Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th June 1783.
Reference Number: 17830604
Reference Number: f17830604-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 4th of JUNE, 1783, and the following Days;

Being the FOURTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Nathaniel Newnham , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXIII.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable NATHANIEL NEWNHAM , Esq; LORD MAYOR of the City of London; The Hon. JOHN WILLES , Esq; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; The Hon. Sir RICHARD PERRYN , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; The Hon. JAMES ADAIR , Esq; Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Berney

Robert Sudgate

Andrew Robson

James Turnbull

William Hewson

Joseph Hopkins

John Cookson

Richard Ginger

* Richard Cope

* William Weatherley served the fourth Day instead of Richard Cope .

Samuel Burton

William Strickland

Thomas Larmott

First Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Elliott

Thomas Buckmaster

Richard Little

John Savage

+ John Johnson

+ Joseph Raven served some time in the room of John Johnson .

John Baynell

Joseph Babbs

Thomas Price

John Edwards

Matthew Dere Percival

Francis Thompson

William Jacobs

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Duvall

James Wywill

William Lambert

Thomas Brown

Edward Orgill

John Birkinshall

James Bell

Isaac Smith

John Rennington

Henry Felts

Christopher Heady

John Dick

Reference Number: t17830604-1

356. JOHN BARTLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of March last, one quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Notley .

THOMAS NOTLEY sworn.

I am a victualler , I live at the Royal Oak, in Christmas-street, Hatton-garden , I lost a quart pot, about the 18th of March last, I cannot be certain to the time, I never saw the prisoner, but that one day; I did not miss it for two days afterwards, I heard of it the Tuesday following, they sent to me from the office in Bow-street, they had taken the prisoner, I swore to the pot.

Court. What is the value of the pot? - They valued it at 1 s. 6 d.

Court. Do you know how the prisoner came by it? - No.

( John Halsey called upon his recognizance.)

Court. How long has this man been in prison? - The 18th of March.

He has been in pretty near three months for stealing this pot, it is shameful to keep him in so long, and no evidence against him, he is not guilty, let him be discharged.

To the Prisoner. What are you? - I am a labourer , I was innocent, somebody put it in my pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

Sir Robert Taylor . Let him be discharged immediately without paying any fees.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-2

357. FRANCIS TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th day of March last, one live goose, price 10 d. one live duck, price 1 s. one live drake, price 1 s. four live hens, price 2 s. one live cock, price 1 s. the goods of David Liptrapp and William Cottrell .

EDMUND MAY sworn.

I live at Mile End, I am a watchman, I met this prisoner when I was on the watch between two and three in the morning of the 8th of March, I saw him with a bundle on this back.

Court. Had he any body with him? - No.

What did he say to you when you stopped him? - I asked him what he had in his bundle, he said, fowls.

Were they alive or dead? - Dead, all dead; I asked him where he got them, he said them fowls he had at Burntwood, and that he dealt in them.

Court. Did you take his bag down? - No, I saw a hole in his bag, I put in my hand, and found them warm, I took him into custody, and led him down to the watch-house, and gave charge of him to the officer of the night: Then we opened his bag, and there was one goose, one drake, one duck, one cock, and four hens.

They were all dead? - Yes.

Were they all warm? - Quite so, he confessed afterwards where he got them from.

Was you by when he confessed? - Yes.

Were any promises made to him? - Not that I know of, he confessed the next day, and he said he had got them from his masters where he worked, Mr. Liptrapp and Cottrell, they are partners, one is a brewer , and the other a distiller .

Court. Did you send to these gentlemen? - Yes.

Who came there? - He sent his bailiff Edward Nickolls , he came the next day.

Were the fowls all in their feathers? - Yes.

You did not pick them before the bailiff came? - No.

( Edward Nickolls and James Genton called upon their recognizance.)

Court to May. How comes Edward Nickolls not to be here? - He lives seven miles in the country, I cannot say, James Genton is now at Hicks's Hall, finding a bill against a sheep stealer.

Court. Genton knows no more of it than you do? - No, my Lord.

Do you know Liptrapp and Cottrell? - Yes, they are partners.

What became of the fowls? - They took them home.

Court. Let both the recognizances be estreated.

What may be the value of these fowls? - I do not know, one shilling.

Court to Prisoner. Are you a married man or single? - A married man.

How long have you been married? - Twelve years.

How many children have you got? - No children.

NOT GUILTY .

Court. You have met with a merciful Jury, there is no doubt of your guilt. -

(The court upon coming in of the witnesses, ordered the fines to be taken off.)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-3

358. WILLIAM JENKINS, otherwise Jennings , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of May last, twenty-nine live rabbits, value 29 s. the property of Richard Harris .

RICHARD HARRIS sworn.

I live in Kensington-gravel-pits , I keep rabbits in pens.

Court. You keep them as tame rabbits? - Yes, my Lord, they are.

What you deal in them I suppose? - Yes, I keep them for the amusement of my child, to keep him out of the street, from bad company, I lost twenty-nine on the 2d of May, I fed them the night before, they were all in pens, and locked in the pens joining to the wall close to the house, at one end of the house they got over a wall about six feet high.

Court. What were the rabbits worth? - The young ones I sold for eleven-pence a piece, and the old ones were worth three or four shillings, there were eleven found alive in the fields, two days after they were lost.

Court. How do you apprehend they came there? - I pursued them, I mistrusted them coming, and I set up, I had seen that there had been somebody over the pales at the rabbit house door, but it was locked, and I went to bed, at about four o'clock, I heard a noise of a bell, which I fixed round the rabbit-house door, and one bell into my room, and one into my son's, I got up, and my son thinking I called him, spoke louder than common, with that I suppose they run away, I pursued them to Kensington town, I sent my son to Oxford-road, I met a butcher, and desired him to tell me if he heard of any such things.

SAMUEL CALLCOTT sworn.

I am a butcher at Kensington, my boy told me, that the prosecutor had lost some rabbits; Harris lives about two miles from me, as I was going to town with my cart, between five and six I overtook another man first before; the prisoner and the other person had a basket on his back, and he set it down to rest, I stopped the cart, and looked at him very hard, it was in the open road, I saw some white sleek on it, and the prisoner was about two hundred yards off this man, seeing this sleek, gave me suspicion that they were the men that took the rabbits, and I went a little further on, they kept following me, and I got to Hyde Park Corner, they then were one on the one side the way, and the other on the other.

Court. Had the prisoner any bag or basket, or any thing? - Yes, he had.

Was you by yourself? - No, another person was with me.

What had the prisoner in his bag? - He had a basket, I got out of the cart, seeing me get out they turned back again, I said nothing to them then.

How near might they be to you when they turned back again? - About thirty yards.

Both turned back at the same instant? - Yes, the prisoner went into a public house with his basket, and the other after him, there was a thorough-fare in the house, and the prisoner went through that way and got off, but left his basket at the public house.

How do you know it was his basket, and not his companion's? - Both the baskets was there, the other party staid, but got off after, I went and spoke to him.

Are you sure they were the same baskets? - I cannot say one from the other, I went in and said to the other man, Mr. Cordway how do you do, he asked me how I did, says I, what have you in this bag, says he, it does not belong to me, it belongs to the man that run out just now, I said they were rabbits, says he, I will shew you who they belong to, he made out of the door and ran away, and as he ran one of the rabbits tumbled out of his great coat pocket; I cannot say how many rabbits, I found in these baskets, there were more than a dozen, all alive, they were white and grey, and black and white, there were 17 to the best of my knowledge; I put the rabbits in the turnpike house, and sent for my horse, and went on to my business, and returned about nine o'clock.

Were they the same rabbits you left? - They were.

Court to Harris. Did you see they were your rabbits? - Yes.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been as far as Mortlake, and at the corner of Brompton-row, I met this man with two baskets, he asked me to carry one of them as far as the turnpike, I said, I could not, says he, then carry it to the public house, and call for a pint of purl, I did so, I went in, and there was no fire, and I went about my business where I was going, I have witnesses to my character.

Court. How came you to run away from the public house? - Because I called for a pint of purl, and there was no fire.

Jury. Why did you leave the rabbits behind you? - I was ordered to leave them there, and he would return after me.

Court. Are you a married or single man? - A single man.

What business do you follow? - Butchering .

Are you a master? - No.

( The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Court to Jury. Gentlemen, what will you have done with this man.

Jury. His character is good, we wish your Lordship to be as favourable as you can.

Court. Why, I would, but you see it is a pretty bold robbery, it is getting over a wall.

Jury. Suppose he was to be whipped through Knightsbridge.

Court. I have a great objection to a public whipping, unless a man has lost his character, it is taking away his bread for life; unless a man is quite abandoned I never give him a public whipping; let him be privately whipped twice with severity and discharged .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-4

359. JAMES YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , one pair of silver buckles, value 16 s. the goods and chattles of George Skar .

GEORGE SKAR sworn.

I live in St. Catherine's-lane , I lost a pair of silver buckles, on the 7th of April, they were in my shoes which stood by the chimney behind a chair below stairs, I was in bed; the prisoner lodged in my house two weeks, he is a sailor ; the prisoner slept in the garret, and I lodged in the lower room, there were more lodgers in the house; my door was locked.

Was the room below stairs open? - Yes, the prisoner went through the room, I missed my buckles in the morning, he went through my room, I said, who is there, he said it was him; that was about seven, I got up as soon as he was gone, then I missed my buckles; I saw the prisoner at a public house on Tuesday.

WILLAM BRUIN sworn.

I am a salesman, and dealer in plate, on Monday the 7th of April, about eight in the morning, the prisoner and another man came to my house, and he said, he had brought this poor fellow or this poor sailor, I cannot say which, to sell a pair of buckles, and the other man pulled them out of his pocket; I asked him whose buckles they were, and he said they belonged to the prisoner, the prisoner stood on one side of him; I thought it rather extraordinary, that so young a man should have such a pair of old fashion buckles, and I questioned the prisoner about the buckles; he said that he was in Portsea hospital, and had wages and prize money to receive, and that one of the Lieutenants had advanced him seven guineas, and with that money he had come to Chatham, and there he got drunk and spent the money; and with a part of the money he had bought these buckles, he said he gave 26 s. for them, and he was drunk when he bought them, and all the next day; here is a part of the buckles, that is all that is left of them; when Mr. Skar came to me, I had disposed of some silver, and that had gone among the rest.

Court. What did you give him for them? - Sixteen shillings and three pence halfpenny, that was the weight of them, it was half a guinea, and the rest in silver, I am sure that is the lad.

Court to Bruin. How can you be sure to that bit of silver? - I took such particular notice of it, that I can swear to it among ten thousand.

Court to George Skar . I take it your room door was not fastened? - No, the prisoner went through our room that morning.

You lay in the room where the buckles were? - Yes.

Had you other lodgers? - Yes.

Did any of the other lodgers pass through the room, besides the prisoner? - Yes.

Who were these? - There were two men more.

Had you any conversation with the other people that passed through your room? - No.

Did they pass before the prisoner or after? - The other two went out first.

Were your curtains undrawn? - Yes.

Could you see your shoes? - Yes.

Did you see the prisoner meddle with your shoes and buckles as he went through the room? - I saw him have the shoes in his hand; I said who is there, he said it is me, and then he ran out.

Court. Was you quite awake? - I was.

As he ran out what did he do with the shoes? - He put them in the same place again, I did not see him take them away, I got up immediately, and found the buckles gone.

Court. Look at that bit of silver, and see what you know of it?

Jury. Was that a part of those buckles? - Yes, I had them two letters made at Copenhagen.

Court. What is the meaning of S. H.? - There was A. E. S.

Court. Make the letters? - I can neither read nor write.

Court. Can you swear that is a piece of your buckle? - Yes I will swear it.

William Bruin . When we were before the Justice, the prisoner was so much altered in his dress I hardly knew him, I asked what he did with the money, says he I gave him nine shillings, we went down St. Catherine's-lane, and there we got change, he said he claimed more of the share, because he helped him to sell them.

Court to Skar. How many men lodgers have you? - I have four.

Did the other three continue in your house? - Yes, but they are gone to sea now.

How long did they lodge with you after this? - About eight days.

Court to Prisoner. How long have you been at sea? - About four years.

Are you an able-bodied seaman? - Yes.

Under what command? - Under Digby.

How long have you been on shore? - About two months, or a little better.

Had you any prize money? - I had a good deal coming, I have had about nine pounds, and I have spent it, I am a single man, all I have to say is, this man did take the buckles, and gave them to this pawnbroker, he lodged in the same house with the prosecutor at the same time, his name is Jackson.

Court to Prosecutor. Did one Jackson lodge at your house at that time? - Yes, he did.

Did Jackson return again to his lodgings after you lost the buckles? - They were acquainted together, Jackson never came back again, he went near an hour before the prisoner.

Court. Did Jackson pass through your room that morning? - Yes, near an hour before the prisoner, he was a sailor.

You saw the prisoner have the shoes in his hand? - Yes.

Can you swear whether the buckles were in the shoes at the time he had them in his hand? - Yes.

Court to Bruin. What sort of a man was he that brought the buckles to you? - I do not know.

Was he like a sailor? - No.

Jury. Did the prisoner come back to his lodgings? - No.

Court to Bruin. To whom did you give the money? - To this man, who took it and put it in his breeches pocket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This fellow that took the buckles, he owed me some money, I lent him 7 s. 6 d. to get his wages, and he was expecting to go home to Wales; I met him going over London Bridge, and he said he had no money, he had buckles he said, if I would go with him he would sell them and give me the money, he said he brought them from Ostend, but I might say they were mine, so the man sold the buckles, and I took the money to pay myself, I went to the lodgings, and he took me up on suspicion, and I told him where a pair of buckles were sold.

Court to Prisoner. The buckles sold for 16 s. 3 1/2 d. how come you to put the whole of the money in your pocket, if Jackson owed you the money?

Prisoner. There was not silver enough.

Jury. The silversmith said that the prisoner told him he gave him 9 s. out of it.

Court to Prosecutor. Did the prisoner come back to his lodgings? - He never came back more.

Jury to Prosecutor. How did you hear of the prisoner again? - From a man at the public house.

Court to Prisoner. How old are you? - About seventeen.

GUILTY. 16 s.

To be once severely privately whipped and discharged .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-5

360, MARY SIDDON, otherwise FIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of April last, one pork ham, value 8 s. the property of Joseph Davis , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH DAVIS , sworn.

I am a cheesemonger , at the corner of Grafton-street, Soho ; on the 30th of April the prisoner and another woman came into my shop, between five and six in the evening, there were several customers in the shop, but nobody of my own family; they asked for a piece of cheap bacon, I said no, I have nothing that will do for you, they immediately went out of the shop, and a neighbour, a customer, says, you answer them very short as if you knew them, I said I know them, that tall woman is part of a gang that has been pestering me for years; I have not seen any thing of them lately; upon which the prisoner returned into the shop, they were only gone into the street, the other person stood at the door, the prisoner took up a piece of bacon in her hand, she held out the piece of bacon in this manner to the other, and asked her if she liked it, the other woman made some objections to it, and on her holding it up, I clearly perceived she had nothing about her under her cloak but a piece of a broken plate; there were six hams laid in the window that just filled up the channel of the window, she went and stood against these hams, part of the window was filled up with hams and part with cheese; seeing her go and stand there, I threw myself a little back, and particularly noticed the hams that they were all right and in their places, I counted them, a customer said to me, mind and serve your customers, I will mind the hams, on which she with two others stood between me and the woman, I could see the woman but not the hams in that situation in which I was; as soon as the prisoner at the bar moved from the window, I said you have not let her take a ham, for I did not think they watched so careful as I could have wished, they said no, I think not, I asked them how many there were, they said five, I said there should be six, I followed the prisoner, and overtook her with the ham in her apron: I had the other woman in my eye all the time, but I think she was not near the hams.

Court. Did you see the other woman at the time you was busy serving your customers, can you exactly say where the other woman stood at the time the ham was lost?

- I had not the woman in my eye all the time, but nobody was near her when I came up with the prisoner I delivered her into the Rotation office, she did not say a syllable; at her examination she said her name was Siddons, also Field, the ham is mine by the mark in the handle, J. D.

Court. You do not put your best hams in the window, they are generally old, indifferent hams? - No, my lord, they are not.

ELIZABETH GOARD sworn.

I went into Mr. Davis's shop on the 30th of April, to get some butter, about a quarter after five the prisoner came in with a bit of a broken plate under her arm, as if she came for some butter, she asked the price of a bit of bacon, and she laid the bit of bacon down and went out of the shop, and spoke to another woman, they went and stood at a door as if considering whether they should go back and buy the bacon; Mr. Davis said to me and another of his customers, watch them women, for I know them to be both thieves, I turned my back to get change for half a crown, and the ham was drawn away.

Court. You cannot tell which of the two took it away? - I saw Mr. Davis take it out of the prisoner's lap.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I came into the shop to buy a bit of bacon, but whether I bought it or no I cannot say, I was very much tosticated in liquor, but as for any other woman, whether I spoke to her or not, I cannot say, I have no witness, I have no friend but God and you gentlemen.

Jury to the Court. My lord, is the outside of the shop window, a part of the shop?

Court. The question is, whether this is a private stealing or not, and I am afraid if you think she is guilty of the offence, it is a private stealing, because nobody was present at the time, but both these people were upon the scheme of getting something out of the shop, the other woman was on the outside, and was not all the time in Davis's eye, they were both on the same scheme undoubtedly, therefore it is a doubt whether this woman took it privately or not, now the construction of this statute is this, that only one person can be guilty of the capital felony, and that is the hand which actually takes it; supposing for instance, half a dozen women of the town, or pick-pockets, were to surround you coming out of the play-house, the man only who puts his hand into your pocket is guilty of the stealing, the rest are only accomplices; therefore unless you believe she is the woman that actually took the ham, you may acquit her of the capital part of the charge, which is that of stealing privately; the other woman might take it and give it to her: with regard to that merciful distinction, which one of the jury pointed out, whether the outside of the window was part of the shop, I am afraid it would be rather too nice to say, that the window where the goods were, is not a part of the shop; in regard to the value of hams, I believe they do not put their best hams in their window, and if you find under the value of five shillings, it is not a capital offence, even though you think she was guilty of privately stealing; but the whole must be left to your consideration.

GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of 3 s. 6 d. but not guilty of stealing privately.

Court to Prisoner. What way have you of getting your livelihood? - By going to market.

Court. Let her be once severely and privately whipped, in the presence of females only , and then let her be delivered to the house of correction, or private work-house, to be confined to hard labour for six months .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-6

361. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th day of April last, one leather pocket book value 4 d. the property of Edward Lowe , and one promissory note dated 13th June 1782, for

the sum of 5 l. 5 s. under the hand of Joseph Berwick , payable to Thomas Green , or bearer, upon demand, at Messrs. Biddulph, Cocks, Elliot and Praed, Bankers, in London; one other promissory note, dated 17th of October, 1782, for the sum of 5 l. 5 s. under the hand of Edward Isaac , payable to Thomas Green , or bearer, at the said Messrs. Biddulph's and Co. one other promissory note, dated the 23d of November, 1782, for the sum of 5 l. 5 s. under the hand of Edward Isaac , payable to Thomas Green, or bearer, upon demand, at the said Messrs. Biddulph's and Co. one other promissory note, for the sum of 31 l. 10 s. signed under the hand of Henry Miller , payable to the said Edward Lowe , at Ed. Griffin 's, Fleet-street, London; one other promissory note, dated 17th March, under the hand of Thomas Golding , for the sum of 156 l. 12 s. payable to the said Edward Lowe , for value received; one bill of exchange signed under the hand of the said Thomas Golding , directed to Mr. James Phillips , London, directed him to pay to the said Edward Lowe , or order, twenty-days after sight, the sum of 21 l. 10 s. and one other bill of exchange, signed Florey and Walker, dated the 12th April, 1783, value 15 l. 7 s. 6 d. payable to one George Goddard , or order; the said several notes and bills of exchange, being the property of the said Edward Lowe ; and the said several and respective sums of money then due and unsatisfied to the said Edward Lowe , against the form of the statute.

EDWARD LOWE sworn.

On the 20th of April, I lost a pocketbook, at the Running Horse, in Little Queen-street , I called for a pint of porter, and three half-penny worth of bread and cheese, it was in the common room, then I called for another pint of porter, and asked the prisoner to drink, I never saw him before; while I was drinking the second pint, I laid my head down on the table; when I went in there, I had a leather pocketbook in my pocket, with a steel spring-look, with the notes in it.

Court. What notes were contained in that pocket-book when you came in? - I have no regular copy of them, there are four that are lost, there was one for 200 l. 10 s. another for 30 l. another for 9 l. 12 s. another for 12 l; these notes which I can swear to were four five-guinea notes, 156 l. 12 s. the other one of the five-guinea notes was turned into money, they were payable at Biddulph and Cocks's, they were Berwick's notes.

Court. Mention particularly the several notes? - There were four for five-guineas each, they were on demand at Biddulph and Cocks's, two of them, I think, was signed Berwick, Wall and Isaac, and the other two was signed Edward Isaac , he is an acting partner in the office; they are all marked, and I had pinned them through with a pin, and when they came to me, they were pinned as I left them, I pinned them through the centre, there were four five-guinea notes, one for thirty-guineas, one for ten-guineas; that was a bill of exchange at Phillips's, a bill of exchange for 15 l. 7 s. 6 d. there was a note payable to me for 200 l. 11 s. but I had not indorsed it; and another note for 156 l. 12 s.

Court. Can you tell the particulars of the three five-guinea notes? - No more than I have had them several times in my hands before and since.

What way of life are you in? - In the Mercery business .

In town? - In Birmingham-row, in Worcester; when this man was going away, I told him he had taken my pocketbook, and I wished him to return it; it was in my left hand pocket.

Court. Was you intoxicated? - I was middling, I remember losing it, and calling in the landlord.

Court. Is it usual to carry such a property as you have described, to the amount of some hundred pounds, about you? - That was the twentieth year I had had that book, and I always carried it; I had a great many more notes with me then, in my waistcoat pocket.

Court. Had you occasion to pay these notes? - I came to lay them out; I lived 14

years at Worcester; I came to town for the purpose of buying goods, I paid some money in Spitalfields about 350 l.

Court. You say the prisoner was in your company and you missed your pocket book? - Yes, my pocket-book was in my left-hand pocket buttoned up.

Had the prisoner left the place then? - Yes.

How long had you been in that dozing situation you described? - I had been a little time, I felt my pocket-book going before, and I said the minute he was gone away, you have got my pocket-book, I called and told the landlord.

Court. Did he run away? - No, he went out and said he had seen no such thing, and I had brought none there.

Court. What did you do afterwards in consequence of that? - I went to my inn at the Bull and Mouth.

Court. Did not you pursue him? - No.

Did you take no steps to pursue him? - No, I did not, I stopped and told the landlord what had happened, and it would be an injury to me, the loss of my pocketbook, as well as my memorandums.

Did you enquire of the landlord of the house who the prisoner was? - I believe I might.

Did he give you any account of him? - He did not say much about him then, I gave a man half a guinea to search the bog for my pocket-book, and it was found there in the bog at Mr. Golding's house.

(The pocket-book produced.)

Court. Are there any marks now remaining in that pocket-book that you can swear to? - Yes and every paper in it.

Was any body in the room with him and you? - Another young man, I did not perceive him touch me, I missed my pocketbook directly as he was going away, I told him he had got it, but he put it up; there was the remains of one note or two, there was the small part of a note that was drawn by an attorney, one Bradstock, upon Mr. Sheppard, in Carey-street, he refused the payment of it, there was the stamp and part of his name, and a little bit of the thirty pound note.

Court. Was the pocket-book, when it was found, delivered to you? - It was delivered to me and the company, I examined it, and found many of the things there.

Court. Was the Running Horse a house you frequented? - No, my Lord, I never heard of it before, but I went in because I thought I could eat some bread and cheese.

Court. Have you got the notes again? - They are in the possession of Mrs. Orde.

Have you seen any of the notes in the indictment since you lost them? - Many times, they were lodged in the possession of Mr. Davison, of Temple Bar, and upon his going into the country, he left them with Mrs. Ord, I was not well the next day, I sent my brother-in-law about them, who went to some of the people; on the Monday night by some means or other it got wind, and they found me in bed at the Bull and Mouth, they came up stairs, there were Mr. Griffin, to whom one of the notes was payable, a clerk belonging to Mr. Thrale, one Humpage, and another man, they came and asked me if I had been robbed, and they produced me seven notes, I looked at them, and saw the pinholes in them, and others without any indorsement, they left me a direction to go to Bow-street the next morning, which I did.

Prisoner. Was I beside you? - I don't say you was, you was very near me.

Prisoner. I was on the other side? - Yes, yes, but I found my pocket-book go.

Jury. You say that you felt him take your book, and you immediately followed him, he went out of the door? - Yes.

Did you see him return into the house? - No.

And yet the pocket-book was found in the privy? - Yes.

Was he there the whole time, till he went away? - Yes.

Court. What time was the necessary searched? - On the Tuesday after, this was on the Sunday.

Court. Had the prisoner at the bar, to

your knowledge been back to the Running-horse after? - I did not see him.

Jury. What reasons had you for searching the necessary? - The prisoner told somebody where it was.

ELIZABETH ORD sworn.

I live at No. 133, in Aldersgate Street, I am in possession of some notes, here are three five guinea notes, on the Worcester bank, payable at Biddulph and Cox's, a bill for 31 l. 10 s. a bill for 156 l. 12 s. another for 15 l. 7 s. 6 d. another for 10 l. 10 s. the prisoner at the bar came to me on the 20th of April last, about five in the afternoon, and asked me to give him change for a note which his brother had sent him out of the country; I looked at it, and I asked him what it was, he said he could not very well tell; I said I thought it was very odd that your brother has sent it, and you not know what it is; it was a five guinea note.

Court. What is your way of life? - I keep a public house, I know the prisoner, he worked for Mr. Seddon in Aldersgate-street, he owed me about fifteen shillings, and desired me to take what he owed me; I said, I did not understand the note, I told him to leave it till the morning, he said, then will you keep it, I said, yes, then he said, take these others (they were wrapped in a bit of paper) and keep till I call: I asked him how he came by the rest of them, he said he had found them, and the one he said his brother had sent him; he did not come very early in the morning, and when Mr. Thrale our brewer's clerk came, I asked him if it was a good note, and he said it was, and I will give you five guineas for it; I told him how the note was left with me, and he gave me the money; he said he was going to Charing Cross, and would enquire at the bankers, he called there and got cash for it, which he told me in the evening, I said I had several more of them: I saw no more of the prisoner, till one of the men from Bow-street came about four in the afternoon of the Monday, and asked me, if I had not some notes of William Hall's, I told him I had, he asked me to let him see them, I said if he would give me any account of them I would, he said he could not, he said would I chuse to bring them to Bow-street; I went there and shewed the rest of the notes, he said here is one drawn on a gentleman in Fleet-street; by this we found out the owners: we went to Mr. Griffin, he said he knew the note, and the person was there on Saturday night for the money for the note; but he was in liquor, and he did not chuse to pay him the note, he said he was afraid the gentleman was murthered, he told us that the prosecutor lodged at the Bull and Mouth, when he was in town, and the prosecutor was in bed when we went there.

Court. You positively swear that the prisoner at the bar was the person that deposited these notes in your possession? - Yes, Sir, he worked at Mr. Seddon's.

(The notes shewn to the Prosecutor and deposed to by him.)

The notes Read.

No. 5072, I promise to pay to Mr. Thomas Griffin or bearer on demand at Messrs. Biddulph, Cocks, Elliott, and Praed, bankers in London, the sum of 5 l. 5 s. Worcester bank, 13th June, 1782, for self, Wall and Isaac, Joseph Berwick .

No. 8636. I promise to pay Mr. Thomas Green , or bearer on demand, at Messrs. Biddulph's and Co. 5 l. 5 s. Worcester bank 23d November, 1782, for Joseph Berwick , Wall and Isaac, Edward Isaacs .

No. E. 834. Thomas Green or bearer, at Messrs. Biddulph's and Co. 5 l. 5 s. Worcester bank, 17th October, 1782, for Joseph Berwick , Wall and Isaac, signed E. Isaac.

31. 10 s. Worcester, Jan. 8, 1783.

Six weeks after date I promise to pay Edward Low or order, 31 l. 10 s. for value received by Henry Miller , and to be paid at Edward Griffin 's, Fleet-street, London.

156. 12 s. Worcester, March 17, 1783.

Twelve months after date I promise to pay Mr. Edward Low for value received, T. Golding.

10. 10 s. Worcester, March 18, 1783.

Twenty one days after sight, pay to Mr. Edward Low or order, 10 l. 10 s. value in account as advised.

No. Birmingham.

Two months after date pay Mr. George Goddard or order, 15 l. 7 s. 6 d. signed Florey and Walker.

THOMAS GOLDING sworn.

I keep the Running horse in Little Queen-street, I remember the prosecutor being at my house, on Sunday the 20th of April I know the prisoner at the bar, he lodged in the house for a fortnight.

Was he in the same room with the prosecutor Mr. Lowe? - Yes, it was in the and Mr. Lowe came in.

During how long time did they continue in the same room? - There were more people in the room, there were two men that dined with the prisoner.

Jury. Did the prosecutor seem to be in liquor? - Yes, he rather looked as if he had been drinking a good deal.

Court. Did he charge the prisoner with taking his pocket-book? - He came into the bar, and said, he had lost his pocketbook, I said, I don't think you could lose it here, it must be lost somewhere else.

Court. Then there was no charge made on any particular person, nor any pursuit after the prisoner at the bar? - No, the necessary was searched on the Tuesday after; the prisoner came back, and lodged in the house; the same night there was a sailor that slept with him, but he knew nothing of what had happened.

Court. Had the prisoner at the bar left the room, before the prosecutor left your house? - I think he had, he came to his lodging on Sunday night, he met with some of his acquaintance of the glass grinders, he is a glass grinder, and they went away, and about eleven he went to bed, and on Monday about eleven he went out, and did not come home on Monday night; I did not see him till he stopt in a coach on Tuesday morning, with some of the Bow-street people.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I dined at this house on Sunday, off some potatoes and mutton, and this gentleman came in whilst we were at dinner, he began clauming the meat about with his fingers, and he had some potatoes with us, and he had some beer, and afterwards, when we were paying for some beer, I saw the pocket-book laying underneath the table; I have no witnesses.

Jury. Is it not probable that it might slip out of your pocket? - No.

Jury. Why did you not alarm the house? - I called the landlord.

Jury. And went about very unconcerned? - I wished my brother to seek after him.

You could not know what you was about? - Yes, I am very clear as to that part of the business, as to not going after him, I was not very well the next morning, I did not seek after him, but I wished my brother in-law to seek after him, as some of them were his drawing.

Mrs. Ord. I never heard any thing against the prisoner before, I have known him two years.

Mr. Golding. He behaved very well in our neighbourhood.

Jury to Lowe. Had you a handkerchief or any thing in your pocket, that you could pull the book out with? - I had lost both my handkerchiefs before.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-7

362. WILLIAM TOMKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January last, four bushels of oats, value 12 s. and three bushels of peas, value 12 s. the goods of George Berner :

And JOHN WELLS was indicted for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen , against the form of the statute.

GEORGE BERNER sworn.

I am a miller at Enfield : On the 6th of February last, in the night, the prisoner Tomkins, and the evidence Whitebread, got into my mill, went into the wheat granary of mine.

