine, it is very much like it.

Prisoner Young. John Dennis said at the justice's, that he was there at the time the robbery was done; and then he said afterwards that it was done while he went to get a pint of beer for his supper.

Court to Dennis. Did you ever say that it was done while you went to get a pint of beer for supper? - I went to get a pint of beer over the way, and when I came back all the things were in the stable.

Q. Did you see him bring the things out before you went for the pint of beer or after? - I went for my beer before I see them bring them out, and when I was coming back I tumbled over the bed.

Court. You said just now that you saw the prisoner Young bring the bed out of the house, and you saw Bocock bring out a shovel and an iron hammer? - No, sir, I said, I saw them bring them on the wharf.

The prisoners Hawkins and Bocock each called one witness who gave them a good character.

Jessy Young, GUILTY. (Aged 22.)

Henry Bocock , GUILTY. (Aged 23.)

Of stealing the goods, but not of the burglary .

To go to Sea, or for Soldiers .

Ann Hawkins , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-4

551. MARY BARKER , the wife of Joseph Barker , was indicted for stealing on the 17th of June , a silver watch, value 2 l. 10 s. two base metal watch keys, value 1 d. a glass seal set in metal, value 1 d. the goods of Felix Mac Dennis , in his dwelling house .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

CATHARINE MAC DENNIS sworn.

On the 17th of June, about three o'clock in the afternoon, Mary Barker came and knocked at my door, my room door, I have only two rooms.

Q. Is this house let out in lodgings? - Yes; we have the first floor, the house is let out in lodgings.

Q. Who do you rent your rooms of? - Mrs. Donaldson.

Q. Did Mrs. Donaldson live in the house? - No. After she had knocked at the door I came down, unlocked the door and left her in; I had left my child behind me, up stairs, on the second floor where I was at work, my child cried, I asked her to sit down; she sat down; and I went up to the child, I brought the child down, she was in the room then, she went away soon after.

Q. How long after? - I cannot rightly tell; not long: she was not gone long before I missed my husband's watch.

Q. When had you seen that watch before? - In the morning, at eight o'clock. It was hanging on a nail when she came into the room, I saw it when she came into the room, I saw it when I went down stairs to open the door for her. As soon as she was gone I missed it, and followed her immediately, she was sitting on a chair at her own door: I went to her at her own door, and called her in backward to her own room, and asked her if she took my husband's watch to frighten me? she said she had not.

Q. What were her words? - She said she had not, she would not do such a thing for the World. on that she came

to my room with me, and asked me to see if I had not mislaid it or something, and she desired me to go with her to a fortune teller, and she would give him half a crown herself if he would tell where the watch was; I went with her.

Q. Where to? - I cannot tell She brought me to some old man, I believe it was at Salt Petre Bank; he said he could not tell any thing, it was past sun set; we came home again; I went and told Mr. Whiteway of it, the runner, and he came down, and spoke to her about it, to see if she could find it; so she said she could not; and the next day she was brought before the justice.

Q. Did you ever search her? - No, I never did. The watch has never been seen since.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-5

552. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a bank note, value 20 l. marked No. 4,881, dated London, July 12, 1793; another bank note, value 30 l. marked No. 2,899, dated London, July 16, 1793; another bank note, value 30 l. marked No. 6,371, dated London, July 18, 1793; another bank note, value 50 l. marked No. 8,423, dated London, March 22, 1793; another bank note, value 50 l. marked No. 8,690, dated London, June 29, 1793; another bank note, value 20 l. marked No. 7,278, dated London, July 18, 1793. The said bank notes, at the time of committing the felony being the property of Thomas Lewis , gentleman .

(The case opened by - .)

THOMAS LEWIS sworn.

On the 29th of July I drew a draft on my bankers, Messrs. Child and Co. for 200 l. and desired Mr. William Vizard, a confidential clerk, to go and receive that sum; I never received that sum of Mr. Vizard, but my banker has debited my account in that sum.

WILLIAM VIZARD sworn.

I am clerk to the prosecutor; I went with the draft, and received the six bank notes; another clerk in the office took a memorandum of the notes, and I examined the notes with the memorandum; (the memorandum read) after the memorandum had been taken I left the notes on my desk, I was there about a quarter of an hour after I returned from the bankers, when I went out and left the prisoner at the bar in the office, and another clerk, William Ward ; the prisoner was a copying clerk ; I returned again about five o'clock; I went away about half past three; when I came back I missed the notes; I went to enquire if my master had got them. I went that evening and saw the prisoner near twelve o'clock, between eleven and twelve o'clock, at his lodgings very much intoxicated, he was so much intoxicated I believe he hardly knew what he did; he had more than two hundred pounds about him, and he desired me to take the two hundred pounds and give him what belonged to him; he had changed one of them, and he had the twenty guineas in cash, and the rest in silver; the Bow-street officer took the notes. I attended before the magistrate the next morning.

CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY sworn.

I am the officer; I was present at the searching the prisoner, I found these notes on him, I took possession of them, and marked them, and they were put in Mr. Child, the banker's possession; I put my own seal on them.

(The notes produced and read.)

Prisoner. My lord and gentleman of the jury, on the 29th of July last, after I had been at dinner I drank more than I do in common. It is very true I came about three o'clock to Mr. Lewis's chambers, and I saw these notes on Mr. Vizard's desk; I had occasion to go down stairs, I remember perfectly well it was a very warm day, and not knowing where to find the key of the chamber, in order to lock the door after me, I put these notes into my pocket for fear that any body should slip up in the interim; on which I went and had two or three glasses of brandy and water, and that threw up into my head, and this business was merely through intemperance, and not guilt. I went home finding myself intoxicated with liquor, thinking the next morning to have seen Mr. Lewis to have returned him this property. I had not any intention of going away, or otherwise other methods might have been pursued. I did not go to the office that afternoon as I was ashamed to face Mr. Lewis being so much in liquor. I believe this is the first offence that I have ever committed of the kind in my life time; I was never at the bar before. One favour I beg, is that as I have not the least doubt but Mr. Lewis has received letters from some people at Guildford, if they could be read it would be a particular indulgence; after that I submit myself to your lordship, and you gentlemen of the jury.

Lewis. He was in my service a month, and I have heard an extreme good character of him, a gentleman, Mr. Sibhorpe, called on me who has known him twenty years.

GUILTY. (Aged 44.)

Recommended by the Jury .

To be imprisoned six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-6

553. HANNAH MACARTHY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Rebecca Judson , about the hour of twelve in the night, on the 16th of July , and burglariously stealing therein, a cotton bed gown, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. a muslin cap, value 3 s. a callimanco petticoat, value 2 s. a stuff petticoat, value 3 s. a tick pocket apron, value 3 d. a ticken pocket value 2 d. an iron key, value 1 d. six halfpence and 10 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the goods, chattles and monies of the said Rebecca Judson .

REBECCA JUDSON sworn.

I live in Aldgate parish , I follow my business in the street, I deal in fruit, and fish ; I went to my bed about nine o'clock on the 16th of July, I saw this woman going by the door two or three times that afternoon, the Tuesday afternoon, I was robbed at night; I had no suspicion of any thing happening from the woman; between the hours of twelve and one I heard a great noise, I lay on the first floor, I heard it just by the bedside, and I got up and I asked who was there, nobody made me answer, and I went to get to the door, and I saw the shadow of a woman as well as I could see; I cried out murder! nobody came to my assistance, I went to bed again; I could not find the woman, she went down, she was going out of the door, and I saw just her apparition like, just the shadow of her, the door went right into the yard, where I slept, I live in Swan-alley. I went to bed again, and when I got up in the morning I found the staple of the door on the ground, and I missed all the things mentioned, a cotton gown, handkerchief, a callimanco petticoat, a stuff petticoat, a pocket, an iron key, and ten shillings and six-pence. I heard no more of it till the Sunday week following, I went up Salt Petre Bank, and knowing my bed gown on her back, I asked a woman in the street whether they could tell me

where an officer lived; I went directly to an officer's house, and the officer came with me, his name is Fonseca, and I went up the Bank along with him, and took her in the Black Lyon, Salt Petre Bank, about one hundred yards from my house or better. When the gentleman took her she wanted to give me the bed gown, and the pocket apron; I asked her how she came by them? she told me if I would let her go she would find the rest for me; I told her I would not let her go; then Mr. Fonseca took custody of her, and brought her down to the watch-house; the pocket apron was tied before her.

Q. Was it dark when you went to bed? - It was.

Q. Did you fasten your door? - I locked the door.

Q. Nobody else lived in the house but you? - Nobody else.

Q. In the morning you found the staple of the door out? - Yes. The constable has got the things.

MOSES FONSECA sworn.

I am the constable, I have got the bed gown and pocket apron which were found on the woman; I took them off from her myself.

Prosecutor. This bed gown was in my house the night of the robbery, I took it off my back, it lay on a chair, I missed it in the morning; the apron is mine, I know it by the marks that is in it, it is my own making; the pocket apron laid on a chair with the money in it; there was five shillings and three-pence in it, five shillings in silver, and three-pence in halfpence.

Prisoner. The way I came by that pocket apron and bed gown, is this, I was coming home looking after my husband, as far as Holborn, there was a drunken man met me, and he had this apron and bed gown, and he made me stop with him in the street, and gave them to me, he told me they were his wife's things, and that he was going away from her. They took five duplicates out of my pocket, and four shillings and six-pence in money.

Court to Prosecutor. Do you know whether she is an unfortunate woman? - She is, I have heard so, she had no money about her.

Fonseca. I took nothing but the duplicates, and a key from her.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE

Reference Number: t17930911-7

554. VALENTINE HARRISON was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Elizabeth Jones in the dwelling house of Harrison Phillip Hinslie , Esquire, on the 20th of August , and putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person and against her will, a tin Box, value 1 d. two guineas and a half and 1 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the goods and monies of the said Elizabeth Jones .

The case opened by -

ELIZABETH JONES sworn.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner? - I see him on Thursday the 20th of August; about half after three he came and knocked at the door, I being alone in the house went up and asked him what he wanted; I am sure the prisoner is the man, the prisoner came into the house and asked me if I did not know him, I said no, says he, don't you know your uncle, he then said he wanted some money, I said I had nothing but a few halfpence, he said that would not do, he took and put my apron up to my mouth, I screamed out, he said if I cried out any more he would cut my throat;

he then put his hand into my pocket and took out a tin box, it contained two guineas and a half, and eighteen-pence, he took the two guineas and half out of the box, and left the eighteen-pence, and threw it down on the floor and said I might take it and be damned, and went away; he was with me about ten minutes.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner? - In ten minutes. As soon as he was gone I went and looked out of the parlour window, and I did not see any body, and I went to the door and I saw a little girl, and I asked her if she saw the prisoner? she said she had, and while I was at the door speaking to this little girl, I saw the prisoner come out of the door of another house, Mr. Osborne's; I was standing at this time at my own door about a hundred yards from Mrs. Osborne's door.

ELIZABETH WILKINSON sworn.

Q. How old are you? - I am thirteen.

Q. Do you know what will become of you after you are are dead, if you should take a false oath now? - I shall never go to God Almighty.

Q. Be sure you say what is true, and nothing but the truth? - Yes, I will.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner? - No, never before he came to Brompton-row , I saw him then, on Wednesday the 20th of August.

Q. Why do you think it was on a Wednesday? Was it at the same time that he went to Elizabeth Jones ? - It was. I am very sure I saw that man come out of Mr. Hinslies house, and he went to No. 15, to Mrs. Osborne's.

MARY ANN TIMMS sworn.

I saw the prisoner on the 20th of August, a little before four, at Mrs. Osborne's; he knocked at the door, and asked me if my mistress was at home? I said, no, but if he had any message I would deliver it; he said he had no message to deliver to my mistress, but he had made her a present of many pheasants and partridges; I was to give his compliments, and his name was Mr. Harrison.

Q. Did he ask about your master? - He did; I told him he had been dead about ten years.

Court to Jones. Did he take the tin box? - No, he threw it down on the floor.

A CONSTABLE sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner; and in a purse, in his pocket, I found a shilling in one pocket, and in another pocket I found four-pence halfpenny; that is all. I found him at the Adam and Eve public house, Petty France, drinking.

Prisoner. I am innocent of the charge that is laid against me; I have no friends here; I have two brothers, but they are both in America.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 60.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-8

555. HANNAH SHEILDS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , two brass candlesticks, value 5 s. a feather bed, value 4 l. a feather bolster, value 10 s. two feather pillows, value 5 s. a linnen table cloth, value 5 s. two mahogany pot stands, value 1 s. five linen sheets, value 10 s. a copper stew pan, value 5 s. a copper coffee pot, value 6 d. thirteen table knives, value 3 s. eleven table forks, value 2 s. two damask bed curtains, value 5 s. two stuff window curtains, value 5 s. seven linen towels, value 3 s. the goods of Peter Square , in his dwelling house .

PETER SQUARE sworn.

I live in George's-court, York-buildings, St. Martin's in the fields. On the

24th of last month I received an anonymous letter, about three o'clock; I went with that anonymous letter to Bow-street immediately, I gave it to justice Bond; he directed me to get a constable, and to search the place pointed out in that letter. The prisoner was a servant in my own house at the time, I never suspected her; there was a constable sent along with me, and when we came to the room, we went to No. 3, in Lumley-court, in the Strand, and the room that we were directed to was locked, on which the landlord or landlady, rather directed us to go to the corner of Southampton-street to the woman that owned the room, where we should find the person that occupied the room; on which the constable, William Hyde , went, he went in custody with the beadle of the parish, and there they found the woman; I waited at the room door as I was directed to; they brought the woman to me to the room door, on which I knew the woman by her appearance, I knew her to have been in my own house frequently; she opened the room door; and there I found a considerable deal of my own property, which is in the indictment; they are here; the prisoner was then in my house.

Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner had lived with you on and off two or three times? - She had lived with me from the 12th of April, to about the 12th of August; she had a good character with me, and I had no suspicion.

WILLIAM HYDE sworn.

I am a constable; I was applied to the 24th of August, by Mr. Square and Mr. Baythorne the beadles, to apprehend Mrs. Hardy that keeps a room where these goods were found; I apprehended her at the corner of the street where this gentleman tells you, and then I took her home to her own lodgings, and there Mr. Square owned the property which we have in Court; I seized it, and I have had it in my possession ever since.

Court to Prosecutor. Have you any body to bring it home to the prisoner? - No.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-9

556. THOMAS GLOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , eleven silver tea spoons, value 13 s. two silver tea strainers, value 5 s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 6 s. a silver salt, value 3 s. a silver cream jug, value 18 s. the goods of Francis Snell , in his dwelling house .

FRANCIS SNELL sworn.

I live in Tottenham-court-road , leading to Hampstead; I live in a house of my own; the prisoner at the bar he was not a servant, nor did I ever employ him. On the 13th of July last I heard my maid halloo out, O Lord! we are robbed, we are robbed; stop thief! stop that man, I immediately ran out into the road, and I saw the prisoner running according to the description given, and I hallooed out, stop thief; stop that man with the blue coat! He was stopped with the property on him; it was the prisoner, I was present when he was searched; I have the property myself here; I locked them up in my own bureau.

Q. When did you see them the last time before they were stole? - I cannot recollect; they were kept in my china closet, in the front parlour; we seldom use them unles we have company; we have common things besides; the key was in the china closet; the cream jug has a cypher three letters, F. R. S. I had the things weighed the

day they were taken from him, they came to three pounds two shillings, at five shillings per ounce.

DIANA BLACKBURN sworn.

I am a servant to the prosecutor; I was sweeping the kitchen stairs down, my mistress sent me up for a little brandy, because my young mistress was not well; just as I was going in I met this man, the prisoner was coming out of the parlour door, I asked him what he wanted? I was a stranger to him, I never saw him before; he made no answer, he walked out of the passage, and out by the stones; and I cried out stop thief! not knowing the man had taken any thing; after he had turned and shut the gate after him, he ran away.

Prisoner. I was walking, and I heard the alarm of stop thief! and I saw two men running along, and I saw two men chuck these silver spoons and the things into a passage, and I immediately took them up, and thought proper to alarm the people that were the owners of them, but was prevented; I was attacked by two or three people, and they told me that I was the person that stole them.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 25.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-10

557. JOHN GABRIEL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of August , two silver candlesticks, value 5 l. the goods of William Burch , Esq . in his dwelling house .

JOHN OAKLY sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Taylor; I saw the prisoner, John Gabriel , come out of Mr. Burch's area, with the candlesticks under his coat on the 10th of August, I saw the bottom of one candlestick under his coat, I was in Chesterfield-street, May Fair , it was at one o'clock at noon, I and another pursued after him, and we saw him go into Hyde Park, as soon as ever he saw me he run, the other person was a shoe-maker, Jonathan Oakes , we pursued him into the Green Park, in Hyde Park, and he had his hands behind him with the candlesticks, and then after that we see his hands before him at liberty, and then we followed him, and took him, and returned, and found the candlesticks in the grass, I brought them and delivered them into the hands of Mr. Burch, an officer in the Army.

WILLIAM BURCH sworn.

I live in Chesterfield-street, May Fair, in St. George's parish, Hanover-square; I can prove the property.

JONATHAN OAKES sworn.

I am a shoe-maker; I was with Oakley when the alarm was given; a boy and Mr. Burch's servant maid came up and asked me if we had seen such a person go past I pursued the prisoner at the bar, I pursued him till we came to Hyde Park, there we saw him run across the Park into Piccadilly; when we got into Piccadilly I lost him, and I asked a gentleman's coachman whether he had seen him? he told me he had gone into the Green Park; I went in, and there I saw him just turned the corner, and trying to get over the wall, and I pursued him further, and he was stopped by another witness here in court; he did not get over the wall; he ran, and I ran after him, and there was an officer of the guards that stopped him, he drew his sword on him, and when I came up I laid hold of his collar, and took him to a magistrate;

I saw him with something concealed under his coat, but I cannot tell what.

Q. Did you find any thing? - No.

Q. Did you go back? - I did not. Oakley went back, I took the prisoner to the magistrate.

Prisoner. Ask the lad whether he can swear that I had the candlesticks under my coat.

Oakley. I saw the bottom of one of the candlesticks under his coat, coming up the steps.

ANN SEARLE sworn.

I was at my own lodge in the Green Park, opposite Claridges-street, and the officer on guard took these candlesticks out of this young man's hand, and desired that I would take charge of them; I kept them from Saturday one o'clock till Monday, when I delivered them into Mr. Burch's charge, they were carried to Marlborough-street; I gave them up there, these are the same candlesticks.

Court to Mr. Burch. Do you know any thing respecting the taking of this property? - I can speak nothing of my own knowledge, only what my servant came up and told me; her name is Ann Bailey , she is not here.

Q. When had you seen the property last? - I cannot exactly say; Thomas Baynes my butler can.

THOMAS BAYNES sworn.

I live with Mr. Burch, I am his butler, I know that these candlesticks were missing about five minutes after I left my master's house on the 10th of August, they were in my charge; I left the candlesticks in my own room about five minutes before I left the house, but I did not return till a quarter of an hour, and in that time they were gone.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at the bar at all about the house? - I cannot say that I did. (Deposes to the candlesticks.) I know them by the number to be my master's property.

Q. Was there any search made on the candlesticks being missing? - Yes, search was made directly; this Oakley met the man.

Q. Was there immediately a hue and cry made? - Yes, there was immediately.

Q. Do you know Oakley? - Yes, he was a country boy, and had the liberty of keeping at our house at the time, after the theft was discovered the house-keeper desired him to run after the property, I did not hear of it the first, because I was gone from the house at the time.

Court to Oakley. You was at Mr. Burch's at the time? - Yes.

Q. You heard the candlesticks was missing? - Yes.

Q. How came you to know it? - The house-keeper informed me, and she desired me to go after the man that had got the candlesticks.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner about the house? - I met him on the iron steps, as I was going down the iron steps he was coming up; as soon as I went down the house-keeper desired me to follow him, and I did, but I never saw him again till I saw him in Hyde Park, there I saw him.

Q. How far is that from your master's house? - I cannot say.

JOHN JACQUES sworn.

I work for Mr. Branham the patent locksmith, in Piccadilly, I went to my dinner at one o'clock, and was going through the Park, and I saw the prisoner attempting to get out of the gate, and I shut the gate and stopped him there, but he was too strong for me, and I was obliged to let him go till other assistance came, and I called out stop thief! and an officer drew his sword and stopped him.

Prisoner. Ask Mr. Burch's servant if he can swear to the property which I had under my coat.

Oakley. I saw the bottom of one candlestick.

Prisoner. Ask him if he can swear that he found any property on me.

Court. He says that first of all your hands were behind you, and afterwards he saw them before you and at liberty, and you was taken and he found the candlesticks.

Prisoner. Which way did he find the candlesticks.

Oakley. I found the candlesticks at the corner of an hedge, among some nettles in the Green Park.

Court. Was that in the way from Mr. Burch's house to where the prisoner was taken? - It was.

Jury. Did you observe the candlesticks under the prisoner's coat at the time he came up the steps? - I did.

Prisoner. Be so good to enquire whether he had not some intelligence that the candlesticks was hid in the Park or not? - No, I had not.

Q. Ask him whether he saw me hide them?

Court. He has never said that he saw you hide them.

Prisoner. Because there was a man at the time I was taken, he came up and he said he knew where the candlesticks were, and he took that lad that stands at the bar there, and shewed him where the candlesticks were. I am a gentleman's servant out of place, I had been out of place about three months; I was going down to Mr. Tattersall's, in Grosvenor-place, to see if I could get any work, and as I was going across the Park they pursued me, and charged me with the robbery.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 25.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-11

558. SARAH HAMMETT or otherwise Hemmett was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of August , a purse made of silk and cotton, value 1 d. and seven guineas, the goods and monies of William Brandon , privately from his person .

WILLIAM BRANDON sworn.

I was a grocer ; I live in Witham Common, in Linconshire, I came from there, I live now in Moore-street, the prisoner at the bar robbed me of seven guineas; I met with her in Broad-street, St. Giles's, it was eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Had you been drinking any where? - No, I was perfectly sober.

Q. Are you a married man or an unmarried man? - Unmarried. She accosted me, and proposed me to go with her to her lodgings in Dyott-street .

Q. Had you been drinking? - No.

Q. Quite sober? - Quite. When I came to her lodgings I had eight guineas in gold in my pocket, in a silk and cotton purse; I changed one and lost the seven, the silver I put loose in my pocket, I lost my purse likewise.

Q. Do you know when you lost it? - I do not.

Q. Did not you drop it on the bed? - I am certain I did not, because I examined the bed, I put it into my pocket the last thing, and buttoned my pocket up in her sight.

Q. You was on the bed with her I suppose? - Yes.

Q. Will you swear positively that you did not drop it on the bed? - Yes, I will, because I buttoned my pocket up before I went to the bed to her.

Q. Did you ever see your money again? - No, I dropped one guinea and picked it up, and put it in my purse, and put it in my pocket.

Q. How soon afterwards did you miss it? - Instantly she run out of the chamber, and that gave me a suspicion. I felt

and my money was gone.

Q. Did not you feel any thing? did not you feel any money go from you? - No.

Prisoner. He said I was from him ten minutes before he missed his money? - I never said such a thing; I missed it immediately as she ran down stairs.

CHRISTOPHER SANDERS sworn.

I was employed at this time at the public office, Marlborough-street; a few lines was left by the prosecutor giving a description of the woman, and I went from that and apprehended the woman, and took her to Marlborough-street, and searched her, and found this purse, and three guineas and a half in it on her; I have kept it ever since.

Prosecutor. The purse is not the same as I lost.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-12

559. JOHN HITCHCOCK was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of August , a penknife, value 1 s. 6 d. a pound weight of bacon, value 8 d. a pound weight of pudding, value 3 d. and half a pint of geneva, value 4 d. the goods of James Cox .

JAMES COX sworn.

The prisoner broke first into a pig sty twice; he broke the boards down first, I found it so; and he owned it himself.

Q. Did you make any promise to him to induce him to confess? - No, he confessed himself.

Q. Did not you tell him it would be better for him? - I did not tell him no such thing.

Q. Where is it you live? - At Pinner .

Q. Was the prisoner a servant of your's? - No.

Q. Where did he live? - He lived at Pinner.

Q. What did you lose? - I lost a bit of bacon, and a penknife, out of the tea chest, and the value of half a pint of gin, and a bit of pudding. The tea chest stood on the dresser, the gin was in a bottle that stood on the dresser; I lost them the 13th of August, between ten and eleven, as near as I can guess, in the day; I went out to work between five and six, I saw them there then; I believe he took them between ten and eleven, because of a little girl who lived at the next door, and I asked her.

Q. How do you know that he took them? - Because he owned it, and I found the things on him in about an hour or a couple of hours, on the same day; I found on him the bacon and the knife.

Q. Did any body in your hearing tell him to confess? - Says I, John Hitchcock , you have broke into the house, and have got the bacon, I know I have, says he, I have got it in my pocket, and he pulled it out immediately; and I asked him, says I, you have got the penknife out of the chest; I know I have, says he, but he did not deliver me that then; I saw him then about two hours after I was robbed; I saw the officer search him, and he found the knife on him; he had delivered the bacon before.

Q. What is he? - He is a carpenter .

Mr. Knapp. This man is only a half witted man I believe? - I do not know any thing about that.

Q. When you spoke to him about the bacon, he had not wit enough to deny it, so he pulled it out and said, here it is. He might have taken your clothes of more value? - He might have taken other things.

Q. He has been in Gaol a month for this already I believe? - He has, a month to day.

SIMON - sworn.

I am an headborough; I took a penknife

from the prisoner; I have got it here.

Prosecutor. I know it is mine by a crumb off the point of it.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-13

560. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , a canvas bag, value 1 d. and an hundred and thirty-four halfpence ; the goods and monies of James Morris .

JAMES MORRIS sworn.

I am a farmer and costermonger ; I live at Harlow. As I was standing in Covent-garden-market the 13th of July, near six in the morning, I felt something against my pocket, I put my hand back, and I catched hold of the prisoner's flannel waistcoat, and he dropped the halfpence down on the ground; he says directly, your halfpence has dropped from your pocket; says I, no, you have took them out.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-14

561. GEORGE WIGHTMAN and GEORGE MACKAY were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of Granville Sharp , Esq .

GRANVILLE SHARP sworn.

On the 11th of July, about ten o'clock in the morning, I was going down Chancery-lane , and I was looking in my pocket book for a memorandum, I heard a little noise on the other side of the way, I looked and I saw a constable on the opposite way had hold of a man, and he held up a handkerchief, and said, sir, is this your handkerchief? it was mine; I looked and saw my name, it was a silk one; the constable has it; I have the fellow of it in my pocket; I believe the tallest one, George Wightman , is the man the constable had hold of; I believe I saw the other there, there was one of the same size.

- sworn.

I am a constable; I was in Chancery-lane that morning about ten o'clock, I and my brother officer observed the prisoners standing at the corner of Chancery-lane, in Fleet-street, I observed Mackay to turn the corner into Chancery-lane very sharp, I says to my brother officer, it is my belief that chap is at somebody's pocket; I followed him, and I saw in Fetter-lane the prisoner Wightman close to Mr. Sharp, and I watched them, and Mr. Sharp then crossed the way, and Wightman and Mackay both crossed the way together.

Q. Did you observe them talking together? - I don't know that I did; they were close together; I then observed Mackay close to Mr. Sharp; I then lost sight of them, because of a coach passing, directly as the coach passed, Wightman ran across the way, and I saw him with the handkerchief in his hand, the other got into the middle of the highway; Wightman he ran as hard as ever he could; I ran after Wightman, and as I ran I past Mackay; Mackay he saw me, he halloos out brush; I immediately ran after the prisoner Wightman; I overtook him about half up Chancery-lane; he threw the handkerchief from him, and it very near went down an area; but I just catched it; I have kept it ever since; when I had him by the collar I crossed

over the way, and asked Mr. Sharp if he had lost an handkerchief? he said at first he did not know he had, and then he put his hand into his pocket, and he missed it, he said if it was his there was G. S. on it; there was G. S. on it; and I have kept it ever since.

Prisoner Wightman. I would be very much obliged to you if you would send me for a soldier or a sailor.

JANES VAUGHAN sworn.

I saw the handkerchief taken; it was shewn to Mr. Sharp; I stopped Mackay.

Prisoner Wightman. As I was going up Chancery-lane I saw this handkerchief lay, and I picked it up, and this gentleman came up and laid hold of me.

Prisoner Mackay. I had been to my mother's, and was coming up Chancery-lane, and that gentleman catched hold of me, and charged me with the theft, and brought me over to this young lad; I never saw him with my eyes, never.

George Wightman GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

George Mackay GUILTY. (Aged 14.)

Sent to Sea .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-15

562. FRANCIS CONNOLLY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of August , a watch with an inside case made of gold, and an outside case made of base metal, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of Lettice Shelton , spinster .

MARSHALL SPINK sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, in Gracechurch-street; I produce a watch which the prisoner at the bar brought on Wednesday August the 14th, between twelve and one o'clock at noon; I had never seen the prisoner before; I am sure he is the man; he was with me a quarter of an hour; when he brought me the watch I asked him what he wanted to do with it? he said, to sell it; I then asked him what he asked for it? he said, five pounds; I asked him whose property it was? he said it was his own; I then enquired where he got it; he said that his uncle gave it him, or left it him, I don't know which; but that he was going abroad and should have no use for it, and therefore he would sell it; I told him I did not believe it was his own property, and should stop it and him; I called a constable and charged him with him, and took him before the Lord Mayor; he persisted in the same story; I have the watch here; it is a watch inside case gold and outside case base metal; I was at Windsor the week before, and I went into the watch maker's house that had the watch to repair.

Q. Did you make observation enough of the watch to know it again? - I did, immediately as I saw it I said it was the watch I saw before at Windsor.

Q. How came you to see it at Windsor? - I went in to ask the widow how she did, and as the watch was hanging I took the watch out of the window, and opened it and looked at it, it was at a person's whose name is Wynn, she is here; this was the week before.

Q. What is there remarkable about this watch that you knew it again? - I knew it by the outside case, and I knew the maker's name.

HANNAH WYNN sworn.

I am a widow; I keep a shop at Windsor ; I am a watch maker. This watch was in my shop, I saw it on Friday the day that it was lost out of the shop, I believe between the hours of eleven and twelve the Friday before that Wednesday.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner was seen in your shop? - I did not see him, I was up stairs; I know the maker's name of the watch, James Allen ; I had it for to repair it between a fortnight and

three weeks in the shop; I am certain it is the watch because I took it out of the window every night.

SARAH SMALLMAN sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Wynn, I saw the prisoner in the shop on Friday the day that the watch was missing, between eleven and twelve; he came in and asked if we had any such thing as a second hand seal, my mistress was up stairs, and I told him I would go and ask if she had any such thing; and I left him in the shop; I am sure that is the same man, I never saw him before he was in our shop; I was not gone above a minute and I came down, and told him we had no such thing, and then he went out of the shop; my mistress came down about a quarter of an hour afterwards and missed the watch; the watch hung up at the window.

Q. Was the prisoner while he was in the room near that window? - I did not see him.

Prisoner. I was in the ranks when she had the regiment over hauled, and they took hold of another man. - I went to look him out, but they laughed and made such jeer that I could not pick him out; I should have known him if he had been out by himself; I knew him immediately before the Lord Mayor.

Court to Mrs. Wynn. It is said to be the property of Letitia Shelton , how came it at your house? - It was delivered into my hands to be repaired; it was out of repair; it was in the window in the course of the day.

FRANCIS BAILEY sworn.

I am the constable. On the 14th of August I was called to take possession of the prisoner in Gracechurch-street, there was a mob with him, it was at Mr. Spink's door, and Mr. Spink had the watch in his custody. (The watch produced.)

LETITIA SHELTON sworn.

I have had the watch about six years; I have no doubt about it being mine; I left it at Mrs. Wynn's the 15th of July.

The prisoner called his serjeant and three of his comrades who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Fined 1 s. and to be taken back to his regiment.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-16

563. JOHN MEARS was indicted for stealing seven iron pigs, value 2 l. 5 s. two pieces of pig iron, weight 187 pounds, value 5 s. the goods and merchandise of Richard Crawshaw , William Crawshaw , and William Thompson , in a barge called the Joseph, belonging to Robert Fletcher , in the navigable river of the Thames .

ELIZABETH PHELPS sworn.

My husband is a stone mason, but we look after the market boats that come to Paul's Wharf ; I was at the water side when the young man, the prisoner, came down to move his boat, he went down about nine or ten o'clock at night to move his boat out of the causeway, he said he was going to stow it into Mr. Crawshaw's Dock, because the market boats were coming in, and that he would make it fast there for safety, this was on Thursday evening the first of August.

Q. Have you any thing more to say about it? - No.

Prisoner. When I went down to my boat I found the iron in her at this time.

Court to Phelps. Did you observe any thing in it? - I did not, I cannot say either one way or the other.

WILLIAM MASON sworn.

I am a barge master; on the 1st of August my barge lay at the Hamborough Wharf, her head tied to Mr. Crawshaw's craft;

between the hours of ten and eleven I saw a person come along side of one of the crafts, I thought there must be somebody coming to steal things out of my barge, so with that I laid down in a small boat to watch, hearing and seeing a man move about, I heard the iron at work, first the upper side, and then the lower side of the craft, after that Robert Williams , he saw a young man coming over the water to the craft, and he hallooed, and he loosened his boat to get nearer along side of the craft where the iron was, and then the man shoved his boat off, and rowed over the water? I said to him if you had stopped a little longer I should have catched him. The prisoner went off with the bars, and Robert Williams called to Thomas Ball to help him come and row the boat after this man, and they went after him, and in about a quarter of an hour they came back, they took him, I saw him brought back to Paul's Wharf, the prisoner is the man that was brought back, but I cannot swear to the man that went off with the barge.

Q. When the man was brought back was he in a boat then? - Yes.

Q. Was any iron brought back? - Yes, seven pigs and two bits.

Q. Was the prisoner in the same craft as the iron was? - I cannot say.

Q. Did you see the iron that night? - I did.

Q. Do you know whether he was brought on shore on the same skiff as the iron was? - I will not say.

Q. Do you happen to know the prisoner? - Yes, very well.

Prisoner. Yes, I have done work for him, ask him whether he can give me a good character? - Yes, he was a sculler when he worked for me.

ROBERT WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a lighterman. Thursday the 1st day of August my business called me to take two craft over the water at eleven o'clock at night, I had got them over the water, and was driving down with them, and I heard a noise of iron grappling. I had two crafts and a boat with me at the same time, I was the width of the pile from the stairs of Mr. Crawshaw's Dock, about ten yards, which I supposed somebody was moving it in the craft of Mr. Crawshaw's Wharf; I called out to one Bensley who happened to be the constable of the night; Bensley is here, I thought he might very possibly have stepped in the craft half a minute or two, I heard a boat row away from the craft, and heard Mr. Mason say something to the man but could not tell what distinctly.

Q. How many people were in that boat that rowed away from the craft? - I did not perceive only one; I dropped my barge down, I asked another, and we followed the man that went off with the boat, and overtook him some little distance from London Bridge.

Q. Did you lose sight of the boat or man in the course of this business? - Yes, I lost sight of the boat, we rowed along side of him, and in bringing him back he wished that we would let him go on shore, and let him throw the iron overboard.

Q. Who was that man you rowed along side of? - The prisoner at the bar. He said we might dispose of his boat as we thought proper; we brought him up to Paul's Wharf stairs, we left the iron in charge of Mr. Crawshaw's watchman.

Q. What quantity of iron did you find in the boat? - Seven iron pigs and two pieces.

Q. Did you make observation enough of that iron to swear it is the same if you was to see it in court? - No, I did not, the prisoner was given in charge of the constable of the night with the iron.

Prisoner. He never knew any harm of me? - I have heard several times of his doing very bad things.

THOMAS BALL sworn.

I am a bargeman; between the hours of ten and eleven Thomas Williams called out to me, desired me to step into the skiff, and row after somebody, I did not know who, we got with the prisoner just after we past London Bridge, and took him, and brought him back to Paul's Wharf, and found seven pigs of iron in his boat, and two pieces, he begged and prayed of us to set him on shore, and throw the iron overboard, and to do what we would with the boat.

Q. What was done with the iron? - It was left on the top of the Causeway with the watchman, Cornelius Crawley .

Q. Should you know the iron again was you to see it? - Upon my word I should not. As we were rowing he put his hands to his face, and cried and said, now I am done if you will not let me go.

Prisoner. I have worked for him, he never knew any harm of me? - I have employed him several times but as to his character he bears but a very middling one.

Court to Ball. Was this craft a float or were they in dock? - They were a float in the dock.

JOHN PELHAM sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Crawshaw, son, and Thompson, the firm is Richard Crawshaw , William Crawshaw , and William Thompson .

Q. Do you know any thing that happened at that time yourself, or do you only speak to the property? - I was called up about a quarter past eleven, and heard that they had taken this Mears, with some iron, and I told them to take him to the watch-house; I was not out of my room. I lifted up the sash, I was three parts undressed, going to bed, I did not see him at all, it was very dark, I saw the iron in the morning, soon after six o'clock.

Q. Did you observe whether any iron was missing? - It was impossible to know out of about forty ton, I ordered our porter to take them into the warehouse and have them weighed, the pig iron found corresponded with the iron that was in the Joseph barge that very night.

Q. Where was this iron? - It was left with the watchman, on the public stairs, down on the Causeway. I examined the iron and found the mark, Donnington, on five whole pigs, and one piece and found the mark Ketley on two whole pigs, and one piece. The Joseph barge is the property of Robert Fletcher , at Queenhithe; this Robert Williams works for him on it; before I went to bed that night I had been out on the stair head to call the watchman, to see if any fresh craft had come in, and called out watchman three times, he did not hear, and then I went into the counting house, and knocked with my stick very hard, and he came out rubbing his eyes, and I went in, as soon as I got in almost, I heard this man was brought back; this Joseph barge lay in the second tier.

Court to Williams. Did either of you examine what was written on the barge over night? - I did not. I observed the mark of Donnington and Ketley on it.

Q. Did you see that Donnington and Ketley on it the over night? - The same night or the next morning, I saw it when I brought it back.

Court to Hall. Did you make the same observation? - I did not.

Prisoner. When I went to the water side to take my boat away I found the iron in my boat, and if they had let me alone I should have come down and told them so. I know no more about the iron coming into

the boat than the greatest stranger in the world; when they came to me I only asked them to put me on shore; says I, you know where to find me.

CATHERINE CRAWLEY sworn.

My Husband is a cordwainer, the prisoner lodged with me a year wanting one week, he paid me honest; I have known him going on of three years, I never knew any harm of him.

Court to Pelham. What is the worth of this iron? - There is seven hundred weight a quarter and twenty one pounds it is worth eight shillings a hundred. I put 2 l. 10 s. at Guildhall, I have exceedingly undervalued it.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-17

564. ALICE HOLT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , a tin nutmeg grater, value 1 d. six guineas and two half guineas, the goods and monies of David Mahony , in the dwelling house of David Selway .

ELEANOR MAHONY sworn.

I am the wife of David Mahony ; the prisoner went out and bought a parcel of toys at Bartholomew fair.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I do, she is my landlady's daughter, I lodge with her mother; her name is Mary Holt . The prisoner came home from the fair with a great parcel of toys, which I have in my hand here, the 5th of September, and coming home from the fair she came into landlord's house who is here; and she came down into the cellar, and she brought a great big doll down into the kitchen, that I suppose cost a shilling; she brought all these things in, and put them on the table; with that I went up stairs, and I saw all these lay on the table and I suspected her in a minute, that she had taken the money.

Q. What money? - My money.

Q. Had you lost any money? - Yes.

Q. How much? - Seven guineas.

Q. When? - I did not see it since the 25th of last month, they were in a box under the prisoner's mother's bed, and the key was by my side; I put them in the box in a nutmeg-grater.

Q. When did you miss them? - The very first day of this month I was at this box.

Q. On your missing them what did you do? - I cried and roared when I missed it out of the box, and I suspected nobody but the mother; I suspected the mother all along till I saw the prisoner come home from the fair; and when I see these things on the table, I said she took the money; she said I told a lie, she did not take it, so with that I called the watchman, and I gave her up in charge to the watch, and he took her to the watch-house that night, and she owned it there before me, that she had taken the money.

Q. Was you present? - I was.

Q. What was the person's name she owned it to? - Rumley.

Q. How old is the prisoner? - Turned of ten.

WILLIAM SELWAY sworn.

I keep the house where this robbery is supposed to be committed, it is a publick lodging house, the mother of the prisoner at the bar rents an apartment of me, and the prosecutor is a kind of a lodger of her's. On Sunday week last there was a rumour that the prosecutor had lost seven guineas out of a box that was locked; I would wish to remark that at the same time there was another box of the prosecutor's,

on the premises which stood open always unlocked, in which was contained a number of articles of wearing apparel, besides a watch, every article of which was safe, not the least thing missing. Accordingly there was nobody could give an account how this money went, or when it went, nobody could be suspected, but the mother of the prisoner at the bar, because she had a key that opened the box; nothing more transpired than on the Thursday following I was standing at my door, and the child, the prisoner at the bar, came home from Bartholomew fair, she had got a parcel of toys in her pin before, she told me what she had got, I desired her to let me look at them, I said there was a great many more than she could come by as she ought; I immediately took her in doors, and began to take her to task, how she came by these toys, she first told me that she got them by a whirligig thing; while I was interrogating her about the toys the prosecutrix came up into my apartment, she cries directly that these toys were purchased with her money.

Court. And you told the child she had better tell the whole? - Certainly. Then the prosecutrix seemed dissatisfied and she insisted on the prisoner being charged with the watch. And I must say that where promises failed there were threats used to get her to confess.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-18

565. JOHN CROW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a man's cloth jacket, value 2 s. the goods of James Till ; a hemp halter, value 4 d. 14 pounds of clover and rye grass, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Richard Rock .

JAMES TILL sworn.

Q. Did you lose a halter and a man's cloth Jacket? - Yes.

Q. What are you? - I am a carman .

Q. Was the prisoner your fellow servant? - No.

Q. Did you know him before you lost this? - No, I never see him before to my knowledge. I was going up Oxford-road and I lost the cloth jacket and half a truss of hay, and the hempen halter, it was taken off the carriage. I driving the horses of the cart along, a gentleman of the opposite side of me, called to me and said, farmer, you are robbed; I turned myself round and saw the prisoner with the things on him; I apprehended him and he acknowledged himself in a fault.

RICHARD ROCK sworn.

I am the owner of the carriage; I did not see the robbery.

Till. I found the clover on him and he dropped the jacket just before I came to him.

Q. How do you know it was the same? - I saw this man running away from the carriage with a halter; I brought the jacket back, I can swear to it, he dropped it just before I came to him; I did not pick up the halter, I left that in the yard.

Prisoner. I know nothing about the jacket, I picked up a bit of clover which I saw laying in the street, I picked it up in the middle of the highway road; he knocked me down with his whip, and I got up and returned the blow, and he knocked me down again and offered to fight me for robbing the carriage of the clover.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Imprisoned six months in the house of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-19

566. JOSEPH OSLAND was indicted for stealing, on the first of August , a cloth great coat, value 12 s. the goods of Richard Parish .

RICHARD PARISH sworn.

I was going up St. John's-street five weeks to-morrow, Thursday, I lost a great coat, I was turning into Woodbridge-street, going under the gateway, I went up the gateway, and as soon as I was up the gateway I missed the great coat, and I looked about and I saw this young fellow running away with it; it was on the tail of the waggon, it was an open waggon, there was nothing in it but a bit of hay besides that, it was at eleven o'clock in the morning, I stepped round the corner and hallooed out stop thief! and this good man took hold of him that is here in court, his name is Honiborne; he and I found the coat on him. (The coat produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. Did you see me take that coat? - No, I see you running with the coat.

Court. How far was he from the waggon when you first saw him? - About half an hundred yards or it may be an hundred.

Q. Was there any body else between you and him that could have taken it and dropped it? - No.

- HONIBORNE sworn.

I was standing at the John of Jerusalem the end of Aylesbury-street, and I saw Osland go by; about ten minutes afterwards I saw him return with a coat under his arm, and I heard the cry of stop thief! and I ran out, and he throwed the coat at the prosecutor, and I laid hold of him.

Q. Did you see him throw the coat? - Yes, and I asked him how he came by it, he made me some very frivolous answers, I cannot say what he said, he was rather frightened at the time. I saw him throw the coat from his arm.

Prisoner. I was going up St. John-street, just as I got to Woodbridge-street, a man ran out before me, and just as I

got up there, I saw that coat lay up by the side, and then one man laid hold of me and said you have got my coat, and I gave it him; the man ran right across the way, right over.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY. (Aged 22.)

Recommended by the Jury on account of his character .

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the first London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-20

567. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , a plough plane, value 12 s. the goods of Richard Harding .

RICHARD HARDING sworn.

I am a joiner and carpenter by trade, I live in Crown-court, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square; I lost a plough plane.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before you lost the plane? - No, I did not; I found my property at a pawnbroker's; I had seen it about a quarter of an hour before; the maker's name is Hampton, I lost it from Mr. Sylvester's shop where I worked in Swallow-street .

HUMPHRY BLADON sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Piosienezi; the prisoner at the bar pawned a plough plane with me, I had seen him before, I have the plane here, it has been in my master's possession ever since. On the 27th of June, the prisoner pledged a plane with me for five shillings, in the name of James White , on that very day in the afternoon, sometime, I cannot say particularly to the hour, the prosecutor and some others came to enquire if I had taken any planes in. The next day I stopped him when he came with a saw.

Harding. I am certain the plough plane is mine; I lost it on the 27th of June.

Prisoner. I was coming along from my dinner, I met a woman in the street, she said, carpenter , will you buy this tool of me? I said, no, I have no use for it, says she I should take it as favour if you would, I have got no money, and my husband has left me, you shall have it worth your money; says I, what do you ask for it? says she, five shillings, says I, it is worth more if all the tools were to it, on condition you will fetch this plough in one month, or six weeks, I will take it of you, and if you will bring the remainder of the bits I will give you some more on it, that is all. I took it to this pawnbroker because I could not do without money.

- BAKER sworn.

The pawnbroker sent to Bow-street for an officer, and I went and apprehended the man, and took twenty-six duplicates of all carpenters tools, and among the rest of this plane.

GUILTY . (Aged 64.)

Imprisoned two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-21

598. SAMUEL SAUNDERS was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of August , thirty-eight pounds weight of copper, called unwrought copper, value 1 l. the goods of Thomas Hodges and Benjamin Watson .

SAMUEL JACKSON sworn.

On the 5th of last August this piece of copper was landed at Brewer's-key, with a quantity of other goods; I am clerk to William Watson and Thomas Hodges ; Brewer's-key is next to our docks; after it was landed I put it under

some boxes of fruit, of raisins, as it remained in the King's charge, till such times as we knew what was to post; in the evening between six and seven o'clock, I went down to put a watchman over them, they were landed between twelve and one o'clock, and I perceived the box of fruit to have been moved from where I put them, and I moved the box where I saw they were put; and I thought perhaps the man that moved them might have put them under the box again; I saw they were gone; I made enquiry if any person there had seen any body move them, I went to a person's house that moved them, and asked if he had seen any copper that lay under the boxes? he said no, in the mean time there was a person came and told me there was a man stopped with a piece of copper, I went down to the office in Ayliff street, and they shewed me the copper.

Q. Did you know it again? - I did, I am sure it is the same, because of a particular mark, it is here, he was not examined that night, the justice put it off till Wednesday.

Q. Who stopped him? - Bare.

JOSEPH BARE sworn.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner at any time? - Yes, on the 5th of August, between six and seven in the evening, I see him have this copper wrapped up in a coat at a place called Manor-row in a direct line from Brewer's Key; I suppose not above five or six hundred yards I cannot exactly tell the ground, I saw the prisoner have something very heavy in his possession, I asked him what he had? he said he had some iron, I told him I must examine it, I am an officer, then when I examined it, it appeared to be copper, I took him into custody, I took him up to the Police office, in Whitechapel, then I went down to one Mr. Hunter's, that belongs to the keys, and told him that I had apprehended a man with some copper, if he should hear of any being lost. (The copper produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I picked it up at Iron gate, that is where I got it.

GUILTY

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-22

569. ELIZABETH HARPUR was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of December , two linen sheets, value 6 s. two woollen blankets, value 2 s. a feather bolster, value 2 s. the goods of William Compton , in a lodging room, in his dwelling house, let by contract to Jonathan Harpur , her husband, to be used by him and her .

SARAH COMPTON sworn.

I keep a lodging house, my husband has been gone from me these four years; I let lodgings to the prisoner, and her husband, they both came together, for three shillings a week, it was a ready furnished lodging, one room; her husband went away and left her, I asked her what she had made away with since her husband had been gone, she said a bolster, and one sheet.

Q. Did not you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - I did not.

Q. What did you tell her to induce her to confess? - I did not tell her any thing, I told her I must have my property, I lost almost every thing in the room, I lost two linen sheets, two woollen blankets, and a feather bolster; Mr. Milton the pawnbroker has them, she said they were at Mrs. Brown's.

THOMAS MILTON sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Brown; an apprentice.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to your shop? - Yes, on the seventh and eighth of December, the 13th of May, and 5th of July.

Court to Compton. Can you swear to your blanket? - Yes.

Court to Milton. When was it pawned?

- On the 7th of December. (Deposed to.)

Court to Compton. Do you know whether her husband had left her on the 7th of December? - I can say he left her three weeks wanting one day, when I took her up.

Court to Milton. What did she pawn on the 5th of July? - A bolster. (Deposed to.)

Q. Did her husband leave her before the 5th of July last? do you know when she was taken up, how long it was after the 5th of July last? - I cannot say, she said she had pawned it after her husband had left her.

Court to Milton. How long after it was pawned was it enquired for? - About a month.

Prisoner. My landlady on the day that the things were pledged, which was before my husband left me, she advised my husband to leave me, and she took of my husband last Tuesday, she took fifteen shillings for these things, and he slept there that night.

Prosecutor. He did sleep there that night, but the fifteen shillings was for rent, they owed me twenty-four shillings for rent.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-23

570. JOHN HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , two silver table spoons, value 1 l. and two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. the goods of John Wilson .

JOHN WILSON sworn.

I employed the prisoner to move my goods into Walker's-court, the bottom of Berwick-street, Soho , after we had moved the things down, he was helping me to put up some bedsteads, and his wife came for him to go and fetch a load of chairs from Temple Bar, about half an hour past four o'clock, I gave him liberty to go, I told him he might as well get another shilling as not. We went to go to tea about six o'clock, and my wife went to look for the spoons, and there was only one tea spoon there, and there were three put into the drawer; we missed all the spoons there but one, we missed two table spoons, and two tea spoons; after that I was advised to go to Marlborough-street, to take a warrant on suspicion, accordingly I did, and I went to Tottenham-court-road to enquire where he lived, and I found he lived at one Clark's, a broker, at the bottom of Tottenham court-road, while me and the constable were waiting there, he came with the load of chairs, which he went for, and then after that he left the chairs, and we were going to Marlborough-street with him, but before that the constable examined him, took him up to his lodgings, the two pair of stairs back room, and there was nothing at all on him, then we were going to Marlborough-street, and we met the justice, we then returned home again and let him go home with the chairs, and from there we went with him to St. Giles's watch-house, after that we came back again, and I came up to the door where he lodged, he was put into the watch-house, and his wife was coming out with something in her apron, I called to the constable, and he came up to her and told her he wanted to speak to her, and they came up stairs, and I followed after, the woman went up first, and the constable next to her, after that I followed and as soon as she got into the room, she throwed the table spoons out of window.

Q. Did you see her? - I was not in the room, but I heard the noise of the spoons, the constable got a ladder that happened to be in the yard, and I got over a little old building, I could see them out of the room, they were thrown on a building, on the other side over an old

building, on some tiles, one spoon was laying on the tiles that we could see it in the room, and the other was dropped in the gutter; I never saw the small spoons after? - They were the large spoons.

Prisoner. You sent me out for a bed key? - I did not.

Prisoner. I went out and could not get a bed key.

Court. How was it possible for him to convey these things away, as you was in the house? - I was going up and down stairs, and there was nobody in the house but him and me.

ELIZABETH WILSON sworn.

My husband gave me five spoons, two table spoons and three tea spoons, and bid me put them into my pocket least they should be lost by moving, I did so, I kept them in my pocket till we had done moving, I gave them then to a woman, Mary Burch , and then saw her put them into a small chest of drawers, in the one pair of stairs front room, I directed her to the drawer, and I saw her put them in, and I think it was three o'clock, or four, but I cannot be positive, but after that time I took Mary Burch with me to the other house to clean it up, therefore I left the prisoner and Mr. Wilson behind me.

Q. Did you lock the drawer? - No, when we came home which was about six, or half after six, I cannot be positive to the time, and going to tea I went up to the drawer where I saw her put them, and I could not find but one, I searched for the rest, I asked Mary Burch if she had moved them? she said she had not.

MARY BURCH sworn.

Q. Did you receive any spoons of the last witness Mrs. Wilson? - I put the spoons in the drawer, and left them there and went away with Mrs. Wilson to the other house.

Q. What time of the day did you go away? - I cannot tell, it was after dinner; I put in two table spoons, and three tea spoons.

DAVID COLE sworn.

I am constable of St. Giles's parish. On the 9th of July Mr. Wilson came to me for to serve a warrant on Mr. Hayes the prisoner at the bar, accordingly I went to the bottom of Tottenham-court-road, waited there a few minutes, and saw Mr. Hayes come with a load of chairs on his back; I told him that I had a warrant against him, on suspicion of taking some spoons away.

Q. You knew where his wife was at that time? - No, I did not I searched him and found nothing at all on him, I went up into his room, and found nothing there that could lead to any discovery.

Q. Did you see his wife there? - No, from thence I was going to Marlborough-street, the magistrate was going, from the office; I let him go home with his chairs then, and then I took him to the watch-house for that night.

Q. Had he an opportunity of going up stairs in that time? - No, after I had left him in the watch-house, Mr. Wilson was afraid he should never see his spoons any more, I told him I would call at the house and see if we could see his wife, accordingly we went and knocked at the door, twice or thrice, and we saw the prisoner's wife come out of the shop door, and going across Tottenham-court-road; seeing a woman and thinking it was Mrs. Hayes, I called to her, says I, Mrs. Hayes, I want to speak to you, we went into the passage, says she what do you want with me, I told her if she had no objection I wished to go up and look into her room; she asked me what I had done with her husband, I told her that he was in the watch-house, we went up stairs, as soon as ever we entered the room the window being up, the under sash being up, she put her hand in her apron, which was thrown over her arm, she took these two spoons from her apron, and she threw them out

of the window, she then said now what do you want with me? I called to an officer that was on the stairs, and told him to take care of this woman; I could see where one of the spoons were and stood in the room, I gave the woman into the constables custody, I went down, and by the help of a ladder, I got over a small building that was in the yard over some tiles. I found these two table spoons which I saw her throw out of the window, I took them, and kept them ever since.

Court to Wilson. Look at these spoons. - They are my spoons I know them by the cypher, it is my own cypher, I. E. W.

Q. Was the prisoner's wife at all at your house? - Yes, she was, she came to the stairs, but was never in the room.

Q. You went up and down stairs, so you cannot say? - I was not up the stairs while she was in the house, she only came to call him to fetch this load.

Prisoner. Mr. Wilson asked me if I had a bed key, I told him no, and I went out to get one.

Court to Wilson. What has his character been? - I know very little of his character.

Prisoner. I could not get a bed key, Mr. Wilson got a bed key before me; when I came in I went up and assisted him to put up a bedstead, with that I had orders to go down to Mr. Parker's, the pawnbroker, in Fleet-street, to carry some chairs to Margaret-street, so with that when I came by my own door, Mr. Cole told me that they had a warrant for me.

Court to Constable. What is his character? - I never heard any thing amiss of him before.

Prisoner. I never saw any thing of the spoons, nor nothing, no more if I was to die for them this very moment.

Court to Cole. Did he go with you readily? - He did.

- SHACKLETON sworn.

He was recommended to me between three and four years ago as a porter ; I have trusted him with goods to the amount of a thousand pounds; I have sent him to many noblemens houses, and he always behaved very honest.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-24

571. ELIZABETH JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , half a guinea ; the money of Gabriel Elliott .

GABRIEL ELLIOTT sworn.

I am a soldier in the guards , the first regiment. I was robbed of half a guinea, I don't know the day of the month nor day of the week particularly, it was about three o'clock in the morning; I light on a friend at the sign of the Feathers, a man that came out of the country, an uncle.

