Old Bailey Proceedings, 25th June 1788.
Reference Number: 17880625
Reference Number: f17880625-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 25th of JUNE, 1788, and the following Days;

Being the SIXTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honourable John Burnell , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY E. HODGSON, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND; And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VI. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXVIII.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable JOHN BURNELL , LORD MAYOR of the City of London; the Honorable Sir JOHN WILSON one of the Justice of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; JAMES ADAIR , Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; JOHN WILLIAM ROSE , Esq; and others of his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justice of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

First Middlesex Jury.

Solomon Hudson

Jacob Allen

Francis I'Anson

Willian Ellis

Edward Lonsdale

William Prior

William Inwood

William Lepper

John Pincott

Thomas Philpot

George Groomes

Joseph Weedon .

Second Mid. Jury.

Alex. Donaldson

William Christie

John Wright

John Richards

William Edwards

Stephen Storace

John Charlton

William Evans

Edw. Charles Hayley

George Catlin

John Ludlam

William Fear .

First London Jury.

George Lyon

Henry Gillam

Thomas Watkins

William Ilstone

William Fountain

Joseph Burrows

John Monk

Joshua Law

Thomas James

George Dean

John Field

James Dancer .

Second London Jury.

John Grey

William Adams

John Munday

John Upward

Robert Turner

Joseph Pugh

Thomas Rutherford

John Hoppey

John Yeates

Joseph Umpleby

Thomas Norris

Robert Alford .

Reference Number: t17880625-1

403. ELIZABETH GOLDSMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Elizabeth Cockburn , on the king's highway, on the 1st of June , and putting her in fear and danger of her life, and feloniously taking from her person, and against her will, one check apron, value 1 s. one silk bonnet, value 1 s. and 14 d. in money, her property .

ELIZABETH COCKBURN sworn.

Between the last of May and the first of June, about half after one in the night, I was going out on some family business for my master, and I met with this unfortunate prisoner and she asked me to treat her, which I did.

Did you know the prisoner before? - To the best of my knowledge I never saw her; I met her a little on this side a place called New-gravel-lane; she asked me to give her something to drink, and it being late, I took pity on her, and gave her something to drink; I took her to a public house, and we had each a glass of gin, and then we went out of the public house; I paid for the gin; we went on together for a good way, till we came to the place called the Match-walk ; then she seemed to stop me, by way of crossing me; I seeing her a stout, sturdy body, being late in the evening, I did not date to refuse her; there were little or few words; what passed I cannot, in conscience, mention, but she stopped me, and untied my apron, then she took off my bonnet, then she rifled both my pockets; I do not know whether she rifled my right or left pocket first.

What did she take from your pocket? - As near as conscience will give me leave to speak, about 14 d. I then went home; I was in hopes to find her on Monday; I am but a poor woman; I could put nothing in force against her; I went back from her; I could not go any further with her; I was going to London-street with her; I cannot recollect the words-that were said; I think I told her I was a Welch woman, and she was going to rob me; to the best of my knowledge, I never saw her before; I can give but little account, but I think she seemed rather in liquor.

How came you to go along with a strange woman to give her gin? - I did it out of pity.

There was no pity in giving a drunken woman gin you know? - There are two apprentices in the family where I live, and they had had words and were gone out; one was a resolute boy, and I went in search of him; the apprentice boy was brother to my master.

Was your master at home? - Yes.

Had you taken any steps to find this woman? - I had searched at several places; I only wanted my property of her; I found her at one Mr. Anderson's, a public house by Smithfield; I do not know the sign; when I saw her there, I did not know her immediately; when I went in, on her speaking, I immediately knew her voice; I said, you took my property; she turned about, and said, me, Madam; I said, yes, my dear, you to be sure; I went to get a watchman; when he stopped her, she attempted to run away, but he took her to the watch-house.

What time was it that you took her? - About half past ten in the evening; she said charge for charge, which I did not understand then; the officer of the night detained me two nights and a day with her in the watch-house; I was taken before the justice; there I gave the same account as I have here, and she was committed to prison; I am sure as far as conscience will permit me to speak, it is the same person.

Are you quite sure of it? - I am sure it is the same person that took the things from me in Match-walk; when first I saw her, when I took her, her back was towards me; I did not know her, but by her voice; but when she looked over her shoulder, I knew her.

Was you quite sober when you came out of the public house? - I was quite sober, and quite sensible; I would not belie my conscience for the world; I had drank a little in the course of the day, but nothing to hurt me; I was truly sensible of what I was doing; I cannot recollect any words she said when she took the things; she was a strapping sturdy body to me; and I am rather of a faint spirit; and there was nobody in the street that I could see.

Prisoner. Am I the person that took your property? - Yes, my dear, you are.

Oh! do not say it? - Yes, but I will fly it.

ELIZABETH THOMPSON sworn.

My brother is a pawnbroker, and I serve in the shop for him; the prisoner came the 3d. of June, with this checked apron; she said it on the counter, and asked me to give her a shilling; I told her no, she might have 9 d. she took the 9 d. I gave her a duplicate and she went away; the prisoner has used our shop a considerable time; I am sure it was her; this apron has been in my custody ever since.

(The apron deposed to)

Prosecutrix. The apron has been out of my hands four weeks; I cannot swear to it; but it is pretty much like mine by the appearance of it.

MARIA CHARLES sworn.

The prisoner told me she had a bonnet to sell; it was Thursday or Friday I am not sure which; after this woman said she was robbed; and I told her our people did not want such a thing; I knew her before; I never knew her to be guilty of such a thing; I gave her a shilling for it; it is here; about a week after I heard she was in custody.

Who are your people? - The people of our house where I live.

JOHN MAYNE sworn.

I produce the duplicate of the apron, which I took out of her pocket before the magistrate.

WILLIAM WHITEWAY sworn.

While the prisoner was under examination before the magistrate, information was brought to me that she had sold a bonnet; I went and found that woman out; she delivered it to me; it was taken to pieces when I got it.

Court to Mrs. Charles. Was it taken to pieces when you bought it? - Yes.

Prosecutrix. When she took it from me it was sit to wear, now it is cut to pieces it is impossible to swear to it.

JOHN SERJEANT sworn.

Between eleven and twelve I was walking to and fro by my box; I am a watchman; it was last Saturday was a fortnight, and a woman called, watchman, stop that woman, she has robbed me; I immediately stopped her, and took her to the watch-house; she was running as hard as she could when this woman called to me; they charged one another at the watch-house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

On Saturday month coming up Angel gardens, I met the prosecutrix very much testicated in liquor; she fell into the kennel; I helped her up; we went to the house and had a quartern of gin; I laid her down on the step of the door she was so much in liquor; I believe it wanted about a quarter to twelve; I could not get in; coming back again I saw this woman sitting; she asked me for a lodging; she said, says she, take care of my bonnet, but the apron is not hers; I found she did not come, and I sold it to that woman for one shilling unpicked; as to the Match-walk, my lord, I never was there; I was down between Angel-gardens, and Old-gravel-lane.

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-2

404. JOHN MYERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , one feather pillow, value 12 d. two linen pillow-cases, value 12 d. a pair of linen sheets, value 5 s. one woollen stuff window curtain, value 12 d. the property of Alice Hibden , widow ; six yards of cotton, value 12 s. a cotton gown, value 10 s. a cotton petticoat, value 2 s. a quilted ditto,

value 6 d. a flannel ditto, value 2 s. a pair of stays, value 18 s. a check apron, value 6 d. three pockets, value 6 d. a muslin neck handkerchief, value 6 d. a pair of stuff shoes with copper heel pieces, value 6 d. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. three linen shifts, value 5 s. three pillow-cases, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Ann Pidder , widow, in the dwelling-house of the said Alice Hibden .

JOHN HIBDIN sworn.

I live at No. 5, Camden-row, Bethnal-green , in the dwelling-house of Ann Hibdin , my mother; on Friday night the 6th of June, I was alarmed with the cry of thieves, about half past ten; I was sitting in the back parlour; I immediately went up stairs, and the garret appeared to have been stripped of several articles; there was a neighbour and a watchman standing in the gutter, on the leads, at the garret window; the neighbour's name is Foster; he is not here; I went to the watch-house, where I found the prisoner, and a bundle, which appeared to be my property; the wearing apparel were the property of my mother; there were these things the property of Mrs. Hibdin; the other things I cannot swear to with certainty; the prisoner did not say a word at the watch-house.

ANN PIDDER sworn.

I live at the house of Mrs. Hibdin; I went up stairs to turn down the beds, and I heard an alarm; I looked out of the window; then I went into the garret, and found that our house had been robbed; I found my box was stripped of all my clothes; the sheets off the bed, which were the property of my mistress, and a pillow and pillow-case, and a green curtain which hung at the window; the next house but one was empty.

RALPH WEEDON sworn.

On Friday, the 6th of this month, I had been to take a walk to Bethnal-green, coming back, I saw the prisoner and his companion come out of an empty house with a bundle under his arm, and his partner says to him, D - n your eyes, come along; and I immediately suspected it was a robbery, and I made an alarm; the watchman was too quick for me; he ran away to shew me the man; and the prisoner was brought back directly, in about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour, as near as I can guess.

Was there a good light? - It was the 6th of this month; there was very good day-light; I am sure the man that was brought back was the man I saw with the bundle; I am positive of it; he had not the bundle with him then; when he came out, I might be half a yard from him; I saw his face.

ANN NEALE sworn.

I was taking a walk on the 6th of this month, and I saw a man coming out of an empty house; I was with the last witness.

Were you near enough to know either of them? - Yes, the prisoner was one of them; I am sure of that, because I went to the watch-house directly and saw him again; the prisoner had a bundle; I did not see his face when he came out; I judged him by his height; the other man was taller than this; I can swear he was the same man; he was brought back directly; the prisoner had light clothes on, such as he has on now.

THOMAS WIGGINS sworn.

I am a watchman; I pursued with the officers; I first saw the prisoner running down the lane with the officers; there was nobody with him, only people after him; Mr. Philpot stopped him; the bundle was brought in by one Isaac Willett into the watch-house; I went out in the morning, and there was a pair of leather shoes and buckles missing that night from the property; I picked them up; and coming along at half after three, I picked up a pair of womens pumps with copper heel-pieces, and a pair of silver buckles in them; at about fifty yards further

I picked up this iron crow; I found the shoes and buckles near the turning to the blind beggar; he ran about five or six yards from the corner; he was taken beyond the corner; the shoes and buckles are in the bundle; I had it from the officer of the night.

ROBERT CHIPPEFIELD sworn.

I am the officer of the night; between ten and eleven I heard the alarm, and immediately ran down the lane that leads to Bethnal-green; the prisoner was in custody; Philpot and two other gentlemen resigned him to me; and I brought him to the watch-house; and in about two minutes, a bundle was brought in by Isaac Willett ; nothing was said by the prisoner; we immediately opened the bundle, took an inventory, tied them up again, and they were delivered into my care; they are the same as they were; then the watchman went his round; at three returning back, he brought me the shoes and buckles.

ISAAC WILLETT sworn.

I was a supernumerary man that night; this man and woman gave me the alarm of thieves; they said there were two men gone a head, with bundles, about a hundred yards; I immediately pursued, and met the other watchman upon duty; he said what is the matter; says I, theft; he immediately pursued the prisoner, I saw the bundle was dropped, but I could not tell by whom, I saw it before it was dropped; the man that had the bundle seemed to be in dark clothes; two men were running, one in dark clothes, the other in light clothes, I picked up the bundle, this is the same, I carried it to the watch-house.

JOHN BARNES sworn.

I watched on the road, and saw the prisoner with a bundle under his arm, and saw him drop it; there was another man with him in dark blew or brown clothes, each of them had a bundle about the size of a peck measure, it never was found, I did not see the prisoner stopped, I am positive he is the same man that dropped the large bundle; I told willet to pick up the bundle, while I pursued the prisoner.

Prisoner. What do you mean to swear to me at that time of night, being a very dark night? - That was the man, I had a stick in my hand about a yard long; and as he threw away the bundle it hit my leg, or else I should have had him, bundle, and all, I suppose it was a quarter of an hour before he was brought back; I returned to the watch-house, and there was the prisoner.

JAMES PHILPOT sworn.

I stopped the prisoner, I saw him running, he had nothing when I saw him, there was nobody with him.

The Things deposed to, by Ann Biddulph .

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, I did not expect my trial on so soon, or else I should have had somebody to my character.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-3

405. ELEANOR the wife of THOMAS HAYES was indicted for stealing, on the 29th day of May , one shirt, value 2 s. one pair of stockings, value 1 s. and one handkerchief, value 1 s. the goods of Peter Anthony Sapte .

PETER ANTHONY SAPTE sworn.

The prisoner has assisted in my family as a chair-woman or washer-woman for these five months past; on the 29th of May, the prisoner and some other women came to wash at my house; and having missed several articles before; I agreed with my family and servants who lived in my house, to search the washer-women before we paid them that night; accordingly

when they had done work, I mentioned my intentions; and every one but the prisoner seemed very willing; she appeared much confused; and after pausing some little time she took the things mentioned in the indictment, out of her pocket; I sent for a constable; gave charge of the prisoner, and delivered the things to him.

JOHN HEATH sworn.

I am a constable; on the 29th of May, I took charge of the prisoner in Mr. Sapte's house, and the things were delivered to me; they have been in my possession ever since.

(The property produced and sworn to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been washing at the prosecutor's house; and I thought those things were not clean enough; and I put them in my pocket to give them another lather; I meant to have brought them the next day.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17880625-4

406. SARAH LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th day of May , one piece of silk, for handkerchiefs, containing in length seven yards, value 20 s. the goods of William Jones , John Jones , William Albion Jones , and John Walford .

JOHN WALFORD sworn.

I am a haberdasher , and one of the partners mentioned in the indictment; on Monday the 26th of May, I was informed by one of our servants that some goods were lying on the ground; the prisoner was in the shop, and the shopmen had some suspicion of her, which they communicated to me; I desired that they would not touch her, unless they were positive, as it was a delicate matter, and in fact would be cruel to take her into custody on flight suspicions; after which the shopmen were quite positive; and on her going out, one of the young men stopped her and brought her back, and she was searched, and a piece of silk for handkerchiefs fell from under her petticoats; which is the goods mentioned in the indictment; I am positive it fell from her, as I saw it before it touched the ground.

WILLIAM STORER sworn.

I am a shopman to the persons mentioned in the indictment; on the 26th of May, the prisoner came in to purchase some silk handkerchiefs; I shewed her some which she did not approve of; upon which I went with her into a back warehouse and shewed her some others; she chose one, and deposited a shilling by way of earnest for it; I shewed her some others of which she chose two and deposited two shillings; after which we had some conversation about the price; she had not paid the full; nor had she them delivered to her; she was to send her sister the next day for them with the remainder of the money, who she described to be a short black girl; I then sold her several yards of binding; then she went out of the warehouse into the shop; Mr. Walford was at the door; when she had got about ten yards into the shop from the warehouse, she let fall a piece of silk handkerchiefs; I was about two yards from her; Mr. Walford said, this is what we want; we will make an example of her; I then returned her the three shillings she had deposited; the constable was sent for, and she was taken into custody.

JOHN BUTLER sworn.

I am a shopman to the prosecutors; while Storer was conversing with the prisoner, I saw a piece of silk handkerchiefs lying on the ground; I thought it looked suspicious, and I mentioned it to Mr. Walford, who told me, not to accuse her unless I was positive, and to be very cautious

about matters of that kind; after which both me and Mr. Walford saw another piece drop; she had her hands in her pockets, and seemed uneasy; on her going out I brought her back, and then she dropt the piece mentioned in the indictment.

WILLIAM HAWKINS sworn.

I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner; and the goods were delivered to me by Storer.

(The goods produced and shop mark sworn to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never touched any thing but the binding; and I looked at the handkerchiefs and bought three, and left a deposit for them; I was very willing to be searched, as I knew I was innocent.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17880625-5

407. JOHN GREENAWAY , alias GREEN , was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Kilby , no person being therein, between the hours of nine and eleven in the fore-noon, on the 19th of May last, and feloniously stealing a cotton gown, value 15 s. three quarters of a yard of cotton, value 2 s. a check apron, value 2 s. the property of Ann Sadler .

MARY SADLER , sworn.

I live near Wilsdon Church , at the house of John Kilby , I pay a shilling a week for two rooms; I lost a cotton gown, and my daughter's gown, a coloured apron; my daughter's name is Ann Sadler ; my gown was worth half a guinea; I lost them on Monday five weeks, I had left the house, and had been in the common field before I was informed of my loss; I went into the field about eight, I left my gown in the house; I do not remember seeing it then, it hung up in the room; I had it on on Sunday; this woman, Mrs. Kilby, was in the house when I went out, she went out afterwards, there was nobody in the house but us two; I locked the door of my own room myself after me.

Has the room that you rent an outer door? - My door comes into a field, and her door comes out into a lane, it is a cottage divided.

Is there any communication between your house and John Kilby 's appartment? - No.

You cannot go out of one into the other without coming into the field? - No; about an hour after I went out, while I was hoeing of beans, I heard the cry of stop thief, I went to my house, and the things were gone; I did not see the prisoner running, the place where the prisoner broke in, is the side of the house; the prisoner was taken directly to London to the justice, I came there that night, and saw the prisoner there.

Should you know him again, do you think? - Yes.

Look about and see if you see him? - (Looks about) That is the man, I never saw him before the robbery.

Had the cottage been originally built to be separate, or had there been any door blocked up? - I believe there had been a door between them, they were built originally separate from one another, that door was nailed up.

ANN SADLER sworn.

I know no more about it than my mother, I went with her to the justices, the things I have in my hand, was carried for me to the justices by Sarah Kilby , they were delivered to me again from the justice and given to me.

(Deposed to the gown by three strings and her work on the cuffs.)

SARAH KILBY sworn.

I went out in the morning to work, and came back immediately, and found the house was broke open, I went up stairs into my own room.

What house was broke open? - Mary Sadler 's, joining to mine; when I went up stairs, I thought I heard the man run down stairs, that was in my own house, I saw nobody; then I came down stairs and called for assistance, I went up a little field adjoining to the house, and saw the prisoner about two or three stones throw off, with the bundle in his right hand, and a stick in his left, he was walking.

Was he in a public road? - No, he was in a bye path.

But he was in a path? - Yes, he was pursued and taken by James Irwine , I did not see him take him, I lost sight of him; he was carried to the justices, I saw the prisoner at the public-house after he was taken, I never saw him before.

From what you saw of the man that was in the adjoining field with the bundle, can you undertake to be sure that that was the same man that was brought back with the bundle to the public-house? - It certainly was; indeed the bundle was not opened at the public-house, a woman gave me the bundle.

JAMES IRWINE sworn.

I was binding hay at a rick just above the house, about four hundred yards from the place where the robbery was committed; Mrs. Kilby called me, and I immediately ran down to her, she said, she thought some body was in the house, I immediately got in at the hole that the man broke in at, I went up stairs and saw nobody there, there was no gowns there; she came in herself, and said the gowns were gone; we went up this little field facing Mrs. Sadler's house, and we traced a man up the grass very plain, the dew was on the grass, it was between nine and ten the 19th of May, to the best of my knowledge; we went out at the top of the little field, there is a road goes across the common field; I says to her, you look at this path, and I will stand here, she saw the prisoner going down the path; I immediately pursued after him as fast as I could, I made no halloo, nor no bellow after him; he crossed the field towards Wilsdon Church; he then came to a blind lane, he had no bundle in his hand then, when he crossed the lane on the other side over the stile; the bundle was missing, when he got over the other little field, the next but one to that, he made a bit of a halt, and looked to see, immediately I missed the bundle from his hand, I looked for it, he got across the next field to the lane, and made a bit of a halt, I still kept following him, crying out, stop thief! he found I still followed him; he mended his pace for a quarter of a mile, then he made a little bit of a halt again, then mended his pace again; three men besides me pursued him, and two of them almost met him, he kept running till he was taken; I never saw him before to my knowledge; I never was out of sight during the whole time I pursued him, only a little turning the corner, but these men saw him; I gave the bundle to a woman at a public house, to take care of till we had taken the man, as soon as the men took him, he drew this tuck out of the stick.

(The stick produced, being a sword in a common walking stick.)

JOSEPH SEYMOUR sworn.

I was officer of the parish, I assisted in bringing the prisoner to the justices, I have brought some things that was found upon him, two pistols, and these other things.

WILLIAM DANCER sworn.

I heard the cry of stop thief, I met the man, he was getting over a stile, and he drew this, I told him to stand back, the young men were close up to him, I saw him draw this tuck, we had nothing to defend ourselves, and I went and assisted the other man and took him; I saw him about ten minutes before I took him, he had run about 100 yards before I took him.

JOHN HILLIAR sworn.

I was at my work, I heard the cry of stop thief, I pursued him across three or

four fields, he got into this field, I defended myself with a hand-saw, for the prisoner struck at me several times with this tuck stick, I saw him two or three fields before he got over the stile.

JOHN POE sworn.

I heard the cry of stop thief from Irwine, I ran about half a mile, I never lost sight of him till he was taken.

Court to Mary Sadler . How long have you lived in the house? - I have lived in the house a twelve-month, I took it from week to week.

PRISONER'S DEFENCE.

I found the bundle in a narrow lane, about a hundred yards from the house, I picked it up, and walked along with it thinking no harm in the world, these men pursued me, I did not know what they were running after, I heard them cry out, stop thief! and as I picked up the bundle, I thought whether or no it might not be on that account, and I made my escape and dropt the bundle, and went away about my business thinking no harm, and they took me to a public house and brought me to the justice. As for the fire-arms, five weeks ago last Sunday, I was coming along about a mile and a hall beyond Edgware, in a very heavy thunder shower, and there was a barn unlocked, I went in for shelter, and there was a little straw and hay on the floor, I tumbled it about to lay down, and out-tumbled these arms, which I knew nothing about; I was surprized to see them, I put them in my pocket without thinking any harm in the world; I have no witness to prove these things, I expect people to my character every minute, one's name is Alsop, and the other Reave.

GUILTY of stealing the things, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Kilby .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-6

508. WILLIAM PHIPPS was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of January , a wooden bedstead, value 21 s. a feather bed, value 4 l. a bolster, value 10 s. two pillows, value 10 s. three blankets, value 20 s. a matrass, value 21 s. a carpet, value 4 l. twelve mahogany chairs, value 3 l. 12 s. an iron bath stove, value 20 s. a fender, value 3 s. a pair of tongs, value 2 s. a shovel, value 2 s. a poker, value 1 s. one looking glass, value 50 s. two other pair of tongs, value 2 s. two iron shovels, value 1 s. two iron pokers, value 1 s. a dressing glass, value 30 s. a tent bedstead, with worsted and linen furniture, value 20 s. one other feather bed, value 20 s. one other bolster, value 5 s. one other pillow, value 2 s. a mattrass, value 10 s. six other blankets, value 30 s. six chairs, value 6 d. a table value 6 d. two deal ironing boards, value 2 s. the property of Hannah Sowerby , widow , in her dwelling-house .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-7

409. DAVID NOWLAND was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Burrell , no person being therein, about the hour of two in the afternoon, on the 6th of June , and feloniously stealing one silver watch, value 50 s. a chain value 6 d. a metal seal, value 6 d. a brass watch key, value 1 d. a tea chest, value 4 s. one leaden jack weight, value 2 s. two tin cannisters, value 1 s. one pair of scales, value 1 s. and one towel, value 2 d. his property .

JOHN BURRELL sworn.

I live in Labour-in-vain-Street, Shadwell , I was at my work on Friday, the 6th of June, I am an engineer , at Shadwell water-works, I left my wife and a young child at home.

ANN BURRELL sworn.

I went out at two o'clock and shut my door, and locked it, when I came back which was half after eight, I found my door locked as I left it, and on entering the house, I found the sash had been thrown up, and the things thrown about.

Are you quite sure the sash was shut down when you went out? - Yes, as sure as you are there; the sash will not stay up, it has no pullies, it had fallen again, and a pane was taken out of the side; there was a piece of paper where one of the panes was broke, he broke this paper and took out this pane, and got in himself, I found my tea-chest on a chair, removed from where it stood, and the jack weight was taken off the jack and tied up in a towel, on the floor, there was a silver watch taken off the nail, and put on again, moved from one end of the nail, to the other, the prisoner confessed it was taken off.

When did you see it before? - Only half an hour before, when I went out.

Had you taken such particular notice of it that you can tell on what part of the nail it was? - Yes.

Did you before he confessed it, upon your oath, observe that the watch had been moved? - Yes.

So that you could have sworn that, if he had not confessed? - Yes, the prisoner was in the room, I caught hold of him, and called for assistance, there was a pin that fastened the sash that was taken out, no pane was broke, I had papered it up, and that paper was broke, I got assistance and took the boy into custody, I had seen him before in the lane, I did not know to whom he belonged, when I went in I saw nobody in the room; I went up stairs and found the prisoner.

Do you know his age? - He said he was fourteen.

Was the tea-chest new? - No an old one.

What was the jack weight worth? - I do not know.

Or the towel? - Of no great value.

When you caught the boy did you say any thing to him about being hanged for this, or threaten, or promise him? - No Sir, I did not promise him any thing, I only asked him what he deserved; and he was carried before the justice the same evening.

JOSEPH MOFFATT sworn.

I went to assist, hearing the alarm, she ran up stairs before me, she had hold of the prisoner, and I took him from her hands, then her husband came from his labour.

Jury. How high was the jack weight from the ground? - Close to the ground, it was within the house; when I first took hold of him he offered to strike me, I spoke to him, then he sat down quietly.

GEORGE FORRESTER sworn.

I am a constable, I took him to the justice, I said nothing to him about confessing: He said before the magistrate, that there was another concerned with him, I heard no threats or promises made in the least, the jack weight is here.

(The things produced.)

Moffat. The jack-weight is thirty-pound, I made it.

Forrester. I know the boy to my sorrow, I believe his mother came to him some time before; he lives towards Ratcliff-cross.

Mrs. Burrell. He said the watch was taken off the nail, that was before the magistrate.

Was it put down in writing? - Yes, he signed his confession.

(The confession produced.)

Forrester. I saw it signed, there was no promises or threats made. (Read)

" David Knowland , says, this afternoon a man who is known by the name of old Bowles, went with him, this confessant, to the house of Ann Burrell , where he was found, that the said old Bowles broke a window with his hand, and lifted up the sash and put him in, and Bowles followed him, took

the leaden-weight and wrapped it in the cloth, and took the tea-chest and put it on a chair, and likewise moved the watch hanging on a nail, that hearing the fore door open, he hid himself under the bed, and what became of old Bowles he does not know.

GUILTY, 10 d.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-8

410. JAMES BEALE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Francis Imberty on the king's highway, on the 5th of May , and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person and against his will, one silk handkerchief, value 12 d. one stick, called a supple-jack, value 2 d. his property .

FRANCIS IMBERTY sworn.

On the 15th of May, about nine in the evening, I was met by the prisoner in Oxford-street , I was alone, I met a party, there was about seven or eight of them together; I found my handkerchief going out of my pocket, and I turned about, and the prisoner knocked me down directly; he never spoke to me nor I to him; he struck me with his fist and foot, and cut my ancle and threw me on the curb-stone, I recovered myself a little, I was so stunned, and attacked him again, till the young man came to my assistance, and then he ran away; I never saw him before, it was not quite dark, I could discern him exceedingly well.

How long was he with you together? - I suppose about two or three minutes; I am quite sure he is the man, and he did not quite me; the handkerchief was taken out of my pocket that moment.

The handkerchief, was out of your pocket before he struck you? - Yes, I felt it go out, and I turned round, and he knocked me down directly; there was a great crowd gathered round; I do not know what became of the other party, I lost my stick, it was a suple-jack, the prisoner took it from me.

Did you strike at him with it? - No.

When did he take it from you? - I was down and he wrenched it out of my hand, I am quite sure; I am quite positive he was the man that took the stick out of my hand; I was so knocked down I could not speak a word, but a young man that is here came and helped me up; he was at a shop door, and saw the transaction, his name is John Ingre .

When was the man taken? - He jumped over an area; I did not see him jump over, but I saw him get out of the area; he was laying down on his back in the area, we knocked at the door, and a woman came up with a candle, that might be some few minutes after he knocked me down, about ten minutes.

When you saw him again within that ten minutes, had you then any doubt, upon your oath, whether he was the man or not? - I had no doubt at that time.

Did you find your handkerchief, or stick about him? - I understood nothing about the matter, he was not searched.

JOHN INGRE sworn.

About nine, on the fifteenth of May, I heard a noise against a door in Oxford-street, I live at No. 89, I saw some people assemble, and this gentleman in the kennel, I ran to his assistance, the prisoner was upon the gentleman using him very ill, I asked him what they were doing to him, and he did not make me any reply.

Did you know the prisoner before? - No, as soon as I got up to him, he had hold of one end of the stick; and Mr. Imberty the other, he threw him on the ground, when I came up to him, Mr Imberty let go the stick; I turned round to assist Mr. Imberty, I saw him strive to get up, but he fell down again, I lifted him, the prisoner got off and ran down Nags-head-yard, and turned up

London-mews, I saw him jump down an area, the left hand side of Queen-street, I was pursuing him all the way, I did not see what became of the stick; we knocked at the door, the gentlewoman came with a light, he was laying in the area, he got up, he said he had not robbed any body, I caught hold of his collar, then we took him, and he began to swear till he saw we were resolute, then he dropped down on his knees, and begged pardon; he was taken to the watch-house.

Had you threatened, or promised him any thing? - No, he never was out of my sight, he did not set off to run, till I got Mr. Imberty upright, he never was out of my sight till he jumped into the area.

Jury. When you took him to the watch-house, you gave him in custody of the serjeant of the watch? - Yes.

Was he searched? - He was not at that time.

Did the prosecutor accuse him of robbing him? - He gave charge of him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE

I was coming down Oxford-street, and saw this gentleman; two men were using him ill: Mr. Imberty struck me with a stick, and I laid hold of it, I know nothing of the handkerchief; the next morning he said it was a silk handkerchief; then he said it was a kind of a cotton handkerchief, worth about six-pence; then they fell a beating me over the shins, and I was taken; I expected my father here, but his business lay another way.

Court to Prosecutor. Recollect you are upon your oath, and that man's life is in danger; in this business, did you or not strike at any body, before you was knocked down? - No, I did not speak, or strike with my fist, or my stick.

Did you strike him on the shins at any time? - I might in my struggle, but I do not remember it, I did not strike at him.

Did he speak to you, and say why do you strike, in that way? - Not a word, not one person spoke to me.

Prisoner. The gentleman was in liquor? - I was not quite sober; but yet I understood what I was about.

Jury. In the charge that you gave to the officer; did you give charge as for an assault; or as for a robbery? - He gave it in, that he had lost a handkerchief and stick.

Jury. Then I conclude from that, that the man immediately searched him; because we are very particular upon those matters; I am one of the vestry of that parish.

Court. We have such instances? - Mr. Imberty did not take upon himself to say, that this man had taken his handkerchief; I saw him take the stick myself.

Did you see what he did with the stick? - No, I did not, nor I did not see what became of it at all.

Court. What was was the value of this stick? - I gave a shilling for it.

GUILTY, of the robbery .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-9

411. MARY LEWIS was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of May last, a pair of leather shoes, value 4 s. five pair of stuff shoes, value 15 s. a pair of leather pumps, value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Craydon ,

The prisoner was servant to the prosecutor, who lives in Drury-lane; and she pawned the shoes; the pawnbroker did not appear.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-10

412. THOMAS NEWBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th

of May , a bay mare, value 10 l. the property of Richard Maycock.

RICHARD MAYCOCK sworn.

I keep the Southampton arms , on the Hampstead road, on the 8th of May, I met the prisoner on the road returning home; he said will you sell your mare; I told him no, I did not want to part with her; then he asked me to let him have the mare to go to Hounslow; I knew him before; he asked me to let him have her the next day; I told him she was engaged; he asked me if he could have her on Friday, at eleven; I told him he might; he did not come that day, which was Friday, till about six in the evening; he told me he had been to Westminster-hall with his master; I belive he is a clerk to an attorney; I bought the mare of his master, whose name is Clapstone, an attorney, and he gave me a receipt in his master's name; he asked me if he could have her on Saturday to serve a subpoena for his master on a gentleman at Turnham-green; I told him the same gentleman was to have her on Saturday morning that had her on Thursday morning, but he would be at home about eleven and he might have her then; he said, that would do very well; he came on Saturday between one and two, and asked me if the mare was ready; I told him it was; the mare was saddled and bridled and brought to the door; then he went into the parlour and asked me what he should give me for her; I said you cannot give me left than three shillings; he said no, he could not give me less, but he had but one or two in his pocket, that he would call on his master as he came back, and then he would pay me; I delivered the mare to him at the door; and in about an hour or a half afterwards, a person came with the mare to the door, and said Maycock I have bought your mare, which made me surprised; I did not know the person at that time, but the person knew me before; and I said, it is very odd you should buy my mare; I have just let Mr. Clapstone's clerk have her to go to serve a subpoena at Turnham-green; when I went to the door and seized the share; I said the mare was my property, and insisted on having her; the person that bought her said I should not have her, but I took the mare and put her into the stable; then we both went before a magistrate at Bow-street, and laid information against the prisoner; he was taken on the 14th following, this was on the Saturday; I believe he was taken in Cumberland-street; Mr. Clapstone lives at No. 35, Union-street, Middlesex-hospital.

Prisoner. Did not you expect to be paid for her at the time I hired her? - I certainly did expect to be paid for her hire.

WILLIAM LADIN sworn.

