Old Bailey Proceedings, 26th May 1790.
Reference Number: 17900526
Reference Number: f17900526-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING'S Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday, the 26th of MAY, 1790, and the following Days;

Being the FIFTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honourable William Pickett , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY E. HODGSON, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND; And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor); And Sold by him, at his House, No. 14, White Lion Street, Islington; Sold also by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane; S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row; and C. D. PIGUENIT, No. 8, Aldgate.

MDCCXC.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable WILLIAM PICKETT , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honourable Sir WILLIAM HENRY ASHURST, one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; the Honourable Sir RICHARD PERRYN, one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Esq; Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City, and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Mould

James Wrench

John Mawson

Andrew Whale

Thomas Arnold

James Pickering

John Gifford

Joseph Hudson

John Walker

David Chrichton

John Bowen

Matthew Sheffield

First Middlesex Jury.

Eusabus Say

Robert Clarke

Richard Taitt

John Carter

William Whitehead

Edward Blissett

William Kendall

Andrew Boyter

Thomas Rabson

Stephen Jervis

John Nimmo

Alexander Oswald

Second Middlesex Jury.

Philip Dixon

Luke Beasley

Isaac Clements

Thomas Blaydes

John Field

William Farmer

Jeremiah Moore

Peter Price

John Birrell

Samuel Slythe

Paul Rayson

Jesse Ramsden

Reference Number: t17900526-1

439. THOMAS HOPKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , one brilliant diamond hoop ring, set in silver, value 8 l. a fancy ring with rubies and brilliant diamonds, set in gold, value 3 l. another fancy ring with emeralds, value 20 s. another fancy ring, value 20 s. a stone set in gold, value 20 s. the property of Constantine Tewlings , privily in his shop .

CONSTANTINE TEWLINGS sworn.

I live at Charing-cross : I am a goldsmith . I know the prisoner; I saw him in my shop; he came first to look at some gold blank seals, which was the 18th of May; he said he would either have his arms, or a crest engraved on one, he did not know which; I pulled out the drawer, and he looked some of the seals over, and one thing or another; he came three or four times, till Friday, the 21st, at four o'clock; then he looked at one thing or another; and he agreed for a gold blank seal, and a pair of gold sleeve buttons, and a shirt pin; and he put them together, and said he had forgot to bring his money out with him; and he would go and fetch the money; and leave a shilling earnest, and be back in a few minutes: I went to put my drawer up again; and looking it over, I missed a diamond hoop ring, a fancy ring, rubies and diamonds, a paste ring, with a single stone in it, a fancy ring, with emeralds and diamonds, and a gold seal.

Court. What was the worth of these things all together? - About fourteen pounds. One of my servants knew the young man; and he lodged at her father's house; I sent the girl to see if he was there, or to let me know when he came in; she brought me word he had not been at home for two nights; I went myself to her father's, and desired to know immediately when he came home; on Saturday last, I heard he was come home; and I went immediately to the house, and found the prisoner in the back parlour; I seized him immediately by his collar, and dragged him out at the door; nobody else had been in the shop, or handled the things, but him; I intended to carry him to Bow-street; but at the end of King-street, by Covent-garden, he stopt and said, if I give you your rings back, will you make it up? I do not know, said I; but says I, have you got the rings about you? he said, yes; if you will step over the way, I will shew them you; so we stopped at the orange shop against Lowe's hotel; and he pulled a piece of paper out of his pocket; says he, there is your ring; (produced; a common ring); that was my property; says I, you scoundrel, that will not do; you have three rings more; then he ran away, and I after him; and overtook him by the church; well, says he, if you will stop, I will tell you where I sold your hoop diamond ring? says I, is it far? he said, no; and he brought me to Butcher-row; we stopped there; and he said to the man, I sold you a ring yesterday; I must have it back: the man, Mr. Lake, very readily delivered up the ring, which is this, a diamond hoop ring, cost me eight guineas at first hand; he had sold it for a guinea and an half; says I, where are my other two rings, and the gold seal? he told me, if I would go with him into Fleet-street, to a pawnbroker's, where he had pawned them, or sold them; I do not know which: the pawnbroker informed me he had sold them and the seal too, to one John Sanders , in the Old Bailey: and the prisoner told me, if I would let him send for some friends, he would satisfy me, and make the matter up? I told him I would not run such a risk for five hundred guineas; it was out of my power; so I brought him to Bow-street, before Mr. Justice Bond, and gave him into custody. The prisoner comes of very reputable parents: his father is a very worthy man: he is head butler to the Archdeacon of London; the things are my property.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. You understand the prisoner to be acting under the impression of a promise? - I said, I do not know that.

This was not all taken at once? - No; it was taken from the 18th to the 21st.

You did not see any article taken? - I did not; they were there two minutes before. And I beg this honourable Court, on account of the prisoner's father, that is now in tears for an only son, to shew him all the mercy in their power.

JOSEPH LITTLER sworn.

On Thursday last, the prisoner brought two rings to me, and a gold seal: I live in Fleet-street; I am a pawnbroker.

Court. You know, of course, the value of jewels? - I do, as well as most in the trade, I believe.

Did the prisoner bring them to sell, or to pawn? - To sell.

Did you buy them of him? - Yes.

What did you give him for them? - For the two rings, one pound ten; I have proof it is a fair price, by the person that they were sold to afterwards; they were two old fashioned rings; the one in the form of two hearts; the other was intermixed with coloured stones, in the form of a basket of flowers.

Were there any diamonds? - A few in each.

Court. Let me look at those rings? - They were since sold to one Sanders, in the Old Bailey, who told me he would be here; indeed he broke them; I purchased a gold seal, which is not here.

Mr. Garrow. How much did you squeeze yourself, to give for the seal? - I did not squeeze at all; I gave a fair price.

How much did you give? - Sixteen shillings.

Was it old, or new? - It was old.

Will you swear that? - I mean to swear I bought it as a second hand one.

Do you mean to swear it was old? - I mean to swear I bought it as a second hand one; I wish to tell the reason? I bought it from his watch; therefore I had reason to think it was old.

Court. Was it a year old? - I really cannot tell; there was no date upon it; it was a modern make.

Mr. Garrow. Will you venture to swear it had the appearance of having hung to a watch a single day? - Certainly I will.

Was the polish rubbed off; yes or no? - No.

Now what is become of it? - It is sold for twenty shillings to a stranger, on the Friday.

Do you mean to swear that you bought a blank seal with the polish not rubbed off, and of a modern make, as an old second hand seal? - I did not say old.

Yes, you did. Did you buy it as a second hand seal? - Certainly.

Did you take him to be a person of the trade? - Yes.

Did you ask him any question? - Certainly.

Who did he represent himself to be? - I knew him very well; he lived next door but one to me.

In what situation? - As a shopman to an oilman.

Did you expect that lad should have a new modern gold seal? - I knew he had left that occupation; I could not tell what occupation he had.

So this discarded shopman to an oil-man, you think was likely to have a modern gold seal: will you swear that? - Swear! certainly.

Such a discarded shopman to an oil-man, could not fail to have diamond rings of his own? - Well, Sir; he said they were sold for another person, by commission; for Mrs. Aldridge, of York-street, near the Middlesex Hospital.

Have you your books here? - I can send for them.

Did you know Mrs. Aldridge? - No, Sir.

Did you make any enquiry about her? - No, Sir.

Did you tell the lad you would receive as many more things of that sort as he would bring? - No, Sir.

Upon your oath, did you not, Sir? - No, Sir.

Did not you ask him if Mrs. Aldridge had any more? - I sold them in the course of about two hours, or less.

Have you such quick returns constantly? - Things that are old, are only fit for breaking.

Will you state that these were old, and only fit for breaking? - The rings I speak of; the one, I believe, was made nineteen years ago; they were old.

Do you mean to swear they were in a state fit only for breaking? - They were, on account of the old fashion of them.

How long have you dealt with Mr. Sanders? - For these six years, or more.

By what name? - By what name! he is known by the name of Sanders; no other name.

Is he here? - He is not; he lives over the way, directly opposite; his Christian name is John.

Did he come to you, to know if you had such an article? - He called; he does not call every day, but most likely, seven or eight times a week.

Did you send for him, to tell him you had something fit for the melting pot? - No, Sir.

Had those things the appearance of being old, or worn, or put upon a finger, except to be tried? - I do not know that they had; if I had put them in the window, they might have laid there twenty years.

Does Mr. Sanders buy a good deal of plate? - No, Sir, very trifling.

To how much account? - I do not know; I have no book of the transactions.

Will you venture to swear that you had disposed of all these to Sanders, before you heard that Mr. Tewlings had lost them? - The two rings I will, upon my oath: I had nothing in my possession when Mr. Tewlings applied: the seal was sold on Friday to a gentleman, who by accident came in for a blank seal; we had others, but none of that size; I had it the day before.

Had you put that in the window? - Yes.

How much do you think the gold of these rings was worth? - The gold of the rings was very trifling; two very small hoops.

How much is the gold of this seal worth? - Twelve shillings: the stone was a cornelian.

What, is that worth but four shillings? - I do not know the value of a cornelian in particular.

Now, upon your oath, what was that old cornelian worth? - I think it might be worth five or six shillings, and no more.

How long have you carried on this roaring trade? - It is an upright trade.

It will very likely put you in an upright situation very soon; boys would not be here, if it was not for such men? - I am sorry you are misinformed.

To Prosecutor. What was the value of these things? - I gave three guineas and a half for the ruby ring; it was like two hearts; one was sine brilliants, and the other a fine ruby; the seal cost me about a guinea and a half, or thereabouts; and as for the other basket ring, that was a present to my wife, and cost four guineas.

GEORGE LIKE sworn.

The prisoner first called on me, on the 19th of May, to shew me a seal to buy; I advised him, on looking at it, to sell the seal where he brought it; and he told me he bought it of Mr. Warboys, of Ludgate-hill; he went away, and returned, and said he had sold it to Mr. Warboys, for twenty shillings; then he called on me on the 20th, on Thursday, and shewed me a large single stone ring, with a gold mount; and asked if it would suit me to buy it? I told him it would not suit me; he had at the same time, a fancy ring on his finger, of a double heart, set with diamonds and rubies; he left me, and told me he had served his time in the city, and was well known by people about; then I did not see him, I believe, till Friday, the 21st; then he called on me, and asked me if I had ever a large lady's ear-rings and necklace; and shewed me a ring he had to sell; that was the hoop ring; I asked him whose property it was? he told me it belonged to a lady that had been in great life, and had a vast number of these things to dispose of; he gave me the name of John Brown, at Mr. Aldridge's, No. 4, York-street, Middlesex Hospital; I bought the last ring of him; the hoop ring; I gave him a guinea and a half for it, which he informed me was the price the lady had set upon.

Court. What was the value of it? - I hardly can ascertain the value of it, without it was taken to pieces; I had it but a little time in my possession; the worth of these kind of things is no more than the materials.

Then you can form a little guess by the quantity of stones; you know they were diamonds? - Yes.

Then you could form some little guess whether they were not worth about a guinea and a half? - I take it, it was worth two guineas; I believe the trade well knows, if they were to see the size of the ring: I am not a compleat judge, to say exactly; I have a better ring than that, which I could dispose of for little more; but buying and selling is a great difference; I gave it up directly.

Mr. Garrow. How long have you been a buyer and seller? - About ten years.

You have but a slight knowledge? - No.

You run the risk of buying and selling? - Yes; I have lost by that.

How came it that you did not see the lady? - It was my intention to wait on the lady on Saturday.

Look at that boy; he had a fancy ring on his finger? - Yes.

Did the things appear to be old things; such as a lady had worn for many years? - They might have been made for years.

Had not they the manifest appearance of coming fresh from a jeweller's shop? - No.

Do you mean to swear that? - Yes.

And to your best judgment, two guineas was the utmost value? - It is impossible to swear.

Do you mean to swear they were not worth more than two guineas? - They were not worth more to me.

What means did you take to ascertain that? - By the one I have of my own.

So you keep one by you, by the way of a pattern, to swear by? - No, Sir; I did not compare them, but by my ideas.

Did you believe this story from a boy not sixteen, an apprentice to an oil-man, that a lady should send him all the way from York-street, past some hundreds of shops, to Butcher-row? - It was near his neighbourhood, where he served his time.

Did you know him before? - Not at all.

Did you enquire whether his story was true? - No.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him an exceeding good character.

GUILTY , Death .

Foreman of the Jury. My lord, we wish with one voice, to recommend him to mercy.

Mr. Recorder. Gentlemen, I am always requested to ask the ground of the recommendation of the jury.

Jury. Only as we have not heard of any other offence; and as he is so extremely young, and has a reputable father.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-2

440. FRANCIS BEETLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April last, eight shirts, value 2 l. five pair of silk stockings, value 10 s. three pair of nankeen breeches, value 20 s. three child's shirts, value 3 s. the property of Sir James Pennyman , Baronet , in the dwelling house of Thomas Clarke .

Sir JAMES PENNYMAN sworn.

The prisoner was a servant of mine; he ran away; and upon his going, I got a search warrant, and searched his lodgings: I went to a pawn-brokers', and found the things in the indictment, and a great many more; I missed them; I never saw the prisoner till he was taken up, some time afterwards; he had lived formerly in my service, and had behaved very well; and I took him again.

Mr. Knowlys, Prisoner's Counsel. Sir James, how long had the prisoner lived with you? - About eight months.

Had he any family? - A wife and three children.

Were they in very good circumstances? - He had been cut of place, and I took him, and thought it would be of service to him.

Had he been paid his wages? - Yes; he had had eight guineas.

JOSEPH BARNES sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Brooks, pawn-broker, in Parliament-street: I produce some property I received from the prisoner.

When were they pledged? - At different times, from Christmas to April.

Did you take them all in? - No; I took in several of them.

What was lent upon them all? - About two guineas and an half.

Were they pledged in his own name? - Yes. Sir James saw them at Bow-street; I have had them ever since.

Sir James. They are my property; I saw them at Bow-street.

THOMAS HINDES sworn.

I live with Mr. Watson, Broad Sanctuary: I produce several things: I received them from the prisoner. Sir James saw them at Bow-street.

Sir James. I saw them there; they are my property.

What money was lent upon them? - Above a guinea. The prisoner redeemed a shirt and a hat, and left them, and said he would call again, but he did not.

Court to Barnes. What money was lent upon the things you did not receive yourself? - Fifteen shillings and three-pence.

Jury. Do you know whether the prisoner redeemed any things? - Yes, from time to time he has, and brought them again, and others in exchange.

Jury. Were these things in the prisoner's charge? - Yes, he had them in his charge.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17900526-3

441. RICHARD ROWEL and GEORGE BERRY were indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Betty Dowling , about the hour of ten in the night, on the 17th of April last, and burglariously stealing therein, six ivory tooth picks, value 12 s. two ditto, value 2 s. and four other ditto, value 4 s. her property .

BETTY DOWLING sworn.

I live in Prince's-street, Soho . A little before ten in the evening, on the 17th of April, a piece of glass was cut out of my shop window, large enough to admit a hand: I am a perfumer: there was a tray full of tooth pick cases; I lost them out of the window; there were four or five.

What was the amount? - I cannot say; the prisoners were detected in the fact.

JOHN EDRIDGE sworn.

I know the prisoners. I was going up Prince's-street about ten on Saturday evening: I saw the prisoners at Mrs. Dowling's window; they stood close together; when they saw me, one of them turned his head about; I stopped for about ten minutes, to take notice of them; they went gently away about four or five yards, and then ran away: I went and put my hand to the glass, and found one of the panes was cut; they went about ten yards; there I took one of them directly: these tooth pick cases were found on them; and this he threw down an area.

(Deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

Court. What is the value of these things? - I will value them at half a crown.

GEORGE ZEAL sworn.

I am an officer. I took the prisoner George Berry from a description.

Prisoner Berry. I am innocent.

PRISONER ROWEL's DEFENCE.

A person chucked away the property, and I happened to pick it up.

RICHARD ROWEL , GUILTY .

GEORGE BERRY , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17900526-4

442. WILLIAM BLOWER was indicted for stealing, on the 20th day of April

last, an oil skin hammer cloth, value 10 s. the property of William Smith , Baronet .

ZACHARIAH MOORE sworn.

On the 20th of April, I saw the prisoner take a hammer cloth, and put it under his arm: I was in the shop of Thomas Clarke , a coach-maker, in Green-street : the prisoner followed me; I saw it belonged to Mr. William Smith ; and I observed whether he was going home with the cloth; I saw the hammer cloth on his carriage at six in the morning; I was going on other business into Cavendish-square; he ran behind me in Oxford-road; then I pursued him into Orchard-street, and down Somerset-street; and there he threw the hammer cloth from under his arm; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I never saw him before; I gave an alarm, and the prisoner was taken into custody; he never was out of my sight.

THOMAS CLARKE sworn.

I am a coach-maker: I am employed by Sir William Smith ; his coach was in my shop; the hammer cloth was on it; it was missed the morning of the 20th of April; it was an oil-skin hammer cloth. Between eight and nine in the morning, my man, Zachariah Moore , brought the prisoner into my compting-house with the hammer cloth.

(Produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A man employed me to fetch it, and promised me a shilling.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17900526-5

443. ELIZABETH ASKER was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas English , about the hour of nine in the night, on the 18th of March last, and burglariously stealing therein, three cotton gowns, value 14 s. four cotton petticoats, value 10 s. two black silk cloaks, value 10 s. and one child's dimity cloak, value 2 s. his property.

THOMAS ENGLISH sworn.

I keep a house in Great Earl-street, Seven Dials . The prisoner lived with us three weeks, as a servant ; and went away that night about seven. At ten o'clock I went up stairs, and found a back door open that goes on the leads, over the parlour, and my wife's bonnet on the stairs; I called to her, and told her; and she said, then I dare say all my clothes are gone; she went up stairs, and looked into the back room, where the door was open; and she missed her clothes, which had been hanging behind the door; we did not know how they went, till near a month after that: the officers took the prisoner, and found the duplicates on her: we saw the things at the office in Litchfield-street, and owned them.

ANN ENGLISH sworn.

The prisoner was our servant; and was discharged the evening of the 18th of March, between seven and eight; and we paid her her wages. English went up stairs about ten, and called to me; and I went up stairs, and looked into the back room where they had hung; and I saw that they were all gone; I saw the door shut between seven and eight, just after the prisoner was gone; I saw the prisoner out on the leads, just before we paid her wages; and I let her out of the street door myself; I saw my clothes in the room that afternoon.

Court. What is the value of these clothes? - About thirty-seven shillings. The prisoner said at the office, that she took the street-door key along with her, and let herself in; and opened the back door at the same time, and took the things; and went out at the street-door.

CHARLES ELLIOT sworn.

On the 8th of April, I took the prisoner into custody in the Park; coming along I asked her where her mistress's property was, that she had robbed her of? she would not tell me then, till I had got a little farther.

Court. Did you make her any promise? - Not in the least. I took her to a public-house in Litchfield-street, and took her into a room, and was beginning to search

her; she immediately put her hand into her pocket, and pulled out four or five duplicates, and gave them to me; I asked her then, how she got the things out, after she was discharged from her mistress? she then told me, she took the key of the street-door with her when she was discharge, and took her box away, and went and left her box at a friend's house; and some time after, went back to her master's the same night, and let herself in, and went up stairs, and took her mistres's clothes; and opened the back door, and carried them out on the leads. I asked her, if there was any one concerned with her? she said, she threw them down into a back private yard that led into another street, left the back door open, and came out the same way she went in; and went then and took the clothes from the place where she threw them over, and carried them, and put them into her box, which he had left at her friend's.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I took in a gown from a person of the name of Asker; but I cannot swear it was the prisoner; I have the duplicate.

Elliot. Here is the counter-duplicate which I found on the woman.

Brown. My lord, they correspond together.

Mrs. English. This is my gown.

THOMAS SANDERSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I took in some articles of the prisoner, a gown and two petticoats, the 13th of April: one of the petticoats belongs to Mrs. English.

Mrs. English. This petticoat is my property.

Sanderson. I took in two cloaks the 31st of March, of the prisoner; a black silk cloak, and a child's white dimity cloak.

(Deposed to.)

CHARLES YOUNG sworn.

I am an officer: I was with Elliott: I know no more.

Prisoner. I leave it to the mercy of the Court; I have no witnesses.

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-6

444. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , two pair of Prince's metal candlesticks, value 6 s. one pair of snuffers, value 12 d. a snuffer stand, value 6 d. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Henry Robbins and John Robbins .

JAMES GARNES sworn.

I found these things (the things in the indictment) on the prisoner. I saw the prisoner take them out of a house that Mr. Robbins was employed to sell the goods: the business is carried on by Henry Robbins and John Robbins . I saw the prisoner at the bar coming up out of the kitchen, on Saturday, the 22d of May, about half past two or three o'clock; I thought his pocket looked big, and I followed him out of doors: they were goods which Mess. Robbins were employed to sell for some creditors; I saw them in his pocket, and desired him to walk back, which he did very readily; and he had two candlesticks in his pockets, and one candlestick in each thigh of his breeches behind; he had a pair of snuffers and stand; the flat iron we could not swear to: the prisoner hardly spoke a word; but before the justice, there was found in his pocket a piece of paper, giving an account of the sales that were that day; and Robbins's name was on them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He knew nothing of the candlesticks; nor never saw them before he saw them on me. Before the Justice, Mr. Robbins said they were not his property, but were the property of Mr. Sturt, who was in France. Then Mr. Read asked the witness if they were his property? and he said, no; then Mr. Read said, I suppose if they are not your real property, they are your local property:

now at that time, that man knew no more of the meaning of the word local, than a child; but then he said they were his local property; and that there might be hundreds more, for aught he knew.

JOHN ELT sworn.

Produced a flat iron which could not be deposed to.

(The candlesticks deposed to.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17900526-7

445. WILLIAM JENKINSON , WILLIAM READ , and HENRY WHITE , were indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Simon Jackson , about the hour of two in the night, on the 23d of April last, and burglariously stealing therein, one silver pepper castor, value 10 s. a silver milk pot, value 10 s. five silver tea-spoons, value 5 s. a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 5 s. six silver handled knives and forks, value 6 s. a cloth great coat, value 20 s. a pair of boots, value 2 s. a cutlass, value 1 s. a razor, value 6 d. a pair of spectacles, value 6 d. eighteen pounds weight of candles, value 9 s. a cloth riding jacket, value 5 s. a silk cloak, value 2 s. two damask table cloths, value 40 s. an apron, value 10 s. three hundred and sixty copper halfpence, value 15 s. ninety copper farthings, value 2 s. his property .

(The case opened by Mr. Garrow.)

SIMON JACKSON sworn.

I keep the Fountain public house , in Virginia-row, Bethnal-green . On Friday night, the 23d of April, about half after twelve, I went to bed; the house was all secure; I was the last person up; nobody was in the house but my wife and myself; I took up the candle, and put it out; my wife alarmed me about five; I came down, and found the outside door open, that goes into the yard, and the flap of the cellar door; the bottom of it was standing against the wall; there was a way cut in the cellar door, to get at the bolt; from the cellar they got access to the inside of the house; and the bar, and the top door of the cellar inside, was not fastened; the back door into the yard, had been opened withinside, and the lead weight cut away; I lost the things in the indictment; I saw part of them the day before; I lost my till; I cannot say the quantity of halfpence: I cannot say anything to the prisoners; I did not observe them.

Jury. Was there but one bolt on that door that goes into the curb? - Only one, and that was cut away.

Mrs. JACKSON sworn.

I went to bed before my husband: I went down stairs about three o'clock for some water; I could not get the stair-case door open; then I came up stairs again: I saw a lighted candle in the tap-room, on the dresser: the door at the bottom of the stair-case was usually fastened inside, next the stair-case; I could not open it; I saw day-light appearing: I went down again; I said, pray open the door; I thought it was my husband that was asleep in the taproom; he slept in another room from me; I put on my clothes; and there was a very large pane of glass broke in the stair-case door, over my head; I looked down, and saw a cooper's gimblet; I was gimbleted up; the gimblet used to be on the head of the butt in our cellar; I opened the window, and saw a neighbour at the pump; I called to him, and desired him to get over the pales; and by his assistance, I got down stairs: the candle was lighted in the taproom, on the dresser; I turned myself about, and went into a little bar, and saw a tea-caddy, where there was almost a pound of mixed tea; it was broke open, and the tea gone by the side of a poll parrot that I had; the till was gone; it was locked the preceding night; I had the key in my pocket; all the things in the indictment were taken away; they were all safe there the night before; the cellar door was standing wide open, and the bar door: I saw the

drawers in the bar all pulled out: I recollected on the Monday before, there were three young men had been playing at skettles; and I knew them well by sight, when they were had up: I gave information of them, and described them to a gentleman, that his wife was a charewoman; his name is Cook: I know the young lad by his buckles and green apron; I desired him to go away, for he had done me an injury; that was before the robbery: I saw the prisoners the Tuesday after the robbery, and apprehended them; the prisoners were at my house on the Monday before the burglary; nobody was with them that I recollect. On Monday morning, White came to my house, and bought gin and beer; I took particular notice where he went, and told my husband, who enquired after him; and he was secured on Tuesday, by Cooke.

JAMES SHAKESHAFT sworn.

I am a headborough of the parish where the house was broke open. On the 24th of April, I received information and description of four men, by Jackson and another young man: I know none of the prisoners: I thought the description applied to a Jew. On Wednesday, the 26th, I was sent for: the evidence, Smith, was at his house: White was then in custody at Jackson's: I went and took the prisoner Smith; he turned evidence; and he told me of the other persons, and where these implements were to be found; I took him with me into the field; and in a hallow tree he said there was the chisels; I got up there, and found they were gone; then he looked for this cutlass and this crow, that were hid in the hedge, and a little hay thrown over them; they were gone; then he took me to a little place in the field, and there was this dark lanthorn hid; that I found: then I went and took Isaacs into custody: I went afterwards with Maxfield to the same field; that was to the same tree that Smith took me to: Smith, the accomplice, shewed me the very same spot where Maxfield told me he found the crow. On the 29th, I took Read and another in company, close by where Jackson lives. On the Saturday, I took Jenkinson at Lambeth.

Was any thing found that relates to this subject, on either of the prisoners? - No: Isaacs gave me these things.

ARCHIBALD MAXFIELD sworn.