Q. Where are these Feathers? - In Westminster. At eleven o'clock I was getting into the street and wanted a bed, and this young woman said that she could help me to one; I was at the Feathers about ten o'clock at night, I left him about a quarter after ten, after that I went to the Barracks, I was too late, and then I went to search for a bed; I could not get in at the Barracks, I was locked out, I met with this girl, and she said she could help me to a bed.

Q. Where did you meet her? - I don't know, I was a stranger to the town then, it was eleven o'clock. I went with her to her home, to her lodging, it was across the sign of the Bell, in High-street; I gave her six-pence; I asked her what she must have for the bed? she said a

shilling; I said I would gave her sixpence, which I gave her, and went to bed; I had this other young fellow, another soldier with me; I was in bed an hour and a half, then the girl came up stairs and she got my breeches up, and I asked her what she did with them? they were put by the bed side, I was undressed in bed; I called after her; she left the place, and took the half guinea; the half guinea was in gold, I had no other money in my breeches besides that; then she ran down stairs, and said she would come back with the change for it.

Q. When had you seen your half guinea last before this? - I saw it when I got into bed, I am sure of that.

Q. Had you been drinking with your uncle? - Yes.

Q. Was you drunk? - No.

Q. Was this a new half guinea or an old one? - It was a new half guinea.

Q. Was it a spade half guinea? - I did not take particular notice, only the mark on the edge.

Q. Did she bring back the change? - No. The next morning I saw her in the public house, about seven o'clock, the sign of the Bell.

Q. Was not that the house you slept at? - No, it was the other side where we slept opposite.

Q. Are you sure the woman you saw at the Bell, was the same woman that recommended the lodging to you? - Yes.

Q. Have you seen the half guinea since? - But I never had it; I see it in the constable's hands the next day but one after I was robbed; I could not swear to it, it was like mine; when I laid it on her she denied it.

Q. Then you did not take this woman to bed to you at all? - No.

Q. You had no connection of any kind? - No.

Prisoner. Mr. Elliott, did not you ask me to go down for a pint of gin? - No.

Q. Did not you give me the half guinea out of your own hand to get change? - No, I did not.

Court. Was you sober enough to know that? - Yes.

FRANCIS ARMITAGE sworn.

I am a soldier; I was with this young man at his uncle's; we left his uncle about eleven o'clock, we went to the Barrack, and we were locked out, they are at the top of St. James's-park; we walked about a good while before we could find any thing likely for a lodging, at last we went into a public house, in a street in Westminster, to ask the landlord if he could tell us where to get one, and this woman we went with her; she said she would find us a good bed for a shilling; the young man said he would give her six-pence; we went into the room, and got into bed, and she left the room; after we had been in about half an hour she came into the room, and took this young man's breeches up and put her hand into his pocket, and took something out.

Q. Did you see her take the half guinea? - No, I did not see her take any thing out. As she was a going out of the room, this young man hallooed out to her to leave the half guinea, that she had no business with it; she went down stairs with it, and said she would go and get silver for it, but did not return with the silver, and we got up, then I went to my duty, and left the young man to look after the half guinea; I returned again there in about an hour, and he had found the woman quite in liquor in the public house opposite where we had the bed, and he desired her to give him the half guinea; she said she had none; after that she said that he gave it to her to go and get

change. The young man finding that his half guinea was nearly gone promised her something if she would give him the rest; and she replied that she would not; the young man after that proferred to let her off stealing the half guinea if she would pay a quart of gin; she said she would not; he told her he would send the constable and take her up; she told him he might fetch one, and I went for one, and the constable came and took her to prison.

Q. Do you know any thing about the half guinea in the hands of the constable, that he has been talking about? - It is the half guinea produced that she paid for the liquor.

Q. Do you know that he had a half guinea? - Yes.

Q. Did you see it? - I did not.

Q. Then as to the half guinea that she paid at the bar, you did not see it paid there? - I did not.

Prisoner. I wish to know whether you did not see him give me the half guinea to get change? - I did not; I saw him give her six-pence before we got to bed.

Q. Did he give her the half guinea when she came in afterwards? - He did not.

Q. Had either of you any connection with this woman? - Not while I was there.

- sworn.

I keep the Bell; the woman lodges almost opposite my house; this woman came in about six o'clock, when the constable took her out of my house; I says to her, Bet, what might you want? she makes answer, nothing; I said to her, you had better go to bed, you are in liquor; she sat down in my tap room near seven o'clock; the soldier came in and says, damn you, you bitch, where is my money?

Q. Did she give you that morning any half guinea? - No. By and by, when the soldier could not get the half guinea, he says to her, give me the change; he says give me three half crowns, and if you cannot give me three give me two, and so he came to a quart of gin; that is all I know.

RALPH STAMPS sworn.

I am a publican; I keep the sign of the Angel, in Tothill-street; I served half a pint of gin to a girl, but I cannot say to that girl, I was very busy just then, and I gave silver for half a guinea, which I have got here sealed up.

Q. Do you know the morning the soldier was robbed? - I don't know; I never saw the soldier till I saw him at the office, in my life.

JAMES BLIGH sworn.

I am the parish constable; I apprehended the woman at the desire of Armitage, the 22d of last month, I apprehended her at the Bell, in Westminster.

Q. Did you take any thing on her? - I produce nothing. The prisoner told me that she had got the gin at the Angel, at Mr. Stamp's house, and she had spent the half guinea; so I concluded that was the proper place to apply to see whether the half guinea would answer to what was lost.

Court to Stamp. You produce the half guinea that a woman gave you? - I have got a half guinea, but I am not sure it is the same.

Bligh. After that she told me it was at the Castle, in Peter-street where she changed the half guinea; so I went there to Mr. Adams.

JOHN ADAMS sworn.

Q. Do you know the day the soldier was robbed? - I recollect the prisoner coming in one morning about four o'clock, they asked for change for half a guinea; I gave it them, and kept the half guinea, and have got it, I don't know that it is the same.

Prisoner. Two soldiers came up to me and asked then whether I could get them a bed? I paused a little and then I said I would for a shilling; they said they would give me six-pence; we agreed for a shilling; when I came up stairs they gave me half a guinea to change, to get some gin; the soldier gave me one six-pence, and pulled off his waistcoat and shirt, and laid it on the chair, and wanted me to take them till he gave me the other six-pence; he got into bed and set up in the bed naked as he was, and gave me the half guinea, and I went down and got the gin, and I came in about six o'clock in the morning and gave him the change, and went out again, and when he came to ask for the change I had but two-pence in my pocket; the half guinea he gave me, and that was the way the change went; he told me if I would give him three half crowns he would let me go, and then he came to five shillings and then to a quart of gin. But the next day, when I came to him, I wanted to give him five shillings, but the other would not let him take it.

Court to Armitage. Did she come in at six o'clock in the morning to bring the change? - She did not.

Jury. Did you see the woman take the breeches and search the pocket? - I saw the woman take the breeches up from the bed side, and saw her put her hand into the pocket and take out something, but I don't know what it was.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-25

572. HENRY OLIVER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , twenty eight pieces of woollen cloth, value 18 s. twenty pieces of buckram, value 3 d. four yards of stay tape, value 1 d. twelve small pieces of canvas, value 2 d. one hundred gilt metal buttons, value 9 d. the goods of John Irwin .

JOHN IRWIN sworn.

I am a taylor ; I keep a house in Artichoke-lane, Wapping. On the 13th of July, Saturday, I lost the articles; I missed them first between five and six in the afternoon, from a public house; I did not see the prisoner take them, they were all in one bundle; it was at the Hampshire Hog, in Rosemary-lane , I went to this public house to get a pint of beer; while I was drinking it the prisoner came in, I see him come in, and he sat himself down by the side of me; I have known him for years by sight; there was a fire called while I was sitting, and I went to the door to see the fire, and while I was gone the prisoner went away with the bundle; I had left it on the seat by the side of where I sat; I did not see him any more till I see him the Monday morning after before a justice of peace; I saw the things on the same day, the shop keeper's man that stopped them had them, his name is James Healey .

JAMES HEALEY sworn.

I am a journeyman salesman. The prisoner, on Saturday the 13th of last July, after eight o'clock, came up the lane with a bag, Rosemary-lane, Mr. Harvey's apprentice asked the prisoner at the bar, if he wanted to buy or sell? he went in doors and took the bag into the shop with him, I see him; I told him the goods were not his; he said they were, and that he got them from on board a coasting vessel; but I knew better than that, I knew his face too well; I told him I would stop him, and the goods too; accordingly I sent for a

constable and the constable of the night has them, his name is Wilson; I believe I marked the goods and the bag too before they were delivered to him; I should know them again was I to see them; they are here, I brought them here.

Q. Of whom did you get them to bring them here? - I got them from this man; I only came in the coach with them, Alexander brought them, I only laid my hand on them; I took them from the prisoner the same afternoon as the goods were lost.

SAMUEL ALEXANDER sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Lloyd, a warehouseman and clothes seller; I delivered these goods to the prosecutor, John Irwin , this day, he works for my master; I had them from the justice to bring them here.

(Produced and deposed to by Healey, as the same he marked, and by Irwin, as his bag, the work he never looks at till he gets home; and Alexander deposes to the other things by his mark on them.)

Court to Alexander. You say you delivered these goods to John Irwin from your master, is he responsible for them? - He is.

Prisoner. I was in that house drinking a pint of beer, and I remember there was a confusion about the fire; but I never saw any property, nor did not know that he had any there. I have been in his Majesty's service this nine and thirty years.

GUILTY . (Aged 69.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-26

573. BENJAMIN BLACKWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , a watch with an inside case made of base metal, and the outside case of shagreen, value 1 l. a steel watch chain, value 1 s. a gilt seal, value 3 s. a base metal watch key, value 1 d. two cornelian seals set in base metal, value 1 s. one guinea and a half, and seven shillings and six-pence in monies numbered, the goods chattles and monies of Thomas Milne , in the dwelling house of John Bramsgrove .

THOMAS MILNE sworn.

I am a servant to the Margrave of Anspach; I called for a bed in John Bramsgrove 's house on the 17th of August, and there I was robbed, it was on a Saturday night, I don't know what time, it was when I was asleep; I went to bed about quarter or half past ten, the money was in my pocket, and the watch on the table by the bed side, the money was in my breeches pocket, which lay in a chair by the bed side, there was no one else lay in the room; I did not lock the door when I went to bed, I awaked in the morning, I believe nearly about five, and discovered I was robbed; I have never found my property again, no part of it, I cannot by any means impute it to the prisoner, I know nothing about the prisoner, I believe it has never been traced nor found.

JOHN BRAMSGROVE sworn.

I don't know that this property has ever been found, but the prisoner was missing out of my house that morning, about four o'clock, and I knew nothing more of him till he was taken.

- HANCOCK sworn.

I am an officer; I never found any thing on him; I apprehended him.

ROBERT BUTTERWORTH sworn.

I am a watchman; I never saw any watch or any thing on the prisoner; a little

before two o'clock, there was somebody opened the public house door, and I stood close by the door to see if they were not bringing something out, and they saw me and they shut to the door again.

Hancock. When I went to the yard where he was, he said, d - your eyes what is all this about, they say I have stole a watch, and a purse of gold, but he damned his eyes, and said that he knew nothing at all about it.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-27

574. MICHAEL ANCEAUME was indicted for stealing on the 31st of January at the parish of St. George's, Hanover-square , a gold stud, value 5 s. two gold ornaments for the ears, value 10 s. the goods of Charles Grant , Esq . commonly called Viscount de Vaux .

AN INTERPRETER sworn.

CHARLES GRANT sworn.

Q. Did you lose a gold stud, and two gold ornaments for the ears? - I did; I live with Mrs. Jones, South-street, Grosvenor-square ; this man was my secretary , I took him on a journey; I am sure he took the ear rings from me in my house, I don't know when, but they were found in the prisoner's pocket, they belong to my daughter, and she had them.

Q. How long did you see them before they were stole? - I don't know, I really cannot say.

Q. Was you present when these ornaments were found on the prisoner? - I was not.

Q. Do you know any thing of this matter of your own knowledge, or who does? - I know nothing of the matter myself, I know them to be my daughter's.

Q. In what part of the house were they? - I believe in her bed chamber; this studd is my own, I lost it about two months since, a week after my daughter set off for Scotland, I wore it myself, I see it at the end of July, or the beginning of August, I lost it from upon my table in my closet.

Q. How long was it before the prisoner was apprehended, that you saw the stud? - I never had any suspicions of the man, I had him about six months with me.

Q. That is not an answer? - About eight days? he took papers besides these things, and the lock was broke, and the prisoner menaced me to assassinate me.

CHARLES JONES sworn.

I lodge in the same house with the prosecutor, I was present when the prisoner's trunk was searched, before the search the Viscount asked him if he knew any thing of the gold stud that was lost, he answered no, that he knew nothing of it, in searching we came to a box in which was some pencils inclosed in bran, and underneath the bran we found the stud, the prisoner upon that said your daughter gave it me, the Viscount asked him why he did not say so before? he said he did not wish to lead the daughter into any strait; the stud was given to me till we came to the magistrate at Bow-street, at which time I gave it to the Viscount, I have marked it with a cross on the back of it.

Court to Prosecutor. How old is this daughter? - Twenty-one.

Prisoner to Prosecutor. What did you do with the letter that you took from me which was sent by your daughter to me? - I found no letter from my daughter.

Q. I asked him to return the letter from your daughter, dated the 10th of July.

Q. You confessed before the justice that there was a letter writ to me? - I have one in my hand directed to him, but it relates to me.

Prisoner. I wish to see the letter that his daughter sent to me the 10th of July? - There is no such letter.

Prisoner. I desire all the things taken from me may be produced in court, and this letter with them.

Prosecutor. The letters are not here.

Prisoner. I wish the justice of peace to prove it.

Court. The justice of peace is not here.

Prisoner. I wish to have the things again, there were six letters, and four letters for me.

Prosecutor. They were letters relative to business between me and my daughter, and the justice gave them me again as not relative to this business.

Jones. At the time the trunks were searched, there was a carpenter called in to see the search.

Court to Prisoner. Have you any witness? - This gentleman knows I am a french lawyer.

Prosecutor. I do not know whether he is an advocate or not, he may have been for what I know.

Prisoner. I have got many foreigners who know that I was an advocate, but they are not here.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-28

575. JOHN BONNER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , a silver watch, value 4 l. a base metal watch key, value 1 d. the goods of Thomas Webb , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS WEBB sworn.

I used to drive a team for Sarah Powel in Cumberland-street; I lost my watch at the sign of the Ship, in Shoreditch , from the room where I slept, I slept there about six months, I missed it the 12th of July, in the night, I went up about four o'clock in the afternoon, and my watch was then hanging on a nail in the cupboard, where I slept, I went about five, I returned about four o'clock in the afternoon, and I see my watch then, I missed it between seven and eight, and the next day this lad, the prisoner, sent a note to me to let me know where my watch was, his master gave me the note, Mr. John Smith , he is the publican of the ship, the house where I lodge, the boy was a servant in the house, I went down with the note that night to the pawnbroker, Thomas Nightly , and I found the watch there.

Court to Prisoner. How old are you? Twenty-two.

THOMAS NIGHTLY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, East Smithfield, about a mile from the Ship in Shoreditch; the prisoner at the bar came to me on the 12th of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon, he brought this watch and asked me a guinea on it, he wanted to pawn it; I asked him whose watch it was, he said it was his own, I asked him where he lived, he told me no where, I asked him where he lodged last night, he said any where, where he could get a lodging; he then told me that he came from Dartford, in Kent, and that he had been there a hay making, and that he had got a brother, which got him this watch made for him, and that he had gave his brother money for it five years, for the purchase of this watch; I asked him where his brother lived? he could not tell; I then asked who made the watch? he said he could not tell I then took him down to the magistrate, and the magistrate committed him for further examination, and I had the watch in the mean time; the next day the prosecutor came to me.

JOSEPH CARR sworn.

I am in the picture line; I live in Nightingale-lane, the prisoner was coming by, and I stood in my shop the

12th of July, he said he was out of work and knew not what to do, for he was quite starving, but still says he, I have got a friend in my pocket, and he pulls out this watch, and he asked me where there was any pawnbroker hard by, and he would be much obliged to me to go along with him which I did. I brought him to Mr. Nightly, and he delivered the watch to Mr. Nightly, and Mr. Nightly stopped the watch.

Q. Do you know how it happened that a letter was written to Webb? - No. I know nothing about that at all. (The watch produced.)

Webb. It is my watch, it has my name on it, and the date of the year 1793.

Q. In whose house do you live? - John Smith 's house; it was taken from the room where I sleep; John Smith lives in the house.

Q. You say Smith gave you the letter from the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. Have you got that letter here? - No.

Q. How do you know it was written by the prisoner? - I don't know, but they told me so.

Prisoner to Webb. Are there not more lodgers in the house, and in the same room? - Yes, there is one man.

Prisoner. Please to hear what I have got to say, I will make it as plain as I can. On Friday dinner time, between two and three, I was taken ill with a violent pain in the stomach, and I continued so till the hours of four and five; my master, Mr. Smith, saying to me you don't look well John, I said I am very poorly, but I will finish getting the pots in, and if I am not better I will go and lay down; between four and five I had occasion to go to the privy, as soon as I entered the privy there laid this watch; I took it up, put it into my pocket, not knowing where it belonged to, and finding I wanted other necessaries more than this watch, I thought I might make free to lay it for a little money.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I am the master of this boy, he lived with me six months, he was an excellent servant the time he was with me.

Court. Here has been a talk about a letter which was not explained to me, do you know any thing at all about it? - No. I had him from the office in Houndsditch; the prosecutor Webb lodges in my house now.

JOHN HELM sworn.

The prisoner lived servant with me between two and three years, about two years and a half ago; I don't know what he has done since, he behaved extremely well, I always found him very honest; I have thought at times that he was a little deranged in his mind, at times he did not know what he was about; I mentioned it to his mother more than once or twice, she told me that when she was with child with him, she had a kick from a horse, from which she always found something like a moon light night.

CATHERINE TROUGHTON sworn.

I live in the neighbourhood of Mr. Smith; the prisoner seemed very assiduous about his master's business; there was a report about the neighbourhood they thought sometimes that he was rather deranged.

Court to Smith. Did you ever observe him deranged? - I cannot say that I did.

MARY GROVES sworn.

I can give him a very good character.

GUILTY,

Of stealing the watch but not in the dwelling house . (Aged 21.)

To go to Sea .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-29

576. RICHARD CLEMENTS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , a linen handkerchief, value 4 d, and four guineas, thirty-six shillings in monies numbered; the goods and monies of John Meredith the elder, in his dwelling house .

(The case opened by Mr. Gurney.)

SARAH MEREDITH sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor, John Meredith . On the 8th of August one Mrs. Berry sent her servant to me, and wished me to give her change for a five pound bank note; I directly went to my money which was the nearest, to give the change, and I had laid down the four guineas in gold in part of the change for the note, and was telling out the silver; I said to my daughter, inspect the silver, I am not clear it is all good; the child inspected the silver, and found one dubious; just at that juncture the man came into the shop, this was between eight and nine at night, and my daughter said this shilling looks dubious; the man asked for some stockings; I had some suspicion of him from his appearance; I changed the shilling, and he took the whole in a handkerchief that lay on the counter, and swept it all up into the handkerchief just at that instant as I changed the shilling; there was four guineas, and six and thirty shillings in silver; he jumped out of the shop immediately; my son was shutting up the shop and he pursued him; I thought at first it was no more than that, but I have recollected since that it must be near eight pounds.

Court. Are you sure it is the same man? - Yes, I am entirely positive.

JOHN MEREDITH the Younger sworn.

About a quarter past eight the 8th of August last, I was shutting up the shop, I saw the prisoner jump out of the shop, I pursued him, and I was not two yards from him till he was brought back; he ran about sixty yards; he was searched by the constable, but the money was not found on him. A man came up to him about sixty yards off, which I thought would assist me in taking him, but I was mistaken; but if he had an accomplice it is no wonder the money was not found.

SARAH MEREDITH the Younger sworn.

Q. Is that the person that came into the shop and went out again? - Yes, I am sure it is.

Q. Did you see the money taken from the counter? - I did; and I am sure it is the same person.

SARAH TAYLOR sworn.

Q. Are you sure that is the same person? - I am quite sure that is the person.

Prisoner. I was going to buy some leather at the leather cutter's; I had five shillings and four-pence farthing when that gentleman took me; I saw two men come out of the shop; this young woman hallooed out, and I ran after them into the ruins; and those that followed thought I was the person, and they chucked something at me, and stopped me, and brought me back.

GUILTY. Death . (Aged 26.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Recommended to mercy by the prosecutor .

Reference Number: t17930911-30

577. JOHN HARRIS otherwise HUMPHRIES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of June , a weather sheep, value 1 l. 8 s. the goods of Samuel Owen .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL OWEN sworn.

I am a butcher ; I live in Hanwell Heath. On the 25th of June I saw the the sheep on Hanwell Common , in the afternoon about three o'clock.

Q. Was there any marks about the sheep that you knew it to be your property? - There were. I never saw it afterwards; I went the very next day to fetch it up to kill it, then I missed my property; I have never seen the sheep again.

JOHN PALMER sworn.

I know the prisoner at the bar, I have known him some time, I worked for him, he was a drover .

Q. Do you remember any thing of seeing any sheep on the 26th of June? - It was on a Wednesday, I worked for him then; he sent me one road, and he went the other, and I met him down at Turnham Green.

Q. Where was he coming from? - We came from market, from Hayes and Southold market, and we were to meet at Turnham Green, he said there were fifteen to go into Mr. Hartwell's house, and he put fifteen in, as I thought there were fifteen, and then he caught another, which he said was an odd one, and he forgot to mark it. I saw him put it in along with the others.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor, Mr. Owen? - I do.

Q. Had the prisoner worked for Mr. Owen? - Not at that time, nor while I worked for him he did not.

Court to Owen. Had he worked for you? - He had drove my things for three or four years for his master and himself; he knew my mark as well as I did myself, it was a ruddle mark down the head and over the shoulder.

Prisoner to Palmer. Did I put any more than fifteen in? - I cannot say, I did not count them, but I thought that you had put fifteen in before.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-31

578. MARY DAVIS otherwise HAYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of August , six linen shifts, value 2 l. 2 s. three linen napkins, value 3 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. three check linen aprons, value 6 s. two linen waistcoats, value 2 s. three silk handkerchiefs, value 6 s. two linen pockets, value 1 s. a lace muslin cap, value 2 s. a silk hat band, value 2 s. three linen towels, value 1 s. a pair of womens leather shoes, value 2 s. the goods of John Dobson , in his dwelling house .

MARY DOBSON sworn.

My husband keeps a public house , the sign of the Hanover-square, in St. George's row .

Q. Was the prisoner your servant ? - I hired her at a shilling a week to work at her needle, and her victuals and drink; I don't know that she stole the things; I missed several things while she was with me, several small articles of linen and wearing apparel, but after she was gone from me about a fortnight or three weeks, I had reason to suspect her; in consequence of that I did nothing till I missed my things further, I did not go after her, my servant went after her; I know my property; she had access to these things, and had an opportunity of going to these things where they were kept; the things are here.

ANN BEARD sworn,

I am the servant to Mr. Dobson; I know the prisoner at the bar, I don't know any thing of her taking the things,

when my mistress missed them she desired me to go along with the constable, John Baker, to see for the woman, we did not meet with her that evening; the next morning I found her in bed, the constable looked and found some duplicates, but nothing belonging to my mistress; when we were coming out, she confessed; the things were found at Mr. Moore's, a pawnbroker, in Broad-street.

THOMAS WATKINS sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Moore, a pawnbroker, in Bird-street; I remember the prisoner at the bar coming to my house, she was a customer of ours, she pawned four shifts, I have got them here, and a napkin, the shifts were pawned for two shillings a piece.

Q. Where they fine shifts? - Not very coarse, nor very fine; there was one sheet besides, and one pair of cotton stockings. I produce them they have been in my possession ever since.

Mary Dobson I know the shifts by the wear, and the cutting them out; I know the napkin by a particular mark, there is a pair of cotton stockings marked M. H. that was the initials of my name before I was married; I know the sheet.

Prisoner. She gave me the things to make, I was very much distressed, and I pawned them.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of twenty shillings . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-32

579. SARAH SMITH otherwise Sarah Thompson, otherwise Sarah Paterson was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of June , a stuff petticoat, value 10 d. two cloth great coats, value 1 l. a linen shirt, value 5 s. three silk handkerchiefs, value 7 s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 6 s. three cotton handkerchiefs, value 3 s. three linen handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two yards of silk, value 6 s. two linen shifts, value 5 s. two cotton gowns, value 1 l. a stuff gown, value 3 s. three pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. two pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s. the goods of William Doggett in his dwelling house .

(The witnesses examined separate by the prisoner's desire.)

MARY DOGGETT sworn.

I am the wife of William Doggett ; we live in Cross lane, at the bottom of Newtoner's-street, Holborn, No. 2 , in the parish of St. Giles's, in the fields; I know the prisoner at the bar very well, by seeing her, I have known her a twelve month, I have nothing to say against her, no more than finding a petticoat on her that I lost in the robbery; my house was broke open the last day of May sessions, the 3d of June, on a Monday in the day time about four o'clock, this woman at that time was with the woman that lodges in my house, I don't know what she did, she was there with her, the lodger's name is Kate Wharton ; when we went home and found the house broke open, they said they were all out; after that robbery on the 3d of June, I missed all the things in the indictment; I was attending here all that day; we had eight search warrants that same night, but found nothing; afterwards these two women left my house, they were in my house for some time after that, I cannot say how long, I had no suspicion of them, they were in the house as much as three weeks, after they went both out of the house without my knowledge; and I lost a blanket, a flat iron, and a sheet. I was going up Parker's-lane one morning, and I saw an old petticoat of mine on this woman, as I was going across the street, I spoke to the woman where she lodged, and I asked the woman that lodged with me how she, the prisoner, got that petticoat;

I sent for an officer and took both the women up, and took them to Marlborough-street, and they were both committed, one for robbing the lodging, and she for the petticoat.

CHRISTOPHER SANDERS sworn.

I was an officer belonging to Marlborough-street at that time; I remember I was at Hicks's Hall with the prosecutor, and we were giving evidence against a man, in about two hours after I was home, I heard the prosecutrix's house was broke open; about the 24th or 25th of July last, I took the prisoner in company with one Catherine Wharton , I and another officer, we carried them up to Marlborough-street, and Mrs. Doggett said that she suspected the petticoat that the prisoner had on was her's, and if it was, she had bound the inside so particular that she should know it again; I took off the petticoat in the strong room, where they wanted to destroy it both of them, but I prevented them, and it was so as Mrs. Doggett said; I have the petticoat here. (Produced)

Court to Mrs. Doggett. Did you ever find any thing besides this petticoat that is mentioned in the indictment? - No, never. I had bound the petticoat the same morning, I had left it on the chest that was broke open.

Prisoner, Did not you swear to another person before the justice? - I took them both up; this was committed for taking the petticoat, and the other for robbing the lodging.

Prisoner I lived in this woman's house with the other young woman for the space of six months; for the time we lived there she often asked us if we would drink any thing, and was very sociable with us, we were there the time the house was broke open, she told us of it, and we said we were very sorry for it; this petticoat she lent the other young woman to clean her room in, we went away from her house and went to another house, and she came after us one day into Parker's-lane, and said, my husband cannot trust you any more rent, and she did not take us up till about a fortnight afterwards; she lent the petticoat to the other young woman that is now in Newgate, the other young woman may be a witness, because the bill is not found; the prosecutrix keeps a very bad house, harbours robbers, all thieves and girls of the town.

Court to Mrs. Dogget. What is your trade? - My husband is no trade at all; we keep an old iron shop .

Q. You don't keep a public house or any thing of that sort? - No, none at all.

Q. How many lodgers have you in your house? - I let out two rooms.

CATHERINE WHARTON sworn.

I know this petticoat, this gentlewoman lent it me to clean her room when I lived lodger in her house, and I lent it to that young woman at the bar. This woman keeps a very bad house and buying of stolen goods. She lent it to me, on my oath.

Q. How came you not to return it? - She told me often I might keep the petticoat, she never asked me for it in her life.

Q. Did the prisoner return the petticoat to Mrs. Dogget? - She took it off her at the justice's.

Q. How came the prisoner, Sarah Smith , to carry it away? - Because I lent it to her to wear, because she had no petticoat.

Prisoner. I call on Mr. Crocker who is here to speak what the character of the prosecutor is.

Crocker. I am here on other business.

Prisoner. I only wish him to be asked what sort of a house the prosecutor keeps?

- CROCKER sworn.

Provided there was a robbery done that

way I should have gone to Mrs. Dogget's house to have searched it.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-33

508. CHRISTOPHER SURRILES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the house of Alexander Peffers about the hours of nine in the night on the 5th of September , and burglariously stealing therein, a wooden box, value 6 d. a pair of linen sheets, value 1 s. a muslin apron, value 8 d. three pair of worsted stockings, value 1 s. and a dimity waistcoat, value 6 d. the goods of the said Alexander Peffers .

CHARLOTTE PEFFERS sworn.

I am the wife of Alexander Peffers , he is a soldier , he keeps a house, we live in Bow-street, Westminster , I lost my property the beginning of this month; my husband is abroad with the Duke of York. When I came home at nine o'clock at night I found my door open, I cannot say it was broke open, I did not see any mark of violence; I lost a sheet at that time.

Q. Do you remember what day it was? - It was last Thursday night.

THOMAS CLARKE sworn.

I am a broker, I buy and sell old goods, I keep a shop in Orchard street Westminster, I saw the prisoner at the bar last Thursday, and that was the first day that ever I saw him. I bought some goods of Mrs. Peffers and I employed this Christopher Surriles to carry them away, and at four o'clock in the afternoon I discharged him; the prosecutor came to me about half past nine in the evening and I found some things were lost; and I met the man a little before ten o'clock with this box and the things conveyed in it the same night; the box is present, I gave it to John Woodward .

Q. What employment is the prisoner? - I don't know.

JOHN WOODWARD sworn.

I received a box from the last Witness and a sheet, they have been in my possession ever since

Charlotte Peffers . This is my sheet, I know it by the marks, I missed this sheet first, and I lost the box while I went after the sheet.

Prisoner. This woman sent for me to move her goods, I came to her, she sent me first to a broker woman, in Little George-street, and that broker and she could not agree, and then she sent for Mr. Clarke, and he and her did agree; and he asked me to help him away with the goods, says she, I must have all the things out of my house immediately, because my house is indicted as a disorderly house, and I went and helped Mr. Clarke, and she said likewise that the house was over big of rent for her; she left these other things for me to take away, and she would have me to take them to any place I pleased.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you deliver him any goods that Clarke had bought of you? - Yes, but he was discharged by four o'clock in the afternoon; his landlord found the first sheet between his bed and sacking; John Woodward is his landlord.

Woodward. About half after nine last Thursday this woman came to me, and asked me if Clarke lived along with me? I did not know him by the name of Clarke, but I said, if she had lost any thing I would break open the door; I searched the premises, and I found nothing then; while we were talking at the end of the lane about this sheet, the prisoner at the bar comes along with the box in his arms, says she, that is my box; says I, how has

he got that box, says she I cannot tell, for I have got the key in my pocket, she said there were seven stockings in it, and a sheet, &c. after this I went to see if my own things were safe, and I turned up the bed, and between the sacking and tick, I found the first sheet, that I have produced, and I have had them in my custody ever since.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of 1 s. but not of the burglary . (Aged 24.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-34

581. JOHN WOOLLEY was indicted for making an assault on Jemima Carr , on the 5th of August , and putting her in fear and feloniously taking from her person and against her will a watch with an inside case and outside case made of base metal, value 3 l. a stone seal set in metal, value 6 s. a metal watch key, value 6 d. the goods of the said Jemima Carr .

FRANCIS RUSSELL sworn.

I am a watchman in St. George's parish; and when watch was called, and stop thief! I ran to assist, and I followed the prisoner up Conduit-street, and we brought him before a young woman, and she said he had robbed her; she was here yesterday to find the bill.

Jemima Carr was called on her recognizance.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-35

582. WILLIAM BRADSTREET was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of July , a silver spoon, value 1 l. a silver coffee pot, value 3 l. seven silver table spoons, value 4 l. a silver lemon strainer, value 10 s. two pair of plated candlesticks, value 10 s. four silver salts, value 1 l. 1 s. a silver cruit stand, value 15 s. four cruit glasses, value 2 s. a silver soup ladle, value 10 s. six silver tea spoons, value 9 s. three linen table cloths, value 10 s. a silver marrow spoon, value 4 s. the goods of Sir John Trevelyan , in his dwelling house .

RICHARD EDWARDS sworn.

I was Sir John Trevelyan 's butler, Sir John Trevelyan is in Somersetshire; his house in town is in Half Moon-street ; I was in town when my master lost this property.

Q. When did you see these things the last? - I have been ill with the gout these three months past, and I did not see them for several days, I was confined in my bed to the time they were stole; I did not see them for a fortnight before, I dare say; they were kept in a little room called the pantry, on the ground floor, it was unlocked I believe.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before these things were stole? - I have known him four years, he was my fellow servant, as under butler and footman .

Q. Was he so at the time these things were stole? - He was not; he had been discharged about two years, I don't know in what manner the things were taken way, I only come to prove the property.

ALEXANDER TATE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 4, Rider's-court, Leicester-fields; to the best of my knowledge, I took in this pair of candlesticks of the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Do you mean to speak positive? - I cannot positively swear to him, because I never see him before.

Q. Was the person any way like the prisoner? did it resemble him? - It did. They were pawned the 27th of July last,

for five shillings, the value of them might be nine or ten shillings; they were pawned in the name of John Brown .

Q. Do you remember what acc oun the prisoner gave of himself? - He came in the appearance of a gentleman, and asked me if I took in plated goods.

Q. Did he pawn any thing else besides that? - Nothing at all but these candlesticks,

Court to Edwards. Look at these candlesticks? - They are Sir John Trevelyans I am convinced they are, I have had them so often in my hand, the nozzel of one is bent; I have no doubt of them; these were some of the articles that were lost with the other property.

WILLIAM RADSHAW sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, in Queen Ann-street, East; I produce a desert spoon, here is a crest upon it, it was pawned by the prisoner at the bar (I am positive it was him) in the name of William Bradstreet , it was brought in the course of the forenoon, about twelve o'clock on the 9th of August, it was pledged for five shillings, it may be worth about seven shillings.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - Yes, several times; he had been my customer.

Edwards. It is Sir John Trevelyan 's, the crest is an owl.

HENRY BANK sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I live with Mr. Beachum, in Holborn; I produce two table spoons, they were pawned by the prisoner at the bar for eighteen shillings, in the name of Mr. Kendrick, by William Brown ; I had known him before, this was the 27th of July, he had brought things before that; he said he brought them from Mr. Kendrick, of Castle-court, Gray's inn; and he said he brought them from Mr. Kendrick.

Edwards. They are Sir John Trevelyan 's, they have the crest of an owl upon them; they are part of the property that is lost.

WILLIAM CHRISTIE sworn.

I keep a sale shop, a silversmith's, No. 33, Wardour-street, Soho; I have got two table spoons, a lemon strainer, two desert spoons, two sugar snuffers, two salts, half a dozen tea spoons, and four caster tops. I bought them of the prisoner, I knew him for two years or better, when I lived up in Queen Ann-street, I kept a pawnbroker's shop there; I always looked on him as a young gentleman that spent his property on women of the town, and that so he came to this; I always knew him by the name of Farmer; he first of all came to know if I would buy any tickets of plate that was in pledge; I told him I would not buy the tickets, but I would buy the plate if he would take it out; my reason was, because sometimes things were pledged for more than we could buy them for; he brought them, and I bought them of him, I gave him five shillings an ounce; here is above twenty ounces, I bought them at different times; I believe they were all in pledge, and he took them out, and brought them to me at different times.

Edwards. They are all Sir John Trevelyan 's.

HENRY CROCKER sworn.

I belong to Bow-street; in consequence of an information of Mr. Christie coming to the office, I attended Mr. Christie at his house, thinking the person would come again, and according to my expectation he came again, he was in the shop, and he had these pair of tongs in the scale, and Mr. Christie was going to weigh them; I asked him if they were his property? he said they were; I then took him into custody; he told me where his lodgings were, and I went there, and I found the glass casters at the lodging where he told me he lodged, No. 10 or 11, Litchfield-street, I think

it was, at his lodging I found different duplicates, which led to the pawnbrokers, some things pawned in his own name, and some in other names.

Edwards. These tongs are Sir John Trevelyan's.

Court to Edwards. How did you find the robbery out? - I heard an alarm in the family, and I went to this pantry, and found the things were gone.

Prisoner. What character did I bear during the time I was in the prosecutor's service? - For the first six months he behaved himself honestly to any thing that I know of, I never heard any thing otherwise; the latter part of the service I was not in town with him, and have nothing to say.

Prisoner. After the first six months I was put to a woman that Sir John Trevelyan kept, and there had every indulgence; after that I was taken into Mr. Edward's service again. I am unprepared for my trial; I have not one witness here; Sir James Sanderson , the present Lord Mayor, can give a character; the window has been shut for twenty years, that they suppose was broke open.

Court. You are not charged with breaking the house, only for stealing in the dwelling house.

Jury to Edwards. Did the prisoner use to frequent the house? - Not of late.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 25.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-36

583. MARY BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , nine shillings and six-pence ; the goods of Samuel Dunt .

SAMUEL DUNT sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I live with Mr. Rumbold, in Haydon-square. The prisoner took nine shillings and six-pence out of my pocket, on the 19th of July, between one and two o'clock in the morning, it was in Back-lane , I was going to see a young fellow home that was very much in liquor, into Old Gravel-lane, he was with me; his name is Stocking.

Q. Was you in liquor at all? - Yes, I was. The prisoner took this nine shillings and six-pence out of my pocket while I was on the bed; I was picked up in the street, and I went home with her.

Q. Where did you go? - I don't know the number of the house, it was in Back-lane; I went up to her lodgings, I had nine shillings and six-pence in my pocket when I went into the room; I believe in the whole of the time I was about an hour with her; I never saw the woman before to my knowledge.

Q. Was there any bed in the room? - Yes.

Q. Were either of you on the bed? - Yes.

Q. When did you miss your money? - I missed it before I rose from the bed, and directly found it in her hands; I felt it in my pocket before I laid on the bed at all; I held her hands, and cried to the watchman; I went to the window, and the watchman said that he had no business that side of the way; that person did not come; I had her three quarters of an hour before any body came to my assistance; at last this gentleman came to me, John Chaplain , he is an officer.

Q. How long might you be on the bed with her? - I suppose I might be on the bed for the space of five minutes. There was a part of the money taken out of her mouth, half a crown and three shillings.

JOHN CHAPLIN sworn.

I am an officer belonging to police office, Whitechapel; about the hour of two on the 19th of July, I was at the end

of Rosemary lane, I heard the cry of murder! we went down this Back lane, we saw the prisoner at the window crying murder; the street door was open we went up stairs, and burst the door open where the prisoner and prosecutor were; the prosecutor said that he had been robbed of nine shillings and six-pence; immediately we searched the prisoner, we found nothing in her clothes and pocket but one bad shilling and a few bad halfpence, and some duplicates; I took her by the face, and I found half a crown and three shillings in her mouth.

Q. Did you search the bed? - Yes, the room all over. She cried murder.

Q. When you came up did she make any complaint against the man? - She did not, she said nothing. When we first entered the room the prosecutor said that he had been robbed; she said nothing to that.

Prisoner. Ask him if so be I did not say I had been beat in a desperate manner by that gentleman there, that has come against me? - Not to my knowledge, I heard no such word mentioned.

Prisoner. The gentleman asked me what money I had about me? I told him I had no money but what was my own; the gentleman who was with me beat me, and kept his hand by my throat, and almost choaked me, and when the officer came up, he took nine shillings out of the other man's pocket.

Chaplin. There were four in the room when I went in, Stocking and one Mary Clarke were together, and Samuel Dunt and Mary Brown , and John Stocking seemed to be very much in liquor, he was laying on the bed when we went into the room; Dunt did not seem so much in liquor; the girls seemed very sober.

Prisoner. The nine shillings was taken out of the other man's pocket, in the morning before the justice.

Chaplin. There was nine shillings taken from John Stocking , which he swore positively to before the justice, Mr. Wickham.

Prisoner. The money that was taken from me was my own.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-37

584. THOMAS GROVES was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of July , seventeen pieces of elm timber quartering, containing in length a hundred and ten feet, value 5 s. three other pieces of timber quartering, containing in length nine feet, value 6 d. the goods of Jonathan Passingham .

JONATHAN PASSINGHAM sworn.

I am a farmer at Elton ; I lost a great many things, and I searched the prisoner's house, and I found seventeen pieces of timber in his house, elm timber, what they call quartering, they were up in the roof of his house, buried under some turf and three in the garden.

Q. Was he present when you found these things? - Yes, he said that he took them to make a fence.

Q. Did you not tell him it would be better for him if he would confess? - I never said any thing to him.

Q. How do you know they were your property? - I can swear to them, because they were part of a barn.

Q. Had the barn been pulled down? - Yes. I had missed such, and I asked him two days before, about such things, whether he had got them? and he told me no.

Prisoner. The fence is his, and the house is his, and I have rented the house of him this twenty years; and the fence was so bad, that I was liable of being indicted every day; they lay on the turf, some of them were out of sight, but not all.

- PENNY sworn.

I saw these things concealed with a few turf over them, and those in the garden laid under some weeds.

Court to Passingham. Is it your house? - I rent it along with the farm, and he lives in the house; I let it to the prisoner.

Q. Did any of his fence want repairing? - His hedge was down.

Q. Was this a proper thing for repairing his fence? - Not at all fit; of late years it had always been repaired with bushes.

JOSEPH PERSON sworn.

I am clerk to a surveyor in the building line; I was requested to look at this timber the 22d of July; I went down and examined the timber, and I found there were two pieces which the prisoner said the prosecutor's father gave to him some time ago; I asked Mr. Passingham if this was all that he had to alledge against the prisoner? as I and two or three more went down to see if he would not admit him to bail, he said that he expected he should be acquitted on his trial, and he was determined to imprison him till the time of his trial; he said also to me this morning that he was very sorry that he had any hand in it at all; all the timber, if it was sold to a wood chopper in London, would not fetch two shillings.

Court to Penny. Was it old or new timber? - Some were old and some not so old.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-38

585. ELIZABETH GROVES the wife of Thomas Groves , was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of July , a brass kettle, value 1 s. 9 d. a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. two linen table cloths, value 7 s. a linen towel, 6 d. a linen dresser cloth, value 1 s. the goods of Jonathan Passingham .

JONATHAN PASSINGHAM sworn.

On the same day we searched the prisoner's house we found these things belonging to me, she washed at my house, she is the wife of the former prisoner; I cannot swear that she stole them, I found them in the house.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-39

586. JOHN GARDINER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , a stuff petticoat, value 7 s. the goods of Edward Morphew .

FRANCES MORPHEW sworn.

I am the wife of Edward Morphew ; I lost the things out of window the 8th of July, between three and four o'clock in the morning; I missed it when I got up between six and seven, the window was open at that time between three and four by my being so hot, the petticoat was on the ground, I left it there when I went to bed.

Mr. Knowlys. It was some time before you heard of this petticoat? - It was from Monday till Saturday.

Q. You know nothing about the prisoner? - No.

Court. Did you sleep on the ground floor? - No.

Q. Does your window look towards the street? Could any body get in? how high was it from the ground? - One story.

Q. Could any body easily get in at the window? - As far as I know.

Q. Was any thing else lost? - Yes, several other things.

JOHN CHAPLIN sworn.

I am an officer. About four o'clock Monday morning the 8th of July, I meets John Gardner in Lambeth-street, Whitechapel, about a quarter of a mile from Morphew's house, I met him there with a bundle and another young man with him, coming the way from the house that had been robbed, I stopped him, seeing him have a bundle under his arm, asked him what he had got? he said he had a jacket, I felt of it, I told him it was no jacket, Sir, says he, you may depend upon it, it is, if you will take my word, I told him I was an officer and I insisted on seeing it; he said, I might depend upon it, it was one of his own killing jackets; he is a butcher , I had some knowledge of him, but not at that present time when I stopped him. Says he, if you will step to the other side of the road I will tell you the truth, it is a woman's petticoat, and I hope you will not hurt me; which I opened and found it was a stuff petticoat, I took him into custody and at half past ten had him before Mr. Wickham.

Q. Did you search him to see if there were any other things about him? - I did not, I had not that knowledge about me at that present time, being only a young officer. This petticoat was tied up in a silk handkerchief which was marked E. M on it. When he was up to Mr. Wickham's, he was committed to the house of correction, he came up again on Thursday and was acquitted, because nobody came up, and on Saturday Mrs. Morphew came up in consequence of an advertisement.

Mr. Knowlys. This man is a working Butcher? - He is.

Q. He worked for Mr. Williams? - He did.

Q. He was discharged on Thursday, and you know that then he went to his master's? - I met him in St. Catherine's in the same dress he is now after he was discharged.

Q. You found him at his Master's on Saturday? - I did.

Q. Was he in his working dress then? - I cannot say.

Q. However he was at his master's the two days after he was discharged? - He was.

Mrs. Morphew. The petticoat is mine; I know it by the particular mark about it. I had a pair of velveteen breeches and a pocket taken, which were returned out of a neighbour's yard.

Prisoner. I was coming along the morning I was taken up and a man saw me pick the petticoat up, and he asked me what I had got? and I told him, I don't know, the man is here now that see me pick it up.

WILLIAM HUGHES sworn.

I live in St. George's-fields, at No. 4, Kings-building's, Pearl-row, opposite the Magdalen, my wife dresses dolls for the warehouse, and I get a shilling or two when I can, at any sort of labour. I think I saw the prisoner about three times in my life; I was going towards Clerkenwell and I saw this young man pick up a bundle; I do positively swear it was him.

Q. When was this? - It was Monday morning the 8th of July, to the best of my knowledge about five o'clock in the morning, says I, what have you got there? says he, I have found a bundle. I don't know who dropped it no more than you

Q. Did you see what that bundle contained? - No, I did not; the bundle was not opened in my presence.

Q. Where was it you saw him? - In Ratcliff-highway.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE

Reference Number: t17930911-40

587. HENRY CHAPMAN was indicted for stealing on the 7th of August , a half crown, and four shillings in monies numbered , the monies of Henry Fourdrinier the elder , William Bloxam , Henry Fourdrinier the younger and Charles Fourdrinier .

CHARLES FOURDRINIER sworn.

I am a stationer . I have partners, Henry Fourdrinier the elder, William Bloxam , Henry Fourdrinier the younger and myself. From the very frequent and continual loss, and from the particular times that money had been stolen, we strongly suspected the prisoner at the bar, he was a porter of ours, he lived and slept in the house; on the 6th of August after all the servants had left business, I really don't know the exact time, we placed half a crown and four shillings in a drawer which were previously marked; the other servants left business about eight o'clock.

Q. Did you do it yourself? - I saw it done, it was placed in the drawer from whence the money had frequently been stolen. It was a drawer without a lock, it was in the shop, next drawer to the till.

Mr. Knowlys. When did you make these marks? - I made them three hours before they were stole, I made the mark the time as I put the money in the drawer, I marked one, and there were marks on the others and I took down the marks; I marked a shilling.

Q. Did you take down these marks with a view of observing the shillings again? - I did.

Q. Then you may read your paper? - There are three round o's on one shilling, I made them with my penknife. The money remained there that evening so marked; at half past six o'clock the 7th of August the next morning, I sent for the constable, we had the prisoner searched; the money was found on him, the very identical money with some other money; it was found in his pocket.

Q. In his Waistcoat or breeches? - I really don't recollect.

Q. Did you see it taken from him? - I did. The money was given to the constable immediately and sealed up; he was taken before the Lord Mayor, and the Lord Mayor granted us a warrant; and in his box there was ninety-four guineas.

Q. In the first place this box was in your house? - It was.

Q. The place where the prisoner dwelt? - It was.

Q. There are no other persons interested in the business except those four you mentioned? - There is not.

Q. Is there any other person who derives any profit from the business of this house? - Clearly not.

Q. No person whose name is not given to the world? - No.

Q. Have you any foreman who is paid out of the profit in proportion to these profits? - No, none.

Q. This man lived with you as a porter for nine years; Was he ever turned away? - No.

Q. Then he had been nine years in your house and never once turned away. Had it happened that there had been any difference of opinion between you and this man some time before this matter took place? - Yes, there was.

Q. How long was it before that this quarrel happened between you? - I believe it might be about a fortnight.

Q. That quarrel I believe was known to the persons in the shop? - Clearly so.

Q. And I suppose among the persons in the shop it was likewise known to those who marked that money which was put by in this drawer? - Certainly it was.

Q. Pray will you be so good as to tell what were the names of the persons who assisted in this operation of marking the money and putting it into this drawer? - Mr. Nellum and Mr. Liddle.

Q. This quarrel got to some height? - Not at all.

Q. This money was not put in the till? it was put in a drawer where money was not expected to be put? - It used to be frequently put there; the only reason it was put in that drawer was, when the foreman or person who took it, had not the key of the till.

Q. The till I take it for granted was locked? - It ought to be.

Q. I believe you have a person of the name of Sale in your employment? - We have at this moment.

Q. This person had on more occasions than one been the means of restoring bank notes which had been by the carelessness or negligence of Mr. Sale been found on the floor? - I don't recollect.

Q. I think you say on the 6th of August this money was found there; who was with you at the time? - The constable.

Q. No one else? - Mr. Sale was in the counting house at the time.

Q. Had not the other servants access to this drawer? - All the servants, except the house maid who was up stairs about her business, had access to this drawer.

Court. Was this money found on him in the counting house? - He was searched in the counting house.

Mr. Knowlys. This man after six o'clock had the liberty of going out to get his supper? - He had not, he had after eight o'clock.

Q. In consequence he had the means of carrying any thing away, if he had a dishonest intention. I would ask you this question, has it not been said that if it had not been for this quarrel this prosecution would not have been carried on to this length; has not this been said in your hearing, and in your house? - Upon my honour I never heard it, I am confident it never was said so; I abominate such conduct.

THOMAS NELLUM sworn.

I live in the house of Mr. Fourdrinier; I am his shopman, we had repeatedly lost money out of the drawer; Monday evening the 5th of August, after I left work a quire of cartridge paper was sold for fifteen-pence, this fifteen-pence was missing from the drawer.

Q. Do you know any thing about marking this money? - I do not; I saw it after it was marked, and put it into the drawer myself, a little after eight o'clock between eight and nine, this was Tuesday evening when the four shillings and half crown was put into the drawer, all the men were gone except Mr. Liddle and myself, one shilling was marked with a figure of two on each side, another shilling was marked with a figure of three on one side, one was marked with an half moon, and a C. the other shilling I cannot say how it was marked.

Q. Look at that paper, see if they correspond? - They are the same marks exactly; I put the money into the drawer myself, and the clerk see me put it in, and then I bid him good night; in the morning when I came about seven o'clock, the shop was open about that time, the first thing I went and looked at the till, and I saw the money was gone, I went and informed Mr. Charles Fourdrinier of it, he told me to be particular and see that it was gone, Mr. Fourdrinier sent for Mr. Black the constable, and all three porters were called in, and there was some money laid down on the desk, outside, and I picked out the money.

Mr. Knapp. You are shopman to the prosecutor, how long have you been so? - Sixteen years.

Q. The prisoner at the bar has lived in the house some time I believe? - He has been in the house about six years.

Q. How many other fellow servants might you have in the house? - I suppose more than twenty, clerks and all.

Q. Does the elder Mr. Fourdrinier live in the house now? - Not in Lombard-street.

Q. Who lives in that house? - Mr. Charles Fourdrinier alone.

Q. This drawer that you put the money in was left open? - It has no lock on it.

Q. The till is separate from the drawer at some distance? - It adjoins to it.

Q. The till is always locked? - It is generally locked, without we are behind the counter.

Q. Do you know what quantity of money there was in the drawer besides what you put in? - I don't think there was any money at all.

Q. Did you look? did you take particular notice that there was no other money in the drawer? - I don't know that there were.

Q. Will you swear there was no other money in the drawer? - I will swear I put no more in.

Q. Will you swear there was no other money in the drawer at the time this mistaked money was put in the drawer? - I don't think there was.

Q. The clerks of course had access to this drawer as well as every person that works in the shop? - I don't think they could after eight o'clock at night.

Q. Will you take on yourself to say that not any other person was at that drawer all that night, all the time that you was standing centinal? - No, I cannot say that, it is impossible, for I left the shop.

Q. Do you know of any quarrel between the prisoner at the bar and any of the servants in the house? - Quarrel!

Q. Don't you understand me, man? - I heard some little dispute.

Q. What was it about? - I don't know, I was not acquainted with it.

Q. Who was it between? - There was some little dispute between Mr. Liddle and the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Had there not been frequent disputes between the prisoner and you? - When he did not do his duty I quarreled with him.

Q. Did not you hear of any quarrel between your young master and prisoner; - I cannot swear for six or seven years ago.

Q. You say then six or seven years ago there might be a quarrel? - I say there might in the course of six or seven years.

Q. What do you think of a fortnight before this transaction happened? - I do not recollect any thing of that sort happening, I will swear that.

Q. Do you know old Mr. Fourdrinier? - Very well.

Q. Do you remember any conversation taking place between old Mr. Fourdrinier, and his saying if it had not been for this quarrel between the prisoner and your young master, this prosecution would not have taken place? - I never heard it in my life.

Fourdrinier. I saw the money in the drawer myself at half past one in the morning on the 7th, and I saw the money in the drawer again at half past six.

Mr. Knowlys. There is one other circumstance, Mr. Fourdrinier, with respect to this quarrel? - Chapman has been in the habit of living with me since I have been in house-keeping for myself this two years; I told him that he was welcome to the cupboard, and I

never locked any individual thing up from any one.

Court. We cannot go into these particulars.

JOSEPH LIDDLE sworn.

I am clerk; I was present at the time that the money was put into the drawer, it was about eight o'clock in the evening of the 6th of August last, the money was marked.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge whether there was any paper taken of the marks? - Yes, there was, I took one myself; I have got that paper, I have kept it ever since I took it; I was not present when the money was taken out of the prisoner's pocket.

Q. Should you know the money again? - Yes, I should.

Mr. Knowlys. You are one of the clerks there? - I am.

Q. This man was in the service before you came into it? - Yes, he was.

Q. How long have you been in this service? - Nine months.

Q. This drawer was not the place where the money was usually kept? - It was put there when we had not the key of the till.

Q. Was it in your time that the prisoner picked up a bank note? - No, it was not.

Q. Have you not heard it mentioned by all the servants in the shop as a common occurrence? - I have heard it, but not by all.

Q. Was Nellum acquainted with this fact? - Yes, he was.

Q. That fact Nellum was acquainted with? - He was.

Q. He restored it to Mr. Sale, did not he? - I do not know to whom he restored it.

Q. Do you remember the quarrel that took place between your young master and this man? - I recollect perfectly well there was a quarrel between them, I don't recollect all the circumstances.

Q. It was generally known to the servants of the house? - It was.

Q. And Nellum at that time was a servant of the house? - He was.

Q. Was you present when the prisoner's wife came to old Mr. Fourdrinier, and he said this would not have taken place, had it not been for that quarrel that Mr. Charles Fourdrinier had with the prisoner? - I did not hear such a thing.

THOMAS BLACK sworn.

I am a constable; I was sent for by Mr. Charles Fourdrinier on Wednesday the 7th of August last, between seven and eight, when the prisoner was present, Mr. Fourdrinier ordered me to search the three men who were in the shop, for he had lost some money; the prisoner stood first; accordingly I told him to pull what money he had out of his pocket, which he did, and out of which Mr. Charles Fourdrinier claimed, as his property, a half crown piece and four shillings in silver; there was a half guinea besides in gold, and twelve shillings and sixpence on him.

Mr. Knapp. The prisoner stood first to be examined? - All the men were to be examined.

Q. And you told the prisoner to pull out of his pocket all the money he had, which he readily acquiesced in? - He did.

Q. In his pocket he had half a guinea and twelve shillings and six-pence in silver? - He had.

Court. Have you the money? - I have kept it ever since. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. This money was laid in that drawer, and looking into the drawer I found it there, and thinking it was not in its proper place I took it, and meant to return it, as I had returned bank notes

and other money before; it was there, but I did not know what it was put there for; they sent for a constable unknown to me; had they asked for the money before I should have given it them, and in two minutes time they sent me to the Poultry Compter. I pulled my money out as soon as I was asked.

