Old Bailey Proceedings, 4th December 1782.
Reference Number: 17821204
Reference Number: f17821204-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday, the 4th of DECEMBER, 1782, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Nathaniel Newnham , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable NATHANIEL NEWNNHAM , Esq; LORD MAYOR of the City of London; The Hon. Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; The Hon. JOHN HEATH , Esq; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; The Hon. JAMES ADAIR , Esq; Serjeant at Law, Recorder of the said City; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Philip Day

John Stanton

Richard Chasnie

Chess Steadman

John Nixon

John Badger

Thomas Allen

William Plaistow

William Lane

John Brooks

Gale Middleton

William Trinn

First Middlesex Jury.

William Allcock

Edward Greensill

Robert Twyford

Thomas Smith

Thomas Fenton

William Hudson

Thomas Row

John Finlayson

Henry Bower

Charles Nicholl

Thomas Hankin

Samuel Vere

Second Middlesex Jury.

Francis Reignier

Thomas Hodgson *

* George Hawkes served the last day in the room of Thomas Hodgson .

William Lewis

Walter Watkins

>William Darling

Samuel Norcott

Benjamin Disbrow

William Evitt

Thomas Stiff

Charles Prestbury

John Flaxman

Frederick Bock .

Reference Number: t17821204-1

1. CATHERINE JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of October last ten pounds weight of cheese, value 3 s. 4 d. the goods of Thomas Hilton .

THOMAS HILTON sworn.

I am a cheesemonger , I live in Whitechapel ; on the 2d of October I lost some cheese out of my shop, my servant told me of it; I know nothing further, only the property being mine.

JAMES BAKER sworn.

I was in the prosecutor's shop, on the 2d of October the prisoner and two other girls came into the shop.

Court. Did you see the prisoner come in? - Yes, with two other girls; they asked for a quarter of a pound of sixpenny butter, and a quarter of a pound of cheese; when I had weighed it, they would not have it; as soon as they were gone I missed the cheese; it was in the shop, about the middle, on a pile of cheeses; then I pursued them, and

in the next street I caught hold of one of the girls, and she had not got the cheese; I slipped back to another, which is the prisoner, and found the cheese on the ground; she was leaning over it, and her cloak covering it.

How long was this after she had quitted the shop? - Not two minutes.

She had taken off her cloak? - The cloak was on the cheese on the ground; I took the cheese and the girl.

The cheese produced and deposed to by Mr. Hilton, being marked.

PRISONER.

I have nothing to say, I have witnesses.

The prisoner brought two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-2

2. HANNAH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of October last one pair of silk stockings, value 11 s. the goods of Mary Smithers , privily in her shop .

SAMUEL REEVES sworn.

I live with Mary Smithers at Holborn Bars ; she keeps a hatter and hosier's shop ; on the 16th of October, about ten minutes before one, the prisoner and another person came in to ask for some cloth; I told them I had none of the cloth that they wanted, but I had a piece of sleezy at seventeen pence a yard, which they desired me to cut two yards off; the other asked to look at some black silk stockings at about half a guinea, which I shewed them; then for some white silk, which I shewed them; the prisoner paid me for the cloth that I sold her, and went out, the other stayed a little while after; as soon as they were gone I looked at the white silk stockings, and saw several pair gone; I pursued them immediately; I went down Chancery-lane, and met three of them together at the corner of Southampton Buildings; I said to the prisoner, Damn you, you bitch, you have robbed me! she run away, and I saw her drop this pair of stockings out of her hand into a hair-dresser's area; the other two got away, and one of them that had some more of the stockings dropped this pair in Staple's Inn.

Court. Confine yourself to the stockings mentioned in the indictment. - This is the pair that the prisoner had; I secured the prisoner immediately, I stood by the area when she dropped them. (The stockings produced.) I saw them taken out.

Can you swear to them being Mrs. Smithers's? - Yes, Sir, they are my own marking.

Court. What value do you put upon them? I will tell you the consequence of it, if you swear that they are above the value of 5 s. it is a capital offence, and her life is affected if the jury find her guilty. - The stockings cost us 11 s. you may value them at what you please, I would not wish her hanged.

Prisoner's Counsel. Was there any other persons in the shop at this time? - Yes, there was a person that lives in Gloucester-street.

Who else? - Nobody at all.

How many people were there in the shop when she came in? - There were two came in, the prisoner and the other came in together; two came in afterwards, and bought a pair of black worsted stockings, and went out again.

Then there were five in the shop at a time? - Two came in while the prisoner was there.

How many people were to serve in the shop? - Nobody but myself.

Then you had all these people to serve at a time? - Yes.

When you run after this woman you met several together? - I met three.

You laid hold of one, I suppose, the first you came to? - I laid hold of her.

Who else saw her drop the stockings? - Nobody as I know of but myself.

Why this made some little hubbub? - It did; but I do not know that any body saw her drop the stockings but myself.

Were there not other people by? - No.

Nobody by at all? - Not as I know of.

Why, this is a very great thorough-fare? I saw no body by.

Do you mean to swear there was nobody by at the time? - Not that I know of, at the time she threw the stockings.

Now, was not it because you saw an advertisement in the paper? - No Sir.

You saw the advertisement? - Yes.

And that makes you so positive? - A gentleman there offered me 20 l. to make it up two days ago.

Prisoner's counsel. What do you sell them stockings for? - They cost 11 s. into the shop.

Any mark? - There is a mark L. on them, on the toe; they were marked when they came into the shop.

JOHN MASON , a Negroe sworn.

Court. What are you? - A gentleman's servant.

Where does your master live? - In Staples Inn.

Was you there on the 16th of October, when this woman was taken up? - I was at Staples Inn, and I came down and saw a woman running down the steps as hard as she could run, she run before me and she dropped something, and I called out, halloo mistress you have dropped something, she kept on, then I picked up the stockings.

Was that this woman? - No, this woman did not drop them stockings, whether she dropped any others I do not know.

Court. Where did the woman that run before you drop the stockings? - On the ground.

- BURTON sworn.

I was walking along through Staples Inn, and I met a woman running, thinking it something very extraordinary; she passed me, when I came into Southampton-buildings I saw the prisoner, and this black followed me with the stockings, and said, the woman had dropped them; the prosecutor had hold of her, and the woman cried out to be searched, he called out for a constable, I said you have no occasion for a constable to take a thief; she desired to be searched.

Did you see who it was that threw away the stockings in Southampton buildings? - There was another woman that run past me, and dropped some stockings in Staples-Inn, I did not see who threw them.

ANDREW USHER sworn.

I serve the prosecutor with some goods; I happened to come past, there were several women in the shop, and when we see people in a shop we never go in; I went further, and when I came into Southampton-buildings, there was a woman with a feather in her hat and very well dressed, threw something in the area.

Was it the prisoner at the bar? - I am sure it was not.

Upon your oath.

Court. Where was this area? - The right hand side of Southampton-buildings, the Barber's shop; the prisoner was on the other side of the way, at that time I saw a mob, the prosecutor laid hold of the woman, she desired to be searched, there was a great mob, somebody gave me a shove; I told the prosecutor I could not get so near to him, or else as I serve him, the affair would not have happened; I am sure that the woman that threw the stockings into the Barber's area, was not this woman, and I endeavoured to tell the prosecutor so then.

BENJAMIN HARRIS sworn.

I was in Southampton-buildings, I saw a great skirmish, and I saw a woman fling a pair of stockings, over the wooden railing of the area of the Barber's shop; the woman that made her escape was a shortish woman.

Was the prisoner the woman that threw it over into the area, look at her? - That was not the woman, she was on the opposite side of the way when the man seized her.

Court. How was the woman dressed that threw it into the area? - She had a black cloak on, and a hat with something on the top of it.

The prisoner brought two witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-3

3. WILLIAM HUNT , and THOMAS HINSELL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of October last, one cloth great coat, value 40 s. the goods of Henry Kitchin Esq ; privily in his coach house, one man's saddle, value 14 s. one bridle, value 2 s. two brushes, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of the said Henry Kitchin Esq; and one fustian waistcoat, value 3 s. one man's hat bound with silver, value 6 s. one linen frock, value 6 s. one pair of men's leather boots, value 12 s. one pair of men's leather shoes, value 2 s. two odd base metal buckles plated with silver, value 6 d. the goods of John Kane , privily in the stable of the said Henry Kitchen Esq ;

JOHN KANE sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Alderman Kitchin, he lives in Berner's-street .

Court. How far is the coach-house from the house? - About 150 yards from the house, at the back of the house.

Court. In a mews? - Yes, the stable is adjoining to it: I know nothing of the prisoners, only the property. About half past seven in the evening of the 24th of October I left the stable, I fastened the door, the great coat was upon the box in the coach-house, and the man's saddle and bridle, and the fustian waistcoat, and a man's hat bound with silver, a linen frock, a pair of leather boots, a pair of leather shoes, and two odd base metal buckles plated with silver.

Whose property were the last? - They were mine.

Describe the communication between the stable and the coach-house. - It is by a little door within the stable; I locked the door over night, in the morning about seven, I came there, and the door was just pulled to, it appeared to have been opened with a key without violence.

GEORGE BAYTON sworn.

I am watch-house keeper of St. Pancras parish; the two prisoners were brought to the watch-house in Glanville-street near Rathbone place with these things, they were brought by the watchman and patrol; and I found the property which has been before mentioned upon them, some on one and some on the other.

Court. What, did you find the saddle and bridle, and great coat, and fustian waistcoat, and linen frock, boots, shoes, and base metal buckles? - The prisoner Hunt had on the smock frock, the great coat, saddle and bridle over his shoulders, and a hat in his pocket.

Can you swear to him? - Yes my Lord, I think it is the same, I believe the prisoners both to be the parties that were in the watch-house.

Court. Can you swear to them positively? - I can swear to them both that they were brought to our watch-house.

Had Hunt any thing besides? - I took a key out of his pocket, that is all that was on him: on Hinsell there was one pair of boots, one pair of shoes, two brushes, two odd buckles, and five picklock keys, and one pair of irons, or instruments like toupee irons.

What were they charged with? - On suspicion of robbery; of robbing no particular person; it was between three and four in the morning; they said they were coachmen to one Mr. Cole in Bond-street; Hunt said so, the other said he was a coachman, but did not mention to whom as I remember; in the morning afterwards, I and the watchman, and the patrol went and searched the prisoners lodgings, they told us where they lodged; in Hinsell's lodging we found nothing

but a file; while we was gone we heard that Alderman Kitchin's coachman had found that the thief was in our watch-house, we went to the Alderman's stables, and tried these keys, and this is the key that opened the stable-door and the coach-house door as easy as the key that belonged to the door.

Court. Is the property in court? - Yes, they have been mostly in my custody, but the Alderman desired his man might have the great coat; I marked it.

Court. What has been in your custody and what not? - The great coat and boots, and waistcoat were delivered to the coachman; the rest of the things have been locked up in a room in Rathbone-place, in the custody of Mr. Purvis, one of our collectors, who is not here.

Court to John Kane . Look at all the things. - They are my master's, I can swear to them.

GARRETT HAYES sworn.

I am a watchman in Stephen's-street, at the corner coming into Tottenham-court Road; on the 24th of October I saw the two prisoners at half past three o'clock pass me with these things; I swear they are the same men, I am sure of it; Hunt had the great coat and the servant's hat on his own head, and the smock frock on him, inside the great coat, and the servant's jacket, and a bridle and saddle tied on his back; the patrol and me pursued them and took them; I asked William Hunt , who was the first man I came up to, whose property he had on his back; he told me it was his master's; I asked him where his master lived; he said he lived in Bond-street with one Mr. Cole; I told him it was not t he proper way to come from Bond-street; he said he went astray; I took him to the watch-house with the patrole.

- READ sworn.

I am the patrol; it was a very light moon-shine night; I was in Charlotte-street, and I saw the prisoners turn into Percy-street, into Tottenham-court Road, we charged them; Hunt said he came from Bond-street, one Mr. Cole, and that he drove a hackney-coach; he said he had lost himself; I said then you cannot be a hackney-coachman; he said he was no thief; we brought him to the watch-house.

Court to Kane. What is the value of these things that are lost? - I valued them, my Lord, at 4 l. 9 s. 9 d.

PRISONER HUNT's DEFENCE.

I had got a furlough to go into the country to see my friends, and I have an acquaintance or two that came from the same place, and they desired me to call on them, and we were drinking rather late on the road, and coming between Newman-street and Tottenham-court Road there were two or three men standing, and when we came up they took to their heels and ran away, and this property was found lying in the street; we stood some time, and nobody came, and we took it up, and we thought to take it home, that it would be enquired after, and if it was not enquired after to advertise it: we had not got above two hundred yards before the watchman and patrol stopped us with it.

PRISONER HINSELL's DEFENCE.

I have nothing more to say than what Hunt has said; we have no witnesses.

Jury. The Jury would wish to be informed, whether they can fix a value on the things?

Court. Certainly it is in your option to find what value you please; but you will consider how far you are warranted by the evidence in finding it.

WILLIAM HUNT , GUILTY , ( Death ).

THOMAS HINSELL , GUILTY, (Death).

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. JUSTICE HEATH.

They were humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Reference Number: t17821204-4

4. WILLIAM SAUNDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of November last eight ewe sheep, price 4 l. and nine wether lambs, price 3 l. the goods of Joseph Snoxell .

JOSEPH SNOXELL sworn.

I am a farmer at Stanmore , I lost seventeen sheep and lambs last month; there were eight sheep and nine wether lambs; I cannot justly say to the day I lost them, I see them every day, but as I have a great number I tell them but seldom; I do not exactly know of the robbery, I know the sheep that were found on the prisoner are my property; I was not at home when he was taken.

EDWARD SNOXELL sworn.

On the 12th of November Joseph Humphries came to me, and told me he had bought some sheep under the value a good deal, and he supposed them to be stolen; I went and looked at them, and found them to be my father's; I knew them by the mark, a pitch mark.

Court. Is not that a common mark? - Yes.

Could you swear to them then by that mark? - Yes.

Do not other farmers use that mark? - No, my Lord.

Where does Humphries live? - About two miles off.

How many did you find with Humphries? - Four wether lambs.

Court to Joseph Snoxell . Did you see them afterwards? - Yes, my Lord, I have them in my possession; they are a very particular breed of sheep, I bred them myself, and they are marked with an S on both sides very plain.

JOSEPH HUMPHRIES sworn.

I am a publican, Sir, I live at the Coach and Horses on Bushey Heath; on the 12th of November I bought four wether lambs of the prisoner, he came to my house in the morning before the candles were put out; I said, Hey! hey! shepherd, where are you going to? it might be about seven o'clock; he said he had four wether lambs in Mr. Greenfield's farm a keeping there, and they were not worth running after, he would sell them if I could help him to a chap: I asked him how he got the lambs? he said his father's name was William Saunders , and that he was keeper of Wadham Chace; I had seen him before; I told him if he and I could agree I would go down and look at them; I went, and we handled them, and I asked him the price of them, they were strong store lambs, he asked me 5 s. a-piece, and I bid him 4 s. 6 d. he told me I should have them; I told him he must help me to drive them home; we drove them home, and I paid him for them; after I had paid him for them I considered of it, and I said they were too cheap; I went immediately down to Mr. Snoxell's, to know the rights on't, and bid another man keep him in the house till I returned.

Court. Did you say any thing to the prisoner about your suspicions? - No, my Lord.

SAMUEL DRUMNET sworn.

I met the prisoner on the highway, and asked him where he was going, it was on the Wednesday before, with a parcel of ewes and these lambs; I asked him where he had been; he said he had been having some sheep to keep; he said he lived with Mr. Snoxell; Why, says I, he never puts any sheep out; he said they were his own; there were six ewes, and four lambs were with them; he said he had them from Harrow-wheel Common side; he did not say where he had the others; I told him I would buy the half dozen of him; on Sunday he came and fetched them up; I told him I would buy them on Sunday; I was rather fearful after I had bought them that he had not come honestly by them, so I went to market to see for Mr. Snoxell, but he was not there; I gave him 5 s. 6 d. a-piece for six ewes; I took them up to Mr. Snoxell, and his son challenged them.

Court to Snoxell. Were these ewes your property? - Yes, my Lord, I have them now in my possession; the other seven he

confessed after his commitment, and I went and found the sheep, and they were mine.

Court to Snoxell junior. Did you hear him say he had stolen the others? - Yes.

Did you persuade him? - No, he first said he had not, but afterwards he confessed he had.

Snoxell senior. My Lord they were found at a place called Colney-street, in the possession of one Harding an innocent man, who had given the value of them, therefore I did not trouble him to come here, because I thought our witnesses were sufficient.

PRISONER.

I have nothing to say.

Court to Snoxell. What is the value of these four weather lambs? - About 7 s. a piece.

What was the value of the ewes? - About 10 s. a piece.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-5

5. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Williams , at the hour of ten in the night, on the 29th of November last, and stealing therein a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. nine yards of silk, value 40 s. one metal watch, value 3 l. one worked muslin apron, value 30 s. one silver pint mug, value 40 s. one pair of muslin ruffles, value 5 s. two silver salts, value 20 s. one silver pap spoon, value 8 s. and one garnet ring, value 8 s. the property of the said William Williams .

When this prisoner was arraigned, he desired to plead guilty, upon which Mr. Recorder informed him as follows.

"The Court on these occasions never suffers prisoners to deceive themselves, you will hear what I say to you, and then if you chuse to plead guilty, your plea will be recorded. If you expect to gain any favour from the Court, or any mitigation of your punishment by pleading guilty, you will be disappointed; the Court will not consider such a plea as any extenuation of your crime, but you will be equally liable to be he executed, as if you had been tried and convicted; therefore it is in your favour, rather to take the chance of trial, and this your plea will not be at all to your prejudice." -

The prisoner then pleaded Not Guilty.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn.

I live at the King's head the corner of King's-street Spitalfields ; between ten and eleven on Friday last the 29th of November, at night as I was going to bed, when I came and unlocked my room door where I sleep, I could not get in.

Court. When did you see the things last? - I saw some of the things mentioned in the indictment a few days before, they were kept in drawers, some of which were locked, and some not; and I locked my door in the evening of the same day: when I found I could not get in, it rather surprized me, and by pushing open the door further, I saw a hole in the cieling where somebody had been in at the top of the house, and chairs and trunks were put to keep the door fast that nobody might come in; I was in the room about dark that night, and there was no hole then; when I got into the room, I called up my wife, and I got up through the hole that had been made in the cieling, upon the tiles, and sent for a neighbouring man a Bricklayer, and we went upon the house, and upon the next house but one; we found nobody on the house: when we had been upon the top of the house about ten minutes, two men came and knocked at the door, and asked if we had not been robbed, I said yes.

Court. When did you see the prisoner? - I saw the prisoner after he was taken.

Court. What conversation had you with the prisoner? - He was crying and confessed the matter, this he had done before I was sent for.

EDMUND WADE sworn.

Court. Was there any means made use of to induce him to confess? - I asked him

if these was any other accomplices with him; it would be better for him to disclose them.

But did you tell him if he would confess he should be more favourably dealt with? - No my Lord.

Did you threaten him? - No, he cried all the time.

To Williams. What did he confess? - He knew the house, having lived with my father as a servant about eight or ten years ago; and he told us that by the assistance of a ladder, which I observed when I was on the house, he got upon the kitchen tiles, then drew the ladder up and laid it on the main house, getting upon the top of the roof he took some tiles off, and with a chisel cut through the cieling and took the things out of my drawers; they were found upon him in his breeches; they are all here, I can swear to the watch, which has my wife's name on the plate, I can swear to them all.

PRISONER.

My conscience will not admit of my saying any thing in my defence: as it was the first time I ever did any thing of this kind, and I was drove to it by necessity, I hope I shall be recommended as an object of mercy: I have nobody to call to my character, my conscious guilt was such, I did not dare to call any witnesses.

GUILTY , Death .

He was humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-6

6. JOHN HOWES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Rowney and Andrew Cook , about the hour of five in the afternoon on the 28th of November last, the said Richard and Andrew, and others of his family in the said dwelling house then being, and feloniously stealing three gold shirt buckles, value 10 s. one gold locket set with garnets, value 5 s. one pair of silver stock clasps, value 2 s. and one stone shirt buckle, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of the said Richard and Andrew .

RICHARD ROWNEY sworn.

I live in Oxford-street , in partnership with Andrew Cook : on Tuesday evening the 28th of November, about a quarter before five I was in the shop, and looking through the window I saw two lads lurking about, and I suspected them? I went to the door and desired them both to go about their business, at that time I did not know the window was broke; they both went away; about a quarter of an hour after, I went to put up the shop shutters, and I missed some things out of the window off the shelves; I missed three gold shirt buckles, a gold locket set with garnets, a pair of silver stock clasps, and a stone shirt buckle set in silver; I had put up the end shutter, and on finding the window broke and the things gone, I went in pursuit of the two lads; returning home I met the prisoner at the bar, just at the corner of Hog-lane, I knew him to be one of the boys that were at the window; I brought him into the shop and sent for a constable, I had him searched, and part of the property was found in his breeches pocket; the gold locket, and the stone shirt buckle; he said he bought them of a boy in Soho-square, and gave him three-pence for them; the constable has the property that was found upon him.

JAMES MARCH sworn.

I am the constable, I searched the prisoner; I found on him in his right hand breeches pocket, these things:

(The things produced and deposed to by Mr. Rowney.)

PRISONER.

I would ask the gentleman whether the window was not broke before I took the things.

Mr. Rowney. The window was found in the day time.

Court. At what time? - It was not broke in the morning when the shutters were taken down.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the things of a boy in Soho-square.

For the Prisoner.

JONATHAN FISKE sworn.

I am a Bookseller and Stationer in Edward-street, Portman-square; I know the boy these seven years, I have employed him at divers times; I have intrusted him with divers sums of money to buy books and paper, and I never found but what he always behaved very honestly to me in every respect whatever.

Court. Does he come of honest parents? - Yes my Lord, they live in my neighbourhood, his father is a Bricklayer, I have employed him sometimes.

GEORGE JOHNSON sworn.

I am a Painter and spanner, I have known the prisoner five months, I have employed him, he was a very good boy, very punctual and always brought the change right; I should be very glad to take the boy apprentice for all that I know of him, he is a very good boy, and a very good genius for painting and drawing; I should be very glad of him.

Court to Rowney. Do you consent that this boy shall go with this man? - There is a number of them sort of boys; there is a gang of ten or twelve of them: that was the boy that looked through my window.

Johnson. I believe the boy has been rather decoyed into it, than from bad principle, and I will take care of him that he shall get a very honest good livelihood.

THOMAS WHITE sworn.

I am a Bricklayer, I am a journeyman, I have known the lad these four years, he was always very civil, as much as ever I saw, he has borne a good character.

Court to Prisoner. How old are you? - Between twelve and thirteen.

ANN WHITING sworn.

I have known him six years very honest and sober; I have trusted him many times in getting change for me, and carrying out baskets of linen.

Jury. If that person will take him apprentice, and be bound for his honesty hereafter, we have no objection; we wish to recommend him.

Court. Certainly it is the kindest thing you can do.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-7

7. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of November last, one watch, the inside case made of base metal and gilt with gold, with an de shagreen case, value 30 s. and one have metal chain gilt with gold, value 4 s. the goods of William Fitzgerald , privily in his shop .

RICHARD THOMLINSON sworn.

I live with Mr. Fitzgerald, pawnbroker , the corner of Featherstone Buildings, Holborn ; the prisoner came into my master's shop under pretence of buying a watch, on the 13th of last month between seven and eight, I am sure it was the prisoner; I knew his face, but I do not know where I have seen him; I shewed him three watches; he agreed to have one marked 3 l. 18 s. then he asked for a chain and seal, and I shewed him one; when he had agreed for them he bade me put them altogether in a piece of paper, then he made a pretence to go out to make water, I had some suspicion that he had taken something, I immediately went after him, and watched him, and he stood as

if he was making water; he stopped near the door, I came back and looked on the counter, and missed one of the watches; it was a metal watch with a fish-skin cover; I immediately went again to look for him, he was gone, I followed him, and overtook him about fifteen yards from the door; I told him he had taken the watch; he said he was going to the gentleman's and would call again; I insisted on his coming back, and he came back easily; I sent for a constable, and they searched him, and found the watch on him; this was one of the three watches which I had shewn him.

PRISONER.

I did not go five yards from the door; I was going to come back immediately to bring the watch back.

DENNIS MACDONALD sworn.

I was coming along Holborn, I saw a crowd, and I saw the man was restive in the shop, and he would not be searched, and I found the watch inside the knees of his breeches, next his skin.

(The watch produced and deposed to.)

Court to Thomlinson. Is that one of the watches you shewed him that night? - Yes.

THOMAS SWELLS sworn.

I am a constable, I was sent for; I went into the shop, and the prisoner was there; they charged him with stealing a watch, I searched him, and I found this chain on him in his breeches pocket.

Court to Fitzgerald. Is that yours? - I know the mark on the paper.

Court to Thomlinson. Is that the chain you shewed him? - I believe it is one of them by the writing; this is not the chain that was put with the watch.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not offer to take the watch to defraud the gentleman of it; I went out to make water, and I wanted to ease myself; I have been in America this eight years; I was going to receive eight guineas and a half that night; they took my pocket-book, and all my prize-money and wages; I intended to have returned the watch when I came back; I have no witnesses. I was wounded in the head with three buck shot in America with my Lord Cornwallis, in five different places; I came home last November; at the full of the moon I am distracted in my head.

Court to Fitzgerald. What is the value of that watch and chain? - I should not chuse to sell it under three guineas though I valued it only at 30 s.

Mr. Akerman. My Lord, ever since the prisoner has been in gaol he has had all the appearance of insanity.

Court. Then you will acquit him, to be sure, Gentlemen.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-8

9. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of November last four linen sheets, value 40 s. eight linen towels, value 10 s. and two linen aprons, value 2 s. the goods of William Streight , in the dwelling house of William Crane .

AMELIA STREIGHT sworn.

I live at No. 5, Leather-lane , in the house of William Crane ; I lost four sheets and ten pieces.

Court. What do you call pieces? - Coarse cloths, rubbers, or dusters; I brought them into my room; I had fetched them from being dried; I brought them in as near as I can guess about seven at night, the 22d of November; I had just brought them in, and went up stairs and came down, and somebody knocked at the door, and I locked my parlour door and went over to the coal-shed to serve a peck and a half of coals, and somebody got in at the window while I was gone; I saw the things in the parlour when I went over the way; I was there some time; I could not find my measure, and a gentleman called out, and said I was robbed; I came back,

and my cloaths lay in the street; I called out for assistance, and picked them up.

C ourt. Did you see any body drop them? - No, I laid hold of the prisoner, a man had hold of him; at that time the things lay in the coach-way.

Was the window fastened? - The window was not fastened, only pulled down.

WILLIAM CRANE sworn.

What occasioned you to seize the prisoner? - I saw him convey the basket out of the window; I was coming down the street between seven and eight; I actually saw him convey the basket out of the ground-floor window, and laid hold of him while the basket was in his hand, that was the reason of the clothes being thrown about the highway; there were three men with the prisoner, they all escaped.

(The things produced and deposed to by Mrs. Streight.)

Court. I see you suppose them altogether to be worth about 50 s.? - My Lord, we were told to value them, and I did not know; I never was upon any such thing before; I leave that to the Court.

Prisoner. Where was I when Crane laid hold of me? - Off of the pavement, with the basket in his hand.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming a quite contrary way; I heard a cry out, I stopped and asked what was the matter; I had nothing on me; he came to me on the flag stones, and laid hold of me, and said, says he, you are one of them.

GUILTY, 39 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-9

10. MOSES MATHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of October last ten pair of leather gloves, value 10 s. the goods of Charles Langstone , privily in his shop .

CHARLES LANGSTONE sworn.

I am a glover in the Strand ; on the 30th of October in the evening the prisoner came into my shop, and took the gloves mentioned in the indictment off the counter; I was not in the shop, I was in the parlour adjoining, and saw him.

How many pair of gloves did he take? - He took ten pair and one glove, which we found, but he must have taken eleven pair; I immediately pursued him and took him; as soon as he saw me in pursuit of him he threw the things on the ground; I ran after the prisoner some distance before I could catch him, he was not more than three or four yards from me all the time; I took him back to the place where he threw the gloves; I was then informed that a gentleman had took them up and carried them into my shop; that gentleman I do not know, he is not here.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

There was a great many coaches coming along, and I ran a-cross the way; and I heard this gentleman cry Stop thief! and I ran with the mob, and my buckle fell out of my shoe, and I stooped to pick it up, and the prosecutor brought me back, and he found nothing upon me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY, Of stealing, but not privately .

To be privately whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-10

11. MARY NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of November last four yards and an half of muslin, value 20 s. the goods of Thomas Woollaston , privily in his shop .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn.

I live with Mr. Woollaston, No. 64, in

Oxford-road, he keeps a linen-draper's shop ; he lost four yards and a half of muslin on the 23d of November last: the prisoner came into the shop and desired to see some clear lawn, and purchased three yards and a quarter and paid for it; she desired to see some muslin, I went to the other side of the shop and shewed her some; she paid me for a quarter and a half of muslin.

Court. Where did the muslin lay? - On the counter, it is the same, I missed that piece of muslin; I brought her back and demanded the muslin of her, which she delivered up.

(The muslin produced; four yards and a half.)

Court. How much do you suppose it worth? - It is valued at 20 s.

Court. You did not see her take it? - No my Lord I did not, I missed it after she went.

Prisoner's counsel. You did not see her take it? - I did not.

You do not know but she might have put it up accidentally with the other muslin? - It was in the other pocket.

Is not the woman big with child? - I cannot say Sir, I am no Surgeon.

No, but you might answer that without being a Surgeon: you asked her name, and you told her she had got something; did not you? - She begged to be let go, I brought her back and desired her to deliver up what she had in her pocket.

The muslin was along with the other things? - No Sir, it was in another pocket.

Did not you press her to give it up, and say, if you have taken this muslin by mistake, it should be given up? - No Sir.

Did not your master know this woman? has not this woman been in your shop before? - I believe she has.

Did she ever go out without buying? - I cannot say.

Jury. When you took the prisoner, did you find the muslin in a paper, or loose in her pocket? - Loose in her pocket.

Had you shown her that piece of muslin? - I cannot say that I did or did not.

Did she say that it was through mistake, when you first apprehended her? - No Sir, she did not, but whether by fright or not I cannot say, she cried immediately as soon as I brought her back.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-11

12. ROBERT PEARSON and JOHN BOOKER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of November last, two gold watches, value 25 l. the goods of Charles House , privily in his shop .

(The witnesses examined apart by desire of the prisoners.)

ANDREW BATEMAN sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. House, he is a Watchmaker , No. 5, Great Tower-street : on Friday the 22d of November, about a quarter after three, the two prisoners came into my master's shop, and Pearson asked me to fit him in a watch glass, which I was a considerable time about; nobody was in the shop besides me; he said it was very odd that out of so many watch glasses, I could not get one that would fit; then I observed the prisoner Booker move a little nearer the glass cases, and Pearson the tallest said, look at my key for the square of it is broke; he said he believed he must have a new one; then I thought I heard the glass case move, as if a key hit against the glass, I turned round and looked, and I saw Booker's right hand in his breeches pocket; I asked Pearson then if I should fit him a watch key, and he said no, he believed he had got one at home, then he paid me for the glass after I had fitted it; and Booker seemed in a

hurry to get out first, they did not take any notice of one another while they were in the shop.

Did they both come in together? - Pearson came in first, and Booker followed him; I did not shut the door between them, I held the door while they both came in: Pearson was a considerable time getting out his money, and the other was trying to get out; the latch was small, and fixed pretty high, and he could not find it: when I had taken Pearson's money, Booker was got on the outside of the door on the step; I turned round and looked at the glass case, and saw it a little way open, and missed two gold watches; I then went to my master who was in the parlour next to the shop, cleaning himself; I told him to come out and look at his glass case, and I went out and shut the door after me, and followed the two prisoners out of the shop, I saw them running down St. Dunstan's hill, I cried out Stop thief! when they got to the end of Cross-lane, I thought Pearson was going down the hill, and Booker going to him down Cross-lane; but I cried Stop thief! and they both seemed flurried, and they ran from the top of St. Dunstan's hill, and both turned up Harp-lane, and when they were got about forty yards up, I catched hold of Booker by the collar, and brought him home to my master's shop; he made no resistance, only he asked me what I wanted, I did not satisfy him; when he came there, he said nothing; I did not see him searched.