I live in Tottenham-court-road; about a week or ten days before I bought the mare, the prisoner came into my cow-house, and he said, Maycock has a mind to sell the mare he bought of my master; I knew the prisoner before, from some business his master had transacted for me; I asked him what he asked for her; he said he thought he could get her for about six guineas; I said, then if he could, I would give six guineas for her, and he might tell Maycock so; he said he was going down, and he would mention it on Thursday; he came to my cow-house again, and said he had been speaking to Maycock about the mare, and that he thought he could get her for the six guineas, for he was d - d sick of her; on the Friday about five or half past, I cannot say to the time, I had been to Smithfield, and the prisoner overtook me and touched me on the side near Gray's-inn, and said how do you do? he said he had been speaking to Maycock again about the mare, and I might have her for the six guineas if I would; I told him I would go down then in the morning and pay him for her and fetch her away; he made answer, no do not go down in the morning to fetch her away, for as I am acquainted, may be I may get her for five guineas and a half, or

six pounds; if I should get her for six pounds says he, you will not grudge me the six shillings for my trouble; I told him I should not; we then parted; on the Saturday he came again with the mare into the yard; I was in the house taking my money; I was called out, and the prisoner said, well you see I have brought the mare; and he took a receipt out of his waistcoat pocket, and said D - n me I have bought the whole kit for six guineas, you shall give me half a guinea for my trouble; I told him I would not give him any more than five shillings; he said, d - n me, it is five shillings easy earned, you shall have her; he was by this time got down from the mare; I said, but she may be lamer than she was when I first saw her; I should like to see her go a yard or two, with that he rode her down the yard; I said, give her to my man, and come in, I will give you the money; I gave him five guineas, two half guineas, and two half crown pieces; I said I never bought a thing in my life, but I had always a shilling returned for luck; he threw half a crown a cross the table, and I gave him eighteen pence, and asked him to eat; he said he was in a hurry; he drank once, and wished me luck with my mare, and away he went; I went out to look at the mare after my business was done, and I said to my man, I think there is something particular, or Maycock would not part with her; I will take her to Maycock; I rode her very hard down the road; I knew she was spavined before; I found no defect; that rather caused a suspicion in myself that the man might not have come honestly by her; I knew the prisoner before; I knew Maycock was fond of the mare, at least I have heard say so; we went down to Bow-street and lodged an information against the prisoner; I know nothing of his being taken up, any further than the watchman told us they had got a man in custody for stealing a horse.

JOHN GREENWOOD sworn.

I am a watchman; we had heard that an information was laid; and I was told that Newby was wanted; I was not rightly sure in the man; a girl said she would not wish to be seen in it, but she would tell me where he was gone to sleep with a girl, which was No. 17, Cumberland-street; I went there on Wednesday about one or half after in the morning, and knocked a double knock; some woman said who is there; I told her it was a gentleman of Mrs. Molton's acquaintance; she said who are you; I said open the door, you will know me very well; she opened the door; I rushed in; says she do you come to rob the house? no my dear, says I, I am come after Thomas Newby ; says she he has been gone a quarter of an hour; we went up stairs, and there he was; I was not rightly sure of the man; I seized him by the collar; he owned that he was Mr. Clapstone's clerk; and he said what he had done he was sorry for.

JOHN GOUGH sworn.

I am a watchman; I was with Greenwood when he took Newby; I know nothing more than he does; I had received information where he was.

JOHN ROBERTS sworn.

On Thursday morning, the 8th of May, I was milking a cow in the cow-house; in comes Mr. Newby, and says how do you do Mr. Landin? I have been speaking to Maycock about the mare; you may have her for six guineas: Mr. Landin said very well; I was with my master, on the Friday returning from Smithfield; the prisoner came between Gray's-inn and Red-lion-square, and touches him on the side; he said, I have been speaking to Maycock for the mare, and I dare say you may have her for the six pounds or six guineas; Mr. Landin says I will come down; that passed on while Saturday; on the Saturday he came into the yard on the mare, and asked me for my master; says I, Sir, he is in the house; says he, go tell him there is a gentleman wants to speak to him; I told my master; he came out; the prisoner said I have brought the mare;

says Mr. Landin I see you have; says the prisoner, I have bought the whole kit for six guineas, give me half a guinea; no said he five shillings; he put his hand in his left hand pocket as he sat on horseback; he sold the mare and was paid for her by Mr. Landin.

SAMUEL BLANCHARD sworn.

I am a milkman; Thursday morning on the 8th of May, I came to the cow-house; Newby was there, and I heard him say to Landin, Maycock has a mind to sell the mare; says Landin, what do you think he will let her go for? says Newby six pounds or six guineas; I am going down to Maycock; I will mention it; Landin said you may do as you like; on the Saturday I was at Landin's, and the prisoner came in with Landin; I saw him pay him five guineas, two half guineas, and two half crowns, for the mare; Landin asked him to eat some buttock of beef; he said no, I am in a hurry; he drank once.

JOHN SWEARING sworn.

I know no more than I saw the money paid, five guineas, two half guineas, and two half crowns.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The first of my making application to Maycock for the mare, I went to him and spoke to him several times; Maycock was always complaining Mr. Clapstone had taken him in, and that she was not worth near the money; he had given twelve guineas for her.

Mr. Maycock. I have the receipt in my pocket.

Prisoner. That she was not worth the money, and that he had no objection to part with her, provided he could get enough for her; and one afternoon more particular, I believe when I was up at his house, Mr. Clapstone put the question to him, said if you are tired of your mare I believe Mr. Newby can get you a customer for it; Clapstone lodged at Maycock's house at the time he was very ill.

Court. Did he lodge there at the time this affair happened? - No, before that a week or a fortnight, Maycock was saying he was taken in, and Mr. Clapston said, I believe if you will give Newby a guinea or something to that purpose, he can get you a customer for her; I do not recollect positively, whether he at that time said he would part with her, but he had said he would part with her, for he had her to let out; as to all the evidence that had been given, I must admit of with respect to Maycock and also Landin, only whether Maycock does not recollect that I hired the mare, and Mr. Clapstone would prove that I certainly made application to Landin knowing the mare, and he very well knew that Maycock had been taken in; that she was not worth near the money; in consequence of that, I went and got the mare in the way that has been described, by hiring it; I was to give three shillings for the hire; she was so lame I dropped in at Landin's house, and told him I had bought the mare; I believe I might say so.

Court. But this is exactly the same story that the witnesses tell.

Prisoner. It is my Lord, I believe if I had made a return of the money, Maycock would have been satisfied.

Court. How came you to go off with the money.

Prisoner. My intention was to make a return, if it had not been for serving a friend, to whom I lent a part of it; I expected to be tried last night.

Court. Where is your master Mr. Clapstone.

Prisoner. I do not believe he is here; I believe I have made him an enemy on some business upon which the court was moved, and I made affidavit which I wish I had not done.

Court. Gentlemen of the jury, I cannot see any reason to distinguish this case from a similar case decided by the judges,

and acted upon ever since, which was a case of a person professing to him a horse, pretending to get that horse for the purpose of going to a certain place, to return that horse, and immediately going to sell the horse, without going to the place for which he had hired it; the jury found that prisoner guilty; upon which it was left to the judges, to say whether they were of opinion under the evidence, that he got possession of the horse merely for the purpose of converting it to his own use, under pretence of hiring it, and with a felonious intention to get possession of it, and the judges were unanimously of opinion, that in point of law, that was a felonious taking, although the delivery had been obtained from the proprietor: upon the authority therefore of that case; if you, gentlemen, are of opinion that this young man applied to Maydock for no other purpose but to get the mare into his possession, in order to sell her afterwards for money, and convert that money to his own use; upon that law which governs this case, it is my duty to tell you, that if that is your opinion on the evidence, the prisoner is guilty of the felony laid to his charge, in point of law; the question is, whether the evidence said before you, clearly satisfies your minds that the pains which this young man used to get Maycock to entrust the ward to his possession, under the pretence of going to Turnham-green to serve a subpoena, was a mere pretence, without any such intention in his mind at that time, and only made on purpose to get possession of the mare, in order to obtain the money by selling her; upon that the evidence to be sure is very strong, for in this case, the evidence of Landin proves an intention in the prisoner to sell the mare, before the first time of wanting to hire her to go to Haunshaw; and on the very same day he was applying to Maycock for the mare, on this very same day he was treating with Landin for the sale of her; one cannot help observing the extreme folly of the fact, for this unfortunate young man was known to both the persons with whom he was practising; he know he was personally known to Maycock; he knew he was personally known to Landin; they lived near each other, they knew each other; he told Landin it was Maycock's mare, therefore it was impossible he could have escaped detection, and he seems to have committed the fact with his eyes open in very uncommon degree; he made use of no false pretences to escape Landin; Landin knew the mare before, so that the utmost he could obtain by this, was the temporary possession of this money, at the risk of his life, and the chance of keeping out of the way; that extreme folly, to be sure, makes the story less probable, and renders stronger evidence necessary; but on consideration of the whole of the case, however foolish, and absurd, and mad the conduct of this young man has been, if it is sufficiently proved to your satisfaction, that the facts are true, the law must follow on those facts.

The Jury retired for a short time, and returned with a verdict.

GUILTY , Death .

Mr. Landin. My, Lord it is the wish of the prosecutor and myself to recommend him to mercy.

The Jury wished to recommend him for transportation an account of his youth and folly.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-11

413. WILLIAM JEWLIN was indicted for burglariously, and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Carter , about the hour of three in the morning, on the 13th of June ; the said, James Carter , and Mary his wife, and others in the same dwelling-house, then being, and stealing, an iron hammer,

called, a beating hammer, value 4 s. his property .

JAMES CARTER sworn.

I am a book-binder ; the prisoner broke open my house, and robbed one of a beating-hammer; I was called up in the morning a quarter after three, on Monday, the 13th of this month, by the watchman; I found the glass was taken out of the casement window of the kitchen, which looks into Bell-yard, Doctors Commons ; I had been in the kitchen the evening before; the casement was all whole then, I am sure; the property laid on a stone that I work with, behind the kitchen window.

Jury. Had you no shutters on the outside? - It is a ground floor; within-side there is one, but there is no fastening.

THOMAS HERRINGE sworn.

I am a watchman; that day, after I had called round my heat at three, it is general with us to patrole the other quarter till the half hour comes about; I was walking along Bell yard, facing Mr. Carter's house, and I saw the handle of something sticking up through the pallisadoes; I had the curiosity to put my hand, and lift it up; it was very heavy; I found it was a hammer, and I put it down in the same manner; I could see nobody; I stood at the door and saw the name of Mr. Carter, book-binder, and I judged it to be a beating-hammer; I went my beat, and came back again, and thought, what shall I do with this hammer? I will put it down and hide it; as I was putting it down, I saw the prisoner in the kitchen, through the window; I spoke to him; says I, do you belong to the house? he made no reply, neither did he wag or stir; I thought he might belong to the house; I saw the casement open, and I said, why don't you take the hammer in, somebody will steal it, or take it away; he made no reply, and I rather spoke louder, I thought he might be hard of hearing; he still made no reply; I did not know what to do with the hammer; I cast my eye round, and saw one of my partners, a watchman; then I let the hammer lay, and went towards the watchman; says I, a hammer lays here, and I have spoke to the people of the house, and they will not take it in I turned back to she him where the hammer was; one jumped out of the window, and jumped over the rails, a young lad in light coloured clothes, that was somebody that had been with the prisoner; I could not lay hold of him; I only saw the colour of his clothes; then the prisoner came out, very close after him; I saw him come out; then says I, I see what you are at, I will take care of you; he said, he was doing nothing at all, only getting down there to pick up a halfpenny; I alarmed the house and took him to the watch-house.

Jury. Are there any rails before the houses in Bell-yard? - Is was a wooden pallisadoe.

In what manner did the hammer lay on the pallisadoes? - The hammer lay on the inside, and the handle was through the pallisadoes.

JAMES SCHREENER sworn.

I know no further than patrolling round after three; I heard my partner speak to somebody in Bell-yard; I saw nobody then, because I was at a great distance afterwards, I saw one jumping out, and made his escape, and I will take my oath, I saw this lad come out.

RICHARD INGE sworn.

I rent the one pair of stairs of Mr. Carter; I was alarmed by the watchman; I immediately got up, and the watchman asked me, if this chap belonged to us; I know nothing but what I heard from the watchman; I saw the pane of glass, and the hammer in the watchman's custody.

THOMAS BRIGGS sworn.

I was constable of the night; I received the prisoner from the watchman; the prisoner never denied being in the house, not a word, till he came before the magistrate.

Court to James Carter . Who was last up in your house the night before? - I was.

Do you make a custom of fastening the doors and windows yourself? - Yes.

Were the doors of the house last that night? - They were, I am sure of that.

In what state was this window when you went to bed? - All fast.

Do you know whether the casement was shut, or not? - Yes; I will take my oath the casement was shut, and there was no pane broke; the next morning it was broke just facing the hasp of the casement, that made room for the hand to go in; I went to bed at eleven; I heard no alarm till the watchman called me; I heard a noise, which I supposed to be the cats, they do make a piece of work, there being a stable near; I heard that noise about three in the morning; I heard no noise before that; my wife was at home; her name is Mary.

(The hammer produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I saw the watchman at the area, and just as I came by, a man came out of the window, and knocked me down, and the watchman immediately took me; I have no witnesses to my character; I did not think of being tried to day; I have a father, he is a carpenter, and lives in Houghton-street, Clare-market; I work with my father.

GUILTY. Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering in the day time .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-12

414. THOMAS SALMONS was indicted for stealing, on the 20th of May , one carcass of a dead sheep, value 20 s. the property of Francis Preston and William Elsbee .

FRANCIS PRESTON sworn.

I am a butcher ; my partner's name is William Elsbee , I lost a carcase of mutton, on the 20th of May out of our cart

WILLIAM ELSBEE sworn.

I am partner with the last witness; I know nothing of it; I bought the sheep of Mr. King.

Mr. Peat, prisoner's counsel. Was you a partner at the time this sheep was lost? - Yes.

JOHN COUGH sworn.

I went to fetch the sheep from the market; I put it into the cart from Mr. King; it was eight in the morning, the 20th of May, when I went to fetch another, the first was stole; I went to look about for it, and one Mr. Kenrick told me where it was; I found one side of the sheep at Mr. Loosley's, in Aldersgate-street; the other side was gone; I could not swear to it; all I know is, I found a side of multon at Mr. Loosley's.

Mr. Peat. How many minutes was it before you returned with the second sheep? - About three minutes.

WILLIAM KENRICK sworn.

I saw the prisoner take a sheep out of the cart; I live opposite the market, where the cart stood; I had a suspicion of him, and I followed him to Mr. Loosley's, in Aldersgate-street; I immediately informed the man of it; I heard him ask a man at Mr. Loosley's, to give him leave to hang the sheep up; I went back with him to shew him Mr. Loosley's.

Mr. Peat. How far was you from the cart? - Between five and six yards; I was rather on an elevation; I was rubbing my windows.

Could you see the sheep as it laid in the cart? - I could not, but I could see him raise up the sheep; I am quite sure the prisoner is the man; when we got to Mr. Loosley's, the sheep was divided, and one half was gone.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn.

I saw the witness Couch take a sheep

from King's it was Preston's and Elbee's; I was present when he bought it

Mr. Peat. What business is the prisoner? - A butcher; he was 'prentice in Fleet-market.

Did the prisoner buy any carecases of you that day? - No.

WILLIAM FAWCETT sworn.

This prisoner came in the morning to Mr. Loosley's shop, and asked me to rest a sheep there; he said it was heavy, and he had to carry it as far as Islington; he brought it on his shoulder; then he asked me to lend him a tray, and he took away one side with him, and hung the other side up in the shop; he came back again in about three quarters of an hour after for the other side, and he was taken in the shop; I am sure he is the same man that brought the sheep, and hung it up.

Mr. Peat. Did you ever see him before? - Yes.

The sheep he cleaved in your shop? - Yes.

An open shop? - Yes; there was me and the other man who was writing.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been with a side of beef on a horse to my master's, and when I had been with the side of beef, I came back to Newgate-street; I had left my horse; I was standing looking at the horse, and a person came to me like a butcher, a lusty good looking man; he said, will you take this for me to Mr. Loosley's; I then cleaved it down, and took one side to Mr. Pigot's, Cow-cross, and left the other at Mr. Loosly's shop; when I returned, the person that employed me was not there.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17880625-13

415. FRANCIS DUFFY and JOHN JEMMETT , were indicted, for that they on the 10th of February , in a certain dwelling-house, in and upon James Barry , did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life; and taking from his person a man's hat value 14 s. the property of the said James .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-14

416. JOHN PLACE and FRANCIS HARRIS were indicted, for that they, on the 25th of May , in the king's highway, in and upon John Billing did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person a steel watch chain, value 8 d. a steel watch key, value 1 d. a base metal watch-key, a cambrick handkerchief, value 18 d. a linen pocket handkerchief, value 6 d. a silver watch, value 40 s. a crown piece, and 6 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , the property of the said John Billing .

JOHN BILLING sworn.

On the 25th of May, a little after eleven o'clock at night, as I was coming along between Tottenham-court road and St. Giles's Church , I was knocked down by one man, Place, and robbed by another.

Was any thing said to you before you was knocked down? - There was nothing said at all that I heard, I was stunned with the blow.

What was you knocked down with? - I took it to be a fist, they both held me down and rifled my pockets.

What did they take from you? - My watch, a crown piece, and 6 s. 6 d. in silver; the handkerchief off my neck, and a pocket handkerchief.

Did you call out? - No, I could not, being stunned with the blow; I laid there for half an hour, and never could see any more of them.

The men ran away? - I should suppose so.

Was you drunk? - A little, but not so drunk but I could remember something of it.

Did the man that knocked you down come behind you, or on one side of you, or meet you? - They met me.

Did you see the person that met you before he struck you? - No.

Then you did not see the persons so as to know them? - Yes, I knew them directly as soon as I saw them.

Was it a light night? - Not very dark.

Did you ever find your watch again? - Yes, my wife found it as a pawnbroker's.

How long were they rifling your pockets? - Not five minutes.

Had you ever seen the people before? - Not that I know of.

Then can you take upon yourself to know the people again? - Yes.

Were not you frightened? - Yes.

In that fright, being in liquor and stunned with the blow, two men you had never seen before, and in the night, can you pretend to say you know them again? - I know something of them.

When did you see the men again? - This was on the 25th, I saw them at the Justice's on the 27th.

For that two days you had not seen them? - No.

Prisoner Place. Will you venture to swear I was the man that knocked you down? - Yes.

Court. How do you know that, if you saw neither of them till after you were struck? - I did not remember them till afterwards.

But how can you tell if you are knocked down by a man that you don't see, and rifled by another, how can you say which it was that knocked you down? - I believe that was the man and I always shall.

But I want to know the reason of your belief? - I am sure he knocked me down, and the other rifled my pockets.

Prisoner Harris. Did you ever see me before? - Never before you picked my pocket.

Court. Are you sure he is the person? - Yes.

WILLIAM TOMLINSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; on the 26th of May, the prisoner Harris in company with Place, pledged this watch with me for twenty-five shillings.

Did you know them before? - Yes, the prosecutor's wife came to me and described the watch, the maker's name and number before she saw it.

Prisoner Place. Can you say that I was with Harris? - Yes, you came just within the door with him.

(The watch produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

WILLIAM BLACKETER sworn.

I am an officer; I had an information that two sweeps had knocked down a man on the Sunday night; I went on the 27th to the prisoner's lodgings, they lodge together in Buckeridge-street, St. Giles's, I found Place at home, I told him I wanted him, he said what for; I told him for a robbery; I tied his hands, and seeing a box in the room I asked him whose it was, he said it was Harris's; the box was opened and I found twenty shillings and a duplicate of a watch. (Producing it.)

To Tomlinson. Is that your duplicate? - It is.

PLACE's DEFENCE.

I was at a public-house; this young man came in and chucked down a guinea and asked me to drink with him, which I did, he said he had found a prize, I asked him what, and he said a watch, and, that he had pawned it for twenty-five shillings.

HARRIS's DEFENCE.

I found it under some mud early in the morning, I had it several hours, I did not know what to do with it, and I pawned it; the prosecutor said before the Justice that he could not swear to us.

To Billing. Did you say that before the Justice? - I did, I thought to have my property again without any farther trouble.

Then you chose to swear falsely to save yourself trouble? - I swore nothing that was not true.

Can you swear to them better now than you could then? - I have recollected since.

BOTH GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-15

417. ANN HARDIMAN and RACHEL HODDY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a cloth coat, value 10. a velvet waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 6 s. a man's hat, value 4 s. a pair of leather shoes, value 12 d. a pair of plated shoe buckles, value 4 s. a base metal knee-buckle, value 2 d. a base metal tobacco box, value 2 d. and 3 s. in monies numbered , the property of Nimrod Blampin .

NIMROD BLAMPIN sworn.

On the 7th of June, about eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner Hoddy in St. James's Park.

What was you doing there? - I was going home, I had been into Oxford Road.

Where do you lodge? - In Gravel Lane.

So you took St. James's Park in your way? - Yes.

You were very drunk I suppose? - I was not sober, nor I was not very drunk, I went home with Hoddy.

Did you know her before? - No; I gave her money to get salmon and beer for supper, and then we went to bed.

Did you undress yourself? - Yes, I put my breeches under my head, and the rest of my clothes on the bed, and my shoes and buckles and hat under the bed, I waked about seven o'clock in the morning, and found all my clothes gone, and I was locked into the room; I could not tell what to do, I would have jumped out of window, but I could not get down; I found a poker in the room, with which I broke open the door, and a soldier that lodged in the under room lent me some clothes to go home in; he and I went about to try to find my clothes but could not find them; as I was going home I was told that the woman was taken, I went back and found the prisoner Hardiman in custody; she owned where Hoddy was, and then Hoddy was brought to the office.

You only saw Hoddy the night before? - No, I went with Hoddy to a woman's where she had sold my shoes and hat; the Justice gave her the shoes and hat till the trial came on, and she has since run away, I found all the other things and they were produced before the Justice the next day.

Was you sober enough to know Hoddy again, think you? - Yes.

Are you sure of that? - Yes.

Thomas Hyndes , a pawnbroker, produced a pair of buckles; and deposed that he took them in pledge of the prisoner Hoddy.

James Kember , a pawnbroker, produced a coat, waistcoat and breeches, and deposed that he took them in of the prisoner Hardiman.

JAMES PAGAN sworn.

I am a constable, I had information of this robbery, and apprehended the prisoners in two public houses; I found upon Hardiman a tobacco box, two duplicates, the key of the room in which the man was locked, and a half crown, and five pence in half-pence, I found seven shillings and a penny half-penny upon Hoddy, which I gave to the landlord of the house for things that were broke, and rent that was owing.

(The things were all deposed to by the prosecutor.)

HODDY's DEFENCE.

This man went home with me, he was so much in liquor he could scarce stand, he told me to make away with the things for he had no money.

HARDIMAN's DEFENCE.

I never saw the man, this young woman told me a man had given her some clothes to pawn, and I went with her to pawn them.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Wilson.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17880625-16

418. CORNELIUS SHEENE was indicted for stealing a pair of corderoy

breeches, value ten shillings , the property of Isaac Barnett .

ISAAC BARNETT sworn.

I am a salesman . On the 26th of May, I lost a pair of breeches from my door, I was sent for in the evening to Justice Green's office, and there I saw my breeches.

When had you seen them before? - I hung them to the door in the morning myself.

RACHEL -

What age are you? - Sixteen.

Do you know the nature of an oath? - Yes.

SWORN.

I was servant to the prosecutor; on the 26th of May in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner take a pair of breeches from the door as I was sitting at the door at work, he ran away, and I ran after him; he dropped the breeches in the middle of Shakespeare Walk, somebody laid hold of him, but I don't know who.

Was he ever out of your sight till he was taken? - No, never.

(The breeches produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I saw a boy drop the breeches, and I picked them up.

GUILTY .

Whipped .

Aged twelve years.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-17

419. JANE WOLFE and ELIZABETH WHARTON were indicted for stealing, on the 5th of June , a penknife, value 1 d. two pair of nankeen breeches, value 10 s. 6 d. a striped dimity waistcoat, value 2 s. 6 d. four linen handkerchiefs, value 6 s. a pair of silk and cotton stockings, value 1 s. a pair of white silk stockings, value 4 s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 10 d. and two linen shirts, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Philips .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-18

420. DORCAS TALBOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , sixty yards of printed callico, value 40 s. the property of John Thwaites and John Fisher , privately in their shop .

SAMUEL OXENHAM sworn.

I live with Messrs. Thwaites and Fisher, linen drapers , the corner of Glasshouse-street and Swallow-street ; on the 20th of May the prisoner came to our shop, I was engaged and did not observe her go out, but I saw Mr. Lockyer, a fellow servant, go out in seeming haste.

Did you know her before? - Yes, she lived in the neighbourhood.

Who was in the shop besides you and Mr. Lockyer? - Mr. Fisher was in the shop, and I believe all the servants were in the shop, but I am not certain; I went out after Mr. Lockyer, and saw the prisoner in Swallow-street, a few yards from the shop; Mr. Lockyer stood by her, and I believe had hold of her, her face was towards me, she was in the attitude of returning; I saw the callico hanging below her cloak, so far below it as to discover the pattern of it; I took it from her, and conducted her back to the shop, she begged to be let go, and in the evening we took her to the watch-house.

THOMAS LOCKYER sworn.

I was serving some customers, one of them said she thought the prisoner had taken something away, I went after her, and Mr. Oxenham followed and took the print from her; we brought her back.

(The callico produced in court, and deposed to by Mr. Oxenham.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I make gentlemen's waistcoats; I had been into this shop of an errand, it is where I always dealt for things I want; when I came out of the shop I met a gentleman that I work for, who gave me this callico to make him some waistcoats; these gentlemen came up and said it was their's; the gentleman used to bring me the stuff, and fetch the waistcoats away again when done, so that I neither knew his name nor place of abode.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who had known her from her infancy, and gave her a very good character.

To Oxenham. Did she say any body had given it to her? - No, she entreated to be let go.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not privily .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17880625-19

421. THOMAS KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , two printed cotton gowns, value 10 s. the property of James Read .

ELIZABETH READ sworn.

I am the wife of James Read , I live in Exeter-street , Strand. On the 19th of May, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, as I was sitting at work in my shop, I saw a man in the parlour, I staid about two minutes to see what he would do; I saw him draw two gowns out of a basket that stood in a chair in the parlour; I ran towards the parlour, and he got up into the window and threw the gowns down the area; he jumped out of the window, and I jumped out upon him, and held him down till I got assistance.

Did you see the gowns? - Yes, I saw them both in the area.

(The gowns produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

WILLIAM TURVILLE sworn.

I heard an alarm of thieves, I went into the prosecutrix's yard, and saw her with the prisoner under her struggling, we took him to Bow-street.

GEORGE TURRET sworn.

I assisted the last witness in taking the prisoner to Bow-street.

JOHN JONES sworn.

I assisted the two last witnesses in taking the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was very much in liquor, I don't know how I came in the place; I don't know that I meddled with the property.

To Jones. Did he appear to be in liquor? - No.

Turville. I saw him at a public-house just before, but he was no more in liquor than he is now.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-20

422. JOHN RENSHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of Joseph Louch , in his dwelling-house .

It appeared from the evidence, that the prosecutor was a publican , that his dial was repairing, and that he went out and left his watch in the bar, there being nobody to mind the house but the pot-boy and a little girl; that the prisoner, who was a neighbour, came in for a pail of water, which the boy went to fetch for him; that there was a woman came in

about the same time as the prisoner did, to whom there was not much attention paid by the boy; the Jury, therefore, found the prisoner

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-21

423. JANE WOOLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , a cotton gown, value 10 s. a pair of stays, value 10 s. the property of Ann Lloyd .

The prosecutrix was called, but not appearing, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-22

424. SAMUEL WARNER was indicted for being found at large in the city of London, on the 19th of March last, before the expiration of the term for which he had been ordered to transport himself .

(The certificate of the former conviction read.

The King's signed manual read.

The recognizance entered into by the prisoner and his security read.)

JAMES SHAKESHAFT sworn.

I heard that the prisoner was a person suspected of returning from transportation; I got some more officers, and we went and took him in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, we asked him his name, he told us some name, I don't know what, but it was not Warner.

JOHN OWEN sworn.

The prisoner was tried here in December, 1784, and capitally convicted.

That you know? - Yes.

Are you quite sure he is the same lad? - I am positive, he was afterwards pardoned on condition of transporting himself for seven years to America; he was discharged on the 5th of May, 1785.

Do you know what he was tried for? - For stealing a coffee-pot and some other articles; he was discharged in consequence of the Recorder's warrant.

THOMAS SHELTON , Esq. sworn.

Do you know the Recorder's handwriting? - Yes.

Is that his hand-writing (shewing him the warrant)? - Yes, it is.

(The Recorder's warrant for his discharge read.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was the person who was convicted, and I went to Charlestown, when I came there, the merchant I was recommended to, Mr. Parker of Charlestown, had made away with himself, about a fortnight before I got there; I remained there as long as I could, but it is a difficult matter to get a living there, and I was obliged to return; I have been on board the Ganges, one of his Majesty's ships, for a considerable time, since I have returned.

GUILTY , Death .

(Aged nineteen years.)

Recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the Jury.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-23

425. WALTER THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , four glasses, called carriage glasses, value 40 s. the property of Thomas Wheatley .

THOMAS WHEATLEY sworn.

I am a coach-maker in Oxford-street ;

on Friday morning the 30th of May, we lost four glasses out of two carriages.

When had you seen them before? - The night before, there were two coach glasses, and two belonging to a vis-a-vis, two of them were broke and some pieces were left behind, I was informed that the prisoner had been seen with them.

WILLIAM SECKER sworn.

I am a coach-maker, I met the prisoner between four and five o'clock in the morning, with two carriage door glasses and some broken pieces under his arm.

Did you know him before? - Yes, I have worked with him, I called to him, but he made no answer.

Are you sure it was him? - Yes.

Did you see his face? - Yes.

What became of him? - He went on, I thought no more of it, till I heard Mr. Wheatley had lost some glasses.

GEORGE EADES sworn.

I am a coach-maker in Camomile-street; on Friday the 30th of May, about eleven o'clock in the morning I observed the prisoner passing my house with a quantity of coach glass under his arm.

Did you know him before? - Yes, I have known him twenty years, he is a journeyman coach-maker, having heard but an indifferent character of him, I suspected him, and watched where he went to, he turned into Mr. Dick's a joiner, about half a dozen doors from me, I went there but he was gone, he had left the glasses; Mr. Dick was not at home.

What glasses were they? - Two carriage-door glasses and some broken pieces, I desired he might be stopped when he came again; in the afternoon he came and told Mr. Dick he was very well known to me, and Mr. Dick brought him to me, I asked him how he came by the glasses, he said he had them of his son-in-law, I asked him what business his son-in-law was, he said he was in the horse-hair manufactory, I told him I thought it was strange such a person should have coach-glasses to sell; I told him he could have no objection to Mr. Dick's keeping the glasses till he fetched his son-in-law, he said he thought it perfectly right, and he went away; he came again on Monday; in the mean time I heard Mr. Wheatley had lost some glasses, and he was stopped on the Monday, and taken before a magistrate.

Mr. Dick confirmed the evidence of Mr. Eades, and deposed, that when the prisoner came again on the Monday, he brought a young man with him, who said he had used him ill in stopping his property, but not the person that he pretended was his son-in-law, that he was then taken into custody.

(The glasses produced in court.)

ROBERT MURLESS sworn.

I am journeyman to Mr. Dick, I took the glasses of the prisoner, the first time he came my master was out, that is all I know.

To Wheatley. Have you any mark by which you can know these glasses? - No, but I have some of the broken pieces that were left behind (producing them), the edges of which when laid together exactly correspond with those the prisoner left at Mr. Dick's.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

On the Thursday night I went to Oxford Road, to an old master of mine, to endeavour to get into the Charter-house; I met a coachman that I had known fourteen years ago, with these glasses under his arm; I bought them of him for a guinea, I thought I should get a shilling or two by them, though I did not very well know the value of it. I have worked with Mr. Eades when he was a journeyman.

To Wheatley. Did the prisoner ever work for you? - No, he had worked at the next shop below mine.

Where were the carriages standing from which the glasses were taken? - In the shop.

Jury. Was the door broke open? - No, the prisoner had been seen about the shop over night, and in the morning the shop door was found open, we had heard a great noise in the night, and I got up, and searched the shop, but among such a vast number of carriages as we have, a person might easily conceal himself.

Have you any witnesses to prove that? - No, I did not wish to take his life.

To Seeker. Whereabouts was it you saw the prisoner that morning? - A very little way from Mr. Wheatley's shop, he was going towards the city.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-24

426. JOHN ROBOTHEM was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of June , nine pounds weight of iron, value 18 d. the property of Jeremiah Smith .

JEREMIAH SMITH sworn.

I am a smith ; on the 6th of June, I lost about nine or a dozen pound of iron; I found it on the prisoner; he worked for me about three weeks; a few days after he came to work for me, I missed a many pieces of new iron, and other articles; I received information of the prisoner; that confirmed my suspicions; this man had several times pretended to be taken suddenly ill; and I had reason to believe he was loaded with some of my goods; on the 6th of June, I saw the prisoner secret some iron in his breeches; I then was satisfied he was the person that was robbing me; I let him go and looked in the shop; I followed him, and met Harper the officer, and laid hold of the prisoner; he was taken to the justices, and the property was taken out of his breeches; there was an old broad axe dropped from his breeches as we were carrying him to the justices; there an officer searched him, and took out three or four pieces of iron; he was going further to search him; the prisoner said, I will take it out myself, and he drew out another piece from the side of his breeches, and it was laid with the rest; then he was committed.

Court. Can you tell distinctly what you saw him put into his breeches? - No, I only saw him put some iron in; the prisoner confessed the iron was mine; me and my man know the broad axe; this piece I marked over-night; I can swear to it.

Prisoner. When he committed me to New-prison, which was Friday; did not I ask him for a shilling the day before.

Prosecutor. I was in the foreshop; I came from a neighbour's where I had an opportunity of watching him; he turned about seemingly confused at meeting me, and said, Sir, I will be obliged to you for a shilling; I said, you will have it at night; he said very well.

Court. Did he ask you for a shilling the day before? - I do not recollect.

JOSEPH IZORD sworn.

I and several other men watched him, and I saw him take away something in his breeches; then he went out, and my master and me followed him, and gave him to Harper, and going along I saw the axe drop from him; I served my apprenticeship there, and I know this axe; I heard him confess before the justice, that the iron was his master's property.

JOHN HARPER sworn.

I am an officer; I was at the justices; I heard him confess; nothing was taken down in writing to my knowledge; I saw the axe drop from him.

Court. Did you make him any promises or threats? - No, none, he said, he should not have taken it if his master had let him have a shilling.

Izord. I heard him say he took the iron to get some dinner, as his master would not give him a shilling.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I asked my master on Thursday morning for a shilling, and at noon for a shilling,

and he had no money; I was faint with working hard, and I went home and pawned a shirt; I went there on Friday and asked Mr. Smith for a shilling, and I took this iron to get me a little dinner, thinking to pledge it till I should get some money from Mr. Smith on his return; and in the mean time he took me; if I had chose to have sold it, I passed several old iron shop; my master owes me seven shillings and seven pence; I sent to him for it since I have been in confinement; he said, if I got clear he would pay me, if not, I might go to the devil.

Prosecutor. That is all false.

