Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th April 1793.
Reference Number: 17930410
Reference Number: f17930410-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 10th of April, 1793, and the following Days;

Being the FOURTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER IV. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE ONE SHILLING and FOUR-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable SIR JAMES SANDERSON , KNT. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; the Right Honourable LLOYD LORD KENYON , Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: The Honourable SIR JOHN HEATH , one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: The Honourable SIR BEAUMONT HOTHAM , one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer: SIR JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City: JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common Serjeant at Law of the said CITY; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William Shuffry

Edward Seymour

Isaac Dickson

Martin Tree

John Jones

William Leathwick

Richard Moss

Joseph Humpleby

John Walker

John Ivy

Samuel Ireland

Raham Reepe

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Stokes

William Rogers

John Burrows

David Shirley Bear

George Freeman

Matthew Stenson

Alexander Wilson

Francis Sadler

John Chancellor

Jonathan Hamston

Jampion Hart

John Edwards

Second Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Newsham

William Gibbs

Joseph Munday

John Beach

Joseph Freeman

Porteus Smith

Richard Price

Isaac Hutchinson

William Green

Luke Cade

Joseph Leake

David Egleton

Reference Number: t17930410-1

285. WILLIAM MANSFIELD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Collins , about the hour of one in the afternoon, of the 6th of February , no person being then in the said dwelling house; and stealing therein, three woollen coats, called flushing coats, value 40 s. one check apron, value 2 s. two linen caps and bands, value 6 d. one silk and cotton handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of Thomas Collins . Two pair of worsted stockings, value 18 d. a pair of thread stockings, value 4 d. two linen aprons, value 6 d. a case knife, value 6 d. and six shillings in monies numbered , the goods and monies of John Robinson .

ANN COLLINS sworn.

My husband's name is Thomas Collins ; I keep a room in Redcross-street , a one pair of stairs; there is no one lives in the room but me and my husband, I have no servant; the house is let out in tenements, there is a lodger I believe above me, and below me, the landlord lodges next door, he has no part in the house.

Q. Is the house in which the landlord lives, by any way connected with the house in which you live? - No, not at all; my husband went out at six o'clock in the morning, I went out at half after seven, I padlocked the door, when I went out, I tried it to see if it was fastened, and it was; I returned about half an hour after one, my neighbours sent to me to tell me my place was open, and I went home immediately, when I came up stairs the door was wide open, some of the bed clothes were off the bed and some on; the staple of the door was drawn and broke, the padlock remained on the door not touched, I had left the things on the bed, the drawers were all open; there were no locks on them, every thing was taken out of the drawers entirely and thrown on the middle of the floor; all the things mentioned in the indictment were missing. John Robinson is my father, but he left the box in my room with the things, and the box was locked in which the things were; that was the only box they broke open; I went the same day before the justice at two o'clock, and I swore to my property, I saw them there; there was nobody in the room when I came back; I saw the prisoner before justice Davis, in Lambert-street, Whitechapel, and I never saw him before in my life, the constable has the articles now; my husband never returned till eight or nine o'clock in the evening, when I went to fetch him, I had the key from six o'clock in the morning myself.

JOHN ROBINSON sworn.

I am the father of Ann Collins ; I was not in the room at the time of the robbery, my daughter came and told me of it, and I went there after the robbery, the lock of my box was broke open; I lost two coarse aprons, three pair of stockings, a case knife, and six shillings in silver.

THOMAS GRAYFLOWER sworn.

I am a watchman; about half after one o'clock, on the day of the robbery,

the 6th of February, I was coming out of Mr. Harris's pork shop, buying some sausages; and I saw Robert Tucker , he was running; I asked him if they were running for a wager? they asked me if I had seen a man with a great coat on with a bundle? I said yes, I followed them, and I saw William Mansfield running with the bundle; I found him up by the Maypole East Smithfield, about two hundred yards from the house of the prosecutor; I got up to him and took the bundle from him, and two pair of stockings from underneath his jacket; I have kept these things from that time to this, Mrs. Collins and Mr. Robinson has seen them, and sworn to them. (The things produced.)

ROBERT TUCKER sworn,

I am a smith. On the 6th of February, at one o'clock, I went home to dinner, and I saw three men go up Mrs. Collins's stairs at one o'clock, the prisoner was one I am sure; at half past one I saw all three come down, I then observed the prisoner William Mansfield , he went through the street with the bundle at his back, and another with him, I did not know him before, and the other went another way; the other took nothing with him; the neighbours seeing these two, made an alarm, and I directly pursued after them till he was out of sight; when I got up to the top of Nightingale-lane, I saw Thomas Grayflower, and he had the prisoner in his hand, one of the same men that I had seen go up the stairs with the same bundle. I saw William Mansfield come down the stairs with the man; we then carried them before the justice.

JOSEPH NASH sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the public office Whitechapel; I know no more than he was apprehended, he was brought to our office and I searched him the same day, and found a case knife and an old handkerchief in his pocket. (The articles deposed to by Mr. Collins and John Robinson .) The three flushing coats cost fifteen shillings a piece; and all the things are worth what are mentioned in the indictment.

Prisoner. I received the things of a man in the street, I was to have a shilling to carry them to the Green Man in Kent-street; they came up and took me and would not take the other man that I received the things from.

Court to Grayflower. What did he say when you took him, he gave no account at all.

GUILTY of stealing, to the value of 4 s. 6 d . (Aged 22.)

Transported for four years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-2

286. PENRY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a spring table clock, value 39 s. the goods of the Right Honourable Ann Baroness Godolphin .

(The Case opened by Mr. Fielding)

JOSEPH AXFORD sworn.

I am a servant to lady Godolphin; the watch was taken out of the parlour on the 2d of February, about half past nine o'clock; her ladyship rung the bell and I went in, my fellow servant shut the window that evening, I did not see it that evening; I saw it the morning of that day, the prisoner was servant there with me about three weeks; I cannot recollect how long ago he left the service,

I believe four months from this time; he had left the service about three weeks or a month before this loss. I was at the justice's, where I understood, he had taken the clock.

Q. Was what he said before the justice committed to writing? - It was.

- NETTLETON sworn.

I am a servant; I saw the clock that evening between four and five; I shut the windows that night; there is a stable yard communicates to Lady Godolphin's house, in this yard there is an access immediately to the house; in consequence of the clock being missed, we searched the house immediately, but we could find no clock, nor any body in the house; there was no other step taken then; I did not see the prisoner till the day he was taken; I believe he was apprehended near Monmouth-street. I did not go with him to Bow-street.

Q. What sort of a clock was this? - I cannot describe the clock, but it was in a black case, it was a table clock; I don't know the maker's name.

Axford. The maker's name is Knibb.

Q. Was the clock ever found? - It is not found yet.

Q. In what service was this boy? - A foot boy.

Q. Do you know where he came from? - I do not, he was in her Ladyship's service before I went, he had lived with her about a twelve month.

WILLIAM BRAMBLE sworn.

I live at No. 107, Oxford-street; a clock-maker by trade; I know the lad at the bar, I met him on the 2d of February last in Oxford-street, between the hours of eight and nine, there was one Edward Poole with him; I had been to carry some work home, and was very wet, I knew him before; Edward Poole said, you are the very man we want; so I asked him what they wanted? they said, they had got a clock, I asked them where they had got it? they gave me no direct answer, but I went with them to No. 39, Rathbone-Place, when I came there, Edward Poole went to get a light, and they placed this clock on the table, Edward Poole did, and the prisoner was present, when they placed it on the table, I told them it was an old family piece, they said, it belonged to Penry Jones, the prisoner at the bar; with that, I asked the prisoner at the bar how long he had had this clock? he said, he had had it three weeks, I told him, that never could be, for I knew it was an eight day clock, and it was then going, and that he must come dishonestly by it; then they asked me if I would make a winder to it? I told him no. I asked Penry Jones if he knew the consequence of it? and I told him to take the clock back again to the right owner of it, then they both laughed at me, and said, would I not make a winder to it? I said no; and I had no further discourse with them till I saw the prisoner at Bow-street. This clock was in a black ebony case. The name I verily believe to be Knibb. I observed the name at the time, and I verily believe it; the circle of the clock was pierced. They came afterwards to the public house where I was, but we had no conversation there about the clock.

Q. Was you before the magistrate? - I was.

Q. Have you a perfect recollection what the boy said there? - He told the magistrate that he had stole the clock.

Q. Did he say where? - He said, he had stole it of his mistress our Lady Godolphin, and that he had given it to a coachman to sell.

Court to Nettleton. What kind of a clock was it - The clock had a black ebony case.

Prisoner I know nothing at all about it; I came from Carmarthen in South Wales.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-3

287. PENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of February, a pair of velveret breeches, value 2 s. the goods of Joseph Axford .

JOSEPH AXFORD sworn.

I lost a pair of velveret breeches; I believe on the 25th of January, my own property; I enquired after them and they were pawned, William Bramble has them; I asked the prisoner about them, the prisoner told me, that he had taken them and pawned them.

WILLIAM BRAMBLE sworn.

I produce the breeches. (Deposed to.) I met the prisoner Jones at a public house in Oxford-street, the sign of the Man Loaded with Mischief. I met him in January, he said, he had a hat to dispose it, I asked him where he got it? he said, from an alamode beef shop, he told me also he had the duplicate of a pair of breeches to dispose of at the pawnbroker's in Wardour-street; I gave him a shilling for the duplicate, and I sent Edward Poole , with two shillings and seven-pence to redeem the breeches, and he brought me these breeches.

EDWARD LAVENDER sworn.

The prisoner had two examinations, and at all these times he confessed to taking the clock, and taking the breeches, and that he had pawned them, and sold the duplicate to Bramble.

Q. Was there any promise or threat made use of? - There was none, it was his own free confession.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-4

288. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , 7 s. 6 d. the monies of William Yendole , privily from his person .

WILLIAM YENDOLE sworn.

On the 25th of February, I lost seven shillings and sixpence; I was at the top of St. James's-street , with my coach and horses about eight o'clock; between eight and nine, I went into the public house and was asleep; I had eight shillings in my breeches pocket; the landlord of the house awaked me, and I found six-pence in my breeches pocket where the eight shillings was. The prisoner was sitting in that house, almost facing the fire place, when I went asleep there was three more in the house, they were gone when I awoke. I found one shilling on this man that I can swear to; about an hour after he was taken at the Coach and Horses, the corner of Charles-street, Covent-Garden; he had six shillings besides that in his pocket, and a counterfeit half guinea.

HENRY BAINBRIDGE sworn.

I was the constable that took charge of the prisoner, it was about a quarter or twenty minutes past ten, on the 25th of February; the prosecutor brought him, and said, he had lost seven shillings and six-pence; I desired to know if he

could describe the money, he said, there was an half crown, and the rest in shillings; he said, there was one shilling almost square, and rubbed at the edge. I told the prisoner I must search him, he said, I might save myself the trouble, all that he had I should see, and he flung the money down on the table, and the prosecutor picked one shilling out that he could swear to. (The shilling produced and deposed to, by the mark on the edge in the head, and it being the first shilling he took in the morning.)

Prisoner. I was in this house in the course of the afternoon, and I had two or three pints of beer, and I went from there to Covent Garden, he was rather in liquor and came in, and pulled me out by the string of my coat, he said, come along with me, and knocked five shillings and six-pence out of my hand, and when I was looking for the money some people came and laid hold of me.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-5

298. CHARLES ALLEN and MARY GOODALL were indicted for feloniously making an assault on Thomas Pearce , on the 25th of March , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will a man's hat, value 5 s. and 4 s. 6 d. in monies numbered; the goods and monies of the said Thomas Pearce .

THOMAS PEARCE sworn.

I am a patrole belonging to Bow-street , to Sir Sampson Wright. I was going out the 25th of March, between ten and eleven at night, and going down Drury-lane I was knocked down, and I lost a new hat and four shillings and sixpence in money, I cannot say positively who knocked me down; the money was in my left hand breeches pocket; I laid there bleeding on the ground; I had no senses till the people came and took me up; I know the prisoner at the bar very well, I have known the woman a good many years, she has been an unfortunate woman on the town; the man I believe is no better than he should be, but there was another man that was with them, that had a green coat on and a crape on his hat, and he knocked me down, and then these two robbed me,

Q. What is Charles Allen? - He is nothing better than a pickpocket.

Q. How near were the prisoner to you when you was knocked down? - The man in a green coat and black crape came before me and knocked me down, and this Mary Goodall and Charles Allen stood over me, and rifled me; I was senseless.

Q. How do you know they rifled you then? - Because I can prove it by evidence.

Q. You could not see the prisoner behind you? - But I could the man before me, that knocked me down; I saw three come out of a public house the corner of Brownlow-street, they came out of that public house before I came near them, I was within two doors of Brownlow-street when they came out, and these two came behind me and the other stood before me and knocked me down; I had no conversation at all with them; the woman was dressed just as she is now.

Q. Are you sure they were the persons behind? - I am; there was no other persons about, I believe there was an animosity to me because I was the under keeper of Bridewell, to Mr. Smith; I had that place for twenty years; I left it in the year 1782, when my brother died, they both knew me; I was as sober as I am now.

Q. Tell me how many times you had been drinking that night, since you was out? - None at all.

Q. Did you see nobody near you at the time? - Nobody was near me but the prisoners and the other man.

JOHN MILLER sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I went by information where one of these men where that robbed this Pearce two days after the robbery. On the 27th of March I went into the Golden Hart in Parker's-lane, there I found the prisoner at the bar playing at shove halfpenny; on his head I found this hat; he said, he found it. (The hat produced and deposed to by Pearce, he having put his name inside of it.)

Jury to Pearce. Is it your own writing? - I wrote it myself, because we lay under a predicament by being knocked down, and I did it to know my hat again.

RICHARD DICKEN sworn.

I draw beer at the public house at Mr. Gordon's, the sign of the Sun, the corner of Brownlow-street; I remember this 25th of March, when this man was knocked down, the prisoners at the bar, Charles Allen , and the young woman, was at our house that night, they left the house about half after ten, they all went out together, I believe there was five of them.

Q. Do you remember a man in a green coat? - Yes, there was a short man in a green coat and a black crape about his hat, the same night I was going out with a pot of beer, and I heard that the patrole was knocked down, I know him; I was coming out of the house with a pot of beer, and I saw the old gentleman laying down at the end of the door, and I went to pick him up, and the woman was laying down by his side, when he got up his hat was gone; the woman lay on his left side, and with one hand about his arm, and the other hand was by his left hand pocket, there was nobody with me; when I got up to him one of them called her, and she made answer and said, damn him let him lay, I will have no more to do with him.

Prisoner Goodall. I will not deny drinking in the house, it was pretty nigh eleven o'clock when I came out, and I went home about my business; I am innocent of the robbery, and I leave you to judge whether I would rob this man knowing him so many years.

Prisoner Allen. I was at this public house, and when I came out there was a mob at the door; I saw a man laying on the ground and thought he was in liquor, so I took no notice at all of him, but went towards my own home, and I saw this hat lay and I picked it up.

George Allen , GUILTY . Death . (Aged 22.)

Mary Goodall , GUILTY . Death . (Aged 20.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-6

290 WILLIAM TURNBULL and JAMES SOMERVILLE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Brooks , about the hour of eight in the night, of the 29th of January , and burglariously stealing therein, four linen towels, value 4 s. a linen table cloth, 3 s. a pair of linen pillow cases, value 4 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 10 s. a tea caddy, value 3 s. a silver spoon, value 3 s. a leather pocket book, with silver clasps, value 10 s. a metal cream pot, value 5 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 15 s. a powder

horn, value 2 s. a knife value 3 d. a dimity waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of plated buckles, value 6 d. the goods of the said William Brooks , and five linen shirts, value 15 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. and two pair of nankeen breeches, value 1 l. the goods of James Upstone .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

WILLIAM BROOKS sworn.

I had chambers in St. Clement's-Inn , the ground floor, No. 16. On the 29th of January I left my chambers about eleven or twelve o'clock in the day, and James Upstone , my clerk , went with me, I had another clerk but he was in Oxford-shire, I left nobody in my chambers; I left them secure, the window shutters were not shut, but the windows were and the door was locked; I did not return myself till about nine or a half past nine in the evening; my clerk was returned before me; when I came home I found some Bow-street people and the porter there and two or three gentlemen that live in the stair case, and I found the chambers had been robbed, and I missed every thing in the indictment, and one of the window shutters had been forced off the hinges by means, I believe, of a chissel; they also forced several drawers of a book case; I never saw either of the prisoners till now.

JAMES UPSTONE sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Brooks. On the 29th of January I went down to Westminster Hall with him and returned about eight o'clock in the evening; when I came home the gentlemen up stairs, Messrs. Hayman and Cobb, and one of their clerks, were in the chambers looking about; we sent directly to Bow-street; the chambers were broke open by the window, the window was listed up and the shutter was wrenched off the hinges. I lost five shirts, a waistcoat, a pair of nankeen breeches, and a pair of cotton stockings, my property; when I went in every thing was all in confusion, my trunk was broke open, the lock was wrenched off and all the things thrown out, and besides that, the bureau and drawers were broke open; here is a paper which I had wrote upon, and I left it on the desk, and it was tumbled down just at the window, and it appears to have a wet foot mark on it, it was a wet night.

BENNET ALLEN sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Hayman and Cobb, their chambers are directly over Mr. Brooks's. On the 29th of January as near as I can recollect about seven o'clock in the evening I was going up stairs and passing Mr. Brooks's chambers a man immediately opened the door and looked me very hard in the face, he was within the chambers, I took him for a clerk belonging to Mr. Brooks, it was quite dark at that time; I had occasion to go out about eight o'clock, and coming past the door of Mr. Brooks, the watchman was there calling out Mr. Brooks, I asked him what was the matter? he said, that on coming to his box he observed a man come out of Mr. Brooks's chambers, and in passing his box the man seemed to be in a hurry to get off, he wanted to know if Mr. Brooks was at home; I said, you had better go in; he went in, and I went in with him; we found two candles laying on the floor, they were both in candlesticks upright, and one was alight; all was in a great heap of confusion; the the door was wide open.

Q. Did you observe the lock of the door? - I cannot say I did.

Q. Did you observe the windows? - I cannot say I did; I was there but a very short time.

Q. Did you make any observations how the persons might have got in? - I did not; I observed all the drawers that had been locked were forced open; going out I met the clerk of Mr. Brooks, Mr.

Upstone, and I told him his chambers had been broke open.

JOHN DE La FONTAINE sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; in consequence of an information I apprehended the prisoner Turnbull, on the 27th of February, I apprehended him at a place called the World's End; I believe it was the house where Turnbull was quartered at, he belonged to the Middlesex militia, and was quartered there at that time; I searched him, and I found on him a powder flask, which I have here; there was another man present with him; I searched him, and I brought him along with me to Tunbridge Wells; he told me that he had a trembling on him for two or three hours before, and that he had a dream the night before that his mother was dead, and he expected what had happened; he knew what I came for as soon as he saw me; I asked him if he had any box, or any thing else? he said he had not; he was giving some things out of his pocket to a comrade, the comrade said, that is my powder horn, I then took the powder horn from him, and brought him to London. (The powder horn produced.) As I was coming along in the coach with this Turnbull, I did not tie his hands; while I was in the coach I was taken very bad and sick, I had occasion to put out my head, I wanted to cast up, while my head was out of the coach, I felt something at my pocket, and afterwards when I felt, I found I had lost the horn; we were then out of the coach, I told him he had used me very ill, he had picked my pocket; he said, he dare say I had let it fall at the bottom of the coach; accordingly I went back to the coach, and the coachman found it at the bottom of the coach. (Deposed to.) On the 26th I had notice of a box being left at Mr. Cook's the furrier's, that was the property of Turnbull. I went to Mr. Cook's and I saw Mr. Cook's servant girl, and the instant she saw me, she was ready to faint away, she said, she knew very well what I came about; of Mr. Cook, who is now in court, I requested to see that box, and therein I found a great quantity of things which I now produce. Mr. Brooks's man has seen them, but Mr. Brooks has not. (The articles produced and deposed to.) I apprehended Somerville on the 22d of February, at the Bull's Head in Crown-street, St. Giles's; Miller and I were together, he denied his name at first, he was playing at knock up halfpenny in the tap room; I looked very hard at him, and said pray, is not your name Somerville, he said, no, I pulled off his hat, and I saw his hair was dressed up in a soldier's form, I said to him your name is Somerville.

Q. Is he in the militia? - No, but he wanted to feign their dress. I said I am certain your name is Somerville, and whether it is or no I will take you, I apprehended him. Treadway had searched Somerville's lodgings before.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

I am a constable. In consequence of an information I went to Somerville's lodgings, on Monday the 4th of February; I know they were Somerville's lodgings, by Stone, who was tried here last sessions, and the landlord is here to prove it. I went to a house, No. 5, in Shaw's-Gardens, I found a deal of property there; some belonging to Mr. Brooke's, and some belonging to other gentlemen in the chambers, here is a pocket book, and two silver spoons, a pair of boot buckles, and two pair of stockings, and a chissel, which has the top broke off, and which piece was found in the Chambers

of Mr. Brooke's, in one of the drawers, and they correspond.

Mrs. PULLEIN sworn.

I live at No. 5, Shaw's-Garden, St. Giles's; I know the prisoner Somerville, he lodged with me three weeks, he had the the pair of stairs back room, he lodged with me at the time that Treadway came.

Treadway. That was the room I searched (The articles deposed to.

Prisoner Somerville. There was a gentleman of the name of Smith that boarded in my house and my wife washed for him, and he brought these things in my absence, and my wife took them in, he had boarded with me very near a twelve month.

The prisoner Somerville called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Turnbull called one witness, who gave him a very good character.

William Turnbull . GUILTY . Death . (Aged 22.)

James Somerville . GUILTY . Death . (Aged 25.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-7

291. JOHN ARNOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , a brass cock, value 10 s. the goods of Sampson Hanbury and Henry Reed .

Indicted in a SECOND COUNT laying it to be the property of Sampson Hanbury only.

WILLIAM HOPTON sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutors Messrs. Hanbury and Reed. On the 16th of March, I saw the prisoner between five and six in the afternoon in the brew-house; I saw him come from the store-house and take a drink of beer, and after some time, he came up to where the cock lay, the cock was laying in a barrel that was full of beer, and he pulls it out and looks at it, and puts it in again, and then looked about him, and after that he pulls it out again, and lays it across his knee; then he took a knife out of his pocket, and cut the leather off that was fastened to it; after that he fixed the remaining part of the leather under the steering, that the barrel was fixed upon, and he went away with the cock in his hand, and I followed him; in two yards from the place, I catched him by the shoulder, I did not see the cock with him then, so I asked where the cock was that I saw him cut away? says he, I have cut off no cock, I have been taking a drink of beer; so he got his hand under his apron, and I put my hand there, and I found the cock in his hand under his apron, and I took hold of the cock at this end, and he struck me on the breast with this end of the cock, and I led him along, and he seemed not very willing to go, and I called assistance, and I secured him, and took him before the Lord Mayor; I carried the cock in one hand, and he in the other; when I see him take it, I was about fifteen yards off him in the store house, just opposite to him; I was in the dark, and he in a light place, I could see him very perfectly.

THOMAS KETTLEBY sworn.

I was in this brew-house; I was called to by the last witness, I assisted to take the prisoner, and we secured him, and took him before a magistrate. I had the brass cock in my hand using of it not ten minutes before. The prisoner begged our pardon, and downed on his knees to let us let him go.

JOHN RUSSELL sworn.

I am foreman to these gentlemen, their names are Henry Reed and Sampson Hanbury.

Q. What is the value of the brass? - We laid it before the justice's at ten shillings, but it is worth more than that.

Prisoner. I am turned of sixty years of age, I never did such a thing before in my life.

GUILTY . (Aged 63.)

Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-8

292. JANE BELL was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , five case knives, value 3 s. two case forks, value 4 d. the goods of James Richardson .

JAMES RICHARDSON sworn.

I am a publican ; I keep the sign of the Man in the Moon, in the parish of St. Mary's, Whitechapel ; I know the prisoner at the bar, she came in and called for two pennyworth of gin and water, and she conveyed the knives and forks in her pocket; I did not see her put them in. I charged her with taking them, and then she took them out, it was the 8th of March. I never see her before, she begged for mercy.

Prisoner. I am not a woman given to liquor nor never was; I went into this house; I never was before a judge in my life; I was a little in liquor, and I set me down, and they took these things from me; but I never saw them, nor knew where I was till between eight and nine at night, I was not sensible.

GUILTY . (Aged 51.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-9

293. WILLIAM BROMFIELD was indicted for stealing, three pounds weight of hogs bristles, value 3 s. the goods of Faith Taylor .

(The Case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

FAITH TAYLOR sworn.

I live in Henrietta-street, Cavendish-square ; I am a brush maker , the prisoner was a journeyman of mine; I had missed hogs bristles at different times, a considerable quantity, I found some at his lodgings, and a broom which he enveigled one of my apprentices to give him some hair to make; I did not find the prisoner but I found a bundle of black and white hair there.

STEPHEN THOMPSON sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mrs. Taylor, I am about fourteen or fifteen.

Q. Have you ever taken an oath before? - Never before this time.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? What will become of you if you speak false? Have you ever learned your catechism? - No.

Q. Have you never learned where lyars go? - They go to Hell.

Court. Do you expect punishment in another world if you don't speak the truth? - Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Now mind and speak the truth. You say you are an apprentice to Mrs. Taylor? - I am; Bromfield was a journeyman there; the prisoner he asked me for some hair, I believe it was one Tuesday night, a month or two ago, to make a brush; I told my mistress of it, that Bromfeild had asked me, and my mistress told me to give him some; I gave them to him, and I saw him put the hairs under his apron about a pound.

Court to Mrs. Taylor. What is a pound worth? - Two shillings and six-pence.

Thompson. He offered me a penny for my trouble for giving him these hairs.

Q. How came he to ask you? - He could not get at them cleverly himself, he wanted the little lilly white.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Court to Mrs. Taylor. This boy is committed to your care, and I think you are extremely wanting in the duty you owe to him, and the public, not to have taught him the first rudiments of religion. If this boy should fail in his future passages through life, I think a great deal will be imputable to you.

Reference Number: t17930410-10

294. MARGARET CAMPBELL was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , nine yards of muslin, value 1 l. the goods of Robert Waithman , privately in his shop .

CHARLES PARRY sworn.

I live with Robert Waithman , a linen draper , the corner of Bow street ; I was in the shop. On the 25th of March, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar came in, with two other women, and asked for some check, they looked at it, and had two yards, which they paid me half a crown for; then Margaret Campbell asked for some muslin to make her a cap, I shewed her some, several pieces, they were very difficult; I suspected their design; one woman kept looking about, from one side of the shop to the other, asking the price of several articles; at last, they fixed on two pieces, the one I asked two shillings, the other six shillings; they asked how much a quarter and half would come to of the six shillings? I told them two shillings and three pence. Margaret Campbell asked one of the other women to lend her half a crown, as she had not enough; she gave her something, it was not enough, so they went out; I was informed by this boy, that the woman in the long cloak had taken a piece of muslin; I had observed her before stoop down in the shop to pick up a halfpenny; I went after them, and got up to her, when she was about half way of Bow-street; when I came up to her, I told her that I would cut her some of the muslin, that she bid me money for; with that, she said, very well and returned; they both came towards the shop, but the other woman went off, and I followed she with the muslin; we came into the shop, I looked over the muslins to see which piece I had missed before I challenged her with it, and she dropped the muslin on the ground; before she came in, I am positive there was no muslin on the ground, it was not a great way from where she stood; I did not see her drop it, nor did I pick it up, there was nine yards and three quarters. (Produced and deposed to.)

THOMAS ARMSTEAD sworn.

I am going on fifteen.

Q. You know the nature of an oath? - Yes.

Q. What is it? - To bind me to speak the truth. I was in the shop that night; I came in between four and five, and I saw that woman, that is there, and two more; when I came in the muslin was on the ground, and this woman dropped an halfpenny, and in picking up the halfpenny, she picked up the muslin, and put it under her cloak, and I told the gentleman of it, and he went after her and brought her back. I saw her brought back, but I did not see her drop it.

MARY SLACK sworn.

I was in the shop when this woman was brought back. I saw her take her hand within side of her petticoat, and drop the muslin down from within side of her petticoats.

Q. Did you see the muslin fall from her? - I did; I see her kick it with her foot (here is the foot mark on it) when she dropped it from under her petticoats.

Prisoner. When that gentleman brought me back he searched me, and I had not a halfpenny worth belonging to him. I deal in a few oranges; I have three poor fatherless children; I went in with this woman to buy an apron, and I came out with her, and then this gentleman came out afterwards, and desired me to go back, and before we got to the door he searched me, and found nothing.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-11

295. JOHN DAVIS and JOSHUA BRUCE was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , a man's cloth coat, value 1 l. 5 s the goods of Simeon Howard .

SIMEON HOWARD sworn.

I only come to prove my property.

WILLIAM CRISP sworn.

I am thirteen.

Q. Be sure you say nothing but what is true. - I was walking by Mr. Howard's house between five and six o'clock, he keeps a cloths shop , I see the by, the prisoner in the blue coat, Joseph Bruce cut down the coat from the door; Davis the other prisoner was very nigh him, Bruce gave it to Davis, and Davies run away, Bruce he followed him pretty fast; it was the 22d of February.

Q. Could you see very plainly? - I could, and I told the shopman of it immediately; I saw him at the Rotation office and knew him again.

- sworn.

I am the prosecutor's shopman, he lives in Whitechapel ; I had immediately turned my back from the door to put up a lamp, and the boy came and informed me, and I went out, and saw Davis in Red Lyon street about an hundred yards from the shop.

Q. Did you make fresh pursuit? - I did; he had the coat under his arm; I know nothing at all about Bruce.

Prisoner Davis. Coming from Whitechapel Church I heard the cry of stop thief, and a man ran very fast and dropped something; I calls out master you have lost something, he dropped the coat, I picked it up and put it under my arm.

Prisoner Bruce. I was coming up Red Lyon-street and this little boy and another were sky larking, throwing turnip tops about, and they heaved one at me, and I threatened them, and in about twenty minutes after I heard the cry of stop thief, and then he came and said, he see me cut down the coat.

John Davis , GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Joshua Bruce , GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-12

296. ROBERT HARDY was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , four linen aprons, value 6 s. three linen

diaper table cloths, value 6 s. a linen napkin, value 1 s. a linen wrapper, value 10 d. a vicker basket, value 3 d. the goods of Mary Bromwick , and two linen aprons, value 5 s. the goods of Mary Medlicot , spinster .

MARY BROMWICK sworn.

I live in Spa-fields ; I lost four linen aprons; I don't know the day of the month, three table cloths and one napkin; I saw the man take them up, they were put out to dry in the yard; I did not know the prisoner before.

Q. How soon was he apprehended? - I apprehended him myself in a few minutes, and I called out my clothes were gone.

Prisoner. I wish to ask her whether when she came out she did not say I was not the man? - I did not; I have no doubt who was the person that took them.

MARY MEDLICOT sworn.

I live servant with Mrs. Bromwick; these clothes were lost the 3d of March; I had taken them in from the line, and put them on the steps of the door in order to bring them in; they had been drying in the yard; I saw the prisoner at the bar with the clothes in his apron, in his custody; I am certain that is the man; I did not know him before.

JOHN ELISHA TURNER sworn.

I took the prisoner with the linen that he stole out of the gentlewoman's yard, he had got up a little narrow passage; I took him in the passage with the things in his apron; he said, he did not take the things; as soon as I caught hold of him he flung down the things from his apron, and tried to get away, only I held him so fast by the collar; the constable has the things.

JOSIAH HON BORNE sworn.

I have got some table cloths and aprons which Turner gave to me. (Deposed to by Mrs Bromwick and Mrs. Medlicot.)

Prisoner to Turner. When you took me did you see any body else? - No, not a single person nigh; I took you with the things in your apron.

The prisoner called three witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Imprisoned six months in the house of correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-13

297. AMBROSE WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , a wooden hamper, value 2 s. and ninety five pounds weight of spun cotton value 7 l. the goods of Daniel Mason .

JAMES BETTS sworn.

I am the porter to the waggon that brought the goods up; the waggoner has no book keeper or warehouse, his name is Stanbridge, these hampers of cotton, four of them were delivered to me to deliver to the owner on the 28th of March by Mr. Stanbridge, to carry from St. John's-street to Brick lane, Spitalfields , to Mr. Mason, I took two of them there in a truck; I delivered them myself; this truck is my own; I carried the two first and delivered them, and I went back and fetched the third and fourth. I had them on my truck, and was going the second time; going along Smithfield this young man was passing me, I asked him where he was going? he said, into Aldersgate-street; I told him I was going into Spitalfields, I would be glad if he would give me a lift, and I gave him a shilling; we went to Spitalfields church and there we stopped to have a pint of beer,

but we did not stop any time at all; I said, we would have it coming back; then we went on and got to Mr. Mason's warehouse; I asked him to mind the truck; while I was delivering the third, he ran away with the fourth, from Mr. Mason's warehouse at the gateway; I I pursued him and took him, and I found the hamper on his back a few minutes after he left the warehouse.

JOHN DUNCH sworn.

I am a carpenter and joiner; this man gave me charge, I am a constable.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-14

298. BENJAMIN JUGGINS was indicted for that he not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and instigated by the Devil, on the 25th of February , a piece of false, feigned and counterfeit money, made and coined to the likeness of an half crown, falsely, deceitfully, feloniously, and traiterously did coin against the duty of his allegiance, his Majesty's Peace and the form of the statute .

Indicted in a second COUNT in like manner for coining a shilling.

Indicted in a third COUNT for coining a six-pence.

The indictment was opened by Mr. Schoen and the case by Mr. Fielding.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

In consequence of some information, I went to the Fleet Prison; I went first to the strong room where the prisoner was in custody in the Fleet Prison; Mr. Lawrance, Mr. Carpmeal, and Mr. Harper went with me, and another person whose name is Bryan, I searched the prisoner.

Q. Did these people all go into the strong room with you? - They did; in his right hand breeches pocket I found some silver, this was on the 25th of February, I don't remember the day of the week, about eleven or twelve o'clock. (The silver produced.) When we had so done we went into a room, his apartment, and there I saw a box which the prisoner declared was his; Mr. Lawrance took the base metal out of the box, I saw it in his hand.

Q. Was this box open when you first saw it? - No, Mr. Lawrance opened it, he took out some half crowns, shillings and six-pences, and some broken pieces, and I think one half crown.

Q. Did these appear to you to be good or bad? - Bad.

Mr. Knowlys. This man was in the strong room? - He was.

Q. How far is that from the room where you found the box? - It is the next floor.

Q. How many persons were in the room where you found these things? - I think only one.

Q. Do you recollect his name? - I do not, he told me it was the man he was chum to.

Q. That man is not here to day? - I have not seen him.

Q. He was a prisoner likewise? - I understand so.

Q. You talk about a box which you found there. Did the prisoner go with you to the room where you found these things? - He did not.

Q. Therefore you only talk of a box in that room? - We went back to him after we had been to that room and told him what we had found, he said it was his room; and Mr. Lawrance produced the money to him.

Q. The prisoner never saw the box from which you took this money from? - He did not.

Q. In point of fact he was not taken to that place? - He was not.

Q. How was the box opened? - I cannot tell whether it was opened with a key or without.

Q. You say the money that was found the half crown, shilling, and other pieces of money appeared bad to you? - They did.

Q. No man living who saw it could doubt it was bad? A man would have been a great fool to have taken it - I should not have taken it if I had looked at it.

Mr. Schoen. You have been asked as to this box, if I understand you right, you took this money to the prisoner, and asked him if that was his box, describing the box it was taken from? - Mr. Lawrance did; he said it was his box.

THOMAS LAWRANCE sworn.

I am one of the city officers; I went with Mr. Clarke into the Fleet Prison, the prisoner at the bar was sitting at the further side of the fire place in the Strong Room, in the Fleet Prison; I searched him, in his right hand waistcoat pocket I found these papers, I went with Mr. Clarke into another apartment, which we were informed was his room, he acknowledged the box I opened was his box.

Q. Did he say any thing about the apartment? - I don't recollect he did. We found a little bench on the window, and on the bench a flask. (Produced.) On the bench there was a parcel of files, they were all open in the room on the bench; the bench was on the front before the window; I found all these things on the bench or under the bench, some galley pots, a pewter pot, some broken crucibles, a parcel of metal, a hand vise, several files, a vial, and a bottle with liquor in them; here are four galley pots, I will not be certain for all, but three of them were on the stone outside of the window. Then I went to the box, the box was locked, I opened it with my bureau key, and I found this base silver, a half crown, five shillings, and one six-pence; five incomplete things, which I will call shillings, two six-pences, incomplete, and then there was some get, and this paper was likewise in the box. There was some spoons found which are here.

Q. Was there any spoons in the box? - None.

Q. Who was with you when you found these things? - Carpmeal, and Mr. Clarke, and Bryan, and Harper; I went back after to him, and he acknowledged it to be his box.

Q. Did you shew him the money that was taken out of the box? - I did not I attended the examination, and he saw the money; I shewed it him while he was under examination.

Court. When he acknowledged the box did you describe the room where the box was? - I did not.

Q. Did any body in your presence? - Not that I know of.

Mr. Knapp. You had been in a room, and asked him if that box was his box, he said it was? - Now all these things were public for any body's inspection, perhaps you have heard that he has a Chum? - I have heard that; the Chum was below, and was brought up to open the door.

Q. Then the Chum had the key of the door, and he let you in? - He did.

Q. And all these things were found at that window on the bench public? - Except that which I have described.

Q. You say it was your key that opened the box? - It was.

Q. Let us look at it, this is a very common key? - It is, but it was with some difficalty I got it open with it I assure you.

WILLIAM KEENE sworn.

I am the Chamberlain of the Fleet; the prisoner at the bar occupies No. 9, the room where the officers went; his Chum's name is Hunt, he was chummed on him the fifth of February, 1793. The man at the bar was the master of the room.

