Old Bailey Proceedings, 22nd April 1789.
Reference Number: 17890422
Reference Number: f17890422-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday, the 22d of APRIL, 1789, and the following Days;

Being the FOURTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honourable William Gill , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY E. HODGSON, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND; And Published by Authority.

NUMBER IV. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row; and J. BELL, Royal Exchange.

MDCCLXXXIX.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable WILLIAM GILL , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; JOHN HEATH , Esq. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JAMES ADAIR , Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Esq. and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Purdie

John Skipper

Thomas Hay

William Ash

Thomas North

John Ross

William Leadbeater

John Farley

Francis Lee

Robert Wood

William Holliday

Edward Kirby

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Stokes

William Rogers

John Edwards

George Bland

William Collins

Charles Barber

Eliezer Gibbons

Benjamin Mattingley

Samuel Kingston

John Burrows

John Chancellor

Thomas Buckmaster

Second Middlesex Jury.

Christopher Kempster

Joseph Munday

Richard Millington

Richard Price

William Gibbs

Joseph Newsham

Luke Caith

John Beach

George Odell

Samuel Cross

Isaac Hutchinson

William Cole

Reference Number: t17890422-1

287. JOHN HARDING and JOSEPH POCOCK were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Stevens , about the hour of eleven in the night, on the 20th of January last, and burglariously stealing therein, ten yards of velveteen, value 2 l. 15 s. eight yards of Prince's-stuff, value 40 s. nine yards of cotton, value 28 s. sixteen yards of casimere, value 6 l. 3 s. twenty-four yards of fancy sattin, value 7 l. 4 s. 6 d. seven yards of velveret, value

32 s. 6 d. a waistcoat, value 10 s. three quarters of a yard of cotton and worsted stuff, value 6 s. four yards of silk shagg, value 10 s. sixteen yards of black sattin, value 6 l. 19 s. 6 d. a waistcoat shape, value 10 s. another ditto, value 14 s. six yards of swan-down, value 2 l. 17 s. his property.

WILLIAM GIBBS sworn.

On Saturday the 17th of January, previous to the robbery, the prisoner at the bar, Pocock, came to purchase a half-mourning sattin waistcoat, at the shop of William Stevens ; I shewed him some patterns, and he said they were not thick enough, and I shewed him some others which he did not like; he told me what he thought he should like, and I promised to get him one in the course of the week; I afterwards perceived him going backwards and forwards; I saw him on the Monday, and I saw him again on the Tuesday near the Pantheon, about eight o'clock the evening of the robbery; I went into the city, the shop is No. 352, in Oxford-street, I had been out, I left nobody when I went out, the house had not been opened above fourteen days, I slept in the shop; I returned from the city about a quarter past eleven in the evening; when I went out, I fastened the door and windows quite secure, I double locked the street-door; when I came home, on putting the key to the door, I found it unlocked, it appeared to have been opened by a key, it was not forced; I went in and found the half door under the counter had been forced open, and a shutter was taken down; there were sundry articles taken away; I made this inventory of the goods after I came from Justice Read's; I found nobody in the house on my return from the city, nor there were no implements of house-breaking found; in consequence of one Reynolds being taken up, he made a discovery; it was on the 26th, and these men were taken.

JOHN DIXON sworn.

On the 27th of January I found these things at the prisoner Harding's lodgings, I received some information from the patrol, and I went to a house in Drury-lane; Harding was in bed there; it was after seven o'clock in the morning; while we were searching the house Pocock knocked at the door, and we took him into custody; I found these things in a chest by the bedside, some other things were found which Harding claimed, and I gave him them; by information I went to Pocock's lodgings, to a court near Chancery-lane, it is called Chichester-rents; we went up two pair of stairs, and there I found these other things, a piece of prince's stuff, and some remnants of sattin; there was some soap in the room, which Pocock claimed; when Pocock knew I was going to his lodging, he told me to tell his wife where he was; I know nothing further, but here are some other things, some given me by Watkins, and the others by Reynolds.

JOHN WATKINS sworn.

I am a coach-joiner, I gave these pieces of goods to Dixon, I bought them of Reynolds about the latter end of January, I had had them a week before; I gave them to Dixon, they are two waistcoat pieces.

Gibbs. This piece that was found at Harding's it is a shape for a waistcoat, I know it by the shop mark, it is Mr. Stevens's; this sattin I believe to be ours, and the piece of stuff, but there is no mark, I am sure the shape for a waistcoat was in the shop; these that were found at Pocock's I believe to be ours, we lost such kind of stuff, and the same quantity.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. Mr. Stevens lived in Leadenhall-street at the time? - Yes.

How often had any body slept there? - I slept there ten nights, I slept there before the robbery.

STEPHEN REYNOLDS sworn.

I was taken up and charged with felony, and then I gave information of this robbery. Between eight and nine o'clock on Tuesday the 20th of January, I, Pocock, and Harding, went to this place in order to rob this shop; Pocock unlocked the

door with a pick-lock key, we all three watched the young man Mr. Gibbs out of the shop, as far as Long-acre; we told Harding to keep watching him; me and Pocock then went back, and left Harding watching of him; Pocock unlocked the door with a pick-lock key, we both went in, broke open the shutters under the counter, we went on the other side, and filled our pockets with the waistcoat preces, and such like; we staid there about a quarter of an hour; from there we went to No. 10, in Cumberland-street, to my lodgings, I did not see Harding any more that night; at the corner of the street I met Mrs. Ford, who cohabits with me, I touched her on the arm, and asked her to come home, which she did; then me and Pocock went back and fetched some more pieces, we divided the pieces into three parts, some of them we cut, and others we took whole, one piece for me, another for Harding, and another for Pocock; Pocock took his part away that night, and said he would call the next morning for Harding's, and the next morning Pocock and his wife came about ten o'clock, and they took away Harding's part; there was a piece of bombazeen, and Pocock gave me six shillings for my part to make his wife a gown; there were marks on the things which I tore off and burnt in presence of Pocock.

Mr. Garrow. It is not very difficult to guess what way of life you are in? - Hardly, since I have been committing these depredations.

How long have you been a thief, a notorious thief? - I have been a very bad man some time.

Give me an answer, guess a little how long have you been a thief? - I cannot guess, I am in hope to leave it off.

Nothing will make you leave it off but a halter; how many robberies have you committed within this twelvemonth last? - Nothing but these three robberies, and picking pockets a little, and such like; I think I should use the gentlemen very wrong if I was to say I was an honest man, I have worked at my trade, and I can't say I have been honest.

What other trade have you worked at than that of picking pockets and other depredations? - I am a shoemaker.

You have not worked at that lately? - Yes, I have.

Who is this Mrs. Ford; I suppose Mrs. Ford is a rib of yours? - A rib of mine!

Yes, bone of your bone? - That I believe is from scripture.

What, have you had any thing to do with scripture? - I hope so, though I have been so bad a man.

You may go down.

ELIZABETH FORD sworn.

I live in Cumberland-street, on the 20th of January, about eleven o'clock at night, I met the last witness, and we went home; and when we got there I saw him and Pocock take several things, some waistcoat pieces out of their pockets; they went out again, and in about a quarter of an hour they brought some more, they separated them into three parts, they said one part was for Mr. Harding; he was not there; I did not see him that night.

Mr. Garrow. How long have you lived with Reynolds? - About twelve months.

What trade has he carried on during that time? - A shoemaker.

Has he worked regularly? - Yes.

I caution you, that if you make such answers you are liable to be committed, and tried; don't you know that he has not done a day's work within these twelve months? - He has worked within these five months; I don't know anything of the robberies, only of his bringing the things home.

Why have not you picked out the marks from the handkerchiefs you knew to be stolen? - No, never. I have worked myself at glove-making.

Tell me any one person that you have worked for? - I have worked for Mrs. Lacie, in Well-street, lately.

What since he was taken up, I suppose? - Yes.

That may be; but name any person you

have worked for within two months before he was taken up? - I worked for Mrs. Rayner regularly when she had work to do.

Did you never see any of his tools; his dubs? - I do not know what you mean.

His pick-lock keys? - There were some things Mr. Dixon found.

Why, you have seen them before Dixon found them? - Yes, I have.

Where used he to keep his lash? - I do not know what you mean; Do you mean his last?

No, his last, no; his cutlass, I mean; he did not use his last much? - I never saw one.

Where did he keep his rook, his crow? - I do not know.

Have you taken any other thief into your keeping since? - No.

FOR THE PRISONER POCOCK.

RICHARD JONES sworn.

I live next door to where Pocock lived in Holborn; I am a tin-plate worker; the prisoner was a breeches-maker; I observed him very attentive, and at work in the shop very often.

- WARDEN sworn.

I live in Holborn; I have known Pocock four years; he was always an honest industrious man.

WILLIAM HALL sworn.

I am a cheesemonger; I live in the Strand; I have known the prisoner 16 or 17 years; I would have trusted him with any thing I had.

JOHN HARDING , JOSEPH POCOCK ,

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-2

288. JOSEPH POCOCK and JOHN HARDING were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Benfield , about the hour of ten in the night of the 26th of January , and burglariously stealing therein twenty-eight seals set in gold, value 31 l. a gold ring, value 12 s. a telescope, value 2 s. two dozen of black lead pencils, value 8 s. a botanical thermometer, value 12 s. his property.

(The Case opened by Mr. Silvester.)

GEORGE BENFIELD sworn.

I occupy a shop in Saville Passage, St. James's ; I had another place where my family dwelt, and where I had my meals, but I slept in this shop: on the 21st of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner Harding came in, and asked me the price of some seals, and asked, whether they were gold; I said, yes: he asked the prices, and said they were too high for him, he believed; but he would call again. On the 26th, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner Pocock came in, and asked for a sheet of cartridge paper, which I sold him; I packed up my gold seals afterwards; I always take them home whether I sleep at home or in the shop; I put them on the compter; and when I had got home I found I had forgot to put them in my pocket; I went back; I found my door opened, and two men rushed out; they were pursued, and Reynolds was taken with this thermometer on him, broke as it is now; when I lost it, it was whole, and 21 gold seals were taken out of his pocket; I can swear to the property; I am sure the door was locked and fast when I left it.

Court. You keep an open shop? - Yes.

There were several people came in to ask the price of goods in that week? - Yes, but I do not remember any person, but the prisoner Harding, asking the price of gold seals.

GEORGE SMITH sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Benfield; I remember the prisoner Pocock coming in about nine o'clock in the evening, and buying a sheet of cartridge paper; I am sure he is the person.

RICHARD KIRBY sworn.

On the 26th of January last I was coming along Saville Row, I heard the cry of stop thief! saw a man running, and I went up and collared him, and held him 'till the prosecutor came up; I saw the barometer taken from Reynolds the evidence.

ELIZABETH FORD sworn.

I know the prisoner Pocock; he came to our house on a Monday between ten and eleven o'clock at night; it was in the month of January; he asked where Reynolds was: I said I did not know; he said, he believed he was taken up, and sent to the watch-house.

Court. Have you any other witness to any fact but the accomplice? - No.

Court. The Justice has certainly done wrong in admitting the wrong person evidence, by which means the whole gang is protected.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-3

289. JOSEPH POCOCK and WILLIAM BAKER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Anthony Maley , on the 1st of January last, about the hour of nine in the night, and burglariously stealing therein 120 pair of worsted stockings, value 10 l. twenty-four pair of thread ditto, value 24 s. three pair of silk ditto, value 24 s. two pair ditto, value 8 s. and eighteen pair of ditto, value 3 l. his property.

MARY MALEY sworn.

My husband's name is Anthony Maley ; we lodged at Mr. Peter Cavernor 's house; Mr. Cavernor had not lived there since last Christmas was a twelvemonth; my husband was in Ireland.

Court. This indictment is wrong laid; it is not the dwelling-house of Anthony Maley ; but we can try them for the felony.

Mrs. Maley. I had been out on the night of the robbery; I left the stockings, they were in two bags; I had only gone next door; I came in about ten; the goods were in the shop below stairs when I went out; and when I came back I missed the goods.

- DIXON sworn.

I am an officer; I had these things from John Watkins .

JOHN WATKINS sworn.

I had these things from Reynolds the accomplice.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury, you see there is evidence in this case also against Reynolds, but not against the prisoners.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-4

290. JOSEPH OAKLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of March , a gold watch, value 10 l. 10 s. a gold watch chain, value 2 l. 2 s. a cornelian seal, set in gold, value 1 l. 1 s. another gold seal, value 10 s. 6 d. another gold seal, value 5 s. and a metal bed-hook, value 1 d. the property of William John Spearman Wasey , Esquire .

WILLIAM JOHN SPEARMAN WASEY , Esq. sworn.

On the 7th of March I was returning from Pall-Mall, where I dined; I met Mrs. Wynham's servant, who informed me my house had been robbed by the prisoner at the bar, who had lived with me about four months as under footman; I had had a very good character of him from his former master, with whom he had lived some years; when I went home there was a deal of confusion; I missed my watch, which I had left hung up at the bed-head on that day; the prisoner was gone off; there were some tea-spoons missing; I suspected

the prisoner, and I went to the office, and the prisoner was apprehended at Ryegate the Thursday following; he was brought to my house by the constables, and he himself delivered me the watch, and the tea-spoons; I know the property.

A WITNESS sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Wasey, me and the housemaid were in the kitchen, there was nobody in the house but us and the prisoner; and he took the candle, and went out of the kitchen, and locked and bolted us in; the housemaid got out at the window, and let me out at the kitchen; I called to the prisoner, and he not answering, I called murder and fire! and I heard the street-door open and shut; it was about nine o'clock at night.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of taking it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-5

291. ELIZABETH HARDEMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a Marseilles bed-gown, value 5 s. a pair of jean breeches, value 5 s. a flannel petticoat, value 12 d. and a red and white spotted handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Philip Wooten .

RACHAEL WOOTEN sworn.

My husband's name is Philip Wooten ; we lost the things between the hours of two and six in the afternoon; I believe it was on the 28th of January, I did not see them taken.

- MULCASTER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, on the 28th of January, the prosecutor called at my shop, and told me that he had lost the things in the indictment; about an hour after the prisoner came in, and wanted to pawn a handkerchief; we stopped her with the things, and she was taken before the magistrate.

(The property deposed to by Mrs. Wooten.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had the property from a woman to pawn.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-6

292. THOMAS EVATT was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , a silver watch, value 40 s. a steel chain, value 6 d. a stone seal, set in silver, value 3 s. and a metal watch-key, value 1 d. the property of Richard Saunders .

ANN SAUNDERS sworn.

I know the prisoner; I have known him from his infancy; he came to me on the 10th of March, about two o'clock; I had not seen him before for eight or nine years; he told me he had been abroad; he came and enquired for a Mrs. Jones; I did not at first sight know him 'till he told me his name; and I asked him in, and behaved with great civility; he came again the next day about four, and the bell was ringing; he asked me if it was striking four o'clock; I looked at the watch, and told him it was within a few minutes; the watch hung by the fire-place, near to where he was sitting down; he got up, and went away, and about two minutes after I missed the watch; I went out to look after him, but he had got off; he was taken on the last day of March; the watch has never been found since.

Court. Who was in the room besides you and this man? - Nobody, but a child in the cradle; when he was taken before the magistrate he said he knew nothing of it.

JOHN TAYLOR sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner; his friends sent for me to take him; I found this sixpenny watch upon him, and this spike.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I saw the watch on the mantle-piece, but I never touched it; the sixpenny watch I had bought to take abroad to the East-Indies, and the hand-spike we make use of on board ship.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-7

293. JOHN HUTCHINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May last, two iron gates, value 5 l. the property of Martha Bowen .

JOHN HALES sworn.

I can only prove the property; Mrs. Bowen lives at Sunbury; the gates were missing betwixt the 7th and 10th of May; they were not hung, they were lying in the fore-court; I saw them on the 7th of May last.

RICHARD EDMONDS sworn.

On the 2d of February last, George White came to me; and asked me if I would buy a pair of iron gates; I am a blacksmith; I live at Moleshead, in Surrey; he said, he had them to sell by weight; I told him I had heard of a pair of gates being lost; and I told him he had better go to the person that lost them; about three weeks after I saw White again, and I asked him, if he had said any thing to the gentlewoman about the gates; and he said, no; and I said I would go myself, and he agreed that we should inform her; and I was desired to buy the gates in order to know who had taken them; by the information of White we sent for Hutchinson to a Mr. Hopman's at Sunbury; he came; and White said to him, here is the man that I asked to buy the iron gates; he says, will you sell them now? Hutchinson said, yes; I asked him, what I should give him; and we agreed for 12 s. a hundred weight; and I was to go about nine in the evening in a boat, they laid near to the river, they were under ground covered with earth; we got the gates home to my house, and then I sent for a constable.

GEORGE WHITE sworn.

I was drinking with the prisoner, and he told me he knew of a pair of iron gates; it was on the 2d of February; and he asked me to go to Edmonds's to see if he would buy them, he only said he knew of them; the prisoner is a basket-maker at Sunbury; I have known him about two years; I had never seen the gates before; I went with Edmonds.

Hales. I saw the gates at Edmonds's; I am sure the gates are Mrs. Bowen's.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I work for Mr. Groves, a basket-maker, and I used to work near to the river to get oziers for the baskets; and I saw them lying there, when I had been to ease myself; some time after White came to me, he had a bad leg; and he asked me to lend him half-a-guinea to get into the hospital; I told him, if he would sell those gates to Edmonds I would lend him some money.

Court to White. Is that true? - No, my Lord, I am sure he would be the last person I should think of asking.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-8

294. RICHARD M'GEE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of April , a live pig, called a roasting pig, value 4 s. the property of John Oaks .

John Oaks and John Ellesworth called on their recognizances, and not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-9

295. GEORGE BELLOW was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , eight yards of linsey woolsey, value 8 s. the goods of Samuel Pollard .

SAMUEL POLLARD sworn.

I live in St. Martin's le Grand, I deal in the hosiery line , I can only prove the property; it was missed on the 19th of March, about nine in the evening, I was out at the time.

GABRIEL JOHNSON sworn.

I am a ticket porter, about eight o'clock in the evening of the 19th of March, I saw two men standing at Mr. Pollard's window, and I saw the prisoner lift up the latch, and go in at the door, the other stood by the door; he came out with two pieces in his arms, he gave one to the other man, and I went up and collared him, and called stop thief, but the other ran away; I took this piece on the prisoner.

Mr. Pollard. I believe this to be my property.

Court to Johnson. Had the prisoner any thing in his arms when he went in? - Nothing.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There was a riot near the door, and I was standing there, and a man pushed me in, and then brought the piece of stuff, and said I took it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-10

296. JOHN DEVOIS was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , two pair of iron tongs, value 2 s. the goods of Richard Crutcher .

RICHARD CRUTCHER sworn.

I keep a little blacksmith's shop , it was broke open on the 9th of March, in the morning, I believe; when I got up, I missed among other things, two pair of tongs; the prisoner was taken on the 10th, and I saw him at the Justice's on the 11th; my tongs were there, I knew them by the make of them.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn.

Between seven and eight I saw the prisoner by the Horse-ferry at Limehouse, he had these tongs, and some large pieces of iron; I stopt him, and asked him where he had got them; he said he was employed by a person the other side of the water, and he was to have a shilling for carrying them; I asked him where he was to take them to, and he could not tell; he could not tell who gave them to him to carry.

Crutcher. I think those tongs are mine, I have no dout of it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A person employed me to carry them, and when he saw the gentleman stop me he ran away.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-11

297. RICHARD EVANS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , two linen sheets, value 4 s. a pillow case, value 6 d. the goods of John Moore .

MARY IVES sworn.

On the 1st of April, between six and seven o'clock in the morning, the waiter at the Red-lion in Covent-Garden knocked at my door for the key to let a lodger out; I gave him the key, and he let him him out; in a few minutes I went down, and he told me that the man had robbed the room of the sheets and pillow case.

JOHN HARPER sworn.

I am waiter at the Red-lion, I let the prisoner out, he had slept at the Red-lion that night; when I examined the room I

found the bed stript of the sheets and a pillow case, I shewed the prisoner his bed, and I am sure, when he went to bed, the sheets were there; they were afterwards found at the pawnbroker's.

Mr. Keys, Prisoner's Counsel. What time did the prisoner go to bed? - About ten o'clock that night.

Did you go into the room or only to the door? - I went into the room.

SAMUEL WIMBURN sworn.

These sheets were offered to be pledged at our shop on the 1st of April, by the prisoner at the bar; it was between the hours of eleven and twelve; I stopt him; I examined them, and I found Mr. Moore's name on them.

(The sheets deposed to by Mrs. Ives.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of the matter.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-12

298. WILLIAM GARMENT was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of January , a live pig, value 12 s. and two live fowls, value 2 s. the property of James Chapman .

JAMES CHAPMAN sworn.

On the 28th of February we had lost eight hens, two cocks, and a pig; they were taken the 27th at night; the next morning the prisoner was taken up at Shepherd's Bush, which is about four or five miles from where I live; I live at Greenford.

WILLIAM BANBURY sworn.

On the 28th of February in the morning, about a quarter after six, I stopt the prisoner, he had got a pig, a cock, and four hens; he had the cock and the pig in a sack, the others were in his pockets, they were dead and appeared fresh killed, they were warm; he said he had been to his brother's, and he gave them to him.

JOHN MERRYFIELD sworn.

I officiate as a constable; Banbury brought the prisoner and the things to me; I searched him, and took four fowls out of his pocket, which were warm, and the pig appeared fresh stuck; he told me his brother had given them to him; it was on Saturday he was taken, and on Monday morning Mr. Chapman saw the property, and swore to the pig and two of the fowls.

Chapman. I am sure to two of the fowls and the pig.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to Brentford to look for work, and I saw two men sitting by the road side, and I called out to them, and one of them took up a bag, and they went off, and left another bag behind them, which I picked up, and I was bringing it home when the man took me.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-13

299. THOMAS MASON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Starr , about the hour of twelve in the night of the 26th of March , with intent the goods of the said Henry Starr to steal .

HENRY STARR sworn.

I live at Enfield Highway ; on the 27th of March my house was broke open, I was in bed, I went to bed about nine o'clock at night; my family consists of myself, wife, and two children, we all went to

bed, and we fastened the door and the window, the door was locked, and the back-door was bolted; a young man coming by seeing the window open called me up, it was between eleven and twelve, I ran down in my shirt, and took the prisoner; there is only one room below stairs, and I found him there, I missed nothing; there was a pane of glass taken out of the window, so that he could put his hand in and take out the peg, and open the window; I knew the prisoner before; I am sure he is the person I found in the kitchen.

THOMAS TYLER sworn.

I live at the White Lion, Enfield Highway, I saw the prisoner skulking about the waggons that I had the care of, I thought he was about no good, and I went to see which way he went, and I missed him; I observed the shutters of the prosecutor half open, a pane of glass had been taken out of the window, and the casement was ajar; I don't know whether they were shut before, I cried halloo, twice, and I had no answer; and I went into the window with my candle and lanthern, and I said halloo, friend, what are you about here? he said, I am going to get my supper and go to bed; I took him by the collar, and called Mr. Starr up; he begged to be let go; there was nobody else with him.

HEROD STARR sworn.

I was in bed, I went to bed about nine, I am sure the window and door were fast when we went to bed, I keyed the window myself; there was no pane of glass broke in it when we went to bed.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn.

I am an officer, I took charge of the man, I took this knife from him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I got into the house for want of victuals, I was starving almost; I was trapanned by the East India Company's serjeant, and on on board ship; I was taken ill, and they turned me off, and I have been begging about for want.

GUILTY, Death .

He was humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-14

300. THOMAS WHITE was indicted, for stealing on the 4th of March , 84 lb. weight of seed, called clover seed, value 20 s. the property of Sarah Thorpe , Bejamin Collett , and Ebenezer John Collett .

WILLIAM HAYNES sworn.

I am a carman; I had a load of clover-seed; I believe it was the 16th, I can't rightly tell the month; it is turned of two months since; I was carrying it from Galley Quay to Mr. Collett's in the Borough; it was Mr. Collett's property; I was up in the cart loading of it; I loaded 15 bags, and one was cut on the Quay; I had got about five bags into the cart when I found one was cut; I heard the seed running; I did not see who cut it.

GEORGE SIMMONDS sworn.

On the 4th of March I was helping to load the cart with seed.

Court. The other witness said the 16th.

Simmonds. It was the 4th of March; I observed the prisoner near to the cart, he had got his apron full of seed, the seed was running; when he saw me he run up Galley Quay gateway; I pursued him, and took him at the top of the gateway; he threw the seed away, it was afterwards picke up, it is in Court; he said nothing but only

"let me go;" the seed belongs to Mr. Collett.

EBENEZER JOHN COLLETT sworn.

I had some seed on the quay.

Court. Have you any partners? - I have two partners.

What are their names? - Sarah Thorpe and Benjamin Collett ; I can only prove the property.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-15

301. GARMATHEW KELLY and DAVID CURTIS were indicted, for stealing on the 13th of March two silver tablespoons, value 20 s. the property of John Wicks .

JAMES BULL sworn.

On the 13th of March the two prisoners came to my shop in Leadenhall-street, and enquired if I bought old silver; it was about seven in the evening; I keep a goldsmith's shop; the prisoner Kelly produced the bowls of two silver table-spoons, newly broken; I asked him, how he came by them? he said they were not his property, they belonged to the other prisoner, and he acknowledged them to be his: I asked him where he lived, and he said at Westminster; I asked him, how he came by them? and he said, if you don't chuse to buy them, give me them back again; I told him I should be satisfied about it, and I sent for a constable; and on searching Curtis, the handles of the spoons were found on him; prior to our examining him, he said he had got no more than the bowls, they corresponded, and on the handles were engraved J. Wicks; Curtis then said to the other, damn me what a pretty piece of business you have brought me into; Curtis said, you knew how I came by them; I told you before I came here; in consequence of which they were sent to the Poultry Compter; and on enquiry they were found to be the property of Mr. Wicks, of the Bush Tavern, Bristol.

JANE DOER sworn.

I know these to be the property of my my master, Mr. Wicks, who keeps the Bush Tavern, at Bristol; I do not recollect ever seeing either of the prisoners.

PRISONER KELLY's DEFENCE.

On the 13th of March I dined with an acquaintance, and the prisoner dined there too; afterwards he asked me to take a walk, and I did; and he said, I have got some silver to sell which I found on the road coming to London; I saw Mr. Bull's shop, and we went in; I had the bowls, and I told Mr. Bull they were not mine, they were the other man's.

PRISONER CURTIS's DEFENCE.

I found them as I was coming from Bath, and I shewed them to the other prisoner; and he said, he could sell them for me; he took them, and afterwards returned the stems; he said he would sell them at another place.

To Mrs. Doer. Had any spoons been missed? - We missed three about a fortnight before we heard these were found.

The prisoner Kelly called one witness to his character.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-16

302. CHARLES HOLLOWAY was indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Johnson , about the hour of four in the afternoon, of the 3d day of April ; the said John Johnson , and Jacob Renatt his servant being therein, and stealing therein eleven silk handkerchiefs, value 40 s. his property.

JOHN JOHNSON sworn.

It was in the shop when the window was cut; it was on Friday the 3d of April, about four in the afternoon; I did not see the boy cut it; I know nothing more of it.

JOHN WAGSTAFFE sworn.

I had been to St. John's Square, and when I came back, I saw the prisoner and another boy standing against the shop window; I thought they had some bad intention; I stept over the way, and I saw them cut the window, and drawing this piece of silk handkerchief out, I went immediately and took them both, he had not got the handkerchiefs quite out.

Court. There must be a complete removal of the things from the place where they are; the witness prevented that, and therefore we can go no further.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-17

303. JOHN MEERS was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , a wooden till, value 1 s. and 192 copper halfpence, value 8 s. the property of Simon Stevens .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-18

304. SARAH NATCHELL was indicted for stealing, on the 14th day of March , ten pieces of linen cloth, value 12 d. and 45 l. 12 s. 6 d. in money, the property of Joseph Crank , in his dwelling-house .

(The Case opened by Mr. Knapp.)

JOSEPH CRANK sworn.

I keep the Bartholomew coffee-house in West-Smithfield ; I know the prisoner, she was my servant , she lived with me about a month; on the night of the 13th of March she went to-bed before I did, it was about 11 o'clock; at half past 12 I fastened up the house; I and my wife were going up to-bed; and I said to her, it does not appear that the dining room windows are shut; and my wife said, she had sent Sally, she had been up stairs three times; I saw a light which appeared through the window; the dining-room door being open, which gave me reason to know it was not shut; my wife then went and shut it; we went to-bed; and about half past six in the morning, the prisoner came and knocked very violently at the door; my wife said, what is the matter? she said, the house was broke open; the dining-room window, she said, was open, and the bar-door had been broke open, and there were thieves in the house; I went down, and observed the bar-door to be open; I saw the street door was a-jar; and I told the prisoner to go, and get me a light; then I went into the bar, I found the till on the floor, and a bowl which we put silver in, and sometimes gold, that was on the floor, and I found a number of loose pieces of paper; there were three bills, among them one for 49 l. another for 66 l. and another for 9 l. 12 s. they were not gone, they were all thrown about; I found a large quantity of money, which I had left on a shelf, was not gone; and another sum of 70 l. which was safe, they were all in the bar, but not in the till; they were put in different parts of the bar, it had not been in the bowl, or in the till; there were several other things of value in the bar, which was not touched; afterwards I went up stairs, and dressed myself, and my wife came down, and saw the things in the same state, as I did; the prisoner went about her business as usual; I had not just then any kind of suspicion; on the Sunday following she went out, and I attempted to watch her, but lost sight of her; she staid out till about nine o'clock; she asked leave to go out: on the Tuesday following, the night of the illuminations, she asked leave to go out then; she went out, I believe, but I will not be positive that it was the night of the illuminations, she staid out till near 11; when she came home she went to-bed; and the next morning

she got up, and complained she was sick, she did part of her business in the house, and she then went to-bed, and lay there the whole day; in the evening she came down, and got some refreshment, and then went to-bed again; the next morning she did not get up, and a person went up to her; she said that she was very ill, and that the town did not agree with her, and she would go away, and go into the country; she called a coach herself, and she put her box in it, and a hat-box; I followed the coach to No. 36, James-street, Bedford-row, it stopped there; there was a footman came out to the coach to her two or three times; then the coachman drove her to a public-house, a Mr. Farrell's in Red-lion-street, Holborn, the sign of the Dolphin; I came home again, and staid 'till the Friday; she got out there, and her boxes were taken out; the next day I went to Mr. Farrel's, but did not find her there; she was not taken 'till the Saturday, she was taken at No. 16, James-street, Oxford-road, in company with one Stevens, a Mrs. Wood, and a soldier, they were at dinner; I lost 22 guineas and a half in gold; 20 l. 14 s. 6 d. in silver, and in half-pence 1 l. 5 s.; I had taken an account on the Sunday before; there are nine or ten cloths we lost; we call them tea-cloths.

Mr. Keys, Prisoner's Counsel. How long had the prisoner been in your service? - About four or five weeks; the prisoner said she had no money, but a guinea and a half-crown when she came to us, she said, that was all she had in the world.

Did not you make her any promises to induce her to confess? - I said this to her, Sally, if you have any person concerned with you in breaking the house, inform me who it is, and I will shew all the lenity I can; this was after the money was taken; I had suspicions, for I had heard of her keeping this soldier's company; she told me, nobody was concerned at all; she acknowledged it fifty times; she said she had robbed me, and the Devil must be in her to do it.

JANE CRANK sworn.

I am wife to the last witness; on the 13th of March lost my husband lost 45 l. and upwards, it was in a drawer underneath the till; you must take the till away to put the money in, there was no money in the till but sixpence and a few half-pence; there was sixteen pounds in the dish, the greater part was in a check bag, in a box under the till; my husband went up before me, he called me; the windows were all shut when I went up to-bed; there was one open before we went to-bed; it was the right-hand window, I shut it, and fastened it, it goes in with a hook, and I looked at the other, and that was fastened; the maid went up about ten minutes before eleven, and she went up three times before, and said she was going to fasten the dining-room windows; I said I thought she had fastened them before, and she went to-bed half an hour after.

Mr. Keys, Prisoner's Counsel. Was not there a person in the house on whom suspicion fell? - No, none at all.

Then how happened it that you did not suspect this maid before? - So I did, but Mr. Crank did not wish it, because it was taking away her character.

HELEN PARRY sworn.

I keep the Dolphin in Red Lion-street, Holborn, I am married; on Sunday the 13th of March the prisoner came to our house, she called for three-penny-worth of brandy and water, there was nobody with her, she looked about, and asked where she could go into; I told her to go into the back kitchen, she asked me for a needle and thread, she was making up a parcel, I did not give attention to her; she came back and said she wanted some twine; she had two three-penny-worths of brandy and water; she sent my maid for two shilling cakes and some oranges, she gave the maid 6 d. and asked me to drink, I refused it; she came to our house on the Thursday following, she came to the bar, she came in a backney coach by herself, she had some boxes, and asked me

to let her boxes stand there for a little time, as she had left her place; she sent for a gentleman's servant who lived at No. 8, in Red Lion-square; he was a stranger to me, he came, I cannot tell what passed; they went into the parlour, but the door was not shut, but what passed I do not know, they staid there about half an hour; then I saw the gentleman's servant go away, he did not take the boxes; after that she asked me to let the boxes stop a little longer; I did so, and they were taken up into the dining-room; in about an hour after she brought a man, a porter, to take them away, and she went up with him; there was a wooden box and a hat box, the prisoner left one box on Thursday night, and the other the middle part of the day, I believe it is about a month ago, one was a leather trunk, and the other was a large deal box; they were the same that were found at my house by the officer.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

On the 21st of March I went with the prosecutor into Little James-street, Oxford-road, to No. 16, the prisoner at the bar was sitting in the right hand parlour, with another woman and two soldiers; I took the prisoner out of that parlour on the staircase, and in her pocket, tied up in this silk handkerchief, were seventeen guineas, and eight half guineas, in her pocket two pounds nine shillings and sixpence in half crowns and shillings; I then went with the prosecutor and the prisoner where the boxes were, in Stonecutters-alley, in a Mrs. Smith's house; there I found in half crowns, shillings, and sixpences, five pounds and sixpence; in a little box, in one of her own large boxes, I found ten of these clouts; there were some new stockings, and six silver tea-spoons, which were new ones, a new umbrella, and a pair of new cotton stockings; the prisoner was not with me.

When these clouts were found, was any promise made her? - The prosecutor prosecutor promised her he would be as favourable as he could, if she would tell where the boxes was.

Court. Then I shall not enquire what she said after that? - I believe that was after some part of the money was found.

But before she said any thing what she had done? - He asked her where the best part of the money was; and she begged he would not take her life, but be as favorable as he could.

(The clouts deposed to by Mrs. Crank.)

Mrs. Crank. I know them by a particular mark with one iron mould at the corner, this is my own work; they were in the garret, they were not in the same place with the money.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My box came up the 16th of March, my prosecutor pretended he had lost some money the 14th of March, the clouts were in my box, and a person is in Court that I promised to give some of them to; her name is Sarah Brown ; the money I had by my young master, who is gone to Bengal, to maintain a child I had by him, his name is Richard Morgan , a lieutenant in the army; he was ordered off with his regiment, he has been gone about a month; my childbed linen was in my box, the prosecutor and his wife have my boxes in their possession; Sarah Brown saw some of the cloth.

SARAH BROWN sworn.

I am a country woman of the prisoner's, she came up about two months after I came up; she always bore an exceeding good character, as far as I know; I know nothing at all but some bits of cloth that she had in her caravan; I asked her to give me some, she said when her box came up, she would give me some.

HANNAH HOLLAND sworn.

I have known the prisoner since she has been in town, I never heard but she was a very sober, honest servant.