WILLIAM SALE sworn.

Q. I believe you are clerk and cashier to Messrs. Fourdrinier? - I am; I have been there nine years, and the prisoner was there rather before me.

Q. I would ask you whether, by accident, any bank notes have been dropped in the shop and returned? - Not to my knowledge; there has been behind an ink stand, either a bank note or a bill of exchange.

Q. By whom was it returned to its proper place? - Not by the prisoner at the bar.

Q. I ask you whether any such fact has taken place within your knowledge? - Not as to paper.

Q. Has it as to money? - Yes, it has.

Q. Has it happened that the prisoner has found money not in a place of security, which he has told you of, so as to enable you to put it in a place of security? - Once in my knowledge he has.

Court. How much money was it? - One guinea.

Q. Where was it left? - I don't know where he found it; he gave it me in the morning, and told me it was in a little insecure drawer above my desk.

Q. How long ago is that? - I suppose two years ago or more.

Q. Do you know whether he has had the opportunity of doing it again since? - Not within my knowledge.

Q. Pray did Nellum live with you at that time? - Yes, and long before.

Q. I believe the fact of having found a guinea and returned it to you, was the conversation in the house? - I don't know that it was, it was not to my knowledge.

Q. What has been his character for honesty? - I believed him an honest character till the present.

Q. You thought him a trust worthy man? - I did.

MARIA KEMP sworn.

Q. You are the house maid in this house of Messrs. Fourdriniers? - Yes.

Q. How long have you been so? - Two years, and three quarters.

Q. You know the prisoner at the bar? - I do.

Q. You sweep out the shop and warehouse? - No, I do not.

Q. During the time that you have been in the employment of Mr. Fourdriniers, have you not heard of the prisoner having found money, and returned it to Mr. Sale? - I have seen money in the counting house, but I cannot answer to his returning it.

ISAAC THOMPSON sworn.

I am employed in the house of Messrs. Fourdriniers.

Q. Do you know of any fact of the prisoner having found money in his master's house that was carelessly thrown by, or dropped, and having returned it? - I know that money has been carelessly left, and not locked up, he has called me in once or twice to see it.

Q. Do you know whether he represented that negligence to the clerk of the house? - I do not.

The prisoner called eight witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-41

588. JOHN ELLISON was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , a

canvas wrapper, value 1 s. 6 d. and a hundred and twenty pair of worsted stockings, value 9 l. the goods of John Shelly .

- WORRALL sworn.

John Shelly is a carrier , I am his bookkeeper. He lost a canvas bag, and stockings from the Castle, in Wood street , the parcel was in the yard, just by the warehouse door, just unloaded from the waggon; I saw the man bring the parcel back again, I did not see him take it, I saw it put down at the warehouse door from the waggon; I have got the bill of lading of the waggon, it came by post.

THOMAS WILSON sworn.

I am a manufacturer of Kendal stockings; I sent these stockings from Kendal the 15th of June, there were ten dozen, or a hundred and twenty pair, they were tied up in single dozens, and put in a canvas wrapper, I tied them up my own self, the stockings are here, they were sent by John Shelly 's waggon.

Q. Was there any shop mark on them? - There is.

Mr. Knapp. We understand that this canvas wrapper containing some stockings were to be sent by the Kendal waggon? - It was.

Q. I take it for granted you employ a great many servants under you? - Not a great many.

Q. Did you deliver these goods yourself, or sent a servant with them? - I delivered them myself to the porter, that comes about, his name is Thomas Beech ; but I see they were entered in the carrier's book

Q. But the person to whom you delivered them is not here.

JOHN COX sworn.

I have a bill of parcels that came by the post, of these goods; I am servant to Barlow and Marsh, they are hosiers, No. 57, Gracechurch-street.

Court to Wilson. To whom were these consigned? - To Barlow and Marsh, Gracechurch-street. (Shewn the bill of parcels.) This is the bill of parcels that I sent.

RICHARD ARGENT sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Shelly; I was sitting in the warehouse, and I saw a man come up the yard, and he looked into the warehouse, and looked into the counting house, and he went up, and came back, and I heard a rustling among the straw, and I looked out, and I saw him with the truss on his back, and I went after him, and overtook him just at the gateway, I took hold of him, and told him that he must not take that away without letting me know what business he had with it, he said he bought this and another.

Court to Wilson. Where does Mr. Shelley live? - He lives at a place called Smitherbrook, near Wigan, he is the London carrier.

- WORRALL sworn.

Q. Whose yard is that? - The Castle yard, it belongs to me.

Q. Do not you look on yourself, as answerable for all property that is put down at your door? - The carrier pays me warehouse room for it.

Mr. Wilson. Do you know whether Mr. Shelly has any partner? - Not that I know of; he collects the bills in himself at Kendal.

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-42

589. THOMAS ALLCOCK was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the 7th of August , in a certain place near the King's highway, on Thomas Crips , and putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a gold watch, value 5 l. a silk watch ribbon, value 1 d. a base metal watch key, value 1 d. a gold ring, value 1 l. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. a silk purse, value 2 s. a silver shirt sleeve button, value 4 d. half a guinea, and eight shillings in monies numbered; the goods and monies of Thomas Crips .

Thomas Crips was called on his recognizance.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-43

590. JOSEPH NEWITT and JOHN DAVIS were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a cotton counterpane, value 2 s. a linen sheet, value 2 s. a looking glass, value 2 s. a linen waistcoat, value 6 d. a woollen blanket, value 2 s. the goods of William Naybours .

WILLIAM NAYBOURS sworn.

On the 29th of July I quitted my house about seven o'clock, about business; I live in Baldwin-street, Old-street , and I returned about half after nine, and I was informed that the bed room was broke open; when I went to my wife, she was at her mother's, that was where I was first informed of it; when I went home I saw one lodger at the door, I live on the ground floor; I went into my lodging room, and missed what is mention in the indictment; they were in the lodging room when I left it; I was informed that there were two men taken up by Mr. Gass the constable, and taken to Worship-street; the constable came to me the next morning, to tell me to go to Worship-street, to swear to my things, and there these things were brought forward, and I swore to them that they were my property.

SARAH APPLEBEE .

Q. How old are you? - I am nine years old.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - Yes.

Q. What will become of you if you swear falsely? - I shall go to the naughty man.

sworn.

Q. Now what do you know of this matter? - I live in Baldwin-street, Old-street, No. 7, we live in Mr. Naybours's house, I lodge there, my mother and father does; it was six weeks ago that I came home on Monday night, I came

home about ten minutes past five from school; I went to work, and had a little girl to help me; my father and mother has the one pair of stairs at Mr. Naybours; Nancy Bantum asked me if I would come and sit down with her? and I went down, and when I went down stairs I locked the door and put the key on the side of the stairs, and who should I meet in the passage but the tallest man, Joseph Newitt ; I am sure they are both the same men, only they have got different clothes, and I asked him who he wanted? he said he had only been to make water; that was in our passage, and he went out of the door, and I went out of the door with him, and he tapped me under the chin, and bid me good by; and he went to the end of the alley, and there he stood about ten minutes; I stopped at my own door and see them both stand at the end of the alley, and they looked up and see me standing there, and then he rather went on one side, and then I went away and sat down to work with Nancy Bantum ; presently I heard somebody whispering.

Q. Where did you sit at work with Nancy Bantum ? - At her house, at her street door. When I heard somebody whispering, I looked back and I saw our street door wide open; I had shut it, and pushed my hand against it to see if it was fast, and then Nancy Bantum came along with me to our street door, and sees both these men in the passage, and we asked them who they wanted? they said nothing, but brushed by us and ran off; then I ran after them, and hallooed out stop thief! and the shortest man, John Davis , was taken in Brick-lane.

Prisoner Davis. Ask the child whether she ever saw me in the entry? - I saw both of them

Q. She did not say so at the office? - I did.

ANN NAYBOURS sworn.

I was out when this happened; I was sent for by the last little girl's father; the house is ours; I was sent for after it happened, I believe it was the 29th of July, on a Monday, and when I came home about midnight, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I had been at my mother's all the day; when I got home I looked and went across the yard, and saw the windows were opened, and saw the things were gone, a quilt, a blanket, a sheet, a looking glass, all the things in the indictment; I shut the door and I returned back again, I did no more that night.

ANN BANTUM sworn.

I am sixteen; I live near Mr. Naybours; I am an apprentice to a mantua-maker, and my mistress ordered me to go home an hour before my time, it was on Monday the 29th of July, a little before five; as I came up the alley, Baldwin's-alley, their door was open and I saw that man Davis standing in the middle of Mrs. Naybours's entry; he had a green coat on then, that was before Sarah Applebee had come to me, and when she came to me she told me about the tall man, and when she told me of that, I told her that I saw a young man in green; she came over to me, and we sat and worked there; after that I thought I heard the latch lift up, and I told her; the house where I was, was within hearing of what passed at Mrs. Naybours; she ran to her own door and called me, and when I went I saw this shortest man half way down the alley, he seemed as if he was tying an apron on, and then he went out of my sight, and I saw the tallest man in the entry just by the street door, and there were some things, which he had dropped, just by his feet; and I said, why, fellow! what do you do there? and he ran by me; then I could not leave the house, because there was nobody at home but me.

Q. Did you see at any time after Sarah Applebee came to you, that her house door was shut? - Yes, it was shut.

Q. How long was she with you before this happened? - She was not with me a quarter of an hour before I heard the latch go.

Q. Into what part did the window of the house look? - Into the back yard.

Q. Does this alley go into the back yard? - No.

Q. Then how could they get into the house? - As they opened the street door the yard door fronted them, and they got in that way; the street door was only on the latch.

Court to Applebee. You say you put your foot against the door, did you leave the door on the latch or lock? - I left it on the latch.

SAMUEL HEATH sworn.

I had occasion to go to Old-street for some ham, on Monday the 29th of July about seven o'clock, or it may be half after, while I was agreeing with the man for the ham, there was a cry of stop thief! about two hundred yards from Baldwin's-court, there were several people running after Newitt the prisoner at the bar, he was running very fast away, I pursued him down Rotten row, and he went down into a privy there, when I opened the door, he said, what do you want with me? and then I told him he was the man that just ran by me; he at first objected to go along with me, but afterward he did go; I took him to Mr. Naybours where the other was detained, Davis; I did not know it then, I found him there; I was ordered before the magistrate, he bound me to appear here.

Q. Was Newitt searched in your presence? - Yes, there was a knife and some halfpence and six-pence found in his waistcoat pocket; and the other had his pocket full of snuff. I bring he things here, they were delivered to me by the constable, by order of the justice.

DRAPER WINDSOR sworn.

I live in Mitchell-street, that Baldwin's-court leads out into; I was alarmed by the cry of stop thief on the 20th of July, I saw the prisoner at the bar, Davis, I pursued him out of Mitchell-street into Brick-lane, he was running very fast, there were no property on him when I took him; there was a something found in a passage by a Mrs. Rose.

JANE ROSE sworn.

I live at No. 5, Brick-lane, I heard a cry of stop thief; I keep a little taylor's shop; in the mean time a person was in my shop that brought a job of work, and that person ran out, and I ran out and saw a bundle lay within side of my passage.

Q. Do you know Mr. Naybours's house? - I do now.

Q. How far is your passage from Mrs. Naybours's? - The space of two hundred yards or more.

Q. Is it in the way that either of the prisoners ran? - Yes, Davis was taken within three or four yards from my door; the constable came next day and took the bundle from my house.

JOHN GASS sworn.

I was sent for on the 29th to take charge of the two prisoners at the bar, it was about half past seven, I went and took charge of the two prisoners at the bar, I took them to Worship street they were ordered to be examined the next morning, the next morning a young woman came to my house and told me there was something thrown into a house in Brick-lane, I went, and Mrs Rose delivered me the bundle the next morning; I have kept it ever since. (Produced and deposed to by Mrs. Naybours, the counterpane in particular being on her bed in the morning when she went out; and the sheet unripped in the middle.)

Court to Sarah Applebee . Did you see the prisoner drop any thing in the passage? - Yes, they dropped a black satin waistcoat, I cannot rightly say who dropped it, I was so frightened, I looked at it on the ground; my daddy first picked up the glass, he fell over it,

Prisoner Newitt. I was going out of a necessary through Rotten-row, into Old-street-road, and a parcel of men came up to me, and said, I was their prisoner, and I went with them to where the things were lost, but I am as innocent of the robbery as a child just come from his mother's womb.

Prisoner Davis. My mother lives at the back of Shoreditch Church, I had not been home all that day, because my mother was out, I was coming at the back of Old-street Church, and I heard the cry of stop thief! and some men came out of a public house and laid hold of me, and said I was their prisoner.

The prisoner Newitt called one witness, and Davis three, who gave them good characters.

Joseph Newitt , GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

John Davis , GUILTY. (Aged 22.)

To go for Soldiers .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-44

591. SAMUEL YOUNG was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on the 6th of July , on Benjamin Burrows , and putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a metal watch, value 4 l. a stone seal set in metal, value 3 d. a metal watch key, value 1 d. the goods of the said Benjamin Burroughs .

BENJAMIN BURROUGHS sworn.

I live in Tothill-street, Westminster ; I am an old feeble man in no kind of business whatever, I am near sixty-eight, I was robbed of a metal watch in Tothill-street; as I was walking along on Saturday night, the 6th of July last, about half past seven to the best of my knowledge; I was walking along, there was this soldier and another, I was just at the corner of Fleece-passage which is a thoroughfare, both the soldiers took hold of my arm, the prisoner was one, I was very feeble and weak as I am now, and they hustled me about, and I stooped down and they lifted me up, and one of them flipped the watch out of my pocket and walked off, I could not pursue them I was not able; my watch is here.

Q. How long was this a doing? - A few minutes.

Q. Did you know the prisoners before? - Never before this time.

Q. Now will you take on yourself, frightened as you was, and only having seen them but the course of a few minutes, to swear positively to his person? - I am sure it is the same.

Mr. Knowlys. You say you are an old man? - Yes, near sixty-eight.

Q. Your eye sight is not so good as it was formerly? - I have used spectacles for years.

Q. Perhaps as you are getting very much in years you can hardly see without spectacles? - I can read a news paper with spectacles.

Q. You had not on your spectacles perhaps at this time? - I never use them only when I am reading a news paper.

Q. You say you slipped down? - I did.

Q. You took up a man of the name of Wilson? - I did, but I did not swear to him, and he was discharged.

Q. Did not you describe that the person who robbed you was taller than this man? - I know there was one taller present than this man.

Q. Did not you say that the person that robbed you was taller than this

prisoner? - I did not say so, that is the person.

Q. Did not you say before the justice that the person that robbed you was taller than the prisoner, and he spoke very rough? - I might say so.

Court. Did you swear to the prisoner before the justice? - No, I did not.

Q. How came it you did not swear to him before the justice? - Because I was not so clear of it as I am now, I have seen him twice since.

JOHN BAILIS sworn.

Q. Was you in Tothill-street at the time Mr. Burroughs was robbed? - No, Mr. Burroughs called on me the 8th of July in the morning, and told me he had been robbed of his watch; I went to Bow-street and gave information, I had some hand bills printed on the occasion; I had not been home above half an hour, before the watch was brought to my house by one John Lees ; I know the watch; I made the watch.

RICHARD WILLIAMSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I live in the Strand.

Q. Do you produce the watch? - No. On Saturday the 6th of July about eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner at the bar, dressed in soldiers clothes, with a boy in company with him in the same dress, came in and offered me this watch and pawned it, I lent him forty shillings on it.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before? - No.

Q. Are you sure as to his person? - I am. He came into the shop in a very great haste, says I, what hurry are you in? says he, I must provide myself with a great many necessaries by to-morrow morning, he said the woman that cohabited with him had made away with all his linen; the shop was exceeding full, and he wanted to be served before any body else, he said he must provide himself with these necessaries.

Q. Did you take particular notice of him? - Yes, he wanted to sell it, I told him I was not able to buy it, it was too late in the evening; I am sure of his person; I lent him forty shillings on it. On Monday morning about nine o'clock, he came to me and told me he had lost his ticket and would wish to take it out to sell it, I told him he must have an affidavit, and go before a magistrate and take his oath that he had lost it, he went and took an oath, and returned in about an hour after with the affidavit, and John Lees , and John Lees took it out of pledge.

JOHN LEES sworn.

I am an hair dresser, I went with the prisoner to take a watch out of pawn; the prisoner said nothing to me any further than I was dressing of Mr. Jacques, and the prisoner said he had got a watch to sell; I gave the watch to Mr. Bailis, Mr. Jacques sent me down with it to him. (The watch deposed to by Bailis.)

Court to Burroughs. Was the watch you was robbed of, the same as Bailis made for you? - It was.

JOHN JACQUES sworn.

The prisoner at the bar came to me the 8th of July, while I was having my hair dressed, and he said he had lost a duplicate of a watch, and he did not know where the pawnbroker was, at which he had pawned it on Saturday night. When the boy came in I sent the boy with him, he came to me afterwards, and told me that the pawnbroker would make it fifty shillings if he would sell it, says I, if it is worth that to the pawnbroker it is worth that to me, I will give you fifty shillings for it for my own wear, he said he gave seven guineas for it, and he would be d - d but he came honestly by it.

Mr. Knowlys. This man made no scruple of his having pawned the watch

on Saturday? - No, he told me he had pawned it on Saturday night, and lost the duplicate.

WILLIAM BROOKES sworn.

I am the constable. Mr. Jacques sent for me on Monday afternoon to apprehend this soldier and another; and I went and took them, and I took them to Bow-street, and they were committed.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you attend at Bow-street? - I did.

Q. Did you hear the prosecutor say the man that robbed him was taller than that man? - did not hear any thing of it, I went out of the office; I did not give attention to any thing.

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I was at the Plough, Princess-street, Westminster; I believe it was about the 10th or 11th of July last, on a Wednesday, there was a soldier there, and this was a soldier too, and they were taking off a seal of a watch, and I understood that he said, the other soldier said to this man, that he had that watch to sell, and the man that bought it was the prisoner at the bar, the one sold the watch to the other for three guineas I believe, and he gave him a guinea down then.

Court. What is your business? - I am a paper hanger.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before this? - I have seen him before this.

Q. When did you first mention this matter? - I never mentioned it at all, it was mentioned to me; I was called upon about a week past.

Q. Are you any way related to the prisoner? - No, I never saw him only at the public house, believe him to be an injured man, upon my word.

Court to Jacques. How much was it he offered it to you for? - He said the pawnbroker would make it fifty shillings provided the difference was paid; and I was to give fifty shillings and to keep it; on payment of the fifty shillings I was to have the watch and to keep it.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 22.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-45

592. HOSEA OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , eighty-five halfpence, value 3 s. 6 d. twenty-five copper farthings, value 6 d. and 1 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , the monies of Edward Hemmings .

MARTHA HEMMINGS sworn.

I am the wife of Edward Hemmings , I keep the George and Dragon, Paradise-row, Chelsea ; I lost some halfpence and farthings, and eigtheen-pence in silver, on the 14th day of August, on a Wednesday. I had sent the prisoner up to bed before I went with my maid and myself; the prisoner was a boy for fetching in pots, and drawing beer; I sent him to bed about a quarter after ten; I went afterwards down in my cellar to look at my cellar, and I heard somebody walk over the tap room, the maid was with me in the cellar, and she said she believed it was the boy come down, and gone into the bar; I came up immediately into the tap room, I was in the dark, I had no candle; I met the boy coming out of the bar, he had no light, and I had not the candle with me, my maid had the candle, we had no light till I called her up with the candle, my maid came up immediately. I asked him then what he came doing in my bar? he said he had not been in. I asked him what was his business down stairs? he said somebody had knocked at the door; I told him that was no reason that he should come down, because he knew both the maid and I were up; I had not the courage to search him; my husband

turned him out of doors when I told him, and he searched his clothes after he was gone; he turned him out the next morning about six o'clock, before I was up.

Q. Where were his clothes? - In the room where he slept; I brought the coat down, and I found it very heavy, and I opened it before my maid servant, and my husband; I found in it about four shillings and three halfpence, in halfpence and farthings, and one shilling and sixpence in silver, I think it was eighty four halfpence and twenty-five farthings, as near as I can guess, they were all together in his coat pocket; for about two days we could not tell where to find him; I cannot swear to the money, but there is one piece my maid can swear to.

Q. Can you swear that you lost any money? - My drawer was shut when I went down into the cellar, and when I came back the drawer was half open.

Q. Can you swear there was any money missing? - I cannot swear that, because I don't know what was in it.

Prisoner. I know nothing about it.

ELIZABETH THOMPSON sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Hemmings.

Q. Do you know whether any money was missing from the till or the drawer? - I will not justly say that.

Q. Did you see the boy below stairs after he was sent up to bed? - Yes, I went down stairs along with my mistress to see that every thing was fast, and while I was down stairs along with my mistress, I heard somebody go across the tap room into the bar, my mistress says, what are you listening at? I said I hear somebody up stairs, and we both went up directly and catched him coming out of the bar.

Q. Did you observe the drawer open? - I did.

Q. Do you know whether it was shut before he went to bed? - That I cannot tell; my mistress says to him, what is the reason you came down stairs after I sent you up to bed, and to come into my bar? he said he had not been in the bar.

Q. Had he been in the bar? - He was coming out of the bar.

Q. Did you see his clothes examined the next day? - I did, and there were eighty-five halfpence, and twenty-five farthings, and one shilling and six-pence in silver found in his clothes.

Q. Did you know the coat to be his? - Yes.

Q. Had you seen him wear it? - Yes.

Q. Do you know any of that money to belong to your master and mistress? - Yes, one piece, a copper piece; the constable has the money; he is here.

RICHARD DORRINGTON sworn.

I am a constable, I took up this boy on the 23d of August.

Q. Do you know whether that was the day of the robbery? - No, the robbery was on the 18th, I found him at Chelsea; at a manufactory, he was at work at a paper manufactory.

Q. Was you there the day the money was taken out of the coat? - When I found him they brought the money to the office in Queen's-square.

Q. Was any thing brought with the clothes? - Yes, some money.

Q. Who brought the money? - The Master. I apprehended the boy at a distance from their house, and then I brought him back to his master's, and from thence I took the boy away to the office, there they brought the clothes and money.

Q. Now can you tell whether it was the man or the woman, that brought the clothes and the money? - I believe it was the master; when they came into the office I searched the coat pocket, and there

I found this property and I have kept it ever since.

Court to Mrs. Hemmings. Is that the money you took? - I cannot swear to it.

Court to Thompson. Look at that money and see if it is the same that was taken out of his coat? - I can swear to this one piece, I carried the money to the office.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-46

593. ALEXANDER GORMAN and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on Mary the wife of William Doggett on the 8th of June , and putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person and against her will, a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of the said Mary Doggett .

MARY DOGGETT sworn.

I am a married woman; this man came and made a great noise in my house on the 8th of June, I was going to market, I keep a private house, I have two rooms which I let out furnished.

Q. Who do you let them to? - To women. I was robbed in the fields as I was coming from market, it was in the evening between ten and eleven; as I went first out I saw these two men, they never were in my room in their lives; they ran back to me and catched hold of my arms, and one catched hold of my neck, and took the handkerchief off my neck.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-47

594. SUSANNA HAWKINS and NICHOLAS JAMES were indicted for Burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Hanson , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 6th of July , and burglariously stealing therein, a silver watch, value 1 l. a piece of silk ribbon, value 4 d. a silver seal, value 6 d. a mahogany watch stand, value 1 s. a mahogany tea chest, value 5 s. a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 8 s. and nine hundred and sixty halfpence, value 2 l. the goods and monies of the said Thomas Hanson .

THOMAS HANSON sworn.

I am a housekeeper; I keep a house at Hampton Wick . On the 6th of July at night about eleven o'clock, I shut up the house and went to bed, I was the last person that was over the house to see that all was fast; I always fasten the door myself. About five o'clock on the next morning the lodger came up to my room door, and knocked at my room door, and asked if I was up? his name is Thorpe, he is a soldier; and he said, the street door was left open, I came down stairs immediately and I did not miss any thing at all then, I found the door open and I went up stairs again, and down stairs again the second time, and I missed the tea chest; as soon as I dressed myself I went to a butcher's shop, and I said to a young fellow that was in the shop, I have been robbed to night; I had no suspicion of the prisoners but from the information he gave me; I went over to Kingston and I got a search warrant to search the prisoner Susanna Hawkins 's lodgings, she lodged in Kingston, I believe they are her lodgings, I never asked that question, I saw her in the lodgings, and the other prisoner James was with her they were not in bed but up and dressed, I got there by six o'clock in the morning, within a very few minutes; we looked about the house

and could find nothing, I told Susanna Hawkins if she would not tell me where the goods were I should take her on suspicion, and if she did, I said, I would not hurt her; in consequence of that I found my property; she put on her bonnet and cloak directly, and took me and another young man up into a field, and she shewed us the tea chest and the watch, and this case under a sir bush, it was very visible, you might have seen it in the open road almost within twenty yards; we brought that home, she took us into the lodgings, and on the bed's head she said there was a tea spoon and tea tongs.

Q. Now with regard to your house you was the last person that went to bed, you was not the first person that went out in the morning? - No, it was the soldier that went out first in the morning.

Q. Was there any violence done to your house at all? - No, none at all, the sash window was thrown open that was all, the room was on the ground floor. There appeared to be no violence done to any part of the house, the street door was fastened with a chain that went across, that chain was undone but no violence, the chain was unhooked.

Q. Was it light when this soldier came up to you? - Yes, it was quite light, it was early in July the sun was rose; the soldier is not here, he is with his regiment.

Q. Have you any idea how the people got into the house? - All that I know is, that the window was down when I went to bed, and was open when I got up in the morning; the window was not fastened only pulled down.

Q. Was a mahogany watch stand lost? - Yes.

Q. Did you find that? - This watch was in this stand.

Q. Had the watch a ribbon and key? - Yes.

Q. Were there nine hundred and sixty halfpence in the tea chest? - I never particularly counted them; I suppose there were that number or more.

Q. What is the worth of the watch? - It is not of great worth, it was my grandfather's, it is not worth much, it never goes true, if I was to sell it I would sell it for half a guinea, but I do not want to sell it.

Q. What is the value of the tea chest? - It is a mahogany one, very small, two shillings.

Q. What is the price of the tea spoon? - I would sell it for six-pence.

Q. What is the worth of the tea tongs? - I think they are worth five shillings.

Q. Did the two prisoners live together, cohabit together? - Not to my knowledge, I have often seen them walking together, he used to come to her to my house when she was at work for my lodgers, she washed for them.

Q. What business is this man? - He is a soldier in the tenth regiment of light dragoons.

Q. As to the woman, has she ever been in your house? - She has been in my house many times.

Q. When had you last seen the soldier in your house? how long before this robbery? - I cannot recollect, it may be a week, or more. As to the woman I was told she had been there the day the robbery was committed, I did not see her there. As to the other articles they are all in the hands of the constable.

Mr. Knowlys. This man is a soldier. Do you know that that part of his company that were quartered at Kensington, were obliged to be out some miles from Kensington at the night the robbery was committed? - He was quartered at the Robin Hood, about three miles from my house;

Q. Therefore his quarters were not at Kensington at that night? - I found the billet was changed that very day.

Q. I believe you know this fellow bears a very good character? - I never heard any thing for or against him.

Q. These halfpence are what they call country halfpence? - They are.

Q. Which some people sell thirty shillings for a guinea? - I here are not many good halfpence going.

Q. On the contrary you hardly ever meet with a good halfpenny in the country? - I should be very sorry not to do it sometimes.

Q. So that though there may be forty shillings of halfpence, they may not be worth twenty shillings; I believe you first of all took James, and then you discharged him? - I took the girl in the fact.

Court. What do you mean? - When she told me where the things were I mean. I stopped James for some time in the house, and I had the curiosity to search him, I felt about his clothes, and I found nothing, and I let him go about his business.

Q. Do you know the corporal of his regiment? - Not by name.

Q. What are you? - I am a cheesemonger . I have a little shop, but I serve a gentleman besides, and I sleep at home every night in the week except one.

RICHARD CARTER sworn.

I belong to Mr. Jennings; I was going over Kensington Bridge the 7th of July last, on Sunday morning, between five and six o'clock, and I met Mr. Hanson, and he told me he had been robbed, and he suspected some persons, and being clerk to a justice I made out an information, and got a search warrant signed, and got a constable, and went to this woman's lodging.

Q. What time did you get to this lodging? - I believe it was after six o'clock; the constable searched and did not find any thing; the prosecutor told the girl that he was sure that she had got the property, if she would tell where it was she should not be hurt, and she went with him, and it was found; she took us into a garden and shewed him the silver watch, and I picked up this watch at the gate, and the tea chest; that is all I saw.

Q. Did you see any thing about the bed? - The prosecutor asked where the spoons and sugar tongs were; and she told, and we went back and found them about the bed; when I came back the soldier was gone.

Q. You did not attempt to detain him? - Not at that time.

Q. How came the soldier to be taken up afterwards if you let him go? - I believe he was first taken into custody by command of his officer for being out of his quarter, and after that he was detained on suspicion.

Q. Was you present when he was taken up? - I was not.

Mr. Knowlys. What the man is taken up for, is merely what you have heard? - It is.

Q. I believe the man, after Mr. Hanson had searched him a little, was suffered to go about his business? - He was. To the best of my knowledge the man went out of the house before the woman went to shew us where the things were.

Court to Mr. Hanson. How came you to take him up? - I never took him up; I never knew he was taken up till I was sent for up to the office.

Mr. Venner. Do you know by what means Susanna Hawkins came to live at Hampton? - I cannot tell.

JOHN LONGUS sworn.

I am a constable of Kensington; I had a warrant brought to me to search Hawkins's lodgings, Sunday morning the 7th of July.

Q. Do you know whether they were her lodgings? - I believe they were the girls; we went down to the place, and when we came there we went up stairs, and there we saw Nicholas James , and

Susanna Hawkins together, we searched the room round, and found nothing, we then came down stairs, and searched every part below, Hanson went to Hawkins, and told her if she would tell him where the things were he would not hurt them, so as he might get them. She then went up stairs, put her bonnet on, and said if we would follow her she would shew us where they were; she went up with us to Chapel-field, about a quarter of a mile from the house of the prosecutor, we went up that field, and we looked under some bushes before we came to it, we looked under a small sir, and there we found a small tea chest, she shewed us the tea chest, a watch stand, and watch; we then came back the other way, not the way we went; as we came along I asked her to inform us where the tea tongs and tea spoons were, she did not like at first, but afterwards she said they were at home, we then went down to her lodgings, and there we found them on the top of the tester of her bed. I have had the care of these things from that time to this. (Produced and deposed to by Hanson.)

RICHARD MOON sworn.

I am a butcher. On the 6th of July, about twelve o'clock at night, the man prisoner at the bar past up and down, several times in Hampton Wick, he was alone.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - Yes, he was quartered at the Robin Hood then, he had been quartered at the White Horse sometime, just by my master's; I think that is the man, I cannot positively swear.

Prisoner Hawkins. They told me if I would tell where the property was they would not hurt me, in consequence of that I went and told where the property was.

The prisoner Hawkins called three witnesses who gave her an excellent character.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-48

595. WILLIAM JAMES WILCE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , a silver table spoon, value 5 s. three silver tea spoons, value 3 s. and a wooden tea caddy, value 1 s. the goods of Catharine Mackey .

CATHARINE MACKEY sworn.

I am a single woman, I keep a house on Brompton Terrace , I was in the country, and I left them in charge of that servant, I came to town on the Sunday as they were stole on the Saturday; I was sent for, I don't remember the day of the month.

Q. Have you ever seen the spoons since? - I have seen something like them since.

Mr. Knapp. What is your name? - Catharine Crawley .

Q. Are you a married woman? - No.

Q. Never have been married? - No.

Q. You don't know the prisoner at the bar? - Never see him before.

MARY UPTON sworn.

I am a servant to Mrs. Mackay; this young man came to see me, I had known him almost two years, he is a hatter , he came to see me the day the spoons were missing, they were kept in the caddy, the caddy was in the parlour, he was there between twelve and one, I missed the things soon after he was gone, in an hour; I did not see them again till I went to the justice's in Marlborough-street; the young man was took up; I see all the things I missed.

Mr. Knapp. How long have you known the prisoner? - Almost two years.

Q. What he has frequently come backward and forward to your house? - He did not come above two or three before I lived in that house.

Q. He knew you before? - He did.

Q. Where did you live before? - At Mr. Digwell's.

Q. He has come there several times? - He has.

Q. Did you ever hear that he had been in Bedlam? - Yes, he has been out of his mind once since I knew him.

Q. How long ago? - Last Christmas.

Q. Where was he then? - He was so ill that he jumped out of a one pair of stairs window. I knew three years ago that he was out of his mind, but that was before I knew him.

Q. So that he was subject to be out of his mind? - I have heard so.

Q. He was not a man in his complete senses of course? - No, he was not.

Court. Did you ever hear him say any thing about these things? - No.

JUDITH KEEPING sworn.

I am a nurse at St. George's Hospital, the prisoner came on Saturday afternoon into my ward; I don't know the day of the month, six weeks ago, and he said that he was married, and that his wife was gone in the country, and that he had brought the caddy from his wife, he went away to see an acquaintance in the Hospital, and he returned about four o'clock in the afternoon, and then the constable came and took him up, he had also two spoons that were broke in two; large spoons.

Q. Are you quite sure as to that? - I am sure that there were two spoons that were broke, one a large spoon, and the other rather less; I see nothing more, I should know them again, for the justice made me mark them.

Q. Should you know the spoons without the mark? - No.

Q. Were the spoons that you saw him bring, the same as were delivered to the constable? - I gave them to the head nurse, and she gave them to the constable; she is not here, she is laying dying on her bed.

Q. What was done with the caddy? - I gave the caddy and the two spoons to the head nurse.

Mr. Knapp. You are nurse to St. George's Hospital? - I am.

Q. How long had you known the prisoner at the bar? - He had been a patient in the house.

Q. How long before had he been a patient in your Hospital? - I don't know whether it might be two or three years.

Q. What had he been in the Hospital for? - The first time he came into the Hospital he was sent to Bedlam; the next time, whether it was a fever or not, I cannot say.

Q. Have not you heard several times that this poor unfortunate man has been out of his mind? - I have.

Q. With respect to the spoons, and caddy, you would not have known any of them, nor could you identify them except the justice had told you to mark them? - Not without that.

Q. Whether they belong to the prosecutor or not, of course you cannot tell no more than the justice told you to mark them when you was there? - No, I cannot.

Court to Upton. Was the man taken up in the hospital the same day as the spoons were stole? what day were they stole? - The 6th of July, I saw them at the justice's the Monday following.

JOHN PIDDINGTON sworn.

I am a constable of St. George's, Hanover-square. On the 6th of July I had an information of a pair of sheets being stole; I took him in our Work-house for that charge, and I found upon him these two spoons, not broke, two tea spoons; these broken spoons, and this caddy was

brought after me, I don't know who gave them me, the nurse of the ward gave me part of them, it was in the evening when I took him up, for when I had taken him to Marlborough-street I was too late, I was obliged to bring him back again; I think it was our watch-house keeper gave them me.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you say you took him in the workhouse, how came he there? - I cannot say, I believe he came there to drink tea.

Court. Where were the spoons that you found? - In his pocket; these four tea spoons, two are swore to, and two are not.

Q. In this watch-house, or workhouse, what account did he give of the two that were sworn to? - He said they were his own.

Upton. They are my mistress's spoons, I can swear them to be my mistress's, I have cleaned them so many times.

Q. Is there any name on them? - No, one of the spoons is plain, the other is worked.

PETER ALVOYN sworn.

I am the steward of Bedlam Hospital since the year 1785, the prisoner at the bar was admitted there on the 19th of December, 1789, as a lunatick, and discharged well the 27th of December, 1790.

Mrs. WILCE sworn.

I am the mother of the lad at the bar.

Q. Are you in circumstances sufficient to take care of your son if he was discharged? - I am not.

Q. What is the state of his mind? - I don't think he has been properly in his mind since he was discharged from Bedlam.

Mrs. JUDITH NEALE sworn.

My husband and I have known the prisoner many years, every body supposed that he was out of his mind, that was the general opinion of the state of his mind.

Q. Can you tell us of any fact that Sunday before this happened? - Yes, he dined with us, he behaved in a very improper manner, putting victuals to his mouth, and then flinging it about; I said to my husband he never can be right in his mind, or he would not behave so; he said directly he had been in Bedlam, I never knew it before, and in the afternoon he came again with the constable's staff in his hand, and said he would take us all up, he did not say what for, my husband said he can never be right, or else he would not behave in that manner to a friend; in the afternoon when he came again there was a man there cutting my husband's hair, Mr. Lesley, and he behaved very improperly to him, he told him that he would take him, and kick him down stairs, and many other improper things.

Q. What was the reason he assigned? - None at all.

Q. Did he give no reason why he should kick Mr. Lesley down stairs? - No.

Q. Do you know any thing else? - No further than that he went into the street, and behaved just the same with the children, and grown people, with his staff in his hand; I did not hear what he said, because I was in my room, but I see him.

Q. Did you then from his whole conduct, judge fairly that he was a madman at that time? - I did.

Q. Do you think so now on your oath? - I do, this was only the Sunday before this happened.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-49

596. WILLIAM JAMES WILCE was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of July , a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. the goods of Daniel Chattington .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-50

597. WILLIAM LARKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of September , two yards of woollen cloth, value 8 s. and a quarter of a yard of linen cloth, value 2 d. the goods of James Duberly .

JAMES MACDONALD sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. James Duberly . On Saturday the 7th of September the articles were stole, he was the cutter in the house; I did not see him take them, Mr. Duberly saw him; he was called into the counting house, took out of his pocket three pieces of red cloth, and the small piece of linen, the whole he stole was in four remnants of woollen about two yards, I took three of them.

Q. At the time you took them did he say any thing about them? - I don't recollect that he did.

Q. Had you missed the quantity? - It is impossible to miss.

Q. How do you know that they were Mr. Duberley's? - We had such stuff of the same sort in the house but we cannot miss such a quantity out of so many thousand yards as we have in the house.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-51

598. STEPHEN CHILD was indicted for that he, on the 17th of May , feloniously and falsely did make, forge, and counterfeit, and caused to be made, forged and counterfeited a certain receipt for money, with the name of Wm. Andrew thereto subscribed, bearing date the 17th of May 1793. The tenor of which is as follows:

Five per cent. annuities, consolidated. July 6, 1783.

Received this 17th day of May 1793, of Mrs. Elizabeth Harrison the sum of six hundred and forty pounds ten shillings, being the consideration of six hundred pounds interest, or share in the capital or joint stock of five percent annuities, consolidated July the 6th, 1783, erected by two acts of parliament, one the twenty-fourth, and the other the twenty-fifth year of his Majesty King George the Third, both intitled,

"An Act for granting annuities to satisfy certain navy victualling and export bills, and ordinance debentures, transferable to the Bank of England, together with the proportionable annuity attending the same." By me this day, transferred to the same Mrs. Harrison. Witness my hand

Wm. Andrews .

Witness, John Smith .

178.

(In the margin) £600 0 0 106 3/4

- 640 10 0

15 0

641 5 0

S. Child.

With intent to defraud Mrs. Elizabeth Harrison .

Indicted in a second COUNT for uttering the same as true, knowing it to be forged, with intention to defraud Mrs. Elizabeth Harrison.

In a third and fourth COUNTS for forging and uttering a like receipt, with intention to defraud the Bank of England .

Elizabeth Harrison was called on her recognizance.

JOHN THOMAS HALL sworn.

I am a clerk of the Bank of England, in the five per cent. office.

Q. Look at that paper, tell me whether you have seen it before? - I have on the 26th of August last.

Q. Who produced it to you? - Mrs. Harrison.

Q. What was her application to you for? - For a dividend of the stock of six hundred pounds.

Q. Did you pay her the dividend? - I could not; it was not standing in her name.

Q. Did you examine the Books? - I did, and there was no such sum standing in her name.

Q. Did you see any sum standing in the name of Mrs. Harrison? - There was to the amount of four hundred pounds five per cent.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner Child? - In a very few minutes.

Q. Who did he come into the office with? - Mr. Stephen Pepys .

Q. Did you or did the clerk say any thing to him on his coming? - I said, Mr. Child, this lady asks for a dividend of six hundred pounds, and there is no such sum in the book.

Q. Did he make any reply? - He did; he said, pay the lady on the four hundred pounds, and I will settle the other with her.

Q. Did you acceed to that proposal? - Certainly not.

Q. Did you put any further questions to him? - I said such a thing cannot pass me without acquainting the principal.

Q. Did you shew him the piece of paper? - I did.

Q. Did he say any thing respecting the paper at that time? - No. On this I sent to acquaint the principal of the office, Mr. Charles Norris .

Mr. Shepherd. The four hundred pounds stock you found in the books had been accepted in the books by Mrs. Harrison? - It had.

Q. On what day? - We have no date to an acceptance.

Q. Was not she willing to receive the dividend of the four hundred pounds? - She did not receive it.

CHARLES NORRIS sworn.

I am the principal in the five per cent. office.

Q. On the 26th of August, what time was your attention called to the transaction we have been speaking of? - It was between twelve and one.

Q. Be so good as to relate slowly, so as my Lord may hear, and these gentlemen likewise, for what purpose you was called; When you was called what did you do? - I came to the division with the receipt in my hand, and I saw Mr. Stephen Child in conversation with a lady, whom I afterwards understood to be Mrs. Harrison; I asked Mr. Child how the lady came to demand six hundred pounds when she was entitled to no more than four hundred pounds? he said he had lost the original receipt in the hurry of business and had made out that I shewed him; I then remarked to him that the sum was different, it was for six hundred pounds, whereas there had been only four hundred pounds transfered to Mrs. Elizabeth Harrison ; he said, no more was to be transferred to her; on this the purport of her observation was, as I do not mean to swear to the exact words; Mr. Child, I was to have had six hundred pounds; that was the substance of her demand; and Stephen Child said to her, I will settle about the two hundred pounds with you. On this we went a little aside, and we made a few remarks on the receipt, that it did not agree in any particular, not only the sum but the names; his answer was he knew it very well, and he had made it out himself; says I, the whole of it? yes, says he, the whole, and that he set down such names as came first to his mind; on this I desired him to go with

me to the accountant, Mr. Edwards; we went accordingly to Mr. Edwards, and after relating the substance of the business for which I brought him, I left him there in order to go back and fetch Mrs. Harrison; when I went back to Mrs. Harrison she was looking at the transfer of the four hundred pounds; I took Mrs. Harrison to Mr. Edwards; Child was then there; the accountant had the receipt in his hand, and he questioned Mr. Child on the matter, and he repeated the same nearly as I have before said, and he said that Mrs. Harrison had lent him the two hundred pounds, for which she was to account to her, and Mrs. Harrison did not deny it; but on Mr. Edwards putting the question to her, she said her sister might have lent him money; and I think he said she had not; but I do not mean to be certain, I cannot be sure of that.

Q. Was it you that made any observation on that which appeared on the margin of the receipt? - I saw the receipt and took notice of the whole of it, and saw S. Child written under the sum.

- EDWARDS sworn.

Q. You examined Mr. Child when he was brought to you? - I did.

Q. Was the receipt produced to you at that time? - It was. On the 26th of August the prisoner was brought before me, and I asked him how he could presume to issue a receipt for six hundred pounds, five per cent. annuities, transfered by William Andrews to Elizabeth Harrison , signed John Smith , when there was no such a transfer made, nor did such names exist in the books, and that though there was a transfer to Elizbeth Harrison, yet there was none for any such sum as six hundred pounds? he said he had lost the first receipt, and knowing the difficulty there was of getting a second receipt of the clerks at the Bank, he had filled up this receipt from memory; and that was the way he accounted for signing names that did not exist in our books; Mrs. Harrison was present at the same time, and she was evidently in great perturbation of mind, hardly knowing what to say on the business, she said she expected to find six hundred pounds, but she thought he did not mean to defraud her; and that she said to me, and that she said before the justice; but seeing these improprieties on the face of the receipt, and comparing it with the transfer book I thought it my duty to take it up.

Q. Do you recollect any other thing that passed? - I cannot say any more than I have said.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-52

599. JEREMIAH READING was indicted for that he having in his custody, a certain bill of exchange, purporting to to be signed by one John White , directed to John King , by the name of John Ring , Esq. for the payment of the Sum of eighty pounds, payable to himself, Jeremiah Reading or order, forty days after date thereof, and that he, on the 29th of February , feloniously did forge, make and counterfeit, and did willingly act and assist in making, forging and counterfeiting on the back of the said note an acceptance, in writing, of the said bill of exchange, and which said false, forged and counterfeited acceptance is to the tenor following, John King , A. with intention to defraud William Dalby and Richard Brown .

Indicted in a second COUNT for uttering, as true, a like acceptance knowing it to be forged, with intention to defraud the same persons.

(The case opened by Mr. Bailey.)

(The witnesses examined separate by the prisoner's desire.)

WILLIAM DALBY sworn.

I live at the corner of Bishopsgate-street; I am in partner ship with Richard Brown , I was in partnership with him in February 1792.

Q. Do you recollect any application being made to you by the prisoner, and when? - He called on me the first time on February the 28th, 1792, on this business; he then told me that he had obtained some money out of Yorkshire that had been long owing him, and he should be able to discharge a debt that he owed me.

Q. Did he produce to you any instrument? - He then described two bills that evening, one on John King , Esq. value eighty pounds; he mentioned also another bill.

Q. Did he mention where John King lived? - I think he did; but I did not enquire particularly; he said he received them of one John White , of Bristol.

Q. Did he mention the date? - I think he did not.

Q. Did he mention the time it had to run? - I am not clear as to that.

Q. Did he afterwards produce to you that bill of exchange? - Not that evening.

Q. Did any thing further pass that evening? - As to the drawer he mentioned Mr. White as a West India merchant, at Bristol, and said that he had received it of him personally at Bristol; I asked him then to see the bill? he told me he had it not with him, but that he had left it with Mr. King for acceptance; he then asked me if I would give him the change out of the bill, deducting the account that he owed me for goods? I told him that I certainly would, if it was accepted by a reputable man, give him the exchange, deducting my account.

Q. When did he come to you afterwards with the bill? - The next evening, after the candles were light, the 29th of February; I then looked at the bill, and asked him respecting John King who he was; he told me that he was a gentleman, lived in a very large house, and kept a carriage, and servants in livery, which he saw.

Q. Did he represent him as living in a large house of his own? - I don't remember he gave any other description. I then particularly looked over the bill, and could observe no acceptance on it, and he had told me it was accepted; he told me then that the acceptance was on the back; at which he turned the bill and shewed it me.

Q. Look at that bill. Did you ever see that before? - Yes, on the 29th of February 1792; this is the same bill that I have been speaking of.

Q. Look at the back. Did he point out to you that name? - He did, he pointed out the name John King . I asked him why it was on the back? because I never saw an acceptance in a place where I thought an indorsement ought to be; he then said he made the same objection to Mr. King when he received it of him; he represented that Mr. King damned him, and asked him what the devil of an acceptance he wished to have?

Q. On that did you advance him any money? - Yes, I did, ten pounds, he represented that he had been distressed; I did not advance more, because I had made no enquiry after Mr. King; I took a receipt for the ten pounds.

Q. Look at that receipt. - This is the receipt written by myself, and signed by Reading.

(The receipt read by the clerk of the court.)

" Received February the 23d, 1792, of Dalby and Brown, ten pounds in part of a bill of exchange, left in their hands to discount, drawn on John King , Berkeley-street, Portman-square.

J. Reading."

Court. Did you say that he wrote the

whole of the receipt? - No, I wrote the receipt, and I will give you a reason why I wrote it. About two years before this man came to me, and could not write his name then.

Prisoner. Ask him whether I can write?

Court. You see him write? - I did, I saw him sign the receipt, and indorse the bill, that was the chief that passed that evening, I was going to Fleet-street to sup with a friend, and I took the bill with me in my pocket.

Q. In all the conversations which you had with him about this bill, did he constantly describe it to be a bill drawn on Mr. King, and not on Mr. Ring? - He did, no other name was mentioned but King.

(The bill read by the clerk of the court.)

"Bristol, February 21, I. H. 1782.

Forty days after date pay to Mr. Jeremiah Reading or order, the sum of eighty pounds for value Recevd, and place it to the account of John White .

John White .

To John King , Esq. Berkley-street, Portman-square, London."

(On the back) John King . A.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar ever come to you to complete the discounting of the bill? - Never.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see him? - I did not see him till I served the warrant at the King's Bench ten or eleven months after that.

Q. Did you cause any enquiries to be made after him? - I did, and could not find him.

Q. Do you know where he lodged? - He lodged at one place in Duke-street, Manchester-square, he told me so.

Q. Did you see him at the lodging? - Never, he told me so when he gave me the bill.

Q. Did you make any enquiries there after him? - I had no opportunity till the wife of the prisoner, and Mrs. Sadler, the landlady of the house where they lodged, in Duke-street, Manchester-square, came down to our house to know whether I had a bill of that same description, of eighty pounds.

Q. How long was it after this happened? - On Friday the 2d of March.

Q. What did you do with the bill after you received it? - As soon as I received it I went to my friend Mr. Brownlow, of Fleet-street, and told him that I had taken a bill on John King , and gave it him to enquire, respecting the validity of John King , and whether he resided as addressed on the bill? this was on the evening of the 29th of January, not an hour after I had taken it; on the next day I did not hear any thing of my friend, Mr. Brownlow, who had the bill to make enquiry.

Q. Did you in consequence of any information coming from any quarter make any enquiry after Reading? - I did, and found he was gone.

Q. Where? - At Duke-street, Manchester square, finding him and his wife had both absconded themselves, from thence, I conceived it to be a notorious transaction.

Q. Did you cause any other enquiries to be made in the public papers, and advertisements? - Yes, I did, I went to the chamberlain of the City; I advertised his person, and description, and there is a copy of advertisement.

Mr. Cullen. What day was it Mrs. Sadler, and Mrs. Reading came to you? - On Friday the 2d of March, the same day that Mr. Brownlow returned the bill to me; I received the bill of Mr. Brownlow the same day after they had been to enquiry.

Q. Did you go to Duke-street, Manchester-square? - I did.

Q. And who did you find there? - I found Mrs. Reading, but not Mr. Reading.

Q. You had transactions with Mr. Reading before this? - Particularly two transactions.

Q. Did not he say he wanted some goods the day he came to you? - Not that I can recollect, he came only mentioning what he owed me before.

Court. How much did he owe you before? - About nine pounds, I cannot say exactly.

Mr. Cullen. When he came he told you where he lived himself, and where King lived? - He did.

Q. The receipt was read over to him when it was written? - It was.

Q. He made no hesitation of signing the receipt? - No.

Q. After Mr. Reading went away, did you give directions to the persons in the shop, that if he called again he should have whatever he desired? - Certainly not.

Q. Did not you before you went out of the shop tell the shopman that if Mrs. Reading came for any thing she might have what she pleased? - Never.

JAMES DUNBAR sworn.

In February, 1792, I was shopman to Dalby and Brown.

Q. Do you recollect when the prisoner at the bar came? - I cannot exactly say the day, it was the evening, the first time he came.

Q. Do you recollect what application he made that evening to Mr. Dalby? - It was about a bill that he obtained of a person that owed him some money in Yorkshire; the prisoner said that he had just come out of the country.

Q. Did he produce that bill? - He did not the first evening.

Q. Did he describe it? - He said the amount of it was eighty pounds, he said it was drawn on King, I am sure he said King.

Q. Did he represent to you who King was, or where he lived? - He said he lived in Berkeley-street, a man of opulence; he represented that the second evening, not the first.

Q. Do you recollect after his coming the first evening, what application he made, with respect to that bill? - He wished to have it discounted, Mr. Dalby said if he would bring the bill for him to examined, he would have no objection to discount it.

Q. Was Mr. Dalby to make any deduction out of it? - Yes, he was to pay Mr. Dalby what he owed him.

Q. When did he come again? - He came the next night.

Q. What was the first day he came? - I think it was the 28th of February.

Q. What day of the week was it? - That I cannot say exactly, he came the next night and brought the bill.

Q. Did Mr. Dalby discount it? - He did not.

Q. What is the reason he did not? - He wished to make some enquiries, I heard him say so, he advanced the sum of ten pounds on it.

Q. Did he say any thing the second night about the accepter? - Mr. Dalby objected to the mode of acceptance, because it was accepted on the back of the bill, Mr. Reading said that he made the same objections to this King, and he said that King swore at him and asked him what he would have?

Q. When Mr. Dalby advanced him the ten pounds on the bill what became of the bill? - He took the bill.

Q. Did Mr. Reading give any acknowldgment for the ten pounds? - Yes, a receipt was given.

Q. Did you hear him describe who Mr. King was that night? - He represented him to be a man of opulence; I think he said, he was one that kept his carriage, and that a footman came to the door.

Q. Did he describe the house? - I think he said something about a large white house, I don't recollect he said any

thing else.

Q. Do you remember whether he stated him to be the only person that lived in the house? - I cannot speak to that, I do not recollect.

Q. Did you see him afterwards? - I did.

Mr. Knapp. You have lived in the service of Messrs. Dalby and Brown some time? - I have.

Q. You of course know the firm of the house; do you recollect what the firm of the house was in February, 1792? - Richard Brown , and William Dalby .

Q. Perhaps you have known the prisoner at the bar some time? - I have seen him several times there.

Q. Had he been accustomed to deal with Messrs. Brown and Dalby? - I recollect him buying one parcel of goods, and they were not paid for.

Q. From his having been there several times, and dealing there once, I presume there was a considerable confidence placed in the prisoner at the bar? - I don't know that there was.

Q. Mr. Dunbar, the way in which the prisoner at the bar came was in your hearing the first night, I suppose there were several present in the shop at the time, who must have heard all the conversation that passed between the prisoner and Mr. Dalby? - I cannot speak to that.

Q. Do you mean to say that the prisoner talked in such away as to prevent any one else from hearing what he said? - He was in the parlour with Mr. Dalby.

Q. He did not whisper, or else you would not have heard him? he said he had got such a bill, and he wanted somebody to discount it? - He did.

Q. And he said he would bring the bill the next night, provided Mr. Dalby would do so? - Yes.

Q. And he came the next night? - He did.

Q. He always spoke of a Mr. King, living in Berkeley-street he spoke of that himself? - He did, of Squire King.

Q. Did you hear say where the bill was drawn from? - I think it was from Bristol, and the drawer was named White.

Q. And that appears on the face of the bill to be truth? - It is.

Q. Look at the bill now, and see whether it appears so? - It does.

Q. It does appear to be a genuine true bill, both as to the bill being drawn itself, and as to the acceptance? - It does.

Q. Do you mean to say that during all the conversation you heard that he ever hesitated giving any account of this bill or of the acceptance? - I don't know that Mr. Dalby asked him any particular questions any further about this King.

Q. I ask you whether he did not give answers without hesitating in the least to the questions that were put to him? - I believe he did.

Q. The second time he came he trusted the bill with Mr. Dalby? - He did.

Q. He got a receipt for it? - He got a receipt for the ten pounds.

Q. He did not write the body of the receipt himself? - He did not.

Q. Was it read to him? - I think it was.

Q. So when the receipt was tendered to him having been made out by Mr. Dalby himself he made no scruple of putting his name to it, and left the bill with Mr. Dalby? - He did.

Q. Now, sir, how soon did you hear of the prisoner at the bar afterwards? - About a twelve month.

Q. Have not you heard that this unfortunate man has been in the King's Bench prison? - I have heard that.

Q. Have you not heard that very soon

after this matter took place, he went down to Bristol? - Yes.

Q. Have you not heard that he was arrested at Bristol? - I have.

Q. Was you sent to make any enquiries? - I went the Sunday following to a place where he used to lodge at in the Borough, and I could not find him, it was in the Borough.

Mr. Bailey. Did you ever understand from the prisoner that he lodged in the Borough? - No.

Q. Did you ever see him in a lodging in the Borough? - No.

WILLIAM BROWNLOW sworn.

Q. Do you know Mr. Dalby of Bishopsgate-street? - Yes.

Q. Did he make any application to you respecting that bill? - Yes, I believe it was about March 1792. He came to me one evening asking me if I knew Mr. King; I received this bill of Mr. Dalby, at his request I made enquiry in Berkeley-street, Portman-square for a Mr. King, I made it the next morning, I could not find any such person in that street, the next day Mr. Dalby called on me and I gave him the bill again.

Mr. Cullen. You enquired after Mr. King in Berkeley-street, Portman-square? - Yes.

Q. In which Berkeley-street? - In both of them.

Q. At what time in the day? - About twelve o'clock.

Q. How long did you make the enquiry? - I went from one end of the street to the other, enquiring at all the shops, and public houses.