Court. Did he apply to you for a shilling on the Thursday? - I have no recollection of it; they usually have their money in an evening; there is about five shillings and eight pence due to him, which I will pay him; I have been almost ruined by these men; he took the iron first, and asked me afterwards.

GUILTY. 10 d.

Whipped .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-25

427. HUMPHREY THORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 8th of May last, an iron chest, lock, and key, value 1 s. a pair of leather half-boots, value 1 s. a mahogany watch-case, value 6 d. a rule, value 1 s. a key, called a blank, value 6 d. an iron pick-lock, value 3 d. two brass images, value 3 d. one iron screw driver, value 6 d. and four pounds weight of iron, value 4 d. the property of Jeremiah Smith .

JEREMIAH SMITH sworn.

I know the prisoner; he worked for me about six months; I found a parcel of things, as many as a man can stand under, at his lodgings, by a search warrant.

(All the things produced and deposed to.)

The prisoner was taken into custody; he fell a crying, and begged for mercy; said he would be a faithful servant to me, and never serve me so again; he said, I should have no reason to repent of overlooking it, if I would be so good to forgive him, and take him into my service again; I asked him how he could expect forgiveness from me, when I had been so very much distressed; I told him, I could not do any such thing; I had been almost ruined; I was present at the apprehending of the prisoner, and I knew the things.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

No man upon earth can swear to that piece of iron; it is a piece of new bar-iron; that watch-case that lays there, the boy brought out one day to burn, and he gave it me; I took it home, and had it repaired, and kept it on the mantle-piece, and the half-boots he was going publicly to sell to the shop's company; they were all mouldy; I bought them for six pence; the witness knows that; as to the other tools, Mr. Smith knows that he never checked me for carrying tools in my pocket; I had several articles; I was paid off from a man of war; I have a whole chest of tools; and I did my endeavour to do a little business for myself when I was out of work; I never took any thing with intent to keep it; the Monday before I was taken, I went to six a gate, and I did not return to the shop that night, there is a whole chest of tools now at the justices.

Court. Did the apprentice boy offer to sell the half-boots? - I did not hear him.

Were these half boots left about the shop, mouldy and not used? - I never saw them mouldy.

Were they left in the shop for the apprentice to do what he pleased with? - No, they were left off to be mended, and the apprentice might wear them; I cannot say he did not; I never saw him wear them; he seldom works with me; I know nothing of the watch-case.

Did you ever see it in pieces? - The prisoner put this bit on.

JOHN HARPER sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner and found the property; some of the things were in a chest locked with two lock.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-26

428. THOMAS WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of May , a printed cotton waistcoat, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Sanders .

The prisoner was seen taking the waistcoat from the prosecutor's shop door, and was taken directly with it.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-27

429. WILLIAM CHATWIN and JOHN DAVIS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Samuel Hill , on the king's highway, on the 17th of June last, and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a pair of men's leather shoes, value 12 d. a pair of buckles, value 6 d. a pair of spectacles, value 2 s. a paper case, value 2 d. a cotton handkerchief, value 2 d. a six-pence and four-pence halfpenny, his property .

SAMUEL HILL sworn.

On the 17th of this month, about eleven at night, on the Acton road , two men laid hold of me; they came along with me from Oxford road; they overtook me at the Pantheon, about ten; I was sitting upon the stops a little in liquor; they came up to me there, and asked me where I was going to; I replied, to Acton; then they said, we are going to the King's-arms, at Acton bottom; we went up as far as Argyle-street, and I treated them with a pint of beer; then we went to Witham, as far as Norton-hill; when we got there, they threw me down, and rifled my pockets; there were two men coming towards us, and then they let me go, after they had taken the things mentioned in the indictment; I then told the two men of it, and they went off for London, and the prisoners followed me for half a mile, till they came near a ditch, where they threw me, and said, d - n your eyes I will have your shoes and buckles; which they took, and my breeches, and I was obliged to go without them; the patrol was then coming up, and they let me go; on my getting out of the ditch, I spoke to the patrole, who followed them; they were taken, and I saw them the next morning at Bow street; I know them again by having seen them at the public-house; and their dress, one of the prisoners ( John Davis ) was in a soldier's coat; and the other in a brown one; they are both soldiers; I only know Davis by his red coat; the things I lost were produced.

DANIEL GRANT sworn.

On the 17th of this month, coming from Acton we saw two men crossing the fields; there we stood about half a minute; during that time the prosecutor crawled out of the ditch; he was then ten yards from us; we asked him who he was; he says, they have robbed me, and thrown me into the ditch; we followed the two men, and lost them; we pursued them, and overtook

them near the Gravel-pits, at Tyburn turnpike; it was about half an hour after we first lost sight of them; I let them go on till I got to Tyburn turnpike, where I apprehended them; I searched them, and found upon Davis, a six-pence in silver, three-pence in halfpence, a penny piece, and a farthing; I found on them likewise, one shoe, one buckle, one handkerchief, a pair of spectacles, a spectacle case, a small white bag; on the other prisoner, I found a shoe and a buckle; here is the property, (producing them;) I took them to the watch-house.

(The property produced and sworn to.)

Christopher Greenland was with the last witness, but not when they were taken.

PRISONER's DEFENCE

The things we picked up, as we were coming from Richmond.

LLOYD YOUNG sworn.

I am a serjeant in the guards, I know both the prisoners, who are good soldiers and honest upright men.

WILLIAM WHITE sworn.

I am a serjeant in the guards, I know Davis, who is a good soldier and an honest upright man, he has lodged with me and always behaved well.

JOHN DICK sworn.

The prisoner Davis is an honest man.

SARAH WHITE sworn.

I have known Davis ever since he was child, and the other prisoner these ten years past.

Prisoner Davis. My Lord I would wish you should ask the prosecutor whether he ever had any body tried at this bar on the same subject.

Prosecutor. Yes, about Christmas last, I prosecuted two men, and they got off because a Mr. Garrow was their counsel.

BOTH GUILTY , DEATH .

The prisoners were humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-28

430. JOHN EVANS was indicted for stealing four silver spoons, value 30 s. and one marrow spoon, value 8 s. the goods of John Appleton .

JOHN APPLETON sworn.

I live in Hatton-garden ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; on Friday morning last, I was informed by my servant, when I came down, that there was a person in the kitchen who wanted to speak with me; I desired he might come up to me in the parlour; he then told me that I had been robbed of the things in the indictment, and shewed them to me; his name is Henry Aston ; he is the constable.

HENRY ASTON sworn.

Between six and seven on Friday morning last, one Perryn, a chimney-sweeper, called to me to take the prisoner into custody; it was at the bottom of Kirby-street; when I went he had three table spoons, and a marrow spoon in his hand, and said he took them from the prisoner; I then searched the prisoner, and found another spoon on him, which matched with the other three.

HENRY PERRYN sworn.

I am a chimney sweeper; on Friday morning in Kirby-street, between six and seven, on hearing the cry of stop thief, having my brush under my arm. I struck at him, and my fellow-servant assisted me in taking him; he threw three silver

spoons, and a marrow spoon out of his pocket; I took him to the barber's shop in Kirby-street, and sent for a constable, and examined him.

RICHARD GOODWIN sworn.

I was taking dust from out of Mr. Appleton's; I saw the prisoner come out of the parlour; I suspected him, and called out stop thief; the chimney-sweepers took him to a barber's-shop.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am a green-grocer about the streets; having had a little money left me, please you my Lord, I was walking along, and the chimney-sweepers took me to a barber's shop, and one of them put a silver spoon in my pocket.

Court. Have you any witnesses.

Prisoner. Please you my Lord Sir, to give me till to-morrow morning and I will bring plenty; I will bring a great number; they have been here waiting till now.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-29

431. ANN GIBSON was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of May , ten yards of chintz cotton, value 15 s. and ten yards of muslin, value 15 s. the goods of William Edward Dalton , and John Barber .

WILLIAM EDWARD DALTON sworn.

I am a linen draper , in partnership with Mr. John Barber; on the 22d of May, I lost the goods mentioned in the indictment; I know no more; I only came to prove the property.

THOMAS BARBER sworn.

I am shopman to the prosecutors; on the 22d of May, about three o'clock, I was in the back ware-house; and a young man, fellow for handcuff shirt, requested me and said, there were two women and a girl in the shop in company together, whom he had suspicion of; I came forward, and the prisoner was being served with some Irish; I looked at them for about two minutes, and not observing any thing, I went to the other side of the counter, and saw the girl pick a piece of chintz cotton up from off the ground, and on her being observed she put it on the counter, and said it had fallen down; this confirmed my suspicions, and I desired them to walk backwards that I might send for a constable to search them; on the prisoner's going backwards, she went rather stooping as if endeavouring to conceal something; I desired her to walk along, and on her rising, I saw the piece of muslin which her clothes hid before; there was nothing else found on her, or the other two; I sent for a constable, and they were all taken to the compter; I delivered the goods to the constable; the grand jury, I have been informed, did not find a bill against the other two.

- DANIEL sworn.

I am another servant of the prosecutor's; the prisoner came into the shop with another woman and a little girl; they went to the apprentice for half a yard of Irish, and he being busy, desired me to serve them, which I did; when I had served them, they desired to look at some muslins which were lying on the counter with some other goods; after they had looked a while, I missed the girl, upon which I looked over the counter, and saw the girl stooping, and she looked at me, and was very much confused; I then whispered one of my fellow-servants to go for Mr. Thomas Barber , who was in the back warehouse, as I then had my suspicions; Jones (the woman that was with the prisoner) says, why do not you get up; she did not; I looked over the counter again, and she appeared much confused indeed, the third time I did so, and then she lay this piece of chintz on the counter, which

was very dirty; then the witness Barber jumped over the counter, and shut the shop doors, and told them they were his prisoners, and desired them to walk backwards; I followed, and just before they got to the warehouse, I saw the witness Barber pick up this piece of muslin; it was close by the prisoner.

Court. How far was Jones, the other woman, from the prisoner? - About two or three yards; the muslin was given to the constable, and the chintz was put in a cupboard; the constable's name is Jones; I know the property by the shop mark.

Thomas Barber , being called again, also swore the property to be the prosecutor's by the shop mark upon it.

WILLIAM BRITTAIN sworn.

I was standing behind the counter; I saw the prisoner and two others come into the shop; they asked to look at some Irish; I took down some pieces; there was another lady on the other side of the counter, who bought some muslin; the muslins were left on the counter; while I was folding up the Irish Mr. Barber went on the other side of the counter, and I heard him say, ladies, you have got something you have no business with; and he took them backwards to search them; and as they were going to be searched, I saw him with a piece of muslin in his hand, which had dropped from the prisoner, and he said,

"ladies, I have caught you," and they were taken into custody; the muslin was given to Jones the constable; I know the property.

EDWARD JONES sworn.

I am a constable; (produces the muslin) it was given to me when I was sent for to take the prisoners.

The property sworn to by Dalton and Barber.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. ROSE.

Reference Number: t17880625-30

432. ANN BLORE was indicted for stealing, on the 10th of June , a black silk cloak, value 10 s. a callico gown, value 10 s. a shawl, value 12 d. a sheet, value 6 s. a napkin, value 6 d. a cotton shirt, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Minty Randall .

A second Count. For stealing two flat irons, value 1 s. 3 d. the property of the said Minty Randall.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-31

433. JOHN POVEY was indicted for stealing, on the 5th of May , one silk cloak, value 5 s. one-linen gown, value 4 s. two cotton bed-gowns, value 3 s. two linen aprons, value 4 s. one shift, value 2 s. one cotton half shawl, value 1 s. one dimity petticoat, value 12 s. one cloth coat, value 5 s. the property of Ruth Levy , widow .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-32

434. JAMES MATTHEWS , WILLIAM WRIGHT , and WILLIAM REYNOLDS were indicted for stealing, on the 17th of June , six frocks, value 2 s. two pair of stays, value 2 s. two shawls, value 2 s. two aprons, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Hurst .

The prisoner Wright was found with the things, and the other two prisoners were in company.

ALL THREE GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-33

435. ALEXANDER CONCHER , WILLIAM GRAVELEY , and THOMAS CRAIG were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Reckshaw , on the king's highway, on the 7th of June , and putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, one yard, three quarters, and three nails of woollen cloth, value 33 s. one half crown, one shilling, and five halfpence , his property.

It appearing from the evidence, that the prosecutor was too much intoxicated to be positive to any of the prisoners, they were all three ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-34

436. ANN BRADY was indicted for stealing, on the 26th of May , one linen work-bag, value 1 d. one half crown, one French half crown, and five shillings , the property of William Mather .

The prisoner came to live servant with the prosecutor, on the 22d of May, from a register office; on the 26th the prisoner was seen at the prosecutor's desk, and the money was afterwards found in the prisoner's box, in a housewife of Mrs. Mather's; Jane Evans saw the prisoner at the desk; the desk was open, which the prosecutor's wife was quite sure she locked and put the key in her pocket.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-35

437. WILLIAM EATON was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , a Cheshire cheese, value 20 s. the property of Strother Allen .

The prisoner dropt the cheese in the presence of the prosecutor, and was soon afterwards taken by him.

(The prisoner called eight witnesses to his character.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-36

438. JANE WYLAE was indicted for stealing on the 28th of April , a gold mourning ring, value 8 s. the property of Richard Carpenter .

RICHARD CARPENTER sworn.

I live at No. 16, Aldgate High-street, I lost a mourning ring on the morning of the 28th of April, about nine o'clock in the morning; I am an engraver, and a dealer in jewellery , I had made this ring for a neighbour, and had sent it home the Friday before, and the gentleman sent it back to me with another for some alteration, and a mad bullock being driven by, a parcel of people run into the shop, I went round the counter; I was much confused at so many people coming in, and I laid down the one ring by the other, the people then went away; I forgot the two rings thro' the confusion, and put some others away; soon after I wanted one to send to a workman to alter, and then recollected it; a Mr. Bunn brought me one of them at five o'clock on the same evening; I know it to be the ring, because it was the only one that had been made for the family.

Mr. BUNN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I had the ring of Ann Deer ; she brought it me on the 28th of April, about five in the afternoon, and I stopped it; the daughter of the prisoner was with her; I saw the name of Colebatch on the ring, with the day of his

death, age, &c. I enquired and heard the ring belonged to Mr. Carpenter.

ANN DEER sworn.

I carried the mourning ring to Mr. Bunn's, I got it from the prisoner between the hours of five and six, I chare for her; I was passing by the door, and she asked me if I would go of an errand to pledge the ring for her, I took it to Mr. Bunn's and he refused it, I told him I had it from the prisoner; I then went back, and the prisoner sent her daughter, who is about ten years of age, with me.

Mr. Knowlys. You was the first that was stopt with the ring? - Yes.

And desired to give an account of it? - Yes.

How came Mrs. Wylae to ask you why you did not come on the Monday, was not she angry with you? - She was.

Did not she use hard names? - No, she did not.

I shall soon make that appear, will you swear she did not? - She did not.

Then she was not angry? - Not that I know of.

Which do you mean to say, you have sworn both? - I do not know she was.

Court. Was she displeased? - She was a little or so.

Well, do not you know, that if you had not shifted this ring to Mrs. Wylae, you must have answered for it, and been tried for it? - I do not know, she took it off her finger and gave it me.

Court. When you was first questioned about the ring, did not you know that unless you produced the person who gave it to you, you would have been liable to have been tried for it yourself? - Yes, my Lord; I did.

Mr. Knowlys. What do you mean by your having said you never was in a scrape before; do you mean you never was taken up? - I never was.

When you returned from Bunn's, was she at home? - She was.

You was taken into custody? - I was; I was in the Counter from Monday till Saturday.

THOMAS WITHERS sworn.

I am a constable, and was sent for by Mr. Bunn about this ring, and he gave me charge of the last witness, and the prisoner's daughter, and gave me the ring; I took the girl and the last witness to the Counter; she said she had it from Mrs. Wylae.

Court to Carpenter. Did you ever see Mrs. Wylae before you saw her before the Lord Mayor? - I did not; I never saw either the prisoner's daughter or Ann Deer before.

Bunn. I have known Wylae before: after charging the prisoners, I was going to her house, I called on Withers, and I perceived some body watching at the front of her door in Petticoat-lane, which I am sure is the prisoner, on her observing me, she went backwards and went out the back way; I did not see her for a fortnight afterwards, when she surrendered herself.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Mr. Bunn is not certain as to my person, for he took a Mrs. Ward into custody for me; I am a widow woman with a large family.

Bunn. It is totally false.

Withers. There was no woman in the house that resembled Mrs. Wylae.

Ann Jenkins . I have known the prisoner some years, she was always a hard working woman, and has a large family.

David Davis says the same.

Robert Evans has known the prisoner six years, is a worthy honest industrious woman.

Frances Jenkinson has known the prisoner twenty-four years, is a worthy honest and industrious character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-37

439. EDWARD WILLAN was indicted for stealing on the 10th of May , one canvas bag, value one penny, two guineas, ten half-guineas, one crown piece, five half-crowns, and eight shillings and sixpence, the property of Stephen Bolton , privily from his person .

(The witnesses examined apart.)

STEPHEN BOLTON sworn.

I went into the stable to lay down to sleep by my horses, and there was the prisoner concealed under a truss of straw, he said, halloo; I knew the prisoner before, he was horse-keeper to my master; when I waked, I had no money in my pocket; my money was in my breeches-pocket when I laid down, in a canvas bag; I looked to see for the prisoner when I missed my money, and he was gone, I went and enquired for the man, I never found my bag again; the prisoner said he had beaved it away in Milk-street; he was taken the same night, on the 10th of May, in Chick-lane, when he was taken I charged him with it; he said he had only five penny worth of halfpence about him; and denied having my money; we brought him to the watch-house on Snow-hill, and there the constable examined him and found this money in his breeches pocket, he found 4 l. 10 s. there was a new guinea, a new half-guinea, and a crown piece which my master gave me a short time before, which I had scratched two or three times over the head, and there were two guineas, two half-guineas, a crown piece, 8 s. and 6 d. in silver, and a bad shilling; I had marked the crown piece which my master gave me for a pocket piece, because I would not part from it; a man offered me 5 s. and 6 d. for it, several persuaded me to have my name engraved in it; I said I would, so I took and scratched it three times athwart the head.

Court. Are you sure that the crown that was found in his pocket was yours? - Yes, the prisoner owned it.

Were any promises made to him to induce him so to do? - No, Sir; there was nothing said, he said he looked upon it to be my property.

Mr. Garrow, prisoner's counsel. You said that he looked upon it to be your property, that was what he said? - Yes.

Did not he say at the same time that he had found it in the yard? - Yes, not in the yard, he said he found it laying down by me.

Why do you not tell us all that he said? - Tell it all!

Mr. Garrow. When the judge asked you just now whether any thing was said; you said, why no, nothing was said to induce him: was not it said that he had better tell the whole story, and no harm should come to him, and that he should not be hurt? - No, Sir, there was nothing said of that sort, there is no harm come of it.

He told you he found the bag in the stable, and looked upon it to be your property? - Yes, when I first came home he was in the tap-room, he appeared to me to be sober enough.

Was he sober when you went and took him? - As sober as I am now, and I am sure I am not drunk.

Was the stable door open the whole time you was there? - The stable door was open, it was not dark.

Jury. When did the man own he had thrown the bag away in Milk-street? - After he was taken.

Court. Where is the stable? - The Three Cups in Bread-street.

Mr. Garrow. How long have you known this man? - I cannot say how long, he did live at our house as horse-keeper.

SAMUEL ROBERTS sworn.

I went to take the prisoner, I searched him, and found this money in his right-hand breeches-pocket; I put it on the table, and Mr. Ashmore our ward beadle, immediately covered it with his hand; I then asked the prosecutor what pieces of money he had lost; he said a new guinea, a new half-guinea, a crown piece, and

some half-crowns; the prosecutor owned the crown piece, and said it was a present from his master; I asked the prisoner what he had done with the bag, and he said he threw it away in Milk-street.

(The money shewn to the court.)

Court. Where did you scratch this crown piece? - Athwart the neck.

How many marks on the neck, and how many off? - I cannot say, I cannot say whose quine it is; I cannot read or write, this is the very piece. (Shewn to the Jury.)

Roberts. The prisoner in the watch-house said it was the prosecutor's money, and that he had found it in the straw.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Jury. When the prisoner was taken, and the money taken out of his pocket, did the prosecutor describe it? - Yes.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-38

440. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , five quart pewter pots, value 5 s. thirteen pint ditto, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Martin .

THOMAS MARTIN sworn.

I keep the Anchor and Crown, Fleet-Market , I know of losing the pots, the prisoner did not take them out of my house, they were lost from a neighbour's door.

The prisoner was taken with the pots upon him, which were produced and sworn to.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

After what has passed I have nothing to say, I was in distress at the time I took them, I acknowledge myself guilty; my situation is so that I have strayed from my friends, and nobody knows my present situation.

Court. Where do you belong to? - To London.

How have you got your livelihood? - By selling things with a horse and cart; I have kept my situation unknown to the world, because I thought if ever I obtained my liberty, it would be the means of hindering my getting my bread.

Owen. My Lord, this man was tried here by the name of John Williams ; I remember he was convicted here before and whipped.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-39

441. WILLIAM HOWE and JAMES HYNDES were indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May last, fifty pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. belonging to William Wilkins , and affixed to a certain building of his, called a slaughter-house, against the statute .

BOTH ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-40

442. LAWRENCE KELLY was indicted for stealing, on the 9th of May last, two silver table forks, value 20 s. and one silver desert spoon, value 3 s. the property of James Campbell .

The prisoner was taken with the property.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-41

443. THOMAS BEADLE was indicted, for stealing on the 23d of May , a yard of wrapper cloth, value 10 d. fifty-two yards of cloth, value 24 l. ten cotton shawls, value 10 s. ten yards of buckram, value 10 s. the property of Abraham Birch .

RICHARD DAVIS sworn.

I am a waggoner, I drive the waggon of Mr. Birch, I know the prisoner from the time of the robbery, when I first saw him which was the 23d of May, as I was going up Oxford-road between the Green Man and Still, I was looking to see whether every thing was right, and I saw the prisoner about thirty yards distance, it was between four and five in the morning; he was on the foot pavement walking after the waggon; but I little thought he had any ill design, I went up again to my horses, and in the space of five minutes, for it was not more I am sure, then I came back again behind the waggon to see as all the things were right mind I saw the prisoner up in the waggon robbing it; he had stole a truss of cloth from the place where I had laid it, and was just on the point of putting it out of the waggon; I asked him what he was doing there, he said he got up to look for his hat; as soon as he saw me, he did not stop to look after his hat any longer, but came out of the waggon as fast as he could, and I caught him by the collar.

Had he any hat on? - No, he had not any hat on in the waggon.

Had he any hat on when you first saw him? - I do not recollect as he had, to the best of my remembrance he had not; he struggled to get away, and I got him down as soon as I could and called for assistance, and the watchman came, and we took him to the watch-house; it was very well I happened to take him, if I had not, this truss of cloth would have been lost; my master might have thought ill of me, and I might have lost my place and my character as long as I live afterwards.

Prisoner. Whether this truss would not move by jolting on the stones? - I am very sure it did not, because it was so closely stoved in, I am sure it could not.

Court. What distance might it be moved? - A yard and half.

Was it tied in any way? - No, but it was packed in as close as could be, no shaking would ever have moved it.

Do you know what was in it? - It is here, here is the man that sent it into our inn.

Court. The yard and half that it was moved was backwards, towards the end of the waggon? - It was moved backwards as close as it could be, except it had been put out.

JAMES HOPE sworn.

I do not know the man, I am only the person that delivered the goods at the inn, to the waggoner, I delivered this packet to the waggoner, here is a direction which I put with my own hand, or at least to the inn where the waggon went from.

DAWES sworn.

This is the truss that was moved.

WILLIAM GOLDSMITH sworn.

I am one of the watchmen, I was on my beat, and hearing a noise in Oxford Road, I went up to see; and my partner the watchman had the prisoner by the collar.

FRANCIS M'DONALD sworn.

I am a watchman; as I was coming down between Orchard-street and Duke-street, I saw the waggon stop, and I saw the prisoner and the waggoner have a great struggle; I went immediately to assist, and asked the waggoner what was the matter, he said the prisoner had been robbing his waggon, I took him into custody with the assistance of the other watchman; the prisoner had no hat.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to Richmond to take a job at the Duke of Queensborough's, going up Oxford Road, I met a young fellow that I used to work with; he chuck'd my

hat into the waggon in a frolic; not having the presence of mind to ask the waggoner, I acknowledge I got into the waggon, then the waggoner up't with his whip and knocked me down; the watchman came up and I was taken to the office, this gentleman swore that nothing was moved and nothing lost; Mr. Robinson came and said, your prosecutor has swore different to what he did before, and you are to be tried at the Old Bailey; I have no friends, I know I am here by myself; he said before that nothing was moved.

Court. Where was it he said nothing was moved? - At the office in Litchfield-street.

Who was there at the time? - I do not know whether any of the runners belonging to the said office is here; I was to have been tried at Clerkenwell.

Jury to the waggoner. Did you see any person near him? - None till the watchmen came.

Prisoner. He swore at the office he saw another young man.

Prosecutor. That is false, I swore the very same at Litchfield Office that I do now.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-42

444. JENNY, the wife of JAMES MEAD , was indicted for feloniously stealing a linen shirt, value 2 s. and linen apron, value 1 s. the property of Catherine Greenock .

CATHERINE GREENOCK sworn.

I lost a shirt and an apron, the prisoner used to take care of my children; I had a suspicion of her and charged her with it, but she denied it; I found the apron at a pawnbroker's in the neighbourhood, then she confessed where the shirt was.

JOHN NEVE sworn.

I am a servant to a pawnbroker, I took this shirt and apron in of the prisoner. (Producing them).

(Deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutrix gave them to me to pawn, I have often pawned things for her; I told the pawnbroker to put the duplicates in her name, and he would not, he would put them in my name.

To Neve. Did she desire them to be put in the prosecutrix's name? - Yes, but my master had written her name, and he said it did not matter.

To Greenock. Upon your oath, did you not empower this woman to pawn these things? - I did not, she has pawned things for me several times, but not these things.

NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-43

445. JENNY, the wife of JAMES MEAD , was again indicted for feloniously stealing, a linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Humphries .

SUSANNAH HUMPHRIES sworn.

My name was Drake, I am since married, I lost a handkerchief at my sister's, the prisoner lodged in the same house; I left it between the dining-room and the kitchen, while I went to speak to my sister, when I came back again it was gone; I asked the prisoner if she had seen it, she denied having seen it at all; but said the young man I kept company with very likely had taken it; I heard no more of it till last Friday, when it was found at the pawnbroker's.

THOMAS CHIFFINCH sworn.

I am servant to a pawnbroker; I took in this handkerchief of the prisoner, on the 26th of December.

Are you sure it was the prisoner? - Yes.

(The handkerchief produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

THOMAS HUMPHRIES sworn.

I know this to be my wife's property, by having seen her wear it, when I kept company with her I found it at the pawnbroker's, and took the prisoner before the justice.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I picked it up in the street, I did not know till last Saturday week what I was taken up for.

GUILTY .

Privately whipped and imprisoned for six months .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-44

446. GEORGE DREW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May, two pair of leather shoes, value 5 s. the property of William Burgess .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-45

447. VIOLETTA ADKINS was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , a copper saucepan, value 10 s. four blankets, value 19 s. and divers other things, the property of Major Beale the younger, and one velveret waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Major Beale the elder.

The prisoner came to live servant with the prosecutor, and pawned the things which were produced by the pawnbroker, and deposed to by the prosecutor and witnesses.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-46

448 JAMES WILSON (a black) was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , a muslin cloak, value 14 s. a muslin apron, value 4 s. four linen frocks, value 20 s. three muslin tippets, value 18 d. and three neck handkerchiefs, value 18 d. the property of William Smith , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

I am the master of Wapping school ; on Wednesday the 28th of May, my wife lost her clothes, I know nothing of the robbery, but I had seen the property about eight o'clock that evening, they were in a basket upon a chair by the fire-side.

ELIZABETH CARR sworn.

On Wednesday the 28th of May, in the evening, I was coming out of the yard, and saw the prisoner upon the steps of the street door, going out; I ran after him, and met Mr. Meakins, I told him, I believed that man had run away with some things from our house; I went back to see if the things were gone, and missed the things in the indictment; Mr. Meakins and I pursued the man.

When you came out again was he still in sight? - Yes, Mr. Meakins overtook him first.

Was he ever out of sight before Mr. Meakins took him? - Yes, he had turned the corner, he had got rid of the things, they were never found, except the trimming of the cloak which he dropped in the passage of the house.

Are you certain he was the person? - Yes, I know him by his walk and his dress.

Was he running? - No, walking very composedly.

How far were you from him when you saw him going down the steps? - About a dozen yards.

You did not see him have the things? - No.

Was he searched? - Yes, but nothing was found.

HENRY MEAKINS sworn.

I am a seaman, I was coming from Gun-Dock, as I came past the prosecutor's door, I saw the prisoner coming out with a handful of linen, and as he was wrapping it up in his arms, he dropped this piece of muslin out of the bundle upon the step, (producing the trimming of the cloak,) he turned towards the water-side, and walked along very gently; I saw the maid come out, and I desired her to come along after him that we might take him; the maid went in again she was so frightened; when she came out again he was twelve or fourteen yards off; I kept my eye upon him till he turned the corner; I went after him and took him in the next street.

Did you see whether he had the things when he turned the corner? - No, I could not, because his back was to me, but if he had got rid of them before he turned the corner I must have seen him.

There was nothing found upon the prisoner? - No.

Are you sure he is the man you saw come out of the house? - I am perfectly sure he is the man; when he was before

the justice he said he would be the death of me.

Did you see his face when he came out of the house? - Yes, and his blue jacket, and white stockings and breeches.

(The piece of muslin deposed to by Elizabeth Carr .)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going along, and this man and woman came up and laid hold of me; a gentleman asked them how they knew it was me; he said the girl told him so, and now he swears he saw me wrap them up.

To Carr. Do you know the value of the things? - No.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 20 s.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17880625-47

449. WILLIAM STEVENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a bay mare, value 3 l. the property of John Manders .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

JOHN MANDERS sworn.

I live in Hornchurch parish, Essex; on the 7th of June, I went on to the common and missed my mare.

When had you left her there? - I saw her there the day before, in the forenoon; I was informed almost as soon as I missed her that she was at Whitechapel.

Did you find her at Whitechapel? - Yes, at the Red-lion-inn.

Are you sure the mare that you found there was your's? - Yes, both her knees were broke, and she was out of condition; I had had her three years.

GEORGE NEWELL sworn.

Last Friday night was three weeks, I had lost an horse out of my own stables; and in going after her, I caught the prisoner with my neighbour's horse.

Where did you see him with your neighbour's mare? - As I was coming up to London, he overtook me between Chadwell-street, and Illford, between two and three o'clock in the morning; I asked him whether he came through the town; he said yes; then I asked him whether he had seen a man on a brown mare with a white jacket on; he said he had.

Did you know the mare at that time? - Yes.

How near do you live to Manders? - A mile and a half.

Are you sure it was Manders's mare? Yes, I had known her above a twelvemonth; afterwards I heard Mr. Manders had lost his mare; and we pursued after her almost as far as the Rising-sun; I asked him how he came by her; I told him it was not his property, it belonged to a neighbour of mine; he said he had her from the Lion at Rumford; my man who was with me said, no, for you came through the turnpike with her at the same time I did, and that is beyond the Lion; then he said, his master had sent him overnight to fetch her from grass, and if we would go, he would shew us where his master lived; he said his master's name was Bushell, that he lived at Holywell mount; we let him get on the mare, and we followed him as far as the Red-lion, Whitechapel, and there we stopped him.

Are you sure it was your neighbour's mare? - Yes, I will take take my oath of it.

THOMAS SHEPHERD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Newell; I was with him, when he saw the prisoner on the mare.

What time was it? - Between two and three in the morning.

Did you know the mare? - Yes.

Did you know her well? - Yes.

Are you sure it was Manders's mare? - Yes, I knew her by her marks and her colour.

You came up with your master and followed this man afterwards? - Yes.

How did he say he came by it? - He said, he fetched her from grass; he said, he did not come through the turnpike, and when I said he did, he said he had forgot that he did come through the turnpike.

Prisoner. What was it that you said to me when you first met me at the turnpike? - I did not say a word to him, he galloped away.

Prisoner. What was it that you said to me when you first came up with your master? - I told him he had laid abed too long in a morning, that he was not quick enough about his business.

Court. What did you mean by that? - Because he should have been out of our way.

What did he say to that? - He made no answer.

JOSEPH LEVI sworn.

On Friday the 6th of June, I was at the Seven Stars in Whitechapel, about four o'clock in the afternoon. (Newell and Shepherd ordered out of court.) The prisoner came in and asked what time the Rumford coach went out; I told him it was gone, or nigh upon going, just at that minute the coach came by, and he left part of the beer he was drinking, and got upon the roof of the coach; on the Saturday morning, between four and five o'clock, I was going down Whitechapel-road, and saw him driving a mare before him towards town.

In what manner was he driving her? - He was walking behind her with a postilion's short whip.

Was she saddled and bridled? - There was no saddle.

Was there a bridle? - I believe there was.

At what rate did he drive her? - Very slow, I was on the footpath and he in the road, I suspected him, because he went down with the Rumford coach but the night before, and I followed him; just at this side of Red-lion-street, Mr. Newell and his man came up and stopped.

Were they on foot or on horseback? - They were on foot.

Which way did they come from? - From Whitechapel Church; but when I first saw them they were standing at Mr. Crabb's, the butcher's door.

Did you see them there? - Yes.

How long before? - Not above a minute or two.

Where was the prisoner with the mare when you saw them at Crabb's door? - Passing by.

They followed him then? - Yes.

How far from Crabb's door was it that they stopped him? - About twenty doors, they stopped him at the end of Red-lion-street.

How near were you to him when they stopped him? - I was opposite them, they in the road and I in the foot way, when they stopped him, I went up to them.

Did they call you? - No, I went of my own accord, when I went up they were asking him how he came by the mare; he said it was his master's, he had fetched it from grass; I asked him if any body thereabouts knew him, he said the landlord at the sign of the Tewkesbury Church.

What did Newell say? - He said it was his neighbour's mare; we took the prisoner to the Tewkesbury Church, the landlord said he knew nothing at all of him; I asked him where his master lived, he said at Holywell-mount; I told him he was going from Holywell-mount; we took him before a Magistrate, and he was committed.

Whereabouts in Whitechapel-road was it you first saw him? - On this side of the hospital.

How far is that from the place where he was stopped? - It is about four furlongs, near half a mile.