Court. What, was not he searched in your shop? - No my Lord.

What became of the other prisoner? - I shewed Mr. Field the corn meter the other and he followed him.

Court. You took him upon suspicion of having these watches? - Yes.

Why was not he searched? - Because the watches had been found by a person that saw him drop them.

You knew that then? - Yes.

JAMES HOLLANDLY sworn.

I was going down Harp-lane, on Friday the 22d of last month, a little after three; I saw a man run out of Cross-lane into Harp-lane, very fast, almost immediately another followed; I heard the cry of Stop thief! I was very near the end of Cross-lane, and he dropped two watches, that was the second man that came out, he was immediately taken in custody; he said his name was Booker; I did not see him taken into custody, I was busy taking up the watches.

You saw the man after he was stopped? - Yes my Lord.

Immediately after? - Yes.

Was that man that was stopped, the same that dropped the watches? - Yes.

Did you notice him so as to know him again? - I should know him again.

Was the man that was stopped the same man that dropped the watches? - Yes, the man that was taken, was the second man that run.

Did you see any body running after him? - Yes, Field was the man that run after him, and likewise Mr. House's young man.

Then it was Mr. House's young man that stopped him? - I cannot say, he was in custody when I saw him again.

Who did you give the watches to? - I carried them to Mr. House, and gave them to him.

Were the watches the same that the prisoner dropped? - They were, one was out of the outside case, and the other was not.

Court to Bateman. Did you ever lose sight of Booker before you stopped him? - No, only turning the corner, not three seconds; I am sure he was the same man.

WILLIAM FIELD sworn.

I am a deputy corn meter; I was coming from my business the 22d of November, the Friday, soon after three in the afternoon, the two prisoners run past me very fast; Bateman called out Stop thief! this was in Cross lane; I turned round and pursued them up Harp-lane; the one I remarked to be lame, which was Booker, he could not run so fast as the other; I said to Bateman stop him, and I will pursue the other; he stopped him

in Harp-lane; I lost sight of Pearson at the end of Harp-lane.

Court. Did you see him drop any thing? - No my Lord, I did not.

What became of the other man? - The other man run over into Mercer's court; I said, when I heard the people say he was run there, that I should take him for he could not escape there being no thoroughfare; I took him there, coming back again; I said this is the man, I am sure he has passed me before, I took him by the collar, says he what is the matter; Hollandly came up to me and said he had picked up the two watches, and shewed them to me.

Court. Are you sure that the man you met coming out of the court, was the same man that run past, and that you pursued? - Yes my Lord, I am very sure of his person, he had the same coat that he has on now; but I am positive to his person; both of them.

Did they say any thing? - Nothing, only desired they might not be dragged along the street to the Compter; it being so late in the afternoon they were not searched; they made no defence, nor were they asked any questions.

Court. Did you see the watches dropped? - I saw them picked up.

Court to Bateman. The prisoner Pearson was out of your sight before he was brought back? - Yes a considerable time, three or four minutes.

Are you sure that that man that was brought back by Mr. Field, was the same man that was in your shop? - Yes my Lord, both of them.

Court to Charles House . Have you the watches? - They are both my property; they were both injured by the fall, the marks are very evident on them, they are the same that were brought me by Mr. Field.

PRISONER PEARSON's DEFENCE.

I went into this gentleman's shop for a watch glass; I asked him to fit a glass, he did, which was a little time about; I recollected the key was broke, I asked him if he had one, he said he believed he had, and I recollected I had one at home; I paid him six-pence and went out: afterwards I heard somebody halloo out, Stop thief! I went as well as the rest of the people, and I went up this court, I thought I saw somebody run up this court; I asked what was the matter, Field said you know, and took me to the watchmaker's, they told me I was concerned in stealing the two watches as they believed; so I went to the Compter before the Lord Mayor, there this young fellow said I was innocent.

PRISONER BOOKER.

I have nothing to say.

PEARSON, NOT GUILTY .

BOOKER, GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-12

13. JOHN M'NEIL was indicted for that having been convicted of grand larceny at the session of gaol delivery holden for May, 1781, and ordered to hard labour on the river Thames, for the term of three years; he did afterwards, to wit, on the 28th day of July , escape from and out of the custody of Duncan Campbell , and Neal Campbell Esqs ; and also was afterwards on the 21st of October last, found at large, and apprehended for the said offence .

PRISONER.

I would not wish to put the Court to any trouble, I am guilty of returning from the lighter to be sure.

Mr. Recorder. Prisoner, the act of parliament leaves no power in the Court, it fixes the precise sentence, which is an addition of three years from the expiration of the term to which you was before sentenced . The sentence of the Court therefore upon you is, that you be sent back for the term of

three years; and you will observe, that by the same act of parliament, if you should escape again it is a capital offence and will affect your life.

Reference Number: t17821204-13

14. ANN GOODIFF was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of August last, 2 linen shirts, value 10 s. and one cotton gown, value 10 s. the goods of Elizabeth Punter , widow .

ELIZABETH PUNTER sworn.

I am a washerwoman , I live in Bell Savage Yard , on the 22d of August the prisoner came to me with a pretence for me to send for a bundle of linen from No. 9, John-street, Adelphi Buildings, about 8 in the evening; then she asked me for something to make water, which I am ashamed to speak, but I must speak the truth; I handed her something, I did not like to look at her, and I turned to my closet for a candle: she squatted down where these two shirts were: after I had lighted my candle, I went for a bit of paper on that side of the room to write a direction, and she was on that side also, and there was a gown on the end of my drawers, and the gown was gone while I turned me to write the direction: I did not miss the gown then nor the shirts; the prisoner was in a great hurry to be gone, and I called my maid to put on her hat and go with her. She said her master had given her a shilling, and she would have a pint of gin, I said, less would do, she sent for some gin, and they drank it at the door, my washerwoman knew her face; then the maid and the prisoner went towards the Adelphi Buildings, and when she came opposite Fleet Market, she bade her go on as she was going to market: when the maid came back, I missed the things.

ANN COPE sworn.

I am a servant to the last witness, I went with the prisoner to fetch the linen from No. 9, John-street, Adelphi Buildings, and as we went she stopped on Ludgate-hill, and asked me for a pin, I gave her one, and she bid me stand before her, and I turned my head round, and she was pinning up something, but I do not know what.

Court. Where was she pinning it? - Under her coats. We went a little further, and she stopped at the top of the Fleet market, and said she must go the Poulterer's for a fowl, and go to the Grocer's for some tea and sugar; and she bid me make the best of my way to the house for the bundle of linen: when I came to John-street, there was no such name or person: when I came back I told my mistress, and she missed the things directly: two shirts and a gown; they were never got again. I heard the prisoner own to the gown the night she was taken up, which was three weeks after: I never saw her before, but I am sure she is the same person.

Court. What did she say when she owned to the gown? - She said young woman do not make yourself uneasy, you shall have the gown; and I said, and the shirts too, I did not hear her answer to that.

Court. Prisoner, would you ask this witness any questions.

Prisoner. Yes my Lord, a great many. This woman I am sure has perjured herself, in regard to her saying I acknowledged the gown at the time I was apprehended on suspicion.

Court. What shall I ask her about your acknowledging the gown?

Prisoner. Ask her where and when.

Cope. At the same house in Turnmill-street that the constable took us to: the constable was present and heard her say it.

Prisoner. Ask her who was present besides? - There was my mistress's nephew, but he did not hear it, and the washerwoman.

Prisoner. From the first of it to this instant moment, I declare I know nothing of it.

JOHN REDGRAVE sworn.

I took up the prisoner, I carried her to a house in Turnmill-street; she desired to have something to drink; she said, as for the

gown, the gown shall be returned, the other things cannot, for they are out and out.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

To answer any question, or demand any question, to a set of people like him who now stands before your Lordship, is in vain; I am at present at your bar friendless, and to a man who gets his money entirely by disposing of the lives of people that come before your Lordship, what have I to say? Redgrave came into my apartment, I had a bad leg, and was making a bandage for it; he was in company with two women; he said, You are my prisoner for robbing the laundress; I said, I knew nothing of it; they never proposed to me neither where did you pledge such things, or had you such things, but you are the person, and they took me to Clerkenwell; on the ensuing day I was had for examination, and this woman, in company with another, which I ordered out of Court, both swore to my being the person by a mark of a man of war on my arm, which arm I am at present ready to expose to the Court: they told me after the second hearing, if I would only acknowledge where the things were, they would forgive me; and the prosecutrix has been with me twice, and sent her nephew; I am entirely innocent, I have nothing marked on my arm but Jesus, Holy Saviour: I am a Roman by profession, or at least of the Church of Rome. I have no money to pay people to go for witnesses, and I trust this is not a land for oppression.

GUILTY . Transported for seven years .

(The prisoner behaved after the verdict in a very riotous and unbecoming manner.)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-14

15. JOHN STOCKTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of November last, twenty-two yards of woollen cloth, value 5 l. the goods of George Field the elder and George Field the younger.

GEORGE FIELD sworn.

I am a Packer , and live in Walbrook; on the 11th or 12th of November we missed some cloth, twenty-two yards. I was informed b y my servants that it was missing; I searched and found it was the prisoner who took it; he made a fair and open confession that he had taken it from my house, and informed Mr. Gates where it was pawned, the confession was taken in writing and the prisoner signed it; I have not measured the cloth since, here is a part of it.

MICHAEL CANNON sworn.

On: the 8th of September I carried this cloth and some more into Mr. Field's house, I had a receipt for them, but I cannot swear to this, it was the same sort; I brought the cloth from one Mr. Rivers.

JOHN FIELD sworn.

I received the cloth, I have not seen it since; I cannot swear to it; I received five half pieces of black cloth on the 8th of November.

SAMUEL COLE sworn.

I was the person that went with Mr. Gates to the pawnbroker's to fetch this cloth out by the prisoner's confession, it was at Mr. Townsend's in Hair Alley, Shoreditch, half of it, the other half at Mr. Davis's at London Wall; it was the same cloth, I have had it in my possession ever since, I was sent by the Justice to the pawnbroker's with Mr. Gates.

- GATES sworn.

I went to the pawnbroker's and found this cloth, it has never been in my possession since; the cloth when taken out of the warehouse was whole, they cut it in two for the convenience of pawning it.

Court to Mr. Field. Can you swear to that cloth being yours? - I cannot positively swear that this is the identical cloth though it appears like it, because there was a seal on it, but on comparing it with the fellow half it appears to be the same.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-15

16. MARY FOSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of November last a pint pewter pot, value 12 d. the goods of Joseph Humbleby .

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Prescot on Garlick hill, the prosecutor is a publican and lives on Garlick-hill ; I was standing at our kitchen window, and looking into the street; the prisoner was coming up the hill and put her hand into a plumber's shop, and took a pot which they had just had some beer in: I immediately went out after her, and took her with the pot, as she was putting it into her pocket; she confessed it, and said, do not say any thing about it, I brought her to the shop.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent: I have only one sister in London, she keeps a very capital shop; I dare not let any body know where I was.

To Brown. How do you know it is Humbleby's pot? - Because he swore to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-16

17. MARY FOSTER was again indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of November last, one quart pewter pot, value 18 d. the goods of James Bucket .

SARAH NEESHAM sworn.

Court. What do you know of the prisoner taking a pewter quart pot? - The prisoner was brought back to our house by the footman opposite our house, with one pint in her hand, and when she came into our shop, my husband opened the door; she had the other under her clothes.

Is that footman John Brown the witness? - Yes, he charged the prisoner with taking pots out of the shop.

What did she say on being charged? - She produced a quart pewter pot, and desired nobody might mention it.

Did she say how she came by it? - We knew they were put in the place in the shop in the morning, ready for the boy when he came; I saw her produce the pot and put it down in the shop.

When first you saw it in her possession did she hold it open or was it concealed? - It was concealed in this manner, as though I had a quart pot under my clothes.

What did she say? - She said she did it for want: it is the property of James Bucket a publican.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I took the prisoner on suspicion that she had taken something else; I thought she had something else in her pocket, and she said she had not.

PRISONER.

I know nothing of it; I have no witnesses.

GUILTY , But recommended by the Jury to be privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-17

11. MARY NEWLAND , otherwise LUCAS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of August last a silk gown and coat, value 40 s. two black silk laced cloaks, value 20 s. one silk hat, value 3 s. one lawn apron, value 2 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. and one pair of shift sleeves, value 2 s. the goods of Mary Clarke , spinster .

MARY CLARKE sworn.

I lodge in Gress-street, I am a single woman, I lost a white silk gown and coat, two black silk cloaks, a shift, two pair of cotton stockings, a lawn apron; I lost these things on the 21st of August, I saw them the night before, I left them on the sopha in the dining room; I missed them in the morning; the prisoner went off in the

morning, and I did not see her any more till she was taken; she was my servant; when she was taken she owned where the things were, that was last Friday I believe.

Court. I suppose you was not by when she confessed? - Yes I was; I told her if she would own to me where they were, I would not hurt her if it was in my power.

And so then she told you where they were? - Yes, my Lord.

How came she in your apartment? - A servant that lived with a person in the house brought her up to me in the morning.

Then in consequence of that you went and found them? - Yes, she sent for her friends to take them before we went to the Justice's; the pawnbroker is in Court.

Court to Jury. You see the prosecutrix knew nothing at all where to find the goods, but from the confession of the prisoner, which she was induced to make upon the prosecutrix's telling her, that if she would own where they were she would not hurt her: a confession that is obtained by that expectation of pardon, is never evidence against the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-18

19. RICHARD CAREY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of November last one silver table spoon, value 5 s. the goods of William Ellison Simpson.

WILLIAM ELLISON SIMPSON sworn.

I live at No. 27, Strand ; there was a message from Bow-street, informing me that a person in custody was found guilty of stealing a table spoon, and that he had confessed he had stole it from No. 27, in the Strand; I enquired below, and they told me there was one lost; I found there was a boy in custody who was a visitant of one of my maids; I then saw the boy myself, and he confessed also to me that he stole it; that was the 25th of last month in the evening.

(The spoon produced, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JOHN HEATHER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I live in Long Acre; this spoon was offered me by the prisoner at the bar on the 25th of November in the evening; I suspected it was stole, and I believe it is his first offence; he is lately come out of the country; I stopped him, and took him down to the office, and he not being an old offender, he confessed it, and how he came by it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The young woman that lives in the house, I went to see her, and I had the spoon in my hand, I was at play with it, I bent it, and I went to straiten it, and it broke in the middle, and she said, I had better go and sell the spoon and come back with the money, and she would give me some more money towards buying a new one; I went to sell it, and they stopped me.

Court to Prisoner. I leave it to you, you must judge for yourself, I cannot advise you about such a thing; if you think the girl will be of any use to you in her evidence, call her; if you doubt about it, you had better not.

Prisoner. She cannot deny it.

Court Exercise your own judgment, you know her best; would you have me call her?

Prisoner. Yes.

ANN CARTEN sworn.

Court. I want to ask you how long you have know that lad? - About two years, Sir.

Where does he come from? - Winchester.

Do you come from Winchester? - Yes.

Have you ever been in service with him? - Yes, I lived with him about half a year at Winchester.

Have you heard about this spoon that he is taken up for? - I never heard of it till my master told me of it the next morning.

Did he come to see you at your master's? - Yes, Sir.

What I am going to ask you, you will

understand, will not affect you, it is nothing at all to you now, therefore only give me an answer as to him; did you see any thing of a spoon that was broke by him? - No, my Lord.

While he was with you? - No, my Lord, I never did.

Did you see any thing of a spoon that was bent, while he was with you? - No, my Lord.

Do you recollect any thing about it? - No, nor he never mentioned any thing about it.

Do you recollect any thing about a spoon being broke, or bent, or missing? - No.

Prisoner. Was not I there that night, and was not I bending the spoon? can you deny it? - There was never a spoon mentioned while I was in the kitchen; I had a red cloak of his sister's, and he called on me to carry it to her; he took it to her; I do not know how long he had been in town.

Court. How long have you been in town? - I came the 14th of August.

Do you know any thing of him from the time he came to town till this happened? - I have seen him, he lived with Mrs. Smith in Suffolk-street.

Jury to Heather. What state was the spoon in when it was brought to you? - In the same state it is in now, broken in two, which gave me a suspicion that it was not honestly come by; I have had many applications on his behalf; his friends are country people, and live in great credit.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-19

20. JOHN LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of November last five printed books, value 12 s. the goods of Mary Booker , widow.

MARY BOOKER sworn.

I live in Sherrard-street , I sell books ; I missed two books some time after the prisoner came to lodge with me.

The Remainder of this Trial in the Second Part; containing, amongst others, the remarkable Trial of JOHN FOY , for a Rape; and also the Opinions of the Twelve Judges on the Cases of HENRY LAVELL , for Forgery, and WILLIAM BASS , for Felony, will be Published in a few Days.

HODGSON's SHORT-HAND TREATISE, Price 2 s. 6 d. with an Explanatory Copper-plate, to be had of J. WALMSLAY, and S. BLADON.

TRIALS, &c. taken with great Accuracy by E. HODGSON, Writer of these PROCEEDINGS, No. 35, Chancery-lane.

N. B. SHORT-HAND taught on an improved Plan.

Reference Number: t17821204-19

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday, the 4th of DECEMBER, 1782, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Nathaniel Newnham , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART II.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of John Lewis .

What is the prisoner? - A hair-dresser; I lost five books, here is a list of them; the first is a quarto Queen Elizabeth's Bible, the next is a large folio latin book, the next is the first volume of Seymour's Survey of London, the next is a folio Latin Bible, and the next is a Geographical Dictionary; on the 11th of November the prisoner came into the shop, and sat down on the seat, and the books were behind him, the two first were taken before; I saw him put his hands behind him, and put one of the books down, it was the first volume of Seymour's Survey of London in folio; I was on one side of the counter and he on the other, and he put it down by the side of him, and it was heavier than he thought, and there was a little washing tub just there, and it rolled the tub from one side the shop to the other; he sat a good bit after that, he said the watch had gone ten, and he said, I will go get me a pint of beer, and he run out of the shop immediately.

Court. Did he carry any thing with him? - He picked the book up, to be sure.

Court. Did he carry any thing with him out of the shop? - He took that book out of the shop then.

You saw him? - I did not see him carry it away, I saw him pick it up, and take it out of the window, but I did not see him take it out of the door.

Court. Was the book missing when he was gone? - Yes.

What became of the book after? - I never knew that, he came home at twelve o'clock, I let him in.

What did you say to him? - Not a word, my clothes were off; besides, I did not think of saying any thing to him, nor would if it was to do again, as I was by myself.

Did you say any thing to him the next morning? - I never saw him from that time till Thursday night; on Thursday night, between six and seven, he came into the shop, and sat down, then I saw him take the books; I said nothing to him about the other book, I was by myself, nor I should not; I saw him take a Latin Bible and Geographical Dictionary, all folio; he took them in the same way.

Did he go out of the shop? - Yes, he did, and I ran after him, and cried Stop thief! all the way down Shug-lane; it was opera night, and the coaches were so thick I missed him; about one o'clock in the morning

he came home, and I apprehended him; he said nothing then, but used a great deal of abrupt language at the watch-house; he had lodged with me five or six weeks, and never paid me any thing; I had seen him before running about.

JANE WATKINS sworn.

I live with my father, he is a porter; the prisoner lodged in the house of the prosecutrix where I lodge; I saw the prisoner go out on the 14th of October at night, with two books under his arm; I opened the door to him when he came home.

JOSEPH CLARKE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; on the 19th of October I took this book in pledge of the prisoner, it is a quarto bible; he told me it was his own property, and he brought it from America; I advanced one shilling on it; he pledged it in the name of John Lewis .

(The book produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER.

I have no witnesses.

What countryman are you? - St. Domingo.

Court. What state of health is the prisoner in?

Mr. Akerman. He is very ill, through poverty and confinement and cold, and laying without a bed.

GUILTY Of stealing the Bible only .

To be privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-20

21. JOHN TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of October last a cloth coat, value 10 s. a cloth waistcoat, value 8 s. and a pair of velveret breeches, value 8 s. the goods of Robert Murrell ; and one hat, value 1 s. the goods of James Lewis Marks .

ROBERT MURRELL sworn.

I am a painter ; I lost a coat, a waistcoat and breeches, on the 26th of October, from the house that I lodge in, in Wild's-court , I saw them that morning, and I missed them at night; the prisoner is the man that took them, he had on the coat and breeches when he was taken, which was the 30th of October, the Wednesday following.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I took the prisoner, and found the coat and breeches on him, on the 30th of October; I sent for Mr. Murrell, to see whether they were his things or not.

(The coat and breeches deposed to by the prosecutor Murrell.)

Did he say how he came by them? - No, my Lord, he asked to go for a soldier, but Sir Sampson Wright would not let him.

JAMES LEWIS MARKS sworn.

I lodge with Murrell, I lost a hat, it is in Court; the prisoner had it on him at the time he was taken by Carpmeal.

(The hat deposed to.)

Carpmeal. There is a waistcoat which he had sold or pawned, I do not know which, but he told us where it was, and it was found.

JOHN BURFORD sworn.

I am a dealer in clothes, the prisoner sold me this waistcoat in the fore part of the week, either on Monday or Tuesday evening.

(The waistcoat produced and deposed to.)

Prisoner. I took the clothes to go after a place, and was at my master's, after a character, when they took me.

GUILTY .

To be imprisoned three months in Newgate .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-21

22. MARGARET WARE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of November

last, one garnet ring set in gold, value 3 s. a cotton gown, value 5 s. a pair of stays, value 1 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. 6 d. a black bonnet, value 3 s. a pair of stuff shoes, value 1 s. a muslin apron, value 1 s. a silk cloak, value 2 s. and one muslin shaul, value 1 s. the goods of Sarah Cooper spinster.

SARAH COOPER sworn.

I was at the play on the 13th of November, and left my mother at home, when I returned about eleven I knocked at the door, and she did not let me in; and I was going into Aldersgate-street to sleep, and the prisoner called me by my name, and asked me where I was going.

Court. Did your mother lock you out so early as eleven? - Yes my Lord, she was gone to bed.

In the street the prisoner met you? - Yes.

Did you know her before? - No my Lord, but she called me by my name, and I looked to see who it was, but she did not know me, nor I her; she asked me where I was going, and I told her, and she said there was a fire near, and I might be taken up by the people, for they had been fighting, and I had better go along with her, and I did; I went with her into Blackboy-alley , as I heard afterwards, but I did not know it then.

Court. Where is Blackboy-alley? - Somewhere in Chick-lane.

Where does your mother live? - She lives in Water-lane, Black-friars No. 10.

What street were you going to? - Aldersgate street, I went with her, and lay down with my clothes on, and she took a ring off my finger, and I asked her what she was going to do with it, and she said she wanted to try it on her finger; she did not return it again, but said she would give it me presently; she got up some time after that, I asked her where she was going, she said she was going to get some coals, and bid me lay still; she covered my face over, and got up; I fell asleep, and I waked about eight in the morning, and the woman was gone with my cloak and bonnet, and my shoes and stockings, and my ring; I staid there, for I could not go, because I had not my shoes, stockings, and bonnet and cloak; she returned home about ten, and I asked her what she had done with my things, she said they were at a neighbours, and I should have them again; after she returned home, she said she must have my gown and shaul to pay her rent, I told her I could not let her have them, but she said she would have them, and she took them from me; she went out and locked me in, and she came home some time after, and in the afternoon s he said she must have my stays, and she took them off from me; and after that, she took my under petticoat and my muslin apron; and my shoes she took in the morning, she did not take any more.

What happened afterwards? - I wanted to go but she would not let me; and on the Saturday she asked me if I knew any friends that I could send to, to send me some clothes to go home in: I remained there from Wednesday till Sunday evening; on Sunday evening the gentlemen came and took me away, they are here.

What gentlemen are they? - They are writers.

What had they to do with you? - The prisoner asked me whether I had any acquaintance to send to, that would get me some clothes in order to go home, and I recollected this young person that is here, and she told me she would go to her if I would not tell her she had taken my cloaths; and I agreed not to tell her, for her to go, that I might get away from her; and she went to the young woman on the Saturday evening, and she was not at home; her name was Ann Branson .

Court. Are the rest of the witnesses in court? - Yes my Lord.

Court. Let them all withdraw.

She went on the Sunday morning again, and she desired her to come to me for I wanted to speak to her; and the young woman asked

her where I was, she said she could not tell her the name of the place, but she would bring her to me, and she brought her; when she brought her I was afraid to tell her what had happened, but I agreed to the prisoner's story that I might get away; this young woman went to my mother, and she was not at home, my father did not know where to find my cloaths, and he told her to call in the afternoon; she went to an acquaintance, and was telling them the story; they had seen me two or three times before, and they said they would come to release me out of that place, and they came with her.

Court. Who are these acquaintances? - Miss Ann Branson , Mr. Johnson, Mr. Jones, and Mr. Fitzpatrick; they came about nine on the Sunday evening; Mr. Johnson took off his great coat and wrapped me up in it, and Ann Branson put her hat and cloak on me, and they took the woman with them to the watch house; and they took me away.

Court. You went to the play on the Wednesday evening? - Yes.

Did your mother know of your going to the play? - Yes.

You came home about eleven? - Yes.

And locked out of your father's house? - They had locked the door, they did not expect me I suppose.

Why not? - Because I very often go to sleep at Mrs. Rumsey's in Aldersgate-street.

Is she any relation of yours? - I lived with her once.

What, as maid servant? - Yes.

Then you are used to sleep out of your father's house whenever you please, and they took it for granted you were gone to Mrs. Rumsey's? - I tell them whenever I intend to sleep out.

Did you tell them you intended to sleep out that night? - No.

Then why should they suppose that you was gone to Mrs. Rumsey's to sleep, if you had not told them so? - I did not tell them so.

Did not you think it strange to be locked out? - I do not know, I never used to sleep out of a night, any further than going there to sleep.

Did you use to do that often? - As I am out of place, I am there for a fortnight together.

Then your father and mother did not think it extraordinary that you should sleep out of nights? - No my Lord.

What time do they go to bed? - Nine o'clock; if I had knocked at the door I suppose I should have been let in, but I did not knock at the door, because I thought I should have anger if my mother got up.

Why I thought you said your mother knew of your going to the play? - Yes she did.

Then what should you have anger for young woman, because eleven is as early as you could well come from the play; why should you suppose she should be angry? - I do not know.

Then you did not knock for fear your mother should be angry? - Yes.

You was afraid they should hear you, and let you in? - No, I thought they might not have been gone to bed when I knocked the first time, but when I found they were, I was loth to disturb them.

The prisoner met you in Cheapside? - Yes, it was in Cheapside, between St. Paul's church yard and Newgate-street.

She called you by your Christian name? - Yes.

What did she say, Sarah, or Sally? - Sally.

Very familiarly? - Yes, she asked me where I was going, and I told her, she said there was a fire there.

Did you believe her that there was a fire in Aldersgate-street? - Yes I did, or I would not have gone with her.

Was there a fire there that night? - I was confined there till Sunday.

You had no curiosity to go and see whether your friend's house was on fire or not? - It might not be near them.

Being told there was a fire where you was going to, you had no curiosity at all to go and see? - She over and above persuaded; to go home with her, and took me by the hand, and said I should go home in the morning.

What, this stranger that you had never seen before? - Yes.

How came you to let her take your ring off your finger? - She took it away by force in an instant.

Did not you feel her? - Yes, but I could not help her taking it off.

Did you shut your hand? - I did.

Did she open it by force? - Yes she did.

She forced your hand open, and you asked her what she was going to do with it? - Yes.

And she said she was going to try it on her own finger, and would give it you again presently? - Yes.

After all this force and violence, then you rested satisfied? - I was obliged to do it.

Soon after that she got up? - Yes.

She desired you to lay still, and covered up your face? - Yes.

How came you to lay still after she had left you? - I was very sleepy.

Then you was quite composed and easy, though this stranger had so forced your hand open, and taken away your ring? - I was rather tired.

Rather tired, quite composed, no fear or apprehension on your mind, and lay quietly and slept till about eight in the morning? - Yes.

Was there any body else in the house? - There was nobody else in the place where she lived.

But in the house? - No, nobody in the house.

When you waked in the morning you found she was gone with your cloak and bonnet, and shoes and stockings? - Yes.

I thought you laid down in your cloaths? - She took off my shoes and stockings, and said I should be better without them.

Did you make no resistance? - I did not make any resistance against her taking them off.

Then you liked to have your shoes and stockings taken off, did you? - I did not chuse to have them taken off, but she took them off.

And you let her? - I did, I did not want her to take them away from me.

Did she take them off before you went to sleep? - Yes.

So then this woman had taken your ring by force, and forced your hand open, and taken your shoes and stockings off against your will, and you lay quietly to sleep? - I did not sleep then.

You never attempted to go away? - I could not go away without my clothes.

You could have called the watch? - I did not see any watch.

Did you open the window? - I did not, I did not call out for help, there was nobody but her sort of people in the place; she said my things were at a neighbour's and I should have them again; she told me if I cried, I should have none of my things again, or else I should never go from her no more, nor see any body any more.

Then she tried to compose you? - No she did not, she told me to make myself easy, but I could not; she kept telling me so all the time I was with her, that I should have them again; but afterwards she said she must have more for her rent, and she would have them, I told her she should not, but she took them off by force.

All this time did you see any body with her? - I saw two women, they came into the room.

Did you tell them? - She desired I would not tell them my case, but one of the women, I told her when she was absent.

Then having done all this to you, she left you in the room with one woman that she did not want to know the case, and desired you not to tell this woman? - Yes.

And then left you alone with her? - She did.

Did you ask this woman to assist you in making your escape, and getting away? - The woman seemed to be my friend; I asked her where I was; she said it was a terrible place, and that it was Blackboy-alley.

Then this woman told you it was a terrible place? - Yes.

Though she herself came to visit there? - Yes.

How many rooms were in the house? - I do not know, I was only in one room.

Was it a ground-floor, or up one pair of stairs? - Up one pair of stairs, the rest was uninhabited.

Nobody else lived in this house but this woman? - Nobody, it is like a barn more than a house; there was no roof to it as I could see when I went out, I did not see that when I went in, there is no number to it.

After all this she went to fetch your friends and relations, in order to take her her up? - She said, if I would promise to keep it secret, she would go and fetch a person, if she thought, she said, I would not tell my mother; she told me that I was to say, that I knew her very well, and that I had been so good as to give her my clothes to pay for the nursing of a child at Battle-bridge.

How, for the nursing of a child? - Of her child; I was to tell the person she had an execution served on her for nursing that child, and I was so good to lend her my clothes to pay for it; and she said, if I did not say so, I should never see any body; and if I would make her that promise, I should see the young person I wanted to see, and I should go: she told the story to Ann Branson , and I did not contradict it, I wanted to get away.

Is your father or mother here? - No.

Why are they not? - They are rather busy, and they were told they would not be wanted; my mother can be sent for if she is wanted.

Whereabouts in Water-lane does she live? - No. 10, opposite Apothecaries Hall.

How were you supported these four days? She brought in a piece of bacon, and some bread and butter, I eat very little.

ANN BRANSON sworn.

Where do you live? - At No. 12, St. Andrew's Hill, Black Friars; I live with my father and mother, they are needle-makers.

Do you know this young woman, Sarah Cooper ? - Yes, my Lord.

What are her father and mother? - I do not know what her father is, I believe her mother goes out a nursing.

How long have you known her? - About two months from this time; I had known her a little more than a month when this affair happened.

Was you at the play with her that night? - No, my Lord.

She lives near you? - Yes.

Do you know many of her acquaintance? - No, my Lord.

Have you known her intimately during the little time you have known her? - Yes, my Lord.

