Old Bailey Proceedings, 20th February 1793.
Reference Number: 17930220
Reference Number: f17930220-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 20th of February, 1793, and the following Days:

Being the THIRD SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER III. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE ONE SHILLING and FOUR PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable SIR JAMES SANDERSON , KNT. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; the Honourable Sir NASH GROSE, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; the Honourable ALEXANDER THOMPSON , one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; SIR JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City: JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common Serjeant at Law of the said City; and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

William French

Joseph Scott

David Cooper

Robert Davidson

James Trimmer

Richard Broadbent

Christopher Bradshaw

William Simmonds

William Henry Dimsdale

Thomas Mayfeild

Lemuel Thomas

John Whitingham

First Middlesex Jury.

John Dorman *

* James Potts served part of the time in the room of Mr. Dorman.

Joseph Dale

William Parminter

John Pinson

John Hook

John Duncan

Joseph Naylor

Abel Panchard

Edward Widows

Thomas Price

Thomas Vincent

Henry Rous

Second Middlesex Jury.

Percy Sadler

John Bowles

John Humphries

John Tupp

Henry Harris

John Aldin

Robert Chamberlain

James Mac Clellen

George Allen

Richard Gray

William Marshall

John Harper

Reference Number: t17930220-1

191. WILLIAM LACY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Moscrip about the hours of seven in the night, of the 21st of January , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, three silver tea spoons, value 5 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 7 s. a silver table spoon, value 10 s. five linen shirts, value 12 s. and a silk cloak, value 14 s. the goods of the said Robert Moscrip .

ROBERT MOSCRIP sworn.

I live at No. 4, Middle Scotland yard, near Whitehall ; I cannot say my house was broke open; the things were taken out on the 21st of January, about seven o'clock; I went home from my work, going home near the door, a person came out of my house who did not belong to it; I met him, he was a suspicious person; this person walked very leisurely till he past me, as soon as he got past me he ran as fast as he could, as I imagined, which gave me a suspicion that there was something not right in the house; I went into my apartments, which is two rooms on the ground floor, which I inhabit myself; I went into the first room and I heard a person rummaging the drawers of the bureau; I stood at the door of the second room till a person came out of the room to me with these articles, the handkerchief excepted; the prisoner was that person I took with the articles on him, carrying them before him in his hands in this manner; I secured the prisoner and called for assistance to the lodger; a neighbour went to the public office at Bow-street and brought an officer, who took him into custody; I have the articles here, five shirts and a silk cloak, the other articles were taken from him by the officer; I saw the officer take from him a silver table spoon, a pair of silver tea tongs and two silver tea spoons; one was lost which never was found. When I went out I left my wife and my family, two children at home, my wife is here. I went out at one o'clock as usual, I had not been home between one and seven. I can swear to the articles, to the spoons by the initials of my name; I know the tea tongs by the cyphers of the same, the table spoon the same as the tea tongs; I leave speaking of the rest to my wife.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask him whether the place was broke open or not, as I am indicted for a burglary.

Court. Who is your landlord? - I rent the house of Mr. Copeland, in St. Martin's-lane, a carpenter; I let all the rest of the house out furnished or unfurnished, except those two apartments; I pay the rent of the whole house.

Q. Was any part of the house broke open; did there appear to be any violence about the house? - There was no other violence than about the flap of the bureau, that had been attempted to be broke; the linen and cloak was taken out of the drawer underneath.

Q. Was there any violence done to any part of your house? - There did not seem to be any violence as I saw.

Q. How do you apprehend they got in? - At the door, I imagine.

- MOSCRIP sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness; I was not at home when my property was taken; the last time I went out was about two o'clock, I have two children, a girl and a boy, and I took them both out

with me; I left nobody in my apartments when I went out; I left the outer door on the latch, because there was lodgers in the house; my husband first discovered the house had been robbed; I was sent for and came home after the prisoner was in custody.

Q. How are your rooms situated? - The one goes into the other from the kitchen into the parlour; when you come to the street door, there is a passage and the two rooms lay on the left hand, one behind the other; the parlour is nearest the street door, you pass by the parlour and come to the kitchen door; when I went out at two o'clock I locked the kitchen room door, but left the parlour door open, I gave the key of the kitchen to a lodger, all this property was taken from the parlour; there was no violence done to the parlour at all; the door was left open, there is no entrance into the parlour but through the kitchen; I missed all the articles in the indictment; the shirts and cloak were in the top drawer, the plate was in a cupboard in the parlour; that cupboard was left open, there is no communication from the parlour to the passage, I knew they could not come into the parlour but by breaking into the kitchen, I can swear all the things to be mine; I know the shirts to be my husbands, by the marks made by myself, and I examined and I found so many were missing; I had had the cloak eight or nine years, I particularly know it by the lace, it is a broad lace and a thing that I commonly wore in turn; the tea spoons I might sell for 6 s. the tea tongs for 7 s. the silver table spoons for 10 s. the five shirts for 12 s. and the cloak for 14 s. I saw the whole of the plate taken from the prisoner by the officer Cook, the same as my husband spoke to, I have kept the linen and the cloak from that time to this, the officer has the plate.

Prisoner. I think I heard her say she saw the property taken from me. - I did, I saw the plate taken from him.

EVANS LOGGARD sworn.

I am a lodger with Mr. Moscrip, that day I went home from my work about half after five from Craven-street, in the Strand, where I have worked eleven months; going home I went up two pair of stairs to get the key of one of Mr. Moscrip's lodgers, I gets the key and went down, and set by the fire about an hour, in this kitchen that leads into the parlour where the things were taken from, I used to use the kitchen; leaving the kitchen I cannot be sure whether I left the door on the latch or open, I went up to my lodging room, I know I did not lock the door, I went to put a lock on to a tea caddy in my own room, whilst I was up stairs I heard the landlord call for assistance, and I ran down to his assistance; going down to the kitchen I saw the landlord had hold of the prisoner, the prisoner was at that time in the kitchen near the parlour door, I saw the plate taken from him, I did not see the bundle in his hand; the prisoner had dropped the linen and the cloak at the door, I did not see him drop it.

Jury. Are your sure that you latched the door? - I am not positive.

Court. Are you sure the latch was down of the outer door? - I cannot be positive.

Q. You was the last person that came in before the prisoner was found, how was the street door? - I cannot be positive whether I shut it or left it open.

WILLIAM COOK sworn.

I attend at Bow-street, I am not an officer; about half an hour after seven o'clock on the 21st of January, a man came up from Bow-street and I went

down to the house, I fastened the hands of the prisoner and examined him, and I found the table spoon inside of his breeches of his left thigh; on the right hand thigh I found a pair of tea tongs and one tea spoon, and in his great coat pocket I found this here tool (an iron tool produced) and a tea spoon; and since that, the gentleman has found one of the teeth of this tool in the bureau; I have kept the silver spoons ever since.

Mrs. Moscrip. I found the tooth of that tool in the bureau.

Prisoner. I leave myself entirely at the mercy of the court; I have nothing to say in the affair; I have no witnesses; I have no friend in the world.

GUILTY of stealing, to the value of 39 s. but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-2

192. WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John White , about the hour of three, on the night of the 19th of January , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, seven linen shirts, value 14 s. three pair of silk stockings, value 9 s. four pair of cotton stockings, value 8 s. three callico shirts, value 12 s. four pair of misello pockets, value 3 s. a flannel waistcoat, value 1 s. a callico bed gown, value 2 s. two dimity petticoats, value 5 s. a callico bed gown, value 2 s. two muslin aprons, value 4 s. four callico aprons, value 4 s. two check linen aprons, value 4 s. one pair of pillow cases, value 3 s. two diaper towels, value 2 s. three pair of lace ruffles, value 6 s. four muslin caps, value 4 s. a muslin tucker, value 1 s. a cotton night cap, value 6 s. five linen table cloths, value 15 s. a cotton gown, value 8 s. two cloth coats, value 10 s. a pair of cloth breeches, value 2 s. a pair of velveret breeches, value 2 s. a linen napkin, value 4 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of the said John White .

MARY WHITE sworn.

I am the wife of John White ; my husband is a labourer ; we live at Bromley , keep a house there; on Saturday the 19th of January, I went to bed a little after eleven, I went to bed and left my place secure as I thought; I was not the last person up; Elizabeth Wilt , a servant of mine, I believe, went up after me; I went into my room, and she went up stairs.

Q. How came you to hesitate about it? - She went up in the garret were she sleeps; I sleep on the ground floor; I am sure she went up before I was in bed.

Q. Are you sure she did not come down again? - Not till the morning; I fastened the house, we have no shutters to the windows in that room that was robbed; it is the kitchen backwards, belonging to the house, it has only one window in it, a casement, that window was shut with the asp, it is on the same floor as where I sleep, I was the last in the room, and took an handkerchief from the clothes that was lost, that window had not been opened for some weeks, I did not try it that night, I did not take any particular observation that night nor for some weeks before.

Q. Then the maid servant might have opened it? - She had no business in the room.

Q. Was that the window that the person had come into the room by, that took your things? - It was, the pane of glass was broke, taken out, and the casement opened; that morning I got up a little before six; the servant came down and was in the room first, and called to

me and asked where the linen was that was in the room; it was Elizabeth Wilt , she is an old woman; I did not know there was any occasion to bring her here; I lost all the things mentioned in the indictment; there are some things found which are here, they were not all my own things that were taken away; I am a poor washerwoman and take things in to wash, but all these things were in my house in the night of Saturday the 19th of January. I knew nothing of the prisoner till I saw him at Shadwell office; my window looks into a back yard, other yards of other houses communicate to it, a whole row of houses communicate to it.

Q. Was it dark when you got up, or how? - Very dark.

JOHN JEVISON sworn.

I get my living by dealing in old clothes in Rosemary lane; on the 20th of January Sunday morning, Butterworth the prisoner and another they came to me between five and six in the morning, and told me they had a quantity of wearing apparel, and they had got it hid away in some place, in some fields; I am told the name of the other is Faulkner who came with him, and they wanted money of me to go and get a coach to bring the bundle, they said it was not prudent to bring it then on account of the patroles for fear of being stopped; I refused them any money that time of the morning, they went away and came again about seven or it may be a little after, both of them, each of them brought some of these articles which they spoke of before; they offered them for sale, and I bought as many as I gave 30 s. for, they told me they had as many as would come to 10 l. or 12 l. but they could not bring them then for fear of being discovered; the things that I received were dirty; they said the other things were washed and done up fit to carry home, and they said they could not bring them then, but they would another time; after that I heard no more particularly of them, till I heard they were taken up, they never came to me with the others.

Court. What day was this? - On Sunday.

Q. What did you do after this? - I naturally put them out of my house for safety; they told me that they got them so and so, and desired me to put them out of the house; I put them in a bag up a chimney in another house where no person lived in; then Wednesday morning I was taken up, and I took the things to Shadwell office, I was taken up for some other things, and I was admitted an evidence, and I told all as I knew; I had known this boy about two months, I did not know the other.

Court. You say you had known this boy some months, in what way of life was he in? - Sometimes he was at work and sometimes he lived with girls; but I never knew him guilty of housebreaking.

Q. You could have no doubt that these things were stolen? - I did not doubt they were stolen, but I did not think that they had broke a house open for them.

Q. Then being taken up for some other robbery you was admitted a witness on this robbery? - Yes.

PETER MAYNE sworn.

I know nothing more then that I received some property of the last witness, and saw the prisoner sign a confession before the magistrate.

Court to Mrs. White. You attended before the justice? - I did.

Q. This boy was taken up there? - He was.

Q. Did you attend the whole time? - I was ordered to come to Shadwell office

on Thursday, I went on Thursday, and there I saw this part of my property I lost; I sware to them, I don't know who had taken them, nor where they came from after they were gone from my house; I was then ordered to attend the next Friday, which I did, I was in the parlour with justice Staples; then he ordered Butterworth to be called in, the prisoner at the bar, I had never seen him to my knowledge before; when he came into the parlour justice Staples asked him how he came there, and he told justice Staples.

Q. Did the justice tell him he had better put his hand to it, what was the words? - He asked me to sign my name, and then he said William Butterworth sign your name, he said I cannot write, the justice said then put your mark.

Q. Was it read to him? - It was.

Q. What did the justice say to him, did he say he had better put his mark to it or no? - I cannot say for truth whether he did or no.

Q. You put your name as a matter of course? - I did.

Q. He put his name just in the same way, the justice did not tell him he should be cautious what he did, because he was confessing a capital offence? - Not that I know of.

Q. No caution given the boy at all? - I don't know there was.

Q. What age is the boy? - I don't know, I think I heard his mother say he was but sixteen.

Q. There was no caution used, but he signed it merely as a matter of course? - The boy was asked the question by justice Staples and he did it.

Q. Had he an idea that he was to be a witness against Faulkner? - I don't know.

Q. Of what age is Faulkner? - About twenty, I have seen him.

Q. Are you sure that the justice after hearing what he said, read it over to him? - I am sure that justice Staples read it.

Q. And nothing at all said to the boy, either to induce him to sign, or to caution him what he was about? - I don't know that there was.

Court to Mayn. Any caution given to this boy? - Mr. Staples asked him what he had got to say, he then upt and told the particulars.

Q. You have known pretty much Jevison? - I have, his way of life is in this way, I believe he has been so for years; I have known him four or five years.

Q. Was not the idea held out to the boy that he was to be a witness against Faulkner? - No.

Q.Was he told that he was to confess the whole that he had done and that he would not be hurt? - No, not a word of that.

Q. What age is Faulkner? - He is something older than this.

Jury. Is Faulkner in hold? - He is not; I had these things of Jevison the Wednesday after the robbery, Jevison was not apprehended for any thing at this time, but I believe he was afraid of being apprehended, and he came down to my house on Tuesday, and on Wednesday he brought this property down.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-3

193. GEORGE BARLOW , MARY LONEY and PATRICK FITZSUMMONS were indicted for making an assault on Alexander Matthison , in the house of Hugh Young , on the 13th of January , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will 10 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said Alexander Matthison .

ALEXANDER MATTHISON sworn.

I am a labouring man ; I live in White's-yard, Whitechapel parish; I was coming home from labour; I work at Mr. Bowles's a glass house, at Cock-hill; I being very dry and I saw Mr. Hugh Young 's house open, and I went in and got a pint of beer, he keeps the Black Lion, Salt Petre-bank , after I had my pint of beer I was taken hold of by George Barlow; I did not stay longer than I had my pint of beer, it was between twelve and one; I was taken hold of and ten shillings and one halfpenny was taken from me in the tap room, and I called out robbery! George Barlow laid hold of me and the woman robbed me; he laid hold of me, put my hands behind me and she put her hand in my pocket; Barlow laid hold of both my hands behind; the woman Mary Loney endeavoured to put her hand into my pocket and the pocket was so near she could not get her hand in cleverly, and then when I called out robbery she took it up on the side and shaked it in this manner on the ground; I called out robbery in the mean time, and the landlord he came in all haste with a light, the landlord he went to the bar again; I begged of them very hard to give me my money and I would give them a gallon of beer freely; after I spoke all the words I could, while the landlord was out of sight, Barlow gave me three kicks and told me he would put me on the fire if I would ask him for my money. When the landlord came he saw these two the man and woman, George Barlow and Mary Loney going away from me, and Patrick Fitzsummons came past and put out the light; I did not know him before, but I knew him by seeing him close to me when I was going out of the tap room, and seeing him putting his hand up and putting the light out; there was one more in the box, his name is John Murphy , he got clear off; they held my hands again, and George Barlow and Mary Loney picked up the money; I cannot swear who held my hands then; I was as sober as I am this moment; all I see Fitzsummons do was he put out the light, I cannot swear he touched me or took any of the money.

Prisoner Barlow. At the morning following he went to another house, he did not know which house he was robbed in.

Court to Prosecutor. How soon afterwards did you see these people again? - I did not see them till the officer took them up at the Nag's Head after they robbed me; I did make a mistake to the officer in the morning, I said, the Black Boy instead of the Black Lion; I had not a halfpenny left, so that I did not know what I was doing.

Prisoner Barlow. There were several people in the house that he accused of the robbery as well as me. - No, it was them two that took my money; I never charged any body else of the robbery.

Prisoner Loney. He was in the lodging house along with me and gave me 6 d. and he said, he had no more than another 6 d. or he would stop with me all night. - I was not in any other house with her.

Court. Are you certain you never was in any house with her either private or public? - Only at the Black Lion; I met her in the street, and she asked me to treat her and I went in with her and I had a pint of beer, and I gave her a drink of it.

HUGH YOUNG sworn.

I keep the Black Lion. On the 13th of January this good man Alexander Matthison , it was Sunday night, past twelve o'clock before he came in; I had refused drawing porter some time before they came in; there was one or

two in the tap room that I wanted to get out. This Matthison and Mary Loney and another young woman came in together, I don't know her name; on his coming in he asked me for a pint of beer; I told him I had given over drawing beer; they went from the door to the far end of the tap room, and he gave this woman, who was with Mary Loney 6 d. to get a pint of porter; some time after that he came to me to the bar and said, it was very extraordinary he could not have his change of his 6 d. of me; I told him I took no money of him to change, with that he made answer that he gave it to my servant maid; I found by enquiry that he had given the other woman the 6 d. and I caused the woman to come forward, and she said, she would not give him the change; and I throws down the four-pence farthing to him; the woman then came forward and said, rather than I should be out of pocket she would give the change, so she throws down the four-pence farthing, and I took up my change again; they continued in the tap room a good while without having any porter, it might be very near an hour; this Mary Loney and the other woman sat there some time in a box by themselves; I took no further notice of the tap room then, for I was rather busy in the bar; a short time after this I heard him cry out robbery; I made what haste I could with the light, the light in the sconce was not out, but it was very short, because I would not change the light for them, I wanted them out; by coming out I saw this man on his hands and knees, this Matthison, and he made such a noise, I held him up in my arms and I held a light, and Barlow and the woman Loney was next to him, and I pushed them two from him; I knew Barlow and the woman before, they used the house; I held the light and told him to hold his tongue, and to tell me who had took his money from him, and I would do my endeavour to get it returned; I asked him who had taken it; he said, they had all; he did not point out any to me at that time; he immediately offered them a gallon of beer if they would return him his money; I could not see any money; I took the candle and I looked round, and there was not any thing to be seen on the ground; Barlow and the woman was standing nearest to him.

Q. Did he tell you how his hands had been held? - No, he had not mentioned it to me, by the way he described it to me, he seemed to me to be pushed out of the box; I know the two women and him set together sometime without any porter at all.

Q. Then you don't know of your own knowledge of any body laying hold of him at all? - I do not.

Q. You saw no money? - I did not.

Q. How many were standing about him? - Seven or eight.

Q. Did you see the candle put out? - I did not, the candle was burnt out a quarter of an hour before this robbery was cried.

Court to Matthison. I understand you had seven or eight people about you. How came you to mention only these three? - I did not know their names, and there was none took any money but these two prisoners at the bar; I don't know how many there was in the room; there was none took hold of me, or did any thing to me, but these three in the bar and one man that got away; there was other people in the tap room, but they did not meddle with me; Barlow first laid hold of my arms and then another man came and laid hold, and Barlow and the woman picked up my money; I cried out the moment that Barlow laid hold of my hands; there was none

see him that I know of; they would not tell me their names or nothing, the people that were in the room would not.

Q. How came you not to tell the landlord that you was robbed? - I did tell him that I was robbed of 10 s.

Q. How came you not to tell him that that was the man that held you, and that that was the woman that took the money out of your pocket? - I did not know their names, Hugh Young , the publican, would not tell me any of their names; says I, that is the woman and man that took my money, and I can swear to it any time.

Court to Landlord. You did not see any body hold of his hands? - I did not, he was down on his hands and knees.

Prisoner Barlow. There was a man called John Dykes whom the prosecutor challenged with the robbery.

Young. He did; but I satisfied the prosecutor that that man was not in my house for six weeks before.

- DAWSON sworn.

The prosecutor came to me on Sunday morning about nine o'clock, and I went with him to Salt petre-bank, and I desired him to keep behind me, and follow me into the house, and I went into the wrong house; afterwards we went into the Black Lion, and I saw Fitzsummons there, and he pointed to this Fitzsummons and said, that he put the candle out; the landlord interfered and said, that Fitzsummons was not concerned, it was George Barlow and Poll Loney, because he ran out from the bar and saw the prosecutor on his hands and knees, and he pulled them off from him when he was on the ground; and I believe he gave evidence to that effect before the magistrate.

Court. Your memory Mr. Dawson does not seem to be quite accurate; the examination reads the same as Mr. Young has now said. - When Hugh Young was before the magistrate and they had taken down his evidence he contradicted a part of his evidence. I took Fitzsummons away about ten o'clock at night; I went into the Nag's Head by the side of Tower-hill, were Loney and Barlow were sitting, and I apprehended them.

Court. I am not fond of officers so forward in court of justice; where they give their evidence right and proper it is a pleasure; but when they come to swear to fact, and refer to writings, and are not confirmed in it, it does not look so well.

Court to Young. Did you say as Mr. Dawson states before the magistrate? - If I said so I must have said a great falsity, he did apprehend me so at first, but I corrected it and said as I said now, that I saw him near me.

Prisoner Barlow. I was only sitting in the tap room.

Prisoner Loney. I had been at Mr. Young's, and I went out and I was going towards home, and I met this man, he asked me where I was going; I said, home; he went home with me and made me a compliment of 6 d. when he came out he said, he had but two six-pences or he would stay with me all night; however, he said, he would treat me with a pint of beer; we went into Mr. Young's and had a pint of beer, and he gave the other woman that was along with me the 6 d. to get change and pay for it, and she would not return the change, so Mr. Young threw down four-pence farthing; says she, rather than you shall be the looser I will give the change; and as he was coming out he bawled out, says he, I am robbed; that is all I know of it.

All three NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-4

104. ELIZABETH LANY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , ten pair of silk hose, value 15 s. the goods of Thomas Clarke , privately in his shop .

THOMAS CLARKE sworn.

I live in King-street, St. Ann's, Soho ; I am a silk dyer and callico glazier . On the 18th of January I lost ten pair of silk stockings out of my shop, sometime in the afternoon.

ELEANOR LOVE sworn.

I am shop woman to Mr. Clarke. On the 18th of January there was ten pair of stockings lost, Elizabeth Lany came in for a spotted sattin cloak that came to be dyed last October; she came in between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; she came for it in the name of Thompson; I looked for it some time and I could not find it, and I asked her if there was any other name that she thought she might leave it in; she told me, Lany; I looked for it and I could not find it; she then went away and she told me she would call again; I knew the stockings to be in the window some few minutes before she came in.

Q. Where was you looking for this cloak? - In that room.

Q. Was there any body else in the shop? - Nobody but me and Elizabeth Lany ; these stockings were within a yard of the door or thereabouts.

Q. How soon did you miss them after she was gone? - Not till two days after; she came on Friday and I never missed them till Sunday about three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. How do you keep your shop door? - Generally shut; I always attend the shop myself.

Q. You go to Dinner sometimes, who attends the shop when you are out of it? - There is three or four occasionally attend the shop and my master; they are not here, only my master.

DAVID GORDON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 134, St. Martin's-lane. January 18, Friday evening about eight o'clock, or it might be past eight, the prisoner at the bar came to my shop with these six pair of silk stockings, she asked a guinea; she said they belonged to Mrs. Thompson in St. James's-street; that Mrs. Thompson was a customer of mine and had a great many things in my house; I told her I could not take them of her, but to go back to Mrs. Thompson and bring me a letter and one of my tickets, that I might know who Mrs. Thompson was, and I would lend her a guinea; she came the Monday following about the middle of the day, and she brought a very decent looking man with her, who said, his name was William Stevenson , that he was a clerk in St. Ann's parish, that he knew the prisoner for many years, and that I was very safe in taking the stockings of her, that they were her own property, that she had lived four years with the old Duke of Northumberland. I have seen Stevenson since and brought him to Mr. Clarke's house; he said he lived at No. 15, Grafton-street, Soho; so he did; I asked her how she came to tell me they belonged to Mrs. Thompson; she said, because she was a poor woman, and she thought I might not take them of her; so through the recommendation of the man I bought them of her, and gave her 30 s. for them; in the course of the afternoon I went out and I went down to Westminster, to the house where she lived, and the man gave her a very bad character; through that I went in search of her and took her up, and I said to her, how could you bring me stolen goods;

she said, she found them in New Bond-street; I asked her for the money that I had lent her on them; she said, she had but 9 s. 6 d. left, and wanted me to take the 9 s. 6 d. and let her pawn them for the rest of the money. I advertised the stockings, and through that Mr. Clarke heard of it. I am sure these are the stockings I took of that woman; they are all marked with the letter C, in the foot.

Prisoner. I did not wish to sell them at all without his desire, I left them from Monday till Tuesday three o'clock in the afternoon.

EDWARD GILL sworn.

I am a stocking trimmer and dyer, I cleaned the whole ten pair of silk stockings for Thomas Clarke , he is my employer, these six pair are part of the ten pair which I cleaned, I returned them to Mr. Clarke Thursday , the 17th of January. (The stockings deposed to by Mr. Clarke.)

Prisoner. On the 18th which was Friday, I was coming down New Bond-street, I had been to enquire for work, I stumbled on something folded up in a bit of white paper, I kicked it before my feet, I picked it up and I took it to a great butter shop in St. Martin's-lane, for to beg a bit of clean paper to wrap it in, I then saw what it was, I went immediately to Mr. Gordon's. he seeing me a poor woman, rather disputed them to be my own, and I told him I had lived at the Duke of Northumberland's a great many years, he said, that would not do, I must bring somebody or other that could speak in my behalf, I declined to go till Tuesday, when I took this person; when Mr. Gordon said, he had no reason to dispute my honesty, but I had better sell them; I asked him what he would give me a pair; said I, one pair with another they cannot be dear at 6 s. he made answer and said, I will give you 5 s. and as that gentleman that is here can vindicate your character here is a guinea and a half, and you must give me 18 d. says I, I have not a 6 d. in the world, with that, he made a receipt and paid me, and when I got home, Mr. Gordon came to my apartments telling me that he did not like his bargain, and that he did not know whether I came honestly by them or not, therefore he desired me to deliver up the money; I told him I have not so much as I got of you; I told him I had bought a pair of shoes with part of the money; then says he, hand over the shoes, and he put my new shoes in his pocket, and when I came to the Duke of Northumberland's to ask for Mr. Anderson, the steward who knew me, was gone out about a quarter of an hour; Mr. Gordon was then with me, and insisted on my giving him what money I had, which was 9 s. 6 d. he then took me to the watch house, and I stayed there till the next day; I have no witness but God and myself.

Court to Clark. What is the value of these things? - I wish to make it 5 s. for the whole.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 4 s. 6 d . (Aged 38.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-5

195. JAMES CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , 25 yards of printed cotton, value 3 l. 12 s. the goods of Frances Brooks , in the dwelling house of John Page .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

FRANCES BROOKES sworn,

I live in Kentish Town , I am in the linen drapery and haberdashery line ; I keep a shop, I do not keep the whole house, only part of the shop, and apartments in the house; it is William Page 's house and he lives in it; last Wednesday as I was sitting at the end of the parlour adjoining to the shop with Mrs. and Mr. Page, Mr. Page thought he heard a person in the shop, and Mrs. Page getting up to see, said, there was a man taking off the things on the counter; Mr. Page immediately pursued, and the man finding himself pursued throwed the things over some palisades; I saw the things behind the palisades where he threw them; I followed and took them up from the place where the man threw them; Mr. Page has the things.

Q. Was this parlour of your's at the back of the shop? - It is, and the glass door between them.

Q. Was the shop door shut or open? - It was shut to, but I cannot positively say whether it was fast or not; it communicates with the street.

Q. Have you any partner, or any body concerned in this business with you? - No, nobody is concerned with me. I am a single person; I never saw the boy till after he was retaken; the prints are here.

WILLIAM PAGE sworn.

We were drinking tea in the parlour adjoining the shop, there was a candle in the shop but not in the parlour; I saw the reflection in the shop of a man; I said there is somebody in the shop; I believe Mrs. Page got up and said, there was somebody; I went out to him; on his being closely pursued, I saw him throw the things over the palisades; I did not see any body near him not so near as to lay hold of him; I am confident that I perfectly saw him throw the things over; when he threw the things over he was a very little distance from me; Mrs. Brookes came up as I was bringing him back to the place; he was got about seven or eight houses off when I took him, and she went inside of the palisades and took them out; we brought him back to our house, the prisoner was very penitent and begged pardon, and wanted to get off, he would go for a soldier, or do any thing if we would set him at liberty.

(The print produced and deposed to.)

Court to Page. Did you see him go out of the shop? - I did not see him till I was out of the shop; but I immediately pursued and never lost sight of him till I got him.

Court to Mrs. Brookes. What is the value of that cotton? - It cost me 3 l. 12 s.

Prisoner. There were two men running before me about three yards, these two men were before me, I had been looking after work, and I was going through the town, I never saw the things; I have no witness at all, I have no soul in London that knows me excepting the girl that I live with.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 19.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-6

200. ELIZABETH FORD , ANN TAYLOR and SARAH BAILEY were indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on Samuel Evans on the 13th of January , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 5 l. a steel watch chain,

value 2 s. two stone seals set in metal, value 3 s. the goods of the said Samuel Evans .

(The Witnesses examined separate.)

SAMUEL EVANS sworn.

I am a farrier by trade; on the 13th of January, Sunday night, about a quarter past nine, I was going down, Cow-cross, near Smithfield , to an eating house, there were five girls together, and them two Elizabeth Ford and Ann Taylor spoke to me, Ford asked me to take a walk home with her, I refused, and she put her hand to my breast and drawed my watch out of my pocket with her other hand, she gave me a sort of a push back a I made an offer of going by her; she did not strike me it was a sort of a push back with her hand; she took the watch out with her right hand; I am positive it was that woman that is nearest the jury, I felt it go, I saw it in her hand as she pulled it out, and I saw her deliver it to the other girl afterwards, she delivered it to the other girl Sarah Bailey, Bailey then took off; I held the other two, and this Sarah Bailey ran down the street; I had hold of them before she delivered the watch to the other, I kept them till the officers came, they came and they took them into the watch-house in Cow-cross; that is, Ford and Taylor; then they took them from there to the prison Clerkenwell. At the time I held them somebody picked my pocket of my pocket handkerchief, and somebody picked my breeches pocket, but I cannot tell they did it.

Q. How came you to lay hold of Taylor? - She assisted the other, she laid hold of me as soon as the other had got my watch, she laid hold of my arm, she interfered as soon as ever I laid hold of her that took my watch, she did nothing more than hold me.

Q What did she hold you for, was it to prevent you from running after the others? - Yes, to be sure it was.

Q How soon did you see Bailey after this? - It might be in the course of two hours and a half; they took her and two more, there was five of them in all at the end of the court at which I was robbed, they took the five up, Bailey was taken as she was coming up the alley, Jacob's court with a pot of beer, and the two other women stood a little lower down.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that Bailey was the woman that ran away with the watch? - I am very positive of it; when Sarah Bailey took the watch of Elizabeth Ford, them two other women went along with her, they ran off together.

Q. Are there any lamps in this Cow-cross? - There are lamps.

Q.Was it a moon light night? - It was very light.

Q. Do you mean to say whether you recollect it was moon light or not, I cannot be certain, it was very light.

Q. Was there any lamps near where these women robbed you - There is a lamp stands opposite.

Q. Women of this description are dressed very much alike? - I can positively swear to them.

Q Are you sure as to Bailey? - I am very certain.

Q. Did either of the other women get away from you? - No, never; one I held inside of my arms, and the other I held in my hands.

Q. What did you lose; - I lost a silver watch, two Bristow seals, one bed hook in the form of a knife and a steel chain; I have never recovered it since; when I took Bailey she was coming with a pot of beer in her hand.

Q What officer was with you when you took Bailey? - All the officers, four of them were there.

Q Which of them pointed out Bailey to you? - I was going by the alley and I saw her face, and I knew her directly.

Q. Did either of the officers point her out to you? - No, they did not, the officer asked me if that was her; I saw her myself first, she had the same dress before; the women were all strangers to me.

Prisoner Ford. Please to ask him whether he did not stop me by my arm and said, says he, I have lost my watch; with that he up with his hand and made to strike a blow at me; I called to the watchman. I never saw the man before he catched hold of my arm and went to strike me, and said he had lost his watch; and that young woman came that side of the way and he catched hold of her and he said, he lost his watch, and we called out patrole.

Court to Prosecutor. Are you sure that you saw the watch in her hand? - I am sure I did; I saw her take it, and I saw her deliver it to the other.

Prisoner Bailey. He never saw me in his life till he took hold of me; I was coming home with a pot of beer, a bit of cheese and a penny candle, and the constable laid hold of me and said, he wanted me, and that man came up and said, I was the person.

Prosecutor. It was the man Appleyard laid hold of her by my desire; but not till I had told him.

THOMAS APPLEYARD sworn.

I am a constable; I was at the apprehending of Bailey; the prosecutor was with me, Evans and three others.

Q. Who first saw the woman Bailey? - I believe I did; I ran up and I took hold of her.

Q. How came you to take hold of her? - The prosecutor was with me at the time I came up to her, and he came up and said, this here is a woman that was with me at the time I was robbed; I went up into the room into her own apartment.

Q. How came you to go up into that place to that woman? - I knew it was a place of ill fame, and it was the corner of the court where the prosecutor was robbed; she was coming along with the candle in her hand and a pot of beer.

Q. Did you lose sight of her after you had taken her? - Yes, after I had taken her I left her in the care of two patroles, and I went into another room; I am positive it is the same woman.

Q Did you examine her? - I did, I found nothing of any consequence.

Prisoner Bailey. I have no further to say, that I never saw the man in my life till he took me up.

JAMES JAMES sworn.

I am a patrole, I was not present when the robbery was committed; when Bailey was taken up I saw her, she was taken up into her room and searched; whether it was one or two pair of stairs I cannot say; she was examined after the prosecutor said she was the woman.

Q. Where was that search? - In Jacob's court, in a room.

Q. How came she to that room? - The first sight I had of her was in the room to the best of my remembrance.

Q. Did the prosecutor say she was the woman in your presence? - He did, he pointed to her, and said, she was the person that the other gave the watch to.

Prisoner Bailey. Because my name was Sarah.

JOHN PECKHAM sworn.

I am a patrole; I was on my duty; I heard a noise down the street; I went down the street to the prosecutor, and there was Nan Taylor and Bett Ford, and the prosecutor; they were in his hands, and he said, he was robbed, I took them and I brought them up to the watch house, directly they were searched and nothing found on them; he charged them with robbing him of a watch.

Prisoner Ford. They said, if we could raise five pounds they would let us go, and we could not; and he said he would shew us as much mercy as the judge would.

Prosecutor. I never said any such thing, they sent a man to me, and offered to give me money, but I said I would not take money; but I said I would be glad to have my watch again; I never said I would make it up for five pounds on my oath; I had money offered me to be sure, but I refused it.

DANIEL MUZZELL sworn.

I am a patrole; I was on my duty, and I heard a noise, and I and my companion came up, and we found this man, with these two women; he said, they had robbed him of his watch; with that we took them to the watch house; the two with him, were Ford and Taylor; I did not see them examined.

Prisoner Ford. That there gentleman sent word to me that if we would raise between us a watch as good as his own he would make it up; with that, we sent word that we were unfortunate girls, and if he would false-swear himself he must; he sent word again, if we could raise five pounds for him to buy a watch as good as his own, he could go a great way off, he was a single man and nobody should know were he was; we sent word we could not; he said then, he would just shew as much mercy as the judge could shew us.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever send any message to them? - I never sent any message to them; the person that came to me told me, there was four of them would subscribe so much a piece to give me satisfaction.

Prisoner Taylor. Mr. Appleyard was the constable of the night that took me, and that man and this woman had a quarrel in the alley; I went over to see what was the matter, and the man immediately laid hold of me, says I, what are you going to do with the woman; with that he says, damn you, what are you one of them, and he laid hold of both my hands, and he had me stripped start naked in the watch house; says I, have you got any charge, no, says he; says Mr. Appleyard you may as well go you are sure to be cleared to-morrow.

Prisoner Bailey. When I was going home with the pot of beer about half an hour after ten o'clock, Mr. Appleyard came and took me by the arm and said, he wanted me; with that he called the prosecutor and asked him if he knew me; he said he believed he did; directly he asked me what was my name, I said Sarah Bailey , says he, if your name is Sally, you must be the girl that has got my watch, with that they took me to the watch house, and the next day to the gentlemen at Hatton garden; there was five of us he took up, and when he came out of the yard he said he had taken a false oath.

Court to Appleyard. Did the prosecutor say there he believed she was the woman, or did he positively say she was? - He positively said, that that was the woman, the first time he clapped his eyes on her when I was with him.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever admit taking a false oath about this business?

- Not at all my lord, I should be very sorry to do it.

Q. The officer took up the whole five? - I believe he did.

Q. How came the other two to be discharged? - Because they had not laid any hands on me.

Prisoner Bailey. The prosecutor said at the justices the robbery was done between seven and eight, and I can bring people to prove that I was that night in a chandler's shop at that time.

Court to Prosecutor. You told me that this happened a quarter past nine - I said the same before the magistrate, which it certainly was to the best of my knowledge.

ELIZABETH FORBES sworn.

I come to speak for Mary Bailey ; I have known her near eight years, and I never knew any thing dishonest of her in my life; I have not known her only seeing her for this last year and a half.

Court. Who do you work with? - With Mr. Davis, Peter's-lane, near Smithfield.

Elizabeth Ford , GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Ann Taylor , GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Sarah Bailey , GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

All of the larceny, but not of the highway robbery.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-7

201. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a canvas bag, value 1 d. an half guinea and 4 l. 19 s. in monies numbered, the goods, chattels and monies of James Schooler , in his dwelling house .

SUSANNAH SCHOOLER sworn.

I live in the Savoy; my husband keeps a public house in the Savoy, the Blue Anchor ; his name is Samuel, No, I make a mistake, James Schooler ; this woman robbed me; she lived servant with me, she had lived so a month or better. On the 24th of January I went to bed about ten or eleven o'clock, and I put my pockets under my head, which I always do of a night, my four pockets I put them underneath the bolster; when I came to get up in the morning I dressed myself all but my pockets; I could not find them; I believe it was two o'clock the next day that I got up, so I pulled the clothes off the bed, the bolster and pillow, and I could not find them. My husband does not lay with me, he has two very bad legs; but we both sleep in one room; I called the maid up stairs and told her about it, that I could not find my pockets, I told her to look for them, and I supposed they must have slipped between the sacking and the bed; she said, she knew nothing of it at all.

Q. Did you examine the bed and sacking? - I did, it was not there. I heard that the maid, the prisoner at the bar, had got a good deal of money, and I went after her; she went away out; she did not give any notice or say any thing when she went away; I went after her; I found her and brought her home, and found the money on her; I found her at a neighbour's house; a soldier was with me that is here; when she was brought back I asked her for the money; she said, she had not got it; then we sent for a constable and searched her, and she had the money in her bosom, in a yellow bag; the constable has got the money now and the bag; it fell out on the floor as they were taking it out and they picked it up, and counted it, there

was 5 l. and more, there was sixpences and shillings, and half a guinea; all the rest in silver.

Q. What was your money in when you put it into your pocket? - It was in a yellow canvas bag.

Q. Do you know how much you had in it? - I can swear to more than was found on her, I had more than that; I look upon it there was as much as 7 l. but I did not find any more.

Q. Are you sure you put this 7 l. in a canvas bag in your pocket? - Yes.

Q. Was the bed room door locked? - No, it was not; the prisoner was in the room in the morning, as soon as she was up; she came up about seven o'clock she did not take it then from me; it was later than that, she came in and took the money from me; I had been poorly, and had not slept much in the night; and I fell asleep after that.

Q Had you a character with this young woman? - No otherwise than that I knew she lived in the neighbourhood, she had done so for a twelve month.

Mr. Knowlys. How came you first of all to tell us your husband's name was Samuel? - I beg you pardon, I was thinking of my other husband; I have had two husbands, my first husband's name was Samuel.

Q. I should have thought you would have forgot your other husband long ago; how long was it your husband got up before you that day? - A good while.

Q. What time do you think? - Eight or nine o'clock, he is afflicted he cannot dress or undress himself; it might be eight or nine or more.

Q. Have you any lodgers in your house? - No, only an old woman.

Q. Have you not got soldiers? - Only one and he was upon guard.

Q. What part of the day did he go on guard? - About seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Do you mean to say he was on guard from seven o'clock in the morning till two, Do you mean to say that he is never relieved for nine hours? - They are there all the day long, they do not come off till the next day; he is down at St. James's at the King and Queen's guard.

Q. You missed some money about a month before? - No.

Q. I believe you found there was some money mislaid, and you found it again? - No, it was my husband had taken the money.

Q. You charged the soldier with it? - No, I did not.

Q. What did you say about it? - I spoke about it, and said I had lost my money; but I did not charge him with it.

Q. Do you mean to say now that you did not charge either the soldier or that woman the time before? - I did not charge the soldier; but missed my money.

Q. I believe afterwards it turned out that the money was mislaid? - No, my husband had taken it.

Q Is your husband here to day? - He is not, he is very bad in bed.

Court. Where had you missed the money from before? - My husband took it out of my pocket when I was in bed.

Q. Did you observe him take it? - I did not mind it.

Q. Did he take it when you was asleep? - He did; but he told me as soon as ever I said I had lost it; he said don't make yourself unhappy, I have got the money.

HENRY SELWAY sworn.

I am a soldier in the second or Coldstream regiment; between two and three this day I went into this public house to

have a pint of potter, the landlord was telling of his loss; and a young man was saying that he saw the maid with a canvas bag; says I, if you are a mind I will go seek after her; I went to the girl and found her, and brought her to Mrs. Schooler, and she denied it; and said if I was a mind to go into a private room, I might search her; which I did, and between her stays and shift, I pulled out the canvas bag; and we found one half guinea in gold, and four pounds nineteen in silver.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you see the old gentleman Mr. Schooler? - I did, but he is not here now; he is very bad in bed; the constable has the bag.

EVAN EVANS sworn.

I am a constable of Covent Garden parish, I took this woman into custody on the 24th of January; I was sent for, and Mr. Schooler gave me the bag of money, and I have had it ever since.

Mr. Knowlys. Did the old gentleman go up to the justice's with you? - He did, but he was not bound to come here, only his wife, the corporal and me. (The purse produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I did not know it was necessary to have any witnesses, or else I could have had witnesses, but I did not know it, I picked the purse and money up in the tap room, and if I had thought it had been Mrs. Schooler's I would not have put it in my pocket; if Mrs. Schooler will get so drunk as not to know what she does; what is to be said to it.

Court to Mrs. Schooler. Was you sober that night? - I was.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 27.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-8

202. ROBERT JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , twenty eight yards of cotton bed furniture, value 3 l. the goods of Richard Jellico .

RICHARD JELLICO sworn.

I am an upholsterer . On Saturday the 26th of January, Mrs. Jellico and I were in the counting house adjoining the shop, between three and four in the afternoon; and I saw the prisoner come into the shop; I supposed him to be a customer, desired Mrs. Jellico to go out at door and see what he wanted; when she went forward I heard a violent screaming, I went into the shop but lost sight of Mrs. Jellico; I went to the door and see her run down London Wall , and running after the prisoner; I saw the prisoner running down London Wall with the furniture under his arm; she told me that was the man that had taken the furniture out of the shop; on the alarm being given of stop thief, he endeavoured to put it under his coat; and being rather closely pursued he knocked down a girl, and threw the furniture just before her, he pushed her against a step on purpose evidently; I followed and took him, and took up the furniture and gave it to the beadle.

Prisoner. The gentleman says he saw me knock the girl down; I am innocent.

Mrs. JELLICO sworn.

I was in the counting house; I saw the man take the furniture from the table and ran out of the shop, I gave the alarm and ran out, and ran down London Wall after him; I never lost sight of him till he was taken.

Prisoner. If she saw me take the property why did not she stop me at the time? - It was not possible I could; he ran out directly.

STEPHEN WALLIN sworn.

I am beadle of Broad-street ward; I received these goods of Mr. Jellico, in Mr. Jellico's shop, and took charge of the prisoner. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. As I was coming by Bedlam Wall a man came by this man's house, and I heard a cry of stop thief; and I ran after him, the man pushed by me, and the gentleman came and took hold of me.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Prisoner. I wish to go on board a man of war, it is the first thing I ever did of the kind.

Court. I do not believe it.

Owen. It is not, he has been here before.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-9

203. THOMAS BRYANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , twelve pair of iron hinges, value 2 s. four thousand nails, value 4 s. one hundred and forty four iron screws, value 1 s. the goods of William Alexander Frazier .

And JAMES BRYANT was indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, on the same day, knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM ALEXANDER FRAZIER sworn.

I am an ironmonger on Dowgate-hill . On the 8th of February, between eight and nine o'clock, or a quarter past eight; a maid servant came and called me, and desired I would come down; for that there was a great noise in the passage below, between my servant Thomas Bryant , and two other men; he had lived with me on and off about two years, he was the porter ; the others were the prisoner James Bryant , and constable; I came down stairs immediately; and the constable told me, that these two men had robbed me; we searched the prisoner James Bryant, and we found the goods stated in the indictment on him; we took them out of his pocket, and I asked Thomas Bryant the servant, how that man came by them, he told me that he had sold them to him; I asked him where the money was for them, he said he had got it in his pocket, I asked him to give it me; then he said that the man was to bring it at ten o'clock; they are relations, I have seen James Bryant once or twice before call on Thomas Bryant . I have a number of set customers; I have told him if such customers should come, he might serve them, but no strangers; we sell nothing retail, unless it is to oblige a neighbour.

Mr. Cox the prisoner's Counsel. You had left this man power to sell? - I had, as I have mentioned.

Q. But it is not a retail shop for any body to come to? - It is not.

JOHN WEINWRIGHT sworn.

I am a constable of Dowgate ward; about eight o'clock on the 8th of this month, I saw the two prisoners at the bar; Mr. Frazier has a stable in Allhallows-lane, and the servant generally goes to look after the horses in the morning; I live next door but one to the stables, I saw Thomas Bryant and James Bryant both come out of the stable together, they passed me, and I thought James Bryant

seemed to have something heavy in his pockets; with that I followed him up Allhallows-lane, when I got into Thames-street, they were in Bush lane, they stood talking a little while together, and I kept back; I went into another court, called Ann-court, to see if Mr. Frazier's servant went on, and I see him cross Chequer-yard, and the other went up Bush-lane; and immediately I got into Bush-lane after James Bryant , I overtook him in about a minute, I came along side of him, and I saw the paper in his pocket; and I stopped him and said, what have you got in your pocket? he made several excuses, that he had nothing but his own; and said, what is that to you; says I, I insist upon seeing what you have got; with that he said it don't matter, don't make a piece of work, I will give it you; says I, what are they? says he, they are a few nails, I asked him how he came by them, who gave them to him? he said he did not chuse to tell who gave them to him; why says I, how did you come by them? he then made answer I found them in Golden-lane, says I, how came you to find them in Golden-lane? says he, they dropped out of a cart, and I picked them up; says I, that will not do, you must go along with me; so I took him to Mr. Frazier's house, supposing where they had come from; Mr. Frazier's servant, the prisoner at the bar, opened the door to me, says I, do you know this man? he said he did not know the man, I said did you ever see him before? then he said he believed he had seen him; by that means I got hold of him, I got hold of one in one hand, and the other in the other; I desired the maid to call the master down, the master came down; and I told him, that I believed that these two men had robbed him; I searched the prisoner James Bryant , and I found these nails, hinges and screws in his pocket; I found nothing on Thomas. (Produced and deposed to by Mr. Frazier as dealing in such articles, but no marks on them particularly.)

Prisoner Thomas Bryant . I had orders to serve trifling goods if my master was out of the way; this man came to me on these goods, he told me a carpenter had sent him, says I have you got the money? no, he said, he would bring the money at ten o'clock, says I, if you don't bring the money at ten o'clock I must come after the money; he was going away with these nails, and this man came after him and took him in the street, and brought him to the shop, and called my master down, and told my master I was robbing him.

Prisoner James Bryant. Mr. Cady, the carpenter, met me this morning, and sent me to Mr. Frazier's shop for these goods, he gave me the goods on condition to bring back the goods for money, at ten o'clock; so before I had time to get up opposite the Mansion House, this man took hold of me and brought me down to the shop again, and got hold of both of us and would not let this man go up to call his master; so he held us until the master came down.

Thomas Bryant GUILTY . (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

James Bryant GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for four years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-10

204. JAMES RANDALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of January , 13 pieces of bar iron, of the weight of fifty-six pounds, value 7 s. the goods of Richard Crawshaw , William Crawshaw and William Thompson .

JOHN HARRISON sworn.

I am the patrole of Castle Baynard ward; I met the prisoner at the bar about two minutes before the half hour past six o'clock in the morning, on Sunday the 27th of January, he passed by me in Little Knight Rider-street, Doctor's Commons; I said, my friend what have you got there? he said, he had picked up a prize, and he kicked his foot against it at Paul's wharf, against the beer casks; says I, you must come along with me to the watch house and give a better account of yourself; I called to a man opposite, a soldier, to aid and assist me to take him to the watch-house, he took the man and I carried the iron; when he came into the watch-house his defence was, that he meant to carry it to the custom house, or leave it at the next watch house that he found open; we sent for Mr. Billing, Mr. Crawshaw's clerk, and he owned the property.

Q. How did you know it was Crawshaw's property? - Because it was so near the wharf; we found on him fifty-six pounds weight of iron; three bars.

Mr. Peat Prisoner's Counsel. You are a patrole? - I am.

Q. How far from this wharf that you speak of was from the prisoner? - Two or three hundred yards.

Q. Was the prisoner walking or running? - He was not running, he was walking very steady with a stick.

JOHN CHAMBERS sworn.

I am watchman to Mr. Crawshaw for the wharf; the prisoner was King's watchman, comes on at two o'clock and comes off at day light, at six or seven, when it was his time for going he said, he would be for going home, he went off about half after six on the 27th of last month, Sunday morning; we had a plank that we lay from the corner of the wharf to the stairs, he had got half way over that plank, and I said, Randall, you may as well come back and help me to haul up that plank and he did, and he went away with nothing but his stick in his hand.

Mr Peat. It was your duty to attend on this wharf as well as the prisoner? - It was.

Q. When he left the wharf he had nothing but his stick? - He had no bundle at all, I see him go down the wharf.

JOHN BILLING sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Crawshaw, Son, and Thompson; Richard Crawshaw , William Crawshaw and William Thompson , they are ironmongers ; they keep an iron wharf, it is called Paul's wharf , so is the next where the beer casks are; there is only a path way of stairs that parts them. On the 7th of January last, about seven in the morning I heard a rapping at the door, I was not up, and there was nobody in the house up and I rang the bell, and the maid got up and went down and let in a watchman, and he wanted to see me, and he told me there was a man taken up with some iron, and I went to the watch-house, and who should it be, but this prisoner at the bar, who had been a watchman on the premises for six or eight months, then I asked to look at the iron, and I was convinced at first sight that it was the property of Messrs. Crawshaw; I ordered the man to be sent to the compter till the next morning, doing that I returned immediately home; I always carry the key in my pocket; I went immediately to that pile of iron, which I conceived it had been taken from; it had been a frost the preceeding night, and I could perceive that the ground was rather fresh broke, it did not appear to have been done above an hour or two at furthest; two bars were missing, and the chalks were missing likewise; when they are laid they are placed perpendicularly, and the cross bars are

chalked; I observed the place where a piece had been taken from very lately; I looked further round the yard to see where the other bars could be taken from, which I will not pretend to swear to; I believe it is one of our bars, but I cannot swear to it. (Deposed to the other two.)

Mr. Peat. You are clerk to these gentlemen, Messrs. Crawshaw, Son, and Thompson; how many partners are there in the house? - Three.

Q. No more? - Not that I know of.

Q. Then it seems that these premises from whence you suppose them to be taken, are on the side of Paul's wharf? - The whole premises is called Paul's wharf.

Q. How far is the beer casks from the premises of the partnership's wharf? - About ten or fifteen yards, there are in the common gang way, between the two wharfs.

Q. Then they are not at all on the premises of the house stated in the indictment? - No.

Q. Now these bars of iron you have told the court how you know them; tell us something more about them if you please. You know them by some chalk mark; I think, and there is one there that you did not swear to? - I did not swear, but I believe.

Q. Now the two that you swear to, do you know them by any thing else than the chalk mark on them? - I know them by their original mark.