(Levi ordered out of court.)

Newell called in again. Where was it you first saw this man? - Between Rumford and Ilford.

How far from Whitechapel? - About nine miles.

Were you on foot or on horse-back? - On horse-back.

Was Shepherd on foot or on horse-back? - On horse-back.

Was the prisoner on foot or on horse back? - On horse-back.

Then he went on before you? - Yes, my man went back after our own horse, and then I heard that Manders had lost his; then I went to meet my man and we both followed him, and overtook him at the Rising Sun.

How far is that from Whitechapel? - About four miles and a half, he galloped as fast as he could and we after him.

After you overtook him, at that time did he ride slow or fast? - He rode gently, he could not get the mare on, he had rode her so hard he was obliged to get off and drive her.

How far from Whitechapel did he get off and drive her? - Some where about Bow.

Did you keep with him? - After him.

All the way? - Yes, as far as Whitechapel.

Where did you first get the constable? - We had him over to the constable's house, he was taken into the sign of the Tewkesbury Church.

Who stopped the prisoner first? - I did.

Whereabouts? - On the stones.

Near Red-lion-street? - I cannot say whether it was beyond, or on this side of Red-lion-street, but it was as near Red-lion-street as could be.

Were you on foot or on horse-back then? - I had got off my horse, and my man held all the three horses while we went into the Tewkesbury Church.

How came you to go in there? - Because he said he knew the man that lived there.

Did you take him into the Tewkesbury Church, before you fetched the constable? - He went in of his own accord, and we followed him.

Did any body there know him? - No, the man that did live there I understood was gone.

It was after that that you went over to the constable's? - Yes.

And took him over with you? - Yes.

Is Levi the constable? - No.

Who was the constable? - I don't know.

When you got off your horse to stop this man, did any body else interfere with him? - Several people were about.

What had Levi to do with it? - He came into the Tewkesbury Church and assisted.

Did Levi come up before you got off your horse or afterwards? - Afterwards; I don't recollect that I saw him till after we got into the Tewkesbury Church.

Do you know a butcher of the name of Crabb? - Yes, at Stratford.

Do you know a butcher of that name in Whitechapel? - No.

Did you stop with any butcher in Whitechapel? - Not that I recollect; no, I am sure I did not.

How soon did you put up your horses? - Almost directly.

After you had been to the Tewkesbury Church or before? - Afterwards.

Did Levi go with you to the constable's? - Yes.

Did he go with you to the Justice's? - Yes.

What did he say to you before he went to the Justice's? - Only that he had seen him going down the night before with the Rumford stage, and that he left half his beer behind.

Did he tell you what reward there was for convicting a man of horse stealing? - No.

How often have you seen him since this man was taken up? - Every day since we have been attending here.

But before the sessions? - I don't recollect seeing him at all before the sessions.

Where did you first see Levi? - At the Tewkesbury Church.

Shepherd called in again.

Where was it Newell stopped this man when he came to Whitechapel? - Near the Tewkesbury Church.

Did you overtake him there, or had you

kept company with him all the way? - We had kept him company from the Rising Sun or thereabouts.

Did you ride fast or slow? - Slow from the Rising Sun, a foot pace.

Did the prisoner ride slow too? - Yes.

Did the prisoner dismount before you stopped him at Whitechapel? - Yes, near Bow.

Did your master dismount when he stopped him at Whitechapel? - Yes, and I held the horses.

Where did they take him to, first? - To the Tewkesbury Church.

Who came to your assistance? - I can't tell, for I took the horses away and put them up.

Did any body interfere with the prisoner at all except your master and you, before you went into the Tewkesbury Church? - Nobody.

When did you first see Levi the Jew? - At the Tewkesbury Church.

Do you know one Crabb, a butcher at Whitechapel? - No.

Did you and your master put up your horses any where before you stopped the prisoner in Whitechapel? - No.

Levi called in again. Do you know where Newell and Shepherd put up their horses before they went to Crabb's door? - They put up their horses afterwards.

But where had they put up their horses before they stood at Crabb's door? - They were a foot then.

Then they had put up their horses before that? - Mr. Newell's man I believe was standing at Crabb's door with the horses.

To Manders. You saw your mare afterwards at the Red Lion? - Yes.

Did you see Newell or his man there? - Yes, when I came up for the mare they were in Whitechapel, and shewed me the mare.

Was it your mare? - It certainly was.

To Newell. Did you see Manders at the Red Lion? - Yes.

You shewed him the mare? - Yes.

Was that the same mare that the prisoner was upon? - Yes.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Here is a person here that can prove that the Jew has been trying to persuade these men to swear my life away, for the sake of the reward; I bought this mare and paid honest money for her as I stand here alive; I bought her of a man about four miles from Rumford, for 17 s. he asked two guineas and a half for her.

(For the Prisoner.)

MARGARET PLATT sworn.

What are you? - A servant.

Where? - I am not in place.

Where did you live last? - At the White Hart Tavern, Bishopsgate-street.

How long is it since you lived there? - About six months.

How long did you live there? - About six months.

How came you to have been so long out of place? - I have been unfortunate.

What is the prisoner? - A gardener.

Where did he live before he was taken up? - At the Curtain, Holywell-mount.

Do you live at Holywell-mount? - Yes.

How long have you known the prisoner?

About a twelvemonth.

Do you know one Levi? - Yes.

Have you ever heard him say any thing about this matter? - Yes.

Now be careful and tell us truly what you have heard him say? - I have heard him say that he knew the prisoner had bought the horse.

Now be cautious, for if you don't tell the truth you will run a risk yourself, and the prisoner's life will be risked too; nothing will be of service to the prisoner but the truth.

Now what else have you heard him say? - I did not hear him say any thing else.

GUILTY , Death .

(Aged nineteen years.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-48

450. WILLIAM TENNANT was indicted, for that he, on the 9th of July, in the 26th year of the king's reign , in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon Thomas Sheen did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person a metal watch, value 20 s. and 4 s. in monies , the property of the said Thomas.

There not being sufficient evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-49

451. FRANCES WATERS and CATHERINE RIVERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , one bank note, value 15 l. one other bank note, value 10 l. and four sixpenny stamps, value 2 s. the property of John Harrison .

It appeared that the prosecutor was in liquor, and that his side-pocket in which the things were was very shallow, the Jury were of opinion that he might have dropped them.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-50

452. JOHN WALKER was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , a trying plane, value 1 s. a pannel plane, value 1 s. and some other things , the property of James Dale .

JAMES DALE sworn.

I am a carpenter , on the 29th of May, I was at work at Temple-Bar , I left work in the evening, I left my tools there; on the Friday evening the prisoner was taken up in consequence of finding some of the tools that he had sold; I found all the rest of my tools over the water where the prisoner worked, except an iron silister, and a smoothing plane.

WILLIAM DAVIS sworn.

I bought this plane and square of the prisoner on the Tuesday following the robbery.

(Producing them.)

Did you know the prisoner? - Yes, he had worked for our master a few days before.

(The plane was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

ROBERT JAY sworn.

The prisoner came to work for my master, he said he had no tools, that his tools were seized for rent, and complained that he had none; he staid from work a day or two; when he came to work again, master would not let him work, because he had staid away; he said he had got some tools then, but wanted money more than tools; and I bought this plane of him for 2 s. 6 d.

(Producing it.)

Dale. It is mine, there is my name upon the end of it.

(The other things that were found over the water were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

May it please your Lordship and Gentlemen of the Jury, on Monday the 19th of May, I was coming along Butcher-row, and saw this basket of tools, except the tenant saw, standing at the corner of the passage of a public-house, I stopped for the space of a quarter of an hour, and seeing nobody, I thought I might as well take them as I was out of work for want of tools; I went to work as this man has described, and my master refused to give me work, and I went to work over the water; I worked with the tools there till I was taken up; when these men came to me, I told them I had found

the tools, and if they could prove them to be their's they should have them. - Now, my Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, is it likely that if I had stole them, I should have taken them to work with where I was well known?

(The prosecutor called Sarah Whining , who had known him between three and four years ago, and gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-51

453. JOHN BRISTOW was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Swafford , on the 21st of March last, about the hour of one in the night, and burglariously stealing therein five saws, value 34 s. a carpenter's plow, value 7 s. eight plow irons, value 2 s. two sillesters, value 2 s. two smoothing planes, value 3 s. two hammers, value 8 s. three drawing planes, value 6 s. one jack-plane, value 10 d. a rabbit plane, value 12 d. and a printed book of architecture, value 12 d. the property of William Hodgson .

WILLIAM HODGSON sworn.

I am a carpenter , I work for Mr. Swafford at Hammersmith ; on the 21st of March, I left the shop about six o'clock in the evening, my tools were then safe.

How was the shop secured? - The shop is nineteen feet from the ground, it is open in front, there is no door to it, it stands upon a wall in a yard, which is fastened with gates.

Then any body that gets into the yard may get into the shop? - Yes, there is a lower shop in which we keep deals, and there is a step-ladder which goes from the lower shop through a place left open in the cieling into the upper shop; my master's house stands in the yard.

After they are in the yard, they can go into the shop without opening either door or window? - Yes.

When did you miss your tools? - The next morning; my tool-chest was broke open and some of my tools gone, I found a window on that side the shop that looks into the garden open, and a pane of glass broke.

Was it a sash? - No, a casement.

Where did it look into? - Into a Mr. Salter's garden.

Can you say whether that window was shut down when you left the shop? - I am certain of it.

Are you sure the pane of glass was not broke before? - Yes, I am; I saw the impression of a ladder's foot on the ground under the window; I desired the people the garden belonged to, to let me examine it, which they did; I traced a man's foot to a wall eight or nine feet high on the further side of the garden, it is a wall that runs between two gardens, on the other side of that wall I traced the foot again across the garden to another wall next the street, which is about ten feet high on the inside, and about six on the outside, there I found the ladder lying on the ground.

What length is the ladder? - Seventeen feet four inches; on the inside of the wall next the street, there was an impression of a man's foot six inches deep where he had jumped over, it was wet weather and the ground was soft, and that foot I traced to the work shop and back again; I suspected the prisoner, and enquired where he worked, but I could not learn; on the 20th of May, I went to Mr. Childs's, where the prisoner lodged, and there I found part of my property, I found a plane and square at the building where the prisoner was at work at Knightsbridge; I got a constable and took the prisoner into custody, he said he had bought the tools.

HUGH CHILDS sworn.

The prisoner lodged with me five weeks, he came about the middle of April, and brought these tools with him in a bag.

Were all the tools that were found at your house brought there by the prisoner? - Yes, the prosecutor came and had them away.

ROBERT ADE sworn.

I am a constable, I found the tools in the house of Mr. Child, I afterwards went to Sloane-street, Knightsbridge, where the prisoner was at work, and took him into custody.

(The tools were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

John Swafford confirmed the evidence of the prosecutor, as to the situation of the workshop.

JOHN WILSON sworn.

The prisoner lodged at my house a night or two, in the spring of the year, but what day or month I cannot say; he was absent one night, and came in the next morning between five and six o'clock with a bag of tools; he said he was very tired, he had been walking all night collecting his tools.

SAMUEL COCK sworn.

The prisoner was at work for me, when he was taken, I happened to be at the building; I know nothing of this business at all.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The tools that are produced in court, I bought in Piccadilly; I had a saw under my arm, a man that looked like a carpenter, asked me if I could tell him of a job, I told him I could not, and he asked me to buy the tools which I did.

For the prisoner.

JAMES CASTLE sworn.

I heard of the prisoner being taken up, and came to town to have a particular account of it, and on the 29th of May, I went to the shop where the prosecutor was at work, he said he did not want to hurt the prisoner, but he could not get him to make it up he was so obstinate; he said he had been for advice to a lawyer, and he asked the lawyer whether the shop and house being on one wall was not both as one, that the lawyer told him it was; he said he was in hopes he should be hanged, and then he should get 40 l. reward, which would pay him for the loss of his tools.

You heard him say so? - Yes.

Upon the oath you have taken? - Yes.

Was any body else in the shop? - Yes, there was another young man at work.

He first said, he did not wish to hurt him? - Yes.

And afterwards that he hoped to convict him, and get the 40 l. reward? - Yes.

Both in the same conversation? - Yes.

Are you sure? - Yes.

To Hodgson. Is this true? - No, this man came to me and wanted me to make it up, I said it was out of my power, that justice must take its course, that was all that passed.

Was any body else present? - Yes, a young man that was at work with me.

Is he here? - No.

Castle. I have known the prisoner twenty years, he always bore a good character.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who had known him from his infancy, and gave him a very good character.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, to the value of 39 s. but not guilty of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-52

454. FRANCIS FLEXMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , two pair of plated shoe buckles, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Clarke .

GEORGE WATSON WOOD sworn.

On Wednesday the 18th of June, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into Exeter-Change , I watched him and saw him go to Mr. Clarke's shop, and take one pair of plated buckles; he went to another part of the Change for the space of two or three minutes looking at the things in the shops, and then came back again and took another pair of plated buckles; then he went away, I followed him and brought him back, he then gave me the buckles out of his pocket; we sent for an officer, and he was taken to Bow-street and committed; he said he hoped we would excuse him, he could not say any thing for himself, because I found the buckles upon him.

In his cross-examination he said,

That the prisoner did not offer to run away; that he did not observe whether the prisoner was in liquor or not.

JOHN ATKINS sworn.

I am a constable, I took the prisoner to Bow-street, his examination was taken in writing, which was signed by me, the Justice and the prisoner.

(Examination read.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was very much in liquor, I thought I had paid for the buckles, when the gentleman took me, I told him I had paid for them, but when I put my hand in my pocket and found what money I had, I knew I had not paid for them, and then I confessed it.

(The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a very good character.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-53

455. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , two gowns, value 18 s. one shirt, value 4 s. the property of William Harris .

(The witnesses examined apart.)

WILLIAM HARRIS sworn.

On the 14th of May, my wife called me into the passage, and told me, there was a man gone into the yard behind the house; I live at No. 26, Union-street, Middlesex hospital ; I immediately run out, and saw the prisoner escaping out of the yard, my wife had him by the arm; it was between eight and nine in the evening; I asked him, what he wanted there? he said, Mr. Jones, a plaisterer; I told him, no such person lodged there; he then wanted Mr. Collins, a plaisterer; I told him, there was no such person there; I then put him before me in the yard, and told him to stop till I sent for a constable, till I knew what he had done with two gowns, and a shirt which were there; he said, he had no clothes, and asked me, what clothes I meant? I said, the clothes on the line; I looked round immediately, and saw the lines both cut at one corner, and the clothes wrapt up in the yard, laying on the ground; I have a piece of the line in my pocket; I tied up the line myself; I sent for a constable and gave charge of the prisoner; my wife took up the things; he was taken to the watch-house; I cannot say I saw these things hanging on the line, they were not wrapt up in any thing, but a part of the line was wrapt up in them; I did not know the prisoner before.

HANNAH HARRIS sworn.

I am wife of the last witness; on the 14th of May, I had been washing these gowns, and I hung them out about a quarter of an hour before the prisoner came into the house, I had hung them in the yard at the back of the house; I heard a little noise in the passage, as if somebody went on slowly; I looked out at the parlour

door, and the lodger said, there was a strange man in the yard taking my clothes or cutting the lines; I went out, and the prisoner was coming out of the yard with the clothes, and he dropt them down by the door; I did not see him drop them; I laid hold of his arm, and asked him, where he had been? he made no answer, and we sent for a constable, and had him searched; he begged very hard, and said, it was the first offence he had been ever guilty of, and should be the last, if we would pardon him, and let him go; I took up the clothes, the Justice sent them back with my husband, and desired me to dry them, and they have been in our custody ever since. (The things produced and deposed to;) this gown, (taking hold of one) is the property of a person I wash for; this shirt belongs to a lodger in the house; I had pinned it on the line.

SARAH BARDOLPH called.

What age are you? - Thirteen.

Do you know the nature of an oath? - The nature of an oath is, if you see a thing to say that you saw it, and not to say that you did not see it, if you did see it.

Court. Do you know what will happen to you my little woman, if you should say what is not true on your oath? - Yes.

Is not it a very bad thing? - Yes.

Then what will happen to you if you do not speak the truth on your oath? - That you are always condemned, that God never will take you, if you take your oath to any thing that is wrong.

SARAH BARDOLPH sworn.

I lodge at Mr. Harris's; on the 14th of May, I had been out of an errand for my father, between eight and nine as I came in, I saw this same prisoner in the yard; as I came through the passage he was winding the things round his hand, I did not see what it was, they were altogether in a twist, and I went into the passage, and knocked at the parlour door, and Mrs. Harris came out; I went up stairs directly, I saw no more of him; I told Mrs. Harris there was a stranger in the yard.

You only just saw the man? - No, no more than just as I came in at the street door.

You know for certain it is the prisoner? - Yes, Sir, to the best of my knowledge, it was him.

But saw a man however, wrapping something round his hands? - Yes.

Was it dark? - It was between eight and nine, it was pretty dark.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I knocked at this door, a man rushed by me, and the woman came out just after the man; she got by me, and laid hold of me; I told her I wanted one Mr. Jones, a plaisterer, and she immediately run into the yard, and fetched the bundle out; she took me into the parlour, and asked me what I wanted; the little girl said, she saw me in the yard, she never saw me, nor I never saw her.

Court to Sarah Bardolph . Did you see two men, one at the door, and the other in the yard? - No, there was only one in the yard.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-54

456. EMANUEL RUSSEL was indicted for that he, in the king's highway, did feloniously assault George Golby , and put him in fear, and take from his person a pair of leather breeches, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Young .

There being no evidence to affect the prisoner, he was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-55

457. JOHN WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , a linen gown, value 5 s. the property of Mary Gates .

JOHN GATES sworn.

On the 10th of May, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was sitting at work in my back room; I heard somebody coming through the passage out of the yard; I thought I did not know the foot; I ran into the yard and missed the things in the indictment, they had been hanging upon a line in the yard to dry; I called Mrs. Boocock who lives in the first floor, and asked, if she had taken the things out of the yard? she said, no; we heard that three men were gone out with a bundle; Mrs. Boocock went after them, and met James Vaughan , bringing the prisoner back with the things upon him; I took the property out of his lap, and gave it to Mrs. Boocock; she took it before the Justice, and it was delivered to the constable.

JAMES VAUGHAN sworn.

I took the prisoner in Grigg's-court, Goodman's-yard, with the property in his apron.

Was he running? - No.

SARAH BOOCOCK sworn.

I had these things to wash for Mr. Gates; I was called down and missed them; I went to the door, and saw the last witness bring the prisoner back with the property.

( Richard Hayes , the constable, produced the things, which were all deposed to by Mrs. Boocock.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found them lying in the street.

GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17880625-56

458. WILLIAM DYER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Francis Ewer , senior, on the 15th of June , about the hour of eleven in the night, and stealing, a leather pocket-book, value 1 s. and a 10 l. bank note, value 10 l. his property .

FRANCIS EWER , junior, sworn.

I live at my father's house, in Princes-square, Ratcliffe-highway ; on Sunday evening, the 15th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock, I left the yard gate open, and went a little way down the square, for about ten minutes; when I came back, I saw the prisoner coming out of the yard; I stopped him; he said, he went in to make water; he ran away, and I pursued him; we had a scuffle about four or five minutes, when the watchman came to my assistance, and we secured him, and took him to the watch-house.

Did he ever get out of your sight? - No.

Was any thing found upon him? - No, but the next morning about eight o'clock, the watchman brought me the pocket-book.

Where had the pocket-book been kept? - In the compting-house.

When had you seen it there? - On Friday or Saturday.

Was the compting-house fastened that night? - Yes.

How did you suppose any body got into it? - By lifting up the sash of the window, we did not examine the window that night, but the next morning, about five o'clock, I found the window up.

THOMAS TEMPLE sworn.

I am a watchman, I assisted Mr. Ewer in taking the prisoner to the watch-house; I searched him but found nothing, about ten minutes afterwards I found the pocket book close to the watch-house door.

Did you perceive him to throw away or drop any thing? - No.

(The prosecutor produced and deposed to the pocket-book which he had of the watchman.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was very much in liquor, I went up this yard; I thought it had been a thoroughfare, and then the gentleman laid hold of me, and told me he would take me to the watch-house, and I ran away.

Ewer. I should have mentioned that when we were taking him to the watch-house he couched down toward the ground almost every minute, and particularly at the watch-house door he bent himself almost double.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-57

459. CHRISTIAN KLENCKE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christian Thiele , on the 20th of May , about the hour of twelve in the night, and stealing therein one gold watch, value 10 guineas; a gold watch key, value 1 s. a silk purse, value 6 d. and half a guinea and 3 s. the property of Francis Monier ; and a silver watch, value two guineas, and a steel chain, value 6 d. and 9 s. the property of George Neal .

GEORGE NEAL sworn.

I lodged in the house of Mr. Thiele; on the 20th of May, I went to bed, hung up my watch as usual, and laid my breeches on a chair by the bedside, I waked about seven o'clock in the morning, and missed my watch and nine shillings out of my breeches pocket; Francis Monier slept in the same room, and he lost his watch and some other things; I afterwards saw my watch again at the justice's on the third of June.

Did you know the prisoner? - I had seen him in the house several times.

CHRISTIAN THIELE sworn.

I am a publican; on the 20th of May I fastened up my doors, as I always do, my own self; I took the key into my bed room; the next morning one of my lodgers told me he was robbed; I examined the lodgers, and they were all searched but nothing was found, the prisoner had used my house till about this time; I afterwards heard that the prisoner was in very good clothes, and I had a suspicion of him, I sent a person to him where I heard he was, to desire him to meet me at the Globe, in Market-lane, which he did; I asked him how he came by his clothes, he said a person lent him two guineas; I asked the person's name, he could not tell; I asked his master's name, he did not know; he immediately went out of the house and ran away, I overtook him about one hundred yards from the house; I brought him into Pall-mall, he would not go any further, I sent a person to the public-house for assistance, upon that he ran away as hard as he could, we stopped him and brought him back, then he produced the silver watch directly, and said the gold watch was in pawn in the Minories, and the duplicate was at his lodging; I asked him what time he left my house on the 20th of May, he said about five o'clock in the afternoon.

Had you seen him in your house that day? - Yes.

Is he a countryman of yours? - Yes, and I am very sorry for it; we took him before Justice Reid, and then went to his lodgings, and there found the duplicate of the gold watch, three rings and a snuff-box.

THOMAS RICHARDSON sworn.

I am a constable, I took charge of the prisoner; when I took him to the watch-house he said he had pawned the gold watch; he had produced the silver watch before; I searched his lodgings and found the duplicate of the gold watch, some rings and a snuff-box; (producing them) I went to the pawnbrokers and got the gold watch; (producing it.)

(The silver watch produced in court and deposed to by Neale.)

LEONARD GATES sworn.

I was with the last witness when he found the things in the prisoner's lodging, they laid upon the window.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in very great distress and could not get any victuals, and seeing these things I had a temptation to help myself to them.

Not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house; but guilty of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-58

460. ANDREW RUFF and JOHN YOUNG were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Lockey , on the 8th of June , about the hour of eleven in the night, and stealing twenty-three men's leather shoes, value 40 s. the property of the said John, in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LOCKEY sworn.

I am a shoe-maker in Lower Shadwell ; on the 8th of June I locked my shop door between ten and eleven o'clock at night; about eleven o'clock the nurse that nursed my wife went to bolt the street-door; she went with a light, and found both street door and shop door wide open, I was in bed; she called out, I got up and took up a poker and alarmed the lodgers, and they all came down, some in their shirts and some in their smocks; the thieves were gone and the window stripped.

Did you observe how the shop door had been opened? - Yes, by a key or something of a picklock; I missed nine pair and five single shoes, which made twenty-three in all; I sent my wife the next morning among the pawnbrokers and dealers in shoes, to stop them if they should be offered; in consequence of this a little after eight o'clock in the morning, Mr. Waters, in Back-lane, sent for me, he had stopped two odd shoes which he supposed to be mine; I went to Mr. Waters's, they had stopped the shoes but not the men, they described the men to me, and Ruff was taken immediately, he said he had the shoes of Young; the officer said he knew Young, and went and fetched him to the office, and they were both committed.

You never found the rest of your shoes? - No.

REBECCA GREGORY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Waters; the prisoner Ruff brought some shoes to our shop to sell, he said a young man who was at the public-house gave them to him to sell, he was going to take the shoes away with him; my mistress told him he must fetch the young man before the shoes went out of the shop, he went away, and I went to Mr. Lockey's to know if they were his property.

Did you know Ruff before? - I had seen him several times.

WILLIAM WATERS sworn.

I keep a clothes shop in Back-lane, on the 9th of this month, in the morning, Ruff brought a pair of shoes to sell, we suspected him and would have nothing to do with them; about half an hour afterwards Mrs. Lockey came to our house to stop the shoes if any should be offered; in about half an hour afterwards he came again with the same shoes, we stopped the shoes and sent down to Mr. Lockey; in the mean time Ruff went and fetched Young, he made a blustering and asked what business we had to stop his property, I told him if he would call in half an hour he should have them.

Did you know Young before? - No.

Are you sure he is the man? - I am very certain of it; when Lockey came he claimed the shoes, and we put him in the way to find the old man Ruff, and he gave

up the young one; I believe the old man is rather impaired in his intellects.

(The shoes were produced in court, and deposed to by Elizabeth Lockey, wife of the prosecutor, who closed and bound them.)

JANE HANSON sworn.

I nursed Mrs. Lockey; on the 8th of June, at 11 o'clock, I went to bolt the street door, I found that and the shop door both open, and two men bolted out of the shop; I had just a glance of the face of one of them and that was all; I screamed out, murder, thieves, thieves, murder, the shop is broke open! I think it was the prisoner Young, that I saw, but I cannot be positive.

JOSEPH WEST sworn.

I am a constable, I took Ruff, at his own door, opposite Justice Staples's office, and the other at Saltpetre Bank.

YOUNG's DEFENCE.

I bought them of a Jew the day before for 4 s. when I came home at night, I went to try them on, and found one was bigger than the other, and next morning I gave them to this old man to sell.

RUFF's DEFENCE.

Young gave me them to sell.

RUFF, NOT GUILTY .

YOUNG, GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-59

461. BENJAMIN WATKINS and JOHN GOGAY , alias SMITH , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Ryan , on the 12th of May last, about the hour of seven in the afternoon, no person being therein, and stealing a cotton gown, value 8 s. a silk cloak, value 2 s. a cotton petticoat, value 2 s. a linen apron, value 1 s. a leather apron, value 1 s. a cloth cloak, value 1 s. a cotton waistcoat, value 1 s. a worsted waistcoat, value 1 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 1 s. and a looking-glass, with a mahogany frame, value 1 s. the property of the said Thomas.

MARY RYAN sworn.

I am the prosecutor's mother; on Whitsun Monday, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I went out of an errand and locked the door.

Did you leave any body in the house? - Not a creature.

Were the windows and doors safe when you went out? - Yes.

Are you sure of that? - Yes; when I came back the door was broke open, and I found the two prisoners in the room speaking out loud; I said, who is there? they made no answer, but Gogay came down with a bundle and ran out; I cried out thieves! thieves; Gogay was too quick for me, but I caught hold of Watkins by the skirt of his coat, which tore off, and he ran away and left the skirt of his coat in my hand, I have it in the bundle here now; my son's apprentice, Edward Belcher , happened to come home at the time, and went after him, but he was stopped before he came up to him, and was brought back by another man, who asked me if that was the man; yes, you villain, says I, I have got the skirt of your coat in my hand, he had dropped the things in the street, and some of them were picked up and brought back.

What became of Gogay? - He was taken by one Mr. Porter about a quarter of an hour afterwards; they asked me if he was the other man, I said he was.

Are you sure of that? - Yes.

You were a little frightened? - I was surprized at seeing the house broke open more than I was at the robbers.

Had you ever seen either of them before? - Never.

EDWARD BELCHER sworn.

I was coming home on Whitsun Monday in the evening, I was within twenty

yards of the house, when I heard Mrs. Ryan call out, and saw two men rush out, I am positive Watkins was one, they dropped the things and ran away, I saw Watkins stopped.

Did you ever lose sight of him? - He turned one corner, but I was within a few yards of him, and I can be positive to him; there was no other man in the street, when I called out after him, I could not meet with any man to stop him, or he would have been secured sooner.

What became of the things? - They were gathered up, put in a bundle and brought to the watch-house.

Who gathered them up? - I saw Mrs. Ryan pick some up, but I did not see them all picked up.

JAMES BRYAN sworn.

I live next door to Mr. Ryan, I was standing upon the steps and saw the two prisoners go into the house.

How did they get in? - I believe the door was open, but I am not sure; presently the old woman came in, and cried out murder! murder! robbers! I ran directly, and one of the prisoners, Gogay ran out with a bundle under his arm, I pursued him and made a grasp at him, and I dragged a petticoat from under his arm, and all the rest of the things fell; one Porter ran after him and brought him back.

Was not he out of your sight while he turned the corner? - Only just in turning the corner, but I did not lose sight of him for a moment, I was so close that I hardly lost sight of him even in turning the corner.

Who picked up the things? - I don't know.

DANIEL PORTER sworn.

I was coming along and heard the alarm, I pursued the prisoner Gogay, and took him as he was turning down Brown's-lane.

To Mrs. Ryan. Who picked the things up? - Children in the neighbourhood, and they gave them to me.

Did you see them picked up? - Yes, I picked some up myself, I have had them ever since.

(The things produced in court, and deposed to by Mrs. Ryan.)

How do you suppose they got in? - At the door.

Thomas Ryan . I rent the whole house, I let the lower part of it, and the street-door is always left open for the lodgers, but it was the chamber that was broke open.

To Mrs. Ryan. How do you know there was nobody in the house? - I am sensible of it.

How do you know none of the lodgers were at home, the door was left open for them to come in and out when they pleased? - Yes, but they were all gone out.

How do you know they were not come in before you came back? - I am very sensible of it.

PRISONER WATKINS's DEFENCE.

I was coming along and heard the alarm, I ran as any body else might, and some body laid hold of the skirt of my coat, God in heaven knows who, and said I had committed the robbery.

Gogay did not say any thing in his defence.

Mrs. Ryan. Here is the prisoner's coat that was taken off of him before the justice, and here is the skirt that he left in my hand.

(Producing them both.)

Watkins called five witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

Gogay called three witnesses, who gave him a very good character.

BOTH NOT GUILTY of breaking and entering the house, but guilty of stealing the goods to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

Each transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-60

462. ROBERT STEELE was indicted, for that he, on the 20th of May , in the King's highway, in and upon Mary Holmes did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and taking from her person a linen shirt, value 5 s. a linen handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Richard Holmes , and a cotton bed-gown, value 18 d. the property of the said Mary .

MARY HOLMES sworn.

I live in Tottenham-court-road ; on Whitsun Monday I was going home with a shirt and handkerchief of my brother's, tied up in a handkerchief; I called down the area to my brother to open the door, the prisoner was standing at the rails of the next area, he came behind me and snatched the bundle from under my arm, and ran away.

Did he say any thing to you? - No, he neither spoke to me, nor touched me, it was so sudden, I had no time to lay hold of him or make any resistance; my brother came out, and we both gave an alarm, and he was pursued and brought back.

Are you certain the prisoner is the man? - I am very certain of it.

Do you know that there is a reward on the conviction of a man for a highway robbery? - There was a man at the watch-house told me there was 40 l. reward for a highway robbery, but that there was nothing for stealing.

Who was it that told you so? - I don't know who he was.

THOMAS HOLMES sworn.

I opened the door to let my sister in, and saw the prisoner run across the way with the bundle, I pursued him and never lost sight of him, till he was stopped.

Are you certain of that? - Yes.

What became of the bundle? - I saw him throw it away, it was afterwards picked up by a person in the mob, and carried to the watch-house.

RICHARD HOLMES sworn.

I only prove the property.

THOMAS BERWICK sworn.

I was coming down Tottenham-court-road, I heard the cry of stop thief, I pursued the prisoner and took him, and with some assistance I took him to the watch-house.

Had he the bundle when you first saw him? - No.

Did you see Thomas Holmes ? - Yes, he was running after him all the way.

JOHN ATKINS sworn.

I was constable of the night; these things were given to me at the watchhouse.

(Producing them.)

Who was it at the watch-house that told the girl there was 40 l. reward? - I was not there when she was brought in.

Did you hear any thing of the kind? - No.

Did you say so yourself? - I never said such a thing to a prosecutor in my life.

(The things were deposed to by Richard Holmes .)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming down Tottenham-court-road and heard the alarm, I ran across the road the same as other people did, and this man laid hold of me and took me to the watch-house.

GUILTY of stealing, but not violently .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-61

463. JOHN RUDDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a leather purse, value 2 d. 18 guineas, and 35 s. in monies numbered, the property of Patrick Cairney , privily from his person .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, but not appearing, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-62

464. MARY HUDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a velveret waistcoat, value 12 d. a cloth waistcoat, value 12 d. and a linen shift, value 12 d. the property of Ann Marshall .

ANN MARSHALL sworn.

I live in Kingsgate-street ; on the 19th of May, about six o'clock in the evening, I heard a noise in the passage, I looked in the yard, and missed the things mentioned in the indictment; they had been washed, and were hung up to dry; I then ran out at the street door, and saw the prisoner going up Eagle-street, I followed her, and took her upon the chapel steps with the things upon her; I charged a constable with her, and she was taken before the justice.

(Norman, the constable, produced the things which were deposed to, by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it, I never saw that woman in my life.

GUILTY .

Privately whipped , and Imprisoned six months .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-63

465. ELIZABETH GYLES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , ten pieces of cotton bed-furniture, value 5 s. and a cotton window curtain, value 2 s. the property of Philip Bowyer .

The prisoner was taken with the things upon her.

Prisoner. I picked them up in the street.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-64

466. ALEXANDER HOBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May last, one piece of Brewick timber, containing 22 feet, value 11 s. one other piece of Brewick timber, containing 11 feet, value 5 s. one other piece of Brewick timber, containing 6 feet, value 3 s. one other piece of Brewick timber, containing other 6 feet, value 3 s. and one other piece of Brewick timber, containing 10 feet, value 5 s. the property of Richard Hanks .

The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-65

467. JOHN PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing, on the 22d of June , a pint pewter pot, value 1 s. the property of John Hobcraft ; and a scrubbing brush, value 3 d. the property of Margaret Cruise widow .

Margaret Cruise deposed, that she went out of an errand, when she came back she met the prisoner with her scrubbing brush, and a pint

pot of Mr. Hobcraft's, that he ran away, but was taken by another person who brought him back with the brush and pot in his apron, and that he was never out of her sight.

