Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th December 1792.
Reference Number: 17921215
Reference Number: f17921215-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 15th of December, 1792, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON,

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY , PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-Street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill.

[PRICE ONE SHILLING.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable SIR JAMES SANDERSON , KNT. LORD MAYOR of the CITY of LONDON; the Right Honourable Lord LOUGHBOROUGH, Lord Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: Sir WILLIAM HENRY ASHURST , one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: Sir RICHARD PERRYN , one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer: Sir JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City: JOHN SILVESTER , Esq. Common-Serjeant at Law of the said City, and others, His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the CITY of LONDON, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of NEWGATE, holden for the said City and County of MIDDLESEX.

London Jury.

Robert Wood

George Smith

John Sineway

John Brotherton

Thomas Goldsmith

Edward Kirby

William Wakelin

Thomas Wells

Richard Arnott

David Lewis

William Cresswell

Joseph Manley

First Middlesex Jury.

John Henry Rigg

James Sutton

Joseph Till

Edward Kendrick

Joseph Nutting

Thomas Attwood

Abraham Walker

Henry Garling

James Birch

Jacob Roberts

Robert Whitefield

James Stamp

Second Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Langmead

William Lonsdale

Christopher Gill

William Bunce

John Coates

Charles Wiple

William Bannister

^ William Smallwood

^ John Ellis served part of the time in the room of Mr. Smallwood.

Samuel Adams Crip

William Bell

Richard Bannister

John Barber

Reference Number: t17921215-1

1. SUSANNA EDWARDS was indicted for burglariously and feloniously entering the dwelling house of James Palmer , about the hour of two in the Morning of the 27th of October , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, a child's silver coral, value 8 s. three yards of mode, value 18 s. one man's hat, value 15 s. one child's hat, value 5 s. one woman's gown made of silk and cotton, value 10 s. three yards of linen cloth, value 4 s. one yard and three quarters of cambrick, value 3 s. one muslin apron, value 3 s. one muslin neckcloth, value 2 s. one cloth cloak, value 2 s. one linen shawl, value 1 s. one black silk bonnet, value 1 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 1 s. one linen shift, value 1 s. one pair of woman's stuff shoes, value 1 s. two womens caps, value 1 s. one linen apron, value 6 d. one silver watch, value 1 l. 10 s. and one Guinea and a half, the goods, chattels, and monies of the said James Palmer .

JAMES PALMER sworn.

I live next door to the dog, in Short's-gardens, Drury-lane , the house is let in lodgings; I have only one room in the house, the landlord does not live in the house; I believe there are four lodgers; I have the first floor, one room, my wife and two children lived with me; I know the prisoner perfectly well, she was to assist my wife being ill, she was with her five weeks before the 27th of October, but I cannot say exactly what time she came; my wife was not able to assist herself, and the prisoner lived in the same room likewise with us; I went to bed at eleven o'clock, and I fell asleep; I had not been in bed above three or four hours, before my wife alarmed me, and asked where Sukey was gone, as she could not feel her by her side, or hear her breathe; and she jumped out of bed in a fright, and I got up likewise; the first thing I put on was my breeches; out of which I found one Guinea and a half was gone; and looking further I found the watch was gone, and all the things mentioned in the indictment, great part of which we have got with us now, the next morning was Sunday; on Monday the day after, we got a search warrant for a person who she was connected with, and we could find nothing; we heard nothing of the prisoner till Tuesday fortnight. In consequence of writing two letters, to the overseers of the poor, at Woolwich, a man came up to us from Woolwich, Mr. Thompson, and informed us where the property was. A bonnet, handkerchief, cap, shift, and shoes were taken off her back before Sir Sampson Wright . (Produced by the officer who took them from her and deposed to by Mr. Palmer).

- PALMER sworn.

I am wife of James Palmer ; I was awake first, and I missed the prisoner out of the room, upon which then I alarmed my husband, and I found all my property gone; mentioned in the indictment; I was ill in bed, and before I had gone to sleep, I ordered her to go down and fasten the street door, and then she came up and locked my door, and then she says to me, do you go to sleep; I don't like you to be disturbed so; I awaked some time after, and found all the property gone.

Q. How did she get out of the room? - I cannot tell, she must have unlocked the door to be sure, but I did not hear her, I am sure I heard her fasten them.

Q. What time was it she locked the door? - About Twelve, near that way.

Q. Who awaked first, you or your Husband. - I waked first, and waked my Husband; he was tired with his work, and I alarmed him.

Prisoner. As to the street door there is no lock; and they say I was with her

but five weeks. I continued with her for seven weeks; and I ask'd her the liberty to let me wash me a few things; and as I had neither shawl nor cap, nor any thing to wear whilst I washed my own things, she lent me those things which I had on the while; and Mr. Palmer wanted me to comply with him, because, says he, I know you are a clean woman, and I will not let my wife know it; I would not consent to his compliance; so they have got this spite against me, and besides that, there was no bolt at all to the street door, and she says, she heard me bolt it.

Mr. Palmer, there is a bolt, a latch and a lock.

Court to Mrs. Palmer. How was your room door fastened. - The door of my room was locked I am sure.

Prisoner. There was no lock on the door, and Mr. Palmer came home nigh Twelve, and then I had got his supper to get, and more particularly I had the table cloth to wash, with my own things, as he was to have some company to come to dinner the next day; and Mrs. Palmer gave me an old shift, an old gauze cap, a pair of shoes, and other things, because she had not money to pay me. Now I have spoke nothing but the truth.

Court to Mrs. Palmer. Is it true that being poor, and not having money to pay her, you gave her these things. - When she came to me she was distressed for her living. She never ask'd me one farthing, tho' I meant to pay her for her trouble; with respect to giving her my shift, or my shoes, then I must have gone without myself, for I had none other myself; I never gave the things to her; I had no other shoes but those the Prisoner took; and I was obliged to walk about my room two or three hours without a shoe, till a neighbour brought me a pair to put on.

GUILTY, Death . (Aged 37).

Recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of her poverty .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-2

2. THOMAS PARKER , was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Wingfield , about the hour of six on the night of the 29th of November , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, a feather Bolster, value 4 s. a linen sheet, value 6 s. a woollen blanket, value 18 s. a woollen Rug, value 13 s. the goods and chattels of the said William Wingfield .

WILLIAM WINGFIELD sworn.

I live in Drury-lane , keep a whole house, am a cabinet maker ; on the 29th of November, I saw Thomas Parker coming out of the passage close by the door, he had got a woollen rug under his arm; I called to him friend what have you got there, he set off as fast as he could.

Q. What time was it. - About a quarter past six in the evening.

Q. Was any body in the house. - Yes, some Lodgers; he broke in through the windows with some iron crow.

Q. How do you know he broke in. - Because I saw the windows were smashed all to pieces, it was a back window which was nailed up.

Q. How many people live in your house. - Four or five.

Q. It was after dark? - Yes, it had been dark an hour and half; he came out of the window, the door was locked; I was close to him just at the door; I do not know the Prisoner, the passage he was coming out of, goes into the Court; he had got the rug under his arm, he set off running and threw the rug down in the street; I ran after him, overtook him immediately; I had him by the collar, and took up the rug.

Q. Did you find any thing missing? - Nothing but these articles, a bolster, sheet, blanket, and rug, he had only the rug, the others have not been found; I had been in the room half an hour before, and all the things were then there.

JOHN CUTLER sworn.

The man and the rug was brought me by Wingfield, and Wingfield went out and looked at his house; and while he was out the prisoner said it was the first offence he had been guilty of, and desired me to speak in his favour; I saw the rug then, but did not see it picked up.

Prisoner. I am very innocent of the fact. I have no friends in town.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 1 s. but not of the burglary . (Aged 25).

Six months imprisonment .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-3

3. EDWARD EGERTON was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the king's highway, on the 31st of October , on Thomas Wallis , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, one gold watch, value 5 l. a base metal watch chain, value 1 s. 6 d. a cornelian seal set in gold, value 10 s. and 4 Guineas in monies; numbered the goods, chattels and monies of the said Thomas Wallis .

THOMAS WALLIS sworn.

On the 31st of October last, I was going from my house in Long Acre, to my manufactory in Dyott-street, and part in New street, I believe it was a quarter before seven; I took my son along with me into High-street; I made a pause whether I should go up Dyott-street, which I have twenty thousand times, all times early and late; and within a few spaces of Plumb-tree-street , very near Charlotte-street, the prisoner at the bar, came plump against me, forced me off the pavement, and I tumbled in the mud; I am confident it was the prisoner at the bar, that ran against me and knocked me down, he threw me off the pavement, the force was so violent that it really stunned me; there were three or four more assembled about me while I was down; and to my very great surprise and astonishment, when I came to myself, I found my watch was gone, I put my hand into my pocket and I found I had lost 4 Guineas and some silver, which I have not mentioned in the indictment; I really did not feel them go any more than you; I did not perceive my watch go out of my pocket any more than you, or than I do this minute.

Q. I think you say you had your boy with you? - I had him in my hand, but seeing the prisoner coming on, I was obliged to let him go to get on one side of the prisoner; but he still came against me. The watch I lost, was a gold watch, a metal chain, and a cornelian seal, set in gold.

Q. When was the prisoner apprehended? - The next day I sent to Bow-street, and left the name of my watch; but I was told there, that they dare say it was christened; the prisoner was apprehended on the 15th of November.

Q. When you was going along, at what distance was it when you first observed him, - three or four paces, he appeared to me to come from Dyott-street, and met me near the top of Plumb-tree-street; and he came so forcibly, that I could not avoid him; but my eyes were upon him to avoid him.

Q. What space of time might it be you observed him? - Not above two seconds, for he came against me at the rate of a man galloping Twelve miles an hour.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - No, never before that night.

Q. Was your watch ever found? - No, never; when he was apprehended, I was sent for to Malborough-street, and I saw the prisoner; this was on the 15th of November; and I fetched my son from Lewisham, and he saw the prisoner.

Q. When you saw the prisoner did you recollect he was the same? - I believe I recollect the very words I said at the office, when the prisoner was brought into the office, I looked at him, walked up to

him, says I, prisoner, I have not the least doubt but you are the man, but I will not swear positively to you; those are the words I said; but after looking further at the prisoner, and seeing of him now I have no doubt at all about me; I told the justice he had altered his dress.

Q. Do you know in what manner he was apprehended? - He was in the custody of a constable belonging to St. Giles's parish, not on this charge, when I saw him.

Mr. Garrow. Since you saw the prisoner first, you have heard Sanders give an account of this transaction? - I have.

Q. I observe that your expression before the magistrate was, I will not swear positively to you; and so it appears, for he was only committed upon suspicion? - He was.

Q. It was as transient as a man's galloping at the rate of fourteen miles an hour, as you stated it yourself - except lightening, I don't know any thing so transient as this.

GEORGE WALLIS .

How old are you? - Eleven.

Q. Do you know the nature of an Oath? - To bind me to speak the truth.

Q. Do you know if you do not speak the truth on this occasion, what will become of you? - It is a very wicked thing.

Q. What punishment shall you receive in the next world? - Be tormented.

Sworn.

Q. You was with your father on the 31st of October, in Plumb-tree-street? - Yes, the prisoner came up to him and knocked him down.

Q. What time of night was it? - about seven o'clock.

Q. Did you observe the person that knocked him down? - No, I did not.

Q. Then you cannot say whether the prisoner at the bar, was the person or not? - No.

CHRISTOPHER SANDERS sworn.

I live at No. 12, Broad-street, Bloomsbury, I am not a police officer, on the 31st of October last, I was standing at the bottom of Vine-street.

Q. What distance was this from Plumb-tree-street? - Very little; three or four men came running down Vine-street, somewhat in great haste; I looked at the men as they passed me; there was no alarm of the robbery at that time; I took no farther notice of them; I saw Mr. Wallis about a fortnight after the robbery was done, and asked him if he should know the man that knocked him down; he gave me such a description of him, that I supposed him to be the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, was he one of the three or four persons running down Vine-street? - I am sure he was one of them, I have not the least doubt, because I knew him a twelve month ago, and another or two of the same.

Q. Do you know any thing of this prisoner? - It cannot be of any service if I relate any circumstance.

Q. Do you know any thing of your own knowledge, had you known him before - I do not think he had any visible way of living; he used to use the Bedford Arms; there was a great many in society in Peter-street.

Q. When they were running down Vine-street, had you made such an observation of this person so as to know he was one of those three or four - most certainly, I had been acquainted with him before.

Mr. Garrow. It is not the first time you have been here; - it is not, Mr. Garrow.

Q. Mr. Sanders you told my Lord, that you was not called a police officer; this is not the first time you have been a witness? - No, Mr. Garrow.

Q. Mr. Sanders has it ever happened to you to receive a portion of a reward, for a highway robbery? - Yes, Mr. Garrow.

Q. Was that for a street robbery. When a gentleman of consequence like Mr. Wallis prosecutes, he does not take the reward, then one gets all oneself; the reward is 40 l. I believe; how much did you share the last time? - I believe I had about 6 l. the last time.

Q. On this occasion you would have 40 l. - Mr. Garrow, I did not come here for any such thing.

Q. Pray Mr. Sanders was not this man about to be discharged on the subject he was taken up upon? - I asked Mr. Rumley if he had any charge against him, and whether he had had his hearing; he said no; says I he is one of the men that robbed Mr. Wallis, I believe.

Q. Pray was it by your advice that the son was fetched from school? - It was not, Mr. Wallis said his son would know him perfectly well.

Q. Now it turns out he does not; that is rather unlucky; were the men going pretty fast? - Partly as fast as they well could.

Q. Have you any other business on your hands of the same sort at present? - I have some at Hicks's-hall.

Q. Was it last Session you received a a portion of the reward? - No I believe it was three or four sessions ago.

Q. You are neither a police officer nor a parish officer, but a gentleman, having time you do this business? - It is for the good of the public.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

Jury to Mr. Wallis. What time was this? - It was seven o'clock at night, as nigh as I can guess.

Q. Was it dark, or a light evening? - It was very dark; but a lamp was near the place.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 26)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-4

4. ANN ROBINSON and MARY DYKE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of September , two pair of gold wire ear-rings, value 4 s. the goods of William Parker .

SARAH PARKER sworn.

I am the wife of William Parker , I live in High Holborn ; on the 22d of September, between four and five in the afternoon, the two prisoners came into the shop, and enquired for a pair of gold wire ear-rings. I did not like very well their appearance. I asked them how much they had got. She said she had got 3 s. I then took four pair of ear-rings out of the window, which were linked together. I gave them into her hand, and asked her if they were the kind she wanted, if they were I would let her have a pair for 3 s. She looked at them some time; and then the other girl, of the name of Dyke, said they are not the kind you want: you want a pair with knobs. I told her I had a pair, but they came to more money; but as they seemed poor girls, I would let her have a pair. I took a pair out of the window, and laid them upon the counter: Dyke took them up in her hand; the girl, Robinson, at the same time had the four pair in her hand; and, in taking her right-hand, and putting them to her ear, in passing her mouth, I observed she bit a pair off: I then missed the other pair, with the knobs, that laid on the counter; I caught hold of Dyke's hand, to take them out of her hand; one of them was broke, and I ran round the counter, and caught hold of Robinson who had the pair in her mouth. I had nobody in the shop but a boy. I desired her to give the ear-rings immediately out of her mouth: she said she had none in her mouth. I caught hold of her, and pushed her against a stool that was behind her: I then put my finger into her mouth and took the ear-rings out: I afterwards searched her, and found she had only a pocket-book, a few thimbles, and a 6 d. I pushed

Robinson then towards the door, she ran away. I was going to search the other's pockets: in the interim a gentleman came in, and I was just going to tell him what happened, when Robinson returned with two women: one of them was seen to take up a handful of mud. I slipt out, and brought Robinson in again. The two women, soon as they saw a gentleman at the door, ran away. I then sent for a coach and took them to Bow-street.

Q. What is the value of these two pair of ear-rings? - About 3 s. the two pair, they are not exactly new.

Mr. Garrow. The prisoner Dyke was too ill to be tried, at the last sessions? - She was.

Q. I believe Mrs. Parker, you desired Dyke to go about her business more than once? - I did, I was not sure that she meant to steal any of these or not.

Q. In point of fact, if she had it, she might have gone about her business? - She might, I told her twice she might.

Q. Then she only had the ear-rings, but did not do any thing with them? - She had them in her hand; I thought it proper to take care of them, when I saw the other bite one pair off.

Court. Did you take them from her at the time? - I did, and have had them in my custody ever since.

JOHN MILLER sworn.

I belong to Bow-street; Mr. Parker brought the two girls into my custody at Bow street.

Ann Robinson GUILTY , (Aged 15.)

Six months imprisonment , and fined 1 s.

Sarah Dyke , not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17921215-5

5. ROBERT JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , ten live store pigs, value 15 l. the goods of Edmund Winder .

EDMUND WINDER sworn.

I live in Southam, in the county of Buckingham . In the night of the 4th, or early on the 5th of November, in the morning, I lost ten store pigs; there were twenty-three together, and ten of the twenty-three were taken away on Monday; I was a great many miles off. On Tuesday morning I came to Brentford market, and a man asked me if I wanted some good store pigs; I told him I had lost ten, and described them; he told me he had just seen two men with the pigs, and he was sure they were my pigs, by the description of them. The next morning I came up to Kensington gravel-pits, and I heard the pigs were sold to one John Hunsley , at Gaggle-goose-green, he had six of them. I went to his house and told his wife they were my property. I knew them by the marks, I bred them myself; one of them I should have known by the marks among a thousand. They are called the right Berkshire breed; one had a particular mark in the ear; I marked it myself; I claimed these pigs. The prisoner at the bar lodged at Kensington gravel-pits; we enquired after him and found him before I went down to Hunsley; this was Wednesday. The prisoner at the bar said he had bought four pigs, and he said he had sold them on Tuesday morning at Brentford market. I had him up to Great Marlborough-street; and when we went back to Basewater, to his lodgings, we found out where the other four were.

Q. Were these pigs your's? - They were; there was one of a dark colour, and white stripe: they were all of my own breed. I should have known them among a hundred. I can positively swear to them; they were pigged in February last.

Prisoner. I went down into the country to see a sister of mine; I was coming along and overtook a drover with these pigs, I asked him if he would sell four of them; he said yes.

Court to Prosecutor. Had you any marks about your pigs? - I had.

JOHN HUNSLEY sworn.

I live in Gaggle-goose-green, in the parish of Hammersmith. I am a little gardener; five acres of ground I have and no more. I have lived there two and thirty years. The prisoner was with the other man that I bought the pigs of. I bought them on the 5th of November. I believe it was between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. I looked at them as they came along the road; but I told him I would not buy them till they came to the gravel-pits. They had ten pigs, and I bought six; I was to give him 7 l. 4 s. I paid him 7 l. all but one shilling; I had not enough. I borrowed some of the money. This man told me he had bought four pigs, and he was a going to put them in his stye, and I might leave mine there. I bought two first; but afterwards buying four more, I gave this prisoner a shilling to drive them off to my house, as I then thought it would be better. I saw no more of them till Mr. Winder come up.

Prisoner. Mr. Hunsley, did I sell you any pigs? - No, I cannot prove you did.

Q. Then you know Mr. Hunsley? - I was very willing to drive home the six pigs for a shilling, and a glass of gin; no man can think that I would have gone back with these pigs three miles, if I had known they had been stole; and I am as innocent as ever a man was born - worse luck of mine, I know that.

- WILLIS sworn.

I live in North-street, Sloan-street, Chelsea.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - I know no other than his working up and down our road, driving a cart, and such a thing as that.

Q. Have you known him long? Not a great while; he drove a team of horses, he was a labourer .

Q. Did you buy any pigs of him? - No, I had some pigs of his in my house, on Tuesday morning; when I was gone out to work, he brought four pigs, and said he would sell them me; and when I came back, I found some pigs; I saw him soon after, and he told me he had bought four pigs, and he would sell them to me, if I had a mind to buy them; I told him I had not money to buy them; so he asked me to let them be in the place where they were till Friday, and then he would pay me for their keep.

Q. Did he ask you any price? - No, because I said I had no money to buy them; this was on Tuesday; on Wednesday night these two gentlemen came and asked whether I had bought some pigs, I said no; but told them there were four pigs, that were left in my premises, that the man would come on Friday and then take them to Smithfield. On Wednesday night he was taken and sent to Clerkenwell; I did not see him afterwards; I cannot say I knew where he lived; he told me he had bought them, or else I should not let him put them there; I had known the prisoner for some time; he drove Mr. Gray's team, and worked in Mr. Gray's Brickfield.

JOHN MORRIS sworn.

Mr. Winder sent me to take the prisoner at the bar into custody, at Paddington; afterwards we had the information of these other four pigs, at Willis's; the prisoner said he sold them going to Brentford, Tuesday morning.

Q. Was the gardener with you when he talked of selling the pigs at Brentford market? - I took this Willis into custody directly as I found the pigs on him.

EDWARD BELL sworn.

I live at Southam-green; I was riding to Smithfield market, on the 5th of November, and overtook the prisoner at the bar and another man with him, with a parcel of pigs; on Tuesday before, I

saw the man with a single pig at Brentford, a pig we all thought he had stole, he had got it in a sack; it was four miles and a half on this side of Acton; I did not say any thing to them; I told Mr. Winder, at Brentford market, what I had seen.

Prisoner. That Gentleman never saw me at Brentford, nor any body else? - I did not say I did; I never saw you with my eyes before that morning.

Prisoner. I will tell you how I came to buy these pigs; I went down to Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, on Sunday; I have a sister that lives there; I got up on Monday morning to come home, and coming on this side of Acton, I overtook this man with ten pigs; and I am sure I had no more thought of buying a pig then of my dying day, he asked me to buy some; I asked the man what he would have for four pigs, he said six guineas; I said I would give 6 l. however says I, I will split the difference; gave him 6 l. 3 s. coming along we came up to this Mr. Hunsley, he bought a couple; but he said he had no where to put them; I said he might put them along with mine. Whilst I went to feed my pigs he bought the other four; and he gave me a shilling and a glass of gin, to drive them down to his house; I am sure if I had known they had been stolen I would never have drove them down to his house; I dare say Mr. Hunsley had no more thought of their being stolen than I had; when I bought them, there were all the neighbours about; I went down to the black lion at Basewater, and told them that I had bought four pigs; I made no secret of it at all.

Court to Morris. What time did you take the prisoner into custody? - On Monday night.

Prisoner. Mr. Gillcock is my master; I work at Kensington gravel pits for him.

Court to Morris. Do you know him? - No, I never saw him in my life, till I had him in my custody, as I know of.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-6

5. THOMAS HEILEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the dwelling house of Quintin Kay , and upon the said Quintin Ray , on the 4th of December , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, 4 guineas, 4 half-guineas, an half-crown piece, and 2 s. in monies numbered, the monies of the said Quintin Kay .

(The case was opened by Mr. -

QUINTIN KAY sworn.

I reside at present in Hatton-garden . On the 4th of this month, the prisoner knocked at my door; my porter opened it. He asked, whether Mr. Kay was at home? He was told, yes. He came into the counting-house, and shut-to the door. I did not at that time recollect him, because his face was painted; and he had the appearance of a person of a very ruddy complexion. He held up this pistol. - Says he, your money, or your life. I said, sir, my money! He said, sir, your money - your purse, or your life. I said I have no purse. I put my hand into my pocket, and took out 4 guineas, 4 half-guineas, 2 s. and a half-crown piece, and one farthing. I laid it upon the desk, where some half-pence were laying. - He took the chief part up with his left-hand, and held the pistol with his right. - He then changed the hand with the pistol, and directly held it up. - Now your pocket-book. My pocketbook, sir, says I. Yes, says he. - No

hesitation. Your pocket-book, or your life! I took this book, and laid it on my desk. He said, that is not the book. No hesitation. - Your pocket-book, or your life - and if you move or stir, you are dead, you are dead, this instant! I thought I might as well lose my life as my pocket-book; and the prisoner, just at that time, seemed rather fool-hardy. I perceived he held his pistol rather loosely - I clap'd my hand on it, and seized him by the collar. He disentangled himself from me, struck me on the head, and brought me to the ground.

Court. What did he strike you with? With the pistol - he cut my head violently, and brought me to the ground. I called out, Help! - Murder! On which my servant, who was in the passage, opened the door, and came in; and the prisoner took up the pistol, and cut his head likewise; on which my servant seized him. He was a powerful man. He seized him. I called out, hold him fast, till I can get a cord to tie him. He held him fast, and I went and got a cord, and tied him, hand and foot; and when he found he was over-powered - O! Mr. Kay, says he, You know me - You know me. I said, directly, - You villain, who are you? and took the candle to his face. On which I said, you are painted, my friend, I see: on which I took the handkerchief, and wiped some of the paint off his face, first on the one side, and then on the other: and then my maid came up. - Soon after that, another maid came up; and they said, O, that is Thomas, who came after Molly! I know him. I then secured him, and sent for the watchman; and then he was secured and sent to New-Prison. I am confident, that is the man.

Q. How long had you known the prisoner? - About two or three years.

WARBERT GRAY sworn.

I was porter to Mr. Kay. I let in the prisoner. The prisoner knocked at the door, on Tuesday, the 4th, about nine o'clock in the evening, and asked me, if Mr. Kay was at home. I told him, yes: then I let him in; and, in the passage, he asked me if Mr. Kay was alone. I told him, yes. He directly walked into the counting-house, and shut the door; and in a little time, I heard Mr. Kay call out murder! and a great scuffle. I directly opened the door, when the prisoner turned at me, and knocked me on the head, with the pistol, and cut my head. I directly seized him by the collar, and held him; and I saw Mr. Kay down on the floor. Mr. Kay called out to me to hold him fast, and he would secure him.

Q. After he was secured, did you recollect who the man was? - No, I never saw the man before in my life.

Q. This is the man you secured? - Yes; it is.

Prisoner. I bear an excellent character, my lord. My friends are not in town, at present. I expected my friends to be present to-day, but they are not here now.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 19.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17921215-7

6. ROBERT PERCIVAL was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Robinson , about the hour of one o'clock in the morning, of the 8th of May , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, four silver candlesticks, value 4 l. three silver waiters, value 3 l. one silver cruet stand with silver cruet tops, value 5 l. one plated bread basket value 1 l. one silver wine funnel, value 1 l. one silver soup ladle, value 15 s. one silver fish trowel, value 1 l. one silver marrow spoon, value 5 s. four silver salt cellers, value 1 l. four silver salt spoons, value 4 s. two silver gravy spoons, 1 l. 10 s. seven silver bottle labels, value 2 l. two silver

sauce boats, value 5 l. one silver sauce ladle, value 5 s. one silver coffee pot, value 5 l. one silver asparagus tongs, value 1 l. twelve silver table spoons, value 6 l. nine silver tea spoons, value 9 s. one gold watch, two gold rings, value 20 l. three silver medals, value 3 s. the goods of the said William Robinson .

(The indictment was opened by Mr. - and the case by Mr. Garrow).

ADAM WRIGHT sworn.

I was servant to Mr. Robinson, on the 8th of May last, we left every thing safe, that night and went to bed; a little before eleven I went round, and saw every thing was safe; I was alarmed in the morning between five and six o'clock by the ringing of the kitchen bell; I got up, and before I could well dress myself, I was alarmed by a knocking at the door; in consequence of that, I came down; when I came down to the bottom of the stairs, I saw a vast many things laying in the passage, the street door half way open with two watchmen standing on the stairs; part of the decanter of wine standing on the mat by these two doors; after that I let the watchmen in and shut the door, and went up and alarmed the house; afterwards I went down into the kitchen and I observed that the passage door, that goes into the kitchen, at the bottom of the stairs, was forced open; there was only one bar that was forced; the area door below stairs, which was fast over night with two bars, was open; one of the inside shutters was open of the kitchen window, and the sash half way up; there is a little hole in the shutter, which had been chipped round, so as to make room for an arm to be admitted through, so as to open the window, they could then take the bar up; the shutters had been forced in several places besides; I saw a candle stuck behind the door, which goes into the area, which they had taken off a box in my master's room; afterwards I went to my pantry where I used to keep my plate; I had an inventory of it; I am upper footman; the pantry is on the same floor, as the kitchen: the cupboard in the pantry was left locked, that was broke open and nothing left but two tea spoons, which they did not find; in the cupboard was a draw which I locked up the plate in, and out of which they took every thing there was; they left nothing, not the least in the world; I locked it up the night before I went to bed, and put the key in my pocket; all the articles mentioned in the indictment, were in this draw, and all were taken away.

Q. Do you know what was the amount of those things that were in your care? - I cannot tell, there was a considerable quantity.

Q. Did you make any observations on the other part of the house? - Yes, I did on the parlour; the parlour is on the ground flour; the cupboard was broke open, and every thing was laying about; next I went to my master's room, which is called the back parlour, and there I saw all his cloaths laying about, his bureau was broke open where my master's cloaths lay.

JOHN MONK sworn.

I was an accomplice in this burglary; I know Percival the prisoner at the bar; I was acquainted with him a long while.

Q. Who were the persons that were concerned with you in breaking into Robinson's? - The prisoner Percival is not the man.

Q. Mr. Monk, you attend here as a prisoner, you are now in custody, you know, as far as relates to the prisoner, your evidence is of no import at all now; the jury will by and by be desired to acquit the prisoner; I am now examining you for a different purpose; recollect you are not yourself out of danger; I repeat to you, who were the persons concerned with you, in this burglary? - William

Wade was one, Robert Percival who lived in Chiswell-street, and not been home two months from transportation.

Q. Do you mean to say the prisoner at the bar was or was not concerned? - The prisoner was not concerned.

Q. Have you ever said Robert Percival the prisoner at the bar, was concerned in that burglary? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Mr. Monk, remember a man who swears to his knowledge a thing that has not happened, may be convicted of perjury; do you mean to swear that you never charged the prisoner at the bar with this robbery at Mr. Robinson's, yes, or no? - This prisoner I never said any thing about to my knowledge.

Q. Do you mean to state that you never did state, that this prisoner at the bar was concerned in this robbery; now upon your oath have you or have you not said that this man was concerned. Do you know Mr. Harper, the officer who stands there? - Yes.

Q. Did you ever say to Harper that this man was concerned in this robbery? - I never mentioned this Percival's name to Mr. Harper on this burglary, but I have of others, but of this I never stated.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Upwell; did you never state to her that the prisoner Percival was concerned in this robbery? - I never spoke to her about the robbery at all.

Mr. Garrow to the Jury. After this I don't want to convict the prisoner; but Monk did you never tell Edward Harper that the prisoner Percival was concerned in this burglary? - several times talking about this robbery, I have said that I would speak the truth; he was concerned in other robberies in Broad-street, but not in this.

EDWARD HARPER sworn.

I am one of the keepers of Clerkenwell Bridewell; I know Monk by coming to see this same Robert Percival the prisoner at the bar, the time he was under conviction for six months; that was after the burglary in Broad-street; Wade and he used to come together; this was just before Percival broke out of prison, I believe he broke out of prison in July.

Q. After that time, had you any conversation with Monk on the subject of this burglary of Mr. Robinson's? - Yes, he told me the day before yesterday that he should speak the truth, concerning this robbery; but as to the prisoner at the bar having his wight out of the robbery, that he was not sure of; he told me the prisoner at the bar carried some of the property; but whether he had his share afterwards he could not tell; but he thought that Wade gave Percival 8 Guineas for his share in the robbery.

Q. Are you positive he was speaking of the prisoner Percival, and no other? - I am positive.

Q. Did you know of any other robbery in Broad-street? - No.

Q. Had you any conversation with Monk about any other robbery in Broad-street? - No.

Q. Did you understand that the conversation you had with him was about this robbery in Broad-street? - I did.

JOHN LOOSELY sworn.

I have been many years an officer; I apprehended the prisoner at the bar on an information; the witness Monk told me where I should find him; another person went with me, accordingly we apprehended Percival. on Tuesday the 7th of November, I and Mr. Harper took him to Clerkenwell Bridewell, from the office in Worship-street; while we were there Monk was brought in a prisoner from Bow-street, having house breaking tools on him again to the same prison; Monk says to me, my lord I shall not own Percival, because you did not send me some money in Bridewell; I told him I did not think him intitled to any; I never gave to any man, it might bias him to say what was false.

Q. Did he then give you an information against the present prisoner at the bar, in a charge of being concerned in Mr. Robinson's burglary? - He did, he said he was with him.

Q. Was you talking about any other burglary in Broad-street, or any where else? - No, only this.

Q. And that this was the proper person was because you found him according to his directions.

Monk to Loosely. Did I give you information to go and take him? - I went to the same place that Monk referred me to; I did not take on Monk's information; but I found him in a place Monk described.

WILLIAM BLACKINGTON sworn.

I belong to New-Prison; Monk was a prisoner in New prison, and I had him in custody in New prison; he told me when a boy came to see him, that had a green coat on, with white metal buttons, that if I would watch that boy out, I should find where Percival lived, for he had on his back the coat that Bob wore, that broke out of Bridewell; and he would go immediately to Percival; he told me, if I remember right, that he Monk, had sold Percival that very coat, and that was the reason he knew it.

Q. For what purpose was you to follow the boy? - To take him up for breaking out of Clerkenwell; he told me he was somewhere in the Borough, in Kent-street.

Q. You knew very well that Robert Percival broke out of prison; is this the man? - It is.

Q. Did Monk ever tell you who were the persons concerned in the burglary, at Mr. Robinson's? - He told me Bob Percival and Billy the trap (that was Wade) were concerned in the burglary at Mr. Robinson's; he told me that Percival was one that carried some of the property. I know of no other robbery in Broad-street.

Mr. Garrow. My Lord, I make application to the court, that on Mr. Robinson's undertaking to prosecute, this man be committed for perjury.

MARIA UPWELL sworn.

I lived with Monk at the time of the burglary; Robert Percival called Monk up that morning.

Q. Is the prisoner the man that called Monk up that morning? - I cannot say on my oath, if he is, he is very much altered; I knew him a little.

Court. Let him be committed.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-8

8. THOMAS MONTAGUE , glover , was indicted for feloniously making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain parchment, on the 9th of October , purporting to be a deed, signed by John Smith for Benjamin Tomkins , John Cole , and John Maud , then and there being stiled Tomkins and Co. by the name of John Smith , with intention to defraud Benjamin Tomkins , John Cole , and John Maud .

SECOND COUNT.

For feloniously making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain parchment writing, purporting to be a deed to be signed by one John Smith , on Hugh Parnell , for Benjamin Tomkins and Co. with the like intention of defrauding the said Benjamin Tomkins , John Cole , and John Maud .

3d and 4th COUNTS on the same Charge.

Laying it to be done with an intention of defrauding Hugh Parnell .

5th and 6th COUNTS on the same. Charge,

Only laying it to be done with intention to defraud James Tweed .

And several other Counts on the same charge, only varying the manner of charging.

The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.

HUGH PARNELL sworn.

You will be so good as to produce the commission issued against Thomas Dumurrell , a Bankrupt in the Minories, (produced) Mr. Prescot was one of the assignees under that commission.

Q. He was, on that dividend being declared, at whose house was it made payable? - At Messrs. Prescot's.

Q. What was the course on which the creditors were directed to receive this dividend under that commission. - They were directed to come to my house for an order; and having that order on Mr. Prescot, they were paid immediately, and they signed a discharge upon having that order at my office: that is, they executed the deed in order to save trouble: and, to prevent them from coming a second time, we had drafts ready filled up, with the amount of the dividends.

Q. Was it the course of your office, for the clerk to put the initials of his name on the paper of the seal? - Exactly so.

Q. Had he put the initials of his name for this order in question? - He had.

Q. On the 27th of October, was any application made by Messrs. Tomkins and Co. to be paid their dividend? - Mr. Maud came to my office, and asked for his dividend. On his application, I applied to the deed, and I found the signature, John Smith , on it.

Q. How soon after that did Vernon leave your service? - Within four hours.

Q. Did he give you any notice? - No: by no means.

Q. Upon what account did he leave your service? - I charged him with a criminal intention respecting this transaction.

Q. Have you endeavoured to find him? - I have. I have advertised him, but cannot find him.

Q. How soon did you find the prisoner at the bar? - About three weeks afterwards.

Q. Where was he found? - I saw him first at Bow-street, in custody.

Q. You have since paid this dividend for the house of Messrs. Tomkins, and Co. - I have.

Court. The dividend was paid to somebody or other, on that order. - It was.

Mr. Garrow. Mr. Parnell, have you reimbursed this sum? - I have.

ROBERT SHARP COGAN sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Prescot and Co.

Q. Do you see any body that is present who was at your banking-house on the 9th of October last? - The prisoner at the bar came in, and asked, Whether Murrell's dividend was paid there? I answered, yes. He immediately walked out; and, in the course of an hour, or an hour and an half, he returned with the draft which I now produce (the draft produced, and deposed to by Mr. Parnell, as the draft which he signed and filled up by Vernon).

Q. In what manner did you pay him? - In cash and bank notes.

Q. Are you certain the prisoner at the bar is the person you paid the 9th of October. - I am certain.

BENJAMIN TOMKINS sworn.

Q. What is the firm of your house? - Benjamin Tomkins , John Cole , and John Maud .

Q. You have paid the dividend under this statute, since the forgery was effected? - Yes.

Q. Have you any person in your service, of the name of John Smith . - No.

Q. Did you ever authorise any person of that name to receive your dividend? - I did not.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - I do not.

Q. You was to have this dividend of Murrel of 101 l. - I was.

Q. Are your partners here? - They are both.

Q. Look at the name of John Smith , and see if that is the signature of any person you know at all. - It is not.

JOHN MAUD sworn.

Did you apply on the 27th of October for your dividend? - I did.

Do you know any body of the name of Smith? - No.

Q. Did you authorise any body of the name of John Smith to receive your dividend. - No.

Q. Do you know any thing of that signature of John Smith . - No.

JOHN COLE sworn.

Q. Did you ever authorise any person to receive the dividend? - No.

Q. Is that the signature of any one that you were acquainted with? - No.

HENRY CARRISON sworn.

I am a Law-stationer. I live in Cursitor-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar? - Yes; he was a covenant servant . He lived with me four years last November.

Q. Did he leave you? - He did, on the 9th of October.

Q. Did he give you any notice he was going to quit you? - None.

Q. Are you acquainted with his character, and hand-writing? - Yes; I have very frequently seen it.

Q. Look at that hand-writing; John Smith , to that deed. - To the best of my knowledge, it is the prisoner's handwriting.

Q. I don't know whether you knew Vernon at all? - Very little of him.

Q. How lately had you seen Vernon before the 9th of October; or did you see him on that day? - One of my lads saw him at my house.

TIMOTHY POUNCEBY sworn.

I was apprentice to Mr. Carrison. I know Vernon by sight.

Q. Where did you see him? - At Mr. Fuller's, Clerkenwell.

Q. Do you know whether he and the prisoner were acquainted. - Not that I know of.

Q. How lately did you see him at your master's? - The day the prisoner went away. - What day that was I don't know.

Q. You are acquainted with the prisoner's hand-writing, of course - look at that signature: do you believe that John Smith , and Messrs. Tomkins and Co. to be his writing? - It resembles his writing, but there are so many thousand handwritings one cannot possibly swear.

Q. How many thousand times have you seen him write? - A great many.

REUBEN LAMBERT sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Carrison. I was fellow-servant to the prisoner.

Q. How many thousand times have you seen him write? - A great many.

Q. Look at that. Whose writing is it? - I believe it to be the prisoner's at the bar, but I cannot positively swear.

- sworn.

I was one of the creditors to Mr. Muller's estate.

Q. On what day did you attest the last signature, preceeding to the forgery in question? - On the fifth of October, I filled it up myself.

JOHN LEE sworn.

I was one of the creditors to Mr. Muller's estate.

Q. Look at that deed. - At the name succeeding the forgery. That is my hand-writing. I cannot really tell when I went for my dividend.

Q. Of course that signature of John Smith was on it before you signed? - I signed my name there, that is my hand writing.

(The deed read by the Clerk).

Prisoner. My lord and gentlemen, the evidence brought forward against me is of some effect to endanger my life; there is a person who comes forward, who is a clerk to a banker in the city; then a Mr. Carrison of Cursitor-street, and one of my fellow-'Prentices; they neither of them can positively swear; I am unprepared for my trial; I therefore rely on the mercy of the court.

WILLIAM BETHEL sworn.

I live in Shire-lane; I have known the prisoner about twelve months; I never knew any thing against him till the present circumstance; I keep Robin's Coffee-house, Shire-lane.

Jury. The gentlemen would be very glad if his master can give him a character.

Court. It would be proper to ask the prisoner if he desires it.

Prisoner. Yes, I do.

Mr. Carrison. I beg to be excused.

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-9

9. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of November , one pound weight of congou tea, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods of the united companies of merchants of England, trading to the East Indies .

(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

CAESAR JOHNSON sworn.

I am a labourer in the East India company's warehouses; the prisoner Williams was an excise officer ; on the 20th of November, between eleven and twelve, on Tuesday in the forenoon; I am positive that I saw William Williams robbing the company, by putting his left hand to lift up the lid of the chest, and putting the tea in his left hand pocket, the outside pocket. I gave information to Mr. Wilson my elder of it; he was stopped and I see him searched; I saw the overseer take the tea out of his pocket; and it was congou tea, the same sort as is in the chest.

JOHN WILSON sworn.

I am one of the elders in the East India company's warehouse; Williams was an assistant locker to the excise; in consequence of what Johnson informed me, I ordered him to be searched, and there was upwards of a pound weight of congou tea found on him loose in his coat pocket.

Q. Did you examine the chest out which Johnson stated he had taken it, was it congou tea? - It was, Mr. Chasemore has got the tea.

Q. What was the value of the tea found on him? - 2 s. 6 d.

JOHN CHASEMORE sworn.

I searched the prisoner by the desire of Mr. Stockwell, the company's warehouse keeper; I found the tea loose in his left hand coat pocket, it has been in my possession ever since, (produced) it weighed one pound, one ounce and a half.

Q to Wilson. Are you sure that belongs to the East India company's warehouse? - I am sure of it, there was none there but what did belong to the company.

Prisoner. I was insensible of any thing of the kind that I had done; sometimes I fall sick, and then I have not any senses about me, nor know what I am doing; I have got my bread for thirty years, and

always got my bread as an honest sober servant.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury by Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-10

10. JOSEPH HOARE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , one wooden trunk, value 2 s. one deal box, value 6 d. seven yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. four cheque aprons, value 6 d. two linen shirts, value 7 s. three cotton half shawls, value 2 s. two printed cotton gowns, value 7 s. one dimity petticoat, value 4 s. one stuff petticoat, value 7 s. one linen handkerchief, value 1 s. two muslin half shawls, value 1 s. one muslin apron, value 4 s. four muslin caps, value 2 s. one linen night cap, value 6 d. one cloth apron, value 2 s. one pair of lawn robbins, value 1 s. one muslin tucker, value 1 s. one printed muslin half shawl, value 1 s. one printed bound book, value 1 s. one printed half bound book, value 1 s. the goods of Mary Richardson , spinster .

MARY RICHARDSON sworn.

I am servant to Robert Bevis , Sloan-street, Chelsea; I lost the articles mentioned in the indictment, as I was coming from Stapleton in Essex, in a single horse chaise with my master; it was tied behind the chaise; the last place I saw it behind the chaise, was at Woodford-brige; I did not miss it till we got to Chelsea; it was about five o'clock in the afternoon we were at Woodford-bridge. and we got to Chelsea about twenty minutes before eight; it was fixed on one side with a strap, and the other with an hamming line; I lost it on Saturday the 20th of October, and I saw it again on Wednesday the 24th, before the Lord Mayor, just in the same state as when I lost it, there was all there; I knew it to be my trunk, there was my name on the box; there are none of the articles with marks on them; I can swear to some, the petticoat is marked with a piece of black thread.

Mr. Garrow. It was very dark when you came to London? - It was.

WILLIAM BIRD sworn.

I am a milkman; on the 20th of October last I was walking along Fleet-street with Mr. Greaves about seven o'clock in the evening; I saw the prisoner at the bar, with two other men, running a little distance behind a single horse chaise, I said to Mr. Greaves, it is my opinion they are going to rob that chaise; I immediately ran across the way, a little distance behind, and Mr. Greaves after me; between Temple-lane and Temple-bar, I saw the prisoner run behind the single horse chaise close, and put his left hand on the trunk that was behind it, and by a motion which I saw in his right arm, I supposed in myself he was cutting what it was fastened on with. Just as the chaise got up to the brink of the Bar the other men got up likewise to the chaise, and one of the other two, and the prisoner at the bar, took hold of it and lifted it from behind the chaise, and I immediately ran up to the prisoner, and he and the other man had the trunk in their possession when I took hold of them.

Q. Are you sure when you took hold of them, the prisoner had hold of the trunk? - Positively, I struck the prisoner with a stick, that I had in my hand, and then took hold of him, and he let go and dropped the trunk; taking hold of him he plunged away from me, and I pursued him immediately, and in the high road, opposite Bell-yard, I struck him again with the stick I had in my hand; he still continued running till he came to the end of Apollo-court, where I overtook him again, and knocked him down; I never

lost sight of him; I never was five yards from him; I took hold of him, and Mr. Greaves came to my assistance, and we took him to the watchhouse of St. Dunstan's; I then went to the bar, and when I came to the bar, a coachman said, here my friend, here is the trunk; he was sitting on it.

Q. Did you make observation enough of the trunk to know that was the trunk? - I cannot positively say that it was the same I saw behind the chaise; I said to the coachman, I am much obliged to you, and I took hold of it and carried it to the watchhouse.

Q Should you know it again, was it in court? - Yes.

Mr. Garrow. What sort of a night was it? - A bright star light night, rather remarkable light than otherwise.

Q. You had not seen the prisoner before? - Yes, I had seen the prisoner before many times.

Q. Where is Apollo-court? - It is between Temple-bar and Chancery-lane, it turns up by Salkeild, the pawnbrokers.

Prisoner. The witness Bird has been in the Bail-dock with me, and he said he knew and would not hurt me.

- GREAVES sworn.

I am a glazier; I was in company with Mr. Bird, on Saturday the 20th of October; I was in Fleet-street about seven o'clock in the evening; I saw two men in company with the prisoner come up Fleet-street; I saw a chaise a little way before me, the horse was on a trot, and these people seemed running after the chaise, as I judged; I and Mr. Bird followed them, and when they came within an hundred or an hundred and fifty yards of the bar, the chaise had come to a walk, because it could not go on so fast for the carriages; I then saw two men turn out into the street, out of the path way into the road way; there was an hackney coach standing close by the pavement; I went behind the hackney coach, and the prisoner in company with the others had got the trunk off the chaise; I directly pursued them; one ran through the bar, and two ran back into Fleet-street; the prisoner was one; I pursued the other and he got away; I saw which way the prisoner took, and when I came up, I supposed he had been knocked down, for he was then sitting on the ground, close by Apollo court, on the path way; there was a scuffle ensued about getting him away; they tried to get him away.

Q. Did you loose sight of him after that? - Never afterwards till we got him to the watchhouse; the next day we took him before a magistrate.

Q. What became of the trunk? - I saw the trunk standing on the pavement, and a coachman was sitting on it, at Mr. Child's the banker's door; I brought the trunk to the watchhouse; I have kept it ever since Monday, when it was taken before the Lord Mayor, where it was sealed in order to be advertised.

ROBERT BEVIS sworn.

I am a baker; on the 20th of October I set off about half after five in the morning to go down to Stapleton; I got there about ten o'clock; I stopped and breakfasted there; the trunk was put on the chaise at Stapleton; I saw it afterwards on the chaise at Woodford-bridge; I came through London, I should imagine about seven o'clock; I came through Whitechapel, Leadenhall-street, and Fleet-street, Temple-bar, and the Strand; I cannot swear to the trunk, but I can to the straps.

WILLIAM MARSH sworn.

I am ward beadle; all I know is that from a letter in the box, I found out the prosecutor of the box and contents. (Produced, and deposed to by Mary

Richardson, and the straps that was cut, deposed to by Mr. Bevis.)

Prisoner. Bird has been with me in the Bail-dock, and wished me to shake hands; says he, Hoare, I have known you some time, I cannot say you was the person.

Bird. He sent a young woman to me to desire me to step into the Bail-dock, for he wanted to speak to me. I was prevailed upon and went; says he, Mr. Bird, you will make the matter easy, and there should be no money wanted. He sent for some wine, but I did not stay till it came.

Prisoner. Upon your oath did I offer you any money.

Bird. He said he would give 10 or 12 guineas to make the matter easy. I told him as for money I did not want it; Greaves was with me.

Court to Greaves. Did you hear what past? - He said you will make the matter as easy as you can; my mother is in possession of a good deal of money; there shall not be any money wanted. I told him my friend I believe money will be of very little matter in this business.

GUILTY . (Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-11

11. MICHAEL RONAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , one diamond, of the weight of 31 grains, value 85 l. the goods of Abraham Mocalto and Asher Goldsmid .

(The Case was opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

ASHER GOLDSMID sworn.

I am a Diamond Broker . The prisoner was in my service about eleven months. I lost a diamond: it weighed 21 grains. - It was of a yellow cast. I had had it about five or six months. I kept the stone usually in a pocket-book, which I carry in my inside-pocket of my coat. - The prisoner brushed my coat every day. I missed it about the 10th of October last. - I cannot say within a day or two. I always found the prisoner a very honest servant . I had not the least suspicion of him.

I communicated the loss to the persons in the house, and the prisoner was informed of it. I advertised, and sent bills about likewise.

About the 20th of November, I heard of it from Mr. Stubbs. I sent him out in the evening before, and he staid out all the evening. I thought some accident had happened with him. Mr. Stubbs called on me the next day, and informed me that he had taken him up. I saw the diamond, and it was the very diamond I had lost; it has been in Mr. Stubbs's possession ever since. Its value is 85 l.

Mr. Garrow. How long had this man lived with you? - Eleven months. I never had the least suspicion of his honesty.

JOHN STUBBS sworn.

I am a Silversmith, in Holborn. On Tuesday, the 20th of November, about eight o'clock at night, the prisoner at the bar called at my shop, and asked me if I would buy a diamond. I looked at it - he had got it between his fingers. - The diamond appeared rather greasy. I said, I don't think this is a diamond. Says he I am sure it is a diamond, from the place from which I had it. I asked him, what he asked for it. He said, 60 guineas. I then step'd out to Mr. Chandler's, the pawn-broker, and asked his opinion about it - and then I asked him who he lived with. He said he lived along with Mr. Goldsmid. I asked him how he came by this diamond. He said, he found it opposite the Royal Exchange. - but I should have observed, that he either said, he had given a diamond price, or it cost a diamond price - I cannot be certain

which of the expressions he used. At last he said, he found it at the Royal Exchange. I told him, I was afraid he did not find it there, but that he found it at his master's house. He then told me that the maids were out, and that he was sweeping the carpet; and underneath the carpet he found this diamond. I asked him how he could offer it to sell, he said his master had offered 10 l. reward for it. I took him to Bow-street, and have had the diamond ever since; and called at M. Goldsmid's the next morning (the diamond produced and deposed to).

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-12

12. ANDREW ALEXANDER DEW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of November , 18 yards of quilted cotton, value 7 l. the goods of James Kastevan and Thomas Kastevan , in their dwelling house .

(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

WILLIAM NEWTON sworn.

I am a Smith. On Saturday the 10th of November, I was employed to do some business for Mr. Austin, in the coal cellar, which has a communication with the area; this was two doors from Mr. Kastevan's - the same side of the way - about half past 5 in the evening, I observed a piece of goods, which I now produce, in the area of Mr. Austin's house. As soon as I discovered it, I got up from the area and went to Mr. Austin's house, where he now lives, while the house was repairing, and told him what had happened. I ask'd him to step over with me: he went over with me; and I took up the piece of goods, and gave it into the hands of Mr. Austin, and he carried it to his own house; and the same piece was brought back by Mr. Austin and me. - It was never out of my sight, only whilst I was climbing up the area. - After I had given it to Mr. Austin, I went with Mr. Austin to his house, I came back again with him, and threw it down again on the same place, as near as I could, in which I found it. I took my station then just within side of the coal-cellar, which was as near as possible. There was a doorway out of the coal-cellar into the area, I believe my feet were in the area. I sat within side the coal-cellar, to hear what passed, and to wait in case any body should come. - I did this by Mr. Kastevan's desire. After I had set there some little time, about half or three-quarters of an hour, some persons, one of whom I suppose to be the prisoner, came to the top of the area, and looked down, and said, there it lays - it is safe. - Are those boards fast? - (speaking to each other) meaning the boards that were laid down to prevent people from falling down before the iron-work was compleated. Another answered and said; No: they are only laid over to prevent people from falling; and these stones are rolled upon them to prevent the boards from moving. Then they went away, and in about a quarter of an hour after, as nigh as I can tell, they returned; and, looking down the area, they saw the piece of goods; they said, there it lies - it is safe; now we will have it immediately. The prisoner came down the area - the boards were removed, - He climbed down - The goods lay at the depth of about 8 or 9 feet: they were obliged to scramble down. On his getting down, I seized him, and took hold of the piece of goods - he had got it about breast-high, as if to deliver it to some one on the outside. I saw him drop pretty near to the goods; so high, that his feet touched the goods. I saw him

stoop and take up the goods: there was a lamp near. - There was more than one person above. I roused myself from my sitting, and caught hold by his coat, and all his waistcoat collars, and dragged him about the area, and cried out for help. He struggled, and fought with me to get away, but I had fast hold and would not let him go: his companions, who were above, whom I knew nothing of, said let him go - let him come up; - we will secure him. My answer was, as soon as I see a face I do know, I will let him go, upon which, immediately, a large club was striking at me from above. As soon as I refused to let him go, they struck at me, and I got down, and pulled the prisoner down over me, in order to secure myself from the blows. Mr. James Kastevan came, and I cried out, I have got him safe. - Then Mr. Kastevan took him from me, from the area; and as soon as I could get the piece of goods up, I went up myself, to Mr. Kastevan's shop, and they consulted, that it would be best to take him to Bow-street, in a coach. I went with him in the coach. As soon as we got in, the right-hand door was opened; and there was some alarm given, and sticks striking about the coach. - And the prisoner started up, and was half out of the coach. Mr. Kastevan and I were inside the coach; and he found we had got him so secure, that he cried out, Do not hurt them. I will not go with you, I tell you. (The silk produced and deposed to).

Mr. Knowlys. This was several doors from Mr. Kastevan's house, where this man was found? - The second door.

Q. In the area of an uninhabited house? - Yes.

Q. When did you first go to work in this area? - That day after I had my dinner, about two or three o'clock.

Q. And you continued working there till you saw this? - No Sir, I had orders to make a coal plate and fastenings; and which was not made till the workmen were all gone.

Q. Then you left the work for same time? - I did.

Q. And returning you found this piece of goods in your area.

Court. Was it dark when you left the place? - It was quite dark; I had a candle to go into the yard.

Q. Can you say positively no other person was in the yard, from the time the piece was thrown down by you, till the prisoner came to take it up? - there was no body but the prisoner.

JOHN EVANS sworn.

I saw this piece in my master's shop on the 10th about half past four; it was either the second or third piece from the door, further on in the window; I saw all that was gone in the course of the day; and this particular piece was there at half past four, when a person came in and wanted some kerseymere, and brought a piece to the door, to see if it was the colour; and a quarter after five I went over the way to dinner, to a house where the family live; I saw the window quite full; I returned from thence about a quarter before six, and saw it was gone before Mr. Newton had given information about it; I know it to be Mr. Kastevan's property, I have no doubt about it.

Mr. Knowlys. Has your master many servants? - Yes.

Q. How many employed to carry out goods? - Five and a boy.

Mr. Garrow. Do you ever carry any out without the order of your master? - No.

Q. Had you any orders to carry this out? - No.

JAMES KASTEVAN sworn.

My brother's name is Thomas; I was sitting up at dinner, and Mr. Austin sent for me, and shewed me the silk, and asked me if I knew it, I did; I was very much alarmed about it; after he went back to the area, I heard him cry out a

thief, a thief; and I went and received the prisoner of him, collared him and took him and shook him; the goods were given to Mr. Bingley's porter; it was marked before it was taken back to be thrown down again. It cost about 8 s. a yard.

Mr. Knowlys. Have you not expressed a suspicion that some people that were intrusted by you, had put the goods down there, that some bad people might come and take them away? - I had no suspicion at the time of any body.

THOMAS KASTEVAN sworn.

The prime cost of this piece of silk is at 8 s. 6 d. per yard. At about a quarter past five I sent the servant over the way, to the house, to dinner, where the family reside, and told him when he came back to clear the window; I then observed the window was perfectly full: In about half an hour I think the prisoner was secured in the area; I went down and got him into my own house, and when I got him into the shop, he fell down on his knees and begged mercy; the prisoner had not the least connection with our shop; he was taken to Bow-street; I went in the coach with him; the moment the coach had turned about, a dozen yards, the door of the coach was opened, and some men appeared with bludgeons, and a cry, rescue, damn you, come out; the prisoner gave a leap; I took hold of his collar; he attempted to get away, and we secured him.

Mr. Knowlys. I am told there is a person of the name of Cave, interested in your business? - That is two years and a half ago; There is no one interested now but my brother and myself.

CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY sworn.

I am one of the public officers, at Bow-street; I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody.

Prisoner. I was coming from St. Martin's-lane, to this end of the town; unfortunately for me, I was taken ill; I saw these buildings, and seeing no public house near, I thought it more decent than going into the road; as soon as I went down my feet came against something that was soft, and I saw this roll of stuff lay.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 39 s. (Aged 24.)

Three months imprisonment in Newgate , and fine 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17921215-13

13. SARAH FREE was indicted for feloniously making an assault on John Adam Carey , in the dwelling house of the said Sarah Free ; on the 5th of December , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will 10 Guineas and a half; the monies of the said John Adam Carey .