Q. Now pray sir, these bars are manufactured from the oars? - They are.

Q. Now does this manufactory produce no other with that mark on them but what is sold at your house? - Very possible.

Q. Therefore it is very possible, and it necessarily follows, that there is a great deal of iron with these marks? - But I have something more to say; this part of the cargo that laid uppermost the lighter that it came in sunk, and the sand leaves a sort of muddy complection on the iron.

Q. How long has the iron you speak of been out of the barge? - About a fortnight or three weeks.

Q. You say the mud was of a particular complection; do you know the mud by the colour, smell or taste? for I confess you are better learned than I am. - I know it by the complection of the mud.

Q. Then it seems you know it by the complection, it is of a very different complection from all other Thames mud; I suppose in the next wharf it is more light or more dark; now about this notable chalk mark of your's, it seems to be a strait chalk? - It does.

Q. There is no other persons but at your house that chalks at all? - Yes, they do.

Q. Then perhaps your chalk is a particular colour and complection? - I do not describe it so.

Q. Then probably it is common chalk which every old woman uses, and it is nothing then a cross mark? - No, it is not.

Q. Was it marked unusually high or unusually low? - I have no particular mark from the chalk; the reason why we chalk, it is evidently that we may know if any is taken away.

Q. You did not see any person take it away? - I did not.

ROBERT MAHANAM sworn.

On the 27th of January, in the morning, I saw this man as I went down Paul's wharf; I saw him stoop down and take up this iron; says he, in the name of God what is this? says I, I think it is a prize; says he, I am going to take it to the custom house, and when I get there I shall not get more than a pot of beer; the man turned his back to me and went off.

Q. What are you? - I am a seaman.

Q. What time in the morning was this? - At half after six.

Q How came you there at half after six? - I was going down to the necessary.

Q Where is the necessary? - On the left hand going down the stairs.

Q. Where did you see him? - Outside the wall of the wharf going down the stairs.

Court to Billing. Is there a passage between the two wharfs; - There is, and a public necessary and a shore underneath.

Court to Mahanam. Did you see Chambers there? - I did not; I saw no man but himself; he told me that he was going to take it to the Custom house; he said, he should not get more than a pot of beer for his share; it was half after six; it was a very light morning.

Q. Had you known the man before? - No, he does not know my name as I know of; but I happened to see his wife the 17th of last month, Sunday, I called to see a person in prison and I was standing at the door, and I heard a woman making a complaint; I should not have known the man if it had not been for the woman; I don't know this is the very man; I don't know what it is than what the wife told me; I never knew the man before; I might see his face but no further; I don't say that I recollect the man.

Q. Then for what you know it might be some other man? - I could swear to the iron I put my hand upon that morning by the length of the bar and the bag that it was in.

Q. How could you swear to the iron if it was in a bag? - The end stuck out.

Q. How came you just now to say that you could swear to the iron if you never saw it? - I clapped my hand on it and felt.

Q. Then from feeling of it you are enabled to swear to it? - Certainly I am.

The prisoner called seven witnesses to his good character, and the Counsel stated to the Court that the commissioners of the customs had a very good opinion of him.

GUILTY . (Aged 55.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-11

205. WILLIAM MARSH , ROBERT MARSH , WILLIAM LANGLEY and ROBERT ARNOLD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Edward Langdon Macmurdo , Francis Hicks , William Lane and Thomas Theobalds , about the hour of two in the night, of the 20th of January , and burglariously stealing therein, twelve pieces of british white callico containing two hundred and fifty-two yards, value 15 l. the goods of the said Edward Langdon Macmurdo , &c .

Indicted in a 2d COUNT for burglariously stealing the same goods in the dwelling house of John Marshall .

Indicted in a 3d COUNT for stealing the same property then laid and exposed in a certain boking house of the said Edward Langdon Macmurdo , &c. from the said boking house.

(The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

JOHN MARSHALL sworn.

I am Mr. Edward Langdon Macmurdo 's servant .

WILLIAM LANE sworn.

What is the firm of the house? - Edward Langdon Macmurdo , Francis Hicks , William Lane, Thomas Theobalds .

Court to Marshall. Where do you live? - I live in Mr. Macmurdo's grounds at Old Ford ; I have a family there; I inhabit a house on the grounds; we lost some callico a month ago last Sunday night.

Q. What quantity of callico was lost? - Twelve pieces; some run twenty-one and some twenty-four yards in a piece; they were lost from the lower part of the grounds, out of the copper house.

Q. Do you know the term boking? - I cannot say I do.

Q. Does this copper house join to the house you live in, or is it a part of it? - It adjoins to it.

Q. How does this join to your house? - I come out of my own door to go into the copper house; there is no way communicates with it on the inside.

Q. When had you seen this copper house before the callico was missed from it? - I had seen it on Saturday night before.

Q. Is the copper house connected to your house by boards or any thing? - It is all under one roof.

Q. Did any body sleep in the copper house? - No, nobody at all.

Q. Is there any wall round the building that completely incloses them? - No, there is not; I saw the door of this boking house fast on Saturday night between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, at the time we left work.

Q. Did any of the workmen lodge in your house? - No, none at all

Q. When did you next have occasion to see the copper house? - On Sunday between seven and eight in the morning I see it, it was fast then as I left it the night before.

Q. When did you perceive that any thing was missing from thence? - On Monday morning I went up to go to work about half past five and I saw a light in this house by the door being half way open; I went up stairs for a candle and lanthorn, and I went to look and I saw a bit of iron lay at the foot of the bridge; I looked at the door and the nail was wrenched out and the bit of the wood where the nail was wrenched out was cracked; the door was nailed up; the carpenter had been at work; I went into the copper house and I found the new wood, the boards was what gave the light; I went to look at the goods, and I found some were missing; it was the light of the morning that I saw in at the door; there was no light within the house.

Q. Did the opening of the door let in that light you talk of? - Yes, I believe it did.

Q. Did you expect to find the door open when you got there? - No, I did not. When I got into the copper house I found a parcel of goods missing; I cannot rightly tell how many, in one parcel was fourteen pieces tied double, and seven were taken away; I cannot tell how many were taken away from the other parcel.

Q. Is that the usual way in which they are left, to be tied double? - Yes, it is. There was a man came and took an account of them all, and there was twelve missing on the whole, seven pieces ash goods and five pieces of four; the four goods are goods finished for printing, but ash goods are not.

Q. Where these called british white callico? - They were.

Q. Did you examine any of the other buildings? - No, none but our own copper house; all the goods were lodged there of a Saturday night.

Q. Do you know either of the men at the bar? - Yes, I know Arnold very well, I lived with him over in Surry, and worked with him; I worked with him five weeks him, he had been over at our grounds this half year.

Q. How lately had he worked at Mr. Macmurdo's grounds? - It is a month ago last Tuesday since he was taken away, when he was taken away on this charge.

Q. Do you know where abouts the value of these goods are? - I do not.

Q Are they worth 20 s.? - More than that

Mr. Schoen. Do you know there was twelve pieces taken away of your own knowledge? - I do.

Q.Did you see them tied up? - I did not, the man that worked with me tied them up? - I was there when he tied them up.

Q Is that man here? - No.

Mr. Knowlys. You say you was in the copper house at the time the man was tying them.

Q. Did you see them after he had tied them up? - I did not count them exactly.

Q. Fourteen is the usual quantity in a parcel? - It is.

Q Did it look less than ordinary? - On Saturday night it did not, but it did on Monday, and the top part of them had been throwed down in the dirt and picked up again.

JOSEPH BARE sworn.

I am one of the officers belonging to the police office, Whitechapel.

Q. Do you know the men at the bar? - I know three of them, I know Arnold and the two Marshalls; I don't know as ever I saw Langley before in my life.

Q Do you know Johnson? - I have seen him.

Q Do you recollect the Sunday night before this robbery? - On Sunday night we generally go out, I went out and I went into a house, I think it is the sign of the Blackmore's Head, the corner of Shorthouse-street, in Back-lane near Wellclose-square; this was the 20th of January.

Court to Marshall. Where do you live? - At Old Ford, just by Bow.

Q. How far from Wellclose-square? - About three quarters of a mile.

Bare. I saw the prisoner Arnold in company with Robert and William Marsh, they were drinking a pot of beer; I looked at the prisoner Arnold and asked him who he was; he told me he was a callico printer, and he worked at Mr. Macmurdo's, and he hoped there was no harm in coming down there to drink a pot of beer as he had no work to do at that time; I stood there a little time and I went out of the house.

Q. What was your business in this house? - I went on business there; I knew it was an infamous house.

Q. Do you know Johnson? - I do not recollect seeing him there.

Q. Are you sure of the persons of the two Marshes? - I know them very well, I left them there. The next morning Mr. Lane came to the office and I went and apprehended Robert Marsh in the same house where I had seen him the Sunday evening before; I found nothing on him; on Tuesday morning Arnold was brought up, and I took him into custody and I said, that was the man that I see along with Robert Marsh on Sunday night.

Prosecutor Arnold. He says he don't know Robert Johnson , and about a week before he apprehended him for stealing six turkies.

ROBERT JOHNSON sworn.

You have been a bad man, and assisted to rob your master; tell us who was concerned with you and how you did it.

Court. If you have no other evidence against these men but the accomplice it is needless to go any farther.

All four not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-12

206. WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH and WILLIAM MARSH were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of January , five pieces of printed callico containing ninety yards, value 10 l. the goods of Henry Gardner .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-13

207. SIMON HAYE , JUDITH HAYES and JOHN BIRT were indicted for feloniously making an assault on John Terry , in the dwelling house of Simon Hayes , on the 18th of January , and putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a silk purse, value 3 d. a tin snuff box, value 1 d. a piece of worsted, value a farthing; four guineas, a half guinea, four half crowns, four shillings and six-pence in monies numbered, the goods, chattels and monies of the said John Terry .

JOHN LANE sworn.

I was not present when the robbery was committed.

John Terry was called on his recognizance.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-14

208. THOMAS BROWN otherwise JAMES CHAMPION was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , one silver table spoon, value 9 s. the goods of Thomas Simpkins .

JOHN BECK HEATHER sworn.

The prisoner at the bar brought this spoon into my shop to weigh, he did not want to sell it nor pawn it, he said, he only wanted to know the weight of it; it was the 11th of February, Tuesday about twelve o'clock; I examined it and saw the marks all rubbed out, and stopped the prisoner, suspecting he had stole it and it proved to be the property of Mr. Simpkins; he said, he had it of one Mrs. Brown in Mary-le bone-street; I live in Long-acre; I am a pawnbroker.

MARY SIMPKINS sworn.

I am the wife of Mr. Thomas Simpkins , we keep the Crown and Anchor in the Strand ; we missed this spoon last Monday week; we count our plate once a week; I know the prisoner, he was porter to a Committee in the house of liberty and property; I know that to be our spoon.

Q.How can you swear that to be your's? - From the number that is on it, twenty-five, nearly erased; the servant has so many spoons given him with such a number on them, and when we looked over the spoons we found it was No. 25 was lost; I told my servant it was that number; I am sure it is mine; I can safely swear it. On Monday week I had intelligence of it from Mr. Heather; on Mr. Heather's coming to me I looked over the plate which I should not have done then, because we were so busy.

CHARLES WILLIAMS sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Bow-street; I was sent for to Mr. Heather's

and took charge of the prisoner; I brought the prisoner down to the office; Mr. Heather has kept the spoon.

Court to Mr. Heather. How soon did you go to the Crown and Anchor? - I sent to Mr. Simpkins directly from the office, the 11th of February; I sent the spoon and the same person brought the spoon back; I can swear to the spoon; I thought first of all it belonged to Mr. Willis in St. James's-street, I sent it to him, and he came; I shewed it to Mr. Clarke, and he said, it was Mr. Simpkin's.

Court to Mrs. Simpkins. Can you say of a certainty that that spoon was missing? - I can.

Q. What day was it Mr. Heather sent to you? - It was the 11th of February when I went to Bow-street, and I saw Mr. Heather there; the spoon brought to me was carried back to Bow-street; my own clerk gave it to me, who brought it in I don't recollect.

Q. Who was it given to at Bow-street? - Mr. Heather had it at Bow-street.

Q. Can you say for certain that this was the spoon that was carried to Mr. Heather at Bow-street? - Yes, I can, here is Crown and Anchor on the bowl which has been partly erased, and here is five, the remainder of the twenty-five.

Prisoner. On Monday week I was coming up Long-acre, I met with a Mrs. Brown, she asked me to go into the shop and get the spoon weighed; when I went into the shop she was at the door, and when she saw me laid hold of she ran away; I was neither to sell it nor pawn it, but only to have it weighed and return it again; then they took and searched me; I had a good number of duplicates about me, but every thing was my own. Then on the day following I was carried down to Tothill-fields, and the next day there was a Mr. Willis swore to the spoon, the same as Mrs. Simpkins has. I am quite innocent, and I beg of your Lordship to look into it; I have lived twenty-nine years with various gentlemen, particularly nine years with judge Nowel; as for my part I know no more of it than only receiving it of the woman in the street, and was to return it to her immediately; they took away from me my almanac, my pocket book, and my letters, they took away all the duplicates of things I had pawned when I was ill of the rheumatism; my wife also was attended by Dr. Morris; I could not afford to keep a nurse for her, I was obliged to attend her myself and it prevented me from doing my business. I would be greatly obliged if your lordship would let me have my property returned to me again, my seals, my letters, my key of my trunk and other things.

Court to Heather. Was Mr. Willis sent for? - He was, and he swore to the best of his knowledge that it was his spoon, but when he saw the Crown and Anchor he said, it was not; this was before I sent to the Crown and Anchor, it was in the course of an hour; the Crown and Anchor is visible on the spoon.

GUILTY . (Aged 59.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-15

209. CATHARINE CORBUTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , two woollen blankets, value 5 s. and a linen sheet, value 1 s. the goods of John Wright .

JOHN WRIGHT sworn.

I am a weaver by trade. On Wednesday the 23d of January last I lost

two woollen blankets and a sheet; I did not see the prisoner take them; I keep a house, they were taken from the upper chamber; I have the whole house under a small rent, I keep a lodging house ; I saw the things there in the morning about ten o'clock.

Q.Were these things let to this woman? - They were not.

Q Did you ever recover them after they were missing? - No.

Q. When did you first miss them? - I did not miss them till Wednesday the 23d, when an officer of Bishopsgate came and enquired if I had lost such things, that was the same day I lost them; I saw them the next day before my Lord Mayor; I never see her before to my knowledge.

CATHARINE WRIGHT sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness; I saw these articles last about ten o'clock in the morning, on the 23d; I did not miss them till the officer came and acquainted my husband with it; I saw the things again at the Lord Mayor's the next day.

THOMAS SAPWELL sworn.

I am an officer of Bishopsgate ward; I produce two blankets and a sheet; I saw the prisoner in Bishopsgate-street, about twelve o'clock on Wednesday the 23d; it is about half a mile from the house of the prosecutor, Mr. Wright; I then saw her turn up Sun-street; I perceived she had a bundle in her lap, I asked her what she had got there; she told me two blankets and a sheet; I asked her where she was going with them; she told me to Fore-street to pawn them; I then asked her who she brought them from; she told me her master in Bethnal-green; I then stopped her on suspicion of stealing these things, took her into a public house, and asked her to be honest and tell me how she came by them, it would save me a great deal of trouble; she told me she got them from a house in Bethnall-green in Old Nicholas-street, from the house of the prosecutor; I then put her into the Compter.

Q.Did she tell you the number? - She did not; I went into one or two houses before I found out this man's house; I went in and asked the man if he lost any thing? he told me No; then he went up stairs and found there were some blankets and a sheet gone; I have kept them ever since.

(Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. Please your worship that there day that the blankets were taken from this man's house, I was coming down Old Nicholas street, and I met a woman, and she asked me to pawn these two blankets and sheet; I took them of the woman; I was coming up Shoreditch and up Sun-street, I met the officer, and he asked me how I came by them? I said, a woman had given them me and asked me to pawn them.

Court to Sapwell. Did she say any thing to you about the pawning of them? - She told me that she was going to pawn them for her master when I first stopped her.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-16

210. ELIZABETH MUMFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , a pair of linen sheets, value 5 s. and a copper saucepan,

value 1 s. the goods of Andrew Raiter , in a lodging room .

MAGARET RAITER sworn.

I am wife of Andrew Raiter ; I let the lodgings to the prisoner, but it was with my husband's consent; I believe it is about ten weeks ago; I let it by the week; she was to pay me 2 s. a week; I live the corner of Wapping New stairs ; they were let furnished, one room.

Q. Did you miss any thing from her lodgings? - Yes.

Q. How long after she had had them? - About two months, I missed a pair of sheets and a copper saucepan; I missed them before she left the lodgings; I missed the sheets in the first place, and she told me her husband had gone out and taken the key of the chest, and he had put them in the chest; she had a man that went by the name of her husband; but I found since he was not her husband; I let the lodgings to them both, they were both together; I let them to them as man and wife, and he agreed to pay for them.

Court. Then there is an end of the indictment.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-17

211. RICHARD PEERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , four linen shirts, value 30 s. the goods of John Wright .

JOHN WRIGHT sworn.

I am a fan paper maker ; I lost four linen shirts, they were taken from the back of my house on Wednesday the 30th of January; I saw them hanging up there myself near six o'clock at night; my house is in Ratcliff road ; I missed them in two minutes after they were off the line; I was at the mill and discharged my man, and bolted the yard door after him; I had not been out two minutes before I heard some body in the yard; I opened the yard door and the prisoner was going from the yard door with the shirts in his possession, they were in his arm; in one arm; I pursued him directly, and he dropped the shirts; I did not lose sight of him; he never ran above twelve yards before I took him and the shirts, and brought him in and sent for an officer; I have the shirts here; I have kept them separate; one shirt was marked and the other three were not; I know them, they belonged to a young gentleman; my wife had them to wash, and if I had lost them I must have made them good again; they all belong to one gentleman; I had seen my wife hang them up; I am very sure they are the shirts she received to wash.

JOHN GASS sworn.

I am a constable; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner, and the prosecutor delivered the goods into my hands.

Court to Prosecutor. What did you mean by saying that you had kept the things from that time to this, and kept them separate? - I did not understand your lordship; they were delivered to the constable at the magistrate's.

Court. People should not be so flippant on their oath.

Court to Gass. Where were these things delivered to you? - At Mr. Wright's house; I brought them down from Mr. Wright's to the magistrate, and the magistrate told me to keep them, and I have kept them ever since.

(Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I am a costermonger ; I sell things about the street; as I was going by with the Jack ass that gentleman hallooed to three thieves; I asked him what was the matter? he told me he would tell me what was the matter, and he took me, and his wife said, the linen was down, and she cut the other end of the line off; but there was nothing missing, and they took me to the justice's, and I was sent to gaol.

The prisoner called two witnesses who said they knew nothing of his honesty.

GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and publickly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-18

212. JOHN TOBIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , a linen shirt, value 5 s. three linen towels, value 1 s. 6 d. a linen table cloth, value 1 s. the goods of Richard Edwards .

RICHARD EDWARDS sworn.

I am a smith ; I lost these articles the 31st of January; I am a housekeeper, No. 1, Crown-street, St. Giles's ; I did not see the prisoner take them; they were taken from a one pair of stairs; it was a bed room, and we used to hang up our linen in it; they were hung up to dry; my wife put them up; the watchman alarmed the house at first; I was at home and in bed; it was nigh twelve o'clock, the watchman told me there was a lamp lighter's ladder against the window, and he thought there was somebody in the house; I went into the room and the room door was open; my wife had shut the door before; I then let in the watchman; my wife told me she thought there was somebody in the next room; the watchman went up two pair of stairs and he brought the prisoner down the two pair of stairs; I saw him on the stairs; I was below when he took him; the prisoner had no property on him.

Q. In what condition did you find this room? - The window was open, and a ladder was at the window.

Q. Was all the linen that was in the room gone? - No, there was some left which was taken down from the line, and put in the seat of the window.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Edwards you are a smith, are you? - Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you are a house keeper? - Yes.

Q. You have a whole house to yourself? - Yes.

Q. What is your rent? - Nineteen pounds a year.

Q. Have you any lodgers in your house? - Yes, I have in the two pair of stairs.

Q. Are they men or women? - A man and his wife.

Q. Are they the only lodgers you have in your house? - Yes, at present.

Q. Had you at the time of this supposed robbery no others? - No, upon my oath only the man and his children; and my children.

Q. You say the prisoner at the bar was brought from the two pair of stairs? - Yes, from the door.

Q. Where the things were taken from on the one pair of stairs? - Yes.

Q. The door was open before you came? - Yes.

Q. The things that were not on the line were in the window? - Yes.

Q. Did you put the things on the line? - No.

Q You never found any thing on the prisoner? - No, nothing.

Q Did you know the prisoner before? - I cannot say that I did, I might have seen him but not to know him.

Q. How do you mean not to know him? - Not to be acquainted with him, I did not speak to him when I met him.

Q. You never heard him say that your house was full of whores and thieves? - No, I never did.

Q. Your house is in Crown-street, St. Giles's? - It is.

Court. Do you know whether this man ever spake ill of you or your house? - Not that I know of.

Q. Was there any quarrel between you? - No.

Q Did you ever hear he had spoke ill of your house? - No.

SARAH EDWARDS sworn.

I am the wife of Richard Edwards ; these things were missing on the 31st of January, Wednesday evening; I hung these things up that same evening before in the room, the last thing I did before I light my lamp and candles, about five o'clock; I saw every thing was made secure, every thing was fastened, the street door and windows and every thing at a quarter before eleven o'clock; but the window where the clothes were in, was put up about three inches for a little air to the clothes; I was alarmed about half past eleven; I was just got to bed and asleep, I heard the watchman alarm the house, and I got up and put my under petticoat over my head and went up stairs to see what was the matter; we lay in the parlour below stairs, under that room where the linen was in; when I came up stairs I saw the room door open, and the window put up, and all the linen taken down from the lines; there was nothing left on the lines, but the strings of my coloured aprons, I mean the remainder of linen that was stole; the watchman cried out for him to come in doors, my husband went down to let him in; I heard a man on the stairs, I waited at the door till my husband came up again, I stood at the room door where the clothes were; the watchman went up on the second pair of stairs, and my husband took the man at the door of the second pair of stairs, I saw him take him there and bring him down stairs; the man was the prisoner, John Tobin .

Q. Was any thing found on him? - Nothing but a pen knife, I have never recovered the things that were missing; the things that are missing are my own property, they belonged to my husband.

Mr. Knapp. You say nothing was found on the prisoner? - No, nothing at all.

Q. You never found your things again? - No.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar searched? - He was.

[The remainder of this trial in the next part, which will be published in a few days.]

Reference Number: t17930220-18

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 20th of February, 1793, and the following Days;

Being the THIRD SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER III. PART II.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE TWO SHILLINGS.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of JOHN TOBIN .

Q. The first you heard of it was the watchman alarming you? - It was.

Q. You went up directly the alarm was given? - My husband did.

Q. Then the man went out from the time the alarm was given, to the time the watchman took him? - No.

Mr. Knapp. What lodgers had you? - We had lodgers come in the night before, and that night they had forgot to lock their room door, they were very much tired; they came from over the way, they were neighbour.

Q. Was there time for him to escape from the time the watchman gave the alarm, to the time he was taken? - He might if he had known the way of the house.

EDWARD GORMAN sworn.

I am a watchman; on Tuesday evening a man passed by my box, and told me of the ladder at this window, and that he suspected all was not right there; and so I went up and alarmed the house, I went and saw the ladder, and the window up; I went up stairs, being let in, I turned into this room that the ladder was to, and found nobody was in it; there was some clothes laid pulled off the line and some strings up.

Q. Was the door of that room open? - It was as they told me, I saw it open; I went up stairs and found the prisoner at the bar lying on the stairs, just about half a pair higher than the one pair of stairs room, on the second pair of stairs, I brought him down, I searched him and found nothing on him, but his knife; I took him to the watch-house.

Mr. Knapp. You found nothing watchman? - Nothing.

Q You searched him every part? - I felt him about.

Q. Was he drunk or sober? - Sober, lying on the stairs.

Q. If he had committed a robbery it was likely he should be staying there, lying on the stairs, was not it? - I don't know.

Prisoner. When I was taken to the justice that there woman that stands there, for the things that they had lost, wanted my mother to make a recompence for them, and my mother being a poor woman, and I innocent of the fact, told my mother to do no such thing; and they said they would go as far as the law would go; it is a bad house for all sorts of bad women, they have not lived in it so much as a quarter of a year.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever tell them you would make it up? - His father and mother came to my husband and said they would make a recompence; they came to make me the offer, I told them it would not lay in my power.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

CATHARINE TOBIN sworn.

I am the mother; the good woman wanted me to pay for the shirt, at the office; my son says to me why should you pay for the things of which I am innocent of as you that was in bed; this house was a house of ill same, I brought my son out of it once before with a girl of the town; these people were not the keepers of the house then.

Mrs. Edwards. The mother of this prisoner came to me the next morning crying, and told me that she would make me satisfaction, or any thing that I desired; I told her it was more than I durst to do, and that I did not wish to hurt him.

Court to Mrs. Edwards. Had you any body in the house but this man and wife at the time? - Nobody else.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-19

213. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , two furr muffs, value 20 s. the goods of William Pearce Dudley .

WILLIAM PEARCE DUDLEY sworn.

I live in great Russell-street ; I am an haberdasher , I cannot give any account of the robbery.

ANN HELLEAR sworn.

I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at the magistrates; on Saturday the 2d of February, a little before twelve at noon; we missed two furr muffs from the window of my son's house, his name is Dudley; I am there always by day, I never saw the prisoner, nor never see any body take them, but I missed them in a few minutes before, I had just turned out of the shop, and the muffs were stole; and when I came into the shop again, I missed them. The officer Sanders brought the muffs back.

- SANDERS sworn.

I was chose an extra man at Marlborough-street; I am an hardwareman. On Saturday the 12th of February, about twelve o'clock I saw the prisoner coming down Vine-street; I was standing at the bottom of Vine-street in Broad-street, it is a street that leads from Russell-street to Broad St. Giles's, he had a blue apron before him, I saw him with something lapped up in it very close against his body, I knew the boy before, and I suspected he had got something that he had no right to, I waited at the bottom of the street till he came to the bottom; I asked him what he had got, and I took hold of him, and brought him into the house where I lived, I searched him to see what he had got in his apron; he did not speak any thing plain that I

could well understand; I asked him if he had got a swag there, and I took and opened his apron, and found these two muffs; I don't think it was above a quarter of an hour according as I heard after they were lost; I took the boy and muffs up to Marlborough-street, where he was committed; I asked the boy where he got them, he said a man gave him sixpence, to carry them through St. Giles's for him, from the end of Oxford-road where I met him into Drury-lane, and to take them from him again; I found no sixpence about him, in searching him, as I supposed if any body had given him sixpence he must have had it; I went to a number of houses where they sold muffs, to enquire whether they had lost such things. On Monday morning I found Mr. Dudley had lost two, I went to Mr. Dudley and acquainted him that the prisoner was in custody, and he came up to the magistrates, and identified the muffs.

Court to Mrs. Hellear. Do you recollect exactly what time of the day it was you missed these muffs? - They were there at half after eleven, and I believe a quarter more; I had seen them a very few minutes before I missed them. (The muffs produced and deposed to.)

Court to Mrs. Hellear. Was there no strangers in the shop about the time these muffs were missed? - There was no one in the shop but our own family.

Q. Then you suppose that the muffs were taken by some person or other when nobody was in the shop? - They were.

Q. How came you to leave the shop? - There were several people in the parlour adjoining.

Q. Do you recollect seeing a boy, or such a boy as that about the shop that day? - Not that day, but I had the day before; and I saw some of his accomplices, I know the boy by sight, when I saw him at the justice's, I recollected him.

Q. Where did you see him before? - Near the house, but not that day as I know of.

Q. Who had you seen him with? - With another boy and girl.

Prisoner. I want to know whether you ever saw me before? - I don't know that ever I saw this boy before, till I saw him at the office.

Prisoner. I was coming down Oxford-road and a man came up to me and tapped me on the shoulders, says he, my boy will you carry these two muffs for me to St. Giles's, and he told me to go down Vine-street, and when I came down Vine street this man apprehended me; I thought the man was behind my heels, and directly I looked back the man was gone.

GUILTY . (Aged 14.)

Court to Sanders. Do you know him? - We had him at Marlborough-street about a week before; I have known him loitering about for four or five weeks, with an apprentice girl, whom I have sent home to her own parish with a pass.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-20

214. ANN ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , nine pair of cotton stockings, value 18 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 4 s. a pair of spun silk stockings, value 6 d. a cotton petticoat, value 2 s. the goods of Charles Harrison .

CHARLES HARRISON sworn.

I live in New Belton-street, Long-acre ; I keep a green grocer's shop . On

Saturday the 19th of January, the prisoner was brought to me between twelve and one o'clock; I was not at home.

ANN HARRISON sworn.

I am the wife of Charles Harrison . On Saturday the 19th of January, I was in the shop, and a lodger in the back parlour came to me and asked me if I had lost any thing; her name is Mary Norris, she was brought to bed last night, so could not be here, she said a woman ran out with a bundle in her lap, I ran to the head of the kitchen stairs, and I looked down and I saw the things were gone, they were hanging on a line in the back kitchen; I told her to run, she run; I went out afterwards, and I saw the prisoner Ann Allen walking gently; as soon as I set running, I cryed out thief and then she walked faster, and gave a little run, and then she was stopped; she went up Plumb-tree-street, and turned round on the right hand, I don't recollect the name of the street, I saw her stopped there; just as she was stopped, she dropped the things, I saw her do that I am sure; she dropped them all together wrapped up in an old bed gown, which was not mine, I picked up the things, then we took her to my house, and went for a constable, and I asked her how she could do such a thing; I never saw her before as I remember, she said very little, she asked me if I would forgive her; I told her I could say nothing to it; because a constable was gone for; the things were taken before the justice; the constable has the things now.

Q. How lately had you seen them before you missed them? - Very lately, about ten minutes to the best of my knowledge, the door was generally left on the jar, and was cooking my dinner; the woman, as I understand, had been up stairs to a lodger in the garret.

Prisoner. Ask her if ever she saw me in her house in her life? - I did not.

Court to Mr. Harrison. You saw nothing of the prisoner till she was brought home? - No, she was brought home about one o'clock; I went for the constable and gave him charge of her, my wife had brought the bundle, and we went to the justice's together.

THOMAS GURNEY sworn.

I am the constable that was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; I have got the bundle, delivered to me by Mr. Harrison. (Deposed to by Mrs. Harrison.)

Prisoner. I never went into her house in my days, nor never near the place; I was going home through Broad-street, Bloomsbury, and just at the end of Holborn a man comes to me and said you must go back; I said, what for? says he, you will see presently, and when he brought me back, this woman had her linen, and said, I had been robbing her of it; I said, no, I had not, for I did not know her; she said, she was very sure I was the person; for I had a black gown on; she brought me before the justice, and there she told the justice that the woman that took the things had a black gown on; I never deprived her of a halfpennyworth, nor never was inside her doors in my days; and the gentlemen said they bad frequently been robbed by the lodger in the house, and that there was not a week but they were robbed of several things, and that if it cost them twenty guineas they would transport me, and I should pay for all.

Court to Mrs. Harrison. Did you ever say any thing of that sort? - I never said no such thing; my husband in his passion might say he would transport her; I have frequently been robbed, but never by my lodgers. She said, at the justice's, that if

I would let her go, she would pay me half a guinea that night.

Prisoner. My husband earns a guinea a week. I have no occasion to take any thing; I never expected my trial, her lodger, that she said robbed her, sent me word that she would not find the bill against me.

Mrs. Harrison. This old bed gown that the things are wrapped up in, is that lodger's that she was acquainted with.

Prisoner. I have no witness here, I had been to great Rider-street to my husband and was going home; and where they found the linen God knows, I don't know no more than a child unborn.

Mrs. Harrison. I saw her drop them out of her lap, but she turned the corner, and there was a man before me that pushed on to catch her before me, she was going down the place called the Vine-yard.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Imprisoned two months in Newgate and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-21

215. RICHARD OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a leather trunk covered with hair, value 10 s. six linen shirts, value 3 l. three linen neckcloths, value 3 s. four linen handkerchiefs, value 4 s. three linen waistcoats, value 15 s. a pair of kersymere breeches, value 10 s. two pair of silk stockings, value 20 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. a linen dressing gown, value 5 s. the goods of William John Careless .

WILLIAM JOHN CARELESS sworn

On Wednesday the 23d of January last, I took a coach at Charing-cross between two and four; I told the coachman to drive to the New Hummums, Covent-garden ; I am a student of Oxford , it was in the day time; the prisoner was the coachman , I put in a trunk and dressing box within the coach with me; when I came to the New Hummums I told them to take out the trunk with the dressing box, and I went into the house; the waiter took the dressing box out of the coach, I saw him, he brought it into the house, I told him to take out the trunk, about five minutes afterwards I enquired for my trunk of the waiter of the house, and it had not been brought out; I can swear that the prisoner is the coachman I took from Charing cross; Mr. Harrison brought him back the same day to the Hummums, within the course of an hour; Mr. Harrison is the keeper of the Hummums, he went out to seek for the coachman.

Court. When you got out of the coach, and went into the house, did you tell the coachman to take out the trunk and dressing box? - I cannot exactly swear whether I told the coachman or waiter, but directly as I came out of the coach I said, take out the things; I cannot swear it was the coachman I told to take out the things, the coachman had hold of the door then, with the door in his hand; the trunk is in court, the trunk was on the seat of the coach, I can swear that is the same trunk.

Prisoner's Counsel. Do you know whether it was the coachman helped you in with the things, at the time you took the coach? - I don't know whether it was the coachman or waterman.

Q. When you desired the things to be taken out of the coach at the Hummums, the waiter was within hearing? - Yes.

Q. You don't know how long the coachman stayed after you went into the house? - I do not.

Q. You made no enquiry about it till five minutes afterwards? - I did not.

THOMAS HARRISON sworn.

I keep the Hummums.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Careless coming to your house? - Yes, on Wednesday the 2d of January last near three o'clock I was at dinner, I heard Mr Careless enquire whether his trunk was taken out of the coach or not; I went out of the room into the hall; Mr. Careless said that he missed his trunk which ought to have been taken out of the coach; I enquired for the waiter that should have taken the trunk out, John Ibbetson ; I could not find the waiter; I found he was gone in search of the coachman, I asked Mr. Careless if he could describe the coach, coachman and horses; I went down to Charing Cross to look for the coach, and coachman, from which place I understood Mr. Careless had taken the coach, I made an enquiry among the watermen, and the coachmen who were on the stand, and gave them such a description as Mr. Careless had given me; I offered a guinea reward, I might be about ten minutes making this enquiry, I went up to the Golding Cross, Charing Cross, supposing I might get some intelligence there; coming down from the gateway, I met a man with an apron on, this man told me he believed he could inform me where the coachman was, in consequence of which I endeavoured to find out the person; I found him at the bottom of the gateway.

Q. Did you describe the man as Mr. Careless had described him to you? - I described him to that man, and the trunk also; accordingly I met with this man that is at the bar at the bottom of the gateway, near to Charing Cross, I asked him if he had brought a fare from Covent Garden? he said, no, he had just come from the city with a fare, and there is the money for my fare, and shewed me eightteen-pence, I told him I had got some idea he had got the property of a gentleman at my house; on looking into the boot of the coach, his coach was standing at the bottom of the gateway, rather to the left of the gateway, he had just set down his fare; looking into the boot, I saw the end of the trunk which answered the description which Mr. Careless had given of it; with that I told the coachman I believed that was the property of a gentleman at my house, I put my hand on the trunk and ordered him to take it out of the boot and put it into the coach, the man very readily assisted me in doing so, I believe he put it in for me; I then ordered him to drive me to the New Hummums which he did; as soon as I arrived there I called the waiter to aquaint Mr. Careless with what I had done, that I had brought his trunk Mr. Careless came to the door to the coachman, and he said it was his trunk, I then ordered one of my waiters to go to Bow-street, and get one of these people from Bow-street to take him to Sir Sampson Wright, and he did so; I went with him, the coachman and Mr. Careless.

Q. How long was it between the time that Mr. Careless came into your house, to the time you went to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross? - It might be near an hour.

Q. Pray Mr. Harrison what did the prisoner say, when Mr. Careless saw his trunk again? - He did not say any thing then; at Charing Cross when I interrogated him about taking the trunk away, he gave for answer that he had brought it from the Black Lion, Water-lane Fleet-street, and that he should have taken it back to the New Hummums as soon as he had an opportunity; there was a direction on the trunk, Mr. Careless's name, directed to my house; when he got to my house I think he repeated it, that he intended to bring it back as soon as he had an opportunity.

Q. Did you see any body get out of his coach at Charing Cross? - I did not, but I had some reason to believe that he had set down a fare, because he shewed me the 18 d. for the fare he had brought from the city.

Q. Had you any other reason except seeing the 18 d. in his hand? - He had it in his hand as if he had just set down his fare.

Q. Do you happen to know whether it is an 18 d. or a 1 s. fare from your house to Charing Cross? - It is only a shilling fare.

Court to Careless. Did you give a shilling or eighteen-pence? - The waiter paid one shilling, I told him to pay.

Prisoner's Counsel to Mr. Harrison. When you took the coach at Charing Cross you got into the coach, and he drove you to Covent-garden? - He did.

Q. Did you charge him with stealing at that time? - Yes, I believe I did; I told him that it was Mr. Careless's property, that he had taken it away either intentionally or by a mistake.

Q. At that time he told you that he meant to carry it to the new Hummums? - To the best of my recollection he did.

JOHN IBBETSON sworn.

I was waiter this 23d of January at the new Hummums when Mr. Careless came there, between the hours of three and four; I went to the door and opened the coach door; I took out a little dressing case; I told the coachman to bring out the trunk; I went in doors with Mr. Careless, I cannot positively say whether the coachman made any answer; I went in doors with Mr. Careless and went up stairs to shew him a room, and when I came down again to see for the trunk, the coachman was gone, on which I made enquiry; I thought the man had gone without his fare, but I found he had been paid by one of the other waiters. That waiter is not here.

Jury. What answer did the coachman make when you told him to bring in the trunk? - I don't immediately recollect he made me any answer.

Q. Are you sure he heard you? - He stood close by my elbow.

Court. Did you attend at Sir Sampson Wright's office? - I did.

Q. What did you depose there? - I believe I deposed he answered yes; I said, I believed he answered yes.

Prisoner. On the 23d of January I got down from Spring Garden gate, and took that gentleman, Mr. Careless, up; he ordered me to pull up to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross, I did s; he then ordered me to the New Hummums, Covent-garden; in going to the New Hummums my near side keeping rein broke, just about the end of Southampton-street; in consequence of that I did not think it proper to stop to mend my keeping reins there, but as soon as I got to the New Hummums the prosecutor got out, he ordered the porter or waiter, I don't know which, to take the luggage out of the coach; I then went to put my keeping reins to rights to mend them; in a few minutes after the waiter came out and says, coachman what is your fare? I told him a shilling, he paid me a shilling; I then continued, I suppose, five minutes at the same door, mending my keeping reins; after I was paid I walks on gently to Catharine-street, and I found the rank full there, and I goes to the Temple, and I put in second coach at the Temple, and I was not there above three or four minutes before a man calls, Coach, I follows him to take up at the Black Lion, Water-lane, Fleet-street, he ordered me to turn round, I turned the coach about, and pulls up to the inn; when the man had opened the coach door the gentleman was ready with his luggage,

he said, coachman that trunk does not belong to me. The gentleman that I carried said so; he had luggage to take up himself; I told him no, I supposed it was the trunk that belonged to a gentleman that I had set down at the Hummums, that the porter had omitted taking out; in consequence of that he ordered me to drive him to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross; I drove him to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross; and as I was setting him down this Mr. Harrison, that gentleman there, was making enquiry.

Court. At the time the gentleman said it was not his? - I put it openly on the foot board, because it should not be mixed with his things. I meant to return it when I had set down my fare.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-22

216. THOMAS STURGES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , one gun, called a fowling piece, value 5 s. the property of James Bowlan .

JAMES BOWLAN sworn.

I live at Preston, in Harrow parish ; I put the gun in this man's care to shoot at the crows and pidgeons that come, to keep them off the hay ricks; he was a labourer of mine, usually employed by me; this was about six weeks ago, if not more, I cannot say punctually to the day I delivered the gun to him; I had often done so before, and this here Thomas Sturges, I parted with him about a month ago, and then the gun was missing; the gun was usually kept in the barn; it was my gun kept in the barn, and I found him in the powder to shoot occasionally; the gun was missing before he went away, the man missed it that stands here.

Q. Did you know before he went away that the gun was missing? - I did not, it was three weeks after he was gone I knew it was missing, and the man came and told me that there was a gun to be sold; after the gun was missing there was a little bit of an oration in the part about our neighbourhood, that the gun was to be disposed of; I did not go, but the man went.

Q. When was it you saw your gun again? - The man was taken the 7th of February, he was brought to Bow-street the 8th of February, and there I saw my gun at the publick office; when the gun was found on this man I was not present.

ABRAHAM ALLEN sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Bowlan; please you my lord, my master put the gun into my possession, and I lost it out of the barn.

Court to Bowlan. I thought you put it in the possession of the prisoner? - No, it was in this man's care.

Court to Allen. When was it put into your care? - It may be six weeks ago or more, I cannot justly say to the day; I repeatedly used it, it was kept in the barn; I missed it about a couple of days before the prisoner went away; I looked after the gun to carry it in the house; I missed it and I said to him that I missed it; I saw it again in his barn, where he was at work for another master; I saw it this day fortnight, at a place called Kingsborough, Mr. Golden is the master's name that he at present works for. I found the gun when I went behind some straw; I did not interrupt it then; the prisoner

was not there then; I went back to my master again; my master sent me over again to fetch it, this was the same day; when I went over again I went to his lodgings in the evening, his lodgings are at Kingsborough-green; he told us he lodged there, I saw him there; I went in and asked if Mr. Sturges was at home; I said to him, I hear you have got a gun to sell, and I should be glad to see it if you please. He said, he had no such thing, and he knew nothing at all about any such thing of the kind. The constable delivered the gun up to me at Bow-street.

Q. Then how this gun found its way into Mr. Golden's barn, you cannot tell? - No, I cannot.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-23

217. CHARLES CARROL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , seventy-two pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. belonging to William Rolfe , affixed to a certain gutter, belonging to a building of his .

JOHN CUTHBERT sworn.

I am bound to appear here instead of Mr. Rolfe, because he cannot attend; he lives at No. 26, Coleman-street ; we have lost lead from the buildings at several different times. I am his clerk; I cannot say any thing respecting the robbery. We have evidence in Court.

RICHARD WILLEY sworn.

I am a patrole belonging to St Sepulchres; I was going a cross Smithfield, about half past six, the 2d of February, I met Charles Carrol the corner of Long-lane, just entering Smithfield; I says to him, what have you got here friend? Says he, I have got chips; says I, they are very heavy chips, I fancy they are oaken chips; says he, I must look at them; says I, come, you must go along with me; I took him to a public house and found it to be lead; it was in a basket which is here in court now; the basket was on his shoulder; I and my fellow servant took off the basket and took him into a public house; my fellow servants names are Conoway and Appleyard; we took him to a public house and found the lead; says I, my friend you had better speak the truth, I dare say you have been made a dupe of, there are others in the business as well as you; with that he said, he was hired to carry it across Smithfield, and he was to have 6 d. and a pint of beer; with that we put him in the Compter; we had him in custody from Saturday to Saturday, and he was then discharged before Alderman Harley; we could not find out at that time where the lead came from; since that he has been taken again by the officers belonging to Worship-street and they sent for me, and I have been since and matched the lead to the dwelling, where he took it from; I matched the lead Tuesday last, on the top of the building in Finsbury-square, Moorfields, belonging to Mr. Rolfe, it is a house not finished.

- CONOWAY sworn.

I am not a plumber; I went up with them who are judges in that business, and I saw it matched; I am one of the patrole, the same as Mr. Willey. On the 2d of February last I was coming up Long-lane my fellow servant had got this man in custody; we took him into a public house; I took the lead into my custody, and they took the prisoner to the Compter. I was present

when the lend was compared; it answered the trunk exceeding well; it was cut off from a gutter; it goes across the middle between the two roofs.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

All I know of it is, that it fits the place where we have tried it; I am a stone mason; I compared the lead in the court with the gutter, sixteen feet four inches long, and seventeen inches wide was cut off.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-24

218. JOHN MAHONAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , forty pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. belonging to William Rolfe , affixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

I am a stone mason; I am employed by Mr. Rolfe at his buildings, Moorfields, in Finsbury-square . On the 13th of February at half past two o'clock, I went down to get a little mortar, the ladder was not there as used to be, and I got down to the mortar by means of some boards; while I was putting the second shovel full in I heard some lead fall down, one part fell on the wall and the other on the joist; I immediately looks up, and see this Mahonay coming down the ladder through the joist, he was coming down three pair of stairs from me; I saw him coming down the ladder in that direction where that fell, and I fills my board full of mortar, and he came down, and I see him get over the wall, a back way; I don't think but that he saw me, he must hear me; I immediately came up and I found this piece of lead, one part of the wall and the other part on the joist; I picked it up, I goes directly to his foreman and told him what had happened, and afterwards we found this long piece in the same building, one story above, they both dropped down but one story above another, and I took it up myself; I knew Mahonay before he was employed on the building, he was a bricklayer's labourer; we went after we found the lead to seek some officer to take him up; we could not find any, and we took him up; we took Mahonay to the place, he had left the place and went to the foreman, and afterwards we came back again to the place, and then we carried him to Worship-street; his employ was in the basement story; the ladder had been taken out of the area; I had been down twice before, about half after eleven o'clock in that day; as soon as we came back from Worship-street I went down to Mr. Rolfe, and he told me to try to match the lead any where; I did; this was before he was committed, and the small piece and the large piece were all taken from the same place, they were both taken from the attick story, one was taken from the wooden roof which was on the laundry; the whole that is missing is not here by a great deal, it was sixteen feet four inches that was missing; and in the large piece of lead this chiswell was found. (A chiswell produced.)

Prisoner. I know nothing at all about it.

WILLIAM BLACKITER sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Worship-street; I produce the lead; I took the man into custody and the lead, and have kept the lead ever since.

Court to Smith. Do you know how long that ladder had been gone from that area? - It was there about eleven

o'clock, and it was about half after two when it was missing.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Imprisoned six months in the house of correction and publickly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-25

219. ROBERT BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , twelve pair of cotton stockings, value 1 l. 1 s. four yards of stuff, value 4 s. a cotton gown, value 2 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 4 s. a pair of leather boots, value 4 s. a linen shirt, value 1 s. a linen apron, value 6 d. six small pieces of woollen cloth, value 2 s. one hundred and forty-four horn buttons, value 1 s. an iron button hook, value 6 d. a brass marking iron, value 10 d. a button hole chissell, made of iron and steel, value 6 d. and one guinea , the goods, chattels and monies of James Sporforth .

- SPORFORTH sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor, James Sporforth ; I was going to Basingstoke in Hampshire, by the Basingstoke coach, it sets out from the White Bear, Piccadilly; I came from Shuter's-hill to go to Basingstoke, and I stopped at the George in the Haymarket from four o'clock in the morning, to wait for the coach; I had got two bundles, and I got a watchman, that stands there, to help me with one and I took the other; when I got to the White Bear door the prisoner told me it was a very cold morning; I said, it was; he said, I had better walk in; I said, I would rather stop there and take care of my own things; the watchman put down my one bundle, and it was by my side, and the other was in my hand; this Robert Berry told me he would take care of them, I had better go in it was so cold, with that he said, it will be a quarter of an hour or ten minute before the Basingstoke coach would come; I did not know the coach when the coach came he told me that that was the coach; I stood at the door all the time; the prisoner took up my things that was standing by my feet and ran away with them directly; I called out to the coachman; he took them just as the coach stopped at the door; I called to the coachman and told him my things were gone; he said, it was no use my stopping to look for them, for it was ten to one if ever they were found; with that I went off to Basingstoke to my husband; I got into the coach and went away, and my things were lost. Being marked with my husband's name the man that found them afterwards enquired and found us out. My husband is recruiting for his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales's regiment .

SAMUEL THOMPSON sworn.

I am sergeant of the night in Mary-le-bone parish; between six and seven o'clock in the morning I went into the sign of the Feathers in Oxford-road.

Court to Mrs. Sporforth. What day was this? - The 11th of January, four o'clock in the morning.

Thompson. At half past six o'clock on the eleventh of January, in the morning, I went into the sign of the Feathers, the public house, facing John-street, Great Portland-street, Mr. Shakleton's, and the landlord called me to the bar and he said, Thompson I have suspicion of a man that came in here a little after five o'clock; the prisoner was in the house asleep; upon this information I went

and fetched two watchmen, and then I awaked him, he was in the box and the things were aside him, he was sitting in the box with his head down fast asleep; when I awaked him I asked him where he had come from with that bundle; he said, from the Bell Savage inn, in the city, and he asked me what business I had with it, it was his own property; I asked him if he had any direction on it; he said, O yes; so I took it up and looked, and there was none; so I asked him where he was going to carry it to, and he said, home; I asked him where his home was; he said, that was no business of mine; so then I gave charge to the two watchmen to take him to the watch-house, nnd I carried the bundle; when we got to the watch-house I said, my friend if you will tell me what there is in the bundle you shall be set at liberty, before it is opened; he said, he would; not with that I detained him and the bundle; when we went before the justice we looked at these boots, and there was this sergeant's name on them in writing, Sporforth; and seargeant Sporforth on the breeches; with that the justice said, I must enquire among the soldiers to see if any body would own them; I did enquire; I went to the life guards and they told me there was no such man in the regiment; my son the next morning went away to Kensington, and there was no such man there. About eleven o'clock I went to the watch-house and the watch-house keeper asked me if I had an owner for the breeches; I had not; says he, bring them to me, and he said, he knew the man, he had billeted him; I went down to Westminster, and I saw one of the regiment and he told me, if I went to the Haymarket some of them were quartered there; but Sporforth was gone to Basingstoke; I went into the Hay-market were this regiment were quartered, and I found he was gone to Basingstoke; I went to the George, I believe the sign is, and I desired the man to send a letter to Basingstoke to him, so he did, and she came up again on Tuesday.

(The things produced.)

Court to Mrs. Sporforth. It was from this house, the George in the Haymarket, that you went to the White Bear? - It was.

(Deposed to, the things being marked.)

Prisoner. I was out waiting at the London coffee-house at dinner, and I was locked out of my lodging; coming home I was enquiring for a night house and I met with a man coming up the Haymarket, says the man, if you will go along with me I will take you to my lodgings; I met him at the White Bear, Piccadilly, and he had got this bundle in his hand; says he, if you will go along with me I will treat you with part of a pot of beer; we went into this house and he went away out with a pretence to call a coach, and he left me there, and I was there in the house in the box with the bundle; I did not know what the contents was, nor did I know any thing of the man; with that I set there till this watchman came in, and he asked who that bundle belonged to; I said, I don't know, it was not my property, it was the man's that came in with me; I know nothing of the man nor never saw the man before.

Mrs. Sporforth. That is the man that desired me to go into the house; he was some time persuading me to go in.

Prisoner. I was never near the door at all, nor near the house.

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-26

220. THOMAS GREGORY and DARBY BRYANT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , two trusses of hay, value 3 s. the goods of Isaac Mole .

ISAAC MOLE sworn.