How did you become acquainted with her? - She was at church where I was, and she fell into a fit, and when she recovered a little, I took her out into the air, and went home with her.

Since that you have been often with her? - Yes.

Often at her house? - Yes.

Do you know one Mrs. Rumsey, in Aldersgate-street? - I have seen her.

What is she, do you know? - I fancy her husband is a goldsmith: the prisoner came to me on the Saturday evening, the 16th of November, I was not at home; she came again on the Sunday morning; she said, she came from Sally Cooper , and she would be glad to see me directly; I said, I could not come then, but I would come in the afternoon, if she would tell me where; she said, she could not give me a proper direction, but if I would appoint a time she would meet me; I met her about half after two; I asked her which way we were to go, and she said, towards Smithfield; I went with her; as we

went along I asked her the reason why Sally was from her friends so long; she said, she had been at the play, and was locked out that she came to her apartment to sleep with her, and she had not been in the room many minutes before a person came to trouble her for some money that was owing for nursing a child at Battle-bridge; so Sally seeing her distress, was so kind to let her have her clothes to satisfy it, and what she wanted was, to get her some clothes to come home in.

Had you known that Sally was missing from her friends before? - Yes, I had been at her friends several times, but never heard heard any intelligence of her.

Did not you think this was an odd story? - Yes.

That she should lend her clothes, and not leave herself clothes to come home in? - Yes.

Did you ask her any particular questions about it? - No.

Did she say how long she had known her? - She said she had known her a good while.

Had you ever seen the prisoner before? - No, I never heard Sally speak of any such person; the prisoner said she knew her when she lived in Bell-yard, Doctors Commons; I went with her to the house, I saw but one room that I know of, and it was a kind of shed, like a slaughter-house underneath, a very deplorable situation.

Did you observe whether there were more rooms in the house, or any other people? - No, I did not; I did not see any more stairs than what I went up.

Now relate what happened after you went there? - The young woman said, she should be obliged to me to go home, and speak to her friends to get her some clothes; the young woman sat on the bed, and the prisoner related over again the same story, and Sally did not deny a word of it.

Did she say any thing about it one way or the other? - No, she did not; only begged of me to go to her friends, and get her some clothes.

Did you ask her any questions then? - No.

Had not you a curiosity to know how she came into such a place, and in such a condition? - No, I did not ask her any questions, the young woman was crying all the time; I left her then, and went to her father, I told him I had heard from her; she intreated me not to tell her father or mother till she came home, and I asked him for some clothes for her; her father asked me if she had been stripped; I told him I did not know; he said I must come in the evening; I called on an acquaintance of mine in Fetter-lane, there were three young men of my acquaintance there, they insisted on coming with me, they said, it did not look like a likely story that the young woman should strip herself; they went with me first to her father's, there was nobody at home but her father; her father said, she must stay till tomorrow; I said, then I would go home; they said no, let us go for the curiosity, and we went: there was no light nor no fire, and we found the young woman in the same distress; and when she saw I had got somebody with me, she then confessed how she had been stripped.

Court. The prisoner was there, was not she? - Yes.

What did she say? - The prisoner asked her to stay all night, and the young men said she should not; the prisoner said she had not stripped her.

What conversation passed between her and the prisoner on that occasion? - The young woman said, it was as she had said before, and one of the young men desired the prisoner to go with them, and she said she would; the prisoner readily agreed to go with us; we took them to St. Andrew's watch-house.

What story did the young woman tell at that time in the presence of the prisoner, as near as you can recollect? - She said she had been at the play, and returned about eleven, that she had knocked several times at her father's door, and nobody answered, and that she was going to Mrs. Rumsey's, in Aldersgate-street, to sleep, this woman called to her by her name, and said there was a fire in

Aldersgate-street, and she had better go home with her, and she would take care of her; Sally said, she went with her, and laid down with her clothes on, and the woman waked her in pulling off her ring, and she asked her what she was going to do with it, and she said she was only going to try it on her own finger, and would give it her again presently; and that being weary, she fell asleep, and slept till eight or nine, and then the woman was gone with her cloak and bonnet and slippers; she came home at ten, much intoxicated, for her gown, and then for her stays; then afterwards she took her under-petticoat, her shaul and apron.

Did you ask her how she came to stay there? - She said she was padlocked in, and the woman told her, if she offered to cry, or make the least resistance, she should never see any body again; I asked her if she knew the woman, she said she did not, and never saw her before in her life.

She gave no reason for going home with this stranger? - No further than that the woman, by her motherly talk, enticed her to go with her.

Is she a very weak, silly girl? - I really do not know that; she always appeared very sensible in my company.

You never found any want of understanding in her? - No.

What were the young men's names that went with you? - George Johnson , Charles Jones , and Charles Fitzpatrick ; Johnson was the most active, and pulled off his great coat, and put on her.

(The Court ordered the father and mother to be sent for, and the Sheriff's porter returned with the mother, the father being ill in bed.)

MARY COOPER (the mother) sworn.

How old is your daughter Sarah? - Sixteen the 2d of last June.

Do you remember her being out three or four days from your house? - Yes, my lord, and in great trouble I was.

When did she first go out? - On the Wednesday night.

What time? - I cannot justly say to the hour, it might be two or three o'clock, or three or four.

Where was she going to, did she say? - I cannot justly say where she said she was going, but she said she would not be a great while.

Did you expect her home to tea? - I expected her home some time in the evening.

Then you had no notion where she was gone to? - No, my Lord.

What time did you go to bed? - I went to bed between nine and ten, I was very uneasy.

How came you to go to bed then? - We lay very nigh the door, I thought I should hear her knock, my husband was at home.

As you were uneasy in your mind about her not coming home, you probably did not go soon to rest? - I thought she was safe enough, I thought she might call at an acquaintance of mine, and I knew if she did she would be taken great care of.

Who was that acquaintance that came into your mind? - One Mrs. Rumsey; I thought she might be there.

If she had knocked loud and often, you probably would have heard her? - She did knock, because a neighbour came by and saw her when she was at the door; I did not hear her.

When did the neighbour tell you this? - Since this all came out, then I heard of it.

Who was that neighbour? - One Mrs. Godsall.

The next morning did you enquire after her? - Oh yes! of the neighbours that I knew, but I heard nothing of her.

Did you enquire at Mrs. Rumsey's? - I sent, but she had not been there; the first I heard of her was a Sunday night, she did not come home then, it was from this young woman, Ann Branson .

How long have they been acquainted? - I cannot justly say, it might be between two and three months; I saw her first on the Monday, she had been at the watch-house and at the constable's house; she cried, and told me what had happened, and how this woman decoyed her away; I never saw

this woman till I came to see her at the Justice's.

Did she give you any reason for going home with this woman? - That the woman frightened her, and told her there was a fire happened where she was going, and decoyed her, and told her she should go back again the next morning; she told me how the woman had taken her things away, and terrified her almost to death; that she took away a thing or two at a time, and a ring off her finger.

In what way, by force or how? - I was not there; she said she slipped the ring off her finger when she was asleep.

Do you recollect her saying so? - Yes, my Lord, she said she was so frightened she did not know what to do, nor which way to proceed.

Did she say she was going to the play on Wednesday? - She did not downright say she was going to the play, there was some talk of it.

CHARLES JONES sworn.

Are you an an acquaintance of Ann Branson 's? - Yes.

of any acquaintance of Sally Cooper till this affair: I went to between eight and nine on Sunday morning in the middle of November, to recollection, when I came there, and it was very dark, there was no light at all in the room; I asked for the Cooper, and she spoke, I asked for a light, and the prisoner said she would get one; I believe Fitzpatrick gave her the money for it; then I saw Cooper sitting on the bed, with a petticoat and her shift only in her, I asked her, her situation, she said she had been without any victuals for two or three days, I told her I would bring her some clothes the next day, and she was very well pleased.

Did she say how she came into that place? - She told me she had been to the play in the middle of the week, and knocked at her father's door, and did not care to knock any more; that she was going to some street in the city; I do not know the street, and the prisoner met her and called her Sally, and asked her where she was going to, and she told her; and the prisoner told her there was a fire where she was going, and that there had been a quarrell and she might be taken up, and that she was welcome to half her bed, and persuaded her to go home with her, and she went home with her; then she stripped her of her ring and clothes, and shoes, and her bonnet and cloak, they were all gone: I believe she took the ring off her finger; she told me this at the watch house, that the ring had been taken off her finger, and she asked her for it, and what she was going to do with it, and she said to try it on her own finger.

Did she describe it as if the prisoner asked her for the ring? - She said the prisoner took it off her finger by force, and she made off with it and pawned it: the prisoner said that Cooper had given her the things of her own consent; she said it was very cruel to think of prosecuting her; I told her when I found her, if she would tell me where the things were, I would get them out, and give her no further trouble; but she said she could not do that, but she would get them out in the course of the week: her husband who was in the militia, would send her some money in the course of the week.

Prisoner. I never saw that witness Sir, I saw two young men that I can recollect, but I never saw him.

JOHN FITZPATRICK sworn.

Are you acquainted with Ann Branson ? - I have known her about a fortnight.

Do you know Sally Cooper? - I went to Blackboy-alley.

What account did Sally Cooper give of what had happened to her? - I do not know that she gave any account in particular; she said that her gown was taken away by force that the woman said her goods were seized and she must lend her her gown to pay the money; this she mentioned at the watch

house, that she had not been long in b with this woman before her ring was gone, and she said she would not lose her ring.

Then she did not perceive her take it? -

As far as I understand, she was dosing and felt it go off her finger; the other said she was only going to try it on, and would return it again.

Did she give any reason for staying so long there, after she had been so long ill used? - That she could not come home without her cloaths; that after her shoes and stockings were gone, her gown was taken.

That was the only reason she gave for staying? - Yes.

SOLOMON GOLDSMITH sworn.

I know nothing of it any further, than I took a pair of stays in of the prisoner; I keep a pawnbroker's shop; the prisoner pawned them with me on the 14th of November, she pawned them in the name of Margaret Ware ; she pawned nothing else with me, she said they were her property; I am sure it was the prisoner that pawned them.

JARVIS ELLIOT sworn.

I keep a chandler's shop; I am a pawnbroker; here is a bonnet, a gown and petticoat, and apron, and handkerchief the prisoner at the bar brought on the 14th of November, the gown on the 15th, and pawned it for four shillings, and she brought me the cuffs on the 16th, and had seven-pence more on the gown; the prisoner has been in my shop at times, I am sure it was her that pawned these things; when she pledged the gown, she had a quartern loaf, three quarters of a pound of bacon, half a pound of sugar, half an ounce of tea, and a peck of coals.

EDWARD ANSER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; I have a cloak and ring, I had them of the prisoner on the 14th of November.

- WATKINS sworn.

I am the officer of the night.

What account did the young woman give? - She gave charge of the prisoner on account of stripping her; she mentioned the things particularly to me; a ring and stays, and gown and petticoat, here are the duplicates which I found on the prisoner.

Court to Sarah Cooper . Look at the things. - This is my ring, garnet set in gold, the things are all mine except one.

How long have you been acquainted with Ann Branson ? - About two months.

How did you first get acquainted with her? - It was at Church.

Who went with you to the play on the Wednesday night? - A young man, and a young woman.

What are their names? - I do not know their names.

Not know their names? - I do not.

Do you use to go to the play with people and not know their names? - They were people that went with me, but I did not know their names, they were at the play house door; I thought of Ann Branson 's going with me, but I went by myself.

Did you ask her to go with you? - I did.

Did you see her that Wednesday at all? - Yes, I went to her house my Lord; I went to the play by myself, I went up the same gallery with this young man and woman, and they came home with me to the door.

Why did they not stay? - They were going home.

Where do they live? - They did not tell me.

Did your mother know that you was going to the play, without knowing who you was going with? - She did not know in particular that I was going.

How came you to tell me at first then that you told her? - I mentioned it to her in the morning.

Who did you tell her you was going with? - I told her with Ann Branson .

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met this young woman between one and two o'clock upon Cornhill, she told me she went to the Inn along with a young man, and when it was time to go to bed the landlady would not let her stay; I told her she was welcome to go home with me; she said she was in variance with her mother and father, and that one Ann Branson and she had seen company unknown to their friends, she said she would stay, and gave me the things to pawn for victuals and drink for support for herself, while she was with me; she gave them me at different times; she said Nan Branson had some money of her's: there is a woman that saw her send me with the stays to pawn for nine-pence, and I bought some tea and sugar; and likewise on Sunday when I went to get more money, I bought some things: this woman that saw her, lives on Saffron-hill, she is a compositer's wife. I do not know who lives in the house besides myself, there are three rooms in it; the people go out to work.

FRANCES YOUNG sworn.

I live on Saffron-hill, I know the prisoner, I have known her about two years.

Do you remember seeing a young woman at her lodgings? - Yes Sir I did, I believe it is three weeks to morrow; I went to the prisoner; and I saw the prosecutrix there; the prisoner had been to buy some tea and sugar, and the young woman was sitting up in bed, and she said, Sally my dear did you think I was gone away; and the young woman was crying, and the prisoner asked me to stay and light the fire, but I could not.

What was the young woman crying for? - I do not know, I did not speak to her, nor she to me; in the afternoon when I went, they were both sitting by the fire together, and the prisoner asked her to lend her her stays to pawn; she first refused it, and then she said she would, if she would let her have the rest of the things the next day; she pawned them for nine-pence, I saw the duplicate on the table; I believe it was on Thursday, the prosecutor told me she had lent her a gown and some things, and that she had proposed to let her have them the next day, and that was what she was crying for in the morning; I asked her how she came to know the prisoner, and she told me she had been at a play against her mother's will; that she came home and knocked at her mother's door but could not get in, that she went to the Cross-keys in Gracechurch-street, and her brother along with her, and that she could not get a bed there, that she afterwards saw the prisoner in the street, and the prisoner told her she was welcome to go and sleep with her, and she accordingly went.

PRISONER.

I have no other witnesses at present; I have more if I could have sent for them, but having no money, I could not get any body to go for them.

Jury to Mrs. Cooper. What is Mrs. Rumsey, we wish to know her character? - She is a Milliner, but follows no business; her husband is a Silver-smith in Aldersgate-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-22

23. ELIZABETH NAPP , ELIZABETH YOUNG , and JANE CAVELEY , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of November last six pair of linen sheets, value 12 s. seven damask napkins, value 2 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. one check apron, value 4 d. six silver tea-spoons, value 6 s. one pair of silver sugar tongs, value 3 s. three silver salt spoons, value 2 s. and one silver cream pot, value 6 s. the goods of William Litchfield .

SARAH LITCHFIELD sworn.

I am wife of William Litchfield , I lost

the things mentioned in the indictment out of my room, and my maid's room; I cannot tell when they were taken away, my maid, the prisoner Jane Caveley , had the care of them; I have not seen them lately, I never recovered any of them again.

THOMAS KNIGHT sworn.

On Tuesday, the 21st of last month, I bought a cream pot of a woman, I cannot tell who, it is not here.

JAMES SMITH sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I took a spoon of Elizabeth Young , the prisoner, the 31st of October, she had been a customer some time; she said she brought the spoon for herself; I lent her 1 s. 6 d. upon it.

(The spoon deposed to by Mrs. Litchfield.)

Court. How long have you had that spoon? - Above these two years; there is another name on it, which is the woman's that I bought it of, it is marked A. O. and W. S. L.

WILLIAM MANSELL sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, I have a spoon marked the same as the other, which was brought to me by Elizabeth Young in her own name; she pledged it for herself; I lent her 1 s. 6 d. on it.

(This spoon deposed to by Mrs. Litchfield.)

Court to Smith and Mansell. Was she alone when she brought the spoons to you? - Yes.

ROWLE EAST sworn.

I am a pawnbroker; the prisoner Young brought me one sheet, the prisoner Napp brought me two sheets, and one Elizabeth Mills brought me another.

Did Young say whose it was? - No, she wanted a gown, and a loaf, and a little butter, and said she would fetch it on Saturday.

(This sheet deposed to by Mrs. Litchfield, her name being on it.)

Here are two coarse sheets that Elizabeth Napp brought me.

Court. Did she come alone? - To the best of my knowledge.

(These sheets deposed to by Mrs. Litchfield, who knew them by the making.)

Court. Have you any thing there that Caveley brought you? - No.

PRISONER YOUNG's DEFENCE.

These spoons were given me to pledge for a person, and the money was for her, and she had it all.

PRISONER NAPP's DEFENCE.

I borrowed the sheets when I was in distress, and I intended to get them out again.

Court to Mrs. Litchfield. Which of the prisoners lived with you? - Caveley, the other two were lodgers.

ELIZABETH NAPP , GUILTY .

ELIZABETH YOUNG , GUILTY .

JANE CAVELEY , NOT GUILTY .

Napp and Young to be confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17821204-23

24. CHARLOTTE MACKAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of March last one linen sheet, value 2 s. one pair of linen check bed curtains, value 3 s. and one feather bed, value 20 s. the goods of Carey Emms ; the same goods being in the dwelling house of the said Carey, and let by him to the said Charlotte, to be used by her for a lodging, against the form of the statute .

CAREY EMMS sworn.

I live in Long Acre , I keep a house to let lodgings; I let a two pair of stairs back room, ready furnished, to the prisoner at the bar about a quarter of a year ago.

Did you lose any part of the furniture? - Two beds, and a great pot, and a large saucepan, and a blanket and sheet, and a pair of linen check bed curtains; she went

away about a week before she was taken, which was on the 20th of November.

Court. When did you miss them? - When she was gone.

Did she pay her rent for her lodging? - Some part, she owes me now about six or seven shillings; she went away without giving me any notice; I saw part of the things at Mr. Heather's, the pawnbroker.

Jury. Was she a weekly lodger? - Yes.

Had she the room to herself? - Yes.

JOHN HEATHER sworn.

I took in this sheet and the curtains of the prisoner at the bar; the sheet for 2 s. 6 d. on the 30th of November, and the curtains for 4 s. the 28th of October; she said they were her property; she pawned them in the name of Charlotte Mackay ; they have been in my possession ever since; Mr. Emms called at my house, and I believe he did not miss them till I told him of them.

(The curtains and sheets deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had lived in that house five months; I and another woman took the lodging together, she went away, and left me; the prosecutor took and broke my door open when I was absent only one day and a night.

Court to Emms. Did you break the door open? - Never.

Prisoner. He did, my Lord: he keeps a house for unfortunate women, and sometimes I have waited on them; and another woman who sent me to pledge these things lived in the even room with me, they do not belong to my room.

Had the prisoner this room to herself? - Another woman and she took it jointly.

Prisoner. The girl whose room the things belong to lodges in his house now.

Court to prosecutor. Were any of these things in the room in which the prisoner inhabited? - I cannot say, they do what they please.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-24

25. ANN WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November last one cotton gown, value 2 s. one Marseilles petticoat, value 2 s. one cloth apron, value 3 d. one pair of thread stockings, value 6 d. and two linen handkerchiefs, value 6 d. the goods of John Cross .

MARY CROSS sworn.

I am wife to John Cross , he lives in Chandler's-street, Grosvenor-square , he is a tire-smith ; on the 21st of November, between eleven and twelve in the day, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, they were in the two pair of stairs room, which is my bed-room, I saw them about two hours before; a woman who was not well in the one pair of stairs, cried out, and said that I was robbed; I opened my parlour door, and saw the prisoner at the bar go out with a bundle; I knew the handkerchief, which was the outside, to be mine, it was tied round my husband's head the night before, and I saw the end of the gown at the corner of the bundle, and therefore I knew it to be mine; I went to the door, and saw the prisoner at the bar run down the street, my husband ran after her, and she was stopped by one William Williams ; I never lost sight of her till she was brought back to my house, which was in two or three minutes; my husband brought the bundle, and Williams brought the prisoner.

MARGARET PURCELL sworn.

Between eleven and twelve on the 21st of last month, I was very ill in bed, my husband went out, and put the key under the door, my bed joins to the stair-case, I heard a person go up the stairs very softly; there was not a person on the floor, first or second, but myself; I heard a person opening the drawers, and it shook my bed; I got up and wrapped my gown round me, and opened my door, and I saw the prisoner, who was a stranger to me, come down with a bundle in her hand; I suppose she was ten minutes in the room up stairs, her step was different from Mrs. Cross's, being softer, for they run up stairs; the prisoner passed by me, and

had the bundle in her left hand, it was in that handkerchief.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS sworn.

On Thursday the 21st of November, between eleven and twelve, I was going a-cross the end of Chandler's-street, I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was running with this bundle in her hand, Mr. Cross was pursuing her, I ran after her, she put the bundle under her arm, I stopped her, and I saw her drop the bundle.

(The things produced and deposed to by Mrs. Cross.)

PRISONER.

I hope you will be merciful to me; I have three small children, and my husband is very ill now, and this is the first offence.

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped , and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-25

26. MARY CARPENTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of November last one heifer, price 5 l. the goods and chattels of William Newby .

ACQUITTED for want of prosecution .

Reference Number: t17821204-26

8. JOHN FOY was indicted for that he not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being instigated by the Devil on the 23d of October last did make an assault on Mary Powell spinster in the peace of God and of the king then and there being, and her the said Mary then and there against her will feloniously did ravish, and carnally know, against the form of the statute, and against the King's peace .

The witnesses examined apart, by desire of the prisoner.

MARY POWELL sworn.

What age are you? - Sixteen the 15th of last June.

Where do you live? - I live with my father and mother.

What is your father? - He is in trade, he lives with his mistress, Mrs. Adams, an ironmonger.

Where do your father and mother live? - In Rose-lane, Spitalfields, No. 3.

Did you live with your father and mother at this time? - No, Sir, I lived at Mr. Cox's, at the Black Horse and Trumpet, the corner of Lemon-street.

How long have you known the prisoner? - I knew him no longer than while I lived at Mr. Cox's, he was a customer; I lived there in November, it was the 23d of October that he committed the rape.

What is he? - He is a waiter at Miss Brown's Hotel, which is near to Mr. Cox's, and is right opposite.

Q. Had you any particular acquaintance with him before this? - No, my Lord, I never spoke to the man, any further than to give him his beer, and what he asked for; I never had any particular correspondence with him in my life.

Tell us what you have to charge the prisoner at the bar with? - On Wednesday night, the 23d of October last, the prisoner came and had some beer, I do not know what time that was, but it was at night, and afterwards he left the house, he had three pints of beer and three pipes, he and another man.

Had you any particular conversation with the prisoner during the time that he and this other man was at your house? - No, I had nothing to say to him.

Had he any thing to say to you? - He did not speak to me indeed; between ten and eleven he came and ordered a pint of beer, I drew it, and there was nobody to take it, and I carried it to the Hotel, and he met me in the passage as I took it.

What did he say to you? - He said nothing, but took the pint of beer out of my hand, and by main force he took and dragged

me along to the parlour that comes into the street, that parlour that fronts the street, and he fastened three doors upon me.

What doors were these? - There was a door in the passage, and a door that is right fronting this parlour door, and the parlour door; he threw me down while he lay with me.

What did he do? - Why, Sir, he laid with me, as I suppose a man lays with his wife, as I was told, Sir.

You must be more particular, you must say what he did to you? - He took me in and threw me down, and put my petticoats over my mouth, and his hand over that, while he lay with me.

You must say particularly what he did, you are young and unexperienced, perhaps it may not be that thing that you suppose? - He lay with me in the room after he had thrown me down.

What did he do to you particularly? - He lay with me as I suppose a man lays with his wife.

You must say particularly, you must describe it, because the man's life is in hazard; he must not be convicted on your supposition, you must describe it; say particularly what he did; it is perfectly necessary you should say what he did? (No answer.)

Why do not you say what he did? - Why, Sir!

You must say what he did; perhaps on your account it may not amount to a rape, therefore you must speak particularly; you cannot tell whether it is a rape or not; that is the reason why you must be particular; it is necessary you should say what he did, and therefore it will not be wrong or improper you should say it; if you do not say it, the man must be acquitted. - (No answer.)

What did you feel? What did he do? - I felt a great deal of pain while he lay with me: he unbuttoned his breeches while he lay with me.

You must say particularly what he did? - He put his t - g into my body while he lay with me.

What his private parts? - Yes, he did.

Did you perceive any thing come from him? - Yes Sir I did.

How long was he about this? - I cannot justly say, it might be half an hour, or it might not be so long.

Did he do it more than once? - I do not know that he did any thing more than once.

Did you struggle? - Yes I did struggle, and I cried out, but I could not make any body come to my assistance.

Could you struggle more? - I struggled as long as ever I could.

Was it half an hour before he got his ends of you? - No Sir, I was in the place I believe about half an hour altogether.

How long did you stay in the place after he had got his ends of you? - He took and dragged me out, took and led me over to my mistress's door.

When you came to your own door did your mistress observe any thing? - After he had led me over the way he told me, if I divulged it to any body, when he met me he would use me ill.

Then you did not tell your mistress of it? - Not the same night, because I was so bad and so frightened; but I told my mistress the next day, she was busy, and that I did not tell her.

When did you tell your mistress of it? - I told her on the Thursday night, the next night as she was standing at the door.

How soon after your coming home, after the prisoner had had his ends of you, did you see your mistress? - I saw her directly, and I gave her the money for the beer.

Then you did not go up stairs before you saw your mistress? - She was down stairs.

How much time was there between the time the prisoner quitted you in the street, and the time you saw your mistress? - I saw my mistress about six minutes after.

Then you who had been thrown down, and used as you have told us, had only six minutes to adjust yourself and come into your mistress's presence, and she did not observe any thing that had happened; how was that?

- She was in a hurry: I told my mistress of it the next night; and I told Sally the house maid of it the next day about dinner time, she is not here; she is the maid at the Hotel.

Did you speak to your mistress first about it, or your mistress to you? - I spoke first; the prisoner was standing at his door with a pint pot in his hand, my mistress was standing at her door, and I went to the green-stall, and my mistress said she could not think what he stood at his door with the pint pot in his hand for, she said she supposed he was going some where else; then I up and told my mistress in what manner he had used me, my mistress said she could not help it, she is here, and on the Saturday morning my mistress discharged me, and told me that the clerk at Miss Brown's Hotel desired I should go away.

You used to go there often? - Yes, when the boy was out of the way I was obliged to go; I came away on the same account.

Prisoner's Counsel. You was dragged into this room I think you say my girl, and it was a front parlour? - Yes.

Who was in the back parlour pray? - It is a double house and they were all backwards.

Was there nobody in the next room? - I did not hear any body.

You resisted for a long time, you must be pretty well tumbled, your cap and your clothes? - My hair was up, my handkerchief was tumbled.

And your petticoats were tumbled a little? - It was out of the binding.

Only out at the binding? I am afraid you did not make much resistance? - Yes I did, I hallood out, and begged of him to let me go.

You never told Mrs. Cox that night, I think you say? - No.

Why not pray? - Because I was frightened.

What, did you go up to bed directly? - No, I staid up about three quarters of an hour.

Did you tell your master that night? - No.

This is not the first thing of the kind that has happened to you I believe? - I never knew a man before.

But you have been ravished before, have not you? - No.

No! why pray do not you know Mr. Kirby? - I did live with Mrs. Kirby, and she was in the country; and her husband did try, but he did not do any thing.

But I believe though you charged him with it, and the poor man was frightened, and I believe you made him pay for doing nothing? - My mistress gave me half a guinea, and she told me that was to pay for tumbling my gown.

You should not play these tricks young woman.

Court. You hear the evidence gentlemen.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-27

27. WILLIAM LOCKEY was indicted for James Tall in a certain highway, on the 29th of and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person and his, one watch, the cases made of silver, value 3 l. one steel chain, value 6 d. one seal set in brass, value 1 d. three pieces of gold coin of this realm called guineas, value 3 l. 3 l. one piece of gold coin of this realm called half a guinea, value 6 d. and 14 s. in monies numbered, the goods, chattels and monies of the said James .

JAMES TALL sworn.

I am a Carpenter and Joiner ; I was robbed on the 29th of October about a quarter after six in the evening, I was going alone to Five-fields-row Chelsea, out of Tothill-fields: in the Willow-walk that leads out of

Tothill fields, Chelsea , I was stopped by the prisoner at the bar and another; I had stopped to speak to a friend that lives at the Duke of Richmond's, and two women came by and asked me to go with them, I stopped a few minutes after them, I got as far as the middle house, and I saw the women before me, I might get about forty yards past the middle house; a man came behind me and knocked me down, and the prisoner was next to me.

Jury. Did you see two men at the time you got up? - Yes; when I got up again I faced them, and the prisoner at the bar pulled my watch out of my pocket, and I put my hand in my pocket and gave them my money, to the prisoner about half as I thought; I had three guineas and an half, and fourteen shillings, and I gave him about half, and then the other man saying there was some left, he put his hand in and took the remainder; I begged of them not to use me ill, and the prisoner struck me two or three blows over my breast, and knocked me backwards against a tree; I caught hold of the rail, and I begged them not to use me ill, and one got of one side of me, and the other, the other, and they took me and flung me in the ditch; I went in with my feet foremost, if they had flung me in with my head foremost I could not have got out; I called out murder for help; the women were before me, they heard me call out, and heard the men rob me, and they run away and left me; my arm catching hold of the bank helped me to get out, I stood up in the ditch breast high, and as I got myself turned round, and tryed to get up, I slipped back, but at last I got up; the prisoner and the other man went off, I ran as fast as I could: it was about a quarter after six, a very fine clear night, the did not shine: it was a fortnight and a day after before I saw the prisoner again; I went into the Ambreys and I was talking of my robbery; I saw the prisoner standing up, I thought I saw the other, but I would not be positive to swear to him; he was dressed smart and I would not swear to him; the prisoner was dressed in the same clothes to the best of my knowledge when he committed the robbery, he had a light coloured great coat on: it was in Masham-street, and a friend of mine sent me to this house, and told me to give a description of the men, and they said go in and see if you know them; when I went in I saw him standing up, and I knew him directly, and I called for half a pint of beer or purl, and I was all in a flurry, and I took up the news-paper but I could not read it; and I went to my friend and said I am sure that is the person; says they, that is a master Baker's son in Tothill-street, I said I am sure it is the man: I had him apprehended: the patroll went into this publick house, and the constable was afraid to take him, he went out and got another constable and assistance, and they came, and I said that is the man, and says I, that is the other one, but I cannot swear to him, as to him (the prisoner) says I, I can swear to him; then he came up to me and gave me a deal of ill language: he put out very bad language: we went to the Brown Bear , and the man that kept the Hercules pillars, he began blasting me, and he would do for me and for them: Mr. Jealous jumped up and said, I will take and iron you directly, then the landlord sat down, we went before Justice Wright about seven, and I told him at the time the prisoner was the person that robbed me.

Court. Did you observe this man before you were first knocked down? - I did not.

Are you sure and positive, consider the prisoner's life may depend on your oath, and therefore you cannot be too cautious; look again and see whether that is the man? - I am certain sure that is the man.

Have you any doubt about it? - No sir, I am as clear and as confident about it as can be; I said I have seen the man's face, I think I should know him again, but I did not know where I had seen his face.

Were you at all in liquor in that time? - I suppose in the course of that day I might

drink eight or nine pints of beer, I had just drank a pint of beer before.

Was your head confused at all? - I was very sensible, but I will not say I was as sober as ever I was, but I remember what I did as well as I should now this minute.

Prisoner's counsel. You are a carpenter, I believe. - And joiner both.

Had you worked that afternoon? - I had not been at work that day.

You had been drinking all day? - No, I may call myself sober, or thereaways; - I was able to take care of myself.

I suppose you could walk well? - Walk well, or discourse.

But you was not so capable, perhaps, of discerning every thing as if you was perfectly sober? - I was, upon, my word.

You think you was? - Yes.

What time of night was this? - I think about a quarter or twenty minutes after six; it is not ten minutes walk from the place where I live to the place where I was robbed.

It was a very dark night, I believe? - No, it was a very fine clear night, I am sensible it was a very clear night.

Do you know Job Carey? - Yes.

Was you at his house that night? - It was the last house I went out of.

Was not you when you went out of Carey's house very much intoxicated in liquor? - I was not.