Court. How do you know, was it from the information of Whitebread? - I found the wheat in the house of Wells, there lodged between the roof and cieling, after receiving an information where it was, I took the miller, and we found seven sacks, I not only found the wheat there, but found it in my sacks; with regard to the oats and peas, they were lost out of a granary of mine, there were four bushels of oats, and three bushels of peas, they were lost about the 22d of December last.

Had you any reason to charge the prisoner William Tomkins with taking these oats and peas? - I do not positively charge Tomkins with stealing the oats and peas, I made great enquiry about them, but could not come at them till after sometime, the evidence Whitebread gave me an account of what became of the oats and peas.

Court. Do you know any thing affecting Tomkins, the prisoner at the bar, of taking these oats and peas, of your own knowledge? - No, only from the accomplice.

Court. Then I will neither hear you nor him.

ACQUIT THE PRISONERS.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

The said WILLIAM TOMKINS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , one deer-skin, value 9 s. the goods of Dutton Greenwood .

DUTTON GREENWOOD sworn.

I am a leather dresser , I live at Enfield : I lost a deer-skin, in February last, I did not know I had lost it, I could not miss a single skin out of so many thousand as I have; I was sent for down to Hertford, where the prisoner, at the bar, who was my apprentice, had pawned the skin.

Court. Are you sure it was your own skin? - The prisoner told me he took it out the yard.

Court. What is your reason for thinking it is yours? - In the manufacturing of them our men mark them, and I have reason to think these are our marks, every man has his different mark, there are about seventeen or eighteen of them in the whole.

Jury. But there are other people that may mark them the same? - Yes.

Court. What could induce the prisoner to send for you to Hertford to give you this information? - He did not send for me, the gaoler sent for me, he was taken up about this skin; he had run away from me on the Sunday, and it was either Thursday, or Friday that I was sent for, and when I came there, I asked him, if this was not such a man's making, he said yes; I made him no promises; he took it to a pawnbroker's, at Bishop's Stopford, and was stopped there, then they sent to me.

Prisoner's Council. You say it is impossible to swear to these skins? - I should think so.

It is marked as your workmen generally mark them? - Yes.

You have many thousands? - Yes.

Did you insinuate that you would shew him favour, or any thing of that sort? - No.

Court. Were any threats made use of? - No, I never promised him any thing, I was very sorry to see him there I told him.

Is that the same skin that was produced to you at Hertford? - Yes.

Prisoner's Council. Did he ever carry any of these skins out for you? - No.

JOHN WHITEBREAD sworn.

I live at Enfield, I worked for the prosecutor, I am of no business at all; the day that he took the skin, was a Sunday, as he told me, I do not know that he took it otherwise; the prisoner and me went to Stopford the Monday after, and the prisoner went to ask his master for his money, and after his master went to church, he told me he took the skin, and carried it to his aunt's.

Court. Did he say what he took the skin for? - No, we went to Stopford on the

Monday about five, we went to the Red Cow, and had three pots of beer, and some bread and cheese, and slept there all night, and on Tuesday we went and pawned the skin for 4 s. and a handkerchief, then we went to the Red Cow again, and stopped there till Wednesday morning, when we were taken up.

Prisoner's Council. You received three guineas from the last prosecutor, Berner, did not you? - I never received any.

Prisoner's Council to Greenwood. The confession was before the justice, I submit that confession will not be received by the Court, unless it was in writing.

Court. If it was taken in writing, then I would not receive the parole evidence.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say, but that I am quite innocent.

(The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

Prisoner, Sir, my master cannot give me a bad character if he speaks the truth of me.

Prisoner's Council. How has this young man behaved during his servitude? - Very well.

Court to Jury. Gentlemen of the Jury, you will in such a case as this incline to the favourable side of the question.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

The said WILLIAM TOMKINS was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th day of February last, nine hempen sacks, value 20 s. and thirty bushels of wheat, value 10 l. the goods and chattels of George Berner the younger .

GEORGE BERNER the younger sworn.

On the 6th of February last, in the night, the prisoner Tomkins and Whitebread went into a wheat granary of mine, and from thence took nine sacks of wheat.

Court. How do you know that the prisoner broke into your house? - The watchman saw the prisoner.

Court. He is here I suppose? - No, he has absconded.

Court. Is there any thing that you know, that induces you to suspect the prisoner? - I found the wheat in the house of John Wells , between the roof and the cieling, on the 14th, in a lane adjoining to his house, it was an empty place on purpose to conceal any kind of goods, I saw no other use it was made of, but part of a drag-net, which was stolen from my father; the sacks were mine, they had my name upon them and marks.

Court. What has the finding of sacks by the house of John Well , to do with the prisoner, how came that to lead you to suspect the prisoner? - From the evidence of one Whitebread an accomplice, who was concerned with the prisoner. Whitebread is here, the prisoner confessed it before the justice, I was present, and my father, when he confessed it.

Now let me hear what passed in your hearing at the Justice's? - It was made mention by Whitebread in what manner they got in; the prisoner owned to the taking the wheat, and conveying it away in wheel barrows, he said, he held open the sacks, while Whitebread put the meal in the sacks, and they then conveyed them away in wheel barrows.

Court. He confessed taking the wheat? - I don't recollect that he said that altogether.

What did he say, be careful to speak nothing but what you do recollect? - I do not mean it.

What did you hear the prisoner say about this matter? - The prisoner said nothing more than this, that he owned to be concerned in taking the wheat.

Was any promises made him, or any threats to induce him to confess? - None at all.

For what purpose did he say he took it? - After Whitebread had given his evidence, which he heard, they were face to face.

Then relate what the prisoner said afterwards? - To the best of my remembrance,

he said, he carried a sack or two to the mills, and helped one barrow full or two to the house of John Wells , who is his uncle.

Court. You heard him say, what you have said yourself? - Yes.

And that was after he heard the account given by Whitebread? - Yes, they were face to face.

Do you know any thing more? - Only the finding the wheat, and removing it from Wells's; the Justice gave me an order to manufacture the wheat.

What became of the sacks? - They are at the mill, there is G. for George and Berner at the end.

When had you seen these sacks at your own mill? - The day before I missed them, they lay in the wheat shop, the sacks lay empty, and the wheat lay loose.

Prisoner's Council. Had you no more sacks than these that contained this wheat, how many sacks had you so marked? - A pretty many.

Do you think all the sacks marked in that manner you have described, are in your possession at this time? - They are never all in my possession, they are in the hands of bakers, and people that I deal with.

You said just now, that you saw these sacks the day before? - Yes.

Do you mean to say, you saw these very sacks in which you found corn? - Yes, these very sacks, because there are particular rags and patches.

You have no other sacks out or at home, I suppose that were mended? - Yes.

What were those particular marks besides the letters? - M. G. I saw that among the rest.

Did they lay one upon another? - No, they all tumbled loose, that lay among the rest.

Did you give Whitebread the evidence any money? - Never.

You did not give him three guineas? - No.

JOHN WITHAM sworn.

I am Mr. Berner's miller, I know nothing of these sacks before the 14th of February, I never heard they were lost before.

Court. Was you absent? - No otherwise than at meals.

And you never heard of those sacks being lost till the 14th of February? - No, I did not miss them till then.

The place where the sacks lay was open to you? - Yes, on the 14th of February my master came to me and said he had heard where there were some sacks of his wheat, our sacks are coming in and going out in considerable numbers.

Then you do not know, except from what you heard from your master, with regard to these nine sacks? - Between the 6th and 7th they were stolen as I heard, but I do not know of my own knowledge, I was very particular in marking the sacks that I might be certain sure, there were six as I said before.

About what quantity of wheat might there be at the time at your mill? - I take it there might be about sixty or seventy quarters.

Would you have missed such a quantity as thirty bushels out of that? - Sometimes it is to be missed, and sometimes not.

You had not missed any between the 6th and the 14th? - No.

Was you present at the Justice when this man was examined? - No.

GEORGE BERNER , the elder sworn.

I was present at the Justice's when this man was examined by one Stanstun, Esq; at Hertford, he made confession not only of this stealing the wheat, but likewise of stealing the skin, but there was a stood in the river, and the miller could not work, they had locked the door over night, and they broke in that very night and took the wheat out, they were confronted together, the evidence Whitebread, and the prisoner, the Justice asked the prisoner whether it was so or not, he confessed it, and said yes, he could not deny it by any means, he said yes.

Jury to Berner. Did you hear the prisoner say so? - Yes, upon my oath.

Did you hear him say any thing about putting any thing into the sacks, and helping to wheel them away: did he speak the word, or did he not deny it? - He said yes, he was concerned, he did do it.

JOHN WHITEBREAD sworn.

The night we took the wheat out of Berner's mill, there was a very large flood, me and Tomkins went down to the mills, to John Well 's house, and there we sat up playing cards, and Peter Bellard , and Mary Wells ; I and Peter Bellard , and the prisoner, went to Mr. Berner's mill, the watchman was coming by crying the hour of ten, after he had done, we set the ladder up against the door, then we got in at the window, and went into the wheat shop, and there lay a parcel of empty sacks, and we took nine sacks, and put as much wheat in as we thought we could carry away, and we carried it to a little place at the bottom of Mr. Greenwood's field, then we got a wheel-barrow and wheeled it up, then we put the wheel-barrow in the mill, where we took them from, and went and carried the meal between the cieling and the tiles, in John Wells 's house, we left the wheat there.

Court. How long after was it that you made discovery of this? - It was on the Thursday night that we took it out, and I made the discovery on the Wednesday following, I discovered it to Esquire Dunstan, of Hertford, on the Monday we set off for Stopferd, and were taken up there for pawning a skin, we were taken up upon suspicion of stealing a skin.

Prisoner. I beg that the character of the evidence may be enquired into.

Court. There is no occasion to enquire into his character, for he sufficiently condemns that by the evidence he has given.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent, I never made any confession, I could not, I was not guilty.

Prisoner's Council. This man has been tried on the indictment before your Lordship came into court, where several respectable persons have given him a good character.

Court to Berner the younger. How came you not to tell your miller any thing about it, nor ask him any thing about it till the 14th? - He remembers hearing the report of the mill being robbed, when I found that sack with that particular mark on it, I remember seeing the sack on the day before.

Court. Then you had not missed the sacks till the 14th? - We missed them, but did not know where they were gone to.

Then why did not you ask the miller about them as soon as you missed them? - I supposed they had been thrown up stairs or shut into the binns filled with wheat.

Then you thought nothing about them till the 14th? - No.

Jury. Have you more millers besides him? - Five or six.

Witham. I did hear the mill was robbed.

Court. Why do you unsay, now you have heard the evidence, what you said before, you said that you had not heard that any sacks had been stolen or missed. - No, I heard that the mill had been robbed on the Sunday morning.

Court. When I asked you so repeatedly that question, why did not you tell me? - I thought you asked me about the sacks.

Court. I do not like this piecing out of evidence, we will take it as it stood at first.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-8

364. WILLIAM IVES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of March last two hempen sacks, value five shillings, and six bushels of flour, value three pounds , the property of George Berner the elder .

There being no evidence but that of an accomplice, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-9

363. THOMAS DAVIES was indicted for burglariously and feloniously entering the dwelling house of Abraham Hancock , Esq ; on the 18th of May last, at the hour of six in the night, no person being therein, and feloniously stealing therein three linen shirts, value fifteen shillings, four muslin neckcloths, value four shillings, one pair of silk stockings, value two shillings, and one silver seal, value two shillings, the property of the said Abraham Hancock ; and two linen caps, value one shilling, one black silk bonnet, value one shilling, and one linen handkerchief, value six pence, the property of Elizabeth Harding .

ABRAHAM HANCOCK sworn.

I live at Walton upon Thames, and have chambers at Staples Inn , where I keep books and papers; Mr. Townsend sent me word that on the 18th of May my chambers were broke open and robbed; Mrs. Harding takes care of my chambers, and sometimes lives there, she has chambers opposite mine, I believe all the particulars in the indictment were mine, and in my chambers, I went out of town on the 17th before, I received information on Monday the 18th, and came to town on Tuesday the 19th, I found my outer door unlocked, and two locks of my bureau broke to pieces, I found nothing but a hat and two pair of shoes, (the hat and shoes produced) this is my hat, these are my shoes.

Court. Did you know the prisoner before? - I never saw him till he was taken, I lost to the amount of four or five pounds.

RICHARD FULLER , sworn.

I am porter in Staple's Inn, I live on the spot, I took the hat and shoes upon the prisoner on the stair-case, coming down from Mr. Hancock's chambers, on Sunday evening the 18th of May, between seven and eight, there was four or five run up after me, I asked him where he had been, and he said to me at Mr. Hancock's chambers, he said he was Mr. Hancock's clerk, I said you are not, he keeps no clerk, I asked him where Mr. Hancock lived, and he said he lived at Hampstead, I said no, he lives at Walton upon Thames, I caught hold of him and he delivered two chissels (one of the chissels produced) he took them out of his pocket himself, I took him in a coach to Justice Girdler's, and he was committed, the staple of the door was found on the stairs near the door.

ELIZABETH HARDING sworn.

Court. You are servant to Mr. Hancock? - I am, I live in Staple's Inn, I had double locked the door when I went out, and there was the property of mine mentioned in the indictment, I lost what I could not replace for twenty shillings (the things deposed to), here is a handkerchief marked with B. I could swear to it from a thousand, it is the property of a friend.

Court to Mr. Hancock. What was the value of the things you lost? - Between four and five pounds.

ANN DUNCAN sworn.

I saw the prisoner go into the room of Mr. Hancock in the evening, I am sure the prisoner is the man, I saw him go up the stairs, when he was in the room I sent to the Cock and Hoop in Holborn for assistance, and they came immediately and took him.

Jury. Was that staple part of the fastening of the door? - It was.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The witness has sworn the staple came from the outer door, some person said, it came from the garret door, at the Justice's.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-10

364. JOHN WILKINS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Eneas Robinson on the King's high way, on the 1st of June last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person and against his will one man's hat, value one penny, and thirteen shillings and six pence in monies numbered, his property .

ENEAS ROBINSON sworn.

I lost my hat and thirteen shillings and six pence in money, on Sunday the 1st of June, on Kingsland Road, Shoreditch , I was on the foot-way in the evening, at half past eleven at night, and I saw two men before me about twelve yards off, they met me and passed me quick, and when they had got about three yards from me, they turned back immediately and said, stop, stop, clapping me on the right shoulder, I immediately stopped, I pulled out my watch, and threw it into a field, the prisoner asked me for my money, I gave him all I had to the amount of fourteen shillings, or fourteen shillings and six pence, he felt about me for more, as he was stooping he said, don't look in my face, he then went towards his acquaintance, who was robbing my acquaintance, he came back and took my hat, I can swear the prisoner is the man, the robbery was about three minutes in transacting, he appeared to have a loose coat, a round hat, it was not very light, but enough to see him, I particularly looked at him while he was robbing me, I am positive he is the man.

Prisoner. When he was at the public house he said to somebody I had a cocked hat on.

THOMAS CHABOT sworn.

I was in company with Mr. Robinson at the time, I was seized by a less man than the prisoner, who was in company with him, he only took my hat.

JOHN ARMSTRONG sworn.

I was an officer of the night, at about half past twelve the gentlemen came to me and said they had been robbed just by the Fox, I asked if they could give any account of the person who robbed him, he said a man about five feet eight inches high, I took the prisoner in the morning, the peace officer who had charge of him, said point out the man, and he clapped his hand on the prisoner and said, this is the man that robbed me; we searched his room and found nothing.

Jury to Prisoner. Where was you that night? - I was at home, and in bed at ten o'clock, nor did I get up till I was taken, I cry fish about.

The CONSTABLE sworn.

After the robbery the officer of the night called me up, and gave me the description the gentlemen had given him, we went to the prisoner in the morning and took him out of bed.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There is a woman can prove she came to light a candle in my room when I was in bed the night of the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-11

365. The said JOHN WILKINS was again indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Chabot at the same time and place, and taking from him one man's hat, value one shilling, his property .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17830604-12

366. CHARLES ALLEN was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Ellis , on the King's highway, on the 1st of April last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, four linen shirts, value 20 s. one linen neckcloth, value 1 s. and one linen stock, value 1 s. the property of the said John .

(The witnesses examined apart, at the request of the prisoner).

JOHN ELLIS sworn.

I was robbed on the 1st of April last, on Holbron-hill , about half past nine at night,

between Ely-rents, and Field-lane, I received a violent blow on the right side of my head, and this prisoner passed me on the right side, he turned, and looked into my face, and snatched my bundle from my arm, and jumped with it into the middle of the street, and went away, I immediately pursued him, and before he got seven yards, he dropt it, I picked it up, and followed him to Hatton-garden, and cryed out stop thief; after he got into Hatton-garden, he took the curb-stones, I made a bit of a stop, I cannot say he was in my sight when he was stopped; as soon as he was brought to me, I said, he was the man that robbed me; he was taken to St. Andrew's watch-house; I swore to the patrol, that was the man that took my bundle from me.

Court. Will you take upon you to say, the prisoner is the man? - Yes, I am positive the prisoner is the man, there was light enough from the shops to see him distinctly.

GEORGE GARRY sworn.

I am constable belonging to the lower liberty of St. Andrew's, I was called to take the prisoner into custody, (produces a bundle which was delivered to him, which the prosecutor said was his property, and snatched from him by the prisoner).

EDWARD HOWLES sworn.

I am patrol of Hatton-garden, between nine and ten, I heard the cry of stop thief, and saw somebody running towards me, I stood by the rails, he run plump against me, I stopped him and said, what makes you run so fast, he said, he was going home, I took him back to the prosecutor, who was coming with a parcel of boys, he said, that was the man that robbed him.

Prisoner. Whether this witness was not very ill, and had a blister on his breast at that time? - I had, and have not been well since.

Prisoner. I might therefore have got from him; the two witnesses argued with one another, which it was took me, and appealed to me; I am a butcher , and live in Benjamin-street; I have a family.

PRISONER'S FURTHER DEFENCE.

A young fellow desired me to bring him a joint of meat to the Coach and Horses, which I did, I stopped there till about ten o'clock, I was returning home rather quick, and that man stopped me, and a person came up and said, I was a head and shoulders taller than the person that robbed him; the gentleman said, he was a rider to a Chymist, at St. James's; he waited here last sessions four days running, that gentleman is now in the country, on his master's business; the prosecutor on my examination said, the justice might do what he pleased with me, he could not prosecute me.

Court to Prosecutor. Had you any sight of him in Hatton-garden? - I saw him, but he got ground of me, and I lost sight of him by the crowd.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character).

The Jury withdrew, and returned with a verdict,

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-13

367. JOHN BITTON was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Usherwood , on the King's highway, on the 21st day of May last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, one linen cloth, value 6 d. and 6 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said William .

WILLIAM USHERWOOD sworn.

I am a servant , about the 21st of May, about twenty minutes of nine, I was coming from Kilburn to Paddington , by myself, between the Hill-house, and the Wheatsheaf, I met two men, one larger than the other, taller; the small one presented a pistol on the right of me, and the tall one on the left; one was a large horse pistol; the small man told me to stop, he said stop, or I'll blow your brains out, and the other

demanded my money, I resigned myself to them, and desired them not to use me ill, and I would give my money; they would not stay, but searched my pockets, they took 6 s. in silver and some half-pence, about three or four-pence, two glass cloths, and handkerchief, they began to take my buckles, I said, my friend don't take my buckles, they are only plated ones, the little one looked, and perceived they were plated, and then took one knee-buckle, and looked at that, the man that was with him said, if they are plated give him them, if silver keep them, they told me to go about my business, if I turned, they would blow my brains out; the prisoner is the small one; it was a fine star light night, I can positively swear to the prisoner; I ran to Paddington, and got an acquaintance to assist me; they stopped me about 200 yards from the Wheat-sheaf; two men went with me, we went on, and met three men, and they had not seen them, we then returned, and a man said, he saw two men go up the lane towards St. John's-wood, we ran after them, and from thence by the foot-path, to the Yorkshire Stingo, and went to the tap-room there; then we went to the Wheat-sheaf, at Paddington, and called for a pot of beer, whilst we were drinking, up came a woman in a cart, who had been robbed on the other side Kilburn; I took a gun, and when I got through Kilburne turnpike, I saw two men run across the road, they ran under the end of Mr. Haley's barn; I went to my master's door, and desired the hostler to assist me, I told him to bring something in his hand, he brought an iron, which they use at the front of the fire, I run round some wood that was near the barn, I found the two men behind the barn, I told them not to stir, for I would shoot the first man that stirred, they parted directly, one one way, and the other the other, I run after the little one, and he put his hand for his pistol, I caught him, and in struggling together, he attempted to shoot me, and it snapped, and did not go off, Alablaster came up to my assistance, and I took the pistol out of his hand, as we were taking him to my master's house, my master came up and searched him, I found the glass cloths, and handkerchief on him, he said, he would have shot me, if he could, when I was taking him.

Prisoner. I never said I would shoot him.

The Remainder of this Trial in the Second Part, which will be published in a few Days.

Reference Number: t17830604-13

Trials at Law, Arguments of Counsel, &c. carefully taken in Short-Hand, and copied with Dispatch by E. HODGSON, Writer of these Proceedings, No. 35, Chancery Lane.

Short-hand taught at Home and Abroad.

This Day is Published, Price 2 s. 6 d. the Second Edition, with Additions, of SHORT-HAND on an IMPROVED PLAN; The Alphabet consisting of Sixteen Characters only, by E. HODGSON.

Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No, 35, Chancery Lane, S. BLADON, Pater-noster Row, and J. CLARKE, Portugal Street.

N. B. This Book, which contains also an Explanatory Copper-plate is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Doubts should arise, they shall be removed on Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

Reference Number: t17830604-13

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 4th of JUNE, 1783, and the following Days;

Being the FIFTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Nathaniel Newnham , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART II.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXIII

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of John Bitton .

JAMES ALABLASTER sworn.

I am an hostler to Mr. Errington, he came about twenty minutes past eleven for help, and I got a bar of iron, and followed him as speedily as I could, I took after the tall man, and Usherwood after the short one, Usherwood called for assistance, I ran to his assistance, when I came up, they were falling together, the prisoner snapped the pistol just as I came up, it missed fire, and did not go off, I laid hold of the prisoner; I sat up with him, I heard him say, he would have bored him, or something of that kind if I had not come up.

JAMES ERRINGTON sworn.

I live at Kilburn-wells, and keep it: Usherwood has lived with me twelve years, he is a very sober man; my man knocked at the door, and I heard him say, bring something, I have been robbed, I laid hold of the prisoner's collar, and he struck me across the breast, I searched him in the passage, and found these things, (produced and deposed to), this handkerchief and glass cloths; I took from him this pistol, which had not any powder in the pan, but was charged with two balls; the prisoner said, he would have bored Usherwood, if the pistol had gone off.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There was a young man and I, took a walk up Park-lane, he asked me to take a walk to Edgware, as we were going along, we found this pistol.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-14

369. GEORGE ADAMS, alias PEAT, alias PEACH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May last, one plated ink-stand, value 5 s. one silver spoon, value 10 s. one knife case, value 10 s. twenty-four knives and forks, value 24 s. and eight table spoons, value 4 l. the property of Robert Harrison , in his dwelling house .

- WELDON sworn.

On the 5th of May last, about nine in the evening, I was passing by Newcastle-row, Lincoln's-Inn-fields , by the house of Mr. Harrison, I saw a very ill-looking fellow near the rails, and observing a window open, I was induced to believe he meant to rob the house, I halted a little, and he crossed the court yard, towards the house, he returned again, and within two or three yards stood another ill-looking fellow on

the footway, this confirmed my suspicion, and finding no body belonging to the family coming to the window, I was going towards the house to alarm the family, and I saw the prisoner jump or tumble out of the window upon the steps that lead to the area, I went up towards him to prevent his escaping, I struck at him with my cane, and knocked him down; when I got the prisoner off the ground, he dropped out of his pocket two ink-glasses belonging to an ink-stand, and at the same time he threw something in the area, which appeared to be the stand for the glasses.

(The ink-stand produced.)

- BARBER sworn.

As I was passing on the 5th of May, in Lincoln's-Inn-fields, I heard a kind of a scuffle, being dark, I could not see what was the matter, I ran up, and saw Mr. Weldon strike at something, and we took the prisoner into the house, he got his hand to his pocket, and dropped a spoon.

(The spoon produced.)

JANE PEPLOE sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Harrison, I found the ink-stand in the area just under the window, it has been in my possession ever since; I received a spoon from Mr. Barber; they are my master's property: And a bundle of linen was moved into another room, and the knife-case was moved from a side-board; (the knife case produced); they are all my master's property.

Court. What is the value of them? - About six or seven pounds.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to Clare-market, to buy beef-steaks, and I turned up a yard to ease myself, and I picked up the things, and I did not come out of the window.

GUILTY , ( Death .)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-15

371. THOMAS GARFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the first day of May last, one cloth-coat, value 20 s. one white Marcella waistcoat, value 10 s. one pair of black sattin breeches, value 5 s. one linen shirt, value 3 s. two linen stocks, value 2 s. one pair of stone knee-buckles, value 5 s. one pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. and one stock buckle, value 10 s. the goods of William Hunter , in the dwelling-house of John Patterson .

WILLIAM HUNTER sworn.

The prisoner was found on the second of May, with my clothes on his back; I missed the things mentioned in the indictment, they had been in my master's house, his name is John Patterson ; they were taken out of my box, from the room where he and I slept; the first that I saw of the prisoner was on the 2d of May, between eleven and twelve, I found him at the White-horse, in St. James's-street, he had my clothes on his back; I know the prisoner, he had worked for me at the baking business; he had the coat, waistcoat, and breeches, and one pair of stockings on him, and the stock-buckle, and knee-buckles, and one stock about his neck; the rest he delivered up, he said, he hoped I would forgive him, that was all.

JOHN ROWLAND called.

He has met with an accident, and has fractured his ribs, he cannot attend; I received these things from John Rowland this morning.

(The things deposed to.)

Court. How do you know they were yours? - They were found upon him, I know them perfectly well to be mine.

Court. By what reason, suppose you had seen them any where else, would you have known them? - I certainly should.

By what? - There is a small hole upon the knee of the breeches, which I remember before I lost them; here are two or three of the buttons come off.

Court. You have found out that now; but suppose you had met with them at an old clothes shop, how would you have known them to be yours? - I know

the coat by the buttons of the coat, I am sure of the shirt, it is marked R. S. and some plaits of the neck out; I know the buckles, there is a stone out of each of the knee-buckles.

What do you know the stock-buckle by? - Because it is the fellow of the knee-buckles.

Are not they common stone buckles? - Yes.

Had this man been in your room the day you lost your things? - In the morning he had, he used to sleep along with me, I missed my things in the evening; he did not come to his bed that night; I went after him the next day.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know a young man that lived at this White-house, and he asked me to come to drink a pot of beer with him; I had been at work, and had no other things to put on of my own, and I thought I would put these on; we drank several pots of beer, and I staid and slept with him, I was afraid to go home; and there I was when they came and found me; I went up to change my own clothes, and put his on, the man was not in the house; I am quite a stranger in town, I have no friends near here.

GUILTY

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

To be publickly whipped , and confined one month in in Newgate .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-16

369. MICHAEL GAFFNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , two linen shirts, value 4 s. and one pair of shoes, value 3 s. the goods of John Bonnikin , and one silk handkerchief, value 12 d. and one pair of shoes, value 3 s. and one pair of base metal shoe-buckles plated with silver, value 2 s. and one iron key, value 1 d. the goods of John Dingfellow .

JOHN BONNIKIN sworn.

I and another young man was out a walking, and came home a quarter before seven; we lived in Whitechapel , at a sugar-bakers; and as soon as we came into the bed-room, we found the prisoner, at the bar there; I did not know him before.

Court. What was he doing in the room? - As I came in the room, he had this bundle in his hand untied; I said to him, what business have you got here, he spoke to me, and I could not understand him, I said, what have you got there, and took this handkerchief from him: there were in it two shirts, and three pair of leather shoes; and one pair of leather shoes, he had in his pocket; there were two pair of shoes that did not belong to me, one pair belonged to me, and the shirts belonged to me; (the things deposed to) there is my name in the shirts, I am sure they are mine; afterwards when we came into the bed-room, he had tied up a number of other things, a whole handkerchief full, three hats, and shirts, I took these from him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lord, I was never there, I do not know him, I saw a many people running across Whitechapel, and I ran across, and they were crying out stop thief, and somebody laid hold of me.

Court. Was he ever out of your sight? - Only just as he turned round the corner; I am sure it is the man.

JOHN DINGFELLOW sworn.

Were you with Bonnikin when he saw this man? - Yes.

Did you see him in the room? - I did.

Did you see that bundle taken from him? - Yes.

Are you sure that is the same man? - Yes.

(The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.)

Jury to Bonnikin. Did the prisoner appear to be drunk when you catched him? - No, Sir, he was not drunk.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-17

370. CHARLOTTE WATSON and ANN DIGNAM were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th day of April last, three pieces of gold coin of this realm, called guineas, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of William Geare , privately from his person .

WILLIAM GEARE sworn.

I was robbed of three guineas, on the 7th of April, at Westminster, about ten at night, at the Marquis of Granby's, in the Armoury ; I went in to drink part of a pot of beer, and the prisoner at the bar, Watson, came, and sat beside me in the box, and the other prisoner was in the other settle, she tapped me over my shoulder, I looked round, in five minutes I missed my money; I had but two guineas and a half left, I had five guineas and a shilling before; the other girl was in the house at the same time, I cannot say what she said, she said something.

You did not feel Charlotte Watson with her hand in your pocket, or any thing? - No, I have lost my thigh, it is all leather, and my money was in that pocket, and I could not feel her; when I missed my money, I challenged her directly, and she went out, and came in again.

Court. Was any body in the box with you besides Charlotte Watson ? - Nobody followed them.

Was any body in the room? - Nobody but them women not near me, when they came in again, I got nothing upon searching them.

When had you felt the money in your pocket before? - Not five minutes after I sat down, I had the money in my pocket; I sat by her half an hour.

Court. How could she get her hand into your breeches pocket? - Very easy.

Jury. Did you take out the money in her presence? - No.

Court. Did Dignam come near enough to you to take any thing from you? - No.

RICHARD SANDERS sworn.

I am a shoe-maker, I was sitting in the box opposite to them, and this lad came in, and shewed five guineas, that he had taken of his pension from the Admiralty; I saw him put it into his pocket, and sat down in the box opposite; and that young woman went and stood by him.

Court. Did she see him shew you the money? - Not that I know of.

Was she near at the time? - Not that I know of.

It was Watson that sat down by him? - Yes.

How long did they sit together? - The course of five or ten minutes before he missed his money, then he hallooed out, said he, I am robbed of three guineas; I did not see Dignam near him; he asked Watson, and she said it was no such thing, and she went out, I did not notice any body else going out.

How soon did she come back again? - In the course of a quarter of an hour; the other young woman came back with her, but I did not notice whether they went out together; I was having a pint of beer by myself.

Court. How came it you did not follow this young woman? - Because I did not like to interfere for fear I should get myself ill used through it, as there were a many in company that might belong to them; when they came back, he took them back in a room, and they both stood search.

Court to Geare. How long have you known Sanders? - About a twelve-month.

How came you to shew him this money? - There were two or three people near.