ANN SAUNDERS sworn.

I have not known her a long time, but heard a good name of her by all her country people.

Mrs. LAMB. sworn.

I knew her when she was an extraordinary good servant in Windsor, to Mr. Morgan, I know of no money he gave her.

Court. Had he a son an officer? - Yes, his name was Edward Morgan , I heard say he was gone to Cork; I have been out of Windsor five years.

When did you hear he was gone abroad? - About six months ago.

Court to Mr. Crank. How is your street-door fastened? - With a strong iron bar that goes across the door as well as the lock, the dining-room window fastened with a hook; they were not broke that I saw.

GUILTY, Of stealing the clouts only .

Court to Prisoner. You have been convicted on very strong evidence of a part of the charge contained in this indictment against you; the Jury, though there were strong circumstances that went to the whole of the charge, in mercy to your life, have acquitted you of the most penal part; it will depend on yourself how far that mercy will or will not be beneficial to you; it remains with the Court to consider the whole of your case; the offence of a servant breaking that trust reposed in them, is so dangerous to the peace and security of individuals, that it is the rule of the Court to treat it with the utmost rigour of the law; the sentence of the Court upon you, therefore, is, that you be

Transported beyond the seas for the term of seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-19

305. JOHN HOLDWAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Bethell , about the hour of two in the night, on the 16th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, two silver table-spoons, value 18 s. four silver tea-spoons, value 4 s. a diaper table-cloth, value 3 s. a linen dresser-cloth, value 6 d. a box handle oyster-knife, value 6 d. his property.

WILLIAM BETHELL sworn.

I live in Covent Garden-market , my house was broke open either the 16th or 17th of March, I do not know the day of the week, I went to bed before my family, I believe my servant was last up, her name is Jane Harris ; I went to bed between eight and nine, my wife and daughter were at the play; I saw the things at the pawnbroker's; I heard no noise in the night; I was up between four and five in the morning.

JANE HARRIS sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor, the house was broke open of a Monday evening, I think I was the last person up in the house, we do not sleep in that house; my master, and my mistress, and a man servant sleep in it, I left the house that night before it was broke open; there is no servant here that was in the house when it was broke open; my mistress is not here, I left the house about eleven, there is a floor up stairs, my master and mistress sleep in a little bed-room even with the shop; when I came away I shut the door after me, and put the flap down, and pushed the hatch over it, that is the only fastening it has; when I came away the kitchen window was down; I came on the next day between seven and eight in the morning, the people were all up before me, I missed the things in the indictment when I went there in the morning; I should know the tablecloth, I cannot swear to any of them, I am certain to the number that were lost.

JOHN CROUCH sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Berwick-street, I

live with Mr. Aldus, I produce all the things mentioned in the indictment, except the oyster knife, the constable has that; I stopped the prisoner on Tuesday the 17th of March, about two o'clock, he brought the things, he asked to pledge the table-cloth for three shillings, and said he had some plate in his pocket; I asked him to let me look at it, and he said, he wanted either to sell it or pledge it; I weighed it, and said, will fifteen shillings do for you to sell them? he said yes, if you will not give any more; I was confident he had stole it, or the person who sent him: he said he had them from Mr. Satchell in Park-street, Grosvenor-square; I sent for an officer, he searched him; then he said he had them from his father last Christmas; I caused the things to be advertised, and the prosecutor came the next day.

(The things deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prosecutor. The tea-spoons marked W A B; the table-spoons I had from an old lady who is dead; they have cyphers, I cannot tell what they were; there is the B on the dresser-cloth; I believe there is no mark on the table-cloth.

Jane Harris . I believe the things to be my master's, I cannot swear to them.

WILLIAM BLACKETER sworn.

I belong to the office in Poland-street, I produce this knife, which I had of the prisoner on the 17th of March, about two in the day; I searched him in the office, and took him from the pawnbroker's; I have kept the knife ever since.

Prosecutor. I am sure it is mine, I had the handle rasped, it was a great deal larger.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I came in on the morning that the robbery was committed in the garden, and walking backwards and forwards for some employment, I had been out of place; I found the things between a watch-box and a stand, it was covered with straw, it was this property; I took it to the pawnbroker's, and asked half a guinea for it in pawn.

Prosecutor. He was a servant of mine, he lived with me about a month, he came out of the country, and while he lived with me he was very honest, but I believe distress and hunger has drove him to this; he left me two months before this happened in a hurry, one morning his father sent up things to market; I owed him a little money, and he asked for his wages when he went away; he assigned no reason for leaving me; I have entrusted him with money at different times.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Court to Prosecutor. When did you see these spoons before? - The morning before they were taken, they were used in common; when we get up in a morning this flap door is left open; I do not know whether it was taken before I went out or after; it is a thoroughfare for twenty different people.

GUILTY, Of stealing only .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-20

306. WILLIAM NICHOLLS and JOSEPH BATES were indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Twyford , about the hour of eight in the night of the 27th of February , and burglariously stealing therein, a piece of silk and cotton velvet, value 10 s. his property.

JOHN TWYFORD sworn.

I am a shopkeeper ; I live at No. 50, York-buildings in the Strand ; on Friday the 27th of March the robbery was committed; I had a suspicion, for a pane of glass had been broke on the Monday before, and another on the Wednesday; I

had a suspicion, as there had been several suspicious people about the shop; on Friday about half after seven o'clock I went over the way; I left a boy in the shop; I was over the way in the passage, and about eight o'clock I saw two people in the window, and I saw one of them take something out of the window; I ran across the road, they went different ways; I came up to J. Bates, he was going towards Charing-cross, then he began to run; I pursued him about two or three hundred yards, and took him; I never lost sight of him; I found nothing on him; I brought him back to the shop, and found the other prisoner in the shop; it was not Bates that took the things out of the window.

Court. How near was Bates to the person that took the things out of the window? - About a yard, they were together at the window, I think I perceived them both in company together several times within the half hour, but I will not swear to that; I saw them come up together, but I did not see Bates touch any thing.

Had you seen them speak together? - I cannot swear that, there were five or six of them together in the course of the half hour.

I think you say, when you came up to Bates he ran? - He did.

WILLIAM EAST sworn.

On Friday, the day of the robbery, I was in an opposite passage to the shop; I saw Nicholls standing at a window, and about eight o'clock I saw him take out this waistcoat-piece from the window; he had a great-coat on; there was a little breach in the window, I saw him take it out, and put it under his coat; I believe the breach was made before, I did not see him make it; he was knocked down, and I picked him up, and took the piece from under his coat; I can't swear to the other prisoner.

(Property deposed to by Mr. Twyford.)

PRISONER NICHOLL's DEFENCE.

At the time I was taken up, and taken into Mr. Twyford's shop; there were two others taken up, and they could not tell which of us it was; there were two young men running along, and one of them have the piece down at my feet, and I picked it up, and I was knocked down, and taken directly.

- NICHOLLS sworn.

I am father to the prisoner Nicholls; he is about 19 or 20; I bred him up to the sawyer's business; he was apprentice to a Mr. Goodchief, he served about four years of his time; he left his master because he had no employ for him; I never heard any harm of him before; he used to work for different people.

The prisoner Bates called one witness, who gave him a good character.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS , GUILTY, Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

JOSEPH BATES , NOT GUILTY ,

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-21

307. WALTER SCOTT was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, upon Ann Richardson , on the 30th of March last, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, a metal locket, value 2 s. her property.

ANN RICHARDSON sworn.

I was a servant to Mr. Belcher of No. 1, Cow-lane, East-Smithfield; on the 30th of March, I had been to Wardour-street; I was coming back, and about eight o'clock the prisoner met me the corner of Drury-lane ; the prisoner passed and re-passed me several times; Mrs. Wilson was with me; I never saw him before that evening; he hit against my shoulder, and I said go along fellow, you are drunk; he says, am I drunk? with that he clasped me round, and whipped my locket away, and ran away; I was so frightened that I did not miss it;

witness told me he had took my locket away; we both called out, stop thief! and he was taken by the constable almost directly.

Court. How long did the prisoner stay with you? - He did not stay, he only passed and repassed.

He only said, am I drunk? - Yes, Sir, that was all.

How long was it before you missed your locket? - Ten minutes.

Did you talk to anybody else beside the prisoner during this ten minutes? - No, Sir, only with a woman that was walking with me.

ELIZABETH WILSON sworn.

The prisoner had been with me to inform me she was going to leave her place; and asked me leave to let her sleep with my children on the next night; I was walking with her to see her part of the way, and at the corner of Drury-lane, we were going to part, and the prisoner came and pushed against her; and she said, go along, you are drunk, you nasty fellow; and he put his hand round his neck, and I saw him snatch the locket out of her handkerchief; he had passed and repassed us several times; there was nobody else with us; we cried, stop thief! and he was soon after taken.

EDWARD TREADWAY sworn.

I am an officer; I took the prisoner on Monday evening, the 30th of March; he ran up a court in Drury-lane; I struck at him; I took this pin out of his hand, and we went before a magistrate; it is a remarkable pin, it is a cooper with an adz, she described it before she saw it.

(The locket produced, and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming along, and I passed those women, and the prosecutrix asked me to give her something to drink; I said, I would not, and just by her I saw this locket lay; and I pickt it up, and she asked me for it, and I would not give it to her; and I went away with it directly.

Court to Treadway. I think you say, she described the pin before you shewed it to her? - She did, my Lord.

GUILTY, of stealing only .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-22

308. JOHN DAGLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of April , fourteen pounds and a half weight of copper, value 10 s. the property of John Buhl the elder , and John Buhl , the younger .

(The case opened by Mr. Silvester.)

NATHANIEL STEVENS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Curtis the glazier, who was employed at the Bank; on the 4th of April between twelve and one at noon, I perceived a kind of hammering, I was cleaning a lamp, I went up to the top of the building, I returned, and afterwards heard the same rummage, and I went into the place they call the Slip in the Bank, and I heard a door open, and I perceived the prisoner open the door; he had a blue coat on, he came down, and I perceived as he came down by one of the doors of the Warrant-office, that he had some copper under his coat, under his arm; I put my hand on it and I felt it; I collared him and I asked him what he had got; he said never mind; is my labourer here? I am going to Petticoat-lane, and we will get something to drink; I then ran into the Bank coffee-house, to see if any gentleman who belonged to the business was there; and from there I went to the White Horse, and got another person to assist me, and we followed him and took him in Throgmorton-street, opposite to Draper's Hall.

JOHN MOAT sworn.

I am a carpenter, I was called by the

last witness, and we pursued the prisoner, I took him and took this copper from him.

JOHN BUHL sworn.

I am a coppersmith and brazier , in partnership with my father John Buhl ; we were employed to cover the Bank with the copper; this piece of copper is taken from the Bank, it is the property of me and my father, I can swear to the property; it is made particular by the size and weight; they were all piled one upon another, they were not laid; there were twenty in the pile, and after this happened, there were but nineteen.

WILLIAM STELLARD sworn.

On the 4th of April I saw the prisoner, it was at the Bank, come down the stairs with a piece of copper; I am sure he is the man.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was so very drunk I do not know how I got it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-23

309. ELIZABETH ROBINSON was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of April , three pair of worsted stockings, value 5 s. the property of John Waddle , privily in his shop .

JOHN WADDLE sworn.

The prisoner came into my shop on last Monday fortnight; in the evening, between six and seven o'clock, and took three pair of stockings; there was another woman with her, she asked for some muslin, she looked at two or three pieces; she was seen to take the stockings by a person in the shop, she had them under her arm.

SARAH WADDLE sworn.

The prisoner came in with another woman, I shewed her two or three pieces of muslin; none were good enough for her; I had suspicion, I put my muslins aside, and while I turned round, I perceived she had got the stockings under her arm; I asked her to give them to me, and I called Mr. Waddle; I am sure they are mine.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

They had dropt down, and I picked them up.

GUILTY, Of stealing only .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-24

308. RICHARD DICKENSON was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of March , three wooden casks, value 2 s. two gallons of shrub, value 10 s. two gallons of brandy, value 10 s. and two gallons of rum, value 10 s. the property of Edmund Wood .

EDMUND WOOD sworn.

I am a distiller , I received information of the robbery on Sunday night; the liquors were seen in the coal-hole in my own house; I know nothing of it myself.

ROBERT SEALY sworn.

I am servant to the last witness; I found a hamper in my master's coal-hole, containing three small casks, on the 15th of March, between one and two in the afternoon, they were two gallons each; two of brandy, two of rum, and two of shrub; I don't know how they came there, the prisoner at that time was shopman to my master.

LEONARD JOHNSON sworn.

I am an officer of excise, I went to survey the house on Sunday the 15th of March, between four and five in the afternoon; Robert Sealy asked me to tell him what was in the hamper, it was just at the edge of the coal-hole, he desired me to go in and look at it, I told him I could not tell; we opened it, and it contained two casks of brandy, two of rum, and two of shrub; two pair of stockings, two lumps of sugar, and two bottles of wine; the hamper was sewed up again, and put in the same place with the same things in it; I saw it again on the 27th, it come to the constable's house, and one of the lumps of sugar was gone, and the two bottles of wine were gone also.

HENRY HALES sworn.

I saw the prisoner take a hamper out of the house, I am porter to Mr. Woods, he took it off the counter on the 16th of March, about seven o'clock in the morning; he took it himself, I was opening the shop; I don't know what it contained, nor where he took it to.

THOMAS LOCK sworn.

Sealy called me on Sunday in the afternoon,

to examine the hamper; I know no more than what the excise officer has said.

HENRY EDWARDS sworn.

The prisoner brought the hamper into the White Bear, Basinghall-street, I forget the day of the month, it was on a Monday, between seven and eight o'clock; he left it there to go by the Doncaster waggon, I am the waggoner, I believe it was not booked; I was to carry it to Doncaster, and it was to be left at Mr. Jackson's warehouse at Doncaster, until he called for it himself, he told me so himself; I carried it to Stamford, and I received an order from Thomas Newstead to send the parcel back again, and to direct it to Thomas Newstead , at the White Bear, in Basing-hall-street.

Court. Where is that order? - I lost it.

When; how long ago? - Two or three days, I shewed it to several people, and they said it was of no use; one of them kept it.

Who was that? - I don't know, if I saw him I should know him again.

Is he here? - I don't know.

Wood. Thomas Newstead is here that wrote it.

Court. That will not do; did any of Mr. Wood's people take it? - I don't know, they were all about when I lost it; when I got to Stamford, I sent it back again by one David Thompson , a waggoner.

Court. Is he here? - No, I believe not.

What is become of him? - I don't know, he is about his business; I opened the hamper at Stamford, and there were in it two sugar loaves, and two bottles of wine, and two pair of stockings; I had opened it at Welling, and I took three keggs out of it at Welling, and I left them; there was no permit, and I was afraid some damage would come to the waggon; Sealey had came in a clandestine manner, and wanted to know where the waggon lay that night, and we suspected the hamper, and opened it.

THOMAS NEWSTEAD sworn.

I am a porter at the White Bear in Basinghall-street, the prisoner brought the hamper on the 16th of March, between seven and eight in the morning; I knew him before, there were directions on it, which went with the hamper, I never saw it afterwards; when he brought the hamper in there were several people present, and I said, Dickinson, it shakes; and he said, ah, there is nothing in it of consequence, only two or three small bottles of wine, and then he walked out of the yard, he said no more, nor gave any more direction about it, after he had set it down in the yard; I saw the hamper afterwards; it came back from Stamford on a Wednesday, I cannot tell the day of the month; Mr. Wood had the directions both down and up again; I can't swear to the hamper being the same which the prisoner brought into the yard.

Court to Wood. Where are the directions? - My Lord, I have not got them now, I have a copy of them.

Court. That will not do; where are they? - They are torn to pieces.

Have you any more witnesses? - No, my Lord.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-25

309. JOHN NEATLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , one pound of hyson tea, value 14 s. the property of the East India Company .

A second count, laying it to be the property of persons unknown.

The case opened by Mr. Silvester.

WILLIAM STAMPER sworn.

I am a labourer in the East India Company's employ, the prisoner was the same, we were stationed in Seething-lane: on the 30th of March we were employed in nailing

up teas in the same room together; I observed the prisoner's hand going in and out the sample bags three or four times, and I believe he then put it into his pocket, I found there was some tea in his great coat pocket; I informed Mr. Pather, and he informed Mr. Bell; as soon as Mr. Bell was acquainted, he looked round for Neatly, and he was missing; he was observed to go up stairs.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. Did the prisoner know you was at work at his pockets? - I don't know, I believe not.

How long have you known him? - I believe five or six months.

Was you always on good terms? - Yes.

The sample bags are returned to satisfy the broker that the tea is of the same quality as the sample? - It is.

The weight of the sample bag is of no importance? - No.

It was out of the sample bag he took it? - Yes.

PETER BELL sworn.

I am the same as the last witness, I went up stairs, I looked through the crevice in the long room, there I saw him put his hand three times into his pockets, and take up tea, and put it into his handkerchief; then I went round to him, and told him he had gone too far, I took him down stairs; when I went down there was no officer, I put him into the place where the men were, they saw him, and were acquainted with the business; then an elder took out a handkerchief with some tea in it; I found some tea in a bag in another place, which drew with a string.

ADAM RUTLEDGE sworn.

I am assistant-elder; I searched the prisoner, and found two parcels of tea; I took some handkerchiefs out of his pocket; and Bell took this out of his other pocket, as soon as he came into the room, he said, he hoped I would not take his bread from him, and he would put the tea into the chests again; I told him it was too publick, I was likely to lose my own bread; I had not the least suspicion of him, he was a very well behaved civil man, and always very obedient to his orders.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. I believe you have not a man of better character in your warehouse? - No, he is a man of some property, and of a very creditable family.

Had you an opportunity of knowing what sort of a man he was when in liquor? - I cannot say.

FOR THE PRISONER.

Mr. Deputy MERRY sworn.

I am one of the Deputies of this City; I have known him about forty years, he is of a very respectable family, for whom I have a very great regard, and am very sorry to see him here; his character has been esteemed an honest one; I always thought him a weak man, but there was a degree of good nature about him.

HENRY FOX sworn.

I have known the prisoner upwards of twenty years; he is a very honest hard working man; if he gets a little in liquor it touches his head, but he has distressed himself by good natured actions.

STEPHEN LEESON sworn.

I have known him above twenty years; he bore a general good honest character during the whole time.

GUILTY.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

(He was humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury.)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-26

310. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of October , a cloth coat, value 20 s. a dimity waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Collinson .

THOMAS COLLINSON sworn.

The prisoner lodged at the house where I did, at Hogsdon; he had been there about eight days before I lost my things; I lost them on the 13th; there were two beds in the same room; he had one, and I the other; and when I got up I laid my things on the box; on Monday morning I got up at five o'clock, it was on the 13th of October, and went to work; I left my coat, it was a blue coat, and a white dimity waistcoat; I left the prisoner in bed when I got up, and returned home at night about seven, when I missed my things; the prisoner was not at home then; the next time I saw him was in Tothill-fields in custody, it was two months after; I heard of it from the people where I lodged, they said, he was taken up; I found him at Tothill-fields; I found my coat and waistcoat at Mrs. Lowe's in Baldwin's Gardens; I did not ask him to tell me where they were; he told another person, of the name of Clark, first, and then he told me, that he pawned them on the same day in Baldwin's Gardens; it was the first time I saw him there that he told me; I first asked him, how he did? and then he said, he had taken my clothes, and had pawned them in Baldwin's Gardens for 18 s.

Court. Did you hear the conversation between him and Clark? - No, I did not.

Is Clark here? - No, my Lord.

Why did not you bring Clark here?

Prisoner. Did not the witness issue a warrant against me for taking the things; and when he came to Tothill-fields Bridewell, he tore it, and said nothing should hurt me? - No, my Lord, I did not; he was in for another offence; after he told me where the things were, I said I wished he was out.

WILLIAM PAYNE sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Lowe, a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned these things on the 13th of October; I knew him before; I have no doubt as to his person.

(The property deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Clark and another person came first, and after some conversation, they persuaded me to tell where the things were, and that they were sure he would not hurt me; that he was a working man, and had been out of work some time, and that it would be easier for him to take them out than buy others, as they supposed I had not pawned them for the value; afterwards the prosecutor came in, and I told him where they were; and he said he would not hurt me.

GUILTY .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-27

311. ANN SMITH and CATHERINE POWELL were indicted, for stealing, on the 3d of April , a silver watch, value 40 s. a seal, value 1 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 12 s. a silver stock-buckle, value 2 s. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. five guineas and five shillings, the property of Thomas Andrews , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Callender .

THOMAS ANDREWS sworn.

On Friday, the 3d of this month, I went into a publick-house between 10 and 11 at night to get a pint of ale, at Mr. Brown's, the bottom of Plough-alley, in Wapping: the prisoner Smith was in the house when I went in, Alexander Chaney was with me; and Ann Smith and another came and drank with us; then Ann Smith asked me to go with her home; I went; I left Chaney at Brown's; she took me to a Mrs. Calendar's, which is in Plough-alley, it is a private-house; we went up stairs, and she sent for a light, and I sent for a shilling's-worth of brandy, after that I sent for another shilling's-worth, we drank part of that, then the mistress sent up for 2 s. for the bed, then the candle was blown out, and I was thrown down on the bed; I cannot say there was any body else

but her, the candle being out; I was very much in liquor, and I apprehended she was going to undress me; she said she would, she began to unloose my shoes; I lost my watch, and my buckles, and my handkerchief, stock-buckle, five guineas and five shillings; I am sure I had them when I went in; after I had lain a little while, two women came up, and they bundled me down stairs, and cut my hand, and pushed me out of the house; then I went into a house over the way, and they seeing what a condition I was in, they washed me, and wrapped up my hand; Ann Smith said before the Justice that she had pawned my watch, she was taken up the 20th of this month; I do not know whether her examination was taken in writing or not; the Justice sent for the watch, and it had been taken out; she said she gave Mrs. Callender three guineas and my buckles, and a guinea was given to a Mrs. Leonard; she said, what was done in Mrs. Callender's house Mrs. Leonard had part; and what was done in Mrs. Leonard's Mrs. Callender had a part.

Court. Are there any of Mr. Smith's officers here? - No.

Why is not Mrs. Callender taken up? - I do not know.

Court. She appears to be the principal person.

ALEXANDER CHANEY sworn.

I was with the last witness at the publick-house, the prisoner Ann Smith was with us; he had his watch in his pocket, and his buckles in his shoes; about an hour after he went out I went to look after him; I went to Mrs. Callender, and she said he was not there; I knew he was in the house, the people on the opposite side of the way told me he was there.

PRISONER ANN SMITH 's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor went home with me, and he went up stairs; we had several shillings's-worths of brandy and water; I left him on the bed, and came down stairs, and Mrs. Callender made me go up, and rob him; she threatened me if I did not, I refused it once or twice; I afterwards went up, and robbed the man, and Mrs. Callender took the money from me; Mrs. Leonard had a guinea of the money.

PRISONER POWELL's DEFENCE.

I was a servant in Mrs. Callender's house, the prisoner came home, and brought the gentleman with her, and they went up stairs; they asked me to fetch them some brandy and water, which I did, and they gave me some; I went several times, I fetched a shilling's-worth at a time; he gave me two sixpences, I believe, every time to pay for it; when I was in the kitchen I heard Mrs. Callender tell her to rob the gentleman, and she made her do it.

Court. Is any of Mr. Smith's officers here? - No.

Court. Let somebody be sent for from Mr. Smith's office; this appears to be an infamous piece of business; and I wish to be satisfied, why Mrs. Callender was not taken up, and included in this indictment; and Mrs. Leonard also for receiving a part of the property knowing it to be stolen.

ANN SMITH , GUILTY .

[Death. See summary.]

CATHERINE POWELL , NOT GUILTY .

Court. It will be necessary to indict Mrs. Callender and this Mrs. Leonard for receiving the money, and Mr. Callender for keeping a disorderly house; therefore let Catherine Powell be detained in order to give evidence of this infamous transaction.

PETER MAYNE sworn.

I am an officer belonging to Mr. Smith's office.

Court. Do you know what has become of Mrs. Callender? - I have been after her night and day, and I could not find her; and her husband, and William Whiteway , an officer, threatened to indict me and Mrs. Noble for a conspiracy; Mrs. Noble

assisted the prosecutor with money to find the bill; Wilkinson was witness to Whiteway's threatening me; if I could have found her, my Lord, she would have been put in the bill; Wilkinson was a witness to their threatening me.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn.

I heard Whiteway say, that every step should be taken to punish Mayne.

Court. Callender the husband has not absconded? - No, my Lord.

Mayne. I have been after Mrs. Callender day and night.

The Court ordered, that proper steps should be taken to apprehend Mr. and Mrs. Callender, and Mrs. Leonard, in order to bring them to justice; and Mr. Callender and Mrs. Leonard were soon afterwards taken into custody.

Reference Number: t17890422-28

312. JOHN TOVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , 32 lb. weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Herbert , affixed to his dwelling-house , against the statute.

THOMAS HERBERT sworn.

I am a housekeeper at Hommerton, in the parish of Hackney ; on Wednesday the 8th instant, about a quarter past nine in the evening, I missed the lead; I saw it on the Monday before, it was a pipe that leads down the water from the top of the house, the lower part of the joint was pulled out from the upper part.

JONATHAN STONE sworn.

I am a coal-merchant, I live at Mr. Herbert's; between nine and ten on Wednesday night, the prisoner at the bar and another man came up to me; I was standing on the steps at the house; I went into the house; I had been in about a quarter of an hour, I heard a knocking at the windows; I came out, and perceived there was lead taken away from the house; I went out on the road, and overtook the prisoner with another man; I told them, I believed they had taken some lead from a house where I had seen them, and the man that was with the prisoner dropt the lead, and ran away; they were walking together the same way; I did not hear any conversation pass between them, the prisoner attempted to run, and I stopt him; I held him 'till Mr. Herbert came to my assistance; and he took the pipe up; I never saw the prisoner before, but I am sure as to his person.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am a constable; I received this lead from the cage where the prisoner was confined by the direction of Mr. Herbert; I compared it, and it fits exactly.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was walking along the road, and the gentleman ran after me, and took hold of me; and said I had been stealing his lead; I don't know where his house is.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-29

313. THOMAS HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , two linen gowns, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. six silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. two gold rings, value 5 s. the property of Charles Roogrove .

CHARLES ROOGROVE sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Welling; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment from out of my apartments, which are in the coal-yard, Drury-lane ; I am a lodger, they were in a box which was locked, it was forced open; I missed them on Easter Sunday in the afternoon, about five or six o'clock; I had seen them on the Monday before.

JOHN EDMUNDS sworn.

I am a silversmith, an apprentice to

Mr. Essex, on the 7th of this instant the prisoner brought two silver tea-spoons to our shop for sale; they were very dirty; and he said, he had picked them up the corner of Essex-street in the Strand; he said, he had just picked them up; I stopt him and the spoon; I know no more; I have had the tea-spoons ever since.

TIMOTHY GODDARD sworn.

I am an officer, the prisoner was brought to Bow-street by the last witness; I was ordered to search him, and I found on him two gold rings which the prosecutor claimed.

(The tea-spoons and rings deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I received the things from a man, he said they were his; and I went to sell the spoons, and I was stopped.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-30

314. JAMES WOOD was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of March , a pair of leather boots, called half boots, value 5 s. the property of Daniel Gilkes .

DANIEL GILKES sworn.

I keep a sale shop ; I know nothing of the robbery; I had seen the property on the same morning.

JOSEPH ADAMS sworn.

I am a shoemaker; I saw the prisoner take the property as it was hanging at Mr. Gilkes's door, it was on Friday the 12th of March, between three and four in the afternoon, he run away with them; I stopt him, and brought him back again with the property, he was never out of my sight.

(The property deposed to by the prosecutor).

GUILTY .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-31

315. ROBERT SAVORD was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , a cloth great-coat, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Ladley .

THOMAS LADLEY sworn.

On the 23d of March, Monday, about three o'clock, I lost my great-coat from out of my parlour; I had seen it about half an hour before.

SUSANNAH CLAYTON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Ladley, the prisoner knocked at the door, and asked for Mr. Ladley; he begged to wait 'till Mr. Ladley came in; he turned back out of the parlour, and asked for a glass of water; he went out softly with the great-coat under his arm; he began to run, and I called a shoemaker, and said he had stole the coat, he was taken in about an hour after; I am sure the prisoner is the person.

RICHARD ROBERTS sworn.

I went to look after the prisoner by desire of my master; the last witness, who is Mr. Ladley's servant, came over to my master, and said, the man had taken her master's great-coat; and I saw the man coming in a coach, with a great-coat over his arm; I had just come out of the Fox publick-house; I saw the prisoner get into the coach, with two bundles and the coat over his left arm; I followed the coach, and he got out at the turnpike; I told the coachman he had stole the great-coat; and the prisoner said, I was some saucy boy or other; I followed him to the White Horse cellar, and catched hold of the great-coat;

and said, he had stole it; I told a footman, and he hallooed out, stop thief! and he was afterwards taken; I am sure as to the person of the prisoner; I saw the coat about five minutes after he was taken; he dropt it as he was running.

WILLIAM SLATER sworn.

I am a labouring man at a wine merchant's; I took the prisoner at the bar; he was running; he had this great-coat under his arm, and he dropt it near the Queen's Arms in Duke-street; I took him within twenty yards from where he dropt it; I never lost sight of him from the first time I heard the call of stop thief.

(The property deposed to by the prosecutor, and Mr. M'Guire, a taylor, who made it.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-32

316. JOHN WISE was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , two ounces of burnt silver, value 10 s. the property of John Davey .

JOHN DAVEY sworn.

I am a coachman ; I had some silver lace I had saved in my service, part of which I burnt; I went to get some more burnt at Long-Acre, at Mr. Plant's; while it was burning, the prisoner came to me, and tapped me on the shoulder; and said, take care they do not cheat you out of the silver; what was burnt was in the pan on the fire; it was on the 9th of March; we thought the prisoner belonged to the shop; and the refiners thought he belonged to us; after the pan was taken off the fire, I asked the prisoner to fetch two pots of beer, and he should partake of it; he went and ordered it, and came back in about two minutes; I was watching the man who was refining, and he came and took this which was burnt, and lay on the block in Mr. Plant's shop, and whipped it into his left-hand pocket; I caught hold of him; and asked him, what he was going to do with my silver? I asked the refiners, whether they knew any thing of him? they said, no; and I pulled his hand out of his pocket, and he put the ball of silver into my right-hand; it was the lump of silver which we had burnt at home, and carried to Mr. Plant's to be refined; I am sure it is the same.

JAMES BOWMAN sworn.

I saw the coachman pull the prisoner's hand out of his pocket, with the silver in his hand.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been to Mr. Plant's to sell a shilling which was crackt in two; I was there when these gentlemen were there; I went to order a pot of beer, and when I came back, they asked me to drink; I had the burnt silver in my hand weighing it, and my other hand being lame, I put it in my pocket while I drank.

GUILTY .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-33

317. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 17th of April , a silver watch, value 40 s. a pair of velvet breeches, value 5 s. a man's hat, value 5 s. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Richard Watson .

RICHARD WATSON sworn.

On the 17th of this month, in the morning, when I awoke, I missed my watch; I know the prisoner, he lay with me on the same night on the 16th; he went to-bed with me; I locked the door; I was sober when I went to-bed; the next morning I awoke, about six, the prisoner was gone, I missed my watch and my breeches, not the breeches where the watch was, but another pair; my hat was on a nail over

bed's head, and my silk handkerchief was over the chair with my breeches; they were all taken away; I got my breeches again; I acquainted the two other witnesses of my loss; we went to the Phoenix publick-house, in Ave-Maria-lane; the prisoner was calling for some gin at the bar; the moment he saw me he ran out at the back door; John Spence went round after him, and he ran back into the same publick-house, and came through again, and went into Black-horse-court; he went in at the first door on the right-hand side, he locked the door; we knocked, and a woman let us in, and we found him in the garret; we found the breeches behind the grate; there was no one in the room but him, he had bolted the garret door, and the woman of the house gave us leave to break it open; and we did, and took him.

(The breeches deposed to.)

JOHN SPENCE sworn.

The prosecutor acquainted me with his loss, I went with the prosecutor, and we found him at the Phoenix in Ave-Maria-lane; we took him in Black-horse-yard, he had locked himself in the garret, and the women gave us leave to burst the door open, and we took him; we found the breeches in the room.

JAMES GARDNER sworn.

I know the prisoner, he is the man that slept with the prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never touched any of his things.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-34

318. MARY JONES was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Bennet , between the hours of one and three in the afternoon of the 7th of April , and burglariously stealing therein, two linen gowns, value 12 s. one black stuff gown, value 5 s. one black bonnet, value 2 s. a pair of black slippers, value 2 s. two frocks, value 3 s. two linen shirts, value 6 s. two linen shifts, value 4 s. and a pair of black velvet breeches, value 5 s. and two pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of the said James Bennet.

JAMES BENNETT sworn.

I can only prove the property.

MARY BENNETT sworn.

I am the wife of James Bennett : I went out to work on the 6th of April, between ten and eleven in the morning, I was going for the whole week to my brother-in-law's, till he got a servant; my husband was there too; there are other people live in the house; when I went out I left the lodger in the one pair of stairs at home, it is the house of Richard Long , he does not live there himself, it is let out in tenements; I have a two pair of stairs room, I left nobody in my apartment, I locked the door and took the key with me, I left the casement open, there is no street-door to the house, there is no garret over the two pair of stairs, they could not have got in from the roof of the house; there are two side sashes to the casement, and the middle one opens; a person came to me on the Wednesday morning, and told me my place had been broke open; I went home directly, I found the door open, and the staple and padlock, which was on the outside of the door taken away; my box was broke open, and the things mentioned in the indictment were taken away; part of the property is in Court; I know the prisoner by seeing her go up and down to a woman in the two pair of stairs on the same floor, and the same house; she was taken up on Thursday morning; part of the things were found in Field-lane, at the house of a Mr. Welchman; I know no more but proving the property.

ELIZABETH BROWN sworn.

I live in Rose-court, Turnmill-street; on the 7th of April I saw the prisoner

come out of the house with a large bundle of things in her apron, it was between one and two on a Tuesday; I knew the prisoner before, I had seen her come up and down the court several times, she spoke to me when she had the things; she asked me how me and my child were, and she went out of the court; I am positive as to her person.

JOHN WELCHMAN sworn.

I live in Field-lane, I bought these things I have here of that Jew on Tuesday the 7th of April, in the afternoon about four o'clock; I have often bought things of him before.

Court. Did you ask him any questions? - No.

How came you not? - I have often bought things of him before.

Court. Do you make a practice of buying things of any body, without asking them how they came by them? - I have known him a good while before.

JOSEPH EWIN (a Jew) sworn.

On the 7th of April I sold Welchman two shifts, two shirts, and some stockings, I bought them of the prisoner on a Wednesday about two o'clock, and I sold them at four the same afternoon; I bought them in an open public street, leading to Saffron-hill; she was a stranger to me, I am sure the prisoner is the woman.

ELIZABETH TROTTER sworn.

I have some things I bought of the woman, and some of the Jew; I live on Saffron-hill, I saw the Jew buy some things of the woman, but I will not swear to the prisoner; I saw her, I bought a gown and a pair of shoes of her, because the Jew had no more money; I lent the Jew some money to pay the woman; I cannot swear to the woman, I did not take notice of her much; I knew the Jew before.

Court. Had you ever seen the woman before? - Not to my knowledge.

Court. It is a very bad practice of buying things of those whom you do not know.

WILLIAM GOUGH sworn.