Court. How many minutes or hours? - I should think I was nearly an hour.

Q. Do you recollect what day of the week or day of the month? - I cannot.

Q. What month was it? - In March.

Q. How long was it after you see Mr. Dalby and he desired you to make that enquiry? - That very day after.

THOMAS SADLER sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Perfectly well.

Q. Was there ever any connection between you and him? - Yes.

Q. What? - He was a lodger and boarder in my house.

Q. Where did you live? - No. 39, Duke-street, Manchester-square; he came on the 20th of January 1792,

Q. When did he go away? - To the best of my knowledge on the 2d of March, and I made an enquiry on the 2d of March.

Q. Did he go away public or without your knowledge? - I did not know that he was going to leave me.

Q. Did you make any enquiries after a Mr. King? - I did in Berkeley-street, Manchester-square, in the upper and lower, all through up to Edgeware-road.

Q. Do you know what is called Berkeley-street Portman-square? - I do, that is what is called Upper Berkeley-street. I made that enquiry on the 3d of March.

Q. Did you find Mr. King? - No such person was ever known to live there.

Q. What kind of an enquiry did you make? - I enquired at the shops, I and two more went and we omitted no house.

Q. Do you know in point of fact how many you enquired at? - Almost every house on one side of the street, I don't think I omitted one.

Q. How long was you engaged in making the enquiry? - As long as in enquiring at every house, the answer was soon made when I asked for such a name.

Mr. Knapp. The prisoner at the bar had lodged with you as a lodger of your's in Duke-street, Manchester-square, so that if he said he lodged with you he spoke truth.

Mr. Bailey. He came to you in January 1792; Did he continue with you uninterupted till March? - I don't know that he was out above one night.

Mr. Knapp. So you made some enquiries about this Mr. King? - I did.

Q. Did you make any enquiries after the prisoner at the bar? - No, it was after Mr. King.

Q. This man had not quite lived with you three months; did you agree with him weekly or monthly? - He was to pay me weekly.

Q. Had he paid you for the lodgings? - He had not.

Q. So that induced you to make that enquiry; you have had lodgers before, you have known them go away and come back again? - Yes, but they always settled with me.

Q. This man did not, and therefore you come and state what you have stated. With respect to Mr. King, did you try one side of the way? - Yes, of upper and lower Berkeley-street, both of the streets.

Q. Is there not another Berkeley-street in Portman-square? - I enquired on one side of the way down both the streets.

Q. Did you make any enquiry on the other side? - No.

Mr. Bailey. For what reasons did you make these enquiries after Mr. King? - Because the prisoner had told me that he had business to do with a gentleman in the city concerning a note, and if that note had been properly honoured, and he had got cash, I was to have been paid the demand I had got on him.

Q. Did he represent to you what that note was? - No, but his wife did.

Q. How came you to enquire in Berkeley-street? Was it from any thing that passed between you and the prisoner? - No, it was not.

Mr. Knapp. Then the prisoner at the bar told you there was some money to be had of a gentleman in the city, and you was to be paid your demand when he got the cash?

ANN SADLER sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Sadler .

Q. Did you look after Mr. King? - I did on Friday and Saturday, in every house in Berkeley-street, Manchester-square. We three, Mr. Blacklock and me, and Mr. Sadler did at every house, particularly we went to the white house, that was the house made mention of by Mr. Blacklock.

Q. For what reason did you make the enquiry? - Because Mr. Reading desired me to go with his wife to be satisfied of Mr. Dalby whether it was a good note.

Q. Have you ever seen the note? - Yes.

Q. Should you know it again? - I dare say I might. (Shewn her.) I can swear to that.

Court. What day was that that he desired you to go with his wife? - That was Friday the latter end of February, I belive a day or two of the last month; and he said he would meet us at the eating house, Salisbury-court, in the course of that time he went and stripped the room of what belonged to him, and locked the door and went off.

Q. On what day of the week was this? - That was on Friday. And when I went back again I did not find him.

Q. Are you sure of the day of the week? - I am sure it was of a Friday, I believe it was the 27th, I think the 1st of March was on Monday.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see him again? - I never saw him till he was in Newgate.

Mr. Cullen. You have seen him frequently since he was in Newgate? - Only twice.

Q. What did you go to Newgate for? - To see if it was the same person.

Q. Had you any conversation with him there? - No, I never spoke to him

there; I spoke to him the last time, last Saturday, he desired to see Mr. Sadler.

Q. Then you spoke to him about the money he owed for the lodgings? - I asked him what proposals he meant to make to Mr. Sadler? he said he would pay Mr. Sadler in two payments; that was every word that passed.

Q. What did you say to that? - Nothing at all.

SAMUEL BRIGGS sworn.

I collected the parochial rates of Berkeley-street in the year of 1792.

Q. Do you know whether a Mr. King resided in that street at that time? - I never knew the name of King in the street at all.

Mr. Knapp. Then every body that pay rates you are in the habit of knowing, because you collect the rates of them? 1 s. - Yes.

Q. But if a gentleman had taken a house for two months, and had not paid the rates you would not have had an opportunity of knowing him, because he would not have appeared in your rate books? - He would not.

Q. As a lodger he would not also? - No, he would not.

Prisoner. Now Mr. Briggs is a gentleman that I know, ask him whether I have not been a housekeeper in Mary-le-bone parish myself? - Yes, and owes some pounds for rates now.

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn.

I was clerk to a Mr. White, of Bristol in the year 1792.

Q. What was his christian name? - John White ; he is a West India merchant.

Q. Do you remember at any time the prisoner coming to Mr. White in the month of February 1792? - I did.

Q. On what occasion? - I believe the prisoner at the bar came to Mr. White on the 19th or 20th of February 1792, with a note payable for an hundred pounds on Mr. White, drawn by one Mr. Gillan, a horse dealer.

Q. What passed between Mr. White and the prisoner on that occasion? - I see Mr. White give the prisoner at the bar twenty pounds, and a note drawn on one King, in London.

Q. In what form was the note? - Pay to Jeremiah Reading or order forty days after date the sum of eighty pounds. It was drawn on one John King , of Upper Berkeley-street, Portman-square.

Mr. Bailey. Pray who are you? - I am a clerk when I can get into employ.

Q. Are you in employ at this time? - I cannot exactly say.

Q. Pray, Mr. Clarke, how long have you been a clerk? - Ever since I was six or seven years of age.

Q How long had you lived with Mr. White? - Five months, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Where did Mr. White at that time live? - He lived at the North side of Queen-square.

Q. I believe he did not carry on much business? - I cannot say to that,

Q. You was his clerk for five months, prior to this time, and yet what business he carried on, you cannot tell? - Yes, I can.

Q. Cannot you tell neither of what extent? - He was as a West India merchant, and sold tea and sugar, Irish linens and other things.

Q. I should suppose he must have a good many pecuniary transaction? - Those I know nothing about.

Q. How many clerks did he keep? - Two; one James Cox and myself.

Q. What was Cox's employment? - As a head clerk; and I was under him.

Q. What did Cox use to do? - He used to be as the out door clerk respect. Mr. White's business.

Q. What was your business? - My business was to be in the counting house to receive orders and to give orders.

Q. Pray did you happen to know from whence Mr. White used to have his teas? - I do not.

Q. Had he any plantations in the West Indies? - I don't know.

Q. Had Mr. White any books? - Of course.

Q. Who kept these books of Mr. White's? - The head clerk in general.

Q. Who kept these books when Mr. Cox was out? - If Mr. White was in the way, he of course, kept the books himself.

Q. If Mr. White was not in the way, who did it? - I had nothing to do but to take down orders till the clerk or Mr. White was in the way.

Q. You know what notes he dealt in? - I know very well he dealt with one Mr. King, and Mr. King had defrauded him of several sums of money, to what amount I cannot say; and I heard Mr. White say that he was very sorry that he had given a note to Mr. Reading drawn on Mr. King.

Q. What was the nature of these dealings? - That is unknown to me.

Q. Pray did you happen to know where Mr. White kept his cash at that time? - At Tindall's and Co. bankers, at Bristol.

Q. In the course of the five months you was at Mr. White's, can you, from any judgment, tell how many notes you might see in Mr. White's house? - I cannot.

Q. Do you think you saw one a week? - Sometimes more.

Q. Did you ever see so few as one? - No. More.

Q. Did you ever see so few as twenty? - I have.

Q. Will you take on yourself to say in the first week how many notes you saw there? I cannot; I was a total stranger to the business of a merchant's clerk before I engaged with Mr. White.

Q. Pray from what place did you come when you went into Mr. White's service? - I came from my father, he is a publican, at Cirencester, in Gloucestershire.

Q. How long had you been at your father's at this time? - For three months.

Q. Where had you been prior to these three months? - I had been a navigator's clerk.

Q. When did you engage as a navigator's clerk? - I believe I engaged about 1779, respecting a cut.

Q. Pray, sir, how old are you? - Nineteen.

Q. Did the office of a navigator's clerk carry you out of the kingdom? - It did not.

Q. What was your employ while you was a navigator's clerk? - To see after the men and pay them.

Q. In what year did your clerkship commence? - It is so long ago that I hardly recollect.

Court. How old was you when you commenced a navigator's clerk? - Six, seven, or eight.

Q. What was your business when you was a navigator's clerk? - To see that all the men were there in the morning, and to see that they all did their duty.

Q. How many men had they? - Sometimes eighteen or twenty, more or less; I put their names down.

Mr. Bailey. What was your master's name? - Clayton.

Q. Where did your master live? - At Cirencester.

Court. What did you put their names down upon? - We had a memorandum book on purpose.

Q. Was you ever at school? - Yes, I have been.

Q. How early? - From three years of age, my mother told me so.

Q. Where? - At Cirencester.

Q. With whom? - With one Mr. Timothy Stevens ; he is a justice of the peace there now.

Q. What was you there to learn? - Reading.

Q. When did you learn to write? - In my fifth year.

Q. Of whom? - Of the same master.

Q. How long did you learn writing of Mr. Stevens? - Two years.

Q. When you left Mr. Stevens, where did you go? - To Farringdon.

Q. What did you do there? - I learned to sum, to cast accounts and navigation.

Q. Who did you learn navigation of at Farringdon? - Of one Mr. Thomas; I went there about half a year.

Q. And did you learn Navigation in half a year? - No, I am not able to undertake navigation now.

Q. Where did you go from thence? - From Mr. Thomas's I went home.

Q. How long did you stay at home? - I cannot exactly say the time.

Q. We will say a week? - I am sure it was more than that.

Q. Where did you go then? - I cannot recollect, because I have been in a many places.

Q. Did you then go to the navigation, the place that you talked of? - I cannot exactly say.

Q. Why according to your account you began to be a navigator's clerk at six years old? - I am not sure to a year.

Mr. Bailey. How many different businesses has your father carried on in your recollection? - Nothing but a day labourer, a publican and a navigator; and his being a navigator got me the commission of a clerk.

Q. Who was your master the navigator? - Clayton.

Q. How long ago is it since you was with Mr. Clayton? - About 1779.

Q. You left him in 1779? - To the best of my knowledge it was in 1779.

Q. How long did you live with him? - About half a year.

Q. Who did you go to then? - You put a question to me that I cannot resolve you.

Q. Tell us one or two more if you please? - I cannot recollect.

Q. Where did you live? - I lived with my father.

Q. During the whole time? - Not during the whole time.

Q. During that time how long was you with your father? - I cannot exactly recollect.

Q. Was you a year or two years? - So long ago I cannot recollect; I was not three years with my father, I will swear that.

Q. After the time you left Mr. Clayton what business was you? - I was at home; I believe to the best of my knowledge I was with one Mr. Lawrence, at Cirencester, I was errand boy, sometimes in the shop, sometimes looking after a horse.

Q. Are you sure you was with Lawrence? - Yes, I am.

Q. How long did you stay with him? - I cannot recollect.

Q. Did you stay a month? - I cannot recollect.

Q. Did you stay a year? - I cannot recollect.

Q. Did you stay two years? - I cannot recollect.

Q. Did you stay three years? - I cannot recollect.

Q. What other employment have you been in with different masters? - I have been in different employments.

Q. Have you in the course of your life time seen many notes? - No, I have not.

Q. Have you seen many notes for these last two or three years? - I suppose I may have seen an hundred.

Q. Perhaps you can tell us for what sums they were drawn? - No, I cannot.

Q. How is it you remember this particular one so well? - Because I copied it.

Q. Then if you remember it because you copied it off, perhaps you can repeat it? - I can. Eighty pounds. Pay to Jeremiah Reading or order, the sum of eighty pounds, for value received, and place it to the account of John White . And it was directed to Mr. King, Upper Berkeley-street, Portman-square, I recollect, because I copied the note in Mr. White's books.

Q. Did you ever copy any other note in your life? - Yes, I have.

Q. Now repeat any other note that you have ever copied? - At twenty-one days after date pay to Thomas Young or order, the sum of ten pounds. To Henry Ruddle , Great Sutton-street, Clerkenwell.

Court. Repeat that note. - Six weeks after date pay to Henry Ruddle or order, the sum of ten pounds fifteen shillings for value received, and place it to the account of John White . Great Sutton-street, Clerkenwell.

Court to Short Hand Writer. Read the two descriptions he has given of the last note. - (He read from his notes as above.)

Mr. Bailey. On what was the note written? - On a stamp.

Q. On what stamp? - I cannot tell; I know it was Mr. White's writing. A stationer in general keeps the stamps.

Q. Did you observe where the sum eighty was written on the bill? - Just at the corner.

Q. Was it written in Figures? - To the best of my knowledge.

Q. Was it at the right hand corner or the left hand corner? - I am not certain.

To whom was it directed? - To one King, Upper Berkeley-street, Portman-square. I am sure it was King.

Q. You say Mr. White made a remark that he was very sorry that he had given Mr. Reading the note on Mr. King? - He did.

Q. As you are so correct as to the memory of this note, be pleased to repeat it once more? - Eighty pounds after date pay to Jeremiah Reading or order, the sum of eighty pounds, for value received, and place it to the account of John White. To Mr. King, or Messrs. King, Upper Berkeley-street, Portman-square.

Q. Now you are sure that you are correct in that representation, are you sure it was not the lower street? - I am sure it was Upper Berkeley-street.

Q. Did you ever in your life see a copy of this bill? - I never did.

Q. And you state the tenor of the bill from recollection? - And to the best of my knowledge. I am not positive they are the words, but to the best of my knowledge they are the words.

Q. Had Mr. White any peculiar way of making any particular letter? - It is so long ago I cannot say; but if I see his name I shall know it whether it is his hand writing or not. (The note shewn him by the prisoner's counsel, Mr. Cullen.) That is John White 's hand writing, that is the note, that I swear, this is the note which White gave Mr. Reading that morning; soon after Mr. White purchased the horse of one Gillan.

Q. What was your reason for recollecting it was Upper Berkeley-street? - My reason is, because when the prisoner came to Bristol about six weeks after the note was given, and took a house adjoining to Mr. White's house; soon after Mr. Reading came to reside in that house he was arrested for a considerable sum of money, what the amount was I know not; he was taken to Bristol gaol; that was within the five months that I lived with Mr. White; soon after he was arrested, within a few days, I took considerable sums of money to Mr. Reading.

Q. You talked of John King having defrauded Mr. White of considerable sums of money? He has, and he found he had absconded.

Q. Do you know what became of Mr. White? - I heard Mr. White say that he

heard Mr. King was gone over to the West Indies, and he would follow him to recover the sums of money.

Q. Where was that Mr. Reading took the house? - On the North side of Queen-street, Bristol.

Q. How long did Mr. Reading stay at Bristol? - I cannot exactly say the time, I only saw him once.

Q. What time of the day? - Between the hours of eleven and twelve.

Q. Did you ever hear Mr. White say where Mr. King lived? - In Berkeley-street, London: In short I copied the bill.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. White ever paid this money? - I don't know that he did.

Q. What interval elapsed between the time that he sent him money the first time, and when he sent him the second? - I recollect I carried it to Mr. Reading three or four times.

Q. How was it carried? - It was always enclosed in a note, and the answer Mr. Reading made was always, very well.

Q. How long was it between the time you went first, and the time you went last? - I cannot exactly say the space of time.

Q. Was it a month? - It might be a month.

Q. How long did Mr. Reading live at Bristol after he took the house there? - He was at Bristol Gaol at the time I left Mr. White.

Q. How long did he live next door to you before he was arrested? - Three or four days.

Q. Do you know for what sum he was arrested? - No.

Q. When did Reading take the house next door to your master's? - About the latter end of February, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. What time of the year did you go to Mr. White? - The latter end of January, I engaged with Mr. White.

Q. How near the time of your going away was you in the habit of carrying money to Mr. Reading? - I cannot exactly say.

Q. When was the last time? - Some time in March.

Q. Do you know where Mr. White is now? - I have not seen him since I left him.

Court. When did you leave him? - Some time in June, 1792.

Q. Then you swear you have never seen this White since June, 1792.

Mr. Bailey. What was the transaction that gave occasion to this note? - Something about horses; Mr. White had purchased some horses of one Gillan, in Yorkshire, six grey horses, and he gave Reading this bill.

Court. Look at the prisoner at the bar, how long have you known him? - I never see the prisoner before I came to town now, only during the time that I carried the money to Bristol Gaol.

Q. When was the first time you ever saw him? - It was in February, to the best of my knowledge, that was the first time.

Q. Tell me positively? - The time he brought the note for payment.

Q. Where? - At Mr. White's.

Q. What do you mean by bringing the note for payment? - He brought a bill for payment of an hundred pounds, and Mr. White gave him a note for eighty pounds.

Q. When did you see him after? - I did not see him till after he was arrested, when I saw him three, four, or five times in Bristol Gaol.

Q. On your oath then you swear that you never saw him before the 21st of February 1792, and that you did not see him afterwards till you carried the money to him in Bristol Gaol, then how do you know that he lived next door to Mr. White before he was in Bristol Gaol? - On account of his wife coming

to the office for money, after he was arrested.

Q. Then you don't speak of your own knowledge, that he lived there? - I never saw him come into the house, and never come out.

Q. How often did you see him while he was in Gaol? - Three, four, or five times to the best of my knowledge,

Q. How many times did you see him before he left Bristol? - It might be three.

Q. How often have you seen him since he left Bristol? - I saw him on Monday last, and I have seen him Tuesday and Wednesday, but not to day till I see him now.

Q. Now I ask you whether you saw him between the time he left Bristol, and Monday last? - I never did.

Q. Have you never had any connections or dealings with him? - No, never.

Q. You have never had any connections or dealings in the bill way yourself? - I never had, nothing further than copying a bill.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. White has had any connection or dealings at all with the prisoner in the bill way besides this bill? - Not during the time that I lived with him.

Q. I don't care for the time that you lived with him or did not live with him, do you know any other transaction in the bill way between the prisoner and Mr. White? - I do not.

Q. How long did you live with Mr. White after the prisoner transacted the business of this bill? - Four months.

Q. When did you leave him? - I left him in June.

Q. Did you ever see Mr. White's book since June? - No, never.

Q. Did the prisoner ever talk to you about this bill? - No, never.

Q. He never mentioned it to you? - He has mentioned to me, he told me what he was committed for.

Q. When did he tell you what he was committed for? - On Monday, that was the first time I saw him.

JOHN ALLEN sworn.

I am an hair dresser.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I do, I recollect him about the 23d or 24th of February, 1792, and I saw him also last Saturday, I went to see if he was the same person. On the 23d or 24th of February, a bill came for acceptance to a Mr. King, in Upper Berkeley-street, I was dressing his hair; I knew a Mr. King, in Upper Berkeley-street, Portman-square, just by New Quebeck-street.

Q. Who else did you dress there? - No other person.

Q. What apartment did he occupy in that house? - A first floor.

Q. Did you ever hear what was the christian name of Mr. King? - I have heard that his name is John King , but I am not clear.

Q. Do you remember while you was dressing him on the 23d or 24th of February, any thing particular that happened, that you took notice of that morning? - A person brought up a bill for acceptance, the word of the man servant was, that he brought up a note up stairs, which he said was for acceptance, and he said the person was waiting below; Mr. King asked his servant to hand him the pen and ink off the pembroke table that stood between the windows; this was as I was dressing him, he did hand him the pen and ink, he wrote, but I cannot say what, I did not see what he wrote.

Q. When he had wrote this what became of the bill or note then? - He gave it to the servant again, I still continued dressing the gentleman's hair, in a minute or two afterwards the servant came up again with the bill, saying that the person was not satisfied perfectly with the acceptance, he ordered the gentleman up, the person that was shewn up was

the prisoner at the bar, when he came up Mr. King asked him what reason he had to object to that acceptance, he said he did not doubt either his honour or his principle, but it was a mode of acceptance he never saw, on that he said, that was the mode he always accepted his bills, and when they came to him, he duly honoured them when due. He said, A. stood for acceptance, and King was his name; he should do no other to it. In the course of a day or two he asked me to get a private lodging, on which I introduced myself, as letting out lodgings; I lived in Prince's-street, Soho.

Q. How long was it before he went to your house, after you told him you could accommodate him? - Two or three days.

Q. How long had you dressed him in Berkeley-street? - Six or seven days, but not more.

Q. Did you see the bill or note? - I cannot pretend to say nothing at all about it for what sum it was drawn.

Q. How long did Mr. King stop in your lodgings? - Eleven days.

Q. When he left your lodgings do you know what became of him? - I cannot tell no more than what he said himself, he said that he was going abroad to the West Indies.

Q. Look round again to the prisoner at the bar, and see if you are certain that he is the man that came to Mr. King's house? - I am sure that he is the man; I have been to Newgate on Saturday to satisfy myself about the identity of his person, I went for that purpose, and for that alone, the remark I made of him was, that he had a particular scar on his right eye, and that I thought he was an Irishman.

Mr. Bailey. How long have been in business? - Eight years.

Q. Are you in business now? - I am.

Q. Pretty good business? - Yes.

Q. How many hands do you employ? - I keep two in winter, and one in summer.

Q. I think you lived in Princes-street, Soho, how far is Princes-street, Soho, from Upper Berkeley-street? - About a mile and a half.

Q. At the time you dressed Mr. King did you dress any body else in Berkeley-street? - No.

Q. How many days did you dress him there? - About six or seven days.

Q. Do you recollect what was the first day, or what was the day of the week you began to dress him? - I cannot pretend to say.

Q. Do you recollect when he came to your house? - I think it was the latter end of February.

Q. Are you sure? - I will not pretend to say.

Q. How many days before he came to live with you did this transaction take place? - About three days, or thereabouts.

Q. Are you sure as to that time? - I cannot pretend to say that I will swear to that.

Q. When you said it was the 23d or 24th of February you was not certain which of the days it was? - It was to the best of my recollection.

Q. Where do you live? - Chapel-street, Tottenham-court-road, No. 4.

Q. In the hair dressing line? - Yes.

Q. How many journeymen do you keep now? - I keep one till November.

Q. Pray what is the name of the person you keep? - As to his sirname, I don't know.

Q. Is not there a society of master hair dressers? - I know there is such a society.

Q. Then you know that the object of that society is, that no hair dresser should take a journeyman without a character? - It is the generality of the way of our business.

Q. Pray when was you first applied to come here? - Last Saturday morning.

Q. Last Saturday morning was the first

time you was applied to come here, no application was made to you to come here before last September sessions? - No.

Q. Who came to you? - The wife of the prisoner at the bar.

Court. Are you sure the prisoner brought the bill? - I saw him come up; the servant brought the bill, and he took it down again. This King went by the name of Nugent at my house, he was asked for frequently under that name. Likewise after he had been there two or three days, I asked, says I, here is a gentleman enquires for a person of the name of Nugent; says he, let him up.

Q. You say you went to a house in Berkeley-street, was it the left hand or the right hand side of the way? - The right hand side of Portman-square from here.

Q. What sort of a house was it? - It was a decent house, a new house.

Q. How many windows in front? - Three.

Q. What colour was the house? - A brick house.

Q. Who is the owner of the house? - Who was the occupier of the house I cannot say; I was not at all acquainted with the house; I was recommended by a captain O'Brian, to this King.

Q. Was it a very large handsome house? - It was three stories high and three windows in front.

Q. How long have you lived in the house where you now live? - Seven months.

Q. Was you brought up a hair dresser? - I was.

Q. Have you constantly followed that occupation? - I have.

Q. Did you ever follow any other? - No.

Q. Then you never was a bailiff's follower, and arrested people? - O! Yes, I have been.

Court. Then I desire to know what you meant by just now saying that you never followed any other occupation than an hair dresser? - I did not know what you meant by occupation.

Q. Now tell me whether you have been a bailiff's follower? - I went along with Mr. Griffin and Taylor, he lives in Tavistock-street, Covent-garden.

Q. Have you ever been employed as a bailiff's follower? - I have been with them, as an hair dresser could get into an house when other people could not.

Q. Have you ever been with them when they arrested any body? - Yes.

Q. How often? - Not a great number of times; six or seven times very likely.

Q. On you oath not more? - I cannot pretend to say, more or less.

Q. Upon your oath have you not been with one or the other twenty times? - I might; it is a long time ago, and long times between the times, so that I cannot pretend to say.

Q. When was you first with any body as a bailiff's follower? - Last December.

Q. Who was you with then? - Taylor.

Q. You never was with any bailiff before? - No, nor since.

Q. How often have you been with Taylor or Griffin since that time? - I cannot pretend to say.

Q. Might not you have been with them thirty times? - No, not thirty times.

Q. Might you have been with them twenty times? - It might have been twenty.

Q. Why did you say it was between six and seven then? - Because there has been so long a distance between the times that I cannot recollect: I never took a thought.

Q. Never took a thought how often you had been with bailiffs, but you have with the note? - The dispute that arose

between Mr. King and Mr. Reading made me remember that.

Q. A dispute! No other dispute than what you have mentioned, was there? - No other.

Q. You was present when the bill was brought? - I was.

Q. Did he write once or twice, or three times? - Once to the best of my recollection; I saw him write no more.

Q. He wrote but once then; with the same pen and the same ink? - With the same pen and the same ink, and the servant reached it to his hand.

HENRY OLIVER sworn.

I am a painter and glazier; I have known the prisoner in the year 1790, from the beginning of January, to the latter end of May; he lived with me these five months; I never heard the least against his character. I live in Wells-street, Oxford street; he was honest in his dealings with me.

Court. What was he at that time? - A servant out of place.

TIMOTHY HARLING sworn.

I am a baker, in Shorter-street, Wellclose-square; I have known the prisoner upwards of twenty-five years; I never knew any thing bad of him before now.

Court. What was he brought up to? - His father lived in the neighbourhood where I was born, he was a man of credit; he was at school when I left the place, and afterwards he came here.

Q. Have you known him since he came here? - I left Ireland about eleven years ago.

Q. Have you known him since that? - I have had some dealings with them.

Q have you been in the habit of knowing him during these last ten years? - No, I have not. But I have known him these four or five years in London.

Q. What has he been? - Upon my word I don't know what business he was been in; but he has called on me in my professional line of business.

JANE DAVIS sworn.

I live with my mother, in Upper Berkeley-street, Portman-square; I have known the prisoner about eight years; I never heard any thing to his disadvantage till now.

Q. What line has he been in during these last eight years? - I thought he was a servant . He lodged at my mother's a few weeks; he wanted a situation, and I think he got one; that is four years ago. He has called since; the last time he called he said he was married, and had married a person of some property; I think it is two years next February the last time I saw him.

Q. Do you know what time in February? - I do not. I went to his house and dined with him, it was in Bolsover-street, Cavendish-square, he had a house in there, I was at the house.

Q. What trade did he carry on? - He told me that he was going to deal in hops and different things, that he had a great many friends that would assist him, and that he was going into business for himself.

Q. Was it a pretty good house? - I believe it was a small house.

Q. Do you know of his being acquainted with any body else in your street? - I never heard him speak of any, nor I don't know that he knew any except me and my mother, and my father when he was alive. A person came in the name of Nugent, much about this time two years, it was the latter part of the summer, an elderly gentleman came by the name of Nugent, he wanted lodgings; we let him the lodgings; he refused to give his character he said, when my mother asked him for his character, he

said, why should we suspect him, he said, I don't like to be troublesome to my friends; I will pay you every week. He came in on that account, because he was to pay every week for his lodgings, we agreed; he said he should order every thing in; but when he had been there about a fortnight, and we had lost just before that a piece of cloth, I found a duplicate, a pawnbroker's ticket, in the house, in his apartment, and I was curious enough to go to the pawnbroker to know what it was about; the pawnbroker asked me if I had found it? I told him I had found it in my house; the pawnbroker said he had orders to stop it; I told him he might stop it if he pleased; I asked him what it was upon? he said it was a man's coat; I asked him the person; he described him exactly, and there was on the duplicate, John King , Mary-le-bone-street; he described the person, so I have every reason to believe it was the gentleman that had taken the apartment, and pawned the coat; and there were a great many people came after him, and enquired for bills and debts, and many things; so that we had every reason to believe that he was not as good as he should be. So I think this gentleman went by the name of Nugent and King.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 31.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-53

600. THOMAS COOKE otherwise EVERSAL and WILLIAM MAC GINNIS were indicted for stealing, on the 8th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the goods of Sir Peter Soame , Bart.

SIR PETER SOAME sworn.

On the 8th of July last I was in St. Faith's Church-yard , I lost a silk handkerchief, I suppose I had seen it in the course of the ten minutes before I lost it.

Q. Then you did not see neither of the prisoners at the bar? - I was told they were behind.

THOMAS LEWIS sworn.

I was in Ludgate-street; I am a truss maker; I saw Sir Peter Soame and his friend along with him go into a shoemaker's shop directly opposite to my house; I am certain of one, with the red hair, Thomas Cooke ; I am pretty sure the other is the same, but there is some alteration in his dress, or hair, or something, but I have no doubt of his person, the two prisoners where close at the heels of Sir Peter Soame and the other gentleman; when they went into the shop, the prisoners loitered and seemed disposed to something; I kept my eye on them, and they separated and got one at each window, and they amused themselves for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, at last one of them sat down at the private door, then got up and looked into the shop to see if the gentlemen were coming out, as I judged; when Sir Peter Soame came out with this gentleman, these two men came together and followed them; I saw them several times attempt at his pocket, I don't know whether it was one or both, several times before they got to St. Paul's Church-yard, when they got into St. Paul's Church-yard, one of them, he in the red hair, just as Sir Peter was going between the posts, put his hand into his pocket and took his handkerchief out of his pocket, and immediately rested his arm on the post, there was a gentleman along with me that saw the circumstance; when I came close to him I attempted to take hold of him by the collar, but he caught my eye, dropped down and ran behind the bar to go between the bar and the walls, and while he was running he threw the handkerchief from him; I then turned myself round and took the other as his accomplice; this one that ran

by the bar the other gentleman that was with me took, he was bound over to prosecute; Sir Peter was made acquainted with the circumstance, he saw his handkerchief and owned it; we took them to Guildhall, when we came to Guildhall yard I met with an officer, a constable, and he asked me what was the matter with these men? I told him they were pickpockets, and desired he would search them immediately.

Prisoner. Ask the gentleman whether he saw me pick the gentleman's pocket, or found the handkerchief on me?

Court. He says he did, and he says you threw it away.

Lewis. No, it was Mac Ginnis picked it out of his pocket.

PHILIP JOSTLING sworn.

The prisoners were brought to Guildhall-yard and given charge of to me, and I produce a handkerchief delivered to me before the Lord Mayor.

Court to Lewis. Did you pick up the handkerchief? - No, somebody picked it up and gave it me.

Court to Lewis. Did you pick up the handkerchief? - No, somebody picked it up and gave it me, and I took it to the Lord Mayor. (The handkerchief deposed to.)

Prisoner Mac Ginnis I was going through St. Paul's Church-yard, just by posts I immediately heard the voice saying, there is a young man has picked the gentleman's pocket. I immediately turned round and somebody took hold of me directly; I asked them did I look like any such person? I worked hard for my living; say he, I am authorized so to do by a gentleman; says I, what gentleman? says he, that man; pointing to that gentleman, Mr. Lewis; sir, says I did you give charge of me for robbing any body? it is a false accusation; they immediately took me up to Guildhall before a magistrate and found nothing at all about me; they immediately searched the young man that was with me, and they found three or four handkerchiefs about him, and they committed me immediately, without giving me an opportunity of saying a word.

Prisoner Cooke. I wish to put my trial off, I have got a wife and family, I work very hard for my living; I have not been in London above a twelve month, I came from Rochester, in Kent.

Thomas Cooke . GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

William Mac Ginnis . GUILTY. (Aged 14.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-54

601. PETER FERNS , MARY MACARTY otherwise FERNS , THOMAS HACKET , JOHN CARTY and GEORGE WEBB were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the house of James Phipps, about the hour of one in the night of the 1st July , and burglariously stealing therein, one hundred and thirty pair of mens leather shoes, value 10 l. ten pair of womens leather shoes, value 1 l. two pair of leather shoes, value 1 s. one piece of wax leather, value 5 s. the goods of James Phipps .

JAMES PHIPPS sworn.

I am a shoemaker ; I live at No. 1, Drury-lane , my house was broke open after I went to bed.

Q. Did you secure the doors and windows before you went to bed? - I and my wife we went to bed together the last of our family; I have only my wife and an

apprentice. Near one o'clock on the 1st of July, my wife awaked me out of my sleep. I went to bed between ten and eleven, she told me to get up for she thought she heard a shoe fall, I got up and I went to the stairs and I looked down and I called to the apprentice, Samuel Penman , and I asked him if he had been down stairs? he said no, he had not been down. I could see no light, and I went to bed again and told my wife I thought it was the rats; she was heavy with child, so with that I got into bed and told her to compose herself and go to sleep, and I almost got to sleep, and she said, Jim, get up for I cannot sleep; with that I heard a chair fall down and shoes on it, which made a great noise.

Q. Now did you hear that there were thieves in the shop? - I jumped up immediately to the window and called watch, and while I was opening the window I heard the door bang, the outward street door, I called watch as loud as possible for the space of a minute, there was no assistance came, but the lamplighter was going by with his lighted torch, and I asked him for a light, and he told me my door was broke open, and I went down stairs and found my door wide open and my shop stripped.

Q. Do you know how much you lost? - Yes, a great many things; here are some things found which are here.

Q. Then you don't know of your own knowledge who it was that did this? - I never saw any body.

Q. Before you went to bed was your property safe? - Yes.

Q. And your things are here you say in court? - Yes, part of them.

Mr. Knowlys. When the lamplighter was going by I take it for granted if any man had been there you could have distinguished the features of his face, even without a light? - No, I could not, it rained very fast, I was very much frightened.

Q. But perhaps the day might have been so far advanced as you might see a man's face that was at my distance from you? - No, I could not.

JAMES PENNY sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Bloombury; I went to Parker's-lane, and I saw Sanders running after a man.

Phipps. In the morning the first that came to my assistance was the patroles after the lamplighter, immediately they thought they saw somebody in the cellar, and they searched the cellar, and immediately they desired me to go to Bow-street and have some bills printed; I went and had some bills printed, and they had not a proper account at first, I went and had some others printed; and they went to pawn two pairs of shoes at a pawnbroker's, that was how it was found out.

CHRISTOPHER SANDERS sworn.

Mr. Phipps sent for me on the morning that the robbery was done, I came to his shop, there was nothing particular then occurred till the pawnbroker stopped two women, and took one of them into custody, she is not here now, she is not one of the prisoners; I went to Ferns house in Parker's-lane, about two hundred yards from where the prosecutor lived, I believe he looks after a cart and horse for Mr. Maccoul, the builder, I searched the house and found nothing, I then asked Mrs. Ferns if she had not taken rooms somewhere else? I went to two other rooms which they had taken of Mr. Maplebank, there was a pair of shoes and a tea chest in the drawers which were in one of the two rooms which the prisoner Ferns said he had taken of Mr. Maplebank.

Q. Were the rooms locked? - Yes, they were, Mr. Maplebank had one key, I could not tell who has the other.

Q. Who let you in? - Mr. Maplebank.

Q. Is Mr. Maplebank here? - I don't know that he is.

Q. What is Maplebank? - He keeps a public house, and I believe he lets out horses and chaises, I have one pair of shoes that were found there, and here is another pair that was taken off his feet, them I have had in my possession ever since.

Q. Have you any thing more to say? - No more than apprehending him.

Q. When you apprehended him what did he say? - He said very little to me, his chief discourse was to Mr. Perry.

Mr. Knowlys. Pray what are you? - I was an officer at Marlborough-street at that time

Q. You have not been discharged for misconduct from Marlborough-street office? - No, I have not.

Q. Who is Mr. Maccoul? - Mr. Maccoul was a builder, and Ferns was one of his labourers, I was told so, I believe he has worked for him this fourteen years; It was a woman that was stopped with the shoes, of the name of Pope.

Q. That led you to Ferns house? - It did.

Q. Pray how comes it that Pope has not been produced here? - She was bound over upon evidence.

Q. Have you taken any pains to find out this Pope? - I called upon her and told her to mind and be in time.

Q. Do you know a Mrs. Doggett that has been in court, and received a reprimand? - Yes. This woman Pope swore she was sent by Ferns.

Q. These pair of shoes that were found on the man's feet, was found eight days after the robbery? - I believe they were.

Q. They were old shoes? - They had been worn.

Q. I don't know whether you have known much of this man? - He was a stranger to me.

JAMES PERRY sworn.

I am an headborough belonging to Bloomsbury Parish, I was sent for by Mr. Wheeler, he sent his servant to me about the 4th of July, I went to Parker's-lane, when I got there I saw Sanders running after a man that had got a bag, he said he was about the business of the house that was broke open the top of Drury lane; accordingly he says to me, come with me, I went with him to Ferns house, there was a young woman there that said Ferns was moved to Maplebank's, I went to Maplebank's, and dispatched Sanders for a search warrant, and Mr. Maplebank opened the door, and I went up stairs, and the rooms were fast, and Mr. Maplebank gave me some keys, and I opened the top door; Maplebank unlocked the street door, and I opened the other, and I found in Ferns room a bag with a few shoes in it; Maplebank told me it was Ferns room, and Ferns told me so.

Q. Maplebank had the key? - Yes, he had.

Q. Did you find any on Ferns? - No, I found out where Ferns worked, and found the prisoner.

Mr. Knowlys. You know Ferns I believe? - Ferns is a hard working man, a day labourer ; I never was more surprised in my life than about this, I always thought him very honest.

Q. Should you have been at all surprised if Maplebank had given him an old pair of shoes for services done him.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I live in High-street, Bloomsbury. I produce a pair of shoes I stopped on Judith Pope , the day after the robbery was committed.

WILLIAM HOW sworn.

I am a servant to Phipps; I know I made a pair of shoes, and these are the pair that I made, I can swear to them.

ELIZABETH ROBSON sworn.

I lodge at No. 6, Parker's-lane. Ferns lodged facing, at Mr. Maplebank's,

at the Golden Hart, in a room over a stable. About the beginning of last July, I was in Mr. Count's shop, Parker's-lane, No. 6, Mrs. Doggett that lives under the same landlord, in his next house at the lower place, she came in Mr. Count's shop as I was standing there.

Court. I cannot hear any thing of Count, as he is not at the bar? - I saw the property taken from Mr. Count's cellar.

Mr. Knowlys. Then this property that was afterwards found to be stolen, was lodged in Count's cellar, and not in Ferns's house? - Mrs. Doggett was in possession of the property, till noon day, and then it was removed to some other place.

RICHARD DOZEL sworn.

I received one pair of new shoes from the woman at the bar, Mary Ferns .

Q. Was her husband present? - No.

Q. Have you got them here? - I have.

Q. Did Mary Ferns pass for the wife of Peter Ferns ? - Yes, here are two pair in all, one pair I received from another person. (Deposed to.)

Mr. Knowlys. What day was this? - The day after the robbery.

Prosecutor. I have a great deal of property in a bag here, which I found in a hay lost, over a stable, where Peter Ferns looked after a gentleman's horse.

Peter Ferns . I leave my defence to my counsel. I bought them shoes, that were taken from my feet, of a shoemaker that lives in King-street, Seven Dials, and gave five shillings and six-pence for them, my master is in the country, and could not be here, Mr. Phipps said that he would bring him here if he could.

Prosecutor. I went to get him to come, and he said if he came perhaps he should do more harm than good, so he would stay away.

All five Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-55

602. ELIZABETH HAGUE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of January , a silver watch, value 1 l. 10 s. a steel watch chain, value 4 d. a brass watch key, value 1 d. the goods of William Robinson .

WILLIAM ROBINSON sworn.

I am a silk weaver , the prisoner was a tenant of mine, she rented part of a house up two pair of stairs, in Pelham-street, Spittalfields . On the 19th of July about twenty minutes before one, she came to ask what was o'clock, she sees the watch hanging up; a few minutes after I went down stairs to dinner, I might be gone about half an hour, and when I came up again the watch was gone.

Q. Where was she at that time? - She went up stairs and down again, while I was down at dinner, I saw her go up and down; the officer has got the watch now in court.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I am a constable of Hatton-garden. I had that watch delivered me at the office by Noon.

JOHN NOON sworn.

I delivered the watch to Ray, the constable. In the first place, I got it of Mr. Manger, the pawnbroker, I bought it of him, I bought two together for two pounds ten.

JEREMIAH MANGER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I remember selling a watch to John Noon ; I received it of this prisoner the 19th of July, she pawned it for one guinea, in the name of Elizabeth Hague ; the 25th of July, she came and seemed to be in very great distress, and wanted me to buy the watch, I told her I had plenty to sell.

Q. Did you buy it? - I did not; there was a neighbour of mine named Drury that wanted a watch, this person had been speaking to me about one a month before,

says I to him, I don't know but what I might have a watch that you may want; he gave twenty-four shillings for the watch, and afterwards he did not like it; I took it of him again.

Q. Are you sure it is the same watch? - I cannot tell, it has been so defaced; I put it into my window after that, and I sold that and another watch out of my window for fifty shillings.

- DRURY sworn.

Q. Had you a watch of Manger? - I had, and I delivered it to him again in one month's time.

Prisoner. I went down for a pint of beer at my dinner, and going down I picked up the watch about two yards from the door, and I took it to Mr. Manger's and made a guinea of it. (The watch deposed to, Robinson knowing the number, and name.)

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 23)

Imprisoned twelve months in the house of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-56

603. WILLIAM IVES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , one hundred pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. the goods of Joseph Sharp .

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn.

I am one of the officers at Marlborough-street. I met the prisoner on the 27th of August, Tuesday, about half past eight in the evening, in Great Marlborough-street, he had this piece of lead on his shoulder; I followed him about half a mile before I stopped him to see where he wanted to sell it; I stopped him in Crown-court, St. Giles's; I stopped him and asked him where he was going with that lead? he said he was going to Mr. Davis; I asked him where Mr. Davis lived? he did not chuse to tell me where he lived; so I told him I must take him to St. Giles's watch-house; the watchmen took the lead; the watchmen is not here.

Q. How do you know it is the same lead? did the watchman take it in your presence? - Yes, I went with him.

Q. When you got to the watch-house, what marks did you put on it to know it again? - I put different marks on it, a cross on it.

Q. Did you find out who the lead belonged to? - I found it out the next morning.

Q. How did you find it out? - By enquiring where we see any repairs going forwards; and we found Mr. Sharp had lost some lead from the top of the brewhouse.

Q. At the time it was lost do you know whether it was affixed or loose? - It was thrown down loose in the afternoon by the workmen.

Q. What was his christian name? - Joseph Sharp , in King-street, St. James's .

Q. How far did you find the prisoner from the house of Mr. Sharp? - Not a quarter of a mile.

Q. Is the lead brought here? - Yes, brought by Mr. Sharp's man.

Mr. CLEAVER sworn.

I am clerk to Joseph Sharp . On the 28th of August, in the morning about eight o'clock, two men from the police office in Marlborough-street, came to enquire whether there was any lead missing from the premises? at the same time they had a man in custody that appeared like a brewer's servant, that had stole some lead; I went to the office and saw the prisoner at the bar in custody there; from thence I went to Mr. Rawlins, the

plumber, to beg him to look at the lead; we found that some lead had been cut down on Tuesday by the carpenters.

THOMAS RAWLINS sworn.

I am a plumber; I do the plumbing business at the brewhouse for Mr. Sharp. On the 28th of August, in the morning, I was sent for to examine the lead that was found; I saw the lead at the office.

Q. Did you know that lead? - I went to the brewhouse of Mr. Sharp, and surveyed the upper part of the brewhouse, and I found there was some lead took off on Tuesday morning, and among it there was one gutter.

Q. Did you carry the lead to Mr. Sharp's? - Not that day, but the day following I did, that was on Thursday.

Q. Did you find the lead there corresponded at all with the lead wanting on the brewery? - There was a piece of lead missing, and had been took out from the upper part of the gutter, and this lead that we took answered to that place as to length and breadth.

Q. Did it appear newly cut? - It was not cut at all; it was a new piece.

MARK FULTON sworn.

I am a carpenter; I let some lead fall down in the yard on Tuesday; I cut it myself from the gutter on the 27th of February; it was not missing that day, it was missing the next day; it was brought back on Wednesday or Thursday; I thought, as far as I could tell, it was the same lead, but I cannot swear to it.

Q. You know there was a piece thrown down, you cannot swear this was the same you threw down? - No. I threw a deal down then, but I cannot swear to any one of the pieces.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-57

604. WILLIAM MUMBY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a cloth coat, value 3 s. the goods of Archibald Elliott .

ARCHIBALD ELLIOTT sworn.

I am a labouring man .

Q. Had you a cloth coat stole from you at any time? - On Monday the 4th of August I had it stole; I did not see the prisoner take it, I saw it just opposite a broker's shop, put up to be sold on Monday morning the 5th.

Q. I ask you when you last saw it before it was stole? - Sunday about twelve o'clock, I missed it from my own room, in the King's Head, James's-street ; I am only a lodger there; I missed it from my bed room.

Q. How soon did you see it after you missed it? - Monday about eight o'clock at Mr. Lawrence's shop door.

- LAWRENCE sworn.

I am a taylor, in Petty France, it is called York-street now. On Sunday evening about seven o'clock the 4th of August, my wife had a very bad state of health, and was very ill that day particularly, about seven o'clock she wished to be at the door for the sake of a little air, and this man came in, and he said to me, would I purchase this black coat? I I told him it was a thing I did not wish to have any thing to do with buying of a Sunday; so I asked him what he asked for it? he said he was a recruit, and rather being short of money he asked four shillings and six-pence or five shillings I cannot be certain which; I told him the most I could give him was three shillings as it was pieced under both the arms. I hung it out on Monday morning between six and seven o'clock.

Court. You see there is nothing thrives that is bought of a Sunday? - Soon after it was hung out, there was a jew that came

in, and asked me what I would let him have that black coat for? and after that the prosecutor came to the door and found the coat; by eight o'clock in the morning the constable came with him; I delivered it immediately. The old man that says he owns the coat, has had it ever since, by the magistrate's order, in his care; I never saw it since.

Q. Now look at that man, was he in a soldier's dress? - The same; he is the man, I never saw him before in my life.

Q. Where did you pick him out? - I went to the Bird Cage-walk on Monday in the afternoon, about the middle of the day.

Q. How long was he with you altogether? - About a quarter of an hour.

Q. What did you recollect him by, his voice, figure, or what? - He has got an amazing sight of warts on one hand, which I took particular notice of, and I gave the same description before the magistrate.

Q. How many did you pick him out of? - I cannot say how many there might be particular, there might be more than twenty exercising at the same time.

Q. Did he say any thing to you when you picked him out? - I did not pick him out while he was exercising, I waited till they were done. This soldier lodges in the house with the old man; after I had seen the man I went with a constable.

Q. Did you know him to be the man before you saw the prosecutor? - I did.

Q. Should you know the coat again? - I should by the piecing under the arm; but at the same time I have seen it so triffling a time.

Q. Is the constable here? - No.

Q. Are you very sure that the coat you gave to the old man, was the coat you received from the prisoner? - It was the same coat; I am sure of it.

Court to Elliott. Produce the coat.

Lawrence. I know it by the piecing under the arms.

Elliott. I know it by the same, and by a remarkable seam on the top of the sleeve.

Prisoner. I never saw the coat, nor know nothing about it.

The prisoner called his serjeant to his character.

Fined 1 s. and sent back to his regiment.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-58

605. WILLIAM NEWTON was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , twelve horse brushes, value 12 s. the goods of Matthew Wilson .

MATTHEW WILSON sworn.

I am a sadler ; I live at No. 31, South Moulton-street, St. George's, Hanover-square ; I keep a house there; I did not see the prisoner take these brushes.

Q. Were they taken from a shop or where? - I cannot tell.

Q. Did you miss them at all? - I did not.

Q. Is there any of your servants that did? - No. I went to Mr. Cary, a basket-maker, in Oxford-street, the prisoner's lodging, and there I found twelve brushes, he lived with me some months in the winter; nine of these twelve brushes I knew to be my property by my private mark, and one by a defect in making the brush; the private mark on them is R: the other two I cannot swear to. This was on the 7th of August, about six or before seven in the evening.

Q. How came you to go to Mr. Cary's? - Mr. Walker, the constable of St. George's, and Mr. Marsh, the Sadler, called on me, in consequence of which I went there.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in that house? - I don't know.

Q. Who produced the brushes to you? - Mr. Walker the constable.

Q. And before this you had not missed them; can you, by these marks, swear that these were brushes you never sold? - I cannot positively.

Q. Who has had the care of these brushes ever since? - The constable.

Mr. Knowlys. It was four months that this man had left you before you received this intelligence? - More than four months.

Q. Had you ever a better man in your service, so far as you had an opportunity of observing his conduct? - He was a very valuable servant ; he was an entire stranger to me when I took him; he was a favourite with me.

Q. This man having left you four months, you had not missed any brushes? - Never till now.

Q. Who has been employed in selling brushes since this man has left you? - Five or six persons have the power of disposing of them if a customer calls,

Q. From the number of your stock, and from the state of these things in your stock, you did not know that any were missing, therefore whether any servant had disposed of these brushes it is impossible for you to tell? - It is so.

WILLIAM WALKER sworn.

I am a constable of St. George's, Hanover-square. Mr. Robinson who was the master of the prisoner, came to me on Tuesday with a search warrant. to search the apartment of the prisoner, at the biscuit baker's, the upper end of Oxford-road, Mr. Cary's; the search warrant was for a cravet; we went and did not find it, and in searching the box I found sixteen brushes, which Mr. Wilson termed horse brushes, but some were differently covered have them here, I have kept them ever since (Produced and deposed to.)

Court. At the time you took these brushes, did any thing pass between you and Mr. Wilson, and the prisoner? - The prisoner was not present.

Q. How do you know they were the prisoner's lodging? - Because I went to to Mrs. Cary's, and she took me up, and he went home, and he confessed it was his box that contained the things where the brushes were; I broke his boxes open.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing about them at any time? - Not that I heard.

Mr. Knowlys. Where was this said that he said about the box? - It was said in the apartment at Marlborough-street office, not while he was present before the the justice, or before the justice's clerk, he said, did you open the other box, because there is money in it? says I, I opened both the boxes; says he, it is my box.

Q. Then he spoke as easy as if I was to ask you whether the shirt on your back is your own, and you would say yes?

Court to Prosecutor. Can you ascertain at all whether there was any brushes missing in your house? - No, not at all.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-59

606. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , a black silk cloak, value 10 s. a cotton petticoat, value 2 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. the goods of Ann Ibbotson .

ANN IBBOTSON sworn.

I am a widow ; I lost the articles in the indictment; I did not see the prisoner

take them; I live at No. 4, Harford-place, Drury-lane ; I employed her as a charewoman ; I missed the things, and I suspected her; I missed my cloak the 8th of August, I don't know whether it was Wednesday or Thursday; I did not miss the other articles till after she was taken, she was taken up the same night; after I missed the cloak I suspected she had taken it, I told the watchman to take her; he took her to the watch-house, and the duplicates were found on her.

Q. After she was taken up did you ever find any more things? - The things were all found on her that are in the indictment.

Q. Did you see the tickets of the other things taken from her? - Yes, I did.

Q. Are all the other articles in the indictment found? - Yes, they are all in court.

Q. To whom were the duplicates delivered to? - To the constable.

Q. Is he here? - No, he is up at Clerkenwell.

Q. Have you seen any of your things at the pawnbroker's since? - Yes, all of them; the cloak was the first thing I did see.

JOSHUA ALLEN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant. On the 6th of August a pair of cotton Stockings were pawned; on the 7th a cotton petticoat, but it was not my taking in; on the 8th a black silk cloak.

Q. Who pawned these things? - The prisoner at the bar; I knew her person, I have seen her many times before.

Q. Did you give her duplicates? - I did. I have got the things here. (Produced.)

Prosecutor. I know the cotton stockings by a dot upon the top of them put on myself; the black silk cloak has two sorts of lace on it, and a tare on the neck; I have had it five or six years.

JOSEPH TURNER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant; I produce a muslin neckcloth, it was pawned by the prisoner at the bar; I had seen her before; it was pawned the 6th of August. (Produced.)

Prosecutor. It is mine, I know it by some iron moles in the front of it.

Prisoner. I was in the prosecutor's house six weeks; she had me first to wash, iron, and get up things, and she never gave me nothing at all but once a shilling, and two-pence and three-pence; I was with a lodger of her's ten weeks, and between them all I had about four shillings; that was all the money I had all the time I was there, and I asked for my money several times, and she did not pay me.

Court to Prosecutor. Do you owe her any money at this time? - I do not.

Prisoner. These things were left in my care to wash, and I thought I would make some money of them till I was paid; I was ten weeks without money.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you give her any of these things either to pawn or wash? - I did not.

GUILTY . (Aged 50.)

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-60

607. MARGARET SHAW was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of July , two pieces of muslin, containing four yards, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Joseph Craig .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

GEORGE BROWN sworn.

I am shopman to Joseph Craig , in Holborn . The prisoner came along with

Mary Longman to buy some muslin; Mary Longman asked to look at some muslin; I shewed her them; Mary Longman objected to the muslin, and thought it was very dear; they did not purchase any of them, but I gave them a pattern to compare with what they might see in other shops, and then they went away, in about a quarter of an hour they returned again, and Mary Longman purchased a dress of this muslin, which I gave her a pattern of; there were other muslins laid on the counter at the time.

Q. Were they near the counter? - Yes. And after I had sold Mary Longman the muslin, the two pieces that lay on the counter were missing. After they were gone I looked for the muslin, and I followed Margaret Shaw and Mary Longman .

Q. Did they pay for the dress? - They did.

Q. When they had paid for the dress did they go out? - They did.

Q. Did you miss the muslin before or after they went out? - I did not see them in the place where they had been at the time they were in.

Q. I ask you whether you missed the muslins before they went out of the shop, or only after they went out? - I missed them before they went out. When they went out I followed them, and I told them I believed they had got more muslin than what belonged to them; they came back into the shop, and I looked into Margaret Shaw 's pocket, and I found these two pieces of muslins, they were given to the constable, and the constable has had them ever since. I put my mark on them that I should know them again. When I found these things in her pocket, I took her before the magistrate in Hatton-garden; the other woman was bailed.

Mr. Knowlys The other woman was bailed, was she? - Yes.

Q. Why she was the person that came into the shop with the prisoner? - Yes, they came together.

Q. Of course then she came with her? - Yes.

Q. She was the person that asked all these questions that you have represented to the court? - Yes.

Q. Every question that was put was put by Longman? - Yes; and the other asked her opinion respecting it.

Q. You missed them before they went out? - Yes, I missed them before they went out of the shop.

Q. Do you know what quantity of muslin you might have on the counter at that time? - It is impossible for me to know that.

Q. I suppose it is equally impossible for you to know how many persons you might have served before the prisoner came in? - Yes, we never keep any account.

Q. Therefore it is quite impossible to know what quantity of muslins you might have sold? - Not before she came in.

Q. Do you recollect, or have you the means of recollecting what quantity of muslin you might have sold in that day? - No, I have no means of recollection.

Q. Now perhaps the quantity stated in the indictment, you might have sold? - Yes.

Q. To any other person then you might have sold this quantity of muslin that is stated in the indictment before this happened, before the prisoner came into the shop, in the course of that day? Don't you understand what I mean? - No.

Q. You say you had a great deal of muslin in your shop in the course of that day for sale; you say you don't know what quantity might have been sold in the course of that day; therefore whether the quantity stated in the indictment might be sold or no, you don't know? - No.

Q. And Longman is the person that has been bailed, and she gave all the orders, and purchased every thing that was purchased in the shop that day.