Was you at Carey's the next morning after this robbery? - Yes, and I asked him who was in the house.

Then you was so much in liquor the night before, you could not tell who was in the house? Did not you tell Job Carey the next morning that you was so much in liquor over-night that you could not tell who was there? - I did not; upon my word I did not.

Did not you say that you could not tell whether any body came in with you or went out with you? - No, I did not.

How was the prisoner dressed at that time? - In a light coloured great coat, buttoned up very close, and a flapped hat; I saw his face because he stood up to me, and being of my own height, or thereaways.

Do you know Adam Baker ? - He keeps the Bull and Butcher.

Did not you tell him three or four days after the robbery that you could not tell the person that robbed you, nor the colour of his clothes? - I told him that I was robbed, but I did not know who the people were, not till such time as I found them out.

Nor the colour of his clothes? - I described the colour of the clothes the next morning before the Justice, I did not tell Baker I could not describe the colour of the clothes, I did not tell him any such thing.

Do you know one Fraser that is returned from the lighters? - Yes.

Did not you go to his lodging, or speak to any body, representing him to be the person that robbed you? - I was at work just by, a person says to me, perhaps it might be Fraser; I believe it was one Sigby; I did know him at that time, but I could not call him to mind; I recollected the men afterwards that he was not the man.

Did not you say at that time perhaps it might be Fraser that robbed you? - It was Sigby that said so.

You know there is a reward on this occasion, do not you? - The reward is nothing at all to me.

Have not you said to something about the reward to somebody? - people have said to me he will be hanged, there will be the reward will make up your loss; and I have said, the reward will be nothing at all to me, the constables will get that: I never saw my watch after.

JOHN ARNOLD sworn.

I took the prisoner.

FRANCIS TILLEY sworn.

I also apprehended the prisoner.

MARY TILLEY sworn.

I was going with a nurse child from Camberwell, and going home, just as I got to the corner of the house; the prisoner jumped a-cross the ditch and looked me in the face.

Was you one of the two women that asked Tall to go home with you? - Yes, Sir, the other was but a child; the prisoner at the bar crossed the ditch on the side of the house, the left hand going down to Chelsea, about a quarter after six.

How late was it? - It w as between the lights, it was a very clear night.

Could you distinguish the features of a man's countenance so as to swear to him again? - I really think that was the man to the best of my knowledge that looked under my bonnet, there was nobody in company with him when he crossed the ditch; he said nothing to me, he immediately went a-cross the ditch again, there was another man a-cross the ditch; I did not observe his height, they swore to one another, and said it would not do, or something of that kind; I went on about forty yards from there, and I heard this carpenter stopped, and I heard the man asking for the money, but what it was I do not know, nor whether there was one man or two; when I heard the man cry out, I made the best of my way home; the man had a light-coloured coat on, buttons one, to the best of my remembrance, a light brown great coat, he had a roundish hat flapped over his face, he looked me under the bonnet, and he pushed his hat up: I observed his face; I saw him again at the Justice's, which was a fortnight and a day after, to the best of my remembrance, they came to fetch me to go.

Was you called upon to find the prisoner out amongst several others? - He held down his head, and I could not see his face, then he held up his head, and I saw it was him, I knew him immediately; I said directly to my husband that was standing by, that it was him; I said to the best of my remembrance to the Justice that it was him; she that was with me is quite a child, and troubled with fits.

Court. Look at the man again. - I am positive, Sir, that is the man that looked me under the bonnet in my face; to the best of my remembrance I can swear to him.

Prisoner's Counsel. What are you? - I wash and scour.

Do you know the prosecutor? - I never saw the man before in my life, before I saw him at Carey's door drinking a pint of beer.

You know there is a on this occasion in case the prisoner? - No Sir, I do not.

You say you believe him to be the man, you do not to the man positively? - I am positive sure it is the man that looked me in the face.

You did not know him before? - No, but he looked me in the face full, and crossed the ditch again.

As the prosecutor (you say) and you are entire strangers, how came you to before the Justice? - The man found me out, Arnold knew me, I ran in my fright to the publick-house and ordered a pint of beer; I went home immediately, and I up and told the landlord there was a man robbed; they told him to look up, and he looked me in the face and then I knew him again.

The Remainder of this Trial in the Third Part.

Reference Number: t17821204-27

HODGSON's SHORT-HAND TREATISE, Price 2 s. 6 d. with an Explanatory Copper-plate, to be had of J. WALMSLAY, and S. BLADON.

TRIALS, &c. taken with great Accuracy by E. HODGSON, Writer of these PROCEEDINGS, No. 35, Chancery-lane.

N. B. SHORT-HAND taught on an improved Plan.

Reference Number: t17821204-27

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday, the 4th of DECEMBER, 1782, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Nathaniel Newnham , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART III.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of William Lockey .

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I leave it to my counsel; I am entirely innocent, I have people here to prove it.

JOB CAREY sworn.

I believe you keep a publick-house in Rochester-row? - Yes.

Do you know the prosecutor? - I know very little of him, I never saw him before that night that he was robbed, he came into my house and called for a pint of beer.

What time of night was that? - It might be a quarter before six for what I know, he had a pint of beer and drank it, and while he was a drinking of it, he laid his head down and seemed to go to sleep; I was sitting in the next box receiving some money, he got up all in a hurry, and said, Mr. Carey I have had a pint of beer, and I have paid for it, very well, Sir, said I, I did not know that he knew me; he seemed to reel very much in going out of the box, I said to him take care my friend, you will fall down, no, no, says he, I shall be capable of taking care of myself though I have been drinking; I wished him a good night, he went all along the passage reeling; that might be about ten minutes after six: the next morning he came into my house about ten, or half an hour after; says he, Mr. Carey I want to speak to you, says I, my friend what is your will, says he, drink, do not you remember that I was here last night, I looked him in the face, yes, says I, I believe you sat in that middle box, yes says he; he had changed his clothes; says he, what company was I in, I had been drinking, I was ill used; I have some notion that some body dogged me out of your house, and used me ill in the Willow walk; for says he, they took all the money I had from me, and flung me into the ditch; he asked me who was in his company, for he said he had been a drinking and he could not remember whose company he had been in; he said he was in liquor, and he could not remember who was in his company: I am upon oath, I tell you the truth: the prosecutor came about a week after I believe, and drank a pint of beer, this was the third time that I saw him; says he, Mr.

Carey I want to speak with you, says I, what is your will now, pray says he is not there one Fraser that keeps horses and carts in Duck-lane, no says I, there is one Simon Fraser , says he, that is the man that robbed me; why says I, that is a one eyed man; the man that robbed you, as you told me, had a scar in his face, all down his face, says he, I do not care, that is the man that robbed me; and I do not know how to go about it to take him up; I said take a constable, that is the way; so he drank his beer and went away.

Court. Has the prisoner a scar? - No.

Do you remember Sir any part of the conversation, at any of the two last meetings, any thing said about the darkness of the night? - No Sir, not to my knowledge; it was quite dark when he went out of my house, so that you could not see the length of your hand.

Court to Tall. You have heard what the witness has said, did you hold such conversation? - I went to his house, and asked him who was in his house, whether any body might have been there and waited for me.

Court to Carey. Had you any soldiers that night in your house? - Yes, there were two or three in the house all the time.

To Carey. Did you know the prisoner at the bar before this happened? - Yes my Lord, very well; I have known him these twenty years; his father is a Baker in that neighbourhood; I never heard but he always bore an exceeding good character.

Court. What is the prisoner? - The prisoner is a Baker.

ADAM BAKER sworn.

What are you? - A Butcher and publican.

Do you know the prosecutor? - Yes.

Did you see him at any time after this robbery was committed? - Yes, about ten days or a fortnight after; the gentleman that was robbed, and two men came into my house; I live in Peter-street, Westminster: and while they were drinking a pot of purl, it came up that this gentleman was robbed; says I, you light with many misfortunes, you was robbed at the spring of the year, yes, says he, he said it was two that robbed him; says I, should you know them again if you was to see them, no says he, I should not; what coloured clothes had they on, says I, I do not know, said he, they came behind me.

Who was in company with the prosecutor when he said this? - The name of one is Sigby, he is an Ironmonger.

THOMAS HARGRAVE sworn.

I am a journeyman Hatter; I know the prisoner very well; on the 29th of October last in the evening, I saw him at the sign of the King's head in the Broad way, Westminster.

What time of night was it you first saw him? - At four o'clock.

How long was he in your company? - Till past seven, I am very positive of it; I cannot say I had my eyes upon him all the time, but I am sure he never was five minutes out of my company at one time, I was drinking with him; there were five or six more; there was John Elliott , and John Lyons .

Do you know Thomas Pearce ? - Yes, he is a corporal, he was present at the same time.

Court. How soon after was it when you was called upon to remember this? - That night, there was a young chap an acquaintance of ours came to call me to the chair-club, at the sign of the Angel, in the Broadway.

Court. What day of the week was it? - On a Tuesday.

What was that young man's name? - I do not know his name: he was chairman of a club, and he brought some bills and handed them about to make a club, and the prisoner at the bar I know went for one; but I would not go.

JOHN LYONS sworn.

I am a journeyman hatter; I was at the

King's head in the Broad-way, on the 29th of October last, I was there all the whole afternoon till after eleven at night; and the prisoner was there in company with me, from before five, till near half after seven.

Court to Jury. Gentlemen, you see that the identity of the prisoner's person is so much called in question, the prosecutor himself being confessedly drunk, that it depends entirely on the testimony of that girl, who is very much contradicted.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-28

29. JEREMIAH CALLNON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of November last twelve pounds weight of lead, value 1 s. 6 d. belonging to John Hatchett , and fixed to the dwelling house of the said John Hatchett , against the statute .

A second Count for feloniously stealing on the same day twelve pounds weight of lead, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods of Henry Allen and Henry Wallis , fixed to a certain building in the possession of the said John Hatchett .

HENRY WALLIS sworn.

I am a carpenter, and work for Mr. Allen, I took the prisoner with twelve pounds weight of lead on him at the corner of Long Acre, about five minutes after twelve in the day; he had got it under his smock frock, it was concealed; Mr. Allen and I took the place to build for a certain sum of money, and to make good every thing; we had lost a vast quantity of lead from the place before.

Was this house inhabited at the time? - This was taken from the shop adjoining to the dwelling-house.

Was it fixed? - It was nailed on.

Then it was fixed to the out-house adjoining to the house? - We had lost several hundred weight of lead before; I caught the man with it myself, he had been at work there, he was a labourer to Mr. Norris, the bricklayer; I met him coming from the building, and I saw him have something under his smock frock, I judged it might be our property, and I stopped him; I took the lead from between his smock frock and his waistcoat.

Did you charge him with taking it? - Yes, I did.

What did he say? - He told me he found it, sometimes he said in one place, first in the shavings, and then at the bottom of the ladder; I matched it to the same place, and the nail-holes matched where it was taken off.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was coming to dinner I found this lead at the foot of a ladder, under some shavings; this gentleman told me he would let me go if I would tell him about his lead; they were ripping off lead that very day.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a very good character.

Court to Wallis. Are you clear and certain it is the same lead? - I am certain it is.

How long before you apprehended this man had you seen the lead fixed to the house? - I cannot exactly say.

GUILTY .

To be imprisoned twelve months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-29

30. JOHN MARTIN , and ANN his Wife , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of November last, one man's hat, value 10 s. one silver pap spoon, value 10 s. one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the goods of Thomas Waugh : one silk bonnet, value 1 s. one apron, value 6 d. one cotton gown, value 3 s. one jacket and coat, value 2 s. two dimity petticoats, value 3 s. one flannel petticoat, value 6 d. one muslin cloak, value 2 s. the goods of Ann Wright , spinster , and one linen shift, value 1 s. the goods of Mary Waugh , spinster.

MARY WAUGH sworn.

I am daughter to Mr. Thomas Waugh , of Drury-lane ; the prisoner and his wife lodged in my father's house; the things mentioned in the indictment were in the room where the prisoners slept, they had lodged with us a month; they went away the 9th of November in the morning before we were up, and the things were gone; they were in a box in a closet, which was not locked; the next day I missed all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); the prisoner Ann was taken last Friday, and when she was stripped, a black silk bonnet, the property of Ann Wright , who is here, was found on her; I made the bonnet and shift, she owned to it, and the other things.

Did not you tell her it would be better for her if she would confess? - Yes, my Lord.

Prisoner Ann. I confessed the bonnet, and she promised me I should come to no harm.

EVE BROUGHTGN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker at Chelsea, I have a cotton gown here which the prisoner Ann pledged with me for 3 s. 6 d. in the name of Mary Smith ; I believe it was the prisoner Ann, but I will not be sure.

PRISONER ANN's DEFENCE.

I hope you will take it into consideration, I do not what to say; I never did such a thing before, nor ever was before any magistrate in my life: my husband knows nothing of the things; the family were up when I went away, and my husband went out some hours before.

Court. It is impos sible the man and the wife can both be guilty of this larceny; if they had both committed it together, the woman must have been acquitted.

JOHN MARTIN , NOT GUILTY .

ANN MARTIN , GUILTY .

To be imprisoned six months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-30

31. THOMAS CROWDER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Bradford Esq ; about the hour of three in the night, on the 30th of November last, with intent, the goods, chattels, and monies of the said John Bradford , in the said dwelling house then and there being, burglariously to steal, take, and carry away .

JOSEPH CLENCH sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Bradford, he lives in Rathbone-place . Last Sunday morning between three and four, I heard a great knocking at the door, and I got out of my bed; my master's bell rung before I could get out of my room, I went first to his room door and opened it, he asked me what was the matter at the door; I went to the door and asked who was there, and the watchman answered me; I immediately opened the door, and he told me there were thieves in the

house; I went down with him, and left another watchman at the door on the outside with his candle and lanthorn, having shut the door; we went down immediately to the kitchen, and the window near the sink was thrown up, and the inside shutters were very much broken, and the outside shutters were open; as soon as we saw that, we went and opened the area door.

Court. Did you see this window shut at night? - Yes, I look at every place before I go to bed, I saw them very fast, I did not fasten them myself, the cook fastened them: we went and opened the area door; and the small beer cellar door faced us almost, and the watchman being before me, said, there they are; I just took a fight, I saw two men in the cellar; we both tried to shut the small beer cellar door, they burst it open, knocked out the watchman's light, got from us, and rushed out at the front door.

Did you take notice enough of the people to know who they were? - No my Lord.

How do you imagine these people got into the area? - Over the rails I imagine my Lord.

Is it a deep area? - It is about eight or nine feet deep.

Not too deep for a man to drop? - No.

Are there iron rails on the outside? - Yes.

JOHN DAVID sworn.

I am the watchman that watched in that beat that night: I was informed by a woman on the other side of the way, that she saw thieves about, and she believed they were in this gentleman's house; accordingly I poked at the shutters and found one of them open; this was at three in the morning; I called to my brother watchman to assist; I knocked at the door, and the footman came and asked who was there, I said it is the watchman, there are thieves in your master's house; I went down with the man, and we saw the window broke, and we opened the door, and I was the first man that went in; and when I saw them in the vault, I spoke with a loud voice, and said, there they are; and I was fully resolved to throw them down if possibly I could; and they knocked my lanthorn out of my hand, and overpowered me, and I took particular notice of them, as much as I could; and I can swear that the prisoner at the bar is one of them.

What became of you when they knocked the lanthorn out of your hand? - I was obliged to stay there.

They did not stay with you? - They knocked out my candle, and went into the house directly; I found this crow in the cellar after.

What sort of a morning was it? - It was a darkish morning, but I had the light in my lanthorn to observe their faces; if I was to see the other man I believe I would know him; I looked full in their faces; they were a matter of three or four minutes with me, fronting me in the area.

Your candle was knocked out? - In three or four minutes.

What, was you struggling with them three or four minutes? - Yes.

That is, you was on one side of the door, and they were on the other? - Yes.

You could not see them then? - No.

Your struggle was to keep them in the cellar? - Yes.

Then they were withinside the cellar? - Yes.

Did you stand with your back to the kitchen door? - Yes, they stood for a matter of three or four minutes in the area.

Court. After they had got out of the vault as you call it, how long was it before they got into the house? - It was three or four minutes, as nigh as I can guess.

And in what part of this three or four minutes was it that your lanthorn was knocked out? - My lanthorn was a-light during that time.

When was your lanthorn knocked out? - At the last.

How was the prisoner dressed? - In a black waistcoat and whitish coat, and a three

cocked hat, that is the man; the other was dressed in a blueish coat, and a bit of a round hat with a lace to it; I saw him at the round house about half an hour after, I knew him directly.

Did you tell the officers that was the man?

PRISONER.

My Lord he said he knew nothing of me.

I was not asked, I knew in my mind that was the man.

Did you say any thing at the time? - I did not say any thing, I was not asked any questions; the other watchman pursued him, and never lost sight of him till he took him to the round house.

PRISONER.

The man laid no charge against me at the watch-house till the Monday following; he owned at the watch-house that he had a doubt of me; at the watch-house he did not then think me the person.

Court to David. Remember you are upon your oath, did you say you knew nothing about him? - No, I was not asked any questions.

DANIEL SILLWAY sworn.

I was one of the watchmen, I stood at the door, it was rather a cloudy morning.

Could you see what passed in the area? - No, I heard them dispute, but I could not see any one in the area.

How long might they be disputing in the area? - About three or four minutes; then I saw the prisoner at the bar come out of the door, I thought he belonged to the house; he asked me where they were, I said they were withinside; he rushed against me, and with his shoulder he attempted to throw me into the kennel, I saw nobody come out with him; he was the first man that came out, he ran hard into Farmer's rents, he returned in less than five minutes, there being no thoroughfare; he was then in custody of St. Giles's watchman.

Court. How long might this be that he was taken by the watchman, after he ran past you; - I suppose it had not been above ten minutes; he made all the best haste he could.

Had you your lanthorn? - I looked as serious in his face as I would in yours.

When he opened the door, he did not give you much time for examination I suppose? - I thought him to be one of the family.

Had you opportunity sufficient to see his face so as to distinguish him? - Yes I had, I swear he was the man.

You must be very quick sighted. - He stood and asked me where are they, and I said they are within side; then he pushed against me, and then I took him to be one of the thieves.

Did you hold your lanthorn up to his face? - When he came to the door, he pretended to belong to the house; I had time enough to look at his face; I am full sure of him.

How was he dressed? - Much such a coat as that he wears now, it may be the same; he had a three cocked hat full of cobwebs, and his back full of brick-dust.

PRISONER.

That man swore at the Justices that I never was out of his sight, from the time that he says I came out of the house, till he took me.

No more you was, till you ran into Farmer's rents.

THOMAS HARDCASTLE sworn.

I am the St. Giles's watchman: last Tuesday morning about a quarter after three, I was at the top of Hog-lane; I heard a rattling, and a cry of Stop thief! I stood with intent to guard myself if he came my way, or on the opposite side of the way; I heard the foot run down this Farmer's rents, I called my brother watchman; I said I believed I could find the prisoner, knowing it to be no thoroughfare.

What space is it down these rents? - I dare say it is 150 yards; my partner Mr.

Carty, and I went down together, and there we found the prisoner immediately, and laid hold of him by the collar; he said, what have I done? what have I done?

Whereabouts in the rents did you find him? - At the bottom of the rents, where he could not run any further: I said I do not know what you have done, there is an oration of Stop thief! and I seize you; when I brought him up to the top of the court, this Marybone watchman, Sillway, said that is the man.

Court. Did he look at him first, before he said that is the man? - No, he did not, he immediately said so, when he got sight of him: I had a light, and my partner had a light; then we took him to the watch-house.

DENNIS CARTY sworn.

I am a watchman, I took the prisoner with the other watchman, and when we came up to the top of Farmer's rents, the watchman said he was the man, and so he said at the watch-house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lord, I keep a house in Great Earl-street, Seven Dials, in the grocery and chandlery business; I had two or three people to dine with me on that day; one of whom was one William Chapman , an Attorney, who lives at the Boar and Castle, in Oxford-road; I went to see him home; I had parted with him about five minutes; and I went up this court to ease myself: there was a young woman stood at the end of the court, whom I have since found; and she asked me to relieve her; I followed her, and enquired into her circumstances, she went part of the way up the court with me: she said her husband was on board the Belleisle, I said I had a wife, I did not want any thing with her, and I gave her three or four penny worth of halfpence; then I went up the court, and eased nature. I was no higher up Oxford-road, than the top of Hog-lane: this man gave no charge of me; the footman was as capable of knowing whether I was the person, as this man was. There is another thing I had forgot; at the time I was taken up the watchmen differed, some wanted to carry me to one watch-house, and some to the other; in the interim a very genteel looking man came up, and said, that in Oxford Road he saw a man come up, and that I was not the man; I have had so little notice, but I believe he is here; they ill used the man, and turned him neck and heels out of the watch-house; the man came in and tendered himself a second time to serve me, and they then detained him, and kept him till the Monday following.

Court to Clench. When you could no longer keep the men in the cellar, but they forced the door open, I want to know how long it might be before they got into the kitchen and ran out of doors? - To the best of my recollection it was two or three minutes, we were in the area during that time.

MARY RUSSELL sworn.

Are you a married woman or a single woman? - A married woman.

Who are you married to? - John Russel .

What is he? - On board the Belleisle.

Do you know the prisoner? - I saw him last Sunday morning at half past two o'clock, at the top of Hog-lane; I asked him to give me something to drink, I said I was a poor unfortunate woman, and was a long way from home, and my husband was on board the Belleisle; he said he had a wife at home, he had no business with any woman, but he would give me something to drink; we staid talking there the value of ten minutes, and while we staid talking at the top of Hog-lane, at Wright's Rents, I believe they call it, the watchman came by half past two; he gave me some halfpence, and I saw no more of him.

Court to the St. Giles's watchman. Do you know this place, Wright's Rents? - I know Farmer's Rents, that is at the top of Hog-lane.

Is there such a place as Wright's Rents?

Russell. I am but a stranger to the place, I understood it was Wright's Rents.

How was the prisoner dressed? - In a drab-coloured coat and black sattin waistcoat, and a lightish pair of breeches; I never saw him before in my life only then, and now I see him at the bar.

Court to Clench. You hear what he says, that there was a well dressed man came to the watch-house? - He was in the watch-house when I got there, I saw no such person; after they had taken this man, the watchman came to let my master know, and I went to the watch-house.

Court to David. You was in the watch-house? - Not before the servant went there, but I saw a gentleman in black, he gave them very ill language, and abused the beadles very much; he looked like a tradesman or a gentleman, he made a great noise.

Did you hear him say any thing like the prisoner's not being the man? - Upon my oath, my Lord, I never heard a word about it.

Court to Silway. Did you hear that gentleman say any thing about it? - He was asked what he was, and he said he was a painter; he came in with the prisoner, he said, he believed he was not the man: says I, Do you know that man? No, says he, I know nothing about him; then the watch-house keeper and the constable of the night turned him out; then he rushed in again, and they suspected that he belonged to the prisoner; he said the man wore a slouched hat, and he saw him run; he said he was late in a public house, and was just come out; he said he was not a master painter, and lived at lodgings, and worked at piece-work, or such work as he could get.

Court to Hardcastle. Did you hear this man say any thing? - When we got the prisoner at the top of Hog-lane he came up, and said, What are you doing to the man? I said, If you know any thing of him, come with us and speak in his behalf: when he came there he interfered, and they turned him out: he said he saw a man run before, and he did not believe this was the same man; he came in again, and used the constable ill, and the beadle, and the patrols; he used a deal of bad language, and they detained him.

Clench. My Lord, this woman has sworn, that she never saw the prisoner before or after till now; whereas when he was brought to Newgate she came in the coach with him and his wife.

- DIXON sworn.

I brought the prisoner to Newgate, and his wife and this woman came in the coach with him; I am positive to the woman, and I saw her at the office, and she said, you cannot get Forty by him as you wanted to get by my husband.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-31

32. JOHN PETERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of October last, 1400 weight of iron shot, value 4 l. the goods of Francis Roper , then and there being in a certain barge called the Susannah, on the navigable river of Thames .

FRANCIS ROPER sworn.

Did you lose any quantity of iron shot lately? - Yes.

Who took it? - I cannot tell, I only come to prove the property; I saw it in the night between the 24th and 25th of October, it was called seventy-five shot.

Is it your property? - I cannot swear that they were, because it was not alongside my wharf; they were sent in a craft from my wharf to be delivered to the East India Company's wharf , and were laying alongside that wharf that night; I know I lost them, because the quantity sent, and the quantity delivered were different; they were sent in a barge, I saw them in the barge, there were one thousand shot sent; my wharf is the Surry side, the company's is the Middlesex side.

Do you know of your own knowledge whether or no the one thousand shot were safely delivered? - I know that there were not so many received.

Do you know of your own knowledge, whether or no these shot were delivered? - No, I cannot tell that.

Was the barge called the Susannah? - I believe she was.

JOHN BIGGS sworn.

I was an officer of the night that night at Ratcliffe, I am headborough; I know nothing about the matter any further than I found four men, and the prisoner was one of them, in a warehouse in the back part of Mr. Kates's house, that is all I know; I took him in custody on suspicion of stealing some rope and shot, I saw nothing about him.

- COLEMAN sworn.

What are you? - I am an evidence, I am no trade at all, I was along with John Peters and Richard Kates in taking this here shot.

Court. Here is not a tittle of evidence to affect the prisoner, except the evidence of an accomplice, which is not sufficient of itself unless it is strengthened and corroborated by other more credible witnesses.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-32

33. THOMAS KELVIE and JOSEPH BENNETT were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of October last 6 lb. weight of old cable junk, value 5 s. the goods of John Body and Samuel Bacon .

JOHN BIGGS sworn.

I know no further than I found the prisoners in a warehouse on the 25th of October, in the morning between two and three, the back part of one Mr. John Kates 's, they were doing nothing at all, I found nothing about them.

Were they charged with any thing in your presence? - No further than there was one piece of junk found in a skiff that lay near the water side.

Do you know that skiff was theirs? - No, my Lord, I took them to the watch-house, and I took the junk that was in the skiff, it is here I believe, it is the same, our beadle has had it in his custody ever since.

ELISHA COLEMAN sworn.

I saw the prisoners unload the junk at Kates's warehouse out of the skiff, but where they got it, or where they came from, I do not know, I was not in company with them at all; I was coming up with some shot to this Kates's house, I saw the prisoners at this Kates's house, they were come there.

How do you know that the skiff belonged to them.

I cannot tell that, I saw them unloading some junk out of the skiff, and they put it into Kates's warehouse.

Court. There is no evidence at all against the prisoners before us now.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-33

36. MARY HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of November last one quart pewter pot; value 18 d. the goods of Ann Williams , widow .

ANN WILLIAMS sworn.

I keep a publick house ; the prisoner was detected in stealing a quart pot my property, she was brought into my house by one of my boys, on the 10th of November, a little after nine in the morning.

THOMAS BROKENBROUGH sworn.

I found the prisoner in Shoe-lane, my mistress keeps the White Swan, in Fleet-market , I was gathering in my pots, and I set half a dozen pots down in Plumbtree-court, and one of our customers saw this woman come by, and saw her stoop, and

told me, and I went after her and took her in Shoe-lane with my mistress's quart pot under her left arm, under her cloak.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the boy, he took the pot on me, I did not know that the pot belonged to him, I knew a person wanted a pot, and I thought the pot was belonging to another, I could not read.

Brokenbrough. She told me the person she lived with had lost a pot.

JOHN BOLTON sworn.

I went in about ten, and this woman sat at the table with the quart pot before her; she acknowledged she took the pot, she said she did it through want; this is the pot.

(The pot deposed to.)

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-34

37. ANN TAUNTON and MARY WALKER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November last, a piece of printed cotton, containing six yards and three quarters, value 20 s. the goods of Buxton Webster , privily in his shop .

(The witnesses examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

BUXTON WEBSTER sworn.

About two o'clock on the 12th of November, I saw the prisoner Walker in my shop, she was looking at some silk handkerchiefs, I was backwards in the parlour, I do not know how long she had been in the shop, I only saw her when she was going out; two or three minutes after she came back, and the other woman Taunton who had the goods, which I took out of her apron; it is my cotton, and has my shop mark on it; she did not buy any thing of me.

Prisoner Walker. When I was examined before my Lord Mayor, the gentleman said he had no mark on this piece of linen, he could only swear to it, by having such a piece of linen in his shop in the morning.

Court. Is that so Mr. Webster? - It is not, it has my own private mark upon it.

Prisoners counsel. That mark I see is only E and S. - Yes.

That sort of mark I believe is the mark of very many tradesmen besides you. - Yes.

And that mark is not of your own making. - It is not.

Therefore all that you can say is, that it is such a mark as you mark goods with. - Several other retail drapers have goods marked in the same way; I saw this very piece of goods myself in the morning.

THOMAS WILLIAMS sworn.

On the 12th of November about two, I saw the young woman Taunton stand in the street, about twenty yards from Mr. Webster's shop, on the same side of the way; I had some little suspicion of her, I looked through my shop window, which looks into Mr. Webster's shop, and saw a person in the shop, I saw her come out, and she turned on the left hand side of the shop step; and looked in at one window, and then at the other: Taunton seeing her come out, came a little nearer the shop, then Mary Walker went into the shop again, and in about five minutes came out; after she came out of the shop, she made up to the other that was looking in at a silver-smith's shop window, they were going up a passage at the corner; but as I suppose somebody was coming, and they went a few yards further, and stood at a gentleman's door; Mary Walker turned her head to the shop, to see if any body was looking after her; I went to them, and I says to Taunton, what have you got in your lap? and she opened it, and I saw a piece of linen, I cannot swear to it; I brought them both back to Mr. Webster's shop; I did not see Walker give her that piece of linen; when I brought them back, Mr. Webster took the piece out of Ann Taunton 's apron.

Court. Was Taunton in sight when the other was in the shop? - Yes, she was not more than twenty yards from the shop.

Prisoner's Counsel. You had your eye on them all the time? - Yes.

I should think it hardly possible for the one to give the other any thing without your seeing her? - I could not see through their bodies, I saw their backs; they stood by the side of each other.

You must see their arms? - The door runs back from the frontispiece of the house.

In fact you saw nothing at all given? - No.

Prisoner Walker. I bought this piece of linen of a pedlar that walks the streets.

Court to Webster. What is the value of that piece at a low valuation? - Eighteen or twenty shillings.

BOTH GUILTY , ( Death .)

They were humbly recommended to mercy by the Jury.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-35

38. MARY FLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of November last, six silver desert spoons, value 30 s. and one pair of silver tea tongs, value 5 s. the goods of Thomas Tookey .

THOMAS TOOKEY sworn.

I live at No. 35, in Monkwell-street; I lost six silver desert spoons, and a pair of tea tongs; I am a working silver smith ; I think I lost them on the 4th of November, my servant lost them; I can only prove the property.

EDMUND JOHN APLIN sworn.

I live with Mr. Tookey; on the 4th of November last, about half past eight, coming from his house down Ludgate-hill , the prisoner at the bar stopped me, and pulled me by my right arm against a house, I asked her what she wanted with me; I told her I had nothing for her, she made me no answer; I tried to push away from her, and in putting my hand down, I felt my handkerchief three parts out of my pocket, I walked at a little distance, and I recollected I had a parcel of spoons, six desert spoons, and a pair of tea tongs in the same pocket, wrapped up in a piece of paper; I felt for them and found them gone, I went back, and the prisoner was away from the place where I stood; I went as far as Ave Mary-lane, going down Ludgate-hill into Fleet market, about a quarter of an hour after, I met the prisoner with another woman, I stopped her, and charged her with taking a parcel out of my pocket; the other woman walked on, she said she knew nothing about it, but I insisted she did, and she should come back to my master, she refused that, she said she would go back to the same place where we stood; she said I might have dropped them; she was on the left hand side, she turned to the door where we stood, and she went close to the door, stooping down, I heard the spoons fall from her, I heard them rattle together I immediately said, she was dropping the spoons; she turned away from the place, I picked up the spoons and counted them, and there wanted one, I said here wants a spoon, and I shall not let you go till I have it; she turned her pocket out, and shewed it me; she said she knew nothing of it, I would not let her go; I never left her till the watch set; I gave charge of her to the watchman in Fleet-market, he took her to the watch-house; I did not get the other spoon, I never saw the paper after.