I found these articles that are produced; the pistol, the crow, the cutlass, and two chisels: I afterwards went with Shakeshaft to the place where I found them; I shewed the place to him accordingly; it was the hollow stump of a tree; I went in consequence of hearing the evidence of Smith, the accomplice; the hollow tree was at the back of our garden.

SIMON ISAACS sworn.

I live in Gravel-lane, a dealer in clothes. I know all the prisoner; I saw them the 24th of April; they came to my house: the prisoner Read knocked at my door between five and six in the morning; I opened the door; and he pulled out of his pocket, a silver pepper-box, a milk pot, a pair of sugar tongs, and five tea-spoons; and he said, stop, there are some more things coming: then White brought a small deal box in a few minutes afterwards; and there was a coat, a linen jacket, four sheets, two tablecloths, and a black cloak, and some candles about two pounds: then Smith came afterwards, and brought some cloth and some candles: then young Jenkinson came in a few minutes; he brought nothing; there was but a few minutes between each of them coming, except young White; he went away after he brought the box; I bought the things of them: I made the bargain with William Smith , in the presence of Jenkinson and Read.

How much did you give him for all these things? - Four pounds ten shillings and sixpence. I had it not in my power to pay them; but I asked a neighbour to lend me the money: I called on one Isaac Sakie, and he paid them a guinea, and told him if he would call at night, he would pay him the remainder; and at night, Smith, and Read, and Jenkinson called: White was not with them; and they received three guineas,

and were to come in the morning for the remaining six shillings and six-pence.

Who was the money paid to? - To William Smith ; they went away all three together.

Are you sure these are the three persons who came? - Yes, I am sure.

You was afterwards applied to from the officers, to find these things? - Yes: I got them from one Mr. Boswell.

Are these the same things that were brought in the manner you have described? - Yes.

Look them over? - This is the jacket, the great coat, the knives, a black silk cloak, three table cloths, three whole sheets, and two half ones: the plate I sold to a Jew that travels the country; I could not find him, nor get them back.

Jury. Did you ever see these prisoners before that day? - Yes; I have bought of them before; of Read.

Did you suppose these things belonged to the prisoner? - No, I did not.

What did you suppose? - I did not ask them that question.

For how much did you sell the plate for? - Two pounds ten shillings.

How much did you get for the clothes and the other things? - Three guineas and a half.

No more for the whole? - No.

You never asked any questions? - I never asked any questions.

Court. Were these three persons together at the time they took this money? - White was not there; he brought this box, and went away.

Was Jenkinson there more than once? - Yes, several times; but I never bought any thing of young Jenkinson before this.

When he came to you, he did not bring any of the articles to you? - None at all.

The money you paid to Smith? - Sakie paid him for me.

Was any part of the money paid to Jenkinson? - None at all; all was paid to Smith.

Was Jenkinson there when the money was paid to Smith the second time? - He was present; he was on one side.

Was he there more than once? - Yes, he was with Read and Smith three or four times; he was there on Saturday, in the afternoon, in the ale-house, drinking along with Read.

Mr. Garrow. Did the prisoner come the next morning for the few shillings? - Smith came and asked for the money; he was paid four shillings; two shillings he owed me; he went away; Smith came alone.

Jury. Did you expect them to come that morning with the things? - No, Sir.

Did you see them the day before? - Yes.

ISAAC SAKIE sworn.

Isaacks called me up the 24th of April, and asked me if I could lend him a trifle of money: I sell oranges and lemons, and barley sugar, when that is out of season, and other articles.

What time was this? - I think it was six o'clock, or a little before. Says he, I want to the amount of about four pounds; I had but one pound one in silver; I said, if this will do you any service, you are welcome to it? so accordingly he told me to give this one pound one, in silver, to Mr. Smith, for his use, and to call for the remainder at night; the remainder I gave him at night, was two guineas and a half in gold, and half a guinea in silver; that was the part of four pounds ten and sixpence.

For what? - For what goods Isaacs bought.

Did you see the goods? - I cannot say I saw them; the goods were there; but I had no right to interfere.

That happened to be his bargain? - It was his bargain.

What persons were there? - I saw Smith in his one pair of stairs, when I came in the morning; I went down stairs again. I think I saw Mr. Read and Mr. Jenkinson in the kitchen.

Did you see any thing of Mr. White? - I did not.

When did you see any thing of those persons again after that morning? - At night, in the public house; I think there were three together; and then afterwards came another.

Who were the three? - I think it was Jenkinson and Read; and I cannot take upon me to say whether it was Mr. White or not: but Smith came down afterwards: Smith came down; but I never saw him in the public house; he was in the street.

Was White either at the public house, or in the street? - My lord, it is a very hard question to resolve you; I cannot take upon me to swear.

Did you pay any body any thing that evening? - I did: I paid Mr. Smith on Mr. Isaac's account, two guineas and a half in gold, and one half guinea in silver; I think there was six and six-pence left; and they were to come the next day for it. Mr. Smith came the next day, and he was paid.

Had you any share in the bargain? - Not a halfpenny.

Did Isaacs re-pay you your money? - He did.

Mr. Garrow There is honour among -

Jury. Did Isaacs pay you any interest for the use of the money? - Not a halfpenny.

When you saw the three men in the public house first, are you sure these three prisoners are the persons? - I cannot take upon me to say.

Court. As you are not sure to White, are you sure of the other two? - I am positive.

Had you ever seen them before? - I never saw them before; but I saw them three times within the two days.

Jury. You knew what bargain Isaacs had made with them, and what it was for? - He told me he had bought a parcel of goods to the amount of four pounds ten and six-pence.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

Mr. Garrow. Recollect it is your duty to tell the truth, and nothing but the truth, and the whole truth? - I will.

Do you know any thing of breaking into this house? - Yes.

Who were the persons concerned in it? - The three prisoners and me.

When did you first agree to go on that business? - On the same night.

When was that? - It was Friday night.

What Friday? - It is a month ago last Friday; it was the 23d of April.

Where did you meet that night? - At my lodging.

Where did you live? - In Camomile-street, which I have not left. I had a small house near Jenkinson's, which I was going to live at.

What time did you meet together? - In the afternoon and evening; we were drinking at Mr. Jackson's skettle-ground.

Had you been there on any former evening? - I never was in the skettle-ground, to my knowledge, before; I had been in the house once, in company with the man I took the house of; his name is Skettles; we staid there till dark, or near upon dark; till about seven at night.

What became of you after that? - We went home to my lodging in Camomile-street. We sent White away to this little house, to stay there till we came to him, which was about twelve o'clock, at the back of Mr. Jackson's skettle-ground. Read, Jenkinson, and me, went to White; he was asleep: then I went and looked at Jackson's; he was not in bed, and we came home: at two o'clock, Jenkinson got over Jackson's pales; there was no light then; there was a light at twelve; I followed Jenkinson, and Read followed me: White continued in the little house; our dark lanthorn was so very hot (the candle was so very thick, it heated the lanthorn) we were obliged to put out the candle; it rained very hard: Read and me shoved up the cellar window, and put a chisel in; then we broke the bolt: White never was in the yard at all; he staid in the small house till we brought every thing to him;

the small house joined the skettle-ground; he waited to lend a hand away with the things.

Supposing there had been any alarm, could he have afforded you any assistance from that place? - Yes.

How was that small house situated, by Jackson's? - It joined the skettle-ground; only a small passage parted.

So that he was as handy there, as if he had been with you? - Yes; and out of sight.

Did White know the purpose you was upon? - We made an agreement to do it, in the evening; we all supped together; then we went up the cellar stairs, and let Jenkinson in at the back door; the cellar door was open; then I got a gimblet that was on the stair-case, and fastened the staircase door, that nobody should come down stairs; it was a cooper's gimblet, which we found on the stair-case: while I was doing that, Read went in and brought out a milk-pot and some spoons; then we all three went in together, and got all these things; the till and all; then we took them over to my house, and packed them all in a box; we took the money and the candles we had taken, and put them in a bundle, and put the things into the box: then Read and I went forward; Read had the plate, and I some of the candles; we went back again; we thought we had left the money behind; White put the box of candles on his head; and Jenkinson put the money in his pocket: White was in the passage of my little house; then we all came away to Isaacs: White carried the box; I had nothing; I gave Read the candles which I had: Jenkinson had the money; we sold these things to Isaacs; I made the bargain, because he could not deal with us, all talking together; he gave two guineas for the clothes, six shillings for the candles, forty shillings for ten ounces of plate; and for the silver handled knives and forks, half a crown.

Did Mr. Isaacs make a good hard bargain? - I do not know.

Were you paid? - No; they gave me a guinea; he borrowed it of Sakie in silver; it was given to me; we all went away. White was sent away as soon as he had brought the box; we were to call again in the evening, for the rest: we went to Leadenhall-market, to a house that was up, and had a pot of beer; then we went and bought some steaks for breakfast; we breakfasted together; in the afternoon, I was gone out, and Read and Jenkinson went to get the money; but he would not pay it to any body, till we were all together; then he paid us all together: when I came there, Read and Jenkinson were waiting: White was with me all the day; but he was not with me at the place, when I received the money; I left him at home at my place, while I went for the money in the evening; I got two guineas and a half, and some silver; and they said there was six and sixpence due; I was very much in liquor; I went the next morning for it, and they would not pay any body; for we had a quarrel and a fight, about not parting the money, in the middle of the street; we went home to my house, and parted the money.

Had you any implements? - Yes; there was a pistol and crow, a dark-lanthorn, and two chisels.

Whose were they? - Read bought the chisels.

What did you do with these, after you committed the burglary? - White and I went and hid them in the field, while Read and Jenkinson were counting the money.

You afterwards described to Shakeshaft, the place where you placed them, before the justice? - Yes.

Was that the place where White and you took them to? - Yes.

Was there any cutlass? - Yes; it came out of the house; it was in the hedge.

How long have you been acquainted with Isaacs? - About a month.

When was you taken into custody? - On the Whit-Sunday after the robbery: White and me were together; then I gave information against the other two.

What did you do with the light that you had in the house? - We left it burning on the dresser, and the gimblet still in the door.

Jury. What part of the dresser did you leave the candle in? - At the corner of the dresser.

Not near a shelf? - No; we left it to give a light: the pistol belonged to one Selwood, over the water; and I borrowed it.

Was it loaded? - Yes.

How long have you cohabited with these people? - I have known them some time; but I have been acquainted with them about a fortnight. Jenkinson lived at Lambeth, with his sister. White lived over the water: I took this small house, to keep out of the way of every body, that nobody should know where I went to; that I might work, and nobody know me: I am a cooper.

(Mr. Jackson deposes to the jacket and great coat.)

This is my wife's cloak: one large damask table-cloth; there is my name at full length; the other is not marked; one of the sheets, I believe, is marked with H. M. or E.; I believe them to be my property; the knives and forks, and cutlass, I am sure to.

Mrs. Jackson. This cloak is my property; I know it by a piece; the jacket is mine, and the large table-cloth; I believe all the articles to be mine.

Court to Smith. Was it day-light, at the time this business was transacted? - No, Sir, it was not day-light; it was about two o'clock, when we returned the second time.

Was it quite dark? - Yes: it rained, and was very dark.

Jury. How long have you had this small house of Jackson's? - Since Easter.

Who projected this robbery? - We all agreed upon it together.

PRISONER JENKINSON's DEFENCE.

My witnesses are not here; I told you so.

Court. Where was you at the time this robbery was done? - I was at Lambeth.

Have you any body to prove that fact? - No: I told you if you would put it off till to-morrow morning.

What business do you follow? - A stay-maker.

PRISONER READ's DEFENCE.

I laid at my mother's that night.

Have you any body to prove it? - No; I thought my mother would have come; but she is not here.

PRISONER WHITE's DEFENCE.

Gentlemen, I am innocent of it; I know nothing at all about the matter.

WILLIAM JENKINSON (aged 17) WILLIAM READ (aged 21) HENRY WHITE (aged 17)

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-8

446. JONATHAN PATE , alias JARVIS , and ROBERT HILL , were indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March last, two wicker baskets, value 3 s. and twenty-eight pounds of wool, called Spanish wool, value 4 l. the property of Samuel Bond .

SAMUEL BOND sworn.

I am a master carman . On the 31st of March, I had several carts loaded with Spanish wool; I come to prove my property; I am answerable for it.

ANN BOND sworn.

I am wife to the last witness. I met these two men in the afternoon with two baskets of wool on their shoulders, near Threadneedle-street; I followed them.

Where did this wool go from? - From Crutched-friars. Hill got away: I told Pate it was my property, and asked him where the other man was? he said he would go and fetch him: he left the basket, and went away; he was not taken till some days afterwards; I know the basket; it is marked S. B.; I am sure they are the men. Hill was my servant some years; he drove

one of the carts; he was not taken till after the other was.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. How long was it till they were taken? - I cannot recollect exactly; it might be about two or three weeks.

They were not taken till the indictment was preferred? - No.

How soon did you take your carman up, who had the care of this load? - Next day.

Where is he? - He was tried here, and cleared.

When you came up to Pate, what did he say? - He said either cotton or wool: Mitchell is gone off.

How long had Hill lived with you? - Five or six years.

He had been trusted to a considerable amount? - Yes.

Court. What was the quantity that Pate left with you? - Thirteen pounds, I understand.

Is the person that weighed it, here? - Yes.

THOMAS MARTIN sworn.

I am clerk to the broker who weighed off this wool; I can only speak to the weight.

Mr. Garrow to Mrs. Bond. What was the colour? - The same colour: all Spanish wool is white.

Do you mean to swear to it? - No.

Martin. I have seen the wool: the officer had it in his possession; I compared it with the other; it looks like it; I cannot swear to it.

Court. It turns more upon the baskets than the wool.

Mr. Garrow. They were their hay-baskets; they had a lawful right to them.

Mr. Bond. The baskets are worth eighteen-pence; the man had the baskets in his custody.

Martin. I saw the wool weighed; I took the weight down: the warehouseman put it it in the scales; I never saw the bags weighed again; I cannot tell whether the wool was deficient.

Court to Mrs. Bond. Did Hill return as usual to work? - No.

Mr. Garrow. Mitchell had the care of this load? - Yes; and he is off.

Court. Mitchell being the carman, and having been tried, and gone away, he might have given it these men: we certainly cannot make any thing of this case; for if he had been an honest man, he would not have gone away.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-9

447. JOHN O'NEIL was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of April last, ten yards and an half of printed cotton, value 15 s. 9 d. thirteen callico shawls, value 1 l. 8 s. one callico half shawl, value 15 d. and one shawl, value 2 s. the property of Mary Hopwood , in her dwelling-house .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

MARY HOPWOOD sworn.

I live at No. 60, Thames street, the corner of Queenhithe . I lost the things in the indictment out of my shop: I did not see the prisoner take them: it was on the 12th of April: I missed them about nine in the morning; I saw them about ten minutes before.

How soon after did you see them? - In about a quarter of an hour; they were brought by my man into my shop.

JOHN BROOKS sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutrix. She is a cheesemonger . A boy told me the prisoner had stole the things: I took hold of him, and desired him to come into the shop with me; and he did: he had nothing on him. I went out for the things; a man gave them me in the street.

What is his name? - He is here.

Prisoner. Did you see me drop it? - No.

Was I in the same street the property was found in? - No.

What answer did I make? - He said nothing.

Prisoner. I asked what was the matter; the prosecutrix said she had been robbed.

JOHN NICOLL sworn.

I am clerk to Beswick and Dennis. On Monday, the 12th of April, I saw the prisoner come out of Mrs. Hopwood's, about nine in the morning; I was in our shop, opposite; I saw his face; he had a parcel of shawls in his arms; he came across the street; and a boy said the man had got the shawls from Mrs. Hopwood's; the prisoner went past me into the next street, Bull-wharf-lane; and I lost sight of him; he returned back directly, and passed me again; he had not the shawls then.

Court. Was he walking? - Yes; he went towards the prosecutrix's door, and her shopman took him into the shop: I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Was you at the window, or at the door? - Through the window I saw you.

Did you follow me? - No.

Did you see me lay them down? - No; he was turned round the corner.

How long after I went into this street, was it before I returned? - But a few minutes.

JOHN GODDARD sworn.

I live with Mr. Nicholl, at the same shop.

Did you see the prisoner? - Yes: that is the man that came out of Mr. Hopwood's with the shawls in his arms; he came across the way, and went into Bull-wharf-lane; he returned in about three minutes without them.

Prisoner. Was you in the shop, looking through the window? - Yes: he was taken in five minutes after; I did not see him lay them down.

STEPHEN HOLLIWELL sworn.

I live with my mother; she sells fish. I saw the prisoner and another standing by Mrs. Hopwood's shop: a boy said, I wonder what they are sneaking about for! I said, I do not know; I went into Mrs. Hopwood's shop for my butter: a man came and said, Mrs. Hopwood, you are robbed; I was in the inner shop; I saw the prisoner go out with a bundle; he went into Bull-wharf-lane; I cannot tell what the bundle was; it looked like linen; I saw his face; there is one window faces Thames-street, and one Queenhithe.

Court. Are you sure he is the man; did you see his face in the shop? - No; I saw his back; I am certain it is the man; I saw him the same day; he was brought in, in about five minutes; I was in the shop when he came back; he said he knew nothing of it.

Prisoner. Did I ask any question? - No.

Did not you say you knew nothing about it? - I saw you go in.

Did you watch me? - I saw him go in empty handed, and come out with the property.

JAMES NORGROVE sworn.

I am a horse-keeper to Mr. Stevens.

Court. Do you know the prisoner? - No.

Mrs. Hopwood. This man took them from behind some shutters, and brought them to my man.

Norgrove. I saw the things lie behind the shutters; I took them into the stable; and hearing the street alarmed, I saw Mrs. Hopwood's man coming, and gave them to him.

Court. What were the goods? - I do not know; the man has got them.

Were they completely hid? - No; some fell back.

Court to Brooke. Who gave you the goods? - Norgrove.

THOMAS HUGHES sworn.

I had charge of the prisoner: the things were given to me at Guild-hall, by order of the Alderman.

Court to Mrs. Hopwood. Are these the things you received from Brooks? - Yes.

Are they yours? - Yes, they are.

Where did you leave them? - Upon a shelf.

What is the lowest value? - Above four pounds; they sell for above five pounds.

When they were brought back, did you put them among any others? - No.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going along the street, and Mrs. Hopwood's man told me his mistress wanted me; I asked him very politely, who his mistress was? he said she lived a few doors off; I went with him; she said she had been robbed that morning. I asked this man, Mr. Nicholl, if he was sure of me? and he said, yes; I said, why did not you stop me? he said he did not know whether I had not bought them; the boy said he saw me stand at the door: I have some witnesses.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character; and said they understood he was a wine cooper.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17900526-10

448. THOMAS BENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th day of April last, twelve pair of leather soles for shoes, value 12 s. the property of William Newman , John Newman , and Henry Newman .

JOSEPH TERRY sworn.

On the 16th of April, the prisoner was coming by my stall with some leather: I said, you may as well leave it with me, I can use it; my stall is in Tooley-street; he did not seem to take any notice; he went away; and he returned, and I said, what do you want? he asked me to buy a dozen of soles? I said if I liked them, I would buy them; I went out in the evening, and told my wife I expected him; and he came; and a person came for me; and I got a constable; he said eleven shillings was the price; I said, I suspect you have stolen them? he said he bought them of a man, and gave half a guinea for them: I delivered him to the constable.

JAMES STEWART sworn.

Court. Were any soles delivered you by Terry? - Yes: Mr. Terry was looking at them; and I looked at them; and I took them and the prisoner in charge; and he said he lived with Mr. Newman, at Snow-hill; and I went to Mr. Newman about them.

JOSEPH HARVEY sworn.

I live with Mess. Newmans: I am the cutter; I can swear to them; they passed through my hands not a fortnight before.

(Looks at them.)

Court to Stewart. Are they the soles? - Yes; I have had them ever since.

Harvey. Here is one remarkable one, I can swear to; I thought it would not do for a sole, and I was going to cut it, to make it a fore piece: they are Mess. Newman's property.

Court. Might not they have been disposed of? I cannot say; I had not missed them; it is impossible to miss them.

Court. The evidence is so slight, that it is not necessary to put the prisoner on his defence: for Harvey cannot tell whether they had been sold or not.

Mr. Sheriff Newman. The prisoner was a porter of ours.

Court. He has said so.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-11

449. THOMAS BURGESS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , one policat handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of Robert Jones Adeane .

ROBERT JONES ADEANE sworn.

I lost a policat handkerchief on the 14th of this month, in Smithfield , out of my pocket: I was standing seeing a man breaking in a horse: the prisoner came running up, and pushed me, and ran away; it struck me he was at no good; and I felt to my pocket, and I found my handkerchief gone; I hallooed stop thief! and pursued him; and a man stopped him, who is here; he

was searched; at the time he was laid hold of, he was putting it in his breeches; I saw it taken from him; the man has got it here.

Prisoner. He dropped it.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn.

I stopped the prisoner; I took the handkerchief out of his breeches: (produces the handkerchief:) this is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. This is mine; it is marked R. A. No. 7.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This handkerchief was valued at one shilling at Guild-hall, and now it is valued at four shillings: I have no witnesses: I was taken at a disadvantage, all in a minute.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17900526-12

450. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Bignell , about the hour of five in the afternoon, on the 22d of April (one Hannah, the wife of Samuel Swaine, and others, being therein) and stealing three silk gowns, value 20 s. a sattin cloak, value 10 s. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 4 s. one pair of stockings, value 12 d. one sat in petticoat, value 6 s one ditto, value 12 d two child's gowns, value 2 s. two shirts, value 2 s. his property, in the same dwelling house .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

THOMAS BIGNELL sworn.

I have been a house-keeper in Cursitor-street almost thirty-two years: on the 22d of April, I was sent for: I was not at home. Mrs. Hannah Swaine, and the wife of Samuel Swaine , and Elizabeth Harvey , and Susannah and Hannah Bignell , and Mrs. Richards; and I believe, John Harris ; but I never saw him at the time; and whether he was in the house or no, I do not know; when I got in the passage, the prisoner was there; the drawers lay about: the constable came, and the prisoner was committed.

SUSANNAH BIGNELL sworn.

I am wife of the last witness: I sent the child up stairs of an errand; and she came down and told me: and I saw the prisoner at my bed-room door, which is the first floor; I asked him what he did there, and what he had been doing? he said he had not been in the room; he had not got any thing; I put my head into the room, and perceived the things had been taken from the places where I had left them; that was three silk gowns, one black sattin cloak, and the other things; I left the gowns and petticoats in a chest; and the sheets and child's gown doubled in a corner of the room; when I saw them an hour before, some was on the bed, and some on the chest: then I sent for the constable; nothing was on the prisoner: the door is an open street door; and my bed-room door was locked; but the key in it; when I went up, it was wide open, and the prisoner at the door; nobody went up to that room besides myself and my family, that I know of; it was an hour since I saw it locked; me and my daughter, Mrs. Swaine, and Mrs. Harvey, and the widow Richards: Harris I did not see in the house.

HARRIOT BIGNELL.

Court. How old are you? - Twelve, last October.

Did you ever take an oath? - Yes, at the Justice's.

What will become of you, if you take a false oath? - A punishment hereafter.

HARRIOT BIGNELL sworn.

I was going up stairs, and I saw the one pair of stairs back room door open, and the shade of somebody go behind the door; I directly asked who it was; and got no answer; and again; I received no answer; and I looked, and saw a man's buckles in his shoes, and the buttons on his coat; the door went as far as it could go, the man being behind it; and I went down stairs: I did not see Mr. Harris in the room: I

saw the prisoner on the landing-place, twenty minutes after; I did not see him come out of the room.

ELIZBETH HARVEY sworn.

I believe Mr. Harris was in the house; I thought I heard him over my head; I did not see him; I live in the second floor: I was sitting at work by the fire, and heard Harriot call out mammy, mammy, here is a man behind the door: and I saw the prisoner against the room door, on the landing-place; that is the room from whence the things were taken; and I picked up a black silk petticoat on the second pair of stairs: I heard a man come out of the room, go up stairs, and come down again; I saw several things about the room, and on the bed.

HANNAH SWAINE sworn.

I saw the prisoner on the stairs, at the first floor door; I saw no property upon him; I did not look into the room.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Coming along Chancery-lane, I met an acquaintance, and enquired for one Mullett, a shoe-maker; he told me he lived at a hair dresser's in Cursitor-street: and I went to this prosecutor's to enquire about it; nobody was in the shop; and I went up stairs, and could not find him; and coming down, I was detected on the second pair of stairs; and they said I had been in the room.

(The petticoat deposed to.)

Mrs. Bignell. The petticoat was missing from my chest.

GUILTY, 39 s. not of breaking .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17900526-13

451. MARY HUGHES and SUSAN HALSEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April last, one guinea , the monies of David Cowen .

DAVID COWEN sworn.

I am an old clothes man : I was called in Exeter-court , by the prisoners, up two pair of stairs, to buy something; I bought it for six-pence; I had not got a six-pence; and I took out my purse with two guineas in gold, and some shillings in silver; I gave one of them a shilling, and she did not like it; she gave me my shilling, and took a guinea, and not a shilling; she was in liquor; and she went down stairs to a room where there was many womans; I went in for my guinea; and there was a woman had a child, and she pushed me out of doors, and said, my child is frightened for you; I cannot remember who it was; I was so frightened, I cannot tell who they were; I cannot swear to the prisoners.

Court. How came these people to be committed? - I swore I was robbed in the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-14

452. HANNAH KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , seven pair of men's leather shoes, value 20 s. the property of John Hoppy .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JOHN HOPPY sworn.

I am a shoe-maker , in the Minories: I lost seven pair of shoes; I cannot speak to the fact; I prove the property. The prisoner came to my shop on pretence of purchasing a pair of shoes for herself: I was told there was some shoes stolen; she was brought back; I saw them lying at her feet, by the door; they were sold; they were in brown paper.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I am apprentice to the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner take the shoes off the floor in the shop; they were in brown paper; she went out; I pursued her, and brought her back; she threw the shoes down; I saw her.

What became of the shoes? - The officer has them.

- BOCHERAH sworn.

I am a constable: I have got the shoes: Mr. Hoppy gave them to me.

(Produces them.)

Mr. Hoppy. They are my property; here is my writing in them.

MARY HERBERT sworn.