Mrs. Bennett came to me, and desired me to go to Welchman's, as she saw some of her property hanging at the door; I am an officer, the woman was then in custody; Welchman was apprehended by me, and a neighbour of his passed his word for his appearance, and afterwards he informed me that he had found the Jew; I took the Jew into custody, and I asked him if he thought he should know the woman; he went to Justice Pickett's with me, and the woman was brought down there; there were four or five more, and he picked her out directly.

The property deposed to by Mrs. Bennett.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it, I never was up the stairs in my life.

Court. What may be the value of the things you lost? - Two pounds three shillings.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 39 s. but not of the burglary .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-35

319. JOHN RUSSELL was indicted for stealing, on the 24th of March , two muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of William Kennedy .

WILLIAM KENNEDY sworn.

On Tuesday the 24th of last month, about ten in the morning, I went out from Newgate-street to go to Chelsea; I am a linen-draper ; when I returned I found a pane of glass in the window had been broken, and two handkerchiefs taken out; the prisoner was then in custody in Wood-street Compter.

WILLIAM GROVE sworn.

On the 24th of last month I saw the prisoner and two others lurking about, I had a suspicion, I watched them, they went up a court, and had some conversation, they came back, and went to the shop-window of the prosecutor; I heard some glass break, and saw the prisoner with something white in his hand, I pursued him, and knocked him down, and took those two muslin neck handkerchiefs out of his pocket.

The property deposed to by the prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I picked them up in Newgate-street.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-36

320. WILLIAM REED was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , a cotton waistcoat, value 3 s. a man's hat value 2 s. a neckcloth, value 1 s. and a pair of plated spurs, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Chapman .

THOMAS CHAPMAN sworn.

The prisoner was a fellow servant of mine at Mr. Rucker's, he ran away from his place on the 25th of March; I missed some things on the night that he went away and the rest the next morning; his brother came up to town, and heard he had done this, and he and another took him, I saw him in Gracechurch-street, at Mr. Jacob's, about thirteen days after the fact with the things upon him; he had a silk handkerchief round his neck, and a neck cloth of mine on, he had the hat and waistcoat on, and the spurs in his pocket.

(The property deposed to.)

JOHN SHEPHERD sworn.

I have seen Chapman wear those things before; I met the prisoner, I saw him at Mr. Jacobs's with the things on him.

JOHN HAMMET sworn.

I am an officer, I took the prisoner into custody.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He lent me the things, he had a new shirt of mine at the time.

Chapman. There was a shirt hanging up at the time.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-37

321. THOMAS GREENBANK and THOMAS WOOLLERTON were indicted for stealing, on the 19th of March , one cotton counterpane, value 3 s. two pair of sheets, value 12 s. one linen pillow case, value 1 s. the property of Edward White , being in a lodging room let to Thomas Greenbank as his lodging .

A second count charging both the prisoners, on the same day, with feloniously stealing, one cotton counterpane, value 3 s. two pair of sheets, value 12 s. one linen pillow case, value 1 s. and two cambrick handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Edward White .

ANN PARKER sworn.

On the 19th of March I was coming down Mulberry-court, Coleman-street, I heard the cry of stop thieves, I saw two men running, I saw Mrs. White's son lay hold of one of them, and the other ran past me with a bundle, I saw a gentleman run after him, and lay hold of him, I saw them tusling together on the ground, and the bundle lay in the kennel, I picked it up, and gave it to Mrs. White; it was the prisoner Woollerton that had the bundle, I am sure as to his person.

MARY WHITE sworn.

I am the wife of Edward White , the two

prisoners came on Thursday the 19th of March, and asked me if I had a lodging to let; I said yes, but it was only half a bed to let, and that was in the garret, I told them I did not think it would suit them, as it was too dirty and too mean for them, they were genteelly dressed, they asked me to look at it, and they did, and Woollerton said to Greenbank, it will do for you; I asked them a great many questions, and they said they had a great chest to bring; I told them the price of the bed per week, and they agreed to take it, they came at half after eight at night; I wondered to see them both, for I thought it was only for one of them, I thought that he might be come to see the other home; then they desired to go to bed, I had only let the half bed to one of them, and I was surprised to see them both; I went up stairs to turn the bed down, and left them in the kitchen; then I came down, and they went up stairs, I began to have a little suspicion, and I went up stairs, and as I went up they both passed me; Woollerton opened the door, and they both ran out at the street-door; my son had just come in, and was in the kitchen, one of them had a bundle; I called out stop thief, and my son ran out and brought Greenbank back, and Mrs. Parker brought me the bundle.

Court. Are these things in the bundle yours? - Yes, I declare by the God that made me they are.

(The property deposed to by Mrs. White.)

JOSEPH EDWARD WHITE sworn.

On the 19th of March last the two prisoners came to lodge, my mother had let them the lodging, they came about half after eight o'clock, and went up stairs, my mother went up afterwards, and they both came down and rushed out; my mother called out stop thief, and I followed and took Greenbank, and brought him back.

- BELLOWS sworn.

I was going down Mulberry-court, and I saw a man rush by with a bundle, he dropped it, and I ran after him and took him.

PRISONER GREENBANK's DEFENCE.

I never saw any of them in my life; I was going along, and there was a cry of stop thief, and the young man stopt me.

PRISONER WOOLLERTON's DEFENCE.

There were several people running; there was a cry of stop thief, and I began to run, and a person laid hold of me.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-38

322. WILLIAM NOWLAN was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of March , five pounds weight of sena, value 10 s. the perty of persons unknown.

TITUS HAYES sworn.

I am a Custom-house officer; on the 20th of March, I am not sure as to the day of the week, it was between two and three o'clock, the sena was lost from Galley Quay, I saw it taken by the prisoner at the bar, William Nowlan ; he took it away out of a large bag, and put it into a small bag; he carried it away immediately, I saw him carry it away; I saw him stopt, and I saw Bramley take it from him; Bramley has had it ever since, it has not been owned; I believe there are about five pounds of it; the prisoner said another man gave it him.

Court. Did you see the prisoner take it out of the bag? - I believe he did, there was another man with him, who was taken afterwards, and discharged by the magistrate; the property was found on the prisoner, he was taken on Tower-Hill.

Court. Did you know the prisoner before? - I have known him about ten years; he used to work in the crane as a porter; I

never heard any thing bad of the man before.

- BRAMLEY sworn.

I am a noon-tender (a watchman at noon from one to three at the Customs) the last witness called me; the sena was under my charge to see that nobody took any; I went up Galley-gateway, and followed the prisoner to Tower-Hill; I took the bag of sena from him; I have not known much of the prisoner, I have not known him above a month.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was looking for a job of work on the quays; and a person gave me this sena to carry, and was to give me a pot of beer; the gentleman took me on Tower-Hill, and said I had stole the property.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-39

323. CHARLOTTE TISDALE was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , a flock-bed, value 2 s. a featherbed, value 10 s. a bolster, value 2 s. a pair of sheets, value 3 s. a linen sheet, value 1 s. a pair of bellows, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Ryley , in her lodging-room .

THOMAS RYLEY sworn.

I am a housekeeper . The prisoner lodged with me about 13 months; the prisoner and her mother took the room; they both lived together; her mother's name is Julia Welch ; they were to pay me 3 s. a week; they lodged there fifteen months; I did not miss any thing 'till the 7th of March; when I missed the things in the indictment, I missed all of them at one time; she had not left my lodgings, a person saw her take a large bundle out of my house.

WILLIAM CATER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner pawned a pair of sheets with me, on the 27th of of February she pawned one sheet, and on the 28th another; I am sure it was the prisoner, I had seen her before, I could have taken any thing in the world of her, she used to use my shop, and I always thought her honest.

A WITNESS sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner left a feather-bed and a flock-bed with me, it was about the beginning of March; I am sure it was the prisoner, I had known her ten or eleven years; I purchased them, I gave her five shillings for one, and three shillings for another; they are old things, I have kept them from the time I have purchased them.

ESTHER RYLEY sworn.

I know the sheets to be my husband's property, because I have others of the same sort; I know the bed, more than half the feathers have been taken out, and I know the flock-bed is mine; it wanted mending, and I know it by a piece I put on it myself.

Court. Had she run away or left her lodgings? - No, she had not.

Did she owe you any thing? - Yes, a guinea and ninepence; there was about 19 s. for rent, and 4 s. 6 d. she borrowed.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

They accepted a note of hand last Saturday night from my mother for the value of these goods; I have witnesses to it; the witness who I left the bed with was to keep it for a week, and I was to return him the money; I went at the expiration of the week, and he refused to deliver it up, though I offered him the money; and some other trifling things, which I left for 4 s. 6 d. he made me pay 9 s. for; Mrs. Ryley gave me leave to pledge the things in the time of my distress, provided I would replace them again.

Court to Mrs. Riley. Did you ever give the prisoner leave to pawn any thing of yours? - I gave her leave to pawn the sheets, but not to pawn the beds; I do not want to hurt the poor woman if I can help it.

Can you tell me the words that passed when you gave her that authority? - I cannot.

Did you tell her she might make use of the things? - Yes, I did.

Court. I think we need go no further

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-40

324. THOMAS STOBIN was indicted for stealing, on the 19th of April , one guinea, one half guinea, and six shillings in silver , the property of Ezekiel Cleeall .

EZEKIEL CLEEALL sworn.

I was going through St. James's Park , on Sunday Morning a little after ten o'clock, going through the court into St. James's Palace; I had my breeches pocket turned inside out, there was a crowd of people; I had my pocket picked of a guinea, a half-guinea, and six shillings in silver; I don't know who did it.

CHARLES YOUNG sworn.

On Sunday morning last I was going through the passage into St. James's Palace; I saw some people I suspected; I laid hold of the prisoner, and he dropt some money; he struck me on the mouth; I took him to the Rotation, and afterwards I heard the prosecutor was robbed; I saw the prosecutor in the mob, and the prisoner was near to him.

Mr. Knowlys, Prisoner's Council. You are an old officer, I believe, you say the prisoner dropt some money? - He did.

Upon your oath don't you know his hand was in his breeches pocket, and that you pulled his hand out of his pocket, and he dropped 2 s.? - I don't know whether it was or not.

Will you swear it was not? - I will not swear either one way or the other.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-41

325. THOMAS ANDREWS was indicted, for stealing, on the 4th of March , two live pheasants, called gold China pheasants, value 20 s. the property of Jervoise Clarke Jervoise , Esq .

WILLIAM GOUGH sworn.

The prisoner at the bar brought me a pair of gold China pheasants, on Wednesday morning the 4th of March; I live on Holborn-Hill; I buy and sell birds; he said, that the person they belonged to, would not take less than 30 s. for them, he said they was not his, he was selling them for a person; I asked him to let me look at them, he took one out of one side of his great-coat pocket, and the other out of the other; I said, you have not come honestly by these birds, and I will take you to the Compter; he was had up three times, and no person appearing, he was discharged; some time afterwards Mr. Jervois's servant came and owned the birds, and I informed the officer, and he was taken into custody; the hen pheasant died.

GEORGE ROLLS sworn.

I pinioned the birds, and burnt them under the left wing; I am gardner to Mr. Jervoise; I saw the birds at Gough's; I knew them by a burnt-mark in the left wing; I knew the cock in particular; they were Mr. Jervois's; I saw them on the 3d of March, and they were missed on the 4th.

Gough. The cock bird's tail was pulled out, and the gardner shewed me the pheasant's

tail, which had been left behind; the prisoner brought them to me on the 4th.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought them for 6 s. on Tower-hill.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-42

326. WILLIAM BATES was indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , two pounds and three quarters of salt pork, value 1 s. the property of Joshua Gregory .

WILLIAM COMYNS sworn.

On the 25th of March coming along Fore-street, Moorfields, in the evening about eight or nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner take a small loin of pork from Mr. Gregory's shop, it was in the window, with that I crossed the street, and took him by the collar, and took him back, he offered me the pork, and wished me to let him go, but I made him bring it back, and he brought it to the shop-door, and dropt it.

THOMAS HILLIER sworn.

I saw the prisoner take the pork out of the shop; I saw him drop it, and I picked it up.

JOHN HEALIS sworn.

I am a constable; I was sent for, and the pork was delivered to me; I have had it ever since.

JOSHUA GREGORY sworn.

I delivered it to the constable.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming by, I saw the pork on the ground, and I picked it up.

The prisoner called four witnesses to his character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-43

325. ALICE SARJEANT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , seven earthen plater, value 10 d. the property of William Davis .

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn.

I keep a Staffordshire warehouse in Fleet-market , and likewise a stand in the market; on the 12th of March I was shewing a person in the shop, and she came and took the plates off a stand, and put them under her cloak, and went off; I stopt her before she had got twenty yards, and I sent for an officer who took her.

JOHN EDWARDS sworn.

On the 12th of March I took the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was very much in liquor; I thought I had paid for them.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-44

327. THOMAS STEVENS and GEORGE WILSON were indicted, for stealing, on the 23d of March , ninety pounds weight of copper, value 40 s. the property of William Homer and Alexander Rabey .

JOHN TAYLOR sworn.

On the 23d of March, about seven o'clock in the morning, I went out from No. 9, in Allhallow's Lane, where I live, I returned about one, I found a heap of copper cakes, and other pieces like this disturbed; I am clerk to the prosecutors, and live over the warehouse; I was informed two people had been taken; I can't rightly swear to the copper.

JOHN WAINWRIGHT sworn.

About twelve o'clock, on the 31st of March, I saw the prisoners in Allhallow's Lane, they were about the door of Homer

and Rabey; I suspected them; I went and hid myself in the warehouse; I had not been there above two minutes before Wilson came in, and the other went to the door; Wilson went to the right hand, and laid hold of a piece of copper, which he did not take away, but went back again; then Stevens, he came in, and he went back again; I went out, and I walked to the top of the lane; I kept my eye on them, and came back, and went into a cooper's shop, then I observed Stevens at the door, and Wilson came out loaded; he stooped down to buckle his shoes, and I went and laid hold of him, Stevens then came up, and Wilson dropt the copper, and then I laid hold of both the prisoners.

Court. Did you see Wilson come out of the warehouse with the copper? - I did.

HENRY PARRY sworn.

I saw them about the warehouse door on the day of the robbery.

PRISONER STEVENS's DEFENCE.

I was coming by when the other man was taken; I know nothing of it, and he laid hold of me.

The prisoner Stevens called two witnesses to his character.

THOMAS STEVENS , GEORGE WILSON ,

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-45

328. JOHN GILLETT and JOHN FORSITH were indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, on William Norman , between the hours of 7 and 8 in the evening of the 5th of March, and feloniously demanding the money of the said William Norman , with an intent the same to steal .

WILLIAM NORMAN sworn.

Between the hours of 7 and 8 o'clock on Thursday evening, the 5th of March, I was coming from Stepney to Mile End road across the fields, there was nobody with me; about the middle of the first field I came into I saw four men dressed like sailors coming towards me; I turned out of the way about three yards to let them pass; the prisoner Forsith whipt the stick from under his coat; and said, Master, have you got any money? Money, says I, yes; that I have plenty; then says he, deliver it it directly, for we must have it; then I put my hand in my coat-pocket; I had two brace of pistols about me; and the other prisoner, Gillett said, you may as well deliver it, for we must have it; by that time three of them had got their sticks up; he then put his stick across his arm, and came up with his hand, as if to receive the money; I had two brace of pistols about me; I pulled out a pistol from my breeches pocket; and one of the other two said, we are as good be off, we had better be off; and they ran off, and I fired right in amongst them; and I followed them, crying out stop thief! I am an officer in the excise; and I had been out after some smugglers, which is the reason of my being armed; one of these sticks I can swear to, but the other I will not; I pursued them, they separated, Gillett was never out of my sight, but Forsith got clear off; the corner of the Bank I pickt up this stick; Gillett was stopt in about ten minutes; I am sure to his person.

GEORGE BURGESS sworn.

I had been to White-horse-lane, coming back, me and another person heard a pistol go off, and the cry of stop thief! the prisoner Gillett running past us on the opposite side of the way; I followed Gillett, and took him; I did not see Forsith; we took him to the watch-house; he said, he had done nothing; and then we asked him, how he came to run away if he was not guilty: He said, he ran, for he was afraid they would shoot him; we went afterwards near to the place, and there we found these two bludgeons.

Norman. I did not see Forsith stopt; he was taken the next morning by one of

Mr. Smith's officers in Nightingale-lane; I am sure as to his person.

FOR THE PRISONER FORSITH.

ELIZABETH CHIVENS sworn.

My husband keeps the sign of the Crown in Nightingale-lane.

Court. How long have you known the prisoner? - About six weeks; at the time he is charged of doing the robbery, he was in my house; my child was very ill; there were several people dancing up stairs, and he was with them; I went up stairs to take my child up to-bed; I had the child in my arms, and a pillow, and two bottles of medicine, and a candle; I had occasion to go through the club-room; there is a passage at the end of the club-room, which parts the room where I was going to and the club-room; this was a little before eight o'clock; I recollect it, for there was an old lady lay ill in the room; and I asked her, if she wanted any thing? and she asked me, what o'clock it was? I told her; he came up to me, and took the candle to light me; he is a very civil young man, it was on the 5th of March, on a Thursday.

Court. How do you know that; how come you to recollect it? - It was a particular day, I went to a burial that day; and Mr. Smith, the Justice, sent to my husband afterwards to know whether he he had seen Forsight at his house that evening; I should not have recollected it, but for the circumstances of his coming up to me, and holding the candle to light me.

How many people were there in the club-room at that time? - There were forty or fifty men and women.

Did you know them all? - No, I did not.

Who desired you to come here? - The Justice desired I would appear on his trial, as he had been informed he was at our house that evening; he said that as he was fully committed, nothing could be done, but I must appear here.

What part of the room did the prisoner come from, when he came and held the candle? - He came from the further part, he came running towards me.

How long did you stay in the room? - Not above a minute or two.

Was the prisoner dancing while you was there? - No.

Was there any body dancing? - Yes, some of the company were dancing, but the prisoner was not, he was standing up; there is another witness here, her name is Hannah George , she is a stay-maker; she came to our house to order some beer, and hearing the company dancing she went up; she staid till ten o'clock.

Where does she live? - In Sun-yard, near to my back-door.

What time did she come in? - I believe a little before eight, about a quarter of an hour, or thereabouts, as near as I can recollect.

Are you sure as to the time? - Yes, I am sure it was a little before eight; she called for her beer, and then she said no, I won't have it now, I'll go up and have a dance.

How long did she stay? - Till ten o'clock.

Did the prisoner go away at the same time she did? - I believe he did.

Did you see him go away? - I believe I did, I cannot rightly say.

How do you know it was ten o'clock when he went? - We always clear our house at that time.

When she went up to join the dancers, who went up with her? - Nobody, she went up by herself.

How long was it after she had been up that you went up? - Directly afterwards, I went to put the child to bed.

Had you seen the prisoner before you went up? - I saw him at seven o'clock, he came down with an empty pot, and ordered some more beer up.

Are you sure it was him; - Yes, I am sure of it.

Who did the prisoner dance with? - I don't know who he danced with, nor whether he did dance.

Did he sup at your house? - No, none of them ever supped in the house.

Was Hannah George 's beer taken up to her? - No, she had her beer when she went home.

Are you sure it was not taken up to her? - I believe not, but I will not be certain.

Did she stop with you when she came down? - I don't recollect whether I spoke to her, or whether she spoke to me; she did not stop I am sure, I was very busy at the bar.

Which way did they come out? - They come past the bar-door to go out.

Did Hannah George take her beer home? - I think she did when she went away; I think she had some when she went out, but I will not be positive.

Did the prisoner or Hannah George go out first? - I think the prisoner went out just after her, I am not quite certain.

Did she stop any time in the bar with you before she went up stairs? - No, she went up stairs as soon as she came in.

She and you are very intimate? - No, she has her beer at our house.

Who was in company with the prisoner? - I don't recollect whether there was any body in particular in company with him.

Did you speak to him when he went out? - No, I did not.

Did he speak to you? - Not that I recollect; I believe he did not.

Did you observe whether the prisoner and Hannah George went out together? - I did not, but I see them go out; I cannot say whether they went out together or not, I was busy in the bar.

How often had you seen the prisoner on that evening? - I saw him several times, he came down stairs to order beer.

Are the houses in Sun-court numbered? - No, they are not.

You and Hannah George are particularly acquainted? - No, not particularly, she has her beer from our house.

How far is Stepney-fields to your house? About a mile and a half.

HANNAH GEORGE sworn.

I am a stay-maker, I live in Nightingale-lane, facing to Mrs. Chivens's back-door.

How long have you lived there? - Six or seven months.

How long have you known Mrs. Chivens? - Since a little after Christmas, they came into the house then.

Had you known them before they came to that house? - No.

Have you been much acquainted with Mrs. Chivens since? - No, not much.

You have drank tea there two or three times? - I do not know, perhaps I might.

And sometimes you have drank beer there? - Yes.

Do you know Sun-yard? - Yes, I live in Sun-yard, facing Mrs. Chivens's back-door.

How come you to say Nightingale-lane? - Sun-yard is in Nightingale-lane.

Are the houses in Sun-yard numbered? - Yes, I live at No. 37, in Sun-yard.

How many houses are there? - I don't recollect rightly how many.

Are they numbered on both sides? - Yes.

Do you know either of the prisoners? - Yes, I know Forsith.

Was you ever in company with him at Mrs. Chivens's? - Yes, I was, I danced with him there one night.

When was it? - On the 5th of March.

What day? - I don't recollect the day.

How came you to recollect the day of the month more than the day of the week? - I don't recollect, I took notice of the day of the month, because this young man was taken up; he was dancing with me the night before he was taken up.

How long have you known him? - I have known him five or six months.

What brought you to Mrs. Chivens's on the night of the 5th of March? - I went in to have a pint of beer, I heard them dancing, and I went up stairs to have a dance with them.

Who did you dance with? - With that young man Forsith.

Did you and him go in together? - No, he was there when I went in.

How came you to dance with him? - He asked me to dance with him.

When you went into the house did you enquire for him? - No, I did not.

Did not you ask if he was there; did not you say you had promised to come and have a dance with him? - No, I did not ask for him, I had not promised to go to dance, with him; I had just left off work, and hearing them dancing up stairs, I went up.

What time do you leave off work? - I generally leave off work about eight.

How did you know it was eight o'clock that night? - I looked at the clock, it was within five minutes of eight.

Did you see Mrs. Chivens come up stairs? - Yes, I did; I saw Mrs. Chivens come up stairs with the child in her arms.

What did she say to you? - Nothing.

What, did not she speak to you? - No, Sir.

Nor you to her? - No, Sir.

Did not she ask you how you liked your partner? - No, Sir.

Did she speak to your partner? - I do not recollect that she did.

How soon after you came in did you go up stairs? - I went up directly.

Had you called for any thing to drink? - Yes, I called for a pint of beer; the servant brought it up stairs to me.

How soon after you had been up stairs? - Almost directly.

You are sure Mrs. Chivens did not bring it up herself? - I am sure the servant brought it up.

Had you had any conversation with Mrs. Chivens before you went up stairs? - Not any, I believe.

Are you sure of that? - I don't recollect that I had.

How soon after you went up stairs, did you begin to dance? - Almost directly.

Who did you dance with? - With that young man, the prisoner Forsith.

How long had you been dancing before Mrs. Chivens came up? - I believe about half an hour.

What did Mrs. Chivens come up for? - She came up with the child that was ill; she had a pillow and a candle, and the prisoner ran and took the candle, and held it while Mrs. Chivens unlocked the door.

When she came back, how long did she stay to see you dance? - About ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour.

How many were there dancing? - There were two couple.

What were you dancing? - We were dancing Scotch reels.

Did Mrs. Chivens come into the room again? - No, I don't recollect that she did.

Had you any brandy and water to drink? - I can't say, I was drinking all manner of liquors.

What was it that Mrs. Chivens brought up? - I don't know that she brought up any thing.

Don't you recollect her bringing up some brandy and water, or rum and water? - I can't say, but I believe it was brandy and water, or rum and water.

Who brought it up; Sarah Taylor , or Mrs. Chivens herself? - I believe it was Mrs. Chivens herself.

How long was that after she had gone down? - I believe it was about an hour; now I come to think, she did come up again; it was her that brought the liquor.

Then you are positive now, that it was Mrs. Chivens herself brought up the liquor? - Yes, I am sure of it.

The Remainder of this Trial in the next Part, which will be published in a few Days.

Reference Number: t17890422-45

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday, the 22d of APRIL, 1789, and the following Days;

Being the FOURTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honourable William Gill , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY E. HODGSON, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND; And Published by Authority.

NUMBER IV. PART III.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row; and J. BELL, Royal Exchange.

MDCCLXXXIX.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of John Gillett and John Forsith .

Q. to Hannah George . Did she drink out of it herself? - I don't recollect whether she did or did not.

Don't you recollect your partner asking her to drink to the next merry-meeting? - No, I do not.

What were you dancing of then when she brought the liquor in? - We were dancing a reel then, the same as before.

Who were dancing then? - Myself, and the three young men who were dancing before.

What were there no others dancing that evening but you and those three young men? - Yes, there were more in the course of the evening; but both the times Mrs. Chivens came up, we four were dancing.

Were there any more young women in the room beside yourself? - Yes, there were plenty.

Did your partner see you home? - No, Sir.

Did not he go out of the house with you? - He did not, to the best of my knowledge.

Who did go out with you? - Nobody to the best of my knowledge.

What did Mrs. Chivens say to you when you went out? - I don't recollect.

What had you and your partner there to eat? - I had nothing, nor my partner neither.

You are sure of that? - Yes.

What was it you said to Mrs. Chivens when you went in about the beer? - I don't recollect I said any thing to her; I ordered the maid to bring it up, and she brought it up as soon as I had got up stairs.

Mrs. Chivens called in again. How long was it after Susannah George went up stairs, that you went up yourself? - I went up directly after, before she began to dance.

Did you see her dance? - No, I did not.

Do you know who she danced with? - No, I do not.

How long did you stao in the room where they were dancing? - I did not stay a moment neither going or coming back; after I had put the child to-bed, I came back.

You are sure you did not stop to see them dance? - I did not stop at all.

Who carried up the liquor on that evening? - The man and maid servants, and sometimes my husband.

Did you carry up anything on that evening? - Yes, I went up several times.

Was the prisoner Forsith in the room every time you went up? - Yes, I believe he was; I saw him at several times, and I saw him below stairs, he came down to order more beer.

How many times did you go up after you had put the child to-bed? - I went up three or four times.

How many were there dancing? - I saw no more than two people, at each time I went up, that were dancing.

What liquor was it that you took up to the prisoner, and Hannah George ? - I took none up to them.

What! no brandy and water? - No.

You are sure of that? - Yes.

How long did you stay in the room when you went up? - I stopt no longer than I got the money, and then I came down directly.

The prisoner Gillet called one witness to his character.

JOHN GILLETT, JOHN FORSITH,

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-46

330. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of March , a linen bed-quilt, value 5 s. a woollen blanket, value 12 d. and a copper saucepan, value 12 d. the property of Alice Haynes , in his lodging-room , &c. let to him by the said Alice Haynes.

ALICE HAYNES sworn.

I live in Cockpit-alley, Drury-lane ; in March last the prisoner lodged with me; he had been there a fortnight and four days; he had a one pair-of-stairs front-room; on the 6th of March he left the lodgings; one of the lodgers informed me he had left the key with her, but she had not seen him; when I went up she gave me the key; I opened the door, and I missed the things in the indictment; the week would not have been up 'till Monday; I took the prisoner up yesterday was a fortnight, and a strange person brought me the quilt, I had never seen the person before, but I refused taking it; I have never heard of the other things; he owes me for a week and four days, that is all.

JOHN WATTS sworn.

I am an officer; I took the prisoner in custody; I know nothing else.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was very much in distress; my wife had lain-in, and distress drove us to it; my sister, I believe, had advised my wife to it, she was faint for want of the common necessaries of life.

Prosecutrix. It is very true, his wife did lay-in.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-47

331. JONATHAN GARLICK was indicted, for feloniously making an assault on the King's highway, on William Peak , on the 8th of April last, with an intent the monies of the said William Peak to steal .

The prosecutor not appearing, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-48

331. SUSANNAH BRAY, alias GAY , was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of April , a linen sheet, value 4 s. the property of John Raynes , in her lodging-room , &c.

JOHN RAYNES sworn.

I live in Blue-cross-street, Leicester-fields ; the prisoner lodged with me, on the 14th of April she came to me, and took a room under pretence that she was come out of the country; I let her a room for 5 s. a week; she staid the Tuesday night and the Wednesday night; I then missed my sheet; she was taken up, and the sheet that was missing was found wrapped round her; I delivered her the sheets myself when she came into the room.

CHARES ELLIOTT sworn.

I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday the 16th, I believe it was about four o'clock in the afternoon; I saw her near Litchfield-street office door; I searched her, and this sheet was pinned to her petticoats by her pocket-hole, in a long bundle, it came down to her heels almost.

(The property deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had not the sheet when the officer took me.

FOR THE PRISONER.

ANN FIELD sworn.

I keep a clothes shop; the prisoner has bought several things of me, and sold me several things; I always thought her very honest.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-49

333. SAMUEL HINTON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of April , eleven pounds weight of lead-pipe, with a brass cock affixed therein, value 2 s. the property of James Larman , affixed to the dwelling-house ; against the statute.

ELIZABETH LARMAN sworn.

I am the wife of James Larman ; we live in Northampton-street, Wood's-close, Clerkenwell ; on the night of the 22d instant I lost the lead, about 11 lb. weight, with a brass cock; it was taken out of a yard, affixed to the brick-wall the back of the house; we were called up between one and two, and was told by the watchman, that he had a person in custody for stealing the pipe; I saw the prisoner on the Friday morning; I have fitted the lead, and it answers.

THOMAS SINGLETON sworn.

I am a watchman; between twelve and one I found the prisoner in Mr. Earman's yard; I took him immediately; I caught him, the water was running out of the pipe; the pipe was laying against the wall; the pipe appears to have been twisted off; it was laying on one side against the wall.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-50

334. VALENTINE FRYAR was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , 20 yards of silk for handkerchiefs, value 4 l. two muslin wrappers, value 10 s. one piece of cotton, value 20 s. two pieces of silk and cotton for waistcoats, value 20 s. and several other things, the property of Charles Fielding and James Underwood , privately in their shop .

(The case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

CHARLES FIELDING sworn.

I am in partnership with Mr. James Underwood; I am allowed a sum out of the partnership to pay the rent and taxes;

I am the housekeeper; the prisoner at the bar was employed as a carpenter at our house; he had been at work there before; we took notice of his diligence; and as we wanted some alterations in the shop, we employed him on his own account, and advanced him money to go on with; he was employed the latter end of March in our warehouse, and had three men at work; I had received information of his dishonesty; I took out a search warrant to search his apartments.

WILLIAM WEAVER sworn.

In consequence of an information I went to the prisoner's lodgings; and, in a box which I saw in the room, I found a quantity of goods; I asked him, if they were his? he said, no, they are my master's; I have robbed him, and I deserve to he hanged for it; the next morning I went to the prosecutor's, and there were three carpenters at work; I took one of them in custody, and he acknowledged to have some of the goods; he was an accomplice, and he was admitted evidence.

JONATHAN REDGRAVE sworn.

I went with the last witness to the prisoner's lodgings; and in his box we found several things; he said he had robbed his master, and the best of masters.

RICHARD WILD sworn.

I was employed by the prisoner to work at the prosecutor's house; I came to work for him on Monday was a month; on the next Thursday the prisoner said, he would give me a piece for a waistcoat; I said, we had better not, we should get ourselves into trouble; he says, don't you touch any thing, I can get plenty that will not be missed; he took a piece of silk and cotton, and desired me to take some others; which I did, and took to my lodgings.

JOHN MORGAN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I received these two handkerchiefs on the 17th of April; I did not receive them from the prisoner.

ALEXANDER ELLMAN sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Underwood and Fielding; I can swear to the two muslin wrappers, by my hand-writing being on them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There is a piece of cotton which I bought myself expecting to go to India, but being disappointed, I had it when I was apprehended.

GUILTY, Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-51

335. DANIEL SEWELL was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of February , a linen sheet, value 2 s. a pair of blankets, value 2 s. and a rug, value 12 d. the property of Thomas Isaacs .

ELIAS ISAACS sworn.

On the 28th of February, near ten in the evening, I was in my yard, my wife called me, and said she saw the prisoner with some property; she was in the kitchen, I ran out after him; he had got out of my sight.

MARY ISSACS sworn.

I was sitting at supper in the kitchen, about ten o'clock at night, and I heard somebody come softly down stairs; I opened the door to see who it was, and I observed it was the prisoner with a bundle of clothes under his arm; I knew him before, I saw him coming down, and I laid hold of him; I called out to my husband; he got from me, and went out of the house, and carried the bundle with him; we all followed him, our children, and all of us, calling out stop thief!

Court to E. Isaacs. When did you first see the prisoner? - I first saw him near Spitalfield

Church; my wife told me his name before I pursued him; I had known him before, when he came from Greenland; when I took him he had no bundle on him, nor has any thing been found to this day; at the watch-house, he said, he wanted to speak to me, and he said, I have been in great distress; he told me he had taken the property; he was away half an hour before I took him; I lost a sheet, a blanket, and a coverlid, which were up stairs on the bed; the room had been locked, and the staple was forced out.

JOHN WHISTON sworn.

I am a patrol of Spitalfields parish; on the 28th of February, at half past ten, I took the prisoner; a boy was crying out he had robbed his daddy; the prisoner was then at the bottom of Red Lion-street, I told him he must go to the watch-house; he begged to go to speak to Mr. Isaacs first; Mr. Isaacs came up before we got to the watch-house, and when we got to the watch-house, he begged to speak to Mr. Isaacs himself; and when he had stept on one side, he begged Mr. Isaacs would forgive him; Mr. Isaacs said no, he would not; I asked him what he had done with the sheets; he said he had pawned them; I asked him where he pawned them, and for the duplicates; and he said where he pawned them they never gave any.

JAMES CUTLER sworn.

I know no more than the last witness.

ELIZABETH WALKER sworn.

I know no more than I locked the door in the morning.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was walking along, and the little boy said I had stole his daddy's things; I know nothing of it.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-52

336. JOHN EADES and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , two quart pewter pots, value 3 s. and two pint pewter pots, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Bramwell .

THOMAS BRAMWELL sworn.

I keep a public-house in Litchfield-street ; on the 10th of March, in the afternoon, my boy had been gathering his pots, and they were afterwards taken away.

ANN WAPSHOTT sworn.

I saw the two men on the night of the illuminations, take away the pots; they were hanging on the ballustrades, next door to the rotation office; it was between five and six o'clock; I only know them by their clothes, I don't know their faces.

CHARLES YOUNG sworn.

I found those pots in Eades's room, on the evening of the 10th of March, there were two in a frying-pan, there was only Eades in the room.

THOMAS DALTON sworn.

I was with the last witness when Eades was taken.

(The property deposed to.)

JOHN EADES , GUILTY .

THOMAS WILLIAMS , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-53

337. JOHN MOORE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Allchin , about the hour of seven in the night of the 12th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, two black silk cloaks, value 30 s. a hat, value 2 s. the property of the said Richard Allchin .

RICHARD ALLCHIN sworn.

I found the prisoner at the bar in my

room on the 12th of March, about a quarter before eight in the evening; I was below, my wife went up stairs, and tried to get into the room; and she came down rather alarmed, and told me somebody was in the room; it is a back-room, one pair of stairs, it is my bed-chamber; I went up and tried to get in, I could not; I called to her, and she brought the key, and unlocked the door; I went in and asked the man how he came there; he said he had made a mistake in the room; I asked him how these drawers came open; he said he had not got any thing; my wife and some others then came up, he had got the two cloaks and the hat in his apron, which was spread on the floor; I then sent for a constable, he was searched, and the constable found some keys, and a picklock; one of the keys opens the door, the street-door is always open in the day-time; we had lighted candles above an hour.