Court. When you took this out of the pocket of the prisoner did she say any thing about it? - She said she put it there by mistake.

LEMON CASEBY sworn.

I am an officer at Hatton-garden. I produce some muslins, two pieces, I received them of the last witness; I have kept them ever since.

Q. Was the prisoner put in your hands at the same time? - Yes; she and another. He only charged this one first, and then he charged the other after. (The muslin produced.)

Brown. This muslin belongs to Joseph Craig , I know it belongs to him from the shop mark, one is worth three shillings and the other is six shillings and sixpence.

Q. Do you know whether that was the muslin that you had shewn to either of the women? - It was not.

Q. Do you know whether it was laying on the counter at the time? - Yes, it was.

Q. Had you been shewing it to any body else? - I had not been.

Q. Can you swear that these identical pieces were on the counter? - Yes, the first time they came to the shop I can swear to these pieces being on the counter.

Q. Had you shewn these pieces to any body else? - No, I had not shewn them to any body else.

Q. How came you to know that they were on the counter? - I saw them laying there at the moment; they are pattern muslins.

Q. Did you see them laying there when they came in the second time? - Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Your name is George Brown , you are a servant to Mr. Craig and Co.? - I am a servant to Mr. Craig.

Q. Craig and Co. is over your door? - it is.

Q. How happens that? - I don't know.

Q. Mr. Craig is not here? - He is not.

Q. Craig and Co. is over the door, and Craig and Co. is in the shop bills, that imports there is some partner? - But there is not any.

Q. You have a deal of the same quality of muslin in the shop? - Yes.

Q. Do you know every sort of muslin you might have had on the shop-board that day? - Yes, every sort had I seen it.

Q. How many sorts might there be that day? - Six, seven, or eight.

Q. Do you think there might be a dozen? - No, I don't think there was.

Q. Do you recollect every particular pattern that was on the shop-board? - I cannot recollect every particular pattern we have got.

Q. When you go to the shop in the morning, do you put down on paper every pattern you have in the shop every day? - No, but I know those because I see them lay on the shop-board.

Q. You think you see them lay? - I am certain.

Q. Then to the partnership you don't know your master's concerns as well as he does himself, but it is Craig and Co. on the door, and Craig and Co. on the shop bills.

Court. Do you keep the shop book at all? - No.

Q. Do you know in point of fact whether Mr. Craig has a partner or not? - He had a partner some time ago, but he died, it was Blakey and Craig, but he has had no partner since.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Mr. Knapp. What was the name of the other partner when he was alive? - Blakey

Q. What was on the door then? - Blakey and Craig.

Q. Since Blakey has been dead it is Craig and Co.? - It is.

Q. Not Craig alone, but Craig and Co.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave her an excellent character.

GUILTY , (Aged 30.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-61

608. ABRAHAM DE FRIZE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , a bank note, numbered 839, dated July 11th, 1793, value 20 l. the property of Hyam Marcus Cohen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Schoen.)

AN INTERPRETER sworn.

MARCUS HYAM COHEN sworn.

I came to London before Witsun holidays; I am a Levy. Yesterday was four weeks, Friday. I received a bank note of twenty pounds and five pounds in cash; I could not read the note

Q. Where had you been when you lost this note? - I received it of David Levy , and from David Levy I went through Whitechapel , and when I went through Whitechapel I lost it.

Q. Have you seen the bank note since? - No.

Q. What time was you in Whitechapel? - After five o'clock in the evening.

Q. In what part about you was the note? - In my breeches pocket.

Q. Was the money in the same pocket? - I had the money in my coat pocket.

Q. Do you know exactly the time you lost it? - A little after five.

Q. Do you mean you missed it then? - I had no more of it in my hand after that.

Q. Did you discover that you missed it as soon as it was gone? - Whitechapel was all in an uproar, and I looked every where for it in Whitechapel.

Q. Was that uproar made on the discovery that the note was gone? - I bought myself a halfpennyworth of currants in Whitechapel, and then I missed the note, and I took some people up, and took them up before the justice, and these people were discharged.

Mr. Knapp Did you know the prisoner at the bar before this transaction? - No.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - No.

Q. Did you see him during any time that this business took place? - No, I did not see him.

Q. Are you sure that the bank note was in the breeches pocket? - Yes, I am sure of that.

Q. Are you sure that the five pounds in cash and the bank note were not in the same pocket? - The five pounds and bank note were in my breeches pocket.

Court. You said before that the money was in your coat pocket? - The copper laid in the coat pocket, but the five pounds in cash was in my breeches pocket.

Mr. Knapp. Did not you charge the person of whom you bought these currants with taking this bank note? - I see a paper lay on the ground, and I thought that was the paper where the bank note did lay in.

Q. Was the bank note in a paper? - It was.

Q. Did not you tell the justice that you saw one of these men draw the paper with his feet? - I did.

Q. The prisoner at the bar was not one of these three? - No.

Q. Did not the justice tell the prisoner at the bar, in your presence, that if he could get bails he would bail him for the offence? - I don't understand english, and I don't know what he spoke.

Q. Then how the bank note got out of your pocket you don't know? - I do not.

Q. But you see one of these three men kick it with his foot? - I saw a paper laying on the ground, and I saw some man kicking that paper with his foot, I went from there, and remembering that my bank note was in a paper, I went back and took the men up.

Court. Was the paper of the same size, colour and sort of paper as you had in your pocket? - I cannot know that.

Q. Do you believe it to be the same paper? - It was not in my thoughts; I did not mind it; if I had been sure I would have picked it up directly.

Q. If you did not believe it to be the same paper, why did you stop the man that kicked the paper? - At first I did not miss it at all, and so I did not take any notice of the paper that lay on the ground then, when I went from there and missed the note, and thought of the man that moved the paper, I went back and took the man up.

Q. Was the paper there when you came back? - It was not, I saw the paper kicked on the ground before I came back.

Mr. Knapp. Did you ever take up this paper to see whether it contained the bank note or not? - I never took nothing up.

Q. Therefore whether it contained a bank note or no you don't know. He charged these three men with taking the bank note and had them before the justice? - Yes.

Mr. Schoen. Were not these men, one of which kicked the paper, immediately taken before the magistrate? - They were.

Q. Were they searched? - They were.

Q. Was any bank note found on them? - No, nothing at all.

Court. Was the man who kicked the paper searched? - He was.

DAVID LEVY sworn

I know the prosecutor, Cohen, I see him on Friday about a month ago, the 16th of August.

Q. On what account did Cohen come here? - He came twice that day, he came both times that day about a manuscript copy of our law, which I purchased of him, written with his own hand.

Q. What money did you give him? - I paid him twenty-four pounds I paid him a twenty pound bank note, and the rest in gold and silver to make up the money, I think it was three pounds, thirteen shillings and six-pence in gold, and the rest in silver to make up the money.

Q. Do you know the number of the twenty pound bank note you gave? - 839.

Q. How came you to know the number of that note? - I had just received that note and another note of the banker's for a draft; I did not book that note, but, I have a great recollection; I am author of the Lingua Sacra; I will tell you the truth, when the man came back and told me that he had lost the note I was as positive as a man can be of a note that he had not booked; I have no doubt but that is the note. I paid Mr. Cohen the note a few minutes after five, by no means did it exceed ten minutes.

Q. Do you know the date of the note? - The date is the 11th of July, 1792.

Q. When did you see the prisoner at the bar? - On Saturday evening about nine o'clock, the prosecutor called on me, and said that he thought he had found the note, and I went to the prisoner's house in Shoemaker-row; I then, as soon I saw the prisoner told him, I am come about a little business, about a bank note which you had yesterday, which you said you

found; he immediately flew at me as a lion in a rage; says he, I found no bank note, I know nothing about a bank note; sir, says I, I don't come here to be abused, I came here to ask a civil question. Pray, sir, says I, was not you yesterday at Mr. Goldsmid's with a bank note? Yes, says he, I was, but it was none of your's; pray, sir, whose was it then? a man gave it me; says he; but did not you tell Mr. Goldsmid that you found it? I did say so, says he, but it was no such thing; I told him I was very sorry to see that he was a very bad man, as he had said that he had found it, and now pretend to deny it; now, says I, how came you by that note? says he, a man gave it me to get cash for him; very good sir, says I, who is the man? says he, I don't know the man; why, says I, that appears very impossible that a man should give you a twenty pounds bank note to get cash for it, and you not know him, nor he you; then he began to be very abusive, and told me to get out, I told him I would get out as fast as I could, but I would take care to bring him to justice for it; in consequence of which I took coach to go home, and called on justice Wickham, and told him the case; he granted me a warrant, and in consequence of the warrant the prisoner was taken the next day.

Mr. Knapp. Did you go with the warrant to the prisoner's house? - No, sir.

Q. Do you know whether he was found at home? - I cannot say.

ASHER GOLDSMID sworn.

I am a broker at the Bank of England.

Q. On the day in the indictment did you see the prisoner at the bar? - I did.

Q. On what occasion did he call on you? - He called on me with a bank note, and I took particular notice of the number, it was about four weeks ago, and produced a bank note, and said that he had found a bank note, and wished to know whether it was a real bank note or a forged one.

Jury. What time? - On Friday about six in the afternoon; I took particular notice of the number on it, 839, the date I cannot swear to; I told him there was but one thing I could advise him to do, and that was to take it along with me to the Bank, and shew it to Mr. Newland, and get the greatest reward he could for it; I told him I would have nothing to do with it in any other way; his reply was, that he could not give an answer to that, he would consult his sons; and I heard no more of the business from him.

Q. Then in point of fact he did not come to you on Monday as you advised him? - I did not see any more of him till he was in custody.

Mr. Knapp. I understand that the prisoner at the bar possessed of a twenty pound bank note, came to you, as a person that knew the value of it, and to know whether it was a good one or not, and he shewed you the bank note? - He did, and I advised him to take it to Mr. Newland, and get as great a reward for it as he could.

Q. You have known the prisoner at the bar before this time? - I have known him several years as a poor man coming for charity, but as for his general character I don't know it, I never knew any harm or good.

Court. What is the prisoner? - He is a jew.

Q. Do you know how old he is? - I do not.

Mr. Schoen to Levy. Was you before the magistrate when De Frize was examined? - I was.

Q. Did you see any paper signed by De Frize? - Yes

Q. And by the magistrate? - I cannot say that I did see the magistrate sign it.

Q. Do you know Mr. Wickham's hand writing? - I cannot say I do.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to your Lordship and my counsel.

HENRY NATHAN sworn.

I am a merchant, No. 8, Bevis-marks. I have known the prisoner at the bar ever since I have been an infant; I cannot tell what his age is at present; ever since I knew him he was an old man; Cohen the prosecutor, told me that he dropped the paper out of his pocket coming through Whitechapel, and when he missed it he went back.

JOSEPH ASHER sworn.

I live in Jewry-street, No. 7; I am a clock and watch maker. I have known the prisoner a great many years; the prosecutor told me that he dropped the bank note as he was drawing the halfpenny out of his pocket.

Mr. Schoen. Did you happen to be near the man when he lost it? - No.

Q. Was you unfortunate enough to be one of the three men that were taken up? - I was not.

Mr. Knapp. It was three different men that were taken up? - It was.

Q. You was not one of them; you don't sell fruit about the streets? - No, I am a watch maker.

JACOB LEVY POWEL sworn.

I am foreman to my father who keeps a glass warehouse; I take care of my father's business; I met the prosecutor, I asked him concerning the bank note; he told me he lost it in buying some things in Whitechapel.

The prisoner called six other witnesses to his character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-62

609. JAMES RANDALL was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on Abraham Henley , on the 18th of July , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a silver watch, value 5 l. a silver seal, value 2 s. the goods of the said Abraham Henley .

He was again indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on the 11th of July , on James Sayers , and robbing him of two guineas, three half guineas and eight shillings in monies numbered; the monies of the said James Seyers .

JAMES SAYERS sworn.

I live at Slough, in Buckinghamshire; I was robbed on Thursday the 18th of July, I was stopped between sixty and seventy yards of the Rose and Crown, at Smallborough-green turnpike , by four men; I was in a post chaise, I was going along and was almost asleep, at the other side of Brentford, it was about half after nine, from that to ten, then it was dusk; the chaise stopped all at once, and it awaked me; I said to the boy, what is the matter? if the horse has taken rusty I will come out and help you; just as I said so one of them puts a pistol to my ear, and said d - n your eyes your money; says I, take that thing away and I will give you my money, and I put my hand in my pocket, and gave him three guineas and a half, and nine shillings in silver; they were on foot; he steps down, and then I saw they were on each side, and the man comes back to me and says, you buggar you have more money about you; I then jumped out of the chaise after him, and said d - n you, you shall have no more if I have fifty pounds about me. Jumping out I fell down on my hands and knees, and they were then going off, and Mr. Henley, who was with me in the chaise, called to me, and said, I had better

come into the chaise, I got into the chaise we drove on, in about two minutes, from between two to three minutes they brought the prisoner at the bar up to the Castle, the men who took him brought him; I said to him when he came up, where is that gentleman's watch, and my money.

Q. Did you take notice enough of the prisoner at the time of the robbery to recollect him again when he was brought to you? - I cannot say that I did; I can-swear to his person positively. He said the man that took the watch had thrown it into the road, but if it was lost his mother would make it good. I cannot say that this was the man that took my money; he said if we would take a lanthorn and candle, and go back we should find it; and we immediately searched his pockets and found a pistol loaded, which answers to the same pistol that was held to my head; I took particular notice of it, it was cocked; the moment that he put it to my head I looked at it, it was an iron pistol or a steel one. We brought him to Hounslow.

Q. Did you ever find your watch afterwards? - No, never.

ABRAHAM HENLEY sworn.

I was in the chaise with Mr. Sayers, at Smallborough-green; when we were stopped two men jumped into the chaise, one of each side, and demanded our money; they robbed me of my watch.

Q. Did you take notice of either of them so as to know them again? - No.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being brought up? - Yes. When he was charged with the watch he said that the person that took my watch had thrown it into the road, but his mother would pay me for my watch.

Prisoner. One of them said at Hounslow, before the magistrate, that the two men that got into the chaise were both little men.

Court. He did not say that you got into the chaise.

WILLIAM COOMBES sworn.

My father is a cooper in the country, at West Drayton. James Rundall and three others came to Mr. Norris's house where I live, at the Castle, Smallborough-green, about five o'clock in the afternoon, they drank together there about half an hour.

Q. Were they on foot or horseback? - On foot.

Q. Where did they go afterwards? - I cannot be certain.

Q. Do you remember a robbery being committed? - Yes, that night, and Randall was brought back that same night.

Prisoner. I did not go there with these men, I only sat down on the bench with these men; I did not go with them.

Court. Did Randall drink with them? - Yes, they paid a pot a piece, and Randall gave me a penny.

GEORGE HARTFORD sworn.

I am a day labouring man and gardener, at Isleworth; I know no further than the house was alarmed, that there was a chaise stopped by four men; and when I came to the door I see two young fellows had this man in a ditch, and they called to me, and I went to their assistance, and we took him up to the Castle.

Q. In what posture was he when he was seized? - They had got him up when I see him, and I went to help him out; when them young fellows got hold of him he was trying to get through the hedge; we took him up to the Castle, and I asked him if he had any fire arms about him? he said he had one pistol; and I took the pistol and these marbles from him, and I shewed them to the gentlemen that were robbed, Mr. Sayer, and another.

Prisoner. There was another man getting through the hedge before me that

dropped the pistol; I was going after him, and he dropped the pistol, and I picked it up and put it into my pocket.

Hartford. I did not see any man but him, and the two men that were taking him.

WILLIAM STRANGE sworn.

I saw this man when I came away from the road, through the hedge, and there was another man got over before him.

Q. Did you see the other man drop it? - No.

GEORGE ARNOLD sworn.

I am a day labourer; I saw the prisoner taken pretty nigh Brentford, in the ditch of the road.

Q. Did you see another man go before him? - I saw four men in all.

ISAAC CLAYTON sworn.

I am a constable; I know nothing at all of the transaction; the prisoner was delivered into my hands by Mr. Sayer and Mr. Henley, and the Windsor waggoner gave me a pistol that he found very near the place where the robbery was committed.

Prisoner. I had been to see one Mrs. Perry, who formerly kept the Castle, at Smallborough-green; I staid there till latish; on returning home I sees this chaise stop, I went to see what was the matter; afterwards I went on and I heard some men halloo out stop thief! d - n them we have got them; afterwards I see one of them throw something out into the hedge, which I thought was the watch; I saw the man jump into the ditch, run up the ditch, and get through the hedge; I went after him; he presented the pistol when I came close to him, and he dropped it afterwards getting up the bank, and I picked it up getting after him. I have no witnesses, because I thought of putting off my trial till next Sessions. I had a man that was with me, but he went into the country yesterday, so I could not bring him here till next Sessions.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 23.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-63

610. RICHARD BROWN and JOHN LINTON were indicted for stealing in the dwelling house of James Jacobs , on the 10th of July , one guinea, the money of John Hensley ; a bank note, value 20 l. two bank notes, value 10 l. each; and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of John Hunsley .

JOHN HUNSLEY sworn.

I live at Gaggle Goose-green, in the Hamlets of Hammersmith, at Squire Askew's, he married one of Squire Cary's daughters, at Hampstead.

Q. Did you lose any notes? - They were handed off the table.

Q. Do you know any thing of James Jacobs 's house? - I never was there before.

Q. When was you there? - At the time I met with these men.

Q. do you recollect on the 10th of July that you was going any where? - I was in town, I cannot say the day of the month.

Q. What day of the week was it? - I cannot say.

Q. How along ago? - About eight weeks ago.

Q. What time of the day? - About eleven o'clock.

Q. Where was you just by Oxford-road? - Just turned out of it.

Q. Now look at the prisoners? - One is Brown, and the other is Linton.

Q. Tell me whether or no you saw them at the time you was going along

Oxford-road? - I saw Brown, but I did not see the other then.

Q. What did he say to you or do? - He said how do you do Mr. Hunsley.

Q. Did you know him before? - Not to my knowledge. I said, you have got the advantage of me; he said he had got a gentleman in town that had six daughters, and they must have some of my fruit by all means; I told him I had none of them to spare, I had agreed with one man for all I had, and I would shew him where the man lived, and he might have them twice a day if he pleased; and I went to shew him the shop where I served with the fruit.

Q. Where was it you went? - I forget the street's name, it was just at this lower side of Mary-le-bone, I went to the shop with him, and he said very well, and we went into an alehouse and had a pint of ale.

Q. What street was it? - I don't know the street, the house was just by the shop.

Q. What was the name of the man that kept the house? - We had but one pint of beer there, and just as we got the pint of beer Linton came in too, and he would drink with us; Brown asked Linton what he was? he said he was come up to London to receive his fortune, as he had an aunt dead; Brown says to him, how much is your fortune? O, says he, three hundred pounds, to the best of my remembrance, so says he, if ever a one of you will shew me fifty pounds I will give you ten guineas; Linton said so to Brown, and I, says I, I have no money to signify; and I went to a man that I knew, and I borrowed the sum of the notes, forty-five pounds, of Samuel Clay , in Oxford-road.

Q. Do you know what notes they were? - No, I am no Scholar; I know them to be four bank notes.

Q. For what sum where these four notes? - Two ten pound notes, a twenty pound, and a five pound. So in going back, covetous to win the money, thinking I was never master of so big a sum, Brown meets me; as soon as Brown met me Linton came, and they took me up to Jacobs's house, I don't know the street's name, and we went in there, it was a public house, and had a shilling worth of brandy and water; Linton said if we could shew fifty pounds a piece he would give us ten guineas a piece; I produced this sum that I had borrowed, I produced forty five pounds in notes and five guineas besides; I laid it down on the table, the forty five pound in notes and and the five guineas; I laid down the notes, and I think the same money, but I cannot say.

Q. Did you lay down all the notes? - Yes.

Q. Was there any money besides that you laid down, besides these bank notes? - I had some money out.

Q. How much did you lay down? - I believe a couple of guineas. Linton said his lawyer told him he was a fool, and could not write his A, B, C. Brown says, let us see if you can write A, B, C. He writ it down A, B, C. Says Linton, I have writ it, where is all your money? Brown says he had given his Polly some to buy her some clothes; and where is your rest? says he, my Polly's aunt has got it and locked it up. There was a letter or two that Brown made and put a pot over it, and so he was to guess; Linton laid a guinea with me that he guessed the letter that was under the pot, and he did not guess it, and so I had the guinea, I took the guinea when I had won it. Then another guinea was laid, and I won it, then Brown took up the money and the notes, forty five pounds the whole sum.

Q. Did he take up any money that you laid down? - I cannot tell how much he took up, but there was but one guinea of mine, and he took that with him; when he had taken it up they both went away

I followed them out, and said stop them! they are rogues and thieves; and they were stopped immediately, and brought back, and gave me every penny of my money again.

Mr. Knowlys. Then you went away after you had got your money? - I did; and the people followed and stopped me and said I should come back; I had got nothing but my own money, and Linton gave me a guinea more.

Q. You know you won a guinea, what did you do with that? - I put it down again, they gave me a guinea over, they said that was to bear my charges, I was going home, but Scott and the other man followed me as far as the gravel pits, and fetched me back again.

Q. You applied to Scott to get some money of these people? - I mentioned to Scott that I had won nine guineas of them, and desired him to go back and get it of them.

Q. How had you won these nine guineas? - In shewing the fifty pounds.

Q. Did not you tell Mr. Clay, the person of whom you borrowed this money, that it was all a gambling transaction between you and these men? - To be sure it was.

Q. I believe you went before the magistrate the 10th of July? - I did.

Q. And there these men were committed as rogues and vagabonds. Now afterwards you went before the magistrate again? - I had some things coming to town, and I begged leave to go and come to-morrow.

Q. First of all they were committed as rogues and vagabonds? - They were.

Q. This Mr. Scott has told you that he will pay you the expences of this prosecution? - He said I should be paid, the justice said so.

Court. And so you shall.

Mr. Knowlys. Did not Mr. Scott tell you that if you preferred an indictment against these people for felony, that he would pay you? - I cannot be sure whether he did or not. The justice told me I should be paid my charges; I paid ten shillings when I filed the bill.

Court. After the men were taken up in the street, who was it said they had only been gambling? - I cannot tell.

JAMES SCOTT sworn.

I am a butcher; I live in Dorset-street, Mary-le-bone, Manchester-square.

Q. Do you remember in July seeing the prisoners and the last witness? - I believe it was the 10th of July about some time after eleven, between that and twelve. I saw the prisoner Brown, I believe it to be him leading along the old man, the prosecutor, and I believe Linton he was along side of him; what made me take so much particular notice, I knew Linton some time, and I knew what they both were; in the course of about eight minutes I saw them both run by me, they came out of a public house, I believe it is the Barley Mow, it is kept by Mr. Jacobs, I believe his name is James, it is in Mary-le-bone Parish ; they were running; I immediately looked over the way, and I saw the prosecutor holding fast the door posts, and he did not know which way to look, and he hallooed out thieves! says I, have they robbed you? yes, says he, they are thieves, stop them; I immediately hallooed out stop thief! and a neighbour of mine caught Brown, and I caught Linton in Manchester-street; my neighbour is not here; I collared Linton and brought him back, and we had returned about twenty yards from where I catched hold of him and he said let me go, and I will give you a guinea; no, I told him, I would see him d - d first, and he said he would return the old man his money, and give me a guinea for my trouble; and we brought him back to the Barley Mow, and there he delivered up the notes.

Q. Who delivered up the notes? - Linton; and Brown said the notes should not be returned except the old man would let them go about their business, and the notes were produced, and some were agreeable to have them let go, and some were not; they were however detained, and we took them to Marlborough-street without a constable.

Q. You can tell us whether somebody or other did not talk about their having been gambling? - They both of them declared, both Brown and Linton, that they and the old man had been gambling, and the old man said they had not, and the old man, as soon he came into the room swore that he would not take the money but he would prosecute them; the two prisoners at the bar desired that Mr. Jacobs might take up the notes, and he delivered them to the old man, and the old man kept them when Mr. Jacob's told them they were very good notes.

Court to Hunsley. Did you get the notes again? - I did, and returned them from where I had them, to Samuel Clay .

Mr. Knowlys. Are you sure that the old man said that he had not been gambling? - I am perfectly sure of it, because he told us a different story.

Q. You have not been laying any bets on this occasion? - No further than we were to appear at Hicks's Hall on Monday, and he was not there, and we laid fifteen-pence that the old man would not come.

Q. Then you did not lay five pounds? - I did not, upon my oath.

FRANCIS BERNARD sworn.

I saw the prisoners on the 10th of July, at East-street, I was standing in my own room, and the woman that lives in the first floor said to me that there was a mob of people; and I went out, and I saw Brown, and he laid hold of me by the right arm, and said I hope you will be my friend; and a Mr. Scott had hold of him, and we went to the public house, and Linton and Brown were both there, and Scott went for the old man, and when the old man came in he said you have robbed me, and I will prosecute you; Linton put down the bank notes, a twenty pounds, two ten pounds and a five pounds on the table; Brown took them up hearing the old man say that he would prosecute him, and swore that he should not have them, but Linton persisted that he should have the money if he would not prosecute them; the old man with the persuasion of the publican and the company that were there took the money, he took the money and was got out of the house immediately.

JAMES JACOBS sworn.

I keep the Barley Mow.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoners at the bar come at any time? - Yes, on the 10th of July the prisoner and the old man came in and asked for six-penny worth of brandy and water, and they went into the parlour where there was nobody else. In about a minute the shortest of them came out to the bar and said make it a shillingworth; and I made it and carried it in, and they paid me for it; I don't recollect seeing them go out of the door; I know nothing about the money being put down.

Q. Did you see them when they were brought back? - I did. The old man said that he was robbed, and they were brought back, and brought into the parlour.

Q. Did you hear him say he was robbed? - I heard him say stop thief! and I see them brought back.

Q. Did you take up any bank notes? - They said they would give the old man the money; the old man desired me to look at the money to see if it was good money, and I took it into my hand and gave it out of my hand to the old man

these was a twenty pounds, two ten pounds, a five pounds and a guinea.

SAMUEL CLAY sworn.

I lent Mr. Hunsley the bank notes on Wednesday the 10th of July, one twenty pounds, two ten pounds, and one five pounds, I have got them here; I lent them him very near twelve o'clock; I see him again about an hour or rather more,

Q. On what occasion did you see him again? - He brought me the notes back again, he said he had gained twelve guineas by them. (The bank notes read by the clerk of the court.)

Mr. Knowlys. This man had the notes of you in the morning, and he returned them in about an hour? - Or an hour and a quarter, and he said that he had got twelve guineas by my lending him these notes, and that he had got two in possession, and the ten he was to receive.

Court to Hunsley. Did you tell Mr. Clay that you had got two guineas, and the other ten you was to receive? - I had got one, and I was to have had the other ten if I had had fair to have had it.

Prisoner Brown. I leave my defence to my counsel and submit it to your lordship.

Prisoner Linton. I leave my defence to my counsel.

JOHN TRIBBLE sworn.

I live in Mary-le-bone-lane.

Q. Did you hear Mr. Hunsley say any thing about this matter? - Yes.

Q. How did he represent it? - I understood that Mr. Hunsley had been robbed of some money; I immediately ran up to him, and he produced these bank notes, and says he, are you sure that they are good? I said they are good, I told him they were so good that I would give him cash for one or all; I said now tell me what is the matter; says he, only some gentlemen have been a joking with me, and I have won ten guineas, I have got one and my own money, and if you had been with me Mr. Tribble I should have had the other nine; I have seen him repeatedly since and he has told me the same.

Q. Was you ever acquainted with either of the prisoners? - I am a friend of Hunsley's; this is the account he gave me of the transaction.

GEORGE MORGAN sworn.

I live in Carnaby-market.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoners? - Not at all. I was standing at the corner of Mary-le-bone and Mr. Tribble called to me, and I went with him and we met Mr. Hunsley coming along, and he said what have you been at? and the old man said to me see if the notes are good; I see myself a twenty pounds, two ten pounds and a five pounds and six guineas; says I, what have you been at? says he, I have been a gambling. Mr. Scott came after the old man for to make him go back, and Mr. Hunsley says to Mr. Scott, the butcher, they owe me nine guineas more, do you run back and get that; Mr. Scot immediately ran back, and then he came and he said to a constable there, that is the man that has been robbed; says the constable, you must go back to give charge of the people, and then we went back and had a drop of brandy; and that is all that I know about it.

The prisoner Brown called John Shepcote and John Atwood , and the prisoner Linton called Ann Pearce to give them a character.

Richard Brown , GUILTY . (Aged 46.)

John Linton , GUILTY. (Aged 47.)

Of the simple Larceny only .

Transported for seven years

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-64

611. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniosly stealing, on the 1st of July , a wooden tea chest, value 4 s. three tin canisters, value 1 s. the goods of John Fenn .

JOHN FENN sworn.

I am a broker and undertaker ; I come to swear to my property

JAMES FRAZIER sworn.

I am a musician to the Duke of York; I was standing at my window, opposite Mr. Fenn's at my lodgings, in Dean-street, Westminster ; I saw the prisoner John Thomas , go to Mr. Fenn's window and take up the tea caddy, and look at it, it stood at the window, the prosecutor is a broker and undertaker; he put it down again and walked about three paces from it, as though he was dealing for it, and then he returns again, takes up the caddy and put it under his coat, under his arm; I hallooed out to Mr. Fenn, but there was nobody came; I put on my coat and ran after him; I overtook Mr. Elliot in Peter-street, and I asked him if he saw such a man? and I overtook him just by the Bluecoat school, and I and Elliot apprehended him; he had the caddy on him; the caddy is here, Mr. Elliot has it.

Q. When he went from the shop did he run or walk away? - He walked away.

JOSEPH ELLIOT sworn.

I met the prisoner in Great Peter-street, walking fast with the tea chest under his arm, about a hundred and fifty yards from Mr. Fenn's house; and then Frazier came up, and we pursued him, and apprehended him, and we have got the caddy that we got from him; the man was very much in liquor. (Produced and deposed to.)

Court. Did either of you know this man before?

Elliot. I never see him to the bed of my knowledge.

Frazier. I did not know him before.

Prisoner. Mr. Fenn I understand is a broker, I went to ask whether he was at home at the time.

Fenn. No, I was not.

Q. Did he leave any person in his house to sell goods in his absence? - Yes, but nobody was in the shop, the person was down in the kitchen.

Prisoner. I never was near his shop, nor did I know where his shop was, I presume it might be handed off, but by another person; at the time he saw me take this tea chest no man called out, nor did Frazier come up, it was that man, the constable, came up. At the same time I had bought this tea caddy, and paid three shillings and six-pence for it, I met a man and he said he was going abroad on that very day following, and I knew there were some people going abroad the next day; and when the black came before the justice, he said it was a man in a green coat.

Court to Frazier. Did you say before the justice that it was a man in a green coat? - I said it was a man in a green coat, and he had on a green coat, he has not got on the coat that he had on when I attacked him.

Prisoner. That black has forsworn against me, ask him if he is a christian.

Frazier. I was born in a christian country, and I believe was made one, as my friends told me.

Prisoner. Does he know the 8th commandment.

Prosecutor. Please you my lord the prisoner has got a family, I beg to recommend him to mercy .

GUILTY. (Aged 45.)

Publickly Whipped

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-65

612. JOHN SCOTT was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of August , six wooden casks, bound with iron hoops, called kilderkins, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of John Bitleston , James Williamson , John Johnson , Samuel Foster , and Thomas Pair .

(The case was opened by Mr. Fielding.)

JOSEPH KIRKMAN sworn.

I know the prisoner at the bar, he was formerly a drayman to my brewery, he lives in Conway-street, he is what they call a firkin man, he buys beer of the brewers and retails it to his customers . I had long suspected Scott of being dishonest, of stealing casks, in consequence of the suspicion I went to his premises on Saturday, the 31st of August, I found a large quantity of our casks, they were of different sizes, I saw six kilderkins there, they have the mark of Kirkman on them, the property of the gentlemen carrying on the brewhouse now; the names are mentioned in the indictment, when I found the casks, some were empty, and some were not.

Q. Was that beer, the beer from your house? - No.

Q. Have you any doubt they are the property of that firm? - I am perfectly satisfied that they are the property of the firm.

Q. Has he dealt at the brewhouse for beer lately? - Not lately,

Q. Is any of the beer found in those casks, beer that come from your brewhouse? - I think not, if it was it was not by the knowledge of the proprietors, I never see him.

Q. Have you any knowledge at all in the manner in which such property could be taken from the brewhouse? - Either from the brewhouse or from the drays in the street; I believe they were taken from the drays, I found abundance of casks on the man's premises with the names chopt out.

Mr. Knowlys. They were found on this man's premises, I believe any body going by might see them? - Some were concealed and some were not, they were piled up.

Q Do not you pile up your own casks? - When they are washed we pile them up.

Q. This man dealt with you after he left your service on to the 23d of April? - I cannot say, he dealt with us so long as we chose to serve him.

Q. How long was that? - I really don't know.

Q. Don't you know it was down to the end of April last?

Court. Might not these be casks not returned? - We never sold him any beer in casks of this sort.

Mr. Knowlys. How do you know that? - I know from the mode of booking the casks.

Q. Do you superintend the booking of your own casks; - Sometimes I do, and sometimes I do not.

Q. Will you undertake to say that no agent in your house has delivered him casks of this size, might they not be out to people his customers, and afterwards returned, if you had made the enquiry?

Court. Pray did you ever miss these casks? - No, surely I never did.

Court. Will you swear to these identical casks being on your premises since April? - No, I cannot.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-66

613. JOHN MAXEY as indicted for stealing, on the 18th of August , a pair of plated shoe buckles, value 2 s.

two pleces of quilted cotton, value 10 s. two cotton counterpanes, value 1 l. two woollen blankets, value 1 l. two tick pillow cases, value 3 s. the goods of Richard Miles , John Miles and Samuel Galindo ; and

JUDITH CURRAN for receiving two woollen blankets, value 1 l. being a parcel of the above goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

SAMUEL GALINDO sworn.

I am a broker ; I am in partnership with Richard Miles and John Miles , at No. 23, Bishopsgate-street . The prisoner was my servant above twenty months; on the 8th of August last I received an anonymous letter, in consequence of that letter I had him apprehended, but not till I had first interrogated him, for I rather thought it was a malicious letter, he said that he had not any thing, nor he knew nothing of any being stole from me; I searched him first in my own house, I did not find any thing on him; I desired him to let me see his box, he had no objection; I desired likewise to see the woman's box, she lives with him, the prisoner he said he could not answer for looking into her box; they lived in Catharine wheel-alley. He said he had no objection to his own box, but his box was not at his lodgings, it was in a person's hands in Moorfields; I asked him how it came there, he said when he was in custody by the officers of Whitechapel for a child this woman swore to him, he was running off with his box, and seeing this person that he knew, he desired him to take it into his possession; I went with him to Moorfields with the officer, he did not know where the man lived that had the box, he said he had lived with Langford, a customer of ours, but he had left him. I desired he would leave me the key, and that he would go with the officer the while, he said he had not got the key, I said it is very odd, you should leave your box and key at a strange man's, I then sent him home, then I and the officer went to his apartments for to search this Curran's box, for she had her box, but before I went to Catharine wheel-alley I went to Mr. Windsor's, the pawnbroker's, and while I was there, in comes the woman prisoner at the bar, with two blankets to pawn; I had been with Curran that morning to see what I could find out, and whether this letter came from her; the young man came out of the warehouse, and said here is the woman that has pawned these cotton counterpanes in the shop now; she was in the shop.

Q. Was what the pawnbroker said, said in her presence? - Yes, it was by Mr. Windsor's man, I don't know his name; she was rather alarmed at seeing me, I asked her how she came by them blankets, particularly one which I owned? she said she bought it, I asked her what she gave for it? she could not tell me that, at last she said it was given to her, she said one Mrs. Cavenor had given it her, I asked her where that woman lived? she said she kept a public house in Whitechapel; I had this woman sent for, and when she came she denied it, and the prisoner said nothing, the woman upbraided her as a very wicked woman; now says I, tell me some other story, this will not do, she then said that she bought it, but she would not tell me where, nor she could not tell me what she gave for it; I then went up to her apartments with her and the officer, and searched her box, but did not find any thing in it, there was another box under it, but that I could not open because I had not the key, and she said Maxey had it, I brought her back to the pawnbroker's, and after taking her before a magistrate she owned to pawning a blanket and a cotton counterpane at another place, then I came

back from her apartment to Maxey and asked him for the key of that box, for I thought I should find it out; he said he had no key; I said you have two keys. I collared him and endeavoured to get it out of his pocket, he had got a coarse apron on, he took every thing out of his pocket and rushed them into his breeches, and endeavoured to get out of my possession; Mr. Windsor's man assisted me, and I was obliged to take up the poker and threaten to knock him down if he did not deliver the key, at last I sent for a warrant, and we took the key by force; the first thing we did we went to the apartment and opened the box; the first thing we found was a pair of buckles of mine, and several small pen knives which I will not swear to, though I know them to be mine; from there I went to Smock-alley, Widegate-street, leading from Bishopsgate-street to Spitalfields, and there we found another box, the man brought a box on his head to Mr. Windsor's; I took the buckles, they are here, they are mine, we then took him to another pawnbroker; before I found it out in my own house I persuaded him very much to confess, but I told him if I found it out of my own accord I would prosecute him; there was three cotton counterpanes which I can only swear to the manufacturer's mark, because they have had the policy to take off our paper which had the shop mark on.

Mr. Knowlys. I think you have mentioned Mr. Richard Miles , and John Miles , is there no other person interested in your business besides these two gentlemen? - No.

Q. I believe you received this man with a good character? - I did, and I wish he my prove himself so, it was not my intention to prosecute, but on the contrary.

WILLIAM BLASSAN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce a counterpane; I took it in of the prisoner at the bar, Judith Curran , I lent her 14 s. on it, it was on the 4th of June.

Galindo. She said that Maxey gave it her before the justice.

CHARLES FLINCH sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in a blanket of that good woman, she pawned it the 6th of June.

JOHN NOWLAND sworn.

I am the constable; I have got the quilt carpet, and a pair of shoe buckles; I took them out of the box.

Galindo. The quilt carpet is mine; my name is on it; I never sell any except made up. I know the plated shoe buckles, I borrowed them of my clerk while I had a pair made, because I had broke one of my own. The prisoner has been in my service twenty months, and I found things in pawn fifteen months back.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

John Maxey . GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

To go for a Soldier .

Judith Curran , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-67

614. DANIEL MACARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , a silver watch, value 2 l. a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. six yards of printed cotton, value 15 s. ninety-six copper halfpence, value 4 s. four guineas, and five shillings and six-pence in monies numbered; the goods and monies of James Terry , in his dwelling house .

JAMES TERRY sworn.

I am a day labouring man . The prisoner broke open the box, and he has delivered three guineas that he had taken

out of the box; he was a lodger of mine; the last time he committed the robbery was the last time he came, I don't know what time it was; there was three guineas taken out of the box, and a watch.

Q. Out of what box? - It was my box.

Q. Where? - In my house, in my chamber room.

Q. When were they taken? - I cannot say what month; I am no scholar; it was not I that missed them first, it was my wife.

Q. How long was it before your wife missed them, did you see them? - The Lord knows that; I cannot say; I was out of the way, I was out at work.

HANNAH TERRY sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you know the parish you live in? - In the parish of Aldgate.

Q. Is it in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldgate? - I don't know. There were four guineas taken out of the box; I saw it in my husband's box, in the one pair of stairs room.

Q. Was that your lodging room? - Yes. I did not lodge in it, but other lodgers did. The box stood between a lodging bed and the window.

Q. Had the box been locked? - Yes. I saw these four guineas the day before I missed them, between eight and nine the next day; there was four guineas, and four shillings worth of halfpence all but a penny, and five shillings and six-pence in silver, a silk handkerchief cost me five shillings and nine-pence, which I did not miss at the time he was before the justice, and my husband's silver watch was taken. I asked this man about them, which I thought there was nobody else to take them but him.

Q. Was he in the house at the time? - He was. When I asked him the next morning, he denied them, that he knew nothing about them. I said that he must know about them, both he and his wife, and I bolted the door on them to keep them in doors till my husband came in at twelve o'clock, because there was nobody in the house but them, his child and me, and then I whipped out to send somebody for my husband, who was at work at the Rotation office, and when I came back I saw him helping his wife over the wall, out of my yard into Mr. Shoebard's yard, a publican. They took the bolt off the door.

Q. How did you get out? - They unbolted the door; there are two doors; I went out at the front door and they at the back door. Then he asked me did I see his wife; I said I see him helping her over the wall: he ran out of the street from me; and I ran after him, and cried stop thief! and other people catched him for me, who, I don't know; he delivered some of the money to me, a little after he was catched, at the Crooked Billet, that was where I saw him, because he was in dread, and he said he would give me the money so as I would let him go, he delivered me one guinea and two half guineas in gold, and two shillings and one penny; he had the things released with the rest of the money, and then he went and pawned them again for three half guineas and a half crown, and gave me that. The watch was laid on the chamber window, in the one pair of stairs; when I pursued after him, I did not find the watch on him, it was laid on the chamber window; the watch which was in the box was in the one pair of stairs chamber window, where the box was, that was where I found it.

Q. Did you find the handkerchief? - I found the gown piece, which he released himself from pawn; he had a bundle at the Three Crowns, nigh the Mansion House, and my cotton was in that bundle; I heard him say so, that he sent it there; he gave me my gown piece out

of that bundle; it was six yards of printed cotton, it cost me half a crown a yard, it is worth fifteen shillings.

Prisoner. There was a woman that used to come to see me that gave me these four guineas.

BARTHOLOMEW KENAN sworn.

There was an irruption in the street, and this man happened to be running, and I took the man in the minories; he was running; I stopped the man, and he told me that he would go along with me; he saw the woman, and on seeing the woman he denied that he had any of her property; in the course of their speaking some time he delivered two guineas to her.

Q. How came he to deliver her two guineas? - I don't know. Some words happened between them; I went to send for an officer, and one of the neighbours went for an officer, and they would not give the charge to this officer; they went from thence to where the man had his clothes; I went to the place with them, it was not an hundred yards from the Minories, in the City, and out of that bundle of clothes he gave the gown piece belonging to this woman, I saw him; then he declared that he had no more property of her's; he proffered to pawn all his clothes if there was any thing amiss respecting him; then he pawned his clothes, and told the woman he would make her recompence, and a gold ring that did not belong to him, belonging to a cousin or sister; he paid her four guineas all but three shillings and five-pence; and then she owned that was all right except the three shillings and five-pence; Then her husband went for an officer, (the gentleman is present) and took him before a justice, and there the woman swore the watch against him; and the watch was in her husband's possession at the same time, and her husband and herself declared the watch was on the window, in their own house.

Court to Mrs. Terry. Was the printed cotton in the box? - The printed cotton was pawned at Mrs. Morris's. I lent him the printed cotton to pawn before that, and he would not give me the money, so I asked him for the duplicate, and he took the duplicate out of the box, and released the gown piece from pawn, and had it in his bundle.

JOHN MURRAY sworn.

On the 7th of August the prisoner came to redeem a piece of cotton at my shop.

- MESSENGER sworn.

I had the prisoner delivered to me, and I brought him before the magistrate; the cotton was delivered into my care in the Court; the watch was delivered to me by the prosecutor.

Prisoner. A woman that used to come to see me at my lodging, gave me four guineas, and how she came by it I cannot tell. I have some witnesses to call.

Court to Messenger. In what parish is this? - In Aldgate.

Q. Is it St. Botolph, without Aldgate ? - I cannot say that.

Murray. It is so.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house . (Aged 19.)

Imprisoned one year in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE

Reference Number: t17930911-68

615. HENRY MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , two cloth coats, value 10 s. four pair of leather shoes, value 3 s. a linen shirt,

value 2 s. a muslin neckcloth, value 6 d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6 d. and a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of Thomas Palmer .

THOMAS PALMER sworn.

I know the prisoner is the man that stole the things; I was not present at the time. I lost this property the 13th of May, the day mentioned in the indictment; I saw them last when I left him in the room, on Sunday night, with the things, (I am a taylor ) that was the 12th, the 13th he took them away in the morning, they were left in the shop; I missed them on Monday a little after seven, when I came down; he lodged in my house, and worked with me; he was gone when I came down, and I missed the things immediately.

Q. Did you see him afterwards? - Not till I took him myself; I took him at Hampstead; I live at Bell's-court, Gray's Inn-lane .

Q. Had he the things on him? - Only the shirt on his back. There is nobody here but myself; the constable has got the shirt, he is not here; I have been after him this morning, but I cannot find him. When I took him he said he did not do the robbery; he worked with me off and on two years.

Prisoner. I bought the shirt.

Court. How came you to go away and leave your master's service? - I went out to seek for work. He told me he could not employ me; he only employed me a day or two, or three, now and then; he could not any ways employ me for a constancy. I have not a friend in the world.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-69

616. ROBERT GRIFFITHS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , a linen gown, value 3 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. two muslin caps, value 5 s. the goods of Elizabeth Wharton .

ELIZABETH WHARTON sworn.

On the 25th of July I lost a linen gown, five cotton stockings and two muslin caps; I missed them off the line in the garden, in the yard belonging to the house where I lodged, it was half past twelve at night when I missed them; I live at Mr. Ussington's library, in Church-street, Hackney .

Q. What did you do to find out where these things were? - I looked out of my window and missed them off my line, and I went down and I found them took off the line, packed up in a bundle laying on the ground, underneath the line in the yard; I know no more than that; taking up my bundle I found my things in it, and in going in, the prisoner at the bar brushed by me, and bid me go in doors.

Q. What you went out into the yard? - I went out into the yard; he came out of a little washhouse, joining to the house, in the yard; I went in doors and gave the alarm for the watch to be called, and he was taken immediately.

Q. Do you know who took him? - James Griffiths .

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the man that brushed by you? - I am sure of it.

Prisoner. I don't think she can swear to me that time of the night, between twelve and one o'clock,

Prosecutor. I can; I had a candle in my hand, and it was quite moon light.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am one of the patrole of Hackney. About half past twelve I was standing at the watch-house door, and I heard the alarm of calling out thieves! I immediately

ran across a bridge, which leads to a brook, and I saw the prisoner come out of the brook, run across a foot path that leads into the road; I called on him to stop, or else I would fire on him; he ran the space of five or six hundred yards before I took him, in that time I catched hold of him, and brought him back to the watch-house; the lady came into the watch-house soon after, within the space of a few minutes, she said he was the man that was in the watch-house, before his face; I searched him; he had no stockings on, he had his stockings in his pocket; I found nothing on him but a screw driver and a pair of clasps, and his knife. (The things produced.)

SARAH EATON sworn.

I went down into the same wash-house after hearing the alarm given, and I found a gown and a child's frock were gone out of the basket where I had left them. I did not see the prisoner.

Prisoner. On the 24th of July I was in Whitechapel, these tools we always have about us; and I saw an acquaintance of mine; he asked me if I was out of service? I told him I was; says he, if you will go along with me I will recommend you, my master wants a man to drive the Woodford stage. I went with with the man and I stayed there till past ten o'clock, and then I came away; I came as far as Hackney, and then I took my stockings off, and was washing my feet, and the while I heard something plunge into the water; I took up my stockings, knowing that Hackney parish was a very strict place, and I went on; and the gentleman overtook me, and brought me to the watch-house

GUILTY ,

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-70

617. NICHOLAS COLE was indicted for feloniously, stealing on the 31st of July , an iron anchor and stock, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of John Hodges Stroud , and Jeremiah Hadley .

JOHN HODGES STROUD sworn.

I am in partnership with Jeremiah Hadley ; we are ship and anchor smith s.

Mr. Knowlys. Have you any other partner? - No.

Q. When was the exact day you lost this? - Sometime between the 6th and 8th of July.

Court. Was Cole your servant? - No, he was a stranger to me.

JOHN RILEY sworn.

I am a constable; I knew the prisoner before this business; he keeps a rope warehouse .

Q. How far did he live from the prosecutor? - On the other side of the water. On the 31st of July I was in company with Cook, and searched his house, and found the anchor.

Court to Hodges. Where is this anchor kept? - On the open Wharf. On high tide any body might come on my Wharf, from the river, and take it.

Riley. I searched the prisoner's warehouse, and we found the anchor, on the 31st of July.

Q. Was it concealed or open? - It was laid in the warehouse, with a quantity of oakum over it.

Q Do you know whether the prisoner ever deals in these things? - There were some tons of new and old rope in the warehouse, but I saw no more than this one anchor.

Q. What is the stock? - In the room of wood it is iron fixed at one end of the anchors; he said he had changed it with some captain of a ship, in room of another; he mentioned the name, but I

really forget the name at present; this was the 21st of July.

Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner then is a person who deals in ship stores? - He does.

Q. And this is a kind of a thing as ship store, and here you found it in his house twenty three days after it was lost? - Exactly.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Not GUILTY

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-71

618. JAMES STEADMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Atwell , on the 18th of August , and burglariously stealing therein, two heads of pins, value 500 l. the goods of Bradshaw Pearson , Esq . and twenty-three tea spoons, value 1 l. 10 s. two silver gravy spoons, value 6 s. a silver cream pot, value 10 s. two pair of silver sugar tongs, value 15 s. a silver staff, value 40 s. two linen shirts, value 10 s. and one hundred Pounds in monies numbered; the goods and monies of James Atwell .

(The case was opened by Mr. Fielding.)

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-72

618 JOHN LOVEARD was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 8 d. and three pint pewter pots, value 3 s. the goods of John Burder .

JOHN BURDER sworn.

I keep the Jacob's Wells, in Barbican ; I lost a quart and three pint pots, on the 21st of August, Friday; Alderman Staines came and informed me; he was the person that detected him.

Mr. ALDERMAN STAINES sworn.

On Friday a quarter before seven, on the Friday the 30th of August, in the evening. I was in a little house which I was building, and this man was working in the house, and could earn twenty two shillings and two-pence per week. I observed him going from the end of my yard where I had lost a considerable quantity of wool; I watched him from that part, and then I lost sight of him while he was gone into the shed; as he come back I stopped him with something in an apron; I asked him what he had got there? he said, only a few chips; I then took the apron from him, and opened the corner of it, and saw it was pewter pots; I called my servant immediately to prevent him getting away, and called for a constable, and gave charge of him; there was one quart pot bruised quite flat up, one pint pot seemed bruised entirely up, the other had a piece cut out with a chissel, where the name had been; I put the piece to it, and it quite fitted that part. I read the name Daniel Grimsby , Jacob's Wells, Barbican, who was the man that kept the house before Mr. Burder came in; and I ordered the constable to take the pots into custody, and to take the prisoner to the compter. I went to Mr. Burder's while I sent for the constable, and desired him to come and look at them; he claimed them as his property, as soon as he saw them.

Prisoner. Did not I tell you that I found them in the cellar, and was taking them to the publican to own them? - Before I gave charge of you, you said they were chips, and afterwards you said you was going to carry them home.

Court. Can you say that the pots you saw in the hands of Mr. Burder, were the same you took from that man? - Yes,

they were kept in my yard till Mr. Burder came, and then they were given to him; they were given after that to the constable.

Court to Burder. How do you know they are your pots? - By a private mark which was made on all the pots I took of Mr. Grimsby.

Q Had you ever sold any of these pots with this private mark? - Never.

Q Did you miss any pots that day? - I did not that day. I lost four or five dozen in the course of a month.

Prisoner. I was at work at Alderman Staines house this day; when I had done work there I carried in my tools, and I found these pots under the stairs; when I first worked there I was told the alderman was a very strict man, and therefore when he first met me I said they were chips, but when he was taking them out of my apron I said they were pots, and I was going to carry them home to the Jacob's Wells.

THOMAS KEMP sworn.

The prisoner is a carpenter , has two children; I have employed him to do different jobs for me; I always found him a very industrious man; I have known him about six years.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate and Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-73

619. CHARLES CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , thirty yards of silk ribbon, value 14 s. the goods of Elizabeth Gaywood , spinster .

ELIZABETH GAYWOOD sworn.

I am a single woman, an haberdasher ; I live in Pelham-street, No. 31. The last Tuesday in July, at seven in the morning, the prisoner at the bar came in my shop, and asked to see some black ribbon, I shewed him a drawer of ribbons, and he picked out one, and he desired me to cut him a yard off; which I did; he desired to see some coloured ones; the ones I shewed him were not broad enough, he should like to see some broader, if I had none others that would do, he would have some out of that; which he did; I shewed him another drawer, but he chose some out of the first; then Mr. Bothroyd came in, he lives opposite, and informed me the prisoner had robbed me; I did not miss any; we detained the prisoner; he taxed the prisoner with having robbed me, and I saw one piece fall from his hand on the counter, after Mr. Bothroyd taxed him, it was half a piece of black ribbon; I did not find any more of mine about him.

Q. Was that the piece of ribbon that you sold him? - No.

Q Can you say that was your ribbon? - Yes, by the private mark U. I have it in my pocket with me, I have the piece which he dropped in the drawer; I saw one piece drop, and I picked it up, and Mr. Bothroyd saw one piece drop, and he picked it up, there was one pink and one black ribbon; the one is worth seven shillings, and the other eight shillings.

Q. Had he paid for that he bought? - I had not taken his money up, it lay on the counter; I returned it to him again and he returned me the ribbon.

Mr. Knowlys. Had you finished the dealing when Mr. Bothroyd came in? - We had.

Q. He had taken up several pieces in the time? - He had.

Q. When Mr. Bothroyd came in, had not he let it fall and was not he wiping off

the dust against his clothes? - There was none fell down.

Q. You did not see any gone till Mr. Bothroyd came in? - I did not.

Court. Did you know any was missing from the quantity? - I did not from the quantity, because there were so many together; I know it had the private mark.

JOHN BOTHROYD sworn.

I am a carpenter; I was at my own door; I saw the prisoner in conversation with Mrs. Gaywood, and dealing for some ribbon, and I see he had got his hand into her drawer, and at the same time taking a piece of pink ribbon up into his hand; the words that passed between the two parties I did not know at that time; she was going to take the drawer away, she turned herself about, at the time she turned herself about, he put that piece of pink ribbon in his coat pocket; also a piece of black ribbon; I saw them both; I then crossed over the way, went into the shop, shut to the door, and asked him if he meant to take these ribbons from the person that stood behind the counter? I take the ribbons; says he, what do you mean by it? why says I, I mean what I say; you have two pieces of ribbon, that I say; he then shuffled, and in shuffling got his hand into his pocket, and took out the pink piece of ribbon which he threw into the drawer; immediately after he put his hand into his pocket, and took out the black piece, which it came unrolled in taking of it out, and in throwing of it on the counter Mrs. Gaywood laid hold of it, and said it was her property. The pink ribbon was thrown into the drawer.

Q. Did she say it was her's? - She did.

Mr. Knowlys. You was over the way? - I was about twenty feet distant.

Q. You was the whole length of the street? - No, only the breadth.

Q. You are pretty sharp on me? - No, sir, I am not.

Q. There are two glass doors at the front I believe? - No, there is not; there is one glass door, a shop door and there is a house door, but I see him through the window.

WILLIAM HOW sworn.

I am a constable; I have five pieces of ribbon that does not belong to Mrs. Gaywood.

Prisoner. On Saturday before this Tuesday I bought several dozen of ribbons. On Sunday I was obliged to make use of some to tie my shoes with: on Tuesday I went in to buy some of that lady, I had a piece that was powdery, and I was wiping it off in this manner at my breeches, and this gentleman came in and accused me with stealing the ribbons, but he never said any thing about the pink ribbon at first, as that constable knows.

Mr. Knowlys to How. Did you hear any charge, any more than about the black ribbon? - I heard about a piece of pink, he said there were two pieces at first.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 43.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before. Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-74

520. ABRAHAM COHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the goods of William Warr .

WILLIAM WARR sworn.

On Sunday the 4th of August, between eleven and twelve in the forenoon, I was

passing Gracechurch-street , towards London-bridge, and my pocket was picked of a silk handkerchief, near Talbot-court. Gracechurch-street; I had gone on for about ten steps before that I knew it; I then heard a cry of come back! I turned round on hearing that cry, and was beckoned to come back again; on which I ran, and the cry of stop thief was immediately given; the prisoner ran up Talbot-court, and was pursued by the evidence and myself, and was taken in Talbot-court, he was not out of sight from the time he picked my pocket until he was apprehended, where he threw down the handkerchief.

ABRAHAM ORANGE sworn.