I was in the shop when the prisoner came in; she sat down; she refused a great many pair; and while the boy went to look another pair, she went out; the prisoner was not out of my sight; the apprentice ran after her; and I saw the parcel drop from under her cloak.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into the shop to buy a pair of shoes; and they had none to fit; I went out, and the boy followed me, and brought me back; and the prosecutor said, you bitch, I had one woman that I prosecuted, died in Newgate; but you shall die at Botany Bay.

The prisoner called five witnesses to her character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17900526-15

453. ADAM BAILEY and EDWARD COLE were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Harbutt on the king's highway, on the 23d of April , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, value 3 l. a watch string, value 2 d. a base metal seal, value 6 d. an oil-skin umbrella, value 5 s. a linen handkerchief, value 12 d. and three shillings in money, his property .

THOMAS HARBUTT sworn.

I am clerk to Mess. Wrights, bankers, in Covent-garden. I was robbed on the 23d of April, a little before ten, between the Foundling Hospital , and the Duke of Bolton's : I was going along, I met three men who asked me for my property; they pulled my hat over my eyes; I cannot swear to their persons; my property has been found; I lost the things in the indictment; I was frightened very much, and begged they would not use me ill: I gave information at Bow-street the next day, and gave a description of the property: I saw my watch at the office in East Smithfield, about a fortnight after the robbery; I know the watch: the maker's name is George Lewis Gerradd , Clerkenwell, London, No. 136; I cannot swear positively to the string and seal: the pawnbroker produced it; he is here.

LUCY LAWES sworn.

Adam Bailey left the umbrella at our house on a Friday, about five weeks ago: I have nothing more to say any thing about: the umbrella is here; the officer came about a fortnight after, and had it away; he is here.

WILLIAM WHITEWAY sworn.

I attend the office in East Smithfield: I produce an umbrella; I had it from the house where Lucy Lawes lives as a servant, in St. Catherine's-lane; I have had it ever since.

WILLIAM ARGUS sworn.

I am servant to a pawnbroker in Houndsditch: I produce a metal watch pawned at our shop, I believe, by Cole; but I cannot positively swear to him; it was on the 24th of April; I have kept it ever since.

WILLIAM HAY sworn.

I am an accomplice.

Court. There is no evidence against Cole: I shall not take any notice of what he says against Cole.

William Hay. About five or six weeks ago, I went out with Bailey and Cole, on the road leading from the Foundling Hospital to the Duke of Bolton's. We stopped a gentleman, and robbed him of his watch and umbrella, and a few shillings.

Who robbed him? - I did: the others shared in it; I do not recollect any thing of a pocket handkerchief.

What time was it? - Between nine and ten.

Did you say any thing to him? - Only asked him to deliver his property; he said, do not use me ill; I have nothing more to say.

Court to Prosecutor. Is that your umbrella? - I believe it to be mine; the handle is rather broke, and the whalebone rather torn from the canvas; I cannot swear positively; others may be in the same state.

PRISONER BAILEY's DEFENCE.

The umbrella was given to me by a person in Fleet-market, to leave there; and he was to call for it.

The prisoner Cole was not put on his defence.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

ADAM BAILEY , THOMAS COLE ,

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-16

454. ADAM BAILEY was again indicted for feloniously assaulting Benjamin Moore in a certain open field near the king's highway, on the 21st of April last, and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, one

silver watch, value 30 s. one watch key, value 6 d. two seals, value 1 s. one guinea, one half guinea, fourteen halfpence, and a linen handkerchief, value 12 d. his property .

BENJAMIN MOORE sworn.

I was robbed on the 21st of April, returning from Islington , between eight and nine in the evening: I was stopped by three persons, coming from the Britannia to the Shepherd and Shepherdess; they presented a pistol; and with dreadful imprecations, rifled all my pockets: I cannot swear to the prisoner; it was dark and cloudy; they took from me the things in the indictment: my watch was marked B. M. in a cypher n the outside: as soon as I was attacked, they pulled my hat over my eyes.

WILLIAM HAY sworn.

About four or five weeks ago -

Court. You are an accomplice? - Yes.

Court. Stand down.

ROBERT PAYNE sworn.

I live with Mr. Berry, pawn-broker, on Ludgate-hill. I have a watch; it was pledged on the 21st of April; I have no recollection of the person I took it of.

Prosecutor. This is mine.

Court. Here is no evidence but that of the accomplice; and therefore the prisoner must be

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-17

455. JAMES DUNCOMBE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May last, one pair of coach springs, value 5 s. and fifty-six pounds of iron, value 5 s. the property of Richard Wallis .

And WILLIAM ORTON was indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

THOMAS DICKS sworn.

I saw the prisoner Duncombe coming out of Mr. Wallis's yard with some iron, but did not see him meddle with the springs; there were two bits of plate-iron, and some other old iron: I work in Mr. Wallis's yard: the prisoner said they came off Mr. Wallis's loft; he was coming out of the little wicket gate; I asked him where he was going with it? he said it was not his; I said, then take it back, and he went back, and laid it against a post.

JAMES PEAKE sworn.

I understood in the morning from Dicks, that he had seen this lad with some iron, and stopped him: then Staines and Power got a search-warrant; and I went with them; there we found three springs whole, and another all in pieces; and by the appearance of the springs, we rather thought they belonged to Mr. Wallis: so we brought them to Mr. Wilmot's Office, as was; we found them at the prisoner Orton's house; I do not know how they came there.

RICHARD POWERS sworn.

I am ostler to Mr. Richard Wallis . Staines, the constable, fetched me from the stable on a Monday; but I do not know the month, nor the day of the month: we went to the officer and got a warrant; then we went to search the house of one Thomas Orton ; and we asked him whether he had any springs; and he brought up four; and we brought them away; I cannot say whose property they were, as one spring is very much like another.

- STAINES sworn.

I went to search for the iron springs: the prisoner Orton said I will shew you immediately; I do not know whose property they were.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-18

456. THOMAS PEARCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , a linen sheet, value 3 s. a silver spoon, value 6 d. eighteen brass curtain rings, value 3 d. and three brass weights, value 3 d. the property of Samuel Porter .

ANN PORTER sworn.

I am wife of the prosecutor: I lost the things in the indictment, about three weeks ago: I know nothing of the things being in the prisoner's custody; I cannot swear to him.

MARTHA DAVIS sworn.

My husband is a pawnbroker. A boy came in the latter end of April, and asked me to buy a tea-spoon; I cannot swear to him; I told him no, my lord; he put it on the counter: and it was broke; and said that he found it; and I bought it of him; it was on a Friday; I gave fourteen-pence for it.

HUGH BEDWICK sworn.

I am a constable: I took him into custody; I know nothing more.

FRANCIS MURRAY sworn.

I am an officer at Poland-street: I went by the boy's direction, to Paddington: he said he had sold it to a boy at Paddington; I told him it was better to tell: I produce a shirt; I got it of Mr. Freeman.

WILLIAM DORSETT .

Court. If you do not speak the truth, what will become of you? - There is a devil in hell.

WILLIAM DORSETT sworn.

I work for Mr. Porter. I heard the prisoner ask where one James Shaw lived; I did not hear the prisoner say any thing about the shirt himself, nor the other boy, in his presence.

Court. That is nothing.

The prisoner came to me, and asked me to sell the weights, curtain-rings, and the spoon? I said, yes, if he was sure he found them; I would not sell the spoon; I waited at the door, till he sold it at Mrs. Davis's; and he wanted me to have half the money; it was on a Friday, in the afternoon; he told me he got a shilling for the spoon.

Jury. Was the spoon broke? - Yes.

THOMAS FREEMAN sworn.

My wife bought the shirt of another boy; not of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. I cannot positively swear to the spoon; I cannot read; there were marks across, and flowers; the prisoner is a neighbour's child; I saw him on the stairs about a fortnight before.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I picked up the things upon Mr. Ward's dust-hill; I have no witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-19

457. JOHN RULE was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April last, two hundred pounds weight of lead, the property of Michael Duffield , Esq. fixed to a certain building of his, against the statute .

THOMAS HUMPHREYS sworn.

I am a patrol. On the 25th of April, about a quarter past three, I was at the corner of Percy-street, Tottenham-court-road: I heard a watchman spring his rattle; I went down Percy-street, and I met the prisoner; and he drew back; I said, are you one of them? he said, no; I stopped him; he had nothing on him; I asked him to go back, and he rather refused, and said he was going to call me; I took him back; the watchman said, are you one of them? he said he was not: there was a piece of lead laying by the chapel door, about four hundred yards off where I took him; I had him to the watch-house, and went back and found four parcels of lead upon the chapel, not put down; and likewise a rope; I took it to the watch-house; and

I searched him, and found a small knife; his apron was wet through, and his breeches and his hands all black with the lead; he said he lodged in St. Giles's, but could not tell the street; he said he was going to Edgeware; and that he worked there for Mr. King; and afterwards he said with Mr. Dawes.

WILLIAM OLNER sworn.

Do you know who the chapel belongs to? - No. At half past three, I was standing by my watch-box: I heard something fall against the railing of the chapel; I went softly to this place, and perceived a man moving it away; it was not the prisoner; I asked him what he had been about? he said, to ease himself; I said, go along, is not the street wide enough for you; and I turned round, and the prisoner came out stooping from under the rails; and I said, how many more of you; I went to see, and I saw the lead laying; I sprung my rattle, and the prisoner ran away towards Percy-street: and Humphries brought him back in about two minutes; when he was brought back, I said, are you the man? he said, no; I said, I can swear to your coat.

Prisoner. Did not you say I was not the man? - I said I was very sure he was, for I knew him by his coat; I was present when he was searched.

Jury. Did you find any chisel or hammer upon him? - No.

WILLIAM SANDERS sworn.

I am clerk of Percy Chapel ; the chapel belongs to Mr. Duffield. After we had been to the Rotation-office, we went up to the top of the porch, and fixed the lead, and it fitted exactly; I received the lead from the patrols.

Court to Humphreys. What was done with the lead? - Kept in the warehouse; it was the same lead that I gave to Mr. Sanders.

Does it appear cut or torn? - Cut.

(The lead produced.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to Edgware, to my mother and sister: I work at Islington, for Mr. King; I was going down Percy-street, and the man took me; I did not refuse to go back; they let me go in the street, and I did not offer to run away; it had rained all the day before; that was the reason my apron was wet.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-20

458. HENRY JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April last, eight yards of printed callico, value 20 s. the goods of Joseph Foster .

(The case opened by Mr. Garrow.)

DAVID LOW sworn.

I am foreman to Mr. Foster. The prisoner was a labourer employed by him: I put these things I have here, in the warehouse, on the 29th of April; they were about three parts dry, all in one piece, about eight yards; I missed them on the 21st of May, about half past five; I did not see the goods for several days after; the constable had them; the prisoner went away without giving any notice.

THOMAS HOLT sworn.

I am a watchman at Mile-end Old-town. I stopped the prisoner on the 30th of April, at half past nine at night, with these goods upon him; he came into a public house where I was lighting my candle; and he wanted to leave them there till the next night: the mistress refused to take them in; and asked him what he had got? he said, six handkerchiefs; I desired to see them; he shewed them to me; and I suspected they were stolen, and told him so; I asked him his name? he said, John Williams ; and that he had bought them in town; I took him to the watch-house directly, and secured the goods: he gave an

account there, that he bought them on board the Queen Elizabeth, off Iron-gate: I delivered the goods to the constable; he said afterwards, his name was Jones.

WILLIAM GOATE sworn.

I was constable of the night. I remember this man being brought in: Holt brought a bundle of shawls: the prisoner said he bought them on board the Queen Elizabeth, Captain Williams , from America; and that his own name was William; and that he lived at No. 3, Red lion-street, Whitechapel; I took the goods to the office, and they were delivered to Mr. Cox, the prosecutor's clerk.

Lowe. I produce the bundle; I had it from Mr. Cox, at the compting-house; he is here; they are the same goods.

ROBERT COX sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Foster: they are the same goods; I locked them up; I had them at the justice's.

Low. These are Mr. Foster's property; I know them by the patterns.

Cox. There had none of them been sold.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found this bundle as I was going home, and took it to Mile-end, to leave it there; and the watchman took me.

GUILTY .

Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-21

459. JAMES SUTHERLAND and ANTHONY ULSTON were indicted for that they, on the 4th of May last, twenty-eight pounds of lead, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Catherine M'Carty , feloniously did rip, cut, and steal, against the statute .

GEORGE FINMORE sworn.

Mrs. M'Carty lives in a tenement of mine, in Blue-anchor-yard, Whitechapel : on the 4th of May, about a quarter past ten, I was alarmed that there was two men on the premises; I heard a rumbling on the top, and I called Joseph Bassett, and desired him to get up, and he did; and I got upon the dust-bin; he found a piece of lead in the gutter, rolled up, cut from the gutter; I desired him to see if he could see any body; the tiles were broke; and Bassett went in under the roof, and brought Sutherland out; and I took hold of him, and took him to the watch-house; when we came back, Bassett went up again, and found Ulster behind the chimney: we took them before the magistrate, and he committed them.

JOSEPH BASSETT sworn.

I was called up by Mr. Finmore; and I went up to the top of this house, and I found Sutherland there, and took him to the watch-house, and came back and took Ulston; I found a knife in Sutherland's pocket.

PRISONERS DEFENCE.

We have nothing to say; only that we did not cut the lead.

BOTH GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-22

460. MARGARET CRAGGS was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of May last, a linen gown, value 10 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Margaret Roberts .

MARGARET ROBERTS sworn.

I was in bed on the 17th of May; the prisoner came into my room, and took my gown off a hook, and the handkerchief; and I got out of bed to stop her; but she was too quick for me; I knew her; she lived in the same house; and I called to her; I never got my property again; she was apprehended the same day.

Prisoner. I was not the person? - She was the person.

GEORGE BOX sworn.

I went to work about five. I saw the prisoner come out with something wrapped up in her apron: the prosecutrix came out in her gown, and said, Box, Box, I am robbed of my best gown; I said, I saw mother Craggs go by me, with something in her apron; and she said, follow her; and I ran after her, and could not find her; and in the afternoon she got a warrant, and took her up.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was not near the place; and I never saw the gown; I was out at work: I have people to my character.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Fined one shilling and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-23

461. HUGH M'GILL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May last, one feather bed, value 10 s. and one linen shift, value 6 d. the property of John Angle .

And JANE ANN WRIGHTSON was indicted for receiving one feather bed, part of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

Elizabeth Angle and Mary Hunt called upon their recognizances, and not appearing, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated, and the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-24

462. NICHOLAS MURRAY was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April last, one cloth coat, value 10 s. the property of William Palmer .

And ELIZABETH TULIP was indicted for receiving the same, knowing it to have been stolen .

WILLIAM PALMER sworn.

I lost a coat the 20th or 21st of April; here is a witness saw Murray come out of the house with it under his arm.

WILLIAM STEELE sworn.

I saw Murray go into the house, and come out with the property upon him; it was a red coloured stripe coat; Mr. Palmer was not at home; Mr. Palmer and I went afterwards to East Smithfield, and took Whiteway along with us; and we apprehended him at the Gun and Hollybush, in Back-lane; he had not the coat then with him.

WILLIAM WHITEWAY sworn.

I apprehended the two prisoners, and found out where the coat was in pawn; the pawnbroker is here.

- WILLIAMS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: here is a coat Mr. Palmer swears to be his; I had it of the woman prisoner; nobody came with her; she pawned it for five shillings.

Michael Gaffney called upon his recognizance, and not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Court to Steele. Should you know the coat again? - Yes; I have seen Mr. Palmer wear it: I am sure it is the same.

Jury. How near was you to the prisoner? - About five yards.

(Palmer deposes to the coat.)

PRISONER MURRAY'S DEFENCE.

Why did not the man take me when he saw me, if he did see me come out of the house.

PRISONER TULIP'S DEFENCE.

A young man asked me to pawn a coat for him: I did not know it was stolen.

MURRAY GUILTY ,

Transported for seven years .

TULIP GUILTY ,

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-25

463. THOMAS RATT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , one hundred and eight pounds weight of lead, value 18 s. the property of Samuel Pole , affixed to a certain building of his, against the statute .

JOHN CURRAN sworn.

On the 19th of May I went to the building of Samuel Pole , Esq. at South-gate ; there was thirty-four feet of leaden pipe taken from the house; it was fixed the night before, when we left the building: I suspected a person; not the prisoner: in the evening six of us went out, and planted ourselves, and about one in the morning Benjamin Jefferys and me took the prisoner about a mile from the house, with the lead on his shoulder; the lead was tried, and it fitted the place where it was taken from, we brought the prisoner with us; he said, he found the lead in the wood; there was another man with the prisoner; he got away: the prisoner did not try to get away; the prisoner was taken before a magistrate and committed to Bridewell.

Prisoner. Did you ever see the man before? - No; not till that night.

JOSEPH COTTINGHAM sworn.

I am the plumber that was employed; I have seen the lead; I have reason to think it is the same; I cannot swear positively that it is the same.

BENJAMIN JEFFERIES sworn.

I was in company with the first witness: going along Palmer's-green the 21st of May; the prisoner and another man came up, I turned round, and went and asked him what he had in the basket; one said he was going to Edmonton: he directly threw the lead on the ground and I secured him; the last witness and the other had a scuffle together for two hundred yards, and at length he got the better of him; I gave him charge of the prisoner, and took the lead to the Fox.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the lead.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-26

464. RICHARD SERPHENEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th day of May , one piece of nankeen, value 8 s. the property of John Bruton , privily in his shop .

CHARLES ALDRIDGE sworn.

I am shopman to the prosecutor, No. 46, New Bond-street , a linen-draper . On the 8th of May, I was engaged in a back shop: I saw a suspicious man go past the door; I watched him, and the prisoner came in, took this piece of nankeen off the counter, and ran off with it; I followed him, and took him with it under his coat: I carried him and the nankeen to the justice; this is the same piece.

(Deposed to, marked K. O.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Coming past the door, a man offered me six-pence to fetch it out; I was very hungry, and took it out; I never did such a thing before; I would not send for my friends, to disgrace them.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-27

465. ISABELLA ROWLES was indicted for feloniously assaulting Margaret Knowland , on the king's highway, on the 8th of May last, putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, a silver breast buckle, value 2 s. a muslin cap, value 1 s. a silk ribbon, value 4 d. her property .

MARGARET KNOWLAND sworn.

I know the prisoner; I had no acquaintance with her before she assaulted me, which was on the 8th of May, about twelve at night: I went out for some liquor for a woman that was very ill; it was in High-street, Whitechapel : the prisoner followed me to the public-house; it was shut up; and I came back to my own place; and near my own place, she struck me, and knocked me down; I had seen her in the street before; after she knocked me down, she took away my cap, ribbon and breast-buckle; I hallooed cut murder! and the watchman came, and she ran away; this was on a Saturday night; and on Monday she was taken.

Court. Did she take these things from you by force and violence? - Yes.

Prisoner. Was not I standing in a woman's room: the person that did rob her, is now in the gaol, come for another affair.

Are you certain, with respect to the person of this woman? - Yes.

You have only occasionally seen her; you have no acquaintance with her? - No; I am sure that is the body.

Are you sure it was her? - Yes.

CHARLOTTE THOMPSON sworn.

I was in bed: I heard the prosecutrix cry out murder; I looked out at window, and saw the prisoner run away; I had no acquaintance with her, only talking with her, and seeing her; she lived in the same street; I know her person; but I cannot swear she robbed her, because I was in my own room.

Did you know from whom that cry of murder proceeded? - No, I do not; only I heard murder cried, and saw the prisoner run away; that is all I have to say.

Was it a light night? - It was a moonlight night.

Are you sure it was the prisoner? - Yes.

In what situation was she? - When the watchman came up, she ran away.

You are sure it was the prisoner? - Yes.

JOHN - sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner on the Monday morning; I searched the woman at her lodgings, and found nothing.

Prisoner. I will take it as a great favour, if you will let me speak two words before I make my defence?

Court. You are called upon to speak as many words as you think proper.

Prisoner. Sir, I take it as a great favour. That gentleman was not the officer that took me: and before Justice Staples, the prosecutrix said she lost a silver locket and a handkerchief; but never mentioned any thing else: and the person guilty of it, is now in the prison for another affair.

How do you know who was guilty?

Prisoner. I was standing in a room right facing her room; and the prosecutrix came and said, Bet King, my name-sake, had knocked her down.

Jury. How do you live? - Please you, I am an misfortunate girl at present; I used to get my living in the street.

Court to Jury. Gentlemen, this case depends intirely on the evidence of the witnesses on the part of the prosecutrix.

Jury to Prosecutrix. Do you know the other person that the prisoner mentions, that she says robbed you? - No.

Court. I do not know whether you know, gentlemen, that there is a reward of forty pounds in this case; the articles she has lost are very trifling; but it is for you to consider, whether you think that woman would be induced to give a false testimony, for the sake of the reward.

Prisoner. I wish you would seek into the prosecutrix's character; she is a misfortunate woman like myself.

Court. You are at liberty to call any witnesses to your character; but you seem to have no character of your own.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-28

466. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April last, three linen shirts, value 10 s. two neckcloths, value 2 s. a pair of breeches, value 7 s. seven pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. a towel, value 6 d. two handkerchiefs, value 12 d. the property of Christopher Huddy .

CHRISTOPHER HUDDY sworn.

I am a lodger: I was called down, and shewed the prisoner with a parcel of my linen in her apron; I asked her what she had to do with my things? these were the things, in the indictment; they are here: the prisoner gave no account of the things; she said a woman met her in the passage, and gave her them; I never saw the prisoner before; the things have been washed, therefore I cannot say that these things are the things which the prisoner had in her apron: the washerwoman is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-29

467. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Warrington , about the hour of three in the night, on the 20th day of February , and burglariously stealing therein, a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10 s. a pair of small ditto, value 4 s. a silver table-spoon, value 6 s. a tea-spoon, value 2 s. a small silver handled caudle-cup, value 2 s. a pair of silver salts, value 20 s. a ditto pepper-castor, value 3 s. a stone sleeve button, set in silver, value 6 d. a large damask table-cloth, value 10 s. a silk waistcoat, value 5 s. six linen shirts, value 30 s. two pocket handkerchiefs, value 12 d. a muslin neck handkerchief, value 2 s. a lawn stock, value 2 s. a lawn half neck-handkerchief, value 12 d. a pair of pillow cases, value 3 s. nineteen yards of cloth, value 40 s. a pair of money scales and weights, value 3 s. a pocket-piece, value 6 d. a guinea, two foreign half crowns, and thirty-one shillings in monies numbered, four hundred and eighty halfpence, one hundred and ninety-six farthings, his property .

The witnesses examined separate, by desire of Mr. Knapp, Prisoner's Counsel.

ANN OAK WARRINGTON sworn.

I am the wife of the prosecutor, Samuel Warrington , in Oxford-street, the corner of Poland-street , a baker ; he is a housekeeper: our house was broke open on the night of the 20th of February; our family consists of five persons and a child; my husband was last up, I belive; but I can hardly tell who was last up: we went to bed about two; I saw the house all safe then; and in the morning, the parlour shutters were wrenched open: one of the men came down first; but a stranger found the door open near eight in the morning, which was Sunday morning: I observed the window open, and the bureau, and drawers, and things, broke open; and the things which were left, thrown about the floor; the things in the indictment were missing; the plate and sleeve button were in the bureau: there were some prisoners tried last session: and this linen was delivered to me by George Zeal , as found in the prisoner's apartment; this cloth is certainly my husband's: I know nothing of the prisoner: my husband is not here.

( John Patten called, but did not appear.)

THOMAS DALTON sworn.

On Sunday, I had information of the robbery: I am a constable of the County of Middlesex; and I made enquiries; and I went with Patten to a front room, up one pair of stairs, which I believe to be the apartments of Hughes; there was a piece of linen cloth, but not the size of that lost; afterwards I went back to Gilbert's room; I do not know the linen, if I was to see it.

CHARLES YOUNG sworn.

On the 21st, I went in company with Jealous and Zeal to the prisoner's lodging: we went away, and returned and searched

Gilbert's room; and there we found these things, and a piece of cloth in Hughes's room: Zeal brought that cloth away.

GEORGE ZEAL sworn.

I found a piece of cloth; it was brought here last sessions; I marked it; that was delivered to the prosecutrix, Mrs. Warrington.

(Produced and deposed to.)

Can you swear to that being the same piece of cloth that was found? - Yes; there is Z. upon it.

Court to Mrs. Warrington. Is that the same that was delivered to you by Mr. Zeal? - Yes.

Jury. How do you know that piece of cloth? - It is marked with a stain or two, that was in it when it was bought; and it is cut; here is the other part of it; there are no stains on this piece; here is one stain.

Will you venture from that circumstance, to swear it was your cloth? - I am sure it was my cloth.

Was the cloth measured before it was stolen? - Not since I cut some off; I suppose there might be about seventeen or eighteen yards; I had not measured it before, the other part of the cloth was found on the other.

Mr. Knapp, Prisoner's Counsel. The other prisoner was tried the last sessions, and acquitted: did you know this was Hughes's? - I knew he lodged in Carnaby-street.

ELIZABETH DAVIS sworn.

Mr. Hughes, the prisoner, lodged in my house: I know nothing with respect to the fact.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

I know nothing, only apprehending the prisoner.

Court. Gentlemen, you have heard the evidence; it seems to me so slight, that I need not put the prisoner on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17900526-30

468. LEVY JACOBS was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Wyatt , about the hour of eight in the night, on the 23d of February last, and burglariously stealing therein, a linen tablecloth, value 3 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. three sheets, value 6 s. a petticoat, value 11 s. the property of Thomas Howell .

N. B. This prisoner pleaded not guilty last sessions; and on the motion of Mr. Garrow, he was permitted to withdraw his plea: but the Jury were new charged on the plea of not guilty.

ROBERT DAWSON sworn.

I only apprehended the prisoner in consequence of the information of the accomplice, Richard Pilkington ; I searched the prisoner, and found nothing on him.

Court. It is unnecessary to take up the time of the Court; for unless his testimony was established, it would be of no consequence.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-31

469. THOMAS STUBBS was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of March , a cloth coat, value 42 s. a pair of velvet breeches, value 16 s. two shirts, value 6 s. a pair of silver knee-buckles, value 3 s. the property of William Cook ; two coats, value 4 l. a waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. the property of John Weyman , in the dwelling house of the said John Weyman .