JOHN ADAM CAREY sworn.

I am a German, a single man; yesterday week I came from St. Edward's, to look out for a captain, to go home; I am a leather dresser ; I made a bargain with a captain to go home to Germany; and I came from that house and went into another house at Iron Gate, and stopped there for some more of my friends, to go home with me; they did not come to go home, so I came out and went up a lane.

Q. What is the name of the public house? - I don't know the name; it was close by Iron Gate, in St. Catherine's-lane ; I came out of it I believe at eleven o'clock at night, what I can tell the

nighest; I was not drunk; I had drank no more than three pennyworth of gin and water; I went out and met a woman in the lane, and I asked her, good woman, where can I get a lodging, a room to myself? I don't like to go over the other side of the water; I am rather late. The prisoner was not the woman that I met; after the woman she told me, she would bring me into a very good house, and a room to myself, where I should not be robbed; I went with the woman, and I came to the house of the woman at the bar; I came and I asked her if I could lodge, she said yes, and what I must pay, she said 2 s. that was not the prisoner that I paid the money to, but the other woman; directly, or a little while after, this here prisoner took a knife and cut down all this side of my breeches, and the other woman took hold of this side, and the prisoner took the money out; I saw the money in her hand. I can say I had 10 Guineas and a half, silver I don't know how much; I saw the gold in the prisoner's hand; after she took the money, she took hold of me and throwed me on a little bed, and struck me on the ground by the temple.

Q. What did this woman do with these Guineas? - She flung them on the table after they knocked me down. They knocked me down three times, this woman and the other both together; I got up again, and they shared the money between them together.

Q. After they had taken the 10 Guineas, what became of it? - She gave it to the other girl; I saw her give it; I don't know how much.

Q. Did you see her give the money to the other? - I did not; I saw it in the prisoner's hand; and I saw them count them on the table, both together.

Q. After they counted them what did they do? - Then the woman went away and the prisoner took and turned me out of doors.

Q. How soon did you see her after this? - The prisoner stood with me in the room; I could not get in any more, she turned me out.

Q. Now attend to me; did you go out when she desired you? - And she shut the door behind me. I stood at the door; the watchman came past directly; and I told him I had been robbed; and I told him to get an officer; and the watchman and the officer they did not come; and I staid all night by the door myself; in the morning when it was six o'clock, I sent the watchman again for the officer, and the officer came and took her up out of the room; she was searched, and there was some gold and silver found upon her; then I carried her before a Magistrate, and she was committed. I saw her before the magistrate at the second hearing, at a house close by where they are shut up, before they go in into the Magistrates; and she told me, she would give me 5 Guineas, and I should make it up; so I believe she said, she did not take any more than 7 Guineas and a half; I told her it was 10 Guineas and a half.

[The remainder of this trial in the next part, which will be published in a few days.]

Reference Number: t17921215-13

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 15th of December, 1792, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir JAMES SANDERSON, Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON,

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY MANOAH SIBLY , PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND, No. 35, Goswell-street, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART II.

LONDON:

Printed and published by HENRY FENWICK , No. 63, Snow Hill,

[PRICE ONE SHILLING AND FOUR PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of SARAH FREE .

Q. At the time this woman ripped your breeches open, did you see her do it? - I did, she said to the man, that was along with us, that she would pay all, except a bottle of wine.

Mr. Knowlys. You are a german, you tell us? - Yes.

Q. You had a long parcel of money this day? - Not this day.

Q. This day you are speaking of? - Yes.

Q. How much money had you in the morning? - I cannot tell.

Q. Was you employed in your business that day? - I was going to Holland.

Q. What time of the morning was it you went into the public house? - Between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. From that time till you called the watchman, how many minutes do you think, you was out of a public house; was not you drinking from eleven o'clock in the morning, till eleven at night? - I cannot tell; I went to the captain, and from the captain, I went to look for my other friends, to go along with me.

Q. Upon your oath, had you not been drinking the whole day? - No.

Q. How many hours in the day, had you not been in the constant state of drinking? - I had not drank a glass of liquor in five hours.

Q. And you mean to tell us seriously you was sober when you set out at Iron-gate? - I was sober.

Q. Can you tell us how much money you had when you went to the captain? - I had 11 Guineas and a half.

Q. How much money did you spend in liquor that day? - I don't know, I paid so much. I paid away 15 s. and I bought

an handkerchief; I paid 3 s. 6 d. for that; and I had 12 s. in silver.

Q. How much money had you in the public house, at Iron-gate, in gold, besides silver? - I had 10 Guineas and a half.

Q. Who was with you at the time you counted the money there? - No body there.

Q. Is your friend the landlord at Iron-gate here? - I don't know the man.

Q. You have not brought him as a witness? - I did not ask him for a witness.

Q. Because he would have told us whether you was drunk or sober, when you left the house. Now you watched at this house all night, that you might know it in the morning; did not you go to another house, and insist upon going in, and charge another woman with the robbery? - I never did.

Q. Then you never charged any other woman with this robbery? - This is the woman.

Q. That is a different thing, on your oath, that very day did not you go to another house, demand admission, and charge another woman with robbing you? - No, I did not.

Q. Did you take up no other woman? - No, I did not.

Q. Nor the Constable at your desire? - No, he never did at all.

Q. Bare was the man to whom you applied, and you swear that you was sober when you applied to Bare? - I was.

Q. Now you tell us, that these women knocked you down, and while you lay on the ground, you heard money chinkling on the table? - I saw them when I was up.

Q. You never attempted to lay hold of it? - I was in danger of my life; I sent on purpose for the money abroad, because I was not able to work.

Q. When these people were counting the money, you lay on the ground? - They knocked me down, I got up directly after that.

Q. Then the other woman went away with this money, and when you was alone with this woman, you was in danger of your life; she is such a great strapper, she could have eat you up; you was left alone with this woman; and then you complained to the watchman that you was robbed in the house; the watchman would not go into the house with you? - The watchman knocked at the door, and she would not open the door.

Q. So the watchman did not spring his rattle, and call for assistance. I take it for granted you have the watchman here? - I don't know the watchman; I never saw him.

Q. You did not tell Bare about the watchman? - I did not.

Q. Then Bare found you at this woman's door? - I sent the watchman at six o'clock.

Q. You did know then where the watchman was? - I did not go away, for fear she should run away.

Q. You know where to find the watchman, because you sent him for Bare? - No, I did not send him for Bare; I sent him for an officer; I did not say I don't know the watchman.

Q. A little while ago you said that you did not know the watchman, and yet you took him before the magistrate with you? - Mr. Bare did not tell me I was to bring him here,

Q. This woman's life is to be forfeited if she is convicted of this you know, and then there would be 40 l. reward in the bargain; that would more then pay you for the 10 Guineas and a half; how came you by so much money as 10 Guineas and a half? - I received it from Messrs. Grosvenors house; my friends sent it over; I have been ill so long I cannot work.

JOSEPH BARE sworn.

I am a constable; I was called up between five and six on Wednesday morning, by the watchman; I went to a house, No. 2, in St. Catherine's-lane, and made them open the door; I made one of the girls get out of bed; I found the prosecutor was at the door; they opened the door, there were two or three women in the lower apartment; the prisoner was not one of them; he charged a woman at this house; I told him to be very cautious; he charged her with robbing him of 10 guineas and a half; I searched the girl's pocket, and I found not a penny about her; so I told the prosecutor to be very cautious in accusing this woman, without he was positive she was the woman; then I let her go, and told her to go to bed. Then I went to No. 1, the next door; and there I went into the room; and there the prosecutor charged the prisoner at the bar; there was no one there but her; she was in bed; I knocked at the door; she got up and let me in; there was no money found on her.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-14

14. WILLIAM GRIFFITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Barker , about the hour of eight in the night, of the 2d of November , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, an iron anvil, value 1 s. the goods of the said Richard Barker .

RICHARD BARKER sworn.

I am a jobbing smith ; I live in Vinegar-yard, East Smithfield ; between seven and eight o'clock, I was going to have my supper; I left work and went into the public house, and had got some herrings, and asked the maid at the public house, whether she could do them for me; I shut my door and put the asp on, and shut the padlock, but did not lock it; I left the anvil there when I went out, and when I came back the anvil was not there; it was fixed to a block, by three nails, and the block is fixed in the ground; it is too heavy to move about; I went back in about ten minutes; I found my house just as it was before; but the padlock upside down, instead of being put on one way, it was put on the other. I did not recover my anvil till next morning, when I saw it at an old iron shop, the corner of Marybone-court, in Nightingale-lane, at one Mr. Carter's; I supposed how it came there; but I could not say; I knew it was mine, because I bought it and paid for it. It was very particular; I made a chiswell on purpose to cut a hole in it; and there is the marks now. I can swear to it.

Q. Can you say, for certain, whether he was in the house or not, when you went out? might he not be concealed? - There was no part of the house that he could possibly be concealed in. I am clear of it.

Q. What was done with the anvil? - It was carried before the magistrate. Mr. Carter has kept it ever since. - It is here now.

Q. Was this shop, and where you sleep, under the same roof? - It is.

THOMAS CARTER sworn.

I keep a coal-shed and an iron-shop, the corner of Marybone-court, Nightingale-lane. This man (the prisoner at the bar) came to me, and asked me to buy an anvil. No, said I, it will not suit me. I do nor want any thing of the kind. If I recollect right, it was on a Friday.

Court to Barker. When did you lose it? - I think it was Friday. I lost it two or three days before the 5th of November.

Court to Carter. Was it the same Friday he came to you? - It was the Friday that Barker came to me the next morning, and said, it is my anvil. I described the man I bought it of; and he knew the man. I gave him 10 s. 6 d. for it. I told him it did not suit me to buy it. He said his landlord was going to seize on him for rent, and that he would rather sell his own property than his landlord should. - This was what he told me, I delivered the anvil up, when I was asked for it. I went in pursuit of the gentleman that I bought the anvil of. I am certain the prisoner is the man. (The anvil deposed to).

Prisoner. I wanted to get a little money: but I asked him if he would keep it while Monday, and I would have it again.

PETER MAINE sworn.

I know nothing farther than apprehending him the next day, about a mile from the prosecutor's house, Brick-lane, Spitalfields, in a public house. Mr. Carter knew him immediately.

Prosecutor. He had worked with me about six weeks.

Prisoner. It was a work-shed wherein I worked. It was not an house, and as to breaking, there was no such thing, because the padlock was only a sham one, to put off and on, because he was to go in at any hour the same as myself, and when I took that to the man, he said he did not care whether he had it or not; but as I was a little urgent, because I expected to be troubled in the morning afterwards and I told him if he would keep it till the Monday, I would give him half a crown, and would have it again; which I gave him a shilling earnest out of; but I meant to replace it. I was coming down the morning after, for to tell Mr. Barker of it, as he and I were intimate with each other, but I could not come as soon as I could wish; and I was apprehended for the same. I had not any intention of having it from him.

Court to Barker. Does he mean to say, that he had as much to do in your house as yourself? - He was with me five or six weeks, but the last two or three days he had absconded. He did not work for me; he worked for himself. He was to pay for his working there, but he never gave me but one shilling.

Q. Was he to pay for working there by the week; or how? - We never made any agreement about that. He gave a shilling, and said as soon as he could get more, he would give me some.

Q. Supposing the day you had lost your anvil, he had come to work, you should not have objected to it. - I should have objected to it, so far as this, that two people cannot work with one tool.

Q. You had not forbid him. - I had, but he said, he would still give me something. There is another person that works in the shop, besides him and me.

GUILTY of stealing, but not of the Burglary . (Aged 45.)

Six Months Imprisonment , and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-15

15. SARAH LOFT , ANN SIMMONS , ELIZABETH REDERICK , ANN DAWSON , and JANE ISON , were indicted for making an assault in the dwelling house of Ann Dawson , upon William Ellis , on the 2d of November ; and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a silver watch, value 20 s. a canvas purse, value 1 d. and 31 l. in monies numbered, the goods, chattels, and monies of the said William Ellis .

(The Case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

WILLIAM ELLIS sworn.

I am a Welch-drover . I lost my money on Thursday, the 2d of November. I came to town the day before.

Q. How did it happen? - I will tell you the truth. I light of this young woman, Sarah Loft , at Cow cross, in the street, coming out of an house there, between twelve and one o'clock in midday; I was sober; I had drank only one pint of beer that day. There were but few words passed between us then; but she took me down round the street, and carried me to the house of Dawson; I did not know then it was her house; it is in Sharp's-alley ; when we went to the house, she took me up stairs, and the next I see, was Jane Ison ; she came up into the room; but before that I and Loft, we make an agreement for 6 d. I took my 6 d. from my waistcoat pocket; the rest of my money was in my right hand breeches pocket, in a purse or canvas bag. When I had given her the money, then we had what you know, we laid down on the bed together; while I was on the bed, I found my purse in her hand; as soon as I found my purse in her hand, I clapped my hand on it, and I got hold of one end of it; the empty end. She called out, the first name was Sukey, and Ison came up first; then she took me by the left arm; and I had the end of my purse in my hand, at the same time; so the other bit me in two or three places, in the hand; then the other two came up, Dawson and Simmons; they came up while I was still struggling, and my hand still holding my purse. When they came up, that Ann Dawson came and clapped her hand on my mouth, because I called out murder several times, I let go; at last they got me down on the bed, and I held the empty end in my hand, and so they cut the end off. Elizabeth Rederick was not there at all; the other four all assisted in getting me on the bed; and while I was down they cut my purse, and while I was in the hobble with them, my watch dropped out on the floor, and the glass dropped out of it, as I had not yet put my cloaths to rights; they took it, it was either Jane Ison or Ann Dawson ; Sarah Loft had the purse in her hand the mean while; they cut my upper lip most shockingly, what with I cannot say; after they had cut my purse, they all ran away directly. I crept down stairs, and was very much frightened; I stood at the door and cried out there, and one Mr. Clarke came to my assistance. There was a pursuit made after the women; I saw two of them, Loft and Simmons the next day, or the day after; I did not see Dawson till lately. I am sure they are the four girls; I have not the least doubt of either of them.

Q. Did you ever hear from Dawson, or any body in her presence, who kept that house? - I did not.

Q. How much money did you loose? - I lost upwards of 31 l. and a silver watch.

Prisoner Simmons. He hath sworn to three different Sums of money at the Justices. He said when he took me, he lost 36 l. when he took Ison he said he lost between 20 and 30 l. and now he says 31 l. - I always said 31 l.

Q. Did not you say at the Justices, you did not know me at all? - I did not say so.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I live in Sharp's-alley; on the 2d of November I heard a cry out of Murder, for God's sake help, as I was going to bed I am a watchman; I threw up the sash of my window; I saw a man at the house, that I understood to be kept by Ann Dawson ; I said my friend what is amiss; he said, I am robbed and murdered; says I, you cannot be murdered, for you are alive now, says I, stop

exactly there where you are, while I get you assistance. I went and got an officer, and when we came down, he stood exactly as I left him; says I this is the manner that I left the man; you have a right to go in and search the house; I went into the house along with the constable; we found one girl there whom we understand is since dead; we went up stairs, I picked up part of a purse, and a pair of sleeve buttons, and the glass of a watch. The constable has got them. I had known the prisoner Dawson as much as two years, she had been backward and forward all that time. I know the other prisoners by sight, by resorting to her house. Dawson was the reputed owner of the house.

Prisoner Simmons. I am sure you don't know me. - I know her extremely well, as coming backward and forward to that house.

Prisoner Dawson. Who told you that I keeps the house Mr. Clarke? - Because she has said that nobody will get me out, because I can live rent free, if I like it.

Prisoner Dawson. He keeps a worse house than mine? - I always take such lodgers in, as are hard working people I don't take upon myself to say all that come are married.

Prisoner Simmons. Did not Rederick, lodge at your house? - I don't know, she might have been with a Mrs. Miller, but I did not approve of it; I told her if she would go away and take her company with her, I would forgive her what was due.

SARAH WHEELER sworn.

I live in Mr. Clarke's house; I get my bread in the street, with a barrow; I had just come home, between one and two; I heard a noise, and looked out of my window, and saw this man standing and complaining, and Jane Gaggers otherwise Ison, give something out of her bosom into Ann Dawson 's hand, what it was I don't know; I don't know all the people at the bar; I don't know how long Dawson has kept the house.

Q. Was this man at the door? - The man was at the door, and they were in the one pair of stairs, close by the window.

Court to the Prosecutor. Was the room in which you was robbed in, the one pair of stairs? - It was, it looked opposite to these persons window.

Q. How wide is the distance between? - About as wide as from you to me.

Q. Mrs. Wheeler, was what you saw, after the cry of murder? - It was.

Jury. Are you certain that the prosecutor was at the door of the house, at the time you saw something given from Ison to Dawson? - He was standing by the door and holding by the staple. I never left my window at all, till after the constable came.

Q. Is there any other way out of the house? - I cannot say, but I have heard there is a back door.

Witness, CLARKE.

I met all the women while I was going for a constable; I overtook them at the top of Sharp's-alley, about sixty yards from the house where they lodge; I spoke to Ann Dawson ; and says Ann Dawson , you have done such a daring thing at noon day, I cannot put up with it.

Prisoner Dawson. He met me, Mrs. Dawson, says he, I will hang you if you had a hundred neck. That was within two doors of the officer's house.

JAMES WHEELER sworn.

I am the husband of the last witness; I live opposite Mrs. Dawson's house; I came home about one o'clock at noon; coming home my wife had sit down to light the fire; we heard a terrible noise of murder; I got up and opened my window; and I saw Ann Dawson take

something out of another body's bosom; but I cannot swear which: I heard Clarke speak, and I ran down stairs; they were in the one pair of stairs, and they could get out at the back door.

Prisoner Dawson. Did you ever go out at the back door? - I have.

Q. Did you ever know that was my house? - I did because you wanted to let an apartment to me.

THOMAS WRIGHT sworn.

I live within half a stones throw of this place; I know nothing of this robbery; I am a City officer; I went in pursuit of them, on the 2d of November, in the afternoon; we went to the house of Ann Dawson ; we found the house fast and a padlock on the door; we searched many suspicious houses, particularly public houses of ill fame; but could make no apprehension that night.

Q. Do you know Dawson? - I do.

Q. Do you know she keeps that house? - I do.

Prisoner Dawson. How do you know I keep the house? - She has got the freehold; and I have known her to come to Mr. - , to borrow money to pay the king's taxes, and he has wanted to have the key.

Mr Garrow. It is a part of the world where possession goes with the key? - It does.

Prisoner Simmons. Pray did not you hear the prosecutor say, he knew nothing about me? - I know he swore positively to Loft, and then he swore positively to Ann Dawson , and then he swore to Jane Gaggers or Ison, that she cut the purse from his hand.

Q. Whether before the magistrate he did not say he did not know me? - He swore to them all before the magistrate, that was the reason the magistrate thought proper to bind me over.

Q No he has not sworn to all, there is one he has not sworn to (meaning Rederick)

- WILLEY sworn.

I am a patrol, I was on a trial here. the 2d of November; I took Jane Gaggers myself; I know nothing of the robbery; I searched her, and found nothing on her; I was before the justice, and I saw them all searched before the justice? there was a guinea found on Ann Loft , and half a guinea on another; I am not certain which.

THOMAS APPLEYARD sworn.

I searched Ann Dawson and Ison, nothing was found upon them. In the room where the robbery was committed, this half purse, sleeve buttons and a watch glass were found. (Produced and the purse and sleeve buttons deposed to.)

Prisoner Loft. I never saw the man before in my life, till I saw him at the justices.

Prisoner Simmons. When I was taken to the justices, I was just done with my work, and was standing at the bottom of Mutton-hill; the officers came up and says, you are the woman that I want; I went with him to the justices: the prosecutor swore to Sarah Loft , and they asked him if he knew any thing of me; no, he said he had no further to say against me, than that he did not know me; with that the justice said fetch the woman, (that is another woman) says the justice, think it will be necessary to commit them all, till the other is taken; and then he swore to 36 Guineas, and his watch. The man that took me, when he was taking me down stairs, says, I don't know what they have committed you for, for the man has not sworn to you now.

Witness WILLEY.

When I was before the justice they were proved to be in the house, Simmons and another, who is dead, but the prosecutor could not attempt to swear that it was them that used the violence, that they took any active part in the business.

Q. Did he say whether they were in the room? - I cannot say.

Mr. Garrow. Have you known the prisoner Simmons? - I have known her many years.

Mr. Garrow. I thought so.

Witness Willey. Ison was taken the 3d of November, she was brought up to the justice and discharged, because the countryman was not in town. I was hunting about for her again, till last Monday, when I took her out of Golden Lane.

Prisoner Dawson. I don't belong to the house, nor did I ever see the man till I was taken.

Prisoner Ison. Ever since my husband's decease I have been at Canterbury, and had only come up that evening as this gentleman took me. I was taken up for this same affair, and this same woman (Wheeler) came against me, that there woman came into the little room and told me if I would make her a present of a small trifle, that neither she nor her husband would appear against me on Wednesday.

Mrs. Wheeler. I never said such a thing to her upon my oath.

Prisoner Ison. Did not I see you on Wednesday evening, and then you asked me for the money? - It is not true, I did attend on Wednesday.

The Prisoner Simmons called one witness to her character.

Sarah Loft , GUILTY , Death .

Ann Simmons , GUILTY , Death .

Elizabeth Rederick , Not GUILTY .

Ann Dawson , GUILTY , Death .

Jane Ison , GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17921215-16

16. MARY HUGHES was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on John Small , the 9th of November , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, two half crowns, the monies of the said John Small .

JOHN SMALL sworn.

I am a married man, and have three children, I met the prisoner in the Broad Way Westminster , she stopped me, it was the 9th of November, at eleven o'clock in the evening, I had been part of the way down to the Suttle Ground, along with a cousin of mine, I was going home, she stopped me, and asked me, and said my dear will you please to go home with me, I said no, I will not, and I made answer where do you live? says she, just by, says I, I shall not go home with you, and wished her a good night: she hugged me round the waist before I did her a good night, and took these two half crowns out of my pocket, she met me full butt.

Q. Was it before or after the conversation? - After that she took the money from me, the same time while she was speaking these words.

Q. You must describe in what manner she took the money from you? - By taking of me quite round the waist, and then picked my pocket.

Q. And you felt your money go? - No, I did not, I plunged myself from her, and wished her a good night, and she said I might go to hell if I liked, the half crowns were in my breeches pocket, I had seen them in the afternoon when I was at play with my little children.

Q. Have you ever recovered them yet? - I have got them, I walked about three yards, and putting my hands in my pocket, I missed my money, and I followed after her, and overtook her. Halloo, said I, you have robbed me, in the mean time of my speaking these two words, she dropped the two half crowns on the

pavement. I heard them fall before I catched hold of her, then I charged the watch with her, and picked up the half crowns myself, I see them fall from her, she dropped them out of her hand, I know them to be mine, because I was at play with them along with my children, there is two plain heads, and one a plain tail, and the other quite smooth, (the half crowns produced, and shewn to the Jury.)

Jury. I think it is very difficult to swear to half crowns, after they are once out of the owner's hands, there is such similarity between half crowns.

Prisoner. Will the man say I ever touched them. - Yes, I will take my oath of it.

ROBERT GREENHILL sworn.

I am a watchman of the parish of St. Margaret's, Westminster, on the 9th of November I was crying the hour of eleven o'clock, I heard somebody cry watch, I made towards the cry, I came up to Mr. John Small , he made the charge of the prisoner for robbing him of two half crown pieces. When I came up to him, he had the two half crown pieces in his hand, one of the half crowns seemed to be dirty, taken out of the mud. I took the half crowns, and both of them to the watch-house, says I both of you shall go to the watch-house, and decide it there. When they came to the watch-house, Mr. John Small gave charge of her to the constable of the night, and she down'd of her knees three or four different times and asked forgiveness; Mr. Nimrow, who was the constable of the night, said it was out of his power to forgive any thing of that kind, and she was committed; the two half crowns were produced on the watch-table by the constable and beadle of the night; Mr. John Small took them away with him.

JOSEPH NIMROW sworn.

I was constable of the night, the parties were brought into me about eleven o'clock as nigh as I can guess at the time, Mr. Small charged the woman of robbing him of two half crowns, and an handkerchief, I took the charge, the woman acknowledged the fact, and begged for mercy; she did not acknowledge the handkerchief, but she acknowledged the half crowns.

Q. Did any body recommend her to make any confession? - Nothing, my Lord.

Court to Prosecutor. Mr. Small, how came you not to say any thing about this handkerchief before? - Because I did not find it on her, but I believe it was written in the letter before the magistrate: indeed I forgot it now, I never found it, it was a new handkerchief.

Prisoner. Sir, I was going along I met this man, and he asked me to take him home; he pulled me about, and something dropped, and he stooped down and picked it up, but I did not see what it was till he came to the watch-house; he said he lost 3 s. 6 d. more, and an handkerchief.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you say you lost more money than the two half crowns? - No.

Q. How came you to charge her with an highway robbery? - I never charged her with a highway robbery no more than they please to put down, I never charged her than of robbing me of my money.

Q. Did you ever charge any body with an highway robbery before? - No.

Q. Do you know the reward? - No.

GUILTY, of Stealing only, but not of the Assault . (Aged 26.)

Imprisoned 12 Months , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-17

17. ELIZABETH STEVENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of November , 9 yards three quarters of worked muslin, value 40 s. the goods of Edward Nicholson , privately in his shop .

JAMES ROUS sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Nicholson, he is a linen draper , his christian name is Edward. On Thursday the 16th of November, between the hours of five and six, this woman and another came into our shop, No. 27, Newport-street , a stock of a bankrupt, which Mr. Nicholson purchased, the prisoner asked for some Irish, I shewed it to her at 19 d. a yard, sold her three yards, then I sold the other lady along with her, three yards also, which made six yards in the whole, off from the same piece; after that the prisoner asked for some muslin yard and a half wide, a spotted one, little spots; accordingly I shewed her, it happened to lay at the bottom of the wrapper, and I turned the muslins all over till I came to it; the wrapper was on the counter, and she approved of it. I sold her a yard and an eighth, after I had cut it off, and was folding it up, I observed the muslins move, I then supposed she might have secreted a piece of muslin, and the prisoner stooped to the ground, whereby I thought she might have secreted a piece of muslin; I took no notice of it, until I saw the next motion, which was, as I supposed, she was making it fast about her coats. I then folded up the wrapper again, and asked the prisoner if she wanted any thing else, and the reply was she wanted to look at some calico; I cannot be positive which spoke, which I shewed her, she then paid me for what she had bought, six yards of Irish, and a yard and an eighth of muslin, and paid me the sum I was to have, I gave her change, and wished her a good evening, then I desired Joseph Nicholson to go and bring the first lady back; he is the nephew of Mr. Nicholson, he brought the prisoner back, she then went round our counter, he then said to her, do not go there to drop it, but drop it here in the middle of the shop; then he said now she has dropped it; I immediately went past her, and picked up the muslin, the muslin lay close by the side of her, it was warm as if I had been holding it by the fire about five minutes; it was a sprigged muslin worked, it was nine yards and three quarters, I delivered it to Joseph Nicholson the other witness.

Mr. Garrow. Pray Mr. Rous how long have you lived at No. 27? - Some time.

Q. What is the firm of your house? - Edward Nicholson .

Q. What do you think of Edward Nicholson and Co. is that bill your handwriting? - It is.

Q. So much for your hand-writing. Now do you mean to repeat to me that the firm of your house is Nicholson, or Nicholson and Co.? - Any name you please.

Q. Now I will give you another name; what do you think of the name of Dickson? - That is taken off the door.

Q. How many times have you been a witness for your master? - Once.

Q. Upon your oath, who are the parties that compose this cheap linen draper's shop? - There are no partners at all, my master is selling on the commission of the assign of the assignees, Mr. Fouquet is one, and the other I cannot tell.

Q. Where did your master live before? - No. 104, Fleet-street, or No. 1, Bridge-street.

Q. And so the house is your's, or mine, or any body's I please, Mr. Nickolson, or Messrs. Nicholson and Co. or Messrs. Dickson and Co. or any body

else that I please. Then I will trouble you no more.

Jury. Do you mean to say on your oath, there is no partner in the house? - There is no partner in the house.

JOSEPH NICHOLSON sworn.

This prisoner and another came into our shop, and asked for some Irish cloth; after she had bought the Irish cloth, she asked for some fine muslin, Rous shewed her the muslin, after that she was gone, he thought, she had secreted a piece of muslin, and desired me to go and bring her back; she went out of the shop about twenty or thirty yards, or it might be more, I cannot say to a certainty; I went to her and said to her, if you please to walk back, you have got a piece of muslin; she immediately came back; he lift the flap of the counter up, when he came out and she ran behind the counter, and I desired her to come out, and drop it in the middle of the shop, if she must drop it; I had hardly got the words out of my mouth before I saw a motion as if she was dropping something; I saw something drop; I immediately says to Rous, she has dropped something; go and pick it up, and see what it is; she walked out as soon as she had dropped it, she walked out into the middle of the shop, from behind the counter; now says she you may send for a constable and search me. He brought the muslin out and gave it to me, and said it is hot, quite warm; it was so; I kept it in my possession till such time we got a constable, when I delivered it up to him.

Mr. Garrow. How long have you lived with your brother? - It is not my brother it is my uncle.

Q. Perhaps you can tell who his partners are? - He has none.

Q. He never tells the world that he hath any partners, upon your oath does not he make out his bills of parcels, in the name of Nicholson and Co.? - On my oath he does not.

Q. Who is Mr. Gibson? - He lives in Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Do you mean to swear that no bills since you have lived in this cheap shop, have been made out in the name of Nicholson and Co.? - I never have.

Q. Do not you know that the bills of parcels are daily and hourly made out in the name of Edward Nicholson and Co.? - There is no partner.

Q. That is no answer? - I can be upon oath, I never made one out so yet.

Q. If you shuffle for a month I will have an answer? - On my oath, I never did.

Q. Will you swear you never saw any? - I will not take on me.

Q. You who have sworn that there was no such a bill of parcel made out in the name of Nicholson and Co. was not that the very bill of parcel, that was delivered to the prisoner. (Produced.) - You cannot catch me at that.

Q. Take it into your hand. Where those the articles the woman had? - I cannot say that that is the same bill.

Q. Are those the same articles she bought. Have you the least doubt that that is the bill? - I have not the least doubt but that it is the bill.

Mr. Garrow to Rous. Upon your oath is not that the bill given to the prisoner? - It is.

Q. How came you to make it out in the name of Nicholson and Co. - I know I was used to do it in the other shop.

Q. Where is that other shop? - No. 104, Fleet-street.

Q. The bills are made out then in the name of Nicholson and Co. Gentlemen you had really better agree about the fact; - Indeed Mr. Garrow, I am unacquainted with the house.

- sworn.

I am a constable; they sent for me to take charge of the prisoner into custody; I produce the piece of muslin. (Deposed to.)

Prisoner. When I went into the shop to purchase the cloth, I bought three yards, and the gentlewoman along with me three yards. He asked me, if I wanted to look at any thing else; I told him I did not; he said we sell things very cheap; and he would not give me my change till he brought me down some plain muslin, and then he brought down some sprigged muslin; I bought an apron; when I came back they pushed me behind the counter, where the muslin lay, and he picked up two or three pieces; then the master came in, and they told him, this woman has been stealing the muslin; and the master then took the muslin and marked it with a pencil; he could not find any thing on me, how could he.

SUSANNA ROBINSON sworn.

I live in Barbican; I am a widow, a pastry cook; I have lived about nine years in that street; I have known the prisoner three years, two years she lodged with me; I can assure you I always found her to be a very sober honest woman; there are seven or eight that would have come, but they did not think her trial would come on so soon. She carries on the business of a mantua maker . She left me about ten months ago.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately .

(Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-18

18. WILLIAM BATEMAN was indicted, for that he, on the 4th of November , without any lawful cause was at large, in the kingdom of Great Britain, to wit, in the parish of St. Giles's, Cripplegate, before the expiration of the term of seven years, for which he was ordered to be transported, at the delivery of the king's gaol at Newgate, the 21st Day of February, in the 27th year of his present Majesty's reign , against the form and the statute, and against the king's peace.

PETER MAINE sworn.

I am an officer at the public office, Shadwell; I apprehended the prisoner on Sunday morning, the 4th of November in company with some public officers, in Fore-street, Cripplegate without ; he was taken to the public office, Shadwell, and committed, he was committed from that office at the time of his conviction.

JOHN COOKE sworn.

I am an officer of the same office as Maine is; I apprehended him with Maine, in a two pair of stairs room, in bed, about seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did any body live in the place but himself? - I don't know, there was a woman in bed with him.

Q. Was there the appearance of any trade carried on in that room? - I did not see any.

(The record of his convicton was read by the clerk of the court, proving that he was ordered for transportation, for seven years, for stealing a wooden boat from Thomas Williams )

JOHN OWEN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Kirby; I know the prisoner, in February 1787, he and another were tried here for stealing a boat and convicted, and sentenced for transportation

for seven years; I was present when he received the sentence; I believe it was where his majesty should appoint; but I cannot be certain to that there; he was at the Hulks at Woolwich a short time after he was convicted.

Q. Do you know whether he was put on board a ship? - I do not.

Q. Do you know where he escaped from? - I do not from my own knowledge.

Prisoner. I had been seven months in Newgate before I went away; I staid three years and one month at Woolwich; I thought it very hard to be a slave in my own country, working morning, noon, and night. One morning a boatswain's mate and another, said to me, will you go away, here is a boat loose; I said, I did not care, I would as soon die as live; we all three went down and rowed away with the boat; I went away directly and entered on board his majesty's ship, the Eagle Frigate; I escaped from the hulk called the Stainslaus; the door was left open on the deck, were we go through to go down the gang way; we made our escape, and I went down to Sheerness, to the Eagle Frigate, a 36 gun ship. As soon as I was paid off from there, I went on board his majesty's Speedy Frigate, and had the Yarmouth station to keep out of the way; I went from thence directly to France, where I staid till these distresses happened, when I was obliged to come to England, and that was the way I was taken. If I knew where the captain lived, I know I could get a good character; I took two prizes while I was on board the Speedy Frigate. I was obliged to come to England, or else I never should. No body has been me ever since I have been away.

GUILTY, Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Recommended by the Jury on account of the length of time since his conviction, the means he had used to keep out of the way, and conceiving a temptation was held out to this man to escape .

Reference Number: t17921215-19

19. CHARLES JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , two Geldings price 30 l. the goods of George Cannon .

THOMAS CLARE sworn.

I am a servant to Mrs. Cannon; I I drive this coach, No. 382; I left my coach and horses in Charles-street, Covent-garden , at the curb side, the 3d of November, opposite to a public house, the coach and horses; I had occasion to go into the house; it was about twenty-five minutes after eight in the evening; I asked William Wilson , just to put my coach into the rank; I went backward to the privy; there was a stand of hackney coaches there, he turned it about, as he told me; after I had been backward, I came into the tap-room, and called for a pint of beer; this man came and gave me my whip, we drank the beer together; and when I went out the coach and horses were gone from the place were he told me he had left them; I directly ran back again and says to him, where did you put my coach and horses, in the rank, says he. I never saw the coach and horses no more till past twelve o'clock at night, in my master's yard, in Aldersgate-street, the coach and horses yard.

WILLIAM WILSON sworn.

Clare the driver stopped at the door of the coach and horses, and asked me if I would turn the coach into the rank for him, accordingly I did put the coach on, and left it the fourth coach in the rank, in York-street; I then went to him and drank share of a pint of beer, and came out again; I did not stay there above ten minutes, and then the coach was gone.

GEORGE SMITH sworn.

I am an hackney coachman; I drive for Mr. Mumford, at the time that this affair happened, it was Saturday evening about nine o'clock, or between nine and ten; I lived at the time with Mr. Butler, Whitechapel; as I came up from the end of Fenchurch-street into Gracechurch-street, this hackney coach passed me very fast, to go over the water; and I being very tired jumped behind to ride, being a driver of an hackney coach myself; I stood up and looking through the hole of the coach, that was behind the coach, I saw nobody inside of the coach, and then looking over the roof, and seeing this dirty boy driving it, I thought something was not right, and knowing it to be Mr. Cannon's property, by the chocolate brown colour, with a kind of a gold border; so then I sets myself down and rides over London-bridge, and he drove at a very great rate indeed; I was determined to see what he meant to do with this coach and horses. I rides this coach till he got off the stones at the Borough, and he turns it about, by the stand going to the King's-bench; I dropped down from his coach, as he was getting off his box, and I went round and came to him, as if I was coming from St. George's-fields, and I came up to him, and I said, my lad what are you at now, he makes answer and says, my master is here, we have just set down a fare at the corner, he has given me six-pence to ride with him to night, says I it is no such a thing, I know you have not come honestly by this coach and horses, and I will find you a master. with that I called to the watchman immediately, desired him to take charge of him, on suspicion of stealing the coach and horses; I think his name is Dicks, and he took him into custody; I got up on the box, and the boy had a desire of speaking to me, and called me on one side, and said, stow it; stow it; I suppose he meant for me to let him go, and say nothing about it, says I, what do you mean, how came you to go to be guilty to take a man's coach and horses away? says he, I took it from Charles-street, Covent-garden; I asked him if he had earned him any money? He said no. I drove the coach and horses up to the watch-house, on the Surry road, and told the night constable the same as I have told you. Mr. Wood the constable agreed for the boy and watchman to be drove to Mr. Cannon's, in the coach, and I to drive the coach; I told the night constable, who the owner of the coach was, and he thought it most prudent for me to drive him there, and I drove him there; and one of the city constables was sent for, and the boy was sent to the counter.

Q. Was the boy drunk or sober? - He appeared sober, I did not see him any thing the least disguised for liquor.

SAMUEL DICKS sworn.

The last witness gave me charge of the boy just by the King's Bench, I was there on my duty, I said to the lad you must be a very bad body to drive the coach and horses off the stand; he seemed very much frightened, and said nothing, so with that I took him up to the watchman of the night, to the Circus, and had his advice about it, from thence I went to Mr. Cannon's own house by the constable of the night's direction.

Q. How came you to know this was Mr. Cannon's coach? - By this last witness. Mr. Cannon was at home, they opened the gates, and Mr. Cannon said, he was very happy to see the coach come home, it was his coach, after that says he, watchman you have done your duty, the boy must be sent to the Counter.

Q. Do you know whether they were geldings? - I cannot say, I was told they were.

FRANCIS PHIPPS sworn.

I am constable of the City, I took charge of the prisoner, and took him to the Counter.

GEORGE CANNON sworn.

I am an hackney-coachmaster, the coach was brought to me, and the horses, and the prisoner was in it, on Saturday the 3d of November. The horses were two black geldings. I am sure they were mine, I should have known them in any other person's coach.

Court to Clare. Were your horses geldings that you left? - Yes.

Q. Did you ply for Mr. Cannon? - Yes, I did.

Q. Was you that night at your master's house after the coach and horses were at home? - I was, I knew them to be my horses, I was very glad to see them, it was past 12 o'clock. I had sent word by my fellow servant to let my master know of the circumstances I had light of.

Prisoner. I was in Charles-street, Covent-garden, and a man asked me to feed his horses, and he said he would be back again in five minutes, he came back and gave me 1 d. and gives me the whip and says, if there is a job comes you may go with it, and come back to me at two o'clock, accordingly I went with the job.

Jury. I beg to ask a question, the fact was perpetrated in Charles-street, Covent-garden, which is in the country, can a London jury be competent to judge of it.

Court. The action is maintainable in any county where the property is carried, it appears he came through the city of London, therefore the action is maintainable here.

Court to Mr. Cannon. What may be the value of these geldings? - £30.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 12.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-20

20. JOHN INSKIP was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of November , one pair of man's leather shoes, value 7 s. the goods of John Jupp , privily in his shop .

JOHN JUPP sworn.

I lost a pair of leather shoes, I suppose they might be taken from my cutting-board, but I did not see them taken, a young man came into the shop first for a pair of shoes, and in a few minutes afterward the prisoner came in and asked for a pair of false straps, said he was in a hurry, so I left off serving the other young man, and cut his straps, and went backwards to give them to my wife to sew, and then I went to look for some more shoes to fit the other young man, as soon as he had the straps he went out, I had no shoes to fit the other young man, so I measured him for a pair and he promised to come for them on Saturday night. This was Wednesday. As soon as this young man with the straps had gone out of my shop, which was four or five minutes before the other. There was the constable and patrole in the street. As soon as I had measured the young man for the shoes, he gave me his address and went out directly. The constable took up this young man, and the patrole the other, and they took them into a public-house, and they came over to me to know if I could swear to these shoes, I said I could. I found the prisoner and the other in the public-house; immediately in less than three minutes they were both of them in hold. The shoes were marked with the name of Evans, by my Clicker, Joseph Mitchell ; they were standing by my cutting board not five minutes before this young man came in, and there was nobody in the shop till he did come in, he leaned on the cutting board whilst he was in the shop for the best part of the time.

PHILLIP JOSLIN sworn.

I am a constable, on Wednesday the 28th of last month, between the hours of

six and seven in the evening I was going up Fenchurch-street, I observed the prisoner at the bar in company with another young man looking into a milliner's shop window, I had a suspicion of them, and I watched them, and I saw them look into several shops, and I followed them, as there was two of them I thought it best to fetch the patrole. The patrole was on duty in Lombard-street, I went to the patrole, and told him there were two suspicious chaps about, and I will watch them: If they cannot give a good account of themselves, I will take them before the Lord Mayor. I followed them till they came to Mr. Jupp's shop, and the prisoner at the bar, and the other crossed over the way and stood at the corner of a passage by Mr. Hatches, the pork-shop, when a coach was going past I lost sight of him that was outside, I crossed over the way, and I saw the other with the prisoner in the shop as I supposed but I could not swear it was the same; therefore he was discharged. When the prisoner came out I seized him, and took him into the City Arms, and there I searched him, and found in each of his coat pockets one of these shoes, I was going to take him off from the seat where he sat, he dropped these picklock keys.

(The shoes produced and deposed to.)

THOMAS BURR sworn.

I saw the shoes taken from the prisoner, I am sure they are the very same.

Prisoner. I was coming home to my mother's, and I wanted to buy a pair of false straps, I went into this shop, and coming out again I kicked something before me, and before I hardly knew what it was, that gentleman came and laid hold of me, and took me into the public house.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Recommended by the prosecutor on account of his youth .

Prisoner. I have been used to go to sea, there is a gentleman will pass his word for me to go to sea.

Reference Number: t17921215-21

21 GEORGE RANKIN, otherwise GEORGE GOODALL ; ABRAHAM MAYO ; ELIZABETH OWEN, otherwise GOODALL, otherwise SMITH were indicted, George Rankin and Abraham Mayo for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the house of Mary Blackmore , about the hour of six in the night of the 25th of November , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein a wainscot box, value 5 s. a pair of silver candlesticks, value 8 l. a silver waiter, value 3 l. a silver tankard, value 8 l. a silver pint mug, value 4 l. 4 silver table spoons, value 20 s. a silver punch ladle, value 10 s. a silver salt-holder, value 18 s. 2 silver salt spoons, value 3 s. 9 silver tea spoons, value 18 s. a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 3 s. a silver tobacco box, with a pearl lid, value 2 s. two gilt mourning rings, value 14 s. a stone ring set in gold, value 7 s. one pair of stone knee buckles set in gold, value 2 l. 10 s. a watch with a gold inside case and a shagreen outside case, value 10 l. a metal watch, value 2 l. a metal trinket, value 1 d. a silver milk-pot, value 10 s. a black silk cloak, value 2 l. a pair of stays. value 1 l. 1 s. a cotton gown, value 1 l. a silk petticoat, value 10 s. a stuff petticoat, value 10 s. three linen handkerchiefs, value 11 s. five muslin aprons, value 2 l. 5 s. a linen apron, value 2 s. a muslin tucker, value 6 d. a a muslin shawl, value 2 s. a cotton shawl, value 3 s. two muslin half handkerchiefs, value 6 s. two lawn half handkerchiefs, value 6 s. one half-yard of thread lace, value 3 s. three linen shifts, value 5 s. and three guineas in monies numbered, the

goods, chattels and monies of the said Mary Blackmore , and three 30 l. Bank notes, and two 10 l. Bank notes, the said notes at the time, being her property, and the said sums of money, being then due and unsatisfied to her against the form of the statute, and against the king's peace.

A 2d COUNT for stealing the said goods, chattels and monies, in a dwelling house without alledging the burglary.

ELIZABETH OWEN was indicted for feloniously receiving part of the above goods, knowing them to be stolen .

MARY BLACKMORE sworn.

I am a widow woman, I reside in Tabernacle Row, Moorfields ; on Sunday the 25th of November I went out to dine, I left my servant Elizabeth Abbott , at home, I went past my own house to my place of worship, at about ten minutes past five to the Tabernacle; I returned to my house about ten minutes after seven, and I found I had lost all the articles mentioned in the indictment; they were all my own property.

ELIZABETH ABBOTT sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Blackmore, about twenty minutes after five I went to chapel, I made every part of the house secure, I lighted a candle almost half an hour before I went from home. I returned from the Tabernacle a little after seven, when I came to the door, I found the door was on the single lock, I had left it on the double lock; when I went in the dog came to the door, as he always does, I went down stairs, and I found the candle where I left it, I found every thing in confusion, and I found a candle on the carpet in the parlour laid flat on the carpet not alight.

Q. Were those things mentioned in the indictment stolen while you was at the Tabernacle? - They were, they had got in at the street door, because every thing else was fast.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn.

I am an officer of the police; I received information of this burglary on the 25th, but on the 28th I had a search warrant to search the house of Goodall, and a body warrant against the prisoner; I went to the house and waited till a young girl came out, whom I was shown by another officer; there was nobody there but this young woman, Elizabeth Owen ; we went up stairs, and took her into custody; and we searched the house; I found some articles which Mrs. Blackmore said were her's. These buckles were pulled out of a drawer, by Mr. Austin, in the middle floor; over the glass in the mantle piece were these buttons in the same room, and some womens apparel, which was in a caravan box, which the woman, Owen, lent me her keys to open; in a bird cage in the room were twelve pick lock keys, there was an handkerchief laying on the drawers with a needle in it, appearing to be under some operation; in the cupboard was a dark lanthorn; in the pocket of the woman, I found 19 Guineas and 2 half Guineas; here are two silver tea spoons I found in the drawers, but the marks are taken out by some body. About twelve o'clock I was called down, and I found Mr. Goodall and Mayo, in custody; we took them to the turnpike house, and searched them; I think there was nothing found on them, except some money, they said they would have their money again and it was returned.

Mr. Knowlys. You say you found Mayo in custody, at the door of the house? - They were at the outside of the door, I opened it to get out.

Q. I believe it was not the house of Mayo? - I don't know whose house it was.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I went with Armstrong, to this house; I saw the several articles found that he produced; we went away about twelve o'clock, Goodall and Mayo, came to the house while we were there.

Q. Do you know whose house it was? - I do not know.

Q. Mrs. Goodall, appeared to be the wife of Goodall? - She did.

ELIZABETH BULL examined.

How old are you? - I am about fourteen.

Q. Now mind and tell the whole truth.

Mr. Knowlys. Little girl, you was examined before the magistrate, was not you, did not you say there, you was about twelve? - No, I did not.

Q. Have you ever been at church in your life? - Yes.

Your father was a man sent out of the country; you was not likely to get any religious instruction of him.

Mr. Gorrow. What is to become of you, if you swear false? - Go to the devil.

- That is as much as any body knows.

Sworn.

Now recollect and be so good as to tell us the truth, and the whole truth.

I know all the prisoner at the bar, I lived with them about two months, I lived with Mr. and Mrs. Goodall, Mr. Mayo lived somewhere about Moorfields, but I cannot say I know where; I saw him most at Mr. Goodall's, he slept there about a week at different times. On the 25th of November, we had just done dinner, Mr. Goodall, and Mrs. Goodall, and me. Mr. Mayo just came in, and he waited about an hour, and they both went out together, Mr. Goodall and Mr. Mayo: I did not see them again till about six o'clock that evening; there was Mr. Goodall, Mr. Mayo and Mr. Muslin came, and Mrs. Goodall was making the bed; some body knocked at the door, and she went down stairs, and I heard some little noise, and then Mrs. Goodall came to me, and gave me some sessions papers to read, and told me I might go to my mother's and I might come again that night or not, just as I would; I went away; I was gone pretty near an hour; I then went back, when I thought my hour was expired; I was coming back by Clerkenwell-green, to go home, and I met Mrs. Goodall, and she seemed to have something in her apron, she appeared to have a small parcel before.

Q. When you went out did you make any observations? - Yes, my mistress was making the bed in the one pair of stairs, and I saw something in the lower room; I thought there was a bundle; I had not been in that room since the afternoon; that bundle was not there then. When I was coming from my mother's, I met Mrs. Goodall, and she asked me whether I was going to her house, I told her yes; she told me to go along with her; I went with her, to Castle-street, in Turnmill-street, where she desired me to wait, I waited there about half an hour; I left the sessions papers at my mother's and brought away five others which I had changed; I went from Castle-street to my mother's again, and I was at Mrs. Goodall's the next morning, about seven o'clock, and I met Mrs. Goodall going out, and she desired me to make haste, for the fire was alight; she told me to brush the stove, and to sweep the room over; I went there and I saw three parcels on the bed, and an handkerchief laying on the bed, and Mr. Goodall at the vice, hammering out the marks of some silver tea-spoons.

Q. Where used Mayo to sleep for a week? - On the same bed.

Q. All the three prisoners together? - Yes.

Q. Was this a week running that he slept there? - No, sir, at different times, but they had slept on the same bed.

Q. In what room was it? - The same room the vice was in.

Q. What made you think he was hammering out the marks of tea-spoons? - Because I could see it.

Q. Had you ever seen him hammer out such things before? - Never but once.

Q. Who was in the room at the time? - Mr. Mayo.

Q. Did you see Mrs. Owen do any thing in the course of that day? - About a quarter after Muslin came up.

Q. When did Mrs. Owen come in? - She came about half an hour after that she took the neck string out of a black silk cloak, and burnt it, and she said it was very remarkable, for it had three joins in it, Mr. Goodall and Mr. Mayo where both present, she then ript the body of a gown, and then she went out with the gown and cloak before breakfast, to take them to a mantua maker to be altered; she was gone about half an hour.

Q. When she returned what did you see? - Some handkerchiefs and aprons, some muslin ones, and a new pair of stays. I was set to pick the edging of a tucker, and the lace of a muslin handkerchief, by Mrs. Owen's orders; about eleven o'clock Mr. Goodall, Mr. Muslin and Mr. Mayo, went out together; they left three bundles, one was in the drawers and two on the drawers, as I can best recollect, Mr. Goodall took out the silver spoons, that the marks had been beat out of with him, and a pair of silver sugar tongs. While they were gone out Mrs. Owen shewed me two Bank notes, this was towards night, she took them out of a little book out of her pocket; she asked me, if I had ever seen any bank notes, I said Yes, and she shewed me them both; I said, what are these his, meaning my master's and she said, there are only one of them George's, the other is Mayo's; I asked her, whether or no he would take them to the Bank; she said, yes; but if he did he would get hung. I was not there when Mr. Goodall returned home.

Q. Was you at any time desired of him to borrow any thing of the lodgers? - Yes, a chopper on Monday afternoon before he went out, I borrowed it of the lodger up stairs, and he cut up a box and burnt it, it was a brown box of a wainscot colour.

Q. Do you recollect any thing about a pair of stays? - Mr. Mayo had them because they were sent by the boy on Monday morning wrapped up in a white counterpane to his wife Mrs. Mayo.

Q. What white counterpane was that? - It was one that had been in a robbery before, I did not hear where the stays came from.

Q. Do you remember being there on Tuesday, where was Goodall the greatest part of Tuesday? - He came home at five o'clock in the afternoon, very much disguised in liquor. Soon after Mr. Macauley, otherwise Muslin, came in when he came in he said he had been ill used at St. Catharine's, and he brought in a bill which had been put out about this robbery, and Mrs. Goodall read it, and presently after she said, that there was something wrong in it about some things, but I cannot tell what; Mr. Muslin I believe said it was not right. Goodall was drunk on the bed, and Mrs. Goodall went and took his things out of his pockets.

Q. Did you hear any thing about candlesticks? - Yes, I heard something about candlesticks in the bill, and a name on them.

Q. Did you see any thing else laying

on the drawers which you had not noticed to lay there before? - I saw a pair of stone buckles on the drawers; I saw them before the justice, and I believe they were the same.

Q. Did you know a person of the name of Joshua Palmer ? - Yes, I saw him at Mr. Goodall's house on Monday morning, I did not hear what past, I was down stairs at the time.

Q. He keeps a pawnbroker's shop I believe. You gave information to your mother of this? - I did.

Q. Did you ever see any thing of this sort before? - (The picklock keys shewn.) - Yes, many times in a bird cage some of them were kept there.

Q. Where was the dark lanthorn kept? - In the cupboard.

Q. How long have you lived with these people? - About two months.

Q. Did you tell your mother all this before you was taken up? - I did.

Q. Had you any share of any of these things? - No.

Q. What was you paid for your labour? - I never had any thing all the time I was there.

Q. Did you hear Goodall say any thing about a bank note? - I believed he changed them because he went out, and when he came home he gave the woman some money, and he said here I have changed it. This was on Wednesday, he went out about 12 o'clock, and returned in about half an hour, and he shewed her some guineas, and said here I have changed it; and then he went out again, and came back again, and when he came back again he gave Mayo some money. This was in Mr. Goodall's house.

Q. Where did Mayo sleep on Sunday night after the robbery was done? - He slept there.

Q. What sum was given to Mrs. Goodall? - Nineteen guineas and two half guineas, and he said to her keep this for me, and put it by.

Mr. Knowlys. Have you ever lived in services before you went to live with these people? - Yes.

Q. How many? - Six or seven.

Q. You are a very young girl to have had so many places? - I went chiefly to nurse children.

Q. How many were you turned away from? - Never a one to my knowledge.

Q. You must know whether you was turned away from some of these places, I understand by your first answer you was not. How many was you turned away from? - I cannot say.

Q. You are young in life, there are particular things, how many of the seven or six different services have you been turned away from - About one or two.

Q. Cannot you recollect a few more? - That is as near as I can guess.

Q. It is rather a particular thing being turned away, cannot you recollect how many out of the six or seven you were turned away from? For what reason was you turned away from the two you were turned away from? - Because she had a daughter come home, and therefore did not want me.

Q. I should like to know what your meaning of being turned away is you know you must have left all the services? - That is all that I mean.

Q. How came you to tell me you was only turned away from one or two? - No more I was not.

Q. You know you left them all, how came you to tell me you was only turned away from one or two, you cannot explain yourself? - No, I cannot.

Q. How long ago was it since your father was transported? - About four months ago.

Q. He was cast for death, I believe afterwards he was pardoned on condition of being transported for life? You have seen your father bring home bank notes, and shew them to your mother? - No, I did not.

Q. What did he commonly bring home and shew to your mother? - Generally liquor.

Q. What kind of liquor - Any kind of liquor.

Q. What was he cast for death for? - For liquor.

Q. Your mother used of course to tell him it was a very bad way, and he would come to be hanged? You used to tell your mother every thing that you saw? - Yes, sir, pretty nigh.

Q. And yet your mother has let you be there four months? - She was going to take me away once or twice.

Q. Whom have you lived with since you was before the magistrate? - With Mr. Dearing, the constable, in White-horse court.

Q. I believe your mother has had a quarrel with Mrs. Goodall? - When, sir, not that I know of.

Q. Then you have not heard of a quarrel between your mother and Mrs. Goodall, she never made any remonstrances to her, never quarrelled in the least about you, or any body else? You saw no bank notes of your father's? - No.

Q. Was your mother to have had some money? - I don't know that.

Q. Has not your mother told you that she was to have some money, and you some new clothes? - No, I did not expect it.

Q. Have you never said so? - No, I never have.

Mr. Garrow. My friend has spoke to you, on the subject of going out to several places, was you ever turned away for things you did wrong? - Never once.

Q. This gentleman has asked you whether you ever saw any thing wrong while you lived there? - Yes, I have seen some things that were wrong.

Q. The gentleman was mistaken there then, you said your mother was going to take you away, how happened she did not? - I don't know, she did not like their proceedings.

Q. How did she know their proceedings? - By what I told her.

Q. By whose order was it that you lived at Mr. Dearing's? - By Mr. Colquohon's, the justice.

JOHN RAY sworn.

I am one of the officers that went to search the house of Goodall's, I saw the things found, I produced a bottle that I found over the mantle piece in Goodall's house, it is a bottle with some phosphorus. I have seen two of them, I produce some scales, files, and chissels.

JOHN AUSTIN sworn.

I went to the prisoner Goodall's house with Mr. Armstrong, and the other officer. I am a nephew of the prosecutor. I went on Wednesday the 28th, and I saw these articles found; the dark lanthorn in the cupboard, and the picklock keys in the bird cage, the buckles were found in the drawer, and the aprons, &c. in a caravan box. On Thursday evening I went again, and just by the one pair of stairs door on the landing place, there was a bit of carpet or worn floor cloth, about a foot or more from the joist, I took with an hatchet a bit of a board up, and there found the metal watch wrapt up in a bit of bed furniture, according to the description the little girl had given to the magistrate, and some picklock keys, and another bundle of other keys, and an iron crow which Mr. Dearing has got. (Produced.)

- DEARING sworn.

I am headborough of St. Luke's, I went to this house, on the 28th of November, I went again on Thursday, and I found under the plank, first, a dark lanthorn, and a bundle of picklock keys, and a bundle of other keys, and a crow, and a metal watch, and a tobacco box

with some stuff to poison dogs. I have had this girl at the house, by order of the justice, because I was bound over for her appearance in 40 l.

Mr. Knowlys. Her mother was there on the hearing? - She was.

Q. And they trusted her with you rather than with her mother.

Mr. Garrow. The magistrate did much more wisely.