Q. How long had he occupied that room before February? - Some years; he moved to another room, and moved back to that room again.

Q. How long had he been confined in the Strong Room? - I cannot exactly say.

Q. Did you ever go into his room while he was there? - Frequently.

Q. Had you been there in the month of February? - I cannot charge my memory.

Q. Did you see a box? - I see two or three boxes there in the room, the day they searched the room; I believe they searched several boxes.

Mr. Knowlys. I think you say Hunt was the Chum then; who had been his Chum before? - One Rushton and others.

Q. This man was not rich enough to buy off his Chum? - I never knew he did, as long as I ever knew him, he had his Chum; I cannot charge my memory that ever he paid his Chum out.

Q. I believe this man had had the misfortune to quarrel with several of his fellow prisoners? - He has quarrelled with his Chum.

Q. And I believe very shortly before this time he had a complaint put in against him, for an assault on some person? - He did, his name is Tracy.

Q. In short, I believe this man is disliked by almost all the prisoners in the Fleet Prison? - I cannot tell; I have known him to have a quarrel with that man that was chummed upon him, and was obliged to put in bail. Tracey had been his Chum. Hunt introduced Tracey as his Chum, who has slept in that room during the absence of this man in the Strong Room.

Q. Hunt then introduced Tracey into this room, who has indicted the prisoner for an assault. Now Mr. Keene how long before this discovery was made, was this man confined in the Strong Room, and unable to visit this room, which was his, was it four or five days? - I cannot speak exactly, it was thereabouts.

Q. Then for four or five days this room, and whatever the man had in it was completely at the disposal of Tracey? - It was so.

Q. And Tracey who has an ill will to him, and indicted him for an assault has slept there, and been in that room. Now we find how very easily the box was opened; if that box which was opened was his there is nothing more easy on earth to open. Did not this man make pewter spoons? - I believe he did.

Q. Don't you know that he sold them about the prison? You have seen him at work? - I don't know indeed; I have seen him rasping and filing spoons when I have come in to gather the rent; I believe he has sold several in the prison.

Mr. Fielding. Who is Mr. Tracey? - The man that was concerned in raising the Royal George.

Q. He desired to get rid of Tracey? - He did.

Q. He did not like him to come into the room? - He did not.

Court. You told us you saw a box in that room which the prisoner acknowledged; was it described to him? - The colour of the box was described to him; there was one a deal box and this was a dark brown box.

Q. Did you tell him where you had been? - We did not; we went to him and searched him, and then we were directed

to that room as his room, and then we went back and shewed him what we had found, and he acknowledged it was his box it was taken out of.

Q. You said before, that he had not seen the property? - He did not see it, he said, the box was his that the property was taken from, but he never was shewn it.

MICHAEL SCOOL sworn.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe you resided some time in Dublin? - I did.

Q. As a barrister at law? - Yes.

Q. There was a bill of perjury preferred against you, was it tried? - There was a man of the name of Dillon.

Q. Answer the plain question; have you been tried on that indictment for perjury? - I believe I have.

Q. Do you mean to say only that you believe? was not you struck off the list from practising at the English bar? - Upon my oath I was; and hindered from proceeding in this kingdom, without being heard. I believe there was no other reason for striking me off, but because I was an Irishman. On my oath I was not heard. On my oath there was no ground for the indictment.

Court. I look upon him as a competent witness.

Mr. Fielding. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I do. I have known him some time; I knew two apartments that he occupied; the first apartment was No. 14, and I remember him at No. 2. There was only a wall between his apartment and mine.

Q. Did you know him at No. 9? - I have been with him in the apartment No. 9, I think it is in the third gallery, I called on him only once there to the best of my recollection; I went into his room, he was only sitting by the fire and doing nothing at all.

Q. Did you see him at work there? - No, never. In No. 2, I have seen him.

Q. How long ago? - I believe four or five months ago, when he lived at No. 14 or 15, there was some report of this business from a woman that he lived with; but I have often waked at night with the noise at No. 2, I was curious to know what it was.

Court. I think this is nothing to No. 9.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-15

299. JAMES BARNES was indicted for stealing on the 23d of March , two pounds eight ounces weight of green tea, value 10 s. the goods of the East India Company .

Indicted in second COUNT, for stealing the same goods, laying the property to belong to persons unknown.

The Case opened by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN WILSON sworn

The prisoner at the bar was a labourer in the Company's warehouses; all I know of the matter is this; the prisoner was suspected for some time, and I set two or three people to give a look over him, he was brought home I think the 23d of March, by Aaron Richardson and James Rickman, between ten and eleven o'clock; I was in the counting house; I sent for a King's officer, one of the lockers, and desired him to search him before me, and this tea, two pounds and a half, and upwards, was found in the pocket of his great coat.

Q. Was it a sort of tea of which you have a great deal more in your warehouse? - We have of the same sort and quality; upon this I asked him where he took it from? and his answer was, he knew nothing at all about it; I asked him several times.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you belong to the tea department? - I do.

Q. I take it for granted you cannot say there was any tea missing? - There were seven chests nearly empty.

Q. I believe the labourers all of them pull off their coats when they go to work? - Sometimes those that come in a working dress do not.

Mr. Knapp. Was the tea taken out of the coat he had on? - It was.

Mr. Knowlys. Did not he take his coat off to work? - I believe he did not, he was in the weighing gang.

Q. He has worked there three years? - I believe he has.

Mr. Knapp. In point of fact had the prisoner at the bar a great coat on covering another coat or not? - He had what they call a surtout coat covering another coat.

Court. You told us there was some missing at this time; you did not know this by going through the warehouses? - We saw the chests plugged, and have had some missing several months before, and it was going away daily.

Q. Was there not to the amount of some hundred men in the warehouse? - There was between three and four hundred.

AARON RICHARDSON sworn.

I am employed by the East India Company; I am a gate keeper. On the 23d of March last I stopped the prisoner, and had a strong suspicion; I stopped him at the back gate of the warehouse leading into Crutched Friars , it was at the inside of the gate; he came to the gate before his time of going out; his usual time is to go out at twelve o'clock, but it was rather before; I stopped him so far, and told him he had no right to go out before his time. Richardson, says he, it is only wanting four or five minutes, it makes no difference, says he, to the company, I live but just by, then says I, I must rub you down; I put my hands down him, and I felt the tea in his pocket, and he immediately wrenched himself away from me, I pursued him, and he endeavoured to make a run, and wanted to make to the gate by force, and I said, Rickman, you must not let the man go out, and I immediately stepped forward, and stopped him again; then I said Barnes, I have had a suspicion some time; now says I, you must go up to the officer Mr. Wilson, we went up, Mr. Wilson was there, and Mr. Wilson sent for the officer, and Mr. Noble came in, and Mr. Noble immediately searched him, and found the tea, and it was put into a sheet of paper before my face.

Mr. Knowlys. What the prisoner said that that way was his nearest way home was true? - It was, he lived just by.

JAMES RICKMAN sworn.

I am a labourer and watchman; I was present at the time the prisoner was stopped, I went then to Mr. Wilson with him to the counting house, and he was searched there by Noble, and there was upwards of two pounds of tea found upon him

RICHARD NOBLE sworn.

I am the King's officer, I searched the prisoner at the bar before Mr. Wilson, and I found on him this tea, and I have had it in my custody ever since. (Produced.)

The prisoner called five witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned twelve months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-16

300. JAMES BOWDEN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a man's cloth great coat, value 10 s. the goods of John Reece .

JOHN REECE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Harris, Rickman-street, Hanover-square ; I lost the coat out of the stable, it was my own; I had seen it the middle of the day before I lost it; the prisoner at the bar worked in the yard, sometimes he went out with the day job; the prisoner I took up on suspicion about twelve o'clock at night, and there was some duplicates found, the constable took them from him; I did not see him; I asked the prisoner about the great coat, and he denied it.

ROBERT MULCASTER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, and I have a great coat which I took in of the prisoner at the bar, on the 25th of March near nine o'clock at night; he pawned it for half a crown, he said it was his own; it has been in my possession ever since. (Produced and deposed to by part of the lining of the sleeve being mended.)

Prisoner. When I came out of this yard I owed a little money to my washerwoman, and I went into the stable where the horses stand, and I went in there for my own coat, and I thought that I had it, and owing my washerwoman a little money I carried it to this here pawnbroker, and I did not know but it was my own; I have no witnesses; I have not been brought here only an hour or so.

Court to Reece. Had he a great coat? - He had.

Q. Was it such a one as this? - I cannot tell, his horses stood in the same stable, there were twenty horses in that stable.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-17

301. CHARLES STAPLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a saddle, value 7 s. the goods of William Hammond .

Mr. HULL sworn.

I bought an horse about six months ago of Mr. Hammond, and Mr. Hammond was kind enough to lend me a saddle to use with that horse, as my own did not fit, it has continued in my custody ever since; I know the saddle that I had of Mr. Hammond, that this is the saddle.

THOMAS SHAW sworn.

My partner and I was working at the top of the yard, at Mr. Catley's livery stable, Gray's Inn-lane , and we saw the young man, the prisoner, come out of the stable with the saddle. This is about five or six weeks ago, and I ran after him and I laid hold of him, and I took the saddle from about his shoulder and brought him back, and I asked him where he was going with the saddle? which I knew was the property of Mr. Hull; and he said, a gentleman gave him 6 d. to carry it; so I brought him back again up the yard, and we took him to Hatton-garden before Mr. Green, and Mr. Green committed him. The saddle is here; I can swear to the saddle; I set Mr. Hull's name in the saddle.

Prisoner. The name he put on the saddle, he did it at the office.

- sworn.

My partner and I was at work, and we saw the prisoner go down the yard with the saddle.

Prisoner. A gentleman was coming out exactly from the place, and he said, he would give me 6 d. to carry it for him to Oxford-road.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-18

302. GEORGE LESTER and THOMAS IBBETT were indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , two cotton gowns, value 1 l. a silk cloak, value 15 s. a stuff petticoat, value 4 s. the goods of Sarah Brown .

WILLIAM PATRICK sworn.

I took in a gown and cloak of Thomas Ibbett , on the 11th of March.

Sarah Brown , &c. were called on their recognizances and did not appear.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-19

303. JOHN MACARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , a china bason, value 4 d. and seventy-seven copper halfpenc e; the goods, chattels, and monies of John Slany .

JOHN SLANY sworn.

I keep a public house in Roach-street, Ratcliff highway .

JOHN HENLY BLACK sworn.

On the 23d of March, last Saturday week, I was standing at my shop door, and I saw the servant of Mr. Slany attack the prisoner at the bar, looking to see which, I saw the prisoner at the bar had a bason under his arm, the servant attacked him in this kind of way, you are the thief, and you have robbed us of the bason and the halfpence; the girl he immediately seized by the shoulder and throws her into the mud; I crossed the way by the shop door.

JOHN BROOKE sworn.

I saw a scuffle between the prisoner at the bar and a maid servant about a bason.

ELIZABETH RAY sworn.

Q. Are you the girl that had this scuffle? - Yes; I live with Mr. Slany, I acted as a servant; this gentleman the prisoner at the bar, and he asked if there was any soldiers quartered in our house? I made answer and said, there was none at all; I saw him do nothing; I did not see him take the bason at all, a little girl was in the bar, and she told my mistress the soldier had got the bason of halfpence, I turns round immediately, I see the bason under his arm; I ran out after him; he threw me down in the mud, and used me very ill; I cannot swear to the pattern of the bason, but I can to the pieces; the bason used to be kept on a barrel in the bar, and my mistress had moved it under the counter; I saw it there while the soldier was there. The scuffle was about five doors off; I picked the pieces up in the street, and three shillings of halfpence.

THOMAS HUMPHRY sworn.

I am constable of Ratcliff; I had a warrant for to take the prisoner; I have got the pieces of the bason, and the halfpence.

Court to Elizabeth Ray . Did you know of your own knowledge, that there was any halfpence in the bason under the counter? - Yes, there was halfpence there.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-20

304. HARRIOTT DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , a satin cloak trimmed with fur, value 5 s. and two guineas and a half in money; the goods, chattels, and monies of Joseph Billan , in his dwelling house .

MARY BILLAN sworn.

I am the wife of Joseph Billan ; I know the prisoner, the first of my knowledge of her was the 10th of February I met her in St. Martin's-court, enquiring the way to St. James's-street; she accosted me with a very plausible and pitiful story; she said, she had been decoyed away by a gentleman from the boarding school, who had pawned her watch, and she wanted to find him; I gave her what directions I could, and gave her directions to come to me the next morning, to tell me the event of finding the gentleman; she came and said, she had not found him, and had not one halfpenny in her pocket; in consequence of which I employed her from Monday to Thursday, when I was asked out on business, and left her at work; when I returned at eleven o'clock at night she was gone, I saw the cloak about her the next day, when she was apprehended, it was a sattin cloak with a hole in the lining of it; I lost my money at the same time; the sattin cloak was not worth much; I had seen the money that morning, it was put in a cupboard against the mantle piece in a box; I cannot say the first time I saw her, but the last time I made my declaration against her was the 11th of March, I saw her then at Bow street, she had not the cloak on then because Mr. Delafontaine had it in his possession.

JOHN DELAFONTAINE sworn.

I am an officer of Sir Sampson Wright's; this lady saw the cloak and told me it was her property; I took it off the prisoner's back. (Deposed to)

Prisoner. I bought the cloak of a young woman at gravesend that was going to sea and had no occasion for it; I did not know it was a stolen thing.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing the cloak only. (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-21

305. WILLIAM KATES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Marsh , about the hour of seven in the night of the 11th of March , and stealing therein seven pair of womens stuff shoes, value 1 l. 4 s. two pair of womens leather shoes, value 6 s. two other leather shoes, value 2 s. two other stuff shoes, value 3 s. the goods of the said William Marsh .

WILLIAM MARSH sworn.

I live at Brentford . On the 11th of March about a quarter before seven in the evening I lost seven pair of stuff shoes, and two pair of leather shoes out of the shop, and two odd stuff shoes, and two odd leather shoes; I had just come into the shop, I heard something hit against the glass; my wife had a candle and she looked where the glass was that we make a show of, and she said, God bless me the shop is stripped, and I went and I missed these things, I jumped up immediately and ran out of doors, and by luck I went the right way, and ran about two hundred or two hundred and fifty yards, and I came up with a person who had got something under his coat, I saw him about four or five yards distant, I catched him by the collar and said,

my friend what have you got here? he said nothing; with that I catched hold of the shoes and said, my friend you have robbed my shop; that were the words I said; the shoes are here. (Produced and deposed to.) I kept the man and shoes till I delivered him into the constable's hands.

Prisoner. I was going along the street; I came up out of the country for work; I was going by and there were two men ran by me, they dropped something and I did not know what it was, I went to see and picked it up, and this man came up to me and asked me what I had got there? I said, I had nothing.

GUILTY .

Of stealing, but not of the burglary

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-22

306. GEORGE GOLDSMITH was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on the 26th of February , on William Bunny , with a certain offensive weapon and instrument called a clasp knife, with a felonious intent to take the money of the said William Bunny , from his person and against his will, feloniously to steal against the form of the statute .

WILLIAM BUNNY sworn.

I am a baker ; I was assaulted in Stepney-fields , on Tuesday the 26th of February; I was stopped by George Goldsmith, the prisoner; I am sure it was the prisoner, I had never seen him before, it was at half after six o'clock in the evening; it was not dark then; I could see about thirty yards before me; I saw the prisoner about thirty yards before I came up to him, as I was on one side and he on the other; when he was three paces off me he presented a knife to me, and said, you bloody buggar either your life or your money; and he flashed the knife across my face; I says, my friend you don't mean what you say; says he, what I say I mean; I said, I am a poor man I had only a few halfpence; you buggar then, says he, you have a watch; he still kept attempting to cut me with the knife, but I sprung back from him; I told him I had nothing but halfpence; says he, you buggar, halfpence will not do, you have got silver; I told him I had not, I see a man coming the same way as the prisoner came, when the person came up he asked what was the matter? not knowing at first but he might be an accomplice, I said, I don't know; he said, does he want to rob you? no, says the prisoner, I don't want to rob him, I am going to Blackwall, we were all three together, I turned about and I saw another man coming, and when he came up I told him that prisoner had a large knife behind him; the man went to look and he made a push directly at the man's side, but did not cut him, but cut through his two jackets; he still kept piercing two or three times more at the man's side, and then he ran about ten or twenty yards towards Whitechapel-road; the man says, I will have you; the person follows him and threw the prisoner against the bank; I came up at the time; the prisoner had got the knife and said, buggar you if you don't let me go I will cut your bowels out; I got hold of his wrist and said to the other man, now take the knife I have got hold of his hand, and then we secured him, he never was twenty yards from us.

Prisoner. I was a quarter of an hour out of his sight? - He never was from us.

Court. How long might all this take up? - I suppose the whole of it did not exceed seven minutes, the whole time of his attempting to cut me and having the scuffle with him, and securing him; I will be on my oath of it.

SAMUEL BUNNY sworn.

I was coming from whitechapel the same way as the prisoner was, and just as I got through the cow lare, I saw the man and the prisoner, and when I came up I see the prisoner with his hand, as if something was in it, and I said what is the matter? the other said, he did not know, thinking I was a companion; I pursued and we took him; he was never ten yards from us.

EDWARD BROWN sworn.

I was the person who came up; I had been over the hedge to ease my self, and I saw the prisoner come up to Mr. Bunny with the knife, here is the knife; I see Mr. Bunny, the other evidence, come up; I asked Mr. Bunny what was the matter? I saw him cut at Mr. Bunny across the neck; I asked does the man want to rob you? Mr. Bunny said, yes, he has got a long knife behind him; I immediately laid my head on one side to look, and he immediately shoved it into my jackets, which with that I said, O Lord help me! for I am done; I then said I will take you now; with that he ran about twelve yards or so, and I ran up to him and pushed him to an hedge, and we took him; going along to the magistrate he tried to pick the knife out of my pocket and when he could not do that he tried to get another knife out of his own pocket, says, he I am done; now says I, what must my wife and family have done had you killed me? says he, I might as well have killed you and saved myself.

Prisoner. I belong to the William Pitt at Blackwall, and I was going strait over the fields, and this man said I pretended to rob him; and I had no such a thing as a knife about me.

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17930410-23

307. JOHN SILVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of March , a hempen sack, value 1 s. a horse cloth, value 1 s. two bridles, value 4 s. a leather martingal, value 6 d. a hammer cloth, value 5 s. the goods of Redmond Kelly , Esq .

WILLIAM HEWLETT sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Kelly; we lost an hempen sack, a horse cloth, two bridles, a leather martingal, and a hammer cloth, they were lost out of the stable; the door was broke open the 18th of March, between seven in the evening, and half after nine; some of the things are here, I know the prisoner at the bar; he was a coachman before he lost a leg; he and I worked together about six years ago, I had not seen him since, till this four or five months.

Q. When did you see the things next after they were lost? - On the 19th, the sack and cloth was found in the prisoner's house; I searched the house with the constable, John More ; the house is about a mile from the stables; the prisoner was down at the stables on the morning of the 18th, between ten and eleven; we found the horse cloth in a tub of water, and a hempen sack up stairs the constable brought it down; I am a painter and glazier.

HENRY WADER sworn.

I am a painter and Glazier; I was going to see an acquaintance in Tothell-street, and I saw a man coming out of Mr. Kelly's stables with the sack; with that I hallooed out coachman, it was Monday the 18th, the same day the things were lost, about a quarter before nine in the evening; not very dark, he made no answer; with that I drew back and I see him walk away without the sack, and I see him come back again and take the sack up and put it on his shoulder and went away with it across the high road; and I ran round the pavement and met him, and I asked him whether the coachman was in the stable? and he made

no answer, so I went away; I am sure the man was the prisoner, I never saw him before but that evening.

JOHN MOORE sworn.

I am a constable; I searched the prisoner's house, I found the hempen sack in the one pair of stairs; it is here, it has been in my possession ever since; I went below stairs and in a tub there was a horse cloth wet, and the binding ripped off, and by the side of the tub. (The sack and horse cloth produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was coming out and going along the middle of the yard I saw something lay on the left hand, in this coach stable, I went up to it and it appeared to be full of something, I takes the sack up and sits it up on its end; and I thought it was stole from somewhere, or a sack littered out of some hackney man's cart; with that I takes the sack on my back and carries it half down the yard, and I takes it off my back, and I thought I would not carry it any further; and then I takes it up again and carries it home, the horse cloth was wet in the sack.

Court to Moore. In what place was the hempen sack found? - In the one pair of stairs under the bedstead.

GUILTY . (Aged 26)

Imprisoned twelve months and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-24

308. WILLIAM BLINCO and THOMAS HOSKINS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , four bushels of beans, value 16 s. a hempen sack, value 2 s. the goods of John and Hayter Reed .

Indicted in a second COUNT for stealing the same goods, laying them to be the property of persons unknown.

(The Case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

RICHARD PERRY sworn.

I am a servant to the prosecutor's; John Reed and Hayter Reed, they are corn factors ; I am the man that measures the corn, they live in Mill-street-Bermondsey; I remember measuring some corn on Thursday the 7th of March, forty sacks of oats, and ten of beans, they were measured to go in our waggon, it was about four o'clock in the afternoon; I was present while most were put in, two or three sacks of beans were put in afterwards, while I was gone up stairs about my business.

Q. How many sacks of beans did you see put into the cart? - I cannot rightly tell, I measured them, the other man put them in; they were to go to Mr. Kitchener, I know the prisoner Blinco, he was our master's waggoner ; I don't know Hoskins.

Mr. Knowlys. You measured a quantity of corn, whether they got into the waggon which Blinco was to drive you cannot tell? - I cannot.

ROBERT WILLS sworn.

I work in grinding for them, a labourer, I received ten sacks of beans from Perry the last witness, he delivered them out of the warehouse to me, and I delivered them to William Blinco and Thomas Neaves; what became of the beans I cannot pretend to say, I saw them put into the waggon, I saw the last sack put in, I saw all the ten sacks put in.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you hear Mr. Perry say there were ten sacks of beans? - No, I did not.

Q. You say now you delivered ten sacks? - I delivered all he put up.

Q. Do you mean to say there were ten sacks delivered to you? - I delivered all that were put up.

Q. You don't mean to assert there were ten sacks? - No, and please your honour.

Q. Then whether there were ten sacks or not you cannot tell. Now what is become of Mr. Neaves? - He is not here.

Q. Then whether Mr. Neaves put the sacks into the waggon you cannot tell? - Yes, I am certain he put in all I gave to him.

Q. Did you see Neaves put all the sacks into the waggon, that you delivered to him? - I did.

Q. Where did you come from just now, from the public house? - No, not at present, I have not been there some time.

Court to Perry. Did you put up ten sacks to the labourer Willy? - I told ten sacks out, and then I filled them.

JOHN VOWELL sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Kitchener; he lives in the New Road, St. George's in the East.

Q. Do you remember at any time in March, the waggoner, the defendant, coming to your master's? - Yes, on the 7th of March, about five or half after five in the evening; some oats and beans came in Mr. Reed's waggon.

Q. Do you know what quantity of oats and beans you was to receive? - No, not in particular.

Q. Do you know what you did receive? - Nine sacks of beans.

Q. What did you do with these nine sacks of beans? - Put them up in one part of the warehouse by themselves.

Mr. Knowlys. All that you received of Blinco you put into your master's warehouse? - Yes.

Q. How long was it afterwards before there was any mention of a loss? - To the best of my recollection it was not till Saturday night; I was not acquainted there was any deficiency before that.

Q. Then on Saturday night you told your master there were but nine sacks; did not your master accuse you? - Of what.

Q. There was a sack deficient, and you told him you never received but nine? - Yes. I know the situation that I left the sacks in; and they were all right as I received them.

Q. Your master was very angry that you had not ten sacks to produce, therefore of course you told him you received but nine? - I did.

Mr. Knapp. Who was with Blinco? - The man that was with him is not here.

Mr. Knowlys. You would have had to make up the ten sacks good, unless you had thrown the blame on Blinco? - It was no mistake, because I knew how I put them.

Q. I only ask you the question? - Yes, to be sure I must.

Q. Therefore it was the best way to say there was only one nine sacks? -

Jury. Was there not a bill of parcels delivered? - Not that I see.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you mean to swear that there was not a bill of parcels delivered with these goods? - I will not swear there was, or was not.

Court. Will you swear they did not deliver a bill of parcels? - They did not to me, I will swear that.

Q. Who was the man that delivered these beans? - Blinco.

Q. Did you count them when they were delivered on Thursday? - I did not, no more than place the beans in one part of the warehouse by themselves.

Q. Did you neither count them, nor receive a bill of parcels? - I know there was no more than nine.

Mr. Knowlys. You might have put up ten, and somebody might have slipt out one from your warehouse, as well as any other place. Is not that possible? - It is possible.

- KITCHENER sworn.

I deal in corn. On the 7th of March, about half past five in the evening some

corn was delivered by Blinco and another man, whom I have never seen before nor since, he ran away; there came in the waggon twenty quarters of oats, and ten quarters of beans; I delivered the key to Vowel and told him where to put them, but I did not see the beans delivered myself; I went in the moment they were unloaded, and I found there were ten sacks together, but one was a sack of oats, which was taken away from the other side, and put to the sacks of beans.

Q. Had you any bill of parcels? - I had.

Q. Had you any quantity of oats? - Yes, but I had only five quarters left there; fifteen were put at another place; the bill of parcels I have got here, it was sent to Mr. Reed again as a receipt. On Saturday night Mr. Reed applied to me to know if I had received my beans safe, I told him I believed I had, as there were ten sacks together; but when I came to examine again more particular I found one sack of oats short.

Mr. Knowlys. You yourself signed the bill of parcel, that all was right? - I did.

Q. I take it for granted that when you found it not all right, you expected Vowel to make good the sack of beans? - I should not look to him for the sack of beans.

Q. Vowell had access to this warehouse of your's? - The key was never out of my possession after Vowell stowed them, till Mr. Reed told me he suspected the carman stealing the beans.

Q. The beans have never been found I believe? - Yes, they have.

NATHANIEL TURNER sworn.

I keep a public house, in Whitechapel the Seven Stars.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoner's at the bar? - I know one by sight very well, the eldest man of the two Hoskins, he works in the market as a porter, and comes into my house frequently for a pint of porter; the other is a stranger to me.

Q. Do you remember seeing Hoskins in the evening of the 7th of March? - Yes, he was at my house the 7th of March, by himself first about six o'clock in the evening, it was on Thursday; he came again afterwards with the waggoner that stands there, it was in less than half an hour after the first time, the waggoner came in and asked me to let him leave a sack of beans; I asked who it was for, they did not give an answer in a proper manner as they should, and I said take it away, I will have no such a thing in the house; they took it away again, and put it in the waggon again; and went towards Aldgate, and then it was offered for sale.

Q. Did you see the waggon the time the waggon was at the door. How many sacks were in the waggon at the time? - I cannot tell what quantity; then they brought it back from Aldgate and pitched it at the door about a quarter of an hour after, as I have a stand at the door; I made them take them again off the bench for fear they should break it; and then Hoskins took it on his back, carried it along the street, and he was stopped by the patrole, I did not see him stopped.

Q. What became of Blinco? - I don't know, he was not with him at this time; the patrole stopped him in the street in about two minutes with the sack of beans and brought him back, and they were pitched at my door; and the patrole asked me to take it into my house, I let him, I have brought it in a coach here to day.

Mr. Knowlys. You never see Blinco before? - No, not to my knowledge.

Q. And this was the 7th of March, therefore you are not certain Blinco is the man? - I am not; Hoskins I know very well; it was Blinco and another man that came first, Hoskins was employed

by them to carry them, Blinco is the man that came to my house.

Q. Are you certain of that - I am.

Q. You never see him before in your life? - I never did.

Q. You did not see him afterwards till you had the hearing before the justice, I believe that was the Saturday following two days afterwards; and then you was not certain Blinco was the man, you saw on Thursday? - Yes, I am certain Hoskins was not with him at first, but Hoskins was the man who was afterwards found with the beans.

Court. Who asked you to leave the sack of beans? - Blinco asked me that.

JOHN FISHER sworn.

I live at the Rose and Crown Aldgate, I am a publican; I know the old man Hoskins, I remember seeing him in March last, I cannot say what time it was, Thursday evening after dark.

Q. Can you tell us whether you made any observation of any thing he brought with him; did he bring any thing? - No.

Q. Did he buy any thing of you? - No.

Q. Did he sell any thing to you? - No.

Q. Did he offer to sell any thing to you? - He did, he said he had got a flyer; he told me afterwards it was a sack of beans.

JAMES COLLINS sworn.

I am a patrole of Whitechapel High-street. On the 7th of March last, at night I took the prisoner Hoskins with the sack of beans on his back, he was going on; I asked him what he had got there? he said beans; says I, where are you going? he said, to Mr. Johnson's, with that I told him I should stop him on suspicion, he said he would take me to the place where he took them from; he went back to the Seven, Stars Whitechapel, the house of Mr. Turner, and pitched them on the pitching block; about half an hour after, I saw Mr. Turner. Then I took Hoskins to the Rotation office; Mr. Turner had them delivered to him, and has had them ever since. (The sack produced and deposed to.)

HAYTER REED sworn.

The sack has the same mark, as those I sent with the waggon that night; but I believe no man living consistently could swear to corn.

Mr. Knowlys. You say very fairly that no man living consistently could swear to corn; your name is Hayter Reed, what is your partner's name? - John Reed , I have no other. I read to Blinco the note which I sent with him, twenty quarters of oats, and five quarters of beans, which makes ten sacks.

Prisoner Blinco. The gentleman he signed the note when I delivered the corn.

Prisoner Hoskins. I work in the market unloading and loading; I was at Mr. Turner's, and they came up with the waggon, and stopped at the door, one George Green was with them, that is run away, they came up and called for a pot of beer, they took a sack of beans out of the waggon, and carried it backward to Mr. Turner, and Mr. Turner told them the beans should not be there, and they carried it out again.

JEREMIAH SORE sworn.

I am a coachman; I drive a stage coach, I come to speak against the prisoner Hoskins, what was said to him at the time they gave him the beans out of the waggon, at the Rose and Crown, Aldgate, High-street, Mr. Fisher's, the man Hoskins came into Mr. Fisher's and asked Mr. Fisher if he wanted a flyer? he told him he wanted no such thing, this man directly Hoskins goes out, and he told the man it would not do there, he should take them to some others; he takes them

out of the waggon and goes to the Seven Stars.

Q. Was the other prisoner there? did you see him at this public house? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Was there any other man with the waggon besides this man Hoskins? - There was; some man gave him the sack out of the waggon, and it was carried to the Seven Stars, about three hundred yards.

Q. What else did you hear about it? - The words that was said when it was delivered out of the waggon by the other man was, that he was to bring the money to him at the Magpie and make the most of it; he took them and offered them for sale at the Seven Stars, to a man at the door, and a man bid him eight shillings for them; they were not sold.

William Hoskins . GUILTY . (Aged 57.)

William Blinco . GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Imprisoned twelve months in the house of Correction , and publickly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-25

309. THOMAS STANTON was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's Highway on Samuel Bellchamber , on the first of March , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a metal watch, value 4 l. and part of a metal chain, value 1 d. the goods of the said Samuel Bellchamber .

SAMUEL BELLCHAMBER sworn.

I am a waiter at the Glouster Coffee-house, Piccadilly; I was robbed the first of March, Friday morning, between one and two; I was under the Great Piazza, Covent-garden ; I was going to get a bed; I had spent the evening with a few friends, and I was locked out of my master's house; just as we got to Mr. Maddocks's door, I was surrounded by four or five arms, and this Stanton, he held my arms while the other took my watch of me; he put both his arms round me, he was on my left side, I had the watch in my right hand, and one part of the chain; they gave me a violent strain when they got it from me, when they first pulled it out of my pocket; I caught it in my hand.

Q. What happened before the watch was in your hand? - I was shoved four or five yards before the watch was taken from me; then they had me tight in their arms; I pulled the watch out of my pocket myself, in order to secure it on their attacking me, and I had it in my right hand, and the watch was taken out of my hand by main force, and my wrist bent almost double; my hand was sprained for three weeks, I could not use it; I saved part of the chain, and the seal and the key.

Q. You don't happen to know whose hand took it? - I cannot say that.

Q. At the time it was taken had he hold of you? - He had.

Q. Have you never seen that watch again? - No. I gave about hand-bills and advertised, but I never saw any thing of it. I held Stanton by the collar, the rest went off, and I detained him till the watch came up; he was examined, nothing was found, the watchman examined him directly; the watchman is here; I told the watchman I had lost my watch.

Q. Did you describe what sort of a watch it was? - I did not; it was a metal watch.

Mr. Knowlys. Now, Mr. Bellchamber, it is well a man should continue in the same story, you have been saying that you had got the watch in your hand, and one of them pulled it out of your pocket; how came you to say before

the magistrate that it was taken out of your pocket? - I believe I did not swear that.

Q. I will read the information to you,

"you met four or five young men who ran violently against you several times, one of which took the watch out of your pocket." - It was taken wrong the first time.

Q. Did you mention a word before the magistrate of this man's laying hold of your arms, while the others robbed you? - I might not say it then, but I know he did.

Q. You was examined before the magistrate the next morning; then the next morning you must at least have as good a recollection of the matter as you can have now? - I was not asked above four or five questions.

Q. I think the most material question in the description of a robbery, is how it was committed; there you did not mention a word of his having held you while the other robbed you? - I don't know that I did.

Q. The magistrate asked you how it happened, how came you not to mention that this man enclosed you in his arms while the other robbed you? Because that is a very material circumstance, however you did not mention it there? - I don't know that I did.

Q. Now another question; was not this man taken up for an assault on the watchman, and not for your robbery? - No, because I had hold of him.

Q. I asked you whether the man was not taken to the watch-house on the charge of assaulting the watchman, and not for a robbery on o? - I charged the watchman with him as soon as he came up; I don't know was taken for assaulting the watchman.

Q. But when a man's life is in danger we wish people to be positive; was your charge made before you made it at the watch-house? - I gave charge directly the watchman came up.

Q. Do you mean to say that you gave charge before you got to the watch-house? - He was taken away immediately as soon as the watchman came up; I said take charge of this man for he has robbed me.

Q. Upon your oath did you mention a tittle of your being robbed by this man before you got to the watch-house? - Certainly I did, I certainly gave charge of him as one of the people that robbed me.

Court. Where was he searched? - In the watch-house.

Mr. Knowlys. They did not search him on the spot? - They took him to the watch-house.

Court. Do you mean to swear that you told the watchman you lost your watch before you got to the watch-house? - I did.

Mr. Knowlys. Will you stand by that that you gave charge of that man, as one of the persons that robbed you before you got to the watch-house? - I don't understand you.

Q. I will put it in such a way as you shall understand; on your oath did you at all charge this man, as being one of the persons concerned in the robbery before you got to the watch-house? - Yes, I did charge him before I got to the watch-house.

Q. Now when you got to the watch-house you had the chain about your finger? - I had it in my hand.

Q. Upon your oath did you mention the circumstance of having lost your watch till the watchman asked the question, from the circumstance of seeing the chain in your hand? - Yes, several times.

Q. Now you was perfectly sober at that time? - No, I was not so.

Q. How long had you been drinking? - Some time.

Q. We want to know what time; from five o'clock in the afternoon till one in the morning? - No, not so much as

that; it was from about half past nine, and I had been drinking till between one and two.

Q. All that time you had been drinking? - Part of the time.

Q. I ask you whether you was so drunk, as not to be able to know what you was about? - I certainly was in liquor a good deal.

Q. I want to know how far you was got in drunkenness, upon your oath had not you drank till you was perfectly insensible - I was not so bad as that, I own I was very bad.

Q. Could you answer the watchmens questions that they put to you, had you the power of utterance at that time? - I don't know about that.

Q. Then you don't know whether you was able to articulate a word to the watchman? - Yes, I suppose so.

Q. Are you sure that you was able so to express yourself, as to have your words understood? - I should think I was not so intoxicated as that.

Q. Do you mean to say you was at all sensible of what passed? - I recollect being stopped by them; I recollect going to the watch-house, and seeing the man searched.

Q. How came you to give a different account before the magistrate than today, do you think you had got over your drunkenness the next morning? - I was not perfectly sober then, I did not go to bed till between three and four o'clock.

Q. And the magistrate did not sit till twelve o'clock, and yet you was not perfectly sober then; your situation in life is only that of a waiter? - That is my situation.

Court. What is the value of this watch? - I valued it at 4 l. it cost me seven guineas and a half.

JOHN WILKINS sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Mews the brewer; I don't exactly recollect the night, but I think it was about five or six weeks ago, I had been spending my evening in Maiden lane, Covent Garden, and coming home, I went through the Piazza's, and I saw five or six men surrounding the prosecutor, and I stood for some minutes, I believe ten, and I see them hoist him backward and forward, and several of them struck him; after standing this time I remonstrated with two or three watchmen who stood round, for suffering the man so to be insulted, without interfering. The watchmen then made an appearance and interference, which gave me an opportunity of going in amongst them, I went in, and immediately laid hold of the man, who had been confining the prosecutor by the arms during the whole time of the bustle.

Q. Is the prisoner that man? - I think he was; on my taking hold of him, I directly told the watchman to take him to the watch-house, and I would bring the prosecutor; they did with some little difficulty; I got the prosecutor to follow after; I accompanied the prosetor to the watch-house, where he gave charge of him; I did not attend any further.

Q. Did you give charge before he came to the watch-house? - No, sir, I gave him into the custody of the watchmen, I did not attend to it any further, I then left him, I might stay there as much as a quarter of an hour after; when I got into the crowd, I observed the prosecutor had got a watch chain in his hand, he said, they had wrenched the watch from him.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you hear the watchman at the watch-house ask the prosecutor what was become of his watch? - I don't recollect that question.

[The remainder of this trial in the next part, which will be published in a few days.]