I keep a public house in Great Windmill-street , and I occupies the stables behind; going into my yard, the tap room door is on my right hand, and four stables lay on my left hand in a strait line, the first stable is about eight yards from my tap room door, and that is let to Mr. Farmer, a coach master in the Haymarket; I have nine in all, I let out three stables, I occupy the six. Thomas Gregory was a horse keeper to me; he was with me about eleven weeks; he quitted my service on the 12th of January; when he came to me I was very ill in bed; I was not out for six weeks with the rheumatic gout, I think it was much about six weeks I began to get better, and I went and looked into my stable, and I thought he did me a deal of justice. On the 24th of January he was along with Bryant in my tap room drinking a pint of beer; Bryant took his place; he lived with me at this time. Mr. Farmer wanted a man and Gregory went to live with him, within two or three days after he left me; Bryant was along with my servant at that time; they had been backward and forward together, and were often juggling together; in the night they appointed at this time to meet there, and to come early together on Friday the 25th the next night; I heard them set and whisper, and say, come here to-morrow night, come earlier; they came again on Friday night the 25th, and there they sat till such time as it was time to shut up, which was about five minutes to eleven, and I unbolted the door and I let them go out into the gateway, and I saw them go down to the yard, and was there a little while, and I saw the stable door open; I saw Gregory run out of the stable and ran by the door into the street, he ran out of the gateway as hard as he could; this was about five or six minutes after I let him out; I don't think the whole was ten minutes; Gregory was against the stable door where the hay was carried, in which I first saw him; that stable is much about eight yards on the left hand side going down, it is one of the stables that Farmer occupies; he ran by me as fast as he could, then I opened the door and I went and I found Bryant standing at the door locking of it; he could not get the key out; this was after the other had ran; I said to him, you scoundrel you have been robbing of me; No, says he, I have not; Bryant did not lodge in my house, nor Gregory; I went a little further to my next stable door and I found the door open; it is my own, one of the six that I occupy; in the mean while I then went up and looked at my hay; Bryant went away after that; I went up to my own loft and I missed two trusses of hay from the loft of the stable that I occupy myself; I had four trusses of hay in particular on one side of my loft, I had laid them there that very evening about six o'clock at night; the hay sometimes runs better than it will at others, and I had a horse that was not well, and I made a reserve of that for that horse; I picked it out on purpose from among the other hay, I thought it was sweeter and better; I suppose there was a load and a quarter in the loft at that time, and this was laid by itself; Bryant nor Gregory had nothing with them when they went away. When I found Bryant at the door I asked him where the lanthorns were; says he, my wife was in the yard and I gave it her to carry home; I went back to the stable door again and I stopped a little while, and my son happened to come home from his work and he came into the yard, and he asked me what was the matter; I told him I had been robbed, and I sent

him down to Mr. Farmer's for somebody to come up and open the stable door, to see if my property was there; I traced the hay from my own door to Farmer's door.

Q. There is a great deal of hay carried up that yard? - No, there is not, only at different times. Farmer sent somebody and we unlocked the door; at first I found the two lanthorns inside of the stable door, shut in on the right hand; then we went a little further into the stable and we found one truss of hay, we looked down a little further and we see the other; one lay on the ground and the other in a little binn. I can swear to the hay.

Q Will you undertake to say that these two trusses are those which had been in your loft? - I can; I had picked them out by themselves, and I had laid them up; I can swear to it by the colour and herbage of the hay; I deal with two farmers.

Q Do either of these farmers sell hay to any body but you, do you know where all these people in your yard buy their hay? - This is a lighter coloured hay and a deal more herbage in it; there is no such hay in the yard.

Jury. Did you find any more hay in Farmer's stables besides these two trusses? - I dare say there was not two pounds; the man had borrowed a truss for Mr. Farmer's horses.

Q. Will you undertake to say, supposing you had seen these trusses of hay without these circumstances, that this was your hay? - When I took Bryant to the watch-house he told that he took my private keys. When Bryant came to work Saturday morning, about six o'clock, I charged the watch with him; he told me then that he did not take the hay, nor did he meddle with the hay; I asked him how he came to rob me; he told me he did not rob me; he told me he should have gone home about his business, but Tom Gregory said, damn you stay, and Gregory made up to a private place were my keys hung and goes up to my stable, and unlocks the door; he said he held the two lanthorns himself; I said nothing to him more than asked him how he came to rob me? this past; in the morning when he came to work he said, Gregory swore that he wanted two trusses of hay and he would be damned if he would not have them, and he held the two lanthorns, and stopped there while Gregory took the two trusses; he said, that he put them in the stable himself, into Farmer's stable. The watchman came and took him to the watch house, and from there to the Rotation office in Marlborough-street. Gregory was taken up last Tuesday week, he absconded, we could not hear any thing of him; he was apprehended at a place called Winchmore Hill; the constable told me he knew the man and he would take him directly; I had a warrant for him the same day as Bryant was taken, but he was not taken till last Tuesday.

Prisoner Gregory. Please you my lord I belong to east Middlesex militia, they were embodied the 28th and I was obliged to go on Monday the 28th. Ask him my lord, whether he saw me take the hay out of his stable - I did not.

Prisoner Bryant. When I came to work at six o'clock, as usual, my master charged the watch with me; there was no such charge, as my master has said; as to carrying in a bit of hay, or locking or unlocking the door I never did.

WILLIAM MACDONALD sworn.

I live with Mr. Farmer; I know nothing more than that the gentleman's son came to me between eleven and twelve o'clock, and took me out of bed to open the stable door that night, I went, but I could not find the right key, for the man Gregory did not come back that night; Mr. Mole and his son unlocked the door with another key; I had not

the right key; and the trusses were there in the stable, they were both laying in the stable, one at the end binn and the other on the ground; I can say we had no hay of our own and we borrowed a truss, and there was no hay in the stable but what was out of the truss; I had not looked after the stable that night; I was in the stable before in the forenoon between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. You cannot undertake to say what kind of hay there was in that stable? - I went to Mr. Haywood in the evening, just about sun set, and borrowed the hay, because there was none for the horses that night; Mr. Haywood gave it to Gregory; I was not present, but I went and borrowed it of Mr. Haywood, and it was to be used for Mr. Farmer's horses.

Prisoner Gregory. That man lives fellow servant with me. Please you my lord and gentlemen of the jury, I lived along with Mr. Mole about eleven weeks, I left Mr. Mole and he gave me an exceeding good character, and I went to live along with Mr. Farmer; at the time I went to live along with Mr. Farmer I did not know about the militia; after I had lived there about nine days I heard that the militia was to be embodied; accordingly I went on Sunday morning down to the militia at Edmonton; I was down there better than a fortnight; two men came down while I was in the ranks and asked me if my name was Gregory; I said, yes; they wanted me to go up to London with them; I asked them for what? They told me Mr. Mole wanted me, and had not I lived with him? I said, yes; I told them I would go; they went to my officer and and they said, that they had got a warrant against me; I came accordingly up to London with them; I know nothing of the affairs no more than a child that is just born.

Prisoner Bryant. I lived along with Mr. Mole. About three days before I came to Mr. Mole, I lived with Capt. Morrison of the Guards; I had been out of place, and having nothing to do I heard that Mr. Mole wanted a man, and then after I had been there nine days, I was taken up and accused by my master of robbing him of two trusses of hay; he accused me of locking the door, and taking the key out of the door, which is no such thing; I never touched the door.

The prisoner Gregory called two witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

Court to Prosecutor. What do you value your hay at? - Three shillings.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17930220-27

221. THOMAS PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , a pound and a half of horse hair, value 2 s. four pounds weight of hogs bristles, value 13 s. a hair broom head, value 1 s. and one flesh brush, value 6 d. the goods of James Smith .

HENRY - sworn.

I superintend the business of Mr. James Smith , he is a brush maker ; these articles were lost from his warehouse on Fish-street-hill ; the prisoner was a porter ; I believe he had been engaged about four or five months, he was engaged while I was in the country. On Monday morning about half after eight o'clock, the 18th of this month, I ordered the prisoner to go to breakfast; the prisoner had a rush hand basket in his hand, with some balls and some other things, which he took up stairs into the warehouse; I followed the prisoner up stairs, having some suspicion; I placed

myself in a room, the back part of the house, to endeavour to see if I could see him put any thing in his pocket, but I could not see him do any such thing, as such I came down stairs, when I came down to the lower part of the warehouse stairs I saw the prisoner go through to the front shop and he went out, I immediately went to the door and looked after the prisoner and found his pockets looked very bulky; I looked out at the door of the front shop, another porter was standing by, I ordered him to go and desire this man to come back again, I wanted to speak with him; he came back and out of his coat pockets I took these two parcels of horse hair; I ordered the prisoner up stairs, when we got up stairs I asked him what he was going to do with it, or what business he had to take it; I don't recollect particularly which question I asked him; he downed on his knees and begged I would let him go, and told me it was the first time he had ever done any thing of the kind, that he was going to make some cod lines with it; I told him he had got enough; he said, he meant to take out that part which would answer his purpose and the remainder he would have brought back again; I then asked the prisoner where he lived; he told me in Marlborough-court, Bishopsgate; I went accordingly and found he did not; I went back again, and I told him he had given me a wrong direction; the reason why I asked him was that I might get a search warrant and search his apartment, the first time I asked him was immediately after he had committed the robbery at half past eight; between ten and eleven after I had come back from the other place I asked him again; and he said, it was Marlborough-court, in Wentworth-street, near Petticoat-lane; I went and I found it was right, I went the same morning to his lodging; he told me he had a room on the ground floor and a room on the first floor; I asked him whether he rented the house or whether he took the rooms of any body; he told me he could not tell who lived in the house above him; I went and got a search warrant, and got to his house between twelve and one; we found several articles in the room, and among the rest we found one of his cards containing a direction where he lived before he went there; we found four pounds of hairs, two pounds I believe below and two pounds above, and also a hair broom head, and a flesh brush, and several articles which are not in the indictment; we took him before the Lord Mayor, and he was committed. There is two pounds of the hogs bristles which have got our private mark, and I believe them to be my own marking; I cannot swear to the horse hair; the broom head has got our mark on it; the flesh brush has no mark on it more than it is an article we sell in our shop.

Mr. Peat You don't pretend to identify it? - I believe it to be ours.

Q. You stated just now that he stated he had never done the like before; you don't state that he owned he took it. - I say that he told me that it was the first time he had done any thing of that kind.

Q. He told you he had taken that hair. What had you said when he said that? - I don't recollect exactly the words that I said to him; I asked him what he had got in his pockets.

Q. You did not at all threaten him? - I don't recollect that I said any thing of the kind.

Q. I fancy there is a great many thousand pounds weight of hair of that sort? - I have no doubt of it.

Q. The two parcels that you particularly state to know to be yours, is because there is your mark upon them; on what part of the hair is it upon? - On the bottom.

Court. How do you mark them? - We generally mark them with letters.

Q. Are they all marked with one letter, or different letters? - Different letters according to the stiffness of them, this was a particular kind and it is a mark that we know the price by; it is a C.

Q Then I suppose if you was writing upon paper you would make such a C as that? - Most likely I should not make it so large; this is made with a brush.

Q. So it seems you can tell your own hand writing from any other, if you write even with a brush. Upon my word, sir, your faith is very strong; for your faith you may be a Mahometan. Then you mark them all on the heads in that manner? - No, only some.

Q Pray, sir, if you had seen these bundles on a journey to York would you have supposed them to have been your's? - I should have supposed them to be ours.

Q. Perhaps it is a peculiar stile of hair. Is there any thing in the colour? - No.

Q. Any thing in the smell? - No.

Q. Well this brush that you speak of you put that mark on other brushes? - Every one of this size.

Q. You mark a great many in a year? - We do.

Q. It is very possible then that a man might have bought fifty brushes out of that shop, or even out of other shops, that might have had that mark on it. The flesh brush you know nothing about. Had he lived with you some time? - To the best of my knowledge he came there about the month of November.

Q How many partners has you master? - Not any in that business.

Q. Are you quite sure that that is your writing? Recollect, it was done with a brush. - I believe it to be such.

Q. How did he behave in you service? - He always behaved very well.

WILLIAM WHITEWAY sworn.

I am an officer; I found all these things in consequence of a search warrant, and have kept them from that time to this; there was no one in the apartment; I found them in the house or apartment of the prisoner; I found all the articles except the horse hair, and that has never been in my possession; the house was in Marlborough-court, Wentworth-street, Petticoat-lane.

Mr. Peat. How do you mean they have been in your possession? - They have not been opened but before my Lord Mayor.

Prisoner. I went out this morning to get a pennyworth of purl; I bought the hair of a man at the door; I wanted some to make some lark lines; he said he had got some very nice as would suit me; I bought the hair of the gentleman; I came in; Mr. Matthews told me to go to breakfast; when I was got about a hundred yards up the hill he sent after me and had me back, and took this hair out of my pocket; I told him I hoped he would let me go; so they took me into a room and locked me up; they asked me where I lived; I told them when I moved out of the Borough that I moved to Catharine wheel-alley, Bishopsgate, and from there I moved to Marlborough-court, Wentworth-street; then they came back to me some time after and told me I had given them a wrong direction; they asked me to write it down myself; they took the direction down; then I told them Marlborough-court, Wentworth-street; they went and they broke open one door and the other they got in at the window, and they not only took away these articles that my master dealt in but they took the money, a guinea and a half, and some silver, and they brought it to the turnkey at Newgate.

Court to Whiteway. Did you you take some money from the house? - Yes, a guinea and a half and three shillings; I thought it was unsafe to leave it as there was nobody in the house, and I delivered it to the prisoner before the turnkey.

Court to Matthews. Are you sure that he told you Marlborough-court, Bishopsgate-street at first? - I am.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-28

222. JOHN RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , one chiswell made of iron and steel, value 2 d. one square punch, value 2 d. nineteen iron rings for weights, value 1 s. 2 d. two iron wedges, value 1 d. three iron nuts with three iron screws, value 2 d. three iron nails, value 1/2. an iron pan handle, value 1 d. one iron hook, value 1/4 a piece of an iron wedge, value 1/4 one nut with an iron screw, value 1/4 the goods of Alexander Brodie , and one canvas apron, value 1 d. the goods of Robert Hudson .

(The case was opened by - .)

JOHN BARNARD VOGLE sworn.

I was a patrole on the 18th of January last; I was patrole in St. Ann's, Blackfriars; I know Mr. Brodie's iron manufactory, in Glass-house-yard, Blackfriars ; it was on Thursday night the 17th of January I observed a light in the foundry; I had some suspicion and I watched the place for twenty or twenty five minutes, when I saw the prisoner come down stairs twice with the light in his hand; it is two half doors, and he came down stairs, and I looking through the two half doors, there was crevice; I saw him go all about the foundry as if looking for some thing to pack up some iron; at last he found a man's apron, he took hold of a towel first, but he flung that away, and then he laid hold of the apron, after that he took out some small bits of iron which lay close by the bellows, after that he took a large iron shovel and poker, and set them together close by the bellows, and then he went up stairs with the apron; I did not see him tie up any bundle, and then I ran to Mr. Eckford's; I knew he had the key of the foundry, and then I met my fellow servant; he put the light out the moment we went in doors; we went into the foundry and went up stairs, and apprehended the prisoner; he dropped the bundle and he fell a crying; I picked it up and it was carried to the watch-house.

(The iron produced.)

Prisoner. He says he saw me take several things which I did not. - I am sure I have described the fact as it happened.

ALEXANDER BRODIE sworn.

I believe the property to be mine, but I cannot swear particularly to it.

SAMUEL BISHOP sworn.

I am a workman to Mr. Brodie; I was the last that went out of the shop of the men; Mr. Eckford went out of the shop last; I know the punch and the wedges, I had used them very lately before myself; there was articles of this description left in the warehouse that night.

ROBERT HUDSON sworn.

I am foreman to Mr. Brodie; I know this is my apron; I had had it about three months; I left it in the foundry that night; I know the cellar window, there are coals under the cellar window; I examined the cellar window the morning after the robbery, we observed the coals quite fresh where a man had dropped

down, there was the mark of a man's feet in the coals; we found the cellar open in the morning; that window was fastened, but I don't know it was fastened the night before.

Q. Could you make out whether the man could get in at that window? - We could not make out that he could get in any where else.

JOHN MACDONALD sworn.

I am a patrole; the night this robbery happened I went with Vogle and Eckford when they opened the foundry; I saw him taken out of the foundry, and this parcel was in his hand; I was left centry outside for fear he should jump over out of window; the prisoner had the bundle, he carried it to the watch-house out of the foundry; I went to the watch-house with them, I followed behind; Vogle had the prisoner in his hand; Vogle and I had the key of a Small cupboard where the articles have been kept ever since till now.

Q. Did you observe the conduct of the prisoner during the time he was going from the foundry to the watch-house? - I saw nothing only that he seemed very dull.

Q. Did he say how he got it? - He said he went and slept there after the men had been at work.

Prisoner. I had been locked out of my lodgings and I knew that the men got in to sleep in the foundry if they were locked out, and I got through the window to sleep there.

Court to Bishop. Did the prisoner ever work at your shop? - I came to work in September last and he worked there then, some time before Christmas he had a burn, and he said he was not able to work, and by that means Mr. Eckford had got another man.

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

I live in Leadenhall-street; I am a jeweller; I keep a shop there; I mean to impeach the evidence of Vogle and Macdonald; I know enough of Vogle as far as the best of my belief he is not to be believed on his oath, and I know enough of Macdonald to say the same.

Q. How long have you lived in Leadenhall-street? - Seven years.

Prosecutor's Counsel. You was rather fortunate to meet two of old acquaintance again. It is a lucky circumstance that you should happen accidently to be in court when there were two witnesses that you know. - When you have done with your soliloquy I will speak.

Q. Pray Mr. Davis we will take Vogle first. How long have you known Vogle? - I believe about three months.

Q. There must have been some very peculiar transactions to enable you to form this opinion. - There were. I have a house in Cheapside which I occupy and carry on the same business as in Leadenhall-street, and I thought it my duty to serve constable, and I cannot say whether it was in the month of November or December, it was my night to be on duty and set up in the watch-house; I always made it my duty to patrole the streets instead of setting in the watch-house. One night one of the patroles led me towards Blackfriars, when I came there, I never had been down one street in which there is a watch-house, the watch-house is very little distance from our patroles beat; sir, says he, this is the way; I went after him thinking it was my duty to go that way; when I came into the watch-house I understood there was no constable there; this man passed as constable and with a great deal of importance asked me who I was; he was sitting dressed in his patrole dress and asked me what I wanted; I told him I should be glad to speak with the officer of the night; says he, what do you want? I am the officer of the night; the officer was sent for and this Vogle came and struck the patrole that was with me, it was after some words

had passed between them about his innovating on their premises in their ward; Vogle then struck him, in which this man I believe Macdonald, assisted him; I had got my great coat on, and there was a gentleman watching at the window all the time of the transaction; I waited nearly half an hour and said, I would go away, they made a prisoner of me, and kept me there; these men after the constable had come in, they declared and said, they would swear on their oaths, that I pulled off my coat to fight them, and had used a great deal of abusive language, which was quite the reverse.

Court. Was this cause ever tried? - It was not.

Court. I cannot help then expressing my astonishment at your swearing that you would not believe these men on their oath on this cause, and which cause was never tried.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Recommended by the Jury.

Six months imprisonment in the house of Correction , and publickly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-29

223. SUSANNAH BURNE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of January , a pair of iron shoe buckles, plated with silver, value 3 s. the goods of Thomas Davis .

THOMAS DAVIS sworn.

I saw none of the circumstances.

WALTER DAVIS sworn.

On the 22d of January, about a quarter past six in the evening I was coming up Cheapside, and came opposite the shop of Mr. Jennings the linen draper in Cheapside; I perceived two gentlemen standing at the window, the window had been nearly cleared of the articles it was dressed out with in the day, and I saw the woman at the bar and another woman in the shop with their long cloaks on; the prisoner at the bar had a chocolate coloured cloak, and the other had a red cloak on; these two gentlemen still kept looking through the window; I looked through the other window, and I supposed these two women to be shop lifters, by their appearance, by the appearance of their persons and dress. The young man, who I supposed to be a shop-man or an apprentice to Mr. Jennings, was shewing them several articles in the course of their business; these two gentlemen still kept pointing to the shopman, who was shewing the articles on the other side of the counter, which he kept his eye on them, and at the same time he shewed the articles he put them away on the other side of the counter; they came out, they passed me at the window, and they walked up the right hand of Cheapside from Jennings's shop, about one hundred yards, when they were joined by another woman without a cloak, a taller woman than the other two; I kept behind them, and there was some conversation took place between these three women; I followed them up Cheapside, opposite the shop of Mr. John Davis ; they all three crossed over the street, the prisoner at the bar and the woman in the red cloak went into the shop, into Mr. Davis's shop, which is the corner of Friday-street ; I kept my eye on them the whole time; I saw the prisoner at the bar, after the shop woman of Mr. Davis had taken down some buckles to the amount of three or four pair, while she turned herself sideways to reach some more, I saw the prisoner

at the bar take a pair of buckles off the counter and secrete them under her cloak; then the woman in the red cloak bought a pair of buckles, which she gave the shop woman half a crown for, they went out of the shop together; I brought the prisoner back after she had gone out into the street; I took hold of her arm and brought her into the shop again, and told her, she had stole a pair of buckles from the lady; she strongly denied it, but I kept her in the middle of the shop and we sent for a constable, and before the constable came she dropped the buckles in the middle of the shop; I picked the buckles up, when the constable came I delivered the buckles to him.

JAMES WOODMAN sworn.

I produce the buckles; I received them of the last witness and kept them ever since; the prisoner at the bar said, that she knew nothing of the affair. (Deposed to by Mr. Davis as being his own manufacturing.)

MARY WILLIAMS sworn.

I am the shop woman to Mr. Davis; these women came in, the prisoner at the bar was one; I reached them down three or four pair of buckles, and while I was reaching another pair Mr. Walter Davis came in, and then the other bought a pair and gave me two shillings and sixpence for a pair, and when they went out Mr. Davis brought her back and said, she had got a pair of buckles, and I went out a door or two to get a constable, and when I came back the buckles were on the ground.

Prisoner. I will tell the truth and nothing but the truth. This woman that was with me asked me to go into the shop with her to buy a pair of buckles; I was coming out with her and this gentleman stopped me and said, he saw me take a pair of buckles through the shop window, and I never saw him in my life; I have no witness except the gentleman favours me.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-30

224. GEORGE DAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of January , a pair of leather shoes, value 2 s. the goods of Peter Rogers .

JOHN OAKES sworn.

I live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury , with Mr. Rogers; I am his servant, he is a shoemaker ; I was standing at his door on Saturday, the 19th of January, about half past eleven at night; he keeps it open till twelve on Saturday nights; my master was out, the prisoner came up to the door and he took a pair off; he took them from the door, they were within side, within the reach of an arm, he put his arm over the door, I was standing within side of the shop, at the door; the hatch of the door was shut, they were standing on some pegs hung upon a rack; I do not think he saw me, because there were some shutters standing in the way; because I was going to shut up the shop, and I was behind these shutters, but I could see what was doing; the man ran away with the shoes and I ran after him, and just as I laid hold of him, about thirty yards from the shop, he chucked the shoes into the kennel; I saw him throw the shoes from him; I called to the watch, and took him to the watch-house; I laid hold of him before I picked up the shoes; the watchman was in his watch-box; I picked up the shoes before the watchman came; he

took him to the watch-house, and I gave charge of him; the shoes were delivered to the constable directly as the charge was given; he is here.

Q. How do you know the man which you see drop the shoes was the person that you see put his arm in? - Because he was never out of my sight.

THOMAS GURNEY sworn.

I was constable of the night; on Saturday, the 19th of January, the prisoner and the shoes were brought into the watch-house by the young lad and the watchman, and this young lad gave charge of him; I received the shoes from Oakes, they have been in my custody ever since. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was going up Broad-street, Bloomsbury, it was a little turned eleven o'clock; as I was going past the said shop, a person passed by me very sharp, and he might fling them down for what I know; that young man came up to me and said, you have got a pair of shoes; not that I know of, said I, and I turned back with him and he picked them up, about a dozen doors off from where he stopped me; I am quite innocent.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 34.)

Publickly Whipped

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-31

225. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of January , a hand saw, value 2 s. the goods of John Chilton .

JOHN CHILTON sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I live in Brook's-gardens, near the Adam and Eve turnpike ; I lost an hand saw on the 23d of January, I laid it down in the back dining room while I went to eat my dinner, in the front dining room; I saw it again and I knew it was my property; I never saw the prisoner about the place; the back dining room is next the street, the window opens into the street; I was at dinner between twelve and one.

- FLETCHER sworn.

I was digging a shore in Somer's Town, on the 23d of January; we always make it a rule to go to dinner at twelve o'clock; the carpenters go to dinner at one o'clock, and one of the carpenters was going to dinner, and the man that was wheeling some stuff away was saying something to him about the carpenters being likely to lose some of their tools; in consequence of hearing this I went round to see, in the pursuit of the man, and the other man followed me, and I saw the prisoner at the bar out in a field, just behind the building; this was at about a quarter after one; I followed him out into the field, when I got within an hundred yards of him I saw something under his arm of his left side; he looked round and he saw me a coming, and made towards a ditch where there is a good deal of water, and then I saw him drop the saw from his coat, from his left side into the water.

Prisoner. No, I was going across the ditch and he knocked me down.

Prosecutor. With that I never stopped at the ditch to see what it was, but I made away and catched him by the collar, and when I catched him by the collar I asked him what he put into that ditch? and he said, nothing; with that says I, come back, you shall go back and see; when I brought him up to the ditch he dropped the saw in; the water was all muddy; I told one of the carpenters that was in pursuit of him, I told him to put his hand into the ditch and see

what it was; with that the man pulled out the saw, and I asked the prisoner at the bar whose saw it was? I had him then by the collar; with that he said, it was his own; I asked him how he came to put it there? then he said, he saw me coming after him and I might think that he stole it, with that he said then, that the saw belonged to one John and Richard, but did not mention any surnames; with that I told him he must go along with me to the public house, and he refused, and he said, he brought the saw from Knightsbridge; I took a plane out of his right hand pocket at the same time, which he said, he brought from the same place, and that he was going to carry them to Cambden Town to these two men; I was not satisfied with this, I took him to a publick house and sent for the constable; he first offered me six shillings to let him go; I told him no, if he gave me six guineas I would not let him go; with that there was a number of carpenters in the house, but none of them owned the saw or plane, with that he offered me nine shillings to let him go, and produced the nine shillings and three halfpence on the table; that was all the money he had, with that the constable said, there was no owner for the saw or the plane, we had no right to detain him; I told the constable I would take him before a magistrate till there was an owner; we took him to Marlborough-street, and he was committed till the Monday following; I heard nothing of any owner till the Monday; I have got the saw here; before we took him to the office he seemed rather impertinent, and I insisted on his being searched, and he put his hand into his pocket and pulled out a piece of paper, with that he kept it in his right hand and refused to let any person see the sight of it; he put his hand into his pocket and pulled out a number of duplicates, the first duplicate that was looked at, it contained three saws, being pawned for eight shillings and six-pence; we told over the duplicates and they amounted to twenty, and in the twenty duplicates there was seventeen saws pawned, and two rules, two planes and a plow; two coats, a waistcoat and two pictures. (The saw produced and deposed to.)

Court to Chilton. How could they get at this saw? - They may get up a temporary ladder up a wall, and I sat in the other room eating my dinner.

Prisoner. There was a man gave it me, the saw and the plane together and asked me to take them to pawn for him; I work for the man, his name is Thomas Jones , I have been this month in prison, I don't know where he is now; I have nobody about me here now as a witness.

GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Imprisoned six months and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-32

226. JAMES ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , a toilenett waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of kerseymere breeches, value 12 d. the goods of William Smith , Esq .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

I live at Ibbotson's Hotel, in Vere-street, Cavendish Square ; in going to my bed between eleven and twelve o'clock on the 8th of February, I found that man concealed behind my bed curtains, at the head of my bed; I believe he was a gentleman's servant belonging to the Hotel I was in; I knew him by sight, he was by the side of the bed, behind the curtain; near at the head, there was a candle on the pillow, which had just

been blown out; it was blown out, but the snuff was burning, and between the candle and him, there was laying on the bed a pair of breeches and a waistcoat; a servant came immediately after me with a candle attending me; the clothes were taken out of a large trunk, that was close by the bedside, which was open.

Q When had you worn these clothes? - Not for some months.

Q. You had not laid them of course on his bed? - I had not; the place for keeping them was the trunk; a servant of my brother's kept the trunk and had the key, and had not locked it that day; that servant is not here, and there was some black clothes rolled up which I suppose was with an intent to carry away, when I went in first, one of the waiters of the inn came into the room, and left the candle; he had not gone out of the room before I discovered the man; I rung the bell and sent for Mr. Ibbotson, the master of the House; and I believe I said to Mr. Ibbotson, this is the manner that we are robbed; and I sent for a constable, and he was committed to the watch-house, I asked the prisoner how he came there? he said he was drunk; I had not been in my bed room since five o'clock that evening, I had gave no orders to have those clothes out, nor had I had them out for some months; and when I was in the room between five and six o'clock, the clothes were not on the bed then, and the trunk was shut.

JOHN IBBOTSON sworn.

I keep this Hotel in Vere-street; about a quarter after eleven on the 8th of February at night, I received an alarm about this matter; I was called up to Mr. Smith's room, and when I got up Mr. Smith said to me this is the way we are robbed; I was very much alarmed seeing the trunk open, I did not immediately cast my eye on the boy, I soon perceived the boy standing at the head of the bed; the trunk might be about three quarters of a yard from the bed side, or a yard at the farthest; there is just room for a person to walk between the bed and the trunk; I smelled the snuffing of a candle, and perceived the snuffing still burning; I went round the bed and took it from the pillow on which it lay, and put it out; I then observed laying on the bolster between the pillow and the boy, a pair of breeches and a waistcoat; I immediately ordered the waiter to go to the watch-house and fetch a constable; the constable came, and I gave the boy in charge; I asked him how he came into that room, for that he had no business there; he told me that he was very much in liquor; he lived in my house at this time, he is a servant to a gentleman in the Life Guards; I believe he had lived about a month or six weeks in the house, I cannot positively say; one of my maids will prove the state in which she left the room; she is here.

MARY STRONG sworn.

I was a servant in this Hotel; this night I was in the room, a little after eleven at night I turned the bed down, there was no clothes laying on it then of any sort; the trunk that belongs to Mr. Smith was shut when I left the room, I was close by it when I went round the bedside; it stood very near the bedside, I must have seen it if the lid had been open.

CHARLES HITCHCOCK sworn.

I was the officer of the night, I was sent for to Mr. Ibbotson's Hotel; the prisoner was given into my custody and some clothes, which I have got now; I have had them ever since. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. A fellow servant of mine asked me to come up and drink a dish of tea with me; and I went there and I stopped there, till about ten o'clock, from that he told me that his master was out, and that he was going to get an hackney coach to fetch him home; says I, I am going home; I will go with you, and we will have six-pennyworth of something to drink, so we did; and we went into a public house and we sat there about two hours, and we spent about two shillings, or half a crown in brandy and water, and I was very much in liquor indeed; so we left the public house at that time, and we went home to the Hotel and got a candle, from thence I was going up to bed, and in my going up to bed I was very much in liquor, I did not know where I was indeed; so I perceived I was in this gentleman's room, but I do not recollect any thing of taking the things out.

Court to Smith. Did he appear to be intoxicated? - He appeared to be sham drunk; to be affected drunk.

GUILTY . (Aged 17.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-33

227. ELIZABETH FRENCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , three linen shirts, value 12 s. a muslin apron, value 4 s. a cotton shawl, value 12 d. a muslin cap, value 12 d. and a linen apron, value 6 d. the goods of Lettice Walker .

LETTICE WALKER sworn.

I am a single woman ; I am a lodger in Rosemary-lane ; I lost some shirts and other articles, on Thursday the 9th of January, the prisoner had been with me for five or six weeks, she helped me to do my washing; this day I was gone to St. Thomas's Hospital; I left this woman there, it was about ten or eleven in the morning; I returned between one and two; and I missed the things in the indictment, they were all left on the table, they were washed ready to carry home; they were sent to me to be washed, I have seen them since, I saw them on the Monday after, at the office, Lambert-street Gardens; Gardiner, the pawnbroker's boy, brought them there; the prisoner was taken up on Sunday morning.

JAMES GARDINER sworn.

I am servant to a pawnbroker; I produce two shirts, and three other articles.

Q. Were they all pawned at one time? - No, on the 9th there was two shirts, and one white apron; the muslin apron was pawned on the 10th all the things were pawned by the prisoner; I had seen the prisoner before, I knew her; I have kept them till now.

WILLIAM CONNELL sworn.

I am headborough for the Parish of Whitechapel; I was sent for from my house, about the hour of eleven, on the 13th of January, and the prosecutor told me the linen belonged to one Carter; and she desired me to search the prisoner, to know what things she had on her; and the prisoner produced to the people of the house, five duplicates; I went to Carter's house, where this woman the prosecutrix lodges; the prisoner was there; I took the prisoner to the watch-house, and I brought her before the magistrate the next day, by ten or eleven o'clock; the duplicates were delivered up to me, Mr. Carter gave me the duplicates, and the prisoner acknowledged in my presence that she gave

these duplicates to Mrs. Carter; she said she was very sorry for what she had done. (The goods produced and deposed to, and the duplicates compared with the pawnbroker's.)

GUILTY . (Aged 34.)

Imprisoned three months in Newgate and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-34

228. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of June , one hundred guineas, the monies of John Pratt , John Watts and Matthew Lowden , in the dwelling house of Patrick Brady .

Indicted in a second COUNT for stealing the same monies, laying them to be the property of Thomas Holland .

Indicted in a third COUNT, laying it to be the property of James Foreman .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-35

229. JOHN TURNER and WALTER HAYCRAFT were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of January , five glasses, framed in wood and cloth, value 3 l. the goods of Robert Platten .

(The Case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

(The Witnesses examined separate.)

WILLIAM ASTLIP sworn.

I am superintendant of the watch of St. John's, Clerkenwell; I was on duty on Wednesday morning the 23d of January, I know the prosecutor, Mr. Platten's premises, he is a coach master , he lives in St. John's Square ; I believe it is called Badger-yard , it is a thoroughfare; I remember going by between one and two o'clock in the morning of Wednesday, I saw Haycraft come out of the yard; I did not know him before he brushed me as he came out; I don't know whether there was a moon or not, I had no lanthorn, there was a lamp opposite, I said good morning to you, and looked him in the face; I thought it was one of Mr. Platten's servants; to which he answered he was coming out presently. A few minutes afterwards I heard a rattle, I was just got into my watch-house in Berkley-street, not above one hundred yards from Mr. Platten's premises, though not in the view of the premises; then I observed Haycraft come past me, he was passing me before; I saw him, he was going from the premises of Mr. Platten; I knew him again well, it was a person with a short jacket on, he was very remarkable; Haycraft now is nearest to the jury; when I saw him pass the second time I did not know what was the matter, or else I should have stopped him then; a few minutes after John Turner was brought to the watch-house, and Turner confessed; I told him it would be better for him if he would impeach the others.

Mr. Knowlys. Where does Badger-yard lead to? - From St. John's Square, into Red Lion-street.

Q. This a thoroughfare through which any body may pass, is there any thing remarkable in a man's coming through there, it is free for any man? - It is certainly.

Q. You had never seen this man before in your life? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. This was between one and two o'clock in the morning; you dropped

your voice when my friend asked you whether it was a dark night? - It was not so very dark.

Q Had it not rained that night? - I don't know.

Q. Recollect yourself a little, had it not been raining a great deal that night? - I do not remember.

Q. You can remember a man's face whom you had never seen before in your life, but you cannot remember whether it rained or not; I ask you whether it had not rained a great deal that night? - I do not recollect, I was not out all night, I will not say any thing about it; that was not the point I expected to be asked to.

Q. That was not the point you expected to be asked to; on your oath had it not rained a great deal that night? - It might or might not; I remember it did not rain in the morning when I went to fetch Haycraft out of his bed.

Q. Did it rain when you pretended you saw this man? - I cannot remember.

Q. What time was it you took this man Haycraft? - I believe it was about five when he was brought to New Prison.

Q. Are you the regular inspector of the watch? - I am.

Q. Are you so now? - Now I am here.

Q. Do you think that answer does you any credit? - Well, I am.

Q. Up to this time? - Yes.

Q. Have you never been discharged from that sort of employment? - No, I have been in it upwards of sixteen years.

Q. I asked you a little while ago whether it rained that night or no, and you could not tell you said? - I reckon after twelve o'clock it is morning.

Q. Have you thought I was talking about night only, between ten o'clock and twelve? - It did not rain whilst was walking about.

Q. There was no moon you told my friend. Can you tell us what sort of a hat the man had on? - He had on a round hat.

Q. You say he passed by you and brushed by you? - He did.

Q. You thought then he was one of the man's servants; you know you have been examined on this matter before; you told my friend he passed you a second time, on your oath did you say before the magistrate that he passed you a second time? - I don't know whether I did or not.

Q. You know you must have a better recollection of it the next morning than you can have now, a month afterwards, yet at that time of night on that view you venture to swear positively to a man's person? - Yes, I do.

Q. Yet you could not recollect the next morning to say he had passed you a second time. Did you search this man when he was taken? - No.

Q. Then you don't know whether he had any knife about him by which he could effect this purpose? - I don't know.

Mr. Knapp. So you have been sixteen years superintendant of the watch to the present time? - Yes.

Q. It is not your business to be out all night? - It is not.

Q. There was a great many rainy nights about the month of January and February? - There was.

Q. You say you are sure the prisoner Haycraft past you? - I am.

Q. You said in your first examination that you looked into the prisoner Haycraft's face, and there was a lamp opposite? - There was.

- JEFFERSON sworn.

I am a watchman; I was so on the 23d of January last; my watch-box is

about twenty yards from Mr. Platten's gate; I could see Mr. Platten's gate from the box; I was close to the gate between one and two o'clock in the morning; Mr. Platten is a master coachman, it was Wednesday morning the 23d, Mr. Platten had a glass coach come in just at one o'clock, I went and lighted the coach in, and I fastened the great gate after him with an iron bar that turns round with a bolt on the inside; I got out of the wicket on the side of the gate, then I went to my box, I sat myself down and presently the coachman comes down and he gives me a penny for lighting of him in. In a few minutes after I heard the gate go moving backward and forward; I got out of my box and went close against the gate, then I saw John Turner and another man come out of Mr. Platten's yard; I knew John Turner , I did not know the other; I am sure the other man is not the man that I laid hold of with him; John Turner was coming out of the little gate, I walked along with them about twenty yards; I was afraid to take them in the narrow passage, and when they came out I sprung my rattle and collared them both; the other man struck me with an oath and ran away; I kept Turner, I am sure Turner is the man at the bar that came out of the yard, and another with him: from the time they came out of the yard I never was away from their side; I gave them all the good words I could, till I came to the place where I took them; I took them to the watch-house when I had taken them, and there I saw Mr. Aslip the last witness, then I went and called Mr. Platten up; then Mr. Platten and I went to the watch-house, and we went back together to the yard; Mr. Platten looked about and he clapped his hands together and said, God bless me, there is somebody has taken all the glasses out of the coaches; we found some glass close by the yard gate; we left the glass there, and went to the watch-house. I went back again to the yard, and Mr. Platten put the glass in one of the coaches all night for safety; I can make no observation on the glass at all; I looked at him, and I said, they were very good glasses; that is all I know.

Mr. Knowlys. When you took Turner he went very quietly with you? - He made no resistance at all.

Q. The man that got away struck you? - This man strived to get away, and I paid him over the head with the rattle.

Q. Haycraft was not the other, or you would have known him? - He was not.

Q. If Haycraft had been at all coming out of that yard, you must have seen him? - I must.

Q. Did you search Turner? - I did at the watch-house, and found nothing at all on him.

Court to Aslip. How far might Haycraft be from the gate of Mr. Platten's when you first saw him? - It was as he came out of the gate of Mr. Platten's yard in Badger-yard.

ROBERT PLATTEN sworn.

We have heard that you are a coach-master living in Clerkenwell? - I do. In consequence of what happened I went to the watch-house on the 23d of January; I went afterwards to the Coach-yard, and I found the doors of the coaches open in the yard, and the tassels cut off; there were five glasses gone.

Q. What sort of glasses were these? - Plate glasses covered with wood and cloth. I went then to the watch-house again; I came back again and we looked in and found the glass in the yard close to the gates one or two of them, the wood was separated from the glass, and the glass was gone from the frame, the other was all packed together, only one separated from the frame, the others were whole; the tassels that draw them up were cut off, or else they could not draw them

through the frame of the door; I know them to be mine.

Q. Did you examine the coaches to see how many were lost? - There was five, two pair and an odd one, and there was five laying down close to the corner of the gate, I put them in the bottom of a coach; we went after Mr. Haycraft, there were many went with links and flambeaus, we found him at a court in Liquor Pond-street, it may be near three o'clock in the morning; the other prisoner was with us, the other prisoner called him two or three times; we found him there and he was taken into custody, and I was very happy, and they were both of them taken to Clerkenwell New Prison; I got home to my premises about five o'clock, when I found the glass where I had left them in the coach.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you drive your coach that day? - I did not.

Q. How lately had you observed these coaches from whence you lost the glasses? - I had seen one of them come in that evening, the first coach I looked at.

LEMON CASEBY sworn.

I am a constable; I was ordered by alderman Clarke to take this glass into my custody at the public office, in Hatton-garden.

Prisoner Haycraft. I was never near the place that night.

Prisoner Turner. I was rather in liquor and I went into Mr. Platten's gateway, as it was open, to ease myself, and I came out and this constable came up and stopped me, and searched me.

The prisoner Haycrast called nine witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-36

230. WILLIAM TURNER and THOMAS BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , two hempen sacks, value 2 s. eight bushels of barley, value 30 s. the goods of Christopher Duncan .

(The case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

THOMAS PIERCE sworn.

I am a lighterman, a servant of Mr. Duncan's, he is a corn facter and lighter-man ; I know a barge of the name of Yarmouth, it was laying at the Hermitage stairs , on the Middlesex side of the river, within about twenty-five yards of the shore, there were two hundred quarters of barley in it. On the 23d of January, Wednesday, about a quarter after seven at outside, it was moon light, I went there with a little boy, I perceived the prisoners long side of the barge, they were in a boat, I had seen them before on the river, I cannot say I had seen them very often. When I came along I saw them take up one sack and hawled the cloth on the remaining part of the vessel; they lifted it to the skiff in which they were; the Yarmouth was about two foot and a half from the edge of the water; they could reach to the cargo of the barge standing in the skiff; they perceived me coming to the barge when they had lifted the sack into the skiff, and they shoved away; I said to the little boy, pull, and I held my arm out and lay hold of the skiff; I was about twenty-two feet from them when I saw them and I called to them not to heave them overboard, they had two in the skiff, but I only saw them actually take one; just as they had taken the two sacks and heaved them overboard, I jumped into the skiff immediately; the prisoner Tucker hove one overboard on one side and then he turned to get the other over, he could not get it overboard without assistance; I never lost sight of him from the time I saw him take one

sack from the barge till the time I saw them thrown overboard. I called to one Henry Hall to shove off; I then called out to him that they had been robbing the barges, he is a watchman to Mr. Duncan, he watches on the barges, but it was not in his charge then, he shoved off; we got into the skiff and Tucker made use of an expression, and asked what I could swear to? the words that he used were, buggar you, what can you swear to now? on this I and Hall secured them; they surrendered quietly; we put them in custody of the headborough.

Q. How far from the barge was it they threw the sacks overboard? - It might be twenty yards from the Yarmouth. I went to that spot the next day, somewhere about nine in the morning; Mr. Hall and Corsaint made a search and got the things.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of these sacks of barley? - I cannot say.

Court. Was there nothing but barley in that barge? - Nothing but barley, all Mr. Davis's.

Prisoner Tucker. I want to ask whether he saw me along side of the craft or not? - I saw them both.

HENRY HALL sworn.

I am a waterman, and watchman to Mr. Duncan. On the 23d of January and at about a quarter after seven, it was just low water, and I was shoving off to go and fetch the barge ashore to Mr. Henley's wharf, I mean the Yarmouth barge, just as I was going off Thomas Pierce called out to me, bear a hand for the barge is robbed; I did not see them rob the barge; I was in sight in a minute and I saw the two prisoners at the bar chuck the two sacks overboard; I cannot say I had not known them before; they never got away from me; I never was so far off as I am from you; Thomas Pierce stepped in first and I stepped in afterwards; one of them, I don't know which of them, made that speech, what can you swear now? I cannot recollect which, I was all in a flurry, at that time the sacks were overboard; we secured them and delivered them to the headborough and went to the justice's with them the next morning before day light; I went to the spot, I reckon about a quarter after six in the morning, it was then low water and we found the two sacks, I and Thomas Corsaint , the sacks were full covered with water about ten feet; I grappled as near as I could to the spot and I found two sacks, and one of them with my master's name on it, the sacks were full of barley; they are here; I carried them on shore to the wharf and delivered them on the top of the wharf to Mr. Henley's wharf; the barley has been emptied and dried, because it would have spoiled; but the sacks have been in my possession ever since.

(The sacks deposed to.)

THOMAS CORSAINT sworn

I went with the last witness to grapple for the sacks on the morning of the 24th; I did not see any thing that passed on the 23d; I found two sacks, I found them where the last witness described, they were full.

CHRISTOPHER DUNCAN sworn.

The cargo on board the Yarmouth was two hundred quarters of barley; all that is in the craft I am accountable for to my employer; we often borrow sacks, one of the sacks is my own the other was borrowed of Messrs. Duncan and Walker; I have no doubt that that is my property. The next day there were three sacks missing, but we have only found two, and since the 23d I have been robbed three times on the river.

Prisoner Tucker. I was going to give a man a cast on board of a vessel where this barge laid; after I took and shoved

from the barge there was another in a boat that I pulled right outside in the middle of the river, that man there came along side of us, but I had nothing at all in the boat, nor did I take nothing at all overboard.

Prisoner Brown. We were not nigh the barge when this man see us, he came and stepped into the boat and drove on the shore; we don't know any thing at all about these sacks of barley.

William Tucker , GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Thomas Brown , GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-37

231. JOHN RUDDLE was indicted for that he, on the 9th of January , on Ann his wife , feloniously, wilfully and of malice aforethought, did make an assault and with both his hands and feet to and against the ground on the head, stomach, back, breast, belly and sides did strike, beat and kick, giving her the said Ann as well by casting her to the ground, as by beating her, several mortal bruises whereof she instantly died, against his Majesty's peace .

Indicted in a second COUNT for the like murder on the Coroner's inquisition.

THOMAS RUDDLE sworn.

I am brother to the prisoner at the bar; I am a gentleman's servant; I knew the deceased, she was his wife, her christian name was Ann; I lived in the same house with them about a fortnight; I was in the bed in the next room very bad, at the time of the death of the prisoner's wife, it was Wednesday the 9th of January, between three and four o'clock, I heard the noise on the floor twice in the room next to me, as near as I could suppose it was some body falling down; I don't know who it was.

Q Did you hear any voice? - I did not.

Q Do you know they were in the room? - They were both in the room; I know they were both in the room, when I heard the noise I went to the door; I got up as fast as I could; I did not say any thing, my brother told me as I was undressed to go back; then I went back and dressed myself, before I dressed myself Mrs. Baker came in and I followed her into the room where my brother and sister where; the deceased lay on her face, then Mrs. Baker she took her up and held her in her arms a good bit, and I held the child at the time.

Q. Did you at any time see or hear the deceased say any thing to her husband? - No.

Q. Do man recollect because from your deposition before the Coroner you seem to have forgot part of the story you told then. Do you remember any words that passed between the husband and the wife? - No.

Q. Do not you remember her saying any thing to him? - No.

Q. Do recollect; do you remember her saying any thing of this sort, that she would be damned if she would give it up with her life, and a scuffle ensued? - I do not remember.

Q. What has been your illness? - A fever.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Baker saying any thing to the prisoner at the bar when she went into the room? - I I don't remember any thing about it; when I went into the room I know I took the child directly.

Q. Do not you remember Mrs. Baker saying something to the prisoner? - I could not hear any thing of that because the child cried so.

ANN BAKER sworn.

I live nearly opposite where the deceased lodged; my husband and the prisoner

worked together; the deceased came over to my place on Wednesday the 9th of January about twelve o'clock, and she asked me if my husband was come home to dinner? I said, no; she asked me if I knew where they were? I said, my husband talked of a fight in the morning and I take it they are gone there; so with that she asked me to come over to her place; I went over and had been some time in the room where she lodged, I went to order a pot of beer for she and I, so I had ordered the beer, and when I ordered the beer I see the prisoner was wheeling my husband in a wheelbarrow to the Brazen Head, a public house, they went in there; I take it they stopped about a quarter of an hour before they came; they had a pot of beer in their hand when I saw them, but whether they drank I cannot tell, I did not stop to see; so with that I came home and I was standing in the room of the deceased and the prisoner came home; I saw him come into the room; when I saw him coming along, I said to the deceased, here is your husband coming Mrs. Ruddle, you had better hide the beer; I sat at the window and she answered and said, no, he might think more of it if she was to hide it; so with that he came up into the room, and when he came I handed him the pot to drink, it was in the room up one pair of stairs, and he drank good health to me and good health to his wife, and he handed the pot to his wife and she took the pot; so with that she began talking to him, and asked him if he was not ashamed of himself to stay out so drinking and his poor brother so ill? he said, it did not signify talking to him he wanted some victuals; he asked her what there was for dinner? she said, salt beef and carrots, and if he could not make a meal of that he must go without.

Q. Was that said rather roughly? - I think it was; she checked him when he came in about being out drinking.

Q. This was said crossly to him at the time? - I think it was.

Q. When he came in was he in good humour? - Yes, he seemed in as good humour as ever I see him in in my life; so he went to the cupboard and he looked in; so whether he said he could not eat it I cannot tell, I sat opposite the window and I saw the man that had been drinking along with them, there had been a good many drinking together, the man lodges in our place; I see him and says to Mr. and Mrs. Ruddle, I must go and send my husband some victuals I see he can send for some; so I went down stairs and went over to my own place, and I cut some bread and meat, and I sent it to my husband to the public house; so with that I came down stairs and came out, and was going over to Ruddle's; so when I came down stairs a gentlewoman that is here, Mary Knight , says, Mrs. Baker you cannot think what an outcry there is with Mrs. Ruddle, I take it he is beating of her; I ran up stairs into the room directly and when I came up stairs he stood at the bed room door with the child in his arms; so I said to him, I am surprized at you Ruddle to get ill using of your wife, as I hear you are; so he said, he had not been touching of her; and I said, he must by what I had been told; he said, she began with him; I had a child in my arms and I laid down the child in the cradle, and I lifted her up in my arms, she laid on the floor with her face towards the ground; so when I lifted her up I said, Lord have mercy on me Ruddle you have killed your wife; I think he said, I hope not, she was only in a fit, and he said, I knew she was subject to fits.

Q. Was that so? - I have seen her in fits before, but not this time; so I took her in my arms and set her in a chair, and got hartshorn and water, and I thought if she was in a fit I would see and bring her too, and when I got her into the chair she made a very heavy sigh

and looked up to me, and she never spoke nothing after that nor ever offered to move after, she never spoke at all; there was hartshorn in the house.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar assist at all? - He did; he endeavoured to bring her too and took her in his arms, he got the hartshorn and rubbed her temples, and he seemed to take very great account and cried sadly over her, and tried a good deal to bring her to, and had her in his arms a long time, for half an hour, he took all the pains he could for bringing her to life again, and was very much distressed, and cried bitterly a good deal; so while he had her in his arms the harts-horn was all used, and I said, I would go and fetch the doctor, and I went for some hartshorn; I don't think I was gone above a quarter of an hour, and when I came back he had her in his arms the same as I left her, he was endeavouring to bring her to, and I asked him how she did? he hoped, he said, she was better; with that he desired me to take her into my arms, he asked me if the doctor was coming that I went for? I said, I don't know for I saw nobody but a little boy, and he said, he would tell his master to come directly; so with that I had been a little time in the room with him and his brother, and he took on very sadly and cried, and he asked me if I had any money? so I made answer and said, Ruddle I have got 6 d. if that would be of any service, and he made reply, then he would have the 6 d. and would go and fetch the harts-horn, and bring the doctor directly; and he went and I never saw any thing of him till I saw him at the justice's.

Q.Was there any blood on the floor? - No, sir.

Q. Did he appear to have used any instrument? - No, I saw nothing of the sort.

Q. Did you happen to see any marks of violence? - No.

Q. How many people attended her afterwards? - I cannot tell, there was so many; there was but one doctor, but the doctor's man came first, and the doctor came after, and the doctor's man blooded her before the doctor came

Q. I believe she never recovered? - No.

Q. Now Mrs. Baker, you probably have known the deceased and the prisoner some time, how did they live together? - I never see them live any way disagreeable that ever I saw.

Q. According to your account he seemed to be in perfect good humour when he came into the room? - Yes, in perfect good humour as ever I saw him in my life.

Q. Was he fond of his wife? - Yes, as far as I know.

Q. How many children had he? - Two, one is two years old and the other is about a twelve month.

Q. Pray Mrs. Baker was any body in the room with you? - No.

Q. You saw the first and the last of it? - Yes.

REBECCA BISHOP sworn.