Court to Bull. Had you ever seen these things in that place where the picklock keys, &c. were found? - Yes, several times.

ANN DAINTRY sworn.

I let the house to a man but who I cannot tell, I think he took it in the name of Goodall.

THOMAS BRANSTON sworn.

I collect the rents of this estate of Mrs. Daintry. Mr. Goodall occupied this house, I received the rents of him, he had applied to me to remove from the house, because he said it rained in. I have settled with him up to the very day of settlement, last Saturday se'ennight.

The articles before produced deposed to by Mrs. Blackmore.

Court to Bull. Do you recollect what time it was you went out? - It was about six.

Q. Was Mayo come in at that time? - They all came in at the gate as I went out.

Q. From the time they went out after dinner had they been home before to your knowledge? - No, not at all.

Prisoner Goodall. I leave my defence to my council.

Prisoner Mayo. I went to see this man home at his own house, he and I had been drinking together for about two or three hours; he was taken and I together; there were three or four knocked me down, and then they took me up, and they took me to the turnpike house, and then they searched me, and they took my watch out of my pocket, and two guineas and a half; then after that they took me to New Prison, and then they took me before a justice, that is all.

Mr. Garrow to Ray. Where were you waiting for them that night you took them? - In the necessary of Mr. Goodall's house. He came and knocked at the door, and Mr. Fairis and I went out of the necessary, immediately Mr. Fairis laid hold of Goodall, and I laid hold of Mayo, it was about twelve o'clock on Wednesday night.

Court to Bull. What time did you go out on Sunday? - About six. While I was up stairs there was a knock at the door, I went out about three minutes after Mayo and Goodall were then outside of the gate in the road.

Q. Did you speak to them? - No, I did not.

Prisoner Goodall. Did you see any thing brought in? - No, I did not at that time, I have seen things brought in at other times.

Court to Austin. What is the distance between the house of the prosecutrix and the prisoner? - Better than a quarter of a mile.

Court to Armstrong. What is the distance? - It is better than a quarter of a mile. I can walk it very well in a quarter of an hour, if I go the nearest way.

The prisoner Mayo called two witnesses to his character.

George Rankin , otherwise Goodall, GUILTY , Death .

Abraham Mayo , GUILTY , Death .

Elizabeth Owen , otherwise Goodall, otherwise Smith, Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-22

22. GEORGE MORRISON and THOMAS TRIMMER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Batten , about the hour of Eleven, on the 5th of December , (no person being therein). and feloniously stealing a cloth coat, value 5 s. a linen shift, value 2 s. a linen towel, value 2 d. two linen sheets, value 2 s. 6 d. one linen bag, value 3 d. one piece of woollen stuff, value 3 d. two half-crowns, 192 half-pence, 92 farthings, and 9 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, the goods, chattels and monies of the said John Batten .

JOHN BATTEN sworn.

At the time of the robbery, I lived in Petticoat-lane . I was a lodger. Mr. Howard rented the house. - I have a woman lives with me, who leads me. On the 5th of December, I went out, about 20 minutes before ten o'clock in the forenoon. - We returned, and we both went up stairs together; but I went into the room first, and the door was open. - When I came into my room, I found my sheets taken off my bed; and I went to my box, and found it was broke open; and I found a coat, 2 shirts, a shift, a petticoat, 2 towels, &c. missing; 2 half-crown pieces, and 7 s. 8 s. 1 d. in halfpence, and 2 s. and upwards in farthings, that was all tied up in a bit of green stuff, as I am informed.

George Morrison lives in the house, in a pair of stairs lower. I got a search-warrant; and Mr. Harpur and Armstrong, broke their place open to search, but could not find any property of mine in their room. An officer, who is here, found some of my property upon him. I know nothing of the other prisoner.

MARTHA WIGGINS sworn.

I live in the same room with the prosecutor. On the 5th of December, we went out about a quarter after 10, and we were at home by twelve o'clock. - When we left the room, I double-locked the door, my own self. - This good man found it open. He went to unlock it himself, as he always does. The things mentioned in the indictment were missing. When we went down stairs, both the prisoners were in the same room together, - one lived next door, and the man, who robbed us, lived in the same house, another story higher. A search warrant was obtained, but nothing found in the apartment.

PETER MAINE sworn.

I am a constable. I took these articles from the prisoner, Trimmer: a towel, a piece of green stuff, with two shillings-worth of farthings in it, one half-crown piece, 7 s. 5 six-pences and 9 s. 6 l. in halfpence, together with some pick-lock keys; one of which I tried the prosecutor's door with, and it locked and unlocked it as well as the key the prosecutor has: this was taken from him the day of the robbery, between eleven and twelve o'clock: I, in company with Mr. Cooke, saw the prisoners coming up George-street, in White-chapel. As soon as they saw us, they ran into a house. We pursued them. - I got into the house first, and I met the tallest of the prisoners coming out. We had no warrant. - We did this on our own suspicion. - And if we had not known them that was sufficient to cause suspicion. Mr. Cooke stood withinside the door. I let the tallest pass me, in order that Mr. Cooke should lay hold of him, and I laid hold of the other. Accordingly, I took Trimmer, in a backyard, that was there; and there I found all this property on the prisoner, Trimmer. A shift I picked up in the passage; but cannot take upon me to say which of the prisoners it was that dropt it. - There was no coat found on him - nor sheets. I found this piece of stuff with the farthings, and 9 s. 6 d. in half-pence; and as soon as I had found the farthings, he took

hold of the piece of stuff, and shaked them in among the half-pence: with that I secured him, and took him to the office, and advertised the articles, on account of which the prosecutor came.

Prisoner Trimmer. Did you take that property from me? - I took every article, expect the shift, out of his pockets.

JOHN COOKE sworn.

I am a constable. I and Mayne met the two prisoners. We pursued them, and I met Morrison, the tall one, coming out of the house first, and the other retired into the house. I searched Morrison, and found nothing; and then I went in to Mr Mayne, and he was searching Trimmer. I saw the keys found on him, and Mr. Mayne asked him where he got all this money: he said, it is my own. - What do you take my money from me for? I had known the prisoners before, and they knew us to be constables. We had no warrant (The things deposed to by Martha Wiggins, the prosecutor being blind.)

Prisoner Trimmer. I stand here indicted for a crime I am entirely innocent of. Last Wednesday morning I was going to work; and in crossing a place, called the Green-yard, near Houndsditch, I saw these things lay; and in returning home, I met Mayne and Cooke. I found the money.

Jury. Are you a Smith? - I am a Sawyer .

Q. Who had you those keys of! - I found the keys with the things. I know nothing at all about them.

George Morrison , Not GUILTY .

Thomas Trimmer , GUILTY of stealing only . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-23

23. ANN TALBOT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of December , twenty-seven yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. 10 s. the goods of Edward Nicholson , privately in his shop .

JAMES ROUS sworn.

I live with Edward Nicholson , a linen draper , No. 27, Newport-street , he carries on the business himself, without any partner; I was lighting the patent lamps we put in our windows, on the 1st of December, and the prisoner was in the shop, and another woman with her, buying some brown holland, for the lining of her gown; I believe the other applied for it; I did not observe this woman was in company; I observed the prisoner stoop down near the door, I heard the rustling of some paper; I then had a very strong suspicion that she had got something; I still kept looking at her; they enquired to look for some callico for a gown, the witness present, Joseph Nicholson , shewed it to them, they looked at several, but purchased none; then she made an excuse that she would come again, I believe, I am not confident, and this woman went out, and as she passed the window her apron flew from her by the wind; on which I then discovered the printed cotton, now produced in court; I saw it as she went out of the shop and passed the window, she had a basket before her apron that she held quite tight to her; I immediately told Joseph Nicholson , she had got a piece of print; I watched her where she went, and I desired him to follow, he followed her and met her coming down the court again, with it in her apron.

JOSEPH NICHOLSON sworn.

I am nephew to the prosecutor, his shopman; on the 1st of December last, this prisoner and another came into the

shop, enquired for some brown holland, the other woman asked for some print for a bed gown, they asked if we had got any low price ones; I told her we had got some as low as 1 s. 2 d. I shewed her some of it; they were not good enough, she desired to see some better, she did see some, she did not buy any; I did not perceive the prisoner do any thing; the prisoner went out first, about half a minute before the other; the time I was taking the money for this brown holland, Rous, said to me, I think that woman has got a piece of print, do you follow her, I did and found the print in her apron, and her fish basket before her; they were two fish women ; it was folded up; I took it from her, out of her apron; I said good woman what have you got here; she said, nothing; she immediately ran away, I ran after her and brought her back, and then the two patroles came to me; I delivered the print to the patrole.

RICHARD ELLIN sworn.

I am the patrole; I received this print of Nicholson, it has been in my custody ever since. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. Did not the other woman run out first? - The prisoner went out first.

Prisoner. I was going to market and the woman asked me to go in and buy a yard of body lining, she came out of the shop and dropped this cotton down, and I picked it up, and I thought to have returned it; I hope you will have mercy on me, for God almighty's sake.

Court. Where do you live, and by what means do you get your livelihood? - I go to market, my husband has left me, and I have got three or four children, and I support and keep them as well as I can.

The prisoner called one witness to her character.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned twelve months , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-24

24. JOHN WHITEHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of November , a pair of velveteen breeches, value 18 s. the goods of Richard Enoch , privately from his shop .

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn.

I am seventeen; John Whitehead came into Richard Enoch 's shop, on the 20th of November, in Oxford-road : he keeps a sale shop , with a pretence to buy a pair of breeches velveteen; I looked out two pair for him to try on, he tried on both; I am an apprentice, one of the pairs fitted him, he asked the price, my master told him 18 s. he wanted a pair that would come cheaper, my master told him he would not shew him any more; in putting his own breeches on again, he put these breeches up his back, and tucked them in his back, and as he was going out of the door of the shop, I saw one knee of the breeches hanging out of his breeches; the other witness and my master saw it at the same time; and the other witness went out and caught him as he was turning the corner of Oxford-road, we took him in a coach to Bow-street; he was in the shop twice with a pretence to buy a pair of breeches, but never bought any.

Prisoner. What did I bring with me? - Nothing at all.

Prisoner. Them breeches were bought of your master. (The breeches produced.)

Prisoner. When I went into the shop the boy was not in the shop. - I was present. When he was in the coach to take him to Bow-street, he wanted to make it up with my master.

SAMUEL RUMBOLD sworn.

On Tuesday the 20th of November, I went into Mr. Enoch's shop, I had a little business with him, the prisoner at the bar at that time was in the back parlour trying on breeches, after he pulled on his own breeches, and returning out of the shop, there was some conversation took place, between the prisoner and Mr. Enoch, Mr. Enoch said, that he believed he rather came with an intent to steal a pair of breeches more than to buy, with that the prisoner seemed very much affronted; Mr. Enoch told him, he would shew him no more, and wished never to see him there any more; the prisoner said, he never would come there any more; after that the prisoner had buttoned up his breeches, and returned out of the shop; I cannot pretend to say, I perceived it before or after he had got out of the shop door; I perceived one knee hanging out of the hind part of the skirt of his coat, five or six inches; he was out of the shop and passing by the window; on seeing this, I went after him, he perceived that somebody was after him, he began to run, he just turned the corner of Mr. Enoch's shop; I caught hold of the hind part of the skirts of his coat, collars him and accused him of the theft; I suppose he was about a dozen or fourteen yards from the shop; with that other assistance came up, and we took him to Bow-street, in an hackney coach; he was examined by the sitting magistrate and committed to Newgate; Mr. Enoch permitted the breeches to be taken out in the coach, going to Bow-street; when I saw the prisoner go by the window, I followed him to the door, but I did not see the breeches till I was at the door.

Prisoner. Please you my lord, on the 22d of October, one William Parkinson and John Thompson , was in this man's shop to buy some Goods, one bought him a pair of breeches and left him 2 s. 6 d. earnest to make him a coat. Please you my lord, I was drinking at the French-horn, in Holborn, meaning to go to Brentford to work; I am a gardener ; I had three pints of porter, saw this man with these breeches to sell; they said, they would suit that young man; he says, I gave 14 s. 6 d. for them; he said, he bought them of this gentleman, my prosecutor, and said, that he gave him 6 d. back again. I gave the landlord a golden guinea, to give me change, he told me the guinea wanted 4 d. he would not give change; I gave him two half guineas, and he gave me change to give 14 s. for the breeches. I have two brothers that live twenty-one miles off, they sent to me for some money, as I had 50 l. left me, and I thought to send them these breeches, and to buy another pair for myself if I could. There is the prosecutor let him say it is not the truth, if he does not I am done.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-25

25. MARTHA LIPNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of August , a metal watch, value 1 l. a cornelian seal set in metal, value 1 s. a metal watch key, value 2 d. the goods of James Sands , privately from his person .

JAMES SANDS sworn.

On the 7th of August, I was coming up Wych-street , out of the city; I met this woman at the bar, and a man arm in arm together, it wanted about twenty minutes to one in the morning, going on I observed this woman and man advance towards me, arm in arm; that woman leaves the man, comes up to me, catches hold of me, each side of my coat and pushes close to me; the man stood at about a yard from her; I looked at the man earnestly; I had got a bottle of rum in my left hand pocket; the prisoner at the bar took out the bottle of rum going to give it to the man; I makes answer, put that from where you had it; the prisoner at the bar said, it was only as fun; in the course of the time she put the bottle in my pocket, and leaves me and brushes up to the man, and takes hold of the man and pulls him away, they both ran one way, down Wych-street; I was alarmed by this and immediately pursued them down Wych-street; at the end of Wych-street there are three ways to take; I stopped a minute to see which way I should take; I took the court and church-yard, goes along the top of the church-yard, gets behind Clement's-church, sees a man looking up to the church, immediately I catches hold of him, and says, you are the man that was with the woman; and I have lost my watch, he says, I know nothing of your watch; I made answer, that is no matter, you was concerned with her, and till I have my property I will keep you: about the middle of the churchyard he makes a trial to get away from me; I broke his coat in holding him, he complained of it; I told him, if you will find my property, I will pay for your coat mending; with that I immediately called out watch; he was taken to the watch-house and nothing found on him; that person I did not get at that time, she escaped; I indicted him for the property last sessions, but he was acquitted: I have evidence in court to prove that that same night the woman was seen with the watch in her hand; and I remember the woman by a particular mark across her nose; I did not perceive her take the watch from me, because she kept a continual pulling about my waist; my attention was not so much to the woman as to the man; I am certain that that is the woman; I had never seen the woman, nor the man neither to my knowledge before.

THOMAS WOOD sworn.

I am a watchman; I was just calling the half hour after one, this woman comes up to the corner of Nag's-head-court, Drury-lane, the prisoner comes up there, and says, Wood, how are you, says she, I am very cold, with that she pulled out this watch, and says, I want money Murphy; I want a fence; she had somebody else with her; with that they went up a court; by that time it was very nigh two o'clock; I lost sight of them, and saw them no more.

Prisoner. I never was near you nor see you but once since I buried my husband.

Court to Wood. Did you ever know any thing of Sands before this? - I never saw Sand till I saw him at Bow-street.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-26

26. WILLIAM ROBERTSON and DOWGALL CAMPBELL were indicted for making an assault on the king's highway, on Richard Bird , on the first of December , putting him in fear and feloniously

taking from his person, and against his will, half a guinea, the monies of the said Richard Bird .

RICHARD BIRD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. George Goldsmid , No. 25, Leman-street, Goodman's-fields. I went to Mr. Asher Goldsmid , my master's brother, about a quarter to eleven, as I was coming just at the four corners Red-lion-street, Ayliffe-street, Lemon-street, and Prescot-street ; I was met by the prisoner Robertson; I am sure he is the man; he came up to me and said, Where are you a going? I said what need you to care about it. This was between eleven and twelve on the night of the first of December, Saturday; he then said, damn your eyes I want some money, he was alone at that time, say she, I have got none for you, then says he, you have got a very flashy chain, I will have that, says I, before you shall have that you shall have my life; he laid hold of the chain, and pulled at it several times; but I put it through the waistband it could not come out; then he knocked me down with his fist; while him and I laid on the ground up comes two more, he and I were on the ground together, he was on the top of me; the two others said damn his bloody eyes, if he wilt not deliver let us murder him; then I made answer consider there is three of you on me, I beg for my life; then directly one said damn me I will kill you; from thence I believed it was too much for me, I was forced to halloo out, and this man, one of the watchmen came up, Bird Ducket . They cut my head open in such a manner, but I kept hold of my watch. I had a half guinea in my pocket, and when I got up my pocket was turned wrong side outwards.

Q. Are you sure that was not the case when you was first thrown down? - No, it was not the case, I cannot be positive it was not turned inside out before the other two came up, but I am positive it was not turned out when I was first attacked. The other men did not come up till I was down. I could not distinguish who was at my pocket. I was not sensible of what any person did to my pocket.

Q Was any of the other two secured? - Yes, Campbell.

BIRD DUCKET sworn.

I am a watchman, my stand is in Little Ayliffe-street, between the hours of twelve and eleven at night, I heard the watch called and murder. Immediately I went where I heard it: There were three men on this footman , the last witness; says I, gentlemen, what are you going to murder the man? one man was on him, and the other kicking him, he had hold of two, he was all but on the ground; I directly says, don't go to murder the man, they kept kicking him, says I, leave him alone. directly I sprung my rattle. Another watchman, Thomas Stevens came to my assistance, and we laid hold of two of them, the third got away. The footman gave a charge of knocking him down, and wanting to rob him. I observed the footman's pockets being turned out as we were going to the watch-house, and he said he had lost half a guinea out of that pocket, says he, they made several attempts at my watch. I had hold of one, and Stevens had hold of the other; they told us we should let loose, or we should not be watchmen there long. We kept our hold and took them to the watch-house, and gave the charge of them, and delivered them over to the constable of the night. The footman was nothing but blood, all his face, very much cut about his forehead. The lining of the pocket was turned completely out. These are the same men we lodged in the watch-house. I attended before the magistrate next morning, and there the prosecutor mentioned his waistcoat being turned inside out, and said, that he had lost half a guinea. We

took hold of these men from the prosecutor. I took Robertson, and Stevens Campbell. They never got out of our hands, we kept our hold, though with much ado.

Court to Prosecutor. When these men attacked you first, had you observed any body waiting about at that time? - I did not.

Q. Is there a button to this waistcoat pocket of your's? - It is a welt, it is a shallow pocket, there is no button to it at all.

Q. When did you see your half guinea before? - I had a guinea, but I owed Timms, at the Black Horse public house, half a guinea, and he gave me change, which was about half an hour before I was attacked; I put it in my right hand pocket, and recollect nothing more about it till I perceived the half guinea was gone. I went after my master's business; after that these men were searched. I was not present.

Prisoner Robinson to Ducket. Whether I did not go quietly along with you? - They did not, they wanted us to loosen.

Court. Did they use any personal violence? - No, none at all.

THOMAS STEVENS sworn.

I am a watchman; my beat is in Red-lion-street; I came up when I heard the rattles sprung; I saw three sailoring fellows struggling with the gentleman's servant. The two prisoners are two of them. I said, what is the matter here? and the gentleman's servant made answer and said, these three sailor ing fellows have attempted to rob me; have attempted to get my watch from me; I immediately took one by one arm and one in the other, and my brother watchman took one out of my hand; there were three of them together, and one of them made his escape before I could lay hold of him. These are the two men that I took hold of, and I took one, and Ducket took one to the watch-house, and they begged to be loosed. I told them loose you, aye no, that I will not, and we struggled together. Sometime they pulled and we pulled; and Campell said, damn and bugger your eyes, if you don't loose us, you shall not come this watch long.

Court to Stevens. Did you see the prosecutor's waistcoat pocket? - I did not before I came to the watch-house. My attention was taken with Campbell.

Q. What did the prosecutor say? - He said, they had robbed him of half a guinea.

Q. Did you examine them? - I did not, I went immediately to my duty again. I delivered him to the constable of the night.

THOMAS GRAIN sworn.

I am headborough of Whitechapel; I was constable of the night, and the two prisoners were brought in on a charge by Mr. Goldsmid's servant; being violently assaulted, beat much in his face, and his clothes terribly daubed, and his waistcoat pocket turned inside out when he came in.

Q. Were they searched? - They were not while I was there.

Q. What was the charge? - For assaulting him, and demanding his money and watch.

JOSEPH BARE sworn.

I am an officer attending the Police Office; I searched these men, I only found 1 s. 6 d. on Campbell, and 1 s. on Robertson, and two knives, such as sailors use. I examined them very strict; it was before the magistrate the next morning.

Court to Grain. Is it not your duty to examine the prisoners brought in? - Saturday is a very busy time, it was a great omission.

Court to Clerk. Remember that this constable, and these watchmen are not allowed their expences.

Prisoner Robertson. I was coming up from my lodging, and I met two or three shipmates, one was Dowgall Campbell , and I asked him to go and see another shipmate, says he, by all means, so accordingly we had something to drink together, and coming along, I cannot tell the hour, he was pretty groggy, says I Dowgall, here is a fight, never mind, says he, let them fight away; says I, I will part them if I can. I went to part them, with that the man who was fighting with this gentleman's servant, turns and struck me in the mouth, with that I went away, and went over to Dowgall, and he said let them fight till they are tired. Dowgall and I stood till the watchman came up, and then he rattles, and there were two more watchmen came up, and they laid hold of us both. I asked him, what he did with me? he said you must go up and answer for yourselves. I am as innocent as a child unborn, the man was fighting with this gentleman.

Prisoner Campbell. I went up on this Saturday to the India House to get a couple of bondsmen, and this Robinson was along with one; we went into the Swan, and had something to drink, as I came out I saw a shipmate that was with me before, we drank together, and my bondsmen together; so this here shipmate and I came along together. After this we had been drinking at several public houses, I was very groggy; he asked me what became off my money, I gave him 17 s. 6 d. So this Bill Robertson asked me to go to Whitechapel to see a shipmate of his? I told him yes; we being very groggy saw two men fighting, says Robertson, there is a fight, let them fight says I, I will go and see what it is, he went and left me standing there, and comes back to me again and said, that the sailor struck him, says I, damn his eyes you had no business to go among them, says he, we shall stand here and see how it comes on; so we were standing both together, and a watchman came and laid hold of us.

Court. You describe yourself as a sailor, What ship did you belong to? - The last ship I belong to was the King George East Indiaman, I had left it about two days before I was taken up. I had got an impress for the Bombay Castle, but lost my place by being taken up on Saturday night.

The prisoner Campbell called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Court to Prosecutor. Did either of them appear to be drunk? - No.

Court to Ducket, Stevens, and Grain. Did either of them appear to be drunk? - No.

Court to Prosecutor. Do you know the reward in this case? - I do not.

Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Goldsmid? - Three years almost.

Jury. Was it a light or a dark evening? - It was a dark evening, there were lamps, but considerable distance.

Q. Did you collar them both or only one? - I had my hand hold of their hair both, and I never let go the man that knocked me down.

Campbell the Prisoner's Witness. Campbell had been at my house that evening about seven o'clock, and he was very much in liquor.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-27

27. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for stealing on the 6th of November, two wether sheep value 2 l. 12 s. the goods of Thomas Kimpton .

THOMAS KIMPTON sworn.

I live at Mim Hall , on the 6th of November, sometime in the night. I lost two wether sheep of the Berkshire breed, marked with red oker across the loins There were but fifteen of that breed. I found both skins and one carcase again at Turner's End. The butcher's name is John Thomas . I heard of them on Friday, and I saw the skins laying in the shop on Saturday following. I believe it was the 10th. It was the 6th night they were lost. Mr Armstrong has got the skins in court.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn.

I produce two skins delivered to me at the public office, Shoreditch, the magistrate bid me keep them. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prosecutor. My sheep had been in keeping about a mile from me, I had sent for them home, and they were taken out of my fold on Tuesday night.

Mr Knapp. When did you say you lost these sheep? - On the sixth of November, Tuesday.

Q When did you hear of them? - On Friday the 9th of November.

Q You say you knew them by the red mark across the loins, is there no other mark you know them by besides that, the mark across the loins is not peculiar to your sheep, another person living near you might have just such a mark; how soon after did you hear of these skins being in the hands of Mr. Thomas? - On Friday.

Q I believe there were two other persons taken up, what were their names? - Duck and Gisborn.

Q. They were taken before the magistrate? - They were.

Q What became of them? - They are at home now.

Q. They were discharged for stealing these sheep? - They were

Q There was no evidence at all against them, how soon afterwards did you go to Thomas's? - I went to Thomas before they were taken up.

Q How soon afterwards was the prisoner taken up? - On the Saturday I saw the skins.

Q. Was Duck and Gisborn taken up before or after the prisoner? - After.

Q When was the prisoner examined? On Tuesday, and Duck and Gisborn were taken up the day after. He gave the information by which Duck and Gisborn were apprehended.

JOHN THOMAS sworn.

I am a butcher at Turner's-end; the prosecutor Mr. Kimpton came on Saturday the 10th of November, and claimed two sheep skins; this man the prisoner had come to me the Tuesday before and told me he had two ewes to sell; the next day Wednesday he brought two wether sheep. I was killing a bullock; I bought them; I had no knowledge of him; I gave him 19 s 6 d. a piece, he asked 2 l. Mr. Kimpton came to my shop when I was not at home, and my landlord shewed him the skins; I came home directly, and shewed them to Mr. Kimpton, and he carried them to the office along with him; I told him I was not sure where abouts he was at that present time; but he was soon found; when he brought the two wethers he said, I made an exchange with my brother; my brother bought four wethers at Hertford fair, and I exchanged them; he told me he was a shepherd.

Mr. Knapp. These sheep that you talk about have a ruddle mark across the loins; you have seen many sheep have the same mark? - To be sure I have.

Q. These wethers were not worth so much as laid down in the indictment 2 l. 12 s. - No, I have bought cheaper and I have bought dearer.

Q. Of whom did he say he got possession of these sheep? - Of his brother, and afterwards he said, of Duck and Gisborn, and he said, that they said, if he would not go and sell them for him, they would kill him, and he was to have 18 d. for his day's work, and the sum was to be returned to Duck and Gisborn, and they were to divide the money into three parts; but he said he would not do that, he would only have his 18 d. for his hire.

Q. This man was taken up before Duck and Gisborn? - Yes.

Q. I would ask you again the mark that was on these two wethers, was it a common mark that all the farmers in the county have? - It is.

ROGER CUTLER sworn.

I was employed by my father-in-law, Mr. Harvey, from whom the sheep were brought the night before; on Wednesday I was going to Turner's-end, and I met the prisoner with two sheep, driving in the road; I did not know them then to be the same that I had sent to Mr. Kimpton; I asked him whether he was going to the welch butcher's with them, he said, yes; I was by when he was with Mr. Thomas; and the butcher asked me to look at them; I asked the butcher what he asked, he said a pound a piece; I told him I dare say the man and he would deal. On Thursday morning I was going by the butcher's shop, and he was killing one of the sheep; I asked him, if the man and he had agreed; I told him, if they were my sheep I would not have sold them under 30 s. a piece: then I recollected they were Mr. Kimpton's sheep; I observed the marks, and I was certain they are the same I saw at my father-in-law's; this was on Thursday; I took an horse and went over to my father-in-law's to know if any sheep were lost, he said he did not know, as Mr. Kimpton was gone to

town, and was not at home, and said it would be as well for me not to go then, but he would go in the morning. Mr. Kimpton came over on Saturday morning, and I told him where the sheep were, and went with him; the skins were produced, Mr. Kimpton claimed them as his property; I went immediately and took the prisoner at the Fox, at Farnham's-green.

Mr. Knapp. Now my friend you say you met the prisoner at the bar, on the road, with two sheep; at that time you had no suspicion of their belonging to Mr. Kimpton? - No.

Q. Was you close to the prisoner at the bar, when you had the conversation with him; you asked him whether he was going to take them to the welch butcher's? - Yes, I did.

Q. You did not know them then? - No.

Q. Now the sheep that you saw on the road, you can recollect they were Mr. Kimpton's, and now you can take on you to say they were the same at Mr. Thomas's. The fifteen wether sheep you sent to Mr. Kimpton, had the ruddle mark on them? - They had.

Q. That is a common mark? - Not very common.

Q. Some mark in one place and some in another? - They do.

Q. You say you did not recollect them to be Mr. Kimpton's, when you saw them on the road, yet you recollected them to be Mr. Kimpton's, when you saw them cut up; you know them by the ruddle mark? - And by the breed.

Q. You talked to Thomas about the price he had given for the sheep, you seemed to think he had a good bargain of it? - I am certain he had.

Q Do you think if he had been driving some stolen sheep to the butcher's, he would not have hesitated a little, to have told you where he was going? - That was the place he had appointed.

Q. Do you think he would have readily told you where he was taking them, if he had been guilty? - I don't think he should.

GEORGE BARNES sworn.

I work for Mr. Kimpton; I have looked after these sheep ever since my master has had them; I am sure they are his sheep; I had marked them when they were at Mr. Harvey's; they were returned from Mr. Harvey's on Tuesday; I put them into a fold, about one o'clock in the day; that is the last thing I saw of them, that was the 6th of November; I went shortly after to Hertford fair, on the Thursday, with thirty-six ewes to sell. (Deposed to the skins by the ruddle marks.)

Mr. Knapp. You are shepherd to Mr. Kimpton, and you seem a very honest one; how many wether; sheep had you the care of? - Fifteen.

Q They were all marked the same? - Yes.

Q. How long have you lived with your master? - One year.

Q. You have marked many wethers before? - Yes, I have.

Q. Did you ever mark them in the same way? - Yes.

Q. Was that the common mark you made use of? - Yes.

Q. Mayhap you may have seen the mark on other people's sheep? - I have.

Q. You have been shepherd to other people before? - I have.

Q. You have made the same mark on other people's sheep before? - I have.

Q. And you know these skins from that mark? - I do.

Court. Do you know of any person that makes use of the same mark in your neighbourhood? - No.

Q. Did you ever see any sheep marked in that way without a slit in the ear, or some other mark? - I cannot say; there is an ear mark in one of them that my

master does not know of, I know of it.

Mr. Knapp. The slit in the ear you have seen in other people's sheep? - I have.

Q. You have made slits in other sheeps ears? - No; when I bleed them, I bleed them in the eye.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-28

28. WILLIAM DAVENPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of Dec . one piece of black silk Florentine, containing in length 38 yards, value 10 l. the goods of John Chaplin and John Burbidge , privately in their shop .

JOHN BURBIDGE sworn.

I am a man's mercer , I live in Ludgate-street , I was in the counting house on Monday morning last, somewhere about ten o'clock, and one of my porters came into the counting house to me, and said that a person was in the shop that had stolen something.

JAMES DAVISON sworn.

I am shopman to John Chaplin and John Burbidge , William Davenport and another came into my master's shop on Monday morning last, between 9 and 10 o'clock, he asked for some patterns of thicksets, they are for making of small clothes, which I desired the porter to give him while I waited on other customers. The porter's name is John, I forget his other name; during the time he was there, I observed him turn his face to the window, presently I asked the porter what became of the piece of Florentine, as I had but just come into the shop, he made a reply and said, he did not know any thing of it; I then looked on the counter, expecting some person might have put it there, and have taken it out of the window. I then looked out at the door, and saw the florentine under Davenport's coat, standing near to the door; I then turned over the counter for the purpose of cutting Davenport's patterns of thickset. The porter had a suspicion, and called Mr. Burbidge forward; Davenport dropped the Florentine from his coat, I saw him, I saw it fall to the ground.

Mr. Garrow. The porter is not here. - He is not.

Q. Were there any other persons who were in the service of Mr. Burbidge? - None, except a customer who came in.

Q. Was this piece of Florentine rolled up tight or loose? - Rolled up as we usually keep them doubled back, to shew the quality in the window.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before? - I have seen the prisoner before in the shop as a customer.

Q. The porter on some observations of his own, called his master? - He did.

- WARREN sworn.

I am a beadle of the ward, I produce the goods, I received it of Mr. Burbidge, it is called Florentine, I have kept it ever since.

Court to Burbidge. At the request of the porter you went into the shop? - I did; when I came into the shop close by the prisoner, he dropped the silk close by me, I saw him, I gave it to the constable.

Q. Do you know whether it was in the shop or no? - I do, I did not see it at the window myself that day, but I saw the vacancy.

Q. Can you say you had not sold it. - That piece I am sure we had not. (Deposed to.)

Mr. Garrow. Was Mr. Chaplin at home that day? - He was not at home.

Q. Sometimes things are taken out

to shew the customers? - Occasionally things are taken out.

Q. You said very fairly you could not take on you to say from your own knowledge, that it was there that day? - I cannot.

Davison. I began to put them in about seven o'clock that day, and it was between seven and eight that I was finished, I put this piece in between seven and eight.

Prisoner. I had occasion to go into this shop; on Monday last, about ten o'clock, there was a person either at the time, or immediately after, came into the shop; the shopman told the porter to serve me with what I wanted, and he would serve the other customer: the shopman immediately goes round the counter, and says to the potter, what is become of the piece of Florentine there? The porter says I have not seen it since, I laid it on the counter this morning, he immediately went out to the door and looked, he came in directly again, and as I comprehended the circumstance, he sent for Mr. Burbidge, and when he came into the shop, a piece of Florentine fell down from behind the door.

The prisoner called eleven witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY, of stealing, but not privately . (Aged 22.)

Imprisoned six months , fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-29

29. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November , nine pounds of raw sugar, value 4 s. 6 d. the goods of Thomas Bolt .

- sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Bolt, on Wednesday the 21st of Nov. about half past three in the afternoon, I was coming up Dice Key gateway , and I saw this young man come from the bottom of a ladder which comes out of the warehouse from between two casks; he came and looked at me, and walked up the gateway, and I thought that he had got something that he should not have. I followed him, and came to him, and clapped my hand on his knee, and I found there was some sugars; I asked him where he was going, he said he was going for some tobacco; he attempted to get away, but I held him, and asked him to come and shew me where he got the sugar from, I found the sugar concealed inside his trowsers; I took him down to the counting house, and sent for the constable, and had him searched. I took nine pounds of sugar from him, raw sugar. The warehouse belongs to Thomas Bolt ; when I had sent him with the constable, I went up in the warehouse to see where he had got the sugar, and I found one of the hogsheads with the head knocked in, and there appeared some deficiency in the sugar; with that we weighed the hogshead, and there was a deficiency of about fifteen or sixteen pounds, we had taken a sample out of it, we supposed to be two or three pounds.

Prisoner. Was I at work at the sugar warehouse that day, or the day before? - He was at work that day, I did not employ him, but one of my fellow servants employed him, he had just had 4 d. for his hire; he was employed in the warehouse among some men.

WILLIAM WADE sworn.

I am a constable belonging to the Custom-house, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody; he had a pair of callico trowsers under the other, and the sugar in these callico trowsers about his knees, and some of it at the back part; the trowsers seemed to be made on purpose, they are here, I have kept them from that time to this.

Prisoner. I looked for a day's work constantly wherever I could earn 6 d. or 1 s. I had been at work that afternoon at that warehouse, and earned 2 d. and did not find out any more work all the blessed afternoon. I was going home, seeing another man on the Keys, says he, there is a small bundle of hoops to light my fire; stooping for his bundle of hoops, please you, my Lord, there was a man lay with something wrapped up in it; says he, here is a prize, he unfolded this mat, and in this mat there was sugar; with that there says he, the second blunder is as good as the first. I thought no harm in it, and I takes this quantity which was found about me, and the other man whether he took the remainder or no, I cannot say; so coming up the gate, I turned to go home, and there was this gentleman standing by the door, I walked up farther, and was going for a halfpennyworth of shag tobacco; he says, where have you been at work? I said, no where; says he, you have been at work in the warehouse; says I, I have been in the hemp warehouse, and have earned 2 d. Says he, come back to me, I told him I would after I had bought the tobacco; there was the King's watchman walking under the gateway, who certainly would have told whether I went up in the sugar warehouse and come down; he could not miss seeing me; I have no witnesses but God Almighty.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-30

30. THOMAS SPENCER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November , a dressing glass in a mahogany bed frame, value 1 l. 4 s. the goods of Thomas Wood .

THOMAS WOOD sworn.

I live in Fore-street , I lost a dressing glass in a mahogany frame, the 21st of November, between eight and nine in the morning; I did not see the prisoner take it; I know it is my property.

- GREGORY sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Wood, I saw the prisoner on the 21st of November standing at my master's door, looking into my master's shop, about half past eight o'clock in the morning Wednesday, with a two foot rule in his hand. I took no notice of him, thought he was a person taking a plan, which many men do in our business; about five minutes after, I saw him come out of my master's shop with the glass in his hand. It is a dressing glass in a mahogany box frame, I said to my fellow servant, do you run to my master, and when he came back I told him to go about Little Moorfields way, and I would go down Moor-lane. My fellow servant took him, and he ran away from him; on Saturday the 24th I took him again in Long Alley, Moorfields.

Q. Did you observe him enough to be able to say that he is the man? - Yes.

Q. Did you ever recover the glass? - Yes; we got the glass on the 21st.

CHARLES FOULSTON sworn.

I am fellow servant to the other witness; I went in pursuit of the prisoner, on the 21st I took him about a quarter before nine, when I took the glass from him. I found him about two or three hundred yards off, it was in Little Moorfields; I have kept the glass ever since. I asked him where he was going with the glass, he said it was a jobb of his own, I told him it was not, it was a glass of our's; he directly pushed it into my hand, and ran away. I am sure the prisoner is the man; he was taken again on Saturday the 24th.

EDWARD WATKINS sworn.

I am a shoemaker, on the 24th of last month I heard the cry of stop thief, between two and three o'clock; I came to their assistance, and took the prisoner along with two more men that are here, Gregory and Foulston; the prisoner was the man I took; Gregory and Foulston said he had robbed his master of his glass.

Prisoner. Foulston said I should know the young fellow again if I was before the Lord Mayor. - I never said so, I was always certain he was the man.

Court. Did he get away from you? - He did.

Q. What day was that? - On the 24th we brought him as far as Short-street, Moorfields, there he rescued himself away, and we cried out stop thief, and we got him again in Butler's Alley.

THOMAS WICKHAM sworn.

I am a constable of Coleman-street ward, and was sent for to take him after he was taken by Mr. Wood's servant.

Court to Foulston. Is that the glass the prisoner put into your hands? - I am certain it is. (The glass deposed to.)

Wood. I did not miss it till I was called upon; I saw one of the men running back with it ten minutes afterwards in his hand, he said he had got the glass, but the prisoner had got away.

Prisoner. I never was out of my shop till Saturday afternoon, and when they took me, Foulston said I am obliged to do it, for my master will turn me away from my work if I do not.

Foulston. I said no such thing.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Prisoner. I should be glad to go for an East India soldier.

Imprisoned six months in the House of Correction , and publickly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-31

31. JOHN GILES was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Burkett Fenn , about the hour of six in the night of the 2nd of November , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein three pair of stockings made of silk and cotton, value 12 s. and one pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. 6 d. the goods of the said Burkett Fenn .

RICHARD JENKINS sworn.

I live with Mr. Burkett Fenn, I am his shopman, he is an hosier , I am his journeyman; on the 24th of last month, about six in the evening, two men came in and asked if our window had been cut, or any of the stockings taken out, I told them I believed not. I went outside, and did not see any glass cut, one of them pulled out two pair of stockings out of his pocket, and asked me if I knew them; I then went to that part of the shop where these sort of stockings laid, and I found then that the glass was cut, and four pair of stockings taken out; the people who made the enquiry were the constables, Jacobs and Humphries.

Q. What kind of stockings were they? - Three pair of mixed silk and cotton, and one a pair of red and white cotton, I put them in the window that morning myself. I know nothing of the prisoner at the bar.

LAZARUS JACOBS sworn.

I and Humphries took the prisoner at the bar, in company with two more men in Houndsditch; they had made several attempts at the windows, accordingly I followed them; when they came to Cornhill, the prisoner at the bar and the others went to the window of the shop, and stood against it; this was about six o'clock, on the 24th of November; in a few minutes afterwards I saw them come away from the window, and I saw

the prisoner put something up towards his sleeves, underneath his coat. I said to my brother officer, I will be bound they have got something, let us go after them, I followed them to the London Tavern, and I took the prisoner, and took hold of him; on that he dropped the stockings, my brother officer struck him over the head, immediately away he set to his heels, and my brother officer after him; I have got the stockings, and have had them in my possession ever since; here is half a coat which I tore off in the struggle.

Prisoner. Be so good as to ask him how long I was in the public house before the stockings were brought in, I was full a quarter of an hour. - The stockings were brought in directly. (Produced and deposed to.)

Q. Was any thing else found on them? - No.

Q. Was the other person with him at the window? - They were both at the window.

Prisoner. The stockings were brought in by a baker's boy. - As soon as he dropped them I picked them up, and my brother officer went in chace of him; they laid on the table while I was attempting to tie his hands.

JOHN HUMPHRIES sworn.

Jacobs and I were going up Houndsditch, on the 24th of November last, and saw three people going along stoping at several windows trying to break them, but they still walked on till they came to Cornhill, where I saw the prisoner working at the window to break it open; we then ran, and Jacobs catched hold of him and tore his coat. I struck him, and broke my stick over his head, he crossed to Leadenhall Market, ran up the right hand passage, and comes up to the beef hall, and then turns to the right, and comes into Leadenhall-street again; coming up there was a man stopped him; accordingly I grasped at him behind, and catched him, he made a little resistance, but Jacobs coming up we secured him, took him into the public house, and there he was very resolute, and buggered his eyes and limbs and all such expressions as are not fit to mention; and there was a gentleman there, the biscuit maker to the Prince of Wales, who offered to lend a pair of pistols for safety, and another offered to lend a blunderbuss; they were afraid of him, he was such a desperate chap, he swore he would not go without the half of his coat that was broken off, so we put it on arms to pacify him; we put him in the Compter, and there he wanted to turn evidence.

Q. Was there any stockings on his person? - I cannot say; I followed and pursued the man, and left Jacobs with the stockings; I know nothing further.

Prisoner. How long was I in the public house before the boy brought the stockings? - I was busy with him, we had not been there five minutes before I saw the stockings there. I cannot say when or how they were brought in, I am sure he was one of the persons at the house, and that window was broke, and I saw him packing up the bundle under his arm.

Jury. Was any thing found on him to cut glass? - Nothing at all that we found.

Court. You say this was about the hour of six in the evening, was it not light enough to discern any man's face? - It was not, at a distance.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him? - I never had him out of my sight from the time that Jacobs had first hold of him, I should have knocked him down under the archway, but a butcher's dog catched hold of me and lugged me some little space, for about a yard or there abouts,

I never lost sight of him; I am sure he is the person.

Prisoner. Does it stand to reason if this man had seen the stockings drop, and there were two or three of them, that they would not have picked them up.

GUILTY, of stealing, but not of the Burglary . (Aged 28.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-32

32. DAVID LEVINGSTON was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Edward Fellows , about the hour of seven in the night of the first of Dec . and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein eleven pair of cotton stockings, value 40 s. the goods of the said Edward Fellows .

EDWARD FELLOWS sworn.

I live at No. 91, on the Terrace, Tottenham Court Road ; I am an housekeeper, haberdadasher and hosier ; on the first of Dec. last, about seven in the evening, I was standing in the parlour, I heard one of the squares of the glass smash; my shop was open, the door of the house was shut up; we keep open till ten or twelve o'clock on Saturdays; I heard a pane of glass break belonging to the shop, it was quite dark; I immediately ran to my door, found the door tied by the handle of the door to the iron railing; by means of a sudden jirk the cord broke. I then ran out into the street, found the prisoner Levingston; I broke the cord in a moment, I found the prisoner in the custody of Mr. Nichols, I never knew the prisoner before, he was then struggling very hard to get away; I found the hose very near the prisoner, eleven pair of stockings; I picked up the stockings and ran to the constable Hatch, and he came and took the prisoner to the watch-house.

JOHN NICHOLS sworn.

I had never seen the prisoner before that evening; passing very near the prisoner I heard a noise of breaking the glass, I directed my attention towards where the noise came, I saw the prisoner running with a parcel, I called out stop thief, least with the speed he was running, he might escape me, on which he dropped the bundle; and before any assistance came, I secured him, and held him till Mr. Fellows came. He was never out of my sight, nor ten yards from me, I took him instantaneously, and held him, and never let him go till he was in the care of the constable; the stockings are in court.

ROBERT HATCH sworn.

I produce the bundle, it has been in my custody ever since I received it; I came up at the time the prisoner was struggling with Mr. Nichols on the ground, it was all done in two minutes I dare say. I opened them at Mr. Fellows's, they were a bundle that stood in the window to shew.

Court to Prosecutor. Had you eleven pair of stockings all in one bundle? - Just as they are now, they were intended to shew, all tied up together.

Prisoner. I had been with a letter to the top of Charles-street, Tottenham Court Road, coming home I saw several people run pass me, stop thief was called out, and this gentleman took me up in his arms, and said to me stop, or I'll dash your brains out; I had no stockings, no bundle at all; I was going back again after I had been with the letter.

Court to Fellows. Had you seen these stockings in the window that day? - I

had, they were in the form of a bundle when I took them up.

Q. Was the pane of glass of sufficient magnitude to have these bundles taken out of your shop? - Yes, it was a large square of glass.

GUILTY, of stealing, but not of the Burglary . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-33

33. JOHN ASHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of Nov . a five gallon copper can, value 25 s. the goods of James Barton and Richard Howell .

RICHARD STEVENS sworn.

On Wednesday the 21st of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, we called at Mr. Sellon's brewhouse, in St. James's Walk, Clerkenwell Green , for to get the key of a shut up house in Turnmill-street, in order to get empty casks from thence. I live with Messrs. Burton and Howell, distiller s, No. 226, Upper Thames-street, the man that was with me was John Pearsall ; Mr. Sellon gave us a ticket to go to his taphouse and have a pint of porter; we went and were in about five minutes; we had left a waggon at the door; a man says there is a man in the waggon, I directly saw the prisoner at the bar jump off the off wheel with a five gallon copper can in his hand, it belongs to Messrs. Burton and Howell, they have no other partners as I know of; I directly pursued him, when he found he was pursued, he let the can fall, I pursued him and took him; I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner. Did you see me come from the waggon with the can in my hand? - I did, I saw you take it out of the waggon,

JOHN PEARSALL sworn.

I was in company with Stevens, at Mr. Sellon's brewhouse for some casks, he gave us a ticket to go to this house to get a pint of porter; we had a waggon in which there were two copper cans, both five gallon cans, I saw the prisoner on the wheel I saw him have the can, he jumped off the wheel, and ran across the road, my fellow servant catched hold of him, he said he was passing along the street, he knew nothing of the can; I see him drop it.

RICHARD ARMITAGE sworn.

I was going along and I saw this man come with the can in his hand, when he got about the middle of the road he let it fall just on the pavement; I saw Stevens pick it up.

THOMAS MILES sworn.

I was sent for as an officer to take charge of the prisoner and the can, it has been in my possession ever since.

Prisoner. I was coming along walking home to my lodgings, and the man came and catched hold of me; there was a man run by me at the same time.

GUILTY . (Aged 19.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-34

34. JOHN ASHBURTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of November , 22,500 iron nails, value 31 s. the goods of Walter Hatton .

WALTER HATTON sworn.

I lost 22,500 nails on the 29th of Nov. the prisoner was a servant of mine, I lost them all at one time; I suspected the prisoner for some time previous to the robbery, I employed him in the capacity of a carman , to drive the cart and take

care of the horses, and it was his custom to get up in a morning half an hour or three quarters of an hour before the other servants.

Court. That might be a proof of his diligence. - I had reason to suspect him, and applied to the patrole of the parish to watch him coming out of the house in the morning. I desired him to wait half an hour longer to see if this man brought any property out with him. I suspected that I had lost nails frequently, but I did suspect my servant.

WILLIAM MULLEIN sworn.

I am a patrole, on the 29th of last month; I stopt the man coming out of the house; Mr. Halton requested I would stay a little longer than usual to watch his house. Our usual time to go off is six o'clock; between six and seven, on the 29th, I heard a chain fall inside of Mr. Hatton's door, I went immediately the other side of the way, and waited for about ten minutes, and then I went and stopt close by the door till the man came out; I followed him till he got out to go to Mr. Hatton's stable, and under the left side of his coat he had got a parcel; I asked him what he had got? he said a few nails, I said where are you going with them? he said to the stable yard, it is in St. John's-street, I told him he should not take them to the stable, he must go along with me, he was my prisoner; from thence I conveyed him to the Cooper's-arms, in Cow-cross; I took that parcel from him that I saw in St. John's-street, and in the Cooper's-arms, I found three other parcels, one he took out of his pocket, and two I took out; so there were four in the whole. I sent for his master directly, and his master came. I have got the nails in court; they have been in my box ever since. The prisoner did not say whose they were. (Produced and deposed to.)

GUILTY . (Aged 36.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-35

35. MARY BROOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of November , a pair of mens leather boots, value 1 l. a pair of mens leather shoes, value 7 s. and a pair of womens leather shoes, value 5 s. the goods of Thomas Theed .

THOMAS THEED sworn.

I am a boot and shoe maker ; I delivered a parcel to Mrs. Goodfellow, who delivered to Mrs. Davis, a book-keeper of the Golden-lion, St. John's-street , on Friday the 23d of November, between four and five, a parcel.

ELIZABETH DAVIS sworn.

I am the wife of a book-keeper, who keeps the Golden-lion, in St. John's-street; I received a parcel of Mrs. Goodfellow, on Saturday the 24th between nine and ten o'clock, as near as I can tell; I don't know what was in it, it was directed to Mr. Hurtley, Layton-buzzard, Bedfordshire; I took the parcel out of the house and took it to the warehouse and left it. It was lost from the side of the waggon in the yard.

JOHN BRIGGS sworn.

I am a pawn-broker, on Saturday morning about eleven o'clock the prisoner at the bar brought to my house a basket, out of which she took a pair of womens shoes, and a pair of mens boots and offered to pledge them; I asked her how she came by them, she said, they had been sent from Berkshire, to her husband, by an uncle; I told her from her appearance they were most likely taken from some waggon, going into the country; there was no paper on them; then I judged so from her appearance. One of my young men said to her, I suppose you have more in your basket; no, she said, she had not; my wife was going to market; she said, here is a man's shoe in the basket. I went round the counter and saw there was a pair, and said to her, now tell one where you

have got these; she said first of all, she got them from Snow-hill, and then from a court, No. 4, Hosier-lane; I was going to send my young man there to find out the persons, she said, no don't send there, they come from No. 15, Silk-street, Grub-street; I told her the best way would be to take her to the office, in Hatton-garden; accordingly I went for a constable; she desired me to call at Mr. Crane's, in St. John's-street, to desire him to inform her father of her situation, and to desire him to get the muffins, as she could not go there, I called at Mr. Crane's. On the second examination she then confessed they were taken from the waggon, which puts up at the Golden-lion, St. John's-street. I gave the goods over to James Kendall .

JAMES KENDALL sworn.

I am an headborough; I produce one pair of boots, and one pair of mens shoes, and a pair of woman's shoes, I got from Mr. Brigg's house. (Deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was about my business and I found them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-36

36. EDWARD COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , two check linen shirts, value 6 s. two pair of canvas trowsers, value 6 s. two canvas mens frocks, value 2 s. four pounds weight of moist sugar, value 2 s. a pound weight of bohea tea , the goods of John Houghton .

JOHN HOUGHTON sworn.

I live at the Bell, Leadenhall-street, a Book-keeper ; I lost the articles in this indictment, they were all in one bundle, on Tuesday the 4th of December, between the hours of eight and nine at night; I took them myself down to Wapping, in a coach, to go and see a little brother that was going to sea; the captain called on me, and asked me to buy these articles for him. I stopped the coach, and the coachman got down and opened the door, and I jumped out, and I heard somebody pushing at the step, and I saw that prisoner at the bar, putting his arm in and get the parcel; I ran after him, this was in St. John's-street, Wapping ; I had not reached the door before I heard him push against the step and take it out, I saw him, it was on the seat of the coach, there was no person in the coach besides myself, and I laid it by the side of me, while I was riding; I ran after him and caught him, and took the bundle away from him, and held him. I have kept it ever since till now, except that justice Staples had it from Tuesday to Saturday; but I put the mark upon it, John Houghton , Leadenhall-street, I know they are the same because I received the things myself, tied them up, and went off as soon as I could, and they were never out of my sight, and I know they are the same I left at the justices by my writing my name, and they were never undone; I received them to bring them here; he had three accomplices who wanted to rescue him from me; they knocked this hand off, and I catched him again with my right hand; that was in the street; as soon as I got him safe, and got him to the justices, then he begged and prayed that they would send him on board the tender for two years. They struck me first, but I told them if ever a one would come near me, I would knock them down immediately.

Prisoner. This here man took me about thirty yards from the coach, when he laid hold of my collar I had nothing

about me at all, nor ever touched any thing of the kind.

Court to Houghton. You never saw this man before? - Never to my knowledge.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-37

37. JOHN CARNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , fifty one pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the goods of William Fisher .

WILLIAM FISHER sworn.

I am a plumber , at Acton; I had four sheets of lead laying at Stamford-brook, near Turnham-green , at a Mr. Bedford's coach house, ready to be laid, and several sheets about five hundred weight; I live a mile from the place; I had not been in the building for two or three days; I saw the lead there a week before; I mean a week before it was missing; I saw it on the Monday after it was missing; it was missed on Friday night; I saw it on Monday; it was cut in the buildings where it was deposited; there were four sheets, one was rolled away into the middle of the coach house, and about two hundred weight cut off, it was rather tore in a zig jag manner; it was very light lead; I discovered the lead to be missing on Monday. Hughes the patrole apprehended the prisoner.

- HUGHES sworn.

I am one of the patroles; on going down the road, on Friday the 30th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going through Kensington town, about the middle of the town, I passed the prisoner, near six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner was in company with another man, that is evidence against him, his name is Mac Laughton, Mac Laughton was first and he had the bundle of lead; I says to my partner, stop that fellow he has got something very heavy, and the prisoner at the bar stepped immediately from the path way into the road, to make his escape; it was very dark, we took them both, and took them into the public house. Swain was the man with me, and he took the load from Mac Laughton's back; I asked him where he got that lead. The lead was brought up to Bow-street, and the plumber looked at it the Wednesday following; Swain kept it in the mean time. I made enquiry and found that there was some lead lost in these buildings. I took them both up and Mac Laughton was admitted an evidence on Wednesday.

- SWAIN sworn.

I am one of the patroles; I and Hughes met the prisoner and Mac Laughton; Hughes told me to mind Mac Laughton, because he had something heavy on his shoulder; I went to him and took it off his shoulder, and took him into the public house close by, and examined what was in it, I found it was lead, it was directly brought up to Bow-street office, and on Wednesday Mr. Fisher the plumber came and looked at it, and brought some more with it that matched very well in quality, but the pieces did not match; the lead was locked up at the Brown bear; I got it back again; I am sure it is the same. (Produced and deposed to.)

FRANCIS MAC LAUGHTON sworn.

I am a bricklayer's labourer; the prisoner is a mason's labourer , he is a countryman of mine; I was admitted a king's evidence; I gave no account of this till I was taken up; I don't know what part he got it from; my master's 'prentice and

I was drinking a pot of beer, and the prisoner came and called me out of the public house, on the 30th of November, last Friday eight days, he called me out and said, he would pay me if I would carry it a piece of the road, that is a part of the way.

Court to Swain. Did he give this account before the magistrate? - He did.

Court. He is giving an account which discharges himself intirely.

Mac Laughton . Accordingly I did till I met the patrole, so they took it up, this was after five in the afternoon when I met him; I do not know where he got it from, he told me he found it in the morning, one side of a ditch.

Court to Prosecutor. This lead was found on these people, on Monday; when was it you saw it in the premises before? - I had not seen it for a week before.

Q. Was it the Wednesday after this Monday that you missed it, that you was at Bow-street? - It was.

Q. The lead that you left was merely in rolls, it was not fixed to any thing? - It was not.

Q. We have been told already that it was cut in such a manner that it could not correspond; how could you assert that the lead you saw at Bow-street was your's? - I do not wish to swear; Mr. Addington desired me to prosecute the man.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-38

38. MARY HAINES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , one guinea , the monies of John Cunningham .

JOHN CUNNINGHAM sworn.

I am a taylor ; I am a married man; my wife is living; on the 15th of November, I was about my business and left two guineas in a bureau; this woman had been a servant to a gentleman who rented the first floor, how long before I cannot say, it might be a month or six weeks, or two months; my bureau was in the parlour, the ground floor; about nearly one in the same day, I returned home, I went out in the morning, I think it was about nine or ten; when I came home I was in want of a man for to come to work; I asked my wife if my children were come home from school, for I wanted her to go and order a man; I went to this bureau to get my money to lay out my money in my business; I missed a guinea; my wife was hardly got out to the street; I immediately called my wife back and asked her if she had taken a guinea out of the bureau, because I had left two; she told me there had been nobody in the place but old Molly; I asked where she was; she said, she was in the kitchen; she went immediately down stairs into the kitchen to her.

Q. How happened she to be in the kitchen? - The person that she had been servant to used to give her needle work for to do; and she came to the house that morning with something that she had been doing for her; my wife went down to her and told her, we had had a loss; says she, I have lost a guinea and you have got it; says she, I will strip, I will strip; and I laid hold of her right hand and put my hand into her pocket; and she said, she had a piece of stake or pork in her right hand pocket, which she did not like her mistress to know; her mistress up stairs came down, and asked what was the matter; my mistress, said she had stole a guinea of her's, and at the time she had her hand in her left hand pocket; my wife called out, she is putting it in her mouth; while she was putting her hand to her mouth, her mistress said, there is the guinea, and

swore an oath; I clapped my hand to her mouth, put my finger and thumb in her mouth, and got her mouth more open; and her mistress saw the guinea more perfect in her mouth.

