Old Bailey Proceedings, 29th May 1793.
Reference Number: 17930529
Reference Number: f17930529-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 29th of May, 1793, and the following Days:

Being the FIFTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY , PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE ONE SHILLING and FOUR-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable SIR JAMES SANDERSON , KNT. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON: The Honourable SIR WILLIAM HENRY ASHURST , one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: SIR JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City: JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Thomas Preston

Edward Howel

Joseph Cecil

Joseph Green

Thomas Bond

Joshua Windsor

David Bligh

Jonathan Cope

John Morgan

Joseph Scammell

Edward Davis

Thomas Swaine

First Middlesex Jury.

John Beard

John Sevigny

Stephen Jarvis

Thomas Williams

John Nimmow

Cornelius Neape

William Farmer

John King

William Middleton

John Thomas

John Hurley

Robert Clarke

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Ham

Samuel Gardener

James Stevens

Edward Owens

James Small

Edward Blissett

Thomas Boot

Thomas Pilton

Eusabius Say

William Storr

Ivy Hairs

William Hargrave .

Reference Number: t17930529-1

392. ANN SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May , a linen shirt, value 5 s. the goods of Valentine Pearce .

MARY PEARCE sworn.

My husband name is Valentine Pearce ; I am an housekeeper in No. 2, Lloyd-street, Whitechapel . The prisoner was an entire stranger to me, she came into the yard and took the linen, I saw her take it, I was at a window; I went to her and I catched her in the fact; the shirt belonged to a gentleman who keeps a chandler's shop next door; I am a washerwoman, and was to be paid for washing it; I stopped her with the property under her arm in my passage, coming out of the yard door; I have kept the shirt ever since. (Produced and deposed to.) I laid hold of her and called my husband to my assistance, and he came and took her into my own apartments, and took the shirt from her.

VALENTINE PEARCE sworn.

I am the husband. She had the shirt under her petticoat, under her arm, and and I took it from her.

Prisoner. I went to this woman to enquire after a woman that lived up one pair of stairs, one Mrs. Jones; I saw the shirt lay as I went up stairs, and did not know what it was; as I was coming down stairs, just at the bottom of the stairs, this gentlewoman came out and said I was going to steal the shirt; I told her I was not going to do any such thing; she called her husband out, and they took me into the room, and then she went and put the shirt in some water to rince it while they sent for the constable and when he came, and we were going to the justice's that gentleman came running after her, and said she had made a mistake and taken the wrong shirt.

Court to Valentine Pearce . Did you ever know this woman before? - No, she was an entire stranger.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-2

393. WILLIAM CLIFF was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , thirty-nine yards of white thread edging lace, value 2 l. the goods of Judith Seymour Griffiths , privately in her shop .

Indicted in a second COUNT for stealing the same lace in the dwelling house of the same prosecutor.

JUDITH SEYMOUR GRIFFITH sworn.

I am a linen draper, haberdasher and hosier . On the 12th of April, on a Friday, about the hour of one, the prisoner came into my shop and desired to look at some silk handkerchiefs, which he did not approve of, he applied at this time to my servant, Ann Williams , but it was in my hearing; he wanted some other pattern; he then came to me to the other side of the shop, I was serving some costomers at that time, I shewed him the sort he asked for, he still did not approve of them, he said he would go and consult his mother; he went out

of the shop and returned again in about a quarter of an hour, he then desired to look at some thread edgings; the drawer was put for him to look at, he put his hand into the drawer and made choice of one, and asked me if I could make him a shillingworth, to put to his handkerchief, to wear of a Sunday; I was then engaged with some other customers, I did not immediately answer him, but I stood before him with the drawer of lace; he desired to be shewn some coarse worsted stockings; my servant seeing him throw the lace about suspected something; I had spoke to her to serve them, and she did not serve him directly, and I asked her why she did not shew the stockings? after that my servant got the stockings for him, she looked at me, but I did not know the cause, after that he looked at the lace, and he said there goes my mother, and he ran out immediately; I saw no more of him; while he was in the shop he stood immediately before the drawer of lace.

Q. Was his mother a person known to you? - No. My servant saw him put the card of lace into his hat, and she told me when he was gone; I said, then why don't you go out after him? and she and her fellow servant, Daniel Haywood , immediately went out after him, and they all came back together, he was brought back presently; my servant, Daniel Haywood , produced the lace to me, and the lace has been in my possession ever since.

Q. What is the value of that lace? - About 39 s. the prime cost.

Q. How long might you have had it in the house? - About a month.

Q. How did you know it to be your lace when you saw it again? - Because I am confident to the pattern.

Q. Did you miss such a piece of lace? - I did; I went and looked immediately; there was no cards found, he had taken the lace off when I missed them; they were different pieces of lace on different cards, there was five cards brought back but only four pieces of lace; the cards had the private mark of the shop on, my own hand writing, with the letters M. D. and M. N. I missed eight cards of lace, I only recovered four, all one description of lace, the same sort, but different prices; I had about forty-eight cards of lace in that drawer.

Q. Do you know the quantity that were on the cards? - Yes, I know the quantity, I believe it is marked on the cards, I am not certain, but I believe it is.

Q. What was the quantity taken from the prisoner? - Thirty-nine yards; I am certain it is my lace.

Mr. Knowlys. You are a widow lady? - I am.

Q. Have you any person that has any interest in the business carried on at your shop besides yourself? - No.

Q. This Ann Williams was serving at this time in your shop? - She was.

Q. You was a good deal angry with Ann Williams that she did not immediately stop him, and give the alarm before he was out of the shop? - I was.

Q. She might have stopped him or gave the alarm? - She represented that she had seen the fact, and I was angry that she had not given the alarm immediately.

ANN WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a servant in the shop; I know the prisoner, I saw him come in and ask for some silk handkerchiefs, he asked them of my fellow servant, the boy Daniel Haywood , he shewed him some, and he approved of none, then he wished to have some with spots in them; then I shewed him some, and he said he did not approve

of them, he said he would go and call at his mother's, and he went out and was gone about a quarter of an hour, then he returned in again, and asked to look at some edging for an handkerchief to wear, he looked at it and there came in a lady who asked my mistress to shew her some bonnets; my mistress then left the lace drawer before him; he said he would choose the pattern himself, and then he would give it her to cut off when he liked the pattern; my mistress left the drawer while she attended to the lady; he then looked at me and told me he wanted some strong stockings; I then was attending on two ladies, I could not attend him immediately, I told him I would as soon as I had waited on the ladies; I was keeping my eye on the drawer before him; my mistress said, why do not you get the stockings for the young man? I went then and got them down, says I, sir, here are the stockings you asked for; and turning in that moment I see him place a card of lace in his hat; I said, here is the stockings you wish to see; he then threw open the door and said, there goes my mother, and went out; I said to my fellow servant, there is that young lad has got a card of lace, and placed it in his hat; we went out directly after him, Daniel Haywood and I; we did not lose sight of him; we took him in Castle-court; we found nothing on him; he ran all the time we saw him; he ran into a house and down the stairs into the shop, it is a carpenter's shop where they work; we followed him and I took his hat off, and there was no lace there, and I saw some lace laying about a yard from him, loose off from the card; I think there was about nine yards of that found first; it was white thread edging lace; after that my fellow servant went back to the cellar to look for the cards, and he found a quantity more; I found the nine yards on the floor; I saw it there, about a yard from the prisoner, a gentleman picked it up and gave it Daniel Haywood in my presence; Daniel Haywood has kept these nine yards ever since.

Mr. Knowlys. The prisoner was not at first pleased with the handkerchiefs that you shewed him, and he left the shop, saying, he would go and ask his mother concerning the property of what he should buy; and then he went out and stayed about a quarter of an hour; did you afterwards see his mother? - No.

Q. It took him some time to go and consult this person whom he said was his mother? - He was gone about that time.

DANIEL HAYWOOD sworn.

I am a servant in the shop; I remember when the prisoner was in the shop; I did not see him take the things; he came in and asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs, and he went out and returned in about a quarter of an hour, and then he came in and asked to look at some edging; he said he wanted about a shillingworth; the one he chose was too fine, we could not make a shilling-worth of it; then he asked my fellow servant for some coarse worsted stockings, after looking for the stockings she happened to turn round and see him place a card of lace in his hat; I did not see that, my mistress desired me to run out, and I ran out directly, I pursued him up Castle-court and kept him in my sight till he went into a house; I followed him into the house, it was a carpenter's shop; he went down into the cellar; I went down after him; when I went into the house there was a woman coming up stairs.

Q. Did you see any lace on him? - No, me and my fellow servant went down stairs and she pulled his hat off, she found no edging in it; there was a man came down with us, he went about three quarters

of a yard, as near as I can guess from the prisoner, picked up the edging and gave it me, I cannot say exactly how much the quantity was, the man picked it up and gave it me into my hand; I have kept it ever since; I did not find any cards at that time, went again and found three more parcels of lace within a quarter of an hour, about ten minutes afterwards, both times we found thirty-nine yards.

Q. Did you find any cards? - No, a shoemaker brought some cards; I have all the lace and have kept it by itself. (Produced.)

Q. Did you bring the lace home yourself the second time you went? - I did.

Q. Now as to the cards, is the man here that found them? - He is, his name is John Howard .

Q. How soon were the cards brought to you afterwards? - They were brought within ten minutes after the first parcel of lace was found; the shoemaker has the care of the cards, that found them.

Mr. Knowlys. When he first came in he asked for handkerchiefs, that seemed to be the article he wanted? - It was.

Q. He then said he would consult his mother? - He went out for some time, and came in again about a quarter of an hour.

Q. Then it was, and not till then that he thought to ask for lace, the second time coming in? - It was so.

JOHN HOWARD sworn.

I am a shoemaker; I have some cards. (Produced.) I found them in my privy the 12th of April, somewhere about ten or eleven o'clock, I am not certain to the time.

Q. Is your privy near the carpenter's house? - No, it is No. 2, in Church-lane, almost facing the house of the prosecutrix.

Q. Do you know the carpenter's cellar where the prisoner was found? - No. The prisoner asked leave of me to go into the privy on the 12th of April, it was before he was taken up; I never saw him before, he stayed in a very short time.

Q. How soon did you find them after he was gone from the privy? - Very near an hour.

Q. Are you positive as to the person of the prisoner? - I am; there was another lad with him, and he came to my house to buy a pair of shoes, and while the other lad was trying the shoes on the prisoner asked leave to go to the privy; the other lad had the shoes and the prisoner paid for them; I took these cards over to the prosecutrix and asked her if they belonged to her? and she said they did.

Court to Ann Williams . If I understood you right, you said you pursued this lad and you never lost sight of him till you got to the cellar? - I did not lose sight of him, I am certain of it. These cards he had taken before, the first time, unperceived, but there was nothing missed till the second time; the first time he came the drawer of lace was placed on the counter, and he stood before it.

Q. How many cards are there? - Five.

Q. You then don't know as to the fact only to his taking one card? - No, I only see him take one card.

Prisoner. I am quite innocent of the charge laid to me.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. (Aged 12.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-3

394. MARY SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , twenty four yards of linen cloth, value 2 l. the goods of John Clarke , privately in his shop .

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I am a linen draper . On the 14th of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was called into the shop, one of my young men had followed this woman out of the house, she had got the cloth during my absence from the shop; when I was called in I desired them to take care of her, and she was taken in a coach to the watch-house; I saw nothing taken from her.

JAMES GREEN sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Clarke. This Mary Smith and another woman came into the shop, the other woman asked for some remnants of cotton, at low prices, while I was looking for it, there lay some irish linens on the counter, I asked the prisoner and the woman to walk down to the other end of the shop; Mary Smith told the other woman to follow me down, and she could have the choice of the patterns; the other woman came after me, and I cast my eye round and I saw Mary Smith offering to go out of the shop, and, as I thought, in a very suspicious manner; I got over the counter and I followed her out; she got by the time I got to the door to the passage, adjoining to our house, belonging to a pawnbroker, and she was then pulling out the piece of irish linen from under her cloak; I laid hold of her arms and the piece of cloth likewise, and told her it was none of her property, she must come back with me; when I got her into the shop she told me she was only joking and she asked me if I would let her go? I told her I did not intend to let her go till such times as she had been to the justice's.

Q. Did you take the linen from her? - I took the linen out of her hand. (The linen Produced)

Q. How much is there of it? - Twenty four yards it is marked O. H. in Mr. Clarke's own hand writing; this piece was laying on the counter along with the others when I went to the back of the shop.

Q. Do you know from the quantity of the stock you have whether there was any missing? - No.

Q. Can you speak from the appearance of the counter? - I did not take any particular notice.

Q. Then besides these marks of O. H. is there any thing else that you know it by? - Nothing else.

Q. What may the value of it be? - Two pounds; we gave more than two pounds for it as a shopkeeper.

Q. Did you see this woman do any thing that induced you to suppose that she took any thing? - I never did, it was merely her walking off that led me to suspect her.

Q. How soon did your master come in after this? - I went immediately to him and he came; there was another young man in the shop besides me, he is not here, he saw nothing at all of it.

Prisoner. I never was in this shop in my life time? - I have no doubt about her person.

Prisoner. I was going into the pawnbroker's to fetch an apron out.

(The property deposed to by Mr. Clarke, by the private mark in his own hand writing.)

Court to Mr. Clarke. Can you swear you never sold it? - I cannot say that.

Q. Nor you did not know it was missing in fact? - I did not.

Q. How long had that mark been put on? - About a month or six weeks.

Prisoner. I was going into the pawnbroker's to fetch an apron out of pawn;

as I was going into the shop a woman came into the passage and dropped, something at my feet, what it was I did not know, and one of these gentlemen came to the place immediately and took me into his shop, and took and put me and another woman in a coach, and took us to the justice's, from thence they sent me to this place, and the other woman they let go about her business. Gentlemen I am quite innocent, neither was I ever in the shop in my life.

GUILTY. Death . (Aged 32.)

The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to mercy .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-4

395. BENJAMIN CUTFORD was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on Thomas Mills , Esq . on the 19th of February , and putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a leather purse, value 1 d. and three guineas and half a guinea; the goods and monies of the said Thomas Mills .

(The case was opened by Mr. - .)

THOMAS MILLS sworn.

On the 19th of February, on Tuesday, I was going to Oxford with Mr. Blackstone to attend the election, the election of a warden of a college there; we left my chambers about nine o'clock in the evening, we had a post chaise and a pair of post horses of Mr. Stirling, who lives in Cary-street; just as we had past Holland-house a man rode up towards us on the side on which I sat, the window was down, he said something I did not understand and put a pistol to the chaise, the boy did not stop and the man past on, having failed in his attempt to stop the chaise the first time, he returned immediately and put the pistol again to the chaise, and called on us to stop and deliver our money; the evening was lightish, so that if I had looked particular I could have seen the person of a man, the postilion did not stop this time, and then he threatened the postilion; I then called to the postilion to stop, which he did, and he again presented his pistol, and I gave him a red leather purse, which contained three guineas and a half, which I had took out with me to pay my expences to Oxford; he asked for our watches which I did not choose to give; he asked for them once or twice, but I believe a carriage was then coming on and he left us without taking them; the pistol I perceived to be a screw barrel pistol, that I could see distinctly; when I came to Hounslow I proposed writing to my clerk to let him know what had happened; I returned from Oxford on Thursday; he was taken up on Saturday, when he delivered his keys which were carried to the place where he said he lodged, and opened a trunk and we found this leather purse and these pistols.

Q. He gave the key of his trunk on being asked? - He did. The purse from the appearance I believe to be mine; from the sight of the pistols which I saw in the chaise I should have thought them rather smaller than these appear to be.

Mr. BLACKSTONE sworn.

I was in the chaise at this time; the man came up just as we passed Holland-house; the postilion did not stop at first, and the man came and put his pistol again, but I cannot speak at all to his person.

JAMES BURROWS sworn.

I drove the chaise on the 19th of February, we went down at nine o'clock, we got past Holland-house, a man rode

by and spoke, I did not understand exactly what he said; then he came to the chaise door again and spoke, still I kept driving on, and Mr. Mills told me to stop, and then a man came up to me and said, damn your eyes if you do not stop I will shoot you; or, blow your brains out; one of them; then I stopped, he went to the chaise door, and I took particular notice of the mare, knowing the mare was out at the same time.

Q. Did you get off your horse? - No. It was a mare with a white face and cropt ears.

Q. Was he on the side you rode, or on the other side? - On the other side.

Q. From the observations you made of the man, can you say that is the man now in the court? - I cannot. After he had committed the robbery he told me to drive on; he called to me at a distance from the chaise; from that I drove on.

Q. Was you at home when the mare went out that day? - I was.

Q. Did you at the time of the robbery think the mare was your's? - I did.

Q. Did you see the mare that morning? - I did. The mare was my master's, it went out about three o'clock in the forenoon; that is the man that took her out of the yard.

Q. Was you at home before the mare was brought back? - No, it was brought back before I came home.

Q. How soon did you see the person who rode the mare again? - On the Monday following, I believe, on the day I went to Bow-street.

Q. At the time of the robbery did you recollect it was the same person that took the mare away? - Yes, I know the man for I had seen him two or three times before at my master's house.

Q. Do you know what his business was at your master's when you saw him there? - He came for a horse.

Mr. Knapp. At the time of the robbery you did not know the man at all? - I did not.

Q. You say the man that came for the mare you knew his face perfectly, you had seen him several times before? - Yes.

Q. He had been frequently in your master's yard for a horse? - He had.

Court. At the time of the robbery you could plainly see his face? - No, I principally took notice of the mare.

WILLIAM HACK sworn.

I live with Mr. Stirling, he is a stable keeper.

Q. Do you remember on the 19th of February any body hiring a horse of your master? - Yes, the prisoner came into my master's stables, on Tuesday the 19th, I had saddled a horse for the prisoner two or three times before; my master was not at home and I saddled him one, and he went out of the ride with it about three o'clock in the afternoon; it was a bay cropt mare, short crop, a star in the forehead and a blaze down the face; he returned about a quarter after ten, the same person as took her brought her back; when he came back I was in the stable and heard the call of hostler, and I went and took the horse in, soon after he came into the stable and gave me sixpence and desired me to give him change and keep three-pence for myself; I saw him next after that on Saturday evening about eight o'clock, he came and asked if he could have a horse, and came down to me and said he wanted it the Sunday, the next day, to go to Hampton Court, and while I was talking to him my master, who had followed him down the stable, came and took him into custody; I was present, my master took him by the collar and went with him to Mr. Mills's chambers in Lincoln's Inn.

Mr. Knapp. You say it was three o clock he came for the horse? - It was.

Q. After he had committed the robbery, supposing him to have committed it, he came again to the same house for another horse. -

BARTHOLOMEW STIRLING sworn

I live in Cary-street; I keep a livery stable; I know the prisoner by making application for a horse three, four or five times; I was not present on the 19th, he had a horse then from my house; on the same day Mr. Mills ordered a chaise to take him to Hounslow; I sent this boy with the carriage; a little before ten o'clock I heard the cry of hostler, in the street; I ran into the street, and when I came into the street the mare was facing the street door, says I, this is a mare of mine, not pleased that she had been out, I put my hand on her and found she was in a violent heat; the prisoner was the man who came with the mare; I said, you have rode this mare fast; says he, I have not rode her far; then, says I, you have rode her too fast; I made the hostler hear as soon as I could, and he came to the gate and took the mare up to the stable; the prisoner then walked into the house and called for a pint of porter; while he was drinking of it he went into the stable and to the hostler, and returned and went with his porter and drank it in an inner room, and paid for it, and wanted a farthing out of his two-pence; I told him we always charged two-pence a pint in that room; he wished me a good night and went off. When the boy returned he told me the transaction that had happened, and brought me a directions from Mr. Mills for me to give to Mr. Mills's clerk, giving a statement of the robbery, in order that his clerk might give information at Bow-street, as I understand; when I saw Mr. Mills's clerk, I said to him, we had better keep this business a secret, and not expose it, for I dare say he will be coming again for another saddle horse in a few days; we did keep it secret, and on Saturday evening following he came again, about eight o'clock, I immediately knew him, he came and asked for the same mare as he had on Tuesday; that mare was engaged; he walked into the stable and there had agreed with the man for another mare; I went after him and said, pray where do you live? says he, at the Spread Eagle, in Gracechurch-street; I took him then by the arm, and I said to him, you are accused of committing an highway robbery the last time you hired my mare; he says in answer, me accused of an highway robbery? yes, says I, you are, and so strongly that I must detain you till you have cleared the matter; I then took him by the arm, says I, we will go to Mr. Mills to see if he is at home; I desired the hostler to go with me, when we came to Mr. Mills's chambers, Mr. Mills was not at home, his clerk was at the chambers; I said to him, this is the man that hired my mare, that the hostler says the man was on that robbed Mr. Mills; says he, Mr. Mills is not within; he not being within we concluded to take the man to the watch-house, we took him to the watch-house and I fancy some little time after Mr. Mills returned and went to the watch-house to him, about half an hour after he had been in custody, as I should suppose. He did live at the Spread Eagle in Gracechurch-street.

Mr. Knapp. So that the place where he told you he lived was the true place where he did live? - It was.

Q. And he expressed a surprize in saying when you charged him with the robbery, me accused of a highway robbery? in that sort of way? - He did.

Prisoner. I hired a horse on Tuesday the 19th of February to go to Mitcham; I went to Mitcham; I was there on some business; I returned from there about seven o'clock and came to the turnpike at the Obelisk, the other side of Blackfriars Bridge, about nine, and from the turnpike I rode the horse very hard to this

man's house. When I was taken to the watch-house on Saturday, I, without any hesitation, told Mr. Mills my lodging; on the day following, which was Sunday, I sent to an acquaintance who lived in Chancery-lane to get me some clean linen, as I had not changed since Friday; I delivered my keys to my acquaintance and desired him to bring my linen to me; he went and brought me word that Mr. Mills arrived there just at the time he arrived, and prevented him executing that order that I gave him; I had told him to leave every thing safe in the trunk, only to bring me some clean linen; I cannot say any more; I was at a great distance from the place where the robbery is said to be committed; I know nothing of it; I am quite a stranger to the business; I cannot prove an alibi, but there are some respectable people to my character.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-5

396. JAMES HASTINGS , JEREMIAH ROSE and PETER DOUGLAS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Evan Austins about the hour of six in the afternoon, on the 9th of May , no person being therein, and stealing therein nine linen shirts, value 5 l. three mens cloth coats, value 3 l. three muslin cravets, value 5 s. four muslin handkerchiefs, value 6 s. a pair of silk and worsted stockings, value 2 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 1 s. four pocket handkerchiefs, value 4 s. the goods of Thomas Shutt .

THOMAS SHUTT sworn.

Evan Austin is my landlord; I do business for Mr. Howard in Old-street. On the 9th of May a person came to me there informing me that my apartment was broke open, I live in Leather-lane, St. Andrew's parish, Holborn ; I went out near eight o'clock in the morning; I returned about seven in the evening; I was informed of the robbery when I was at business; I immediately went home and found my door had been opened, the door of my apartment, I left it locked and had the key in my pocket.

Q. Was the outer door of the house locked? - I cannot say. I lodge up one pair of stairs, other people lodge above me; the people that keep the house lodge below.

Q. How did the lock seem to have been opened? - When I put the key in to attempt to lock the door, I found the lock had been strained, I could not get the key in, I found the door open, or at least upon the latch; there were three coats gone, two close bodied coats and a great coat, nine shirts, four neck muslin handkerchiefs, three muslin cravets, a pair of silk and worsted stockings, a pair of worsted stockings, four pocket handkerchiefs; the shirts were entirely new, they cost me a deal of money, I valued them altogether at 9 l. the boy that came for me informed me that the prisoners were in custody, they were down at the public office in Hatton-garden; I went down to Hatton-garden and the things were there produced, and I saw the prisoner Hastings, and when I came to examine him he had got a great coat of my own on his back, and one of the officers took it off his back; I understood that some of these things were taken from him before.

LEMON CASEBY sworn.

I am an officer of Hatton-garden; I had the prisoner Hastings given into our custody at Hatton-garden, I and my brother officers, we searched him, and we found two pick lock keys in the pocket of Hastings, one pick lock key was chucked down in the office, we don't know who by, it was found in the office; this coat which was on the prisoner Hastings's back, the prosecutor owned, I took it off his back in the office.

Q. Did you find any thing more on any of the prisoners? - I had nothing to do with the prisoners afterwards; the accomplice gave me an information against Douglas and Rose; Rose was apprehended that same evening. (The coat taken from Hastings produced and deposed to by the prosecutor as his own, and as left in his room when he went out in the morning.)

THOMAS SHERRIN sworn.

Being at my own door the 9th of May, between six and seven in the evening, I observed some men on the opposite side of the way. I observed them some time, and had a suspicion that things were not altogether right; I after that went into the yard behind my father's house, when I came back I was told that one of them had gone into a house nearly opposite, Mr. Austin's house; I then went round the corner to see for assistance at Elliot's and Harris's, and there I found them together; I mentioned my suspicion to them, Mr. Elliot and Harris were together, and I desired them to look out, and returning a very short time afterwards I saw the prisoner Hastings come out of Austin's house, I followed him about twenty or thirty yards and then laid hold of him; I then brought him back to my father's door, a number of people were collected about at the time, and his coat and waistcoat was unbuttoned or tore open, I cannot say which, and these things that were taken was under his clothes, and in the course of the time he dropped something out of his apron, but I cannot tell whether he dropped them after I had hold of him or no; I cannot say any thing but to Hastings, I followed him, and never lost sight of him; the others I cannot positively say they are the men. (Produces a silk handkerchief and a pair of silk and worsted stockings, which are deposed to by the prosecutor)

ROBERT ELLIOT sworn.

Mr. Sherrin came to me and told me that he suspected some thieves had gone into a house, to commit a robbery, just opposite his house, he told me when they came out to give an eye, in a few minutes Hastings and Stevens came out with this property on their heads; we came out and cried stop thief! me and Mr. Sherrin; and Hastings threw down these bundles; I am sure to one bundle, the other has had some other things mixed with it at the office, but it is all what they stole. Stevens he ran away with them, the things I produce; and I took him with the property on him; they were taken to the office (produces two coats and one shirt, which are deposed to by the prosecutor.)

GEORGE EWER sworn.

On Thursday the 9th of May, Hastings was brought to our office in Hatton-garden assisted by Stevens; I searched the prisoner Hastings and took two pick-lock key from his person; here is a letter which came from Jeremiah Rose threatening the evidence; I cannot prove the hand writing, but it was thrown over the wall of the office in Hatton-garden; I cannot tell by whom.

JOHN ROGERS sworn.

I saw three out of the four that committed the robbery about the door that

day, one that is admitted an evidence, and Hastings and Douglas; I saw Peter Douglas standing nigh the window, and about the window, while the others committed the robbery, after I had heard the cry of stop thief I went out to the shop door, and I saw Hastings running across the way with something in his apron; after that somebody seized him at the corner of the street, I don't rightly know who, and there were some things dropped, among the rest I very well remarked a green coat which proved to be the property of Mr. Shutt.

Q. Was you present when the bundle was taken from Hastings? - I saw him drop the things.

Prisoner Douglas. This person swore at the justice's that he saw me pass and repass on the Wednesday before this robbery was done, three or four times. - I swore to the best of my knowledge I saw him the afternoon before the robbery about the door, but I swore positively that I saw him the afternoon the robbery was done.

WILLIAM MAY sworn.

I know very little concerning the robbery; I heard the cry of stop thief, and I ran the same as another man, I saw Douglas and the other man, named Rose, to the best of my knowledge, but I am positive to Douglas, I saw them very near the place they robbed, and Mr. Butcher cried out May take them, and I attempted to take them, Douglas hit me a blow and knocked me down at the time I was in pursuit of him, and they were not taken at that time.

Prisoner Douglas. I wish to know where it was he stopped me? - Within about twenty yards of the house that was robbed, in White Hart-yard.

JOHN BUTCHER sworn.

On Wednesday evening the 9th of May, between six and seven o'clock, I was standing with Mr. Sherrin, that has been examined, and we see three men standing together, which are the three men at the bar now, the prisoners, they seemed as if consulting about something, and I says to Sherrin, I think these men are after no good, we will stop a moment and see what they will attempt to do; accordingly Hastings, who is one of the prisoners, walked away from them and walked to the house door where the robbery was done at, the door was open, he stopt there with a pretence to make water, which I fancy he did, he then went on a little further to a gateway just behind the house and there he stopped to see if any body was watching of him; I left the door and was going into Mr. Sherrin's shop when he was coming back from the gateway, while I was going through Mr. Sherrin's shop from the parlour he told me there was one of them men gone into the house; I waited a short time and out came one of them, which I did not see before, it was Stevens the evidence, he came out with several things in his apron; I immediately said, that is none of the men that I saw, where is the other two? Hastings came out with him; I immediately followed Hastings with several things in his apron; I told Mr. Sherrin that this was the man that I saw talking with the other two; I am sure the other two are the men that were consulting with Hastings before the robbery; I walked back again to the place where I had been talking with Mr. Sherrin and Hastings came across there, and I laid hold of him by the collar, as soon as I laid hold of him by the collar, he dropped several things out of his apron, I think there was two coats among them, and one was a green one; I then gave him to Mr. Sherrin, and says to him, there he is; it being very ill convenient for me to attend at this place, I went off and knew nothing further till Mr. Blamire sent for me.

SIMEON STEVENS sworn.

We went from one Mr. Williams to a house in Leather-lane; I don't know the gentleman's name that keeps the house, Austin is the name, I believe; I went in company with Jerry Rose , Jemmy Hastings, and Peter Douglas , all three of them, we went there between six and seven.

Q. For what purpose did you go? - To rob the house.

Q. Did you go in there? - Yes, I went in first.

Q. Was the outer door shut or open? - Open.

Q. What did you do there? did the three prisoners go with you? - They did; I went up first and James Hastings came after with a bag.

Q. Did they all three go up? - No, only James Hastings.

Q. What became of Rose and Douglas? - They stayed at the door to receive the property; I went up and stood on the stairs, and soon after James Hastings came up and with a picklock key opened the door, James Hastings undid the door; there was some people below on the ground floor; then when the door was opened we went into the one pair of stairs room, we took a good deal of linen there, and coming out again James Hastings and I were taken.

Prisoner Hastings. The evidence, Stevens, came to me to Mr. Williams, the Duke of Argyle's Head, Leadenhall-street, and asked me to go with him to carry some wearing apparel; I went with him to Leather-lane, we came to the house and he told me to stop at the door, while he went up stairs; he went up and came down again with two bundles under his arm, and he gave me the keys and one of the bundles; as to the two prisoners at the bar they are innocent of the robbery.

Prisoner Douglas. The witness Stevens, cannot say that I knew any thing of the robbery.

WILLIAM HASTINGS sworn.

I am the father of the prisoner Hastings, and I brought him up, and gave him a good education, equal to my trade, and I beg for mercy.

James Hastings , GUILTY,

Of stealing in the dwelling house, but not of breaking and entering, no person being therein .

(Aged 19.) Death .

Jeremiah Rose , GUILTY, ditto. (Aged 28.) Death.

Peter Douglas , GUILTY, ditto. (Aged 28.) Death.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-6

JAMES SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of November 1791 , eleven iron bars, value 16 s. an iron rail, value 4 s. the goods of William Pardo Allet , affixed to his dwelling house .

WILLIAM PARDO ALLET sworn.

I live in St. John's-street . On the 5th of November 1791, there was eleven iron bars and an iron hand rail stole; on learning they were stole I sent for Mr. Lucy the constable to make enquiry, and he returned in about half an hour and said he had found them; the scraper was left on the steps, I took it up myself in the morning; I went with Mr. Lucy to where the bars where; I was took down to Mr. Pallet's, and they were in possession of John Hodelle ; I was very much surprised, I asked him how he came by them; he said he bought them of one Spencer a smith; when we took them I compared the two bars with the scraper that was left, and they exactly corresponded, since which time I have also tried each

into the stone steps and they exactly correspond; I can swear they are my iron bars, they were given into the possession of the constable and there they have been ever since.

JOHN LUCY sworn.

On the 5th of November 1791, I was sent for by Mr. Allet, who informed me of the robbery, in coming back again I received an information that some bars had been carried into Mr. Pallet's yard that morning that answered the description; Mr. Pallet is an ironmonger in St. John's-street; I went there to John Hodelle the warehouseman, he informed me after a little conversation, that such things had been brought in that morning, and was brought by one James Spencer a smith ; I went to Mr. Allet's and Mr. Allet came with me with this scraper; I found it corresponded with the part broke off between two of the iron bars, Mr. Pallet ordered his man to deliver them to me; we went after Spencer to his lodgings, but did not find him. On the 5th of this month I had occasion to go to the police office in Hatton-garden, and there I recollected him again, and I charged him with this offence before the magistrate, and sent for the prosecutor, he was at the bar at the office, charged with an offence and I knew him again; I since have fitted them to the place they were taken from and they all corresponded entirely.

JOHN HODELLE sworn.

On the 5th of November 1791, I was a servant to Mr. Pallet, between seven and eight in the morning, James Spencer brings these bars in for sale, I buys them of James Spencer for Mr. Pallett, in a short time afterwards Mr. Lucy comes in and asked whether I had not bought some bars? I told him yes, I went and shewed him them, and he went to Mr. Allet's and they came down together, and Mr. Allet said they were his property, he brought a scraper to which two of the bars corresponded, which it had been between; Mr. Lucy and I goes in search after the prisoner and could not find him we went several times, once or twice afterwards and could not find him till Mr. Lucy saw him at the office.

WILLIAM HARPER sworn.

On the 5th of November 1791, John Hodelle told me the weight of some iron which he had weighed in the warehouse, and I paid the money, the man whom Hodelle brought in with him was James Spencer .

Prisoner. My name is Spencer, and I am innocent of this matter.

Court to Hodelle. Look whether you see Spencer in the court? - Yes, I do, that is the man that is at the bar.

Prisoner. I never meddled with that iron nor knew any thing of that iron; I am innocent of the affair; the prosecutor never saw me before, nor I him; I am very innocent of the matter; I have a wife and family; I know nothing about it.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-7

398. ANN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May , a silver watch, value 2 l. a steel watch chain, value 2 s. a metal watch key, value 1 d. a steel bed hook, value 1 d. the goods of Thomas Poyntell .

THOMAS POYNTELL sworn.

I am a journeyman carpenter ; my wife and I have been parted these three years by agreement.

Q. How came you acquainted with the prisoner? - I was too late to get into my

lodgings on Wednesday evening, the 8th of May about eleven o'clock, I lodge adjoining to the Six Canns in Holborn; I tried to get in and could not get in; coming from the gate, this Ann Walker accosted me and asked me for a glass of gin.

Q. Had you ever seen her before? - I think I have some knowledge of her by standing at the gate; I have stood there at times, and I think I have some knowledge of her face before; she took me over the way to the wine vaults, and we had a glass of gin.

Q. Did you go into a room with her? - No; she came out and took me by the hand, and said, go along with me to my lodging; I went along with her, and when I came to the lodging, (her lodgings are No. 9, Star-court , it leads out of Holborn into Lukener's-lane or Lukener's-street,) when I came into the room she asked me for a compliment; I asked her what it was? she said half a crown; I paid her half a crown; I had no more silver.

Q. Was there any witness in this place but yourself? - None in the place but myself.

Q. Was you sober? - Yes, sober enough; I was as sober as I am now; I had been drinking in the evening part of two or three pints of beer.

Q. Had you been at work that day? - I had not; I had been about business for my brother-in-law.

Q. Had you drank any liquor in the course of the day? - Not in the day time, in the night I had part of six pennyworth of rum and water that was with this woman before I came to the house and that was all then, and I had only two or three pints of beer all the whole day. I gave her half a crown; then she requested me to give her something to drink; I said, I have no more silver; she said, you have more money; I put my hand into my pocket and gave her half a guinea to go and get something; she went to the door and talked as if talking with somebody to give an order for the liquor, and then returned in again, and was there about ten or twelve minutes, or thereabouts; I said, this liquor is a great while coming; she said, I think it is; then she turns about and whips my watch out of my pocket.

Q. Did you perceive it go? - I did, it was a silver watch with a steel chain, a metal watch key, and a steel bed hook; she was gone out about a quarter of an hour after she got the watch, and then returned in again, as soon as she returned in again I said, give me my watch.

Q. Did you permit her to go out with your watch? - She went out in an instant as she got the watch; it rained as hard as it could rain, and it was very dark, and I was in an entire strange place.

Q. Did you ever get your watch again? - Neither the watch nor the money.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-8

399. THOMAS ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , 13 l. in monies numbered; the monies of William Borradaile , Richardson Borradaile and John Atkinson , in the dwelling house of the said William Borradaile .

WILLIAM BORRADAILE sworn.

I am an hatmaker ; my partners names are Richardson Borradaile and John Atkinson ; I keep the house, I dwell there; none of my other partners dwell there; I lost to the amount of one hundred and thirty pounds and upwards; the prisoner was an apprentice of captain Hodgson's, of the Cornwallis, who desired he might stay as a clerk in our house

while he was gone to India he is now on the eve of departing, he came to us about a twelve month before he was taken up, in May 1792. The beginning of February last our petty cash keeper came to me, and in consequence of some information from him the prisoner was taken up on the 6th of May, and committed to the Poultry Compter, having previously confessed in my hearing.

Q. At the time the confession was made had you made him any offer of favour or threatened him? - Never.

Q. Had you said any thing at all to make any impression on his mind, one way or the other? - I had not.

Q. Had you taken him up? - I had not.

Mr. Knapp. I understand there is a written confession.

Court to Prosecutor. Was there a written confession taken? - There was on the 7th of May.

Q. Did you see the prisoner sign it? - I did, I see him sign something, I cannot say it was this paper.

Q. Do you know there is any body else here that see him sign that paper? - I don't know there is.

Q. When was this written confession made? - He was taken up on Monday the 6th of May, the confession was made on Tuesday.

Q. When was the other confession made that you was talking of before? - That was on Monday morning the 6th of May, he came to me, to the counting house, and said that he was the person who had robbed the desks; I had sent for him into the counting house and asked him why he went out on the Sunday without my leave. On the Saturday, previously, I questioned him how he came by such and such clothes and he had often been flush of money, I did not know that it was with my own money; I questioned him how he came by such and such clothes, he having laid out about twenty five pounds, I asked him where he had got the money? he replied, from a Mr. Law the third officer in the ship Cornwallis and whom he sailed with, and with Mr. Hodgson; he said that he had had various sums at different times but could not tell within ten or fifteen pounds how much he had had of Law, Saturday evening I forbid him to go out of my house on the Sunday without my leave. On the Sunday morning I got access to Mr. Law and he denied every thing that the prisoner said; on his coming into the counting house on Monday morning, I asked him why he went out the Sunday contrary to my express approbation? he said he had been to Thomas Barton , a weaver at the Bohemia Tavern, Turnham Green to tell them of the business which had happened.

Q. What did he mean by that business? - Alluding to the business of robbing the desk; I understood that he had been to Robert Barton to tell him that he was like to be found out for robbing the desk, and I understood that he told Robert Barton that he was like to be indicted or found out, and that he could not have these clothes, they would not be delivered to him which he had ordered of Mr. Richards; I had been previously on the Saturday morning with Richards the taylor, he said in this conversation, that he had taken the money out of the desk, after he had talked about Barton and Richards, not before; after this I sent for the witness Robert Hop Massey the cash keeper, who had been discharged from our service, from suspicion of being concerned in the robbery, he had left us the 25th of March; I sent for him and his brother; on their coming I told them that his brother's character was clear; I called the prisoner into the parlour and in the presence of the prisoner told Robert Hop Massey that the prisoner had confessed that he had taken the money, and that I was glad my suspicions were wrong; he then confessed to them what he confessed previously to me: after I

sent for the constable and took him to the Compter.

Q. Have you ever found any of your money that was missing? - Never; the first time I heard any money was missing was the account given me by my cash keeper, he is here; I missed out of my own desk eighteen or twenty or twenty-two pounds which I did not miss till the 25th of March; three guineas of which the prisoner told me he took away from a particular bag, and described it; I asked him by what means he got at the desk? he said he had four keys which opened it, which keys he flung down the necessary.

Q. You did not see these guineas I suppose? - No.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Borradaile, I want first of all to be better acquainted with this house of yours; you say you have two partners, Richardson Borradaile and John Atkinson ? - Yes.

Q. The house and the warehouse adjoins? - They do.

Q. The rent of the house is it borne by you or all your partners? - I am the landlord of the whole, and I charge the trade with a certain portion of the rent.

Q. Then the dwelling house, your dwelling house, is paid for by all the partners? - I pay for the whole in the first instance, and I charge to the trade for the proportion of the rent.

Court. Do you charge any proportion for the dwelling house? - Not for the dwelling house.

Q. Where was this counting house? - In the warehouse.

Q. Which it is paid for by the trade? - It is.

Q. Is it all under one roof? - It all adjoins.

Q. You are the only person that dwell there? - Yes, I consider myself as the master, but the other partners dwell there occasionally.

Court. Then that takes it out of the act.

Mr. Knapp. At first when you suspected the prisoner I think it was on Saturday the 4th of May? - That was the first time I had any conversation, I suspected him previously.

Q. On Saturday evening you stated to me before, that you had no sort of conversation with the prisoner? - Not in the evening; I had a great deal in the middle of the day.

Q. Do you remember saying this to him, that the best way to save you the trouble, and the prisoner the disgrace, would be for him to confess that he had robbed you, for now is the time for to stand or fall? - I never said any such a thing.

Q. Nor to that effect? - I am positive I did not.

Q. On Monday following did you promise or say any thing at all about shewing him mercy? - Not in the least.

Q. Did you say any thing like this, that if he could find any friend that could make up the money the matter should be hushed up? - Never.

Q. How long had the prisoner lived with you before you suspected him at all? - He came to us in May 1792, and I did not suspect him till after this deficiency was found out.

Q. Will you have the goodness to recollect whether when he came to you from captain Hodgson, he did not come with an exellent character? - He did.

Q. You say that of Massey, you had entertained suspicions of him, and in point of fact he had been discharged? - Not in consequence of dishonest suspicion; I had given him notice to quit our service before that, but he did not quit it without suspicion, because he could not account for these deficiencies.

Q. After his discharge and before any suspicions fell on the prisoner, had there not been a considerable number of deficiencies and mistakes happen? - Never since Massay was discharged there was no mistake, but before there was reason to suspect.

Q. Do you recollect having any conversation with the prisoner at the bar on Monday before you went to the magistrate's? - None but what I have related.

Q. Then there was no conversation of this sort, I am in hopes that captain Hodgson will come forward and make up matters, to which you answered, if captain Hodgson will do that I am satisfied? - Never.

Q. Had you not some conversation about six or seven o'clock in the evening when captain Hodgson and Mr. Barvis was present on Monday? - I do recollect we had some conversation in the afternoon, we were in the parlour together, and Roberts said he was a bad fellow, and deserved any punishment that should be inflicted on him, and that he would suffer the punishment due to his crimes.

Q. I wish you would be kind enough to recollect again, for I have it in my instructions said, that you made a promise of some sort of favour or held out a favour to this man? - Never.

Q. By whose means did you discover that he had robbed you? - By his own confession alone.

Q. He came then voluntarily to you and acknowledged himself to be guilty of a capital crime; then it did not proceed from any conversation that you had with him, but he came to you point blank at once? - He did, point blank at once, without any sort of inducement, promise or threat.

Jury. There had been some conversation respecting his clothes? - There had, but that was on Saturday the 4th.

Court. You mean to say that he made the confession without any sort of inducement held out by you? - He did so; and said what I have said already.

Q. Was there any recommendation to him to tell the truth if he was guilty, or to that effect, or that you would not prosecute him if he would tell who was the thief? - Never.

Q. So then there never was any promise of reward, or promise of screening him from justice, or any thing to that effect? - There never was.

Mr. Knapp. Then I am sure the man must be a madman.

ROBERT HOP MASSEY sworn.

I was Clerk to Mr. Borradaile in October last; when I entered into the service of Mr. Borradaile, I was put under Mr. John Clarke , the Clerk of the counting house, who, after I had been there about a fortnight, entrusted me with the petty cash, after having kept it about two months, one day I found a deficiency of about fifteen pounds, the prisoner being in the counting house, I mentioned it to him, he advised me to mention it to the head clerk, which I did, and the head clerk wished me not to communicate the business to Mr. Borradaile, he would see if I had made any mistake; it passed on for five or six days, when I reckoned up my cash again and I found five or six pounds more short, which I again mentioned to the head clerk; he advised me the same as before, and every time that I went to examine it I found it five or six pounds short; I took care to mention it every time; it came to the amount of one hundred and twelve pounds one shilling and four pence short in the course of six weeks; the head clerk then advised me to make up the deficiencies and say nothing about it to Mr. Borradaile; with the advice of my friends I communicated it to Mr.

Borradaile, who made me reply that he could do nothing in the business; my friends coming forward they were determined to have the business investigated; I was examined on the 18th of March before Mr. Alderman Wright.

Q. Had you left your place at that time? - I had not; I did not leave it till the 25th, on some disagreement between Mr. Borradaile and me, not relating to this money at all, I was present on the 6th of May at Mr. Borradaile's, the prisoner there confessed that he had taken all the money I had lost.

Mr. Knapp. Why Mr. Massey, you had like to have got into a scrape here? - It was a private examination, sir.

Q. You did go before Mr. Alderman Wright? - I did.

Q. Who attended there? - Mr. Borradaile.

Q. On the 18th then every thing was settled, and you was discharged before the Alderman? - I was totally to Mr. Borradaile's satisfaction.

Q. So well satisfied that he kept you seven days after. How came you to keep all this so snug from your master? - By the advice of the head clerk.

Q. He was the person that invested you with the cash? - He was.

Q. So you chose to pursue the advice of the head clerk instead of going to your master? - I thought the head clerk would advise me to the best.

Q. Did not you think it was very odd to lose till it amounted to the tune of one hundred and twelve pounds? did you not think it extraordinary that he should give you this advice? - I did not know his reason, the only reason he gave me was that Mr. Borradaile would think it very careless of me.

Q. Therefore he, in order to screen you, advised you not to tell your master; so he and you kept it snug to yourselves till it amounted to one hundred and twelve pounds? - No, it was known to others in the house.

Q. What do you mean by this man's confession when you came into the parlour on Monday? - Mr. Borradaile said, do you choose to confess before Massey what you have said just now? He then said, yes; and he told the story.

Q. And not till then in your presence? - Not till then.

Q. When was you discharged? - On the 25th of March.

Q. Seven days after you had been before the alderman.

THOMAS MASSEY sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. alderman Wright and Gill, and Co in Abchurch-lane. In October last my brother went into the service of Mr. Borradaile; Mr. Borradaile put him under his head clerk, soon after he lost the sum of fifteen pounds; after it was the sum of one hundred and twelve pounds he told me, and Mr. Borradaile insisted on my brother's making it up; I went to Mr. Borradaile on purpose that an investigation might be made; Mr. Borradaile wished to know what kind of an investigation; would wish to have made of the matter; I told him, and my brother went before Mr. Alderman Wright with Mr. Borradaile, but not as that gentleman has represented it, he was not lugged by a constable but Mr. Wright sat as an arbitrator, not as the justice, the matter was determined to Mr. Borradaile's satisfaction, and Mr. Borradaile said he had no farther to look to my brother. On the 6th of May my brother and I were sent for to Mr. Borradaile's, when the prisoner confessed that he had taken the whole of the money that Mr. Borradaile had lost out of his desk.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Borradaile insisted on your brother making up the deficiency? - He did.

Q. Where was Mr. Alderman Wright when he heard the parties as arbitrator? - In his parlour at Abchurch-lane.

Q. Did you go into the room at Mr. Borradaile's the same time as your brother did on Monday? - We all were in together.

Q. Then you heard something that your brother has stated that the prisoner said; will you state the particular words that Mr. Borradaile said to him? - Now Roberts will you state before Massey what you told me? and then he said that he had taken all the money that my brother had lost from his desk.

Prisoner. On Saturday morning Mr. Borradaile asked me where I got the clothes? I said I got the money of Mr. Law; he said he missed a good deal of money; I told him I was very sorry he suspected me; he said he would give me one hour to confess it in. On Saturday evening he called me up again and told me that he had seen Mr. Tomlinson, and Mr. William Borradaile said again that he had missed the money, and the best way would be to save him trouble, and me disgrace, to confess whether I had or no, and by that I should stand or fail, and he desired me to stop at home on Sunday; I went out thinking it was a liberty I had always took since I had been in the house. On Monday morning Mr. Borradaile came into the counting house about a quarter of an hour after, he then told me that if I would confess to the money being taken he would make up matters with captain Hodgson, and I should not hear any thing of it more.

Mr. Tomlinson and Captain Hodgson both gave the prisoner a good character.

GUILTY,

Of stealing but not in the dwelling house . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-9

400. JAMES WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , forty pounds weight of black pepper, value 3 l. 10 s. an hempen bag, value 1 s. the goods of Edward Whitmell , William Whitmell , and Sarah Parker .

EDWARD WHITMELL sworn.

I am a grocer ; I have two partners, William Whitmell and Sarah Parker . The prisoner was taken with the pepper on him by Wainwright.

JOHN WAINWRIGHT sworn.

I am the constable of Dowgate Ward. On Sunday morning the 14th of April at a quarter before six I was standing at the corner of the Mansion House, near to Lombard-street, the prisoner at the bar passed me as I stood at the corner, he had this bag under his arm, he was dressed in a porter's dress, and I thought it rather looked odd to have this bag under his arm at that time in the morning, he crossed the street and went by the Bank, up Threadneedle-street; I followed him up into Threadneedle-street; I got up to him, says I, young man what have you got here? he said he had got pepper; I asked him where he was going with it? he said, he was going to the Vine Inn, Bishopsgate; it was to go into the country; I asked him where the directions were? he said, he had lost it; I asked him how the waggoner could know where to take it to without directions? he said the man knew where to take it to; I asked him what weight it was? he said he could not tell; I asked him where he brought it from? he said he brought it from a grocer's in Bread-street, I told him it had a very bad look, I was afraid he had not come honestly by it, I would wish him to go back with me to see if it was right or wrong; he said very well; he came a little way back and then began to hang

back, and desired I would let him go; I told him I could not think of letting him go by no means; he said he would give me his watch or any thing; I told him I should not let him go, I was a constable, and I took charge of him; when we were going back opposite the Bank he said it did not come from Bread-street, it came from Mr. Whitmell's in Cannon-street; I said, I know Mr. Whitmell very well; how could you get it out that time in the morning? he said, the carman got up to go with the horses, and he followed him out, that he was a porter in the house, and to the best of my knowledge, he said he lived in the house; I then put him into the Poultry Compter, and about eight o'clock I went to Mr. Whitmell's, and I sent word up to him by the servant that I would be glad to see him, and he came to me at last, and I informed him of the matter; I have had the property in my possession ever since.

Mr. Raine. I understand you to say, that he said, he got it of the grocer's in in Bread-street? - He told me, to the best of my knowledge, that he was a porter there in Bread-street.

Q. Afterwards he told you he belonged to Mr. Whitmell's? - He did, and I told him I knew Mr. Whitmell very well.

EVAN ROBERTS sworn.

I am a grocer; I am in the service of Mr. Whitmell; I am the warehouseman; I was informed of this on Sunday morning when I came home from Church, about twelve or a little after.

Q. Did you miss any pepper? - To the best of my knowledge there is not quite so much in the cask as ought to be; this cask was laying in the bottom warehouse, it had pepper in it.

Q. Is there any mark or any name on it? - I believe not.

Court to Mr. Whitmell. Can you identify it? - No, I cannot.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-10

401. RICHARD WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , three muslin neckcloths, value 3 s. the goods of John Hebden , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HEBDEN sworn.

I am a brother to John Hebden . The prisoner on the 21st of last month, at No. 49, Oxford-street , on Monday, in the year of our lord 1793, in the month of April, he asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; I had not got any that would suit him; then he asked to look at some neckcloths, which I shewed him; he bought one which cost him four shillings, which he paid for; as I was going to wish him good night our young man came in and had a suspicion that he had got something inside of his hat, and he stopped him as he was going to the door, and he pulled off the prisoner's hat, and took the neckcloths out, and asked me if I could swear to the mark on them? I told him I could not.

Mr. Const. Are you sure that this happened on Monday? - Yes, it did.

Q. Not on Saturday, because Monday is the 22d? - It was Monday.

JOHN MANTLE sworn.

I came in on Monday as I had been out, and I saw Richard Wood in the shop, I had some suspicion of his having some neckcloths in his hat, from which I asked to look inside of his hat, and there I found a

neckcloth, which appears to be ours from the mark; I cannot say whose marking it is, because we have two shops, one in Holborn, but it is the same as ours; he had bought one and this appears of the same writing with that he had bought; I sent for a constable and had him taken up, and he was committed from the office.

Q. Did you ever ascertain whose mark it was at either shop? - I never did; I have not had it since the constable took it.

Mr. Const. You went before the justice? - I did.

Q. You know nothing of the mark yourself, and you applied to your master and asked him if he could swear to it? - I did not; I asked Benjamin Hebden , he said it was our mark.

Q. So if this man had bought it at the other shop it must have exactly the same mark? - It must.

CHARLES HITCHCOCK sworn.

I know nothing further than being sent for as an officer; the things were taken from the prisoner before I came to the shop, and they were delivered into my custody, and this is the property delivered to me,

Prisoner. They are my property; I bought them.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-11

402. WILLIAM CLIFTON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May , a drawing framed and glazed, value 15 s. the goods of Robert Jenkins .

(The case opened by Mr. Const.)

JOHN EVERETT sworn.

I live at Mr. Francis, St. James's-square . On Friday the 17th of May the prisoner, between eleven and twelve, he was in the passage leading from the area opposite the servants hall, in Mr. Francis's house; he saw me in the servants hall and asked if it was the dutchess of Gordon's? I told him it was not, I told him it was the last house but one in the corner, a white fronted house; I went up the steps then and watched him, and I saw him go first to Mr. Barlow's, the house before the dutchess of Gordon's, he went down and was down there about the three fourth of a minute, he came up and past the dutchess of Gordon's and went into Lord Donnegall's, and went down that area, he did not go to the dutchess of Gordon's; when he came near Mr. Francis's house; I went from the steps to the stair case window, two pair of stairs, but when I got there I lost sight of him, from whence I concluded that he must have gone down some area; I waited there about two or three minutes, and then I see him come up from Mr. Hanson's area with something wrapped in a coat, which coat he had on when he was in our area, the same coat he has on now; I immediately came down from the window and went to the street door, and by that time he was a few yards distant from the door; I and John Jackson were together, and Manning followed very soon, after that Jackson and I pursued the man till he got to the corner of Queen-street, when he turned back hearing something of us, and he saw us, and he threw down the coat and whatever was in it; we pursued him, Manning took up the picture and coat; I and Jackson pursued him, we overtook him in about twenty yards from where he took the picture from.