Reference Number: t17930410-25

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the City of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 10th of April, 1793, and the following Days:

Being the FOURTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER IV. PART II.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

PRICE ONE SHILLING and FOUR-PENCE.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

The Continuation of the Trial of THOMAS STANTON .

Q. Had the prosecutor at that time any share of recollection so as to recollect what was past? - He was in a state of intoxication, all the account he gave was that he came out of a coach.

Q. Was he able to give any account of the transaction at the watch-house? - No, he only said, he was ill used by the people, that is all that I recollect of the circumstance; he appeared very much in liquor; but the whole of the business seemed to have brought him something to his recollection.

- sworn.

I am a watchman; about half after one, on the 1st of March, there was some people got about Bellchamber here, and the watchmen threw their rattles, and I came up to their assistance, and Mr. Bellchamber had hold of the prisoner, and the prisoner had hold of him by the breast, I asked the prisoner what business he had with him? and he said, what was that to me, he wanted to take care of him, so I told him to go about his business; with that, he made a strike at me at my breast, and I took him out of Mr. Bellchamber's hands, then with that Mr. Wilkins came up, and he said watchman take him away, and take him along to the watch-house.

Q. While you was in the street did the prosecutor give you any charge of the prisoner? - Yes, he told me to take care of him, for he was one of the people that robbed him of his watch; I took him to the watch-house.

Q. Was you examined before Mr. Justice Addington at Bow-street? - No, I was not. On this, I was for myself, because I gave charge of him for striking me.

Court. He was examined at the watch-house? - He was, there was nothing found but a couple of shillings in his pocket?

Prisoner. Please your Worship, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I had been spending my evening with a few friends, and was going my way home, through the Piazza, Covent Garden, I saw a crowd about the prosecutor, and seeing him a decent man, I thought I would

take his part; the watchman came up and took me, this watchman said immediately, I saw a man run out of the crowd, and very likely he was the man that robbed him: But however this prosecutor, by the persuasion of other people, thought proper to charge me. I never before this was in the walls of any prison, my name was never known to be amongst suspected persons, and I hope you will find me as innocent as I am conscious I am myself.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-26

310. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , a plate coach glass in a wooden frame, value 5 s. the goods of Dennis O'Neal .

DAVID MACLESH sworn.

The prisoner was helping me in the stables; I am coachman to Lord Corke, the prisoner had been in the stable about a fortnight, my Lord was not in town; I had two horses to take care of, he went away after a fortnight, and went to live along with another coachman, and in about a week after, one evening I found my coach house door broke open, and this glass was taken out, it was a side glass; the coachman where he was living, in the mean time, the next morning, the 2d of March, found this glass on him, I saw it on the 2d of March, I discovered the coach house the 1st of March, I saw it again in the custody of the coachman, where he was living, William Collins ; the glass was broke across the middle, before it was in a coach belonging to Mr. Neal, which stood in that coach house under my care.

WILLIAM COLLINS sworn.

I know the prisoner at the bar; I found this glass on him, he helped me, and he brought the glass into my stable, and I asked him where he got it from? he said, from Lord Cork's coachman: I thought it was not come honestly by, and I sent to Lord Cork's coachman.

Prisoner. The coach doors was broke open, and I was going by, and I took the glass out.

GUILTY .

Publickly Whipped

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-27

311. GEORGE ANDERSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Turner , about the hour of ten in the night, of the 4th of March , and stealing therein, a silver watch, value 1 l. seven silver tea spoons, value 7 s. and a pair of silver tea tongs, value 2 s. the goods of the said Thomas Turner .

THOMAS TURNER sworn.

I live at the horse shoe and magpie, Berner's-street, Soho . On the 4th of March, my room and bed room was broke open, it was after ten o'clock; I was down at Stanmore that day, and I fancy I was not at home when I was robbed. About half after ten my wife came into the parlour, and told me the bed room door was broke open; with that I went up stairs and looked, and saw some of the drawers broke open, but did not mind any thing then but my watch, which I left hanging up at the bed's head; I came down stairs, and there was some people drinking, and the prisoner with the rest, I insisted on searching every one present, as I had been robbed of a watch, and begged nobody to go out, the prisoner moved to

the end of the box, and I took him by the collar, and I said, I will search you first; I put my left hand into his right hand pocket, and out of that I pulled a chissel, a new one, without a handle turned up at the end; and I put my hand into his pocket again, and I pulled out an handkerchief and three tea spoons, and a pair of tea tongs, they were mine marked I. S. G. I sent for a constable, the constable came, and between his thigh and his breeches, he took out four more tea spoons, and then he further searched him, and took out of his pocket a guinea, two six-pences, half a crown, and several halfpence, that is all we found on him, and several duplicates; the duplicate of the watch was found in his pocket the next day before the magistrate, he was a lodger, he lodged with another black man.

Q. You don't at all know how the bed room door was opened? - I do not.

GEORGE NISBITT sworn.

I am the constable; I was sent for about half past ten on Monday night, the 4th of March, and Mr. Turner gave me charge of the prisoner, and I searched him and found four silver tea spoons between his breeches and his thigh. (Produced and deposed to.) I found the duplicate of the watch in his pocket, in a pocket book, and the money the justice ordered me to keep till I came before your worship; I found the watch by the duplicate, the pawnbroker has it here.

ROBERT ARMSTRONG sworn.

I produce a watch which I believe I took in of the prisoner at the bar, I never saw him before, but I believe him to be the man, it was Monday evening the 4th of March, I belive it might be between eight and nine, he brought it twice, the first time he brought it about eight o'clock or between eight or nine, my fellow servant offered him money upon it, and he asked him whose it was? in a little time afterwards he came again and took what my fellow servant offered; I lent him it, it was a guinea. (The watch deposed to.)

Prisoner. I went to the house to get a pint of beer, and setting and drinking it, the other black man I sleep with, my bed fellow, asked me to go and pawn the watch at the pawnbroker's, he told me to ask three guineas, they said one guinea; I went back to tell him, and he told me to go and get the guinea, and I went and when I came back I gave him the guinea, and then he asked me to go and pawn the spoons, and I would not.

GUILTY of stealing, but not of the burglary . (Aged 17.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17930410-28

312 JOHN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing the 23d of February , a silver watch, value 3 l. a steel watch chain, value 2 s. a steel seal, value 2 d. the goods of John Mitchell , in his dwelling house .

JOHN MITCHELL sworn.

I am a labouring man I live near Fulham ; I lost my watch; I was not at home when it was taken out.

ANN MITCHELL sworn.

I was at home when the watch was taken, the prisoner at the bar came and knocked at the door and asked me if there was not a house to lett? I said, yes, two, one that I lived in and another, says he, I will be glad if you will shew me them, says I, if you please to see mine first; I shewed him mine, and then he asked to see the other house, as soon as I knocked at the door of the other house, he said he liked the other house best, says he, I will come

and let you know on Monday, and take it for three years certain, and begged the favour of me to let him go into the house again to measure the fire places, to see if the stoves fitted; says he, will you be so good to let me go up stairs to measure the front room fire place? my watch was hanging on the bed side, I let him; he comes down and bids me good morning, when I instantly thought of my husband's watch, I went up stairs and found it was gone, and I runs after him and met him.

Mr. Schoen. There is in point of fact another house in the row that is to be lett? - There is, the next door but one.

Q. Do you recollect when the man left your house to go to the other, whether you left your door open? - No, I did not, I locked it.

Q. How long was it before you had seen your watch? - When he knocked at the door I see the watch, and it was half after ten.

Q. Do you know whether the garden door was open? - No, it was not.

- WOODLUCK sworn.

I was at work at Mr. Wilcox's garden and I heard the cry of stop thief, and Mrs. Mitchell was there, and she said, the prisoner had took her watch; the prisoner was stopped, and I found the watch laying on a gravel walk, on Mr. Heaviside's garden, and it has been in my possession ever since.

Mr. Schoen. How far is Mr. Wilcox's garden from Mr. Mitchell's house? - five or six hundred yards.

WILLIAM WEBB sworn.

I was present at the pursuit of this man; I saw him run past me; Mrs. Mitchell and another was pursuing; I saw him swing his arm forward, but I could not see what he flung, but I imagined it must be then he threw the watch out of his hand, it was towards Mr. Heaviside's garden.

Mr. Schoen. He was running, it was a cold frosty morning? - No, the frost was broke.

JOHN OSBORN sworn.

I stopped the man, the people was pursuing him, and crying stop him.

GUILTY of stealing to the amount of 39 s . (Aged 33.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-29

313. CATHERINE OWEN and JANE HUGGINS were indicted for feloniously making an assault on Daniel Swinney , in a certain dwelling house, on the 27th of March , and putting him in fear and feloniously taking from him and against his will, a silver watch, value 2 l. 2 s. a steel watch chain, value 2 d. a metal watch key, value 1 d. a sixpence, and eight halfpence, the goods, chattels, and monies of the said Daniel Swinney .

DANIEL SWINNEY sworn.

I know the prisoners at the bar. On the 27th of March, I was going to the hospital with my wife to lie-in, she had got a letter to lie-in there, because I was a poor man, and I could not afford to keep her at home; at my coming back, I came by this Parker's-lane, it was four o'clock in the afternoon, at the bottom of a court, near Drury-lane , I was making water there, and this Jane Huggins came up to me, and asked me if I would have any thing to drink? I told her I would have none; Catherine Owen was with her, and then they both pulled me up inside of a door, in the place in which I was robbed; I was not in liquor, I had only drank my share of three pints of beer, and a quartern of gin that day, and that is all; I never drank in their company, they pulled me up two steps of the stairs; they pulled me up and dragged me up into the room, and then

they came to me, and asked me which I would lie with? I told them I was a married man, and I would not lie with either; I stayed in the house above a quarter of an hour, they had the door shut, and had me close in the corner, and they robbed me of a watch, I gave two pounds five shillings for, but four or five days before; the low woman Catherine Owen took the watch; there is the woman! I came down stairs directly, and the tall woman gave me a blow in the mouth, and took away sixpence, and four-pence from me, and tumbled me down stairs; I came down stairs, and hallooed out I was murdered.

MARGERET REARY sworn.

I was standing at my own door, and I heard murder cried in the street; I was at the second door from where this woman lived; I saw the prosecutor in the street crying murder, and three or four women came out.

JOHN LANE sworn.

I know no more than that on the 28th the prosecutor came to me, and told me he had lost these things; I went down with him, and took the prisoner Catherine Owen.

EDWARD WHITE sworn.

I know no more than taking Jane Huggins by the order of the prosecutor.

Prisoner Huggins. I live in Parker's-lane; I heard a terrible noise in the street, and the man was making a most terrible piece of work, and about forty or fifty people round him, and I goes up, and he says, O murder, I am killed, give me a knife, and I will kill myself; I stood in the mob like another person, I know no more of it.

Court to Prosecutor. Who took your watch? - Catherine Owen ; and Jane Huggins knocked me down, while she took it.

The prisoner Owen called two witnesses to her character.

Court to Reary. Was the prosecutor sober? - He was.

Catherine Owen . GUILTY . Death . (Aged 16.)

Jane Huggins . GUILTY . Death . (Aged 30.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-30

314. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , a silver watch, value 2 l. 2 s. the goods of William Howard ; another silver watch, value 2 l. 2 s. the goods of John Bowering , in the dwelling house of John Brown .

WILLIAM HOWARD sworn.

I am a coachman ; I live with Mr. Whitbread; I lost a watch in February, at the Eight Bells, in Hackney , it was Tuesday morning the 26th; I had seen it hang up that morning, about six o'clock, by the bed side, and I missed it between the hour of six and seven that same morning. John Brown keeps the Eight Bells; I left my watch up two pair of stairs, in the room where I slept; another young man John Bowering slept in the same room with me; I never found my watch, it has not been heard of; I never knew the prisoner before he came to the Eight Bells, he came on the 22d of February, and absconded on the 26th, he lived as post-boy, he drawed beer there, he sleeps in the same room, he got up before us, he took both our watches, we pursued him, and catched him in Fleet-street that same day, about one o'clock in the afternoon, he had Bowering's watch about him, and the duplicate of the other: I knew Bowering's watch when

I saw it; I found out the pawnbroker by the duplicate he had upon him.

JOHN BOWERING sworn.

I slept in the same room and lost my watch; I had seen my watch that morning; I saw it the evening before when I wound it up, and hung it up; we both missed them partly the same time between the hours of six and seven; I was at the taking of him; I found my watch on him; I have got it here; I had the watch about three months.

- TRINDER sworn.

On the morning of the 26th of February, the prisoner at the bar brought this watch, and offered it to pledge (I am positive it was him) between the hours of eight and ten; I live at No. 32, St. Martin's-lane, the West End of the town. (Deposed to by Howard.)

JOHN BROWN sworn.

This here prisoner at the bar had lived with me, and absconded from the house, on the 26th of February, before I got down stairs, after I called him in the morning at six o'clock.

Prisoner. I was in distress, I am sorry for it, it was the first offence.

GUILTY of stealing to the amount of 39 s . (Aged 13.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17930410-31

315. EDWARD WRIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , eleven muslin handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 8 s. the goods of Thomas Clarke , privately in his shop .

- BOYD sworn.

I am a shopman to Thomas Clarke ; he is a linen draper , the corner of Holborn , and the corner of Drury-lane ; I never saw the prisoner at the bar till I saw him that day; I don't remember him exactly coming into the shop, but I saw him in the course of half a minute after he had been in, it was about two o'clock, on the 2d of April; there was two customers more in the shop, when I came into the shop, and the apprentice boy could not find an article to suit one of the customers; I asked the prisoner what was his pleasure? he said, he was waiting for some person to come and look at some goods; I went to the counter right where he was standing, and I perceived a piece of muslin hid under a bag under his arm; I leaped over the counter, and took it from him; I know it to be my master's property, it is marked by my master.

JOHN NICHOLSON sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Clarke; I was present when the prisoner came in, but did not speak to him; I went up stairs for something, and when I came down stairs he was taken; the muslin is what I was shewing to a lady just before I went up stairs; it was near the counter end when I went up stairs; it is my master's writing on it I believe; there were two other shopmen in the shop.

GEORGE HARRISON sworn.

I saw the prisoner in the shop; I saw him near the end of the counter where the muslin was.

Prisoner. I was not out of the shop; I went with an intent to buy a pair of stockings; I had been drinking with a friend of mine for an hour or two; I took my bag, and laid it as it might be here, and in taking up my bag, I took it up with it; I did not know that I had it under it; I am innocent of it entirely; I allow I was a little in liquor; if I had intended to have stole it, I would not have stood in the shop.

Boyd. He had it under his arm with the end out behind, and I saw it out behind, when I asked him what was this for? he said, he wanted some persons to look at it; I had got it in my hand at the same time.

Prisoner. I meant the stockings.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 64.)

Imprisoned two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-32

316. RICHARD otherwise PETER ISAACS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Jordan , about the hour of six in the afternoon, of the 26th of February ; the said John Jordan and Mary Laidler being in the said dwelling house, and feloniously stealing a pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s the goods of the said John Jordan ; four womens shifts, value 15 s. a linen apron, value 2 s. an India shawl, value 2 s. the goods of William Laidler .

Indicted in a second COUNT for burglariously breaking and entering the said dwelling house, about the hour of seven in the night of the same day, and burglariously stealing the same goods.

JOHN JORDAN sworn.

I live at No. 18, Chapel-street, St. George in the East . On the 26th of February, my mother, Mary Laidler , had some linen hanging up in a one pair of stairs room, drying inside the room; I set her up in a chandler's shop and pay the rent, and live in the house; the window was up about six in the afternoon; I heard a rummaging over my head in the shop, and I came out and I saw the prisoner chucking the things out of the window; I immediately told him to stand fast or I would blow his brains out; he saw I had no arms in my hand, and he immediately jumped down and I received him; I took him prisoner myself, there were three shirts and a shawl, that his companion had got off before I came out, but what I took him in custody with was an apron, a shift and a pair of stockings belonging to me.

GUILTY of stealing but not of breaking and entering . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM

Reference Number: t17930410-33

317. SARAH CLARK was indicted for stealing on the 25th of March , a callico shawl, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of Joseph Craig .

GEORGE BROWN sworn.

I live with Mr. Craig, he is a linen draper in Holborn , he deals in shawls; he lost one the 25th of March, between seven and eight in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop and looked at some muslin and muslin handkerchiefs, and bought one, and afterwards looked at some shawls, but did not buy any, but she got one under her cloak, I saw her put it under, she went to the door before I stopped her; I got over the counter and brought her back and took the shawl from her in the shop; I have got it here. (Produced and deposed to.) It has our private mark on it; she was alone, she said, she was very innocent, she did not know that she had it.

Mr. Schoen. She had a kind of a woollen cloak on? - She had.

Q. Might it not occur to you that it might stick to the woollen? - It might, but she got it up with an intent to put it under a silk cloak which was under the woollen one.

Q. She had used your shop a good deal? - I don't recollect ever serving her before, we have not been open above twelve months before.

Q. She paid for the handkerchief she bought? - She did, and half a yard of muslin.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave her a very excellent character.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined one 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17930410-34

318. DENNIS DEALY was indicted for stealing on the 25th of March , three half crowns and two shillings in monies numbered, and a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods and monies of Hannah Crawley .

HANNAH CRAWLEY sworn.

I sell fruit in the street , oranges and whatever I can get to sell; I happened to be down at my sisters one night, she was very ill, and I was coming home and going up stairs; the prisoner lives in the same house with me, he is a lodger there, and I lodge in the room above him; when I came home he let me in, and I asked for a light, and I was lighting the bit of candle, and he said, he would be much obliged to me if I would give him a bit of tobacco; I pulled out my tobacco box and having my money loose in it, I put it into my hand, and he asked me for what was in my hand, I told him I should not give it to him; he said, by the Holy Ghost you bloody whore, if you will not give it to me I will have your life; he then put my hand between his two knees and he forced the money out of my hand, and then he turned me out on the stairs and I was crying for the money, and he brought a great stick.

Q. How soon afterwards did you make complaint? - At the same time I told the Watchman, Edward White .

EDWARD WHITE sworn.

I am the watchman; I was down Parker's-lane, I heard the cry of murder, and this woman was standing at the door all over blood; and she said, she had been robbed of sixteen shillings and a silk handkerchief; I sprung my rattle, and there was some of the men of Marlborough-street, happened to be out, it was search night, and they came up, and he stood at the top of the stairs and said, he would knock down the first man that came up stairs; he lives on a woman who goes out getting her living how she can; I searched him and found three half crown pieces in his pocket, and two shillings; here is the one half crown which is remarkable, it has been in my possession ever since.

Court to Prosecutor. What was the money you lost? - There were three half crowns amongst the money, and the rest was in six-pences and shillings. (Deposes to one half crown piece.)

Prisoner. Ask her did not she go into my room when I was in bed? - I did not go in till he opened the door.

Prisoner. She asked me for a light, and I told her to take a light, and then she would not go to her own room, and I got up out of my bed and wanted to shove her out; with that, directly she dropped two half crowns and two shillings on the floor; she immediately ran down stairs and called for the watchman, I told her to take it up, she would nor, I had not picked up the money hardly when the watchman came in, and she swore that I robbed her, when I declare, before your lordship, I never saw a halfpenny worth of her money till she dropped

it. I have no witnesses but Bridget Carney , the girl that was in bed with me.

BRIDGET CARNEY sworn.

Q. Are you married to the prisoner? - No, I have lived with him these three years.

Q. Now, upon your oath, remember that the testimony that you are to deliver is in the presence of God, and therefore I admonish you to beware of what you say. Do you remember the night this man was taken up for taking away the money of Hannah Crawley ? - I do, she came up stairs for a light, seeing a light in the place.

Q. Was you in bed with the prisoner at that time? - I was.

Q. How do you know any thing then about the matter? - He left the light for his brother to come up stairs by.

Q. What was her errand? - She asked for a light, she came in and would not go out again, and he got up in order to turn her out of the place; she called out and said, he had robbed her; she called the watchman, then she would not go out and said he robbed her of the money; it was with much ado she would go out of the place.

Q. Where did Crawley lay? - She laid up in the two pair of stairs.

Q. That was above you? - Yes.

Court to White. Was any silk handkerchief found on him? - No, none at all.

GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-35

319. MARY GILES was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , a silk cloak, value 10 s. a woman's cotton gown, value 6 s. a muslin apron, value 2 s. a white linen apron, value 2 s. a check linen apron, value 1 s. two womens muslin caps, value 2 s. two linen caps, value 6 d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. a pair of womens leather shoes, value 1 s. and a man's linen shirt, value 1 s. the goods of John Hughes .

JOHN HUGHES sworn.

I live in Cartwright-street, No. 39, Rosemary-lane ; I was at work at the time this robbery happened; I came home and I saw the property before the the justice, and I missed the property at home on the 22d of February last.

MARY HUGHES sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness. On the 22d of February, I only went to the next door for some potatoes for my husband's dinner, I don't think I was gone ten minutes, I came to my door and I found my door open, and this woman running out of it; I had left my door locked with the key in it at the outside; I had the middle room in the house; when I came she ran up two, three or four stairs to the garret, I cannot exactly say which; I asked her who she wanted? or what business she had in my room? or whether she wanted the woman that lived up stairs? she said, she did want the woman that lived up stairs, and I directly called the woman, she said the woman was not at home, as soon as I called she came and opened the door; the prisoner directly ran away, and I finding my door open I ran after her, she went into a court and up some strange stairs, and I apprehended her myself; she had with her one cotton gown, one black silk cloak, &c. as in the indictment; the things are here. (Produced and deposed to.) I took her back to the place where she took them from, and then I took them from her; I did not know the woman before.

HENRY HARRIS sworn.

I am a dealer in old clothes. On the 22d of February, I came to Rosemary-lane, and I saw a mob standing there, and I took the goods from off the ground and some pick-lock keys out of her pockets.

The prisoner called one witness who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-36

320. THOMAS HACKET was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , a pair of mens leather shoes, value 2 s. the goods of William Bernard .

WILLIAM BERNARD sworn.

I lost a pair of shoes on the 8th of March; I am a shoe maker , I was not at home, my wife was.

Mrs. BERNARD sworn.

I live in High-street, St. Giles's , I keep a shoe maker's shop. On the 8th of March, I saw the prisoner at the bar, he came into my house between eight and nine at night, about half after eight, and asked me to shew him a pair of shoes, a pair of my best; I shewed him a pair, he said, they were rather too big for him and I let the shoes stand on the counter while I looked for a pair that was less; in the mean time he ran out with this pair, and I never saw no more of him till the 12th of March following, when they took him; I did not go after him only to the next door, because it was dark and I had nobody in the shop; on the 12th of March, he brought this sheet to the next door neighbour of mine to sell, and she stopped the sheet, and she came and called me and I went in and saw the man, and I took him to the justice and swore to him; he was in my house the week before that and he sold me a pair of shoes off his feet for another pair, and I gave him six-pence in money besides; I have never seen the shoes since.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17930410-37

321. JOSEPH HEWITT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , a pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Patty , Richard Burchall and Joseph Coombs .

EDWARD MERIDITH sworn.

I live with Messrs. Patty, Burchall and Coombs; they are partners in trade; I know the prisoner at the bar; on the 12th of March, between three and four o'clock in the evening, he came into the shop and asked for some white cotton stockings; I was then serving two customers behind the counter; I referred him to the opposite side of the shop to a young man to shew him some, which he did he shewed him a paper of ribbed stockings which he disapproved of; the young man is not here, he turned his back towards the prisoner, I looked at the prisoner in the mean time and I saw him take a pair of stockings and lodge them in his breast, between his waistcoat and his shirt; I went immediately and catched hold of him by the breast and took him on one side, and told him he had got something there that did not belong to him, and wished him to step up to the counting house, there he was searched; I had hold of him all the time; the stockings were

taken from between his waistcoat and shirt in my presence, they are marked with the prosecutor's private mark, they are in the custody of the constable now.

RICHARD BURNIS sworn.

I produce the stockings, I had them of one of Mr. Burchall's clerks, they have been in my possession ever since.

Meridith. The name of the clerk is Henry Derrett , they are the same stockings as taken from the prisoner.

Prisoner. I enlisted for a soldier at Coventry, and I was brought up and examined at the India House, and I was rejected; I took them to carry me home to Coventry.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-38

322. JOHN SEVILLE was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , four hempen hammocks, value 11 s. the goods of Samuel Walker .

(The Case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SAMUEL WALKER sworn.

I live in Mark-lane; I am a merchant ; I am a contractor with government for hammocks, furnishing the different yards; I was sent for to the public office, Goodman's Fields, about the beginning of March, and was shewn four hammocks, they appearing to me to be mine; they were produced by order of the magistrate by Joseph Bare, in consequence after writing, I had some communication with the officers of the Dock-yard, at Deptford, and was informed there was four deficient, and they were stopped in the account; I have been in the habit of sending them down daily ever since the armament began.

Q. By what conveyance do you send them? - By the cart of Mr. Robinson's.

JOSEPH BARE sworn.

I belong to the office in Whitechapel. On the 1st of March, Friday night; I saw the prisoner going into an old iron shop, he went into the shop, one Bury's shop, he had a bundle on his head, and he put it down, and I went in and asked him what he had got there? he said, for God's sake say nothing about it, for it would be the ruin of him; I told him I was an officer, and must do my duty, and take him to the justice; I took the bundle and him to the justice; I have got the bundle here; the bundle was a great quantity of hemp, and in the hemp packed up these four hammocks. (Produced.)

JAMES ROBINSON sworn.

I live in Stoney-lane, Tooley-street; I am a master carman; I am in the habit of carrying every day for Mr. Walker; I carried two loads of hammocks on the 1st of March; I know the prisoner very well, he drives one of my carts.

Q. Did he drive your cart on the day you describe? - Not with hammocks, he had many times before that day; I saw him in the lock-up place before he was examined; I said, I was very sorry to see him there, he said, he was brought in there, and it was what he got by serving somebody else, that was all he said at that time.

WILLIAM NETLAND sworn.

I work for Mr. Walker; I am the man that takes the hammocks in and delivers them out.

Q. Do you remember delivering out any in March last? - Yes, we count them out ten in a bundle, that is the usual way.

Q. Do you deliver them out in any other mode? - Never.

Q. Do you know whether you delivered these out? - I cannot say; I don't know that I was absent one day.

- HUGHES sworn.

I am labourer in the Dock Yard at Deptford; I keep mostly keep tally; there.

Q. Do you remember any goods sent by Mr. Walker in March last? - I do, and there was two in one bundle deficient; a bundle consists of ten.

Q. Was there any other deficient besides the two in one bundle? - I don't know.

Prisoner. I have got nothing to say.

GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-39

323. RICHARD WARRAN and JOSEPH JOHNSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a silver watch, value 2 l. the goods of John Clarke .

John Clarke and witnesses were called on their recognizances, and did not appear.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-40

324. GEORGE SEARLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , three silver table spoons, value 2 l. 10 s. the goods of William Dawson , Esq . in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM CHEEK sworn.

I live with Mr. Dawson, he lives in Hind-street, Mansell-square ; he lost three table spoons the 10th of March, he lost them out of the pantry, it was about twelve o'clock when I had seen them there; I missed them in the evening between nine and ten, I missed the spoons while the prisoner was present; being an old fellow servant and knowing him a number of years, I invited him into the pantry, the property at that time was up in the parlour; the company had left the dining parlour and had retired to the tea room; at that time George Searle called on me, I let him in and shewed him into the pantry; after that I returned to the parlour and brought down my plates and spoons, and then returned again for the glasses, and when I counted my spoon to put them into the cupboard, I missed three spoons, I told them over again, I still missed the three; I went to the kitchen maid to enquire if she had washed up all the plate; she said, she had; I returned to the pantry still missing the three spoons, and still tried to see if I could make my spoons right. George Searle said, he was sorry he had come at such an unlucky time, he hoped I did not accuse him; I said, no, I should be very sorry to accuse him, but at the same time the spoons could not be far off; at this time the carriage was waiting at the door for my master. While I was discoursing on this business with Mr. Searle the bell rung to bring down the tea things; coming down with the tea things I met George Searle coming up the stairs; I said, Searle, I hope you are not a going; yes, says he, I am, you seem to be in an unpleasant humour, and I shall not stay any longer; I asked him to walk into the parlour, and told him not to leave the place till the spoons were found; he promised me he would wait a little; I invited him down into the pantry to go and sit down there, and he refused it, and said, he would

not go there any more; he then went and sat in the Hall, and we were discoursing on the spoons, and was sorry I should accuse him, but I hoped he would not leave the house; in the course of this conversation the bell rang which I went to answer, and while I went to answer the bell he went away; when I went down and found he was gone I went down immediately to the kitchen and told my fellow servants; I went immediately in search of a constable; I found a constable in Mary-le-bone-street; I told him the circumstance, and he advised me to go to Mary-le-bone watch-house; I went; I told them he had a wife and family in Swallow-street, and they advised me to go to the Coach and Horses in Marlborough-street, and ask if there was an officer there in the house; I went and they said, no; I got an officer at last in St. James's; I shewed the constable the door of his lodgings that night, but having no light he said, if he was an old offender he would take the property some where else, and if he was a green one we should find him in the morning; I went to Searle's house and watched to see if he went in or out; finding he did not I went to the watch-house and waited till six in the morning when we went and Searle came out, and we took him to the watch-house; when we got to the watch-house door he said, I am guilty; and there was the property in his pocket.

JAMES SLADE sworn.

I got these spoons out of George Searle 's pocket on Monday morning. (Deposed to by Cheek.)

Mr. Schoen to Cheek. When he called on you he said, he was a little groggy? - Yes, but by the answers he gave I don't think he was.

Q. You thought him an honest man or else you would not have asked him into your master's house? - I always took him for one; he and I lived in one family six years ago; I believe he is now out of place.

- sworn.

I am beadle of the parish of St. James's; I went to aid and assist the constable in taking the man.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-41

325. THOMAS MORRIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling of William Mansell about the hour of two in the afternoon of the 23d of February , no person being therein, and stealing therein half a yard of striped dimity, value 1 s. 6 d. three yards of long lawn, value 3 s. a linen shift, value 1 s. a dimity petticoat, value 1 s. 6 d. two linen petticoats, value 2 s. two cotton bed gowns, value 4 s. a callico petticoat, value 1 s. 6 d. a linen frock, value 1 s. a child's linen bed gown, value 1 s. three linen shirts, value 4 s. 6 d. a linen gown, value 6 s. a cotton gown, value 10 s. 6 d. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a silk bonnet, value 3 s. a linen bed gown, value 6 d. two base metal candlesticks, value 4 s. a copper tea kettle, value 4 s. and a paste board bonnet box, value 2 d. the goods of the said William Mansell .

WILLIAM MANSELL sworn.

I am a cheesemonger ; I drive a cart for Mr. Davis, a cheesemonger; my house is in Green Arbor-court in the Old Bailey ; at that time my wife was out, I had no children nor no servants at that

time, it was the 23d of February, Saturday; I went out about nine o'clock in the morning, and she brought the keys to me about twelve; I went home to my dinner between two and three in the afternoon and I saw this gentleman coming out of the house; when I had got about half way down Green Arbor-court I saw a couple of men coming out of the entry of the house where I dwelt in, and as soon as they came out of the house they turned down Breakneck steps into Sea Coal-lane, I looks very hard at the property which they had, and I thought it belonged to me, but I was not justly sure then; the prisoner, one of the two men, he was the last that came out, he had this bonnet box under his arm, the other got away; I immediately goes up stairs and sees the room door open; we had only two rooms in the house, it was let out in three parts, there were two other sees of lodgers in the house, the landlord did not live in the house, nor had any servants there; I saw the room door open and immediately turns back and goes down Breakneck steps into Sea Coal-lane, in order to follow the men; as soon as I got at the bottom of the steps I got a sight of the men again, I called stop thief, as loud as possible I could halloo, these men hearing me cry stop thief, they throws the things down and runs away in order to make what escape they could, the prisoner throwed down this bonnet box, the other had a painted deal box.

Q. Were these men talking together do you know? - I did not see them talking together; they came out of the house as near together as possibly could be; as soon as they heard the cry of stop thief they throwed down the things, and a witness that is here see them do it, and this man was never out of my sight till he was taken; I am sure I did not lose sight of the prisoner after he threw the things down from under his arm; he was brought back to my house, and from there he was taken to the New Compter; I saw him brought back to my house and I went with him to the Compter and things likewise, and the things were given into the hands of Mr. Prior; these two boxes contained all the articles; the things here are only the things that were in this paste board box, the other box has not been meddled with.

Q. How soon did you go back to your room after you took the prisoner? - In less than two minutes.

Q. How do you conceive they got into the room? - They must pick both the locks; there is a lock which is fastened on the door, and a padlock outside; neither of the locks were broke, neither the one nor the other, and the lock, which was the padlock, was found behind some tubs close against the door, in the same stair case, the staples were not in the least injured they were all as when I went out in the morning.

Mr. Knapp. This you say is your dwelling house; - I rent two rooms.

Q. You went down first in the morning and left your wife at home, you left the keys with her of course? - I never see any thing more of them till she brought them to me.

Q. And when she went out there were the other lodgers in the house? - There were.

Q. How many might there be? - A man, and a woman and a child lived in the two pair of stairs.

Q. There is a street door? - There is.

Q. It is generally open? - It is in the day time.

Q. So that if the indictment states that no person was in the dwelling house, it is not so. You know that you have indicted this man capitally? - I suppose it is for a capital offence.

Q. Have you ever heard there was a reward for convicting a house breaker? - I have.

Q. Had you never seen the prisoner at the bar before? - I don't know that ever I saw him in my life.

Q. There were two persons? - Yes.

Q. Did you take notice of the other person? - I did not, but I had opportunity of taking notice of this man, because I had hold of his collar.

Q. What was contained in the box you knew very little about? - It is all set down.

Q. You did not know at the time? - I did not.

Q. This door was open all the day long for all the different people to go out of their different apartments? - It was.

Q. The staples were the same as when you left them? - They were.

Q. You say you never saw the two persons talking together at all; they appeared to have no connection with each other? - None at all, only coming out close to each other.

Q. Was you by when the prisoner was searched? - I was not.

Q. Do you know in point of fact whether any thing was found on him? - I don't believe there was any thing found on him.

ELIZABETH MANSELL sworn.

The day the house was robbed I went out about a quarter past twelve o'clock, we have two rooms adjoining to each other, we have only one door in the stair case; when I came away I locked both locks, the common lock and the padlock, I am certain of it, I tried them both, I came away and took the keys to my husband, my husband was at work at the warehouse, Mr. Davis's, just by Green Arbor-court, I gave him the keys; I returned again about half past seven in the evening.

Q. Do you know the bonnet box? - Yes.

Q. Where did you first see it after you saw it at the Compter? - The first that I saw of it was at Guildhall the Monday afterwards, this was on Saturday the 23d of February.

Q. The things are there? - No, the alderman gave me leave to take what I wanted, and put a mark on every thing.

Mr. Knapp. What does your family consist of? - Poor people; I have only my husband and my child, the child is born since the robbery; my husband went out early in the morning, I stayed at home till about a quarter past twelve, I did not go out at all before that time.

Q. Do you know the lodgers in the house? - I cannot say that I am acquainted much with them.

Q. Whether they were at home when you left the house you cannot say? - The woman and child was at home, and the man was backward and forward.

Q. Was there any door out of the inner room to the stair case? - There was not.

Q. How lately had you seen your things before? - I had seen them before I went out.

PETER LECLERE sworn.

I am a cutler and headborough in the parish of St. George's. On Saturday the 23d of February between two and three in the afternoon as I was going down Fleet-lane I saw some people running and I walked leisurely after them, they were running in a lane on the right hand called Sea Coal-lane, and I saw them stop, when I came near I saw a man holding the prisoner at the bar by the collar, somebody said, why do you collar the man? for he is no thief, and if he is you have no right for you are no constable; and he let go the prisoner and the prisoner ran off, and he ran down by me, and I pursued him, and took him in a Baker's shop.

Q. Was Mr. Mansell present when you took him? - He was not in the shop

when I took him; when I took him in the shop I put my hand on his shoulder and told him he was my prisoner; several people came into the shop and one of them assisted me to take him to the Compter. There was two boxes laying in Sea Coal-lane.

Mr. Knapp. Have you never been here before? - Yes, I have.

Q. Perhaps convicted your man before? - I convicted!

Q. What was you here before for? - I have been here several times before.

Q. Was there ever a person convicted on your evidence? - I don't know it was on my evidence, but I was a party.

Q. Did you ever hear on conviction of a man for house breaking that there was a reward? - Since I found he was convicted I was told of it by a person in this court.

Q. You say there were some persons running up Sea Coal-lane? - Yes, the prisoner was one; I don't mean to say I saw him stopped.

Q. He had the good fortune to run into a shop, it was the likely way for him to escape? - He certainly could not see me till I took him in the shop; there he was secured; I secured him myself.

- BASCOE sworn.

I am a watch maker; I saw the prisoner come down with the box in his hand and another man with him, with another box; the prisoner had a bonnet box the other had a wooden box; they came down from the one pair of stairs of Mr. Mansell's dwelling about half after two; I saw him go down the steps with it in his hand, and the prosecutor was within three doors of his own house, he went in and went up stairs, and came down again and pursued after the man, and the prisoner threw the box away into Sea Coal-lane; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I did not see the prisoner taken; I saw him go by my window.

Mr. Knapp You had never seen the prisoner before? - Never.

JAMES PRYOR sworn.

I am a constable; I produce the property belonging to the prosecutor, a bonnet box, four gowns, a tea kettle, and several other things; this box was brought to me to the Compter; I had it of Mr. Mansell; when the box was brought there, there was a number of people present.

(The things deposed to.)

Court to Mansell. Did you see the prisoner run into the shop? - I did not, I saw him when the other man Hughes took him and brought him back to the things, but then he let him go, and then he was out of my sight, and Leclere took him; I never saw him no more after Hughes let him go till I saw him in the Compter.