John Hobcraft deposed, that the pot was his property.

Francis Glover deposed, that he heard the alarm, that he pursued the prisoner and brought him back with the things in his apron.

James Bernard the constable, produced the things.

PRISONER's DEFENCE

I know nothing at all of it.

(The prisoner called Stephen Hunter , a sadler, who had known him six years, and gave him a very good character.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-66

468. MOSES NOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , two pint pewter pots, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Maggs .

The prisoner was seen by the pot-boy to take the pots, and put them one in his breeches, and the other in his coat-pocket; he was taken immediately after the fact, with the pots in that situation.

Prisoner. I know nothing of it.

(The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

To be whipped .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-67

469. JOHN MASCALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , a cotton handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Esau Harris .

ESAU HARRIS sworn.

On the 24th of May, about 12 o'clock at noon, I was coming by the end of Fleet-market , I felt something at my pocket, I turned round and seized the prisoner's wrist, I found my handkerchief was gone, and charged the prisoner with it; he denied it, but said he would pay me for the handkerchief; I told him I would not be paid for it, I must have it, I then saw it lying behind me; Mr. Sullenge came by and persuaded me to take him before a magistrate, which I did.

Was it your handkerchief? - Yes.

JAMES SULLENGE sworn.

I was coming past and saw the handkerchief lying close to the prisoner's heels; there was nobody near but the prisoner, and I and Mr. Harris.

(The handkerchief produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never touched the handkerchief, the gentleman would have let me go, but the other man said no, if you cast him you will be rewarded.

(The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a very good character.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-68

470. THOMAS LEE and JOHN HYSER were indicted, for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alexander Gleig , the said Alexander and others of his family being therein, on the 17th of June , about the hour of three in the forenoon, and stealing a copper, value 12 s. two copper porridge-pots, value 20 s. a copper stewpan, value 2 s. and a brass skillet, value 2 s. the property of the said Alexander .

ALEXANDER GLEIG sworn.

On the 17th of June, I had my house broke open; about a quarter after 4 o'clock in the morning I heard a noise, I thought some of the servants were got up to washing, and I did not take my further notice of it; but when the servants got up about 6 o'clock, they informed me that the house was broke open.

Who was last up the night before? - I believe the house-keeper was last up, but I was up till 12 o'clock.

Were the doors and windows all fast? - Yes.

Do you know that yourself? - Yes.

How was it in the morning? - The kitchen door was wrenched open, which opened into the yard; the adjoining house is an empty house, through which we suppose they came; I missed the things mentioned in the indictment, the copper was taken out of the brick work; I heard that a person had been stopped at Clerkenwell with a large pot, I enquired and found the man that had stopped him.

Who was he? - His name is Isaacs.

THOMAS ISAACS sworn.

On the 17th of this month, about a quarter past 5 in the morning, I was going out about some business, I saw the prisoner Lee, with a copper upon his head going down a court opposite to my house, where Hyser has an apartment; I immediately went up to him and took him into custody, I took the copper from him, and as I was taking the copper home to my own house, I saw the prisoner Hyser, about twenty yards from me with a large black pot upon his back, upon seeing me he ran

back again with the pot; I took Lee to prison immediately.

Are you sure it was Hyser that you saw? - I am very positive it was him, when I came back from taking Lee to prison, I saw Hyser coming out of the court towards Turnmill-street without any thing, I took him into custody immediately; there was the mark of the black pot upon his back, and I took him to prison; the prosecutor afterwards came to my house and claimed the copper, I went and tried it into the brick-work, and it fitted exactly.

WILLIAM LOWE sworn.

On the 17th of June, about a quarter after two o'clock, I was coming past the prosecutor's house and saw three men loitering about.

Do you know who they were? - No.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

I saw three men going up Water-lane, about half past 4 o'clock in the morning.

Do you know who they were? - No.

SARAH READ sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor, I went to bed about 12 o'clock that night; the doors and windows were then fast.

The prisoners did not say any thing in their defence.

LEE, GUILTY, Of stealing the goods, but not Guilty of breaking the house .

Transported for seven years .

HYSER, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-69

471. HENRY JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , two silk handkerchiefs, value 8 s. the property of Philip Presbury .

The prosecutor deposed, that he saw the prisoner take the handkerchiefs out of his shop window, that he pursued him, and that he was taken by another person, and brought back with the handkerchiefs upon him; that he never lost sight of him till he was stopped.

John Story deposed, that he saw the prisoner run out of the shop, that he pursued him and brought him back.

(The handkerchiefs were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-70

472. ANN MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a half-guinea, and 2 s. in monies numbered , the property of William Beeson .

WILLIAM BEESON sworn.

I am a porter at an inn, I had been with a parcel to Bethnal Green, as I was coming back again past the end of Beech-lane , the prisoner stopped me, and asked me where I was going, I told her where all honest people ought to be; she said come along with me Ned, I had not been with her a minute, before I missed a half-guinea of the new coin, and 2 s. out of my breeches-pocket.

When had you seen the money? - When I was at Bethnal Green, and I had never had my hand in my pocket for any thing from that time till I met with her, I charged her with it, and she said she would poke my bloody eve out, for accusing her with a false accusation, that though she was a woman, she had fought a better man than I; the watchman came by, and I gave charge of her; there was 2 s. found in her

pocket, and a half-guinea of the new coin inclosed in her left-hand between two fingers.

JOHN NIWMAN sworn.

I was the constable of the night, I observed that the prisoner when she was brought to the watch-house, she kept two of her fingers closed, I opened them and took out a half-guinea of the new coin, and 2 s. out of her pocket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It was my own money, I did not take any from the man.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-71

473. JAMES ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , six silver tea-spoons, value 12 s. the property of Ann Fish .

ANN FISH sworn.

I keep a pork shop ; on the Saturday before last, I went out to market, when I came home I found the prisoner in the custody of Mr. Briggs.

JAMES BRIGGS sworn.

I lodge at Mrs. Fish's, I was coming through the passage and saw the prisoner in the parlour, he said he wanted a penny black pudding; I called Mrs. Fish's sister to see if she had lost any thing, she looked and missed some tea-spoons, I immediately sent her for a constable; in the mean time he took the spoons out of his pocket, and laid them down in a chair in the parlour.

(The constable produced the spoons, which were deposed to by Mrs. Fish.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into this shop to buy a black pudding for my breakfast, I knocked several times and nobody came to me; I went to the parlour door and cried out halloo! is there nobody here? while I was standing there, this man came, and said I wanted to steal those spoons that laid in the chair, and charged me with a constable.

GUILTY .

Aged eighteen years.

Court. The sentence of the court upon you is, that you be transported beyond the seas, for the term of seven years .

Prisoner. I am very much obliged to you gentlemen, I shall make a bright man yet.

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-72

474. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Neale .

JOHN NEALE sworn.

On Wednesday the 25th of June, I was going through George lane , which leads into Botolph-lane, I felt something at my coat-pocket, I turned round and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, he threw it down and ran away; I took it up, and a person in the lane stopped him, I charged a constable with him, and took him before an alderman.

Was he ever out of your sight? - Never.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming down the lane, this gentleman laid hold of me, and said I had took his handkerchief, I know nothing of it.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-73

475. ISAAC COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , one cloth coat, value 1 s. the property of James Pearce .

The prisoner was taken with the coat upon him.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-74

476. CHRISTOPHER DAVENPORT was indicted for stealing, on the 12th of June , four wooden bobbins, value 1 d. five ounces of silk, value 5 s. the property of William Davis , Peter Broadhurst , and Zacharias Bradbury .

PETER BROADHURST sworn.

I am in partnership with Matthew Davis and Zachariah Bradbury , at No. 91, Long-Acre , on the 12th of June, we lost some silk, between four and five of that day; I ordered the man to watch, I goes up stairs, and ordered Davenport to go down and fetch a bobbin of worsted, he did go immediately, and came up again in a very short time with a bobbin of worsted in his hand; the man I ordered to watch came up presently afterwards, and told me he had got the silk in his pocket; I then went to Davenport, and asked him what he had got, he said, nothing; then the man who saw him take it, came and said he saw him take it, and pressed him so much that he pulled it out of his pocket before us; here is the silk, I have had it in my possession ever since. (Produces it). It is worth about 10 s. there is no mark upon it, but it was never off the premises; I suppose there may be about five ounces; he had worked in my shop about four or five months; we never put any marks, except upon the larger bobbins; he was a weaver, he wove livery and coach-laces, and worsted, or such as we wanted.

THOMAS JOHNSON sworn.

I know the prisoner, I know Davis, Broadhurst, and Bradbury; on the 12th of June, master ordered me to conceal myself in the shop till Davenport came down, I did; he came down and I saw him take these pieces of silk, and make off with it as fast as he could, some off the jack, and some out of each drawer; I followed him up stairs, and told master; he denied it, and then produced it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was sent down stairs by Mr. Broadhurst for a bobbin of worsted; I was then much afflicted with a pain in my bowels, I hardly knew what I went for, and I understood that I was to bring up the silk as well as the worsted, the silk happened to be in my pocket. I always bore an undeniable character; I leave myself to the clemency of the Court and Jury, hoping they will bring me through as well as they can.

Broadhurst. I ordered him to bring up no silk.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Whipped and imprisoned six months .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-75

477. WILLIAM TENNANT was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles Westman , on the King's highway, on the 9th of July, 1786 , putting him in fear and danger of his life, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a silver watch, value 20 s. one guinea, and one shilling, his property .

CHARLES WESTMAN sworn.

On the 9th of July, 1786, I was robbed of my watch, I was stopped in the fields, leading from Kentish-Town to Pancrass ,

by two men, it was about ten at night, they demanded my money, I was coming towards London, and I met them, I gave them my money, one guinea, and a shiling, and I begged they would not use me ill; then they threw me on the ground, held me by the throat, and took my watch out of my pocket; I believe the prisoner to be one, my watch was found afterwards, I never saw him but the time he robbed me, and the time I was before Sir Sampson, which was the 19th of May last; but then I was not able to swear to him, I cannot swear to him, they were about a quarter of an hour with me, the other man was never taken; my watch was found; I advertised it, I cannot tell how long ago; I heard of it last December; I received a letter from Sir Sampson Wright, I am sure it is my watch, there is C. Westman, on the dial plate, and the number of it, which I gave to Sir Sampson, was 13085, the maker's name J. Crick.

THOMAS BAMBOROUGH sworn.

The prisoner worked with me some days at North Berwick, about a year ago; I think it might be about the latter end of last July, he worked with me seven or eight days, and he gave my wife this watch to lay by in a drawer, I saw him give it to her, the watch was taken and advertised at Berwick about that time, that very day he went away; when he went away from me I gave him the watch; he said his name was William Tennant , he was taken up by the Magistrates of Berwick, the Magistrates got the watch, I know the watch again by the name on the dial-plate, which was Charles Westman ; and I know the number of it was 13085, he told me he got the watch from his captain, Westman; he told me he had been a soldier.

ARCHIBALD RUTHWIN sworn.

I brought up the prisoner from Berwick, under guard to Sir Sampson Wright's.

Capt. Mackey. The watch was brought up by me; I never saw the watch in the possession of the prisoner, the prisoner owned before Sir Sampson, that the watch was the same that he had in Scotland, he said his wife took it for part payment of some washing.

Court. Was what he said reduced into writing? - It was.

Is Sir Sampson Wright here? - No.

Did you see the prisoner sign it? - I did not.

Court. We cannot take it as Sir Sampson is not here, and it was reduced into writing.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My wife took the watch from one William Gapper , in part of payment for some washing, but I cannot say whether that is the watch; the watch I changed for another, and gave eight shillings to boot; the watch was taken from me about the 22d of July last, in North Berwick; none of the people are here that took it from me; I never told Bamborough I had it from my captain.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-76

478. WILLIAM PEARCE was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of May , four pounds weight of opium, value 42 s. half a pound of oil of lavender, value 6 s. one glass phial, value 6 d. half a pound of of camomile, value 3 d. four ounces of ising-glass, value 1 s. 6 d. two ounces of rhubarb, value 2 s. the property of George Webster , John Watts , and Thomas Harrison .

THOMAS HARRISON sworn.

I am one of the partners with Messrs. Webster and Watts; we are drug merchants at Bucklersbury ; the prisoner was our porter ; in consequence of an information from one of my servants, that they had lost some goods, I marked the things

in the indictment; the 15th of May, Mr. Webster came home in the evening, and I counted fifty five pieces of opium, out of which, I missed six pieces; the prisoner was going to breakfast, and I desired him to step back; I got a constable to follow him home; I ordered my clerks in the compting-house to take notice of him; we found nothing in his boxes, but in his breeches pockets we found two pieces of opium that I had marked; but on searching his lodgings, we found two pieces of opium, and other things marked.

(The things produced and deposed to, marked by opening it on one side and putting in a piece of paper, on which was wrote Thomas Harrison , and then closing up the opium.)

The mark was in it when it was found, and is in it now; the value of this piece is one guinea; before that, I believed him to be an honest man; I think on the whole, I have missed eighty pounds worth of property at different times.

WILLIAM PARROTT sworn.

I searched this man's lodgings, and found the things that are in this handkerchief.

(Produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

The prisoner's counsel called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-77

479. MICHAEL MICHAELS was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of May , one hundred pounds weight of lead, value 15 s. the property of Caesar Andrews , affixed to a certain building of his, against the statute .

The prisoner was taken with the lead upon him by Thomas Vigor .

(The lead produced and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-78

480. THOMAS TWITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th day of June , twelve bottles of red wine, value 12 s. twelve bottles of white wine, value 12 s. three pictures, framed and glazed, value 3 s. and one linen towel, value 6 d. the property of the Honourable Martha Maria Hervey .

(The witnesses examined apart.)

WILLIAM EMMES sworn.

I live at Brompton, at Thoburn's nursery; I know very little of this business previous to the execution of the search warrant, when I went with the officer and Elizabeth Sibley .

Court. We will hear her first.

ELIZABETH SIBLEY sworn.

I live servant with the Honourable Martha Maria Hervey at Brompton; I am her maid; I resigned the key up to this man to bring away some wine, likewise some empty bottles, and the key of the house, and several articles which were in the house, which was to be removed to the house in James-Street, Westminster, which she left, the third house on the Terrace, on the right hand; I cannot rightly tell the day, but to the best of my knowledge, I think it was about this day fortnight; Thursday evening I gave him the key of the house, to bring away the things remaining in the house; two dozen of wine, some empty bottles, some pickles, and several articles which were left in the house.

What was the prisoner? - He assisted in moving the furniture from James-Street, to Brompton; he waters the horses at Buckingham-Gate; he has been a Hackney coachman.

What was your place in the kitchen? - I am cook.

Does your lady keep a housekeeper? - No.

Nor a maid of her own? - Not particularly.

How came you to be trusted with the key of the house? - My mistress entrusted me with the key; I packed up the wine myself; I was removing the furniture, and was in the house last; I have lived with her between four and five years; I packed up the wine in a large hamper; I left it in a house behind in the yard; gave him the key on a Thursday; he was to bring the things at his leisure times; there was no particular time set for him to bring them; on the Sunday evening he came to Brompton; I asked him where the key of the house was, and the reason he did not bring it, and the things he had to bring, he said, he had delivered the key up to the landlady, and there was no wine left in the house; I asked him where the remainder of the things were; he said they were a pack of d - d dirty rubbish, old trumpery things, that he had given them to an old woman about the streets; I expressed the wine particularly; he said no, it was not there, for he helped the wine into the cart himself when we were moving; I told him if the wine was not there, it had certainly been taken away out of the house by him, or somebody that he knew; on the Monday I went to fetch the wine, and the man with me, and I thought it must be some where there, but there was not any thing in the house, but two or three bottles of stuff that was not of any consequence in the least, and two bottles of salt water.

How did you get into the house? - I went to the landlady for a key, with the man with me to fetch the wine away, neither of them would do any thing; then it was almost nine at night, on Sunday evening; on the Tuesday, I went to Mr. Wright's office, and took out a warrant against him, and we found the man watering the horses at Buckingham-gate; we asked him particularly as we went in, whether he knew any thing of the wine; he expressed very much that he knew nothing of it; we took him to Mr. Wright's, and had his apartments searched, and found thirteen bottles of liquors in his apartments; I cannot rightly say what, and several things which we did not expect to see, was there, such as pictures, two of them green birds, which I cannot swear to, and my mistress's coat of arms, and my mistress's crest, I think it was; a cannister, and a great many things I do not chuse to swear to; these pictures were my mistress's; there was something more left in the empty house, which was locked up in an empty closet, which was some empty bottles, that was all that was left in the house, and likewise a napkin.

What liquor was it? - I cannot tell, it was different sorts; I am pretty sure it is my mistress's, but I do not chuse to swear to it, but the pictures I am sure of; I have some here that will pattern them in this handkerchief.

Mr. Garrow, prisoner's counsel. Mrs. Sibley, this lady was moving? - Yes.

Most of her things had been moved? - Yes.

The rubbish was left to be moved by this man at his leisure? - Yes.

No particular time fixed? - No, no particular time fixed, as soon as he could.

What might be the value of all the things left behind? - I cannot tell.

What might be the value of this old towel? - It is valued in the indictment.

Because you are a judge of it; you belong to the kitchen; do you think it was worth three-pence or four-pence? - Yes, Sir, and a great deal more; it is not an old towel.

A young one then; now cookey, this towel that has no darns in it, and these

other things, this man was to bring when it suited him, and when it was convenient for him? - Yes.

You found him at his work at Buckingham-gate? - Yes.

How long has he worked there, cook? - I cannot tell.

How long have you known him working there without any sort of imputation on his character, cook? - I have known him working there.

Is not there a little matter of vails to the cook upon moving? - That I do not understand.

How long have you known him: half a year? - More than that.

Two years? - Near two years.

Now upon your oath, Mrs. Cook, and you seem a choice spirit too, did you ever hear any body whisper any thing against the man's character in your life? - I will not be upon my oath.

Upon your oath, woman, during the two years this man was working there daily and nightly, did you hear any thing against his character? - I never heard any thing against his character till he came to move our goods, never in my life, my mistress sent for him.

She had employed him during the time she had lived in James Street? - Yes, he had been in the house for some weeks waiting on a gentleman.

Upon your oath, Mrs. Cook, had not there been a little misunderstanding between you and this man that had been in the house for some weeks? - I knew nothing of the man.

But he knew something of you and something of some other man, was not there some misunderstanding? - No Sir.

Will you swear that? - Yes, Sir, I will swear that there was no misunderstanding at all that I know of, not in the least.

Had you never any words with him before you quitted James Street? - Yes Sir; no Sir; not any thing particular at all.

Neither in anger nor otherwise, do you mean to swear, because he will contradict you if you do, that you had no misunderstanding, no dispute, no quarrel with this man before you went out of St. James's Street? - No Sir, none at the time of moving that I knew of.

Do you mean to swear that after this man was brought into the house of your mistress, you and he never had any words of any sort? - No words, not to my recollection in the least; I do not recollect any words.

Do not you know that you had words with him, and quarrelled with him? - No Sir.

Will you swear you had none? - Yes.

No dispute of any sort? - No.

No words with him of any sort? - None.

What place did you find these things in his lodgings? - In his bed chamber.

Were they concealed? - No, they were hung round about his drawers over a chest of drawers.

Had he brought any thing to Mrs. Hervey's before you went to his room? - No Sir, he had brought nothing.

Was not the first charge you made against him for taking a washing stool, a hair broom, and a tray? - Yes.

Was not it in answer to that; that he told you they were such rubbish he had given them away? - Yes.

Now upon your oath, at that time was there one syllable mentioned of any wine? - Yes; I asked him where it was, he said, he saw no wine.

Did not you before the magistrate first accuse him of this washing stool, this hair broom and tray? - Yes, because he owned to nothing else; the washing stool is in the landlady's yard, the man told me so.

What may be the value of it? - It is of no consequence.

Was there any permit for moving this wine, was not the man to carry the wine as he could so as to avoid the Excise officers? - He was to bring it to our house at his leisure; I do not know there was any particular time; I cannot tell whether he was to bring it two bottles at a time.

Were not these his instructions, to bring it a few bottles at a time? - No Sir, he was

instructed to bring it two bottles at a time, his instructions were to bring the wine there was two dozen.

Was not he told if he attempted to bring the two bottles at a time it was liable to seizure; was not he so told? - I do not know that.

Did you ever hear that? - No Sir.

Never in your life? - No Sir.

Do not you know he was expressly told so? - No Sir, I do not know that; my mistress gave him his orders to bring the things, she told him to bring the things; he was to bring them at his leisure, I suppose there was no particular time mentioned; it could not be a great while, because the key must be delivered up at such a time on quarter day.

When did you give it him? - This day fortnight, all the things were cleared out, and the key delivered up a fortnight ago almost.

WILLIAM EMMES sworn.

I only know that the man was employed to assist me in removing the goods from Brompton, I slept in the house at Brompton a week before Mrs. Hervey went into it, after all the things were moved except two dozen of wine, he had the key, he never came near the place till Sunday; I do not know of my own knowledge what things were left in the house; on the Monday evening my master lay dead in the house at Brompton, the next morning I went with this servant girl to Mr. Justice Wright's office, who granted a warrant to have him taken up on suspicion, when he went before Mr. Wright in the coach, he first of all denied the wine, I told him we did not wish to have any thing done to him, if he would only tell what was done with it, as the maid was accused; he said he knew nothing of the wine, but he had the washing stool, the broom and the tray; a search warrant was granted, we went down to bring these things, and when we went into the house, to our great surprize we found the property in this hamper which is a part of the wine; fifteen bottles of something I cannot say what it was, there was one empty pint bottle with a label of my own hand writing, lavender.

Mr. Garrow. That is not in the indictment? - They are now in the hamper two of them the officers and the people present drank; and the thirteen were in the hamper, one of the bottles was red port, I did drink of it, I cannot say what the other was; Mr. Wright tasted it, he said it was wine, but did not know what sort; there were seven pictures framed and glazed, and three that I can swear to, as having the fellows of them, I have often seen them besides, here they are.

(Producing them.)

Do you know this little picture? - Yes, by having the fellow to it; this I brought with me yesterday morning from Brompton.

Court. Do you know them or not? - Perfectly well by sight, I am perfectly clear they were Mrs. Hervey's, they were hung up against the wainscot in the prisoner's room, and I had hung them in Mrs. Mervey's room.

Elizabeth Silbey . I know them perfectly well, I am very sure they are the very same.

Court. What did the prisoner say when these things were found? - When we came before a justice nothing was said, he was committed for re-examination; all the articles besides those have been removed before, every body knew he had those to remove, he spoke of the wine when the cart was at the door; the prisoner said it was not well pack'd, let it lay, and he would bring it with him; the wine was to be brought by the prisoner, it was no secret.

No particular time was fixed I understand, for the time he was to remove them, was at his leisure? - Undoubtedly, yet Sir there would have been very great satisfaction in having it brought.

Then you allowed him from the Thursday to the Monday, and then you got a search warrant? - Yes.

How long have you been acquainted with Mrs. Sibley? - Ever since I knew Mrs. Hervey.

Had there been any little misunderstanding in the family? - No, he did clean shoes and go of errands for a gentleman in the house.

Mr. Garrow. He was a very welcome guest, a great man likes to have a deputy always; was not there a little misunderstanding between the cook and him? - How am I to understand what you mean?

Do not you know that before you quitted James-street, this man and the cook had had a misunderstanding? - I never heard of any such thing.

How long have you known the prisoner? - Three or four months, I have known Mrs. Hervey's family three or four years, I went to assist in apprehending him, I found him in his usual business, he had been spoken to on this about the Sunday.

Upon your oath down to the time was taken into custody by the advice of this justice, who is deaf and hears nothing you have said, did you ever hear any thing against his character? - Never, if I had heard any thing against him, I should not have wished to have had him about me.

Every body knew he had the care of these things? - Yes.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lord, I was at the moving of these things from James-street to Brompton, the maid servant had the order to give the key in, she gave me the key, and told me not to let her mistress know any thing about it, and I kept the key a day or two, and the owners asked me to resign these things up, I kept the things to carry them at my leisure time, for which I had an order; I was asked to go out with a coach for a master I lived with because his man was was taken ill.

Court. How came you to deny that you had any of these things? - My meaning was to carry them home.

The prisoner called four respectable witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-79

481. HANNAH FOWLEY was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of May , one pair of men's silk stockings, value 8 s. one cambrick neck handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Fryer .

JOSEPH FRYER sworn.

My wife takes in washing for several gentlemen, and this woman has washed for her six months; on the 29th of May, a little girl went for a gentleman's linen to Watling-street, she brought in a bundle, and finding a pair of new silk stockings unmarked, I mark'd them I. R. these stockings were taken away, and found at a pawnbrokers in Whitechapel, No. 105.

WILLIAM KINDLE sworn.

On Friday the 30th of May, the prisoner came with this pair of stockings and a half handkerchief, and pledged them at our house for 4 s. I asked her no questions as she was a tidy looking woman; she was a stranger, I was at Guildhall and I saw her in custody; it was at noon, there was no person in the shop but myself, I am sure she is the same woman, I delivered them to Rayner the constable, they were the same things the prisoner pledged with me.

THOMAS RAYNER sworn.

I only produce the things in consequence of a search warrant, the woman delivered to me a great number of duplicates, among the rest was one for a pair of silk stockings, and likewise a half neck handkerchief.

Joseph Fryer . I suspected her, she acknowledged

the fact, she was told it would be better for her.

(The things produced and deposed to by the marks.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Gentlemen, I found the stockings and the handkerchief in the yard as I went out, rolled one on the other, I took them with me, I was necessitated for a little money, I sent a person to pawn them, the gentleman never saw me; the prosecutor told me if I would own, he would forgive me.

Witnesses called to her character, but none appeared.

GUILTY .

Privately whipped and imprisoned for six months .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-80

482. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of June , one black cloth coat, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Ruffell ; one pewter pint pot, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Strouts ; one other pint pot, value 10 d. the property of Adam Rigg ; and another pint pot, value 10 d. the property of William Bond .

RICHARD RUFFELL sworn.

The prisoner stole my coat, I was out on my business as a ticket porter .

THOMAS STROUT sworn.

The prisoner came into my house about one at noon, the Three Crowns, Dowgate-hill, he had one pint of beer, it was on the 11th of June, he was going out at the door, I stopped him at the door seeing him with something under his coat tucked up behind it; I asked him what it was, he said nothing; I put my hand under his coat, and found the last witness's coat, he plies at our house, and left his coat there; I found a pint pot belonging to Mr. Bishop, and there was one pot found belonging to me, he said he did not mean to carry them away; but he was going out when I stopt him, he had not got over the threshold.

(The coat and pot produced and deposed to.)

Court. We cannot receive any evidence of the other pots under this indictment, they are distinct felonies at different times.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I came into the public house in liquor and fell asleep, and somebody laid the coat over me.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-81

483. SARAH DOWDELL was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of February , two cotton gowns, value 20 s. three silk cloaks, value 20 s. and divers other things , the property of Mary Tisdale .

MARY TISDALE sworn.

I hired the prisoner about eleven months ago to live with me, and she went away and came again some time afterwards at 2 s. a week; I went after a house and left the prisoner in charge of my house and the child, the child was screaming to that

"success" the value of half a pint of blood was by the side of the cradle, this was on the 10th of February; all my wearing apparel was taken except a pair of stays which I have on; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, two white muslin marseilles petticoats, six white handkerchiefs, three silk cloaks, one shawl, a piece of fringe, a piece of lace, three white aprons, one new that was never made up; I was a widow at this time, I value the

gowns at a guinea, the petticoats at a guinea, the silk cloaks two guineas, the linen aprons half a guinea, the handkerchiefs and shawl half a guinea, the lace and a pair of gloves, and some trimming of small value; I was obliged to break in the windows to get at the child, the doors were all locked, I was two or three hours before I could compose myself with the child, and when I went for a clean night cap, my locks were all broke, and every thing gone except my child's things; I took a coach and went to her mother's, but did not hear any thing of her, I found her again, six or seven weeks ago, on Wednesday in Whitsun week, and took her up; we were obliged to break open the door at last to get at her, her mother lived at Stratford near the Swan, I brought her to town, and she was carried before Justice Staples, I found a piece of lace, a pair of gloves, and a piece of trimming of one of my gowns wrapt up in a sampler, the gloves were wet just washed; when I went in I asked her how she could use me so ill, so fond as I was of her, and how she could use the child so ill six months old, to lock it in the house, and the other she locked out in the street; the last thing I did before I went out of my house, was to lay up my things all clean, except one dirty gown, and lock up my box; it was half after one in the day, I came back about five.

MARY STEPHENSON sworn.

I made my sister a present of a piece of lace, and this lace was found on the prisoner, I do not know that she robbed her of it.

GEORGE HOLLAND sworn.

I am constable, I took up the prisoner, this woman came up with me to the house, I could not get in, this was taken out of a trash-bag, and those gloves were taken off the line wet.

(The gloves and lace deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Please you my Lord, the woman says, she would sell my blood for the sake of the money, I have a witness of it, for the sake of the forty shillings; Sir, she is an old bawd, and I went to lie with her, and I was ruined with her, and she wanted me to pick a gentleman's pocket, and I run away and made my escape as well as I could.

ELIZABETH CHISSEL sworn.

Court. Do you know the prisoner? - My Lord, yes.

How long? - From the time she was at school, I can say nothing against her; she came from Drury-lane, and called upon me, and begged I would lend her a guinea to go down to Manchester, and I did.

When was that? - I cannot tell the day, I know very little of the prosecutor, I never heard her say any thing against the girl.

- LEVY sworn.

I have been here yesterday, the prosecutor said to me that she would wish to have the girl cast, that she might get 40 l. by the prisoner; that is all that I know of it.

Court. How came she to say this to you? - She knows me, and I know her, so she came up to me and said, you are intending here? I said, yes, I am obliged to intend here; says she, I wish to God that my prisoner would weigh forty; says I, what does she mean? to another woman; says the woman, she means to hang her: I know the prosecutor very well, I did not know the girl.

Prosecutor. I never spoke to her; she set some bad women upon me, and I was obliged to give charge to the constable of her, I never spoke to her, never mentioned a word to her, I never knew her, only she passed by my house several times; she has been at my house, I keep a shop, she has bought garden-stuff of me; the constable is at the gate in a kind of claret coloured coat, but I do not know his name.

(The constable sent for.)

Mrs. Levy. Every body knows that she

keeps a bawdy house, I am sure of it, but I have not been in it, she hired this girl as a maid; this girl that is a witness was in her house as a girl herself.

Mrs. DOWDELL sworn.

The prisoner is my daughter, this woman was over at the King's-Head, at Stratford, in Essex, and sent for my child and told her there was a place for her; she went and came home and said, mother, I have a place, I will go to it to-morrow; I lost her for twelve days, I happened to go down Church-street, and saw her there, I said, Sally, Sally, have you got to Mrs. Breeds? because she had a child by a man of that name who lived at Stratford, our parish allowed her 2 s. a week; a young woman that is on the outside now, went on the Monday, and she told her as soon as ever she could get an opportunity she would run away, she took half her things and half she left behind her, and her boxes; and this woman that swears against her, has keys that unlocks her box and her little trunks; she lent me her keys to unlock them; when my daughter run away she went to her sister at the other end of the town, and borrowed a guinea to go down to Manchester, then she came up to me, and they came and took her into custody; they turned and tossed all my things about, I lost a silver tea-spoon, a pair of white cotton stockings, a silver three-pence, the things all lay about the room when I came in.

Court. Did the prosecutor come to your house to enquire after your daughter? - Yes, she came and asked me if my daughter was come home, I said no; oh! says she, she has robbed me; says I, she has not been here, nor has she got half her things as I am informed; says she, here is my bunch of keys, and you may unlock the box and see, which I did.

Had your daughter been in her service before? - When she was big with child with this last, a chance child that she had by young Joe Linnel , she did not swear it, but she got three guineas from one, and three guineas from another, or else she would have sworn it; she was with her one week, and then she run away.

Jury. Is this your own daughter? - Yes, and she served seven years in the charity-school, I have but two alive; I have another whose husband belongs to the India-house, and rents a house of 50 l. a year, she did not tell me the second time where she was going to live, for I knew her to be a bad woman; the first time she enticed her away from one Mr. Jourdan's in Spital-fields, I did not know where she was.

Your daughter did not behave very well, I doubt? - Why my Lord, she is but young, very young, and she was brought up in the school.

WILLIAM BOX the Constable sworn.

Court. Did the woman give charge of any body? - No, I never saw the woman before.

Did she charge any body in custody? - No, not at all, there were three girls talking about bawdy-house-keeping, and I told them it was not right, and I turned them out of the yard.

Jury. My Lord we are satisfied.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-82

484. TIMOTHY MURPHY and MARY MURPHY were indicted, for that they on the 2d of May last, feloniously and falsely did make, forge and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be made, forged and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the false making, forging and counterfeiting, a certain will and testament, partly printed and partly written, purporting to be the will of James Ready , late mariner on board his Majesty's ship the Eagle, dated the 7th of March, 1777, with an intention to defraud the king .

A second Count, For uttering the same, knowing it to be forged, with the like intention.

A third and fourth Counts, For forging and uttering the same, with an intention to defraud Eleanor Ready , widow .

The indictment opened by Mr. Fielding, and the case by Mr. Baldwin.

THOMAS FLETCHER sworn.

(Examined by Mr. Silvester.)

I am clerk in the Prerogative office, and produce the original will, I brought this from the proper office, this is the revocation of the probare of this will, this is the original minute book of the court, (reads) dated 2d of May, 1787, the day it was granted.

What is the date of the order of revocation? - Second session of Trinity, Wednesday 28th May, 1788.

JOHN GILES CHRISTIAN sworn.

(Examined by Mr. Fielding.)

I am a proctor of Doctor's Commons, I know both the prisoners, I remember in 1786, application being made to me by the woman some time about the middle of the year 1786, she brought the will in question, signed Phillip Murphy , I saw the will produced, I suppose it is the same, (looks at it.)

Do you believe that that is the same? - Yes, I do.

Court. Is there any writing of yours upon it? - No.

By what do you know it to be the same? - By the remarkable signature of the witnesses names, as it has rather a remarkable appearance.

Have you a distinct remembrance of it? - Yes, I have, I had it a great while in my hands.

Are you clear it is the same will? - Yes, I am, to the best of my remembrance, she came and said she had a will to prove, upon looking at it, I perceived she was not the excutrix.

Court. Did you ask her her name? - Yes, I did at the time, I do not know whether it was just before or after.