WILLIAM COOK sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. David Simpson, a plaisterer: the prisoner slept with me; we both lodged at John Weyman 's; the prisoner took a candle, and went up to clean him, and returned presently, and went away about seven, to the best of my knowledge; at ten I went to go to bed; the prisoner returned at half past eleven; I found the

room all in confusion; all the drawers open, and my trunk open; and the things taken out; a superfine light drab coat, and two shirts of mine, were gone from my trunk; I left it locked; and the key was under it; but it was broke open, and two other drawers; I saw it locked on the Sunday; I lost the things in the indictment; (repeating them): I got nothing back, only two shirts and a silk handkerchief: the constable had them from a woman that is here; I did not buy them new; there is some of the name left; I cannot swear to the handkerchief; the shirts have been altered: the collar, sleeves, and tail, taken off; I cannot safely swear to them.

JOHN WEYMAN sworn.

I am a plaisterer's labourer. The prisoner was a lodger of mine; I keep a house; he took my clothes the same night he took the other; I had not seen my property for a month or six weeks: on the alarm given by Cook, I went up stairs, and found all the drawers pulled out, and the box wrenched, and the property gone: I missed the things mentioned in the indictment: (repeating them): the two cloth coats are here; I saw them at the justice's: (deposed to): the taylor made one of them with hooks, but not with eyes; and buttonholes to the pockets, but no buttons; the other coat has a rent on the back.

Court. What is the value of these two coats? - I cannot justly say; I gave four pounds.

They would not sell for four pounds now? - I do not know that.

How long have you had one of them? - Five years; and the other in August last.

Can you fix any thing what they are worth? - I do not understand them; this waistcoat is mine: I went to a club burying; they said the person died of a putrid fever; and I got a bit of rue, which I tucked in. The breeches I had in August; I gave twenty-five shillings for them; I know them by the size and the make.

How soon did you see the things after they were missing? - In five weeks.

Mr. Knowlys. Where do you live? - No. 9, in Northumberland-street, Mary-le-bone; I keep a house, and pay twenty-two guineas a year.

Let a good part of it out in lodgings? - Only one front door and back door; no part of the lodgings are divided; nobody joins with me in the rent of the house.

For aught you know, they might have been taken out separate? - I cannot say.

JAMES MULCASTER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, in Chandler's-street, Grosvenor-square: I speak only to this black coat, waistcoat, and breeches. On the 8th of March, in the evening, I took them in pledge from the prisoner; I have known him ten or a dozen years; I am certain he was the man; I knew his mother and him: he said they were his father's; he pawned them for fifteen shillings; the prisoner always bore a good character.

THOMAS CHIFFINCH sworn.

The prisoner pawned this blue coat with me the 2d of March; I am positive the prisoner brought it; I have kept it ever since.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who all gave him a good character.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-32

470. HENRY NICHOLLS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April last, four hundred and sixty-eight copper halfpence, value 19 s. 6 d. and nine hundred and thirty nine copper farthings, value 19 s. 6 d. the monies of Edward Dawson .

EDWARD DAWSON sworn.

I live in St. John's-street : I keep a public-house .

I lost, on the 29th of April, halfpence and farthings to the amount of one pound nineteen shillings and three farthings; they were in a half peck measure, in a room behind the bar: they were counted at the sessions-house at Clerkenwell-green: between one and two, or near two, the prisoner came into the house, and called for a pint of beer; he staid some time; he had done a job of work for me a few days before: and my wife thought he was hardly well enough paid; and she gave him a plate of victuals; he drank his beer, and went out, and returned again, and had another pint of beer: I found the halfpence in a corner of a room some distance from his stall, among some dirty things; the prisoner was present.

ELIZABETH DAWSON sworn.

I caught the prisoner in the kitchen, and nobody else; that was the second time he came in; I went up stairs, and he was alone; when I came down, I went to the bar, and soon missed my property; the halfpence were gone, and the farthings; I saw them half an hour before; I desired them to pursue the prisoner, as nobody else was in the house; he had a cobler's stall four doors off; he was taken; I saw him and the money at the justice's; I picked out one halfpenny which I had taken half an hour before, and swore to it; I do not know how much was in the measure.

Court. How long after you left the prisoner alone in the room by himself, did you discover the halfpence? - About three quarters of an hour.

- SANDERS sworn.

I am a constable: I found the halfpence in a room in Sutton-street, No. 3, one pair of stairs; the prisoner was present; these are the halfpence and farthings; we did not find the measure; I was at the justice's; and Mrs. Dawson swore to one halfpenny.

(The halfpenny deposed to.)

Mrs. Dawson. I described it; it was a plain yellowish Birmingham halfpenny.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I knew nothing at all about it, till I was taken into custody.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-33

471. THOMAS JONES , alias AYRES , and CHARLES RICHARDS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Francis Hutton , on the 6th of May , about the hour of nine in the night, and burglariously stealing therein, a leather japanned hat, with a silver laced band, value 8 s. his property .

(The case opened by Mr. Silvester.)

JAMES SLADE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Francis Hutton , in East-street, Red-lion-square, No. 31 . On the 6th of May last, at nine o'clock, I heard a knock at the door; I went up and opened the door; there I saw Jones, alias Ayres; he says, is this Mr. Hutton's? I told him it was; he said, Miss Hughes's compliments, she is sorry she cannot wait on Mrs. Hutton to-morrow morning; I said, I do not recollect my mistress has such an acquaintance; he said, yes, Miss Hughes of Great Queen-street; I shut the door, and he came in; I rather stopped; he said he was rather in a hurry; he drew out his watch, and said it was rather past nine; I then said to Jones, otherwise Ayres, it was not quite convenient to deliver that message just then, as my mistress had company in the drawing-room; I would deliver it after supper; I then delivered it to her after

supper; I let him out; I swear it was that man; I heard another knock at the door, and of course went to the door, and opened it: the servant was then preparing the supper: the prisoner Charles Richards walked in, and presented me with a note, and says this is for Mr. Hutton; it came from an attorney, and requires an answer; I asked him whether an answer was required? he said, yes; I then said, you will stop; he came in, and I shut the door.

Court. Was the other prisoner with him? - No; I did not see any body with him; the parlour door was open, and a candle burning on the side-board; I looked at the direction; and instead of Hutton, I saw it was Hatton; at that moment I heard the door open, and the sound of a person's foot; I turned, and saw the two prisoners; Jones with a great coat in both hands; and Richards I saw take this hat off a brass nail; it was hanging in the passage; it dropped on the floor; and I directly cried out, stop thief! and followed them; they both went out; Jones went up East-street, and Charles Richards crossed Harpur-street; I pursued Richards, calling out stop thief! and at the top of the street, Richards was taken; never was out of my sight; and was stopped by James Moss ; I then desired Moss to secure him; I then returned, and took hold of Richards, and led him down to my master's door; the hat was dropped in the inside of some great coats; it was on the nail before; I am certain I saw him take that hat off the nail; there was no other person in the street but he and me, till he was stopped by Moss: I went back to the house, and shut the door, for fear of any body else; and when I returned, they were bringing up Jones; I never lost sight of the prisoner, till he was stopped by Moss.

Court. Before the time you went back to secure the door of your master's house, you had made such observation of the person of Richards, that you can be sure he was the same person that took the hat off the nail? - I am sure of it; for I took very great observation of his person in the passage, when he delivered the note to me: I am sure Richards is the man that delivered the note to me: I am sure Jones is the man that came with the message.

Are you sure he is the man that came with the message when Richards was there? - I am sure of it; this is the hat; it is Mr. Hutton's property.

Mr. Garrow. I am counsel for the prisoner Jones.

Was there day-light enough, when you pursued, to know the man's face? - I know their faces by the light of the passage; there certainly was light enough both by the daylight, and the light of the lamps.

Do you mean to swear that positively? - I am positive I could tell the man's face by the day-light.

Court. Are you sure that there was a sufficient light in the street, without the assistance of the lamp, merely by what is called day-light, to distinguish the faces of these persons at the bar? - Not at a distance; but what with the help of the light and the lamps.

Do you consider that hour when you saw these men, as night or day? - It certainly was night.

JAMES MOSS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Waterman. On the 6th of May last, as I was going to my lodging in Bedford-square, at half past nine, as near as I can recollect, I heard the noise of stop thief; I stopped a little while, and heard somebody running; and presently I saw there were two men coming; the one a little way before the other; and he that came first, I laid hold of; and he was very much frightened, I fancy, for he trembled exceedingly, and said he was not the man; that was the prisoner Richards: Slade cried out hold him fast; he came up in the course of a minute.

Did you let him go? - I never let go of him at all: then Slade came up, and said that was the man; he laid hold of him; he begged still to be gone, for he said he was not the man; we led him backwards nearly up to his master's door; and there

was a great many people got about; and I believe, another prisoner; but I did not see him.

Court. Was it at this time light enough for you to discover the faces of the prisoners at the bar, from Heaven, and without the assistance of the lamps? - I cannot say I could discover it by day-light, as there was lamps; I cannot say whether there was day-light sufficient, or not.

Jury to Slade. Is there a globe in your master's hall, or a burner, that shewed light in the hall? - Yes.

What distance is it from the hall-door? - It seems to be four yards from the street-door: it is a round globe with three burners, but only two lighted.

Had you a candle in your hand when you opened the hall-door for Jones? - I do not recollect that I had; I left it in the parlour.

How near was Jones to the light in the hall? - He came just on the mat, just within the door.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Freeland, in East-street. On the 6th of May, Thursday night, between nine and ten, I was out on business in a milk-cellar in Boswell-court; I heard the alarm of stop thief! I came out of the cellar, and saw Jones running by as hard as he could run; I was not certain whether it was him or not; I came to the steps, and an alarm was made; I pursued him; he cried stop thief several times; I took him in Queen-square, and brought him back; he had nothing in his possession: I met a congregation of people coming towards him: I delivered him to Ball, the constable: the prisoner Jones, otherwise Eyres, is the man: we came back into East-street, where the alarm was given; we saw the other prisoner, and the congregation of people.

Court. Was it light enough to distinguish a man's face, without the assistance of lamps? - Why, I really believe I could discover a man's face within eight yards of me; there was day light enough then.

Mr. Garrow. There is evidence enough to the day-light. In the case of life, your lordship knows there is no limitation of distance by the law: the law says, that if there was light enough at the time a man's countenance could be distinguished thereby? - I took notice of his face; I had a right to do so.

Prisoner Jones. I leave it to my counsel; I have nobody here.

THOMAS JONES (aged 20) CHARLES RICHARDS (aged 20)

GUILTY ,

Of stealing.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-34

472. The said THOMAS JONES , otherwise AYRES , was again indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Francis Riollay , doctor of physic, between the hours of seven and eight in the night, on the 28th of April last, and burglariously stealing therein, a cloth great coat, value 10 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 2 s. his property .

A second Count, for that he, being in the same dwelling house, and stealing the same goods and chattles, broke out of the same house, against the statute.

JOHN ACRES sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Riollay; he lives at No. 17, Hart street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner knocked at the door, with Miss Hughes's compliments to Mrs. Riollay, and she had been very poorly lately, and would call on the morrow, as she was got better; I went in to deliver the message; he came between seven and eight; it was day-light; we had a light in the hall, and candles; he took a great coat, and two silk handkerchiefs.

Mr. Garrow. I have no objection, my lord, to the jury finding him guilty, as he

has been convicted of one felony already. The value of the coat was ten shillings.

GUILTY of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-35

473. The said THOMAS JONES , otherwise AYRES , was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April last, three silver waiters, value 12 l. and five silver tea-spoons, value 40 s. the property of Sarah Sayer , in her dwelling-house .

MARY ALLEN sworn.

I lived with Mrs. Sayer, in Kings-street, Bloomsbury . The young man came between eight and nine in the evening, of the 3d of April (he knocked twice at the door) with Miss Campbell's compliments to my mistress; would be glad to know what time on Monday she would send her things; or whether she should call on her; I received the message, and went up stairs and delivered the message to the ladies; they had some suspicion, and desired I would run down; as I came down stairs, the street door bell rung.

Was the prisoner that delivered the message to you, in the passage, when you came down again? - He opened the door, and ran out.

Was it the prisoner at the bar? - To all appearance it was him; it certainly was him; I never saw him before; James rung at the door; the young man opened the door, and let him in; James ran after him; I did not miss any thing till the ladies came down and examined the parlour; and the plate was gone; I examined after, and found three silver waiters and some spoons were gone.

Mr. Garrow. You never saw him before? - No.

You never saw the man that brought the message, till this man was in custody? - No.

Where was you sent for to go and see him? - I do not know.

You expected to see the man? - Not without. I knew him.

You was told that such a man was in custody? - I was told by the description I had given.

Was not you told that a man was in custody that had robbed other houses? - I was told three men were in custody; and I picked him out; that was about six or seven weeks.

So that you saw him in custody for this sort of offence? - I really thought it a real message.

Therefore, of course you had nothing to attract your notice of the man? - Nothing at all.

He was gone before you got down, out of your sight? - He was.

It was between eight and nine? - Yes.

You have heard the two last trials? - I have.

I am very sorry for it. Who was the person that gave your mistress this information? - I cannot say.

Who went with you to the place? - Another young woman in the same street, at whose house this young man had been.

Had that young woman seen him? - Yes; and swore to him at the same time.

Had she seen him before you went? - I do not know.

Had not that young woman seen him at the watch-house? - She saw him several times.

Did she not tell you as she went along, that she was quite sure he was the man? - She did not.

What did she say? - Nothing: nobody asked me to see whether that was the man; I had no talk at all.

You knew from her, that the man had been at her house? - Yes.

This gentlewoman heard you say, to all appearance, this is the man that came to our house? - Yes.

I should think, as a conscientious woman,

where a man's life is at stake, you would not carry it further? - I have no reason to doubt it.

Do you think you could swear to me to-morrow? - I dare say I could.

Not without this wig, I think you could not? - I saw you at Guild-hall without a wig; and I could swear to you then.

JAMES CHELTENHAM sworn.

I lived with Mrs. Sayer the beginning of April: I was the person that was let in on Saturday, the 3d of April; I went for oysters about eight, and returned about half after; I rang the bell, which I had no sooner done, than a man let me in, and went out; I had no suspicion, as people are continually coming, but was going to shut the door; the cook came down and said, where is the man? that struck me; I made haste after him, calling stop thief! he got clear off; when I came back the ladies were all in a fright; they missed the plate; and I missed the things; the side-board was stripped of what plate was on it at eight o'clock: I would not swear to the prisoner; there was five table-spoons, one large waiter, and two smaller, and some desert spoons; but how many I cannot say; I suppose the value of the large waiter, about fifteen pounds, a great deal under value; the two small waiters, about eight pounds.

Mr. Garrow. Your plate has never been found? - No.

How long did you pursue the man? - A considerable way.

You cannot speak to the man? - No.

Mr. Garrow. To call witnesses to character, after what the jury has done, would be very superfluous.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-36

474. HENRY SYKES and WILLIAM BERRYMAN were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of April last, four pounds of glue, value 6 s. and two pounds of nails, value 5 s. the property of William Rowel and Samuel Bentley ; one plane, value 2 s. one screw-driver, value 1 d. one plow-iron, value 2 d. one square, value 6 d. two saws, value 6 s. two saws, value 4 s. the property of George Thompson .

EDWARD ROWLAND sworn.

I know George Thompson ; he is my journeyman . On the 30th of April, at five in the morning, I went into the shop, and was informed the shop had been robbed: the prisoner Sykes worked with me in February: I was informed a thousand of nails were missing, which had been in the shop the evening before; also a quantity of glue which was in the compting-house the evening before: at twelve o'clock I was informed the thieves and property were in custody; and he brought the prisoner Berryman with him to the yard; he was a total stranger.

GEORGE THOMSON sworn.

I am a carpenter: I work for the prosecutors. On the 30th of April, me and two more men called at my master's door for the keys of the shop; one of the men opened the gate, and we went to the workshop door, and went into the shop, and missed some nails and glue; and the screws of the tool-chest were wrenched out of the lid; but the staple was fast; and I missed three saws, a plow, a phillister, a pair of iron nippers, and some other trifling things.

THOMAS MITTON sworn.

I went on the 29th of April to Mr. Bayley's, and bought two half thousand papers of nails, and took them to my master's, the prosecutor's shop, and locked up the shop.

PATRICK FLINT sworn.

I am a watchman in the parish of St. Giles's. On the morning of the 30th of April, I was going my beat at five: I came to my watch-box, and I saw the two prisoners come out of Stone-cutter's-alley; they

crossed Little Queen-street, into Parker's-street; I followed them to Drury-lane, and took them with this property: Mr. Atkins was with me; they said they were going to a job in Mary-le-bone; we took them to the watch-house: (the things produced and deposed to, except the glue): Sykes had threee saws, and a parcel of other tools in a handkerchief.

JOHN ATKINS sworn.

I was with the last witness, and apprehended the prisoners with the things.

Prisoners. We are innocent.

The prisoner Sykes called five, and the prisoner Berryman called one witness, to their character.

HENRY SYKES - WILLIAM BERRYMAN

GUILTY ,

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-37

475. WILLIAM GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 12th day of April last, six pair of silk stockings, value 1 l. 18 s. the property of John Handcock , Matthew Handcock , and Francis Wakefield .

THOMAS BARNARD sworn.

I am warehouseman to Mr. Francis Wakefield , John Handcock , and Matthew Handcock. Part of the silk stockings were taken the 29th of April; I cannot tell when the others were taken; they were all found together; the prisoner was footman and porter and stept in the warehouse, to take in, we suspected him some time silk stockings were in his box on Friday the 30th of April; he was then in house; I saw them in the box, but did not see the box opened: Newman, the constable, has the stockings; I knew one by the clock; there were six pair in the box, in the whole.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. This man came to Mr. Wakefield, from Salisbury? - Yes.

JOHN DARWIN sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutors: I saw the box opened by the constable, in which were found six pair of silk stockings, the property of the prosecutor; one pair I can swear to.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn.

(Produced the stockings.)

Darwin. This is the remarkable pair, that I swear to by the point of the clock: I can say for certain, that some were missing from the parcels.

Court. Did you ever sell any with that point? - No; that is the only pair we ever had: Mr. Matthew Handcock is the only partner in town; and he very seldom sells.

Jury. Do you make these stockings? - The man that works for us, does not work for other people.

Do you mean to swear that the man that made them, does not work for any body else? - Yes.

Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutor.

GUILTY , (aged 19.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-38

476. JOSEPH DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , one man's woollen cloth coat, value 8 s. and a boy's ditto, value 10 s. one pair of nankeen breeches, value 4 s. four linen waistcoats, value 5 s. one dimity waistcoat, value 2 s. the property of John Ward .

JOHN WARD sworn.

I am a watchman belonging to St. Sepulchre's: I lost the things in the indictment; the prisoner was caught with the property upon him.

PETER WARD .

Court. What will become of you, if you

tell an untruth? - Go into everlasting punishment.

PETER WARD sworn.

Did you ever see the prisoner? - Yes, in my father's room, in Cow-lane. My mother was bad abed in an inner room; I was going down to the privy; I put a hasp on the door; I came out of the room, to come down stairs; I came back, and the hasp was gone; and I knocked at the door, and called mother; and then the prisoner came out, and asked for Mrs. Davis? and I told him there was no such person; then he said I was a very wicked boy for leaving my mother; and I pushed him in, and kept him in, and called my mother; he had the things under his arm when I stopped him.

When had you last seen these things? - The Sunday before; this was on a Friday; they were in the lower drawer.

Was the drawer locked? - No.

What was done with the things? - The constable had them.

MARY WARD sworn.

I am wife to the prosecutor; I was ill: the boy called me, and I got up: the prisoner was putting the things on a chair; all the things in the indictment were there; the drawer was unlocked the last time I saw them there; I never lock the drawer: the things were put into a constable's possession.

MARY WOODEY sworn.

Mrs. Ward called me to assist her: the prisoner said a man came and took them away, and gave them to him; the things were on a chair; he was committed.

RICHARD WILLEY sworn.

I am a constable; I have got the things I have had them ever since.

(Produces the things.)

WILLIAM FRAIL sworn.

I saw the boy in the room, and the clothes in a chair by him.

(Mrs. Ward deposes to the things.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going after a place, and a man met me, and asked me to carry some things for him; and I went to the door, and took the things, as he told me; and the little boy came up and took me.

GUILTY (aged 12.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-39

477. THOMAS BECKETT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th day of May , one silver table-spoon, value 5 s. the property of Eliza Fawcett .

GEORGE PURSE sworn.

The prisoner brought a spoon to me to pawn, about three in the afternoon.

Eliza Fawcett called on her recognizance, and not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-40

478. ALEXANDER KING was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , one wooden cask, called a half hogshead, value 3 s. 6 d. and twenty-eight gallons of vinegar, value 20 s. the property of William Smith and Co.

JOHN BACON sworn.

I am a master lighterman. On the 12th of May, between three and four in the afternoon, I was in Thames-street; and I saw the prisoner rolling a half hogshead of vinegar; I saw him rolling it up Dunstan's-hill; I saw the mark on the cask; and I went up and took hold of him; he said he was going to roll it into Tower-street; and afterwards he said to Westminster. I have the property in a warehouse of mine.

JOHN HAMMETT sworn.

I am a hair-dresser: I saw him roll it up the Custom-house gateway: I am a constable; I took it from the prisoner, and put it into Mr. Bacon's warehouse.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

I am a cheesemonger. Agreeable to a note I have, this vinegar was sent to go by a vessel, to Hull, of which I am part owner; I have seen the vinegar at Mr. Bacon's warehouse.

(The note handed to the Court.)

Court. Who is Leonard Hebden ? - The person who sent it to be shipped.

Where did you get this note? - From the Quays.

Do you know the cask? - No.

Court. As Mr. Hebden is not here, the prisoner must be

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-41

479. MARTHA LLOYD was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , one woollen cloak, value 3 s. two muslin caps, value 4 s. one child's cap, value 2 s. 6 d. two childs lawn caps, value 3 s. the property of Benjamin Powers .

MARY POWERS sworn.

I am wife of the prosecutor: I know nothing of the robbery.

- JORGIN sworn.

I am a mathematical instrument maker.

The prisoner came into my apartment, and took some property belonging to Mr. Powers: I was gone to assist Mrs. Powers: there was a fire at Long-lane: Mr. Powers's goods were brought to my lodging between one and two in the morning; a great many goods and clothes; my boy and I were coming up with two chairs, and stopped her; she was coming down stairs; the child-bed linen dropped from under her petticoat; she had the cloak under her petticoats; it hung down; she turned back, and threw the cloak up another pair of stairs: my son found it; the things were left in the apartments; I picked up some, and my son picked up some: Mrs. Powers took them the next day.

Prisoner. Did you see any thing upon me? - Nothing but what she dropped.

JOHN TREW sworn.

I am son-in-law to the last witness. As I was going up stairs, I saw the prisoner with the cloak under her petticoats; she dropped a cap, and I picked it up; the cloak was thrown up stairs, and I fetched it into the room: my father and I went to the fire again: she was stopped again with the cloak on her, in Smithfield.

JOHN KIRBY sworn.

I am a watchman: I stopped the prisoner in Smithfield: I asked what she had got? she said, what was that to me; she said it was her sister's; then she said she bought it: and she was committed.

Court to Jorgin. Did you let the woman go? - Yes; and she came back the second time, while I was gone to the fire, and took the cloak.

(The things produced.)

Mrs. Powers. These are mine, all of them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to see the fire: and Mr. Jorgin's son asked me to come up to his room to see the fire; I and another young woman he keeps company with; and he desired me to take the cloak home with me, for it was his sister's.

Court to Trew. Where is Mr. Jorgin's son? - He is pressed, and gone to sea.

Have you a sister? - Yes; she keeps house in Goodman's-yard: the prisoner was in the room, and another young woman with her; I saw her about one o'clock there.

Court. How came you to let her go? - There was never a watchman to take charge of her.

Did you see the young woman with your brother? - No.

Prisoner. Was not you in my company with your brother and me, at the Castle at Cow-cross? - Never.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-42

480. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , one grey mare, price 10 l. the property of Samuel Gascoyne .

(The case opened by Mr. Garrow.)

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JOHN NICHOLS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Gascoyne; he is a publican ; he lives at South Mims. I was at Mr. Hodgson's, in Colchester-street, Savage-gardens , on the 17th of April, between four and five in the afternoon, with a cart, to have it loaded with liquor, to carry down to Mims; the things were put into the cart; I left the mare and the cart at Mr. Hodgson's door: the prisoner helped to load them; he took the cart away afterwards, while I was talking to Berry the cellar-man; I saw him drive it away.

Prisoner. He was drunk.

Did you know him before? - He shewed me the way to Mr. Hodgson's; and he took me there, and helped to load it; he got into the cart, and drove it away; I am sure he is the man: I did not see him till

the Monday: I saw it before my lord mayor; I was quite sober.

Court. How came you to let him drive the cart away? - I made an alarm, and could not hear any thing of him; I did not think he meant to drive it away.

Prisoner. He was drunk? - I was sober.

Prisoner. He bid me get into the cart? - I did not.

JAMES BERRY sworn.

I am cellar-man to Mr. Hodgson. I saw the prisoner help to load the cart: my master went away; and the prisoner, or Nichols, asked for something to drink; I took them both into the cellar, and gave them some rum; the prisoner had two glasses, and Nicholls one; they staid about three minutes; the prisoner said he was a ticket-porter, and his father was a livery-man; when we came up, the prisoner jumped up into the cart in the presence of me and Nichols, and took the reins in his hand; the prisoner said, will you get up? Nichols said, you are older than I, do you ride; he drove the cart away gently; Nichols says to me, the man has charged me too much; he has charged me a shilling for shewing me the way from the Vine Inn, besides some beer; that was all that passed; he shook hands with me; the horse and cart was not above fifty yards off, I believe; I understood he was driving the cart for Nichols; Nichols went away, and followed the cart; the cart was just out of sight; about three hours after, Nichols came back with another man; he said he had been at Islington; and he came back with this man, who shewed him the way, to know if we knew any thing of the cart? my master asked him if he had been at the Vine Inn to look for him? he said he had not been there; and I went there, and the ostler said he had not seen any thing of it.

Mr. Garrow. Was Nichols sober? - Yes; when he came back, he was more sober than when he went away.

ROBERT PAYNE sworn.

I am ostler at the Cherry-tree, Kingsland-road. The prisoner came into our yard with a horse and cart, about five or six weeks ago, on a Saturday, about three or four o'clock; I did not take particular notice; he desired I would take care of it, and what was in the cart; I asked him what was in it? and he said two hampers of wine; he said he had a partner coming; he said he had not the permit, but his partner had got it.