I saw this prisoner the 4th of August, between eleven and twelve, the corner of Jerusalem court; I saw him going after this gentleman; I looked round, and I saw him take the handkerchief out of Mr. Warr's pocket; I beckoned for the gentleman to come back, and I ran after the prisoner, and hallooed stop thief! just as he got to the bottom of the court he threw down the handkerchief out of his coat, and I ran after him, and picked it up; he never was out of my sight till the officer came and took charge of him; he asked what we wanted with him? I said that he picked the gentleman's pocket of a handkerchief; the expressions he made was, you cannot hang me for it, making an oath.

JOHN RAYNER sworn.

I heard the call of stop thief, and I ran after him, and I saw him pull the handkerchief from underneath his coat, and throw it down.

- FOSTER sworn.

I have got the handkerchief; I received it of Mr. Orange.

Orange. I gave it to Foster. (Produced and deposed to.)

Court to Warr. How long before had you known you had that handkerchief? - I had it in Lombard street; I had occasion to use it then.

Prisoner. I was going down Fish street-hill, to Bishopsgate-street; there were two men walking before me; I heard a great noise of stop thief and I ran with the others, and Mr. Orange came up and stopped me, and he said that he believed that I picked the gentleman's pocket, and when he came before the Lord Mayor the next morning he swore that I did pick the gentleman's pocket.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-75

621. JAMES VOUGHAN SHIPMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , in the dwelling house of Alexander Marshall , two bank notes, value 50 l. each, two ditto, value 25 l. each; one value 20 l. and three bank notes, value 10 l. each; the property of Alexander Marshall .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ALEXANDER MARSHALL sworn.

I am an attorney in Staples-inn . On the 7th of March last I met the prisoner at the King's Arms coffee house, over Blackfriars-bridge, where I usually at that time dined, we dined together, and in conversation at dinner, or after dinner, he said he had served his clerkship to a gentleman at Ludlow, in Shropshire, and that the name was Kinnersley and that he had been sent by his father to London to get into an attorney's office for improvement,

and that he had been recommended to Messrs Kinnersley and Long, at Symonds-inn, Chancery-lane, that he had been there but they had no vacancy; he said his father meant to give fifty pounds with him to be at an attorney's office a year or two; he then asked if I wanted such a person, or if I knew any gentleman that did? I asked him who he knew in town to give him a character? he said he knew Alderman Harley, and Alderman Harley knew him, and his family very well, and Mr. Knight, the member of parliament, knew him, and he said the lady of that house knew him, who, when I enquired, she said that he had been there about a twelve month before with his father, and she gave me a very favourable account of the young man and his family. On this I asked him to drink tea with me; he did; and he asked if he might come the next day? I said by all means; he came on the 8th and continued till the Thursday following, the 14th. On the 14th I had the balance of account, in a case that I had, to send into the country, the sum of one hundred and fifty-five pounds, six shillings and two-pence. On the 14th, in the morning, I went and looked into my drawer, and I had two hundred pounds, I went to my drawer I looked at my money, because I had to make the former payment either that day or the next.

Q. Was the money there in bank notes or in cash? - In bank notes; there were two fiftys, two twenty fives, one twenty, and three tens.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner was in the chamber at the time you looked into this drawer? - That same morning he was not in the chambers, but the day before I had been putting a bank note in the drawer, and the prisoner was warming himself by the office fire, and he was looking at me at the time.

Q. When you was about what? - At these bank notes. On the 14th I left the chambers in the morning.

Q. Do you know whether you left the prisoner in the chambers? - I am sure I left him in the chambers that morning.

Q. At what time did you leave him in the chambers? - In the morning about ten or a little after.

Q. Had you any other clerk at that time? - My other clerk was with me; there was nobody left in the chambers but the prisoner; I took the other clerk with me, and just before I went I saw the bank notes in the drawer.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again, after you left your chamber in the morning? - He asked what time I should be at home? and my clerk said between six and seven in the evening.

Q. Did you see him again that day? - Yes, I did. I went to the same coffee house where I used to dine between two and three.

Q. Had you returned to your chamber in this interval? - I had not. The prisoner was at the coffee room at dinner? says I, dinner so soon? he usually used to go with me to dinner at three o'clock; so I sat down and dined with him; after dinner he asked me if I had been at the the chambers? I said, no; why has any body been there? he said nobody but Mr. Knight, the member of parliament, whom he said stayed with him above half an hour; I said directly, I wished to have been at home, because I wanted to see Mr. Knight, because he referred me to Mr. Knight for his character, and it would have saved me the trouble of going to Whitehall; he said that Mr. Knight had asked him to drink tea with him that afternoon, and could he go? I said by all means; I asked him what time he intended to go? he said Mr. Knight told him to be at his house at

five o'clock; I said, five o'clock, that is too early for a gentleman. He called for a glass of brandy and water, in the mean time a gentleman came into the coffee house to speak to me, and just as the brandy and water was brought he disappeared; I did not see him after; he never returned to the chambers that I could learn; I never see him again till the 12th of July, and that merely accidental.

Q. How long after this conversation was it you returned to your chambers? - I drank tea at my chambers; I returned about six; I found my chambers locked.

Q. Was there any appearance of violence about your chambers? - No, not that night; I perceived nothing that night that led me to any suspicion; I had this one hundred and twenty-five pounds to send into the country in the morning.

Q. Did you go to the drawer where these notes were, the evening you returned from the coffee house? - No, I did not; it was the next morning, the Friday between ten and eleven o'clock. I slept in the chambers that night.

Q. In what state did you find the drawer? - I went to the drawer, drew it out, and went to a memorandum book which I replaced these bank notes in, within its leaves; this book was there, and the notes out of the book.

Q. Did that lead you to make any observation on the drawer itself? - I pulled out the drawer, I found it had been wrenched open by some instrument or other, as if they had got under the table and wrenched it under.

Q. Was this drawer separate by itself, and no drawer under it? - It was.

Q. So any person might have applied an instrument to the bottom of that drawer, and it appeared to have been wrenched? - It did.

Q. I believe you have not been able to trace any of the notes? - No.

Mr. Const. After he had applied for you to take him he told you it was necessary for him to write to his father, to have his consent, and that before he compleated this agreement with you he was to receive his father's answer's? - It was so.

Q. During the time you were together you lived together? - We did; we dined together.

Q. I believe the landlady of the King's Arms coffee house was a near relation of your's? - Yes, she is.

Q. It was to her you applied for his character, and she satisfied you? - It was.

Q. On the 14th, after the time, he went back to your sister's house where you always dined, and there he dined? - It was so.

Q. Therefore it might appear that he wanted to meet you? - To be sure one might think so, that he went to meet me.

Q. When he told you that Mr. Knight had asked him to visit him that night, did not you say then, you had better make haste, for it is time to set off? - It may have been so, but I do not recollect it.

Q. Then he finished his dinner, and called for a glass of brandy and water, and when he went away you was otherwise engaged with some body else? - I was.

Q. I don't know whether you are aware of it; do you know that on the morning of the 15th, he really did receive a letter from his father forbidding him to enter into the engagement with you? - I do not know it, it may be so.

Q. Was he the only person that had access to your chambers? - The laundress always has a key.

Q. And how is that key disposed of when the laundress does not want to come to the house? - Left at the porter's lodge; but the porter would be very particular whom he gave the key to.

WILLIAM VERNON sworn.

I am a woollen draper and man's

mercer, Charing-cross. I saw the prisoner at the bar; I cannot exactly say the day of the month; I have an entry in my book of an article he had the 23d of March, it was between the 12th and the 23d, I cannot speak nearer than that; it was between the hours of nine and ten o'clock at night; the shop was shut up; I was up stairs, and he came with another person, whom he called his servant; he immediately called me by my name, and he says, you recollect me, I had something of you when I was at the Golden Cross sometime ago; I did then recollect him; I took him into the back shop, and he told me that he wanted half a dozen waistcoats if I had them ready made, and a coat or two he wanted; I told him I had not got the articles ready made, but I could make them for him at a very short notice; he seemed to be very urging if I had any thing of the kind, as he meant to go abroad immediately; he informed me that he had seen an advertisement for one that wanted a companion who was going abroad; he said that he had seen that advertisement in some news paper that he could not recollect, and asked me if I could tell him? I told him I did not recollect any reference; there happened to be a waistcoat ready made for a gentleman that I thought would about fit him, and he had that waistcoat and a pair of drawers; he took his pocket book out of his pocket, and out of that pocket book he took a quantity of bank notes, and offered to pay me if I would give him change.

Q. Could you distinguish the notes? - I could not distinguish any of the bank notes. On his offering to pay me for them, I told him it was no consequence, as he had things before I was not afraid to trust him, or words to that effect; he agreed to call the next morning to look out the goods that he wanted, and he gave me his address, that he lodged at the King's Arms, Blackfriars-road; I expected him the next day, but I did not see him afterwards.

Mr. Const. Are you sure that he is the man? - I have no doubt at all about it.

Q. You have not seen him since March? - Not till I saw him at Bow-street.

Court. How often had you seen him at your house? - To the best of my recollection he called once or twice.

Mr. Const. If I understand you right, you had some difficulty in recollecting him, if he had not told you he was the person that came before? - I had a deal of conversation with him that night.

Q. Did it not appear to you extraordinary that that man should resort to you to know about a person for travelling? - It did not.

Q. At this night, you knew from him, that he lodged at the King's Arms coffee house? - Or else I should not have known were to have applied.

Q. You have stated it to have been on the 12th or 23d, will you take on you to say upon your oath that it was before the 14th? Will you venture on your recollection to say that this time when he called and produced the bank notes was not before the 14th? - When I called to enquire for him at the King's Arms coffee house, they told me that he had robbed his master.

Q. On your oath was it not before the 14th? - It might be, I will not be sure.

Court to Marshall. Was this King's Arms the same coffee house that you dined at? - The same coffee house.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-76

622. EDWARD KEPPEL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of January , a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 4 s. a pair of silver knee buckles, value 2 s. the goods of Edward Burrows .

EDWARD BURROWS sworn.

I live in Great Russell-street, Bloombury . On the 24th of July I came home in the evening, and was informed by the servant that boy a had stolen something out of the house; our house was repairing; he was in the capacity of a plaisterer's boy .

Q. Did you look to see that the buckles were missing? - I did not. I went down to the pawnbroker's, near St Martin's Church, and there I found a pair of buckles which I believe to be mine; the boy was apprehended, and carried to the watch-house, and I went to see him.

Q. Did any thing pass to promise him or threaten him? - There was no promise made, but I desired him to confess, and told him it would be better for him.

Q. Do you know any thing of the knee buckles? - No further than I believe they are mine.

DAVID GORDON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I think he pawned these knee buckles the 12th of July, it it was Thursday, I am sure it was the prisoner, he had on a white jacket then.

Q. When did you see him? - I see him the next day when he was committed. He offered to pawn them; he asked me four shillings for them, I saw he was a poor like boy, and I asked him who they belonged to? he said he had them of his father; I asked him where his father was? he said his father worked for Mr. Collins, the dustman, at Westminster; that gave me rather a suspicion, and I looked over the counter, and I saw these shoe buckles were in his pocket; I then put him in St. Martin's watch-house, and after eleven o'clock I got him to Bow street, and I cannot remember whether he confessed going along or at Bow-street. There were two boys together, but the other boy had only a pair of shirt buttons.

Burrows. There was another boy at work with him in the house, and which boy stole the shoe buckles I don't know. (The buckles produced.)

Burrows. I do not venture to swear to them; I believe they are mine.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-77

623. MARY JOKEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of august , three guineas ; the monies of John Sidwell .

JOHN SIDWELL sworn.

Mary Jokeman picked my pocket of three guineas on the first of August; I never saw her before that day that I know of, nor since, except at the Justice's; I saw her then at the Half Moon, Hatton, in the parish of East Brentford ; I went into the Half Moon, and called for a pint of beer, and asked if one Mrs. Misslebroke lived there? they said she was dead and gone and her husband; and this Mary Jokeman , and the man that cohabited with her, pretend to be the landlord and landlady of the house, and the woman that was the real landlady, whom I afterwards found to be Mrs. Misslebroke, acted as maid.

Q. Do you know that of your own knowledge? - These were the words they told me afterwards. I asked for some victuals, and I had some gin and water.

Q. What time of the day was it? - In the evening after candlelight. And after that I asked the man that I thought to be the real landlord, to drink, his name is Alexander Penters ; he told me that Mr. and Mrs. Misslebroke were both dead and gone, and we had some gin and water, and then he went away and left me; then what became of him I did not know, but I found afterwards he went up stairs to bed I asked him if I could have a bed there? they said, yes; I think the woman, Mary Jokeman , said yes; and having some money in my side pocket I put three guineas in my breeches, and after that I wanted to go to bed; I went up stairs, Mary Jokeman went up with me, and when I went up stairs I went through a room, and there I saw the man lay in bed, and the prisoner at the bar told me that was her husband, and this Jokeman pretended to be landlady and light me up stairs, and she turned down the bed, there were two beds in the room, and she said I might have which I pleased to lay in; I told her I would lay on that nigh on the head of the stairs; I said to her, will you go down? I can put the candle out myself; after that she said she did not choose to leave the room for fear of fire; I undressed myself and got into bed; she had gone and sat down on the other bed, she still sat on the top of the bed, and when she thought I was asleep, she came round on the other side of the bed that I laid on and drew my breeches from under my head; the rule fell out of the pocket, I am a carpenter and joiner by trade, then I see her take my breeches and hold them up before me and rifle my pockets; there was half a guinea and some silver, and halfpence in one pocket, and three guineas in the side pocket; she took the three guineas out of the side pocket, and left me the half guinea and silver and halfpence. Then there was a racket below, and she went down stairs and bolted the stairs foot door that I could not come down, and there was a racketing with them all night, till four o'clock in the morning, a swearing and noise; after that I got out of bed and felt my breeches and I found she had got the three guineas away entirely; I did not get out of bed till day break, because I was afraid; then I laid down again till about six; I looked out of window to see if I could get out of window if any thing happened, but could not it was so high; about six o'clock I got up, and I then found my mistake about Mrs. Misslebroke, and that she that acted as maid was Mrs. Misslebroke, and she was damning and swearing to her own child; I got up as near as I can guess about six o'clock; I knocks at the stair foot door, and I could not get out, I rapped three times, at last I kicked it with my foot, and then I was let down stairs, I went down stairs into the tap room, and a young man came in, a carpenter there, I think they called his name Hilliers, I will not be positive; then Mrs. Misslebroke began to blast the wash tub and the harvest too; so this man, that was there and I, we had a pint of beer together, and Mrs. Misslebroke said that Mrs. Jokeman had just gone out with her husband, for he had just come from the Indies with a good deal of money.

Q. Did you enquire for her? - I did not; I said nothing only bring me a pint, for I am very dry; I told the young man that I had been robbed by Mary Jokeman of three guineas; and he said I might take her up at the Bell, at Hounslow, if I went there; I did not go, I stayed there till she came, and then I swore it was she, this was about twelve o'clock. When she came in Mrs. Misslebroke told her that I said she robbed me of three guineas; and then she came and abused me, and said she would knock my head against the wall if I said so; then there

came in a bricklayer and another, and I set off and got a warrant, and the constable that is here took her up.

Prisoner. Did I carry the candle up stairs? - You did, and you sat down on the other bed while I got into bed.

ANN SEABROKE sworn.

Q. Do you live at this house? - No.

Q. What do you know concerning this matter? - No otherwise than she bought some things at Hounslow, and brought them for me to make up for her the day after the man was robbed, she told me she had bought them at Hounslow; it was a gown, a quilted petticoat, a muslin handkerchief, and a yard of muslin to make a double bordered cap.

Q. What do you think they might cost? - I think they might cost a guinea and a half, the things she brought to me.

Prisoner. Did not I tell you that the gown cost only ten shillings? - I don't justly recollect what she told me was the price of it.

Q. And the petticoat eleven shillings? - I think she did say so, to the best of my knowledge, that the petticoat cost eleven shillings.

Prisoner. I wanted to lay my money out a good while before; I always told her so.

ANN FRIEND sworn.

I live at Hatton; I know nothing more than that the prisoner, Mary Jokeman , came to me about five o'clock in the morning, the same morning as the man was robbed, and she asked me if I would go to Hounslow with her? if I would she would give me a shilling for my trouble, and I went with her, and she bought these things; I don't know that the money was stole that she bought the things with.

Q. How much did she pay for them? - A guinea and a half; she paid one guinea, and had the other in change half a guinea.

Q. Did you see her pull out any more money? - No, I saw the guinea and a half.

Prisoner. Ask her whether I did not go with her a week before to get her to shew me the shop where to buy these things? - She did; I went with her and shewed her the shop.

Court. How long have you known the prisoner? - About two months.

Q. Do you know who she is? - No.

Q. Do you know where she comes from? - I do not.

Q. Where had she lived all the time that you had known her - At the Half Moon.

Q. Had you been much with her? - No.

RICHARD FOOT sworn.

I live at Balfour, all in the same parish as Hatton. I was with the prisoner, and she said if Mr. Sidwell would go back with her to Hatton again, she would give him one guinea of the money again, and make the rest up in property; and Mr. Sidwell would not go.

Q. How came this conversation? - She wanted to make it up with him; he said he would make it up if she would go and fetch him the money and things there, but he would not go to Hatton with them.

Q. Did you promise her any thing to make her confess that? - Nothing at all; it was voluntary.

Prisoner. That man said if I would give him some money he would make it up between this man and me? - I did not.

JAMES ASLOP sworn.

I went to aid and assist with the constable; I know nothing of the matter.

Q. Did you hear say what the last witness has said? - I heard her say nothing at all.

Prisoner. I never saw the man's money; I never saw the man from the time that he went up stairs till the morning; he asked me to drink, I told him I would not drink; he asked me to go up stairs and have connection with him; I denied him; then he asked me to make him some gin and water; I told him I was not the landlady; he said he had lost money out of his pocket, and he would make me suffer, because I denied him that question.

Court. At whose house was this? - At Mr. Misslebroke's.

Prosecutor. Mrs. Misslebroke acknowledged that she had one guinea of the money to Mr. Lane; so Mr. Lane sent her to prison too with Mary Jokeman .

Prisoner. The prosecutor sent word to me that I need not care about it, for he would not appear against me; he came to me in prison and brought me victuals, and said that he would clear me if I would swear against the landlady, because she was a woman and had friends, and I had none; but as he had begun he must go through with it, he said it had cost him twenty pounds.

Prosecutor. I went to the prison to her and gave her six-pence, and I said, why did you give Mrs. Misslebroke any part of the money? you have brought yourself into the trouble and you must go through with it.

Jury to Prosecutor. On your oath will you say that you was sober when you went to bed? - I was no ways to be called in liquor.

Q. Did you know what sort of a house this was before you went in? - When I went in I thought they were very creditable people in the house, because they told me that Mr. and Mrs. Misslebroke were dead.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Court. Let the notes of this trial be sent to the magistrates, for I am sure that house ought not to be licensed

Reference Number: t17930911-78

624. THOMAS BIRCH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of September , two half crowns, and one shilling ; the monies of Jane Cartwright .

JANE CARTWRIGHT sworn.

I am a single woman.

Q. Are you in any business now? - I am an unfortunate woman; I live in Pye-street, Westminster ; I was coming home near half after eleven, as nigh as I can guess, when I was at the public house there came in this man and a soldier and his sister, into the public house; it was the Rose and Crown, the bottom of Dartmouth-street, Westminster, as I had known them before I told him I would give him a glass of gin; I had not had a drop of nothing before all that night.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before this? - I knew him so far as this, that he was a plaisterer as I heard; I went home along with this man to my own house.

Q. Did you carry him home? - No, I did not carry him home.

Q. You agreed to go home together? - Yes. And I put off my pockets, and put them between the sacking and the bed; in my right hand pocket there were two half crowns, in my left hand

pocket there was a shilling. I went to bed, and about half after three o'clock he got out of bed, he went to bed with me, I heard him get up, and I heard him going out of the door, Thomas, said I, where are you going? no, says he, I am not going, only going backward; I thought to myself I am very afraid of your going backward, and I went to feel for my pockets, and I missed my pockets from under the place where I had put them, and before he got down stairs I went down stairs after him.

Q. Were the pockets gone out of the room? - They were not, I missed them from the place where I put them; I followed him down stairs and I would not let him go out of doors till I asked him for my money; he said he had not the money, he had not a farthing about him, he said he never saw the money; hearing a dispute my landlady got up she struck a light and she opened the door, and hearing of that, she said, have not you got it in your shoes, and he opened his waistcoat, and there was nothing; I would not let him out, and the two patroles came to the door, I went up stairs to search my bed, in the mean time he let down his apron and they found the money; I did not see the patroles do that.

Q. After you missed it how soon did you see your money? - In about an hour and a half.

Q. Did you see the two half crowns, and shilling? - Yes.

Q. In whose hands? - In the patrole's.

Q. Did you know that money to be your's? - I don't know it for a certainty; I cannot swear to it.

Q. Now when he denied having the money what did you say to it? - He said, I have money about me to be sure, and I took it, and hid it for fear she should rob me when I was gone to bed; and he said to the watchman, I insist on having it again, for it is my own money.

Q. The patrole proves the taking of the money from him? - Yes.

ANN MURRAY sworn.

I am landlady of the house; I saw the patroles take the money from him; he said he had money, but that the money was his own.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-79

625. THOMAS BARTLETT was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , one shilling and four halfpence , the goods of Jonathan Greenstreet .

MARY GREENSTREET sworn.

I am the wife of Jonathan Greenstreet, he is a turner and ivory piercer, and carver . The prisoner was a stranger, he took the money on the 22d of July, Monday, between five and six; a little before six in the evening we were going to Sadler's Wells; it was in Sadler's Wells yard the prisoner put his left hand into my right hand pocket.

Q. Did you perceive his hand there? - I took his hand within my pocket; as I took hold of his hand I see a shilling and some halfpence, I don't know how many, I took him by the collar, and the constable came; the constable has got the money; he never got away from me at all.

Prisoner. I had six or seven shillings of my own money.

Court to Mrs. Greenstreet. Are you sure that this shilling was your's? - I am sure of it, the shilling is marked with a T, on it.

ROBERT SMALL sworn.

I was close by the lady at the time, and I came up, and I saw this man in the

hands of the lady, who had him by the collar; I searched him and found one shilling and two-pence in his pocket; there was six or seven shillings with it.

Court to Mrs. Greenstreet. I understood that you said that you took the money in his hand? - No, he shifted the money from his left hand to his right hand, and then put it into his pocket. (The shilling and two-pence produced.)

Mrs. Greenstreet. I can swear to the shilling.

Prisoner. I was going to Sadler's Wells, and there was a great many going into the garden hallooed out, take care of your pockets, I was standing by the gentlewoman, and she caught hold of my collar; I was going to put my hand to pay a shilling to go in, that is all I have got to say.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

Court to Mrs. Greenstreet. Are you sure that his hand was in your pocket? - Yes.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-80

726. HENRY LANGLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July fifty four silk handkerchiefs, value 4 l. the goods of John Potter .

JOHN POTTER sworn.

I am a linen draper . I lost fifty-four silk handkerchiefs; I live in White Lyon-street, Pentonville , I keep a shop there; I only prove my property, I lost them the 8th of July.

ROBERT JONES sworn.

I am headborough of St. James's, Clerkenwell.

Q. Did you find the things on the prisoner? - I did not.

- MURPHY sworn.

I am a school boy.

Q. Are you any relation to Mr. Potter? - No.

Q. Do you live in the family? - No. I was going into White Conduit-fields, about twenty yards from Pentonville.

Q. Do you know the house of Mr. Potter? - Yes.

Q. Was you going in a direction to his house or from his house? - Neither one way nor the other, I was in the street, I heard Mr. Jones halloo out stop thief! and afterwards Henry Langley threw down the things, he had them under his great coat; I picked the bundle up, and I stayed where I picked them up till Henry Jones came past with Henry Langley , the man that stole them.

Q. Now from the time he threw down the bundle and you picked it up, and he was brought back to you; did you lose sight of him at all? - No.

Q. Was it a bundle tied up, or was it open? - It was tied up in nothing; it was silk handkerchiefs; Mr. Jones has had the care of them ever since.

Q. Did you give them to Jones? - Yes.

Prisoner. This lad has said that he never lost sight of me; when I was taken I was turned round the corner.

Jones. I am a shoemaker, a master; I keep a shop in White Lyon-street. On Monday the 8th of July, a neighbour came to me, and desired me to go and see after a bullock that had strayed that way, and to disperse the mob; with that I went up and went round the street, past Mr. Potter's house, with that I went across the way to the lare, and the bullock was got up, locked up; when I got there, there was the mob, and I stopped to see what became of them, and this lad and some more went on to the

Angel, and then they turned back; and went up White Lion-street, and past my door; I followed the prisoner at the bar about fifty yards behind them; when he got to Mr. Potter's door he made a stand; with that I made a bit of an halt likewise, and he looked himself a little about across the way; there is a public house opposite, and I see him take up the handkerchiefs, a bundle however, which were laid in a sopha at Mr. Potter's door, where there were other articles put out at the door; after that he took the bundle, and he put it under his great coat, then he made off as quick as he could, and I after him, and I hallooed stop thief! then he turned the corner into Banner-street; I never lost sight of him till I took him; he dropped the property in Banner-street, about the middle of the street, I saw him drop it, but I did not stay to see him pick it up; the lad picked it up and brought it me while I had the prisoner in custody. (The property produced.)

Q. What time was this you went round and took this man? - About four o'clock.

Court to Potter. When did you last see these at your door? - That day about three o'clock in the afternoon; it was then laying on the sopha before the door; I know them to be mine by my own mark, of my own hand writing, 2 s. 3 d. 2 s. 6 d. 2 s. 9 d. and 3 s.

Prisoner. I was that day asked out to dinner at Cannonbury House, turning up White Lion street, I heard the cry of stop thief! with that I ran, and I was taken running, and Mr. Jones said that I was the person that took the property, which I am as innocent of as a child unborn.

GUILTY . (Aged 20)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-81

627. WILLIAM ANDREWS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , eight pair of mens leather shoes, 8 s. one pair of flannel drawers, value 6 d. three flannel waistcoats, value 3 s. a pair of flannel drawers, value 2 s. a quarter of a yard of red woollen cloth, value 1 s. a wooden box, value 1 s. 6 d. four mens linen shirts, value 4 s. two yards of blue baize, value 1 s. twenty yards of irish cloth, value 18 s. the goods of James Duberley .

JOHN MADGEWICKE sworn.

I am foreman to Mr. Duberley. The articles lost were all under my care; the prisoner was a porter , he lived in the house, No. 33, Soho-square ; Mr. Duberley had a mistrust of the prisoner, and had his box searched, where we found a remnant of linen; I went to Bow-street to prove the property which was found.

Q. Did you happen to know, before this property was found, that any were missing? - Yes, from the chest particularly, and the shoes were missing from time to time.

Q. What day was it you was sent for to Bow-street? - Friday the 19th of August; and there I saw some property.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

I am a constable. On Friday the 16th of August, Mr. Duberley came down to the office at Bow-street, he wanted an officer, he suspected the porter had robbed him, to search his box; I went with him; he was seated in the room, and I asked if he had any objection to have his box searched? he replied, no. We went up into the garret, and we opened the box, found this piece of linen first, and in the box was found these two keys; these two keys being in the box, Mr. Duberley asked him where his box was he suspected he took

it? after a little hesitation he said he would go where it was; this was a box belonging to his master; he went with him to his lodgings, where he used to lodge, at one Mr. Godfry's, Castle-court, Castle-street, Oxford-market, and when we went there we asked for the box, it was brought out, and all the other articles in the indictment was found in that box; the box is here. (The articles produced.)

Madgewicke. Here are eight pair of shoes, four pair of them marked with a K. and 7. four of them with a W here is a remnant of fine scarlet that I cut off the piece myself, it was laid in the counting house, and I did not know which way it went; here are a pair of flannel drawers, I can swear to them by the particular lining; I believe all the things to be Mr. Duberley's.

Prisoner. I have nothing more to say than that I am innocent of it.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-82

628. WILLIAM BOULTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of July , forty pounds weight of lead, value 3 s. the goods of John Drummond , Esq .

THOMAS REYNOLDS sworn.

Q. Are you a servant of Mr. Drummond's? - I am not; I stand at the Turnpike and look after the gardeners; I stopped the prisoner at the Turnpike, at Kilburn, it was at six o'clock on Monday morning the 22d of July.

Q. How much lead might there be? - Forty pounds.

Q. What past between you and him? - We heard of him before he came up to the gate, and when he came up to the gate we stopped him, and then we asked him what he had? and where he had got it? he said he got it of Mr. Drummond, that he had it out of an hay loft where he layed; he used to lodge there; he said that it laid loose in the loft; he did not say any more; the lead is here now. (Produced.)

Q. Have you had it ever since? - I left it at Bow-street.

Q. When you left it at Bow-street did you put your mark on it? - I did not; but I can swear to it, because it is particularly rolled up.

Q. Who brought it here? - I brought it here.

JOHN RIDDOCK sworn.

I am a gardener to Mr. Drummond.

Q. What is Mr. Drummond's name? - John Drummond , Esq.

Q. Have you seen the lead? - I have seen it at Bow-street; this is the same lead I saw at Bow-street.

Q. Can you swear that to be Mr. Drummond's lead? - I cannot.

Q. Can you swear that such lead was missing? - Yes, it was missing from a loft.

Q. Do you believe that to be the lead that was missing? - I will not say that.

Court to Reynolds. When he told you he had this lead, had not you told him it would be better for him to confess? - I had not.

Q. Did not you recommend him to say some thing to induce him to say that? - I did not.

Q. Had you persuaded him at all to confess where he took it from? - I did not.

Prisoner. This young man asked me where I had it from? I said I picked it up.

Court to Riddock. Had this man any

business in the hay loft? - He was hay making.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-83

629. WILLIAM CROSS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of September , one iron bolster, value 6 d. a steel studded tool, value 1 s. six pieces of solder, value 1 s. a pound weight of steel, value 6 d. a pound weight of iron, value 6 d. the goods of - Witler .

- WITLER sworn.

I live in Milbank-street, Westminster ; I am employed in the repairing of the mail coaches .

LAWRENCE CAWTHORNE sworn.

I am a workman to Mr. Witler; I took them things out of his pocket, I believe the 11th of September, on Wednesday, about twenty minutes past seven at night; my master took him after he had gone from the yard.

Witler. I followed him and found the things on him; he was about two hundred yards from my house, mine is a work shop of various sorts; I asked him where he was going? he said home; I said that was not his road home, he was going quite the reverse; I asked him what he had got in his pocket? he said, nothing. I put my hand into his pocket, and found several pieces of solder and steel, and that sort, and ordered him to walk back again; I called the watchman, and he took out of his pocket all the things in the indictment; I delivered them to Joseph Manning , Joseph Manning see them taken out of his pocket, I called him at the same time; Manning brings them here. (Produced.) I can swear them to be mine.

Q. What was this man, William Cross? - He is an apprentice as a painter to me.

JOSEPH MANNING sworn.

I saw these things taken from the prisoner; I have had them in my possession ever since. One of the tools in particular belongs to my master, that is the iron bolster, it has a mark on it that I mark all the tools with; the other things I cannot speak so particularly to; it is a cross struck in with a chissel in the side of the bolster; and an iron studding tool is missing from the spring maker's of the same size.

Q. Pray had the apprentice any business with these tools? - He had no business at all but in the painting way, he had no business in any other shop, and Mr. Witler gave him a caution against going into any other shop.

WILLIAM TRICKY sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Witler.

Q. Did you see the things taken from the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. Are those the things? - They are; I can speak to one particularly.

Prisoner. My mother says I am an apprentice, I cannot say whether I am or no; but I was bound apprentice to John Bizant , and he is dead.

The prisoner called his mother, and three more witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 17.)

Recommended to Mercy .

To go to Sea .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-84

530. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of July ,

four brass candlesticks, value 4 s. the goods of Mary Mills , widow .

MARY MILLS sworn.

I am a widow; I keep a public house in Gray's Inn-lane . The prisoner at the bar and two more men came in and called for a pint of beer, on the 18th of July, on Thursday, at five or six o'clock in the afternoon, they drank to the amount of three pots of beer; they called for more, but I told them I did not mean to draw them any more, for I was in doubt whether I should get paid for what they had drank or not, and when I refused to draw them any more the bell was rang for me to get my reckoning, while I was trying to get my reckoning, the man the prisoner at the bar went backward, and he soon returned from backward out of the yard, and he past through a little area where the candlesticks all stood, he went out at the door, I did not notice him going out, but he presently returned with money to pay for the beer; while I was disputing one of the men that were left behind wanted me to take a silk handkerchief in pledge; I told him I never did any thing of that sort, he was got into a wrong house; soon after the prisoner returned and throwed down six-pence, and he says to his companions, sure you can raise the other four-pence halfpenny; they said, no, no, he had managed well, and he could pay for the whole of the beer, and he paid for the whole of the beer, and when I had got my money I left the room and went into the bar, and they called for a quartern or a quartern and a half of gin, and had it, and paid for it; then after he went backward into the yard again, he stopped some little time, and I was sitting in the bar; I got up to see what he was at, and there I saw him fumbling something in his pocket, under the shelf were the candlesticks were, and he had got two high ones in the left hand pocket, brass candlesticks; I took two out of the right hand pocket myself, and I called out for assistance, and I had assistance come to me, and he went to the necessary and dropped two down, the second we heard fall, but the first we did not; the second we took out.

Q. Can you swear them to be your's? - I can, those that I took from him.

Q. Is your name on them? - No, it is not; they have been at the office Hatton Garden ever since. I missed seven in all, and found these four; three are totally gone, which I suppose he took at first to go and get the money to pay for the beer.

Q. How long have you had these candlesticks? - I have had them for seven years. One of the small ones, which I took out of his pocket, I think it is marked, pattern on the bottom; I can swear to them safely being my property.

- BUTLER sworn.

I am a carpenter; I saw the two candlesticks that had been taken out of the necessary; I did not see them thrown down.

BENJAMIN BEVAN sworn.

I produce the candlesticks; a servant of Mrs. Mills gave them me that does not appear. (Deposed to by Mrs. Mills.)

Prisoner. I was drinking at the prosecutrix's that same evening, and I had been there about two or three hours, and I went to ease myself; and dropped my tobacco box in the necessary; coming in to ask the landlady to look for my tobacco box, I took a candlestink from the bench; she came to me, and asked me what I was going to do with the candlestick? and she ran against me, and pushed me, and knocked another down, and then she said that I wanted to steal them.

Mrs. Mills. The two small ones were in his pocket.

Bevan. I am desired to mention that he belongs to the militia , and that his serjeant and corporal is here ready to take him back.

The prisoner called one woman to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-85

631. MARY BRYAN was indicted for stealing on the 8th of July , a woollen cloth cloak, value 8 s. a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of John Sullivan .

CATHARINE SULLIVAN sworn.

I am the wife of John Sullivan I lost a woollen cloth cloak on the 8th of July, Monday, between five and six o'clock in the morning, I lost it from Church-street, St. Giles's ; I lost it from out of my room, I saw the prisoner take it; my husband came in between five and six o'clock in the morning, he is a watchman , he called to me to lock the door after him, but I did not; and somebody came up stairs and took the cloak off the line while I was in bed.

Q. Then you did not see her take it? - No, I did not see her take it, I was in the room.

Q. Was it taken from the same room in which you was in bed? - Yes.

Q. How soon did you recover it? - The next day about twelve o'clock, I see it with the officer.

Q. Did you know it to be your husband's coat that you see at the office? - Yes.

ANN JOLLAND sworn.

I keep a little clothes shop in King-street, Seven Dials; the prisoner brought the cloak to me about the 8th of July, about nine o'clock in the morning, or rather better; it was on a Monday, I knew her before, she had been at the shop buying trifling articles and I thought her a very decent well behaved woman.

Q. Did you ask her how she came by the cloak? - She said it was her own. I bought it of her for six shillings and six-pence, that was the full value; I think the trimmings are very much broke, the cloak is stained.

Q. How was it found out you had it? - The officer was enquiring about it, I carried it up to the officer when I heard of it, and left it there.

DANIEL SULLIVAN sworn.

I am a watchman; I assisted in taking the prisoner on suspicion of robbery, I got information where she lodged, and she was seen sitting at the door this morning, I found her in the coach yard, Broad St. Giles's, I took her up, it was the next day, the 9th of July, and I carried her to an officer about between twelve and one o'clock, then the constable and I made a search in this woman's house, and she said she would come and bring it down to the office.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn.

I am a constable belonging to Marlborough-street; I produce a cloth cloak and silk handkerchief, I got them of Mrs. Jolland in the office, I have kept them ever since, I took them from her about the 9th of July, I think it was of a Tuesday.

Court to Mrs. Jolland. Did she sell an handkerchief to you? - Yes, she sold me both together; I gave her six shillings and six-pence for both; I think they are the same indeed.

Prosecutor. I know the cloak by spots in the fore part, and it is ript in two or three places; I have had it three years now; the silk handkerchief I used to wear every day; I missed it from my room, and it was hanging on the same line with the cloak.

Prisoner. About four months I lodged in her place, and the woman gave me this cloak and handkerchief to sell, and I fetched them to this here woman and she bought them.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever see this woman in your room? - No.

Q. Was she a stranger to you? - Yes, I never saw her before.

Prisoner. I have no witness but my husband in this kingdom.

GUILTY.

Recommended by the Jury .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-86

632. MARY BRYAN was again indicted for stealing, on the 2d of June , a cotton gown, value 3 s. the goods of Hannah Cushion .

HANNAH CUSHION sworn.

I am a single woman; I lost a cotton gown; I am a servant , at No. 56, St. Jamess'-street, Oxford-road , with widow Rumford, at Mr. Naylor's house, he is a painter and glazier; I lost the gown on the 2d of July, on Tuesday; I was in bed when it was taken, it was on a chair; I missed it when I awaked; I see it on the 8th or 9th of July, either on the Monday or Tuesday; this gentlewoman, Mrs. Jolland, brought it to the office in Marlborough-street, and there I see it; I knew it to be mine it was a figured gown; I have got some of it here in my hand; the prisoner was at the office, I did know her, I see her the very day I lost my property; she lodged at the house were I lodged; I was out of place at that time; I am now a servant; I saw her in that house in the course of the day.

Q. Was the door of the room open? - Somebody opened it; I don't say it was the prisoner.

Q. Do you sleep with your door open? - The family of the house took care of it; I went to bed first.

ANN JOLLAND sworn.

I produce the gown; it was at a pawnbroker's, at Long-acre; and I stayed at the door and gave her the money and bought it of her.

Q. Had the prisoner a duplicate? - Yes.

Q. Have you got the duplicate? - No, she has had it; I brought the gown up to the office, as I bought both the gown and cloak of her I carried them up, and the constable went about and found an owner for them.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn.

I bring the gown here; I received it from Mrs. Jolland, on the 9th of July, I have kept it ever since. (Deposed to.)

Court to Ann Jolland . What day did you carry them to the office? - It may be the 6th; I believe it was on a Saturday; this is the very same gown.

Prisoner. The same person that gave me the handkerchief to sell gave me the cloak to pawn for five shillings, and I fetched her back the duplicate; in about three days she sent me to this witness that is here, to see if she would buy the

duplicate of the gown, and she went with me to the pawnbroker's, and gave me the money, five shillings and a penny, and then she fetched me home to her own place, and gave three shillings for the gown; that was eight shillings and a penny.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Imprisoned one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-87

663. MARY HOWARD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of July , four guineas and six shillings in monies numbered; the monies of William Thompson , in the dwelling house of Thomas Powell .

WILLIAM THOMPSON sworn.

William Powell keeps a lodging house; I am a single man; I was coming home to where I live, I live in Norfolk; I met this woman at the top of Tottenham-court-road on the 29th of July, it may be about eleven o'clock at night, it was a Monday, I was drunk, I was walking up, and she catched hold of me, and whether she spoke to me first, or I to her, I am not positive; I asked her if she could take me any where, where I could lodge that night, as I was quite a stranger? she told me that she could take me to a house that she knew very well, where I could have a very good bed; she took me to a lodging, No. 4, Church-lane, close by Bloomsbury, it is in St. Giles's parish ; I went to bed there, I pulled off my clothes; I am not certain whether the woman went to bed or not; as soon as I was in bed I was asleep.

Q. What were you so drunk you don't recollect? - No, I do not.

Q. How much money had you about you when you went into the house? - Four pounds ten shillings. I paid a shilling for the house, and I gave the prisoner something to drink; I had four shillings and six-pence I believe.

Q. Did you pay for what you gave the prisoner to drink? - I don't know; I had four guineas and about two pennyworth of halfpence in my waistcoat pocket, I saw them when I was in bed.

Q. Had you any silver? - Yes, when I went in I had four or five shillings, I cannot tell which, besides two very remarkable six-pences.

Q. When did you first miss your money? - In the morning about half after four o'clock, and the woman was gone.

Q. Was the woman in the room when you missed your money? - No.

Q. You was not sober enough to know whether she left the room? - I was not.

Q. Has any of this money been found? - The two six-pences she gave me out of her own pocket the next morning. When I awaked I got up, and went and searched the houses where I could find any body, and I went into a public house, called the Running Horse, and there I found the prisoner, the best part of a furlong from the lodgings; with that I saw her, and I said are you the person that took me to the lodgings last night? she said, yes; said I, what have you done with the money? then she said, she had got none; I told her she certainly had, and she had best give it up to me without any further ado; she said she had not got it, and the woman that keeps the public house said she knew better, that she had got it; that was in the presence of the prisoner, and the woman that kept the house told her if she had not got it then, she had given it to an old woman that she had been treating that morning; there was another girl also there, and she

told her that she should be well rigged out in two or three days time; with that I saw a person there that I knew, and I slipt out for the officer; he came and searched her; before he came she gave me these two six-pences, and she said she had not any more but them, and the officer searched her, and he could not find any more about her; Mr. Sanders, the officer, has the six-pences.

Court. How came you not to put these six-pences in the indictment?

CHRISTOPHER SANDERS sworn.

I was an officer at Marlborough-street; I saw the prosecutor and the girl together, at the same public house, the Running Horse; I searched her and found nothing on her; these two six-pences were given to me; I received them of the prosecutor; I asked the prisoner whether she gave them him? she said she did; she said they were among the gold, the four guineas that he lost; when I was taking her down, after she was committed, she said that she gave the four guineas to the old woman.

Q. Had you recommended her to confess? - I had recommended her to confess.

Q. Is the old woman here? - She is not; she has left her lodgings. (The two six-pences produced and deposed to by the prosecutor, from having holes in them.)

Court. The four guineas have not been found? - They have not.

Court to Prosecutor. How do you know it was the house of Thomas Powell ? - I enquired who it belonged to; I don't know of my own knowledge.

Court to Sanders. Do you know it to be the house of Thomas Powell where the man slept? - I have had some discourse with Thomas Powell , and he told me so himself.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-88

634. HENRY DORNTON otherwise COULSTON otherwise JAMES MATTHEWS otherwise Captain WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , half a guinea and ten shillings and six-pence in monies numbered ; the monies of William Bayliss .

WILLIAM BAYLISS sworn.

I keep the Three Queens at Brentford , I know the prisoner at the bar; I think it was on Friday the 19th of July, he came into the yard and asked if he could have the room that he had before, he had been there a few days before in a phaeton and pair, and a servant; he then had the uniform of a midshipman; he was told that he could, and he ordered a dinner, and after that he ordered the hair dresser to be sent for, and just before the hair dresser had done he called for change of a guinea, and his answer was that he should give the guinea when he went up stairs; my wife gave the money to the waiter, but I was in the bar at the same time, the change was half a guinea and half a guinea's worth of silver; he went up stairs and put on his coat, and ordered his bill, and said he should leave his horse there all night, and ordered the chaise to London; he said he should leave the horse there all night, and should call for it; the saddle was to be taken to the sadler's, and he left us to go to the sadler's under pretence of giving orders for the saddle; he said he should be back directly; in about three quarters of an hour I went to the sadler's, and found that he had been and sold the saddle instead of giving any orders about it; we never see him till afterwards, we see him at Bow-street when he was taken up on another account; on the 22d, three days afterwards, I was summoned to Bow-street with respect to the horse; he acknowledged having received the change in the coach that he was taken to Bow-street in.

Prisoner. I was not dressed in midshipman's dress? - It was a blue turned up with white, and the button holes worked.

Prisoner. I was intoxicated when I left this house. I leave it to your mercy.

Prosecutor. I did not see that he was.

Court to Prosecutor. What name did he pass by with you? - Dornton.

Q. Did he pay you for what he had before, the first time? - He did.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-89

635. JOHN SEVILLE, otherwise WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July , four silver candlesticks chased, value 20 l. four silver candlesticks, called branch candlesticks, value 20 l. two silver candlesticks, value 5 l. a silver chased plate, value 2 l. two bracket candlesticks, value l. a silver cocoa pot, value 3 l. eight silver sauce ladles, value 2 l. a silver tureen ladle, value 1 l. six silver gravy spoons, value 3 l. a pair of silver asparagus tongs, value 1 l. a silver fork, value 10 s. a pair of silver snuffers, value 10 s. forty-eight table forks, with silver handles, value 20 l. forty-eight silver handled knives, value 20 l. eighteen desert knives, value 6 l. eighteen desert forks, value 6 l. twelve silver spoons, value 3 l. a silver tea urn, value 5 l. a silver stew pan and cover, value 5 l. a silver lamp and triangle, value 20 s. a silver ice pail, value 5 l. a silver tankard, value 5 l. a silver dish, value 15 l. a silver fish plate, value 5 l. six silver waiters, value 15 l. eight silver sauce boats, value 3 l. four silver salt spoons, value 1 l. six silver candlesticks, value 10 l. a silver coffee pot and lamp, value 5 l. a silver cream pot and silver ladle, value 1 l. a half pint cup, value 1 l. seven silver bottle labels, value 22 s. the goods of John York , in the dwelling house of Richard Hemmings ; and

ELEAZOR LAZARUS was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 8th of August , all the before mentioned goods, well knowing them to have been stolen .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Venn; and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

THOMAS HEMMINGS sworn.

I am a silversmith, in Bond-street; I know the prisoner Seville, I have known him about four months.

Q. On what occasion did you first know him? - Owing to an advertisement in the news paper, I took him into my service.

Q. What day did he first enter into your service? - The 9th of April, and he quitted it on the 7th of August.

Q. In what capacity was he? - As a porter , and to wait at table occasionally.

Q. As a porter, what did he do? - He opened and shut up the shop. My customers when they went out of town they sent their chests of plate to my house.

Q. From the nature of his employment, was he or was he not in the habit of becoming acquainted with the manner of your house, and where this plate was deposited? - He was.

Q. Did he know where the plate was deposited? - He has assisted in carrying the chests of plate to the cellar, when they were brought in by my customers.

Q. Then in consequence of carrying down these chests of plate into the cellar,

he knew where the plate was deposited? - Yes.

Q. What was the situation of this cellar? - It is a strong cellar with a double door and plated with iron.

Q. On the inside in what position was this cellar? - It opened into the back kitchen; there was but one window and that was strongly barred with iron; the iron barrs looked into my garden; I mean the iron barrs of the cellar where the things were deposited.

Q. Was it level with the garden? - No, it was under the garden, and strongly barred withinside, only these bars remained just as they were.

Q. Be so good as to describe what was the situation of the other part of the cellar? - The cellar was square.

Q. How many outside walls? - Only one.

Q. Was it towards the garden? - It was.

Q. What does the other three communicate with? - One to the back kitchen, and another is the party wall between the two houses, and the other divides the scullery; between the cellar and scullery, within the cellar there is a door way, and a smaller cellar behind that.

Q. Will you describe the situation of the wall which you mentioned to be towards the back kitchen; in what situation was that wall when you made the discovery? - In the wall between the scullery and cellar there was a small hole that conveyed a water pipe.

Q. What size was that hole that conveyed the water pipe? - About the size of the crown of a man's hat.

Q. What was the situation of the wall surrounding this pipe? - It was bricked up; and when I received information that I had been robbed I went to that place, and found that the bricks had been removed out and replaced; I mean the bricks about the pipe; I opened the cellar door, and when I entered the cellar every thing appeared perfectly secure; but after searching the different chests I found two chests belonging to Mr. York broke open.

Q. Before you go any further tell me exactly where these chests stood? - They stood fronting the door, one of them, and the other above it, rather behind, close to the wall of the garden.

Q. What had these chests been fastened with? - They were locked with padlocks.

Q. Who had the keys of them? - Mr. York or his servant.

Q. Did it appear to you that the locks had been forced? - The locks had not, but the staples had been.

Q. From this hole, where the pipe was introduced, you observed these bricks removed; what was the size of the hole? - About the size of one of those books.

Q. Was it large enough for a man to get in at? - Yes, it was.

Q. How far did this box stand from the hole? - The hole is a great deal higher than a man's head, seven feet high from the ground, and there appeared, on the side of the wall, evident marks of a person getting up through the hole.

Q. How far from the place where this hole was stood these boxes? - About six feet; so that a person must have been in the cellar and got over other chests to have got to this.

Q. By your description I take it for granted that these boxes stood without any other boxes on them? - There were no chests on the top of either of these of Mr. York's.

Q. Did they stand on the ground, or on other chests? - On other chests, one of them about three feet from the ground, and the other about five feet.

Q. Then that that stood about five feet from the ground, I suppose it was necessary to get on something to open it? - On one of the other chests. These

two chests were covered with matting, so that a person might have gone into the cellar several times without observing they were broke open, as the matting was replaced again.

Q. When you examined this hole, that you have described, did you observe any rubbish that were left in consequence of that? - There was an oven in the scullery, which a person had got open to get into this hole; on this oven I found mortar and rubbish, it evidently appeared that somebody had been on the top of the oven.

Q. Did you find any instrument within the cellar, by which it might be supposed that this box was broke open by? - In searching the cellar at one corner I found this hatchet or cleaver; I remember seeing it some time before, it had been laying about in the kitchen some years I dare say.

Q. Will you tell me the latest time you recollect seeing it in the cellar? - About six months ago; I am confident it was not in the cellar five months ago.

Q. Do you happen to recollect, Mr. Hemming, when Mr. York's boxes were deposited there? - On the 10th of July I believe it was.

Q. When you examined these boxes where part of the property was taken away, at which part of the cellar did you find the cleaver in? - I found it in the small cellar, near the hole.

Q. Be so good as to mention some of the articles that were lost. - I had not a list of the contents of the chests.

Mr. Knowlys. This man, I think, you say was discharged from your service on the 7th of August? - He was.

Court. Pray, sir, what day was it you first made this discovery, or went to the cellar? - He went away from me on the 7th, but I asked him to come on Friday the 9th to wait at table in the evening, to assist my servant; on that day I paid him his wages; he came about three o'clock in the afternoon to wait, and he did wait, and he slept there that night, and went away about ten o'clock on Saturday the tenth.

Mr. Knowlys. Then this man had two clear days to have gone any where out of your reach, and on your invitation he came on the third day? - He did; he went on the 7th and came again on the 9th to wait.

Q. Now you say this cellar communicated with the back kitchen; pray how many servants may you have employed in this business of your's? - I have two others besides the prisoner at the bar, who are engaged in the actual business, two more servants.

Q. They had as much access to the cellar as the prisoner? - They had more access to the cellar than the prisoner had, because they had the keys.

Q. I believe as this communicated with the back kitchen, the servant of the house likewise knew that was the deposit of the plate? - I presume if the maid servants knew it, the men servants knew it.

Q. How many servants have you who are engaged in the business now? - Only two; I have only four servants in the whole.

Q. I believe you have an uncle of the name of Hemmings? - I have.

Q. I believe he has some concern in the profits of the business? - He is not in partnership, he has been out of business some time. I had a cousin who was in the business since, whom I presume, you mean, but he has been out of business some time.

Q. I think you said you are certain that this cleaver was not in the cellar five months ago; how long it had been in the cellar of the five months you cannot tell; it may be in the cellar four months, but five months you are sure it was not; I take it for granted you know no better about the removal of the bricks how long ago this aperture was made in your

cellar you cannot say? - I cannot say. I should suppose it has not been above five months ago, the very same cellar was attempted, the window was broke and one of the bars taken out; at that time there was but one chest in the cellar, and the cellar was cleared out, and strong bars put to it.

Q. Therefore the cellar having been attempted at the outside of the house, your attention, which was to make that stronger, was drawn to quite a different part of the cellar than where this hole was made? - Certainly.

Court. Mr. Hemmings, the window being repaired if the cleaver had been in the cellar then, you, or some of your people would have seen it? - Certainly, because the cellar was then cleared out.

BASIL FISK sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Seville at the bar? - I know him very well; John Wright is his real name, as he always told me.

Q. How long have you known him? - These three years, it may be a little more, it is not less.

Q. Where do you live yourself? - Before I was taken into custody I lived at Mr. Roach's, in Pall Mall, as a porter.

Q. Did you know the prisoner when he was in the service of Mr. Hemmings? Yes, I don't know the day that he went, but he told me two or three days before he went that he was to go there.

Q. Then you knew him when he was actually in Mr. Hemmings's employ? - I did.

Q. Had you any connection with him while he remained in that service? - No, I had not.

Q. Did you visit him there? - I went to see him sometimes.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Thornbury? - I knew him very well as an acquaintance of Mr. Seville.

Q. Did Seville at any time, and you must tell when, say any thing about what he had done in the house of Mr. Hemmings? - The first thing that ever he told me was of a tea urn.

Court. I would be glad if you would recollect the time? - He had been there about a month or six weeks, as nigh as I can guess, I cannot justly say to a week.

Q. What did he say to you? - He said that he had got a tea urn; I asked him afterwards how he got it? he said he got it by a hole in the wall where the plate was.

Court. Was this all the words he said, because that is an unintelligible sort of language, and must be unintelligible to you? - He said he was looking for something one day, and he got into a hole of the wall.

Q. Into the hole of what wall? - Into the hole of the wall of the house.

Q. Of what house? - Mr. Hemmings.

Q. When he told you he had got a tea urn, was that all he told you? - He said that he had got a tea urn.

Court. What was the whole of the conversation? - It was at his master's house, Mr. Hemmings, and I asked him if he could not stop in his place without doing such things as these, for he would lose his place.

Q. What was the beginning of the conversation? - The beginning of the conversation, before ever that he told me about the tea urn was, he said, that was he in my place he would never want money, he would rob my master of all the silks he could; I told him I I should not do any such thing; I told him I had done too much for him already.

Q. What was it you had done for him before he went to Mr. Hemmings? -

He slept with me three nights, and the first night he slept with me he asked me if I had any money? I said, no; he said he had not money sufficient enough to to go to his place, and I told him I had no money; he said I was a damned fool, for if he lived where I did he never would want money; he asked me to get some silks; I asked him what he meant? He had none that first night, the night after he came again, and asked me to get some silks; to rob my master of some silks, that was his expression; on which he had two pieces the second night, and the third night he had the same; he took them out of the shop; I was a party in that.

Q. After this what more past? - He went to Mr. Hemmings service; a few nights afterwards I went to Mr. Hemmings to see him, he told me he had sold the silks to the jew, that he mentioned that he should sell them to, and I asked him what he had got for them? and he never satisfied me, and I had two guineas in the whole from him at different times; I went after that, and he still was persuading of me to get some more silks. he told me I was a damned fool that I did not. Another time after that, about six weeks after that he went to Mr. Hemmings, he told me that he had got a tea urn.

Q. How did this conversation begin? - He said that he meant to get something of his master before he had got it.

Q. Was that his expression? - It was. After that I went again, and then he told me of this tea urn; I went one day, says I, Wright, how do you do? says he, I am very well; and he whispered to me and said that he had got some plate of his master's; I asked him what it was? and he told me that it was a tea urn; with that I told him if he could not stop in his place without robbing his master he had better go away from him; he told me I was a damned fool, did not I think that he knew what he was about? I asked him how he got it? he said he was looking for something one day and he found a hole in the wall, and the hole was not quite large enough, and he pulled a few bricks away to make it larger.

Q. Now at that time, which was five or six weeks after he had been there, the story happened about this tea urn? - It did.

Q. You went away at this time? - I did.

Q. Did you go again at any other time? - I did in about a week, it might be a little less, or a little more, I cannot say which; he said that he meant still to get some more; that was all that passed the second time as near as I can recollect.