Prisoner. What is alledged to me I am totally innocent of. On Saturday afternoon I was coming down Sea Coal-lane, I had got a bad leg; I had been to have it dressed, and I saw two men pass me, and I saw a man throw a box off his shoulder, and the other from under his arm; with that I went to pick up one box out of the kennel, and they said, don't touch it for they will say you are the thief; I was going to alderman Boydell's and this man came and took me; I said, for what? I said I will go wherever you please; I went to the Compter, and then that Mansell came and the watch maker, and swore that I came out of the house; I am as innocent as any gentleman of the Jury.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 9 d. (Aged 25)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-42

326. HENRY CORLESS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , six ounces weight of nutmegs, value 16 s. thirty-two black lead pencils, value 5 s. twenty-three other black lead pencils, value 9 d. one quarter of a pound weight of cocoa, value 4 d. one wooden box, value 1/2 the goods of Henry Blakey , Robert Porter and William Hodgson .

HENRY BLAKEY sworn.

My partners are Robert Porter and William Hodgson , we are haberdasher s; these articles were taken from No. 2, Bridge-row , my dwelling house, and the warehouse is there, all these articles were the property of the partnership, they were taken from the warehouse, they were in the business as haberdashery articles we deal in; the prisoner was not a servant at the time, he had been discharged about three weeks before, he was a kind of a warehouseman ; I was out of town at the time; I can speak to part of the property.

Mr. Knowlys. I don't know whether you know it or not, that this man had been authorized either by yourself or the other partners to sell any little quantity that he might want to accommodate his own friends? - He had no permission only as to mustard and blue, and he had them the same as we charge to other people.

Q. He weighed these things to himself? - He might, but before other people; we gave him no authority as to these things.

WILLIAM HODGSON sworn.

On Friday last the fifth of April, about a quarter before six o'clock I was sitting in the counting house by myself, I heard a disturbance in the warehouse, and I looked and I saw the prisoner taking something out of a box, which from the noise and situation I supposed to be nutmegs; the box was in the warehouse on the shelf; I saw him through the window out of the counting house, by which we have an opportunity of looking all over the warehouse; I opened the counting house door, and he immediately came from the place, and he took up an old bag, and I asked him what he wanted? he said, he wanted an apron; I immediately charged him with the theft of taking these nutmegs, and the acknowledged it, and I brought him to the counting house, and I took out of his right hand coat pocket fifty-nine nutmegs; this is all that passed at that time; I was at his apartment the same evening, (the prisoner was then in the Poultry Compter,) the prisoner's wife was there, we found some black lead pencils, cocoa, and several other articles; to the best of my recollection thirty-two black lead pencils and twenty-three others, we found some cocoa, the box had our label on it; we gave these things into the custody of the officer, his name is Hickens. I have no more to observe, except the manner in which he got into the house; I was told how he got in.

Q. Was you told that in the prisoner's presence? - No.

Mr. Knowlys. The place in which you sat, and in which you saw this was a place separated from the warehouse commanding a full view of it? - It was.

Q. Of course the prisoner must know that? - He must; when I charged him with taking the nutmegs he acknowledged that he had taken them illegally.

Q. Did he say that Mr. Hodgson? did not he say that your porter had given him leave to take some at the usual price? - No, he did not.

THOMAS DICKENS sworn.

I am the constable that took the man, he was delivered to me about six o'clock last Friday evening, the day of the robbery.

Q. Was any nutmegs delivered to you? - Yes, and I have kept them ever since; I went to his apartments, he gave me directions to them; I found several articles; I found some pencils and some cocoa in a wooden box; I have kept them ever since. (Produced and deposed to by Mr. Blakey, the pencils as having the maker's name on them, who lives in Cumberland, and serving none but him, and the cocoa having his label on them.)

BENJAMIN BOYSE sworn.

I went with the officers to make the search.

Q. Were the things open or were they consealed? - They were not consealed when I went into the room.

Dickens. The wife unlocked the box and gave the things out of the box.

Prisoner. I bought the cocoa and paid for it to Mr. Porter the other partner, I bought two quarters of a pound and paid 16 d. for it, and every article that they found in my room, I honestly paid for as ever I did any thing in the world; as for the pencils I bought them of a Jew in November last, and as for the nutmegs Mr. Hodgson was in the house; I met Mr. Porter in Budge row and told him what I wanted; he told me to go and have them; our master's servant was at the door and desired me to walk in. I was taken bad last Saturday three weeks and was obliged to go to bed till Thursday following; I went again to my place the Monday after, and Mr. Porter called me into the counting house and said, he and I had better settle; says he, I don't understand your being off a week; I told him I was ill; then he said, I had better rest then come to do nothing; then says I, we met friends and I hope we shall part friends.

MORDECAI PRITCHARD sworn.

I am porter to Messrs. Blakey and Hodgson.

Q. Do you know whether at any time your fellow servant bought any cocoa of Mr. Porter? - I don't know any thing about it.

Q. Did you ever see any cocoa that he bought? - No, I have known him to buy a few pounds of mustard; that is all that ever I knew.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , fined 1 s .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-43

327 JOB TRISTRAM was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of March , four pieces of fir timber, value 5 l. the goods of Thomas Lett , Thomas Lett the younger and John Lett .

(The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN LETT sworn.

My partners names are Thomas Lett , Thomas Lett , junior and myself, we are timber merchants , Narrow wall, Lime-house ; we have lost a great quantity of timber at different times.

Q. Have you since been able to find any timber you have lost? - We have found four pieces, two of them lay in Harford-street, Tottenham Court-road, and two in Fitzroy-square.

Q. Had they any mark on them? - Yes, our own mark T. L. cut out in one united, and A. W. another mark, and there were other marks, the ship marks; A. W. meant the person to whom they were sold, Archer Wilson , but they never went to him because they were stolen first; the day I saw them in Harford-street and Fitzroy-square was

Thursday the 28th of March, they were missed since the 12th of January, or about that time.

Mr. Knapp. You have three partners? - Yes, two besides myself.

Q. I understand from my friend's opening just now, Mr. Knowlys, that you are considerable timber merchants, of course you have a great deal of timber of that sort, and I suppose all the timber that belongs to you are marked in the same way.

Court. Not all marked A. W.? - No, only T. and L.

Mr. Knapp. How soon is the mark of T. L. put in the timber that comes to you? - It is marked before it comes to us from the ship; there is also the mark of the feet it contains; the timber was put on the river; it was rafted on our wharf with ropes, and stapled down.

Q. You say you have missed a great quantity of timber before this; has it never happened to you that the timber has floated down the river, and you have found the timber again? - Yes, but we always can tell what timber we miss because of the mark.

Q. In point of fact have you never missed timber before which has gone away and floated down the river? - We very frequently have missed timber.

Q. Have you never missed timber by the casual floating of the raft? - We have from the bridge and other accidents; that is a common thing in trade; somebody picks it up and they are paid for their trouble.

Q. How long before had you an opportunity of knowing what quantity of timber you had on that raft? - This was a quantity of timber marked for a person with A. W. to go away the next morning, it lay under the crane subject to be floated.

Q. How long before had you seen the property, and what quantity had you seen? - The whole number of pieces was seen by me the night before on the wharf.

Q. Then there were a great quantity besides the pieces that were missing floating? - No great quantity.

Q. Only four pieces were missing in the morning? - No, only four pieces.

Q. Then they might have had the accident of floating down the river by the tide? - No, they could not, because the rope was cut and the breast rope was cut, they were evidently cut by an axe, the mark of an axe was plain on the rope.

Q. Then the other pieces might have had an opportunity of floating from the cutting of these pieces? - They might have taken the whole to besure.

Q. The mark A. W. is the mark to whom they were consigned, you did not put that mark yourself? - It was either me or my brother.

Q. You stated to my friend, that you had missed timber ever since the 12th of January, and until the 28th of March you knew nothing at all about it? - We never found it till then.

Q. Had it happened during that time that you missed a great quantity of your property, between the one date and the other? - No, we had not; I should have observed that there were some other pieces, but I cannot fully ascertain what they were.

Mr. Knowlys. From the view which you had of the raft the morning after you supposed they had stolen them, you could not ascertain they could be taken any other way than by cutting the rope with the axe? - I could not.

JOHN WOODCRAFT sworn.

I am a lighterman; I saw the prisoner at the bar in company with Mr. Needs.

Q. Was you ever employed by him or Needs to tow some timber? - I was by

Needs, and that gentleman was with him.

Q. Which of them gave you the directions? - I met them at the place where I took it to, both Mr. Needs and him together; I towed six pieces.

Q. Who first of all applied to you to tow it? - Needs, and that gentleman was in company with him; I towed it from a wharf that belongs to Reed, King's Arms stairs.

Q. How far is King's Arms stairs from Messrs. Letts, where these rafts were, from Narrow Wall Limehouse? - About a quarter of a mile. I towed this timber to Chelsea; when I got to Chelsea I saw both Needs and the man at the bar.

Q. Was you paid for your trouble? - Yes, Needs paid me, Tristram was by.

Q. What did you ask for your trouble? - I did not ask any see at all; I towed it to Gill and Wilson's wharf.

Q. Have you ever seen any of these pieces of timber since that time? - Yes, I went and looked at them, I went to Mary-le-bone near Fitzroy-square, in a timber yard there.

Q. Are you sure that these were a part of the six pieces that you towed up? - I am not sure they are them, but they are marked the same way as those that I did take.

Q. How long ago was this? - Five weeks to day since I towed it up.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Woodcraft, did you happen to know Needs before? - Yes, because I live just on the spot.

Q. Needs employed you, Needs told you where to take it, Needs paid you; Mr. Woodcraft, did the prisoner during the whole time that he happened to be with Needs seem to have any hand in it at all? did he say any thing at all about it, during the whole time? - He asked me to have something to drink; the prisoner asked me to have some rum and milk.

Q. You say you asked no see whatever? - I did not.

Q. You had been used to be employed by Needs? - No, never before nor since; he paid me.

Q. Needs you know is indicted for this very felony.

Court. No, he is not.

Mr. Knapp. You was shewn some timber afterwards? - I don't understand you; I went into a carpenter's yard to look at them.

Q. And you of yourself had not made any particular observation on them to know them, only by the mark you saw on them? - I cannot pretend to swear they are the same, but they are marked the same.

Mr. Knowlys. Did Tristram ask you to drink before or after you had done the job? - It was on the road.

Court. How were the two marked you saw in the carpenter's yard? - A. W. I did not perceive any other mark; that was a fresh mark.

JOHN WITTON sworn.

I am a servant to Messrs. Gill and Wilson, they are masons and builders, and keep a wharf at Chelsea.

Q. Do you know the man at the bar? - No, I never saw him there in my life; I saw the timber lay under the wharf, and I helped to load it when it went away, there was a man there at the first load and he promised to come again to pay the wharfage, but we never saw him any more.

RICHARD LOCK sworn.

I am a carpenter; I live in Pedlar's Acre near Limehouse, there was a person came along with the prisoner of the name of Williams or Kemp, I don't know which, for me to draw some timber, I believe it may be near a month ago, I did not do it for him, because the timber had lain under my own wharf, and it was moved from under my own wharf, and I told him I could as well have drawn it from my own wharf as from any other.

Q. Did you see the timber which they applied to you to draw? - Yes, I have seen it since up in Fitzroy-square; I saw

nine or ten pieces there, I knew but one of them, and that piece of timber lay at my wharf before ever I took the premises, I bought the lease there, I took the premises the 17th of January; all that I know it by there is a cut in the side of it.

Mr. Knapp. There is a person of the name of Needs, do you know any thing of him? - I bought the lease of the premises of him, on the 17th of January last.

Q. Needs has been looked after on this occasion? - Yes, I looked after him myself along with the officer.

Q. He has absconded then? - He is out of the way.

Q. You say a person of the name of Williams, or Kemp came with the prisoner? - It was not the prisoner applied to me to draw the timber, it was the man along with him, and gave me a paper where to draw it to, which I have now.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before? - Yes, many times I have seen him.

Q. Have you ever heard that he went to the Water Bailiff of the City of London about this affair? -

JAMES NICHOLLS sworn.

I am a carman and builder; I know the prisoner at the bar, he called on me three weeks ago, he came along with Mr. Jackson, a relation of mine, he wanted to draw some timber off from Wilson and Gill's wharf at the Wooden Bridge, Pimlico, up above Chelsea bridge.

Q. And you in consequence of that went to the Wooden Bridge? - I did not the first time, the carriage went twice, I did not go with it the second time but the carriage was detained and I went to see what detained it, and I saw the carriage on the crane, I saw the carriage draw the timber from the wharf; Tristram he hired the carriage; he did not know the peoples name, but he described the place, and I told him it was Gill and Willson's wharf to which he agreed, and said, there should be people there before my carriage to load it; the timber was laid down against the wall of the Westminster Infirmary; I saw both loads laid down there.

Q. Have you seen any of that timber since? - No.

Mr. Knapp. You say he did not know where it was to be taken to till you explained it to him; all the business he had to do was to hire the cart? - He described the place by the Wooden Bridge, and I named the name of the wharf.

ROBERT JACKSON sworn.

I know the prisoner at the bar; I live in Duke-street, No. 13, Portland Chapel. About three weeks ago, on a Sunday, he told me he wanted to find somebody that had a timber carriage to draw timber from Chelsea; in consequence I took him to Mr. Nicholls, I introduced them together, and they bargained for the drawing of the wood; I never was at the wharf in my life.

Q. Do you know what was agreed to pay for drawing it? - I understood 3 s. 6 d. a load; the whole amount of the money was 1 l. 4 s. 6 d.

RICHARD BOLD sworn.

I live in Tottenham-place; Mr. Tristram, and Mr. Needs, whom I knew for some years, offered to sell me some timber, Needs offered some at different times, at last Tristram came with him, he went by the name of a captain, he was called captain; Mr. Needs withdrew, I believe he went out to get some refreshment, and then the captain asked me what quantity of timber I wanted? I told him about a couple of loads, and we agreed for 3 l. per load; then I had some suspicion that it was stolen timber; then when Mr. Needs came again I asked him where was this captain's address? the captain did not hear that.

Q. Did you ask the captain who he was, or what trade he was? - I did not.

Q. Did you ask him what measurement? - I did not.

Q. You say you had some suspicion. Did you buy any then? - No.

Q. Where was it to be brought to? - It was to be brought and laid in the New Ground called Fitzroy-square, about fifty yards from my premises.

EDWARD WALES sworn.

I live in Warren-street, Pancras; I am a carpenter; I have seen the prisoner at the bar, he came along with another man, whose name is Needs, and some timber was brought on my premises before I saw him, it was brought by one Needs, and this gentleman was called captain; I did not see it brought.

Q. Had you any conversation with this man at the bar? - Yes, he went along with me to take the contents of the timber brought on my premises, ten pieces, and five at another place, both he and Needs went with me, the other man said, this is my captain; he went along with us and I gave him the contents, and he pulled out a calender from his pocket and shewed me the price of timber the week before on the Change.

Q. Whose timber was it represented to be Needs or the captains? - Their timber; it was brought there for sale; they had a good deal more they said to bring; I was taken there to become a purchaser if I approved of it; I saw different marks on it and I had suspicions.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Lett has ever seen these pieces of timber? - Yes, he has and challenged them; he challenged two on my premises and two in New Fitzroy-square.

Mr. Knapp. Needs was the first person you saw about this timber? - Yes, I never saw him before.

Q. Needs was the person that seemed to deal about the timber first with you? - I understood that Needs was the carman and that he brought the timber.

Q. Did any conversation pass from Needs to the prisoner about measuring this timber. Did not Needs desire the prisoner at the bar to take measurement of the timber? - They were together.

Q. Did not Needs desire the prisoner to measure the timber? - It was not measuring, it was taking the contents.

Q. I thought this gentleman was the merchant. Did not Needs desire the prisoner to take the contents? - No.

Q. This property was seized by the Water Bailiff of London? - Yes, after it was owned.

Q. Do you know who gave the information? - I don't know; Mr. Climer, the deputy of the Water Bailiff, came to me and I gave him an account.

Mr. Knowlys. You say you looked on the prisoner as the merchant of the timber? - I did from his conversation.

Prisoner. Needs told me that he had sold the timber to Bold three weeks before that for 3 l. per load. On the Thursday or Friday he told me he had sold it for 3 l. 10 s. per load, and when I went there I thought they were all swindlers and shufflers together; accordingly I went to Mr. Climer's and called him up at six o'clock in the morning and gave him information against the timber, and told him I thought it was not honestly come by; Needs took some off his own wharf, and there were seven pieces taken from another wharf, and then he comes to me for fear of being arrested, but as soon as ever I found out I was among a parcel of shufflers I went immediately to Mr. Climer, and Mr. Climer to Mr. Smith, and then they took me to my Lord Mayor; then I was clear on the Saturday concerning all this timber of which I gave information to his Lordship.

- CLIMER sworn.

I am the deputy Water Bailiff of the City of London; I know the prisoner

at the bar; I remember his coming to me on Thursday before Good Friday, about six o'clock in the morning or rather before and knocked me up, I got down stairs and asked him what his business was? he came to me and said, that there was a parcel of timber that had been accumulated together, that had been a drift and picked up at different times in the river till it came to several pieces, from thence they were conveyed, by some means or other, to Tottenham-court-road by cartage and wharfage together; I said, I took you to be another kind of a man; how came you to be concerned in picking up timber, and be concerned in selling it? he said, he never picked up any in his life; he went with me up to this place.

Mr. Knowlys. You have known Tristram for some time? - I have known him ten years

Q. Did you ever know him as a captain in any vessel trading in timber? - Never in my life; I know he kept a chandler's shop and public house; he told me they were pieces that came adrift, and he thought they belonged to the City of London; in consequence of giving this account Henry Smith , Esq. and I put a mark on them, and took a warrant against this man that he might not be an evidence against his accomplices.

Court to Lett. What day was it you saw the timber? - The day before Good Friday, the 28th.

Court to Wales. When was it you acquainted Lett with this? - It was the Tuesday, I sent to him the 26th; on Monday night I found it out; on Tuesday morning the information was laid.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 60.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-44

328. GEORGE SHIRLY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , three hides of tanned leather value 9 l. the goods of John Dyster .

JOHN DYSTER sworn.

I am a warehouseman ; I lost three tanned hides either the 12th or 13th, I cannot say; if it was the 12th it was late, between nine and ten, or else it was early in the morning of the 13th; I lost them out of Leadenhall-market ; I did not see them at all of my knowledge; we never missed them till the next morning when we came to load; I was not present; I saw three hides cut up which I took to be three we lost; I saw them on Thursday in Worship-street, the pieces are here.

Prisoner. He said at the justice's that he could not swear to them, there was more than his property? - I said I could not swear to the hides because they were cut in pieces; there is nothing but the duty mark that I swear to.

MARY GRIMES sworn.

My husband is a shoemaker. On Wednesday morning the 13th of March, about eleven o'clock, I came from market and my husband came to me, I live in White-cross-street, about a mile from Leaden-hall-market; Poll, says he, they are cutting up leather next door; says he, Mrs. Jackson has been in and said so; I went and looked into a place called a hay lost, and I saw two of them cutting up leather; the prisoner was one, but who the other was I cannot tell, they were cutting up the leather into square pieces.

Q. Did you go in where they were? - I did not.

Q. How came you to be so curious to look into their room? - Mrs. Jackson mentioning it to my husband and he mentioning it to me. I saw them afterwards

with some bundles, he went down past my window with a knot.

Q. Is he a porter? - I cannot tell; I saw him with a knot and leather on his shoulder going down the court, Plaster-court, it is the court where I live, I live next door to this hay loft; he took the leather and carried it into Playhouse-yard, and put it into his cart, from that he went back again; I went to Arthur's, who had been a constable, and Mr. Foxon was in the place at the time, and I told them I thought there was a man in the court had got some stolen leather, and I went and shewed them where the cart was with the leather, and he stopped till the prisoner came with the rest of the leather, I stopped till he came, the constable then charged him with stealing the leather, and he was taken to Worship-street; I cannot positively swear to the leather.

THOMAS FOXON sworn.

I took the prisoner into custody at the instance of Mary Grimes , and took the leather, and have kept it ever since; I am a constable; when I detected the prisoner he said, what is that to me? I pulled out my staff and said, I am an officer, I have an information that you have some stolen property; he said, he was going to take it to his master, Mr. Cox, in Chick-lane, and desired me to go to his master and then I should soon know whether it was stolen or no; I told him I should not go to his master, I should take him to the office in Worship-street and if it was his master's property he might send for him, and his master would come forward. (The leather produced and deposed to by Mr. Dyster having lost three hides, one out of a parcel of eight hides and two of a parcel of twenty two hides, and having seen them complete the night before; I know it by the hammer mark.)

Court. Can you tell it to be your's by the hammer mark? - I can, one was tanned in Poulton in Lancashire.

Q. As to this hammer mark that is the officer's mark? - It is.

Q. Are there not more tanners in that district whom the officer marks with the same hammer mark? - Yes.

Q. Then how do you prove that to be a bit more your's than any other person's in the district? - None had been up from this place I suppose this three months, they only come up now and then.

Prisoner. I am a bone jeweller by trade, and it is very slack; I porter in the morning; I had an order for a gross of diamond scutcheons the Tuesday before this happened; I made them and carried them home, and while I was gone this here parcel was brought to my place, bag and basket, by a knock at the door to know whether there was a porter lived there? my wife was laying in at the time; there was a woman who came to see her, and she asked her to stop and have a drop of caudle, and while she was there this here man came and my wife sent this woman to me, to the Three Mariners at Fore-street, for at the time the East India company's ships sail, Mr. Newbank, in Grub-street, kills for them, and I am a swabber, I wash the hogs down; my wife sent this woman to find me and before I went with her I found they were going to kill on the Thursday following, and I asked the woman to come back to my wife and I gave her 2 s. to take to her, and told her to tell my wife I would come back as soon as I could, when I came home it was too late to carry them that night, and I went and took it in the morning; the woman can tell more about it than I can.

MARTHA MATTHEWS sworn.

I am a widow,

Q. Do you know a hay lost about the prisoner's premises? - I do not live with him; I know his wife, I have known her this five years. There was a parcel brought there on Tuesday, I think it was between six and seven at night, I went to see his wife, she laid in, and a person knocked at the door, and I opened the door, and a man asked if there was not a porter lived there? I answered yes, he asked if he would carry that load? his wife said, where was it? he left the load; I desired him to carry the load back into the yard, it was carried back into the yard so far, as that the child went into the yard after, that and see two or three pieces lay and brings it in, and said, mammy here is some bits of leather; the man asked the wife if the husband would carry it to Mr. Cox's, Chick-lane, the husband was not at home, the man who brought it begged it might be taken care of, as there was a great hole in the bottom of the bag.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-45

329. WILLIAM GINGER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ann Harrison , no person being therein, about the hour of five in the afternoon of the 17th of February and feloniously stealing therein, three silk gowns, value 3 l. a silk petticoat, value 1 l. a cotton counterpane, value 1 l. two diamond rings set in gold, value 3 l. two silver table spoons, value 1 l. a silver marrow spoon, value 5 s. a silver tea spoon, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of the said Ann Harrison .

Indicted in a second COUNT for burglariously breaking and entering the said dwelling house about the hour of eight in the night, of the same day, and burglariously stealing the same goods.

(The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MILCHA WILSON sworn.

I was staying with Mrs. Harris in Cross-street, Islington , as servant till I got a place, her house was robbed on Sunday night the 17th of February; my mistress went out some where either about twelve or one, she went to dine, she returned about nine o'clock, after notice of the house having been broke open.

Q. Was there any body left in the house that day excepting yourself? - No, nobody; I left the house about half an hour after, about one, while I went to Church, and when I came home, I returned about five; I left the house safe; I locked the door, I left nobody in the house.

Q. Was the rest of the house fast? - There was a garret window that any body might get in at; all the rest of the house was safe.

Q. Was the garret window left open? - No.

Q. Did you find the house safe when you returned at five o'clock in the afternoon? - To all appearance it was the same as when I left it,

Q. Did you leave the house again after five o'clock? - I shut the window and made them fast as I thought; I made it fast then for the evening, and I left the house immediately; I think I double locked the street door, but I will not be positive, but I am sure it was locked; it is a spring lock; I cannot be positive whether I turned the key again.

Q. When you left the house was it light or dark out of doors? - It was quite light; I had just come from Church; I returned home again about half past seven or eight o'clock; as soon as I opened the door there was a great deal of linen all laying in the passage, when I

saw the linen lay in the passage I was frightened, I stepped back again and pulled the door to back after me; there was no linen laying about the passage when I left the house for I had locked up that linen; seeing this I went to my mistress and informed her what I had seen; she was lower down at the end of the Cross-street, she sent the servant man of the house where she was at.

Q. Did you then return before your mistress saw the house? - I did; but I did not go in at the first, I stopped at the door till they searched the house; the servant man is not here, he is in Wales now.

Q. Did you see how the house was when you went in? - I observed the cellar door open, I thought the thieves might be in the cellar, therefore I desired the people to go in because I dare not go in.

Q. Tell us how you found the house when you did go in? - The chests of drawers had been broke open and the wardrobe; the wardrobe and the chests of drawers joined together.

Q. How lately before you returned and saw the drawers in this state, had you seen them before? - I had seen them before I went out the first time; it was safe and in a good state then; I locked them up and gave the keys to my mistress before she went out.

Q. Could you at all find how the persons had got into the house? - No, I could not.

Q. Did you examine the windows and doors, and so on? - Them that went in did.

Q. Did you make any observations yourself? - I could not at all in the least.

Q. No marks of violence about the house? - No, none at all.

Q. Do you know what was missing in in the house? - Some particular things.

Q. Will you tell us what articles you missed? - A plated tea pot, two silver spoons, a silver marrow spoon, a silver tea spoon, a counterpane, two diamond rings, a gown, and petticoat, which I had seen, and two gowns, which I had not seen.

ANN DOUDLE sworn.

I live in Church-street, No. 3, Islington, near Mrs. Harrison's, it is this side of the Church-yard, Mrs. Harrison's is the other side; I remember the Sunday when Mrs. Harrison's house was said to be robbed; I saw Mrs. Harrison's house the evening of that day; I saw three men come out of the house, this was about seven o'clock; it was moon light.

Q. Was there any lamps near Mrs. Harrison's house? - Yes, they were lighted at that time; they came out of the front door; I was about three yards from them when they came out.

Q. Was you able to see the faces of the men? - Yes, and one of the three I knew, the last who came out, I knew his name, I had seen him before a great many times.

Q. Did you know him well? - I remember seeing him about the street, and at Parr's Head, the publick house facing Mrs. Harrison's.

Q. Who is that man? - That man, the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Had you full opportunity of seeing his face? - I had; I am sure he is one of the three.

Q. What opportunity had you of seeing his face? - By the light of a lamp the lamp is at the corner of Mrs. Harrison's house.

Q. Do you mean that you saw him coming from the house or saw him come out? - I saw him come out of the street door.

Q. Have you any doubt at all that he is one of the three? - I know he is one of the three.

Court. Were either of these three men stopped, or did you give any alarm? - No.

Q. How soon did the servant maid come home after you saw these men come out? - I don't know; I did not see her come home.

Q. When they came out did they shut the door after them? - Yes, this man pulled the door after him; I thought he put his finger into the key hole and pulled it that way, but I cannot be certain of that.

Q. When did you give any account of this matter? - A servant girl who had lived at Mrs. Harrison's before, came over to me; I had told my mistress, and my mistress told that girl, and Mrs. Harrison came over to me the next day about eleven in the morning, and she asked me if I knew any of them that had done it? - I told her I did; I did not mention his name to her then, but I did before I went to Hatton-garden the next day.

Q. Have you any doubt at all that he is the person? - I know he is the man that I saw come last out, I have no doubt whatever.

Prisoner. I would wish to know what she saw me in? - A frock brown coat, I think he had a dark brown coat, a darker than the one he has on now.

Q. What hat had the man on? - A round hat, I was coming across the way, but if I had not known him before I could not have sworn to him.

ANN HARRISON sworn.

I am a widow ; in consequence of information I received from my servant, I repaired to my house about nine, but I did not dare to go in till some gentlemen went in first; and then I durst not stay all night, I went in and looked at my wardrobe and saw the things turned topsy turvy; I missed a good many things, I left my things safe in the morning after I had dressed for church, the maid locked the drawers and gave me the key; I lost all the things in the indictment; I valued them rather under their value.

Prisoner. I know nothing of the business, no more than a child unborn.

FRANCIS AUSTIN sworn.

I am a master shoem-aker; he worked for me between four and five years, he had left me about a month, when he was taken up I never knew any thing dishonest by him.

HENRY HARVEY sworn.

I live in Crown-street, the bottom of Oxford-road, I have known him two years last Christmas, I never knew any thing of him but a good character since I knew him.

ROGER UXTON sworn.

I am a tanner, I knew him about five years ago, he lodged at my house he bore an extreme good character; I never heard man, woman or child, speak against him.

JOHN GIBBS sworn.

I am a shoe-maker, in St. Ann's-street, Battlebridge, the prisoner worked for me at the time, he was taken up; he went to Islington as soon as he heard of the charge against him; this was Wednesday morning after the robbery was committed, for he thought the accusation was false; because the Monday night after the robbery was committed he was at the public house opposite the robbery, and he heard nothing about it then; we went to the public house exactly opposite the head of old Parr; he went then over to Mrs. Harrison, but he called on Mr. Austin first, and he went with him, he surrendered himself to Mr. Austin that same evening; he is the constable of Islington parish.

Court to Austin. Did the prisoner surrender to you as the other has said? - I met with him at the public house, and told him what I had heard, and he said he thought it was my spite because he left me, I told him he must go over with me to Mrs. Harrison's, and after that I met him at the public house along with his master, and he said he would go before a justice, for he would rather go than not, and I took him down the same evening to justice Blamire's, this was the Wednesday after the Sunday, that the robbery was committed.

Q. Did you challenge him first? - I did, I saw him at Parr's head, he sent for me over, and told me he wanted to speak about this robbery and he wished to go over to Mrs. Harrison's, and I went over with him to Mrs. Harrison's; the prisoner said to her that he was sorry that she should have any suspicion of him, Mrs. Harrison said she did not suspect him nor any body else in particular; then he went back again to the Parr's head, the servant was there at Mrs. Harrison's Mrs. Harrison's servant not Ann Doudle.

ELIZABETH STONE sworn.

Are you any relation of the prisoner? - No, I was along with Ann Doudle at the time she said she saw Ginger; my grandmother is a midwife, and I was going to chapel to fetch my grandmother, I met this young woman Ann Doudle , and we came across the road almost facing Mrs. Harrison's door, and we came down the church yard; Mrs. Harrison told me if I did not say that I saw Ginger, I should be the first that was hung; Mrs. Harrison sent for me to her own house, I cannot tell what night it was, it was the night after she came from Hatton Wall.

Q. How came Mrs. Harrison to know you knew any thing about this? - I cannot tell.

Q. Did you appear before the justice? - Once I did.

Q. Did Mrs. Harrison send for you before you appeared before the justice or after? - Before.

Q. You had never spoken of this matter to any body? - I had not except to my mistress, Hannah Broadway , a laundress.

Q. Did the other young woman take any notice to you that she saw any body come out of the house? - I never saw any body pass but an old gentlewoman, after this.

Court to Doudle. Had you any body in company with you after that? - I was in company with her, but it was after that I saw the man.

Q. How long might you have left her before you saw these men at the door? - About half an hour; I went with a letter for my mistress Mrs Smith, to Mrs. Ormes No. 3, on the Terrace; the first time the lady was not at home, I went home and went out again to know if she was come home; and it was then that I saw the door open.

Q. Did you know the prisoner's name? - Yes.

Q. You had seen him often at the public house? - Yes.

Q. How came you not to tell Mrs. Harrison the name? - I don't know, I was asked his name; Mrs. Harrison came and asked me if I knew the man; I said yes.

Q. How came you to tell it at the magistrates? - They asked me.

Prisoner. I wish to know whether she knew any body else of the three that came out of the house.

Court to Mrs. Harrison. There is a young woman of the name of Stone that has sworn to a conversation with you; that you told her she must swear to the prisoner? - On my oath I never said so to her, I never was in her company but I

may have seen her; I saw her at the justice's in Hatton Garden but they would not hear her speak.

Court to Stone. Where was it you had this conversation with Mrs. Harrison? - At her own house, she sent for me.

Court to Mrs. Harrison. Did you ever send for this young woman to your house? - I never sent for her, nor did I know there was such a person.

Q. Was she ever in your house having such a conversation as she has deposed? - No, I will take my oath that conversation did not pass.

Q. As to that other young woman Doudle, when was it she told you who it was robbed you? - Tuesday, I believe, I went to her, Sunday evening she said she saw three men come out of the house, and the last was a black hair man that she knew very well, and who worked with a shoe-maker at Islington, he had a brown coat on; I don't know whether she said so much at the first, but she said she knew the man and my young son charged Austin to take him up to Hatton Garden.

Court to Stone. How long have you known the prisoner? - I have not known him long, only by seeing him at the public house; I have seen him once, I don't know how many times I have seen him.

Q. How came the prisoner to bring you here to day? - I do not know I am sure.

Q. Was you any acquaintance with him? - Not at all.

Q. Did he ever come to your house? - No, never, he might know my father and might know where I live.

Q. How happens it that he sent for you to day? - I cannot tell.

Q. When did he first send for you to be a witness; had you a subpoena? - No, Mr. Austin came for me.

Q. Why did Mr. Austin come to you? - No further than I was at the justice's.

Q. How came you before the justice? - Because Mary Doudle said I was with her.

Q. How came you before the magistrate? - Mr. Austin came for me.

Court to Austin. Was that Stone before the magistrate? - Yes.

Q. Was she any acquaintance of the prisoner's? - Not that I know of.

Q. How came she before the magistrate? - I fetched her, because I met with her mother on Sunday evening and on what the mother told me I thought it was proper she should go before the justice as well as the other.

Jury to Milcha Wilson. Did you see the young woman Stone at Mrs. Harrison's? - I did, on Friday night I think after the robbery was committed.

Q. Was that before or after they had been before the magistrate? - It was after they had been once.

Q. Do you know how she came there? - There was a little girl brought her to our house, I believe my mistress sent for her.

Q. Do you know what passed when she came? - My mistress told her that she was informed that she was with the girl when she saw these men come out of the house, and my mistress said she only desired her to speak the truth and nothing but the truth; and if she saw the man come out she desired her to speak it, if not she did not desire her to speak it; and the girl was very impudent, and I don't think my mistress recollected what she was about, she was confused and very angry.

Q. Did she ever tell her in pointed terms what Stone said she said? - No, she did not; she told her them that took a false oath deserved to be hanged.

Prisoner. I have no other to call but my landlord, and he could not come because his wife is ill.

Gibbs. I called on this landlord and his wife's mother is dead, and his wife is gone into the country and he has nobody to mind his house.

GUILTY .

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-46

330. JOHN RHODES was indicted for stealing, 1000 sheets of paper printed, value 50 s. 350 sheets of royal paper printed, value 50 s. 150 sheets of other paper printed, value 30 s. the goods of James Wilkinson .

Indicted in a second COUNT for stealing the same goods, laying it to be the property of Andrew Strahan and William Woodfall .

Indicted in a third COUNT laying it to be the property of Charles Dilly and others.

(The indictment opened by Mr. - . and the case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS BENNET sworn.

I am warehouseman to James Wilkinson ; I missed a quantity of paper about the 7th of March, between eight and nine o'clock; he was printing the Attorney's Pocket Book, Gilbert's Law of Evidence by Capel Loft; and P. Williams's Reports; Mr. Wilkinson's apprentice, William Sherwood , went down in the night of the 7th between eight and nine o'clock, with a light in his hand, and he put it down just by the side of the streetdoor, and he discovered some paper behind it; 365 sheets of the Attorney's Pocket Book; he called me down and shewed me the paper behind the door, I found it there standing up behind the door in a state of concealment; the paper ought to have been in a warehouse, up one pair of stairs; we put out our candle and stood by to see if any body came to take it away; the prisoner at the bar an hour after that came, but he went away again; he was an errand boy to Mr. Wilkinson, he had been employed about six weeks; we at last took the paper up stairs into the warehouse, we could do no more in it it was so late; we looked and saw that quantity was gone from the impression, the impression was 1500; we missed about 1100 sheets of the Attorney's Pocket Book, we missed nothing else at that time; we had a suspicion at that time, and I attacked him with it in the morning; we took the boy up to Bow-street and he was discharged; then we went in pursuit of the paper, at the different shops in the neighbourhood; the next day we went to Mr. Edwards's shop, a cheesemonger, in the afternoon, the 8th of March, I went first by myself, and I found on his shelf, behind the counter, 50 sheets of royal paper printed off, P. Williams's Reports, and Capel Loft's Law of Evidence; the Pocket Book was printed in demy, there was 1100 sheets of that in the same shop, I took it away and brought it to my master's shop; it has been in my custody ever since, it is in a clean state. I went afterwards to Mr. Edwards's shop and took the boy with me, about ten minutes after; the boy lives the next door or the next door but one, Edwards came out of the back parlour when the boy came into the shop, he said that is the boy I bought the paper of, the boy did not say any thing, but cried, he did not deny it.

Court. Are you liable to make good these sheets if they are lost? - My employer is.

JAMES WILKINSON sworn.

I live in Clare-street, Clare-market. I am in the employment of Messrs. Andrew Strahan and William Woodfall ; they were at this time printing the Attorney's Pocket Book, Gilbert's Law of Evidence, edited by Capel Loft, and P. Williams's Reports; I live in the house of which the warehouse is apart; I have lived there this twenty-five years. It is the custom of the trade for those persons who are interested in a work to send in their own paper for the law printers to print.