Q. Had you lost sight all this time after that you came to the door? - Never. We took him to Mr. Hanson's,

and there the coat was opened and the drawing taken out.

Q. Did you see Jenkins the witness there? - Yes, he was sent for when we got to Mr. Hanson's.

Q. Did he claim the picture? - Yes, as soon as he came; from there we went to the justice's; while we were at Mr. Hanson's the prisoner claimed the coat the picture was wrapped up in, and we returned it, and he took it.

Q. Did any particular conversation pass? - At the justices I gave the same evidence as I give now; the prisoner said he was sorry for what he had done, hoping Mr. Jenkins would forgive him.

ROBERT JENKINS sworn.

Q. What is the value of the picture? - Fifteen shillings I valued it at; it is certainly worth that.

JOHN JACKSON sworn.

I remember Mr. Everett's pointing out the prisoner to me; I was on the stair case with Mr. Everett, and saw the prisoner come up with the coat under his arm and something in it from Mr. Hanson's; I ran down stairs and went to the street door, he was then about four or five yards before me; I pursued him very slow, making observations till he came to the corner of King-street, when he past a gentleman, and I ran and ran against the gentleman, and the gentleman said, what is the matter? the prisoner heard that, he looked over his shoulder, and then he threw down the coat against the iron rails; I pursued him for about twenty yards and then took him; I never lost sight of him from the time that he past our window till the time we took him; Mr. Everett and I brought him back to Mr. Hanson's, and there he desired we would give him the coat, which is the same coat he has on now.

THOMAS MANNING sworn.

I was with these two gentlemen that have given evidence; I saw the prisoner throw down the parcel; and I took it up and carried it back to Mr. Hanson's.

- ELKINS sworn.

I am the constable; I produce the picture delivered to me with the prisoner; I have had it in my possession ever since. (Deposed to by Mr. Jenkins.)

Prisoner. There is none of them can swear it was me that took the picture; as I was going down the Square this picture lay, and I picked it up, and immediately one of these two gentlemen came and knocked me down in the road, and immediately the picture fell, and then they took me to Mr. Hanson's, and from there to Marlborough-street.

The prisoner called his own father and two other witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-12

403. DAVID COLLYER , WILLIAM SHORT and SAMUEL STEELE were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , a watch, in a metal case, value 1 l. 1 s. the goods of Thomas Palmer .

RACHEL PALMER sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Palmer ; my husband lost a metal watch the 6th of May; it hanged up by the chimney

piece; I left my door to go to speak to my neighbour; there was no one in the house; when I went to go in again I saw the prisoner Collyer coming down the steps, I asked him what he wanted? he asked me if I sold bread and cheese? I told him no, he might have it at the last house in the railing, and I watched him on to see if he went in, seeing him not go in, but to make up to his companions, and they shuffling on together and looking back, gave me a suspicion, I went in and missed my watch, I came out and gave the alarm; they were pursued after, and the one that took the watch came back to a public house and called for some bread and cheese, and beer.

Q. Did you see him go into the house? - I did not, I was told by one that see him go in there; I went and see him there, and left him there and went home, I had young children at home, and I wanted to get home to them.

Q. When was he taken? - Between the hours of two and three.

Q. Who took them? - I cannot say, he was kept there till the other two men were brought to him.

Mr. Peate. You are a married woman you say? - Yes.

Q. What business is your husband? - He is a coachman .

Q. Does he keep a shop of any kind? - Yes, a little bit of a shop; I sell tapes and penny toys, and such like.

Q. Has your husband any partner? - No.

Q. How long had you been out? - About the space of four or five minutes.

Q. When did you hang the watch there? - It hung there always.

Q. Was it there when you went out? - Yes, because I left the chair just by it, and I saw it there.

Q. Can you take upon you to say that you saw it there, or only surmise it was there from being usually hung there? - I saw it there.

Q. What house was this you saw Collyer at? - A public house.

Q. What distance was this from your house? - About an hundred yards.

Q. You did not see your watch then? - No, I did not.

EDWARD WALLIS sworn.

I was drinking of a pot of beer at the Red Lion at Acton; I heard an oration there was a watch lost in the town, and I went out to the door, and I saw two of the people going up the hill, two of the prisoners at the bar, the two outside ones, under Mr. Venn's garden wall, they made a bit of a scuffle and put their hands underneath their breasts, I cannot say what for, but afterwards I found this here crow underneath the nettles close to the wall, then I thought by that, by the watch being lost it might be thrown over the garden wall, and I went and asked the gentleman's gardener to let me go into the garden, whereof he did, and I could not find any thing the first time, then I went in the second time, and I found this watch.

Q. How near was that place you found the watch to the place where you saw the man? - They went up to the top of the wall and turned round, and it lay at the top of the wall, about twenty yards from where the crow laid; Short and Steele were the men that I saw up there.

Mr. Peat. What time of the day was this? - Between the hours of two and three.

Q. It is a public highway? - It is.

Q. A good many people pass that way? - There is; it is the turnpike road to Uxbridge.

Q. The prisoners were in no other kind of action than what you have described? - No.

Q. Then all you know is, that the prisoners were on one side of the wall, and the watch on the other; the watch is not bruised, nor is the glass broke? - No.

Q. How high is the wall? - About seven feet high.

(The watch produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Mr. Peat to Prosecutrix. Do you know the Number? - I cannot say the number.

Q. Who is the maker of it? - Read; it came from Buckinghamshire; I can swear it to be my watch by all the trinkets, it has a seal with two heads.

ROBERT NARROWAY sworn.

I was at dinner, and I heard the hue and cry of thieves, there was a watch stole: I saw Samuel Steele jump over Mr. Winter's gate, and I followed him, the gate leads to the plowed ground; I took him in one of Mr. Anthony's grass fields.

Mr. Peat. Was this near the wall that the last witness spoke of? - It was not far from the wall where he jumped over, but it was near half a mile from where I took him.

RICHARD GOSS sworn.

I am an officer of the parish of Acton, and I was sent for to take the care of these men, and in searching their pockets, in that man's pocket I found these things, a little chissel, an awl, a pen knife and a gun flint; they were all on William Short .

Mr. Peat. You say you have an awl there, a pen knife, a flint and a chissel, all very useful things, to enable a man to take a watch from a mantle piece.

JOSEPH SALTMARSH sworn.

On the 6th of May as I was going through Acton I saw the three prisoners at the bar, and I saw Collyer give Short something, but I cannot say what it was; I saw him do this facing the Red Lion at Acton ; Collyer came back and the other two went on.

Q. Do you know Mr. Venn's garden? - I do not; I am not acquainted with the place.

Mr. Peat. It might be bread and cheese for ought you know that passed from one to the other? - When men have bread and cheese they generally are not ashamed of it, and put their hands behind them.

All three not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-13

404. HENRY EGANS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a base metal watch, with the inside case gilt with gold, value 1 l. 10 s. a base metal watch chain, value 1 s. a base metal watch hook, value 1 d. a stone seal set in gold, value 12 s. the goods of Joseph Knowles .

JOSEPH KNOWLES sworn.

I left my watch carelesly on the seat in the necessary, at the Rose and Crown on Kew Green , about six or seven weeks ago, about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after that I missed it, and I went back to look and it was gone; I live in Soho-square, No. 25. I don't know the prisoner; the watch was stopped on the prisoner; I offered a reward of two guineas for the watch; I offered it in half an hour of the time I lost it.

Mr. Peat. You live in Soho square, No. 25; are you the master of the house? - I am steward to general Conway.

Q. You had a lady with you at this time? - Whether I had a lady or not is nothing to this affair.

Q. I believe in point of fact you had? - If I had it is nothing to the purpose.

Q. You had a lady with you? - I don't choose to answer it, unless ordered by the court.

Q. If you stand there till twelve o'clock at night you shall answer the question? - I will if the court order.

Court. You are bound to answer that question? - I had a lady.

Mr. Peat. You past there as a man of some distinction I believe? - I paid for what I called for.

Q. Do you happen to know whether you was considered as a noble man there? - I paid for what I called for.

Q. Did not you assume some title? - No.

Q. Nor no title given you? - No.

Q. In fact you was not called by any name of distinction? - Not that I heard or knew of.

Q. Then it seems you did not; but you offered two guineas reward for this metal watch? - I did, and the landlord and this man went out with me to look for the watch, when he had it in his pocket.

Q. Then, sir, whether you knew it or not, you was considered there as a man of some distinction, and I thought you stated it to this court when you said you lived at No. 25, Soho-square.

Court. You did not happen to be known in this house where you called? - I don't know that ever I was in the house before.

Q. How long was you in the house? - I slept there all night.

Mr. Peat. The lady was not your wife I presume? - No, sir.

WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn.

I am coachman to Duke Colson, esq. he has a country house at Westborough Green.

Court to Knowles. You did not tell me the day of the month, or the day of the week? - I cannot be positive, but I think it was the 5th of April, I think it was Thursday night; it was Friday morning I lost the watch.

Taylor. The prisoner came to me on the 9th of May, Thursday, came to town to me and asked me to go to Mr. Heather to ask the value of this watch; he stopped and stayed with my horses the while; it was neither offered to be pawned nor sold.

Q. How came you to go to ask the value of it? - I went to oblige the prisoner. Mr. Heather looked at the watch and asked if I wanted to sell it; I made answer, no, and I asked him if it was worth five guineas? he looked at the watch and asked me how I came by it, and where I got it, where I stole it? and stopped me in the shop till the prisoner came in and then we were taken to Bow-street.

Mr. Peat. It seems the prisoner held your horses while you went to enquire the value of this watch; did he direct you to sell it? - No, he did not.

Q. Nor you did not on your own account offer to pawn it or sell it? - I did not.

Court. How soon was the prisoner taken up afterwards? - In about a quarter of an hour.

Q. When you was detained by Mr. Heather did you give any account of the prisoner? - I was detained two hours.

Q. I ask you when you was detained by Mr. Heather, did you give any account to Mr. Heather that the prisoner was holding your horses - I did, and I told him I had the watch of him.

Q. Where was the prisoner taken? - He was taken in the shop; he was sent for, and we were both taken together in the shop.

Q. Were you both charged with this robbery before the magistrate? - Yes.

Q. You was discharged I suppose? - Yes.

Q. Should you know the watch again was you to see it? - No.

Mr. Peat. The prisoner came with the person that was sent for him willingly? - He came willingly.

JOHN BECK HEATHER sworn.

Taylor the last witness brought the watch into my shop to know the value of it; from seeing of him I asked him a good many questions how he came by it and where he got it? and I suspected from what he said that he did not know any thing about it; I sent my servant privately to Bow-street to get a constable, and when the constable came I gave him charge of him; then he said he had the watch of a man that was with his coach three or four doors off, waiting with his coach and horses; then I sent the constable and my servant to tell the man to come; the prisoner at the bar said that he gave this man the watch, for him to ask the value of it.

Q. When your servant went after the prisoner, in what way did he come to your house? - He came directly with my servant.

Q. Did any thing pass that is material to state? - He said he found it in the necessary house, on the seat; I searched them both at Bow-street, and there they were examined; the coachman was discharged to take care of his horses; the other man acknowledged that he gave it the coachman to ask the price of it at my house.

Q. What was done with the watch after that? - I have kept it in my custody ever since, (Produced) it is a metal watch gilt with gold.

Mr. Peat. Then it was not offered to you either to pawn or sell? - This Taylor said he was to give five guineas for it.

Q. And the prisoner came willingly to your shop when you sent for him? - He did.

Court. Do you know whether he was a servant, or in what capacity he was.

Mr. Knowles. He was an assistant to the hostler at the Red Lyon-Inn, Kew Bridge.

Mr. Heather. The prisoner had a direction where to go with the watch to get the two guineas reward, it was found when he was searched; I saw it and read it.

- RUTHEN sworn.

I am a patrole under the direction of Mr. Addington; I was sent for to Mr. Heather's shop; this young man and the prisoner were in the shop at the time, and I was desired to take them to Bow-street; this bit of paper was found in his pocket where to take the watch to get the two guineas.

Mr. Knowles. It is the direction I left with the landlord. (The watch deposed to.)

Mr. Peat to Heather. Did the other man say before the prisoner that the prisoner wanted to sell it for five guineas? - No, it was before the prisoner came in.

Prisoner. I meant for the gentleman to have the watch, and I leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-14

405. MARY MOORE was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April , a cotton gown, value 2 s. a cloth cloak, value 3 s. four linen aprons, value 2 s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 6 d. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of Jane Owens .

JANE OWENS sworn.

I am a single woman; I lost the things in the indictment on Monday morning the 29th of April, they were taken from the garret; the prisoner was a stranger, I never knew or see her before; I am a servant to Mr. Hughes, he is a steel worker; these articles were in the garret in my room; I went down stairs and left my garret door unlocked; they were some of them loose about the room, and some in a drawer which was not locked; I did not find the property with her; Mrs. Fox my mistress's mistress comes and gave an alarm first; she met her on the stairs; I first saw my things in Mrs. Fox's arms and the prisoner walking along with Mrs. Fox to our house.

ELIZABETH FOX sworn.

I am a washerwoman. On the 29th of April I was sitting out at my own street door on Monday between eight and nine in the morning; I live opposite Mr. Hughes in the same street; I saw a woman running out of Mr. Hughes's house, and Mrs. Hughes crying out, O dear, Mrs. Fox, that woman has got something out of our house; I ran after her and cried stop thief; I did not lose sight of her till I stopped her; she ran down a coach yard, just as I came up to her she threw down the bundle, it was tied up in a black silk handkerchief; I picked up the bundle and told her to come along with me back again.

Q. Was she detained then? - She was; I carried the bundle to the justice, and the constable has it since.

Q. Do you know the bundle again? - Yes, they were all the articles in the indictment, except two, which were taken out of her pocket.

- SANDERS sworn.

I belong to Marlborough-street; I am an extraordinary constable; I was sent for; I received the bundle of Mrs. Fox before the magistrate; when we took her to the watch-house I searched her, and I took an apron from before her, and this muslin handkerchief came out of her pocket.

Court to Owens. After the alarm, were the things brought back with the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. Who brought them back? - Mrs. Fox.

Q. Look at these articles, see if you know them? - They are all mine.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel. These things were given to me by a woman that was up in the house.

Mr. Knapp to Owen. Did not you hear that there was another woman? - No, I never did.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-15

406. RICHARD SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , three silver table spoons, value 1 l. 10 s. two silver salt spoons, value 4 s. the goods of Elizabeth Dolignon , widow .

THOMAS BOX sworn.

I am servant to Elizabeth Dolignon ; she is a widow lady; the prisoner was a servant to Mr. Screen; he came with a note; he lives at No. 2, Hyde-street, Manchester-square; he came down with a note to Mrs. Dolignon; I was absent; I did not see him in the house.

SUSANNAH SANDERS sworn.

I am a servant to Mrs. Dolignon; the prisoner came to our house with a message on Tuesday the 23d of April,

about nine o'clock in the evening, from Mrs. Screen.

Q. What part of the house was he in? - In the hall.

Q. How came you to charge him with taking any thing? did you see him take any thing? - No.

Q. How long did he stay in the hall? - About half an hour.

Q. Is the parlour near the hall? - Yes.

Q. Where were the spoons missed? - From the beaufet in the parlour.

Q. How soon were they missed after he was gone? - I cannot tell; they were missed the next day the 24th.

Q. Do you know whether the parlour door was locked or unlocked? - The day he was there it was unlocked.

Q. Do you know how it happens that he is fixed upon for taking these spoons? - No.

Prisoner. It was not nine o'clock, it was a little after eight. - I am not quite positive to the time.

JOHN BECK HEATHER sworn.

The prisoner at the bar came to my house on the 1st of May, I believe it was a Thursday, to sell a table spoon, between five and six o'clock in the evening; I saw it broke, and I judged the prisoner might have stole it; I asked him a good many questions; he said he had it of his father about nine years ago; with that I said to my servant, go and search him, and see if he has got any more, he heard me say that to my servant and he immediately ran out of the shop, and my servant ran after him and brought him back, with great difficulty we stopt him and searched him and found two more table spoons and a pair of salts, all broke, my servant took them out of his pocket before my face; he struggled a good while, and wanted to get away, but I searched him and sent for a constable; I have kept them from that time to this, except a little time, I marked them with my own mark; I can swear to them; the young man's master was sent for, Mr. Screen, he is a private gentleman, and he blamed the man, and asked him why he did not go and sell them at his own silversmith's and not to bring them to my shop? but when he found they were stole he was very sorry for what he had said, and said I had done right; a Mr. Hughes went to sup with Mr. Screen the next night, and Mr. Screen told him that his servant was taken up for stealing three silver table spoons, and the next day there was some table spoons brought from the family which corresponded with these the prisoner brought; I advertised them the next day. (The spoons produced.)

Court to Box. Do you know whether these spoons were in the house at the time you left the house? - I do, they were then in the beaufet, they had been used for dinner.

Q. Can you take on you to say for a certainty that the spoons were there? - I can; the three table spoons and a pair of salt spoons.

Q. Was the door locked or left open? - It was locked, but the key was left in it; it was the custom of the house so to do; they have all my mistress's cypher on them, I. E. D.

Q. Did you miss more than those? - No more than those found exactly.

Court to Susannah Sanders . When this man was there was he left in the hall alone? - He was.

Prisoner. I lived five years at Kensington with Mr. Wills, and three years with Mr. Kenyon.

The prisoner called his brother to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-16

407. CATHARINE HOGAN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , a leather purse, value 1 d. a clasp knife, value 2 d. half a guinea and two half crowns; the goods, chattels and monies of Nathaniel Bowler , privately from his person .

NATHANIEL BOWLER sworn.

I am a servant, a waiter at the hotel in Vere-street, Oxford-street. On the 21st of May, Tuesday evening between ten and eleven, I was coming from Smithfield, going home, I met with the prisoner in Holborn; she asked me to go to her lodgings with her; I went to her lodgings, they were in St. Giles's ; I asked her what I should give her to sleep on her bed all night? she said, a shilling; I took my purse out and gave her a shilling, and then I put it into my side pocket, and suspecting it might be pulled out there I put it in my fob; she asked me for some halfpence to get some beer; I gave her three-pence; the clasp knife was in my waistcoat pocket; I laid down on the bed about two minutes, and she came and laid down by the side of me about ten minutes; after that she got up and said she would go for the beer, and I felt and found my purse was taken out of my pocket.

Q. Did she go for the beer? - She did not. I accused Catharine Hogan with taking it; she told me she had not, and if I made any noise she would screek murder, and bring some body to confine me in the room; she set herself against the door; I pushed against the door and drove her from it and opened it, I called watch, but I could not make the watch hear; another man at the next door told me if I did not go away peaceably he would come out; another woman came to the door while the door was shut and asked her to give her the money; I went down two or three stairs from the door, and I went up again; the woman told her she should not; she went to her room again; I went down stairs then and called the watch; the watch came; I went up stairs and rapped at the door; she refused to open it; the watch called to her three or four different times; I told the watchman if he would let me come I would open the door; I forced the door, and took her on the bed; I took her out to the watch-house; she was searched in my presence, the clasp knife was found on the prisoner, I saw it found, the prisoner said it was the knife she had had for two or three years; the watchman kept the knife; the blade had been broke off and it was ground up, the screw at the end is rather bent, and there is a little spot of rust near the end; I never recovered my purse or my money; I missed the half guinea and two half crowns at the time I missed my purse, they were in my purse.

Q Was you quite sober? - I had been drinking a little, but very little.

Q. When did you leave your house? - I had drank a little, but I was not drunk, I was sober.

Q. What had you drank? - I had been drinking some ale with some others.

Q How long might you be drinking with them? - We were drinking about half an hour.

Q. Do you know how much you did drink? - I believe there were four of us drank three bottles of beer.

Q. Then you found nothing but this knife? - No.

Prisoner's Counsel. What is the name of the maker on the knife? - I do not recollect.

DANIEL HOGAN sworn.

As nigh as I can guess it was half after eleven the prosecutor came to me and asked me if I was the watchman? I told him I was; he told me he had been robbed of half a guinea and two half crowns and a purse; I went and took the woman out of the room directly, and searched her, and found 2 s. and two halfpence, and a clasp knife.

(The knife produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. This man picked me up in Broad-street; he asked me if I had a room of my own; I said I had; I took him to the room, and he asked me what I was to have? I said I left it to him; he said he had a six-pence; I said I never was with a gentleman for six-pence; he then said he had a shilling, and after he had connection he wanted the shilling back again, and I said I would not give it him; so he knocked me down and gave me a black eye, and made me bleed, and the other woman came to my assistance; as for the knife I had it to cut a bit of bread and cheese.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Imprisoned one week in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Reference Number: t17930529-17

408. ANDREW PATERSON , was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , two iron wedges, value 2 s. the goods of Richard Meux .

JAMES COMMERYS sworn.

I am a smith. Mr. Paterson the prisoner brought this wedge for sale; I asked him how he came by it? I don't know the day exactly, about eight weeks ago; I lived by Kensington at that time; he told me he found it; I took and weighed it, and it weighed seven pounds, I gave one shilling for it; he was rather dissatisfied with the money; I delivered it to Ewster the constable; he was rather dissatisfied, but I could not afford to give any more, I told him I thought it was a long price for old iron, it was almost twopence a pound; he went away about his business; I never saw him before in my life, I have seen him since pass and repass.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you know who he is? - Yes.

Q. Where does he live? - I don't know; I never heard.

Q. When was it found in your possession? - The 25th of April I believe.

Q. Then you was called to give an account for it or else they would have taken you up? - I don't know; as soon as I heard of it I took it directly.

Q. Who found it in your possession? - The constable; but before that, Mr. Meux's son and one of his men came.

JOHN EWSTER sworn.

I am the constable of Eling; these are the wedges that are sworn to; Commerys only brought one, and another person brought another.

JOHN BURGESS sworn.

I am a journeyman smith; my master's name is Abraham Fall ; this wedge was bought in his own shop at Acton, I cannot

say what day of the month, it may be three months ago that he first bought the wedge of him, he gave him eighteen-pence for it, he gave it to Andrew Paterson the prisoner

Q Did he or you know the prisoner? - I knew nothing at all of him; I had seen him go by, but did not know what he was; he asked him where he had him? he said he found him in a foot path near the road side.

Q. What did you do with it afterwards? - Kept it in the shop; it was delivered afterwards to the constable; I saw it delivered.

Mr. Knowlys. You say you had it of Andrew Paterson ? - Yes.

Q. Which is Andrew Paterson ? - That man at the bar.

Q. You say it is about three months ago? - Yes, I imagine it may.

Q. When was it the constable came to your master's house? - The constable never came to our house; the man that found the wedge out was Mr. Long.

Court. You are a servant to Mr. Fall? - Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. How long ago was this the wedge was found? - The day he was taken; my master was not at home.

Q. Then you was to account how you came by it? - Yes.

Q. And then you told this story? - Yes.

SAMUEL BASSET sworn.

I am a smith: I know the wedges very well; I made them for Mr. Meux, I made them about two years ago; Mr. Meux would have them steeled, and here is the mark where the steel is laid on; I never steeled any before, and I have made many scores in my life time; I know the wedges very well, and I have had them to sharpen several times since; I made them new.

Mr. Knowlys. You never steeled any wedges for any body before, but it is a very common practice? - Yes, it is.

Q. Some other obstinate gentlemen might have steeled as well as Mr. Meux? - Yes, they might.

Q. You are not the only blacksmith that makes wedges. Did you put any mark on them? - Yes, they are marked in Mr. Meux's name.

MOSES GAMMON sworn.

I lived fellow servant with Andrew Paterson at the time the prisoner lived with Mr. Meux, he was in his service when he was taken up for this offence, he was a gardener ; Mr. Meux lives at Eling; I had heard that the prisoner had sold the wedges; I found them afterwards; the wedges were produced and I know them to be my master's property; I look after the live stock; I did not see them till they were produced and he was committed.

Q. Who had them then? - The men that bought them; I can swear to them to be my master's property; the prisoner always had them in his care; I did not miss them till I heard they had been sold.

Mr. Knowlys. Your business was to take care of the live stock? - Yes.

Q. You don't know where they were put? - They were always kept in the prisoner's tool house, where he locked his things up, in a little house by the garden.

Q. You did not know the number of them, or any thing of them? - I knew what number there should be when they were altogether.

Q. When was he taken up? - About the 23d of April it might be.

Q. You know this man has a wife and three children? - I know it now, I did not till after he was taken up; I heard then he had a wife and two children.

Q. And he has been in prison for this month, and his wife and two children have been starving for this half crown job? -

- LONG sworn.

I am a day labouring man, I know the wedges are my master's property; I have no doubt; I am sure they belong to Mr. Meux.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Court to Ewsters. Where did you get these two wedges? - From Mr. Meux's house, Paterson was in my custody at Mr. Meux's house, and the wedges were brought there by the two smiths, and I have kept them ever since.

Jury to Gammon. Pray were the tools kept in a little place in the garden by himself? - Yes, they were locked up under his care.

GUILTY . (Aged 31.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-18

409. ISABELLA TATE was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , twelve yards of thread lace, value 10 s. and one guinea the goods , chattles and monies of Lawrance Palk , esq .

LAWRENCE PALK sworn.

I was robbed of the thread lace; the money belonged to lady Elizabeth, my wife; the prisoner was my house maid , she lived with me till she was taken up; I had been absent from London a fortnight or three weeks, and when I returned I marked a number of guineas and put them in the place where the money was usually kept, in her dressing room; I marked fourteen or fifteen and put them in a purse which was kept in her pocket on a horse, in her dressing room; I believe it was the 22d of April, in the evening, I don't know the day of the week, I marked them and took down their dates, also, whether they were old or new guineas; I went into the dressing room immediately before the prisoner went in to light the fire, the day after I marked them, the 23d, I counted the guineas then, and found them right, fourteen or fifteen, I have got them now in my pocket and the list.

Mr. Knapp. Now over night you marked a certain number of guineas, you put them in a purse, and took a list; when you again came into the dressing room did you again take the guineas and compare them with the list? - I did not exactly campare them with the list then, but I found them right.

Q. Did you find them right from your recollection, or from actual comparison? - By my recollection. On the 22d of April I took a list of these guineas, but I did not examine them by the list the next morning, but I found them all right before she came in to light the fire; immediately as she left the room I went and examined them again and I found one missing.

Q. Do you mean to say for a certainty, and are you sure that there was any one less than there was before? - Yes, there was. I went down the stairs, called the prisoner to me, and told her to give me the guinea she took out of lady Elizabeth's purse; she denied having taken any; I then told her to shew me what money she had in her pocket, and she pulled out a guinea, which I had marked, and I can swear to.

Q. Have you kept that guinea separate? - Yes, I have, I then sent the housekeeper up stairs to lock up her room, and sent for one of the Bow-street officers; Mr. Kennedy came, she gave up the keys of her boxes, and I had them searched, and I found this piece of lace, I believe it

belongs to me, I missed just such a piece, and have compared it with some others, and it suits exactly.

Q. Did you take it out of her box? - No, Mr. Kennedy did.

Q. Did you see him do it? - I did not.

Q. You said you found it? - I meant to say that I sent for Mr. Kennedy and he searched the box.

Q. You say you had taken down a list on paper of a number of guineas which you put into Mrs. Palk's purse? - I did.

Q. There is but one guinea in dispute? - There is not.

Q. You say you looked at a number of guineas the next morning? - I did.

Q. Does your recollection now serve you to be accurate whether it was fourteen or fifteen? - I have not looked at the list; I cannot be positive now; I know there was one missing by the list, and I will tell you how, when I found one guinea missing I compared the rest with the list; I marked them down as I took them out of the purse; I found one missing; I took notice of the mark on that, and I found it answered exactly with the one on the list that was wanting.

Q. How can you know they were correct by the list when you did not take the trouble of comparing? - My memory may be indifferent, but it would serve me for a dozen hours.

Q. Pray in whose pocket had this purse been? - in nobodys pocket but lady Elizabeth Palk 's; I put it in her pocket myself.

Q. About what time was it you came up after the servant had been in? - I had reason to suspect that somebody took her money; I went in before the prisoner, and then I went to lady Elizabeth Palk 's room, which is next to her dressing room; immediately as the prisoner had been in and came out again I went into the room again, and found the guinea was missing; I ordered the lace at Honiton for my first lady, lady Mary Palk : I found six yards missing.

Q. You never knew the length of that lace of lady Mary Palk 's. How long has she been dead? - About three years.

Q. Then you did not see it for three years? - I did not.

Q. Then for what you know lady Mary Palk might have given it to the prisoner, as she was a servant in her time. How long had this servant been in the house? - More than four years.

Q. You had a good character with her? - We had and till this event happened I always found her deserving of it; I will do her the justice to say, till this accident happened I always found her industrious, and I thought honest.

Jury. Pray had lady Elizabeth been in the dressing room herself? - No, she had not.

Q. Had the other servants access to that room? - Most certainly.

CHRISTOPHERKENNEDY sworn.

I am an officer; I was sent for to Mr. Palk's, I went on Tuesday the 23d of April; I searched the box of the prisoner at the bar; I found this lace; I gave it to one of the women servants that were in the room, and the woman servant gave it to Mr. Palk, and he said it was his property.

Court to Mr. Palk. Is it lace for a lady's use or for gentlemens ruffles? - For a lady's use.

Court to Kennedy. Was there any charge about the guinea? - That was what I went for first.

Q. Was there any charge about the guinea? - Yes, there was.

Mr. Knapp. She did not give you the trouble of opening of her box? - She opened it herself.

Q. There were several boxes? - Yes, several.

Q. And nothing found but these two separate pieces of lace? - Nothing else; the two pieces were both together.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing the guinea only. (Aged 33.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the house of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-19

410. LUKE COATS was indicted for that he, on the 3d of February , unlawfully did hinder, oppose and obstruct one Thomas Cass an officer of the excise of our lord the King, then being on shore and in the due exercise of his office, seizing and securing, for the use of our lord the King, ten gallons of rum and forty gallons of geneva, which were then and there seized by the said Thomas Cass .

Indicted in a second COUNT for unlawfully hindering, opposing and obstructing the said Thomas Cass being an officer of the excise of our lord the King, in the due exercise of his office, on the same day, and same place.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. - , and the case by Mr. - .)

THOMAS CASS sworn.

I am an excise officer ; I received some information of some liquors being concealed at Hemley , in the house of Robert Bond , I went and searched the house, and found one cask of four gallons in the house, in a closet, Harris Thomson was with me; I searched the house; I went into the garden, and in a place made in the shape of a pig sty, covered over with straw I found thirteen casks, and two bags of tobacco; the prisoner was in Bond's house at that time, he was setting on the table; I knew the prisoner very well, he called us by our names as soon as we got into the house; we could not find any more; we thought it was the best way to go and get a cart, I went to a farm house and got a cart, and loaded these goods to carry them away in the cart; we proceeded about two miles till we came on to a Heath called Carver's-walk in Walvering field, it is a lonesome place, there is nothing but a barn on the Heath, just as we came to the barn twelve or fourteen men came out from the barn armed with hedge stakes, clubs and bludgeons; the prisoner was one, he and the rest took the horse by the bridle and turned him about, the prisoner in particular did, they called to us and bid us stop we had got far enough, and should not go any further; then Thompson jumped out of the cart, I continued in it a little time, but not long, I should have continued in the cart, but some of them called, knock him down, or throw your stick at him, if you can reach him; then they got to the cart and began to take the goods, throwing the goods out into the ditches, all the time we endeavoured to stop the horse, and when we stopped the horse they threw the goods out, they at last took the horse by the head and turned him about, and went on, continuing throwing the goods out, they were continually saying, you come to fight, why don't you fight? let us begin, but we kept them off, they could not come within reach of us; after the goods were gone we left the cart there; the farmer when the scuffle began he went away.

Q. What did they do when they had unloaded the cart? - We went back; we went home, and several of them followed with hedge stakes and bludgeons to see us quite away from the place.

Court. You was apprehensive for your own safety? - Yes.

HARRIS THOMPSON sworn.

I went with Thomas Cass to seize these spirits; I saw the defendant Luke Coats in the house at the time I went in with Mr. Cass.

Q. What was his behaviour? - Nothing particular; I was left with the goods at the time Mr. Cass went to get the cart, he came twice to me while I was standing to deliver the goods, and said d - nation take all informers; I assisted to take these goods into the cart; when we came to Carver's-walk Coats came and a dozen or fourteen men, unknown to me, armed with hedge stakes and bludgeons, the prisoner at the bar took hold of the fore horse and turned him about; I am an officer of the excise; the defendant knew me and called me by my name; he said the horses and cart should not go any further, and Luke Coats turned the horse round, and the others assisted him, by coming up and using ill language, they swore they would knock the old fellow down, meaning Mr. Cass, and they came and took the casks out, it was a low cart which they could reach as they were on the ground; we had no fire arms, we did all we could to resist, we defended ourselves with a tuck so that they should not come near; they drove the horses till they had got all the things out, and then Mr. Cass and I returned, and several of them followed us with sticks, and said we had better go home or else they would make us.

Prisoner. Did you ever know any thing bad of me before? - Never.

Jury. Did this man do any thing more than stop the horses? - Yes, he took out some of the tubs; this man turned the horses about, and then came to the head of the cart and took the things out.

Court. When they had turned the cart round they proceeded on the road, and brought the goods off? - Yes, they did.

Jury to Cass. Did you see him take any out? - Yes, but I believe he was in liquor.

Q. Pray what was Bond? - A smuggler. We had taken goods from him before, about half or three quarters of a year ago.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Confined six months in Newgate .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Ashurst.

Reference Number: t17930529-20

411. LEVY DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , a coachman's cloth coat, value 1 l. a pair of leather gloves, value 6 d. the goods of Bartholomew Nicholls .

AN INTERPRETER sworn.

BARTHOLOMEW NICHOLLS sworn.

I live at Fulham. On the 1st of April I lost a coachman's coat and a pair of gloves; the coat was worth 1 l. it was hanging in the stable when I left it; I missed it a little after two; it was my mistress's coat, she lives at No. 14, Upper Seymour-street .

WILLIAM NICHOLLS sworn.

On the 1st of April last I was in the stable in same Mews; I left the stable for about five minutes, I went to borrow a truss of hay at the next stable, and when I returned I met the prisoner coming out of the stable with a coachman's frock in an apron under his arm; I throwed down the truss of

hay from my back and ran and catched him by the collar; then he desired me to let him go, I would not let go; he said there was somebody at the top of the mews wanted to speak to me.

Q. Pray did he speak english? - Yes.

Q. And did he understand what you said to him? - Yes. And then he offered me his money and watch if I would let him go; I told him I did not want any thing of the kind, he should go back along with me to the stable, for he had got something more in his bag; I got him back to the stable and then I sent for somebody to come to my assistance, and then I sent to the house to let them know what had happened, and then they sent for the constable and he was taken to Marlborough-street; the constable emptied his bag and there was the coachman's great coat in the bag.

Prisoner. When I came through the street I called clothes, and as I came along to this door this man laid hold of me, two minutes after I had bought this great coat, and this man came up and seized me by the collar, and I told him if he would go back with me to the place I would shew who I bought it of.

William Nicholls . He never said any such thing.

Court to William Nicholls . Do you recollect when you went out whether the great coat was hanging up there or not? - It does not belong to our stable; he took it from another stable.

Court to Bartholomew Nicholls . That great coat belongs to your mistress; had you ever sold that great coat to the man? - I could not sell it, it was gone when I came back.

Prisoner. I bought the coat for fifteen shillings, and I sadly wanted the man to go back to shew him the person whom I bought it of.

Court. Have you got that man here now that you bought it of? - No, I wanted to go and shew him where I did buy it.

Court to Bartholomew Nicholls . How lately had you seen this great coat? - I had seen it about one when I left the stable, and I missed it when I came back again.

Jury to Bartholomew Nicholls . Is it customary for you to leave the stable door open? - I don't stand by myself, I saw it there when I left the place; it is a public stable in Seymour mews. (The great coat produced and deposed to.)

Jury to William Nicholls . Pray what time did you stop him? - A little after two.

Q. Pray who remained with you while you sent for assistance? - I sent a little boy; he wanted me to let him go several times; he pulled his money and watch out, but I would not let him go, because I thought he had something else in his bag belonging to us.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-21

412. ELIZABETH HUTCHINS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a muslin apron, value 5 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 4 s. a pair of womens leather gloves, value 12 d. the goods of Francis Warner .

FRANCIS WARNER sworn.

On the 27th of February I went out in the morning to my labour, my wife went out before me, she returned home about nine o'clock, and stopped at home about half an hour; I went

out between five and six, she returned to me and brings me the key, and I came home about six in the evening, and I found the door open, and the window open, this was after she came home in the morning; she had locked up the place and brought me the key; it appeared to me as if the door and window was forced open; the prisoner at the bar came to my house about three nights before, and asked me if I was not afraid of having my house broke open? I knew her before, she is a servant ; I made answer and said, no, why should I be afraid of having my house broke open? I think they had need bring something into my house instead of taking any thing out; she makes answer, Lord, Francis, I should be afraid of having it broke open; I lost an handkerchief, an apron and a pair of red gloves; the value of them altogether is ten shillings; the prisoner took them to a pawnbroker's to pawn; I have heard of it.

ANN WARNER sworn.

Q. What is the value of the things? - Ten shillings.

Court to Francis Warner . Do you know of your own knowledge that these things were in the house when you left it? - I do.

MARGARET HARTSHORN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Lawrence the pawnbroker. Elizabeth Hutchins , on the 4th of March, offered me an handkerchief and apron to pledge, which the prosecutor had given me orders to stop; I delivered them on the 9th of April into the prosecutor's own hands; they were not pawned, I stopped them.

Mr. Knapp. They were not pawned, Mrs. Hartshorn? - They were not. (Produced and deposed to.)

Q. You parted with them on the 9th of April? - I did.

Court. The same you delivered Mrs. Warner were the same you had of this girl? - They were.

Court to Prosecutor. How do you know them? - By the mark A. and N.

The prisoner called six Witnesses who gave her a good character, but said that she was rather silly and stupid.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-22

413. SAMUEL PENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , seven cotton handkerchiefs, value 5 s. 6 d. the goods of Ann Jordan , spinster.

ANN JORDAN sworn.

I live in Hayes-court ; I lost some cotton handkerchiefs; my brother will inform you the time; I know no more than the property was mine.

THOMAS MURRELL sworn.

I am brother-in-law to the last witness. There were seven cotton handkerchiefs with plain blue borders, they cost 10 s. I see the prisoner steal them; they were within the shop, hanging across a line.

Q. What kind of goods do you deal in? - Haberdashery, millinery and lace. I saw the prisoner take them away; I pursued him and never lost sight of him till he was taken; the patrole has them now in his possession.

SIMON SLOPER sworn.

At the time this man and some others cried stop thief! I was coming up Grafton-street; I pursued with them that were pursuing the thief; when I came up there were some people had him in

custody, and I asked who was the thief? they said the prisoner; I asked where the property was? and some man handed me the property, and I took it and handed the prisoner to the watch-house.

Court to Murrell. Did you deliver these handkerchiefs to the hands of the patrole? - I did not, I saw them delivered.

(The handkerchiefs produced and deposed to by Murrell, as the same he lost, and the property of his sister-in-law, marked by himself.

Prisoner. I was tried for this affair last sessions, and set at liberty for it.

Murrell. It was a mistake of the justice's, he bound us over to prosecute at the general sessions at Westminster? and when I attended I found the prisoner had been discharged before I came.

Court. You was not tried by a jury, you was discharged for want of prosecution.

Prisoner. I was just come from Bath; I have no friends here.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-23

414. HENRY BETTIMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , a screw, called a cap screw, value 4 s. the goods of John Fisher .

Indicted in a second COUNT laying it to be the property of our sovereign lord the King .

Indicted in a third COUNT for stealing seven pounds weight of base metal, value 4 s. the goods of John Fisher .

Indicted in a fourth COUNT laying it to be the property of the King.

JOHN FISHER sworn.

I am the master brewer .

JOHN FENNELL sworn.

I was employed at the Hartshorn Brewhouse in April last; the prisoner at the bar was at work there at times, he was at work there the 22d of April.

Q. Is the hartshorn brewhouse belonging to the victualling office? - It is so; in Lower East Smithfield, in Aldgate parish ; I believe we lost several things out, and I had a suspicion of the people that were the pumper s; I watched the prisoner and I saw him stoop down, and go to a private concealment while the others were gone down; he went to a private concealment that he had, and there he clapped his hands on one side, and put this cap underneath his bosom; when he got down, I set Mr. Lambert to stand opposite the gate to stop him going out; Mr. Lambert stopped him, he was going home just out of the gate, and Mr. Lambert was searching his bag; I told Mr. Lambert it was not in the bag; it was not, he said, and then he takes it from his side and gave it me himself.

Q. Did you try it? - It was tried before Mr. Bishop, Mr. Dawson and Mr. Lambert, and it fitted: this is what was made for an experiment in the brewery.

Q. To whom does this brewhouse belong? - To the crown.

Q. What is the value of it? - I think four shillings.

Prisoner's Counsel. What is it made of? - It is brass most of it; we call it a brass cap.

ROBERT DAWSON sworn.

I was sent for on the 22d of April; I was present when the prisoner was searched; I received the cap screw, I received this of Fennell, I believe, but they

were all three present, Fennell, Lambert and the prisoner, when I searched him.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY. (Aged 26.)

Recommended by the Jury .

Confined three months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-24

415. WILLIAM SHEPHERD was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , a watch, with an inside case gilt with gold, and the outside case with a tortoiseshell, value 3 l. and a gold seal, value 10 s. the goods of Charles Moore , esq. privately from his person .

CHARLES MOORE sworn.

I lost a watch and seals the 1st of May; the inside case gilt and the outside covered with tortoiseshell; I was in Covent-garden ; I was coming to town, and I believe I had drank rather too much; I came outside a good part of the way, and at last I took a post chaise, and the prisoner prevailed on me by some means or other, to let him get into the post chaise, and when I got out in Covent-garden at Mr. Stirling's I missed my watch; the prisoner was in the house at the same time with me, in Mr. Stirling's house he is a victualler I believe; on my missing my watch Mr. Stirling came, and on searching the prisoner found it on him; Mr. Stirling has got it.

- STIRLING sworn.

When Mr. Moore came into my house I heard him say that he had lost his money, and feeling about his breeches, says he, and I have lost my watch; when I came into the room the post boy that drove the chaise was in the parlour with Mr. Moore, and this man at the bar; I went to look at the chaise to see if I could find either money or watch, nothing was found there at all; the post boy followed out of the parlour to the chaise, and I said to him, you stop, for it will be necessary for you to clear yourself as well as the man; instead of which he immediately put the steps of the chaise up, shut to the door, mounted his horse and drove off as hard as he could; I then came into the parlour and searched Mr. Moore first, and I found in his pocket only eighteen pence and three-pence halfpenny, that was all the money he had, the watch he had not, and then I searched the prisoner, and found three shillings or three shillings and sixpence, I found nothing else in his pockets, but between the flesh of his thigh and his breeches there I felt the watch, and I desired him to give it me out, which he did. (The watch produced and deposed to by Mr. Moore.)

Prisoner. I was out of place, and I was told of one at Maidenhead, and I went down, and when I came to enquire for it, it did not suit them to keep any other than that they had got; I saw a chaise at the Sun, at Maidenhead; the chaise belonged to Slough, I was going to speak to the boy, I was going into the yard, and the gentleman asked me if I belonged to the chaise? I told him, no; says he, call the boy that belongs to it; I went into the yard and I saw the boy speak to him, and the boy and the gentleman came out, and what the agreement was I don't know, but the gentleman told him to give me a glass of liquor I went in and had it, it was a glass of rum; afterwards the boy and I had another, the gentleman told us to have it, the gentleman got into the chaise, and I was going to get on the box of the chaise, and he desired me to get inside; we came to Slough, and the same chaise went on with a pair of fresh horses; the gentleman told me to put

on his great coat, and I picked up this watch in the bottom of the chaise; whether it belonged to this gentleman or any other I did not know, therefore I was willing to keep it till it was advertised, or I was recompenced for it.

Court. You heard the gentleman talk about losing his watch? - No, not till we got to the Hotel, the gentleman then said he lost a gold watch, and this was a watch in a green case, and whether it did belong to him or no I did not know.

Court to Prosecutor. You say you was a good deal in liquor? - I was.

Q. Are you certain you did not drop the watch at the bottom of the chaise? - I am pretty confident I did not; I am not quite.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-25

416. JAMES BOOTH was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , eight pair of mens leather shoes, value 38 s. the goods of Alexander Muir , privately in his shop .

ALEXANDER MUIR sworn.

I am a shoe-maker . On the 30th of April there was a young man came in, about the size of the prisoner, and asked for a pair of false straps, about a quarter before nine in the evening; I said, yes, you may have them; says he, they are not for me, they are for my brother that is at the door; the prisoner came in, and took his buckle out of his shoe; while I was fitting the strap to the buckle he stood so as to shadow the light from me, close by me; while the first one that came in handed out the shoes, eight pair, to some others that stood at the door; I did not see him do this, but I turning about at the instant, I missed them off the shelves, and charged them with the theft, at that instant when I charged them with the theft, the young man that stood behind, said, I have none, and held up his two hands; I instantly shut the shop door and charged him with the theft; I beat with my heel on the floor for assistance to come up from the kitchen; the gentlewoman was coming from the kitchen; he that was behind got to the door and made his escape; the prisoner I had got hold of; I never saw none of the shoes after; they were the best sort of wax leather shoes, worth 38 s.

Prisoner. I went into that gentleman's shop to buy a pair of false straps, some other lad came in while I was buying them, and presently the man accused the other lad of stealing some shoes, and then he catched hold of me, and said, I was along with him.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-26

417. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Moses Akerman , about the hour of five in the afternoon, on the 27th of April , Jane Akerman , the wife of the said Moses Akerman . and others being in the said house, and feloniously stealing therein, a pair of mens leather boots, value 4 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 7 s. the goods of Janes Brace .

JAMES BRACE sworn.

The boots and linen sheets were moved, but not taken away, on the 27th of April, in the house that I lodge in, of Moses Akerman , No. 24, Butcher-row,

Temple-bar ; Moses Akerman lives in the house, and lets out part of it, in different tenements, he is the landlord.

Q. Were these boots and sheets in your lodging room? - They were in the one pair of stairs; I saw these boots, I laid them out of my hand sometime that week that this happened, in one corner of the room, they were not my own property, only in my care, they were removed on the 27th of April; I know they were there on Saturday morning, I am sure I saw them then; there were two beds in the room, and there were two upper sheets on each bed taken off, and laid in a heap, and the boots put on the sheets; I saw the beds made towards the evening; I was there about five o'clock and this happened between five and six.

Q. Was you at home when it happened? - I was not; I was sent for; I knew nothing till I was sent for home.

Mr. Knapp. These boots were not your own property? - They were not, they belonged to a gentleman whom I worked for.

Q. There were other people in the house? - There was one Richard Blany in the upper part of the house; the prisoner was catched on the premises.

Q. This other man is not here? - He is not.

Q. These sheets were let to you with the lodging? - They were.

Q. Then the sheets were the property of Mr. Akerman? - They were.

Court. In what way were these boots left with you? - They were left with me to do a job upon; I am a shoemaker by trade.

Q. What are the boots worth? - I valued them at four shillings.

Q. They are old boots? - They are so old, that they are worth that; they would sell for that; I would give it myself for them.

Q. How is the street door? - The door stands open a great part of the day. I am not at home all day, sometimes I find it open and sometimes I find it shut.

Mr. Knapp. Is it ever locked? - Yes.

Q. In the day time? - No, but it is in the night.

Court. Now this house door has it a latch to lift up? - It has, and a lock too.

JANE AKERMAN sworn.

I am the wife of Moses Akerman .

Q. Do you know the boots and the sheets that were removed? - I know the sheets very well.

Q. Do you know the day? - I cannot say I do; I believe it is three weeks ago, but I cannot be certain to the day.

Q. In whose room were they? - In Mr. Brace's room.

Q. Did any body get into his room? - Yes.

Q. Was the room locked when he went out? - When he went out he locked the door.

Court to Brace. Did you lock the door? - I did.

Mr. Knapp to Brace. When you went you always locked it? - I did.

Q. Had not the other man the other key? - I believe it was with my landlady.

Court to Mrs. Akerman. How was the street door? - The street door stands open.

Q. How was the door of Mr. Brace's room? - It was locked.

Q. When you went up did you find the door broke open? - No.

Q. When you went up was the door open? - When I went up with the person that was taken, the door was open.

Q. Did you find the prisoner in the room? - No, I did not; I saw him first

run out of my own passage, and I cried stop thief! a passage that goes just by the shop, a door for the lodgers to go in and out, so it is open all the day; it is the house passage; he was running from my passage, and he was stopped as he was running up Shire-lane.

Q. Had he any thing on him then? - I really cannot say.

Mr. Knapp. How many people were in the house besides you? - All the lodgers.

Q. Was Mrs. West in the house? - Yes.

Q. Was Mr. Blany in the house? - Yes.

Q. Were any other persons in the house? - Yes, a great many; all the lodgers were in the house.

Q. How many lodgers have you? - I have a great many, seven or eight, or it may be more.

Q. What time of the day was this? - Between five and six o'clock in the evening.

Q. We have heard talk about some boots? - They belonged to Mr. Brace.

Q. Have you heard that these boots were the prisoner's boots? - No.

Q. Then the prisoner's wife did not call and claim the boots, and they were delivered to her? Had not the prisoner's wife a pair of boots delivered to her when she called for them afterwards? - She had.

Q. There are two lodge in this room? - There are, Mr. Brace and Mr. Blany.

Q. Mr. Blany was at home at the time? - He was.

Q. You saw somebody run out of the place? - I saw the prisoner run out.

Q. Both these lodgers, both Brace and Blany have keys of the door? - Mr. Brace has one key, and the other key belongs to Mr. Blany and me.

Q. In point of fact the boots were not taken out of the room? - They were not.

JANE WEST sworn.

I am a married woman; my husband's name is Henry West ; I was sitting in my own room, I heard somebody go by the passage; I listened a while to hear if it was Mr. Brace; I heard a key turning in the door, Mr. Brace's door; I asked if that was Brace? there was no answer made; I asked a second time if that was Brace? to which no answer was made; I then went out of my room to the door, and I found the chair was against the door in the inside; with that the prisoner came and took the chair from against the door and went to come out, and I got into the street before him, and I cried out stop thief! I saw him in the street; on my alarm he was stopped in Great Shire-lane; I never lost sight of him.

Q. How far is that from the house? - One street.

Q. Did you see him come out of the room? - I did.

Q. Did you see what had passed in the room? - No more than that.

Q. Was there any violence used to the door? - No, it seemed to unlock quite easy.

Mr. Knapp. The chair was put against the door; what door was that? - The door of the room where the prisoner was in; the chair was put I suppose to prevent any person from going in.

Q. The door appeared to have no sort of violence done to it? - It opened as easy as ever.

Q. There are eight lodgers in this house I understand; do you know whether they were at home at this time? - Blany was at home; he works up three pair of stairs higher.

Q. Was Mrs. Akerman at home at the time? - She was.

Q. You say you lost sight of him? - No, I did not.

Q. Where does your house stand? - It is in Butcher-row, No. 24.

Q. In order to get into Shire-lane there must be two turnings? - Only one turning which goes up by the fishmonger's.

Q. You must lose sight of him at the turnings? - I did not; I was very quick footed.

Q. Did you hear of the prisoner having a pair of boots up at Brace's room? - There was none in Brace's room; there was in the house, and was delivered out to the prisoner's wife after he was taken up; they were old boots.

NICHOLAS SWINDLE sworn.

I work at Mr. Cooper's, coal-dealer, No. 15, Great Shire-lane; I was in my master's shop on Saturday evening about six o'clock; I heard an outcry of stop thief! I looked out and saw a great many people coming up, and a young man came up before me; there was a young man attempted to stop him, and I saw the prisoner push him down; he was meeting him; then I jumped out of the shop, catched the prisoner by the collar and stopped him, and then took him to Mr. Akerman's in Butcher-row, and they kept him till the constable was sent for.

Mr. Knapp. You took him and delivered him to a constable; you found nothing on him? - Nothing.

Q. He ran against the man that you described, and the man ran against him? - The man wanted to catch hold of him, and he shoved him down.

JOHN BEDDOW sworn.

On the 27th of April last, I was sent for between five and six o'clock, to take the prisoner into custody; I took him into custody at Mr. Moses Akerman 's in Butcher-row; Brace gave charge of him, with feloniously breaking into his apartments; I took the prisoner up stairs into his apartments and searched him, and found nothing but one small key and three pennyworth of halfpence; there was a pair of sheets folded up and a pair of boots lay on the top of them, and the beds were turned down.

Court to Brace. How many beds were there in the room? - Two.

Q. Were the sheets on the bed in the common way when you left the room? - They were; the beds were regularly made; when I returned, I came home and I looked at the prisoner in the lower part of the house, and then went up stairs, and found each of the beds turned down from the blankets, and there was a pair of sheets lay on a heap on my own bed, and the boots which lay in the side of the room were put on them; when I went out they were on a box, on the side of the room.

Q. Are you sure you did not leave them on the sheets? - I am clear I did not.

Mr. Knapp. Whether the sheets were removed or the boots while you was out you don't know? - I do not.

Q. You know this is a capital charge that will affect the man's life? - On my oath I don't know.

Q. Have you not learned it since you came into this court? - I have not.

Q. Have you not heard that there is a forty pounds reward on the conviction of house breakers? - I have heard of such a thing.

Q. Don't you know that if this man is convicted you will be entitled to a proportion of it? - I am not throughly acquainted with the circumstance.

Q. Have you not heard that there is a forty pounds reward, and that people that give their evidence are entitled to a share of it; if this man is convicted don't you know that you will be entitled to share in the reward? - I don't wish to look after my property in such a light; I don't know I should be entitled to it.

Q. You don't mean then to take any share in this reward? - I don't wish to get my bread in this line.

Q. If this man is convicted do you mean to refuse to take any share of it? - Sir, I have not come here with that view.

Q. That is any thing but an answer. Do you mean to refuse your share in the reward if this man is convicted? - Sir.

Q. Don't you understand me? - I have not come hear with that view.

Q. I will have an answer before I have done? - I don't think I should take it; nor I am sure I should not; I don't come with that view; I thank God I think I can do without it; I don't want any such thing.