Mrs. ALLCHIN sworn.

I had been in the room about an hour and an half before, when I came out I locked the door; I went up again and tried to unlock the door and could not; I went down stairs to call my husband, and I heard somebody in the room; my husband came up and I followed him, I then unlocked the door, I could not unlock it before, the key would not turn round; when my husband went up it turned round more easy, I saw the man standing by the door, I saw nothing else; I was very flurried, it was a quarter before eight o'clock.

JOHN LAMBERT sworn.

I am a constable, I was sent for to take the prisoner in custody; I searched him, and on him I found these keys, a screwdriver, and two screws; one of the keys, the smallest, opens the door, I tried it out of curiosity.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was to meet a person at their house, I used to use it; it is a public-house.

Mrs. Allchin. I did not know he was to meet any body there; I had not known him three months.

FOR THE PRISONER.

JAMES BIRCH sworn.

I am a founder, the prisoner was a master smith, he did live in Hyde-street, Bloomsbury; he has left that about three years ago, I have known him seventeen years, he has always bore the character of a very honest man.

THOMAS BLINCOE sworn.

I am a glazier, I have known the prisoner sixteen or seventeen years, he always bore an excellent character.

The prisoner called three other witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-54

338. PETER ROCK was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of March , a half cambrick handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of George Anstey .

GEORGE ANSTEY sworn.

On the 14th of March, about eleven in the evening, my partner Mr. William Baker informed me he had seen our servant maid in the shop, the prisoner used to come to see her; we supposed she had robbed us, we found the prisoner concealed in her bed, she was his wife; there was nobody but me and Mr. Baker, and he run down and gave information, and the prisoner was delivered into the custody of the watchman; he was taken to the watch-house, and the officer found one of my neck-handkerchiefs round his neck; he swore a little, and said we might do our worst.

JAMES TALLBOY sworn.

I found the neck-handkerchief round the neck of the prisoner.

The handkerchief deposed to.

WILLIAM BAKER sworn.

I found the prisoner in his wife's bed; she was our servant, I called the watchman and he was taken.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My wife gave me the handkerchief in the bustle, when the watch was called.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-55

339. ANN ROCK , the wife of PETER ROCK , was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March, three pair of linen sheets, value 15 s. a cotton counterpane, value 14 s. three table-cloths, value 12 s. and several other things , the property of George Anstey and Peter Baker .

PETER BAKER sworn.

The prisoner was servant to me and Mr. Anstey, from December till the 8th of March, when I gave her warning to leave us; on the 14th about eleven o'clock in the evening, I went into the shop, I saw her there, she had no business there, and she blew out the candle, I had a suspicion of her, I followed her up stairs, I saw something under her arm, I desired her to come into the dining-room; she said if I had any suspicion I might examine her; I did, and I found several of our things on her, and her husband was found in the bed, on the same evening; the next morning I searched her room, and found in her drawer a parcel of duplicates, amongst which were some for sheets and table-cloths, of which we had missed a great number; we found where they were, she was to quit our service the next day; I know no more.

JAMES TALLBOY sworn.

Mr. Baker delivered me those duplicates, I went in search of the things, and found them at six different pawnbrokers.

JOHN GAREWOOD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Rochford, a pawnbroker; on the 28th of February, Saturday in the evening, these sheets were pledged with us by the prisoner at the bar; I am sure she is the person.

The sheets deposed to by Mr. Baker by the marks.

RICHARD WILLIAMSON sworn.

I live with Mr. Fleming, a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane; these sheets were pawned with us by the prisoner at the bar, on Saturday the 3d of January.

Mr. Baker. I believe these to be ours, we lost sheets of this kind.

JOSEPH BARNES sworn.

I live with Mrs. Cooper in Wych-street, this counterpane was pledged to us by the prisoner at the bar, in the name of Mary Thomas , on the 23d of February.

Mr. Baker. We have lost a counterpane of this kind and quality.

THOMAS NEAVE sworn.

I live with Mr. Purcell in the Strand; I don't know who pledged those things, I was in the country.

SAMUEL NEWTH sworn.

These sheets were pledged with me by a woman; I believe it to be the prisoner, but I cannot swear to her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I lived with Mr. Baker, and he used to pay me two guineas a week to lay out in the house; I lost half a guinea, and I

pawned the things to make up the money.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-56

340. THOMAS NEWMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , seven guineas, in monies numbered , the property of Timothy Marshall .

TIMOTHY MARSHALL sworn.

On the 11th of last month my box was broke open, and my money taken out, from over Alderman Sawbridge's stables; the prisoner came and told me of it, I took him up on suspicion, and put him in the watch-house; I thought it must be him and no one else, and in the morning he owned it before the Justice.

HENRY PERRY sworn.

I am a watchman; about eleven or twelve o'clock on the 11th of last month, the prosecutor informed me he was robbed; I took the prisoner up on suspicion, and the next morning he confessed he had done the robbery; I advised him to give the money, and to let the poor fellow have his money, and to tell the truth, I told him so several times; I found seven shillings on him, he went to the stable, and took three guineas out of a hole, and gave to me, which he said was the man's money.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-57

341. JOHN BAKER was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , four pounds and three quarters weight of bacon, value 2 s. the property of James Clark .

JAMES CLARK sworn.

I am a cheesemonger ; on the 12th of March, (Thursday) about nine in the evening, I missed the property; it was lost from the shop, the prisoner had been a servant of mine eight months before.

THOMAS FITCH sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor, I was going down into the cellar, and the prisoner called me to hold his apron while he tied a string on, and I saw the bacon poke out of his breeches; I acquainted my master with it.

Mr. Schoen, Prisoner's Counsel. How was you holding the apron? - I was holding it up in front of him.

Can you swear that as you was holding the apron horizontally, standing before him, you could see the bacon poke out of his breeches, as you say? - Yes, I did.

GEORGE STAFFORD sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Clark; I found the bacon in the prisoner's breeches, it was Mr. Clark's property, I had only cut it off a quarter of an hour before; the prisoner was a porter to Mr. Clark.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Publickly whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-58

342. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Mitchell .

THOMAS MITCHELL sworn.

I live in Wood-street; on the 16th of April I lost a silk handkerchief; it was in the forenoon in Holborn; I was shewing

a little boy the peacocks at the bird-shop on Holborn-hill, and I missed my handkerchief, it was a silk one; I saw it as soon as the prisoner at the bar had got it from me; I saw it picked up, and the man that picked it up, gave it to me; I will not swear to the property.

WILLIAM SEABROOK sworn.

I am a butcher; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, and throw it down; I picked it up, and gave it to the prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was much in liquor; I know nothing about it.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-59

343. RICHARD COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Basham , on the King's highway, on the 27th of March last, and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a wooden barrel, value 6 d. one dead turkey, value 7 s. 6 d. two dead hares, value 8 s. one other ditto, value 4 s. two linen gowns, value 6 s. the property of John Hurnall and Thomas Bolton .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

EDWARD BASHAM sworn.

I am a porter to Mess. Hurnall and Bolton; the house is the Saracen's Head, Aldgate; Mr. Hurnall's christian name is John, and Mr. Bolton's Thomas; my master, Mr. Bolton, carries on the inn and the warehouse ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, they were in different parcels, I had the care of them all, and I took them from my master's house to the pitching-block at St. Dunstan's church, and I pitched them down there, and a gentleman came and asked me the way to Charing-cross; I cannot tell whether it is the prisoner or not; he asked me if there was not a Golden Cross at Charing-cross; I told him there was, and he asked me the way; I told him right forward, as right as he could go; and he said I was a damned rascal, I had told him wrong; and with that he knocked me down, and before I could recover myself, my load was gone.

Had you any part of the load about you when he knocked you down? - I had my hand on the pitching-block.

Had you your hand upon the pitching-block, or upon the things? - I had my hand upon the things.

Are you sure of that? - Yes; I do not know who the man was that knocked me down, nor that spoke to me.

Did you ever recover your things again? - Yes, five parcels out of the nine; I recovered the articles in the indictment, I know them all.

Where did you recover them? - A gentleman took them in Fetter-lane, that was Mrs. Stapleton, I saw the things in three hours after I had been knocked down, they were in the constable's hands, they were the same that I had in my custody; I can swear to them by the bills, and by the sight of them likewise; I did not lose the bill, my master has the bill, he is here; there were directions upon them when I lost them, and the same directions were upon them when they were found; one of which was;

" Miles Barnes , Esq. Edward-street, Portman-square;" there were eight ducks in it.

Mr. Knapp, Prisoners's Counsel. When was this that you had these parcels? - The 17th of March last.

Where were you to take them to? - I was to take them to different places according to the directions.

You pitched for case, I presume? - Yes.

Somebody came up and spoke to you for a considerable time? - Yes.

Asked you several questions? - Yes.

Will you swear positively you never put your hand off during the time the man was

talking to you? - Yes, I am sure I had my hand upon them when the man knocked me down.

How long did the conversation last? - It might be three minutes.

During the time the conversation took place, was your hand ever off the pitching-block? - No, it was not; when I pitched it down I had my hand on my load, and so it was when I was knocked down.

You cannot tell who knocked you down? - No.

Have not you said before the magistrate who knocked you down? - No.

Have not you said, you thought it was a tall stout man? - Yes, the man to appearance was a tall stout man.

Have you kept in that opinion down to the present time? - Yes, it was the same man that spoke to me at first.

A tall stout man? - Yes.

You could only swear to the packages by the directions? - No.

Now the bill you say you swear by? - Yes, I had it with me then, I received the bill from Mr. Bolton, then I put it into my pocket, and looked at it afterwards, but not for some time; I packed the things up myself; I had the same bill, and brought the same home again.

You said Mr. Bolton particularly carries on the inn? - Yes.

Why, he is the only master and proprietor of the inn? - They are both partners, Mr. Hurnall and him; my master carries on the business.

THOMAS BOLTON sworn.

John Hurnall and me are partners in this inn; I know that the parcels that were produced at the officer's house in Fetter-lane were the goods that I sent by my porter; the officer's name is Campden; I made the bill of parcels, and took them from the owner's bills; I have the bill of them; I had examined them that evening after she coach came in, it was on the 17th of March, we lost two parcels, there were my marks upon them; I knew my own hand-writing.

Mr. Knapp. Have you any partner? - Yes.

Who is your partner? - Mr. John Hurnall .

You made a bill of these parcels? - Yes.

You received a great many parcels the same day, I suppose? - There were seven parcels which that man took.

JOHN STAPLETON sworn.

I am a carpenter; I was walking in Fleet-street, between 7 and 8 o'clock in the evening, on Tuesday the 17th of March, all of a sudden I heard a man halloo out he had lost his load, that very instant a man came up to him, and directed him towards the bar, and told him it was gone that way; I did not know who that man was; and I heard another voice say, he has not gone towards the Bar, he is gone the other way; I knew the voice of the man that said that, and I immediately went that way, and took down Fleet-street; I looked at every window, and in Serjeant's Inn; I then went up Red-lion Court, and through West-harding-street into Fetter-lane, and opposite Roll's Buildings I saw a man carrying a load; I looked at the load, and it appeared to me to be different parcels from an inn, or something of that sort, game; I thought I would be cautions, and I did not speak to the man, but I followed him, I believe for 50 yards; in following him, some man passed me in the highway, and joined this man that had the load.

Who was the man that had the load, was it the prisoner? - No, Sir, a taller man, I dare say by a head; he joined him, and went up the lane, and went down Plough-court; I called for assistance, and three or four boys going by, I told them, and asked them to go with me; as we were going down they were coming up, and the prisoner at the bar had the load on his head; I seized him by the collar, and he threw it down, immediately some people came, and presently after the constable came and took him into custody.

Mr. Knapp. So you followed a tall stout man up Fetter-lane, did you? - I said nothing about a stout man, a tall man, he had a load on his head.

Then you followed him down Plough-court, and then the bundle was changed? - I suppose so, I did not see it changed, but by the appearance of the size of the man; I look upon it, it was changed down the court, I have no doubt it was the same bundle, it was changed, it must be changed.

Then it was put upon somebody else's shoulder? - Yes, I took the person that had it on his head.

Had you ever seen that person before? - Not to my knowledge.

Did you see that person on that day before? - I did not.

You did not see him as he followed the tall man up Fetter-lane? - No, I saw several people follow me, but I could not swear to any of them.

Supposing this tall man had the parcels on his head, when you took the other man, should you have known his face? - No, I should not, the tall man was out of my sight, and I never saw the other man till he came up from the court; I cannot swear this man was in the lane when they went down the court.

Supposing there had been no parcels at all on the shoulders of the prisoner, should you then be able to describe him? - No, Sir, I should not, he was a tall man, and when he went down the court he had the bundle on his head; and coming up the short man had the load.

THOMAS CAMDEN sworn.

I am a porter; I went of an errand for a gentleman, of Fleet-street, for a loaf of sugar; coming by St. Dunstan's church, by the pitching-block, a porter said, I have lost my load; and I said, go down Fleet-street.

RICHARD HUTCHINS sworn.

I keep a pork-shop in Fetter-lane, I am a constable, the prisoner was given in charge to me by Mr. Stapleton; I took care of him; the property was delivered to me; I took it the next day before the Alderman; the parcels were not all capons, there were hares, and a turkey was in the basket unpicked; the linen gowns were in a parcel, as I suppose; I know there was a barrel, they were ordered to be delivered pursuant to their directions, on account of their being perishable, I ordered Mr. Bolton to keep the directions, nothing was returned me.

Mr. Knapp. You do not know at all, you say, what property was delivered to you by the prisoner, excepting that there were two bares, and a bartel, and the others were parcels unopened? - I do not know how many hares there were, they were never out of my custody.

ANN BOLT sworn.

Court to Basham. Shew that paper to that young woman.

Court to Ann Bolton. Was there any bundle in the paper with that direction? - Yes, there was something in it, this is the paper that came with the gowns.

Court to Bolton. Have you any bill that corresponds with that of the gowns? - Yes, the weigh-bill; it is the first on the list.

Mr. Knapp. This is a bill delivered to the porter of the inn with the parcels; and it says,

"Mrs. Monk, Mount-street," one parcel.

Court. Did you see it taken out of that very parcel that was taken from the prisoner? - I did, two gowns.

When? - The 18th I delivered the parcel into the porter's hands myself; this parcel was directed to

"Mrs. Monk, in Mount-street, Grosvenor-square."

Mr. Knapp to Basham. You know nothing at all what was contained in these parcels when you received them at the Inn? - No.

(The paper that had the gowns in handed to the Jury.)

Prisoner. I wish to speak for myself; I wish first of all, if it be agreeable to the

Court, to have all the witnesses out but the porter.

(The following questions were handed from the prisoner to Mr. Knapp.)

To the Porter. How long after the conversation took place was you knocked down? - I cannot justly say, a very little time, indeed.

How soon did you go home after that time? - I suppose it might be two hours after I went home.

Why did not you go home direct? - I did not like to go home; I was afraid to go home to my master.

What sort of a day had this been? - It was a darkish day.

The streets vastly clean, I suppose? - Not very clean, middling, a dry day.

Who did you see when you went home? - I went to the publick-house just by our house, and I sent to our ostler, he is not here; then I went home, and my master sent for me.

Was you hurt by your fall? - No, not stunned, but frightned; I told my master, Mr. Bolton, I had lost all my load.

What did he say to you? - He seemed to be very little concerned about it.

He did not blame you? - No great matter.

You was afraid of losing your place? - Yes, that was more than any thing else.

Mr. Bolton. I saw the porter when he came home, the ostler brought him to me; he was very much flurried; he was afraid to come home.

His clothes were very dirty? - No, Sir, I do not recollect they were, I took but little notice of him; I immediately set off to No. 3 or 4, a coachman said they were in Duke's Place.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lords, and Gentlemen of the Jury, impressed with the highest sense of candour of your Lordship, and you Gentlemen of the Jury; I hope you will not be prejudiced against me because I have stood at this bar once before; I hope that the voice of slander against me will do me no hurt: I was returning from Westminster, and went up Fetter-lane to go towards Moorfields; on my way home I saw some persons turn down a court, it was rather dirty and dark, I mistook it for Bartlett's Buildings; a tall person threw a load down within a few yards of the court; I caught hold of the load, and immediately Mr. Stapleton collared me; I expostulated with him in a manner that I was not the person; he insisted on stopping me 'till he went for a constable; the boys likewise came along; I asked the young men, if they did not see him throw the load down? they said, no; if I must speak, it was a tall man that threw it down; I told the magistrate so the next day; when the porter came before the magistrate, he said, the blow that was given him stunned him, and that he did not see the person; I throw myself on the mercy of the Court; my life is now at stake; I have no witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-60

344. GEORGE WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April , a pair of black breeches, value 5 s. two muslin aprons, value 4 s. another apron, value 1 s. a pillow-case, value 1 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Hales ; and a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Ann Baverstock .

SAMUEL HALES sworn.

I keep a publick-house at Dalston ; last Wednesday was a week, which was the 15th of April, the prisoner was at my house; he had been there some time, he had some ale to drink; I was standing at the door taking the money of the waiter, and I know who comes in and who goes out; seeing the prisoner there some time I took particular notice of him, he first got up into the garden, and had a pint or two of ale; then went into the little room opposite the bar; after a while I saw him go up

and after that he came down again; he walked about, and looked about him; I did not much like him; a little after that he came by me as close as I am to this gentleman, and went up stairs again; I took no notice of him, he had no bundle when he went up, and I saw him come down with a bundle under his arm, as he came by me I looked at him very hard, I wondered how he came by that bundle; I thought I saw the corner of a silk handkerchief, he looked about him quite unconcerned, and went into this little room where his friend was; soon after he had had his glass of ale, the other man came out and paid me for the ale; then the other went up to him again, and the prisoner met his friend, and they went in again and drank the ale; I took an opportunity to run up stairs to see whether there was anybody in that little drinking-room, nobody was there, I ran immediately to the bed-room door, and I saw the prisoner run away, I cannot say whether the door was locked or no; I immediately ran down stairs, there was a man standing at the door; I said come along with me, he ran down to the bottom of the garden, and just as we got to the bottom of the garden I saw the prisoner with a bundle under his arm, I ran after him and caught him by the flap of his coat; he said, d - n your eyes, what do you want with me? I told him I wanted my property; he immediately flung the handkerchief down, and gave me a violent blow over the head, then immediately my gardener seeing that he collared him; we brought him up to the house, and I brought the bundle under my arm which contained the things in the indictment, they were mine, they are here, the officer has them.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn.

I saw the prisoner with the bundle under his arm, when my master caught hold of him.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn.

I was sent for to take this prisoner into custody, Mr. Hales gave me these things, they have been in my possession ever since.

Court to Mr. Hales. Were the things you gave to the constable, the same that the bundle contained? - Yes.

(Part of the property deposed to by Mr. Hales.)

ANN BAVERSTOCK sworn.

This handkerchief is mine, it has no mark; I cannot swear to it, but I believe it to be mine, I know some of the things are my mistress's; here is a muslin apron, which was rough dry and put by.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not go into the room to fetch these things out, but the other man that was in the little room fetched them out, and desired me to fetch them down myself; my friends and witnesses were to meet me tomorrow morning; he told me he had this bundle, and that it was in a closet, and the key was in the door.

Court. This is an admission of the crime; the evidence together with what the prisoner has now said, leaves you nothing to consider of at all.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Prisoner. Would your lordship admit me to go into his Majesty's service; I have always maintained a good character, I was accused by my prosecutor, who knew I had been transported once.

Owen. I do not remember him.

Prisoner. I wish to go to the Indies, if you will admit of any thing of the kind; I am brought into this by a villain.

Court. I cannot give you that indulgence.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-61

345. FRANCIS EVANS and JAMES SCOTT were indicted for stealing,

on the 29th of March , a hempen rope, and an iron chain affixed thereto, value 20 s. another piece of hempen rope, value 2 s. three pieces of other hempen rope, value 2 s. the property of Frederick Croker .

FREDERIC CROKER sworn.

I am a pilot ; I lost the things in the indictment from the lighter head; on the 30th of March I was absent for a week, and then returned; I know nothing with respect to the lighter's being broke open myself; my property was never found.

JAMES CROKER sworn.

On Monday morning I found a coat button on the lighter-head, the constable has it, I kept it till my father (the last witness) came home; the step-board belonging to the wherry was in the lighter's fore sheets, which was belonging to the boat that they had stolen away; I suspected the prisoner by the button, we found them in East Smithfield on Tuesday morning the 31st; they were taken in East Smithfield; they ran away when they saw us, we did not find any of the things; they were overtaken, they acknowledged taking the things in a public-house.

DANIEL KITCHENOR sworn.

My master sent me to look after the chain, I was walking down towards Ratcliffe Highway, and just before I came to the door I saw Evans and one Beck together; then I stept back, he is an accomplice, I said, I believe I want you; then afterwards I let him go; he ran away and I ran after him, and took him again; I sent my master's son away immediately to fetch his father; he brought him to Battle Bridge; then we went to the public-house, and I heard Evans say, he was the person that lent a hand to rob the lighter, on the 31st of March, before Justice Swabey; I cannot say whether it was taken in writing or not, I was present when he was examined.

Prosecutor. I was present, there was no promise made to Evans or Scott to tell the truth; I heard what he said.

Kitchenor. Evans said he lent a hand to haul the chain out, and put it into another boat; Scott said he was not guilty.

Prosecutor. I heard Evans say that he lent a hand to haul the chain up out of the lighter-head, and to put it into the wherry, and that they sold it at Limehouse for half a guinea; we were going out to search, and before I went out they sent me word they had taken a man; the button which was found and given to me is one of the accomplice's that was admitted an evidence; his 3d and 5th buttons are off his coat; Evans got from them, at that time they did not secure either of them but Beck; Evans got off.

- BECK sworn.

Court. I shall not hear Beck's evidence against Scott.

To Beck. You was concerned in this robbery? - Yes.

Was Evans with you? - Yes.

Are you sure of that? - Yes.

What time did you go on board the lighter? - Between eleven and twelve o'clock.

How many were there of you? - Four of us; we took a piece of chain, and two or three pieces of rope; we got a piece of stick and broke the hold board up, and got a chain; we carried the things to Limehouse; there we sold them for half a guinea for the chain, and half a hundred of rope and other things for twelve shillings and nine pence; they gave us twenty-three shillings and six-pence for it all and two tarpaulins.

PRISONER EVANS's DEFENCE.

Scott had nothing to do in the affair; Beck persuaded me to go out with him, I being a little in liquor went out with him, little thinking any thing of that kind, and he hauled the chain up.

FRANCIS EVANS , GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

JAMES SCOTT, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

346. FRANCIS EVANS , and JAMES SCOTT were indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , a piece of hempen rope, called a five-inch hawser, value 5 s. the property of Jeremiah Hayes .

JEREMIAH HAYES sworn.

The lighter was broke open, which lay near to my ship, and my ship was cut adrift, and every bit of the hawser down to the chain was cut away; I know no more than that my ship was cut adrift.

There was no more evidence but that of Beck the accomplice

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-62

347. GEORGE WOOD was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Gigney , the elder , on the 1st of March , and burglariously stealing therein, a silver milk-pot, value 10 s. a punch-ladle, value 5 s. a tea-strainer, value 2 s. a silver watch, value 3 l. two silver table spoons, value 20 s. four silver teaspoons, value 5 s. a black silk cardinal, value 10 s. and eighteen guineas in monies numbered , the property of the said Samuel Gigney , the elder.

SAMUEL GIGNEY , the elder, sworn.

I live at Cambridge Heath, in the parish of St. John's, Hackney ; the prisoner and two others lodged at my house; I went for the benefit of my health, about a fortnight before I heard of this robbery, into Kent; and on the 9th of March my son sent for me; I had left in my house the things mentioned in the indictment, they were in my lodging-room up two pair of stairs, the prisoner lodged next room to me.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. Who did you leave in the house? - My lodgers.

They could come in and out as they pleased? - Yes.

WILLLIAM GIGNEY, junior, sworn.

I am the son of the last witness, I am a baker, I live in Well-street, Hackney; on the 9th of March I went to my father's house on Cambridge Heath; I went up two pair of stairs where my father lived, and I found the door open; I fastened the door, I sent an express to my father, and when he came up, he told me of the property he had lost.

JOHN LEE sworn.

I am constable at Hackney, I served a warrant on the prisoner at Erith, on the 12th of March, he was at work in a brick-field; I did not chuse to take him there, on account of the quantity of people that were at work; I took him on the Thursday following at a public-house; I searched the prisoner, and in his fob I found the glass of a watch broke; I went with the prisoner down a cellar at his lodgings, and he there pulled out a parcel of spoons and a cream-pot, which were covered over with sand; two table-spoons, four teaspoons, a tea-strainer, a punch-ladle, and a silver watch, were in the sand, and a black cardinal was tucked underneath a beam between the joists of a floor in the cellar; I took him into custody, and after examination he was fully committed; he said he could not say he did not commit the robbery, but he did not break the door open; I heard no promise made him to induce him to confess.

The property deposed to by Samuel Gigney the elder.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him him a good character.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 36 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-63

348. WILLIAM INNIS was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of March , four pair of thread stockings, value 6 s. the property of John Eastfield .

MARY EASTFIELD sworn.

I am the wife of John Eastfield , I was in the shop when the prisoner came in, which was at half after five in the afternoon on Saturday the 11th of March; he asked for what is called a pea jacket, which is a rough jacket, I went to look for one; another man came just in at the door, and said, have you a second hand one; I told him we did not deal in second-hand things, he said he would call again; he went out, and I observed him very shy of me; I let him go on, and observed something under his arm; I called out stop thief, and he was taken, I lost sight of him for a little while; I am positive to the property.

SILVESTER ATKINSON sworn.

I am a butcher, I took the prisoner, I observed the prisoner drop the bundle; he never was out of my sight; I took him about twenty yards from the place where he dropt the bundle.

GUILTY .

Publickly whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-64

349. WILLIAM ATRIDE , alias BARKER , was indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February last, a gelding, value 6 l. the property of Richard Street .

RICHARD STREET sworn.

I am a farmer at West Lambeth , I lost a gelding, I have had it some years, I can only prove the property.

WILLIAM YOUNG sworn.

I am a labourer, I was employed by the prisoner to take the horse to a Repository, I live in Holborn, I never knew the prisoner before he applied to me, which was on Wednesday about 8 in the morning, this day month, the prisoner came to the Swan at Holborn-bridge, and brought a letter in his hand to the inn-gate; and asked me, if I knew St. Martin's-lane? I said yes, very well; he said he had a horse to go there to the Repository, and he bade me carry it there; the ostler of the Swan Inn delivered the horse to me in the presence of the prisoner, and if he was sold I was to bring the money; I took the horse there, and delivered it to the servant at the repository, and the letter likewise, that was about nine in the morning; I asked the servant what time they would begin to sell; he said about eleven? I said, I have no occasion to wait, I will go back, so I left the letter and the horse; and I came back again, and found the prisoner there; says he, what are you to have for your trouble? I said a shilling; and he said he would give it me; but he did not: he bade me go back and come again at one, for he was going; he went to the repository, and I ran after him seeking for my money; says he, if the horse is sold I will pay you the money; and if not sold you shall take him back again to the inn; the same night I waited there, the horse was put up at 3 l. and each bidder rose him at 10 s. each time 'till he came to 5 l. 10 s. and then he was knocked down; there was no money paid; then the prisoner came back, near to the inn, when all was over, and bade me stop at the gate, which I did 'till about four o'clock, then he took me down Holborn again, pretending he was to lay at the Swan in Holborn, and then he ran away; I am sure the prisoner is the man, but he was dressed better a great deal then, and his hair was powdered a little, but that is the man; I went to the repository the next morning after he flung me; and I asked, what time he was to be paid? the man asked me, if it was me that brought a letter and the horse? says I, I am afraid he has bilked me; the man told me to come between 9 and 10, and I might see him; I

never heard any more of this matter 'till I was at the justice's.

THOMAS KING sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Aldridge, that keeps the repository in St. Martin's-lane; I remember the last witness coming, he brought this letter which I have in my pocket, upon opening it, it mentioned the horse was to be sold for what he would fetch, and to pay the bearer; then the porter went away; he came again in the afternoon, and likewise the prisoner came; he asked me, what time he could receive his money? I told him not before Friday, that was Wednesday morning the 18th of February, when he brought the horse to our house, the prisoner staid at the next door, a publick-house, on the Friday morning, I told him he might come for the money, the clerk was there, I had a mistrust the horse was stolen by the writing of the letter, and I apprehended him on suspicion.

Prosecutor. I lost my gelding out of a straw-yard, the horse was there at eight at night, and was gone in the morning at six, it was the 16th of February; I knew the prisoner very well, he was bred and born in the parish, he has not lived there for some years, I had the horse for four or five years, the horse was 11 or 12 years old, he was a dark bay-gelding, a blemish in the off-eye, a little lame on the shoulder, he was a very remarkable horse; I have no doubt he was my horse; the prisoner had been a gentleman's servant.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was employed by a man to take this horse to sell for him; I received the horse from the man in a halter; I have no witnesses.

Jury. We wish to see the letter.

Court. It must be read.

Addressed to

"Mr. Aldridge, at the

"livery-stables, St. Martin's. Wednesday

"morning. Mr. Aldridge. Please to sell

"this horse to-day, if possible, for what

"you can get, and please to pay the bearer

"the money; and you will oblige your

"humble servant, John Barker, West

"Lambeth, Surrey."

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17890422-65

350. EDWARD WELCH was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , a feather-bed, value 10 s. a bolster, value 3 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 5 s. the property of John Evans , in his lodging-room , let to him by the said John Evans , &c.

ANN EVANS sworn.

My husband's name is John Evans ; the prisoner came to lodge at our house on the 1st of April, and went away on Friday evening, he never gave us notice; I missed a bed, a bolster, and sheets; and I missed other things which are not in the indictment; he was taken the same evening with the things, and the next morning he was taken before the magistrate.

THOMAS CHIFFIN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; this sheet was pawned the 3d of April, about six in the evening, by the prisoner.

(The sheet marked I. E. deposed to by Mr. Evans.)

JOHN PENLEY sworn.

The prisoner came to my shop on the 3d of April to sell a bolster and sheet; he said they were his own, he asked me 5 s. for them; he then said, he had a bed and bedding at home at his lodgings in James's-street; I went home with him, and looked at them; he asked me 1 l. 2 s. I bid him 15 s. I did not then pay for them, but went to a Justice, and gave information; and we went and took the prisoner, sitting on the bed, in Oxford-street.

(The sheet and bolster deposed to by Mrs. Evans.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was brought into this scrape by a young woman who took the lodgings of another young man.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-66

351. JOSEPH LYNS and JOHN JEFFKINS were indicted, for stealing on the 18th of April , eighteen iron saw-plates, value 4 s. and an iron hammer, value 1 s. the property of William Green and Thomas Dixon .

WILLIAM GREEN sworn.

I am a stone-mason , in partnership with Thomas Dixon, the prisoner Jeffkins had worked for us; on the 8th of this month, about six in the morning, I found our yard had been broke open, and the things mentioned in the indictment taken away; about 10 o'clock the same day I saw both the prisoners at the Justices, and they made a confession; we found the things at one Cartwright's, who said he was a cobler, or a shoemaker.

WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT sworn.

I keep a shop, and sell old shoes, and other old things; the prisoners brought me those things to sell as old iron, they were both together; one of them said, his father was a stone-sawyer, and had been two years making these old wasters; I bought them as old iron; I live in Ogle-court, Marybone, at No. 7.

Court. How came you to buy those things as old iron? - I thought they were good for nothing else, they were knocked up together.

Court to Green. Was these things fit to be sold as old iron? - Some were, and some were not; some are new, and some are old.

Court. Could not anybody that understands old iron know that these were not fit to be sold as such.

Cartwright. I did not understand it, my Lord.

(A hammer deposed to by Mr. Green.)

(Some of the saw-blades deposed to.)

Court to Cartwright. What did you give for those things? - A halfpenny a pound, that is as much as I can give for iron that is not thick; those people that buy iron of me give me no more than a halfpenny a pound.

- BEAMISH sworn.

I am an officer; I went to take the prisoners in custody, and Jeffkins told us where they had sold them; we went to Cartwright's, and in a shed, at the back of his house, we found these saw-blades, and the hammer was found in the shop.

Court to Cartwright. Let me give you this caution, that if you had been on your trial for receiving these things, most likely the Jury would have convicted you, and you would have been transported for 14 years.

JOSEPH LYNS , GUILTY .

Imprisoned six months .

JOHN JEFFKINS , GUILTY .

Imprisoned twelve months .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-67

352. JOHN BRADY , RICHARD ROBERTS , and JAMES TYRE were indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Dunhill , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon of the 9th of March , and feloniously stealing therein, twelve yards of calico, value 10 s. his property.

JANE DUNHILL sworn.

I am wife of the prosecutor, my husband keeps a linen-draper's shop in Oxford-street ; on the 9th of March I lost some callico about eleven in the morning, I was the only person in the shop; three boys came in to ask to look at a silk handkerchief; the prisoners are the boys, I shewed them a silk and cotton one at the price of two shillings, and the prisoner Brady said he would buy it, if the little one (Tyre) would lend him six-pence; the little one refused to lend him six-pence, and they walked out of the shop; we did not miss any thing till a man came with the callico to the shop, his name is George Allen .

GEORGE ALLEN sworn.

I am a constable, I met three lads in Moor-street, in the parish of Saint Ann's, and knowing two of the lads, I suspected they had been stealing this; it was tied up in an apron, and I saw a piece of it hanging out; Roberts had it, I met him on the 19th of March, between eleven and twelve, I took them into custody; Roberts said he found it, the other two run away, and they were apprehended soon after, and they were soon after brought into the office, I knew them again.

THOMAS DUNHILL sworn.

This is my property, here is the mark in my hand-writing.

Do you sell it with that mark upon it? - We leave the fag end on where we put our mark, I saw it the evening before, we had been making some particular use of it; I laid it on some Irishes on the counter, and in removing the Irishes in the morning, I laid this piece on the counter, and went out on some business, I never missed it till the man brought it in.

What is the value of it? - About eleven or twelve shillings, it is full that value.

PRISONER ROBERTS's DEFENCE.

I saw these two lads go in the shop, I met with them a little after, I thought it was a shirt lay on the counter, and I wanted a shirt and I took it; these two lads know nothing of it.

PRISONER BRADY's DEFENCE.

I went in to buy a neck-handkerchief, and this little boy and Roberts came in after us; we knew nothing of him, I have no friends.

PRISONER TYRE's DEFENCE.

I am turned of ten; I have nothing to say.

Court. How many yards of it is there? - Twelve yards, I have valued it at one shilling a yard, but the prime cost is sixteen pence per yard.

Court to Mrs. Dunhill. Did the three boys come in together? - I cannot positively tell how they came in; the three were in the shop together, and seemed to know each other.

JOHN BRADY , aged 14, RICHARD ROBERTS, aged 14, JAMES TYRE , aged 10,

GUILTY, Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17890422-68

353. EDWARD LARY was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Joseph Borret , on the King's highway, on the 11th of January , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, one silver watch, value 3 l. and a steel chain, value 2 d. his property.

The witnesses examined apart, at the request of Mr. Garrow, prisoner's Counsel.

JOSEPH BORRETT sworn.

I am a butcher , I was robbed on the 10th of April, about five o'clock in the afternoon, in Duke-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields ; there were three of us together; I, Mr. Vincent, and Mr. Birkwood; we were coming along Duke-street, and we went into the Roman Catholic chapel, and staid there half an hour; we came out again, and the prisoner met us, he struck Mr. Birkwood, and tore his shirt; the prisoner asked him what he was laughing about; we were talking together, and coming away.