The prisoner and the deceased were lodgers of mine, they lodged in the first floor.

Q. Did you see what passed on this unfortunate occasion? - I saw nothing, but I heard, nobody saw but Ann Baker; the first that I heard was Mrs. Baker run down stairs after Mr. Ruddle came home, I got up and watched her home; I do not know what was the reason, but I did do it. As soon as she was gone, there was a strange noise upon the floor were the prisoner and the deceased were; it founded to me like a fall and a blow, when I heard Mrs. Ruddle give an uncommon cry, I got up and took my infant in my lap, and went to open my door for to hear what

was the matter, and just as I opened the door I heard Mrs. Ruddle cry out murder very fierce; when I went to the door, Mrs. Ruddle came down stairs and she went and stood at the door with the little boy in her arms; I looked at her and she looked at me, and she shaked her head three times, but never spoke, and when she came by to go up stairs again, I asked her to walk into my room to stop a bit; she made me no answer, but shaked her head and went up stairs, there was a child in the room, and she says to the child, I do not know who you belong to, and she took the child to put it down stairs, for it to go down stairs; he told her she was a damned lyer, she did know who it belonged to, and as soon as she got into the room there was the same noise as I heard before; there was a rumbling on the floor like fails, and a noise like blows; then I heard Mrs Ruddle give an uncommon cry, I got up and opened my door, before I could get to the stairs I heard her cry murder; when I went up stairs I met Mr. Ruddle on the landing place; I asked him what he made such a noise and such a piece of work in my house for; I asked him whether or no he was not ashamed to use a poor woman of ill? he asked me, what business I had with it, what affair it was of mine? I told him if he made such a noise and riot in my house I would fetch a constable and have him taken up; he told me I might fetch a constable and have him taken up and be damned; he told me I should go down stairs, if I did not he would kick my backside down stairs; Mrs. Ruddle said, I should not go down, very fierce; at that time she was standing at a chair before the window, with one hand to her head and the little boy at her left knee, and he said, if I would not go into my own apartment he would kick me down, and he looked so spiteful and malicious, but having a young infant in my arms to save the child I went down into my own room and shut my door, and sat myself down, I got a clout and put on the young child, in that instant, I was struck all with a cold shiver, directly on that I heard the same rumbling as I heard before; I heard a noise in the prisoner's room like falls and heavy blows, like that of people fighting; it was the same sort only louder than I heard before, and I heard Mrs. Ruddle call out Mrs. Bishop, she gave two cries more and I heard no more of her; and then I stopped a while and I heard Mrs. Baker come in, and I heard her say, damn it Ruddle what have you been doing; and I sat and lissened a great while, and I could hear nothing of Mrs. Ruddle, and heard a great crying and walking about the room, but did not know what was the matter, and I went up and knocked at the door, Mr. Baker was there, Mr. Ruddle opened the door and came to me himself; I asked him how Mrs. Ruddle was; Oh! he said she was very well, she would do very well, she would come to presently; I stopped and talked to him a good while on the stairs, and asked him how he could use her so? says he, does not your husband and you have words sometimes? I said, yes, but not blows; he told me he should give her a beating no more; I asked him what he abused me so for? I had done him no harm; he asked my pardon and wanted me to shake hands with him; he asked me what I would have to drink? I told him nothing at all; I went down stairs and stopped a while again, but I could hear nothing of Mrs. Ruddle, Mrs. Baker was in the room all the time; I went down and stopped a while and I went up to the door again, and he came to the door himself again, by some means or other the door slipped out of his singers as he went to pull it after him; I asked him to let me go into the room? and he said, no, she would do very well; I says,she looks to me to be dead, why will not you let me go into the room? he said, no, no, never mind she will do very well; I says to him, she looks to me to be dead, you have killed her, you have killed her, you have given her the death wound; he said, no, no, she will do very well; I went down stairs and alarmed the neighbourhood as fast as ever I could, in the mean time he changed his coat and hat and he came down, as I stopped at the door, and went down the street as unconcerned as if nothing had been the matter, and he walked down the garden and along the street, just as he used to do when he went to his daily work, Mrs. Baker came down the stairs and called me up, as soon as I entered the room I saw she was dead; I says, to Mrs. Baker, she is dead; Oh yes, she says; says I, have you sent for a doctor? says she, no; then says I, send for a doctor directly; I went down stairs and sent some little boy to the doctor; the doctor's man came, but I did not go up stairs to see any thing further.

Q. Have you had any conversation to day with any body about this? - No.

Q. Has any thing been read to you to day? - No, I am sure of that

Q. Has nobody read a deposition to you in the parlour nor in any room near this court? - No.

Court to Mrs. Baker. Was not some deposition read here to day? - Yes.

Q. Was the last witness there? - No, it was this good woman and me.

Prisoner to Mrs. Bishop. Whether I ever said that I would kick you down stairs? - Yes, to be sure you did.

Court. When was that Mrs. Bishop? - At the time he was abusing his wife.

Q. Was it when Mrs. Baker was in the room? - No.

MARY KNIGHT sworn.

I live at the next door but one to where the deceased lived, they lived at No. 12, and I live at No. 10. On the 9th of January, between three and four in the afternoon I heard murder cry, and I opened the door and stood at the door, and I saw Mrs. Ruddle come to the window and opened the window, and the prisoner pulled his wife down with very great vengeance and he said, blast your eyes be you coming that again? then he went to the other window and he drew a curtain before it, then the room was still for a few minutes, I kept my standing, then I heard Mrs. Ruddle cry out again very terrible, then I still kept standing there and I saw Mrs. Baker go up, and I heard the room very still, then I never heard any thing more of it, then I saw the prisoner come down and I said to him, you have killed your wife Ruddle; he made me no answer but looked very wishful at me, and he got lower in the garden and I still kept saying, I know he has killed her; with that he said, hush, three times; as soon as he was gone I went up into the room and I found Mrs. Ruddle laying dead on the floor before the window towards the door.

Prisoner. Did you see me draw the curtain? - I did.

JOHN MACKINDER sworn.

I am a surgeon; on Wednesday the 9th of January last, as near five o'clock as I can guess, two boys came desiring I would go immediately to see a poor woman who had been having words with her husband and was either dead or in a sit; at that time I was in a conversation with a gentleman in the shop on some business, I desired my assistant to go with the boys and I would follow directly; after the assistant went I went after him, I found the deceased laying on the floor senseless and motionless without any symptoms of life whatever; the assistant had attempted to bleed her without any effect; on that I examined the body particularly

at that time to see if there were any marks of violence about the body, on examining particularly all over the body particularly the external part, I saw no appearance of violence there whatever, the only appearance I saw was under the chin where there was a little bit of skin grazed off; on enquiry I found that had been there for several days before.

Q. Did you examine sufficiently to see whether she might possibly die of a fit? - I saw no symptoms of her dying in a fit at that time, at that time I could not tell what had been the occasion of her death; there was no mark any where and no appearance of blood no more than on the apron from attempting to bleed her; at the time there was a conversation that she was pregnant, and I particularly examined the stomach to see if there was any mark in her stomach where there might have been a blow that would have occasioned an immediate suspension of life, but I saw none on the stomach, and the stomach was perfectly flat, no appearance of her being far advanced as I was told; I was ordered before the coroner on Saturday, and was ordered to examine the body, and I opened it, on examining the body at that time there was no appearance of violence any where on the body, except about the neck from ear to ear, and under the left ear a great fullness of swelling, a very great extravasation of blood. On opening of the body I found the whole of the viscera was in a perfect healthy natural state, both the thorax and abdomen, and she was not pregnant; on referring to the head and examining the scalp no injury at all, nor to the bones of the head, on opening the head and turning on one side the covering of the brain, the dura mater, there was a general extravasation of blood, there was a great extravasation of blood on the cerebrum and cerebellum.

Q. Now could you on the dissection of this head discover what was the occasion of this poor woman's death? - No doubt it was that extravasation.

Q. How did it appear to you that that had been caused? - As if violent pressure about the neck had been used.

Q. Might it be done by a violent blow? - It was in consequence of violence but what sort of violence I cannot say, it appeared by violent pressure of the neck.

Q. Did you take any measure to find out whether it might be by a fit? - I did, there might be the same symptoms take place of a fit or a violent blow, or fall, but there would not be that great extravasation of blood about the neck.

Q. Then if I take you right any violent means, or any accidental means that might be the occasion of this rupture of the vessels might have had that effect? - Yes.

Q. And if the woman had died in a fit such would have been the appearance as they were now? - Possibly, though in a slighter degree.

Q. Did you happen to know the prisoner at the bar and the deceased? - I might know them personally, but never to my knowledge; I have only to observe, when I saw her on Wednesday there was no appearance of the blackness about the neck and of the extravasation; the pressure would not shew immediately, but it would some time after.

Prisoner. That day that this accident happened I had been out along with my fellow workmen having a little beer, and my wife had been drinking too, not with me; when I came home it was between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, Mrs. Baker was in the room and they were drinking some beer and they asked me to drink, and I drank, I drank both their good healths, and soon after Mrs. Baker went out of the room; in Mrs. Baker's absence I asked my wife whether we should have our dinners; she replied, no, where I had been to get my beer there I should go and have my dinner;

and I replied, and said to her, why should you be angry you have been drinking a little as well as I have; she said that did not signify for I should have no dinner there; I was sitting down in the chair and words arose, she being angry with me she took the poker out of the fire and struck at me twice, and I asked her why she did that? for I said, I was not angry with her if she was not angry with me; she still kept the poker in her hand and I took hold of her by the arms, and set her down in the chair and begged of her to be quiet, and she got up again and I set her down in the chair again close by the window, and being rather intoxicated with liquor she alarmed the neighbourhood, which I had not meddled with her at all; she got up again and said, I should go out of the room I should not stop there; I replied and said, I should not go till I had something to eat; she came to me in the mean time and attempted to put me out of the room; I took hold of her again for to set her down in the chair again, and with attempting to set her on the chair against the window I shoved her beside the chair and the chair and she, and I fell all down together, the cradle stood close by, the rockers of the cradle caused the blow at the side of her temple; that is all.

GUILTY of man slaughter . (Aged 25.)

Imprisoned twelve months and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-38

232. MARY LEWIS otherwise GREENWOOD was indicted for that she, on the 29th of January , being big with a male child, on the same day, by the providence of God, did bring forth the said male child alive, and which said male child, by the laws of this realm, is a bastard, and that then not having the fear of God before her eyes, on the said male child feloniously, wilfully and with malice aforethought did make an assault in that she a certain piece of silk ribbon, value 1 d. with both her hands about the neck of the said male child did tie, twist, fix and fasten, and the said male child with the same silk ribbon feloniously, wilfully and with malice aforethought did choak and strangle, of which choaking and strangling the said male child then and there instantly died .

Indicted in a second COUNT on the Coroner's inquisition.

CHRISTOPHER LATIMER sworn.

I have only the ribbon to deliver that was about the child's neck.

MARY WILLIAMS sworn.

I keep the house; I live at No. 4, New court, Little Chapel-street, Westminster , opposite the Bluecoat school; the prisoner at the bar lodged at my house; I have known her about a year and a half if not more; she came to lodge with me as a servant out of place two or three times; she came to lodge with me the last time about three months before she was brought to bed to the best of my knowledge, she was brought to bed three weeks last Tuesday, she did not give up her lodgings all that three months, but she was away about half the time; she was brought to bed the 29th of January; I saw her the morning of that day, she breakfasted with me about ten o'clock, about eleven she went up stairs to her room, a one pair of stairs room; I stayed in the house all that morning, I was in the house from that time till it was half after three; I did not see any thing more of her only that I spoke to her about half past two, she was in her room and the

door was locked, I tried it to go in, the man, that she says to me was her husband wanted to speak to her, his name is Thomas Lewis , he had called at half past two; on finding her locked in I called to her and asked her to come down, that her husband wanted to speak to her; she told me that she could not come; says she, I cannot open the door Mrs. Williams, I am naked, cleaning myself; I was at the room door while I had this conversation with her, says I, it is me my dear set open the door, and she answered me, Mrs. Williams, I cannot, I am naked, cleaning myself; with that I went down stairs and told the man she would be down presently, he waited a few minutes, I cannot tell how many, and I heard her unlock the door and call him, and he stepped up stairs within a step or two to the top, he did not go into the room; I did not see her at that time; I don't know what passed between them, they conversed the space of five minutes, then he came down stairs and walked out.

Q. Do you know whether she had come out of the room at that time or not? - Yes, she stood at the top of the stairs to speak to him, I heard her voice speaking to him there and saw his shadow on the wall of the landing place.

Q. Do you know what became of her after the man came down? - She went into the room and I could hear the door lock, this might be about three o'clock or something after, very likely there or thereabouts; I went out at that time for the space of ten minutes or a quarter of an hour to the best of my knowledge, when I came back she was down stairs in my apartment sitting by my fire, as near as I can guess it was about four o'clock, I found her sitting by my fire, when I came in I asked her why she did keep herself up stairs, and she told me she was very busy sewing; I told her she could not be at sewing work because her thimble was below, and she put her left hand into her pocket and shewed me another thimble, and, says she, I have got another thimble in my pocket; I went out directly then about my business, I went out with my milk, I sell milk; I came home about half after five to the best of my knowledge, and she was sitting down at the same place then when I came back that time; and she drank tea with me about seven o'clock as usual, she called for a penny loaf and eat as before, there we sat and talked till abour nine o'clock; we had a bed in the two pair of stairs room that we had not an opportunity to make in the course of the day, her room was one pair, this was two pair, I told my niece to go up stairs and make that bed, her name is Mary Williams , she went up and made the bed, and she came down as soon as she made the bed and asked me to go up into the one pair of stairs room; the prisoner was present with me in the lower room in my apartment, my niece did not tell me any thing but desired me to go up into the one pair of stairs room; I went up myself alone and opened the room door, my niece did not go with me she was very poorly, this room door was not locked at that time, that was the prisoner's room, and I was very much frightened to see the room all bloody all over, and I followed it to the closet in the same room, the door was not fastened in any place at all, the door had no hinges. I saw the child lay dead on the naked boards naked without any covering nor nothing, and his little head was in an old slipper of her's in a dark part of the closet; I returned down stairs very much frightened; I did not make any more observations on the child, and I said, what am I to do? what is this that is come to my house? and she asked me, Mrs. Williams, what is the matter? I says, O you brute, you ask me what is the matter, and you know what you have been about locking yourself up stairs

all day, and she begged my pardon; she says, I beg your pardon Mrs. Williams, I could not help it I miscarried; miscarriage or not miscarriage I should know of it; for God's sake, says she, say not a word about it to nobody and I will take it away in the morning, and have it buried, and I will go to my uncle and be there; No, says I, not a limb of it shall go out of my house in that manner; then Mrs. Gibbs came down stairs and asked what was the matter? she is a lodger of mine; I told her there was matter enough with me, that woman had told me she had miscarried, but however, says I, she has got her dead child in the cupboard; with that Mrs. Gibbs answered, let me see the child will tell you whether it is a miscarriage or not; I took a candle and took Mrs. Gibbs with me up stairs, we went together into the room and to the closet, and the prisoner Mary Lewis followed us both up stairs, Mrs. Gibbs took the child up in her arms and turned its head towards the cupboard door; I could then see a ribbon about its neck; says I to Mrs. Gibbs, what is that ribbon about its neck? undo the ribbon; Mrs. Gibbs did undo it and I was present, and then the prisoner threw herself on the side of the bed and laid down, and I asked her what she put that ribbon about the neck of the child for? to draw it from me, says she; it was a slip knot and Mrs. Gibbs took hold of it in one end, and undid it, it was very easily taken off, it was tight about the neck, we could not see a bit of the ribbon about the neck it was so tight but the bow; I told her to take the child down stairs and take it to the fire and rub it; I thought to bring the child to life, and gave her a little brandy to rub it with; but when I considered how many hours the infant had laid it was impossible, but we had it to the fire and tried, but it was as cold as as clay; the trace of the ribbon was very visible in the neck, and the skin was a little raised with the tightness of the ribbon on one side of it; it was a man child; with that we took the child up stairs from the fire and put it where we found it, I and Mrs. Gibbs, and laid it down as we found it; with that I had her put to bed; I told her to go to bed for shame of her; after I had her put to bed I locked the room door, she went to bed in the same room; I had asked her if she would take any thing, and I went down for a man midwife to look at the child.

Q. Before this had you seen any symptoms of a delivery besides the child? - Yes, it was in the pot along with the baby in the closet and an old rag of a pocket handkerchief with it.

Q. You mean the after burden? - Yes.

Q. When did you see the prisoner after this happened? - The next morning, I went up stairs and asked her if she would have something to eat, and asked her why she did not leave the child alive in some corner of the room for me, and if she had a mind to run away herself if she had left the child alive I should not care; I wish I had now Mrs. Williams, says she; whether she meant that she wished she had left the child alive or wished that she had run away, I cannot say.

Q. How came you to forget this before the Coroner? - I answered every thing they asked me.

Q. Did she say any thing about the birth? - She told me it was a miscarriage; I asked her whether she found the child was dead or alive with her? and she told me she believed it was alive in the birth; I went with that and acquainted the people at the office; I went first of all to a gentleman, Mr. Ashmole, in Petty France and told him what had happened and he went with me to the justice's office, Queen-square; she was in bed all this time in my house,

Q. There was no restraint upon her all this time after the child was found. Did you lock her in the next morning? - I did not; the parish people came there about ten o'clock on Wednesday and the woman from the work-house was watching her all night.

Q. You had known this woman a good while, of course you must have had a good opinion of her? - I had a very good opinion of her, if she was a sister of mine I could not have a better opinion of her.

Q. Perhaps she had before this time communicated to you that she was with child? - Yes, she agreed with me to nurse her for the month; she told me the first time she came she was married and with child, and since she came to lodge with me she told me that she had an uncle in Bond-street and kept a public house, who had promised to send her three sacks of coals for her laying in and a sack of wood, and she told me that a relation had promised her all the baby linen, but she never brought none to my house; I saw her working at a bit of a shirt and a cap, I asked her whether she was doing her baby linen? she said, yes, my baby linen is at a relations, this is nothing but to amuse me.

Q. How long was it before she was brought to bed you see her at work about this shirt? - About a month or more I had seen such a thing in her hand; but she told me her baby linen was at a relations.

Q. From her coming to you she made no secret that she was with child? - She told me she was with child, and she told me she was married, and I was to take care of her during her laying in.

Q. That was agreed upon? - It was.

Q. What was to be done with nursing of the child? - She told me she would never suckle herself, nor no woman living should suckle her child; I was telling of her one day of bringing something for the baby's use; she used to say, don't you fear I shall have every thing that I want for my baby in time; says she, I shall not lay in till the latter end of February; she was going on in my debt, telling me she had a yearly income and the writings were in Mr. Montague's hands; she said, she had 15 l. a year; she told me the Wednesday morning after she was delivered that she was not married.

MARY WILLIAMS sworn.

I am the niece of the former witness; I live in the same house with my aunt where Mary Lewis lodged; Thomas Lewis who the prisoner called her husband came in about half after two, on the 29th of January, and he wanted to speak with Molly, as he called her, my aunt answered him, she was up stairs ever since breakfast, my aunt told him to come in and sit down, and my aunt went up stairs and told her that Lewis wanted to speak to her; I could hear my aunt trying to go in, but the door was locked, and my aunt told her to open the door, and asked her what did she lock the door for? I heard her speaking these words, I cannot because I am cleaning myself; and my aunt came down and told Lewis that she was a cleaning herself, and would be down by and by; she was not very long in the room and I heard her come out of the door and shut the door after her, and called to Lewis, if you want to speak to me come up; she stood on the landing place; Lewis went up and spoke to her; he was there about five minutes; I don't know what they were saying, I did not hear that at all, but he returned down stairs and went out, and my aunt went out to fetch her milk home, and in the time that my aunt was out she came down stairs, and I was sitting with my face towards the window sewing, she came by me and sat down in the corner by the fire; I asked her what

she had been doing up stairs, and why she did not come down and keep me and my child company? I have been sewing, says she, very busy about it; that was the very words; and I said, your thimble is here; she told me she had another thimble in her pocket; I said, I thought you were ill or something; no, no, says she, I was not ill, when I am ill I will let you know fast enough; I was in the room down stairs by the fire; my aunt came home about half past five o'clock, and she drank tea with us about seven as usual; about nine o'clock at night we had a bed in the two pair of stairs not made, my aunt told me to go up and make the bed, so I did, as I was going up I saw a stain in the landing place where she stood to talk to Lewis; as I was coming down after I had made the bed I turned into this room, and the room was all over of the same.

Q. What kind of stain did it appear to be? - Blood; I went no farther I was so poorly; I went then down stairs and I told my aunt to go up the one pair of stairs room; what for? says my aunt to me, is the woman's coals coming? no, no, says I, go up stairs and see what is coming; and my aunt light a candle and went up stairs; I did not go with her; while my aunt was gone up the prisoner never spoke a word to me, nor I to her; my aunt returned down, there was nobody with her but herself; O God! what is this that is come to me in my house? says my aunt; and the prisoner made answer, what is the matter Mrs. Williams? and my aunt said, matter enough, what have you been doing up stairs? how can you ask me what is the matter? and she said to my aunt, I beg your pardon Mrs. Williams I could not help it, I have miscarried; my aunt answered her and said, miscarriage or not miscarriage, you should have let me known; she told my aunt to say nothing about it that night and she would take it away in the morning, and have it buried, and she would go to her uncle and be there; my aunt said, not a limb of it shall go out of my house in that manner; Mrs. Gibbs came down stairs at this time and asked my aunt what was the matter? I fell in a fit at seeing what I did up stairs, and my aunt told Mrs. Gibbs that that woman said that she had miscarried up stairs; Mrs. Gibbs says, let me go up and I will tell whether it is a miscarriage or no; my aunt and Mrs. Gibbs went up and the prisoner followed them, and I followed her up stairs; my aunt and Mrs. Gibbs went to the closet and I was at the closet door, and I saw the child laying there before they took it up, and Mrs. Gibbs took hold of the child and took it up, and my aunt said, what is that ribbon about the child's neck? I saw the knot on the left side, and Mrs. Gibbs undid the knot directly, for my aunt told her, and they carried the child down stairs and had it in a flannel by the fire; the child was so cold it was all in vain, and then they carried it up again and put it down in the closet where they found it, and came down stairs both of them, but my aunt put her to bed first, and we went down stairs and my aunt locked the room door after her, and my aunt went out for a doctor, but the doctor could not come that night; I looked at the child after the ribbon was taken off and the track of the ribbon was in the child's neck.

ELIZABETH GIBBS sworn.

Q. We understand that you went up stairs this night to examine the room, who did you go up with? - With Mrs. Williams, and I saw as fine a child as ever I set my eyes upon in the cupboard with its head in an old shoe; I put my hand on its left shoulder and I thought then that I saw its right foot wag, that made me cry out to Mrs. Williams, bring me a flannel for I think it is alive now;

I observed a great deal in the cupboard; I took the child up, Mrs. Williams said, what is this ribbon about its neck Mrs. Gibbs? I laid hold of the ribbon at one end and off came the ribbon; I gave it a good hard pull; we carried the child down stairs in a flannel and we rubbed it by the fire; I could observe no life in it, but it was very black about the mouth, and looked to be a blow on the temple; I carried it up stairs again, and I put it where I took it from as I found it was dead; I said, I will take care of the ribbon and I gave it to the Coroner, and I received it of Latimer now; it is a silk ribbon.

MARGARET GARRAT sworn.

I was one of the women sent from the work house to take care of the prisoner; I searched her pockets and I found two little shirts and two little caps; the prisoner has got them herself; I found them of my own accord.

ANN STEWARD sworn.

I was the other woman sent to take care of the prisoner; I was present when Margaret Garrat searched the prisoner; I see her find the things she has mentioned in the pockets of the prisoner; I know them to be proper things for a young child.

FRANCIS MOSELEY sworn.

I know the prisoner, about ten weeks ago the prisoner lived with Mr. Trevers as a chair woman; I was an assistant to Mr. Trevers as an apothecary; I asked her once what time she expected to lay in? she said, in eight weeks; I asked her if she was going to stay with us in the situation of a servant? she said, she could not as she had not above eight weeks before she expected to lay in; I enquired what she meant to do with her infant? it was one afternoon while we were at tea; she said, to put it out to nurse and to procure herself a situation as wet nurse; she was only there till we were supplied with a constant servant; she slept in the house while she was there; there was no concealment whatever.

- LINN sworn.

I am a surgeon; I live in Parliament-street. On the 30th or 31st of January I was desired by the Coroner to examine the body of the child, previous to the Coroner's sitting; I found an evident mark like a ligature about its neck, and a slight excoriation, as done by the ligature; I opened the body; I found the lungs had contained air, having been partially inflated; the blood vessels about the neck and heart were particularly turgid and full; I did not open the head, if the child had breathed it must have been a very short respiration; if it had breathed at all it must have been very short.

Q. Was it possible for the lungs to be inflated to such a degree without the child having some degree of breath? - I should think not.

Q. Had not the breath which it might take in the act of delivery be sufficient to inflate the lungs? - It might most assuredly.

Q. And yet the child die instantly? - It might. I went up to the prisoner and told her that I understood there was a ribbon found about the child's neck; I wished to know of her what was the reason for applying it; she said, she applied it to bring the body of the child from her; she found herself in great pain and that it stuck at the shoulders; she was pulling for about ten minutes before she could get it away from her; the child was remarkable large and it appeared to me that she could not have got it away without some such assistance. I am not a practitioner in midwifry, here is a gentleman here who can speak better to that point, he is the man midwife to the parish; but that is my opinion of the matter.

Q. Now, Sir, supposing this story to be true, suppose the child had been some time stuck by the way, by the shoulder, before she applied the string, might not that impediment suffocate the child? - In my opinion equally so.

Q. So that the child might be suffocated in the delivery before the application of the string? - I believe it frequently happens.

- GRAVES sworn.

I am a man midwife employed by the parish; I saw the child, and a very large child it was, prodigious large over the shoulders, and when the child sticks so it stops the circulation between the mother and the child, and destroys the child ninety-nine out of an hundred.

Q. Was it likely it would be the case with this? - I have no manner of doubt.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-39

233. JAMES BOYLE was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the Devil, on the 18th of November last, on William Calland feloniously, wilfully and with malice aforethought, did make an assault and with a certain gun, value 5 s. loaded with gun powder and leaden bullets, which said gun he in both his hands there had and held to, at and against, and on the said William Calland shot off and discharged, and that he with the said leaden bullets then and there did strike, penetrate and wound the said William Calland on the left shoulder, giving to the said William Calland so shot, on the left shoulder two mortal wounds, each of the depth of three inches of the width of half an inch, of which said mortal wounds the said William Calland , from the 18th of November to the 27th of the same month, did languish and languishingly did live, on which said 27th of November the said William Calland did die .

Indicted in a second COUNT for the like murder on the Coroner's inquisition.

SARAH MILLS sworn.

I live in No. 2, Tabernacle Walk; I am a servant. On the 18th of November about five or ten minutes after nine I came out of my own house, which is the second door from Tabernacle-row ; when I came to the corner of the Row I saw the patrole before me; I went on a few yards and I heard the voice of a woman say, stop that man, he has got my bonnet; a man ran by me, I turned about to see what it was and I heard the patrole say, damn him I will shoot him; and the piece went off.

Q. How far had the man got from the patrole? - I cannot tell.

Q. Was the prisoner the patrole? - I don't know; I know it was the patrole that fired; but I don't know the prisoner to be the patrole; I saw the patrole stoop and he appeared to pick up the bonnet from the ground and gave it to the woman, and he says, Mistress, here is your bonnet, I have got the bonnet; and she said, thank you

Mr. Knowlys. This was in a place not thoroughly inhabited? - Yes, it was.

Q. It was one of the new streets? - It was.

Q. Now within half a dozen yards from where the man was shot it is all new buildings, uninhabited houses? - I cannot pretend to say that the man was shot because I did not see him shot; I did not hear the man was shot till the next morning.

Q. They are almost all uninhabited? - A great many are inhabited.

Q. Close by there are a great many uninhabited buildings? - Yes, there are.

Q. Is not there a great many robberies committed in that neighbourhood? - There is; there was a robbery committed there since then.

Court. What was the words he used? - Damn him I will shoot him; but I rather think he attempted to stop him, but in my fright I cannot say.

DANIEL JONES sworn.

I was told that this young man was shot, in consequence of this I went to Bartholomew's Hospital and there I found him; I believe he was shot on Sunday night the 18th of November, and the Tuesday following I went to him, to the best of my knowledge, and we found him in Queen's Ward, his father was with me, and his father asked him how it came to happen; he said, that he came to a new public house near Tabernacle Walk, and a woman of the town and he had some crank, gin and water; on this he said, that he was there and when he came out he heard this patrole, who is the prisoner, cry patrole; this woman went up to him and said to the patrole, this man has got my bonnet; has he? says he; then he pointed the bayonet at him, and he ran away being frightened at the bayonet; on this he said that he ran very hard; I understand that he was rather deaf of hearing; on this he said that he ran near an hundred yards before he dropped; we begged of him to tell us the truth for the physicians had told us his life was in danger and he could never recover.

Q. Was the deceased told that he was in danger? - Afterwards we told him the next day, for the physicians had told us that he was so; he said he ran away being frightened, and in about an hundred yards he dropped; in consequence of this we went to the neighbourhood to see if we could learn any thing of this transaction, at last we found one Mr. Mills and he told us he knew and had seen every thing transacted of it, and we went to the sister and she told us; on this we made particular enquiry whether there was any alarm of murder. Also the Sunday before he died he declared that was the truth that he had said to us.

Q. Did he say any thing to you about the bonnet? - He observed one time to the nurse that she threw her gown over her head when he saw the patrole and the bonnet dropped.

Mr. Knowlys. Mr. Jones what are you? - I belong to the India House.

Q. Do not you act as an attorney in this business? - I do not.

Q. Have you never represented yourself as acting in this business? - I never did.

Q. Did you attend the Coroner's inquest on this occasion? - I did.

Q. The Coroner's jury who heard all this deposition, I believe, brought it in this was justifiable and inevitable homicide on the part of the man? - We were turned down and knew nothing what was brought in; for any thing I know the jury brought him in guilty of shooting him.

Q. Do you mean to stick by this answer? have you never heard that the jury brought it in justifiable homicide? - I don't know the terms of the law in that. The prisoner was not taken up till after he was at Hounslow Heath; there were four bails against him and they never surrendered him up.

Q. On your oath did not he attend the Coroner's jury himself? - I cannot say; I never saw him but once and that was before the Lord Mayor.

Q. You never learned what was the verdict of the Coroner's jury? - I understood that they brought it in not guilty of murder, but of shooting.

Q. Did not you ever make any enquiry what the verdict was? - No, we were ordered to prefer a bill before the Grand Jury.

Q. By whom? - By different opinions of different people.

Q. You swear you was ordered to attend the Grand jury and prefer a bill of murder against him? - The father-in-law was advised to do so and I told him I would attend and give my evidence.

Q. Do you take that to be an order? - Mr. Shelton drawed out the bill or his clerk.

Q. Did any man ever order you to attend the Grand jury to prefer a bill of indictment? - We had a just right to get justice done; the prisoner was under bail of four men of forty pounds each; he was bailed before the death of the man.

Mr. Knowlys. Now we must go gently on with you? - If you please.

Q. Then they bailed him with four men in forty pounds each that he was to surrender if the man died; then he was to appear before the Coroner's Jury? - I supposed that the bail ought to bring him there.

Q. Now on your oath did not you hear that the Grand jury had acquitted him, and that therefore you advised the the father-in-law to indict him for murder? - I did not we were advised to come before the Grand jury.

Q. You was advised to that? - I had not a doubt but I should go before the Grand jury, I was compelled to it because there were subpoenas given.

Q.Did you advise the father-in-law to indict the man, yes or no, for murder? - I cannot charge my memory, it is three months ago; several of us did; I might say prefer the bill before the Grand jury.

Q. Did you or did you not, on your oath? - I might for what I know, but I think to the best of my knowledge I did not; I cannot answer.

Q. You do not think you did? - I have told you as I told you before; I cannot take on me to say; we were advised in different companies to do it.

Q. Who took out the subpoenas? - Mr. Cummins the prosecutor.

Q. How long after the Coroner's jury had sat.

Q. When did you prefer the bill for murder? - The very next sessions.

Q. When did the Coroner's jury sit? - On the 28th of November.

Q. Then you was not at all bound over to prefer a bill of indictment? how came you to tell me you was ordered to attend the Grand jury? - Ordered or not ordered we were advised.

Q. I ask you again whether you was ordered? - No further then we were advised; who could order us, we were advised but not ordered.

Q. How came you to swear that you was ordered to go before the Grand jury? then you was never ordered? - By no authority.

Court. You come here to speak to expressions, and you therefore ought to be accurate in the expressions you use; was you examined before the Coroner? - We were examined before Mr. Shelton, I think there were a few questions asked.

Q. And your examination taken down? - To the best of my knowledge Mr. Shelton might; I did not sign any thing, I believe he would not hear but very little what I had to say, because he said I was not present when the man was shot.

Q. Did you hear a man of the name of Cropwell and Black examined; they were not present when the man was shot, he heard them? - Mr. Shelton asked them who ordered them to there? and they made answer that the bail had ordered them; that they found we had

the runners to take this man up; Mr. Shelton advised the father that it would be only throwing his money away to prosecute the man.

Q. Was you present then? - I was.

Q. Why did you begin with saying you was ordered? - He was not taken up on the Coroner's inquisition at all; I did not see him there.

Q. After the Coroner had brought in their verdict you did not enquire what it was? - I was told afterwards that it was brought in guilty of shooting, but not of the murder.

Q. Did you subpoena all the witnesses that were examined before the Coroner? - We did not know of it till two hours before the jury sat.

Q. You say you was compelled by being subpoened to give in evidence before the Grand jury. Did you subpoena all the witnesses that were before the Coroner? - No, only Sarah Mills and I, and another witness; they were all subpoened but the doctor, who could not be found.

Q. Then you meant to say that the other witnesses who were examined before the Coroner, where subpoened before the Grand jury? - Yes, the two were; Mr. Cummins subpoened.

Q. Were all the witnesses subpoened? - There were several witnesses examined before the Coroner in favour of the prisoner, but not in ours.

Q. What have you to do with it; is it your cause? - No, it is Mr. Cummin's cause.

Q. Why did you make use of those words, our cause? - It is an error in judgment no doubt.

Q. Upon your oath did not you go before the Grand jury of Middlesex first, and did they not throw out the bill? - I almost undertake to say it was not drawn up

Q. Do not you know there was a bill prefered in Middlesex and thrown out? - No, I believe not on my oath, to the best of my knowledge.

Q.Did not you say at some time of the last sessions that you would give such an oath as would do that man's business? - No, I never did to my knowledge.

Q.Do you know Mr. Hedge? - No.

Q. Mr. Moody? - No.

Q Mr. Rederick? - No.

Q. Have you never said that you would give such an oath as would do that man's business? - No, never to the best of my knowledge; I might have said that I would do all my endeavour to take the prisoner, but never to say that I would do for him, to any person whatever.

Q. Have you never declared to any body that you would make such an oath as would do the prisoner's business, or words to that effect? - I will take my oath that I never said that I will do the prisoner's business, but I would do my endeavour to take him prisoner.

Court. Did you never say words to that effect? - If I was to die this moment to the best of my knowledge I never did.

Q. It is a fact which you must recollect? - I cannot, if I knew that I had said so I would acknowledge it; I positively do not think that I ever said such a word.

- GALE sworn.

I came on account of the young man, the deceased; he worked for me and boarded with me and lodged with me; I know nothing of this transaction.

Court to Sarah Mills . Did you prefer a bill of indictment at Clerkenwell? - I don't know what you mean by prefering a bill; the man's father was there to file the bill, but they would not file the bill; the man's father that was shot went with me and nobody else that I recollect.

JAMES YOUNG sworn.

I live in Whitfield-street, Tabernacle Walk, No. 19; I had been out on Sunday evening and returning home I found the deceased laying in a sad situation, near about half past nine to the best of my knowledge, he was laying at No. 4, Friendly-place, at the steps; I thought that the man really had been in liquor; I then knocked at the inhabitants door the deceased laid at, and they brought out a candle; I examined the man and I found he was speechless, for some time I could not get any thing at all out of him, so then I said to the inhabitant, it was a pity the man should lay there in that situation; I supposed the man had been in liquor and had had a fall, and hurt himself; immediately some blood came out of his stomach; I then said, to the inhabitant that lived at the house where the man then laid at the door, it was necessary that that man should be taken care of supposing he had been in liquor and hurted himself by some means, directly hereupon the gentleman at No. 3, says, do you know any watchman that will take this man away? I said, I dare say the patrole is on his duty I will go and desire him to take him; when I came into the street the patrole was crying his round as usual; I then said, Boyle, I want you, he immediately made away to me, and crossing the street he told me, master I have shot a thief; well, says I, what did you do with him, have you taken him; no, sir, says he, he has got away; says I, I have got a man that lay in a shocking situation in Friendly-place; it is about two hundred yards from where the man discharged the piece; I then said to the patrole, there is a man laying in this court perhaps it may be the man you have shot at; do you know the man? he said, no, he should not; it was a very dark night to the best of my remembrance; then I asked him where he had shot him? he said, if I have shot him at all I have shot him in the legs I believe; says I, come up along with me and we will go and look at the man's legs; I examined the man's legs and I found the blood to drop out of the band of his breeches; then the patrole asked him if he had been shot? he said, no; that was repeated twice to the best of my remembrance, and he twice denied that he was shot; in about ten minutes we asked him again; he said, O damn that person that has led me into this error; to the best of my knowledge he then asked him if he had been shot? he immediately said, O! says he, I am shot in the back; directly when we found the man was shot, the inhabitant charged the watch with him, suspecting him to be the thief; I then applied to two of the watchmen and the watchman going past took him; he did not approve of the watchman taking him, he wanted to go in some public house; says I, my friend if you want any thing to support you I will get you something; I went into a public house going past and brought him out a drop of gin, and gave it him and he drank; then in going from that public house to the watch-house he kept still in the same mind, he did not want to go to the watch-house; we went to the watch-house; I spoke to the constable of the night and when they put him in they found the wounds where over the left shoulder; then I said

[The remainder of this trial in the next part, which will be published in a few days.]

Reference Number: t17930220-39

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 20th of February, 1793, and the following Days;

Being the THIRD SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER III. PART III.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE TWO SHILLINGS.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of JAMES BOYLE .

to the constable of the night, it was proper the man should have a surgeon to examine his wounds, suppose he was a thief; the constable of the night immediately applied to a surgeon and examined the wound, then my lord I left the watch-house, and saw no more of him till two or three days afterwards, I went to the Hospital and he said, it was some boys that took off the bonnet, and he took it away from the boys.

Q. And did he say any thing about a bayonet at his breast? - No, he did not.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe this place where the patrole stood on guard is a place much infested with robbers? - There is scarce a week but there is some robbery committed.

Court. Did Jones attend the Grand jury? - He did.

Q. Was he examined? - He was.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe this place has a good many uninhabited houses about it? - It has.

Q. Of course it requires a very active patrole. This wound was not received in front it was in the back? - It was.

Q. The man was discharged by the Coroner's jury? - He was.

Q. Was it a secret at all there abouts that the Coroner's jury had acquitted the man? - This Jones stood by the side of me when the jury brought it in that the man was accessary to his own death by running from justice.

Q. Jones must have heard that? - He certainly must.

Q. Was you subpoened to attend the Grand jury? - I was not.

Q. This is nearly about the same spot on which Goodall and Mayo committed

the robbery. What is the character of the patrole, is he a malicious man? - I always found the man to be a very just dealing man; he was always very civil indeed; I actually do think he was fit to be trusted in his station.

JAMES CROPWELL sworn.

I was subpoened before the Coroner's inquest, and I gave in my testimony to the Coroner; I was along with my brother beadles; I did not take him to the Hospital, Mr. Black did; I went on the Sunday following, I asked how the deceased did? I was told he was very poorly, Mr. Black went to him first and spoke to him, and asked him how he did? he said, very ill, and asked what was the occasion he was shot? says he, I had been near an hour at Whitefield's Tabernacle; he said, that he had met with a young woman and she and he agreed to go together, after they had agreed to go together, she refused going with him; then says he, I snatched away her bonnet from her and ran away, and I ran such a way that I thought no watchman would meet with me.

Q. Mr. Cropwell are you sure that he made use of these expressions? - I am positively sure; I communicated the sentiment to the employer of him that very night.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you think any body could be ignorant that the man was acquitted by the Coroner's verdict? - I should think not.

JAMES BLACK sworn.

I am the beadle of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch. On Sunday the 18th of November last, between the hours of nine and ten I was sent for, the watchman informed me there was a man had been shot and carried to our watch-house; accordingly I attended, when I came there there was a gentleman of the name of Wilson, he had examined the man before I came and advised him with all expedition to send him to the Hospital; accordingly I did, I sent him to St. Bartholomew's; the next morning I met the houseman and the officer taking the prisoner before the justice; he said to me, the man that was shot last night is now dead. We came near Mr. Hedge's house, and I thought proper to acquaint him with the business; the man was not dead; I went to the Hospital the Sunday following and told the sister of the ward I would be glad to see Mr. Calland; she gave me a candle to go to see him, and he told me that on the Sunday before he was coming along by the Tabernacle that he met with a woman, that he snatched the bonnet off her head and run away; that the woman called out stop thief; that he was stopped by some body; with that he said, that he had passed the patrole, and the patrole said, if he did not stop that he would fire; he said, that the patrole attempted to stop him, but he got by him; soon after that the patrole fired, and that when he shot him he did not know that he had more than stunned him, and that he ran down Friendly-place, about three hundred yards from the place where he was shot; he denied telling his name; when I first sent him to the watch-house he gave me two or three different names.

- BIRD sworn.

I am a Merchant; I found the deceased at our steps; I did not hear any thing pass.

JOHN JONES sworn.

I am surgeon at St. Bartholmew's Hospital; this man was brought into the Hospital on Sunday evening, with two wounds, between eleven and twelve, there were two wounds on the back

part and they proved mortal, and he died on the ninth or tenth day afterwards.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-40

234 MARY JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a woollen cloth jacket, value 6 d. a pair of cloth trowsers, value 6 d. a linen shirt, value 6 d. a brown holland pinbefore, value 6 d. a pair of cotton stockings value 6 d. a pair of leather shoes, value 3 d. an hat, value 6 d. the goods of Thomas Vaughan .

THOMAS VAUGHAN sworn.

I lost a child and I found it again; I live at No. 35, New Street-square; the child is four years old last September.

MARY VAUGHAN sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness; I sent the child on an errand the 4th of this month, into Holborn, at half past ten o'clock Monday morning; he was four years old the 4th of last September, it is a boy; I sent him out and I never saw him nor his clothes till the Monday following, at a quarter after nine o'clock at night; I had sent the child to the Coach and Horses in Holborn for a whip for his father; he had been at the house a great number of times, he had been there twenty times by himself; the prisoner at the bar she brought him home; I did not take the child in myself, a witness that is here took the child in; I cannot repeat the words that she said when she came, but there is a person here that can; she was in my house an hour and a half; she said, that she had brought the child home, and she brought it all the way from Windsor, and she found it at the Duke's Head in Prescot street, Windsor; I had advertised the child three times and gave hand bills about; I had mentioned where to bring the child to; when the child was brought home it had on the clothes it went away in, set aside the shoes; she said, she had got a husband and child, her's was nine years of age, and this child she took from a public house to play with her child; and she said, the child told her his name and number where he lived the day she took him, but she did not know where New Street-square was, and that he told her his father was a coachman .

JOSHUA EARLY sworn.

I am an independant man; I live at Colnbrook; I happened to be drinking in a public house when this woman brought the child in last Tuesday fortnight, I think it was the 5th, between the hours of twelve and two, as near as I can say, at the Star at Colnbrook, and the prisoner brought the child in from the public tap room; I asked the woman how she came by this child? she told me it was her own child, and it had got a good father to maintain it, and the father and the child lived either at Wardage or Wallingford, which I cannot say; I looked upon it from the Tuesday to the Saturday; that I lived there, as her own child; she came on the Tuesday and I came away on the Saturday following; she lodged all the time at the woman's that keeps the public house; the person is here that kept the house; I believe the prisoner used to travel with the basket and sell divers pedlary ware, and handkerchiefs, and waistcoat pieces; during the time I used the house she behaved well to the child, used to ask the child if it was hungry, will you have some bread and butter? she used to call it Jacky and my dear.

Q. Pray what name did she go by? - I used to call her always Betty, I thought that was her name, by hearing other people call her Bet.

Q. Pray, sir, what are you? - My name is Early.

Q. How do you earn your livelihood? - I live on what I have got, I live entirely on my means.

Q. Do you follow any business at all? - I did.

Q. How lately? - Within this two months; I have been a farmer, I rented a farm under the Earl of Buccleigh; I came up to town with a view to take a yard and stable.

Q. Pray, sir, how long have you known the prisoner at the bar? - I believe it is two or three months.

Q. How long have you known her? - Upon my honour I cannot tell you.

Q. Have you known her a twelve month? - No, my lord.

Q.Where did you first know her? - At this woman's house where she first brought the child; I have only known her at this public house.

Q. Have you seen her often there? - She has been divers times.

Q. Have you seen her often there? - I have different times.

Q. Many times? - I cannot say.

Q. Twenty times? - O yes, she was with a man that she called her husband, and it was her husband; I have seen her at the house; I know no more about the woman.

Q. I suspect you do know more about the woman? - But I am sure I don't.

Q. When did you first know her using this house. How long ago? - It may be two months ago, or ten weeks; I cannot tell to a week.

Q. Had not you known her longer-ago? - No.

Q. Did you know her before you left off being a farmer? - No.

Q. When did you leave off being a farmer? - At Michaelmas.

Q. Pray what name did you use to call her? - Bet.

Q. What besides Bet? - Nothing else.

Q. Do you know her husband? - I know the man that she cohabited with, he used to go by the name Will the Blacksmith, that was what we used to call him.

Q. What is the name of the person who kept the star? - Mary Aston .

MARY ASTON sworn.

I live at the Star and Garter at Colnbrook, I know the prisoner; I have known her since last Michaelmas; she came to my house for a lodging with a man that went as her husband, and I know no otherwise; he goes by the name of Will the Blacksmith; I have known him this two years, he did lodge at my house all the two years; he left it last summer, and came again about Michaelmas, and then he brought the prisoner at the bar with him; and she continued with him as his wife. I remember the child, the prisoner at the bar brought it on last Tuesday was a fortnight, some time about noon, I was very busy in my house.

Q. Did she sleep in your house the night before? - No, I believe she had been absent a month; when the child came it had on a blue jacket and trowsers, it continued to wear these things constantly from day to day.

Q. Did the prisoner dispose or any of the things do you know? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Do you know what became of the shoes the child had on; do you know whether the child returned in the same shoes? - I heard the prisoner say she bought him a pair of shoes, she told me so.

Q. Pray did you enquire whose child it was? - I asked the prisoner if it was her's? she told me it was; I really thought it was her's, she always used the child so well, that I took it to be her's.

Q. Pray madam did you happen to hear at all of a paper importing of a child being lost? - I never see it till I was subpoened on the trial.

Q. Pray what did the child do while it continued with you? - As all other children did; sometimes it played, sometimes it sat still, it was very quiet all the time.

Q. When did the child leave you? - It was from the Tuesday to the Friday following; the prisoner went away on the Friday and took the child with her; it might be about ten o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did she ever pretend that she found the child? - No.

Q. Was the man with her during the week she was there with the child? - Yes.

Q. She never came back since she took the child away? - No.

What did the man do. What was his business? - He was a blacksmith.

Q. Pray did you examine the prisoner at the bar concerning the child? - I asked her if it was her child? she said, yes; I knew her to be a woman that travelled the country.

Q. Did it not appear to you that the child was dressed a little above the state of a blacksmith? - I did not think any thing of that; I asked her if she had brought it up? she said no; she said it had been at nurse, and it was at nurse with a coachman's wife.

Q. Did the child ever tell you where it lived? - No, nor I never asked it, because I always thought it was her's, she used it so well I could not think any otherwise.

Prisoner. I would like to know how she came up on this piece of business? - I was subpoened.

ANN COOPER sworn.

What do you know of this matter? - I was the person that took the child from the prisoner when she brought it home; I am a lodger in the house; the first time I saw the prisoner was on the 11th of this month, Monday; she said here is your child, and I have brought him all the way from Windsor; she knocked at the door, and I went down to the door; the mother of the child was up stairs; I knew the child, I said how could the child get as far as Windsor? she said it was brought to the Duke's Head at Windsor by a travelling woman, as travelled about the country; and he was at play there with a little boy of her's, at this public house; and she asked the child whether that was his mammy? and he said, that was not his mammy, for his mammy lived in New Street-square, No. 35, and she took him home with her little boy; and she said to her husband she would write to town the day after, to let the parents know where it was; her husband said she would have no call to write, for they were coming through town on the Monday following, to go to Maidstone fair, and they would bring the child with them, and see if they could find its parents, they should have him; if not they would take it along with them, where they were going; she said she lived at Windsor.

Prisoner. Did I say I lived at Windsor? - You did.

Prisoner. I did not; I said that I lived at Layton Town, in Warwickshire.

- GREEN sworn.

I am a constable of St. Bride's; I saw the prisoner the 11th of this month, Friday

night; I went to Mr. Vaughan's house where the prisoner brought the child home; I heard several questions asked the child, and where she had brought the child from; she said she brought it from Windsor; she said it was brought by a travelling woman to that house; I asked her what the reason of her taking to the child? she said she liked the child well, it was a pretty likely child; and she would wish to keep it; I told her by all means she had no right to take the child from that woman but to have left it with the person that belonged to the house; and as it was not their's they would have advertised it, and found the owner of it. Several neighbours asked several questions; Mr. Vaughan gave me charge of her, and I took her to the compter; she said that her husband was standing a the corner of the street waiting for her; we could not find him.

ELIZABETH VIZETELLY sworn

I heard the voice of a woman enquiring for the name of Vaughan, on Monday week the 11th of this month, about nine o'clock in the evening; I live in New Street-square, No. 2; I heard her say she had found the child or left it at a public house, I cannot tell which, then I thought it was the lost child found; and I went to enquire of its friends, I had heard of Mrs. Vaughan having lost her child, on the Saturday before; when I went in the prisoner was sitting down by the fire, and the child in its mother's lap; I asked the prisoner where she found the child? she told me it was left at a public house the Duke's Head at Windsor, by a travelling woman; she said she was a poor low life drunken wretch; I asked her if she knew her? she said she knew her well; I said she must know that that child was not her's, she said she knew that well, for she knew that she never had a child in her life; I asked her how then she could tell the child that its mammy was gone; for she had told me, that she said to the child your mammy is gone, when that woman went away she said the woman told her it was just come from nurse; I then took the child on my lap and asked the child who took him away? he told me that lady, pointing to the prisoner; I asked him when the lady took him? he said the first day, he is a very intelligent child, this was all in the hearing of the prisoner; I asked him where? he said he rode in a cart, I asked him with whom? he said with that lady, pointing to the prisoner; I asked him where? he said not far; the prisoner made answer and said, that he had been in no cart with her; the prisoner said that he had rode on the coach top, from Windsor that day; the child made answer and said he rode in a cart the first day; she was silent to that.

Q. Was it explained what the first day meant? - The child said he had left home a good many days; but that was the first day he rode in a cart, when he left home, he said they were measuring coals, where he strayed from; the child could not mention the name of the street, and he crossed the way, and that lady laid hold of his hand, and said she would take him to his mammy; she took him a little way, and then she put him into a cart, and that lady rode in the cart with him.

Q. What did the prisoner say to this? - She said she had rode in no cart with the child.

Q.Did she deny any other part of the story? - She said the mother had got the child, and what more did they want? she would not have brought it if she had known that there would have been that piece of work; she had taken great care of it, and washed its shirt and bought it a pair of shoes.

Court to Mrs. Vaughan. I think you told me that all the clothes were brought

back again? - Yes, there was, only the shoes.

Q. Was there any buckles in the shoes? - Yes, they were brought back.

Q. What sort of shoes were they? - The shoes were not very good, pretty much wore; the child came back with another pair of shoes which had been new, the heel pieces were wore off and his feet were so blistered he could hardly stand for three days afterwards; they had been bought new.