Q. You come hear then purely for the sake of justice? - I do.

Mr. Knapp to the Constable. It was a small key you found on the prisoner? - It was. There were two other keys in the room, and a screw driver, one of which opened the door very well, and which a person in the room observed the prisoner endeavouring to put into his pocket; this person was in the room when I went up.

Q. Where did you first find the prisoner? - In the shop below stairs; I took him and led him up stairs.

Q. How many keys had that man of him? - Two, one of which unlocked the door perfectly well.

Q. Was there any conversation between the prisoner and that man about the keys? - Not in my presence. The prisoner denied knowing any thing about them when I asked him to his face.

Q. Then it appeared that this other had keys about him, one of which opened the door, and which he talked about to the prisoner, and the prisoner denied knowing any thing about them? - He did. The person at Bow-street declared on oath that he had the keys of the prisoner.

Prisoner. There was a man in the house had a pair of boots of mine to sole and heel, he lodged in the garret; I went up to see if they were done, just as I came to the landing place I saw a man run out, and the woman after him, he ran down Shire-lane, and the woman after him; I was there after him to see what it was, and just as I got to the coal shed the man came and took hold of me.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing but not of breaking and entering . (Aged 27.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-27

418. JAMES GARDINER was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Boulton , about the hour of two in the afternoon, on the 1st of May , and feloniously stealing therein, a base metal watch, value 2 l. a base metal watch chain, gilt with gold, value 1 s. a gold seal, value 8 s. two pair of shoe buckles, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of the said William Boulton .

WILLIAM BOULTON sworn.

I have chambers in the Inner Temple ; I left my chambers on the 1st of May, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning; I locked the door, it is a spring lock; I returned about two or three in the afternoon; I found the door of the chambers the same I left it, fast, the passage window was up, which I left shut at my going out in the morning; the passage was in the chambers, the shutters were fastened when I went out in the morning, and when I returned they were opened; they got in at the front window by forcing the shutter, the shutter was split, the chamber was on the ground floor.

Q. How was the window left? - Fastened by a latch and screw. When I came back I found the shutter open, the screw had fell down; when I went out the inside shutter was shut; when I returned the inside shutter was opened.

Q. How far is this window from the ground? - Between two and three feet, I believe.

Q. Was there any mark of feet about the window? - No.

Q. Was there room for a man's body to pass through the window? - Yes.

Q. Could a man with tolerable ease get in and out? - Yes, by making a little effort and spring on the outside. On searching my drawers I missed several things.

Q. How did you find the room on your return? - In the same state I left it, except these drawers which had been opened.

Q. Were these drawers locked when you left them? - The keys were in the drawers. I missed a watch and a pair of buckles and some spoons; there was some linen taken out of the drawers but not taken away; I missed all in the indictment.

Q. What may be the value of all the articles you missed? - About five or six pounds.

Q. Why do you charge the prisoner with this? - He took the things to different pawnbrokers.

Q. Did you see the things in the hands of the pawnbrokers yourself? - Yes, the pawnbrokers are here; one pair of silver buckles I recovered on the afternoon of that day; I received the rest about five or six days afterward.

Mr. Knowlys. What day do you say this was? - On the first of May.

Q. You had left your chambers as early as ten o'clock, therefore at what precise time these chambers were robbed you cannot tell? - Only by information.

Q. Of your own knowledge you cannot say when this robbery was effected, except between ten in the morning and two or three in the afternoon. Have you a laundress? - I have.

Q. The laundress of course has a key to have access to them? - She has.

Q. Whether she had been or not, of course we can know only from her.

Q. She is not here? - She is not.

Q. For ought you know the window might have been left open by her? - It is not very likely.

Q. She had a power so to have left it? - She never goes into our chambers between the hours of ten and three.

Q. She had access at any time if she chose it, and whether she did that day or not you cannot say? - I cannot.

Q. She might incautiously have left the chamber door or window open? - I never knew her guilty of that action.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I produce a pair of silver buckles, which I received of the prisoner the first of May in the afternoon, between three and four o'clock, I live in Long-acre, at Mr. Brown's.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before? - Yes, I know his person; I lent him fifteen shillings on them, I gave him the duplicate.

Mr. Knowlys. What day did you say this was? - On the first of May, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, as nigh as I can guess.

Q. Have you the buckles here? - Yes.

JAMES VINCENT sworn.

I have got a watch and a pair of buckles, which were pledged with me by the prisoner the first of May in the afternoon, and a gold seal, beside there is a metal chain to a watch.

Q. Did you know his person? - I am certain of the man, I gave him a duplicate, he gave his address, No. 15, White-lion-street; but no such person was ever heard of there when we went to look for him.

Mr. Boulton called on me the 3d of May following, and enquired if any such goods had been offered to me, I looked over the plate drawer and there I found the articles which he had missed.

Mr. Knowlys. You gave the utmost value you could advance upon them? - I did, he even wanted more.

JOHN SHALLARD sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner, I took him the 13th of May, I found nothing on him but some duplicates, nothing which answered to this robbery.

Mr. Knowlys. You took him at his father's house I believe? - No, I took him in Drury-lane.

Q. You found nothing of this? - I did not.

MARY SMITH sworn.

I am servant of Mrs. Rebecca Anderson .

Q. Do you know the young man at the bar? - I do, my mistress lives in Russell-court, next door to the play house, at the prisoner's father's, she rents the first floor; she is a lady who has frequent visits of gentlemen.

Q. Do you know of any person being in your mistress's company on the first of of May? - I don't know whether it was the first of May or the second of May, I don't know precisely the day of the month.

Q. Do you recollect being called up by your mistress to pawn any thing for a gentleman who was there? - I do, it was a pair of buckles, I believe it was between two and three in the afternoon.

Q. Do you recollect whether the buckles were produced to you that were intended to be pawned? - I should know them again if I was to see them (shewn the buckles pawned with Brown) these are the buckles, the gentleman produced them to me for the purpose of being pawned.

Q. Did you according to your mistress's desire, take them to be pawned? - I did not because I was busy washing, I said Mr. Gardiner's son was below and I would ask him to go, he was just come in to dinner and the gentleman gave me the buckles and I went down and asked James Gardiner to go and pledge them for me, because I was very busy in washing.

Q. Did he in consequence of your desire take them? - He did, he returned in about a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you see yourself what it was that he brought home in exchange for these buckles? - He gave me the money, fifteen shillings and the duplicate.

Q. What did you do with that fifteen shillings, I took it up stairs and gave it to the gentleman who was in my mistress's company.

Q. Do you know what became of that gentleman after giving him the money and the duplicate? - He went out for about half an hour and then returned again to my mistress.

Q. Had you ever seen this person for whom these buckles were pawned at your mistress's before? - No, never, he only came as a visitor that day.

Q. When he returned again did any thing further pass? did young Gardiner go up when he gave you the duplicate and the money? - No, he stayed below and eat his dinner, then the gentleman returned again. My mistress called me up stairs, and the gentleman said he had not sufficient money for what he wanted, and he pulled a watch out of his pocket, and a pair of buckles out of his shoes; he desired them to be pledged as the other were.

Q. Do you think if these things were shewn you you should recollect them again, or do you think you should not? - I think I should recollect them again.

Q. You say as to the first buckles you are sure of them? - I am, (shewn the buckles and the watch pawned with Vincent) Them are the buckles, and that is the watch, I brought them down and asked him if he would go out and pawn them as he had done the first pair.

Q. Did he as you desired him go and pawn them? - He did.

Q. Do you recollect what he brought in for them? - One pound fifteen shillings I think; I cannot rightly be positive.

Q. Was there any duplicate brought back? - Yes, there was; the one pound fifteen shillings and the duplicate he gave to me, and I went up stairs and gave it to the gentleman before my mistress's face.

Q. Have you ever seen that gentleman since? - I have not.

Q. Are you quite sure that the transaction took place in the way you have related it? - I am quite positive.

Q. Gardiner then took these things to pawn at your desire, you being desired by the gentleman to pawn them? - Yes, he did.

Court. How long have you lived with this girl of the town? - Seven weeks.

Q. Where did you live before? - In Newman-street, with Dr. Randall; I lived there a year and a half, my mistress died, and then I left him.

REBECCA ANDERSON sworn.

I live in Russell-court.

Q. Who keeps the house? - John Gardiner ; he is the father of the prisoner at the bar.

Q. We have heard that you are a lady that sees company? - I do.

Q. That is your unfortunate situation? - It is.

Court to Mary Smith . Do you recollect what day of the week this was? - I believe it was Tuesday.

Rebecca Anderson . The first of this person's coming was between twelve and one; I think it was either Monday or Tuesday, he told me, after a little conversation, that he had no money, and told me to call up my servant, and ask my servant to go and pledge the buckles.

Q. What time did he come to you? - I think it was between twelve and one; he came about a quarter after twelve. The buckles had little knobs about them. (shewn the buckles produced by Brown.) They are the buckles he pawned first, I think they are the same buckles.

Q. Did you in consequence of his desire call up your servant to pawn these buckles.

Q. Do you know whether she took them to pawn or not? - She told me Mr. Gardiner's son was below, she was very busy washing, she went down and came up directly, and said she had sent them by Gardiner, but I did not see Gardiner.

Q. Was any thing produced, as the produce of pawning these buckles? - She brought up the ticket and fifteen shillings, the pawnbroker's duplicate.

Q. To whom was that ticket and duplicate given? - To the gentleman.

Q. Had you ever seen him before? - Yes, two or three times, but I don't know his name, or any thing of him besides.

Q. When he had got this fifteen shillings and the ticket, the produce of these buckles, what became of him? - Then he told me he was going a little way on business, and he would return in half an hour; he returned and told me he had not money enough for what he was going to do, therefore he pulled out the watch from his pocket, and a pair of buckles out of his shoes, he proposed having them likewise to be pledged as he did the other; I applied to the servant again to pledge them, I called her up, she told me as before that she would send Mr. Gardiner's son, the young man at the bar.

Q. Do you know what they produced? - One pound sixteen shillings.

Q. Who produced the one pound sixteen shillings? - The same servant as before, and it was given to the gentleman.

Q. Have you ever seen that person since? - No, never since.

Q. I don't know whether you have seen the second pair of buckles and the watch? - (shewn them) I think it is the same buckles, and I think the same watch, but I had them so short a time in possession.

Q. Did he stop long after he got the produce of these buckles and watch? - About half an hour or three quarters.

Court. Do you know what business the prisoner follows? - I believe it is a carpenter; his father is a carpenter and joiner.

Q. Your servant was busy washing that day, who let this gentleman in? - The servant she let the gentleman in, and he came up stairs to me.

Q. Did the servant let him out too? - Yes.

Q. I believe when these things were to be pawned you sent for the servant? - I called her up; she came into the room, and the gentleman gave her the things.

Q. Was the gentleman in boots or shoes? - I don't know whether the gentleman was in boots.

Q. You must know that! The gentleman was in boots, was not he? - No, he was not, he was in shoes.

Q. Was his hair powdered, or did he wear a wig? - His hair was not powdered at all, nor did he wear a wig, it was his own hair tied behind.

Q. Cocked hat or a round hat? - It was a round hat I am pretty sure.

Court to Mary Smith . Did you let the gentleman in on this occasion? - Yes.

Q. Did you make any particular remark about the gentleman's boots? - Seeing a strange gentleman I never looked at him.

Q. Do you remember whether he was in boots or not? - Yes, I observed he was in boots, and had a blue great coat on with plated white buckles.

Q. Was any thing said about his hat? was there no conversation between you and your mistress about his hat? did not you say he must be an officer by the cock of his hat? - I don't remember.

Q. Did you see any hat at all? - I did not take notice.

Q. You took some notice of his wig; you let him in and went in and out twice. Did not you make any remark about his wig? - I cannot remember.

Q. Do you remember whether he was an old man or a young man? - I did not take notice.

Q. Was he in mourning? - I cannot say; he had a great coat on.

Q. Do you remember whether his hair was drest or not? - I believe it was dressed.

Q. His hair was powdered then? - Yes, it was.

The prisoner called six witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s. but not of breaking and entering. (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER

Reference Number: t17930529-28

419. ANN GILDER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Dobree , about the hour of one in the afternoon, of the 27th of May , the said John Dobree and others of his family being in the said dwelling house, and stealing two pair of silver shoe buckles, value 3 l. the goods of the said John Dobree .

SAMUEL JONES sworn.

I live in the house of Mr. John Dobree , I was standing last Monday, the 27th of January, in the shop; I heard the breaking of the shop window; looking round I saw the prisoner at the bar with her hand and arm in the window, it was between one and two o'clock in middle of the day.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before that time? - I never saw her before. I jumped over the counter and ran out of doors, and catched hold of her arm; she had got then about a dozen yards from the window; as soon as I got up to her I found these two pair of buckles on her; I catched hold of her and brought her into the shop with these buckles.

Q. Do you remember where abouts these two pair of buckles were in the shop? - These two pair of buckles were in the window at the time she broke it; I took them from that hand which arm was all bloody, with the cut, which the force had given when she struck against the glass; I sent for an officer at Bow-street, and had her taken there, and she was committed.

Prisoner. I have got nothing to say in my defence, I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

I know nothing further than being fetched to take the prisoner into custody.

Court to Jones. Who were in the house at the time besides you? - There were other people in the shop; all the whole family were in the house, Mr. Dobree was in the house, but did not see the hand and arm in as I did.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 18.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST

Reference Number: t17930529-29

420. ELIZABETH BIGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , a black silk cloak, value 1 l. 1 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. a check linen apron, value 1 s. a muslin cap, value 2 s. a cotton shawl, value 2 s. a linen shift, value 1 s. 6 d. and a callico muslin pocket handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of George Southo .

ELIZABETH SOUTHO sworn.

I am the wife of George Southo . On the 23d of March I was going into the country; my father had been very bad with the gout; when I had been up stairs to pack my clothes up I says to Elizabeth Biggs , (she was my servant ,) I should stop for the course of two or three days, and I told her to go and get the key of Mr. Morgan's room, who was a gentleman who lodged in the house; I bid her go down into the bar to get the key to make Mr. Morgan's bed; I told her not to go out of the way while I was gone for very likely I might stay three or four days; I returned back between eleven and twelve the same night; I hung that black cloak on the chair back; I keep the Ben Johnson's Head, Pelham-street, Spitalfields; I got up to make six pennyworth of brandy and water, and being very much agitated in my mind on account of my father being so bad, I did not recollect the cloak till the next morning; in that same room where she had been making the bed, was a closet where I always put the dirty linen; I did not go to bed till very near four o'clock in the morning, in the morning about a quarter past seven the other servant came to inform me that Elizabeth Biggs was not in the house, and that when she went down stairs she found the street door left open, and the bar which used to fasten the door was put against the door, to keep the door open, and the key of the closet was taken away where the foul linen was; I lost one cap a pair of cotton stockings, one coarse apron, a black cloak and several other articles, to the value of thirty shillings; I had always used her with the greatest tenderness that any person could; the things were put into the closet, and the

key used to hang in the bar, at the same place where the key of the room was; I never saw the things after she went away not till the time she was taken; she was taken the 11th of May, when she was examined before the magistrate she had got on a pair of cotton stockings and a coloured apron, part of the things that was missing; Mr. Southo went to Clerkenwell Prison to her on Sunday the 12th of May, and she acknowledged where the other things were; on the 13th I went and see my own cloak; she had put it in pawn at one Kendall's, Brick-lane, Old-street, for ten shillings and six pence, and then it was fetched out by one Mrs. Holloway; she bought the duplicate of Elizabeth Biggs for four shillings.

SARAH HOLLOWAY sworn.

I know the prisoner Elizabeth Biggs . As nigh as I can guess about seven weeks ago yesterday, she came into the shop and waited while I served two people, I then asked her her business? and she asked me if I wanted to buy a ticket of a cloak? I told her I did not want one; she said she was in great distress, and that she had not had any victuals to eat since the day before; I asked her how she came so distressed? she told me she had been bad of a fever near on three months; I told her as she was so distressed, I did not want a cloak, I would let her have some victuals, and if I heard any body wanted it I would let her know; in about an hour and a half she came again and asked if I had heard of any body? and I told her no; then she begged me to buy it; accordingly I did buy it; I gave her four shillings for the duplicate, to the best of my recollection there was a shawl and a cloak, they were pawned at Mr. Kendall's Brick-lane; I sent for them, and they were brought to me; the officer has got them now.

ROBERT HARRIS sworn.

I am a constable at the public office in Worship-street; I have got a cloak and a shawl, and some other things; after the gentleman had been robbed he came and laid information at our office Worship-street; I knew the prisoner, and some time afterwards I apprehended her, and on her there was an apron and a pair of stockings; after that we found a cloak, a shawl, a cap and a shift in Mrs. Holloway's possession; they were delivered to me before the magistrate at the office; Sarah Holloway was there. (Produced.)

Holloway. This cloak and shawl I believe are the same I had of Harris the Pawnbroker.

Q. You are not sure of it? - Yes, I am perfectly sure.

Court to Harris. Did the prisoner say any thing about these things? - She said the cloak, &c. was there at Mrs. Holloway's.

Q. Did she say how the things came there? - She did not tell me how they came there; I went along with Mrs. Southo to the house of Mrs. Holloway, and there they were; I told her to come with me before the magistrate, and she did the same day without any summons or any thing; the stockings were on her legs, and the apron was on her side. (Deposed to by Mrs. Southo.)

SARAH COMER sworn.

Elizabeth Biggs and I lived fellow servants together, with Mrs. Southo. On Sunday morning the 24th of March the prisoner got up near about seven in the morning, and left me in bed; when I came down I found the door open, and when my mistress and master got up they missed the property, and then we never saw any more of her till the 11th of May; when we were at the office the constable took a pair of stockings

off her legs, and an apron off her sides; after that we went to Mrs. Holloway's and found the cloak.

Prisoner. On Sunday morning I got up and left my mistress Southo, and went out, and left the door open, and in about two months afterwards I met with the officer, and he said I must go with him to the office, and I never owned any thing, but my master came to me to the prison, and said if I would confess where the things were, so that he might get his property again, I should not be hurted.

Court to Mrs. Southo. Do you know whether there was any promise made to her or not? - There was not; it is false what she says.

GUILTY . (Aged 22)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17930529-30

421. HANNAH FINDALE was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , a red morocco leather pocket book, with a silver lock, value 2 s. a pair of steel scissars, value 6 d. a double bladed knife, value 6 d. and two pair of steel nippers, value 4 d. the goods of Alexander Caldcleugh , privately from the person of Elizabeth his wife .

ELIZABETH CALDCLEUGH sworn.

My husband's name is Alexander. I was going into Covent-garden on Friday the 15th of April last, with Mr. Caldcleugh and his brother, between four and five in the afternoon, we were going in at the entrance in Bow-street , we were going to the pit; the doors were not open; we stood there about one minute, not more; there was no body standing behind me; the prisoner was on my right hand; I felt something at my pocket; I put my hand immediately in my pocket and seized her hand in the bottom of my right hand pocket; I immediately missed my pocket book by the weight of it; I kept her hand fast; I immediately called out, this woman has picked my pocket; my husband came round and seized the prisoner's right hand, and I never let go her left hand, which was in my pocket; on looking I found my petticoat was cut down the whole length of my pocket, my pocket hole before was very short; the pocket was hanging out of the hole she had cut, my watch was in the bottom of that pocket where I felt her hand, she had got hold of the watch when I laid hold of her; the pocket book was found in the evening of that day.

Q. Then the pocket book was missing the time you caught her hand in your pocket? - It was; it was a red morocco pocket book, and those articles in the indictment were in it.

Q. You had no reason to suppose it was taken at any other time? - I had felt but a minute before in my pocket, and found my watch and pocket book safe.

Q. Have you any doubt it was at this moment you lost your pocket book? - I have no doubt.

Q. What is the value of it? - A few shilling. She was searched, there was nothing found on her; she was taken to the house in Bow-street and searched immediately.

Prisoner. I was above an hour and a half in custody before ever the pocket book was found, or brought against me.

JOHN MILLER sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Bow-street. About half after seven I was coming along Bow-street, and I was told there was a little boy had picked up a pocket book;

I went after the child, and he had it in his hand wet; I took it from him, and have kept it ever since. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I never set my eyes on the pocket book nor knew what I was accused of.

Jury to Prosecutrix. Was there any croud collected behind you? - There was none; I came there very early, and I put my hand in my pocket a minute before, and had it.

GUILTY,

Of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 47.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-31

422. THOMAS YATES was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a cloth coat, value 10 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 3 s. three yards of woollen cloth, value 18 s. three linen table cloths, value 10 s. the goods of Cornelius Hatch ; a callico gown, value 3 s. the goods of Elizabeth Price ; a small wooden box, value 1 d. a check apron, value 6 d. and five shilling in monies numbered; the goods and monies of Emma Hatch , in the dwelling house of William Walldon .

CORNELIUS HATCH sworn.

I am a taylor ; I am a lodger; I lodge with William Walden , he is the landlord and lives in the house.

Q. Did you lose any property at any time? - Yes.

Q. Was all the property in one room? - Yes; Elizabeth Price is my niece and Emma Hatch is my mother; she is a widow ; we have two rooms on the first floor, it is in No. 14, Red Lyon-passage, Red Lyon-square .

Q. What day did you miss these things? - Tuesday the 7th of May, about six o'clock in the evening.

Q. When had you seen them last before they were missing? - I had seen the piece of cloth in the afternoon; it was only brought in between twelve and one that day; it was in the front room.

Q. What time did you miss them? - Just after six at night.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take them? - I did not.

Q. Was he a lodger in your house? - No, but I had seen him before many times; I was up at the time in the garret at work; as soon as the alarm was given I ran down stairs, and I found the drawer open, and the clothes gone from my room, a cloth coat, a cloth waistcoat, the woollen cloth; my mother missed the other things.

Q. Did you pursue the prisoner? - No.

Q. Have you ever seen any property that was missing? - Yes.

Q. How soon did you see it after it was missing? - The Friday following, this happened, on the Tuesday; Elizabeth Price my niece brought them in; I have had the care of them since; I have brought them now. (Produces the coat waistcoat and the woollen cloth.)

Mr. Knowlys. You live in Red Lyon-passage; it is a narrow passage? - It is.

Q. The houses are very close to each other, and an alarm very easily communicates of course? - Yes.

Q. I believe you heard no alarm till after the thief had got out of the way, clearly from Miss Price? - No.

Q. I believe you was at work in the story immediately over that room from whence the robbery was committed? - No, I was at work in the garret, and this was in the one pair of stairs.

Q. Pray how was the alarm communicated to you at first? - My niece

hallooed on the stairs, or at the room door, and called up to me, and said I was robbed.

Q. Did she call you by name first, and then tell you, you was robbed? - I cannot say that.

Q. Did she tell you you was robbed before you came down stairs to her? - Yes, she called me and told me I was robbed.

Q. She called, you came down, and then she informed you, you was robbed? - She said, come down, you are robbed.

Q. She did not call to the neighbours at all, nor threw up the window at all? - I believe she ran down after the prisoner.

Q. I would ask you whether your niece did not describe to you, that the person who had robbed you had thrown her down in the room, and held a knife over her, and threatened her if she made any alarm? - She did.

Q. You called Mr. Macphaile over, and he came over? - He did.

Q. Now I ask you whether when you saw that bed, it had any signs of any person being thrown down on it, and whether Mr. Macphaile did not say so in the face of your niece who told this story? - He has represented it so, he has hinted something of that kind.

Q. Now we come about hints. Has not he said so to you? - He said he should wish to speak what he knew.

Q. Did not he tell you that, that was part of what he knew, that your niece had told a story, because there was no marks of violence on the bed? - He said he should wish to be on the trial.

Q. For what reason? - He is to give his reasons I suppose.

Q. Did not he so hint to you? - Yes, he has.

Q. On your oath did not he so express to you in the room, in the presence of your niece; you must not shelter your niece, though, she is your niece? - He did not say so at that time.

Q. At what time? did not you hear him say so? - After that I did.

Q. When was it? - He said he should wish to come on the trial.

Q. That is very different. When was it he told you that he observed there were no marks of violence on the bed, that your niece said she had been thrown down upon? - I cannot exactly recollect the day.

Q. How long after your niece's story was it? - It was not long.

Q. Now we talk about hinting, I believe it is not the first time your niece has hinted that you was robbed? - I never was robbed before.

Q. Was no house in which you have lived in robbed before? - Not that I recollect.

Q. Has not your mother been robbed? - It was not my mother, it was a cousin of mine, who lives in the same house of Mr. Macphaile.

Q. Did not she accuse your cousin who was proved before all the world to be innocent? How many times has your niece made accusations of robbery against other persons, which have proved to be unfounded? - I never heard of any but that.

Q. Never heard of any but that, and there every body was convinced that your niece told a story on the business? - That does not concern me.

Q. Was not this man very well known in that neighbourhood? - He was.

Q. And did not he bear a very excellent character in that neighbourhood? - I don't know nothing to his character.

Q. Don't you know he was extremely respected and bears a good character? - He was no acquaintance of mine.

Q. Upon your oath have you not heard a very good character given of him

in that neighbourhood? though the answer comes with difficulty I will have it? - Not that I recollect.

Q. Do you mean to say that it is matter of recollection? have not you been told by all the neighbours that he bears a good character? - I cannot recollect.

Q. Will you swear they did not tell you? why that man that you accuse is as honest a man as any in the neighbourhood? - I cannot tell.

Q. You must know one way or the other. You heard no alarm of this till this matter was over? - No.

Q. And this was about six o'clock in broad day light, in a place where the man was well known.

ELIZABETH PRICE sworn.

I am the niece of Mr. Hatch; I live with him; he was robbed on Tuesday the 7th of May; the prisoner at the bar came and rang the bell at the door below, about six o'clock, and I went down to him, and he asked me if Mrs. Hatch was at home? I told him, no; and then he asked me if Mr. Hatch was within? and I told him yes; and then he went away, and I shut the street door after him and came up stairs, and I was at the fire place when he came in to Mr. Hatch's room, up one pair of stairs; the street door stands on a latch, and then he shut the middle door that goes into the front room, there is a back room and a front room, and the middle door is between the two rooms, and he left the back room wide open, and then I got away from the fire place and got to the foot of the bed.

Q. How came you to go to the foot of the bed? - I knew it was the man that had been talking with me at the street door. Then he tosses me on the bed; then I thought to have hallooed when he pushed me down on the bed; but he produced his knife, the knife had two blades, he opened it and he called me an impudent hussey, and said if I dare to halloo he would cut my throat from ear to ear; then I laid still, and heard him go to the drawer, it was the second drawer, he took out a red waistcoat, and piece of cloth, and a green coat, and as for the third drawer I cannot say, because I cannot say I was quite sensible when he went to it; then he went about his business.

Q. What did he do with these things? - He took them with him.

Q. Do you know any thing of any table cloth? - Yes, there were three table cloths missing; I did not see him take them.

Q. Do you know any thing of a callico gown? - I do; that was mine I did not see him take it.

Q. There are a wooden box, a check apron and five shillings in money? - I don't know any thing of them; they were missing; they were all in the same room.

Q. Were they missing from the drawers? - They were.

Q. Did you say any thing about this at the time - I made the alarm when he was gone as well as I could.

Q. Who did you see on that alarm? - I saw a good many people; I saw my uncle, he came down stairs.

Q. Was this man pursued at all at the time? - No, not then, nobody went after him then; my uncle was undressed, not fit to go after him.

Q. Were the other people undressed? - No.

Q. How came it nobody went after him? - Upon my word I cannot say.

Q. Did you ever see any of these things again? - Yes. On the 10th of May, I let my brother in at the street door at twelve o'clock from school, there came a man by and asked me if I was the person that had swore that innocent young man's life away? I told him I did not

know what he meant; then he said if I would go along with him he would give me some of the property back again; and another man came up, a bricklayer's labourer, and he said that I had no need to be frightened, I will see you safe there and back again; then I went with the man to fetch the clothes, when this bricklayer's labourer came up, I went along with him, and I went to a house in Eagle-street, across Red Lyon-square, and when I went in, this bricklayer's labourer left me to this other man, and the man gave me the green coat, a piece of cloth and a red waistcoat, and there came some bad women up in the room, and they bid him to let me go about my business; then I came home with the clothes.

Q. How old are you? - Fifteen.

Q. What business do you follow? - My uncle keeps me.

Q. None of the other articles have ever been found, have they? - No, none.

Mr. Knowlys. You have told this story several times have you not? So this was about six o'clock? - It was near there.

Q. Mr. Macphaile lives very near opposite to you? - He does.

Q. You say the prisoner rang the bell and you went down; how was he dressed? - He was dressed in a light coloured coat.

Q. Are you sure it was a light coloured coat? - I am.

Q. Which way did he go when you told him your aunt was not at home? - I cannot say; I shut the door immediately.

Q. What lock has it? - A latch only.

Q. It was but a very few minutes when you saw him again? - I had but just got up stairs to the fire place, and then I saw him again.

Q. The door of this back room communicates with the stair case? - It does.

Q. Therefore the door of this back room would enable you to have gone up to your uncle's? - Yes.

Q. When the prisoner came in, was not you a good deal surprised that he should come in? - Yes, I was, I knew it was him that I had left at the door.

Q. Did not you ask him what he came for? - No, I did not.

Q. How did that happen? - It surprised me to I did not speak to him.

Q. You was a good deal alarmed? - I was.

Q. Pray as you was alarmed, why did did not you call out for your uncle? - Why when he shut the middle door I thought I could get out of the middle door.

Q. When he first came in he shut the middle door; you was by the fire place at this time, the back door was open, but instead of moving to the door you moved to the bed? - The bed faces the stair case.

Q. Instead of going up stairs to your uncle you went to the bed? - I got to the bed post; he would not give me time to get out; when he saw me going out, by that he pushed me on the bed.

Q. Then you was going out at the back door; how came it you did not tell us this before? - I was going strait to get out, and he pushed me strait on the bed.

Q. How came you to say that you went and laid hold of the bed post? - I said I got to the bed post.

Q. You could have got to the back room door? - Yes, I could.

Q. Then as you was alarmed and could have got to the back room door, why did not you? why should you stop at the bed? - I made an attempt to go to the door.

Q. It is not the direct way from the fire place to the back room? - Yes, it is.

Q. There you stopped? - Yes.

Q. By this attempting to push you you stopped? - I cannot say, I might stop at the bed.

Q. Did you or did you not stop at the bed before he attempted to push you? - I did.

Q. Why did you? - I don't know upon my word.

Q. I am sure I cannot guess the reason; this frightened you of course. Did not you scream out as every girl does who is frightened? - No, he said if I dare to halloo out he would cut my throat from ear to ear.

Q. But before this it takes some time before he can say all these words and produce his knife, you never saw any thing of the knife then? - When he pushed me on the bed, he put his hand into his waistcoat pocket and pulled out his knife, and opened both blades.

Q. So here he stood, first of all, having made the threat, he opens both the blades, and there you see him in the operation, opening both the blades, one would not do for the purpose? - I see him open both.

Q. You was very much alarmed, after this you had hardly your senses about you? - I cannot say I had.

Q. And yet you say you particularly noticed him taking out a great coat a waistcoat, and the piece of cloth; you particularly observed from what drawer he took it, this coat, waistcoat and piece of cloth from, that it was the second drawer, though you was in this alarm, losing your senses by the fright of two blades he had produced, yet you saw him take those things, particularly as you was laying flat on the bed at this time? - I was.

Q. Was your face thrown on the bed? - I laid flat on my back.

Q. You did not dare to rise yourself for fear he should cut your throat. Now I ask you by what possible direction your eyes could see that second drawer from the bottom? - But I did see the second drawer.

Q. I know you did; but we must know how you could do it; the bed was higher than the second drawer at the bottom? - Our bed is very low.

Q. Perhaps your bed is not so high from the ground as the first drawer of that pair of drawers? - I don't know what you mean.

Q. I ask you whether the bed is not higher from the ground than the first drawer of that pair of drawers; is it not higher than the second drawer? - I believe it is.

Q. Then I ask you in what possible manner you could see any thing, laying flat on your back on this bed? - Ours is a chest of drawers.

Q. In what possible direction could your eyes see the second drawer of that chest of drawers. Leaving that to be reconciled in the minds of the jury; where were the rest of the things taken from? - From the third drawer from the top.

Q. Did you see that? - I did not, I was down in a sit.

Q. Now I assure you in your examination at Bow-street you made no more scruple in swearing to what he took from the third drawer than from the second? - (the information read) They did not ask whether I was sensible or no.

Q. Now my girl he ran down stairs with these things; was the back room door which communicates with the stair case, open all the time this was going on? - It was.

Q. So this man had the precaution to shut the middle door, but not the door by which every one must see what was going on who went up stairs? - We have no lodgers except up in the garret. He shut the middle door because he knew the neighbours could see.

Q. How long was he gone before you communicated any alarm? - He was not gone long, about five minutes.

Q. Perhaps ten? - I don't think it was.

Q. What was the first thing you did when you got up? - I hallooed to my uncle.

Q. You did not run and throw up the window, and call out stop thief in the court? - I did not.

Q. But you stayed somewhere between five and ten minutes, and then went to the back room door and called to your uncle; did he come directly? - He did not come down till the second call; and I was at the street door when he came down; I first of all called uncle, and then ran down and called again uncle; I called out, uncle you are robbed.

Q. Where was your brother all this time? - My brother had that minute gone up with the iron.

Q. Did not you call to your brother? - I did not; he was not so big as me; he had just gone up before the man had rang at the bell, and my brother was coming down to the bell when I got up stairs, he came out of the garret when the man rung the bell; he had left the iron up in the garret, for I had gone up stairs, and the man was gone, and I sent word up to my uncle, by my brother, that it was somebody wanted my aunt.

Q. Did you give any alarm to the people in the street, at this second time, before your uncle came down? - I had.

Q. Before your uncle came down you had given an alarm in the street, and there was a great mob came, that you are sure of; I thought you had called out uncle after the mob had come round? - I did.

Q. How long do you think it was between your calling uncle the first time and the second? - The instant I got off the bed, I called uncle then, then uncle did not hear what I said, then I went straight to the door hallooing out, uncle, thieves! I am sure of that.

Q. Who came up on this? - There was nobody else to come but those below stairs, Mr. and Mrs. Walden, and they came out at the time my uncle came down, and then the mob came about.

Q. Among the mob Mr. Macphaile came over? - He did.

Q. When Mr. Macphaile came up in the room, where the robbery had been committed, what did he see? - He see what had been done without my telling of him.

Q. You told him that he had thrown you on the bed? - I did.

Q. And upon your oath did not Mr. Macphaile say, there is no mark of any person being on that bed? - This was the remark he made to me at the time, he lifted his hands and said that he never saw such a cruel thing in his life; he did not say till two days afterwards that there was no mark on the bed.

Q. Then nobody else remarked it at all? - No soul.

Q. When did he say and where, that there was no mark of violence on the bed? - It was below where he lives, at Mr. Johnson's, he is Mr. Johnson's lodger.

Q. You know that he said so; did you hear him? - I did not. What I heard was that he told his landlord so below.

Q. I believe the neighbours have been cruel enough to intimate some suspicions that the robbery was done by a relation of Mr. Hatch's? - Yes, so they have.

Q. I believe Mr. Macphaile got into a sad scrape for making this expression? - I don't know.

Q. Don't you know that he has been ill treated, and ill used in consequence of having made use of that expression? - I know what you mean.

Q. I am very glad of it. Don't you know he was extremely ill used? - I never knew he was ill used. Mr. Gammon's

niece has lost a gown at Mr. Johnson's, and the next morning I see Mr. Macphaile's sister-in-law come out with a bundle in her lap.

Q. That is not using Mr. Macphaile ill. Don't you know that your uncle has told you that Mr. Macphaile has been ill used because he has thrown out that hint? - I never heard any thing about it.

Q. Have you not heard it from your uncle, or from some of your relations that they have treated Macphaile ill for what he said? - I have not heard.

Q. Now my girl at the time you gave this alarm to the neighbours, was there any pursuit made after the prisoner? - No.

Q. Had not you seen him out about that neighbourhood before? - No, I had not, only his being such a remarkable man that made me look so much at him; he was in a light coloured coat.

Q. Certainly not a blue coat then? - No.

Q. He was taken up when? - Two days afterwards.

Q It was after that, that these things were brought back to you? - Yes, it was.

Q. Your uncle did not pursue after the man at all at the time the robbery was committed, and the reason was he was undressed and not fit to go after him, that was the only reason? - It was; I am sure of that.

Q. The mob about the place were not undressed? - But they did not attempt to pursue.

Q. You was very much surprised certainly at these barbarous neighbours, Your uncle, you mean, to say had the knees of his breeches unbuttoned, and his coat and shoes off, but your neighbours were dressed. Did not you think it was cruel, it was a great pity; advise your uncle the next time to have his shoes on. The neighbours have been so unkind as to impute it to some part of your own family? - They have.

Q. You say you had just let your brother in, and a man came up and asked you if you was the girl that had swore that innocent young man's life away? Did you call your brother to hear what the man said? - I told him I did not know what he meant; he said if I would go along with him he would shew me the things; he came alone, he was not in company with any body, there came up a bricklayer's labourer, at the same time, as I took him to be.

Q. What time of the day was this? - About twelve o'clock at noon.

Q. He came alone, you wanted somebody to protect you. Did you desire your brother to step up stairs to your uncle? - My brother had gone up stairs.

Q. Then as you did not like to trust yourself alone, did not you call out to your uncle? - This bricklayer's labourer came up and he offered to see me safe.

Q. He did not come up till the man had done talking and you was afraid to trust yourself along with him. Pray how came the bricklayer's labourer, as the man had done talking to you, to come up and offer to protect you? - He might be a friend of the man's who had been talking to me; I was crying, because I thought it was too much to go by myself, I thought it was something so flattering.

Q. Then why not call Mr. Walden to go with you? - I did not think any thing about Mr. Walden.

Q. Mr. Walden you know could have protected you? - He told me I must go alone with him; he said if I would go along with him alone he would help me to my property.

Q. How came this bricklayer's labourer to be suffered to go along with

you? Have you ever seen that bricklayer's labourer again? - Never have.

Q. Eagle-street runs at the back of Red Lion-passage? - No.

Q. Eagle-street runs from Red Lion-street to Gate-street? - It does.

Q. Now you are at twelve o'clock at noon. At what house in Eagle-street did you go? Have you ever fixed on that house, or have you ever been able to tell what house that was? - No, I cannot tell what house it was, because when I came out I was so frightened.

Q. You was not at all frightened going there? - No, I was not.

Q. You told your uncle you was there? - I did.

Q. Did not your uncle then say, shew me the house that we may get the rest of the property? Pray does not your uncle's brother and sister live in Eagle-street? - I have heard a young man say so; my uncle's sister does not speak to me, because she owes me a great spite.

Q. However this house is in Eagle-street, and you have heard a young man say that your uncle's sister lived in Eagle-street, and at that time. Now your uncle is out, pray tell us where this sister of his lives. Who told you that she lived there? - One Mr. Baker said so.

Q. Where does your uncle's brother live? - He has no brother.

Q. Has he a brother-in-law? - He knows nothing at all of him.

Q. What is his name? - Wood.

Q. Where does he live? - I do not know.

Q. Does not he live in Eagle-street? - I do not know.

Q. He knows where to find your uncle and your uncle's premises? - I do not know any thing about it.

Q. Don't you know that Wood's wife was at your uncle's the other day? - Yes, she was.

Q. Then if Mr. Wood's wife knows where your uncle lives, how came you to tell us that Mr. Wood did not know? - They do not live together; my uncle's sister is a very bad girl, and they have not lived together a great while.

Q. Now when you got to the house there were a number of bad women there, perhaps you was so much frightened if she had been there you would not have known her? - I don't know whether I should have known her or no; but I think I had my senses about me just enough to know her and no more.

Q. So then they gave you these things and you came back. Did you tell any part of this story at Bow-street? - My uncle went back to Bow-street.

Court. Did not you give account of this at Bow-street? - I have not been there since the things were found.

Q. Were these things brought back before he was taken up or after? - After he was taken up.

Mr. Knowlys. Now my girl this is not the first you have accused of a robbery? - I did say that I saw the woman come out with a bundle, and the people said she had not been out all the morning.

Q. You never accused any body else with a robbery? - I have not.

Court. When was it that this man was taken up? - I believe the second day after the robbery; the man was in prison when the things were found; I recovered the things on Friday.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you mean to insist on it that you never charged any other person with a robbery, except that person that you now mention; remember Mr. Macphaile is here? - I have not.

EMMA HATCH sworn.

I am the mother of Cornelius Hatch ; I was from home when the robbery was committed, and all that I lost was a wooden box with five shillings in it, and a check apron; I came in about five o'clock; I have never seen any thing

since but the coloured apron, which came home with the things.

Mr. Knowlys. You have a daughter lives in Eagle-street? - Indeed I don't know.

Q. Is her name Wood? - It is; I have not seen her for this quarter of a year; of course she knows where I and my son live, and Wood also, who married her, I don't know where he lives.

Q. Your neighbours have been so unkind as to suspect some of your own family? - They have done us a deal of injustice.

HUGH MACPHAILE sworn.

I am a printer's ink maker; I can hardly speak, I have just now been so insulted by my landlord, Mr. Johnson. The evening this affair happened, as two of my servants had been charged with a robbery the same morning, I went over immediately, one was a house servant, and the other was a servant employed to wash and clean for us besides; the charge was made at my house, at my apartment, the girl Elizabeth Price declared she would swear to one of them coming out with a bundle at nine o'clock; Elizabeth Price this same evening cried a robbery; my wife called me down instantly and said there was a robbery over the way, and said perhaps it might be a discovery of our robbery; I went over the way, and went up into the room, and I found Elizabeth Price standing in the room with her uncle Hatch, and another man; she said that a man came and knocked at the door and asked for her grandmother, he said that he had a message from a gentleman's house-keeper in Lincoln's Inn-fields; she replied that her grandmother was not at home; he enquired if her uncle was; she informed him that he was; that then he went away and she shut the door, and she was surprised to find him follow her up stairs; that he took her immediately and threw her on a bed, a little bed that stood by, and I took particular notice of the bed, the bed was perfectly well made, there was no mark on it; I come here to speak independent; I know nothing of the prisoner not them, before that day; I know nothing of any of them; a drawer was half open; she said the man pulled the drawer open, and she said that was the only drawer that ought to have been locked, and he whipped up the things, wraps them in a check apron and was off in an instant.

Q. Was you before the magistrate? - I was not.

Q. Was you before the grand jury? - I was not. Mr. Hatch told me that he would be very glad if the prosecution was squashed, for he was urged to it by people that persuaded him.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you hear the girl relate that the robbery was done while she was on the bed? - I did; but the bed was perfectly smooth.

Q. At that time did you, with your own eyes, observe it, that it was perfectly smooth? - I communicated it to them all, and had an argument with them on the impossibility of the transaction.

Q. Are you sure that you had an argument with them? - I am; and they wished to evade it.

Q. When was it you had the argument with them? - The day after.

The remainder of this trial in the next part which will be published in a few days.

Reference Number: t17930529-31

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 29th of May, 1793, and the following Days;

Being the FIFTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY , PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART III.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE TWO SHILLINGS.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

The Continuation of the Trial of THOMAS YATES .

Q. Then they cannot possibly be ignorant that they had that argument with you? - I communicated every thing to them as I have to the court, on my oath,

Q. How long have you lived in this neighbourhood? - Since Christmas.

Q. Have you the least interest in this business, or are you at all related, connected, or any way known to the prisoner? - I am not. About a month prior to this, I heard a person at the door where Mr. Hatch lives, I looked out of window, and a cart was there; after some time a person got up and began to speak, and said they had been tumbled down stairs neck and heels, and she said she was the daughter of Mr. Hatch.

Q. Have you communicated to them your intention of coming here, to declare the whole truth? - I have; I have been threatened for it by Mr. Johnson; I have been threatened even at this door.

- CROCKER sworn.

In consequence of information I apprehended this prisoner; I only produce the knife which the girl swore to at Bow-street.

Q. Where did you find the prisoner? - In Eagle-street near Red Lyon-square.

Q. What day did you apprehend him? - The 9th of May; I believe this day three weeks; I received the information on the 8th; I apprehended him the next day, by the girl's shewing him me in the street, in Eagle-street, at a door; the information I received from Hatch was, that they had been robbed; I was informed that he was at a club at a house

in Dean-street near Holborn; I thought it was not prudent to go there that evening, I would not take him without the girl was positive for I had no warrant; therefore the girl and I went and waited for him, the girl was on one side of the way and I was on the other; I took him into a public house and searched him, and I took out of his pocket a pocket book, and this knife, and a mask, and then I took him to Bow-street, before the sitting magistrate there, the magistrate shewed the knife to the girl and she said it was the knife he held in his hand while she was on the bed; she then said that the prisoner had not on the clothes that he had then, he had a light coat; I went back to his lodgings, and I found that light coloured coat, here are some things I found in the lodgings, a ladle, a crucible, and a dark lanthorn, that I thought proper to bring them away; I took the key out of the pocket of the prisoner.

Mr. Knowlys. You have been an officer a long time at Bow-street? - Near nine years.

Q. Of course you know that you must be consistent in your story, it is your duty certainly; you was examined before the magistrate? - I was.

Q. How came you not to put the mask in your examination? - I shewed it.

Q. You swore to your examination? - I did.

Q. It was read over to you? - It was.

Q. But there is not a word in it about the mask? - When the clerk is writing he may omit something.

Q. Is it not your duty to attend to your examination that you are to swear to? why did not you tell the clerk you have forgot to put down the mask? Did you swear to finding that mask before the magistrate? - I did at the examination; when I was before the magistrate I produced every thing.

Q. So you say, but here is a note in which nothing of that kind is mentioned, and you, of all others, are most bound to attend to your oath; it is not a new thing for you to take an oath or sign an examination? - No, it is not.

Q Now it does not appear in the examination? - I produced it before the magistrate, and swore to it.

Court to Hatch. Look at the coat, waistcoat, and piece of woollen cloth and check apron. - The coat I valued at ten shillings, the waistcoat at six shillings, and the piece of woollen cloth at eighteen shillings, the check apron sixpence; the coat waistcoat and cloth is mine; the coat I can swear to, and I believe the other things,

Mr. Knowlys to Crocker. You found nothing else relating to this robbery, nor any property of Mr. Hatch's in this room? - No, none at all.

Court to Price. Look at the knife? - It was such a kind of knife as this; the knife had two blades.

Q. How do you mean such a kind of knife? - I know it by the blades and handle.

Mr. Knowlys. You remarked it particularly that you might know it again? - Indeed I did.

Q. What remark did you make on it? - It looked very bad, having both the blades open.

Q. Therefore because it looked very bad it must be the same knife? - Yes.

Q. You looked at it particularly that you might know it again? - I did look at it particularly.

Q. When you was so much alarmed, you really had your senses about you to take notice of these blades? - It looked so terribly to have both the blades open.

Prisoner. I am entirely innocent of the charge laid to me; does it stand to reason, that I should go to commit an

outrage on a person I knew very well? Mr. Hatch and I were children together; I was known to the people of the house; I was born in the neighbourhood, and have lived in it twenty eight years; I hope my lord and gentlemen will take my case into consideration, and pronounce me innocent; I have several respectable people who will give me a good character.

ANN PEARCE sworn.

I live in the house where the prisoner lodges.

Q. We understand there was a dark lanthorn and some other things taken from your lodgings? - There was.

Q. Now I ask you were they there before the prisoner took the lodgings or were they not? - Upon the word of a woman, and upon my oath likewise, they were there three years and a half before the prisoner came to lodge there, the prisoner lodged there about six weeks or two months, or thereabouts; as to that mask which Mr. Crocker has produced we have had it up and down the house joking with it about three weeks or thereaway, it commonly lay about the house.

Court. What are you? - My husband is a shoe maker; I have lived in that house a year and half.

Q. Why you have a good recollection, you have put the lanthorn there three years and a half? - I have seen it there for three years and a half; I have been backward and forward to the house this seven years; my sister kept the house, it is in Eagle-street.

Q. Did you ever happen to see that waistcoat and piece of cloth in the house? - Never, upon my word.

Q. Do you know Elizabeth Price ? - No.

Q. Did you ever hear mention of the name of Mr. Hatch? - I have since the prisoner has been in trouble.

Q. Do you know whether the niece has ever been in Eagle-street at any time? - No, I know nothing about the business.

PATIENCE CRUTCHFIELD sworn.

I live at No. 6, Holly-street, Clare-market; my business is to get my bread by going out washing and charing; I have known the prisoner at the bar, to the best of my remembrance, going on seven years; I never heard nor knew any thing amiss imputed to him before now.

Court. What is his business? - He is a shoe maker .

Mr. Knowlys. Will you be so good as to tell us what day he was at your house? - He was there on the 7th of May, he came there between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, he called on my daughter to go with her into the City to Guildhall, to get a warrant, which my daughter intended to take out; I believe he stayed there about half an hour; my daughter and him set off.

Q. Where was your son at that time? - He was not at home; he was out at service; they went out between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, it was about three when he came, and they returned near eight o'clock or half past seven, it was rather dark, he came home with my daughter and stopped in my place some short time, and it was dusk when he went away,

Court. What day of the week was this? - Tuesday.

Q. Are you sure you never said to any body it was Wednesday? Why are you positive it is Tuesday? - I took particular notice of the day, because of my daughter's going out on the business she was upon.

Q. Might not your daughter go as well on Wednesday as Tuesday? - She might to be sure.

Q. When was you first called upon to give evidence here? - Yesterday.

Q. Who applied to you? Was you subpoenaed? - His sister came to me.

Q. How came his sister to know that you knew any thing about the business of Tuesday? - I did not know any thing of it till he sent to me.

Q. What had he to do with the warrant? - My daughter wanted to take it out, but she did not know how to go by herself; it was against one John Martin , but they did not take it out because they were too late.

Q. What was it for? - For abuse and scandal to my daughter.

Q. What was the abuse and scandal? - I cannot justly say myself.

Q. It was hardly a secret to you, what the abuse and scandal was? - I cannot positively say myself what the scandal was; there were many scandalous things said of her.

Q. What was the scandal about? - I cannot justly say; my daughter can tell.

Q. You must know? - To be sure it was very scandalous, he said that she had a child by him; and went and exposed her at the public house; it was on that occasion they went for the warrant.

Q. How came they to go to Guild-hall? - Because the man Martin, lives in the City, in Cheapside.

Q. What is Martin? - He is a servant to a silversmith.

Q. Did they take out any warrant? - They were too late.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you recollect what coloured coat the prisoner had on that day? - I don't recollect.

Court. How came you to know that he came in about half after seven or eight o'clock in the evening? - By the close of the evening.

ANN CRUTCHFIELD sworn.

I am the daughter to the last witness; I know the prisoner at the bar, he went out with me to Guildhall, on Tuesday, the 7th of May; I go to service, but I am at present at home with my mother; he called on me, as near I can guess, between three and four o'clock.

Q How long did he stay at your house before he went out? - Nearly an hour I think.

Q. Did he go away from your house alone, or did any body go with him? - I went with him,

Q. Where did you go with him? - To Guildhall, to get a warrant for a person that assaulted me, John Martin .

Q. What was the nature of your complaint against him? - Nothing particular, he grossly offended me while I was in my place.

Q. Do you mean by assault, striking you? - No, it was insulting me in scandalous expressions.

Q. Tell us whether you went to Guildhall together or not, tell the whole story, how far you went together, and the whole of it? - Me and the prisoner, we went straight to Guildhall from my mother's, we went to get a warrant; we then returned home, and in Charter-house-square, on his return, the prisoner met a person whom he knew, he is not here, he was a person I did not know, this was I suppose between five and six o'clock, I suppose so from the length of time and the length of way; from Charter-house-square, we went straight on towards Clerkenwell.

Q. Did the other man join you? - No, he only spoke, and after he spoke we parted. At a house near Clerkenwell-green we stopped, at a public house, the prisoner and I we had a pint of ale, he left me and went out to get some ham and bread, I suppose he was gone about a quarter of an hour; I should suppose this was about six o'clock; he returned back with the ham and bread; we set there and eat it, and drank and had another pint of ale to it; from there we went straight across Clerkenwell-green,

and in some shop, I believe it is called Mutton-lane, a chandler's shop there he called, and I stopped at the door, he stayed there a few minutes and came out to me, and from there we went straight home to my mother's; at the time I got to my mother's I believe it was between seven and eight o'clock, it began to be dusk.

Q. Are you able to say what coloured coat the prisoner had on at the time he went with you? - It was a blue coat I am certain of that.

Q. Look at the coat, (which Crocker produces) is it at all like the coat he had on? - Not at all; he had on the coat he has on now, all the time he was with me.

Q. At any time you was with him, did you see a clock? - At the time we went through Clement's-inn, as we were going to Guildhall there was a clock, and I said it is half past four o'clock; he said, I am afraid we shall be too late; but we proceeded.

Court. How came you to go so round about a way home? - We were not in an immediate hurry to go home, so we took our time.

Q. Was it at your desire or his, that you went to these particular places? - It was his desire, not mine.

Q. How long have you known him? - I have known him five or six or seven years; he is a shoe maker.

Q. What was the man's name that scandalized you? - John Martin .

Q. What was the scandal? - I cannot say the particulars of it, but I have people that can prove it; he said that I had a child by him.

Q. How came you to fix on the prisoner as the man to accompany you on this occasion? - I never went about a warrant before, and I asked him to accompany me.

Q. Did you drink tea before you went out, or after you came home? - We had no tea at all; we did not stop for it before we went out, and when we came back it was too late.

Q. Did your mother know that you went out? - She did.

Q. Was she at home when you went out? - She was.

Q. How long have you been living at your mother's lately? - This seven or eight weeks, I think.

Q. Where did you live before this? - With one Mrs. Hosley, Mary-le-bone I did not live long with her because she went into the country; I was there a servant of all work, I lived with her turned of six months.

Q. Where did you live before that? - Church-street, Soho, with one Mr. Crompton.

Q. How long did you live with Mr. Crompton? - Either four or five months; I don't know which.

Q. Where did you live before? - At one Mr. Gray's, Henrietta-street, Covent-garden.

Q. Did you go to all these places with the knowledge and consent of your mother? - Yes.

Q. How came you here to day? - I was sent for; the prisoner's sister sent for me this morning.

Q. How came she to send for you about the prisoner's business? - I had told her before that I was with him.

Q. Why did you tell? - I don't know any thing particular.

Q. When did you first tell the sister of it? - Some days ago.

Q. You mentioned to her, I suppose, this business of Martin's, and that Martin had scandalized you? - That was all I told her.