How long was you with her the first time? - Not above a minute or two, there was not five words passed.

( John Stephens the constable produced the spoons, which were deposed to by Aplin.)

Stephens. The prisoner said she knew nothing of the spoons; but she would get a friend to make the money up, rather than have the trouble of a prosecution.

Prisoner. Please to ask him if he was with no other woman but me?

No Sir, not one; I never spoke to nobody.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going along by the-sevage; that young man came after me and told I had robbed him; I never saw him in my life.

Court to Aplin. Did you know this woman by sight? - She had a long white cloak on; I have seen her before in the same spot, but never spoke to her, nor she to me, that I know of.

Tookey. The tea-tongs were wanted in a very great hurry; they had not time to be hall marked; and there is my name struck twice on them.

GUILTY .

To be confined to hard labour, six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-36

39. AARON DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of November last a canvas bag, value 4 d. and thirteen pounds weight of bohea tea, value 40 s. the goods of Thomas Kemble and Co.

JOHN SADLER sworn.

On the 6th of November, between seven and eight at night, I was unlading a cart of Messrs. Smith, Kemble and Co. in Newgate-street , and I saw a man in brown clothes get on the wheel of the cart, and knock a bag out of the cart, the man run and I run about two or three yards, and he had got nothing along with him; in about two or three minutes a man brought me the bag, and said they had taken the thief.

Court. Then this is not the man that knocked the bag off of the cart? - I do not know what became of the bag, I did not see it on the ground, it was on the other side of the cart, I saw the man knock it off the cart; they brought the prisoner to the King's-arms Tavern opposite; they gave me the bag, and the constable took it; there is the same mark as was on it; it was directed to one Bailey at High Wycomb (look at the bag); I am sure it was one of the bags on my cart.

Prisoner. When they came into the tavern they asked him how he lost this bag, and he said at first he was hoisting up a hogshead of sugar.

SAMUEL WAIGHT sworn.

I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw a man run by with a bag under his arm; after he had run a little way he dropped the bag: I am convinced it was the prisoner; he told me afterwards he picked the bag up, and that a man hit him in the face; I saw him stopped.

Did you ever lose sight of him? - I believe I might.

ROBERT TIMCOCK sworn.

I took charge of the prisoner, and this is the same bag, I know nothing further.

JOSEPH LUTON sworn.

I am shopman to the prosecutors, I saw the bag packed with the thirteen pounds of tea in it, and directed it, which direction is now on the bag.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am a young lad, and come out of Wales to buy beasts for my mother and father; there was a gentleman that lives at No. 1, Church-court, in the Strand, coming by, I picked up this bag, there was two or three carts standing, I knew not what cart it belonged to; I went to the pastry-cook's to look at the direction, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I immediately delivered it out of my hand, it fell down; I went on, they followed me, and stopped me; when I took it, I meant to see the direction, and carry it to the owner,

and if not, to advertise it; I have a witness, a carman.

THOMAS VENABLES sworn.

I am a callenderer by trade, I work with Mr. Lamb, he is a buckram-stiffener in Chiswell-street; I was taking in some goods belonging to a customer of my master's; I saw the prisoner cross the way, and pick up a parcel off of the stones, and he went a-cross the way, and he was halloo'd after, and he dropped the bundle, and he was pursued and taken: I said he did not take it off the cart; then they asked me who I was, and some of the people took hold of me; I said, I was neither afraid nor ashamed to say who I was, or what I was; I gave them my direction: I saw the cart, and I saw a man in the cart in brown clothes, who belonged to the cart, I believe: I saw the young man pick it off the stones, and away he walked with it; if it had lain much nearer I should have gone and picked it up myself.

Court. Was not the carter the most likely person to have enquired of? - To be sure, my Lord.

Had not it the appearance to you that it had fallen from the cart? - It was just by the cart-wheel, under the copse of the cart.

Then you would have enquired of the carter, would not you? - To be sure I would, my Lord.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Jury to Venables. Did he seem to run off when he picked up the parcel? - He walked very sharp, to be sure, but I cannot say he ran, there was a cart coming by at the time.

Court to Sadler. Who was in the cart at the time that this parcel was thrown down? - One of my fellow-servants, I called to him: all our men have brown jackets.

How long was it after you saw the man with the brown coat on at the wheel of the cart before you cried out, Stop thief? - It was two or three minutes.

Then that man had gone clear off? - There were two or three on the other side of the way, they stopped a little while and walked on; I did not see the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-37

40. JAMES THORPE and BARNARD MANNING COLLINS were indicted for feloniously assaulting James Shadbott on the king's highway, on the 16th of November last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person, and against his will, one watch, the inside and outside cases made of silver, value 40 s. one steel chain, value 6 d. one brass watch key, value 1 d. one seal set in steel, value 3 d. and 5 s. in monies numbered, the goods, chattels, and monies of the said James .

JAMES SHADBOTT sworn.

I am a butcher , I live in London Colney, I was robbed the 16th of last Month, I go to my customers twice a week; I was going home from Kitt's End in a cart, a little boy was with me, who is servant to me; the road turned up on the right-hand side; the two prisoners rode up to me, and bid me stop; I would not stand, I drove on again, then they bid me stop again; that short man, Thorpe, rode up to my horse, and caught hold of his bridle, and presented a pistol to me, and threatened to shoot me through the head if I did not stand; the other was on the other side, he said nothing, but jumped off his mare, and came to me directly, and bid me deliver my money in a minute, and presented a pistol, and said he would blow my brains out; I said, Do not be in a hurry, my cock; I put my hand in my pocket, and gave him 5 s. Here, my cock, says I, take this, so he took it; then directly he demanded my watch, put his hand in my pocket, and pulled it out; he clapped his hand in this

pocket, and said, What have you here? says I, it is a pen and ink, that I settle my accounts with; says I, My cock, take this, and mind and cast your accounts up against to-morrow morning; I asked him if he would have it, and he said no, and I said, I wish you a good night; it was a fine moon-shine night, as clear as day-light.

Court. Were they long enough with you for you to be able to distinguish them exactly? - Yes, Collins had a crape about his face, about his nose, the other had nothing.

Are you positively sure of the two men? Yes, I am.

Why you say Collins had a crape on his head? - Yes, but just as he was going away from me the crape sell off; I could swear to him if it was only by his speech and person.

How was he dressed then? - With a light-coloured coat and waistcoat, and a light-coloured great coat over it, with flapped hat.

He never was nearer to you than the horse? - I sat on the tail of my cart, he came near to me, I could swear to him by his speech and his person; it is hard swearing to people, but he is the man, and the other I will swear to.

Jury. Pray do you say that the crape fell off his face? - Yes, just as he was drawing round to get upon his horse.

Now as to the other who had not the crape, you say you have no doubt? - Not the least in the world, he was dressed in rather a light-coloured coat, and one about the same colour underneath it; I did not take particular notice of his hat; they did not stay with me above three minutes, they were in a great hurry to get away.

Was this in an open road where you had all the benefit of the moon, because the moon does not shine upon some roads that are open? - The moon shone bright.

Did the moon shine on their faces or on yours? - I was on the side that was the lightest a good deal; the prisoners were taken up last Tuesday was se'nnight, I gave information that same night; if I could have got a horse I would have tried to have taken them myself; I knew them immediately when I saw them again, I fixed on them; there was another with them when they came to be examined.

Prisoner Collins's counsel. There were three together when you came to examine, and so you took two out of the three? - Yes.

Nobody else was present? - No.

What did the people say at the office? - Nothing.

Did not they give you a little hint? - No, only asked me whether that was not my watch.

What lane is it? - It is a road that turns up to the Duke of Leeds, and the other turns up to a wood.

A little lane, ha? - Aye.

Trees of each side set, is not there? - Aye.

So it was in that lane you was robbed? - No, I was six or seven yards beyond it, I was in the high road.

Trees there of each side, is not there? - Yes, little low pollard trees, and they stopped me just against the first pollard.

Had the man that got off his mare a round hat or a flapped hat? - Mine is a tilted cart, he stood below me, close to me.

He did not look you up in the face? - Once or twice.

That was all the time you had an opportunity of seeing his face? - Only just as he was getting on the horse.

At that time he had a crape? - Yes.

Which had the crape? - This here Collins.

How high over his mouth? - As far as his nose.

Then you could only see his chin? - Yes.

That is the only opportunity you had of observing him? - Yes.

And this not above three minutes? - Yes.

You should be cautious; you see here the whole robbery was not above three minutes, the man might see your face, but you could not see his with a flapped hat and a crape over his eyes and nose? - I could only see his chin.

How was he dressed? - In a light cloth coat buttoned, and waistcoat and great coat.

All light-colours. - Yes.

Nothing remarkable in the coat? - Like a low country farmer.

JOHN DICKSON sworn.

I was at the apprehending the two prisoners at the bar; I found a brace of pistols on them; I apprehended them in Aldersgate street, in Collins's house; they were both at dinner my Lord; when we went in, I found this watch on Thorpe, a key of a pair of pistols, and two balls in his coat pocket; and these pistols my Lord, were up by Collins's bed-side, in a chair, one was loaded, the other was not; I found nothing else; he said they belonged to him.

Prisoner's Council. Did you find any thing on his person? - I did not search his person.

I wonder at that too. - Mackmanus searched him.

But nothing was found on him? - Nothing but money.

He lives there, and has a number of men working there? - I saw one at work; I took the horse out of the stable, which the gentleman that was robbed said was his; the horse is in custody.

Court. Look at that watch Mr. Shadbold. - It is my watch, I will swear to it; I have had it this 14 or 15 years.

PRISONER THORPE's DEFENCE.

I bought the watch, and paid for it honestly; I bought it of a stranger where I was buying hay, in the Hay-market.

How long have you had it? - I bought it last Monday was a fortnight. I have no witnesses.

Prisoner Collins. This man Thorpe, came to my house about half an hour before, I asked him to dinner: I had a hackney coach, and I found the pistols tied up in a bundle, and a pair of gloves, and several little things in the coach: this man bought a horse on Friday, at market, and he asked me to let him stand in my stable.

The prisoner Collins called six witnesses who gave him a very good character.

Prisoner Thorpe. This other prisoner is entirely innocent of what he is accused of.

THORPE, GUILTY , ( Death .)

COLLINS, GUILTY , ( Death .)

The prisoner Collins was humbly recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and jury.

The prosecutor said he had known him from a little boy.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-38

28. ELIZABETH SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August last, in the dwelling house of Frances Fortescue widow , twelve yards of white sattin, value 4 l. 10 s. eighteen yards of other white sattin, value 7 l. eighteen yards of figured sattin, value 7 l. 10 s. eighteen yards of silk lutestring, value 4 l. 10 s. twelve yards of embroidered white sattin, value 12 l. one watch the inside and outside cases made of gold, value 15 l. one gold watch chain, value 5 l. one cornelian seal set in gold, value 10 s. one silver cup and cover, value 20 l. two silver goblets, value 7 l. two silver waiters, value 6 l. twenty-three silver table spoons, value 11 l. eighteen silver desert spoons, value 6 l. one silver soup ladle, value 20 s. four silver gravy spoons, value 30 s. one silver marrow spoon, value 6 s. seven silver tea spoons, value 36 s. two silver salts, value 40 s. two pair of silver tea tongs, value 15 s. fifteen linen shirts, value 15 l. six stocks, value 6 s. six yards of thread lace, value 20 s. and five guineas in monies numbered, the goods, chattels, and monies of the said Frances Fortescue widow: one silver waiter, value 40 s. thirteen table spoons, value 6 l. six desert spoons, value 40 s. eighteen tea spoons, value 50 s. one silver marrow spoon, value 6 s. one silver skewer, value 6 s. one pair of silver candlesticks, value 12 l. four silver bottle labels, value 8 s. one tortoiseshell snuff box mounted with silver, value

20 s. one blood stone snuff box mounted with metal, gilt, value 10 s. one metal etwee case, value 10 s. one shagreen etwee case mounted with silver, value 10 s. one silver thimble, value 12 d. one pair of stone sleeve buttons set in gold, value 20 s. two pair of stone sleeve buttons set in silver, value 10 s. one knife with a tortoise-shell handle, value 2 s. four gold mourning rings, value 40 s. one plain gold ring, value 10 s. one gold ring with hair, value 10 s. one callico quilted petticoat, value 30 s, one silk handkerchief, value 12 d. one piece of foreign gold coin, called a thirty six shilling piece, value 36 s. one piece of proper gold coin of this realm, called a guinea, value 21 s. five crown pieces, value 25 s. sixteen half crown pieces, value 40 s. the goods, chattels and monies of Frances Trehearn widow , in the dwelling house of the said Frances Fortescue .

FRANCES FORTESCUE sworn.

On Thursday the 8th of August my house was robbed, I was absent about a hundred yards from my house, I was engaged out to dinner, I went from my house about a quarter after four, I do not know the prisoner at the bar; about a quarter before seven a message was brought that my house was in great confusion, and my servants were tied; I went home, and there were a number of people, I suppose above two hundred, in and out of the house; I found the house in great confusion, all the boxes were broke open that contained the plate, and a little closet that held the spoons; I did not at all suspect the servants then, but Alderman Townsend being strongly suspicious that it must be done by them, from the time of day, being between three and four, at that time of the year, we afterwards proceeded to examine the servants: I know nothing myself that affects the prisoner.

FRANCES TREHEARN sworn.

I was out at dinner with Mrs. Fortescue; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, I swore to them before.

Court to Mrs. Fortescue. The things in the indictment mentioned to be yours, were yours? - Yes, my Lord.

JOSEPH KINDER sworn.

On the 8th of August last, on my return from Edmonton, where I had been riding, I called on Mrs. Trehearn and Mrs. Fortescue, as I usually do; I am used to go in without ceremony, being intimate in the family, so I tapped with my switch, in order that the servants might open the door, this was about a quarter after six, to the best of my knowledge; as I did not discover any servant in the kitchen, I was going to ring, and I saw the hall door stand a-jar, with that I whipped in, and gave a great smack with my switch, and called out, Halloo! what are you all dead, is nobody in the house? immediately upon that, I heard a female voice, as I thought it might be one of the ladies seemingly in fits, I was going up stairs immediately, the front stairs of the hall, and I discovered there was a naked hanger upon the harpsichord in the hall, a hanger or a cutlass, I cannot say which; on that I drew back, suspecting that there were some thieves about, and I went to a neighbour, with whose family I was very well acquainted, and begged some of the servants would go with me; the footman came out, and we agreed to go to Mr. Coteen's to get assistance; I immediately went to the front of the door to see who came out; I waited till three or four servants came to my assistance; as soon as they came we went into the house, the servants rushed up stairs immediately, I did not go up immediately, I staid in the hall, they called down to me and said, the two maids are tied to two different bed-posts; they desired me to come up, I went up stairs half way, and I discovered a man with a blunderbuss in his hand; I thought he had been a thief, and I drew back, but it happened to be one of the servants; they desired me to lend them a knife, to cut the maids loose, which they did before I got up stairs; that was no sooner done,

but in comes Mr. Coteen, the gentleman where these ladies dined, and the ladies; Mr. Coteen and I thought proper to examine each maid separately, and we discovered upon the whole their accounts did not seem to agree; with that we suspected this robbery must be by the maids, or somebody concerned with them; every thing was in confusion and disorder, where there were things of value: the maids were not then immediately taken up; Alderman Townsend was sent for, and he, as I am informed, was clearly of opinion that the maids were privy to the robbery.

ELIZABETH GREEDY sworn.

I went to Mrs. Goodall's house, and took an apartment there.

Court. Who is Mrs. Goodall? - She is the woman whose daughter was as hanged for the same robbery.

Did she keep a public house? - No, a private house; I lodged there at the time of this robbery, she lived in Kingsland Road, the prisoner lodged in the same house, I do not know what she was; she had a man lived with her, I thought it was her husband, but she did not lay in the house while I was in the house; she had two rooms there; I was about eight days in the house; the prisoner came and asked for Edmonds, to lend her his clothes.

Who is Edmonds? - He is the young man that was hanged for the same robbery; the prisoner said she was going to her sister's for a wager; she did not say what the wager was.

Did Edmonds lodge in the house with you? - Yes.

Had you any acquaintance with the prisoner? - No, Sir, I never saw her till I went there to live; I heard her ask for his clothes, and Mrs. Goodall too; I saw her dressed in in them, it was on Tuesday, the 8th of August.

Did she dress immediately? - Yes, she staid and had her dinner in the man's clothes, she had a round hat on, and the clothes which are in Court.

Did you see her go out? - No, Sir, I went out about two o'clock of an errand, when I returned she and Mrs. Goodall was gone.

What time did you come back? - I believe I was gone about a quarter of an hour, I saw the prisoner on the Friday following, the next morning, and Edmonds asked her for the clothes, I believe it was between eight and nine in the morning, at Mrs. Goodall's house, she was then in woman's clothes.

Had you any conversation with her about the wager, or the success of it? - No, Sir, I had no conversation with her, she was too much in a hurry to speak to me.

She seemed to be in a hurry, did she? - Yes, Sir.

SAMUEL YARDLEY sworn.

(Produces the clothes.)

I found these clothes in Mrs. Goodall's house, I cannot say what day, it was six or seven days after the robbery, I found them in Mrs. Greedy's apartment.

Court to Greedy. Look at these clothes, are these the clothes that you saw Edmonds give to the prisoner? - Yes, Sir, they are, all but the breeches, the breeches were white cloth breeches.

Is the hat there?

Yardley. No, my Lord, I found none but a cocked hat, and I did not bring that.

Court to Greedy. How came these clothes in your apartments when they were found by Yardley? - They were Edmonds's clothes, and he and I were going to be married, that was the reason that they were found in my apartments.

Court to Yardley. Did you take the prisoner? Yes, my Lord, I took her about three weeks ago, she acknowledged before the magistrate that she was guilty of the robbery; I took her at a house in Norton Falgate; I had information of some coiners being at work there, and in the house I saw her, and I was informed she was the girl that was concerned in the robbery at Tottenham, and before Mr. Wilmot and Mr. Townsend she acknowledged that she was guilty of the robbery.

Court. Was that acknowledgment taken in writing? - No, my Lord.

Was you present? - Yes.

Was the confession fair and free? was nothing said about it? - Justice Wilmot asked her, and said, you may as well tell the truth as you now stand indicted: she said she went to Tottenham in man's clothes, and Mr. Wilmot asked her how the breeches fitted her.

Court. I ask you, whether the confession she made was a free and fair confession; or whether it was extorted from her by any hope or promise, or any thing of that sort? - No, my Lord, there was no promise at all.

Was she persuaded to confess by being told that it would be better for her? - They did not tell her it would be better for her, they said it would be no hurt to her.

Court to Mrs. Fortescue. I think I heard you say on a former trial, that none of these things were ever recovered again? - Part of them were, a piece of silk and a very little plate.

Do they make any part of this charge? - A snuff box and some things, a man was convicted of receiving them.

Prisoners counsel. How long was the prisoner under examination before Justice Wilmot. - I cannot say particularly, she had two examinations.

I am speaking of that examination at which this confession was made? - I believe she was there two hours backwards and forwards.

How long had she been there before this confession was made? - I do not believe she had been there above a quarter of an hour.

Was it before or after she was ordered out? - I cannot say, I think it was the first time of her going in.

I wish you would recollect the questions that were put to her before she confessed? - She was asked whether she was not in the robbery, and she had better own it, and that it would be no disservice to her.

Court. nothing was found on her? - Nothing at all, I searched her.

Court to Mr. Chetham. The articles that have been since forthcoming, where were they found? - Not on this prisoner.

Court. Then there is nothing that affects this prisoner, but what comes from her own the accomplice.

The Remainder of this Trial in the Fourth Part, which will be Published in a few Days.

Reference Number: t17821204-38

HODGSON's SHORT-HAND TREATISE, Price 2 s. 6 d. with an Explanatory Copper-plate, to be had of J. WALMSLAY, and S. BLADON.

TRIALS, &c. taken with great Accuracy by E. HODGSON, Writer of these PROCEEDINGS, No. 35, Chancery-lane.

N. B. SHORT-HAND taught on an improved Plan.

Reference Number: t17821204-38

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday, the 4th of DECEMBER, 1782, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Nathaniel Newnham , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART IV.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXII.

[ PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of Elizabeth Simpson .

Court. If any thing had been found at any pawnbrokers, that had been pawned by the prisoner, or any thing found on her, but at present there is nothing to affect her but her own confession, and we cannot examine the accomplice, till something comes out by some other witness to affect her.

Court to Mrs. Fortescue. If you wish we should call any other witnesses, to any other point, we will call them.

Mrs. Fortescue. Will your Lordship please to call Elizabeth Steen ?

Court. We cannot examine the accomplice now, because nothing has as yet come out against the prisoner, but by her own confession.

Mrs. Fortescue. We are not anxious at all about it my Lord.

Court. I dare say not.

Court to Jury. The prisoner being thus examined before the justices, she has confessed the fact, and there is nothing else to affect her but that confession; the evidence of the accomplice cannot be received till something has come out to affect the prisoner from other witnesses, therefore you must acquit her.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Before the prisoner went from the bar, Mr. Baron Hotham thus addressed her.

Elizabeth Simpson ,

This ought to be a very serious lesson to you for the remainder of your life, for though by the tenderness of the law you have now escaped punishment, yet two people have been executed for the same crime, and two more transported for fourteen years; you have been one of their accomplices, and as deeply concerned in this robbery as any of them, and have been partly the cause of their death and punishment; you have therefore now nothing to do, but to make the best attonement you can, by leading a better life for the future.

Reference Number: t17821204-39

41. JAMES WILSON and THOMAS TIDMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of November last, one iron shovel, value 1 s. 6 d. one pick axe, value 1 s. 6 d. one iron saw, value 1 s. 6 d. the goods and chattels of Richard Jefferys ; and one iron shovel, value 6 d. the goods and chattels of William Gore .

RICHARD JEFFERYS sworn.

I am a Carpenter ; I live in High-street,

St. Giles's; I lost a shovel, a pick axe, an hand saw, and another shovel, the property of one of my men, William Gore , I suspected my old man Gore had taken them, but he brought the prisoner Wilson to me, he confessed, I told him it would be better for him.

JAMES GRIFFITHS sworn.

I am a car-man; I know the prisoner; I stand for hire by St. Giles's Alms-houses; the prisoner Tidman came to me, and said, I have got a few odd things to sell, they were left with me, he said they are not my own, they belong to a man that is going to Birmingham; he shewed me the things in the tap room; there was two shovels, a hand saw, and a pick axe; I asked him what he would have for the two shovels alone, he said they were to be sold together, for his acquaintance was going to Birmingham and wanted the money; he said the price was four shillings, I offered him three shillings, he said that would not do, he came back and said will you give the other six-pence, I said no, he said you shall have them, I paid him the money; and then I saw some or all of the money pass to this other prisoner, which I knew nothing of, and had not seen before; he said he would carry them home for me for a pint of beer; in a short time after they were taken before a magistrate: Mr. Jefferys asked me if I had bought such things, I said yes; this was on the 29th of November, between nine and ten; the things are here, they were all marked by the Justice, they have been in my possession ever since.

(The things deposed to by the prosecutor, who said the shovel had the shop mark on it.)

I only bought it the Monday before; these things were kept in an empty house, I have the key of it; I know the hand saw by a particular mark on it; I know the pick axe by the handle having a piece of leather to it, which was drove into it; I only bought it the day before. I knew the prisoner the old man, he used to lay in the house on straw, when it was empty.

( William Gore proved the shovel to be his; it was run over by a cart, and a piece broke out of the side.)

PRISONER WILSON's DEFENCE.

I was in great necessity, and in great want.

PRISONER TIDMAN's DEFENCE.

This man was at Mr. Martin's in the morning when I went in, I have used the house for some years; and he says to me, I have got some tools to sell for a man that has left them with me, that is going to Birmingham, he has 150 l. left him; he said, he owes me 2 s. 9 d. for a good while; I said I did not know any body, but a man that keeps a horse and cart; I told Griffith's, who came in directly; I brought them up, he asked the price, and offered 3 s. I said no; I went to another man that I knew in the same way, he did not want them; Wilson said to me, let that man have them, I spoke to Griffiths, and he came and bought them, and I offered to take them home for a pint of beer: presently the young man came in, and called this man out, and came in afterwards, and said, was not you a drinking with that young man, yes, says I, then this gentleman came and dragged me out of the house, says I, do not pull me, I am no thief; and I went to the Justices.

WILSON, GUILTY .

TIDMAN, NOT GUILTY .

The prisoner Wilson who appeared to be in a very infirm state, to be privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-40

42. JOHN KNOWLES and WILLIAM FULLER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Charles Smith , at the hour of eight in the night, on the 19th of November last, and burglariously stealing therein one iron

shovel, value 2 s. 6 d. the goods and chattels of the said Charles Smith .

(The witnesses ordered to be examined apart, at the desire of the prisoners.)

CHARLES SMITH sworn.

My Lord, I was put into Esquire Holland's house, in Sloane-street, Chelsea , to take care of it as his servant , on the 19th of November some men were trying to break into the house between seven and eight, they came over the back way, and tried to break in at the back of the house; they found they could not break in there, they came to the fore side, they broke open the front door, then they came all the way up the house, the house was not properly finished.

Court. This house of Mr. Holland's, that you was taking care of, is the house that the things were stolen from? - Yes.

What is Mr. Holland? - An Esquire, a master-builder.

Was this house let to any body? - He had agreed in articles to have it himself as soon as it was finished.

Prisoner's Counsel. It is an unfinished house, and never was inhabited by any body.

Court. Gentlemen, it is unnecessary to suffer your time to be taken up by giving evidence upon an indictment on which the prisoners cannot be convicted; the indictment says, the burglary was committed in the dwelling-house of Charles Smith ; now Charles Smith tells you he is only servant to Mr. Holland, whose house it was, but I have ordered the prisoners to be detained to the end of the Sessions.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-41

43. JUDITH BACON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Abraham Levy , between the hours of eleven and twelve, in the forenoon of the 14th of October last, no person being therein, and feloniously stealing one linen gown, value 20 s. six brass candlesticks, value 5 s. one brass mortar, value 2 s. one linen sheet, value 5 s. two linen shifts, value 6 s. the goods and chattels of Emanuel Moses .

EMANUEL MOSES sworn.

I live in Fashion-street, Spital-fields, No. 17 , I went out in the morning of the 14th of October about nine, and I locked my door, the street door was upon the latch, I live along with my wife's relation, his name is Mr. Abraham Levy .

Court. Then it is his house, is it? - Yes, I left nobody at home, when I came home between three and four, I went up to my apartment, and I found the door was broke open; I went into the room, and I found the drawers were broke open, and the candlesticks and the things were gone off the mantle-piece; I found this poker in the room (producing a poker), I directly suspected the prisoner at the bar, because this poker belonged to her mother, who lived in the garret, but she had turned her away; I know this to be her mother's poker.

Court. Then the street-door was upon the latch, and the mother of the prisoner lodged up stairs? - Yes; I lost a gown, two shifts, one shirt, six candlesticks, one mortar, and some glass; the pawnbroker is here.

The street-door was not broke open? - No, my Lord.

WILLIAM DAINTY sworn.

I have a pair of candlesticks which I took of the prisoner at the bar, they are odd ones, on the 14th of October she pledged them in the name of Elizabeth Wood , I knew her by being with the person whose name she made use of; she lives in the alley down by my house, she goes about singing ballads, her husband is a blind man; here is a mark which I did not observe when the candlesticks were in my custody, but the prosecutor shewed it at the Rotation-office, he says he has marked his name underneath the middle of the candlestick.

Should you have observed it if it had been

there? - I do not think I should, I cannot tell whether it was on them or not.

Did the prosecutor shew you that mark at the time that he first claimed the candlesticks? - No, he did not.

The first time when he came to you about the candlesticks? - The prosecutor's wife came to me with Elizabeth Wood , and fetched the candlesticks out, I did not see them for almost a week after.

ELIZABETH WOOD sworn.

The prisoner pawned these candlesticks on the 14th day of October, I was not with her, she lodged in the house where I live with a woman, she came up stairs, and asked me if I would buy them; she brought up the duplicate, and left it with my husband till she called for it, he is a blind man; I was in Mr. Good's house, in Moorfields, when she sold four candlesticks on Monday, the 14th of October.

How came you at Good's house? - To have a pint of beer, like another poor person.

Was that before or after she brought the two candlesticks to your house? - No, she had pawned these a week before.

You happened by accident to be at Mr. Good's when she sold these candlesticks, did you? - Yes, Sir; there was four candlesticks and a brass mortar to two strange men.

Then it was a week before she sold the four that she pawned the other two? - Yes.

How long did the duplicate remain with your husband? - Not above two days, we found the owner of the candlesticks, she left it the same day that she pawned them.

How did you find the owner of the candlesticks? - In Fashion-street, by going to her mother, we delivered him the duplicate, and we went with him to fetch them out.

Then some days after that she sold the other candlesticks? - Yes.

You went with the prosecutor for the candlesticks, did not you? - Yes.

Did you tell then who had pawned them? - Yes, Judith Bacon .

When was she taken up? - I do not know.

How long after? - Two or three days after; she was taken up a day after she had pawned the candlesticks; I will not tell you a lie.

We will see that presently; how long after the time that the candlesticks were taken out of pawn was it that the prisoner was taken up? - That I cannot tell you.

Was it a month or a day? - I cannot tell.

And you mean to be believed in saying so? - I cannot tell indeed.

Not whether it was a month or a day? - I cannot indeed.

Did you ever look at the duplicate the two days it was with your husband? - I never looked at it at all.

Then how do you know it was the same? how do you know that the duplicate she left with your husband was for candlesticks? if you never saw it, how can you tell? - That I cannot tell at all.

Then you do not know it was the same? - If it had not been the same, please you, my Lord, they would not have given the candlesticks.

I cannot tell that; how do I know what duplicate this young woman left with your husband? - The pawnbroker would not have given the candlesticks without the duplicate.

How do you know that it was the same? - I cannot tell.

How did you come by the duplicate? - By her leaving it with my husband; we went with the owner, and fetched them out.

How came you to go with the woman? - My husband had the duplicate all the time.

How do you know that duplicate was for a pair of candlesticks, you never saw it?

She delivered it to my husband.

She gave something to your husband which you never saw? - She gave a bit of card to my husband, what it was I do not know, she did not tell me, nor my husband did not tell me.

How came they to be pawned in the name of Elizabeth Wood ? - I do not know.

What age is this young woman? - I cannot tell.

How long have you known her? - By going a singing as we do.

How long? - Not long.

What age do you take her to be? - About nineteen, I have known her a good while.

How long? - A good while.

What do you call a good while? - About a month.

Court. Does not she sing ballads with you? - Yes.

And your husband is blind? - Yes.

Then how could your husband know any thing about the duplicate, unless you read it? - I did not read it, the prisoner said it was for the candlesticks.

You have a very short memory good woman; you told me just now she said nothing about it, not half a minute ago.

ANN DAVIS sworn.

I live at Mr. Good's at the sign of the Crown and Anchor Moorfields, he is a publican; on the 14th of October, the prisoner at the bar and this Elizabeth Wood came in for a pint of beer, they came in together, and while they were drinking the beer, the girl put down four brass candlesticks, and a mortar on the tap-room table, and two strange men came in promiscuously, and they bought them; I was about my business, I do not know what passed about it.

Do you know what they were sold for? - I cannot tell indeed; they were brass candlesticks, shortish ones, and the mortar was a large one.

JOSEPH LEVY sworn.

I know no further than taking the prisoner out of a room in Shoreditch; she said if they would not hurt her, she would tell where the things were, she said she would shew them to me, she said the publican bought the candlesticks in Moorfields; we went to this house, the prisoner was with me, and she said she had sold them; I asked her afterwards how could you say you sold this publican the candlesticks, where is the linen? she said, I will tell you no more now; I never saw her till I saw her before the magistrate.