Did you give it into the hand of them? - No, Sir, I put it into my breeches pocket.

Court. Did the women see you shew the money? - They was in the settle at the time, and they must see the money.

PRISONER WATSON's DEFENCE.

We went for a pint of beer, and the taproom was full, and I sat down in the first convenience which was along side of the prosecutor, and immediately when I had drank my beer, I went to go away, and he said, he had lost his money; I came back, and was searched.

Why did you go out before you was offered to be searched? - I did not go out of the house at all.

CHARLOTTE WATSON ,

GUILTY, Death .

She was humbly recomended to mercy by the Jury and prosecutor .

ANN DIGNAM , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-18

371. THOMAS ALDEN and BENJAMIN WINKHURST were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Biggs , on the King's highway, on the 22d of May last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, the inside and outside case made of silver, value 2 l. the property of the said John Biggs .

JOHN BIGGS sworn.

On the 22d of May last, I was robbed about eleven at night, in St. John's-street ; I live with a grocer, in Whitechapel; I was coming from a house in St. John's-street, I walked up till I came to the narrow way, near a house that was burnt down; and I found I was wrong; I met a maid, and asked her the way to Whitechapel; she put me in the right road, and I said, I would go back again; I offered her something to drink; we went into the Gun, in St. John's-street, and called for a quartern of gin; the prisoner at the bar sat in a box, and said, we may as well have half a pint, and then we can all drink: We had also a glass a-piece, they then asked me to drink some beer with them; I paid for the gin; we had one pot of beer, besides what they had; after this, I felt in my pocket to pay for it, and feeling in my pocket, I could not find any money to pay for it, when I found I had not, I offered my watch, which the landlord refused; the prisoner at the bar took my knot away, I cannot tell where he put it, the prisoner Winkhurst took it; I was rather sick, and reached a little, the landlord ordered the two prisoners to take me out of doors; they took me out of doors, and I wished them a good night for their kindness; after I got about forty or fifty yards from the place, the prisoner stopped me, and robbed me of my watch: Benjamin Winkhurst took the watch out of my pocket, and the other pulled me by the collar; no words passed at all: I felt him take it, I was afraid to make any resistance till I got a little farther, then I called out for assistance; the young woman came out, and asked what was the matter: A constable came to my assistance; the patrol seeing me run, cut me in the hat supposing me to be one of the prisoners: - This was about three minutes past eleven.

Court. On your oath was you not very drunk? - No, my Lord.

Sick with liquor, but not drunk? - Yes, my Lord, the prisoners were both taken that night.

Were they strangers to you? - Yes, my Lord, my watch was found the next morning, buried in the publican's cellar.

Did you see it? - No, my Lord.

Where were they taken? - In the Gun, the landlord refused the watchman and me coming in, we found one sitting at the table pretending to be asleep; the other was up stairs in his bed-room, he lodged at the house, but the landlord said, he did not lodge there, on making a great deal to do he came down stairs.

Prisoner's Council. Where did you stop? - At the Golden Lyon, and had a pint of beer.

What state was you in when you went into the Gun? - I was not quite sober before I drank the gin.

Do you recollect sitting on a stool? - Yes.

Did you not fall off the stool? - No.

Was you able to walk? - Not quite so strait as I sometimes do.

When you took leave of this house, what money had you in your pocket? - My watch.

Had you no money? - No.

Had you enough to pay your reckoning? - Not enough.

How do you know you had your watch when you left the Gun? - I had.

You say it was a dark night, how can you know it was these men? - It was.

Court. How far did you go before you was stopped? - About fifty yards.

Court. Did you feel you watch after you offered it to the landlord? - Yes, my Lord.

MARY CLOUD sworn.

I was returning from Islington, and I met Mr. Biggs, in St. John's-street, he asked me the way to Whitechapel, I directed him; he asked me if I would have any thing to drink, I said if it would not be disagreeable, he took me to the Gun, and these two men were there; they said, he had better call for half a pint, and let them drink with us; Mr. Biggs called for another quartern, we then sat down together, and when he came to pay, he had no money; he offered his watch; and he said, he would have a coach and go home; I saw him put his watch in his pocket again; he began to be sick, and these two men took him out of doors by the arms; he did not appear to be able to walk by himself, when they led him out; he had not been out many minutes before we heard watch cried; we ran to the door, and the two men came in, one went up stairs, and the other sat below; I thought I heard Mr. Bigg's tongue, I went over the way to him to the Horns, and asked him what was the matter, he said, he had been robbed by the two men that were drinking with him; I took him to the house, and when we came there, he said this is one of the men that robbed me.

Prisoner's Council. What are you? - A poor woman, I do any thing.

What time did you meet Biggs? - About eleven.

What passed between you? - He asked me to drink.

Did he appear to be sober when you first met him? - No.

What sort of an evening was it? - It was very dark.

Was he sick? - He began to grow sick after he drank the dram, and a little ale.

Do you remember his falling off a stool? - Yes, he did.

WILLIAN ASKIN sworn.

I am superintendant of the watch, and hearing a man cry stop thief, I took my rattle, and alarmed the watch; then I met the prosecutor John Biggs , and I asked him what was the matter, he told me he was just robbed, I asked him where, and he shewed me the spot; while I was with him a woman came up, and told him the men that took the watch from him were gone into the Gun.

Before the young woman come up did he tell you who robbed him? - Immediately, I asked him if he should know the men, he said yes; as soon as we went into the Gun, he said, that was the man that robbed me, that was the prisoner Benjamin Winkhurst , he said there was another with him, I was going backwards to search for the other, but the landlord stopped me; I told him I would not quit the house, till he produced the other man, then he came down stairs.

LEONARD STAPLES sworn.

You was not sent for till after the men were taken? - No, my Lord, I found the watch in the cellar at the Gun, the morning after, the landlord shewed me the place were it was; it has been in my custody ever since.

(The watch produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER WINKHURST'S DEFENCE.

Biggs and Cloud came into the Gun, and called for a quartern of gin, I said you had better call for half a pint, then I can drink with you; Biggs was so drunk, he could not stand, and we took him out of the house, where he was very sick, and while I stood at the door, I heard the rattle, and cry stop thief, when they came into the house, I told them, I found the watch upon the floor.

PHILIP HUMPHRY sworn.

Are you the landlord of this house the Gun? - Yes.

Do you know how the watch came in your cellar? - The soldier told me the other man put it down in the cellar with the knot.

Do you know what came of Biggs after you turned him into the street? - I did not hear any thing of him till I heard the rattle, then I was informed Biggs had been robbed.

(The prisoner Thomas Alden called several witnesses who gave him a very good character.)

THOMAS ALDERN , NOT GUITY.

BENJ. WINKHURST, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-19

372. MICHAEL HAMMELL was indicted for that he, on the 11th day of May last, with a pistol loaded with powder and ball, did feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously, shoot at the Rev. David Henry Durand , Clerk, in the French-church, in Spitalfields .

DAVID HENRY DURAND sworn.

I was preaching in the French-church, in Spitalfields, in the middle of my sermon, I heard the report of a gun, I thought it was some boys on the outside, but shortly after, I heard a whiss, and the tap of the ball against the wall directly, I turned round, and saw the prisoner surrounded with the smoke of his pistol, he was about ten yards from me, the first I heard was the report of the pistol.

Prisoner's Council. Did you know the prisoner before? - Never.

Not heard his name perhaps? - Never.

Could have never spread any ill report of him? - No.

You have been a preacher twenty years? - Yes, twenty-three.

Before the Justice what reason did he assign? - He had a grudge against the French.

Was any examination taken in writing? - I believe there was.

Was the prisoner asked, where was you yesterday at half past eleven? - Yes, he was asked, was you at the French chapel, he said I was, and he said yes, upon every question that was asked him.

When he was asked what he did there, what did he say? - He said, he shot at the minister, because the French had injured his character; he asked why did you shoot at him, and he said, to be revenged of the French; when he was asked how he came by the pistol, he said, he bought it about a fortnight ago.

Did he before the Justice discover any sign of insanity? - He seemed composed, and seemed to answer no more or less, than in the compass of the question with great precision.

Prisoner. Why did he shoot at me, as for me, I shot in my own defence.

LEWIS GASCOINE sworn.

I was at the French church, the 11th of May, I was on the opposite side of the church, and by chance, I turned my head towards the gate, and I saw a man present a pistol with both hands, directing at Mr. Durand, as soon as I perceived it, it went off; the congregation were in a confusion, I went out and pursued the man, as far as Prince's-street, I cried stop thief, and he was taken.

Was the church pretty full? - Yes.

Prisoner's Council. Is the church large? - As large as this Court.

Where is the pulpit? - In the middle.

JOHN GASCOINE sworn.

You was in the church? - I was.

You saw the prisoner shoot? - I did.

Was it with deliberacy? - Quite deliberately holding the pistol with both hands, and after he fired, he waited an instant or two, to see whether he had taken effect.

You attended before a magistrate? - Yes.

Did the prisoner seem out of his mind? - Quite composed.

Were the answer deliberate? - Precisely to the effect of the question.

ISAAC ORANGE sworn.

I was present when the man was taken, he was nigh twenty yards down Prince's-street, when he was taken, he made an attempt to hit me with the pistol, and I seized the but end of it, I took the pistol from him, which was warm; he had a stick in his hand, pointing it strait towards the croud.

DAVID WILMOT , Esq; sworn.

(Produces the Pistol.)

Has it been in your custody ever since? - It has been in my drawer ever since.

How did the prisoner behave? - I never examined a prisoner that gave a more clear account, he said a clergyman had given him a bad character.

Council for the prisoner, by leave of the Court, stated the prisoner's case as follows:

Mr. Morgan. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, the prisoner is a German Protestant, and has followed the business of a weaver , he was a man of fair character, and had saved money. In June 1780, he was seized with a fit of insanity, which his friends imputed to a shock he had sustained from the riots; he took it in his head that the French had offended him, he appeared so much disordered that he was attended by Mr. Pearson, an Apothecary, and by him recommended to a mad-house at Hoxton, he was afterwards removed to St. Luke's, where he continued for a year, and was returned to his friends as incurable, he became very troublesome, and lodged at Mr. Fremeau's, where he became so very troublesome, he was taken before Justice Wilmot, who recommended him to quit Mr. Fremeau's house; he continued in the same state to the present time, though with some lucid intervals, so as to enable him to do some work at his loom: a paper was also found in his lodgings, written by himself, which plainly shews the state of his mind.

Prisoner. The reason as I went to Mr. Durand's French church, was, he hurted my character, and shot at me, and prevented me getting my living.

MICHAEL PIERSON sworn.

I am an apothecary, I sent him to Hoxton as an insane person, I attended him when he went there two months, it was the latter end of June 1780, it was supposed by his friends his insanity happened in consequence of the riots.

Has he had medicines since? - Yes.

JOHN MEADOWS sworn.

I am apothecary to St. Luke's Hospital, I remember the prisoner being at St. Luke's for insanity; he was petitioned for on the 23d of June 1780, he was received on the 25th of August 1780, and he was discharged the 3d of August 1781, as uncured, and is upon our list not to be admitted again as an incurable; I have seen him since his commitment, last Saturday for the first time, since his discharge; he was then in the same state he was in at the time of his discharge; his ideas were as nearly alike, as can be, at the time he was discharged.

CONRAD TAYLOR sworn.

(Produced a paper found in the prisoner's Apartment.)

"This is to acquaint the gentry and

"public, &c. that Mr. Granger and his

"son-in-law said they would give out that

"I am a very nasty fellow. Nov. 1782.

"Mr. Granger and his son-in-law are

"both dishonest men. Witness Michael

"Hammell."

He often complained to me he had a pain in his stomach, sometimes in his head; he sometimes rested himself when he had these complaints, then began again: I have seen him in Newgate, he is much the same as ever.

PETER FREMEAU sworn.

I know the prisoner about five years.

Did he on his return from St. Luke's lodge with you? - Yes, about nine months; he was about a fortnight just as he was at first, then he was better about three months, then he began to grow worse, I gave him warning, and I heard a great noise in his room, about a fortnight yesterday; some time afterwards I again heard a great noise in the room, which shook the house, I went up stairs, and he told me my wife wanted to lay with him; he took up a pair of pincers and said he would knock her brains out; he swore yesterday, when he heard his trial was to come on, let the Frenchman be confined, and then I cannot shoot him; why should he not be confined as well as me?

Council for the prosecution. Did he say any thing about what he should do if at liberty? - He said if he was at liberty, he would fight Mr. Durand with sword and pistol.

JOHN CONWRIGHT CRAWSHAW sworn.

I have known him twenty years, I conversed with him, and I asked him what he was in that place for, he said why did they take my character away, I looked upon him to be a madman.

MARY PHILLIPS sworn.

I know the prisoner about nine months, I live in the house where he lived, the corner of King-street, Hoxton, I think he is not in his senses.

ANNESLEY FREEMANTLE sworn.

I have known the prisoner many years, he has worked with me up to May last, he was not an orderly person, I had heard he had been insane, I thought he had a wildness.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-20

373. ANN QUINCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of May last, a linen handkerchief value 1 s. and seven pieces of gold coin of this realm called guineas, value 7 l. 7 s. the property of John Wighton , privily from his person .

JOHN WIGHTON sworn.

On the 14th of May, between seven and eight in the evening, I met the prisoner in Wingfield-street, Spitalfields; I was walking out with an acquaintance, and I met this girl, she said where are you going, and asked for something to drink, we went to the Star, we had a pint of ale, and then we went to her lodging just by the Star in Catharine-wheel-alley , we went up stairs and had a glass of gin, then I went to bed with my cloaths on, and went to sleep, I was a little in liquor, and lost seven guineas in gold, I waked about eight and the young woman was gone, I missed seven guineas in gold, it was in my right hand pocket, and a remarkable halfpenny, and my handkerchief; when I awaked I found only 13 s. in my left hand pocket, the gold was taken out of the other pocket, I am certain the money was in my pocket when I paid for the beer, I gave her 6 d. at her lodgings to fetch a quartern of rum.

Court. Can you say the money was in your pocket when you went with the prisoner? - Yes, when I waked I began to make a noise, there was then two men in the house, one struck me and cut me across my face, whilst I was making the noise; we were in the dark, and a woman came in with a candle, the tallest man struck me.

Was you in liquor when you awaked? - No.

JOHN RIVELL sworn.

I was the headborough who was sent for about a quarter past ten, after we had taken the prisoner, we found upon her 4 s. in silver and a crooked halfpenny, we asked Mr. Wighton if there was any mark, he said a crack upon the bend, I saw it taken out of her pocket, we went to Mr. Bibeson's, and there she was with three or four more, we brought her to Catharine-wheel-alley, and the prosecutor said that was the woman that had robbed him.

- MATHEWS the beadle sworn.

I took her in Wingfield-street, at the sign of the Star, the prosecutor told me he had been robbed of seven guineas and some silver, and a halfpenny, he said it was a woman with a thick lip, I went with him to the Star, where he said he had been robbed, and found her, I brought her to the corner of Catharine-wheel-alley, and he said this is the woman, I took her to the watch-house and searched her, I pulled out 4 s. and a bad one and a halfpenny, he immediately swore by God that was his halfpenny, I asked him if there was any particular mark, he said it was cracked;

she had ear-rings on when I first saw her, and when she was catched she had not.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-21

374. JOHN HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of May last, two pair of sheets, value 20 s. two shoemaker's knives value 1 s. and one cloth jacket value 1 s. the property of David Nightingale ; one linen handkerchief value 6 d. and one apron value 1 s. the property of John Angus .

DAVID NIGHTINGALE sworn.

On the 16th of May the prisoner came to work for me, on the 17th at nine o'clock he brought down a pair of shoes he had made, I said, young man this work will not suit me; it being Saturday he desired I would give him one pair more to finish the day, I gave him some other work; after my apprentice came down to dinner, the prisoner came down and asked if his other upper leather was done, and upon that he went up again; about five minutes after that somebody came down stairs, my wife said perhaps it is the young man, sure he has not taken any thing, we went up stairs and missed a pair of sheets, I pursued him, and found upon him a bundle containing two pair of sheets in an apron, two shoemaker's knives, a jacket, waistcoat and handkerchief belonging to the apprentice; he begged I would forgive him, he said it was the first time, I am sure of one of the knives, it was marked, there was no mark on the sheets by which I could know them, I believe the things found upon him to be mine.

JOHN ANGUS sworn.

About eleven o'clock or a little after, I was rung to dinner, soon after I came down, the young man went up stairs, a pair of sheets was gone, (the things produced) I know the jacket, it had a flap which I cut off and put three buttons, I had it faced with shalloon, I know the waistcoat, I had sown it up the back with a wax end.

PRISONER.

I have nothing to say.

GUILTY .

To be twice publicly whipped and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-22

375. RICHARD MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th day of May last, one tobacco box value 1 d. one pair of leather shoes value 1 s. one pair of buckles value 1 s. and 1 s. 4 d. halfpenny in money , the property of John Harford .

JOHN HARFORD was sworn, who knew nothing of the robbery of his own knowledge, but from the information of Job Greensmith , who told him he see the prisoner rob him; nothing was found on the prisoner.

JOB GREENSMITH was called but did not appear, and the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-23

376. MARY GRAVES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th day of May last, one gown value 4 s. and one linen apron value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Elphy .

ANN PRICE sworn.

I was coming home on the 7th of May at four in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner coming down stairs with a bundle, I alarmed Mrs. Elphy directly, I asked her if she had lost any thing in the garret, Mrs. Elphy kept her eye upon her, this lad followed the prisoner, I and the prosecutrix followed

her, and we took her at the bottom of the street.

Court. Is the prisoner the same person you saw coming down stairs? - I am sure she is the person that came down stairs; she dropped the things in the street, she was not out of my sight; she denied being in the house; I saw the prisoner on the two pair of stairs, as I was going up the one; Mrs. Elphy run into the fore-room to look out, and I went down stairs to follow her.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS sworn.

I saw her come down the steps with a bundle, I was on the other side of the way, I looked at her about two or three minutes, a woman came to the door, and seemed flurried, and I asked her if she had lost any thing, she said she had, I followed the prisoner down the street, she had got about fifty yards, I lost sight of her: She went up a court with the bundle, and when I got to it, she was coming down without the bundle; It was a thoroughfare.

Was you sure enough when you saw her to know her again? - She was the same person who came out of the house; it was near the top of Whitecross-street, I went up the court, and found the bundle behind a door that leads out of the court; when I came back they had stopped her; I brought the bundle, I gave it to Mrs. Elphy.

Prisoner. When I was before the Justice they all swore to me, by a green bonnet I had on.

Court. Had she a bonnet on? - I did not take much notice of her bonnet, I took notice of her face, I don't know whether she had a green bonnet or not.

ELIZABETH ELPHY sworn.

I went into the front room, and looked out of window, I saw a tall woman stepping off the last step, with a black gown, a black cloak, and green bonnet; she had a bundle, I kept sight of her twenty yards, till I knew whether any thing was missing; I was not certain then, that the things were mine. After I told Mrs. Price in the street, to keep sight of her, I ran down, and she was stopped about fifty yards from my door, when I first got out of the door she was then in my sight, I never lost sight of her after; she had a child in her arms.

Had she the child when you first saw her? - No, she had the bundle, and no child; I saw her turn into the court before I came down stairs.

(The bundle produced and deposed to).

Court. How long had the woman been out of your sight? - Two or three minutes.

Could you be three minutes running fifty yards? - I cannot exactly say, I run before she turned into the court, and when I got to it, she was returning; I did not see her with a child in her arms.

ANN PRICE sworn.

I did not see her turn into the court, I saw her come out, and she had a child; I saw her take a child from a woman, who stood at the corner of the court, and when she was taken, the woman took it because it cried.

What became of the woman who took the child? - She followed us to the Justice's, but did not go in.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going down Whitcross-street, with a child, and they stopped me, and took me into a shop, and beat me unmercifully; the child belonged to the young woman that was along with me; the constable said, if I could raise half a guinea, my prosecutor would not hurt me.

I know nothing of the affair.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-24

377. JACOB DANIELS, alias SAMUEL LEVY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May last, three live hens, value 3 s. one live cock, value 1 s. the property of Mary Tell .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-25

378. THOMAS ARNOLD and JOHN DEASON were indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Lay , on the King's highway, on the 18th of May last, and putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, one silk handkerchief, value 1 s. and 5 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, his property .

EDWARD LAY sworn.

On the 18th of May, between two and three in the morning, I was robbed at Kensington Gravel Pits , I went to the King's-head, and had a pint of beer; I drank with the landlord, I came out between two and three, and when I came out the prisoners asked me to have a pot of beer at the Swan; they were both in the King's-head, and came out at the time I did. When I had got about sixty yards, they stopped me, and demanded my money, and took my silk handkerchief off my neck, Arnold untied it; I was quite sober, one held me on one side by the collar, and the other the other, and Deason cut off the corner of my waistcoat pocket; there was five shillings and six-pence in it, he ran away, and I cried out murder! Arnold ran after me, and swore he would kill me, I did not see any weapon that he had at all. Mr. Brown where I lodge, next door to the King's-head, came to my assistance as the prisoners threatened to kill me, if they could lay hold of me. Brown opened the door, and I went in and Brown too. We did not go after them, we were afraid, I went to bed and got up at eight o'clock. I went to my cousin John Clevelly , and told him how I had been robbed, and described the men and he knew the men; we went after them, and found Arnold at the Hob in the Well, about nine in the morning, and William Brown took Deason, whilst we was seeing after Arnold, I knew him directly when I saw him.

Jury. Was it light when you were robbed? - It was just break of day.

Was you sober? - I was, I knew I had 7 s. in my pocket, I suppose they saw me when I paid my reckoning; I drank part of two three penny worths of rum and water, and one pot of beer.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn.

The prisoner lodged with me about twelve days, he is a labouring man, he kept very good hours till that morning, I heard murder cried, between two and three, I jumped out of bed directly, and ran to the door; the door was upon the latch, he had opened the street-door, and got into the passage before I could open my own door, he said he had been robbed, he wanted me to pursue them, I said poh! poh! go to bed, or I will shut you out, I was in my shirt, I said go to bed, what business had you to stay at the public house so long; he told me there was three men had robbed him, he was not quite drunk, I did not assist him because I thought it was dangerous to attack three men at that time in the morning; as soon I was as up, he related the affair to me, and blamed me for not going with him that night, he described them, and by the description I knew them, they lived near me, he said there were three men, and that two collared him, and the third robbed him. Clevelly and I apprehended both, we found the first at the Hob in the Well in bed, (Arnold) I called him, and asked him to come down to drink, and I saw Deason go into the sign of the Hoop, and I took him; he said he knew nothing of the affair, I asked the prosecutor whether this was the person that cut off his pocket, and he said it was. Arnold admitted it at the Rotation Office, and produced the handkerchief, that Deason was one, and Wm. Lewin who is not taken; Arnold confessed without any promise; Arnold confessed he took the handkerchief off his neck, he said there was a skirmish, and he went to the other's assistance.

Court to Prosecutor. Relate again as particularly as you can, how they first attacked you? - Those two, they walked with me some distance, till I was stopped; Arnold first stopped me, Lewin came up to them, the other man met us, and then Arnold and Lewin collared me, and Deason

cut my pocket; Arnold swore he would kill me.

JOHN CLEVELLY sworn.

I was present when Arnold was taken, he denied it all the way to the watch-house, but going through Knightsbridge, he seemed to own a little; he described to me, that he took the handkerchief for fear the other should take it.

JOSEPH CALLIS sworn.

They sent for me on Sunday morning, as being constable, when I went up stairs, the soldier Arnold opened the door, I took him coming along; we met the prisoner Deason, he said he knew nothing of the matter.

PRISONER ARNOLD's DEFENCE.

When the prosecutor came into the house, he was very abuseful, he went to cards with the landlord, and stripped to fight, and I took his part; he played till half past two, and then the wife turned us out, and I was going by the Swan, the lad was kicking at the door, and they was talking in conversation, and took the handkerchief.

PIRSONER DEASON's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say more than he says.

(The prisoner Arnold called three witnesses who gave him a good character).

THOS. ARNOLD , GUILTY, JOHN DEASON , GUILTY ,

( Death ).

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-26

379. RICHARD WALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th day of May last, twenty pounds weight of lead, value 20 s. affixed to a dwelling house of Abraham Adams , against the statute; and

JOHN BARNETT was indicted for receiving the same, well knowing it to be stolen .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-27

380. HENRY ROW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May last, forty pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. the property of Abraham Adams , then and there fixed to a certain building belonging to the said Abraham Adams , against the form of the statute.

ABRAHAM ADAMS sworn.

This house is assigned over to me.

SAMUEL WILD sworn.

On Saturday evening, the prisoner owned he had taken some lead, I told him Mr. Adams had lost a great deal of lead, and wanted to find the receiver; I told him Mr. Adams wanted particularly to find the re- receiver, but I told him he must undergo the course of law: He said he had taken from one of the Circus houses, where he was apprehended; he said, he had taken about eighteen pounds; he went with the constable, and shewed him the man that bought it.

Prisoner. He said if I would confess, he would be favourable to me.

JOHN ROBSON sworn.

I am a carpenter, I took the prisoner by the side of the leads of a house in the Circus, I was at the house on Saturday the 31st of May, about nine in the evening, I heard a noise at top, I listened, and heard some dirt fall down; I directed my eye towards where it fell, and saw something move; I went out, and told some people there was somebody stealing lead; I desired some men to go up the next house, and I went up that house, we went softly; he did not see us till I was even with him in the garret, he stood by the side of the window, and the lead by him; it came from the gutter, I cut a piece from the same place, and matched it; it exactly filled the place; the prisoner said, you have not got me; nobody else was at the top of house.

(The lead produced).

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I hope you will be favourable, I have a large family.

(The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

To be publicly whipped and discharged .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-28

381. JAMES CARROL and RICHARD BRYAN were indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Brockley , on the 2d of June last, at nine at night, feloniously stealing therein, five gold pins, value 7 s. and one paste shoe buckle, set in silver, value 5 s. the property of the said Robert .

ROBERT BROCKLEY sworn.

I live in Old-street , on Monday evening the 2d of June, about nine, a boy informed me there were two chaps at the window, I ran into the shop, and saw a hand draw out of the window, having a sash to draw back, I could not catch his hand; Bryan was brought in, in about five minutes, by Isaac Keen , he was searched, and nothing found upon him of my property; the other prisoner was brought in about an hour after, and nothing was found on him; I lost five gold pins, and a silver paste shoe buckle, they were there when I opened shop.

ISAAC KEEN sworn.

I was standing in Old-street, about nine o'clock, within about six yards of the prosecutor's shop, I saw the prisoners go by up to Mr. Brockley's window, they went five or six times by, and at last opened the window, and then Bryan ran across the street, they opened a pane that is made to open with a tin frame; he came back again, put in his hand, and pulled something out, I could not tell what; then they ran off, about five minutes after he came up again, the other went into the Dolphin; he came up to the people, I laid hold of him, he said, he knew nothing of the things, I saw the two prisoners speaking together, after he had put his hand into the windows.

WILLIAM FORD sworn.

I left work about nine o'clock, I saw Bryan come up to the windows four or five times, and at last he opened the window, he put his hand, and took something out.

PRISONER BRYAN's DEFENCE.

I was going from Oxford-road, and the Gentleman came up to me, and caught hold of me.

Prisoner Carrol. I have nothing to say.

(The Prisoner Carrol called two witnesses who gave him a good character).

JAMES BRYAN , NOT GUILTY .

RICHARD CARROL , NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-29

382. JOHN GROVES was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 14th of December last, four hundred pounds weight of potatoes, value 20 s. the goods of John Dyer .

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-30

383. JAMES GRANT and WILLIAM SMITH were indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Jacomb , widow , on the 25th day of May last, at three o'clock in the afternoon; no person being in the same dwelling house; and burglariously stealing therein, four silver waiters, value 19 l. two silver basons, value 4 l. two silver sauce boats, value 2 l. two pair of silver salts, value 20 s. two pair of silver salt spoons, value 4 s. seven silver table spoons, value 4 l. twelve silver desert spoons, value 3 l. one silver soup spoon value 30 s. two silver sauce spoons, value 20 s. one silver mustard spoon, value 6 s. six silver tea spoons, value 20 s. one silver cream pot, value 20 s. one silver pepper

box, value 10 s. one silver lemon strainer, value 20 s. two silver bottle labels, value 3 s. one silver marrow spoon, value 2 s. one silver wine strainer, value 20 s. five silver candlesticks, value 25 l. four silver cups, value 12 l. one silver meat skewer, value 5 s. and one linen table-cloth, value 5 s. the goods of the said Mary Jacomb .

(The witnesses examined apart at the request of the prisoners.)

THOMAS PICKERING sworn.

I am servant to Mrs. Jacomb, she is a widow, and lives on Lawrence Pountney Hill ; about five minutes before three I left the house, on Sunday the 25th of May; I shut the door, and I am pretty sure I locked it; my mistress and the servants were all gone to meeting; after I had gone out of the house I went to meeting, and after I had been there half an hour or three quarters, I observed my mistress was sent for out of her pew; in a few minutes my mistress's nephew came to my pew, and told me not to be alarmed, for his aunt's house was broke open, and to go home directly. I went home immediately, and found several people round the door, and one of the witnesses was standing on the door step with a bundle of plate in his hand, and a red box; a person amongst the people gave me this wine strainer and pepper-box, and asked me if I could swear to them. I then opened the street door, and went up into my pantry immediately, it was shut and not locked, turned with the key as I thought I left it; the door is a spring lock, and shuts after us, and only opens with the key; when I came up into the pantry, I found my plate drawer pulled wide open, and all the plate taken out; the drawer next to it, which contains the table-cloths, and those things, I likewise found pulled open, and one table-cloth and a green cloth which I lay under the table-cloth, was flung upon the ground, and two pieces of candle which I had stuck in one pair of candlesticks for night was taken out and flung into my tray, and the salt that was in the two salt-sellers ready for supper was likewise flung into the tray with the candles; I then went down into the kitchen, and missed the soup-ladle, which was in the kitchen.

What plate did your mistress lose? - I can inform you, I have a list of them in my pocket.

When did you make that memorandum? - Not till after the plate was stolen; I made it from my memory; Mr. Chetham has one, and I took this from it.

Court. Read it from the original. - [Reads] Plate that was stolen out of the house on Sunday afternoon: two pair of silver salts, two pair of salt spoons, seven table spoons, twelve desert spoons, one soup spoon, two sauce spoons, one mustard spoon, four waiters, two pair of candlesticks, one small candlestick, two basons, (one was a sugar bason, the other a slop bason, both silver) two sauce boats, one cream pot, one pepper box, one lemon strainer, two bottle labels, one marrow spoon, one wine strainer, six tea spoons, one meat skewer, that was all; there were four silver cups in a red box in a cupboard in my pantry, underneath the drawer, and one breakfast cloth, and that tied up the plate in it; I am very sure that all the things were in the house when I went to church.

Is your mistress here? - I believe not.

How long have you lived in the family? - Almost five years; my master died the 23d of February last, it was Mr. Jacomb's property.

Prisoner's Council. Mr. and Mrs. Jacomb were married before you came into the family? - Yes.

ATCHESON MAXFIELD sworn.

You live near Mrs. Jacomb? - Yes, opposite.