Q. Was the guinea ever found? - No.

Q. There was not any thing particular in that guinea. - No, I cannot say it was my guinea; I did not see the guinea myself in her mouth; Mrs. Butler called out, there is the guinea, why do not you take it out of her mouth.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-39

39. MARGARET MUNSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of November , one cotton bed gown, value 10 d. two check aprons, value 1 s. 3 d. the goods of Thomas Riley .

THOMAS RILEY sworn.

On Thursday the 8th of November, about the hour of four in the afternoon, I met the prisoner coming out of the house with her apron tucked up; I asked her what business she had there, and if she was a lodger; she said, she was not; I pursued her into Oxford road, and asked her what she had there? She said, what is that to you you scoundrel; I said, I was determined I would know, because she came out of my room; and I found on her a cotton bed gown and two check aprons.

Q. They are the sort of things your wife can swear to better than you; is your wife here? - No.

Q. And did your wife say nothing about these things. You did not open the bundle, nor get the things of her till you stopped her in the street. Was the bundle opened in the presence of your wife? - My wife did not pursue her, but I did.

Q. Can you safely swear that this cotton bed gown is your wife's? - I can, I bought the stuff in Oxford-road out of a shop; and my wife made the bed gown up. One of the check aprons my wife had to wash; it belongs to a Mrs. Hatch; it was in my wife's possession to wash.

Q. You know that your wife had an apron to wash, but you cannot swear that that was the apron? - I can swear there was an apron in the possession of the prisoner, and my wife had an apron to wash, and it was missing.

JOHN LEADBETTER sworn.

I am a cordwainer; I saw this woman come out and Mr. Riley after her, follow her about fifty or sixty yards from the corner of Oxford-street, he laid hold of her and took the things out of her apron, a cotton bed gown and two check aprons, which were given to Mr. Riley's wife.

Court to Riley. Was the bed gown given back to your wife? - This was the check aprons; I have had them in my custody ever since.

Prisoner. The gentleman has accused me very wrongfully; I went up into the house to look for a person that lodged there; I came down stairs, this gentleman stopped me in the passage and asked me what I went up there for; the things laid on the bannisters of the stairs; but as to taking them from me he did not, as God almighty knows; the gentleman has swore my life away very false.

Court to Prosecutor. On your oath did you take these things from the woman? - I did.

Court to Leadbetter. Did you see them taken from the woman? - I did.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d

Imprisoned six months and fined 1 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-40

40. RICHARD BROUGHTON was indicted for stealing on the 4th of November , a gelding, price 10 l. the goods of Thomas Francis .

THOMAS FRANCIS sworn.

I am a colour-maker in Long-acre. On the 4th of November, I lost a gelding; the stable was broke open at Battle-bridge. I know the horse was there about five o'clock, Sunday evening. Battle-bridge is in the parish of St. Mary, Islington . I have a stable there and a manufactory, the stable is a distance from the manufactory. I see him again on Tuesday following, at the Police-office, in Queen-square, Westminster; where I identified him to be my property, it has a blaze face, four white legs behind, five years old, and a long tail.

Prisoner. I have the key of his stable to take care of his horses, and drive them about.

Prosecutor. He had been a servant with me till that evening, but I met him that evening with something on his back and I discharged him. I apprehend he returned within an hour to take the horse after I had discharged him. I locked the stable door at five o'clock.

Q. When you had locked the stable door was he done in your service? - He was, he had looked after the horses in my mill; we call him a carman or labourer or both. When I locked the door the gelding was there and another horse. I kept a boy there, besides the man, and at a quarter before twelve my boy came and rung the bell, I got up and asked what was the matter; this was at my house in Long acre.

SAMUEL CAVE sworn.

I am a labouring boy, I was going by my master's stable, and I saw the door open between ten and eleven, I goes in, this was on Sunday night the 4th of November, I went into the stable, and I missed my master's horses gone, I missed them both, I went immediately to my master's house in Long-acre, and rung the bell, and told him the stable door was broke open and the horses gone; when I went back again from Long-acre, I found one in the stable again; I went back between twelve and one o'clock.

Prisoner. The boy used to sleep in the stable. - I slept along with him in a private house, I used to sleep with him at the lodging, I never slept at the stable while he was there.

Court. How came you to find the stable broke open? - I went home to my lodgings, and I halloo'd him, and I could make nobody hear, and I went to the stable to see for him, and I found the door broke open.

ADAM WOOD sworn.

I am an hostler to Gabriel Smith , he keeps livery-stables, hackney coaches, and one horse chaise. This horse was brought to me on the 4th of November, about half past seven, at Bristow-street, Earl-street, Blackfriars; the prisoner brought it to the gate, and called hostler, and I went to the gate, and asked whose it was, he said it belonged to Mr. Simpson, St. Paul's Church-yard, and I was to take care of him, and give him what he was to have of corn and hay; he said, he fetched him from Rumford, and I was to let him have a gallon of beer at the public-house, and when the horse was paid for, Mr. Simpson would pay for it.

Q. What public-house? - At Mr. Henry Aston 's, the Bricklayer's-arms, he asked me to let him have 3 s. and I objected; I had never seen him before, I told him if Mr. Simpson gave an order for it, he should have it or more. I am sure the prisoner is the man. I took the horse to the stable, and gave him his corn. The next morning the prisoner was brought in custody by Spriggs, about half past seven in the morning, or it might be eight, I cannot say exactly.

Prisoner. Did I offer him for sale to you, hostler? - No, you did not.

JOSEPH CHAMBERS sworn.

I am a watchman of the parish of St. Andrew's Holborn; I saw this gelding in the stables belonging to Mr. Smith, on the 5th of November, to the best of my recollection, in the morning about eleven o'clock, or before; I did not know whose gelding it was, only by the description given by Mr. Francis.

BENJAMIN SPRIGGS sworn.

I am a night beadle, belonging to St. Andrew's watch-house; on the 4th of November, Sunday night, the prisoner Broughton at the bar, was brought to the watch-house, with the whip in his hand, detected with a quantity of iron; he was brought about one o'clock, Mr. Francis the prosecutor, came to the watch-house about two o'clock on Monday morning and said, that he had lost a black horse: the prisoner was locked up; the next morning we found out where the horse was in Bristol-street at one Smith's; I saw the horse, and Adam Wood said the prisoner brought him there the night before; the prisoner said that was the horse I delivered to the hostler.

Prisoner. I lodged him in some stable or other, I don't know where it was, I was in liquor.

Prosecutor. I went down to Battle-bridge, and I found one horse in my stable, and the other gone; but I never saw the prisoner till I saw him at the Police-office; I called at the watch-house of St. Andrew's, and heard that he was there, but I did not see him; I saw my gelding at Queen-square, having notice given me to attend; I am certain it was my gelding.

Court. I see there is another indictment charging the prisoner. Where these things in the stable? - They where not, they were in the factory, which is seven or eight hundred yards from the stable.

Q. Had you given him these things or given him any orders about the horse? - None at all.

Q. When this your horse was lost this man was in your service? - No, I made him lock up my two horses at five o'clock, and discharged him immediately; and I ordered him to give me the key, and told him I had no further occasion for him. I had a sufficient reason for discharging him; I met him with my property on his back carrying it away, and I made him carry it back, and put it in the stable, and locked the door, and took the key of him.

Q. Did you see any violence at the stable door? - The staple was pulled out and broke, it was fastened with a padlock.

Prisoner. He was not my employer, he had nothing to do with me, his son was my master; he gave me a key, and he had another key for himself; one of the horses had his legs swelled, and he told me to walk him about, I took him down to Fleet-market; I went for my shirt, and I got myself drinking, he had nothing to do with me.

Prosecutor. I have a son, but this man was employed by me. I hired him, and I gave my son money to pay him.

Court to Wood. What time was this horse brought to you? - About a quarter past seven on Sunday evening, the 4th of November.

Court to Francis. I think you did not see the gelding till Tuesday? - I did not.

Q. How came you not to see it till Tuesday? - I was informed where he was, and my son went to see him; I could not leave my shop.

Q. Who carried the gelding to the office? - Mr Wood the hostler.

Court to Wood. Was that the gelding you received of the prisoner? - It was.

Court to Francis. Was it your gelding that was carried to the office? - It was.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 24.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-41

41. TABITHA LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 1 l. the goods of Mary Tomlinson .

MARY TOMLINSON sworn.

I am a single woman; I live in Plough alley, Wapping ; this woman was my servant . Between eight and nine o'clock of the morning I got up, and went down stairs, and left my shoe buckles up stairs; about two o'clock in the afternoon I called her down stairs, to go and fetch the victuals from the bake-house. This was on the 7th of November, on a Wednesday. I told Joseph Bare , if they would find her, I would make them a present of half a guinea; she was brought to me. The pawnbroker has the buckles.

RICHARD HARPER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce a pair of silver buckles, which I received from Mary Woodham ; they were pawned the 7th of November; I cannot be positive, but I believe it was about two o'clock; I gave a duplicate with them.

MARY WOODHAM sworn.

I am an engine windster. The prisoner came to me, and called me down from my mother's, where I was at work, and asked me to pawn them for her; this was the same day the young woman lost them, about three o'clock, as far as I can recollect, in the afternoon. I took them to the corner of Rose lane, Prescot street, and pawned them; the prisoner waited for me till I came out; I was taken up for it; I did not know any thing of this till I was taken up.

Q. When did you give this account? - To the man that took me.

Court to Harper. Do you know in what name they were pawned? - Mary Woodham. (Deposed to.)

Court to Prosecutrix. Had you ever seen Woodham in your house? - I never see her before I saw her before the magistrate. The prisoner lived with me a week and four days.

GUILTY . (Aged 24.)

Imprisoned six months , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-42

42. JANE WIGGINS, otherwise YOUNG , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , two linen sheets, value 5 s. the goods of William Davis .

ELIZABETH DAVIS sworn.

My husband's name is William, I lost the sheets, the 19th of November. The prisoner came in for a pint of beer, on Monday, about half past one; I went and drawed the beer myself, and when I came up, she refused the beer; said she was in a hurry, but told my husband, she would have a glass at the bar, which, she said, was the same to me, and suited her; she had something in her hand, but I did not know she had robbed me, till about three o'clock, when I went up stairs, and found my bed sadly tumbled, and missed my sheets, but did not know who had robbed me, till about five, or half after four; this same woman came into my house again at just dusk, and she came from the tap-room to me, and asked me for a pint of gin hot; I went to get it, and before I could get it hardly on the fire, I heard there was somebody in my bed-room; I went to see who it was; my husband went up the first, and met her coming out of the bed-room in the club-room. Mr. Armstrong was sent for, and there was a duplicate of the sheets

found on her; she took the sheets at noon; I believe, Mr. Armstrong has the duplicate.

Prisoner. She never saw me in the room; I asked her to step backwards, and she gave me leave; she did not ask me to go up.

MARY BURDITT sworn.

I am sister to Mrs. Davis. Mr. Davis keeps a public house. I missed the sheets about three o'clock. I was with her about three or four days in a week. Mrs. Davis and I missed them together, when we went up to make the bed. About five she came back to me, as I was washing my hands; about a minute or two after, I heard somebody over head; I ran up stairs, and met her coming out of the room where the sheets were lost; I then called out to my brother, and said, there was a woman up stairs; the room joins the club-room; I met her coming out of the bed-room as I entered the club-room; I then asked her, What she went up stairs for? she said, You know what I want.

Prisoner. I met her on the stairs, as she was sweeping the stairs.

John Armstrong . I was sent for to take charge of this woman. It might be five o'clock. I found on her two duplicates; (produced) one is for the 19th of November, one sheet for 1 s. and the other is the 2d of November, one sheet for 5 s. which does not apply to this.

JOHN TYLER sworn.

I am a pawn-broker, No. 110, Houndsditch; I took in two sheets from the prisoner; I can swear to her person. On the 19th of November, I had seen her before, I gave her a duplicate (The sheets produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. The pawnbroker knows I pawned the sheets many a time at his shop; they are my own property. The gentlewoman gave me leave to go up stairs; she was sweeping the stairs; she called her brother, and said, she believed, I was the woman that stole the sheets.

ELIZABETH BARKER sworn.

This woman, the prisoner, gets her living by hard work; she is a washerwoman; I have known her several years; I have pawned these sheets several times for her.

Q. These very identical sheets? - Yes.

Q. Where did you pawn them? - Once at Catherine-wheel alley. I am a widow, and have eleven children.

Court to Pawnbroker. What time of the day were these pawned. - The 19th of November; I think, about three o'clock, to the best of my recollection.

Court to Mrs. Barker. When was the first time you pawned these sheets? - I pawned them about eight or ten weeks ago, with Mr. Davidson, the corner of Catherine-wheel alley; they gave me a duplicate.

Q. When was the other time? - Before that.

Q. Do you mean to insist on it, they are the same sheets? - They are the same sheets.

Court to Mrs. Davis. Were these sheets ever out of your house before? - Never, my Lord.

Prisoner. Mr. Tyler knows I have pawned them in his shop before now.

Court to Tyler. Did she ever pawn these sheets before? - Never, to my knowledge. I don't know whether it is proper to mention it to you, but this woman, (Barker,) brought me a letter from the prisoner; the purport of it was to induce me to say the sheets were pawned separate.

Court to Mrs. Barker. Did you carry this letter. - I did.

GUILTY . (Aged 40.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-43

43. WILLIAM PALMER was indicted, for that he, on the 3d of November , did make an assault on Richard Mann the younger , and with both his hands and feet feloniously and wilfully, and with malice aforethought, did divers times beat and kick the said Thomas Mann ; and then and there, feloniously, wilfully, and with malice aforethought, divers times did cast, and throw him to, and against the ground, and him, the said Thomas Mann , with the hands and feet feloniously and wilfully, and with malice aforethought, in, and upon his back, breast, stomach, belly, side, and loins, gave divers mortal bruises, of which bruises he languished until the 25th of November, and then did die .

Second COUNT. He was charged on coroner's inquisition for killing and slaying.

(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)

SARAH HILL sworn.

I knew the deceased between four and five months, his name is Richard Mann . The prisoner keeps the Cock and Castle public house, Kingsland-road . On a Saturday in November, about five weeks ago, my brother-in-law, Francis Chapman , and I, and Richard Mann , came to the prisoner's house. This deceased and I stopped at the door, and Chapman went to order a pint of beer; we stopped with a jack-ass; this was between eight and nine; it was very dark. Mr. Palmer brought the beer, and put it into my hands; it was light enough to see the countenance of the prisoner and deceased by the candle in the tap room. I was close to the deceased. The prisoner came out to the door with a pint of beer; he gave it into my hands; he said to the deceased, Are you not a rascal, and a villain, and a thief? The deceased made answer, and said, No, Mr. Palmer! and Mr. Palmer made answer, and said, You are. No, says he, I am not. I am no thief, nor yet a rascal, nor a villain. Yes, says Palmer, I can prove him a thief. Now, says he, I know you owe me a grudge for owing you 5 s. and then he said, Yes, you do, you owe me 5 s. The deceased made answer, and said, No, Sir, I paid you some. He said, if you say so again, I will knock you down; and then the deceased made answer, and said, Yes, I paid you some; and then he made no more to do, but Palmer knocked down the deceased immediately; I saw him, upon my word; I cannot say I see where he struck him. He got up, and said, very well, Mr. Palmer; and then he repeated his blow, and knocked him down again; I saw that; and the deceased got up, and got off from his premises, and went to Mr. Bennett's door, the next door, and there the deceased said to him, You struck me twice, now if you strike me the third time - I am off your premises - I will make you pay for it; and then Mr. Palmer said, Damn me, if I am to pay for it, I will pay for some thing; and then went, and struck him again, and then I never stirred an inch from the place where he struck him; I saw him strike him; I stopped at Mr. Palmer's door till my brother came out, and then I went away.

Mr. Garrow. What was the deceased? - He was a bricklayer's labourer occasionally.

Q. Rather found otherwise, I believe: Be so good to recollect the language he used to Mr. Palmer. - He used none while I was there.

Q. He did not say he would beat his fat head about? - He did not while I was there.

Q. How long did you continue there, after Mr. Palmer gave him the blow? - About ten minutes.

Q. How long did you see him afterwards? - That day fortnight, at the Coach and Horses, at Newington.

Q. How far did he go from Mr. Palmer's door that night? - About a quarter of a mile.

Mr. Knapp. You saw him at the Coach and Horses about a fortnight after; how did he appear in health? - Very bad, indeed!

Mr. Garrow. How did he appear before? - Very well, for what I know.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - I cannot.

FRANCIS CHAPMAN sworn.

I am brother-in-law to the last witness. I remember being with my sister and the deceased, at this public house, the Cock and Castle; I went there for a pint of beer; I called for the pint of porter, and was inside, and saw nothing at all of it. I saw the deceased after he was dead which was about two months after. I was in the tap room, about seven or eight yards from the side of the door.

THOMAS BARNETT sworn.

I live next door to the Cock and Castle. I remember coming out of my house, on the 3d of November; it was all over when I came out; I saw the woman that sells greens; that is all I saw; I did not see the deceased at that time, nor at any time afterwards.

RICHARD MANN sworn.

I am the father of the deceased. I remember my son coming home on the 3d of November, (Saturday.) on Monday after he made a complaint; Mr. Penleaze attended him; I cannot say how soon he attended him; the Sunday three weeks following, I saw the body when he was dead.

Q. Had you seen the body while living? - I had on Monday morning; he was very black on the left side, and all round his loins and flank was partly black.

- PENLEASE sworn.

I am a surgeon; I live at Stoke Newington; I was sent for on the occasion, eight or ten days previous to his death, to attend the deceased; he then was labouring under a disagreeable fever and a bilious complaint. I treated him in the usual way; the medicines did not succeed; he died on Monday the 25th. I went down, and see that he was black on the side, and the blood was ready to burst through; a mortification had taken place; but I do not take upon me to say, he might not have died without that, but, I think, his death might be accelerated by this; I heard nothing of this before his death; if he had sent for me immediately, he might have recovered.

Court. Your opinion is that the disorder might have occasioned his death without the blow. - He was labouring under a bilious fever.

Q. That could not happen from the blow. - It might by the disturbance of the vessels that secrete the blood.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-44

44 RICHARD WILLIAMS, otherwise BRADLEY , was indicted for that he, on the 18th of November , had 18 pieces of false and counterfeit milled and coined money, made after the likeness of good and lawful money of this realm, called a 6 d. and three pieces of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of 1 s. the same counterfeit pieces of money, or either of them, not being cut in pieces,

then and there, feloniously and unlawfully did put off to Joseph Worsdale , at a lower rate and value than they were numbered for, to wit, for 5 s. in monies numbered , against the form of the statute, and against the King's peace.

He was indicted in a second Count for the same offence, only varying the manner of charging.

The case was opened by Mr. Fielding.

JOSEPH WORSDALE sworn.

On the 17th of November, (Saturday) about twelve o'clock, I was coming with one Luckney, a professor of the same employ, an utterer of bad money, I met the prisoner at the top of Long-lane, by Aldersgate-street, we went into a public house, called the Six Canns, in Barbican, all three, and had something to drink; then the prisoner said to me, I want to speak to you on business to-morrow, because I can put something in your way, that will be of service to you. I met him, by appointment at the sign of the Cart and Horses, in Sutton-street, in Goswell-street, on Sunday morning, at ten o'clock; I went there first, and waited about an hour. I was sitting at that time in the tap room; when he came, I believe, he spoke first; he said, he expected two sellers that were coming with some money, who was to meet him there; they did not come; I went out of the house with him, and we went down to Long-lane, about three quarters of a mile from the place, in Sutton-street; we went to the Bell; there he shewed me some bad money in a paper, that they had brought to him; I suppose there might be 40 or 50 s. most of them six-pences; he then took me up to Goswell street, almost by the turnpike, and said, they must go through the pot again, for they have been rubbed. That parcel of money was delivered to him in the lane, in a little court that goes into the square, in Long-lane .

Q. Then you received this money of this man. - Yes.

Q. Did you go any where else with him. - I went with him to a house in Fashion-street, Spitalfields; there was a public house in a Short street, that we went in before, but the house that I bought the money at was at the Queen's head, in Fashion-street .

Q. Was there any body else there? - There was a man in a sailor's habit; I bought of him there, in that house, sixpences and 3 shillings, bad money, for 5 good shilling. Mr. Croker has got it. This was on Sunday evening, about five o'clock, that I bought it; he asked 5 s. for these 18 bad sixpences and 3 shillings, and I gave it him. I went and delivered them to Croker, at the Feathers, in Hart-street, Covent garden, about seven o'clock on the same evening.

Q. Had you kept this money separate? - I had wrapt it up in two or three papers, that it should not get lose in my pocket. When he was apprehended on the Tuesday following, he was then to meet me again in Church-street, in the Strand; I went there, and Croker with me and another officer, he was in the path, at first, and Croker and Davis followed a distance; he went out to the coach way, to bring a bit of comb out of the coach wheel to do them, because they were too bright what he had got.

Mr. Garrow. Mr. Worsdale do me the favour to look at these gentlemen across; where do you live? - No. 13, Charles-street, Tottenham-court-road; I have lived there ever since I came down from Little Heath turnpike, in the neighbourhood of Mims, between Brent and Hatfield.

Q. Are you the toll collector to a turnpike? Pray are you the same gentleman that we have had so many complaints about bad money at Battle-bridge? - No.

Q. I will take down that answer. - I never staid there but three weeks in my life, and that was about four years ago.

Q. I pass through that turnpike, at least, once a week, and I recollect you. How long was it since you was dismissed from Battle-bridge turnpike? - About three or four years.

Q. For being too honest, I take it for granted? - I went from there to Isleworth.

Q. What might you be dismissed from Battle-bridge turnpike for? - Because I could not get money enough.

Q. How long did you stay at Isleworth? - Seven months.

Q. You left that, because you could not get money enough, I take it for granted? - I lost the use of two of my fingers; then I was out of employ for sometime, and went to sea.

Q. How long have you been a landsman again? - Pretty near a year and three quarters.

Q. Got into any other toll-gate since? - I collected the City street toll, and after that, I went down to Little Heath turnpike.

Q. Is 5 s. the common price for 18 sixpences and 3 s? - I don't know the common price, for some gives more and some gives less.

Q. I don't know, whether you know, you are liable to be prosecuted as well for buying as for selling. Did you ever buy any before or since? - I have, I will not deny it.

Q. Yet you cannot tell the market-price? - They differ.

Q. Pray how many are you in the course of this day to try to convict single handed? - There are two more.

Q. Pray now, Mr. Worsdale, what is the reward for this dealing? - I know not any, nor do I require any.

Q. You do it all for the good of the public? - I do, it is never too late to mend.

Q. Now, one question more; Have you not been discharged as the collector to the Sunday toll at Battle-bridge, because you was wonderous utterer of bad money? - No.

Q. No! Now, remember, Mr. Worsdale, that once a week, at least, I have taken bad six pences at that gate. Upon your oath. Has there never been a complaint against you for giving bad sixpences at the turnpike gate? - Not to my knowledge.

Q. Will you swear you never heard of such a complaint? - There might be.

Q. I would not hurry you; for the world's sake, take your own time, only tell me, on your oath? - I never heard of such a complaint.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - If it had been made, there is not a doubt, but it would have been just.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-45

45. JAMES STAINES was indicted for selling, on the 14th of November , sixteen pieces of false counterfeit money, made and coined to the likeness of a 6 d. and one piece of counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a 2 s. 6 d. for 5 s. of good money, to Joseph Worsdale .

The prosecution was declined.

Not GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17921215-46

46. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , 10 s. 6 d. the money of Daniel Burriston .

DANIEL BURRISTON sworn.

I was on duty the 23d of October last; I am a serjeant in the guards ; I went into the sutling-house at one o'clock to dinner;

the prisoner at the bar came, and called me out, and said, some of the soldiers wanted me; when I came out, there were three men in company wanted 6 d. each, in part of their pay; I offered one of them half a guinea, and said, if they were going to refresh themselves, they might get it changed; they hesitated; and the prisoner came up to me, and said, serjeant, if you want change, I can get you change in a minute. The prisoner was the servant of the house, on which I trusted the prisoner with the half guinea to get it changed. I returned back, and finding the boy not come to me, I enquired of the soldiers, if the boy had brought them the change, one of them answered, he had not seen him since he went out; I enquired of the master what was become of the servant, he replied, he had no seen him for half an hour; I informed his master I had entrusted him with half a guinea to get change. He did not return till the 27th of November, and I did not see him till the 21st; he came to the Horse Guards, and asked a soldier to let him sleep in the guard in a night, and a corporal of the same company I belong to, came and informed me. I had him taken up in the morning of the 28th, and he was conducted to his master, and I took him to the magistrates, and then he was committed.

Prisoner. This gentleman gave me half a guinea to get change, and it dropped out of my hand, and I was afraid to go back again.

JOHN PEARSON sworn.

This boy was in my service, he had been there from Sunday to Tuesday, and when he left me, he was employed to draw beer. I knew nothing of him before, he directed me to a place in Westminster, where I could get a character; I went; he had not lived there, but he had been there about eight or nine days about the house, and appeared very industrious, and he believed he was honest; he left my house on Tuesday between two and three o'clock, I missed him all of a sudden, and presently the serjeant came to me, and enquired where the boy was; he never came back till he was brought back by the corporal on the 28th of November; I asked him what made him behave in that manner, or what made him make away with the half guinea, he said, he went to a public house, and there he saw a man like a coal-heaver, who said, to him what do you want? says he, I want change for half a guinea for the serjeant; O says he, never mind going back with the half guinea, let us nd seen it.

Prisoner. I can get a character from where I lived five years; I have always been be up very honestly, and I never do any thing of this sort before in my life; my father and mother live down at Newbury in Berkshire.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Imprisoned six months , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-47

47. FRANCIS ORANGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of November , six hats, value 12 s. the goods of John Walker .

JOHN WALKER sworn.

I am a dealer in hats in Oxford-street , on the 13th of last month, I lost six hats, they were taken out of my shop.

JAMES BIRD sworn.

I was a patrole belonging to St. Giles's in the Fields; on the 13th of November, I was going down Market-street, and I saw the prisoner at the bar coming up with a quantity of hats under his arm, I asked him what he had? he said,

he had got some hats, and that they were his own property, I asked him where he lived? he said he would not tell me, I was taking him to the watch-house, and as I was taking him up the lane he dropped the hats, and my partner picked them up, and we took him to our watch-house, and he not giving a satisfactory account, he was brought before a magistrate and committed; and the hats advertised, and the prosecutor applied at the second hearing and claimed the hats; the watch-house-keeper has the hats.

CHARLES MORGAN sworn.

I produce the hats, they have been in my custody ever since the 13th of November; they are in the same state as when I first received them. (Deposed to by the prosecutor as having lost such.)

DAVID KEITH sworn.

I was along with my partner, as patrole; this man met us in Market-street, my partner asked him what he had got, and was taking him to the watch-house, and he dropped the hats, and I picked them up, and took them to the watch-house.

Prisoner. I am but a stranger in London, I never was in London before in my life, I asked a gentleman to shew me a way to a lodging, and he took me down three streets, and gave me the hats to hold, I had not got above five or six yards before this gentleman look hold of me, I never saw these hats before.

Jury to Prosecutor. Was six exactly the number you lost? - It was.

GUILTY . Imprisoned one month .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-48

48. MARY ANN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , six yards of thread lace, value 15 s. the goods of John Berry and William Simpson , privately in their shop .

JOHN BERRY sworn.

I am an haberdasher in Orchard-street , prior to the 10th of August, I lost a card of lace, how it was lost I cannot pretend to say, but I verily believe it was stolen out of my shop; on the 19th of November the prisoner at the bar brought two packets of lace in order to match them; one of these very packets I recollected to be the lace I had lost out of my shop; I asked the prisoner how she came by it? she gave a very indifferent account indeed, she said, she bought it out of a shop for less than what it had cost me; I then requested to look at the pattern of the lace, and discovered my mark.

Q. How much was in that pattern? - About three quarters of a yard; there was originally six yards of it; I had my private mark on it; I took the prisoner before a magistrate, and swore to my mark there.

Mr. Garrow. Your mark is very near the end? - It is.

Q If any person had been indiscreet enough to match it in your shop, could they not have cut that mark off with great ease? - They certainly could have done that.

Q. How much would they have wasted? - About half an inch.

Q. So that this young woman with your mark on it brought it to your shop, I observe gentlemen, (of the Jury) you do not think it needful for me to put another question if I don't misread you.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-49

49. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of November , one silver watch, value 1 l. one steel watch chain, value 2 s. a metal seal,

value 6 d. two metal watch keys, value 4 d. the goods of William Lander , privily from his person ; and

DAVID DOGHERTY for receiving the same goods on the same day, knowing them to be stolen .

WILLIAM LANDER sworn.

I had been out to a supper along with some shopmates, returning home on the morning, on the 29th of November, between two and three in the morning in Holborn , I met the prisoner Ann Smith , and she tapped me over my left arm, and entered into discourse with me, I wanted to get home, and she took the watch out of my pocket, I believe, I did not feel her take it out, returning from her I clapped my hand to my pocket and missed my watch, says I, you have got my watch, says she, you are a bloody lying thief; from the time that I was with her first, and the time I missed my watch, was not above three minutes; I asked her for my watch, and she said, she had not got it, I said, if she did not give it me immediately I would give the watchman charge; accordingly I gave charge, there was no person nearer than the watchman, I gave charge to; when I gave charge, he desired her to give me the watch, she said, she would not, and used a good deal of bad language; going along there was another watchman called to his assistance, he was the prisoner Dogherty, and she said, she gave him the watch, I did not see the watch in her possession, after she had taken it from me; nor see her give it to the other man; she was searched at the watch-house, but no watch found on her; the person that searched her came out, and told the watchman there was no watch about her; this Dogherty desired he would go in again, the constable did the second time, and the third time; in the third time, she confessed she gave it to Dogherty, and Dogherty gave it to the constable of the night.

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN sworn.

I am the constable of the night; this was on the 29th of November, Ann Smith came in half past two o'clock, I took the charge, I went and took her into the room and searched her, and found nothing at all about her; this man at the bar, says, go and search again, I went in again, when I came out again the watch was in Welch's hands, taken out of Dogherty's hat; then the watch was produced by Dogherty at last; the watchman had possession of it till I went down to Bow-street, and then he desired the watchman Welch to give it me, I have the watch now. (Produced and deposed to.)

Court to Prosecutor. At the time the watch was taken from you did not you observe it taken out from your fob? - I did not.

Prisoner Smith. I met the young man, and he began to pull me about, I was rather disguised in liquor, but I never had the watch, and when I would not go with him up a court, he said I took his watch.

Ann Smith , GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Imprisoned six months , and fined 1 s.

David Dogherty , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-50

50. WILLIAM STEVENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of November , six silver thimbles, value 6 s. two metal gilt seals, value 2 s. the goods of George Grosvenor .

GEORGE GROSVENOR sworn.

I live at No. 302, Holborn, I deal in hardware and jewellery , on the 8th of November, I sent William Stevenson with some goods to the West end of the town, he was bound apprentice, but I took him as a servant , he lived with me two years as an apprentice; I was very much surprised at not finding him return as I expected, when an officer from Bow-street came, and asked me if I did not know such things; the officer's name is Thompson, he produced a watch chain,

too gilt seals and a key, which is not in the indictment; he was sent to Bow-street before I knew what was become of him; before this I had a very good opinion of him; I placed him over another boy, which I could not so well confide in.

- THOMSON sworn.

I am a constable of the parish of St. Martin's, he produced six thimbles; I found the prisoner at Mr. Hether's, pawnbroker in Long-alley; I took them from the prisoner at the pawnbroker's shop; one of Mr. Hether's servants came down to Bow-street.

- sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Hether the pawnbroker. On Thursday the 8th of November, the prisoner came into our shop, and offered six silver thimbles to sell between two and three o'clock; seeing them new thimbles, I carried them into my master; and I asked the prisoner when I came back again, where he got them, he said he found them; seeing them to be new thimbles my master ordered me to send for an officer, and he was taken into custody; when the officer came and he was searched, and a chain and seals were hanging at his watch pocket; the officer took all the things, but the thimbles. I have got the thimbles, they have been in my custody ever since. (The thimbles produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, only that I found them.

GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

To be put on board a ship .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-51

51. RICHARD VINCENT and THOMAS SENNETT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , an iron shovel with a wooden handle, value 2 s. the goods of John Price and John Belcher .

JOHN PRICE sworn.

I live at Stepney ; I lost an iron shovel, the property of myself and Belcher; John Price and John Belcher , it was lost the 22d of last month, I can swear to the shovel.

SOLOMON MENDOZA sworn.

I live at Stepney; I was in a public house, and I saw the prisoner looking towards Mr. Price's shop; and in about five minutes, I saw the prisoner go into the shop; and Sennett was his companion; I did not see Sennett go into the shop; he came out with a shovel under his right arm; says I to Newton, who was with me, he has got the shovel under his right arm, I went out and crossed towards him on my left hand, and Mr. Newton followed him on the same side he was walking; he had got about thirty yards distance from the shop, and he began to run; Newton hallooed stop thief, and we ran and took him with the property underneath his arm, and he was taken to the watch-house.

Prisoner Vincent. I was walking down the road; I did not go into the shop.

JAMES NEWTON sworn.

I was in this same public-house, looking towards Mr. Price's shop; I saw these too young lads looking into the different houses. I kept my eye on them; they walked down to Mr. Price's shop; at last this Richard Vincent being next to the door, the other was on the

right side of him looking through the window; presently I saw Richard Vincent go in and take the shovel; he came out, and I ran after him, and cried out stop thief; and he was stopped, till I came up; I never lost sight of him. (The shovel produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner Vincent. My Lord, I belong to the East India-Company; that day, I had been bidding my friends good by; going down the road with Sennett, I left him to make water, and I saw the shovel lay down, and I takes the shovel, and going along with it, they cry'd out stop thief; I laid the shovel down, and and they came up to me and scratched my face.

Prisoner Sennett. This person asked me to take a walk with him to Bow, as he was bidding his friends good by, I said I would go along with him, walking side by side I was stopping to make water, and I saw him with this shovel in his hand, and they all ran after him and took him; and as they came back they took me I never knew that he was going to take the shovel at all, no more than if I was unborn; I never was a minute in prison in all the world before; I worked hard for my living, from my infancy.

Richard Vincent , GUILTY . (Aged 18.)

Publickly Whipped .

Thomas Sennett , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-52

51. MATTHEW WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of November , six halfpence, and five shillings in monies numbered , the monies of John Harman .

JOHN HARMAN sworn.

I went to see a friend in Drury-lane, and we had 2 s. worth of brandy and water at Mr. Murphy's in Drury-lane ; I never saw the prisoner before, and then they put me to bed with the prisoner; I took my clothes off, and my breeches and waistcoat, and I put them under my head; in the morning the prisoner was up, and I said to the prisoner, what are you doing with my breeches, for he had them in his hand, he said he was looking for his stockings, and he threw down my breeches, and I found all my clothes removed, which I had 5 s. in my breeches pocket going to bed, and three pence of halfpence in my waistcoat pocket; I did not find it again.

Q. How many people did sleep in this room, there were three beds, and people in all the beds; I had no mistrust till I got up. I told this man that I was robbed, and he said tell the landlord; I went, and the landlord said he had lost things before, stop till night; and at night the prisoner was brought in by the patrole.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-53

52. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of November , one leather horse bridle, value 8 s. one harness, value 12 d. the goods of George Steele .

GEORGE STEELE sworn.

I live at the stables, my mother is proprietor with me.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-54

53. THOMAS CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , one man's velvet waistcoat, value 2 s. one woman's cotton gown, value 5 s. one linen sheet, value 4 s. the goods of Henry Enever .

HENRY ENEVER sworn.

I live at Bethnall-green , a blacksmith ; Thomas Clarke was a lodger to me, and I had let him the room, he slept in, in the morning after he was gone, I found the things gone out of the room; and I went in several places, up and down to look for them, and I found them at a pawnbroker's, in the name of Thomas Clarke ; I missed them the 17th of October, I found them at the pawnbroker's, two or three days afterwards at one Mr. Tomkins; he did not come any more, after that time the 17th of October, I did not see him till he was taken.

- TOMKINS sworn.

I live at Ratcliff-high-way, I carry on the business of a pawnbroker; I never saw the prisoner in my life to my knowledge; there were some things found at my house in the name of Clarke; a woman came and enquired if there was any things pledged in the name of Thomas Clarke ; but I don't know the prisoner.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-55

54. SAMUEL HARRIS and WILLIAM RYAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , one pair of stays, value 10 s. the goods of Sarah Wootton , Spinster .

SARAH WOOTTON sworn.

On the 20th of November last, I lost a pair of stays; I left them in a room where I live, on the table near the window.

JOHN WILKES sworn.

On the 20th of November, I was coming out of the Spanish Ambassadors Chapel, in George-street, Manchester-square; I met with a gentleman, and we went along, and Mr. Rogers overtook us, just as we got to Edward-street , Mr. Rogers turns back, and says, Wilkes; there is a couple of thieves there with a pair of stays; and Harris who had the stays under his arm, threw them down into the area, in Edward-street; they ran a considerable way, and then ran down Barfield-street; they drew a long knife at me, and swore you bloody bugger if you come any further, I will rip your bloody guts open. I pursued him from Edward-street, and came up to him in Barfield-street; I did not come up quite to him, he made a step back with the knife; after some little way farther, then Harris turns round to Ryan, and says damn you, why don't you do the bugger; I followed them then up into George-street, where they ran into Kendall's-mews; there Harris stooped down, and pretended to ease himself; and there they were apprehended; the stays are in court.

WILLIAM JACKSON sworn.

I am constable, I produce the stays, and the knife was picked up on the dunghill; and this screw driver was taken out of Ryan's pocket; the knife, and stays were given to my care at the Magistrates; Wilkes brought them.

Court to Wilkes. Of whom did you get the stays? - Of Sarah Wootton, they were brought back to her. (Deposed to.)

Sarah Wootton . They were brought back by my fellow servant , I left them in the room in Edward-street; and they were brought back to me, I had not missed them before the alarm.

Mr. Garrow. There is no one to prove they are the same, as was lost.

Court to Wilkes. Did you see them thrown into the area? - I did, I did not take them from thence; I pursued the prisoner; I went back to the house where the prosecutrix lived, and asked for the stays, and she gave them to me; and I took them to the watch-house; she said they had been brought from the next house; I saw them thrown over the area of the next house.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-56

55. MARTHA LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , one watch in a metal case covered with shagreen, value 1 l. a steel watch chain, value 6 d. a steel watch key, value 1 d. one metal watch key, value 1 d. the goods of John Neal .

JOHN NEAL sworn.

I lost a watch on the evening of the 3d of this month; I was coming from Smithfield, and as I came down Cow-cross, I met the prisoner at the bar and she told me she wanted to speak to me; I knew nothing of her person before, it was between twelve and one in the morning; I then walked on and took no notice of her; she came up again and laid hold of my arm, and insisted on speaking to me; she drew me into a court, called Colledge-court, Cow-cross , and there she began feeling about my fob to see whether I had a watch; I thought her intentions were not right; I took the watch out of my fob into my coat pocket; she took me round her arms, and took my watch out in the scuffle, and ran away, and I ran after her, and she took into Sharp's-alley; I never lost sight of her all the way.

- CAMPBELL sworn

I am a watchman, I was going my beat at half past twelve; I heard this young man call watch, accordingly I went to his assistance, and found he and this woman together, in the scuffle they tumbled down together; and he gave me charge that this woman had robbed him of his watch; accordingly I took the charge and took them to the watch-house; the watch was found close by the place where they tumbled down; a girl went out with a lanthorn and picked it up; I did not see it till I saw it in the officer's hands the next morning. The girl is not present, she is in the country.

Court to Neal. Was you present when your watch was found? - Yes, I am sure it did not tumble out of my pocket; I was quite sober.

- WILLIS sworn.

I am a watchman; I heard this man call out watch, and I went to his assistance; and he told me the prisoner at the bar had picked his pocket of his watch; we took her to the watch-house, and she was searched, and the watch was not found

Q. Do you know how the watch was found? - No more than I heard that a young woman, Mrs. Spencer's maid, found it and brought it to the constable.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-57

56. FRANCIS MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , two pair of leather pumps, value 6 s. a pair of leather shoes, value 7 s. the goods of James Ferguson .

JAMES FERGUSON sworn.

I live at No. 27, Russel-court, Covent-garden; I am a shoe maker ; I lost three pair of shoes, two pair of ladies and one pair of gentlemens. On Saturday evening, the 8th of December, about nine o'clock, this Francis Morris came into my shop, and agreed with me for three pair of shoes; I tied them up in the apron, and sent the boy out with them; him and I had agreed about the price, but he did not pay me; I had never seen him before in my life, he was to go along with the boy.

JOHN GREENHILL sworn.

I am between sixteen or seventeen; I am apprentice to Mr. Ferguson; I was sent out on the 8th of last month, with the prisoner, with the shoes; I was going along he asked me whether I was an apprentice or a boy to my master; I said, I was an apprentice; then when he came to the chandler's shop, he said, are the shoes for buckles, or for ties, for I want them for buckles; and then he opened the bundle and looked at them; this was in Exeter-street; he tied them up again, and I asked him for them; no, no, says he, I can carry them if it is not too much trouble; then he went along Denmark-court , turns down to his left hand, and then turns again and says, I have gone past the house, it is a door or two further; then when he turned the corner again, he set off running; I hallooed out after him, and he went down to Exeter-change; I had not lost sight of him till the crowd got round him; then he came along to my master's with a watchman; he throwed the shoes away; he had not them on him; they were thrown into a gentleman's passage and he brought them to us; they are the same shoes I carried with the man, they had been in the shop a good bit before. (Deposed to by the prosecutor having made them all himself.)

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 21.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-58

57. JOHN YOUNG and WILLIAM DAVIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , five pieces of wood called log-wood, value 1 l. the goods of Frederick Rash .

A second COUNT on the same charge laying it to be the property of George Springle .

THOMAS PEATE sworn.

I am one of the trinity officers; on Sunday morning the 2d of December, between five and six, I was coming from Rotherhithe in a boat, and I saw the two prisoners, Davis and Young, in a boat coming down the river; I was going up; perceiving the boat very deep in the water, I ordered the waterman to row towards them; accordingly they rowed directly over for the other shore to Wapping; I am sure they observed me; we then came very near to them, and before we could board the boat, the prisoner Young jumped over-board, and says, you bugger now catch me if you can; he endeavoured then to swim towards the other shore, towards Rotherhithe-stairs; we then came close to the boat and perceiving it to be loaded with log-wood; Davis would have jumped over-board likewise, but the waterman catched him by the coat, and called him by his name; he attempted

to jump, and got up on purpose to do it; and I told him, I would shoot him if he did; we then rowed immediately after Young to pick him up out of the water, and told him to swim to the boat, or I would blow his brains out; he swam to the boat and got hold of the stern; we then took him into the boat and then we rowed after Davis who had got the property in the boat; we overtook him; we then took both of them together over to Shadwell watch-house, and there they remained till Monday morning, when they had a hearing before the justice. There was thirteen pieces of log-wood in the boat; I took it to Shadwell, and by order of the justice put it into a warehouse, where it was locked up; some of them weigh about an hundred weight a piece; we have got two pieces here, we marked it so as to know it again; on one piece we put the broad R, with a knife.

Prisoner Young. Before they took this load from us, they had got another skiff load of wood which they took from two men. - We had not, we had nothing but my blunderbuss and cutlas; our business is to go up and down the river to keep peace and quietness.

Prisoner Davis. I never attempted to jump over-board. - He did attempt to jump over the boat's head.

WILLIAM MAXWELL sworn.

I was rowing the officer up, as we were rowing up, they were coming down; as soon as they saw our boat coming they shot over towards the other side of the water; both of them pulling toward Wapping; by that I rowed my boat after them; as soon as I got our boat up to them, Young jumped over-board out of the boat; then we came to the boat and this Davis gets up and I catched hold of him by the back of his breeches, and pulled him back, and the officer said, if you don't sit still, I will blow your brains out; he pointed a pistol; then seeing this young man in the water, I said, let us shove and pick him up, we left Davis sitting in the middle of the boat, in the middle of the river, with only one skull in the boat; and then we went and picked up this Young; he refused to be picked up by us; at last I stepped after him with my boat and took him up, and Davis attempted to get the boat to some stairs; I cried out, stop thief; he got it under a wharf that he could not get out the boat. There was about thirteen or fourteen pieces of log-wood in the boat, which were put up in a warehouse by the justice's order; there is one piece which I scratched with a knife which I can swear to.

Prisoner Young. When they took me and the boat away they said, we have took a boat not half an hour ago, loaded with this kind of wood. - There was none at all in our boat.

Prisoner Davis. I never got up to escape. - He did, I took hold of his breeches and called him by his name; I knew him very well.

Q. I had no breeches on. - I don't know whether it was breeches or trowsers; I took hold of him.

- sworn.

I am Clerk to Mr. Springle, he lives near East-lane, Rotherhithe , he lives where the yard is; on Saturday the 2d of December, a neighbour of Mr. Springle's called upon him; and on Monday morning I observed there was a vacancy in the middle of the pile; I observed the surface of the pile was even on Saturday night; I went on Monday to see if I could hear any thing of it; I could hear nothing of it; on Tuesday a person called on me and said it was somewhere at Shadwell; I went on the second hearing to Shadwell, on Thursday following after the 2d of December, and I saw the property in the warehouse, it was shown me by Peate and Maxwell; I knew it to be Mr. Springle's by the size of it, it has lain seven years in the wharf; there are some

pieces weigh three quarters of an hundred. I verily believe they belong to Mr. Springle.

Q. Who is Mr. Rash? - He is a Dutch Merchant .

Q. Mr. Springle does transactions for him. - He has a commission for the care of these things.

ROBERT SEYMOUR sworn.

I am foreman to the yard where the wood was stole; on Sunday the 2d of December I missed it; I saw it on Saturday evening when I locked the yard up.

Q. Is the wharf open to boats if the tide is up? - There is no fare through in the night; the wharf this time of the year is opened about eight o'clock in the morning and shut again at five in the evening; it is intirely enclosed from the water-side.

Q. Could people easily get at this timber? - They might get over the fence, and then they might easily hand it over.

Q. How many pieces did you miss; - It is impossible for any body to form any idea of the particular quantity of pieces.

Q. Where did you see the log-wood afterwards? - Maxwell and Peate came to me and informed me they had stopped some log-wood, and Maxwell shewed me the log-wood in the warehouse; I knew the log-wood; I can swear to five pieces positively; I was taking them in seven years ago, and I particularly put them by, they are not to be matched in any yard in England, and one was the outside piece of the parcel and was the longest of the five, the other two were rather shorter, and the two following were shorter still.

Q. Why were they kept so long? - By the order of Mr. Springle in case he should want to oblige any merchant abroad; he never sells any in England. (Produces and deposes to the outside pieces.) I dare say I have moved it twenty times; I know the prisoners; I know their parents, and I only want what is honest and just.

Prisoner Young. Last Sunday I awaked and got up, and was going down to Billingsgate to get some fish, going across the water from Pickle-herring-stairs, I saw this boat adrift; I had this young man with me; I says to him, there is a boat adrift; never mind the boat, says he; says I, I don't like the boat to go to pieces; I tied my own boat and was going down to Fountain-stairs; just before I came to Fountain-stairs these men rowed out of the craft, bring too, says he, or I will blow your brains out; he came right in to us; I made over to shore, and they came after me, and told me, if I did not come in they would blow my brains out; then they took Davis at Cherry-garden-stairs. I have been at sea seven years, and then I came home and bound myself apprentice to a waterman, but I did not serve long, but was going to sea again; I have got a ship now.

Prisoner Davis. This here man Young, called me up about five o'clock in the morning to go to Billingsgate and get some fish; he sees this boat adrift, accordingly we rowed towards her, he jumped in and sees the man's name on the boat, and accordingly says, I know partly the man and where his stairs are, accordingly he towed his own boat ashore and made her fast, and was going down towards Fountain-stairs with the boat, but this man attacked us and fixed a blunderbuss, he jumped over-board and took one of the skulls; I was drove athwart the ships, and to save the boat from being sunk, I pulled in towards Cherry-garden stairs, and then I set myself down to wait till they came to me, when they told me to come into their boat which I did.

The prisoners each called one witness to their characters.

Both GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before. Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-59

58. EDWARD HATRED and HENRY JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , one bushel of coals, value 1 s. the goods of William Stone and Thomas Lawrence .

THOMAS LAWRENCE sworn.

I have a partner, William Stone , we are coal merchants ; we lost some coals on Tuesday the 6th of November, they were taken out of a barge.

THOMAS RODBARD sworn.

On the 6th of November, my lad came to me and said, that some men were stealing some coals; I went out and saw the two prisoners with each of them a coal sack on their back; I took them from them, from little Trigg stairs, upper Thames-street; they were coming up, I stopped them; I asked them where they got the coals, they said they were sweepings; I examined one bag, and they were round coals and not sweepings; that was Hatred's; I gave charge of them to the constable, Joseph Tucker .

Prisoner Jones. I wish to know whether Mr. Rodbard asked me whether they were sweepings? - No, I did not ask you.

- MARSHALL sworn.

I live along with my mother, she keeps a chandler's shop; I went down to Mr. Rodbard's necessary, and I saw too men come down, and they went on the top of the craft; and the big one began, and pulled a sack from underneath his waistcoat, and the little one afterwards, and began to take the round coals, and fill them; I saw them, I went up stairs and called Mr. Rodbard.

Q. Did you see them come away with the coals? - I did.

Q. Did they seem to have any thing in their sacks? - They had.

Prisoner Jones. I was on the craft, and he was on the shore; I ask him if he saw any coals filled in my bag? - I did see him, he began first.

JOSEPH TUCKER sworn.

I am an officer, Mr. Rodbard gave me charge of them as I was coming along, they had two bags of coals; I am sure they had each coals; they were no sweepings at all.

Court to Marshall. Do you know whose craft it was? - It was Mr. Stone's craft, there were many craft lying together; some were Mr. Rodbard's, and some were Mr. Stone's. (The coals shewn to the jury.)

Jury. How do you know my man that these were Mr. Stone's? - I know the barges, and I shewed Mr. Stone the barge from whence it was taken, and he said it was his; and I knew it was Mr. Stone's by the number.

Mr. Lawrence. We sent a barge with coals to Trigg-stairs, and that barge and coals was our property. I was not on the stairs at the time; I saw them the next morning after they were taken.

Q. Did Marshall ever point out to you the barge, from whence they were taken? - He did, and that was our barge.

Prisoner Hatred. I heaved out the coals, from a West-country-barge; and they gave me 1 s. and the sweepings out; I don't rightly know whose barge it was; I heaved five chaldrons out, Jones was heaving the head room out, and I was heaving at the stern room; accordingly I came ashore with my coals; and Mr. Rodbard stopped me, and I was taken before

the Alderman; I told them that they were sweepings; when I got up I lifted them on the full piles, and then I suppose the boy saw me take them down: I begged very hard of Mr. Rodbard, that he would not send me to the Compter; I never was in the Compter before, nor in any place of confinement; it was a strange place to me, and I was afraid of going to such a place; I have got a poor old mother at home, who entirely depends on my maintaining her. Mr. Tucker came to me and said, this boy was to have 10 l. from the Coal exchange.

Tucker. There is not a word of that true.

Prisoner Jones. The constable came up to the Compter, and said, that he dare say I should be transported; for the boy would have 10 l. and he dare say the boy would say any thing.

Court to Tucker. Do you know there is any reward in this case? - Yes, I knew nothing about it, till three days afterwards, I heard that there was a reward of 5 l. from the Coal-exchange.

Edward Hatred GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Henry Jones GUILTY. (Aged 25.)

Six months imprisonment ,

And publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-60

59. ELIZABETH RIMES was indicted for feloniously selling eleven pieces of counterfeit monies, made to the likeness of a good shilling; the same being uncut; to James Worsdale , for 5 s. of good-monies .

JOHN STIRLING was indicted for counselling, aiding, abetting, and procuring the said Elizabeth Rimes, to commit the said felony .

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-61

60. JOHN COUSINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , sixteen earthen ware dishes, value 20 s. The goods of William Davis .

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn.

I keep an earthen ware warehouse , and likewise a stand in Fleet-market ; on the 6th of December, between the hours of five and six, I heard my man call out to me very loud; and I went to his assistance, and he had got the prisoner, with the sixteen dishes, and had secured him; I missed them immediately as I went out, off the board.

Prisoner. He is swearing false against me, as God is true; at Guildhall he swore that he took me with the dishes. - I did not.

Q. Did not you say you would hang me, or transport me? - No, I mentioned no such word.

JOSEPH CARDOZZI sworn.

I am a servant to this gentleman, Mr. Davis; that young man had been watching me half an hour about the stall. I am of Italy, he watched me, I was in the stall; I thought in my head that Gentleman wants to steal something; afterwards I see him take sixteen dishes, and away he went: they were standing on the board, he took them off the board, and then ran away, and I followed, just where you cross the market to the bridge, I followed, but did not lose

sight of him; he put down the dishes in the open bridge, on the corner of the market; the Gentleman crossed the road, and I collared him, I took the dishes myself, and carried them back to the shop; and master did hold the man the mean time; there are the same dishes, they are my master's property.

Jury. How far from your stall did he put down the dishes? - About six or seven yards, more or less, I did not measure it at all

Prisoner. When he took hold of me at first, I had no more than I have at present in my hands, he came behind me and said I was a thief; there might be a dozen people about me. (The dishes deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was going down the market to get a basket to go to Billingsgate, to earn a shilling please God; going down, and by the side of the market, he rushed from the middle of the market by Mr. Davis's stall, he seized hold of me, and tore my coat; he said I was a thief; and called master, master; and he dragged me the same as I am now; Mr. Davis says ay you are an old porter, ay you villain; I will make an example of you, if it lays in my power; I will either hang you or transport you.

GUILTY . (Aged 42.)

Six months imprisonment and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-62

61. THOMAS LUMLEY was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Withers , about the hour of five in the night; of the 26th of November , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, thirty-three yards of linen cloth, called Hessian, value 1 l. the goods of the said William Withers .

WILLIAM WITHERS sworn.

I live in Cannon-street , all I know of this affair is, that it is my property.

WILLIAM JONES sworn.

On Friday night the 23d we lost a piece of cotton out of the shop, on Monday night we waited about some time to see if any body would come into the shop as usual, and this same Thomas Lumley came in, went back, and in a very short time he came back again, and comes on the threshold of the door; this was between five and six o'clock, in Mr. Wither's shop; with that he returned short again; and in a very short space of time he came back again; and he comes boldly in again, and went to the far end of the shop, and took this Hessian, in the view of the prentice and me; when he got nearly off the threshold of the door; I jumped up and collared him, and secured him, and sent for a constable; he dropped the cloth when I took hold of him, in the shop.

ROBERT CULVERWELL sworn.

On Monday the 26th of November, the prisoner came in twice, and went out again, and the third time he came in again, and took the piece of Hessian out of the shop, he was going out at the door when the porter took him; he was concealed for that purpose; I saw him take it off from the board.

Prisoner. I had been to St. Paul's-church yard to see a Captain belonging to an East-Indiaman, and I wanted to

ask my way to London-bridge, I went into this shop, and the man jumped up and said, I was the man that robbed his master two or three nights before; I was taken up; the next day I was committed; the prosecutor came and said if I would give him intelligence of the property he had lost before, he would give me a note of hand, not to prosecute me for this fact, if I did not he said he would indict me capitally. I have been all my life in the Merchants service, and his Majesty's; and I hope your lordship, and gentlemen of the jury will shew me some small mercy.

GUILTY of stealing, but not of the burglary . (Aged 23.)

Six months imprisonment and publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-63

62. GEORGE DAWSON was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Lewis Le Conte , about the hour of five in the night, on the 9th of December , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein a mahogany knife case, value 14 s. twelve silver handle knives, value 10 s. twelve silver handle forks, value 10 s. twelve silver handle desert knives, value 6 s. the goods of the said George Lewis Conte .

LEWIS CONTE sworn.

I live in London-street, Fenchurch-street ; on the 9th of this month, I set a watch in consequence of losing things before: about two minutes after five I heard the window thrown up, and I heard a bustle, when I came in, the man had got my servant on the ground; I had the watch in a corner of the room, with the screen before him, so that he could not see him in the corner of the parlour, the window was left down but not fastened; I was outside the door, and I waited till I heard a bustle, about four or five minutes from the time I heard the window thrown open, he jumped over the iron rails three or four times, and in five minutes he was apprehended, before he could carry off any thing; he came into the window, and went across the room to the side board; and my servant went behind him and tucked up his heels; and when I went in, he was struggling with my servant; I went in, and I got somebody to stay with my servant, and I went for the constable, he came and he was apprehended; the side board was in the parlour of which he threw up the window. This was property attempted to be stole, but he was prevented from carrying them off; there was in the knife case the several knives and forks in the indictment; they were still on the side board; any person might have easy access to the room by throwing up the window, the window was open when I came in.

BARTHOLEMEW BATEMAN sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Conte, I was set to watch, I was behind the screen, my master was in the passage on the other door; and the prisoner came and throwed up the sash, then he got over the rails again and went away; and then he came again, and opened the blinds and in about a minute and a half or two minutes, he came into the room, I am sure it was the prisoner and he went strait across the

room and had got the knife box in his hand, I took him before he lift it high enough to turn round about over the glasses, I seized him instantly, he had it not high enough to get it over the glasses that stood before it, when I seized him that fell down, there was a scuffle and my master came in, and he was apprehended.

THOMAS SPILLER sworn.

Mr. Conte came to my house last Sunday evening between five and six o'clock, and when I came there, I found the prisoner on his back in the parlour; I searched him, and found in his pocket an old knife and 2 s. I took him to the Compter.