Court to Moses. You came home between three and four in the afternoon? - Yes.

It was then you found your door broke open, and nobody in the house? - The mother of the prisoner is out at work, from eight in the morning till night, and there are no other lodgers in the house; my wife was out with me.

Was the mother's room locked or open? - It was locked before she went out.

The mother was out and her room door locked, was her room door broke open? - No.

Then how could the girl get the poker? - Because she went away about three weeks before, and took the poker with her.

How do you know that? - Because her mother told me so.

That is not evidence Sir, do you know that of your own knowledge? - No, no otherwise.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going up Bishopsgate-street for a sheet of pins, I met with this Elizabeth Wood , and she over persuaded me, and I went up stairs to my mother's room, and I was up stairs, and I had lighted the fire for three quarters of an hour, and she called me down stairs, and I went down stairs and put on my hat and cloak with her, and she asked me to pawn them two candlesticks in the name of Elizabeth Wood , for one shilling; then I went with her to Moorfields, and she asked me to sell four candlesticks and a mortar, and I did; I am thirteen next Easter.

Court to Elizabeth Wood . I think you told me that you did not go with her to the house of Good, but happened to be there by accident? - I went with her there, but did not know what she had in her apron.

Court to Jury. Gentlemen, it is laid in the indictment, that the prisoner broke and entered the dwelling house of Abraham Levi , that was not the case, the house was not broke open by any body, the door was on the latch; it was the lodging room of - Moses that was broke open, and that is not within the description of this indictment, and the prisoner had a lawful cause of entry

into the house, because her mother lodged up stairs.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-42

44. WILLIAM SETON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of November last one silver watch, value 20 s. the goods and chattels of Alexander Colderhead , privily from his person .

ALEXANDER COLDERHEAD sworn.

I lost my watch the 4th of November, about a quarter past seven in the evening, I was at the Spotted Dog in the Strand .

How did you lose it? - I cannot tell.

Was the prisoner there? - No, I was in liquor and fell asleep, and it was taken out of my pocket; I laid myself along the bench in the tap-room, I looked at my watch before I fell asleep, for I was to stop till eight for a person; I went in there about six, when I wa my watch was gone.

Did you ever get it again? - The pawnbroker stopped it about an hour after the same night, his name is Dickson, he advertised it on the Wednesday, I know nothing about the prisoner myself, I never saw him to my knowledge, I did not see him in the house that night.

ALEXANDER DICKSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, the prisoner at the bar offered to pawn this watch with me on the 4th of November, about half after eight in the evening, I live with Mr. Fleming, opposite the Play-house, in Drury-lane; I asked him if it was his own watch, he said yes; he said he had had it two years, and then two months; then he said it was given him that day, and I stopped him, and carried him to Bow-street.

(The watch produced and deposed to.)

Court to Prosecutor. How long have you had your watch? - Between eight and nine months, I am a journeyman baker, I know the man that made it, his name is Wilson, the number is 1,267.

Did you know that before you lost it? - I always look at the number of my watch when I have it first, and commonly set it down; I have lost watches before now, and that makes me careful when I buy a watch to set down the number.

Was there any paper in it? do you know any body in Saville-row? - No, the last man that cleaned it is a man up by the other side of Red-lion Square.

Do you know Lady Mary Forbes in Saville-row? - That is a piece of paper that was in the watch when I got it.

Court to Dickson. Did this man describe his watch to you before you shewed it him? - No, my Lord, he did not.

Did he tell the maker's name and the number at the Justice's before it was shewn him? - No, he did not.

Court to Calderhead. Did not you enquire of the mistress of the house who was near you? - I told her I had lost my watch.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My Lord, I honestly bought the watch of a man at the Sun, in Drury-lane, of a stranger, it wanted about ten minutes of eight at night when I bought it.

THOMAS PRITCHARD sworn.

I am a broker, auctioneer, and appraiser, No. 36, Baldwin's-gardens, Leather-lane, I am a housekeeper; I never knew the prisoner any further than once, I was at Hounslow, and he brought me home in a returned chaise, he was a post-boy; I was coming along by the Sun, between seven and eight, I went in, as a person went in whom I thought I knew, I believe it was of a Monday evening, when I went in I found it was not the man I thought, I might stay there a few minutes, I leaned over the settle, and just spoke to the prisoner, he nodded his head, I saw the man that was with him deliver him a watch; I saw him deliver the watch with a bit of chain or link; I have nothing more to say, than that I saw a man deliver to the prisoner at the bar a watch; I

took the more notice of it as knowing the prisoner.

Court. How did the prisoner find you out? - The prisoner only knew me by bringing me from Hounslow; he did not know my business, or where I lived, or whether I was a master or servant; I was a servant to a nobleman at the time that he brought me from Hounslow, but a woman enquired at the Queen's Head, in Gray's-inn-lane, and they found me out, and I went to Newgate.

How long is it since the prisoner was a post-boy? - I have not seen him these twelve months before, it was two years ago, or better, that he drove me; my Lord, I give you a just account, I hope you would not dispute any thing that I say; upon my affidavit I came to Newgate to see whether it was the man I had seen in the box or no dealing for the watch, and I am sure it is.

The prisoner called three other witnesses, who all gave him a very good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-43

45. ROBERT BROWN , MARY HILL , ELIZABETH HILL , and MARY ROOKER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of December last, five pieces of gold coin of this realm, called guineas, and five shillings in monies numbered , the monies of John Field .

JOHN FIELD sworn.

Last Sunday night, about twelve, I was at No. 22, Charles-court Strand , at a private-house, but I cannot say whose house it was; I was met in the street by the prisoner Mary Hill, and brought there by accident.

Court. Then it is a disorderly house? - I cannot say but what it is; the prisoner Mary Hill, and me, went to this house, into a room, and had some pots of beer; the other two women prisoners were in the room, and two or three men came in, among whom was the prisoner Brown; they were playing and joking, one with another, every one had his own company; I did not like them, and I was going; this young body insisted I should not go that night, and upon the same terms I took off my cloaths and lay in the bed; the others went about one or two o'clock; then the other prisoner Mary Rooker came to bed to me and Mary Hill: I fell asleep, and I missed my money, about five when I awaked, I saw nothing more of the other prisoners that night. I had five guineas and six or seven shillings in silver, I am sure I had that money going to bed, because I stuffed my neckcloth into my pocket to keep it steady; I directly accused Mary Hill, and the other woman, who were still in bed with me: they denied it bluntly: they made a great noise about it, at last she went to accuse that young boy with it.

You did not see him in the room after you went to bed? - No.

Did you ever get any of your money again? - Never a farthing, there is a little of it in view, as it might be; I left them that morning, I took them up in the evening.

HENRY WOOD sworn.

This young man, the prisoner Brown, is my apprentice-boy, and he has served four years of his time the 19th of this month, I want to have a f inal separation; there was money found in his pocket, a part of this money.

Court. How do you know it was part of that money? - It was some money which he could never come by from me nor any of his friends, it was a half guinea and some silver.

WILLIAM PASELEY sworn.

I am an officer of the parish, I took this lad and brought him to the watch-house, and there he made a confession; it was taken down by one Mallathem; I told the lad, says I my lad, if you confess the truth as it is, it will be much better for you.

Court. Then you need not say any more about it.

PRISONER MARY HILL 's DEFENCE.

I met this young man in the Strand, and being in liquor I asked him for a glass, he said he would give me one, and the young woman that was with me; we went to the Horseshoes, and had a quartern of gin; I asked him to go with me, I took him home to my room, my sister was very ill, and asked for some mutton broth; I told her I would leave it to the gentleman's generosity to get some; he sent for some mutton and turneps; I asked him for something to drink, he sent for a pot of beer, and up comes a young woman and a young man that I let lay in the room with me, and they sat on one side; up comes this young fellow (Brown) to see my sister, and sat himself down; after that he sent for another pot or two of beer, I was rather in liquor, so was he; he said he would go to bed, and I went to bed with this man; I asked him when I was going to bed, if he would not send for another pot of beer, in case we should be dry, and he gave this girl sixpence; I said, lend me a shilling, and he did, and he said, if you want any more in the morning you shall have it, and we both went to bed, and these two people went away: I know nothing of the money's going nor I never forsook the prosecutor from the time he lost his money till he found the others at night; when this young woman came up with a pot of beer, she saw the prisoner Brown with the man's breeches by the fire; Brown and two more had the breeches, and Brown had all the money; he owned to four guineas.

PRISONER ROOKER.

I leave it to the Court.

ROBERT BROWN , MARY HILL , ELIZABETH HILL , MARY ROOKER ,

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-44

46. MARY BRANSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of November last, six pair of upper leathers for men's shoes, value 10 s. one linen shirt, value 6 s. one silk handkerchief, value 10 d. one pair of cloth breeches, value 6 d. and one linen apron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Cornish .

JANE CORNISH sworn.

I am the wife of William Cornish , he has been gone since the 20th of June, he did live at Hemming's-row , I do not know where he is gone, he left me there, and the people let me a cellar a groat cheaper than they did any body else on account of my two babes; I was robbed last Saturday, I lost a shirt, a coloured apron, and a handkerchief; I left my little girl in bed, and went out about ten minutes after nine in the morning; the things that I lost were in my room when I went out; I returned before ten, and I asked the child who had been there, and she said nobody but a drunken woman; I missed them immediately, I recovered nothing but the black breeches which the man gave me.

- RAYMOND sworn.

I am a paper-stainer, I know nothing of it, but the prisoner came to our house last Saturday morning, between eight and nine, she sells greens and fruit, she said her mother was out, and she could not get in, and desired to leave some things till she went to her mother for the key; she left them with me; there was six pair of upper leathers which the prosecutor never mentioned; she left nothing but them and a pair of old breeches, in about an hour she came and fetched them away; the woman came and owned them about an hour after; I cannot swear to the things, I saw nothing but six upper leathers, and I did not open them.

(The upper leathers produced and deposed to.)

Jane Cornish . They are my master's property, I thought I should lose my senses when I missed these upper leathers, here is my master's mark on them; I have nothing here but the upper leathers.

- PAISLEY, the Constable, sworn.

The prisoner goes by the title of Mad Moll.

Court. Do they call her Mad Moll from being merely a boisterous fighting woman, or by being a frantic woman? - For fighting; the prosecutor came to me, and begged me to get up, and said she was ruined; so I got up; and I went to Mad Moll, and I found the upper leathers on the prisoner, they have been in my possession ever since; it was in the fore part of the day, but I am not sure what hour; she did not deny but she stole them.

Court. Did not deny it; did she say any thing about it? - I believe she said she did take them, to the best of my knowledge that was her expression.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A woman gave them to me, and I was very much in liquor, and I gave her some halfpence for them; my child lays dead now.

Court. Was she in liquor? - I have seen her ten times worse than she was then, she was not sober, she seldom is, she had been fighting at the White Horse.

Raymond. When she came to me she was very much in liquor.

GUILTY .

To be imprisoned six months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-45

47. FRANCES WHITEHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of November last, twenty-two yards of linen cloth, value 30 s. the goods of Edward Rogers .

EDWARD ROGERS sworn.

I keep a shop in Holborn , I deal in linens and cottons, and china; the prisoner came into my shop on the 12th of November, in the evening, about half an hour past five; having lost two pieces of linen on the 9th of November, I secreted myself under the counter, to watch if any person would come back for any more: on the Monday night I staid there till half past seven, but nobody came; and on Tuesday night I did the same: my wife staid in the parlour; in about half an hour, I saw the prisoner at the bar come to the window, I could see out between the post and the door, because it was an open counter; she came and looked in, and went to two men that were standing on the flag, and seemed to be in conversation with her; then she turned and looked into the same window again, and stood at the door about the space of a minute, and walked into the shop and looked about her, and there was but one candle in the shop; she looked behind the door, and every where, to see if there was any body, and she stepped forward to some shelves, where some pieces of linen cloth lay, and she took this piece of cloth in her hand, and went out from the step, I then got from under the counter, and caught hold of her on the step, and pulled her into the shop; she either endeavoured to throw the linen to the men, or drop it, but I kicked it into the shop; I sent for a constable, and took her into custody.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was coming along, two men pushed me plump into the shop, and I sell against the shelf, and knocked down that piece of linen, and he said he would run me through with a sword which he had.

GUILTY .

To be confined six months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-46

48. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of September last, one stuff gown, value 3 s. a flannel gown, value 3 s. and a pair of new blankets, value 6 s. the goods of Ann Crout widow .

ANN CROUT sworn.

I live in Dart's-alley, Whitechapel ; I was robbed on the 2d of September last, of this gown that is in my lap, and a fellow gown to this, and a pair of new blankets off the bed, I was not gone out half an hour before they were taken away; I went out about a quarter before four in the afternoon; I never saw the prisoner in my life till that morning; she stood up at my door where I live, up two pair of stairs, I suppose she was watching her opportunity; I went out to carry my work home, and I locked my door, and shut the outer door; this gown was catched upon the back of another woman, to whom she had sold it, I cannot tell who that woman was; the Justice ordered her to pull the gown off.

JOHN DUNN sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the Rotation office in Whitechapel, coming in, a woman that had the gown on her back, was there; she said she bought it out of pawn; I went to the pawnbroker's, and the Justice bid the woman pull off the gown.

WILLIAM DREW sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, the prisoner came to my shop, and wanted a camblet gown out of pawn, she said her sister pawned it; it was about the 18th or 19th of October, it had been in our shop almost two months.

Who brought it to your house? - Mary Neale , I said she must come for it; the prisoner said it was all the same, she was only over the way, and she went and fetched her, and they took the gown out.

MARY NEALE sworn.

The prisoner was a neighbour of mine, she called me down stairs, I was washing; and she said she had bought a gown in Rosemary-lane for her daughter, and it was too big, and begged me to go and pledge it for half a crown, and I pledged it for 18 d. the 2d of September; and I redeemed it afterwards by her desire, and she said she would sell it; it is the gown now produced.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have dealt in the lane a great many years: I had not a minutes notice of my trial coming on, to send for any body: I bought the gown of a woman, the corner of Tower-hill, for half a crown; I thought it would make a good gown for my daughter; and I afterwards got this good woman to pawn it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-47

49 HENRY HURFORD , otherwise BARKER , and THOMAS HOWELL WELLS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Edward Overton , at the hour of two in the night on the 12th of November last, and feloniously stealing one mahogany dining table, value 40 s. one mahogany card-table, value 20 s. a pier glass, value 20 s. and one leather saddle with plated stirrups, value 4 l. the property of the said Edward .

EDWARD OVERTON sworn.

I live at Mile-end green ; a back-house of mine where a clerk lays occasionally, which joins to my dwelling house, was broke open between the 12th and 13th of October, at night; I saw it locked the night before, the windows were screwed with a screw, and the property was there; the thieves broke a pane of glass to get in, and the things mentioned in the indictment were stolen; they were a mahogany dining table, a card table a pier glass, and a leather saddle with plated stirrups.

JUDITH HUBBARD sworn.

I am a servant of the prosecutor's: between six and seven in the morning of the 13th of November, when it was between dark and light, I saw the door of the outhouse where the clerk lay was open, and I mentioned it to my fellow servant, and asked her how she could leave the door open.

DOROTHY HAYES sworn.

I live in Blue-anchor yard, in the same house with the prisoner Howell; he came in about three in the morning, and I heard him strike a light, and light his candle, and he went out again, and about seven he and the other prisoner brought in a mahogany table; about eight o'clock the other prisoner Hurford carried it out; I never saw the other prisoner before; I was up at seven o'clock, at work.

You know Mile-end-green? - I do not.

Court to Mr. Overton. How far is Blue-anchor-alley, from Mile-end-green? - I do not know.

Levy. My Lord it is about a mile and a quarter, or a mile and and a half.

Prisoner Wells. How does she know I was out all night? - Because we always fasten the door, being the last persons up.

Whether the door was usually fastened or not? - Yes.

How she knew it was me that came in and struck a light, as she was in bed? - There is nobody lives in his room but himself.

Was you up at eight the next morning? - Yes, at seven.

Court to Hubbard. You say you saw the door of the coach-house open? - Yes.

Did you observe any thing broken? - No, I did not go in to see.

ELIZABETH HICKS sworn.

I live at No. 36, Rosemary-lane, near the Minories, the prisoner Hurford came and asked me if I would buy a mahogany table, about eight o'clock last Wednesday morning was three weeks, I bought a mahogany card table and a dining table, I gave him thirty shillings for them both; I asked him if it was his table, and he said no, it was a man's that was sick, and that he came to sell it for him; I am sure the prisoner Hurford is the man; he in the brown coat I mean.

SARAH PEARCE sworn.

I live in Plow-street, Whitechapel, and I work at slop work; the prisoner Howell brought in a mahogany dining table three weeks last Wednesday morning; my landlord, Mr. Miller, went out at six in the morning, I got up between six and seven, and went down to light a candle, and I opened the door, and I saw two mahogany tables standing at the door in the street; Plow-street is the next street to Red-lion-street, Whitechapel; when I was gone up about half a dozen steps the prisoner Howell came into the passage, and brought a table; he desired me to let him leave it there for about half an hour, he said he was going to sell it; he said it was his own table, and his wife and he had fell out, and he was going to sell the goods; I told him to take it away, for I did not like it should be there, as I was a stranger to the house, the landlady would not think it belonged to me or him; he said it should be there, and that if Hurford was there, he would let him put it there; the landlady came out, and asked whose table that was, and Hurford fetched the table away; I knew Howell before, he is a carpenter, Hurford is the same business.

Mr. Overton. My Lord, the prisoner Wells had been employed in my house, in building a stable, by my carpenter, he had worked at my house about ten days.

Prisoner Wells. I brought the table into the passage, but I said no such thing that it was mine.

Prisoner Hurford. I took the table away.

JAMES MATTHEWS sworn.

I am one of the beadles of Whitechapel, on the 13th of November last I was on duty, and the prisoner Hurford and this Mary Pearce were brought in as prisoners; I asked them what is the matter now? they said they had been doing nothing; Mary Pearce said, that they were taken up for a robbery; and she said that Hurford should not suffer alone, for Wells should suffer with him, he was as guilty as he was, for she would go and shew me where Wells lived; this was in the presence of Hurford; according I went to Blue Anchor-yard, to one Mr. Frinnore's Rents, and she shewed me the wrong door, he lived at the next door; the door was fast below stairs, a woman let me in, and I went up

and took Wells out of bed; he said he knew nothing of it; when we came back, Hurford told us where he had sold the tables; no promise was made him; Mary Pearce went with us, and shewed us where this saddle was, it was in Goodman's-yard, at the White Horse, and where she had pawned the looking glass.

JOSEPH LEVI sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the Rotation-office in Whitechapel, I rise at four in the morning, and carry a little lanthorn with me, and I went down Plow-street; this was on the 13th of October, and coming down Colchester-street, about five in the morning, I saw two men with two tables, Colchester-street is in the way from Mr. Overton's, the back way; I held up my lanthorn, and one of them, the prisoner Wells, had a smock frock on, Hurford I knew before; there was one Mr. Phipps, a cabinet maker, close by, and I thought they were moving some furniture; I went afterwards to the office in Whitechapel, and the prosecutor came in, and said they were his tables: the witness Pearce lives with Hurford, and she went and shewed me where the saddle was, and where the pier glass was pawned.

JOHN TANN sworn.

I found the tables at a broker's in Rag Fair.

BENJAMIN NAPP sworn.

I belong to the Rotation-office, I took the prisoner Hurford and the witness Pearce into custody, she cohabited along with him; she she said he should not suffer alone; I went in search of Howell.

ANN MILLER sworn.

My husband is a taylor, I rent the house in Plow-street, where Pearce and Hurford lodged in a ready furnished room; Hurford came in the name of Barker; I let the room to them as man and wife; I heard somebody come down stairs softly, I thought they went out, that was a little before six, they left the street door open; presently they came in and went up stairs, and left the street-door open; then I heard goods rumbling in the passage, and I jumped out of bed, and Pearce was lighting a man with a large mahogany table; I asked her who the goods belonged to, and who gave him liberty to bring the table there; she said she did: they bid me make myself easy, that they were moving goods for a person in Whitechapel; I said, I was afraid they had been a housebreaking; Hurford came down stairs, and said it was his shop-mate's table, that his wife had threatned to set the house on fire, and he was taking them away because they should not be burnt; he said he knew the man that made it, and he was with him; he turned to Pearce, and said, I will take and carry it into Glass-house yard, then it will be safe.

Prisoner Hurford. What time did I go out? - I believe he must have been out all night, for the door was double locked when my husband went out.

Court to Overton. When you heard that the door was open, and the things were stole, did you go and look at the house? - Yes.

Did you find any thing broke about it? - Only the window; by breaking this pane, they could put their hand round and unscrew the sash; the sash is a sliding sash, it was open in the morning.

Could a man go through it? - Yes.

Did your clerk sleep there? - Not that night, nor the next night.

PRISONER HURFORD's DEFENCE.

I went out about five in the morning, and I saw these two tables laying in the field, and I took them home, and I met this man, and begged him to take one, while I went and fetched the other.

PRISONER WELL's DEFENCE.

I was going along the street to Mr. Wilson's yard, the King's wheeler; I met this man in the street, he asked me to carry a large table to Plow-street, and put it down under the lamp, and he would give me 6 d. I put it down there, and saw no more of it.

Court to Jury. An out-house, joining to a house, as this has been described, is the same as the dwelling house, and in consideration of law, constitutes a part of the dwelling house: and the crime of burglary consists in breaking and entering a dwelling house at night, and committing a felony, or with intention of committing a felony.

HURFORD, GUILTY , WELLS, GUILTY,

( Death .)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-48

50. MARY WHITE , alias MARY CARPENTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of April last, two silver quart tankards, value 10 l. two silver spoons, value 2 s. one pair of silver shoe buckles, value 8 s. one cloth cloak, value 5 s. and one silk hat, value 1 s. the property of Mary Bennett , widow , in her dwelling house .

MARY BENNETT sworn.

I live in Glass-house-yard , I keep a publick-house ; the 13th of last April, the prisoner at the bar came to live with me as a servant , and she robbed me on the 14th; I order my house to be shut in, being a widow, of a Sabbath night, at 10 o'clock; I bid the prisoner, being a stranger, go to bed, and my daughter; and I bid my daughter take up the two tankards with her, I saw her take them up, she carried them into my room; this was about half past ten; my daughter and me sleep together, up two pair of stairs, and the prisoner in the one pair; just as I was going down into my cellar, to see all things were right, the prisoner came down stairs again, and says to me, madam have you got the key of the kitchen, I said to her, child, the key lays there; she took the key and the candle, and went into the kitchen, I wondered she did not come up to bed again, and in five minutes she had unbolted, and unlocked the street door, and was gone; I ran up stairs to my daughter, and said, oh! I am afraid I am robbed, my maid is gone; I found the tankards gone, and my silver buckles; I ran to the street door, and there was a man coming up the yard, he said he met a woman with a cloak: I went to look into the kitchen, and found my cloak was gone too, and spoons, and my daughter's hat; I never found any thing again but my cloak, which the prisoner had on; she was not taken till July; she was let out the session before last, through mistake.

RICHARD HILLYARD sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner the latter end of July, and she had this cloak on.

(The cloak produced and deposed to by Mrs. Bennett.)

Court to Hillyard. Did she confess it? - I believe she did, I said nothing to her.

Court to Mrs. Bennett. Did you persuade her to confess? - No my Lord, she said, if I would go with her to Short's-gardens, in Drury-lane, to one Mrs. Wells's, I should have my tankards again for three guineas and a half, I said let me see the tankards, and then I will tell you what I will do; we went to Mrs. Wells's, and they denied her ever being there with the tankards; then she was committed.

Court. What sort of tankards? - Two quart silver tankards, full Winchester measure; a silver-smith said they were worth 10 l. for old silver; they were old fashioned heavy tankards.

ELIZABETH WELLS sworn.

I keep a chandler's shop; the prisoner at the bar came to my house, I cannot say the particular time; and three months afterwards she came again, this young man with her, and she said, Mrs. Wells, I am taken up, I said, what is the matter? she said, about two pots I sold, says I was it them pots you sold the Jew, she said it was, and asked me where the Jew was, he came to my shop; they call him Harry the slabberer; his name is Henry Harris ; when she came the first time, she asked me if I bought any old silver, I told her no; I did not see then what

had to sell; but says I down the street there is a club that buys old clothes, and old silver, and such things; I went to shew her where, and I saw this Harry go by, I told him this good woman had got something to sell; I went behind my counter, and I saw her give him one pot, and no more.

Was you acquainted with her before? - I had seen her once or twice before.

What month was this? - If I were to die I cannot say.

Did you ever hear of Mrs. Bennet's being robbed? - No, my Lord.

Was it in the spring of the year? - It is about eight or nine months ago, I could tell by the death of my child if I was at home.

Have you forgot when your child died? - I have the receipt at home, but I cannot tell the time; one has been dead six months, and one nine; to the best of my knowledge I saw her between five and six, she asked me where the Jew was; I said I could not tell, I did not expect he would be there till the following morning; she said, he owed her some money; presently this Harry the Slabberer came in.

When did you see her again? - I never saw her again till I was taken up, and carried before my Lord Mayor, because I would not tell where the Jew was; I know no more, but that one of the Jews was taken up, and the other is out of the way; this Harry the slabberer, he has never been at home in his own place since.

Court. You said something about two pots? - When she first came in the shop, she said she was taken up for two pots.

Prisoner to Mrs. Wells. Did not I ask you when I came in, says I, do you buy old silver, no, says you, but I will fetch a man that will; she knows it was an old bruised quart pot that I had, I had a guinea and a half for it; and please you my Lord, it had been my great grandmother's, for ought I know; I am as innocent as the child in my womb now, of robbing that gentlewoman; to be sure I have been to blame about the cloak: there was a young man laid over head, I sancied it was my young mistress's sweetheart; another woman lived in the next room; I came into the tap, and I did something in the tap, and my mistress saw me; I have two children at home, I thought I will not stay, I will go home; as for that cloak, I bought it for four shillings and six-pence out of pawn, in Monmouth-street, that was the first day I put it on: to be sure, when my mistress said, it is better to confess, well says I, it is your cloak; she took me to the three Tuns in Fleet-street, the people there said, they could not swear to me; my mistress sent me word yesterday, telling me, not to be uneasy, for she would never appear against me.

Jury to prosecutrix. Did a young man sleep in your house? - Yes my Lord, he has lodged with me a year and better, he lodges with me now; and the woman that she mentions has lodged with me ten years, next Christmas.

Court. Were any of these people in the house that night? - They were all in the house, they got up; I went myself, and fetched the young man out of bed, and got him to go to the Justice's; my daughter is very young, and has no sweet heart.

GUILTY. Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-49

51. THOMAS HAY , otherwise DAY , and JOHN WEEKS , were indicted for that they, on the 7th of November last, with force and arms, one piece of copper money of this realm called an halfpenny, unlawfully and feloniously did make, coin, and counterfeit, against the form of the Statute .

A second Count, for that they on the same day one piece of false, feigned, and counterfeit copper money, to the likeness and similitude of the good, legal, and current copper money of this realm, called an halfpenny, unlawfully and feloniously did make and coin, against the form of the Statute.

WILLIAM SEASON sworn.

Do you know any thing about a house in Leather-lane? - On the 7th of November last, I, Denmore, Kippin, and others, went to No. 55, Leather-lane, Holborn , between eleven and twelve in the day; we knocked, and were let in, we went down into the fore kitchen, and I saw the prisoner Hay, otherwise Day, and John Weeks , and another person, whose name is Ballantine, they were sitting in the fore kitchen; I left them in charge, and Denmore, Kippin and I, went to the door of the back kitchen, we saw a mat, and I and Denmore broke it open, we lighted a candle by the fore kitchen fire, and in this back kitchen there we saw the fly, and the press and dies, and about half a dozen candles, two of which were warm; I went down by the side of the press, and I saw a halfpenny between the two dies, I have it here, it is a perfect halfpenny; I saw a number of sacks, and what they put over the shoulders, and the place was covered to keep the sound out, for fear any body should hear the sound of the fly; there was a mat that hung from the top of the door; here are some halfpence that correspond, that were found on the ground, the blank half-pence were found by the side of the die; I took a pair of handcuffs out, in order to take them to prison; I had taken out the dies and the press at that time; there was better than one hundred weight of halfpence and blanks together.

(The dies and halfpence produced.)

JOHN DENMORE sworn.

I am a constable, I went with Season to this house on the 7th of November, between eleven and twelve; when we went down to the kitchen the prisoners were sitting by the fire, we opened the door where the mat was, there we found the fly, and under the press (it was a stamping press) there were several dies that are here now; between these two dies I saw Season take out an halfpenny; here are five more dies all for halfpence; there was one candle, the wick of it was warm, and the grease of it was not quite hard; it could not have long been put out, because the wick of it was rather loose, and the top of the fat was warm.

- BALLANTINE sworn.

Do you know these two men? - I know that I worked with them; I worked with them on the 7th of November, pulling a fly to make the halfpence.

What was Day about? - He worked along with me, the boy laid in the halfpence between the dies; I was there when the officers came.

Had you or had you not been at work that morning? - Yes, Sir, we had, about two minutes before the officers came in.

How long had you been at work? - Seven or eight days.

RICHARD FRANKLIN sworn.

One of the moniers of the Mint, proves the halfpence to be counterfeit.

PRISONER DAY's DEFENCE.

I had not been two minutes in the house; I knew the servant girl, and went into the house with her; she said, you look very poorly, I had had the ague and fever; I went in, and sat me down by the fire, and these gentlemen came in and took me.

PRISONER WEEKS's DEFENCE.

I came to bring a letter.

Prisoner Day. This boy is quite innocent.

BOTH GUILTY .

To be imprisoned twelve months in Newgate .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-50

52. CHRISTOPHER TOWNSEND and BARBARA BURKETT were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Alexander Brown , about the hour of eight in the night, on the 28th of October last, and stealing one hundred weight of hard soap, value 2 l. 14 s. one five feet rule made of box wood, value 2 s.

twelve knives and forks, value 12 s. and a wooden box, value 3 d. and four hundred and eighty copper half-pence, value 20 s. the property of the said Alexander .

ALEXANDER BROWN sworn.

I am a soap manufacturer , I live in Ray-street, Clerkenwell ; my house was broke open the 28th of October; I went to bed about ten, I heard nothing till the men came to work in the morning, and then they found the gates open; and I found I was stripped of every thing, I saw many papers laying about, I found the thieves had come in at a back parlour window, which looks into the yard, the blind was broke by getting it open, the shutter was not shut, the sash was down, they drew up the sash, and came in over the desk; I went out into the yard, and I found my pocket-book, which had been taken out of that desk, with all the papers ransacked in it; I went back into the ware-house, the door was left open, and every bit of soap was gone, there was not a pound left, and a box containing a quantity of halfpence, I suppose double the quantity mentioned in the indictment; I swear to 20 s. worth, and I swear to one hundred pounds weight of soap; there was a five feet rule, hanging in a bag in the ware-house, where the soap was, the rule was taken, and the bag was left; there was a dozen of knives and forks taken away, they were in the parlour, and several other things; I saw the things on Saturday night, except the knives and forks, and I eat my supper with some of the knives and forks on the Sunday night: the night before the house was broke open, there was a hanging lock on the cart way, that leads down to the house, which was broke open; after seeing that I was robbed, I sent my young man up to Mr. Seasons, to let him know of it, and about ten, he brought me half a cake of soap, which was mine: I went to the lodging of these prisoners, and then Mr. Lucy put two other pieces of soap into my hand, which I am sure of.

Court. Did you know the prisoners before? - No, I never saw them before.

JOHN LUCY sworn.

I am constable, I found this soap on the morning of the robbery, on the mantle piece, in the lodging of Barbara Burkett the prisoner; these two pieces; she acknowledged them to be her lodgings: she said that on the 27th, in the evening, about nine o'clock on Sunday, Christopher Townsend and she went to bed together in this room, and she awaked about four in the morning, and found he was gone from her.