Tell the Court what you perceived on Sunday afternoon. - On Sunday afternoon, the 25th of May, I was sitting in my dining-room window, directly opposite Mrs. Jacomb's great door, a few minutes after three I saw three men come up towards the door, two of them was dressed in light-coloured drab clothes, the fashionable colour,

very smart and clean; the third was in dark colour; after they stood there a few minutes, whether the prisoner Smith or Grant went in first to the house, I cannot swear; there was one of them that appeared to me to remain behind. I observed three men, that got in by the same way that Mrs. Jacomb's servant frequently gets in, which is, as I take it, by a key, without ringing the bell; I cannot say which went in first, the third man might stand twenty yards off; I did not measure the ground after.

Did they walk in as if the door had been open, or did they make any halt as if they opened the door? - I did not see that; but I did not see any woman or man that opened it; after the two prisoners had been in ten or fifteen minutes, I saw the door open, and stand on the jar for, I suppose, a few minutes; I was very attentive, and I took notice.

They shut the door, and locked it after them when they first went in? - Yes; after that the door remained on the jar, as I tell you; I took notice, and was very attentive; some good-looking people came down Duck's-foot-lane, some went along Green-lettuce-lane; the prisoner Grant came out first; one of them had a tablecloth with something in it, which he seemed to carry just as a person would carry any thing out of any house; Smith had a trunk under one arm; the third man got off. I ran down Lawrence Pountney-lane, and the three men came into Thames-street together. I had not so good an opportunity of observing the third man, but I am sure as to Smith and Grant.

Court. Were these the same men you saw before? - There was no one in Duck's-foot lane but our three selves.

As to the two prisoners, you have sworn that they were the same two men that went into the house? - Yes; as they went down Thames-street I was close to Mr. Smith; they were very well dressed; they crossed over, and went into a place called Coal-harbour; when Grant and Smith had got under this gate-way, the man in the reddish coat kept in Thames-street. I clapped Grant on the shoulder, and insisted on knowing what he had; on which Smith, without any answer or ill language, jumped from me, and he and Grant went down the lane; they ran very fast, and I ran as fast as them; when they had got a quarter down the lane, Smith let fall the trunk, which I picked up, and still continued to pursue them; the handle went away, and the trunk fell from me; I still continued to cry out; they turned to the right by Mr. Calvert's brew-house, towards Allhallows-lane; when I got to the bottom, I asked if they saw these people go by; they said, yes; they had so much the appearance of gentlemen, that we did not stop them.

And there you lost them? - Going up Allhallows-lane, there was a lusty good-looking man; says he, I believe I have got what you are looking for; he had got the table-cloth, I do not know the man's name; I am very bad at remembering names, but my eye-sight is pretty good; I believe he was coming across. As we were walking, a brewer's man called after after us; says he, here is something that belongs to you; I turned about, and saw the man had a silver pepper-box, and a silver strainer; he gave them to me, and I gave them to the man that had the plate in the table-cloth, and we went into Thames-street to Mrs. Jacomb's door, and then left him there, and beckoned to the person to come and take charge of the plate; I went to the meeting-house at Salter's-hall, to tell the man who opens the door I wanted Mrs. Jacomb; he brought, I believe, Mrs. Jacomb's nephew to me; I told him, a little accident had happened, and I begged some person might come and take charge of the plate. Several gentlemen came up, some produced picklock keys, others other picklock keys, others some silver salts, or something of that kind. I begged they would go to the Poultry Compter with me, where they might see the men.

Can you say they were the men that had been stopped? - Yes; I then went to the Poultry Compter; the turnkey told me the

prisoners were in a room, and he would fetch them, which he did; the two prisoners came out dressed just as I had seen them before.

Did you know them directly? - Oh, Lord, aye, knew them directly! they were very remarkable!

In the same dress? - Yes; I went to Alderman Hart's, Smith was in the same dress that he was before, but Grant had got on a very different coat, but his face was the same; I thought his having a different coat on was rather extraordinary, because I told the keeper not to let them change their cloaths.

I only ask you one general question, Are you sure, upon your observation on the sight of the men, that these two are the two men? - I can safely swear they are the two men that came out with the plate and things, but I did not see them go in.

Are you sure they are the two men that came out; - Yes, they were at the Poultry Compter, Alderman Hart was very a ngry with the keeper of the Poultry Compter, for suffering them to take off their cloaths.

Prisoner's Council. You say on the Sunday afternoon, about three, you was sitting at your window, which is opposite? - Yes.

Before the man came up you was not talking to any body? - No.

You saw them enter without any pause or interruption? - They might stay a minute.

You saw nothing like taking any thing out of their pockets? - He went close up to the door as the servant used to do.

You saw no more? - No.

They were out of your sight a considerable time? - From ten to fifteen minutes.

Had you given the alarm of stop thief before they were out of your sight? - Yes, they were not so far from me as I am from you, when I cried out stop thief.

They went down Ducks-foot-lane, they were out of sight then? - I did not know they were thieves till I put my hand on his shoulder.

I only ask you a plain question, I do not mean to argue with you, you walked quietly down? - No, I run very fast down that lane.

You met two men first? - They were in another lane.

You spoke to Smith at the bottom of Alhallows-lane, one would have thought you must have been in some little doubt at that time, as you know every man is supposed to be innocent till he is found out? - I saw them all down the lane, which is a very long lane; after I lost sight of them, I saw them no more till I saw them in the compter.

You then enquired of the keeper where the two men were that were in custody, they were brought out as the two men that were supposed to be the persons? - I cannot say whether there was any other fettered in the yard, there was a great many men in the yard that were not handcuffed.

Prisoner Grant. My Lord, I should be glad if Mr. Maxfield would answer why he did not swear to us before Alderman Hart? I swore before the Alderman, at least I said before the Alderman that I could not swear they were the men that went into the house, but I did not tell the Alderman that they were not the very men that came out of the house.

Court. Then it was put to you whether you would positively swear that they were the men that went into the house? - Yes.

Did you tell the Alderman then that they were the men that came out of the house? - I did.

WILLIAM HENSHAW sworn.

I am a merchant's clerk, I formerly lived with John Norman a dry-salter in Cornhill, I was at Coal-harbour-stairs on Sunday afternoon May the 25th, I heard the cry of stop thief, upon looking up Coal-harbour, I saw these two prisoners and Mr. Maxfield following them, crying out stop thief, Mr. Maxfield was stooping at the time to pick up that trunk, one of them had just dropped it, the other had a bundle, I cannot say which, I saw the trunk dropping to the ground, they turned towards Alhallows-lane, I followed them, and came very near

up with the prisoner Grant, about the middle of Alhallows-lane, when he dropped these keys on the steps of a door, I saw him drop them; upon which one Mr. Bennet a blacksmith stood just by, and knowing them to be picklock keys, he followed me giving me his child, I gave it his wife who was close behind me; I picked up the keys and followed them, I lost sight of them at the top of Alhallows-lane, and gained sight of them again in Hand-court.

Court. How long might they be out of your sight? - About the space of a minute, or not quite so much, they were about ten yards from me when I saw them again, they were the same men that I saw again in Hand-court, I am sure of it, they kept pretty close together; Hand-court leads into Chequer-yard, and Mr. Bennet laid hold of the prisoner Smith, while they turned out of Chequer-yard into Dowgate-hill, I lost sight of them again, I do not suppose it was half a minute or a quarter of a minute, Mr. Bennet had hold of the prisoner Smith, when I saw them again, he had got before me in the pursuit; Grant went a little higher, and I saw Mr. Maidment had hold of his collar, I did not see him stopped, I saw Bennet have hold of Smith, and Maidment hold of Grant.

Prisoner's Council. How far was Mr. Maxfield from you when you was alarmed? - About thirty yards.

Were there any other people in the lane who were put into pursuit upon this alarm? - There were several, it is a common thoroughfare, and generally frequented by a great number of people, any person who had been passing that way might have joined in the pursuit, one of the prisoners dropped the bundle, and a young man, I cannot tell who it was, picked it up, and gave it to Hinton.

Court to Henshaw. Whereabout did you see the bundle dropped? - I did not see it dropped.

Did the trunk drop from Grant? - Not that I know of.

You pursued a considerable distance, did not you? - Yes.

Many other people joined in the cry? - Yes Sir, there were four or five round the prisoner.

Council for the Prosecution. This Coal-harbour is not a very great thoroughfare of a Sunday? - There is a great many people go to the stairs being pleasant.

Court. You say you saw one of them drop the trunk which Mr. Maxfield picked up, and the other had a white bundle? - Yes.

You never lost sight of them I think you said till they turned out of Alhallows-lane, and you got sight of them again in Hand-court? - Yes.

What became of the white bundle? - I have heard it was dropped at the bottom of Alhallows-lane, it was gone when I came up with Grant in Alhallows-lane, before I picked up the keys, and they were in the middle of Alhallows-lane.

Then they never had been out of your sight at that time? - No, they had not.

ISAAC ESTRIDGE sworn.

On Sunday the 25th of May, between three and four in the afternoon, I was walking up Thames-street, and just by the end of Coal-harbour-lane, I heard the cry of Stop thief; I turned about, and saw Mr. Maxfield holding his stick up for assistance; I ran back to the top of Coal-harbour-lane, and then Mr. Maxfield was down past the gateway with a box in his hand, and I saw the two prisoners at the bar running; I turned to the top of Alhallows-lane, and I thought it was impossible to overtake them the other way; I staid, and saw them run and turn the corner of Waterman's-hall; they came up the lane close together, and passed me; I was sure by their dress they were the same same men; they were dressed in light-coloured cloaths, like mine.

Did you perceive either of them have any thing in their hands? - Nothing, but I head a great jingling in their pockets.

Which way did they run? - From the top of Allhallow's-lane straight up into Chequer-yard,

through Hand-court, and down the gate-way; Smith have a butter-boat and a small taper candlestick out of his pocket; I picked them up; while I was picking them up, Bennet seized Smith, who was behind; I did not see him, but it was just then I held up the plate; as they were running, I halloo'd out, for God's sake stop thief, here is some of the plate; the people would not stop them; the other two proceeded on a little way, about 20 or 30 yards; I saw him stopped, and brought back immediately.

JAMES BENNET sworn.

On the 25th of May my wife and child and me were walking out after dinner; I was going down Allhallows-lane, and there was a cry of Stop thief, stop thief, do not stop one, but stop them both; that was the cry that I heard at the bottom of the lane. I immediately says, these two gentlemen cannot be them who are coming up, they were the prisoners at the bar; they were just upon the trot when they came to me, they rather walked by me; immediately as Grant walked by me he threw a bunch of picklock keys down; I am sure Grant is the man that threw them down; I immediately gave the child away to a young man that is in Court, that picked up the keys, and ran after them to Dowgate-hill to the gateway; as I got into the gateway Smith threw down a silver butter-boat and candlestick; I saw him do that, and laid hold of him immediately; I never lost sight of either of them, I ran as fast as possible, I took Smith under the gateway; the last witness picked up the boat and candlestick. In about ten minutes after, I heard Grant was stopped. I was going along with him after the other was taken, and a constable came behind, and laid hold of his coat, which pulled him very hard, and the prisoner said, do not pull me so hard, I can go with the man that took me.

THOMAS COLLINS sworn.

I was sitting in the tap-room in Coal-harbour on Sunday afternoon, between three and four, on the 25th of May; I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner, Grant pass by me with a white bundle, I am sure that is the man; he had the bundle under his right arm. I observed it, and ran after him directly. There was another man along with him, but I did not see his face; I cannot say any thing to him. There was a gentleman following them with a trunk in his hand, that cried out, Stop thief; I followed them till they were taken, but I was out of their sight twice; I first lost sight of them turning the corner from the brew-house into Alhallow's-lane; I did not lose sight of them for more than a minute; when I saw them again, I knew them to be the same men; one of them I can say to, that is Grant, but the other I cannot; they had lost their bundle, I was a distance from it; the bundle I passed by, and my master picked it up. My master's name is Daniel Hinton .

The Remainder of this Trial in the Third Part, which will be published in a few Days.

Reference Number: t17830604-30

Trials at Law, Arguments of Counsel, &c. carefully taken in Short-Hand, and copied with Dispatch by E. HODGSON, Writer of these Proceedings, No. 35, Chancery Lane.

Short-hand taught at Home and Abroad.

This Day is Published, Price 2 s. 6 d. the Second Edition, with Additions, of SHORT-HAND on an IMPROVED PLAN; The Alphabet consisting of Sixteen Characters only, by E. HODGSON.

Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No, 35, Chancery Lane, S. BLADON, Pater-noster Row, and J. CLARKE, Portugal Street.

N. B. This Book, which contains also an Explanatory Copper-plate is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Doubts should arise, they shall be removed on Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

Reference Number: t17830604-30

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 4th of JUNE, 1783, and the following Days;

Being the FIFTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Nathaniel Newnham , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART III.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXIII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of James Grant and William Smith .

Prisoner Grant. When this lad was before the Alderman, he would not take upon himself to swear to either of us; he said, he could not.

Court. Did you swear before the Alderman? - I did.

Court to Grant. Shall I ask the Alderman that question, he is here? - If you please, my Lord.

Mr. Alderman HART sworn.

Did this young man swear to the person of Grant? - When he was before me, I asked him particularly to look at the men, and he swore to him, and said, that is the man. I questioned Mr. Maxfield very particularly whether he was quite clear that these were the men that went into the house; he said, he could not tell: I said, are you sure they are the men that came out of the house? he said, he believed they were, but he would not take upon him to say; their dress was both alike, and they were pursued; and he said, he thought they must be the men, but he would not take upon himself to swear to them.

Prisoner Smith. There was a very singular thing happened about this lad; the lad would not take upon himself to swear, and I told you at the same time that you did not give us fair play; you said, very well. - The boy swore positively at once.

DANIEL HINTON sworn.

You were the master of that boy, Thomas Collins ? - Yes; I was standing down at the Coal-harbour wharf, smoaking my pipe, my face towards the Thames; I heard a cry of Stop thief, and there were two men, one of them with a bundle, which I cannot swear to; one of them had his back to me, running to Calvert's brew-house; I sent the boy after them, I said I could not run so fast; and a young man that picked up a bundle, he gave it me, There, Sir, says he, here is a bundle one of them has dropped; I did not see the bundle dropped; it contained silver spoons, and four waiters, it was tied up in a handkerchief, and then in a white table-cloth, then there was a speckled handkerchief thrown over it; I heard the man's name was one Allardson, who lives in Tower-street.

JAMES MAIDMENT sworn.

I live on Dowgate-hill. On Sunday the 25th of last month, about half after three in the afternoon, as I was sitting at my father's, I heard the cry of stop thief at a distance, I made the best of my way down stairs, when I came into the street, I observed the prisoner Smith, in custody of Mr. Bennet, and some plate in his hand; I believe salt cellars; the prisoner Grant was then on the other side of the way running away; Mr. Bennet who had hold of Smith called to me, for God's sake to pursue Grant, I did so, and at the corner of Cloak-lane, I came up with him, and took him by the collar, I never lost sight of him from the time I first saw him till I took him; upon my taking him, he dropped these keys; I tried this key, which opened Mrs. Jacomb's-house with the greatest ease afterwards; I have had them in my possession ever since, I sealed up the others, and kept that separate.

- ALLARDSON sworn.

Did you see either of the prisoners drop a bundle in Alhallows-lane? - I believe the left hand man dropped a bundle, but I cannot say, I believe he was one of the men that dropped a bundle, I gave the bundle to a lusty man, he appeared to me a publican, I gave it to him, and I turned back; I was going over the water.

Court. Did you observe the two men that were running before the rest? - I did, they were two smart fellows, I thought they were joking, they got up to me, I ran after them the distance from Coal-harbour-lane to Alhallow's-lane; I believe Grant to be one.

ABRAHAM WINTERBOTTOM , Esq; sworn.

That is the plate which I brought before the Alderman, one bundle was sealed with Mr. Alderman Hart's seal and mine; so was the box; it has been in my custody ever since.

- HINTON sworn.

I took the bundle that was given to me by Allardson, and left it in charge of Mrs. Jacomb's people.

Court to Pickering. That bundle and the box are the same you produced before the Alderman? - Yes.

Court to Mr. Winterbottom. They are the same? - They are.

(The butter boat and taper candlestick deposed to by Isaac Estridge ).

(Smart deposed to the two salts and spoons).

I sealed up and delivered the boat, candlestick, and salts, and one salt spoon to Mr. Winterbottom.

Court to Maidment. Who did you deliver them to? - To this man the constable, the constable delivered them to Mr. Winterbottom, the constable produced two more keys which he took out of Smith's pocket.

Prisoner Grant's Defence. Yesterday was a fortnight, I had been in the city in the afternoon to meet my sister, I was standing at the bottom of Alhallows-lane, and all of a sudden there was a cry of stop thief; I went up along with them, and they ran across Thames-street, towards Dowgate-hill, and at the bottom of the gateway across Dowgate-hill, I picked up these keys.

The Keeper of the Poultry Compter sworn.

Do you belong to the Poultry Compter? - Yes.

Were you there when the prisoners were brought into custody? - I was.

Did Grant go up the next day in the same cloaths he was brought in? - They were both in light drab cloaths, I took as much care of them as I could, we have two turnkeys, one to attend each day, but one was ill, any body might put a coat through the door; and about an hour after they were examined, Grant had changed his coat, I told him, I would rather have given him a guinea than he should have changed his coat, I told him he was a rascal and a villain.

Prisoner Grant. I changed the coat because it was too good to wear in gaol.

Prisoner Smith's Defence. I was coming up Alhallows-lane, and heard the cry of stop thief, I saw several persons running, and I saw a tall man throw away some plate, I picked it up, my foot slipped, and the butter boat-fell out of my hand, I delivered the property up directly.

Prisoner's Council. I beg leave to submit to your Lordship, whether you think this case is properly substantiated against the prisoners at the bar; I conceive the best evidence is not brought forward, for there cannot be the best proof without Mrs. Jacomb's coming here herself, and therefore it is fair for me to say, that these men went into the house by Mrs. Jacomb's consent, and that the goods were not taken away feloniously, for there cannot be a proof of felony, and of the goods stolen, being the property of Mrs. Jacomb, without her standing forward: I submit there cannot possibly be a proof under this indictment, without Mrs. Jacomb herself standing forward and saying, that these things were her property, and that they were taken away without her consent; and consequently taken away feloniously: It does not prove what is necessary to prove in the present instance, and I think, unless Mrs. Jacomb had been here, that you have not the best evidence that the nature of the case will admit of; and I submit, that if the best evidence is required in support of a common action, surely the best evidence is required upon a case of such importance as the present.

Court. Have you any authority to shew that a person cannot be convicted for stealing goods, without the owner being present; I am clearly of opinion, that there is nothing at all in the objection, so clearly that it is not necessary for me to give you any reasons for that opinion. If you please I will leave it to the Jury, whether Mrs. Jacomb gave the prisoners consent to go into her house.

Prisoner's Council. All presumptions are in favour of the parties accused.

Court. It is not a necessary presumption of law, but the reverse; if you force me to give my opinion, I think the reverse; but if you think it to be left to the Jury, I have no objection.

EDWARD CLOD sworn.

I appear for the short man that is in green, I do not know his name.

Court. Look round and see, if you can see him? - That is the man.

Which man? - The man in green.

That is Smith? - I do not know his name, I never saw the man before in my life, I never saw him till I saw him here.

(This occasioning a loud laugh, which interrupted the Court.)

Court. When prisoners are upon trial for a capital offence, and in a case where in all probability the verdict of the Jury will affect their lives, is there any man in an English Court of Justice so devoid of feeling and so brutish, as to break out into indecent exclamations, and disturb the attention of the Court; if I find any such man so behaving, I will teach him to behave better by committing him to Newgate.

Court to witness. Do you know him? - Nothing about him, only I came to speak in his behalf, as I read in the news-papers, that he was to be on the trial to day; that gentleman, that man in green, I do not know his name.

What was it in the news-paper, that a man dressed in green was to be tried to day? - I read that.

You read that a man dressed in green was to be tried? - I saw him in the mob.

You heard from the paper this man was to be tried, what man? - I heard there were two gentlemen to be tried on this robbery done at Upper Thames-street.

Court. Then these were not the two men? - I am sorry I should be mistaken, I think, I perfectly know the day, and every thing about it.

Court. Be careful what you say, and if you have any sense, just attend to my question, you say, you heard from the papers he was to be tried? - Yes, there is the thing, I was told in company that these gentlemen were to be tried day.

A man in a green coat? - I know he had a green coat when I saw him pick up what was lost, I heard that they were to be tried to day.

That who were to be tried to day? - I was at the gate, I sell mackarel; and all

those things in fish season; I happened to be there, and seeing the mob run, I saw a man hurl some things down, and they were picked up in the lane, I came to speak in the gentleman's behalf, I came just upon a walk, I came here by accident, I was asked to come in to speak the truth by two or three of his friends, what I saw.

Court. For whom? - For the gentleman in green.

What did they tell you? - Nothing particular, only as I saw the mob running, I saw some things thrown down.

Who did you come here to be a witness for? - To be a witness to speak what I saw.

On what business? - I came to be a witness upon no considerations.

How did you know that there was any trial to day? - I was walking past to day, and I heard by accident, there was to be a trial here about a robbery done in Thames-street, I heard there were two to be tried for it, I did not ask their names, I only came to speak what I saw, I have not been in the Court above a quarter of an hour, my name is Edward Clod , I live in White-chapel, in Plow-street.

What number? - There is no number, it is next to the Plow.

Who keeps the house? - I do not know, I rent a lower room of one, I cannot think of his name for the heart of me; I know his name, but cannot think of it now; it is the right side as you go down from here. Oh! his name his Bullen or some such thing; it is the same man that keeps the Plow.

What is your business? - I sell fish, greens, any thing that I can deal in, that is my calling.

Court. Now tell your own story? - What story would you have me to tell.

Court. Why the truth? - I was walking out the Sunday, and I had been after some mackarel, I go every day and Sundays; I saw a mob running, and I saw a parcel of people in Alhallow's-lane, and I saw somebody hurl some things down, and I saw others pick them up; I saw a man in a white coat, I think a man in a green coat, pick something up and put it into his pocket, and he got a kind of a slip as he went along.

Court. Who was that man in the green coat? - About the size of that gentleman, I do think that is the man, I do think it is the same man, I believe he had the same coat on to the best of my knowledge; I do not know, but I think that is the coat he had on, to the best of my knowledge; I never saw him before.

Prisoner Smith. That is not a witness for me.

Witness for prisoner Grant.

JOSEPH JACKSON sworn.

I am come on account of recollecting a circumstance in an advertisement, that I saw in the news-paper, concerning the robbery that was committed on the 25th of May.

Court. Mind, let me warn you a little? - I need no warning.

Court. I do not know that, let me warn you that if you are detected in swearing falsly, I shall not suffer you to go out of Court, but shall certainly commit you to take your trial? - I am obliged to your Lordship for your caution, but I do not need it.

What are you? - A letter case maker, I live at No. 12, in Cock-lane, I rent a room there, I have lodged there about eight weeks, I believe.

Who is your landlord? - His name is Evans, I do not know his christian name, I follow my business there, there are my tools and materials.

You talked of recollecting a circumstance that occured on Sunday the 25th of May? - I recollect walking down Dowgate-hill, I met some people more or less, and going down the gateway, I recollect a person was stooping and picking up something.

Who was that somebody? - What brought me was to see whether it is either of the prisoners at the bar, on account of an advertisement that I read in a newspaper, that I have in my pocket.

Court. Let me see the advertisement? - Nothing but humanity led me here, I shall tell nothing but what I know; I came here in consequence of this advertisement unknown to the prisoner intirely, I declare to God; I thought I could recollect the man again, he was dressed in a light coloured coat, it was under the gateway, he picked them up somewhere near upon the turn; I did not see any body taken afterwards; I went forwards about my business; there were some people coming seemingly in a hurry through the gateway.

You had no curiosity to enquire what was the matter? - I asked what was the matter, they said, some thieves, and I went away directly, I think the man in black is the man.

Had he the same cloaths on? - No, no, he had light cloaths on then, I took notice of his face, seeing him stop attracted my eye; I never saw him since till now, nor never before then.

Council for Prosecution. Did not you send to him, to let him know that you would be a witness? - No, nor he to me, I made all the enquiry when the trial would come on, I thought it was time enough then; I thought the best way would be to come into Court; I waited on Saturday till they said, the London Jury was gone off, then I went away; and yesterday I never called on him.

HYAM MOSES sworn.

I am a fishman, I live the corner of Gravel-lane, the first house, No. 5, I rent a lower room, my landlord's name is Soper.

Court. Have not you been here before? - Not as I know of, I have been here, Sir, about four or five years ago; I might be here since but I cannot tell.

Will you venture to say that you have not? - I have been here before, but not before you that I know of, I have been here about two or three years ago.

What trial was you witness upon? - I do not know, I have forgot the trial.

How often have you been here? - Never but once.

And yet you have forgot what that once was about? - I have forgot who it was for.

What do you know about this matter? - I know nothing at all about it, I know nothing of the prisoner; only last Sunday fortnight coming from Billingsgate, I saw a great number of people crying out, Stop thief!

JANE LYNES sworn.

I live at No. 9, Richard's-buildings, Shoe-lane; I am a house-keeper; I have seen one of the prisoners; I was walking down Dowgate-hill, with a little boy in my hand, last Sunday was a fortnight, and a great mob came against me; this man pushed against me, and picked something up, and knocked my child down, that was Grant; I resented it, and he begged 'my pardon, it seemed to me to look like keys.

JAMES GRANT , WILLIAM SMITH ,

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-31

384. JOHN SEAGRAVE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May last, one great coat, value 20 s. one woman's riding coat, value 20 s. and one chaise coat, value 20 s. the property of John Gibbs .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-32

385. VALENTINE STEERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th day of May last, 125 lb. weight of iron, value 10 s. the property of John Fenton .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-33

386. JOHN FISHER and THOMAS KNOWLES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th day of May last, one

hempen sack, value 6 d. and four bushels of beans, value 3 s. the property of William Heading .

WILLIAM HEADING sworn.

On the 6th of May last, I was unloading a barge at St. Catherine's , and two men informed me I had been robbed of a sack of beans, and that they had taken the prisoner Knowles, with the beans upon him.

Court. When was Fisher taken? - The same night.

What did Fisher say? - That Knowles employed him to carry them.

JOHN CRAIG sworn.

I saw Thomas Knowles take a sack of beans out of a craft on the river, and I saw the beans in the sack, at the office.

THOMAS WIGHT sworn.

While we were loading the cart I saw the two prisoners standing by the cart, and presently after I saw Knowles with a sack of beans, I went over to the craft and missed one; I then followed them, and Fisher had the sack, then I stopped Knowles, and Fisher went away.

Are you sure this is the sack? - I am.

PRISONER KNOWLES's DEFENCE:

Fisher told me, here is a job of beans or oats for you to land if you will have it, I went to work and fetched it.

THOMAS NORGRAVE sworn.

I know John Fisher , I had a load of charcoal to land, and asked him to help to unload the waggon, and told him I would give him four-pence and bread and cheese when done; Thomas Knowles says to Fisher, have you done, yes, then come along with me and I will give you another job, and they went away together.

(The sack produced and sworn to.)

SERJEANT REYNOLDS sworn.

Do you know that tall man at the bar, Fisher? - Yes.

How long have you known him? - About four years, I know him to be a good soldier and always attended his duty, I know nothing of his private character.

JOHN FISHER , NOT GUILTY .

THOMAS KNOWLES , GUILTY .

To be publickly whipped in Thames-street, and discharged .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-34

387. JOHN OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st day of May last, two linen shirts, value 8 s. and one linen shift, value 3 s. the property of John Marridge .

ELIZABETH MARRIDGE sworn.

I was gone out of the parlour, the street door and parlour door were both open, and I left linen upon the ironing board; I was gone in the back yard, and a woman came and knocked at the door, and said I was robbed.

What did you lose? - A shirt and a shift, I run after the prisoner, and he was taken with the linen upon him.

MARY PRESBURY sworn.

I was coming by, and saw a boy coming out of Mr. Marridge's house with some linen under his hat, I knocked at the door, and told Mrs. Marridge she was robbed, he walked away and was pursued directly.

ELIZABETH OLIVER sworn.

I went for a half-peck loaf, as I came from the baker's I heard the cry of Stop thief! and I collared the prisoner, and saw him drop the linen in the street.

GUILTY .

To be twice publickly whipped and imprisoned one month in Newgate .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-35

388. WILLIAM DELANEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th, day of May last, three pounds weight of Bohea tea, value 6 s. nine pounds weight

of green tea, value 17 s. twenty nutmegs, value 1 s. one pair of scales, value 6 d. one half pound weight, value 4 d. one quarter of a pound weight, value 2 d. and one two ounce weight, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Carr .

THOMAS CARR sworn.

I am a grocer , the prisoner was my porter , on the 4th of May, Mr. Miller and me searched his box, in which we found about twelve pounds of tea, three pounds of sugar, ten ounces of sugar candy, 20 nutmegs, a pair of scales, and weights of different sorts, the prisoner gave us the key of the box himself; Mr. Miller took the prisoner into custody, and he went down on his knees and begged me to be merciful to him; I took him the following day before Mr. Alderman Hart, he was examined, he said he had bought the tea, and had given six shillings and six-pence for the black tea, and eight shillings and six-pence for the green, the bags that the sugar is in, I can positively say to.

Court. What sort of bags were they? - Paper bags.

What do you know them by? - Some of them were a particular sort, cut for the purpose; I am sure as to the paper.

Court. These sugar bags were made of the same paper with yours? - Yes.

Prisoner's Council. The prisoner I believe has been in your service a long time? - Eleven years and upwards.

During which time I believe he behaved himself well in your service? - Yes.

So well I believe that you gave him something additional for his assiduity and good behaviour? - I did.

You cannot speak of his character before he lived with you? - I had a very high character of him, from Mr. Mables, in Smithfield, I thought him a very honest man till now, I always thought him such, I was too partial.

The tea you cannot identify, that is impossible, the sugar bags are common sugar bags, such as other grocers have, it is not peculiar paper that nobody could have but you? - I do not know that; the person that made these bags has made them a number of years, the paper the bags were made of, is not usually made into sugar bags.

Jury. Was it a kind of paper that nobody else could have but you? - I bought the whole that was made by the maker at that time, I am positive to the paper.

Court. What was there particular in this paper, you do rot mean to say that this was made by any particular direction of yours, therefore the same man that made this paper, made other paper of the same kind, this paper was not made on purpose for you? - No, but I happened to apply it for a different purpose to which it was usually applied.

WILLIAM MILLER sworn.

I went to Mr. Carr's to search this man's room and boxes, I waited some little time before the man came in, and I said, William, your master informs me that there is a suspicion that you have behaved dishonestly, he said, he was very sorry, he did not know that he did any such thing; now says I, you have an opportunity of convincing your master, if you will do what I desire you to do; there is a suspicion that some things are secreted in your boxes, will you immediately deliver up the keys, the man took out the keys with some little reluctance, and gave them to his master, we went into the room; we were obliged to cross the kitchen, and Mr. Carr went with a candle before us, in order to go up stairs; the prisoner turned short about, and seemed disposed to make down stairs, and out of a back door, I put my hand on his breast, and said follow your master, he did so; then his master opened one or two boxes, and found nothing but a little quantity of sugar candy, and in the last box there did appear a considerable quantity of tea and sugar, done up in pounds, and a pair of scales, and some weights, the man seemed much agitated, I ordered a constable and a couple of watchmen to attend below, when he came down and found a constable had been in the parlour; he said, he hoped his master would not be cruel to him, his master, who appeared at that time

exceedingly affected himself; returned into the parlour, I told him as the matter appeared so very clear, to leave him to me, and I took him to the Compter.