Prisoner. On Sunday morning about eight o'clock, there was two men that belonged to the East India Company's ship Brunswick, came to my house and called me out to take a walk with them; we went to Clerkenwell; coming through London-street, this window was up, they threw my hat in and I went to get my hat, and they came and laid hold of me.

Court to Bateman I think you say, that the prisoner threw open the window and looked into the room once or twice, before he came into the room. - He came back first and throwed up the sash, and went away, then he came back a second time and opened the blinds, and then he went again.

Q Was it possible for you to distinguish the features of a man, to know he was the same man? - I could, he jumped over, and there was two outside to help him.

Q. Was there any hat thrown in? - There was no hat but what was on his head.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-64

63. HENRY HYAMS , EDWARD ROBERTS and MOSES ABRAHAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of October 364 pound weight of sugar, value 9 l. the goods of Gearod Wilkins , and

JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously receiving the same knowing it to be stolen .

(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-65

64. THOMAS BRADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of November , a tenant saw, value 6 s. the goods of Thomas Johnson ; and one tenant saw, value 6 s. the goods of John Laird .

THOMAS JOHNSON sworn.

I was at work for my master on two of the new buildings in Portland-road , the 3d of November last, along with the other three of my master's men, carpenter s of the same line of business with myself, we left the building to go to dinner, and returned at one; I went up into the garret where I was at work before, and there I missed my jack, I immediately made a search, and I found my tenant saw was gone likewise, in a few minutes after John Lane told me, each of them had lost one of their saws at the same time, he ordered us to go and make search at the pawnbroker's, as fast as we could; John Lane and John Claxton found them at a pawnbroker's shop; the prisoner was carried before a justice in Malborough-street, where my tenant saw was produced and I swore to it. Matthew Swift the constable has kept it ever since.

MATTHEW SWIFT sworn.

I produce a saw, I received it of David Lloyd , it has been in custody ever since.

DAVID LLOYD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. This saw now produced, the prisoner at the bar offered me for 3 s. I offered 2 s. 6 l. Claxton came in immediately, and asked me if I had taken in any saw; I told him no, but said here are two saws, Claxton owned one, I asked the prisoner if they were his own, he said they were and he was a carpenter; I am sure it was the prisoner; the saws have not been in my possession since.

JOHN CLAXTON sworn.

Where those the saws you saw at the pawnbroker's? - They are; I told him they belonged to me and the other man that was with me, John Lane ; I was employed to go in quest of these saws.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar a man that worked in the house with you? - No, I never saw him before.

Prisoner. They could not swear to their saws when they came before the justice; the justice took and wrote each of their names on the saws, then they said they could swear to them when they came before your lordship. - We all swore to our property at Malborough-street office before the justice, we had not the least doubt but they were our saws.

Prisoner. I came out of the country three weeks, a fortnight of the time I worked at Uxbridge for one Mr. Brown; the people at Uxbridge informed me if I came to London I should get better work and wages; accordingly I came to town on Friday, on Saturday I went up and sought after work, I went to Oxford-road and got my dinner; I went to the public house, and sat myself down and called for a pint of porter; there were two well dressed men with two tenant saws on the table, I asked them where I could get a job of work, they asked me if I was a stranger to London, I said I was, they said, I was welcome to go with them, and seek after work if I liked it; accordingly we went down into Holborn, I think they call it so, and we went into a master carpenter's yard, on the right hand side, and asked for work, he said, he did not want any hands at present, we came out, I asked them if they would drink, they thanked me they would, we had two pints of beer, we came out again, and went down several little streets, and they said, young man, as you are so civil to treat us with this beer, they said, if I would pawn these two saws, they would return it, I asked them what pawning was, they told me if I went in, and asked them to lend me 2 s. 6 d. on them saws, they would do it; so I went, and when I was there two gentlemen came in and stopped me, the men said at first, that they would stop till I had pawned the tools at the corner of the street, whilst I was in the pawnbroker's shop, these men came in and stopped me, there was a great number of people about the door; when I came to the justices, they said, they could not positively swear, and then they got the constable to mark them.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Imprisoned six months , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-66

65. THOMAS CARVIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of March , a deal box, value 6 d. 5,854 piastres, value 200 l. the goods chattels and monies of John Busher .

(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

JOHN BUSHER sworn.

I am a waterman and lighterman , the prisoner was in my service; I brought the box in question, it was delivered to me at twelve o'clock at noon day, Wednesday

the 28th of March; I received it of captain Richard Wilson with a number of other articles, he delivered it to me at his own lodgings, about two hundred yards from my boat, which was at Wapping-stairs ; I put several things particularly this box in my boat myself; I gave the prisoner a particular charge of the box of money, to carry it on board the Minerva, captain Wilson; he had been on board attending the same ship some weeks carrying stores, the Minerva was at that time bound for Madeira, laying somewhere about the Dog and Duck, nobody was to go but himself; I never saw him till the day after; I heard that the box was not delivered first; sometime in the month of June I was informed by Messrs. Strahan and Co.

Mr. Knowlys. How long had this man lived with you? - About since the month of October, or November, before the March these things were lost.

Q. You had always found him an honest man? - Yes.

Q. Have you a partner in this line of business? - Not in this business.

Q. What part of the business is that? - In the anchor boats.

Q. This man works with you occasionally? - He has been constant since the latter end of June, but before that he has not been above sometimes two days a week or three days or so; but when he was out of my employ it was his own fault. I paid him 3 s. a day as long as he worked.

Q. How long was it before the Minerva sailed after the 28th of March? - She proceeded immediately, she left the river about the 29th or 30th.

Q. You heard nothing of the loss of this till June, and then I believe you took a search warrant to search the prisoner's lodging? - I did.

Q. You found nothing there? - I did not; I took him before Justice Staples, where he was discharged.

Q. I believe that from June to a very little time ago he continued in your service? - He did.

Q. I believe you told him that you had heard something more about this box, and you expected he would attend before Justice Staples again? - No, he was taken before Mr. Staples; I had no suspicion till he came before an attorney, and I found that he could not clear up his point.

Q. Have you ever said, that you thought the prisoner was innocent? - No.

Q. It is customary for you to have receipts? - No, it is not.

Captain RICHARD WILSON sworn.

I was the captain of the Minerva; I delivered on the 28th of March, the box in question to Busher, I have known him four or five years; I did not discover the box was not on board till I was half way on my passage to Madeira, about three weeks after I left the river, it contained 5,854 piastres and a broken one; they were in a wooden box.

Mr. Knowlys. Where did you come on board? - At Gravesend.

Q. You had not been told that there was a box brought under the stern at Gravesend, which he said wanted some repairs, and then took it back? - I never received it at Gravesend; I did not ask for it there.

Mr. Garrow. When you did ask, was you so told? - I was.

Mr. Knowlys. You never heard any thing of that sort while you was in the river? - Never.

Q. This I take it was one of the most valuable part of your cargo? - It was.

Q. Did the rest of the boxes contain money? - No, it was the valuablest one and smallest one of the cargo.

Q. The cargo was known to them on board? - It was certainly.

Q. That box was not unknown to the people? - The people did not know any such a thing was coming on board the vessel.

Q. If it had got on board it would have been known from the weight, to have contained money? - Most certainly it would.

Q. I take it you was a good deal surprised that you had not been told of that before; you was a good deal surprised that your crew had been so negligent? - They did not know the box was to go on board the ship; they told me a box was along side; I asked myself about it.

Q. You thought it strange they did not tell you of this before? - No, I did not think it was strange, because they did not know it was coming on board, they had seen a small box, but when they were told it was to go back for alterations, I did not think any thing of them about the box.

Q. Was Galloway your mate? - He is, he has been with me five years.

Q. Is he a man of good character? - He is.

- So is this man.

WILLIAM GALLOWAY sworn.

I have been mate of the ship ever since she was built; I was on board her to take in her stores, on the 28th of March, on her last outward bound voyage. The prisoner came under the stern, about twelve o'clock at mid-day; the tide had raised the ship fifty or sixty feet, and he hailed and told us he had something for us, but he was going down the river further and he would call when the tide served to come nearer the vessel; he went away at that time down the river, and he came when the water was lower, along side, about three in the afternoon; on his coming along I asked him if he had any thing heavy in his boat; he said, there was nothing heavy in the boat, but one box which was going back, (pointing at it,) and there was some alterations he believed to be made in it, and he believed he was coming down with it in the afternoon; immediately I ordered William Goodall an apprentice of the vessel, to haul up the other things; the prisoner rowed away with one box in the boat; before we arrived at Madeira the captain made enquiry about the box, and I told him what had passed; I can swear the prisoner did not put on board that day any heavy box.

Court. When did the captain enquire? - Sometime before he got to Madeira.

Mr. Knowlys. How many things did he bring in this boat? - I cannot tell the number of things, there were several things for the ship, that this man brought.

Q. How many boxes? - Only one, the letter box.

Q. And he pointed particularly to another box? - He did.

Q. He told you that that wanted some repairs and alterations and he believed he should be down in the afternoon, signifying there were more things coming down for your ship? - So I understood him.

Q. That you are quite sure of? - So I thought.

Q. How long after this was it the captain came on board? - He came on board at Gravesend.

Q. You told him you expected some more things would have come on board, but they went back for alterations? - No, I did not.

Q. Why you was a good deal disappointed, was not you? - No, being so full of business we did not think about it.

Q. Was this the last package? - It was that came in a wherry; there was another man came down, but with no packages.

Q. You was a good deal surprised he did not keep his word? - I was so.

Q. And yet you did not tell the captain? - I did not.

Q. Was you ever on shore after? - Never.

Mr. Garrow. So that if you had stole the piastres yourself you must have eat them.

WILLIAM GOODALL sworn.

I am 'prentice on board the Minerva, when she went her last outward bound voyage; I know the prisoner Thomas Carvin ; he came to the side of the vessel while she lay on the ground at limehouse-reach; I hauled up some goods and there was one box left in the boat, after he had hauled up every thing except this box, I threw down the rope again for this box, he told me it was not coming up, he was to take it back to have some alterations to it, and he went away from the ship up Limehouse-reach again; I am positively certain that the box was not put on board; the captain made an enquiry before he got to Madeira; I told him what passed.

Q. Was you ever on board again before the ship sailed? - I have been in her two years and seven months.

Mr. Knowlys. You expected the prisoner to return according to what he said? - I did not hear him say that.

Q. All the hands were on deck? - There was none but me and the mate.

Q. They were within sight of the boat, if they had directed their sight that way? - They might if they looked over the side.

Q. He said this box was to have alterations made in it? - He said nothing to me about that.

Q. As the box was to have alterations in it you expected him to return? - I never thought any thing about it.

Q. Did you think it was to return or not? - I never thought any thing about it, I was about other work.

Q Was you on shore afterwards? - No.

Q. My friend I ask you whether if you had not been on shore yourself, you might not easily have had any thing conveyed on shore by other people?

Mr. Garrow. Did you in point of fact steal it and give it away?

Mr. Knowlys. What time was this that this man came to the ship in the boat? - As nigh as I can recollect, between two and three in the afternoon.

HUGH HOUGHTON sworn.

I am Clerk to Messrs. Cheap and Luffman, who were the merchants who sent the piastres; I nailed the box and sealed it, and delivered it to a porter.

RICHARD ROGERS sworn.

I am a waterman; I know the prisoner at the bar; I saw him in the river, in the month of March; I went down to Deptford with a fare, rowing up again I met Carvin in Limehouse-reach; I asked him where he was going; he said, he was going on board the Euretta, and mentioned something about a box of cash.

AARON SWAIN sworn.

I am partner to the prosecutor in the anchor boat business; I have known the prisoner ever since he was a fellow 'prentice, he has worked for me ever since June constant; he always bore the character of an honest man.

The prisoner also called seven other witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-67

70. JEREMIAH CLARKE was indicted for making an assault on the King's highway, on Elizabeth, the wife of James Fentum , on the 14th of December, puting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, a silk counterpane, value 3 l. and a linen handkerchief, value 12 d. the goods of Samuel Warner .

(The Case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

ELIZABETH FENTUM sworn.

My husband's name is James Fentum ; he is a clock-maker. Catharine Warner is my sister. - She married my own brother.

On Friday the 14th of December, about half after seven, as near as I can recollect, we had been to Warner-street, to which place my sister had been to dispose of the counterpane. Warner-street is somewhere on Clerkenwell-green. We were returning from Warner-street to my house, Brackley-street, Golden-lane. - The first thing was, that my sister stopped to tie up her garter. - On which there were two bad women and a young man with them passed, that made a very bad expression. - I did not notice them, any otherwise than that, I observed a man with them. I came to the corner of Sutton-street, which turns about the post. I perceived the young fellow to pass me very swiftly by, going in the same direction with me, I noticed him to have a blue jacket and a round-hat. - Then I was saying to my sister, that I knew Mr. Cannon, that kept the Bunch of Grapes; and while I was speaking to my sister, he passed quickly between me and the window, and looked in my face. I believe it is the same man that passed me twice before.

Q. Then he must have turned? - I did not observe that, but I observed that he was the same person, as I believe, but I am not certain it is the prisoner who passed me. There was a person passing while my sister was tying up her garters; and another while I was speaking to my sister at the Bunch of Grapes window, that person, I believe to have been the prisoner; but the person that passed me afterwards I am sure was the prisoner. He was dressed in a blue jacket, round hat, and a striped waistcoat. After he had passed me, he struck cross-wise, and came and catched hold of my bundle. I had just got across to the Charter-house-wall then. I did not observe him at me, till he seized my bundle. I was following my sister. I had crost, going to the place where I lodged. This was at the corner of Wilderness-row .

Jury. Which end of Wilderness-row? - In Goswell-street. - There was nothing passed; but he gave me a sudden twitch: and there came behind a lad of fourteen or fifteen years of age, and he also catched hold of my bundle. - Then the prisoner aimed to hit me, and he missed my head and hit my shoulder with a stick. - From that he raised his hand again; and I looked at him, and said, will you strike me, you villain? At which the blow hit me on the bonnet, just over my eye, and knocked me to the ground. It was a violent blow - it stunned me. I was certain it was the prisoner as soon as I saw him. The first thing that I observed, after I was sensible, was that I was dragged along by this person and another, on the ground, by my bundle. - I was dragged very near from the corner of Wilderness-row, to the Bar at the end of Wilderness-row. I called out, by name, Mr. Cannon, for God's sake, come out; I am murdered! When I called out, the prisoner ran away, and took the bundle with him, and tore sadly the inside of my hands. On my calling for assistance, they were pursued. I saw him again in the course of the evening. - As soon as I did, I jumped up, (though hardly recovered) and was going to seize him as the person. I was taken into Mr. Cannon's, and they brought him into Mr. Cannon's to me. He was in the room when I came to myself. I jumped up, and said, that was the villain that robbed me and used me so. I had not been informed that any body was taken at all. - I was hardly sensible. - There was a number of strangers in the room. I have no doubt about him at all. As he held up his arm to strike me, I noticed him; and his dress was the same; but not the dress he has on now. - He had a

blue jacket, a round hat, and a striped waistcoat, cross-wise. I could not see the colour of the stripes by the lamplight.

Court. You describe, three different times, persons passed you; and the prisoner was the person that passed you the last time. - He was, and directly as he had passed, he came and snatched at my bundle.

CATHARINE WARNER sworn.

I am sister-in-law to Mrs. Fentum. - I made no observations before my sister was knocked down. There were two women and one man passed us, but I did not know what they said. I walked before my sister, first, to get home, because of my child. I had my child with me, (it being late) and then I was three or four yards before her; and I heard her scream out and I turned my head, and saw she was laid in some mud, a good way from me. It was by a wall. - I saw a man run with the bundle, and I thought it was mine; and I ran after him, and cried, stop thief! I followed him a great way, but I could not follow all the way, I was so tired with running. I lost sight of him. I am wife of Samuel Warner . I live in Red-lion-street, No. 22. He is a Cabinet-maker.

GEORGE THORPE sworn.

Between the hours of seven and eight, I was going up Wilderness row, and I heard a cry of murder! and stop thief! I was got about three parts down; and I saw the prisoner ren by me, with a bundle. - And on account of the alarm, I took him just at the bottom. I never quitted sight of him, after he ran by me, till I got him; but he dropped the bundle before I took him: but when he ran by, I saw him have the bundle under his arm. I know it is the man, for he never was out of my sight after I had seen him with the bundle under his arm. The patrole came up, and took him while he was in my custody. I saw the bundle again directly, as soon as possible, the man that picked it up could come up. - Williams brought up the bundle.

JOHN WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a stable-keeper, in Old-street. - I was passing down Wilderness-row, from Goswell-street into St. John's-street, and I heard the cry of murder! and stop thief! On this cry I returned, running pretty swiftly. Just as I got to the pavement, I met a man, full-plump. Directly he saw me, he threw from him a bundle, which he had in his hand, down into Cross street. Mr. Thorpe had passed me about a yard, and got up to him, and struck him on the neck, against the iron rails. I took the bundle up, and brought it to him. After we had secured him, we took him to the public house to the prosecutrix; and directly she saw him, she was just recovered from a fainting-fit; she said, that is the villain that robbed me. Then Mr. Thorpe and I followed him to the watch-house. We went down Wilderness-row; and I wanted to see whether there was any bludgeon, or any thing else. - He had taken nothing else of her. While we were going to the watch-house, and looking about, the prisoner said he had taken nothing else. I suppose it was what he spoke accidentally. I told the patrole what I was looking for; and he knew I was looking for the bludgeon.

WILLIAM STEADMAN sworn.

I am a patrole of St. John's parish. I and another was in Pardon passage at this time. - We had got almost out of it; and we heard the screaming of a woman, crying, Stop Thief! I said to my partner, there is some Row! - Stop, a-bit! We directly turned back again, and met the prisoner at the bottom of Wilderness-row - we were both together. My partner laid hold of him. I happened to run

against a post, and he slipt through between the post and the palisades, Mr. Thorpe had struck him, I believe, - he said he was running after a thief. I said, there was no thief came that way, because there was no person passed that way. He said, the thief went down Cross-street. I said, then you have certainly over-run your mark. Says he, I could not stop myself (I produce the property which I received from Mr. Williams. I have kept it ever since.)

Prisoner. Where did you stop me? - At the end of Wilderness-row; against the palisades, by the posts.

Prisoner. The lady said, I dragged her as far as the posts. - The posts I met you at, are near St. John's-street. There are posts near at both ends of the row.

Court When you took the prisoner to the woman, at the public-house, were there many people in the room? - There might be three or four more.

RICHARD SHEPHERD sworn.

I was one of the patroles. - I was with Steadman at this time - We were almost to St. John's-street. We heard a great cry - We turned back both together. Just against the end of Wilderness-row, Mr. Thorpe struck the prisoner, and I caught hold of him directly: and we took him up; and the gentlewoman was crying and screaming that had the child. Mrs. Warner, she said, her sister was up at the Wine vaults, Mr. Cannon's; and we carried the prisoner there; and as soon as the woman saw him, she flies up, and said, you are the thief that knocked me down. The bundle was delivered to Steadman by Williams.

RICHARD CANNON sworn.

I keep the Bunch of Grapes. This night I was standing by the fire; and I heard somebody cry murder! I directly took the candle, and went to her. - She said, Mr. Cannon, Mr. Cannon, I am murdered! and robbed of goods to the value of 5 l. She was about eight or nine yards from my shop door. She was down on one hand. I took her into my house. The blood was very much running over her eye. I took hold of her arm, and I bore her weight into my house. I was present when the prisoner was brought in. She had fainted away, and was sat down in a chair: and she immediately rose up, and said, that is the villain that struck me, and robbed me.

BENJAMIN FIDLER sworn.

I was constable of the night. I took charge of the prisoner, and took him to New Prison: and then I went to look for the woman to get her address; and she was very nigh an hour before she came to herself, to speak. (The counterpane and handkerchief deposed to.)

Court to Prosecutrix. When Mr Cannon came out, was you sensible he came to you? - I was sensible he took me up.

Prisoner. I know nothing at all of it.

Court to Steadman. Did you observe what sort of a waistcoat he had on? - It was a waistcoat, striped a-cross; and a blue jacket. (This was also corroborated by Thorpe and Fidler.)

The prisoner called six Witnesses to his character.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 17.)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-68

71. L U IA GAMMON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of October , a cotton counterpane, value 16 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 5 s. two linen pillow cases, value 1 s. two silver tea spoons, value 6 s. one iron key, value 2 s. the goods of John Slater , in a lodging-room .

JOHN SLATER sworn.

I am an house carpenter , my wife let a lodging to the prisoner on the 18th of October last; on Thursday she was to pay a guinea a week for it, she paid for the first week; I missed the things on the 31st of October, the day before her fortnight was up, a waiter came from one of the houses of Covent-garden, and the prisoner at the bar went out and left the door open, this was Wednesday evening; seeing the parlour door open, my wife and I went in, and found the articles mentioned in the indictment gone, I immediately went down to Thompson's, the pawnbroker's, and got the things, all but the key; I took her up in the course of four or five days; we found her at Haddock's, in Covent garden; nothing was found on her at all.

Prisoner. I went down into the kitchen, and told Mrs. Slater, that my servant had robbed me, it was not the day I was sent for out: I believe, she said, that her maid had gone away and robbed her; it appears to me that these things were pledged the 25th of October, I have got the duplicates by me, she must certainly have been privy to it, because she acknowledged it, when she was apprehended, I told her she would come best off to tell the truth.

ELIZABETH SLATER sworn.

The prisoner lodged at my house in the month of October, a fortnight but one night, she went out, and I found some duplicates on the mantle piece in the room the prisoner lived in, I am sure I took them from the mantle piece; she was to pay a guinea a week; the pawnbroker has got the counterpane, and the other articles here. I found them gone after she left the lodgings, she pretended that her own maid had robbed her of her own clothes, before I charged her with any of these things; she had two servants while she lived with me, both together, a considerable time.

THOMAS JONES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker's servant to Mr. Thomas, in Marybone, I don't know any thing of the prisoner, I don't know that ever I saw her before, till I saw her at the magistrates; I produce a counterpane, two sheets, and two pillow cases; I received them of a person of the name of Elizabeth Stevens , on the 25th of October; she has not been taken up at all.

WILLIAM RUMBLE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Thomas, pawnbroker, Newnan-street, Marybone, I produced two silver teaspoons, they were not pawned by the prisoner at the bar, but by a short person, not in the name of Stevens; my duplicate is in the name of Gammon; Stevens frequents the house; they were pawned on the 29th of October. (The articles produced and deposed to.)

Court to Slater. What was the name of her servant? - I don't know the one, the other was Stevens, the little one.

Prisoner. My servant robbed me and sent me the duplicates, and said, that I had got a young woman in my house whom she supposed I was going to keep, and discharge her, or else she would not have served me so, and it was not in my power to redeem the things, or else I would not have left the lodgings, I have a witness that they offered to take four guineas not to appear against me.

Court to Mrs. Slater. Did this woman pay you when she left your lodgings? - No, I never see her.

ROBERT PACKER sworn.

I am a waiter to Mr. Spencer, Garrick's head, in Bow-street; I know Mr. Gammon the prisoner's father, he sent me to Mr. Slater's, and told me if I would pay four guineas they would make it up; I went to Mr. Slater's and they made the bill out 4 l. 4 s. 4 d. and I told Mr. Gammon of it, and he said it was an imposition.

Q. If you had paid 4 l. 4 s. 4 d. what was to be done with the things? - Mr. Gammon did not think they would have made a charge above 3 l. which if I would have paid he would have paid me again.

Q. Was this sum of money offered for the things that were pawned? - They were to take them out of pawn with the money; I was to pay them the money and he was to throw the bill out of court.

Q. If Mr. Gammon paid this money, and you paid 3 l. who was to have the things? - I understood that they were to have the things; they were to have the money to get the things out of pawn.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-69

72. JAMES HITCHCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , 11 yards of carpeting, value 30 s. one carpet-strainer, value 6 d. the goods of Thomas Moore Fosket , and William Fosket .

- BROWN sworn.

I am fore-man to Thomas Moore Fosket and William Fosket , Carpet-manufacturer s, Moor place, Finsbury-square . The prisoner was a weekly-servant, employed in the house, but did not board, as a fastener-down of carpets and measurer of rooms , and such kind of things.

On the 2d of November, between eight and nine at night - I think it was Tuesday - two men called on me to know if I had sent a person out with any property; or whether any person in the house had. They told me, to be certain. They requested me to go and see the man going along Chiswell-street. I saw James Hitchcock , in custody of some officers, who had the roll of carpeting in his hand, not above two hundred yards from our house. - They had taken him from some greater distance. I immediately said, when I saw the roll of carpeting, you have taken this from the top-hole, in the upper-part of the warehouse. He did not deny that; but said, he believed the devil was in him. I mentioned to the officers, the next morning, how many yards there was in it; and when it was measured at the mansion-house, it proved to be that quantity. I have no doubt about it being my master's property; we had the same in our shop; we know it by the name of the pattern.

JOSEPH GREEN sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the city; I and three more stopped the prisoner on the 20th of last month, Tuesday night, about half after eight, going out of Little Moorfields,

about a quarter of a mile from the house, nobody was with him; we hallooed out to him; he had not the carpet; it was laying on the ground just before him; he was up in the position as though he was up in the corner easing himself, or making water, or something of the sort. I asked him, where he was going with it; he said to Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell; I told him it was not his way from where he brought it; I stopped him, and then sent two of the officers to enquire of his master; four of us were together.

JAMES HALL sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the city; this man was stopped in the way described by Green; we offered to go with him to the master; he seemed reluctant, and I took the roll from under his arm; as we suffered him to take it, John Green stopped him while the other two went to his master, and Mr. Brown came; there were some duplicates found on him, and among the rest, a duplicate of a carpet strainer.

JAMES DEAN sworn.

When we took him to the compter, I searched his breeches pocket, and found a number of duplicates there, one that led to this carpet strainer. I got it from Mr. Page's, the pawnbroker, in Chiswell-street; it was pledged for 6 d. (The carpet and carpet strainer produced and deposed to)

Prisoner. Please your honour, my lord, I was going through Little Moorfields; I stopped to evacuate, the patrole came to me and asked me what that was by my side on the ground; it being very dark I had not noticed that any thing was by me on the ground, until the patrole mentioned it, and asked what was there; then I foolishly said, it was mine, as I did not know whose it was, or how it came there, it was laying on the ground before I stopped.

GUILTY . (Aged 47.)

Imprisoned twelve months and publicly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-70

73. SOLOMON READING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , sixty pounds weight of iron, value 10 s. the goods of John Milner and Mary Clarke , Widow .

JOHN MILNER sworn.

What is the name of the form of your house? - John Milner and Mary Clarke , and John Milner the younger.

Court. Then there is an end of this indictment.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-71

74. FRANCIS POPE and JOHN CROFT were indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ann Connolly , about the hour of one in the morning, of the 23d of November , and feloniously and burglariously stealing therein, four silver cruet tops, value 3 s. five cotton window curtains, value 10 s. a linen table cloth, value 10 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 168 halfpence and two shillings in monies numbered, the the goods, chattels and monies of the said Ann Connolly ; a tea caddy, value 1 s. two check linen aprons, value 2 s. the goods of Elizabeth Connolly .

ANN CONNOLLY sworn.

I am a widow ; I keep the Bedford-head, a public house in Bedford-street,

Tottenham-court-road . On the 24th of last month we were alarmed; the house was broke open on Friday night, and we were alarmed on Saturday morning; I was the last up; I went to the door the last; I went to bed about half past eleven; I examined, I went round the house and the house was all fastened the usual way; the young man, John Langley , went with me round to the door again; I was alarmed about a quarter after six by the watchman, and my daughter ran down stairs first, before I did; it was getting light, but not light enough to see without a candle.

Q. If any person had been in the street, was it light enough to have seen them? - If there had been any person we might have seen them. When I came down I found my house all in confusion; the bar with the liquors all broke open, and from the outer door in Tottenham-court-road; the lock was entirely forced off.

Q. Was that door at the front of your house or at the back? - It is called the front I believe; there are two doors; it is a corner house; the inside of the door was wrenched open, and the window of the bar, that throws up to undo the bolt was broke, the till was taken away, it was locked the night before; the lock of the street door had been wrenched, but not to hurt the lock; the drawers and the things were all pulled out, they were all in confusion; I missed the curtains of the bar; I lost a silver tea spoon, and a check apron, four silver cruet tops, five cotton window curtains, a linen table cloth, two linen handkerchiefs, 168 halfpence, and two shillings in silver; they were all in the bar; I have seen part of them since.

ELIZABETH CONNOLLY sworn.

I am the daughter; I was alarmed about a quarter past six or rather more; I had a light in my room; I came down stairs and went to the street door, and found the street door broke open, and the box which holds the lock taken off; it was there when I went to bed, but my mother went to bed after me; I went to bed about ten o'clock; the door was open when I went down; I went and looked at the bar and the door was broke open, and the till was gone, and all the other articles mentioned in the indictment and more.

JOHN LANGLEY sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Ann Connolly ; I was alarmed by the watchman; I was in bed; I came down and I opened the door in Bedford-street, and went round to the other door, and when I came round the door was open, and the box of the lock was gone, there was our own tap-room poker laid just by the door and a stick; the bar was broke open and the things in the indictment taken away; when I went round to the corner in Bedford-street I saw the door was not put to by an inch; I put my hand to the door and the door came quite open; then I went to the window under where Mrs. Connolly sleeps and called and Mrs. Connolly's daughter came down.

Q. Was the lock broke? - Yes, I went in when they came down and they found all in the situation before mentioned.

Q How was the light at this time? - It was a quarter after six; it was a dull heavy night, there was not light enough to discern any thing the distance I stand from you.

HENRY CROKER sworn.

I am the conductor of the patrole under the direction of Sir Sampson Wright. On the 24th of November, about half past two in the morning, I was going up Carolina-street, me and three men belonging to me, one end of Carolina-street

goes into Bedford-square the other end into Russel-street, Bloomsbury; it was about three hundred yards from the prosecutrix's house, I had sent two men on one side of the street, and I and one man was on the other; I thought I heard some person patting in Tavistock-street; I saw two men come from Tavistock-street into Carolina-street where I was, Francis Pope one of the prisoners was one; I saw the third man come out and I pursued immediately with Doyle who was with me; the third man was about five yards behind; I believe they were twenty or thirty yards behind me, and I pursued and they separated, one went down the other street and two kept together; I took Pope, me and Doyle laid hold of Pope, and the other man made his escape; and I found in Pope's hand, this iron crow and a dark lanthorn; I observed him stoop; I brought him back from that street into Tavistock-street, and there I got a watchman to lend me a light to search him; he said, I have nothing Mr. Croker; I searched him and found nothing; I left him in the care of the two men and took Lewis with me, and went back to the spot where I stopped him, and just on the spot I found this bundle; I did not see either of them drop it; I have kept the bundle ever since; I am sure I found it on the same spot where the prisoner was.

Prisoner Pope. Did not you search me on the spot when you took me first? - I did, I rubbed him down and found nothing; when he was at the distance from me of about ten yards, I observed him stoop.

Prisoner Pope. If it had been on the same spot he must have seen the bundle.

ROBERT SPENCER sworn.

I am a watchman. On the 24th morning of last month between two and three, I heard some men running down Carolina-street into Russel-street; I immediately made over to them; Mr. Croker was near and had got one of the prisoners; he said, spring your rattle and follow that man; I saw two coming down; I took croft; I ran down Russel-street into Tottenham-court-road; I never lost sight of him; in Tottenham-court-road he tumbled into the dirt, he got up again before I got hold of him, he runs into Oxford-road and there I catched him facing the Boar and Castle, in Oxford-road, and took him to the watch-house of St. Giles's; he was examined and had nothing on him; when I first saw him he was about ten yards before Pope; I am sure it is the same.

Croker. When I opened the dark lanthorn the candle was greasy as if not blown out long.

Prisoner Croft. Whether he can swear I was the person that left Pope? - I can, I am very certain.

JAMES FITZ PATRICK sworn.

I am a watchman belonging to St. Giles's; I saw Croft before he was brought to the watch-house, first in Tottenham-court-road and then I see him fall down at this near end of Tottenham-court-road; I came up at the taking of him; I did not see him in company with Pope, he was with himself when I saw him.

JOHN DOYLE sworn.

I am a patrole under Sir Sampson Wright; I was along with Mr. Croker, on the 24th of November about half after two in the morning; I saw three men running before us coming out of Tavistock street and turning down Carolina-street; I gave no alarm, Croker pursued pretty close and then they began to run; I pusued also and I took Pope along with Mr. Croker, there was a man with him, but I cannot say it was Croft, the man that was with him ran strait into Tottenham court road; Mr. Croker seized hold on his right hand

and there was that iron crow and a dark lanthorn in his left hand coat pocket; I saw him do nothing else; Mr. Croker touched the candle and said, you have done the job for the candle is not cold; I observed him rather stoop to the left when Mr. Croker had hold of him; I was not aware what he did, I took him round from the place to Tavistock-street, and Mr. Croker left him in my custody, and another man and he went and returned in a few minutes and brought a bundle.

(The bundle produced.)

Prisoner Pope. That man was not present. - I was present, I had hold of him as soon as Mr. Croker.

EDWARD LEWIS sworn.

I am a patrole belonging to Sir Sampson Wright. Mr. Croker and I and two more were going up Carolina-street about half past two; I see Pope in custody with Mr. Croker and Doyle; I went with Mr. Croker to the spot where he secured him, and I saw him pick up this bundle; Pope was left in the custody of Doyle and Manning, the mean while the bundle was picked up in Russel-street.

Croker. I took Pope in Russel-street, coming out of Carolina street.

Court to Lewes. Did Mr. Croker carry the bundle away with him? - He did. (The contents deposed to by Mrs. Connolly and Miss Connolly; which was one curtain, four cruet tops, a tea caddy and one apron.)

Prisoner Pope. I had been to Somer's Town to see an acquaintance who was a bricklayer, I stayed rather later then ordinary, as I was coming along the corner of this street, I saw two men runing along the street; and them things I saw lay in the street, and picked them up.

Prisoner Croft. I work for Mr. Ellbank a salter at Blackfriars-bridge; coming up Oxford-street there was a waggon by an Inn, called the Boar and Castle, the watchman was pursuing a man, and he came against me and knocked me down, I got up, and went round the waggon, and the watchman pursuing the man came up to me, and took me.

Court to Croker. Did you hear these people talking together? - I am not sure, I thought I heard one of them say damn the watchman.

Francis Pope GUILTY . Death .

John Croft , Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-72

75. JEREMIAH CARTER was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the King's-highway, on William Cleaves on the 20th of November , and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, with an inside case made of pinchbeck, and the outside case made of tortoiseshell, value 2 l. a base metal watch chain, value 3 s. two stone seals, value 1 s. a base metal watch key, value 1 d. the goods of the said William Cleaver .

WILLIAM CLEAVER sworn.

I am a journeyman cabinet-maker in Norman-place great Norman-street, on Tuesday the 20th of last month, between the hours of six and seven in the evening, I was going along St. Luke's wall towards St. Luke's hospital , with a basket and tools in it on my shoulder; the prisoner Jeremiah Carter , and another man ran violently against me, insomuch that my basket was knocked off my shoulder, and at the same instant my watch was taken out my pocket, I felt my watch go, as soon as I recovered from the stagger, which the violence of the assault made on me; I cried out stop thief; on which I received a blow in

my face, from one of them who knocked me down, I cannot say which, they were both so close together, they ran and I pursued them, crying stop thief all the way, till we came near Old street-square, where I overtook the prisoner, on my overtaking him he said words to this purpose, I have done you all the assistance in my power, I have endeavoured to take him; but he has run on too fast, he has run on that way, pointing towards Old-street-square; at which I looked at him full in the face, and said I believe you have been some service to me, come into this public house (as there was one near) and I will treat you, for what you have done, he replied that he did not want to be treated, I was very welcome for what he had done for me, he would go into this house, or that house, or in short to any house but the public house; on that I took him by the collar and said, but sir you shall go into the public house; on that he struck me in the face, and endeavoured to get away from me; damned my eyes that he would not be taken by me, or any man living; being pretty near the public house, I got him into the public house, I called for the landlord, and the man who answered to that call came, and I insisted on his sending for an officer, for that I had got a man that had robbed me, the landlord of the public house told me he would have nothing to do with it, we must fight it out; I asked him if he knew the prisoner, he said no, but he would have no disturbance in his house, two or three others who were in a back room behind the bar came out, and told me, that I had no right to hold the man, as I was not an officer, this was at the White Bear, near Old-street-square; on which, the prisoner struck me again, and endeavoured to get away, and I felt myself shoved and pushed about by the persons who came out, and the landlord himself. I was pushed and hussled into the street by the people that were there, having fast hold of the prisoner, he came out with me, I perceived I had got in the neighbourhood of people who did not take the part of an honest man: The prisoner asked me if I would go into an house where he was known in that neighbourhood to hear his character, I went into the house of Mr. Wise, as I have been afterwards informed was his name; there were two or three women in that house, who told me the prisoner's name was Jeremiah Carter ; but it was very reluctantly on his part that his name was told. That he was a task-master of Bridewell-precinct , in Fleet-street; that he had 'prentices under him, and had spent some hundreds of pounds in trade; not satisfied with this information, I insisted on his going to the spot where the robbery was committed, for the purpose of giving information there of the robbery at the spot, because my basket of tools was left there where they were knocked off my shoulder, I got him down there partly by fair means and partly by foul; as soon as I came to the spot where the robbery was committed, there was a woman of the name of Mason, who said, do not let him go young man, he is the person that has robbed you, he past me but an instant before, and I saw him assault you; on that information, I took him into the sign of the Red Lion, in Old-street, by myself, I had no assistance; the Red Lion is close to the spot where the robbery was committed, I there sent for an officer; a Mr. Shurey who was going by at the time, and said he was an officer, came and took charge of him; Mr. Shurey searched him as soon as he came in, and found a bad shilling, and a farthing on him only; the young man begged I would not take any advantage of him, and that I would permit him to send for some of his friends; I submitted to that, and he sent for several people who camedown, among the rest was Mr. Wise, whose house he first went in, and a Mr. Fisher who lives close on the spot, and two or three others, who were relations and brothers; after spending some time, a Mr. Gass who was an officer came, and then Mr. Shurey resigned his charge over to Mr. Gass, and told him the particulars, and he was taken into custody; during the time he was there, the friends of this young man begged and prayed with me that I would compromise the matter; that he had a very aged mother, and that it would certainly involve her in the deepest distress; and begged for God's sake I would make it up, and not to take him before a magistrate; I told them I was ignorant, with respect to these affairs, never having been in the like situation before, and applied to the officers to know what I was to do; saying to the officers, you as officers know best what is right, and what ought to be done; the officers could not agree at first; I believe it was in consequence of one of the officers being resolved that no compromise should take place; after that they had me down to the police office in Worship-street; but before he was taken to the office, he was taken into a public house adjoining the office, there they repeated the applications, that I would compromise it, begging of me to consider his family; and that the young man was drawn in to do this by his companion; and Mr. Shurey took five guineas of Mr. Wise, and put it into my hand, saying keep this till you have your property, or till you shall be satisfied; and now says Mr. Shurey let us go into the office; the magistrate began to examine me, and by some means or other was informed of the five guineas; and he asked me about it; and I told him all I knew, as I have now repeated; then says the magistrate we must have these five guineas returned, before we proceed to any kind of business; we must not compound a felony; he was examined, and the magistrate committed him, and ordered him up again on Friday, between eleven and twelve o'clock, for the second hearing; but he was in consequence of Mr. Shurey's application, brought before the magistrate on Thursday evening, instead of Friday; then he was examined, and fully committed.

Q. This happened between the hours of six and seven; are there any lamps there? - There are; and they were lighted.

Q. Did you lose sight of the prisoner? - I did for an instant or thereabouts, it was in his turning the corner which leads into Old-street-square; there was two in company, when they assaulted me, and were arm in arm.

Mr. Garrow. Mr. Cleaver, you did not know either of the persons who ran against you before? - No.

Q. The course of the transaction took up but a short space of time; then you lost sight of him for a short space of time? - I did.

Q. Did this information you received of this young man turn out to be true? - It did.

Q. In point of fact, was he the last of the persons running? - He was.

Q. If I understand you right, you called out stop thief the moment of your assault? - I did.

Q. Did many persons pursue? - Not a soul besides our three selves.

Q. It was late in the evening, between six and seven o'clock? - It was.

SUSANNAHMASON sworn.

My husband is a fishmonger. On the 20th of November last, on Tuesday I went out from my house to see my husband's mother that lives at Hoxton; I left my husband's mother at six o'clock, she is a nurse to a farm house, Mr.

Robinson's at Hoxton, and I believe it might be twenty minutes or half an hour after six when I got into Old-street, I was walking strait up, and just as I got to the coach stand, the prisoner at the bar, and another man met me, the other man gave me a push, and one of them made a very bad expression, I believe it was the prisoner, but I cannot positively say; I let them pass me, and they went on some yards from me and I kept behind them, and when they had got about three or four yards, they then went quite on the run, then it was about two lamps off I saw the prosecutor; and I saw the basket fall from his shoulders by the light of the lamps; then I heard somebody call out stop thief; and I walked pretty fast, when I came to the place there lay the basket, but nobody was there at all; with that I stopped a minute or two, and some people came round and asked what was the matter, I told them I believed somebody had been robbed, for I saw the basket fall from the man's shoulders; and they took it up, and just as we got the basket into the house, the prosecutor came back with the prisoner in his hand, or by the side of him, with that he insisted going back to the place where he was stopped, and they went to the place, I and several more people, the prisoner and the prosecutor, and they found a piece of chain, and the watch key; I am sure that is one of the men that pushed against me; but I cannot say he was the man, that robbed the man; after that they brought him back, and took him into the Red Lion, and the young man begged leave to send for some of his friends; with that one Mr. Fisher, and one Mr. Wise, and several more people came into the parlour; one Mr. Gass was sent for as an officer, and Mr. Shurey, another officer was there; and Mr. Fisher, or one of them pulled out some notes and offered the man a note for his watch.

Q. Was it a Bank note? - I fancy so, I did not see it only as it lay; they asked him how much his watch cost, he said, five guineas, with that they offered him five guineas, to pay for it, he said, he would leave it to the constables, for he did not understand whether he might be safe in taking it; with that Mr. Shurey wanted to make it up; Mr. Gass said, he should not; I went before the magistrate with them, where I related the same and he was committed.

JOHN GASS sworn.

I am a headborough of St. Luke's. I was sent for on the 20th of November, a little after six o'clock, at the Red Lion in Old-street road; I took charge of the prisoner at the bar, when I came in one Mr. Shurey was there an officer of the same parish, he desired me to take charge of the prisoner, for he could not stop; I took charge of him. Mr. Shurey returned in about half an hour, we went down to the public office, Worship-street, and at a public house adjoining the office, there Mr. Shurey took five guineas of one Mr. Wise, and told the prosecutor to take the five guineas into his hand, till such time as he had his watch returned; and if he should not have his watch returned, he should have the choice of two or three together; after that, I told him he had done very wrong in so doing.

Mr. Garrow. He took no part in it, all this was done by Mr. Shurey? - It was all done by Mr. Shurey, not by the prisoner.

Court to the Prosecutor. Your watch has never been recovered? - No, sir, it was a watch the inside case pinch back, or some other metal, and the outside case was tortoiseshell, gold rims and gold studs, and chain to it, two metal seals, a metal key.

Prisoner. The prosecutor never charged me with robbing him at all, but wanted to know whether I was a

person of good character; accordingly he took my address and seemed content.

The prisoner called twelve witnesses, who gave him an excellent character.

GUILTY. Death . (Aged 24.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Recommended by the prosecutor, and the jury, having such an extraordinary character .

Reference Number: t17921215-73

76. JOSEPH PONTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , one quart pewter pot, value 1 s. two pint pewter pots, value 1 s. the goods of John Cooper .

JOHN COOPER sworn.

I keep a public house , the Horse and Groom, in Maiden-lane, Covent-garden ; I did not see the prisoner take the pots, nor see them on him.

JOHN LILLY sworn.

I am a plaisterer; I was coming through the parade in St. James's park, on the 13th of November, between four and five, and I was informed by a centinel, there was a pot-stealer gone along; I immediately ran, and pursued him, and when he saw me coming, he stopped with the pots; I overtook him; I collared him; and he was conducted to the police office, in Queen-square, and going through Queen-square gate, he put his hand into his breeches, and pulled out a pint pot, and said, damn the pots, and threw it against the wall; it was brought to us by a person unknown; I had hold of his collar, and see him throw it; it was delivered to a soldier, a witness, who is here.

THOMAS PUGH sworn.

I am a soldier; I am employed by a lady that lives close by me, to carry a parcel to Maiden-lane, Covent-garden; as I was going across the parade, I heard the centinel of the corner of Mr. Pitt's wall, saying, there was a man gone by, with some pots in his pocket; it was about half past four in the afternoon; I followed the prisoner, depositing my parcel with the centinel, and I followed him to Duke-street steps. I overtook the prisoner; I seized him, and said, I am informed, you have got some publicans pewter pots about you; he said, no, I insisted on searching him; I put my hand into his right hand pocket, and there I found one pewter pint pot; I then told him he must go with me to the police office, and going along, he offered me money, all the money he had in his pocket, I refused to take it; he told me, he had been an old soldier in the guards, about fifteen years ago, and going through Queen-square gate, he immediately put his left hand into his breeches and draws out a pint pot, and threw it across the road, against the wall, and said, damn the pot, and me too; I told him, he must not think to unload himself till he came to the police office; there was a man brought the same pint pot, and delivered it into my hand; I then took him to the police office front door, and delivered him to a constable's hands, and the pint pot I also delivered to the constable, with the property he had about him: he had then a pint pot in his right hand coat pocket, and a quart pot in his breeches.

WILLIAM CARR sworn.

I am discharged the army; I was that day in company with Lilly, and we were informed, a man had gone by with some pots; we overtook him in Duke-street; when he got down the steps, me and the witness Pugh was examining him, he said, he had got one here in his pocket, and

others about him; we took him to the office, and I saw the pot thrown away, and I saw a man pick it up, and give it to Pugh.

JOHN CREEDLAND sworn.

I produce the pots; I received them of the witness Pugh. (Deposed to.)

Prisoner. My Lord, I was going along Scotland-yard, and I saw these pots under a court; I picked them up, and thought of carrying them home, when I saw who they belonged to.

GUILTY . (Aged 58.)

Publickly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-74

77. JOHN HARDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , ninety pounds weight of cheese, value 30 s. the goods of John Lyons .

SARAH LYONS sworn.

I am the wife of John Lyons , a cheese-monger ; on the 30th of November, a person passing by told me, I had left the cheese out; I went out, and found the flap that lets the air into the cellar open, and there was one cheese conveyed off, and two were found there; I went into the street, and saw two Cheshire cheeses stand just lifted out of the cellar; I alarmed the next door neighbour, and when I came back again, I saw the prisoner taken out of the cellar; he pretended that he went there to sleep; all the cheeses there were our property.

ROBERT HARRIS sworn.

I am a whip-maker, next door neighbour to this good woman. Mrs. Lyons knocked at the door, and said, there were thieves in the cellar; I went down; the prisoner got up from some straw, which was among some tubs, and seemed to be surprised, and wanted to know what he had done; I took him by the collar, and brought him up; the constable took him away, and he was committed.

Prisoner. I hope you will take it into consideration, and send me for an East-India soldier, my Lord.

GUILTY . (Aged 16.)

Imprisoned 6 Months , and publickly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-75

78. ADAM HENRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , two gold rings, value 10 s. a pair of gold wire ear-rings, value 3 s. a body of a man's linen shirt, value 2 s. a check linen apron, value 2 s. a cotton neck handkerchief, value 6 d. the goods of George Moore .

GEORGE MOORE sworn.

I know the prisoner. On the 4th of this month I came home to my dinner, between twelve and one o'clock; I live at Chelsea ; I lifted up the latch of my door, and I found the door shut against me; it was locked; returning, as I could not get in, I was going down the stairs again, and the prisoner at the bar, Adam Henry , opened the door, and I returned back, and he bid me sit down to my dinner; I did, and asked him to sit down too.

Q. What business could he have at your house; did he live at your house? - No, my Lord, he did not. I ate my dinner, and had a good way to go to work; and I went away as fast as I could back again to my work, and I left the prisoner

at the bar there; I returned home between five and six o'clock from work, and I came up stairs to the room, and my wife lifted up the latch, and my wife spoke, which she could not get out, nor I could get in; with that I broke the door open, and my wife cried out, she was robbed by Adam Henry ; with that I went in pursuit after the prisoner; he was not at his place till about ten o'clock; I went again, and I found the prisoner; I asked him for the key of my room, and he denied it; we searched every place, and the key of the room dropped out of his breeches; I asked him where the things where that he had taken of my wife; he said, he had pawned them at Hambury's; I asked him what he got for them, and where were the duplicates; he said, they were in his coat pocket, but one Ann Cooper had taken his coat, and pawned it for 2 s. I asked him, what he got for them; he said, he pawned the two gold rings for 5 s. he confessed to taking them all; and he said, if my wife and I would make it up, he would give some of his pension when he got it; with that when I took up the prisoner, I went to the constable, and the constable would not come to take the prisoner; he told me, for the neighbours and me to take him away to the watch-house; with that, we took him to the watch-house, and put him in till the morning.

SARAH MOORE sworn.

On the 4th of this month, I went to this man where he lodged; I asked him, if he would be kind enough to grant me a favour, to go on an errand for me; if he would go as far as Westminster, and pledge a petticoat of mine for 3 s. after that I treated him, and taking a little too much, I laid down on my bed; I had my property about me when I laid down; my rings were on my fingers, and my ear-rings in my ears; when I got up I lost my property; they were taken off my fingers, and out of my ears, while I was asleep; and I lost a check apron, a shawl, a body of a new shirt, and a black silk cloak, and a cotton handkerchief besides.

Q. Then these ear-rings in your ears, and these rings on your fingers, were taken before your husband came home to dinner? - I don't know that; I was asleep when my husband came home. I don't know what time they were taken.

SAMUEL NEAL sworn.

I have got the body of a linen shirt and an old silk cloak I received of Adam Henry ; he gave the name of Pearce; he pledged them on the 4th of November, between six and seven in the evening; I lent him 2 s. 6 d. on them. (Produced and deposed to.)

JAMES TIMBREL sworn.

The prisoner at the bar, about five and six o'clock, on the 4th of December, brought a gold ring and a pair of earrings; I knew the prisoner, and knew that he had a wife; and I asked him, if they were his wife's; he said, they were; I lent him 3 s. 6 d. on them. (Produced and deposed to, Mrs. Moore having lost such.)

JAMES FOWLE sworn.

About ten o'clock, on the 4th of this month, Mr. Moore came to me, and told me his wife had been robbed, and that he could not get a constable, and asked me to go with him; we went together, and found the prisoner at a lodging-house, in a neighbouring street; on finding him, he acknowledged his guilt, and said, he would make any recompence if they would drop it; he said, he was ready to make amends, when he was in capacity to do it; meaning when he received his pay.

JOHN CREEDLAND sworn.

I went to the pawnbroker's, and desired them to bring the property before the magistrate.

Prisoner. Please you, my Lord, last Tuesday week, Mrs. Moore came to my lodgings, and asked me to pledge her some things, likewise I did; I went to Westminster, and pledged them for 3 s. 6 d. when I came back, I returned with the money; she asked me to go and drink something, likewise it was all spent in liquor, and she was very much drunk; and she asked me to put on some dinner for her husband; her husband came home, and after her husband had eat his dinner, she awaked, and gave me some more things to go and pawn; after that, she went along with the rest of her company and drinking, and then she came back again, and asked me to take some more things which I did; she gave me them all to pawn; I told her, if I had taken them unknown to her, I would have paid her out of my pension, but I took them for her, and we all drank together, and spent the money.

Not GUILTY .

Tried before the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-76

79. WILLIAM LOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of December , eleven yards of carpet, value 60 s. the goods of Samuel James and Samuel Williams .

SAMUEL WILLIAMS sworn.

I have a partner , Samuel James . On the 3d instant, the prisoner came to our window, at a pane that had been broke the day before, and he was about the window, and I saw him take the piece of goods out, and I pursued him; I immediately seized him, and at that time he had the piece of goods in his hand, endeavouring to hide it under the flap of his coat; he turning about, and seeing me, he endeavoured to give it to a companion, a boy that was with him, and dropped it.

Prisoner. A lady in the shop said it was not me, but another boy. - It was this boy . There was another boy in Queen Ann-street, but not at the window, he was with him round Queen Ann-street.

Prisoner. My father has been dead these two years, and my mother is ill; I was eleven years old last Tuesday.

GUILTY .

Publickly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-77

80. MARY GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of November , one large table spoon, value 12 s. the goods of Daniel Shay .

ANTHONY SIMMONS sworn.

I live with Daniel Shay ; I and my master went down into Bath; he lives in Ely place, No. 35 ; when we returned from Bath, we found my fellow servant, John Dunny , had an acquaintance, who came to my master's, and they broke the cellar door open; and he treated them very well, and were intoxicated.

ALEXANDER LANE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I produce a spoon; I received it of the prisoner at the bar, the 19th of November; she had been in habits of pawning things in my shop; I asked her what it cost her; she said, they

cost her 1 l. 4 s. a pair; I lent her half a guinea on it; she pawned it in the name of Ann Gill . (Deposed to by Simmons, as belonging to his master.)

Prisoner. I bought that spoon for 14 s. of a jew, last Monday was five weeks. My Lord, I have got three small children, and a husband.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-78

81. ELEANOR JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of November , a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. the goods of John Emery .

JOHN EMERY sworn.

I am a hard labouring man ; I know nothing more than I can swear to my property.

Q. Is that your wife? - It is; we have been married twenty years; we were married at St. George's church.

- EMERY sworn.

I am wife of the last witness; I knew the prisoner just a week, by sight; I know about her neither good nor harm, only that she took my property. No other person knew that I had such a thing but her; no other person was in my place; it was laying in a cup and saucer, upon the mantle piece.

Q. Then it lay open to any body that came into the house? - No woman ever came into my room but her; I lost it; and I found it again at the pawnbroker's; the prisoner pawned it.

Q. Had you pawned it yourself, or desired any body to pawn it for you? - No, I missed it on the 18th of last month; I found it at the pawnbroker's the same day.

Q. How came you to go to the pawnbroker's to enquire for it? - I missed it.

Q. How came it into your head it was at the pawnbroker's? - I thought I would endeavour to find it. I first went to Brown's, I could not find it; I went from there to Mr. Wright's in the Ambrey.

Q. Had you ever pawned any thing at Brown's? - Yes.

Q. At any other pawnbroker's? - No, I went and asked, if any body had taken in a spoon, with three letters on it, I and two E's, they produced it.

ALEXANDER LANE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I know the prisoner; about nine o'clock, on the 19th of November, she brought a spoon; Emery's wife came about two or three hours after; I gave her 18 d. Emery's wife asked me, if I had taken in a spoon, with three letters on it; I told her I had, and shewed it her. (The spoon produced, and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I went down into the yard, about eight o'clock in the morning, and I found the spoon by the sink hole, and I took it, and went and made away with it; I never was in the woman's room; she cannot say I was in the room from Sunday night. Pray, Mrs. Emery, did you see me in the room? - No, but she was the only person that knew the spoon was in my room; it was in my tea cup the night before, when I went to bed, in the morning it was gone; I did not know she was in my room; but no other person had been in my room since I have been in the lodging but her.

Prisoner. I was down in the yard, and there I found it; she saw me standing by the street door when she came down, going with her husband's breakfast. My

father is a master gardener to Lord Barrington; my mother goes out a nursing.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-79

82. CHARLES OLIVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of December , a leather housen, value 2 s. the goods of Samuel Whitbread , Esq .

SAMUEL JORDAN sworn.

I am store-cellar keeper to Samuel Whitbread , Esq. Chiswell-street.

Q. Is he in partnership with his father? - No. On last Tuesday evening he lost a leather housen; our drays were standing in Play-house-yard ; one of my men saw this man standing along side, and informed me of the matter, and took the prisoner in this act, and then they sent for a constable.

JAMES BURKITT sworn.

I was loading the two drays in Playhouse-yard; I am a servant of Mr. Whitbread's; I was coming the hindermost dray, and coming to my fore horse, I saw this man cutting my fore horse's housen off, this was last Tuesday night; I am sure it was that man; as soon as he cut it off, he took it in his left arm, and ran up Golden-lane with it; I followed him, and was not above four yards from him all the time; he took it in his right hand, and threw it in a passage, within a door; I followed him, and in about ten yards I caught him, brought him back again to the house where he had thrown the housen in, and a man gave me the housen; and we took him to a house we serve, and had a constable. (The housen produced, and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I had been to look after work, and coming down Play-house-yard, this gentleman ran after me, and cut me with the whip, and I stopped as soon as he told me, and he said, I had been cutting his leather off.

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-80

83. MARY ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of December , two silver table spoons, value 19 s. a silver tea spoon, value 1 s. the goods of George Smith .

- SMITH sworn.

I am wife of George Smith ; the prisoner lived with me five months as a servant ; she left my place in a very ill state of health; her sister washes my linen; as far as I can recollect, I missed one spoon, the 20th of October; and on the 3d of December I lost another table spoon, with a cypher and crest; the cypher is M. S. K. She left my service more than five months ago.

Q. What month was it she left your service? - I cannot recollect.

Q. Have you any account of these spoons you have lost? - I have from the pawnbroker. It is a painful task for me to appear against any poor creature, but I have suffered so exceedingly by servants, that it is necessary to make an example of them: a servant went and enquired, and found them at a pawnbroker's in Gravel-lane.

- sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I produce the spoons. (Deposed to.) The first table spoon was brought the 22d of October; the tea spoon some time in September; but I cannot say positively the day; and

the other table spoon this month. I have known her upwards of five years to use our shop; I received them all of the prisoner at the bar; I supposed she was a servant; I knew her using the shop; bringing the things; she had not brought any plate before, but she had brought other things; she had brought her own gowns, aprons, and so on; I had known her some time, and she always had a good appearance.