Court. Did you see the prisoner come out of the chapel? - No; Birkwood said to the prisoner, we might laugh in the street without offending him, and he struck him in the breast; I said, keep your hands off, or else we must take another course with you, and he turned about to me.

Was he sober or drunk? - I cannot tell; he then struck me in the breast, and I went to run from him, and he run after me, and he pulled the watch out of my fob; we we were all running away, and he run after us; the prisoner had got hold of my watch-chain, and in pulling it out the watch separated from the chain, and hit against a carriage wheel; a gentleman picked up the case, and gave it me, I picked up the watch; I turned about to get the chain out of the prisoner's hands, and he struck at me three or four different times; he dropped the chain, then I picked it up, and in picking it up, he struck at me again; I then got out of his way, and kept my eye upon him, and sent to Bow-street for a constable; Mr. Vincent brought the constable, and I watched him into a public-house in Lincoln's-inn-fields; he was standing at the door of the public-house,

and I gave charge of him; it might be a quarter of an hour after, this was about five in the afternoon.

Court. There were people going past I suppose at the time? - Yes, there were four or five.

Mr. Garrow. This was on Good Friday, was not it? - Yes.

That every body knows is a great day among the Roman Catholics ; you know that, do not you? - No.

Are you a Roman Catholic? - I hardly know what I am myself.

Are you a Roman Catholic or not; there is no crime in it? - I am a churchman.

Had you been into the chapel? - Yes.

The prisoner had been there at his devotion, he is a Roman Cotholic? - I do not know, I did not see him in the chapel.

How long had you been in the chapel? - I might have been in about twenty minutes.

You went in there for your diversion? - No, I was coming home.

Of course you did not go for your prayers? - I went as other people did.

How long had you been amusing yourself with crossing yourselves, and calling those people craw-thumpers, as they came out at the door? - We went into the chapel, we did not stop at the door.

Had neither you nor your friends been insulting the persons that came out? - No, Sir, we were coming away.

Had nothing of that sort passed? - Mr. Birkwood did cross his face.

Did he thump his breast too? - I do not recollect that.

Upon your oath, was not these insults to the Roman Catholics , the cause of the quarrel between you and the prisoner? - I do not know, I said nothing to the prisoner.

Did your companions say any thing to him? - I do not recollect that they did.

Do you mean to swear that you do not recollect that that was the cause of the quarrel? - No, I cannot recollect.

Why you told me only just now that that man asked you what you was laughing at? - He asked Mr. Birkwood.

Did not you strike at him, and strike him actually in the cheek with your watch-chain? - No, Sir, that I can safely say; this man was in the street about two minutes, and then he went into the chapel, and stopt about a minute.

Then after he had robbed you of your watch, he went into the chapel again? - Yes.

And then he went to the public-house in Lincoln's-inn-fields? - Yes, and staid there about twenty minutes; I never was at the chapel before, it was my way home.

Are you a master butcher? - A piece of one; I have been in it about a month.

Why it would be a good convenient thing to get forty pounds towards setting up in trade; would not it? - I do not know, it was not my intent.

Do not you know that there is a reward of forty pounds? - I have heard of such a thing.

THOMAS VINCENT sworn.

On Good Friday I was at this Roman Catholic chapel with Borret and Birkwood; I suppose we might stay in the chapel for a quarter of an hour; I did not see the prisoner in the chapel, we were all three of us coming out of the chapel, and were not above six yards from the chapel door when the prisoner met us, the service was not over; when we came out of the chapel, the prisoner met us; me, Mr. Borret, and Mr. Birkwood, were speaking as we came out of the chapel, and he asked us what we laughed at; I told him we did not laugh at him, nor interrupt him, nor any body that was there; upon which he struck Birkwood in the face; Borret desired him to desist, but he did not, but he struck Borret; a gentleman came along, and told us we had better make off, unless we intended to take him up; I acquiesced with the gentleman, Birkwood and me walked on, and looking back for Borret, saw a watch and the case rolling along the ground, and I

saw a watch-chain in the prisoner's hand, by what means Borrett came by the chain again, I do not know, I do not justly whether the prisoner went into the chapel immediately, for I was desired to fetch a constable, which I did; we took him at the Crooked-Billet, near Clare-market; it might be the space of a quarter of an hour after, but I cannot say how long; he was taken to Bow-street, and committed.

Mr. Garrow. You were just speaking as this man came out of the chapel? - Yes, that was all.

I take it for granted, you was not crossing yourself; you are too decent: Did you cross yourself? - No, Sir, I swear that.

Did Birkwood cross himself? - I cannot tell.

Did any body beat their breasts? - We had not been amusing ourselves in laughing at the people at chapel; we had been in the chapel about half an hour; I am a churchman, we did not insult them; we were going that way, and I hope there is no harm in going in.

This robbery was done in the face of all the world? - It was in the publick street, there were not a great many people at the door at that time, there were some.

How happened it you did not immediately seize this man? - Because we were desired not to seize him; we thought it best to fetch a constable.

Had he produced any dangerous weapon that frightened you? - No, Sir, nothing of that sort, there were only us three.

WILLIAM BIRKWOOD sworn.

I am a butcher; on the 10th of April, Borrett, Vincent, and me, took a walk into Duke-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields, we met with the Roman Catholic chapel, and dropt in and staid half an hour; we came out again, and went into the middle of the highway, we were all three speaking together, when the prisoner met us, he came up to me first, as I stood next him; and he said, you scoundrel, what are you laughing at? says I, my good man, we are saying nothing to you, we are laughing at ourselves; he hit me a stroke on the breast; I turned me round, and said, good man, go about your besiness; he took me by the collar, and tore my shirt; he shook me, and hit me another blow; a gentleman and lady coming by persuaded me to go from him, which I did; and I turned back, and saw Joseph Borrett coming towards me, with the body of a watch in his hand, and the watch case laying on the floor; but I saw no more; I did not see the watch chain in his hand.

Mr. Garrow. You are a butcher? - Yes.

These foolish Roman Catholicks do not deal much with butchers on a Good Friday? - I believe they like fish; I can say it was not our intent to go in to insult them.

You were laughing at one another? - Yes, we were only speaking a little, we did nothing else.

You did nothing else by way of insulting these people at all? - I was not insulting them at all.

Who was it crossed himself? - I do not understand you.

Do you mean to swear, that you do not understand what I mean? - Yes, I do.

Who did this? (crossing himself.) - The prisoner at the bar.

Who did this? (making the sign upon the breast.) - The prisoner at the bar; I thought he meant to strike me.

Do you mean to swear that in the face of the Jury, that you really thought that? - Yes, I did.

What did you think I meant by imitating the Roman Catholicks ? - I only say this, that we were laughing at our- ourselves.

Upon your oath, did not you make a sign of a cross with your fingers on your face? - No, Sir, I never touched my face.

Did you cross yourself any other way? - I might point my fingers to my body.

Jury. We are satisfied.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-69

354. MARIA ISRAEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , two pieces of muslin, value 3 l. the property of John Goldwell , privately in his shop .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

JOHN LANGARD sworn.

I live with Mr. Goldwell, on the 6th of April, I was in the shop, No. 2, in Sidney's Alley , by myself, it is a haberdasher's shop; between three and five the prisoner and another woman came in for some muslins; some muslins were on the compter, when they came in, I had them in my hand about ten minutes before they came into the shop, I was serving another customer, they bought half a yard, and paid for it; and when they were gone out of the shop into the alley, about a dozen yards, I turned my head round, and saw some muslin under the prisoner's arm; I saw one piece, and could not tell what it was; just as I got behind her, the prisoner gave one piece to the other woman when she found I was detecting her; I saw another piece on the ground, I am sure I saw a piece under her arm, she had wrapped a piece under her cloak, and it was not quite covered, it was the piece I saw under her arm which she gave the other woman; the woman got off, I snatched the piece from her just as she gave it to her; I never saw the prisoner before to my knowledge, she staid in the shop about a quarter of an hour.

Did any other person come into the shop, while they were in it, besides the woman you were serving. - No other person.

CHARLES ELLIOT sworn.

I produce two pieces of muslin, one of which I saw the prisoner drop; I was accidentally in Sidney's Alley, going past, I believe it was about four in the afternoon; I saw Langard in the Alley at the time; I did not know what he was doing, he was among the mob, there was no cry of stop thief! I am sure I saw the prisoner drop the piece, there were not many people.

Court. How many? - There might be two or three dozen people.

Court. People enough to obstruct your view? - No, I saw her put it under her arm before she dropped it.

(The muslin deposed to by Langard having his private mark.)

Can you also swear that that piece of muslin was on the counter at the time the woman was in the shop? - Yes, I had had all the pieces in my hand about ten minutes before; and this is the piece I took from the other woman, and which I saw the prisoner give to the other woman; this also was on the counter at the time.

Court to Langard. Are these two pieces of muslin new? - Yes.

What is the value of them? - About three pounds.

Prisoner. Where did you see me first? - The corner of Sidney's Alley, in Prince's Street.

Prisoner. Elliot swore at the Justice's, that he saw me drop a piece in Liecester-fields; I was a quarter of an hour in the shop before any constable came; I was sitting in the back parlour.

Elliott. There was no such thing said.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into this gentleman's shop; what I asked for I bought and paid for; I went out, and this gentleman came out, and he had some muslin with him; he brought me back; two or three of the neighbours came into the shop, and a constable came in; I did not think that my trial would come on 'till six o'clock.

GUILTY, Of stealing, but not privately .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-70

355. MARGARET CARTER was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March ,

one pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. and one pair of silk stockings, value 8 s. the property of William Somerset , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM SOMERSET sworn.

I live in Newport street, Leicester-fields , I am a linen-draper and hosier ; my house was broke open, on Monday the 9th of March, between three and four in the afternoon, I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner and another woman walk past the shop several times; I lifted up a shawl, which hung on a rail before the window, and saw the prisoner and another woman at the window, the window was not open; I heard a noise, and looked and missed two pair of stockings immediately; I believe the glass was cracked before they pushed the piece out; I am sure the piece was not taken out before; I saw the piece in the sash not ten minutes before; I followed them, and overtook them in Gerrard street, Soho; I asked the prisoner to go back with me, for I thought she had stole some stockings out of my window, she said she would, she went back; I immediately sent for a constable, and searched her, we found one pair of stockings upon her.

Was the prisoner out of your sight? - Yes, but I took particular notice of her, as I saw her walk past several times, I can swear she is the same.

CHARLES YOUNG sworn.

I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, and in searching her I found these tied stockings underneath her apron, she did not say how she came by them; they have been in my possession ever since.

(Deposed to by the prosecutor by the private mark.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-71

356. JOHN WARD , EDWARD CHURCH , and JOHN BLINKWORTH , were indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph May , about the hour of one in the night, on the 7th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, a silver pint mug, value 3 l. a silver milk-pot, value 8 s. two silver pepper castors, value 20 s. two silver tea-spoons, value 2 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 6 s. a time-piece, value 10 s. a coat, value 3 s. a pair of velveret breeches, value 2 s. two canvas bags, value 1 d. several pieces of base metal, value 1 s. eight shillings, 16 sixpences, a piece of silver, being part of a sixpence, value 1 d. 9 silver threepences, ten silver fourpences, 250 copper halfpence, value 10 s. 5 d. his property.

A second Count, for being in the same house, and stealing same goods, and afterwards breaking the same dwelling-house, against the statute.

(The case opened by Mr. Silvester.)

The witnesses examined separate by the desire of Mr. Garrow.

ANN MAY sworn.

I am wife of Joseph May , my husband is a butcher , and lives in Fore-street , on Saturday the 7th of March, I went to-bed between 11 and 12, I was the last person up in the house, I was in the shop the last person, I fastened the door myself, I locked the desk, and I locked the till, the timepiece was there when I went to-bed, and the rest of the house was then safe; my servant Selina Wallis was the first person up the next morning.

SELINA WALLIS sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. May, on Sunday the 8th of March I arose nearly at six, I was the first person up, when I came down the street-door was open, I observed nothing else; I went up stairs, and my master came down in a few minutes after; I went and got a light, it was dark; then I remember some plate being lost, I saw it at 11 the night before; a silver pint mug, two silver

a silver milk pot, two silver pepper casters, two silver tea-spoons; I had left them in a closet in the dining-room; I shut up the place myself; the time-piece was below stairs in a little compting-house in the shop, I am very sure all the house was safe on the Saturday night.

JOSEPH MAY sworn.

I am a butcher in Fore-street, on Sunday morning, a little before six, my servant called me down, when I came down the street-door was open, I examined the door to see whether the lock was strained, I found the door was not in the least forced, and the key in the lock as we always left it; I examined the back part of my house, and found it was broke into, where there are some rails from two inches to one inch and a half square, and a wooden fence to admit a little air, and to prevent any-body from coming in; some of them had been pulled down, the nails drawn, and the laths or fence broken to pieces; they got in at that place, they had made an opening large enough to get in, they got in underneath the yard; this lartice supplies the place of the window, and this shop is part of my dwelling-house; I lost the things in the indictment (repeating them) the time-piece was in the compting-house in the shop; I lost some pieces of money, fresh of the Late King's coin, and one shilling in particular of the late King, that I marked, and one shilling wrapped up in a piece of paper of his present Majesty's coin; the paper has one or two faint marks of yellow, this money was in my desk in the shop, which was forced open, and the hasp that goes into the lock was forced into it; I lost a coat and a pair of velveret breeches which had been scowered, and the coat likewise; I lost some silver two-pences and threepences, I cannot say exactly the sum, there was some base metal that was lost, that was taken out of the till of my compting-house, which was forced open, which had been formerly passed as shillings and sixpences; I am overseer of the parish, there was a bag with some little cash, that might amount to a few shillings, that was left in my desk that night, and another small bag, which we make use of, we used to put farthings into it, which I can swear to, and that was taken away; the prisoner was a servant of mine, I discharged him the 3d of February last.

JAMES ARMSTRONG sworn.

I am a constable of Shoreditch parish, I attend Mr. Wilmot's office, I stopped Ward and Church first; the prisoner Blinkworth was about two or three yards behind them, it might be about ten minutes after six; I stopped them in a passage that comes into Gravel-lane, Shakeshaft and Harper came up directly, and Church rather tried to shift his hold, I kept hold of him, and then clapped my hand in Ward's pocket, and found this pepper castor; at that time I saw Shakeshaft pull a pint mug out of Blinkworth's pocket; then Blinkworth said, Mr. Armstrong here is more; I searched his waistcoat pocket, and found two teaspoons, and this pair of tea-tongs, and there is a new shilling in that pepper-castor, that Blinkworth gave me out of his pocket after he was in the watch-house, he did not say anything about that, coming along we met Mr. May; Ward was searched by Harpur afterwards; May said, he had been robbed, and he said Ward had been his servant, and that the plate was his; the prisoner was taken to Justice Wilmot's, and Mr. May swore to the goods; Mr. Wilmot then asked them, what they had to say? one by one; they said it was the first thing they ever did in their lives, and they hoped Mr. May would forgive them, this was not taken in writing, as for Blinkworth, if he had not said search me, I should never have searched him, for I knew him so long, and his father lived in such credit, I had not the least suspicion.

What is Blinkworth's father? - A very great scavenger in our parish.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. If he had been in any erapen you were likely enough to have known it. - I am sure I should.

JAMES SHAKESHAFT sworn.

I was in company with Armstrong and Harper, I heard him call out, and went to his assistance; I took hold of Blinkworth, and one of the others, I cannot be sure which; then Harper came to our assistance, and out of Blinkworth's coat-pocket I took this mug, and then this pepper-box, and a milk-pot; I then took a base half crown, nine base six-pences, and five base shillings from Blinkworth; and I took eight shillings in good money, and some new money from Blinkworth; we took them to the watch-house, and Mr. May said there, that he believed he had lost some of his clothes; Church said there was a coat and a pair of breeches in the store-houses between the tiles in the yard; we went there, and left Armstrong to search about, and he found them, and took them to Mr. May; Shakeshaft, I, and Mr. May, was present before the magistrate; the property was produced, and the magistrate asked them what they had to say for themselves; it was not taken in writing; Mr. May heard it, and the magistrate asked them one by one; and I think Blinkworth said it was the first thing he ever did in his life; and he hoped Mr. May would forgive him; so the other two said.

SAMUEL HARPER sworn.

I was in company with Armstrong and Shakeshaft, I searched Ward and Church, I found in Ward's left-hand pocket the time-piece, I found nothing else upon him, but some money in his fob; there were silver groats, and three pences, and shillings, and six-pences, there is a new shilling wrapped up in a paper; on Church I found this bag with the contents, and a paper of halfpence that I in the scuffle let fall; I found a crown's worth, wanting two; I have one hundred and eighteen; here is the bag with some halfpence and silver, and a broken six-pence.

(The things found on Blinkworth deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prosecutor. The ring is marked with H. C. on the back, that is mine; one of the pepper castors has got a bruise; the sugar-tongs has the initials of my name, J. M. and the spoons also; (these things were found on Ward) this pepper-box I am sure is mine; the time-piece I am sure is mine, one of the screws, in taking it off, is broke off, I am sure of it; this shilling is mine, I swear to the paper it is in, because it is marked with two faint yellow spots; this is the bag I kept my money in; I am positive of the bag, it is my wife's make, we used to keep farthings in it; I can swear positively to this bag, because it is rent down on each side; and here is the piece of a six-pence, it was in my desk among some other money; this coat and breeches were found in a store-house belonging to the brewer, in Holloway-lane, in Shoreditch; when I said I believed I had lost some of my clothes, Ward said there was a coat and breeches of mine in that store-house; we went and searched it. Armstrong got on the back of Harper, and took them out; I am certain of it, it is marked in the sleeve; these are my breeches, there is a different kind of stuff at the back to the fronts, I am positive they are mine, I was in possession of them on the Saturday night when I went to bed.

Prisoner Ward. I leave it to my Counsel.

PRISONER CHURCH's DEFENCE.

Ward was coming along, and this young man and I met him with these things under his arm, and he said he had picked them up.

PRISONER BLINKWORTH's DEFENCE.

I was going out, and I met Ward and Church, he had these things under his arm, we asked him what he had there; he said some things, he did know what they were; he said he found them.

The prisoner Blinkworth called three witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Blinkworth's Father. I had two or three words with my son one night, and he went a house of bad fame in Hollywell-lane, and I have lost my wife on account of it; she is since dead.

The prisoner Ward called three witnesses who gave him a very good character.

The prisoner Church called two witnesses who gave him a very good character.

The Jury withdrew, after deliberating some time, and returned with a verdict,

ALL THREE, GUILTY , Death .

They were all humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17890422-72

357. JOHN WHITE , the younger , together with JOHN WHITE , the elder, who was sick, were indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March last, a pair of iron collar links, value 1 s. a pair of jumping links, value 6 d. a standard pin, value 6 d. a plough pin, value 6 d. a plough spindle, value 1 s. the property of John Pond .

JOHN POND sworn.

I live on Enfield-chace , I am a farmer , I lost the things in the indictment, in an inclosure; I had seen the things about twelve on the Sunday before, on the 22d of March; I missed them on the Monday morning, coming to plough again; I had seen the prisoner once or twice before, he had worked near me.

GEORGE LAWFORD sworn.

I was fetched to apprehend the prisoners, I received them from John Beamer .

JOHN BEAMER sworn.

I am a poor labouring man, we took the father with the iron on his shoulder, and the boy was with him; he had a sack on his head, with the irons in it; in the sack I found the iron plough-spindle, a plough-pin, a standard-pin, and other things; he said at first he found them, he offered to drop them off his shoulder, and beg pardon if we would let him go.

PRISONERS' DEFENCE.

We had had no bread for two days, and we found them under a hedge.

(The things deposed to.)

Court to Beamer. How far was it from the prosecutor's that you apprehended the prisoners? - Five miles; it was on the 23d of March we took them.

What aged man is the father? - I took him to be fifty.

Was he capable of working? - At that time he was, he worked for a neighbouring farmer about a week.

GUILTY.

(Recommended to mercy.)

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17890422-73

358. WILLIAM KNIGHT was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of January , a silver table-spoon, value 5 s. the property of William Gray .

WILLIAM GRAY sworn.

I keep the Bell Savage Inn on Ludgate-hill ; I lost a silver spoon on Wednesday the 28th of January; I only prove the property, I did not see him take it; I saw him afterwards, when the waiter charged him with it, and he took it out of his pocket; he said somebody else had put it in.

Was there any body in the same box with him at the time the cloth was laid for him? - Not at the time he was at supper; there was a person sat nigh him at the time the spoon was taken from him; the constable has the spoon.

JOHN CATTERWOOD sworn.

The prisoner at the bar came to our house on the 28th of January, and ordered a mutton chop; it was dressed, I laid the cloth, and did not lay any spoon, and a gentleman came in and ordered a pint of porter, and a Welch rabbit, and the prisoner called for a spoon; I wondered what he should want with a spoon to a mutton chop; I saw him using the spoon against the edge of the dish, there was no gravy; when I came back I missed the spoon; the gentleman had not been a quarter of an hour by him; he did not sit on the same side with the prisoner; he sat opposite to him, the prisoner was there a matter of three hours; it was some time before the constable could be found.

Mr. Schoen, Prisoner's Counsel. The prisoner had used your house very often? - Three or four times before.

Do you know that he is a farmer in Northamptonshire? - I do not.

Why; had not he slept at your house for some nights before? - He had slept there two nights; I waited upon him, and carried him his mutton chop.

Your chops have never any gravy, I take it? - I did not think a spoon was wanting, I took the cloth away.

Do you recollect leaving the spoon on the table when you took the cloth away? - No.

Do you recollect whether the spoon was covered with a newspaper? - I swear I left no spoon there, when I took away the cloth; he ordered six-penny worth of punch.

Do you recollect then, his asking you whether you had missed any thing? - He said nothing to me, that I swear.

Was you perfectly sober that night? - Yes.

That you swear? - Yes.

You was not at all in liquor? - No.

Do you recollect the prisoner asking you if you was sure you brought a spoon to that table? - No.

Then the prisoner did not give you the spoon, and tell you you had left it there, and threatened to tell your master of your carelessness? - No, Sir, that he did not.

JOSEPH THOMPSON sworn.

The spoon has been in my possession ever since; I am a constable, I was sent for, and the prisoner denied having the spoon; I told him it was necessary for me to search him; he said, if I have any spoon about me, somebody else must have put it in my pocket; he then put his left-hand into his pocket, and pulled out the spoon.

(The spoon deposed to by the Prosecutor.)

Mr. Schoen to Thompson. Are you perfectly accurate as to what he said at the time? - He said if he had a spoon in his pocket, somebody else must have put it in.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

On Wednesday the 28th of January I went to Mr. Gray's house, about nine; the waiter neither brought a spoon nor any salt, which I thought was something extraordinary, but he appeared as if he was in liquor; after I had been there a quarter of an hour, a gentleman or two came into the box, on the opposite side, I did not know them; after supper I ordered the waiter to take away the things off the table; in about ten minutes after he came for the newspaper, and there lay the spoon under the newspaper; there were two gentlemen in the box, I took up the spoon and said, what a curious fellow this is, Mr. Gray ought to be made acquainted with it; I put the spoon into my pocket with an intent to give it to Mr. Gray; and in about fifteen or twenty minutes after, I went to the bar to give it to Mr. Gray, he had two gentlemen with him in close conversation; I went and sat in my seat again, and ordered my slippers, I had slept there the two preceding nights, I called for six-penny worth of liquor; before that I said to the waiter, have not you missed something tonight? says I, do you recollect what you brought me? he did not recollect himself then; somebody in the coffee-room called him away; in about a quarter of an hour

after he brought me six-penny worth of punch; when he bought it I said, don't you recollect you brought me a spoon, do not you recollect whether you took it away again? he said he did not know; says I, who should then? says I, I have the spoon and will give it to your master; he said I might do as I pleased; in consequence of that I apprehend he went to his master, and acquainted him that he missed a spoon, and had a suspicion that I had it; in consequence of that in came the constable; he said, I must search you; I said for what; I did not know that he was a constable; I believe I might be a little pert; says I, I have the spoon, it is in my pocket; he took it away from me; there came a swarm round me, and the constable did not use me well, he began to pull and shake me about, he took me by the collar and pulled me about, he did not use me in a genteel manner; then he took me to the watch-house in Fleet-market, and from thence to Wood-street compter; the next day I was taken before Mr. Chamberlain Wilkes; I begged him to be so obliging as to wait a little while, I expected a gentleman to come on my behalf, that saw me hold up the spoon, I had no intention of taking it, which the waiter must know; the Alderman put off my hearing till the next day; I mentioned it to Alderman Clarke, he said if you have not that person I must commit you; last session I put off my trial on account of the absence of my witnesses; I hope that will satisfy you.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Court to Thompson. At the time the spoon was found in his pocket, did he say any thing of this? - When I told him he was charged with stealing a silver spoon, and I must search him; he said I had no business, I said I must; he said, if I have a spoon in my pocket, it is more than I know of, for I have none.

But did he say any thing to his having put the spoon there, with intent to tell the master? - No.

Prisoner. He would not allow me an opportunity.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-74

359. JOHN KING was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of March , a hammer, value 5 d. a cloth jacket, value 5 d. a shovel, value 10 d. the property of Philip M'Guire , a hammer, value 5 d. a trowel, value 6 d. the property of James Wycott .

PHILIP M'GUIRE sworn.

The prisoner took from me a hammer and a jacket at Kentish Town , out of the house where we were at work, on Saturday night, the 14th of March; the prisoner worked there for us; we were plastering, we left work about six on Saturday night; I hid my tools, the prisoner saw me hide them; on Monday morning I came to work, and found the things gone; I went in search all Monday and Tuesday; and on Tuesday evening I caught the prisoner with my jacket upon him, in New-street, Covent Garden; I asked him what he had done with the rest of my things, and he said he had pawned them; I went with him to Mr. Davis's, the corner of Bell-yard, St. Giles's, and there I got my hammer, which was pawned for three-pence; my partner, James Wycot , lost some things at the same time; the prisoner had nothing to say for himself.

JAMES WYCOTT sworn.

The prisoner was at work with me at Kentish Town, and on Saturday evening I hid my tools with my partner's, the prisoner saw us put them there; they were

gone on Monday morning; I found my things on Tuesday afternoon at the pawnbroker's.

JOHN JONES sworn.

The prisoner worked with us; I am a labourer, I lost a shovel at the same time; he had pawned it at his lodgings for sixpence.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was hungry, it was that made me do it.

Wycott. He had left all the things together at his lodgings for six-pence.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Court. How long had he worked for you? - About four days; when he came to us, he said he was a plaisterer's son.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-75

360. THOMAS PALMER was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , thirty-one pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Reynolds , affixed to a building of his against the statute .

William Camell caught the prisoner twisting off a lead pipe which was in the kitchen; he had one piece twisted off, which lay by him.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-76

361. ELIZABET SWITHERS, alias CHARLOTTE DAVIS , was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of April , a gold watch, value 20 l. a gold seal, value 20 s. a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. two guineas and a half in money , the property of Thomas Robinson .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-77

362. MATTHEW ROSS was indicted, for stealing, on the 28th of March , eight pounds weight of brass, value 2 s. the property of George Walker .

GEORGE WALKER sworn.

I am a brass-founder , on the 28th of March last, which was on Saturday, about five o'clock in the evening, I lost eight pounds of brass; the prisoner was stopt, and brought back to me almost directly; he was seen to take the brass by James Weston.

JAMES WESTON sworn.

I am a brass-founder; I work for Mr. Walker; on Saturday about one o'clock, by the information of a boy, I looked under a tub, which we call the casting-tub, there I saw two papers of brass, there was some loose brass besides, I acquainted my master; in the evening, about five o'clock I saw the prisoner come, and take two papers, one he put into one pocket, and the other into the other; the loose brass he put into his breeches pocket, he went through the passage-door into the street, where I stopt him, he did not run; he was a servant to my master at the time, he used to help to cast; I told him my master wanted to speak to him, and he must go back again, he made no resistance, nor said any more; this is old brass bought on purpose for melting.

FRANCIS UMPAGE sworn.

I am an officer; I took the brass out of the prisoner's coat-pockets, his waistcoat pockets, and breeches pocket.

(The property deposed to by Mr. Walker.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I own I took the property; I never did such a thing before in my life.

GUILTY, of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-78

363. BENJAMIN STOKES was indicted for stealing, on the 2d of March , ten pounds weight of brass, value 2 s. the property of George Walker .

GEORGE WALKER sworn.

On the 2d of March, Monday, between seven and eight in the evening, I missed the ten pounds weight of brass; the constable found it upon him; I saw him take the brass out of the casting shop, he took it from a shop up two pair of stairs to the front warehouse; I saw the constable take it from out of his pockets; I never gave him any authority to take it away, nor had he any business with it; he said it was his first offence; the constable had the property.

FRANCIS UMPAGE sworn.

I took this brass out of the prisoner's coat pockets, waistcoat pockets and breeches pocket in Mr. Walker's front shop.

STEPHEN WESTON sworn.

I am an apprentice to the prosecutor; I saw the prisoner take the brass out of the casting-shop, and go into the workshop; I saw him wrap it up in a paper, and put it into his pocket.

FOR THE PRISONER.

FRANCIS UMPAGE sworn.

I am the officer that apprehended the prisoner; I have known him this 14 years as a very honest man, and I was really surprised when I was obliged to take him into custody.

- MURPHY sworn.

I am a housekeeper; I have known the prisoner 14 years; I always believed him to be an honest man.

GEORGE WALKER (the Prosecutor.)

He worked for my father a long time, and has worked for me since; I never suspected him before; I was really astonished at it.

The prisoner called four other witnesses; who had known him many years, and who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY, 10 d.

Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-79

364. JOHN KING was indicted, for stealing, on the 8th of March , six pair of iron hinges, value 4 s. the property of Reuben Bridges .

REUBEN BRIDGES sworn.

I am a carpenter ; I lost a great parcel of hinges out of my buildings in March; I do not know the day of the month; I did not know where they had gone to, nor who had them, 'till there were some more things missing from the plaisterers, and they took the prisoner up, and he owned it.

THOMAS MANSFIELD sworn.

The prisoner was brought to Litchfield-street office, I do not know how; I went with the prosecutor to St. Giles's to find out the property; I believe some promises were made him; I found the property at St. Giles's, a few doors from the Black Dog, at an old iron shop, at Mrs. Monk's; they were hanging at the door to sell.

ELIZABETH MONK sworn.

The prisoner, I believe, brought them to our house, I cannot say positively to

him, I never saw him before he brought them to sell; I keep a publick-house; the house that has the iron shop belongs to me, the man and his wife are both lately dead, and I put up a bill to let it.

CHARLES ELLIOTT sworn.

I went with Mansfield, and I found these hinges in Mrs. Monk's shop.

Court. There is not sufficient evidence, as the woman will not swear to the person of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-80

365. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of February , a silver watch, value 45 s. the property of Thomas Disdale , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS DISDALE sworn.

I am a baker ; I live in Charlotte-street; I lost my watch on the 1st of February; the prisoner had been an old servant of mine, and he came the Saturday forenoon, and told me he was out of place; I gave him his dinner; and in the afternoon he said, Master, I should be glad if you would let me stay all night; well, says I, Jack, I don't mind, you may stay all night; on the Sunday morning my watch was hanging up on the mantle-piece in the parlour, nobody was there; on the Monday morning I saw him go into the parlour, I was in the passage, I saw no more of him afterwards; I went into the parlour at different times on the Sunday, I looked for the watch to see what time to draw the pans, and the watch was gone; I saw it there that morning, and brought it down stairs with me; I found the prisoner in the New-Prison in the Borough the week before last; I never found my watch; the person that was bound over to prosecute with me never appeared afterwards.

Moses Knight called on his recognizance, and not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Disdale. I charged him with this robbery, I made him no promise, he owned it freely; and that he sold the watch to Moses Knight for 1 l. 10 s. here is his confession in writing; I saw him write it before Justice Staples.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it.

Court. How came he to write this? - He wrote it before Justice Staples, when he was examined.

Prisoner. I did not write it.

Court. Did he say any thing before he went to the Justice's? - No, I asked him nothing.

Then all you know is, what he wrote down? - Yes.

The paper you have was written before the Justice? - Yes.

Court to Mr. Shelton. Has there been any examination before the Justice transmitted?

(The Confession handed up to the Court.)

Disdale. I saw Justice Staples sign this, and this is the paper I saw the prisoner sign; no promise was made him.

(The Confession read.)

" John Williams confesses, and says,

"about 11 or 12 weeks ago, he took a silver

"watch as it was hanging in the parlour

"of Thomas Disdale , having only a key

"to it, and hanging by a string, which

"watch he sold about a fortnight after for

"thirty shillings, and two shillings that

"was spent.

(Signed)

" John Williams ."

Taken before me this 14th of April, 1789.

John Staples .

GUILTY, 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-81

366. JOHN LINDSEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , a boat called a wherry, value 40 s. the property of John Barber .

JOHN BARBER sworn.

I am a waterman ; I lost my wherry on the 29th of March, at night, between nine and ten, I left her there on the night before, which was Sunday night, I saw her safe; in the forenoon, on the Monday, I went to look after her, and I was informed she was detained; one of the witnesses, John Ellis , had her in possession.

JOHN ELLIS sworn.

I am a waterman, on the 29th of March, I was going over the water with a fare, and I saw this man laying under the ship's bows cutting a rope away, in this boat and pulling along-side of him, they shoved away, there was a waterman in the boat with the prisoner; the rope was hanging along-side the cable; I put the man out of my boat into the ship's boat, and pulled after these men, I came along-side of them, and talked ten minutes, the waterman had the sculls; after that this prisoner got up, and took hold of one of the sculls, and pulled away from me; at Ratcliffe-cross they pulled the boat ashore, and they both jumped out and ran away; I ran after the prisoner, and stopt him; I am sure the prisoner was one of the men in the boat.

JOHN BRODGDEN sworn.

I had the watch on the 29th, and seeing two men run, I ran after them; I heard the cry of stop thief! and immediately pursued them, and caught this man; I did not see him come out of the boat; he was running when I stopt him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never was in the boat, nor do not know the owner of the boat.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-82

367. EDWARD CASELTINE was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of April , six bushels of coals, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Lancaster ; and Sarah Michael was indicted for feloniously receiving the same on the said 21st day of April, knowing them to be stolen , against the statute.

The indictment opened by Mr. Silvester.

THOMAS GODSELL , jun. sworn.

My father is a wharfinger at Wapping; on the 21st of this month one of our carts was loaded with coals for Mr. Lancaster; his warehouse was in Lime-street; we loaded the last load about a quarter after six; there were 26 sacks in the waggon; the prisoner Caseltine drove the waggon; they left our wharf at half past six.

Mr. Knowlys, prisoner Caseltine's Counsel. Was you present, Sir, or your servants? - I was present.

Does your father deal in coals? - Yes.

These were your father's? - No, Sir, they were for Mr. Lancaster; they were Mr. Lancaster's property.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE sworn.

I keep a chandler's shop in Church-lane, Whitechapel; the prisoner Sarah Michael lives next door to me, and is a greengrocer; on the 21st, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner Caseltine take a sack of coals, which was in a waggon standing by Mrs. Michael's window, and shoot them down into her cellar-window; then he shot another down; Mrs. Michael was present out of doors at the time, about three or four yards from the waggon, in the street; I had the curiosity to follow the waggon; he then drove up Whitechapel, and stopped with another man to drink, and then went to Lime-street; I saw a man take the middle part of the sacks, and draw them up to the top; I informed Mr. Lancaster; I am sure as to the prisoners.

Mr. Knowlys. It was dark when you saw this? - No, it was not.