Q. Had that been the case with respect to the things in charge? - It had.

Q. If that paper is lost Messrs. Strahan and Woodfall are answerable for it? - They are answerable both for paper and print. In consequence of some information I had from Bennet, I took the boy to the public office in Bow-street; after that he was discharged in the morning, the boy went home, and came back again, and the warehouseman found other things were missing, besides the Attorney's Pocket Book; we missed some of P. Williams's Reports, we did not know any of Loft's Law of Evidence were missing, till we found it in Edward's shop, and then we went and looked, and found that just that quantity was missing.

Q. Did you afterwards find that the quantity you discovered at Edwards's shop exactly made up the quantity missing? - No, some of P. Williams's Reports are still missing; but Gilbert's Law of Evidence exactly made up what was missing. I took the boy in consequence of that transaction to Edwards's shop, and Bennet went with me; I told him it was my property, and asked Mr. Edwards how he came by it? he said, he bought it of that boy; I asked him what he gave a pound for it?

Q. Did the lad deny that assertion of Edwards's? - No, not in the least, the boy began to cry very bitterly, and was very sorry for what he had done; I asked him what could induce him? he said, he wanted to lay by a little money for the Easter holidays.

Q. Did he at any time even subsequent to that deny that he was the boy that brought it and sold it afterwards? - Never, I took the lad again to Bow-street, at six o'clock that same evening.

Q. Do you know whether his examination was taken in writing or not? - They took some writing of the boy's declaration.

Q. Had you said any thing to the boy giving him hopes of favour, if he made such a declaration? - No, except in the morning the warehouseman did.

Q. Did you see the boy sign that declaration? - He was brought forward to the table but the Court was so full I cannot say that he did.

Prisoner. Mr. Wilkinson told me if I would confess, they would not hurt me; if not they would send me to Bridewell.

Court to Wilkinson. What became of the paper that was at Edwards's shop? - It was taken away; it was work that has never been in trade and could not by any means get from the warehouse, except from our shop.

JAMES CRESWICK sworn.

I am a lodger at Mr. Edwards's the cheesemonger; I remember seeing a boy come into Mr. Edwards's shop, but I cannot swear that is the lad.

Q. You was examined before the magistrate? - I was.

Q. Did not you swear to him then? - No, I said I had no reason to doubt.

Richard Gibbs and John Simmons were called on their recognizances and did not appear.

GUILTY . (Aged 12.)

Fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-47

331. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April, a silver watch, value 5 l. a leather watch chain, value 1 d. a brass watch key, value 1 d. the goods of Patrick Lyon , privately from his person .

(The case opened by Mr. - .)

PATRICK LYON sworn.

I was robbed of my watch the 1st of April 1791, I saw it again on the 6th of March last 1793; I saw it at the Fountain in Shire-lane, Mr. Rymer had it in possession then; he said he bought it of one John Green, and gave four guineas for it; I swear that is my watch.

Mr. Knowlys. Are you sure you was sober enough to know at the time whether you lost it or whether it was picked out of your pocket? - I lost it.

Court. Did you feel it go out of you pocket? - No, I did not.

JOHN RYMER sworn.

This watch I had of Mr. Green about three weeks before Christmas; he gave it me to dispose of in a public manner, I advanced a trifle on it, ten and six pence, and six and six pence; after I had it in my possession about a couple of months I told him I could not sell it, if he would give up the money I had let him have, I would give him the watch; but he said it did not suit him to pay it, so I paid him four guineas for it.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe the prisoner gave you this watch, that you might exhibit it in a public raffle? - He did.

Q. You was to shew it to every body who might wish to see it? - I was.

Q. Is there a man who bears a better character than Green? - I never heard any body give him a bad one.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-48

332. JAMES LAVENDER was indicted, for that he on the 22d of March , on Mary Lewis spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault; and her, the said Ann, against her will feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 28.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-49

333. JOHN PRICE and ELIZABETH COPE were indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's Highway, on Samuel Milson on the 19th of February , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, three guineas and ten shillings, in monies numbered; the monies of the said Samuel Milson .

SAMUEL MILSON sworn.

I saw the two prisoners about eight o'clock in the evening, on the 19th of February, I had some business to do at Artillery-lane; I came to my own house about seven o'clock, and went to Artillery-lane, I had three guineas and nine shillings in my pocket to pay people in Artillery-lane; from there I went to Petticoat-lane , about four or five doors up the lane, I had occasion to make water at the end of a passage, and I saw the woman come out of the door before me, about five or six yards; she came out of a house and came up to me; I rather stood against the wall, just at the entrance into the court by the street side, she came up to me and laid hold of me; I said woman go about your business, at that instant of time comes up Price the man, he came and pinned my arms directly, and laid hold of my throat and knocked me against the wall several times, and made use of very bad expressions, and asked me what business I had with his wife? I told him I had nothing at all to do with his wife? I felt their hands about my fob, pulling my fob open; I had not power to call I was so frightened, they held me I suppose for the course of a minute and a half, they pulled me about very much, and tore my breeches open, and took three guineas and nine shillings out of my fob; in the scuffle I saw a man stand at some distance, who it was I cannot say; he called out come along Price, in the instant they all went away; I was so terrified I had no power to speak, nor to follow them, some people came past and I said be so kind as to go up this court; this woman came out of this court; I have been robbed by one or two men, some went up the court with me and we went into the house, we asked what woman came out of that house, out of which I saw the woman come? several people answered, that there was nobody went out of that house but Bet Cope; I told them I had been robbed by that woman and I should be glad to know whereabouts I could find her; they seemed to make a laugh and joke of me, and I went away; I went immediately up Petticoat-lane and I heard of a constable, I applied to him, he was not at home, I left word where I lived, No. 93, East Smithfield; accordingly the next morning the constable came down to my house where I live, and him and Mr. Dawson went and took the two prisoner's; Mr. Dawson and I was at the justice's and laid the information against them, we did not take the man till the Saturday following; we took the woman up the Tuesday following in the evening.

Q. What day of the week was this 19th of February? - Tuesday, we took the man up the Saturday following, and the woman the Tuesday following, that day week; we had been at several places

about Tooley-street every day, just at the edge of Tooley-street on the foot of the bridge on Saturday, I saw the man and knew him directly, I said there is the man that robbed me; and they took him, I knew him before; I had been frequently in Petticoat-lane, for I lived some years before in Wentworth-street myself.

Prisoner Price. Did not you ask the woman where one Mr. Linnen was? - No.

MOSES FONSECUS sworn.

On the 19th of February, Mr. Milson the prosecutor called at my house, and I went the next morning to his house.

Prisoner Price. I lived over the water for this four or five months, and I have not been in Petticoat-lane for this four or five months.

Prisoner Cope. What that man swears is false as God Almighty is true, I never robbed a person on the face of God's earth, and I can bring people to prove it.

Court to Fonsecus. What description did the prosecutor give you of the man? - A tallish man pitted with the small pox with a scar on his cheek.

John Price , GUILTY . Death .

Elizabeth Cope , GUILTY . Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-50

334. WILLIAM TURNBULL and THOMAS MAITLAND were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Borton and James Houghton , about the hour of eight in the night of the 18th of January , and burglariously stealing therein three pair of silk hose, value 14 s. a dimity waistcoat, value 2 s. a muslin half handkerchief, value 2 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of the said James Borton . Two cotton waistcoats, value 12 s. a half handkerchief, value 2 s. a pair of silk hose, value 10 s. a metal watch case, value 1 s. a yard of baize woollen cloth, value 6 d. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 1 l. six linen shirts, value 1 l. 10 s. a gold ring, value 10 s. the goods of James Houghton .

Indicted in a second COUNT with the same burglary only alledging it to be the house of James Borton only.

JAMES BORTON sworn.

I live now in Southampton-street; I did live in Clement's Inn , on the 18th of January last; I have a partner, Mr. Houghton, we occupied the chambers jointly; on this day about six in the evening I left them with Mr. Houghton; when I went out we fastened the door; about half after seven the laundress came to the office which I was at in Cary-street, to inform me that the chambers had been broke open; accordingly I went home and I see two trunks taken from the bed room and drawn into the sitting room, with the locks forced open; there were a great number of articles stolen at that time, some my property and some Mr. Houghton's property, according to the indictment; the suspicions rested on the prisoners at the bar, from having made application to Bow-street, and proper steps were taken to find out the offenders. The officer is here who took them. (The things produced and deposed to.)

JOHN DELAFONTAINE sworn.

I am an officer of Bow-street; on account of these gentlemen giving information at the office I went in search of Somerville, Turnbull, and Maitland, from some suspicion of them; first I had information of a box being lodged belonging

to Turnbull, at one Mr. Cook's, I went after the box first, I did not know it was Turnbull's at that time, I went to Mr. Cook's house, a furrier, in Castle-street; this Turnbull had a sweetheart that lived servant to Mr. Cook; I went there, I saw the box, and it was delivered up to me; after I had opened the box, I found there were several things apparently that were described at the office, belonging to the different gentlemen; on that account I took the box down to the office and sent for all the gentlemen, and then I took up the prisoners; I took Turnbull at the World's End, just by Tunbridge Wells within four or five or six miles of it; Turnbull is the same that was tried the other day, Maitland has not been tried; Maitland I took at the Three Jolly Butchers, in Newport-market the 24th of February, Sunday morning, after I had taken Maitland, who was in bed, he requested to come down to Covent-garden watch-house; I told him I could not take him there for Somerville was there; in going and searching of some pawnbrokers I found this ring, Turnbull acknowledged the trunk to be his.

Q. Did you shew it him? - No.

Q. Did you find any duplicates about Maitland? - No.

ALEXANDER LEE sworn.

On the 2d of February this gold ring was pledged with me, in the name of James Samuel , I believe by the prisoner Maitland, I am not positive, I cannot swear positively; it was pledged for 10 s.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-51

335. ISAAC ISAACS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Scatcherd , about the hour of eight in the night of the 5th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, two pair of plated candlesticks, value 5 s a plated coffee urn, value 4 s. three cloth coats, value 3 l. a pair of leather breeches, value 10 s. a pair of silk breeches, value 3 s. a silk waistcoat, value 2 s. a kersemere waistcoat, value 2 s. a linen bed gown, value 1 s. a cotton bed gown, value 1 s. a pair of flannel drawers, value 2 d. a a piece of woollen cloth, value 2 s. three cotton shirts, value 1 s. 6 d. a silk cravet, value 6 d. a leather pocket book, value 2 d. the goods and chattels of the said John Scatcherd .

Indicted in a second COUNT for that he being in the said dwelling house feloniously did steal the same goods and afterwards about the hour of nine of the same night of the same day burglariously did break to get out of the same.

MARY BUSHNELL sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Scatcherd, he lives in Ayliffe-street, Goodman's-fields . Last Friday the 5th of April, about twenty minutes after eight o'clock, somebody came and knocked at the door, I directly came up to the door, the person asked if my mistress was at home? I said, no; he said, I am captain Dawson; I opened the door immediately; the prisoner came in first, and then a little man came in after and snatched the candle out of my hand and knocked me down; there were three in all; I did not see the other till I recovered myself and got into the counting house, and they were all three breaking the desk open; then I said, for God's sake gentlemen don't do that; then that little one that knocked me down, again knocked me down, and then the prisoner at the bar held his hand to my mouth the whole time, and fastened me against the parlour door in the counting house; they kept me in that position very near half an hour;

for God's sake I said don't murder me; and they said they would if I did not hold my tongue, the little one came down stairs three or four times, but the third I did not see after he went up stairs, I should know him again if I was to see him near enough.

Court. See if you can find out the man and touch him.

She went to a man standing in the Court, not the prisoner, and touched him, and said I am sure that must be the man.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-52

336. BARNES MURPHY was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Sarah Jones , on the 3d of March , and putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person and against her will a cotton shawl, value 8 d. an half crown and one shilling in money, her property .

Sarah Jones was called on her recognizance.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-53

337. HENRY NASH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Francis Charles Phillips ; about the hour of seven in the night of the 24th of February , with an intent burglariously to steal his goods .

FRANCIS CHARLES PHILLIPS sworn.

I live at No. 1, John-street, Berkley-square . On Sunday the 24th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening; I heard the cry of stop thief in the street, and immediately I heard my own hall street door shutting, I was in the parlour; I immediately ran to a dressing room where I had been writing letters just before dinner; and a young woman and her brother knocked at the door, and said that a thief had made his escape out of my house; on going into the dressing room I observed that one of the windows had been opened, the sash thrown up; I had been writing some letters, and I left it shut when I went to dinner, perhaps half an hour before my bureau was open and my unfinished letters were on the table; I was a good deal alarmed for the fate of what was in the bureau, I ran immediately and found nothing had been taken out of the bureau; a pursuit had been made in consequence of this young woman and her brother seeing a man run out of the house, and this man that now stands at the bar was brought a prisoner to my house.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Phillips what are you? - I am steward to the Prince of Wales .

Q. You had been about half an hour before in this room? - I had, then I went to dinner.

Q. I take it for granted your servants took care of your house? - Most undoubtedly.

Q. It was quite dark? - It was so late as seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. The prisoner was not searched at all? - No.

THOMAS DEIGHTON sworn.

I was in Queen-street, Cousin-street. On this 24th of February, I did not see any thing, some time after I heard the cry of stop thief, it was night about seven o'clock, I heard the cry of stop thief; this young man, John Hewitt said here he comes, we heard somebody coming, the prisoner

at the bar was running very fast, we both tried to stop him, and laid hold of his coat, but he slipped it; he ran down across into Cousin-street, we made several catches at him, but he slipt us, he escaped a little way, in that instant he turned round and blasted our bloody eyes, if he would not blow our brains out if we attempted to stop him, he got from us a little way in Chapel-street; at last we took him, when we stopped him he begged and prayed of us to let him go, that it was only for a bastard child; when he found we would not let him go he began fighting, and cut me down the face with some instrument, which I suppose was the knife, which I have got now in my pocket; this knife was found in the scrummage, it was found on the ground in the street near where the scrummage was, I don't know who picked it up; he got from there into Hertford-street, where we took him the second time, this man did who stands here.

Prisoner. Pray sir did you shew these cuts the first hearing? - Yes, I did.

THOMAS WHITE sworn.

I was passing by this house on the 24th of February, Sunday evening, in John-street, and I saw this window up, and as we came to the window my sister said she saw a man in the room, and I said if you knew any of the family you had better inform them; with that I went to the street door, and the person came out as close to me as could be, and pulled the door after him; as soon as ever he got past me he set running as fast as ever he could, I observed two men before him, and I called out stop thief, and pursued him into Queen-street, and when I got into Queen-street I was crossed by two men, and I sprained my ancle, and I saw him run down across the street on the left hand side.

Court to Deighton. Where did you first see him? - In Queen-street.

Mr. Knapp. The man ran from you as he came out of the house? - He did.

Q. And who that man was you don't know? - I do not.

ELIZABETH KIRTON sworn.

I am sister to Thomas White .

Q. Did you make any observation on Mr. Phillips's house? - I told my brother the window was open, and I discovered a man standing at a little distance from the window; the words that I made use of were, that there was a man standing there, and I thought it proper to knock at the door; my brother asked me if I knew any part of the family, I had no knowledge of any part of the family, my brother attempted to go up to the door, and the door opened at the time, a man came out and pulled the door after him by the knocker of the door; I cannot tell the person of the man, my fright was so great; the man ran down John-street into Charles-street, I did not pursue with my brother, my brother cried stop thief, and I expressed the same words, and returned to Mr. Phillips's door and knocked.

JOHN HEWITT sworn.

I was with Deighton; I was one that pursued when he got away; Deighton and I followed him into Hertford-street and took him, he attempted several times to run something into me after I took him, which I suppose was the knife, which was found in the scrummage.

JOHN DELAFONTAINE sworn.

I was coming by John-street, and Mr. Phillips was standing at the door with a number of other people, he told me he had a very narrow escape of having his house robbed.

Prisoner. I was coming from Chelsea on Sunday night. I could not come Hyde Park way, so I came by this place, there was a mob and I found they had somebody that they said was a thief; immediately they began striking one another, and I had one of the blows, and I struck them that struck me, and I ran off for fear of worse usage, and ran up Hertford-street.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-54

338. WILLIAM DEER was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , five pounds weight of wax candles, value 8 s. the goods of Robert Gostling .

(The case opened by Mr. Steel.

BENJAMIN SHUTE sworn.

I purchased some pieces of was candles, I believe of the prisoner; I was not in the shop at the time, my servant was there.

MARY LEEKE sworn.

I purchased some pieces of wax candles of the prisoner at the bar about a fortnight ago; my master's house is the corner of Little Queen-street, Holborn; I was at Bow-street when the prisoner was examined there.

Q. Do you know whether what he said was taken in writing? - I cannot tell you that.

Court to Shute. Was you present at Bow-street? - I was.

Q. Can you tell whether what the boy said was taken down in writing? - I think not.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-55

332. WILLIAM BROWN otherwise SMITH and JOHN LISCOE were indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , three pair of leather shoes, value 4 s. the goods of Thomas Evans .

THOMAS EVANS sworn.

I am a shoe-maker ; I live at No. 23, Whitechapel-road . The 15th of March, the last month, I lost three pair of shoes, all leather, they were in the shop window, on the shelf in the open window. I did not see the shoes taken.

- sworn.

I am a broker and appraiser; it was this day four weeks I saw these two Chaps leaning about on the window; I was going pass and I returned back, and I saw they were standing at the window working with a knife; I thought they were after no good; the little one, John Liscoe had this knife in his hand; I returned and catched hold of him, and he had the knife then closing and putting it in his left hand pocket; William Smith he was going up Whitechapel, and I was going down Whitechapel, and I called to Mr. Millbank a neighbour, who was going by, to stop that boy in the white coat; I took the knife from John Liscoe , and it was all over blood, and he had cut his hand either with the glass or the knife, I cannot tell which; it was a whole glass apparently to me, and they cut the putty off from the side of it, and worked it out. When I got to Mr. Evans's, the old lady and gentleman seemed to be flurried; says I, don't frighten yourself for I have got them.

- MILLBANK sworn.

On the 15th of March I was called to by the last witness to stop the prisoner Brown; I stopped him, and I

found these three pair of shoes on him. (Deposed to by Mr. Evans.)

Prisoner Brown. I have got neither father nor mother; I used to go out into the Brick-fields

Prisoner Liscoe. I have none but a father-in-law, he is a weaver, he will not take any heed of me.

William Brown . GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

John Liscoe . GUILTY . (Aged 13.)

Privately whipped , and imprisoned one week .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930410-56

340. MARY OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , three pints of brandy, value 3 s. the goods of Jeremiah Sambrook .

JEREMIAH SAMBROOK sworn.

I am a brandy-merchant ; the prisoner at the bar was a servant to me; about two o'clock, on the 9th of March, about two minutes after I had set down to dinner, she came up to me, and wanted the key to get some coals up for the use of the kitchen, I gave her leave to go and take them, she went and took the key; I thought I heard there were two keys instead of one; there was the key of the wine cellar hanging with the key of the coals; I had a suspicion and I got up, and saw the key of the wine vaults was taken away; then I went immediately to the top of the stairs which goes directly down to where the coals are; I could not see any light, I went immediately to the wine cellar, just as I was going to the wine vault door, I perceived a light; I took and I pulled the door, and I found her in the cellar, she was just then coming from the brandy, and this pitcher was quite full of brandy; I asked her what she had got there? says I, it is brandy you thief, what was you going to do with it? says she, I was going to bring it to you; says I, we never have our brandies and rums brought up in mugs; so she came up stairs, and she downed on her knees, and begged my pardon.

Mr. Knapp. Your son's name is Jeremiah as well as your's? - It is.

Q. How soon afterwards did he come home? - In less than an hour.

Q. Where was this key of the wine cellar kept? - It was hanging up with the other on a nail in the shop

Q. So that any body going into the shop might take the key and have access to the cellar? - Nobody, but myself and son went there.

Q. She might have got to the cellar, and got brandy for your son without your consent; Did you never hear that she got brandy for your son? - She said at Bow-street, that my son was accessary to her robbing me, and Justice Bond said, that that was worse than the robbery itself.

Court. How long had she lived with you? - Five weeks.

Q. Had she conducted herself fairly? - I cannot mention any thing, but what is in the indictment, or else I could say a great deal.

Q. Is she a married woman or a widow? - When she came to me, she said, she was a married woman, but I find it is no such thing; she had a child by a man she lived with.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned six months in the house of correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-57

341. JOHN MACLANE was indicted for publishing a libel to which he pleaded.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and found security for two years .

Tried before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-58

342. THOMAS CORFIELD , EDWARD DAVIS , NATHANIEL COOK , WILLIAM BRADBURN , and GEORGE TAYLOR were indicted for a conspiracy , to which they pleaded

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s .

Tried before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-59

343. LAZARUS ISAACS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of February , a pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s. and two worsted stockings, value 6 d. the goods of Albert Creaton .

Indicted in a SECOND COUNT laying it to be the property of Elizabeth, the wife of the said Albert Creaton .

ELEANOR ALBON sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Creaton; he is a haberdasher and hosier . On the 22d of February, Friday, between seven and eight o'clock, a boy came in for a halfpennyworth of thread, and Isaac Lazarus , the prisoner at the bar, followed him, and came and took some stockings from the counter, and I ran after him, and called out stop thief, and he was taken; I lost sight of him, but he was taken a very few doors off; I am sure that is the man.

PETER KERLE sworn.

I am a lighterman by trade. On Friday evening, about seven or eight o'clock, I was coming up Tower street , I heard the cry of stop thief, the prisoner came running down the street, and I stopped him, and just before I stopped him, I saw him drop something from under his pocket; I saw a gentleman, Mr. Earle, picking part of them up, and a young boy picking the remainder up.

Q. Are you sure that what Earle picked up was what dropped from the prisoner? - I am, he attempted to get away from me, he dragged me seven or eight yards, but I held him pretty fast.

EDWARD EARLE sworn.

I am a wire-worker, in Tower-street; I was standing opposite my own door, on Friday the 22d of February, within two doors of Mr. Creaton's; between the hours of seven and eight Mr. Creaton's maid came out and said, this man had robbed the shop of some stockings; one turned up the lane, and the other ran down Tower-street; I saw him run, and he turned just by the church wall, and when I came down, he was stopped by Kerle, and returning back, I picked up one pair of stockings, and two odd ones; I don't think there was any person passing in the street but him, they must fall from him; I saw Peter Devalle pick up a pair of stockings almost close to him.

CHARLES CHORLEY sworn.

I am a constable; I produce the property; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner at Mr. Creaton's house; I received the stockings at Mr. Creaton's house; Peter Kerle gave me the stockings.

Kerle. They were the stockings I picked up. (Deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was walking along Tower-street, and they hallooed out stop thief, and I ran to see, and they catched hold of me; I did not touch the stockings indeed.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-60

344. MARY FRETTON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of April , nine half yards of printed callico, value 1 l. the goods of William Fisher .

MARY EASON sworn.

I am servant to William Fisher , he is a linen draper , No. 2, Houndsditch . On the second of April this prisoner came into the shop of Mr. Fisher, about six o'clock, Mr. Wall the shopman and three ladies that he was serving were in the shop, there came another in with her and asked for a piece of grey linen, this prisoner asked for nothing, she went towards the window behind the customers and there I saw her stoop down and take up the printed cotton callico, she put it under her cloak, I let her go out of the shop and I told Mr. Wall, and he went and fetched her back into the shop; immediately she got into the shop she tossed it from under her cloak on the floor; Mr. Wall took it up; I am sure I saw her toss it from under her cloak on the floor; I am sure it is the same woman.

RICHARD WALL sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Fisher, he lives in Houndsditch, No 2. On the second of April Mary Eason called out to Mr. Wall, here is a woman gone out of the shop and taken something with her; I went with her to the door and she pointed to that woman, I went after her and brought her back, and as soon as she came into the shop she flung down the piece of print from her, I conducted her to the top of the shop and sent for Mr. Fisher; I saw her drop it from under her cloak; the officer has got the print; I gave it to Mr. Fisher and he gave it to the officer in my presence.

RICHARD TIPPER sworn.

I am the officer, I have the callico I received of the last witness; I have had it in my possession ever since. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I met a woman that I never saw in my life, and she asked me to drink share of a pint of twopenny, and she told me she was going to a shop to buy a bit for a cloak, and she fixed at a place in Houndsditch, and she went up and took the thing and put it into my apron, and told me to go out and she would meet me the corner of Bishopsgate-street to take it from me; I have no witness but God.

GUILTY . (Aged 46.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT

Reference Number: t17930410-61

345. JOHN MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , six pounds weight of copper, value 4 s. the goods of John Warner .

JOHN WARNER sworn.

I am a fonder , coppersmith and brazier ; I live in Fleet-street ; this man worked for me between four and five years as a porter and labourer . On the 8th of March at breakfast time one of my men brought me word, as I was sitting at breakfast; I am sure, says he, I have found out the thief, he said, that he had followed the prisoner from my house to Fleet-lane to an old iron shop, and he see him pull the copper out from under his apron.

THOMAS STUBBS sworn.

I am a workman of Mr. Warner's. On the 8th of March about breakfast time, nine o'clock, the time of our going out to breakfast, I followed this man into Wine Office-court, and seeing him

turn about and lean against the place I suspected him, and from there I followed him into Fleet-lane to an old iron shop, and there I saw him take this metal and put it into the scale; I went into the shop immediately and laid hold of him and metal, and brought him to my master; he wanted to get from me; it is ridges of copper work; I know it to be my master's property; it was cut from a tea kettle.

Prisoner. You said at first it was cut off from a candlestick feet? - I never said such a thing.

Prisoner. Before we came out to breakfast there were five men working together, as close as we could; there was a woman out of doors who begged me to sell it for her; so by her persuasion I went to sell it for her, when I was talking to the woman in Fleet-market I see Mr. Stubbs, but had no notion he was looking after me.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-62

346. THOMAS CONNER and JOHN DONNIVALL were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , five hundred pounds weight of lead, value 2 l. the goods of John Wilson .

Indicted in a second COUNT for stealing the same lead laying it to be the property of John Wetherall .

(The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN WILSON sworn.

I am a carpenter and builder ; I have undertaken to repair a house of Mr. Wetherall's in Bucklersbury ; there was a leaden cistern there; it was my property.

Q. At the time was it affixed to the wall? - It was not; it had been taken off before I went on the premises; it was kept in the house on the back room one pair of stairs, which formerly had been made use of as a kitchen; I had some men at work there, Cook and Godsell, and several more; the two prisoners were employed about this house, one as bricklayer and the other as a bricklayer's labourer, Donnivall was the bricklayer , and Conner was the labourer to him; I went into the building on the 20th about eleven o'clock and was informed about this robbery; I made every enquiry I possibly could, first among my own men and amongst all the men; Mr. Donnivall told me he did not understand to be talked to in the way he had been by my carpenters, for they had told him that he must be one; I then went up stairs to see if I could find any part of the lead concealed; I came down again the second time and Mr. Donnivall said he would not stop in the building if he was to be talked to in that way by my carpenters; I said, Mr. Donnivall I shall certainly take you into custody as one; I saw the man was very much frightened indeed; I learned there had been two men seen the night before, I understood that from my own men, who mentioned it in the presence of the prisoner, that there were two men taken in custody the over night, in Mr. Reece's premises getting over the wall of our house; accordingly I desired the carpenter not to suffer the men to go, and I went to Mr. Reece's and got Mr. Reece's two men, Mr. Page and Burburry, and they came and they said they were sure of Donnivall, and they believed the other were the men they saw the over night; Mr. Donnivall said he could prove where he was between six and seven o'clock that evening; they charged him

with being in this situation about seven; Donnivall told me he was at a house in Fleet-market, and he could bring proof of that; Conner said likewise that he could bring proof where he was at seven o'clock, for his master's maid servant saw him at a publick house in Windmill-street in the Haymarket; they both denied being the persons that were over the wall, and they were very sure that they were not the people.

Q. Was any of this lead found? - Yes, I saw it found after I had given the two prisoners in custody of an officer; he told me it would be unnecessary for us to attend because there was not a sitting alderman at that time, and he would let us know; accordingly Mr. Hollis and I went over every room in the building and searched in the cellar, at last Mr. Hollis taking up a shovel, there was a large portion of screened rubbish and a heap of mortar, he takes up the shovel and stuck it into the lead; I then went round and saw him dig a second time and I believe there was six or seven pieces we found in the mortar and screened rubbish.

Q. Was you able to determine whether that lead constituted any part of the cistern? - Clearly so, because we put it together and matched it, there was as much as weighed five hundred and a half and eleven pounds.

Q. Did you weigh it at the time? - Yes, instantly.

Q. Whereabouts is the value? - Five pounds; I think there was at least five hundred pounds weight of it gone besides.

Prisoners Counsel. You say the man instantly pointed at the two prisoners as those that got over the wall the night before? - They did.

Q. Did you suspect them to be dishonest before? - I don't wish to affect the prisoners any thing more than merely to do common justice.

Q. Had you any grounds for suspicion before? - Yes, by losing property at various times.

Q. Had you any reason to suspect Donnivall? - I will tell you candidly what my reason was, they never knew my time of coming into the buildings, and I have seen that man several times flipping of something behind some part of the premises.

Court. You had suspicion of these people from their conduct and your losing property? - I had.

CHARLES COOK sworn.

I was employed by Mr. Wilson in this house of Mr. Wetherall's; I was employed there the 19th of March; I know the two prisoners at the bar, the one was employed as a bricklayer, and the other as a labourer. On the 19th of March they were at work there in the one pair of stairs front room in taking rubbage out by a cart besides, out of the cellar; they left work as near as I can guess about ten minutes before six o'clock, the usual time is six o'clock, they made belief to go out, whether they went out or no I cannot tell; they went down the ladder and they got their coats on, the man put his coat on just before he went down the ladder; he generally does not work in his coat, it was Donnivall did that; as for the other I did not see whether the other went out or not, or whether he pretended going out or not; the door was on the spring lock; we heard the door go; when I left work I double locked the door; I left work at six o'clock, Godsell left the house at the same time with me, and the cistern was there when we left work, and it was gone when we went in the morning; I left it on the one pair of stairs back room.

Q. Do you know whether there were any workmen left in the house at the time you left it? - It was not my

intention to leave any of them in, it was my intention to see them all out; I returned the next morning and I found the door double locked.

Court. Were they sober when they left work? - Yes, both of them at that time.

Prisoners Counsel. There are other buildings repairing in Bucklersbury? - There are.

Q. There are platforms to the other houses? - There are.

Q. And they might come up from these platforms to this house? - It is possible to be sure.

Q. Do you know who are working at these other houses? - Yes, they all came out of the gate when we went off the yard.

JOHN GODSELL sworn.

I am a carpenter; I left work about five minutes past six; I left work with Cook and the rest of my shopmates; I know the two men at the bar they left work pretty near six o'clock; when Donnivall went down I looked at my watch, he was going to leave work twenty-four minutes before six o'clock; I then looked at my watch and told him, and he put his coat down and went to work again for about ten minutes, when he put his coat on and went down, and I heard the door go to; I did not see the labourer.

Q. When you left work did you suppose any body was in the house? - No, we did not.

Q. What became of the cistern when you left the house that evening? - The last thing I did I pulled my hat off my head and throwed it into the cistern, and my jacket and my basket of tools were in the cistern all day, it was in the kitchen floor up one pair of stairs back room; in the morning I see the cistern cut up and my tools lay just by in the basket, every thing right; I went down below but I could not see any thing of it.

Prisoner Counsel. You say that when you returned in the morning you found your basket of tools and you saw the cistern cut up? - I missed it when I came up in the morning, was what I said.

Q. Were there any houses repairing in the neighbourhood? - Yes, there were two, and one has communication to this platform.

Q. Was you present when the two men came in to identify these people? - I was not.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Reece, his back yard looks into this back yard of Mr. Wetherall's; about seven o'clock this evening two men were found in the yard I went in and saw them, I asked them how they came there? the further man, Connor, told me, says he, to tell you the truth I fell asleep, and the other man, Donnivall, gave the same account; I dare say they were with me in the yard near five minutes; I have not the least doubt but they are the men, I have no doubt of either of them.

Q. When did you see them again after this transaction? - Mr. Wilson desired me to look at them the next day, and I was very certain they are the two men I saw the preceeding evening.

Prisoners Counsel. When you went the next morning to see these men how were they dressed? - They were dressed the same as in the evening, Donnivall had on a drab coat.

Q. Did not you desire they should be dressed in their long clothes before you could identify them? - No such thing at all.

HENRY BURBERRY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Reece. On the 19th of March the door bell rang, of course I went to answer the bell, there was a man

followed me down I asked him if he came from the counting house? he did not make me any reply, in short I let him out of the gateway, he went on the pavement, he did not give me a satisfactory answer I desired him to come back again, it was the man in the blue coat at the bar, Donnivall, there was another within, in the yard, Connor, I went up to him and asked how he came there? and desired him to give an account of himself; he said, he was double locked in by the carpenters in the other court, and that in order to get out they took that convenience by which means they thought they could get out, the other man said but very little.

Q. Are you sure that these are the two men? - I do believe they are I see them there afterwards in the building opposite, where they worked the next morning, the master carpenter and the master bricklayer came to me. I believe they are the two men that were in the yard the night before: I am pretty well positive.

Q. How long did they attend together that night? - Somewhere about ten minutes.

Prisoners Counsel Did you go the next morning into Mr. Wilson's yard to identify these men? - I did.

Q. How where they dressed? - They had got their coats off.

Q. Did you desire that they should put on their coats before you could identify them? - The right hand man was desired to put on his coat and it was the same.

Q. Do you know what coloured clothes all the workmen wear? - No.

Q. Do you know any thing of the situation of the place where Mr. Wilson is working? - I do not.

Mr. Knowlys. You say from their faces you believe them to be the men, and when their dress was produced it likewise corresponded.

Prisoners Counsel to Wilson. If these people were in a mind to commit a robberry in this house might they not easier get out at the door, that being only a spring lock, than by coming over this Wall? No, it was impossible to get out at the door because the spring lock was double locked.

Prisoner Donnivall. I am innocent.

Prisoner Connor. I am innocent.

Court to Burberry. What was the hour? - Rather after seven o'clock.

The prisoner Donnivall called eight witnesses, and Connor two who gave them good characters.

Thomas Connor , GUILTY .

John Donnivall , GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-63

347. Joseph Hughbank was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of march , five yards of muslin, value 5 s. ten yards of thread edging, value 2 s. three pair of silk stockings, value 9 s. one yard and a quarter of silk ribbon, value 5 d. half a guinea and nine shillings in monies numbered , the goods, chattels, and monies of John Cave .

JOHN CAVE sworn.

I live at No. 273 Holborn ; I am a haberdasher and hosier ; the prisoner at the bar was a shop boy of mine. On the 21st of march I sent him to attend a lady in Queen-square with a variety of goods, and amongst other things a card of lace which I borrowed of a brother tradesman; he informed me when he returned that he sold goods to the lady to the value of 1 l. 4 s. and three yards of edging in part amongst other goods, of that which I had borrowed; I desired him to take this piece of blown edging to the gentleman whom I borrowed it of, informing him the quantity that they cut off; when he came back, he informed me that they mentioned there was three yards and a half gone of the lace; I asked him how that

could be? his answer was that he did not shew the blown to the lady himself, but he sent it up stairs, and she cut it off herself; after that I desired him to return to the lady and tell her that he believed there was a mistake, as there were three yards and a half gone instead of the three yards which she paid for; he went out apparently as going to the lady, and returned bringing me 2 s. 3 d. for the half yard of the blown, saying, at the same time, that the lady was very sorry, and did not mean to hurt me; I was not satisfied with the account, and I went to the lady that evening, I received a note from the lady's maid that the bill came to 1 l. 12 s. I then took the prisoner up stairs and told him I was sure that he had injured me, and insisted on knowing the contents of his box; on his opening his box I found a variety of different goods, my property, as stated in the indictment; immediately as I found these things on him I desired a servant maid to go down stairs and send a lad for a constable.

Q. Can you with absolute certainty speak to these goods? - There is my own private mark on the muslin, and the whole goods are in my line; the prisoner acknowledged before the constable they were my property.

Mr. Knowlys. Have you any body interested in this business besides yourself? - No.

Q. I believe you had this young lad come to you from Mr. Cary's? - He did, I had a very good character with him.

Q. I believe he is the youngest of eleven children of parents in the country he has been very decently brought up? - He was, as I understand.

Court. Where did he come from? - Out of Yorkshire.

Q. How long had he lived with you? - One month; he is sixteen.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you ever permit this custom that your servants do occasionaly take goods out of your shop and account with you for the value of them? - I do not.

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN sworn.

I produce the property.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Privately whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-64

348. WILLIAM ATKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , a man's cloth great coat, value 20 s. the goods of Edward Atkins .

JAMES CHILD sworn.

I am a coachman to Mr. Atkins; it is a great livery coat that was lost, I hung it up in the horstry last Thursday week at ten o'clock at night, I missed it Friday evening about half after eight; I wanted the coat again and it was gone from the place where I left it; I found it again on Monday, with the prisoner at his mother's lodgings, the prisoner had it, but not on, he begged my pardon for it, he owned it was the coat that he took from the stable; he told me that he had had it on, that he took it off again to bring it back, he told me he was just going to bring it back; he was a coachman , his horses stood in the same stable as mine did.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-65

349. WILLIAM PRUDENCE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , four quartern loaves of bread, value 2 s. the goods of Michael Fendon .

MICHAEL FENDON sworn.

I am a baker ; I lost four quartern loaves on Saturday, the 9th of March, between five and six o'clock; I lost them out of my basket, I pitched my basket in the street, and I went to serve a quartern loaf; and when I came back again four quartern loaves were out of my basket, and I turned myself about to look round for my bread, and while I turned myself about two gentlemen came and brought this man and bread along with them.

WILLIAM ISOP sworn.

I saw the prisoner take four quartern loaves out of Mr. Fendon's basket; I directly ran after him, and he made off into Wheeler-street. I ran after him and I spoke to a gentleman to run after him, and we apprehended him with the loaves on him; he gave an account at the office that he lived in Shoreditch, and the officers there knew him, and said that he had been taken up there that week before.