Prisoner. I came from where I lived in London, when I am in London; I was coming to the top of Holborn and there was a parcel of bullocks and cows running in the road, and the child was there and would cling on me whether I would or not, and he said, pray do take care of me and he would hang on me whether I would have him or no, and I took the child by the hand till all the bullocks were gone by, I loosed the child from my hand, and he said, he was going this way, and followed me all the way along Piccadilly, till I came to Hyde Park-corner, and the child would go into the public house along with me, and I gave the child some beer, there I asked him which way he was going? and he said, he was going this way, after I got through Hyde Park-corner, I stopped for the coach there, at the Hyde Park-corner, I got on the coach, I had not got to Knightsbridge before a man ran after me and said, I had left my child behind me, it was crying, the coachman stopped there and I got down from the coach again and I stopped there, and two men brought the child to me, and I did not know what to do with the child, and I told the people the child did not belong to me and they said it did, and I sat there with the child on the ground for a matter of an hour, I wanted to go to my journey's end, and I took the child along with me, just at the end of Knights-bridge I gave a man six-pence to ride in a coach to Brentford, the child would not tell me where it belonged to, and I got out of the coach at Brentford and I walked to Hounslow with the child in my hand, and the child's shoes were very ordinary, and I went and bought a new pair the next morning, and I asked it what its name was, and it said, Jackey Vaughan; and the next day I brought him down to that gentleman's house at Colnbrook; on the Thursday night I was putting the child to bed I asked the child where his mammy lived, he said, in New Street-square; I was coming to London on Monday and I thought I would bring the child then.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE

Reference Number: t17930220-41

235. WILLIAM HICKES and HENRY HALL were indicted for making an assault on the king's highway on William Reading , on the 11th of February , and putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a black silk cloak, value 2 s. a cotton shawl, value 2 s. three dimity petticoats, value 1 s. a check linen apron, value 6 d. a cradle linen quilt, value 6 d. and an horn lanthorn, value 6 d. the goods of the said William Reading .

WILLIAM READING sworn.

I am a coachman to Mr. Tootelle, Swinton-street, Battle-bridge; my wife and I had some friends to see us last Monday week and they stopped while past twelve o'clock at night, I went home with them; my wife lent them some things to go home with, it had just gone twelve o'clock when I went from Charlotta-street, I went therefrom into Islington; I went through the end

of Islington down the City Road; when I got home with them I returned and I had a lanthorn, but the wind was so very high that it went out, and I asked one of the watchmen to light my candle; after that I walked down the city Road and a little before I came to the Shepherd and Shepherdess I was met with by three men, they first passed me and then one came fast back and seized me by the collar, and the other two came back and drew their cutlasses, and took the bundle away from me; the person that laid hold of my collar took the bundle away, and gave it to William Hicks , the person that took it away appeared to me to be like a sailor and said, we must have this; he had a brown jacket on, after he took the bundle he unbuttoned my waistcoat and asked me if I had any money? after he had searched my pockets I asked him if he would shake hands with me? he said, no, I will not shake hands with you; William Hicks came up to me and said, I will shake hands with you if he will not; after I had shaked hands with him I parted from them and I went about twenty yards from them, I went back and I asked for my lanthorn, and they told me to go along about my business or they would cut me down; after that I crossed the road and went by the end of St. Luke's, and I told the watchman I had been stopped by three footpads and that they did not strike me; I went then along Old-street road, across Clerkenwell-green to Battle-bridge; I went to Swinton-street and I saw no light there, and I went to my wife, and I went and told my fellow servant in the morning that I had been stopped by three men, and that they had taken the bundle from me.

Q. Did you know these men before? - I never saw them before.

Q. At what time was it? - It was very near one; it was star light and very windy.

Q. Were the men disguised at all? - The man that came to me first had on a brown jacket, and the person that stood behind my back had a dark drab great coat, and the other person had a lighter great coat on, rather taller than he that had the jacket on.

Q. How long were they robbing you? - They might be about five minutes.

Q. Five minutes is a long while. - The first man that came was dressed in a brown jacket, he had a round hat, they all three of them drew their cutlasses, and the man that stood behind me had a round hat on with a drab great coat, the other that stood by the side of him he had on rather a lighter drab coat, they had all round hats, the person that had the light drab coat on he had his hair tied, the other person's hair was short.

Q. Was it a cloudy night? - It was rather cloudy, but it was star light.

Q. Was you alarmed? - I was; the person that was in a brown coat put his hand in my pocket.

Q. This was rather a darkish night and a late hour; was you sober? - I was very sober.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see these two men? - I saw him last Monday morning.

Q. Did you ever see him before the 11th of February? - No.

Q. Did you get any of your property found? - No, none of the property was found.

Q. Their hats was never off their faces? - Their hats were never off their faces, but I saw the person's face that shaked hands with me.

Q. You was not long shaking hands? - But when I asked the person that was in the jacket to shake hands with me, he said, no, go along or I will cut you down, make the best of your way; I observed the person's face that shaked

hands with me; I looked him full in the face; I can swear to his face.

Q. But you had never seen that face before nor for a week afterwards? - I saw it the very night that he shaked hands, and I saw it the Monday afterwards.

Q. Do you mean to say that from the mere observation you made while he was shaking hands with you enabled you to swear to his face? - I know it is the same person.

Q. Are you in place now? - Yes.

Q. Was you in place then? - I was.

Q. Who do you live with? - I live with Mr. Tootelle, in Swinton-street; I have lived with him between three or four months.

Q. You have heard there is a reward in these cases? - I never did.

Q. How long have you lived in London? - About seven or eight years; I lived between four or five years at Tottenham High Cross, and I lived at Southgate some time.

Q. Have you been a coachman all that time? - Yes.

Q. Who have you drove for the last three years? - I drove for Mr. Minett, he had a house in Old Broad-street; I never heard any thing of the kind of a reward.

Q. Have you had any conversation with Blackiter concerning a reward? - I have not, I never saw him till Monday.

Q. Did you never hear him say there was forty pounds for each of them if convicted? - I never heard any thing of that kind; I have heard of rewards if any body took any body; I never heard of any reward by any conviction of any person; I have heard of a reward offered in the papers if people were taken.

Q. You are the person that brought these people here? - I was the person that told the officer in the Old City Road the circumstance that happened to me and the next morning it was put in the papers.

Q. How came you just now to tell me that you never heard of a reward? - I did not understand you at first, I have heard of a reward as far as this, that there is a reward offered for taking of people.

Q. You can read? - I am not a very good scholar, I never understood any thing but it was for the taking of a person.

Q. None of your property has ever been found? - No, none.

Mr. Knowlys. You told us you did not see Blackiter till last Monday? - The last Monday of all.

Q. You do not misunderstand me that it was the last Monday? - I do not.

Q. Pray when were these men examined before the magistrate? - On Tuesday.

Q. You was no time in company with Blackiter at all? - When I went to Worship-street, I drove my master to Finsbury-square, and I left the coach and horses in Finsbury-square while I went to the office to see these people.

Q. How came you to know the people were taken up? - There was one of the officers came to Swinton-street, to let me know in the morning; they told me they had taken up some men and they wished me to go and look at them, and when I went on Monday morning I left the coach and horses in Finsbury-square, and I looked at the men, I saw them both; I saw them at the public house adjoining the justice's office in Worship-street.

Q. Who was with you then? - The officer was walking about the public house.

Q. How long did you stay in this public house in the company of the officer? - I was there to the best of my

knowledge ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. These men were taken up for examination that day? - They were, but I could not stop, I was afraid something would happen to my coach and horses, they were waiting in Finsbury square; they were taken on suspicion of robbing me; and when I saw them, I knew them to be the same persons that robbed me.

Q.You knew before you went before the magistrate; you had seen these men, and were told they were taken up on your account? - They were taken up on suspicion of robbing another person.

Q. Blackiter shewed you a coat, did not he? - He did.

Q.Which he told you belonged to Hicks? - He did not tell me who it belonged to, when he shewed it to me.

Q. How often did he shew it to you? - He only shewed it to me once, he brought the coat into the tap room, and he said, do you know any thing of this coat.

Q. This was Mr. Blackiter's private examination before you went before the justice to be examined? - Blackiter brought the coat to me, and asked me if I know any thing about it, I said that is the lightest coloured coat, I would not go to say any thing that was wrong.

Q. What other things did Blackiter point out to you, before you went to the justice at this private rehearsal on Monday? - Nothing else.

Q. How many other of these persons, officers as you call them, was you sitting in company with at the public house? - I was not in company with any of them, I was walking about the room, first in one room and then in another.

Q. You told my lord you never heard of a reward; you lived at South-gate some time? - I did.

Q. That is not far from Finchley Common, and Finchley Common is a very common place for robberies? - It may be so for what I know, I don't recollect any just now.

Court. Are you positive as to Hicks? - I am positive.

Q. Where you always positive? - I was positive since he shaked hands with me.

Q. Have you always said that you was positive as to Hicks? - Yes, always.

Q. Was you positive before the magistrate? - Yes.

Q. Did you swear positive? - I did.

Q. When you was examined before the justice, they took down your very words and you signed your examination; you swear that you verily believe according to the examination? what makes you more positive than you was a week ago? - The more I see that man's face the more it strikes me.

Q. You know there was a hat on his forehead? - I looked him full in the face when he shaked hands with me.

WILLIAM BLACKITER sworn.

I had an information that William Reading had been robbed; I went to a house in St. Luke's, the Golden Hind, in Allen-street, in Goswell-street; it is a house where very few people resort but thieves; I went there and I saw the two prisoners there; William Reading said he was robbed by three men; there were two men in dark coloured coats, one a little taller than the other, and one with a sailor's jacket on; but the one with the sailor's jacket on was not there; he gave me no other description than that, I knew the persons before; I took Hall to New Prison, Hicks called himself the landlord of the house, and I was in doubt about it till I went out; coming back from the prison I went and took Hicks. On Monday morning they came up for examination

before the magistrate, the servant that was robbed came to Worship-street, and he did not stay five minutes, I lost him; I did not know where he was gone to; the magistrate sent for him to come up the next day at eleven o'clock, and he came, he said before the magistrate that he had his doubts about Hall being the man; he believed that Hicks was the man that shaked hands with him.

Q. How came you to slip out that word believe? - I did not hear him say believe; he said of Hicks that that was the man.

Q. Did he sware positively to Hicks? - He swore that was the man that shaked hands with him; he declared that he had his doubts about Hall, because he stood behind the sailor. While they were at the office the justice ordered us to go and search the house, to see if we could find any goods, any thing of the robbery; Armstrong, Harper, Ray and I went and searched the house, we found these two slicks, and facing the door of the cellar in the yard, I found these three cutlashes, with about a wheel-barrow full of stuff over them.

Q. Who keeps the house? - Mrs. Lucas, she is a widow woman; her husband is in trouble for debt; this house is a common resort for thieves, and finding a man there in dark coloured clothes I took him immediately.

Q. The prosecutor did not pretend to have the least doubt in the world before the magistrate about Hicks? - No, not the least in the world.

Q. Was the examination read to him? - It was.

Mr. Knowlys. You have been in this way of business a long time, how many years? - About ten or twelve years.

Q. You have got to the New Police office now; is it your practice before persons go before the magistrate to produce every thing to them, and examine them? - Not in general.

Q. Therefore of course you produced nothing to this man, to ask his opinion about it? - I never saw the prosecutor till he came before the magistrate; I never saw till Monday.

Q. How came you first of all to say that you did not see him till he came before the magistrate? - I mean that he was at the office door, and the magistrate was not come then, and he went away again, and he was remanded on Tuesday.

Q. Mr. Blackiter be a little correct, because you know what evidence is; how came you to say that you did not see him before he came before the magistrate? - I did see him, but I said so because he did not see the magistrate at all on Monday.

Q. Now we will try a little more of you. You say then you never produced property before a person, till he appears before the justice? - No sir, I never examine before the magistrate.

Q. Nor did you in this instance? - I never saw the man before.

Q. Is that an answer to my question? then you never produced any thing before him for his opinion before the Tuesday that he was before the magistrate? - No.

Q. Then if he has sworn that you did, he has lied most abominably. - I never saw him on Monday, only he came into the public house and went out again, he told what he had lost then, and that was all that passed.

Q. Now this man had no knowledge whatever of any reward? - I never told him there was a reward.

Q. Is there any man more likely to know of a reward than a coachman driving on the road? - I don't know.

Q. Do not you know, that there is a reward of 80 l. if these two men are convicted? - Certainly.

Q. How long have you been in your situation, as a person apprehending people that committed robberies? - Ten or twelve years.

Q. How came you first of all to say that the man said he believed? - Upon my word I should be very sorry to say any thing that was not truth.

Q.Don't you know that in relating the difference between the man's believing and being positive, stands all the chance of receiving the 40 l. or not? I will have an answer. Do not you know that if the man only swears that he believes, you are not so likely to receive the reward, as if he swore positively? don't that make all the difference of the chance? - As for the reward, I would not wish to take any reward.

Q. Will you give me an answer? - Yes, I do.

Q. Why it comes from you like a drop of blood? - The man said every time he looked on Hicks, he knew him more and more.

Court. Had you any conversation with the prosecutor on Monday? - I asked him if he had been robbed on Monday? and he said yes, but I did not even ask the prosecutor what he lost on Monday; it was not the prosecutor that gave the information.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Worship-street, I know nothing about the robbery; I was only at the apprehending of the men.

Q. What was their description? - I did not know their description before I went.

William Hicks GUILTY . Death . (Aged 23.)

Henry Hall. Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-42

236. CHARLOTTE BARTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a cotton gown, value 6 s. the goods of Jane Price , widow .

JANE PRICE sworn.

I am a widow, a chair woman ; I live at No. 4, Gardener's-lane, Duke-street, Westminster ; I have known the child the prisoner a great while; it was the 26th of January, she came into the room, I was not there, and took the gown out; a person, a lodger, called out to me and said somebody had been in and taken the gown away; the girl did not live in the same house, she has got a father, her mother is dead lately; her mother lived lower down in the same lane. It was found out the gown was pawned for 3 s. a person went to the pawnbroker's and enquired for such a thing, the person is not here she was obliged to go away down to Chatham; I left the room between eight and nine, and I missed my gown just afterwards; I was not gone five minutes before the gown was missed; I missed it before nine.

Q. How many lodgers are there in the house? - There are five besides myself, the key was left in the door, somebody went and took the gown out, who that person is I do not know; it was pledged in her name.

WILLIAM BLACK sworn

I am a pawnbroker, I live at Mr. Wright's, Westminster; on Saturday the 26th of January, the child brought the gown to me about nine o'clock in the morning, the child wanted four shillings, I asked her where she brought it from? she said from her mother; I supposed it was a child of one Walker who uses our house, and she said she lived in Petty France, where that woman lived; I lent her three shillings on it; I am perfectly convinced that is the girl; I knew it was

the girl immediately as she was brought into the shop again the same afternoon; the gown is here. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prosecutor. I have known the father, and I have known the mother; the mother is dead now, the father works in Charles-street carrying out coals, the mother I don't know much about.

WILLIAM WEBB sworn.

I am a butcher; I live in Mint-street, in the Borough; the prisoner is my sister's own child, the mother I have been to bury this evening, the child has been lost intirely for want of friends; I never heard where the child was till this evening, her father never took care of her; she has been I understand in Tothill-fields for above a month, and her father would never let me know where she was; I will take care of her if she is spared this time.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-43

237. EDWARD STONE and ANN SOMERVILLE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Borton , and James Houghton about the hour of seven in the night, on the 18th of January , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, a pair of pistols, value 20 s. three muslin neckcloths, value 3 s. two silver table spoons, value 20 s. six silver tea spoons, value 12 s. a silver marrow spoon, value 20 s. nine muslin handkerchiefs, value 18 s. four linen shirts, value 10 s. three pair of silk hose, value 15 s. &c. the goods of James Borton . A cloth great coat, value 10 s. a pen-knife, value 3 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 20 s. eight linen shirts, value 60 s. three pair of silk hose, value 20 s. three muslin half handkerchiefs, value 6 s. &c. the goods of James Borton .

Indicted in a second COUNT for the same burglary, laying it to be in the dwelling house of James Borton only.

(The Case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JAMES BORTON sworn.

I and Mr. Houghton have chambers jointly; his name is James Houghton , I am the responsible person, and Mr. Houghton lives with me; our sleeping place was in these chambers On Friday the 18th of January we left them about six o'clock, I saw the doors fastened, I did not absolutely lock it myself, but I felt, and it was fastened, I left them perfectly secure; I believe, as near as I can guess, about five minutes past six, we had light candles, we light candles about half after four when we dined, it was dark then out of doors.

Q. When did you hear that the robbery had been committed? - About half after seven, we received intelligence of the laundress; in consequence of which information, we immediately both of us went to the chambers with the laundress, we found them in a very great state of confusion and disorder, there were two trunks drawn out of the bed room into the sitting room, with the locks absolutely forced up from the bottom, we had left them, one in the passage just by the outer door and the other was in the bed room; the locks were forced underneath and wrenched off, and the lock itself was torn from the wood, and left on one side of the trunk; my trunk was nearly emptied of every thing, but some letters, and some papers, that trunk was left in the passage, I lost all the things mentioned

in the indictment; I attended at Bow-street afterwards, I saw Stone in custody on Friday the 4th of February, all he said before the magistrate was taken in writing. The lock of the outer door was found in a perfect state, there was the mark of some instrument at the dressing room window, as if it had been forced up; the window looks into the garden in Clement's Inn, it is the ground floor, the mark was on the outside of the window, but whether it was done at that time or before I cannot pretend to say.

Mr. Peat. You went out about six, who was with you? - A gentleman, a stranger was with me and Mr. Houghton, we all went out together.

Q. You say you observed that the door was fastened, how do you mean? - I said to the gentleman, Gardiner, will you lock the door, he did, and I put my finger into the key hole to see if it was fast, and it was.

Q.As to this mark in the window was the sash fastened down with any thing? - It is commonly fastened with a bolt, but whether it was bolted then or not I don't know.

Q. Had the other gentleman a key? - No, we both had one, and the laundress had one.

Court. Can you say what the value of the articles were? - According to the value I have laid them in the indictment, they are six pounds, and they are laid very much under their real value.

JAMES HOUGHTON sworn.

I left the chambers with the other gentlemen, I lost all the things mentioned in the indictment and several more things.

Mr. Peat. You did not return to the the chambers before you saw the laundress? - I did not.

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE sworn.

I am laundress to the last gentlemen, that stood up here, I went to the chambers about a quarter after seven in the evening; I opened the door, and I found two mould candles burning, and there were two trunks broke open, and the locks were wrenched with great violence; I went into the dining room or sitting room, and said gentlemen are you in? after that I went into the bed room, and I found the candle burning there, and there was a pair of leather breeches very near, and if I had not gone as soon as I did the breeches would have been on fire by the light of the candle; I went out of the bed room to the gentlemen, to the office in Carey-street, No. 3, I called the gentlemen out and they came with me; it is Mr. Miller's office, the gentlemen were there both of them, we came to the chambers and found they were robbed, they took Mr. Gardiner with them to the chambers, and I went with them; I found then that the things were gone, and the dressing room window about that high up.

Mr Peat. The dressing room window you found it up? - I did.

Court. Did there appear to be any marks of violence about that window? - I did not look then, nor since; there was a tea cup at the side of the window, and a pair of trowsers and a brush, and the tea cup was thrown down to the floor and it was not broke.

Q. Did you observe whether there was the marks of any feet, or any thing of that kind, what sort of ground is that that is underneath it? - It is a flag pavement, not soft ground.

Mr. Peat. Had you been in the chambers before that day? - I left the chambers about half after five o'clock the window was down then when I left it.

Court. When you left it at half after five, and when you returned afterwards did you find the trunks in the same place or were they all changed? - They were all taken out of their place.

Mr. Peat. You are sure all the windows were down when you left the chambers? - I am very certain of it.

Q. Was you in the bed room at all before you left the chambers that day? - I was.

Q. Did you take notice of the situation of the trunks before you left the chamber? - I took notice that one trunk was in the passage and the other was in the bed chamber.

GEORGE DOBREE sworn.

I am a pawnbroke, I produce a pair of pistols; I have kept them from the time they were pawned, ever since; I received them of Edward Stone the man at the bar; the 31st of January, Thursday; he asked a price for them, and I asked him whose they were; he said he had the mould of them at home; he said he bought the pistols and the key, he did not say any thing more; I know the man perfectly well, I do not recollect ever seeing him before.

Court. Had you ever seen him before? - I know him by his face, he is the man that pledged the pistols; he called again the 11th of February, he was then in custody, before that I saw an advertisment from Bow-street, the 2d of February I saw an advertisement describing these pistols; I took them to Bow-street, and took them to this gentleman's lodgings, and shewed them him; on Monday the 4th of February, he came with the ticket to redeem them, he laid the ticket down on the counter, and I immediately sent for the constable, and he was taken.

Mr. Peat. You took in the pistols you say? - Yes.

Q. You had never seen this prisoner Stone before? - No, not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you ever see him after that till he came to redeem them? - No, not that I know of.

Q. These tickets go into the hands of many persons, any person may come for the things that have the ticket? - Yes.

Q. You have little partitions and apartments in your shop, where people stand behind the shutters? - He did not happen to be in one of these; he was in the open part of the shop at day light.

Q. You stated that those pistols have been in your custody; I presume they were laid by in the shop? - No more than being in the shop.

Q. Every body had access to them as well as you? - Yes.

Q. It sometimes happens that tickets are mislaid and affixed to other goods than those they belong to? - That is impossible, the ticket is on them, and he came for them; I can swear they are the pistols that was pawned; I never saw a pair like them in my life; I have seen a thousand pairs.

Prosecutor's Counsel. In what name did he pawn them in? - Edward Stone .

Q. Have you any doubt about his person? - I have not.

Court. When he came for the pistols did you produce them? - I did not.

Q. Had you any in the house at that time? - Yes, a hundred pairs; but these pistols are rifled all the way down, you hardly see one pair that is so in five thousand.

EDWARD TREDWAY sworn.

I produce a penknife, I got it in the lodgings of Mrs. Somerville, and I found these three large keys in a chest in her lodging room, No. 5, Short's Gardens, St. Giles's, I found them on Monday the 3th of February; Chamberlain the other constable had got Stone in custody at Bow-street; he said the prisoner told him where he got the pistols from, and he did not know whether he had a right to go and search the lodgings; I went with him to the lodgings of Mrs. Somerville, she was in the room, and an old woman that is her mother, I found the penknife

in a box; she told me her husband was out at work; her husband was out I have never seen him, he is a journeyman carpenter; she was looking in the box sorting some things out; I brought every thing away, which the other constable has got, and what led to the discovery, was the boots with Mr. Borton's name inside; I found a great coat, and two or three shirts, and I believe a couple of waistcoats.

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN sworn.

I produce a pair of boots, &c.

(The pistols deposed to by Mr. James Borton , as having the maker's name on them and the pistols being made for him on purpose, with the riffle barrels all through, and have them for a twelve month; and having such bags for them as there were found in.

Prisoner Stone. I borrowed these pistols to make some money upon them of this woman.

Edward Stone GUILTY .

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. but not of the burglary.

Transported for seven years .

Ann Somerville Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-44

238. ANN SOMERVILLE was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Sheldon , Esq . about the hour of nine in the night of the 18th of January , and burglariously stealing therein, four silver candlesticks, value 10 l. a silver wax paper box, value 10 s. a travelling knife, the handle made of silver, value 10 s. a silver fork, value 10 s. a silver table spoon, value 10 s. two carving knives, the handles made of silver, value 5 s. two carving forks, ditto, value 5 s. twelve silver handled knives and fork, value 10 l. twelve silver tea spoons, value 12 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s a silver ink stand, value 5 l. four silver tops for glass ink stands, value 4 s a silver pencil case, value 4 s. a gold stock buckle, value 2 l. three pair of shoe buckles, value 1 l. nine pair of lace ruffles, value 1 l. six silk handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 5 s. &c. the goods of the said William Sheldon .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-45

239. JAMES YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of John Nott , privately from his person ,

JOHN NOTT sworn.

I live at Chatham in Kent. On the 4th of February I was journeying from Chatham to Bow, I came to London in a single horse chaise, and from thence I walked to Bow, in going through Whitechapel , somewhat lower than the church, a person came after me and told me my pocket was picked (I believe he is not here) of a silk handkerchief, and desired me to step back; with some hesitation I went back.

Q. What was your reason for hesitation? - I felt and found my handkerchief gone; my reason was, I was going to attend a funeral of my father at the same time. His was the side of the way opposite the church; when I got back some person was got at the other side of the way in the charge of an officer; I was directed across to him and went with them to the Rotation office near

that spot a silk handkerchief was there produced of the same kind I lost, it was in the hand of an officer, his name is Callow I believe, it had not any private mark by which I could swear to it, the magistrate thought the evidence sufficiently strong to commit the prisoner, and bound me over to prosecute.

Q. Can you tell how long you had your handkerchief before this alarm was given? - I had it about my neck on my journey, at the inn, I took it off and put it in my pocket, the Queen's Head inn in the Borough, a considerable way from this place.

ROBERT CALLOW sworn.

I am an officer. The 4th of February, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner was brought home to my house in Whitechapel by a gentleman in court, Mr. Muston; and the prosecutor was sent for and brought into my house likewise.

Court to Nott. I understood you was called over the way; did you go into the house? - I cannot be positive.

Callow. I asked him if that handkerchief was his? he said, yes; the gentleman brought in the prisoner and the handkerchief, the prosecutor said, it was his; I took the prisoner before the magistrate directly; Mr. Nott at first declined to go, he wanted to go and bury his father, but he did go and the prisoner was committed, and the magistrate made him put the two first letters of his name on the corner of the handkerchief; the prisoner begged to go for an East India soldier, or any where the magistrate would send him. He was an old offender.

JAMES MUSTON sworn.

I was standing against my own door, No. 37, Whitechapel, and I saw Mr. Nott and the prisoner were going past the door, the prisoner had his hand in the gentleman's pocket; Mr. Nott was going first, and the prisoner, I saw, had his hand in Mr. Nott's pocket more than four or five times, and I followed him whilst I saw him take the property from Mr. Nott, I saw him take a silk handkerchief out of his pocket of his right hand side, and after I saw him take it out, the gentleman was passing on, and I got another man, who saw him as well as myself, to run after Mr. Nott to give him information, and I went after the prisoner, the prisoner was going down Great Garden-street, about twenty or thirty yards from where he took the handkerchief, he had turned down the street; just as I came up he was pulling the handkerchief out of his breast of his coat and waistcoat to look at what property he had got.

Q. Did you observe at the time he took the handkerchief away where he put it? - I saw him putting it there; and when I went up to him he was looking at the property, and I laid hold of his arm and told him he must go along with me; he then resigned the property to me, and I took him to Mr. Callow the officer's, and from there we went to the magistrate; I have no doubt at all but the prisoner, I apprehended, was the person that I saw take the handkerchief from Mr. Nott's pocket; I saw him trying at his pocket more than five or six times, and curiosity led me to see what would be the end of it.

(The handkerchief produced and deposed to by Mr. Nott, as the same handkerchief that was produced at the office, and exactly the same as the one he lost.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, but only I found it going down whitechapel road.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately .

(Aged 16.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-46

240. ANN HEATHCOAT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a child's bath beaver great coat, value 2 s. a muslin neckcloth, value 1 s. a child's dimity petticoat, value 1 s. two pair of childrens stays, value 4 s. two childrens cotton frocks, value 2 s. a linen counterpane, value 1 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. two cotton shawls, value 2 s. a printed folio bound book, entitled, Allen's exposition on the bible, value 1 s. a linen table cloth, value 1 s. two linen shift bodies, value 2 s. the goods of James Griffiths .

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn.

I was absent at the time of the robbery; I serve the honourable East India company as one of their surveyor s; I live at No. 35, Mulberry-street ; I had been absent and I came home on the 15th of January, and I found my children stripped of all their property, their clothes, nothing left but what they had on their backs; this prisoner was working in the neighbourhood backwards and forwards at several houses, and she came and cut out some little things for my children; accordingly when I left my family, I says to Mrs. Heathcoat, I wish you would take the superintendance of my family during my absence; this was the 29th of November; accordingly I left for my family's support a guinea and a half, and two guineas was paid on the 12th of December, and three guineas more on the 7th of of January, eight days before my return from the Downs; she had nothing to pay for butchers meat nor coals; upon my return the money was all expended, six guineas and a half; and I asked, I believe on the 18th, what she had done with my property? and missing the key of my chest and the key of my parlour door; she told me they were lost, but she could find them; but not finding my keys I broke open my chest, and found the chest was totally gutted, every thing was taken out; and from my parlour was taken out a claw table; I missed every article mentioned in the indictment and a great many more; on this she says, Mr. Heathcoat, my husband, will be at home in a day or two, indulge me till Sunday or Monday; I had left her in the possession of my house; I never saw her husband; I took her into custody on Monday the 21st from some circumstances which gave me a suspicion of her; when she was examined the first time I asked her what she had done with my things? she told me she was very sorry for what she had done; and produced me these duplicates which are in my possession, which I believe is fifty of them; the duplicates answer to my property most of them; the justice desired that my children might be brought into court; one is fifteen and the other is thirteen.

THOMAS ROLFE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce two frocks and a pair of stays; they were brought by the daughter of the prosecutor, not by the prisoner; the children of the

parties used to bring things backwards and forwards to the shop; I knew nothing of the prisoner till I saw her at the magistrates.

Q. What was the name in which the things were pledged? - In the name of Hannah Griffiths .

Q. Pray who did the children tell you Hannah Griffiths was? - The mother.

Q.How old are the children? - Between fourteen and sixteen, as I understand by Mr. Griffiths.

Q. I desire you will refresh your memory a little; you say the children only came to you; I desire to know again whether the children always came to you alone? - I don't recollect any thing of the prisoner at all.

Q. Will you swear upon your oath that you never saw the prisoner in your shop? - I cannot charge my memory with it.

Q What do you think about it? - All I know of the prisoner is when she was before the magistrate.

Q. I don't want to know what passed before the magistrate. Did you ever see the prisoner at your house? - I can venture to swear I did not to my knowledge.

Q. How long have you known her? - I never saw her before I saw her at the magistrates to my knowledge; I don't recollect ever seeing her before.

Q. In your deposition you say you did not clearly recollect; that gives me some suspicion that you had some recollection; I desire you therefore to refresh your recollection and tell me on your oath whether you can tell me that you recollect or not? - I don't recollect on my oath; I knew nothing of the prisoner at all, or else I should be very happy to speak to her.

Q. Did you know the children? - I did.

Q. Did you know whose children they were? - I did not.

Q. Did they tell you where they lived? - They did, in Whitechapel.

Q. How far away from you? - Close by.

How many things might they pawn with you in this way? - There are four articles remaining.

Q. How many might they pawn in all from the first to the last? - I cannot tell; they did not use the house long; I asked them the reason why the mother did not come? the answer was the mother was ill and could not come.

Q. Now Mr. Rolfe there is only another question, which is, that these people living in the neighbourhood, and all these things being brought by these children, why you did not take the trouble to go down to the parents house to see whether all they said was true? - I did not.

Q. I only ask you the other question, why? - The reason was because I asked them why the mother did not come? they said, the mother was ill and could not come.

Q. How long were they in the course of pledging property? - It might be two months.

Q. Then they were pledging things at different times for near two months and yet you would not step to a neighbour to enquire about this circumstance? - I did not step to be sure.

JONATHAN MURRAY sworn.

I live in Whitechapel; I am a pawnbroker; I produce a book and a counterpane, and several other things.

Q. Is there any thing that you can speak to brought at any particular time? look at the prisoner at the bar; did you ever see her? - Yes, on the 24th of December she pawned a counterpane with us; I have it here, she brought it herself.

Q. Did you enquire whose it was? - I did; she said, it was her own property.

Q. Pray was any body with the prisoner when she brought the counterpane? - Not at the time she brought the counterpane; she pawned it for 2 s. 6 d.

Prisoner. When I carried in the counterpane the daughter was with me. - The daughter was not in the shop at the time.

Court. Can you recollect and be sure there was no other person with the prisoner at that time? - There was no other people in the shop with her.

Prisoner. There were several people in the shop and the daughter was with me.

Court. Was there many people in the shop at the time? - There were more people.

Q. Pray how old were the daughters of the prosecutor Griffiths? - About fourteen years of age; they have frequently come with the prisoner when she has brought things at other times; she pawned it in the name of Ann Walton . (Produced and deposed to by Mr. Griffiths, by a rent in the middle done in calendering of it; he have seen it a hundred times, and had had it in his house many years.)

Court to Mr. Griffiths. Was you at home on the 24th of December? - I left home on the 29th of November, and did not return till the 15th of January.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar living in your house on the 24th of December? - She was; I left her in charge of my family during my absence.

Q. Pray did you at all mention this counterpane or had any conversation about the counterpane with the prisoner? - I never spoke to her about that article, for that article was left in a chest, and I left the key at home, that was one of the keys that were lost; when I left home that counterpane was in that chest.

Q. Did you just before you left your house see this counterpane? - I did; I had some papers that was in the trunk, and before I left home I went to the trunk and put them together, and this counterpane was there then, and when I examined the chest when I returned it was gone; I also lost a paper which entitles me to will 50 l. to whom I please, from a benefit society.

Prisoner. When Mr. Griffiths went out of town he left me in charge of the children; with that my husband left money to pay a bill that was owing, I imprudently lent the money; I asked the children for something to make up the money; they gave me leave; I did nothing without the childrens consent, and if Mr. Griffiths had given me a few days longer I should have replaced every thing; I have had the money since and that the children know; I beg you would examine them; the eldest took all the things out of the chest and gave them to me.

SARAH GRIFFITHS .

Q. How old are you? - Sixteen in August.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - Yes.

Court to Prisoner. Now prisoner I do not chuse to put any question to this child but what you shall dictate.

Prisoner. Ask her whether I ever opened the chest and took any thing out? - No, I never saw her.

Q. Whether I ever took any thing out without her leave during her father's absence? - Yes, once.

FRANCIS GRIFFITHS sworn.

Prisoner. I have only to ask her what I asked the sister.

Court to Mr. Griffiths. In consequence of a question that the prisoner has desired to put to these children; I must put to you a question; did you put these things in the care of the children, or in the care of the prisoner? - In the care of the prisoner.

Q. Who had the key of that chest? - The key of the chest I left with my daughter Sarah; but when I came home I enquired for it of the prisoner; she told me it was lost, but every thing was safe in that chest; and she said that Sally Griffiths had lent it to that child that is now in the prisoner's arms, and it was lost that way.

GUILTY of stealing the counterpane only

Imprisoned two years in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-47

241. WILLIAM HITCHINS and ELIZABETH HITCHINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January a four post bedstead with cotton tester headcloth, curtains and valance, value 1 l. a press bedstead, value 10 s. two feather beds, value 4 l. two bolsters, value 2 s. mahogany bureau, value 1 l. mahogany drawers, value 12 s. six mahogany chairs with horse hair bottoms, value 1 l. 16 s. six other chairs value 6 s. two pictures, value 2 s. two prints, value 2 s. two elbow chairs, with horse hair seats value 10 s. a looking glass, value 6 s. another looking glass, value 15 s. a mahogany night stool, value 4 s. three mahogany tables, value 1 l. a large Kidderminster carpet, value 8 s. two bedside carpets, value 2 s. two iron stoves, value 10 s. two iron shovels, value 1 s. a pair of iron tongs, value 4 s. two iron pokers, value 1 s. an iron fender, value 3 s. two woollen blankets, value 10 s. one rug, value 2 s. a mahogany side board value 1 s. 6 d. a watch, value 1 l. a cotton window curtain, value 3 s. six china plates, value 2 s. a mahogany tray, value 2 s. a wooden tea tray, value 1 s. a picture, value 2 s. three canvas window blinds, value 1 s. a picture, value 2 s. a canvas window blind, value 1 s. a linen curtain, value 1 s. three pair of linen sheets, value 13 s. six linen towels, value 2 s. four linen table cloths value 2 s. the goods of Hannah Fisher , widow , in the dwelling house of Benjamin Lay .

HANNAH FISHER sworn.

I live in - street, I keep a house in this street; I have a house to myself; I let lodgings; I paid the rent of the house at that time, it is No. 6.

Q. What have you to say to the loss of this inventory of furniture? - I could wish to have it back again.

Q. What have you to say? tell your story? - They had no right to steal it.

Q. Give what evidence you have of the fact of stealing of it? - They took them away by night in a cart.

Q. What night was it you lost your furniture, or any part of it? - I forgot the day of the month.

Q. What month was it? how long ago? - I really forget how long it is ago, a month or six weeks; Mr. Hitchins came with a cart and took all the property away; I was ill in bed.

Q. How do you know it was Hitchins came with a cart? - I was informed so afterwards.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners? - They were in my room and took my bed and all the furniture out of the room early in the morning.

Q. Who came into the room? - The beadle, the constable and Mr. Hitchins whilst I was in bed, they forced the door of my room, they said, they came to take my goods out.

Q. What did they tell you they took your goods for? - To go into the cart to the broker's.

Q. Did they tell you why? - They did not.

Q. Did you ask them why? - I did; they said, they were going to sell them; they said, it was their property.

Q. How had they become their property? - Not by my orders.

Q. Did you ask them how they became their property? - I cannot recollect I did; I know they were my property.

Q. Do you know what their claim was? - I do not; I had no notion what foundation there was for any pretence or claim of theirs to the property of the goods, they had no right to them at all.

Q. Did you know Hitchins? - Yes.

Q. What was Hitchins? - He is an hair dresser.

Q. Where did he live at this time? - In the same house.

Q. How long had he lived in this house? - Several years, ten or a dozen.

Q. Before this forcing of your door by the beadle, constable and Hitchins, you had no notion of any claim set up by Hitchins to these goods you call your's? - No, I never had; they had no right to them.

Q. Well now what did they do after having come for these goods? - The things where all moved out, soon afterwards they obliged me to get up and took the bed and every thing, they took down the bedstead and furniture, they moved them all away in a cart; I saw them go out, I was up in my room and saw them take them down stairs; they took all the things at one time; the cart came but once.

Q. Did they take any thing more than the bedstead and furniture? - They took the sheets, blankets and every thing, they carried away all the articles mentioned in the indictment and many more besides, furniture, china and articles of that description.

Q. Where was the watch taken from? - From me.

Q. From your person? - Out of the house.

Q. How do you know they took the watch? - I think it was taken out of the parlour; Mr. Hitchins had it from me and I never had it back again, some months back; I don't rightly recollect when; it was not at this time, but all the other articles were carried away at that time by Hitchins, some went before in trunks and boxes before the cart came.

Q. When did this other part go? - Some days before.

Q. Who came then? - Nobody particularly came then; Mr. Hitchins took them away himself.

Q. What did he take away? - A table cloth, and towels, and china and glass

Q. What did he say? - He claimed them as his property, but I knew they were mine.

Q. Under what pretence did he claim them? - I don't rightly know.

Q. Then he never told you how he claimed them? - No.

Q. Now this having happened some days before and you knowing he had no claim or pretence of claim, how came you to take no steps against him relating to these things? - I did as far as I could; I kept myself locked in my room.

Q. Why not go to a magistrate on that subject? - I had no thought to go.

Q. How came you to have no thoughts of it if he had taken them without the least colour of a claim? - Some days before they came and swept the house.

Q. How came you to submit to that? I was very ill in bed.

Q. No thought of going to a magistrate? Hitchins continued to live in the house? - Not full and wholly, he was away some times several nights.

Q. Did he continue in the house after he took these things first? - He did; he came there and had lodging, he sleeped there now and then, when he thought proper.

Q. Did you use endeavours to prevent all this? it took up a great deal of time I suppose loading the cart with this furniture of every description? - They had a constable with them.

Q. Why did not you indict the constable? had you no idea why the constable and beadle came? - They were in the house the best part of the night, but I did not know that till the morning, they were partly packed up in the evening, so that the noise was not so much heard.

Q. Did not you know that evening what they were about? - Why I thought that they were going to move the things away.

Q. Did not you know what they came for the evening before? - I did not, I had some suspicion.

Q. Who lived in the house besides you? - No lodgers but them at that time.

Q. How long ago might this be? - About six weeks or better, they were there in the evening and they were packing up the things all night.

Q. Did you see the cart go away? - I did.

Q. It only came once? - They carried some things in their hands.

Q. And you never in any way applied to your neighbours to have this stopped? - They kept me a prisoner up stairs; I was kept a prisoner in the room.

Q. When was you a prisoner there? - A week, I believe.

Q. Before or after? - Before.

Q. By whom was you kept a week a prisoner in this room before this? - By Mr. Hitchins and that woman; I was not suffered to come down stairs or to have any body come up to speak to me, almost starved to death whilst I was there; they did not lock me in, but I durst not go down.

Q. How came you not to dare to go down stairs at that time? - They threatened to turn me out into the street, and I thought I had better stay where I was.

Q. What were they to turn you out in the street for? - I don't know; it was their intention to do it

Q. How long did you stay in this manner up stairs? - A fortnight, I think.

Q. Pray how long had you been possessed of this property, these goods and things? - Ten or eleven years.

Q. Do you know what became of them afterwards? - I got some of them again afterwards.

Q. When? - I cannot recollect the day of the month, about a fortnight since

Q. What did you do immediately? - I do not rightly recollect; immediately I went to the justice to get the property back again, I cannot recollect what day; it was not that day; I don't know how many days after.

Q.Can you give any reason for not going or sending immediately after this robbery? - No.

Q. Do you know what is become of the remainder of your things; you say you have got some of them back again? - I got them from the place where they where carried to from Mr

Hitchins's lodgings; I went there with a search warrant.

Q. You swear you don't know the claim that he set up? - I don't rightly understand you; I had not at this time any idea of his claim to the goods; he had no right to them; I had no notion of his claim.

Prisoner's Counsel. Mrs Fisher, how long have you gone by the name of Fisher? - That is my name.

Q. Any other name lately? - Some people have called me Hitchins,

Q You have called yourself perhaps Mrs. Hitchins? - I don't know.

Q. Upon your oath have you not? - I believe I have.

Q. What did you mean by saying no, the very moment before? - How long have you gone by the name of Hitchins? - Seven or eight years.

Q.How long before you thought proper to take this young man up was he married? - I don't know.

Q.Was it a fortnight or three weeks you knew he was married? - I never knew that he was married.

Q Upon your oath have you not heard that he was married? - I have heard it, but I did not know that it was true.

Q. How long? - About a fortnight before the taking up.

Q. Your husband died about ten or twelve years ago? - He did.

Q. Was this house furnished at that time? - It was part of it.

Q. Did your husband die insolvent? who paid his debts? - There were very few debts to pay.

Q Was there not a distress on your goods and furniture immediately after he died? - Soon after.

Q. What was the whole property sold at? - I really forget.

Q. On your oath was it one farthing more than 12 l. will you swear it was more? - I will not swear it was.

Q. Who has maintained you for this last ten years, and your family and children? - A journeyman and Mr. Hitchins together; he carried on the business of a hair dresser, his trade.

Q. Who paid for the maintenance and support of the family? - The customers found money.

Q. Who was the master of the shop? - I was the mistress, there was no master.

Q. Who paid the rent of the house for the last nine years? - I paid it sometimes.

Q. Who gave you the money? - I received it of my customers.

Q. Pray what part of the house did you sleep in immediately after your husband's death? - The top of the house, two pair of stairs.

Q. Any body else sleep there? - The children.

Q Nobody else? - Not at that time.

Q I am not asking you on the night of your husband's death. Did not you go to that young man and fetch him back immediately on your husband's death? - Not immediately.

Q. How soon? - Two months afterwards I sent for him to come and take care of the business.

Q. Why this furniture it is worth about 200 l. I understand? - No, sir.

Q. How much less? will you give me the name of any one person living that you ever bought any one of these articles of? - I trusted Mr. Hitchins to buy for me; he had the money that he earned.

Q. Who fitted your son out to America? - Mr. Townsend, who took him.

Q. Did you go by the name of Hitchins then? - Not at the time my son went to America.

Q. How soon afterwards? how was this linen marked that you have spoken

of? - Some was W. H. H. and some of it was marked otherwise T. H. F.

Q. Is any of it here that is marked T. H. F? - Not that I know; I don't rightly understand you.

Q. I ask you how the linen was marked that was taken off? - Some was marked with both of these marks.

Q. Of whom did you ever purchase any of this table linen? - I bought some at one place and some at another.

Q. State me the name of any man that you bought any one article of? - I bought some at the corner of Arundell-street, in Coventry-street.

Q. Was there any part of this furniture that you had in the life time of your husband? - Part of them was.

Q. Was there any part of this furniture in the inventory at the time the distress was made? - That four post bedstead belonged to me the four post bedstead that was taken away was bought with my father's money about four years ago.

Q. You went by the name of Hitchins then? - I did, and Mr. Hitchins was at the transaction when it was bought.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-48

242. JOHN CURTIS was indicted for not having the fear of God before his eyes on the 28th of March , in and upon Sarah Tipple , spinster , violently did make an assault, and then and there the said Sarah Tipple violently and feloniously did Ravish and carnally know .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

SARAH TIPPLE sworn. I am a single woman, I go to service; at the time of this assault I lived servant with Mr. Curtis; I lived with him three weeks; I am nineteen next August.

Mr. Curtis is a publican , he keeps the Robinhood and Little John in Bishopsgate-street . I came up to London on Saturday; I came from Wyndham in Norfolk; I went to my place to Mr. Curtis's on Monday, this affair happen on tuesday. I was up three pair of stairs making of the beds, and my master came up stairs and bolted the door, he insisted violence upon me immediately.

Q. You must explain - He entered my body; he took and threw me on to the bed, and I called for assistance; I skrieked out once, and he put his hand and cramed the sheets into my mouth; as soon as he came into the room he bolted the door; he never spoke to me at all; he threw me on the bed without speaking to me; he put his private parts into mine.

Q. What passed then, did you make any resistance? - Yes.

Q How did he manage to keep you down on the bed, did you resist? - He forced me down, and he laid on me in such a manner that I could not get away

Q. Had you stays on? - I had a pair of stays on.

Q. Did you make all the resistance in your power? consider one hand was engaged at your mouth? - I resisted as much as I could.

Q. Did you try to do him any injury? - Yes, all that lay in my power. I could not get away at any rate in the world

Q. What past after he put his private parts into your's? How long might he be in that situation? How did he force himself on you? Did you see him take down his breeches? - He did that after he put his hand to my mouth, and then he forced his private parts into mine, and something warm came from him.

Q. During this time could not you make any resistance? - He put the sheet into my mouth and I could not, I had done all that lay in my power.

Q. How long do you conceive he remained in that situation on your body? - Five minutes; after this was over he went out immediately and went and brought up some water; I was almost dead, and he brought up some water for me to drink.

Q. Did he bring this immediately? - Yes, I was very ill.

Q. Had you fainted? - Yes.

Q Do you mean to swear that? - Yes.

Q. Can you tell at all when you fainted? Was it when he first made the attack on you? - It was when he got away.

Q. Then till he did get away you was sensible of all that passed? - I was, I don't remember his coming up stairs the second time till he put the water in my mouth, after that he went down stairs and I lay about a couple of hours on the bed before I was able to go down stairs.

Q. You do not mean that you was totally void of strength, that you could not get out of the bed? - I was too ill, I could not get up, I attempted it many times.

Q. What was your complaint? - I felt myself so ill I could not get up; I was there about three weeks afterwards; I did not know a soul in the world in London.

Q. When you did get up, whom did you find in the house? - I did not get up for about two hours; my master was in the house, and the other partner too, their was a good many people in the tap room, but I did not know them. There is a woman that lives up one pair of stairs, but I did not know her at that time.

Q. What was her business? - I don't know.

Q When was it after this happened to you that you first made any complaint? - I found myself very bad indeed and I thought it might be because I had never known any body before; at last I applied to a surgeon.

Q. Did you not complain to your master for this ill treatment? - No, I did not at all.

Q. Did you make any complaint to the woman that lodged there? - I did not, I did not know her.

Q. Who was the first person that you did complain to of this business? - I went to live in little Mitre-court, in Fenchurch-street, I was so bad I could not stay; after I found I had the bad distemper I asked the prisoner, my master, to get me into the hospital, and he sent a constable to take me up, I had left him a long time before I found out that I was so.

Q. How long ago was it? - About nine weeks ago.

Q. Did you tell him he had committed a rape on you? - I did not know any thing about committing a rape, all I asked him was to get me into the hospital.

Q. Will you swear upon your oath that you have never known him but that one time? - I never had any connection with him but then, he sent for a constable and took me up, he said, I insulted him for money, but I did not.

Q. What answer did he make to that? - I did not hear him say so, the constable told me so; the constable came and told me I must go along with him.

Q. Did you go with the constable? - I was obliged to go, he took me to the compter.

Q. How long did you remain there? - From nine o'clock till twelve.

Q. Now, I ask you when you first made that complaint? - It was when I came out of the compter.

Q. How long might that be after that happened? - I cannot rightly tell.

Mr. Knowlys. Now, my girl, tell us a little more about this; there was a man of the name of Potts lodged in the house? - There was.

Q. There was two servant girls besides yourself? - No, but one, her name was Hannah.

Q. They said you was very fond of Potts? - They did say so.

Q You kept it all snug from her and from your mistress; Hannah and you slept together; Hannah was spiteful enough to say that you sometimes got out of bed and cuddled him. Young woman was not you turned out of doors for being found in bed with Potts? - I was not.

Q. Was you not found in bed with Potts? - He does not know whether I am a man or woman; I was not in bed at all, I set on the side of the bed and was sewing my cap into the crown.

Q. How came you into Potts's room? - I went in there to make the beds at first.

Q. Did not your mistress accuse you? - My mistress never turned me away, I gave my mistress a week's warning.

Q. You never applied to your master Mr. Curtis for money? - I applied for him to get me into the hospital.

Q. Did you ever send to your master for money? - I never sent to him for a farthing.

Q. How long have you been out of place? - A long while,

Q. How have you maintained yourself? - I have sold my things.

Q. You have never received money from gentlemen? - Never.

Q. Your master came in and never said a word to you good, bad or indifferent, never called you my dear; never courted you at all? - Never said a word, but immediately threw me down on the bed.

Q.You had never known any thing of this sort before? - Never before in my life.

Q. Which part of the bed did you fall against? - It was the side of the bed near the feet and my head towards the other side.

Q. When he threw you on the bed I suppose that you suspected his intention? - I did, and shrieked out.

Q You never shrieked out more than once? - He put the sheet into my mouth, immediately crammed it in; the sheet was in my mouth all the time of the business, he was holding it down with his hand.

Q Then he had only one hand at liberty, for one hand was constantly employed in keeping down the sheet in your mouth; that was so? - It was.

Q How was your two hands employed against his one? - My two hands were behind me.

Q Pray, who was it put your hands in that shape? - Seeing him bar the door I was frightened and I held my hands so.

Q You suspected when you saw him bar the door? - I did not know what he was going to do, I thought he was going to kill me or something, I cried out and he immediately chucked me on the bed.

Q. Then he shoved you on the bed the moment that he barred the door; how far is the bed from the door? - It is close.

Q. Then you had time to make one cry and no more; how came your hands to fall behind you? - I cannot tell.

Q. That was rather odd, was not it did you ever in your life when you fell having your hands close by your side had your hands behind you before, how could they be twisted backwards by that fall? - I cannot tell.

Q. Then they remained behind all the time? - I could not get them away, I made all the resistance I could; I could not get my hands away

Q. They then remained pinioned like a fowl? - Exactly so, he prevented me, he lay on me.

Q The man is not two or three ton weight? - I made all the resistance I perfectly could.

Q. How could he laying on you prevent your drawing one hand from under you? - I made all the resistance I could.

Q. Then you really could not get one hand from under your back, that man is not a very fat man? - The moment I saw him bar the door the moment my strength failed me directly, I being in a strange place what did I suppose that that man was going to do.

Q. Did you slap his face? - I did not.

Q. Did you pull his hair? - I could not get away.

Q. Did you kick him at all? - I kicked him all that lay in my power.

Q. Then you almost overturned him by your kicking? - I don't know, I cannot say but what I might.

Q. Here he lays on you and you kicking about, it is natural you should almost overturn him? - I did all that was in my power.

Q. Did you kick his shins or did you not kick at all? - I did all that lay in my power to get away, I tried to get up.

Q. How did you try to get up; the moment that you fell down he threw himself on you; where was your petticoats? - He pulled up my petticoats.

Q. Were they pulled up before you was on the bed or after? - After.

Q. How did he manage with his other hand? - And then he laid his knee on me and in that situation he lay on me, he kept my petticoats high up with his knee.