What name did she tell you? - I cannot exactly tell you, but seeing her so frequently afterwards, I took her to have the name of Ann Murphy .

What name did she give you? - I am not certain whether she told me her name.

How came it you did not ask her what her connection with the executor was, or any thing about it? - I believe I might.

Have not you a recollection then? - I think she told me that her husband was a creditor.

Did she say that her husband was the executor? - No, she did not, I believe, she said her husband was the attorney of the executor, the I told her it was necessary her husband should come himself; I dare say I asked her name, but I cannot recollect I did, all that I recollect was that her name was Murphy, but I am not sure to the christian name, because I always called her Mrs. Murphy.

Court. Did she tell you that her name was Murphy? - Yes, I believe she has told me so; I do not recollect the time, but in the course of the business she told me her name was Murphy.

During any part of the transaction afterwards, did you see the other prisoner with her? - I have since that time.

Did they pass as man and wife then? - I always understood and looked upon them as man and wife.

When you told her that she not being the executrix of course could not prove the will, what did she say? - I do not recollect what she might say, I suppose she might say she would bring her husband.

Court. Do not suppose, tell us what she said, tell us what passed on the occasion, what you said and she said? - I think at the time she came and offered the will, I finding she was not the executrix, I enquired I suppose -

Court. You must not suppose about it, tell us what you know and no more? - Perceiving she was not the executrix, I naturally asked her if she had not a husband.

Court. Did you ask her that? - I am not certain, but think from the nature of the

business I must, I told her when she told me that her husband was the attorney of the executor and was a creditor, I am sure she told me that, I told her he must come and take administration with the will annext, as the attorney of the executor; she told me at the time her husband had a power of attorney.

Did any thing else pass between you by way of question, from your observation from her where the executor himself was? - I made enquiry after the executor, I am not sure whether she said he was at sea or in Ireland, it was either one or the other, I think it was in Ireland.

What more passed between you at that time? - I believe nothing more.

Court. Did she leave the will with you? - I have it not in my recollection whether she did or not; she came in a day or two with Mr. Landy who was my clerk at that time, he spoke to her, I did not see her, I did not see her some time after that, for Mr. Landy did the business; several times afterwards I saw her again.

Did any thing particular ever happen at any of the times subsequent when you saw her? - No, I do not recollect.

When did you first see Timothy the husband with her? - I think it was some time after the application that he came to my office.

Did any thing pass between you and him? - I do not recollect any thing.

What did he come for? - He came at different times afterwards, finding a caveat was entered by two proctors.

Had you yourself in consequence of this, taken any steps in the business? - No, I did not take any steps.

Do you recollect any thing that ever passed between you and Timothy on the subject.

Court. Have you ever heard the husband say any thing about it, one thing or the other? - I have several times since the administration was got under seal, the husband first came, in some time after her application to me, it was before administration was granted.

Did the husband when you first saw him come with the wife or not? - That I do not recollect, it is so long ago I cannot tell, I have seen him at different times with her and without her, but the first time I do not recollect whether he came with her, or without her, he came the first time about this business, I do not recollect what he said.

When was the first time you heard him say any thing about this? - The first time, I cannot recollect the exact time, but I recollect that he, upon representing how the business was to him.

At the time you are going to speak of now, did he come with the wife or alone? - He came so often that I do not recollect.

I want to know when he first interfered in this business, and said any thing to you about this will, or whether he ever did? - Several times, but he came so often I cannot say whether he came alone, he came oftener alone, sometimes with his wife.

When did you first understand from himself that he had any thing at all to do with this will? - It must be some short time after the wife first came to me, but how long I cannot recollect.

Then when you understood that he had any thing to do with this will, what did he say about it? - I do not recollect the words that he said.

Can you tell nearly, can you tell the exact particular part of what he said? - He asked me once who the parties were that entered the caveat, I told him.

What did he say to that? - I told him the nature of the proceedings in our court in those cases, and upon that he told me to warn the proctors to the caveats.

Did he himself make use of that expression? - I told him the nature of the process of our courts; accordingly the proctors to the caveats were warned.

Court. Did the husband Timothy ever tell you what he had to do with this will? - He appeared as the attorney of the executor.

Did he produce any power of attorney? - He did produce the power of attorney in

my office, I have not got it, there is a gentleman who has it, who is a witness, I saw it afterwards, I did not see him produce it at that time.

Had you ever any talk with him about that warrant of attorney afterwards? - Not in particular any more than as the attorney of the executor, I was to warn the other proctors to the caveats, and assign a time to appear before the court accordingly; I do not recollect whether I appeared that day on the court day or not myself, but both proctors were assigned to exhibit proxies as the proctors for the creditor was to exhibit affidavit or shew bond; accordingly after the form of the court, there was a proxy exhibited by Timothy, authorizing me to appear as proctor.

Do you recollect about when that was? - The date of it will shew.

Did you take any step yourself when you was apprized of the caveat being entered, did you enquire at all into the ground why a caveat was entered against this will? - Yes.

Mr. Baldwin. Did you do the business yourself or your clerk? - I was ill at the time and the clerk did the business.

SAMUEL SANDY sworn.

We understand from the last witness that you are the principal man in his office? - I suppose I was rather accurate in the business.

Do you recollect either the prisoners or one of them coming to Mr. Christian? - I can recollect particularly the woman, she came first to the best of my recollection, I was there when she first came, she produced a will, this is the will, there are some figures upon it of my writing.

What was said to her? - I am afraid I shall not be able to recollect the circumstance; we found the will could not be proved from the account she gave, I do not know whether I can attempt to particularize the words; we found that there was a power of attorney, and soon after it was brought.

Who brought that power of attorney? - There was such a group of them, there was Philip Murphy , and there was the two prisoners; I do not know which it was that came first, I am sure I cannot swear positively to the power of attorney.

Did any of them bring a power of attorney? - Yes, there was one brought, but I cannot tell who brought it.

How soon after Mary Murphy had been the first time was it that this power of attorney was produced? - Some few days after; then the prisoner Timothy came and Philip was with him once or twice, but whether Timothy came alone that time I cannot say, I have seen them altogether repeatedly; they gave proper instructions that a proxy should be drawn.

Is that the proxy, and are you a witness to it? - This proxy is of my own engrossing and executing.

Did you see Timothy execute that? - I cannot recollect positively, it was some little time after this proxy was signed.

Are you in the habit of witnessing things that you do not see signed? - We see them signed, but we do not take any particular notice of the parties.

Court. Then all that you know is, that you saw somebody sign this? - A Timothy Murphy did sign it; to the best of my belief it was the prisoner, but I cannot swear positively, because there was another person, Philip; I should know Philip Murphy instantly, the prisoner was not Philip, I have seen the prisoner Timothy in that office.

Had they any business at that office, but relative to this will? - No other that I know of; I left his service almost immediately after that proxy was signed; he has no clerk now that I know of.

Court. Then understand that you cannot swear positively that the prisoner was the person that signed this? - I cannot; I can swear positively, that I have seen Timothy at that office, but whether or no he signed this proxy, I cannot say.

Who wrote the mark of Timothy Murphy ? - I wrote it myself, I wrote his name

and the mark, but who the person was that signed it I cannot positively swear.

To Christian. Who is the other witness? - He has left my service, I do not know where he is at present, I shall very likely see him, I do not know where he went to from me.

Court to Christian. Was you present when the proxy was signed? - No, I was not.

Had you ever any talk with the prisoner Timothy, about it; did you ever shew it to him? - I do not recollect.

Did you ever act for him? - No.

THOMAS MITCHEL sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Bishop and Weller; I know the prisoners, I cannot recollect how long it is since I saw them, it may be a year or two, I cannot say.

Where did you see them? - At Mr. Weller's office.

Upon what business did they come there? - Upon a business of James Ready , deceased.

Did you go any where with them? - They came in consequence of a caveat being entered by Mr. Bishop, for Mr. James Ryan a creditor, they applied in consequence of this caveat.

What did they say? - I cannot recollect perfectly what they said, I cannot recollect the exact purport, I believe it was to know for what reason the caveat was entered, to know who were our parties.

Who came to know? - I cannot say which of the prisoners came first, but I have seen them both, the parties came several times.

Which of the parties? - I cannot positively say, I do not recollect, they have come separate, and together very often upon that business.

What was the purport of their coming either separate or together? - To know what we meant to do on behalf of our party that was James Ryan .

Did they, or either of them, or both together, explain to you what interest they had to enquire about Mr. Ryan, or about your caveat? - They certainly had, but I cannot recollect the particulars, I cannot say, my recollection does not serve me so far.

Upon your oath what did they say to you? - I cannot recollect.

Nor the purport for which they came? They came to know for whom we entered the caveat.

Did you ask them what they had to do with it? - I do not doubt but I did, but I cannot recollect.

Did you go any where with either of the prisoners, come, Sir, upon your oath? - Sir, I cannot recollect.

Have you any such an officer as a Surrogate? - There are several.

Did you go before any Surrogate with either of them? - I cannot recollect, upon my oath I do not recollect; I do not upon the oath I have taken.

Do you know who was sworn administrator? - Not of my own knowledge.

Mr. Silvester. Produce the warrant; this is too much young man, I promise you it is no laughing matter.

Court. Let me look first what it is.

Court. I cannot permit you to shew him this to refresh his memory, for he it not a subscribing witness.

Mr. Silvester. I may ask him, is it his hand-writing? Is any part of it your handwriting? - There is the 12th of December, 1786, is the date; Bishop and Weller in the margin, and an alteration where the executor resided, Drogheda, in the county of Munster.

Court. Upon what occasion did you write that? - I cannot recollect that, but I have not a doubt but it was on the party being sworn, I have no doubt but some party was sworn, but who I cannot tell.

Did you see Dr. Harris, the Surrogate, sign this? - I cannot recollect that.

Court. There is a witness to this; Peter Jocelyn Cresswell , a notary-public.

Mr. Silvester. Are you articled to Mr. Bishop? - I am not.

Are you a mere writer? - A mere writer.

What do you laugh for? - I do not mean to laugh.

Perhaps you do not know the forms in in our common law courts, that you are sworn to speak the whole truth? - Yes.

You know Dr. Harris? - Oh! perfectly.

You know his hand-writing? - Perfectly.

Is that his hand-writing? - Yes, I can swear to it.

Then you have no knowledge of the party who went with you to swear that? - That I cannot possibly answer, it might be this person or it might not.

JOHN WILLOUGHBY sworn.

I was clerk to Messrs. Bishop and Weller, I have seen both the prisoners before at the office of Messrs. Bishop and Weller several times.

Upon what occasion, and upon what business was it that you saw them? - A caveat was entered in the month of January. 1786; in May, the same year, Mr. Jenner entered a caveat also; and about two months after that there was a caveat entered, they both brought in their wills.

Which will did the prisoners both or either of them bring? did they bring you any will? - I cannot say, we were not for them, we were for a creditor, Ryan.

Upon what occasion was it that you have seen the prisoners, or either of them? - By reference from Mr. Christian, I believe they were referred to me from Mr. Christian.

Did they come to you? - Several times, some times together, and sometimes otherwise.

When you saw them separate, what was the business they came upon? - About the business of Ready.

In what character? - As the attorney, I fancy.

Court. Do not fancy, tell us what they said? - If you will give me leave, I will tell the circumstance; Mr. Christain, I believe, was arrested by some of his creditors, and he was under confinement for some considerable sum, during this confinement I believe Mr. Jenner declined proceeding, the prisoners came with a power of attorney.

Did they produce any power of attorney? - The power of attorney which I have brought, this is it.

Who produced that power of attorney? - They were both together.

Court. What do you know this power of attorney by? - I have had it in my possession ever since.

Then you are sure that is the one that they produced? - Yes, I then told them that I should do nothing; I went in to the register, and looked at the will, and the appearance was not very well, and I told them I should do nothing for Mr. Christian, or them in business, unless I was satisfied it was a fair and proper will; and I told them there had been a great many frauds, and bad wills that were brought, and I should do nothing without I was satisfied; they told me they did not know whether it was a fair will or no, but there was one of the witnesses in London, but it had been delivered to them by a man who had made a power of attorney to them.

Were they both together then? - Yes, I believe they were; I did not prepare a warrant till I was satisfied in my own mind that the will was proper, and had been inspected before it bore the seal of the office; still I suspected it; some time after this, they brought a person who said he had witnessed the will; I asked him a great many questions about it, I did not shew him the will, but I asked him to wrote his name.

Were the prisoners present? - I cannot say particularly that they were, but I could almost venture to say that they were, because he could not know where to come without them; the man wrote his name to this paper.

Court. We cannot receive that as evidence against the prisoners, what he said; when you are sure the prisoners were present you may tell us. Were the prisoners both or either of them present, when you had this conversation with the witness? - I should rather think so.

But you must be sure of it; will you swear it? - I may venture, I think, with safety so to do, I cannot say; I know I had

a long conversation with the witness, and I will tell you his answer.

Court. No, we cannot hear that? - I am sure that one of the prisoners brought the man to the office.

But was either of the prisoners present, and in the hearing of that conversation? - I should not choose to swear positively that they were.

Court. Then I cannot hear what he said? - In consequence of this I drew that warrant.

Is that warrant signed? - It is signed by the Surrogate and the Notary, I was not present when it was sworn.

Mr. Baldwin. Did you send Mitchell with the parties? - I rather think Mitchell did not attend the swearing; I rather think that one of Mr. Christian's clerks did.

(The will read.)

ROBERT HORNE sworn.

The Eagle was a 74 gun ship. James Ready entered the 4th of February, 1779; I cannot say where the ship was at that time.

Does it appear in that book when he died? - Yes; 6th of August, 1784, at Madrass hospital.

Can you learn by the same book when Philip Murphy entered? - was there any man of the name of Philip Murphy in February or March, 1779? - No, there was not.

When did Philip Murphy enter? - The 19th of January, 1780.

Was there any man of that name on board before that time? - I have searched the books for that purpose and found none.

Where was the ship then? - I have not the books here to tell, that I could tell at the office; the ship's journal is here.

When did Philip Murphy leave the ship? - This book goes to September, 1784, he remained on board then.

Court. Is there any man in the Eagle's books of the name of Timothy Murphy ? - I have not looked for that.

Court. Look for it while the trial is going on, Where do you bring the journal from? - From the navy office; it is returned there by the master.

THOMAS CRIBEN sworn.

Was there any man on board the Eagle, of the name of Timothy Murphy, in February or March, 1779? - Not to my knowledge, not at all while I was master.

Was the ship Eagle at sea, or in harbour, in February or March, 1779? - The ship got under way at St. Helena-Road at six in the morning, on the 7th of March, 1779.

For what voyage? - For the East Indies.

Was there any such person on board as Philip Murphy ? - There was not; on the 19th of January, 1780, the ship was in Madrass Road, in the East Indies.

Where was she in February, 1784, when Ready died? - I was not in her at that time, I left her in 1783.

Where was she then? - She then was in the island of Trincomale, I went to another ship.

Did you know James Ready at all? - I did.

Do you happen to know whether he could write or no? - I do not remember that I ever saw him write.

Did you know one James Gilpin ? - I recollect the name perfectly, but I do not know the person.

Can you ascertain from the master's book when Gilpin entered on board? - He entered the 22d of January, 1779, and died the 1st of April, 1784.

CALEB COOK sworn.

I was captain's clerk on board the Eagle.

Did you know James Ready on board that ship? - Yes.

Do you remember where you were, in 1779? - At Spithead.

Did you witness any will that Ready made at that time? - I made about twenty or thirty wills at that time, I know my own hand writing.

The Remainder of this Trial in the next Part, which will be published in a few Days.

Reference Number: t17880625-82

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex, HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 25th of JUNE, 1788, and the following Days;

Being the SIXTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honourable John Burnell , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY E. HODGSON, PROFESSOR OF SHORT-HAND; And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VI. PART V.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXVIII.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the trial of Timothy Murphy , and Mary Murphy .

Look at that? - I witnessed this, it bears date the 15th of February, 1779.

Do you recollect where you were at that time? - It must have been at Spithead at that time.

Could Ready himself write? - I really forget, having so many powers, but he certainly could by his name being there, that certainly was his hand writing.

Court. Did you know James Ready personally? - Yes.

Then you saw him write this? - Undoubtedly I did, there was one Thomas Rudd on board at that time, and James Ready ; I believe they both came out of the Greyhound.

Mr. Baldwin. Read that will.

Court. The contents of that will can be no evidence, it is a paper under the hand writing of the testator; how do you make that evidence, no matter what the contents of it is?

Court to Cribben. Whose command did the ship sail under from Spithead? - Ambrose Riddle , he succeeded Sir Roger Curtis , some time about the 22d or 23d of February.

JAMES DAVIDSON sworn.

I am shopman to Messrs. Page and Mount, Stationers, on Tower Hill.

Who prints the wills for your house? - Mr. March.

Do you know whether this is one of yours? - I believe it is printed on the same paper we generally print them on.

Court. That is no evidence? - I cannot say for certainty whether that is from one of our plates.

Court. Then that comes to nothing.

JOHN MARCH sworn.

I understand for these twenty years you have printed for the house of Mount and Page? - Yes, to all appearance this seems to be one I printed, I believe the plate is that way.

Court. Can you tell with certainty whether that is from that plate, possibly you may; if you can, say so? - I think it is as nigh as I can judge.

Have you any doubt about it? - I cannot say I have any doubt.

JOHN GALE sworn.

I am an engraver.

That plate I believe has been repaired or something by you? - Either this or one much like it has been repaired at my house for Messrs. Mount and Page, I think it was the 2d of April, 1783.

Court to Davidson. Have you any other plate than one for seamens wills? - They are always left in the possession of Mr. March.

Was any one repaired at that time? - Only one.

Is that the one? - I cannot take upon myself to say.

To March. Did you send that plate to be repaired? - No Sir,

Who did? - Messrs. Mount and Page, I cannot say whether this is that that was repaired, I have had it in my possession these five or six years.

To Gale. Have you a doubt about it? - I have not a doubt but this is an impression from this plate in the state it is in at present; it appears to be a repaired plate, here is a mark in the plate that has been done by some accident, and the motto is wrong, it is officie instead of officii.

Court. Then this is the very same plate that was attempted to be proved here before on another trial.

Mr. Garrow. Yes, my Lord, it was, and it failed.

March. I do not keep in memory when we send our plates to our employers.

How long have you had that plate in your possession in the state in which it now is? - I believe four or five years.

Can you say that it was not longer than that? - No, I do not think it was longer.

Have not you had it in your possession nine years? - I cannot say positively.

To Gale. When did you alter the plate? - I do not know when it was altered, if it is the same plate, it was the 2d of April, 1783, but whether this is the same plate I cannot say.

To Davidson. Had you ever any altered but this? - We had but one, I can't recollect the circumstance.

Court. We tried at it before.

What became of the plate that was altered? - It was repaired and was sent to Mr. March.

Mr. March. I have had the plate I dare say four or five years, I have had no other will plate but that, I really cannot say how long I have had it.

To Davidson. Was it sent to Mr. March when it was repaired? - That plate which was repaired went to Mr. March.

March. I have no other in my possession.

Court to Timothy Murphy . Do you wish to say any thing about this will how you came by it? - Yes.

If you have a mind I will hear what you have to say.

Prisoner Timothy Murphy . By keeping a house and lodging, and chandler's shop this Thomas Ready lodged with me and a great many more, and by his going to sea, when he came home he came to me again, he and a good many more sailors with him; when he went he owed me a trifle of money, and when he came back he owed me a great deal more, and was with me a good while, that is three weeks, then he left me his own power and this will along with it, he did not pay me any money, he told me the money was sure, so I being persuaded by the neighbours and some of my lodgers to take it, that the money was sure when it was payable, which would be in five or six months, I lent him all the money I could, and he told me to get the money and he would send for it, I kept the thing in the house and did not know what to do with it, at last I was persuaded to carry it to the commons, I happened to send it to Mr. Christian by my wife, I would not go myself, she went and I went, and at last I was stopt.

Mrs. Murphy. May I speak? - There is nothing against you, you cannot be convicted on this indictment certainly.

Court to Jury. Gentlemen, I think I need not trouble you to call witnesses, there is no evidence; it is in proof to you, strong proof, that the will in question is a forgery; the two circumstances from whence I incline to think that are these;

the first is, that it purports to be the mark of James Ready , and it is very clearly proved he could write tolerably well, and there is another still stronger, that one of the witnesses to this will was not on board that ship at the time the will bears date, not for two months after; these two circumstances together do afford a very strong presumption that this will is a forgery; but that is not the only question you are to try, but whether it is forged by either of these prisoners, or whether they knew it to be forged, when they uttered it as a good will; now upon that I state to you few grounds why it seems to me there is nothing to charge them with; this is a will of Thomas Ready , it is in proof to you, that there was a man of the name of Thomas Ready on board the Eagle, during all the time that James Ready was on board, then the prosecutors themselves have given in evidence a warrant of attorney executed by one Thomas Ready before the then lord mayor of London, Mr. Alderman Wright, and executed in February 1786; why then it is not as the council opened, that upon their being told a warrant of attorney was necessary, they went and brought a warrant of attorney of a man who was then in Ireland; which would be a strong circumstance, but this warrant of attorney bears date on the 8th of February, and their production of it was in the month of May, so that it is perfectly consistent with the supposition of Thomas Ready being in Ireland at that time, therefore there is no circumstance in that which proves that the prisoners story is not true; on the contrary it accords with all the circumstances of the case; if Thomas Ready or Philip Murphy were either of them at your bar the case would be the stronger, but Philip Murphy , who was on board the ship, he appears at the same time present with the two prisoners, and acknowledges the will, there is no proof of any connection between the prisoners and Philip Murphy , though each is of the same name; and when Timothy Murphy is asked whether it is a fair will, all that they can say is, they do not know, they received it from a witness who is now in London; there is nothing at all now in evidence to charge either of the prisoners; as to the woman prisoner, if there was evidence, she must be acquitted, because she was in company with her husband; but there is no evidence against either of them.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

485. THE same two prisoners were both again indicted for the same offence, and there being no other evidence, they were BOTH ACQUITTED.

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-83

486. SUSANNA RICHARDS and MARIA M'KENZIE were indicted for stealing on the 10th of May , a silver watch, value 4 l. a steal seal, value 3 s. the property of Christopher Finney , from his person .

CHRISTOPHER FINNEY sworn.

I lost my watch on the 10th of May last between eleven and twelve in the night, in Parker's Street, St. Giles's ; coming past the door I saw Susanna Richards at the door, she asked me how I did, and to come in, I set myself down, I had seen her once before; I fell asleep on the bed, and she took my watch away from me, and they were taking my rule out of my pocket, I awaked and said it would be of no service to them, and desired them to leave it alone, and they let it alone; I said I missed my watch; she said she knew nothing of it; I said she must; she asked me the description of it; I told her it was a silver watch with two cases and gold hands, and my name on the dial plate, I told her I certainly had it when I went there, I told her if I found it safe in the morning, I would give her half a guinea in the afternoon;

she was at home and I asked her for the watch, she said she found that watch at Maria Mackenzie's, who was present with her, she took it out of her bosom and was gone away with it, and where she was gone she did not know; I staid till she returned, and charged the watch with her.

Were you drunk or sober? - I had rather been drinking that made me sleepy, but I was sober enough before I went to sleep; I live in Tottenham-court-road, I had been to see my friend at the foot of Black-Friars-Bridge, and coming that way home I met with this person.

Parker's-lane was not in your way? - I came across Lincoln's-inn-fields in order to make it in my way.

Are you quite sure that you had the watch in your pocket when you went into this house? - Yes, I had had it out a quarter of an hour before in the public house where I was drinking, and when I found it was that time of night, I set off to go home, I am very sure I put it up again; when I was awaked by pulling out this rule, the two prisoners were both there, when I went to sleep they were both there, and the door was made fast, and it was fast when I went again in the morning, they were both there when I went in, and I was awaked about twelve, then I went to sleep again till about day light in the morning.

Prisoner Richards. Whether I did not do my endeavours to find the watch again? - She went out of doors, and said she would search for Mary Mackenzie , I gave her three shillings before.

HUGH JEROM sworn.

I was the watchman on the same beat, coming round at eleven that night, on the 11th of May, the man was standing at the door, and the landlord of the house, the prosecutor said he had lost his watch, and gave me charge of these prisoners, I would not go in, he went in and brought Mary Mackenzie out to me, I took charge of her, as I was taking her to the watch-house, she said she had nothing at all to do with the watch, I waited there till twelve, and the constable of the night came to me and I waited for Richards, she was coming in, the prosecutor said that was the person that was along with him when he lost his watch, we took her into custody and kept her confined till next morning, then she was brought before the justice.

Court to Prosecutor. I think you said you paid Susanna Richards ? - Yes.

Did you pay Maria Mackenzie too, for you had two of them? - Yes, I paid them both.

Court. It would be well if you could have found your right way home instead of going through Parker's-lane.

ANN ROBINSON sworn.

I keep the house in Parker's lane; the prisoner Richards rented a room of me, she brought me in two shillings, and she said she thought it would be in her power to help me to four shillings and six-pence in the afternoon, she said she had a friend slept with her last night that had had the misfortune of losing his watch in the bed, and she said she had got it, and he promised to give her half a guinea, I said to her, Sukey, do not make a friend a foe, and be a foe to yourself, be sure, let the gentleman have the watch, the man came when I went in, she said, Oh Mrs. Robinson! Mary has gone away and stole the watch from me; I saw the watch, and I clapt my hand underneath it; it was a silver watch with two yellow hands, I took no further notice of it.

PRISONER RICHARDS's DEFENCE.

My Lord, the prosecutor came to sleep with me on the Saturday night, he knew me very well; he asked for the name that the people give me of Tall Suk, we were all so much intosticated with liquor we all slept in our clothes, in the morning something ensued that he awaked me for, and waking me so it happened, I dare say it was six o'clock after matters were over, he put

his hand in his pocket and said he had lost his watch, says he, I have got a guinea and a half in my pocket that is not gone, I said, Christopher, you have slept here before and I never wrong'd you; after that he turned round and saw Mackenzie, and he said, if I had known I would have slept with her, and he paid her likewises in the morning I tried every means to produce him his watch, I did not intend to wrong him, he came in the afternoon.

Court. Did he sleep in his clothes? - Yes, all three of us.

Court to prosecutor. Did you sleep in your clothes? - Yes.

Prisoner Richards, I shewed the watch to twenty different people, I did not intend to defraud him of it.

PRISONER MACKENZIE's DEFENCE.

He came on the Saturday night to sleep with us; in the morning he awaked me, I told him I knew nothing of his watch, and, I never saw it; he offered half a guinea; I should not know it if I was to see it, I never saw it at all.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-84

487. CHARLOTTE HUGHES and MARY FORD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of June , 27 guineas, value 28 l. 7 s. the money of Christopher Byrne , in the dwelling house of Mary Drisdale.

(The witnesses examined separate.)

CHRISTOPHER BYRNE sworn.

I live at the New Hummums, Covent Garden , I am a servant to Mr. Hilton; as I was coming through the city I met with the girl who calls herself Charlotte Hughes , between eleven and twelve somewhere near Covent Garden, I believe it was either in Catherine-street or in Russel-street; she asked me if I would treat her with a glass of wine, and I said yes; there was another girl with her; she desired me to come with her to the London Hotel, in Bridges-Street; I went with her, and the waiter said he would not give a bed for two girls with one person, so I went out again; I did not know the other girl, and I went home to the Hummums, and I left there some money, five guineas out of a certain quantity of money that I had which might be about thirty-five pounds, I left these women and promised them to return, I intended when; I went home to leave more, but when I came home I changed my mind.

What state was your mind in sober or drunk? - I was sober, the waiter that saw me said, you had better leave the whole of the money, seeing my handful of gold; no says I, I shall be back presently, accordingly I met this Charlotte Hughes .

Why did you intend to leave the whole at home? - Because I was going to join company with this Charlotte Hughes .

Why did you change your mind? - Because I did not intend to sleep with her.

Why did you leave out five guineas? - Because I did not chuse to leave the whole with him, I left five guineas with him.

You did go back I suppose? - Yes, I went back and found Charlotte Hughes in the street waiting for me, I went with her to the same Hotel in Bridges-street, and called for a bottle of Sherry and bisquits, I was in her company about two or three hours, paid my reckoning; and the waiter gave me change for a guinea; then the girl asked me if I intended to sleep with her, I said undoubtedly if I was agreeable to her; she said I must pay her a compliment; I said it is not my custom to pay before hand; but if you behave as well in future as you have done, I will give you half a guinea in the morning; upon which she said she would not trust me, but if I would give her five shillings, she would trust me the rest, to which I would not consent; however she desired me to get to bed, I

slipt off my clothes carelessly and laid them in a corner of the room, that she might not suspect, then I went to bed; then I desired her to go to bed; she said she would not, she pressed me to go; I said, to satisfy you I will; I observed she drew the curtains very close, says I, what are you going to do? says she, I am going to do the same as they do abroad; says I, I beg you to explain that; says she, Oh! you know very well, and I perceived she went towards the corner where my clothes lay, and out of the feet of the bed I saw part of my breeches in her hand, I jumped out and seized my breeches, she said, Lord, I was not touching your clothes; I found the money in my breeches, I laid them exactly in the same place again; now says I, madam, if you don't go to bed directly and lay quietly, I shall turn you out of the room; she took hold of my hair, and she tore my shirt, and threw me down on the bed, and I called out murder and help, I could certainly have got from her if I had given her a blow, but that was contrary to my intention; Mary Ford came up, I did not know Mary Ford before, she disentangled me from this Charlotte Hughes , and Mary Ford held me very fast; says I, I insist on your letting me go immediately, I want to put on my breeches, and take care of my property, she kept me down that I could not get away; in the mean while Charlotte Hughes robbed me of my money; I run immediately to my breeches and found my money gone; I declared the robbery immediately, I saw Charlotte Hughes take my breeches, this was the second time; Charlotte Hughes was still in the room, and when I said my money was gone, she took up the candlestick, and swore that if I did not keep off she would knock me down, and split my skull, I immediately put on my breeches, and to save my life jumped out of a one pair of stairs window on the supporter of a lamp, where I called out murder and help, and after a few minutes the watch came, I desired them particularly to come in directly to the house; I told them I had been robbed; and I insisted on their coming in and taking the parties, the watchman jeered me for a quarter of an hour at least, they would give me no assistance.

Then you did not jump down? - No, I stood on the lamp iron for a quarter of an hour at least.

Who jeered you? - The watchman and other people about, I told them I should punish them if they did not come in, they paid no attention to what I said; at last one of the people said, watchman, if you do not go for a constable, I will; then one of the watchmen went for a constable, whose name is Bambridge; there were three watchmen to the best of my remembrance, as soon as the constable came into the room, I got in at the window again, and charged him with Charlotte Hughes for stealing my money, and at the same time, Mary Ford for assisting her in taking it; whether she was innocent or not I cannot say, that I leave to yourselves; the constable asked where Charlotte Hughes was; when I got into the window, Ford I believe was in the room, and Charlotte Hughes came into the room, the constable took them to the watch-house, where he searched them, but found they had no pockets on.

Was any thing found upon them? - Nothing but their clothes, but you will observe when the constable came I had been absent from the place a certain time, I do not think there was any money found upon them; if there was any, it was but very little, I had in my pocket when I first went into the room, twenty-eight guineas for certain, but as I took one out, I had twenty-seven for a certainty, that was all gone; these are the two women, I never saw any thing of either of them before.

Mr. Garrow, prisoner's council. Pray Mr. Byrne how long had you been at the Hummums? - How long had I lived there?

Did you hear my question? I will explain it? - I had been at the Hummums,

I believe about a month; my master lodged there, his name is Hilton, he is a Lancashire man, I believe he is at the university of Cambridge; I had lived with him two years, and travelled abroad, I am almost sure he is at the university of Cambridge, I was, discharged on account of attending this prosecution, he said I might come down to him again if I chose.

Was your master at the Hummums at that time? - He was not.

How long had he been absent from the Hummums? - He comes there in the course of twenty-four hours, for about an hour or two.

You, I take it for granted, had a proper room appointed for you to sleep in at the Hummums? - Yes.

You was too much a man of fashion for that; do you usually carry all your money in your pocket? - No, Sir, never; I generally carry about a guinea in my pocket.

Upon this occasion you happened to have it all? - Not all the stock.

You had been in the city? - Yes.

Had you been in company in the city? - I had been at an ale-house, opposite the mansion-house.

You was drinking a little matter? - I drank, I believe in the course of an hour or two a pint of beer, and an overtaker.

That is a thing that makes one drunk, overtakes the little intellect one has and puts it to rest: So you had walked from the mansion-house to Bridges-street? - Yes.

You were quite sober I take it for granted? - I was sober and sensible.

And therefore having picked up a woman and going to a house where they would not take two women in wish you, you went home to deposit your cash, and left five guineas, and brought the rest out; then you picked up the same woman and went to the same hotel, and asked her to go with you? - Yes.

She said lord! lord! did she not say my lord? you was the Italian Count that night, was not you? - I was Mr. Byrne.

Upon your oath did not you represent yourself to be an Italian Count; now, I ask you seriously? - No, I did not.

Will you swear that? - I am upon my oath now.

Will you swear that you did not that night at the hotel, represent yourself to be an Italian count, a foreign count? - No, I did not.

A foreign nobleman; upon the oath you have taken did not you represent yourself to be a foreign nobleman? - No, for the third time I did not.

So then you had the usual compliments on these occasions, cakes and wine, and so on: Did you ask for change for a 50 l. note when you went into the house? - I did not.

Then of course you were not answered by the waiter, that you had better change a one and twenty shilling piece, instead of a 50 l. note? - The waiter came in when I called him, and says I, what have we to pay, that was after we had been two hours there, I gave the waiter a guinea, and he gave me change.

Then you swear you did not say any thing about changing the 50 l. note? - I might mention something to the girl about changing a note, but I do not know what I said about it.

Do not talk about might, what did you say? these gentlemen do not let any foreign noblemen so impose upon them? - As I have been a clerk in the city, I perhaps might mention something.

Where was you clerk in the city? - At several places, at Martini, Martini, and Company, in Winchester-street, about four years ago; and that is the reason I might talk about bank notes, and things of that kind.

So when you get to a bawdy-house, having been clerk to a banker, you talk always regularly about bank-notes? - No, I might say some trifling matter; I have already said what I have to say on the subject.

Court. You have already told us, you did not ask for change of a 50 l. bank-note?

- No, I did not, we were in conversation and singing.

Mr. Garrow. To what tune do you set your conversation about a bank-note, Mr. Count, which of your Italian tunes? - I do not recollect.