Court. What did he say, respecting these things that were found in his box? - I think he said, he had bought them of somebody, I remember now he said, of an acquaintance, I believe I did ask him his name, but he did not tell me, he fell down on his knees twice, and begged that his master would not be cruel to him.

(The things produced, and Mr. Carr ordered by the Court, to look out such things as he could swear to.)

Court to Mr. Carr. About this time did you miss any quantity of tea? - I could not miss such a quantity as that.

Prisoner's Council. This prisoner was frequently sent by you to the bank, and you always found him very exact? - I have frequently trusted him with a great deal of money at a time, and never found him a penny wrong.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

All that I have to say in my defence is, that Mr. Carr is an honest man, and I leave it all to my council.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-36

389. JOHN SILCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th day of May last, three harnesses for coach horses, value 30 s. the property of Joseph Tibbs and Richard Davis .

EDWARD SPREADBURY sworn.

On the 26th day of May last, we lost three harnesses for three horses, which were hanging up by the stable door in my master's yard, I missed them about half before eleven at night, I saw the prisoner in the yard standing by the harnesses about half an hour befor the harnesses were lost, I do not know what the prisoner is; my fellow-servant went out the next day to look after them, and we went to one Riley in Harp-alley, and we found two of them there, the harnesses are the property of the proprietors of the Brighthelmstone coach, they have their names on them; I afterwards met the prisoner in Shoe-lane, with the other harness in his arms carrying it to Riley's; Riley told me, he was to bring him another.

JAMES WILLIAMS sworn.

I took the prisoner in Shoe-lane with the harnesses on him, I saw the harnesses at Mr. Riley's.

MARMADUKE RILEY sworn.

I am a man that deals in harnesses, what you call a broker.

How did you come by the two harnesses that were found in your house? - I generally go out of mornings, I had been out that morning at Lord Paget's and Lord Grosvenor's; the prisoner came to my wife when I was out to sell these harnesses, but I came in before he went away, and he asked me to buy them; I said, if they are honestly come by, he said they were, and he had more; I said, if they are not, come no more here; he went away, I took the harnesses up stairs and took out the ornament piece, which is Tibbs and Davis; says I, I will go to Mr. Mountain, and find out who they are; in the mean time came in these two men to enquire about them; I told them, I had a pair of harnesses just come in that I believed were them.

Court to Spreadbury. Did he tell you so? - Yes.

Riley. My intention was to take and seek among my customers; before I set down to dinner these two men came in, and I shewed them to them, and went to the Red Hart, and the prisoner went by, and we pursued him down to my house, and there he was taken.

You are sure the prisoner was the man that brought them? - Yes.

Court. You have justified yourself very fully? - I have my Lord, I can tell a thousand stories, and tell them upright; an

honest man need not mind how he tells his stories; have you done with me.

Court. Yes.

(The harnesses deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in the yard, it was full of people at the same time I went there, and I went home the next morning; in Fleet-market I met the man with these harnesses, he asked me fourteen shillings for them, I bade him nine and gave him ten; I went and fetched the remainder, and they took me up, I did not know they were stolen, I was in the yard.

Court. Is the man here that you bought them of? - I have people to my character, I am just come from sea.

The Prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

To be twice publicly whipped and imprisoned one month in Newgate .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-37

390. SOPHIA OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May last, one cotton gown, value 5 s. the property of Sarah Bur .

SARAH BUR sworn.

I lost my gown last Monday was three weeks; it was hanging up between three and four, and it was lost before seven, I am a countrywoman, and wore it up to London; I had been here going on nine weeks, and the gown was very dirty, it was washed on the Monday and hung out, I went to take it off the line before night and it was gone, I went to all the pawnbrokers to see whether I could hear any thing of it, it was advertised the Monday following, and then I found it down at Fleet-market at a public house, the house of Thomas Hill, I am sure it was my gown.

THOMAS HILL sworn.

I found the gown in the prisoner's apron, she was in my kithen, I asked her what it was, she said, it was a gown belonging to her mistress, the gown was wet, I asked her where her mistress lived, she would not tell me, then she said, it belonged to her sister, then to her aunt, then she said, she found it.

WILLIAM HILL sworn.

I took this gown from the prisoner at Thomas Hill's house, wet.

(The gown deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The person that says, she belonged to the gown, had it marked at Guildhall, that she might swear to it, when she came here, for she had no particular mark on it before.

GUILTY .

To be publickly whipped , and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-38

391. JAMES PRIOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May last, one cloth coat, value 16 s. one velveret waistcoat, value 5 s. one pair of black velveret breeches, value 16 s. one pair of thread stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. one neck-cloth, value 6 d. and one pair of stone knee-buckles, value 2 s. the goods of John Youngman .

THOMAS BIGGERSTAFF sworn.

The prisoner came to my house on the 21st of May, in the evening, with a person that I know, to look for a lodging; he had one in my house, he staid in my taproom about five or six minutes, and went up to bed, and I saw no more of him; I believe he stole the clothes out of the room; Youngman lodged in that room, he was out that night, and I told him to lay in his

bed; the watchman told me, he saw a man in brown clothes, come out of my house, at three in the morning, and he left the door open, and that he shut it himself; I am positive this is the man that came and lodged that night at my house; he was taken the Tuesday after.

WILLIAM HUTCHESON sworn.

I live servant with Mr. Biggerstaff, I lighted the prisoner up to bed, I saw no more of him; that was Youngman's room; I know there was a box containing Young-man's clothes, I saw it open the next day, but whether it was locked before I cannot say; there were a few things in it, but nothing of consequence, the prisoner's old things were in the box.

JOHN YOUNGMAN sworn.

Business called me out that night, I did not sleep in Biggerstaff's house, I left the things mentioned in the indictment; the box was locked, I came home on Thursday evening, I directly missed the things; I was advised to go to the fitting Alderman, and I met the prisoner there, detained for breaking a coach window; I found the things on the prisoner at Guildhall, the Alderman desired them to be taken off, and I sent for his old clothes, and had them put on.

(The things deposed to).

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I came from Portsmouth, on Thursday the 23d of May, and I was going to Queen-street, and I bought the coat, waistcoat, and breeches at a clothes shop, and I wore them through London for three or four days, and one night coming up the Strand, I was taken, and I was examined the next day, and this gentleman said, the property that was on my back belonged to him; I told the Lord Mayor where I bought them, I never was in Biggerstaff's house in my life; I was not in London, I was in his Majesty's service almost a dozen years since, and then I was pressed, I was going to Ireland.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-39

392. SUSANNA HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May last, one pint pewter pot, value 10 d. the property of John Chiswell .

JOHN CHISWELL sworn.

I keep a public house , on the 13th of May, about three the prisoner came in, and had a glass of ale; she staid a considerable time in the tap-room; and another witness saw her take a pint pot, and put it under her cloak, he told me, and I followed her, and brought her back, and took it from her; she had the pot when I brought her back.

JOHN CALLINGTON sworn.

I was at Chiswell's, and I saw the prisoner take a pint pot, and put it under her cloak, I told him, he went after her, and brought her back, and took the pot from her.

(The pot deposed to).

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into the house, and another old clothes woman was with me, I had half a pint of ale, the other woman stood in the entry, and I took the pint pot out of the entry, and put the ale in it, and took it out to her; the prosecutor said, he would have a guinea; I have no witnesses.

GUILTY .

Court to Mr. Akerman. Has not this woman been here before? - Yes.

For the same offence? - Yes.

What punishment had she before? - Six months imprisonment.

Court to Prisoner. Since that punishment has not been sufficient, the Court must double it.

To be privately whipped and confined to hard labour, twelve months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-40

393. ROBERT MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May last, one pair of Nankeen breeches, value 18 d. one crape hatband, value 1 s. five linen shirts, value 30 s. and one pair of thread stockings, value 3 s. the property of Edward Friend .

EDWARD FRIEND sworn.

Last Sunday was three weeks, on my return to town, my box was broke open, which was up stairs in my room, at one Mr. Conner's, in Bishopsgate-street ; my Nankeen breeches were found upon the prisoner, I never found any of the other things; we went in search of him, and when we returned on Sunday night, between eleven and twelve, the prisoner was in the house below stairs, I came down, and said, I had missed my things, and the prisoner went out, and we followed him into Kingsland-road, to a house of ill fame.

(The breeches deposed to).

JOHN BENNIFOLD sworn.

I saw these breeches, and the hatband taken from the prisoner in Kingsland-road, I lived in the same house; the things were taken between eleven and twelve.

Court. You told me, that the prisoner was in the house at the time the things were taken, what did you mean by that? - I meant because the landlord missed them out of the house.

When was that? - Between eleven and twelve of that day, the landlord told a young fellow to go up stairs to bring down his things; that was after this young man came home to the house from the country.

Who told you that any thing was lost out of the box? - I did not know it till after.

Did the young man own them? - The young man said, he left them in a chair, in a bundle tried up in a handkerchief.

Court. You were in the house when Friend came home from the country? - Yes.

The prisoner was there too? - Yes.

How long had the prisoner been in the house? - I cannot tell, he was in and out.

Was the prisoner in the house at any time before Friend came home? - I cannot tell.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent, I have been in his Majesty's service eighteen years, I have lodged in that house eight or nine months; the woman was at my Lord Mayor's when I was there, and I asked her, if she had any thing to say against my character, and she had not.

GUILTY .

To be twice publicly whipped and imprisoned one week in Newgate .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-41

394. BARNABY DONOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June instant, twenty-seven pair of men's gloves, value 40 s. the property of Lewis Gilson , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL RICHARDS sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Gilson the prosecutor, he is a hosier and glover ; last Thursday evening, about half past eight o'clock, I was alone in the shop, there was a carriage stopped, and I went to speak to it; in the mean time, a man and a woman came into the shop, they asked to look at some white stockings; I thought they were suspicious people, and gave them a denial; they accordingly asked for a different article seemingly in great confusion; I denied them, and they went out, as soon as they were gone, a young man came into the shop, and asked me, if I had shewn them any kind of goods, I told him I had not; another customer came in, I could not follow them at the time, but I begged they would follow them in about five minutes, I followed, and saw the prisoner with another man, and a woman come out of a public house, he carried a parcel in his left hand, I crossed over before them, and went up a little court, when they passed, I returned, and walked by the side of the prisoner

at the bar, which was next the kennel, he had a parcel in his hand; I knew the parcel, it had my writing on it, there were twenty-seven pair of leather-gloves.

Court. Was he one of the people that had been in the shop? - I cannot say, it was in the dusk of the evening.

Was he one or not? - I cannot say, the parcel had my writing on it,

"Men's York Tan;" I immediately seized him, but not having proper assistance, the other two got off.

DANIEL REATH sworn.

The first time I saw this prisoner, another man and woman were with him; they went into another shop, they wanted to buy a gown, the woman told them they did not sell any such things; I came and watched them, I saw the other man and woman that is gone off, go into the shop, and the prisoner staid at the door, directly as they came out, he joined them, and crossed the road, and went down Jewry-street; I then went, and asked the young man if he had lost any thing, then I went across the road, and we watched them, and the prisoner at the bar came out with the other man and woman, and he carried the bundle in his hand openly, and Mr. Gilson's young man seized him.

Court. You saw this man stopped with the property? - Yes, a person came by, and looked at him, and the prisoner struck him, and the prisoner told us, he had the bundle from the public house.

EUCLID HARRISON sworn.

I was standing at my master's door, and I saw the man and woman whom I thought to be shop-lifters, and they went into Mr. Gilson's shop, and the prisoner stood at the door; I afterwards saw the property taken from this man.

Prisoner's question. Did not you see another man with the property in the street? - No, the prisoner first of all said, that he found the parcel under the bench in the public house.

(The constable produced the property, which was deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going down the street, and I met a man and woman, and they asked me to carry this bundle, I carried it openly, and the gentleman came up and said, it was his property.

(The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY.

Of stealing but not privately .

To be publicly whipped , and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-42

395. JOHN SYMONDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April last, two hundred pounds weight of mohair yarn, value 50 l. the property of James Mays , and James Le Chevalier .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-43

396. ANN CLARKE was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Boyce , in the day time, on the 9th of May last, no person being therein, and feloniously stealing two cloth coats, value 10 s. one waistcoat, value 2 s. and two gowns, value 10 s. the property of the said William .

ELEANOR BOYCE sworn.

The 9th of May, I went out between three and four o'clock, I shut my door, and locked it to the best of my knowledge; I was gone about a quarter of an hour, and a child informed me, she had seen a woman come out of my house with something; I got up to the door, and called after the prisoner, and asked her what she wanted at my house, she told me, she wanted Mr. somebody, an India winder there; I went to get my key to lock my door, and found two of my drawers open, and I then followed

her, came up to her, and she came back with me, I called my neighbour, and she emptied the things out of her apron on the bed, there were two cloth coats, a waistcoat, a gown, and a child's gown; (The things produced and deposed to.) The prisoner turned herself round to go I asked her where she was going, she said to the gentlewoman that gave them her; she got as far as the next door but one, we followed her, and held her till we got assistance.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming back from where I had been, I stopped to buckle my shoes, and a woman gave me this bundle to carry, I made some difficulty, I know nothing more of the things than my being asked to carry the bundle.

GUILTY Of stealing only .

To be publicly whipped and discharged .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-44

397. MARY DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May last, seventeen pieces of gold coin of this realm called guineas, value 17 l. 17 s. the property of John Williams , in the dwelling house of John Cole .

The prosecutor not appearing the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17830604-45

398. MARY CLINTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October last, one pair of silk stockings, value 2 s. one pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. three linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the goods of Eleanor Oliver .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-46

399. SOPHIA GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May last, 14 s. in monies numbered , the property of John Helmsley .

JOHN HELMSLEY sworn.

The prisoner robbed me of 14 s. I was coming out of Piccadilly, betwixt twelve and one o'clock in the morning, the 19th of May, she asked me where I was going, I said to Crutched Fryars, she said, you will not get there to night, God bless your charity, give me a glass of gin; we went to a public house, and had two glasses of gin, and I paid for her; and I had all the silver in my hand; and put it into my right breeches pocket; as we came out, she said, she could get me a bed for one shilling, I said, I should be obliged her; she took me into a court, she said, will you have any more liquor, I said, I would give her six-pence, I put my hand into my pocket to give it her, and found I had only two six-pences left out of sixteen shillings, I said, she had got my money, she turned with a blast, and flung me back my six-pence; whilst I was stopping to pick it up, she ran off, and I followed her, and caught her, I charged the watch with her.

Court. Was you sober? - I was midling; I counted my money when I paid for the gin, and I had just sixteen shillings, I am certain I put it in my pocket; I did not feel her get her hand into my pocket, I had no intercourse with her; they did not search her, because she was an old offender, and would not have any thing to do with her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never saw the gentleman till he knocked me down, he said, he had been robbed, and I should pay for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-47

400. ANN HOUGHTON , MARGARET WRIGHT , and ANN HERLOCK , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th day of May last, one

piece of ribbon, value 9 s. the property of William Starsaker , privily in his shop .

ELIZABETH STARSAKER sworn.

I lost one half piece of ribbon, containing eighteen yards; these three prisoners came into my shop to buy ribbons, they staid about ten minutes, they looked at ribbons, and did not buy any; I saw one of them, Ann Houghton , take a piece of ribbon eighteen yards, and put it in her pocket apron before; I went round with intent to take it of her, she took it out, and threw it down by her; I sent a constable after them, and they were taken before a Justice; I am certain they are the people; I said, they were sad husseys to take things, she said, they had never done so before; I took them back and searched them; I did not see the others attempt to take any thing: This is the ribbon, it has my mark upon it.

(The ribbon produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER HOUGHTON'S DEFENCE.

I went into the shop for a yard of ribbon, and she cut me a yard off, and came round, and said, I had taken it.

PRISONERS WRIGHT AND SHERLOCK'S DEFENCE.

We wanted to buy a hat, and went with her, without any intention of doing wrong.

ANN HOUGHTON , GUILTY

Of stealing but not privately .

MARGARET WRIGHT , ANN SHERLOCK ,

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17830604-48

301. ABRAHAM GOOSEY was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Edward Allen , on the 4th of June last, about the hour of one in the night, and feloniously stealing therein, one looking glass, value 10 s. one coat and breeches, value 5 s. one apron, value 5 s. one pair of pockets, value 1 s. the property of Edward Allen .

EDWARD ALLEN sworn.

On Thursday morning between one and two, I lost the things out of my bed-room; I was in bed at home, I thought my wife was about the room, I went to bed between eight and nine in the evening, and left my wife up; I was waked by a noise in my room, I thought it had been my wife, she was in bed, I went to sleep again; I got up about three, and the first thing I missed was a looking-glass, then I missed my breeches, and my coat, and nothing else, and after that, I missed a silver spoon and other things; I sleep in the front room, one pair of stairs, the prisoner came in at the window, there was a screw pushed back, and the sash quite open, it is over the bar of my house; the goods were found on the prisoner.

CATHERINE ALLEN sworn.

I went to bed a little after twelve, and fell asleep; about three in the morning, the window was fast, and the sash down, I am certain; the door of the house was fastened.

JETHRO VIAL BRIANT sworn.

I was in Gravel Pit Field, Bethnal Green: I saw the prisoner, and some others about nine on Thursday morning, the 5th of June, come into Gravel Pit Field with a bundle; I went to Mr. Wilmot's, and said there were two men going with a bundle, he said, go and follow them, and Yardley went with me; we saw the prisoner in St. John's-street, talking to a girl; the prisoner snatched the bundle from the other and ran away, he ran two hundred yards, and tried to throw the bundle over a wall, I being headmost ran and picked it up, he ran and fell down by the Three Sugar Loaves; he never was from my sight, from the time he snatched the bundle; I carried the bundle to Mr. Wilmot's.

JOHN YARDLEY sworn.

That man came to me to pursue some men: I run, and cried stop thief! he attempted to throw a bundle away; it was delivered to the officer John Potter , in my presence.

Prisoner. When I was first taken he said he saw me snatch it, he was so near me, he could not.

JOHN POTTER sworn.

I was standing at a door in Bethnal-green parish, and I saw the prisoner tumble down, and some people run, I thought it had been a mad bull at first, Mr. Vial marked all the articles in the bundle with ink.

(The things produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming from my father's, I met my ship mate, he said, if I would go with him he would treat me with a pint of beer, I was talking with a girl, and he chucked the bundle into my arms, and I run away, but thinking it was not right I threw it away, and the gentleman came up and took me.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-49

402. RICHARD THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of May last, a quantity of iron and smith's working tools , the property of Thomas Marsh .

THOMAS MARSH sworn.

I am a smith , on the 20th of May I lost some files, on the 21st I got up early, I saw the men come into the shop; they all came in but Richard Thompson , and twenty minutes after six he came and ordered his boy to blow his fire: he went to the sign of the Roebuck in Turnmill-street, he stopt about a quarter of an hour, I went to Thomas Graham 's and saw some of my files laying in a one pair of stairs room; I believe them to be mine; I can swear to nine of them: the prisoner work'd about five months with me: I went for a constable, and took him at the Punch Bowl; I took him and the files to the officer's house.

WILLIAM ALLEN sworn.

Mr. Graham infrmed me the prisoner had offered him some files; I was present when the old iron was found at Thompson's lodgings.

THOMAS GRAHAM sworn.

The prisoner brought the files into my room to sell, about ten or a dozen; I knew him before: he said, they were his own and he had had them three or four years; I said, they would not suit me, I would ask Mr. Allen, we consulted and thought they might be Mr. Marsh's.

THOMAS ISAAC sworn.

On the 21st of May, about eight o'clock in the morning, Marsh told me he had been robbed, I went to search, and found these things: he begged for mercy.

(The things produced and deposed to.)

Mr. Marsh. This file I had made at Wolverhampton, I know them all to be be mine; I missed them on the 20th.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Those files I have had by me a great while; I had them of a man who is gone abroad.

GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-50

403. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May last, twelve pair of worsted stockings, value 20 s. and 40 l. in monies numbered, the property of Thomas Livesay , privately, in his warehouse .

THOMAS LIVESAY sworn.

I know nothing more than that the property is mine.

JOHN COOPER sworn.

I was opening the warehouse, and a man saw a person go into the warehouse, and bring this parcel under his arm; it was the 20th of May; he shewed me the person, and I run after him, I pursued him down Aldermanbury, and called to some people to stop him, I just lost sight of him once, turning the corner of a court, I saw him in Lad-lane, he was stopped by the church

in Aldermanbury; the parcel was lying on the ground in the court.

JOHN TANE sworn.

I was standing next door to Mr. Livesay's, in Lad-lane, and I saw the prisoner go into the warehouse, and come out with a parcel in about two minutes; he run down the lane towards Aldermanbury; I shewed Cooper.

Can you swear to his person positively? Yes, Sir, I believe it is the man.

PETER FURNETT sworn.

I was setting out a waggon in Aldermanbury, I saw the prisoner come with a parcel as fast as he could run, as he was turning into the court, I caught him by the coat but could not hold him; I saw him drop the parcel on the right hand of the court, I saw Mr. Livesay's man pick it up.

THOMAS HARDING sworn.

I got this parcel from Mr. Livesay's servant, Cooper, it is just the same it was when delivered to me; I carried it to Guildhall; it was given me again at Guildhall, and has been in my custody ever since.

Mr. LIVESAY sworn.

I opened the parcel at Guildhall; I took out forty pounds in money, a five guinea draught on a banker, and a ten pound note: there was beside one dozen of hose, which was delivered to the constable; the parcel is directed to me

" Thomas Livesay , London".

Did you keep any shop? - Not there.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I can only say I was standing at the corner of the court, and the gentleman took me.

GUILTY Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-51

404. JOHN BAPTISTE EMANUEL ANTHONY VERSTRATEN was indicted, for that he on the 23d day of May last, did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit one bill of Exchange, subscribed A. Thomson, dated Ostend, April 25th, 1783, at forty days, for the sum of 50 l. 10 s. with intent to defraud Messrs. Boldero and Co.

Another Count. For uttering the same, knowing it to be forged with the like intention.

BERNARD BROOKES sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Kirby; the 23d of May this bill was brought to me by a debtor, one James Harris ; I took the bill, and about five minutes after, the prisoner came in and asked me whether I had got the bill, I answered yes, and if I would let him have any money on it. I asked him how much he would have; he said 10 l. I lent him nine guineas; he was indebted to me before I kept the bill, and the next morning, the 24th, I sent the bill to Boldero to know if it was good when it came due, the person came back with the bill; I never got my nine guineas. He gave me a note afterwards for the nine guineas.

(The note produced.)

Prisoner's Council. Did he desire you to keep the note, and not to shew it to any body upon the face of the earth? - I was not to shew it.

Was the bill taken from him? - He gave it to another, he never saw the bill after I got it, he told me to keep it.

Who was the note of nine guineas given you by? - It was given the 26th, by one Edward Williams .

Did you see the prisoner write it? - No.

What money did he ask you for? - For ten pounds to the best of my knowledge.

Had you any conversation with the prisoner? - After he found I had sent to Boldero he came to me and said, I had done very wrong in sending it, he did not give it with that intent.

When he first came in what did he say? - He said you have done very wrong in

sending the note to Mr. Boldero, he did not give it with that intention.

Prisoner's Council. Was this nine pounds part of the money due to the tap? - I lent the money to discharge the debt due to the tap.

- MARTIN sworn.

Did you take a bill from the last witness to Mr. Boldero? - I did.

Did you mark it? - I did not.

It was stopped there? - I went back without it.

The bill you left was the same Brooke gave to you? - It was.

Have you seen it since? - I have seen it since at Guildhall.

HENRY ERONIMUS DEACON sworn.

Do you know the bill? - I do, a man brought it, who said he brought it from Wood-street Compter, this is the man; he enquired if it was a good bill; the acceptance is not Mr. Boldero's, nor any of the Clerks.

You do not know Augustine Thompson? - We have no account with him in our house, we stopt the bill.

Court to Martin. Is that the gentleman you shewed the bill to? - I believe it is.

Prisoner's Council to Deacon. You would not pay a bill unless indorsed? - No.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-52

405. THOMAS HENLEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Melchisideck Taylor , on the 23d of April last, on the King's highway, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person, and against his will, one linen handkerchief, value 6 d. and eighteen pieces of woollen cloth, cut out for coats, value 18 s. eighteen base metal buttons, value 12 d. the property of Edward Taylor .

CATHERINE STEVENS sworn.

I saw the prisoner speaking to Mr. Taylor's child in Short's gardens at two o'clock in April last, the child had a bundle he put his hand in his breeches pocket and gave the child something, he took the bundle out of the child's hand, he went to a chandler's shop, and when he returned the man was gone off with the bundle; I was standing at my mistress's door, I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Did you know the contents of the bundle? - No.

Court to Prisoner. Will you ask the prosecutor any questions? - No, she is foolish.

JANE CUNINGHAM sworn.

A quarter before two on the 23d of April last, I delivered this bundle to the child, it was cloth for a regimental coat and part of another, it contained sixteen pieces besides pockets and buttons, it was tied up in a red and white pocket handkerchief, it was to carry to his mother's to make up.

Whose property was it? - It belonged to Mr. Shields, who employs people to make soldiers cloaths.

WILLIAM GARRET sworn.

On the 23d of April, the boy came into my shop for a quartern loaf, he put down a bit of brass, this piece, something like half-a-guinea, I would not deliver him the loaf, the boy went out, and in a little time I heard the boy cry, he had lost his coat.

WILLIAM AUSTEN sworn.

I saw this woman and the child in her hand in Short's Gardens, this woman was making an enquiry, if any body had seen any man with a bundle taken from a child, I saw a person like him by the description, at a public house, I went with him to Justice Walker's, from the public house, he was committed.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am quite innocent of the affair.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Of stealing.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-53

406. THOMAS HOWARD and JAMES BUSHEL were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Ferreday , on the King's highway, on the 12th of May last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person, and against his will 3 s. in monies numbered, his monies .

WILLIAM FERREDAY sworn.

Do you know the persons of the prisoners? - I cannot swear to their persons, I am a servant to an ironmonger, I was robbed of three shillings, I was coming from Hackney between nine and ten, on the 12th of April, I was attacked by seven men, I was alone, I passed by two first, and then a little further I passed two more; I passed the bridge and saw three more, I turned back immediately, I attempted to pass the second two that met me; they bid me stand and put my hat over my face, I said nothing; they were all round me, and put my hat over my face; they beat me with sticks a great deal: they cried damn his eyes cut his head off if he speaks; I called out murder, and thieves: When I called out they ran away, one turned back, and said damn you, if I had you here, I would cut your head off, I do not know either of them, I cannot swear to them, I did not see them any more, till I saw them at Justice Wilmot's office.

SAMUEL YARDLEY sworn.

I went to fetch Bushel the prisoner from Justice Staple's, I took him before Justice Wilmot. Mr. Wilmot asked him how he could be guilty of beating a person so cruelly, he said, he did not beat him.

There being no evidence, but that of an accomplice, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES

Reference Number: t17830604-54

407. The said JOHN HOWARD was again indicted, (together with JOHN RAWLINS ) for feloniously assaulting, Benjamin Millard on the King's highway, on the 10th of May last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person and against his will, one pair of silver knee-buckles set with stones, value 2 s. one pair of plated shoe-buckles, value 1 s. half a pound of sugar, value 3 d. one half guinea, three shillings in silver, and six copper halfpence, his property .

There being no evidence, but that of an accomplice, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17830604-55

408. The said JOHN HOWARD was again indicted, (together with JOHN RAWLINS ,) for feloniously assaulting John Almond , on the King's highway, on the 9th day of May last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person and against his will, one silver watch, value 40 s. one pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 14 s. one pair of silver knee-buckles, value 2 s. one piece of gold coin of this realm, called half-a-guinea, value 10 s. 6 d. and 14 s. in monies numbered, his property .

There being no evidence, but that of an accomplice, the prisoner was ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17830604-56

409. JOHN ROGERS was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Fitzpatrick , on the King's highway, on the 2d day of March last, and putting him in fear, and taking from him one silver watch, value 40 s. one chain, value 6 d. one seal, value 1 d. a key, value 1 d. a hook, value 1 d. and two half crowns, value 5 s. his property .

JOHN FITZPATRICK sworn.

I am a gardener ; about half past eight on the 2d of March, I was going from London to Fulham , it was a star-light night, I met two men, the prisoner and one Hazleworth, the prisoner desired me to deliver, Hazleworth who was tried last sessions, presented a knife they took a silver watch with seals, chain, and hook.

Are you sure the prisoner was one? - I am sure the prisoner took my money, Hazleworth took my watch, they were no longer with me than while they robbed me, I called the watchmen and ran after Hazleworth and collared him, Rogers ran away, I saw him in Litchfield-street, about a fortnight ago, I am sure he is the man, the watchman found my watch in the hedge where Hazleworth got over, I found a broken knife in the hedge the next day.

Prisoner. Did you observe whether I had one hand or two; I was pressed and sent to America in Lord Cornwallis's army, and had my hand shot away, which was cut off in six hours after? - He had not his hand tied up.

- MAYNARD sworn.

I am a patrol; on Sunday the 2d of March I had been up and down to the end of the road, and as I was speaking to an acquaintance, the prisoner and another man came by, I know him by his face, the other I believe was Hazleworth, I proceeded after them, and as I was going I met them returning, I went about a mile and a quarter down, and when I came back the watchman said there had been a robbery, that's all I know about it.

Court to Prosecutor. What time was you robbed? - About eight.

Prisoner. I have nobody to my character, I am but lately come from abroad, my friends live in Queen-square Westminster.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-57

410. JOHN NEALE was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Stephen Bradshaw , on the 26th of May last, one cloth coat value 10 s. one silk handkerchief value 1 s. one man's hat value 1 s. one gold ring value 4 s. and 8 s. in monies numbered, the property of William Shuffel .

WILLIAM SHUFFEL sworn.

I live at Punner , I rent a room in Stephen Bradshaw 's house, I am a labourer .

Did you lose anything out of your room? I lost a coat and two handkerchiefs, one silk, one cotton, a hat and a ring, I went out on Monday week to work, my wife and child all went to bean-howing, on that day I saw the house locked, I left home about seven in the morning, and returned about seven at night, when I returned, I found my door broke open, my bed turned bottom upwards, my chest broke open, and every thing gone.

The Remainder of this Trial in the Fourth Part, which will be published in a few Days.

Reference Number: t17830604-57

Trials at Law, Arguments of Counsel, &c. carefully taken in Short-Hand, and copied with Dispatch by E. HODGSON, Writer of these Proceedings, No. 35, Chancery Lane.

Short-hand taught at Home and Abroad.

This Day is Published, Price 2 s. 6 d. the Second Edition, with Additions, of SHORT-HAND on an IMPROVED PLAN; The Alphabet consisting of Sixteen Characters only, by E. HODGSON.

Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No, 35, Chancery Lane, S. BLADON, Pater-noster Row, and J. CLARKE, Portugal Street.

N. B. This Book, which contains also an Explanatory Copper-plate is a sufficint Instructor of itself, but if any Doubts should arise, they shall be removed on Appliccation to the Author without any additional Expence.