Q. What past after this? - I did not go any more for a fortnight after this; I told him that I did not like to come, because your master must find out this that you are doing of, and he will think that I have helped you off with it; and he said I was a damned fool; he was then saying that he wanted somebody just to take the plate off, as he should take it away, and I said don't mention that to me for I shall have no hand in it at all; then I did not go to him any more for a week; he then was telling me that he was going to put some money, twenty pounds, in the bank. About this time, it must be towards June or later, I cannot recollect the time, I cannot say the time, he said that he meant to put twenty pounds in the bank, and that he should not stop with his master but a very little while; no, says I, now you have robbed him of all you can you are going to leave him; he said, yes, did I think that he did not know what he was about? I told him

I did not know whether he did or not. Another time he was telling me, it was the day before he left his master, and there was a young man there, that was to succeed his place, he says to me, this is the young man, I don't know his name, that is to come to take my place; O, is it? says I, then I suppose you go away to night; no, he should not go away till the morning; he did expect to go away a week before that he did. I called the next day, in the afternoon about five o'clock, and I asked the shopman whether Wright was gone? and he told me no he was not gone.

Court. How came that about? did you call him Wright at the shop? - I did sometimes; and he accused me with it, why I could not keep my own counsel, and said I was a damned fool for it. The shopman said that he was not gone, but he supposed that he would not be long, I might go down stairs; I did go down stairs, and I saw him in the pantry, and I said, John, I see you are not gone yet; no, says he, but I shall not be long first, and after a few minutes talk he went towards his box, and opened it, and shewed me a coffee pot; then he came towards the warehouse, and he unbuttoned his breeches, and shewed me a handful of spoons that were there in his breeches; they were silver spoons; if they were tea spoons they were very large spoons; I said to him, John, do not take any thing out of the house, but put them where you had them; he said no, did I think he was a damned fool and did not know what he was about? then I did not say any thing more to him about the plate at all; I stayed half an hour, and he called a coach; this was the very day that he went away, and the box was carried up, and put into the coach; the coffee pot was in the box, and he got into the coach and I wished him a good night; says he, what are you a going home? yes, says I, I am; no, says he, go along with me to Oxford-road; with his asking of me I did go, I got into the coach; a little way from Mr. Hemmings's, Charles Thornbury stopped the coachman and got into the coach; then Seville and me, and Thornbury were all in the coach, and we went to where Thornbury did live in Oxford road, No. 100, There we got out of the first coach, they went in, but I did not; they took Wright's box out and put it into another coach, which they called; they went into a house for a box, of Charles's, at his master's; then they got out, and got into the other coach.

Q. Who discharged the first coach? - I don't know. Then the box that was brought out of Thornbury's master's was put into this second coach, and Wright's box was put into the same coach: I stayed in the first coach while they went into the lodgings, and we all got into the second coach; when we were all in they desired the coachman to to go to the French Horn.

Q. Who desired him? - One of them did, I don't know which it was. When they came there they desired the coachman to drive into the yard, and there the coach stood, and they got out of the coach, and the boxes were taken out, and I got out, and there we all went into a lower room at the French Horn.

Q. About what time of the evening was this? - About eight as near as I can guess.

Q. Now then you three, and the two boxes are at the French Horn; what day was this? - It was of a Wednesday, but I don't know the day of the month.

Q. Then when you was in the room what passed? - I said I must go home; they said, stop a little while and you shall ride home, and I did stop for about a quarter of an hour; the coach was ordered to stop by the French Horn gate; then after stopping that half hour

we all three got into the coach and left the boxes behind, and they desired the coachman to go to the Strand, just by Temple Bar, and when we got through Temple Bar they desired him to drive up to where they sold sticks and umbrellas.

Q. Where was the journey you all took together? - To the bottom of the Haymarket. Then Wright says, we are going to the Haymarket little Theatre, and if you will go back and shut up your shop, and do what you have to do and come back we will come down in an hour; I went home and did what I had to do at home; in about an hour after that I went to the little Theatre, and I saw them there again, and when they came out they called a coach and desired the coachman to drive to Brownlow-street, Drury-lane, and we went there, and then knocked at a private house door, as I thought it was, but I found it was a dancing room; we all three continued there till half after eleven; when we were coming away I said, I don't know what to do about going home, I am so late; says he, you shall go along with me and sleep at the French Horn, which I did, and the coach waited at the dancing room till we did go.

Q. Was you ever at the French Horn before? - Never in my life. When we arrived there they called for something to eat for their suppers, and then they went to bed; they all three slept there.

Q. Did Seville say any thing to you about the contents of the box? - No, nothing at all that evening; the next morning when we got up I said, I cannot tell what I shall say or do when I go home; says he, that don't matter what you say, never mind, damn it, leave your place; then they had breakfast, and they said they were going to Limehouse; after breakfast they called a coach, and the coach came into the yard, and this box that Thornbury took from his master in Oxford-road was put into the coach; the box that belonged to Wright was left behind.

Q. Did you all three go into the coach with this box? - Yes, we did.

Q. Where did you drive? - We ordered the coachman to drive to Ludgate-street, where they each one bought a pair of boots, and John a pair of boots and shoes; they then ordered the coachman to drive to Limehouse, which he did; I asked them when they were going what they had got in that box of Thornbury's? Charles said they had got pictures. Then when they got to this place at Limehouse, they took the box out and stopped half an hour or more, and I sat in the coach all the time, they took out the box and emptied it, and brought the empty box into the coach again; then when they returned from there they went out a little distance from that, where there was but just room enough for a coach to go, the name of the place I don't know, they stopped at some house which looked like a fireman's or waterman's, I don't know which, they both of them got out and took this box with them, and went up stairs, I stayed in the coach all the time, they stopped half an hour in that house; then this box was brought down again, and the coachman brought it to the coach, and I lifted up the box and found it was not very heavy; after they got into the coach they desired the coachman to drive them to the French Horn where he brought them from, which he did; as soon as they got into the coach I said to them, what is here in this box? and they both laughed and said they were oranges; odd sort of oranges, says I, I doubt; Wright said they were the best sort of oranges; they both said so, and coming home I asked them what they meant to do with themselves? they said they meant to go to Margate, and that they should want some servant, and they

found they could never make a buck of me; if I would go with them they would give me a livery coat and a hat, and four guineas a month, for they should never make a buck of me; then we got to the French Horn and desired the coachman to drive into the yard, and the box was taken out, and we all got out, and the waiter carried the box up, and Wright, he said, now I will go and see for Moses, for he is waiting somewhere hard by; then he went down stairs; after he had been gone about ten minutes he came back and he said that he was just at the corner of the gate, but he would not come up the yard, and he said to Charles, we must take the plate between us to him, for he will not come up; they did, they opened the box that they took from Limehouse, and they took some kind of plate, there was a silver tankard, the silver tankard they bruised together; there were two pieces of a silver dish cut or broke, I did not see it done.

Q. How did they take this away? - John and Charles took hold of this to pull it one way, and the other to pull the handle off the tankard; I stood still, and they said, you sit still and will not help us; I said, no, I will not; Wright said don't ask him any thing about it; they could not make any impression to pull it to pieces together, so Wright put it down under his feet and pressed it together; Charles took the largest piece of the silver dish, that had been broke or cut, and put in John's breeches and buttoned them up again, and then they put some in their pockets and other parts about them, and this tankard they put it into an handkerchief; then they took what they thought they could get off without being noticed, out of the house; there was this coffee pot left, which I saw at his master's then in the box, which they did not take, and there was some other little articles left; they asked me to take that; and I said no, I would not touch them, nor I did not; they left that behind; they put them into John's box, and they went down stairs, and I followed them a little way from the French Horn gate, there stood the jew, the same man as at the bar, Eleazar Lazarus, with a bag on his shoulder; when they all three got into the coach Wright says to me, you must not go in because the jew never saw you before, and as I would not take any thing; then I got up behind; then they drove to Whitechapel, I shewed the gentlemen the spot where they stopped, the place I don't know the name of; when they got there I got off from behind, and went the opposite side of the way to what they stopt; after they got out of the coach the jew came the same side I was of, but I don't know whether he saw me to know me or not, and he went into a house either by the corner of the street or a little way up the street; after the jew went away from them Wright held up his hand to me to come over to him and I did, and I saw no more of the jew for that moment.

Q. When you came up to Wright where was Thornbury? - Thornbury was with him.

Q. What became of the bundle? - The jew had the same bundle when he came out as he got into the coach with, and John and Charles had nothing about them.

Q. Did there appear to be any thing in that bag as he past by you? - There was something in it before.

Q. When you came to the coach to Wright and Thornbury, what they got into the coach with they had not about them, nor was it in the coach? - I did not look into the coach, they had it not about them.

Q. What became of the coach? - The coach then turned away; they discharged the coach.

Q. What became of you, and Wright, and Thornbury? - We went to a public house just by, within a few yards of where they got out.

Q. So that the coach had stood at no particular place, only for the jew to get out? - No, at no door at all; then they went to the public house, and Wright and the landlady's boy went out, and got some beef and ham; Wright was telling me that he expected the jew every moment; in twenty minutes or less the jew came into the house, but had no bag, he had nothing that I saw; Wright asked him to sit down, and he looked very hard at me, not knowing me nor seeing me before, and he sat down; Wright asked him to eat, but he did not, he drank a little, and stopped in the house about a quarter of an hour, and he says to Wright, I want to speak to you; then Wright got up, and the jew and they both went out, and Wright was gone about twenty minutes with the jew, leaving Thornbury and me in the public house; this was between one and two at noon, as near as I can say; then when Wright came back I said, what did the jew say about me, for he seems very much frightened at the sight of me? Wright told me that he told the jew that I was his brother; soon after that they called for the reckoning, and we came away, and coming home we called another coach, about half a mile from this public house, I don't know the name of the street; the jew did not come in any more after he went out with Wright, and we all three got into the coach, and desired the coachman to drive us to the French Horn again; then afterwards at the French Horn they dined and went up stairs, and opened the box, and took the plate that I would not take, and tied them up in a bundle; that was from the box that Wright had left; they then took it themselves, they told me they were going to take it to this same jew that they had taken the other to; he said he was going to take fourteen or fifteen guineas of him when he returned back with this plate that I would not take.

Q. Did they go to look after this jew? - They went out of the French Horn, and I went out with them; they took the plate in a bundle tied up in a handkerchief; before they left me they said if you can get some silks of your master to night do, and the jew will buy them, and we will all set off on Monday or Tuesday next for Margate; which I told him that I should not; I wished them a good night and went home to my master's house; I lost sight of them.

Q. Did you see any more of them that day or night? - I did not see any more of them till the Saturday following.

Q. Where had you been on that Saturday? - I had been after some business in the City and I called at the French Horn, and I asked if either of them young men were at home? I was told one was at home. I went up stairs, and Wright was then in custody of the beadle of the parish; I was coming away, and he said, young man, you seem to know this young man, and I have orders to stop him, and I must stop you too; and I was carried with him to Bow-street, and we were both examined there.

Q. Do you know of yourself who was the keeper of the house at Limehouse where you went? - No, I do not know.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Dordy? - Yes, very well; I have known him this nine or ten years; he is a gentleman's servant; I knew him when he was an apprentice, and when he was a master, he was a master baker; I knew him when he lived near Bedford-square, I know him now,

he lives with Mr. Appleton, No. 77, Hatton-garden went the next day to Dordy, after he had been with them on Friday, and I called on him to ask him how he did; and he was asking me when I saw Wright.

Q. Had you seen Dordy near about the time that Wright had left his master? - A little after I did; the day after I had been at Limehouse and Whitechapel I went to his house, he was a servant to Mr. Appleton, and I went to Mr. Appleton's house where he was a servant.

Mr. Knowlys. Pray where did you come from? - From Tothill Fields Bridewell.

Q. You have been there ever since you was at Bow-street? - I have been there some part of the time that I have been in custody, and some part of the time in Clerkenwell.

Q. So that in short you have been a prisoner ever since the information of your's? - Yes.

Q. I am very sorry that so much good advice as you gave this young man has been thrown away. So he came to see you at Mr. Roach's, you permitted him to sleep in the house, and the first use he made of that indulgence was that he persuaded you to rob your master? - He did.

Q. You was quite shocked with that advice? - I was.

Q. I dare say you declined all further acquaintance with the man? - I told him when he asked me that I should do no such thing.

Q. Did you tell your master? Kick him out of the house? or tell your master's servants? - No.

Q. Did you ever tell any body that he had given you that advice before you came to Bow-street? - I don't know that I did tell Dordy of it.

Q. So that you kept this snug to yourself. On the second night he came to sleep with you, I suppose you told him as you are a man of this cast, I shall have no more acquaintance with you? - I did not tell him that.

Q. You permitted him to come and sleep in your master's house the second night? - I did not ask him.

Q. You did not tell him you are not a fit man to keep me company? - I did not. I asked the house-keeper; I did not let him sleep without leave.

Q. Did you tell the house-keeper what he had told you the night before? - No, I did not.

Q. You say this robbery of your master's was committed the second night? - The second night he had two pieces; the first night he had none.

Q. Pray who shewed him where the pieces of silk were? - He went along with me into the shop.

Q. He was the person that took the pieces? - He was.

Q. That you are positive to; your conscience would not let you take them at all? - He took them out of the house.

Court. Did you take them at all? - He took some and I took some.

Mr. Knowlys. How came you to tell us that he took the pieces, and you consented? - I said that he took them out of the house.

Q. You never gave any information of this business to Mr. Hemmings, or to any of Mr. Hemmings's servants? - I did not.

Q. You knew it for the five months that he was there? - I knew it as he told me.

Q. Even on the very day in which he was going, this person shewed you some silver, and you assisted him to take his box out of the house? - No.

Q. You see it taken out? - I did.

Q. And you followed it into the coach? - I got into the coach after the box was in.

Q. I don't know a plainer definition of following a box into a

coach? - He asked me to come in as I said I wanted to go home.

Q. Pray how often was you examined at Bow-street? - I don't know.

Q. Was you ever examined at Bow-street or any other justice's office before? - No, never in my life.

Q. Now do you recollect how many examinations you underwent? - There were several examinations, and I don't know how many there were.

Q. You was examined the first time, did you tell any thing of this story on your first examination? - I don't know whether I did or did not.

Q. Upon you oath don't you know that you did? - I don't know; I cannot recollect.

Q. On your oath did you reveal this circumstance on your first examination or no? - I don't know whether I did or did not.

Q. On your oath was not your second examination finished before you gave any account of this business? - Finished!

Q. Had not you gone through your first examination before you mentioned even a syllable of this against this man? - As near as I can tell I told them all I knew on the second examination; the first examination was late, and therefore they did not stand to hear but little what I had to say.

Q. You knew that all this happened when you was first examined; had not you got through the whole of your second examination before you gave an account of this business? There is something or other I have got hold of; this examination was put off you say; what about the robbery of your own master? - I don't know whether it was or was not; first of all the foreman came to me on Sunday.

Q. Was you examined relative to the robbery of your own master, when you was examined at Bow-street? - They did not ask me, but I told them.

Q. On your oath was not the magistrate going to commit you for trial for robbing your own master, before you said any thing about this business? - They never asked me about my own master's affairs till I told them of this.

Q. You was not then going to be committed for trial? - I was, but it was on Mr. Hemmings affair.

Q. Then to save yourself you have discovered other people, to save yourself from being tried? - I accuse nobody but what is true; I knew I had not done any thing with the plate at all, and therefore I had a right to save myself.

Q. You know you are not to be prosecuted for robbing your master? - I should not have done any such thing as this if I had not been over persuaded.

Q. You know you are not to be prosecuted for robbing your own master? - I don't know.

Q. Don't you know you are not to be prosecuted? - Yes.

Q. How came you to be so long before I could get it out of you? You cannot account for delaying your answer so long.

Mr. Const. Do you remember what past at the time you was admitted to give evidence? - No, I do not.

Q. Then after being asked several questions you was told that you could not be believed, and you must be put to the bar with these two men? - I never heard any body say so as I know of.

Q. Perhaps you remember when you was asked whether the jew was the same person that got into the coach, did not you say that you did not know him at all, and to the best of your knowledge you never saw him before? - I said I had seen a man a great deal like him if that was not the man.

Q. Did you or did you not say, that you could not swear that you had ever seen him before in your life? - I did not say that I could not swear; the justice

asked me to look at the man; and I said that I had seen a man a great deal like him; he told me to look at him again; then I said that I did know him.

Q. You then don't remember that he asked you three or four times before you said that you knew him?

Court. Did you ever tell them that you did not know them? - No, I never said so.

Mr. Const. Did you or did you not say that you never knew him? what was the first answer you gave? - I said that I had seen a man a great deal like him.

Court. How long was it between the time that you had seen him on the occasion you have mentioned, and the time he was brought before the justice? - This was on Wednesday, and the Thursday week following I saw him before the justice.

Q. When you saw him at the justice's had you any doubt about him? - I had a right to look at the man.

Q. You may think that you shall not be prosecuted; but if you do not make proper answers you may find yourself mistaken. When you saw him before the justice had you any doubt about him? I will have a direct answer, yes or no? - I thought I knew him; I had not much of a doubt; I had no doubt.

Q. How could you have a doubt when you had seen him but a week before?

Mr. Const. Why did you tell the justice that you had seen a man a great deal like him? - Wright says to me at the bar, this was not the man, for he had never seen the man before in his life.

Q. The question they put to you was whether you knew the man? you said that you had seen a man a great deal like him. I only ask you why you said so? - I could not be positive till I had looked at him; I had a right to look at him first, before I said it was the man.

Q. This happened on the second time you was examined? - It was the first time I saw the jew.

Q. You stood as close to him at the time you gave this answer as the next man now that stands by you? - I did.

Court. You may be sure, Mr. Const, that no jury will convict a man on this evidence, except it be corroborated.

JOHN DORDY sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Appleton.

Q. How long have you known Fisk? - It is about thirteen or fourteen years since I first knew him.

Q. You have been in habits of intimacy with him? - Since I came to London.

Q. When was it you made application to Mr. Hemming's? - On the 10th of August.

Q. How did you learn any of those matters that you communicated to Mr. Hemming's? - By the information of Fisk.

Q. When did Fisk give you that information? - On the 9th of August.

Mr. Knowlys. You are sure it was the 9th of August? - I am.

JOHN SCOTT sworn.

I did live at the French Horn.

Q. When did you leave the French Horn? - Last Monday week.

Q. Did you know the prisoner Seville who stands at the bar there? - Yes, I saw him before.

Q. Did you ever see him at any time at the French Horn? - Yes, about five weeks ago I saw him there; I saw him in the same clothes that he has got on now he lodged there for about a fortnight.

Q. When did he begin to lodge there? - About six weeks back.

Q. Did you ever see any other person in company with him at the French Horn? - I saw Fisk in company with him at the French Horn.

Q. Did he sleep with him? - That day he did

Q. Did you ever see Thornbury there? - Yes, sir, I did; I saw him there

about a fortnight, the same time as the prisoner had been there.

Q. Do you recollect at any time their bringing things in a box, and other ways? - Yes.

Q. Do you recollect Fisk, Seville and Thornbury going away with a box? - I put it into the coach and carried it down stairs.

Q. Can you by any sort of means, bring to your recollection the time? - No, I cannot.

Q. You remember the circumstance of Fisk and the prisoner being apprehended? - To the best of my recollection about three days after I carried down the box.

Q. Did you ever see Fisk before that time? - No, I never did.

Q. Do you remember seeing him after? - Yes, he was there on an afternoon once, but he did not sleep there.

Q. Do you remember the day when Wright was apprehended? - I remember he was apprehended.

Q. Thornbury was not taken into custody? - No, he was not; he got away from the house.

Q. Pray did you happen to know what was in any of these boxes? - No, I did not.

Q. How large was this box? - About three feet in length.

Q. Was it heavy? - No, it was not.

Q. Was it directed to any body? - No, it was not.

WILLIAM CALLCUTT sworn.

I am an a driver of an hackney coach; I had seen an advertisement describing some particular people going to a particular place, I saw it on Thursday morning, nine o'clock, two days before they were taken; I found my hackney coach had been at the French Horn, I was first coach at the end of Red Lion-street at nine o'clock, the watchman ordered me to turn round to the French Horn gateway; then there was an hostler ordered me to pull into the yard; I pulled up to the coffee house, and the waiter brought me a deal box out, Scott brought a deal box out, and I put it into the coach, then he stood at the door and three men came, two drest like brothers.

Q. Look at that young man at the bar? - That is one of them, and Fisk is the other, there was a third; I carried them to Ludgate-hill, and there they got out and they bought two pair of boots, and I went to Three Colt-street, Limehouse; I stopped at a house there about five doors down behind the church, as nigh as I can guess, and there the two brothers got out, and they ordered me to give them the box out; I carried it out and gave it them into the parlour, and I came out and minded my horses; the two brothers went into the house, they stayed in about three quarters of an hour, and they hallooed coachman to come and take the box in again, they ordered me to go down London-street, Ratcliff-cross, to turn on the left hand, and go to the bottom of the next street on the left hand; then I turned on the right, and went to the bottom of that; then I went to the left into Tiles Alley, to a fireman's, belonging to the Sun Fire office where I stopped; the same two young men got out, and they ordered me to take the box out again; I did so, and put it into the passage of that house, and they stayed in the house about a quarter of an hour.

Q. After this quarter of an hour had past what happened then? - They called me again to take the box into the coach the second time, and they got into it again.

Q. Where did they direct you to go then? - Back to the French Horn; I went up into the yard again into the same house; they got out, and two men came and took the box, and there one of the brothers came out, and asked me what my fare was?

Q. So all this time Fisk remained in the coach, and never got out at all? - He never got out at all.

MARY PEACOCK sworn.

I keep a house in Three Colt-street, Limehouse; I know the young man Seville at the bar, I saw him twice at my house; he came to see Charles James Thornbury , they past as brothers.

Q. Did Thornbury lodge at your house? - Yes; he worked along with my husband at one Mr. Mitchell's, a rope maker at Limehouse.

Q. Do you remember their coming in an hackney coach to your house? - Yes, I saw him about the 8th of August, they came to my house and brought a box with them, they had inside the box a bible and four numbers of publications, and several pictures of his own drawing as he said.

Q. How long did they stay? - They did not stay half an hour at the outside; they emptied the box, this Charles Thornbury put a blue coat in it, and then put the box into the coach and went away from my house; when the gentlemen came to search the house, to rummage the house, I recollected the gentlemen then, there were several then came together, when they came into the house they did not tell me their business, they searched the house every where.

Q. What day did they come? - I cannot tell what day particularly.

Q. What did they find? - They found nothing at all just then; I delivered some labels to them; I dare say they are silver; I delivered them to the officer; them there labels were left in this Thornbury's room, in a box, and he was absent from the room three weeks.

Q. Did you see the prisoner with Thornbury in that room at all? - Never at all; he came there but twice, he past as his brother, they said they had got very good friends, and an aunt particularly that used to buy them new clothes.

- MILLER sworn.

I am the officer who apprehended Seville at the French Horn, Holborn; I searched him and found on his person twenty guineas in a purse, a ten pound bank note; then I took his watch, a silver watch and a gold seal, out of his coat pocket, and underneath that was ten guineas lapped up in a bit of paper; after that, in the presence of Mr. Hemming and two or three others, I searched his box, in that I found another silver watch, and a gold seal, and a silver thimble; after making that search I took him down to the office in Bow-street; after that I went to Limehouse to Mrs. Peacock's, when I went to Mrs. Peacock she said there were six things belonging to bottles, which she gave me down from the shelf.

THOMAS COPE sworn.

I live with Mr. John York .

Q. Do you recollect packing up any plate and sending it to Mr. Hemming's, the silversmith? - I took it to Mr. Hemming's the 10th of July, and saw it locked safely in the room, the chest was locked when I took it, and I saw it locked up in the strongroom of Mr. Hemming; there were seven labels in the chest, (the seven labels found in Thornbury's lodgings shewn him,) these are the seven labels which I found in the chest; I know them by the number of them, the names of the wine, and the pattern of them; I verily believe they are the same; I have had them in my hand a number of times.

Jury. Was there any particular mark in any one of them that you could know them by? - Not that I ever observed.

Q. Were they lapped up in such paper? - To the best of my knowledge they were.

Court. Have you found any or either of the articles in the indictment? - No.

Q. Were there two boxes or only one? - Two boxes.

Q. Can you tell us any of the things that were in the boxes.

Court to Mr. Hemming. What do you think the bottle labels are worth? - Ten shillings the whole.

Mr. Fielding to Mr. Hemming. Do you know any other articles that are lost? - Yes, a great many; all the things were not gone out, only the things in the indictment.

Cope. When did you examine the plate? - When the robbery was made known.

Q. How many candlesticks were missing? - Four of one sort, worth four pounds; four table spoons, worth three pounds; a silver tankard worth five pounds, &c.

Prisoner. I came from a place called Bedford, in Norfolk; from there I went to counsellor Mingay's service, there I lived near three years; from there I went to alderman Macaulay's; from there to alderman Swain's lady; from there to Mr. Hemming's. In these different places I have given the greatest satisfaction.

WILLIAM VAUGAN sworn.

I lived as butler to Mr. alderman Macauley; he lived in my master's service about six months; he left us about twelve months ago; he had the care and charge of the plate during my absence, and had the cleaning of it, and did the business of a footman; he maintained that kind of character that young men do.

Q. Did he bear a good character in that place? - As to the point of honesty there is not any thing that I can swear to.

The prisoner called two other witnesses to his character.

Jury. On what day did Fisk go through his first examination? - On Monday the 12th of August.

John Seville otherwise Wright

GUILTY . Death .

Eleazar Lazarus Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-90

636. ELEAZAR LAZARUS was again indicted for receiving stolen goods, on three other indictments and acquitted .

Reference Number: t17930911-91

637. EDWARD BARNES was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of June , in the dwelling house of George Rutten and George Chapman , a bank note, No. 8,594, dated London, April 29th, 1792, value one hundred pounds, the said note at the same time, being the property of the said Thomas Rutten and George Chapman .

Indicted in a second COUNT for stealing a like note, value a hundred pounds without particularly describing it.

(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

GEORGE FLUDYER sworn.

On the 27th of May last, I paid a bank note of the value of a hundred pounds, No. 8,594 to Mr. Chapman, in his counting house; the transaction took up some time, as I had considerable change to take, and when he had done I left the counting-house, and he left the bank note on the bridge of his desk and went out; the desk stands in the counting house, the counting house is a slip taken out of the shop.

Q. Did the desk stand so as any body might see the note in the street? - I should think so; it was about a yard and a half from the street; Mr. Chapman had taken down a tin box to give me the change, but whether he put the note there again I am not sure, he put it under a weight on the desk; I then left the desk, and he followed me out of the counting house, but I do not recollect whether he went with me to the street or not; I was returning home from the house of commons about four o'clock that same afternoon, and Mr. Chapman asked me if I could furnish him with the number of the note? I told him I could, and gave it him, No. 8,594.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you do that from a memorandum? - I did. As I paid the notes away I wrote down on the original memorandum that I made of the notes when I received them, the parties to whom I paid the bank note, and I can swear to the bank notes from the memorandum.

Mr. Const. I understand it is this, on paying the bank note, you made that memorandum you have now about you? - No, I have only a copy of it.

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn.

I am in Partner ship with Mr. Rutten, in Charing Cross .

Q Did you receive a bank note of Mr. Fludyer on the 27th of May? - I did; as soon as I received the note I put it into a tin box, among a number of other notes, while I was giving Mr. Fludyer change I put this tin box with the notes on the ridge of the desk; when I had given him the change he went out and then the men came in, I don't know whether they were five or six, they engaged my attention by asking for many things which we did not deal in, and particularly engaged my attention, and stood close by the counter, and I believe it might take up about ten minutes when these men went out; and then I returned to the counting house, and looked at the tin box on the desk, and found it was empty of its contents, not the whole of its contents, but part of its contents, about seventeen hundred and twenty pounds; there was a bank note of a hundred pounds; there were bills and notes to the amount of seventeen hundred and twenty pounds; I sent some of my men out a little while, but I found that was of no consequence; I took my bill book down, and took the number of them all, and went away immediately to Bow-street, I have not traced the bank note as yet; I heard of it on the King's birth day; I then went to Bow-street, and I had no knowledge of the prisoner's person; this was between two and three o'clock.

Court. Whose dwelling house is this? - I live in the dwelling house; it is the partnership account.

Q. Whose dwelling house is it? - Mine only. Mr. Rutten lives in Parliament-street.

THOMAS MOSS sworn.

I am a watch maker, on Ludgate-hill.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to you? - I am not sure it is the prisoner at the bar, I have a doubt whether it is him or not.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-92

638. RICHARD GOLDING was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of August , two yards of cloth, called hessian cloth, value 1 s. 4 d. two pounds weight of hyson tea, value 16 s. six pounds weight of mace, value 18 l. twenty-six pounds weight of nutmegs, value 30 l. twenty-one pounds weight of raw sugar, value 8 s. the goods of Harriot Frampton and John Thompson .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN THOMPSON sworn.

I am in partnership with Harriott Frampton , we are wholesale haberdashers , and in the tea line, No. 34, in Leaden-hall-street ; I know the prisoner at the bar, he was a porter in the tea warehouse.

Q. Did you, in consequence of any suspicion of the prisoner at the bar or any body else, go any where with a constable? - I did.

Q. Where? - I went to his lodgings in St Mary Axe; he was then in custody.

Q. When was it you went to the prisoner's lodgings? - The 17th of August.

Q. How do you know they were the prisoner's lodgings? - There was his wife there, and I asked his wife.

Q. Did you ever hear the prisoner say any thing about his lodgings? - I did not; I went there supposing it to be the prisoner's lodgings.

Q. And what did you find there? - I went there, looking into his box I found two pieces of hessian cloth; it was in a box under a turn-up bedstead in these lodgings.

Q. Do you know to whom that hessian cloth belonged? - I did not know till I ordered the constable to take it home, when it was at home me and the constable compared it together with what I had at home, to see if they corresponded in the cutting and parting, they did exactly.

Q. Was you enabled to say, from the correspondence of these two pieces of hessian cloth found at these lodgings, that they were your property? - They fitted.

Court. How long before this day had you seen the hessian cloth together? - I had not seen it in one piece a long time; I don't remember only cutting off eight yards.

Q. Had you ever seen it in one piece? - Yes; I bought it myself; the piece was upwards of thirty yards, there has been at times cut off more than twenty yards, I never cut off any only eight yards when I bought it.

Q. What quantity did you find at the prisoner's lodgings? - One piece containing about four yards, and the other about two yards.

Q. Were they together? - They were in the box together.

Q. Did they seem to tally one with the other? - They did.

Mr. Knowlys. The piece you found in the prisoner's room is the width of your piece? - It is.

Q. And that is the general width that cloth runs? how many pieces of this had been cut off by your foreman, or by your porters for your use you cannot say? - The foreman is here.

Court. Have you any other reason to say that it is part of that piece than, because it is particularly of the same width? - I have no other reason.

Q Then all that you can say is that it was of the same width as that you have.

Mr. Knapp. Was there any other mark by which you knew the hessian cloth? - None but by the cutting off.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-93

639. JOHN WELLS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of August , five tallow candles, value 4 d. the goods of Harriott Frampton , and John Thomson .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM FRAMPTON sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Harriott Frampton and John Thompson ; they are wholesale grocers and haberdashers , in Leadenhall-street ; the prisoner was a porter to our warehouse. On the day laid in the indictment we missed five candles, they were counted about five minutes before the prisoner went out of the warehouse; in consequence of the

candles being missed I ran out and called to the porters to come back, the prisoner was one, the prisoner pulled the five candles out of his pocket immediately. The candles were taken out of the warehouse.

Q. Had you seen yourself what number of candles were in this box? - I had not.

Mr. Knowlys. We have just heard a prosecution a little while ago of a piece of hessian cloth, I believe you never saw such five candles in your life, they are all broke in pieces? - They were all whole when he gave them me.

Q. I don't know how long this man worked for you? - About four months.

Q. I believe he has a pretty large family? - I don't know that he has any; he is a married man.

Q I believe you do now and then allow there men to take a candle? - I don't know that we do.

ANTHONY BRUFF sworn.

I am a warehouseman to Messrs. Frampton and Thompson.

Q. Do you know of any candles being lost? - I do; I saw ten candles in the box, and in about five minutes afterwards I found five out of the ten gone, in consequence of that I informed Mr. Frampton immediately.

Mr. Knowlys. How far was this from the warehouse where this man was taken back from? - About twenty yards.

Q. This is a common course warehouse candle, four-pence is the very utmost value of them? - I cannot say whether it is or not; I am not a tallow chandler.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 34.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-94

640. DANIEL SERJANT was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of August , eighteen ounces weight of congou tea, value 4 s. the goods of the united company of merchants trading to the East Indies .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JEREMIAH DICKSON sworn.

I am a customhouse officer attending at the East India warehouse.

Q. Who was with you on the 6th of August? - One of my partners, Tarratt, was with me; the prisoner at the bar was there, he is a labourer , employed by the East India company.

Q. What was his employment that day? - I don't recollect.

Q. Did you see him that day; and tell us what you observed? - I examined all the men that came out of the warehouse, and I searched him, and I found something bulky with my hand passing, and I gave it a pinch with my hand, and I found it was tea, and I called to Tarratt, my partner, to come down to the counting house.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you know what warehouse this man was employed in, the bohea warehouse or congou warehouse? - I don't know there is any such distinction.

Q. Did you search this man when he went in? - No.

Court. He may carry in as much tea as he pleased, but they must not carry any out.

Q. Do you know whether any tea was lost that day? - I cannot say that.

WILLIAM ROBERT TARRATT sworn.

Q. Did you examine the prisoner in the counting house? - I did, and examined him before he came into the warehouse, under the gateway.

Q. Was it at the request of Dickson, the last witness? - It was.

Q. What did you find on him? - I found a bulk between his legs; we said you have got something between your legs that does not belong to you; on this he took out this bag of tea.

Q. Have you looked into that bag? - I have; it is congou tea.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you know in point of fact whether there is a distinct warehouse for the congou? - No, congou, bohea and greens, are all in the same warehouse together in Fenchurch-street.

Q. Can you undertake to say that tea was lost out of the chests? - It is impossible where there are so many thousand chests open.

Prisoner. I shall give the matter just simply as it occurred, and begin with my coming to the warehouse. On the 6th of August I met with a man whom I knew perfectly well, whose name is Underwood; he entreated me much to go with him to drink some brandy and water; I told him I should be too late for the warehouse; he said he had known the time that I would not mind losing a day to go with him; I told him I was now married, and had left off all that sort of fun; you married? says he; yes, I am, says I; then says he, I will give you a portion of tea; he pulled out a bag, and it burst; I said I had got a bag which I usually put my breakfast in, and I put it into this bag, and went into the warehouse. I am in a very disagreeable circumstance; I have been swindled by two attornies out of six guineas, who ought to have subpoened my witnesses, but they have not; but I have those here who will give me a character.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 40)

Imprisoned six months in the house of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-95

641. DAVID DONOUGHTY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of September , a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the goods of Robert Bucannan .

ROBERT BUCANNAN sworn.

I am a wine merchant ; I lost a silk handkerchief on the 2d of September; I was walking in Lombard-street , it was four o'clock in the afternoon, I had put it into my pocket about an hour before.

Q. Did you miss it when it was taken? - I felt my coat pulled behind me, and I turned about and I turned round, and the prisoner dropped a silk handkerchief; a constable came up and I gave it to him, and he has it.

Q. How far was the prisoner from you? - About two yards.

Q. Was any body near you besides the prisoner? - There was one man stood by him, that he meant to give the handkerchief to.

GEORGE WINTER sworn.

I am a constable; I have got an handkerchief which the prosecutor gave into my possession and have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. I am positive about my handkerchief; I had my pocket picked about an hour and a half before this; there are three little holes in it.

Prisoner. I will be much obliged to you my lord to hear me. He asked me for two handkerchiefs that he had lost on Ludgate-hill two hours before; the constable would not take charge of me till he broke the handkerchief out of his pocket, tied by a piece of tape; directly as he collared me, he says, I will be revenged now for the two handkerchiefs I have lost. I am innocent.

Court to Prosecutor. Was it separated from your pocket? - It was not entirely separated, it was on the ground, but it was tied to my pocket by a bit of tape.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-96

642. JOHN COX was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Catharine Pyott , between the hours of ten and two on the 2d of July , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing, six silver tea spoons, value 6 s. a garnet ring, set in gold, value 2 s. a hair ring, set in gold, value 2 s. a pair of garnets, set in gold, value 6 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 5 s. a pair of stone shoe buckles, set in silver, value 5 s. a silver butter boat, value 1 l. six silver table spoons, value 3 l. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 10 s. and one silver tea strainer, value 2 s. and one guinea and a half; the goods and monies of the said Catharine Pyott .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

CATHARINE PYOTT sworn.

I live in Bowling-alley, White-cross-street, in St. Giles's parish, without Cripplegate . My house was robbed the 2d of July between the hours of ten and two; I have been a widow these thirty years; I have no family nor servant; I left my house at ten o'clock, and was at home by two; when I went out I double locked all my doors, and locked all my drawers, but he had a key to let himself in, he was a lodger in the house.

Q. How did you find your house at your return? - All fast.

Q. Did you perceive afterwards that any part had been broke? - I went to my drawer where the money had gone out, and when I missed my money I flew to my drawer where the plate was, there was gone one guinea in gold, and half a guinea and five shillings and six-pence in silver, a silver butter boat, and six table spoons, six tea spoons, tongs and strainer, two gold rings, a pair of ear rings, and two pair of silver buckles.

Q. Is any part of it here? - No.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - He was my lodger for three weeks? he came to live with me the first of June, and the second of July the robbery was done.

Q. Had he quitted his lodgings before the robbery was committed? - No.

Q. Had you entrusted him with the keys of your house? - Nothing but the key of the street door to let himself in with, because his wife said that he must have a street door key, but he had no other keys.

Q. When did you see the prisoner the last time before your house was broke open? - I saw him the day after, and I saw him on the Sunday before the house was broke open, on Tuesday morning.

Q. Have you any thing to charge him with? I charge him with the whole of the robbery.

Q. What is your reason? - His wife, on Saturday night, came to me and begged me to lend her a guinea; and I went to the drawer where the plate was and she see all the plate in the drawer.

Q. Are you sure that nobody else was in the house but the prisoner? - No.

Mr. Peat. So it seems you gave these lodgers of your's a key of the street door? - Yes.

Court. Was any door broke open of the house? - No, they were all locked again.

Mr. Peat. You had other lodgers in the house? - One, a man and his wife, who, I believe were all connected together.

Q. What was the lodger's name? - Lovatt.

Q. Had Lovatt a key? - He had a street door key.

Q. You charged Lovatt with the robbery? - No, I do not.

Q. Did you any time charge him with it? - No, never.

Q. What passed about a glove in in Lovatt's room? - The half dozen of spoons were in an old leather glove, and I found it in Lovatt's room.

Q. You found the glove in Lovatt's room, and the magistrate told you he would not commit any one person on your strange story.

Court. Did the justice commit John Cox ? - He did.

Mr. Peat. Did you charge Lovatt with this offence before the magistrate? - I did not.

Q. How came the glove before the magistrate? - Lovatt's wife was before the magistrate to give an account of the glove. I charged her with the glove because she acknowledged that they cleaned the plate in her room, and they cleaned the plate with it, the half dozen table spoons were in it, but nothing else.

Q. You have some person, some friend that you have made a legacy to, that you have left your effects to? - I have people to leave them to when I die.

Q. Has any body persuaded you to commence this prosecution against this man? - No, nobody in the world.

Q. Does your street door stand open in the day time? - No, I never suffer it to stand open.

Q. Does persons go forward and backwards to the lodgers? - No.

Q. What have they no intercourse? - I had no person come after them during the small time that they were in my house; Lovatt's daughter came, but I know of no acquaintance.

MARGARET GRINDLEY sworn.

My husband is a cooper, and lives in Old street-square. This Mrs. Pyott came up to our house one day and said that she was robbed, and cried sadly, and begged I would come to her house, and she told me she had been robbed by her lodgers; when I came down to the house I met Mr. Cox's wife; Mrs. Pyott got bills and printed them and sent them about, and we went to different pawnbrokers to enquire whether we could hear any thing of the plate, we could hear nothing of the plate that day; Mrs. Pyott gave charge then; she suspected Mr. Cox and his wife; the next day I went to the pawnbroker's, in Bishopsgate-street, and when I came there I gave Mr. Davis's man a bill, and asked him if any thing of them had been offered to be pawned or sold.

Q Did he deliver you any thing? - No.

JOHN KING sworn.

On the 3d of July I was desired to go and look at a house that was robbed, Mrs. Pyott's, I suspected that the house had been robbed by somebody that lived in the house; then I took up the prisoner's wife and another person, I put her in prison and I caused a detainer to be against him, and I found him in prison; Thursday morning we went before a magistrate, he said he knew nothing about it; I told him that I had information that he had known it for he was seen going to a certain public house in Moorfields. I went to a pawnbroker's, one Mr. Davis's, in Bishopsgate-street, and got some silver spoons; I searched the prisoner's room and I found the key that locked the cellar door where Mrs. Pyott locked her keys up.

Court to Mrs. Pyott. Do you know whether the key of your street door would open your cellar door? - No. It is a small key.

Q Did you ever trust them with the key of the cellar door? - No never, these were the keys that I locked my door with.

Court to King. Did the pawnbroker tell you that Cox had been there? - The pawnbroker said he knew the man.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn.

I am a constable. On Monday July last, Mrs. Pyott sent to me, and informed me that she had been robbed; I went and got some hand bills, Cox was not at home, Cox's wife was at home and another woman that lives in the one pair of stairs, and she wanted me to take charge of the two women; I said, if Cox came home I would take charge of him, but we had better leave it alone for fear we should be wrong. The next morning I went in company and took the two women, they were taken before Sir William Plomer ; I enquired of Mrs. Pyott whether Cox had come home; she said he had not, and I happened to sit up in the watch-house that night and I went to the compter in the morning and enquired whether Cox had been to see his wife; I laid a detainer against him, and the next morning when I went to fetch the two women out he was there detained.

ANDREW PUPARD sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Davis, the pawnbroker; I produce some spoons, the prisoner brought them between one and two, and desired to have them weighed they were six table spoons, there was three letters on them; as soon as he had them weighed and I had returned them to him again, he said that he had laid a wager that they weighed eighteen ounces, and they weighed but sixteen.

Court to Mrs. Pyott. What marks had your spoons on them? - G. C. A. for the man's and woman's name, Charles Glass and Ann Glass .

Court to Lupard. Do you remember whether the letters G. C. A.? - I cannot recollect.

THOMAS SMART sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I know the prisoner.

Prisoner. He has been in court while three witnesses were examined.

Court. Then I cannot receive his evidence.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-97

643. CATHARINE DUNBAR was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Michael Dedds , about the hour of one in the afternoon on the 27th of July , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing a cotton gown, value 10 s. a cotton counterpane, value 5 s. two linen shirts, value 6 s. a linen shift, value 2 s. a pair of leather pumps, value 7 s. the goods of Michael Dedds .

HANNAH DEDDS sworn.

My husband is a day labourer , he lives at No. 2, Little Britain .

Q. Does he keep the house? - The house is all let out in lodgings; the landlord has no part.

Q. Was your house broke in July last? - It was. On the 27th of July last I went on an errand between twelve and one in the day; I left nobody in the house, I locked my door after me; I was out about ten minutes, I returned and found my door open, and the prisoner at the bar inside of my room.

Q. What had she with her? - The articles mentioned in the indictment, a cotton gown, which the prisoner at the bar had in her apron; a cotton counterpane; two shirts, and a shift; I left it to the mercy of the court to value them as they please; they are not new; she was in the inside of my own room, and the door shut after her; she had got all the things in her apron; she said she had nothing belonging to me, and I was obliged to my neighbour's assistance, she came in

and made her leave the property behind.

Prisoner. Were did you find your property? - In your apron.

Prisoner. I had none of your property.

ELIZABETH SAVILLE sworn.

I am a neighbour of Hannah Dedds ; she called for assistance, and I ran down stairs directly; this woman had got the property in her lap.

Court to Prosecutor. Were the pumps your's? - Yes.

Prisoner. That gentlewoman goes off out of the house, and in a little time she returned and said I was going to rob her house. As I am a living woman she saw no property with me; certainly the things were together there, but I never had them in my possession. I work very hard for three fatherless children since I buried my husband; I have no witness.

Court to Prosecutrix. Was it your own lodging door that you locked? - It was.

Prisoner. It was a one pair of stairs room, I saw a woman go in and run out in a minute.

Court to Prosecutrix. Did you find any key on her? - No, I did not

GUILTY,

Of stealing but not of breaking and entering . (Aged 40.)

Court to Prisoner. Are you a married woman? - I am a widow , my husband is dead and I have three children.

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-98

644. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of July , a quartern roaf of wheaten bread, value 6 d. and a quartern brick of wheaten bread, value 6 d. the goods of John Johnson .

JOHN JOHNSON sworn.

I did not see any thing of the robbery.

EDWARD JOHNSON sworn.

I am servant to John Johnson , when I was in serving Alderman Boydell I missed two loaves.

Q. Was you carrying bread about in your basket? - Yes.

Q. What do you know of the prisoner taking them? - I saw him coming down Ironmonger-lane with the two loaves under his arm.

Q. How do you know they are the same you lost? - By many things.

Q. How soon after you had lost them did you see them? - Not above five minutes.

Q. Was the prisoner going towards your basket or from your basket? - Coming to me.

Q. What distance was he from you? - He was close by me, coming to me when I saw him.

Q. How far is your master's shop from the place? - About thirty yards, not more.

Q. Did not the prisoner appear to be coming from your master's shop? - No, sir.

Q. Why did not you stop the prisoner? - I did not see him take the bread.

Q. Did you see the prisoner before or after you found the bread was missing? - After I had found the bread was missing.

Q. Why did not you seize the prisoner? - He was seized before I saw him.

Q. Did you see the bread? - No otherwise than in the man's hand. He was taken up for stealing the other man's bread.

Q. Can you swear positively to your bread? - Yes.

Prisoner. What were the marks? - There were no particular marks that I know the bread by, but I know the quality of bread.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-99

645. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, two quartern bricks, value 1 s. the goods of Thomas Lott .

THOMAS LOTT sworn.

On the 9th of July last the prisoner was brought to me.

JOHN CHAMBERS sworn.

I am Mr. Lott's servant; I lost two quartern bricks; I left my basket in the street, and I went into a house, and was absent about five minutes; when I came out I missed two quartern bricks; I saw the prisoner afterwards with them; he had them on him when I saw him, which I suppose was in five minutes afterwards; the bread was under his arm; there is a hole in the bottom of our oven, and we were obliged to put a tin to keep the bread out of the hole, and these two were baked on the tin.

Q. Do you know whether any body see him take them? - He was stopped by my fellow servant.

Lott. I can swear to the loaves; I generally set my bread out myself, and these two were particular loaves and joined together.

Court to Chambers. When you saw these loaves under his arm was the prisoner in custody or not? - He was in my fellow servant's custody.

JOHN PATERSON sworn.

I have known the prisoner this seven months; he is one of our watchmen belonging to St. Bride's, and he belongs to the India House, he was very much hurt at his wife losing the use of one side, that was the occasion of his coming on the watch to work night and day to support her.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn.

I have known him eight months; I never knew but he was a very honest man; I am a constable likewise of St. Bride's.

Prisoner. That bread that I got I had bought, and was taking it home to my family.

Court to Chambers. What did he say at the time? did he say that he bought it then? - He did not.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-100

646. JOSHUA DANIELS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of August , a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of Hnery Huddy.

HENRY HUDDY sworn.

On the 17th of August I was crossing John street, Crutched friars, Aldgate , a little after twelve o'clock, I thought I felt something at my right hand pocket; I put my hand into my pocket and immediately turning round I saw the prisoner running across the way; I missed my handkerchief; I then ran after him, and thought it was best to call stop thief! and on my calling stop thief, he put his hand into his right hand pocket and threw it into the kennel; a great many people were following me at that time; I suppose he ran about fifty yards before he was stopped; I then took him home and got a constable,

and desired the constable to take him before the Lord Mayor; he was out of my sight after he dropped the handkerchief, turning a gateway, but not above half a minute.

Q. Are you perfectly sure, as you lost sight of the boy , that is the lad that took your handkerchief? did you see him taken? - I did.

Q. Was he running when he was taken? - He was.

Q. Who picked up the handkerchief? - I picked it up myself.

Q. Was it your's? - It was; I knew it by three or four particular marks upon it.

Q. Have you the handkerchief here which you have kept from that time to this? - Yes. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. Ask the gentleman whether he felt my hand in his pocket? - I did.

THOMAS TRIVERS sworn.

I am a carpenter and constable; the gentleman knocked at my door, and I took charge of him and took him before the sitting Alderman; he ordered me to search him; I found two silk handkerchiefs on him; they neither of them belong to this prosecution; one of those silk handkerchiefs he desired to have about his neck, and the other I took into my custody, which I have got now; it has been marked and the name is cut out.

Q. Did Mr. Huddy leave his own handkerchief? - I had it in my possession, and gave it to him to day; I kept it till now.

Prisoner. I was going to my aunt's, in Tumble-alley, Mrs. Cohen, and I suppose this gentleman lost sight of the other person that picked his pocket and he catched hold of me, and took me before my Lord Mayor, but I know nothing gentlemen, about it, nor never see him in my life; my witnesses have been here all day, but it is fast day now.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-101

647. JANE ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , one guinea, four shillings and six-pence ; the monies of Charles Wright .

CHARLES WRIGHT sworn.

I am a single man; I was going along up Ludgate-hill , this woman got hold of me and asked me to go along with her; it was about half after twelve o'clock, I believe the 8th of this month of September, the woman got hold of me and asked me to go along with her, I refused her, I said no, I would not, with that she said I had better, and I felt her fumbling about my breeches, I pushed her hand away, and desired her to be quiet; she came up to me again, and said I had better go, and began fumbling about my breeches again, and by some means she got her hand into my breeches pocket, and she took a guinea and some silver out of my pocket.

Q. Did you perceive the money go? - I did not perceive her take it out, but I felt the money go from me,

Q. Did you see the money in her hand? - No, I did not see the money in her hand, I got hold of her and she called out watch, and the watchman he came up, and I gave charge of her directly.

Q. Was she examined? - Yes, at the watch-house.

Q. Did you find any money on her? - Yes, a guinea, and two shillings in

her mouth; I saw it taken out of her mouth, she was further searched and there was two shillings and six-pence found about her.

DANIEL GERMAIN sworn.

I am a watchman on Ludgate-hill; I was on the beat when this man was robbed, and I heard the watch cried, and I ran down and this gentleman gave me charge of the woman for robbing him of a guinea and some silver; I brought her to the watch-house and saw her examined, there was a guinea and two shillings got out of her mouth; we quitted the room, and then she was more strictly examined, and there was an half crown found.

Q. Then the last witness did not see the two shillings and six-pence taken from her? - The other witness was present but I was not present.

Q. What was done with the guinea and two shillings? - The constable of the night has got it, he is here.

Q. Did she give any account of this money? - She made some equivocation about it, she said that she got it of some friends and relations of very great property.

THOMAS WARREN sworn.

I am one of the beadles of our ward, and I was officer of the night, between the hours of twelve and one the prisoner was brought in and charged with robbing the man of a guinea and some silver, and he said that there were two remarkable pieces, a shilling and a six-pence, when they brought her in I saw her dribbling down the mouth, and I suspected she had got it in her mouth, I searched her and found she had it, and at last with a deal of trouble, I got one guinea and two shillings out of her mouth, she had two pockets on, and out of her pockets I took the money out myself two shillings and six-pence, which answered the description the man gave me of the sixpence, it was a new six-pence with a hole punched just at the edge of it quite through, the shilling was stamped with a letter A in the middle of it; she said she had received some money of some man coming along, and she put it into her mouth for fear of being robbed to take care of it; I have got the money about me. (Produces it.)

Q. How much of that money can you swear to? what do you know the shilling by? - By the letter in the middle.

Q. How do you know the six-pence? - It being a new six-pence and a little hole in the edge.

Court to Prosecutor. When had you last seen your money before the girl had taken it from you in the course of that day? - I don't know that I had it out since I put it in my pocket in the morning.

Prisoner. I had been down to Gravesend along with a young man, and he took his money and he gave me a guinea and some silver; I came from the Gravesend boat, and going along I met that young man and he told me he would give me six-pence; I told him I would not oblige him for six-pence; so with that he gave me a shilling; he wanted me to have connection with him in the street; I told him I would not except he would go home with me; he said then he would be revenged, he called out watch; and said he was robbed; with that I was taken to the watch-house, and the constable of the night took one guinea and two shillings out of my mouth; he gave me the six-pence and the shilling for obliging him, but I would not oblige him in that place.

Court to Prosecutor. On your oath did you give her this money? - No.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-102

648. JANE LLOYD was indicted for stealing on the 6th of September , a copper tea kettle, value 1 s. the goods of Samuel Peyton .

SAMUEL PEYTON sworn.

I am a brazier and tin man ; I lost a copper tea kettle on Friday the 6th of September; I saw the prisoner brought into my shop after she had taken it in the forenoon about eleven o'clock.

Q. Was the property on her when she was brought in? - Yes, in her hand, and she put it down in the shop when she came in; I can swear it to be mine, being one of my own making, and by putting it out of doors not above two hours or two hours and a half before the woman took it.

Q. Was there any marks at all about it by which you knew it? - I can positively swear to it.

Q. What did you do with the tea kettle after it was brought in? - I sent for a constable, and gave it into his possession; the constable is here.

JOHN WARNE sworn.

I am a tin plate worker; I was at work in the cellar of Mr. Peyton, and all of a sudden the window was dark, I looked up and I saw this woman with a large white cloak stoop down, and then she went into the adjoining passage, and she crossed over the way, I suspected she had stole something; I went to the door, and when I came to the door I saw her crossing the way, I followed her into Cree-church-lane, I stopped her and told her she had got what did not belong to her and brought her back again, and saw her put the kettle down in the presence of Mr. Peyton.

Q. Do you know there was one missed? - I know there was one missed out of the row that was put out of doors when I came up stairs.

Prisoner. I was coming along Leadenhall-street, I was going to see a cousin of mine in Fleet-market, and the soldiers were going to the Tower; and there was a great mob, and the tea kettle was in the middle of the highway with the lid off, and I picked it up and meant to carry it to the man, I do assure you I did, and that man had the impudence to say that I took the kettle, it is as false as God is true, upon my word I tell you the truth.

- sworn.

I am the constable; I have the tea kettle; I received it of Mr. Peyton and have kept it ever since.

Prisoner. The prosecutor said if I would pay for the kettle he would let me go; I told him I did not want the kettle, I had no money to pay for the kettle, I had but eighteen-pence in my pocket. I have been out of my mind but I was not out of my mind then, I was then as sensible as ever I was in my life; nor was I drunk, I durst not drink a drop of gin ever since my head has been bad.

Court to Prosecutor. How did this woman appear when she was brought to you? - She appeared to be sober, and said she was very sorry for what she had done, and if I would let her go she would never come that way again. About two years back I had a shop in Surry-road and she served me just in the same way, and I did not prosecute her then because of the evpence of going to the Guilford assizes.

GUILTY . (Aged 60.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-103

649. MARY CARTY otherwise MACARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of August , a canvas purse, value a halfpenny, two guineas, a half guinea, five shillings, and two sixpences ,

the goods and monies of John Ruff .

JOHN RUFF sworn.

I am a single man; I was robbed of my purse and money the 26th of August, Monday morning between twelve and one, nearly one, between Sunday and Monday; I was coming up Holborn , and near at the end of Leather-lane, the prisoner at the bar and another woman catched hold of me, one of one arm, and the other of the other; the prisoner had hold of the right arm, she put her hands down trying to pick my watch out of my pocket; I went to rescue my watch, and she plucked me forward towards her and catched hold of this purse out of my pocket; I felt it drawn out, and then I immediately called the watch, and catched fast hold of her, I called three or four times before any body came, and there was a man crossed over who wanted to rescue her from me, the other at the same time picked my pocket of my handkerchief, but I would not lose this party that I had got hold of, I continued to lay hold of her till I got her into the watchman's hands, and afterwards I conducted her to the watch-house, there I asked the constable of the night to search her, which they would not do in my presence. I knew she had got my money about her, because my purse dropped from her when the constable first took hold of her; it dropped from under her clothes on the flag pavement, but all the property was out of it.

Q. Was it whole or had it been cut? - It was just the same as I have it in my pocket at this present time, there was half a guinea and four shillings also on the flag stones, the watchman picked it up and gave it into my hand. I see my purse before in the evening about seven or eight o'clock; I had in it two guineas, half a guinea, five shillings and two six-pences; all that I ever recovered was half a guinea and four shillings.

Q. Could you swear to the money that was found? - No, I could not.

Q. Can you speak to the purse? - It is a canvas purse; I have had it seven years at least, it is greasy by my selling pickled salmon and putting the money backward and forward in it; I have no doubt in the least, I am positive this is the purse the money was in; after I had been in the watch-house the constable asked her if she had any charge against me? yes, she said, she had a charge against me for robbing her, so he said then there was charge for charge.