HENRY HOWELL sworn.

I am a butcher; I assisted in taking this man, I did not see him take the bread; I saw him go by my door with four quartern loaves, two under each arm; and I went after him.

Prisoner. Ask him if I was not coming along the same way as he was? - He was not.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 43.)

Imprisoned six months and publickly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-66

350. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing on the 2d of March , nine feet of leaden pipe, value 9 s. belonging to Robert Risley , affixed to a certain building of his .

ROBERT RISLEY sworn.

I live in Curtain Road, Shoreditch ; I lost nine feet of leaden pipe on Saturday night, on the same night the pigs were taken away, the pipe joins to the stable, joining to a cistern that stands in the yard fastened to the wall of the stable, it was to bring the water from the cistern to the yard; I never found it again, I knew the people that took the pigs away, I cannot say who took that away.

JOSHUA RALPH sworn.

On the 23d of February, Mrs. Risley sent for me, that there was a woman there that had come to give information, who had stole the pigs; I know nothing about the leaden pipe.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-67

351. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of February , a live sucking pig, value 5 s. the goods of Robert Risley .

Indicted for stealing, on the 26th of February , two live sucking pigs, value 20 s. the goods of Robert Risley .

Indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , three live sucking pigs, value 30 s. the goods of Robert Risley .

ROBERT RISLEY sworn.

I lost five pigs in one week, all young pigs; some four months old, I lost them in February, we never found the pigs; we found the lad that took the pigs.

JOSHUA RALPH sworn.

Mrs. Risley sent to me; and I went to apprehend two prisoners, that she thought had got the pigs, I took them by that, the prisoner is one, and the other was a brother in law of his; I did not find any pigs, he told me of another that was concerned with him; when I took him up I made him no promise; he told me that one Samuel Courtney was along with him, when he took the two pigs, he did not say how he came to take them, he used formerly to work in the gardens, Mr. Risley told me so then; I went in pursuit of Samuel Courtney that Sunday evening, but I could not find him; and the prisoner was taken to the justice and examined and committed.

Prisoner. He told me that if I said I did steal them, I should be sure to get off clear? - I did not, I made him no promise whatever.

GUILTY .

Privately whipped and imprisoned one month .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-68

352. CHARLES EMERY was indicted for making an assault, on the King's Highway, on Robert Pilkington , on the 9th of March , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, half a crown and five and six pence in monies numbered, the property of the said Robert Pilkington .

ROBERT PILKINGTON sworn.

I reside at Chelsea; I had been in the city, and I returned home in the Chelsea stage; the 9th of March, I believe it was Saturday evening, the stage was stopped at the back of Chelsea College by a person on horse back; I only saw but one, I heard the language say down with your glass, your money sir; I put my hand into my pocket and gave him my money, with words to this effect, here is all I have; the half crown slipt down on the road, and I told him you have dropt the half crown; he afterwards went towards the heads of the horses, and returned again, and said your watch; says I, I have none; your pocket book says he, I never carry one says I; he afterwards insisted on my watch and pocket book, I told him I had none; I must say he never used any threatening language, or put me in any kind of bodily fear; for I was perfectly cool and collected as I am at this minute; there was a gentleman with me, but he was not robbed, it was soon after eight at night.

Q. Were you able to discern the features of the person who robbed you? - Certainly.

JOHN MASLIN sworn.

I am owner and driver of the Chelsea stage; I drove it on this 9th of March, in the evening; I was present when it was stopped, it was very dark, I could not discover the features who stopped the coach; I was the person who took the prisoner, he seemed to be very full of liquor, he was taken that night; he was apprehended near Chelsea church; he said when taken I acted like a man, use me like a man, that was all he said.

WILLIAM JONES sworn.

I was coming from Pimlico to Chelsea, on the 9th of March, on foot, I was stopped by a person who told me that the prisoner at the bar attempted to rob him.

Q. Did you see what happened to the stage coach and Mr. Pilkington? - No, nothing at all.

THOMAS DAVIS sworn.

I stood at mine own door, and the coachman and man came together at the same time, on the 9th of March, about half after eight o'clock; the coachman jumped from the box and caught the man round the arm; the coachman was John Maslin, and the man Charles Emery , the man at the bar, he says you have robbed this coach or this gentleman I will not be positive which, were the words; he called for assistance, and I caught him by the leg; I heard some thing drop to the ground, we secured him, and got his hand fast; I called for a light, and picked up a pistol loaded and cocked. I live about a quarter of a mile from the back of Chelsea College; the prisoner said it was distress that drove him to it.

Court to Maslin. How came you not to tell me this part of the story? - I was coming down King's Road, and I jumped off my box, I was setting down one passenger there, the person that robbed the coach went forward, and I got up to him, and I got off my box and I seized him.

Q. Have you any doubt of the person you seized? - I have a little doubt.

Q. How came you to jump off your coach? - I had a strong suspicion; if you put me to my oath, I have not the least doubt.

Court. How dare you to want to suppress this case in this manner; have you been with him in gaol? - No, I have never seen him till this present time.

Q. Was you present when the pistol was found? - Yes.

Prisoner. I think it is a great piece of prevarication, as to the first instance of my being taken. I was taken at a distance off almost a quarter of a mile; no property found, the prosecutor said it was so dark he could not rightly tell a man from a woman; in my commitment it is eight shillings that he lost, now he swears to an half crown piece; and now the coachman first swears to one evidence and afterwards to another; I was taken to the watch-house, and then this man comes up and says that is the man, before that one of the evidence that is come against me says, that he was asked to stop by another; the man then looks at me a second time, why was not that other man as likely to drop the pistol as me.

Court to Pilkington. Was there any body else apprehended on this charge? - Not that I know of.

Jones. I was partly examined; I can tell more, it is as much for the prisoner, as it is against him, alluding to what he has said, there was a person of the name of Hoggs who said the prisoner attempted to rob him on the side of Battle-bridge, so as the prisoner at the bar came by, he said that is the man; and I said let me have your horse and I will follow him, let him go where he will; Mr. Pilkington was present when he was searched.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord KENYON.

Reference Number: t17930410-69

353. WILLIAM TRELEVEN was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a cloth great coat, value 5 s. a man's hat, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Wildman , Esq .

The witnesses were called on their recognizances.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-70

354. SAMUEL GILBERT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Faulding , about the hour of seven in the night, of the first of March , and burglariously stealing therein, twenty eight yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the goods of the said Thomas Faulding .

JAMES CROWDER sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Bright, a master weaver in Chiswell-street. On the 1st of March, I was going by Mr. Faulding's shop, in Coventry-street ; it was between the hours of six and seven, I hears the fall of glass; it was about half an hour after six, it was dark; with that I turns about and sees a person stooping in this manner, and immediately snatched something from the window, it was a long piece they took out; I ran up in pursuit of the person, I saw a sudden snatch, it lays very low to the ground from the bottom pane of glass; I ran after the man, the man ran into the square, I don't know the name of the square; with that he ran against a gentlewoman, to whom I rather thought he gave the property, I ran after him, and I found there was no thoroughfare in the square, and as such I found him standing at a door as if he was going to knock at it; then when I found that he was secured in the square, I saw nobody else about, Mr. Faulding's servant came out and I said there is the man; but says I, where is the woman, the woman has got the property; Mr. Faulding's people secured the man; the property was thrown over an area, I did not see him throw it; I thought he gave it to the woman; I am sure he is the man, his hand was cut with the glass.

Mr. Knowlys. This was about half past six, on the month of March? - It was.

Court. Pray was there any body else at the window? - No, there was not.

Mr. Knowlys. You saw a man's face? - No, I did not, I saw a man stooping.

Q. You saw a man go into the square? - I did.

Q. You saw him go to the door? - I did, and stand as if he was going to knock.

Q. Did you see his face then? - No, I do not undertake to say I did.

Q. If any body had been coming by you then, supposing the lamps not being light, there was not light enough to distinguish the features of any man's face? - I was not so near him as that.

Q. Then there was day light enough to distinguish the features of any man's face if you was tolerably near him? - I cannot say there was.

Q. You cannot swear there was not day light enough? - I will not undertake to say.

Q. If any person for instance had come pretty near you at that time there would have been day light enough to have distinguished the features of his face? - The lights of the square was sufficient for that.

Q. I am talking of the day light that remained? - I don't think there was really.

MARY BRUCE sworn.

I am a milliner. On Friday evening the 1st of March, I was at an opposite neighbour's house in Panton-square; Mr. Faulding's shop is at the corner of Panton-square; I heard the rattle of the glass breaking, and in crossing the way to my own house, the prisoner ran against me, and gave me a blow, and drove me up against the pallisadoes, not by way of striking me, but getting past me, and cried out halloo mistress; in stopping to recover myself, I observed

the prisoner to throw something over the pallisadoes of a house two doors from where I live, Mr. Gibbon's; he then went on in the square, it is not a thoroughfare, he got up into the square, and there he was stopped, a little boy came up to me and asked me, if that man gave me any thing; I never saw him since; I perfectly heard the sound of stop thief, and saw William Stacey , shopman to Mr. Faulding pass me; immediately after I saw the prisoner and Stacey together on the opposite side of the way; I heard the conversation of Stacey to the prisoner, have you seen, says he, any person pass this way? the prisoner answered he had not; I immediately called out that was the man, I left him and the prisoner together the opposite side of the way, and went into the house, when I got into the house, I recollected I saw him throw a something over the pallisadoes; I came out, and went and looked down the area, and saw a something; I went into Mr. Faulding's shop, the prisoner was there, and gave the information.

Q. When you see him again with Stacey are you sure it is the same man that pushed you, and threw the things over the area? - I am certain of that.

Mr. Knowlys. This was a little after six? - It was.

Q. This man pushed against you, came near to you? - I was in the way of his path.

Q. You saw his face very plain? - Very plain.

Q. Coming so near you supposing there were no lamps you would have been able to distinguish him? - Yes, I could.

Court. Was there twilight enough to know him by? - Yes, I had but just left work without a candle.

WILLIAM STACEY sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Faulder. On Friday the 1st of March, about seven o'clock in the evening; I was in the shop, and hearing the noise of some glass; I went out, some person called out he has run that way, meaning towards Panton-square, I immediately followed him, and came up with him to the top of the square, and asked him, whether he saw any person pass that way? he answered no; he pretended then to knock at a door, he immediately came away from that door, and went down the street, and I kept behind him, and some person called out in the street, that was the man; I immediately laid hold of him, and with the assistance of John Watts , I brought him into the shop.

Q. Where did you see Crowder? - I see him about the door; John Watts went after the linen.

JOHN WATTS sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Faulder; I heard the glass break; I did not go with Stacey, I could not because there was nobody else in the shop; I did not follow him at all, till I was told to come and assist him with the prisoner, we took the prisoner into the shop; Mrs. Bruce came and told me that the piece of furniture was in Mr. Gibbon's area, and I went and knocked at the door, and desired Mrs. Gibbons to give it me out, which she told the maid to do, Ann Wright .

Q. Are you servant to Mr. Faulding? - Yes.

Q. What is his christian name? - Thomas.

Q. Has he any partner? - No, I am very sure.

ANN WRIGHT sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Gibbons; she lives in Panton-square; Thomas Watts came for the piece of furniture, and Thomas Stainsby gave it out of the area to me, and I went up to the door, and gave it to Thomas Watts.

JOHN STAINSBY sworn.

I was at Mrs. Gibbons's, the 1st of March; I found that piece of furniture in the area, I gave it Ann Wright .

Court to Stacey. Whose property is that cotton? - Thomas Faulding 's. On the 1st of March, I put it into the window near the pane of glass that was broke; I am sure it is our property; it was my own putting into the window.

Mr. Knowlys. Has not Mr. Faulder a brother that serves in the shop? - Yes.

Q. Has he any share in the business? - No, he has not, I am sure of that.

Prisoner. Between six and seven o'clock, I came through a thoroughfare that leads out of Windmill-street into Panton-square, in going down to the bottom of the street that young man arrested me and said, I broke his master's window; I was detained there three or four minutes, and I might have been let out of the shop, if I had had money enough; and when Mr. Faulding came, then they went out, and they said, they lost a piece of bed furniture; Mr. Faulding said, his window had been broke before, by his servant, by some accident or other.

Stacey. There was a little hole in it, but not room enough for any thing to be taken out.

GUILTY of stealing only, but not of the burglary . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-71

355. CATHERINE JOHNSON was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , one guinea, and 5 s. the monies of Thomas Wilson .

THOMAS WILSON sworn.

I am a baker ; I live in King-street, Soho; this woman robbed me in Monmouth-street . On Saturday night about eleven o'clock, the 2d of March, I was going home quite sober; I was making water, and the woman came up to me, and kept talking over my shoulder, and put her hand into my leather breeches pocket, and she let a shilling drop, and she went off, and I followed after her, and called watch, and the man went by and took her immediately, and she had the money in her hand, she took a guinea, and five shillings in silver, it was all loose in my pocket.

Q. She could not well put her hand into your pocket if she was behind you? - She came on one side, and one hand was over my shoulder, and the other was at my breeches pocket, the money was taken from her out of her hand by the watchman.

Q. How far had she ran away from you? - She ran down to Great St. Andrew's-street, exactly facing Monmouth-street, where I catched her; I had never lost sight of her.

Q. Had you any more money in your pocket? - No.

Q. Were your leather breeches tight? - Yes.

Q. Did you feel her take it? - Not till the one shilling dropped on the stones.

Q. You are sure there was no familiarity between you? - There was none at all.

Prisoner. He gave me all the silver that he had in his pocket, he took me up the passage, and the gold was along with the silver; or else I did not know it was there, till I was taken to the watch-house; I am an unfortunate woman, and poverty and distress obliged me to go along with him to my sad misfortune.

DENNIS NEAL sworn.

I am a watchman in Monmouth-street; there was a man crying stop thief, and he had hold of the woman; I went up to them, and laid hold of the woman, and took a guinea, and some silver out of her hand, the prisoner is the woman; I never saw her before only once.

Prisoner. To be sure the money was in my hand, but it was given me; I did not know the guinea was among the money, till it was produced at the watch-house.

JAMES DENNIS sworn.

I am a watchman at King-street, Seven-dials; Dennis Neal sprung his rattle, and I went to his assistance, and I saw the money taken from the woman.

ANDREW TODD sworn.

I am a constable; Neal gave me the money, he gave me a guinea, and eighteen pence; there was no more money brought me.

Court to Wilson. Was there any mark on the money? - Yes, it was marked in the watch-house.

Q. Was it marked before? - No.

Q. You cannot then swear to the money? - Yes, I can, because it never was out of her fist.

Q. There is no mark particularly? - Only it was a new guinea that is all I know.

Q. Was any money found? - Only one shilling that I picked up myself, which dropped on the stones, when she put her hand into my pocket.

Prisoner. The prosecutor swears very unjustly against me, for he gave me all the silver that he had in his pocket, and I did not know the gold was along with it; I have nobody but God Almighty, and a merciful Judge and Jury to have mercy upon me.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-72

356. ELIZABETH EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , four pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. the goods of John Bagshaw , and two hundred silver eyed needles, value 3 s. the goods of Harriot Bagshaw .

JOHN BAGSHAW sworn.

I keep a hosier's shop , the corner of Great Turnstile, Holborn ; about half after seven o'clock, on the 2d of March, the prisoner at the bar, my servant , was sent of a trifling errand down to Clare-Market, and I never saw her till the Sunday evening following; she was a servant of all-work; she never came home; I saw her on Sunday in Covent-garden watch-house, about nine o'clock. On Saturday I had a customer come into the shop, a woman that I had served for a great many years, and wanted a pair of stockings; I from the habit of serving her pretty nearly judged what sort of stockings she wanted; I went to the part of the shop where I expected to find the stockings I wanted, and I missed the bundle; I found them again on the Monday following previous to going to Bow-street; I saw them in Mr. Heather's hands, the pawnbroker's; I saw four pair in his hands; I did not miss the needles, nor knew any thing of them till I saw them at Mr. Heather's; the needles were not my daughter's property, they were only sent into the shop to be sold. The prisoner had lived

with me two months; I had a very good character with her. I would ask permission of the Court to speak a word in favour of her, she is very young, she is a single woman, she is not twenty.

JOHN BECK HEATHER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; a little child about six or seven years old brought the Stockings into my shop, on the 2d of March, about eight o'clock in the evening; two pair of womens cotton, and two pair of childrens, I told her I could not take them in of children, she must send her mamma, with that she went into the passage, and brought the prisoner at the bar; I seeing them new stockings, I asked her how she got them? she said, they were her sister's stockings, and she lived in Moorfields with her mother; I seeing her without a hat, I said, you have come along way off from Moorfields to pawn the stockings in my shop; I suspected she had stole them, so I stopped her and sent for an officer, and took her into custody, and found the needles on her when I came to search her; I have kept them till now. (The stockings deposed to by Mr. Bagshaw having such in the shop, and by the eylet holes.)

Court to Prosecutor. You said there were only three pair you missed? - The two pair of womens stockings are two of the three pair that I missed; I did not know that I lost any of the small kind.

Q. Then not missing them can you swear them to be your's? - Only by having the same in my shop.

Q. How came you to go to Mr. Heather's? - She sent for me on Sunday evening, and I found her in Covent-garden watch-house, she was full of contrition, when I saw her she voluntarily confessed that she had taken the stockings, and she begged I would be merciful, I promised I would not aggravate the circumstances, and I would be as favourable as possibly I could.

Q. Had you told her before she confessed that you would be favourable to her? - She confessed to me before I said any thing.

The prosecutor and three more gave her a good character, and observed that she was week in her intellects.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Fined 1 s .

Recommended by the Jury.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-73

357. THOMAS GUNBY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Charlotte White , about the hour of ten at night, of the 14th of March , and burglariously stealing therein a man's livery hat trimmed with silver lace, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of the said Charlotte White , and a man's linen shirt, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of John Garnatt .

Indicted in a SECOND COUNT for barglariously breaking and entering the same dwelling house, about the same hour in the same night, with intent the goods and chattels feloniously and burglariously to steal.

(The Case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOHN GARNETT sworn.

I am coachman to Mrs. White; her christian name is Charlotte, she is a widow, her stables are in Falconberg-mews , they are a little distance from us.

Q. Do you remember on the day laid in the indictment the 14th of March leaving any part of your property in the stable of Mrs. White? - Yes, I think it was Thursday the 14th,

I left this hat, I hung it up in an empty stall, at the other end of the stable, it is a silver lace hat, that stall was the farthest from the door; I left also a shirt in my box. In consequence of some information, I went into the stable, and found the property was removed.

Q. What time did you last see your property? - At half after seven.

Q What time did you leave your stable? - At half after seven; when I came back, I found the shirt and hat was there in the stable, the hat was found just behind the door at the other end of the stable to which it was before, it was in the last stall next the door; the box was left where it had been before that night; I was informed by John Davis , he told me there was some stables broke open, and I went to the stable door, and I saw the door was shut to; I tried it, and said, if there was any person in the Mews, I would charge the watch with him. John Davis was behind me, and saw two men rush out of the stable.

Q. Did you see the shirt again? - Yes, it was by the hat behind the door in the last stall.

Q. What else did you do? - We ran after the men, and took them, I pursued.

Q How far was the man from the stable when you pursued? - I imagine about five or six yards.

Q Did you know the person of any one that rushed out? - No.

Q. Did you see any body rush out? - No, the prisoner was taken in consequence of that pursuit.

Q Had you lost sight of him during the pursuit? - I never had the sight of him, John Davis had.

Court. When you pursed you did not see the prisoner? - I went after John Davis , who was pursuing the prisoner; I saw the prisoner taken; when John Davis took him he might be fifty, or sixty, or one hundred yards from the stable.

Mr Knowlys. You had not seen the stable from half after seven till the man was taken up? - No, there was nothing found on him.

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

I am a coach-maker, a journeyman; my master's name is Parker, we had a shop down the Mews, where we work. On the 14th of March, between the hours of ten and eleven, I was at work at that time, and I thought I heard the voice of two people that I knew, which occasioned me to look out, and I see two men come down the court.

Q. Did you hear what these men said? - I did not.

Q. Did you observe what became of then? - I did not, they came down the court, I rather thought they were at no good; I still kept looking out of window, and I saw them come up again, one stood by the public house door, and one came up again, and I heard something down the Mews, like a wrench when the other man was standing at the public house back door, I saw the other man go down by himself towards this stable, when he came back again, he had something in his hand; I cannot justly say what; they walked from thence from the public house again, to a court there, they stood, and I heard the ring of an iron implement; I saw them come back again, and they stopped at the Three Tuns back door, and there they told over some halfpence, and then they went down the court, and when they came out there again; I went down to give an alarm at the public house, that I thought there were some suspicious persons gone down the court, and Mrs. White's coachman was there, and he came out, and the prisoner and another burst out from the stable. I am sure the prisoner is one that rushed out, there was nobody else there, the other man turned the corner, but the prisoner at

the bar ran straight forward, and I ran after him, and never lost sight of him, but took him, and delivered him to the patrole, and he was taken into custody.

Q Did you go back with the last witness to the stable? - I went back after he was there; I went in, and I saw the staple laying at the stable door.

Q. Did there appear a staple missing at the door? - Yes, there was one missing, and that staple I found close by the door, I saw it picked up.

Court. Where did you see the hat and shirt? - I saw the hat and shirt, and some other things lay at the horses heels close to the stable door.

Garnett. I observed this staple on the ground, there was a staple to the door, when I left the stable.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing, but not of the burglary . (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-74

258. SUSANNAH WIMPLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , four yards of printed cotton, value 18 s. four quart bottles, value 10 d. the goods of John Perium .

JOHN PERIUM sworn.

I live at the Castle Milborough-green ; I lost four yards of printed cotton, and four quart bottles; I lost them out of my house about the 4th of March, in consequence of suspicions I got a search warrant, and I found the property on the 7th of March, at Mr. Evans at Isleworth, her lodgings are there; I found the prisoner in a back room at Mr. Evans's, and a box, I found there some pieces of cotton, and four quart bottles standing in the window.

Q. Do you know how long you had lost these things? - I did not.

Mr. Knowlys. This woman who has surrendered to take her trial on your charge, has been employed at your house and worked for your wife? - Never employed to my knowledge for my wife, she worked for other people.

Q. I see which way you are now driving; she brought an action against you I believe, how much does she claim for work and labour? - I don't know how much exactly.

Q. Is it not sixteen pounds? - Yes, it is

Q. How came you to say you did not know, perhaps she has arrested you on it? - She did.

Q. So if you convict this woman there is an end of the action? - I don't know.

Q. Have not you lived long enough in the world to know that a felony is a set off to an action? Perhaps you don't know that a person who is convicted of felony forfeits all they are worth. Was you never taken up for felony? - No.

Q. Never for picking pockets? - Never.

Q. Never laid hold of for such a charge? - Never.

Q. How long after she brought the action, did you bring the indictment against her? - I cannot tell to a day.

Q. You never said to any body that if she persisted in her action, commenced against you, you would be damned if you would not transport her? - Never to my knowledge.

Q. Brush up your memory a little; do you know a Mr. Wheeler? - Yes.

Q. Upon your oath have you not said so to him, or words to that effect? - I am sure I never did.

Q. What did you say to Mr. Wheeler about this affair? - Nothing at all as I know of, the man was in our house.

Q. What kind of cotton is this that you have alledged she stole, is it a whole piece? - No, it was cut into small pieces.

Q. Upon your oath was not this woman at work for your wife in making up some cotton into curtains? - I don't know, I never employed her.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-75

359. JAMES WHITE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of January , 700 pounds weight of lead, value 5 l. affixed to a certain building, called Pinner Chapel , the property of the Reverend Walter Williams .

Indicted in a second COUNT laying it to belong to John Smart and John - . Chapel Wardens.

Indicted in a third COUNT laying it to belong to the inhabitants of Pinner.

(The case opened by Mr. Schoen.)

JOHN SMART sworn.

I am one of the Chapel Wardens of Pinner Chapel; I saw the Chapel on the 13th of January, the Parish Clerk called on me on Sunday morning; and I went and I saw the lead was gone from the Chapel, a great deal was taken off.

Q. At what time had you seen it perfect? - I cannot tell what particular time.

Q. Did it appear to be recently done? - Yes, the Chapel belongs to the inhabitants and the Reverend Walter Williams; the lead appeared to be cut off with a sharp instrument, this knife was left; 1500 pounds weight was put on to replace it.

WILLIAM MIDDLETON sworn.

I keep the Swan at Sudbury-green. On the 12th of January, in the afternoon, there came two men in a horse and cart into my house, I keep a public house; one was dressed in a blue surtout coat and a round hat, and a pair of boots; they stopped there about half or three quarters of an hour, or somewhere thereabouts; while they were there there came two more, and they had some refreshment; and then they all went on the road, all four of them together, they took the cart and horse on with them; I don't know either of them.

THOMAS DAVIS sworn.

I have a field near Pinner Town; when I came to the gate, I saw there had been a horse and cart in, this was after the robbery, I went round and I found a good deal of hay pulled out of the rick by horses, and when the cart went out I could track the horse and cart towards Pinner, instead of the track the way it came in.

Q. Did you see where the horse and cart stood? - I did.

Q. Did you observe any appearance there? - The horse had trampled a good deal, and appeared to have stood two or three hours, I cannot tell how long; it is about a quarter of a mile from Pinner Chapel.

NICHOLAS WORTH sworn.

I was servant to the prisoner White. On the 12th of January, Mr. White and I went down the stable and put the horse into the cart, about four o'clock in the afternoon by Mr. White's order, we went directly out to Paddington towards Pinner Chapel; we came to the public house the Swan on the Pinner-road; there Lamb and Hughes joined us, and from there we went towards Harrow, and went through Harrow; and we went into a

field to a hay rick, and there we laid down for the course of two or three hours, I cannot say which; we came out from there and went to Pinner, and there we helped up one another to the top of the Church, and there we cut the lead, Hughes cut the most of it, and me and White rolled up the best part of it the other man was looking out most of the time; I believe he fetched down one piece; I cannot say whether he fetched down more or not; we brought it from the church, and went and fetched the horse and cart, within one hundred yards of the church, and there the cart was backed, and we put the lead in, and brought it to town, and came to town about ten o'clock on Sunday morning.

Court to Middleton. Look at the witness? - He is the man that came first with the horse and cart.

Mr. Schoen to Worth. Did you all four come to town together? - At Paddington Hughes left us and went on before the cart on the foot path.

Q. Did any thing happen as you came to town? - No, nothing; I drove the cart, and Mr. White walked and paid the turnpikes, from Paddington to Blenheim Mews, where the horse and cart stands; when we came to Blenheim Mews we took the horse out of the cart and put the horse up there. We took up some geese at Paddington and brought them to town, we drove the three geese from the Pond; we plucked and dressed one for Sunday's dinner, and we left two unplucked.

Q. What became of the lead the next day? - White and I drove the cart down to Baker's.

Mr. Knapp. Have you ever been in this court before? - No, only as a witness, that was when I was thirteen years old.

Q. Pray how long was it before you told this story against the prisoner? - Directly I was taken.

JAMES BAKER sworn.

I know the man at the bar very well; I saw him about the 4th of January, he came to my brother's warehouse with some lead, and his man Worth, was with him.

Q. How did he bring the lead? - In the cart; there was six or seven hundred weight, I cannot say particularly; my brother bought it, I weighed it.

Mr. Knapp. Did you ever see the prisoner before in your life? - Yes, several times.

Q. It was all like old lead? - It was old lead.

Court to Smart. Do you know whether the lead fitted? - No, the lead was sold; we could not obtain any lead.

MATTHEW SWIFT sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner. On the 14th of January I searched his house, and found two geese not pulled, and the feathers, wings, and feet of another goose; I apprehended the prisoner on the 5th of February.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 30 .)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-76

360. JOB TRISTRAM was indicted for stealing on the 15th of March , five raw hides, value 5 l. the goods of Walter Miller , in the navigable river of the Thames .

WALTER MILLER sworn.

I am a wharfinger ; my wharf is in Lower East Smithfield . On the 13th of March I received twenty six hides. On the 20th a Mr. Bell, the original proprietor

of the hides, understanding there were some hides stopped in the Borough he sent down to me, mentioning the circumstance supposing they were stole; the next day I sent my clerk up to Mr. Bell; I am accountable for the hides.

Mr. Knapp. Have you any partner? - None.

JOSHUA BUTTERWORTH sworn.

On the 13th of March last, we sent twenty six hides to Miller's wharf, to be shipped for Scotland; I am partner with my brother; the next day we sent twenty six more, consigned to the same house, to Hoar's wharf. On the 19th of March, Mr. Ashmore, a tanner, sent to our counting house, and said, he should be glad to speak to one of our house immediately; as soon as I came home from market, it was market day, I went, and he said, that his foreman had bought five hides of the prisoner; I saw the hides at Mr. Ashmore's.

Mr. Knapp. Did you see the twenty six hides put into the conveyance? - I did not; we sent them by our cart.

Q. Supposing they had been lost before they got to Mr. Miller's you would have been accountable for them? - To be sure.

Court. You saw them on Tuesday? - I did, and I suspected the hides, and from the mark on them, I believed it to be my mark; I would not swear positively; I did not swear positively before the justice.

THOMAS CHADWICK sworn.

I received twenty six hides of Joseph Butterworth and Co. his carman brought them; I saw the skins afterwards at Ashmore's, a tanner's; I saw them there on Tuesday the 21st, not the same day Mr. Butterworth saw them; he saw them before me.

Q. Can you say the skins you saw at Ashmore's were the same skins you saw at your wharf? - I cannot say that.

CHARLES CAMBRIDGE sworn.

The prisoner at the bar came to my house sometime in the month of March, I cannot say to the day; I was rather ill, and he asked me if I knew the price of hides? I am a publican, says I, I don't know the value of them, but I told him I had an acquaintance that would give him the value of them; and then he said to me, you may as well take a walk up to him, and he went and agreed with Mr. Winter for the hides; I never saw the hides at all; he only asked me the question; and I went with him for a walk.

GEORGE WINTER sworn.

The prisoner came to me to talk about five hides; I never saw them before I bought them; I bought them the 19th of March; I bought five; I gave him 4 l. 10 s. for them; I took them into my master's yard and weighed them; I bought them for my master; my master was not at home; that was the full value for them; when Mr. Ashmore came home he looked at the hides and thought they were not rightly come by; I went to three factors, and Mr. Butterworth came and thought the hides were his.

Mr. Knapp. Did you take any particular notice of the skins? - I can swear to what I bought.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-77

361 FRANCIS FIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , an iron screw point, value 2 s. two iron gouges with wooden handles, value 2 s and an iron chissel with a wooden handle, value 1 s. the goods of Jonas Barnell .

JONAS BARNELL and JAMES HOWEL were called on their recognizances.

SAMUEL BUNN sworn.

The prisoner owned to me that he stole these tools.

Q. Did any body tell him it would be better for him to confess? - Yes.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-78

362. ELISHA HAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , a check linen apron, value 2 s. a linen shawl handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of Mary Ward .

MARY WARD sworn.

I am a servant to Richard Porter , the Blue Coat Boy, at Islington ; the prisoner at the bar was a day labourer , he stole a coloured apron and a shawl of Mr. Porter's, at the Blue Coat Boy out of the pantry; I missed it last Friday I saw it on the Thursday before; the things are here now.

JOSIAS LACK sworn

I produce the shawl and the check apron; I am a constable; I was sent for to take this man into custody on another charge, I did not find the things on him; I found the things at a different house.

Not GUILTY

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-79

363 ELISHA HAILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , a man's cloth great coat, value 10 s. 6 d. a pair of man's stuff breeches, value 2 s. and a linen napkin, value 2 d. the goods of John Sturges .

JOHN STURGES sworn.

I know nothing of the robbery

JOSIAS LACK sworn.

I was sent for by this man, and I went over to the George, and I brought the prisoner over to this man's house; the prisoner told me where the things were.

Q. Tell me whether you did not tell the prisoner at the bar it would be better for him if he would say where the things were, and on that he told you where they were? - No, he did not tell me; I went to the George the opposite house, and there I found the things; the landlord is not here.

Not GUILTY

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-80

364. JOSEPH HUDSON was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , a two wheel caravan, made of wood and iron, value 10 l. the goods of John Kilby Cox , Thomas King , James Curtis , and Edward Paine .

JOHN KILBY COX sworn.

I am in partnership with Thomas King , James Curtis , and Edward Paine ; I live in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's Inn-fields . On Wednesday morning when I came down stairs I was informed by some of my people there had been an extraordinary robbery of one of my caravans, and that it had been stole from the door of the wheeler's; it stood in the street I understood.

EDWARD WHITE sworn.

I am a parish watchman. On Wednesday morning about twelve o'clock I

saw three or four man going along with the caravan in Drury-lane, at twelve o'clock at night; they were drawing of it, it had no horses at all; I thought it was some of Mr. Cox's men first of all; I saw them go down the lane and seeing no horses at all I made after them, and I came up to them just at the corner of Great Queen-street, in Drury-lane, and there they dropped the caravan and ran along, they saw me come over the way, and I went down Drury-lane, and I went through a court and I met Hudson coming back; the rest got off.

Q. How far was this from Mr. Cox's house? - Mr. Cox lives a good way off in Parker's-lane; the prisoner at the bar is one of the men that was shoving the caravan along; I have known him four or five years, he works sometimes in Drury-lane at Mr. Lucas's and goes with a Jack ass; he does any thing.

JOHN COLLINGS sworn.

I am a caravan man to Mr. Cox; I was taking butts out of the Monday, and likewise was fetching them home; and on Monday night I shoved the caravan right against the wheeler's door; on Tuesday I was at work in sight of it all the day, and that the boys might not rattle it I chained it right against the wheeler's door. On Wednesday morning when I went to make use of this caravan it was missing.

Court. to White. Do you know the wheeler that he is speaking of? - There was a wheeler living in the street.

Q. How far from the wheeler's did you see it? - They had got it all the length of Great Queen-street into Lewkner's-lane.

Collings. I saw it again the next morning, it was brought down Parker's-lane close to the brewhouse.

Q. Was the watchman there when it was brought? - I don't know; I was in bed.

Court to White. What did you do with the caravan when they left it? - I left one of the girls to mind the caravan while I went down to the watch-house, and then I went down to Mr. Cox's and called the watchman to help to take it down to Mr. Cox's.

JOHN BURN sworn.

I am a night watchman to Mr. Cox's brewhouse. White came down to me to let me know where the caravan was; I found it up in Drury-lane, facing Great Queen-street; the watchman was not there, he was just by, between the caravan and Brokers-alley, but he went along with me to the caravan and shewed it me before I took it away.

Court to White. Did you shew the caravan to that man? - I did.

Burn. I can swear to the caravan; the prisoner was taken up at twelve o'clock the same morning immediately.

White. I went after the prisoner and met him coming through Brokers-alley, and took him to the watch-house directly.

Q. How near was you to him at the time you discovered him drop the caravan? - I was not so far from him as I am now; I have known him these three or four years.

Prisoner. I was coming through Brokers-alley, I had been to my aunt, coming through, Mr. White collared me, and said, you and five or six more have been dragging this caravan away; says he, you shall go with me to the watch-house; I never saw or knew any active part of the caravan; I was coming from my friends.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-81

365. WILLIAM HARVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February , a bear skin muff, value 1 l. the goods of Moriah Kidder .

MORIAH KIDDER sworn.

I am a housekeeper; I live in Berkley-street, Portland-square; I lost a bear skin muff about two months ago out of a coach; I left it there; I came from Great Queen-street, Golden-square to my own house; I valued it at a guinea; I did not purchase it, it was made me a present in France; the hackney coachman is here; I know nothing about the prisoner; I never saw him till he appeared at Bow-street.

ROBERT FARR sworn.

I am a gardener at Fulham; I produce the muff; I did business for Mr. Griffin at Brompton, and I was there, and Mr. Harris's coachman asked me if I wanted to buy a muff? and I went in, and this boy, the prisoner, had the muff tied up in a silk handkerchief; I was in my cart, and Mr. Harrison's coachman asked me if I wanted such a thing? I said, let me look at it; I asked him what he asked for it? he said, five shillings, I gave him three for it; he said, his master gave it him.

Q. Did you know his master? - No, I had the muff a week and one day before it was found out.

Court to Moriah Kidder. You was totally a stranger to the prisoner till you saw him at Bow-street? - Yes, I never saw him before; I summoned this coachman that carried me to Somerset house.

WILLIAM DABRIDGE sworn.

I am a hackney coachman; I drove the lady about a month ago from Queen-street to Grosvenor-square; I never saw any muff.

Prisoner. That coachman used to employ me to wash his coach and all that I found in the coach I used to keep; I was going to service that morning; I had kept the muff a week to see if it was advertised, and then I offered to sell it.

GUILTY . (Aged 14.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-82

366. THOMAS JOHNSON and SARAH JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , a woollen blanket, value 7 s. a linen sheet, value 3 s. a feather bolster, value 5 s. 12 pounds weight of feathers, value 6 s. the goods of Jeremiah Cater , in a lodging room .

JEREMIAH CATER sworn.

I let ready furnished rooms; the prisoner came to me on Monday the 31st of December last; the man asked me for a ready furnished room; I told him I had got one; he asked if he might see it? I told him I was very particular who I took in; I asked him what he was and where he came from? he said, I might have his character and he should not want the room till the day following, he agreed with me for the room at half a crown per week; he came on Monday night instead of the Tuesday and asked me for the key of the room for he had brought his wife out of the country and he had no lodging for his wife; I let him have the key; after I had let him have the key he brought in several articles, as wood, &c. when his wife came I objected taking her in; if that is your wife, say I to him, I believe her to be a bad woman; says he, she is my wife, I was married three months ago at Cripplegate Church; I did not like to take her in, says he, I have taken the room and possession is nine points of the law, you may enquire my character to-morrow; he paid me exceedingly well till the 27th of February; on the 27th of February I suspected the prisoner having taken something out of the room; I went into the room and found a sheet, blanket and bolster missing, that was in his care; I examined the bed, and found a great quantity of feathers out of it; the bolster that was left had been a very full bolster and almost all the feathers were gone.