Reference Number: t17830604-57

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 4th of JUNE, 1783, and the following Days;

Being the FIFTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Nathaniel Newnham , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER V. PART IV.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXIII.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of John Neale .

Court. Have you reason to suppose the prisoner broke open the house? - I found my things on the prisoner at the Vine at Stanmore, all tied up in a handkerchief.

When was this? - Tuesday at four or five o'clock, I went to see if I could find out the man that had them, I went to a public house, and was informed a man had been there, and had a pint of beer, who had a bundle, and a man thought the handkerchief was mine.

JOHN TURNER sworn.

(Produces the bundle.)

I took these things from the prisoner, a man came to me and said a person was at the Vine whom he suspected of robbing his brother, I went there I took him into another room, and asked him how he came to rob the prosecutor, I desired him to pull a purse out of his pocket in which were eight shillings and six-pence, he said those things were given him, he seemed sorry for it, and wanted the prosecutor to forgive him.

(The prosecutor deposed to the purse, coat, and handkerchief, which were in his house on Monday morning.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming down Hill Field, and a man overtook me and gave me the things, he ran away over Harrow-wheel common, and I went to the Red Lion, and had two quarts of beer.

GUILTY. Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-58

411. WILLIAM HUBBARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of May last, a gold watch in a shagreen case, value 5 l. a steel chain, value 1 s. a seal, value 1 d. and 6 s. in monies numbered, privily from the person of William Clay .

WILLIAM CLAY sworn.

Do you remember going into the Two Blue Posts in Cockpit-alley, Drury-lane ? - Yes, between three and five in the morning, I was very weary and fell asleep, the waiter came to me for my reckoning, and

said I owed five shillings and four-pence, I asked him how I could have five shillings and four-pence to pay as I drank nothing; seeing the morning come on I felt for my watch, and could not find it, I said I would not pay my bill till I had my watch, he said he had got none of my watch, we were all put out of the house.

Was you quite sober? - Not quite.

What sort of watch? - A green shagreen outside case, gold inside case, and a seal and chain, a cornelian seal, and two half crowns and one shilling in money, I never found my watch again.

JOHN MACDONALD sworn.

Did the prisoner lodge in the house? - He did; I am waiter, I rose about four o'clock, I have lived there about eight or nine weeks.

Was Mr. Clay asleep when you got up? - I believe he was; I saw the prisoner at the bar take the watch out of Mr. Clay's pocket, the maid servant Bridget Martin took it, there was a bustle in the house, and the landlord put every body out of the house, I went to Mr. Clay the next day and told him the person that had his watch, the prisoner and Bridget Martin went away the next day.

Court. How long was it after the watch was taken that Mr. Clay awoke? - My master came down in about ten minutes.

How came your master to come down? - The nurse went up to call him.

How came the uproar to begin, did you discover to the company the watch was taken? - Not till my master came down, it was as much as my life was worth to say any thing before my master came down.

Prisoner. Why did not Macdonald swear to me the first day I was examined, he treated me with three or four six pennyworths of brandy and water, he gave one shilling to Mr. Humphry's brother for me.

Court. What did you give it him for? - To buy him some drink.

MARY HATTON sworn.

I was nurse to Mrs. Arnoll, whose husband keeps the house, I remember seeing the prosecutor asleep, I desired the waiter to get the reckoning of Mr. Clay, the prisoner said I need not mind the reckoning, he had got the gentleman's watch and money, and he paid five shillings, he said it was a very large watch and difficult to get out of his fob.

Court. How came the prisoner to make this confession to you, was you acquainted with the prisoner? - Not till I came into the house, I come from Low Layton on purpose to serve them, I had only been there a few days, I knew nothing of him before.

Prisoner to Prosecutor. I should be glad to know if you did not give two guineas, and promise five guineas, or something else? - I never gave any thing.

GUILTY Of stealing, but not privately .

To be fined one shilling , and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-59

412. JAMES COUSIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of May last one silk handkerchief value 1 s. the property of Nassau Smith .

GUILTY .

To be twice publickly whipped and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the second London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-60

413. RICHARD PRATT was indicted for that he, well knowing that one other Richard Pratt had lately served our Lord the King on board his Majesty's ship the Rainbow, and was entitled to certain prize-money as his share of the capture of the Soufleur, on the 2d day of June last, with force and arms, feloniously, willingly, and knowingly, did personate and falsly assume the name and character of the said other Richard Pratt , in order to receive the

said prize-money against the form of the statute.

- OMINE sworn.

I live in America-square , the prisoner came to me on Monday the 2d of June, and demanded his share of the prize-money of seamen on board his Majesty's ship the Rainbow, to which he claimed as his share on the capture of the Soufleur, I enquired for his certificate, which he produced by order of Captain Trollope, the commander; Captain Trollope happened to be there himself, and upon being shewn this certificate, he declared it was not his hand-writing.

CAPTAIN TROLLOPE sworn.

There was a Richard Pratt , a seaman on board his Majesty's ship the Rainbow, who was entitled to prize-money; there was but one Richard Pratt , and the prisoner is not that man.

SAMUEL INMAN sworn.

(Produced the books of the ship, and proved that there was prize money due to Richard Pratt , whom the prisoner personated.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A man gave me that order and directed me to receive it.

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-61

414. WILLIAM FIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing a swing looking-glass, value 20 s. the property of - Neal .

- NEAL sworn.

I live in Cock-court Black Friars , I ordered the boy to come with his ass for my maid servant to buy a cabbage, he lifted up the sash-window and took the looking-glass.

MARY ATKINSON sworn.

I saw the girl buying the cabbage of the boy, and he went a little way from the door and came back again, and looked in at the window, and drew the canvas away, and seeing nobody there, took the glass away by putting his hand in, and drew it out; Mrs. Neale was called down and informed of it.

WILLIAM SAUNDERSON sworn.

I went to the door and found Mrs. Neal had lost her glass, I followed the boy to Chatham-street, the prisoner had the glass under his coat, I went for a constable, I left the glass in the hands of a woman during the time while I held him, and she gave it to another woman.

Court. Was the glass in your custody? - It was sent to Mrs. Neal's, she saw it brought into her house, and said it was the same glass that stood in her window before; (The glass produced and sworn to) the prisoner is the same man that took the glass.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say.

GUILTY 10 d.

To be publickly whipped and discharged .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-62

415. FRANCIS SILVER was indicted for stealing 40 lb. weight of raisins value 10 s. the property of John Butler .

JOHN BUTLER sworn.

I am watchman on the quay , I had a cargo of frail raisins and 600 jar raisins, I watch in the day.

JOHN TURNER sworn.

On the 31st of May at four in the morning I heard a noise among the hurdles, and saw the prisoner run away with a bundle, which was a jacket full of plumbs, and jump on board a ship, in the hold of a Portugueze ship, I went into the cabbin to call up the officers, upon which the prisoner ran on shore, and was stopped by the watch, and taken to the watch-house with the property on him; I was sent for to the warehouse, and in his jacket were concealed 40 lb. of Malaga raisins.

TIMOTHY JONES sworn.

I am watchman of Billingsgate, going my rounds I met the prisoner with the property on him, I had great difficulty, and received several violent blows from him, the property and the prisoner were carried to the watch-house, the bundle that was carried to the watch-house was the same that is here in court.

(The bundle produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. It is all false.

GUILTY .

To be publickly whipped and discharged .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-63

416. NICHOLAS QUIRK was indicted, for that he on the 1st of March last, feloniously and falsely did make, forge, and counterfeit a certain order for payment of money in the words following, that is to say,

"No. 50, Cornhill, London, Feb.

"28, 1783, Mess. Dimsdale, Staple, Sons,

"and Bernard: Pay Mr. Thompson,

"or bearer 210 l. (signed) Colloghan,

"Pollard, and Co. 210 l." with intention to defraud the said Mess. Dimsdale and Co. against the statute.

A second count for uttering and publishing as true the same forged order with the like intention.

A third and fourth counts, laying it with intention to defraud John Colloghan and William Pollard , against the statute.

The draft was presented for payment by one Carey Bartlet , who said the prisoner sent him, and was waiting at Lowe's hotel in Russel-street.

Carey Bartlet was called on, but not appearing, and Mr. Pollard not being a competent witness, the prisoner was for want of evidence.

ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-64

417. RICHARD WILLIAMS , JOHN MURRAY , JAMES MOORE , and JOHN WALKER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May last, fourteen live chickens, price 15 s. the property of Edward Smith .

RICHARD WILLIAMS , JOHN MURRAY ,

GUILTY .

To be confined to hard labour twelve months in the house of correction .

JAMES MOORE , JOHN WALKER ,

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-65

418. ELIZABETH COMBERBECHE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April last, one black silk cloak, value 4 s. three yards and three quarters of Florentine silk, value 13 s. one check shirt, value 7 d. one check apron, value 3 d. and one handkerchief, value 3 d. the property of George Brown .

GUILTY 1 s.

To be privately whipped and discharged .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-66

419. RICHARD DEAVILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May last, four iron crows, value 20 s. the goods of John Coates .

JOHN COATES sworn.

I lost four iron crows the 14th of May, I live in Limehouse, about three in the morning the watchman took the prisoner, with these crows on his back.

(The crows produced and deposed to.)

Court. What did he say for himself? - He said, he had been to call Andrew, I told him, I did not bid him call him; he said, he dreamed I bid him take those crows, and call Andrew.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in liquor, and I did dream that the man bid me take up the crows, and go, and call Andrew.

- NEWMAN sworn.

The prisoner went in sight of the watchman, he told the watchman, they were Mr. Coates's, he did not endeavour to conceal them; he said, he was going to work for him.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-67

420. RICHARD MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May last, four copper sauce-pans, value 15 s. one copper stew-pan, value 3 s. three flannel petticoats, value 3 s. one tea-kettle, value 1 s. one apron, value 6 d. two towels, value 6 d. the property of Mary Bird , widow .

MARY BIRD sworn.

I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, on the 31st of May last; I did not see the prisoner take them.

JONATHAN REDGRAVE sworn.

This day week in the morning I met the prisoner, and an other man with him, the prisoner had a basket on his head, between seven and eight in the morning in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell, I suspected and seized him, there was another man following him, which was the ground of my suspicion, because I know the other man to be a very bad man; he made his escape, he had a dog, and began to unmuzzle him, and took a knife to cut his muzzle, the prisoner said, for God sake Mr. Redgrave, call somebody to your assistance, and I called a man; it gives me pleasure to represent to your Lordship, the prisoner behaved exceedingly well, and I think, I owe my life to him.

(The parcel produced and deposed to.)

Court. Did the prisoner know you before? - He had been in the militia, and I knew him before, but I know nothing bad of him, since he came out of the service.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A man asked me to carry some things, as I was coming through Little Britain from Billingsgate, and leave them at the Nag's Head, Gray's Inn-lane, and he would give me a shilling; he came after me, and this gentleman took me, and I put them down immediately.

Court to Redgrave. What did he say then? - He said, he was employed to carry them, and there was a man behind him.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-68

421. EDWARD PARROT was indicted for that he, well knowing that one John Brecie had lately served our Lord the King as surgeon's mate, on board the ship called the Pomona, and that certain prize-money was due and payable to him, the said John, for the service of him, the said John, on board the said ship, on the 28th day of Febuary last, with force and arms, feloniously, willingly, and knowingly, did personate, and falsely assume the name and character of the said John Brecie , in order to receive the said prize-money, then due and payable for, and on account of the said service, of the said John, on board the said ship , against the form of the statute.

GEORGE MAXWELL sworn.

I am the person employed as agent to pay the prize-money of the Pomona, on the 27th of February, the prisoner came to me and demanded that proportion of money, which belonged to John Brecie , surgeon , in the Pomona frigate.

Court. Did any person of the name of John Brecie appear to be entitled to any prize-money, on board the said frigate? - Yes, to four different distributions for the

capture of Fort Omoa, and the prize money was distributed in four different proportions, I have the books here, upon which it appears that he was so entitled: This is a list of the officers, seamen, and others, who were on board the Pomona; on this list John Brecie appears for the first distribution 17 l. 8 s. 8 d. on another distribution 11 l. 16 s. 3 d. the other two payments are in different books, the whole amounted to 128 l. some shillings and pence.

Court. Are you sure the prisoner is the man that came to you? - I am.

Court. He desired payment of what was due to John Brecie ? - Yes, I examined the books and found that Brecie was entitled to these sums, I requested of him to produce me a certificate, a warrant, a discharge, or a note from his captain, to identify his being the person: He said, he had none of these, having quarrelled with his captain, who had put him on shore, by which means his papers were all left on board, I apologized to him for giving him the trouble, which I said, I dare say, would prove perfectly unnecessary, but without such proof, I could not pay him; but if he would come the next morning to the counting-house of Mr. Canning, my employer, or bring any gentleman that knew him, he should receive the money.

Court. Did he tell you his name that day? - He told me his name was John Brecie .

You are sure he said his name was John Brecie , not that he applied on account of John Brecie ? - He said, says he, my name is John Brecie , the surgeon's mate of the Pomona; one circumstance puts this matter out of doubt, it is usual to ask the person we purpose paying, what is his name, I recollect asking this gentleman what his name was, to search for it; he came the next morning, in company with a young man, who said he had been captain of a privateer out of Bristol, on board of which he said the prisoner, by the name of John Brecie , had sailed with him as his surgeon, or surgeon's mate; he said, he did not know him to have been on board the Pomona frigate; but from the general conduct of the prisoner, he dare say he would not do such a thing; Mr. Canning was not at home, I turned to the book, and seeing the name spelt different, I was induced to refer to the original prize list, signed abroad by the persons themselves, and I then found the hand writing very different, and the name spelled in a still different manner.

Court. Have you the book here that he signed? - I have, (The book handed up) that in the second column is what I saw him write; on referring to this original prize list, and seeing the hand writing so different, I declined paying him, I told him, as his captain was in town, notwithstanding some little difference, that I dare say on application to him, he would give a note to ascertain that he was the same person; he and the young gentleman that was with him, after using some arguments to prove that people write differently and spelt their names differently at times, left me.

Did you know the person of the prisoner before? - Never saw him except those two days, I saw him after, the beginning of April, this was in February, and on the day on which he made the demand at Mr. Canning's; I do recollect seeing him and the captain that was with him passing thro' Clement's-lane, I am quite sure he is the man; I have not the smallest doubt; he probably might have set a quarter or from that to half an hour in the pay room the first day; I was induced, seeing him decently dressed, to ask him his commands; I knew him again the second day.

Do you know what the prisoner's name is? - He appears in the indictment by the name of Edward Parrott .

Prisoner. You never saw me before? - No.

Did you discover the forgery immediately? - I saw the hand writing was different.

Court to Prisoner. The charge against you is not for forgery, but for personating the character of John Brecie in order to obtain the prize-money.

Prisoner. How was I dressed the first day I applied to you? - In a blue surtout lined with red, the second day the same.

There was another person with me? - There was.

You saw me write my name, was there any other gentleman in the counting-house when I came in? - There was, but that person went out of the counting-house while I was handling down the box in which the books were.

Court to Prosecutor. You do not know the person of John Brecie ? - No.

Is there any body here that knows the person of the prisoner and can prove that he is not John Brecie ? - Not that I know of.

Court. How can we tell that his name is not John Brecie? - He calls himself Edward Parrott , I heard him declare that was his name before the Justice, he denied the name of Brecie and declared his name was Parrott.

Did you hear him? - I did.

What did he say to this charge? - He denied having ever seen me before, and on being afterwards urged by the Justice, he told him, he was instructed he had better say nothing at all in respect to the matter.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lord and gentlemen of the Jury, I cannot produce that evidence that will prove my innocence, respecting my being at Ostend at the particular time that this affair happened; a principal evidence in this matter, was obliged to go to the West Indies: if you believe the prosecutor's evidence after two months has elapsed, I can only beg you to remember one person may resemble another.

Court to Prisoner. If you could have made a ground from the absence of a witness, the Court would again have put off your trial? - The man is gone to the West Indies, it may be a twelve month, and may be eighteen months, he never may return.

Court. If you had been willing to remain in confinement till that witness had returned, the Court would certainly have put off your trial.

Prisoner. My Lord, there is no doubt but this man would have proved I was at Ostend.

Court. Have you any body to your character? - I have my Lord.

The Prisoner called four witnesses who all gave him a good character, and the last said, his name was Edward Parrott .

GUILTY. ( Death .)

He was humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury and the Prosecutor .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-69

422. ANTHONY CRAIGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the first of April last, two pieces of printed cotton, containing fifty-six yards, value 5 l. the goods of John Whittenburg , Samuel Swann , and William Brocklehurst .

SAMUEL SWANN sworn.

I am a Manchester warehouseman , I live in Friday-street , we have two doors, the door was open to Friday-street, on the first of April, between twelve and one, I was in the counting-house, when you come in at Friday-street door, this counting-house is to the left hand in the other corner; William Whittenburg was in the warehouse at a desk, I heard a noise in the warehouse, I was opening the letters at the desk, I apprehended that something was the matter, and ran from the desk immediately.

Court. Could Whittenburg see from that desk what was done in the warehouse? - Yes, Sir, I came out of the counting-house into the warehouse, and saw two pieces of printed cotton lay near the warehouse door to Friday-street, they were laying withinside of the warehouse, and I saw the prisoner at the bar running up the street, the other witness was running after him, he was stopped half way up the street; Whittenburg laid hold of his collar, and we brought him back into the warehouse.

WILLIAM WHITTENBURG sworn.

I happened to be standing at a desk, and I saw a motion before my eyes, and I lifted my head, and saw a man in the warehouse, I was rather hid from the man.

Court. Is there any wood or any thing before your desk? - Nothing only the plain desk; I saw the prisoner with two pieces of cotton in his hand, he was carrying it towards the door, I called out to him; they were piled up in the middle of the warehouse, he removed it about two or three yards, I immediately called out to him, and he let them drop, and set out, and I after him; I am sure of the prisoner.

Was he ever out of your sight? - No, my Lord.

What did he say when you took him, and brought him back? - He said nothing to me.

Prisoner. Whether or no he saw me take the cotton off the pile? - No, I did not, I saw them in his possession.

GEORGE GRAVES sworn.

I picked up the two pieces of cotton, they are now in my possession, they were about three yards distance from the place were they were taken, near the door, that was before the prisoner was brought back; I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner; the goods were delivered to me by Swann, as the goods taken by the prisoner; these are them.

(The goods deposed to).

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming down Friday-street, and there was a cry of stop thief, and a young man ran by me, I was never in the shop.

GUILTY .

To be confined to hard labour twelve months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-70

423. AMBROSE WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May last, one linen handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of Thomas Barnard .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-71

424. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March last, one hempen bag, value 2 d. and thirty skeins of worsted, value 5 s. the goods of Hannah Langston .

GUILTY .

To be imprisoned twelve months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-72

425. CHARLES GODDARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April last, three linen shifts, value 10 s. two linen shirts, value 4 s. one linen table cloth, value 12 d. the goods of Richard Chell .

Richard Chell was called upon his recognisance, and not appearing, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated, and there being no evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17830604-73

426. SARAH HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February last, one cotton gown, value 10 s. the goods of Samuel Rutter .

MARY RUTTER sworn.

I live at Isleworth : I am the wife of Samuel Rutter , my husband is a day labourer , I lost a cotton gown with a yellow ground, it was some time in February, but I cannot pretend to say when; I only prove my property.

ELEANOR HAWKINS sworn.

I live in Monmouth-street, and keep a sale shop for womens clothes; the prisoner

at the bar brought this gown publickly up the street across her arm, she asked our maid to buy it, the maid called me, I asked her if it was her own, she said yes, I told her it appeared to be too short for her, she said, she never wore her gowns long, I asked her where the cuffs were, she said, she never wore any cuffs; there was another person with her; she said, there were enough to buy it; she said, she lodged at one Bills, in Dyot-street; she was at that time much decenter than she is now; she said, before you buy the gown of me, I must buy a bed-gown for I have nothing to put on, I sold her a bed-gown for two shillings, and I gave her eight shillings for the gown; the prisoner brought Mr. Rutter to our house, and said, that was the house where she sold the gown; my shop woman produced the gown directly.

(The gown deposed to.)

Court. What made the prisoner bring Mr. Rutter to you?

Mrs. Rutter. She was in confinement in Brentford cage, and she said, she should know the shop, and at last; she took us into the shop, we saw the gown upon a shelf.

Court. But how came you to ask her if she had your gown? - Because she had robbed my neighbour, that gave me suspicion.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing at all of the property, I am as innocent as you are.

GUILTY .

To be confined to hard labour twelve months in the house of correction .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-74

427. MARY WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April last, forty yards of silk ribbon, value 20 s. the goods of Drayson Moore , privily in his shop .

- MOORE sworn.

I live in Oxford-street : My husband keeps a haberdasher's shop masquerade warehouse , we lost about forty yards of silk ribbon, on the 24th of April.

WILLIAM GUNSTON sworn.

On the 24th of April last, the prisoner came in under pretence of buying some ribbon I was in the shop; I am in the Coventry ribbon line, I go round to take orders; while I was there Mrs. Moore was giving me the orders, and when I had taken my orders for the ribbon, I looked at the two women and something causing a suspicion within me, I stood and watched them; Mrs. Moore then went to the drawer to serve them with the ribbon, one of them cheapened a remnant; and the other woman drew Mrs. Moore's attention to look at a ribbon in her cap, telling her to look at it, and the prisoner took the opportunity of taking a piece of ribbon out of the drawer; I saw a piece slipped out of the drawer, in the hollow of her hand, and immediately she put it into her pocket under her apron; Mrs. Moore, and the two women were still talking about the ribbon, and could not agree for it, and they were going out of the shop; I then took hold of the prisoner by the two hands, and said you have got some ribbon, which you never intend to pay for; I would not let her go, they sent for a constable, I desired Mrs. Moore to search her; she threw herself on her back, and endeavoured to kick some thing from her, but Mrs. Moore searched her, and found three pieces of ribbon, all marked with Mrs. Moore's mark.

(The ribbon deposed to.)

Court to Prosecutor. Were they in the drawer at the time you shewed them to the prisoner? - The lad was the first that shewed them to her, I am very confident that she took the two first from him, and one from me; when she was found out, she offered to give me three guineas to let her go, I said, I would not for three times three.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say, the gentlewoman told me, she had cast three for this, and she was rather to late last sessions, or else she would have cast another; I leave it to God and to you.

Court. This is an indictment for privately stealing, which is where the property is taken away feloniously without the observation of any body in the shop; but here is a person that saw her take it, that will save her life.

GUILTY. Of stealing, but not privately .

To be privately whipped and discharged .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-75

428. FRANCIS STRUTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February last, one silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the goods of John Neale , and one pair of silver shoe buckles, value 12 s. the goods of John Evans .

Neither of the prosecutors appearing, their recognisances were ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17830604-76

429. VALENTINE LOWE and BRIDGET MURPHY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April last, a piece of Scotch carpeting, value 4 s. six linen shirts, value 36 s. four dimity petticoats, value 4 s. two linen waistcoats, value 5 s. nine linen pin cloths, value 2 s. three linen shifts, value 10 s. three linen pillow cases, value 3 s. the property of Hugh Boyle .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-77

430. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May last, one peruke, value 20 s. the property of Joseph Godin .

JOSEPH GODIN sworn.

I lost a peruke; my bell rung, and I ran down stairs, I found the wig laid upon the stones in Crown Court, Portpool-lane ; the prisoner said to a woman, for God's sake hide it! hide it! and he was brought up to me.

ANN LAWRENCE sworn.

I live in Crown Court, and I heard the prisoner say for God's sake hide this, and he chucked it over my shoulders, and threw it on the mat, and I picked it up.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say.

GUILTY .

Prosecutor. My Lord, he has a poor father and mother, be as merciful as you can.

Court. You are a very humane prosecutor.

To be fined 1 s. and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-78

431. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May last, four plated candlesticks, value 10 s. the property of James Fitzgerald .

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped and discharged .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-79

432. MARY EGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th day of May last, forty-two yards of white callimanco, value 13 s. the property of John Shelley .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-80

433. ELIZABETH CAMMELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the

16th day of May last, one silk handkerchief, value 12 d. one canvas bag, value 1 d. thirty-two pieces of gold coin of this realm called guineas, value 33 l. 12 s. and one shilling, value 12 d. the property of Thomas Hunt .

THOMAS HUNT sworn.

I am a drover from Gloucester, on the 16th of last month, I lost a silk handkerchief and thirty-two guineas, and one shilling, I had been in Smithfield with a drove of cattle, and that was the money for them, which was my master's; it was in a yellow canvas bag; I met the prisoner in St. Giles's next door to the Royal Oak: I went in there to have a pint of beer, and the prisoner was there, and drank two pints; it was then between ten and eleven: I went out, and the prisoner followed me, I went up to Oxford-market, and there had another pint of beer, she followed me, I stopped there sometime, and she followed me back to the house where I was at first; I could not get away from her, she pulled me into a passage next door to the Royal Oak, and robbed my pocket of the bag and thirty two guineas.

Court. Had you any criminal conversation with her? - No, my Lord.

What did you suffer her to attend you all the way? - I could not get her away, she would follow me.

Court. Could not you have resisted and prevented it if you had thought proper? - I could not get the money out of her hand: This was about three in the morning.

Court. Was you so long with this woman, and yet have no criminal conversation? - I know nothing more then I tell you.

But you was in liquor? - No.

What could you have been doing for four or five hours? - That is all that I know about it.

You had more than one pint? - We had two pints at the first house, and one more at the other.

Was you in a private room with her at Oxford-market? - No, in a public room.

Was any other company there? - Yes.

What public house, was it in Oxford-market? - I cannot tell that.

Which way did you go up the market? - We turned to the right from Oxford-road.

Court. Did you make no resistance? - All that laid in my power, but I could not get the money, I called the watchman, and he came to my assistance, he took her up and shook her, and one guinea dropped out of her bosom, and another guinea was found in her pocket, and my handkerchief; the rest and the bag was never found; a woman came on her side.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He asked me to drink part of two pints of beer, I went up stairs with him, he said he had no money, and he gave me his handkerchief and some half-pence, a woman went out of the room, he pulled off his shoes, and I pulled off my stays, and we went to bed.

Court to Prosecutor. Is there any truth in all this? - No.

Jury. Did you ever give her this purse of yours? - I told her I was going to Smithfield, I never took my purse out, I was as sober as I am this minute.

You are sure you never went up stairs? - No.

Did you never kiss her all these five hours? - I never touched her only setting by her.

DENNIS M'CARTY sworn.

The prosecutor called out to me in Lawrence-lane, High-street, St. Giles's , next door to the Royal Oak, that the prisoner had robbed him.

Court. What kind of character has the Royal Oak? - There is a parcel of loose women there, the prosecutor said, the prisoner had pulled him in, and taken the handkerchief off his neck, and robbed him of almost 70 l. I took her, shook her, and one guinea dropped from her, and the other guinea I took out of her pocket, she was stretched down; the man was over her, I would not let her go at all; I would not believe he had so much money in his pocket, and he pulled out ten guineas and a 50 l.

bank note out of his pocket; (The prosecutor deposes to the handkerchief, there was no person near me all the night but this girl.)

Prisoner. I was laying down, and the man was kicking me violently, and it was me that called out watch; I have no witnesses.

GUILTY .

Let her have a severe whipping and be confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-81

434. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May last, one canvas purse, value 1 d. and 3 s. in monies numbered , the property of John Brown .

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I had been at a brewer's, between two and three, for grains, I live with Mr. Rhodes, in Gray's Inn-lane, I lost 3 s. and a purse, I got the purse again; I found the prisoner's hand in my pocket.

How came she to be so near you? - She was walking along by my side, she followed me up Red Lyon-street, and asked me where I was going; she said, shall I go with you, I said I do not care where you go, she walked, alongside of me, and I found her hand in my breeches pocket, she pulled her hand out, and shoved it into her pocket, I took hold of her hand and said, what is that you have put in your pocket, I opened her hand, and there was the purse, she gave me the purse, but not the money.

Court. Do you swear that your money was in the purse at the time she took it? - Yes.

How long had she been with you; had you no consideration for this, had you nothing to do with this woman? - No, nothing at all any more than as she was walking along the street.

Prisoner. Please to ask him whether he did not send for me to make it up with him, if I would give him six shillings; I have witnesses in Court.

Prosecutor. A woman that said she was her sister came to me, and I told her I could not make it up without going before the Justice where I had been before, I charged the watch with her then, and she was committed.

Prisoner. I did not approve to give him six shillings.

Court. How came you out so late? - I was walking, and the prosecutor asked me for a glass of gin.

Prosecutor. I never saw the woman before she spoke to me.

Court. You had not been to any other public house in company with any other woman? - No, I was as sober as I am this minute.

GUILTY .

To be fined 1 s. and confined do hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-82

435. GEORGE LEGG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May last, one ewe sheep, price 13 s. the goods of Samuel Davy Liptrop , John Mileward , and William Cottrell .

THOMAS COTTERELL sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutors, I lost twenty-three ewes, and twelve lambs, they have two or three farms besides, we lost one sheep between the 10th and 12th of May, I saw it myself on the 10th about the middle of the day, I went to look for the sheep, and there was a ewe missing, I went and saw the skin on the Saturday following.

Court. Where did you see the skin? - Down at the Rotation Office.

Court. Did you know that skin? - I believe it to be the same skin when we put him in that field, it turned the skin of a black sooty colour, there was a pitch mark on it; but that was carried away.

Then you did not see that? - No.

Then how can you tell, was there any mark on it? - No, only smoke and dust.

JAMES GLANSTONE sworn.

I was the constable of the night, and was upon duty on the 12th; about three in the morning the watchman brought a man on the Monday morning, I ordered him to go back and see what was thrown away, and he brought back this skin with the heart, liver, and lights, all fresh, and the head just cut off, while he was gone for the skin, I searched the man, and he was secreting this knife, and it was all bloody, and he had a pair of trowsers on which are here all bloody.

EDWARD CONYER sworn.

I saw the prisoner going with a bag on his right shoulder, I followed him, and he shoved the bag into an area; I was as close to him, as I am to your Lordship, I catched him by the collar, and I said, my friend, take up the bag and come to me, he said, the bag did not belong to him, he knew nothing of it, I asked him what was become of the other man which was in company with him: I saw another man in company with the prisoner, before I stopped the prisoner; I ran after the other man first, and came back and stopped the prisoner, the prisoner had hid himself in the grove, I took him to the watch-house, and then went back and fetched the bag; I am sure I saw him throw the bag over; the bag had got half the sheep, the four quarters and the head, and the head off; and when I took it out on the table, I could open the mouth as easily as I could open my own mouth; there was nothing else in the bag.

Cottrell. I cannot swear to the ruddle mark, I take it it is the smoak that comes from the still-house, and that blackens the whole.

Jury. They are as black in the King's gardens at Kensington.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never saw the sheep before I saw it in the watch-house.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-83

436. HENRY COURTIEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of June , one silver watch, value 30 s. one seat and chain, value 2 d. two seals, value 2 d. one basemetal swivel, value 1 d. one key, value 1 d. one pair of plated shoe buckles, value 6 d. one pair of leather shoes, value 12 d. one pair of stockings, value 12 d. one linen handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Chatrill , and one man's hat, value 12 d. the property of George Wilkinson .