Court. Was he present when she said this? - No; about seven he returned again, she was below stairs, he went up stairs into this room, she went up after him, and saw this soap on the mantle piece.

Mr. Brown. I can swear this soap to be my manufacture, I know it by the make, it is a particular boil of soap; I was very clear of it, and all the rest of my people; these two pieces were particular bits, that I remember very well seeing there, and knew them.

Court. Remember these people's lives depend on what you say, can you safely swear it is your manufacture? - I am very clear of it.

CLEMENT LYON sworn.

I am servant to the prosecutor, I remember on the Saturday, the 26th of October, seeing this corner piece of soap in the house, and that there was none sold afterwards.

Can you swear to that piece of soap? - Yes, because it is a very remarkable piece.

Cannot there be some other soap made like it? - It is a remarkable cut.

Cannot any other be cut like it? - Yes, there may.

Then how can you swear to it positively? - I can swear to the two pieces in particular, because I tried to make up weight with them.

WILLIAM SEASON sworn.

I am constable, between seven and eight on Monday morning the last witness came and informed me that the house was robbed; I went to Three Pigeon-court, and found the prisoner Burkett in the lower room, in

the kitchen; I then asked her who she lived with; she said I knew as well as she; I said, is it Townsend? she said, yes, and we went into her apartments, and found the soap, and I took it to Mr. Brown, who said he could swear to it: I asked her where Townsend was; she said she did not know, he was gone out.

THOMAS ISAAC sworn.

On the 28th in the morning I went to this house of Barbara Burkett 's, we went up stairs into her room as she told us, and found this handkerchief hanging a-cross the chair; I ashed her whose it was, she said it was Townsend's; here is the mark of the soap that had been brought in that handkerchief; I likewise found these things, which he owned before the magistrate to be his property.

Court. Was the prisoner Townsend's examination taken down in writing? - I believe it was taken down by the clerk.

JOHN KIPPIN sworn.

I am a constable, I was at the apprehending the two prisoners; I found the prisoner Townsend, after I had apprehended the woman, in Mutton-lane, I charged him with it; he said he knew nothing of the matter; I searched him, and I found this picklock key in his pocket, that is all I found about him.

SARAH SMITH sworn.

What are you? - I keep the house that Barbara Burkett lodged in; I know nothing but that the woman lodged with me.

Do you know whether that Sunday night, the 27th of November last, that young man lay with her? - I never knew that she had any body lay with her; I have seen the young man before, but I did not see him that night; I saw him the next morning between seven and eight; he came first into our kitchen, I saw nobody with him, he went up stairs into Barbara's room, he was not there a quarter of an hour, he came down again, and went away; I saw Barbara about ten o'clock at night, she came down stairs to go into the yard, and went up stair again.

PRISONER BURKETT's DEFENCE.

I am a poor unfortunate girl of the town, I went out that Sunday night, and brought a man home with me; he had a bundle with him, and he left it behind him, and when I opened it, the soap was in it.

Court to Lucy. What time was it you searched Barbara's lodgings? - Between nine and ten in the morning.

Court to Smith. What time did you get up that morning? - Barbara came into my room, and light the fire, she did not go out, I saw nobody else come in but that young man.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-51

53. THOMAS COPE was indicted for that he on the 9th of November last one piece of false, forged, and counterfeit money, to the likeness and similitude of the good and legal money, and current silver coin of this realm, called a sixpence, falsely, deceitfully, feloniously and traiterously did forge, counterfeit and coin, against the duty of his allegiance, and against the form of the Statute .

(The witnesses examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.

PRISONER.

My Lord, I beg the character of the witnesses may be enquired into, how they get their living, and if they are not interested in this affair.

Court. You will impeach their character if you have any thing to say against them.

JOHN DIXON sworn.

On the 9th of November I went to the house in Rose-street, Spitalfields , about two o'clock in the day, there was Blacketer,

Grubb and Macdaniel; Blacketer is very ill, and cannot attend; having information against the prisoner at the Bar, I waited till almost six in the evening; the information given me was, that the prisoner was not come to work; I went to a public house, and in a little yard of the house I found the prisoner Cope, in a kind of smith's shop, as it appeared to me; there were two windows in it, and there was no glass, and there were rugs hung against the frames; I peeped in at a part where the rug hung down a little, and I looked through, and saw what passed within; I saw the prisoner blowing the fire, it was a kind of kitchen, a smith's shop, I saw Cope stand by a forge, I knew him very well by fight before, he was blowing the fire; after he had blown the fire, I saw something hot in the fire, but I could not tell what it was, then he took up a pot and drank; then he blowed the fire again with a pair of large bellows that were fixed there; after that, these bellows (producing a pair) lay on the forge, and he took them up, and he blew the cinders and the coals out of a crucible, and he took these tongs (producing a pair) and took this crucible (producing a crucible) out of the fire, and I saw him run it in these flasks; the crucible was what I saw him take out of the fire, it was red hot, and he run it in these flasks by the side of the bellows; as soon as he had done that, he was returning with the crucible hot in the tongs, and I knocked down the rug and went in; I said, If you stir, I will blow your brains out; the other people came up, I believe I tied his hands.

Prisoner. You are pretty sure of that; you did.

Dixon. Well, I believe I might, I dare say I did: in his right hand breeches pocket, I took these sixteen pieces of base metal; I then searched near the forge, and Blacketer said, here is something here, but I cannot get it out; here is a piece of rag, so I put my fingers in, my fingers being longer than his, and I pulled out these sixteen pieces of pewter, which are for patterns; the coiners generally work with silver patterns, but these are pewter; I searched further, and Grubb, I believe it was, said, Dickson here is a hole in the wall behind Cope, he looks very earnestly at it, I wish you would look into that; then I looked there, and I found eleven six-pences which are finished; and in the same hole, under some little rubbish, I found this milling tool, which is a milling tool for half crowns: I never opened the flask till I came to the Rotation Office, it was hot when I took it, I opened it there, there appeared to be ten six-pences which were run; the top of the flask was hot, (the flask opened) there is a pattern for sixteen in the flask, but the metal run short, there was only metal enough for ten: the sixteen pewter patterns, answer to every six-pence except the finished ones, which have been crooked afterwards: we found aqua fortis, scouring paper, files, sand paper, sand and facings, and every thing that is used in this business; I do not see any thing deficient: here is arsenick, and every thing.

Prisoner. What dress was I in? - The prisoner was dressed but meanly, not so well as he is now, he had an apron on, and his hands were dirty, he had his coat on.

What coat? - I believe it was a black one.

One or two? - I believe one, but I cannot be particular.

Was you at the Rose, in Rose-lane, playing at a little table where the marbles roll down, when you sent to Harris's house, to bring me down on this false accusation? - No.

So you do not know what dress I was in, when you came in at the window? - I think you had black clothes on.

It is astonishing to me, that a man should come here on his affidavit, and cannot tell what cloaths I had on, had I any cloaths on? - Yes Sir.

CHARLES GRUBB sworn.

I went with Dickson to this house in Rose lane; I stood behind Dickson, he looked in at the window, I did not look myself, I heard the blowing of the bellows in the shop; I followed Dickson in, and directly saw the

crucible quite hot, that he had been melting silver in.

Prisoner. How do you know it was silver that was melting? - I do not suppose it was, I suppose it was metal; I burned my fingers with it, I felt it for a day or two; the flask when they run the metal in, was hot at the mouth; I held Cope, while Dickson searched him; he pulled out of his breeches pocket, some of the spray, I think sixteen; Dickson and I looked round, and found all the things that are here; Dickson as he brought them out, shewed them to Cope.

Prisoner. How did you examine these things to find they were hot? Did you examine them at all? - Yes, for I burnt my hand most terribly.

Where was the crucible? - It lay down by the side of the forge.

Where was the flask? - Just by the side of the anvil.

Do you know what the anvil and the forge is? - Yes, there is a difference; they were close by one another; the first thing I examined was the crucible and the flask.

Did you examine what was in the flask that you say now was hot? - They were not opened till we came to the office; I am sure they were warm when they came to the office.

(The things shewn to the Jury.)

RICHARD FRANKLIN sworn,

One of the Moniers of the Mint, proves them to be counterfeits, and very bad ones.

Prisoner. My Lord, I have a number of witnesses to call, and I can prove every matter they have set forth against me to be quite the reverse; as to what they have brought there, it is a dead fix upon me; there is a wicked designing man that is concerned with this Mr. Dixon, and has been some time; he has been convicted several times for his life, he has been transported to America for seven years, he returned, he was taken up again, and was tried for the robbery of - I believe I can tell your Lordship in a very short time - for robbing the house of one - Haden, Esq; he got his Majesty's pardon for that, on condition of going on board the lighter.

The Remainder of this Trial in the Fifth and Last Part, which will be Published in a few Days.

Reference Number: t17821204-51

HODGSON's SHORT-HAND TREATISE, Price 2 s. 6 d. with an Explanatory Copper-plate, to be had of J. WALMSLAY, and S. BLADON.

TRIALS, &c. taken with great Accuracy by E. HODGSON, Writer of these PROCEEDINGS, No. 35, Chancery-lane.

N. B. SHORT-HAND taught on an improved Plan.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday, the 4th of DECEMBER, 1782, and the following Days;

Being the FIRST SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Nathaniel Newnham , Esq; LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY E. HODGSON, And Published by Authority.

NUMBER I. PART V.

LONDON:

Printed for E. HODGSON (the Proprietor) And Sold by J. WALMSLAY, No. 35, Chancery Lane, and S. BLADON, No. 13, Pater-noster Row.

MDCCLXXXII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

Continuation of the Trial of Thomas Cope .

Court. Who are you speaking of?

Prisoner. I am speaking of one Harris, who gave the information.

Court. Circumstances concerning any body that has not given evidence on this trial, are totally irrelevant to the purpose; you will not be admitted to prove these facts about a man that is not here; as to the witnesses that have sworn to positive facts, if you have any thing to say to attack their credit, you may produce any witnesses to that purpose.

Prisoner. The men that have given evidence against me, are a set of men that live entirely by rewards; I have witnesses here, by which I do not doubt but I can prove every thing contrary to what they have said; this is the most treacherous affair that ever was in the world.

JAMES SEARLES sworn.

All I have to say is this, on the 12th of November I called on Mr. Harris, who was the man that lived in the house where this Mr. Cope was taken; I called to know whether Cope was taken, and Harris told me very freely that he was taken at his house, and that it was the greatest wonder in the world that he was not taken himself; that he had been a casting, and had put the pot on the fire, and stepped out for some sandpaper, and returning, his window being as usual open, he saw four or five men in the house, and heard his wife and the children crying, with that he stepped back into an alley.

Court. This is nothing to the purpose, what this man said, have you an thing to say respecting the prisoner.

Searles. No my Lord, no further than I know Harris to be in that way for some time; I never saw the prisoner at the bar before to day, I know nothing of him.

Prisoner. I should be glad my Lord, if you will look over this matter of defence, it is absolutely the truth, and nothing else but the truth, (handing up a paper) I am rather disappointed in not having my witnesses here; but if I must lose my life, I must lose it; it is the most wretched thing that ever was known; I am as innocent as one of these sprigs of rue.

Court. I will read this paper to the jury if you chuse it, but you had better read it yourself.

The PRISONER read his DEFENCE.

I am a Gun-maker in Goodman's-yard, Minories; having an order, I applied to

Harris to get some things done, which he promised, if I would bring him a pattern; I went to him in a day or two after, and informed him I could not get the pattern, and I gave him the best instructions I could; he promised to get them done, but did not do them: on the 9th of November, Harris came to my house, and told me he had a gun to repair, and would be glad if I would call at his shop in Rose-lane; I promised to call in a day or two, but in the afternoon Harris came again, and begged me to come as soon as possible that evening, as the person that the gun belonged to was in a particular hurry; that was this set of gentlemen that were waiting: Harris, when he came to my house, observing a gun rammer that my wife was stirring the fire with, he told me he had an old poker at home he would bit for me, and hoped I would not fail coming that evening: having some business in Spital-fields market, I went to Harris's, the door was bolted, they let me in; he said Mr. Cope, I am glad you are come, step this way into the shop, I went immediately, and began blowing the fire; and he laid hold of a poker, and said, this is what I intend for you; blow the fire, and I will step and fetch the gun; and he went out and locked the front door; and as I was blowing the fire, I saw something in the fire, and I put the poker in and stirred it, to see what it was, and finding it a pot, I took it out, and took a pair of bellows and blew the ashes out to see what was in it, finding nothing in it, I threw it out of the fire on the anvil; and then these men came in at the window, with pistols, and said they were come to look for dubs: I do not know what dubs are: they asked for the master of the shop, I said he was stepped out; they looked round the shop, and said, there is something else going forwards, and they searched, and found the things concealed; and now old gentleman they said, we must search you, and they searched me, and found nothing but a farthing about me; I had not been in the shop above two minutes: these fellows did not care who it was they took hold of. This Harris was a deserter; he as been tried twice, and sent to America, he came back again, and robbed a gentleman's house, and was convicted, and sent to the lighters, he received his Majesty's pardon, and entered into Lord Harrington's regiment; and has at different times received rewards from the thief takers: here is Dixon himself, to my certain knowledge, but a few days before, when this Harris was taken up for desertion, he cleared him himself, on consideration he should get him any man that would weigh forty. This is the most wicked thing that ever was done in the world, and if I die for it, I shall not give myself any concern; I am as innocent of it as the child unborn. I had a question or two my Lord which I have omitted.

Court. By all means, any question that you wish to put.

Prisoner to Dixon. Where did you find the sixteen patterns? - In a hole under the anvil, the anvil stands on the half of an old coach wheel, and they were in the hole of the spokes.

Prisoner. If I was to die, and to be hanged in the yard this minute, I know nothing of the affair any more than the child unborn.

GUILTY , ( Death .)

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-52

54. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Stephen Brougham on the 24th of October last, about the hour of nine in the forenoon; no person being therein, and stealing one gun, value 20 s: one pair of men's shoes, value 1 s. one pair of base metal buckles, value 6 d. and one pen-knife, value 1 d. the property of the said Stephen .

STEPHEN BROUGHAM sworn.

I am a labourer , and live in the parish of Enfield , at a lone house which was broke open in the day time.

- BROUGHAM sworn.

I am the wife of Stephen Brougham ; I was the last person that left my house the 24th of October, I locked the door, and secured the windows when I went out; there was in the kitchen, a gun, a pair of leather shoes with wooden soles, a pair of buckles in them, and a pen-knife; I returned in about half an hour, I was the first that came home, and I observed the lock was spoiled, and the windows broken, and somebody had been in; the prisoner was found under my bed, but he got away; he frightened me to death; there is no neighbour near: the shoes are on the prisoner's feet now.

(The gun deposed to.)

Court. Should you know him again? - I believe I should.

Look round and see if you see him. - (Looking at the prisoner) Yes, here he is, I am very sure that is him, very sure I am.

WILLIAM EDGE sworn.

The prisoner came and offered this gun to fell at our shop for 4 s. at Barnet; he came by the backside of the church: I took off the lock of it, and said, my lad you have stolen this gun, he said he brought it from Endfield, then he said he brought it from Edmonton, and then he said he did not know where he brought it from.

Are you sure that is the boy? - I never saw him before, I cannot be certain.

JOHN HENNELLS sworn.

I took the prisoner almost half a mile from any house, in the fields, I kept him till the prosecutor came home, then we took him to Endfield cage, and kept him there till Monday morning, then we had him before the Justice, and the Justice committed him to New-prison.

JOHN CROUCH sworn.

He brought the gun to my house, and offered it to sale; I am not certain to the boy, I never saw him before.

PRISONER.

I do not know what to say, I did not meddle with the things.

Court to Jury. By a Statute that passed in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, it is made a capital offence for any person to break and enter a dwelling house in the day time, no person being therein, and stealing to the value of 5 s. this act of parliament was made for the protection of poor labourers, who are obliged to leave their houses, to follow their daily industry.

GUILTY .

Of stealing to the value of 4 s.

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-53

55. THOMAS SIMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of November last, two leather bridles, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Bickham .

ELIZABETH BICKHAM sworn.

On Friday, the 22d of November, I was going from the counting-house to the lower part of the yard about five in the afternoon, I was talking to a gentleman who is now in Court, I saw a man coming from the stables, and going out of the yard towards Smithfield, he held his right hand under his coat, I turned round and asked him as he passed by, what he had under his coat; he made no answer; I followed him to the street-door, and took hold of his coat, and bid him turn back, for I apprehended he had something there did not belong to him; he turned round, made no resistance, but said he should not; he walked a little way down the yard, and dropped a chaise-bridle, he walked further on, and flung away another bridle; I sent

for a constable, he said he was not afraid of any thing I could do.

Court. Did he give you any reason for not being afraid? - He did not; the chaisebridle was my husband's property, the other was a gentleman's, who had intrusted it with one of our servants; I took up the saddle-bridle, it was given to the constable on Saturday, I had it till then, I gave it to a lad, one William Edwards , who is now in Court, to take to Guildhall; Mr. John Evans took up the other, and I kept it till I gave it to Edwards.

Prisoner's Counsel. When you first saw the prisoner in the yard, did not he inform you that he came to speak to William the ostler? - After he was taken he did; I saw him throw one bridle down.

You looked where you thought he threw something, but will you say it was a bridle? - I saw the bridle in his hands before he threw it away.

JOHN EVANS sworn.

I was coming out of the tap-room to go and order my horse and chaise, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Bickham's stable, I said to Mrs. Bickham, that man is come out of your stable, and he has something under his coat; she went after him immediately, he turned round, and I saw him drop the chaise-bridle from his coat, I stood over the bridle till the prisoner was taken.

Prisoner's Counsel. You are sure he dropped it there? - Yes, Sir, as sure as I see you.

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn.

What are you? - I am a witness.

But what was you before? - An ostler to Mr. Bickham; two bridles were given to me, which my mistress picked up in the yard; one of them was a chaise bridle, it was my master's and the other, the saddle bridle, was a gentleman's, whose horse was in my master's stable; I have seen the prisoner several times; he is no acquaintance of mine, I did not see him in the stable.

(The bridles produced and deposed to.)

PRISONER.

I leave my defence to my council.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

To be publickly whipped , and confined to hard labour six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-54

56. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of November last, one woollen blanket, value 4 s. the property of Philip Day .

PHILIP DAY sworn.

I live at No. 67, Cheapside , I have a back door into Queen-street, I had just waited on a customer, and I saw the prisoner come down from a middle staircase which leads from his room, with a blanket under his arm, he was looking at the shop window to see if any body saw him, and he perfectly ran against me; I stopped him; he immediately threw the blanket on some packing cases, I laid hold of him, he attempted to run into the street, but I held him till I gave him to the constable with the blanket.

Prisoner's counsel. Was this a new blanket or an old one? - It was neither new nor old.

The blanket was visible for any body to see? - Yes, he had it on his arm.

- LOWNDES sworn.

I was in Mr. Day's shop, and saw the prisoner come down stairs, he looked stedfastly into the shop, as if conscious that he was doing a bad action.

Prisoner's counsel. Was his behaviour at that time such that it occurred to you that he was doing a bad act? - No, Sir.

Then it occurred to you afterwards? - Yes.

(The blanket deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner's counsel to prosecutor. Did you know at the time it was on his arm that it was your blanket? - Yes, I know it by a stain on it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It is usual for us apprentices to go home every Saturday night; three or four Sundays before when I was shifting myself, I found some vermin, and I thought it must come from the bed, as we have not had a clean pair of sheets since last July; I was determined to look at the sheets and blankets, I did, and found some vermin on them; I was going to carry the blanket to the scowerers, because if I had asked my master, he would not have had it cleaned: my master stopped me at the bottom of the stairs, I was going into the privy to ease myself; I laid down the blanket, and they sent for an officer, and sent me to the Compter: my friends were here yesterday.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-55

34. JOHN STOCKTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of November last, one piece of woollen cloth, value 5 l. the property of Burchill and Co.

- GATES sworn.

The prisoner was brought before Mr. Alderman Townsend on Saturday last, and he confessed where the property was, that was at Mr. Townsend's, the pawnbroker, in Hair-alley, Shoreditch; we went there, and looking over the pawnbroker's books, we saw a great many more things in his name, which we brought away; this is a particular kind of cloth for the Spanish trade, I believe it is called Estimania; he said he took it from Mr. Burchill, I heard him say so voluntarily.

Court. Is that the same piece that was produced in the prisoner's presence, which he acknowledged? - It is, I had it in my custody a long time; here is the mark that belongs to it.

- COLE sworn.

I am a journeyman packer by trade; I had some intelligence where to find this cloth on the Friday evening: by which means I secured the prisoner, and lodged him in the Compter; on Saturday morning he was taken before Mr. Alderman Townsend; Mr. Gates asked him where the black cloth was, he gave a direction, and Gates and me went there, and found this piece of cloth amongst the rest; it was produced in presence of the prisoner, and he said when it was brought into court, that he took it from Mr. Burchill.

(The cloth deposed to by Mr. Burchill.)

PRISONER.

My Lord I am guilty.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-56

35. JOHN STOCKTON was again indicted, for feloniously stealing on the 27th of November last, twenty-eight yards of Tammy, value 30 s. the property of Isaac Wilson .

HENRY COCK sworn.

The prisoner took a piece of Tammy out of our warehouse, I heard him confess it, I went to hear the examination, knowing this man had taken several things as a porter; as soon as I went in, this Cole that apprehended him told me that he had got my tammy, and that it was at Mr. Townsend's, the pawnbroker's; we went before Justice Wilmot, and these things were brought there; the prisoner acknowledged he took it; it is my tammy.

- GATES sworn.

I was not at the finding of this tammy, I heard the prisoner confess it.

- COLE sworn.

I found this tammy at the pawnbroker's.

PRISONER.

I am guilty.

GUILTY .

To be transported to the Coast of Africa for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-57

57. GEORGE PETERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of November last, a pair of men's shoes, value 3 s. one pair of stockings, value 1 s. and one linen handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Samuel Moorley .

SAMUEL MOORLEY sworn.

I was in the tap-room at the Three Tuns, Snow-hill , at supper, last Tuesday se'night, about six at night, and the prisoner came in and took some things from under the bench where I sat; they were a pair of shoes and stockings tied up in a handkerchief; John Trinby saw him take them, and he came and told me; he was overtaken in the street, but the things were never found.

JOHN TRINBY sworn.

I saw the prisoner come in about a quarter after six, it is a house of call for wine-porters; he came and warmed himself, and looked round and went out; he came in again in two minutes with a young woman, and called for a pint of beer, he staid a quarter of an hour, I saw him put his hand down, I did not think of the countryman's bundle, I thought he was taking one of the publican's pots; then presently he got up, and looked round the room, and went out half bent backwards, with his hand behind him; I saw a blue and white checked handkerchief, with a bundle in his hand; I called to one of my fellow-servants to go after him, he did not go immediately, he brought him back to the house, he denied it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went in there; I had a pair of new shoes with me, under my jacket: why did this man let me go out with the bundle, if he knew it to be the countryman's? I am a native of Philadelphia; I went out of this town in the Resolution, I was taken and brought into Rochelle; I have been eleven months in prison there: I have a wound in my leg, I intend to get into St. Bartholomew's Hospital, and then go to sea.

- CATCHPOLE sworn.

There was found on the prisoner, a pound of tobacco, a pair of woman's new shoes, and a brass weight.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-58

58. ANN BAKER was indicted for loniously stealing on the 7th of November last a quart pewter pot, value 8 d. the goods of John Chapman .

JOHN CHAPMAN sworn.

On the 7th of November the prisoner came into my house for a penny-worth of purl, she whipped a quart pot off, put it under her apron, and said, if it was not convenient to me, she would not have the purl; she was going out, and I laid hold of her, says I, you have got a quart pot of mine; I took the pot from her; the constable has it.

- ALLEN sworn.

I took the prisoner into custody, some other pots were found on her.

PRISONER.

I know nothing of it.

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped , and confined six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-59

59. CATHERINE WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of October last, one quart pewter pot, value 12 d. the property of William Elsworth .

JOHN PIDDEY sworn.

I am waiter at the Queen's arms, Newgate-street ; I saw the prisoner loitering about our yard at dusk; I went up stairs and opened the window to observe her, and I saw her make three attempts where the pots stood, there were some decanters underneath; then I saw her take something, and I ran down, and caught hold of her with this pot under her arm.

(The pot deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had just left off work; I went through this place, and I took hold of the pot to drink a drop of water; I had no intention to thieve, any more than you gentlemen; I work very hard for my bread; I was loth to send for any body.

Court. Was it in the yard, or out of the yard you took her? - It was beyond the water tub, and there was no cock in the yard: she denied she had any thing.

GUILTY .

To be privately whipped , and confined six months in the house of correction .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-60

60. JANE LITTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of November last, three remnants of silk ribbon, containing thirty-six yards, value 16 s. and three pieces of lace edging containing one hundred yards, value 5 l. the goods of Richard Thorne privily in his shop,

RICHARD THORNE sworn.

The prisoner was in my front shop on the 20th or 21st of November last, about half past one; she asked for some ribbon, and my man having told me she had taken something, I took her by the hand, and told her to go with me; then she dropped one card of edging, I saw her drop it from under her cloak; going a little further, she dropped another card; after that I got her into the back shop, and told her I should send for a constable immediately, and I sent for one; mean while she dropped two pieces of ribbon in the back shop, that were not there before; then I took her up stairs to be searched, and going up, I saw her drop another piece of ribbon.

Court. Were those pieces of edging and ribbon that were dropped your property? - Yes my Lord.

JOHN JOY sworn.

I am shop-man to Mr. Thorne; I was shewing the prisoner some edging; she took one card, I did not observe the second; but I saw her take a third, then she let one fall; I put back her cloak, and there was another piece under her arm; I saw her drop it in the shop, from under her cloak.

PRISONER.

I have nothing to say.

Court to Jury, Gentlemen, the evidence does not amount to stealing privately, because the shopman saw the prisoner take two cards of edging, and in order to constitute stealing privately, no person must see the property taken.

GUILTY

Of stealing, but not guilty of stealing privately.

To be privately whipped , and confined six months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-61

61. SAMUEL TOOME was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of November last, two pieces of bar iron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of George Ilsley .

JOHN FORD sworn.

I am apprentice to the prosecutor, I am fourteen years of age, I was in the shop the 25th of November, about half past six, behind the large bellows; I had a suspicion of the prisoner taking things, and I saw him take two pieces of bar iron from the door where the men always go out, I was not so far from him as I am now, there was a candle, I run after him, and stopped him; he called me a fool, and bid me not tell my master that I saw him; he had not got far from the shop, and I stopped him again the second time, he run down Whitechapel, the iron was never seen after.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was out with Mr. Ilsley's other apprentice with some work, the shop was all in darkness, the oldest apprentice ran down to see for this boy, whom we supposed was at the alehouse, and I went after him to my tipping, and the boy said, you must bring the iron back, and I had none, I shewed him my hands.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

To be imprisoned in Newgate for twelve months .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-62

62. ELIZABETH TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of November last, one silver watch, value 3 l. the property of John Schwahn .

JOHN SCHWAHN sworn.

I am a German , and a sugar-baker ; last Sunday was three weeks, the 10th of November, I had been in a public house in Winifred-street, Whitechapel, the prisoner met me in the street, and asked me to go home with her, I was a little in liquor.

Was you any ways drunk, speak the truth? - I was a little in liquor, I went home with the prisoner to her lodging, and I laid my watch down in the window, after I had looked to see what o'clock it was; I sat down, and she went to the window, and took up the watch, and ran out of doors directly; I followed her, but I could not find her, it was dark, the constable found her.

Court. Are you sure the prisoner is the person? - Yes.

Can you safely swear to her? - Yes.

Were not you so drunk that you might be mistaken? - No, I am not mistaken.

JOHN CRAYDON sworn.

I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner on the 11th of November, she came into a public house near where she lives, and said to me that she had got into a very fine hobble, for she had done (in the vulgar way) a man out of his watch, and she asked me to soften the matter; I said, being a constable, it was not my place to conceal a robbery, but that I would do all I could for her: I found out the prosecutor, and got a warrant, and took the prisoner; the prisoner gave the duplicate of the watch up to me.

JOHN BRADY sworn.

I took this watch in pawn of a young man, one Nathaniel Robins , I know nothing of the prisoner.

PRISONER.

I know nothing at all about it, I have not a friend in the world.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-63

63. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of October last, twenty-four punds weight of iron nails, value 6 s. the property of Peter Mestaer , Esquire .

JOHN STANFORD sworn.

I am foreman to the prosecutor, he is a master ship-builder , on the 24th of October I went up into our loft and caught the prisoner, I found him very heavy in taking hold of him, he was a stranger; I examined his pockets, and between his skin and his shirt he was loaded as deep as he could be, and every pocket; I took him to the Justice's, with these nails upon him, he was just coming out of the loft.

Court. Are they your master's nails? - Yes.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was at rigging work on board of ship, and I had come back from my breakfast, I went to get some nails, and the gentleman took me; I was at work for Mr. Allen.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-64

64. JANE PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of November , one silver watch, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Anthonio Farrer .

(The prosecutor being a Portuguese, Maria Powell , an Interpretress, was sworn.)

ANTHONIO FARRER sworn.

I made a bargain to sleep with the prisoner at her lodgings for half a crown, in Winifred-street, Whitechapel , I had been drinking two or three pints of beer, but was not in liquor, I put my breeches under the bed's head, and she pretended to put her pockets under, and took my watch; I was in bed, but she was not; then she blew out the candle, and ran away: there was nobody else in the room, the prisoner is the woman, she was taken a fortnight after.

CHARLES EARL sworn.

I took the prisoner, no watch was found on her.

JOHN CRAVEN sworn.

I am a constable; on the 17th or 18th of November, the prosecutor and his brother came into a publick house where I was, and said they had been robbed of a watch, as well as they could speak; says I, do you think you should know any of these girls, accordingly he looked round, and looked at one Peggy, as they call her, and he said that was the girl that blew out the light; so I carried her before Justice Staples, and he sent her to Clerkenwell for further examination; she said it was Jenny Tumbler was the girl that was going to lay along with the prosecutor.

PRISONER.

He gave charge of another woman; I know nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-65

95. WILLIAM BLAKE and WILLIAM KERCHEVAL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of November last, one basket, value 1 s. and one hundred lampern eels, value 5 s. the property of James and Stephen West .

WILLIAM WEST sworn.

My brother and me lost a basket of eels, we saw the basket at Mortlake; and I caught the prisoners selling them, and they acknowledged taking them; I told them it would be better for them to confess.

Court. You could not swear to eels? - No my Lord.

Was it the same quantity you had lost? - They had sold great part of them, there were about eleven left.

Court to Jury. There is no evidence sufficient to bring the charge home to the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-66

66. ANN ATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of October last, two guineas, value 2 l. 2 s. and 9 s. in monies numbered , the property of James Price .

JAMES PRICE sworn.

I am a private in the Horse-guards ; on the 23d of October last about eleven at night, I was going up Oxford-street; I met the prisoner at the corner of Duke-street, by the King and Queen, and she asked me to go along with her, and I went, and she took me up a gateway which is called Oxford-court ; and she asked me what I would give her to be concerned with her, and I told her I would give her a shilling; the bargain being made, she began to unbutton the flaps of my breeches; and then she got one hand in my pocket, and the other she unbuttoned my breeches with; and she had taken two guineas, and 6 or 7 s. unperceived: I caught hold of her hand while it was in my pocket; I asked her what she was doing; she gave a jerk out of my pocket, and dropped a guinea on the stones; I looked in her mouth, and perceived a half crown, part out of her mouth; and I stooped to feel for the money, and she ran away immediately.

Had you this money in your pocket before? - Yes, I had felt it in my pocket not ten minutes before I met her.

Was you sober? - I was as sober as I am this minute; I had been drinking, but not at all disguised; no further than would do any person good.

You never saw her before? - I have seen her about that corner; it is her beat, I knew her by seeing her thereabouts; the next night I saw her at the very same spot, she was fighting with another girl; I let her have her battle out, and then I charged the watch with her: I am perfectly sure the prisoner is the same girl.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The gentleman took me up the court, and gave me half a crown, and I put it in my mouth; and he wanted it again, and he said he would have it.