Q. What became of the feathers? - They were entirely taken away; the prisoner I had got into custody, at the same time

I found his wife had left him; I asked him for the things; he said, I should have all the things presently; he gave me a duplicate of the sheet, and gave me a direction to his wife where she was; I went and fetched her to my wife; then afterwards we took her to the pawnbroker's where the things were, I found feathers, and have got them here.

Q. You say he brought in some articles, what were they? A little table I believe and some wood.

GEORGE BENTON sworn.

I took in half a sheet of the prisoner, Sarah Johnson , the 23d of February; she left it for something else, and I put it in the same name she brought the other in.

WILLIAM WRIGHT sworn.

I am a constable; I have got half a sheet, I found it at Mr Cater's, it is the remainder of that that she pawned.

Cater. I cannot swear to that part of the sheet, I believe it to be mine, the mark is cut off.

Benton. I lent eight pence halfpenny on it, she left it for an iron I believe; here is also a blanket that I took in.

Prisoner Thomas Johnson. I took this room at the rate of half a crown a week, I paid them duly and truly; I owe him nothing; he went into this room when he liked, and these things that my pretended wife made away with, was unknown to me, but whatever she had made away with I was willing to replace it, to the utmost farthing, but I know nothing when they were pawned; I am innocent of it; I have no witnesses but God and you; it is the first time I was before a judge or jury, or justice in my life.

Thomas Johnson, GUILTY . (Aged 49.)

Transported for seven years .

Sarah Johnson , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-83

367. MOSES PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a velveret waistcoat, value 7 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 3 s. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of William Moseley .

WILLIAM MOSELEY sworn.

I am a brewer's servant ; the prisoner took my property from me, I saw him foraging in the drawer, and I could not tell what he took, but I went and had him taken up the same day, he was a stranger to me, only he slept with me, and a fellow servant and worked with me; I went directly to my drawers and missed my things, my handkerchief, waistcoat and pair of stockings, they were worsted stockings, velveret waistcoat and a silk handkerchief, I had not seen before for two or three days, I cannot tell particularly, it was less than a week, I did not speak to him while I saw him, because I did not know but he might do me an injury; directly I pursued him and overtook him in half an hour afterward in Castle-street, Long-acre, that is close by my master's house, within a stones throw, he had not the things about him then; the pawnbroker has got them now; I missed my things the 22d of March.

WILLIAM KILSBY sworn.

I live servant with Mr. Lloyd in Shaw's-gardens, a pawnbroker; the prisoner came at separate times, he brought the handkerchief and waistcoat on the 20th of March, the stockings on the 22d, the day that the man missed the things. (The things produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. It was not I that took the things out of the drawer but I pawned them, I did it through necessity, not thinking to steal them.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction and fined one 1 s .

Reference Number: t17930410-84

368. FRANCIS MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , a silver skewer, value 12 s. the goods of Lady Charlotte Burgoyne .

MORIAH HARPER sworn.

I live with Lady Charlotte Burgoyne as cook. Thursday evening last I used the silver skewers and cleaned them, and hanged them on a nail in the kitchen; I did not miss this skewer at all till it was sent home from Marlborough-street; I know it is my lady's skewer.

JOHN MILLER sworn.

I have got the skewer, I got it of the boy, he offered it for sale yesterday afternoon at four o'clock; I asked him how he came by it? he said, a servant gave it him for four shillings he owed him; I said it was not at all likely, you must either tell me how he came by it or go before the justice; when he got into the street there was a boy an acquaintance, and he said that boy picked it up; that boy ran away, I secured him and took him to the justice; we found that it was Lady Burgoyne's.

Harper. I saw him come into the kitchen between eleven and twelve, as much as I can tell, yesterday, with charcoal and salt, and other articles that we had ordered from his master's; he did not stop above two or three minutes the farthest, I was in the kitchen and my lady and the governess, my lady was writing a bill of fare out.

Q. Was the skewer in such a part of the kitchen as he could get at it? - Yes, he put the salt very near where the skewer was hanging on the dresser.

Q How do you know it to be Lady Charlotte Burgoyne 's? - I don't know any further than by her crest, and I had bent it in using it.

Prisoner. I was in Lady Burgoyne's kitchen at past eight o'clock for my master, and I had a sand sack in my basket, and I was in a great hurry, my master told me to make haste home again; I catched up my sand sack in a hurry and put it into my basket, and put it on my shoulder and came home again, and when I had sawed about half a dozen sticks several of these pieces of wood tumbled on this basket, and when I came to take the sack out of this basket these two pieces of a skewer dropped out of them.

Court to Harper. How long have you lived with lady Burgoyne? - About fourteen months. This boy came almost every day with things since Lady Burgoyne came to town.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-85

369. GEORGE BEARDMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , twelve case knives, with ivory handles, value 1 l. 4 s. twelve forks, ditto, value 12 s. the goods of John Skidmore .

JOHN SKIDMORE sworn.

I am a stove grate maker in Holborn ; the prisoner had been in my employ as a clerk some years ago, but lately as a workman to do work out of doors in the bell hanging way ; I was up at breakfast Thursday morning last, and word was brought up that Beardmore was below; I went down stairs as soon as I had done breakfast, and I went backward before I came to the counter and stopped about three or four minutes; and then I came to the counter, and my son whispered to me something; I said to him, let it be; Beardmore was going out of the door; I went to him and before I did any thing I called two men; they said, what do you want? I said, only that you may see what

I take out of this man's pocket, and I took the knives and forks out of his pocket, but not till after some struggle.

Mr. Steel. Have you any partner? - No, I have not.

Q. Is not your son a partner? - No, nor is he to receive any benefit till these articles, I have in my hand, can be executed; I expected to be asked that question.

GAMALIEL SKIDMORE sworn.

I am fourteen this month; I came down stairs the 11th of this month, and saw Beardmore standing by the fire, between nine and ten, presently the bell was rung, my father was wanted, and he came down stairs, he no sooner turned his back than the prisoner put his hand in a box of knives and forks, and put them in his pocket, he could not get them quite in, he left about half out of his pocket; then I told my brother, and my brother told my father.

Mr. Steel. Whereabouts was you standing? - Behind the counter.

Q. Whereabouts was the prisoner? - Behind the pillar; the box of knives and forks was behind the pillar.

Prisoner. I went into Skidmore's house for some balance due to me for some work done last month, and the son had granted me to take things and to pay by installments, and I meant to acquaint the son before I went out of the shop; the son gave me leave.

GUILTY . (Aged 46.)

Imprisoned six months in the house of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-86

370. PETER MURRAY was indicted for that he, in a public street and highway, on Mary Chapman , spinster , wilfully, unlawfully, maliciously and feloniously did make an assault, with intent to burn, spoil, cut and deface the garments and clothes of her the said Mary Chapman, and that then with force and arms, in the said public street and highway, wilfully, unlawfully, maliciously and feloniously did burn, spoil, cut and deface a cotton gown, value 12 s. the goods of the said Mary Chapman, being part of the garments and clothes of her's, on her person, and then in wear .

MARY CHAPMAN sworn.

I am a servant . On the 19th of February I left my master's house about half after seven in the evening, he lives in Whitechapel High-street; I was going to Messrs. Newman and Davis, in Fenchurch-street on an errand; I met Peter Murray by the way at the five lamps, at Aldgate; I knew him before; I stopped him and asked him if he was in work? he told me, no, he was not in work; with that I went strait to Mr. Davis's and company, and when I came there they refused the half crown that I had, with that I came out and went into a turning in Fenchurch-street, to a wine vault, and there Peter Murray and I had something to drink; I went back to Messrs. Davis and Co. and got the things I went for before; then I returned home to my master's house, coming along after we left Messrs. Davis and Co. we got in discourse, he told me, he was going to India; and we had had some words, and he asked me to make it up; I told him I would; he asked me whether I would marry him before he went, or would I stay till he came back? he had a young woman that he had children by, I told him that I could not think of marrying him or any thing of the kind. He had then a cotton gown of mine in his hands and he said, if I would not marry

him I should never see it more, the gown was in pledge; and I asked him to give me the ticket of it, and he told me he would not, then I returned home to my master's house, when I came in doors I went up stairs to put our two boys to bed, and putting my hand behind me, when I went up stairs, I found something burn my hand, he did not go home with me to the door, he left me in the street.

Q. How long after you got in doors might it be before you went up stairs? - It might be a quarter of an hour; the little boy said, Molly, somebody has spit on your gown, and then I found something burn my hand, I told my mistress that my gown was all burnt in pieces and she desired me to put it in water immediately; it was burnt very much.

Q. How do you know that he did this? - I did not see him do it to be sure, only by what I remarked that he walked behind me some time.

JOHN THORN sworn.

I am this girl's master, I saw the gown when it was in water, and saw the holes in it.

HENRY CHAPMAN sworn.

This Peter Murry used to come to our shop, and he used to threaten to do so and so to my sister, several times, I had a ring and a knife of his, he threatened it would be the worse for you if you do not send the ring and the knife for I will be revenged if it was seven years after; I said, when he returned my sister's box and gown he should have his things.

Mary Chapman . After that he threw some aquafortis into my eye, so that I have lost one eye.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-87

371. HANNAH ROWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , fifteen pounds weight of feathers, value 8 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. the goods of John Hodge , in a lodging room .

Mary Hodge was called on her recognizance.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-88

372. ANN MACARTHY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a feather bed, value 39 s. the goods of Patrick Mordaunt .

- sworn.

Mrs. Macarthy's husband turned her out, and I took her in, and she brought a feather bed, and I would not take it in, I thought it was her husband's property, her and her husband had some words, my husband took her in for charity's sake, and she went out in the morning, and she brought the bed at night, and my husband would not take it in, and I went to this Mr. Macarthy's house and I told Mr. Mordaunt.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-89

373. WILLIAM WYBROW was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a bed quilt value, 5 s. the goods of James Matthews .

JAMES MATTHEWS sworn.

I am a porter ; I lost a bed quilt, on Saturday the 30th of March. When I came home from work about seven o'clock

at night, my wife told me that she lost a bed quilt; I have seen one since very much like it, I believe it to be the same, I cannot swear positively, but I believe it is, I saw it on Wednesday last in the hands of Weaver a witness.

Mr. Raine. There is no particular mark on your quilt? - No.

Q. What is the value of it? - About five shillings.

JOSEPH BARE sworn.

I took the prisoner, I do not recollect any conversation that passed.

John Weaver was called on his recognizance.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-90

374. MATTHEW LOWTHORP was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , thirty five pounds weight of bees wax, value 3 l the goods of John Falshaw and John Horner .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

THOMAS COX sworn.

I am a servant, a porter, to Mr. Falshaw and Mr. John Horner, they live in Upper Thames-street , they are wholesale chymists and druggists ; the prisoner was a laboratory man . On the 28th of March last I suspected Matthew Lowthorp; I saw him after the usual time of leaving work in the laboratory, between the hours of eight and nine, his usual time was eight o'clock, which gave me a suspicion; I walked up the laboratory, and turning myself about I saw a bag laying containing something that I did not know what it was, on an hamper of dirty bottles, I immediately went to this bag and I put my hand on it and I found it contained something very hard, and I immediately went into the shop to one of the journeymen and desired him to see Matthew Lowthorp if he brought any thing out; I had no sooner spoke these words than I saw the prisoner light a candle, he was in the laboratory, I saw him take this bag containing the bees wax under one arm, and took a lighted candle to go up a one pair of stairs, and at the top of that one pair of stairs, there was a communication to another pair of stairs which belongs to the dwelling house of my master in Old Fish-street.

Q Was he used to go down that way when he left work? - No, that door was very seldom used on any occasion, that second stair case led to a warehouse, and the dwelling house was over it.

Q. You say here is a communication from one house to the other that was by a door way that was broke through? - It was in order for a communication.

Court. When he got up one pair of stairs, was it there you found him? - I found him with the door partly open that opens into the street.

Mr. Knapp. There are two houses in Fish-street? - There are.

Q. And there is a communication to both these houses backward, but they both open into Fish-street? - It is so, there are No. 10 and No. 11, one the private door and the other the shop door.

Q. When you went up stairs, what did you do? - I took a broom in my hand and went out into the street by the shop door, then I saw a light over the door, the private door in Old Fish-street, and I steps to that door, and I heard the chain let down, and I heard the bolt go back; then I saw the prisoner with his head partly out to see if the coast was clear; I immediately went up to the prisoner and asked him what he had got in that bag? the prisoner was then in the passage, he was not willing to let me see it, I told him I would see it, I insisted upon seeing what he had,

and I got the bag from him and shut the door; then the prisoner takes me fast round the middle and desired me not to say any thing to Mr. Horner as he was a married man, he said, he would give me any thing not to say any thing concerning of the wax, but I told him I would not see my master robbed.

Q. Had any conversation passed between you what was contained in the bag before that? - No, I got it from him and I took it up to the place near where he took if from and laid it down.

Q. Did you make any promise that you would not say any thing about it? - No, I did not; I then took it into the parlour with intent to shew it to Mr. Horner, but I found he was not at home; then I took it from there to the kitchen and let it remain there till my master came home; I opened it to see what was in it, there were seven pieces of bees wax; he desired me not to mention it to Mr Horner; I told him I would not hide it from my master, I would shew it him immediately as he came home, then the prisoner went home to his lodgings.

Q. How came you not to take him then? - I did not know what was best to do with him; he was taken up on Saturday, after this happened on the Thursday before Good Friday.

Q. Did you go to his lodgings? - I did not

Q At the time you got into the passage, after you saw the prisoner at the door, was any body else with you in the passage? - Nobody at all.

Mr. Knowlys. How long had you lived with your master at the time this happened? - Six weeks.

Q. This man had not lived perhaps so long? - Yes, he had lived three years and upwards.

Q. Till you came into the family was there any complaint made of his conduct? - I never heard of any.

Q. They tell me servants do not always agree together. Had not you had repeated quarrels with this man? - We all of us had a few words together, and I had a few words with him, but not to bear any malice, it was concerning some glass that he sold and took the money.

Q. He would not allow the perquisites that you claimed? - I don't know what perquisites I did claim any more than we wanted the money divided among us, that the glass was sold for.

Q. Did you claim the produce of that glass as a perquisite? - I did not.

Q. You quarrelled with that man that he would not allow it you, you never thought to tell this gentleman that? - That gentleman never asked me.

Q Pray how long before you found out this man's dishonesty was this quarrel? - It all happened on the same day.

Q You was wonderfully acute in finding out the dishonesty of this man? - Why should that make any difference.

Q. Then from that moment you was determined to spy out whether he was an honest man or not. How came you to put yourself in the way to spy out your master was robbed? - I could not help seeing it.

Q You told my friend that you suspected him, and therefore you went on purpose to observe him? - I did.

Q. Then you could have helped seeing, could not you, if you had not been purposely on the watch for this man you would not have seen it? - I was not purposely on the watch for this man.

Q. How came you to tell me that you went purposely to observe him, and now you say you did not go purposely to observe him? - It was after his usual time of leaving work.

Q. That is any thing but an answer. As it was after the hours of work you would not have suspected that he was there except you had gone purposely to watch him? - I do not understand you.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you did not go purposely to watch him? - I did not.

Q. Had you any business in the laboratory? - I had business to put my hat and lay down my knot.

Q. Then the laboratory is the place where you put your hat and your knot? - Sometimes I have put my hat and knot there.

Q. Now tell us what business you had there? - If you must know, I went back to make water.

Q. Then you went back to make water in your masters laboratory; after this don't tell us where your masters shop is, for we shall not like any thing that comes out of your masters laboratory; then the reason you first gave is not true, for you went there to make water? - Yes, sir, and put my hat and knot down too.

Q. Then we are to understand you, that putting down your hat and knot is a preface to making water. This young man he acknowledged that he stole the bees wax; for God's sake, he said, don't tell your master; you was examined before the sitting alderman on Saturday? - I was.

Q. Upon your oath did you mention a single circumstance of that man's clinging round you? - No, I did not, I was not asked.

Q. The magistrate he knew nothing at all about this business, he told you to tell your story? - He did.

Q How came you to tell me then that when you was asked to tell your story you did not tell the magistrate he used those expressions which implies guilt so strongly; upon your oath did you mention a word of that before the magistrate? - No, it was not mentioned.

Q. I dare say that you must think it was very extraordinary that he should crave mercy of you? - He offered me any sum of money

Q That you omitted to tell the magistrate also? - It was not mentioned.

Q. You say you never thought of detaining this man? - I did think of detaining him, but I did not know whether I had best let him go or detain him.

Q. Did you desire him to stop? - I did not.

Q. So this man there he stayed in his lodgings, to be taken, from Thursday night till Saturday? - Because he thought Mr. Horner would look over it.

Q. And so he was taken on Saturday in his own lodgings; did not you say before the magistrate that he dropped the bag at the door that goes from the house into the warehouse? - There is a warehouse at the top of these stairs; I swore before the magistrate that he dropped it at the door in Fish-street.

Q. This man's work is in the laboratory? - It is.

Q. This bees wax is of a nice quality? - It is.

Q. Therefore of a good quality for making ointments.

FREDERIC BURNETT sworn.

On the 28th of March, Thursday, I was in the prosecutor's shop, between eight and nine in the evening; I heard a noise and I went to the bottom of the stairs, which stairs lead to the warehouse on the same floor with the laboratory and shop; the first word that I heard was Thomas Cox saying, that he would be damned if he would see his master robbed in that manner; the prisoner was standing close by him at that time, and he appeared rather agitated; Thomas Cox took the bag up stairs into the parlour, determined to shew it to the prosecutor as soon as he came home, he was followed by the prisoner into the parlour directly, I followed the prisoner likewise into the parlour, the words that I heard the prisoner make use of, to the best of my recollection were, that he begged he would make no noise about it to Mr. Horner, but let it drop, I had said nothing to the prisoner.

Q. Had Cox said any thing to him in the parlour before that? - I don't recollect that he did. The wax then was conveyed from the parlour into the kitchen by Thomas Cox; Thomas Cox took out the cakes of wax from the bag while I and the prisoner was present, and the prisoner at that time urged him very much not to mention it to the prosecutor, but let it drop, the prisoner stayed a short time in the kitchen and then went home, he was apprehended afterwards, I was not present, I was present before the magistrate, and he put down in writing what the prisoner said, which I don't recollect.

Court. Do you know whose property it was? - I cannot swear to the property, we had two kinds of wax in the warehouse.

Mr. Knowlys. This man had got into ill bread about these perquisites of broken bottles? - There was a quarrel about the broken bottles; I understood that the money was to be devided that the broken bottles fetched; we did quarrel that day.

Q. This was the man that made up the medicines? - It was.

Q. He had liberty to take the wax from the warehouse? - He had.

Q. You don't recollect your master complaining about the inferior wax having got its way into the ointment? - I did not.

Q. You say the man was urgent? - He said to Cox, do not talk about such nonsense.

Q. Was you examined before the magistrate on Saturday? - I was examined by the clerk, but not by the alderman himself.

Q. Did you before the alderman mention any expressions of that sort, that you said the prisoner used to Cox, such as desiring him not to tell his master? - To the best of my recollection I mentioned as I do now.

Q. Do you mean to say that the examination was read over to you, because there I find that it is, that you was at the top of the stairs when you heard this conversation? - I said to the clerk that it was the bottom of the stairs; I cannot swear to the property, I never said that I could.

Mr. Knapp. My learned friend has been asking you about the perquisite; what do you mean by these perquisites? - When any large quantiy of broken glass is collected together we usually have a share of it; the prisoner at the bar he did not wish to divide the money.

Q. What was this glass worth think you? - Some tifle or another.

HECTOR BARNES sworn.

On the 28th of March I recollect Thomas Cox bringing a bag of wax into the lower warehouse to be weighed; when the bag was opened I looked into the bag and saw it was bees wax, and I saw one piece that I believe I had seen in the cask before in the cellar.

Q. Where did you see this wax? - I saw it in the warehouse the same night between eight and nine; and I believe it is the same as I saw in the cellar two or three days before.

GILBERT WILSON sworn.

I am the constable; I apprehended the prisoner at the bar, and Mr. Horner delivered me some wax; Cox was by and Barnes, it has been in my custody ever since.

Q. Was the prisoner by at the time? - He was. (One piece deposed to by Barnes.)

Court. How came you to take particular notice of this piece of wax? - Being a fine piece, and at that time I found it, it was not heavy enough for what I wanted; I had seen it two or three days before.

Q. Have you been in the cellar since? - I have.

Mr. Knowlys. I suppose its being a fine piece of wax it is the fitter for ointments.

Court to Cox. You told me that at first you desired a man to watch, who was the person? - Barnes.

Prisoner. I lived a servant in this place three years and two months; the first fourteen months I was employed as a workman; I had always the priviledge of making up every article that was wanted in the way of ointments at home, and to take what wax I thought proper for that purpose. On the 27th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went into the cellar to see what ointments were wanting, we wanted green elder ointments, and yellow basilicon; I went to see if we had any good wax in the house, I saw we had some very good, I wanted twenty pounds and twelve pounds; and the next day being Good Friday, it was not in my power to make it in the warehouse that week, for fear it should be made use of in the warehouse, that week, I wished to carry it into the next cellar, and consequently I took it down stairs and opened the latch of the door, and Thomas Cox met me and asked me what I had got in the bag? and he rushed in and felt at it. I told him it was bees wax; he asked me what I said to Mr. Palmer concerning our quarrel that we had a few hours ago? he then said that he would be damned if I was not going to thieve it; I said, I would be damned if I was. Mr Horner and Thomas Cox came to my apartment and charged me with the theft, and said that he would have my house searched that night; I told him he was very welcome whenever he pleased for I had nothing of his property in my house; my wife set up till eleven o'clock expecting Mr. Horner would come on Friday, he did not come on Saturday till about eleven o'clock; I was going into Watling street, turning the corner of Maiden-lane, and he took me.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-91

375. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for that he, on the 23d of March , not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and instigated by the Devil on Ann Elder , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and against her will feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-92

376 WILLIAM MATTINGBY , THOMAS FOLEY and MARY PARSONS were indicted for making an assault on Charlotte the wife of Richard Tomkins , in the dwelling house of the said Richard Tomkins , on the 9th of March and putting her in fear and feloniously taking from her person and against her will five guineas, the monies of the said Richard Tomkins .

(The case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

CHARLOTTE TOMKINS sworn.

I am the wife of Richard Tomkins, we did keep a lottery office , we did at that time; I know the prisoners at the bar. On the 9th of March I heard a great noise as I sat in the parlour, with that I went up stairs, I found the room door locked, I went through my bed room and opened another door which went out of that room into the

office, in going in there was Foley and Mattingby there, and Foley had a person of the name of Sykes by the collar with a bludgeon in his hand, and Mattingby held John Atkinson with a cooper's Adze in his hand over him, going in I said, what is the matter? they said, it is all done and settled; one of the two prisoners said it, I cannot be sure which, they yet kept their hold of the two Men, they did not let them go, on which Sykes said, they want money and they will not go out of the house till they have money; I gave them two guineas and Mattingby and Foley said, we must have ten for there is seven more at the door, five men and two women, mentioning Mrs. Parsons as one, who is now at the bar; I don't recollect who the other was, she was not in the house at that time, on that I said, I was not willing to give it them; I gave them five guineas.

Q. Had they at the time loosed their hold of these two men? - They had, but they kept close to them.

Q. Did they do any thing to you? - They did nothing to injure me; then they signed a receipt that they would leave the house; I went down into my parlour and going down Mattingby had the key of me to open the door, he opened the door and in rushed many people whom I did not see, when Mary Parsons rushed in to me and took hold of me, used many infamous words to me, calling me such names as an infamous bitch, and that she had been better than a mother to me, and turning about asked me where the white headed buggar of a husband was? she said, she would take him to the watch-house; I being much frightened I left the room; that is all I know about it.

Mr. Knowlys. This is the shop where our servants and apprentices get rid of their money, and sometimes come to the gallows for robbing their masters. Pray how often has it happened to you that you and your office has been invested by people that have come to look after persons offending against the Lottery Act? - Mrs. Parsons had received money of my husband before.

Q How often had the officers of justice been in your house to take persons offending against the Vagrant Act? - They never were since I was in Rathbone-place.

Q. What you locked them out? - I don't know they have ever been in the house.

Q. Is not your house so constructed as to prevent the officers from visiting you? - There is a middle door.

Q. Will you be so good as to tell me how I was to get in if I wanted to make insurance? - I don't know any particular manner, there are people at the first door to open the door; they do not report to me nor to my husband.

Q. Do not you know there are persons stationed at that middle door to let proper persons in? - I should suppose that they let in people that we know without any enquiry.

Q. I dare say you would let in that gentleman Mr. Wood? - I saw Mr. Wood at Bow-street, but I never saw him before in my life.

Q. Are there not persons stationed there to prevent persons from getting in who are likely to inform against you? It is to prevent informations? - I cannot answer to that.

Q. Maid servants and apprentices, and unwary people are let in without the least difficulty? - I don't know.

Q. Have not you seen the conduct of that office? - I am in my parlour always; I do not go below stairs.

Q. Did not you say at Bow-street that you knew at that time they were executing illegal insurances, illegal transactions in your house? - I knew it was illegal transactions.

Q. You say Foley first of all took hold of Sykes. Upon your oath did not

Sykes withdraw with you and say we must give them money? - Sykes did say they must have money.

Q. Upon your oath did not Sykes tell you that they must have money to prevent them from going to goal? - They did not tell me what they came for.

Q. Did not Sykes tell you these people must have money, or they must go to the watch-house? - I don't know for I did not know what these people were come upon; I had never seen Foley nor Mattingby before, and Mrs. Parsons was not in the room.

Q. Do not you know that Sykes asked the money of you to prevent them from going to the watch-house? - I know it now, I did not know at the time, I did not know at the time but Sykes was arrested.

Q. Did not one of the gentlemen jump out of the window because he would not be taken

Court. Did not you give this money, not from the terror of this bludgeon, but to prevent the men from going to the watch-house? - At the time that they had their bludgeons over the men I gave the money to save the men from going to the watch-house.

Mr. Knowlys. Now look at these policies, look at them and tell me what name they have on them first? - Mary Parsons on one, Mary Parsons on two, three, four, five.

Q. All these policies were insured at your office; were they not? - I cannot swear to the writing.

Q. I see they are done in a very pretty way; is that the cypher with which your policies are made up? - I could not swear to the policy.

Q. Upon your oath are not the policies issuing from your office made on the same sort of paper? - They are made on the same sort of paper.

Q. They are engraved perhaps for your shop? - Perhaps they are not.

Q. What is written at the bottom? - If the book and the policy does not agree no money paid.

Q. Upon your oath is not every policy in your shop made of the same sort of paper, and has exactly the same subscription on it? - They are not.

Q. Mary Parsons has put her name on them. Do not you know that she, by this policy, can inform against these five persons that gave this policy? - I know it now you tell me.

Q. Are you a lottery office keeper and not know that? - I suppose it is by a policy they give information.

Q If you happen to hang Mrs. Parsons there prosecutions will never take place on these policies; there will be an end of poor Mrs. Parsons. You know that this is an indictment to hang her; don't you know that she is indicted for a robbery on you? - Not Mrs. Parsons as I know of.

Q. Pray how long had you been carrying on business at that office? - We might have been there about three weeks.

Q. Do you mean to say that you do not know the hand writing of your clerks? - I do not.

Q. What do you believe? did you ever see any of them write? - I have.

Q. Then you gave this money to save them from going to prison? - They said they would take them to Prison and I gave the money.

All three not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17930410-93

377. ADAM PENDERGRASS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , a cotton gown, value 15 s. a stuff petticoat, value 5 s. a cloth cloak value

18 s. three check aprons, value 5 s. the goods of Hannah Theed , in the dwelling house of John Oliver .

HANNAH THEED sworn.

I live with Mr. Oliver in Kentish Town , he is a publican. On the 19th of March, I lost one cloak, one gown, one petticoat, and three coloured aprons; I had seen them between twelve and one o'clock that day, I saw them in my own apartment; I missed them between two and three; I recovered them again at three o'clock in the fields at a distance from the house, Adam Pendegrass , the prisoner, carried them to that field; I did not see him take them, he was in the house drinking of some beer, he had left the house before I missed the things.

JOHN WEST sworn.

I was at Oliver's house when these things were taken away; I saw the prisoner there; I heard the alarm given, and I pursued; I took him in the fields under the hedge, about half a mile or hardly so much from the house; I took him about three o'clock; I found a bundle on him.

WILLIAM CANTON sworn.

I was sent for to John Oliver 's house I being a constable, and I got these things from Oliver's. (The goods produced and deposed to.)

JOSEPH HEMPEY sworn.

I was drinking a pint of beer at this house, the prisoner came in and another along with him; he went out backward, and after a while he came in again and sat down a little while, and had a slice of bread and cheese and eat it, and went out again, and I was coming home, and the girl made an alarm that she had lost her clothes, and we had a suspicion it was him, and we pursued after him.

Prisoner. This was the public house where I went in at, when I went out I was going about my business, I was going home, this here man ran across the field and laid hold of me while I was easing myself; I asked him what he was going to do with me? he said, he supposed I was the man that took the things, and he went on a little farther and found the bundle, and he said he would be damned if he cared, he would make me suffer for it.

West. I saw him run under the hedge; he had the bundle at the side of him, at the ditch as he laid down.

Prisoner. I have no witness here now, I have had plenty in the morning but they thought my trial would not come on.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17930410-94

378. THOMAS COOPEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , five three inch deal planks, value 1 l. two three inch deal ditto, value 8 s. four three inch deal ditto, value 1 l. two three inch deal ditto, value 8 s. one three inch deal ditto, value 5 s. the goods of Thomas Dickenson the elder , Thomas Dickenson the younger , and William Burgess .

Indicted in a second COUNT laying it to be the property of Thomas Park .

JOHN WAINWRIGHT sworn.

I am a constable and patrole of Downing ward; I know the prisoner at the bar, I saw him on the 4th of March, about eight o'clock on Monday night; I was going my round as being patrole

for the ward at the time, at the bottom of the Coal Harbour close by the water side, there was one plank which was on the shore and a man standing by it close at the London side; I looked and I saw a craft lay with more planks in her, I had a strong suspicion what he was about, but I did not say any thing at all to the man, but I withdrew, I went a little way from the place and came back; I concealed myself behind some casks belonging to Mr. Calvert's brewhouse; I and my partner were both together all the time; soon after a man took a plank from the water side, that man's name is Samuel Coopey , he is nephew to the prisoner at the bar; I followed him into Thames-street from the water side, and I went to the head of him and I said, where are you going with this? after we had taken this man to the watch-house we went back again, and we met this man, the prisoner, and another in Thames-street with a plank on their shoulders, one at each end, the two men carrying one plank; Mr. Coopey's man was the first on the road; I asked him where are you going with this? he said, he did not know; says he, I don't know nothing at all about the matter, there is my master at the other end of the plank.

Q. Could the prisoner hear what the ohter man said? - There is no doubt of it, the plank was about twenty feet long; I went to Mr. Coopey, the prisoner at the bar, at the other end, and said, where have you had this from? he rather hesitated, and at last he said he had it from the water side; I asked him whose it was? he said he did not know; I asked him if it was his property? he said, that somebody had been with him and he had them to cut up, and he was taking them home, I asked who ordered him to take them home; he said he did not know.

Prisoner. Mr. Wainwright, mind what you are speaking of, I did not hesitate.

Wainwright. I asked him if he knew who owned them? he said, he could not tell; then says I, don't you know who employed you? says I, you must drop it and go along with me; I took him to the watch-house and I asked him can you give any good account who these belong to? I asked him if he knew who the person was if he could find him? he did not know; I left him at the watch-house and I went down to the water side again, I and my partner both together, at the water side at the same place, there were two boys pulling the planks on shore.

Q. What became of the plank when you took the prisoner to the watch-house? - I left it in the street, and when I came back again I found it in the same street; his partner's name was Williams, he is not here; I went before the magistrate the next day, and the prisoner was committed, not that day, he was remanded till the day following; then the nephew was ordered for a witness, he was bound over in a ten pound bond to give evedence; I have not seen him here.

Mr. Knowlys. You asked him whether those deals belonged to him? he said, they did not; he never claimed them; you asked him whether he knew the person that employed him? you said he told you he did not know the man; you know where this man lived? - Yes.

Q. You knew him before? - I knew something of him; he lives in East Cheap; he was going in a direction towards his house.

Q. He is a sawyer? - He is.

Q. He told you he was carrying them to cut them up, but he did not know who the property belonged to.

Mr. Knapp. Have you got the plank here? - Yes.

GEORGE SKEENE sworn.

I am an exchange broker; I was employed by Messrs. Dickenson to measure

and sell these planks; they were called american deal planks.

Q. What is the names of the firm? - Thomas Dickenson the elder, Thomas Dickenson the younger, and William Burges .

Q You say you measured these planks for Messrs. Dickenson? - I was to have done them, but they got them off; I had orders to measure a whole cargo, and I had measured some out of the same ship, the Charlotte of New England; it laid at Iron Gate ; I had measured the last the Saturday preceeding.

Q. Have you seen a deal in the yard? - I have seen several which correspond exactly with the mark; I have seen the one that was taken on the prisoner, it measures seventy five feet; twenty feet long, fifteen inches wide and three inches thick; it is the property of Messrs. Dickenson; I can swear to it from the mark, but it is a mark put on where it comes from, they came from Boston in New England, from New England at least.

Mr. Knowlys. You say you had seen some deals on board a ship at Iron Gate? - I had been at the wharf and measured two or three lighters before this lighter came up, but I never measured any from this lighter before it was stole,

Q. It has no mark of Mr. Dickenson's? - It has not; I cannot swear it is Mr. Dickenson's; I can say on empting the craft there were sixteen missing, but I cannot say that of my own knowledge.

Court. When was you on board of this craft? - Not till the next morning after three deals were lost.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-95

379. SARAH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April , eight guineas, two half guineas, three half crowns; the monies of John Harrison , privately from his person .

JOHN HARRISON sworn.

I am a breeches maker in Fleet-street, and I keep the Crown, Clement's Inn-passage . I was coming from that house to my house in Fleet-street , this woman accosted me with, my dear, will you go home with me? I said, good woman is that your home, pointing to the Hole in the Wall, the next door but one to mine, she said it was, and ran after me down to my own door; I said, good woman I am at home, you had better go home yourself and I rung the bell to go into my own house; she hung about me, my breeches pocket being open, and she took the money out of my breeches, and I never perceived it.

Q. Where did she rob you? - In the street; it was at my own door after I told her she had better go to the Hole in the Wall; I pushed her from me, and she went away easy enough, I did not miss the money till after I had rung the bell, the person did not come immediately and I put my hand into my breeches pocket as I was standing by the door, and I found my money gone, and she was going across the street.

Q Did not you at all miss it before this time? - I did not.

Q. Did not you feel her take it? - I did not. She was going from my door across to the other side of the way; I followed her and catched hold of her, says I, what have you done with the money you took out of my pocket? she said, she had not got it; I said, I would call there watch; she immediately dropped the half crowns, and two guineas and a half on the pavement; I both saw it and heard it drop; I stooped down, I picked up a part of it; I picked up a guinea and a half, and three half crowns, and I laid hold of her with the other hand, and

called the watch; I thought she had dropped it all, and I stopped to look for the remainder; the watch came up, she ran across while I was looking after the money; and he ran across and laid hold of her; there was one guinea I did not pick up then, I picked it up about an hour after; they took her into my shop and I sent for some more watchmen to take her to the watch-house; she was taken to the watch-house in my presence; she begged of me to have pity on her; she said that as we were going to the watch-house, and when we went into the watch-house, the remainder of the money was found on her; I saw her examined there, the remainder was six guineas and a half, I saw it fall from behind her, it fell out from between her handkerchief and cloak.

Q. When had you last seen your money? - About five minutes before I came out of the other house; I counted it in my hand and put it into my pocket.

Q. Before you found this money on her did you tell the constable exactly what money you had lost? - I did; I could tell one half crown again, it had a small hole on one side of it, but that half crown was not found on her, it was found in the street; I had had that half crown about three weeks or a month.

Mr. Knowlys. Had you had any friends with you? - At my own house I had some company; I had been in my bar only; I keep the Crown public house; I had drank, but it was before I counted my money.

Q. This was rather late? - Gentlemen do not go till twelve, and an hour is as little as can be to get ones supper and to come home.

Q. Were you not in some degree of intoxication at that time? - I was not.

Q In no degree of intoxication. You had been drinking merrily with your friends? - I was as sober as I am this moment.

Q. How long had you been drinking? - I was drinking with some gentlemen about an hour perhaps, but it was about six o'clock.

Q. What did you drink, red port I dare say? - It was.

Q Pray what did you put on the top of the port wine to keep it steady? - I drank some brandy and water.

Q. At what time? - At the same time; the gentlemen ask whether you will not drink with us.

Q. What did you add to the brandy and water? - Nothing at all; I might drink a little porter with my supper, and that is all.

Q. This only comes down to seven o'clock what did you take between this and supper time? - Suppose I went to sleep.

Court. Did you sleep that evening? - I did.

Mr. Knowlys. What did you refresh yourself with after your sleep? - I had my supper and a little porter.

Q. If any of your customers had asked you, you would have partook with them? - I should have had no objection.

Q. When did you sup? - About twelve o'clock; I had very little supper, and then I drank some porter.

Q. Therefore now I dare say you will not say that you was sober? - I was sober.

Q. Mr. Harrison, on your oath you say you was accosted by this woman; perhaps at that time in the morning you was accosted by others? - I was not.

Q You remember her putting her arms round your waist? - She did.

Q And you found she had got her hand into your pocket? - I did not find it only by knowing my money was gone.

Q. You have already sworn that she put her hand into your pocket? - She took my money out of my pocket, and she could not get at my pocket without.