Q. How came she to desire you to come here? - I did not come on that account of Martin's, I came here on the prisoner's account, he was with me the same day as the robbery was committed.

Q. When was it you first discovered it was the same day? - I don't know justly.

Q. Was it on a Wednesday? - No, it was a Tuesday.

Q. Did you tell the sister it was a Tuesday? - I did.

Q. Now you failed of you warrant that day, did you take the warrant out the next day? - No, I never have; I never went before nor since about a warrant.

Q. On your return, how long did he stay in the house? - He did not stay long.

Q. Did he sup with you? - No.

Q. Did he eat and drink in the house? - No, not after we came back.

Q. Look at that white coat. - I have seen it before; I have seen the prisoner in it before.

Q. Where does the prisoner live? - I really don't know; I don't know where he lived since he left his house in Bedford-street.

Q. When did he live in Bedford-street, to your knowledge last? - It was at the time that I lived in my place, and I cannot tell exactly, about three months ago, it may be more or it may be less.

Q. How came he to attend you on this business of Martin's? - My mother met him the week before, my mother desired him to attend.

Q. Did you ever hear of his living in Eagle-street? - No, he might live there.

Q. How often have you seen him in the course of a week? - I had not seen him for some time since I left my place in Bedford-street, till my mother saw him.

JUDITH LAWTON sworn.

I live the corner of Mutton-lane, Clerkenwell; I keep a chandler's shop; I remember the prisoner's calling at my shop the 7th of May between six and seven in the evening, nearer seven than six; he called for to see me and how I did, and how my children did; he is a shoe maker; I asked him in, and he was in the shop, but he said he had a young woman waiting for him, and he could not conveniently stay.

Q. Are you sure that this was on the 7th of May? - I am very sure of that.

Q. Did you see the young woman? - I did. Says I, my dear Tommy, why did not you bring her in? I knew his mother; no, madam, says he, I cannot, because I cannot stop indeed.

Q. Did you in point of fact, see that he had a young woman with him? - I did; I cannot recollect whether that is the young woman or no, that he had with him.

Q. This was near seven o'clock? - Nearer seven than six; he always bore the character of an honest, industrious young fellow.

Q. Have you any recollection what coloured coat he had on? - I don't recollect.

Court. What day of the week was this? - Tuesday; the reason of my being so very particular, I am very correct in my tea book.

Q. How came this business to get into your tea book? - That made me know the day; I was settling the book when he came in.

Q. When do you settle it? - Sometimes once a week, sometimes every other day.

Q. Then it may be some other day; you don't always do that of a Tuesday? - But that made me particular then as to the day.

Q. Then you know this man's mother? - I do.

Q. What did you give them on this occasion; tea or coffee? - He stopped but a few minutes with me.

Q. You did not let them go away dry handed; did you give them any thing to eat or to drink? - I did not.

Q. Did the young woman come in? - No, she did not.

Q. Then you did not ask her to tea? - Ask her to tea! I had my tea; she did not come in at all.

Q. What brought you here to day? - To speak the truth of this young fellow.

Q. Came you here by a subpoena? - Which I was surprised at.

Q. When was you subpoenaed? - The night before last, I think to the best of my remembrance.

Q. Have you got it with you? - No.

Q. How came you to leave it behind you? - I put it on the shelf.

Q. Who served the subpoena on you? - I was not at home; my maid came for me, and I went home and I saw a young man, and he asked me if I recollected seeing one Thomas Yates .

Q. Was this the day before yesterday? - I think it was. I told him, yes, and was very happy to see him, not knowing they were going to serve me with a subpoena; I told them I had a child ill of the small pox, but I would do my endeavour to come; he said I must.

The prisoner called four other witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-32

423 JOHN GABRIEL was indicted for feloniously making on assault, on the King's highway, on Richard Upton , on the 16th of April , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a linen shirt, value 3 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. three muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the goods of the said Richard Upton .

RICHARD UPTON sworn.

I am a foot boy to one Mr. Nash, Leicester-square. As I was going through Coventry-street on Tuesday the 16th of April, between nine and ten at night, as I was getting up behind an hackney coach John Gabriel came after me and said, why don't you get up? I was getting up, and he snatched my bundle away from me; he snatched it away all of a sudden, and he ran down a court, and when he got to the bottom of the court he cried, stop thief! and I left him, and he crossed the Hay-market, and I was in view of him till he came to Norris-street, I lost sight of him in Norris-street, and he tumbled over some flats, some vicker baskets in St. James's-market; I lost sight of him before that; I pursued him into St. James's-market, and he fell down; I did not see him fall, I know it by a witness; from thence he was taken to St. James's watch-house; I am sure the prisoner is the same man; he had the bundle in the Haymarket, he threw it somewhere in Norris-street; it was never found; I never recovered any of the property; there was a shirt; a pair of stockings, three muslin neck handkerchiefs; they were tied up in one of them; I am sure that is the man, but he was not dressed in that dress.

Q. How long might you lose sight of him? - Between four or five minutes.

THOMAS READY sworn.

I am a shoe maker; I was in a shop in Norris-street, I heard the cry of stop thief; with that I ran out of the shop, and this person that is at the bar tumbled over some flats that were at Mr. Birch's door, (in the country market it is so called) it is in St. James's-market; this young man was at my back, and he said that was the man that had robbed him; with that I collared him directly.

Q. Did he say any thing about a bundle? - He said that was the lad that robbed him; he said he was robbed of a shirt, stockings, and some handkerchiefs; I heard that he dropped it in Norris-street.

Prisoner. I was just coming from St. Martin's-lane, I had been there to buy some things; I was going across the Hay-market, I heard the hue and cry of stop thief! I saw a man before me, and I was running and I fell down over the baskets, and I was taken; when the boy came up they asked him if I was the person? he said he did not know; when I came to the watch-house he said he could swear to my voice.

GUILTY,

Of stealing, but not of the highway robbery . (Aged 21.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-33

424. JAMES CRAVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , a cloth coat, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of John Scott .

JOHN SCOTT sworn.

I am a Taylor ; I lost a cloth coat on Saturday the 22d of April; I was out near about ten o'clock at night, at a neighbouring house to buy some buckles, and while I was in the shop I heard the cry of stop thief! and I ran towards my own shop, and I met the girl with the child in her arms crying, stop thief! then I went down Drury-lane and they had laid hold of the prisoner at the bar, one of the shopmen next door to me had; I did not see him laid hold of, I saw him when the young man had hold of him, I laid hold of him myself, and brought him into the shop; he had not any thing on him when I laid hold of him.

Q. Did you see him throw down any thing? - No, I did not.

Q. Where was this coat taken from? - It was taken from a shelf in the shop; I saw it about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. What time did this happen? - Near about ten o'clock in the evening.

Q. How soon did you see it after you lost it? - I saw it in about three minutes.

Q. In whose hands? - It was laid on the counter.

Q. Have you kept it ever since? - No, I delivered it to my customer, and he has wore it, but I have put my mark on it; it is a new coat; I made it for my customer, but I never delivered it to him before it was stolen.

ELIZABETH GOWLAND sworn.

I am the servant of Mr. Scott; my master and mistress were gone out of the way, and my master left me in care of the shop and told me to give an eye to the shop; I was standing in the parlour with a child in my arms, and I saw a man looking through the glass window at the door, it is a glass door, he directly lifted up the latch of the door and comes in; I thought it was a customer; he calls out, halloo, mistress, to me; I made answer and said, I am coming; and I had just come to the parlour door as he came into the shop, just by the end of the counter, and he had then got his hand on the coat, which was on the shelf, he took down the coat, then I was very nigh him, and he let it fall and stooped to pick it up, and then he ran out of the shop with the coat in his hand, and I ran after him and called out stop thief! he was taken in about three minutes afterwards; I

did not see him taken, I see them bring him into the shop again and the coat too, it was the same coat that he had taken out of the shop, and the same man.

CHRISTOPHER SANDERS sworn.

About ten o'clock I was sent for; the prisoner was in custody when I came, and I took him into custody, and the prosecutor asked me if I knew him? I said yes, very well.

Prisoner. I was coming from Long-acre, between nine and ten o'clock; I have worked for a person there these three years, and I was coming up Drury-lane, and stop thief, was crying out, they came and collared me and took me into the shop; that is all.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-34

425. ANN KELLY otherwise LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , two steel plates for a chariot spring, value 5 s. an iron hammer with a wooden handle, value 1 s. two pair of iron pincers, value 2 s. two iron hooks, value 2 s. an iron square, value 6 d. the goods of Stephen Taylor and Thomas Richardson .

STEPHEN TAYLOR sworn.

My partner 's name is Thomas Richardson ; the things in the indictment were stole from me on Sunday evening, the 28th of April; I have a witness in court who took them from the prisoner.

SAMUEL GRIMES sworn.

I am an extraordinary constable belonging to Marlborough-street office. On the 28th of April, Sunday night, I was coming down Bow-street, Bloomsbury, one side of the way, and the woman on the other going up, hearing the iron square drop, it was nigh twelve o'clock at night; I just saw the shadow of somebody passing as I was on one side of the way, and she on the other, I did not know what it was till I went over, I picked it up and said, what are you at now? she made me answer directly, says she, I don't know; what is it? it is dropped from the window by somebody or other; I made answer all the people must be in bed at that time of the night; I put my hand on one side of her and I found something hard, but I could not tell what it was till I searched her, and then in searching her I found all the tools I have brought here now; I took them from her and took her to the watch-house; I have kept them ever since.

TIMOTHY RAYNER sworn.

I am a coach spring maker; I work for Mr. Taylor and Mr. Richardson; I made this one pair of pincers; I made these two steel plates; I made this iron hammer; I made both these hooks, one is not quite finished.

Q. Did you make the square? - I know it belongs to my master; I can swear that I made these things in their employment.

Q. Suppose you had been at York, should you have known them to be your own work? - I should know them particularly; I should know this hook, the pattern of the hook, and the two plates, the pincers, and the hammer.

Court to Mr. Taylor. How far distant is your house from where this woman was found? - I live at No. 107, Drury-lane ; I can speak to the plates myself; the man missed them on Monday morning and told me.

Q. Did you then examine to see if they were missing? - The man, the last witness, asked me if I knew where they were? he examined every place, hole and corner, and could not find them; I believe all the other articles to be mine; I cannot swear to them to be mine.

Q. You have not made so much observation as the man that made them? - Not so much, but I know them.

Prisoner. I had no money to pay my lodgings, I have been used to sleep on board a ship; I went to sleep on one of the bulks in Covent-garden; I picked up these things on one of the bulks; I took them away with me, thinking they would fetch me a trifle in the morning and going along Drury-lane Mr. Grimes laid hold of me; I have been nine years on board a ship.

Court to Taylor. Whereabouts were these things kept? - In my work shop in Drury-lane.

Jury. How did she get these things from your place? - I really don't know; the door of the shop is kept bolted, and on Monday morning we found it unbolted.

Q. Was there any communications to your work shop exclusive of the dwelling house? - There is a passage through my own house, but that door we generally make a point of shutting at eleven o'clock but that night it might be left open, sometimes it is.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-35

426 ELIZABETH MANN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , two muslin frocks, value 10 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of Samuel Harris .

CHARLOTTE HARRIS sworn.

I am the wife of Samuel Harris ; we are lodgers at No. 3, Robert's buildings, Flask-lane, Chelsea . On the 30th of April, Tuesday, eleven o'clock, I delivered the things in the indictment to Elizabeth Mann ; she washed linen and carried out linen for me, she was my work woman ; I paid her by the day according as she did it; when I delivered the things to her she went out and offered them for sale, as I heard, I gave directions to carry them to Mitre-court, Temple Bar, and I did not see any more of her till Mr. Doran came to me: I take in washing; I did not see her till I saw her at the office, I believe I saw her at the office between one and two, in Queen's-square, Westminster; I delivered her all the articles mentioned in this indictment; I recovered the things at the office, I did not see them till I went there; she had done work for me upwards of six months, I believe she had been above a year and a half backwards and forwards.

- PIGOTT sworn.

I am a Stationer in Mitre-court, Fleet-street; Mrs. Harris washed for me; on that day Tuesday I did not receive any linen of her, but Mrs. Pigott can speak to it more than I can.

SARAH ANN PIGOTT sworn.

I am the wife of Mr. Pigott. Mrs. Harris used to wash for my family.

Q. Did you receive the linen as usual the 30th of April? - No, I did not.

Q. Did it usually come on that day? - It did; I can prove the property.

BENJAMIN DORAN sworn.

I am a dealer in clothes; I produce the property which the prisoner at the bar brought to my house to sell, on the

30th of April, a few minutes past twelve, when I came in I found the property in the house, offered for sale; she told me she was sent by Mrs. Harris to sell it for a guinea, she was to carry a guinea home for the property; I told her I would go to her mistress and buy the property of her mistress, but not of her; she went along with me to the bottom of Tothill-street, Westminster, and wanted to get the property away from me; I sent over the way for a constable to assist me; I have kept the property ever since, and have got it here now; two muslin frocks, two linen table cloths, and a muslin handkerchief.

SARAH DORAN sworn.

I am the wife of the other witness. The prisoner brought the things to me first, into my shop; these are the things she brought, I delivered them to my husband.

Q Did she go away with your husband? - She did to fetch her mistress.

MARTHA GARRARD sworn.

I go out a washing and charing. The prisoner came to my house and begged of me to let her leave the things in my room, on Tuesday the 30th of April, about twelve o'clock; I live at No. 11, Tothill-street; she left the basket there; I don't know what was in it, it was linen, I never looked at them.

Q. Did she take away the basket again? - She took some things out of the basket, and asked me to leave the basket while she went opposite the Abbey; she never returned, I never see her till now; the basket was left with me with some things in it; Mrs. Harris came for it.

Court to Mrs. Harris. Were the things in the indictment in that basket; - No. (The things deposed to by Mrs. Pigott, by her own marking, S. P.)

Prisoner. I was very much in liquor, and I did not know what I was doing of, and I met with some person that enticed me to do it; I am very sorry for what is done; that is all I can say for myself.

Court to Mrs. Harris. Did you tell her to sell the things for a guinea? - No.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned one week in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-36

427. DUDLEY LYONS was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Ann the wife of Jeremiah Norris , in the dwelling house of the prisoner, on the 16th of May , and putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, one hundred and eighty pieces of copper monies, called halfpence, and sixteen shillings and six-pence in monies numbered; the goods, chattels and monies of the said Jeremiah Norris .

ANN NORRIS sworn.

I am the wife of Jeremiah Norris ; I lodge at No. 1, Jermyn-street, Piccadilly; I missed my husband in Rosemary-lane, and I met the prisoner, and he brought me home to his own house; I gave him six-pence to go and get a pot of beer, and some bread and cheese; he brought it; I met him at the Rosemary Branch in Rosemary-lane, the husband and the wife, and they drank with me there.

Q. What time was you at this house? - I went to the house about five, and left it about ten.

Q. When you went to this house the Rosemary Branch, was you alone,

or had you any family with you? - Never a one; there was only myself and the prisoner, and his wife joined me at the public house; I never knew them before; they were country people.

Q. Was you sober when you came out of the house? - Very sober. I went to their house with them; they live in Blue Anchor-yard , himself and his wife brought me safe home to their own house; just about two o'clock he called his child up, he said, Polly, bring me down the candle; I laid up stairs along with his children and his wife, and he lay below; I am very sorry I cannot speak, and I will tell no more than the truth; I laid up two pair of stairs with his wife and children, and he below in the one pair of stairs; he calls his child, Polly; yes, daddy; is she asleep? I don't know, daddy; the child laid just near her mother; about four o'clock he brought a candle up in this manner in the room with his wife, he cut my apron and my pocket apron, and the lace of my stays, all three together; I had sixteen shillings and six-pence in my bosom; he took the sixteen shillings and six-pence of silver out of my bosom, and seven shillings and six-pence in halfpence out of my pocket apron; I always put my silver in my bosom.

Court. Is it true that you was drunk? - No, I was not.

Q. Had you had any liquor that day? - I am an irish woman.

Prisoner. What was your reason for giving four bad six-pences to my wife, and wanting her to go along with you the next day to pass bad money? - I will tell the truth, and then I shall go through the world; it is not true; honesty will go through the world.

Q. What was the reason she did not come to look after me the next day, and the second day, and the third day? - I could not come, it rained very hard, and I could not find him out, and his wife said she would make up five shillings, and I said I would not smuggle the law; she said she would come all the way to Jermyn-street to pay five shillings.

Jury. Did you receive the five shillings? - I did not; I would not take any money.

JEREMIAH NORRIS sworn.

I am the husband of the last witness, I sell a few oranges, lobsters , and any thing that I can get a livelihood by; I was in the house, the Rosemary Branch, but I went home after I gave her the money, and she came after me there; I gave her sixteen shillings and six-pence in silver, and seven shillings and six-pence in halfpence, and she had more halfpence in her pocket, this was about four o'clock in the afternoon, Monday afternoon; then I went home, when I could not find her, I did not find her till the day after, when I met her near Temple Bar, this was in the afternoon.

Q. And you got the money from her? - She had no money; she pulled the knife out of her pocket and the lace, which she said the man cut where she had been all night.

Q. Did you take up the prisoner? - I was the Instigation of taking up the prisoner; he was taken up on Thursday after the Tuesday that this happened; it rained very hard on Wednesday, and so I would not go any further than Fleet-street; then the next day I went, she went and shewed me the house; on Thursday I went to his wife, and she said, good man make no words, and I will make up the money; an old woman in Rosemary-lane told me that he was an old offender for stealing a frying pan, and that he worked near Shoreditch; we went to where he worked, and he gave me saucy words, and said, that he would

put me into Newgate; if he had given me good words I would not have taken him up; so I sent my wife for a constable, and he said he sold four of the shillings, that were bad, to a jew for six-pence, he offered a shilling in lieu of them; the constable took a six-pence from him with a hole in the edge: I can swear to that six pence, and here was also a french half crown among the money, I cannot swear to any thing but the six-pence.

Prisoner. What time did I offer you the money? - It was in the afternoon when I was after him, on Thursday, and the constable came.

Jury. Did you make any appointment with your wife after you parted with her at Tower-hill? - I appointed to meet her at the Rosemary Branch.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; when I took the prisoner I searched him, and on him I found a bad six-pence with a hole in it; I have kept ever since. (Produced.)

Q. Was not there some conversation about a bad shilling or bad shillings? - No, not in my presence. (The sixpence deposed to by Jeremiah Norris , as the very six-pence he gave to his wife, which he knew only by the hole in the edge.)

Prisoner. I came home about nine o'clock on Monday; I found this woman and my wife at home before me, quite drunk, and I began to be angry with my wife for having the woman in the place; so with that this woman pulls out a shilling out of her pocket and desired me not to make any words, and to go and bring a pot of beer, and I went and the publican said it was a bad shilling; I came back again, and and I found my wife looking at four bad six-pences that she gave her, wanting her to go along with her the next day to pass bad money for her; I takes the four bad six-pences out of my wife's hand and put them into my pocket; at half after five the next morning I went to work, and never heard any more of it till she took me up on Thursday afternoon; that is one of the six-pences my wife had, and I gave it to the officer.

DOYLE MACLOEN sworn.

I deal in clothes; I have known the prisoner a good many years, fourteen or fifteen, he is a taylor by trade; I know nothing as to dishonesty; when he gets in liquor he will be hot and passionate; the prosecutrix said to me yesterday, that she would make it up if her sister would give half a guinea, and if not she would hang him.

CIBBY MACEWEN sworn.

The character I give is, that he is an hard working man; I have known him this twenty years; the husband of the prosecutrix came to my house twice, and wanted sadly to have half a guinea, and offered to discharge him for that.

ANN JONES sworn.

I have known him since he was seventeen or eighteen years of age; I have known him this thirty years, I never saw any thing in my life but what was honest; I was with his wife when the prosecutrix's husband came, and asked to make it up for half a guinea; I am the sister of the prisoner.

Court to Mrs. Norris. Is it true that you offered to make it up for half a guinea, and if not you said you would hang them? - I mentioned no such a thing to no one of them.

Court to Macloen. Look at that woman in the face, and tell me whether you insist upon what you said just now? - I do.

Court to Norris. Will you look that woman in the face, and tell me it is false? - I will.

Court to Jeremiah Norris . That woman, Jones, has sworn, that you offered to make it up for half a guinea. On the oath you have taken is it true or is it false? - It is false; I never offered to make it up; they offered me two guineas.

Ann Jones . I insist upon it, he did; I was present.

Court to Norris. This woman and Macloen has sworn the same, is it true? - It is false, on the oath I have taken.

Macloen. He did come on the oath I have taken.

Court to Mrs. Norris. Did not you undress when you went to bed? - I did not.

Jury. Pray Mrs. Norris, was you asleep when he robbed you? - I was as wake as I am now.

Q. Did you speak to him at that time? - The minute he dropped the knife, I cried out directly, and he ran down stairs, and his wife said to me, my dear don't cry, I will go and get the money before he spend it in the night houses.

Not GUILTY

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-37

428. JOHN GASTRELL and ROBERT JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , a cloth box great coat, value 3 l. 18 s. the goods of John Fitzgerald , esq . (The witnesses examined separate by the prisoners desire.)

JOHN FITZGERALD sworn.

I lost a box great coat, it was taken from the box of my carriage, my carriage was standing half in and half out at the back of Alsop-buildings .

SAMUEL PARKE sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Fitzgerald. The carriage was at the coach-house door when the coat was taken away, the horses were at the stable door, the stable is at the back of Alsop-buildings, on the road to Paddington; I had seen it on the box about five minutes before it was lost; I did not see the prisoners take it; the coat has never been recovered.

JOHN HARRADINE sworn.

I am a plaisterer; I saw this man about Mr. Fitzgerald's coach, on Wednesday, the 18th of April, and I saw one of them, Gastrell, go up and take the box coat from the box, the other two were close by; he delivered it to Johnson, and he put it in his apron, and the coat was so big he could not put it in, and they went away with it; they were not taken till the next morning; I was at work in a building, in a garret, and there were no stairs, and I could not go down; I gave the alarm out to a carpenter, who went to Mr. Fitzgerald's coachman, and then they got off in the mean time.

Q. Were they strangers to you, or had you seen them before? - I had seen them before, but not to say to know them.

Q. What distance was it from the stable where you see them from the garret? - One hundred and fifty yards I suppose; I cannot speak with certainty, as to the men I take it was Gastrell that took it; I am confident to Johnson; as to the other I cannot positively swear, because I was only looking out of the window, and so far off, not nigh enough to speak to them.

Jury. How came you to be so positive to the other? - Because I see him so plain, and I knew him before, better than I did Gastrel.

Q. How soon did you see Johnson after this? - I saw him two days after,

when he was at the justice's, at Marlborough-street I was then positive it was the man that had the coat in his apron.

THOMAS DALBY sworn.

I am a bricklayer's journeyman; I saw the prisoners go along with Mr. Fitzgerald's great coat, Johnson had it in his apron, they were coming along Baker street; I was at work at the very next door, at the sign of the Globe.

Q. Where is Baker-street? - It a great way distance from where they took the coat, not a mile; I saw the coat hang out and I saw a bit of the sleeve; Gastrell was in company with him, they were talking together, they went along a little past me and Johnson turned down Davis-street with the coat in his apron; there were three of them in company, and the other two kept along Baker-street. I went the next day and apprehended them with the constable; Johnson and Gastrell were together at the Spotted Dog, in Oxford-road; the great coat has not been found at all.

Prisoner Johnson. If he saw me with the great coat, why did not he stop me? - There was another bricklayer along with me at work, and he persuaded me to have nothing to do with it, he saw him go along the same as I did.

EDWARD TRUELOVE sworn.

I am a journeyman baker. I was going out with my bread, and a baker met me and says, here comes three chaps here; the two prisoners are two of them, I saw them the corner of Upper Baker-street; Johnson had the great coat, it was a drab coloured coat and a red cape; they were all three together, they all walked together while I saw them.

Q. Were they conversing together? - Yes.

ROBERT LOVETT sworn.

I attend the public office Marlborough-street. On the 18th of April one of the watchmen belonging to Mary-le-bone, applied to me to take the two men; I went to a house called the Spotted Dog, Oxford-street, and I saw the two prisoners; I did not find the coat; that is all that I know.

Court to Prosecutor. Had your coat a red cape? - It had; I did not see it for two or three hours before it was lost, and it never has been found.

Prisoner Johnson. I never was nigh that way at all, nor had I seen Gastrell since Monday till Thursday morning.

Prisoner Gastrell. I was out of work about three weeks, and I was waiting for a job, and I went to the Spotted Dog to wait till my father would come to tell me of the job.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

John Gastrell , GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

To go for a Soldier .

Robert Johnson , GUILTY. (Aged 18.)

To go to Sea .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-38

429. JAMES NEW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , a pair of leather boots, value 18 s. the goods of Henry Herbert .

Henry Herbert and John Thompson were called on their recognizances.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-39

430 HENRY HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , a deal box, value 4 s. a cloth coat, value 10 s. a man's surtout coat, value 1 l. a pair of nankeen breeches, value 2 s. a printed jean waistcoat, value 2 s. a pair of womens stays, value 5 s. a stuff petticoat, value 5 s. a cotton gown, value 5 s. a muslin apron, value 6 s. a a cloth coat, value 2 s. six pair of cotton stockings, value 6 s. a pair of shoe buckles, value 2 s. a common prayer book, value 1 s. a linen shirt, value 5 s. a pocket handkerchief, value 1 s. and four pounds of gloucester cheese, value 1 s. the goods of William Sparing , in the dwelling house of John Booth .

WILLIAM SPARING sworn.

I live at No. 10, Porter-street, Newport-market ; I am a shoemaker ; I lost all the articles; I am a lodger in the house, and the prisoner is my bed fellow; Mr. Booth lives in the house, and lets lodgings in the house; these things were lost out of my room; Holland is a copper smith; the things were taken on Tuesday the 23d of April, I was at work in the garret, and the things were in the one pair of stairs back room; so the little girl, that is here, came up and said Mr. Sparing somebody has taken out your box; I was at work, and so went down to run after him, but I could not catch him that night; I missed all the articles from my appartment mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Which did you see first, the prisoner or the articles? - I took the prisoner myself, in the Hambury, Westminster, the next morning, between the hours of seven and eight, I found some of my property; he told me where it was; it was at Strutton Ground, at the corner of the same street: he had sold the things for a guinea and a half; he went with us, the constable and him, we took him into a coach with another man.

Q. Did you find it all? - No, I found the best part of it; the constable has got the property, which was found there, he told me that he broke the box open in the street.

Prisoner. When I was apprehended, the constable and him told me if the property was found I would be immediately discharged? - Yes, but he would not tell me, he always refused to tell me of some things.

Q. Was you present when he made the discovery? - I was.

Q. Did you promise to discharge him? - Not at that time; I did in the morning as soon as I took him.

Q. When he told you where the things were, did not he expect to be discharged? - Yes, but he never told me; there are a great many things lost, which he never would discover.

Q. He told me in what manner I should go after them, but I would not go by myself in such a manner, without a constable, he said I should go into a house and, say damn your eyes where are my things, my bed fellow brought into this house, the last night? but he never discovered where it was.

- BOOTH sworn.

Q. How old are you? - Going of twelve years old.

Q. Have you been sworn before the magistrate? - I was.

Q. Suppose you tell a lie, or a story, or swear that, that is false; have you been taught what will become of you? - Go to hell and into everlasting fire.

Q. Now mind you will be punished here and hereafter if you don't tell exactly what is true? - At half after nine o'clock on Tuesday, that man came to my mammy, I don't know the day of the month, and he asked my mammy for the key of the room to go to bed; then my mammy gave him the key, and

he went up stairs, and he came down with the box and made a noise in the passage; I ran out and saw him in the street, he was facing a shop where there is a great light, and I saw the box very plain; I ran in and told my mammy as soon as I saw him, and my mammy told me to go and call Mr. Sparing; and I went and called him, and he came down.

SARAH DAWS sworn.

I keep a chandler's shop, and clothes shop, and coal shed, in Strutton Ground, No. 21; the prisoner brought some part of the things to me, some time between the hours of nine and ten on Tuesday night, he brought two coats and other things, he brought them in his hand, and asked me if I would buy them? I had seen him about a twelve month before, but not to say any thing to him, there was a young man with him; I asked him if they were his own? and he said the things belonged to an acquaintance of his; but I did not ask whether the young man belonged to them or not, he laid them down, and he asked two guineas for them; I told him that the clothes were old, and I could not afford to give him that for them; I gave him a guinea and a half, I did not ask him whether they were his or not.

Court. I hope you will not go on in this way, if you do you will stand at the bar? - I never bought any before that were so unlucky.

DAVID DAWS sworn.

I am the husband of the last witness; I was present just at the time the bargain was made; she gave a guinea and a half for them; that man that is at the bar brought them to the best of my knowledge; they were delivered to the constable without any dispute.

- GASTREL sworn.

I am the constable; I produce the property found at Mrs. Daws's, I got it there on Wednesday the day after the robbery was committed; I have kept it ever since. (Produced and deposed to by Mrs. Daws, as the things she purchased; and by Sparing as his property.)

Sparing. The womens clothes are my sister's; she is here to swear to them; they were in my box, I had them to keep for her.

Prisoner. When the constable apprehended me the constable and another young man was with him, an acquaintance of the prosecutor, and I was in liquor, when they first apprehended me; when I got sober they both came to me to the watch-house, and told me if I would tell where the property was I should be discharged; I told them I could not tell where all was but I could the best part; he said that would do; and the constable said so himself, that I should be discharged.

Court to Constable. Was that so? - It is strictly true, he was very much in liquor; in the morning when I took him, the prosecutor told him if he would tell where the things were he would forgive him; indeed he offered him money, but he would not tell then.

GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 34 s. (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-40

431. THOMAS SMITH and THOMAS EDWARDS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Ramsey about the hour of nine in the night on the 20th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, six silk handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 15 s. and three quarters of a yard of silk lustring, value 1 s. the goods of the said William Ramsey .

WILLIAM RAMSEY sworn.

I keep a house in Glass House-street, St. James's ; my house was broke open about nine or somewhere before nine, I was at home, on the 20th of April, Saturday; I sell clothes, and had had several people in the shop, and there were several things on the counter. I sell men and womens clothes, and new clothes, and handkerchiefs, and a variety of other things; while I was clearing these away to take some of my property out of the window, I heard something against the glass, the outside of the window, when I came to that part, the glass was broke; I was very near the person who broke it, though I could not swear to him at all, I saw a hand pass through where the glass was broke, and grasp at the things laying on the window, but the man that was taking them I cannot tell notwithstanding.

Q. Did you see him take any thing away? - Yes, I did plainly. I know there were these handkerchiefs there, and I saw him take them away.

Q. Do you mean to state it is a fact, that you saw them taken away, or do you reason on it? - Most undoubtedly I saw them taken away, there was a piece of silk which was laying along with them, they were all laying together, I could not take on me to say what the man took, but they all lay together, opposite to one pane of glass; as to the handkerchiefs I clearly saw them go; I was rather flurried in consequence of such a daring thing, so that by the time I had got to the door they were so far gone that I did not think it worth while to go after them; I saw them turn the corner a few doors from my dwelling house; there were other people in the street who gave the alarm; the two prisoners were brought back by the evidence Bocknell and another, who is here, in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. Was your property brought back? - There were six handkerchiefs and a piece of silk, something short of a yard, it was given into my possession when brought back; I gave it to Carpenter, the beadle of the night, in the watch-house; I have had it since of the constable, in Marlborough-street, it was sealed and delivered to my custody.

THOMAS BOCKNELL sworn.

I live at Mr. Drummond's, I am his butler; I was in Glass House-street, this Saturday evening, about twenty minutes before nine, on the 20th of April, it was candle light, quite dark in the street, candles were light in all the street, and lamps; passing Glass House-street I heard a window break, I was in Glass House-street, opposite to the house, I went over to see what was the matter with many others, I found that Mr. Ramsey had been robbed of some silk handkerchiefs, and his wife then said stockings; she came out of the door, and I asked him why he did not pursue the prisoners? I then went my way home, and going down the Hay Market there is a small court, which leads into Jermyn-street, I heard a buzzing, and I looked round and I saw three men coming out of the court; I thought them suspicious people, and it might be those that robbed Mr. Ramsey; they crossed over the Hay Market; I followed them; they then went into a court, called Coventry-court; I followed them into this court, I passed them in this court, there were three of them, and Edwards, the tallest of the two at the bar, he pulled out this piece of silk handkerchiefs, and was shewing it to the others, that confirmed my suspicions, and I went and passed them again, and got into Coventry-street to get some assistance to take them, being three of them; I saw a

butcher coming out of Newport market, and I asked him to help me and we went and took two of them, one escaped, these are the two that we took.

Q. Was there any conversation between this prisoner, who produced the silk handkerchiefs and the others? - Yes, they were in deep conversation all the way.

Q. How long might they be conversing together? - Not five minutes. They made no resistance at all; the handkerchiefs were with Edwards; immediately after they were taken he threw them from him; I saw him throw them down; I am not quite positive whether I picked them up myself or somebody else, but they were in my hands directly, I believe the other man, Smith, had the silk, but I will not take on me to say, the butcher is not here; I heard the prisoners in conversation in this court, and they said, did you hear a buggar of a butcher say, they were gone down Hare-street? I took and carried them to Mr. Ramsey; they were in the same dress they are in now.

WILLIAM CARPENTER sworn.

I was the beadle of the night. On the 20th of April, I think Saturday night, near nine o'clock, they sent down to the watch-house either for beadle or constable, to take two thieves out of Mr. Ramsey's house; I went down and I took another man along with me, and I had some property home with me, which lies here now; I kept it in my custody till we went before the justice, then it was delivered to Mr. Ramsey again after we had sealed it.

Mr. Ramsey. I can swear positively to the silk, because of the pattern; it was a piece I had by me, the remnant of a gown, and the same number as I lost; there was seven in the piece, and one I sold, and these are the six remaining.

Q. You saw the man's arm in the hole of the glass; could you distinguish the colour of his coat? - It does not strike me any observation of that.

Court to Bocknell. How soon might it be after you left this house, that you saw these people in the Hay market? - Not five minutes.

Q. On hearing the noise and going up, did you see any body? - I did not see any of these men; there were many people ran up through curiosity, but the thieves were gone.

Prisoner Smith. I have got a brother that lives in St. James's market; I always carry his linen home of a Saturday night; coming from him through Coventry-court, this gentleman came up and laid hold of this young fellow and me, and said we had done a robbery; I know no more of it than a child unborn.

Prisoner Edwards. I had been on an errand to Mr. Reynold's printing office in Piccadilly; coming down Coventry-street I met this young fellow, and this gentleman laid hold of both me and him, and said we were the persons that committed the robbery; it is no such thing, sir, says I; in the mean time there were two hundred or three hundred people round about at the time; I know no more of it than a child unborn.

The prisoner Edwards called one witness to his character.

Thomas Smith , GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 39 s. only. (Aged 14.)

Thomas Edwards , GUILTY, ditto (Aged 17.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-41

432. JOHN BEANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of

March , a feather bed, value 30 s. a flock mattrass, value 6 s. two feather pillows, value 4 s. a feather bolster, value 3 s. two linen sheets, value 6 s. two woollen blankets, value 6 s. a bed quilt, value 3 s. a stuff window curtain, value 2 s. an iron stove, value 3 s. an iron fender, value 6 d. an iron shovel, value 6 d. an iron poker, value 6 d. a flat iron, value 1 s. an iron bar, value 6 d. a copper tea kettle, value 2 s. a copper sauce pan, value 2 s. a copper frying pan, value 2 s. a brass candlestick, value 9 d. a looking glass, value 2 s. a pair of bellows, value 6 d. and two bed cords, value 4 d. the goods of William Bunyan .

WILLIAM BUNYAN sworn.

I live in Corbert's-court, Brown's-lane, Spitalfields ; I am a house keeper; I let lodgings to Mrs. Beane, she came in that name to me, as the wife of the prisoner, she came and paid earnest, and he paid the week's money; she came the 2d of March last, she took the chamber; we have only one room to let, they took it furnished, they came the same day they took it, they were to give 3 s. a week, and he paid the half crown to make up the 3 s. when the week was up, they had all the things let with the room mentioned in the indictment; they stayed three weeks; they went away the 23d of March and took the things away with them; I was in bed and my wife too; it was between five and six in the morning; I am a cooper .

Prisoner. What name did the woman come in? - She said her name was Beane.

Court. Who paid the fortnight? - He paid the one week; and they ran away before the other week was due; here are some things that were found.

MARY BUNYAN sworn.

I was present when the lodgings were let, and my husband too, we were both in the room; I am deaf.

Q. Could you hear what passed? - Nothing particular; she put down the six-pence; I was there when the man and woman came; says he, I like the apartment very well; and I said to her, I am very glad your husband approves of what you have done; they continued three weeks, and went away the day the the rent was due; I went after them that morning, and I missed the things after breakfast about ten o'clock, the 23d of March; she had locked my husband and I in; I found these here things in Bunhill-row, in Twister's-alley, and the prisoner was laying on the outside of a mattrass, stuffed with straw; it is part of a mattrass, and part is gone; they have taken the inside out: I know it to be part of my mattrass, because I made part of it and I stuffed it with fine flocks; I saw it as he lay, and when he got up I said, that is my mattrass; I know these bellows, I have had them twenty years; here is a quilt which was pledged in the name of Mary Thompson ; nothing else was found in Twister's-alley but the bellows and mattrass, the woman is here who keeps the house.

Prisoner. I would ask whether that cloth was not torn off from some other which it was before joined to in the room? - Yes, the officer took a piece off.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn.

I went to Twister's-alley; Bunhill-row; I went to the house where the prisoner laid on this mattrass, with something else stuffed with straw, he and one Jane Gubbins were in the room; the prosecutrix said it was part of her mattrass, and there were her bellows; I told the prisoner he must dress himself and go with me; I found these duplicates, but they are nothing to the property the people lost; I know nothing about the quilt.

JEREMIAH MANCRAFT sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I live the corner of Brown's-lane, Spitalfields; the quilt was pawned the 12th of March for two shillings, it was not me that took it in; I cannot tell who pawned it; the person who took it in is very ill of a fever, and I see from him it is pawned in the name of Mary Thompson .

JANE GUBBINS sworn.

How old are you? - I am twenty nine the 6th of June; I lived with the prisoner two years and a half, and whatever we did we meant to get out as soon as he got work; I used to work at the silk business; our trade is so very bad we did it out of distress.

Court. Young woman, mind you are upon your oath; let nothing tempt you to take a false oath; you know very well you are liable to punishment if you speak falsely, not only here but hereafter. Now with that caution to you, what do you know of this transaction? - I made away with nothing but what he knows of; we had it between us, he desired me to pledge the quilt, and he said when we had work he would get it again.

Prisoner. I am really drawn into this affair by that woman, that Mrs. Davis can prove where we lived.

MARY DAVIS sworn.

They took a room of me in Twister's-alley; the woman came and she offered me three pence earnest; I thought she was a poor woman, and I told her to keep the money till the week was up, and they paid me duly and truly; I asked her if she was a married woman? she said she was lawfully married; I let a man in one night, he was a little man, I think they came on Wednesday the 24th of March, but I cannot be positive.

Q. Do you mean to say then that he was not taken away the very next day, after he came to your lodgings? - No the next day, it was turned three weeks or a month.

Court to Armstrong. What day did you go to this place? - Wednesday the 24th of April.

Court to Mrs. Davis. Did you and Armstrong come there? - I did not, I cannot swear to the man, but I can to the woman; I don't know that I see him but once.

Prisoner. I unfortunately lived and cohabited with this here woman, and I believe, who has been the perpetrator of the act, and to screen herself has entirely laid it on me: I know no more of Bunyan's things nor never handled any thing of them, or took any thing out of the room; I met that woman in the street on the 2d of March; she told me she lived in Corbert's-court; did not know Mr. or Mrs. Bunyan before she said if I would come and be with her as usual she would be glad; accordingly I went with her, she took me up stairs into the chamber and walked round the room, after some few words passed I said, I suppose these things to be none of your own; she said they were not, but part were and part were Mr. Bunyan's; I then asked her what she paid a week rent for the room? she told me half a crown; on Saturday night following she asked me for the money, she said she had no money to pay her rent; I asked her what the rent was? she said, three shillings; I thought she wanted to impose upon me to get the six-pence for herself. I am very sorry, my lord, if the law allows by my paying for that week's rent to be brought into a scrape for what is done; I went to Mrs. Bunyan's and paid the two shillings and six-pence, little thought what I was to come to through that, I stayed there the whole three weeks; in the course of this time I found one morning a sheet pawned off my bed, I said to Jane Gubbins , that I thought she had done very wrong, for that property

was not her own, but Mrs. Bunyan's, and if she wanted money it was better to pawn her own things; she answered me, it was no concern of mine, and without she liked it I should not be there for she was the mistress of the room, and I was not the master. Another time I came home in the day time I missed a saucepan, I asked her what she had done with it? I said, I hoped she had not pawned the saucepan; she said, no, Mrs. Bunyan had got it down stairs for her own use. Another time I found a different quilt on the bed to what I saw at first, I was then told that Mrs. Bunyan had changed it; I told her I did not chuse to stay with her any longer, and then I found out this quilt she had pawned; I then gave her the money to fetch it out again, and insisted on her fetching it home; she went out and when she returned she brought a quilt, which I thought was the same that she had first when I came away, I did not know whether she meant to stay there or not, she told me she should stay, and I sees no more of her for five or six days, when I was accidently going through the street and she called after me, she then told me that she had got a room in Twister's-alley and had left Mr. Bunyan's; I then went home with her into Twister's-alley. On the 24th of April Mr. Armstrong and Mrs. Bunyan came up into the room, as soon as Mrs. Bunyan came up she took up a pair of bellows, she said they were her property; I never carried them to the place where they were, nor was I there till after the bellows were there; the things which Mrs. Bunyan calls her mattrass was joined to another piece which we made use of for a bed, being stuffed with straw; I was then carried before a magistrate, when I came there Jane Gubbins said that if in case they would forgive her she was willing to tell the truth; I little thought that the truth was to lay a falsity on me, when we came to the justice's the justice heard what she had to say, she began to tell a story that I got up in the morning on the 23d of March, and that I packed up the bed and bedding and every article mentioned in the indictment; the magistrate asked her how many times I came backward and forwards? she said I carried it all away at once; the magistrate said it was impossible to carry all away at once; they then asked her where they were carried to? she said to a house in Long-alley: they asked her whether she should know the house? she said she should. Mr. Armstrong took her down to Long-alley, and then she said that she could not find out the house where they were carried to; I was then committed till the Saturday following, when I was carried up for other examinations, and Jane Gubbins told a different story to what she did at first, she then said, instead of saying that I carried the things to Long-alley, there was a deal of conversation passed between her and Mr. Armstrong in the office; Mr. Armstrong is present and I hope will give an account of what passed; I then was committed here to take my trial; in the course of which time a man whom I have subpoenaed on my trial came to me in Newgate, and told me that Jane Gubbins had applied to him with some duplicates of some things, for him to fetch out of pawn for her, and he was apprehensive they were belonging to the lodgings; as such I got a friend of mine to go to the pawnbrokers to see if such and such things were there, and then I told him to go and acquaint Mr. and Mrs. Bunyan; he returned to me and said that he had been to the pawnbrokers and that the pawnbroker had produced the things, and the pawnbrokers declared that they knew nothing of me, but they were brought by a woman whom they shouldknow again if they saw her; I then thought when I had found out this matter that this woman had been guilty of making away with this property unbeknown to me, and that she had swore falsely, by laying the matter on me; I had some hopes that I should clear the point and prove to this honourable court that I am innocent of the matter; I have subpoenaed William Sherwood if you please to call him, and there is another pawnbroker. William Crawford .

Prisoner to Armstrong. Whether you did not converse with Jane Gubbins in a private room at the office, and whether you did not tell her what words to say? - I had orders before the magistrate to take her into a private room to ask her if she would be a witness, and I did so.

WILLIAM SHERWOOD sworn.

The mother of Jane Gubbins came to me on Thursday the 2d of May last, and brought two duplicates, one was a duplicate of a quilt.

WILLIAM CRAWFORD sworn.

I have a sheet which belongs to Mrs. Bunyan, a woman pawned it with me the 5th of March, in the name of Mary Thompson .

Court. What is the description? - I have got it down; Brick-lane; we ask their christian name; sirname and address, and whether it is their own property.

Prisoner. Ask the witness to look at Jane Gubbins whether she did not pawn the sheet with him.

Court. I will ask Jane Gubbins herself.

Jane Gubbins . I pawned the sheet by his desire.

Prisoner. Why did she pawn it in that name? - He went by that name and it turned me out of my bread by that name, if I was to have my liberty this minute.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-42

403. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , in the dwelling house of Bridget Maclaurin , widow ; Alexander Sinclair Gordon and James Mead , a promissary note called a bank note, value 20 l. No. 4,822, the said note being the property of the said Bridget Maclaurin , Alexander Sinclair Gordon and James Mead , and the said sum of 20 l. payable, and secured to, thereby being then due to them .

Indicted in a second COUNT with the same offence, laying it to be in the dwelling house of Bridget Maclaurin only.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

ALEXANDER SINCLAIR GORDON sworn.

On the 15th of April the prisoner at the bar was a servant of mine, he was a shopman in the warehouse ; my partner s are Bridget Maclaurin and James Mead ; the house is situated in Pudding lane, No. 17, and No. 18 , Mrs. Maclaurin lives at No. 17, she lives up stairs, the warehouse and counting house is on the ground floor, there is a cellar underneath the ground floor, which is likewise in the business. On the 15th of April I called at Messrs. Coutts's between two and three in the afternoon; I went to receive payment of a draft of Mr. Daniel Spence 's, on Messrs. Hughes for twenty pounds, I saw one of Mr Coutt's clerks whose name is Charlton, and I received

a twenty pound bank note in exchange; I don't recollect the number of the bank note, when I had received it I returned home, I put the bank note loose into my breeches pocket, I had no pocket book about me at the time.

Q Had you any other bank note about you at the time? - I had not. When I came home I went through the warehouse to the counting house, part of No. 17, on the ground floor; I took the bank note from my pocket and laid it down on my desk for Mr. Mead to lock it up; the note was first missed on Thursday morning afterward, the bank note was lost on Monday the 15th; the Thursday morning, subsequent to the Monday, which was the 17th or 18th, I called all the servants in the house and enquired of them if they had seen such a thing; I enquired of the prisoner at the bar, as of all the others, if they had seen a note? I told them that a bank note was lost, and I was very much surprised for I never lost any thing before from that place; the prisoner said he had seen nothing of it; the reason I laid it on my desk was, I had not the key of my small iron chest in my pocket, therefore left it for Mr. Mead to take care of it, there was one Charles Donnell not present when I made this enquiry, he was ill in bed up stairs; I desired the prisoner at the bar to go up to him and ask him if he had seen any thing of it; the prisoner brought down the answer, so far as I can recollect, that Charles had seen nothing of it; I think those were the words.

Q. Did you ever recover your bank note again? - I received it by order of Mr. Newland from the File at the Bank.

Mr. Knowlys. I think you say that you never lost any thing before? - I would not wish you to press that particularly.

Q. On the 15th of April you say you went with the draft to Mr. Coutts's? - I am perfectly confident it was of a Monday; and the reason why I remember the circumstance was I was at a funeral on the Monday before, in St. Martin's Church.

Q. I don't know whether your's is a wholesale or a retail shop? - We consider ours as a wholesale shop, but the doors of the warehouse frequently stand open.

Q. You laid this bank note on the desk? - I did, and there I left it.

Q. Had you ever the precaution given you of having papers loose in your pocket? - No.

Q. Were there any other bank notes on the desk? - Not that I know of; my attention was not drawn to any other.

Q. I think you say, that when you made the enquiry of these servants of your's, the manner in which you made it was, I have lost a bank note from that place; naming the desk, the particular place from whence it was lost? - It certainly was.

Q. You asked your servants if any body had seen it; you was ignorant of the number at that time, therefore you could only describe it as a twenty pound bank note lost. Do you know a person of the name of Adams? I mean a cobler who lives in your lane? - There is a cobler lives there, but I don't know his name.

Q. How many years has he lived there? - I don't know.

Q. He had his seat or stall in Pudding-lane, just by you? - He has a seat or stall close underneath the blacksmith's, opposite Mr. Mead's house.

Q. Do you know who you left in the warehouse at the time you left this bank note on the desk? - Mr. Mead was in the counting house, and I don't know whether all the men were in the warehouse or not.

Q. The warehouse has communication with the counting house? - It has; when

I went out of the counting house I met the prisoner at the bar; I gave him instructions when Charles, one of my men who was out, came home, to go to Mr. Lambert's on Ludgate-hill, that was a little after four o'clock.

JAMES MEAD sworn.

I am one of the partners of this house. On the 15th of April, my partner brought home a bank note and laid it on the desk before me, I was then writing at the desk, I did not touch it because I was busy a writing, it laid before me, and after I had done writing, in about five minutes, I saw the note and went out to my dinner forgetting to put the note into the iron chest, I had set down about ten minutes at my dinner, I recollected I had not locked the note up, I went into the counting house but could not find any note there; I looked all about but could not find it; Mr. Gordon was gone, I took it then for granted that Mr. Gordon had seen I had left it; when I found it was not so, all the servants were enquired about it, and they were particularly examined, and one servant was ill, Charles Donnell , we sent the prisoner up to him to ask about it; the prisoner said that Donnell had seen nothing of it; he expressed some astonishment that he should be asked; three other persons were asked, they were all asked individually.

Mr. Knowlys. There were three others in the warehouse? - There were.

Q. You directed your attention to the bank note that lay on the desk? - I did; the number I had not specified, because I had not seen it, it was laying down before me.

Q. Was you much pressed with business? - A good deal; but not more than common.

Q. I find that you forget something that was communicated to you, by your partners; your mind was so much engaged that you forgot to do what you was desired to by your partners.

Q. Have you never been cautioned about carrying papers loose in your waistcoat pocket? - I don't recollect.

Q. In the hurry of business you had forgot to secure this note as your partner had directed; might not the same want of recollection induce you to clap it in your pocket? - Certainly not; I certainly did not do that; I did not lay hold of it at all.

Q. I should think, Mr. Mead, that in the hurry you were in you might possibly have sweeped it off the desk in your motion? - No, it was above the desk.

Q. You was in such a hurry as to forget one material thing.

Mr. Knapp. The bank note was on the flat part of the desk above the sloping part? - It was.

WILLIAM CHARLTON sworn.

I am a clerk to Messrs. Coutts and Co.

Q. Do you recollect seeing Mr. Gordon on the 15th of April? - I do, he came for the change of a draft of twenty pounds, I paid him in a twenty pound bank note.

Q Do you recollect the number of the bank note? - I do not; I made an entry of it; I have the book here.

Mr. Knowlys. You recollect nothing of this draft from the memory of this draft? - I made a payment of twenty pounds.

Mr. Knowlys to Court. I object to his reading the entry; he says, Mr. Gordon came with a draft, what the sum was he only recollects from the draft, which is not here produced.

Charlton. I have made an entry.

Court. Read it? -

"Gordon twenty pounds note, No. 4,822. twenty pounds paid Nathaniel Spooner ." And to the best of my knowledge the bank note is dated the 4th of April 179.

Mr. Knowlys. Mr. Charlton be so good as to tell me how many bank notes

you may have paid in the course of six or seven days after? - Some thousands. When I receive a bank note from a gentleman I take the Number and date, but when I pay it away I only put down the number, and I generally pay away the last note I receive first.

Q. Therefore what the date of the note was, whether the year 1791, 1792, or 1793, it is impossible for you to tell? - Not from memory.

Q. I believe you know that the same number occurs in bank notes of different years, therefore a bank note of 1792, may be of the same number of one of the same value, of the year 1793, therefore without the date the number is no criterion to make out the identity? - Certainly not.

Court. Do you pay away those bank notes you take in the course of the day, or those you do not? - In general those we take.

Q. Then if you do pay them away the same day, do you put down the date or only the number of them? - Only the number, because it is the custom of the house.

Q. Are you able to say then any particular date or number of any note paid away that day? - Yes, we can, by referring to the person's name from whom I received it.

Q. Who did you receive this from? - From a person of the name of Gressey.

Q. Read it? -

"Monday, 25th April. Received of Mr. Gressey, bank note twenty pounds, No. 4,822, dated 4th April 1793." Both entries are in the same page.

Q. Are you able, by these two entries, to say that the note you paid to Mr. Gordon was the note you received from Mr. Gressey? - Yes.

Mr. Knowlys. Mr. Charlton, do you mean to say that you are positive you paid away that identical note you received of Gressey? - To the best of my knowledge, and from the books.

Mr. Knowlys to Mead. Have you not learned, that while you was up stairs a quart of oil was sold by some persons in your house? - I cannot tell that.

JOHN BOLTON sworn.

I am a victualler; I live in the parish of St. John's, Southwark, in Three Oak-lane; I know the prisoner at the bar very well; I have known him upwards of three years.

Q. Do you remember seeing him at any time in the month of April? - I cannot positively say, without a doubt, because I serve him with beer.

Q. Do you recollect seeing him any particular day? - I cannot positively say.

Q. Do you remember no conversations or dealings with him in the month of April? - Without a doubt I had.

Q. State to the court what those dealings were.

Court. What month was it in? - It might be the month of April, or it might not; Mr Smith came in and asked me for to change a twenty pounds bank note; to the best of my knowledge I gave him two ten pound bank notes.

Q. How long did you keep the note? - I cannot positively say.

Q. Did you receive any note of him? - I did; it was a twenty pounds bank note, but as for the number I don't know.

Q. How long did you keep it in your possession? - It might be one day or two, I will not positively say.

Q. To whom did you part with it? - To one Mr. King.

Mr. Knowlys. You have lived in this man's neighbourhood a long time? - Eight years.

Q. I would ask whether you ever knew an honester man? - Never.

Q. You don't know but this transaction might have been in the month of March, for what you know? - It might be for what I know.

Q. Are you sure this note you received from the prisoner was the same you paid away to Mr. King? - It might be; sometimes I have thirty, forty, or fifty in the house, and sometimes not so many; whether it was the same I received from the prisoner or not, that I paid away to Mr. King, I cannot positively say, but I did pay a bank note to King.

DAVID KING sworn.