Not at eight o'clock? - It was not eight o'clock.

How came you to say eight o'clock? - It was eight o'clock when it was unloaded at Mr. Lancaster's; it was unloaded, and all by half past eight.

Who was with the waggon at that time? - The waggoner himself.

Who was with him? - Nobody.

Where was you then? - As near as I am to you.

What are you? - I deal in coals and wood.

So does Mrs. Michael, does not she? - I don't know, she sells greens, I believe, and buys old iron.

Don't you know she sells coals? - No, I do not, I am not master of her shop.

How long has she been your next door neighbour? - I believe two years.

You did not go up to the man, and ask how this happened? - I never spoke to him at all.

Was you not upon a regular plan of watching Mrs. Michael? - No.

Had you or had you not before this day formed a determination to watch Mrs. Michael? - No, I had not.

Mr. Peatt, Prisoner Michael's Counsel. I believe you did not like Mrs. Michael's coming there? - I did not dislike a good neighbour.

Had not you a dislike to Mrs. Michael's coming there? - One does not like a person to take the bread out of one's mouth.

Court. What became of the sacks they shot the coals out? - They were put into the middle part of the waggon; and when they came to Mr. Lancaster's they drew them quite forward.

ANN DEER sworn.

I was standing at my brother's door, on the 21st, about half past seven, I saw a waggon of coals, which was drove by the prisoner, stop at Mrs. Michael's door; he asked for a halfpenny-worth of tobacco; I then went into my brother's shop; and when I came out I saw some coals shot out, I don't know how many, and the sacks were put at the top of the waggon.

Mr. Knowlys. You board with your brother? - Yes.

And are you paid by him? - Yes.

Mrs. Michael deals in the same things as your brother? - Yes, I believe.

Has he never complained of Mrs. Michael taking the bread out of his mouth? - No, never.

Mr. Peatt. What hour was it when you saw this transaction? - About half past seven.

JOHN KNOX sworn.

I keep a green grocer's shop in Cullum-street, and am constable of Lime-street Ward; I was passing by Mr. Lancaster's door on the 21st, about twenty minutes past eight; I saw a waggon of coals standing at the door, and three men about it; the men seemed much confused, one of them said d - n your eyes, get up and pull down the empty sacks; the prisoner at the bar jumped up, and put them behind the hind wheel of the waggon; Mr. Lancaster came out with a candle and lanthorn, he appeared in confusion, and got on the shafts, and looked for the empty sacks; Lancaster could not find them, then one of the men took a sack of coals, and went up the passage that leads to the warehouse, and made a stumble; he then came back, and took the two empty sacks, and laid at the tail of the cart, and put the one he had shot in the warehouse with them.

Mr. Knowlys. Did you inform Mr. Lancaster of this then? - Not that evening.

THOMAS LANCASTER sworn.

I have a wharf at Wapping; my warehouse is a mile and three quarters from it.

Is Church-street in the way for them to have come with the waggon? - No, a quarter of a mile out of the way; the witness Partridge came, and informed me of the transaction; and that if I would look into the waggon I should find the empty sacks; I bid them stop unloading, but they would not; I endeavoured to get up, but could not; I then went to get a light and

a chair, and by that time they had laid the sacks even at the tail of the cart; I asked them, what made them come the way they did? and they said the pavement was up in White-lion-street, and therefore they came the other way; I went to see, and found it was no such thing; there were 26 sacks in all: the woman was taken into custody, and she denied having any from this man; and said, she had in her house a bushel, or a bushel and a half.

Partridge. Upon the woman saying to the Justice, she had but a bushel, or half a bushel in her house; says he, I am a pretty good judge of a bushel, I will go with you myself; I went with the Justice to this woman's house, and we looked and found the als under the window; the Justice asked her, what she had to say in her behalf? and she said, she was very sure that she had no such quantity of coals in the house, for she was obliged to send for a bushel on Saturday night at Mr. Hands's; then says the Justice, I can judge of a bushel, and I'll go and see myself.

Mr. Knowlys. Was what you are talking of taken down in writing? - I believe it was; then I saw the coals measured, first in the cellar, there were about four bushels and a peck, and there was another parcel measured two bushels within about a quarter of a peck, in this hole; afterwards the Justice sent one of the men to fetch two parcels of coal, some out of this cellar, and some out of a room.

JOHN RIDLEY sworn.

I am the coal-merchant who sold these coals originally; I was at the Justice's when the coals were brought, I believe they are the same; nobody in their senses would attempt to swear they were.

The prisoner Caseltine called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Michael called seven witnesses, who all gave her a very good character.

EDWARD CASELTINE , GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

SARAH MICHAEL , GUILTY .

Transported for fourteen years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-83

368. WILLIAM COOK was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of March , a brilliant diamond ring, with a hair device set in gold, value 15 l. the property of Miss Ethelred Tyron .

(The Case opened by Mr. Knowlys.)

MISS ETHELRED TYRON sworn.

In November last I went into Kent, accompanied by Mr. Edghill; I had a brilliant diamond ring with me, there was M. Tyron on the ring; I did not miss the ring 'till after my return; I was one day on my journey, and came back the next day; I did not receive intelligence of it 'till the 1st of March.

Mr. Garrow, prisoner's Counsel. Have you any recollection of having the ring after the 1st day on your journey to Kent? - I have not; I was only one day on my journey, and returned the next day.

On your getting out of the chaise, you and Captain Edghill walked together? - We got out of the chaise, and walked up the hill, called Madam's-gate Hill.

- EDGHILL, Esq. sworn.

I will not positively swear to the person who drove us; I went to a Mrs. Steel's, who lets out post-chaises; in order to find out who drove us; I was shewn the prisoner, but I will not swear to the prisoner.

Mrs. STEEL sworn.

I let out post-chaises; the prisoner at the bar was my servant, at that time; he drove the gentleman and lady on their journey, and returned back again; I know nothing more.

I believe he has lived with you 2 or 3 years, what character has he bore? - A very honest man; I always found him so.

Captain Edghill . I went to Mrs. Steel, and the prisoner was called up, and he denied having ever seen the ring; afterwards on his examination he said he found it on the hill.

CHARLES STUBBS sworn.

I am a silversmith, on the 21st of March the prisoner came to my house, and bought a pair of spurs; he told me he had found a ring coming up Madam's-gate Hill; he offered it to me for sale, and I went to Mr. Heather's with it.

JOHN BECK HEATHER sworn.

The ring was delivered to me by the last witness; he came to ask me, what it was? I am a pawnbroker in Long-acre; Mr. Stubbs told me he had given two guineas for it; I stopped him, and took him into custody; I had never seen him before; I sent for proper officers for that purpose.

Miss Tyron. The ring is my property.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury. It is requisite that some proof should be given of the robbery; the lady acknowledges she was walking where the prisoner says he found it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-84

369. THOMAS STEVENSON and JOHN DUDLEY were indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , thirteen linen handkerchiefs, value 13 s. the property of John Thwaits , privately in his shop .

JOHN THWAITS sworn.

I keep a shop in Holborn ; I was at home when this happened, it was about five o'clock in the evening, of the 27th of March, the prisoners came into my shop; I was about eight yards distance from them; I did not observe them at first; a young man desired me to keep a strict eye on the prisoners; he said, he suspected they would hand something off; the tallest of them was buying of a pocket handkerchief, the other stood by; I took no notice of them 'till they went out; I ran after them, and desired one of my young men to follow me; and about thirty or forty yards off I took Stevenson, the other got off, but he was taken in a few minutes afterwards; I found thirteen pocket handkerchiefs concealed under Stevenson's great-coat; I am sure they are mine; he went down on his knees, and cried, and begged to be set at liberty; the prisoner Dudley I understood had bought a handkerchief; I did not see either of the prisoners take any thing; one William Brown saw him taken.

Court. Is he here? - No.

How came you not to bring the witness? - I could not spare him.

How came you to indict them capitally? Did they come in together? - I am not certain.

Mr. Peatt, prisoner Stevenson's Counsel. You say you was apprised that they were suspicious people? - Yes, I was.

Mr. Garrow, prisoner Dudley's Counsel. Nothing was found on Dudley, but a handkerchief he had bought? - No.

Court. I shall not put Dudley on his defence.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him him a good character.

THOMAS STEVENSON , GUILTY, Of stealing, but not privately.

Recommended by the Jury.

Transported for seven years .

JOHN DUDLEY , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-85

370. GEORGE KING was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a silver tankard, value 6 l. 6 s. the property of Timothy Martin .

The prosecutor not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated; and the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-86

371. THOMAS HETSELL , and BENJAMIN RUTLAND were indicted for stealing, on the 25th of March , four live pigs, value 6 l. the property of Joseph Cooper .

The prisoner's counsel objected to the statement in the indictment, being called pigs, each of them being of the weight of sixteen or seventeen stone; and on asking the witnesses, who were hog butchers, separately, they replied that they never knew or heard of their being called pigs, after they exceeded the weight of six or seven stone.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-87

372. ANN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 23d of March , a pair of gloves, value 6 d. a watch-chain, value 6 d. a handkerchief, value 6 d. a coloured apron, value 1 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. two shawls, value 2 s. and several other things, the property of Ann Williams .

ANN WILLIAMS sworn.

The prisoner lived as servant with me three weeks, I took her in as a charitable act, she said she had just come to town, and had neither money nor friends; my man met her going to an office, he brought her to my house, he was a countryman of her's; I told her I did not like to take strangers in; she said she was willing to do any thing; I told her if she behaved well I would clothe her, as fast as it was coming to her; on the 23d of March Mr. Baker informed me she had left a bundle, and was going away; I went to Mr. Baker's, and I examined the bundle, and found the things were mine; Mr. Baker is a neighbour of mine; here are some things I took out of her pocket, a pair of gloves, a watch-chain, some money, a handkerchief, a coloured apron; this check apron was too short, I had more joined to it; her care a pair of shoes, these shawls I know by the colour being discharged by lemon.

JOHN BAKER sworn.

The prisoner came to my house in the morning about seven o'clock, I live in Vine-street, it was on the 23d of March, she desired I would let her leave that bundle there, as she was coming away from her place; I told her she might; I went and told my wife that I did not think that the thing belonged to her, I told my wife to inform Mrs. Williams, and she did, and she came in and said the things were her's, and the prisoner was taken into custody.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Mr. Baker's servant came to our house on Sunday night, he staid there all night, and I let him out the next morning, and he gave me the bundle to take; I said I would not leave my place; he said if I did not bring it out, he would knock my bloody eye out, and I took it and left it at Mr. Baker's.

GUILTY .

To be transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-88

373. JOHN FREASURE was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of March , an iron spade with a wooden handle, value 2 s. the property of James Ellis , and another iron spade with a wooden handle, value 2 s. the property of Edward Sawyer .

JAMES ELLIS sworn.

I am a gardener ; on the 12th of March

I went to dinner, I left my spade at Mr. Birch's nursery at Fulham , I left it in the ground at one o'clock; I came back about a quarter after two, when I came back it was gone; I suspected the prisoner by his coming into the grounds about once or twice, three or four days before, he used to come to speak to one Edward Sawyer who worked in the ground; I afterwards found my spade at the George on Waltham Green, the same evening; the prisoner was there, the spade had been given in custody of the landlord; I questioned the prisoner about it, and he denied it; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM LAYTHORN sworn.

I keep the George at Waltham-green, I have seen the prisoner about once at my house; there was a spade brought to my house, I believe it was the prisoner that brought it, I had never seen him but once before; I can't be sure it was him, he never was out of my house; the man that Ellis took up is the person that brought the spade, but I cannot swear to the prisoner now.

Ellis. The prisoner is the man I took up at the George; I believe it to be my spade, I believe I had worked with it for about three months; I bought it of one Polkstone at Fulham; there is writing on it, but I don't know what it was; I cut some nicks in it at the Justice's.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-89

374. JOSEPH ATKINS was indicted for stealing on the 6th of January , twenty pounds weight of leaden pipe, value 3 s. the property of John Lisle , affixed to his dwelling-house , against the statue.

JOHN LISLE sworn.

I am a house-keeper , the lead was stole from the house in which I live, I lost it on the 6th of January, I don't recollect the day of the week, it was about eight o'clock in the morning; I saw it on the day before when the water came in, I knew it to be my property; one of the tenants gave me information of it's being stolen.

- WRIGHT sworn.

I am a watchman, I took the prisoner, he had a sack on his back; I took him with the property; I knew him before.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-90

375. GEORGE BODMAN and JOHN THOMPSON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , ten pounds weight of brass, value 10 s. the property of Edward Buttwell .

BOTH NOT GUILTY :

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-91

376. GEORGE MASON and WILLIAM PITT were indicted for stealing, on the 26th of January , a steel watch chain, value 5 s. the property of William Hodges .

WILLIAM HODGES sworn.

I make watch-chains, and other steel articles ; I live near Sadler's Wells ; my shop adjoins to my house opposite Lane's Gardens; on Monday morning, the 26th of January, a little past eight, I found the chain at a Mr. Datton's, who keeps a publick-house, in King-street, Drury-lane; I knew it to be mine by the workmanship, part of which was my own; I could have swore to it any where; it had been missing near two months before I had information; Mr. Datton gave it to Atkins the constable; I saw him give it to him.

JOHN DATTON sworn.

I am a publican and cooper; some time in the latter end of January, the prisoner Pitt came to me, and had a quartern of gin; he put a watch chain down on the table, and he asked me to buy it; after that, he said he was going to take it to his master, Mr. Green in Drury-lane, to see if he would buy it; if not, he should pawn it; I asked him, if it was his property; he said, it did not belong to him, he had it from a young man to sell; I told him then, to go and fetch the young man; he went and brought Mason; I asked Mason about it; and he said it was his property, it belonged to him; I asked him, what I should give him for it? he said 7 s. I said it was not worth above 4 s. he went into the back room, and laid down the chain before some men; he said, it was his property, and he owned it as such; I gave him 5 s. for it; I had the chain in my possession two months, 'till Mr. Hodges applied to me; when they came to me I produced it to him and Atkins, and he said it was his property, and I gave it to Atkins; when Mason came to me he was very decently dressed, but Pitt was not; I never saw either of the prisoners before or since; they are the men.

JOHN ATKINS sworn.

I am the constable; I produce this chain; I received it the 5th of April last from Mr. Datton.

(The chain deposed to by the prosecutor.

Mr. Hodges. Mason worked journey-work for me.

Did Pitt work for you? - No.

PRISONER PITT's DEFENCE.

The prisoner Mason brought me a chain, to sell it or pawn it; I said I would shew it to my master; I stopped at Mr. Datton's, I and another had a quartern of gin at the bar; I told Mr. Datton I had it to sell; and he asked me, whose property it was? I told him it was a young fellow's that I knew that wanted to sell it.

The prisoner Mason called one witness to his character.

GEORGE MASON , GUILTY .

Privately whipt , and imprisoned six months .

WILLIAM PITT , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-92

377. PETER MILLER (a boy aged nine) was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , 10 s. in monies numbered, the property of Thomas May , privately from his person .

THOMAS MAY sworn.

I am a poor man in the workhouse ; I did not see or know the prisoner robbed me.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I am a poor man in the workhouse; I was at work with the prisoner and Mr. May one day, and I saw him help Mr. May with his coat on, but I did not see him take any thing.

May. I had 10 s. in my pocket when he helped me on with my coat; I felt his hand in my pocket; I had two half crowns, and 5 s. in my pocket; I had seen it about half an hour before that; about four o'clock in the afternoon my coat was on the ground on the common before he helped me on with it; I did not see any body on the common but me, and the prisoner, and this man; I was digging gravel; I had the silver in my coat-pocket; I had no suspicion of him before the Sunday morning; it was on Saturday night he took it; I did not take any notice of it at that time.

Court. How came you to say at first you did not know of his robbing you? - I did not know he had: I asked him on the Sunday morning, whether he had seen any money of mine? and he said no: I asked him again, and then he said he had got two half crowns and 4 s. of mine, and he brought it down to me; then I said I wanted a shilling, and he said he spent it; I threatened to send him to gaol, before he brought it down, if he did not give it to me; he then brought me down 9 s. and said he had spent 1 s. I got all but 1 s. back again.

How came you to indict him capitally? Do you know that he is tried for his life? - I do not know.

Do you know that the charge you have made against this boy is a capital charge? - No, I do not think it is.

Have you never been told that? - No, I never was.

Did not the officer who drew the indictment tell you he had made a capital charge of it? - No.

Prisoner. How many shillings did I give at one time.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. You have told the Judge, that to your knowledge they did not tell you it was a capital charge: Do you mean to swear that they did not tell you so? - No, Sir, not to my knowledge.

Will you swear positively they did not? - I have been lame these three years.

Do you mean to swear that nobody has told you, that if this boy was convicted he would lose his life? - Not to my knowledge; he has been in custody a week.

Do you mean to swear, that since Monday last nobody has told you, that if this boy was convicted he would be hanged? - No.

Do not you know you would have a reward? - I know there is some reward.

Have not you heard there is a reward of 40 l. - No, I heard it was some reward; I do not know who told me so; I have heard so from people.

Who told you so? - I cannot tell now.

Do not you know he was committed by the magistrate for a capital offence? - No.

Did not you ask the magistrate who was to pay your expences? - No.

Did not the magistrate tell you that the Could would order you your expences, or that you would have a reward? - I am a poor man belonging to the workhouse; I work under the overseer, and I received this by my labour.

Is your memory affected by your poverty? - No.

Is your head affected? - It is a good deal.

You'll be mistaken this time as to the reward.

GUILTY, 10 d.

Whipped .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-93

378. THOMAS RILEY was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of March , fifteen pounds weight of Indigo, value 4 l. and three hempen bags, value 3 s. the property of Edward Sewer .

EDWARD SEWER , the Elder , sworn.

I am a dyer , the prisoner has worked for me a great many years; the prisoner was set to clean a warehouse where this indigo was on the 13th of March, about five o'clock I sent my son to go and see how things were in the dye-house; he went out, and in a very short space of time he sent somebody to call me; I went, and he had got Riley by the collar; he said, he had got some indigo in his apron; I looked, and he had this bag in his apron unsewed, it was huddled up in a wrap to keep it close together; he began to beg for mercy of me; I said, he had very little mercy on me to take my goods; I believe there are seventeen pounds, it cost me 6 s. a pound; there is nothing in it that I should know it if I had found it out of my shop, but it is of the quality I had open.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. I believe your son is your partner? - No, Sir, I have no partners but such as the prisoner.

EDWARD SEWER , the Younger, sworn.

On the 13th of March, about five o'clock, I was going into the dye-house; I saw the prisoner, who had something in his apron; I asked him, what it was? he said, a job; and he said, if I would forgive him he would never take another; I insisted on looking in his apron, and there I found the indigo.

Mr. Sewell, the Elder. My Lord, the prisoner has worked for me a number of years; I have trusted him with every thing in my house before, and never missed any thing; I never had any suspicion of him.

GUILTY ,

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-94

379. JOSEPH WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously making an assault on Mary, the wife of James Porter , in the dwelling-house of the said James Porter, and then and there, by threats and other menaces, demanding the money of the said Mary Porter , against the statute .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-95

380. JOHN EADES was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of March , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Buchanan .

John Buchanan called on his recognizance and did not appear.

THOMAS DALTON sworn.

I am an officer of Litchfield-street office, and a constable of the night; I desired the prosecutor to attend; I produce a quart pewter pot which I found secreted in Eades's apartment under the bed; the prosecutor sent word that it was a busy day and he could not attend; this pot has the prosecutor's name on it.

Court. There must be proof of the property being the prosecutor's; there is no such proof.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-96

381. JAMES HENLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of April , eleven pounds weight of copper nails, value 10 s. the property of Mary, now the wife of Robert Sherson , (late Mary Thoytes , widow) Richard Burfoot , Richard Rooke , and Peter Robinson , the executrix and executors of John Thoytes , deceased.

EDWARD SMITH sworn.

I am clerk to the house of Thoytes and company; the late widow Thoytes, now Mrs. Sherson, belongs to the company, and Richard Burfoot , Richard Rooke , and Peter Robinson are joint executors; I have the probate of the will, they are copper-smiths ; on the 3d of April, between the hours of twelve and one in the day, I saw the nails taken out of of the prisoner's coat pockets; there were about eleven pounds.

JOSEPH SWAIN sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Robinson; on Friday the 3d of April, I met the prisoner coming out of Mess. Thoytes's shop, he is their journeyman; I saw Mr. Smith take the nails out of the prisoner's pocket, I helped to take them out; I have had them ever since.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. How long has the prisoner worked for Messrs. Thoytes? - About two years and a quarter.

Had not he bore a good character? - Yes he had.

Did you observe whether he was quite sober that day? - As far as I know; I cannot positively say.

DAVID SWAIN sworn.

I am an apprentice, I had some suspicion of the prisoner; on the 3d of April I saw the prisoner take some copper nails, and put them into his pocket, and go out of doors with them, and I gave information to my brother, the last witness; he stopt five minutes before he went out; those nails were Messrs. Thoytes's.

Mr. Garrow. Nobody saw the prisoner take the nails but you? - No.

How came you to let him go a quarter of a mile before they went after him? - I don't know.

He bore a very good character in the shop? - Yes.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY .

Publicly whipt , and imprisoned six months .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-97

382. JOHN CLARK was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of March , nine men's hats, value 3 l. the property of Philip Cox , Esq . and Henry North .

HENRY NORTH sworn.

I am a hat manufacturer , my partner's

name is Philip Cox ; we lost nine men's hats, they were taken on the prisoner; I only prove the property.

JOHN ELLIS sworn.

I am one of the city patrol, I was on duty on the 22d of March, I staid till nine in the evening, in Thames-street, the prisoner came past me, with this bundle in his hand; I asked him what he had there; he said some hats, he was going to Mile-end with them; I rather let him go on, and I found he mended his pace; I went after him directly, and I stopped him, and took the hats from him; I took him into Dark-house-lane, and he told me he had bought them of a hatter in Tooley-street; I told him I should go over the water and enquire of that hatter about it; then he said he did not live there, he was broke, but he had lived there; then he directed me to one William Evans , a public-house in Tooley-street; I left him with two men I had with me, and went over the water to this house; when I came there, there was no such person lived there, then he was committed the next morning; I was informed they belonged to Mr. Cox, I carried them to him, the clerk claimed them; I have kept them ever since.

(The hats deposed to by Mr. North.)

Mr. North. I can say with certainty that these hats had never been sold out of our warehouse to any hatter; some of them no hatter would buy, I saw them a few days before, we have sold none since I saw them; the prisoner was my servant; this is a letter I received from him, I believe this to be his hand-writing, I have seen him write a great many times.

(Read) Signed

" John Clark ," addressed to

"Mr. Henry North , Tooley-street,

"March 13, 1789."

"Sir, I should be very much obliged

"to you, if you would give yourself the

"trouble to read this; I am sorry for my

"bad misconduct, and I hope you will forgive

"me for wronging you of your hats,

"and I am now in the Compter in the

"Poultry, and I beg for mercy at your

"own hands; and I beg you will come to

"me and own the hats, if you please,

"and tell the people that you let me have

"them yourself, or else I am done for; but

"I beg for mercy at your hands, and you

"may have me if you will, but take it into

"consideration to pardon me this time;

"I never wronged no man of a shilling in

"my life before; but I beg for mercy that

"you will pardon me this once; you never

"shall hear the like any more; I will

"go down on my bare knees to you, and

"ask your pardon; and I beg you will not

"mention it to Mr. Cox, nor even to my

"wife's friends; for if you do, I am

"ruined: I hope you will pardon me this

"time, I beg for mercy.

" JOHN CLARK ."

"P. S. I never will come into your

"house no more, so long as I live, if you

"will pardon me this time."

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am charged with a wrong indictment; I am charged with taking these hats when I was in the Poultry Compter; I was in the Poultry Compter at the time.

Court to Prisoner. You mistake the law; if the indictment charges them any day before the Grand Jury found the bill, the day is immaterial, but it may be material as a fact.

To Ellis. Was the prisoner ever out of custody from the time you took him? - No.

GUILTY .

Publicly whipped , and imprisoned six months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-98

383. JOHN HOPKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 7th of April , ten quartern leaves of wheaten bread, value 4 s. the property of Spencer White .

SPENCER WHITE sworn.

The prisoner lived with me eight or nine months, I am a baker ; on the 4th of April he stole out of my bake-house one quartern loaf, and on the 6th he stole seven, and on the 7th he stole two; I saw him take them each day, I cannot tell what he did with them, he had concealed them over the oven; there is a small hole over the oven, this he made bigger, and in the course of the day he was taking two out; I caught him in the fact; I marked two of them before he took them out.

(Two loaves produced and deposed to.)

Mr. Knowlys, Prisoner's Counsel. It is not at all extraordinary for your man to take the loaves from the bake-house, and carry them into the compting-house? - Yes, quite so; there is a thoroughfare at the back part of the bake-house, which goes into the cow-yard; I have one customer there, he may go to the customers that way.

Whether he was carrying them to the customers or not, you cannot say? - He had no business with that bread.

This young man is of good family and connections? - I have heard of his friends within a day or two, but I know nothing of them.

- MUMFORD sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner.

The prisoner called nine witnesses who all gave him a very good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17890422-99

384. WILLIAM GOWER was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of March , one snatch-block, made of iron and wood , the property of Almond Hill and Robert Mellish .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-100

385. THOMAS GOUGE was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , twenty-four pounds weight of pork, value 8 s. the property of Thomas Hawkes .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-101

386. MARY the wife of SAMUEL WILTON was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of March , one linen sheet, value 3 s. six yards of linen cloth, value 3 s. two tea-spoons, value 2 s. the property of William King .

ELIZABETH KING sworn.

I am wife of William King , I live in Harrow-road , I lost the things in the indictment; the prisoner and her husband lived with me almost three quarters of a year; she did not leave the house till she was taken up; we got a search warrant, and found the things.

Mr. Knapp, Prisoner's Counsel. What was she to pay for her lodging a year? - Five pounds ten shillings.

Has there been any dispute between you and the prisoner? - There was, she had told her husband it was three pounds ten shillings.

Has not your husband sued out a writ in the Marshalsea-court? - Yes.

Did you ever lend any spoons to this woman? - Yes, I lent her mother some twice, and I have lent her some.

At this time had you lent them? - I lent them, and she came and told me she had brought them me down, and I never saw the spoons.

At the time these spoons were found, was there not some money found? - One shilling; the sheet never was lent, nor the cloth, nor never was up in her room before; I had kept the sheet in my own apartment, and saw it there last.

GEORGE ZEAL sworn.

I belong to the public office; I went with Justice Blackborow to the prisoner's lodgings, and on searching the bed, I saw her hide the sheet under the child; I made her take up the child, and there was the sheet.

WILLIAM BLACKETER sworn.

I attended with the last witness, and on searching I found two spoons broke in her box.

GUILTY .

To be imprisoned for six months .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-102

387. ELIZABETH BATTIER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of February , eighteen guineas, one half guinea, and one Mocoa stone stud, set in silver, value 1 s. the property of Richard Hewitt .

RICHARD HEWITT sworn.

I am a widower , I live in Warwickshire; I charge the prisoner with taking eighteen guineas and a half from me; I met her in Fleet-street, she asked me to go with her, I said I did not mind; she took me to a private lodging, we drank a bottle of wine; then she asked for another; I was very sleepy; she asked me to go to bed; I did, I undressed and put my breeches under the pillow; the money was there, I had it when I was in the room with this girl; I had nineteen guineas in a purse, I took it out in her presence.

How came you to take out the purse in her presence? - I do not know, because I was foolish; she charged me five shillings for the bed; I took half a guinea and paid five shillings for the bed, and the other five shillings and six-pence was spent in wine.

You was not very sober I suppose? - I was not drunk, Sir; I lost a studd out of my wrist, it was a Mocoa stone set in silver; in the morning I awaked, and found my breeches, instead of under the pillow, upon the pillow, and my purse and money was gone; I found the purse on the table cut in three or four places, I cannot tell what time it was when I awaked, it was not light, it might be four or five; the window was open, and the curtains drawn; I called to the person of the house, and the maid answered that the door was done; the woman's name is Lumley, I heard of the prisoner at No. 3, Goldsmith-street, at one Eaton's, on Sunday afternoon; I went to her, she was alone at her lodging, I suppose Mr. Eaton came up; I asked for her.

How did you get her name? - I had her name.

How did you get it? - I had it.

You must give me an answer? - I have given you an answer; Mrs. Lumley gave me her name, and even her maid was the person that gave intelligence where she was.

Are you sure the woman you saw at Eaton's, was the same woman you had been in company with before? - Yes, that is the same person, I have looked at her, I asked her whether she could give me any of the money again; she said she had it not in her possession; she said she knew nothing at all of it, she gave me the studd before the constable, it was my studd; my money was not marked.

Mr. Knowlys, Prisoner's Counsel. This is a very pretty, a very entertaining, a very becoming sort of a story; because I observed, when you first came up to that box, you came smiling and laughing? - No, I did not, I do not know that I did, I am sure.

Do not you recollect that you was laughing? - Somebody gave me a push on the back, as I suppose, as I was coming up, I did not smile at the Court.

Do you mean to say that you did not

smile and laugh when you came up there? - I do not know, I might smile.

Who are you? - I am a dealer in cattle, when I am out of London.

Then you came to London about your cattle? - Not on purpose.

That makes me suspect that here is rather an over-charge as to the money? - Not purposely, I did not come.

You was at the Swan with Two Necks in Lad-lane? - That day I dined at one, at the Swan with Two Necks.

How much money might you spend in liquor, before you saw this young woman? - I spent none, for I paid nothing there, I spent it between Lad-lane and this place.

You drank, I suppose, pretty well at your dinner? - Yes, I suppose I drank some liquor at my dinner.

Do you only suppose that? - Yes, I know I did.

You had drank pretty plentifully at your dinner I take it? - Yes, I drank some liquor.

What liquor? - I drank porter, and I drank punch.

What might your reckoning come to? - That I cannot tell.

What time did you leave the Swan with Two Necks? - At Five o'clock.

Then you was enjoying yourself from one to five? - Yes.

Then from five to half past six, it was that you was getting this four or five miles to Temple-bar? - I suppose I was; I know I was an hour and half getting to Templebar.

You did not walk very strait? - Yes, I did; I do not eat a deal, but I drink a good deal.

Do you know what women you met in the way? - No, I cannot tell their names.

Amorously inclined, I suppose at this time? - I suppose I was at that time, I do not know, I accusted one, I cannot rightly say what part of Fleet-street I met her in.

How many places did you stop at in going? - I cannot tell.

Will you venture to say that you knew every thing you did with your purse, and every part of the money you laid out during that hour and half? - Yes, I will say that I know what money I had in my pocket.

Which way did you get into Cheapside? - I do not know that.

SAMUEL SINGLETON sworn.

I am a hatter, I am a constable; I was sent for on the 8th of February, about nine in the evening, by this prosecutor, and the person that keeps the house; he gave me no other account than that he was robbed of eighteen guineas and a half, and eighteen pence; I think it was at Mrs. Lumley's.

You are sure he said eighteen pence? - Eighteen guineas and a half, and eighteen pence, and a studd; the prisoner delivered the studd in my presence.

(The studd produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prosecutor. I do not know whether it might drop out or whether it might not; this is my studd.

JOHN PARKER sworn.

On the Sunday morning that Mr. Hewitt came to buy a suit of clothes, I saw him change a bill, he had cash in his pocket when I came in the evening, he was out that morning, he had plenty of gold in his purse; on Saturday night he came and told me the business, I had made the clothes and taken them home according to order; he paid me for the clothes afterwards, and told me what he had been robbed of; he said he had been robbed of eighteen guineas and a half; at the time I saw him in the morning, I cannot say he was sober, he had come above an hundred miles an outside passenger; a gentleman who was in Court, in the presence of the prisoner, offered to give a note at six weeks, his name is Levy, and Mr. Eaton offered to pay part of the property; I advised Mr. Hewitt to take what he could get.

Prisoner. I leave it to my Counsel.

ABRAHAM LEVY sworn.

I am a turn-key of Wood-street Compter; I was present, on the 7th of March, when the prosecutor applied to Sir Watkin Lewis who committed her, to get the commitment discharged after the prisoner was committed; the prisoner was committed on Tuesday, and he applied the Saturday following; I can prove what passed with respect to Mr. Hewitt's prosecution.

Did he say why? - The reasons he assigned for it was (which he said in the Compter) that he meant to take the prisoner down into the country along with him.

You heard him say that? - Yes I did.

Mr. Knowlys. I will not call any witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-103

388. WILLIAM MITCHELL was indicted for receiving, on the 12th of October last, twenty-seven silver plates, value 130 l. the property of His Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury ; he, the said William Mitchell , knowing the same to have been stolen , against the statute, &c.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-104

389. LEWIS SEAGLER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of April , a metal watch, value 40 s. and several other things, the property of John Marlow , in the dwelling-house of John Sharp .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-105

390. JOHN WILKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 36 pair of silk stockings, value 20 l. and twelve pair of thread stockings, value 3 l. the property of William Wayte .

WILLIAM WAYTE sworn.

I am a hosier and hatter ; I live in Panton-street, Clare-market; on the 9th of February I lost the things in the indictment, it was between one and two on Monday when I delivered the goods in the indictment to my apprentice to carry to a Mr. Heath; there were three dozen of silk stockings, and one dozen of thread stockings.

RICHARD M'MICHAEL sworn.

I am an apprentice to Mr. Wilkins, on the 9th of February I had two parcels from my master to carry to a Mr. Heath; I was going up Ludgate-hill, and I was met by the prisoner at the bar; he asked me, where I was going? I said to Mr. Heath's, a hosier; the prisoner at the bar said, he was going to my master for those things from Mr. Heath; I had the parcels under my arm, I did not see them packed up, my master gave me the parcels to carry; he gave me another small parcel, and said, I must give it to my master; he said, there was a letter in the inside, he desired I would take it to my master, and it was to be forwarded to Mrs. Brown immediately, he took the other two parcels from me, he walked on slowly, and went towards the Old Bailey; afterwards I had rather a suspicion of him, I ran after him as far as the Old Bailey; I asked him, if his name was Mr. Heath? he said, yes, it was, and I left him then; I did not get the parcels back; I can swear positively to the prisoner.

Prisoner's Counsel. You had never seen the prisoner before in your life? - No.

You was met by a person, you say, who took your parcels, and gave you another? - Yes.

You had no suspicion? - Not at the time.

How long was it before you saw the prisoner again? - About two months or six weeks.

Where did you see him? - At the Compter.

Who shewed you the man? Did Newman? - Yes, he said he had taken the man.

Did he shew the man to you? - No, I saw him, and said that is the gentleman.

Court. Were there a great many in the Compter at the time? - Yes.

Was he pointed out to you, or did you point him out? - I pointed him out.

JOHN NEWMAN sworn.

I am a fishmonger; on the 9th of February, I was going with some fish to Mr. Shaw's of Bridge-street, Black-friars, it was between one and two o'clock, going down Ludgate-hill, I saw the prisoner standing at a pawnbroker's near to the Bell Savage; I saw the boy coming with two parcels under his arm; the prisoner John Wilkins came from the pawnbroker's to the boy with a parcel in his hand; he stopt the boy, and they were in discourse together for about two minutes, then the boy delivered the parcels into the prisoner's hands, and the prisoner gave the boy his parcel; the prisoner then walked towards St. Paul's, the boy then ran after him, and said something else to him; then the boy came back, and I told him he was cheated out of his parcels; says I open the parcel, and you will find it so; he says it is nothing to me; it is Mr. Heath, I know Mr. Heath; when he came into Bridge-street, he opened the parcel, and in it there were two dishclouts; he took them out of the parcel, and fell a crying; he told me he had stockings in his parcels to the amount of 5 l. I knew the person of the prisoner before; I took the prisoner about a month afterwards; the alderman told me to take care of the parcel, with the dish-clouts.