You must recollect, as I shall presently have my Lord's authority for desiring you, and we will judge about your sobriety presently? - I tell you again that I really do not recollect what I might say; I might say something about it.

Do not you know you did? - I certainly know I did, I know I might say something.

What did you say about a bank-note? - I really do not know what I said about it, it might be some trifling matter of no consequence, upon my oath, I do not recollect what I did say, I might say something about a bank-note, I know very well I might say in the course of conversation.

Court. He says they were singing; who else was there? - Nobody else.

Mr. Garrow. It was a duet then? - Only us three.

And you were amusing yourselves singing for two hours? - Part of the time singing, part of the time drinking, part in conversation.

Attend, because your answers are taken down in short-hand: Did not you ask for change for a 30 l. note? - No, I did not.

Did not you ask for change for 30 l. and you was answered by the waiter if it was a 50 l. he could give you change? - No, I was not so answered, I do not recollect any thing of the kind.

Did not the prisoner Hughes say, she supposed it would come to a 10 l. note, and at last to a twenty-one shilling piece? - I do not recollect any such conversation.

Will you swear it did not pass? - I do not know what conversation she might have with the waiter.

Will you swear she did not? - Yes, I will.

Now, will you go further and swear that no such thing passed, because to this there are two witnesses, that you asked for change for a 30 l. note, and was told if it was a 50 l. they would change it, and the woman said it would come down to a twenty-one shilling piece? - I do not recollect any such thing.

Will you swear that no such conversation passed, because a man so flush of money would have said, I do not want change? - I had more prudence than you might have had perhaps in such a case.

Therefore you left five guineas at home, and carried out twenty-seven; however that was your prudence which you take to be very much above mine? - Certainly.

Did not that conversation pass that I have stated? - Conversation about what?

You have forgot it? - What about the bank-note?

Aye, about the bank note? - I'll swear I do not recollect it.

Was not this the conversation that led to your giving the man the guinea to change, after flourishing with all your countships about 50 l.? - I paid him a guinea.

How came you to quit the service of the banker? - I wished to travel, my character is known here, I went from there to Mr. Butler's a lawyer in Lincoln's Inn, the editor of Coke upon Littleton, and lived with him for about two years, and Mr. Butler recommended me to this young gentleman; no part of my money was ever found.

THOMAS HARRISON sworn.

I know nothing at all of the matter, I know nothing of the man's money, I have waiters, I keep the New Hummums.

Mr. Garrow. What sort of hours does this gentleman keep? - I cannot say, I go to bed by eleven or twelve; his master who has left my house, has given him a very good character.

I believe you know that these women or one of them, was permitted to go about their business, upon promising to come again to the office? - Yes; that is the waiter's wife, who had lately laid in; I passed my word for her, and she came again, I know nothing at all about her.

Court. Whose house is this London Hotel?

Do you know of your own knowledge? - One Mrs. Drisdale; I know it, I have known the woman in the neighbourhood for a many years.

Do you know her christian name? - No, I do not.

JOHN BAKER sworn.

The prosecutor came into our house, a little before one in the morning, he put his hand into his pocket and pulled out a handful of gold, and gave me five guineas, I wanted him to leave it all; he said he was going out again, and he would not leave me any more then.

What day was this? - I cannot tell the day of the month nor week; he came in again a little before five in the morning, and said he had been robbed of all his money.

How long is it since? - About a fortnight I believe.

Are you sure it was not later than one when he went out? - It was near one.

Then it was not so early as eleven? - It was near one, I sat up in my turn, he did not tell me what he wanted to carry out so much money for.

He did not hint to you that he was coming home again? - No, he did not.

To Baker. Was his master there night? - I cannot justly say.

HENRY BAMBRIDGE sworn.

I was constable that night; about ten minutes before four, one of the watchmen gave me an alarm in the watch-house, I immediately went out to enquire into the matter, when I came up stairs, the first person I saw was the prosecutor, it was in a dining-room; it had a bed in it, and it was at the London Hotel, in Bridges-street, he was in the room, and there was one John Ford along with him, that is the husband of the prisoner, he is the waiter there; I immediately asked this Byrne what he had lost; I saw nobody in the room at that time, but this man, I had not been there above a minute or two before Mary Ford came into the room; I asked him in what manner he had been robbed, and he described the particulars to me, that he was struggling on the bed, and that she had taken his breeches away which were lying on the table under his coat; he gave charge of another person who was not in the room, that is the prisoner Charlotte Hughes.

Jury. Who was he struggling on the bed with? - He said he was struggling with another person, which I knew afterwards by his discourse to be Hughes; as I was talking, the prisoner Charlotte Hughes came into the room, I was in the room about two minutes and a half, and whether she came out of the adjoining room, or came from the stair-case I cannot say, when she came into the room, I asked the prosecutor if that was the woman; he said, yes; upon his saying that, I took her into custody; and the prosecutor said, speaking of Mrs. Ford, I look upon this woman to be as guilty as the other; he said, she held him, but I did not see that; upon this I stood in the room, I suppose for a quarter of an hour, till the prosecutor had dressed himself; he had neither stockings nor coat on; Mrs. Ford said, if I must go to the watch-house, let me put on my stays, I am just out of bed; I put them both on the stairs, and took them to the watch-house; I took care to keep so close to them that nothing could be dropt, I had them stripped, and searched them, and made them pull off their shoes, and felt their stockings, and searched their hair; also I searched the clothes in the bed-room.

Court. Did you search the adjoining room? - No, I could not tell from whence she came, she was out of the room for some time.

Mr. Garrow. I believe Ford was permitted to go for some hours, till about a quarter after? - I went for her, and she came voluntarily.

Court. Do you know who keeps the London Hotel? - I know her very well, I know she keeps the house, her name is Mrs. Drisdale.

Prisoner Hughes. I leave my defence to my counsel.

Prisoner Ford. I leave my defence to my counsel.

WILLIAM DAVIDSON sworn.

I live at the Coach and Horses, Charles-street, Covent-Garden.

Mr. Garrow. Look at that man with the black hair (the prosecutor). Do you remember seeing him at any time at your house? - I cannot say I remember the man, there was a man came into my house on the 7th of June.

Prosecutor. There was a man served me, I believe it was at the Coach and Horses. in Charles-street.

To Davidson. Do you believe that was the prosecutor? - I do believe it was that man.

What time was it? - I believe between one and two in the morning.

Did that man come in alone, or with company? - He came in with two or three women.

Were they women of the town? - I believed them to be so.

What passed? - They had to the best of my rememberance three glasses of shrub, and that man pulled out some money, I saw some guineas in his hand, he paid me with a shilling, and I gave him change, he put his money into his pocket, and they all three went out together, I do not think he was sober; I cannot say he was drunk, I did not see him for above five minutes at most.

Then did you think he was in liquor? - He certainly did appear to me to be in liquor, because he talked and made very free with the girls.

Did you say any thing to him upon that? - Nothing more than giving him the change, and serving him with the liquor.

Court. Were you very sober at that time? - Yes.

Had you been at home all the evening? - Yes.

Do you remember any other man coming in with them girls, and giving them gin? - I do not particular, but there might before that, there was none like this man to my rememberance.

Are you quite sure it was after one o'clock? - I cannot say, it was some where about that time, it might be after or before.

JOHN MADDOX sworn.

I am a watchman, I was called, and was the first watchman that went.

Do you remember seeing this man there? - I do.

Who let you into the house? - The landlady of the house; Mrs. Ford the prisoner.

Was she dressed, or had she the appearance of just having got out of bed? - She was just got out of bed, the prosecutor was in the one pair of stairs room.

Was not he out on the lamp-iron? - He came out on the lamp-iron, but when I went up he was in the one pair of stairs room; when he first called me, he lifted up the sash, and called watchman from the inside of the room.

Then at that time he was not out on the lamp-iron? - He was within the room when I first came up, and he threw up the sash, and he called out for assistance, I stood there some time, and many people beside myself, then he came upon the lamp-iron.

When he first called you, did not you go up? - I could not get in to go up stairs; I went to the house when he first called, and stood till the door was open, he came out on the lamp-iron, and there he stood on the lamp-iron, he had his breeches on, and a little light waistcoat, and a shirt; he had no stockings on; he said, why do not you break the door open? - I said it is more than we dare to do; I said to another watchman go for the constable of the night, that will be sufficient for us; I staid there myself, and after the door was opened I went in; I said to another watchman let us go up stairs, the consequence cannot be no great deal, let us go up stairs, they cannot hurt us no great matter, when I first came up this man was not on the lamp-iron, he was in the room by himself.

Court. Did you hear any cry of any kind before you went to the place? - I heard no cry at all, any further than I said to him, when he stood on the lamp-iron, we dare not burst the door open without you cry murder; he cried murder directly; somebody said, that will not do; you must go in doors and cry murder; then it will do.

What did he cry out when he first called? - He said he was robbed of thirty guineas and his watch.

Mr. Garrow. Did he say afterwards he had lost his watch? - No.

Court. Upon your oath did he say at first he had lost his watch? - Yes, upon my oath he said he had lost his watch.

What time might this be? - Why it might be about half after three or pretty near four.

JAMES SULLIVAN sworn.

I am a watchman, I went to the Hotel with the other watchman, Maddox.

Did you hear this man call out? - Yes.

Where was he when you first went up to the house? - He was on the lamp-iron on the outside, then he went into the house, he wanted the watchman to break the door, and he did not like to break the door, the people that were passing told him to go in and cry out murder; and then the watchman would break the door; Another watchman went for the constable of the night.

Did you hear this man say before he went into the house what he had lost? - He said he had lost thirty guineas and his watch; upon my oath he did say so.

Are you sure he said he lost his watch? - I am sure of that, if I was to die; the door was opened before the constable came by Mrs. Ford, she had a loose bed gown wrapt round her, and had the appearance of a woman just come out of bed.

Court. Did you and the other watchman come up both together at first? - Maddox was there before me, he was at his sland, and I was in the next street.

The prisoner Ford called four respectable witnesses, who gave her a very good character.

The prisoner Hughes called one witness, who gave her a good character.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-85

488. SARA H KELLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th day of June , one base metal watch, gilt with gold, value 10 s. two keys, value 6 s. a linen shirt, value 5 s. the property of Henry William Taylor .

HENRY WILLIAM TAYLOR sworn.

I lost my watch on the 6th of June, at one in the morning, I had been spending the evening in Poppin's Court, Fleet-street, I was a little in liquor, and unfortunately picked up that woman, I knew her before only by name, I took her to my lodging, and about four I awoke and found I had lost my watch.

Where did you pick her up? - By the side of Fleet-market, when I awoke missing her, I suspected I had lost something, I found my watch was gone and a shirt from the top of the bed, I applied to some man of St. Brides, he took me to her lodging on the Friday night, and on Saturday night she was taken, they called on me, I said I believed her to be the person from her appearance and voice; she then promised that she would bring the property the next day, saying she had pledged them; we depended on her word, but she never came; we found her again and took her before Alderman Sanderson, he questioned her about the matter, and she said she had sold the watch and pawned the shirt, in consequence of which he committed her, there were no threats of any sort, she said she had pawned the shirt, she said she gave

it to the person that lodged in the same house by the name of Elizabeth; I never saw the watch since, she said she had sold it to a person in Chick Lane.

You was drunk I suppose at this time? - Rather so, I should be sorry for an act of that kind if I was sober.

Are you quite sure that that is the girl? - Quite so.

You was not quite sure when she was taken first? - I said I thought her to be the same, and I believed her to be the same.

One of the Jury. My Lord, before the alderman he said he was very much in liquor.

Court. You was very drunk? - I do not know what you mean by very drunk, I did not tumble about; I had lost the faculty of my senses.

Where did you come from? - I had been in Poppin's-court, but I went part of the way with a friend.

Where had you been drinking? - In Poppin's-court, the sign of the Bell.

Did you meet with any other woman? - Not a soul that I can take upon me to say.

Are you sure you had your watch when you came in? - Quite sure, I saw it some little time before I quitted the company, and I have a custom of putting chain and all into my pocket.

Did not you lose it chain and all out of your pocket in the street? - I know from nothing else but her own confession.

Are you quite sure you had it when you came home with the girl? - I am as sure as I am here, I let myself in and fastened the door on the inside, so she let herself out; I had seen the woman before.

But she had never been at your lodgings nor you at hers? - Not to my knowledge.

Did you know her name? - I think she told me her name was Sarah Kelly at that time.

Do you know Elizabeth Kelly ? - I do not.

PHILLIP CKOCKFORD sworn.

I am servant to a pawnbroker, I took in a shirt the 6th of June, it was fetched out again.

Who brought it? - The woman's name that brought it is Elizabeth Norris , I delivered the shirt to Mr. Barber.

RICHARD BARBER sworn.

On the 8th of June, Mr. Taylor came down to the watch-house, and said he had been robbed of his watch and his shirt by one Sarah Kelly , and about three hours after she was brought disorderly to the watch-house, I then sent for him to know whether this was the girl that robbed him, he said it was the very woman that robbed him of his watch and his shirt, she said she had the watch, and had pledged it, but would bring it at nine on the Monday morning; she did not come, I found and took her before the alderman, he committed her, that was the 10th, there were no threats or promises to my knowledge, she said she gave the shirt to pawn to one Bet Kelly, and she said she sold the watch to one Jem Day; alderman Sanderson desired me to find this Kelly, and search Day's house; we found nothing there.

(The shirt deposed to by prosecutor, mark'd No. 4. F. in red.)

Elizabeth Kelley gave me a ticket, and desired me to give it to Mr. Barber, she said she was afraid to go herself.

Crockford. I delivered the shirt to Mr. Barber.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Reference Number: t17880625-86

489. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for stealing, on the 1st of June , a leather trunk, value 2 s. four shirts, value 20 s. sixteen handkerchiefs, value 8 s. eight pair

of silk stockings, value 20 s. a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. two muslin gowns, value 40 s. a cloak, value 5 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. ten yards of lace, value, 20 s. an apron, value 2 s. and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. and 20 guineas, the property of Richard Wiltshire ; one bank note, value 50 l. another bank note, value 40 l. another bank note, value 30 l. another bank note, value 10 l. another, value 10 l. and another, value 10 l. the same being the property of the said Richard Wiltshire , and the several sums payable and secured thereon, being then due and unsatisfied to him, against the statute , &c.

RICHARD WILTSHIRE sworn.

I lost a trunk the 1st of June, it was cut off from the front of a post chaise in Monmouth-street , coming into town, about a quarter past ten, there was a lady with me in the chaise, Mrs. Robinson, she is not here, she is not well, she lives in New-street, Fetter-Lane; I did not see the trunk cut off, I missed it, I suppose about forty yards after it was cut off, the boy stopt the chaise, I got out to see whether we could find it, and we could not, I went to Bow-street and heard the man was in custody, he had been stopt by the watchman, I know nothing of the prisoner, I saw the trunk and all the things taken out that night, the trunk was there, it was my trunk, there were all the things mentioned in the indictment.

Whose were they? - I bought them, they are mine.

Were they yours at the time? - Yes.

Are you a married man? - She is not my wife, but I bought them and paid for them.

Then if you bought them and gave them to any body, they were not your property? - The shirts were mine, there were four ruffled shirts, four neck handkerchiefs, and pocket handkerchiefs, six pair of silk stockings were mine, one silver buckle was lost of mine; the other was in the trunk, several things were not in the trunk; there were ten guineas which were mine, and the bank notes were mine.

GEORGE SOLOMON sworn.

I am the watchman, at half past ten, on the first of June, a man came by me with a trunk under his arm, I said what have you got there? he said a trunk: so I took my lanthorn, when I came up he threw down the trunk, and away he ran, I followed him, and a man got him, I did not see him stopt; I called stop thief! I really believe it was the man from his running, I had not sufficient opportunity of knowing him; the trunk lay in the middle of the court, it was open, and some of the things were out, I put the things in and brought it to the watch-house; the prisoner said he was not the man, but said he was running because I called out stop thief!

Mr. Peatt, prisoner's counsel. It was half past ten? - Yes.

Your attention was fixed to the trunk? - Yes.

The WATCHMAN sworn.

On the first of June, between ten and eleven, you heard the cry of stop thief, the prisoner was running? - Yes.

And you stopt him, there were other men running at the same time? - Yes.

ABRAHAM DYER sworn.

I only pick't up a buckle in the court, and a knife, I did not see the man.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I was constable of the night, on the 1st of June, at half past ten, the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, he said, he was not the man, but he was running after another man, and they took him.

(The things produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was going along, I heard the cry of stop thief, I run and was stopt.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-87

490. MARY COLEBURN was indicted for stealing on the 29th of May , one pair of sheets, value 2 s. one pair of blankets, value 12 d. a bolster, value 6 d. a pillow, value 2 d. a brass candlestick, value 2 d. two flat irons, value 6 d. a pillowcase, value 6 d. the property of John Davis , being in a certain room let to her .

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

In April last, the prisoner took a lodging of my wife, about the 6th of April; she left the lodging the 9th of May, she gave no notice; on the 29th of May she was taken up, she took the key with her; we found them at the pawn-broker's when she was taken up, we opened the room the 29th, in the morning, and she was taken up afterwards the same day; a pair of sheets was missed and a bolster, the sheets were found in Shorts-Gardens the same day at Mr. Johnson's; I know them, and can swear to them, my wife is extremely ill.

JOHN JOHNSON sworn.

The prisoner pledged with me a bolster, a pillow, and a pair of sheets, one the 8th of May, the bolster and one sheet the 21st of April; I am sure of the prisoner, she used my shop some time.

JOHN BARNEY sworn.

On the 29th of April, the prisoner pledged with me a candlestick for 3 d. and one sheet for 1 s. and 6 d. on the 5th of May.

Court to prosecutor. What is the matter with your wife? - A fever.

Have you had the misfortune to be robbed often? - Very often of late.

How often? - Three or four times.

Did not you prosecute Elizabeth Price ? - My wife might, she was here at that time.

What became of her? - I cannot say, I fancy she was to be transported.

Owen. Elizabeth Price is under sentence of transportation now; another was transported by Mr. Davis; there are several of them prosecuted, I cannot tell their names.

Court to prosecutor. Do you know their names? - I know Mary Stuart .

Barney. M'Carnon was tried and transported for robbing Mr. Davis.

Owen. I never saw Mr. Davis appear here before, his wife always attended; he keeps a pawn-broker's shop in St. Giles's, and she keeps a common lodging house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE (Read).

My Lord; I trust your goodness and humanity will pardon this intrusion of us unfortunate women; this prosecutor and his wife make it their practice to let lodgings to such poor people, and she says, you may pledge or do any thing you please with the things; when she finds it not in our power to pay her exorbitant rent, immediately puts us into prison with intent to get the reward allowed, to pay herself her debt; and there are now suffering two poor women; one has been here two years, the other eighteen months; one man sent abroad, and one since dead; and if your Lordship will please to refer to the records of this court, you will find scarce a sessions passes, but some body or other feels the effects of her wickedness, being cast for transportation; and we humbly implore your goodness and humanity to take pity, and be merciful upon us poor unhappy sufferers, that we may be once more restored to peace and liberty, and we shall be bound to pray for your Lordship as long as we live. - Elizabeth Price , Elizabeth M'Clashary, Mary Coleburn , now upon trial. Gone abroad, Tho. Johnson , and John Wilson .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-88

491. ELIZABETH M'CLASHARY was indicted, for that she on the 29th of May last, feloniously did take away with an intent to steal, embezzle and purloin,

one pair of linen sheets, value 1 s. 6 d. one bolster, value 6 d. a pillow, value 3 d. a pillow-case, value 2 d. the property of John Davis , being by contract or agreement let to her in a certain lodging, in the house of the said John Davis, against the statute .

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

This woman took lodgings in April, about the same time as the other; I never troubled myself with the lodgers, she left it about the 9th of May, I believe they went away both in one day; on the 20th of May, my boy and I went down and opened the door and found a bolster and pillow missing, and some other things; I gave the boy a pair of sheets to take down, I know the sheets, they are marked, I know nothing else.

Mr. Peatt, prisoner's counsel. How do you know the sheets? - One is marked with I, and the other with D, I only know them by the mark.

There are a great many honest men of your name as well as you? - Yes.

This house is in little St. Andrew's-street? - Yes.

You keep a pawn-broker's shop in Broad St. Giles's? - Yes.

Do you happen to know that your wife gave permission to this woman to pawn the things? - No.

The things were not pawned at your shop? - No.

If they had been pawned at your shop, would you have prosecuted this woman? - How could I.

Did it ever happen to you that any of your lodgers pawned any of your goods at you shop? - Yes.

Then you are in the habit of receiving your things pawned? - Not knowingly.

Are you sure of that Mr. Davis? - Yes, I am sure of it, I know nothing of what my wife does; you never saw me here before; the door was opened by order of me or my wife.

Jury. Who marks your linen? - My wife.

WILLIAM TOMLINSON sworn.

The sheets were pledged with me the 3d of May, not by the prisoner, but by another woman whose name is Jones, she is not here.

Court to the Jury. Gentlemen, here is still less evidence than there was in the other case.

NOT GUILTY .

Court to Prosecutor. Mr. Davis, a person may very well without any fault have the misfortune of being robbed once or twice, but it is very extraordinary your lodgings should be exposed to these frequent robberies; if they really are true, take a little care of your property; you will not come with perfect credit before a court of justice, if you come so again.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-89

492. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing on the 19th of June , twenty pounds weight of lead, value 2 s. belonging to Thomas Holwell , affixed to his dwelling-house .

The prisoner was taken with the lead upon him by the prosecutor's wife; he was breaking it to pieces.

(The lead deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the lead.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-90

493. ROBERT HAYWARD was indicted, for feloniously assaulting Isabella, wife of Charles Smart , on the king's highway, on the 21st day of June last, and putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and feloniously taking from her person and against her will, one pair of stuff shoes, value 3 s. a pair of leather shoes, value 3 s. a pair of worsted stockings, value 10 d. a shift, value 3 s. a table cloth, value 2 s. the property of the said Charles .

(The witnesses examined separate.)

ISABELLA SMART sworn.

On the 21st of June, I was robbed in East Smithfield , at the bottom of White's yard, at eleven at night; the prisoner happened to come by my door in the evening about nine; I went over to a neighbour's house to pay for a bedstead, I staid to drink something; this man came by, I told him I did not chuse to drink any liquor, here is a poor lad, and he drank a glass of liquor and thanked me; I asked him to go over and shut my shutters, I knew him before; I said, have you had any victuals? he said no; and I gave him a little bit of cold pork, and sent for some beer, it was almost eleven; and, I said to him, go with me to buy me some shoes, he said he would, I went into a shop and bought a pair of new stuff shoes for myself, and a pair for my daughter, he took them from the man, and we came to another shop, I bought a

pair of black stockings and a shift, and a table-cloth, he stood at the door; then I went to the grocers, and I bought some tea and sugar, and I put all the things into the apron, and he turned round and said, give me the things out of your lap; no, says I, I'll carry them myself; and before I could look round me, he snapped them all out of my lap and run away with them; he took them forcibly out of my lap, I was in no fear at the time, and he used no other force than taking the things out of my apron; I saw him again on Thursday last, he said if I would forgive him, he would get the things again; I made him no promise, I thought him an honest lad.

WILLIAM ELBY sworn.

I took the prisoner by the woman's description; I heard him say before the magistrate that he had the things and fell asleep, and lost them in the street.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutrix has attended me every day since I have been in prison, she told me she was insinuated to do it by Elby.

Elby. I deny every word of it.

Court to prosecutrix. Who advised you to charge this as a robbery? - The justice.

GUILTY, Not of the robbery .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-91

494. THOMAS CHARLES ROGERS was indicted for stealing, on the 21st of June , twenty-eight yards of woollen stuff, called tammy, value 12 s. the property of John Hartley and William Giles .

WILLIAM GILES sworn.

I am partner with John Hartley , I lost a piece of tammy stuff, I did not miss it till the 23d of June, I saw it some days previous to the time; I dyed it; the prisoner acknowledged he had the seal off it, and thrown it down the necessary for fear of a discovery, he said it was the first time; he was not promised favour by me, but his mother said it would be better for him; it is the same colour and quality, and the piece makes out the number.

PHILIP JOCELYN sworn.

I had been down to Wapping, and coming along Rag Fair, I saw the prisoner standing with another boy, he had that sack under his arm, I followed him up a court, and the prisoner pulled the piece out of the bag, and offered it for sale; I heard the word eighteen pence mentioned, I immediately stopt him, and charged him with an officer.

The piece produced and deposed to, value one guinea.

Prisoner. I hope you will be favourable; my father was scalded to death, and my mother is in the work-house, I have nobody to feed me.

GUILTY .

My Lord; I beg to recommend him to mercy, he is an industrious lad, he has been with us half a year, and never lost an hour, but we are obliged to prosecute; we have forty men, and have missed things before; his mother is in the work-house, and his father was scalded to death in the dyer's copper.

Court. Do you think there is any chance of his getting any employment in this country? - I do not know.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-92

495. JOHN THOMAS was indicted for stealing, on the 28th of May , thirty pounds weight of veal, value 6 s. the property of William Derose .

WILLIAM DEROSE sworn.

I am a butcher ; I lost a hind-quarter of veal the 28th of May, in the night; I was not there when it was taken, I saw it afterwards and can swear to it.

James Rippard , the watchman, and Henry Crist saw the prisoner running with the veal and stopt him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have no witness but myself, I know nothing of the veal, I belong to a ship.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-93

496. JOSEPH FYSON was indicted for that he, not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil, on the 22d day of June last, in and upon one Kitty Sweetman , a woman child, under the age of ten years , to wit, of the age of seven years, did make an assault, and her feloniously and wickedly did know and abuse .

(The Witnesses examined apart.)

JACOB SWEETMAN sworn.

I am father of this child.

What age is this child? - She is six years and eight months, seven years old the 27th of October.

Is the child capable of knowing the nature of an oath? - No, I really think she is not.

Is she a quick or backward child of her age? - She is very quick, very artful.

But not of knowledge enough you think to know the nature of an oath? - I do not think she is.

Do you know any thing of this business of your own knowledge? - No further than the prisoner being a very intimate acquaintance; he took the child out on the Sunday, in the afternoon, last Sunday was a week, I lodged in his house for some considerable time before this, not now; he took her out about half past two, as near as we imagined, and she came home between five and six, he always sent her home by herself; she would come home when he put her into the way, she had been out divers times, he frequently asked my wife to let him take her out, he knows the child better than I do myself, she came home between five and six, I did not observe any thing was the matter with her, she said nothing at all; on Wednesday in the evening my wife was looking out the foul clothes for washing, and she saw the child rubbing herself at bed time, I was in bed, in the same room, and she says Kitty, what is the matter with you? she thought the child might be chased; Oh, mammy, says she, I am so wet you cannot think, and my wife took up her clothes, and found her thift in as terrible a condition as could be, and she said, she was afraid she was ruined; my wife shewed me the linen, and I said, I really think the child has the foul disease upon her, it had that appearance; I observed a very great running, and a very great stiffness upon it.

Did you examine the person of the child? - After I had taken the prisoner into custody, I did, but not before; I took him into custody on Thursday last, about twelve, that was the next day, I went to the prisoner where he was at work; I said Mr. Fyson, I want to speak with you; and the man was ready to sink into the earth; oh, says he, Mr. Sweetman, I am sorry for any thing I have committed; says he, Mr. Sweetman, a guinea or two shall not be deficient; pray do not mention it to any body; says I, how came you to use the baby in that manner?

Had you said any thing to him? - I said, Mr. Fyson, I am very sorry the affair should happen, you doated on the child so, more than I did myself, I charged him with the action, says he, I handled the girl, I cannot say what possessed me to do

it; I really do not know; says I, Mr. Fyson, it is not a guinea or two will satisfy me, I will have you before a magistrate, so come along; says he, Mr. Sweetman, I'll follow you with all my soul; and he went with me out of the shop, he wanted to go over to the Horse and Windmill; no, says I, and I delivered him into the officer's hands, he confessed it to the officer, I heard him; says he, I am very sorry for the affair, I cannot deny but I am guilty of the matter.

What matter? - Of the injury he had done the child, he said, he had handled the child.

Did he ever say any thing more? - No, we took him before the justice immediately when he was examined I insisted upon it that the child was foul, he denied it intirely; Mr. Wilmot sent for Mr. Brown, he could not come for a considerable time, and with a deal of patience, he came, then he had the man examined in court, and found him to be foul; Mr. Wilmot said, you villain, where did you get this disease? says he, I caught it of the prosecutor's wife about six weeks ago.

Was that true! - No Sir, my wife said, if the gentlemen will withdraw, I will be examined, she was within an hour or two of being delivered; she was delivered last Sunday, she was here on Saturday all day, the midwife is not here; here is a woman here, that was at her delivery.

Court. If I had known as much of the case as I do now, I would have put off the trial to the next sessions; did the man ever acknowledge to have done any thing else to the child but handling her? - No, no further; I went last Sunday, and the child shewed me the place where the affair was committed, upwards of two miles off.

Mr. Peatt, prisoner's counsel. You seem so candid, Sir, I shall only ask you a single question. The child was out of your company, and out of your house? - Yes, I was at home all the time.

She could not have been at home without your knowing of it? - No.

You said nothing more to the prisoner at first, than what you have mentioned? - No.

JOSHUA BROWN sworn.

I am a surgeon; this child was brought to me on Thursday morning last, I examined it, and thought there were some symptoms of a venereal complaint.

Were the symptoms such as enabled you to pronounce with any certainty? - I thought it really was so; I thought there were some symptoms of a local complaint, it had all the symptoms of a venereal complaint, not a lues, but a gonorrhea.

Might no other cause of inflammation produce the same symptoms? - There might such things happen.

Have you, either then or since, been able to ascertain with any certainty, whether it is a venereal complaint, or might it proceed from other causes? - I have often known children to have similar complaints, and I have found afterwards that the parents had something of that complaint upon them.

Are you able to say with certainty from whatever cause the venereal complaint proceeded, that the complaint is venereal? - According to some symptoms.

But I ask whether all the symptoms might not be occasioned from inflammations proceeding from other causes? - They might have originated from other causes.

Would not a greater length of time have enabled you to pronounce for certainty, whether the child's complaint was venereal or not? - It might so, I never saw it but that once.

Then probably from your examination, you are not able to pronounce with certainty, that the complaint is venereal? - I had only a slight investigation of her.

Let you have seen her once, or twenty times; let your investigation have been slight or minute; are you able to pronounce this for certainty, that the complaint is venereal? - I really thought it to be material.

Do you think so still? - Certainly.

Are you sure in your opinion? - I cannot be sure.

Would not an inflammation in those parts, arising from any other accidental cause, produce the same appearances, from over exertions; suppose now for instance, from very violent exercise of any kind, the child had been hurt in those parts, might not the same symptoms appear? - They might.

Then it would depend on time and observation to ascertain, whether the complaint was venereal or not? - I have often observed complaints of a similar kind, I never could account for it, but some times I found out that the parents had a venereal complaint, and it might have been contracted from the parents.

Were those infallible symptoms, or such as might arise from any other cause? - They certainly are doubtful symptoms, but I really supposed it to be venereal.

Do you give a certain or a doubtful opinion? - A doubtful opinion, but my opinion is, that it is venereal.

Did you afterwards attend at the justices? - Yes.

Did you examine the prisoner? - Yes.

Has he any venereal complaint? - He has some symptoms of a venereal complaint likewise.

Are his symptoms more or less certain than those of the child? - They are local; but his is certainly a venereal complaint.

Was you there when the prisoner said he had got it from the prosecutor's wife? - Yes, the woman was present; she said she would suffer herself to be examined; she was not examined.

Did you hear this man say any thing what intercourse he had had with his child? - Not in the least.

Court. Does there happen to be any medical gentleman besides Mr. Brown in court.

Prosecutor. Mr. Ball I understand is a gentleman of skill.

Court to Mr. Ball. Will you have the goodness, Sir, to withdraw with Mr. Brown into the Lord Mayor's parlour, and examine this unfortunate child?

Mr. Ball. Yes, my Lord.

ANN PERKINS sworn.

I live in Well's-street, Mile-end Town, with Mr. and Mrs. Sweetman, I know the child, she sleeps with me every night.

Did the child complain of any disorder before last Sunday week? - No, I do not know that I ever observed any thing on the child in my life, before last Wednesday morning, I did not observe the child's linen before then discoloured or stiffened, last Wednesday morning about seven or eight, I was getting up, and dressing myself I saw something on the child's shift, says I, Kitty what is this? says she, it is the child has puked over me, that is the child I have in my arms, then I went out to work, and thought no more of it.

Did you examine the person of the child at all? - No.

Then you know nothing more but what the child told you? - No.

Mr. Peatt. Did the child ever complain of any ill treatment from the prisoner? - No never, but always was extremely fond of him.

Was the child kept pretty strictly at home? - No Sir, I cannot say but she is a very forward fond child.

She runs about and plays with great boys? - I do not know, I go out at seven in the morning, and come home at night.

Does she not run about the neighbourhood with a strict attention of her parents? - Yes, she does.

And is some times hours together without the knowledge of the parents? - She is.

Court. Did you ever observe any thing particular in the prisoner's behaviour to the child? - No Sir, but always very fond of her.

(The Surgeons ordered in.)

DAVID BALL sworn.

You have examined this child? - I have.

Has she the venereal complaint? - Yes.

Is it manifestly so? - Clearly so.

Court to Mr. Brown. Are you of the same opinion? - I am.

Are your doubts removed now? - Yes, it is very clear.

Mr. Peatt to Mr. Brown? Is not it possible for a venereal taint to be got or acquited in different ways than from a man's penetrating a child or woman? - I have observed that children have had it in that manner without the least penetration.

Court. It certainly may, and clearly by contact, without penetration.

Mr. Peatt. It may be got by sitting on a seat at a necessary, or by touching a child with his finger? - It may be.

Court. You have had now two opportunities of examining this child; is there any appearance of laceration? - Not in the least, no laceration of the parts.

Then you perceive from the appearance of the child's person this crime could not have been committed, could she have been penetrated by a grown-up man? - I think not.

Court to Mr. Ball. (The same question.) - Why my Lord there is certainly no appearance of laceration, nor should I hardly have supposed there could have been any, I do not see any thing like that laceration having been made, nor any wound that has been healed, it seems to me quite unaccountable.

Mr. Peatt to Mr. Ball. Would it not in a child of that age if penetrated by an adult be exceedingly visible? - I should apprehend so.

HENRY BANFORD sworn.

On the 26th of this month the father of the child applied to me with a warrant to take up this man, I went with him to Whitechapel to a public house; I told the prisoner I had a warrant against him for injuring this man's child; the father said in my hearing to the prisoner, how could you injure my child? the prisoner said I hope you will forgive me; I was in liquor, but I hope you will forgive me.