Q. Did not you swear so that she put her hand into your pocket? - She must, I think to take the money out.

Q. Did not you so swear? - I don't recollect, if I did I wrong understood you.

Q. I was not asking the question, my lord desired you to give an account of the matter. She had her arms round you; perhaps if you had not had this nap you would have perceived her hand in your pocket? - Perhaps I should not.

Q. You and I are not coming here to argue? - You say perhaps.

Q. Had it not been that you had been drinking with your customers, in this way you would have perceived her hand in your pocket? - I don't think I should, for I did not perceive it.

Q. Now I ask you whether you do not think if you had been so attentive as if you had not been drinking at all you might have perceived it? - It could not be, because I really was as sober as ever I was.

Q Perhaps you had been drinking some drams that morning? - I will not swear I had not.

Q. Then you do undertake to say that you was perfectly sober? - I was perfectly sober at the time.

Q Though you admit that you might have drank some drams in the morning, was drunk in the evening and yet you was perfectly sober? - I was perfectly sober at that time.

JOHN DENHAM sworn.

I am the watch-house keeper; the officer of the night ordered the nightly patrole to search the prisoner; the prosecutor said the money he then missed was seven guineas and a half; not finding any in her pocket I took off her bonnet and cloak, she had two handkerchiefs on, and underneath the upper handkerchief there was six guineas and a half; Mr. Harrison said there was one guinea missing yet, he had not got all the money; then Mr. Harrison went with the patrole to the place where she dropped the other money, and there he picked up the other guinea.

Mr. Knowlys. If you had been sober and any body had been taking your money, eight guineas and a half, and three half crowns out of your breeches pocket you would have felt them? - There are dextrous pick-pockets.

- BUTLER sworn.

I was present when the prisoner was searched at the watch-house, and I was one that helped to search her; I went to Mr. Harrison's to fetch her to the watch-house; when I came to Mr. Harrison's he gave charge and said she had robbed him of nine guineas and three half crowns.

Q. Are you positive as to the sum? - I am, on the oath I have taken. We took her to the watch-house and searched her, in searching her we found six guineas and a half concealed behind her neck, underneath her handkerchief, Mr. Harrison said, that was not all the money that he lost, he had picked up some, but it did not make it nine guineas and three half crowns. I searched her myself very particularly to see if I could find the other guinea, I did not find it on her, I found it in the street about an hour after, Mr. Harrison was with me, Mr. Harrison then said that he had found all his money.

Q. Do you mean to be particular as to the words, nine guineas and three half crowns? do you mean to insist upon it that the charge was that? - That was the manner he described the money to me.

Q. Did he mention any other sort of money besides that that you mention? - None at all.

Mr. Knowlys. If a sober man looks at his money just before he goes out is not he likely to be correct? - I should think so.

CHARLES DONNEGALL sworn.

I was the officer of the night; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house and charged with robbing Mr. Harrison of nine guineas and three half crowns; she was searched by the houseman; I held the candle while she was searched, there was six guineas and a half fell from her, she had some other silver about her, but that Mr. Harrison did not claim; then after that they went out and found the guinea, and that guinea is kept separate from the rest.

JOHN BROUGHTON sworn.

I am a watchman; I was calling one o'clock in Fleet-street by the Hole in the Wall; I heard the cry of watch! watch! I ran directly, and Mr. Harrison called out, come over, this woman here has robbed me; the prisoner was there and I saw her fling down the money on the ground out of her hand; I cannot say what money, but I think there were three half crowns picked up and a guinea, and a half guinea; I secured the woman and took her to Mr. Harrison's shop, while he sent for the officer to come, and I went to the watch-house with her; I was by when the money dropped; I heard it fall; I did not touch the money.

Prisoner. I was going from Red Lyon-square towards the Borough, along Fleet-street, Mr. Harrison just came up from a turning, a woman came first, and just as I came past he laid hold of me and said I had robbed him; I told him he was very much mistaken, but before he said I robbed him he asked me to have a glass of wine; I told him I was going home, I would not go with him, I had two children to go home to, and I was a widow woman, and was making what haste I could home; he than pulled me along and took me into a shop and sent somebody with me, and then he sent for the constable or somebody and told them to take me to the watch-house, and when I came to the watch-house they pulled my things off roughly; I had before put my money there to secure it, and they took it away from me; I put it there because I had been robbed of some silver one night when I was late out; they asked him if there was any mark he could swear to? he said no.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing, but not privately.

(Aged 35.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-96

380. CHARLES WYLDE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of January , a base metal tea pot, plated with silver, value 1 l. forty eight yards of printed cotton, value 4 l. two razors, value 10 d. and four ounces weight of lump sugar, value 2 d. the goods of David Glover , in his dwelling house .

DAVID GLOVER sworn.

I am a sugar refiner in Martin's-lane, Cannon-street ; this lad had been in my service near seventeen months as a footman ; I had been continually losing property all the time he was with me; things that he had the particular care of. On the 18th of January the day the Queen's birth day is kept, my son went to the other end of the town, and consequently the counting house was left without any body in it; as I was coming home about four o'clock in the afternoon, coming down Martin's lane, I saw a very suspicious ill looking woman stand talking to somebody at my counting house window; when I came a little further it appeared as if the foot boy was in close conversation with her; he was cleaning the

windows, when I came nearer there was nobody there but him and her; in the course of that day we had that silver plated tea pot and it was his particular orders always to carry it into the kitchen closet, instead of which that day he left it in his own closet a place that is not so secure; we dined by candle light and he left his candle at this closet door instead of bringing it in to the side board; the tea pot was missed about an hour or an hour and a half after that, the tea pot was lost in that day; when we went to tea the tea pot was gone, and the callico was gone which laid in the drawing room very near it; neither the tea pot nor cotton furniture is found; this led me to think worse of him than I had done before; I went into his room on the 8th of March, and the first thing I took up was his coat, and I found it rather heavy, and I found a sample of sugar in it; I then went to his box, it appeared as a locked box, and when I came to his box there I found both of my razors with the initials of my name on them, one of them I had missed about nine months and had talked of that loss often in the house, and I believe before him; they have never been out of my possession since. (Produced and deposed to.)

Q. How long before this was it that you missed the razors that you discharged? - I found them on the 8th of March, I think on Friday, and I discharged him the Thursday following; I did not know so bad of him as afterwards; I turned him away on Thursday and I believe the Wednesday following I took him up.

Mr Steel. Where did you hire this boy? - My wife hired him at Bath.

Q. His friends live at Bath I believe? - I believe at Axminster.

Q. I take it for granted you have many servants? - I have no other in his capacity? I have men work in the sugar house.

Q. Did any other servant go away on the day that he was discharged? - A maid servant did.

Q. Had you any other besides the maid servant and this boy? - We had a girl.

Q. Did you and the boy live on very good terms? - When I found things missing I could not but be uneasy and find fault.

Q Did this misunderstanding go to any length? in fact did you ever beat him? - I believe I have; sometime after the tea pot was missing my wife ordered him to do something in the house and he was extremely impertinent.

Q. In consequence of this he gave you warning I believe? - He did.

Q. At the end of the time that warning was up did he stay behind that? - I did not take account of his warning.

Q. Did the boy remind you? - I don't know that he did.

Q Now on the subject of this in your information before the Lord Mayor the commencement of it says, "That this informant hired the boy and finding the character not right you was determined to get rid of him." Is it not singular you never mentioned that warning before the Lord Mayor? - I thought nothing about it, nor did he I believe.

Q On the subject of this plated tea pot, did you retain any thing out of his wages? - Not for the tea pot; he is in my debt.

Q. For what did you retain the guinea out of his wages? - He had always been told that if the tea pot went out of that closet he should pay for it; at the settlement with him my wife says to him Charles, your master has been at a guinea expence or more in

attempting to find this tea pot, are you willing to pay for it? he said, he was; and there was 13 s. 4 d. kept back, but he has had that back since.

Q. How came he to have it back? - About two days before he was apprehended he took out a summons, that is, the summons is dated two days before, but it came to me the day after he was apprehended, therefore I knew nothing of the summons being taken out at the time he was apprehended; on summoning of me I called upon him to know what he had summoned me for; he said, for what I stopped for the tea pot; I then put my hand in my pocket and gave him a guinea.

Q. You have told us that this box had all the appearance of a locked box; in fact you might as well have told us it was open, for you opened it by going to it. Where these razors never about the house? - One of these razors was taken out of my travelling shaving case.

Q. Was your travelling case locked? - The closet door is locked in which the travelling case is kept.

Q. You found no duplicates in the box? - I did not look for any.

Q. You looked into this box on purpose to find what you could of your's; so far as you did look into the box you did not find any pawnbrokers dupplicates there? - I did not find any there.

Q. Then the impression of your mind at this instant is that there was no duplicates? - It is not.

Q. Do you think they were duplicates? - I have no impression one way or the other.

Q. Did you leave the razors in his box? - I did, and said nothing about them. The night I discharged him I asked him about the razors, after I had discharged the maid servant I discharged him; I asked him about the razors; he said they were up stairs in his room.

Court. What did you do with the razors when you found them? - I put them where I found them in his box.

Mr. Steel. You said nothing to him about them when you found them; when did you charge him with taking them? - The night I discharged him.

Q. You spoke to him about them, and he said they were up in his room? - He had come down and wanted to have his livery; I sent him to the drawing room to change his clothes, and in almost a moment I found Charles was gone; I immediately ran up into his room and there I found him without waistcoat or shoes; he had not changed his breeches, and then he had the razors in his hand.

Q. He told you they were up in the room, and when you followed him they were in his hand. Did he appear to be secreting them or bringing them to you? - It struck me that he went up there to get them down in the best manner he could.

Q. What are your reasons? - As soon as my back was turned he immediately ran up stairs.

Q. There is a lump of sugar put into the indictment; you are a sugar baker? - I am, and have a good many men.

Q. Did the boy never remind you that the time of his warning was up, and that he wished to quit your service? - I believe he did a day or two before.

Q I believe that you had a side board that this boy had access to? - If he had chosen it.

Q. Had not he access to silver plates which he might have taken away? - They would have been missed in five minutes.

Q. Might he not have conveyed them away if he pleased? - He might.

Court. Did you miss any silver plate? - None.

Mr. Steel. He was brought up before my Lord Mayor on the 26th of March. How long did he remain in custody before he was examined the second time? - I cannot tell; I don't know; I don't think quite so much as a week.

Q. Was it not thirteen days? - I don't know; that is nothing to me.

Q. I am asking in point of fact? - I don't know in point of fact; the Lord Mayor would have sent him to sea, but the boy refused.

Q. Was he not threatened to be sent to Bridewell if he would not go to sea? - Not in my presence.

Q. Do not you know it was said so? - I do not know it.

Q. Was any thing said about his going to sea on his first examination? - Yes.

Q. Then he refused to go to sea, he would rather take his trial? - I never heard him say that he would rather take his trial.

Prisoner. I know nothing of any thing that is laid to my charge.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930410-97

381. WILLIAM SPENCER was indicted on the Coroner's inquest for that he, on the 27th of February , feloniously did make an assault on John Myers , and feloniously did seize and lay hold on him, and then and there did force, push and shove the said John Myers from and off the foot pavement into the highway, to and against the ground, by means whereof an off wheel, drawn by two horses, of a certain dray passing along the said highway, did then and there pass over, against and on the head of the said John Myers , and then and there gave him a mortal wound in and upon the head, of the length of six inches and the breadth of three inches, of which said mortal wound the said John Myers , from the said 27th of February to the 8th of March following, did languish and languishingly did live, on which 8th of March the said John Myers did die .

WILLIAM RICHEY sworn.

I am a Brewer's servant to Messrs. Scott and Robinson. On the 27th of February I was coming down Bridges-street, Covent-garden about five o'clock in the afternoon with a dray drawn by two horses, and a good number of people were coming along on the foot pavement towards Russel-street, the deceased, Myers, was going along before me on the pavement, and William Spencer was coming up the pavement the other way, Myers held up his elbow before Spencer, which touched Spencer's breast, Spencer put his left arm on the arm of Myers, the deceased, to push him out of his way, and he fell down in the street before the off wheel of the dray, with his head about a foot before the wheel of the dray, which was attempted to be stopped by the man who drove the dray, and the wheel went over the upper part of his head, he was taken up, but I ran away after Spencer.

Q. When Myers was walking along the footway was the prisoner running or walking? - They were both walking, and a great number of people were coming along at the same time; Spencer then ran up Bow-street where he was taken; there was nothing said by either of them.

Q. The prisoner shoved the deceased's arm on one side? - He did, then Myers was taken to a surgeon and from thence to an Hospital.

Q. They did not seem to know each other at all? - No, they never spoke.

WILLIAM BLACK sworn.

I was at Bow-street, and I heard the cry of stop him, and I ran out of the office and towards Long-acre, and I saw Spencer seemingly the object whom they where running after, and he ran against a man, and that rather stopped him, and I ran and took him; I went the next day to the Hospital and I saw the man; then he was up, and had had his breakfast, and seemingly in a fair way; he wanted me to give him some gin as he was low spirited; I went again the same day to the Hospital and he was in bed, and seemed pretty well composed; I don't know when he died, I believe it was on the 8th of March.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-98

382. JOSEPH GUILFORD was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a bushel and a half of coals, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Thomas Lowndes and John West .

THOMAS LOWNDES sworn.

I am a coal merchant at Bride's Wharf, Whitefriars . On the 21st of March, between the hours of seven and nine in the evening, I was informed there were two men robbing the barge; I having been a good deal robbed about that time I looked through the gates, and saw the two men in the barge robbing it of the coals, the barges were under the Docks; immediately I went round, and one of my clerks had secured the prisoner with the coals; I saw him in the barge, I cannot swear to the man that I saw in the barge, but I can swear this was the man the clerk had hold of; the prisoner at the bar said, sir, I have only taken a few coals for my own burning; it seems we had employed him as an odd man.

Q. Do you permit men to take coals for their own burning? - Certainly not.

Prisoner. His clerk came up and laid hold of me as I was coming up the wharf.

JOHN COOPER sworn.

On the 21st of March, about twenty minutes past eight o'clock at night, I was informed there were two men robbing the craft; I immediately went out of the counting house and saw the prisoner and another man in a room of coals filling a sack; I immediately went up the wharf and ran down the neighbouring wharf which is about two hundred and sixty yards off, and there I caught the prisoner standing by a sack of coals he had got from the craft then, and not on our premises.

Q. Did you see who was in the craft? - Yes, the prisoner is one of them; then when I went round I saw one of the same men on the shore standing under an adjoining wharf by the sack of coals; I laid hold of his collar, and I said, you are the person that I have been looking for a long while; pray, says he, Mr. Cooper exeuse me, I was only taking a few for my own burning; I secured him and directly gave a man the charge of the coals; the other man made his escape.

Prisoner. I wish to ask him whether he catched me with coals, or any coals nigh me within an hundred yards? -

He was standing quite close to the sack.

Court. What is the value of these coals? - Eighteen-pence.

Prisoner. I was not standing near the coals, I was out looking for a Guilford barge, expecting to work on it, and I did not see any, and as I was coming up again this gentleman, Mr. Cooper, catched hold of me and said I had been stealing his coals; with that they had me into custody for ten minutes, and left me in charge of two horse keepers, with that they went and searched all round, and asked for the other man that was with me; I told them I had nobody with me. I have not a soul in the world to speak for me.

GUILTY . (Aged 33)

Imprisoned six months in Newgate and Publickly whipped at Bride's Wharf .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-99

383. JARVIS BUXTON was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , thirty pounds weight of iron nails, value 7 s. 6 d. six iron cupboard locks, value 4 s. 6 d. two brass till locks, value 6 d. twelve brass cocks, value 5 s. twelve pair of iron hinges, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of John Vardon .

WALTER VINCENT sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. John Vardon , he is an ironmonger No. 3, Gracechurch-street , I can swear to the property; I did not miss them till they were found; I can swear that there is one thing missing, from a mark at the outside of one of the papers.

CHARLES SANSUM sworn.

I am the watchman at Aldgate. On Friday the 15th of March last, at ten o'clock at night I saw the prisoner at the bar with a bag at his back, the corner of Shoe maker-row towards Aldgate; when I came up to the corner of Jewry-street he crossed over towards the other corner; I turned my head round towards him, and he ran and I ran after him; he had got as far as the public house, the Three Tuns, I came up to him, I asked him what he had got there? He told me he had got some nails; I asked him where he was going with them? he said he was going into the Minories with them, I asked him whose property they where? he said they were his master's; then says I, you must go along with me; says he, you may go along with me, but I will not go along with you; he then told me they were his own, and I told him I did not think that they were his own, he had told me so many stories; says he, I am going to meet a man at the Two Black Mares in Tower-hill, and then he said he was going to the Minories to one Mr. Bowen's, then at the Black Horse; that made me have a strong suspicion; he then began to pull the bundle away and wanted to chuck it from off his shoulder, but I prevented him, and I brought him and the bag together, as he had, to the constable's house; going to the constable he told me that a man employed him in the Strand, and was to give him a shilling to carry them down to the Black Mares till the man came to him; we afterwards took him to the watch-house.

Mr. Knapp. This man said that he was going to the Minories; did not he? - He did.

Q. The Minories is near to Tower-hill? - It is adjoining.

Q. He said he had got some nails there? - He did.

Q. He said they were his master's? - He first of all said they were his, and then his master's.

Q. Did you ask him who his master was? - I did, but he did not tell me.

Q. He said you may go along with me, but I will not go with you? - He did.

Q. He said he was going to the Black Mares. Do you know that sign? - I know Two Black Mares.

Q. You did not go with him? - I did not.

Q. You did not offer to let him go if a sum of money was paid down? - He offered me a guinea to let him go, but I said, if you give me a hundred I will not let you go.

JOHN PINNER sworn.

I am the constable; I live at No. 7, Jewry-street, Aldgate. The watchman brought the prisoner and bag to me, Friday March 15th, between the hours of ten and eleven; I was eating my supper; says he, Mr. Pinner I have got this man with this parcel; why, sir, says the prisoner at the bar, it is my own property; then I said, I must see what you have got, so I and the watchman went with him to the watch-house and I found a parcel of nails, brass locks, &c. Says I, now my friend where did you come from? says he, I came from nowhere, I am out of place; says I, how came you with these things; says he, I was employed by a man in the Strand to carry them to the Two Black Mares at Tower-hill, and I was to wait there till the man came to me; says I, do not you live in any place; no, says he, I do not, I am just come out of the country, I have no place, I want a place; says I, I am afraid you are telling me lies; says he, I really do not, I never lived in London in my life, I am in lodgings at the present; I want a place. Then I says to him, my friend, I shall take care of you; he says, for God's sake do not; if you will let me go I will give you a guinea. The answer I made was, if you give me five hundred I shall not let you go; with that I took him to the Compter. (The bag produced and the contents deposed to by Vincent.)

Vincent. The prisoner was a porter to Mr. Vardon and slept in the house.

Court to Vincent. Do you sell these articles in these quantities in London? - No, never; I never saw such a quantity sold in London since I have been in the shop, which is three years full, I am convinced they are my master's property by the marks on the papers.

Mr. Knapp. Your master is in a considerable line of business? - Yes, very.

Q. He has a considerable deal of property of the same sort as you now produce in his shop? - He has.

Q. The mark on each of these is the mark of the quality and quantity what is contained in the papers; there is no other mark but this mark? - We never put any other mark.

Q. The prisoner you say was a servant to your master, he had been accustomed to deliver things out of your shop as your master might direct him to do? - Certainly the orders he might receive he was used to do like all the other servants at different times of the day.

Q. Whether he was ordered to deliver any things this day you cannot recollect? - I am certain he was not ordered to deliver any such goods that day; I am sure of that.

Q. I suppose your master has a great many servants? - He has five.

THOMAS - sworn.

There are several of the articles with my own mark upon them; they were never sold from the house I believe.

Mr. Knapp. You believe? - I am certain.

Court. Why are you certain? - Because I have examined the books and I never sell such a quantity in London of the nails.

Mr. Knapp. Your master has a deal of business I suppose? - He has.

Q. You say your mark is on the nails; I take it for granted you mark a great deal of other property of your master's? - I have.

Q. Do you put the same mark as you put on these nails to other nails? - Of the same denomination I do.

Q. All that you mean to say then is, that from the mark on the nails you know they were of such a quantity and of such a quality? - Yes.

Q. Then there is no other mark whereby you can ascertain the property? - No.

Q. Now you say none of this property has been sold; how comes it you can ascertain that? - We have a book on purpose.

Q. How from your own knowledge do you know in the course of that day that none of these had been delivered out? - They are all entered in a book.

Q Was you in the warehouse all the course of the day? - I believe I was only during dinner.

Q. During that time there might be some delivered for what you know? - There are none entered on the book, and there is no cash received for them.

Prisoner. I leave all to my counsel.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-100

384. MICHAEL LANAHAM was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of April , twelve cotton handkerchiefs, value 14 s. the goods of William Hobbs , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM HOBBS sworn.

I was absent at the time the theft was committed.

THOMAS LEE sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Hobbs, he is a linen draper , Cannon-street ; the prisoner at the bar came into the shop on Wednesday last the 10th about three in the afternoon, in company with another person, an elderly gentleman, in order to purchase some pocket handkerchiefs.

Q. Did you know the elderly gentleman? - I did not; the boy in the shop shewed him many; I was present, the other man purchased four, the prisoner paid for them; they had some difficulty in casting up how much they amounted to, the old gentleman desired the boy to make out a small note with it, I accidently was standing at the door, and this man came out with something under his jacket or coat, which he has on now; I had a suspicion that he had stole something by seeing something underneath his coat, I saw something like a kind of a border of a handkerchief; I saw he walked pretty fast and then began to run; I followed him and took hold of him by the collar, and took from under his coat a dozen of handkerchiefs which I know to be the property of Mr. Hobbs.

Q. When he was going out you observed this dozen of handkerchiefs? - I did, and they appeared like borders of handkerchiefs.

Q. In such a manner that you could hardly be deceived? - Certainly.

Prisoner. I thought they were the handkerchiefs that the man had bought.

Lee. The man had those himself, and they were then laying on the counter and he took them.

Q. Did they walk out together? - No, this person left the other in the shop while the note was drawing out.

ANDREW WOOD sworn.

I was coming past; I saw the prisoner come out of the door with something under his coat; I am servant to a druggist

in St. John's-street, Smithfield; he walked pretty swiftly before me towards Cree Church-lane; after that I saw Mr. Lee come after him without any hat, and seize hold of him by the collar, and I saw him take the handkerchiefs from under his coat; he got away from Mr. Lee and was going to run away, and I seized him by the collar and brought him back again to Mr. Hobbs's shop.

JOHN BOWEN sworn.

I am a constable, and have got the handkerchiefs; Mr. Hobbs gave me the handkerchiefs; he confessed it to me as I was taking him to the Compter and begged for mercy, he said, he was very sorry for what he had done; I said nothing to him to induce him to confess; I told him I could do nothing in it.

THOMAS MOLE sworn.

This prisoner came in and asked to look at some pocket handkerchiefs, and I immediately shewed him those which he afterwards took, and he said they were not the kind which he wanted; I did not see him take them; Mrs. Hobbs was in the shop, and she did not see him take them. (Produced and deposed to by Mr. Hobbs.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say for myself, only I took them in a mistake thinking they were the same handkerchiefs that the man had bought; I was in liquor at the same time.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a character.

GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the amount of 4 s. 11 d.

(Aged 38.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and publickly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-101

385. JOHN GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a woollen cloth great coat, value 10 s. the goods of Alexander Purse .

WILLIAM WAKEFIELD sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Alexander Purse , pawnbroker and salesman , in London Wall . On the 20th of March, about five o'clock in the afternoon, as I was busy serving some customers, a person called out at the door and informed us that a man had taken a coat from the door, the coat hung up at the door, our other young man, who was in the shop, immediately went out, and I went out as soon as I could, and as soon as I went out myself, I saw the young man had got the man by the collar, and another man picked up the coat and brought it to me.)

GEORGE RUMBOLD sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Purse. On the 20th of March, some person called out that a man had taken a coat from the door; I immediately jumped over the counter and ran down the street, and I saw the prisoner with the coat, he ran down the street, down London Wall, he saw me coming after him and he threw the coat from him, up the stable yard, and he ran over the way; I brought him back to the shop; I never lost sight of him.

JOHN FENNER sworn.

I produce the coat, I received it of this gentleman's master. (Deposed to by Rumbold, as the coat he hung up in the morning, and that which he saw chuck from him.)

Prisoner. At five o'clock I was going down London Wall, I saw that coat lay, and I picked it up, I had not walked above twenty yards before somebody called out stop thief; hearing the report

of stop thief; I was frightened and threw it down.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and publickly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-102

386. WILLIAM SPELMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , one pewter quart pot, value 1 s. the goods of John Waters .

JOHN WATERS sworn.

I am a publican ; I live the corner of Cock-lane, Giltspur-street . On the 6th of March, the prisoner came in about half after nine or near ten in the morning, he asked for a pint of purl, he paid for his purl, there was no attention paid to him; while I was in the cellar, and other people absent, he concealed the pot under his apron, leaning his elbow on the table; Charles Smith came into the passage and informed me there was a person taking my property away, and told me if I would go into the tap room I should see the person no doubt; I went into the tap room and saw the prisoner leaning on his elbow, he offered to go to the door, and I went after him and stopped him, and told him he had got something that was not his own property, and I found this pot in his breeches, my pot; he begged for mercy, when I told him I should certainly make an example of him for others, because I had lost sixteen dozen within this six weeks; he said, I might do my worst I could not hang him; he was very sober.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate and publickly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-103

387. ROBERT OWEN was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a glass jar, value 1 s. three quarters of a pound of biscuits, called naple biscuits, value 1 s. the goods of Susannah Robinson .

NATHANIEL ROWLAND sworn.

The prisoner came into the shop and took a biscuit, and took and put it into his pocket, and then takes up the glass of biscuits and ran off, and I ran after him and took him with it in his hand, and brought him back with the glass, and took him over to the watch-house; Mrs. Robinson lives in Barbican , she is a pastry cook .

- CONSTABLE sworn

I was the officer of the night; I have got the biscuits and glass.

Court to Prisoner. Have you any father and mother boy? - No; I was an apprentice to a chimney sweeper.

Constable. He is an apprentice facing my house; he has been in my house an hundred times; I never lost any thing after him.

Court to Prisoner. Is your master here? - No, he works at an inn.

Mrs. ROBINSON sworn.

This is my property, but I do not wish to be harsh with him, I have children of my own.

- sworn.

I am the sister of the prisoner, he was an apprentice to a chimney sweeper, but he is now out of his time.

GUILTY . (Aged 14.)

Fined 6 d .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-104

388. ANN HEATHEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of March , half a guinea, two shillings, and six pence ; the monies of Daniel Macmins .

DANIEL MACMINS sworn.

I am a salesman ; I live No. 38, Crown-court, East Smithfield. Between the hours of eight and nine in the evening of the 4th of March, Monday, I was coming up to Mr. Gerards's, the Crown in the Minories to get my uncle, who lives there to come to supper; I went through a passage which was dark in the way to this house, and there this woman came up to me and demanded six-pence, and there was a man and woman along with her in the mean time in the place, it is a darkish alley; I refused to give her six-pence; she said, give me six-pence and you shall go along with me; I did not go with her, and then she comes up to me and got her left hand round my middle and her right hand in my breeches pocket, and took out half a guinea, two shillings and six pence, she did this directly as I refused to give her the six-pence. I takes hold of her by the cloak directly and said, you have robbed me; and she stretched up her hand to the other woman and gave her something; there was some people in the street, and I called out to the people in the street, and she went along with me into Mr. Gerards, I searched her.

Q. Was you sober? - I was.

Q. Had you been drinking? - I had one glass of gin; that was all, the whole day long.

Q. Did not you stop to talk to this woman? - I did not.

Q. She asked you to go with her? - She did; and then she got hold of e round the middle and took out the money.

Q. Did she come before you, or behind you, or how? - She came before me and quite lifted her feet from the ground; she got hold of me so fast I thought it was impossible almost she could get hold so fast only with one hand.

Prisoner. Did you come out of Mr. Gerards? - I was going to Mr. Gerard's for my uncle to come and have some supper.

Prisoner. When he came up to me there was no soul in the narrow passage? - There was a woman in a red cloak and a tall man, and they spoke together, but what I cannot say, and she said, in the mean time, when I took her into Mr. Gerard's, that she would let me have her cloak to get half a guinea upon at pawn; the prisoner asked me if I would search her? I said, no, I would send for an officer; she desired to be searched by the woman of the house and her mother.

WILLIAM GERARD sworn.

About half after eight o'clock Mr. Macmins brought this woman in by the shoulder, and she was taken up stairs to be searched, but there was no property found.

EDWARD JOLLY sworn.

I was the constable that was called upon to take charge, and I asked the parties whether she had been searched, and they said they had searched her.

Prisoner. Between the hours of eight and nine I was going through this turning, there are three different ways into the place, one goes into Rosemary-lane, another into the Minories, and the other into Goodman's-yard; this man was standing up in the corner, he laid hold of me and said, woman you have been just in my company, I gave you sixpence; I said, I never saw you with my eyes; I asked to go to the watch-house; no, he said, I should go where he thought proper; he took me into Mr. Gerard's and there he searched me, and found nothing; I am totally innocent.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-105

389. JOHN THOMAS otherwise MANSFIELD was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , a wooden barrel, value 3 d. and forty one salted herrings, value 3 s. the goods of Philip Edridge .

- sworn.

I live with Mr. Edridge; I was at my business under the fish board and I heard some noise; Mr. Edridge is a fishmonger , he lives in Smithfield , the corner of the Ram-inn; I immediately ran to the door and I saw that young man run across from the door with the herrings in his hand; I saw him put them down and a young man ran after him and caught him, and brought him back to my master; I am sure he is the same young man that took the herrings.

Prisoner. It was not me that took the things at all; I don't know anything of the matter.

Court. Did you see him take them? - I did not; I saw them in his hand.

Prisoner. They were in a sheep pen when they laid hold of me.

Court to witness. What did he do with them? - I called stop thief; and he put them down; he had them in his hand before, running across the road.

Prisoner. I was going through Smithfield market and they hallooed out stop thief; and they came to me and I said, I was willing to go along with them.

Court to witness. Are you sure that he is the man? - I never lost sight of him.

PHILIP EDRIDGE sworn.

When I was called they had him in possession; they were my herrings and tub.

- TAYLOR sworn.

I produce the herrings and tub. (Deposed to.)

Prisoner. They laid hold of me; I went with them into the shop, and stood an hour before any body came to me, while they were gone for the constable; I have no witnesses here; I work at the brickmaking sometimes.

GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Permitted to go to Sea .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-106

390. GEORGE WEBB was indicted for uttering on the 19th of February , a bad half crown to one John Hopwood .

Indicted in a second COUNT for uttering a bad half crown on the 22d of February to one Belcher.

Indicted in a third COUNT that within ten days after the said uttering of the last piece of false and counterfeit money he did utter another counterfeit half crown to the said John Belcher .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Knowlys; and the case by Mr. Fielding.)

THOMAS HOPWOOD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Crawley, chymist and druggist, No. 181, Bishopsgate-street without . On the 19th of February, about dusk in the evening, the prisoner at the bar came into Mr. Crawley's, I recollect him perfectly well, and asked me for one or two pennyworth of liquorice; I am not certain which, I served him, he gave me a half crown piece, not having sufficient change in the till I took the half crown into the counting house to Mr. Crawley; I observed it at the time and I doubted it was not good; he said, it is a good one for we are very careful in what we take; I am perfectly correct in that expression; this was before I took it to my master; I then took it into the counting house and gave it to Mr. Crawley, he having a gentleman with him in the counting house not noticing it immediately he held it in his hand, or at least laid it down on the desk, Mr. Crawley gave me the change, and I delivered the proper change to the prisoner, and Mr. Crawley kept the half crown, this was on Tuesday.

Q. Are you able to recollect satisfactory whether that was the half crown that you gave to Mr. Crawley or not, and the same you received of the prisoner? - It was. The prisoner went away when I gave him his change; I saw him again in the shop on Friday the 22d about dusk, and I saw him again on Saturday the 23d, I cannot certainly say, but I think somewhere about seven o'clock, candles where then light; I believe he wanted then two pennyworth of tamarinds; Mr. Belcher served him in my presence, he tendered half a crown, then he was taken up.

Q. Then he came with half a crown each time? - Yes.

Q. Who has got these pieces of money? - I have got the first and have kept it in my possession ever since; I received it of Mr. Crawley.

Q. What day did you receive it? - Saturday evening.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner is the man that was there on the 19th? - I am perfectly sure.

Prisoner. I have a person here that I was with him all the day from two to nine.

Court to Hopwood. Are you sure it was the prisoner? - I am; I have seen him several times; I know him by sight, it was between four and five in the evening that he came.

JOHN BELCHER sworn.

I live at Mr. Crawley's, druggist in Bishopsgate-street, he came to our shop on Friday the 22d of February, near dusk, somewhere about six o'clock, and asked for a pennyworth of tamarinds; I served him, he gave me half a crown, I made an observation that it seemed rather suspicious; I being in a hurry I put it into the till, and gave him the change, I made observation enough to know it again; when I had given him his change he went about his business; I saw it again in the morning when the silver was taken out of the till, it was brought to me in the shop by the clerk; I have no doubt but it is the same half crown I took of him; there was no other half crown in the till but that at the time; I have very little doubt.

Court. Though there had been no other half crown in the till at the morning, might there be not another in the evening after put in or some one taken out? - Not to my knowledge, and I was there all the evening after. I saw the prisoner come on Saturday about the same time, he came for two pennyworth of tamarinds, I served him with them and he pulled out a half crown and tendered to me, which I accused him of being a bad one; the constable has got that; I then accused him of giving me a bad half crown and of taking two before of him of the same stamp; he seemed very agitated in his appearance, and Mr. Crawley was near, and I gave the half crown into his hand and then Mr. Crawley sent for a constable; the constable has got that half crown, Mr. Crawley gave that half crown to the constable as soon as he came; when the constable came he was searched and there was found on him two good shillings and four pennyworth of halfpence.

Prisoner. I had two pennyworth of bad halfpence, and that the constable said before my Lord Mayor.

WILLIAM CRAWLEY sworn.

I am a chymist and druggist in Bishopsgate-street. On Tuesday, the 19th of February my shopman, Mr. Hopwood, brought an half crown in to me, and I had a person with me, I clapped it down on the desk, I gave him two shillings and six-pence without looking at it, I concluded he knew what money he had taken; about five minutes after when the gentleman was gone I saw it was a bad one; I then went out to him and asked him if he knew he had taken a bad half crown? he said, no; I asked him if the person was gone? he said, yes; I told him to be careful for he would certainly be there again as he had put it off so easy; I gave it to Mr. Hopwood on Saturday, I made a small mark on it before I gave it him; on the Friday morning following which, I believe, was the 22d, my apprentice brought the money out of the till into the counting house, his name is Joseph Price , he is not here, Price brought the money out of the till; I saw another bad half crown, I saw it correspond with the half crown I had before, I took it backward and laid it down on the desk, and let it lay there till Saturday evening, when the prisoner came into the shop again; the

half crown lay on my desk till Saturday night, when I gave it to Mr. Belcher, I gave him the same half crown on Saturday night following; on the 23d I happened to go forward, not knowing any thing of the prisoner, when Mr. Belcher had served him he said, this is the man that has given the two half crowns before, he has now given another; and he put the impression into my hand; and I kept it in my hand till I gave it to the officer.

Belcher. I can swear to the half crown I took of the prisoner on Saturday by the mark I put on it, and I believe the other is the half crown I took on Friday, but I cannot swear to it.

ROBERT CLITHEROW sworn.

I was the constable; I was sent for by one of Mr. Crawley's servants I saw the prisoner there; I searched him and found on him 2 s. and three pennyworth of half pence at least; I did not tell them, I told Mr. Crawley there was no other bad money about him, and I returned it to the prisoner; I got an half crown of Mr. Crawley. (Deposed to by Mr. Belcher as the one Mr. Crawley put in his hand on Saturday night.)

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

These three half crowns are all counterfeit, and I have not a doubt but they are all of one die; they appear to me to be struck.

Prisoner. I have this to say, I did not design giving them a bad half crown. On Saturday night I was going to my aunt's to inform her that I had a child that was dead, and another ill; going past I was going into this shop for two pennyworth of tamarinds, and got this half crown to pay for the tamarinds; they said I had offered two bad half crowns there before; I told them I never offered a bad half crown to my knowledge; they said I was there yesterday; I said, I am sure I was not here yesterday, because I can prove I was at home all day yesterday, I was not out; the gentleman said I was there in the evening; and I supoenaed the man that works for me to prove that I was not out of my own shop.

Court to Belcher. Are you sure that man was there with the second half crown as to his person? - I am confident of it; I saw him on Tuesday.

GUILTY ,

Imprisoned twelve months in Newgate , and to find security for two years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930410-107

391. MOSES JULION was indicted for rescuing and putting at large four persons unknown, in the charge of William Cromwell and William Barnett , charged with stealing four woollen jackets, value 18 s. the goods of James Hart .

Indicted in a second COUNT for the same offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

WILLIAM CROMWELL sworn.

I am a constable. Elizabeth Hart , who gave the charge, cannot be found; she has left her lodgings; there was an alarm coming down the Bridge, stop him! stop him! there was a parcel of people running, I said, stop who? they said they had taken away a jacket.

WILLIAM BASSETT sworn.

I was coming promiscuously over the Bridge; I did not see the robbery, I saw the charge given.

MATTHEW WALKER sworn.

I did not see the robbery, but I was there at the time the charge was given.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: o17930410-1

Sophia Langford , Sarah Townsend , John Sharp and Joseph Spencer , capitally convicted at a former Sessions, were put to the bar and severally accepted his Majesty's pardon, on condition of transportation for the term of their natural lives .


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