What relation are you to Newman the constable? - I am his brother.

You was going to Mr. Shaw's with some fish? - Yes.

How long have you left Mr. Banks? - About three years.

What made you leave him, was it not about some boots? - No.

Will you swear that? - Yes, Sir, I will.

This man you suspected immediately? - Yes, Sir.

Why did not you stop him? - The boy would not open his parcel.

You did not see him afterwards for six weeks? - Yes, Sir, I did, I saw him about a fortnight afterwards at about nine in the evening, but I was by myself, and I did not like to stop him.

Mr. Wayte. The boy came back about two hours after I had sent him out; he had been before to Mr. Heath's; I do not know whether he knew Mr. Heath personally.

The prisoner's Counsel objected, that it was not a felony, but obtaining goods by false pretences, and the case was reserved, and sentence respited, for the opinion of the Judges.

GUILTY .

Jury. My Lord, we mean we are perfectly satisfied, that he was the man; and we believe what the witnesses have sworn.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-106

391. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of March , fifty-seven pounds weight of bell-metal, value 30 s. the property of the Governor and Company of the Copper Miners of England .

The case opened by Mr. Blofeld.

A WITNESS sworn.

The Company are incorporated by the name of

"The Governor and Company of the Copper Miners of England;" we are a trading Company.

THOMAS COLLINS sworn.

I am a constable, on the 9th of March last, a little after six in the morning, I observed a man loitering about Cow-cross, I

watched him, and I observed him go into an old iron shop, with this piece of bell metal; I see him lay it down at the door, and he went to walk away, I laid hold of him, and asked him, what he had got there? it was wrapped up in a cloth; I thought it had been a piece of cast-iron; I asked him, where he got it? and he said a man gave it him to sell; I told him I should keep him in custody 'till I found out who it belonged to; he then begged I would let him go, and keep it myself; I refused, and he snatched a stick from me I had in my hand, and he struck me with it several times, and endeavoured to run away; I followed him, and took him, he was committed, I marked the metal; when he was before the magistrate, he said he found it.

JOHN GUNSTAN sworn.

I am warehouseman to the Governor and Company of Copper Mines; I believe this bell-metal to be their property, by the mark that is on it, which is

"41 Slab;" we lost a slab of this size, and I believe it to be theirs; it was lost from the warehouse in Bush-lane, which is about a mile from Cow-cross, it was not missed 'till the constable came, and gave information that he had found a slab; I then examined, and found that we had missed it; there are other Companies who make the same kind of metal; but I don't know how they mark it; I never saw the prisoner on the premises.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I pickt it up in the street, I never offered to sell it; I meant to leave it there 'till I came back, and then to carry it home, and have it advertised.

The prisoner called two witnesses to his character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-107

392. JAMES WEBB was indicted, for feloniously assaulting George King , on the King's highway, on the 20th day of February last, and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 4 l. a silk watch-string, value 1 s. a seal, value 1 s. a key, value 1 d. three guineas, two shillings, and three halfpence, and a stone shirt-pin, value 2 s. his property.

(The case opened by Mr. Schoen.)

GEORGE KING sworn.

I live along with Mr. James Esdale , in Duke-street, Westminster, No. 20; I had been to see my brother, who is a coachman, in Swallow-street; his coach was at the top of the Hay-market, in Piccadilly, it was the 20th of February, I was coming down St. James's Park, about the middle part of the Park, from St. James's, what is generally called the Canal-walk; it was about half past seven as nigh as I can recollect; the prisoner met me, he put his hand on my shoulder, he was not on duty at that time, he asked me for something to drink; I told him I had nothing to give him; I did not know what he meant; he followed me down the Park, said, he had been on board a ship eating of salt meat, and he had really got no money; I thought a pot of porter was a small object, and I treated him with a pot of porter, at the sign of the Rose and Crown, in Crown-street, Westminster.

Court. Had he his regimentals on? - Yes, he had, we drank the pot of porter in the publick tap-room, I paid for it; he asked me, which way I was going; I said, I was going to the stables; I was going to meet the coachman in order to fetch the family home; not finding the coachman at the stables, I returned home to my master's, the prisoner followed me at a distance to the stables and house; he was not with me; I went into my master's house, and he went his way; I staid at the Rose and Crown, as near as I can guess, about five minutes.

Had you any conversation with him as he

was following you to the stables, and to the house? - No, none at all; in about half an hour I went out again to the stables, in order to fetch my master and mistress home; the stables are the top of Delahay-street, the bottom of Duke-street, this man following me, I thought he had no good design; I went up the Park straight, I met him in the Park about three or four poles from the Park-gate, where I went to shun him, for I thought by his following me he had no good design; he met me, and said, young man, let me feel your bubbies, with that he put his hand to my bosom, and took out my shirt-pin, and my handkerchief from my neck, then he ran off; I had hold of him by the hand, but he was too powerful for me, and he ran off; I made no alarm, but went away; next night about half past 11 I was going down Duke-street on a message for my master, the prisoner met me in an undress, in a regimental jacket, with a flapt hat and his hair about his shoulders; he said he was taken up on my account, and he immediately rushed upon me, and took my watch, three guineas, two shillings, and some halfpence.

Court. When he rushed upon you, you do not mean violently by force. - Yes, violently; d - n your eyes, says he, if you offer to resist, or call out for assistance, I will kill you; he held his left hand up against me, at the same time he made use of those words, I did not call out for assistance; I was frightened in the hurry of his threatening my life, I was rather confused, and did not, and he ran off immediately, I did not see any thing in his hand.

At the time he took your watch and money, did you make any resistance at all though you did not call out? - No, I did not make any resistance, he was too powerful for me; I had no strength against him.

Did you struggle at all for your watch? - I did, I went the next morning upon the Parade, but I was not positive that I could swear to the man, because he came in different dresses to me.

Prisoner. Did you see me on the Parade? - Not to be positive, I did not.

Did you mention this to any body this night? - Not that night.

Did you mention the loss of your shirt-pin and handkerchief to any body before? - Yes, I did, to my own brother, to nobody else.

When did you tell him? - The next day when I saw him.

How long was it after this robbery? - I cannot justly say, as nigh as I can guess about two days.

When did you first mention this robbery of this watch? - I mentioned it on the 10th of March when he was taken; this was the 20th of February; I believe it was about six days after the prisoner came to my master's door in the evening, about six or seven he knocked at the door, I answered the door; he said, he had my watch, and my property, that he had stolen from me; if I would come out of the door he would give them to me.

What were the precise words that he used? - Them were the words as nigh as I can recollect.

Repeat them again? - He said, he had got my watch, and my property, which he had stolen from me, if I came there, meaning out of doors, he would give them to me, if I would not say any thing to his officer, to have him taken up and expose him; I went out into the street, and shut the door after me, thinking to receive my property; he then said, he was going to Bath, he had pawned my watch, and every thing he had; and, d - n his eyes, if I did not give him more money, or money's worth, he would accuse me of an unnatural crime, he would take me up, and have me hanged; he immediately rushed me against the wall, and rifled my pocket, but I had no money, and he ran off down Crown-street; I followed him down the street, but he was gone off, and there was not a person there that I could get to assist me to stop him; on the 9th of March he came, about half past seven, to my master's door, and knocked; I answered the

door to him; he said then, I have taken your property, and your watch out of pawn, here it is, I will give it you; he put his hand to his breeches, as if he was going to pull the watch out; I went to him, and he immediately, as before, robbed me of one guinea in the same manner as he did before.

Where was that, in the hall, or where? - In the street.

How came you in the street? - I shut the door, as I did before, when I saw him put his hand to his breeches, I thought he had got my watch; when he had got the guinea, he said, d - n his eyes, if I did not fetch him more money, he would murder me; I got from him, and got into my master's house; he followed me to the door, I knocked.

How did you get in, because you said you shut the door? - I knocked at the door, and was let in by the servant in the hall; my master answered the door, and asked the prisoner who he wanted.

How did your master happen to answer the door? - The prisoner came after me the last time he robbed me, and knocked at the door, and my master was in the hall, he came out of the parlour at the same time, and answered the door.

What, when you and the other servant were in the hall? - Yes.

Is it usual for your master to do so? - No, it was not a usual thing for my master to do.

Was you making any noise or disturbance in the hall, or calling out? - No, I did not, my master asked the prisoner, who he wanted; he said, he wanted Charles; I was present in the hall at the time.

Who is Charles? - He meant me; my master said, there is no Charles lives here; walk in, if you have any thing to say, with that my master let down the chain, and then the prisoner made off; my master asked me at that time, when he saw him go off, what he wanted with me? and I told my master the particulars; I had not before then told my master of the robbery; on the 16th of March I went from about half past seven o'clock 'till about one, which was the day the guns were fired off the day of the illumination; I pursued the prisoner, I watched him to the house where he went, which was the sign of the Horseshoe in Petty-France; I went, and got two constables, and took him in the street; he had left the house then.

Then I suppose it was in consequence of your master's advice that you went into the Park the next day? - Yes, it was, but I should have taken him up before, if I could have sworn to the man.

Mr. Scboen. Was any of your property found upon him? - Yes, a silk handkerchief, that was the handkerchief he took from my neck; when we took him to Justice Abbington's he was particularly engaged, he asked to go into a necessary; he went in, and he conveyed from his neck this handkerchief, which was round his neck, when he was taken, and he conveyed it down the necessary; I mentioned it to the constable in the coach; I did not think to mention it before, though I saw it round his neck when he was taken; after we had an hearing at Sir Sampson Wright's, he desired us to go back to this necessary, and in the presence of Justice Abbington, we took it out of the necessary; we took the handkerchief the next day to Justice Abbington's, and the constable took it the day he was fully committed.

Court. Did you ever get your watch again? - No, Sir Sampson asked him, what he did with the watch; he said, he sold it to a Jew; I was present when he said that, and so was the constable.

Court. Was his examination taken in writing? - Yes.

Mr. Knowlys, Prisoner's Counsel. There is no examination of the prisoner's returned. I am for the prisoner; I ought to submit to your Lordship; here is a charge which certainly constitutes several highway robberies, and they are all consolidated in one charge in this indictment.

Court. Take any one.

Mr. Knowlys. You lived with Mr. Esdale in Duke-street? - Yes.

Do you live there now? - Yes.

Is your master here to day? - He is.

You say the first attack was on the 20th of February? - Yes.

You was going to call on your brother? - I had called on him, I was going home to my master's house; my brother lives in Swallow-street, Piccadilly.

What time was your master's carriage ordered that evening? - At half past eight.

What time did you go to your brother? - At about seven, or a little after.

Which way did you come home? - I came in at St. James's.

It was dark I take it at seven? - Yes, it was darkish.

Swallow-street, if I know it, is nearer to your master's than St. James's palace? - Yes, I do not know but it is.

Then you did not go the nearest way home to your master's house? - No, I do not know that I did.

Has it never happened to you to hear that people going along the park, have been exposed to robberies after dark, and frequent complaints have been made of it? - Yes, I have heard of it.

Can you give us now, my friend, any good reason why you chose to go round from Swallow-street, all through St. James's palace, into the Park, that way exposing yourself in a place, where you know robberies have been committed, rather than go the straight way? - No, Sir, I do not give you any particular reasons.

And you can give no good reason for it? - No, I cannot give any particular reason for it.

You had no reason at the time? - No, I had not.

Then you were first of all accosted by the prisoner? - Yes.

He was then in regimentals? - Yes.

You a perfect stranger? - Yes.

You say that the first thing that occurred to you was, his laying hold of you by the shoulders, and asking you for something to drink? - Yes.

Was not you a little alarmed at that? - Yes, I was a little alarmed, but not confused.

Then you was not confused? - I was confused to be sure.

Were you, or were you not confused at that address? - Yes, Sir, I was confused.

Were you near any body there? - No, Sir.

And in the dark too? - Yes, it was in the dark.

I suppose you looked upon this almost as much as forcing so much money out of your pocket? - Yes.

If any watchman had been near, I take it you would have charged him with a robbery? - Yes, I dare say I should, but I am not positive; I could not call it a robbery to ask me for something to drink; I do not know whether I should have charged any watchman with him or not.

I ask you whether you should not have complained of an attempt to rob you at that time, if you had had any person by, who would have rendered you substantial assistance? - Why, no, I think I should not.

How came you to tell me just now that if assistance had been near you, you should have been inclined to have complained of an attempt to rob you? - When he took his hand from my shoulder, and left me and followed me, I did not thing any thing of his going to rob me; I was confused, and I was not confused; I was alarmed to be sure; I thought by the man's making a pitiful story to me, it was out of charity I gave him part of a pot of porter.

Then this man being a perfect stranger to you, you at first thinking he had some bad design, he was the most unlikely man in the world, whom you should choose for a companion to go and drink with? - No, he was not.

How came you then to go to partake of this pot of beer, as you meant to give him as matter of charity? - I can give you no particular reason for that.

How long might you stay at this public-house with the man? - Perhaps ten minutes, or not quite so much.

I take it the explanation took up some time in the Park, before you were prevailed on to give him a pot of beer? - I did not stop, I went on.

How long might you have been going from Swallow-street to St. James's-palace, and then through the Park? - Not twenty minutes, I was not walking very fast; it was almost at the bottom of the Long-walk, pretty near Spring-garden-gate.

The centry-boxes are some distance from that place? - Yes.

And there is a wall near there? - Yes.

And no windows that look on that part? - No; the prisoner followed me, I did not walk with him, he followed me at a distance, not at a distance, he was telling his pitiful story.

Did not you desire him to follow you at some distance? - I do not mean to swear any such thing.

Did he or not, follow you at your desire? - Not at my desire.

Are you sure of that? - Yes, I did not go through the Horse-guard-gate, not Storey's-gate; we went through a gate by Lady Suffolk's house, which comes into Duke-street; that gate is open till ten, I found no difficulty in getting out at that gate.

Then you went into the ale-house? - Yes.

Did he go first, or you? - I cannot justly say; I did not give him the money for the beer before we went in; I paid the landlord of the house for the pot of beer, I do not know which went first into the public-house.

Had you drank at that house before? - Yes, I believe about once, the prisoner sat by the side of me, and we drank the pot of beer.

Did much conversation pass between you at that time? - No.

Then you staid ten minutes at that house? - I said five minutes.

Then you say he asked you where you lived? - No, he asked me where I was going, I said I am going to the stables.

Did you desire he should follow you again to the stables? - No, Sir, I did not desire it.

Nor forbid it? - No, I did not care whether he knew where I was going; there are other coaches stand in the stables, and there are dwellings where the coachmen sleep.

Was you pleased with this man's company? - His company! No, Sir.

Did you wish to pursue or renew the acquaintance? - No, I did not.

You did not find the coachman there, nor any body you knew? - No, I did not, I did not stay at the stables a moment when I found the coachman was not there; he followed me to my master's undesired.

No conversation all this time? - Yes, Sir, there was no conversation passed.

Was there any conversation at all passed? - No, there was not.

How came you to tell me yes at first? - I do not know that I did.

You of course perceived this man following you? - Yes, I did, he followed me directly from the stables to my master's house, I went into my master's house, and he went his way.

Who let you in? - One of the maid servants.

Did you relate this circumstance to her? - No, I did not; I went in at the street-door.

Do you remember opening the other door that evening, the back door, the servant's door? - Yes, I did.

How long after the street-door did you open it? - I cannot justly say, it might be a quarter of an hour.

Will you swear it was more than five minutes? - Yes, I will.

Then there was nothing improper done all that time? - No.

When do you say there was any thing improper done? - There was not any thing improper done then, but when I went out again at the gate, which was about a quarter of an hour afterwards, I was robbed of my handkerchief and pin.

At that time had you no threat at all,

nor any accusation from this man against you? - No, Sir, he took my pin and my handkerchief, and he immediately went off, he ran towards the barracks that was in the Park.

How far was the centry off? - A great way at the top of George-street.

How far is that gate at which you were, from Storey's-gate, at the top of George-street? - It is about forty or fifty poles.

You made no alarm of this robbery? - No, I had hold of his hand, he was rather too strong for me, I never called out.

Did you give any information to any of the servants, or to your master that evening, that you had been robbed in the Park by a soldier? - No, Sir, I did not.

Did you give any information at all of this robbery, before you was threatened to be charged with an unnatural crime? - No, not to my family.

Was your brother before the magistrate? - No, he was not.

Is that brother here to-day? - No, he is out of town at a funeral, and has been these two or three days; the second time I saw him was the next night, nothing passed only he met me in an undress, and said he had been taken up on my account.

That was not true? - No.

Then the man fixed himself, and you knew him then? - Yes.

That of course fixed his person strongly on your mind? - Yes.

That he had robbed you on the night before? - Yes, he had, this was in the street about half past seven, it is not a public street, sometimes there is not a person for half an hour to be seen; my fellow servants were in the house.

How long might you remain in conversation with him that evening? - Not at all.

At that time there was no intimation from you that you meant to charge him with any thing? - No.

You did not complain of this second robbery? - No, I did not, to any person.

That was done with a considerable degree of force? - Yes, it was, I took no means to apprehend him that night, but I went the next day to see if I could see him, but I was not positive then whether I knew him, because of his two different dresses.

Did you describe him to any of the Serjeants in the park? - No, I did not, the third robbery was attempted four or five days after.

Even then there was no threat from him? - There was a threat from me, for I followed him down the street, and I should have taken him up if there had been any body; I cried out at the top of Crown-street, and he set off and run, and I after him; I did not say stop thief, but said that man had robbed me: there was nobody by.

Did not the man, when he came to your masters's, say, Sir, I want Charles; and when your master said to him, there is no Charles here; did not he point to you, and say, that is the man I want? - I did not see him point.

Upon your oath, before the magistrate, was not that given in evidence, and did not you yourself swear it? - No, Sir, I do not know that I did, I will not swear positive, to the best of my remembrance I did not swear it.

Court. But though he did not point to you, did not he say you was the person he wanted? - Yes, my Lord, he did; he said that is the person I want.

Then the man said boldly to your master, that is the man I want? - Yes, Sir, he did; and then after he was gone, I told my master.

But not while he was present, and your master wondering why he called upon you, you never charged him with having robbed you? - No, I did not.

Nobody was by when you lost your handkerchief? - No.

Mr. Schoen. Your brother knows nothing of this but what you told him? - No, he does not.

Court. When the man was in the hall, and your master opened the door, and he said you was the person he wanted, did your master ask him what he wanted with you? - Not then, but afterwards he asked me.

And then it was you told the story? - Yes.

Then I suppose your master said you must take this man up. - He said, if he has robbed you, take him up.

JOSEPH NIBLOW sworn.

I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner in Petty-France, Westminster; I carried him before a magistrate; I found the handkerchief in the necessary at the Justices soon after he got to Mr. Abbington's; he asked to go to the necessary, it was within a couple or three yards of the office; I have the handkerchief, it was rather soily; I hung it up and dried it, here it is; I observed when I took the prisoner, that he had a darkish silk handkerchief tied with a bow; but as he mentioned nothing to me I took no more notice of it.

To the Prosecutor. Is that your handkerchief? - Yes, there is my own name upon it.

Mr. Knowlys. That handkerchief was publickly about his neck when he was taken? - Yes.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

JOHN FORD sworn.

I am a drummer in the Duke of York's regiment of Guards, 2d battalion; I know the prisoner very well, he was in the same regiment with me.

Do you know the prosecutor? - No.

Have you seen him before? - I never did to my knowledge.

Did you ever go to the alehouse in Duke-street with the prisoner? - Yes, I have, to the best of my remembrance it was the 7th of February I met with Webb the prisoner, at the Bull's Head in Petty-France accidentally, and we there stopped and drank together a considerable time, and his money was pretty near expended; I went with him from there with an intention to go to Duke-street, and I went with him to No. 20, he knocked at the door, I saw the door open, it was not shut.

Did you see any person do any thing with him? - I saw a man open the door to him, but I do not know who it was.

THOMAS HAGGET sworn.

I am a private in the same regiment with the prisoner; I have known him three years, a very good character as far as I knew; I was coming home from work about eight at night, I believe it was the 5th of February; and I was going up Charles-street, the prosecutor's master lives right opposite there, I saw a grenadier, that was the prisoner, and the prosecutor stand talking together, and I stopped, knowing him to be one belonging to the same regiment; I heard the prosecutor tell him to go round in the Park to the back door, and he would let him in, then he shut the door after him and went in, and I went and spoke to the prisoner; and asked him, what he was about? the prosecutor came and opened the door and let him in, and shut the door after him; he stopped there about a quarter of an hour, he came out again, and the prosecutor wished him a good night, and shut the door after him; I took particular notice of him; I had my working dress on; it was in Duke-street, right opposite to Charles-street; I know the house, because the door of the house is right facing the top of Charles-street, I do not know the number, nor who lives at it, but I perfectly remember the prosecutor, I never saw him before to my knowledge, I suppose I staid the value of half a minute, this was about eight on the 5th of February, there was a lamp at the door, it was very light; I am perfectly sure it was the same person.

How came you to be applied to, to come forward in this business? - I do not know, I was subpoened.

Had you remarked this man then? - No further than I said, that I did see the man and the prisoner together; that I have said since he has been confined; I do not know the prosecutor's name; I know him by sight; I am certain sure of him; I know it is the same man.

How did you know he was the prosecutor? - I did not know it 'till now; I see it is the same person; I do not know that I saw him before nor since 'till now.

A Soldier. My Lord, the grenadier saw him at the door just now, and he said he was the prosecutor, and then the grenadier told me he was the same man.

Haggett. I was subpoened the 22d.

What was you subpoened to give evidence about? - Nothing but the truth.

But what was that truth to be? - I have told you that I was coming home from work; and I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor stand at his master's door; I did not know that he was the prosecutor, but I know it was the same man as I saw.

The prisoner called three other witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Jury. We wish to ask the master a question as to the character of the servant.

JAMES ESDAILE , Esq. sworn.

Court. The Jury wish to know of you, Sir, what character you give the prosecutor? - He has been a very faithful servant to me; and I am sorry for this happening, as I must part with him.

Mr. Knowlys. If you think it proper, my Lord, I wish the master may relate something.

Court. One is always happy, when a man is standing on his trial for his life, to hear something come out that may be of service to him.

Mr. Esdaile. On the night that I answered the door myself; I was led to it from hearing a number of small taps at the door; the man asked for Charles; I said, there was no such man; I opened the door with the chain up; I recollected the man, I had seen him a fortnight before in the street, with my servant talking, on the pavement; I then suspected something, they ran down into the Park, I knew his face again, and seeing him I threw down the chain; he immediately said, that is the man I want; now it is given in evidence that he ran away, but that was not the case, for he would have come into the house, but he was in liquor; had he been sober he should have come in; I thought it necessary to mention it, my Lord.

Court. That is very honourable of you, Sir, indeed.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-108

393. WILLIAM MITCHELL and RICHARD WILEY , alias VERRY , were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of March , four silver teaspoons, value 10 s. the property of the right honourable George Lord Rivers .

JOHN REEVEN sworn.

I am servant to Lord Rivers; on the 6th of March last, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was returning from below stairs, I saw the prisoner Mitchell come out of the steward's room with the four teaspoons in his hand open; I observed the bowls of the spoons in his hand as he went up the area steps; I pursued him about forty yards; the other prisoner was waiting for him; he seemed to want to shift them from his hand to the other prisoner; the other prisoner was not in the house; Mitchell was not a quarter of a minute out of sight; he was taken, and the spoons found just under his feet.

- RYMER sworn.

The gentleman's servant cried stop thief! I saw the man in the blue coat; I ran past him; I stood two seconds; the footman came; he said, what have I done? says I, if you have done no harm, you have no occasion to be afraid; we went back, the four spoons were hid just where he was standing.

WILLIAM MITCHELL , GUILTY .

RICHARD WILEY , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-109

394. JOHN DUMPER was indicted for stealing, on the 27th of March , a leather portmanteau, value 1 s. a pair of boots, value 6 s. a waistcoat, value 4 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. the property of John Burrows .

JOHN BURROWS sworn.

On Friday the 27th day of March I came to town, and in the evening my servant got a coach, about 10 o'clock in Harley-street; he put all my things into the coach, there were five parcels; I did not go in the coach, some ladies did, with my things in it, to Great Russel-street.

Who were the ladies? - Mrs. Burrows, her sister, and daughter; when we came to the door in Great Russel-street, one of the parcels was missing; there had been a man on the coach-box, who came with the coachman; I went to the proprietor of the coach, he gave the man a good character; the next day the coachman came to me to know what I should do, and the parcel was brought back by the coachman, the prisoner here, John Dumper ; the prisoner said, the man had confessed he had stole the parcel from my door; when he told me that I thought proper to arrest him.

What is become of the other man? - The other man is not apprehended, as I know, yet.

THOMAS MEARS sworn.

I am the person who called the coach; in that coach I put five parcels and a coat; John Dumper drove the coach; soon after the prisoner stopt at Harley-street, a man came and fed the horses; after I put the parcels in the coach I did not leave the coach 'till the ladies came down stairs; my master called for his great coat; I went in, and put it on; I returned in about two minutes, saw the coachman on the opposite side of the coach from the door, and the man was feeding his horses; after the ladies were in I got up behind, the man went up with the coachman 'till we came to Great Russel-street; the man that was with the coach then made off; when we searched for the parcels there were only four in the coach; he declared he knew nothing of it, nor of the man, no otherwise than that he was the waterer, and feeder of his horses.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-110

395. JAMES BELLAMY was indicted for stealing, on the 2d day of April 1789 , a sword mounted with steel, value 17 s. the property of Jacob Phillips .

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

The prisoner pledged that sword with me on the 2d of April, on a Thursday, about eight o'clock in the evening; I live in Broad-street, Bloomsbury; I cannot positively say he is the man; to the best of my knowledge he is; he told me he lived in Compton-street; the sword was broken then.

JACOB PHILLIPS sworn.

I went into Mr. Alexander's house, that day it was very cold, and had a glass of gin; there was a parcel of Irish people in the house; I bought this sword of Sir Joseph Yorke 's valet; it was not broken when I bought it; not in that manner.

What was Sir Joseph Yorke 's servant's name? - Mr. Lewis.

How long have you dealt with the servants of the Yorke family? - I have dalt in that house ever since last year.

Do you know any thing of Sir Joseph Yorke ? - Not particularly.

Do you know there is such a person? - When I was in Holland, he was at the Hague.

Do you know any thing where he is now, or what he is now? - No.

Then you speak of only what you know when you was in Holland; where did you buy that sword? - I bought this sword at Mr. Yorke's in Cavendish-street, facing Mansfield-street, going out of Portman-Place up towards Marybone, next to a General's.

Can you recollect the General's name, if you hear it? was it Mansfield or Brown? - No, neither of those names.

What did you give for that sword? - I gave 14 s. for that sword, and a pair of buckles, but I reckoned the sword worth 17 s.

What became of the sword? - I went into Mr. Alexander's house, and had a glass of gin; it was a publick-house, so when I came in, and paid for my gin, the man of the house said to them, this is the man that took up Jem Poles; I went along the tap-room, says he, you Jew thief,

get out of the tap-room; through this, as there was a great many Irish people there, I thought to myself it was time for me to go, because there was bad words there, and I went out, and forgot my sword; as I had been used to have the sword under my arm, from Mansfield-street, I had not been above six minutes, or at the most ten minutes, before I missed the sword; I went back to the house.

Where is Alexander's house? - Almost the middle of Monmouth-street, the Spread Eagle; I went back again, says I, Gentlemen, you may make a joke of it, but I do not mind paying a gallon, or half a gallon of beer if they would return me my sword; the landlord says, did not I say he would come back to lay it on some one or other? the prisoner was in the room, but I cannot swear he took the sword; I was used very ill in the house; I was glad to get out of the neighbourhood, if the sword had been worth 100 l.; the prisoner was in the room, but I cannot swear who took the sword.

What day was this you lost the sword? - The first or second of April, I cannot tell very well.

What time of the day? - It was in the evening, about six or seven o'clock.

What sort of a sword was it? - It was mounted with steel, outside and inside, twisted with silver; it was very handsome before they broke it.

Should you know the sword again? - Yes.

(The sword produced.)

This is the sword.

What do you know it by? - This here was out, and I thought to have something put in, and sell it at a shop.

Are you sure this is the sword? - I am.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the man; I was that day looking for a job, I called at this publick-house, there were two men sitting in the box; I sat down, and drank a pint of beer, one man calls me out; he says, Bellamy, here is a pawnbroker's ticket, I will be glad if you will take care of it; I never saw the Jew nor the sword 'till I saw him at the office.

Where did you get the sword you pawned at Davis's? - I never pawned any.

FOR THE PRISONER.

JOHN FORD sworn.

I live in Broad-street, St. Giles's, I sell muffins and gingerbread; on the 10th of April one Franklin brought a duplicate, and gave it to Bellamy to keep; Bellamy could not read it, he desired some man to read it for him; it was about eight or nine at night.

- DISMORE sworn.

The Jew when he came into the public-house had his bag on his shoulder, and the sword under his arm; the bag and the sword lay very near an hour, he went out and left the sword behind, he returned in half an hour, and said if any one could give him any account of the sword, he would give him a gallon of beer; the prisoner sat in the box, but I did not see him meddle with the sword, nor yet with the Jew, the Jew over-hauled another man, but said nothing to Bellamy.

TIMOTHY MURPHY sworn.

I have worked with the man some time back, and he always was a very honest man.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-111

396. SAMUEL DELVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , six goat skins, value 18 s. a dog skin, value 12 d. a pair of crap soles, value 4 d. one ditto, value 2 d. one ditto, value 3 1/2 d. a piece of dog skin, value 3 d. the property of Samuel Miller .

SAMUEL MILLER sworn.

On the 21st of March I discovered some

leather concealed in my cellar, I was determined to find out who took it; I had at that time two shopmen and an apprentice; on the 24th of March, when Delves was at breakfast, one of the pieces of leather was missing; on the 1st of April a second piece was missing, and I discovered one piece taken on the 16th of April; I lost a piece of inner sole leather, value three-pence halfpenny, from under a board in the cellar, where it had been concealed, I suppose by the person who took it away, it had been taken from the shop; I searched the house of the prisoner, where there was a great deal of other leather, as well as that very piece, which I know to be my own; there was one skin in particular I could swear to; there was a mark of 71 in red chalk on one; on that I had the prisoner taken up; there was a dog skin marked R. M. which I had some knowlege of; I asked him where he bought that skin; he told me he bought it at Alderman Newman's.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. How long had this man been your foreman? - About four year and three quarters.

You know he had carried on some business for himself? - I told him I had heard something of it, and that I would turn him away if he did so.

I believe you found at his house several manufactured shoes, so that it seems he had not followed your injunctions? - Yes, I did.

I believe you know that he dealt with your currier? - Yes, I had heard it.

Have you heard he was about to set up in your neighbourhood? - Yes.

How near was the situation he intended to set up to your shop? - One within seven or eight doors, the other in Cow-lane.

The prisoner hath, I believe a wife and three children? - Yes.

I may venture to ask you whether he was not a very industrious and honest man till this happened? - He was, and I kept him for his honesty.

He had such an impediment in his speech that he was a great hindrance in your shop, but his honesty got the better of it? - Yes.

What a good thing then he hath somebody to talk for him now, as he cannot talk for himself; had you not somebody else in your service whom you know had pilfered you? - No.

Perhaps he was more a pilferer than the word imports? - The boy once went to buy something, and he charged me more than he gave for it.

This boy is still continued in your service? - Yes.

How came you to suspect your foreman more than this boy? - He was not my foreman.

How came you to acknowledge him such before, who looked after your business when you was from home? - Either of my men.

What quantity of manufactured shoes did you find in the prisoner's room? - About one or two and twenty pair.

Were any of these your property? - Not to my knowledge.

On your oath, did you not know they were not your's? - They were not.

How happened it that you let this piece of leather lay so long; did you look at it every day? - Yes.

Which was the first, taking the man up, or getting the warrant? - I first got the warrant.

It was something about the size of this book, and the value about the price of a pot of beer? - Yes.

RICHARD MUMBY sworn.

I am a leather cutter; about the 15th of December last I sold eight or nine dozen of dog skins to Mr. Miller; when I bought them at Leadenhall, they had a stamp J. M. upon them, and I put R. M. on them.

Was they the only parcel you ever sold with J. M. on them? - Yes, I do not know I ever sold any marked so before.

Did the prisoner ever buy any leather of you? - No.

CLEMENT CAZIM sworn.

I am an officer; in the prisoner's house I got these skins, up one pair of stairs in the dining-room.

Prisoner's Counsel. He carried on work there, I believe? - I saw a good many cuttings of leathers.

Was that the room where the work was carried on? - Yes.

All you have produced you are sure you found there? - Yes.

Who desired you to take the shoes? - I had an order before the Alderman to take care of all the things.

Are you the person that was tried for a misdemeanor on the city of London? - No.

Then you are not tried yet? - No, that has nothing to do with this.

But it has to do with your character, it certainly must be for some good, no doubt.

Court to Mr. Miller. Can you pick out any of that leather you yourself can swear to? - Yes, this piece I can swear to.

What do you know it by? - There is an odd kind of a stain upon it, which was on it when it was under the board.

Were the letters on it now, on it when it was under the board? - No, I put it on it to know it again when it was brought on trial.

How came you to do that, if you was certain it was yours? - Some person stood by advised me so to do.

Mr. Mumby. I know this was mine once; I really believe it is the piece I sold to Mr. Miller.

Did you never sell any of that parcel to any other person but Mr. Miller? - I think not, but I cannot say positive; but I am sure it was never retailed out of my shop, but it was sold in a lot.

JOSEPH THOMPSON sworn.

This is my mark on this piece of goatskin.

Who was that leather sold to? - It was sold to Mr. Miller by our catalogue.

Where is your catalogue? - It is not here, it was the sale catalogue.

Who marked the catalogue? - My master.

Is he here? - No.

Then 'tis of no use to produce it? Do you know of your own knowledge any thing, except by the catalogue? - No.

Was you present when the entry was made? - No.

W. BRADSHAW sworn.

Here is a piece of leather in Court; I had the cutting of it; my master sold it to Mr. Miller.

Who is your master? - Mr. Farborough in the Borough; Mr. Miller bought a parcel of these soles of my master.

Was you present? - Yes.

How many? - Thirty dozen.

Did the prisoner ever buy any soles of your master? - No.

How do you know that piece of sole? - By the price that is put on it; I chalked it on it myself; it is the No. 10, for the price of the soles.

Where is the No. 10? - Here is the 1 and here is the 0.

Now go, shew it to the Jury.

Jury. There has been such a mark on it.

You told me just now, you knew it by the mark which you chalked upon it. How do you know that that is the piece now? - By the leather and the form of it.

SOLOMON BORAM sworn.

I saw some leather in Mr. Miller's cellar; it was on a Saturday, in the month of March; it was inner sole leather, three pieces; I did not know for what purpose it was there for; I missed it on the Monday week following, on Saturday from thence I saw three pieces of a bigger size, then I acquainted Mr. Miller.

Do you know what became of these three last pieces? - I missed them at different times after I had told Mr. Miller; on a Tuesday I told Mr. Miller one pair was gone, during the time that these two pieces was there, I saw another piece concealed under the same board; there were two of them missed, and there was another piece concealed under another hole, which has been found since.

That piece that the constable found, do you know it? - Yes.

How? - By the mark I put on it under the flaw; the cutting is the contrary way to the flaw.

Mr. Garrow. How long have you heard that this man was to set up for himself? - I heard it since he was taken up.

He had been a long while in the service, did you know he was going to leave the service? - No.

Did you know he worked for himself? - Yes.

MATTHEW ROBINSON sworn.