Q. You must have known whether she was a servant? - No, I did not.

Q. I wish to know, whether you thought she was a person likely to have plate of her own property? - I did.

Q. What name were they brought in? - One was pledged in the name of Kirby, and the other in the name of Brown.

Q. Had you no suspicion, by her using two names, what was the common name? - Brown and I heard that she had been married lately, and had changed her name.

Q. How much did she get on these pawns? - The tea spoons 18 d. and the other two table spoons 6 s. each.

Q. You thought she had got up in the world, and mended her circumstances, coming out with the silver table spoons? - I saw the letter was K.

Prisoner. I have been four years in London, I never pledged any thing but in the name of Mary Laurance , that was my first husband's name.

Court to Prosecutrix. Did she come to your house? - She came frequently to fetch the linen away for her sister to wash; I lost many things during her service; I have no suspicion of her sister.

GUILTY. (Aged 30.)

Recommended by the Prosecutor .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-81

84. JANE KIRK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of October , a check apron, value 2 s. a cotton shawl, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Christian Plasket , widow .

CHRISTIAN PLASKET sworn.

I live in Old Boswell-court, St. Clement's Dane , I am a lodger in a one pair of stairs room, I never saw the prisoner till three weeks after I lost my property, I don't know the woman; I hung some clothes out on the top of the leads where I lodge, on the 9th of October last, a check apron and a cotton shawl were taken away, all the rest were left, the pawnbroker has them.

JOHN PAUL sworn.

I am a journeyman pawnbroker, a check apron was pawned and was redeemed at our shop, it is not in court, it was pawned in the name of the person whom she said sent her with it.

ANN SETTLE sworn.

The prisoner at the bar went with it herself, she came up into my room, and she told me that she had left her place, and her mistress would not pay her her wages, and she begged of me to let her put the things by the fire to dry, that she might summon her mistress for the wages, then I was going out, and the prisoner pledged the apron herself, I did not know it to be the property of Mrs. Plasket, nor had I any knowledge afterwards that it was her property.

RICHARD BROUGHTON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I have got a shawl, it was pledged on the 9th of October, in the name of Jane Kirk , I cannot say it was the prisoner at the bar, I took it in of somebody, but I cannot tell of whom; I never had any dealings with the prisoner at the bar knowingly; the ticket is Jane Kirk , No. 8, Holborn.

Court to Ann Settle . Do you live at No. 8, Holborn? - I do.

Q. Did you see the prisoner when she came to your house in possession of a shawl? - She brought a shawl and an apron, I did not make any observations, I did not know but they were her own.

Prisoner. I know nothing about it, my friends are dead.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-82

84. SOPHIA TILLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a metal watch, value 1 l. one metal key, value 1 d. the goods of Isaac Pilleau .

ISAAC PILLEAU sworn.

I was going through the Piazza's, one evening going to the play, and I could not get in, and this person picked me up, as I was with her I went to her lodgings, after I had been there some time, I took my watch out of my pocket, and lay it in the crown of my hat, the prisoner saw it, and ran down stairs with it, and I never recovered it. I advertised the watch, as it was a watch of value, on which I was advised to apply to some of the people at Bow-street, as in all probability I should get it; I thought to have prosecuted the receiver, but to my great surprise, I found I was bound over to prosecute the thief instead of the receiver; I was drawn into this prosecution; I have never seen my watch again.

Q. How did the advertisement lead to the prisoner? - By describing the prisoner one of the people at Bow-street found her, and told me he would take her up, and did, and brought the person who had received the watch whom she confessed she sold it to for 15 s.

Q. How long was you with her? - Eight or ten minutes.

Q. How can you take on you to say this is the same person? - I could not be mistaken, because I took particular notice of her.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Pilleau you seem a gentleman pretty far advanced in life? - Young enough for this business.

Q. Pray sir, what station of life are you in? - That is nothing at all to the purpose.

Q. It is to the purpose Mr. Pilleau? - I belong to a public office, I belong to the Bank, I am a clerk there.

Q. A single man I take it for granted? - I am not a single man.

Q. Perhaps you have children? - I have.

Q. How many children have you? - I have had a great many, I have six.

Q. Your wife living and six children at this time; so you was betrayed and seduced into this prosecution was you? - I did not mean to prosecute the girl, my motive was to prosecute the receiver.

Q. Now you never knew this girl before? - I never saw her but once before in the Piazza.

Q. Upon your oath did you never see her before she accosted you in the Piazza? - Not in her room, I saw her in the Piazza as I came by.

Q. On your oath have you not had frequent conversation with her? Mind what you are about Mr. Pilleau. - Not frequent, no farther than told her to go about her business.

Q. Was this once or twice? - Once, about a fortnight before.

Q. How happened it, sir, that you as a married man going to the play, and finding this woman, thought proper to go to her lodgings with her? - Because most men do foolish things sometimes.

Q. It is a disgrace to come with such a prosecution into court. And when you went to her lodgings they were in Parker's-lane , I believe? - I don't know.

Q. Do not you know Parker's-lane? - I did not know it before.

Q. Now sir, when you went with this girl to these lodgings, did you agree to give her any money? - I did not.

Q. What did you go for? - For a lunching as most men do.

Q. Did you give her any thing? - She did not stand for that.

Q. You put the watch on the hat before her face? - I did openly before her face.

Q. You have never seen the watch since? - I have not, I wish I had.

Q. Do you know how old the prisoner at the bar is? - I think I have heard she is about eighteen.

Q. You are sure you never knew this prisoner before, and if any body was to come, and swear you had known her perfectly well a great many years, it would be a falsity? - It would.

Q. You never went with the prisoner at the bar before to her lodgings? - No, nor to any house whatever.

Q. When was it you went to the play? - The third of November.

Q. Did you meet the prisoner as you went, or as you came back? - I met her first as I went, and told her I could not stay, and desired her to go about her business.

Q. How long was it before you returned from the play-house? - About ten minutes.

Q. Where was the prisoner then? - In the same place, or thereabout, somewhere under the Piazza.

Q. Did not you appoint the place? - No, I did not, nor did I measure the ground.

Q. Do you know Mr. King's? - What Mr. King.

Q. Do you know Crown-court? - I don't know what they call Crown-court, I know no such a place much.

Q. Crown-court, Little Russel-street? - I don't know much or little either.

Q. You are treating us with shuffling at present? - You shuffle with me.

Q. Crown-court you don't know, out of Drury-lane, or out of Little Russel-street. Then you did not go with the prisoner at the bar, to a house in Crown-court a fortnight before this? - I did not.

Q. You are still a clerk in the Bank? - I am.

Q. Do you live with your wife and children? - Suppose I do, or do not.

Q. Answer my question, Sir? - I do.

Q. Do they know of this? - They do not.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Ryder? - I do not.

Q. Do you know Union-place? - No.

Q. Union-place, Lambeth? - I lived there.

Q. How came you to say, that you did not know it; perhaps, now you have brushed up your recollection, you know a person of the name of Ryder, that lived there? - I do know him.

Q. Did your wife and family live there? - They did.

Q. Mr. Ryder had some family I believe? - He had.

Q. I believe there had been some complaints of very indecent conduct from that part? - What indecent conduct?

Q. It is not fit for a court of justice to be disgraced with the recital. Has not the Mr. Ryder that you know, complained of no indecent conduct that you have practised? - Mr. Ryder and I were on very good footing.

Q. Perhaps, I am putting a wrong term on the manner in which you thought proper to conduct yourself; you may not consider it indecent; you may call it decent? - I don't know what you mean, that has nothing to do with this.

Q. I will tell you what it has to do: there are some pails between you and Mr. Ryder's house? - You are wrong informed,

if they told you so, there are not; there are high walls.

Not GUILTY .

Court. It is a great indecency; by the account you have given of yourself, there appears not the least degree of decency or modesty.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-83

85. ABRAHAM BOLTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of November , five linen handkerchiefs, value 18 d. the goods of certain persons unknown .

ROBERT OSBORN sworn.

On Friday the 9th of November, I was at Westminster-bridge , seeing the Lord Mayor's shew; I had not been on the bridge above twenty minutes before I heard the cry of Stop thief; I turned myself about, and saw the prisoner run; I was along with Mr. Trip, and I looks out, and saw a man of a gentleman-like appearance, that says, that is he, he robbed me; accordingly I run after him, and as soon as I came up to him, he dropped an handkerchief from him; I picked it up; I asked him, if he had got any more; the constable came up in a moment or two more, and he was searched; there were three handkerchiefs in his breeches; I said to the gentleman, that said, that is my handkerchief; you come along; he said, no, he said, he would rather lose his property, than say any thing more about it; I went with him and the constable, and the prisoner was committed.

WILLIAM ASTON sworn.

I produce five handkerchiefs, a glove, and a tip of a gentleman's shoe, that I found on him beside, three were in his breeches, one was thrown down, and the other I found in his pockets, after I got to Queen-square; I had them all of the prisoner; there was a man on the bridge, said one of the handkerchiefs were his, but he would not come forward to prosecute, so we were bound over with ourselves.

PHILIP TRIP sworn.

I was on Westminster-bridge the 9th of November; I saw the prisoner at the bar running; I immediately ran after him; my acquaintance ran likewise, and catched him before me; as soon as he caught hold of him, he threw an handkerchief down, and I am certain I saw three taken out of his breeches pocket.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

The prisoner's father and two more appeared to his character.

GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17921215-84

86. CHARLOTTE WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , two guineas , the monies of Peter Thomas Hilliard .

PETER THOMAS HILLIARD sworn.

On the 27th of November last, I left my master's house, by the desire of some gentleman there, to get a bottle of whiskey, at two o'clock in the morning; I am a servant to John Humphries , at the Globe, in Fleet-street; I asked a watchman, and I turned on my right hand towards Temple-bar, where he thought I could get such a thing; I then asked another watchman, and some gentleman directed

me across Shire-lane; a little up Shire-lane was the prisoner; she accosted me, and said, she would shew me where I could get it; with that she brought me up the lane, and desired me to turn up on my left hand, she then desired me to turn again on my left hand, which brought me into Ship-yard ; she then shew me up a court; I looked; says I, there is no tavern this way: no, says the prisoner; nor one we don't want; accordingly, she seized me by the waistcoat, and tore it open; I gave a shilling to have nothing to do with the woman, finding myself deceived; while I was preparing to put my waistcoat together again; my left hand pocket I found open; the prisoner then left me with myself robbed of two guineas; I missed it instantly; with which she made of; I pursued her, and a little further on, on the left hand again, I found her standing in a necessary at the end of the yard; I called the watchman to my assistance, and he came, and took her immediately; my money was not found; she was immediately taken to the watch-house, and one Mr. Dobbings, the night constable, searched her, but could not find any thing but the 1 s. she produced.

Q. Had you any connexion with the woman? - No, none at all; I was too anxious in my business.

Prisoner. I met him in Fleet-street, the city side of Temple-bar; he asked me, if I could tell him where he could get some whiskey; I went with him up Shire-lane; they were shut up; he turned down, and went to Ship-yard; they were shut up there, and he and I stayed at the end of a court together; he asked me, where I lived; I told him; he said, it was too far; he said, he would give me a shilling, if I would let him have connection with me in this court; it was close by a necessary; he wanted me to lay down in this necessary; I told him no, I did not chuse to do any thing of the like; he said, if I would, he would give me another afterwards; I said, I did not approve of it; he said, I might be damned, and the 1 s. too; he went away from me; I set on the necessary about a minute, having occasion to make water; I heard him speak to the watchman; says he, did you see a woman go by here; no, says the watchman; then she must be in the place where I left her, he said; he came to me, and said, I believe you have picked my pocket of three guineas; Lord, sir! says I, I have not told gold this good while, I have only this shilling you gave me; says he, watchman, I give charge of her; I was taken to the watch-house; the constable asked me, what money I had about me; I told him, but 1 s. the constable asked him, if he gave me a shilling; He said, yes, for charity; the constable asked me to strip my clothes off; I did to my shift; he searched even my bonnet and cap. The constable said, I have found nothing, and if, you think, I have not done you justice, take and strip her again. The gentleman at Bow-street told him, it was impossible for me to rob him if he had no connexion; he said, he believed, I must come on the side of him in some odd manner, and take it out of his pocket; he asked him, what he gave the shilling for; he said, he gave me the shilling out of charity, and had nothing at all to do with me, nor I had nothing to do with him, than I have to do with him this moment; if I had robbed him, I would not have stopped in the same place as where he left me.

Prosecutor. She deceived me, by not directing me to the place I thought she would; she tore my things all open.

Q. How could she get her hands into your pocket? - I cannot say.

Q. Where was your money? - In my left hand breeches pocket.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH

Reference Number: t17921215-85

86. JONATHAN HARDING was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Dyer , about the hour of six in the night of the 6th of December , and burglariously stealing therein, eight china boxes, mounted with base metall value 5 s. the goods of the said James Dyer .

JOHN GORE sworn.

I am a porter; I lived with Mr. Adams in the Minories, but I have come away now; I was coming along Bishopsgate-street, on the 6th of December, about a quarter after six o'clock in the evening, and I saw this man come up to Mr. Dyer's shop window; he keeps a toy shop in Bishopsgate-street ; I saw him break the glass with his elbow, and put his hand into the window; it was the shop window; I could not see what he took out; I immediately followed him down Houndsditch; it was, I believe, about twenty or thirty yards down Houndsditch; I see him lay down the piece of broken glass; I immediately crossed over Houndsditch, and he made up towards Bishopsgate-street; then he went and crossed over there towards the church, and I goes to the shop, and says, Have you got a man that can take a man, that has broke your window; and he crossed over, and came to the same side of the way again; as he was coming by the shop, I and the young man of the shop took him into the shop, and while they were gone for an officer, he puts his hand into his pocket, and says, I have got some of the property, and throws them on the counter, eight boxes, and he said, here they are, I find I must go.

JAMES DYER sworn.

I live in Bishopsgate; on the evening of the 6th of December, my lad was called down a little after six in the evening; in the course of two or three minutes, my wife called me down; when I came down, I saw the prisoner in the house; I expostulated with him for some considerable time, and he, at last, put his hand in his coat pocket, and pulls out a parcel of china boxes, to the number of eight toy boxes, and put them on the counter, and says, I see you have me, and I must go to Botany bay.

ROBERT STEWARD sworn.

I am patrole of Bishopsgate-street. I happened to be walking down the opposite side of the way, near on the time he was taken into the shop; I went to see what was the matter; I took the boxes into custody, and sent for an officer; I gave charge of him; I searched him, but found nothing else on him; I delivered the boxes to Supwell.

- SUPWELL sworn.

I am a constable; I produce eight boxes. (Deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was going up Bishopsgate-street, a boy ran by, and said, Take these here; take what, says I, take these, says he, I took them; they cried out immediately, Stop thief; and I was taken and searched.

Court to Gore. Was there any other person at the window besides him? - No.

Jury. Did you see him break the window? - I did, he broke it with his elbow; and I saw him lay a piece of glass down in Houndsditch.

GUILTY of stealing, but not of the burglary . (Aged 33.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-86

87. JOHN SIMMONS was indicted, for that he on the 6th of December , with a certain offensive weapon, called a stick, which he then and there, in his right

hand had and held, on John Barlow , unlawfully and feloniously did make an assault, with a felonious intent to rob him .

A SECOND COUNT, for that he on the same day, feloniously did make an assault on the same person, and in a forcible and violent manner, feloniously did demand his goods, chattels, and monies, with a felonious intent to rob him.

JOHN BARLOW sworn.

I live in Holborn, on the 6th of this month, I was coming out of the country, coming down Cow-lane, a few doors down Cow-lane , there was a bit of a dispute with somebody, there were three of them stopped me I was on horse back, they struck me first before ever they said any thing to me. Three young men about the prisoner's size; I was stagnated almost with the blows I received over the temple; they had long sticks a piece, I resisted to go forward, the mare knocked one or two of them down, but there was always one or two of them up, and they beat me back again to Smithfield; they did not ask me for any money, they said, I must give my property, or they would have my bloody guts, they repeated these words several times before any body came up to my assistance; I rode up to a public-house and hallooed out, and somebody came by, and they ran away; I would not pretend to be positive that this man was the man that struck me or demanded my money; they were all pretty much alike, and it was very dark; I am positive he was one, he had a stick in his hand; I was advised to follow them, I did, and they ran down Chick-lane; this man was taken in about five or six minutes; I saw him in six minutes, or rather more. I have no doubt he is one of the three.

JOHN EADES sworn.

I am a porter at Leadenhall-market; on the 6th of December, I was coming up Cow-lane, from a job of work between five and six, very nigh six, at the top of Cow lane, I saw three men with sticks in their hands, and they turned this gentleman's horse about several times, and struck both him and his horse several times, and they made use of words take his property, or cut his bloody mouth open or rip his guts open, they said this different times over; I never lost sight of the prisoner till I took him, with that when the gentleman rid up to the public house he called for assistance, and they turned down to the top of Chick-lane, and I followed them, I caught hold of two, but one got away, and this one I took, I am sure he is one of the three.

Prisoner. Was I coming up Chick-lane or going down? - You were all three together going down, and I never was above three or four yards off.

Court to Barlow. Had you ever quarrelled with these people? - I knew nothing of them before.

Prisoner. I had been to my mother, and I was very much in liquor, and coming right down Long-lane, coming that way there was two more young fellows walking before me, they hit this gentleman, and run away, and this man came, and was riding, and struck one of the two first, and then they struck the gentleman.

GUILTY . (Aged 29.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-87

88. RICHARD BLAKEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , thirteen pounds weight of beef, value 4 s. the goods of Joseph Calaway .

GEORGE SIMONS sworn.

I am a butcher's boy in the Market to Mr. Waghorne, a butcher in Fleet-market ;

I was coming down the market on the 8th of December, at about half after eleven o'clock at night, and I saw this man take an edge bone of beef from the board, he went down with it and got under the carts at the back of the door; directly John Roe came out; I having told him before; he lives along with Mr. Calaway; he heard me say to John Roe , that a black, man had taken an edge bone of beef, and that was the reason why he got under the cart

Q. Had you lost sight of him? - I see him whip round the corner; I am sure it is the same man.

JOHN ROE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Calaway Simmons came and told me the black man has got your beef; I goes out and I went by the side of the cart and he heaved the meat out from underneath the cart and I went to lay hold of him and he hit me directly.

Prisoner. You see me underneath the cart? - I did, it is Mr. Calaway's property, there was no meat near there till then; when he struck me another came up and then we took him.

JOHN LLOYD sworn.

I am a watchman in the market; I saw this man with a piece of beef under his arm, presently he got under the cart and John Roe came out to him.

Prisoner. Please your lordship I wanted a bit of salt beef to buy, I took this bit up and threw it down again; I wanted to do a job by myself and I got under the cart and they came to me; they found the meat again on the block where I put it.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned twelve months and publickly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-88

89. FREDERICK FALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , twenty-four pounds weight of stone blue, value 16 s. the goods of Henry Sutton , John Keene and Joseph Smith .

JOHN KEENE sworn.

I live on Garlick-hill , a manufacturer of stone blue and mustard , my partners names are Henry Sutton and Joseph Smith ; we frequently missed the blue which we conceived must have been stolen; the prisoner at the bar worked for us about sixteen months, he worked more particularly in the manufactory of mustard, he managed the horses, the mills that manufactured the one did the other; but still the mustard-maker has no business with that part of the manufactory where the blue was manufactured; he might occasionally have worked at the blue, but he had not for some months past. On the 5th of November very late in the evening, Hall, a city constable, and another man called and told me they had him in custody; I attended the Lord Mayor's court and the property was there produced.

JAMES HALL sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the city. On the 5th of November last, near nine o'clock in the evening, I and some more officers were going up Petticoat-lane, we observed the prisoner at the bar with a bag on his shoulder, he stopped at the door of an iron shop, a suspicious house, we crossed over the way, went to him immediately and asked what he had got there; he said, he had got some blue; I asked him how he came by it; he said, he met a man and gave him 5 s. for it; I immediately took him into a public house close on the spot; I then asked him if he knew where to find the man; he said, no, I then asked him where he lived; he made no answer, but that

he worked on the Keys at different places; he hoped I should not detain him; I told him I must take care of him; immediately I then carried the blue and took the prisoner to the Compter, going to the Compter he said, it was his first offence and desired me to let him go.

- JOSTIN sworn.

I am an officer; I was in company with the last witness Hall and two more, on the 5th of November between eight and nine; going up Petticoat-lane I observed the prisoner at the bar with this bag on his shoulder at an old iron shop; I crossed over the way and took it off his shoulder and asked him what he had got; he said, he had got some indigo blue that he had bought of a man for 5 s. (Produced and deposed to particularly twenty-four pounds of it, having a particular mark and never sold in that state.)

Prisoner. My lord I would wish you to be as favourable as you can; I can say I know nothing at all of this, these men will swear my life away for the sake of the money.

Court. Your life is not in danger, but your liberty is.

The prisoner called one witness to his character,

GUILTY . (Aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT

Reference Number: t17921215-89

90. ELIZABETH STATUM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , three muslin handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a piece of silk lace, value 6 d. a lace tucker, value 6 d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6 d. the goods of Thomas Reynolds .

Mrs. - REYNOLDS sworn.

I live at Kensington ; I lost some things while this girl was in my service at different times, and I spoke to my servant s about it and they all seemed to be innocent; the prisoner came into the kitchen one day and said, she thought she knew the thief; I asked her who she suspected; she told me she suspected the house maid; I asked her what reason as I myself had none; she said, because she had picked up a piece of lace of mine, and had not delivered it when it was enquired for; I called the girl and the girl cried very much, and asked her how she could accuse her, and said, she would go before a justice and clear herself, and declared she knew nothing of the things; then I was very angry with her for accusing this girl whom I thought to be innocent, and I desired her to get her things and go out of the house; she was my upper servant; she brought her box down and came into the parlour to me, and said, madam, I have brought down my box will you please to examine it before I go; I said, I will, and examined her box and found nothing in it; I found some little things but they were of no consequence; I told her to get her cloak and I would discharge her; I looked at her bosom and I saw something look very large; I asked her what she had got there; she said nothing of mine; I insisted on seeing and the things I took out of her bosom; she says, these things my daughter gave her to mend, and I don't know the contrary, they were not given by my knowledge.

Q. Are your daughters here? - They are.

Mr. Garrow. They are here but they are my witnesses, I sent them out as my witnesses.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17921215-90

91. SARAH DUNKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , a woman's cotton gown, value 8 s. and a man's linen shirt, value 10 d. the goods of Thomas Huster .

MARY HUSTER sworn.

I am wife of Thomas Huster . On the 29th of October I lost the things in the indictment, they were in the one pair of stairs, No. 1, Newtoner's-street, Holborn ; I had left the shirt on a horse and had told the girl to fetch it down and she went out; before she came back I went up, some time after I went up and I missed the shirt from the horse, she was gone out for a pail of water, when she came back I thought the shirt might be about the bed where the children lay; I called her up and asked her where the shirt was that was on the horse; she said, she did not know where it was; says I, do not you know where it is; says she, perhaps it may be in the box; I went to the box and the first thing I missed was a gown; I asked where is the gown and shirt; she fell on her knees and said, she wished God might strike her dead if she knew any thing about it; I insisted on it she did, says I, I will give you an old pair of shoes if you will tell me what you have done with them, for I told her she must have pawned them or something; she said at last, she had given them to her mother.

Q. How lately before had you seen this gown and shirt? - I sent her up on the 29th of October, and I missed them on the first of November, I put the gown in the box, on Monday morning, and the shirt on the horse on Tuesday night; it was the day afterwards on Wednesday that I missed the shirt; on the Saturday after, one Mrs. Fitzgerald says to me, have you lost your shirt? Yes, I have, says I, says she, you must come over to Mr. Dover's, the pawnbroker's, and see whether it is your shirt; and I went over and it was my shirt.

SARAH VAUGHAN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Dover, this shirt was brought and I took it in on Tuesday, the gown was pledged on the 29th, we stopped the shirt, did not take it in; it was brought by a person, who called herself Fitzgerald, she pledged the gown in that name. The person that brought it, was admitted an evidence against this girl, and she has run away; she brought the shirt and we asked her whose it was, she said it was Fitzgerald's, I told her I would take it in of Fitzgerald, but I would not take it in of her; she fetched Mrs. Fitzgerald, and Mrs. Fitzgerald came; and she said this girl has brought me to own a shirt, that I know nothing about; she said that the girl lived at the Bell, a public house in Newtoner-street, a servant, she did live at the Bell, and we sent over to her master; then immediately Mrs. Fitzgerald found out that this woman lost her things, either this day or the day after.

Court to Prosecutor. All you know about this girl's taking them is, that when you taxed her with it, she then said she had given them to her mother? - She did, and nobody else goes into the room but the prisoner and me, and two children; she said she met her mother in the street, and gave them to her.

The prisoner called two witnesses to her character, and who proved she was not rightly in her senses at times.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17921215-91

92. ELIZABETH CARTER and ELIZABETH FORD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of

November , nine guineas and three shillings in monies numbered, the monies of Benjamin Painton , in the dwelling house of Edward Macclew .

(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

BENJAMIN PAINTON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Millworth, he deals in corn and lives in Sutton-street; these girls picked me up the 8th of November between seven and eight in the evening; it was Elizabeth Carter , she took me to a house in Sharp's-alley ; I have learned since that it is Macclew's house, otherwise mother William's; we went up stairs; I agreed with Elizabeth Carter for six pence; I gave her a shilling as she wanted some gin, she gave it to Ford to get some gin, then we were going to the agreement and she picked the money out of my pocket; we were both laying on the bed; she pulled the money out of my pocket, and I felt her; it was in my breeches pocket, it was in a purse; I thought she had put her hand into my pocket; I caught hold of her pocket and pulled it off; there was nine Guineas in my purse and some silver; I am sure to the sum; I had not had any strong beer nor spirits, I had nothing but small beer that day; I am certain I had the money when I laid on the bed; I took the six-pence and shilling from the same purse in the same room, I got aside, after that I put the purse back again into my pocket, which was not above a minute or two before we laid on the bed; I found nothing in her pocket; after we had tumbled some little while Elizabeth Ford came up and collared me and tore my shirt collar; after I had tumbled with them Mrs. Macclew came up and I was obliged to throw them down; they would have been too much for me if I had not looked sharp; mother Macclew came up and asked what was the matter; I told her they had taken my money; she asked me how much; I told her nine guineas and some silver, and then she persuaded this Elizabeth Carter to give it up again; she said, she had not got the money; I told her she must have it or know where it was; she said, no; after that Mrs. Carter shewed me the purse laid down in the room just by a bed, not that bed we had been upon.

Q. From the situation you was in with respect to your clothes, was it possible for this purse to drop out? - It was impossible because the pocket was buttoned They were cloth breeches.

Q. Even if it had not been buttoned, could the purse have come to that place where you saw the purse lay? - It was from one side of the room to the other, one shilling laid down by the purse; they were searched in the watch-house but not in the room; I never got but one shilling.

Q. How long had you been earning this? - It was all that ever I got all my life long; I am quite certain as to the girl Carter, she was never out of my custody.

Prisoner Carter. I never saw him till he was in my room, and Mary Williams gave me the purse.

MARY WILLIAMS sworn.

Mr. Macclew is my man; I am not married to the man.

Q. Then this is Edward Macclew 's house? - It is.

Q. Was you there when this poor foolish fellow came in? - It was Elizabeth Carter came in about seven o'clock in the evening, and asked me whether she could have a lodging there; I answered, yes, and put the light on the stairs, and she went up stairs; she had not been up stairs long before I heard a noise up stairs.

Court. Did any body come in with her? - I did not see any body; I put

the light on the stairs and shut the door.

Mr. Garrow. It is not polite to look at your customers. How long had she been up before you heard a noise? - About a quarter of an hour; I heard a man crying out that he had lost his money; I went up stairs and I found there was no light in the room; the man said, I will be obliged to you to bring up a light; I went down stairs and I fetched a light; I found the man and Elizabeth Carter in the room, and I cannot say whether Ford was in the room or came up after me; I found the candle in the room that I put on the stairs, that was out; I took the light and the man said, he had lost his money; I asked how much; he said, a good deal; the man pulled at her pocket, and she strove to save it, and they were all three on the ground again, and then the candle went out again. The candle was on the window.

Q. How did it go out? - Upon my word I cannot tell, I was standing at the door; I think it was put out by their struggling in the room in getting at her pocket, and so I went for another light, and I came back and the man said, he would not leave the room till he had his money; I begged very hard for them to give the money if they had got it; I did not see the man pick up the purse nor the shilling at the bed; I really was frightened.

Q. Did not you see the purse picked up? - I cannot say I did.

Q. Can you say you did not? - Indeed I can say I did not; I did not upon my soul.

Q. How long have you known Mrs. Carter, Mrs. Macclew? - I have known her a good while.

Q. What was the expression you used when she asked you for a lodging? - I put the candle on the stairs and said, Bet you must not make any noise.

Q. What noise did you expect her to make, did you expect that a decent young woman would make a noise? - Because she had been in my place before and made a noise.

Prisoner Carter. When I was distressed for a lodging I goes to her and said, Mrs. Williams will you be so kind as to let me have a lodging; she gave me a candle and told me to go up into the two pair of stairs, and that man was in the room walking about.

ELIZABETH GRAY sworn.

I live near Macclew's house; the first that I heard of it, was that the man said, he would not go without his money; some of the neighbours said, why was not the patrole there; I went to the patrole and gave him notice to go to the house.

WILLIAM MULLEINS sworn.

I am a patrole; I went in consequence of Mrs. Gray's information; I took them into custody; I did not search them; I did not see any thing of the purse. (The purse produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner Carter. I was distressed for a lodging and went to Williams's house; she gave me a light; I went up stairs and that man that is standing there, directly laid hold of me and said, I was the person he wanted; I asked him why; he said, he had been robbed; I called out for assistance, Mary Williams came up; I told him not to ill use me, but call for assistance, and I would not go out of the house till a constable came, when he came I was directly taken to the watch-house and searched before that man's face that is standing there; this young woman was not in my company, I never had the money though I have been lying in prison ever since.

Elizabeth Carter GUILTY of stealing but not in the dwelling house .

(Aged 22)

Transported for seven years .

Elizabeth Ford not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17921215-92

93. JOHN SHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a piece of oak timber four feet and a half in length, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Winkworth .

THOMAS WINKWORTH sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I lost a piece of timber at the corner of Jewin-street, in Redcross-street, Cripplegate , out of a hoard which is usually put up about buildings to be pulled down to keep the property together; I saw the timber the same day it was stole, which was on the 10th of November last; I did not see the prisoner take it, it was in the constable's hand at my own counting house.

WILLIAM FRANCIS sworn.

I am a publican; I took the prisoner coming out of the hoard with it, he had it on his shoulder; I came up to him and asked him what he was going to do with that piece of timber; he said, he was going to carry it to his master; I told him he must carry it a door or two further; I made him bring it to our door; I had him taken into custody and had him taken to his master; the timber was taken into our house that night.

Court to Winkworth. How came the timber at your house - It was brought by Wharton the constable and the prisoner while I was paying the men; I can particularly swear to this timber because I had a piece cut off for a small house I am building in Worship-street; this man was a servant of mine a labourber ; about a fortnight before I had discharged him; I had marked this piece for the man to cut it as is usual with a bit of chalk; the marks are not on now.

Q. Were they on when the constable brought it to you? - I did not examine it then; I have tried it the next day with the other piece of timber, and I found it answer exactly.

Prisoner. I did it for real distress and want; I had not a farthing in the world nor could I get any relief from the parish where I belong to; I took a piece of wood whether it is the same or no I cannot tell.

RALPH STOCKDALE sworn.

I fastened up this hoard between breakfast time and dinner time between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. When did you first know it was broke open? - About half after six in the evening; it was locked with a stock lock; the lock was wrenched open.

Court to Francis. What time was it you took the prisoner? - About half after six in the evening.

CHRISTOPHER WHARTON sworn.

I took the man with it on his shoulder; I see him coming out of the hoard at the same time Mr. Francis did; he said, he took it to get some money to pay his lodgings for he had got nothing to pay his lidgings; that was all I heard; the timber at that present was left with Mr. Francis, afterwards it was taken to the prosecutor.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-93

94. ANN MACARTHY was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Bartholomew Dorgan , about the hour of three in the afternoon, John Dorgan being then in the said dwelling house, and burglariosly and feloniously stealing therein, two cloth coats, value 15 s. two linen shirts, value 3 s. a pair of velveret breeches, value 6 s. a cloth coat, value 2 s. a woollen blanket, value 3 s. the goods of the said Bartholomew Dorgan .

JOHN DORGAN sworn.

I live in George-alley, St. Andrew's parish ; I live in one house with this man that was robbed, he is an uncle of mine; this woman came up two pair of stairs where I was enquiring for a person at the house; I told her there was no such person, with that she made an intent to go down stairs and stopped at the one pair of stairs for the space of ten minutes; with that I heard her at this room door; I came down and I turned her out of the house; she returned back and hanged on the lock of the room door supposing to get it off; she was at the lock near an hour before she could get it open; I stood at the one pair of stairs and saw her down at the ground watching her breaking the lock open; she went in and shut the door to after her on the latch; I went and told James Ragan that she was there, and said, James Ragan come down, and he and I watched at the door till she came out, coming out I apprehended her with the bundle under her arm and took the cloak off her shoulder; I took them both from her before John Ragan , and sent for a constable and gave charge of her.

JOHN RAGAN sworn.

I was in the house when John Dorgan called for me; he told me that this woman entered the house and broke open the lock and I went to the door and met her, and she had the cloak on her shoulders and the bundle under her arm; I stayed at the door till she came out (The things produced and deposed to by John Dorgan , Bartholomew Dorgan being blind.)

Prisoner. This man called me in and had me up stairs; I had 2 s. 3 d. tied up in an handkerchief and they took it from me; I was making a report about loosing my money and they came and pushed me down one pair of stairs, and I attempted to scream out, and they shut the door and they opened it again and I went out; when they pushed me down the one pair of stairs I thought my neck was broke; I thought he was going to give me my money; he called me in and told me to go and pawn these things for him; I told him I would not, with that he told me by Jasus Christ that made him if I would not he would rip me open with his knife; so I would not and I screamed out; so he went and called the constable and told him that I was going to steal them and break open the door, which I know no more about these things if I was to be burned like that candle there; there were no witnesses but the people that came into the house.

Jury to John Dorgan . Was you acquainted with the prisoner previous to this transaction? - To the best of my knowledge I never saw her before.

Q. How came you to be an hour watching her? - We stayed there to see what she would do; as she came up and asked for a person that did not live in the house.

Q. What is the value of these things?

Bridget Dorgan . About 30 s.

GUILTY of stealing but not of the burglary . (Aged 25.)

Imprisoned six months and fined 1 s.

Reference Number: t17921215-94

92. ELEANOR LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , eight pounds weight of mutton, value 2 s. the goods of Richard Hamborough ; and

ANN LLOYD was indicted for feloniously receiving the same knowing it to be stolen ,

RICHARD HAMBOROUGH sworn.

I was at my shop on the 6th of this month, Thursday, my son came to me and told me we had lost some mutton, and said, it was taken by a servant maid and carried to a sister of her's; I went and saw the mutton at her sister's house, Ann LLoyd ; I cannot swear it was my mine I saw it and examined it exactly.

Prisoner's Counsel. You speak like an honest man, I think it must be a very nice point to swear to a piece of mutton.

Both not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17921215-95

95. CHARLOTTE THOMPSON ELIZABETH THOMPSON and MARY ROBINSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , a silver watch, value 2 l. 10 s. a steel chain, value 6 d. a steel seal, value 6 d. a base metal key, value 1 d. the goods of Robert Kirkpatrick .

ROBERT KIRKPATRICK sworn.

On the 11th of November I lost a watch, nearly a new one, it cost me seven guineas, I valued it at 1 l. 10 s. a steel chain, a steel seal and a metal watch key. I was going along the Strand , Charlotte Thompson was standing with several of them at the corner of an alley further on with another woman, and she took hold of my arm, she was on the right side of the Strand as I was going up, and she asked me to have a glass of wine, or something of that sort; I refused giving her the wine, and she still kept hold of my arm till we got to the corner of a passage when I stopped with her; we had not stopped above a minute or two, but I put my hand into my pocket and missed my watch; I was not sensible when she took it; I asked her if she had got it; she said, she had not got it and laughed, and just as I missed it I turned round, and the other women that were with her was gone; at the time I first met her there were two other women with her; but she stayed with me till the watchman came up voluntarily; when he came up I gave her in charge to the watchman; she was taken to the watch-house and searched and nothing found on her; the other two women was not near me, they were within a yard or two, I don't think they were near enough to touch me; she had got hold of my right arm and I never let her quit my hold till I charged her with the watch. I was sent for to the public office in Lemon-street; these other two women were in custody and the watch was found on them; I saw the watch at the office; I advertised the watch next morning with a reward; but I found it was taken immediately. I went on the 12th, they were taken on the 11th.

Mr. Garrow. Mr. Kirkpatrick I believe these ladies were apprehended in the neighbourhood of East Smithfield; that is a considerable distance from the Strand? - It may be, I don't know where it is, I am a stranger in town.

Q. Very likely then your curiosity might lead you to converse with more ladies then one; - I believe there was another spoke to me somewhere in the Strand.

Q. You seem a good humoured pleasant man, and no doubt inclined to indulge

the ladies as far as in your power; did you stop any length of time? - No.

Q. Pray Mr. Kirkpatrick where had you been spending your evening? - In Covent-garden.

Q. Drank a little of course? - Yes, a little.

Q. Had you been in Maiden-lane? - No.

Q. Pray Mr. Kirkpatrick how lately before you came into the Strand did you know you had your watch? - I had had my watch when I was in Covent garden.

Q. You had been at the coffee house that evening? - I had been at the Carpenter's-arms in the middle of the Garden.

Q. This is one of the early houses; I observed that the expression you used when this was fresh in your memory was, that you verily believed that you had the watch when you went out of that coffee house? - If you will give me leave to explain it, I think it necessary. Some gentlemen had gone to that house and had had a little supper and drank some liquor there; one of them there pulled out my watch; he said, I think you are rather poorly, we will try how your pulse beats.

Mr. Garrow. I believe then I need not feel how your pulse beats any further.

All three not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17921215-96

96. ELIZABETH HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , a watch with a case made of base metal, value 2 l. a man's cloth great coat, value 5 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 1 s. the goods of Thomas Parker , in the dwelling house of John Conte .

THOMAS PARKER sworn.

I am a manufacturer . On Friday the night of 7th of December, between the hours of eleven and twelve; coming from the west-end of the town, something disguised in liquor, I was accosted by the prisoner, (to the best of my recollection) in Broad-street, St. Giles's, and solicited to accompany her to her lodgings, which, at that time, I did not know where they were. I went with her. - I was conducted up to a one pair of stairs room, where there was then a light, and a small fire. - I was there about a quarter of an hour. - I was then further solicited to take off my clothes, I did; and I went to bed with her. - How long I was I don't know; but I fell asleep very soon, from the effects of the liquor I had drank. I awoke; and reflection and recollection came a-cross me so strong, that it alarmed me a great deal. I enquired what o'clock it was. - My reason for asking this, was, I had hung my watch close by the bed-side, on the corner of the chimney-piece, which I then missed. The chimney-piece is not a yard from the bed, to the best of my remembrance. Missing my watch, I immediately got up, and was going to dress myself. I should observe to your lordship it was then dark; my clothes were removed all about the room, and when I wanted them I found sometimes one, and sometimes the other; finding my situation to be such, I called out and gave an alarm; the prisoner asked me what I wanted, why I made such a noise; I told her I thought there was sufficient reason, as I have been robbed, and as such I would wish to know what was become of my watch, she said she knew nothing about it; the alarm I had given brought some persons into the room; but whom I cannot tell, one was a woman, and the other was a man; the man enquired what was the matter, I told him accordingly, I had been robbed,

I missed a shirt pin, a pair of silk stockings, a man's cloth great coat; my pocket I found had been rifled; the man that came into the room said I am sorry for it, I will go down and call my father, he went down and came up again, and said his father was coming; he came and brought his father, and we came down into the street and called the first watchman near; his name is Edward White , he called another watchman, who soon came, we all went together, and we found the door shut and the padlock on it; they opened the door and we went in, and nothing could be seen but a number of my papers laying about the floor; we came down stairs again, on that I was taken to the watch-house, at St. Giles's, I went there with the watchman; I then related to the constable of the night the circumstances, I had no money left, as such I intended to stay there, having to go home in the morning; about seven o'clock in the morning the watchman White, brought the prisoner in with another woman, the prisoner had on my great coat as stated in the indictment; the master of that watch-house, Mr. Rundly took the coat off from her back; I can swear it to be mine, the woman I believe had nothing on her.

Q. You admit yourself to be so very drunk that you fell asleep as soon as you got to bed? - It was not from the quantity of liquor, but the badness, that made me drunk; I had not drank more than six-pennyworth of rum and water, I might have drank a little more of porter that day, I had called at a house in the evening.

Q. Was you sober enough to know that you had your watch about you? - I am sure I had and the pin to the best of my recollection I slipped into my coat pocket where my pocket book was.

Q. Had you any light in the room? - When I went into the room there was a light and a fire.

Q. What was your watch? - A metal watch.

Q. Did you ever find your silk stockings again? - No.

Q. What did you do for a pair of stockings? - I had two pair on, I had a pair of under ones, under my silk stockings, I found the one pair, but the silk ones I lost.

Q. What might be the value of this watch be? - 15 s. or 20 s.

Q. What might be the value of your silk stockings? - 2 s.

Q. What might be the value of this pin? - 15 s. or 20 s.

Q. Now in whose house was you at this time? - It was No. 6, Parker's-lane, John Conte I recollect being told is the owner of the house.

Q. Had you made this woman any present? - I suppose I had, for I had no money about me left.

Jury. Do you think from the state you was in you can speak to certainty how long it was before you went to bed? - About a quarter of an hour.

Q. Do you mean to swear that is the woman? - It was.

Q. You was in a drunken state and don't know whether you made her a present or not? - I had made her a present.

Q. How do you know it is the woman? - I do know that.

Q. Have you any other reason than from the recollection you have of that time? - No.

Q. Suppose you had not seen her that morning, or she had been brought without the great coat, should you have known her then? - Yes.

Q. It is very extraordinary you should be able to swear so exactly to the person of the woman, and yet not know whether you gave her money or no? - By that, I

meant that I did not conceive she had taken any money from me.

EDWARD WHITE sworn.

I am a watchman; to the best of my knowledge I believe it was about three o'clock, when this gentleman called me; I was calling the hour of three, down Parker's-lane , and he said he had been robbed; I asked him what he had been robbed of, he recollected he had been robbed of a pair of silk stockings, a watch, &c. I went and fetched another watchman, and went down to the house immediately; it was John Conte 's house; I knew the house before he lived in it; I fetched the other watchman and went up stairs, and there was a padlock on the door; I have been a watchman there seven years; I put my hand on the padlock, and I saw it was fastened, and the staple came out, and I went in, and there was nobody in the room at all; we searched the room all over, we could find nothing but papers throwed about the room; the prosecutor said he had no money, he said the best way would be to go down to the watch-house; so I went along with him to the watch-house; and when I came with him to the watch-house, I told him that if he would give me his number where he lived, very likely I might find it out who had robbed him; he gave me his directions, I went back on my beat; about half after six in the morning I called the same watchman, and we went up to the same room; and I found the prisoner at the bar laying on the bed with another woman, and she had this great coat on her; I asked her whose coat it was, she said it was one of Jack Hall's; that was a man she lived with some time back; I told her, I must take her down to the watch-house; and when we came there the prosecutor he said it was his coat. (Produced and deposed to.)

VALENTINE RUMBLY sworn.

I am watch-house keeper; when the watchman brought the prisoner into the watch-house; he said he had got the prisoner that had robbed the gentleman; that was about seven o'clock in the moning; as soon as the prosecutor saw the prisoner, he said that is the woman, she has got my great coat on her back; now he said there was some of the buttons broke; I immediately made her pull it off her back, I looked at the buttons and some were broke.

Prisoner. I had a young child bad with the small pox, I had been to see it at the nurse's how it was; coming along Holborn, I met this gentleman, he said he wished to go to bed, for he had not a farthing of money about him, and that he would leave me his great coat in pledge till the morning; he awaked in the night and said he was very dry; I got up in the morning, put on his coat and went for some purl, when I came back I found he was gone.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-97

97. PATRICK KEEFE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of November , 30 pound weight of lead, value 5 s. affixed to a certain dwelling-house .

In a 2d COUNT, he was charged with feloniously ripping the lead, with intent to steal it, and several other Counts for the same felony, only varying the manner of charging it.

JOHN HARRIS sworn.

I am master of the work-house St. Georges, Hanover-Square , the prisoner at the bar is the person I found the lead on, there is a place under repair adjoining

to that work-house and belonging to it, the prisoner at the bar was working at that building between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I had business there, and I went and saw the prisoner at the bar descending at the foot of the ladder, which was erected for the repairs of the building, the ladder rested on the parapets, and there was a communication to the top of the work-house, where the lead was, I saw him with the basket partly on his head, and partly rested against the back part of his shoulder, by that I conceived by his walking along, that he had something heavy in it; I followed him, as soon as I got to the gate, a man opened the gate, and let him out, I said to the Porter, John Read follow that man and bring him back, I stood at the door and saw Read bring him back, when he came back, he had the basket on his shoulder, I then ordered Read and another person to take the basket off his head, taking the basket off his head, there was the jack that was over the lead, with that I immediately took out the lead and I marked it, I then ordered him to the watch-house, after I had lodged him in the watch-house, I went to the roof of the work-house, there I observed a great quantity of lead cut away all of it fresh. I took the lead in the basket into my possession and kept it, it was taken to the roof of the work-house, I sent for a plumber and had it beat out on purpose, it fitted and corresponded even with the nails.

Q. Was he examined at the time he was sent to the watch-house? - No, nothing further.

Q. Did you search his pockets or person? - No.

Mr. Garrow. Then of course you did not see any instrument by which this could be cut? - There was a bricklayer's ladder just by an adjacent building.

Q. This man was a bricklayer's labourer - He was?

Q. Do you know so despotic a sovereign as a bricklayer is over his labourer, his man was under the controul of such a monarch? - I cannot say.

Q. That is an universal proposition? - there is no rule without an exception.

Q. Had he taken in his beer that day? - I really do not know, but he had taken in a great deal of gin.

Q. How long had the poor fellow worked there? - I had observed four or five days.

Q. Is his master here? - I cannot say.

JOHN READ sworn.

I was desired by Mr. Harris to follow this man; I did, and that is the person; I followed him about eight or nine yards; I desired him to come back, and he did willingly; says he, that I will; when he came back we examined his basked and there was the lead.

Mr. Garrow. He said, he would go back very willingly, and seemed to have his share of gin that day.

The prisoner called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . (Aged 27.)

Imprisoned six months and publickly whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-98

98. JOHN HODGSON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Brown , about the hour of six in the night of the 23d of November , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, a dimity waistcoat, value 2 s. a pair of nankeen breeches,

value 2 s. two linen sheets, value 3 s. a silk hat, value 6 d. the goods of the said John Brown .

The witnesses examined separate by the prisoner's desire.

ELIZABETH BROWN the Elder sworn.

I am the wife of John Brown , we live in Little Ormond-yard, Ormond-street , he keeps a little house at 11 l. a year. On the 22d of last month, a little before six in the evening, I heard an alarm over my head up stairs, I said to my eldest daughter, Betsey, did you lock the door? I was a washing at the time, I was in the room on the ground floor in the parlour, when I supposed the prisoner was coming down stairs, he made a scrape with his foot, as I supposed to feel the stairs, I made answer to my daughter, there is some body up stairs, with that I took the candle, went out, and immediately the prisoner at the bar was abreast with me, with the bundle under his arm, he was in the passage, passing my parlour door; he did nothing to me, but his elbow was against my breast as I went to snatch the bundle. I cries out, you villain, you scoundrel, you have robbed me, with that he rushed to the street door, a person saw the prisoner at the bar come out of the house, and drop the bundle; he went behind a water spout, against a stable; I saw him again in two minutes; I went out with the candle in my hand; I never lost sight of him from the first moment I saw him, till after he was taken to the watch-house; the young woman is in Court that picked up the bundle.

Prisoner. This woman took hold of me as I was making water at the door, I was making water and a man run out by me. - I never lost sight of him till he was taken, I followed him out immediately, and he turned to the left hand, my eldest daughter took him at the water-spout.

Court. You do not state how this man came in the house. - I sent my youngest daughter about half after five for some candles, when she came in, I said, have you shut the door, she turned back again and latched it, I heard her; he must open the latch and go up the stairs, and the key being in the one pair of stairs, he turned the key; it was the street door my youngest daughter shut when she came in; my daughters are both here; there was no one in the house but us three.

ELIZABETH BROWN , the younger sworn.

I was the person that locked the room door, the last time I was up was at five o'clock, after I had done what I wanted, I locked the door and left the key in the door; I did not hear the man come in, I was at work at the table in the parlour; my mother said, about a quarter before six, who is up stairs, my mother opened the door to see who was there, and the man was a full breast at the door, with the bundle under his arm; I saw the bundle, she says, you have robbed me, he never spoke, but rushed out of the passage; I followed him with the candle in my hand, I never lost sight of him, he turned to the left hand corner at a farriers shop and fell against the stable, I took him.

Q. Had you any man to assist you? - Yes, there was a man who saw him run from the bundle, he ran to take him.

Q. What happened when you took him? - The people ran out to my assistance, I held him till the constable came, he said he was not the man, it was a tall man in a blue coat; the way I was sure of him was, he had got a scarlet waistcoat on when I saw him in the passage, and that made me sure of him, and I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner. That woman came and takes hold of me while I was making water. - You are the very man that was in the house.

- BROWN,

Q. How old are you? - Not quite ten.

Q. Was you ever sworn before? - At Westminster twice.

Q. Suppose you tell a story, have you ever been taught what will become of you, if you tell what is untrue? What will be your punishment? - Go to the bad man.

Q. Who do you mean by the bad man? - The Devil.

Sworn.

Q. Did you see the man at the house? - I was the last person that came in, and when I went in, I shut the door and latched it, I am sure the latch was down; I then went and shut the parlour door.

Q. Did you see the man in the house? - I did, but not till my mother came and said she was sure somebody was up stairs, and when my mother opened the room door, I saw the man with a red waistcoat on, and he had a white bundle under his arm, he went out, and my sister ran after him, and he fell back against the coach house, at a farrier's shop; I did not see him fall but my sister did, and she catched him, I see my sister run after him.

Prisoner. I never saw the child at all.

JOHN SAMUEL sworn.

I am a carpenter, on the 23d of November, Friday, about six in the evening, I was putting up my window shutters, I heard a cry of stop thief, I could discern a person very well, without the assistance of a candle, by his clothes, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Brown's house, and saw him drop the bundle about two yards from the door. I immediately went in pursuit of him, but in turning the corner, I lost sight of him, I went forwards about sixty yards, and returned back again, and saw Elizabeth Brown have hold of a man, I over-run the man in his turning the corner. I have no doubt but that is the man.

Prisoner. When I was in the watch-house, he said to me they cannot hurt you man? - I never said that at any time, I never spoke to him in my life.

WILLIAM MERRYFEILD sworn.

I am beadle of St. George's the Martyrs, I was sent for, they said there was a thief in the yard, when I went out and looked at the man, and some woman was fastened on him, I went down to our night beadle and brought him, he came up and searched him, and found nothing on him.

BENJAMIN SPRIGGS sworn.

I am the beadle of St. George's parish, I went up and found the prisoner in the girl's hand, and took him into custody, the prisoner told me when I was coming up with him, that he lodged in Red-lion-street. (The bundle produced, and the contents deposed to by having lost such things, a piece being put in the neck of the waistcoat, and the backs being one thing and the fronts another; the breeches were seated; the sheets, one patched, and one with a hole in it; and the silk hat by the ribbon and make.)

Prosecutor. The sheets were taken off the bed, the blanket and coverlid being turned down.

Prisoner. Please you my lord, I am a seafaring man , I had been down to Deptford, that day to get a birth to go to India, I could not, I came home to my brother's, and meeting a shipmate, and had a pint of beer, and came out, and was making water, and this woman came out and took hold of me, and said, I believe this man has been in my house, and presently, she says, and you was the man, directly she sent for a constable, and sent me to the watch-house; I know nothing of it, my lord.

MARY CUDWORTH sworn.

I heard the alarm, and I went out and picked up the bundle; I did not see the prisoner taken, I picked it up immediately

as he was taken, it was about six o'clock, I gave it to Mrs. Brown.

Jury. Where was Mrs. Brown when you picked up the bundle? - They were with the prisoner.

GUILTY of stealing, but not of the burglary . (Aged 26.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-99

99. JAMES MACQUIRE and SAMUEL CUNNINGHAM were indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling of John Davis , about the hour of two in the night, of the 4th of December , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, a watch, with an inside case of silver, and the outside covered with shagreen, value 1 l. two other watches, with the inside and outside cases made of metal, value 1 l. 10 s. another metal watch, value 10 s. nine silver tea spoons, value 12 s. two silver, desert spoons, value 8 s. the goods of John Davis .

MARTHA DAVIS sworn.

I am wife of John Davis , I live in Broad-street, St. Giles's , my husband is a pawnbroker , I went to bed at half past twelve, on the 4th of December; my shop and the windows was safe then, and I locked the shop door myself, the boys sleep in the shop, and I locked the boys in, as I always do; I have two boys. At about a quarter past two in the morning, I heard the watchmens rattles go, and I heard them halloo out Davis your house is broke open, I went down stairs with just a petticoat on, and when I went down I opened the shop door, and saw a light through, I then made the boys get out of bed and opened the shop door immediately, I believe the biggest boy was getting out of bed; I found my property was all gone on one side of the window, so far as it could be reached, to the value of 30 l. of property; they had taken a pannel out of the shutter, and broke two panes of glass, and reached all they could on one side of the window. I then slipped on my things, and heard there were two men taken to the watch-house, that was running across the street from my house, and I went down to the watch-house, and when I went I saw them, the man in blue Samuel Cunningham , I know his face, that he was in my shop on Monday pledging a shirt: I never saw the other to my knowledge in my life. I know nothing of the robbery any further.

JOHN LANE sworn.

I am an officer of St. Giles's in the Fields; on the 5th of December, I was coming up Drury-lane, with another man, about one in the morning, or twenty minutes after, we saw these two men with another in company standing at the corner of Great Queen-street, Drury-lane, I went over to them, and I asked them what they were doing there? one of them pretended to be immediately in liquor, which was Macquire, he told me they were doing an act of charity in helping him home to his lodgings, being drunk, I told him I should take them to the watch-house and examine them.

Court. You did very right. - I took them to the watch-house and examined them; they told the same story, and he pretended to be the same in liquor, I asked them where they lived? one of them told me he lived in London-wall, Macquire told me he lived in White-hart-yard, the other told me he lived in Dyott-street, St. Giles's, says I, if you will promise me immediately to go to your own homes, I would let you go about your business; in about half an hour after that, or rather more, I was coming up Drury-lane, and I heard a rattle spring in St. Giles's, I was

very near the corner of St. Giles's, I see a watchman stand by a box taking no notice of what was passing, he is not here; I asked him why he was not doing his duty? he asked me whether he was to spring his rattle? I said by all means, go by this side of the way, and I will go the other, as soon as I got the other side, I saw three men run from the clothes-shop just close by Mr. Davis's, and run towards High-street, the rattles were busy springing, and I heard a rattle spring up towards the church, these two men were running from that part, I put myself immediately to catch them, as soon as they came down, I catched one in one hand, and the other in the other, and I said, you are the same men as I had before, as soon as ever the other person came to my assistance, I called for the watchman, and asked him why he sprang his rattle? he said, that these men had been at his beat all night, and he sprang his rattle to get rid of them, says I, I will now fix them; I took them to the watch-house, as soon as I had given the charge, I came up to seek the other, and coming up Dennis Galwell , he pointed to a place where the pannel was cut out, he says, look here Mr. Lane, and pointed to a pannel cut out, with that I alarmed the people, and Mrs. Davis at first came down; it seemed, to the best of my knowledge, as if it was cut on one side by a knife, and with that the other side was forced out of its socket, it was the whole pannel about two feet in length, and a foot and half in width, after that I had alarmed the people, I went immediately to the watch-house and searched the men, and in searching Cunningham, I took this cloth and those cards, I asked him what he did with those cards? he said, he got his bread by them, I asked him in what manner? he said, he went about to public houses shewing something of slight of hand with them. Whether I found this knife on Macquire or Cunningham I cannot say. While I was there part of this property was brought to me, which had been picked up by a lamp-lighter, William Williams , two watches, and a case of another; after that I received nine spoons from another evidence, I forgot his name; then after that I received two desert spoons through the rails of Mr. Kirkman's brewhouse from one of his men; after that I received the other things brought in by other people, but I cannot positively say who.

Prisoner Macquire. Where did you find us first in the morning? - At the door of the corner of Great Queen-street.

Q. Where did you take us last? - At the corner of Great Dyott-street.

- sworn.