Mr. Garrow. God forbid I should go any farther in a case of life and death.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-43

481. MARTIN LEONARD was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , one hundred and twenty copper halfpence, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Potts .

THOMAS POTTS sworn.

I keep a public house at the New Road, Mary-le-bone . I lost some halfpence on the 5th of May: the prisoner came to my house.

HANNAH POOLEY sworn.

I was servant to the prosecutor: I saw the prisoner at my master's bar; he called for a gallon of beer; I was to take it over the way; he said he was foreman to the buildings there; he said he wanted five shillings worth of halfpence; I carried the beer and the halfpence; and he met me in the road; he told my mistress he would send a guinea to change; he said, you stand here with the beer, and I will go and take the halfpence; and he took them, and put them into his pocket; and he would send a man with a guinea for the beer; he went through the buildings into the fields: my master ran after him, and took him; and he had the halfpence upon him; he begged for mercy.

Prisoner. The mistress gave me the halfpence? - No, she did not; she gave them to me, and I gave them to you.

GEORGE PHILLIPS sworn.

I am a constable of Mary-le-bone. I took the prisoner before a magistrate; I saw the halfpence taken out of his pocket; there were five shillings and a halfpenny; I have them here.

Court to Prosecutor. Was there any mark upon the halfpence? - No: I pursued the prisoner, and took him to Mary-le-bone watch-house; I saw them half-pence taken from him at Litchfield-street.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming down Mary-le-bone, and met a man who owed me some money; and he said if he could get change, he would pay me fifteen shillings; and I went to this house; I knew the man's wife; and she said she could let me have a crown, if that was of any service; and I went out and met the man; and he said, I will give you a gallon of beer: and I was not got a dozen yards from the house, when Mr. Potts came up to me, and said I had got some of his halfpence; he said he would hang me; he is jealous of his wife; I did not deny having the halfpence.

Prosecutor. I never saw the man before: it is a false story.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-44

482. HENRY WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , seventy gallons of porter, value 50 s. the property of - Pierce and William Sedgwick .

WILLIAM SEDGWICK sworn.

I am a brewer , in partnership with Mr. Pierce: I know nothing of the robbery, only that there was a deficiency.

HENRY MANDEY sworn.

I took the prisoner filling a bottle: I am cooper to the prosecutors: the prisoner is a smith; I watched the store cellar; the prisoner came in with a stone gallon bottle, and he filled it; I took him to Mr. Pierce's compting-house; I know nothing more: it is Mess. Pierce and Sedgwick's store cellar.

Mr. Garrow. How came the prisoner to have an opportunity of getting in there? - He lived under the same roof.

What character does he bear? - A very good one.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-45

483. JOHN SADLER was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April , a blue cloth coat, value 6 s. and a silk waistcoat, value 4 s. the property of Alexander Higginson , Esq.

WILLIAM BEEBY sworn.

I live with Alexander Higginson , Esq. in Harley-street . I lost a blue cloth coat out of the house-keeper's room: I did not see the prisoner take it; I saw it about a quarter of an hour before it was missed; the waistcoat was with it; I found them in the front area, lying on the steps: when I was called, the prisoner was standing by them.

JOHN HUDSON sworn.

I live with Mr. Higginson. The area gate was left open, and the door into the passage: the footman and I heard somebody come down the steps; he said, go and see who it is; I got up, and saw the prisoner go into the house-keeper's room; and I saw him come out again; and I said, young man, I will have you; I suppose he had thrown the clothes on the area steps; he said, is this thirty-six? I said, no, thirty-five; he went up the steps; and I saw the clothes lying; and I said, stop, you have been at no good.

Court. How could he throw them on

the steps? - I lost sight of him for a little time: I called to Mr. Beeby, and he came out; he was taken to Litchfield-street, and the clothes with him: Mr. Beeby has had them ever since.

Beeby. This is my coat, and this is my master's waistcoat.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I used to go to Newport-market of a morning, and buy pigeons, and go to gentlemens houses, and sell them: I had been at No. 36 the day before; and they bid me come next day: I went to this gentleman's area in mistake; I asked him if that was No. 36? he said it was next door; when I came up the steps, there was a parcel lay; and he struck me.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-46

484. JAMES STERLING was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April , two quartern loaves, value 1 s. a piece of suet, value 6 d. and four pounds of cheese, value 16 d. the property of Harry Harmood , Esq.

A WITNESS sworn.

I am cook to Mr. Harmood. Between twelve and one, on the morning of the robbery, I locked the safe in the area. About half past three, the family was alarmed by a knocking at the door: my master got up, and his son, and one of the servants: the watchman had got the prisoner; he took him from the front area; there was a hole in the safe, where the things were taken out; the things in the indictment were missing; I saw them there between twelve and one; I did not see them in the prisoner's custody.

JAMES DAWSON sworn.

I am a watchman in New Norfolk-street: I did not see the prisoner take the things; I found him in the area with the things tied up in an old blue apron; he said a man knocked his hat off, and he went to get it; he was not near the bundle at the time; it was about a quarter past three when I took him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of the affair.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-47

485. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May last, one pillow, value 1 s. a pillow-case, value 6 d. a tin tea-kettle, value 6 d. a tin kettle, value 6 d. a pair of tongs, value 6 d. a blanket, value 1 s. and a pair of sheets, value 3 s. the property of Stephen Woodbine , in a lodging-room let to him, to be used by him, against the statute, &c.

CATHERINE WOODBINE sworn.

I am wife to the prosecutor; he is a seafaring man . The prisoner came to me for a lodging about three months ago; he took them by the week; I stopped him with the pillow, on the 5th of May, about twelve at noon; he was going away with it: I apprehended him at the pawnbroker's, with a pillow on him, and a sheet, out of the room adjoining; I found a pillow-case there, and this pillow and a sheet: the pawnbroker's name is Howell: I saw the officer take two duplicates from his pocket: the pawnbroker delivered the sheets to me without any money; he said he would have no more trouble about it; I recovered nothing else.

Are these sheets yours? - Yes; there is a mark on them, K. B.

What business did the prisoner follow? - He said he got his living by the waterside.

WILLIAM HOWELL sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I produce a pillow and pillow-case, I had of the prisoner; I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. I did not pawn the pillowcase? - He came and took it out; his wife brought it; I said I thought it did not belong to him; he said it was his own; and while I was talking, the prosecutrix came in and took him.

(Produces them.)

(Prosecutrix deposes to the pillow.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was taken ill; and the things were taken away not with an intent to defraud her; but I intended to get them again, but had it not in my power at the time.

GUILTY .

Publicly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-48

486. ELIZABETH FARROW was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of May , ten hare skins, value 4 s. fourteen rabbit skins, value 3 s. and one fitchew skin, value 6 d. the property of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL sworn.

I am a furrier . On the 3d of May, I was called up about five o'clock, by the watchmen; when I came down, the prisoner had got a parcel of skins; I went into my warehouse, and found some skins removed; I missed about an arm full of skins; when I came down, I looked over the skins; there was a fitchew skin, I am sure of being mine: the prisoner was taken to the watch-house: the watchman has the skins.

JOHN GRIMWOOD sworn.

I am a watchman. I went down to Mr. Hall's premises, and I saw the prisoner at the back of the warehouse; I asked her what she did there? she said, to ease herself; I observed something under her apron; and I pulled out these skins.

(Produces them.)

WILLIAM BENDALL sworn.

I sold this fitchew skin to Mr. Hall, on the 30th of April; I am sure it is the same.

JOHN HARRIS sworn.

I am a labourer: I work at Mr. Ward's: I saw these people lurking about.

SARAH HILL sworn.

I come to prove some of the property: the rabbit skins, I tore the tail off one of them myself.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought these things in the country, near Kingston upon Thames: I went up the passage to ease myself, and the watchman pulled me away, and took me to the gentleman's house; the doors of the warehouse were all safe; I am innocent; I beg for mercy; I have a fatherless child; my husband dropped down dead in Holborn.

GUILTY .

Fined one shilling .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-49

487. WILLIAM CHECKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May, one linen handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of William Lovegrove .

WILLIAM LOVEGROVE sworn.

I am a salesman at Leadenhall. On

Saturday, the 8th of May, between eleven and twelve, I was going along Leaden-hall-street : I felt a person, and put my hand to my pocket: a gentleman said, that is him, in the blue jacket; I pursued him, and saw him put the handkerchief under his waistcoat; I catched him, and he put it down into his breeches: the man who is here came to my assistance: he stripped himself. Dormer took the handkerchief from him.

CHARLES DORMER sworn.

I am an officer. I was going along Leadenhall-street: I saw the prosecutor challenging the prisoner; and the prisoner stripped off his waistcoat; and I pulled the handkerchief out of his breeches.

(Produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing about it: I have no witnesses.

GUILTY . (Aged 15.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-50

488. JAMES FLINDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May , one yard and a half of muslin, value 5 s. one silk gown, value 2 l. 2 s. one silk petticoat, value 18 s. three cotton gowns, value 4 l. 4 s. a petticoat, value 10 s. a gown, value 10 s. a bed quilt, value 10 s. 6 d. a ditto, value 5 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. a shawl, value 3 s. two yards of lace, value 5 s. two yards of callico, value 4 s. a bed-gown, value 3 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a pair of pockets, value 1 s. three linen towels, value 3 d. a piece of cloth, value 8 s. three other pieces of cloth, value 6 s. the property of Elizabeth Woodley , widow , in the dwelling house of Francis Gilding .

JOHN LUCY sworn.

I am a constable of Clerkenwell. On 16th of May, in the morning, about five o'clock, in New Prison-walk, Clerkenwell, I saw the prisoner with the property on his head: I having heard there was a fire, I asked him where he got it? he said he had it from a person in Red-lion-yard, Aldersgate-street; and was going to No. 12, Pear-tree-court, Clerkenwell; I told him I had suspicion, and laid hold of him; after I had taken him, he said he was employed to carry it from St. John's-street, as a porter: I secured him, and went to Alderman Skinners, and gave information; and about six o'clock, the prosecutrix came and claimed the property: the things were in two drawers on his head, with the name of Gilding on them.

ELIZBETH WOODLEY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Gilding, in Aldersgate-street, No. 113 . This property was kept in the garret, in my room; I saw it in the evening of the Saturday; it was in the drawers; the room door was open; the drawers were not locked; there was a fire: I saw the things at Lucy's house: the drawers are my master's property; there were some things gone out of the drawers; but what were left, was in the drawers: there were many people to help at the fire; I never saw them till the next day.

Court. Were not any of these things taken out of the house at the time of the fire? - Not by people of the house, that I know of; I cannot say.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I received these things of a man at the end of Sutton-street, in St. John's-street; and he desired me to carry them to No. 12, Pear-tree-court; but before I got there, I was stopped.

Court to Woodley. Where is your master's house? - Between Charter-house-lane and Long-lane.

(Th propertr deposed to.)

GUILTY of stealing, but not in the dwel-house (aged 20.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-51

489. MARY, wife of MATTHEW COX , was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , one child's cotton frock, value 2 s. and one skirt, value 6 d. the property of John Robinson .

ELIZABETH ROBINSON sworn.

I am wife of John Robinson : I live at No. 43, Saffron-hill. On the 19th of May, my child was taken from the door, about eight in the evening; I left the child at play, and went up stairs to put my other children to bed; I looked out of the window, and called for my child; it is not six years old; I called it to go to bed; and it did not answer; and I came down stairs, and went to my neighbours to look for her; and I could not find her; about nine she came back by herself, stripped of her frock, skirt, and the clasps out of her shoes; I asked her where she had been? and she said a woman took her to Fleet-market , and stripped her: I went to the pawnbroker's; and the next day, I found the things, in the afternoon, at Mr. Cottrell's the pawnbroker's.

RICHARD DUCK sworn.

I am a gentleman's servant. A young man came to my house to enquire after the child; and I sent a person to find the prisoner; she refused to come: I sent for Cottrell's man; and he said she was the woman.

- FORBOTHAM sworn.

I live with Mr. Cottrell. I took these things of the prisoner; a frock and skirt; I took them in between eight and nine, on the 19th of May; I had never seen her before; I am sure she is the person; I saw her the next night.

(Produces the things, which were deposed to by Mrs. Robinson.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent: I never saw the things till I saw them at Guild-hall.

GUILTY (aged 44.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-52

490. NICHOLAS CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April last, one wooden boat, called a skift, value 4 l. the property of William Beckett and James Beckett , and twenty-three hundred weight of cast iron, value 5 l. 15 s. the property of persons unknown.

WILLIAM BECKETT sworn.

On Monday, the 19th of April last, I lost a boat. My brother and I are partners; his name is James. I was informed on the 20th that my boat was found at Deptford; it was lost from Fresh-wharf, near London-bridge : I was informed the prisoner was taken in the boat: I sent my servant down for the boat; he is here; the boat was brought back by a man, whom the officers sent, who took the prisoner.

JOHN BARBER sworn.

I went to Deptford after the boat, and found it in Deptford-creek: I saw the prisoner in the watch-house; the constables would not deliver the boat to me; they sent a man with it, Elias West; he is not here.

HENRY SPEARING sworn.

I am a constable at Deptford. On the 20th of April I was informed there was some stolen iron in a boat, in the Creek: I went with Mr. Cox, and found the prisoner asleep in the boat; we waked him, and asked him where the iron came from? he said, from Mr. Bradley's, Bankside; I asked him where it was going to? he said, it was consigned to Mr. Banks, of Deptford; I saw a loose pair of sculls in the boat, besides the oars that belonged to it; I asked how he came by the boat? he said, it was borrowed; I asked him if he had got the key belonging to the locker of the oars? he said, no; the person never lent the key out that belonged to it; I said, I thought it was very odd to lend a boat, and not the key to the oars; I said, I thought he had stole the boat, as well as the iron; I desired him to come out of the boat; and took him, and asked Mr. Banks if the iron was coming to him? he said, no; I sent to the prosecutor to see if they had lost a

boat; he said, his boats were all at the wharf; he did not miss it till the next day; I took the prisoner before Mr. Russel, a magistrate; he said there, that he was employed by a strange man, to bring the boat down; but he did not know him: the magistrate ordered Mr. Cox and I to bring the prisoner and the boat to town, and take him before the sitting alderman; I advertised the iron, but nobody owned it.

JOHN COX sworn.

I know no more than Mr. Spearing. The prisoner prevaricated a great deal about the iron.

Jury. What is Mr. Banks? - He is a common fence; he would receive any thing, old ropes, or iron, or any thing else.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There were people saw the man who employed me; I was looking out of my own boat; and the man told me to take it to Deptford, and fasten it to the Creek, and at Deptford he would come to me: he gave me two shillings to take it.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-53

491. SOLOMON MARKS was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Levy Goldsmith , about ten in the night, on the 24th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, two linen table-cloths, value 5 s. two linen sheets, value 5 s. two caps, value 2 s. two aprons, value 2 s. a bed-gown, value 3 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. a nankeen ditto, value 2 s. two shirts, value 10 s. two shifts, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 12 d. one feather bed, value 20 s. two blankets, value 2 s. the property of Jacob Phillips , in the same dwelling-house .

A second Count, laying it to be the dwelling-house of Jacob Phillips .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

HANNAH PHILLIPS sworn.

I live in Levi Goldsmith 's house; I have two apartments there; it was about nine and ten o'clock; and I sent my husband out for a candle; I was busy; to night it is five weeks; the candle was burnt out; and he came back and said, for God's sake who has left the window open at this time of night.

Court. Where is the house? - No. 117, Gravel-lane, Houndsditch . I was in a great fright; and I ran into the room where the window was open; I cried Almighty God, I am robbed! I am robbed! and make a great noise: I could not find no tief, nor no prisoner, nor nobody; the things were gone; I lost the things in the indictment (enumerates them.)

Court. When did you find them again? - On Sunday morning a young man came and asked me as I was robbed? and I said, yes; he told me if I would give him something he would tell me where my property was; I gave him half a crown; and he told me where it was; and he shewed a constable the place; and the constable came to me, and asked, if that was my property? I said, yes; and the constable took me to the house, where the prisoner was; he took the prisoner into custody.

SOLOMON ISRAEL sworn.

The prisoner came to me with this property this night five weeks, a little after ten; he asked half a guinea for it; seeing it was worth a great deal more, and seeing a veil in it, I told him I would have nothing to do with it, and sent him away: on Sunday morning, about twelve, I heard Mrs. Phillips was robbed; I went to her, and asked her if she had been robbed? she said, yes, and mentioned the articles; we went to Spinosa, and had the prisoner taken.

Prisoner. Where did I bring the property to you? - In my father's room.

JACOB SPINOSA sworn.

On the 25th of April, about twelve at noon, Solomon Israel came to me at my home, and informed me that Mrs. Phillips

had been robbed the night before, and that the prisoner came to him the same night, and offered him the things for half a guinea; I went to Mrs. Phillips and asked her whether she was robbed or not? she told me, that on the Saturday night she had been robbed; I told her I would go and seek after the thief: I went home; and just as I got home the prisoner came by; I took hold of him, and challenged him with the robbery; he said, he knew nothing of it; I told him I should take him into custody; he said, he would shew me the property; he took me to Dillon's-court, in Petticoat-lane; I followed him; he pushed open a door, and took a trunk, behind a door; he unlocked the trunk, and gave me these things in a bundle.

(The things deposed to.)

I was in my kitchen; there were two rooms on a floor; if they came through I must see them; they got through the window.

ABRAHAM FERNANDEZ sworn.

He deposed that he was at the prosecutor's house the same evening, and that the prosecutor's maid told her mistress she left the window open.

Jury to Mrs. Phillips. Was the window open? - It might be.

(Aged 15) GUILTY ,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. but not of the burglary.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-54

492. STEPHEN ATTAWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May , one oil skin umbrella, value 4 s. the property of William Pettigrew .

Thomas - deposed that he took the umbrella from him, and secured him; and deposed to it.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-55

493. JOHN PEAKE was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of May last, one pair of silk stockings, value 6 d. a silk cloak, value 12 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. 6 d. a gown, value 6 s. a striped waistcoat, value 3 s. a muslin ditto, value 6 s. a shirt, value 4 s. 6 d. a woollen cloth coat, value 9 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 4 d. one linen bed tick, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. four yards of Irish linen cloth, value 4 s. the property of John Berry , in his dwelling-house .

A second Count, for stealing the same goods, laying them to be the property of several persons.

SAMUEL SADLER sworn.

I am servant to a pawnbroker, Mr. Berry. I know these things were lost: I know them to be the property of Mr. Berry by the duplicates, which are of my hand writing, and the rest of a man in the shop: Mr. Berry has a house in Aldersgate-street, which was burnt: every thing but one pledge was taken in that evening; the things were all taken away; the fire was on Sunday morning: I saw them on Thursday after the fire, at Guildhall; they were brought by the king's officers.

ANN GREEN sworn.

I am wife of William Green. I can swear to the black silk cloak being my property, which I pledged at Mr. Berry's.

JOHN KING sworn.

My brother patrol brought the prisoner and the things to the watch-house, where I was, just at the time the house was on fire; I have kept them ever since.

WILLIAM CONWAY sworn.

I am a patrol: I heard the alarm of fire: I went round towards Long-lane; when I

came round to the fire several people were trying to break open the door; at the end of the place I saw the prisoner with these things under his arm; I saw him come out of the side door, under the gate-way; he began putting the things in his pocket out of the bundles, and two women came and disturbed him; at last he went towards Barbican; I stopt him with the property; he would not give me any answer; but began to strike at me several times; I took him to the watch-house; I took several parcels from under his arm, and delivered them to one Mr. Durant, a pawnbroker, that was with me at the time; he brought them to the watch-house, and delivered them to me; the prisoner tried to trip me up: he shuffled a pair of white cotton stockings out of his pocket, and one Mr. Wright took them up, and brought them to the watch-house; and Mr. Wright took three parcels more out of the prisoner's pocket; there were eleven parcels in the whole carried to the watch-house; the prisoner behaved very ill, and almost killed one man; he tripped him up, and jumped upon him, and cut another in the cheek: he behaved terribly at the watch-house.

Mr. Sadler. I was at home when the fire broke out, which was at the back part of a building, about half after twelve; we endeavoured to get out all the things we could; I did not see the prisoner there; I know nothing of him; I was present, and in the shop when the man tied them up; he took them from the counter; he is not here; I do not know the value of the whole articles together; here are four yards of linen cloth, value four shillings, a white muslin gown, value six shillings, a Manchester cotton gown, value six shillings, a black petticoat, value three shillings, a linen shirt, value four shillings and six-pence, a silk handkerchief, value three shillings, a pair of shoes, value two shillings and sixpence, a pair of silk stockings, value sixpence, a pair of cotton stockings, value four-pence, a linen bed tick, value two shillings, a man's cloth coat, value nine shillings.

(Mary Green deposed to the silk cloak.)

Prisoner. When I saw the fire I asked one of the watchmen where it was; he told me; I went to see whether my brother was in danger: I saw many people there; and a woman came in and plunged these things upon me, and said, for the Lord's sake take these things, our house is in flames; some of them fell down; I picked them up; I went to the pawnbroker's in Barbican, whose name is Burrows, and nobody came when I knocked; my wife went the next day to find out Mr. Berry's people; she enquired of two lads whether there were any women that assisted at the fire; and Mr. Berry said they wished to avoid prosecution: that is the truth, as I hope for salvation at the last day: I was going back to see whether there was anybody to take them in; I work hard for my bread, but they have completed the business.

Court to Conway. Have you had any quarrel with this man before? - No, never; I never spoke to the man.

Is there a pawnbroker of the name of Burrows? - There is.

Did he stop there, or attempt to get in there? - He did not; he went up the court, but did not knock at the door.

Prisoner. I have some friends here to speak to the principles of my character.

JEREMIAH STEELE sworn.

I was present, and assisted; I laid hold of his collar; and he tripped up a man's heels that stood by the side of him, and trampled on him: I do not know his name: he is very bad.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Jury to prosecutor. Are the things pawned to the full value? - Some of them may.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-56

494. MARY PARKER was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May last, two pewter quart pots, value 2 s. and five pints, value 4 s. the property of James Free .

JAMES FREE sworn.

I keep a publick-house in Bishopsgate-street . The pots were lost in Bishopsgate-street.

JAMES FOSTER sworn.

I saw the prisoner with the pots; I did not see her take them; she put them down, and sat upon them, and covered them with her gown; I asked her how she got these pots? she said, what was that to me; she said she was going to take them home: she had passed the prosecutor's house; I took her into custody.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to take them home.

(The pots deposed to.)

The prisoner called six witnesses who gave her a very good character.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned one month , and fined 1 s.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-57

695. JOSEPH WEBB was indicted, for that he, on the 22d of December last, did marry one Benediction Buck , spinster , by the name of William Webb , Hannah Talbot , his former wife , being then living, and in full life .

A second Count, for marrying the same person, by the name of Benediction Buck Bennett .

Prisoner. I hope you will order the other witnesses out of court.

ELIZABETH ROBINSON sworn.

I was present when the prisoner was married to Hannah Talbot , in 1785; I do not know the month; but I believe it was in August; I believe the prisoner was a soldier; I was present at the ceremony; there was a man there: I do not know whether Hannah Talbot is alive or dead; I saw her when the prisoner was committed; she was there.

Court. When was the prisoner committed? - The 23d of April.

Mr. Knowlys, Prisoner's Counsel. Was her name Hannah or Anna? - She always went by the name of Hannah.

BENEDICTION BUCK sworn.

I know the prisoner; he married me the 22d of last December, at St. George's the Martyr, Queen-square; he declared he had no other wife but me. Mr. Atwood and the deputy clerk was there: there was no woman but the woman that opened the pews: I lived in the same house with his wife; but she did not own to being his wife: he had twenty guineas of me when I was married; I never saw his face for six weeks afterwards: his wife went by the name of Hannah Talbot ; but she never would own, before nor after, that she had concerns with him, but an acquaintance; she declared both after and before, that she was not his wife; she is bound over to prosecute him, but she will not appear: Hannah Talbot was the cook; I was upper servant; he paid his addresses to me; and I asked her whether she had any demands on this said Joseph Webb .

So it seems to be a conspiracy to get the twenty guineas from you? - I went home and dressed my mistress in the morning; I never saw him since.

He lay with you that night? - I never saw his face, nor ever knew whether he was a man or woman, only by his clothes.

How came you to take the name of Benediction Buck Bennet ? - It was a mistake of his, when he went to Doctor's Commons; he put in the name of Bennet; my name is Benediction Buck.

Mr. Knowlys. I believe all your friends have cautioned you against your acquaintance with this man; and told your he certainly was married? - No friend ever could find out; nobody cautioned me: I had my

sister and others to his face; I had a reason, when he never came nigh me, and took my money from me.

Had not your friends cautioned you repeatedly, that he was married? - Never a one; she linked me in the mess; she deceived me in every thing, and so did he.

Did not your friends caution you not to have any thing to do with him? - I had no friends in the case; I consulted my friends as far as I could; I went and told them what sort of a man he was.

How long did this man court you? - Why about seven months.

Did you never tell your friends what a smart man was courting you? - I certainly did.

Did not your friends tell you he was married? - I never was cautioned before by no friends.

Then what was the occasion of your enquiries, if you had no caution? - Because he went away from me so many weeks.

And it was uppermost in your mind? - My reason was, for his ill-treatment; I had the reason which every woman has, if they are going to be married, to wish to know whether he was a single man or not: I heard Hannah Talbot say they kept company together.

This man has never visited you; you are not the worse for him in that respect? - I lost my money; I am the worse for that.

Jury. Did not Hannah Talbot tell you he had another wife? - Not till after I was married; then he said he had a wife or two.

Did your mistress know any thing of your being married? - Not that morning, nor before; but I told my mistress of it in a fortnight.

Court. How came you to be such a simpleton, as to part with your money before the next morning? - I did it for the same as I thought any woman ought to do.

Mr. Knowlys. Did not you tell Hannah Talbot you did not care if he had twenty wives? - I never said no such thing.

JAMES ATWOOD sworn.

I am a clergyman. I married this Joseph Webb, on Tuesday morning, the 22d of December, 1789, to this woman, Benediction Buck Bennet ; here is the licence.

Have you the register here? - I have: an error was inadvertently made, by entering the name of William, instead of Joseph; I should think I married him certainly by the right name; the entry is an erroneous one; it is William instead of Joseph, which must have arisen from listening to the remarks in the vestry, on the name of the person.