Q. And in that situation he did it? - No, he did not do it so.

Q What did he do with his knee? - After he pulled up my petticoats he laid his knee on me to keep them up while he pulled down his breeches.

Q.He continued his knee there then? - No, he did not.

Q What kept your coats up? - He took his knee up when he unbuttoned his breeches; he was on the bed and my coats kept up.

Q. Did they keep up of their own accord or did you keep them up? - He kept them up to be sure.

Q. Now, how did he keep them up, he had not three hands, had he? - No.

Q. Now, let us dispose of the two; how did he keep them up? - I cannot tell.

Q. How high were your clothes? - My clothes were quite up to my chin.

Q. And you struggled and kicked about a good deal, did not you? - All that lay in my power.

Q. Still they kept up to your chin; you was quite a maid at this time? - I never knew a man before.

Q. Will you tell us how he managed to bring his private parts to your's, can you account how he did that? - No.

Q. Did you cross your legs? - No.

Q. It did not occur to you that that would be a good way to stop him; did you keep your legs a little wider than usual? - I don't know that I did.

Q. Don't you know that you did not? - I don't know that I did not.

Q. I should have thought keeping the legs close would be the best way to prevent him; do you know how he managed to introduce his private parts? where was the hand that was at liberty? one hand was at the sheet at your mouth, where was the other hand? - I cannot tell.

Q. Cannot you tell me how he managed to introduce his private parts to you, because you know you was a maid? - No.

Q. Nor where his hand was? was it employed to prevent your struggling? - He laid on me.

Q. Really my girl in the way you describe it I cannot see how such a thing could be effected? - He certainly did.

Q. You did not feel where the other hand was, you never felt how he employed the other hand? - No.

Q Never felt it about your person at all? - Yes.

Q. Then how was it employed? - He took his other to put his private parts into mine.

Q. Now my girl, how came you to tell me a minute ago that you did not know how it was employed, because I put it to you several times? - Because I was ashamed.

Q. When one hand was on your mouth and the other hand was so employed a very little struggle would have put him off; how came it you did not get rid of him when both hands were engaged? - I did all in my power.

Q. Did he continue this hand to his private parts all the time that he did this to you? - No, not all the time.

Q. How did he employ it afterwards? - I cannot tell you, I am sure.

Q. How came you to tell nobody of this affair? - I had no friends nor any thing in London, or else I would have told them.

Q. You slept with Hannah? - But she told such stories about, that I did not like to speak to her.

Q. What was the stories? - I did not like Hannah.

Q. Did you complain to her of your parts being sore? - No, not at all.

Q. In short they were not sore? - Yes, very bad indeed.

Q. Did you shew them to any body? - No, not at all.

Q. What did you do to alleviate this pain? - I did not do any thing at all.

Q. Your mistress's sister was there too I believe? - She was, she is ill I believe now.

Q. You know Margaret Vaughan ? - I don't know her.

Q. Not Peggy? - No.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Lancaster that lodged in the house? - I know the woman now, but I did not know her then.

Court. Was your mistress's sister the woman that lodged in the house that you told me of just now? - No, it is not.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you know Baker the watchman? - No, I do not.

Q. Did you use at any time to carry out the pots? - No, never.

Q. Did you go out of an evening? - Not while I was there.

Q. Was there only one of the servants or two that slept with you? - But one; but my mistress's sister slept in the same room but not along with me.

Q. How long was it before you discovered the venereal complaint? - I could not think what was the matter with me.

Q Are you sure nothing passed between you and Potts? - No, he does not know whether I am a man or a woman.

Court. Can you tell my girl what was the distance of time that you first charged your master? - At the time this affair happened.

Mr. Knowlys. We shall be able to ascertain that of another witness.

ROBERT CARROL sworn.

I am a silk weaver; I never saw the girl only bringing beer to my house from Mr. Curtis, he lives next door; she left her place and she brought her box, and she asked my wife to wash her some linen and she washed it for her; this was within a week or a fortnight after she left her place, I cannot say nearer; she told my wife she was going to live at No. 88, Houndsditch; she was a stranger to me only coming there; she fetched her things away and paid my

wife for washing them, and after that she came backward and forward with some young children that belonged to the master she lived with; and in the month of June, my daughter about fourteen years of age, one night said, she was sleeping in the necessary; I was in bed and the girl came to the bed side and told me of it; I said to my wife, let Sally sleep here to night; by my permission she came and slept with my children; the next morning I said to her, I wonder you do not keep your place, it is a pity you do not keep your place, to throw yourself into the street at night; she gave no reasons at all; my wife recommended her to Mr. Dobson's, she went and stayed there a little while, a very short time, there were words arose between her and the fellow servant about a pair of cotton stockings and she came away; then she went and lived at a cook's shop, in Holborn, as she told me; then she came back again and came to my house again and slept there; on being there a little while, I perceived she walked lame, and my wife used to tell me she washed herself with fuller's earth, and said, she was chafed; I said to her, if you have any thing a matter with you I will go with you to a surgeon, I went with her to a surgeon and the surgeon examined her, and he said, he thought there was nothing a matter without her blood was bad, and then she came back again and she became very bad indeed, got worse and worse; I asked her several times if she was ever acquainted with her master; I meant joking among ourselves; it was said, that Mr. Curtis was rather fond of a woman; it was not done out of any ill design to Mr. Curtis; she said, that her master never offered any thing to her, that he never behaved any way ill to her, in a while after she came to me while I was at work.

Q. Do you mean on the same day? - I cannot say whether it was two or three weeks or a month after.

Q. Can you tell me when she first mentioned this about her master? - It might be about the month of July or thereabouts; about a month after this she came up to my loom side, and she said, my master Curtis, gave me the bad distemper; I asked her how she knew that he gave her the bad distemper, and she told me that he was obliged to take the plaisters off before he could meddle with her.

Q. How often did she pretend that he had meddled with her? - I cannot say.

Q. Did you understand from this language that he had meddled with her more than once? - I should imagine by that that she did; I said to her when she told me that, did your master promise you any thing? she said, that he promised to take care of her. Then I asked her, pray did you ever tell your master that he gave you this distemper? she said no. I asked her two or three times over, she said no, she never told him. Pray, did you ever tell your mistress of it? no she said, she asked me to ask her master to get her into the hospital to get cured; I told her no, I could not think of doing of any such thing, for the time was so long I could not think of troubling my head about the matter, and if she had any thing to say to her master they must decide it themselves; that is all I know concerning that. She told me that she had a sister at the other end of the town.

Court. Just now she swore that she did not tell this to any body, because she had not a friend in town.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-49

243. HANNAH FINDALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , a silver watch, value 1 l. a piece of ribbon, value 1/2 a base metal watch key, value 1 d. and a seal, value 6 d. the goods and monies of Mary Litchfield .

The witnesses examined separate

MARY LITCHFIELD sworn.

I am an inhabitant of Birmingham, an house keeper there; I am a visitor in London to Mr. Isaac Dimsdale in Glass House-yard; this happened on Tuesday, the 15th of January; I lost my watch in Silver-street , at the end of Monkwell-street; I was in company with Mr. Dimsdale and his wife, and coming along a narrow passage, I was pushed a great deal, there were many in the passage besides me and my two friends; I saw some silk binding that I had purchased that day drawn out of my pocket; from that I concluded that my pocket was picked, and I called out that I was robbed. Mr. Dimsdale immediately turned again, I had been obliged to go rather before him on account of the narrowness of the passage, and clasped his hands round me to guard my pocket and claps hold of an arm that he judged to be mine; he called out to know what I had lost, as did several others; I told him I believed a watch; I immediately looked and found I had lost my watch, I saw my watch again in the same passage, in the hands of Mr. King, he said, he took it on the prisoner; it was while the crowd was all thick about us.

Mr. Knowlys. Mrs. Litchfield, this passage was a good deal crowded? - It was, there was a good many people coming from a chapel.

Q. It was dark at this time between seven and eight? - It was between eight and nine.

Court. Was there any lamps at the place? - The lamps were near enough for me to distinguish the silk by.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe it was under a wall? - It was at a sort of turning.

ISAAC DIMSDALE sworn.

I am a coachmaster; the prosecutrix, Mary Litchfield a native of the town of Birmingham, being in London on the 25th of January, was passing Monkwell-street, having hold of my arm; just as we came to the passage it was narrow, we went off the foot path into the highway and she went before me because there was a great many people; there was a man and woman that seemed to jostle her about, I immediately said, what the duce are you at? she said, somebody had got their hand into her pocket, was picking her pocket; I immediately went to clasp my friend round to lay hold of her arm, and I immediately took the prisoner by the bare arm thinking I had hold of my friend's arm; in the mean time came up Mr. Byfeild, the clerk of the Chamberlain's-office, and said, what is the matter? I said, here is a person that has picked my friend's pocket, and Mr. King, of the Castle and Falcon, picked up the watch from the ground; then directly Mr. Byfeild and Mr. King produced this watch; I kept the woman's hand in my hand all the time, and we proceeded then to the Castle and Falcon, Aldersgate-street.

Q. Was this woman one of the persons that was jostling your friend? - So far as this, I got hold of her arm; there was a great crowd there.

Q. Did that woman take any active part in jostling of her for the purpose? - She did, she and the man that was beside of her, they appeared to me to be jostling of her more than the other people which were in the crowd; when we came to the Castle and Falcon, Mr. King sent for the constable of the night.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you search this woman at the Castle and Falcon; - Yes, and found nothing at all.

Q. There was a considerable crowd? - There was.

Q. You was moving up the place, she was coming down? - I was close by the side of her almost.

Q. I think you said the pocket dropped? - I did not.

Q. How many people do you think might be in the passage? - Some thirty or forty before and behind

Q. Do you mean to say that somebody's hand was in her pocket, because she has told us a very different story? - She did not know at first it was so.

George King was called on his recognizance and did not appear.

JAMES BYFEILD sworn.

I know nothing farther than that I picked up the watch; I saw a crowd and understood that a woman was robbed; the prosecutrix said, she had lost her watch, they did not charge the woman I believe, I came up and they insisted on taking her some where to search her, and when they moved her in order to take her to be searched, I looked down and I saw the watch on the ground, I did not observe it till she was removed, then it was on the spot on which she stood; I picked up the watch, a friend of mine came up and said, give me the watch, whose name is King; he took the watch and fetched the woman back to their house, which he said, was the Castle and Falcon, in Aldersgate-street; she was taken there, I attended her there, nothing was found on her unless six-pence and a few halfpence taken out of her pocket.

Q. Was that watch shewn to the prosecutrix at the time? - It was, she said it was her own.

Mr. Knowlys. There was a great number of people close round about there? - There was people of all description, I should suppose so from the crowd round about.

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON sworn.

I was officer of the night; the watch was delivered to me by Mr. King or Mr. Byfeild I cannot say which, in the presence of the prisoner; Mrs. Litchfeild said, it was an old silver watch with two old green ribbons to it, and I found it answered the description; I have kept it ever since. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I am totally innocent. I leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-50

244. JOHN SPENCER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of December , a dozen of clock pins, value 2 d. a dozen of lifting handles made of brass, value 1 s. three dozen of brass hinges, value 3 s. a dozen of brass door buttons, value 1 s. six sets of brass lock furniture, value 6 s. a dozen brass rings and roses, value 1 s. a gross of iron nails with brass heads, value 1 s. a dozen of brass casters, value 1 s. a dozen of sash spring fastenings, value 1 s. the goods of Thomas Rotten .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-51

245. WILLIAM PITT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of January , two pair of mens leather shoes, value 10 s. two pair ditto, value 4 s. one pair ditto, value 3 s. the goods of Ann Fogg , widow .

ANN FOGG sworn.

I lodge at No. 5, King's Head-court, Shoe-lane, I am a widow; I clean shoes ; the prisoner stole five pair of shoes from me on Monday morning; I catched him selling them; I never saw him before this time. On Monday morning last was three weeks I left him in the court, and he ran away with the shoes, at the time the shoes were in a basket, they were in Hind-court, facing Water-lane ; I clean shoes there; they were blacked all ready for shining off, this was about ten o'clock as near as I can guess; I went away from Hind-court and I was not gone above ten minutes, I left the shoes under the care of the prisoner, he wanted his own shoes cleaned, he came up to ask to have his shoes cleaned, he had them on his feet and he pulled them off to be cleaned; I cleaned them for him; I saw them on his feet; he sent me of an errand; he pretended to know a servant maid there, and he sent me for a quartern and half of gin; there was a servant maid went out with a plate in her hand and he said, he knew her, and then he asked me to go for the quartern and half of gin; I went to the Kings and Keys in Fleet-street, for the nearest place; he gave me six-pence to get the gin; I was absent only a few minutes, when I returned with the gin, he was not there nor the shoes, he had drawn one basket out of the other; I desired him to take care of my shoes and basket and he took all away; I ran as fast as I could into Field-lane.

Q. How came you to go into Field-lane? - God Almighty directed me I was in so much distress, I did not know where to go, I ran directly into Field-lane and catched him in the shop.

Q. Was that the first shop you went into in Field lane? - I asked in the first shop and I did not see the prisoner there, but I went into the next shop, the house of Jane Stuart , and there I saw the prisoner, in her shop; I went in and I asked if any body had been to sell any shoes? the prisoner answered me and said, no mistress, there has been nobody selling shoes here; a little boy came out and said, that man has brought five pair of shoes, and the prisoner said, it was no such thing; so that little boy went in to his mother, he appeared to be about thirteen or fourteen years old, I laid hold of the prisoner and the man of the shop produced the shoes, and a gentleman came in and said, I should prosecute him and he was taken to a place in Hatton-garden, before the magistrate; the shoes were delivered to the constable.

Q. Now all these things you must have answered for them if they had been lost? - I must indeed.

Prisoner. I never spake to her at all, not one single question, at her coming into the shop she did not know me. - I knew him to be the person that took them.

Court. When you came into the shop, and he answered as the master of the shop, no, no, there were no shoes brought in here, did you know him to be the same man that had his shoes cleaned, and sent you for the gin? - I knew him to be the same man, I took hold of his collar, and I said you are the man, and have got my shoes, that was after he had answered, no, no, there has been no shoes selling here, and before the boy came up.

WILLIAM BUNN sworn.

I am a porter; I went into Field-lane about ten o'clock in the morning; I believe

it was a Monday; I went into Mrs. Stewart's shop, and I saw this man standing there, I wanted to sell a pair of boots, about two minutes after I had been in there, I saw this old woman come in crying, and she asked, if any shoes had been sold there? that man at the bar answered no; the man that did belong to the shop, and the prisoner were there; the prisoner was there before me; the little boy that was in the shop ran back to his mother, and acquainted her of it, that there was a woman had lost some shoes, and directly the shoes were brought forward into the place, the mother is here, but the boy is not; then they were shewn to the old woman, and the old gentlewoman owned them, and said, there was every thing there, only the strings had been taken out of one pair of them.

Q. Did the little boy say in the hearing of the prisoner who it was that brought the shoes there? - He said, the man there, the man waited for the money, they had agreed for 12 s. he asked 14 s. the boy was telling his mother not to let him have the money, because he thought they were stole, because the woman had come to own them, the shoes were produced, and the woman owned them; as soon as the woman owned them, he was going to run out of the shop, and I catched hold of him by the collar, and when I catched hold of him by the collar, there was some gentleman there bid me take him before the justice, he walked there, I took the shoes up with him, and they were delivered to the constable, he has them now.

Prisoner. In the first place, he said, I asked 14 s. for the shoes, and then he said 12 s. and then he said the woman would not give me the money, because she thought I stole them, she never said any thing about it.

JANE STEWART sworn.

I keep a shop in Field-lane, a man came into my shop, with five pair of shoes, and he asked 14. for them, and I did not know so much about the business, I took them to one of the men to shew them what they thought they were worth, in the mean time, the woman came in, and my boy came up, and said, mother, the man has stole the shoes, there is a woman come after them.

Q.Is that the man? - I don't know, I was so frightened when I came down stairs.

Q. Did you see who the man laid hold of? - Yes.

Q. Did not you see the man carried out of your shop? - I did not take much notice of him.

Q. Had you never seen the man that offered you these shoes before? - Never to my knowledge, it is very like the man.

Q. Was you before the justice at Guildhall? - I was.

Q. What account did you then give of the matter? - I said I could not possibly swear.

Q. And you now swear that you never had seen that man before to your knowledge; have you had no dealings with that man before? - Not to my knowledge.

- HORNE sworn.

I have got the shoes; I received them at Guildhall; the prisoner was brought in by Bunn, and another person, and the woman; the shoes have been in my custody. In taking the prisoner to the Compter, the prisoner informed me that he found them Produced and deposed by Thomas Dutton , as being his own, his father's, and his brother's, and also deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Prisoner. Last Monday was three weeks, about ten o'clock, coming from King's Head-court, these shoes lay in a narrow passage, I saw them lay there, I stopped there a minute or two, I took them up, and went home with them, I

thought there was no owner to them, and I went into Field-lane to dispose of them; in the mean time, while I was in the shop, waiting to dispose of them, that old woman came in, that elderly woman came in, and I asked her if they were her shoes, she said, I believe they are mine; good woman, says I, if you believe they are your's take them, you are welcome; I was going to the door to speak to the lad, who saw me pick them up, and the boy, the woman's son laid hold of me, says the woman I want nothing of him, I have got my shoes, I am very glad, and the porter took hold of my collar, and I was taken before the magistrate; as to my part, I never saw the woman before, till I saw her in the shop. I had people to my character these two days past, but I did not expect my trial to come on to-day.

GUILTY . (Aged 48.)

Imprisoned six months in Newgate , and publickly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-52

246. WILLIAM HOYLAND , WILLIAM THOMAS , and THOMAS TISDELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , an 100 lb. weight of lead, value 10 s. belonging to George Davis , affixed to a certain dwelling house of his .

GEORGE DAVIS sworn.

I am a brewer in Maiden-lane, in the Borough. On Monday morning, the 21st of January, the watchman that was on the beat in Brooke's Market came to inform me that a house, which I have in Brooke's Market, the Three Jolly Butchers , had been broke open, they had taken some young fellows in it, and had taken some lead off the premises.

JEHU WARD sworn.

I was watchman in Brooke's Market. On the 21st of January, my partner called to me, and said, Ward, here is a cellar window open. He is ill he, is not able to attend here, he is in the hospital; accordingly I went over to him, and we knocked the people of the house up, this was in Brooke's Market, I went down into that cellar after the people were up, and I could find nothing at all in it; accordingly I saw three or four bars of the grates broke up, I said there was somebody in the Three Jolly Butchers; accordingly I went further up, and I heard a great knocking in the house; accordingly I went to the door, and there was a padlock on the door, on the outside; accordingly we agreed on it to pull our coats off, and to go down into the cellar to see who were there in the house, and I went away up into Gray's Inn-lane, and I turned my rattle for assistance; assistance came, Edward Lee , and another watchman William May , a bye man came down. My partner's name was Welch, me, and Welch, and May, went down, we went and searched all the house over, and found nobody at all in it; we came out again, and thought we would acquaint the inhabitants to be cautious, because there were thieves about; all we came out, and the prisoner Hoyland came to the fore door in the inside, and cried thieves; the fore door was shut, and the padlock outside, he said, there was thieves in the house, we shall all be murdered: We then went down again into the cellar, the same way as we came up, and when we came into the passage, I found young Hoyland in the passage of the tap-room, he says to me, my brother is in the yard, I looked round in the yard, and I could see nobody at all, and then Lee brought a ladder, and Lee got over, and he turned Tisdell over, and we took them out, and we took them two to the watch-house;

I never saw Thomas till I came to the watch-house; when I got into the house, I saw a piece of lead lay on the table of the tap room; the lead is here, I looked at it, there is no appearance of its being cut; there was the print of the lead where they brought it down stairs from the top of the house, where they rested it, it is above half an hundred weight; the next morning we went to the place, and it appeared to be taken from the top of the house; I did not see any left at that part, it was part of a gutter, the whole of the gutter was gone; when I went into the cellar the next morning, I found another piece with a pipe to it.

EDD LEE sworn.

I am a watchman, I was on watch this 21st of January; Ward the watchman in Brooke's Market turned his rattle for assistance, I went to see what was the matter, he said, there was an alarm of some thieves, he supposed they were in the Jolly Butchers public house, in Brooke's Market, I went with him to see what was the matter, there was a cellar broke open by somebody; not the cellar belonging to the Three Jolly Butchers.

Davis. I have a cellar under another house, which has no communication with the house, it is under, but goes directly into that public-house.

Lee. Welch, May, and Ward, forced up the flap belonging to the Jolly Butchers, and went down that way, while they were down there Fincher, another watchman and I stood above, we stayed above to watch this cellar window, while they were down there, it appeared to me, that this here cellar, that is broke open belonged to the green-stall: I told Fincher to stop there a bit, and I would go down this place to see how the cellars were; accordingly I got down the cellar that was broke open, and went down into the cellar, when I went down, I found it had no connection with the green stall, but was an arched cellar, which came into the street, I then went from that into another arch, and from that to another; there were three arches; and then I got to the cellar which belongs to the Jolly Butchers, then I went up the cellar stairs, and I went into the tap room, and in the tap room I saw one of these pieces of lead rolled up, and laying on the table, I did not look any further then into the house, but went down the cellar stairs again, and got out into the street, and I told Fincher, the other watchman, how the cellars were, that they were connected all in one; Fincher said, he would go and stand at the corner, in case if there was any body they would come out backward there from the other houses; I took my lanthorn, and set it down by the cellar that was broke open, and I went and stood by this flap of the cellar of the Jolly Butchers, they were about five or six yards apart; while I was there I saw Davy Thomas, the prisoner, come out of that cellar, its him that stands in the middle, he goes by the name of Davy, I have known him many years, he came out of that cellar that was broke open, I seeing the man come out, I made up to him as fast as I could, just as he was rising from the cellar, I caught hold of him, I said, Davy, I believe I have got you, with a sudden jerk he snatched himself out of my hand, and ran up the market; he out ran me, Fincher and May, was very handy to him, I told them to run after him, and I went back to the cellar, I had been at the cellar about two minutes, and May brought him back to me, and I said take him to the watch-house, he is the man that came out of the cellar, and they took him to the watch-house, I stood at the cellar for a great while, I suppose for an hour, until such time as I heard Ward say, Lee come down, we have got one here, I went down directly as he

called me, with a ladder, which we borrowed at the green stall, and went up the cellar stairs, as soon as I got up on the top of the cellar in the passage, I saw Ward had hold of Hoyland, the prisoner, Ward said, go into the yard, I heard an alarm in the yard, I took the ladder with me, the yard is surrounded with houses, and there is a partition at one corner partitioned off, this partition is about six or seven feet high; the inhabitants were looking out of their windows, some of them said, that they saw a man get out of the Jolly Butchers, back door, and get over that partition, and they said, it was impossible for him to go through that way, and as they had not seen him come back, that he must be there now; accordingly I got over, and I found that in the yard there was a little fowl house built, and I looked about in the yard, and up in the corner, between that and the partition, I saw the prisoner, Thomas Tisdell , he was not down nor properly up, but like down on one hand and knee, I asked him what business he had there, he did not give me any answer, I desired him to get over the partition back again, the other watchmen came up and they took him.

Prisoner. I wish to know whether the lead fitted or no? - I don't know.

WILLIAM MAY sworn.

I was one of the watchmen, I went into the house along with Ward and Welch, I went all over the house, and out upon the house, we could find nobody; Ward and I came back, and I put my lanthorn on the parapet gutter and stood still; I went and searched for them, and could not find them, on that we all came out of the house again; I went down into Leather-lane, and Lee called out there is one got out, and he told me Fincher was gone after him, I ran after Fincher, he saw him run up a pair of stairs, called the Hole in the Wall passage, I ran up these pair of stairs, and catched him at top in the passage, it is a pair of stairs belonging to a house, it has no under floor nor street door at all, I asked him what he did there? he said, it was his lodging, I laid hold of him, and told him I would help him to a better lodging, I took him back to Lee, and he said, that was the man.

Court to Lee. How long had you known Thomas? - I have known him about six years, he is a butcher I believe, his mother lived a neighbour to me some years, I don't know a he served his time to any thing; I saw him every night at Gray's Inn-lane, at a house of slight character among bad people.

Court to May. Did you see this lead sitted? - I did, both the pieces, they were sitted to the back part of the house over the garret window, in what they call a fillet gutter, one piece fitted very well.

Prosecutor. I employed two men on Thursday the 24th, to fit this lead, I saw them fit one part, that has the pipe to it, a very remarkable piece of lead, and it appeared to fit; but, my Lord, I have to observe, that the two plumbers that I employed, they cut off these two little pieces of lead from the others, and threw them down; one plumber was endeavouring to fit the lead on the outside of the house, and the other was inside of the house in the garret; I walked from one side of the house to the other, presently came down one of these rolls of lead, as if it had been rolled up, in a very little time while the watchman was present came another; I don't know whether it is fair to mention it, there was some little bribe.

- KING sworn.

I am a carpenter, I was there when the lead was fitted in the gutter, and it all fitted exactly, I don't know the day.

Q. Where did you get the lead that you fitted there? - The watchman had it of Lee; I got it from the office, Hatton-garden, and the two plumbers had it of me.

Ward. The lead that we found in the house, me and May carried to the office; it was never carried to Mr. Davis's.

Lee. I locked it up in my house, and it was carried afterwards to be fitted, I went with them and took it to the house.

King. I saw it fitted, and helped the man to fit it; it fitted exactly, these pieces that were pulled off, they all came certainly from that place.

Prisoner Hoyland. I was coming by this place, going across the market and was going home.

Prisoner Thomas. I was coming home late from Lambeth, and I heard this man cry out there goes one.

Prisoner Tisdell. William Hoyland and I were out drinking sixpennyworth of crank together; we went into Gray's Inn-lane, as I lay in the Jolly Butcher's house before, I went in there, and I went into the back yard, and went to sleep.

ANDREW MUZZARD sworn.

I know Ward, I heard him say he would do Hoyland if it was possible.

Q. Where did this conversation take place? - At the justice room.

Court. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I have known Hoyland ever since he was a child; I have known his father this thirty years.

The prisoner Hoyland called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Thomas called one witnes who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Tisdell called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Thomas Hoyland GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

William Thomas GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Thomas Tisdell . GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON.

Reference Number: t17930220-53

247. FRANCIS NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , two pewter quart pots, value 3 s. one pewter pint pot, value 12 d. the goods of William Chapple .

WILLIAM CHAPPLE sworn.

I keep a public house , the Black Dog, the corner of Long-alley, Brown-street, Moorfields ; I lost two pewter quart pots and a pint pot. I missed them the 12th of January, and I found them myself in a dust cart the same day between two and three in the afternoon; the prisoner was employed by me to take the dust out of the cellar, he was the driver of the cart, they were covered over with dust; these men had fetched my dust away for four or five months, the man came this day to take the dust, and the boy told the maid to tell me that he had got a pot; I took them out of the cart and put them in the bar, and marked them separate at the time; in consequence of the information I also went down into the cellar, the moment I was down the cellar stairs the man that was employed by this man takes the pot out of the basket, and runs and put it down in the yard by the side of the cellar.

JOSEPH DOWLING sworn.

I am a looking glass grinder; I was going past Mr. Chapple's door between one and two o'clock, on the 12th of January, I asked what was the matter, and they said the dustman had been thieving some pots, Mr. Chapple said that the prisoner was in the cellar; and Mr. Chapple was contesting with him to get into the tap room, persuading him to go up stairs, he had been taking a pot out of his basket, and he drove him up stairs before him; when he came up stairs the publican said perhaps he had got some in his cart already, so he jumped into the

cart and he takes the broomstick and he stirs about a pot which he gave into my hand, he found a quart pot in the dust, and a pint pot, and he was for sending for a constable to give charge of him; and this prisoner tried to make his escape down Long-alley, the landlord pursued him, and brought him back into the tap room, and he said he should not stir from there till such times as he had given charge of him; the constable came, and he charged him with him, and he was afterwards committed.

Court to Chapple. Did you see the pot taken out of the basket in the cellar? - Yes, this man the prisoner was filling in and the other man stood by.

Q. Did you go into the cellar before you went into the cart or after? - Before.

Q. Who had the basket? - It stood at the bottom of the stairs.

Q. Whose basket was it? - It stood at the bottom of the stairs. This man's partner, took this quart pot, out of the basket; I saw him do it, and ran into the back yard, and put it down on the pavement; that basket belonged to him; the basket was not in either of their hands, it was on the ground standing.

RICHARD MORBY sworn.

I was pot boy there, I was in the cellar and they were making a scuffling with the pots, both of them; they told me to go out to get an old birch broom to sweep the dirt up, they had a new broom and that would not do for them they said, I turned, and just as I turned, I saw the prisoner put an hand and take a pot, and put it into the basket, it was a quart pot; and I went up and the maid, and she went up and told master, and master came down directly.

Q. Do you keep these pots in the cellar? - There were six dozen in the cellar.

Court to Chapple. Have you kept these pots from that time to this? - They have never been used, they have been tied together ever since; there is my name, and the name of the place, and the sign on them all.

Prisoner. I went to take this gentleman's rubbish away, and there was another man with me, and he filled the basket while I was at the cart; and what he put in I don't know, for I never saw any thing of the kind, nor never touched any thing of the kind.

Court to Morby. Was it this pot the pot in the basket, or was it the other? - It was this.

Court to Chapple. Were these the servants of the dustman? - They were, and I went to the master afterwards and he gave them a very good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-54

248. JAMES NEW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , twenty pounds weight of lead belonging to John Briggs , affixed to a certain building of his .

HENRY HUNT sworn.

This lead was stole from a house intended to be called York Place, a house unfinished in Baker-street, near Portman Square ; the house belongs to Mr. Briggs, I do not know Mr. Briggs christian name.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-55

249. JOHN SWINNEY and CHARLOTTE PEARSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , two linen sheets, value 12 s. a cotton bed quilt, value 5 s. a copper tea kettle, value 5 s. a tin sauce pan, value 2 s. 6 d. and a flat iron, value 12 d. the goods of Patrick Mordant in a lodging room .

PATRICK MORDANT sworn.

I let a room to John Swinney and Charlotte Pearson ; I let it to John Swinney , the man was responsible.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-56

251. ELIZABETH THOMPSON and ELIZABETH COX were indicted for stealing, on the 11th of February , six guineas and eighteen shillings , the monies of William Scott .

WILLIAM SCOTT sworn.

I am a tallow chandler , a married man; last Tuesday was a week, three quarters before one o'clock in the morning; I had been up into the city settling some of my affairs with my creditors which I serve with candles; my customers I mean.

Q. Had you been drinking? - No I had not.

Q. Where was the place you had been settling this business? - One was in Chancery Place, the other was in Leadenhall-street; I met the women in upper East Smithfield , they were standing by a corner, the women stopped me, Elizabeth Thompson kept hold of my collar, and Elizabeth Cox put her hand into my pocket, my left breeches pocket, and then they both ran off immediately.

Q. Did you say nothing to them at the time? - No, not at that present time.

Q. Did you perceive her take any thing? - I perceived she took my money out of my pocket, I immediately clapped my hand on my pocket and I found what it was, I kept hold of the chain of my watch, with my right hand; I immediately called out for the watch, and they both ran as fast as they could; I called out to the watch and laid hold of Elizabeth Thompson , and Elizabeth Cox at the time she was running she dropped her bonnet which Elizabeth Thompson picked it up; there was a fire at some distance off, and a crowd of people; Elizabeth Cox ran in among the crowd of people, and I lost her in the crowd; I detained Thompson and gave charge of her; the officer pursued Cox; Thompson was brought up before a court of justice and carried to the watch-house, she was examined by the justice.

Q. Was she examined that night? - They overhauled her, her pockets were overhauled by the officers of the watch.

Q. Was any of your money found? - None on Elizabeth Thompson .

Q. How soon did you see Cox afterwards? - I did not see Cox till she was taken by the officer, I never saw her till she was taken up, and carried before the justice in the afternoon; she was in the officer's custody, he brought her up, I saw her at justice Davis's in Fore-street, I believe she was brought by the officer, I don't know who was along with her when she was taken.

Q. Was any body with her but the officer? - No.

Q. You saw her in one of the rooms at the office, was there any other woman

in the room? - No, not in the office, the officer took her by the description I gave of her.

Q. When she was brought into the office, did the officer point her out to you? - I told them that was the woman as soon as I saw her, she did not say any thing to me at the time.

Q. Are you quite sure that she was the woman? - Yes.

Q. You say she had a bonnet on? - Yes, but she dropped the bonnet, and the other picked it up.

Q. Were there any lamps near the place, or was it a moon light night? - The night was pretty clear.

Q. Had you any conversation with these women before they did it, or was it done instantly? - It was done instantly.

Q. You had two people to take notice of, one collaring you, and the other employed with her hand in your pocket? - I had.

Q. Did you take observation enough of them to swear to them? - I did.

Q. Did you ever see them before? - I never did.

Q. Now was Cox examined at all? - Not that I know of.

Q. Has your money ever been found? - No.

Q. Now you was perfectly sober? - I am sure I was perfectly sober.

Prisoner Cox. Was you not drunk? - I was not.

Prisoner Thompson. Had you not been drinking with one officer, Mr. Bare? - I was not.

Court to Scott. Have you told exactly all that passed between you and this woman, had not you conversed with them, or any thing? - No.

JOHN DAWS sworn.

I am a supernumerary man, I was in the watch-house facing Smock-alley, and I saw this Elizabeth Thompson and another come by my watch box; and the first had never a bonnet or hat on, and they had both past my box about five yards, and the prosecutor caught hold of Elizabeth Thompson and stopped her; I don't know as ever I saw them in my life before.

Q. Who dropped the bonnet? - I cannot say, Elizabeth Thompson had it in her hand when she came by me, and the other that was before her, said why don't you come along? when the prosecutor caught hold of them, he said, return me my money? she said, what money? says he, the money you took out of my pocket, or else I will charge the watch with you, with that he gave charge directly; she put her hand into her pocket and said, I will shew you all the money I have got, and pulled out two or three halfpence; as soon as the other found that she was stopped, there was a fire close by, and being a crowd, she set off directly into the crowd, and I could not get any more sight of her.

Q. Did you observe Cox enough to swear to her? - I did not, I cannot say the other woman was Cox.

Prisoner Thompson. That bonnet I picked up at the fire in East Smithfield.

Court to Prosecutor. When was it you had last seen your money, before these people took it out of your pocket? - About ten minutes before I came to this place; I had six guineas in gold and eighteen shillings in silver, I lost it all every halfpenny? it was loose in my breeches pocket, I had changed at a public house in this place, right facing Newgate, I had change for a guinea, there I paid for a pot of beer.

Q. Was that all you paid? - That is all.

Q. What did you pay for your pot of beer? - I paid two shillings to another man; I paid it as I came home.

Q. That will not make it out? - I had a relish to eat, and they charged me ninepence for it.

Prisoner Cox. I never saw the man till the very next day, when the officer came to take me up; I was searched and I had nothing, I never saw the gentleman before in my life, I have wore a hat for above this seven years, as for a bonnet I never wear any.

Prisoner Thompson. The officer said that he had a bottle of wine and two pots of porter with the prosecutor.

Court to Prosecutor. How much might you drink in the whole course of that time? - I drank nothing but a pot of beer and a pint throughout the whole night.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-57

252. SAMUEL EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , one quart pot, value 12 d. four pint pots, value 2 s. the goods of John Prosser .

JOHN PROSSER sworn.

I keep the sign of the Ship, in Gray's Inn-lane ; I did not see the prisoner take the pots, I never saw the pots after they were taken away; I sent my boy out at the hour of four o'clock, on Friday the 18th of January; his name is Lewis Morgan , and he returned to me without his pots; as soon as I found my pots were lost, I repaired to the prisoner's father's house, who lives in the same lane, Gray's Inn-lane; I saw the prisoner there, and I laid hold of him; and I told him he had stole my pots, I laid hold of the button of his coat, saying I must, take him to a justice to answer for what he had committed; he immediately drew back and drew a knife on me; I went immediately to the Rotation-office in Hatton-garden to get an officer.

Q. What sort of a knife? - A clasped knife, the officer has got it; on his drawing his knife I drew back; and went to Hatton-garden to the police, and brought Robert Smith the officer with me, when we came back to the house we went in, he drew his knife again on the officer, the officer as he advanced desired him to shut his knife; on his non-compliance the officer wounded him in the hand with his hanger; he then told the officer he would shut his knife, and the officer took him; and then we took him to the Rotation-office, and as soon as we got into the street, he gave me a knock down blow in the street.

Prisoner's Counsel. Was he sober? - He may be in liquor, but he was not drunk.

Q. He certainly was not sober? - He may or may not be.

Q. You say he was in liquor? - He might, I don't know that he was or was not.

HENRY CARPENTER

Prisoner's Counsel. How old are you? - Going of eleven.

Q. You have been at school I suppose? - No.

Q. Do you know the nature of an oath? - No.

Prisoner's Counsel. Go down then.

Court. Have you never been told what will become of you if you tell a story? - Go to the Devil.

Q. If you swear what is false what will become of you? - Go to the Devil.

sworn.

My uncle is an hair-dresser, I live with my uncle, he lives in Gray's Inn-lane No. 18, I have seen the prisoner at the corner of our court at the public house; I was going for two sixpences for a shilling.

Q. What do you call your court? - Charlotta Buildings.

Q. Do you recollect the day of the week? - I do not.

Q. The day of the month? - I do not.

Q. Do you recollect how long ago it must be? - I do not. I saw the prisoner at the top of Charlotta Buildings, it was after dinner.

Q. What time do you dine generally, one or two? - It was almost four, I saw the pots in the prisoner's hand, I took notice of the handle, there was P. I. A. on them.

Q. Were they quart pots or pint pots? - I did not take notice what pots they were.

Q. Did you see him take them? - No, he had them in his hand, he went into the public house with them the corner of Charlotta Buildings, he did not stay above five or ten minutes; and then I saw him go down the court.

Q. Did he bring the pots out with him? - I don't know, I saw him with something under his arm in a blue apron, when he went in he had them in his hand on a leather strap.

Q. Was the blue apron on before him or was it loose in his hand when he came out? - He had it under his arm; he had never an apron on when he went in.

Q. Did it appear flat or bulky? - quite bulky under his arm.

Q. Did you give any account of this to any body? - Yes, I told it to our lodger up in the garret, Mr. Burton thought it was very odd he should go out instead of the pot boy with the pots, and I took notice of the pots, P. I. A.

Prisoner's Counsel. Where did you see these three letters; where was you? - He was going in at the door.

Q. Was there any lamps light? - No.

Q. Was it light or dark? - It was lightish at that time.

Q. You don't know what pots they were? - They were pint pots or quart pots.

Court. Do you know how many they were? - I don't know; he had them in his hand.

LEWIS MORGAN sworn.

I am pot boy at the sign of the Ship Gray's Inn-lane, Mr. Prosser's; I left five pewter pots four pints and a quart, I left them at No. 18, the corner of Charlotta Buildings; I left them in a passage at four o'clock on Friday the 15th of January, I left the pots while I went up stairs, and I was not up above two minutes, and came down; and the pots were gone.

Q. Did you never know who took them? - No.

Q. Did you ever see them since? - No.

Q. Did you tell your master of it? - Yes, I went home directly.

Prisoner's Counsel. What pots do you say you lost? - Four pints and a pot.

Q. Is that the account you gave before the magistrate? - It is.

Q. The examination stands, that you swore before the magistrate that you lost two pewter quart pots and three pewter pint pots.

Court. You find suggested to you, that on the examination before the magistrate you said that there were three pint pots and two quart pots; which do

you mean to say was left? - Four pint pots and one quart pot.

Q. Are you sure that before the magistrate you gave the same account? - Yes, I did.

Prisoner's Counsel to Prosecutor. Was you with the boy when he was examined before the magistrate? - I was.

Q. Did you see him write his name? - I did.

Q. Did you see the magistrate sign this paper? - It was handed to him.

Q. Was it read over to Morgan? - It was.

Q. What account did the boy give? - The boy always told me four pints and one quart from the beginning.

Q. What did you hear him say at the magistrates? - I cannot upon my oath call to mind; the boy being a country boy was a little shagreened at going before a magistrate never having been before one before.

Court to Henry Carpenter . What public house did the man go in with the pots? - The Pheasant's.

Q. How far was that from Mr. Prosser's? - Mr. Prosser's is in the same street higher up to Holborn, not above two hundred yards.

Court to Morgan. Can you read? - Yes.

Q. Do you know what was written on the pots that you lost; J for John, and Prosser at full length, the sign of the Ship Gray's Inn-lane.

Q. Was there any letters? - Yes, I. P. A. on the handle.

Prisoner. I was going in to have a pint of beer at my father's house, with that my father said Mr. Prosser thinks you have got some pots; Mr. Prosser came in a passion, and I told him not to use me ill; I would go with him if he would get an officer, he used me very ill in the street.

The prisoner called witnesses who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-58

253. HENRY DE La HAYE SYMONDS was indicted for publishing, and causing to be published on the 6th of August , a certain scandalous and seditious libel in a book, entitled the Rights of Man, part second; by Thomas Paine .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. Fielding.

(And the Case by Mr. Attorney General.)

The prisoner, by his Counsel, Mr. Raine, acknowledged himself GUILTY .

After which Mr. Raine addressed the Court in mitigation of his offence.

GUILTY.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Fined 20 l. Imprisoned for two years , and afterwards to find security for his good behaviour for three years, himself in 200 l. and two sureties in 100 l. each .

Reference Number: t17930220-59

254. PHILIP WARNER was indicted for that he, on the 1st of February in a certain Nursery ground belonging to Mary Kirk , William Kirk , and Joseph Kirk ; unlawfully did enter, and take five shrubs called Mazarion shrubs, value 50 s. then and there growing in the said Nursery ground; and being the property

and belonging to the said Mary Kirk , &c. then and there growing, standing, and being; unlawfully, did break, spoil and destroy, against the form of the Statute

Indicted in the second COUNT for feloniously stealing the same goods.

(The Case was opened by Mr. - .)

WILLIAM KIRK sworn.

I am a Nurseryman , I live at Brompton , in the parish of Chelsea; the Nursery belongs to me, my mother Mary Kirk , and my brother Joseph Kirk ; between the hours of half past five on the 1st of February, and half past seven on Saturday morning, the 2d; the property was missed, I was robbed of a quantity of Mazarion shrubs, I had seen them there the night before, in the garden standing, and growing; I missed them on Saturday morning, a little after eight, my brother was the first who missed them.

JOHN WHITE sworn.

I am a gardiner, I work for Mr. Kirk I worked for him the 1st of February, I was in the garden all that day before; but I don't recollect seeing the Mazarion roots there; I returned to work a little after six on the 2d of February, it was light; when I came to work in the morning, my master took me up the ground, and I saw the ground all torn to pieces, and the tops of them left on the ground; and some of them found in the other man's ground, the neighbour's.

Q. What time was it you missed these Mazarion plants? - I did not miss them before eight o'clock, they could not be taken away by day light, without our knowing it.

Q. Did you observe that piece of ground? - I cannot say I did.

Q. The question I ask is whether you will undertake to say that no man could come at the place without your seeing it? - I cannot say for I saw nothing particular.

TIMOTHY RAHORDIAN sworn.

I am a gardener, I work at these grounds, I recollect seeing the Mazarions growing there. On the first of February, I left work at dark, I returned to work the next day as soon as we could see; when I went up to work and came in from breakfast, I missed the shrubs, this might be between nine and eleven o'clock.

Q. Did not you see the place where the Mazarions had been before that time? - Yes, but not at that day.

Q. Had you been at work in the garden all the morning until you missed these shrubs? - I had.

Q. Near to this place where they were taken from? - I cannot rightly tell, we go according to our orders, I cannot certainly be positive.

JOHN BLACKWELL sworn.

I keep an herb shop in Covent-garden Market; I saw the prisoner at my shop, on the morning of the 2d of February, about half after six on Saturday morning; he came to my shop before I saw him, I was in bed, and my man called me up, and I saw a bag of mazarian roots in the shop, the prisoner had them to sell, I asked him what he asked for them, he said, he asked one shilling a pound, I told him I should detain him, and the roots, in consequence of information of some nursery grounds being robbed; I asked him where he got them? he said, he got them from a man at Paddington;

I then sent for a constable, and he was taken to Bow-street; the roots were then produced, and Mr. Kirk then brought the tops after some little time, and a great many of them were matched with the roots. (The roots produced, compared, and several of them exactly matched with the tops where they were cut, found in the prosecutor's gardens, and the other gardens, which had no Mazarions growing in it, it being a market garden.

Prosecutor. There is a wall between our garden, and the market garden of eight feet and there was the marks of feet on it.

Q. Did you trace no foot steps in your garden ground, where the tops of the Mazarions were found? - I could, and marks where they jumped down from the wall.

Q. Did you trace any on the opposite side? - I did not that day.

Q. Pray, sir, how many did you lose? - I cannot be positive, there might be seventy, but I can swear to fifty, they were worth about one shilling a plant.

Prosecutor's Counsel to Blackwell. What do you consider the value of these things to be? - The price of the plants is one shilling a piece, but we give one shilling a pound for the roots.

Court to Blackwell. What time did you see the prisoner that morning? - At half past six o'clock, we had lights burning there.

Prisoner to Mr. Kirk. What marks have you got that you can swear to the roots against any other roots.

Court. The marks are these, he does not say, that there are any particular marks on the roots, except that the roots appear to have been cut, and that by putting the top of the Mazarion to the root of the Mazarion, one part agrees and tallies with the other, that is the reason that induces him to swear to them.

Prisoner. That is done since.

Prosecutor. We tried them in the presence of Justice Bond.

JOHN GULLIFORD sworn.

I live with Mr. Blackwell. On the 2d of February, I saw the prisoner there, I came in about a quarter after six, I went to my master's home, and got the keys of the shop, and while I was unlocking the shop, this man came to me, and asked me, if I wanted any Mazarian roots? it was dark, he came into the shop, I asked him where they were? and he said, he would fetch them, he brought them into the shop; he said directly, I will be glad if you will dispatch me as soon as possible, he said, a person was waiting in Hart-street for him, says I, as soon as I have got the things out of the shop, I will weigh your roots; accordingly my fellow servant came in, and I sent him over to my master, and my master came.

Kirk. I have known the prisoner at the bar several years, he usually used to work in nursery gardens and grounds, he has worked for me, and he has worked for my father at different times, the last time he worked for me was about ten or eleven months ago, as nearly as possible.

Prisoner. I was coming one morning from my wife, going to my wife's brother in Cold-bath-fields, and coming along the road I picked up this bag of roots by the road side, I brought them to Covent garden; I thought they belong to me as much as any body else; I asked Mr. Blackwell, if he wanted any roots, and when he came, he said, he had information given out by Mr. Grimwood, if there were any thing came they must be stopped.

JOSEPH HOWELL sworn.

I am of the King's Road, Westminster; the prisoner worked with me between two and three months before he was apprehended. On the 1st of February he worked at my shop till eight o'clock on Friday evening; I heard no more of him till I heard he was apprehended in Covent-garden; from the time he was with me, he behaved himself in a very honest diligent manner.

The prisoner also called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Imprisoned six months in the house of correction , and fined 1 s .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-60

255. CAROLINE JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , one pair of linen sheets, value 12 s. a linen table cloth, value 14 s. three linen shirts, value 1 l. four lawn neckcloths, value 8 s. a muslin neckcloth, value 2 s. the goods of John Nicholls .

JOHN NICHOLLS sworn.

I live in York-street, Buckingham-buildings , the prisoner was a servant of mine, I cannot tell particularly when I missed the things, but she would not confess any thing till I said I would fetch a constable and take her up; I went and I could not find one, I came back again, and I knew that her mistress had lost some things, which she had the ticket of, I asked her for the tickets, she would not give them, my wife searched her, and something dropped down, my wife saw it, she then took something up in her hand, which my wife asked her to give up, she said, she would not, she gave it up to my wife at last, and my wife gave it to me, and it was a parcel of pawnbroker's tickets; there was not a great many tickets of things that we had lost; I went to the pawnbroker's with these tickets, and I asked them to give up these things, they gave up part of them, which I have here, they related to all these things which I have here; before I went to the justice's, I asked her if she would tell us where the rest of the things were, she said, she knew nothing at all about it, that she had not taken any thing, but these things she had pawned.

Q. How long had you missed these things? - We missed them only that morning looking over our things, she was then going away; there is a waistcoat of mine, and some other things of mine, that I found at the pawnbroker's, but the man that drew up the indictment said, as I had not got them again, there was no occasion to put them in the indictment.

Court. That is abominable, that because you have not got your things you are not to prosecute.

- sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mrs. Brown, in the Strand, I have a pair of sheets that were left by a woman on the 22d of December.

Q. Do you know who that woman was? - I don't know.

Q. Did you ever see her before? - I I never did to my knowledge, she came to the house of Mrs. Brown's, and left a pair of sheets for nine shillings.

Court to Nicholls. Was this the same pawnbroker you got your things from? - No.

Court to Pawnbroker. Did she come herself? - I do not recollect.

Q. What name were they pawned in? - Catharine Nicholls.

Q. Did you give the woman a duplicate? - Yes, we always do.

Court to Mr. Nicholls. Where did you get that duplicate? - I found it on the prisoner.

Court to Pawnbroker. Did she say where she lived? - I don't recollect.

Court to Nicholls. You had not missed them sheets till that day? - I never had.

Q. Then how long they had been gone you cannot tell? - I cannot.

Q. Have you no shirts here? - No, she acknowledge all this before, when we found the tickets, she said, she had taken no more than these; that the tickets alluded to, and she was very sorry for it, and believed the Devil was in her.

Q. Did you tell her it would be better for her if she told you? - I did not, she said, that she had taken nothing else, than what the tickets belonged to.

Q. Are you sure she said that? - I am certain of it.

Prisoner. I was taken very ill, and my mistress said, if I would confess to those things it should be better for me, she wanted me to strip in the kitchen, which I did, and she took from my own bosom, my own duplicates, and these things, and told me if I would confess, they would not put me in prison; my master came backward and forward several times, and urged me to speak to articles, which I knew nothing about. (The sheets deposed to.)

Prosecutor. The sheets were kept in a trunk.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-61

256. ALEXANDER ELDER was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Abraham Barrier , about the hour of seven in the night, of the 19th of February , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, a pair of womens stays, value 6 s. three linen shirts, value 7 s. a child's cotton gown, value 9 d. a child's cotton handkerchief, value 6 d. a linen pudding cloth, value 2 d. a check linen apron, value 1 d. a linen bag, value 2 d. the goods of James Fletcher .

ELIZABETH FLETCHER sworn.

I live at No. 19, Grafton-street, Soho , in the house of Abraham Barrier ; I am a lodger there, my husband's name is James Fletcher , he is a journeyman currier ; I went up into my room last Tuesday night, I cannot exactly tell to the minute, between six and seven o'clock, it was very soon dark that evening, I ran up stairs into my own room quick, something within gave me an impression; something came over me that I must go up stairs that instant.

Q. Did you say something came out of you or something came in? - Something directed me within; when I got up stairs I was greatly surprised at seeing

my doors a little opened, I left it perfectly safe locked, I saw my door a little opened which startled me.

Q. How long had you been come out of your room? - I suppose about twenty minutes or half an hour, it was dark when I left it.

Q. Did you lock your door? - I did, and I had the key in my pocket.

Q. How many pair of stairs is your room? - One pair; I rushed in and he stood still and never spoke, I seized on him.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar the person? - Yes.

Q.Whereabouts did you see him? - It was not quite in the middle, it might be about half a yard from the middle; he stood still in the middle of the room, not quite so far as the middle.

Q. Had you a candle in your hand? - No, there was a reflection of the lamp, by which I saw the man; there is a lamp exactly opposite my door, in the street close opposite to the door of the room; there is but one room on a floor in the house. I ran and seized on him and held him with all my might, I did not speak nor he did not speak, but he seemed to wish to speak but did not; I held him with all the strength that ever I could, he rushes from me, he did not strike me nor offer it, he rushed from me, with that I scrieked murder, stop thief, he went down stairs, he rushed down stairs, and he stumbled on some of the stairs on which he was, immediately I heard a woman come out, with a candle in her hand on my alarm, and she collared him, he wrested from her, and I ran after him, and pursued him crying stop thief, in the street, till he was taken. Mr. Leclere took him; I saw him till he was taken, be stumbled over a post by the Thirteen Cantons, that was the means that he was taken in King-street, then he was surrounded and seized; I went home, when they said, that he was secured; I did not know I had lost any thing then, and went up into my lodging room, then I looked and saw that the lock was forced open, the latch of the lock was out, I put my key in to unlock the door, and it would not take the impression as usual, it appeared forced as far as that. The lock was out, and I could not return it with my key.