I am an ironmonger; I know Mr. Bolton the last witness; he lives next door to me; I live in Horsely Down; I gave him cash for this bank note in half guineas; I took it immediately up to Messrs. Downing and Co.

Q. Do you know to whom you paid it there? - I don't know; I took it with other cash and notes; I don't know the number at all.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-43

434. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , ten pieces of nankeen, each piece containing seven yards, value 3 l. a wooden box, value 6 d. twenty three yards of paper hanging, value 3 s. another wooden box, value 6 d. a muslin cap, value 10 d. six yards of silk, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of John Middleditch .

- sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Middleditch; he lives in Finsbury-square; I packed up all the things in the indictment, in a wooden box, on Monday evening between eight and nine o'clock, and gave them to Irwin; he went to take them to the Saracen's Head-Inn, Snow-hill.

WILLIAM IRWIN sworn.

I live with Mr. Middleditch; I was sent from my master's shop with this box to Snow-hill; I had only one box, there was another small box in the inside of it; I found it rather heavy; when I came to Cheapside I met a carman, and I asked him to let me pitch it behind his cart; I put it in the tail of the cart and walked behind; when I came almost as far as St. Paul's Church I asked him how far he was going? he said, to the bottom of Snow hill; when I was in Newgate-street the prisoner came up and asked me the way to Leather-lane? I gave him the best directions I could; he then slips round and takes the box out of the cart, I did not see him take it from the cart, but I saw him with the box and saw him drop it; I was pointing towards the way the young man should go, in the mean time he slips round me and took it off.

Q. How far had he got from the tail of the cart when you first see him? - Not a great way off. I cried stop thief! he had the box on his shoulder, almost close by me, and he ran away, and I ran after him, and he dropped the box at Butcherhall-lane; then I took up the box and the people pursued after the man; I was going away with the box, and thought I was very well off with it, but they took the man and the people made me come up to him, I dare say I was very nigh a quarter of an hour before they brought the man back; I am sure that is the man, it was between eight and nine o'clock; I saw him very plain, I am certain he is the man, I am positive; I am sure it is the same box

Prisoner. I wish to ask him whether he did not quit sight of me in the course of that time; the story he told at Guildhall was, that another person was amusing him. - You are the man that asked me the way to Leather-lane, and nobody else.

THOMAS PIGEON sworn.

I was coming up Butcherhall-lane, between eight and nine o'clock, and just

as I got opposite the prisoner he threw the box down, and I ran after him, and I never lost sight of him, he went into Cary-lane, he was taken there; I was the second or third that got up to him and brought him back to give him into the custody of Mr. Dempster, and we went directly to find the box; I am certain he is the man that had the box; I never lost sight of him; he said, damn me, if I knew you was so near to me I would have stuck a knife in you.

- DEMPSTER sworn.

I am a constable; I know nothing but having charge of the prisoner; I secured him, but did not examine him; I had much ado to get him to the Compter.

Prisoner. I think it was Saturday morning last my wife told me that Mr. Pigeon had been with her, and when she came down to me she told me she said that Mr. Pigeon did not wish to say any thing against me, as I was a poor man, he would settle the matter for two guineas; says I, I have no guineas to spare, so I will take the chance.

Court to Pigeon. What are you? - I am out of employ at present; I was a clerk and warehouseman to a wholesale linen draper, I never saw the woman except at Guildhall, nor him neither, before I took him. When I came to find the bill I did not know the way to apply, in which time the bill was found. When I came on Thursday morning his wife sent several people to me to make it up for two guineas; and because I would not take it the prisoner's mother-in-law came and abused me very much: I told her if she did not desist I should certainly complain of it when I came to give my evidence.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-44

435. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , a silver watch, value 2 l. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. a silver seal, value 1 s. a brass watch key, value 1 d. the goods of William Rowland , privately from his person .

WILLIAM ROWLAND sworn.

I am a coachman to Mr. Duchamp; I went out the 26th of April to spend the evening at Crutched-friars; I was returning at half past eleven o'clock, I met with Mary Jones .

Q. Was you quite sober? - I had been drinking a little, I was not so in liquor at all but I knew what I was about.

Q. Was you perfectly sober? - I knew what I was about.

Q. You know that is not an answer? - Yes, I was sober.

Q. Is it a difficult point to determine, because you considered of it so long? - I was sober enough.

Q. On your oath was you perfectly sober? - Yes, I was. I met this woman in Aldgate ; she asked me to go with her; I said I was behind my time, I could not go; I walked towards home, and she followed me about ten yards or more; she found I would not turn back with her she went back herself, and I went on, it may be a quarter of a mile or not so far, and found my watch was gone; I turned back immediately, when I found my watch was gone, to the place where she wanted me to go to; I found the woman that was along with her; I took her up and put her in the cage all night; the next morning I took her to the office, and she confessed.

Q. Was it taken in writing? - It was. There was another young man with me when we met these two women, and this woman was with her I took that night; this woman had my watch, because my property was found the next day upon her; it was the other woman that confessed

before the justice, this woman was taken up the next morning.

- LEWIS sworn.

I live with Mr. Duchamp and Co. they are dry salters; I am in the warehouse. Coming by Aldgate two women met us, Rowland and I were together, one walked by my side, and the other walked by the side of the other man; one of the women were near to him, and the other to me; before we came to the India House, in Leadenhall-street he said he had lost his watch; we went back to the George Yard, Whitechapel, to see if we could find the watch.

Q. At that time you did not know which of the two had stole it? - We took the first up for being in company with the other.

Q. Did not Rowland know? - I cannot tell whether he did or not.

- WHITEWAY sworn.

On the 27th of April, in the morning, I took the prisoner into custody, and when I met with her in the street she had this watch in her hand, wrapped round with an handkerchief; I asked her where the watch was? she cried and I found it in her hand; I asked her where she got it? she said she had been along with some young man near Moorfields, and as she left him, the watch, by some means, got hold of her clothes; I took her into a public house and there I found another watch under her arm, which the prosecutor swore to be his property. (The second watch produced and deposed to by Rowland.)

Prisoner. This young man picked me up one night, and would not let me alone, he wanted to go home with me, but he said he was short of money; I said, if you are short of money make me a present till another time I meet you; he left the watch in my care; the next morning he came, but had no money, and he said he would have the watch or he would charge an officer with me.

GUILTY, of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 25)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-45

436. JOHN PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , nineteen pieces and a half of silk ribbon, containing seven hundred and two yards, value 30 l. the goods of Thomas Wilson , Joseph White , Nicholas Smith , and others.

JOHN JONES sworn.

I live with Messrs. Drury and Co. there were a parcel of goods went from Drury and Co. in Bread-street, to the inn; I delivered the parcel the 16th of April last to the book-keeper of Wilson and Co. proprietors of the Exeter mail coach , Swan with Two Necks, Lad-lane ; it contained silk ribbons, nineteen pieces and a half, value thirty-nine pounds; I took this parcel in the afternoon; I cannot tell exactly the time; it was directed to Mrs. Elizabeth Hull , of Exeter.

JOHN NICOLSON sworn.

I am book-keeper to the Swan with Two Necks; I received a parcel from Jones, it was directed, Elizabeth Hull , Exeter; I booked the parcel my own self; I received it, I believe, in the afternoon, I cannot justly mention the hour, it was marked and delivered to the porter Robert Couch , who loads the coaches, he marked it off.

Q. What became of it afterwards? - I don't know.

ROBERT COUCH sworn.

I am the porter; I carried the parcel to the coach, it was directed, Elizabeth

Hull of Exeter; I put all the parcels in the seat of the coach except that I could not get it in it was so large, I laid it on the seat of the coach on the cushion, I went back again to the warehouse to fetch some more parcels, and in that time they laid hold of this lad.

JOHN DUGARD sworn.

I saw this young lad at the coach a quarter before eight o'clock at night, on the 16th of April, and I saw him go with the parcel in his hand from that coach, behind the next coach which was by the side of that, and drop it down; I asked him what business he had with that parcel? and then he took between the leaders and the wheel horses, and wanted to make his way through the passage; and there we took him in the passage; I am sure that is the lad.

JOHN HUNT sworn.

I live at the Swan with Two Necks; I take care of the fire arms for the guards that go with the mail coaches; I was up behind the Bristol coach, buckling up the fire arms, and this lad came under the coach and dropped the parcel under the dicky, the place were the guards sit; I saw him drop it there; I called out to John Dugard ; the coachman jumped down and took up the parcel, and the boy was immediately secured.

JOHN FENNER sworn.

I am a constable; I have the parcel, it was given me before the Lord Mayor.

- GAY sworn.

I am a coachman; I drove the Bath and Bristol coach; I had done my day's work and was helping John Dugard to load his coach; he asked me to go and have a glass of gin and water, and he sees somebody getting out of his coach; he says, who is that getting out of my coach? and I made a run and I sees this boy run behind the Bristol mail coach, and there he dropped the parcel, and I watched him, and he ran underneath the Manchester mail horses and came out, and there I catched him, in the new made passage, by the collar. (The ribbons produced and deposed to by Jones, who swore to the fancy patterns, but not to the plain ones)

GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-46

437. JANE FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , a pair of linen sheets, value 6 s. a bolster case, value 1 s. the goods of Henry Moss , in a lodging room in his dwelling house let by him, to be used by her and her pretended husband .

HENRY MOSS sworn.

I live in Great St. Ann's-street, Westminster , I keep a chandler's shop ; I have a house and let lodgings; I let lodgings to this woman, she came to me to ask for a lodging, sometime in the latter end of March; I don't remember the day; I asked what she did for a living? she said she bought and sold old clothes; I asked her what her husband was? she said, he was a working man, and worked at Chelsea, and that he was a very quiet man, and I should hardly ever see or hear of him in the house; I then told her that if they got their bread by honesty they might come, but I took in none but I knew how they got their bread; she came to the lodging on Tuesday, and behaved very well for a fortnight; she then had a soldier coming after her; I

told her then she had deceived me, and I wished her to go out of the lodging; she did not go as I desired her, and on Saturday the 29th of April, or the 30th I am not confident which, the person who lodges on the same floor with her, calls out that Mrs. Field was going away, for she had put the key under the door; the woman told her that if she did not come to us, she would come down herself and tell us that she was a going; on my coming down into the shop I found her in the shop, and she said to my wife, I have done a sad thing; says I, I hope you have not robbed my lodging? yes, says she, I have.

Q Did your wife make her any promise? - No, I am sure of it, because she was hardly in the room before I was; I sent for the constable, and when he came, she gave me the duplicates of things she had pawned, of her own accord; we could not go into the room not through the door, because she had put the key so far under the door, the constable was obliged to go and borrow a ladder to get in at the window to see what was gone; when we went in we found nothing gone except the sheets and bolster she gave the constable the duplicates of; I never saw her before she came to take the lodging; she appeared rather poor but the clothes she had on were very clean; I thought her a working person as she said she was, but I found she was not, and that made me want her to go out of my lodging.

JOSEPH TUCK sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Brown, Strutton Ground, Westminster; the prisoner pledged one sheet with me for three shillings and six-pence, the 25th of April, and a bolster case for two shillings and six-pence, the 26th of April, and another sheet for three shillings and six-pence the 26th.

Prisoner. I meant to get them out; I told my landlady that I had pawned them but I would get them out again.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-47

438. JONATHAN ROBERTS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , six thousand coffin nails, value 11 s. 6 d. and six thousand of metal chair nails, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of William Bent the elder , and William Bent the younger .

WILLIAM BENT sworn.

I live in St. Martin's-lane , I am an ironmonger , the prisoner was my servant, he robbed me of the several things contained in the indictment; I think he had been my servant three months, he was a kind of clerk and shopman , I had strong reason from other circumstances, to suspect him, and I charged him with the crime; I knew I had lost property, but I was not sensible of what I had lost; and I said this to him, desired him, if he expected any mercy to let me know the extent of his crimes; and to tell what he had done, and he confessed.

FRANCIS CLEWLEY sworn.

I am the officer of St. Martin's parish; Mr. William Bent came to me on Saturday night, April the 20th, and told me that a servant of Mr. Bent's had robbed him, and that he had reason to believe that some of his property was at his lodgings, he lodged at a public house in Russell-street; I went to his lodgings, the prisoner was not with me, Mr. William Bent was with me; I found this parcel of goods in his box; I took a

coach and brought the goods to Mr. Bent's, I had been at Mr. Bent's and searched the prisoner, I had the key from the prisoner which opened the box, I found six thousand coffin nails and six thousand metal chair nails.

WILLIAM BENT the Younger sworn.

I am in partnership with my father; I went the 20th of April with the constable, I went to a public house in the neighbourhood of Covent-garden, Russell-street; I believe the constable found the key of his box in his pocket, he found these nails there; the papers of the chair nails have our private mark; the coffin nails have no mark on.

Q. Did you ever sell these? - No, we never sold them.

Q. How do you know that? - From his own confession.

Q. Can you say so independent of that? - No, I cannot.

Prisoner. I generally went out for orders; I was ordered by Mr. Bent to call on the customers, I called on a customer who gave me an order for these things, and Mr. Bent and I we did not settle sometimes for some weeks, and there was a balance remaining frequently between him and I for three weeks, and I took these to my lodgings with a view of taking them to the man, I had an order besides to go very near to the place where this man lived; when the night he called on me to settle with him I was behind hand, I had not cash to make up; he said that if I expected any mercy of him I must send for somebody to make up the cash; he seemed to express a concern for the present unhappy situation in which I am involved in; says he, I will do every thing in the world if you will tell me how matters stand with you, but if I would not the utmost of the law should be exercised; I told him I would tell the truth, and he went out and got a constable, and when the constable came I gave him the key, and he found the things in my box.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-48

439. WILLIAM TOMKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , a bay gelding, value 12 l. the goods of Thomas Barnet .

THOMAS BARNET sworn.

I live at Bow with Messrs. Hudson and Gordan, brewers, and my horse was kept in Mr. Hudson's stables before it was lost, it was a bay horse, it had a blaze in his face, two white legs behind, a black swiss tail and mane, rather thick winded, fifteen hands high; I have had him eight months; it was lost from a house in Bow-bridge .

WILLIAM SHARP sworn.

I am Mr. Barnet's servant; he is a cooper and brewer to Mr. Hudson and Gordan; I took the horse from my master's house to the tap house door at Bow, just against the brew house gate, and hung it on the peg round the post, it stood just by the door, this was Sunday between the hours of nine and ten o'clock; I don't recollect the day of the month.

Barnet. The 28th of April.

Sharp. I went into the tap, and when I came out the horse was gone from the place where I left him, I suppose I might be there a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes; he was not made properly fast to the post, he might get loose, it is a common size post just stood by the tap house door; I never saw the prisoner with my eyes till I saw him since he was taken up.

THOMAS JUDD sworn.

I am a cooper; I work for Mr. Hudson. On the 28th of April between

the hours of ten and eleven I saw the prisoner at the bar leading this horse through Stratford, he was leading the horse, and the bridle was across his shoulder, and the saddle on the horse; I knew the horse, for four or five months, I am sure it was Mr. Barnet's, and I am sure that is the man, I knew him before, he used to carry greens about and fish ; I know he is the person.

Q. Why did not you stop him, seeing him leading the horse? - I thought Mr. Barnet had given him orders to take the horse to a relations, a little further from where I see him.

ANTHONY GRANGER sworn.

I keep the Bell at Stratford-green. On Monday morning the 29th I was going to London, between the hours of nine and ten, the prisoner past me in Brick-lane on horse back, on Mr. Barnet's horse, I knew the horse before Mr. Barnet had it, and I called to him, I knew the man, I have known him three or four months, I called to him in the highway, he would not stop; I said, stop, and repeated it till I came to the French Chapel; I followed him to Bishopsgate-street, and he would not stop, and then I followed him to Shoreditch and there I came along side of him, and then I asked him about the horse; says I, is it your's? he told me, no, but, says he, you must know, it is squire Sayer's, a brewer at Winchmore-hill, and then I let him go about his business, and then I went to let Mr. Barnet know that that man had got his horse; I knew that Mr. Barnet had lost it.

Q. Why did not you stop him? - I did not know as I had any right to stop him, as I was no office.

- REYNOLDS sworn.

I am a breeches maker; I live at Stratford in Essex, and a constable; I apprehended the man; all that I know is of a hue and cry that Mr. Barnet had lost a horse, on Sunday morning; on Tuesday evening by the description they gave me of the man I stopped him; I saw him go by where I was at work; I said to him, what have you done with Mr. Barnet's horse? says he, the horse is safe enough, it is grazing on the Forest.

JOHN PEARCE sworn.

I am an helper in the stable of Sir James Tilney Long's, at Wanstead; I was coming out at Bush Gate on Tuesday and Mrs. Harley comes out of the yard about two o'clock, she calls to me to tell me that there was a man had found a horse on the forest; I was not the first person that saw it; I went and I found the horse standing in a hollow bush, fastened by a hemp halter to a hollow stem of the bush; after I had seen the horse stand I went to let Mr. Parker know, who is the steward, he desired me to go and take him from the hollow bush and put him in the Manor Park in the Pound I delivered it into the bailiff's hand, he had the key and he put it in; Mr. Barnet came the next day to own the horse; I was not present when he looked at the horse; I knew it to be the same horse by the make of the horse, it was a bay horse, a star on his forehead and two white feet; I saw it after Mr. Barnet took it though I did not deliver it to him.

Court to Barnet. Did you go to Epping Forest to Sir James Tinley 's? - I did on Wednesday morning; I found my horse there, the same horse that I had lost on Sunday morning.

Prisoner. Please you my lord, as I was going to London on Monday morning, I met the horse loose by the Butcher's at Bow, one rein was broke and the other was loose, so I took hold of him and led him along for about half a mile, and then I wanted to do a job by myself,

and then the other rein broke for I thought to take him to the Pound.

Q. How came you to tell the man the next day that it belonged to Esq. Sayer, at Winchmore-hill? - I never told him so, I went to a house close by Mr. Barnet's and asked if they knew the horse? and asked the turnpike man and enquired of every body that I saw and nobody knew him.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-49

440. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Rippinghall , on the 26th of April , about the hour of six in the afternoon, the said John Rippinghall and others of his family being therein, and stealing, two cotton gowns, value 1 l. 10 s. a linen shift, value 5 s. a dimity petticoat, value 8 s. a linen apron, value 2 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. a cloth waistcoat, value 2 s. and a linen shirt, value 4 s. the goods of Thomas Rossell .

MARY ROSSELL sworn.

I am the wife of Thomas Rossell ; I lodge with John Rippinghall , No. 10, the back part of St. Clement's ; I was standing in a room opposite a coachman's room, William Hales , the person that I was standing with told me my room door was broke open; I told him how could that be when I had locked the door and was sitting on the key.

Q. Had you locked the door? - I had, and was fitting on the key and when I got up, and went and looked at the door I saw this man that stands now at the bar, I found my door quite wide open, the place where the lock goes in was a little thrust, but a very trifling, and the lock half went back, the prisoner was standing just at the opening of the door, as if standing to keep it open within the room, I asked him what he wanted and then he dropped the petticoat from his hand, and told me he wanted Mrs. Wilson, and asked is there such a person in your house? I told him no; do you know such a person? no; I catched hold of him by the collar, and told him he was a liar, he wanted my clothes; when I had him by the collar I fell down the stairs, whether he tripped me up, or I slipped down, I cannot say, but here is a piece of pocket and a piece of the flap of his coat which I tore off; then, sir, when the pocket tore off and the piece of the coat, he ran away from me; I got up in a moment and ran after him, I went across the way after him and across the Church-yard, and I lost sight of him by going up a little court, up which I did not follow him for I did not know but what there was a thoroughfare in it; I am perfectly sure the prisoner is the man, it was a dimity petticoat that he had hold of.

Q. I see there are other articles in the indictment; what have you to say about them? - They were all dirty linen left by one corner of the bed, I had left them not above ten minutes before I found the prisoner, and when I returned and went into the room I found them off, on the ground in the middle of the room, rather behind the door.

Q. Are you sure they were removed? - I am.

Q. Now what may be the value of the two cotton gowns? - I think about thirty shillings, the linen shift about five shillings it was new, it was never worn, the dimity waistcoat about eight shillings, the linen apron two shillings, the muslin handkerchief eighteen-pence, the cloth waistcoat two shillings, and the linen shirt four shillings.

Q. Some of these things are old? - They were.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the amount of 39 s but not of breaking and entering .

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-50

441. WILLIAM WHITE and WILLIAM SULLIVAN were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April , a looking glass in a gilt frame, value 1 l. a cotton gown, value 2 s. four pounds weight of veal, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Evan Evans .

JANE EVANS sworn.

I am the wife of Evan Evans we keep a house, a public house , the sign of the Roe Buck, in Clerkenwell, in the middle of Turnmill-street ; we lost these articles on Sunday the 20th of last month; these two men lodged with me sometime, and Sullivan went away the week before I was robbed; William White is a bricklayer the other called himself a muffin maker ; I had been robbed several times before, I had some disputes with that Sullivan the week before and I told him he should never come into my house no more, from that time he went away; I missed these articles on Sunday morning the 21st, I missed them about half after six o'clock in the morning, I missed all of them from the parlour, I did not see them on the prisoner, there is a person that did; I went to bed at one o'clock in the morning, as near as I can guess; I have never received nor seen the property since, William Sullivan was there the last person in the parlour at night, and William White was the only lodger I had in the house at the time; I got up in the morning at half past six and see my door open, I ran up to my husband and told him that I had been robbed; he told me that William White went out at five o'clock.

Q. Who shut the door last at night? - It was me, I left all the doors fast at night, every one, but this door was a private door that was found open in the morning, there was nobody went to that place but William Sullivan , I never went back to that door after twelve o'clock, no person went backward to that door but William Sullivan ; at twelve o'clock I left all my doors fast, and at one I let Sullivan out, and he went backward before I let him out.

Prisoner Sullivan. I wish to know whether she can say I was the last person, when there was a great many in the house? - I can take my oath he was the last person I let out, and the other man White, went up to bed, who was the only lodger I had in the house.

JOHN FRENCH sworn.

I keep a cart and two horses; I see Sullivan come out of the alley with the glass under his arm, on Sunday morning out of Roe Buck-alley, the alley that leads to this woman's house.

Q. What sort of a glass was it? - It was a large glass, the frame was gilt like; he had something wrapped about the looking glass, but what it was I cannot say.

Q. Did you see any veal about him? - No, please your honour.

Q. Then you cannot say to whom this glass belonged? - No, I cannot take upon me to say.

Prisoner Sullivan. First at the justice's he swore that he saw me come out of the alley with the glass covered over with a check; in the next place Mrs. Evans said it was a cotton gown.

French. I said it was something striped, what it was I did not know.

RICHARD MATTHEWS sworn.

I am a publican; I keep the sign of the George in Turnmill street, Sullivan came into my house about ten o'clock on Saturday night and had a pot of beer, and he went out and stayed about half an hour, and he came in again and had a bit of meat under his arm part of a loin of veal.

Q. Did you take it from him? - I did not; I did not know whose veal it was.

THOMAS RIPPING sworn.

I am a labouring man; I was in the public house on Sunday morning, at the sign of the Red Lion, and I heard Sullivan say that he had a piece of veal for his dinner.

JAMES WILSON sworn.

I am a hard working man, I get my bread in the street, in what they call grubbing; me and my friends were in Red Lion-street and we saw the prisoner there, and we happened to hear him say that he had a bit of veal for his dinner.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-51

442. WILLIAM PURCHASE was indicted for stealing, on the first of May , an iron hobbing, value 5 s. the goods of Joseph Sherwood .

JOSEPH SHERWOOD sworn.

I lost an iron hobbing on the first of May, on Wednesday; it was lost from one of the workmens benches.

Q. Where is your house? - In Upper East Smithfield .

Q. What time of the day did you lose it? - I cannot positively tell; I was not at home when it was lost.

- FEILD sworn.

I am a victualler; I live facing this gentleman's house, Jeremiah Bird came over and told me there was a thief in their shop, and would be glad if I would step over, and I went over and took him coming out into the street just at the door; he was charged with stealing this hobbing; he seemed very much in liquor; I took the man and hobbing to the officer.

Mr. Peat. What do you call that you have now produced? - An hobbing iron.

Q. You speak so indistinctly that the prisoner was coming out; what do you mean? - The prisoner was coming out with Jeremiah Bird and I saw the iron in his pocket, and I took it out of his pocket and I have had it in my possession ever since.

JEREMIAH BIRD sworn.

I am a journeyman to Mr. Sherwood. On the 1st of May I was informed that we had got a thief supposed to be taking the property belonging to my master, I was alarmed and I went according to the information given me, and found him in my master's shop; I says to him you have got something here I think that don't belong to you; he made for answer, never mind, being very much intoxicated in liquor; I said, that will not do, we have been accused several times of thefts that we have not been guilty of, and my master has cautioned us, if we could find out the thief, he would make an example of him; my shopmate said let us take it out of his pocket; I said, no, let charge be given of him; I then left him in the situation he was in, with several more shopmates, and ran over to this gentleman Mr. Feild and brought him in, and told him to take charge of him; I did not see the hobbing taken out of his pocket; I gave charge to the constable; the prisoner was a journeyman to Mr. Sherwood, and had been three or four months.

Q. You say you had information; how many might there be at work in your shop at this time? - Sixteen or eighteen; we are not exact as to number.

Q. You told me you had information; was it given in the hearing of the prisoner? - It was not, it was given by our own people; they are not here.

Q. You have no more of your people here? - No more.

Q. How do you know that to be the property of your master? - This hobbing I have noticed several times, being a particular thing for the purpose we had used it for; I cannot tell how long we have had it; I know it from the levelness of it, and the goodness of the steel and iron.

Q. When that was taken from the man's pocket, can you say there was one missing? - I cannot.

Q. Then why did you take it to be your master's? - By the knowledge of it, in the account I have given to your lordship.

Q. Had this man been at work that day? - I don't think he had.

Q. You found him in the shop, how came he in the shop if he had not been at work? - That is out of my power to say.

Q. Did any conversation pass except that which you have mentioned? - When I brought him to the door he said, don't hurt me; I said I am afraid you are hurting yourself.

Mr. Peat. What is your name? - Jeremiah Bird .

Q. You are a shopmate with the prisoner? - I have been.

Q. You was present when this tool, which you produce, was taken out of his pocket? - I was not.

Q Don't you know who produced that tool? - No.

Q That tool that is produced you say is your master's? - It is.

Q. What is it called? - It is in the place of a anvil; its use is to punch upon; I really believe it to be my master's.

Q. Who are these kind of tools made by? - There are smiths on purpose to make these tools.

Q It is an instrument to punch metals upon; what is the name of your master's trade? - A gunsmith, or gun lock maker.

Q. There are more gun smiths than your master? - Certainly; but this is a very uucommon good tool.

Q. What is your master's name? - Joseph Sherwood .

Q. I suppose your master then is the best gun maker in the kingdom? - I don't say in regard to the trade.

Q. There are other gun smiths use the same kind of tools? - Yes.

Q. What is the name of that kind of anvil, or thing which is so extremely outlandish, that there is no remembering of it? - It is an hobbing.

Q. Is that hobbing made by a particular way, in a particular manner, and with particular kind of metal for your master alone? - I will not say that.

Q. What is your name do you say? Jeremiah Bird .

Q. How do you know that to be your master's? - I cannot positively say any more than this; I have seen the tool in my master's shop; I was not at the buying of it.

Q. Now, sir, do you know that tool by its weight? - Yes, I believe I do.

Q. Do you think nobody else uses such a tool of the same weight? - I don't think they do.

Q. Tell me why you think so? - Because it is reckoned the best tool in the trade.

Q. By whom? - By them that are judges in workmanship.

Q. Who are they? - I myself for one.

Q. Are there not other tools of the same description used by other gunsmiths? - There are

Q. Of the same size? - I don't know that.

Q. Did you ever weigh it? - It is thirteen pounds as nigh as I can guess.

Q. Did you ever weigh it? - I have heard the weight of it.

Q. Did you ever weigh it? - I did not.

Q. Did you ever measure it? - I never did.

Q. Is there the same kind of tools made of the same materials for other gunsmiths? - I believe there are.

Q. Do you know it by the taste, smell or colour? - I can tell it by two out of the three, by the smell for it is oily, and also by the colour.

Q. You admit you do not know it by the weight nor the measure; is the colour peculiar? - It is.

Q. Is it whiter, blacker or browner? - It is rather whiter.

Q. Are there not tools as white as that? - I never saw one more clearer, or more whiter.

Q But there are many tools as white as that, and as you are a very good judge of grammar, iron that smells as sweet and as sour, which ever you please; you may scratch your head you will find nothing there; let us know in what manner you know that tool to be your master's; I admit your master might have a very good tool of that sort, but tell me how you know that tool in your hand; tell the jury how and why? - In the first place I know it by the end of it, for I made remark of this end at the first.

Q. Let us know how you know it, you have such a flippant tongue; you tell me you don't know it by weight, nor measure, nor the smell, nor taste, nor colour; tell us what you do know it by? - I do know it by the smell.

Jury. Did you ever work at it yourself? - No, not myself.

Mr. Peat. Tell us what you know it by in plain language? - I have told his lordship all that I know about it.

Court to Prosecutor. When you came home did you find any hobbing had been missed? - I did; I looked directly as I came home at the bench where this hobbing should have been.

Q. If you had seen it any where should you have known it to be your's? - I should by the sight; I am satisfied it is mine.

Mr. Peat. Will you permit me to ask how you know it by the sight; that wants some explanation; let me know how you know this; give me some better reason for this? - Just the same as I should know you from some other gentleman.

Q. That will not do, and I will have a better reason before I have done with you? - I know it by the sight of it, the same as I should know you.

Q. It is very true, that every man has got a nose, and eyes, and chin, and therefore you may know him to be a man; there are other tools used of this description by gunsmiths? - Not many.

Q Then you are the only gunsmith that uses these kind of tools? - I am not a gunsmith, I am a gun lock maker, and there is only me and Mr. Nock on Ludgate-hill.

Q Do you know its weight? - I see it weighed when I bought it; I think it is thirteen pounds and a quarter.

Q. Have you weighed it since this man was charged with this fact? - I have not.

Q. Is this tool a peculiar little size, or a peculiar large size for the purpose for which it is used? - It is a large size.

Q And you take on you to say on your oath that this tool is your's? - If there were five thousand and that was put amongst them I would pick it out.

Q How would you pick it out? - By knowledge of it; it is impossible for any man living to make a fellow to it.

Q Then I would be glad to know why they cannot make a fellow to it? - That has been worked upon for many years, and without damage which very few have.

Q. Then it is impossible that an instrument of that weight, dimensions and every thing the same as this can be worked upon without damage, and you know this tool it is impossible there should be such another in the three kingdoms, or perhaps in the world except in France, and that we know nothing about? - There cannot.

Prisoner. My lord, I was in the shop at work, I had been drinking in the morning it is true, we had been paying for beer towards birth days, I had had my coat off it is true, with presence to go to work, I did do a little and but a little; when I went to put my coat on I found it very heavy, and while I was putting my coat on the gentleman's apprentice seized me and put his hand into my pocket to see what was there, and found my master's property in my pocket it is true, and it is not the first time I have found things in my pocket, and who the person was that put these things in my pocket I cannot tell, and what I am challanged with I am innocent of.

Peat to Jeremiah Bird , I believe there was some little jealously about this man's peculiar excellence as a workman? - He is a very good workman I believe.

Q. There was some little jealously I believe in the shop? - Not from me.

- sworn.

I am the constable that took him into custody.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-52

443. JANE LOW was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of May , three guineas and four halfpence , the money of John Thomas .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JOHN THOMAS sworn.

I am a breeches maker a married man. The 23d of this month about one o'clock in the morning, to the best of my knowledge, it was Thursday, going along Coventry-street I met with the prisoner she stopped me and asked for something to drink; I told her I had no money; at the same time I had between four and five pounds in my breeches pocket, gold and silver, and some halfpence in my waistcoat pocket, I told the prisoner that I had no money, neither could I give her any thing to drink; so she said she would treat me rather than we should part without drinking together; so we went to a public house in Piccadilly, I don't know the sign of it, we had a glass of gin a piece, and she put her hand into her pocket for to pay for it, and she wanted a halfpenny, and she asked me for the halfpenny which I gave her out of my waistcoat pocket, to pay for the gin, after that we came out and came back again down Piccadilly, and stopped at the corner of Piccadilly by a brazier's shop; after that she asked me to have a coach and go with her to Westminster, and I refused; I was looking to see for a watchman or patrole to take her into custody; while we were talking together the two witnesses Jackson and Harriot came up to us; Jackson asked me if she was my wife? I replied she was not; but I had been robbed by her, and told him I was waiting for somebody to take her into custody; he replied directly that he was an officer belonging to Bow-street and that he would take her; going along I told him I had been robbed of four guineas; when I came to the watch-house I searched my pocket, and I found only one guinea and one shilling left in my breeches pocket, which both the witnesses saw, and the halfpence were gone out of my waistcoat pocket.

Q What halfpence had you in your waistcoat pocket? - I cannot tell.

Q. Did you ever find your money? - There was money found on the prisoner; she was examined at the watch-house in my presence.

Q. Were these guineas marked? - They were not.

Q. Then the money you saw on the girl, you cannot swear to any part being your money? - I cannot swear to any part of it.

Q. Did she say any thing about it? - She said nothing particular.

Q. Was you sober? - I was sober enough to know all that passed.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-53

444. NICHOLAS HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of July 1792, a silk gown, value 8 s. a cotton gown, value 12 s. a white dimity waistcoat, value 3 s. two yards of cotton, value 11 s. a worked muslin apron, value 3 s. a linen apron, value 1 s. 6 d. a pair of mens linen trowsers, value 8 d. a black sattin waistcoat, value 6 s. two woollen blankets, value 18 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. two cotton counterpanes, value 3 s. a feather bolster, value 4 s. two feather pillows, value 4 s. a sattin petticoat, value 6 s. a linen sheet, value 3 s. a flannel petticoat, value 1 s. a silk cloak, value 3 l. the goods of David Norrie .

DAVID NORRIE sworn.

I am a taylor ; I lost the articles from the house I live in, No. 14, Cleveland-street, just at the end of London-street ; I was only a lodger, I had the two pair of stairs and the garret, it was the 7th of July, or thereabouts I believe, I don't know much of the fact, my wife must be the evidence, for she did the whole business.

ANN NORRIE sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness; I lost all the articles mentioned in the indictment, on Saturday the 19th of July; I lost them from No. 14, Cleveland-street, they were all carelesly thrown into the two pair of stairs room.

Q. Was the room locked? - Yes, I put in the things and went out Saturday three o'clock, and never saw that room till Sunday morning half after seven.

Q. How do you apprehend they could get at these things, did the door appear broke? - The door was locked the same as I left it, when I came back

Q. Was there any window to the house by which they could get in? - No. On Sunday we had not a thing to put on our back.

Q How do you conceive the people got into the room? - This prisoner had the house a year and a half before we went to it.

Q. Was no violence done to the window? - No.

Q. Was there no violence about the room at all? - Not the least, my key opened the room door the same as ever; I don't know how they could get in except by picking the lock.

Q. Did you ever recover the property? - They are in the court with the pawnbrokers, all that I could find, I have found none but what the pawnbrokers own to that are in court.

Q. How do you know he kept the house before you went to it? - He told us that he kept the house, but I was to have the house till I could suit myself with a house.

Q. What had he to do with the house, did he sleep in the house? - There was nobody in the house but his wife and him, and his two children.

Q Did he sleep in it till the time he was taken up? - He never was taken up till about a fortnight ago, he was about the

house the Sunday and Monday after the things were put in, but after that Monday he never came into the house, till about a fortnight ago when he was taken up.

Mr. Hosty. How long is it since you got in this house? - Only on the Thursday before this happened.

Q. On your oath when did you take lodgings in that house? - Mrs. Fisher told me I might be there till I could suit myself with a house.

Q. You say you went out at half after three and did not return till Sunday; do you know a Simon Gordon ? - Never in my life.

Q Do you know a Mrs. Rivers of Chelsea? - I do.

Q Did you go to Mrs. Rivers's that Saturday evening? - I did not.

Q Did not you return on Sunday with three women of the town very much intoxicated? - No.

Q. Will you declare whether you did or did not, send all these goods to pawn by this man and to raise money so as your husband might not know how much you had spent? - I never did; I never saw any man in the house besides that man.

Q Then you did not give these clothes to this man to pawn for you? - I did not.

Q. Had you ever any quarrel with the wife of the prisoner? - Never.

Q Did she ever take a warrant out against you? - Never.

Q. Are you sure this was the 19th of July, not the 21st? - The 21st I went after my property.

Q Where did you find it? - I found it at one Mr. Dobree's and some at another place.

Q Was the indictment read to you when the bill was before the grand jury? - No.

Q. Who gave you permission to go to the house originally? - It was Mr. Rivers's house, they could get no money of these people.

Q. Who gave you the key? - The key was in the door.

Court. How came you not to bring the prosecution on before this time? - I never could find him before, they told me he was entered on board of ship.

JOSEPH HUXLEY sworn.

I am a journeyman pawnbroker to Mr. Dobree in Oxford-street.

Q. How far do you live from the house of the prosecutor? - About a quarter of a mile; I produce two gowns, one petticoat, a worked muslin apron, a white cloth ditto, a white dimity waistcoat, a muslin handkerchief, and two yards of cotton these were all pawned at one time, the 21st of July, by Nicholas Hughes in his own name, I knew him before, I gave him a duplicate, I knew his wife very well, she came often and brought things for other people; he said he brought the things for his wife and she was very ill, and he could not pay his taxes, and this was to make up the money; I knew they did keep the house in Cleveland-street

Q Do you know any thing of this Ann Norrie ? - Yes.

Q What is her character? - She has pledged things for ladies sometimes.

Q. Has she any lodger of that description? - Not that I know of.

Q. Who was the occupier of the house Hughes or Norrie? - Hughes was the name the house went by at the time I took those things in.

JOHN WATTS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I have got two counterpanes, a handkerchief, a black sattin waistcoat, a pair of drawers, a blanket, a bolster, two pillows, and a sattin petticoat; they were pawned on Saturday the 21st of July; I believe the early part of the day; I remember the circumstance of taking them in, they were put in distinct pledges, they were pledged in the name of

Nicholas Hughes , but I cannot say that is the man from the distance of time.

Prisoner. The fact is I keep this house, and I have pawned these goods with them gentlemen; this good woman was turned out of her house in Mary-le-bone some time before this happened, through keeping a bad house; Mrs. Rivers being my landlady, begged me to let her have a room in my house, accordingly I agreed to it; Saturday the 21st of July she came to me, and asked me to help her to move these things into the lodging, she told me if I would go and help her in with the things she would pay me; a fellow workman called on me expecting I would go to work, but I did not; in the midst of it she told me that she was distressed for a little money to make up her rent, and that her landlady had told her that she would cartainly seize the things if she did not make up the money, and she asked me to go and pawn these things; accordingly I told her I would, and I went to these places, I carried the things that she gave me, I went out once and after I came back, she told me that was not enough, and she desired me to go again, I went the second time, and when I came back I gave her the money and the duplicates, before my fellow workman; the Monday following I went into the country to the harvest, this woman never said a word to me good, bad nor indifferent. I found on Sunday that she came with three women of the town and abused my wife very much; on Monday morning I spoke to her and she said she had got a drop in her head, and did not know what she said; Monday evening I met her and she told me she had got a warrant against me; I told her she had no right to have a warrant against me; she did not say any thing to me, good, bad or indifferent; and when I was in the country she turned my wife away, and never let her come into the house any more.

Watts. At the same time the person pawned these things in the name of Nicholas Hughes there was also a silk cloak pawned in the same name, which the prosecutrix came and redeemed herself; she redeemed it about three months ago; she paid the money that it was put in for, and said she would take out all the rest by degrees; she did tell me she had been robbed of it.

SIMON GORDON sworn.

I have known the prisoner at the bar for some years back, he worked along with me; this Saturday morning that the woman has been speaking of, he stayed away and did not go to work; he was moving in goods for this woman into his own house, and I lent him a hand down with two or three stoves into the kitchen for her; I see her give him a bundle, I know there was in it two gowns and a black cloak, and he went out and brought in some money and duplicates. I think it was the 19th or 20th of July, it was a Saturday. She told him to pawn the things, I waited till such time as the man came back again, and he gave her some gold and silver and duplicates, and they wanted me to go out and bring in some gin; there was some gin got, a shilling worth, and we drank together, and she had the money the things produced herself, and the first time he came back she said that was not enough; she sent him out the second time with another bundle, and she was very well satisfied at both times.

Q Had you more gin when he returned the second time? - Indeed we had; the gentlewoman had almost a pint mug full of gin when I came into the place.

Court to Mrs. Norrie. Is that true or false what this man has sworn? - I never saw him with my eyes before; I never saw his face in my life time before.

Q I want to know whether on that day you charge this robbery to have been committed, any man was in your company drinking gin with the money that was got from pawning these articles? - No.

Q. Do you remember any time sending any body to pawn these clothes? - No.

Q. Do you insist upon it on your oath? - I do.

Court to Gordon. Do you mean to say upon your oath that that fact passed? - I do.

The prisoner called four witnesses to his character.

Mr. Hosty to Watts. You say these things were pawned with you the early part of the day? - Yes, before dinner time.

Q. What do you call dinner time? - Before two o'clock, but I am not very exact in the day.

Q. How soon were they found at your house after they were pawned? - I think she made an enquiry on Monday.

Court. This woman swore positively that she went out at half after three o'clock, and then all the things were safe; do you think they were pawned before that time? - I firmly believe they were; I believe they were pawned before two o'clock.

Q You are now stating a transaction that happened ten months ago; what reason have you to induce you to suppose it was earlier than the time she speaks? - Because on the Monday when the enquiry was made I had the recollection of it in my mind, that makes me have little or no doubt.

Q. What makes you have little or no doubt, in opposition to this woman's positive oath, or what is the ground of your belief that they must have been pawned earlier? - I recollect being very particular in taking them in, he told me he was a housekeper, and that I might go and see or send.

GUILTY . (Aged 44.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-54

445. MARY ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , a woollen rug, value 1 s. 6 d. a woollen blanket, value 1 s. 6 d. an iron frying-pan, value 1 s. 3 d. a linen sheet, value 1 s. 6 d. a flat iron, value 9 d. the goods of Stephen Ring .

STEPHEN RING sworn.

I am an housekeeper; I let lodgings to this woman near a twelve months ago; she did not continue to the time I missed the things, she absconded from the lodgings, and did not pay the rent for some time.

Q. Had she got rid of the contract? - No.

Q. How long was it before you lost the things you let the lodgings? - Near twelve months.

Q. What was she to pay for the lodgings? - Three shillings a week.

Q. Were the articles she stole the furniture let with the lodgings? - Yes; she left them the 1st of April; I never looked into the room till the 18th of April.

Q. Did you never see any thing of her till the 18th of April? - I heard of her and see her once, and asked if she would give me the key or pay me the rent? she said she would pay me the rent, but she never came to pay me the rent. On the 18th of April I went into the room, I missed the following articles, a

woollen rug, a woollen blanket, an iron frying pan, a linen sheet, and a flat iron, I have got the things in Court now; I did not recover them, they are in possession of the pawnbrokers; they are in the hands of two pawnbrokers.

FRANCIS OXLEY sworn.

I keep a house in Newport-street. Mr. Ring came to me and asked me if such a person was at my house? I said, yes, they are just gone out, and will be in presently, and I asked him to come in, and he came in, and in talking I told him a rug was in my house that was none of mine, and I desired my girl to fetch it, and she fetched it, and he said it was his, and I gave it him, I don't know exactly the day, it was a fortnight and some days after she came to my house; she lodged at my house about a fortnight or three weeks; after she left him this rug was left in my place where she lodged; I don't know whether it was left by her or her husband; they took my room as ready furnished; she did not come in all the time he was there.

Court to Ring. Do you know whether this man that Oxley speaks of was her husband? - I believe they are not named, but when I let the lodging I did not know but they were man and wife, the man took the place of me.

SARAH THOMPSON sworn.

I work at the stay work for the fair; I pledged a sheet and a blanket for the prisoner at the bar while she was in distress, before she left Mr. Ring's house.

Q. Are the pawnbrokers here to whom you pledged it? - Yes, the pawnbrokers resigned it up to Mr. Ring; I pledged it in my own name; I live in the same house.

THOMAS WILLIAM sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I took in this frying pan of the prisoner; the blanket and sheet I took in of Mrs. Thompson, and I had took them in many times before; I took in the frying pan the 9th of March; I gave her a duplicate in the name of Elizabeth Rogers ; I knew her very well; I remember her pawning them exceeding well; I have kept the things from that time to this.

Q. What are the things you produce? - A blanket, sheet, and frying pan.

SAMUEL STEWARD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant; I took in a flat iron of Mary Rogers on the 15th of November; I have kept it ever since. (The goods produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was very ill at the time, and the prosecutor he came and he asked me for some money; I was very ill and I did not know what to do for some money; I had no money, and this good woman attended me some time; I had no things of my own, and I asked this good woman to take these things to make up the money to pay my rent; I did it, and indeed in distress, because I would not be turned out while I was ill.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-55

446. JOHN PATERSON and EDWARD WHITE were indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway on John Gordon , on the 16th of April , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a linen handkerchief, value 1 s. and 3 s. in monies numbered; the goods and monies of the said John Gordon .

JOHN GORDON sworn.

I am a master taylor ; I live at No. 64, Compton-street, Soho. I was robbed on Tuesday the 16th of April. Before I begin with my evidence, I would wish just to observe, that with regard to the prisoner White, I never sought the prosecution against him, he was brought before the magistrate, and from the circumstances which I related to him, it was the only way that he was committed; I am a very innocent prosecutor against White; I had no thought against him, only what I related before justice Addington. On Tuesday the 16th of April I was met at the end of Lukener's-lane in Drury-lane , (I have a shop in Drury-lane,) I had a woman with me, she had hold of my right arm; when we came to the end of Lukener's-lane I saw six or seven men and women stand at the corner; in order not to pass through them, I let go this woman's arm for to cross the way, because I would not go past them; the moment I let go of her arm the men that were in the corner momentarily stepped on the highway, and there was more room then for me to go on the pavement, and I then went straight on, and they surrounded me immediately; the woman she avoided the men and I went to go straight through. When I was thus surrounded the prisoner at the bar, John Patterson , was on my right side, then he catched fast hold of me on my right side, the moment the others fastened on me on my left side, they are not here, there was several of them; the prisoner catched hold of me by my coat, it is a great coat; there is a post the corner of the street, the others on my left side jammed me up against the post, the post was right at my back, and they were on each side of me; there were some women who were in the front of me, but they never molested me; this Paterson at the bar, he put his hand into my great coat pocket, I had two handkerchiefs in that pocket which he drew out; I catched hold of his arm with the handkerchiefs in his hand at the same time; the others on my left side was searching this here pocket, and another put his hand into my waistcoat pocket; I called for the watch as soon as ever I was attacked, and at the very moment of time I saw a lanthorn spring from the side of the houses, at the corner of the street; when I saw the lanthorn spring I observed it and I saw it was going the wrong way; I immediately catched hold of Paterson when he had the handkerchiefs, and held him in my arms; he struggled to get away from me, I seeing the lanthorn I still held him, as he was struggling, it was right under a lamp, I had a full view of his face; in his struggling to get away from me he pulled me two or three yards into Lukener's-lane; when I was there I perceived the lanthorn to stand, but it never came up to me at all, it stood at some very short distance, and as I held him a blow came on my head, which seemed to be from a bludgeon, that blow was still repeated, I did not fall at the first, second, or third blow, I received a great many blows before I fell to the ground, the blows cut my head right into wounds, I received a great many blows, some under my ear, whereby my hearing is so much hurt that I cannot hear no more than if I put my finger into my ears, my hearing was never bad before; when I was on the ground I was bleeding very much, and as I laid I remember a person, I believe it was the person of the public house, came out first and the watchman came up to me, and several other people, and I was taken into the public house and I had blood pouring from me in two strong streams, my eyes and every part of me was covered with blood; my head was washed with some brandy there, and I believe a table cloth, or something of that kind put on my head to stop the blood; then the watchman White came

into the room where I was, and I then naturally looked at him, and supposed him to be the watchman that I had seen before with the lanthorn, and I said, if you had done your duty, I should not have been cut in this way.

Q. Was the other prisoner in the public house at that time? - No, he escaped, I said so to White, meaning that I thought he should have given me some assistance. They asked me in the public house whether I knew any of them that had robbed me? I told them I did, as near as I can recollect, I said, I know some of them or one of them; I was rather afraid in the house; I was then taken to a surgeon in Queen-street; the surgeon did not open the door, but he said this, I must be taken to an hospital; as I was coming back again down Drury-lane to go home I was so ill I could not stand; I remember falling down in Drury-lane.

Q. Who attended you to the surgeon? - I cannot be certain; I had two with me at least, if not more. I believe I lay on the ground for a quarter of an hour; I fainted there, whether these people stopped with me or not that took me to the surgeon, I cannot positively tell; I recollect as I lay there, begging of somebody to go and get a coach, and I recollect somebody returning and saying they could not get a coach, but whether it was the same people as went with me to the surgeon's, or somebody going by I cannot say, but I remember that some that stood by helped me up and led me home.

Q. What time of night was it you got home? - It must be between twelve and one I think; when I was taken home I remember being brought into the parlour, and I remember somebody saying they found me in Drury lane; a coach was sent for and I was immediately taken to the Middlesex Hospital; when I came to the Middlesex Hospital I remember the surgeon opening of my head, and examining the wounds; he said he could not tell whether my skull was fractured or not; I was in the hospital four days; I enquired at home who brought me home, and I was informed that there was no watchman had seen me home; on the next day somebody called at my house and asked how I did.

Q. I wish to know what was the name of the woman that was with you? - She is here; she will tell herself.

Q. Who was this woman that was with you? - I have known her a great many years; she did keep the house where I now live; she works at the upholstery line.

Q. From the best recollection you have, what length of time might the prisoner be in your presence? - In that situation a minute is a good while.

Q. Now considering all the wounds you received, and the state in which you received them, have you a perfect recollection that the prisoner Paterson was the man? - Certainly, because I saw him before ever I received any wound at all, I had seen him once in the street before, which I told him when I held him; the lamp shone right in his face as he struggled to get away, and I said I know you.

Q. How soon did you see him after this happened? - I believe a fortnight after.

Q. Where did you see him? - In New Prison, Clerkenwell. One of the men belonging to Marlborough street office had got an order from the magistrate for me to see the prisoner, one or two before that had been shewn to me to see if I knew them; there was one brought up to Bow-street, and another at Marlborough-street for me to see.

Q. Was there any other persons in the room at Clerkenwell when you saw him? - I saw him through a chequer gate, and there was twenty or thirty in the yard, or

more for what I know; I pointed to the man though he was in a very different dress; I saw him through the grate at the door, before he came through the gate, I said to the officer that is the man.

Q. Are you sure that he is the man? - I am confident of it.

Q. Had he any hat on? - He had on a round hat.

Q. Did you see his face? - I did perfectly.

Q. Do you remember any part of his dress? - His dress appeared to me a lightish coat; the description I gave before ever he was taken at all at Bow-street was in this way, a youngish man, a very remarkable nose, sandy hair and pock marked.

Mr. Schoen. The first you saw of White was that he was one of the watchmen assisting you in the public house, and you thought he was the watchman whom you had seen before with the lanthorn in the street, and on that the magistrate thought proper to commit him for the felony? - I never thought or intended any prosecution against White and I never said any thing more against White then I have now; I told the magistrate that I could not take on me to say that it was White that was in the street with the lanthorn I was in such a bloody condition.

Jury. You say you had known this man Paterson some time before? - I had seen him in Drury-lane.

Q. Had you ever had any thing to do with him before? - Never in my life.

Q. Could you by that light, and in that situation know he was pock marked, and that he had sandy hair? - This was before I was struck.

Court. You had observed you say, that this man was pock marked, and that he had sandy hair, was it from the light you had at that time that you distinguished he had pock marks and sandy hair? - I am sure it was, for I held him in my two arms.

Q. Was it by only previous knowledge of him that you knew he had sandy hair and was pock marked, or was it from the light then? - It was from the light then. I mentioned I believe that it was the people on my left hand that took the three shillings out of my pocket.

Q. How happens it that you only put one handkerchief in the indictment, and you say he took two? - I took one out of his hand, and I did not charge him with that, because I got it again.

The remainder of this Trial in the next part, which will be published in a few days.

Reference Number: t17930529-55

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the City of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 29th of May, 1793, and the following Days:

Being the FIFTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY , PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART IV.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

PRICE TWO SHILLINGS and SIX-PENCE.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

The Continuation of the Trial of JOHN PATERSON and WILLIAM WHITE .

MARY HARTY sworn

I was with the prosecutor the day he describes; he has a house in Compton-street and a shop in Drury-lane, I called on him in Drury-lane, I am not certain whether it was nine or ten in the evening. Mr. Gordon was going to see me home into St. James's; I live there now; coming down Drury-lane the corner of Lukener's-lane there were several people, they seemed to be very riotous; Mr. Gordon dropped his arm, I had hold of his arm, and I immediately went across the way, I thought that Mr. Gordon was following me, but hearing his voice call out watch almost immediately I turned back, but could not see him; on missing him I turned back again and hearing him still call out watch, with that his voice appeared over the way, I looked up Lukener's-lane and could see the light of the publican's candle, who stood at the door, the watch stood on the other side with his lanthorn in his hand, and Mr. Gordon stood before the door of the house bleeding, I immediately crossed and begged of the people to let him come in, and I went in with him, and had some brandy to bathe his head; I was very much frightened and was afraid he would bleed to death, a gentleman who was there scraped some hat and put it to his wounds to stop the blood, he still bled violently; I asked if a doctor could not be sent for? they said there was a surgeon in Queen-street and he had better be taken there; we tied up his head and two men held him up, and Mr. Gordon and the watchmen, then walked out to the door.

Q. Do you know whether these men are here? - No, they were total strangers to me; they came in I believe by the alarm; Mr. Gordon asked me if I had a shilling to pay for the brandy? I gave the shilling to the publican, and he rather disputed that it was not good, he took me into the bar to try whether it was good, in this time Mr. Gordon was taken

away to the surgeon, and I lost him for that night; I went away and enquired of a watchman where I could find them; he told me they were gone to a surgeon Cooper's in Queen-street; I went up and down Queen-street and could not find him, I then went and enquired of a watchman where surgeon Cooper lived; he said he could not tell me; I then went home and saw him no more till I saw him in Middlesex Hospital on the Friday following, as this happened on the Tuesday.