But the persons subscribed their names? - He could not write; it is the mark of William Webb .

Read.

"1789. William Webb , of this parish,

"batchelor, and Benediction Buck Bennet ,

"of the same parish, spinster, were

"married in this church, by licence, this

"22d day of December, 1789, by me,

" James Atwood , curate. This marriage

"was solemnized between us: the mark +

"of William Webb. Benediction Buck

"Bennet: in the presence of William

"Jones, Samuel Harrison ."

Mr. Knowlys. You have no entry in the register, of Joseph Webb and Benediction Buck Bennet .

Court. But was that the person at the bar? - Yes; I can take upon me to declare it was certainly him, though I have not seen him since; I recollect his face perfectly; I make no doubt but he was married by the name of Joseph, otherwise he would have contradicted me; I suppose I trusted to my memory at the time of insertion, listening to the subject of conversation, owing to the odd names of the woman; she said, in the vestry, to the best of my recollection, that her name was not Bennet.

Mr. Knowlys. Are the witnesses to the marriage here? - No: the only witness belonging to our parish, is Samuel Harrison , deputy clerk; I do not know whether he was subpoened; he said he should not come without he was: the other witness is William Jones , an indifferent person, whom I know nothing of.

Court. Did you make any enquiry of William Jones ? - I do not know who he was; I never saw him after that morning. Mrs. Buck produced the copy of the former register, which she had examined.

Prisoner. I am innocent; I had no money of her.

GUILTY , sentence respited .

Court. Now, madam, you are at liberty; I hope you will be more cautious for the future.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-58

496. RICHARD TURNER was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Matthew Riley , about the hour of one in the night, on the 27th of April last, and burglariously stealing therein, nine linen shirts, value 27 s. five shifts, value 10 s. eight pair of cotton stockings, value 8 s. six aprons, value 6 s. a muslin shawl, value 1 s. a linen gown, value 6 s. his property; and one linen gown, value 6 s. three silk handkerchiefs, value 3 s. three muslin handkerchiefs, value 2 s. one callico shawl, value 2 s. three caps, value 2 s. two shifts, value 4 s. the property of Mary Lawrence spinster , in the same dwelling house .

ELIZABETH RILEY sworn.

I am wife of Matthew Riley , at the Bowling-pin, in Bowling-pin-alley . Our house was broke open between twelve and one at night, on the 27th of April; I was the last person up; I went to bed about twelve: I waited half an hour for the prisoner's coming in, who was a lodger of ours; when I went to bed, I made all fast; when I came down in the morning, I found the kitchen windows had been broken open; the things in the indictment were missing, belonging to us and our servant girl; we heard of some of the things, the 28th, in the afternoon, from the watchman; great part of the property is lost; it was quite light when I came down.

MARY LAWRENCE sworn.

I am servant to the last witness; she went to bed after me, and came down first; I lost the things in the indictment; I ran down when my mistress called me, before she had opened the door, and found the window broke open, and the bars on the out-side.

PHILIP WELCH sworn.

On the 27th, I saw the prisoner with this bundle, about four in the morning; I observed him look behind him about two yards; I let him go out of my sight; and he returned into Stone-cutter's-alley; and seeing me, he returned back; then I sprung my rattle, and overtook him in Queen-street; he made a sort of a stop, and said, am I the man you want? yes, says I, what have you in that bundle, and where are you going with it? he said they were clothes he was carrying to the stage coach; I asked him what stage? he would not tell me for a good while; then I asked him to let me look at the bundle? I found the clothes were not quite dry; I asked him if he was to go with the stage? he said, no; and he would not tell me where they were to go to; then I took him to the watch-house: then he told the constable of the night he was going to send them by the Leatherhead coach: he was brought before the justice, and committed; and I found out the prosecutor.

(The things produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Going to work in the morning, I met a woman who gave me these things to carry.

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-59

497. GEORGE BARNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of May , one linen handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Swan .

JOHN SWAN sworn.

On the 21st of May, I had my pocket picked in Long-lane, Smithfield , going towards Aldersgate-street. I felt the prisoner take my handkerchief, and saw him go away with the handkerchief in his hand; and I pursued him; it was in my coat pocket: by the assistance of Ryland, I took him; I saw Ryland take the handkerchief from him; I never lost sight of him: the constable has the handkerchief.

- RYLAND sworn.

I saw the prisoner attempt to pick the prosecutor's pocket: Mr. Swan felt him; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief; I took him, and gave the handkerchief to the constable.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn.

I am the constable.

(Produces the handkerchief, which the prosecutor deposes to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going down to Long-lane, and there was a number of people made a stoppage; and the gentleman said I had picked his pocket: I am willing to go to sea, or for a soldier.

Court to Swan. Was any body near you? - Not so near as the prisoner.

Prisoner. My witnesses are not here; I did not expect to be tried to day.

GUILTY (aged 15.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-60

498. WILLIAM VALE and SAMUEL THURLEY were indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Charles Dixon , about the hour of nine in the night, on the 19th of April last, and burglariously stealing therein, one wooden trunk, covered with leather, value 18 d. a silk purse, value 6 d. half a guinea, and twenty shillings, in monies numbered, six shifts, value 12 s. six aprons, value 5 s. a cambrick apron, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. a lawn ditto, value 6 d. nine muslin handkerchiefs, value 9 s. four caps, value 18 d. one muslinet gown, value 17 s. one callico gown, value 16 s. a dimity ditto, value 13 s. a cotton ditto, value 4 s. a silk cloak, value 3 s. the property of Mary Stevens , spinster , in the same dwelling house .

(The case opened by Mr. Garrow.)

(The witnesses examined separate.)

MARY STEVENS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Charles Dixon , the corner of Charter-house-street . On the 19th of April, between eleven and twelve in the forenoon, I left the casement of the garret fastened with an iron catch; nobody else had been in that garret that day, that I know of; nobody else had any business; no other servants: I went up a little after nine, to put two children to bed; I took up a candle; it was quite dark; I observed the window open, and the trunk gone, which was the side of the window in the garret; the trunk was in the same window that was broke open; on my giving an alarm, in about a quarter of an hour, some persons were brought in custody; I did not go into the empty house which there was next door; when the garret window is open, there is a lead gutter, and a wall above the gutter.

Mr. Knowlys, Prisoner's Counsel. Is your master a married man? - Yes.

Can you be precise to the particular time you went up stairs? - It was after nine, I suppose about a quarter of an hour; or it may be more.

What do you know about the time? - Because I was in the shop; and I asked my mistress if I should put the children to bed; and she asked what it was o'clock; and I looked at the clock; and I said it was past nine.

Do the children play in your room? - No.

Have you a curtain to your window? - Yes, I have; it was drawn about half way up at noon; and at night it was tied up.

You could not, of course, perhaps, see very well beyond the stair-case, without the candle? - But there was some day-light.

If you had been looking through the window: you do not mean, to be sure, that it might not be light enough out of doors, for you to see the face of any body you knew; you might have distinguished the face of a person who was looking in at the out-side of the window? - If I had a candle, I might.

Suppose now for instance, the servant at the next house was peeping in at the outside of the window, coming along the leads, could not you have distinguished his face without a candle? - I will not be sure I could not.

Your mistress occasionally visits your room? - No.

She may go up if she pleases? - Yes.

CHARLES DIXON sworn.

The prosecutrix is my servant. On the 19th of April, I was shutting up my shop; and she came down and said the window was open; and she had lost her trunk out of the garret: I immediately went round and spoke to Elizabeth Rany , a woman that sells greens, and desired her to give an eye to the door of the empty house: I fetched Mary Stevens , and sent her over to the butcher's to get assistance to search the empty house: I went into Charter-house-street; I went opposite the door of the empty house a few minutes; and I saw Samuel Thurley , the prisoner, come out of the empty house; I had not made any alarm then.

How near was you to the door when he came out? - Within four or five yards; I stood facing the empty house door.

Had you an opportunity of seeing him come out? - I collared him as soon as I saw him, right opposite the door; a scuffle insued, and I threw him right down in the middle of the street; I caught hold of the skirt of his coat; I heard his coat rend just like rending a piece of cloth; he slipped from me; and I saw him either stopped or hindred, at the Red Cow, opposite my house; I could see the appearance of him; after that, I lost sight of him, I suppose, five or six minutes; I went immediately to the empty house to secure the property: I got some persons to wait at the door: I went to see after the prisoner down Long-lane; and when I returned, the two prisoners were in custody of Peter Smith and Robert Wilson ; I did not know Thurley again from his features; but I particularly felt at his coat, but did not perceive it was torn then.

Did you at any time examine his coat, to see if it was rent? - I did, at the Compter, the same night; he never was out of their custody; his coat was rent across the flap, in the main cloth.

Have you any doubt that he is the man you had the scuffle with? - Not the least doubt in the world: then I got a ladder and got over the party wall, into the empty house; the street door was shut after he got away from me; I put my hand against it, and found it fast; we found it within-side, on the spring bolt to the lock, that would open with a key; I saw the trunk found; I was in the passage of the empty house: the trunk was brought to me by Wilson, when I was in the passage.

Was it dark or light? - It was darkish; it must be dark; it was a dark evening.

Was it dark or day-light? - It could not be expected to be day-light at that time in the evening.

Was it night? - It was not; it was dark.

Could you have made out the face of a man, without the assistance of a candle, of some other artificial light? - No, I could not.

Have you any other servant that has access to your garret but her? - No.

Have you any partner in the business? - No.

You rent the whole house yourself? - Yes.

I take it for granted, you was not in your maid's room that day? - I was not.

She has told us she was not there later than twelve; therefore how long this window had been open, you cannot possibly say? - No.

You seemed at first of all to say that it was darkish, which led me to conclude you did not mean to say it was quite dark? - It was a darkish evening, as we may call it.

If you had seen any of your neighbours on the outside of the door, could you have distinguished their faces? - I do not think I could, without I had been close to them; if I had been close to him, I certainly could have known his face.

Was there light enough for you to distinguish his features? - There certainly was before that time.

FRANCIS CAMPION sworn.

I live in Cloth-fair: I am a butcher, a neighbour of Mr. Dixon; when he gave the alarm, it was a quarter past nine.

Was it dark or light? - Quite dark.

Not any day-light left? - Not any; when he gave the alarm, I was at his door; I did not see him, though he was close to me; I knew his voice; I heard somebody run; they made to the wall of the window; I saw a young man; and I happened to lay hold of him; but he disengaged himself from me, and ran across Long-lane.

Did the person run from the way of the empty house? - Yes; I had a good right to believe so, though I did not see; he crossed Long-lane; and at that instant a coach came by, and I lost sight of him for about a minute; I ran across the way; I happened to turn the same way, which was Middle-street; and in the ruins of some houses lately fallen down, he was taken; I did not see him taken; we were not apart a minute: he was stopped by Peter Smith .

Is the man that was stopped by you, the man that you had been pursuing? - I believe he is.

Did you see the coat torn? - I did not.

PETER SMITH sworn.

I live in Long-lane: I am a cord-wainer. I pursued on the 19th of April, on an alarm; I began the pursuit in Middle-street, Cloth-fair: I saw a butcher's man running, and the two men; they called out stop thief! I stopped one by the house that is tumbled down in Cloth-fair; the man that I took hold of, is the man that Robert Wilson the butcher's man was pursuing; there was no other person; that was this young fellow here, Thurley: Mr. Campion came up directly; as soon as I had secured him, I took him away to the Compter: I did not see Mr. Dixon examine his coat.

ELIZABETH RANY sworn.

I sell garden-stuff: I live by Mr. Dixon; he desired me to watch the empty house, on the latter end of April; I kept an eye upon it; I saw nobody come out; only one man pushed against the door, and went away: I did not know what Mr. Dixon's meaning was in bidding me mind the door: after he went away, Mr. Dixon came up and asked me; I told him; I followed him up to the empty house door; and while we were talking, directly the two men flew out of the house: Mr. Dixon knocked one of them down in the kennel; they both ran away; I cannot swear to either of them; one of them had a red waistcoat on.

Was it dark or light? - Oh, Sir, it was a quarter after nine; and I was rather frightened.

Had candles been lighted? - Yes.

It was what you call night? - Yes.

There was no day-light left? - No.

Then how came you to say that one of them had a red waistcoat on? - I saw that.

ROBERT WILSON sworn.

I live at Mr. Campion's, in Cloth-fair: I am a butcher. Mr. Dixon's maid came to our house, and desired me to go to her assistance, somebody had stolen all her clothes; that was a quarter past nine, quite dark; just as they got from the door, I saw Vale jump from the top of the door; whether the door was open or shut, I do not know; I immediately pursued after him.

Did he run? - Yes.

How far did you pursue him? - Two hundred yards, to the top of Middle-street; I lost sight of him only turning the corner from our house; I took him in a minute and a half, or two minutes.

Are you sure the man you took on the ruins, was the same man you saw jump from the steps? - Yes; that is the same man; he laid down in the ruins; I took him by the collar, and pulled him up; I asked him how he came to do the fact? he said, what did I mean? I brought him back to Mr. Dixon's; I left him: me and another young chap went to the place, and within a few yards of that place, where I took him, I found a dark lanthorn; and a little further, we found a match and tinder-box in the way that he had ran, from the empty house to the ruins; and a little farther than that, we found a man's shoe and buckle, and gave them to the constable: the prisoner had no hat, nor shoes, nor buckles, when I took him; it might be fifty yards or nearer to the empty house.

Was any thing else found in your presence? - I found nothing else, nor saw any thing else found.

What sort of a waistcoat had this man on when you took him? - A red waistcoat; I did not go to the empty house, after I went to the other: I did not see Mr. Dixon examine the coat of Thurley.

WILLIAM WILSON sworn.

I live in Little Britain. I went with Mr. Dixon through his house, and over a wall, into the passage in the empty house; I went into the parlour; I saw nobody there; I went into the passage, and found a trunk reared up on one end, about two yards from the street door, and a person left there on the out-side, attending it; I found nothing else.

Mr. Garrow to Mr. Dixon. What did you do with the trunk, after it was delivered to you by the last witness? - I took it and handed it over the wall in the empty house, into our own yard, in the state in which I found it; it was shewn to the witness Stevens.

Who has had the custody of it since? - She examined the trunk, and said it was her property; it was left all night in my shop, but in her custody; and the next morning it was taken before the Alderman; it has been since in my custody, or her's, ever since.

Did you examine: can a person pass from the empty house to your garret? - Very easy.

HENRY CROSWELL sworn.

I first saw the prisoner Thurley at Woodstreet Compter. I did not see Mr. Dixon examine his coat when he came in; next morning his coat was torn in the shirt behind.

(The things deposed to by Mary Stevens.)

Mary Stevens . The box was locked when it was lost, and brought back fast; I unlocked it with the key which I have in my pocket; here is two petticoats, a dimity and a cotton one.

Court. What is the value of that? - The dimity petticoat, three shillings, the cotton petticoat, one shilling, seven muslin handkerchiefs, one shilling.

Do you mean one shilling each? - No, one shilling all.

Mr. Garrow. Are all the things in the box worth thirty-nine shillings? - Yes.

How much are they worth? - I do not know, I am sure; here is half a guinea in gold, and one pound and six-pence in silver.

( William Wilson called again.)

These articles were delivered to me before the magistrate; part of those that were taken in the box; a muslinet gown, a shoe and buckle, and the tinder-box, a phosphorus box, and a match: here is a pane of glass which was delivered to me by Mr. Dixon.

Mr. Dixon. I found this in the pent house on the other side of the leads; it was taken out of my window; it laid on the parapet near the gutter.

Court to Mary Stevens . When you was up in the former part of the day, was that pane of glass out? - No, it was not.

Wilson. It was taken out intirely; I did not perceive whether the lead was raised.

JOHN WHISTLER sworn.

I am a labourer: I was employed at the empty house, next door to Mr. Dixon; I left work on the 19th of April, at half past six; I double locked the street door; it goes with a spring; I took away the key in my pocket; the yard door had two bolts; I searched the place from top to bottom: and the out-side and all; and nobody was in the house.

The prisoner Thurley called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

Prisoner Vale. I have no witnesses: I was coming up Long-lane, and heard the cry of stop thief! I ran to Cloth-fair; and the houses had falled down that day: and the mob shoved me among the ruins; and that man laid hold of me, and dragged me along; and I lost my shoes; coming along, Wilson said he should get forty pounds by me.

Court to Wilson. Did you say any thing about a reward to the prisoner? - Nothing, my lord.

WILLIAM VALE (aged 23) SAMUEL THURLEY (aged 17)

GUILTY ,

But not of the burglary.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-61

499. GEORGE PIPPIN was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May last, a neat's tongue, value 2 s. the property of Barnard Dowland .

BARNARD DOWLAND sworn.

I lost a neat's tongue, and caught the prisoner with it; it is here; it is the same tongue that was taken from him; he was about ten doors from my shop; the prisoner came in to me to ask for gun-powder; he went out; and going out he cut the strings of the tongues, and took this tongue with him; I did not see him cut it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the tongue on the pavement: I am in the first regiment of the guards.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-62

500. ANDREW QUIN was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , two linen sheets, value 6 s. the property of John Clark , in a certain lodging room let to him, against the statute .

MARY CLARK sworn.

I am wife to the prosecutor. The prisoner hired a lodging of me, a bed only for a single man; he came on the Saturday, the 1st of May; he staid only one night; he said he was come out of the country, and had no friends in town; and asked me to let him be there for a night or two, that he was going into the country again soon; he went away on the Sunday morning; the sheets were off the bed, and gone; as he went out, I observed a lump by his side; he was gone about thirty yards from the house; and I sent my daughter up to see if the sheets were gone: and a young man who lodges in the house, said he would watch him; and he went, and brought him back with the sheets upon him; the sheets are here: the constable has got them; (produced): I saw them taken off him when he came back.

- WATSON sworn.

I took the prisoner into custody: these sheets I had at Mr. Clark's house.

Mr. Clark. I can swear to the sheets; they are marked I. M. C.

JAMES BANDIDGE sworn.

I lodge at Mr. Clark's: I was in the tap-room; and the prisoner came down about twenty minutes after nine; he went through the tap-room: Mrs. Clark desired me to watch him; he turned up Bear-alley: Mrs. Clark's daughter told me to stop him, for he had got the sheets; I took him, and brought him back, and took him into the club-room; and he unbuttoned his two waistcoats, and I took them from him.

Prisoner. I was in distress.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and imprisoned six months .

Tried by the London jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-63

501. THOMAS SIMMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of May , one wooden box, value 8 d. sixteen pounds weight of preserved orange peel, value 13 s. sixteen pounds of preserved lemon peel, value 13 s. the property of Willium Tilt , privily in his shop .

WILLIAM TILT sworn.

I am a confectioner . I lost a box of orange and lemon peel; I did not see it taken.

ABRAHAM DAVIS sworn.

I am a confectioner. On the 2d of May, the prisoner brought a box of peel to me, to sell; it was a wooden box; he applied to me a week before, to know if I would buy it; he asked me six-pence a pound for it; I offered a groat; I stopped him; I have got it here: (produces it): I know the box to be the same; I marked it, and gave it to Mr. Tilt.

Court to Mr. Tilt. Look at that box; who gave it you? - Davis brought it me on the 3d of May; it is marked R. Medge, Oxford, who is a customer of mine; the tare of the box is marked at one end; I am sure it is mine.

When had you last seen it before Davis brought it? - I cannot say; I put it in the garret, where we keep empty boxes.

What is it worth? - The box is worth eight-pence; the contents I cannot swear to; I could not miss such a quantity: the prisoner is my apprentice; he was in the last year of his time.

Do you give your apprentice the old boxes? - No.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I do not wish to give the Court any unnecessary trouble; I did take the box; I beg for mercy; I would have given all I had in the world to have got it back again into the shop; I was in great agitation of mind at the time.

GUILTY of stealing the box, value 8 d.

On condition of entering into the King's service , fined one shilling , and discharged.

Court to Prosecutor. Have you lost any property before? - Yes, a great deal.

Mr. Sheriff Newman. Officer, you take the peel, and give the prosecutor his box.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-64

502. WILLIAM POOLE was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of April last, six guineas , the monies of Jacob Worthy , John Worthy , and William Hudson .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JOHN WORTHY sworn.

I live in Hanway-street, Oxford-street: I am a silk mercer : Jacob Worthy and William Hudson are partners with me. On the 27th of April, I was informed, and had suspicion of the prisoner; he was a porter employed by us; I called up the prisoner with Mr. Hudson, and told him we must search your box; we searched it, and found nothing of our property: on Tuesday morning a letter was left for his sister, who used to wash for him; I believe it to be his hand-writing; I cannot say; on the Tuesday evening he confessed.

Court. Previous to that confession, did you say any thing to him, promising him, or giving him any reason to expect that you should not prosecute him, or that he should not suffer in consequence of any thing he should say? - I did.

Court to Jury. Gentlemen, I shall not receive it; you will find him not guilty.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-65

503. ELIZABETH POWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April last, a pair of linen sheets, value 10 s. the property of Richard Slater .

SARAH SLATER sworn.

I am wife of Richard Slater . I lost a

pair of sheets the 19th of April, from my house; they were in my parlour; they were new, and were pawned for eight shillings; they might be worth about twelve shillings.

- JUNK sworn.

On the 19th of April, the prisoner brought a pair of sheets to my master's, Mr. Turner, in Panton-street; he lent eight shillings on them; I was in the shop at the same time; the sheets are here.

Deposed to, having the prosecutrix's name on them. The prisoner slept in her house two or three nights, during which time they were lost.

JOHN HARPER sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner; she denied any knowledge of the sheets; I searched her, and found some duplicates in the name of French; I did not find the duplicate of these sheets: the pawnbroker came in and said she pawned them in the name of French; I went to the pawnbroker's, and there we found these sheets.

Prisoner. I never pawned those things at that pawnbroker's in my life: I went that morning with Mrs. French to the pawnbroker's: the prosecutrix knows Mrs. French.

Junk. I am sure she was the person; she said she brought them from Mrs. French, who was in trouble at the justice's.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I lived at the White Hart tavern: I have been out of place only a fortnight.

GUILTY .

To be imprisoned one month in Newgate , and fined one shilling .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-66

504. JOHN BROWN was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May last, forty-three pair of leather gloves, value 20 s. the property of Frances Gibbon , privily in her shop .

The indictment being improperly laid, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-67

505. HENRY WILD was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April last, one ham, value 6 s. the property of Elizabeth Skill and John Skill .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JOHN SKILL sworn.

I am a cheese-monger , in partnership with Elizabeth Skill . On Saturday, the 24th of April, I was informed I had lost a ham.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. He was very drunk? - Yes, he was.

JAMES MANCHESTER sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Skill. I was informed, and I came out, and ran down Craven-street; and I saw a man catch hold of the prisoner; and a ham was on the pavement.

JOSEPH HARTNELL sworn.

I am porter to Mr. Skill: I saw the ham on the ground.

James Price called, and did not answer.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-68

506. ANN BENNETT was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of May , three linen shirts, value 10 s. the property of Jane, the wife of Michael Keen .

The indictment being improperly laid, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-69

507. GEORGE GREGG was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , a man's hat, value 10 s. the property of Henry Carling .

HENRY CARLING sworn.

I am a hatter and hosier : I lost a hat the 5th of May: I saw the prisoner throw the hat down.

JOHN BARLOW .

Court. Did you ever take an oath before? - No, not before the grand jury.

What will happen to you if you swear that which is not true? - If I take a false oath, I shall go into everlasting punishment.

JOHN BARLOW sworn.

The prisoner is the lad that took the hat: I am servant to Mr. Windsor; I saw him take the hat off the nail at the door; I thought he was going to buy it; I took no notice of it; and directly I saw the boy come past with the hat in his hand, and Mr. Carling after him.

(The hat deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming down Cow-cross between two and three; and a lad came down to me, and asked me to hold that hat while he went to the chandler's shop, which I did; and they accused me of stealing it.

GUILTY , (aged 15.)

Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-70

508. JOHN JACKSON was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April last, a hand saw, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of William Page .

WILLIAM PAGE sworn.

I am a shipwright . I lost a hand saw on Saturday, the 17th of April; I left it on board a new ship, at Black-wall , where I was at work; I went on shore about eleven: about twenty minutes after two, I got it again from Francis Colesworth ; he is here.

FRANCIS COLESWORTH sworn.

I am a shipwright. I took this saw from the prisoner about half after one; he was on board the new ship; the prisoner says he is a shipwright; it was between his breeches and his trowsers; he said he took it through want: I gave it to Mr. Page.

(Deposed to, the prosecutor's name being on it.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in Black-wall-yard looking for a job: one of the sawyers gave me a chip; I took this saw to cut the chip; I went to return it; I gave him the saw directly; I put it under my trowsers for fear they should see me; I had no more intention of taking it, than any gentleman here.

Court to Prosecutor. Were there any chips that he might cut? - There might.

Court to Colesworth. Where was the prisoner? - He was walking about when I took the saw from him; I do not know whether he was going to cut any thing, or no; he was not on board the ship; he was walking from the ship.

Prisoner. I have nobody here but myself; my wife is dead since I have been in confinement; I have had a great deal of trouble.

GUILTY .

Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-71

509. THOMAS LAYTON and WILLIAM ARMSTRONG were indicted for

stealing, on the 1st of May last, a saddle, value 42 s. a bridle, value 21 s. the property of Thomas Everitt , Esq.

THOMAS SMITH sworn.

I am a publican: I keep a horse of Mr. Everitt's; and the saddle and bridle, I lost them on Saturday, the 1st of May, about eight at night, from the stable; I saw it again on Monday, in Bow-street.

- ALLEN sworn.

I am captain of the patrol under the direction of Sir Sampson Wright. On Saturday, the 1st of May, at nine, in the path leading from Pancrass to Kentish-town, I met the two prisoners; Armstrong had the saddle on his head, and Layton had the bridle under his coat, part hid; Armstrong threw down the saddle as soon as I stopped him; we took hold of Layton; Armstrong said he had been, in company with Layton, to take a horse to grass, and was bringing back the saddle and bridle; they could not tell the name of the owner of the field.

(Deposed to.)

Prosecutor. It was best part of a mile from my house.

PRISONER ARMSTRONG's DEFENCE.

I had been to Finchley, to carry my brother a bundle of linen; it was on a Saturday night: I overtook this young man; he asked me to give him a lift with the saddle, by the Bell, Battle-bridge; in about five minutes after, we were taken.