Q. If the lock was out there must have been force to the part where the lock was? - There was some appearance, the staple was on, but it was looser than usual; when I came to look round the room, I missed some things directly out of a soul clothes bag, there were two dirty shirts, and a silk handkerchief, and a child's gown, and a pudding cloth, all the things mentioned in the indictment; a pair of stays hung up in a bag, and a clean shirt, marked J. F. No. 4.

Prisoner. Who advised you to say that the lock was in that state? whether you was not advised to say so by the person who lives in the house? - Nobody said any such thing to me, nor was I ever before a justice or peace before this occasion, and I am ignorant of all matters. I am in my eight and fortieth year.

Court. Had you any conversation with the constable about this - No, none at all.

Prisoner. The constable that has laid this breaking against me lives in the house, and the first constable that took me, told me that the other constable had advised him to swear my life away for the sake of the reward.

Mrs. Fletcher. I would not take a false oath for all the world, I know what an oath is too well for that.

HANNAH BOOTLE sworn.

I live in the same house with Elizabeth Fletcher .

Q. Do you remember any thing happening to Elizabeth Fletcher , or to her house at any time? - Yes.

Q. What is her husband's name? - James Fletcher ; the house belongs to Abraham Barrier; on Tuesday night last Mrs. Fletcher went out of my apartment to go up stairs, as soon as she got up stairs she screamed out violently, I ran to see what was the matter, as soon as I got my door open, I heard her cry stop thief.

Q. Did you ever know the prisoner before? - No, I saw the prisoner running down stairs, as he got on the two bottom stairs, he had like to fall, I ran and I got hold of him, but he soon got from me, I could not hold him fast enough, and a piece of his neckcloth came off in my hand, he got away from me, I followed after him, crying stop thief, by that means he was taken, but I did not see him taken; a man in the court took him, Mr. Leclere. I am positive the prisoner at the bar is the man.

Q. Had he a bundle? - No, he had not as I saw.

Q. Did you go up afterwards to Mrs. Fletcher's room? - I did.

Q. Did you look at the lock? - I did, the lock and bolt were both out of its place, the bolt was out of the lock instead of being in.

Q. Did you look to see whether there was the appearance of any force? - It was forced, but how I cannot tell, the catch was forced too; I am sensible it was a good firm lock and catch too.

PETER LECLERE sworn.

I am a cutler; I live at No. 5, High-street, St. Giles's; I had occasion to visit my father on Tuesday evening the 19th of this month, he lives at No. 21, Litchfield-street, in the parish of St. Ann's, Westminster; about seven o'clock, I was alarmed, by the cry of stop thief, I instantly pursued, and took the prisoner at the bar against a post, at the corner of King-street, he appeared to me to have tumbled against the post; he was rising from the ground; it was in King-street, the corner of Litchfield-street; I immediately brought him back to my father's shop; as I am an headborough of the first division of the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields, I thought I was authorized to search his pockets; I searched his coat pockets first, and I found three shirts marked J. F. and one cotton handkerchief, one pudding cloth, and one check apron; I have got them here; likewise in his breeches pocket I found two false keys, and one pick-lock; the keys have been filed; I then took him into charge. (The keys produced.) I kept him in the shop, and one Mr. Barclay, constable of St. Ann's, wanted to force him from me; I took him to Marlborough-street, but the justices not sitting that evening, I brought him back again to my father's shop.

Prisoner. I wish to ask him whether he did not want me to say that the other man had no hand in taking me? - I never spoke to the man on any terms whatever.

Q. Whether he did not tell me when I was going along that morning, that I had now got into such hands, that my business would be done? - I did not.

CATHARINE BARNER sworn.

On Tuesday evening, about seven o'clock, I was on the second floor room, I heard a cry of murder first, and then the cry of stop thief, as I was coming down stairs, within four or five stairs from the bottom.

Prisoner. Did you see any marks of violence on Mrs. Fletcher's door? - No, I did not.

Court. Did you look at the door? - I did not positively look at the door, but I looked at the lock, the bolt of the lock

was out, it appeared to be forced open, but in what manner I am no judge.

Prisoner. Please to ask her whether it is not a spring lock, that the lock naturally flies open? - No.

(The things deposed to by Mrs. Fletcher.)

Prisoner. I have nothing particular to say in my defence; I was going along that evening, I saw a man running along, and he heaved these things down; I had them not in my pocket at all, when I was laid hold of for this property; I had never a pocket about me, I picked them up, and they took me for the person that stole them. I have no witnesses, they have been attending here two or three days, but they are not here now.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 46.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-62

257. JAMES BANNER was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on Robert Woodriff , on the 5th of February , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, with the inside case made of base metal, and the outside case made of shagreen, value 1 l. the goods of the said Robert Woodriff .

ROBERT WOODRIFF sworn.

I live in the Temple; this happened on Tuesday the 5th of February, at half after seven in the evening, I was coming out of the Little Theatre, in the Haymarket , towards Piccadilly; I was alone, I observed three or four men coming down the street, within a door or two of the Little Theatre, whose appearance I did not much approve of, they were coming from Piccadilly towards Cockspur-street; there were four of them at least, if not more; they were coming meeting me; as I did not like their appearance, I put my hand into my coat pocket, and placed it over my watch in this manner, and stood a little on one side, on the curb stone, to let them pass, with an intent that they should pass; when the prisoner at the bar, made a kind of stoop, and ran his shoulder into my stomach, the other men surrounded me at the same time; in consequence of the blow, my hand fell on one side, that was over my watch, and I felt it going out of my pocket; in the drawing of it out, the outside case spring being rather loose, it fell to the ground; I immediately seized hold of the prisoner by the collar, drew him to the ground, and picked up the case; I took him immediately into a shop down a flight of stone steps, six or seven I believe, and searched him, but could not find the watch on him; bringing him out to deliver him to a constable, I had got half-way up the steps, when some men came down the steps, one of them I was positive was one of the party, that had been hustling me just before; I knew him again immediately from the manner of his dress, and they began to cry out, what do you shove so? one of the men that came down prest a good deal on my arm, having hold of the prisoner by the collar, and as I would not let him go, began to strike me on the arm; he then put his shoulder to my arm, forced me against some iron rails, and kept rubbing my arm against the edge of the rail, the arm I had hold of the prisoner by; the pain of it at last induced me to let the man go; as the prisoner ran off, I immediately slipped by the other man that had been pressing me, and pursued the prisoner, who ran underneath some coaches, I presently lost sight of him under the coaches; I went back and got a constable to go with me round the other side of the street, and there I found the prisoner in custody stopped by some person

or other; I am sure that is the same person I had hold of, I had him in the room by myself for full five minutes, and I got him into custody again in three minutes, it must be the outside; he was taken to the watch-house, and the next day committed.

Q. In the way you describe the blow given you, it could not be an accident? - It was this man ran at me, and done with a kind of stoop; I saw the man; I am sure of the person, as to that; but I have some reason to believe that prisoner was not the person that took the watch, because it went the other side, if he had taken it he must have taken it with the left hand.

Prisoner. Ask him whether I was the person that shoved up against him.

Court. He has sworn positively, he has no doubt it was you.

JOHN CHAPMAN sworn.

Please your Worship, and Gentlemen of the Jury. On the fifth of February, this present month, I was coming up Cockspur-street, and coming along by the side of the play house, passing by the play house, just as it was breaking up, we came to this place, where we see Mr. Woodriff. I am a patrole belonging to Sir Sampson Wright, coming up to him, he said, he had been robbed of his watch, by three, or four, or five people, he said, he had taken one, but he was rescued from him, as he was taking him from the place, where he took him to search him, by rubbing of his arm against some rails; as we found that, we said to him immediately, if you will please to cross over the way, we will try and pursue him we crossed over the way, and at the corner of Norris-street, we met some servants, that had headed him, and turned him, and stopped him; Mr. Woodriff says immediately, that is the man that was with me, but I don't believe he was the man that picked my pocket, but he was with them; we searched him, but there was nothing found on him.

DANIEL MACLAURIN sworn.

I came up with Mr. Chapman and Mr. Woodriff, and the prisoner was surrounded by several servants there, I don't know that they had hold of him, but they surrounded him, and Mr. Woodriff said immediately, that is the man, take him into charge; Mr. Woodriff desired we should take him to the watch-house, and he would appear the next morning against him.

Prisoner. As I was going down the Haymarket, there was a mob of people coming out of the play house, I was shoved underneath the coach to let the people go by, and they shoved me against that gentleman, but with no intent to take any thing from him. I know nothing at all about it. I have no witnesses.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 21.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-63

258. SAMUEL COWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , three pair of mens leather half boots, value 1 l. 11 s. two pounds weight of leather, value 4 s. two iron hammers, with wooden handles, value 2 s. a pair of iron pinchers, value 6 d. four wooden lasts, value 1 1/2 d. the goods of William Baldwin .

WILLIAM BALDWIN sworn.

I am a shoe-maker ; I live at Battle-Bridge. On the 13th of November, I left the prisoner in the stall, about four o'clock in the afternoon; a stall that I keep at Battle-Bridge , and I returned about eight in the evening; the prisoner

was my servant ; I asked my wife if Sam had brought the things from the stall as usual, my wife said no; he had been my servant about three years on and off; my wife told me she had not seen any thing of him all the time; I directly went up to the stall, it was dark, I had no light; my house was about three hundred yards from it, I felt all about the stall, and I could find nothing, I goes home; I did not take any more notice; I got up in the morning, about four o'clock, looks all about, and could not find any thing no where, what I had left in the stall, then I directly tells my wife the things were all lost.

THOMAS KENDALL sworn.

I work for Mr. Baldwin, at the house where he lives, not at the stall; and these here things were brought down by the person that works at the stall every night; every thing that was at the stall by the last person, that was there master or man; and the things were not brought down that night the 13th of September, we could not hear of him till he was taken up, when he was taken up we found some duplicates on him; he left his master and we could not hear any more from that time till last Monday; last Monday there were two men at the Northumberland Arms, Clerkenwell Green, took him into custody, and came and told master, and they kept him in custody till we came back, I went with my master; we took him before a magistrate; he said he was very sorry that there was any thing laid to his charge; there were ever so many duplicates found upon him, and one for a pair of half boots, and we found the half boots; the pawnbroker is here that has got them, there was a great many things out, but we did not have any thing else but the half boots.

JOHN CAHUAC sworn.

I live in Drury-lane, I am a pawnbroker, I have got a pair of half boots, they were brought some time in November, but the prisoner came to sell them out on the 31st of December, and they would not suit the person, and he had a fresh duplicate on them, what time in November, I really don't know.

Court to Baldwin. Did you find the original duplicate on the prisoner for these half boots? - Yes, the constable has it. (The boots produced and deposed to, not one pair in five hundred being cut out like them.)

Baldwin. The prisoner was making them when I left him on the 13th of November.

Prisoner to Kendall. Have not you swore wrongfully in saying that is Mr. Baldwin's property? - I saw you at work on them, I took them up while they were on his seat, and I looked at them, and I know the man they was made for, I know them they are so small; I have no doubt about it but they are my master's.

Prisoner. These half boots I manufactured them up myself, for a man that bespoke a pair of them; and the man came and told me that he had not money to pay me for them, and I being a poor man was obliged to pawn them; this Mr. Baldwin is not a shoe-maker he never served a legal time to the business, and I think he is no judge; there was a poor man did attend here three days last week to speak for me, and he could not afford to spend his time any longer.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Imprisoned one month in Newgate and publickly whipped .

Reference Number: t17930220-64

259. ALEXANDER SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , four pair of leather shoes, value 4 s. the goods of Thomas Lavally .

THOMAS LAVALLY sworn.

I am a shoe-maker , I live in little Poultney-street, Golden Square ; I lost my shoes the 1st of this month, I went up two pair of stairs to my wife, I had left my shop and a lad in it, and he made an outcry in the street; and I went down immediately, the boys name is Thomas Baldac ; when I came to the bottom of the street, the people round there said that was the man, he was secured, there was a parcel of people about him; on being secured, he was brought forward, but nothing was found on him; there was a gentleman brought some of the shoes into the shop again afterwards, he is here.

THOMAS BALDAC sworn.

I am not an apprentice to Mr. Lavally, I live with him, I have done so these four years; at this time I was alone in the shop, and the prisoner came in and asked for a pair of shoes; I got up and served him with a pair of shoes, I went and shewed him three pair, he tells me they would not do, he asked me the price of them, I told him, he said that would not do; I hangs them up, and he pushes to the other counter, and I think he took up the shoes and put them under his coat; I did not rightly see the man, he went strait forward to the counter, after I had hung up the shoes, and immediately he goes out of the shop and never says any thing; these were other shoes, not those that I hung up; I did not miss the shoes till the man was gone; I saw the shoes lay about half an hour before on the counter, four pair, I missed them immediately, I looks about, and I runs out after the man, and another gentleman caught him; I hallooed out stop thief.

Q. How far was he caught from your shop? - I cannot rightly tell, it is a little short street and he was quite at the end.

Q. The prisoner was the person stopt? - He was, I think he was the person that had been in the shop.

Q. What do you mean to say I think? - I cannot rightly tell whether that is the person, because he is quite in a different dress.

Q. Was the man that was stopped in the street, the same man that had been in the shop? - Yes, it was the very same I am sure of that, I knew it was then, but his dress is different now; another man brought in the shoes, I did not see them till the other man brought them in.

ROBERT GRIERSON sworn.

On the 1st day of February, eight o'clock at night, I ran out and I saw a crowd coming back again, I asked what was the matter? they said that the prisoner at the bar had thrown down some shoes just by the shop window; I have a cheesemonger's shop in the same street, and a little from my shop window the way that he ran, I found a pair of shoes in the kennel, I took a candle and looked, this might be about an hundred yards from Lavally's shop or better; some body looked round and they saw two more pair, and another person brought one pair; neither of these are here; the boy came and told me they were his master's; I knew where Mr. Lavally lived, and I took them to his master, the boy claimed them at once, and he said the man that the other had hold of, was the man that stole them; when I went into the shop I gave them to the master, the master wished me to appear the next day; I appeared, and gave my evidence.

There is one thing which I wish to inform your lordship; the prisoner'

friends has been treating with the prosecutor, and got him to take a bribe, I believe the prosecutor was innocent in taking it, but he has given it back.

Court. He was excessively wrong in taking of it.

- PEARSON sworn.

I was standing in my shop and I heard the cry of stop thief, and I ran out; I ran after the prisoner, I saw him running and by some means he fell down off the pavement, he was running as from the shop of the prosecutor; and I laid hold of him and pulled him up on his legs, and brought him to the light and looked at him; and when there was plenty of people round him, I went into my shop again.

Q. How near is your shop to Mr. Lavally's? - Nearly opposite.

Q. Did the boy at that time insist that that was the man, that had been in the shop? - I don't know. I did not go into the shop; that is the same man that he was running after, he was crying stop thief.

The constable who had him in possession he has likewise took a bribe, he has taken ten shillings of the prisoner's wife, his name is Kettle.

Court to the Clerk. If there is any recognizance of Kettle's let it be estreated.

Court to Lavally. How came you to commit such an offence? - The constable told me it was right.

Court. If you had kept the money, you would have been in as bad a condition as that man there. (The shoes produced and deposed to.)

Pearson. At the time of going before the Grand Jury, the constable and another advised the boy not to say what he did at the justice's.

Prisoner. I was going on some business of my father's in Poultney-street, and I heard the cry of stop thief, and I ran and they detained me for it, that is all that I have got to say.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Privately whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

The Court ordered Kettle to be prosecuted for taking the bribe, and the witnesses were bound over.

Reference Number: t17930220-65

260. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a spring bell, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of John Plant .

JOHN PLANT sworn.

I keep a public house, the Hole in the Wall, the corner of Blossom's Road ; the prisoner came in at eight o'clock in the morning; he never called for any thing when he first came in, I had rather some suspicion of him; I asked him what he wanted? he told me he wanted nothing but a glass of gin; he went away at eight o'clock in the morning when he first came; coming again the same day about half past twelve, there was a spring bell for an alarm, he takes this bell from the shelf and puts it under his coat on the left side, and I caught him, and I took it from him; and I found it on this left side, the place where I saw him put it, the bell is worth 18 d.

Prisoner. I was in a state of intoxication, I don't know that ever I was in the witnesses house.

THOMAS PLANT sworn.

I am the brother of the prosecutor, I happened to be there, and I saw the prisoner

come into the house and warm his hands, and went out again, there was some people in the house said Plant is up to something; and I saw my brother go out.

Prisoner. The prosecutor and the witnesses came to me this day week, and asked me if I meant to pursue the prosecution; and the prosecutor asked him, the last witness, if my name was Smith; and the other witness said that was not Smith; and he said he would drop the prosecution if I would go for a soldier, he said it was a frivolous affair and he would drop it, but he was bound in a deal of money; I told him I could not think of going to serve his Majesty as I was subject to fits, and very much troubled with the stone and gravel; therefore if I thought myself guilty I could not think of doing that

GUILTY . (Aged 37.)

Publickly Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice GROSE.

Reference Number: t17930220-66

261. JULIET DUPREE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , a silk cloak, value 2 s. a linen apron, value 2 s. a black silk bonnet, value 2 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 20 s. a cloth coat, value 20 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 10 s. a gold shirt breast buckle, value 7 s. the goods of Elizabeth Moseley widow .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

ELIZABETH MOSELEY sworn.

I am a widow for any thing I know; I heard about three months ago that my husband was dead, my husband and I have been separated a great while, I live at No. 30, little Windmill-street ; I did not pursue the property, till last Saturday week; on last Wednesday week I missed a hat and cloak, a bonnet and an apron, which Mr. Kennedy has here to produce; I was ironing on Saturday night last, I had missed a wash tub that same day; and I heard some noise at my door, and I opened it and I saw my wash tub at the door, and a little girl at the same time picked up some duplicates at the door, that I had sent for some thread, she is here; I went in consequence of these duplicates to Mr. Frear's the pawnbroker's, and I found the blue coat and buckles there; the prisoner came backward and forward occasionally to me; the pawnbroker refused to let me have them; he has them here, I found also my bonnet and my cloak, and apron.

CHARLES PHILLIPS sworn.

I live in little Windmill-street, Mrs. Moseley has all my property in her care because I depend on her honesty.

Q. Where do you live? - Why suppose I live there. I live at Mrs. Moseley's, I am a carpenter, she has the keeping of my clothes, she had them in her care; and she always behaved honest to me, and I would trust her with a thousand pounds; the pawnbroker has got my property in his possession at this time, the prisoner was backward and forward at Mrs. Moseley's.

Q. When was it you missed any part of your clothes? - I only wore them on a Sunday, and then I put them in her care and keeping.

Q. When did you last deliver them to Mrs. Moseley to take care of them? - On Sunday evening before the Saturday, that the duplicates were found.

Q. What had you done with your buckles? - She had both in her care in the chest at the same time.

Q. Answer the question, do not run on in such a strange way. Had you any stockings? - There was a pair of silk stockings that I missed a few days before the coat was lost.

Q. What do you say to the gold shirt buckle? - I had such a thing in Mrs. Moseley's care.

Q. Now tell me when you ever saw your coat, your buckles, your stockings and your shirt buckle again? - I cannot say that I have seen them since that I delivered them up to Mrs. Moseley; I did not find them till I found them at the pawnbroker's on Saturday evening, between eight and nine o'clock; when I got the duplicates, I went immediately and demanded the coat and buckles last Saturday week, but I have not the things as yet.

- FREERS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I live in little Poultney-street, I have got a coat and a pair of buckles, I got them of the prisoner at the bar. On Monday the 4th of February, she pawned the coat for a guinea, and the buckles for fifteen shillings; she said she came for Mrs. Moseley, and Mrs. Moseley had authorised the prisoner to pledge things before now, I knew the name of Moseley.

Q. Had she ever pledged things with you before as belonging to Mrs. Moseley? - Yes, I believe she has.

Q. Who has redeemed those things? - The prisoner at the bar.

Q. How long had she been pledging as for Mrs. Moseley? - For the space of two or three months; she used to pledge the articles the beginning of the week, and towards the latter end of the week redeem them by pledging other articles.

Q. Mrs. Moseley herself had never redeemed any thing herself that the prisoner had pledged? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. We understand Mr. Phillips came and enquired for them? - Mrs. Moseley came first, the prisoner at the bar came on Wednesday and said that Mrs. Moseley and she had quarelled, and the tickets were lost, and desired me to stop the things; she mentioned that Mrs. Moseley had used her ill, and said that Mrs. Moseley had left her lawful husband, and had taken the duplicates and lived with another man, and desired we would not deliver the articles, if Mrs. Moseley should make application; we supposed the man's apparel belonged to Mr. Moseley, and if she had left her lawful husband, we had a right to stop them till Mr. Moseley made application for them; Mrs. Moseley came the Saturday following after we received notice from the prisoner to stop these articles; and Mr. Phillips came and made application, we produced not this coat and buckles, but a green coat and a pair of buckles, which the prisoner at the bar had not given us any notice to stop; when Mrs. Moseley came to redeem these articles, she said that Mr. Phillips was her brother, and he said it was his coat and not Mr. Moseley's, I delivered him that coat that he came for. (The coat produced and deposed to.)

Court to Phillips. Where were these things kept in Mrs. Moseley's house? - In a chest belonging to me.

Q. How came you to lay them to be her property, where did the chest stand? - In the room in which I myself sleep.

Court to Mrs. Moseley. I wish to know how you have the care of Mr. Phillips's clothes? - They are left in my care; it is not my property. I have employed this woman to pawn things before, but not since the tenth and eleventh of January, which was two spoons my own property.

Q. What have you to say concerning the loss of your bonnet, cloak and apron? - This woman was at my room this

Wednesday, and I went down, and when I came back this woman was not there; I left her in the room in which I live, the first floor, I am not certain whether the things were hanging on a nail or laying in a chair; but I am sensible they were in the room because I had them in my hand about a quarter of an hour before; when I came up again the landlady went first, and she said your door is open, I was following her up stairs; I had shut the door when I went out, and left her in the room; I missed my things immediately when I went into the room and I called in the landlady, I never saw them afterwards till Mr. Phillips came to fetch me to go to Marlborough-street; I believe that was the Wednesday following, afterwards I saw them there, and Mr. Kennedy the constable took them off her, they were on her back.

Q. Had you not seen the prisoner from that time till you saw her in Marlborough-street? - I had not.

Q. Had you lent her these things to wear? - I had not; I had lent her them once about a month ago, or six weeks, but never since.

Q. How did you employ this woman? - She used to come backward and forward very frequently.

Q. Was she a servant or an acquaintance? - Never an acquaintance; she first met me in the street by accident.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn.

I have got the black silk cloak, a black silk bonnet and a linen apron; I took them off the prisoner at Marlborough-street office, after she was apprehended; Mrs. Moseley claimed them as her's.

Prisoner. Mr. Kennedy knows that I said that Mrs. Moseley sent me the cloak? - She did not, Mrs. Moseley said that she stole the cloak. (The apron, cloak and bonnet, deposed to by Mrs. Moseley.)

Court to Mrs. Moseley. Tell us when your husband died? - My husband left me about fifteen months ago; I heard by a person that lives at Clerkenwell, that he was dead; I never passed for a widow.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-67

262. GEORGE BEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , one cheese, called a Darbyshire cheese, of the weight of eighteen, pounds value 6 s. the goods of John Hartshorn .

WILLIAM JONES sworn.

My master's name is John Hartshorn , he lives in great Tower-street ; I did not see the prisoner take the cheese, it was taken out of a cart.

GERALD FITZGERALD sworn.

I am a porter to Mr. Green; I saw the prisoner take the cheese on Friday, I don't know what day of the month, about a month ago, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; I saw him go to Mr. Hartshorn's cart and take the cheese out of the cart, he had another partner, the cart was standing by Mr Hartshorn's door unloading, he had another partner, and he gave it to that man, I saw him do that; I stopped this man and gave him to Mr. Hartshorn, the other man dropped the cheese and went off; this man was never out of my sight, he stood up along side of the cart and took it out; he stood up on the road and put his hand up, and took it

out of the cart, the cart was low, he could reach up to it.

Q. Who packed up the cheese? - I don't know.

Q. Did you tell this to any body? - I gave notice to Mr. Hartshorn, he was at home, I went in to his shop.

Q. What became of the cheese? - I don't know.

Q. Did you take any notice of that young man that is here now, Jones? - I do not recollect whether he was at home or not.

Q. Was there many other cheeses in the cart? - Yes.

Q. Do you know whose cart it was - It was Mr. Hartshorn's own cart; I knew the cart, his name was on it.

Court to Jones. When had you first notice of this robbery? - I was in the counting house; I did not see the robbery; my master desired me to go and get a constable.

Q. Did you see a cart at the door when you went out to get a constable? - The cart was there, it was unloading, it had been at the door about a quarter of an hour.

Q. Do you know what became of the cheese? - Yes, it was brought into my master; who brought it in I cannot rightly tell; all the cheeses in that cart were my master's property.

Prisoner. I had been at a cook shop; as I was coming along home, I came along Tower-street, as I came along this man came past me, and then as he turned back again he turned me into the cheesemonger's shop, and told the master I had taken a cheese out of the cart.

Court to Fitzgerald. Are you sure that you saw him take the cheese out of the cart? - I am.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Publickly Whipped

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-68

263. MARY ANN MARCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a clasped knife, value 2 d. a worsted purse, value 1 d. an half crown, ten shillings and six-pence, and ten halfpence, the goods and money of John Pratt , privately from his person .

JOHN PRATT sworn.

I am a dustman ; a married man; I have got five small children.

Q. Did you lose the several articles mentioned in the indictment? - I did, ten shillings and six pence and half a crown, my purse and knife, and ten copper halfpence; I was at the One Tun, Holborn-hill , my fellow servant and I, between three and four o'clock in the evening, it was Tuesday, I believe, I cannot justly say the day of the month, it was a month ago to-morrow; I was in a box in the tap room; this good man, the witness, was there and my partner, my partner went away directly as he had drank some beer, and I stopped there for him with this other man, James Harvey , this good man awaked me, I was asleep.

Q. Before you went to sleep had you seen the prisoner in the room? - I cannot say whether she was in the room or not.

Q. Had you been drinking any liquor that made you go to sleep? - We were up all night, it was not the liquor; this good man waked me, and as soon as he waked me, he bid me feel in my money pocket to see if I had lost my knife; I felt in my pocket and found I had lost my purse and my knife, it was all gone when I awaked; they were all in my breeches pocket, they were leather breeches, I then sent for a constable.

JAMES HARVEY sworn.

I am a plaisterer; I was doing a jobb and I came into that house waiting for some money, that I had been doing a jobb for,

the man was in the house and the woman likewise, and his mate; his mate went out to see about the cart, the prosecutor remained; he was in a box by the fire place; he sat in the further corner, the woman in the middle, and I sat next the fire place; he was asleep. I got sitting down by the fire and saw the woman fumbling about his pocket, she pulled out a clasp knife and a halfpenny first, I see her do it, and she said, he had got nothing at all; and then she got fumbling again, I thought she had been fumbling in another manner at first; then she fumbled again and pulled out the purse out of the same pocket, as for the contents of the money I will not be answering for; it was a worsted purse; I awaked the man immediately and told him of it; I asked him if he had not lost a knife and a halfpenny? he said, yes, he had lost a knife and some halfpence, and thirteen shillings, then after that he wanted her to give him the money and make it up and let her go about her business, then she would not make it up, the woman would not deliver the money to him; so we told Mrs. Peacock of it at the one Tun; says I, this here woman has taken the money from this here man, and she denies it; she kept it for some considerable time; then she took it out of the purse and put it in her pocket, and then threw the purse down; then Mrs. Peacock begged and prayed of her to give the man the money, then she pulled out the half crown piece, and four shillings and some halfpence, and the knife; then mistress ordered me to fetch a constable; when the constable came to search her, he found three shillings in her hand more, then after he had got the three shillings, she wanted to go, the constable said she should not, because she did not make the remainder of the money up, the man said if she would make the remainder of the money up he would spend two shillings for the good of the company, she would not do that; so they took her away.

Q. Was this woman in the company of this man at the time you went in? - She was in the box.

Q. Where they old acquaintances do you know? - I don't know nothing about it.

Q. Did he at all admit that he gave her any money? - When he awaked he said he had lost his money.

JAMES NEWMAN sworn.

I produce four half crowns and five pennyworth of halfpence, a knife and a worsted purse, they were all on the table; I searched her and I could not find any thing about her, and she turns herself about in the box, and she pulled out three shillings more, and said now let me go? no, says I, I shall see nothing of this sort before my face.

Court to Prosecutor. See if you can speak to that purse, and to the knife? - I can, but I cannot speak to the money.

Prisoner. I was going out to do a day's washing, and our water did nor come in, and I went to a public house to get a pennyworth of warm beer, this man began to pull me about, I told him I was not for his purpose, he said he would give me any money if I would go with him, as for the colour of his money I saw no more of it than a child unborn; I turned myself round and see some money lay on the table, but I am as innocent of taking it as a child that is unborn, I stripped myself, and I had nothing but my own duplicate, I have no witnesses; I have got a poor fatherless child, I have let nobody know where I am.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 30.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-69

264. ANN SOMERVILLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a woollen cloth great coat called a drab great coat, value 2 s. six pair of silk stockings, value 9 s. two linen shirts, value 3 s. a dark lanthorn, value 1 d. one cotton waistcoat, value 3 s. the goods of Charles Birckbeck Andree . A silver tea spoon, value 3 s. the goods of Charlotte Andree , widow , and a Vanhee cane, value 6 d. the goods of George Andree .

CHARLES BIRCKBECK ANDREE sworn.

I live in chambers in Staple's Inn ; I lost a vast quantity of things; those in the indictment are only what we found; I did not see the person take them, I was in the country at the time the chambers were broke open; I came to town the day after, I came to town I think the 3d of January, I do not remember the day of the week; nobody sleeps in these chambers, they were all lost from one room; the great coat was hanging up, and they broke open a great many locks of desks and scrutoires, there was four desks all of them were broke open.

Q. As you had been in the country, had there been any body in them, or were they locked up? - They were chambers for business, there were clerks in them all the time I was out.

JOSEPH EVANS sworn.

I am a watchman to the society of Staple's Inn; just before nine o'clock the custom of the inn is, for the watchman to go up the stair case; and the outer door of Mr. Andree's chambers was then shut; I know his chambers he is an attorney; these chambers are No. 8, the first floor on the right hand, the door was shut as usual, I tried it.

Q. Was it broke open at any time, or that night? - It was not broke open as I know of, it was a window; when I went up the stair case, when I went up in the morning at five o'clock, before the chambers were opened, I found the door on a jar, I was in hopes it was left open by some body carelessly, I just peeped in and I saw all the papers scattered on the ground; I then went into every room, and the chambers, which consists of four; and I found every thing as in the first office; I had the key of Mr. Andree's chambers, my wife was the laundress to it; the desk in the first office stood wide open, then I went for the key, and got the key; and went back and double locked the door, and and did not go in again till my wife went with me.

Q. How do you suppose the persons got into these chambers? - Through the window, the shutters were broke.

Q. Was the shutters usually broke or was it broke in the course of that night? - In the course of that night; the screw that was in the middle I think was broke and a little hole was made at the bottom of the window.

Q. How did you find the window when you first discovered these chambers open? - I did not see it then, I did not discover it was broke till my wife was along with me, about an hour or an hour and a quarter afterwards, I have never found any thing of the things since.

- TREADWAY sworn.

I am a constable; I produce a dark lanthorn, a silver tea spoon, two silver sleeve buttons, &c. and I got them at

No. 5, Shaw's Gardens, the room belongs to the prisoner's husband, he is now in custody for this robbery, and was examined yesterday at Bow-street.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-70

265. EDD ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of December , six pieces of woollen cloth, containing 9 yards, value 9 l. the goods of the Honourable East India Company .

Indicted in a second COUNT for stealing the same goods, laying them to be the property of persons unknown.

The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS WEBB sworn.

I am a waterman; I am employed by the East India Company; I am the master of a hoy, called the Clockton, that hoy is in the service of the East India Company.

Q. Do you remember any cloth delivered to you on board the Clockton from the East India Company? - There was a number of bales (I cannot tell what they contained) delivered between the 11th and 13th of December; the hoy was then at Lion's Key at Billingsgate , they were marked with the Company's mark upon them; I know Adams very well, he was a journeyman of mine at that time.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Turrell? - He was apprentice to a master of another hoy that belonged to the East India Company, the name of it was the Bearing.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Taylor? - I know a lad that they call Taylor, his real name is Smith, he is an apprentice of mine.

Q. Was Adams by at the same time these goods were delivered on board the Clockton? - He lent me a hand to get them in.

Q. He was employed to take these goods? - Yes, under me, he was a constant servant with me.

Q. When these goods were taken in, in what part of the hoy were they put? - In all parts of the hoy under the Company's locks; they were locked up and keys given to the supercargo, Mr. Higgins, he is not here; I locked them up myself.

Q. About the time the indictment states did you lose any thing? - I don't know.

Q. Did Adams sleep there? - I expected him to sleep there.

Mr. Knowlys. You say that something was delivered to you from the East India Company, what they were you cannot tell? - I cannot tell the contents of the packets.

Mr. Knapp. Did you attend the magistrate? - Yes.

Q. Was you there at the time that Adams was examined? - I was at one time.

Q. Did you see him put his name to a paper? - I did.

Q. Look at that? - That is my hand writing, and Adams made the mark; I saw him make it.

Mr. Knowlys. For any thing you know there might not be a particle of cloth within these bales; you see nothing but the outside of these bales? - What bales?

Q. You say there were bales delivered? - There were two hundred delivered.

Q. It might be linen, woollen, or no cloth at all? - It might for what I know.

Q. You say Turrell was a person belonging to an hoy just by you, a very bad

fellow you know? - I don't know any thing about him.

Q. He has owned that he is a thief? - He certainly has.

Q. How many persons were there on board your vessel besides this man? - Only this Smith, myself and the prisoner.

Q. Smith is not here? - He is not.

Mr. Knapp. Did you see the Lord Mayor sign this paper? - I cannot positively say I did.

Mr. Knowlys. You was not present during the whole time he was under examination? - I heard that he had had some private examination, to which I was not present.

Q. Perhaps you was not present at the whole of the public examination? - Yes, I was, I believe, I think I was to the best of my knowledge; I don't wish to swear it.

Mr. Knapp. How long was you there? - I might be there an hour or more.

Q. All these things that were delivered had the East India Company's marks on them? - I did not examine the marks, but I took them as the East India Company's goods.

Mr. Knowlys. In point of fact you don't know they had the East India marks on them.

ANTHONY STEVENSON sworn.

I am a Custom House officer; my duty led me on board the Clockton hoy, I was on board her on the 13th of December, I have a minute of it that I made at the time.

Court to Webb. Do you mean to insist on it; it was the 13th of December? - It was, it was before Christmas.

Stevenson. I did not notice any thing particular, only as being an officer on board of her, until I got on the Keys on board at Billingsgate, where I perceived this piece of cloth concealed, sewed up in a bed in the cabbin; we came from Gravesend to come up to the Custom House Keys to deliver this cargo that she was leaded with.

Court to Webb. You say with regard to these bales of goods they were delivered on board the Hoy the 11th or the 13th of December, this man says when he came to the Keys in town, he found something in a bedding; had these bales been delivered at Gravesend? - They had been delivered. When I delivered my bales at Gravesend, I went immediately to Chatham River, and then we came back again to Gravesend and this revenue officer came a board of us.

Mr. Knapp. They were first of all delivered on board the Clockton at Lyon's Key? - Then they were to be delivered on board the East India ships at Gravesend; then the hoy returned and took this Custom House officer.

Court. Did he bring any goods back with the ship, or how did he come on board? - After I had been at Gravesend I got my receipt for the cargo, I went away from that ship to Chatham River for a load of cottons, and when I got at Gravesend they put this officer on board, and they came back with the cotton to the Custom House Key.

Mr. Knowlys. You delivered all the cargo as you believe, and the officer of the ship gave you a receipt for the full amount of that cargo? - He did.

Mr. Knapp. Who has the custody of the cloth now? - One of the warehouse-men.

JOHN SAWDEN sworn.

I belong to the King's warehouse; I am a Custom House officer; I have got a piece of cloth here; I got it from the King's warehouse, the 15th of January, I have had it ever since; it was produced before the Lord Mayor, by the head

warehouse keeper; I put a seal on it.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you mean to say that Stevenson brought that cloth to you, or that somebody brought it from Stevenson? - It was brought by Francis Richardson , from Stevenson.

Q. Whether he had it from Stevenson you don't know? - I do not

FRANCIS RICHARDSON sworn.

I am a Custom House officer; I remember seizing some cloth, Stevenson was with me; I took it out of a bed and he took it to the King's warehouse.

Q. When did you deliver it to Stevenson to take it to the warehouse? was you with Stevenson? - I was not, I was on board of the vessel.

Q. To whom was it delivered, and by whom? - I cannot tell, I was then on board of the lighter doing my duty.

Court to Stevenson. What did you do with it when you carried it to the Custom House? - I gave it to the warehouse keeper.

Q. Was there any seal on it? - There was not; I was obliged to put in a seizing note with it. The man that I delivered it to is not here.

FRANCIS HOLLAND sworn.

Q. Do you know my Lord Mayor's hand writing, Sir James Sanderson ; look at that? (The examination shown him.) - I have no doubt but it is his hand writing.

Mr. Knowlys. What past at the private examination you cannot say? - I cannot.

WILLIAM LEWIS NEWMAN sworn.

Q. Was you present at the examination of Adams? - I was, I believe that to be my Lord Mayor's hand writing.

Q. A witness has been talking of a private examination, was there any private examination between the Lord Mayor and the prisoner? - Not that I know of.

Mr. Knowlys. You don't know there was no private examination? - I should apprehend if there had been any I should have been present.

Court to Webb. What did you mean by a private examination? - I did not say that there positively was one, but I heard so.

Mr. Knowlys. Do you know in whose Company this man came in before the Lord Mayor? - He was brought by a constable.

Q. And therefore what influence they made on his mind in the way you cannot tell; is the constable here who took him before the Lord Mayor? - No.

Court. Have you recollection enough of the matter? because you first did not know what this business was. Can you change your memory compleatly that there was no promise nor threat? - I remember particularly that there was not; I verily believe there was no such thing took place. The examination of Edward Adams read, as taken before the Lord Mayor, January, 20, 1793, Which faith,

'That William Turrell desired this examinant to go with him into the Clockton, laying at Lyon's Key, Botolph wharf, between one and two months ago, and that Turrell opened the bales and took out the contents, being six pieces of woollen, two of which were taken care of by this examinant, on a promise that he would find a chap for them, and give Turrell the money they should produce; that Turrell put them on the examinant's bed, and that John Taylor afterwards put them into the bed where the examinant slept.'

WILLIAM TURRELL sworn.

I have been admitted an evidence for the crown.

Q. In what situation of life have you been in? - I have been in the service of the East India Company, in the vessel, the hoy, named the Bearing.

Q. Do you know the defendant Adams? - He was a person employed by the Company, likewise in the Clockton.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Taylor? - Yes, he was likewise employed in the Clockton.

My Lord we two, I and Adams were on board the Clockton; and John Taylor was on board; we jointly agreed to take a bale of cloth out of the Clockton; I believe it to be the 13th of December, to the best of my recollection; Edward Adams went down the cabbin in the Clockton and fetched a piece of iron called a marling spike, and with that prized the board over the foremost hatch; he was then going down himself, but he afterwards recollected that if in case his master should come there would be no one to give an answer, and he would wonder to see him not on deck; he thought it was most fit for me to go down, and I went down and cut open a bale of cloth, the smallest I could find; one of the smallest, the contents of which was six pieces; I then handed it up to Edd Adams and John Taylor , and the pieces of rope, and the two pieces of board that were about the bale; the two pieces of board which is packed on each side of them, one at the top and another at the bottom of the bale, I handed up likewise.

Q. Had these boards any mark on them? - Not that I observed; there was the Company's mark on the canvas; I came out of the hold, and they were all then handed into the cabbin, and Edd Adams then took and cut the mark off the wrapper of the bale, and the boards with the mark of the wrapper he burnt, and the remaining part of the wrapper was hove over board; the bale contained six pieces of cloth, and each piece was wrapped in a sort of dark coloured canvas, and at one end of the canvas was painted flowers, with the Company's arms,

"super purple sixteen and half yards"; Edd Adams and I took the canvas off from one of the pieces of cloth and found it to be a very dark purple, the cloth at one end had a square piece cut out and a leaden seal at one corner, and I held the leaden seal while Edd Adams cut it off, which in so doing he cut my finger; then we considered what was to be done with the cloth, we were going to take two pieces away over the water, but we thought it was too late, and Adams said, he could put no more away, he could hide no more than two pieces; the Bearing, the vessel that I belonged to, lay close to the Clockton, and I agreed to put four pieces in her, which Edd Adams then assisted me in carrying over; I then put them, I hid them in the cabbin which I slept in; he then went on board of his craft, and I was gone to bed, he afterwards came over and told me that he had put his two pieces in his bed; the next day the Clockton went away with the goods, she had got in for Gravesend; the same morning a person of the name of William Tunnicliff came on board the Bearing, the vessel I belong to, and I told him I bad got this property and how I came by it, and I told him I would give him a piece of cloth provided he would assist me in taking the rest away, which he agreed to do; the same evening we took two pieces away over the water; I and William Tunnicliff ; one piece of it he took to his house.

Q. What became of the two pieces in the cabbin of the Clockton? - One piece of it Adams told me he carried to his brother's house, and the other piece was seized by two Custom House officers, he did not tell me their names.

Q. How long had you been in the situation you hold in the East India Company? - Three years and five months

Q. You know the marks of the East-India Company well? - Yes, I do.

Q. Where the marks you have described to be on the canvas, the marks belonging to the East-India Company? - They were.

Mr. Knowlys. This is a very pretty account you have been giving of yourself? - Yes, sir.

Q. I see you give it with just as much ease as if you had been at church last Sunday? - I wish to give it with ease.

Q.Pray, sir, be so good to shew that pretty face of your's, and stand up like as an honest man ought. How long have you been a thief? - That is not to the point in question.

Q. That is to the point in question; how long have you been a thief? - I cannot justly say.

Q. Now I hear very much to the misfortune of the East-India Company you have been three years and five months in their service; now of that three years and five months, what part have you employed in plundering them? you have been plundering them without remorse, and I want to know how long you have been in this practice? - That is not to the point in question.

Q. It is to the point in question, what kind of credit the Jury can give to your testimony? - I have told you before I could not justly say how long.

Q. How many years? - Not many, about nine or ten months.

Q. Nine or ten months is not a year; then nine or ten months you have had your full swing at the East-India Company's property? - No, it is not so, not always.

Q. No oftener than you had a good opportunity? - No.

Q. Then having given such a good account of yourself, I take it for granted you do it to save your neck? - Certainly.

Q. Now there was one thing I think you told us, that Adams told you, that he would not go down into the cabbin to get up these things, because there would be no one to give an answer to his master? - I did not say the cabbin, I said the hold.

Q. There was a lad on board besides Adams, so that that could not be the true reason, yet you have sworn it; with all that load of iniquity on your head, I take my leave of you, good by to you, you may stand down; I dare say the next time you give an account of a robbery, you will not do it so easy, you will do it at that bar.

Court. You have not explained to us after you had taken out this bale of cloth, what you did with it? - They were all in pieces of canvas, there was six pieces; the whole bale was completely taken away.

The prisoner called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-71

266. JOHN WOODWARD was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Fordred , about the hour of twelve in the night, of the 23d of January , and feloniously stealing therein, a pair of mens leather shoes, value 5 s. and three pair of womens stuff shoes, value 10 s. the goods of the said John Fordred .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JOHN FORDRED sworn.

I live at No. 430, Oxford-street, near Tottenham-court-road ; I am a shoemaker ; I went to bed about half after ten, on the 13th of January.

Q. Did you take care of the fastenings of your shop that night? - I do not

usually, but that night I examined my house, about half past eight, just as the man had shut up the shop, I examined both of the shutters, and I found them safe; I left the door in the care of the man, he is not here.

Q. Did the man sleep in the house with you? - He did, I found the bolts of the shop window all safe; about half after twelve I was alarmed by the watchman, he is here; I went into the shop as soon as I could; I got out of bed as soon as I could, and looked and saw a hole made through the shop window, both through the window shutter and the glass; the shutter was not down, there was some goods on a show board, opposite to the pane which they broke; these goods where there in the day time, and left there at night; they took out the pannel of the shutter, which was about nearly a foot one way, and the length of my arm in length, as near as I can judge; the glass seemed to be broke with the hand thrust through it, the panes are very large sash glasses, much larger than the pannel of the shutter, not so long, but wider; so that any body putting in an arm through the fracture of the shutter, and through this pane could reach the goods which were in the show window with very great ease.

Q. Were the articles, which are mentioned in this indictment in this shop window? - They were standing in that window, the three pair of womens, I verily believe were standing, but one pair I am sure of; the mens I put there the day before myself; I am sure I had in that window that day the mens shoes.

Q. How did it appear that the pannel of the shutter had been broke, had it been cut out or knocked to pieces? - There was a hole made at the bottom of the pannel, and an iron crow put in there and raised it out; when I opened the door, they informed me there were two near the window. About ten o'clock the next day, Mr. Williams, one of the witnesses sent his man, to know if I had lost any shoes, I informed his man I had; Mr. Williams is no officer, he lives on the other side of the street higher up, no great way from me; I went and he shewed me four pair of shoes, one pair of leather shoes, and three pair of womens stuff, I knew them all, and before I went to Mr. Williams's, I had just recollected that pair in particular, as being the pair that was in the window. Mr. Williams gave the shoes into my hands; I have them here.

Q. No other violence was offered to your house? - No more.

Q. And you could not consequently lose any thing more, than what was within the reach of an arm? - No, I could not.

Q. Had the watchman, when he gave you this alarm, any body in his custody? - He told me he had a man in custody, but I did not see the prisoner till I saw him at the watch-house. (Produces the shoes and deposes to them.) There is no mark in the mens shoes, there is a hole in the flap which I observed, when they were brought in from the binder, a fault in the leather, which the white leather should have covered, but it did not; I observed that hole when they were cut out, and I supposed that the white leather would have covered it, but it did not.

Q. At what time had you put that pair of shoes, or remember to have seen them in your shop window? - I think it was sometime in the afternoon; I am certain it was before dusk.

Q. In the same window that was broke? - Near the spot; I have no mark on the womens shoes, whereby I know them to be mine, only that they are my father's manufactory, he is not here; I

judge of them from the knowledge of the manufactory, I think it is the first I ever had of him, I assisted him sometime before I was in business myself.

Q. How long had you had these shoes of your father? - Not more than two months.

Q. Where had they been usually put? - Some of them were put in the window, I can undertake to say, that they were a part absolutely that I had of my father; my father does not make himself, but I had knowledge of the workmen for several years; two pair of them were made by two different workmen that I know, the other pair I cannot so positively speak to.

Prisoner. Is the prosecutor the proper owner of the shoes? - The shoes are my property; I have no partner; I have only the lower part of the house, Mr. Clarke has the whole house, and lets it out in two parts, and I have the lower part; there is nobody lives in the upper part, and it was empty at that time; Mr. Clarke does not live in the house, nor any of his family; I sleep in a bedroom backward behind the parlour.

Q. Is there more than one entrance to the house? - There are two, one for the shop, and one also for the use of the upper part of the house, I use both, they are both at the front, one is on the right hand side of the shop quite detached from the shop, we make use of that after the shop is shut up to go to our other apartments.

- HAYNES sworn.

I am a settled watchman of Mary-le-bone Parish; just after I had finished crying twelve, on Wednesday the 23d of January, I was in Oxford-street, a little below Rathbone-place, and I heard something crack at the bottom of the road, on the right hand side, I went down to see what it was, and saw the pannel of a shutter broke; it was as near as I can guess about two hundred yards from where I was standing at the bottom of Rathbone-place; I went down, I went immediately by the other side of the road, and I saw it was the shoemaker's, I observed the pannel of the shutter lifted out from the bottom, and the glass broke the same way, I went a little way up Oxford-street, and I saw this young man and another, a little way from the crack; I saw two persons standing still, immediately I crossed to the other side of the way to my own parish to watch them, how they would proceed in the business; I saw these two persons go, this prisoner and the other to the shop window, I am sure he is one of them, and I saw him put his arm in, and I went to him, and I catched him with his arm in, he had not taken any thing when I caught him; immediately he drew his arm out of the window, and chucked something over his shoulder from the window; this other man that was along with him took over to the other side of the way, which was in Mary-le-bone Parish, there was nobody with me; then one of the witnesses picked up what the prisoner threw away.

Q. When you laid hold of him, and he had got his arm in the window, did you then see any thing in his hand? - I did not observe any thing, but I am sure I observed him throw something from him, but what that was I did not then see; I gave an alarm, and there was our patrole came, and was with me after I had taken him, and sprung the rattle.

Q. How long was it after your hearing the crack of the shutter, that you went down there? - I went immediately.

Q. Did you see any body at the window before you came up? - I did not.

Prisoner. It is of no service of me putting to him any questions, he will continue in the same story for the purpose of swearing my life away, he has owed me a spite for this two years.

Court. Have you any spite or any ill will against this prisoner? - Never in my life; I never had any quarrel with him in my life; I always knew him to be a very hard working lad, and before this time, I looked upon him as well as my own brother, and would do any thing for him as far as laid in my power.

Jury. Have you had any quarrels? - Never in my life, since I have known him, and I have known him now going on twelve or fourteen years, and I always thought well of him before this transaction.

Q. How long have you been a watchman? - About four years.

JOSEPH CALLOWE sworn.

I live in Mary-le-bone; I am a patrole among the watchmen; I have eight men that are under my care. On the night of the 23d of January, I was going down Oxford-road, and this Thomas Haynes told me that he had a suspicion of something going forward in the St. Ann's side of the road; the watch had called twelve, and he called me over, and I saw a hole in the shutter in which I could put my two fingers in, it was cut with some instrument, the whole pannel was not wrenched out at that time.

Q. Did you see any persons standing in the neighbourhood of this place? - Not at this time, I did afterwards; then I went to two or three watering houses, that are about there, on the same side of the way; I wanted to see if we could see any suspicious people about, we could not; coming back an hackney coachman told me there was something going forward on the other side of the way, for he had heard a window broke, I was not absent above ten minutes, I returned, and Haynes was with me; Haynes went down St. Ann's side of the way, and I went down Mary-le-bone side, and Haynes took the man, and sprung his rattle; I did not see him lay hold of the man, it was the other side of the way, and I ran over to him.

Q. Had you yourself observed any persons at that time, on the side of the way that Haynes was of? - I had not; he sprung his rattle, and I went over to him, and the patrole of St. Ann's came up and Haynes, and the patrole of St. Ann's took him to St. Ann's watch-house; I saw nothing of any property at that time, the prisoner was the man he took.

Q. Was there any shoes produced that night? - I cannot say.

GEORGE SOLOMONS sworn.

I am a patrole belonging to St. Ann's. On the 23d of January, as I was coming along Oxford-street, I heard the rattle sprung, I ran out to where the rattles sprung, as I came up, the watchman Haynes had hold of the prisoner at the bar by the collar, it was just close by the prosecutor's shop, I asked him what was the matter? he said, he catched him with his hand in that window.

Court to Callowe. You said the first time you went down Haynes and you went over, and you then found a hole cut in the shutter, in which you could put two fingers, did you afterwards make any observation of the shutter before Haynes took hold of the man? - No.

Q. Did you make any observation of the shutter being more broke? - O yes, the pannel of the shutter was out, and a pane of glass broke.

Court to Solomons. Where had Haynes hold of the prisoner? - He was standing close by the shop of the prosecutor's.

Q. Did you take any notice of this shop? - I saw a great hole that I could put my arm in, in the shutter, and a pane of glass broke.

Q. Did you see any thing of any property then? - I did not then, I did the next day.

JOHN HAWTHORNE sworn.