Q. Did the prosecutor at any time after that happened give any account of the man that did it? - He always described him as he has done now.

Jury. Pray where does Mr. Gordon live? - He keeps a house in Compton-street, but he keeps a shop in Drury-lane within a few doors of the spot where this happened, it is almost opposite Brown-street.

Q. I think you said you called on him in Drury-lane, I called on him first at his house in Compton-street and he was not at home.

Court. When did you say you called upon him? - On Tuesday the 19th of April, at night between nine and ten.

Q. Do you mean to be accurate as to the time? - I am not positive.

Q. What is the time that you think this business happened? - I think it was past eleven, but I am not very clear to the time.

Q. How long might you stay at his house? - I might stay an hour.

CHRISTOPHER SANDERS sworn.

I heard of this robbery being done a short time afterwards; I heard it was done on Mr. White's the watchman's beat, in consequence of which I went to him and I found him in bed, after they have been on duty they commonly sleep in the day, I believe this was about ten or eleven o'clock, this was a day or two after the robbery was done, I asked him if such a circumstance had not taken place? he said it had, I asked him to go along with me after some of the people to see if we could apprehend some of them; he signified that then he was rather tired, but he would meet me at five o'clock in the evening; I met him at that time, and he seemed to go very readily with me in search of some of these men, and I make no doubt but if I had met with any of them he would have assisted me to have taken them. In consequence of the information of this robbery from Mr. Gordon, I shewed him a man at Marlborough-street office, a man we know by the name of Old Hyke, I asked him if he could swear to him? he said he could not, but he could swear to one was he to see him; he gave me an exact description of the prisoner at the bar; the moment he gave me the description I said it was Paterson, and I obtained an order from the magistrate to take the prosecutor to see Paterson in Clerkenwell New Prison; I went with the prosecutor to the prison, Paterson was called forwards and the prosecutor looked through the grating of the bars, and see him and knew him.

Q. Did he see the prisoner as he happened to be with the rest in the gaol, or was he brought forward by himself? - There was a good many in the gaol.

Q. Was he separated from the other prisoners? - He was after that.

Q. I ask you when he saw him first? - The keeper called him by his name, and he was walking forward.

Q. Is that your duty as an officer; you always have particular orders in such cases that the prisoners should never be separated? - We had no such orders at that time; Paterson was called to, I saw him come forward from the rest, and the prosecutor see him come out from the rest on the call; I would wish you to understand that before he came from the rest the prosecutor said that is the man, and then desired them to let him out that he might take a full look at him; he said this before he was called.

Q. Are you sure that the gentleman before the prisoner was called pointed out to him as the man? - Not before they hollooed the name of Paterson, then they were all together, Paterson was advancing.

Jury. What was done as soon as he came to the grate? - The name of Paterson was called by one of the keepers, and the prosecutor was looking through the grating of the gate at the prisoner; the same time, he kept looking through the gate and he saw Paterson among the rest, and he signalized him out and said, that was the man, and when he said that was the man, I asked the keeper to let him through that he might have a perfect look at him; he said he need not look any longer at him for he was sure he was the man; the prosecutor pointed him out before he came from the others.

Court to Gordon Was your handkerchief ever recovered? - No, I never saw it more.

Prisoner Paterson. I wish to know first how that man can swear to me that hour of the night? - I held him sufficiently long enough under the lamp, I held him a minute.

Prisoner. My hair does not answer the description he gives; it is a dark auborn hair; I would be glad to know whether he was perfectly sober? - Perfectly sober and never otherwise.

Prisoner. Sanders called me up to the gate, and that gentleman came and looked at me directly.

Sanders. I am sure he pointed him out first, and then I desired him to come between the gates that he might look at him more fully.

Prisoner. I wish you to examine the Prosecutor's character to know what house he keeps.

Court to Prosecutor. What sort of a house is it you keep? - It is a large house of forty pounds a year, it is let ready furnished, it is let to women of the town.

Q. Are you a single man? - I am not a married man; I have a person that has lived with me this many years; I have carried on the business of a taylor a number of years, I have a shop in Drury-lane where my men work as well as my house in Compton-street.

Q. Did you hear Paterson's name called at the gaol? - I did not.

Q. When you first saw him, was he advancing from the rest, or along with the rest? - He was along with them; I looked through the grating, and there was a great number of prisoners, and I said there he is.

John Paterson , GUILTY . Death . (Aged 19.)

Edward White , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-56

447. ELIZABETH HILL was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May , a man's cloth coat, value 7 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 6 s. two linen waistcoats, value 4 s. five pair of worsted stockings, value 5 s. a linen gown, value 8 s. a cloth apron, value 2 s. a cloth bag, value 1 s. the goods of James Curford .

JAMES CURFORD sworn.

I am a bricklayer's labourer . All the things in the indictment belonged to me, I lodge in Ball-court, Shoreditch ; they were taken from a three pair of stairs room; I missed them on Friday the 10th of May; nobody saw her take them; they all hung up on a line in my room; I saw them there on Friday morning about half after six o'clock; my wife locked the door with the padlock, the hasp of the door was broke, my wife first discovered that; I have seen the things since, I cannot properly say how soon, I believe three or four days after, my wife went to the pawnbroker's, and see them;

I saw them when they were brought to the office in Worship-street; I know them as far as this, I cannot properly take my oath on them, because there is no mark on them, but I believe them to be my property.

FRANCES CURFORD sworn.

I am the wife of James Curford . On Friday morning the 10th of May, when I went out it was about half after six o'clock, my husband went down stairs, and I went down stairs after him, and locked the door with the padlock; we both came home together, we went out to work; we came home between seven and eight in the evening; we found the door broke open, and this piece of the asp of the door was laying on the ground; we missed all the articles in the indictment; I never saw them again till I was at the pawnbroker's the Saturday, I think the next day.

Q. Do you know them? - Yes.

Mr. Raine. You went out at half past six in the morning, and you did not return back till seven or eight in the evening? - That is so.

- JONES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Fashion-street, Spitalfields.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor? - I do not.

Q. How far do you live from Ball-court, Shoreditch? - About a quarter of a mile from my house. I produce a gown, a cloth apron, a man's cloth coat, a waistcoat, breeches, and a pair of silk and worsted stockings, they were brought in two different pledges; they came in very nearly together; the gown and apron were pledged in the name of Elizabeth Hill , Brick-lane, and the other clothes and stockings in the name of Elizabeth Davis , Winfield-street; I cannot fix it on the person of the prisoner.

Q. Can you say it was the same person that pawned both or different persons? - I cannot; there is a little parlour adjoining to the shop, and I was in that parlour, and made out the ticket without seeing her; my boy saw her, but I have discharged him; he has been guilty of robbing my house, and as such I got rid of him.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-57

448. JOHN MOLKAHY was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on Jeremiah Hurd , on the 12th of May , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a silver watch, value 2 l. the goods of the said Jeremiah Hurd .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JEREMIAH HURD sworn.

I am out of place at present; I lived servant with a wine and brandy merchant last; I was out of place when I was robbed, which was on Sunday evening the 12th of May, in Oxford-street, the corner of Davis-street ; Robert Colebert and me were walking down Oxford road, he was a young man out of place at the time, he lived last at the Florence Bottle; about eleven o'clock in the evening we were walking down Oxford-road, below the Pantheon; we came out of Swallow-street; we came from the Ship in Swallow-street, and were going to the Thirteen Cantons very near the bottom of Oxford-road, the right hand side of the way, to get our suppers; the prisoner at the bar overtook us a little below the Pantheon, he came behind us, he began quarrelling with us there, he ran against Robert Colebert first, he began talking with him, and catched hold of him.

Q. What sort of language did he hold? - I don't know what he said to him, because he spoke to him first; he laid hold of him; after that he wanted us to go into a house, which was a few doors below, to have something to drink to make it up; then we went in and had three glasses of liquor, and Robert Colebert offered to pay for it, but the prisoner at the bar would not let him, he said he would pay for it himself; he did pay for it; after that we went to the bottom of Oxford-road, he went with us from there to a house, and had six pennyworth of gin and water; I paid for that, and Robert Colebert as soon as we came in wanted me to come away; he said, it was a bad house, and therefore he would not stay; he went out and left me, he said that in the presence of the prisoner, and the prisoner at the bar followed him out, and left me in the house by myself; the prisoner came back to me, and I asked him what he had done with the young man Robert Colebert ? he told me that he was gone home to his lodgings, and would not come back any more; so with that I finished the remainder of the liquor and paid for it, and came out, and the prisoner came out with me, and followed me, and came along with me to Oxford-road till I got at the corner of Stratford-place, and the prisoner then got hold of me by the arm and pushed me across the road, just to the corner of Davis-street; after he got across I found he had got bold of my watch chain; after I found that, I turned round to resist him, and he gave me a blow on the side of my head, and knocked me down; he gave the blow with his clinched fist, not very violent to make any mark, but it knocked me down quite level on the ground, after that he snatched my watch and ran off across the road.

Q. Was you sober? - I was, and I was very sensible so as to know what passed; I felt my watch go. The constable has the watch; I saw it on the 18th the Saturday following, I am sure it was my watch, Cole the constable has got it.

Mr. Knowlys. You was out of place at that time? - I was.

Q. How long had you been out of place? - About two or three months.

Q Whom did you live with before? - Joseph Collis , a wine and brandy merchant.

Q. Being out of place, and Sunday being an idle day you and your companion had been drinking together? - We had been but not so as not to know what we were about.

Q What time of the Sunday was it you first went into a public house? - I did not go into any public house in the day till I came to the ship in Swallow-street about ten o'clock.

Q. Do you mean to say you had not been in any house before to drink? - We might have liquor in the garden.

Q How much might you have in the garden? - We had some in one place and some in another.

Q. How came you to evade the answer. These gardens belong to public houses, do not they? - They do.

Q. Now what time in the morning did you go to these gardens? - It was between eleven and twelve when I set out from my lodgings, and I got to the gardens about an hour after.

Q. How long did you stay in the gardens - Somewhere about an hour.

Q. You drank in the gardens I suppose? - We did.

Q. That was before dinner, and on an empty stomach, and a little liquor will then do a good deal of execution. Now where else did you get drink next? - We did not drink any thing till we came back to dinner.

Q Where did you dine? - At a cook's shop; after that we drank together again for about an hour.

Q. Where did you go next? here is a great part of the Sunday to pass; you did not go to Church, I suppose? - Certainly not.

Q. No, the person does not dispense good liquor, he only gives good advice. Where did you go next? - We walked to Kentish Town, we went to a house that belonged to my master, a house that he keeps there, a private house, my master is not there, the house is empty; we went to look into the gardens; we went after that into a garden over the way.

Q. Did you go into the house? - We did not.

Q. Why the garden did not produce any liquor whatever? - But the liquor can be brought in though.

Q. Then I take it for granted it was brought in; how much did you take there? - About two pints or three pints of cider.

Q. Cider alone? - Yes.

Q. Nothing else with the cider, because the cider is apt to disagree with the bowels? - Nothing else.

Q. Where did you go next? - We came home again.

Q. Where did you go after that? - We came to Swallow-street again, we went to a house there and drank tea, and sat there the evening till about ten o'clock, when we went into the Ship; and came out again at half after ten.

Q. After you had parted with your friend Colebert and came out of the last public house, was you in your way home? - I was.

Q. Where is your home? - No. 161, Oxford-street, directly opposite Davis-street; I was going from home when this man came up to us.

Q. Had not you been at supper at the Ship? - We had been drinking at the Ship, but not getting our supper.

Q. You then had been drinking again at the Ship, and after that was going to get your supper at eleven o'clock at night? - I suppose when we went out of the Ship it was half after ten; when we are out of place we sup when we like; it was in my way to supper when this man came up to us; he was a perfect stranger.

Q. He was pretty drinky, was not he? - Not that I know of.

Q. On your oath did not he stagger against you or your friend Colebert? - He assaulted Robert Colebert first.

Q. If you had not looked on him as a drunken man would not you have fought with him on that occasion? - Robert Colebert spoke to him, and then he asked us to go and have three glasses of liquor to make it up.

Q. Did not you look on him as a drunken man when he first came up? - I did not.

Q. And then you went with him and added to all that load of liquor which you had taken before in the course of the day? - We did.

Q. And then that did not content you, you went after that to another house to drink, you had not enough at the first house you must go to the second; will you say that after all this you was not drunk? - I was very sensible; I cannot say I was perfectly sober.

Q. Was not you very drunk? - I was not.

Q. You went at last to the Flying Horse, St. Giles's? - That was the house the prisoner took us to.

Q. What did you drink there? - We drank six pennyworth of gin and water.

Q. And then it was your friend being a little more sober than you was, thought you had better quit the place? - He thought it was a bad place.

Q. Then this man whom you had quarrelled with, you chose to prefer his company to your friend's? - I did not know my friend was gone till this prisoner came back and gave me notice that he would not come back.

Q. When did you first begin to think the prisoner was drunk? - I did not think the prisoner was drunk at all.

Q. Not in the whole course of the time? - I did not.

Q. Now you have told us all the truth on this occasion; was not you in company with bad women? - I was not.

Q. Nor you was not in the whole course of your walking with him, in company with any bad women? - There was a bad woman came into the house while I was there; but there was no woman with me all the way I was coming home not coming up or going down only the woman that came into the house while I was there.

Q. When you was at the corner of Stratford-place there was a watch box close by you? - Yes, I believe there was.

Q. The prisoner began pulling you there? - He began pushing me across the road.

Q. You began then to suspect him; why did not you call out to the watchman who was in the box? - I did call out, and the watchman was standing at the corner of the market, and told me the prisoner ran down James's-street.

Q. Then though you called watch, the watch did not come up? - There was no watchman came up.

Q. Then at what time did the watchman tell you that the man was gone down James's-street? - This was after I got up.

Q. As you was quite sober you got up the moment you was pushed down. What was that watchman's name? - I don't know; I asked them why they did not come, they told me they did not hear me call, not one.

Q. Did they come up at all? - They were coming from the door when I was coming to them.

Q. On what beat was this watchman that you spoke to? - I don't know.

Q. On your oath have you ever applied to any watchman to come forward on this occasion? did you ask these watchmen to pursue or spring their rattles? - I did not.

Q. You did not desire them to make any alarm or make any pursuit, and in fact they did not? - They did not.

Q. How far were they from you when he pushed you down? - I was pushed down the corner of Davis-street, and the watchmen were all standing in the middle of Oxford market.

Q. You saw him the moment when you got up; which way did the prisoner run? - Across the road down James's-street; so they told me.

Q. Did not you see him run? - I did not, when I got up he was out of sight.

Q. Did not you say just now, that you got up immediately almost as you was pushed down? - I got up as soon as I could; he knocked me down, and I could not get up directly.

Q. Pray where did the blow hit you? - On the side of the head.

Q. Did it knock your hat off? - It did not; when I fell against the wall my hat fell off, my hat was off when I was down.

Q. Are you sure of that? - I am.

Q. This was a violent blow? - I don't know, it was very violent.

Q. Could you produce any kind of mark to the watchmen on this head of your's? - No, it was a blow on the temple, on the side of the head.

Q. No bruise, no bump at all? - No.

Q. Pray how was the other side that fell against the wall? perhaps a wall will not bruise a head like your's? - It was not hurted.

Q. This head of your's, I wish you would go with the Duke of York's army, for according to your account of it, a cannon ball would not hurt it. Nor you never found any bruise nor bump; he seems to be a very good stout man

which could hit a hard blow? - He knocked me down.

Q. And yet you was quite sober? - I don't say I was quite sober.

Q. Do you know how far you was gone towards drunkenness? - I knew very well what I was about.

Q. Do you know that you had your watch about you? - Yes.

Q. How do you know it? - I felt him pulling the chain before he knocked me down.

Q. How long before he knocked you down? - Directly.

Q. Which way did you call watch? did you call up the street? - I was out of Oxford-road then, it was in Davis-street.

Q. You came down the Stratford side of the way, and you said just now that the moment he began to push you you suspected him, and called out? - I did not suspect him till he got hold of the chain of my watch; I called out as soon as I felt he got hold of the watch.

Q. Then you did not call out, till he had hawled you from Stratford-place side of the way, into this place by the timber yard? - I did.

Q. Did you call out while you was in Oxford-road or not? - I believe I was off the road getting on the stones.

Q. The moment he began to push you you suspected him? - I did the moment he got hold of the chain of my watch.

Q. Why did not you call out before you got to Davis-street? - I did, I called out as soon as he got hold of the chain of the watch; he shoved me across instantly.

Q. Then you did not call out all the time he was pushing you across Oxford-road? - I did not till he got hold of the chain of my watch.

Q. Then direct opposite to Stratford-place is South Moulton-street, Davis-street goes aslant? - It does.

Q. And yet you suffered him to be pushing you all that way, and never called out; you say you got up directly; was you stunned by the blow? - I cannot say I was much stunned by it.

Q. Was you, or was you not? - I was not stunned by it.

Q. Then there was nothing to prevent you from getting up, and yet you could not see which way the prisoner went? - I saw a man running down the corner of James's-street, whom I suspected to be the prisoner, when I went to the watchmen I asked them, and they said a man ran down James's street; I asked them if they did not see a man? and I asked them why they did not come when I first called? and they said they did not hear.

Q. And they made no pursuit after him, nor did you; and you have not called any one of these watchmen to be a witness here to day. Have you had any conversation with Cole about this business? - I have not.

Q. You charge him with a highway robbery, and you are out of place; how long have you been out of place? - Between two and three months.

Q. So this force; this knocking down, and this violence, makes it altogether an highway robbery? - It is an highway robbery.

Q. Then you get, how much by it? - I don't know.

Q. Have you ever heard that there is a forty pounds reward on the conviction of any one for an highway robbery? - I have heard it since the prisoner was taken; I never heard it in my life before.

Q. When did you hear it since, and who told you? - I heard it in this Court by the counsel of a person that was tried.

Q. Was he the first that you heard it from? - My master was the first that informed me of it.

Q. When, how long ago? - I cannot say what day.

Q. Is it a month ago? - Not a month ago.

Q. Was it before you preferred your indictment? - I cannot say exactly when I was before the grand jury, but I heard of it before I was before them.

Q. In the drunken state in which you was you would have trusted your friend Colebert with your watch I have no doubt? - He had a watch of his own.

Q. If you had been going any where for any particular purpose, you would have had no objection to have trusted your friend Colebert to have kept your watch for you? - I was quite sober enough to keep it myself.

Q. Where was the prisoner taken up? - At the Cross Keys, Mary-le-bone lane, at his pay table; I went to the house where we were drinking, and asked a person if they knew the prisoner, and where he worked, and I found his master, and I went to him, and his master told me he was at work on a job for him in the country, and he came back to his pay table on Saturday night, and there he was taken.

Q. Upon your oath, man, when he was taken and asked about the watch, did not he tell you if you would describe the watch you should have it? - He did not; I had been there a quarter of an hour before he came in there.

Q. This man is not out of place? - His master told me he was gone down to work at Woodford.

ROBERT COLEBERT sworn.

I am one of the witnesses, I was porter at the last place I lived at, it was at the Florence Bottle; Jeremiah Hurd and I were walking along Oxford-street, and this man came up and begun quarrelling with us, to make up the quarrel he treated us with three glasses of gin, I offered to pay for it, but he would not let me; he paid for it himself and we went from there to the Flying Horse the bottom of Oxford-street, that was the second public house; we went there after we had the gin; as soon as I came in, I see there was bad company there; I left the house immediately, and I asked Jeremiah Hurd whether he would come away with me, or not? he said he would stay and pay for that liquor he had called for, and then he would come; I left Jeremiah in the house and the prisoner followed me out, and up Oxford-road, when we came a little way up, he asked me to go back, but I would not go back, he said if I would go back he did not want me to stay only to help drink what they called for; then he came round me and I lost my pocket handkerchief at the same time, but I cannot say whether he took it, he wanted to force me to go back, I told him if he did not leave me alone I would charge the watch with him; I went home to my lodgings, but did not go in, I went to the next door the Green Man and Still.

Mr. Knowlys. You was much more prudent than your friend on this occasion; the moment you got into this house, and the liquor was ordered you saw it was a bad house, and you went out immediately. How many women might there be in this house? - I saw but one woman, and she made bold to sit by Jeremiah Hurd 's side.

Q. Which he did not seem to dislike, but you did? - He was not pleased; she set herself down by his side.

Q. If any body then has sworn that she was not near him, but in another part of the room it is not true? - She sit down in the same box; she might be two or three feet off for what I know, but it was in the same box.

Q. So this man wanted to force you to come back to this house? - He did.

Q. He behaved so rude you threatened to charge the watchman with him to get rid of him? - I did.

Q. But you would not touch a drop of liquor there when you saw it was a bad house; you and your friend had not

drank at all that day? - Yes, we drank some.

Q. You went into the country that day; what house did you go into? - We drank in the country that day to be sure, but I don't recollect where, and I am sure we were not the worse for liquor.

Q. Was it in the afternoon you set out for the country? - No, the morning.

Q. How much might you drink before dinner? - We might drink a little before dinner, but not much.

Q. How many places did you stop at? - We might stop at two or three places, but it is so long ago I cannot recollect.

Q. Your companion told you the next day that he had been robbed? did not that bring to your recollection all that you had done the day before? do you know what part of the country you went to? - I cannot justly recollect at present.

Q. I suppose the liquor has worked away the remembrance of it? - We had no liquor at all to hurt us.

Q. You never sat down at the Ship to drink an hour together? - We sat down there to drink about ten o'clock.

Q. Was not that before supper? - We had no supper at all; we were going to the Thirteen Cantons to supper when we met this man.

Q. Were you going straight home at eleven o'clock? - We were not, we were going from home to supper.

Q. Then you met this man? - This man came reeling against us; he came quarrelling with us first.

Q. At the first then he did not shove you at all? - He only gave abusive language, and we quarrelled with him.

Q. Your recollection is certainly as good as your friend's, you had drank as little as he? - Nigh one about as much as the other.

Q. What did you drink when you went to the first house? - After we met with this man we drank a glass of gin a piece.

Q. That did not hurt you with an empty stomach; where did you dine that day? - I cannot recollect.

Q. I thought not, though you heard on Monday that your friend had been robbed on Sunday; you cannot recollect where you dined that day; where did you dine yesterday? - I dined at home yesterday; it is not so long ago.

Q. Perhaps you did not go into the country yesterday, you was so busy at your work yesterday? - No, I have not been at work this six weeks.

Q. How have you supported yourself this six weeks? - By what I got before.

Q. If you should get twenty pounds it would be unacceptable? - Surely not; I know what you mean.

Q. You know there is a forty pounds reward for a highway robbery? - I have heard it, but not till after I had sworn to the watch.

Q. How came you to think I was driving at the forty pounds reward? - Because I knew you was.

- COLE sworn.

I am a parish officer of St. Giles's, Mr. Hurd came to me as I was at Marlborough-street one day, Tuesday I believe, and said he had been robbed; I asked him if he knew who it was that robbed him? he said he had been to enquire for such a man, and he heard where he worked, and he had been informed where he was to be on Saturday night at pay table; accordingly we went to the Cross Keys, Mary-le-bone-lane where the pay table is held, and we stayed there about a quarter of an hour, we went there the Saturday evening after the robbery; as we were there sitting in the little parlour the prosecutor looked through a window, and he told me here is the man, and I went out to him, says I, point the man out to me, says he, that is the man; I

asked the prisoner then to step into the parlour, for I wanted to speak to him: when he came in I searched his breeches pocket; I found nothing there, and then I put my hand to the fob and got hold of this here ribbon, and pulled this watch out, (produces the watch) it is a silver watch; as soon as I pulled the watch out Jeremiah Hurd and Mr. Colebert said I will take my oath that is my watch; the case is worse so perfectly thin that it is dinted in, the inside likewise is square pillars, and it has had a new pendulum put to it; then Mr. Colebert said I can swear to the watch, for I sold it to him, and then Colebert asked, where is the chain that belongs to it? says he, damn your eyes I have had this watch this four years; he threatened to knock Colebert down if he could get to him; I got between them, and said, you must not strike him; I put the watch in my breeches pocket, and have had it in my custody ever since; I have shewn it to nobody at all.

Mr. Knowlys. You are parish constable? - I am.

Q. You never attend at Marlborough-street office? - I go there when I like.

Q. Are you one of the constables in constant waiting there? - I am not, I go there when I like; I am not confined to go there.

Q. Is it not your constant business to be there? - No, sir.

Q. Will you swear you was ever absent three days in a week? - I have.

Q. When? - I cannot tell.

Q. Are you or are you not in the character of a runner? - I don't know whether I am or not; I am not confined there.

Q. You are constantly attending there? - Sometimes I am not there from morning till night.

Q. I find you have introduced a great deal of conversation which we did not hear from the others. Do you know there is a reward of forty pounds if this man is convicted? - But what of that, sir? I have no more thought about the forty pounds than I have about this here.

Q. You had a good deal of conversation before you got there? - The man came to me about seven o'clock in the evening on Saturday.

Q. Not before? - They came to me on the Tuesday, and then Mr. Hurd told me he had been robbed; about seven o'clock on Saturday they came again, and we took him about eight o'clock; I don't suppose we could be in the house above a quarter of an hour.

Q. Then all that conversation which you have related of the prisoner, passed in the presence of the two witnesses; - It did.

Q. You are then not ignorant of this forty pounds? - I have spoke nothing but truth.

Q. If this man had described to you that he had been robbed, and a man was seen running you would have thought it your duty to pursue? - I had no occasion to pursue, because the man was present.

Q. I ask you whether you would not have done such a thing if this man had described to you he had been robbed, and a man was running? - I don't know whether I should or not; very likely I should; I know it is my duty to do so.

RICHARD LOVETT sworn.

I keep a chandler's shop below Tyburn Turnpike, between that and Bazewater. On the 18th of May the constable Cole charged me to assist him in apprehending the prisoner; I went with Cole into Mary-le-bone-lane, to a public house called the sign of the Cross Keys; the prosecutor pointed out a man to Cole, and said, that was the man that robbed him; Mr. Cole took him into the parlour,

and took a watch from his pocket which the prosecutor said that is my watch; the prisoner said, I never saw you before in my life, that is my watch I can prove I had it this four years. I assisted Mr. Cole to take him to the watch-house; that is all I know of it; Mr. Cole had the watch.

Mr. Knowlys. Are you an officer? - I assisted Mr. Cole.

Q. He attends constantly at Marlborough-street? - I am not sure whether he does or does not.

Q. You know from him that he attends constantly at Marlborough-street to do the business there? - I dare say he does.

Q. Do you recollect this man's saying to the other, that he insisted, before he delivered the watch up that he should describe the watch, and tell the number? - I cannot charge my memory with it; I cannot say he did or did not.

Q. The man, the officer says, that he first of all searched his breeches pockets, and there he found nothing, but he found this watch in his fob? - He did.

Q. Therefore it was not concealed at all? - It was not.

Q. Though you attended to them at the time you cannot say that he did not make that demand, that the prosecutor should describe the watch, and tell the number before he gave it up.

Court to Hurd. Look at the watch. - It is my watch; I know it first by the outside case being battered, and it has a new swivel put in, and I know it by the make of it, being square pillars; I had it of Robert Colebert about three weeks or a month; I changed with him for the watch that he has now in his pocket, which was mine, a metal one, he has it now by him.

Mr. Knowlys. You could not describe it by its number when you was in this house? - I could not.

Court to Colebert. Is that the watch you sold to Hurd? - It is.

Q. Have you any watch of your own? - Yes.

Court to Hurd. Look at that; is that the watch you changed for his? - It is.

Prisoner. I have to say a couple of words. Please your worship, I want to ask the prosecutor whether at the time he picked up the woman, he did not ask me to keep the watch for him twice over.

Prosecutor. I was with no woman, only the woman that came into the house, and that woman I left in the house.

JOHN BAILEY sworn.

My father is a plaisterer; I manage my father's business in part; I know the man at the bar, he worked for my father when he was taken up.

Q. Do you know at what time he came to work on Monday preceeding the Saturday he was taken up? - I cannot say exactly, because he was at work in the country, at Woodford-bridge, at Mr. Naylor's.

Q. Do you know at what time he ought to have attended on that job, on the Monday prior to his being taken up on the Saturday? - At five o'clock in the morning; he was paid according to that time.

Q. What character has he borne? - A very hard working industrious man; a man trusted by us with the direction of the jobs in the country at different times.

Q. Have you any authority to say whether your father would again receive this man into his employ, was he discharged from this bar? - I would employ him to night.

The prisoner called two other witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY. Death .

Recommended by the Jury on account of his good character .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-58

449. SARAH FELTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a printed cotton gown apron, value 1 s. 6 d. two linen shifts, value 3 s. a woollen blanket, value 1 s. the goods of Ann Garland .

ANN GARLAND sworn.

I am a widow ; I live in Dean's-yard, Sun Tavern fields . The prisoner lodged with me; I gave her her lodgings for about two years; she used to go out washing and charing ; it was the 1st of May, or the 2d; I lost a shift, a silk handkerchief, another shift, a cotton apron, and a blanket; the cotton apron was on the bed, and the shifts were in the drawer; all the things were in my apartments; I did not find them till I found the duplicates; she was taken up the 3d of May; she lay there that day, and took the blanket, and the last thing she was going to beat me, and I called out for help, and my daughter came, and sent for the runners.

Q. When did you charge her with the robbery? - The 3d of May. She drops the duplicates behind the bed when the runners came to take her; and I found them and a bit of cloth on the bedside; the runners went to the pawnbrokers and brought them before the justice; I knew that she had taken them before I found the duplicates, but I did not know where she had taken them to; and I had charged her with taking them; but she said she had not, till I found the duplicates. The runners came the 3d of May.

ANN TOON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Old Gravel lane. On the 2d of May I took in to pawn of the prisoner, one shift and one handkerchief; I am sure it was the prisoner, I knew her before; I lent a shilling on the shift and handkerchief; she pawned them in her own name.

SAMUEL STEWARD sworn.

I am a servant to a pawnbroker; my master's name is William Fendall , No. 69, Cable-street. I took in a cotton apron for sixpence the 1st of May, and a shift for sixpence the 2d of May, and a blanket for fourpence the 3d of May; I am sure it was the prisoner; I had seen her before. (The things deposed to by Mrs. Garland.)

Prisoner. I lodged with this good woman a matter of two years, and I always used to go out a charing, and get money, and I used to give her the money; she used to have the money and support herself with it; she used to want me to turn out and look for men; and when I would not she used to lick me and abuse me, and when I came to prison I had a black eye, and I have been in the sick ward almost ever since; she desired me to pawn the things.

Mrs. Garland. I never desired her to pawn any of the things; she pawned them for liquor.

Prisoner. She is just moved to that house where she is; and pays twenty-pence a week for it, she knocked me down, she wanted me to go with men, both with blacks and whites, and I am not guilty of the crime; I have no witness nor a friend in the World; I was born in a place called Southampton, I have friends there, but none in London.

Jury to Prosecutor. Had you any knowledge of her pawning of these things? - I had not.

Q. You said just now that she pawned them to get drunk? - I am certain she did, because she came in drunk and went out sober.

Q. Did you ever suffer her to pawn any thing at all? - Yes, she did, my own things.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-59

450. WILLIAM SANDERS was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Margerett Marshall , spinster , in a certain stable, on the 3d of April , putting her in fear and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, half a guinea and seven shillings and six-pence in money; the monies of the said Margerett Marshall .

MARGERETT MARSHALL sworn.

I am a woman that gets my bread by selling things in the street, with a barrow , sell fish and fruit, and all sorts of goods that are in season. The prisoner is a hackney coachman ; I have known him going on this six years; I have been intimate with him, he lives in Black Horse yard, Rathbone-place; he is an horse keeper to Mr. Cowel that keeps the public house the corner of Charles-street, Soho square; I went out to the best of remembrance on Tuesday morning the 22d of April, between ten and eleven; I was selling nothing that day, I went to look for a room as my own habitation was partly all burnt down by a fire that happened in the neighbourhood; I called at an acquaintances house, a woman acquaintance, and happened to stop about two hours, I had a bit of bread and cheese, and she and I had part of a pot of beer between us, and then I could not see an habitation where I was in St. Ann's, I crossed over to Mary-le-bone, and it came on to be about five or six o'clock; coming along I saw a gown hang up, I asked the price of it; the woman wanted four shillings for the gown; I told her I would give her three shillings for it; after this here I got there about half after five, between five and six o'clock, it had not gone six, it was my nighest way home; I had called on the prisoner before for some money that he owed me; he borrowed six-pences and shillings often, when he was out of place, and I lent him money to save words and blows, being a lone woman; I bought this gown and changed a guinea, and had the money in my hand, having but a very little way to go I had the money in my hand, and I saw the prisoner at the bar cleaning the harness at the door; there was another young man in the stable, but he has never been seen nor heard of since, I knew him by sight, he is a hackney coachman.

Q. Do you know who he drove for? - No, I cannot say that I do; he was out of place, because he was helping this William Sanders to clean the stable. When I came nigh the place this William Sanders followed me and says here is my fine woman; with that he called to me and said, Mrs. Marshall I want to speak to you; on which I went up to him, and the first word he said to me was, fine woman, are you going to give me any gin? I told him I had no gin money, it was better for him to take and pay me what he owed me; he then called me a very bad name, a bloody whore, and up with his hand and knocked me down; when I was going to get up, he upped with his foot and kicked me in the mouth, and knocked three of my teeth out; my blood gushed out with a deal of blood, and I spit my teeth out on the ground; I immediately catched hold of him, and tore his shirt; I fixed on him and laid hold of him by the shirt, and tore his shirt; with that he laid hold of me by the hair of my head, and he dragged me into the stable, and he threw me under an horse, and he hit the horse to make it stand on me; I cried out for mercy, and he saw the horse startlish, and he took me by the right hand to pull me from underneath the horse and immediately I dropped the money, and he took and dragged me towards the door, and kicked and beat me very much; he pulled me from there to throw me some where else about the stable; immediately as he saw the money drop he directly dragged me towards the door, and kicked me in a woful manner; I ran out of the stable as fast as I could.

Q. I want to know how he and you came to know one another? - I know a good many coachmen by cohabiting with this man; I cohabited with him five years; I have left him ten months.

Q. He did not know you had this money in your hand? - He did not know it before he laid hold of my hand, but he found my hand clinched.

Q. What did you do after all this? - I ran away, and left my money behind, and left my shoes, handkerchief and cap, in the stable, and ran home immediately; I don't live a stone's throw off; I left the money there, I did not take a farthing; I ran home and put on an old pair of shoes, and returned back to the stable again to see if he would give me my money; he had turned my shoes, handkerchief and cap, out on the dunghill, and he was gone; I immediately went down to his mistress in the bloody condition I was in, and she turned me out of doors, and said I had no business there; I left the money in the stable on the litter where he made me drop it.

Q. There was nobody present? - Nobody present but the young man, George Purchase , that was in the stable.

Q. Who advised you to indict this man for felony? - I laid my case down before the justice; I went immediately to the justice's that same night, and the two gentlemen told me to come in the morning.

Q. What coachman do you live with now? - I live along with nobody now.

Q. Then he struck you with intent to rob you? - Yes.

Q. But did not you tell me just now, that he did not know that you had any money about you? - This hackney coachman has got a woman to put me to Gaol for an assault, on account I should not prosecute him, and they came to the Gaol last Wednesday, and they said if I did prosecute him I should come worse off.

Mr. Hosty. You knew this man five or six years? - Yes.

Q. And cohabited as man and wife. Do you know a Mrs. Lewis Powell ? - I had not seen her that morning.

ROBERT BERISFORD sworn.

I know nothing more than apprehending the man.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

I know no more of this business than merely apprehending the prisoner.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-60

451. WILLIAM JUGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April , a wooden Cask, value 8 d. and two hundred and two pounds weight of salted butter, value 6 l. the goods of John Todd .

JOHN TODD sworn.

I live in St. Paul's Church-yard ; I am a cheesemonger . On 27th of April last, at eight o'clock, or a little past, I was serving my customers and I saw a man looking in at the window; I looked very earnestly at him, and I saw him move his foot; I went out to him, and he was kicking a cask of butter; I ran up to him, and asked him what he was taking? he said he saw some boys rolling of it, and he began rolling, and he was rolling of it by his arms when I took hold of him; he could not lift it, it was two hundred weight and odd; there was no one boy there, but himself; I stopped him with the butter, and took him and called the people into my own shop for assistance. (The cask produced.)

Mr. Peat. Was this butter your's that you have been speaking of? - It was.

Q. You saw him at first rolling the cask; how do you mean? was you looking at the cask when he began to

roll it? - It was on the side when I saw him, and I left it on its end.

Q. How many minutes might have elapsed from the time you saw the cask at the door, to the time you saw it with the prisoner? - I cannot tell.

Q. How many do you think? state as accurate as you can. - I cannot justly say.

Q. Was it five? - Something more.

Q. Was it ten? - It might be ten.

Q. Is it not possible that twenty boys might have helped roll that cask while you was serving your customer? the cask in question did not stand by the counter, did it? - No, it stood at the door in the street.

Q. Then when you was serving your customer you could not see the cask? - Not without turning my head that way; I could not always have my eye on that.

Q. Therefore it might have been rolled by boys for what you know to the contrary? - There were no boys there.

Q. It was impossible that you could look at the firkin and the customers at the same time, therefore the boys might have been there for ought you know.

ROBERT THOMPSON sworn.

I am a neighbour to Mr. Todd; I was in the shop.

Q. Were any boys near? - No, none; the man had his hands on the cask when Mr. Todd came up to him.

Mr. Peat. Did the prisoner seem to be sober? - He did.

Q. Did you converse with him? = I did; he said he was very well known in that neighbourhood.

- FITZGERALD sworn.

I was there, and I saw a croud; Mr. Todd called out will any body go and get me a constable? I said I am one, and I took the prisoner into custody.

Mr. Peat. Was he sober? - I did not observe he was in liquor.

Mr. Peat to Todd. Was he sober? - As far as I can say he was sober.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-61

452. ANN EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , a silver pepper box, value 10 s. the goods of Robert Nutter .

ROBERT NUTTER sworn.

I know nothing of the transaction; the property was taken out of my house by whom I cannot tell you.

MARTHA NUTTER sworn.

I am the wife of Mr. Robert Nutter ; he is a reed maker , in Gun-street, Spitalfields, in the old Artillery Ground ; I have lost a pepper box, it was taken out of the kitchen; it is out of my knowledge to say by whom; I do not charge the prisoner, I never saw her in my life; my husband found it in a pawnbroker's shop.

Court to Robert Nutter . How long had you lost it before it was found? - Eight days; we saw it the 17th and missed it on the 18th; but by whom taken I cannot tell, for I never saw the prisoner in my life to my knowledge.

ROBERT SEER sworn.

I have a pepper box; I received it on the 18th of April, I believe to the

best of my knowledge it was from the prisoner at the bar; I would not take on me to sware positively.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-62

453. JOHN CHALMERS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , two woollen blankets, value 6 s. a tin pan, value 4 d. a tin tea kettle, value 1 s. a feather bolster, value 1 s. a feather pillow, value 1 s. a looking glass in a mahogany frame, value 1 s. a linen sheet, value 3 s. a bed curtain made of linen and cotton, value 3 s the goods of John Knott , in a lodging room .

JOHN KNOTT sworn.

I lived in Golden-lane at the time as a pawnbroker ; I had the prisoner taken into custody, I keep the house; a woman came to me in the name of Chalmers: I asked her if she had any family? she said she had none but her husband and herself; I said she might have the room if the character answered; I sent my wife after the character, and it answered very well; they gave him a very good character; the man always brought me the rent for five or six weeks duly and truly; I did not miss the goods till the 26th of April; I cannot directly tell the day they came first; the last week they were there I had heard that some of the things were out of the room, and I was told I had better come and look for my things in the room, or perhaps they would be gone; that was the 28th of April; I do not know as well as my wife what was in the room, I believe it is all specified in the indictment; I let it for three shillings a week to the woman, and this man came to the room and paid me the rent; I never saw the man till he brought me the rent.

Susannah Knott . There were two curtains belonging to a half tester bed, two blankets, a tin pan, a looking glass, a linen sheet, &c. these things were all in the room when I let the room to the woman, and when I went in on the 18th I found them missing.

GEORGE BAKER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker to Mr. John Crouch , Fore-street; I produce a blanket and curtains pledged by Martha Rowbottom .

Q. Was any body with her? - No.

WILLIAM HEPPINGSTALL sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, a journeyman to Mr. William Parker in Grub-street; I have a feather bolster, two pillows, a tin tea kettle and a frying pan, pledged by Martha Rowbottom ; the tea kettle was pledged the 25th of February.

Q. Do you know who Martha Rowbottom is? - Yes, by coming to the shop.

Q. Was any body with her? - No.

JOHN KING sworn.

I am a constable. On the 18th of April Mr. Knott fetched me to go to his house that he let out in ready furnished lodgings; I went and I found this man, and found several duplicates on them which answered to the things mentioned in the indictment, all in the name of Rowbottom except one, that was in his name, but that pawnbroker is not here, he was not bound over; I have got the duplicates that were found in his possession.

Prosecutor. My lord, I am afraid to swear to the things positively, there are so many things alike, as there are no marks on them, and they have been out of my hands.

Prisoner. I never pawned any thing in my life, nor did I know any thing were going; I always paid my rent on Saturday

night, and never left my room till I was taken out of bed on Sunday morning.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-63

454. EDWARD STACK and MARY STACK his wife were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , a feather bed, value 2 l. a feather bolster, value 4 s. a feather pillow, value 2 s. two woollen blankets, value 6 s. two linen sheets, value 5 s. a woollen coverlid, value 5 s. a brass candlestick, value 1 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. the goods of William Goodall , in a ready furnished lodging .

WILLIAM GOODALL sworn.

I live at the Three Tuns in Smithfield ; I am a publican ; I keep the house, I let these lodgings for six-pence a night, a single bed; I let lodgings to this man on the 9th or 10th of February; Mr. Stack came and agreed to pay six-pence a night; he took it from night to night, but he told me he should continue till the month of June, and after lodging some particular time he asked to have his wife to come to sleep with him; as he had the bed, consent was given for his wife to come and sleep with him; he continued, to the best of my knowledge, from the 9th of February to the 13th of May.

Q. When did he ask leave for his wife to come? - I cannot justly say, she might be there three weeks or a month, or longer; I did not put it down; we delivered the articles to him in the room, a feather bed, bolster and pillow, two woollen blankets, two sheets, a coverlid; all the articles mentioned in the indictment; the brass candlesticks he had to light them to bed on the 8th of May, and the 9th she pawned it with Mr. Hammond.

Q. When did you miss these things? - He went away the 13th in the morning, and I went up and looked through the hole, and saw the bedstead drawn across the room, and the door was opened, and the things were missing, and I pursued him and had him taken in the evening.

Q. How could he convey the feather bed out? - We suspect it was taken out by piece meals. The woman was not with him when the lodgings were taken.

Mr. Peat. You let lodgings all the year round to travellers, and to persons of all descriptions? - I seldom take in any body without a character.

Q. But you receive travellers and persons frequently without any previous knowledge of them? - Not one time in a twelve month; I have not done it for more than a twelve month.

Q. There is a communication between the prisoners apartment, with some other part of the kitchen, a kind of trap door? - There is a place we can call down to the cook at a dinner, or of that sort, but that was fastened down to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Is that aperture big enough to admit a chair or a bed to pass through? - It is not.

Q. Is it big enough to admit the person of a man or woman? - I never took such particular notice; I know it was very loose at the time I went there.

Q. Do you not know that it was so circumstanced that it could be opened with ease? - When I went to the house I fastened it down myself and I never examined it since to this day.

Q. In what state was it while the prisoner lodged in your house? - It was fast when he went in there; I saw it fast; it was fastened by me just before he came in, by a nail, the very time that I let the room to a single man; I fastened the place up.

Q. Did you see it every day after you fastened it? - No, I did not.

Q. This house of your's is in Smithfield, and I presume you have a good deal of custom to it? - So far as to live.

Q. In fact it is a common open public house, open to every person that chuses to use it; you have a victualler's licence? - I have.

Q. And I believe there are sometimes insurances in the lottery going on there? - Never was.

Q. There are men and women company come in at pretty late hours? - My house is always shut up at eleven o'clock.

Q. How long did Mr. Stack lodge at your house? - To the best of my knowledge he came the 8th or 9th of February.

Q. I believe Mr. Stack was not there when you broke open the door? - I was not there when it was done, I was gone out about some other business.

Q. I believe you have a bunch of keys whereby you can occasionally go in and out when you want? - I had not any key that would open that door.

Q. Was there any key in your house to your knowledge that would open Mr. Stack's door? - None.

Q. It seems this lock was a very common lock? - It was appraised in to me when I came into the house.

Q. Was the room when you entertained this suspicion in the occupation of Mr. Stack, and you expected to be paid? - I did expect to be paid till such times as I found myself mistaken.

Q. Have you any partner in your house? - Yes.

Q. I don't mean your wife; have you any persons concerned in the business? - I have not.

Court. I suppose the prisoner owed some rent? - He did above a guinea.

Mr. Peat. Is it not within your knowledge that Stack had another room for fear of the bailiffs? - I did not know it, I did understand that that house of Mrs. Rose's was his own right and property, and that Mrs. Wheeler was his lodger.

Q. In fact he was afraid of being arrested, and he had other apartments for that reason? - He never told me about his business no further than I imagined.

Q. Did not he act as a man in debt? - He did go out by six o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner. No never in my life but twice.

Court. What business did he pretend to be? - He pretended to be a lawyer, and a man of consequence, and brought in papers and large bundles of writings.

Mr. Peat. However that lady at the bar he stated to be his wife, and you received her as such? - We did.

- sworn.

I am the constable of the rolls. On Monday the 13th of May, about half after eight, I was called to take charge of the prisoners at the bar for a felony, at Breames-buildings, for robbing Goodall at the White Swan; when I came to the door I found a great croud about the door; I went in to the landlord to know what I was wanted there for; he said that the prosecutor wanted me to search his house for the prisoners now at the bar; I asked if such people where at his house? he said they had been there, and were gone, but they would be there in a little time; in the course of five or ten minutes they came to the house, and the landlord called me to receive them, Mary Stack the prisoner at the bar had a bundle with her; she said I had no occasion to detain her she knew nothing at all of the affair; I took a bundle from her which was nothing but rags; the landlord of the house said they had been in that house several mornings in private; the bundle is here; on taking the prisoners at the bar to the watch-house, we sent for Goodall to

come and make his charge good; the wife of the prosecutor came and gave charge, and after we had received the charge I proceeded to search the bundle; the first thing was a canvas bag, which seemed to me had held feathers by its being all over feathering; the next thing I found was an act of parliament; after that I asked Mary Stack if she had any duplicates? she said, no; I then proceeded to search her person; on searching her at first I found two keys which were owned afterwards by different prosecutors, who are here now; I had nearly given up searching her when I found something stiff, I desired her to let me see what that was; I found they were duplicates; she kept some in her hand, and some she put in her mouth, and chewed them the same as I would bread and butter; there were some taken out of her hand, and some fell on the ground, and some she put in her mouth, and one I positively swear, but how many more I cannot say that she did chew like bread and butter; the man was sent down to New Prison; we searched him and found nothing on him except a copy of a forty pound note, which he said was of great consequence to him, so we returned it and some blank papers. In the morning came two women to ask leave to see the prisoner, I did not know who they were or what they were; I opened the door, and told them not to go too nigh, they asked him immediately for the keys of the rooms and I delivered them to them.

Mr. Peat. You was present at this delicious meal on pasteboard, you saw some pawnbrokers duplicates and I suppose you examined those that she fed upon, before she began her operation? - If I had done that I should not have let her done it.

Q. How do you know it was pawnbrokers duplicates? - By the check; positively on my oath I sware to her swallowing, and chewing one duplicate, and after she had chewed that same duplicate for a quarter of an hour she complained of a load on her stomach.

Q. Then it seems you did not take these papers into your hands before she did chew them? - No, I could not do that.

Q. Then all you know is that they were in that state, and they were never in your hands, she would not wish you to touch what she eat. What other things did you find on her? - A bundle and a canvas bag.

Q. Was any thing there you knew, any thing there owned by other persons? - No.

Q. In fact whether it belonged to the prisoner or the Empress of Russia you cannot tell.

- WILSON sworn.

I am an officer of the City; I have got a rug and a candlestick; I got them from Mr. Hammond, a pawnbroker in Long-lane.

THOMAS HAMMOND sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Long-lane. This candlestick and rug was found in my shop, and the prosecutor claimed them; they were pledged in the name of Mary Batty , the female prisoner at the bar; one on the 11th of March and the other the 9th of May; the rug on the 11th of March, and the candlestick the 9th of May; she pledged the candlestick but I do not recollect the person who pledged the rug, it is not so recent.

Mr. Peat. You know nothing about the rug, and the candlestick was pawned by a person who called herself Mary Batty . Did you know her? - I did.

Q. There are little holes in your shop; was it day or night time this was pawned? - I believe day time.

Q. Then you had seen the person before that called herself Mary Batty ? - Yes, I have known her this four years.

Goodall. The candlestick is mine, there is a gentleman now in court who mended it; I am confident to it by this little bit of a knob that was in casting of it; I bought five of them all odd ones; the rug is mine; it was used as a coverlid, it was an outside rug and a little damaged, which I was allowed something for.

Mr. Peat. I think there are about fifty thousand candlesticks of that kind in London. Don't you know that these candlesticks are cast in a mould? - Yes.

Q. Do you happen to know this; whether persons that make candlesticks make a mould for every different candlestick that they cast or do you happen to know that they cast fifty thousand in one mould.

ROBERT GRIMES sworn.

I am a founder.

Q. Look at that candlestick. - I know it; I mended it for Mr. Goodall.

Mr. Peat. What are you? - I am a founder.

Q. A candlestick came to you to mend; you did not measure the candlestick? - I know my work where I mend; it is the same candlestick.

Q. Well and you being a founder, I presume that other candlesticks have been mended by you? - Without doubt, many, I have mended a great many, but I never mended any other of this sort.

Q. There is a knob? - There has been a soldered place in the foot.

Q. Probably the same mould serves for a great many candlesticks? - No doubt.

Q. So that it is very probable an hundred more might be cast of the same description, and the same quality of metal? - Without a doubt.

Q. Then it seems you know it by the soldering? - That is the candlestick that I had to mend.

Prisoner Edward Stack . Mr. Goodall knew the situation I was in; I paid Mr. Goodall sometimes nothing, but chalked up, and sometimes I paid him; Mr. Goodall never asked me for the rent; Mr. Goodall had no suspicion of me, nor any person that came to me; I have heard that he has accused others since he has taken me up; his servant maid had a key to that room, my wife had a key, and I had a key; it is most certain that I would not stay in the house if I had robbed the house, it is most evident I would not.

Edward Stack , GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Transported for seven years .

Mary Stack , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-64

456. THOMAS PLOWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , four wooden trunks, covered with leather, value 10 s. the goods of Joseph Griffith and Elizabeth Griffith , widow .

JOSEPH GRIFFITH sworn.

I am a trunk maker ; I was in partnership with my mother, she is dead.

Q. When was this property stole? - It is impossible to say.

Q. When did your mother die? - The 12th of March.

Q. How soon did you miss them after her death? - I cannot particularly say when I missed these things.

Q. These things might be missed then after her death? - Possibly.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-65

457. RICHARD HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Folkstone , the said George Folkstone and others being therein, about the hour of eight at night on the 25th of May , and feloniously stealing therein, a wooden box, value 1 s. a cloth coat, value 5 s. a pair of nankeen breeches, value 3 s. a cotton waistcoat, value 2 s. and two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. the goods of William Anston .

WILLIAM ANSTON sworn.

I am a coach founder ; I do the plated work to coaches and harnesses; I live in Drury-lane, Holborn ; my landlord's name is George Folkstone. On Saturday night last the 25th of May, about eight or nine o'clock, Thomas Warren saw a hole cut through a pannel of the room where I lodge in, and he saw a man's face through.

THOMAS WARREN sworn.

I am a hop porter in the Borough.

Q. Do you know the apartments of Mr. Anston? - Yes, they are just opposite to mine; I lodge in the same house.

Q. Who is your landlord? - George Folkstone . In the first place I asked my landlord for the key on Saturday last, to go to bed; he gave me the key; so I went up and I saw a pannel of Anston's room broke open, and a man inside looking through where the pannel was broke through; the door was padlocked; I called to him and I asked him if he lodged along with that young man in that room, and he never spoke; I asked him again, but he never spoke, but got out of sight; then I went down and I told my landlord, and my landlord took the key of that room, and Anston and me, and him all went up together; he opened the door, and the person was gone.

Q. Was there a hole big enough in this pannel to let a person out? - Yes.

Q. Then you think the person must have gone out of this pannel? - He went out of the window; my landlord went out of the window to look after him; we found the window open; my landlord went out at the window on the top of the house, and there he found him; I saw him find him; my landlord took him to the watch-house.

Q. Was the prisoner the man? - Yes, he was.

Q. Did you find any thing on him? - The watchman found some keys and a knife; the watchman is here.

Q. Now in regard to this pannel, was there always a hole in it? - No, it had just been broke open.

Q. Might the man have come in at the window? - No, he could not, for that house is ten feet higher than any other house; he was taken on my landlord's house. It was a garret window he got out at.

Court to Anston. Was you at home at this time? - Yes.

Did you go up on the alarm? - I did

Q. When had you last been in the room? - I came home from shop about six o'clock; I was in then.

Q. How was the window? - Open.

Q. Was there any ladder near, or any way by which a man might get in at the window? - No, my lord, it is full ten feet higher than the houses of either side.

Q. When you left the room did you lock the door? - Yes.

Q Was the pannel safe? - Yes, it was.

Q. When you went up on the alarm; how did you find the pannel? - The boards quite open, with a hole big enough for any man whatever. I did not see the prisoner till I saw him on the top of the house, and my landlord had got him, and I knew him when I first saw him; it was

a little after eight, as near as I can say, it was very day light.

Q. Was there day light enough to see a man's face? - Yes.

Q Had you lighted candles below? - Yes, and we brought a candle lighted up with us; I knew the prisoner before, no acquaintance before, but I knew his person perfectly well.

Q. When you went into the room did you find the things in the same state as when you left them? - No, the box was removed.

Q Were all the articles in the indictment in the box? - I did not look then; I had put all the things in the box the Monday before, and I don't recollect opening the box after.