PRISONER LAYTON's DEFENCE.

I had been to Highgate after a place; as I came back, I overtook a man; he asked me to carry it to the Bell in Battle-bridge.

THOMAS LAYTON (aged 15) WILL. ARMSTRONG (aged 15)

GUILTY .

Both Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-72

510. ROBERT PIRTON was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of May , two cotton gowns, value 15 s. a shift, value 2 s. three muslin aprons, value 7 s. four muslin skirts, value 5 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6 d. a cotton handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Mary Power .

MARY POWER sworn.

I am a single woman , a servant to Mr. Jones. I lost the things in the indictment, which were in the room where the prisoner slept; he was a lodger in the house; they were in my box; I saw them safe on Monday night, at six o'clock; I locked up the box, to the best of my knowledge; on Tues- last, at twelve, I missed part of the things in the box; the box was there: the prisoner was in the house; he went out about seven on Tuesday morning, locked the door, and took the key; he returned about ten at night; I missed the things before he returned; I had him stopped: I got my things at a pawnbroker's; his name is Robert Mulcaster .

ROBERT MULCASTER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I know the prisoner; on Wednesday afternoon last, he pawned these things which are here, with me; I have seen him before at different times.

(The things deposed to.)

JOHN PIDDINGTON sworn.

I am a constable, beadle, and engine-keeper of St. George's. By virtue of this warrant, I took the prisoner. I went to Mr. Mulcaster's, and ordered the things to Mr. Justice Read's.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in want of money; I took these things to help to make money; and on Saturday I meant to take them out again.

GUILTY .

Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-73

511. JOHN GLOVER was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March last, a gold repeating watch, value 20 l. the property of Thomas Hooper .

THOMAS HOOPER sworn.

I live in Soho-square . I know the prisoner: he was at my house on Wednesday the 24th of March. I missed my watch: I went into the water closet about ten at night, and lost it there: I missed it soon after; but it was gone: the prisoner left my house on the Friday. I gave information in Bow-street; and they sent printed bills, with ten guineas reward: I found my watch at Bow-street, in the hands of the pawn-broker, about three weeks ago, on the Monday, I was sent for to Sir Sampson's, and saw the prisoner; I believe he said he took it from the water closet, but meant to return it; I am sure he said so.

Prisoner's Counsel. Your house is in Soho-square; a hotel? - Yes.

Much frequented I believe by gentlemen? - Yes.

Then this necessary was frequented by those that use your house? - Undoubtedly.

Therefore a person finding a watch there might not know it was your property? - Certainly not.

This gentleman, I believe had lived at your house? - He had.

You did not know much of him yourself before? - No; he had been there about six or seven days.

And when he was apprehended in Bow-street, he said, he meant to return it? - He did so.

WILLIAM ALDUS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Cates, pawnbroker, in the Strand. On the 23d of April the prisoner came to our parlour door, the private door, and rang at the bell, as he had done before; he had been a customer of ours for six years: we had before received gold watches of him: he pulled out a gold watch and chain, and wanted twenty guineas upon it; I told him it was not customary to lend so much money, but if he liked to leave the watch, I would lend him ten pounds; I did so: on the 8th of May the prisoner came again; he brought the duplicate, and said, he wished me to buy the watch; I told him it was not lawful for us to buy such things while they were in pledge, but if he would leave it till Monday I might hear of some person that would buy it; according, when he was going, I thought this might not be the watch we had formerly had; I turned to the books, and saw the description of the hand-bill; I went to Sir Sampson, and Mr. Hooper was sent for: on Monday the prisoner came, and some of Sir Sampson's men were waiting to take him into custody: he was taken to Bow-street.

Are you quite sure that was the watch he pledged with you in April? - Quite sure.

Prisoner's Counsel. This gentleman had before pledged his watch with you? - Yes.

Therefore he did not come either disguised, or privately, but to a person who knew him? - Yes; we have had a gold watch of his for six years, backwards and forwards.

PATRICK MACMANUS sworn.

I produce two seals and a bracelet of this watch. I took this gentleman into custody on the Monday: I was sent by Sir Sampson Wright to wait for him at Mr. Cates's: the prisoner said at Bow-street, that he found the watch in the water closet, that he did intend to return it: I searched him, and found two keys; and he pointed out a key where the two seals were: I went to the prisoner's house.

Prisoner's Counsel. He gave you the key himself? - Yes; he said this little key opens the table drawer, and there you will find the two seals, belonging to Mr. Hooper.

(The watch and seals deposed to.)

JOHN CASTLE , Esq. sworn.

I am proprietor of a sugar estate in the Island of Granada.

How long have you known this gentleman? - For many years; I knew both him and his family; he always was a gentleman

in very genteel life: very much respected: a very good character always.

Do you know any thing of his circumstances? - I always understood he was distressed, and had been so for some time.

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL , Esq. sworn.

I have estates at Grenada, St. Kitts, and Antigua. This young gentleman was at the West Indies: he had property in the three Islands: I have known him since he was a boy: my brother bought the estate of his father's from the executor: I gave letters of recommendation for him to be educated: I have since known him at different times, when he served his time with Mr. Peterson, in the West Indies: I have known him to the last May in the West Indies: last May he had about seven thousand pounds sterling: his general character was very good.

- HYDE, Esq. sworn.

I am in the profession of the law. I live in Lincoln's-inn. I have known him five years, during which time his character has been that of a gentleman: I know no act of immorality or dishonesty.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Mr. Garrow. Gentlemen of the Jury. I am instructed by Mr. Hooper to say that he is very well pleased with your verdict; only he thought it his duty to his house to prosecute.

Reference Number: t17900526-74

512. JOHN TAYLOR and ANN HARRIS were indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April last, six pieces of linen cloth, called Silesia, value 30 s. the property of Edward Hoare .

WILLIAM HOARE sworn.

I am nephew to Mr. Edward Hoare: I live in his house: he is a wharfinger . On the 20th of April I went into the warehouse, and found the bale was loose: on Friday the 22d, on an officer's coming, I went into the warehouse, and found the bale had been opened, and the things in the indictment taken out; there were eleven pieces taken out; it was a linen, called white Silesia: I went to the place where the man prisoner was in custody, and I saw six of the pieces there: the prisoner had been watchman to Mr. Hoare about six months, and being rather disorderly had been discharged: I went before a magistrate, and swore to the property.

(The linen produced.)

ROBERT DAWSON sworn.

I produce the goods: they were delivered to me by Samuel Joseph , on the 22d of April, at night, in Rosemary-lane; there were only four pieces then: when I came to Joseph's house the prisoner Taylor and a woman were measuring the linen; I asked him whose it was? he said, it was nothing to me; coming out with the man prisoner I found the woman prisoner at the door; I searched her, and found in her pocket a key, and in her room, where the key opened, I found the other two pieces; they have been in my custody ever since.

(Deposed to.)

SAMUEL JOSEPH sworn.

I keep an old clothes shop. On the 22d of April, at night, this prisoner came up the lane; and Mr. Emanuel asked him if he had any thing to buy or sell? he said, he had; and Emanuel called me; I went and said to the prisoner, what do you ask for that cloth? he said, threepence a yard; I sent for an officer: the prisoner would not wait; I said immediately, go over to your shop, and tell a person to detain him; but mistrusting the cloth we sent for Davidson, and he was apprehended: it was the prisoner Taylor that produced the cloth: it was wrapped up in a red cloth.

Jury. What is the common price of it? - About ten-pence a yard.

Is not this the usual price that comes on these goods? - Yes.

There is no private mark of your own? - No.

MICHAEL EMANUEL sworn.

Deposed to the same effect.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the cloth. I worked for my master, Mr. Hoare, thirty years ago.

To Mr. Hoare. How long have you known the prisoner? - About a twelvemonth he was employed about six months as a watchman, during that time he was frequently in liquor; I was obliged one night in particular to sit up till two in the morning, to take care of him; and on that very account we discharged him from being watchman; I had no suspicion of his honesty.

JOHN TAYLOR , GUILTY , (Aged 64)

Imprisoned six months .

ANN HARRIS , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-75

513. ELIZABETH FOLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of May last, a gold handkerchief pin, value 5 s. the property of Mary Beales .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

MARY BEALES sworn.

I lost a gold handkerchief pin on the 10th of May. I am wife of Robert Beales . On the 10th of May, between twelve and one, I went up stairs to put my things on; and I brought my things down into the parlour; as I was coming down stairs, the prisoner was in the drawing room selling some oranges to my lodger, and my lodger asked me to accept of an orange; I went into the drawing room, and accepted a couple of oranges from the lady, and we all came down into the parlour; the prisoner went in with me, and my parlour lodger bought some more oranges of her; I laid my cushion down on the parlour table, with this gold pin stuck into it; the prisoner went away; I put on my clothes, and missed the pin; I searched diligently after it, but could not find it; from thence I went out, to pursue this woman; I found her in Mortimer-street; I asked her how she came to take the pin away; she did not deny having it, but said, she did not take it with intent to keep it, but was just going back to remit it to me again: we went to Justice Read's, and she was committed: the value of the pin is five shillings.

Mr. Knapp, Prisoner's Counsel. Where do you live? - No. 36, Union-street, by the Middlesex Hospital.

How long have you been married? - Going on of three years.

How many lodgers have you? - Three lodgers.

Ladies? - Yes.

She did not endeavour to escape, or run away? - By no means.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel. I have friends here.

The prisoner called five witnesses to her character.

(The pin produced and deposed to.)

GUILTY .

Recommended to mercy by the jury and prosecutor.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Court. Let her be imprisoned six calendar months , and fined one shilling .

Reference Number: t17900526-76

514. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of April last, a saddle, value 9 s. the property of John Benbo .

JOHN BENBO sworn.

I lost a saddle and bridle five weeks ago. I know the prisoner by seeing him before his majesty.

EDWARD ROBERTS sworn.

I am hostler at the Green Man, at Paddington . The last witness and his son left two horses, and saddles, and bridles, under my care, this day three weeks; when he returned I had one saddle and two bridles stole; I stopped the prisoner with the saddle fifty yards from my house.

(The saddle produced and deposed to.)

I saw the prisoner come out of the stable with the bridle: I am sure of him.

JOHN COCKPIT sworn.

I found these two bridles in Mr. Willis's garden, on the Harrow road, about a quarter of a mile from the place; he owned it to me, and told me where to find them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A gentleman employed me to carry the saddle for him.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17900526-77

515. RICHARD HAMPTON , and MARY HARBORNE alias HAMPTON were indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March last, two blankets, value 6 s. a pair of sheets, value 5 s. a bolster, value 3 s. a copper tea kettle, value 2 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Terrissick , in a lodging room, let to be used by him and the said Mary Harborne , his pretended wife .

THOMAS TERRISSICK sworn.

I live in Crown-court, Grub-street . The prisoner, Richard Hampton , had a ready furnished lodging of me for two months; they left it the 12th of March: I lost the things in the indictment, to the amount of one pound, five shillings, and sixpence: the man took the room of me, and went off with the key of the room; the woman went the day before: I saw the copper tea-kettle at Mr. Parker's, a pawnbroker in Grubb-street; when I took the prisoner up he said he was very sorry, and offered to make any amends.

Court. You did not let the room to the woman.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was taken before my Lord Mayor, and he cleared me, I know nothing of the things.

ANN TERRISSICK sworn.

I pushed the lock back, and found the room empty, and the things gone; I lent the greatest part of the things to the prisoner: the things were never found.

WILLIAM HOWARD sworn.

I took both the prisoners: I took the man at a publick-house; he desired to go to his master; he offered to pay it at two shillings a week, as a debt.

RICHARD HAMPTON GUILTY .

MARY HARBORNE alias HAMPTON

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

The man was recommended to the mercy of the Court, by the evidence of the oath of the constable not corresponding with the other witness.

Publickly Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t17900526-78

516. SAMUEL PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May last, eight bushels of oats, value 14 s. a hempen sack, value 1 s. the property of Richard Mountain .

Another Count, for stealing the same goods, laying them to be the property of Richard Hodges .

And JOHN MARLBOROUGH was indicted for feloniously receiving the said goods, on the same day, knowing them to be stolen .

(The case opened by Mr. Silvester.)

RICHARD HODGES sworn.

I am a wharfinger at Northumberland wharf, Scotland-yard: I keep carts and horses. On the 1st of May, about six in the morning, I sent a load of corn to Castle-street, Oxford-market: the carman's name was Robert Stevens .

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. Let Stevens go out of court? - There were thirty sacks; that is fifteen quarters; I saw it delivered in the cart, all right; I told it myself.

Whose corn was it? - Mr. Mountain's; I carted it for him; he was to deliver it to a gentleman, Mr. Akers, in Castle-street: Palmer was a carman with me; I had discharged him; and he was then what we call a trouncer. About five or six in the evening, I sent another load by a carman of the name of Blackhall; there were thirty sacks, fifteen quarters, to go to Mr. Carr, in Oxford-street, the stable keeper: Palmer was trouncer with that cart: that was likewise Mr. Richard Mountain's: I saw the prisoners sign their confessions; there was no promise.

Mr. Garrow. Malborough attended to give evidence against Palmer? - Yes; he was obliged to attend; they were all taken up.

WILLIAM DARMER sworn.

I am a cooper, in Mary-le-bone-street, Golden-square. On Saturday, the 1st of May, between six and seven, I saw one of Mr. Hodges's carts coming up Oxford-street loaded with sacks: I saw the prisoner Palmer bring one sack loaded with corn or sugar (God knows what it was; it might be saw-dust) and carry it into Marlborough's house; the cart went on, and stopped about ten yards up Francis-street, while the man came our. In the afternoon, between four and five, I saw another of Mr. Hodges's carts; I was coming into my house; it was loaded with sacks in the same manner, and this same man, he did not take it from the cart; that I do really believe; for the carman put it on his shoulder; but he brought it from the cart to Marlborough's house; I saw him come out; the cart and he went up Francis-street likewise: as to Marlborough, I know nothing of him; but he certainly carried the sacks into that house; what was in them, God knows, whether corn or saw-dust.

Mr. Garrow. You did not examine at either of the times, what number of sacks were left in the cart? - No.

Whether this was a sack picked up in the road, after the compliment was compleat, you cannot say? - I cannot.

What is a trouncer? - When I have had coals come in, they have asked me if the trouncers should trim them; that is all I know: I recollect, in putting it down, it fell in the street; I thought the carmen were worse than him, for they gave it to him.

ROBERT STEVENS sworn.

Mr. Garrow. I submit whether there is enough to let in this fellow?

Court. His evidence is certainly competent.

Stevens. I used to work at the coal-wharf: I was the first carman, on the 1st of May, I had a load of oats, fifteen quarters, to carry to Castle-street, Oxford-market.

Did you go with it safe there? - I went up Mary-le-bone-street, and the other partner with me took a sack off his cart, and told me to go on.

Where did he carry it to? - I do not know.

You mean Palmer? - Yes.

You was the carman, and he the trouncer? - Yes.

When you came to unload, how many sacks had you? - He told thirty full sacks.

Were there thirty full sacks? - I do not know; I did not tell them when they were loaded.

Had you taken up any sack in the way? - No.

Was the sack that was taken from your cart, one of those that were loaded at Mr. Hodges's wharf? - Yes.

Mr. Garrow. How long have you been a thief? - I never was in gaol before.

You did not help to take it off? - No, Sir.

That you are quite sure of? - Yes.

He did it without your consent, I warrant you? - Yes.

You were to carry the thirty sacks? - Yes.

And you carried him thirty? - Yes.

So they took you up for this? - Yes.

And you was sent to gaol? - Yes, worse luck.

Was afraid of being hanged, if you did not tell this story? - I tell no more than the truth.

Jury. Do you say that he took that sack without your knowledge? - I did not know he took it off; he told me to stop the cart, and I stopped.

Do not you always walk together? - Yes.

Is not the cart always tied? - I did not help him to take it off.

Who did?

Darmer. A man or boy, God knows which it was, helped him; he could not take it off himself.

WALTER BLACKHALL sworn.

I was a carman belonging to Mr. Hodges; I was an odd man there for two hours; I drove this cart in the afternoon, to go to Mr. Akers, the stable-keeper, in Oxford-road: I stopped just as I turned into Francis-street, I think, as you go into Golden square, for my horses to stale.

Mr. Garrow. And for you to steal? - No, Gentlemen, I did not: I turned my head round, and I saw Samuel Palmer with a sack out behind; but where he carried it to, I cannot say.

Was it one of your sacks? - I cannot say; I did not see where he took it.

Did you stop? - No; I went on with my cart.

Mr. Garrow. Did he steal this without your knowledge? - I do not know upon my word; I did not see where he took it from.

Who helped him off with it? - I cannot say.

Upon your oath, did not you? - No, I did not.

Will you swear that positively? - Yes, I will, and take my oath positively.

What, you did not know what was going forward? - No, I did not indeed; I will tell the truth as nigh as I can.

You really mean to say you did not know what was going forward? - I did not.

Did you tell the gentleman that you had lost a sack? - No; I did not know whether I had or not.

Now, Mr. Honesty, how came you not to tell there was a sack lost? - I could not tell that, because I did not know whether there was or not.

You do not know now? - No.

Did not the gentleman give you a bill for the thirty sacks? - He gave the other man the bill; I saw the man put a sack from my cart.

Do you usually let a man take a sack? - I never did in my life, not before this time, nor at this time; I was not sure that he took it from my cart.

You said this moment, that you saw him taking it from your cart? - I saw him with the sack on his back; I did not know any thing at all more than seeing the man with the sack on his back; I was along with the cart.

They sent you to gaol? - Yes.

That was very wicked of them? - I cannot tell that.

THOMAS HODGES sworn.

I went to Marlborough's house, in Mary-le-bone-street, on Saturday night, the 1st of May: I know nothing of the transaction in the morning. On Saturday evening, there was a cart went out, drove by Blackhall, to Mr. Akers's, in Oxford-street; there was a sack short when the cart came back; we sent notes with them; they sent back a note for twenty-nine and a half; I immediately went to Mr. Akers; and Mr. Akers's foreman gave me information; I found a sack short; I reckoned

the sacks when they came back, and there was a sack short; and after some time, there was a letter came down, which led me to Marlborough's house: I fetched a constable, and took the carmen into custody; I went with the carman, Stevens: he said he thought he could inform me of the house; and went to Marlborough's house, and found four sacks, seemingly oats, and a large basket and an orange chest; Marlborough keeps a horse and cart, and moves goods, and keeps a fruit-shop; the sacks were marked the same as Mr. Mountain's, R. M.; I told him what the carman had confessed; that he had bought two sacks of Samuel Palmer , and given five shillings a sack for them. On Monday morning we went to Mr. Hyde's; and Marlborough confessed, which was taken in writing; I saw him sign it; on the Saturday night he told me he had bought two sacks of Samuel Palmer , that same day, and given five shillings a sack; I suppose then the oats sold for sixteen shillings.

RICHARD MOUNTAIN sworn.

It cost fifteen and six-pence on board the ship; then there is lighterage and cartage to it.

One sack is but half that value? - No.

Mr. Garrow. What did you charge it to Mr. Akers? - I could tell you; but it is not a fair question; but I charged him sixteen shillings and six-pence.

Joseph William Carrington called, but did not answer.

Prisoner Palmer. I leave it to my counsel.

Prisoner Marlborough. I leave it to my counsel.

SAMUEL PALMER , GUILTY ,

Transported for seven years .

JOHN MARLBOROUGH , GUILTY ,

Transported for fourteen years .

John Marlborough was recommended to mercy by the jury, from motives of compassion, having a large family, and his wife laying in.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-79

517. JOHN COCHER was indicted, for that he, having in his custody and possession, a certain bill of exchange, commonly called an inland bill of exchange, signed and subscribed Johan Cocher , for seven pounds eleven shillings, two months after date, to the order of the said John Cocher , which said bill of exchange is in the words and figures following, that is to say,

"7 11 s. London, 1st of April,

"1790. Two months after date, please

"to pay to my order, seven pounds eleven

"shillings, value received, Johan Cocher .

"To Mess. Grillo and Marachot;" afterwards, to wit, the 1st of April , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit an acceptance of the same bill of exchange, purporting to have been written by the said Mess. Grillo and Marachot, with intention to defraud Isaac Scott .

A second Count, uttering the said forged acceptance.

A third Count, for that he, the same day, did publish as true, a certain forged, false, and counterfeit acceptance, purporting to be the acceptance of the said Mess. Grillo and Marachot, signed with the name of Johan Cocher, directed to them, Mincing-lane, Fenchurch-street, dated the 1st of April, 1790, by which he required them to pay to order to him, seven pounds eleven shillings, with intention to defraud the said Isaac Scott, knowing the same to be false, forged and counterfeited.

ISAAC SCOTT sworn.

I know the prisoner. The 1st of April, the prisoner came to my house, and told me if I would take that bill of seven pounds eleven shillings, I should have fifteen shillings that he owed me, out of it; I received the bill, and gave him the discount; two or three days after, I went to Mincing-lane to

enquire for Grillo and Company; I went there, and presented the bill to some gentlemen in the compting-house, and asked them if it was theirs, or if they knew any thing of it; they refused the bill; I returned home, and went to the prisoner's lodgings, and told him I could not find the acceptor of the bill, and desired he would give me a proper direction, or go and shew me; he refused to go; he told me it was a very capital house, and any body knew them; I told him after that, if he did not go and shew me, I should take some other method with him; for all that he would not go, so I took him into custody.

Court. Did you go and leave him behind, when you got the warrant? - Yes.

Did you, after he refused to go with you, go and get a warrant? - Yes; I went out first, and stopped some time; and then I went and left him at his own lodging.

Was he there when you came back? - He was not there.

Was there any indorsement upon the bill when he gave it you? - At the time he gave it me there was not; but after I discounted him the bill, he wrote his name, and where he lived, upon it.

There was an acceptance upon it? - Yes.

Prisoner's Counsel. He is a foreigner? - Yes.

How long have you known him? - Five or six months; he used my house for beer; I keep the White Lion, Drury-lane.

This is his real name and direction, on the bill which he gave you? - Yes; I knew where he lived.

How long has he been in England? - I do not know.

FRANCIS BLACKETT sworn.

I am book-keeper to Mr. Grill. About the beginning of April, Mr. Scott came to the compting-house of Claes Gill, a merchant, in Dunster-court, Mincing-lane.

Court. What is the name on the bill? - Mess. Grills and Maracho. The witness, Mr. Scott, asked if this bill was a good one? I told him if it was meant for Mr. Grill, it was not worth one farthing; that we knew nothing at all of the drawer; and he went away seemingly very much disappointed.

Mr. Grill has no partner? - No; he is the Swedish consul, and lives in Dunster-court, Mincing-lane.

JACOB FREEMAN sworn.

I executed a warrant on the prisoner; and when I came to question him where the acceptor of the bill lived, he told me he was a clock-maker, in Mincing-lane; I went to Mincing-lane, and I could find no such person.

Jury. Did you take the prisoner with you? - No.

Blackett. This is the bill that Mr. Scott brought to our house; it is not Mr. Grill's acceptance.

Prisoner's Counsel. It does not purport to be Mr. Grill's acceptance? - No.

To Freeman. I think you have retired on your fortune: are you still an officer? - I was at that time.

It is since this you retired? - Yes.

Now you are a gentleman on your fortune: you did not ask the number where the watch-maker lived in Mincing-lane? - No; he gave me no direction of the number.

And you did not take him with you? - No, for this reason: when I informed him I had been there, and could find no such person; he said he was gone to Birmingham; and so he told the magistrate.

You went in all the courts? - Yes; I believe there is but one.

Who did you enquire for? - For Mr. Grill, the clock-maker; that was the direction he gave me: when the prosecutor told him he had been to the Swedish consul, the prisoner said, that is not the person.

Then he never pretended this was Mr. Grill, the Swedish consul? - Not in my hearing.

He spoke English perfectly well? - Yes, you will hear.

Prisoner's Counsel. I submit that this foreigner did not say it was Grill, but Grillo, the watch-maker.

(The bill read.)

Signed Mess. Grillo and Marachot, Mincing-lane, Fenchurch-street. Accepted, Grillo and Co.

(The bill shewn to the Jury.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

First my prosecutor makes a misdate in the day; he mentions my bringing the note to him the 1st of April; and I brought it to him the Easter Monday, which I believe was the 4th; and I offered him if he would take this note upon the usual discount, I would pay him what I did owe him? upon which he said, yes; and I gave him two shillings and eight-pence discount, and paid him his debt: the note I had received from Grillo and Marachot, on Good Friday; Grillo alone gave me the note for him and his company; it is only signed by him; he gave me the note in my room, in fetching his work; I am a watch-gilder and watch-case-maker; I never was at his apartments; he told me he kept a private house; and that it was next door to a sugar-baker's in Mincing-lane.

Was you ever at his house? - I never was at it.

Then how came you to tell the prosecutor that any body knew him? - Because he always paid me very honest.

What was your reason for refusing to go and shew the house? - He told me the direction; that it was next door to a sugarbaker's: after I gave this note to Mr. Scott, he told me that that note was not good; and I knew that this Grillo had much commerce in Birmingham.

But if you knew he was in Birmingham, why did you not tell him so? - He had the note two days after.

But as soon as you knew he was not in town, you should have informed him of it? - Mr. Scott did make no scruple of the note at the time; I have had notes of him before, and they were always honestly paid.

To Scott. Have you ever received notes from the prisoner at the bar, that have been honestly discharged? - I once received a note that was drawn on Cox in Shoe-lane; and that note was paid.

Prisoner's Counsel. Cox, the jeweller, you mean? - Yes.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him an exceeding good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-80

518. DAVID GUEST was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April last, one pair of linen sheets, value 5 s. two woollen blankets, value 3 s. one copper tea-kettle, value 2 s. a saucepan, value 12 d. a frying-pan, value 6 d. the property of John Buckingham , in a certain lodging room in his dwelling house, let by contract by him to the prisoner, and to be used by the prisoner, with the lodging room aforesaid .

JOHN BUCKINGHAM sworn.

I keep a private house, No. 12, Middle-row, St. Giles's, and likewise a public house. I let the prisoner a ready furnished lodging in the public house, between the 1st and 5th of May, 1789; I lost the things in the indictment; he continued in the room about a twelvemonth; he quitted them the beginning of April last: he had been questioned concerning arrears of rent; I desired him to quit the room, and he did not; afterwards he quitted the room, and left the key in the door; I went up, and missed the things in the indictment; I never saw them since; when I took him into custody, he denied some articles, and confessed to some.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The woman I live with took the room; she pawned the things, as she tells me.