I am a bridle-bit and strap-maker, No. 4, King-street, Drury-lane, on the 5th of December, about one o'clock in the morning, we found three men standing in Great Queen-street, we took them to the watch-house, and they were set at liberty, on condition that they would every one separate, and go to their own homes; about an hour after we went out again, in the middle-way of St. Giles's, the rattles sprung, and Mr. Lane ran immediately, and he and I collared them, I am sure these are the two men I saw at the top of Queen-street; those two men were coming very fierce along the place where the property was found, and we stopped them; I was not there when the property was found.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a lamp lighter, I was out lighting my lamps between one and two, by the time I got up to Mr. Kirkman's brewhouse, it might be about half after two, as nigh as I could guess, I saw there Mr. Kirkman's man standing with a watch, and they picked up a couple of spoons, and I went a little further, and I kicked the watch before me, I saw no

man run away, and a watchman picked up some spoons, and said, they are silver; looking about again, I found a watch case in the dirt, just off the cirb; looking round a little further again, I found another watch; looking round again in Mr. Kirkman's area, there was another; I could not get it there, the patrole came up and asked me, what was the matter? says I, here is one down the area, and I cannot get at it. When I heard the alarm, I went to the watch-house, and Mrs. Davis said they were her property.

AARON BLAKE sworn.

I am a watchman; about half past two o'clock this lamp lighter was coming home and the ladder was standing at Mr. Kirkman's door; I saw him stopping for something; and he said I have got some spoons; and I saw the lamp lighter pick up something, and I picked up nine spoons myself; and I took them to the watch-house and gave them to the constable, Mr. Lane.

DENNIS GALWELL sworn.

I am a watchman, I cried the hour of two o'clock, past Mrs. Davis's house; and the house was safe then; I went into Salutation-court, and coming out I saw a man pass the court, out in Dury-lane; there were three men, and my brother watchman ran after them, pursued them up to the Hampshire-hog-yard, and there I lost them; I came back again, I found Mr. Lane with the prisoners; when I came out of the watch-house to my beat, I found the house had been broke open.

DENNIS BUCKLEY sworn.

I am patrole, past two o'clock in the morning I heard the rattles spring; I ran towards the broadway; I did not see the men till I saw them at the watch-house.

Court to Lane. Where is Mr. Davis's house; did the men run from that spot? - They did, and I took them not above an hundred yards from the spot; I cannot tell what became of the third. (The articles deposed to by Mrs. Davis.)

Prisoner Cunningham. That same night I was drinking along with some acquaintances on Ludgate-hill; it was very nigh one o'clock, and a young man asked me which way I went home, I told him up Holborn, says he I will go along with you immediately; I went up along with him, and he treated me with a glass of gin at the watering house in Holborn: as I was coming along very nigh Dury-lane, I saw this man on the street, between sitting and laying; says I friend, what do you lay there sleeping, get up, and I roused him up, and another young man came up; says he what is the matter, says I this young man is rather intoxicated with liquor, I asked him to get up; so with that Mr. Lane and another gentleman came up: says Mr. Lane what do you all do there; he said it was proper we should be at our homes, at that time of night, so this young man seemed rather to give Mr. Lane some ill language; he took us to the watch-house; the constable of the night asked us where we lived, and our names, and thought proper to discharge us; when we came out the young man said for your civility I will treat you with something to drink; says I, if you will come along with me, I suppose there is a house open very near where I live, I went to the house, they would not admit us nor sell us any thing; we turned up Dyott-street, and was going towards King-street to a watering house, says this young man I am locked our of my lodgings; and the other young man said he lived at London-wall, so that he supposed he was locked out too; I was not above fifty yards from my lodging, I

met Mr. Lane again; so he took us two to the watch-house; and the other young man he slipt away, some how or other, and he took us to the watch-house, and gave charge against us for being disorderly, I was not much in liquor, but a little; we both went to the watch-house and fell asleep, about half an hour after; Mr. Lane and two or three more made us strip, and searched us all over; and said there had been some shop broke open; the next morning they took and tied us two together, and examined us, and we were committed to Clerkenwell for re-examination.

Prisoner Macquire. I live in White-hart-yard, Drury-lane; I had done my work about seven o'clock, I went to the public house, and was drinking till about half past twelve, and I says to the landlord of the house, I wish you would let me lay here, for I am afraid I am locked out, he said he could not; so with that I goes up where the old play house is pulling down, and I had a glass of gin there, and I went up Drury-lane, and I tumbled down in the street, till this young man found me, and we were all taken up to the watch-house; and when we came out again I said for your good civility, I will give you something to drink.

Court to Prosecutor. They said they had two hearings before the magistrate? - They had three.

Lane. That was because we thought there was a person, who was come into New Prison, who could tell us something of it.

The prisoner Macquire called two witnesses to his character.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-100

100. MARGARET LONDON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of December , one cotton gown, value 5 s. the goods of Richard Hedges .

ELIZABETH HEDGES sworn.

I am wife to Richard Hedges , I went out about eight and returned about nine or ten, and laid the gown in the chair, and went out again directly, and when I came back again I returned about twelve, and found my gown was gone; I had a padlock to my door, but any body might put their hands through and take the gown out of the chair; it was a very indifferent padlock, and it gave way, and I went down to the pawnbroker's and found it; I told the woman the prisoner, that I lost the gown, she lived up two pair of stairs, and I lived up one; her husband is a ballast heaver , she came down stairs and helped to look after it but did not find it; I asked at this gentleman's house if such a thing had been brought, and he said he believed there had

EDWARD PRITCHARD sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Ratcliff-highway, it is about a quarter of a mile from the place where this woman lives; on the 8th of December, the prisoner at the bar, pawned this gown about eleven o'clock; I am sure that is the woman, and I am sure that is the gown; I lent her half a crown on it. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I was coming down, and I picked it up in the passage, and did not know it was her's; I was distressed and I went and pawned it; I have an husband and he is sick, and I have a large family.

Court to Prosecutor. Has she a large family? - She has three children.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-101

101. MARGARET CAWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , two cotton shawls, value 12 d. four linen aprons, value 4 s. five linen sheets, value 10 s. four white linen shirts, value 4 s. four check linen shirts, value 4 s. two pocket linen handkerchiefs, value 12 d. two silk neck handkerchiefs, value 12 d. a pair of woman's stays, value 2 s. the goods of Adam Lindsey .

ADAM LINDSEY sworn.

I live in Church-lane, St. Martin's, No. 3 , my chief business is being a watchman at night; I have been twenty-six years in one place, this woman was nursing my wife, taking care of an old woman sixty-six years of age, delirious in her head; I had her from the workhouse, to nurse her, to give her so much a week, she came to me the 5th of June, and she was taken up for this misdemeanor on the 22d of November, she lived with us all that time; she carried then away, and pledged them at a pawnbroker's unknown to me; and one day when I was going out I wanted a shirt and I could not find one, or else I had not known to this day; I missed them about the 4th of November, I think, I cannot say to the day; I was under a mistrust of the woman, and I thought nobody else could get at them, but my son or daughter in law; but here my son asked her about them; and she owned to taking them.

Q. Are you sure they were stole? - I am sure they were carried away unknown to me, they were taken without my leave, consent or knowledge.

- GORM sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner at the bar brought me several things: she pawned some things since the 17th of July to this present time; she brought me the sheets, and I asked her whom she brought them from, she said she was nursing a poor woman, and I might go over and see her; the shirt was pawned on the 29th of October, for a 6 d. there is another pawned the 8th of September, for 15 d. I am sure this is the woman that pawned these things.

Prisoner. Old Mrs. Lindsey told me to take them.

Prosecutor. My wife is quite delirious incapable of any business whatever.

Prisoner. She can eat very hearty, knows when she want victuals and drink, and can ask for it; you never allowed enough to keep the house with.

The prisoner called one witness who had known her twenty years, and proved she was on the parish books insane.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you ever hear any thing of that? - Not till lately.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-102

102. ELIZABETH SPRINGALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of December , one linen shirt, value 3 s. the goods of Thomas Clark , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BOYLE sworn.

I am a shopman to Thomas Clark , on the 7th of December, when I came from dinner about two o'clock, I found the prisoner at the bar looking at some shirts in the shop; Mr. Clark is a linen draper and sells ready made shirts, these were ready made; I dismissed the apprentice who was shewing them, and sent him to his dinner; I shewed her several shirts and she disagreed with the buying; but said she would call in the evening, she offered me so much short, that I really could not take it, I told her she had better call in the evening with

her husband; she went to the counter end which is facing Broad-street, St. Giles's ; and I went to the door facing Holborn she went out at St. Giles's door; crossing Broad-street; and I went up Bow-street; I missed a shirt from the counter, and I pursued her; I saw her go into the pork shop the corner of Bow-street, in Brewer's-street; I went in and took hold of her cloak; and asked her if she had seen a shirt, she said no; I lifted up her cloak and said, this is the thing I want; and I took her down to the shop; and sent for a constable; I took the shirt from under her cloak in the pork shop; and I have kept it ever since, but I should not have known that a shirt had been missing, if I had not seen it lay in a particular place; I am sure that is the the woman. (The shirt produced and deposed to.)

GEORGE HARRISON sworn.

This woman came in and asked to look at some shirts about 5 s. but she did not buy any; I am sure that is the woman.

Prisoner. I have three small children besides this in my arms; and I am very innocent of it; I went to buy a shirt for my husband, and I had this child in my arms, and I suppose I must have taken it up with the child; I am very innocent, or else I would not have gone into the pork shop.

Court to Prosecutor. In what manner was this shirt under her arm? - It was put up, close up to her arm; she is often a customer of ours but we never had any suspicion of her before that time.

GUILTY . (Aged 35.)

Imprisoned six months , fined 1 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-103

103. WILLIAM DICKENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , eight flannel waistcoats faced with sattin, value 30 s. eight linen handkerchiefs, value 10 s. thirteen cotton handkerchiefs, value 13 s. the goods of John Jones , in his dwelling house .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JOHN JONES sworn.

I was not present at the robbery.

BENJAMIN FOREMAN sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Jones; his foreman, he lives at No. 3, Jerusalem-passage Clerkenwell ; about three o'clock in the afternoon on Thursday last the 13th of December, the prisoner at the bar came to buy a pair of breeches, and he tried two pair, neither of them fitted him, he went away and was sorry he gave me so much trouble; a little before four he came again the second time, and he said he went to the other shop, and could not suit himself, and he said he must have a pair of ours, on which I turned round to the window to reach him some breeches that hung on the rail at the window; I pulled down three or four pair, he said he had put on one of them pairs before, and if we had no others fitted him better he would have them; when I turned round and perceived one of the flannel waistcoats faced with sattin hanging out of his breeches down at his shoes, with an intent to put a pair on, and as he stooped down I perceived something up behind the back of his coat, a large lump which gave me a suspicion, he had taken something belonging to my master, more than the waistcoat in the breeches; I said nothing, but I went round to the door in the passage, and I called my mistress, Mrs. Jones, and she came to the shop door, the door where we were, and I told her that that man had robbed us, for that I saw the waistcoat in his breeches, and I believed there was something up his back beside; I took up the

handle of something that screws up the kitchen grate, and told him if he did not deliver the waistcoat and my mistresses's property up, I would knock him on the head; he asked me what I meant, I told him I meant my mistresses's goods, I would have them; he denied for some time that he had any thing; on which he pulled out the waistcoats out of his breeches; eight flannel waistcoats he had not buttoned up in his breeches, he could not pull them up, the waistcoats were so large, that was how I happened to see the waistcoats, he took them out of his breeches himself; I told my mistress to send for a constable, and I searched him, my mistress sent for a constable, before the constable came, he pulled out thirteen cotton handkerchiefs out of his pockets, and up his back, I had seen these handkerchiefs and flannel waistcoats in Mr. Jones shop, when he was in the shop before at three o'clock, they were linen handkerchiefs concealed either up his back, or in his pocket. A young man that was going by, heard me say to Mrs. Jones go after a constable, and stopped; I told Mrs. Jones to call that young man in, and he assisted us; he said why did not you let me take them out before you took me; the young man came in and I see him take the red handkerchiefs out of his pocket after he came in; the waistcoats are worth 30 s. and more, the cotton handkerchiefs 13 s. and the linen handkerchiefs, 10 s.

Prisoner. Why did not you take them out of my breeches when you said they were in first? - I thought you was a stronger man then me; and I thought I could get to the door and lock you in.

Q. Did not I tell you I was the person that was in half an hour or three quarters of an hour ago? - You did.

ELIZABETH HAYES sworn.

I live in Jerusalem passage, St. John's-square; last Thursday about a quarter before four I was standing facing Mr. Jones's shop, and I saw the prisoner take one of the handkerchiefs out of his pocket, or from some where about his clothes.

Prisoner. Where was you when you saw this? - I was standing at my own door, it is not above three yards across.

JOHN LEE sworn.

Last Thursday I was in Jerusalem-passage; and I heard somebody say, Go, and fetch a constable. I immediately turned my head about, and I heard Mr. Jones's foreman say, Call that young man in. I immediately went into the shop, and there I saw a good many flannel waistcoats strewed about. As the prisoner at the bar was stooping, I there observed him pull out some red handkerchiefs out of his pocket, and drop them on the floor, pretending to buckle his shoe.

Prisoner. The gentleman says, I pulled them out of my pocket; and the other says, I pulled them from behind me. - Whether it was from behind you you pulled them out, or out of your pocket, I cannot say positively, but you pulled them from you.

SAMUEL BURR sworn.

I produce the articles delivered to me in Mr. Jones's shop (deposed to).

Prisoner. I went into this shop to buy a pair of breeches, and the gentleman pulled me down five or six pair; two pair I tried on, and they were full large, - They would not do. I want a pair says I with strings. I went out - there were none fitted me. I went to the Coach and Horses, in Clerkenwell-green, and I stayed about an hour. When I came back, I called for a pair of breeches;

and the gentlewoman came to the door, and she called this young man in. When I went in, says I, you remember I was here about three-quarters of an hour ago. He took me down a pair of breeches: says I, they will not do, because they are straps, and I want strings. Trying on the breeches, I pulled down my apron, and a parcel of things tumbled down with it - Some fell behind my breeches, and some just at the knee of my breechs. The young man came round, and says, What are you at? - If you stir, I will cut your head open. You talk foolish, says I. He calls out, directly, for the gentlewoman of the house; and she came, and the gentleman came in; and the neighbours picked up several things at the same time: but as for having any thing about me, I had not.

Court. How came this bundle up your back? - I had nothing behind my back - Is it possible to suppose, that a man should have such a bulk about him without being perceived? When the constable came he searched me, and found 17 s. and 6 d. in my pocket.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s. (Aged 41.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-104

104. ELIZABETH RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , one yard and a half of kerseymere, value 15 s. the goods of Samuel Berridge , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL BERRIDGE sworn.

I am a man's mercer ; I keep a shop in Holborn ; I know nothing of the robbery.

GEORGE HINDES sworn.

I work under Mr. Berridge; I am a journeyman; I was standing in the parlour adjoining to Mr. Berridge's shop; the prisoner came in, and asked for black camblet; there was another woman in company with her; Mr. Berridge told her, we do not sell black camblet; and she told them, she had nothing like it but only shalloon; the other woman who was in company with the prisoner, said she wanted bombazeen; Mrs. Berridge got up on the counter to reach it down, and shewed the black shalloon; she said, that would not do; they both went to the shop door together, to go out of the shop; Mrs. Berridge stood on the counter, and perceived the line of the window to move; she immediately called me; I followed the prisoner, by the desire of Mrs. Berridge; I saw them both together; they were about five yards from Mr. Berridge's shop; I pursued the prisoner, and brought her back to Mr. Berridge's shop, and we sent for the constable.

ELIZABETH BERRIDGE sworn.

I am the wife of Mr. Berridge; between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop; no one was in the shop but me and this young man; they asked for some black camblet; I told them, I had no camblet, only shalloon; the prisoner at the bar asked to look at that; I was obliged to get upon the counter to reach the shalloon, and shewed it her on the counter; the shalloon was laying on it; the prisoner said, it was not what she wanted, and the other person said, she wanted bombazeen; I told them, we did not sell it; as they went out of the door, I observed the line to move, and jumped off the counter, and saw the kerseymere gone; the kerseymere was in the window, just against the door; there are several lines in the window, and

this kerseymere was rolled on a line, and leaned against the window; I did not see either of them take it off the line; I am pretty clear they took it as they went out, because I kept my eye on them all the time they were in the shop, suspecting them; I see the line shake, and saw the piece of kerseymere was gone; I am certain they took it, as they were attempting to go out of the door; the door has a latch and spring lock; the other woman was not brought back; she could not be taken; the prisoner was examined by the constable; I had not resolution to stop them, or I might have stopped them before they had gone out; they came in between six and seven the 24th of November, Saturday.

THOMAS MARDEN sworn.

I am a constable; I searched that woman's pockets to see if I could find any thing; I found some duplicates, but no property.

Prisoner. After I had done my work, I went in to buy a bit of dark camblet, to mend the gown I had got on; I went into this gentlewoman's shop, and asked for some; there was a little boy and lady at the end of the counter; when I went in there was nobody went in with me but myself; I came out about my business; about two yards from the door there was a coach coming fiercely along the road; I stopped till the coach went pass; one of these gentlemen came. and took me by the arm, and said, I must come back; I went back; and she said, I or the other gentlewoman had taken a piece of stuff out of the window; she sent for this officer, and this gentleman searched me, and took the money out of my pocket, and these duplicates, and took me before the justice, and when I came before the justice, this woman would not come, and then they sent me to prison, and three days afterward, then she was fetched, and then she said, it was two yards of stuff, and then a yard and a half. Gentlemen, I am as innocent of it as a child unborn.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-105

105. JOHN BIGNALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , twenty rabbit-skins, value 6 s. four dead rabbits, 3 s. a wicker basket, value 4 d. the goods of Edward Dalton .

EDWARD DALTON sworn.

I sell fowls and rabbits in the market ; I bought four rabbits and twenty rabbit-skins at Newport-market , and they were taken away; I did not see any body take them, but I went to seek after them, after I had lost them; and I happened to come to Mr. Mackey's, where I saw this man with the rabbits, but I cannot swear to the rabbits, but I can to the basket: to the best of my knowledge, it is mine.

- MACKAY sworn.

This good man called on me, and told me, if any such thing came to my house to stop them; about half an hour after, the prisoner came, and had them in a basket; and I sent for the prosecutor, and he swore to the basket. The basket is not here.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-106

106. JOHN COTES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , one man's hat, value 5 s. the goods of James Killgore .

GEORGE SHANNON sworn.

I am a watchman; I went to the call of the hour of one in Monmouth-street,

and it happened that I stood at the corner of Red Lion-street; I think, it was Monday morning, between one and two; I really think the evening before was Sunday; I heard a man to call out, Stop thief, in Compton-street; and I stopped a few moments at the corner and I saw, the man running; he was running down from Compton-street into Monmouth-street; I stayed till the man came to me, that I could lay hold of him; he shoved himself on one side, and the next watchman to me, Andrew Sims , took him; when I made over to him, I see him drop the hat; I went to the next watchman; he dropped the hat in the middle of the street; I saw the hat lay; it was not moon-light; it was a little darkish; there are lamps in that street, but I did not look at them; I never lost sight of him from the time he lost the hats till the time he was taken; I am an Irishman; I have kept the hat ever since; it was carried to the constable of the night at the watch-house; I saw it carried there.

ANDREW SIMMS sworn.

I am a watchman; I heard the cry of Stop thief, on the 20th of November; I saw Shannon there; the prisoner came running up, and I stopped him; I saw nothing on him; we went back to the end of Red Lion-street, and the hat was laying in the middle of the street, and George Shannon picked it up, and it was carried to the watch-house; I am sure, the prisoner is the man I took on the top of Red Lion-street.

- LECLERC sworn.

I am a cutler, and headborough of St. Giles's in the Fields, on the 19th of November last; I was constable of the night in St. Giles's watch-house; the hat and prisoner were brought to the watch house; I don't know whose hat it is

Shannon. I did not see it taken from any body; James Killgore said, the prisoner took the hat off his head in Compton-street; he was a journeyman baker going to the East Indies.

James Killgore was called on his recognizance, but did not appear.

Not GUILTY.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-107

107. ELEANOR HOLLWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , a silver watch, value 20 s. a steel watch chain, value 1 s. two metal seals, value 6 d. a metal watch key, value 1 d. the goods of William Hall , and

THOMAS WATTS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM HALL sworn.

I am fifteen years old; I am servant to a public house ; I saved up my money, and bought a watch; I live at the Saracen's head, in Camomile-street, in the city; the servants where I live used to take it by turns to go out on Sunday; my mother lived at Shadwell; I called into Mr. Watts's house; he is a nail-maker; I lived servant with him; I did not go to see him, but his wife; and his wife had left him, but I did not know it; and there were three men and another woman drinking besides the prisoner; Thomas Watts was one man, Mrs. Morgan's husband was another, and Thomas Stanley was another; they asked me, whether I would have some beer; I said, no, at first, they gave me the pot to drink; I then drank of it, and then they sent for another pot, and while the man was gone, they said, will you sell your watch; I told them, I did not want to sell it; he said, if I was in the mind to sell it, he would give me the value of it; I said, I gave 1 l. 3 s. for the watch, but if I did want to sell it, I would not sell it for less than 30s. because I can get that for it; and I let Mrs. Hollwell

look at the watch twice, and she gave it me again; but the third time, she said, she would lay any body a pint of beer they could not tell what it was o'clock; so they told, and she told me the watch was not right, and she would go over the way to get it righted. I said, give me my watch; but she said, nobody should have it, and she went out of doors. Mr. Watts said, the watch was advertised; I said, I did not care; I bought it honestly, and paid for it; and she said, she only came into his house to buy her own property again; she said, that she saw thieves come into the house to sell her property, and that the watch belonged to her; she went out, and Mr. Watts and I went after, and after they had gone a little way, Mr. Watts turned back again, and she went on the same side of the way, and I followed her, and she got hold of me by the collar, and knocked me down in the street twice; and coming almost to Shadwell-market, there was a man came by, and asked, what was the matter; and I told him, that that woman had robbed me of my watch; then I asked the man, if he was an officer; he said, yes; he asked me two or three times before he would take charge; at last he did; he took her into a private room, and then Mrs. Elby came, and then I told her, that was the woman; but they could not find any property about her, when they took her into the private room to search; I never saw the woman before as I know of; she returned me the watch twice, and the third time she would not give it me again; she wanted me to sell it, and said, she would look at the maker's name, and what number it was, and said, she would give me the worth of it.

Q. Was you sober? - Yes, I had not been drinking any thing all that day, except at my meals.

Q. Were they all sober together? - No, Mr. Watts was not; as to the others, I cannot tell.

Q. Did any of them see her take your watch? - Yes, John Stanly did; she wrung it fairly out of my hand.

Q What length of time did all this take up? - About two hours, more or less; I cannot tell; when she was in the lock-up room, Mr. Watts sent up the watch by Stanley to me, but I did not take it. Mr. Elby has got the watch.

Q. Would you have sold it for 30 s.? - No, I would not have sold it at all, because my father would have been angry with me if I had. I am sure she took the watch; it is her, and no one else.

ELISHA MORGAN sworn

As I was coming along the street, I saw a mob against the Three Betts head door; the boy was crying, and said, that the woman had stole the watch; I stopped her, searched her, and found nothing on her.

- ELBY sworn.

I was going to the Three Bet's head; hearing that this lad was robbed of his watch, I went and asked the boy, who had robbed him: he said, the prisoner at the bar, Hollwell; I stopped her, and searched her, but could not find any watch on her, about two hours after Stanley brought the watch to me to the Virginia Planter; I cannot say I know any thing of the boy, but he knew me directly as he came into the house.

JOHN STANLEY sworn.

I am a Nail-maker; I work for Thomas Watts. Thomas Watts gave me the watch, from his own table, to take to the boy; and I carried it up to the Virginia Planter. We had been drinking together. I cannot say I recollect any thing that past. They all looked at the watch, every one besides me. They seemed to be funning with him. I did not know the boy before. I never saw him to my knowledge before. He sent the watch

before he was taken up. I don't think the women meant to rob him. I have told the truth as far as I know. I never saw the woman, before that evening, to my knowledge. I cannot tell what she did with the watch. I never went out of the house.

Q. How could Watts get the watch? I cannot say. - He went out of the house. He delivered it to me, I dare say, in an hour after.

Q. Had he been with the woman? - I cannot say. He is an house-keeper. He keeps an Old Iron-shop, and is a Nail-maker .

Jury. I think the boy says in his evidence, the woman took the watch; and the woman and Watts went out together.

Hall. The woman went out first, and I after her; and then Mr. Watts followed.

ANN MORGAN sworn.

Sunday was a week, Mr. Watts, and his man, Stanly, came to me, and asked my husband and me, whether we would be so kind as to come to see him at their house, as his wife had made an elopement for a fortnight before we went there; and when we were there, this boy came in, and asked Mr. Watts to buy a watch: Mr. Watts, knowing the boy, asked him where his father and mother were. He then asked him the price of it. - He asked a guinea and an half. Mr. Watts bought the watch for 25 s. if his father was agreeable to take the money. On that Mr. Watts asked the prisoner Hollwell to go with the lad to see if his father was agreeable. We sat in the house just the same; and that gentleman came to me, and said, he wanted Mr. Watts. He then stepped out with the watch, to ask somebody, whether it was worth the money or not; and he brought it back - and when he brought it back, he gave it to Mr. Stanley to take it to the boy. The boy delivered the watch to Mr. Watts for 1 l. 5 s. if his father had been agreeable to take the money. Hollwell never had the watch. She went out, and the boy and Watts soon followed.

WILLIAM MORGAN sworn.

I was drinking there. Thomas Watts came to my house Sunday was a week, and enquired of me, for my wife and me to go over and see to make matters up between him and his wife. While we were there, in came the boy with the watch, and said he would sell it; and offered it to Mr. Watts for sale. Mr. Watts asked him, what he would take for it: he said a guinea and an half. - They came to an agreement for 1 l. 5 s. if in case his father was willing to take the money. - His father lived in Union-street, Shadwell. So, by that means, the woman and he went out both together, to see if his father was agreeable or not. There was a man's voice called into the boy while he was in there; they thought it was his father. - He said it was. They went out, and I heard no more.

Q. How soon did Watts go out? - I cannot tell.

Q. Did he follow the woman immediately? - I don't think he did, I suppose it might be a quarter of an hour for what I know.

Q. Where was the watch that time? - The last time I saw the watch, it was laying on the table, the woman went out with the boy, and took the watch with her.

Q. When she took the watch from the boy's hand, what did she do with it? - She looked at it, and it was laid down on the table.

Q. Do you mean to swear that? - I am certain it was laid on the table.

Prisoner Hollwell. Mr. Morgan, my brother and sister invited me to come down to Mr. Watt's, this boy came in between five and seven o'clock, and offered this watch for 1 l. 10 s. for he said, it cost his father that, Mr. Watts said, he

had only a guinea, but he would give 1 l. 5 s. and if his father would come he would give him that money; he had lived twice with Mr. Watts, as they say, the lad shewed the watch about to all the house, the boy said, to me Mr. Hollwell, what do you think of it, I said, I don't know, the boy sold it to this man for 1 l. 5 s. Mr. Watts went to the public house to borrow the remainder of the money; the boy said, my father is sick in bed. Mrs. Hollwell said, Mr. Watts will you step to his father and see? I heard somebody call Will to that boy, Jack says he, you must say the watch is your's, for they have stopped it; I took hold of the lad, and says, I believe you have stole the watch, he had a little wand, and struck me twice, I ran after him into the Virginia Planter, and I said to some man are you an officer, if you are, take hold of this body, I never denied that Mr. Watts bought the watch.

Prisoner Watts. On Sunday morning this man and me went over to Mrs. Morgan's to ask them to come over, they came and this gentlewoman came over too, we made shift with a bit of cold leg of mutton for dinner, and it passed on till between five and six getting a little drop of drink, this boy came in and stood dangling his chain, so says I, Will you have got a watch is it your own? he comes and whispers to me I will sell it to you, if you will buy it; my father has been out of work this week or fortnight, and I want to give him a few shillings; what do you ask for it, says I, I don't know, whether he told me 1 l. 10 s. or 1 l. 11 s. 6 d. I will not be positive, he came to 1 l. 5 s. I said, I would buy it, if his father was agreeable; the watch was laid down on the top of my table, every body was looking at it, now thinks I, I have not the money, I will whip over to the chandler's shop, and at the same time, I will shew it somebody, I heard there was a disturbance about this watch, I went in again, and I says to the man, you run up with the watch that is all I know about it. I never wronged a man of a farthing ever since I was born.

The prisoner Watts called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-108

108. JOHN ARMSTRONG and DENNIS CONDE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , 4 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, and eight halfpence , the monies of John Harvey .

Both Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-109

109. JOHN PHANCUTT and JOHN PLATT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , three live tame cock fowls, value 5 s. three live tame hen fowls, value 3 s. the goods of John Tibbott .

(The case was opened by Mr. Schoen.)

JOHN TIBBOTT sworn.

On Sunday morning about a quarter past five, on the 11th of November, I found my gate open, and I missed my fowls, three cocks and five hens, they were alive before they killed them; they were game fowls no gamer going; I saw them on Saturday the 10th of November, at dinner time, I did not go home after that.

Mr. Knowlys. When is your dinner time? - At twelve o'clock.

Q. Then from twelve o'clock to five the next morning, you did not see the fowls? - I did not.

Mr. Shoen. Where did you see them next? - I saw them at the magistrates.

Q How did you know them? - They were marked, one was marked in the foot, the red cock cut in the web of the foot; I see him cut, the man that cut him is not here, and just above his eye, a piece was cut out with a pair of scissars.

Q. What was that for? - Because I should know him again; the other cocks were not marked, I had had them two or three years, I will take my oath as long as I live, that they fowls were mine; one of the other cocks had a core taken out under his throat; I know the hens by having them so long, knowing they were my property by seeing them in the day, I had them three or four years, four of the hens were black, and one was a brown or red whatever you call it.

Q Did you define when you was at the magistrates, precisely the number you had lost? - Yes.

Q. These fowls where all your's? - They were.

ELIZABETH TIBBOTT sworn.

I let these fowls in between four and five o'clock, I live between Cock-lane and Haggerston .

Prisoner Phancutt. In the mean time I would beg leave to ask them how I get my livelihood.

Prosecutor. They both worked for the same master as myself before they were taken.

Mr. Schoen to Mrs. Tibbott. Where did you turn them in? - Into a shed adjoining to the dwelling house, I cannot say I saw them after that time.

Q. Does the shed lock up? - No, it is fastened by a string twisting about the nail.

Q Do you know these fowls? - I do, they were my fowls positively, I did not see them till I knew they were gone, I lost eight, three cocks and five hens.

SAMUEL BURR sworn.

I am a constable of Clerkenwell; on Sunday morning the 11th of November, about six o'clock I met Phancutt, Platt was with him, I met him at the top of Albemarle-street, St. John'-street, they asked me for the Nag's head, I told them it was very near there, and I asked them what they had got under their arms? each one having a bundle in a blue apron, I asked them what they had got there? Phancutt said, does it trouble you, what we have got, I said it did, and I would insist on seeing, says he, you have no occasion to make such a bother about it, he said, he was going down to Bath, I said, I would see what was in there, and I called my superintendant, Mr. Inglefield, to take charge of Platt; I directly took hold of another man, who was discharged before the justice, I carried them down to the watch-house, I took the bundles and opened them at the watch house; Inglefield carried one each; Inglefield carried Phancutt's bundle, and I carried Platt's, I opened their bundles, and they contained dead fowls quite hot, just killed, they said, they were their own fowls, they said, they were cocks, hens, and pullets, he said, be they hens or cocks, be they what they will, there are eight in number. Phancutt had four, one cock and three hens; the other had two cocks and two hens; I says to them directly, now tell me where you have come from, they said directly they came from Kensington. Phancutt told me, that I got their names, now my lads, says I, you shall go along with me to gaol, I took them before the justice, and there Tibbott saw them, and the fowls, going to gaol, they begged to have a little beer, I let them have two pots of beer among them all.

Mr. Knowlys. In all this Phancutt was the great spokesman, do you think Platt had recovered from his evening's dose? - He was not drunk, but he had but very little to say.

CHARLES INGLEFIELD sworn.

I am superintendant of the watch, I was in company with Brown, at the time he stopped these men, I went to shut up the by man's box that morning, and Mr. Burr was along with me; just as I had shut up the box, these three men came up, the two men at the bar and another; Burr called to me, and we took them to the watch-house; there Burr asked what property they had there? they said, what property they had there was their own, the fowls were not produced before them, till they came before the magistrate in the morning; we took the fowls from them at the corner of Albemarle-street.

Mr. Knowlys. I take it for granted you do not mean to tell a different story from Burr? - I will tell nothing but the truth.

Q. Did either of the men say any thing to you? - They did not till they got up to the Harp, where they went in to drink, when Platt said, he thought it made no odds to which prison he went, says he, I had rather go to New Prison, because I have been out only there last Thursday, from thence we went to prison with them; the next morning they were before the justice, and the prosecutor came and owned the property.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe Phancutt was the only person that spoke about the fowls, except that particular, which you mention, was Platt quite sober that morning? - He was not.

Court. How did you get at the owner? - The prosecutor met me while we were going up to the office on Clerkenwell green.

Prisoner Phancutt. That gentleman tells false things, he carried them down to the watch-house himself, and he opened the apron, and told them as they lay on the table, and I told him I came from Kingsland.

Prisoner Platt. I told that gentleman in Clerkenwell, I never was there for any robbery.

The prisoner Platt called five witnesses, who gave him a good character; and the prisoner Phancutt called one.

John Phancutt . GUILTY . (Aged 34.)

John Platt . GUILTY. (Aged 28.)

Imprisoned six months, and publickly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-110

110. JOHN DUNNETT was indicted for that he, on the 8th of November , feloniously did utter and publish as true a certain false and counterfeit bond obligatory purporting to be signed by Peter Richardson , William Goodluck , George Arnold and William Lea , and to be sealed and delivered by the said Peter Richardson , &c. and directed to John Dunnett , Esq. Rainthorp Hall, in the county of Norfolk, Esq. the tenor of which was as follows;

Know all men by these presents that we Peter Richardson , William Goodluck , George Arnold and William Lea , of the city of London, are held and firmly bound to John Dunnett , in the sum of 2,510 l. of lawful money, of Great Britain, to be paid to the said John Dunnett , his successors, heirs or administrators, or either of them, the said sum of 2,510 l. of like money to be paid by us, our successors, heirs, executors or administrators; therefore we are firmly bound to the said John Dunnett , in 2,510 l. of lawful money of Great Britain, to be paid by us our successors, heirs, executors or administrators, therefore we firmly bind the same. Dated this 20th day of November, and in the 30th year of our sovereign by the grace of God of Great Britain, France and Ireland, king, defender of the faith and so forth, and in the year of our lord 1720. Being sealed with our seal of office the year and day above written. Signed P. Richardson, Wm. Goodluck , George

Arnold and William Lea . Being first duly stamped in the presence of T. Roberts. The receipts for the interest being as follows;

Received January 4, 1792, in trust 50 l. John Dunnett .

Received January 20, 1792, in trust 50 l. John Dunnett .

With intent to defraud the said Peter Richardson , William Goodluck , George Arnold and William Lea ; he at the same time well knowing the said bond to be false, forged and counterfeit against the form of the statute and against the king's peace.

(The indictment was opened by Mr. - and the case by Mr. Garrow.)

Mr. RAILTON sworn.

At the latter end of October or on the 1st of November, Mr. Sewel who is an attorney at Norwich, and acquainted with Mr. Tilbury, who is a partner of mine, came to my house, he said, he came on a message of importance, he said, it was concerning a considerable debt which was due to the prisoner at the bar; Mr. Sewel produced to me this bond which I have in my hand, and said, the prisoner claimed on it; on that I read the bond over, found it very imperfectly written, being a bond for so very large a sum of money, said, it does not appear to me that it was written by any professional man; I wanted to know the consideration for the bond and how it came into Dunnett's hand; I mentioned that in the presence of the prisoner; the prisoner said, that he received the bond in payment of the quarter part of the lottery ticket which he had purchased in the lottery preceeding the date of the bond of Messrs. Richardson and Co. I then observed that there was 10 l. more than the quarter part of that ticket, and that I apprehended there were deductions made from the prizes; the prisoner said, the bond was not dated at the period at which he became entitled to his prize but afterward; I asked him if he knew who the witness to the bond was, because I had my doubts respecting it; he said, he believed he could find him out; I asked him how he became possessed of it; he said, it came to him in a parcel addressed to him at a house in Norwich; I think he said, the flying or rampart horse; I wished to see the letter it came in, and also to know who the witness was, as I thought I ought to have information of that kind before I made application to Messrs. Richardson; I desired Mr. Sewel to return into Norfolk for that purpose, and to learn every information he could respecting the bond; I was induced to do this in consequence of my believing what the prisoner said was true, and thinking that the payments had been made by some clerks in the house, and might have patched up this bond and have quieted the prisoner without Messrs. Richardson's knowledge, and I was the more led to make that sort of enquiry seeing two sums written by way of interest on the bond; on the subject of both of which he gave as blind an account as he did of the bond, and which he had admitted to have received in bank bills addressed to him in a similar manner as the bond itself, from which payments, he said, he had been inclined to rest satisfied with the bond till he had occasion for the money, which he then had for a considerable part of it. In consequence of my advice they returned into Norfolk as they left me, promising to go there; they came to my house again on the 8th of November, Mr. Sewel and the prisoner; I was out when they came in but found them there; the prisoner was desirous of having Richardson and Co. proceeded against by an arrest for the recovery of the bond; having still my doubts about the validity of it, as they

had brought up no information or cover conveying the bond, I waved proceeding by an arrest, said, I knew the house of Richardson and Goodluck to be solvent, and that there would be no danger of a personal application, which I wished to have made on the circumstance of the bond, thinking as I did, that the prisoner had been imposed upon by the clerks. I desired an application might be made by myself that I might observe the countenances of the parties and the nature of their receiving the application. Dunnett and Sewel went with me, when we went to the lottery office I perceived Mr. Richardson there; I told him I had an occasion to speak to him on a letter of business, and wished he would give an opportunity of doing it in a private room; he invited me up stairs, I told him the two gentlemen with me, pointing to Mr. Sewel and the prisoner at the bar were concerned in what I wished to speak to him about, and therefore I desired they might come up at the same time; he consented to it, and we all went up together; Mr. Sewel then gave this bond to me in the presence of the prisoner; I gave it to Mr. Richardson, told him I was applied to by an attorney and the prisoner respecting the money that was due on the bond, that the prisoner did not want all the money, but a part of it, that I wished him to look on the bond and give his answer to it, and then gave it to Mr. Richardson; Mr. Richardson read it, was much agitated I could perceive while he was reading it; he locked at me says he, Mr. Railton I have known you many years, I am astonished at the demand, and if the parties had presented the bond without your being present I would have deemed them madmen, but out of respect to you I shall give such answers as I think proper; I then asked him if the signature to the bond, purporting to be Richardson was his signature; he said, it was not; I asked him if the signature of any of the gentlemen who were his partners appeared to be their signatures; he said, they did not; I asked him if he knew the signature of the person purporting to be a witness Roberts, he said, they had a clerk of the name of Roberts, he said, it was not his signature; he, desirous of giving me any information in his power; after he had denied the writing of himself and partners, said, that if I wanted the satisfaction to see his partners he would desire them to come up without any comment at all, without any observation they each denied the hand writing on the bond to be theirs; I then communicated to them my sentiment that he might have been imposed upon by some person in their house, and I would wish the books to be searched, which they readily consented to, and searched the books so as to discover this man had no dealings with them at the period which he mentioned; there were some transactions that appeared afterwards to be done with him, and there appeared to be about 8 d. or 4 d. owing for the postage of a letter or something, and the prisoner was that overpaid, he then asked the prisoner what he brought the bond there for; then he demanded the 2.510 l. for which it purports to be given, he said he demanded the money of Mr. Richardson; it was after this period that Mr. Richardson wanted to know what to do; I then said, if it would turn out fatal to the prisoner I was sorry I had been made use of. A constable was sent for and he was taken into custody, and taken before a magistrate; I am sure it is the bond, for I put my initials on the margin; I put it under the seal of the prisoner, then I put the bond under a cover sealed by the prisoner and myself, and afterwards I put my initials on it.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Railton, I believe before this you had never seen the prisoner at the bar? - Nor knew him, nor did I know Mr. Sewel.

Q. Mr. Tilbury nor yourself was agent to Mr. Sewel? - No, not at all.

Q. When the prisoner at the bar was first introduced to you you looked upon him quite a country man, an ignorant man who might easily be imposed upon? - I did in the manner I have alluded to in my evidence.

Q. When he came first to you you compleatly had the idea in your mind, and that was the reason you had the desire of his going back again; his persisting that he had bought a quarter share of a lottery ticket which had been fortunate to be drawn a 10,000 l. prize? - I thought him imposed upon as a countryman and that Richardson and Co. had paid the money to some of their clerks who had quieted this man by this bond.

Q. At the last you felt yourself extremely concerned to have any thing to do in this business. You went twice to the house of Richardson and Co.? - I went only once.

Q. Did Mr. Sewel or the prisoner tender the bond? - Mr. Sewel produced the bond to me; he always produced it to me; Mr. Sewel also told me that he had his doubt about the bond and that Dunnett admitted it to be his.

Q. Dunnett did not make use of such expression as admit? - Yes, he did, and that he had it for payment of a lottery ticket.

Q. We are then to understand that the prisoner having expressed a doubt about this bond went to the house of Richardson and Co. whose bond it was. Did he ever hesitate going to Richardson's house? - I cannot say he did; I advised Mr. Sewel not to part with the bond.

Q. From the first time you had seen him to that time he might have come back again or not? - To be sure he might, I would have much rather he would have gone off than stayed.

Q. You say you was led to imagine that this man was imposed upon by another circumstance, that the bond itself was not done in a business way yet the indorsement was? - No, he had wrote the indorsement himself.

Q. In point of fact when you came to make the enquiry you did hear of such a person of the name of Roberts? - Yes, that made me still the more believe the man could be cheated; I was satisfied there must be guilt somewhere, but I could not impute it any where.

Q Still however the prisoner at the bar, in the course of all this examination stopped and heard it all and he remained fixed in his determination and you went with him? - Because I wished to see how Richardson and Goodluck would treat it in countenance and observation.

Q. He was there and stopped all the while to hear it? - Yes,

Q. To Railton. I would ask you, sir, from your opportunity of observing of the prisoner at the bar whether he shewed any particularity in his conduct during the whole or part of the time you saw him? - I thought his countenance was wild and distracted even from the first time I saw him he gave frequent stares and looks, not quite in my opinion consistent with a person in his senses; that was the impression his conduct made on my mind in the moment.

Q. Whether you did not imagine that his conduct betrayed the conduct of a man out of his mind? - When I told him the question was serious, he seemed very much agitated; and I could see that his mind was disturbed, whether it was the effect of a disordered mind, or the effect of conscious guilt, gentlemen, it will be for your verdict.

Q. Mr. Richardson seemed to think the same as you? - The reason was, that he thought it was a bold thing, to demand money on a bond which was neither his writing nor his partners.

Q. Did you see, on that occasion, Mr. Arnold? - I saw all the partners, but one, Mr. Goodluck.

Q. Do you know whether there is such a person as Mr. Goodluck? - I don't know.

Mr. Steele to Mr. Railton. Did it appear to you that Mr. Roberts. their clerk, had had correspondence with the prisoner? - It did.

Mr. SEWEL sworn.

I am an attorney at Norwich. I have known the prisoner ever since my infancy. He has resided at Rainthorp Hall, about eight miles from Norwich. He had mentioned being possessed of such property, frequently. It may be four or five years back. He described himself to be possessed of property of three of four thousand pounds. I don't know from what house, but I recollect he had security for some property, derived from the lottery, as early as four years ago. About the 8th of October, he applied to me on the very subject of this bond. On the 20th of August the prisoner applied, and requested me to go over to Ingham with him, to look over a considerable estate he was about to purchase. I went over with him, and advised him against it. - The estate afterwards came to auction, and the prisoner became the purchaser of it, for 6000 l. - Afterwards he wished to recede from the bargain, as they applied to him for the deposit and duty. I was applied to to settle it, as he did not want to have it, the world was very censorious upon him, and he asked me to advertise for a meeting of his creditors. In consequence of that advertisement being inserted, the prisoner deposited that security, with other securities, in my possession, for to answer these demand. The amount of the other security might be 500 l. or upwards: all of them promissory notes. The debts claimed amounted to more than 700 l. After the others had been lodged with me I recommended the prisoner to look to the notes of hand first, and let this matter rest a little while. I wrote to the parties, whom the prisoner pretended were his debtors, and delivered the drafts to the prisoner, who said he was going over to Bury, and that he would deliver them to the parties. None of them paid, except 6 l. On the 30th of October, Dunnett applied to me to come to town with him. There was 700 l. to pay, and only 6 l. to pay it with. The prisoner was in the seed trade, and lived at some expence, in the stile of a private gentleman's son. In consequence of that I came, and arrived in town, on the 31st of October last; and called upon Mr. Railton. I cannot correct Mr. Railton in his statement, in one instance. I was before the Lord Mayor. The bond that I went to demand upon, I received from the prisoner.

Mr. Knapp. You say, you had known the prisoner from his infancy. Had you frequent opportunities of seeing him? - Very frequently.

Q. Was you in the habits of intimacy with him? - Yes, on very good terms. I have been with him at his uncle's house, when I was a school-boy, I used to go there to spend two or three days frequently.

Q. Did you ever make any observations on his conduct? - There was I thought something extremely singular in his conduct; it might be three years since he seemed very low, rather in a state of stupidity than otherwise.

Q. Had he any sister? - He had two or three sisters.

Q. Do you know them? - I know one and only one; I have heard that he went to a closet and took out a brace of pistols and attempted to shoot his sister.

Q. Do you remember the circumstance of his having a fall from his horse? - That was the time I speak of, three years ago; I did not see him fall, I heard of it, and

that he was in consequence of that, in a state of stupidity for some time; it was after that time that I heard of the conduct he used to his sister; last November I heard of his conduct to his sister.

Q Have you heard any thing of his attempting to drown himself? - I did hear it in the month of October, or the begining of November.

Q. In short from the observations that you had made of him from being a school boy to the present time, there was always something peculiarly singular about him? - There was.

Mr. Garrow. Pray Mr. Sewel let us be a little grave. If he had applied to you to make his will would you have made it? - I did make his will in the month of March, in the present year.

Q. Did you consider him as a sane man at that time? - Undoubtedly so, or else I should not have made his will.

Q. You took him to be a man of sound mind and memory, capable of disposing of his property; do you think that he continued of the same disposing powers till he came to London? - I do.

Q. All that you meant to describe of him was, that he was not so gay, that he was not so talkative as some others, that he was occasionally dispirited, but always of a sound mind and disposing powers. Now we heard a good deal of what you have been told. Did you ever hear it insinuated that he was not a man of perfectly good understanding and capable of conducting all his affairs? - Never.

Q. Pray when did you hear this anecdote about the unloaded pistol? - This I heard just before he came to town the last time.

Q. Was that after he had been at Mr Railton's? - It might be a fortnight back or three weeks,

Q. Then there had got a rumour in the country, that he had presented a pistol to his sister, and fell from his horse; but down to the time you visited Mr. Richardson, had you ever heard it hinted that he had been in danger of drowning? - No.

JOSEPH KEITH sworn.

I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Richardson and Goodluck; I am acquainted with the hand writing of the parties; I came there in November 1790; I do not believe the signatures to this bond to be Mr. Richardson's, Mr. Goodluck's, Mr. Arnold's, or Mr. Lea's; I am satisfied they are not the hand writing of either of them; I know Mr. Arundell Roberts, I am acquainted with his hand writing; the subscribing witness to this bond. I am sure is not his hand writing; I am satisfied neither of them are the signatures of any body in that house; Mr. Richardson to be sure does write P. Richardson, and that is P. Richardson, but that I am certain is not his writing.

ARUNDELL ROBERTS sworn.

I have been in the house of Richardson and Goodluck five or six years; I don't believe any of the signatures of that bond, are the signatures of either of the gentlemen of that house; the name of Roberts as the attesting witness is not my name nor my hand writing. We have had some transactions with a person of the name of Dunnett; the first letter was an order for shares of tickets, this was answered in February 1792. This is the first letter I ever remember coming from Mr. Dunnett. (The letter deposed to be the prosecutor's hand writing by Mr. Sewel, and the letter read by the clerk.)

Messrs. I have inclosed a bill of eleven guineas; I should be much obliged to you to send by return of post as many sixteenths in the present lottery for that sum; I will send you a list of names and the money for registering as they are

not all for myself therefore, I cannot now inform you till I have seen the parties, your's John Dunnett , Rainthorp Hall; February, 1792. Please to direct to me at the Rampant Horse, Norwich. (A letter shewn to the witness, which he deposes was in answer to this letter.)

Here is also another letter, which is the last I ever wrote to him, from his writing to us about selling 2500 l. stock for him, and from Rainthorp Hall, I took to write to him, John Dunnett , Esq . the stock he wanted, sold for 2510 l. this he was informed of in the letter of the 14th of October. On the 25th of October, I received another letter, desiring to know transfer and other days of doing business at the Bank.

Here is another letter, and a cover to it which I sent him on the 26th of October.

Q. Are you certain that that cover never contained the bond, or at least you never sent it in that cover? - On the contrary, it contained a mere letter of business; for the house of Richardson and Co.

The letter was wrote on a sheet of post paper, this cover is the half of the letter I sent, here are a number of seals on the paper, which were not on it when it went from me, the words Sir, Sir, was not on it, when it went from me.

Q. Was there no transaction with your house, and the prisoner on the account of a prize of 10,000 l. - We have not shared a 10,000 l. prize since the lottery 1785, which was drawn in 1786.

Q If any person in the name of Dunnett, had become possessed of such a prize, would you of course have known it, are the books public for all persons to see? - They are.

Q. Then except these transactions there has been none with the prisoner Dunnett to your knowledge? - None at all, he wrote up to know what his prize amounted to; and we wrote him word, he owes us now about 1 s. 7 d.

Mr. RALPH DYER sworn.

I have been a Clerk in the house of Messrs. Richardson and Co's, for twelve years. - The signature to this paper has not the least appearance of the handwriting of any person in our house.

CHARLES WATTS sworn.

I am a Clerk in the Bank of England. I was at Messrs. Richardson's and Goodluck's, and knew the character and handwriting of all the parties. All the signatures to this paper appear to me to be forgeries.

Q. To Mr. Roberts. What is the names of the house of Richardson and Co. - Peter Richardson , George Arnold , William Goodluck , and William Lea . - ( William Goodluck being a minor, the father, Robert Goodluck , executed the bond for him.)

WILLIAM MERRYMAN sworn.

I am a constable. I was present at the Lord Mayor's when the prisoner was examined, and he described this cover as the cover in which he received the bond. (The bond read by the clerk).

Prisoner. May it please your Lordship, and Gentlemen of the Jury. In the beginning of the year 1789, I sent money to the house of Messrs. Richardson and Co. to send me, in return, a quarter of a lottery ticket. In the month of March following, I was informed that the ticket was intitled to 10,000 l. Being greatly rejoiced at such an event, I was going on horse back, among my friends and acquaintances, when I had the misfortune to be thrown from my horse, and my skull was fractured. - And from that time I was incapable of attending to my business. As soon as I recovered my senses a little, I sent a letter to Messrs. Richardson and Co's. informing them, I

was the fortunate adventurer, and became thereby intitled to the 10,000 l. prize, and would take their bond, payable on demand, for the same. On which, in a few days afterwards. Messrs. Richardson and Co. sent me an answer, desiring me to buy a quantity of lottery tickets, and they would send me their bond, as required, which they did: and they sent me 2510 l. and I received two different sums of money, as interest for the same, of Richardson and Goodluck.

In the month of October, being in want of a few hundred pounds, to answer some demands: I desired Mr. Sewell to advertise a meeting of my creditors; and I requested him to come to town with me, to receive such monies as I should be intitled to, to answer the demands against me: and Mr. Sewell and myself came to town in October; and we went to Mr. Railton's. He advised us to go back again to get some necessary things wanting; accordingly I did. - When we went up again, and came again to London, we went with Mr. Railton to Mr. Richardson's; and when Mr. Richardson asked me if I wanted the money, I told him, yes. He sent for a constable, and charged me with commiting a forgery.

I hope you will take my unfortunate case into consideration. I am innocent of the case before you, I have at all times been a man of property until now. And, my Lords and Gentlemen, I should have a number of respectable persons, in order to convince the Court of my innocence, and my character in general; and of the unfortunate situation of being deranged in my senses, as I am frequently laid up for a month, which is a hardship for me: but the great distance prevents their attendance; which I hope, my Lords and Gentlemen, you will take into consideration my unfortunate condition, in losing my senses. - And, my Lord, if the bond is a forgery, I have been greatly imposed upon, by those who remitted me the bond for my share of the ticket in the lottery. I never was in London till I came for the bond. If I had known it to have been a forgery, I would not have gone to have received the money, nor have had it in my possession. I never saw any of their writing, nor of their clerks, till I came to London. - Therefore, my Lord and Gentlemen, consider my unfortunate situation, of being deprived of my senses, which can be no more restored to me again.

THOMAS PIXLEY sworn.

I am an East-India Company Surveyor. I don't know the prisoner, only by the conversation I have had with him.

WILLIAM ROBERTS sworn.

I am an Assistant to the Poultry Compter. I remember the prisoner at the bar coming into my custody; his conduct has been very singular in many instances. He has pretended to write to people of Norwich, whom he has had no degree of claim on; and several other things that made me believe that the man was really out of his mind.

The second or third day after the man was in custody, Mr. Railton and he were in the lodge together; and Mr. Railton said he must be out of his mind, or he would never have done as he had done; and in several instances behaving wild - such as making away with his things: - he did not mind whatever he had. He would give away every thing he had - he did not care to whom: I sincerely believe, and, I am on my oath, that the man is not right in his senses.

Mr. Garrow. Have you ever had occasion to observe mad people before? - I never was much used to them.

Q. Was you subpoened? - I always attend here the time the London Jury are sitting.

Q. When did you first communicate this? - Several times I communicated it.

Q. Mr. Roberts have you other grounds than those you have mentioned, to make you suppose this man was deranged? - He first of all employed Mr. Railton, then he employed Mr. Dalby the short hand writer; and at last he employed this man.

Q. Mr. Roberts, who wrote these letters you have mentioned? - Mr. Dalby was applied to in the business for him, and he wrote to Norwich by the desire of Dunnett, there was an answer to this, and Mr. Dalby shewed me the answer to this letter.

Q. Then Mr. Dalby employed as the confidential solicitor to a man under your custody; shewed you his client's letters and the answers? - He shewed me the answers, I cannot say he shewed me the letters himself.

Q. When did Mr. Dalby shew you the answers? - As nearly as soon as he received them.

Q. I suppose you thought it a strong proof of madness that the man did not receive the money he wrote for. Did you hear of this story of the pistol that hath been invented? - No.

Q. Nor any fall from the horse? - No, sir.

Q. With respect to Mr. Railton, was what Mr. Railton said no more than this, that he believed he was mad; did not he say that his reason for stating him to be mad was his conduct? - Mr. Railton said he believed he was mad.

Q. So Mr. Railton was coarse and indelicate enough to tell a poor man in his condition

"you are mad;" and that is all, on your oath did Mr. Railton ever make use of such an expression without adding more; did not he say you must be mad to go to a house to demand money on that bond? - I tell you and what I tell you is verbatim.

Q. Then Mr. Railton did not give any reason for thinking him mad: upon your oath did not you hear Mr. Railton say that his conduct was the conduct of a mad man, thinking to demand this money when it was not due? - I never heard so much discourse as that.

Mr. Railton. I waited on him at two periods in the Compter, he was without friends, and without property, and without advice, and sought for me to advise him; I did not incline to undertake such a prosecution; I said that Mr. Chetham was a very proper person to advise with him; this was the first period I saw him, he was very much distressed; the second time I saw him I did not chose to go up into the prison to the man again, for I thought he looked agitated; this man has great truth in part that he says; when he came down to me, I asked him if he had employed Mr. Chetham, I told him it would be material, he should have some advice.

Court. I think the indictment is ill conceived; I shall take the opinion of the Jury on the fact; the act of parliament describes a number of offences by indorsements and by assignments, &c. but I take it in all, there must be a condition, and a penalty, to make it a bond obligatory, this is a writing obligatory, but I think it is not a bond obligatory, unless it has these two essential qualifications to it; I shall therefore reserve the law for the opinion of the Judges.

GUILTY. (Aged 25.)

( Judgment was ordered to be respited .)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT

Reference Number: t17921215-111

111. WILLIAM GOLDSMITH was indicted, for that he on the 13th of November , with a certain bludgeon of no value, which he then in his right hand there had and held unlawfully, feloniously and maliciously, on Philip Morgan did make an assault; and then and there in a forcible and violent manner, unlawfully, feloniously, and maliciously demanded his money with a felonious attempt to rob him .

PHILIP MORGAN sworn.

I am no business, I am blind; I have some little to live upon, I live at Ratcliff-cross, on the 13th of November, about five or a little after in the evening, to the best of my knowledge, I was going from London to Stepney, I was all alone, by enquiry I can find my way any where almost; I came along Fieldgate-street , and was going into the fields, in the foot path that goes from Whitechapel to Stepney church; Mr. Upsall that is here saw me across the road, because it was very dirty, and went with me through the posts just into the fields; I am sure I was in the direct foot way, he led me just to the posts, I went through the posts by myself; I am certain I was in the foot way; then as soon as I came into the fields, I heard two men talking, one of them said to the other, damn your eyes, and passed. William Goldsmith came up to me and bid me stand and deliver; I asked him what I was to deliver, he told me either my money or my life, I told him I had very little money only a few halfpence, and if he would have patience I would give him them; he then said, damn you, where is your watch, I said, gentlemen, I have no watch, he immediately tore off a button of my breeches, and put his hand into my breeches pocket; than he began beating me with a stick very violently, I tried to wrest the stick out of his hand, I said for God's sake do not use me ill, gentlemen, for I cannot see; then the other man said come along, and they both left me; directly I heard a voice cry stop them; and I came back out of the path into Whitechapel, and I asked somebody where the people were that cried stop him; when I came up, Mr. Upsall had got him into custody; I cannot know him by sight; but I shall know him by his speech, because I took particular notice; when I was going before the magistrate I put my hand to my side, and I felt it wet, and I found my shirt was all blood, and I found there was a hole cut there, even to my skin.