Q. Where was this box removed from? - From the floor on to the bed.

Q. Was any thing missing out of it? - No, nothing; the lock was forced.

Q. Had you left it locked before? - Yes. I am sure when I went in before the box was not on the bed.

Q. Who was in the house at this time? - Mr. Folkstone, Thomas Warren and I.

GEORGE FOLKSTONE sworn.

I am a bricklayer by trade; I am the landlord of this house; I went up stairs on an alarm; I went to the room of Mr. Anston, he is a lodger; I found the room door locked, and a pannel taken out close by the room door; I opened the lock of the room door, and I went in, and Warren and Anston went up along with me, and I saw the garret window open, and I made to the window, and went out, and got over the ridge of the house, and I found the prisoner at the back part stuck behind some chimnies, and I brought him down.

Q. Did he say any thing that is material? - He begged me to let him go, and said it was his first time; and he wanted something to make a few shillings for he was going on Shipboard on Monday.

Q. Did you see him examined at the watch-house? - I did not.

CHARLES MORGAN sworn.

I saw the prisoner at the watch-house; I found on him a knife broken at the point, and three keys; one key has been bruised.

Q. Are any of them skeletons? - No, I asked him how he came to do such a crime? he said he only wanted a pair of breeches; he was going to Sea on Monday.

Prisoner. I was going to Sea on Monday, and I went to see my shopmates; they gave me some liquor and I wanted to go to sleep; I went up these stairs in order to lay down in the passage, but seeing that hole there I went into that room, and I heard the alarm, and I got out on the house, thinking to come down again when they were gone away.

GUILTY,

Of stealing the goods but not of breaking and entering .

To go to Sea .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-66

458. JAMES GOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April , a mahogany tea board, value 4 s. the goods of James Matthews .

JAMES MATTHEWS sworn.

I am a master cabinet and chair maker . I lost a mahogany tea board the 23d of April Tuesday; I did not see the prisoner take it, I saw it on him; I saw the witness bringing him back with the tea board, it was about six o'clock in the evening, when I first saw him it was nearly opposite my house; the witness put the tea board in the shop, and delivered

the boy to me; I delivered it to the constable; he has had it ever since.

Q. Did you separate it from your other property? - The constable was sent for immediately, and it was delivered into the constable's hands.

THOMAS HILLARY sworn.

I am a journeyman pawnbroker; I was standing at my master's door between six and seven o'clock, on the 23d of April, I saw the prisoner at the bar take this board from the door of Mr. Matthews he ran across the way with it, ran up an alley, and I pursued him.

Q. Did you lose sight of him? - Yes, I took him in Blue Anchor-alley; I did not lose sight of him half a minute; he had the property on him when I took him; I brought him to the house of the prosecutor.

- sworn.

I am the constable; I produce the tea board; I had of Mr. Matthews; I have kept it ever since.

Prisoner. I was coming down Whitecross-street, there was a young man at this shop told me to take this tea board in my apron, and carry it to Blue Anchor-alley and he should be there as soon as me.

GUILTY . (Aged 13.)

Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER

Reference Number: t17930529-67

459. SARAH MERCHANT was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , two cotton gowns, value 15 s. a linen apron, value 2 s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a muslin apron, value 2 s. a check apron, value 1 s. a cotton shawl, value 1 s. 3 d. a linen shift, value 1 s. 3 d. the goods of Elizabeth Tooner , spinster .

ELIZABETH TOONER sworn.

I am a single woman; I lost these articles from my brother's room; I live in the country, and I left these things in my brother's room at the Masons Arms, in Market-street .

Q. When did you leave them there? - I cannot tell, I believe it was eight weeks ago to day; I cannot tell the day of the month, because I was hurried away to the country so fast.

ELIZABETH GREASLEY sworn.

I keep the house; this young woman was going in the country to live with Mr. Sheridan; she asked her brother leave to put her things into her brother's room, in a box up two pair of stairs; the prisoner was a servant of mine at the time they were missing; they were locked up in the box; I did not miss any thing of it at all, but I saw the prisoner wear several of the things in the course of the week while the young woman was absent; this young woman came to town on Sunday for some of her things; she found the box locked as she left it, but when she opened it it was almost stripped, and she and her brother came down to me; she went away on Friday and she returned on the Sunday week following; it is seven Sundays ago that she returned to town; they came down to me, and I took my girl to talk about it; I told her there had nobody gone into the room but herself to make the bed, and so I told her that I was very certain she must know about it; my husband says to me go and search the beds, and see if you can find any thing; I did and I found the young woman's gown under one of the beds, and an apron under another, and I came down to her again, and told her I had got some of the property, and I was certain she must know of the remainder; she denied it; I sent for the constable, and he searched her, and found a great many

duplicates, and a key that opened the box in her pocket; I saw her wear part of the things, a shawl, an apron, and a cap, in the absence of Mrs. Tooner.

Q. Can you from that cursory observation venture to swear that they were Mrs. Tooner's, or the same that Mrs. Tooner swears to? - Yes, I can; I took the apron in my hand. I thought it was one of my own, and asked her how she came by it? she told me she borrowed it; I did not know then that it was Mrs. Tooner's; I did not know till she came to town that she had missed any thing.

JOHN NEALE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; there was a cotton gown and an apron pawned with me the 9th and 10th of April; they were pawned in the name of Mary Roberts ; I cannot swear to her person, but I believe it is the same.

Prisoner. I don't know what I am here for; I know nothing of it.

- sworn.

I am a constable and beadle. Mrs. Greasley where Mr. Tooner lodges sent for me; they gave me charge of the prisoner at the bar, for robbing them of these articles; I went and searched her, and I found these duplicates that she said were her own. (Produced, and two of them deposed to by Neale the pawnbroker.) I found this key which opens her own lock and the other lock where Mrs. Tooner says her clothes were left, but with great difficulty; I found some things at a neighbouring house, and I was made to understand that she carried them there; it was at No. 4, Haydon-court, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Tooner's lodgings; I was informed they were carried there to wash.

Q. Did you ever shew the things to the prisoner? - Yes, she went with me, and shewed me where she carried them; I found there a muslin handkerchief and a pair of stockings.

Court to Mrs. Tooner. What do you produce? - A gown and a coloured apron that we found under the bed, under a lodger's bed; I left these things about eight weeks ago at my brother's.

Q. When did you return? - The next Sunday after but one.

Q. Did you go into the room and find the things missing? - I did.

Q. Be so kind as to look at the two things produced by the pawnbroker, and tell me whether they are your things; I think the one is a cotton gown and the other a linen apron? - They are mine; they were left in the box; I know the gown, I put new sleeves into it before I left it; my name is on the linen apron; there is my name on the cotton stockings; the two muslin handkerchiefs I only just made them before I went to my place

Court to Mrs. Greasley. Are any of those things that you saw on the woman's back here? - This check apron I am confident of.

Prisoner. I know nothing about it, nor do I know what I was taken up for; when I was taken up they put their hand in and took some duplicates out of my pocket, and seven-pence, they had me down to the watch-house one night, and the next morning they took me up to the justice's, and I knew not what they took me there for; I have lived in places where I have always had an upright character; I never touched a rag of any body's, for I had plenty of my own to put on.

The prisoner called one witness to her character.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-68

460. MARIAH NUGENT and HANNAH JACKSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a silver watch, value 2 l. a steel chain, value 2 d. a stone seal, value 6 d. a metal key, value 1 d. a pagoda, value 7 s. 6 d. and three shillings and six-pence in money; the goods , chattels and monies of Thomas Jones .

Thomas Jones was called on his recognizance.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-69

461. JOHN PARSEY and SARAH PARSEY were indicted for stealing, on the 20th of April a feather bed, value 1 l. a feather bolster, value 2 s a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. a woollen blanket, value 2 s. a bed curtain, value 6 d. a copper saucepan, value 2 s. a copper tea kettle, value 1 s. 6 d. a bed quilt, value 10 d. an iron frying pan, value 6 d. &c. the goods of Elizabeth Dore , widow , in a lodging room in her dwelling house .

ELIZABETH DORE sworn.

I am a widow; I let lodgings; I let a lodging to the prisoner, about eight weeks before they robbed me, but I am not certain to the eight weeks; I let the lodgings to the woman, and he came and approved of them; they were to give me two shillings a week furnished; I missed a sheet, a saucepan, and a blanket; I went into the room for the saucepan, and they told me it was in the house; I believe this was Monday, the last day in March, and then I looked to the bed, and I missed a sheet, and a blanket, and I gave them warning, (There was a pair lost when they left me) and she told me it did not suit to quit my lodgings for a fortnight; they only paid one week, and the night she said she should quit, I went up, and I found the key laid over the door, and I took it, and went into the room, and I missed all the things in the indictment.

Q. How soon did you see them again after this? - I saw him again on the Wednesday following, the 24th of April and then he went with me to the office in Worship-street; I told him he must go to give an account of the things; I had a man with me, and he told us where she was, and she was brought and searched; I see her searched, and there was a duplicate of a sheet found on her, which sheet I went to the pawnbroker's to see, and I found it to be my property; the pawnbroker is here.

Prisoner John Parsey . There was no lock on the door.

NICHOLAS NORRIS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker I produce a bed quilt, the prosecutor has got the sheet.

Q. Who pawned the sheet? - I believe it was the sister of that woman at the bar; I am sure it was not the prisoner.

Q. Who pawned the quilt? - The same person.

Q. In what name were they pawned? - Ann Parsey .

JOHN RAY sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I searched Sarah Parsey the prisoner at the bar, and in her pocket I found a duplicate, Mrs. Dore was with me, and I delivered the duplicate to her.

Mrs. Dore. I went to the pawnbroker's, and found the sheet which sheet I have.

Court to Norris. Have you got the duplicate of the sheet? - I have; I have left it at home.

Court to Mrs. Dore. Look at the sheet? - It is my sheet; it is marked R. E. D.

Prisoner John Parsey . I am clear of it, I know nothing about it.

Prisoner Sarah Parsey . There never was a lock fastened on the door while ever I lived there; I don't know who took the things out if I was going to die, not one individual thing, the things were taken out when we were not at home.

The prisoner John Parsey called three witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Both Not GUILTY ,

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-70

462. JAMES SPENCER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of May , an iron door frame, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of John Davis .

NATHANIEL THORLEY sworn.

I know nothing of the robbery.

THOMAS POWEL sworn.

I was a watchman the time I took this man, I took him on Monday morning the 6th of May; I found him in a garden belonging to Bagnigge Wells ; he had this iron frame of a door by the side of him; I see him break the pales, and see him go in, and when I got up he had gone inside, and had set down; with that he had got this iron frame of the gate laying by the side of him, as he set down, I asked him what business he had in there? he said he got in there to ease himself; with that I told him I thought it was a comical way to break peoples palings down to ease himself.

Q. Did you ever see it in his hands? - No, I did not, it lay close by the side of him as he lay down in the inside.

Thorley. It was an old iron door frame, that lay by as old iron, it was left about four or five yards from the place where it was found with the prisoner; my father keeps Bagnigge Wells; it was laying against a fence in a yard where we keep lumber in, on the other side of the ground.

Q Can you say for certain where it lay? - If what the watchman says is true, it was found four or five yards from where it was left.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-71

463. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , a mahogany table, value 16 s. the goods of William Wince .

WILLIAM WINCE sworn.

I am a cabinet maker .

Q. Did you see the prisoner take the table? - No, the property was stole the 12th of May, Monday, between the hours of one and two; I missed this table from the door, a neighbour of mine that lives opposite, sent his little boy over to me; I was up stairs at dinner, and informed me of it; I ran down stairs, and run round the corner, ran up Brooks's-street, and I saw the prisoner in Brooks's street; as I ran along I called out stop them men, they have got my table; there was two of them, one of them ran away, I collared the other, the prisoner is the man; my table stood on the ground on its feet; this man stood by the side of the table.

Q. Did this man run? - No, I collared him, and brought him to my house; after that I carried him to the justice's in Hatton-garden; he told me that he was going along, and some man asked him to carry the table for him.

THOMAS KIRKHAM sworn.

I was standing at my own house opposite the prosecutor's, and I saw a man take a table from the door, I cannot pretend for to say it is the prisoner; I see a man take a table from the door, I believe that is the man, but I cannot pretend to swear to it; he went round the corner; I never left my own house; I gave the alarm, and bid my own boy to tell this Mr. Wince that there was a table taken from his door, and to know whether he sold it, or had given orders to have it taken away; I did not pursue, I never went out of my own house.

Court to Wince. Was the table your's that you saw standing with this man? - It is here now; it was out at the door; I know it is mine because I made it.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-72

464. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , a silver tea spoon, value 1 s. 6 d. a base Metal tea spoon, value 1 d. a calico bed gown, value 5 s. two childs linen clouts, value 2 d. the goods of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH sworn

I lost the things in the indictment on the 24th of March; I live in Collwell court ; I was at my work; my wife is the evidence.

MARY SMITH sworn.

I am the wife of John Smith ; I know nothing about the prisoner, I never saw her with my eyes before she came to my place; I saw her on Saturday at my own door, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, she came to the door, I buys and sells old brokering things; she came to my door, and asked me if I had got an old blanket? I told her no; she would have no denial but forced herself into the place; she would force discourse to me; she asked me what country woman was I? I told her I was Stafford; she said, I am you countrywoman; I said, you are a Yorkshire woman; she said if she was, she was bread and born in Stafford; she took one of my little girls up in her arms, and she wanted some drink, and I gave her a tea cup with two spoons in it, a silver one and a metal one, and went down to get some water; and left her in the room, and I pulled my gown off my back before her face, and she set there; the milkman came with the milk, and I took in a farthingworth of milk, and I left her again; when I came back she had my other little girl in her lap, and then she asked to go down the yard; I let her go.

Q. When did you lose your things? - The 24th of March, a quarter of an hour after she was gone.

Q. Did you miss all the articles in this indictment? - Yes, every one.

Q. Have you ever seen them since? - No, I have not.

Q. How soon did you find her afterwards? - Three weeks afterwards; my little boy saw her in the street, and told me of it.

Q. What passed when you took her up? - She said she never saw me with her eyes, nor I her.

Prisoner. The day she says, I went into her house to sell some old iron, and she said after I had sold the old iron, that I had robbed her, and that I sent for two half pints of gin to treat her with; good woman, says I, you never saw me, nor I you.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-73

465. SAMUEL WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of April , an iron stove grate, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of John Moles .

JOHN MOLES sworn.

I keep the White Horse in Pond-street , Hampstead ; the house was burnt down the 25th of March; this iron grate was a fixture, we got it out of the ruins, and put it in a shed before it was stole, and I put an old door against the shed, and two spikes, one on one side and another on the other; a gentleman came and said he saw somebody go away with my grate, and I went and followed the prisoner home.

Q. Did you see him with the grate on him? - I did not. I went to his door and knocked at his door, and said give me that grate, that you have stole from me; Lord, says he, Mr. Moles, I never touched it, I never was near your place; says I, you are a false man; my witness, John Limerick , he was by at the time, I spoke to the prisoner; I told him if he did not give it me away I would send for a constable, and I searched the house and found the stove.

Q. Do you know whether it was his house? - I do not; there are neighbours here will say.

JOHN LIMERICK sworn.

I am a carpenter; I was in Mr. Moles's house, having some beer, and I was in the privy, and I saw this man against the stable door where the iron is, and presently he pulls down the door and takes out a back of the grate, and lays it down, and then he takes out this grate, and puts it under his coat; it is an iron stove grate, and I watched him home with it; then I came back and told the landlord.

Q. Do you know that house where it was found? - Yes.

Q. Do you know whether it was in any part that he lodges in? - It was found just at his door.

THOMAS ARNES sworn.

I am a constable. On the 13th of April I was sent for to Mrs. Moles's house, and was told that a man had stole a stove out of the stable, and I went to the house where that man lived in, and found the stove behind a door in that house. (The stove produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. This affair happened on Saturday night, this witness, who is a witness against me, owed me some money; in the course of the week I had asked him for it, and I told him I would summon him for it on Friday; I know nothing about the stove, it was not found in my room; I was in my own room sitting by my own fire when they came; it was found behind the passage door.

Constable. It was behind the first door before a small passage which leads to other peoples door.

Court to Limerick. He says you owed him some money, is it true? - I owed him six-pence

Q. Did he call on you for the money? - No, he never asked me; his wife said, why did not I pay Sam the six-pence; I had not the six-pence then to pay her when she asked me.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - Yes.

Q. Is he a lad of character? - Yes; I never knew any thing else but honesty by him.

Court to Arnes. Is the lad a lad of character? - He was born in the place, I never heard any thing imputed to him before.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-74

466. RICHARD LLOYD was indicted for that he on the 27th of January , with a pistol loaded with gunpowder and leaden bullets, unlawfully, maliciously, and feloniously did shoot at Richard Lloyd the elder , he being in his dwelling house .

RICHARD LLOYD the Elder sworn.

Q. Is that your nephew at the bar? - Yes. I was sitting in the parlour the 27th of January. (I live in Lemon-street, Goodmans-fields ) between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was sitting by the fire side reading, and my nephew came into the parlour and sat down behind me at the window; he was reading also as I thought; I did not see him, but I heard him move the books as my back was towards him; he went out into the yard, and returned in some little time, and sat down again on the same chair by the window; he says, uncle what day of the month is it, I answered the 27th, at that I heard the report of a pistol, and I was wounded on the side of my head; he seemed very much frightened, he did not say a word.

Q. Did you see him as soon as it was done? - I saw the side of his face but I did not see his hand or arm, I was so frightened; I was sitting down, and I got up, I turned my head and I saw my nephew; he went out into the yard.

Q. Did your nephew appear to have any thing about him? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Where was your nephew when you saw him? - Partly behind my back in the parlour; he walked out from the parlour like a man frightened and went into the next house; he went into my yard first, after he went there I cannot say any thing more. I said, my God! my God! what is this you have done.

Q. Where did you last see him after this happened? - Going out of my own wash-house into my own yard.

Q Is there a thoroughfare from your yard to the next house? - There is no gate but some small pallisades, which he had used to get over.

Q Where did you say my God! my God! what is it you have done? - I was so frightened I hardly knew what I said.

Q. Was there any body else in the same room besides you and him that you knew? - Not any one.

Q. To whom do you impute the firing of this pistol? - I cannot pretend to say, I did not see any pistol from first to last, but I should suppose from the wound it was from some piece, pistol or gun.

Q. Do you know what the wound was made by? - By a ball of some piece.

Q The wound was by a ball you say, was that ball shewn to you when it was extracted? - Yes.

Q. Was there any ill will at all between you and your Nephew? - I don't know that there was.

Q. How soon was your nephew taken after that? - He only went into the next house, he never went from there as I know of.

Q. You never saw the instrument by which this was done at all? - No.

Mr. Knapp. We understand then that there was nobody else in the room besides your nephew and yourself, so that nobody else can give an account of this transaction except yourself; you say your nephew was behind you; during the whole time you had observation of him; you did not see gun or pistol or any thing else, I believe your nephew and you had been always on very good terms? - Six years almost we had lived comfortable together.

Q. You stated to the recorder and court just now, that there was no ill will between you? - Not on my side, nor I hope on his.

Q. The nephew went to the next house, he never went any further? - He was there I was told.

Q. Now I would ask you Mr. Lloyd, what is his mind, is he completely in possession of his mind? - I don't know he was ever affected, I never observed any

thing that led me to think that he was so.

Q. So what the wound was given by, you don't know, as you never saw any piece.

Court. Did you ever hear any report? - Yes, I heard the report.

Q. How old is your nephew? - I believe he is turned of sixteen or seventeen.

Jury. Did he make you any answer when you said good God! what have you done? - Not a word, he seemed frightened so.

ROBERT DAWSON sworn.

I am a constable; the prisoner has a brother and he was taken up for this offence, and the brother was discharged and I was bound over to prosecute this prisoner; I found some things in the brother's box, I found some cases of pistols, and on one of the cases there was a label; I found some powder and shot; on drawing the charge of the pistol which was produced at the office, the powder and ball which I found in the brother's box corresponded to the ball in the charge; I found the brother's box in the New-court, in the Old Bailey, nearly opposite these gates; the brother was an apprentice to a cooper in Whitechapel, but he had ran away from his master, and I don't know how he lived at that time, I understand him to be about twenty; when I apprehended the brother, I apprehended him in Cornhill, I found on him a key, and I examined him as to where he lived; he told me, and I came to No. 3, New-court, Old Bailey, and there were two children only in the house, at last I found the box in the cellar; on one of the cases was a label, I had received information where the pistols was purchased, and I went with this case with the label to the shop, the man said, that this case was purchased with the pistols, but he could not tell who purchased them, therefore I did not bring him to the office. I found likewise a canister of powder, I understand he lived in these lodgings by himself, and I found likewise some shot or small ball. I found also the key of some pistols.

Court to Prosecutor. Did it appear to be the same sort of ball as was extracted from you? - It did not.

Mr. Knapp. You apprehended the brother in Cornhill, and went to his lodgings, and there you found a key and some cases belonging to pistols, this was at this boy's brother's lodgings, and he had ran away from his master and there he lived by himself and it was his lodgings? - I know him to have run away.

Court to Prosecutor. Did your nephew live with you? - Yes, he did for twelve years to the present time.

Jury. That brother had not been at your house that afternoon? - Not to my Knowledge; I did not see him.

Mr. Knapp. He used of course frequently to come to your house? - He did, but whether he was there that day, I do not say, nor will I take on myself to swear.

Jury. You are sure the piece was discharged in the room, was the window broke? - It was not.

Q. Was it open or shut? - I cannot be positive.

Court. I think I understand you to say that when this happened you stood up and turned your head round, did you then see the prisoner in the room or in the wash house? - He was going out of the parlour into the wash-house; when he was in the room I heard him turning the books over, and I thought he was reading, as he used to read frequently.

Jury. Was there any smell of powder? - I suppose there must, but I was so frightened I cannot recollect.

Q. Was there nobody came into the room soon afterwards? - The next neighbour came in directly.

- WAINWRIGHT sworn.

I am an officer. On the 27th of January I was sent for from my own house to come and take Richard Lloyd into custody, I went and took him next door; that is all I know of the business.

Jury. Did you examine his pockets? - I did not, I did not search him.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-75

467. GILES GOOFFREY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , a linen table cloth, value 5 s. the goods of John Lear .

An. INTERPRETER sworn.

JOHN STAPLETON sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Lear of the Three Tuns coffee house in the Strand . I have the principal care of all the things in the house, that are given daily for the use of the house, the linen and glasses. I had nine cloths in my care for the use of the coffee room; about eleven o'clock on the 15th of May, I left a waiter in the coffee room while I went to clean myself up stairs, I had not been above a quarter of an hour; just as I was coming down stairs I heard the bar bell ringing very violently, I ran down stairs as fast as ever I could, when I came down the prisoner was brought back into the coffee room with the table cloth on him, by a man where he had been to sell it with Mr. Lear's name upon it, the number of the house and the number of the box to which it belonged; this man I had frequently seen at our door begging and jabbering french. I could not understand him.

Q. Had you seen him that day? - I had not till he was brought back; the cloth is here, he said that a man gave it him in the street. The waiter had left the room in my absence, there were nine lay folded up in one of the seats exactly opposite the door, the opposite side of the room, they could see them in the street.

JOHN HOWARD sworn.

I am a shoemaker in Church-lane in the Strand. On the 15th of May, I was called down stairs between the hours of eleven and twelve, when I came down the prisoner was in my parlour with this here table cloth; I saw the name on the table cloth, he asked five shillings for it; I knew the house, and and stopped him; I asked him how he came by it? he spoke french; I did not understand him; I sent for a constable and took him to Mr. Lear's house.

ELIZABETH HOWARD sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness; my husband is a shoemaker; the prisoner came to me Wednesday the 15th of May, between the hours of eleven and twelve o'clock, he asked me if I would buy the cloth; I told him to come in, he spoke english to me; I asked him what he asked for it? he told me five shillings; I asked him if the cloth was his own? he said it was, and he was a frenchman, he brought it from France, it cost him ten shillings; I saw the mark and I asked him if he lived at that gentleman's house that the name was on the cloth? he told me no, a gentleman marked it for him; all that he spoke was in english.

Q. You are positive he said that it was his own? - He did, he said, he brought it from France.

Prisoner. I never said I brought it from France, I have lodged two years

at a tavern. I have no witness; I have served the King for five years, and I have a pension from Chatham now. (The cloth deposed to.)

GUILTY . (Aged 51.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-76

468. EDWARD STACK and his Wife were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , a feather bed, value 2 l. 10 s. a feather bolster, value 5 s. a feather pillow, value 6 s. two woollen blankets, value 10 s. &c. the goods of Daniel Wheeler in a ready furnished lodging .

Edward Stack pleaded Guilty and exculpated his wife .

Edward Stack GUILTY. See No. 455.

Mary Stack Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-77

469. JAMES LAMB was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , a linen sheet, value 1 s. a linen table cloth, value 1 s. a cotton gown, value 2 s. and two waistcoats, value 2 s. the goods of John Wallis .

JOHN WALLIS sworn.

I am an hair dresser ; I was robbed of the things in the indictment the 17th of April last, the prisoner was a servant to me; on Monday he asked me for a few shillings to get some things out of pawn, and he was to come back on Tuesday morning at seven o'clock; he did not come till three o'clock on Wednesday afternoon, when I catched him within twenty yards of my own house, with the gown in his hand; the sheet, the waistcoat and the table cloth, he had in his own pocket.

Q. Had he a great coat on? - No, he had a straight coat on. He said I might do with him as I liked. I am positive the things are mine by the marks on them; the dimity waistcoat is pieced on one side of the breast; the others are torn.

Q. How do you know the cotton gown? - By the print of it; it is wore much; there is no mark on the table cloth or sheet, but I believe they belong to me.

Prisoner. About five or six yards from the door he took the things from under my arm.

JOSEPH WEST sworn.

I am a constable. I produce the articles which I got from Mr. Wallis's house, where I got the prisoner likewise; I have kept them ever since.

Prisoner. When I got up to his shop he took the things out of my pocket he mentioned. On Monday morning I left him, he gave me 5 s. part of the wages I had to get from him.

Court to Prosecutor. What servant was he? - A journeyman .

Q. How long had he lived with you as a journeyman? - Four days.

Q. Had you any character with him? - I was not at home when he was employed; my wife employed him; he was sent from the hair merchant's.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-78

470. MARY MILLER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , nine pounds weight of copper, value 5 s. and nine pounds weight of metal called pot metal, value 5 s. the goods of Thomas Allen .

THOMAS ALLEN sworn.

I live in Banner-street, in the parish of St. Luke's ; I am a founder ; I had not missed the metal nor I could not swear to it when it was brought to me.

GEORGE CONWAY ALLEN sworn.

Q. How old are you? - Fourteen next birth day.

Q. Do you know of your father's loosing any metal? - Yes, about three weeks before the prisoner was taken up I bought weights like to these with some more metal.

Q. Do you know it again when you see it? - Not by any particular mark; I know my father lost some, but I don't know what quantity. (The metal produced.)

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-79

471. JOSEPH NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , six bushels of coals, value 6 s. the goods of Nathaniel West and Nathaniel Cove .

WILLIAM TURNER sworn.

I am foreman to Messrs. West and Cove, they are coal merchant s, I know nothing of the circumstance, no further than I gave the man orders to attend the barge, our servant is absconded. I gave orders to the man on the night of the 29th to take the barge from the ship to Messrs. Coutts's and Co. it was called the Friends, it was laying at Stratford with the coals; I gave the orders to Robert Wilkinson the lighterman.

Q. Do you know that Robert Wilkinson is concerned in these things? - It is so reported, but whether it is or no I cannot tell; he went down with the barge, I saw him on Wednesday afternoon on board a ship, and I saw him on Thursday morning.

JOHN HILL sworn.

I am a waterman and lighterman. On Tuesday the 30th of April I was down near the Bow-creek, I saw the prisoner and another companion that was with him, and Wilkinson a lighterman in the barge; the prisoner at the bar is a fisherman's apprentice , I saw the prisoner and his companion, another person, not Wilkinson, with a basket in the barge taking a great many round coals from the top and putting them into a peter boat where they were concealed, then I rowed along by.

Q. Had the prisoner any business on board that barge? - I don't know.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - Yes, I know his person very well, after they put them into the peter boat; I rowed to them, the time I was rowing to them this prisoner and his companion chucked a parcel of them over board, finding I was rowing to them, and they rowed away as fast as they could, then I went on shore, they filled the well full and a cheese laid on it to conceal it.

Q. Could you see by the appearance of these coals whether they were the same coals that came from the barge? - I think they were; then I rowed on shore to the Orchard house and called the officer that is in court, Thomas Peat ; then we went in a wherry and pursued after the lighterman to take the name and number of the barge, her number was 1,018, her name was Beccy; we did not like to take the lighterman, Wilkinson, because of leaving the craft adrift; the lighterman was in the craft when the property was taken out, he was present and saw it done, I did not see him chuck any coals over, it was on a flood tide, and he was shoving the barge in on shore.

Q. Are you satisfied he knew what was going forward? - I am certain he see what they were about.

Q. Did you go to the lighter? - Yes, we went on board of her, the officer did not think proper to take him because there was nobody to take care of the craft and the property in it; he went up with the craft.

Q. Did you go up with him? - No, we pursued directly after the boat and found the prisoner in the peter boat with the property which I described before, we took possession of the coals, and brought him up before the magistrate, there might be six or seven bushels, some of them are brought here, they have been in the office ever since, and there was a seal put on each sack.

THOMAS PEAT sworn.

I am a trinity officer. On Tuesday I ordered Hill the waterman, to go down to Blackwall, and to stay at the mouth of Bow-creek to see if any thing was going forward in the coal line, to see if any of the boats were there loading out of any of the craft, and if they were, to come on shore to the Orchard house immediately and inform me of the same; after I had been there some considerable time I went out to see for him, and met him coming to the house to inform me there was a barge being plundered; in the mean time the lighterman Wilkinson, came into the house before Hill, when he saw Hill and me together he immediately went away from the house and called a boat with a ferry at Bow-creek to row him to the craft; from what Hill told me I got into my boat and rowed after Wilkinson, he rowed up Bow-creek after the loaded craft, when he was on board the craft I went on board to take the name and number, observing to him that there had been a quantity of coals taken out of the same craft, by observing the hole from whence they were taken; we took her name and number and told him I should acquaint the proprietor as soon as I could find out who it was, and send for him when I wanted him; I immediately rowed down the creek again after the prisoner at the bar's boat; in consequence of which we fell in with him and took him with the coals now produced in court.

WILLIAM HAYWARD sworn.

I am a waterman and lighterman; I was along with Mr. Peat on the 30th of April at the Orchard house, Tuesday, and being in there they thought Mr. Hill was a good while before he came to us; Mr. Peat went to look for him and we met him, and they spoke together and they agreed to have a boat and row round Bow-creek. I took them into the boat and we went round and got to the craft, then Mr. Peat stepped into the craft and took the name and number of the barge, 1,018, Beccy; after we had seen the lighterman, Mr. Peat spake to the lighterman, we then after that pursued after the boat, and took it; the peter boat was up at Blackwall at a good distance from there, I dare say half a mile, the boy was rowing the boat in by the side of the Gun at the upper part of Blackwall.

Q. That is in a direction from the barge? - Yes, it is where the boy and his master lives.

Prisoner. A barge came down from Blackwall and the wind blowed very hard, they were on the lee shoar; I was standing at the Gun-yard at play, and the man could not hold his craft in, he immediately called out for help, my fellow servant called me out of the yard and I went and helped the man almost round from Bow-creek, and he had no money to pay me and he told me to take some coals, he insisted on our taking them for our good nature for helping him down off the lee shore, and my fellow servant

chucked them on board because he would not dirty his boat with them.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-80

472. ANN THOMAS was indicted for stealing on the 30th of May , a linen sheet, value 10 s. the goods of William Smith .

MARY SMITH sworn.

I am the wife of William Smith , I live in Queen-street, Bloomsbury ; I am a laundress, I lost a sheet on the 30th of May, a woman came in at the street door, went down into the kitchen and opened the door, it was not locked, and took out the linen as it hung a drying; I did not see her, there was nobody see her take it, but we found her in the dust hole with the sheet. My lodger went down for a pail of water and she saw something in the dust hole, and she came up and told us, and we went down stairs and she was coming up stairs, and there was a sheet in the dust hole from whence she came.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come from the dust hole? - I met her on the stairs, the dust hole is under the stairs, it was between eleven and twelve; the sheet is here, I took it immediately from the dust hole, I am sure it is one that I had to wash; I have the fellow to it at home, it belongs to a family, it is particularly marked, it has a coronet on it.

ANN ELDER sworn.

I lodge in Mrs. Smith's house; I went down for a pail of water and I saw something lay on the dust hole which I pulled; the dust hole is at the bottom of the kitchen stairs; I laid hold of it, it pulled against me, I drawed the pail of water and went by the dust hole again and pulled it again, and it pulled very much against me. I went up stairs and knocked at my landlady's door, I saw, but I could not particularly observe what it was I saw, it was a person laying there, which very much alarmed me; I desired them to go down and look into the dust hole for there was somebody there that ought not to be; my landlady went down and met the old woman the prisoner, standing on the stairs, and went down and found the sheet in the dust hole; she said that she had been there to sleep and I had awaked her; it was between eleven and twelve.

Court to Mrs. Smith. How long had you left the kitchen? - It might be two or three hours, I cannot justly say.

Court to Mrs. Elder. Was the old woman drunk or sober? - She appeared stupid.

Prisoner. I never saw the sheet nor had it till I see the gentlewoman had it in her own room; I had four witnesses here on Saturday but they could not come to day.

- sworn.

I am a constable, I produce the sheet; I took the woman into custody and took the sheet, and have kept it till now.

GUILTY . (Aged 65.)

Confined one month in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-81

473. ELIZABETH MERCHANT was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of May , a silver watch, value 2 l. a silver watch string, value 2 d. a stone seal set in

metal, value 8 d. a watch key, value 1 d. the goods of Thomas Angel .

THOMAS ANGEL sworn.

I am a taylor ; I work for my father, I am a single man. As I was coming up Holborn the 7th of May last, this prisoner accosted me and told me she was a poor distressed woman, it was Tuesday morning about two o'clock; I had been in some company but I was quite sober; I went into company about eight o'clock in the evening at Bagnigge Wells.

Q. Did you continue in that company till two o'clock in the morning? - Not quite all the time, we had been drinking together.

Q. Was it a party of men or women? - Men.

Q. Did you drink all that time? - No.

Q. What liquor did you drink? - Negus; I went with another young man; there were five in company with me, I had not been drinking all the while, I was quite sober, after I came into Holborn I was by myself; I live in Gray's Inn-lane; she accosted me and said, she was a poor distressed woman and had no home to go to, this was nearly opposite the George and Blue Boar Holborn; I felt her pull the watch out of my pocket, I walked a little up Holborn with her, and I had stopped about two minutes with her and returned back.

Q. I understand you that you was going home, did you go back again? - I walked a little way out of the way for home while she was telling her story; when she robbed me I was just standing still, I was talking to her; this was in Holborn.

Q. Did she say any thing about the watch to you? - No.

Q. Did you see the watch go? - I felt her take it out of my pocket; it was a silver watch.

Q. Did you say any thing to her at the time? - I charged her with taking my watch, and she made many oaths that she had not, it was in my coat pocket, I had drawed it up about an hour and a half before, and put it in my coat pocket, I did not put it into my fob.

Q. It seems to me that you felt it go out of your pocket? - I did.

Q. Did you feel her hand in your pocket? - I did.

Q. Did you catch hold of her hand? - I did not, I put my hand to her and said, you have got my watch; she made a great many oaths and said she had not; I immediately called watch, one came from across the way, and I told him that she had taken my watch from me, and she tried to strike me; we went to the watch-house and while I was giving a description of the watch she came up and hit me in the face; the watchman took the watch from her as we came along, out of her hand; he is here.

Prisoner. Ask him if he did not give me the watch? - I did not on my oath.

Q. Ask him if the watchman took the watch from me? - He did.

Q. Ask him if he did not go to my apartments? - I did not, she said she had no apartment, she had no home.

PHILLIP WELCH sworn.

I am a watchman; I came up to the call of the prosecutor; when I came up the prosecutor told me that this girl had robbed him of his watch, and bid me take her into charge; I told the girl if she had it to deliver it to me; she said she had not, we took her a part of the way to the watch-house, and she said, it may be the gentleman might have dropt it; then we came back to search the place for fear it should be there, and it was not there; she went back with us; as we could not find it, we were taking her up towards the watch-house and she puts her hand up somewhere about her cloaths and takes the watch out; there was another watchman behind her, but I saw

it first in her hand, the watchman behind called out there is the watch, so I took it from her, I had it for about four hours till I went to the justice's, when I gave it to one of the Bow-street officers, the reason why I gave it them was because I had got a drop in my head, and I was afraid I should lose it.

JOHN LYONS sworn.

I am a watchman; I know the prosecutor; I was not called to assist him, I came of myself, when I saw this young woman and man and watchman coming up Holborn, I crossed the way and asked him what was the matter? they told me this woman had robbed that young man of his watch, this was said in her presence; I told them to take her away to the watch-house and let her be tried there; then I kept walking behind her, and I saw her pull the watch out from under the waist of her gown; I laid hold of her by the hands, and I said here is the watch, and then Welch the watchman, laid hold of the watch and dispossessed her of the watch; it was brought to the watch-house, the watchman took it to Bow-street the next day.

Prisoner. Did not you tell the justice that you had the watch of the officer? - The other watchman took it from her; I had hold of her right hand, and she took the watch from under the waist of her gown.

HENRY CROKER sworn.

I belong to Bow-street; I was at Bow-street, and I took the watch out of Welch the watchman's pocket, he was very much in liquor, and going to be ordered out of the office, therefore I took it out of his pocket, and produced it before the magistrate; I have kept it ever since.

JOHN CANN sworn.

I was the constable of the night when the girl was brought to the watch-house; the watchman Welch brought the watch, Mr. Angell charged her with robbing him of his watch; he had been at Bagnigge Wells to spend the afternoon with his friends; the prisoner did not say much to it; as soon as I took the charge she upped with her fist and knocked him down, made the blood come out of his head; likewise she knocked the watchman down that was in the watch-house; this is the watch I know that was taken from her; she owned she had it; the watchman was very sober when I took the charge, it was about two o'clock; but he was drunk when he got to Bow-street, and Mr. Bond told Mr. Croker to take the watch from him, which he did.

(The watch deposed to by the prosecutor, by the name, Samuel Stevens , and the No. 302.)

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever give her the watch? - No.

Q. Had you any money about you? - I had.

Q. Are you in the habit of putting your watch in your coat pocket? - Sometimes I do of an evening when I am going home.

Q. Do you think it safer there? - Yes, rather.

Prisoner. It was about half after twelve when I first met this young man in High Holborn, I had known him some time, he had been in my apartments before; I told him I was distressed by my landlord, on account of not having money; so as we could not go to my room, we went down a court called Feather-court; he said he would make me the usual compliment, he said, hold my watch till you oblige me, and I will give you the crown immediately, I obliged him in the said court; after he was obliged, he asked me for the watch again; I told him I would give it him after he had made me the present; he

said he would have it or charge the watch with me; I told him he was welcome to charge the watch with me; with that he went down into Turnstile, and going through there he called watch, he came, and I would not say that I had it, he sprung his rattle, another came, and the watchman and him laid hold of both of my hands; I then said that I would rather go without the money than go to the watch-house; likewise he told me before if I would return it he would give me the crown; after that they went to the watch-house with me. I have been under the doctor's hands ever since I have been in Newgate; likewise the prosecutor struck me before I struck him; I knew him about five or six months before.

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-82

474. WILLIAM TURNBULL was indicted for that he, on the 24th of July 1783, did marry one Sarah Hemmings , spinster, and afterwards, on the 23d of February last, in the parish of St. George's, Hanover-square , did marry one Harriot Brown , spinster , his former wife being alive .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Schoen, and the case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN PLASKETT sworn.

I am parish clerk of St. Botolph, Aldgate. I have the register of the marriages, William Turnbull and Sarah Hemmings were married there in July 2, 1783.

- CADDICK sworn.

I am a clergyman of the Church of England.

Q. Be so good as to tell us whether you attended that marriage? - I did; the defendant Turnbull, was the man that was married, and Sarah Hemmings was the woman; I knew them both; I saw Sarah Hemmings about six weeks or two months ago, I saw the prisoner with her; I am sure it is within two months, I think it was some time in the beginning of March; I am sure it is since February; they came to relate to me that they both had agreed to part, and that they had signed bonds to part, and that they had not cohabited together for some time, and they desired me if any body enquired after a marriage, to be so good as to say I did not recollect it; I said if I was called upon before a justice I should speak the truth.

Mr. Knapp. I presume you have been in the Church a good many years; this appears to be in a Church out of your own parish? - It is.

Q. Have you often done duty in this parish? - Never before nor since.

Q. I presume every person that you marry you don't recollect their faces? - I do not.

Q. You remember some conversation between Sarah Hemmings and the prisoner about a separation; then you know Mrs. Hemmings to have agreed to it as well as the prisoner? - It was so.

Q. If I understand you Sarah Hemmings , as well as the prisoner, desired if any body was to enquire, you would say you did not recollect the marriage; you say you have known Sarah Hemmings since? - I have.

Mr. Knowlys. As you only officiated in this instance at this place, how came you to officiate then? - By the particular desire of Sarah Hemmings ; I had known her from a girl.

Q Then you cannot be mistaken in her person? - I cannot.

CALEB FLEMING sworn.

I have got the original marriage books of St. George's, Hanover-square; I am

the clerk. (Reads)

" William Turnbull of this parish, and Harriot Brown of St. Luke's, Chelsea, were married in this Church by licence, the 23d of February 1793, by me J. Downes, minister."

Q. Do you remember the man? - I do not; I was not there at that time.

Mr. Knapp. Is this the only book of registers you have? - It is.

HARRIOT BROWN sworn.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Q. Was you ever married to him? - Yes, on the 23d of February last.

Q. At that time had you any suspicion that he was a married man? - Not the least.

Q. How long after was it, you was persuaded that he was a married man? - I had suspicion that he was a married man ten days after I had been married to him, and I left him immediately.

Q. When did your acquaintance first commence with him? - About a year and five months before.

Q. Where did it commence? - At Mr. Martin's.

Prisoner. I am not guilty of what is laid against me. I never lived in the parish of St. Botolph's, nor Sarah Hemmings .

GUILTY .

Imprisoned one year in Newgate .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-83

475. BRIDGET OATES , ARTHUR SMITH and ROBERT NEWMAN , were indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , a pair of leather boots, value 10 d. a muslin neckcloth, value 3 d. and seven shillings in money ; the goods, chattels and monies of James Farrell .

JAMES FARRELL sworn.

I am a gentleman's servant belonging to Mr. Duberly in Soho-square. Last Tuesday night, the 28th of May, I asked my master leave to go and see a friend of mine; I came home to my master's house between eleven and twelve in the night, I rang the bell, there was no one answered; I went over to the rails in Soho-square, I looked up and saw a light up stairs of my master's house, but none in the kitchen; I thought I could not get in, I went to St. James's-street, Oxford-road, to get a bed there; I could not get a bed there under three shillings, I thought it too much, I came back to Oxford-road again towards my master's house, and at the corner of Charles-street I met Bridget Oates and another woman standing along with her, at the watering house; they asked me where I was going? I said I was going to get a bed; I believe this was very nigh one o'clock, or past one; they asked me how much I would stand for a bed to go home with them? I said I should not begrudge two shillings, as I was fastened out, and I wished to have a bed; they took me to New-street, in St. Giles's ; Bridget Oates and another woman went up stairs, Bridget Oates unlocked the door and let me in, and this other girl came along with her; I gave Bridget Oates six-pence to go for some brandy; she came back and said she had got none, she could get none at that time of the morning; I was naked at the time, I was in bed, and the other woman that came up with her was in bed too, and part of her clothes off. Bridget Oates said she could get no brandy; so I desired them to share the six-pence between them; Oates then came into the bed; my clothes lay in the window on a board; my money was in my boots, my boots were underneath my coat and waistcoat, on the window ledge, my money (seven shillings) was in my boots, I took it out of my waistcoat pocket and put it in one boot, my boots were covered with my clothes; I heard the money gingle as she touched the clothes; I told her there was no

money there, only a few halfpence in my pocket; she asked me did you think I was going to rob you? I said I don't know; immediately she got up and went to lock the door; she went down stairs but did not lock the door; at this time I slumbered to sleep; I awaked again, I believe it was two o'clock, and she brought this Robert Newman up; the other woman went away the same time as she did.

Q. Did she dress herself? - I don't know because all was in the dark; I was sober at that time.

Q. Was you sober at eleven o'clock? - No, not quite, I had drank share of a pot of beer, and a glass of gin; while I fell asleep Bridget Oates went out for Robert Newman , and came in about two o'clock.

Q. You had been asleep between one and two? - Between one and two she was in the room, and then I dozed asleep, but I believe it was two or half past two when she was in the room with Newman, and Newman brought a stick up and struck the foot of the bed, and asked what was the reason I should come into his wife's apartments? I made answer that I paid for the bed, she made answer and said that was her husband and I must quit the room, and they put me out of the room, and I left all my things in the room all but my coat, waistcoat and hat; he called out stop thief! the lace was gone off my hat, when the watchman came he found my neckcloth hid between two pails; Robert Newman said that the woman gave him the boots.

Q. How came you when you knocked at your master's door at half past eleven to leave the door? - I went and pulled the bell, I rung it the same as I usually do; my master was not at home, and therefore they went to bed earlier; I made noise enough for them to come to the door.

Q What servants were there in the house? - Two maid servants, they both lay in the same room, the front room where the light was.

Q And yet you saw that light and chose to go away again! and when you could get a lodging at a creditable place for three shillings, how came you to go and spend two shillings and six-pence on these women? Did not you know they were common prostitutes? - I did not know what they were, I knew they were out a night walking; they made an agreement that I was to have a bed.

Q. And a bedfellow to! what did you do from half after eleven till half after one? - I was up in James's-street, I was looking for a bed at several houses, at two or three houses.

Q. And do you mean to say you was two hours looking for a bed? - I was; and I went into a house where I thought I could have got a bed, and could not get one, the man was in bed.

Q. Then your boots were taken when you was asleep, and your money and your neckcloth, and when you awaked there were neither of the women there? - I found Bridget Oates and this man Newman.

Q. Of your own knowledge you don't know who took the things? - I do not.

Q. Did you ever know these women before? - Never before.

TIMOTHY PENDERGRASS sworn.

I was watchman of St. Giles's; I was just coming down the street crying the hour, between two and three o'clock very near three, this man cryed out watch, so the other watchman came; I came across to him when he sprung his rattle, and came to his assistance, we went up both together into Bridget Oates 's room, and this Robert Newman was coming down as we went up, we went up and searched the room over for this man's things; we did not stop him then; Bridget Oates desired us

to search the room, and I found this neckcloth between two pails, it was in a pail, and another pail laid on it; then after that she was charged with the watch, and she was carried to the watch-house by this Hagan the watchman and my assistant; I was ordered to bring this Bridget Oates down to New Prison, Clerkenwell, after that I took her in, she made a discovery against this Robert Newman ; she called me in, and says, I will not be condemned nor transported for nobody; I will tell you who has got this property, Robert Newman , in High-street, St. Giles's. Says I, if I can get them there I will certainly apprehend him; I went to a public house, and had intelligence of him there, she told me that he took them out of the room, and took the lace of the hat off, she thought he had the lace and money as well as the boots; after I had gone up to High street I enquired after this man at several public houses, they told me there was no such man, but I went into one house and I was informed he was just gone out, I walked out after him, and he turned the corner, I went in again to this publican and told him to deliver a message to Robert Newman that I wanted to see him in Dye-street; I walked out and when I came to Dye street, I met Robert Newman and another walking up Dye-street, he made a discovery and wanted us to take two half crowns, I said I wanted none of your money at all, you must go through the law; and he said he would pawn his shoes, coat and hat, and pay for the lace of this Farrel's hat; I told him I would not take any thing; so I took him before the justice, so the justice sent the constable and me down to Mary-le bone, he told me he gave them to one Smith a gipsey there, so Smith had the boots.

Prisoner Oates to Prosecutor. At what end of the street did you drink with me? - I did not drink with you.

Q. What did you say to me down in New Prison? - I asked her to give me the lace of my hat, and I said I did not want to do her any harm if I got my own property.

Q Did not you want me to give you a guinea? - I did not.

- KENNEDY sworn.

I am a peace officer at Marlborough-street. On the 29th of last month the magistrate called me in and gave me a search warrant to get a pair of boots at Smith's apartment; Newman told me where to go, I went and I found them in Bennet's-court, I found Smith there; I told him I had a search warrant concerning boots, I have got the boots, says he, and I will go with you to the magistrate and take them with me for Newman gave them me, and Newman said he gave them him. (The boots deposed to.)

All three Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-84

476. THOMAS PENNY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , a muslin cravat, value 2 s. the goods of William Robinson .

WILLIAM ROBINSON sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I lodged in April last in Size-yard, Whitechapel , at Mrs. Shears's; the prisoner at the bar lodged in the same room with me. On Tuesday morning six o'clock, I left the prisoner in bed, and I went down into the country, and came home on Thursday the same week; when I went on Tuesday I left all my clothes in the box, and when I came home on the Thursday night my landlady asked me for the things to wash, because she always washed for me; I told her I had put them in the box, and for her to take

them out; it was a box that I put my dirty linen in; she told me she went to the box as soon as she was up, and the things were missing, and Thomas Penny the prisoner at the bar was gone; I have two boxes, one in which is my clean linen which is locked, and the other which is for my dirty linen, and that was open; there were several things lost besides the cravat; I asked where the man that lodged there, the prisoner at the bar, was.

ELIZABETH SHEARS sworn.

I am the landlady of the house; this young man, William Robinson , has lodged with me upwards of a year and a half; the other came in the middle of the week, the Wednesday before Easter, and he asked me on Saturday night what I charged for my lodging? I told him fifteen-pence a week; and he said he supposed if he gave six-pence that would do, and then he would begin the next week with me; the Tuesday after he went away, I was in my bed at the time when he went away; I generally makes a rule to go up into the bed rooms as soon as I can to open the windows, and do my business, and then I went to the box to take out the dirty linen to wash it, and get it up, there was nothing but the coarse apron, and that was not in the box; on that I enquired of this young man when he came home on Thursday, what he had done with the clothes? thinking he had locked them up in the chest; Penny left the lodgings the same morning as the young man went out, and he never returned, nor we never see any thing of him till Mr. Robinson met him and took him up with his clothes on his back.

Court to Robinson. When was it you apprehended this man? - Whitsun Tuesday in the morning, between eight and nine o'clock; I was robbed on Easter Tuesday morning, and Whitsun Tuesday I met him in the Strand; when I met him I saw that he had the property belonging to me on him, he had one of the cravats about his neck, and a pair of stockings; I took him into custody, and took him before a justice, and he was examined; as to the stockings I could not safely swear to them, but as to the cravat I could.

Prisoner. When you met me in the Strand, and you told me I was your prisoner, did not I go with you very willingly? - Yes, you did, very peaceably.

- MACAULY sworn.

I am a constable; I attend the public office, Whitechapel; I took the cravat off the prisoner's neck. (Deposed to.)

Prisoner. I bought that property at the pawnbroker's in Rosemary-lane; I had no money to subpoena him here; he came before this gentleman and said I had bought one, but he could not remember whether it was this one or not.

GUILTY . (Aged 46.)

Imprisoned one week and publickly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-85

477. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May , a silver tea spoon, value 6 d. three linen napkins, value 1 s. a linen napkin, value 4 d. the goods of Sarah Taunton .

SARAH TAUNTON sworn.

I live in Market-lane, St. James's-Market, No. 19 . Elizabeth Williams lived with me five months and a fortnight; I always thought her a very honest servant while she was in my service; I had no character with her only from her sister. On Sunday the 5th of May, a young man came to me after dinner, and asked for the name of Elizabeth, and asked if she had lived with me? I told him yes; I had then discharged her,

and she was at a grocer's, another place, she had left my place about six weeks to the best of my knowledge, I told him that such a person had lived with me; he pulled out some tea spoons and asked me if any one of them were mine? I owned one; I went afterwards to her place, looked at her box with the constable, and found this property in her box; I went to one Mr. Barnes's a grocer in Princes-street, Piccadilly, on Sunday the 5th of May, and in her box was found three pocket handkerchiefs, a napkin, and a tea spoon.

Q. Was she present? - She was not.

Q. Was the box locked? - It was, and was opened by Price the constable; she was taken up by the master, Mr. Barnes; I did not appear against her the Monday, because he came to me the Monday morning, and begged I would not, and that he would not go; so by that she was discharged; when she went to the constable to demand my property, and likewise her own spoons, the constable would not give them up. I was sent for to Bow-street about a month ago last Saturday, by an order from the magistrate to go there and prove my own property; when I came to Bow-street I saw my property, and was very much against swearing to it, but I did at last.

Q. Is there any mark on it? - Yes.

Q. Who took her up at that time? - Nobody; she went to the magistrate to demand the property of the constable as I did not appear against her.

Q. She behaved well in your service? - Exceedingly rude several times which made me part with her at a day's notice.

Mr. Knapp. This unfortunate woman at the bar lived with you five months, during that time she deserved a very good character? - Yes, as far as I know.

Q. You say in consequence of some information you went, and in her box the spoons were found? - No, the gentleman brought the spoons to me; there were more than one spoon, six or seven in the whole, and one of mine.

Q You did not mean to prosecute her? - No.

Q. Did not you desire her to go to Bow-street to claim her property? - No, I told her to get the property and I would not hurt her.

Q. Then she did go to Bow-street to claim the property of her own accord? - She certainly did go to Bow-street.

Q. Do you know how often she might have gone to the constable's before she went to Bow-street? - I do not.

Q. Did you ever hear that she went to the constable's two or three times? - Yes, at the justice's.

Q. A week had elapsed before you got to the justice's? - I don't know whether it was a week or a fortnight.

Q At last she was charged on your complaint, now she is committed and on your charge? - I have spoke the truth.

Q. You was very much against swearing to the property? - I did not wish to hurt her.

Q. What became of the property after you searched her box, was she discharged from Mr. Barnes's service? - The matter is, she was employed by Mr. Barnes as a charewoman, I fancy he did discharge her in two or three days, he did not immediately, I never went to the house again.

Q. Did not you go back to Mr. Barnes's? - Never there only Sunday the 5th of May, and that day the prisoner was not there, she was at the Round house.