Prosecutor. The man had been watchman

for many years; he was discharged from the watch for age; I always thought him an honest man.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17900526-81

519. JOHN JUNER was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May last, one large coal, value 6 d. the property of John Raybore and Company .

The prisoner was seen taking the coal, and apprehended with it under his arm.

GUILTY, 3 d.

Whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-82

520. JAMES ALLEN was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of April , five pounds and a half weight of iron, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Dredge .

THOMAS DREDGE sworn.

I am a smith ; I lost the iron from the shop: the prisoner was my servant at the time; I was not at home.

JOHN EYRE sworn.

I am a smith: I work for the prosecutor: the prisoner was my shop-mate. On the 23d of April, the prisoner was very bad; on the 24th he went down for his coat; and he said thank God, he was a great deal better since he had the flannels round him: and I saw a bar of iron stick out of his coat; I followed him up Jewry-street; the iron was in his left hand coat pocket; I followed him to Aldgate; I lost him a few minutes; I saw him again in Petticoat-lane, offering it for sale: (produced and deposed to): I took it out of his pocket; the woman did not buy it; I took it from him at the shop; he said he took it to buy him bread.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I picked up the iron; I never offered it for sale; and I told the man I picked it up.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-83

521. WILLIAM HENMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April last, fifty pounds weight of wrought iron, value 5 s. one saucepan, value 2 s. two chisels, value 6 d. the property of Alexander Brodie .

And MARY BURR was indicted for feloniously receiving on the same day, twenty pounds weight of iron, value 2 s. parcel of the above goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

ALEXANDER BRODIE sworn.

I am a smith : I lost the things in the indictment from my manufactory in Carey-street ; I cannot swear to the property.

- HOSIER sworn.

I am a carpenter. About nine months before, I apprehended the prisoner, Mary Burr ; I had frequently seen her come to an iron shop belonging to Mr. John Alford , in West-street: on Saturday, the 24th of April last, between seven and eight, Mr. Alford's shop was not open, and she went past, and returned in about two minutes, and went through his passage into his house; I saw her in the shop; she had been in about a minute; I followed her; she was standing by the side of the counter, and Mr. Alford at the back of the counter; I clapped my hand on some iron that was then weighing in the scale; I said I believe this property to be stolen, therefore I will send for an officer: the prisoner immediately ran behind the counter, and cried, for God's sake, forgive me.

Did you ever see that iron in her hand? - No, not visible: says Mr. Alford, I know nothing about it: I sent for an officer, and gave him charge of the woman and the goods: Mr. Alford absconded three days; he is not here.

ROBERT BELL sworn.

I took the woman into custody: she said her husband worked for Mr. Brodie, a smith, and gave it to her; she said she was to have a penny a pound; I have heard she is not married.

ROBERT BERRY sworn.

I am a constable; I produce the iron.

(The iron produced.)

Hosier. This is the iron I took out of the scales.

BENJAMIN WELLS sworn.

I am a journeyman to Mr. Brodie; I know nothing of this iron; I know the two chisels; I made them.

JOHN WELCH sworn.

I work for Mr. Brodie: I know the saucepan; I made it.

JOHN MUTCH sworn.

I am a smith. On the 24th of April, Mr. Brodie called me out of the workshop where Mr. Hosier was. I went to Mr. Bell's, the constable's, and saw Henman's wife there; they did live as man and wife; we knew no other; I asked her how she came by the iron which was laying on the tap-room table, in the house of Mr. Bell? she said, if Mr. Brodie would forgive her, her husband would do so no more; Mr. Brodie then took her, together with Mr. Bell, to the Compter; to the best of my knowledge, the iron is his property; one piece I can swear to; this is the piece, which was cut by a tool which we have, which I never heard of such a tool before; it is a tool in the form of a bench, with a chisel; I never saw that piece of iron to my knowledge: Mr. Brodie may have sold iron cut with that tool: Henman was a labourer of ours. On the 26th of April, I had information that there was iron under Henman's bed; and we found it under his bed: the constable has it; his name is Robert Pickett ; but I cannot swear to that; the two chisels were there; the saucepan was in the prisoner's outer room.

Wells. I know these two chisels: I would have sworn them to be Mr. Brodie's, because I made them for his use; there is no name on them.

Welch. I made this saucepan for Mr. Brodie, for sale; I have a particular mark on it; I have made some dozens; I cannot say it has not been sold.

Brodie. I did not know I had lost any articles; I cannot swear to any of them.

PRISONER HENMAN's DEFENCE.

Them two chisels, they brought them to be repaired, from the foundry; and I gave them to Mr. Wells; I mended them, and flatted that up: at that time, I said to Wells, make me a couple for my use, and I will give you a pot of beer; for I cannot keep any on the board; so he did; and I was called out in a hurry; and I put them out of my pocket at home; and the little boy got to play with them, and threw them under the bed.

Jury to Wells. Did you ever repair any chisels for the prisoner? - I made a new pair for him to do work with; he brought them from the foundery for me to repair; and said he would give me a pot of beer; and I made him two new chisels; they are the two chisels; they are my master's property; they are for people to work with that work at the vice, and go out of doors.

Did this man ever do any work for your master at his own lodging? - Not that I know of.

Do any of the men? - No, never.

WILLIAM HENMAN , MARY BURR -

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-84

522. GEORGE GREEN was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , one cart, value 5 l. one leather cart harness, value 17 s. seventy-eight quart bottles, value 10 s. ten gallons of red port, value 4 l. five quarts of other wine, value 4 s. and five gallons of gin, value 40 s. the property of Samuel Gascoyne .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-85

523. WILLIAM WATTS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May last, one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Haming .

SAMUEL HAMING sworn.

I lost a silk handkerchief. I was coming up Size-lane , at six in the evening, last Wednesday night; I found his hand at my pocket, with my handkerchief; I am sure of the prisoner.

(The handkerchief deposed to.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17900526-86

524. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of April last, twenty pounds weight of raw sugar, value 8 s. the property of Richard Taylor .

RICHARD TAYLOR sworn.

I am a warehouse-man ; this sugar was in my care.

EDWARD BISHOP sworn.

I am a working man. On the 30th of April, I saw the prisoner in the afternoon, between four and five, come out of Mr. Taylor's warehouse with a bundle under his arm; I pursued him; he dropped the bundle on the wharf; I picked it up, and called Mr. Taylor, who was on the wharf, and he took the prisoner; we went into the warehouse, and found a hogshead of sugar broke open.

THOMAS HUNTER sworn.

I received this sugar from Mr. Taylor: (produced and deposed to): it is raw sugar; I took a sample out of the hogshead; the hogshead was safe an hour before; there were near forty pounds missing.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Coming along Billingsgate, I picked this up in the bag.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-87

525. EDWARD BACCHUS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April last, a cotton handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Samuel Nowell .

The prisoner was seen taking the handkerchief.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-88

526. ANN HASLAM was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of May , eleven silver table-spoons, value 30 s. a time-piece, value 5 s. and a linen towel, value 10 d. the property of Mary Fenton .

MARY FENTON sworn.

I live in Upper John-street, Tottenham-court-road : I lost the things in the indictment; their value is a guinea and a half; the spoons were in knife-cases on the sideboard in the parlour: the prisoner was left in charge of the house; she was my servant at that time, and had been so a week and a day; she confessed that she brought home two strange men; she was out for five hours, during my absence; at first she would give no account where she had been; I was out of town when the things were lost; and my other servant missed them before I did; I went out of town on Sunday,

the 9th of May, and returned on Wednesday, the 12th: a gentleman who is in court, came to inform me the property was lost.

Mr. Beth, Prisoner's Counsel. Pray what number do you live at in John-street? - No. 2.

Do not you bring strange men to your house usually? - That I cannot tell.

Have not you brought strange men to your house? - No; I defy any body to say so.

Are you a married woman? - No, I am not.

Does not a gentleman from the city very often visit you? - He does.

You say you never brought a stranger there? - No.

What reason had you to suspect this servant that you put so much confidence in? - I put confidence in her because I had a good character of her; I had no other reason to suspect her, than she said two strange men followed her to the house: my servant boy has lived with me near a twelvemonth; I never found him dishonest; the towel was found in her box; I do not suppose she took that with intention to steal it; I think she would certainly have taken something of greater value.

Did you never bring a stranger there? - I think, Sir, you ask me very odd questions; if I must speak the truth, I never took strangers.

Had you any suspicion of the gentleman that visited at your house? - I believe that gentleman's character will bear enquiry.

Mr. Sheriff. A gentleman behind is telling her to say no: (the gentleman ordered out of court): I believe her not to be a good woman; her husband has now been in Newgate four years, also condemned for his life.

Were not there a great many gentlemen that visited your house that you might as well have suspected? - No, Sir; none at all; the property I used the day before I went out of town; and I saw it all.

Did you lock it up? - The gentleman that put it up is in Court.

What servants have you? - A foot-boy, and a servant of all work.

FRANCIS MURRAY sworn.

I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner; to search for the spoons: I looked into her box, which was packed up, and tied with a cord; I found no spoons in it; I only found this towel: I enquired about the spoons, but heard nothing.

Mrs. Fenton. This towel is my property.

Mr. Beth. What did the prisoner say? - She said, this is my mistress's to be sure.

- EDWARDS sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Penton. I know no further, only that those spoons were lost during the time my mistress was out of town: I had no suspicion of the prisoner till I saw two strange men come home with her; and I asked her who those two men were; it was on Tuesday evening, the 11th of this month (my mistress went out of town on Sunday, and returned on the Wednesday): the prisoner told me those two strange men she did not know; that they were two strange gentlemen to her: and there was a pot of porter standing in the kitchen; I asked her how it came there? and she told me, she fetched it for those two gentlemen, and asked them to eat some bread and cheese; and I asked her what made her leave the house to fetch them porter, if she knew nothing of them? and she said, did I think such genteel men as them would touch any thing? and I made her answer, I did not know; and I took up some knives in the parlour, which I had been cleaning, and I missed those spoons out of the boxes; I missed eleven spoons; I saw them in the knife box in the parlour, on the Monday: when I went up to bed she called to me: I lay in the next room to her: and she said, the clock was gone, which I did not know; and I asked her why she did not let me know the clock was gone before we came up? and she made answer, because she thought it would make me more uneasy.

Mr. Beth. These were very genteel people I believe? - Yes.

Had you ever seen them in your house before? - No.

Was you present when they knocked at the door? - I was behind them, at the street door.

Did not they ask for your mistress? - No such thing. I was going of an errand to Park-street: and I gave her the key of the street door, and told her to take care of the door; and she laughed, and said, do you think I will not: I thought these were two clerks, where she lived last: I thought by their conversation they were acquainted, for they were talking very high together.

Court. How long was you before you came home again? - I was two hours.

Did you find the men there when you came back? - No.

Who did they ask for? - They were coming home with her hand in hand: I saw the time piece in the afternoon; I cannot say what hour; it might be about two.

What time was it that these two men came home with her? - At ten in the evening: the prisoner went out at five, and came back at ten: I left the men on the step of the door.

Mr. Beth. Do not you know that this servant was standing with the door open, in order to bring gentlemen into the house, and do not you know that she has brought gentlemen into the house? - No, Sir; I do not know it.

Do not you know this woman, this prisoner, was often sent out to the streets, at different hours, in order to bring gentlemen to this lady? - She never was sent out before; I always went out myself.

Have not you brought men when you returned? - No, Sir, never.

How were they dressed? - They had boots on, their hair dressed, and flapped hats, and great coats, and sticks.

Were they not as well dressed as this gentleman that visits at your house? - No, Sir; they were exceedingly well dressed.

Do not you see gentlemen of this lady's acquaintance not so well dressed as they were.

Court. I do not understand that there has been any imputation thrown on this lady's character.

Mr. Beth. My lord, I only wish to establish this, that many gentlemen visit that house; that the lady has been in the practice of sending out this woman to bring home gentlemen.

Court. She has told you she did not.

Mr. Beth. Were not these two gentlemen who called, as genteelly dressed as that gentleman that is at present with the lady? - Yes; as he is now; but he has more clothes; perhaps they have not.

What was your reason for thinking they were clerks? - Because they had the appearance of clerks; I have seen a great many clerks; and this woman living with a linen draper; as she told me she was going to receive her wages; and I thought they were clerks she had brought to protect her home.

You do not know that the prisoner was sent out by the lady for any other gentleman? - No, Sir; I do not know that.

Court. No; he says she never was.

Prisoner. My master is gone for; Mr. Walker, a linen draper, in King-street, Covent-garden.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

Reference Number: t17900526-89

527. CHARLES EDWARDS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of April last, one silk handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of a person unknown.

CHARLES YOUNG sworn.

On the 26th of April I was attending the masquerade, at the Pantheon. I saw

the prisoner following a gentleman, crossing of Poland-street, in Oxford-street : I saw him lay hold of the flap of the gentleman's coat, and take something out of the gentleman's pocket, and put into his right hand coat pocket: I pursued him, and called Elliott to my assistance, and took him the corner of Berwick-street; and in his right hand coat pocket I found this silk handkerchief: he had nothing else in that pocket: he said it was his own.

Charles Elliott called on his recognizance, and not appearing, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN .

Reference Number: t17900526-90

528. MARY HARBORNE , alias MARY wife of RICHARD HAMPTON , was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May last, one child's cotton bed gown, value 6 d. one diaper towel, value 6 d. one yard of callico, value 18 d. one linen checked apron, value 6 d. the property of John Kennedy .

JOHN KENNEDY sworn.

I live in Aldersgate-street , a porter . The prisoner came to me and my wife, to stay a day or two in my room: I knew her.

- PEARCE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: the prisoner brought these things to our house, to pledge.

(The things deposed to.)

Prisoner. I never had any victuals; I had but three-pence and two-pence for three weeks work.

Prosecutor's Wife. I did give her victuals and drink.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and imprisoned six months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-91

529. JOHN LEGG was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May last, a five gallon copper can, value 15 s. the property of William Mardle .

JOHN BARLOW sworn.

I live in Houndsditch; a copper-smith.

JOHN HAY sworn.

I live in Houndsditch . About half after eleven, on the 20th of May last, in the morning, I saw the prisoner walk backwards and forwards, and stand at the prosecutor's door; and then I saw him go into the shop and take the can: I took him, and gave him and the can to the constable.

Prisoner. The can stood close to the door, under the window, and I took it up.

GUILTY .

Publicly whipped .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-92

530. BRIDGET CARTY was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of May last, a gold watch, value 9 l. a steel chain, value 8 d. a brass key, value 1 d. a stone seal set in silver, value 15 d. the property of Robert Carless .

ROBERT CARLESS sworn.

I am foreman to the Board of Ordnance, and worked for it twenty years: I am a smith , and a single man . I was crossing Little Tower-hill on Monday, the 24th of May, near the end of the Minories, about half after eleven at night; the prisoner accosted me; I turned round, and she forcibly pulled my watch out of my pocket; I seized her with the watch, but I never recovered it; I laid hold of her arm immediately: I took her to the watch-house: I did not find the watch: she called out to somebody by name, and a man and a woman came close to her: I saw nothing

pass: it was dusk: I never parted with the prisoner: at Guildhall she said, if she delivered the watch again, what could they do to her then: I am sure the prisoner is the person: no other person was by: I never saw her before: I had been in liquor: I was quite sober.

WILLIAM BOX sworn.

I was constable of the night: I took charge of the prisoner.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-93

531. DAVID OZELEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of May last, seventeen pounds weight of lead, value 18 d. one brass cock, value 6 d. belonging to - Matthews , affixed to an out-house, belonging to his dwelling-house, against the statute .

WILLIAM COLLINS sworn.

At a quarter after four in the morning I saw the prisoner standing by Mr. Matthews's premises putting up the flap of his coat on one side: as I turned back he had one hand with a bag in it, and the other hand was up, taking something off the partition; I could not see what he took; but I saw him put it into the bag: I met him, and asked him what he had: he dropped the bag: the court joins to the prosecutor's house: I called an alarm: he was stopped in half a minute; I did not see him stopped: I am sure he is the man: I never saw him before: it was broad day light: I took up the lead, and took him to the watch-house.

Mr. Knapp, Prisoner's Counsel. How long have you been watchman? - Five years.

The front of the house leads into the lane? - Yes.

What is the back part of the house? - There is a small partition made to the house.

Did you take up the bag immediately as it was dropped? - No, Sir.

How long might it lay? - I suppose a minute.

Other persons might have passed? - The court is no thoroughfare.

What is next the court? - Nothing; the partition boards are as high as I can reach; they are about four feet from the house.

Does any thing project from these boards? - No, Sir.

REBECCA MATTHEWS sworn.

This is the side of the court wall; I cannot say whether it communicates with the house.

Court. The back of this house is in the court? - Yes.

Part of that court is separated by a wooden building? - Yes.

This lead is fixed to that wooden building? - Yes.

Is that wooden building connected with the house? - I cannot tell.

Court. Then there is an end of this indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-94

532. JAMES SANDERS otherwise JACKSON was indicted for that he, on the 5th of September, 1784, did, by the name of James Sanders , marry one Celia Fore , spinster, and had her for his wife , and afterwards, to wit, on the 15th of February , in the 30th year of the king, with force and arms, feloniously did, by the name of James Jackson , marry and take to wife one Sarah Cooke , and to her was married, the said Celia, his former wife, being then living and in full life, against the peace.

(The witnesses examined separate.)

CHARLES ELLIOTT sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the Rotation-office, in Litchfield-street. I know the prisoner very well: I was at the marriage of the prisoner and Sarah Cooke : he was married by the name of James Jackson : I saw them married at St. Ann's, Soho , about thirteen or fourteen weeks ago.

JOHN FORES sworn.

I know the prisoner: I was at the wedding of him to Celia Fores : I am her father, and gave her away: he was married to her in the name of James Sanders , which is his right name, at Shoreditch church, on the 5th of December, as I remember, six years last December: she is here.

SARAH COOKE sworn.

I was married to the prisoner the 15th of February last, at St. Ann's church.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY. Judgment respited .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-95

533. WILLIAM BURT was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of April last, one feather bed, value 20 s. one bolster, value 3 s. two woollen blankets, value 2 s. one pair of sheets, value 2 s. one iron stove, value 2 s. 6 d. one brass fender, value 2 s. one shovel, value 6 d. one iron poker, value 6 d. one pair of tongs, value 6 d. a looking glass, value 6 d. a copper saucepan, value 18 d. one set of harrateen bed furniture, value 2 s. the property of Richard Beecham , let by contract to him, in a lodging room .

RICHARD BEECHAM sworn.

My wife let lodgings to the prisoner about eight months ago; there was furniture, as in the indictment. On the 23d of April, the prisoner was still in the lodging, I went up to his door, and went in, I asked him for my furniture, and my bed? he said, he hoped I would not hurt him, and he would tell me: I did not promise him any favour, on the contrary I told him I would punish him if the law would; he said, he had sold my bed, and pawned the bed clothes, and sold the stove, and fire things: I sent for an officer, and he got the duplicates.

ELIZABETH LEE sworn.

My husband is a pawnbroker; his name is Thomas Lee . I do not know the prisoner. A lad pledged the things with me; two blankets, which were pawned in October, and the bed furniture at various times, and redeemed again; it is harrateen furniture.

(Produced.)

RICHARD BERNEY sworn.

I am a constable: I apprehended the prisoner on the 23d of April: I found these five duplicates over the mantle-piece, of a blanket, a sheet, two curtains, and a flat iron.

Mrs. Lee. Two curtains in one duplicate, and two blankets in two.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My wife is a very indifferent kind of a woman, and made away with these things at different times, and I could not get them out.

Court to Prosecutor. Had he a wife in the lodgings with him? - Yes.

GUILTY .

Imprisoned six months , and publickly whipt .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-96

534. ANN NEWLAND was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of May last, two pieces of silk lace, containing twenty-three yards, value 4 l. two other pieces, value 5 l. one yard and a half of black ditto, value 5 s. three pieces of silk ribbon, containing seven yards, value 18 d. the property of Robert Dyde and Achilles Scribe , in their dwelling house .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

ROBERT DYDE sworn.

My partner's name is Achilles Scribe; we are warehousemen ; we lost the things in the indictment; on Wednesday, the 26th, it was discovered that a piece of silk was missing out of the warehouse: the suspicion fell on the prisoner, who was cook , and cleaned the room where the lace was locked up in presses; in consequence of that suspicion, we put some goods into the same place the next evening; the next morning, after she had cleaned out the room, I saw the goods afterwards found upon her; the same day, I found some bundles belonging to her, that she was going to take away; part of the things in the house, that were mentioned in the indictment; a quantity of black lace, and a piece of silk that had been missing; it was silk lace; I went to her lodgings where the trunks were, and there we found the other things: the prisoner went with us, and unlocked the trunk herself; we found another card of black lace and a card of thread lace; there was one piece in the trunk; the first piece of lace was not in her bundle; it was found in her stays in her band-box up stairs; I found in her trunk two pieces of thread lace; the value of one piece of black lace which was in her stays, was from two to three pounds; the yard and a half of black silk, about two or three shillings; three yards of ribbon, about one shilling; another piece in her trunk, worth from twenty to thirty shillings; the other pieces of thread lace, worth four pounds, at the lowest; I can swear to part of them; to the first piece of black lace I can positively swear.

Mr. Garrow. There is no other person in partnership with you, but Mr. Scribe? - Nobody else.

How long have you been in partnership? - Two years.

Were you two partners before the bankruptcy? - Yes, for about six or eight months.

ACHILLES SCRIBE sworn.

On Wednesday, about twelve in the morning, missing different things, I, myself, at night measured a piece of silk which was left; it was missed from a press in the back room; I did not miss it myself; at night, I put in that very place, a piece of silk that I measured, and a piece of ribbon; the next morning, I went into the room myself, and measured them over again, and part of it was missing: I told Mr. Dyde of it, and went to Justice Hyde for a search-warrant; I came back with a constable; and Mr. Dyde went to search the prisoner, and it was in the prisoner's room up stairs; a piece of lace was found by the constable, in a hat-box; it was black silk lace; I know of nothing else in that room; I went out immediately: Mr. Dyde, the constable, and the prisoner, went into the kitchen; a little after, I went down myself, as the constable was opening a little bundle, in which were two remnants of silk, and the remnant of ribbon, that I missed; it was a yard a half of silk, and about three yards of ribbon.

Mr. Garrow. These bundles were chiefly sealed up? - I do not know that they were.

Do not you know that they were only pinned? - I do not know in what state they were.

WILLIAM WATERS sworn.

I am a constable: I searched the house on Thursday; there was some black lace found in a hat-box where this young woman and her fellow servant slept; we went down stairs in the kitchen, and there was a bit of black mode in a little pantry on one side of the kitchen, in a little work-bag; we went to the room in Great Mary-le-bone-street, where she had sent her boxes; and there we found some ribbon and some lace.

Mr. Garrow. Have you kept the things separate? - No, Sir, they are all together.

Jury. What quantity was there? - I do not know; there is some on a card, black lace, which they measured in the office, which was about twelve yards: Mr. Dyde said he measured it.

(The things produced and deposed to.)

The prisoner called one witness to her character.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17900526-97

535. SARAH WOOD, alias SLADE was indicted, for that she, on the 18th of May , about eleven in the forenoon, the dwelling house of John Lucy , unlawfully did break and enter, with intent to steal his goods and monies .

DEBORAH LUCY sworn.

My husband's name is John Lucy : I live in Poppin's-court ; I keep a house; it was broke open by the prisoner, on Saturday, the 18th of May; I went out of a little errand about eleven at noon; and on my turning back, this good woman, the prisoner, was in the room before me; the landlord keeps the bottom part for the use of his chaise; he does not live in it; I have the rest; I pay him for the whole, except the bottom part; I left the door locked; it was open when I returned; I left nobody in the house, except the people in the second floor; they are not here; the key that opened my door, I found on the prisoner, and sent for the constable; I looked in her apron, and found the keys; she had more keys.

JOSEPH THOMPSON sworn.

I am a constable. I only took the woman, and found some skeletons of keys on her; one of which opened the prosecutor's door; the woman acknowledged the keys were her's, but would give no account of herself.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I knew a woman that lived there; I went to enquire for her; and this gentlewoman's door was open.

The prisoner called one witness to her character.

GUILTY .

Fined one shilling , and confined twelve months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: o17900526-1

Thomas M'Donald (of last sessions.)
Reference Number: s17900526-1

The Sessions being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment as follows:

Received sentence of death, 6, viz.

William Jenkinson , William Read , Henry White , Richard Turner , Richard Hopkins , and Elizabeth Asker .

To be transported for fourteen years, 2, viz.

Elizabeth Tulip , John Marlborough .

To be transported for seven years, 38, viz.

Richard Serpheney , Thomas Stubbs, John O'Nell, Thomas Burgess , Hannah Kelly , John Johnson , Francis Beetle, Richard Rowell , William Bower , William Davis , Henry Nicholls , William Vale , Samuel Thurley , Thomas Jones , alias Ayres, Charles Richards , Martin Leonard , James Sutherland , Anthony Ulston , Nicholas Murray , Thomas Pratt , Henry Sykes , William Berryman , William Green, Joseph Davis , James Williams , Samuel Palmer , William Checkley , James Flindell , George Barnett , Mary Cox , Nicholas Carter , Solomon Marks , Ann Newland , John Peake , James Davis , Edward Bacchus , Bridget Carty , and

Reference Number: s17900526-1

Thomas M'Donald (of last sessions.)

Fined one shilling, and imprisoned twelve months, 1, viz.

Mary Wood , alias Slade.

To be imprisoned six months, 6, viz.

Andrew Quin , (fined one shilling) John Taylor , Elizabeth Foley , Mary Harborne , alias Hampton, William Burt , (whipped.)

Fined one shilling, and imprisoned one month, 1, viz.

Mary Parker .

Whipped, 10, viz.

Henry Jones , John Taylor , George Gregg, John Jackson , Thomas Layton , William Armstrong , Robert Pearton , Richard Hampton , John Juner , John Legg .

Fined one shilling, and sent to sea, 1, viz.

Thomas Simmons .

Fined one shilling, 2, viz.

Margaret Craggs , Elizabeth Farrow .

Sentence respited on James Webb and James Sanders , alias Jackson.


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