Q. Did he stroke you before he demanded your money? - No.

Q. Did he at any time after he struck you demand your money? - No, it was before he struck me.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-112

112. EDWARD PLUMMER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of June , a pair of linen sheets, value 5 s. a linen table cloth, value 2 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. the goods of William Bennett in a lodging room .

WILLIAM BENNETT sworn.

My wife let a lodging to the prisoner, and a woman as his wife

ELEANOR BENNETT sworn.

I let this lodging for three and sixpence a week, my husband knew it afterwards he was in it about nine weeks, it was the 2d of June twelvemonth past, about nine weeks after they came, the mother of the woman came and demanded her away; and to the best of my knowledge he stayed about five weeks after, he had

the room ready furnished; he went away on Tuesday and sent the key on Friday by his hair dresser, I went up stairs directly into the room, and there were no sheets on the bed: this was in June, 1791, and every thing was safe, but these articles, the sheet cloth and iron I have never seen them since.

Q. How came you not to prosecute him before this? - I never knew where he was.

William Bennett . I agreed to this contract of my wife; I know the articles were missing; near a twelve-month ago I met him promiscuously in the street; I asked him concerning the things, and he promised me before witness that he would satisfy me.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-113

113. BARNABY YATES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of November , ten yards of cotton, value 35 s. four cotton shawls, value 12 s. the goods of John Scoffeld in his dwelling house .

JOHN SCOFFELD sworn.

I am a linen draper , on the 14th of November last, the prisoner at the bar, came into the shop rather hastily; and took up this property, I was in the room adjoining, I was going out of the shop, and I gave the slip, to a person who will appear next, which is my brother; I had that day week lost about 20 l worth; I went into the parlour, just as I was at the door, the prisoner comes in and takes these articles up; my brother pursued him, and took hold of him just before he was out of the shop, I saw him stop him as I came out; he let them fall in the shop, and he said he was only moving them because I was gone out; I do not know him, but I heard him say that expression, he took them from the counter, I then took him below till I had time to see for a constable, for fear he should be rescued; I could not find one, I took him to Bow-street, and carried the things to Bow-street along with the prisoner; and they delivered them to me, and I have kept them ever since. (Produced and deposed to.)

WILLIAM SCOFFELD sworn.

I am the brother of the last witness; I was in the shop at the counter end, nigh the door, it is No. 78, Piccadilly ; the goods were folded up on the counter; this man came in, the door was open, and catched hold of the goods and was going off immediately, he was about two yards and a half from the door when I took the goods and laid hold of him, and said, you thief I have catched you, and immediately he tumbled the goods out of his hand just down by his feet; my brother came out and we took him to Bow-street.

John Scoffeld I petition you to tell the jury to find the value of the things under 40 s.

Prisoner. I leave it to the court.

GUILTY of stealing to the value 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

GUILTY. (Aged 17.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-114

114. WILLIAM BLACKETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a horse collar, value 1 s. a horse bridle, value 1 s. a sessing girt, value 1 s. and a pair of horses ends, value 1 s. the goods of Abraham Herne .

ABRAHAM HERNE sworn.

I am a bricklayer ; I lost these articles out of my stable, the prisoner was a servant of mine at the time I lost the property, he was a carter ; I did not know they were lost till I received information of his landlord where he lodged; I was with the constable when the property was taken; I did not see them till the day he was taken up, when the goods were found; I saw the prisoner in the hands of the constable, Saturday evening the 17th of November; I did not see any thing on him; I saw them afterward at his lodging; I heard him say it was his lodging; I found the things mentioned in the indictment there, in a box; he did not sleep at my house; when these things were taken he fell down on his knees and begged I would overlook it, it was his own voluntary confession before the hearing. (The things produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. He told me if I would confess he would not hurt me.

Court to Prosecutor. Did you take a character with him? - I did not; I had only had him six weeks.

Jury. How did he behave, did you find him a diligent man? - I did.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

Prisoner. I told him I could not live long with him only till the spring of the year, as I intended to do a little business for myself; after I had been with him about six weeks the landlord takes a note to Mr. Herne; it is about three weeks or a month before I had these things; I bought them in Smithfield, they are old things; I bought them for 4 s. 6 d. I could spare a little at a time better than a great quantity.

Court to Herne. Are you sure they are your things? - I brought them from Marlborough-street office; there is no mark on them; I believe them to be mine.

Prisoner. This Mr. Herne keeps seven or eight labouring men; I goes out from six o'clock to six o'clock, and they are in from morning to night, most of them Irishmen; I gave 18 d. for the head, 1 s. for the collar, and 2 s. for each of the other things. Mr. Herne knows I told him so.

Herne. His name is not William Blackett , but his name is James Blackwell .

GUILTY . (Aged 32.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-115

115. LAWRANCE BLEWMOUTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , twenty pounds weight of Russia tallow, value 5 s. the goods of Charles Patrick Reman and Thomas Holmes .

Mr. JONES sworn.

I am the mate of a ship which lies on Limehouse hole , the 3d tier. On Wednesday the 12th of December, I went down into the hole and I found three casks of tallow broached, it was between eight and nine in the morning, I went up and mentioned it to the people on deck, and desired them to look out after the lumper s when they went on shore. At half past twelve the prisoner at the bar and another man went into the boat, the officer saw them going over the side, he informed me of it; I insisted on them two men not to go; I took them back and had them stripped, and the prisoner at the bar said, I have some tallow, and dropped the tallow from his leather belt; I did not see it drop, but I saw it dropping, it came from under a leather belt, the bag weighed about twenty pounds and two ounces; it belonged to the owners Reman and Holmes.

Mr. Knowlys. What time did this man come on board that day? - He came on board half past eight; there might be six or seven or eight or nine more in the vessel.

Q. When he went out he came back on your calling him, and on your saying, that some of you have tallow about you, he readily admitted he had tallow? - He did, and afterwards it was laid down on the deck.

Q. Now I would ask you Mr. Jones, after you had made enquiry on the subject, whether you have made use of this expression, that you did not believe the prisoner had stole the tallow, but that the little man had done it, and that you believed he was innocent, and you had more suspicion of the little man than this man? - I said, they were all concerned together.

Q. Pray Mr. Jones was not this man at the time pretty far advanced in liquor? - He was not.

Q. This man has a wife and four children? - He has.

Court. What is he? - He goes a lumping.

JOSEPH WEST sworn

I am a constable; I was called to take this man into custody, and I took him and the tallow before the magistrate; I don't know who are the owners of this ship.

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

I am a tide waiter and constable; I don't know who are the owners of this ship.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-116

116. JOHN MACDONALD was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of December , one silk cloak, value 15 s. a linen apron, value 2 s. and two guineas in monies , the goods, chattels and monies of Martin Leonard .

MARTIN LEONARD sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I live at No. 6, Wild-street . Last Saturday night this man came into my room; about one o'clock awaked and saw the man in the place; I asked him what he wanted; he said, he wanted to lodge; I left the door on the latch, it was a public lodging house; I look upon it the time he came in he was in liquor; I don't know exactly that the man came in with an intent to rob; I did not catch any thing on him but I charged him with the constable, and I missed the two guineas about six in the morning, but I cannot charge the prisoner exactly; there were things in the place that I saw him undoing, but there was nothing found on him.

GEORGE HILL sworn.

I am the watchman of St. Giles's; coming past the door I was called up, this man was in his shirt, his wife was in bed, the prisoner was in the room with his clothes on; says he, I give you charge of that man coming privately into my room, with an intent to rob me; I took the man to the watch-house, and he was had before the justice, and committed to trial, but neither me nor the constable searched him.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-117

117. RICHARD GOODALL and EDWARD MARSHALL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , fourteen furr tippets, value 4 l. the goods of Joseph Slack

ISAAC SLACK sworn.

I am the brother of Mr. Joseph Slack , he keeps two shops , No. 42, and No. 45, Oxford-road , I was in the shop, No. 45, and I saw the prisoner at the bar, Marshall, on the 13th of November, between four and five in the afternoon; I went out and went to No. 42, and saw he had Goodall with him in company, and communicated my suspicons to No. 42, afterwards I saw them by the door, each side, and I saw Marshall pull down some tippets, one of which he put under his coat and the other he kept in his hand; the tippets were about a yard from the door, hanging by the side, they were within reach of a man's arm if he stands on the threshold of the door, he made off and I followed him and took him in twenty yards; when I laid hold of him he threw one tippet down as I brought him to the house at 42, and the other fell from under his coat, after I had got him into the house, Goodall came into the shop and wished to excuse the other, and said, he was sure Marshall would not take them; on that I attempted to lay hold of him, because he was in company with Marshall at the time the tippets were stole; I was quite sure of that at that time; he got away amongst the crowd as fast as he could; there was a crowd about the door, he could not run because there were so many people; he was taken near an hour or an hour and a half after; nothing was found upon him at all; I don't think he was searched, he was taken immediately to the office in Marlborough-street; when he was before the Magistrate what he said was not taken in writting, nor did I make use of any persuasions or any body in my hearing; he said, it was the first offence, and he hoped they would let him get off this time and he would quit England; this was said by Goodall, Marshall said nothing at all; the tippets were delivered to our shopman, he has had them ever since.

Q. Then you have no reason to charge Goodall, but merely being in company with Marshall? - In the first instance Marshall and Goodall were by our shop and then he took them and gave them to Marshall.

Prisoner Marshall. I had no more than one, and I carried it open in my hand.

JOHN PAINE sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Joseph Slack : at the time the two first tippets were stole I was in the shop 45; I saw the two prisoners but I did not see any thing they had got; about a quarter of an hour afterwards the two prisoners were round the door again, as I am told; I was out when I returned the two other tippets had been stole; Mr. Slack informed me what had happened, and delivered to me the two tippets; they were carried before the magistrate, and I have had them in my possession ever since. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner Marshall. Please your Worship when I set off from my friends house in the morning, I went to Charles-street, Bartlet-square to a butler, and drank a little with him there: coming down Bond-street I met a friend that had just come from France; I went with him and had four pots of ale; he told me of a place of a gentleman just going abroad, to enquire at the Oxford coffee house, accordingly I called there and he was not at home; just as we got to Mr. Slack's house we parted and shook hands together; he returned back to go up Oxford-road, I left him and going by the prosecutor's door I saw this tippet lay by the prosecutor's doors; I picked it up, and was walking away with it openly in my hand; the prosecutor came and catched hold of me and took me into the shop, and when I got into the shop, he said, he would prosecute me if he could; I begged mercy; if I had meant

it as a thief I should not have carried it in my hand; he told the gentleman of the office that I stole another tippet which he found on the ground by me; when I was before the justice I begged his pardon, and he said, you rascal if it was in my power I would hang you, and if you are not heavy enough, if I could have my will, I would pull your legs.

Prisoner Goodall. I left Marshall nigh the prosecutor's door and went on; I heard the cry of stop thief! I turned back and in about twenty yards I heard the thief was taken; accordingly I saw it was Marshall, he called me in, as as soon as I got in, the prosecutor took hold of me by the collar and said, sir, you have got the other two; he kept me about three minutes and then let me go; in the course of an hour and a half, two constables took me up and searched me and found nothing.

The prisoner Marshall called five witnesses to his character.

The prisoner Goodall called two.

Both GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-118

118. JOSEPH EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , one silver watch, value 1 l. one steel watch chain, value 6 d. two brass watch keys value 2 d. one steel watch key, value 1 d. one steel seal, value 1 d. one steel bed hook, value 1 d. the goods of James Foxley .

JAMES FOXLEY sworn.

I am a day labourer ; I have been in town a little while at work, at Mr. Hull's livery stables, in little Moorfields: I laid there on the 17th of November; I went to bed a little before ten; when I went to bed I pulled off my breeches and laid them below my head; my watch was in my breeches; I awaked about eight in the morning and got up; I did not miss my watch before; my breeches were gone from the head of the bed, and lay at the foot of the bed, and my watch was taken out, it was a silver case watch, both cases; this man had been at work with me for about three weeks, he lay in the same room with me, but not that night; I saw him at the King's Head in Angel-alley that night, he knew where I lay; I did not lock the door because there were two young fellows I expected to come to bed; this was on the 17th, Saturday.

JOHN KING sworn.

I am an officer of the city. On the 20th of November Foxley came to me and said, he had lost his watch and asked me to go along with him and apprehend the prisoner; I told him I was obliged to go to the Mansion house; he said, he expected to see him at twelve o'clock; says I, do you seize him, when I came back I found he had taken the man; I went before the Lord Mayor and he was discharged and nothing found on him. On some other occasion his master had desired me to get some duplicates of blankets which he had lost, he said, he had made away with them; I saw his wife and him fumbling in a box together; I catched hold of the box, and I found this duplicate in her hussiff in the box, pledged on Wednesday night after he had been turned up by the Lord Mayor; the maker's name was on the duplicate, which the prosecutor told me; I acquainted the prosecutor; he went with me to the pawnbroker's and said, it was his watch.

Prisoner. The person that you took the duplicate from was not my wife, nor did belong to me nor was it my room. - You called her your wife, and you lodged there.

Mr. BAKER sworn.

I live with Mr. Harrison the corner of Tottenham court road, opposite great Russel-street; I know the prisoner. On the 20th of November, between eight and nine in the evening, he came to me to pledge a silver watch; I am sure I took it of that man; I took it in for 12 s. 6 d. (Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. My lord this man accuses me of my apartment belonging to me, it does not; I never took the room nor lodged in it, nor paid rent for it; I took my linen to wash there once a week; I had no property in the box.

Court. How came you to pawn them? - I did not.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-119

119. WILLIAM RATHBONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , one side of pork, value 10 s. the goods of John Wilkins .

JOHN WILKINS sworn.

I am a porter for people at Islington; I work with the cart and horse; last Wednesday morning I was loading my cart and was going back again for some more meat, between eight and nine the cart was at the end of Rose-street, Newgate-street , and I turned my head about and sees a man taking a side of meat on his shoulder out of the cart; I immediately asked him where he was going with the side of pork; he said, he was going to put it in another man's cart; I said, if you please you must put into my cart again, and I charged an officer with him, and carried him to Bow-street; I know nothing of the man, I never employed him, nor never saw him with my eyes before as I know of; it was a whole side of pork worth 10 s. he had just turned round with it and was going away; it was in one of the public avenues going to the market.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him an excellent character.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-120

120. DANIEL KNIFE was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Arthur Double and Mary King , about the hour of six in the night of the 4th of November , and burglariously and feloniously stealing therein, a printed bound book, value 1 s. the goods of Edward Cashen , and four printed bound books, value 4 s. the goods of William Gillies .

MARY DAVIDSON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. King and Mr. Double, they keep a boarding school in Cooper's-row. Golden-square, Crutched-friars ; I was standing in my kitchen and I heard a noise and one of the blinds of the window was loose; I got up and went into the pantry and I found nothing there, and I immediately went into the parlour; I had been about ten minutes before that in the parlour, that I found one of the blinds and both the windows up, I shut down both the windows and I immediately put the shutters to and went up stairs to my fellow servant, and told her I believe the house

had been robbed, I missed these books directly, we came down both of us and could not find any body in the house; I had been about ten minutes before and made up the fire, and carried a shovel of coals, they were both down then, nobody had been in the parlour since at all, for my fellow servant was gone to lay down, there is a spring to fasten these windows, but it was not put back; it was about six o'clock, it was dark.

EDWARD CASHEN sworn.

I am a merchant , on Sunday the 14th of November, I went into the country, and did not return till Tuesday morning, and I was informed the house had been robbed; about two hours after some officers came to the house, with the boy .

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG sworn.

I in company with some officers, was in Wimpole-street about half past seven; Mr. Harper said, do you see that the other side of the way; I immediately ran, and caught hold of Knife, and from under his bosom I took these two books, at that instant I took them another person, and a little boy ran away; I know the man, but I don't know the boy; the man was Turner, we secured the prisoner, and left him in custody with Mr. Harper, and went and took Kennedy and Turner in a room, up two pair of stairs, I took Kennedy only on suspicion; we took them to the magistrate, next day, and I was desired to go with the boy to the house, where they were supposed to come from; we did, and we brought the gentleman up to the magistrate.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn.

I accompanied Armstrong and took the prisoner, and saw them books taken out of his pocket, I don't know the boy, but I know Turner and the prisoner.

- KENNEDY

I am turned of eleven; my father is a taylor, I work with him; I cannot read.

Q. Do you know what it is to take an oath? - Yes.

Q. What is the consequence if you take a false oath? - I shall go to Hell.

Q. Mind my boy that you speak the truth, and if you do not speak the truth you will be punished here as well as in the other world. Now mind what you say, deliver the oath to him slow, not too fast.

sworn.

I live in Well-street, Ratcliff-highway; I have not known this man long, the young woman's brother, that lives with him, was bad in a fever, and I goes to see him, that was the way I got acquainted with Knife; I don't know Turner, only by seeing him up at Knife's house; I don't know the age of Knife's brother, his name is Thomas Bristow , he is a bigger boy then me, he has been in the Marine society, I have been there two or three times; I never stole any thing with them before; the last time I was with Knife, was the night the robbery was done of the books; he lived at the top of Petticoat-lane, it was Sunday; I went to Knife just before dark, when I came there Knife was there, and the young woman he lives with, and the boy who was bad, we went out together and we looked at this house and Knife looked into the window, this house was in Crutched-friars. they saw a light by the fire and the books laying, Knife shoved up the window, and sent me the other side of the way, and a blind fell down, and Knife put his body half way into the window and reached three books, and Turner opened the other window and Turner took up three books, there were six in all; seeing the gentleman's name on the back, he took his knife out of his pocket and tried to scratch it out, but

he could not without scratching a hole in the book, they was going to sell them somewhere, I don't know where; we met Mr. Armstrong, and Turner and Knife were with me, and Mr. Harper went on to Turner first, and Turner and I ran away, and we went up to Knife's room, they kept Knife, presently Mr. Armstrong came up stairs and took Turner and me and tied our hands together with an handkerchief, and takes us all three to the watch-house till the next day; I am sure all this is true; I was out with Turner and Knife once before, but I did never thieve any thing with them before. (The books deposed to.)

Prosecutor. I had been out on the 4th of November all the day, returning home I met this boy with the four books under his arm, he asked me where he could sell them, he said, he got them in Duke's-place; I told him, I was no scholar; I took them of him to go to a public house to look at them, and this man stopped me, and said, I was good for 40 l. for I had been breaking a house open, they took this boy home and gave him a supper that night.

Court to Davidson. What time of the night was it? - About six o'clock in the evening.

GUILTY of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: t17921215-121

120. HENRY GRIFFIN, otherwise GEORGE HUBBARD, otherwise LORD MASSEY was indicted for feloniously forging a certain order, for the payment of money, purporting to bear date on the 15th of March, 1791, and to be the order of Charles, Earl of Tankerville, and directed to Thomas Coutts , Edward Antrobus and John Antrobus , by the name and description of Thomas Coutts and Co. requiring them to pay to Lord Massey or bearer, the sum of 1449 l. with intent to defraud Robert Willerton and Charles Green .

The note is as follows:

No. 147.

London, March 15, 1791.

Messrs. Thomas Coutts and Co. pay Lord Massey, or bearer, 1449 l.

Tankerville.

He was indicted in a SECOND COUNT for feloniously uttering it to be true, knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud Robert Willerton and Charles Green .

He was indicted in a THIRD and FOURTH COUNTS for uttering it to be be true, knowing it to be forged, with intent to defraud Charles, Earl of Tankerville .

He was indicted in a FIFTH COUNT for uttering it with intent to defraud Thomas Coutts , Edward Antrobus and John Antrobus .

(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

CHARLES GREEN sworn.

Q. You are in partnership with Mr. Willerton? - Yes.

Q. What is his Christian name? - Robert.

Q. You carry on the Goldsmith and Jewellery business in Bond street? - Yes.

Q. On the 16th of March, 1791, did any person make any application to you in the jewellery business? - Yes, on the 16th of March, 1791, the prisoner came to my shop to ask to see some necklaces, and ear-rings, we shewed him some that were commonly sold, he said he wanted

diamond necklaces and ear-rings, and was recommended by Lord Salisbury, there were but few in the shop, I told him we would collect others of the work people, and shew them in a few hours; he agreed to my waiting upon him in two hours, which was at four o'clock.

Q. Where was you to go to? - To St. James's Place, he left a card and address (the card produced) Lord Massey on one side, and No. 36, St. James's Place, on the other. I went accordingly to the apartment at four o'clock, when I came to the house, a man servant shewed me up stairs, and I went into the room and found the person who had given me the card, I opened my goods and shewed him my book, he was looking over the book, and he asked the price of several articles, I told him; he asked me if I asked the lowest price, as he was going to pay ready cash for them. A person came into the room and said Dr. Hunter was come in, the Dr. came into the room, and the prisoner at the bar begged I would go out of the room while he spoke to the Dr. I went out of the room for about five minutes, and then was called in. Dr. Hunter was sitting down at the table to write, the prisoner looked at the articles, he then made choice of a pair of diamond ear-rings, a necklace, a watch and chain; he desired me to put them in cases, I told him I would take them home and put them in cases, as I had no proper cases with me, he desired me to bring them again as soon as possible, as he was going out; I went back again as soon as ever possible I could get them packed up, and took the bill.

Q. What time was you back? - This was before five, he looked over the bill, and I shewed him some other articles at the same time, which the workmen had brought in since I was gone out, he looked over the bill.

Q. What was the amount? - Seven hundred and sixty pounds; he then went to the drawer, and brought me this note. (produced) I looked it over, found it was regularly drawn on a check, told him I had not cash about me, I would get it changed, I returned in about half an hour with a draft on my house for the difference of the bill, his servant told me he was gone out, I waited for about half an hour expecting he would return, but I found he did not; I told the servant I would call in the morning, I went to Mr. Coutts's first in the morning, found the note was refused payment there.

Q. I believe from the time of his delivering the note, you never saw him till he was in custody at Birmingham? - Never.

Q. When was that? - That was on the 13th of last November twelvemonth, the year 1791, he was at that time in custody at Birmingham.

Q. Was the person you saw at Birmingham, the same person that gave you the said draft? - He is.

Q. Be so good to look at the prisoner, are you certain and clear he is the man? - I am; I have not the least doubt.

Q. I observe that before the magistrate at Birmingham, you said you believed he was the man? - I did; I wished to avoid prosecuting him, I thought there were such heavy charges against him there, that justice would be done without.

Mr. Knowlys, Prisoner's Council. There was eight months from the time you saw the prisoner and received the bill from him, to the time you saw the prisoner at the bar? I should like you to recollect what you said, when you got to Birmingham? You said just now, that you verily believed he was the man, did not you say on the contrary, that you could not positively speak to his person? - I said that I believed him to be the person.

Q. I ask you whether you did not make use of this expression at any time in Birmingham, that you could not speak positively to his person? - No, sir, I said that I believed him to be the person.

Q. Did not you say, Mr. Green, that the person who had got the goods of you was a thinner man than the prisoner, who was then examined? - At that time, I said, he was thinner than when I saw him before.

Q. I wish you would recollect yourself a little, did not you say that the person who had the goods of you, was a thinner man than the man that was examined before the magistrate? - I did not.

Q. You never had the least sight of the person who obtained the goods of you for these eight months? - No, not for these eight months.

Mr. Garrow. Had you taken any pains to find him? - I had advertised a reward and distributed hand bills.

(The draft read by the Clerk of the Court.)

Prisoner. When I saw you at Birmingham, prior to the last time I saw you, you had two or three interviews with me before you made this charge? - I went with Mr. Wallis the constable to you.

Q. Had you not seen me prior to that time when you was asked whether it was the person that imposed on you or not, and did not you say that the man that had imposed on you was a man that was a much thinner man than I am? - No.

Q. Did you say I was the man? - I said I believed you was the man.

Q. Mr. Green, as a man of honour, as a tradesman of respectability, to which no doubt you aspire; did you, or did you not say, that you verily believed that I was not the man? - I did not.

Prisoner. My Lord, I beg your Lordship's pardon in intruding upon the court; but they are facts that I can bring an indisputable witness to prove, a person not unknown to my Lord Loughborough.

Court. The time to call your witnesses is in your defence.

Prisoner. I shall take the liberty of calling the witness to prove what I have just stated.

- HORTEN sworn.

Q. I believe, madam, in March, 1791, you lived in St. James's Place? - I did, Lord Massey took my lodgings on the 15th of March, but did not come till the 16th.

Q. Did he take them for a certain time? - He did not.

Q. When did he leave them? - He left them on the 16th, he was there but a few hours.

Q. What time did he come on the 16th? - About twelve o'clock.

Q. Do you recollect any person coming to him while he was at your house? - I recollect Mr. Green coming.

Q. Any body else? - Yes, Mr. John Hunter .

Q. Was Lord Massey attended by any servant? - He was attended by a French servant.

Q. Will you look round and see if you see that person? - I think I do, I think the prisoner at the bar is that person.

Q. Did you know he was going to leave your lodgings so suddenly? - I did not.

Court. Was he in your house on the night of the 15th? - he took them on the 15th, but he never slept there; he came about twelve o'clock on the 16th, and stayed till between four and five, and then he walked out as indifferently as you or I, or any person else would do.

Mr. Garrow. Did he leave any thing? - Nothing but two trunks, which on Mr. Green's returning from Bow-street, were opened, which contained nothing but brickbats, tiles, and haybands.

Mr. Knowyles. There was nothing partticular in this person's mode of leaving your house, he walked out very leisurely? - He did.

Q. This is at a very great length of time you are now speaking of, a year or more? - It is.

Q. Do you inhabit the whole of the house yourself? - I let the first floor.

Q. You have a variety of lodgers of course? - I have.

Jury. Pray did the last witness say, I think he is the man? - That was the expression, I think he is the man.

MARY MONRO sworn.

Q. You was servant to Mrs. Horton? - I was.

Q. Do you recollect any person in March, 1791, lodging there, passing for Lord Massey? - Yes, that person at the bar.

Q. Are you sure? - I am confident.

Q. Had you any occasion to attend him while he was there? Yes, he rung the bell while his own servant was out of the way, I went in, and he desired me to call a coach, which I did.

Q. At what time was this? - Soon after he came, and he desired me to look carefully about the room, for he had dropped a check, I went down to my mistress, and told my mistress what my Lord had lost, I looked about the room, but I could not find any thing; when he came to the coach, he desired the coachman to drive him to the Duke of Argyle's, his Lordship was absent about two hours, and returned as near as I can recollect.

Q. Do you recollect any person coming to him after he returned? - Dr. Hunter came, but I did not see him, I saw Mr. Green.

Q. Was the prisoner at the bar the person to whom Mr. Green came? - Yes, there was no other person there.

Q. How soon after Mr. Green came, did the prisoner at the bar go out? - He went out the second time about six o'clock in the evening; and when he went out, he told me not to put any sheets on the bed, for he found his own linen.

Q. But he did not return? - He did not.

Q. Did he leave any person in his room? - He left his man servant all night, expecting my Lord to come home.

Mr. Knowles. Do you live with this lady still? - I do.

Q. She has had a number of lodgers since that time? - Yes.

Q. This person who took your mistresses lodgings was only there a few hours? he had a man servant with him, of course The chief attention that would be paid to his commands, would be by his own servant? - Yes, but he was out.

Q. All that you know, is, that this person went out, and that you went and called a coach? - Yes.

JOSEPH LECREE sworn.

Q. You are a French servant, I understand? - Yes, my Lord.

Q. With whom did you live in the month of March, 1791? - With Lord Massey.

Q. Was that at the house of Mrs. Horton, in St. James's Place? - It was.

Q. How long was you in his service? - I was hired the 16th of March between twelve and one o'clock.

Q. Was you hired at Ibberson's Coffee-house, Vere-street? - I was.

Q. Did your master come there to hire you? - No, I had advertised the day before, being out of place, and a card was left for me to go to Ibberson's Coffee-house, where I was directed to my Lord the first time I went at twelve, my Lord was not come in, but calling again about half after twelve he was there, reading the newspaper, he hired me as a servant.

Q. For what length of time? - He did not mention, but I was to come immediately in his service, otherwise it would not do; accordingly, my being out of place, I did not refuse the place! he sent me to Mrs. Horton, to see if his lodgings were ready. The lodging being ready I came back to let my Lord know, and he desired me to wait till some of his baggage came from my Lord such a one, whom I cannot exactly say; the baggage arrived, it consisted of a large trunk, and a portmanteau;

he sent me immediately to Mrs. Horton's in a coach, with this trunk and portmanteau.

Q. How soon did he come there himself? - In a very short time, about a quarter of an hour afterwards.

Q. What was you employed in? - I began to undue the trunk till my lord came home, then he sent me to buy some oranges, pens, and ink, and so on; and then I was sent to Mr. John Hunter 's, with my lord's card; that Mr. John Hunter was to call upon him at three o'clock, he was not at home the first time, and then I was sent again, and I appointed him to come; when I came home the first or second time, I cannot exactly say, the maid servant told me my lord was gone out, to pay a visit to the Duke of Argyle, and would be back immediately. After he came home there was a porter brought a letter directed to Lord Massey, left it and went away. Mr. Green came afterwards, I shewed him up to my lord, I don't know what passed while Mr. Green was there.

Q. Which came first Mr. Hunter or Mr. Green? - I believe Mr. Hunter was in the room before Mr. Green, and Mr. Green waited till Mr. Hunter went away.

Q. After Mr. Green had been with him, how long did my lord stay at home? - Five or ten minutes.

Q. Did he leave any message with you when he went out? - He did, he desired me not to go out, as he expected somebody to call for him.

Q. Did he tell you whether he should return to sleep that night? - He said, he should come home to dress, but he never returned again.

Q. Look round and see if you see the person here that you have described? - That person at the bar is the very same resemblance of the man that was called, my Lord Massey, but he is not so fat nor so red as he was.

Q. Do you mean to speak with doubt or certainty of him? - I never saw him from that time till a fortnight ago, I took him then to be the person.

Q. On the whole have you any doubt that he is the person that hired you? - It is the same picture of him, only what I mentioned before,

Mr. Knowlys. You are a French servant that wait upon foreigners a good deal when they come to town, frequently change your service? - No, sir.

Q. How many services have you lived in since you was with my Lord Massey? - One.

Q. Do you recollect going into Newgate? - Yes.

Q. Was not there a man of the name of Bonus, that was tried here last sessions, which you expressed as your opinion was the man that you served? - I did not see any body in prison that I served else.

Q. Did not you see a person in the prison of the name of Bonus, that you thought was the person you served? - I saw a good many people there.

Q. Did not you express an opinion that some other person whom you saw there, was the person you had served? - No.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Kendall? - No.

Q. Have you been in this court before? - No.

Q. Was you shewn any more apartments than one in Newgate? - Only one.

Q. Do you recollect seeing a tall genteel looking man there? - I saw several there.

Q. Now I ask you to recollect whether you did not intimate to some person, that you thought another man you saw there, was the person you served as Lord Massey? - I fixed my mind and was confident, this person is the person I served, as Lord Massey, I was in prison and looked at all of them, and I saw that same man, and I don't know that it is any other.

Q. You deny then that you ever expressed your opinion that some other person in prison was my Lord Massey? - I deny it.

- CHALRTON sworn.

I believe you are cashier to the house of Messrs. Coutts and Co.? - I am.

Q. Was that draft presented to you by Mr. Green? - It was, and I refused to pay it.

Q. Did my Lord Tankerville use your house? - He did not.

Mr. Knowlys. Then you refused paying the draft because my Lord Tankerville did not keep cash there? - Yes.

JAMES SHELTON sworn.

I believe you have been solicitor to my Lord Tankerville for some years? - I have.

Q. Have you seen his lordship write frequently? - Yes, frequently, and have received many letters from him.

Q. Be so good to look at the signature of Tankerville to the draft you have in your hand? - I believe it is not his hand writing.

Q. Would you on that signature have made any payment, or done any thing as by his lordship's orders? - Certainly I should not.

- CLARET sworn.

Have you had any opportunity of being acquainted with my lord's manner of writing? - Yes, I have seen him frequently write, I believe that not to be my lord's writing, I would have made no payment under that signature.

WILLIAM BEEZLEY sworn.

Have you had opportunity of seeing my Lord Tankerville write? - I have more than twenty years, that is not at all like his hand writing, I would not have made any payment, or done any business for my Lord Tankerville, on that hand writing.

Mr. Garrow to Charlton. Be so good to tell us the firm of Mr. Coutts and Co's banking house? - Thomas Coutts, Edward Antrobus , and Thomas Antrobus .

Mr. Knowlys. Are there no other partners? - No.

Mr. Garrow to Shelton. Be so good to tell us Lord Tankerville's Christian name? - Charles.

Prisoner. My Lord, your Lordship has done me the honour to allow me to reply in answer to the charge exhibited against me by Mr. Garrow; it certainly is not my with to be distinguished as a public speaker, and several powerful reasons present themselves, why I should be silent on this occasion; but in the present case, I feel myself irresistibly impelled to arrest the attention of the court, while I submit a few remarks to the candour, good sense, and liberality of you, my Lord, and the Gentlemen of the Jury. Gentlemen, I feel peculiarly unfortunate in being obliged to add to the loads of misery I now sustain, the being placed at this bar, to answer this charge. The circumstances of my now standing under the strongest prejudices, the public opinion being against me, oppressed by calumny in every newspaper, and almost convicted by the popular cry, before I have even heard the charge imputed to me, or had it in my power to say a syllable in my defence, under such prejudices, and in such a situation, I can only rely on the judgment, the honour, and the integrity of the learned Judge, before whom I am tried; and to implore a fair, candid, and an impartial hearing of the cause to the Jury, who are to determine the matter.

Gentlemen, I can only be anticipating the observations that will be made much more favourable for me by the learned Judge, when I earnestly request of you, Gentlemen of the Jury, to try this cause

on the evidence adduced before you, and totally to lay out of your consideration every thing you have heard before it came into this court, your minds being only impressed by the effect of the evidence; from which I feel a most perfect confidence in receiving a verdict declaring my innocence.

I will now take the liberty of imparting to my lord and gentlemen of the jury, such observations as have occurred to me on the evidence which has been given against me.

Mr. Green, gentlemen, I am sorry to say it, hath exceedingly departed from the truth, in a most gross and flagrant manner; gentlemen, my assertion is this, and I well know that base assertions can have but little weight, but, gentlemen, I have it in my power to call a gentleman of the first respectability, a man who wants only to be known, to be universally admired; I shall not anticipate his evidence more than I have already done, he will tell you that Mr. Green, when he saw me at Birmingham, on the mention of this question, said that the person that imposed on him was a much thinner man than myself, he has now told you he did not say so; that he said, that I was exactly the man, and that he was very certain of it; gentlemen, what can we think of a man thus elastic in his mind, one that will swear one thing one day, and one thing another: Heaven forbid, gentlemen, that I should be desirous of depreciating the character of any man, even the greatest enemy I have in existence, I assure you I would not; but when such flagrant evidence thus contradictory in itself, is brought against me, with a view to deprive me of my life, I think it but fair I should make it known.

The next witness that is called is the lady that keeps the house, where the impostor lodged; she has acted in such a manner that does her infinite honour; she does not say that I am the person, she says she thinks I am the same person, but she does not attempt to speak that I am the person who imposed upon her. Gentlemen, I need not tell you what a wonderful coincidence in manner, size, appearance and voice, there may be between two persons without the smallest connection, as to the same identical person; we know a man of the brightest genius is like to err, as to identity and more particularly, where the view has been transient, as appears in the present instance. The mistress of the house swears that I left the house at five o'clock, the maid servant swears it was at six; gentlemen, were women will take upon themselves to swear to the identity of a person, in a forcible manner, it is very extraordinary, they should not as well recollect, to as great a certainty the hour, it appears they do not, for the mistress of the house says, I went away about five, and the maid servant says, I went away about six; therefore her evidence, as to the identity of person, cannot be depended on.

The next witness called is Lecree, who appears to have been a servant, with the assumed Lord Massey, he has told you, gentlemen of the jury, that I resemble him that there is a wonderful likeness; but surely, gentlemen, that is not evidence, that ought not to add any weight in the scale of this cause; surely nothing but the most clear and strong evidence should govern the determination of a Jury; nothing of this sort as adduced by this witness, should be suffered to make any impressions; more particularly when the life is at stake.

Gentlemen of the jury, there is a circumstance occurs to my mind, which I think very proper for your consideration. Mr. Hunter's name has been mentioned,

his name has been used in this cause, his evidence no doubt would be a material weight in this cause, I should be glad to know why he has not been brought forward, a person of his integrity, respectability and veracity, would have had very great weight with the judge, and you, gentlemen of the jury.

I will beg leave to read to you, gentlemen, two letters, they were received by me yesterday from a man that was my servant, they will prove beyond the possibility of a doubt, the intention of Mr. Green and will manifest he has left no stone unturned to deprive me of my life; I will beg leave to call a witness who will prove having received this letter from Steven Duport , extracts of which are as follows:

Sir, I have sent you word that Mr. Green (the prosecutor gentleman in this cause) is determined to make me appear, it will be a great hurt to you, therefore you will see by my conduct that I take your interest, and found this to let you know he hath been at my house yesterday, and desired me not to be out of the way on Wednesday, he says he will give leave to go into the country, if it was for a month, but you know my disposition. If I had money, I had not have wrote, therefore I shall go out of the way:

Stephen Duport .

An abstract of the second letter is as follows:

Sir, the very moment I sent of your other letter, Mr. Willerton and Mr. Green, have come to me and asked me several questions, the same as before, I have given the same answers, that I would be ready at any time; they asked me at last, Mr. Green asked me if I meant to stay always in livery, I said no; he said if I wanted money or clothes he would lend me some. - The meaning of it, gentlemen, you may see very plain.

Gentlemen, under all these circumstances it would be an insult to your understanding to suppose you capable of giving a verdict contrary to your best wishes, I solemnly declare to his lordship, and you, gentlemen of the jury, that I am not guilty of the charge.

Gentlemen of the jury, I have been in custody fourteen months, since which time eight sessions have elapsed; why this charge has not been brought forward before this period; I cannot say. Gentlemen, from the vicisitudes I have undergone, it is impossible for any person possessed of sympathy, not to feel something, and more especially on the present occasion; where the dictates of keen sensibility take place, without the smallest mitigation.

Gentlemen, I need not tell you, I have long been the mark of vengeance. I have been reviled to the utmost; but I have the infinite satisfaction in my own breast, that they are ill grounded; for could I be truly charged with any dishonourable, mean, or unmanly undertaking; my feelings would indeed be very different from those I now experience; my mind in that case would sting me, more than the bitterest reproof of the sincerest friends. Thus supported by my conscience, I wait for your verdict without inquietude, as knowing that to men of your liberality of sentiment, I am not the object of those prejudices, which have operated to fatally against many men in my circumstances, and doubt not, but that you will form your result, from a feeling heart, directed by an enlightened understanding.

JOHN BROOKES sworn.

I live at Birmingham, I am in the profession of the law.

Q. Was you present at any time, that Mr. Green saw the prisoner at the bar? - Yes.

Q. Did you hear him give any account as to the knowledge of his person, and will you be so kind as to tell us the expression he made use of on that occasion? - I was with him when he was before Mr. Careless at Manchester; Mr. Green got up and walked about the room, and he was asked whether he was certain he was the person, he did not take on himself to say. Mr. Careless wished me to be present, as a professional man; in consequence of this, I asked Mr. Green if he was certain, that Mr. Griffin was the person that had committed the robbery, he said he could not speak with certainty to the person, but his young man could; Mr. Griffin after some conversation got up, and walked up to Mr. Green, and beseeched him to take every opportunity of satisfying himself, whether he was the person or not. - I then told Mr. Green, that he ought to be decided in his evidence against him, as the charge was of such a serious nature as to affect his life; he said he believed him to be the person; on which Mr. Careless said it was sufficient to commit the gentleman on that charge.

Mr. Garrow. I am sorry you have had the trouble to come to day, to take on yourself to prove what Mr. Green has said before. - Perhaps this examination is your hand writing? - It is not, it is Mr. Careless's I believe, this examination was brought ready prepared.

Q. Did you see Mr. Green sworn to it? - I did; I asked Mr. Green whether he was certain as to the day, Mr. Griffin said it was no consequence, if he said the month of March, for he was all that month on the continent.

Court. Was your conversation with Mr. Green, before or after, his examination? - Previous or rather during his examination.

Q. Was it before he signed his examination? - I believe it was.

Mr. Garrow. As you attended to assist Mr. Green, you of course saw that every thing was put down correct? - I did not exactly see, what was exactly put down, I was there in some respect by desire of Mr. Griffin.

Jury. Did the last witness say of Mr. Green, that he could not swear positively to the woman, but his servant could.

Mr. Garrow to Mr. Green. This gentleman has said that you said you had a person who could more recognize the prisoner than yourself. - That is so, that person is in court.

Jury. We wish him to be called.

WILLIAM MEARS sworn.

Was you in the service of Messrs. Green and Willerton, in the month of March 1791? - Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner as the person who came to your masters shop? - I cannot swear positively to that person, but I think the prisoner resembles him.

Q. Will you be so good as to point out any alteration between the person at the bar and the person who assumed the name of Lord Massey? - He appeared I think at that time to be rather fuller in the face.

Q. On the whole are you able to form a belief that the prisoner is the same person or not? - I cannot take on me to say; I cannot say any thing more than I have.

Q. Do you believe he is or is not? - I rather believe he is.

Mr. Garrow. Gentlemen of the Jury, I state to you gentlemen, that this person was not in my brief, or otherwise I would have called him.

Prisoner. It is rather extraordinary Mr. Garrow you should not have called him.

Mr. Garrow. Sir, I have done you the justice and liberality to state that he is not in my brief.

Court. How long had you an opportunity of seeing the person March 1791? - I only saw him in the shop.

GUILTY . Death . (Aged 25.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17921215-122

121. MARY ANN FOWLE was indicted, for wilful and corrupt perjury .

(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow, and the record of of Radley's conviction read by the clerk of the court.)

JOHN DALBY sworn.

I attended as short hand writer on the trial of John Radley , I have the notes of that trial; I heard the prisoner examined, but did not attend to her oath; (reads)

"I offered a brilliant diamond for sale to Mr. Hether." (Here Mr. Dalby delivered his notes to the clerk.)

"I know nothing of this, this is not the purse that was taken from me, it is not the same or is it mine; I never had that purse of the prisoner at the bar, I never said at the office that I had that purse of the prisoner at the bar." This was in answer to a question of Mr. Garrow's.

"Who did you receive this purse from? I caution you Mrs. Fowle to tell the truth, as I have witnesses to prove from whom you received it."

STEPHEN WAY LAVENDER sworn.

I have got the leather purse; I sealed it up on the occasion of the last trial, it is the same leather purse to which the prisoner was examined in this court; I heard the oath administered to her; I heard the evidence, she gave the same as Mr. Dalby has stated; I was examined on the occasion; I took the leather purse from the prisoner at the bar in Bow-street, the purse shewn to her in court was the same shewn to her in Bow-street, she was asked of whom she received it; Radley was then under examination who was charged with an highway robbery, she said, she received it of that young fellow, she touched the prisoner Radley with her finger, and said, she received it of him.

Prisoner. I never touched the prisoner at the time.

EDWARD HUGHES sworn.

I was present at Bow-street when that leather purse was produced to the prisoner at the bar, it was the same purse as was shewn her in this court before; she pointed to the young fellow; Mr. Addington said, which young fellow, and ordered her to go and touch him, and she went and touched the prisoner Thomas Radley .

STEPHEN GOODALL sworn.

I was the coachman who drove Mrs. Fellows home when she was robbed; I attended at Bow street; I saw the prisoner there; I saw the leather purse

shewn her, she said, she received it of that fellow, the magistrate asked her what fellow do you mean, she pointed to Radley, after that she put her hand about to him to touch him.

Prisoner. I wish to know who it is indicts me, or where it is committed; I never was sworn till before this honourable court; as to the time I was examined I was overcome with confusion, not sensible of what I said; Sir Sampson Wright had two purses in his hand when he asked me those questions, I was much confused.

Mr. Garrow. She is indicted for what she swore in this court, and Mrs. Fellows prosecutes her.

Court to Hughes. Where there two purses? - There were, one was a silk one.

Jury. Was she sworn before the magistrate? - No, she was committed as a receiver.

Court. When the two purses were taken from her, was the conversation about the leather purse or the silk purse? - Mrs. Fellows described she had been robbed of a leather purse.

Mr. Garrow. Was the question before the magistrate confined to that leather purse described by Mrs. Fellows? - Quite so, the other purse was not at all the question.

The prisoner called one witness to her character.

GUILTY . (Aged 25.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17921215-123

122. ROBERT JONES otherwise called CHARLES WARNER was indicted for that he, on the 3d of November, knowingly and unlawfully did send a certain letter, the names of James Cook and William Brown subscribed thereto, to Thomas Horne , threatening to accuse the said Thomas Horne of the crime of sodomy, with a view and intent to extort money from him against the form of the statute and against the King's peace; and

ANN SIMPSON was indicted, for that she, on the same day, knowingly and unlawfully did deliver the said letter.

(The case was opened by Mr. Garrow.)

THOMAS HORNE sworn.

I am by profession a stock-broker ; I was born in this city, and have transacted my business in the Royal-exchange many years; I sent an advertisement to the paper for insertion on Friday, but it was not inserted till the next day, Saturday the 3d of November; on that Saturday morning I saw the woman Burton at my office about twelve o'clock, she delivered me that letter; in consequence Mr. Harris went out with the woman and brought the woman and man back.

Q. How soon did you see Phillis Jones or Warner; was you present when any questions were asked of him with respect to the knowledge of that letter? - I was, the woman was brought in again, and him in about five or ten minutes, as soon as he came in into the office he said to me, it was a very extraordinary thing that I should have him brought into my office who knew nothing at all about the business, for (he added) I am sure I can know nothing, for I never saw you before in my life, and I dare say you never saw me; I told him that was nothing at all to the matter in dispute; I told him that a very extraordinary letter was brought to me into my office, and I should insist of knowing from him, before he left my office, where he got that letter; then he threatened me with an action for false imprisonment

for detaining him; I answered, I would run that risk; I then sent a man immediately for a constable, and he brought one in about ten minutes, he kept continually saying, he knew nothing more of the letter; when the constable came he took him immediately before my Lord Mayor; I did not ask him any questions, I thought it was best to reserve that for the magistrate; when they were taken before the Lord Mayor they gave a most contradictory evidence to what he gave me, the woman was examined first, as soon as he was brought in and examined he was asked if he knew nothing at all of the letter; he said, no; my Lord Mayor then asked him his name; he said, Robert Jones , and that he lived at an oyster shop some where in Chancery-lane; the Lord Mayor asked him what apartment; he said, a front room and a chamber, he paid 15 l. a year for it, at last he said, that the woman's husband threw the letter after her, that he, the prisoner, had taken it up and given it to her and came to shew her where to come.

Q. I observe the letter is not directed to any particular place but only Mr. Horne, Stock-broker; I suppose in your advertisement you had stated where you did your business? - Yes, he was then asked again about his profession and what he was; he said, he was a gentleman; he asked him what he had to live upon; he said 50 l. a year, which was remitted from his father in Ireland; the Lord Mayor then asked him, whether it was remitted in bills or Bank notes; he said, in Bank bills; then he was asked whether he had not a great many of those covers by him; he said, he certainly had; he was asked whether he had any of those about him; he said, no, he was very glad he had not, because he did not choose they should be exhibited to every body; he was then asked about the letter, and then he said, he did give it to the woman, and a woman in the street gave it to him; then the Lord Mayor said, it is very extraordinary that he should bring a letter and take a letter from a stranger; have not you been at Tothill-fields Bridewell? he said, no, he had never been there, and then he said at last, he had been there that very morning; he did not say that he had the letter from thence, but he seemed to imply it; then he was asked again if he knew the contents of the letter; he said, no; then he was asked if he was the writer; he said, he could not write; then he was asked if he knew either of the parties who signed the letter; he said, he believed he might know them by sight; then he was asked whether he was not a member of this club in question, at last he acknowledged that he had been there some time and that he knew the man at the house.

Q. Did you learn from him in any examinations whether he could write? - The Lord Mayor on Monday desired him to write, and he took a pen and made a scrawl; the Lord Mayor's clerk asked him if he had not been there charging a man with robbing him of money and signed his name; he said, if he had signed it was very badly wrote; the Lord Mayor asked him if that robbery had been tried; he said, no, the grand jury threw out the bill. On Monday he said, that every thing that he said on Saturday was wrong.

Q. Did you enquire to see whether he lived at the oyster shop? - They neither of them lived where they said. I went to Tothill-fields Bridewell; I saw Brown there; I never saw him before, and he acknowledged he never saw me.

Q. Mr. Horne I will put a question to you though it has not any thing to do in the subject; was there the smallest truths in these insinuations? - Not the least in the world.

Mr. Knowlys. Mr. Horne I am extremely sorry they have been thrown out. I can assure you that in my brief

there is not a tittle suggested to your prejudice, and God forbid I should throw any imputation.

PHILLIP NICHOLS sworn.

I was with Mr. Horne at the time the woman brought this letter, I have known him thirty-four years; I was present also when the man was brought in.

Q. You have heard Mr. Horne, was it as he said? - It was.

WILLIAM HAYNES sworn.

I have been clerk to Mr. Horne thirteen or fourteen years; I was at the office when the woman first came, she asked if Mr. Horne was at home, I told her he was not, she said, she would call again, I went out merely from curiosity to the door, and I saw her in company with Warner; he was at the Royal Exchange Gate, he appeared to be there waiting, and when they came past the door, she said, there was somebody there, or with him, and so I said nothing about it; in half an hour after, I saw the man in Exchange Alley, I was out on business, then he was waiting by himself, on my going on to the office, I found the woman there, I found Mr. Horne had received the letter, he asked the woman where she brought it from, she said, a man gave it her in the street, I went out and fetched the man in, he was still waiting in Exchange Alley; I asked him to go along with me, he said, he would not, he was waiting for a lady, I told him the lady wanted to speak with him, and I laid hold of his arm, he says, don't behave rude to me, I will not go with you; I then went into the office, and told the woman, the man would not come, O says she, then I will fetch him in, and then I, and the woman went out together to fetch him in, he was gone, then I brought the woman back, and Mr. Horne gave me the letter to go to his attorney, when I came out, I saw the same man at the Royal Exchange Gate, and as soon as I came in sight he ran away, I soon overtook him, and laid hold of him, and brought him back to the office.

The letter read by the clerk, as follows:

Saturday morning, sir, I am sorry to inform you, that I have been unfortunate with the rest on Monday last, in Clement's-lane, as I suppose you must have seen in the papers, and have been in prison ever since, not being able to get bail as some have done, I have been solicited to say who supported me in the least, which I would not do, till I sent to you and another friend likewise, who I believe is out of town; I believe, I could get bail, if I could but make up 10 l. which would settle every thing intirely, for it is very hard, as you know, and as I know, you are a considerate man, for me to lay in prison six months, in a starving condition, therefore I hope you will send me the assistance by the bearer, &c.

From your's to command, J. Cook - W. Brown.

We shall be brought up again, at the office, this evening, when with your kind assistance, I shall be able to settle every thing quietly.

To Mr. Horne, stock-broker.

Mr. Knowlys spoke on the part of the defendant.

Robert Jones otherwise Charles Warner.

GUILTY . (Aged 22.)

Transported for seven years .

Ann Simpson otherwise Mary Burton.

Not GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Reference Number: o17921215-1

THE OPINION OF THE JUDGES, ON THE CASE OF MOORE, CONVICTED OF SECRETING A LETTER, CONTAINING A BANK NOTE, as delivered by Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

WILLIAM MOORE you was employed to carry a letter from the General Post Office to Charles Quin , in Charlton-street, in the parish of Mary le Bone, in the county of Middlesex, and the indictment states, that two letters sent by one William Collier , by the post from Stilton, directed to Charles Quin ; containing therein a Bank note, had come to the possession of the prisoner, and that the prisoner afterwards being in that employment as a letter carrier, the letters by the post, did, having the said notes, come into his hands and possession, secret the letters then and there contained therein, the Bank note specified in the indictment, the note was stated to be the property of William Collier in this indictment, he was arraigned, tried, and found guilty; but a doubt having occurred to the learned Judge, who tried the prisoner, whether on the circumstances of the facts stated in the evidence, the prisoner's case was held within the act of parliament under which he was indicted, made in the seventh year of his Majesty; on this doubt the judgment was respited, for the opinion of the Judges. On the evidence adduced in the trial, it appeared, that the Bank note had been cut into two parts, and one part of the note inclosed in a letter sent one day, the other part of the note inclosed in another letter, and sent the next post day; the Bank note so divided into two parts was under these circumstances secreted by the prisoner, the doubt suggested was, whether he had been guilty of the offence laid down in the act of parliament, with respect to that, at two several periods of time, the parts were secreted; which by the objection, was argued, separate offences had taken place; on that doubt all the Judges present, when the case was mentioned, were unanimous of opinion, that the offence stated in the indictment in form and manner, as it had been proved by the evidence falls directly within the meaning of the acts of parliament, contained in the first section of the acts of parliament,

chap. 3. in the seventh year of his present Majesty which makes this offence a felony. The persons who are particularly trusted, with respect to letters, have been by the legislature put under a specific and peculiar law; the prisoner that is charged, in this present case, in the indictment, is not charged with having stole the letter, but with having secreted the note, contained in the letters, that was conveyed by the public conveyance of the kingdom. Now the words of the act of parliament are very carefully and wisely made, for they have put in the persons of every description, all of every office and capacity, that may be employed in post offices, deputy, clerk, agent, letter carrier, post boy, or any other officer, or person whatsoever, employed in receiving, stamping, sorting, charging, carrying, conveying, or delivering letters or packets; that shall secret, embezzle or destroy, any letter or letters, package or packages, containing any Bank note, with a great number of other necessary descriptions, which might be restricted by the act specifying the crime that a person shall be guilty of.

Now upon this fact it is clear he has secreted the letters, containing this note, the letters being proved to have come to his custody; two letters, in which two letters a Bank note was contained, that is, two parts of a Bank note, which made a Bank note in the whole; therefore, this particular fact, as proved, is contained in the express, conscious and proper words of the act; the Bank note divided into two parts, and contained in two letters, he has secreted by secreting the two letters; these two letters contained a Bank note together; the two parts cannot possibly be added together, without having reference to this identical case; the case is within the very terms of the act of parliament, with respect to the construction of stealing, and with respect to the words of the act. On the case so stated, all the Judges, that were present, were unanimous and clearly of opinion, that the prisoner is rightly convicted, and ought to receive sentence accordingly.

Reference Number: o17921215-2

And Isaac Moore , convicted in September sessions, No. - 525

Reference Number: o17921215-3

Thomas Kirk , Robert Wallace , Thomas Crump and Mary Burges , were put to the bar, and accepted his Majesty's pardon, on condition of transportation; the former for fourteen years, and the three latter for life.

Reference Number: s17921215-1

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to pass Sentence, as follows:

Received sentence of Death. No.

Bateman William - 18

Broughton Richard - 40

Carter Jeremiah - 75

Clarke Jeremiah - 70

Dawson Ann - 15

Edwards Susanna - 1

Edgerton Edward - 3

Glover Thomas Montague - 8

Griffin William alias Hubbard George > alias Lord Massey - 110

Heiley Thomas - 5

Inskip John - 20

Jones Charles - 19

Ison Jane - 15

Loft Sarah - 15

Mayo Abraham - 21

Pope Francis - 74

Rankin George alias Goodall - 21

Simmons Ann - 15

Reference Number: s17921215-1

And Isaac Moore , convicted in September sessions, No. - 525

Received sentence of transportation for seven years, 32, viz.

Anderson Mary - 83

Ashburton John - 34

Ashton John - 33

Blackett William - 114

Bolton Abraham - 85

Carvin Thomas - 65

Cox Edward - 36

Carter Elizabeth - 92

Davis William - 57

Dickenson William - 103

Edwards Joseph - 118

Fall Frederick - 89

Giles John - 31

Goodall Richard - 117

Harding Jonathan - 86

Hoare Joseph - 10

Hodgson John - 98

Knife Daniel - 120

Levingston David - 32

Marshall Edward - 117

Morris Francis - 50

Owen Edward -

Oliver Charles - 82

Ronan Michael - 11

Simmons John - 87

Stevenson Elizabeth - 17

Trimmer Thomas - 22

Wiggins Jane - 82

Williams William - 9

Whitehead John - 24

Yates Barnaby - 113

Young John - 57

To be imprisoned twelve months.

Richard Blakeman - 88

Mary Hughes - 16

Ann Talbot - 23

James Hitchcock - 72

To be imprisoned six months.

William Davenport - 28

Edward Hatred - 58

Thomas Spencer - 30

Henry Jones - 58

John Cousins - 60

Thomas Lumley - 61

Ann Robinson - 4

William Griffiths - 14

Margaret Munster - 39

William Johnson - 46

Ann Smith - 50

Thomas Bradley - 64

John Harding - 77

Ann Macarthy - 94

Patrick Keese - 97

John Phancutt - 109

John Platt - 109

Elizabeth Springall - 102

To be imprisoned three months.

Alexander Dew - 12

Thomas Parker - 2

To be imprisoned six weeks.

Tabitha Lane - 41

To be imprisoned one month.

Francis Orange - 47

To be whipped.

Richard Vincent - 51

Joseph Ponton - 76

To be put on board a ship.

William Stephenson - 40

Reference Number: s17921215-1

Thomas Kirk , Robert Wallace , Thomas Crump and Mary Burges , were put to the bar, and accepted his Majesty's pardon, on condition of transportation; the former for fourteen years, and the three latter for life.


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