I am a leather-cutter; here is a pair of soles which Mr. Miller bought of me, which have my mark upon them.

What is the mark? - 5 and 6, signifying that they were 5 s. 6 d. a dozen.

Did you mark them yourself? - Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Any other bought at your shop, of the same value, would be so marked? - Certainly.

Are you able to say this sole was sold to Mr. Miller, or some other person? - I am certain it was sold to Mr. Miller, because I save all I get of that price for Mr. Miller for this twelve-month last past.

Did you sell them marked thus before this last twelve months? - Before that time I did, but not since.

Do you recollect when that mark was put on? - He sends for soles about once a fortnight, and generally hath four or five dozen at a time.

Are you certain this pair was sold to him? - I am certain.

Suppose you had sold them a twelvemonth ago, would you know them from this? - I should not.

FOR THE PRISONER.

ROBERT LAWSON sworn.

I am a currier of leather, in business for myself; I know the prisoner at the bar vastly well; I have taken some scores of pounds of him, for all sorts in that business, for boots and shoes.

Have you sold him sole-leather like that? - Yes, I have, always ready money; indeed I thought I had the whole of his custom, but I find I had not.

HUBBARD FRY sworn.

I am a servant to Alderman Newnham; the prisoner hath frequently dealt at our house for himself, and sometimes looking out leather for his master; we have sold him all sorts of leather proper for boots and shoes.

Do you see there any leather you know to have been Alderman Newnham's? - I see none.

WILLIAM READ sworn.

I live in Drury-lane; I am a currier, in business for myself; I know the prisoner, by coming for some boot legs for Mr. Miller.

What character did he bear? - A very good one.

How long have you known him? - About two years.

Is there any leather bought at your house? - No.

- BARBER sworn.

I am an Attorney at Law; I have known the prisoner about a year and a half; he used to make my shoes.

What character did he bear? - A very good kind of man.

Did you know he was going into business for himself? - I heard of it from himself.

ROBERT CURTIS sworn.

I live at No. 7, Green-Arbour Square; the prisoner bears a very good character; and is a very industrious man.

- JOHN PRITCHARD sworn.

I am a haberdasher on Snow-hill; I have known the prisoner for four or five years; he hath often been at my house, eight or ten times a-day backwards and forwards; through his behaviour at all

times, and attention to his master's business, if I wanted a servant of that description, there is no one I would take sooner.

RICHARD COMBS sworn.

I am a shoemaker; I have known the prisoner upwards of two years; he always bore an excellent character; I lodged in his house upwards of eight months; I worked for the master, and sometimes for the prisoner himself.

SIMON LUNGRAN sworn.

I live in Great New-street, I am a shoemaker; I have been a servant to Mr. Miller, and found the prisoner ever attentive to his master's business, bore an excellent character, and the honestest man I ever had any connexion with.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-112

397. SAMUEL PRITCHARD was indicted, for stealing nineteen ounces of iron wire, value 9 s. 6 d. and sundry wood bobbins, containing a quantity of silk and cotton on them, value 4 s. on the 23d day of March , the property of Samuel Heighway .

SAMUEL HEIGHWAY sworn.

I am a coverer of wire, and manufacturer thereof .

Did you lose any iron wire on the 23d of March? - I did; the prisoner was a servant of mine, I believe about twelve months, during those twelve months these things were missing; on the 23d day of March I took from the prisoner sundry bobbins of silk and covered wire; they were in a drawer, which was the prisoner's drawer, in a chest of drawers that belong to him in the house; he was not present; I do not positively remember what he said, I had him committed.

(Produced, and deposed to.)

- LEMON sworn.

I am a weaver, my wife winds for Mr. Heighway; we mark the bobbins, and there is one here that is my marking to the best of my knowledge.

Mr. Heighway. In the course of the business he works with the articles to cover the wire, with the different materials.

To Lemon. Which is the bobbin you marked? - It is here.

What is the mark on it? - 40.

Do you know your hand-writing to that? - I cannot swear positively; to the best of my knowledge that is it.

How do you know that that which is marked 40 was carried back to the prosecutor's house? - I am certain, to the best of my knowledge.

Mr. Heighway. Can you say with certainty, that that bobbin was ever in your house? - As far as a tradesman can say, it was; in the course of my business there are many marked 40.

Can you swear for a certainty that bobbin was ever in your house? - That cannot be.

Do you think it was possible this woman to be deficient a bobbin, and you not to have known it? - No.

DANIEL WESLEY sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Heighway, on the 23d of last March, on Monday, in consequence of an information from Mr. Grant, I went along with Mr. Heighway to the prisoner's drawer, and the drawer was opened, and there were sundry bobbins of silk and cotton found in the drawer, when I went in; I was present when the goods were taken out, it was partly open; here are two bobbins of my own marking, which I have brought from the warehouse to shew against them here, that it is the same hand.

Have all people in the trade bobbins wound in the same manner? - Yes, but they are my own marks.

Is this W your own hand-writing? - It is; no doubt at all.

Have other people in the same business the same marks? - I know not that they have.

Are the marks on the bobbins such as you had at that time in your house? - All.

Was you at the opening of this drawer? - I saw it opened.

Nothing was put in? - No, my Lord, but those things only taken out.

Is there anything about that iron wire you can identify? - One part I can, the other I cannot.

- EXTON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Heighway; I knew so far, that the prisoner had offered the wire to sell; Mr. Heighway had taken me with him to the prisoner's; from the prisoner's drawers I took these two bobbins, and these two pieces of wire.

CHRISTOPHER FOX sworn.

I am a weaver; Mr. Heighway deals with me; I saw the bobbins at the prisoner's house.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

On the 23d of March last, the prisoner at the bar offered me one of the parcels of wire for 10 s.; I can't swear to the parcel, but I believe it to be the same; the prisoner told me he bought it of one Mr. Grant; I went to Mr. Grant, and he said the prisoner never bought any; I gave the prisoner 8 s. and I received the wire from the prisoner, and was to give him 2 s. more the next morning, if I found he came honestly by it; I carried the wire to Mr. Hyam's the same night.

Hyam. I have kept it ever since.

JOHN GRANT sworn.

I know that I manufactured the wire for Mr. Heighway; I know the wire, and I know I manufactured it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My master's work is weighed to me always; no one can say I ever took any of the property.

The prisoner called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. ROSE.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17890422-113

398. HENRY AITKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 16th of April , three half guineas, and some silver , the property of Samuel Lucas .

SAMUEL DENTON sworn.

I came to Mr. Lucas's office in Westminster , the deputy clerk of the peace , about a quarter after ten; I act for Mr. Lucas in the office; when I came in, the office was rather full; among the number the prisoner was one; a witness, who is now present with me, wanted her business done immediately; I desired them to stop while I went out with her; the prisoner wanted a recognizance discharged, it came to 9 s. and 8 d.; he said he had but 5 s. and 3 d. in the world, and begged I would take that; I told him I could not, but would give him a week to pay it in; he staid in the office while I discharged the other people; I took the following monies; of one 3 s. and 2 d.; of another, 1 l. 9 s. 8 d.; I took two guineas and a half, the rest in silver, one half guinea was light; as I took the money I put it into my drawer under the desk, I took another 14 s. in silver likewise; I put them all into the drawer during the time the prisoner was in the office, the whole amount of which was three half guineas, and silver to about 3 l. the prisoner was one of the last in the room; and at last he went, and I went out with the witness, Mr. Saunders; and shut the office, and left the money in the drawer.

Court. Did you lock it? - I did not lock it, nor the office door neither, I shut the door; I returned in about ten minutes; I found the prisoner in the office, he offered me 10 s. to take for his 9 s. 8 d. I blamed him much for telling me a lye at first, and was rather surprised to find he had 10 s. after he had declared he had but 5 s. 3 d. when I took the 10 s. I saw a shilling which struck me I had seen before; I then opened my drawer, and began to look over my silver; the witness Saunders said immediately, you have lost your gold; I said I had; I rung the bell immediately, and inquired if any body else had been there, they said no; the prisoner remained there; there was a lad coming, who was in the passage, I believe; I bid him to shut both doors, and told the prisoner I must be under the necessity of searching him, on which he said, you need not search me, I have got 36 s. in my pocket; I laid hold of him, and immediately he pulled out the three half guineas, and some silver; I asked him, where he got it? he said it was his own money, and said I need not be surprised at his having that, for he had six and thirty shillings in his pocket which he had received of one Mr. Jaques that morning.

Prisoner's Counsel. Your office had been pretty full? - Yes.

You left the office-door unlocked, and the drawer unlocked? - Yes.

There were other persons who have access to the drawer beside yourself? - There was no other person that day.

You did not come 'till a quarter past ten? - No.

Is the house inhabited? - Yes.

Every person that inhabits that house then, can of course have access to the office?

Court. It goes further, the door being unlocked, any body might have access.

Prisoner's Counsel. The door of that house is opened in the time of publick business? - No, it is not kept open.

There was a lad in the passage, you said? - I only asked him a question, and discharged him immediately.

It frequently occurs, that people that come to discharge their recognizances, represent themselves as being poor when they are really not? - Sometimes it happens that they say so.

SUSANNAH SAUNDERS sworn.

I was in the office before the clerk came, the prisoner was there, and there were seven or eight more; I waited 'till all the rest were gone, 'till the last witness went out with me; I stood close by the clerk all the whole time; he put all the money he received into the drawer; I saw him receive two half guineas, and some silver; he put it in a drawer, the prisoner was in the office all the whole time, I stood just by his elbow; I went out with Mr. Denton, I returned in about ten minutes, or rather less; I went out to see a person that was ill; the prisoner was in the office when I came back; he went out just before Mr. Denton and me, and when I came back he had ten shillings in his hand; Mr. Denton says to him, what, have you made up the money? he says, yes I have; to tell you the truth I had it about me all the whole time; and the clerk made answer, then, you was a very bad man, because it makes other people fare the worse not to speak the truth; he said, I have six and thirty shillings about me; Mr. Denton drew out the drawer; and I said, you have lost your gold; he then told the prisoner he must be under the necessity of searching him.

Court. Did he say he had got the six and thirty shillings before or after Denton said he must search him? - He said it after, and then he pulled out three half guineas and some silver.

Prisoner's Counsel. You stood close to the clerk all the whole time by the drawer where the man was? - I did.

At any time when you had the opportunity of observing him, he was not in the reach of the drawer? - No.

How many recognizances did you come to discharge? - Three.

Did not you say to the prisoner, that if

he had drawn so many recognizances as you had he would know better the expence about it? - I did not.

Are you not often at that business? - No; those three were not on my own account.

ANN ROYDEN sworn.

I let the prisoner in between the hours of eight and ten; I go out a nursing, and I attended at that time at Mr. Lucas's; the boy was out, and I opened the door to this man; he said he was come with 5 s. if the gentleman would take it to draw his recognizance; I told him I could not do any thing 'till the clerk came; I then went up stairs; after Mr. Denton went out the boy came down, and told me there was somebody in the office; I then went up, and found this man, the prisoner, in the office, and a lad in the passage; he offered me ten shillings to carry up stairs, and to plead poverty for him, for he had but 5 s. in the world 'till he went and pawned his two shirts; he begged very hard for me to go up with the money, I told him I could not, I did not choose to leave the office for fear; I spoke to the boy in the passage, and asked him, what he wanted? and I staid in the office 'till Mr. Denton came in.

Court. Did you see Mr. Denton go out? - No.

How long was you in the office with the prisoner? - I was in the office three or four minutes before the Clerk came.

Prisoner's Counsel. The boy came up stairs with you? - That boy in the passage was a stranger; as soon as Mr. Denton came in, the prisoner offered him the money; Mr. Denton opened his drawer; and asked, if any body had been for money? I said, no; he said, I have lost money; Mrs. Saunders said immediately, you have lost your gold; Mr. Denton said to the prisoner, I must be under the necessity of searching you; and then he said he had six and thirty shillings in his pocket, and pulled out two half guineas and some silver; then the lad went away.

Pleading poverty is an old trick at that office when people come to draw recognizances? - I do not understand it; I was only there two days.

THOMAS MANSFEILD sworn.

I was at the Clerk of the Peace's office to draw recognizances; the prisoner was in the office, he did not know I was an officer; I searched his pockets, and found the money; I took it, and brought the money down to the office.

JOSIAH WOOLDRIDGE sworn.

I let the man in before Mr. Denton came back, and immediately I went out.

Did he knock at the door? - Yes.

What did he say when you let him in? - He did not say any thing to me; I went out on an errand immediately.

How came you to let a man in without asking him any question? - I supposed he came in on business, and I did not know but there was somebody in the office.

How long did you stay out? - About three minutes, when I came back I went down stairs, and a boy in a green coat came; I opened the door of Mr. Denton's office, the man followed me in.

Where was he when you came back first? - When I came back first he was not in the office, he was in the passage; I went in, and he followed me; then I came down stairs and asked where Mr. Denton was.

How long might the prisoner be in the office by himself before any body else was there? - About two minutes.

Prisoner's Counsel. What became of the boy in the green coat? - He staid in the passage.

That boy is not here? - No.

Court to Denton. What was the business of the boy in the blue-coat? - He came to search if a recognizance was discharged; I told him it was.

Was he asked any questions in the prisoner's presence? - I was going to take his directions, but as the man had got the money I thought it needless.

On whose account did you receive this money? - On account of Mr. Lucas.

Prisoner. I have got some friends here to give me a character.

MARY JEFFERIES sworn.

I live in Elder Row, Marybone parish; I go out charing and washing; on the Thursday before Good-Friday I went to this man's house for some potatoes; he keeps a green grocer's shop; there was a gentleman buying some nonpareils; he gave his wife an old half guinea to change, and she scrupled it; I told her she need not be afraid, it would have many masters; she went to a box, and opened it, and there was another half guinea in it, some half crowns, and some small silver, they were altogether in a sampler, and put this old one with them.

(The Prisoner holds up the Sampler.)

Prisoner's Counsel. That is all you know of the matter; you say his wife took an old half guinea, which she put in a sampler with another half guinea, and some silver? - Yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-114

399. PAUL WEAVER was indicted, for feloniously assaulting, on the King's highway, William Beckwith , on the 10th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one gold watch, value 20 l. and three cornelian seals set in gold, value 2 l. his property.

WILLIAM BECKWITH sworn.

I lodge in Charles-street, Covent-garden; I was out on the 10th of March, at the corner of Cockspur-street , between seven and eight o'clock in the evening. I was going along with a friend; I had a great coat, with leather breeches, which fitted exceeding tight, so that I could not put one large seal in my fob; I had a friend with me, who is not here; there was a crowd in consequence of the illumination; I felt a person's hand on my fob; I immediately laid my hand on his wrist; after which I immediately felt a pluck at my seal from the hand which I had then hold of; I had hold of another person with my other hand; I quitted that person, and got hold of that person whose wrist I had got in my other hand; after which I still retained the hand, and I felt it evidently expanded open, there was at the time some soldiers coming past; with an amazing deal of trouble, I got into a house, and afterwards sent away to Bow-street.

Did you lose your watch? - I lost my watch.

How could the prisoner have an opportunity of conveying away the watch when you had hold of his wrist? - I had only hold of part of his wrist.

What became of the watch? - I do not know.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. There was a very considerable crowd at that that place? - Yes.

Had you the same misfortune as you have now with your eye? - I had not.

Had you been at Bow-street that day about your other robbery? - I do not recollect.

You must recollect it? - To my knowledge I was not.

You was going, as others were, to see the illuminations? - Yes.

This man was instantly secured with the seal in his hand? - Yes.

The man was instantly secured, and the watch could not be found? - Yes.

What promotion have you in the army - I have sold it out since.

What regiment was you in? - In the twenty-ninth.

An officer, I conclude? - An ensign.

Was you so at that time? - I cannot recollect.

You must recollect; do you recollect at what time nearly, you sold out? - The sale of it was on the day the first gazette came out after the King's recovery, I was in the gazette.

Your watch never was recovered? - No, never.

Was this man searched? - I did not see him, the man who came from Bow-street said he was.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-115

400. JOHN JENNINGS and JOHN WOOD were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Beckwith , on the King's highway, on the 2d of March , and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, six shillings and six-pence, in monies , his property.

WILLIAM BECKWITH sworn.

On the 2d of March I was in a post-chaise coming to town, with a Mr. and Mrs. Hirst; I was asleep when the chaise stopt.

What was the first thing you perceived? - I felt a man's hand on my thigh, he said he wanted my money; I said he should have it presently, I had three guineas in my pocket, and some silver, and I was not disposed to part with my gold; I was some time separating my silver from my gold; one man, the opposite side called out, damn me, why don't you rob that gentleman? the man immediately said, make haste, or I will fire; I had not given him any thing then, I told him he might fire and be damned, and gave him six shillings and sixpence; afterwards they went off.

What sort of a night was it? - It was rather a light night, and the road was particularly light.

Could you see either of the persons, so as to recollect and know them again? - I will not say positively.

HENRY HIRST sworn.

I was in the chaise when this happened with Mr. Beckwith, coming to town, between Brentford and Turnham-green, I was stopped by a man and robbed, and he took from me one half guinea, one shilling, and two counterfeit six-pences; I believe the man on the other side of the chaise did take some money from Mr. Beckwith.

Did you see him so as to know him again? - I think I should, it was rather duskish at the time; the man that robbed me had a brown great coat on.

Look round at the prisoners, if you think either of them was the person? - I believe the person in the blue coat (Jennings) was the person that robbed me; I will not be positive.

HANNAH HIRST sworn.

I was in the chaise with Mr. Hirst and Mr. Beckwith when it was stopt, but I cannot speak to the persons of the prisoners.

JOHN CREEDLAND sworn.

On the 2d of March, near the hour of nine in the evening, I was going to Acton, together with three others, two on one side of the road, and two on the other; we met the two prisoners coming from Acton towards us; I was going to Acton, I let the prisoner Wood pass by the left hand side of the road; Jennings jumped from the footpath into the middle of the road, where he run backward, when I had an opportunity to see he had a pistol in his hand; (the pistol produced) he ran then on the right side of the road on the foot-path, he ran on, and I after him for some considerable way; he turns about with the pistol in his right hand, presented the pistol to me, drew the trigger, and it flashed in the pan only; he run on with the pistol in his hand till he

came to a stile on the same side of the way, he threw the pistol out of his right-hand over the stile; he crossed the road again, and went through a hedge, and into a field; he ran to the right-hand side of the hedge, and in getting over there I apprehended him, and brought him back to the four-mile-stone on Acton road, into a public-house, and I searched him and found on him a small box containing six balls and some powder; after securing the man I went back to find the pistol, I knew where the pistol lay, there had been some men looking after the pistol, and one Mr. Street being near the place, he took it up, and gave it to me; I went back to the public-house, unscrewed the barrel, and took out two balls; (the balls produced) after that I took him to the watch-house, he had a brown coat on; I found besides on him a knife, one penny, and a pair of gloves.

Mr. Garrow, Prisoner's Counsel. No money was found at all on him only one penny? - No.

And you searched the man intirely? - Yes.

It was perfectly light, you could discern a man's features? - Yes.

It was not then, as Mr. Hirst says, duskish; you can see perfectly well, perhaps better, in the dark than in the light? - It was rather light.

You just now said it was perfectly light to discern a man's features? - It was in the month of March, near nine o'clock.

DUNCAN GRANT sworn.

I am a patrol with Creedland; on the 2d of March as we were going backwards and forwards, I saw Wood between Acton and Shepherd's-bush.

Did he run away? - He did not, because he was seized; I brought him to a public-house and searched him; I found on him half a guinea, two half crown pieces, four shillings, and three six-pences (the money produced); I found this powder in his pocket (produced); I saw him throwing away the pistol.

Did you find the pistol again? - I sent two men and they found it in the very spot where I apprehended him, in a field on the onside of the road, that is on the left side of the road going from here to Acton.

Court to Creedland. On which side of the road was the other pistol thrown over? - On the right-hand side.

Court to Grant. What did you do with the pistols? - I unscrewed the barrel, and drew the pistol, and it was loaded with two balls.

Court to Mr. Hirst. How much did you and Mrs. Hirst lose? - Mrs. Hirst told me she lost a guinea and some few halfpence.

How much did you lose? - One half guinea, one shilling, and two bad sixpences.

Was there any of the money such as you could know again? - There was one of the six-pences I think I could recollect.

Do you think you can positively say? - Money is such a thing one cannot scarcely swear to; I verily believe it was the money I had in my pocket.

Can you recollect any thing of the half guinea? - It is one of the late coin, one that looks pale.

Was there any silver you could know? - One of the six-pences had a notch in it.

Court. If it is not sufficient to swear to, we need not take up time? - I mean not to swear to it.

Was there on any of the six-pences any marks? - Not to swear positively to.

Can you describe the marks on the sixpence with the notch, such as they were; was there any thing else beside a notch; was it a thick one or a thin one; was it a remarkable thin one? - I cannot take on myself to say.

Have you observed any other marks besides that notch? - I cannot recollect.

Did you observe whether it was round or not? - I do not think it was quite round.

Now, Sir, look at that six-pence. and tell me how far you can speak to it? - This is, I believe, the very six-pence I had fourteen days in my pocket.

Does the Inspection make you positive? - It does not, coin is such a singular thing for a man to be positive to.

Court to Mrs. Hirst. What money did you lose, Madam? - A guinea and some halfpence.

Court to Mr. Beckwith. What pieces did you lose? - Half a crown and four shillings.

PRISONERS' DEFENCE.

We are not guilty.

- HARMAN, Esq. sworn.

The prisoner Wood was my coachman, he lived with me three years, he was very honest, an exceeding good servant, and exceedingly attentive during the three years he was with me; I trusted my property to his care, and have sent him with cash to the bankers, to the amount of six hundred pounds at a time; I entrusted two hundred pounds to his care a very short time before he was discharged my service; he left me in February last, I did not discharge him for any fault, I had no further occasion for him; but on parting with him, told him, whenever I wanted a coachman again, I would take him into my service.

BOTH GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17890422-116

401. JOHN PARKINS was indicted for bigamy , to which he pleaded

GUILTY .

Imprisoned twelve months .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17890422-117

402. SIMON COZONI was indicted for that he, on the 10th of March , four pounds weight of pickles, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Christopher Pack and Edward Lewis , by a certain person then lately before stolen, did receive and have, well knowing them to be stolen, taken, and carried away, the same person who stole them not having been before convicted thereof .

NOT GUILTY .

403. JOHN BISHE was indicted for the same offence.

NOT GUILTY .

404. HE was again indicted on two other indictments for a similar offence.

NOT GUILTY.

All Three Tried by the London Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17890422-118

405. SAMUEL BROUGHTON was indicted for obtaining goods by false pretences, with intent to defraud Peter Wells , and Co.

The prisoner brought an order for goods as from William Hewitt , of Turnham-green, who was a customer of the prosecutor's; in consequence of which the goods were delivered to him, and were afterwards found at the house of Stephen Yoell , to whom he had sold them for three pounds thirteen shillings.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This is the first offence I ever committed.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: o17890422-1

The following Female Convicts were put to the Bar, and informed that his Majesty's Pardon was granted to them on the following Conditions, viz.

SARAH COWDEN ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. No, I will die by the laws of my country; I am innocent, and so is Sarah Storer ; the people that had the money for which I was tried, are now at their liberty, therefore I will die by the laws of my country before ever I will go abroad for my life.

MARTHA CUTLER ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. Before I will go abroad for my natural life, I will sooner die.

SARAH STORER ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. I will not accept it; I am innocent.

SARAH MILLS ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. I will go to my former sentence; I had not power to speak on my trial.

Court. If you do not accept of the King's pardon now, it will be too late hereafter; you may depend upon it, that every woman who now refuses to receive the King's pardon, will be ordered for immediate execution.

Sarah Mills . I would rather die than go out of my own country to be devoured by Savages.

MARY BURGESS ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. I had rather go to my former sentence; I had rather die than leave my child and husband behind me; I am very willing to die; I will die before I will leave my poor child in a strange place; I am satisfied I am a dying woman, and I will go to my former sentence; I will die an innocent death; I beg pardon for making so free.

Court. It is my duty to tell you if you refuse the pardon now, it will be too late ever to expect it afterwards; consider what you are about; it is my duty to give you that notice, you certainly will be ordered immediately for execution.

Prisoner Burgess. Well, I am very glad to hear it. I do not care how soon.

JANE TYLER ;

On condition of being transported for her life.

Prisoner. My Lord, I will not accept it; I will go to my former sentence; I will die first; I think I have suffered hard enough to be in gaol three years for what I have done.

ELEANOR KIRVAN , otherwise CARAVAN ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. I hope this honourable Court, or any of the Gentlemen in company, will not object to what I shall say; I have laid

in prison three years; I do not intend to object to my sentence, but I am not in a situation to go abroad; if I was I would go; the crime deserved Death; it is an injury to community, but I never was guilty of it; I have two small children; I have no objection to confinement for life; I cannot live long.

Court. Do you refuse to accept the King's mercy on the condition that has been read to you? - I am not in a condition to go.

Court. If you do not accept it now; I have no power; if you should wish for mitigation of that sentence; but after you have accepted it you may apply further for mitigation; but if you do not accept of these terms, you stand as a person condemned to suffer Death, and will be in the situation of those who are so condemned, and will certainly be ordered for execution, and it will be too late to recal your opinion; I recommend you to accept of that favour.

Prisoner. I only refer it to Mr. Curtis, and the Gentleman who attended on the Recorder to prove my innocence; I submit to confinement, if you think proper to give me time, 'till Mr. Simpson pronounces me fit to go, but not to send me away in a day or two; I accept his Majesty's mercy on that condition.

Reference Number: o17890422-2

The following Prisoners accepted the conditions mentioned in his Majesty's pardon, viz.

To be transported during the term of their lives.

Lidia Jones ; Elizabeth Shakespeare ; Esther Thornton ; Catherine Heyland ; Ann Steel ; Elizabeth Smith ; Mary Wade ; Jane Whiting .

The following Prisoners accepted the conditions, viz.

To be transported for the term of seven years .

Margaret Wood ; Sarah M'Cormick ; Mary Kimes , alias Potten ; Mary Chafey ; Sarah Young ; Mary Hook ; Elizabeth Goldsmith ; Mary Hounsom .

Reference Number: s17890422-1

The Sessions being ended, the Court proceeded to pass Judgment as follows:

Received sentence of death, 9.

Thomas Mason , William Atwright , alias Barker, John Ward , Edward Church , John Blinkworth , Ann Smith , John Jennings , John Wood , John Moore .

To be transported for fourteen years, 1.

Sarah Michal .

To be transported for seven years, 53.

Thomas White , William Knight , Thomas Andrew , Thomas Stevens , Elizabeth Hardiman , William Garment , Maria Israel , Richard Roberts , John Eades , John Hopkins , George Williams , Peter Roch , Ann the wife of Peter Roch , Thomas Palmer , John Wife , John Gillett , Edward Welch , William Mitchell , George Wilson , John Russell , Thomas Greenbank , Thomas Woollerton , Thomas Evans , John Holdway , Walter Scott , John Tyre , Susannah Bray , alias Gay, Mary Wilton , Francis Evans , John Lindsay , Margaret Carter , Joseph Smith , Elizabeth Robinson , John Forsith , Thomas Stevenson , George Wood , William Reed , Valentine Fryar , John Broughton , George Bellow , William Nicholas , John Bradey , Robert Seward , Edward Caseltine , Daniel Sewell , John Williams , John White , John King , Ann Thomas , Mary Jones , Joseph Atkins , Thomas Ryley , John Harris .

To be imprisoned for twelve months, and fined 1 s. 2.

George Isham Parkins , John Jeffkins .

To be imprisoned for six months, 10.

John Dagley , John Neatley , Alice Serjeant , Samuel Pritchard , John Clarke , Richard Evans , Mary Wilson , James Henley , George Mason , Joseph Lynes .

To be whipped, 14.

William Bates , William Nowlan , Samuel Pritchard , John Baker , John Clarke , Richard Evans , Mathew Ross , Benjamin Stokes , Thomas Holloway , James Wood , William Innis , James Henley , Peter Miller , George Mason .

Sentence respited on

John Wilkins .

Reference Number: s17890422-1

The following Female Convicts were put to the Bar, and informed that his Majesty's Pardon was granted to them on the following Conditions, viz.

SARAH COWDEN ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. No, I will die by the laws of my country; I am innocent, and so is Sarah Storer ; the people that had the money for which I was tried, are now at their liberty, therefore I will die by the laws of my country before ever I will go abroad for my life.

MARTHA CUTLER ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. Before I will go abroad for my natural life, I will sooner die.

SARAH STORER ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. I will not accept it; I am innocent.

SARAH MILLS ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. I will go to my former sentence; I had not power to speak on my trial.

Court. If you do not accept of the King's pardon now, it will be too late hereafter; you may depend upon it, that every woman who now refuses to receive the King's pardon, will be ordered for immediate execution.

Sarah Mills . I would rather die than go out of my own country to be devoured by Savages.

MARY BURGESS ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. I had rather go to my former sentence; I had rather die than leave my child and husband behind me; I am very willing to die; I will die before I will leave my poor child in a strange place; I am satisfied I am a dying woman, and I will go to my former sentence; I will die an innocent death; I beg pardon for making so free.

Court. It is my duty to tell you if you refuse the pardon now, it will be too late ever to expect it afterwards; consider what you are about; it is my duty to give you that notice, you certainly will be ordered immediately for execution.

Prisoner Burgess. Well, I am very glad to hear it. I do not care how soon.

JANE TYLER ;

On condition of being transported for her life.

Prisoner. My Lord, I will not accept it; I will go to my former sentence; I will die first; I think I have suffered hard enough to be in gaol three years for what I have done.

ELEANOR KIRVAN , otherwise CARAVAN ;

On condition of being transported for life.

Prisoner. I hope this honourable Court, or any of the Gentlemen in company, will not object to what I shall say; I have laid

in prison three years; I do not intend to object to my sentence, but I am not in a situation to go abroad; if I was I would go; the crime deserved Death; it is an injury to community, but I never was guilty of it; I have two small children; I have no objection to confinement for life; I cannot live long.

Court. Do you refuse to accept the King's mercy on the condition that has been read to you? - I am not in a condition to go.

Court. If you do not accept it now; I have no power; if you should wish for mitigation of that sentence; but after you have accepted it you may apply further for mitigation; but if you do not accept of these terms, you stand as a person condemned to suffer Death, and will be in the situation of those who are so condemned, and will certainly be ordered for execution, and it will be too late to recal your opinion; I recommend you to accept of that favour.

Prisoner. I only refer it to Mr. Curtis, and the Gentleman who attended on the Recorder to prove my innocence; I submit to confinement, if you think proper to give me time, 'till Mr. Simpson pronounces me fit to go, but not to send me away in a day or two; I accept his Majesty's mercy on that condition.

Reference Number: s17890422-1

The following Prisoners accepted the conditions mentioned in his Majesty's pardon, viz.

To be transported during the term of their lives.

Lidia Jones ; Elizabeth Shakespeare ; Esther Thornton ; Catherine Heyland ; Ann Steel ; Elizabeth Smith ; Mary Wade ; Jane Whiting .

The following Prisoners accepted the conditions, viz.

To be transported for the term of seven years .

Margaret Wood ; Sarah M'Cormick ; Mary Kimes , alias Potten ; Mary Chafey ; Sarah Young ; Mary Hook ; Elizabeth Goldsmith ; Mary Hounsom .

The Prisoners who refused to accept his Majesty's Pardon, as before-mentioned, were again put to the Bar; when the Court addressed them as follows:

I find there are several of you who have refused his Majesty's most gracious pardon on the present occasion; you have been convicted of very heinous offences, and you seem to forget that the King, in his great goodness has saved your lives; having saved your lives, your not being inclined to accept that pardon arises from a hope that you shall not be sent off so soon as the other prisoners; I think it my duty, who have not the power to alter the sentence at all, to tell you that this sort of conduct will be considered as an aggravation of your offences; and if you have any hopes that your sentence will be altered, you had much better accept of the King's pardon now, and try what interest you have to get that sentence mitigated; but if you go from the bar now, you will remain under sentence of death; and you may depend upon it, that you will suffer death with the first culprits, at the next execution; I think it my duty to state this to you, and to remind you of the most dreadful situation in which you stand; if after this notice you chuse to suffer death, which the law has ordered, I have done my duty in stating it to you, and you must take the consequence; I have sent for you that you may know your situation, and not be hurried to that which may bring you to a most disgraceful end; I hope you will take the advice of the Court, and accept of pardon, if not it will certainly be too late hereafter.

Prisoner Burgess. I am satisfied with what I hear about it, I will suffer death before ever I will go abroad with them; I am very well satisfied with the death that was ordered for me.

Court to Mr. Akerman. Take her away, and put her into the condemned cell by herself.

Prisoner Tyler. I will never accept of it to go abroad.

Prisoner Cutler. I think it is very hard; I will not accept it.

Prisoner Cowden. I will not accept it; I will die first.

Prisoner Storer. I will not go out of my native country.

Prisoner Mills. I will not accept it; I will sooner die in my own country than be sent abroad.

Court. Let these women be confined in separate cells, and fed on bread and water.

Reference Number: a17890422-1

Mr. HODGSON

RESPECTFULLY returns his most grateful Thanks to his Employers and Pupils, for the Preference they have thought proper to give to his Mode of teaching and writing SHORT-HAND, which he flatters himself is at once as concise and correct as any other System; he continues teaching in four Hours, by four Lessons, the whole necessary instructions in this much approved Art. He also takes Trials and Arguments with the utmost Care, which are copied so expeditiously as to be sent home the same Evening, if required.

A new Edition of HODGSON'S TREATISE ON SHORT-HAND, which is a sufficient Instructor of itself, is just reprinted, Price Eighteen pence; also his Publication, entitled,

"SHORT-HAND CONTRACTIONS, adapted to every System of Short-Hand;

"to which are added, a Comparative Table of Short-Hand Alphabets, and

"two Extracts by way of Specimen, with two Copper-plates annexed," Price 2 s. 6 d. Sold by J. Walmsley, Chancery-lane, and also by Bladon, Matthews, Bell, Brown, Clarke, Egerton, Fourdrinier, and all the Booksellers.

Letters (post paid) from Purchasers of either of his Books, directed to Mr. Hodgson, No. 35, Chancery-Lane, will receive immediate Answers, and all Orders from Gentlemen in the Profession of the Law and others, immediately attended to: Addressed to Mr. Hodgson, at his House, No. 13, White Lyon Row, Islington, or left for him, at No. 35, Chancery-Lane.

Gentlemen who send in haste to Islington, are requested to send a Porter, and not trust to the Stage or Penny-post.

The numerous and particular Trials which have been much enquired after, Mr. Hodgson has reprinted for the Accommodation of his Customers.

N. B. As many Gentlemen who have taught themselves Systems of Short-hand, not formed on Mr. Hodgson's Plan, wishing to exchange them, have found the Attempt too embarrassing: Mr. Hodgson has recently succeeded in introducing the peculiar Brevities of his System into others without altering the Alphabets, and has found the Practice, (though novel) perfectly easy.

Mr. Hodgson has a compleat Set of Sessions Papers, for the last sixteen Years, which he will dispose of; or any person wishing to see any particular Trial, may have an Inspection of the same, or take a Copy of it, at the usual Prices.

Just published a new Edition of the Trial of Andrew Robinson Bowes , Esq; and several others for a Conspiracy against the Rt. Hon. the Countess of Strathmore, Price 3 s. 6 d. taken in Short-hand by Mr. HODGSON. Sold as above.

The Monthly Review for August, thus notices the above Trial

"The Reviewer

"is much obliged to Mr. Hodgson for making his Title Page so full and circumstantial

"that it requires nothing to be added, except our acknowledgment of the

"care and accuracy, with which he appears to have given this Trial to the Public."


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