Q. Then she was not by when the box was searched? - No.

Q. Then whether it was her box or not you don't know? - I make no doubt it was her box, I know it was her clothes.

Q You told the prisoner to go to the constable for the property, where did you

see her? - At her lodgings.

Q. I believe you have lost your husband? - I have.

Q. I believe she attended him to the time of his death? - I beg your pardon, I attended him myself.

Court. When you came to this Mr. Barnes's you examined the box? - I cannot speak to the box.

Q Who was present? - The constable, Mr. Barnes and myself.

Q You desired her to get the property? - I told her if she would get the property I would not hurt her.

Q. It was by your request she applied to the constable? - It was.

Mr. Knapp. The prisoner went by the appointment of the constable to the magistrate? - I don't know nothing about it.

Q. Did not you hear that she had been before to the magistrate, and the constable was not there, and she attended another day? - I know nothing about it.

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I am the constable of St. James's parish; I was present when these handkerchiefs and this napkin was found in her box, she gave me the key.

Q Have you got the key here? - No, I gave it her back again, it was a paper box, a ban box; that was not locked where these things were, I am sure of it, the spoons were in a box that was locked but not the napkin and handkerchiefs, the spoons were in a trunk lined with leather, it was a common key she gave; I asked her which was her box? and told her it would be better for her to tell; when I took these things the prisoner was in custody at the watch-house, then she was examined the next morning for another robbery, I was constable of the night on Saturday night; I did not attend before the magistrate because the watch-house keeper had took her up till I came; I was attending on Mr. Hastings's trial.

Q. Are you an hired constable? - Yes. Because you ought to know that when a person is trying for one offence you have no right to give evidence of any other.

Q. How long have you been a constable? - A year and a half.

Q. I think you should have known your business better than to give evidence in this kind of way. When did you see her after she called at your house? - Two or three times after, she came for the property.

Q. Why did not you deliver it to her? - The magistrate advised me not to do it.

Q. Did you go to the prosecutor with it? - No, I did not, I did not think it was proper, I did not know who to deliver it to; I went to Mr. Addington's and he desired that the maid might come forward and swear to the property.

Q. Did you tell her if she came before the justice that she would have it? - I did, I told her so, I fixed the time.

Not GUILTY ,

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

478. EDWARD STACK and MARY STACK were indicted for stealing, on the 13th of January a feather bed, value 1 l. 10 s. two woollen blankets, value 9 s. a feather bolster, value 4 s. two feather pillows, value 8 s. a looking glass, value 10 s. an iron trivet, value 9 d. a flat iron, value 6 d. an iron footman, value 3 d. a mahogany tea board, value 1 s. the goods of Mary Justice in a lodging room .

Edward Stack acknowledged himself Guilty and exculpated his wife .

Edward Stack GUILTY.

Transported for seven years .

Mary Stack Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-86

479. HEBDEN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , eighty four yards of printed callico, value 12 l. two half pieces of muslin containing thirty six yards, value 6 l. the goods of Edward Johnson and Edward Coston .

ROBERT TWYDELL sworn.

I am an apprentice of Mr. Henry Hall of Union-street in the Borough, a linen draper. On the 30th of April I packed up four pieces of printed callico and two half pieces of white long cloth muslins, I delivered them to Mr. Johnson's boy when I packed them up, I put them in a sheet; it was between four and five o'clock in the afternoon.

EDWARD HARPER sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Edward Johnson , his partner's name is Edward Coston , they are callico glazier s, I received a bundle of Robert Twydell about four or five o'clock in the afternoon, on the 30th of April; they live in little Distaff-lane, No. 4; as I was bringing this muslin from Mr. Hall's in the Borough, a man met me in Thames-street.

Q. Who was that man? - I don't know, he told me I had got the wrong goods, and I went back, and at London Bridge he told me to put them down that he might take them up, and that he would follow me to Mr. Hall's; I put them down and left them, and I went a little way further, the man told me to go to Mr. Hall's; and I saw the prisoner at the bar going the wrong way with them; I left him and was going to Mr. Hall's, he said he lived at Mr. Hall's and I put the goods down for him to take up.

Q. Had you observed him before he had taken them up? - No, I ran back again, and Mr. Merriman made him drop the goods, and I stood by the goods while Mr. Merriman catched the man.

Q. Had not the man the goods with him? - Mr. Merriman made him drop the goods.

Q. Are you sure that is the man that had the goods? - Yes, he had them on his head.

Q. What became of the other man when the bundle was put down? - He went towards the bundle.

Mr. Knowlys. When Mr. Merriman stopped this man, the man whom you first saw ran away? - He did.

Q. This man you had not seen with the other man? - I had not.

Q. He was taking them up on his head as a porter would do? - Yes.

THOMAS MERRIMAN sworn.

I am a constable of the City; on the 30th of April between five and six I was coming over London Bridge, I saw the prisoner at the bar in company with another and the boy in one of the arches, the prisoner had his hand behind him on the property, while talking to the boy.

Q. Who was talking to the boy? - Both of them together, the prisoner and one that made his escape; I crossed the other side of the way and walked backward and forward, for a space of a couple of minutes and see the prisoner run off with this here property, he had got it on his head, and the other followed him a little way; I immediately pursued the

prisoner and catched him by the collar, he was running towards St. Magnes's Church; immediately he threw it off his head and ran about twenty yards further, I there got hold of him and brought him back to where the property lay.

Q. Are you sure that is the man? - I am positive.

Q. Are you sure that is the bundle? - I took it into my own care and have had it in my possession ever since; I sealed it up.

Mr. Knowlys. You must not be correct in one part, for the boy told us he did not converse with the prisoner? - They were both talking with the boy.

Court. How near was you to them? - Just passing the arch way.

Q. What became of the other? - He ran away; he ran away as soon as I catched hold of this man.

JOHN GARLING sworn.

I was going over the Bridge; I am a porter, and Mr. Merriman the street keeper, he had stopped the prisoner, and I came up directly as he stopped him, I saw the bundle fall on the pavement, but whether it fell off his shoulder or head I don't know, but immediately the prisoner ran away and Mr. Merriman after him; and he called to him to bring the property after him; that is all I know about it.

Edward Johnson . I only can swear to this board that it belongs to me. My partner's name is Edward Coston.

Mr. Knowlys. What is the name of your other partner? - I have no other.

Prisoner. I was going over the bridge promiscuously, a man asked to earn a shilling; I asked him what it was to do? says he, it is to carry a little parcel to Fenchurch-street, accordingly I goes a little way with him, he appeared like a porter, so the boy put it down and I took it up.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

To go for a Soldier .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-87

480. JAMES MULLEINS , was indicted for uttering on the 26th of May a Counterfeit shilling to Susannah, the wife of Luke Case .

Indicted in a second COUNT for having at the same time another bad shilling, in his possession.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

SUSANNAH CASE sworn.

I am the wife of Luke Case ; I keep the Black Raven in Golden-lane , I know the prisoner at the bar; last Sunday week be owed me four shillings for beer and for things that he had at my house, I had seen him before several times, he came on Sunday morning to pay it; last Sunday morning was a week, he paid me down the four shillings; I looked at the silver and I thought they looked rather blackish they looked as if they were badish, they had a blouzy blackish look, and he asked me if I knew the reason why they looked so dark? I said no, he said it was the sweat of his pocket; I got a person who was a stander by, to be so kind as to look at it, and they said they thought they were bad, and would not have me take them, then I gave them to Mullein again, and he laid down four more, the same person that had looked at the others looked at these, and he said to Mullein these will not do, they are all of the same stamp, and I refused them, then Mullein had them all again, he had these eight again; he put down four more and the same person said, they will not do, all

these twelve are alike.

Q. How many shillings did he produce in all do you think? - I cannot justly say, he had all of them again, he had a hand full of silver.

Q. After you had returned the twelve was there any more offered? - Yes, sometime after that he had two sixpennyworth of crank that made it five shillings, Mulleins called me a little while after and said take your reckoning he said you recollect I gave you four shillings, I said you recollect I gave them you back again for they were all bad; he said I ask your pardon, and then he laid down five shillings which was to pay the whole reckoning, the score and the two sixpenny-worths of crank, and I said Mulleins I think these looks as black as the others did; I asked two or three people to look at them and they pronounced them bad, and I refused them, I kept these five in my hand, then Mulleins gave me five more and they were looked at and they were bad, they appeared to be of the same sort, I kept all the ten together in my hand, and there were some words arose and I sent for Mr. Lett a constable; my husband was out and I had nobody but myself, and when he came I asked him to be so kind as to look at the silver for me, he said they were all bad, the prisoner said then he got them of his master, he took three pounds of silver of his master; when Mr. Lett said they were all bad he struck Mr. Lett, and Mr. Lett sent for Mr. Newman.

Q. Did Lett give him any provocation except saying they were bad? - No other. When Mr. Newman came, Mr. Newman insisted upon searching Mulleins before he went out of the house, he did search him, I saw him take the money from Mulleins, I don't know how much exactly.

Q. What became of the ten shillings which you had in your hand? - I gave them to Mr. Newman when he came in, and he said they were bad.

Q. Did you give the ten shillings immediately to Newman? - I gave them to Mr. Lett and he gave them to Newman.

Q. Do you know whether Lett kept them in his hand till Mr. Newman came? - I am sure he did.

Prisoner. I wish to ask her whether ever I paid a bad shilling to her before?

Court. What business is this man? - He told me he is a smith , I don't know no other.

Q. How long have you known him? - Two, three, or four years, about the neighbourhood, he used to call frequently at the house.

Q. Had you ever received any money of him? - Yes, several times.

Q. Did he ever tender you any bad money before? - Never to my knowledge in my life.

Prisoner. Have you ever been paid the five shillings I owed you? - No.

WILLIAM LETT sworn.

I am a constable, I was sent for to the Black Raven on the 26th of May, by Mrs. Case; she said that her husband was gone to Gravesend; she said that that man had behaved very ungenteel, and had offered money that was bad to pay his week's score.

Q. Did you see the money in Mrs. Case's hand? - Yes, and I took it out of her hand, and I said they are all bad ones, and he called me all such names you would be amazed to think.

Q. Did you give him any other provocation than saying the money was bad? - No, none at all.

Q. What did you do with that money that Mrs. Case gave you? - I kept it, except one night I gave it to Mr. Newman.

Q. Was the prisoner searched in your presence? - Yes.

Q. Did you see what was found on the search? - Yes.

Q. Who searched him? - Newman.

JOHM NEWMAN sworn.

I was sent for to Mr. Case's house, I received twelve shillings of Lett, I wrapped it up in a piece of paper and tied it up, and the next morning I gave it to Lett again before the alderman; I searched the man, and by force, for I was forced to throw him down in a chair; I found fifty three bad shillings in his breeches pocket and five in his waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner. Did you find any good silver in my waistcoat pocket or no? - No, none at all.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I have been engaged in the Mint prosecutions, and given evidence upwards of twenty-five years; these twelve are all bad blanks without any impressions, they appear to be of the same manufactory, these fifty three appear to be of the same manufactory except one which is a frenchman, the five are all counterfeit of the same impression.

Prisoner. There was a man lodged in the room where I live, who pretended to be a gardiner, he got up at three o'clock this morning, and when I got up I found these shillings laying in a loose paper, I took them up and I went down to pay my reckoning with them.

Court. You forget that you told the woman that you received three pounds-worth of your master? - I did not say any such thing.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned in Newgate for one year and to fined security for two years more .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-88

481. DANIEL ISAAC EATON was indicted for publishing a certain scandalous, malicious, and seditious libel .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Feilding and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

GEORGE HUMPHRIES sworn.

I know the defendant Daniel Isaac Eaton , I saw him once at his house in Bishopsgate-street, I think the beginning of February last or the latter end of January, it was at No. 81, Bishopsgate-street ; I bought some books there at that time, I did not buy this book then, I saw him subsequent to that; it is intituled,

"Rights of Man combining Principle with Practice, by Thomas Paine ." I saw him after that at the house, I bought it at the same place where I saw him at, when I saw him he was acting as the master I believe; on asking for some of Mr. Paine's works he hesitated selling them, but after some little conversation he sold me some.

Q Did any conversation pass between you at that time when you saw him with respect to the book you had bought? - He objected to selling me those I wanted, I wanted

"The Address to the Addressers," I told him I had bought

"The Rights of Man," there before; and his wife, I believe, or a woman that I considered to be his wife, said, that she had sold that gentleman

"The Rights of Man," with some other of Mr. Paine's works, a little while ago, I believe he said, did you? after that he let me have the other books I wanted.

Q. What was the day you bought the Rights of Man? - The 17th of January.

The selected passages in the book read and compared with the record in the indictment, as follows:

Title page,

"Rights of Man, part the Second, combining Principle and Practice, by Thomas Paine , Secretary for Foreign Affairs to Congress in the American War;" and Author of the Works, intituled,

"Common Sense, and the first Parts of the Rights of Man."

Page 18,

"It cannot be proved by what right hereditary government could begin,

neither does there exist within the compass of mortal power a right to establish it, man has no authority over posterity in matters of personal right, and therefore no man or body of men had or can have a right to set up hereditary government."

Page 19,

"Hereditary succession is a burlesque upon monarchy, it puts it in the most ridiculous light, by presenting it as an office which any child or an ideot may fill, it requires some talents to be a common mechanic, but to be a King requires only the animal figure of a man, a sort of breathing automaton; this sort of superstition may last a few years more, but it cannot long resist the awakened reason and interest of man."

Page 20,

"A government calling itself free with a hereditary office, is like a thorn in the flesh, which produces a fermentation which discharges it."

Page 21,

"The hereditary system therefore is, as repugnant to human wisdom as to human rights, and is as absurd as it is unjust."

Page 25,

"Whether I have too little sense to see, or too much to be imposed upon; whether I have too much or too little pride, or of any thing else, I leave out of the question; but certain it is, that what is called monarchy always appears to me a silly contemptible thing. I compare it to something behind a curtain, about which there is a great deal of bustle and fuss, and a wonderful air of seeming solemnity; but when by any accident the curtain happens to open and the company see what it is, they burst into laughter."

Page 26,

"That monarchy is all a bubble, a mere court artifice to procure money, is evident at least to me in every character which it can be viewed."

Page 27,

"It can only be by blinding the understanding of man, and make him believe that government is some wonderful mysterious thing, that excessive revenues are obtained. Monarchy is well calculated to ensure this end. It is the popery of government, a thing kept up to amuse the ignorant, and quiet them into taxes."

Court to Humphries. Was it the latter end of January or beginning of February that you bought this book? - I bought it the 17th of January, but I saw him at his house subsequent to this; I bought it of a woman.

Mr. Vaughan addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY,

Of publishing, but not with a crimnal intention.

Judgment respited .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-89

482. SARAH HYNES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , a cotton counterpane, value 1 s. two woollen blankets, value 2 s. a linen sheet, value 2 s. a cotton gown, value 5 s. a linen check apron, value 1 s. a muslin cap, value 1 s. a child's muslin cap, value 6 d. two cotton frocks, value 1 s. 6 d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. a canvas towel, value 2 d. the goods of Henry Townsend .

- TOWNSEND sworn.

I am the wife of Henry Townsend ; I lost the things in the indictment; the prisoner was my servant at the time I lost my property; I lost a cotton gown I lost two blankets off from her own bed, and one sheet, some were found and some not, my gown she had on when I catched her; I first missed the property the 25th of May; on Saturday she left the house before we were up in the morning and left my door open,

I saw her again on Sunday, it was a cotton gown she had on.

MARTHA TINKLER sworn.

I lodge at Mrs. Townsend's. On Sunday morning we went to take a walk in the park, Mrs. Townsend and I, and I see the servant girl, I was a little before Mrs. Townsend, and I said, here she is, she has got your gown on her back.

Q. Did you ever see Mrs. Townsend wear that gown? - Yes.

Q. Did you stop the girl when you found her in the park? - Yes, I did, and we asked her some questions, she insisted upon not going home with her mistress; she did not answer what her mistress asked her, and we got a constable, she had taken the things to Islington, and some she had sold; she said she sold the sheet and blanket for five shillings; she did not tell me the name of the place only Islington at a clothes shop; the other things she had left at a public house in Islington, she could not tell the sign, but she could shew the place, the person that she said where they were was her mother, and she said it was not her mother, she said that she was a friendless girl, and had been out of the country only a fortnight and had no friend at all.

WILLIAM GREEN sworn.

I am a constable. This blanket and this sheet I got from Sarah Mills on Monday, I went to Islington for, and fetched them from there by Alderman Boydell's orders; I produce also another small blanket, two linen check aprons, two coarse aprons, a linen sheet, two muslin caps, one cotton frock, a pair of cotton stockings, a canvas towel, a cotton counterpane, and a cotton gown; I got them from the Red Lion Islington, they were left there by the prisoner, I took this gown off her back, she had it on, on Sunday morning when she was taken.

Prisoner. My mistress sent me to Islington to sell them things.

SARAH MILLS sworn.

I keep a clothes shop in Islington; I know the prisoner, this is she got the things off, one sheet and one blanket, the sheet is burnt with an iron. (The things deposed to.)

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever give this girl any authority to carry these things to Islington? - No. I had no character with her, I took her from the office in Snow-hill.

Prisoner. My mistress sent me to Islington to sell them things one Saturday night, by that I went and sold them.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-90

483. LAWRENCE FLEMING was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , a pewter dish, value 2 s. a pot cover, value 1 s. the goods of Elizabeth Carpenter .

ELIZABETH CARPENTER sworn.

I live in Hare-alley Whitechapel , I keep a public house ; I have lived there this twenty years close by the India warehouse; I lost my pewter dish the 16th of April, I know nothing about it only swearing to the property; the prisoner was at work at my house as a carpenter and he used to bring his tools in and take them away, and as I sat at tea I see him take his basket and go out and I thought it was his tools as usual;

I am sure that I had seen the pewter dish in the course of the day before, the 15th I am sure I had seen it then; the dish was used as a cover to a great large salting pan, and the lid was on the pot, I have the pot to match the lid at home; this man is a journeyman carpenter ; I have a parcel of rents, and I used to employ him.

JOHN WEAVER sworn.

I am an officer; on the 16th of April about six o'clock in the evening, I was coming along Petticoat-lane Whitechapel, I met the prisoner with a basket on his shoulder, I had some suspicion seeing something rather round that there was something there more than tools, I asked him what he had got there? he said what is that to you? it is my own property; I said it is to me and I shall see it, he said I should not, however I pulled it off his shoulder, and on the top of the tools I found this large pewter dish and this copper cover, they were covered over with this green coat that they should not be seen; says I, my friend where did you bring this from? says he, I brought them from my own house at Snow-hill; and where do you mean to take it to? says I; to Snow-hill again, says he; says I, I don't think you give a good account of them, and if you cannot give a better account you must go before the magistrate. I got him into the public house before we went into the office where we keep the prisoners, and there he told me that he had been at work for Mrs. Carpenter; I went to Mrs. Carpenter and found he had been at work there, says I, have you missed any pewter dishes? she went round and she said I miss a pewter dish off my salt pan, and a copper cover from my pot. (The dish and cover deposed to.)

Prisoner. There were some taylors drinking in the house and I was drinking with them, and we drank pretty freely, and we got to sky-larking, and I did not like it, and I had some beer to myself; one of the taylor's came to me at last and said, carpenter you had better take your basket and go home, not knowing what was in it, when I went home I took my basket and did not know what was in it no more then of my dying moment; accordingly I was going home and two men met me as I was going home, and they asked me what I had got in my basket? and they took me away directly and locked me up.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 56.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and publickly Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-91

484. CATHARINE HODEY was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April ten yards and a half of muslin, value 1 l. 15 s. the goods of John Bloomfeild privately in his shop .

JOHN BLOOMFEILD sworn.

I am a linen draper in Newgate-street ; the prisoner came to my shop on Thursday the 18th of April, about nine o'clock in the evening, she asked for a piece of muslin, being nearest the door I called my young man and told her to step forward, he asked her what kind of muslin she would like to look at? and turning himself round to take the muslin down, when he turned round again I heard him ask her what she had got, in a minute or two after I came up and saw him have hold of one end of the muslin, and the other part was under her cloak and part out, and I took it from her.

Q. Whose muslin was it she had under her cloak? - It was mine, it was marked in my own private mark, and my own hand writing C P. or C H. I cannot recollect which.

Q. Do you know whether you had such a piece of muslin? - Yes, I had just before that shewn it to a customer, but I am not able to say whether it laid on the counter or was with the other on the side of the shop.

Prisoner. The prosecutor was not in the shop when I was taxed with taking it? - I was there an hour or two before and after.

Court. How many people may be in the shop besides? - I think three of my own servants.

ROBERT PORTER sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Bloomfeild. On Thursday the 18th of April about nine o'clock at night, this woman came in and asked Mr. Bloomfeild to shew her some muslin. Mr. Bloomfeild asked her to step backward, I being there asked her what kind of muslin she would have? she said the same as she had before; I immediately turned round to get it and I heard a kind of rustling noise, and I got the print and put it on the counter, and I then saw this muslin under her arm.

Q. Was this muslin in a wrapper? - No, it was quite a different muslin to what I reached down; I immediately took hold of her arm, and laid hold of the muslin that was under her arm, and Mr. Bloomfeild saw me talking to her and he came up, the constable has got the muslin now, before I delivered it to the constable I put our private mark on it besides.

Q. Can you say where it was laying before she took it up? - I cannot say where it was laying.

Q. Can you say what time she took it up? - I cannot.

Q. How many shopmen had you at home that day? - There was another besides my master and me.

RICHARD TILLCOCK sworn.

I produce the muslin given to me by Mr. Bloomfeild, I have kept it ever since.

Mr. Bloomfeild. It is mine, it has my private mark on the corner, I am not able to say it is my hand writing, but it is one of my mens.

Q. Do you know the hand writing? - It is my mark, I had been shewing the same piece not half an hour before to a customer, and it was all unfolded when she took it up.

Prisoner. I went to the shop in the morning to purchase some muslin for which I paid ten shillings; I went back in the evening for some of the same sort, but before that I had been drinking, and not being accustomed to drink, I did not know what I did, I was not sensible of whatever I did.

Mr. Bloomfeild. I believe my lord she was in liquor a good deal.

Prisoner. I was so much in liquor I did not know the shop.

Court to Porter. When you took it from her did she say any thing? - She denied it, I took it from her and I jumped over the counter and set her down in the middle of the shop, and she denied taking it immediately when I took it from her.

Q. It was under her cloak you say and under her arm? - It was.

Court to Bloomfeild. What is the muslin worth? - Thirty-five shillings at prime cost.

The prisoner called one witness who gave her a good character.

GUILTY,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. (Aged 33.)

Imprisoned six months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-92

485. JOHN STEVENSON was indicted for a libel .

(The indictment opened by Mr. - and the case by Mr. Knapp.)

- HURL sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Moy Thomas ; I received this letter from Mr. Stevenson, I know it is Mr. Stevenson's hand writing; I received this letter also from Stevenson's son.

The letter read as follows:

"Mr. Moy Thomas , I find you are the thief that has robbed me of my peace of mind, by causing my wife and children to be secreted, and for which will make you pay very dear; you have only given ear to Mrs. Stevens, and persuaded her to act as she has done, because you wanted to get the receipts of the rents and to swindle her of the property; on reading your name to Messrs. Phillipson and Bridgeman at Grocers-hall, they said you was a dirty fellow, Thomas Phillipson says the same, and that you merit the halter, and many others say that if I do not sue you they think me rightly served; I will put an execution into every one of the houses, for the recovery of the rent that may grow due, and that is more than you dare to do.

I shall direct to you in future No. 19, Walbrook, attorney, the most noted villain in the City."

John Stevenson

October 9, 1792.

THOMAS PHILLIPSON sworn.

You are stated to say that Mr. Moy Thomas merited the halter, did you say that? - Certainly not, I believe him to be a very worthy character.

Mr. Knowlys. Perhaps you are in the same way of business? - I have seen a variety of letters of Mr. Stevenson's myself, and there are the strongest marks of insanity in the world, I believe he is deranged very much.

The prisoner expressed that he was sorry for what he had written, and believed Mr. Moy Thomas to be of a very good character.

GUILTY.

Judgment respited, till the next sessions .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-93

486. ELIZABETH WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of April , 15 s. in monies numbered , the monies of Agnes Gray , widow .

AGNES GRAY sworn.

I am a widow. I lost fifteen shillings in money, I keep a Turner's shop , No. 29, Cow-lane, Smithfield ; the prisoner came to me on Thursday before Good Friday, and ordered a mat, a broom, a a basket, and a whitening brush, and told me I must send change for a guinea, I made a bill out, they came to six shillings and I gave it to her, and gave the change to my girl.

ANN - sworn.

I am servant to the widow lady Mrs. Gray; I had orders the Thursday before Good Friday, to go along with the prisoner at the bar, I took a mat with me and a large hair broom, that was all I took, the prisoner took the rest, the basket and the whitening brush; I took fifteen shillings with me which my mistress gave me; I went with her till she came to Mr. Smith's in Smithfield an oil shop, she said, she wanted something there that was wanting in the house, and if I would let her have the money I should save her the trouble of coming out again, and she would take the things she wanted in with her.

Q. Did she live at that oil shop? - No.

Q. Did you give her the money? - I did, and she went in and came out again, and I went with her to Charter-house-square under the arch way.

Q. Did she lay out any of this money in the oil shop? - Yes, she did, I think it was two pence half-penny, and then she said in Charter-house-square that she had forgot to get a lump of fresh butter, and she said she would go back and get it if I would stop there, and she would not be above five minutes gone; I stopped there above an hour till my mistress fetched me home with the goods, and I did not see no more of her till yesterday week; this happened about two months ago.

Q. Did you know her when you see her last Monday week? - I did not, she was serving a lad in the same manner, and I asked him if the woman had his money from him? he said, yes; I was in Charter-house-square, I watched her then where she went to, she went into the corner of barbican a public house, and when she came out from there, the people of the oil shop to whom the boy belonged came to her and had the money back again; and then she went to an old iron shop and from there to several other places, I pursued her about an hour and a half before I could get any body to get a constable; I took her at last in Cloth Fair, and the constable took her into the public house, the sign of the Punch Bowl in Long lane, where she had served them in the same manner.

Q. Was any of the fifteen shillings marked at all? - No.

Q. Have you the money taken on her? - Yes, the constable has got what was found on her.

Q. Did you part with the other things? - My mistress has got them again.

Prisoner. I wish to know whether ever she saw me before she saw me at Guildhall? - After she had first got the money from me I saw her at Charter-house-square, and then afterwards at Guildhall.

LAZARUS JACOBS sworn.

I am a constable; I was sent for on the 27th of May, there were two or three people came to my house; I examined her, I found on her half a guinea and three shillings, but nothing that that young woman could swear to.

Prisoner. I live two or three doors from the prosecutor, I have lived there this two years; the prosecutor and the girl have both of them been at my apartment; I went into Middle-street Cloth Fair last week, and somebody charged me with a defraud, and I was committed to the Compter, this person, the prosecutor, said that she knew me to be the same person by being a tall woman, they have been both at my house in Cow-lane, I don't live ten doors from them.

The prisoner called seven witnesses who gave her a very good character.

Jury to Prosecutor. Did you know that the prisoner did live in Cow-lane? - I did not know it till after she was committed.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Imprisoned six months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-94

487. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing on the 30th of May , three linen sheets, value 16 s. the goods of John Cook .

ANN COOK sworn.

My husband's name is John Cook ; he is a housekeeper, No. 32, Shoe-lane ;

last Thursday I had a woman to wash for me, and these three sheets were hanging out on the line, they hung in the yard at the back of my house, I have a little piece of ground there; I saw them there not half an hour before they were taken off the lines; I had my mother to tea with me, and was cutting some bread and butter, my mother pulled some clothes on one side that hung up in the room, and she said, Nancy did not you leave some sheets in the yard? I ran backwards directly, and when I came into the yard, the prisoner stood in the yard, on a plank which supports the wall from falling, it is an old wall, he stood with the sheets in his arms, I don't know rightly the length of ground he might be distant from my house; my yard is very small; I ran to him, and pulled the sheets from him, and he jumped over the wall, and I screamed stop thief! I immediately ran back screaming all the way I went; this gentleman that is here pursued him, and took him on a vacant piece of ground at the back of the yard.

Q. Are you sure that is the same man that you took the sheets from? - I am very sure, and I am very sorry about it; he had a hat on then, and the same jacket he had on that he has on now; the sheets are here, the constable has them; I gave them to him the next day, one is my own, and the pair was a person's up stairs, that I am paid for washing of them, I am answerable for the sheets, there were three linen sheets in all; my own was marked, I. A. C. No. 2. I am confident of the others they are the same sheets, because I pulled them from his hands before he was out of the yard; had they been out of my sight I could not have been so positive.

SAMUEL SUTTON sworn.

I heard Mrs. Sutton make a great noise by the stairs, and I ran down stairs, and when I came down she told me the boy got over the wall into a vacant piece of ground, I pursued him, and I found him concealed in a hole underneath a carpenter's bench, I took him, and the lady knew him directly.

JOHN JONES

Q. Was you ever sworn before? - No.

Q. What will become of you if you tell a story? - Go to the naughty man.

Sworn.

I know the boy at the bar; I see him on the top of George-alley; I did not see him steal the sheets; he said if I told where he hid himself, he would murder me; he was on the top of the hill; I did not follow him; he went down the hill, and crept under a carpenter's bench, and that gentleman that is here was on the top of the hill, and he said, did you see any boy here? Yes, says I, he is under the bench.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn.

I am a constable. I produce three sheets, and I had the prisoner delivered to me in charge. (The sheets deposed to.)

Prisoner. It was about the middle of the day, and I was coming by that way, and I had occasion to stop; I was there hardly five minutes before I heard the cry of stop thief, and the gentleman came and took hold of me, and said that I stole a sheet; as to the little boy, I don't know that I ever saw him in my life.

GUILTY . (Aged 14.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-95

488. GEORGE HOOK was indicted for stealing on the 31st of May , a

silver bladed fruit knife, with an horn handle, value 4 s. 6 d. the goods of Richard Jones .

RICHARD JONES sworn.

I am a house keeper; I live at No. 25, Ludgate street ; I keep a shop . On Friday last the 31st of May, between the hours of twelve and one o'clock, I was behind my counter, I found my window had been broke, and a silver fruit knife gone; I keep a hardware shop; my wife was present at the time, she said, you had better take the things out of the window and send for a glazier, and have the window mended; just before dinner my wife went out to see if she could get a knife out by the hole that was broke, and she could but just touch them; we went into dinner, we had not been at dinner three minutes before we saw the prisoner at the bar, he looked first at one part of the shop and then at another; he then looked up and down the street, I went out at the back door and came into the street that way and Mrs. Jones walked forwards toward the shop, when I came to him he had got a hook in his hand, and was trying to take one of the other knives out of the window, a silver handled fruit knife, he drew it from the situation where it was before, about two inches and a half, he had removed it an inch out of the window; I thought he laid hold of it; I seized him instantly, and took him into the shop myself, and when I took him into the shop he had the hook in his hand, some way or another he dropped the hook out of his hand, that I did not find the hook to produce it when I came before the Lord Mayor, but Saturday morning when I was sweeping the shop I found the hook; when I came into the shop Mrs. Jones went out and pushed the knife into the window as far as she could; I am very positive it was removed, because when I went to dinner I observed where it lay, and I was so positive with respect to his having the hook on him, that I had him taken up stairs and searched to find it, but did not find it till the next day.

ANN JONES sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness. I was in the shop at the time that Mr. Jones perceived the window broke and a knife gone; this was before I went to dinner; I went then into the street to see if I could take a knife out with my finger; I could reach one with my finger, but I could not take one out of the hole it was so very small; I wished Mr. Jones to take the knives out of the window; we went into the parlour the back part of the shop, we never took our eyes from the window till we saw the boy come up to the window, he looked in to see if any body was in the shop, and he looked up and down the street, and then he put his hand to the hole of the window, and attempted to get a knife out; Mr. Jones went out of the private door and catched hold of him before he got the knife quite out, and brought him in; I went out into the street and shoved the knife back again to where he had got it from, it was drawn through the hole about an inch, there was one gone besides this, which I have never seen since; I missed that before I sat down to dinner, we missed the first between twelve and one, and the boy came about twenty minutes after one.

Prisoner. I was looking in at the window when this gentleman laid hold of me, and took me into the shop.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Sent to Sea .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930529-96

489. WILLIAM GARRETT and JAMES LAWRENCE were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April , a

hempen sack, value 2 s. and four bushels of malt, value 18 s. the goods of Thomas Palmer .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

BENJAMIN READING sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Palmer, he lives at Wallingford in Berkshire. I came to town in a barge, and I brought malt to Winkworth's wharf, the barge was there on the 25th of April.

Q. Where is Winkworth's wharf? - At St. Mary Somersets . I went on board the barge about half after eight at night, and I got under one of the cloths, which covers the bulk, and about half after twelve the same night, I heard the cloth rustle, and I saw William Garratt heave a sack of malt on John Lawrence , he took hold of it in his hand, and heaved it on one shoulder, he took it from the outside quarter of our barge; the other person stood down in the hatch, and the other stood on the coat's swell, and heaved the sack to him, he received it on his back, he carried it off from the hatches, and delivered it into the boat's bottom of Mr. Keith's, their master's vessel; it was adjoining to our vessel the inside; Garrat said to the other, will that do? I went on the top of the bulk, and I said, it would not do; I said that is my master's property, you have no business with it; they looked up, but never a one answered; I told them that is my master's property, and the best way will be for to bring it back again, and put it in its place; they jumped down into their master's barge, and says to me, you get down and give us a heave; Garrat said so; with that I made reply, I will not, I am put here in trust to take care of my master's barge, and I will not stir from it, and Lawrence jumped down and lifted it on Garrett's back, and he brought it back.

Q. How soon were the prisoners taken up afterwards? - Between ten and eleven the next day; the next day I gave information to Mr. Randal our master's factor.

Mr. Knowlys. Were they not takens at their master's boat? - No, neither of them.

Q. They were close by? - They were.

Q. When you desired them to return the sack they did it? - They did.

Court. What kind of terms are you upon, you and these men; Did you know them before? - Yes, this ten years.

Q. Did they know you was waiting in your barge? - I don't know that they did. Lawrence was watchman in another barge, he was on board of Keith's barge; they came from Abingdon loaded with malt.

Q. You are all then brother bargemen; is it not customary for somebody to be on board of a night to watch? - It is always customary.

Q. You never had any quarrel with these men? - Never had a word with these men in my life.

Q. Nor your master? - No, never, all on good terms.

Q. Is the sack here? - It is.

Mr. Knowlys. They have been in prison ever since the 25th of April? - Yes, from the 26th. (The sack and malt produced and deposed to.)

Court to Reading. Are both of these men Abingdon men? - Yes, and both married men.

The prisoners called five witnesses who gave them an excellent character.

William Garratt, GUILTY. (Aged 46.)

James Lawrence , GUILTY. (Aged 33.)

Recommended by the Jury on account of their good characters .

Imprisoned one week and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-97

490. WILLIAM GIBBS was indicted for obtaining a dozen of mens stockings, value 10 s. 6 d. of Thomas Parker , under false pretences .

THOMAS PARKER sworn.

I am warehouseman to Messrs. John Hancock , Matthew Hancock and Francis Wakefield , they are wholesale hosiers, they live in Clements-court, Milk-street, Cheapside . The prisoner on the 20th of February came to our warehouse, and asked for a dozen of mens stockings twenty-four embroidered at ten shillings and six-pence; these were the words he made use of, I asked him who they were for? I knew his face very well; after he had looked out the dozen of stockings, I asked him who they were for? he said they were for Mr. Matthew Gibbs , of Fenchurch-street, hatter and hosier, that was all he said; they were entered to him, Mr. Matthew Gibbs was a customer of ours, and had been for many years; after he had looked them out they were tied up, I asked him his name? he said his name was Smith; I never knew that he was the son of Matthew Gibbs till he was taken up, he went away with the goods; I knew his face very well, because I have lived in the warehouse of Messrs. Hancocks near ten years, and had an opportunity of knowing his face very well, but never knew that he was Matthew Gibbs 's son till he was taken.

Q. Did you deal with Mr. Gibbs? - We did.

Mr. Peat. How long have you lived with this gentleman? - Ten years.

Q. The firm is in the manner you have described it? - It is.

Court. You never found your stockings again? - No, never found them again.

MATTHEW GIBBS sworn.

I am an hatter and hosier, Fenchurch-street.

Q. Do you know the young man at the bar? - Too well; I am so unfortunate as to be his father; he served part of his time with me, he has been gone from me this three years and a half.

Q. Then no doubt in February you did not send for goods? - I did not.

MATTHEW HANCOCK sworn.

All I know of it is, that on the 16th of April I came home to dinner about three o'clock, went into my counting house and there I saw the constable and the prisoner at the bar, my servant in the warehouse told me that that person, meaning the person at the bar, was that person who had defrauded us of different goods, which Mr. Gibbs denied to belong to his account; I had no conception that there was a false account with Mr. Gibbs till this time. Pray, says I, to him, what have you done with the goods? says he, I beg you will send for my father, and I have no doubt but he will settle the matter; says I, are you a son of Mr. Gibbs? yes, says he, I am; I immediately sent for his father, and begged to see him; the message came back that he could not wait on me; I felt a good deal of alarm for the circumstance, I thought it was an extraordinary one, and immediately left my dinner and went to Mr. Gibbs in Fenchurch-street, and told him I was shocked to understand that it was his own son that had these goods, and wished to know whether he had these goods on his account; he said he had not; then, says I, you not owning these goods; I must commit your son.

Mr. Peat. How far does the father of this lad live from your house? - A small distance; so far as from Clement-court, Milk-street to Fenchurch-street:

WILLIAM GREEN sworn.

I am the constable; I know nothing more than apprehending him.

Mr. Peat addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant.

JOSEPH SHAW sworn.

I am a china merchant; I have known the young man and his father many years; within these three years I cannot speak of the son, but before that he had a tolerable good character; he is a married man, I think he has either one child or two.

Mr. Hancock. My private opinion of the business is, that the cruel inhumanity of the father has inclined the son to do what he has done; I have heard the story, and understand the circumstance of his having married, and having married a young woman who was a servant, has occasioned the father's displeasure to such a degree, as to send this young man, woman and child into a garret, and to send eighteen-pence at a time to support him, the poor woman and the child; and he knew the situation of the case, he knew that his son had no other mode of getting his bread, but in that line of business. The moment we told Mr. Gibbs, his suspicions led him to his son; the son acknowledged the fact, but in his distress I think he pointed at the right object; I am sorry for the young man's situation.

Matthew Gibbs . I feel myself exceedingly degraded by this gentleman's report; they know that I have done from time to time more than I had a right to do.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-98

491. WILLIAM ATWELL was indicted for obtaining twenty-seven ladies morocco collars, value 1 l. 1 s. 6 d. of Joseph Berisford , under false pretences .

JOHN EVANCE sworn.

I know nothing of the transaction.

JOSEPH BERISFORD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Evance, King-street, Cheapside; I was sent the 16th of April with some ladies leather collars, I don't know how many, to Mr. Belger; I was going along Cheapside about four o'clock, and a man met me, says he, I know your face; soon after the prisoner came up, and he met me the corner of Snow-hill, the man when he met me, asked me where I was going? I told him to Covent-garden; and he asked me to shew him the direction; I shewed him the directions, it was to Mr. Belger, New-street, Covent-garden; this I shewed the man in Cheapside. I met the prisoner the corner of Snow-hill , says he, you have got a parcel for Mr. Belger and he said he was going for it; I told him I had, and the receipt was a guinea and six-pence, and he said Mr. Belger did not tell him to pay any receipt; I told him then to go to Mr. Evance's clerk and pay the receipt; he asked me for the bundle, and I gave it him; he said he came from Mr. Belger's and was going to Mr. Evance's for the parcel; I gave it him, and he said Mr. Belger did not tell him of the money; then I said, pay Mr. Evance's clerk, and I left him; he walked off, and I went about my business. This was on Tuesday I saw him on the Saturday after he was taken up.

Q. Did you see him between the Tuesday and Saturday? - No.

Q. How came he to be taken up? - I don't know. I am sure that is the man.

Q. Who was with him when he took the parcel? - Nobody. I am sure he is the man.

Q. Did you know any thing of this man before? - No.

Mr. Knapp. You never saw the prisoner before in your life? - Never.

Q. And yet you say you are sure he is the man? - Yes.

Q. Have you ever seen the first man that came to you? - Never.

Q. Should you know him again was he to come to you? - I don't think I should.

Q. Why he had some conversation with you? - Yes, about two minutes.

Q. How much time was you with the prisoner? - A good deal longer with him, about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. Then the other you do not recollect? - He is a thinish man.

Q. You don't know whether these goods were sold or no before you saw the prisoner at my Lord Mayor's? - I did not.

Q. Have you always said that you was sure of the man? - Yes.

Q. You was before Mr. Alderman Boydell? - Yes.

Q. On the first examination, will you take on yourself to say that you said, you was sure of the man then? - Yes, sir; I did.

Q. Pray was not this the case, that you was not sure of him at the first, but you was at the second examination? - He had not got his hair the same the first time.

Q. He was in custody all the time? - He was.

Q. And there were two examinations of him? - There was.

Q. You thought you knew him at the first, but you was sure of him at the second examination? - Yes.

Court. What do you say now, is he the man or not? - He is the man.

Q. Have you any doubt about him? - I am sure he is.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Cowles in Cornhill, he is in the jewellery line. Having occasion for the articles which are described in the indictment, I sent to Mr. Evance's, and was informed of their being defrauded of such articles, red morocco collars for ladies, being informed they had not got any, we applied for some elsewhere. The articles laying in the window was the cause of the prisoner bringing in some to offer for sale, he came in the 18th of April, saying he had an article which he found on Tower-hill, and seeing that I had an article of the same description in the window, he came to know if I would buy them; he did not know what their value were; from the appearance of his story I thought they were the collars that Mr. Evance's lad was defrauded of, I suspected him, and to be certain before ever I taxed him with it, I begged him to sit down while I went to shew them to Mr. Cowles who was hard by; instead of which I went to Mr. Evance's, and asked Mr. Evance's clerk if they had heard any thing of the collars? he informed me they had not; when I returned to the shop, I found the prisoner was gone, and had left the shop about a minute, I was informed he was gone down Sweeting's-alley; I immediately went in pursuit of him, at the bottom of Sweeting's-alley the prisoner looking about observed me, and he immediately communicated it to some others, as I conceived by their looking about too; I went up to him and asked him if he had not shewn to me some red morocco collars at a shop in Cornhill? he told me he had; says I, why did you leave the shop till you had done your business? the excuse he made was, that he had some business with these friends in Broad-street, and

he wished to finish it in my absence; I told him he must come back with me and finish the business he had in hand first; accordingly he came back, and he was charged with the constable; the collars are in the custody of the constable.

ANDREW RUDE sworn.

I am constable of Cornhill; I received these collars of a gentleman in Mr. Cowles's shop.

- HUTCHINGS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Evance; having an order from Mr. Belger for two dozen of collars, we made some according to his directions, of different sizes, I believe these to be the same, we sent them by the boy the 16th of April; there is no mark on them, but the reason I believe them to be the same, we had particular orders to make them very neat; I can speak particular to one, I sent two dozen and three, he wanted only fifteen; I sent the boy with them on Tuesday.

Mr. Knapp. You are inclined to think from the appearance of these collars that they belong to Mr. Evance? - I do.

Q. How long have you been in this line of business? - About two years.

Q. The work comes out as neat of other shops as it does out of your's? - They are very neat.

Q. Do you mean to swear to the Court and Jury that you never saw any others of that sort before? - No, but at the same time I believe they are the same; I would not say further.

MATTHIAS BELGER sworn.

I live in New-street, Covent-garden.

Q. Do you know the prisoner? - No.

Q. Did you ever send him for any goods? - No.

Q. Was he ever a servant of your's? - No.

Mr. Knapp. You are in a considerable line of business in New-street, Covent-garden; you employ a good many workmen, perhaps you have a foreman that manages your business? - Not so much manages my business as he is my clerk.

Q. What is his name? - John Holford . In my business there is one more who is present, Henry Bunting .

Q. Mr. Holford may give orders for persons to fetch your goods in, and has done so many times? - He has.

Q. Whether he gave any orders respecting these goods you don't know? - I do not.

Q. Did he know whether you had ordered the collars? - I cannot say, I will not by any means say that I know the prisoner, but that same evening somebody brought the collars to me in the dusk of the evening, I chose some of them, I chose one dozen, and paid for them, I made use of them.

HENRY BUNTING sworn.

There was a young man brought some collars from Mr. Evance's into the house he gave a little parcel and said he brought them from Mr. Evance's; I did not buy them, he said he was not to leave them without the money; I desired him to call again when Mr. Belger would be at home.

Mr. Knapp addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant.

Court to Belger. Did you or did you not give orders to any body to go for these goods? - No, I did not.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before. Mr. COMMON SERJEANT

Reference Number: t17930529-99

492. RICHARD STEVENS was indicted for unlawfully receiving the 16th of May , a hand saw, value 1 s. the goods of James Mash ; an iron hammer with a wooden handle; the goods of James Mullet .

JAMES MASH sworn.

I lost a saw, and hammer, and a pickaxe together; the saw to the best of my knowledge had two teeth broke out of it when I lost it, but when I saw it, it had four out of it; I lost it to the best of my knowledge the 6th or 7th of May; I lost it out of an open field in the Square in Moorfields ; I cannot tell how it went, but I lost it, and I went to cheapen some articles in this broker's shop, and I saw this saw there; I would not wish to swear to it, for one saw is like another.

- NEWMAN sworn.

I was sent for to the old iron shop, and Mr. Mash had the saw and hammer in his hand, and they were disputing about it; I said you had better go and settle it before the alderman; the alderman was sitting.

RICHARD ELDER sworn.

I was going by the broker's shop, and I went in, because I heard some words, I took the saw into my possession, and I went with them to the sitting alderman, and there I asked him what he knew the saw by? he said it had two teeth out; says I, this has four; says he, is it? I did not know that; and he said he knew the hammer by the weight,

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-100

493. THOMAS SANDERS and HENRY FIFE were indicted for a conspiracy .

(The indictment opened by Mr. - ; and the case by Mr. Knowlys.)

RICHARD REEVES sworn.

I was a dealer in fruit ; I live at Swanley, Sutton at Hone near Dartford. On the 5th of October I came to Smithfield and brought a brown gelding my own property, for sale; I came on Thursday night to market I was at market on Friday between two and three, as I walked the horse up and down Smithfield market , one Laugher asked me if I would rap my horse for his? I saw his horse, but I refused it, I told him I did not want to rap, I came to sell; I left him then; as I rode the horse up and down the market there were several people asked me the price; I told them it was six guineas, I would not take no less, unless it was one shilling to drink, whether I sold him or not; then in a little time after, Sanders said, if I would rap my horse for that grey horse that was in Laugher's possession, he would give me the six guineas; I thought that was the same as if I sold my own; he pulled the money out of his pocket, some money, I cannot say how much, in gold and silver, and shewed me, I made him some answer and held my hand out for the money; I think he said, do your business first; I accordingly asked Laugher whether he would warrant his horse found or not? Fife was not there then; he said he would warrant it found; I agreed to the exchange, and exchanged with him; I told him before I took him into my possession I would have a man to give judgement of the horse; accordingly we went and tolled the horses where the horses are tolled, Sanders went with us, and in a short time after we were there Sanders quitted the room again; I don't recollect what passed while we were there, he then left another man to vouch for him, Laugher was along with him the mean time, we were all three together; when I came out again my brown horse was gone, it was tied up at the rails within three or four yards of the grey horse; when I came out I asked where my horse was? Sanders said he was safe enough; I then asked him to give me the money which he proposed for the grey

one? he wanted me to untie this horse from the rails.

Q. Did you? - No, Laugher untied the horse from the rails he took him from the Toll house, he took him on the left hand from the Toll house, he went to the bottom of the market, and turned up on the right hand; Sanders then took the horse into his possession, and told me to take my horse; I told him it was no horse of mine; then he wanted to shove the halter into my coat at my breast; then he let the halter go, and went off. The horse was there a little space of time, and I asked a man, who I saw there, to take hold of the horse, and I took it up to the Toll house, to take the horse to where he said he lived, and where he brought it from; I got the directions, and when I came out there was a man came up to me and said, farmer, you have been taken in here by a snitch. I went with that man to a public house in Long-lane, where I saw Mr. Fife and three or four or five more, I cannot say exactly, I saw Mr. Fife when I got to the door, and he acknowledged the horse was his, and said it was his servant that had transacted this piece of business with me; he was very sorry that it had happened into a poor man's hands like mine.

Q. Did he give you the six guineas? - No. Then I wanted the money, he said I should not be the loser of the horse, he said he had not got the money about him then. I was very much vexed to think of the loss of my horse; I told him I would behave like a man to him, if he would give me five guineas ready money I would take it; he had offered me a note of six guineas for the money of the horse, he told me he would give me a note of hand where to find him to-morrow morning, and then he would pay it.

Q. How do you mean a note of hand? - A direction in writing Accordingly I refused taking it, several times I refused the note of hand which he wanted me to take.

Q. What did he offer to give you? - He told me he put down in it five pounds five shillings, for the horse; I took that note; I brought the note away with me down to Fleet-market, to Mr. Clipson's in Fleet-market, the Bull and Garter, next door to the prison gates. I cannot read any writing; I am sure that is the paper he gave me.

Q. When he gave you that note what did you understand that note to be? - He read it me, and told me where to call on him.

Q. What did he say this was? - He said it was a note of hand for five pounds five shillings, and told me where to call on him.

Q. Where did he tell you to call on him? - No. 6, Harp-court, Fleet market.

Q. Was the note ever paid? - No.

Q. When did you see any of the parties after that? - I saw Sanders as that happened on Friday, on the next Friday following, at Guildhall.

Q. How came you to see him at Guildhall? - I had taken Laugher at Black Heath Fair, on Thursday after the Friday, I went and fetched a constable, and took him up, and brought him to Guildhall, Sanders came to Guildhall to bail the other out, Mr. Alderman Clarke was the magistrate, then Sanders was apprehended, and he was taken to the Compter.

Q. How long was it afterwards before you saw Fife? - I attended here four sessions, and I had attended here two sessions before I saw him first.

Q. Are you sure he is the man? - I believe he is the man, but I cannot positively swear, but to Sanders I will swear to

Q. When was Fife apprehended? - I don't know.

Q. Who apprehended Fife? - I don't know.

Q. Have you any doubt about the man? - have none in the least, but I cannot

swear positively he is the man.

Court. Do you mean to say that you believe he is the man? - I do.

The note read:

"October 15, 1793.

On demand I promise to pay Richard Reeves the sum of five pounds five shillings, for value received, for a grey horse, by me

Henry Fife , No. 6, Harp court, Fleet-market"

Mr. Gardiner. How long was it you first saw Mr. Fife afterwards? - Five or six or seven months, when I first saw him after this transaction.

Q. You did not see him at the transaction? - Yes, I did.

- CLIPSON sworn.

Q. Do you know Fife? - I cannot say I do; he came to me five or six times along with Mr. Mincher.

Q. Look at that note. Have you ever seen that note before? - Yes, I have.

Q. Did you ever go to Fife the defendant with that note? - I was with him about the note; I did not see him at the time; I had a writ against him some time afterwards and then I mentioned it to him; he said he had given such a note. The first night Reeves had been to sell the horse in Smithfield he came to me.

Q. What did you say to Fife about the transaction? - The day after the note was taken I went to demand the money; I told them if the note was not paid they must abide the consequences; I told that to Mr. Mineher; I saw Fife about ten days after, and arrested him; he wanted me to let him go; I told him there was a note also of a poor countryman's at my house; after that he sent the money for the note, and I went down to Mr. Reeve's one Sunday with the money, and he said he would not take it, he was advised to trouble him for horse stealing.

Q When you saw him ten days after this transaction, you told him you had a note against him, due at your house to one Reeves, what did he say to that? - He said he would pay it as soon as possible with some other little matters, and also the writ I had against him.

Mr. Gardiner. Mr. Reeves himself sent you to demand the money for him? - He did.

Q. First of all he accepts the note, and the note not being paid he charges him with a felony? - I believe it was so.

Q. You did receive the money to pay this note some little time after of Henry Fife ? - One Mr. Lauress brought it to me.

Mr. Gardiner to Prosecutor. What was it that Mr. Fife said, as exactly as you can recollect on this occasion, when you mentioned what he said about his servant? - He said it was his servant transacted this business with me, and he was very sorry that it had happened into such a poor man's hands like me.

Q. When did you first give the order to Mr. Clipson to receive the money of the note? - When I first went to Mr. Clipson he said, this is the old complaint, this here glandered horse has brought them in fifty pounds to my knowledge.

Q. Did you know it had the glanders? - I did not; I am no judge.

Mr. Knapp. Had you ever been in Smithfield before? - Yes, once before.

Q. Did you sell a horse there before? - Yes.

Q. Was you lucky there before? had that the glanders too? - No.

Q. How many horses have you sold in your life time? - Three.

Q. You took this five guinea note, it is stamped? - It is.

Q. If you could have got your five guineas it would have done, if it had been five guineas instead of the note you would have been content. Did you

know Clipson before? - I did.

Q. Did you know he was a serjeant of mace for the City of London? - I knew he was an officer.

Q. You went to him in hopes he would get the money for you? - I told him the story, and he offered his services first.

Q. You tried your men for felony? - They were.

Q. You know that the charge of felony for which they were tried here before, was for horse stealing? - It was.

Q. You know likewise if they had been convicted they would have been liable to have been hanged? - I suppose they would.

Q. You know if you had convicted them at that time, you would have been entitled to a certificate? - What do you mean; I don't know what you mean.

Q. Then attend to me. Supposing you had convicted them, do you know that you would have had an exemption from parish officers? - I do not.

Q. Fife he gave you the note, and he said that the other person was his servant, Laugher was his servant? - Yes.

Q. There was nothing said about Sanders at that time? - Nothing at all.

Mr. Knowlys. You applied to Clipson as your friend? - I did.

Mr. Gardiner addressed the Jury in behalf of Fife; and Mr. Knapp in behalf of Sanders.

Fife called three witnesses to his character, and Sanders four.

Thomas Sanders , GUILTY .

Henry Fife , GUILTY.

To be imprisoned six months in Newgate , and to be put in the Pillory in Smithfield market .

Tried by the London Jury before. Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930529-101

494. JOHN POTEUS was indicted for perjury .

Joseph Body , William Jeffries , Anthony Girling and Samuel Broughton , were called on their recognizances.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.


View as XML