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped and imprisoned three months in Newgate .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-84

437. WILLIAM MEREDITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of May last, 36 yards of printed velveret, value 5 l. the goods of Daniel Lovell and James Punk .

JOHN BELL sworn.

I was in our counting-house, and I saw the prisoner take one piece of velveret, he had one piece under his left arm before I saw him in the counting-house; he walked out, and I followed him, I overtook him, he perceived me following him, and I saw him throw them down, he went a little further before I took him, he never was out of my sight.

JOSEPH WELCH sworn.

The last witness cried out stop thief, and just as I turned my head I saw him drop them down, I picked them up, I held them in my hand till he had got them, and I gave them to Mr. Banks.

(The velveret produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was never in the house, nor never had the parcels in my hand, I was coming along the street and heard the cry of stop thief, and I was running as well as the rest and the man laid hold of me, I have not had time to send for my witnesses.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-85

438. WILLIAM CHADBORNE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of May last, one weather sheep, value 34 s. the property of John Messenger .

A second count, for that he on the same day and place, one other sheep, price 34 s. the goods and chattles of John Messenger , wilfully and feloniously did kill, with felonious intent to steal the two fore quarters and the two hind quarters of the said sheep, against the form of the statute.

MARK FAIRHOUSE sworn.

On the second of May I went to examine my sheep and they were all right, I am shepherd to Mr. Messenger at Paddington , they were in a field near the house, I left them over night, the next morning they were moved, and I observed something laying in a pond which I took to be a drowned sheep; but on examining, I found it to be the skin and entrails of a sheep, I missed one of my sheep, they were all moved out of the field, I put them into another field, and in the other field they were penned with hurdles, I examined the skin, it had the mark of U on the side, we take in goods for other people, and we are obliged to pay for them if we lost any of them.

Court. Did you know this was the skin of one of the sheep you had? - I had nine more left of the same mark, I am sure it was one of that ten; the contents of the entrails was the small guts, and the liver without the heart, and the melt, they were the only things that were missing of the entrails, the head was with the skin not skinned, after I had taken them out of the pond, I went and found the place where it had been killed, it had been killed in the other field where I found them, and there lay the melt, this was on the Saturday, on Sunday a man came and asked me if I had lost a sheep, he said we have taken a man with a sack full of mutton, he brought the meat to me and I compared the neck with the head which was wrung off and not cut off, it was twisted off.

Court. Is not it a difficult thing to twist off the neck of a sheep? - It is often done in the butchering way, if they have a mind to make it a short neck, I compared the mutton with the head.

JOHN FREE sworn.

I am a toll-man, on the 3d of May, about seven in the morning the prisoner came to me and asked me for a bag which he had left in the night, the bag was put into the toll-house while I was taking a toll between one and two, he said the man that was on duty at the toll-house gave him leave, I asked the prisoner what he had in the bag, he said it was his own property, I said I did not think it was, I opened the bag and found a neck and two breasts, and some fat, and a soldier's jacket, I asked him how he came by the meat, he said it was his own property, and it was no business of mine, I told him he must give an account how he came by it; I stopped him, we compared them together, and the bone fitted as nigh as could be to the same, and went right into the place, and fitted to all appearance where it was wrung out.

WILLIAM BOWYER sworn.

I know nothing more than upon searching the prisoner, finding the heart of the sheep and the tail in his pocket, likewise the knife which it appeared he had killed the sheep with, which was bloody and woolley, and the shaft of it was very greasy, the tail fitted exactly, he said he had found it, I said I should search him, and he was searched, and the knife was found, he said he had had the knife upwards of two years, his cloaths were all bloody, and the jacket that was found in the sack was almost ready to drop with blood.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to Acton, and I see a bag lay, and there was two fore quarters of mutton and some feet and I examined it, and there was the sheep's heart and tail, I put them in my pocket, I had this jacket, I put it into the bag, and picking it up I thought I would not take it to Acton, I

left it at the turnpike, I have people to my character.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

Court to Jury. The same act of parliament that makes it capital to steal sheep, makes it the same to kill one or more, with felonious intent to steal one or more part or parts of it.

GUILTY. ( Death .)

He was humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-86

439. JOSEPH PHAROO, alias BARNARD PHAROO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December last, six linen shirts, value 30 s. eight pair of cotton stockings, value 16 s. one handkerchief value 1 s. four neckcloths, value 4 s. one purse, value 6 d. one bible, value 2 s. one penknife, value 2 d. four guineas, value 4 l. 4 s. two half guineas, value 1 l. 1 s. and one hundred and ninety-two copper halfpence, value 8 s. the property of James Bell , in the dwelling house of Edward Day .

JAMES BELL sworn.

I lodge in Mr. Day's house, on the 26th of December last I went to work about one in the afternoon, I left my room door unlocked, Mr. and Mrs. Day and the prisoner were at home, he lodged in the same house, I left nobody in my room, but the door was unlocked, I came home at seven o'clock, I did not miss any till I went up stairs, which was at ten o'clock, the prisoner was not at home, then I missed the things mentioned in the indictment, when I went up stairs I found the cords of my box cut open, it was not locked only corded, I saw them in the box that morning.

How came you to cord the box? - To keep it fast.

What had you opened it for? - To take out a pair of stockings, I saw all the things safe then, I suspected the prisoner by his not returning any more to his lodgings, I searched after him, and found him on the 5th of May, I took him myself, I found some of the things on him when he was taken, one neckcloth and a knife, and a duplicate where he had pawned a pair of stockings and a neckcloth.

What did he say for himself when he was taken up, and these things were found upon him? - I took him in Holborn, he said he did not know me, I told him he had robbed me, with that he struck at me and ran off, I followed him and took hold of him again.

What did he say when you took him the second time? - He struck at me again and walked along, and would not be taken by me, I walked along with him, he went into a public house and I called for a pint of beer, he ran out again, then he threw me down in the street, I got up and ran after him, the mob gathered, and I told them he had robbed me, I took him to Justice Hyde's, when we were almost there, he said he would go down to Hammersmith, he went into the necessary, and we found he had thrown a bag down there.

How came you to look for the bag? - The Justice asked me if ever he had been out of my sight when I took him, I said never, but when he was in the necessary.

What was in the bag? - A bible with my brother's name in it, that was the bible which I lost, I never found any of the other things, he never told where they were, nor made any confession; I went with the duplicate and found the neckcloth and stockings at one Mr. Davison's in Bishopsgate-street.

Court. The neckcloth that you found upon him was that yours? - Yes.

Was there any mark on it? - Yes.

Is it in court? - Yes.

In whose possession has it been ever since? - In the constable's.

Was there any thing particular in the penknife? - Yes, there was a bit broke out

of the handle, I have no doubt but it was mine.

EDWARD DAY sworn.

Court. When the prosecutor went out, you and Mrs. Day, and the prisoner were at home? - Yes, the major part of the afternoon he spent in my company, about six or seven he left me, he had been at work for his master, as he had for a fortnight before, and he found himself ill; his master came in and asked him to go and begin a pair of breeches to be done against Friday, for a Jew wanted them; he said, he was not very well, but he would rise early in the morning, the master sat down and drank three pints of beer, and I advised him to take something warm and comfortable, and go to bed; he said, something troubles my mind, and I am not easy, he went out, I sent the lad after him, I sent him to search the privy, he said, he was not there, I went out myself, and no man was to be found.

Had he been up stairs after the prosecutor went out? - He had been up stairs in the afternoon to lay on his bed, as he said.

Court. You never saw him after till the Monday of May? - No.

Court. Is the pawnbroker here? - No, he has given up the things by a summon from Litchfield-street, the Justice said, it was not material.

Were you there when this neckcloth and stockings were got from the pawnbroker's? - They produced them upon the duplicate that Bell carried with him.

(The things deposed to.)

Prisoner. Do you remember a stain in one of the neckcloths, for I bought it in Cambridge from one Richard Brown , I had only worn it one day.

Prosecutor. Not while it was in my possession.

Court. Is Richard Brown here now? - No, Sir, I bought it of him, and I said, it is stained a little, I had no thought it was Mr. Bell's mark, I gave him eightteen-pence for it, I had the duplicate of him, he gave me directions, and I took little care of it, and I lost it, I have worked at Cambridge several years, I have no friends or relations in London, and two letters I sent, I believe was never carried.

Day. These things and the money was the property of a brother that was unfortunately drowned.

GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-87

439. THOMAS ING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May last, one mare, price 10 l. the property of Thomas Pooley .

THOMAS POOLEY sworn.

I live at Northwould in this county, I lost a mare on the 8th of May, my servant came to me about four o'clock, and asked me, if I had lent my mare, I said, I had not, then he said it was stole, for it was missing from the manger in the stable; she was a black cart mare, about fourteen hands and a half high, there was a lump of flesh on the near side, just above the rim of the belly, and one on the near foot behind, the hair was off, and a white foot.

Court. So that you was capable of distinguishing her from other horses? - Yes, my Lord, from five hundred; I went myself, and traced the mare, I road to Southwould turnpike, I went to Uxbridge-market, I ordered some hand bills to be printed, I suspected a person that had been seen on the premises the night before; which my wife saw him go by the window on Friday morning, I came to Smithfield-market in search of my mare, I could not find any thing of her, I lay at the Ram Inn, I took the landlord with me to one of those houses, where they kill horses, and boil them for the flesh, we met a man who said, he had lost a horse, and that he was going to Bow-street, he said, he suspected it was a man that drove Solomon Richardson 's team the fore part of the year, says I not Tom, I cannot

think it, but if he has stole yours he has stole mine, for the prisoner worked for me about eight weeks, as nigh as I can remember; I found my mare again in the parish of Boddington, in Herts, in the possession of Henry Grover , I had information from Bow-street, the hostler at the Swan was there, he said, he had got the horse, and the man both says I, is it Tom, he said, it is, I might examine the prisoner; I said Tom, be honest enough to me to let me have my mare again, he denied knowing any thing of it an hour or more, till after he was examined, I staid with him an hour, still he said, he knew nothing of it, he never stole her, after considerable time, he told me, if I went to the sign of the Swan, at Boxmoor, there I might hear where she was, I took a horse and went that afternoon, I went to a blacksmith's shop, and enquired for the man the prisoner sent me to, I went into the yard, and said, I heard he had a horse to part with, I went into his stable, he said, he had a mare, and described the mare, when I saw it, I told him it was mine, and he asked me to come in.

HENRY GROVER sworn.

I live in Boddington parish.

Court. How did you come by this mare? I bought her of the prisoner at the bar, at the Swan at Boxmoor, within about two miles of Boddington, I am sure it was the prisoner that sold her to me, I bought her the 9th of May in the morning, I gave 4 l. for her, I did not know the prisoner, I was going by, and the landlord at the Swan called to me, and said, there was a mare to be sold, I asked the price, he asked six guineas, I bid him 4 l. but I said, I had not the money in my pocket, I should return in three hours, and I returned, I said, I am afraid my man you did not come-honestly by the mare, and I took him to Justice Bingham, at Waterend, and he examined him, and said, I might pay for the mare before him very safe.

Court. So you did it under the authority of the Justice, are you sure the prisoner is the person? - Yes.

Did you ever know him before? - No.

Jury. When the prisoner was before the Justice what did he say? - He said, he was a farmer's son, and his father was likely to be seized, and he had it to make a little money on.

Jury. Was the Justice satisfied with that? - He said, his father lived somewhere about Bayswater.

Court. What was the true value of the mare? - I have bought and sold many a mare as good to look at for 4 l. I thought it was worth no more.

Jury to Prosecutor. What was the worth of her when you lost her? - I believe she might be worth 10 l. when she was stole from me, but she had been at work, I did not think she might look so well by some pounds.

Court. According to your own account of her there was some defect.

Prosecutor. When I went do wn to swear to the mare, the Justice would not deliver her on my oath, I thought it was very odd that he would not let me swear to my own property.

Grover. I wish he had let you have her, I should not have had so long to have kept her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not steal her.

Jury. Was it possible that the mare could get out of your premises? - Impossible, she was found with a pannel that belonged to me.

GUILTY , ( Death .)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-88

411. THOMAS KEAT otherwise SCATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th day of May last, one weather sheep, value 20 s. the property of William Piper .

RICHARD PIPER sworn.

I live at Hampton , on Friday evening the 9th of May between six and seven, there came a man over to the house, I was in the shop and my father too, and asked us if we had lost a sheep, I had not lost one before, I

said, I could tell by looking over the book, I immediately did so, and took an account of the number of each sort of sheep, I missed one out of the field, which came home on the Tuesday before, it was marked down the back and across the back with a ruddle mark, there was no letters of our mark, there was a pitch mark on the sheep, I could not describe what letters they were, I went over to Felton to the prisoner's house, his wife was there when I came, they had just cut the sheep up, in a very improper manner, I told the woman, she must not dispose of any of it, I thought it was my father's property, I went the next morning to Mr. Lyon.

Are you sure the skin that was found at Lyon's house, was the skin of the sheep that you found on your father's ground? - I verily believe it was, I will swear to the mark of the ruddle, there is not any body round that part that marks them so, all butchers have private marks, and we always mark them different, I found there was a sheep gone that was marked in that manner.

Was that mark sufficient to enable you to speak with certainty to the skin? - I verily believe that was the skin.

Court. When you say, you can swear to the certainty of the mark, do you verily believe it was one of the sheep? - Yes, the prisoner was committed the day before I searched his house.

JOSEPH LYON sworn.

I took the sheep skin out of the prisoner's house the 8th of May, the sheep was killed and hanging up; I took him to the Justice, he said, he bought it of a drover between the Powder-mills and Hounslow, and gave a guinea and half for it; the skin was hanging up in the same place with the sheep, it was hot, the sheep was just killed.

JOHN ARCHER sworn.

On Thursday the 8th of May between seven and eight, I was going up with a flock of sheep, and saw the prisoner standing among a parcel of butchers upon Felton Common, in a place where there was no road for near a quarter of a mile, where I got before him to shop, I says to this man, what does that man do there, he said, he did not know; he had got a sheep in a string.

Did you see he had a sheep in a string? - Yes, but we did not see it at first, for he was among the bushes, he drove the sheep into his own house, I was close by him.

What mark had it? - It was a stroke of ruddle, I could not observe any pitch mark, to know the letters, I saw there was a pitch mark.

WILLIAM JEWITT sworn.

I was cutting brush upon the common, I was near, and saw what he saw, what he has said is true.

Court to Piper. Did you see the sheep's skin? - I saw it at the Justice's, I think I can safely swear it is my skin, it was my mark, nobody in the country marks as I do.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say no further, I have no soul to my character, I am quite a stranger in the country, I have been there about a quarter of a year.

Where did you come from before that? - From Southwould Green.

That is not far off? - About three miles from that.

Court to Archer. Is this man a butcher by trade? - No, but he used to follow it and kill a sheep once a fortnight.

Jury to Constable. When you went up to this man's house, did he seem any ways confused, or scruple to shew it you? - Not in the least, he was frying some of the liver.

Jury to Prisoner. Where did you buy the sheep? - On the side of Hounslow Powder-mills, about two furlongs of this side.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-89

442. ELIZABETH SHAW , CATHERINE WILMOT , and GEORGE KING were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of May last, nine pieces of

gold coin of this realm, called guineas, value 9 l. 9 s. and one piece of gold coin of this realm called half a guinea, value 10 s. 6 d. the monies of Cartwright Norman , privily from his person .

CARTWRIGHT NORMAN sworn.

I had received thirty-five guineas, I was in liquor, the prisoners were strangers to me, I went with the two women, I do not know what street it was; I was sober when I first met them, we went to the publick house, I cannot tell what house it was, it was in Broad-street , near the Pay-office; I went in by myself about ten in the morning, and saw the two women prisoners in the public house I went drinking with them as soon as I saw them, and I got quite in liquor, I missed about nine or ten pounds, I told my money as soon as I got home, I had it all when I went into the publick house; I had about three guineas before I received the thirty-five, I was in no company but with them; I was with the prisoner Shaw from ten in the morning till eleven at night; the prisoner Wilmot took me home to her room along with the prisoner Shaw; I went from the publick house about two or three in the afternoon, with the two women, I was then in liquor, the prisoner Wilmot left me with the prisoner Shaw, while she went down to get some tea and sugar, she came back again; I went to Horselydown and got some more liquor, and she got my watch.

Court. You cannot tell us any thing about the watch, it is not in the indictment, when did you lose your money? - I can only tell the time that I came away from the house; I did not miss it till I came home. Mrs. Shaw confessed before the Justice, that the prisoner Wilmot took nine guineas out of her pocket and flung it into her lap.

Was Wilmot present? - No.

Did Shaw confess having any of them herself? - Wilmot never confessed any thing herself.

You cannot tell when you lost the money, or what time of the day; what have you to say against King? - Only concerning the watch which was found upon him.

PETER MAYNE sworn.

I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner Shaw, and the prisoner King was in the house with her, she told me when I went in, the man had the watch, nothing was said about the money, she said the prisoner Wilmot had seven guineas and a half.

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-90

443. CHARLOTTE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of May last, one watch, the inside and outside case made of silver, value 40 s. one linen handkerchief, value 1 s. and one shilling in money, the property of Richard Peworth , privately from his person .

RICHARD PEWORTH sworn.

The prisoner and I went to the Blackamoor's-head, Broad St. Giles's , between the hours of two and three in the morning; I met her in Drury-lane, I called for a pint of purl, and fell asleep; I was neither drunk nor sober; a person in Court, one Ann Carey , about six in the morning, awaked me, and told me I was robbed, she asked me if I had lost any thing, I felt in my pockets and missed one shilling and a pocket handkerchief; I felt for my watch, and found I had lost it; after that there was a parcel of watchmen in the house, I asked them to search for my property, and they refused it, and I got a constable and took the prisoners into custody, I slept till six in the morning; I have nothing more to say.

ANN CAREY sworn.

I went in between five and six, and I saw the prosecutor sitting in the box in this publick house, and the prisoner with him, nobody was near him but the prisoner, and nobody near his pockets, the prisoner was very busy about his pockets, and I saw her draw out a silver watch; then she jumped over the table and changed a shilling, and called for a quartern of gin, she stood in the tap-room, I waked the man and told him he was robbed; the man said, he had lost one shilling, his handkerchief, and his watch; I told him that was the woman that had his watch, she denied it, I saw no more afterwards; there was nobody in the box but the woman and the man; there was a good many in the tap-room, I did not know who, there was some watchmen, the landlord was busy serving purl; he could not find any constable.

Prisoner. That woman had the handkerchief, and there was three or four women in the box besides me.

AUGUSTINE WADE sworn.

I am a shoe-maker, in King-street, I was at this publick house, at four o'clock, the watchman was going off his beat, I asked him to drink, there were two more watchmen came in, and I saw the prosecutor sitting in a box, and a soldier at the further end of the box asleep, with his head towards the wainscoat, and the woman sitting

next to the soldier, (he is not here) and a woman sitting on the left hand side of him, she run away when the prisoner was taken, and has not been in the parish since; the watchman took hold of me, and said, here is something going forward that may create a good deal of trouble, I was sitting in the same box the other side the table; as I was coming out of the box I naturally looked, and I saw the watch drawing from the waistband of his breeches, it was the prisoner I saw drawing it, I am very sure of it, then there arose a dispute among them, they went backwards to be searched, and this woman awoke the soldier; while they were going backwards the soldier was gone, but nobody knew which way; he never went out of the street door.

Court. Who searched them? - I do not know, I did not go backwards, nobody went with them but the landlord.

Did any of your friends the watchmen go with them? - They began to disappear when the noise began.

Did you see the last witness, Ann Carey there? - Yes.

What did she do or say? - She waked the prosecutor and told him he was robbed.

Was she near him? - Very near, she stood at the end of the box; there was a woman next to him besides; he was between two women when the watch and money was taken, the other woman and soldier made off, and this woman made off too; I said to the watchman, why did not you stop her, says he, I have no business with it, I am off my beat.

Court to Wade. Do you know any of the watchmen beside the one you met with? - I do not know the names of any, but one they call Joe; I know them all by sight.

Court. Where do you live? - My name is Augustine Wade, I live in King-street, Seven Dials, No. 7.

Court to Ann Carey . Do you know any of the watchmen? - No.

Do you know them by sight? - Yes.

Where do you live? - I live with this Augustine Wade, I take care of his small family.

Did you go to this house with Wade? - I went after him, he asked me to go to have something to drink.

You told me, there was nobody in the box with this woman? - I did not observe them, I saw her draw the watch out of his pocket.

Court to Prosecutor. What sort of a watch was the watch you lost? - A silver watch.

Has it never been found again.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lord, I never saw the watch, handkerchief, nor money; that woman had the handkerchief, and he tore all her petticoats off in fighting with her; she told him he gave it to her.

Court to Peworth. Is there any truth in that story; did you charge Carey? - I saw the handkerchief thrown about from one to the other, I did not know but what she had got it at first.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-91

444. JOHN FENTUM , BENJAMIN FENTUM , and JAMES BUSHELL , were indicted, for feloniously assaulting Robert Pettit on the King's highway, on the 27th of April last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, three pieces of gold coin of this realm, called half-guineas, value 1 l. 11 s. 6 d. one half-crown, value 2 s. 6 d. and one sixpence, his monies .

There being no evidence but an accomplice, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17830604-92

445. The said JOHN FENTUM , BENJAMIN FENTUM , and JAMES BUSHELL , were again indicted for feloniously assaulting William Richardson on the King's highway, on the 27th of April last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and feloniously taking

from his person, and against his will, one pair of plated shoe buckles, value 2 s. and three shillings in monies numbered, his property .

There being no evidence but an accomplice, the prisoners were ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17830604-93

446. The said JOHN FENTUM , BENJAMIN FENTUM , and THOMAS RANSON , were indicted, for feloniously assaulting William Harbridge , on the King's highway, on the 17th of May last, and putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one linen handkerchief, value 10 d. his property .

There being no evidence against the prisoners, they were all ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t17830604-94

447. The said JOHN FENTUM , BENJAMIN FENTUM , and ABRAHAM YOWELL, otherwise THOMAS UGLEY , were indicted, for feloniously assaulting Francis Finlay on the King's highway, on the 4th day of May last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, one pair of plated shoe buckles, value 1 s. one piece of gold coin of this realm, called a half-guinea, value 10 s. 6 d. and 9 s. in monies numbered, his goods and monies .

The witnesses examined apart at the request of the prisoners.

FRANCIS FINLAY sworn.

On the 4th of May, I was going from London to Stoke Newington, and about half way between Stoke Newington and the Fox, I was stopped by these two gentlemen, the two Fentums, and the accomplice Farrington, about five minutes before ten, the man in green came off the foot-path, and stopped me in the middle of the way, and Benjamin Fentum , he gave me the salutation of, Damn your eyes, stop; I thought it was in vain to make any resistance, I told them, if they would not hurt me they should have what money I had; I gave them my money, half a guinea and 9 s. they searched for a watch but found none, one of them took the buckles out of my shoes, one of them put my hat over my eyes, they came behind me.

Jury. What sort of light was it? - Sufficient to discover one man from another.

Court. Where was it that they pulled the hat over your eyes; when they first came up was the hat over your eyes? - Yes, till they rifled my pockets and took the buckles out of my shoes; I saw them before they came to me.

Prisoner's Council. Had you ever seen any of these people before that day? - No.

Then they were perfect strangers to you? - Yes.

I do not suppose they being passengers on the road induced you to take any particular notice? - I looked at them more strong than I would at others, because I suspected them, they were about fifteen yards off when I saw them; they came behind me directly and took my hat off and put it over my face; I had no conversation with any but him that stopped me.

You do not mean to swear as to that other man? - I know they were all in company.

You must speak from sureness, you cannot speak from sight? - I saw them three people together.

And you conceive in your own mind that these two people must be with that other man? - I saw them before; I was accosted by one, he did not pull my hat over my eyes at first, but when the two men came off the foot-path, one of them took off my hat and put it over my eyes.

Jury. How near was the other person to you, when the first man accosted you? - I was in the middle of the highway, and this man was very nigh to me, and then these men came off the foot-path and took my hat off.

How far were they from you? - Only the breadth of the road.

Did they present any fire arms? - No.

Had they any? - No.

Prisoner John Fentum . What dress was I

in when I attacked your person, if you took such particular notice of my features, I should think you must have some idea of my cloaths? - I did not take any notice of your cloaths, I wanted to get out of your way.

JOSEPH FARRINGTON sworn.

Where was you on the 4th of May? - I did not take notice of the day of the month, but I went with the two Fentums and Thomas Ugly , the three prisoners at the bar, in Kingsland Road, we stopped a person between the King's-head and the Fox at Kingsland, and stopped him with an intent to rob him.

John Fentum . Who demanded his watch? - I asked for his watch, I took out his buckles, I stopped him first on the road by myself, and turned and put his hat over his face, with that they runs up, and Ben says, I will hold the hat, and I took the plated buckles out of his shoes, then I asked him where his watch was, and then I told him to go along or else we would blow his brains out, that was all that passed.

What distance was you from the prosecutor before you saw him? - About three yards off.

Was it sufficiently light to see what you was about? - No, it was not sufficiently light Sir, I suppose it was ten minutes after ten.

Do you know the gentleman you robbed? - I know the gentleman, that is the person, it was light enough to see him.

Court. Where were the other three at the time you came up? - They were about two yards from me, and I called to them directly.

Prisoner's Council. Was it you my friend that stopped the prosecutor? - Yes.

You seem to have done the whole of the business yourself? - No, I did not, we had sticks, a cutlass, and a knife.

PRISONER JOHN FENTUM 's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the matter any more than a child.

PRISONER BENJAMIN FENTUM 's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor says there was three, the evidence says there was four, the prosecutor says, I am the man that stopped him, the evidence says, he was the man that stopped him and put the hat over his eyes.

The Prisoners called ten Witnesses who gave them a very good character.

Jury to Prosecutor. Can you speak positively to these two men as to any part of their dress? - I cannot but I am sure they are the two persons, I am positively sure these are the two men, and this is the man that stopped me, because he took hold of me by the left wrist and never left me till they had parted from me.

JOHN FENTUM , BENJAMIN FENTUM ,

GUILTY , Death .

ABRAHAM YOWELL , alias UGLY,

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-95

448. JOHN SIMFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of May , one bay mare, price 4 l. the property of Stephen Walker .

STEPHEN WALKER sworn.

I live in the parish of Frying Barnet, I lost, on the 17th of May, a little brown mare with a star in her forehead; one of the turnike-men came and informed me, he thought he saw her and a man on her; she was lost out of the parish of Finchley ; she was at grass, I saw her the night before, I saw a man that is here leading her up the field, I got up when the turnpike man came down to me, and went to the field and found the door open, I returned, and my son and me went after her, my son was on horseback and I was on foot, we went a good way over the common, I took Kentish-town way, and my son took Islington way, I saw the mare the first time after she was stolen, in the yard belonging to the

Castle, just a little way from the turnpike, and the prisoner was in the house with his hands tied, I knew nothing of him before.

THOMAS WALKER sworn.

I am son to the prosecutor, I went in pursuit of this mare, I passed the prisoner standing under four trees, with the mare in his hand, facing the Pied Bull, at Holloway.

Court. What did it rain? - No.

What could he be standing there for? - He had no money to pay the turnpike, and he could not go through.

Are you sure it was your father's mare that he had in his hand? - I passed by him, and rode up to the young man at the turnpike, and told him, I had lost the mare, and I rode on as if I took no notice of him; I got off my nag, and whipped into a gate, I kept my eyes on him and saw him, and there came up two waggons, and he attempted to get through by the long-side of the waggons, and the young man and me seized him and the mare, the mare was very big with foal, and warmish, and I thought it was not proper for her to stand there, and I put her into the Castle, and am sure the prisoner was the man that was in possession of the mare when I stopped him, I asked him where he was going with that mare, he said, what was that to me, I said, it was; says I, you have stole her, says he, if I have, I have, here I am; he made no resistance.

GEORGE TATTIS sworn.

I assist at the turnpike of a night, in the morning of the 17th of May, between two and three the prisoner came to the turnpike, and this young man came up and informed me, that such a man was there that had stole a mare from his father, I asked him, if he was clear to swear to the man, he said, yes; presently there came up two waggons, and the prisoner came on the off side of the waggon, on purpose to bilk the gate, I told the waggoner to stop, and I went and got hold of the mare, and the last witness took the prisoner, and we brought him into the turnpike and tied his hands; he said, if he stole her, he stole her, here he was.

WILLIAM CHADS sworn.

I am a servant to Stephen Walker , I had the mare down in the field that night, I put her through two gates.

Court. It is very extraordinary he should take a mare in foal, she was very heavy in foal.

Jury. Had she any halter on her? - I led her with a halter because I thought to have brought her home again; it is a field along the road, through two gates.

Court. The field next but one to the road.

Thomas Walker . When I took her, she had a halter made out of a thick rope, and it was not enough, and there was a bit of leather: when he came to the Justice's he was searched, and had nothing but a penknife.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I came up constantly every week in the higling way, I came over Maidstone turnpike that week, I think the waggon was two thousand five hundred heavy that night, Mr. Adams's of Daintry, that night the other man went, I stayed behind a little longer than ordinary, and the waggon was going forward, and going over the common I picked up the mare with a halter on her head, I thought she belonged to some of the waggons, and I thought I should find an owner.

Court. Have you any witnesses? - I have no witnesses but myself, I am in the higling way, I live at Great Biggin, in Bucks, I could have plenty here to-morrow but not to day.

Court. Did you belong to these waggons that were going through the turnpike at that time? - I drove the waggon myself.

Jury to the Turnpike-man. Did any waggon pass through the turnpike without a driver? - No.

Court. Do you know the face of that man, as going through the gate often? - I never saw him before.

How long have you been at that gate? - Three nights in a week about half a year.

Jury. Why have you not got your master here to prove this? - I had no opportunity.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-96

449. JOHN MORELLET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May last, two pair of silver shoe buckles, value 40 s. the property of Philip Litchby , privately in his shop .

PHILIP LITCHBY sworn.

I am a silver-smith and pawn-broker , I keep an open shop, on the 10th of May I lost out of my shop, two pair of silver shoe buckles, some time about nine in the evening after candle light.

Court. What part of your shop were they in? - They were upon the counter, one pair new and one pair second hand, they were both my own on sale, they were taken down for the prisoner to look at in my public shop; I asked him what he wanted, he said, to buy a pair of silver buckles, but he was not in a hurry, I shewed him the two heaviest pair in my shop, when I laid them on the counter he said, have you knees that will follow them, I said, I had, when I brought him the knees, he desired me to weigh them, while I turned my back to weigh the knees, he run away with the two pair of shoe buckles.

Court. You did not see him take them? - No, my Lord, my back was to him, I missed him in less than half a minute, and jumped over my counter and run after him, and called Stop thief! and I believe he did the same, when I came to my door, I saw him about fifty yards up the street, and nobody was in the street, he ran into Hermitage-street, and while he turned the corner, I lost sight of him, which was not above a quarter of a minute, a man stopped him upon my calling out, Stop thief! I was in sight when he stopped him, and he held him till I came up, he was about thirty yards off me, when the man stopped him.

Court. Had you a candle in the shop? - Five or six, when I came up to the prisoner he said, Sir, I have dropped your buckles, and one of the men that stopped him, laid hold of his right hand, I said to the prisoner, never mind you shall come along with me, we carried him to the watch-house, he was searched in my house, I felt my buckles on the out-side of his left breeches pocket, the buckles were taken out of his pocket in my sight, I am positive to them being mine.