I am a constable of the night; I had the prisoner given into my charge in the parish of St. Ann's watch-house.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a shoemaker; I live at No. 52, Oxford-street; I was coming past, on Thursday morning, the 23d of January, about twenty minutes before one, opposite the side where Mr. Fordred, the prosecutor lives, he lives on the left hand, on St Ann's side, and I live on the right, I was going from St. Giles's, to my own home; I crossed as I usually do, the end of Oxford-street from St. Giles's, because it is the cleanest, and my feet ran against something, I did not know immediately what it was, they were laying just as I was going across away from the small pavement way, to get from the Boar and Castle, from the end of the road to the Boar and Castle gate; I believe it is about thirty yards more towards Tottenham-court-road, than opposite Mr. Fordred's shop, not above fifty yards from Mr. Fordred's shop; they rather entangled over my ancle, I stopped to see what it was, it was a pair of shoes, and stooping I perceived there were three more pair, I found four pair, and I carried them home, three pair of womens stuff, and one pair of mens leather. The next morning I employed my young man to go and know if any house had been broke open, whether any body would own them, and I understand the first shop he went into, he saw Mr. Fordred, and he recognized them directly. I know the shoes again, they are the same shoes I found.

Q. What do you say on recollection concerning the distance of Mr. Fordred's house? - It was fifty yards; whoever must take them must have run towards Tottenham-court-road.

Court to Haynes. You swear that you saw two persons standing there in that neighbourhood, now when you laid hold of one of them, what became of the other? - He took the other side of the road, which way he went I cannot tell, my back was to him, when he took the other side of the road.

Q. You saw the prisoner chuck something over his shoulder, did you look to observe what became of that thing that he so chucked? - No.

Q. How near was the other man to the prisoner, when the prisoner chucked something over his shoulder? - Very near, close to him.

Q. Was it before the prisoner chucked something, or after, that the other man took the other side of the way? - After, I am sure of that.

Prisoner. When I was taken into custody for this robbery, I had been to a public house, where I had met several men that I worked with, who detained me drinking there quite late in the evening, and I departed from them, and was walking towards my own home; I was walking down Oxford street, and I saw a hole in the pannel of the shutter; I drew pretty near to see whether it was a hole or not, in the mean time I was looking at it, a man about twenty or thirty yards off walked very sharp away, in the mean time I was looking stedfast at it, that man came, and took me into custody, it is impossible to break a shutter, without having instruments. I have no witness.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 21.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron THOMPSON .

Reference Number: t17930220-72

267. RALPH EDDLESTONE was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on James Francis , on the 18th of January , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person

and against his will, 1 s. and thirteen halfpence, the monies of the said James Francis .

JOHN COBHAM sworn.

I was the watchman; the prosecutor is not at home; I know the prosecutor called me to his assistance, I was there as soon as he called me, on the 19th of January, a little after eleven o'clock, I heard watch called at the Green Park Wall , I stepped to the Green Park Wall immediately; James Francis was laying down on the flags, and he had hold of Ralph Eddlestone , by the great coat tail, and James Francis charged me with Eddlestone, saying, he had knocked him down and robbed him; I did not see it myself, only I found Francis laying down, when I came to the wall, when I laid hold of him immediately, and springing my rattle, my partner, William James came to my assistance, and Dennis Manning came up afterwards, and desired us to secure his hands, that he might not get them to his pocket, then we took him to St. George's watch-house, where Dennis Manning searched him, and we found 2 s. 6 d. in silver, and 1 s. and 6 d. 1/2 in halfpence.

Q. Any fire arms? - No, I know nothing more about it.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-73

268. ROBERT JENKINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of January , one mare, value 10 l. the goods of persons unknown.

HENRY MEREDITH sworn.

On the 25th of January, I had information, and I pursued this man, when I went up to him, I asked him where he had got this mare? he told me, that the man that was walking along with me knew him, and where he got the mare; I asked the man, and he said, he knew nothing about the mare, he did know the man; with that I told him, I should keep him in custody till the owner was found, I took him before Mr. Justice Bond, and he was committed. I had the mare cried at Battle Bridge, and some other places, but I have not found the owner.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-74

269. JAMES BELLOWS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of January , 56 lb. weight of lead, value 9 s. belonging to Mary Fletcher , widow , affixed to two several dwelling houses of her's .

MARY FLETCHER sworn.

I am a widow; I keep a public house , the Two Brewers, Bembrook-street, St. Giles's; I lost some lead from two houses, on the 30th of January, I don't know how it was lost, I did not see the prisoner take it away; there is a person who said, that he see it, but he is not here; the lead was affixed to the gutters, that runs on the top of two houses belonging to me, I have a lease of them.

EDWARD PINNER sworn.

I am a bricklayer; I repaired the houses; in the morning I went up and saw the lead cut from between two houses, about twenty-four feet; I did not see who took it, but on the side of the door I see a piece lay down, and I found the girl, and she went and swore to this man, but she is not here.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn.

I was the officer that took the prisoner into custody. I know nothing of the robbery.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-75

270. THOMAS BUNN otherwise BARTON , and JAMES BUNN otherwise BARTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , a copper ball of a cock, value 1 s. 6 d. being a utensil fixed to a certain outhouse, belonging to a dwelling house of John Batterbee , he not having any title or claim to the same .

Indicted in a SECOND COUNT for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January, six inches of leaden pipe, with a brass cock and copper ball, value 2 s. the property of Barbara Dicks , widow .

JOHN BATTERBEE sworn.

I live in Charles-street, Battle Bridge ; I work in the livery lace manufactory ; I kept a house the time the affair happened; it was the 25th of January, Friday morning, about between four and five o'clock; I was alarmed by the watchman, who told me there was a man in the yard, who was this James Barton, the watchman took him in the yard coming from the wash house, with the balls belonging to the water cock, the water cock was affixed over the water tub; I had seen the water come in the Wednesday before, and I am sure it did not over-run.

Q. Had this man any pretence to the house at all, did he lodge in the house? - He did not.

Q. Do you know any thing of these men? - I never saw any thing of them before to my knowledge; the other man, Thomas Barton was in the next yard to him, belonging to the Golden Lion public house, I see him come out of a privy; coming up to this privy, Thomas Barton , who was inside spoke, and the other James immediately said, that is my brother that is inside there; after he was taken out, one of the watchmen said, suppose we examine the privy, James Barton said, it was no use, for it goes down into the shore; the cock is here.

Prisoner James Barton . I never said any thing to Mr. Batterbee about any body being along with me.

THOMAS POWELL sworn.

I am a watchman; on Friday morning about one o'clock, I was going my round, I saw the two prisoners at the bar, and another man with them, standing together close by the gates of the Golden Lion; with that I turned myself round, and they saw me, and they went off as fast as they could; at three o'clock I found the gates open that goes into the back yard, I shut them all then; at half after three, I went round again, and I found them all open the same again, and then I goes up the first street, and I lights of the other watchman Henry Herbert, and I told him what I had seen going forward, and he said, it was a pity, but what I could lay hold of them; with that, I went down again, and I saw one of the prisoners at the bar, I cannot be certain which, taking a ladder down from the side of the wash-house place, with that I slepped up the street, and kept crying the hour till I came up to Herbert's house, and asked him to come down, for I knew that the people were about; with that he came down, and I went round to the gate, and he got over the pails, with that, we searched about the place for some considerable time, with that, we wanted to get upon the pales; there was some old timber

that laid against the pales in the back yard, we got on the top of these, and Mr. Herbert was getting over, and saw James Bunn come out, with the ball of the cock on the side of him; with that, we asked him what he did there? he said, he lodged there; with that, we asked him where he was going out that way? he said, he was going to work; with that, we told him, that was a comical way to come out to go to work, to come over a parcel of pales seven or eight feet high, we demanded him to come over, then we took hold of his shoes to see what condition they were in, and we found his shoes more dirtier than ours, who had been out all night; with that Mr. Herbert gets over, and knocks at the door, to get the person up that belonged to the house; we saw him drop the ball of the cock as he came out of the place, and Mr. Herbert picked it up; with that, he knocked at the door to alarm the landlady, to know if she had any body lodge there, she got up and said no; we got and searched, and saw where the ball was broke off; with that, Mr. Herbert said coming out, you had better look round that corner in the privy, it was belonging to the Golden Lion, James Clare keeps it; I found the door was fast.

Q. Did that public house communicate at the back to Mr. Batterbee's house? - The yard did, only the paling parts, and we found the other prisoner in the privy, Thomas Bunn , he had nothing with him, with that, we took them away to the watch-house.

Q. Are you sure you had seen these two men lurking before? - Yes, I am sure these are the two men.

HENRY HERBERT sworn.

I am a watchman; when I went over the pales, I was called by Powell, I was in bed, says he, Harry are you in bed? no, not quite, says I, come down along with me, says he, I went with him, and gets over the pales into the Golden Lion Yard, he went round to the gate; with that, we got over, and looked about, and could see nobody at all; I got on this timber, and sets there for the value of a minute or more, while I was standing there James Bunn came out of the wash-house, with the ball in his hand, and I immediately hallooed who are you, what are you doing there? says he, I lodge here, I am going to work, I said it was a comical place to get over to go to work, he comes to the pales and drops this down, and I took it up, I compared it with the piece that was left on the cock and it fitted; so he got over the pales, and I said, let us look at your shoes, and he put his shoes up, and I said, your shoes are dirtier than mine, that has been out all night, and I knocked at the door, and they said nobody lodged there, and I told the man, and he got up; with that, I looked in two or three privies, to see if I could find any body else, coming out I said, look into that necessary, perhaps there is somebody in there, and he went to the door, and put his hand against the door, and he said, there is somebody here for it is fastened on the inside, James makes answer, and says, it is my brother that is in there; so then he opened the door, and there he was in the privy, I asked him what he was doing there? he said, he went in there and he was asleep, he said, he did not hear any noise when the rattles sprung, for he was asleep; we took them both into custody, and had them to the watch-house.

JAMES BATES sworn.

I am the watchman adjoining to Thomas Powell; I saw three men, two of which are the prisoners, come by my beat about half after one, I saw them

go down towards Thomas Powell 's beat, I informed him, and asked him, if he did not see some men about, he said, he had, I described them, and he said, he had seen the same, at half after four, I heard him spring his rattle, and I went down to his assistance, and I found the two men, one was in custody of Mr. Herbert, that is James; I had my lanthorn, the other had none, and I went to the necessary with Mr. Powell, and there was Thomas, we searched to see if we could see any thing drop down. Thomas Bunn I knew very well, he is a shoemaker , and works for Mr. Gibbs; he opened the privy door inside. James said there was nobody there but my brother; with that we took them both up to the watch-house. (The ball of the cock deposed to.)

Prisoner Thomas Bunn . I was at work very near ten o'clock that same evening; I went to get my supper at the Golden Lion, and I stopped rather too long, and got locked out of my lodgings, and being a wet night, I went into this privy, and sat till morning; my brother had left me some time; I work for Mr. Gibbs.

Prisoner James Bunn . I was with my brother, and had been very ill; I got over into this gentleman's yard to get a drop of water being very dry.

James Bunn . GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Thomas Bunn . GUILTY . (Aged 23.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-76

271. ADELARD HART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a cotton shawl, value 2 s. the goods of Horace Gooch .

(An Interpreter sworn)

HORACE GOOCH sworn.

I live at No. 35, Oxford-street ; I am a linen draper ; the prisoner at the bar came to my shop to purchase some goods; the 4th of February, about two or three o'clock in the afternoon, she bought a shawl of the value of 4 s. 3 d. and a person who was in the shop, saw her shove another shawl from the counter on the floor; after that she set down on the stool, and concealed it down some where under her clothes, they told me of it, and she was just gone out of the shop, and I went after her, and brought her back, and my young man Benjamin Clement , pulled the shawl from under her cloak, the same pattern as they see her take; to the best of my knowledge, I never saw her before; I believe she is a foreigner, we had some difficulty in understanding her, but we could make out what she wanted.

BENJAMIN CLEMENT sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Horace Gooch . On Monday the 4th of February, the prisoner at the bar came to the shop of Mr. Horace Gooch , she asked to look at some shawls, she bought one. A customer that was in the shop called me, and told me, the prisoner had taken some shawls; I went up to her again, and asked her if any thing more was wanting? she bought a yard of muslin, she paid for it, and went out, and I told Mr. Gooch of it; as soon as she was gone I immediately went after her and brought her back; she came and she leaned over the counter, and pulled the shawl out from under her muff; the other shawl was in a bit of paper. I don't know what she did with it, I put that and the yard of muslin together.

Q. Did not you observe when you brought her back, whether she had one or two shawls? - I don't know.

Q. Did not you search to see, whether she had taken by mistake that shawl instead of the other? - I did not.

Q. When she was brought back you went up to her? - Yes.

Q. Did not you observe, whether she had the other parcel? - I did not see it. I don't know whether she had or not.

SARAH MORLING sworn.

My husband is a day labourer; I saw the person take the shawl, I saw her throw it on the ground from the counter, she wiped it from the counter with her cloak, she threw her cloak on it, and threw it down by the side of her; I saw her, afterwards she shuffled it under her clothes, she sat down on the stool, I saw her pick it up from the ground, and in paying for what she had bought, she was very much confused when she found that she was found out; when she came back, she had the parcel that she had bought inside of her muff; I am certain of it, and she laid it down on the counter; afterwards the shawl was taken from her, by that young man Benjamin Clements ; after she had bought the things, she was ready to cram the money into the person's hand before he was ready to take it, in order to get out of the shop, as soon as she went out of the shop, I informed the master of the shop, and he immediately followed her, and fetched her back.

JAMES KENNEDY sworn.

I was sent for to the prosecutor's shop; I searched the prisoner at the bar, when I searched her, I found the shawl wrapped up in a bit of paper with the muslin, this was in her pocket, and the other shawl was delivered to me there in the shop. (The shawl produced and deposed to, as the same that was taken from the woman, but not having any private mark on it, the prosecutor could not swear to it.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-77

272. ANN HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a linen table cloth, value 2 s. a cotton curtain, value 4 s. a cloth coat, value 10 s. three check linen curtains, value 6 s. two linen sheets, value 1 s. a jean waistcoat, value 2 s. another jean waistcoat, value 1 s. a cotton counterpane, value 5 s. two moco stone rings, set in gold, value 6 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 4 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. a black enamelled gold ring, value 2 s. two pair of stone ear-rings, value 4 s. a linen gown and coat, value 5 s. two linen shirts, value 4 s. a quarter of a guinea, and two pieces of foreign coin, value 4 s. the goods, chattels, and monies of William Heath in this dwelling house .

WILLIAM HEATH sworn.

I live in Queen-street, St. Georges, Bloomsbury ; I am Clerk to Mr. Edward Kendrick , No. 33, King-street, Covent-garden; he is a brass founder; I keep a house in Queen-street. On the 28th of January as I was going past St. Paul's, I missed my watch; at first I thought I had left it at home, being Monday, as I frequently had done in my Sunday's cloaths; I know the woman at the bar, she was at my house and did the business of my house; I never made any agreement with her.

Q. Are you a married man? - I am.

Q. Does your wife live with you? - Yes, she is related to my wife by her first

husband; my wife's first husband was her uncle. I never made any agreement with her as a servant; had she acted as she ought to have done, as far as my ability, I would have rewarded her in the course of time.

Q. What was she to do? - I considered when she came into the house my wife was but very poorly; I understood there was some difference between her and her husband, and she came into my house and asked my wife to let her be there for a few days; she came then, and when I came home in the evening my wife informed me; this was some time in June last, and the prisoner at the bar asked me whether it would be agreeable for her to sleep there for a few days? I acquiesced in it, understanding she was some relation to my wife by her first husband. On the 28th of January I challenged her with having taken several articles; she acknowledged to some of them; I enquired after the articles, as in searching over my dress I missed my silver buckles; I lost my articles, and consequently I was to enquire after them; I found she had pledged my silver buckles I charged her with, my black coat I also charged her with; she wished God would strike her dead if she knew any thing of my silver buckles or my black coat; I charged her also with several other articles I missed at certain times; some of the articles she owned to having pledged, to the amount of about 1 l. 6 s.

Q. What did you say to her to induce her to own to these articles? - I told her if she would give me up the duplicates of the articles that she had pledged, I would not prosecute her, but she did not give me up the duplicates, for this was on Tuesday or Wednesday; after the 28th she told me where the things were, part of them, but she told me they were pledged in Tottenham court-road; she did not give a just account where they were, nor a just account of all the duplicates; there was one duplicate brought to me afterwards by her own husband, sent by her to me. I missed many other articles besides.

Q.Did the husband come to see her at your house? - Yes, he had been there several times, I cannot tell how often, as I am obliged to be away from home from morning till night, and my wife being ill ever since June last; I missed all the things in the indictment at different times; I cannot tell what is missing, because I was not in the way altogether to know; when I told her I would not prosecute her, I was not sensible of my loss.

Q. Where these the things you missed before you told her you would not prosecute her, if she would give up the duplicates? - Yes, they were taken at different times; I know no more to my own knowledge.

Mr. Knowlys. I suppose you had a good opinion of this woman? - I had a very great opinion of her, or else I should not have trusted her; I placed the greatest confidence in her; I believe all the things in the indictment are present.

Q. I dare say that you will be able to recollect a little more than what you have told us Mr. Heath, it was a long time before we learned that she was so near a relation; now you talk about duplicates and so on, and that you had a very good opinion of this woman; perhaps you had a very good opinion of a woman named Margerett Carr? - I took her up at the same time; I charged her with the constable, Samuel Hanover

Q. Then the next indictment is a charge against Margerett Carr? - She was admitted an evidence at the police office.

Q. I see her name is struck out of the back of the bill? - I really cannot find her.

Q. When did you see her last? - The last time was at the police office in Marlborough-street.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - of you please; I don't know to my knowledge that I have seen her since.

Q. You must know whether or not you have seen a woman that you have charged with a robbery? - I have not seen her.

Q. When did you attend at the police office? - On the 13th of February.

Q. As it is only thirteen days ago since you see her, you can tell us positively whether you have seen Margerett Carr since? - I have not seen her since

Q. Do you swear that positively? - Yes.

Q. Why did you say before you had not seen her to your knowledge? - Because I was willing to speak the truth.

Q. Then you do not mean to swear positively that you have not seen her? - I have not seen her.

Q. Now I will tell you; do you know a Mr. Broughton? - I don't know the name.

Q. When did Margerett Carr leave your service? - On the 28th of January or 29th; I will not take on me to say which.

Q. Whom did she go to live with? - I told her not to let me see her face any more.

Q. Who did she go to live with? - She is a chairwoman I believe.

Q. Why do you believe she is a chairwoman? - Because I understand she acted as a chairwoman at my house.

Q. Did not she live as a regular servant there? - No.

Q. Do you ever recollect saying this, that you would certainly hang that woman there, but you would spare Carr? - I never said any such word.

Q. Upon your oath do not you know this fact, that every one of these things, which are produced from the pawnbroker's, were pawned by Margerett Carr and in her name? - I do not.

Q. Have you not seen the duplicates? - I have.

Q. Are these not all in the name of Margerett Carr? - No, they are not.

Q. Now you have not seen this Margerett Carr at any friend's house? - No, not since she was at the police office.

Q. How soon before she was at the police office had you seen her at any friend's? - I cannot say, I saw her on the 28th or 29th of January.

Q. At what friend's house? - At no friend's house.

Q. Do not you know that this Margerett Carr has been in Newgate under a charge of felony? - I never heard that she was in Newgate, or any other place of confinement.

Q. I believe, as these things have been going frequently, you have had occasion to complain of other persons who had robbed you? - I have had occasion.

Q. That person was in your family down to the present time. Have you not had occasion to charge one of your children with robbing you? - No.

Q.Nor ever suspected them? - No.

Q. Pray who bailed Margerett Carr? - She was bound over, I understand, by Mr. Nathaniel Conant to appear in evidence, I don't know any thing of any bail.

Q. You told us a little while ago that Margerett Carr was admitted to bail? - No, it was admitted an evidence; she was bound over with the pawnbrokers.

Q. Did not Margerett Carr, say that she had pawned all these things in her own name? - No.

ALEXANDER LANE sworn.

I live in Holborn; I took these things into pawn; I took five stone rings, two pair of ear rings, and a gold cane, of the prisoner, the 24th of December; I am sure it was the prisoner, she pledged them in in the name of Ann Jones; here is a pair of buckles which I took of Margerett

Carr, and the prisoner came forward with Margerett Carr, and had more money on them. The other things I took of Margerett Carr, Margerett Carr was with the prisoner when she pledged the rings, the cane, and the gold pair of ear rings; I asked her whose property they were? - She told me her own.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I did not take in the things I produce of the prisoner; I took them in of Margarett Carr.

GEORGE BOYCE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I live with Mr. Harrison, Tottenham Court Road; I know nothing of the prisoner at the bar. On the 5th of last October I took in this gown, which William Heath swears to be his property, but it is so long ago I cannot recollect whether the prisoner at the bar is the person or not.

SAMUEL HAMILTON sworn.

I am the officer; I know nothing only taking the prisoner. (The things produced and deposed to.)

Mr. Knowlys to prosecutor. How came this to be a charge for a capital offence, she was only committed for a single felony from the office? - I don't know what she was committed for there, I understood I was to set a value on the things; I hope I have not over charged them.

Q. Did you know she was so near her time? - I have heard she was with child.

Q.Do you know she was very near being brought to bed, she will now be brought to bed in less than an hour? - I have been a great sufferer.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Of stealing to the value of 30 s.

(Aged 30.)

Recommended by the Prosecutor and Jury, being so near her time.

Privately Whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-78

273. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of January , a set of cotton furniture, for a four post bedstead, value 20 s. two callico window curtains, 5 s. a looking glass, value 3 s. a pair of brass candlesticks, value 3 s. a pair of steel snuffers, value 1 s. and a japan snuffer stand, value 3 d. the goods of Ann Constable , widow , in a lodging room .

ANN CONSTABLE sworn.

I am a widow; I live in Vine street, Middlesex Hospital ; I keep a house; Mary Jones the first of this month came to take a lodging of me, and came to it that night, a three pair of stairs front room, ready furnished, to pay 5 s. a week; I had other lodgers in the house, in the first and second floor at that time; I live in the lower part of the house in the parlour. On the 7th of this month the second floor was then to be let, and she took that; I never see no more of her, but I heard a noise which occasioned me to tell her to leave that lodging at the week's end; the noise was between her and some men that she brought into the house. On Thursday the 13th, between the hours of nine and ten at night, she came down to me and said, she could not leave the lodgings until Saturday, as she had then got a lodging to go to, and begged for a night's lodging over her week; I told her she was extremely welcome to the night, provided she went away quietly; I saw no more of her never, till she was taken; she went away immediately

as she asked for admittance to stay an over night; I had never seen her before she came to my house in my life. On Friday I was called up by one of the lodgers who suspected she was gone, and a person ran up by my desire to see whether the things were gone or not, and I went up, and I went into the room and found the room stripped of every thing; the first thing I missed was the sopha cover; not half the things are in the indictment; I missed the cotton furniture, the window curtains, the brass candlestick and the snuffer stand; these things were found at Strangeways, a pawnbroker's, over Black Fryar's Bridge.

JOHN STRANGEWAYS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Surry Road. On Friday, the 15th of this month, the prisoner at the bar, brought me these things to pledge, they are the things mentioned in the indictment, she pledged them in the name of Maund, I am sure the prisoner is the person, I knew her before by that name, I had had some things of her some time back; I know it is the same woman; I was the means of her being taken. (The things produced mentioned in the indictment, and deposed to.)

Prisoner. My husband sent me out to get a lodging, he took the best part of the things in my absence, and when I came back again he told me if I would not take the remainder he would murder me.

Court to Prosecutrix. Did she come as a single woman or as a married woman? - She came as a single woman.

Court to Strangeways. Do you know whether she has a husband? - I do not.

The prisoner called two witnesses to her character.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-79

274. JAMES KELLY , WILLIAM HESLIP and JOHN MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of January , a silver ink-stand, value 39 s. the goods of John York , Esq . and Charles York , Esq .

Indicted in a second COUNT, for stealing the same things laying them to be the property of John York , Charles York and the Right Honourable Chistian Charlotte Margerett, Lady Dowager of Dover .

Indicted in a third COUNT, laying them to be the property of Lady Dover only.

The case was opened by Mr. Const

THOMAS GOODWIN sworn.

I am the carpenter of the Sun Fire Office; there had been a fire at Lord Dover's house; I employed the three prisoners to turn over the ruins and to see if there was any property in the ruins; it was the 11th of this month, it was Monday evening, there was a letter left at the public house over the way with a direction for me to go to Mr. Gordon's the pawnbroker; in consequence of which between three and four in the afternoon, on Tuesday, I went and he produced this silver ink-stand, there was none of the prisoners present at that time, they had left their work the same day at eleven o'clock and absconded; Mr. Gordon gave me the description of the three prisoners that I knew who they were; I went from this house to Bow-street, with an intent to get a warrant, and I meets one of them which is Murray, the short one, in one of the courts just by; I asked him where he was going? he seemed rather confused, made me, no answer; I asked him directly where Kelly his other partner was? he told

me at his lodging; by his instructions I found the other two; they went up with me to Bow-street; I left a person with them at the Green Man; I did not give any charge of them, they were taken before Justice Bond and committed. I searched all the prisoners twice on Monday, the day that we employed the prisoners, to see that they had nothing in their pockets, they had been at the work twice that day, and I ordered the man to search him in my presence, he stood at the side of the door when I let him out.

DAVID GORDON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 434, St. Martin's lane. On Monday night the 11th of this month, about half past eight or rather more, Heslip and Murray came to my shop; Murray came in and produced some plate which was cut in pieces, three large pieces and some small pieces besides; Murray said, we have brought you something worth your buying, I looked at it and I saw it was plate, as though it was quite blackened by the fire; on one piece I found a gentleman's coat of arms, I shewed it to them, they seemed not surprised, I asked them particular where they were working? they said, they were working by a fire by Oxford-road, and they found it in the ruins; I asked them what street? they could not inform me, they said, they did not know; I asked them who was their employer? they said, Mr. Goodwin, which was a master bricklayer; I asked them where he did live? they could not inform me, they said, they did not know; I asked them where he paid them? they said, at a public house; I asked them the sign? Murray said, he believed it was the One Tun, he said, near the buildings; I asked them where he hired them? he said, at Charing Cross, it may be about that very instant my lad went out of doors, and he found Kelly, and he brought him in, he came in with the lad, he had not hold of him, my lad said, he found him at the door; I asked Kelly the same questions as I had asked them, word for word; I believe he gave the same answer exactly; I asked how long they had been in London? they said, they had been in London a fortnight; I asked them if they heard how long the fire had happened before they went to work? they said, a few days; I could not find at what house this was; I asked them if they had heard of any accident that happened at it? they said, there was a young woman that sell out of a two pair of stairs window; from that I knew it was Lady Dover's; they did not seem to be any way intimidated or afraid; Kelly said, they would bring Mr. Goodwin, their employer, about the plate, that they lived all three together in Marigold-court, in the Strand; they gave a proper account; directly my lad and I went to this place where the fire was, I saw a gentleman's servant crossing the street, I enquired for the One Tun, I went into a public house and shewed them the plate, and I found out the steward about ten o'clock, and I shewed him the plate and he owned it directly, he said, that he and one of the executors would call at my house the next morning; Mr. Goodwin called, I told him I had not the pleasure to know him, but I would go with him to the steward.

Q. You have stated to us that the two which first came in, namely Heslip and Murray, gave you answers to every question you asked, just as you have told, and Kelly when he came in he repeated nearly the same, every thing exactly corresponded? - It did.

Q. Was the directions they gave to their own lodgings right? - It was.

JOHN KIRBY sworn.

I was present when they came to Bow-street, and the plate was produced, I have had it in my custody ever since; Gordon, the pawnbroker, produced it.

PETER CELESTINE AARON sworn.

I lived with my Lord Dover; I was the valet de chamber there; as far as I know I recollect this to be part of his Lordship's plate, he had an ink-stand standing always in his study, but it is so disguised that I cannot swear positively, but I believe it is; it is not in the form, there is my Lord's coat of arms, but that is also the coat of arms of the rest of the family; I cannot venture to assert it is part of that ink-stand.

All three not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-80

275. BENJAMIN DICKSON COOK was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Thornton , about the hour of five in the night, of the 15th of January , with a felonious intent to steal his goods .

JOHN THORNTON sworn.

I live at St. Mary's Whitechapel ; I am a carman , I keep horses and carts to let to hired work; about five o'clock in the evening I believe I was sitting by the fire, on the 15th of January, it was near dusk, it was just candle light, and I could see just a face without any light.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-81

276. SAMUEL YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , a pannel saw, value 6 s. the goods of Benjamin Gill . A pannel saw, value 5 s. a tenant saw, value 5 s. a plow, value 2 s. the goods of Henry Stanforth . A ripping saw, value 2 s. the goods of John Myrtle . A sash saw, value 2 s. the goods of Joseph Wilson . A square made of wood and iron, value 2 s. the goods of William Smith . A sash saw, value 2 s. the goods of John Sawyer Glanville .

BENJAMIN GILL sworn.

I am a journeyman carpenter , I was at work at the Duke of Leeds, St. James's Square . On Saturday night I left the house at the usual time about six o'clock, I left the saw in the room, in the one pair of stairs on Monday morning, when I returned to my work again it was gone; it was a pannel saw, that is found; I lost an hand saw at the same time that was not found, and a trying square.

HENRY STANFORTH sworn.

I am a carpenter at the Duke of Leeds. On Saturday night I left work at six o'clock, I locked up my tools in my chest, a pannel saw, a tenant saw, and a plow; when I returned to work on Monday morning, there was my chest broke open and my property gone.

JOHN MYRTLE sworn.

I am a carpenter and work at the Duke of Leeds. On Saturday the 12th of January, I left work and left my tools in my chest; when I returned on Monday morning, the saws were all taken from my chest; there was a ripping saw, and a pannel saw, and two other saws; my chest was broke open.

JOSEPH WILSON sworn.

I was at work at the Duke of Leeds. I left my saw hanging upon a nail, to the

best of my knowledge, Monday when I came, it was gone.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

I am a carpenter, I worked at the Duke of Leeds. I left my tools on Saturday night hanging up against the wall, against the bench; Monday morning when I came to work, they were gone.

JOHN SAWYER GLANVILLE sworn.

I was at work at the Duke of Leeds. I left my tools in Mr. Stanforth's chest, they were gone on Monday morning.

GEORGE WOOD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, No. 21, Green-street, Leicester-fields; I took a saw into pawn, on the 22d of January, which I can swear to the person of whom I had it, Samuel Young is the name on the duplicate, it was pawned for half a crown. (Deposed to by Mr. Gill.)

GEORGE TURNER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I live with my brother, Ponton-street, in the Hay-market; I have got one saw pawned, on the 23d of January, I lent eighteen pence on it, I think I received it of the prisoner, but I don't know. (Deposed to by Mr. Smith.)

- sworn.

I live at Mr. Freer's, little Poultney-street, Golden-square; I have got a saw pledged, on the 28th of January, and three saws pledged about a fortnight or so before; I cannot say exactly when they were pledged, in the first place; because the tickets were destroyed, and he came forward with another to sell them, and then we gave a fresh ticket; I took in one or two of them, I was present when he pledged them all; I am sure it was the prisoner who came with them; there was one pawned the 28th of January, and one before that time. (The four saws deposed to.)

- KENNEDY sworn.

I am a peace officer belonging to Marlborough-street; I took the prisoner into custody after half an hour's battle between the prisoner and me; I found a number of duplicates. (Produced and one deposed to by Turner.)

ELISHA RAY sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Mollet, he lives in Rose-street, Covent-garden. On the 23d of January, the prisoner brought in a long square; I have a plow likewise which Henry Stanforth claims; I am sure it was the prisoner who pawned the square. (The plow and square deposed to.)

Prisoner. I work for Mr. Sylvester, at the top of the Hay-market; about five weeks ago I was discharged, on Saturday night; I went as far as the Blue Last, in Oxford Road, I went in and asked if the landlord was at home, and could give me a job, he said no; I told two men that I was going to the West Indies and I wanted a job for a fortnight, one of them said he was going down to a captain on board a man of war; they asked me what things I wanted? he said, I had better take some carpenters tools; for saws of five shillings and sixpence here would sell for fourteen shillings or fifteen shillings a piece there, I told them I had not above nine or ten shillings in my pocket; they had the tools and they asked me to go down along with them and have a pint of porter, and if I like to have the tools, I might go and pledge them at a pawnbroker's if I had not enough to purchase them, and buy the duplicate with what money I had in my

pocket, and I got them in that way; the men are not here, the two men are strangers to me; I went and pledged them at different times, and fetched them out afterwards to shew them to my shipmates, I have not any witness because I have not expected my trial to come on till the afternoon.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-82

277. MARGERETT PARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a pair of linen sheets, value 5 s. a copper saucepan, value 6 d. the goods of Sarah Clarke , in a lodging room .

SARAH CLARKE sworn.

I am a widow , I let a lodging to her and to another person whom I supposed to be her husband, he was to pay four shillings a week.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-83

278. RICHARD RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a silver watch, value 30 s. a steal watch chain, value 12 d. two stone seals, value 2 d. a watch key, value 1 d. the goods of Richard Dale .

RICHARD DALE sworn.

I am a publican the corner of Wych-street ; I was standing at my own door, on Friday the 8th of February, I lost my watch, I went out of my own house to make water about half after eleven, to that door, and a person passing by picked it out of the right side of my breeches, and the glass being broke it catched, feeling my watch go I pursued, and cried stop thief, and I saw somebody turn the corner in Wych-street; I did not see the prisoner at all, this might be about eleven o'clock in the evening, and a gentleman coming down the street caught hold of the prisoner, and said to me here is your watch; the gentleman stopped him before I, and the watchman got up; the gentleman brought him down and the watch to my house; I had lost sight of him, I have no recollection who the person was, I gave the watch up that night to the beadle Richard Dobbings ; the gentleman told me the prisoner gave him hold of the watch as soon as he caught hold of him.

Q. Why is not that gentleman here? - He had taken a coach, and he said he might be at Jamaica before the trial would come on; the prisoner kneeled down and said it was his first offence and hoped I would forgive him.

JOHN BERRY sworn.

I am a watchman; I was calling half after eleven, on Friday the 8th of this month, and I heard a cry of stop thief, I pursued the thief, I saw him run, and I took that prisoner; and I sprung my rattle, and the gentleman had caught hold of him, when I went up I took hold of the prisoner, I saw a watch in the gentleman's hand, and I heard the gentleman say in the hearing of the prisoner, that he took the watch out of the prisoner's hand; he said it was the first thing ever he had been guilty of. I saw the gentleman deliver it to Mr. Dale, it was a silver watch.

Mr. Schoen. What sort of a gentleman was this? - He appeared like a gentleman.

Q. Was he going the same way with the prisoner? - He was going towards where the prisoner ran.

RICHARD DOBBING sworn.

I am a constable. On Friday the 8th of February, past eleven at night, the prisoner at the bar was brought to the watch-house; he was charged with robbing Mr. Dale of a watch, he said it was his first offence, and wished he would forgive him; I have got the watch here. (The watch deposed to.)

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

GUILTY . (Aged 33.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-84

279. JOHN WILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , two silver tea spoons, value 4 s. four linen table cloths, value 15 s. five printed books, value 5 s. the goods of Matthew Williams .

MATTHEW WILLIAMS sworn.

The prisoner has been a servant of mine 'til the latter end of the last month. On the 28th day a man came and gave me an information; and I applied to the public office in Bow-street, this man had left my service for a day or two; we went in search of him, and at his lodgings we were told he was gone out with his wife; the constable broke open his door, and we found five printed books my property, which I have here; eighteen pawnbroker's duplicates or there abouts, we collected from these pawnbrokers, four table cloths and two silver tea spoons, in consequence of this, I had him taken to the magistrate in Bow-street and committed; the books I swear to be my property, by my hand writing in them, and the table linen will be proved by a servant of mine. These books I produce, has my hand writing in every one of them; I cannot take upon me to say how long I had seen them before in my house, this man had lived with me I believe about three months; I searched his lodgings the day I received the information, the 28th of January, when I took him to Bow-street, he signed a written confession that he had stole these things my property.

Q. Was there any thing previously said to him? - Nothing by me, nor by the magistrate, neither promise nor threats; I don't know whether it was read over to him or not; I saw him sign it, and I saw the magistrate sign it; and I witnessed it; I have not a doubt but it was read over to him.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you ever see Mr. Mitchell write? - Yes, I see him write that.

Q. Are you a married man Mr. Williams? - I have been.

Q. What was the name of your wife? - Elizabeth Williams .

Q. Who is Ann Williams ? - I don't know such a person.

Q. Do you know all the books you have lost? - I do not, but I know all I have found.

Q. I shall not ask you any more? - You are very obliging.

RICHARD MENDOZA sworn.

I live with Mr. Collins in great Wild-street, I have three table cloths and two spoons, I received two spoons of the prisoner's wife, I am not certain of whom I received the others. I have some little recollection of the man, but I cannot positively say whether he is the

man or not; Mr. Williams has got the the duplicate; I heard it was the prisoner's wife from the prisoner.

Mr. Knapp. You say you don't know you positively received them of the man? - I cannot.

Q. You have a great deal of business, I take it for granted? - We have.

Q. With respect to the prisoner's wife, this is what you have heard since? - It is.

Q. You say that the prisoner told you it was his wife? - No, I believe it was Mr. Williams, I did not recollect myself at first.

Q. Have you been examined as a witness before? - Yes, several times.

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I live with Page and Rice, pawnbrokers in St. Martin's-lane; I produce a table cloth pledged in the name of Thomas Wills , I took it in the 4th of January, I have not the least recollection of the prisoner, no more than if I had never seen him.

Q. Is it not one of your instructions always to look at people that come to pawn things? - Yes, but it is impossible always to recollect.

Mr. Knapp. You see a great number of persons in the course of the day? - We do.

Q. Your constant customers you know very well? - We do.

Q. That man you had never seen before? - No.

Q. You say you had not the least recollection who it was? - I had not.

FRANCIS OLIVER sworn.

I am a servant with Mr. Williams; I have lived with him two years; to the best of my recollection it is Mr. Williams's table linen; there is nothing in them that I can swear to particularly? - I am bar maid; there is no marks on the tea spoons.

The confession read as follows:

The voluntary examination and confession of John Wills , servant of Matthew Williams , of Bow-street, Covent-garden, victualler. This examinant faith,

"That two silver tea spoons, five books and four table cloths, he acknowledges to be the property of the said Matthew Williams , his master; and acknowledges that they were stolen by him in his said master's house, without the knowledge of his wife; that he afterwards sent his wife to pawn these two tea spoons, in Wild-street; and this examinant also acknowledges, that he himself pawned the four table cloths, now produced, with the pawnbroker that now appears with them." Signed,

Thomas Wills .

Taken before me, A. Mitchell.

GUILTY .

Judgment respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-85

280. REBECCA JOYCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , eight trusses of hay, value 8 s. the goods of James Tarling .

JAMES TARLING sworn.

I live at Finchley ; I have been robbed many times, at different times, of considerable quantity of hay, for about six weeks, or two months; I had hay which I put into my barn one night, and there came some persons and cut off a quantity of hay; the hay was perceived littered along down the field, and it was traced; I then went to another hay rick and there I lost several trusses; with

that I had suspicion, and I enquired about the neighbouring farmers; I lost three trusses last Monday seven night, and they tracked the hay along the Common towards where this woman lives; says I to my men and boys, be very careful how you bind your hay, and we shall find it out by degrees. On Thursday after they sent me word there was eight trusses stole, and they tracked the hay from within ten or thirteen yards from the house where this woman lives; she has two sons with her, one about nineteen and the other some where about fifteen or sixteen; with that I goes to Justice Neat, he was ill; I applies to Samuel Collins , Esq. and he begs I would go to Mr. Neat; I did, and asked him for a warrant; says he, can you swear on suspicion, that they have got the hay? he granted me a search warrant; I took a constable and two men, and I went into the cow house, and I found a little piece of hay; then we goes into the dwelling house, and in the closet underneath the stairs I saw a few bents of hay; says I, it is my opinion the hay is here; and there was eight trusses of hay in a cupboard, underneath the stairs, and I am sure they are mine.

Q. Then if I understand you right you lost some hay, and you found some of your hay in this woman's custody? - It is so.

Mr. Knapp. There are two sons live with the prisoner? - There are.

Q. Did you ever see this woman about your premises? - But the sons have been seen about the premises, and about other peoples premises, and that made me have a suspicion.

ROBERT COX sworn.

I am a hay binder; we followed this hay by the track to Rebecca Joyce ; two of them are grown up.

Q. Did you ever see this woman about your premises? - No, I cannot say that ever I did.

Q. Where was the hay found? - It was found in the house; I am sure it is our hay for we made them particular that day.

Q. What house did she keep? - A little house by the Common side; she keeps a cow.

Mr. Knapp. These young men were badish young men, are they not? - I believe so, I am not certain.

Q. Were they not suspected? - I have heard so.

Q. They have been seen near your premises? - I have not seen them there.

RICHARD WALL sworn.

I am a hay binder to Mr. Tarling; I can swear to the hay that I bound; I found it in a closet of Rebecca Joyce 's, underneath the stairs; I lost it on Wednesday night about six o'clock, and I found it on Thursday night about four; we tracked it within about fifty yards of her own house.

Q. Did you ever see her about your barn or stacks? - No.

Q. Did they take the whole trusses? - Yes, eight that night.

Q. Did you find all the eight there? - Yes.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I am a constable; Mr. Tarling brought a search warrant to me, and desired me to execute it; I went and searched the house, and found the quantity concealed under the stairs in a closet; the woman was not at home; she went out in the morning, as the boy told me, to town.

Jury. Whose house is it? - Mrs. Joyce's.

Mr. Knapp. The sons all lived at home with the mother? - They did.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 38.)

Recommended by the Jury.

Imprisoned one week and fined 1 s .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-86

281. JOHN BARROW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a musical clock in a mahogany case, value 9 l. the goods of Thomas Wood .

MARY WOOD sworn.

I was servant to Mr. Thomas Wood , he is a broker , No. 82, Fore-street . On the 30th of January I saw the prisoner just stand out at the door about half after four, with the clock under his left arm.

Q. Where had that clock been before? - I cannot tell; I did not see him take it; I immediately ran to my master and called him from the other house, and my master and the man ran after him; I am sure the prisoner is the man, he was not brought back again, he was taken to the Compter.

THOMAS WOOD sworn.

I have a broker's shop in Fore-street. On the 30th of January, about half past four, that young body came to me; I was about two doors from where the robbery was, and told me that a man had taken a table clock out of the shop; I keep two shops, and there is two private houses between; I immediately runs to see whether the clock was gone; I ran back to fetch one of my porters to assist me to try to take him; it stood about six yards from the door inside of the house; I asked the servant which was the man? she shewed me; my porter's name is Thomas Gregory ; the prisoner went along Fore-street, my porter and I ran the other side of the way, in order to have a view of the side of the way that he was, and I saw him about fifty or sixty yards distance, with the clock under his arm; we both ran as fast as we could and took it on him; my man took it and I was close at his elbow; we took the clock of him, and took him to the Compter.

(The clock produced.)

THOMAS GREGORY sworn.

I am porter to Mr. Wood, the 30th of January last, which was the Wednesday afternoon, the maid came and gave the alarm, and said, that a man had taken the table clock; I pursued him and I catched him partly opposite Baldwin-street, in Fore-street; I catched him with the clock under his left arm; I put my hand over his left shoulder, and seized it by the ring, and then took hold of him afterwards by the collar; for fear he should let the clock fall.

JOHN CLARK sworn.

I am a marshalsman; I saw Mr. Wood and his man running; I came out of Basinghall-street at the time; I joined the pursuit; Mr. Wood's man laid hold of him and I immediately went up and took possession of the prisoner; I saw Mr. Wood's man take the clock from him and I have had it ever since. (The clock deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was going down Fore-street and a man stopped me, asked me to carry this clock; I had not carried it any way hardly before Mr. Wood's man stopped me, and asked me where I was going with it? I immediately turned round and saw the man was gone; I don't know as I have any witnesses; I have witnesses to my character I believe.

Court to Wood. How far did you pursue him? - Near a hundred yards; there was a lad with him, who was taken to the compter and who afterwards was proved before the alderman to be his brother, but the property not being found on him he was discharged.

The prisoner called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17930220-87

282. SUSANNAH WINTON alias HARRIOT BELL JAMES was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-88

283. PHILLIP COHEN was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17930220-89

284. JOHN MONK was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

(The case was opened by Mr. Steel, and the record was read by the clerk of the court of the trial of Robert Percival , tried in December sessions, for robbing of Mr. Robinson of articles to a large amount.)

EDWARD HARPER sworn.

I saw John Monk the prisoner sworn.

MONOAH SIBLY sworn.

I was short hand writer at the time of the trial of Robert Percival ; I have my original notes taken at the time; I was particularly desired to be exact. Monk was asked by Mr. Garrow,

"Have you ever said Percival the prisoner at the bar was concerned in that burglary?" His answer was, "Not to my knowledge." Q.

"Did you ever tell Edward Harper that the present prisoner Percival was concerned in this burglary?" his answer was,

"Several times talking about this robbery I said I would speak the truth; Percival was concerned in other robberies in Broad-street, but not in this."

Harper. I am one of the keepers of Clerkenwell Bridewell; I remember Robert Percival being tried here for a burglary in the house of Mr. Robinson; I know that Robert Percival ; I know the prisoner at the bar, John Monk ; the burglary was committed in May last; Monk was confined in Bridewell, and he told me that Robert Percival , William Waine and himself were concerned in the burglary at Mr. Robinson's, in Broad-street.

Q. Was he then speaking of that Robert Percival that was afterwards for this burglary? - He was.

Q. Was Percival then in custody when he told you this? - He was.

Q. Are you positive that the prisoner at the bar was speaking of that Robert Percival that was tried here last sessions? - I am, and to the best of my knowledge speaking of the burglary at Mr. Robinson's.

Q.Had there been any other burglary committed in Broad-street? - He had told me of others the same as he did of that.

Q. At what time did this conversation happen in Bridewell? - He came the 6th of November, by the commitment, and it was after he came in Percival was apprehended on suspicion of this robbery; at this time Monk was brought in again, because he had house breaking tools about him. I am not sure which came in first, I believe Monk.

Prisoner. When I came into goal who was in the lodge? - Percival.

Prisoner. And just now you said, that I came in first? - They both came in very near five minutes of each other, I fancy I was wrong.

Prisoner. Do not you recollect I went up to sleep that night? - I cannot.

Prisoner. You don't recollect my being struck over both my legs? - I heard you say so, but I was not there.

Prisoner. When I used to go up stairs in the night, from being an evidence, the prisoners used to strike me with irons and pokers, and after two or three nights the turnkeys used to let me sleep in another place.

Court to Harper. Which of these two was brought in first? - Percival, and I think he was sitting by the fire when Monk came in.

JOHN LUCY sworn.

I know Monk the prisoner at the bar, by apprehending him.

Q. Do you recollect Monk being examined on the trial of Robert Percival ? - I do.

Q. He stated himself to be an accomplice in a burglary alledged to have been committed in the house of Mr. Robinson, in Broad-street? - He did.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with him relative to Percival who was then under trial? - I had which I related then. I was at the apprehending of Waine and convicting him, Monk gave information relative to Waine, who had been tried before; I apprehended him according to his information at Enfield highway, when Monk attended at the Old Bailey to give evidence against him; I attended with him two days at the New Inn, in the Old Bailey September sessions last, when Waine was convicted; Monk told me about Robert Percival , that he was connected with him and Waine in the burglary of Mr. Robinson's in Broad-street; I informed him I did not know Robert Percival 's person, he described that his father was a carpet beater in Moorfields, and lived at a public house; that he, Robert Percival , lived with a girl of the name of Elizabeth Ayres , that he was by trade a boot closer, and that he had information that he was over in the Mint. He described him also to be the person that had broke out of Clerkenwell Bridewell, and his reasons for so doing.

Court to Harper. Had Percival broke out of Clerkenwell Bridewell? - He had.

Court to Lucy. Is Robert Percival who broke out of Clerkenwell Bridewell, the same as was tried here? - He is, I have seen him this day; I afterwards apprehended Robert Percival in the Mint; when I was taking Robert Percival to Bridewell to the lodge, the prisoner

Monk was brought in by the officers of Bow-street, having house breaking tools about him.

Q. Did Percival and Monk speak together at the time? - I don't know that they did; I told him that I had apprehended Robert Percival in the Mint, he said, you might have had him before for I informed you he was in the Mint, he says, I shall not swear to him; I asked him why? he said, because I had not sent him any money while he was in trouble; I told him I never did, nor never would, because it might bias the mind to say what was wrong; he informed me that Clark, one of the witnesses that was against Waine, had given him two guineas.

Q. Mr. Lucy are you quite sure that the burglary he had been speaking to you of was the burglary committed in Mr. Robinson's? - Yes.

Q. Are you equally sure that the Robert Percival was the Robert Percival tried here in December sessions? - I have no doubt at all about it. Percival is now convicted to be two years in Clerkenwell for having house breaking tools about him.

Prisoner. Did I mention Mr. Robinson's name to you? - He did frequently.

Q. When I came in from Bow-street, I had been at Bow-street all day long for a hearing, and you had just taken Percival, and you came in and told me, with that I might say something or other to you, I cannot tell, but you speak of my words when I was in liquor.

WILLIAM BLACKITER sworn.

I was a servant in New Prison.

Q. Do you know Robert Percival that was tried here last sessions? - I do.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Monk? - Yes.

Q. Did Monk ever tell you who were the persons concerned in the robbery at Mr. Robinson's in Broad-street? - William Waine , himself and Robert Percival .

Q. Where had you this conversation? - In New Prison.

Q. At what time was this? - I do not recollect what time, it was after he was brought from Bow-street, and Robert Percival was not in custody at that time.

Q. Did he describe the Robert Percival to you so that you knew it was the Robert Percival that was tried here last December Sessions? - Yes, he described him to be the Robert Percival who broke out of Clerkenwell, and he was the person that was tried here the last December sessions. There was a woman in New Prison on a warrant, a boy came to this woman in New Prison, and Monk says to me, Blackiter (this was just before Percival was taken) follow the boy, he is going to Robert Percival , because he had got on a coat that he had sold Percival.

Q. This conversation between you and Monk, was for the purphse of giving you information where to find Percival for this robbery? - It was; he said, that boy would go to Percival.

Q. Now you are sure that he talked whenever he talked about Percival about the Robert Percival that was tried here last December sessions? - I am sure.

Q. And you are sure that it was the robbery of Mr. Robinson's that he spoke of? - I am; he gave me an information to go to Mr. Lucy and tell him where Waine was, and I went, and in consequence of that Waine was apprehended.

Prisoner. Did I tell you where to find Waine? - He did, he told me that Waine was at the White Hart, in Enfield Wash.

Q. When Mr. Lucy came to the Prison was there no talk about any reward between Mr. Lucy, you and I? - No, there was not.

Q. Did you never talk to me and wanted me to apply for a reward? - No, I never did.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

In the first place Mr. Blackiter that is now come to swear against me, has been an officer in every office almost round London, and discharged, through misconduct, from every office that he has been in; and now at this present time he lives with a common shoplifter.

Blackiter, I never was discharged from an office in my life.

Prisoner. The Percival that was taken and was brought to trial, was not the Percival that did the robbery; the words that they insinuated and drew from me, were words that I was not on my oath, neither was I before a Justice, they were only my words; I never kept any thing back from justice, I brought every thing to justice as far as lay in my power; there is no account from the prosecutor that that was the man, nor any further contradiction except my own words; them two, Harper and Blackiter, I was obliged to keep in with that I might not be turned in amongst the other prisoners; what I might have told them in liquor I cannot say. There are two Percivals. Clarke, who met us coming out of the house of Mr. Robinson's, says, it was that other Percival; he was the chief witness on Waine's trial, and is not brought forth; I thought they would have called him.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: o17930220-1

John Davis , convicted in July sessions last, was put to the bar and accepted his Majesty's pardon, on condition of transportation for fourteen years . Jeremiah Carter , convicted in last December sessions, on condition of transportation for seven years . Ann Dawson , Jane Ison , Ann Simmons , Richard Broughton , Jeremiah Clarke and Sarah Loft , on condition of transportation for their natural lives .

Reference Number: s17930220-1

Reference Number: s17930220-1

John Davis , convicted in July sessions last, was put to the bar and accepted his Majesty's pardon, on condition of transportation for fourteen years . Jeremiah Carter , convicted in last December sessions, on condition of transportation for seven years . Ann Dawson , Jane Ison , Ann Simmons , Richard Broughton , Jeremiah Clarke and Sarah Loft , on condition of transportation for their natural lives .


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