Q. What is your prosession, what are you? - I am a fishmonger . They then took me to the patroles, and I was committed to the Poultry Compter.

Q. What were the words he made use of? - Have you any charge against him.

BARTHOLOMEW BUCKLEY sworn.

I am a watchman; after calling one o'clock I sat in my box, and this man cried out for the watch, accordingly I answered the call, and he had hold of this woman, and I asked him what was the matter, and he told me that woman robbed him, and accordingly I took her; after he had said that the prisoner had robbed him and he had hold of her I saw her drop three shillings in the street on the flags, I did not see her drop it, there was some gold lay on the door way.

Q. What was it she dropped? - Three shillings; I see nothing else drop, I saw some gold lay on the door way before she dropped the three shillings, the first thing I saw was the gold laying on the ground, it lay on the other side as near as I can guess about a quarter of a yard; then besides this gold, I saw three shillings drop from her, I asked her to give the rest of the money to the man, says she that is

all the money I have got, that was all she said then, I took her prisoner to the watch-house and gave her to the officer of the night.

Q. Who picked up the money? - Some man that was in the croud, there were several people there and four watchmen.

Q. What passed after you got to the officer of the night? - I did not stay there, I left them in the watch-house after I gave charge.

ALEXANDER SCOTT sworn.

I am one of the beadles of St. Andrew's Holborn. I was the officer of the night, it was about half an hour after one the watchman brought that woman down, and then about five minutes after the man came in and charged her with robbing him of two guineas and a half, five shillings and two six-pences; accordingly when he made the charge the prisoner at the bar said you are a d - d scoundrel, and used such oaths as are not fit to be spoken of here, and says you have robbed me of seven shillings and six-pence, accordingly I said there is charge for charge. As Ruff was dry he gave a shilling to send for some drink; accordingly the beer came, says I, you must go to the compter as well as she, without you can send for any house-keeper I know, then he said he could not, therefore I thought proper, for the good of the community at large, to send him to the compter as well as she.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner? - Four or five years, I have seen her many times at the corner of different courts in the parish and made her go away.

Q. Was she examined there? - She was, and there was only six-pence found on her.

Q. So she gave a charge against this gentleman? - She did, as soon as he gave charge she gave charge.

Q. Was you sober that evening? - Yes, I was quite sober as I am now.

Q. Then you have a perfect recollection of what passed? - I have.

Q. Have you told us on your oath exactly all that passed? - Certainly, what I have said is truth.

Q. And exactly in the manner you have described? - Yes, exactly,

Q. Then if any body has given a different account to what you have given they would swear false? - I am certain they cannot give a different account.

Q. Then you mean to insist upon it that she instantly gave charge of him as he gave charge of her, and if any body has said different they have sworn false? - I have no further to say. When she found that she was going to the counter she downed on her knees and said, what I have said is all false against Mr. Ruff and I hope for mercy.

Q. It has been told, that after the man had made the charge, that you asked her if she had not a charge to make? is it true or false? - I might say so.

Q. What did you mean by telling me that it all passed as you said just now? as soon as the charge was made by him, did you say what charge have you to make against the gentleman? - I might say so, I cannot recollect my mind now; the watch-house was full of watchmen and patroles, I could not hear myself speak.

Court to Prosecutor. I understood you to say that the officer said immediately as you gave the account of the story, have you no charge against him? - Them were the words he made use of.

Court to Scott. Was this woman searched? - She was, and there was sixpence found on her, the prosecutor was present and there was several present.

Prosecutor. I wished her to be searched in my presence, but they would not grant me the favour.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you keep that money separate that was taken up? - No, I did not, as I could not swear to it.

Court to Scott. Do you mean to swear that there was only six pence found? - Only six-pence.

Q. Pray what did you mean by not searching her in the presence of the prosecutor? - He said he searched her in the street and found a shilling in a private place.

Prosecutor. I never said the word that I searched her.

Court to Buckley. When you was present at any time did that gentleman say that he had searched her in the street? - I did not hear him say that he did.

Q. Was you present at the search? - No.

Court to Mr. Scott. Are you in office now? - Yes, I am.

Court. Then I assure you that the court will recommend that you be turned out of office.

Prisoner. I was coming down Holborn and this gentleman was standing at the door and another young woman along with him, directly as I came to the spot the other woman went away, and he catched hold of me, and I told him if he did not let me go I would charge the watch with him; and he said I had robbed him, and he called the watch and said that he had lost two guineas; he was very much in liquor, I was so pulled about that I lost six shillings; I had my witnesses here all day to day, and I did not think I should be tried to night so they are gone; they came as far as Woolwich.

Court to Buckley. Did you see the purse at all? - Yes, I see it on the ground.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-104

650. JOHN DICKMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of August , seven pounds weight of moist sugar, value 3 s. the goods of persons unknown .

WILLIAM WELLS sworn.

I saw this prisoner at the bar on board a lighter; he was down the fore scuttle; it was about eight o'clock in the morning he was there some little time, he then came up with a great coat rolled up together, seeing the great coat rolled up in that manner I supposed that he had something that he should not have, the lighter was loaded with sugar; he put his great coat down and sat there for some little trifle of time and at last he came on shore, when he came on shore I stopped him and asked him what he had got there in his great coat? he told me he had got some scrapings. I told him if he had nothing but scrapings I had nothing to do with it, but I must be satisfied, accordingly I took the handkerchief from his great coat, and it proved to be clear sugar, he had seven pounds; I then took him to the compter; another person and I went on board the lighter about an hour after, and found an hogshead broke open and plundered, and we found an handkerchief containing a quarter of an hundred in a locker on board of the lighter.

Q. You don't know to whom it belonged? - I do not.

Mr. Knowlys. What name was there at the lighter? - The Brothers I believe.

Q. The owner's name is always on the lighter? - I don't know that the name is on a key lighter.

Q. Did you make any enquiries about who the lighter belonged to? - No.

Q. Has this lighter property of different people on board? - Yes.

Q. Are the lightermen answerable for the property? - I understand it as such; we reckon it always as belonging to persons

unknown until it has passed the King's beam.

Q. If a lighter has any name on it is there any difficulty to find out the owner? - No, I don't say that it is, but that is not our business.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn.

I am an officer to a West India merchant; Wells told me that he had stopped this man, and I went into the lighter and saw an hogshead that had sugar taken out of it.

Q. Do you know who that lighter belonged to? - I believe it belonged to the owners of Ralph's key; it belongs to Mr. Willop, and they entered it on the King's books.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-105

651. THOMAS CULLUM was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of August a wooden basket, value 1 s. 6 d. seven quartern loaves, value 4 s. and three other loaves, value 4 d. the goods of William Wright .

THOMAS FRAY sworn.

I am a journeyman baker to Mr. Wright. I lost a wooden basket, seven quartern loaves and two three-penny loaves; on Thursday between four and five in the afternoon the 22d of August, I left my basket on a pitching block which projected out from an oil shop window, the corner of Mr. - 's gateway; I brought about twenty quarterns out, and a small basket and a large basket; in the mean time while I was gone to serve my customers with some bread which I carried in the small basket this large one was missing. I looked about for my basket, and I saw the man with the basket going down Whitechapel with it on his shoulder, nearly three hundred yards from where I left it; there were seven or eight, but I swore to seven quarterns and two threepenny in the Basket; I knew my basket again immediately, he said if it was mine I might take it; I knew the basket by carrying it so long a time, there was no name upon it, nor no mark, I had used it about three months, there were three loaves missing which he said he had taken to some butcher's, but he could not tell me where, I only found four quarterns and two three-penny in the basket, there were three quarterns gone nothing else, I knew the bread to be mine by making of it and baking of it; I had not observed any thing remarkable on it; from thence I took him home to my master's, and gave charge of him; I cannot say I ever see the prisoner before to my knowledge.

JAMES THACKERALL sworn.

I gets my daily bread in the street, I sell fish. On the Thursday afternoon coming from my employment, I saw two three penny loaves laying in the kennel, a woman present went and took the two three-penny loaves out of the kennel and was wiping the bread, when the prisoner came up, and took the bread out of the woman's hand, and said I will take care of the bread; immediately the woman said he ought to be ashamed of himself to leave the bread rolling about the street, he made answer he had been over to a butcher's shop with a couple of quartern loaves, he borrowed a knife of me to trim the bread, and was going to tumble it into his basket, I told him it was not yet fit for sale, and I took and trimmed it for him, as soon as the bread was fit for sale, as I thought, he tumbled it into his basket, takes the basket up and said he was going to Mile End turnpike with it, in so doing I put my basket on my head and walked behind the man to the distance

of between two or three hundred yards, he kept saying he was going to carry it to Mile End turnpike to one Thomas's, whom he said was very much intoxicated with liquor, and unable to take care of his bread; and he said that this Thomas had entrusted him to go and fetch the bread and basket to him; when he was overtaken with the basket by Fray, he he comes up and says halloo my friend, where are you a going with that, that is my property, by Jesus says he, if it is your property take it; I was present and he pitched the basket down, on which Fray said to him as you have carried it so far you may as well carry it a little farther take it up again, on which he did, and followed him to Mr. Wright's shop.

Q. Did Fray in the presence of the prisoner say to whom the bread belonged? - Fray claimed it as his property, or as his master's property.

Prisoner. Did not a man come up to me at the time and ask me to sell the bread, I said I would not sell any of it, but I would bring it to the man who entrusted me with it; this man came and asked me this question at the time I was cleaning the loaves. I am a stranger just come from the country; I accosted this man who had the basket, and I asked him if he could help me to a master, he told me he could if I would assist him to carry the basket.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

To go for Soldier .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-106

652. ELIZABETH SAINSBURY was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of June ten guineas , the property of James Gildon .

JAMES GILDON sworn.

I am a married man; I am a post boy , I came home very late from my chaise from Hounslow, and was locked out of my lodging in Cross-lane near Lukener's-lane; it was on the 28th of June Friday morning between seven and eight o'clock, and a woman asked me to go along with her home, which I did, I went to her lodgings, I went to bed, I undressed myself entirely; I had had some liquor to be sure.

Q. Did the woman go to bed too? - Yes.

Q. You was sober enough to know that? did she undress? - Yes, and I missed my money, ten guineas.

Q. When did you first miss your money? - Between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; the girl was then gone.

Q. When had you last seen your ten guineas over night? - At six o'clock in the morning.

Q. Where had you been at six o'clock in the morning? - I got ten guineas, I had it in my pocket some time.

Q. Is that all the account you can give of this ten guineas? - I had it some time.

Q. Did you as a post boy driving about on the road carry ten guineas about you? - I had had my box broke open a little before at my lodgings the Coach and Horses, Charles-street, Covent-garden.

Q. Did the man of the house know that you had your box broke open? - No, it was broke before I brought it there.

Q. Where was it broke open? - At the Thatched House in Red Lion-street, Holborn.

Q. Did you tell the people of the Thatched House that your box was broke open? - I did, his name is Tomkins.

Q. How do you say you got these ten guineas, did you get it all at once? - No, I saved it at service.

Q. How came you to see it at six o'clock in the morning? - I lost half a guinea with the first woman, I was with another woman before this.

Q. Was ever any of this money found? - No.

- TREADWAY sworn.

I am an officer, I searched the girl and found no money on her at all, but I found this piece of paper which he swore to being the paper that his money was rolled up in.

Court to Prosecutor. Was there any thing wrote on that paper? - No, nothing that I know of, only it had a bit of a slit.

Court. This is a rather remarkable piece of paper, it is a piece of music.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-107

653. JOHN HOLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of July , a linen gown, value 10 s. a dimity petticoat, value 2 s. the goods of George Gayton .

GEORGE GAYTON sworn.

I only prove my property.

MARY GAYTON sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - Yes, I never knew him before the things were stole. I live in White Lion-street, Islington ; I had been out for a pot of beer about half past one o'clock at noon, and I was going up stairs again and I met the prisoner on the stairs, he wanted to go past me, and I stopped him and I hallooed out there was a thief in the house; the prisoner found he could not get by me he went up stairs again with me into the room, and pulled out the gown, and several other things; it is my gown and petticoat. I delivered them to the constable my own self.

- JONES sworn.

I produce the gown and petticoat, they have been in my possession ever since I received them of the last witness.

Court to Mrs. Gayton. How do you know the gown? - By a mark in the tail with pitch or tar, and I was mending it that very morning, it is all out of the plaits.

Prisoner. About half past twelve o'clock I left work, I work along with my father; I was going up to wash myself at the New River Head; a woman going by asked me if I would go up stairs and ask for Mrs. Jones, if I would she would give me a pint of beer; I went up stairs, and the street door was open, and I came down again, and this woman came and charged me with stealing this property, and then she took me upstairs again and as I was coming down she said she had nothing to charge me with, and just as I came to the bottom of the stairs three men came and took me into custody.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-108

655. THOMAS STEPNEY and WILLIAM BAMFEILD were indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , a cow price 10 l. the goods of Richard Trow ; and two other cows, price 20 l. the goods of Jonathan Parkinson .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys, and the prisoners were acquitted .

Reference Number: t17930911-109

656. ANN WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of August , two child's linen shirts, value 1 s. two womens muslin caps, value 1 s. a child's diaper pinbefore, value 2 d. half a cotton shawl, value 2 d. an earthen bason, value 1 d. a wooden pail, value 1 s. the goods of Jonathan Broomfield .

JONATHAN BROOMFIELD sworn.

On the 24th of August about ten o'clock on Saturday, this woman came in at my back door where I live in Chatham-place , and came into the wash-house; I did not see her, a person who was coming from the field told me, I was informed that a woman in a bed gown had taken something; I directly goes as soon as I heard of that to the workshop, and goes towards the Shepherd and Shepherdess, and I saw her with the pail that is here now, and she was viewing of it at the time that I saw her, and I says, good woman what will you have for this pail? and she turns about and looks at me, why says she sir, it is my own pail, says I, I don't know that it is not your pail, but if my informers has informed me wrong, they must put up with the inconvenience; with that my wife came up, and she said that that was our own pail, and she had lost two or three articles out of a dish that laid on the wash tub; I then told the prisoner to return with that pail to the place from where she took it from, and she comes back and put it back, and brings it into the washhouse, and I desired her to go into the kitchen, that was the front of the warehouse, and she sits down and lets the bottom of her apron go over her arm, and took this bason out of her lap with two or three things in it and put it on the top of the dresser; I have got them here, and took care of them ever since; there are no mark on the childrens shirts, but my wife has but these two to put on and the child was without either, it was on a Sunday.

Prisoner. I had been eleven weeks in the hospital with a fever, and when I came out, the gentlewoman whom I worked for, as I go out a charing for, sent for me, and I went to the gentlewoman to do the day's work, and I was not able to stand it, with that I came back, and as I came back I found these things, and I picked them up, and the gentleman followed me afterwards into the field, and he accused me with that pail, I told him, sir, if it is your pail you are very welcome to it, with that he took it from me, and he brought me back to his house, I have no witness.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Court. Are you a married woman? - Yes, I have a husband, he is on board a man of war, and I have a child two years old.

Privately Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-110

657. ROBERT PICKERING was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , two pair of silver shoe buckles, value 1 l. 10 s. seven yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. a linen handkerchief, value 1 s. a cotton handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. a muslin apron, value 5 s, two muslin caps, value 2 s. and twenty-one guineas ; the goods and monies of Richard Hodgson .

Ann Hodgson was called on her recognizance.

JOHN SHAW sworn.

I apprehended the man; I have some articles that I took from his premises.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-111

658. MARY CLARKE was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , 9 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , the money of Samuel Dent .

Samuel Dent and John Taplin were called on their recognizances.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-112

659. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for that he on the 16th of April , feloniously did forge, falsly make and counterfeit a certain receipt for money, bearing date the 16th of April, purporting to be the receipt of one Edward Howis and Co. whereby the said Edward Howis did acknowledge to receive of the Honourable St. John, the sum of 16 l. with intent to defraud Edward Howis , Eleanor Frisby and Stephen Howis .

Indicted in a second count for uttering the same as true knowing it to be forged.

In a third and fourth counts for the like forgery and uttering with intention to defraud the Honourable St. John .

(The case opened by Mr. Fieding)

(The witnesses examined separate.)

General St. JOHN sworn.

The prisoner at the bar lived with me as my butler about four years and a half; Mr. Howis was a Tradesman of mine.

Q. Had he delivered you any bill at any time? - There was a bill of his left at my house thirty pounds in value or thereabouts, he was an oilman in Germain-street, I ordered my servant John Thompson to pay it in part, that was the bill left by him, I gave my servant John Thompson fifteen pounds on account to pay to him, sometime in the month of April last.

Q. What was the next thing done by him when you had given him the fifteen pounds? - He brought back to me a receipt signed Howis, by which I supposed he had paid according to which I had given him.

Q. Do you remember the particular directions you gave him at the time you put the fifteen pounds in his hands? - I ordered him to pay so much on account to the man.

Q. Had he ever paid money to Howis before? - I told him to pay to Mr. Howis fifteen pounds on account of the thirty, and this was the receipt he brought back.

The receipt produced and read as follows:

"Received April 16th, 1793, of the Hon - ble Gen - ll St. John, the sum of fifteen pounds on account for bills deliver'd for Self and Co.

Howis."

The first discovery I made of his not having paid the bills, was on the first of July, when I discovered he had not paid some other bills, I then went to Howis to enquire if he had been paid; I found he had not.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe during this time the man lived with you, you had some particular instances of his honesty? - I always looked upon him as an honest man till this occasion.

Q. I would ask you whether he did not deliver to you a purse of gold that very likely might have been lost?

Court. We cannot go into that evidence.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you know a man of the name of Kennedy that was in the habits of seeing the prisoner? - I never heard of such a man.

Mr. Fielding. Has that fifteen pounds been paid? - It has; I have paid it since.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you pay it with your own hands, or did you send it with any other person? - I ordered it to be paid by another.

EDWARD HOWIS sworn.

Q. Have you any demands on General St. John for the fifteen pounds for which the receipt was given and is the subject of the present prosecution? - I have not.

Q. You was an oilman, and General St. John was a customer of your's? - I was.

Q. You know Thomson was a butler of his? - He came to my house very often, perhaps once or twice a week during the time the gentleman was in town.

Q. Look at the receipt, is that your receipt? - No.

Q. Did you receive about that time any money at all of Thompson, as from General St. John? - No.

Q. Is that writing any way like your hand? - No, none at all.

Mr. Knowlys. Does it resemble the hand writing of any of those persons who are employed in your trade? - No.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner write? - No, I have not.

Q. Do you know a man of the name Kennelly who had been a servant to captain Chinnery? - I know two persons of the name of Kennedy.

Prosecutor. General St. John whom I had the pleasure to serve at that time, gave me thirty pounds and some other money to pay some bills; fifteen pounds I was to pay Mr. Howis oil man of Germain-street. Fifteen pounds on account of bills delivered to Mr. Barnett of the Haymarket; I believe this was on a Tuesday in April; and I had also to pay some other bills that were then due; there was a person named Kennelly called on me that morning; he was formerly servant to Mr. Chinnery; I had been in Bath different times along with that man, we had been three or four seasons successively together; this man being out of employ at this time, and as I was going out with different tradesmens bills, and as I wanted to go to several places, I asked him to go and pay two or three bills for me; the one was to Mr. Hall, and the other was to Mr. Howis; accordingly I had some business at the bottom of James-street, and an order down in Pallmall; I went from there to Mr. Barratt's, I paid fifteen pounds on account there at the same time I delivered that bill. This man comes to me at the bottom of the Hay-market, at the sign of the Swan; a person was present who see him deliver the bill to me as paid, and likewise he told me that he had paid sixteen shillings for half a dozen packs of cards, I did not suppose but that the sixteen shillings was paid for the cards, neither did I suppose but what that bill was paid, or certainly I should have made very particular enquiry, and got it settled. General St. John generally paid the yearly bills soon after Christmas; had I had the least suspicion that that bill had not been paid it would have been a great obstacle on my mind, very interesting indeed; for I did expect that the General would send for Mr. Barratt, Mr. Howis, and other tradesmen for to pay them. I honestly declare that I thought the bill was paid, neither did I know to the moment the charge was made against me. I must rely on your lordship, and the mercy of the jury. Had I the least probability that the bill had not been paid, I would never have suffered it to have gone so long and not to have paid it, for I really considered the General every day would have settled these bills, but I most assuredly knew nothing that the bill was not paid.

Court to General St. John. When this matter broke out, did the prisoner at the bar set up that excuse that he has now mentioned? - No, he never told me a word of it at the time.

Prisoner. The reason was, I was so flurried in my mind that I did not think of it till I saw the charge made against me as a commitment.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him an undeniable character.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 41.)

Prisoner. I am innocent of the charge as God is merciful.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-113

660. WILLIAM MINNIKIN was indicted for that he not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and instigated by the Devil, on the 21st of August , on Joanna Murphy , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and then and there feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-114

661. JOHN MEARS was indicted for stealing, on 20th of July , a set of cotton furniture for a tent bedstead, value 1 l. 18 s. the goods of Arabella Beard .

ARABELLA BEARD sworn.

I am a married woman.

Q. What is become of your husband? - He is in town.

Q. Because the articles is laid as your property? - I am a separate trader from my husband.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner taking the property? - I only came to prove it to be mine.

Q. Out of what place did you lose the things? - Out of my shop or warehouse.

Q. When had you seen them the last time before they were taken? - That same afternoon, I was out of town when they were taken.

WILLIAM HOLMES sworn.

I keep the Red Lion in Fenchurch-street ; I live a few doors distant from Mrs. Beard's house; I am a neighbour. On the 20th of July, being Saturday evening, about ten o'clock I had occasion to go that way to Leadenhall; I was in the street, and going past Mrs. Beard's door, I saw the prisoner and another man reconnoitering the door way; it struck my recollection and gave me a suspicion that they had intent to rob the house; I watched them, I turned back and they were just behind me, I got a glimpse of them; I did not take any particular notice, least they should do me an injury; I crossed the way opposite to Mrs. Beard's house with an intent to alarm the family, that there were some suspicious people at the door, and to take care of their property; just as I got across the way I had not time to inform them before the prisoner and the other were at the door, I saw one man, I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or the other go into the shop while the other stood on the step, and fetch out some bed furniture; I did not know then what it might be; they walked away both together towards Lime-street; I directly ran across the way as they came from the door, and informed them that two men had robbed the shop, the shop was a being shut up, the door was open and the man was gone in for another shutter I believe; I

ran immediately after the prisoner, and they followed me, just as we got to the corner of Lime-street, they were just turned into Lime-street, one with the furniture under his arm; we went up to them to know what they did with that furniture; the one that had not the furniture parried several strokes at me by way of keeping me off, and they found they could not keep the furniture he dropt it on the ground, they made an attempt to get away, but I never quitted them, they tried by knocking us about; I never lost sight of them after they committed the robbery, I called out thieves, least we might not secure the prisoners; some people came running, and I took hold of one side of the prisoner, and another person of the other side and secured him, the other made his escape; he was among the people; had I any body with me that I could have consided in we could have took both; the furniture was picked up by somebody, it is in the possession of the constable.

Q. Was the prisoner out of your sight from the time you first saw him? - He was out of my sight after the furniture was stole, but not after the furniture was dropped. We brought him back to the house, and that is all I know of the matter.

Q. What did he say? - He said something to the purpose that he was not the man, but I cannot swear that he was the man that dropped the furniture, but he was one of the two men that had got the furniture.

MARY SIMPSON sworn.

I am twenty-two; I live with Mrs. Arabella Beard , I was at work in the shop at the time the prisoner was brought in, he was standing with his back towards me, at the side board where the furniture lay.

Q. Did you know him before? - No, I told master Beard there was a person standing at the side board; I did not see what he was about, I did not see him take any thing, I saw that he was in the place.

Q. Did you miss the furniture? - Yes.

Q. How soon afterwards? - We did not look into the place where I saw the prisoner standing, till the prisoner was brought in.

Q. Was he in the shop then or out of the shop? - In the shop.

Q. Did he pretend any business when he came in? - No, he did not.

HENRY BEARD sworn.

I saw the prisoner, I did not see him take the furniture out of the shop, but I see him when he was taken; Mr. Holmes came into the shop, and told me that a man had taken a parcel out of the shop.

Q. Did you miss the furniture then? - We ran out directly.

JOSHUA HARDING sworn.

My father is a perfumer in Fenchurch-street; I was a going up Lime-street, and there was a cry of stop thief! I was going to market; I turned about directly and I saw a man drop something and the same man was caught, he was not out of my sight at all; I know the man he is pitted with the small pox.

WILLIAM BURDY sworn.

I was informed by Mr. Holmes as I was shutting up the shop; I pursued and I saw a man carrying some curtains, I apprehended the man who was carrying the furniture, I am sure of that, I have no doubt but what that is the very identical man.

Prisoner. I wish to know whether he did not deny his words when he came before the Lord Mayor, for there he

said that he had a great doubt whether I was the man or no.

THOMAS SERRY sworn.

I am a constable; I have the furniture, I had it of Miss Simpson in the shop, I have had it in my possession ever since.

Mary Simpson . Master Henry Beard picked the furniture up at the prisoner's feet.

Court to Beard. Did you pick this up at the prisoner's feet? - Yes.

Q. Do you know how it came there? - No.

Q. Who brought it into the shop? - I.

Prosecutrix. It is mine I had it made for a bedstead which I have in the shop now, and I know the pattern.

Prisoner. I was sent on business to Great St. Helen's, and from there to Mincing-lane, from there to Crooked-lane; and going down this lane was where this gentleman, Mr. Holmes, apprehended me, they laid hold of me and took me into a shop and kept me there half an hour before the things were brought in, and then a little boy brought in some things and said I had stole them, this Mr. Holmes said directly that if he had the least suspicion of any man that was a thief, he would take the greatest pleasure to transport him or hang him which ever he could.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good Character.

GUILTY .

To go for a Soldier

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-115

662. MATHEW MILLER was indicted for that he on the 8th of January, 1789, did, in the parish of Stockton in the county of Durham, marry Phoebe Sheraton , spinster , and afterwards on the 24th of March last, in the parish of St. Nicholas, in the City of Rochester , did marry Catharine Loader , his former wife being then living .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knapp and the case by Knowlys.)

EDWARD JONES sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Exceedingly well; I knew him at Norton, within a mile of Stockton, in the country of Durham.

Q. Was you present at any time when a marriage took place? - I was, it was between the prisoner and one Phoebe Sheraton , a young woman of Stockton; I gave her away, I knew her exceedingly well.

Q. When did you see her last? - She was in my house the latter end of May, she came to take her leave of me when she came up to London; my wife and her are sisters.

Q. How long did they live together? - I cannot exactly say, between two and three years, they had two children.

Q. What time was this marriage? - It was performed the 8th of January 1789.

Mr. Wentworth. You have said that the prisoner at the bar had two children by his first wife, are you sure of that? - Yes.

Q. Are you certain how long the prisoner has been absent from his wife? - I cannot tell within one day, it was either the 22d or 23d of last November was a twelve month.

Q. Mr. Jones, who are you? what are you? - I keep a little shop.

Q. What have you been early in life? - I have been a common soldier, never was higher than a corporal.

Q. Have you ever followed any other business? - I trade about the country.

Q. And you gave away this fine lady?

Court. That is not a proper expression.

Mr. Wentworth to Jones. Do you know the parish where this ceremony was solemnized? - Yes, Stockton, I was present at the ceremony.

Q. Where did it take place? - In the parish church.

Q. How old is the prisoner? - Twenty-eight I believe.

Court. Then he was twenty-three or twenty-four when he was married.

Mr. Wentworth to Jones. What time of the day did the ceremony take place? - In the morning, between breakfast and dinner.

Q. What hour? - I don't recollect the hour.

WILLIAM CLARKE sworn.

I am the clerk of Stockton parish; I have the book of marriages there.

Q. Be so good as to produce it and turn to the entry of the 8th of January, 1789. (Reads.)

No. 864, Matthew Miller and Phoebe Sheraton , both of this parish, were married in this church by license, this 8th day of January, in the year of our Lord 1789, by Mr. John Grickson curate. This marriage was solemnized in the presence of Ann Mary Marsh , Edward Jones , John Sheraton .

WILLIAM ROBBINS sworn.

I live in the parish of St. Nicholas, in the city of Rochester; I am the clerk of the parish.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Catharine Loader ? - Yes.

Q. Do you know of a marriage taking place between these parties? - Yes.

Q. When was it? - On the 24th of last March, between the hours of ten and eleven o'clock; it was by license, and mentioned in the license Matthew Miller , batchelor; I have here the copy of the register, I see it wrote by the clergyman.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn.

I am one of the constables for the city of London; I apprehended the prisoner in Maiden-lane, in the city of London, Jostling was with me at the time,

Q. Had you any information against him, that made you apprehend him? - Yes, I had an information to apprehend the prisoner at the bar for having two wives.

Court to Clarke. By whom was the marriage performed? - By the curate and lecturer of Stockton.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Prisoner. I came here chiefly to establish my moral character; I know very well I should have pleaded guilty but for my friends.

Imprisoned twelve months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-116

663. WILLIAM INNIS and CHARLES BURN were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of July , three wooden cases, value 6 s. the goods of Andrew Stirling and Co. and

JAMES ASH for feloniously receiving on the same day, the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Const.)

THOMAS WATSON sworn.

Q. Did you live with Mr. Ash in July? - I did.

Q. Was you sent at any time to Messrs. Hunter and Spencer's? - I was.

Q. Did you at any time that you was sent see Innis and Burn? - I did.

Q. When was the first day you see Innis, did you on the 26th of July see Innis and Burn both of them? - I had orders to go to Bow Church-yard at five o'clock in the morning, as I was to bring a bundle from Burn; I did go on the 26th of July, and there I saw Innis and Burn; I was to have a bundle from Innis at five o'clock, but I had it not; but at half past five I had these cases both from Innis and Burn; I went at five and I had them at half after five.

Q. What did you do with them? - I was to take them to Mr. Ash. I knocked at the door and he said he would let me in in a minute, and the constable took both him and me into custody.

Q. By whose order did you go there? - Both by the order of Ash and his wife.

Q. Did they tell you for what purpose? - They said it was to receive some things of Mr. Hunter's porters.

Mr. Knowlys. So you got into a scrape, you was taken up? - I was.

Q. You know a man of the name of Keyworth? - I don't know him only by seeing him.

Q. These men was under his controul to obey his orders? - I have heard so since.

Q. He was the head porter? - I have heard so.

Q. He has run off? - I have heard so.

Mr. Fielding. As soon as you went in the morning and happened to see Innis and Burn, something was given you, these cases were given you; did you know what was to be given to you? - No.

Q. Then your order over night was to go there for something? - There was a strict charge given me not to tell one porter of what the other did, because I was told that the porter s were going to cheat one another, I was to go out first at five o'clock to receive a parcel of Burn and then to bring it home, and go for one from Innis, and not to tell each other that I had been there.

Q. Then the instant you came to the door, before Ash said any thing to you the constable met you? - He did.

Q. And then the constable followed up his duty and took you both into custody? - He did.

KNIGHT SPENCER sworn.

Q. Did you at any time find any packing cases which you supposed were your's? - I saw Mr. Watson with them on his knot in Cheapside, this was the morning of the 26th of July, we were on the watch for him, in consequence of an information we received; immediately as I see him I pointed out to the constable that that was the man he was to take care of; I did not go with the constable to Ash's house.

THOMAS DICKENS sworn.

I am a constable; I went to Mr. Ash's on the morning of the 26th; when the door was opened, I seized Mr. Ash and the porter.

Q. What property did you find there? - We found the property afterwards in the course of three or four hours; we never quitted the house till a search warrant came, we found some callico wrappers and a sheet.

Q. What had Watson on him when you see him? - He had the cases on his back, and we followed him to Ash's house.

Mr. Fielding. You followed Watson with the cases? - These cases were laid down at the door, the man knocked at the door, Ash put his head out of the window, he said he would be down, to the best of my knowledge, in a minute, he came down, as soon as he came down, we seized him

and the porter, and the cases were down close by the door, these are the cases.

Prosecutor. They are my cases.

Mr. Fielding. You sell many cases in that condition? - We do.

Court. Do you sell such cases as these are? - Those that are useful for repacking we keep for repacking, and what we do sell, we never sell to any but trunk makers.

Mr. Fielding. What are the names of your partners? - Andrew Stirling and James Hunter .

Q. I believe at this time you had a porter of the name Keyworth, he was an old porter in the house? - He was.

Q. These persons are younger than Keyworth? - They were.

Q. He as the older porter would be very likely obeyed by the younger ones? - I don't know that, he had no authority from us.

Q. Keyworth has since absconded, has not he? - I don't know, I have not seen him since his last examination at Guildhall.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe after this discovery in the morning you employed both these porters to carry goods for you, did they perform their business as usual? - They did.

Q. I believe you searched Innis's house and found nothing.

Court. Mr. Spencer could you have had other porters to send out these goods by? - The young man in the warehouse ordered the goods to be taken out by these people.

Q. Was you under any necessity or under any engagement to deliver them? - No.

Prisoner Ash. This Watson came with me and lived with me about nine days, he came when I was out, to my wife, he said he was in great distress and wanted work; my wife said she should want a man on Monday, which she did not know that we were engaged, for when I came home she told me that a man of the name of Watson had been there, that he was in great distress and would be glad to come to work for twelve shillings a week; I said I cannot say any thing more of him till I see him; he came again, and he said then that he was a carpenter by his trade, and he had worked for two masters and could not get his wages; I was out at this time, when I came home my wife told me of it, I said, I don't think, says I to my wife, that if he can get eighteen shillings a week he will come to me to do my dirty work for twelve shillings; he came again and my wife took him in, he came on Tuesday morning and said he would engage a room with my wife, which when my wife spoke to me about, I told her not to take a man in that I knew nothing of; by this that I would not take him in he said he would be revenged of me, my wife took him in however and at the end of the week she says to me he has not worked his time this week; I said it is your own doings, you should not have taken him in without a character; but on Saturday night she paid him the wages, he came again on Monday night, and my wife said to him except you work constant and keep your time it will not do; he went on Tuesday to breakfast about nine, and did not come back till nigh twelve; on Wednesday he went to dinner at twelve, and did not come in till between three and four, and my wife then said to him you will not do for us; and he has done what he has done out of spite.

The prisoner Innis called three witnesses, and the prisoner Burn one, who gave them very good characters.

EDWARD STRICKLAND sworn.

I know Thomas Watson , he was in our manufactory, and I would not believe him on his oath.

Mr. Const. Who applied to you to come here? - I was subpoened.

Q. Do you know much of Watson? - He worked in our manufactory for two or three years, it is better than a twelve month ago he was discharged from our house.

Q. Do you recollect any thing on which you found your opinion which you have given on oath? - He always told us a quantity of lies while doing the business with us; the latter part of his time he had twelve different warrants taken out against him by different women.

The prisoner Ash called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

William Innis , GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Charles Burn , GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

James Ash , GUILTY (Aged 40.)

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930911-117

664. JOSEPH HENTON was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of William Blades privately from his person .

WILLIAM BLADES sworn.

I was robbed in Smithfield just going into Long-lane about three o'clock on the 19th of July. A Mr. Tyler's son came and told me my pocket had been picked; I felt in my pocket and missed nothing but my handkerchief, the apprentice of Mr. Tyler followed the prisoner, and I run after him and took the prisoner myself, I did not see him nor feel him take the handkerchief, nor did I find the handkerchief.

JOHN TYLER sworn.

On the 19th of July I saw the prisoner in Long-lane picking Mr. Blades pocket of an handkerchief; I saw him do it; our apprentice was in the shop coming down stairs, and I said look over the way, that man is picking the gentleman's pocket, I ran to the gentleman and told him and told the apprentice to go and shew the gentleman the handkerchief, I think he put the handkerchief in his pocket, I stayed in the shop to mind my father's shop, I did not go after him, the apprentice did.

Prisoner. When he see me take the handkerchief, where did he see me put it? - I think I see him put it in his pocket.

- HOLMAN sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Tyler; I was coming down stairs to get some water and came down without a pot, and I was going to turn round to get a pot and I saw this Joseph Henton trying to pick Mr. Blades pocket, John Tyler was standing at the door and he did not see me behind him, and when I went up stairs to get a pot, I see him take it out about six or seven inches.

Court to Blades. Did you lose your handkerchief, was it quite taken out? - It was.

Court to Holman. Are you sure the prisoner is the man? - I am sure it is the man.

Prisoner. As I was going up Long-lane I turned down a gateway to ease myself, and just as I had done and coming up the court, that little boy that stands there he looks at me very hard, I believe, says he, he has got it, what, my little lad, says I? says he, you have got that gentleman's handkerchief in your pocket, with that they sent for a constable and searched me; I am as innocent as the child unborn; I have no witnesses at all.

GUILTY,

Of stealing but not privately . (Aged 18.)

To go to Sea .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930911-118

665. MARGARET CARRUCH was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of August , sixteen pair of womens leather shoes, value 16 s. twenty-five pair of stuff shoes, value 1 l. 5 s. the goods of Nathaniel Phillips , and

MARAGET FINER was indicted for feloniously receiving, thirteen pair of womens leather shoes, value 13 s. fifteen pair of womens stuff shoes, value 15 s. being a parcel and part of the above goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

NATANIEL PHILLIPS sworn.

I am a shoemaker in Lombard-street ; Margaret Carruch had been my servant thirteen months previous to her being taken up. I have a great number of shoes, I did not miss any of them, they appear to be taken at different times.

Q. Have you any shoes here? - Yes, I have; she confessed.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her to confess? - When she had confessed she had taken some shoes, I said if she would confess the whole I would be as favourable as ever I could; before I made that promise she only confessed generally.

Mr. Knapp. At the time you charged her did not you hold out these hopes to her? - By no means.

Q. Did you not either one way or the other? - It was taken down before the magistrate.

Q. You seem to be an extream fair man, you have lost a deal of property; was it not when you charged the woman, that you said, well if you have robbed me for some time and will make a full confession I will shew you favour? - Certainly not, because I had information before I charged her.

THOMAS BATT sworn.

I am the constable; I have twenty pair of shoes I brought them from Queenhithe. On Friday the 9th of August Mr. Phillips sent for me to take up his maid which he said was for robbing him of shoes; I took her up and took her before the Lord Mayor

Court. Is the confession here.

Answer. There is none returned.

Batt. I know nothing else than that I found these shoes in Margaret Finer 's possession, she said that Margaret Carruch had given them to her to keep, that is all.

THOMAS PARROTT sworn.

I am one of the marshalmen, I went with Mr. Phillips to the house of a gentlewoman in Noble-street, and searched a box, and the landlord said it was the servant's box, and found these shoes that I now produce, and I put my initials on them, after the gentleman said they were his.

THOMAS LAWRENCE sworn.

I went with the prosecutor, Mr. Phillips to the apartment of Mr. Brind in Noble-street.

Q. Did you go with Parrott? - No, I found a box and in that box four pair of shoes; I have got them here.

JOHN BRIND sworn.

I am a silver turner; I know Carruch the prisoner at the bar, she left two boxes at my house about last April was twelve months.

Q. Were the boxes that Parrott and Lawrence searched, the same boxes as Carruch left? - Yes, they were the same.

MARGARET CARRING sworn.

I lent Margaret Carruch a guinea, and I had six pair of shoes for the guinea, I have got the shoes here.

Court to Brind. Did the prisoner Carruch come from time to time to her box? - Yes, she did.

Mr. Knapp. You don't know that of your own knowledge? - Yes, I do.

Prosecutor. I know the shoes to be

mine by the shop mark, my shopmen put them on, they are all here.

- HUMPHRIES sworn.

Q. Look at the shoes that Batt produces? - They are my marking inside, I have looked at those by Parrott and Lawrence and they are my marking.

Prisoner Carruch. I leave my defence to my counsel.

The prisoner Carruch called one witness to her character.

GUILTY (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Margaret Finer . Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930911-119

666. ISAAC SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of August , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of Edward Kirby .

Edward Kirby was called on his recognizance.

- NOWLAND sworn.

I know no more than taking the man into custody.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930911-120

667. JOSEPH SALMON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a man's hat trimmed with silver lace, value 1 s. the goods of Edward Dutch .

EDWARD DUTCH sworn.

I was carter to Mr. Robert Fuller ; I was unloading my master's waggon the 29th of July, at one o'clock in the morning in Paternostor-row ; being a very warm morning I pulled off my hat and laid it down on the bottom of the waggon, and I turned round so and missed my hat.

Q. Did you see any body near the cart? - I never see any body meddle with it; I ran down Ivy-lane, I enquired of the watchman if he see any body come along with a sliver laced hat, he said he had just seen two men come a pace; then I went on directly into Newgate-street, and I asked the watchman at the corner, and he said he saw two men with something under their arms, and I went on down further, and asked of a watchman and he said there were two men just gone into the market, and one of them had something under his arm, I asked him if he would go into the market with me? he said he would follow me, and before we got into the market we met the two men coming out, that he said were the men that went in, and I took the man that had the hat, myself, who is the prisoner that stands there, he was coming out of Newgate-market, I stopped the prisoner, I asked him if he had not got a hat belonging to me? he said no, I said if you have not got him you know where he is, with that the watchman that stood by said, I don't know what we can do in it; then my lord I should have let the man went, but he said I had better been in Paternoster-row than holding him by the collar, and that gave me a greater suspicion.

Q. How far was this from your waggon? - This was in Rose-street, and my horses were down in Paternoster-row.

Q. Had you said any thing about Pater-noster-row? - No.

Q. Did you ever find your hat? - Yes.

- SADLER sworn.

I am a gardener; I am just turned of thirteen; I live with Mr. Fuller. About

one o'clock in the morning of Monday the 29th of July I saw two men run by with the hat; it was a white laced hat.

Q. Which way did they run? - They ran up to the top of Ivy-lane into Newgate-street.

Q. Did you know either of these men? - No, I did not, I know the prisoner, he was the person that had the hat.

Q. How do you know that, was it light enough? - Yes it was quite a moonshine morning, I saw the men.

Q. You saw two men run up Ivy-lane into Newgate-street.

Q. What became of them afterwards, did you see them stopped by the waggoner? - I did.

Q. Are you sure that the man that was stopped by the waggoner was the same man that run by with the hat? - Yes, it was a very few minutes afterwards.

Prisoner. Do you remember seeing me in Newgate-street at all my little man? - Yes, I see you run up to the top of Ivy-lane into Newgate-street.

JAMES EARL sworn.

I am the watchman in Newgate-market; I heard a noise about a person losing a hat, but I saw nothing of it, and I heard that they were taken to the watch-house, after which I went round with my lanthorn to see if I could find the hat; there was a private watchman that thought he had seen them plant it and I found it in a very obscure place, at a corner in the market, at a cobler's stall; it was laying in the manner it is now, and these here china cups and saucers and bason were laying close by it on some straw; as soon as I found it I went up to the watch-house, and there was the prisoner and the officer of the night. (The hat deposed to.)

- sworn.

I am the officer of the night, I only took the charge when it was brought into me.

Prisoner. I had a dog with me and he broke away from me, and went up into Newgate-market, I hunted about for him five or six minutes or more; I was coming away into Newgate-street and some men called to me and asked me if I had seen any thing of a hat? I said I had not, and he brought this gentleman, and he said he had lost a hat, he said if I would tell him where it was he would let me go; I told him that I wanted to go about my business. My master was here very late last night, but he is not here now.

GUILTY . (Aged 25)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930911-121

968. JOHN DAVIS otherwise LEVY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of Samuel Shatt .

SAMUEL SHATT sworn.

I am a glass cutter at No. 6, Churchyard-alley, Spital-lane; I had walked from Fetter-lane, I was walking through Smithfield the 12th of July last, and I saw a mob in Smithfield of a horse getting his leg entangled by a coach wheel; I was tapped on the shoulder by a constable who is here, and told that I had lost my handkerchief; I did not feel nor see it go, all I know is that I was standing in Smithfield and was informed that my pocket was picked, but it might have dropped out of a hole in this pocket, it has had a hole in it these six months, and I might put it there in the room of the other pocket.

Q. You have been with the father of this young man just now? - The father is here present I believe.

Q. You have been with him, have not you? - Yes.

Q. I suppose you immediately told the constable of this hole in your pocket? - No, I did not.

Q. How came you not to do that? - I am not sure whether I put it into that pocket.

Q. Will you upon your oath say that hole has been in your pocket for more than six months as large as it is now? - Yes.

Q. You say you had walked from Fetter-lane to Smithfield, had you walked any further that day? - No.

Q. What else had you in your pocket besides? - Nothing.

ROBERT NEWMAN sworn.

I am a city Constable. On Friday the 12th of July last I was in Smithfield, between six and seven in the evening, I saw a horse get his leg entangled with a hackney coach, there were several boxes in the coach; I ordered the coach door to be shut, and the boxes were secured; after that was done I saw the prisoner at the bar pick this here young man's pocket of a silk handkerchief; I immediately seized the prisoner and tapped the young man on the shoulder; I am positive I saw it taken out of his pocket. The prosecutor did not pretend there was a hole in his pocket then. He swore to it by several marks. (Produced.)

Prosecutor. It is hard to swear to an handkerchief after it has been out of my pocket.

Q. Had you any handkerchief in your pocket besides your own? - It was not my own handkerchief; I had an handkerchief of this kind in my pocket of one William Sibley's; he is not here.

Newman. That is the handkerchief the prisoner took from him, and he swore to it at Guildhall.

Prisoner. I was going from Clerkenwell-green to Newgate street; I stopped to see this horse in Smithfield, and this gentleman laid hold of me, and said that I picked that young man's pocket of an handkerchief, and I never touched the handkerchief in my whole life; I have got people to my character.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned one year in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930911-122

669. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of July , two leather collar braces, value 2 s. the goods of John White .

RICHARD CARTER sworn.

I am sixteen; my mother keeps a wine vault, in Long-lane; my father is dead; I serve at the wine vault. Me and my mother were standing at the door, and this coach went by, and my mother said that man behind the coach is asleep; it was the 23d of July, almost eleven at night; it was a glass coach; I followed him on; at first he was leaning on his belly on the perch, and when he saw me he got up and sat on the perch; I followed him down Barbican, and I saw the watchman down Barbican, and I went and told him that there was a man behind the coach taking the straps; says he, are you sure of it? then we stopped till the coach came up, and me and the watchman went behind the coach, and there was a strap dragling on the ground; the man was behind the coach, and he ran between the fore wheel and hind wheel, and ran down Red cross-street, and the watchman went after him, and ran across

the road, but I did not go after him, I stopped there; the coach went round the corner, and I went to the coach, and there was one strap hanging across the spring, and I took it up and gave it to the coachman as he was getting off the box; then me and the watchman went back to look for the other, and I picked it up and gave it to the watchman; we found it dropped in Barbican; I then said, good night, and went home.

Q. Did you know the man that was laying on the perch? - I did not see his face when he was behind the coach.

THOMAS EMBERSON sworn.

I was coachman to the carriage at the time this circumstance happened; it was a glass coach belonging to Mr. White; I believe these collar braces were on the coach; I don't know who took them, I was on the box.

ROBERT LOVE sworn.

I am a watchman, my box is in Bridgewater-square. When this lad, Richard Carter , came to me I was at the bottom of Prince's-street, Barbican , going half past ten, he came to me and said there is a man behind the glass coach coming up cutting the leathers off. When the coach came up there was a man behind the carriage leaning on his belly on the perch, under the body of the coach; I called out to the coachman to stop; he did not stop immediately; the man got down from the perch and ran between the two wheels and ran away, and I pursued him, and Mr. Newman, the patrole stopped him, and we took him to the watch-house; I never lost sight of him; I am positive it is the man.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn.

I am a patrole. On the 23d of July I heard a cry of stop that man! the prisoner was running as fast as he could, and the watchman after him, and I catched hold of him, and we took him to the watch-house.

JOHN HUMPHRIES sworn.

I was constable of the night; I heard a cry of stop him! stop him! I went into the middle of the way and I saw this prisoner at the bar coming round the corner; Newman was before me, and I saw him brought into the watch-house with these straps, they have been in my possession ever since.

Court to Love. Where did you get the straps? - One of them the lad took from the coach, and the other was found in Barbican. (Produced.)

Emberson. I believe they are mine.

Prisoner. I am a grinder by business; I had been abroad that day, and it was almost ten o'clock, I walked as hard as I could to get home, and just as I got to the Black Horse, in Barbican I got up behind this coach, there was another man behind the coach then; I had not been up above half a minute before that man jumps down from the coach, and the coach stopped, and I jumped off; I never meddled with the straps or knew any thing about it.

Court to Carter. Was any other man behind the coach but this man? - No, there was no other behind the coach all the way.

Q. How far was he down Barbican? - As far as the green grocer's, where I see him by the light.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930911-123

670. REDMAYNE CARR was indicted for uttering a counterfeit half crown .

(The case opened by Mr. Trebeck.)

CATHARINE LOWE sworn.

I live at No. 4, White cross-street , On the 28th of July last about half past nine in the evening, when he came in he asked me if I sold bread? I told him yes; says I, I have got no loaf left but a three-penny one; says he give me that; I goes behind the counter and gives it him; he asked me if I sold cabbages? I said, yes; he said, give me a cabbage, and I gave him a cabbage; he asked me what they came to? I told him the cabbage was three halfpence and the loaf was three-pence, four-pence halfpenny in all; he gave me half a crown; I thought by the feel of it in my hand it felt very light; I took up the candle to look at it, and I went to rub it, and as I went to rub it he gave me a blow on my breast, and said don't rub it I will change it for you; with that I asked him how he dare use me so? a woman came in and went between him and me, but what passed between them two I don't say; the woman went out again directly, I did not see what passed between them, but he kept the loaf under his arm and cabbage, but he began to ill use me very much with his tongue; so I sent for an officer and had him taken up as he did not give me the goods nor the money.

Q. Did you see what passed between them? - The woman talked irish to him.

MARGARET NEWLAND sworn.

On the 28th of July, Sunday, I happened, by mere accident, to go into this shop to buy some cucumbers, and while I was there buying some things, the prisoner at the bar came in, and bargained for a loaf and cabbage, and he offered a half crown as I suppose, and the woman offered to try it, and he refused to have it offered to be tried whether it was good or not, and he pushed his hand against her breast and said if she did not like it he would change it; a woman came into the shop.

Q. What passed? - She held up her apron in this manner, and he emptied some money out of his pocket, which appeared to me to be silver, and which I wondered at, because he looked like a poor man; with that Mr. Lowe came, and he went for the constable. It appeared to be money to me, it might be good money for what I know of, but she received it and went away with it.

JOHN KING sworn.

On the 28th of July I was the officer of the night at our watch-house. About ten o'clock in the evening a charge was brought to the watch house for an assault and uttering a bad half crown; I had the prisoner then in custody; having of him in custody I wished to know where he lived, I found out where he lived in a minute, I went to his house and I ordered one of our patroles to attend the house; another person resumed the name of his wife, and I secured one woman and I got admitted into the house, and he told me it was his house, and going into the house I found several pieces of money in a cupboard. (The half crown produced that he had of Mr. Lowe.)

- PARKER sworn.

I have looked at the money, it is counterfeit.

Prisoner. The prosecutor sent for my wife and persuaded the poor thing to give her some money, a guinea and a half, and after she had taken it she said she would come and get me discharged by the alderman. I was very much in liquor when I went into her house, and if I had known I should have been tried

I should have prepared for it; if you will stop half an hour I will send for witnesses. As to this cupboard where this money was found it was for the use of all the lodgers to put their bread in. Ask my prosecutor whether or no she was not going to bail me herself? - No, no such thing.

GUILTY .

To be imprisoned six months in Newgate and at the expiration to find security for twelve months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-124

671. JAMES STONE was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

ANN PRICE sworn.

My husband is a salesman. On the 2d of August , Friday afternoon between four and five o'clock, James Stone came to our dwelling house, I saw him myself, he asked for a hundred and a half of eggs; I asked him what made his master send for them at that time of the day; he said that his master wanted the hundred and half to go to one house; I told him I did not know that we had any left, but I would take the key and go and see; I served him half a hundred and seventeen odd ones, and he had them all, which made seventy-seven.

Q. When he said he came from his master, who did you understand his master to be? - Mr. Eames a green grocer.

Q. Did you ever know him live at Mr. Eames's? - Yes, and he used to come when his master wanted any always. He told me to be sure to save the rest to make up the hundred and a half against the next morning ten o'clock, as he would come.

Q. Mr. Eames was a customer of your's? - Yes, he was.

Q. What may be the value of these eggs? - Two shillings and nine-pence. He came the next morning and had the remaining part, and our maid servant told them, and I stood by her with them; he had then one hundred and three.

Q. Who did he say he wanted the second for? - He spoke of it as part of them that he wanted before; he came within half an hour of the time that he said he would.

Q. What is Mr. Eames's christian name? - Richard.

Q. Where did Mr. Eames live? - In Chichester-rents, Chancery lane.

RICHARD EAMES sworn.

I am a green grocer; I know the prisoner exceeding well, he was a servant of mine, he served me seven weeks, he went from my service the day he got these eggs, at half past two o'clock.

Q. Did you send him with any message to Mr. Price for eggs? - Not at all, I am certain of that.

Q. Did you want any eggs? - No, I gave him no direction of any sort or kind.

Q. Had you said any thing to him that could be construed in that way as a message to Mrs. Price? - Never a word.

ELEANOR HODDY sworn.

I am a servant to Mrs. Price; I was there when the prisoner came the second day, I don't remember that he said any thing; my mistress desired me to tell the eggs out to him; we knew he was coming; I told them out, three quarters of a hundred and thirteen, that is one hundred and three in all; he asked my mistress how many his master owed for before? my mistress said one hundred and a half, and that hundred and a half made three hundred.

Prisoner. Did I ask any thing about my master owing any? - You did.

Prisoner. I did not, I only came for the remainder. I went to the house, and Mrs. Price came; I told her I wanted one hundred and a half of eggs; says she, I don't think I have got so many in the house; says she, you may have what there is, and she told me out what she had, and I went the next morning and had the remainder, and I says to Mrs. Price when I took them, Mrs. Price, I will pay you for them on Monday; that was all, and she said, very well. I never mentioned a word about what my master said; Mr. Price said he would go to the extremity of the law, except he had seven pounds.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the house of Correction and Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930911-125

672. GABRIEL MOORE was indicted for obtaining goods under false pretences .

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I live with Mr. Thomas Patrick , in Newgate-street , a tin-plate worker . The prisoner at the bar came to our house on the 24th of June, midsummer day, at half past seven in the morning, he asked me for two copper tea kettles for Mr. Mardin; I let him have them; he said the tea kettles were to carry to a lady to shew, to see which the lady would chose to have, and he would bring the other back; he took them away and I saw no more of him at all.

Q. What is Mr. Mardin's christian name? - Francis.

Q. In what parish does he live? - In Christ Church, in the ward of Castlebaynard. I knew him to be a customer of our's.

Q. Do you know whether Moore had ever been a servant to Mr. Mardin? - I remember his face, once he came as a servant to me.

Q. What was the value of these kettles? - Fourteen shillings.

FRANCIS MARDIN sworn.

I am a smith; I live in Castlebaynard ward, in Christ Church parish.

Q. Had this man ever lived with you? - Yes, he had.

Q. Had you seen him on the day the tea kettles were taken? - I had not seen him; he had not been at work for some time, long before, but he never was discharged though he had never been at work.

Q. Then before Midsummer day he had lived with you as your servant? - Yes.

Q. Had you given him any orders to go for tea kettles to Mr. Patrick's? - I had not given him any order of the kind.

Q. This man on Midsummer day was not actually in your service? - The time book is in my hand, he was not in my pay for some time on account of his being lame; when he worked I paid him, and when he did not work I did not pay him; on Midsummer day he did not work at all, I did not pay him that day.

JONATHAN BEGIM sworn.

I am a shopman to a pawnbroker. On Tuesday morning the 25th of June the prisoner brought two tea kettles to my master's shop, and received half a guinea for them; my master lives in Hare-alley, Shoreditch; I lent the half guinea.

Q. Did you give him a duplicate? - Yes, I have got the counter part and the tea kettles.

Smith. They are Mr. Patrick's, I marked them myself, I gave them both to the prisoner.

Prisoner. My Lord, previous to my receiving the kettles of Mr. Patrick's man I had been lame almost for the space of three months, totally incapable of getting my bread, which had reduced me to a deal of distress and poverty, which was the total cause of my acting in such an atrocious manner; it being the first offence I beg for the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY.

Recommended by the Jury .

Imprisoned three months and discharged.

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.


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