Jury. Is there a private mark on that buckle? - Yes, on one there is, there is my private shop mark on one and a crack on the other, you will find 48 just at the corner, they were so marked when he took them away, we always mark them and make an entry in our book, and the names of the persons we buy them of, the other buckle had a crack in it, which has prevented me from selling them, he desired me to let him go as I had got my buckles again; you rascal, says I, I have suffered too much by such dogs; that is all I know.

Court. Did you see him take them? - No, my Lord, there was nobody else in the shop.

NICHOLAS ARCHER sworn.

I am a baker, I stopped the prisoner on hearing the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was running, and I ran just over the way, and I laid hold of him at my door, he made no resistance, the prosecutor came up, and the prisoner said, he had dropped the buckles, and went with him; I was present when he was searched, and these two pair of silver buckles were in his left hand breeches pocket.

Court to Prosecutor. What might the value of these buckles be? - The weight of them is nine ounces, your Lordship knows the value of silver, they stood me in three pounds one shilling and nine-pence.

MONTAGUE WILLIAM HINDES sworn.

I was coming down Virginia-street, and I caught the prisoner; I just run across that gentleman and took him, I took the buckles out of his pocket at the watch-house; when I stopt him, he said, he had dropped the buckles, and begged for mercy.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going home, and hearing one of them cry out Stop thief! I saw a man chuck them down, and I put them into my right hand pocket, and went with them.

Court to Prosecutor. You are sure that is the man that was in your shop? - Yes.

GUILTY , ( Death .)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-97

450. ANN CROWDER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of May last, one stuff petticoat, value 5 s. 6 d. the goods and chattles of Ralph Steele , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL ROGERS sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Ralph Steele , on Saturday the 3d of May, the prisoner came into our shop in Castle-street , to look at some petticoats, I shewed her several, there were some laying on the counter, she asked me, which she should have of the two I shewed; I told her the colour was all fancy, I put up one, she would have five yards of the same cut off the piece for a gown, so I cut it off; she then asked me, if it was convenient to send a boy home with her, with the parcel, as she had not got money enough about her, she then hesitated and said, she would leave five shillings earnest, and call for it that evening or Monday; when she found I was agreeable, she hesitated and said, she had not money enough about her, but she would call in her way home, I told her, it was always the way to leave earnest when goods were cut off the piece; I began to suspect, and came round the counter to shut the glass door of the partition; I was passing by her, and saw the quilted petticoat through the arm hole of her cloak; it was a different petticoat to that she purchased.

Court. Was the petticoat you saw under her arm, upon the counter before? - Yes, with several others (the coat produced) she gave me direction to No. 8, Bow-street, but she said at the Justice's, she lived at No. 17.

Jury. Have you any private mark on that coat? - Yes.

Do you know that to be your master's property? - I do.

Court. Was she close to the counter at this time? - No, the space of a yard and a half off.

Jury. Were they folded up? - Yes, they were folded up, she seemed confused; I saw the foldings through the arm hole of her cloak, she saw that I saw it, and she dropped it on the ground, and took it up, and laid it on the counter, and said, she was not culpable.

Jury. Did she say she was not culpable, before you charged her? - Yes.

Did she ever look at that petticoat before? - No.

Court. Did you observe her take the petticoat up? - I came round the counter to shut the door, she was a good many minutes looking for her money, but she had but two-pence or three-pence.

Court. Then you did not observe her take it and put it under her arm? - No, I did not see it till I saw it under the armhole of her cloak.

Court. Then if she had left the five shillings, she would have gone off uninterrupted? - No, I do not believe she would.

Prisoner. When he was before the Justice, he said, he was in great confusion.

I was a little suspicious when I was on the other side the counter; she asked me to make out a bill, I got a pen and ink, and then I was a little confused, suspecting she had something under her cloak.

Court. You was not so confused but

you remember the circumstances you have now mentioned? - Perfectly well.

Prisoner. The reason I did not leave money, I had been out to market and changed half a guinea, and left it on the drawers.

Court. What was the value of the things she bought? - Fifteen shillings and sixpence.

Court. Then half a guinea could not pay that, you must go into the shop with an intention only to steal.

JOHN BEALBY sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Steele, I was present when the prisoner dropt the coat from under her cloak, I did not see her drop it, I saw her take it off the ground and put it on the counter. I heard her say, she was not culpable.

Court. What was the exact expression she made use of? - She denied it.

DENNIS M'DONALD sworn.

Mr. Steele sent one of his shopmen for me, and I searched the prisoner and found three-pence, that is all I know, and she had only three-pence.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lord, I am innocent of what is alledged to me; I have been five weeks in two different prisons, not a friend to help me to a shilling.

Court. What way of life are you in? - My husband has been abroad about a twelve-month, he supported me in a genteel life and that is expended; I expect to hear from him every day, to remit me some money, or to support me.

Court to Jury. In this case I should recommended to you to take the milder meathod, and reduce the value under five shillings though if ever there was a case of private stealing this is one; I was in hopes something would have come out, that he saw her steal it, therefore, if you think she is guilty, you will find her guilty of stealing, but under five shillings.

GUILTY Of stealing, to the value of 3 s. 6 d.

Court to Prisoner. You mentioned that your husband was abroad, and that your circumstances were bad, this is not the way to mend them; my inclination is, in hopes you may amend, that you be privately whipped and discharged .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-98

450. JOHN FENTUM , and BENJAMIN FENTUM , were again indicted, for feloniously assaulting George Conway , in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, on the 11th of May last, putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person, against his will, one silver watch, value 40 s. one steel chain, value 6 d. one steel chain, value 4 d. one base metal seal, value 4 d. one pair of silver buckles, value 8 s. one half-guinea, twelve shillings, and two half-pence, his goods and monies .

Court. Here we must reverse the usual course, and begin with the accomplice, I may safely trust his evidence with this Jury.

JOSEPH FARRINGTON sworn.

I was on the 11th of May, with the two Fentums and Ranson, in a field near Ball's Pond , it was on a Sunday night, about half after eight, we stopped a man and a woman, and we took twelve shillings in silver, half a guinea in gold, a watch and a pair of silver shoe buckles, and knee buckles; I am sure that is the man, we all run up together, and I caught him round the middle, and the gentlewoman said, what a pity it is such lads as you should go on in that way, and I took out his buckles, twelve shillings in silver, half a guinea in gold, and his silver watch, it had a black seal, and another seal, the seals are all pulled off, it had a steel chain, with a little hook to hang up to the bedside, we took the silver buckles from the gentlewoman, I took the money, watch and buckles, while Jack held him, Benjamin Fentum took the gentlewoman's buckles; then we went over

to Islington; no other outrage was committed; we said, we would cut his head off if he said a word; we had a cutlass, Jack had it, he threatened to cut his head off, I had a stick, Benjamin Fentum had a stick or a knife, I cannot say which; I was taken about a week after.

Jury. What age are you? - About eighteen.

Court. Who took the knee buckles? - I do not know.

What did you do with the watch after you took it? - We sold the watch, and silver shoe and knee buckles, to John Fentum for twenty-six shillings, we all sold it, any one might have bought it that had the money.

Had he any of the other things? - No.

What became of the watch chain, and the other things? - You know he had them with the watch.

Jury. Did you share the money among you? - Yes.

Court. After he had it, you do not know what became of it - I know he used to wear it.

How long did he continue to wear it? - About ten days.

Did he dispose of it? - No.

Court to Conway. Can you, consisting with your religious persuasion, take the usual oath? - I will speak the truth, but I cannot take the oath.

SAMUEL YARDLEY sworn.

I am one of the officers belonging to the Rotation Office; I have a watch here; when the man was admitted an evidence, I had him into a room, and he said, if you search John Fentum , you will find the watch that we stole at such a place upon him; accordingly I searched him, and found this watch, and took it out of his pocket; it has been in my possession ever since, I asked him how long he had had it, he said, about a twelvemonth, he bought it of a young man that was gone to sea.

EDWARD WADE sworn.

I was the officer that took these two prisoners, and I found these buckles in a box, in the bed chamber, the father said, it was the lads bed room; I took them from his table at dinner.

Were they present when the father said so? - No.

Did they acknowledge that to be their bed room? - No, my Lord, they said, they weaved in the same house: I took them in the kitchen.

How did they behave? - Very quiet.

WATKIN WHITEHURST sworn.

I know this watch, the maker's name is Nathaniel Edge of Colchester; I do not remember the number; I know it to be the same watch; I had it to clean for George Conway , three months ago; I know it by the work, there is one particular pin, that is not in one watch in ten; I have had it twice; I am positive it is the same watch, there were two seals, one brass with a cypher on one side, and a blank on the other.

Prisoners. We have nothing to say.

Court to Jury. There is no direct evidence against Benjamin Fentum , except the evidence of the accomplice.

JOHN FENTUM , GUILTY , ( Death .)

BENJAMIN FENTUM , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-99

451. ANN CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of May last, one gold watch, value 6 l. and one metal chain; value 1 d. the property of John Clowes , in his dwelling house .

MARGARET SERTEES sworn.

I was up in the one pair of stairs at Mr. Clowes, on the 17th of May, I was called down about one o'clock, the prisoner at the bar was coming in at the window, the window is about a yard from the ground in the churchyard; the prisoner had got the gold watch, and laid it on the ground from her bosom, Mrs. Clowes called me down.

Court. Did this woman come into the room window while you was in the room? - Yes, and then took the watch from her

bosom, and laid it down in the window. The ground of the churchyard is so high that the window may be stepped into.

MARGARET CLOWES sworn.

I was sitting in the parlour; I saw the prisoner jump out of the window into the churchyard; I then run up stairs and called my husband and Margaret Sertees , I went into my bed-chamber and missed my watch; Margaret Sertees came down first, and called to the prisoner, and told her she had my watch, for it laid on the window seat; the prisoner went towards the churchyard gates, but they being locked, she could not get out; she came in at the window again, and said she had not the watch; the young woman came down, and I saw the prisoner take the watch out of her bosom, and lay it in the window seat; she said nothing for herself.

Court. Do your generally leave you watch in that situation? - The window is always screwed, I am sure of that, the watch is in the hands of the constable Thos. Fielder .

(The watch deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been in the churchyard all day long, the grave digger had fastened the doors, I did not know he had fastened the door; when this woman called me, and said her watch was taken, then she took me down stairs, and charged me with a constable, and I was committed, and I never saw the gentlewoman, nor never was in the place in my life; she turned round and said, oh! here lays the watch.

Prosecutor. After you had pulled it out.

Court to Margt. Sertees and Mrs. Clowes. Are you sure that you saw this young woman take this watch out of her bosom? - Yes.

GUILTY, Death .

She was humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury , being only 17 years of age.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-100

452. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May last, one cloth great coat, value 10 s. the property of James Sewell .

JAMES SEWELL sworn.

I drive a coach for Mr. Hart, I had been out with the last coach, about half after nine in the evening, Mr. Hart rode down with me from the White Lion, in Bishopsgate-street , I was absent about a quarter of an hour; then there was an alarm, they said your coat is lost, they said it was a butcher; another young man and I ran after the man, and there was a mob, and the man was stopped; I went to the Compter, and found the prisoner in custody, and my great coat there.

Was the prisoner there? - Yes, I owned the coat, it was mine.

JOHN SHARP sworn.

As I was coming through Bishopsgate-street, I saw the prisoner with a coat under his arm running in the street; I suspected he had not come honestly by it, I called out Stop thief! I heard the alarm of thieves, he was some distance from the White Lion; the prisoner asked me whether I saw him steal the great coat, I did not see him steal it, he said he picked it up in the street.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had been in the Borough for my master, and coming along Bishopsgate-street, facing the Black Bull, I saw this great coat laying on the road, I have two gentlemen here to prove it, I did not know their names exactly.

For the Prisoner, Thomas Watkins and Timothy Kelly .

TIMOTHY KELLY sworn.

I live at No. 19, in Bishopsgate-street, I am a taylor by trade, a master taylor; I live up two pair of stairs: All I know is, that going to Shoreditch one night, in Bishopsgate-street, there was a man walking before me; he went across the street, and picked up a bundle, he came across again, and I saw it was a great coat.

What man was it that picked it up? - He told me his name was Thomas Brown , that is the man in the white waistcoat: it was very nigh ten.

Did you know him before? - No, my Lord, I never saw him before.

Do you know the White Lion, in Bishopsgate-street? - Yes.

How far was it off? - I cannot exactly recollect.

You live in Bishopsgate-street? - I do, I was going towards Shoreditch.

Were there coaches standing at the door? - I did not observe it particularly.

You did not know the prisoner before? - No.

You walked on about your business? - I walked on pretty fast, as I saw a mob run, and they walked faster than I did a good deal; I walked fast till I came up to the mob, and I saw this coat that he picked up, on another man's arm, that had him in hold, that was after he had picked up the great coat, then I found they had stopped the young man with the coat.

Did you say any thing about having seen him pick up the coat at the time? - When he came up I said, you are taken for this, he said, you are the man that saw me pick it up, says he, my name is Thomas Brown , if I am called upon, I beg you will appear for me, and declare what you saw, and he gave me his direction, I did not speak to him; when I saw him pick up the great coat, it was quite a bright moon-light night; I cannot recollect the day of the month, nor the day of the week.

Court to Prosecutor. What day of the month was it? - The 14th of May, three weeks last Wednesday.

How came the prisoner to know that you saw him pick up this great coat? - I came close by him, he did not know it till I came up to the mob; I never saw him before, but when the mob seized him, I asked him, is that the great coat you picked up; I spoke to him first.

How did this man find you out again? - I beg says he, you will appear for me, you saw me pick up the coat.

Appear where? - Before the Lord Mayor he said, then I gave him my address where I lived, and he sent to me.

Court. Had you your address in your pocket? - I cannot say.

Where did you write it? - I gave it him by word of mouth, he sent to me the day after, I was too late, and he was committed.

Court. But you told these people that had stopped him in the street, that you saw him pick up the great coat? - I did.

How came it they did not discharge him? - I do not know.

Pray have you not been here before some times? - Only once.

Was not you here last sessions, do you know one Lewis? - No, I do not; I was not here as a witness on Lewis's trial.

Court. Which way do you swear, that you was or was not here last sessions? - I was not here last sessions; I never was here but once, that was for a man in Wapping, one Mr. Daniel, for an assault, for cutting and beating a person; he was tried here; the woman's life was despaired of.

How long is that ago? - I cannot say exactly.

Was you a witness for or against him? - I was against him, for the prosecutor.

(Ordered to be committed to take his trial for perjury, several gentlemen in court recollecting to have seen him the last sessions, on the trial of Lewis.)

THOMAS WATKINS sworn.

I am an iron master, making the iron from the ore.

Where do you live? - In Little Somerset Street, No. 6, near the Minories, I am a house-keeper.

Do you know any thing about this great coat? - Last Wednesday three weeks, I was going down Bishopsgate Street, between the hours of nine and ten, I saw the prisoner stooping from the foot-way into the street, where he picked up a bundle; after he picked up the bundle he looked at it, by which I could perceive it was a blue coat, a coachman's coat; he threw it on his arm, and walked across the street with it, he was on the other side of the way from me, he went on, and I saw nothing of him till I saw a great mob at a distance, I believe it might be a quarter of a mile, upon which I went over, and he was taken

hold of, and I asked the reason, the mob told me, there was a thief taken; upon which I stepped up to see the person, and saw it was the same person that I saw pick up the bundle which was the coat; I told them he had not stole the bundle, but that I saw him pick it up in the street, they paid no attention to what I said, they were going to take him away, I said, I live at No. 6, in Somerset Street, send for me, I will appear in your behalf, to testify what I have seen; he sent for me the next day, to come before my Lord Mayor, I did not happen to be at home when he sent, but as soon as I came home I went, and found he was fully committed for trial.

Was there any body else that came to answer for him? - Not that I know of, I do not know that any body came.

Court. Is this the first time that you have been a witness here? - No, I have been once before.

In what trial? - In the trial of a young man a taylor, his name is John Cantrell ; I was a witness for him.

What were you to prove? - That he came home with me from the Strand.

At the time he was accused of committing the fact? - Yes, it was.

You are an iron master? - Yes.

Were you acquainted with Cantrell? - He had done some work for me.

Have you been here upon no other business than upon Cantrell's trial? - No, never.

Do you know Nicholas Quirk who was tried this sessions for forgery? - I came here to make affidavit of the serving a subpoena.

Was Quirk an acquaintance of yours? - He was.

Court. You who are an iron master, now and then amuse yourself with the serving subpoenas? - I never did it before; a person came to me; his name was John Lewis .

Was not you a taylor originally? - Never, Sir, in my life time, I was an iron master for seven years: Jones works at Messrs. Wrights and Pigotts, from over the water, at the Falcon, I do not recollect his Christian name, but I know that his name is Jones, and he afterwards worked for me, at the Bear Garden Foundry; he asked me to serve it for Mr. Quirk, I said, I did not know Mr. Quirk, but I would serve it.

What connection had it with your trade, or business? - I do not know how it came; he asked me to do it; I said, I did not care if I did.

Court to Watkins. You have had the good fortune to serve several people in distress? - Only Cantrell and him, and to serve a subpoena.

Prisoner. I had plenty of witnesses here yesterday when you put me to the bar, and they were all waiting at the door, and they came and spoke to me, and are forced to go to work to-day.

Court to Jury. This trial is become of considerable importance, and deserving your attention on account of the evidence that has been produced on it.

Court to Sharp. You are the man that first stopt this man? - Yes.

When the mob gathered about him did you see any persons come up and say, they saw him pick up that coat? - No, my Lord, not in my hearing.

GUILTY .

Court. With respect to Watkins, he has asserted no facts which can be contradicted; he must take warning, but let Kelly be committed to Newgate to take his trial for perjury.

Kelly. I beg for mercy, my Lord, I am a poor old man, consider a poor old man sixty years of age.

Court. It is impossible, consistent with publick justice, to pass over so gross and impudent a perjury. It is the most impudent I ever remember committed in a court of justice; you have ventured upon oath to deny a fact, which is known to several persons.

Kelly. I beg pardon, I am sure I shall not live.

Court to Prisoner. You have been convicted of an offence, which considered merely in itself was not of a very aggravated nature, and if the case had rested entirely on the evidence given on the part of the prosecution against you, and you had been simply convicted; the court might have thought perhaps a corporeal punishment,

and a confinement for a few months might have been sufficient; but here is an attempt to add to the crime, a subordination of perjury, which is of infinitely greater magnitude; the jury have formed judgment which I most entirely approve; there is not the smallest doubt on that evidence, that the judgment they have found is right: the Court consider you as in the highest degree, partaking of the guilt of those men, as well as your own, and I think it right that those people who have heard this trial should hear the sentence that the court will pronounce, and the reason why that sentence is pronounced: Therefore instead of that mild punishment, which would have been inflicted upon you; the sentence of the Court is, that you be transported to America for the term of seven years .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-101

453. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May last, one double iron plane, value 2 s. the property of Josiah Osborne .

GUILTY, 10 d.

To be privately whipped and discharged .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-102

454. JOHN JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th day of May last, one linen handkerchief, value 12 d. the goods of William Robinson .

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-103

455. DANIEL SCOTT and THOMAS SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th day of May last, twelve pounds weight of copper, value 10 s. the property of George Pengree and Co.

BOTH GUILTY .

To be privately whipped and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-104

456. SARAH WHITTON was indicted, for feloniously stealing on the 4th of March last, one rose diamond ring, value 5 l. the goods of John Conrady , in the dwelling house of Andrew Bushman .

GUILTY Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

To be privately whipped and discharged .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-105

457. WILLIAM CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May last, one linen table cloth, value 15 s. twenty-two black handle case knives, value 6 s. twenty-two forks, value 6 s. and six yards of canvas, value 10 s. the property of Samuel Marriott .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-106

458. FRANCES JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May last, two linen shirts, value 5 s. one black cloth waistcoat, value 12 d. and two silk handkerchiefs, value 12 d. the property of John Angles .

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-107

459. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th

day of May last, one carpet, called a Wilton carpet, value 6 l. the property of James Fitzgerald .

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-108

460. WILLIAM COWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th day of May last, one blue cloth great coat, value 10 s. the property of Walter Ford .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILLES.

Reference Number: t17830604-109

461. MARY LUTFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th day of May last, one woman's black silk hat, value 1 s. one tea kettle, value 2 s. one linen apron, value 4 s. one child's linen gown, value 1 s. and one flannel gown, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Evans .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-110

462. HANNAH HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May last, ten yards of plain lawn, value 20 s. three yards and a half of spotted lawn, value 13 s. the property of John Cooke and George Jubb .

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped and discharged .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-111

463. MICHAEL RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May last, one iron shovel, value 1 s. the property of Alexander Goodge .

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped and discharged .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-112

464. WILLIAM WADE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May last, one copper tea kettle, value 6 s. one pair of brass candlesticks, value 3 s. one tin pint mug, value 6 d. and two pair of steel nut-crackers, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Shrimpton and Co.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-113

465. HENRY BROAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March last, one wooden window shutter, value 3 s. and one piece of rose wood, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Wetherell .

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped and imprisoned one month in Newgate .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-114

466. RICHARD BAKER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Aldridge Hawkes on the King's highway, on the 24th of March last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person and against his will 18 d. in monies numbered, the property of the said Aldridge Hawkes .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-115

467. ELIZABETH LIVINGSTON , and ANN OBERY were indicted, for

that they, on the 9th day of May last, about the hour of three in the night, being in the dwelling house of John Balfour , two silver tea-spoons, value 3 s. two crown pieces, value 10 s. one hundred and twenty-eight half crowns, value 16 l. - 50 s. one piece of foreign silver corn, value 7 d. the property of the said John, in his dwelling-house did steal, and being so in the said dwelling-house afterwards, about the hours of three, feloniously and burglariously did break the said dwelling-house, to get out of the same , against the form of the statute.

ELIZABETH LIVINGSTON , GUILTY Of stealing, but not guilty of the burglary .

ANN OBERY , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17830604-116

468. JOHN LIDDELL and THOMAS ROGERS were indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Barb on the King's highway, on the 9th of May last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person and against his will, one silk handkerchief, value 6 d. and 3 s. 6 d. and nine copper half-pence, his property .

THOMAS BARB sworn.

On the 9th of May I was robbed in Kingsbury parish , about six or seven miles off; the prisoner John Liddell came up to me, collared me, and clapped his bayonet against my breast, and told me to deliver my money, the other prisoner was in company with him, I knew nothing of them before, it was between nine and ten, the moon did not shine out clear, the prisoner Liddell took the money out of my pocket, 3 s. 6 d. in silver, and 4 d. half-penny.

Jury. Do you say positively that these are the two men? - Yes.

What time did they take in robbing you? - About two or three minutes, I had never seen them before, I met four men going after them, they said, they had been robbed by the two men, I said, they had robbed me too, we went after them, and the two young men pursued one, and took him at the five mile stone, the other was taken the next morning.

How long was that after you was robbed? - Two hours.

How soon afterwards did you see them? - I saw one of them, Rogers, in about two hours after I was robbed, at the publick house; he was the man that was in company; Liddell was taken the next morning; Rogers told where he was, and Hawkes went and took him, I knew him to be the person directly.

ALDRIDGE HAWKES sworn.

My brother was robbed the 9th of May, he came to our house and said, he was robbed, and desired me immediately to follow him, and at the White Lyon, at Edgware, we heard they had robbed a waggoner: I took Rogers just by the five mile slab, between the four and five mile stone; I found upon him four silk handkerchiefs, a night cap, a pair of gloves, 4 s. 6 d. and 4 d. half-penny, the silk handkerchief he pulled out of his breeches, and this man swore to it, the prosecutor swore to one of the shillings.

Court to Prosecutor. What do you know the silk handkerchief by? - There is a snag at one corner, it is tore; there was one of the shillings that I put into my mouth and tried it, and there is the dot, I scratched it with my teeth.

Jury. How long have you had that shilling to be acquainted with it so? - I received it that day, I took particular notice of it, I thought it was not a good one.

Court. (Looking at the shilling). This appears to be a good shilling. Rogers informed us where Liddell was to be found; he said, he was very sorry, he should rob a soldier, that was my brother, that was in the Oxfordshire militia; and Liddell cried and said, it was the first time, he had ever been out: he did not acknowledge robbing the prosecutor, he did my brother.

FRANCIS ANSELL sworn.

On the 9th of May, I was going to

Hampstead, of an errand; I met the prisoner on the main road, about the going down of the sun, between Hampstead and Golder's Green, I am sure they were the two men, I never saw them before, I took particular notice of them, I pursued them, and cocked my pistol at Liddell, and he dropped his bayonet, this is the bayonet, and ran away, and the other witness took Rogers.

(The other bayonet produced.)

PRISONER LIDDELL's DEFENCE.

I never saw any thing of either of them, till they came to apprehend me at my lodgings.

PRISONER ROGERS's DEFENCE.

I was coming home from Edgware, and these two men rode after us, and told us to drop our arms, otherwise they would shoot us.

The prisoner Rogers called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

JOHN LIDDELL , THOMAS ROGERS ,

GUILTY , Death .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron PERRYN.

Reference Number: t17830604-117

469. SARAH THOMPSON was indicted, for that she being a person of evil name, and dishonest conversation, on the 19th of October last, feloniously did receive five pair of silver shoe buckles, value 40 s. two pair of knee buckles, value 6 s. ten ounces of silver filings, value 50 s. three pair of other shoe buckles, value 30 s. two pair of other shoe buckles, value 20 s. one other pair of shoe buckles, value 10 s. one pair of knees, value 3 s. the property of George Smith , lately stolen by a person unknown, well knowing the same to be stolen .

GUILTY .

Fined six shillings and eight-pence , and imprisoned one year in Newgate.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17830604-118

470. ELEANOR WOOD was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 19th of October last, one pair of silver shoe buckles, value 10 s. the property of George Smith , lately stolen by some unknown person, well knowing the same to be stolen .

There being no evidence given against the prisoner, she was ACQUITTED .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: s17830604-1

The Trials being ended the Court proceeded to give Judgment as follows.

Received sentence of death, (22.) viz.

Edward Parrott , Ann Clarke , Richard Pratt , James Grant , William Smith , Charlotte Watson , Thomas Davis , Charles Allen , John Bitton , George Adams , alias Peate, alias Peach, William Chadbourne , Thomas Ingre , John Simpson , John Morella , John Fentum , Benjamin Fentum , John Little , Thomas Rogers , John Rogers , Thomas Arnold , John Deeson , Abraham Goossey .

Transported for seven years. (10.)

William Meredith , Thomas Brown ; Samuel Jones , James Prior , William Hall , William Tomkins , Michael Gaffney , Joseph, alias Barnard Pharoo , Henry Williams , Thomas Henley , John Neale .

Confined to hard labour for twelve months. (3.)

Anthony Craig , Richard Wills , John Murray .

To be confined to hard labour six months. (12.)

James Cowen , Sophia Owen , Barnaby Donnolly , Robert Johnson , Frances Jones , Elizabeth Camnell , Elizabeth Livingston , William Hubbard , William Jones , Mary Johnson , John Hall , Ann Howson .

Imprisoned one year in Newgate.

Sarah Thompson , and fined 6 s. 8 d.

Imprisoned three months in Newgate.

Henry Courtier .

Imprisoned one month in Newgate. (4.)

Henry, John Silcock, Thomas Garfield , John Owen .

Whipped. ( 10.)

James Cowen , John Silcock , Richard Morgan , (twice, and imprisoned one week) Barnaby Donnally , William Jenkins , alias Jennings, (twice, and imprisoned one week) Thomas Garfield , John Hall , Henry Row , Thomas Knowles , John Owen , (twice.)

William Wynne Ryland remains till next sessions.

Reference Number: a17830604-1

Trials at Law, Arguments of Counsel, &c. carefully taken in Short-Hand, and copied with Dispatch by E. HODGSON, Writer of these Proceedings, No. 35, Chancery Lane.

Short-hand taught at Home and Abroad.

This Day is Published, Price 2 s. 6 d. the Second Edition, with Additions, of SHORT-HAND on an IMPROVED PLAN; The Alphabet consisting of Sixteen Characters only, by E. HODGSON.

Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No, 35, Chancery Lane, S. BLADON, Pater-noster Row, and J. CLARKE, Portugal Street.

N. B. This Book, which contains also an Explanatory Copper-plate is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Doubts should arise, they shall be removed on Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

Reference Number: a17830604-2

Trials at Law, Arguments of Counsel, &c. carefully taken in Short-Hand, and copied with Dispatch by E. HODGSON, Writer of these Proceedings, No. 35, Chancery Lane.

Short-hand taught at Home and Abroad.

This Day is Published, Price 2 s. 6 d. the Second Edition, with Additions, of SHORT-HAND on an IMPROVED PLAN; The Alphabet consisting of Sixteen Characters only, by E. HODGSON.

Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No, 35, Chancery Lane, S. BLADON, Pater-noster Row, and J. CLARKE, Portugal Street.

N. B. This Book, which contains also an Explanatory Copper-plate is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Doubts should arise, they shall be removed on Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

Reference Number: a17830604-3

Trials at Law, Arguments of Counsel, &c. carefully taken in Short-Hand, and copied with Dispatch by E. HODGSON, Writer of these Proceedings, No. 35, Chancery Lane.

Short-hand taught at Home and Abroad.

This Day is Published, Price 2 s. 6 d. the Second Edition, with Additions, of SHORT-HAND on an IMPROVED PLAN; The Alphabet consisting of Sixteen Characters only, by E. HODGSON.

Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No, 35, Chancery Lane, S. BLADON, Pater-noster Row, and J. CLARKE, Portugal Street.

N. B. This Book, which contains also an Explanatory Copper-plate is a sufficint Instructor of itself, but if any Doubts should arise, they shall be removed on Appliccation to the Author without any additional Expence.

Reference Number: a17830604-4

Trials at Law, Arguments of Counsel, &c. carefully taken in Short-Hand, and copied with Dispatch by E. HODGSON, Writer of these Proceedings, No. 35, Chancery Lane.

Short-hand taught at Home and Abroad.

This Day is Published, Price 2 s. 6 d. the Second Edition, with Additions, of SHORT-HAND on an IMPROVED PLAN; The Alphabet consisting of Sixteen Characters only, by E. HODGSON.

Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No, 35, Chancery Lane, S. BLADON, Pater-noster Row, and J. CLARKE, Portugal Street.

N. B. This Book, which contains also an Explanatory Copper-plate is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Doubts should arise, they shall be removed on Application to the Author without any additional Expence.

Reference Number: a17830604-5

Trials at Law, Arguments of Counsel, &c. carefully taken in Short-Hand, and copied with Dispatch by E. HODGSON, Writer of these Proceedings, No. 35, Chancery Lane.

Short-hand taught at Home and Abroad.

This Day is Published, Price 2 s. 6 d. the Second Edition, with Additions, of SHORT-HAND on an IMPROVED PLAN; The Alphabet consisting of Sixteen Characters only, by E. HODGSON.

Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No, 35, Chancery Lane, S. BLADON, Pater-noster Row, and J. CLARKE, Portugal Street.

N. B. This Book, which contains also an Explanatory Copper-plate is a sufficient Instructor of itself, but if any Doubts should arise, they shall be removed on Application to the Author without any additional Expence.


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