Did the prisoner express more particularly what he had done to the child? - He said he had put his hand to the child's private parts.

Did he confess any thing further? - No.

Mr. Peatt. Was the father present when that passed? - Yes.

Did any thing pass from the father to induce any conversation of that kind? - Nothing but the charge he made.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It is eight weeks ago next Thursday, since this prosecutor's wife gave me the foul disease.

Court. That is no excuse for the crime with which you are now charged.

MARGARET SMALL sworn.

I have known the prisoner for about two years, I work at my needle; I am not a married woman; he has a very good character.

What has been his general conduct as to decency of behaviour? - I have been with him half a year, I never saw or heard one immodest action or word, nor any indecency in his conduct.

ELIZABETH PLATT sworn.

I have known him four year, I never saw any misconduct in his behaviour or conversation since in my house he has been either to women or children.

MARY TAYLOR sworn.

I keep a chandler's-shop and am a married woman; I have known the prisoner four years.

Is he a man of decent conduct to women? - I never heard to the contrary nor never saw any thing of the kind.

WILLIAM MEARS sworn.

I am a bell founder, I have known the prisoner six or seven years, he has worked

for me that time; I never saw him indecent in any respect, not even in his conversation; he behaved with decency and propriety in every respect.

The Jury upon giving a verdict guilty of the attempt, and being informed that they must either convict or acquit the prisoner under the indictment, which was for the complete crime, and not for an attempt, the foreman pronounced the word Guilty; upon which the learned Recorder thus addressed them: - Gentlemen, In order to find the prisoner guilty, you must be satisfied on your oaths, that the prisoner has completely entered the body of this child, and has had the same knowledge of her that any of you have had of your wives; I feel some anxiety that you should clearly understand this case, and the question which you are to determine; leaving the determination of it to you. The verdict which you first delivered in, I confess, appeared to me to be a declaration of the truth of the fact according to the evidence; it appears that this man has been guilty of a very gross and brutal attempt, to do an act, which neither has been nor could have been completed; if that is so; if that is your opinion of the fact, (for you are to judge of the fact and not me, I am only to tell you my opinion of the law) I can tell you with confidence, that if your opinion of the evidence is what you have now stated, you are bound to find him not guilty; you do not acquit your consciences and your oaths as Jurors, if believing he has been guilty of the attempt, you find him guilty of the complete charge; but if you are certain from the evidence that he is guilty of this complete crime, you will declare so by your verdict.

The Jury immediately found a verdict, of course

NOT GUILTY .

Court to Prisoner. Although I could not help feeling some anxiety about the event of this trial under this indictment, because I always wish the law to be administered dispassionately, yet till this very respectable jury had declared their verdict, it was not proper for me to say any thing of the motives which excited so great a doubt in their minds, who would not have entertained any doubt under other circumstances; (but the nature of good men's minds is so much offended at that conduct that has been clearly committed by you) and my opinion of these gentlemen is not altered by their finding that verdict; and I am happy in knowing that the consequence of that verdict is not a total impunity for your offence, for the law prescribes a different punishment although under a different prosecution for the offence that has been proved against you; and these gentlemen having done their duty, and repressed those honourable feelings which led them to be under some little danger of going beyond their duty, I shall certainly take the opportunity of bringing you to that punishment which you deserve; therefore I shall certainly order you (the Grand Jury being discharged) to be detained till the next sessions, in order to be prosecuted for the attempt. This poor man, the prosecutor, cannot afford the expences; I shall therefore make him a liberal allowance. Allow the prosecutor five guineas for the expence of this prosecution, and bind him and his witnesses over, to appear and give evidence on a bill of indictment against the prisoner, before the Grand Jury at the next sessions, and let the prisoner stand committed till the next sessions.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-94

497. JAMES BAKEWELL was indicted for obtaining on the 16th of June , by false pretences, 10 s. 6 d. of William Brown , his property.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-95

498. JAMES PEISLEY was indicted for obtaining by false pretences, a bill of exchange for 100 guineas , the property of Alexander Crighton .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17880625-96

The court was then adjourned to the Monday following the 7th of July, at the Old Bailey, for the trial of Nicholas Ready Ledwich .

Adjournment of Sessions, Monday, July 7th, 1788, at the Old Bailey, Trial of NICHOLAS READY LEDWICH , for PERJURY.

The Jury sworn.

Robert Andrews ,

Joseph Hand ,

Wm. Gardiner ,

John Newbald ,

Job Orton ,

Thomas Silk ,

John Cooper ,

David Evans ,

James Cardin ,

Matthew East ,

John Price ,

Thomas Duncomb .

Counsel for the Prosecution.

Mr. Silvester and Mr. Knowlys.

Counsel for the Defendant.

Mr. Ball.

Mr. Ball. My Lord, before Mr. Ledwich comes into court, I am to request of your Lordship that he may not stand in the bar, till it is known whether some of the witnesses can ascertain his person; I am also to request that the witnesses may be examined apart.

Court. Let Mr. Ledwich be brought into court, and instead of being placed in the bar, let him be placed in the other jury box, in the front row, among the witnesses and spectators; and exchange lists of witnesses, and let all the witnesses withdraw, and be called in one by one as they are wanted.

NICHOLAS READY LEDWICH was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

The indictment was opened by Mr. Knowlys, as follows:

May it please your Lordship, and you Gentlemen of the Jury, the indictment against the prisoner, Mr. Ledwich, states, that in Hilary Term last, a certain cause was depending wherein the prisoner was plaintiff, and one Edward Gill , the prosecutor of this indictment, was defendant. That on Wednesday, the 23d of January, the court made a rule that the prisoner (Mr. Ledwich) should show cause why all proceedings in the said action, and in the actions assigned on the bail bond should not be staid, and why Mr. Ledwich should not pay to the said Edward Gill the sum of 10 l. and answer the matters in certain affidavits: That Mr. Ledwich did on the 28th of January last, appear before Sir Henry Gould , Knight, and did then and there produce a certain paper writing,

purporting to be an affidavit, and that he was then and there duly sworn before the said Mr. Justice Gould, he having competent and sufficient power to administer an oath in that behalf, and that being so sworn, and contriving to prevent the defendant in that action from obtaining justice, and also to get the said rule discharged; he did then and there upon his oath maliciously, falsly, wickedly and corruptly say, depose, swear, and make affidavit in writing of and concerning the several matters in the said rule, in substance and to the effect following, that is to say,

"and first this defendant Nicholas Ready

"Ledwich (meaning himself) says, that

"on or about the 12th of January, 1787,

"one Francis Sweatman mentioned in

"the affidavit of Gale, who was then

"(meaning on the 12th January, 1787)

"an entire stranger to this deponent, applied

"to him at his chambers in Hare-Court,

"Temple, requesting him as an

"attorney to write to one Morgan Davis,

"a laceman in Long-acre, for 2 l. 2 s. 0 d.

"due from Davis as the acceptor of a bill,

"that he gave to this deponent the name

"and place of abode of the said Gale in

"writing, and directed this deponent to apply

"as an attorney to get the said money

"from Davis." Gentlemen, the indictment further states, that Mr. Ledwich being so sworn as aforesaid, and not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the Devil, did further falsly, maliciously, wilfully, wickedly, and corruptly say, depose, and swear in substance, and to the effect following:

"And this deponent

"further denies that he was ever

"in company with the said Sweatman

"(meaning the said Francis Sweatman ) at

"house of one Robert Addison , in Hanover-street,

"Long-acre, (meaning the

"house of Robert Addison , a witness in

"this cause); and this deponent also absolutely

"denies that he ever had any intimacy,

"connection, or familiarity whatever,

"either directly or indirectly, with

"the said Francis Sweatman ; nor had

"this deponent any knowledge of the said

"Sweatman, before he called on this deponent

"at his chambers for the said purpose." - Gentlemen, the indictment then assigns, that in truth and in fact, the said Francis Sweatman was not on the said 12th of January, 1787, an entire stranger to the prisoner, and that in truth and in fact, he was a person well known to him, and that the said Sweatman was in truth and fact for a long time, to wit for three months, well acquainted with him; and that in truth and in fact he was before the time of taking his said oath, in company with the said Francis Sweatman ; at the said house of the said Robert Addison, in Hanover-street aforesaid; and likewise states, that he was well and intimately acquainted with him, &c.

The case was opened by Mr. Silvester, as follows:

May it please your Lordship, and you Gentlemen of the Jury. This is an indictment against Nicholas Ready Ledwich, whom you see there, and the indictment charges him with wilful and corrupt perjury. Gentlemen, I must claim your attention to the case which I am going to open, because in opening that case, I shall discover such a scene of iniquity as men of your description are not acquainted with; and you will see from thence on what tenure it is, that you keep either your lives or your properties lafe, if a man of this description can be let loose on the country after being guilty of the facts, which I trust I shall be able to prove before you in evidence: But it will be necessary for me to begin the transaction a little further back, that you may understand the whole of the case, see the force of it, and observe the purpose for which it was done, and the iniquity which was intended to be perpetrated in the hands of this man, who is an attorney. Gentlemen, when I say an attorney, it is to call your attention more particularly to the case; because men of his description are not to exercise their power to the ruin of their fellow subjects, and to the disgrace

of the honourable profession to which they belong; therefore, I say it behoves you and the court to watch more attentively to their conduct. Gentlemen, in the end of the year, 1786, a Mr. Gale, who is the prosecutor of this indictment, who then lived in the Hay-market, and was a leather trunk-maker, and was acquainted with a person of the name of Sweatman (Sweatman was a coach harness-maker) he applied to him, and told him he had an opportunity, if he would but lend him a few pounds, to make a very advantageous bargain; that a person of his acquaintance had a pair of coach-harness to sell, which he offered him five guineas for, and that he should have three guineas profit: at first Gill was unwilling to lend him the money, but the profit being so great, and this man being at the same time in necessitous circumstances, and he telling him I will put in your hands the security of two guineas due to me from a Mr. Davis who lives in Long-acre, and the moment I have sold the harness, I will pay you: A short time afterwards he paid him the three guineas, but on application being made to Davis for the two guineas on the note, Davis either unable or unwilling to pay it, did not chuse to pay it, upon which Gill returned the note to Sweatman, and told him it was of no use; Sweatman received the note, went away and he heard no more of him for sometime: at that time Gill was perfectly unacquainted that there was such a man in existence as Mr. Ledwich, he had never heard his name, or seen his person, and was surprized one day being applied to by Mr. Ledwich, who asked him if he had settled Sweatman's affairs, he said no, he knew nothing of it, he owed him two guineas; because says he, he has brought an action against Davis, and the moment I recover it, I am to pay you. Sometime after Ledwich sent to Gill, and got him to the coffee-house; unfortunately, gentlemen, there is a coffee-house where men of Mr. Ledwich's description meet, and where I do not think it safe for any other man to go, because the company he meets with there are of that description as always to be ready to watch to take advantage of what is said. Gentlemen, at this coffee-house Mr. Ledwich told Mr. Gill, that unless he paid him a sum of money down, the action which he had brought in his name on this note of hand would be nonprossed; Mr. Gill was astonished! alarmed! he had returned the bill to Sweatman, he had never seen Ledwich, nor ever gave him authority to sue at all, and was much surprised to hear from him that he had with at any authority whatever made use of his name to bring an action against Davis; he did not take any notice of it, or pay him the money; some time after that, this poor man for the good-natured action of having lent three guineas to Sweatman, was arrested and obliged to pay 10 l. for not going on with an action which he knew nothing of; he applied to Mr. Ledwich immediately, who informed him Mr. Sweatman was at Kentish-Town; and at last after frequent enquiries he found that Sweatman and the defendant Ledwich were intimate friends, countrymen, and cronies, that they had been together at the house of one Addison, that they were often together, and that Sweatman acted sometimes as attorney for Ledwich; when he found that, this poor man, by the advice of his attorney, paid the money, and he then arrested Mr. Gill for 14 l. 8 s. 10 d. for costs for going on with that action; as soon as he was arrested, he put in bail, but not wishing to try the cause, he got an assignment from the sheriff, and that brought the parties before the Court of Common Pleas; when they came before the court, Mr. Gill opened the whole transaction, stated every fact, that he had lent the money, and had only taken this note as a security which he returned as invalid; that he never directly, or indirectly gave Ledwich orders to prosecute on the note, or bring an action on the note, and was perfectly ignorant of Ledwich, and that he shrewdly suspected it was a contrivance between Ledwich and Sweatman to rob himof his money; this was the affidavit made by Mr. Gill in the Court of Common Pleas. In answer to that, Mr. Ledwich did not as is usual, produce an authority in writing from Mr. Gill, but he made his affidavit, and said he had been employed, and that as to this person of the name of Sweatman he did not know him nor bad any connection with him; he said that Sweatman was then an entire stranger to him; these are his words;

"And this deponent further

"denies that he ever was in company with

"the said Sweatman, at the house of one

"Addison, in Hanover-street, Long-acre,

"and absolutely denies, that he

"ever had any intimacy, connection, or

"familiarity whatsoever, either directly

"or indirectly with the said Sweatman,

"nor had any knowledge of him before he

"called on him at his chambers, for the

"purpose mentioned in his affidavit." - Yet he would have the court believe that a man whom he was entirely ignorant of, had come to his chambers and picked him out from all the rest of mankind to bring an action, not in his own name but in the name of Gill; why did he swear this? because he was charged by Gill, that it was a contrivance, a trick of his, planned by him and his countryman Sweatman, for the purpose of robbing Gill. Gentlemen, the action was brought on this note, which he must know at the time he could not recover, for it was invalid in point of law, but he knew at the same time he was playing a safe game, and if once he could get the costs from Gill, it was perfectly immaterial to him whether he recovered or not; if he recovered against Davis, he was sure of recovering his costs from him; if he failed, he had nothing to do but to institute a suit against this gentleman Mr. Gill, stating himself to be employed by him, and by an affidavit rob him of that money which he was not intitled to. Gentlemen, this is the iniquity which this man has been guilty of; you see the deep laid plan which every one of you as well as myself who speak to you are liable to at this moment; if men of this description who have art enough, are wicked enough to put that art in force. The transaction between Sweatman and himself (which Mr. Gill says, was a contrivance;) Mr. Ledwich denies, and swears positively to the employment, and thinks he is safe, because one witness cannot convict a man of perjury; but there are fortunately for the country, and fortunately for all honest men not only one, but many witnesses who will contradict that fact which Mr. Ledwich has sworn, and which he himself knew was false. Gentlemen, I will prove to you that Mr. Ledwich in company with this man, went to the sheriff's-office, with a person of the name of Hargrave, whom we have not here at present, that Sweatman and he dined together every day in the week, that he was the go-between that man who was in goal and the plaintiff; that they belonged, I believe to a club, and were in the strictest habits of intimacy; and notwithstanding Mr. Ledwich has sworn that he was not on a certain day at Addison's house, Mr. and Mrs. Addison will tell you that he was there, and that they saw him. It is lucky for the public that men of this description have not always their senses about them, therefore they give an opportunity to bring them to justice, which otherwise in this case we should not have had. Gentlemen, I shall produce his affidavit, in which he states, his perfect ignorance of Sweatman, and his not having been at this place; that I shall contradict by several witnesses; and I must make one other observation which is, that not one of the witnesses I shall call to you are or will be interested by the event of this cause; they are neither to get nor lose by your verdict, therefore they come before you unimpeached and disinterested: I have no objection, gentlemen, that Mr. Ledwich should sit there, if it can avail him to sit in any part of the court; because I do not wish for your verdict, unless it is founded on the evidence I have to offer, I do not wish that any thing I have said should influence your judgements against Mr. Ledwich, all I wish is to direct your

understandings to the point in issue, and when I have proved my facts, I call upon you as honest men for your verdict of guilty: If on the other hand he can make a defence which will avail him, and convince you that he is innocent of this charge, I shall rejoice in his acquittal; but if I convince you that what he has sworn is absolutely false, the justice of your country requires you to do your duty (although it is a painful one) and pronounce him guilty.

(Mr. Silvester read the note.)

Court. You must prove Mr. Ledwich's hand-writing.

A WITNESS sworn.

Where did you get that affidavit? - From the office.

Do you know the Judge's hand-writing? - I do not.

Did you ever see the Judge write?

Mr. Ledwich. My Lord, I do not want any thing unfair, I will acknowledge it, I will look at it, and see that there is no interlineation in that part that affects me; (looks at it) this is my hand-writing, and I believe this to be Mr. Justice Gould's hand-writing.

JOSEPH BODDY sworn.

I brought this affidavit from Mr. Skin, one of the Secondaries of the Court of Common Pleas, I had it from him at his office.

Mr. Silvester. Now produce the affidavit of Edward Gale , the defendant in that action.

Mr. Ledwich. I believe this is very right my Lord, I will admit it, I hope they will be as candid with me, and acknowledge the affidavits I have made likewise.

BENJAMIN SMITH sworn.

(Produces a copy of the roll examined by himself, at Mr. Skin's office with the roll - Examined by the indictment. - The rule of court read in the Common Pleas.)

Mr. Ball objected, that Mr. Ledwich was indicted for an affidavit which he made in answer to an affidavit of Edward Gill ; but in the indictment it was not stated to be in answer to the affidavits of Edward Gill , upon which a rule was obtained; and that the indictment did not state that that rule was obtained on the affidavits of any person; and of course there was a perfect variance. This objection was over-ruled by the court, together with two other objections, one of which that they had not set out a whole sentence in the affidavit, but had garbled it, was reserved till it was seen to what the evidence should amount.

JOHN BANKS sworn.

Mr. Silvester. Have you been in court? - No, I have been in the yard.

Do you know Mr. Ledwich? - Yes.

Look round? - This is him.

How long have you known him? - Between two and three years.

Do you know a man of the name of Sweatman? - Yes, I knew him in 1786; I saw them together when I was in company with Sweatman and Hargrave, about the middle of that year, I cannot recollect the month, Sweatman, Hargrave, and myself were in company drinking a pot of beer at the Anchor and Vine; Mr. Ledwich was in the room executing some papers, I believe it was for the purchase of some part of the pay of a lieutenant, Hargrave spoke to Ledwich, and he said, I am very busy, gentlemen, you'll excuse me at present; we were also a second time in that said room we three together, I have used the house these ten or a dozen years.

Did they seem to be acquainted with each other? - Ledwich was busy, he said gentlemen, how do you do? I am busy just now.

Have not you seen Mr. Ledwich lately on this business? - He called upon me at the Prince William Henry , after the bill was filed, to consider his situation and his family that he a large family looking up to him for bread, and to say nothing but what was truth, not to ruin a man; that was what he said; that was the only time

that I saw Ledwich and Sweatman together, I arrested Hargrave the 19th of October, 1786, I believe; and on the 26th, I got a letter of attorney.

Court. Was Ledwich there? - No, I never saw him afterwards in the business.

Mr. Ball. You was sitting in the public room with Hargrave and Sweatman, when Mr. Ledwich came in? - Yes.

You had known Mr. Ledwich between two and three years? - Yes.

You was acquainted with him at that time? - Yes.

He was also apparently acquainted with Hargrave, and Hargrave spoke to him first, and he said, I beg your pardon, gentlemen, I am now busy? - Yes.

Did Sweatmen speak of Mr. Ledwich, do you recollect? - I do not recollect that he did.

Did you ever tell Mr. Ledwich that Sweatman did then speak of him? - No.

Recollect as well as you can, because it is a serious matter your omitting it? - I do not recollect that he did.

Court. Was there any conversation between them and Ledwich? - No, not at that time, Mr. Ledwich said he was very busy.

Mr. Ball. Was this the evidence you gave to the Grand Jury? - Yes.

That you saw them twice in a public room together, and that at neither of those times did they speak to one another? - Ledwich spoke to Hargrave.

But do you know of any connection or acquaintance, or intimacy whatever subsisting between Ledwich and Sweatman? - No.

ISAAC GILLET sworn.

I was a sheriff's officer, I know Mr. Ledwich, I had in my custody once a man of the name of Hargrave.

Look round for Mr. Ledwich? - I know him, Hargrave was in my custody about six or seven days; I arrested him the 19th of October, Mr. Ledwich was only once at our house.

Court. Did you ever see Mr. Ledwich in company with Sweatman? - Yes, they were at my house.

How often? - Only once I believe, I just came in as they were coming out, they were in the passage; it is so long ago I do not remember what was said, I never heard Ledwich say any thing about Sweatman, I never had any conversation with him particularly, I remember nothing that passed at all.

Did you ever hear Sweatman say any thing in the presence of Ledwich? - No.

Mr. Silvester. Did Mr. Ledwich come at any time in consequence of a message sent to him? - I do not know, I cannot enter into his heart.

Did you ever send for Mr. Ledwich to your house and he came directly? - Yes, I did, I sent Sweatman for him, and he came.

How soon after you sent for him? - I cannot exactly say, I do not recollect the circumstances, he did not come at the time I sent for him.

Mr. Ball. Do you know of any intimacy, familiarity, or friendship between Mr. Ledwich and Sweatman? - I do not, they were strangers to me.

Court. When you came in Mr. Ledwich and Sweatman were in the passage? - Yes.

Did you hear any conversation between them? - No, I do not remember.

Did you ever hear Mr. Ledwich call Sweatman by his name? - I do not remember.

Did you ever hear Sweatman address himself to Mr. Ledwich in your presence? - I do not remember.

Did you ever hear Mr. Ledwich in 1786, mention the name of Sweatman? - No.

SUSAN HART sworn.

I was servant to Mr. Gillet.

Do you know Mr. Ledwich? - Yes.

Should you know him again if you was to see him? - Yes, I believe I should, I never saw him but twice, I believe this gentleman is him with the papers, (pitches on a wrong person).

Court. That is Mr. Ledwich; are you sure of that? - Yes.

Very well, go on; how often have you seen Mr. Ledwich? - Three or four times.

Where? - In our room in the back parlour, in the Rolls Buildings; it was the 26th of October, 1786, he was there drinking with Mr. Hargrave, who was a prisoner then at my master's.

Who was in company with them? - Mr. Ledwich.

And who else? - There were other people but I do not know their names, I never took any particular notice of them, we kept no man, but a person at the King's Arms, in Roll's Buildings, used to go of Mr. Hargrave's messages, I saw nobody else but Mr. Ledwich and Mr. Sweatman, I have seen them there about three or four times; I am not quite sure how many times.

Did they come together? - Yes Sir, they came together, and drank together; I gave them liquor, and took the money of them.

Were they acquainted? - I fancy they were, I am sure they were together.

Are you perfectly acquainted with Mr. Ledwich's face, so as to be able to know him again for a certainty? - No Sir, I am not sure, but I dare say I should, I never took any particular notice of him, any further, I am pretty sure that gentleman in black is him.

(Pointing to the same person.)

Court. Do you know Mr. Sweatman? - Yes, I believe I should know him as well as I do Mr. Ledwich.

JOHN BLOMART sworn.

I was bail for Ledwich, I know his person, I do not know the person of Sweatman

You mean to say that? - I never to my knowledge laid eyes upon him.

Do not you belong to a club with Mr. Ledwich? - I did a twelvemonth ago, in 1786.

Was not Sweatman a member of that club? - I do not know that he was, I never met him there to my knowledge.

Mr. Ball. Was not that a club consisting of a great number of people? - Eighty odd at one time.

Did all the members of that club seem to have a particular intimacy and connection with one another? - No Sir, there were several that I knew nothing of.

RICHARD SMITH sworn.

I have known Mr. Ledwich for a year or two, I have seen him several times.

Do you know a man of the name of Sweatman? - I do not upon my honor, I do not indeed, not that I ever heard of; I never heard of any such person, never saw him, nor never conversed with him.

NICHOLAS O'BRIEN sworn.

Mr. Ledwich. He has been in the court all the time.

O'Brien. I do not know the gentleman.

Court. You have been in court? - Yes.

( Robert Addison called.)

Mr. Adlam, a friend of Mr. Ledwich's, said that Addison had been in the gallery.

Mr. Blades. He was called, and I saw him come out of the gallery, and I would not let him come in.

Have you been in court? - I was up in the gallery.

Did not you hear that all the witnesses were turned out? - I was there not thinking any harm.

Court. He was in court contrary to order.

Mr. Silvester. Have you heard any of the witnesses examined? - Not one, I was the first called, and I went out of the gallery.

Who was it took you up into the gallery? - An acquaintance of mine, he would persuade me, and we both went up.

Who was he? - Davis.

Court. Tell me what passed between you and Davis, why did you go into the gallery? - Because we had been standing

so many hours here, and we wanted to hear the debates.

Was not you in court when an order was made, that all the witnesses should withdraw? - I never was in court till I went into the gallery.

When did you come into the gallery? - I believe it was directly when the order was given for going on with the trial, and I was immediately called and came out.

Was you there when the jury was sworn? - No.

Was you there when Mr. Silvester spoke to the jury? - I did not hear him.

Was you in the gallery? - I was no where else; I might be about ten minutes, or a little better before I was called, the gentleman persuaded me to go up into the gallery, I denied it two or three times, but he persuaded me to go up into the gallery to hear the debates, whether the bill should be thrown out or not; I cannot recollect the words, that gentleman was talking to my Lord; I dare say Davis thought no more harm than I did.

(Morgan Davis called.)

Court. How came you to take Addison up into the gallery? - Nothing but curiosity, we were not five minutes before Mr. Addison was called, I never heard the order.

Court. Both parties have neglected to call the witnesses together, which they ought to have done, I think in point of justice I ought to hear what Addison has to say, he has in fact not heard any thing.

ROBERT ADDISON sworn.

I live in Hanover-street, Long-acre, No. 16, a private house; I have kept a house there above thirty years.

Do you know Mr. Ledwich? - Yes.

Did you ever see him at your house? - Yes.

When? - I cannot ascertain that, not thinking it of any consequence; it was near a twelvemonth ago, or thereabouts; I have a shop in the back buildings; I am a truss-maker; I was called down stairs; when I got into the back room, Mr. Ledwich and Mr. Sweatman were there.

How came they there together? - Mr. Ledwich came because I had made a truss for him.

How came Mr. Sweatman there? - I do not know, I know Mr. Sweatman before, I had seen him many times.

Do you know whether Mr. Ledwich and Mr. Sweatman were acquainted? - No more than what I tell you, I never saw them but that once together, I am sure of that, I never saw them any where else together.

Have you had any conversation with Ledwich about Sweatman? - No, none concerning Sweatman, not that I can recollect, there was no conversation passed then about the matter, and I believe that Sweatman did not speak a word while he was there.

They came together? - They went away together, but I was called out of my shop, and they were in the parlour; I do not know how they came.

Mr. Ball. Do you know of any acquaintance, connexion, or familiarity between Mr. Ledwich and Mr. Sweatman? - I do not know.

You were called down out of your shop into your parlour, there you found two persons, one that had particular business, and the other came to ask you how you was? - Yes.

Do you think that Mr. Ledwich had any knowledge of Sweatman at that time? - No further than that they were both together in the room, and went away together.

Did they go out as if they were going to any place together? - I do not know that they were.

Was there any appearance of their being acquainted with one another? - No more than going away together; Sweatman had no business with me that I know of; I immediately went back to my work.

Was you subpoened on an action depending between Mr. Ledwich and Gill in the Court of Common Pleas? - No.

Court. How long did Mr. Ledwich

and Sweatman stay with you? - Not many minutes.

Did any conversation pass between them two while you was there? - Not a word that I can remember.

Did you ever hear Mr. Ledwich call Sweatman by his name? - No, I do not recollect that I did.

Mr. Ball. Do you think if at any time within these six months, if Mr. Ledwich had spoke to you, and asked you how you did, you would have known him, or even since this indictment was found? - That is just as it happens; I am rather forgetful of people's faces, but I think I should.

Court. He knows him now.

Mr. Ledwich. I spoke to him to day.

Court. Have you any other witnesses that have seen him at Addison's house.

Mr. Silvester to Addison. Is your wife here? - No.

Court. Then you have not got a step further, unless you had another witness; there is no evidence to go to the Jury; where is Hargrave?

Mr. Silvester. He is down at Colchester.

Court. Gentlemen of the Jury; this last witness carries the case no further, for his evidence is upon the distinct assignment of perjury, that Ledwich never was with Sweatman at the house of Addison: now, if what Addison has stated, was proved by two witnesses, I should certainly leave it to your consideration, whether you believed the assertion of Mr. Ledwich in his affidavit, to be knowingly and corruptly false, or not; but in the crime of perjury, the law requires two witnesses to convict, even on a distinct assignment of perjury; and the law does not leave it to the Jury to determine, whether they will believe one witness or the other, where there is but one each way; because the person indicted for perjury, has already sworn one way; and if there is but one witness that swears the other way, the law will not suffer the person indicted to be convicted: I am therefore not permitted by law to put the question to you, whether you believe Addison's evidence; upon the rest of the case, there is no evidence at all, for the evidence that at a public-house, where there were a number of people, and Mr. Ledwich was twice in company with Sweatman in the same room, without any proof that he spoke to him at all, or was acquainted with him, that is certainly much too slight to be taken notice: therefore, to be sure there is no evidence in support of this prosecution.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Mr. Ball. This business will undergo a revision in another place on an indictment for a conspiracy.

Reference Number: o17880625-1

JOHN COGAN and THOMAS RILEY being set to the Bar, Mr. JUSTICE WILSON delivered the Opinions of the Judges upon their Cases, as follows:

JOHN COGAN otherwise JAMES COOGAN , you were indicted and tried here in July sessions, 1787, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a certain false will and testament, purporting to be the last will and testament of James Gibson , with intention to defraud Evelyn Pierrepont , Benjamin Waddington , and William Waddington ; and upon another count, with intention to defraud the said James Gibson , knowing the same to have been forged. Upon your trial here there was no doubt of your having done the thing with which you were charged; but it appeared that James Gibson, whose will you was said to have forged, was alive and produced as a witness: I was in some doubt whether you could be convicted of forging the last will and testament of a man alive, his will is in his own power till he is dead, therefore no will can be said to be a man's last will till he is dead; I was in some doubt about whether that which had the similitude of a last will could be regarded as coming within the act of parliament. The case was laid before the Twelve Judges, who were all of opinion, that the doubt was without foundation, and that in reality, if a thing purporting to be a last will and testament was forged, uttered, and published as a true last will and testament, the man being said to be dead, (for you said the man was dead, and got the executorship and probate of that will) that is as much within the act of parliament as if Gibson had been really dead; and this opinion is founded upon preceding practice: there are several cases found; one of the King and Murphy, in the year 1753, where Murphy was indicted for forging a seaman's will, and he was tried and executed, though the man whose will was forged, was then alive. There is another case of the King and Stirling, who knew that his laundress had some money in the public funds, he made a will for her, and got her money; some time after the poor old woman went to receive her dividend, and found that her money had been taken out by some other person; enquiry was made into it, and Stirling was taken up and executed; and, indeed, if it had been otherwise it would be dangerous to keep any money in the funds. - There is another case, the case of Ann Lewis , who forged a power of attorney in the name of Elizabeth Tingle , who had taken administration to her father, and obtained some seaman's wages; it appeared that the man never had any daughter at all; therefore, there could be no such power of attorney given from his daughter, but as it wore the appearance of a power of attorney, the Judges were all of opinion with the exception of one, that that was within the same statute. There is another case, the case of the King and Bolland; he was indicted for forging and endorsing a promissory note in the name of James Banks , no such person having existed; he stated him to be a wine and brandy merchant in Rathbone-Place, and he was executed for that forgery. Upon these precedents the Judges were of opinion that your case was within the statute, and you are therefore to receive sentence of death.

THOMAS RILEY , you were indicted at the sessions holden in this place in September last, for feloniously procuring John M'Daniel to take a false oath, and got letters administration of one - Lewis, in order to receive the wages due to the said Lewis. This by a statute of the

33 Geo. II . was made a capital felony; there was no doubt about your guilt, but the judge who tried it thought fit to respite your sentence, on a doubt whether the testimony of one of the witnesses was competent; he had been himself indicted for taking a false oath in the same business, you were indicted for procuring that oath; M'Daniel was indicted and found guilty, but no judgment was given against him, and he received his Majesty's pardon before he came to be tried; he was offered as a witness, and was received by the learned Judge, who when he received it, entertaining some doubt of his competency respited your judgment in order to take the opinions of the Judges. Your case has been laid before the Judges, and they are of opinion, that if the man had not been pardoned, there would have been some doubt, but as he was pardoned, that that pardon not only respited him from punishment, but absolved him from the crime, and restored him to credit. There is a case in Lord Chief Justice Hobart's Reports, of Waddington, and something I don't exactly recollect the name, in which the same doctrine is held, that where a party has been pardoned, it not only takes away the punishment, but restores the person to credit. The Judges were of opinion that the witness was rightly admitted, and that you were rightly convicted.

[Death. See summary.]

Reference Number: s17880625-1

The Trials being ended (except the Trial of NICHOLAS READY LEDWICH , for Perjury, which was postponed by Consent to Monday the 7th of July, at the Old Bailey), the Court proceeded to pass Sentence, as follows:

Received sentence of death, 11, viz.

Thomas Riley , John, otherwise James Cogan, (reserved from former sessions, for the opinion of the Judges) Elizabeth Goldsmith , William Chatwin, John Davis , Thomas Newby , John Young , John Place, Francis Harris , Samuel Warner , William Stevenson .

To be transported for seven years, 50, viz.

Sarah Lyons , Ann Gibson , William Jewling , George Thomas Salmon , William

Pearce, Thomas Jones, William Jones , Edward Willan , William Jones, Sarah Kelly , John Phillis , John Mascall , Thomas Lee, Henry Jackson , John Greenaway , David Knowland , John Meyers , James Beale , John Evans , Laurence Kelley , Mary Lewis , Humphry Thorne, Violetta Atkins, Tho. Beadle , John Collins, Michael Michaels , Thomas Twite , John Watkins , Christian Klenche , John Walker , James Matthews, William Wright , William Reynolds , Ann Brady , William Eaton, Ann Hardiman, Rachel Hoddy, Dorcas Talbot, Thomas King, James Wilson , John Bristow , Francis Flexmore , Benjamin Watkins, John Gogay , Charles Rogers , John Thomas, John Williams , Robert Hayward , Robert Steel, Elizabeth Gyles .

To be imprisoned six months, 5.

Eleanor Hayes , Hannah Fowley , Christopher Davenport, Jenny Mead , Mary Hudson .

To be whipped, 5.

Isaac Collins , Thomas Nott , John Robotham , Christopher Davenport , Cornelius Sheene .

Reference Number: a17880625-1

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