Court to Jury. You hear the evidence gentlemen: to be sure there is one remark that occurs, which is, that as the man's breeches were unbuttoned, the money might fall out.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-67

67. SUSANNA KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of October last, two linen sheets, value 4 s. one linen shirt, value 1 s. one stuff gown, value 1 s. one cloth coat, value 6 d. and one cloth waistcoat, value 6 d. the goods of Eleanor Perry , widow .

ELEANOR PERRY sworn.

I live in Old Cock-lane, Shoreditch : on the 24th of October I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; I went out about nine in the morning, and left nobody at home; the prisoner lodged in my house, up two pair of stairs; I returned about five, and found my lower door, my inner door broke open, and the bed that my daughter laid in, was turned down, and both sheets taken off, and also a shirt, my child's green coat and waistcoat, and a green stuff gown; I saw the things in the morning before I went out; I found the prisoner about an hour after I came home, at the sign of the city of Canterbury, in Norton-Falgate; she had two sheets in a

bundle, I can swear to them, as I made them, and to the shirt which I had to wash; it belonged to another person; I believe the coat and waistcoat to be mine.

FRANCES WHEELER sworn.

I live facing the prosecutrix; I saw the prisoner go into her house, and come out with a bundle, but I do not know what was in it; the bundle was spread on her shoulders.

JOHN MILLINGTON sworn.

I am a patrol of Bishopsgate without; I was at the sign of the city of Canterbury, and the prisoner came in with a bundle, and offered the coat and waistcoat, and a man's shirt, to a man that sold rabbits at the door for sale; she said she had them from Bow.

WALTER PROSSER sworn.

I took charge of the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not guilty: Mary Walker (whom they have put away) brought them to me to sell, I know nothing where she got them from; I have nobody but God and myself; my husband is plowing the ocean.

GUILTY .

To be confined to hard labour twelve months in the House of Correction .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17821204-68

68. MARGARET HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of December instant, in the dwelling-house of George Parker , one screw box, with eight gold rings, value 40 s. three silver buttons, value 12 d. four guineas, value 4 l. 4 s. six light guineas, value 6 l. one half guinea, value 10 s. 6 d. one light half guinea, value 9 s. one moidore, value 27 s. one gold medal, value two guineas, sixteen pieces of old silver coin, value 20 s. the property of John Jackson ; and one promissory note of 20 l. from the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, commonly called a Bank note , being the property of the said John Jackson , the proprietor thereof; and ELIZABETH COLEMAN was indicted for that she on the same day, with force and arms, the abovesaid goods, chattels and monies, feloniously did receive and have, well knowing the same to have been stolen .

JOHN JACKSON sworn.

Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar? - Yes, Margaret Hall.

Do you remember her ever sinc e the night you was robbed? - Yes, I saw her at the Justice's since, I remember her from the first night very well; I met with her the corner of Dyot-street, St. Giles's, on Monday night last, I take it to be about ten o'clock, we went to the public house to drink; there were two girls, her and another, when I first saw her; after we had drank, she took me to her lodgings, as I understood it to be, it was just opposite the public house, we went up stairs, and had a pot or two of some liquor, purl, or gin-hot, or something of that sort; they teased me for money, I had no more silver, and I pulled one of them boxes out of my pocket, I had one in each waistcoat pocket, they were two penny screw boxes with light gold, which I brought up to town to sell, and four guineas and two half guineas; I gave them one half guinea, and they brought me the change; I had got the other with gold rings, and some silver coins, and a moidore, and a remarkable gold coin of Charles the First, to the best of my knowledge; they took the box that had the light gold, the rings, and my 20 l. Bank note, which was in my pocket-book, there was about twelve or fourteen light guineas, they put the box in my pocket again; I put the change of the half guinea, which they brought me, in my pocket, and soon after I went to bed, and there was a girl sitting on the bed; and I really believe in my conscience, and upon my oath, that I was in sleep in five minutes, I slept till day-break; when I awoke, I found

nobody with me, I missed the two boxes and the silver, all but one half crown; the papers were gone out of my pocket-book, and one 20 l. note; and one 20 l. note they left; there was a screw to the pocket-book, and in their hurry they had torn off the lid: I came down stairs, and knocked at the bottom door, and this good man and woman ( George Parker ) were going to breakfast, and I told them how I had been used; they said they were very sorry, they would see if they could hear any thing of them; he said it was better to send for one of the runners at Justice Walker's; by the time he had applied to them the prisoners were taken: I saw them again the afternoon of the next day, I knew Margaret Hall very well, I said the same then I say now; the gold coins and some of the gold rings, and about 20 l. in money, was produced, the Bank note was not produced.

Court. Where did you spend the afternoon before this? - I came up by the coach, I got down at the White Horse-cellar in Piccadilly, I was very much benumbed with cold, I drank several glasses of rum on the road to keep out the cold, then I went and had a pint of beer, and read the newspaper, then I had another.

Were you not very much in liquor? - Yes, or else I should not have done so, especially if I thought of my property, I never once thought of my property.

Now after this, you went with this woman to the public house, and drank more there, so that when you went to Dyot-street I suppose you was so much in liquor as not to know what happened to you? - I was rather too much in liquor, or else I should have had more prudence.

Can you speak particularly to taking out the box, and giving the half guinea? - I remember that exceedingly well.

Did you know either of these young women at the time? - I never knew them before.

Did you take notice of them so as to know them again, as you was so much in liquor? - That young woman I know exceedingly well.

Can you undertake to swear positive? - I can, indeed, I said all along that I could swear to that young woman, there were two in the room, and one up and down stairs fetching the liquor, that young woman was one of them; I believe one young woman sat down on, or got into the bed.

Was that the tall young woman or not? - I cannot swear positively.

Then how can you swear positively that the tall young woman was in the room at all? - Oh yes, Sir! I remember her being in the room with me.

Was she in the room when you went to bed? - I believe she was.

But you are not sure of that? - I cannot swear positively to that, she was in the room, and was drinking at the public house, and I am sure she and I agreed to go to bed together.

How long had you been in the room before you pulled out these boxes? - I imagine some time, they were continually asking for more and more to drink, and I found I had no more silver, and I took half a guinea out of the box; I am sure she was with me in the room.

Can you swear with certainty to her being there any time after you went into the room? - I think, to the best of my knowledge, she was in the room all the time, but I cannot swear for certain.

SARAH COX sworn.

I am servant to George Parker , in Dyot-street, I remember seeing the prosecutor last Monday night, turned eleven o'clock; the prisoner Hall was with him, and a person not yet taken.

Did you know her before? - Yes, by living in the neighbourhood.

Did he and she go into any room in your house together? - She came up with the other girl, and the prosecutor said he would give her something to drink; she said she was very cold and very weary, and I gave her the liberty to partake of the liquor, as he chose to send for it: the prisoner Hall and the prosecutor went up to the two pair of stairs

front room; there was a person that is not taken, her name is Sarah, but her other name is not yet known; she is a little girl, I am very sure it was not the other prisoner; the prosecutor remained all night in our house; the person as is not yet taken, I did suppose to be with him all night; Margaret Hall went away, I ordered her out of the house about twelve, she was in the passage, she said she was going home, she lodged at the next house to us; I do not know whether the prosecutor was in bed then or not, but he was in the apartment; I changed half a guinea for him, and gave him full change, that was after eleven; the next morning about ten he came down, and said he was robbed; I went in search of the prisoner Hall, Coleman was not in our house.

Court. The other young woman you say staid all night? - As far as I know, I did suppose her to be there all night; I did not hear any thing of her being gone at all; we do not suffer two girls to sleep with one man; it was the prosecutor's desire that the little one should sleep with him, he told me so: and so I told Hall not to stay; she only came in as an interloper herself, only to drink.

Did not they all come in together? - Yes, the prosecutor and Sarah was together; and Sarah was to stay with him, as she told me; and Margaret Hall told me she was to have something to drink; she came with them.

You do not know whether the otherswent away before or not? - I do not.

EDWARD FRANCIS sworn.

I am a silver-smith, and keep a sale shop in High-street, St. Giles's; I know the prisoners at the bar, they both came to me on Tuesday morning last, between nine and eleven; they pointed to two pair of silver buckles that hung in my window; they agreed to give me 2 l. 16 s. for them; they were all silver, tongues, chapes and all; going to pay for them, they pulled out some foreign coins, which I have in my pocket; they gave me the silver ones, and said, if it was not enough they would make it good; I weighed them, and they afterwards gave me the gold; and I said, with a view to see if they had any more, that they were worth 4 l. (though they were worth 10 l.) they swore an oath, and said, it was very lucky for them, that they had got money coming to them; then I asked them how they came by them, they said they found them between my house, and the church; I told them I must have a more explicit answer than that, or I would stop them; I sent for a constable, and they were taken into custody; we searched them in the shop, and upon them we found about 20 l. or upwards; there was a box found on the shortest, and nine guineas and a half and two shillings on one, I do not recollect which; and 11 l. odd on the other; they rather baffled me at that time, one of them told me a different name than that which she is indicted by now: I am sure to both the prisoners; I received the coins from the tallest, she had the same cloak on she has now, only it was turned lining outwards. (The coins handed up to the court.)

Court to Prosecutor. Can you describe any of the things that you lost? - Yes, I can swear to the coins; the buttons are my own engraving; I am a clock and watch-maker, and silver smith and engraver.

What are the letters on the buttons? - I cannot say exact, they are not done by me, there is T. H. on them I believe.

Court. Tell me some of the coins. - There is a Hanoverian coin, silver with a horse upon it; there is a gold coin, a very remarkable coin of Charles in armour; there is a Venice coin; there is a Hungarian coin; there are several of King John's coin; that gold coin is virgin gold, it will bend under your fingers like lead; it is a great deal better gold than our guineas: there are some of King John's pennys; there is a seven and twenty, without any particular mark; I brought them up to sell.

Court. Look at these coins. - (Looking at them.) I am sure they are mine, if I was to die this minute.

Court to Jury. Gentlemen the coins are very remarkable.

JOHN YOUNG sworn.

I am the keeper of St. Giles's Round-house; Mr. Francis sent for me about ten o'clock on Tuesday morning, and gave me charge of the two prisoners. I searched them, and found on Coleman, ten guineas and a half and four shillings and six-pence; on Hall, I found nine guineas and a half, and two shillings, and a thimble; and I found a breast buckle on one of them: they were examined at Mr. Justice Walker's: I found this ring, which I heard Coleman say she had dropped it in the Church-yard; and one ring I had off her finger; this box I found in Hall's pocket, with the money in it. (The rings and box produced.)

Court to Prosecutor. Look at the rings. - I cannot describe any of the rings I lost.

Court to Sarah Cox . Upon your oath who was the woman that was with Margaret Hall? - I cannot tell.

It was not Elizabeth Coleman? - No, my Lord.

PRISONER HALL's DEFENCE.

I was not along with the gentleman, nor did not take any thing; I left the house before Mr. Parker went to bed; the girl was with the gentleman when I came down stairs.

PRISONER COLEMAN's DEFENCE.

I never was in the house, nor never saw the gentleman before I saw him at the Justices.

MARGARET HALL , GUILTY , ( Death .)

ELIZABETH COLEMAN , NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-69

69. WILLIAM MUNRO was indicted for that he on the 7th of October last, with force and arms, did feloniously and falsely, make, forge, and counterfeit, and cause and procure to be made, forged, and counterfeited, and willingly act and assist in the making, forging, and counterfeiting a certain bill of exchange, purporting to be drawn by John George Evetts , directed to Mr. George Newnham , Cross-key court, Little Britain, London; by which said bill, the said John George Evetts , directed the said George Newnham , to pay to the said William Munro , the sum of 12 l. 10 s. six weeks after the date thereof; and which bill of exchange, so falsely made, forged and counterfeited , is in the words and figures following, that is to say.

"No. 761, 12. 10 s. Birmingham, September 28th, 1782.

"Six weeks after date, pay Mr. William Munto , twelve pounds ten shillings value received, per advice, John George Evatts . To Mr. George Newnham , No. 16, Cross-key court, Little Britain, London: when due at Hodsell and Cos. Strand.

G. N."

With intention to defraud Thomas Gill , against the statute.

A second Count for feloniously uttering and publishing the same as true, with the like intention.

A third Count for falsely making, forging, and counterfeiting an acceptance of the said bill of Exchange, purporting to be the acceptance of the said George Newnham , with the like intention.

A fourth Count for feloniously uttering the said acceptance, knowing it to be falsely forged and counterfeited, with the like intention.

A fifth Count for uttering and publishing the said acceptance with intention to defraud the said George Newnham .

RICHARD LAW sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Thomas Gill , of Birmingham, I keep a warehouse for him in town; on the 7th of October last the prisoner called at Mr. Gill's warehouse, No. 11, Charing Cross, and requested to look at some pistols, which pistols were shewn him; he said they were to shew a gentleman of his

acquaintance, and if they were approved of, a number would be wanted; for which he begged to leave, as security for payment of these pistols, a draft, value 12 l. 10 s. he wanted seven pair; I made some objections, but at last agreed that he should take the pistols, and leave the draft as a security; the pistols came to 8 l. 16 s. he took them, and left the draft, and returned the following evening or morning, I cannot say which, and said the pistols were approved of, and that he expected we had examined into the bill, and found it a good one; I informed him that I had not enquired into the validity of the bill, but on his declaring that the bill was a very good one, I was induced to give him the difference, which was 3 l. 14 s. he told me the bill was drawn on George Newnham for a quarter's rent, for a house which he rented of Mrs. Evetts, of Birmingham, the mother of John George Evetts , at the annual sum of 50 l. a few days after I called at Hodsell and Co.'s, in the Strand, to enquire if Mr. Newnham kept cash there, and they informed me they knew no such person.

Court. Produce the bill.

(The bill read as in the indictment.)

On receiving that answer I immediately called at Newnham's house, where I saw Newnham; he knew nothing of the bill, and refused to pay it; I immediately sent it to Birmingham, to my employer, and desired he would present it to John George Evetts , which he sent me word he had.

How do you know he did? - He wrote me word he had.

All you know is, that you offered it to Newnham, and that he disowned it, and would not pay it, do you know from any witnesses that are here whether the story the prisoner told about Evetts is true or not? - I found that Newnham lived at the house; he said at Bow-street Office that he was an ironmonger; I learned that his father was an ironmonger, and failed, and that he was engaged in settling his accounts.

Prisoner's counsel. Do you know whether the bill has been paid by his brother-in-law? - Since the man was in custody it has.

( George Newnham called on his Recognizance, and he not appearing, his Recognizance ordered to be estreated.)

Court to Jury. The bill was payable at Hodsell's, in the Strand, within a very short distance of the prosecutor's shop, and the prisoner left it for twenty-four hours, and called again, and the bill has been paid by the drawer besides.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-70

70. WILLIAM FULLER and JOHN KNOWLES were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Holland , Esq ; about the hour of eight in the night, on the 19th of November last, and burglariously stealing therein one iron shovel, value 2 s. the goods of the said Henry .

A second Count, laying it to be the property of one Charles Smith .

CHARLES SMITH sworn.

I was employed at the house of Mr. Henry Holland , junior, in Sloane-street, Chelsea , I came home on the 19th of November, and every door in the house was fast, I doublelocked the door and went to bed about half past six in the evening; when I had laid about three quarters of an hour I heard a noise, I thought it was the window shutters clapping backwards and forwards, the glass of the windows was not in; I heard the noise come nearer to me, till it came into the next room; somebody tried to break open my door, I called out, Halloo! and they answered, and I said, what are you come to bed already? another man was to have laid in the room that night; I called again, and there was no answer, and I said I would shoot them, for they were thieves; I took a hatchet in my hand, and went out, and said, the first man I met I would cut his head and his arms off; when I came down stairs, the street door, the parlour door, and one or two of the other doors, were broke open; I went

into the street, and called Watch! he came directly; there was a place where a house was to be built, and for a garden, and a ditch against the foot path, five feet high, and I saw the prisoners under the garden wall, and the watchman and me carried them to the watch-house; Fuller said, he went there to case himself; we found on each a clasp knife, and a common screw-driver on Fuller; just under the wall we found two sacks and a road shovel, which was taken from my door between seven and eight; we also found an iron crow; the house was well secured but not finished, the sashes were not in, there was no furniture in the house besides what I brought in.

Court. Was the flooring all finished? - All but a little of the garret.

The house then by your account was not finished fit for habitation? - No, my Lord, it wanted painting and glazing; there has been a great deal of lead taken from the houses all along the street, so they put me in to take care.

You was no part of Mr. Holland's family? - No.

You worked for him as a labouring man? - Yes.

Prisoner's counsel. You was examined before the Justice? - Yes.

Whose house did you then say it was - It went as the house of Mr. Squires.

Court. I am of opinion that this is not sufficiently a dwelling-house to support the indictment for burglary, it has never been inhabited; and whether this man watched in the inside or on the outside, makes no difference; he might as well have watched on the outside, there was no furniture in the house.

Prisoner's counsel. You saw a shovel near this house that had been at your chamberdoor? - Yes, I saw the shovel there half an hour after they were taken.

JOHN HOTTY sworn.

I am a watchman, I was called by Smith the 19th of November, I found the prisoners under the shade of the garden wall, I collared Fuller, he said he was easing himself, the moon shone on the outside.

Court. At the first moment you saw them, where they in the situation of men easing themselves, or unbuttoning their breeches, or any thing of that sort? - I saw nothing of that, they were standing up when I first saw them; Fuller said he was easing himself; Fuller made a sort of snatch back, and I pulled him forward.

But did he attempt to get away? - No.

At the time you took them did you observe any things beside them at the wall? - No, not at that time, I found the shovel, two sacks and a crow, a yard off; I found the prisoners about fifteen yards back, there was an opening to the fields, they might have got away.

THOMAS ROSEBLEED sworn.

I lay in the same house, I went out before six, and locked the door, and locked Charles Smith in; I took the key, I returned about eight, and the house was broke open, the prisoners were in the watch-house.

Court to Smith. What is the shovel worth, what would you give for it? - A shilling.

PRISONER KNOWLES's DEFENCE.

I work in East Smithfield, I came to order some metal, and I asked the other prisoner to go along with me; we went to Knights-bridge, and I wanted to case myself, and they took us to the watch-house.

Court to Smith. How long was it after you went down stairs to the taking of the prisoners? - About two minutes, they went out backwards.

What situation is the garden in? - The wall is ten feet high, and six feet paling at the bottom, which is marked out for a mews.

What sort of ground was the back of the house? - Digged ground for a garden, it was quite open to the view.

The prisoner Knowles called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

The prisoner Fuller called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Court to Jury. This house, according to the situation described by Charles Smith , is not a dwelling-house in the sense and meaning of the law, having never at that time been inhabited by any family, nor finished ready for a family, and having no furniture in it; this Charles Smith , and the other man, who were there, being there only as watchmen, for the purpose of keeping the lead from being stolen.

FULLER, GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 1 s.

KNOWLES, GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 1 s. but not guilty of the burglary .

To be transported for seven years .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-71

71. WILLIAM WOOD and JOHN FITZGERALD were indicted for feloniously making an assault on Thomas Mumford , in the dwelling-house of James Crosier , on the 2d of November last, and putting him in fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person and against his will, one iron key, value 6 d. the goods of the said James, and also one shilling and two sixpences, the proper monies of the said Thomas .

THOMAS MUMFORD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Crosier, the keeper of Clerkenwell Bridewell; on the 2d of November the debtors were removed from Clerkenwell Bridewell to New Prison; the man that had the key of the gate of the men's yard let them all down, and they came into the lodge before I knew anything of it, this was between four and five in the afternoon.

Court. Were these two prisoners among them? - They were, my Lord, the prisoners were among the first people that came in; Wood put a pistol to my head, and Fitzgerald a knife to my belly, and swore they would murder me.

What were they confined for? - They were vagrants; somebody gave me a violent blow on my face, and as I stood in that position, some of the prisoners cried out, Frisk him for the keys! that is, meaning to feel in my pockets; and they cried, Why don't you murder him? then Wood put his hand into my right-hand pocket, and there he took out a shilling and two sixpences, and out of my left-hand breeches pocket he took the key of the main gate; then they went from the lodge, and went out, and one and thirty of them made their escape.

Did they secure you any way? - I was close up in the corner standing.

But when they took the key from you, did they tie you, or any thing of that sort? - No, my Lord.

Court. When were they taken again? - Wood was out a week or more; Fitzgerald was taken immediately, within a quarter of an hour.

When they held the pistol and knife to you, did they ask you for any money, or any thing? - No my Lord, they took the key out of my pocket.

Court. As there was such a croud about you, are you positively sure it was the prisoners? - I am quite sure, because having them under my care, I know their faces so well.

Prisoner Wood. That man is not to be believed on his oath.

WILLIAM BROWN sworn.

I am a coalman, I happened to go in with coals on the 2d of November; I saw some of the people that broke out go into the lodge; I cannot swear to either of the prisoners, but I saw a knife in one's hand, and the shape of a pistol in the other, going into the lodge; I know the prisoners were there, but I cannot say it was them that had the knife and the pistol; I saw nothing that was done in the lodge; one of them hit me on my breast on the stairs, I wasstopped there, I could not go any further.

Court to Mumford. Are not these people secured with irons? - Fitzgerald had irons on, but Wood had none on.

SARAH REID sworn.

I am a stay-maker; I happened to be in the lodge the same time when these men rushed in; there was a great many of them, I saw the prisoners at the bar amongst them; Wood had a pistol in his hand, and Fitzgerald had a knife; they told Mumford if he did not let them go, they would blow his brains out.

Did you see them take any thing from him? - I cannot say I saw them take the key; they were using him very ill, and I screamed out; and Fitzgerald said he would murder me if I spoke another word.

How did they use him ill? - Standing with a knife and a pistol; and the other prisoners cried out, murder him! murder him! shoot his brains out.

Prisoner Wood. Please my Lord to ask that woman, whether she has not been once or twice capitally convicted here.

Court to Reid. You hear what he says? - Yes Sir, I have.

Prisoner Wood. Mr. Akerman's servants will justify it; she was convicted once here for a felony in a shop.

Court to Reid. How came you into the lodge? - I went to carry Mr. Fletcher's dinner.

Prisoner Wood. This woman, and this Mumford's oath would not be taken before Alderman Townsend; he said I will hang you, if you have fifty necks; the Alderman is not here; but if Mr. Wilmot's men were here, they would testify the same; I was taken up to Hicks's Hall, and I was fined for two years, for breaking out; I could have had my master, but I did not know of coming up.

JOHN BROWN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Crosier, the governor of the House of Correction, at Clerkenwell, I was in the lodge, writing out the copy of a commitment; between four and five on Saturday, this Fitzgerald and several others, went into the lodge, Fitzgerald held a knife to me, and threatened, damn his eyes if he would not cut my throat, if I would not deliver the key of the main gate to him, I told him I had not got the key, he swore again, he would cut my throat if I did not tell him where it was; he kept me down in one corner of the lodge, till they searched my fellow servant Mumford, for the key; after they had searched Mumford, they made their escape out of the gaol: in saving my throat from being cut, Fitzgerald cut me a-cross these two fingers.

Court to Mumford. Did they ask you for any money? - No, they said if I did not give them the key, they would murder me; then they put in their hands into my right hand pocket, and took out the shilling and two six-pences.

Did one say to the other, that he had got a shilling and two six-pences? - I cannot say, I was so frightened.

WILLIAM WOOD , GUILTY , ( Death .)

JOHN FITZGERALD , GUILTY , ( Death .)

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-72

72. THOMAS TOWNSEND was indicted for receiving on the 4th of December instant, from one John Stockton , twenty-eight yards of tammy, knowing the same to have been stolen .

HENRY COCK sworn.

I am a packer; I live in Bush-lane; Stockton lived with a packer and presser, in Great St. Helen's, where they used to press goods for me, and many others; Stockton took from me a piece of tammy, and it was pawned at Mr. Townsend's, it was found there.

Court. Then you only swear to the property.

SAMUEL COLE sworn.

(Produces some tammy)

I found this at Mr. Townsend's, this day week; I discovered this, by searching at the same shop for some black cloth, and I found

this among other things; I thought there were other things behind, I went back; I took one of Mr. Wilmot's men with me, and I found this piece by searching the books, and I insisted on seeing it, and the servant brought it down.

Counsel. Mr. Townsend is a pawn-broker? - Yes.

You found this regularly entered in his books? - Yes.

And they brought it down to you when you asked for it? - Yes.

And what are you to have friend, for endeavouring to take away this man's character, which stands as fair as any man's in the court?

Court to Jury. Gentlemen there is no evidence at all of this charge.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-73

73. JAMES WELLBELOVED was indicted for that he not having the fear of God before his eyes, but being instigated by the devil, on the 7th of November last, in and upon John Barnard , feloniously, wilfully, and of his malice aforethought, did make an assault, and him the said John Barnard, then and there being, in the peace of God, and our lord the King, did strike, beat, and kick, with both his hands and feet, in and upon the head, breast, back, and other parts of the said John; and him the said John, did cast to the ground with great force and violence, giving the said John, as well by the casting and throwing him to the ground aforesaid, as by the striking, beating, and kicking aforesaid, several mortal strokes, wounds, and bruise, of which the said John, from the 7th till the 8th of November, did languish, and languishing did live; on which said day, to wit, the 8th of November last; the said John Barnard , of the said mortal strokes, wounds, and bruises, died .

WILLIAM HANCOCK sworn.

I live in Lombard-court : on the 7th of November, about eight o'clock, I heard the prisoner at the bar swearing, and making a piece of work, and I went to see what was the matter, and I saw the deceased, John Barnard , come up and push the prisoner, and lay his hand on him; and then the prisoner struck the deceased, and knocked him down with one blow; he struck him but once; and he lay on the stones six minutes before he spoke, he was taken up, and I and another young man that is here, went and saw him home; and the next afternoon I heard he was dead: they were both in liquor.

Court. What did they quarrel about? - I do not know.

Prisoner's Counsel. Do you know any thing of the prisoner? - I have seen him before.

Lombard-court is a thoroughfare, is it not? - Yes.

What business is the prisoner? - A grinder of butchers instruments : I have known the prisoner for six or seven months, he always behaved exceeding well; a very good natured man, would not hurt a worm.

They were both in liquor you say? - Both very drunk; the deceased pushed the prisoner, the prisoner only struck him one blow on the side of the head, and he fell on the stones.

ANN COPELAND sworn.

I saw nothing till the gentleman was laid down, and I went to the apothecary, and gave him some drops, and rubbed his temples.

JAMES PARKER sworn.

On Thursday evening, the 7th of November, between eight and nine, I was passing through West-street, at the end of Lombard-court, and I heard a man talking loud, and turning my eye up the court, I saw two men coming towards me, which was the deceased and his nephew (who is now ill of the small-pox) one of them had a very large dog; they were followed by the prisoner, who was talking very loud, and

asking him why he shoved against him, or why he insulted him, or words to that effect, and challenging him to fight, and asking him to loose the dog, and give him to somebody to hold; I saw the dog loosed, and the deceased turned round from me towards the prisoner, and the prisoner immediately struck him a blow, and the deceased fell on his back, on the stones, in consequence of the blow; I came up to assist the man, and this Ann Copeland went to the apothecary, the deceased lay on the ground for a considerable time; the nephew, who was a countryman just come to town, was incapable to take care of him; I prevailed on the first witness to assist in getting him home; he walked between them to his house in Margaret-street, Cavendish-square, he was very much in liquor, or else the blow made him appear so, for he appeared dreadfully intoxicated, the blood came out of his right ear; I saw no appearance of any outward danger, except the flowing of the blood; I called the next evening to enquire after him, and found he was dead.

Court to Jury. Gentlemen, there is nothing in this evidence; you must find the man guilty of Manslaughter.

Counsel for the Prisoner. My Lord, I have many witnesses to his character, that he is a very well behaved, quiet man.

GUILTY, of Manslaughter ,

To be fined 1 s. and be discharged.

COURT to PRISONER.

James Wellbeloved ,

I do not impose any further fine upon you, because I am satisfied that your own recollection of what has happened, will be a much greater punishment than any I can put on you; you see the consequences of getting in liquor, by which you have occasioned the death of this man; therefore go home, and think of it the rest of your life.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-74

74. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of December instant, nine pewter pint pots, value 4 s. and one quart pot, value 1 s. the property of John Lyford .

WILLIAM BRAITHWAITE sworn.

I went last Thursday night to collect my pots, I left nine pints and and one quart at a door in Grafton-street , and I saw the prisoner take them up, and I took them out of her arms, she had them under her cloak; she said she was going to carry them to Mr. Shepherd's, the next door but one; there is no such person lives thereabouts.

(The pots deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I sell old clothes, I was taken very ill, and I stooped to do up my shoe, I never touched the pots.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 10 d.

To be privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-75

75. MARGARET FINNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of October last, one quart pewter pot, value 12 d. and one half pint pot, value 4 d. the property of James Maddox .

SAMUEL SHARPE sworn.

On the 18th of October having information from a neighbour, I went to the prisoner, who was knocking at a door, and asked her what she wanted; I took her into the tap-room belonging to Mr. Maddox, and she dropped a quart pot, and a half pint pot I took out of her pocket.

(The pots deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A woman bid me hold them.

Court to Prisoner. Have you got that woman here? - No, I never saw her since.

GUILTY, Of stealing to the value of 10 d.

To be privately whipped and discharged.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-76

76. JAMES CONNER , MARY ELLIS , and MARY DUNN , were indicted for that they on the 26th of October last, with force and arms, one piece of copper money of this realm, called a farthing, unlawfully and feloniously did make, coin and counterfeit, against the form of the Statute .

A second Count, for that they on the same day, one piece of false, feigned, and counterfeit copper money, to the likeness and similitude of the good, legal, and current copper money of this realm, called a farthing, unlawfully and feloniously did make and coin, against the form of the Statute.

JOHN DIXON sworn.

I belong to the Rotation Office in Litchfield-street; on the 25th of October last I went to one Bulger's house, in Nag's-head-court, Fish-street, or Gracechurch-street, Macdonald and Blacketer went with us; we left Grubb at the house in Goose-alley, while we went to this other house to get the stamping press; we saw Connor sitting by the fire in the parlour, with his coat off, and his hands very dirty, greasy, and black; I immediately tied his hands, and ordered Blacketer to secure him while I lighted a candle and went into the cellar; Macdonald opened the door, the shutters were put before the top door that comes into the passage; I broke the top cellar door open, and went below, and there was another door, and Macdonald opened that other door; we went into the cellar, and saw the two women prisoners sit by the stamping press, they were just pulling the fly round, and on seeing us did not pull it up sufficient: this farthing I took from between the dies, but they did not pull it sufficient to make so good an impression as they have on the other, it is rather faint; this blank I took out of Ellis's hand; I took these dies out of the press, they were fixed, and that farthing between them; there were a great quantity of finished halfpence, except the blacking of them: we then secured the women, and I sent Macdonald and Blacketer with them to the office: two candles were lighted by the side of the press; the door into the street was padlocked on the outside, and the parlour shutters being put before the cellar door, some body must have come out of the cellar to have done it; and when we went down the cellar stairs, there was another door which was locked outside likewise, and the key in the door; we took them into custody; the women were without their gowns: Conner pretended to be asleep after he saw us go in.

Prisoners Counsel. There was a press you say in this cellar, and the two women at work? - Yes.

Both at the same press? - Certainly, one could not very well work at a press, nor two with any great deal of propriety, it generally takes three.

However, Conner the man was asleep in the parlour? - No, I do not think he was in sleep.

He appeared to be so? - He made believe to be so.

You cannot tell that he made believe.

Court. What did his hands appear to be dirty with? - In the situation these peoples hands are, he had his coat on.

DENNIS MACDONALD sworn.

I went with Dixon; I saw the prisoner Conner, he had his coat off, and leaned back at the fire side; his hands were dirty, as if he had been at work; they were all black like the womens hands that were below; I searched him, and found this letter on him, directed to James Hamilton in Goose-alley, where the cutting out press was; and this key, that Hamilton swore was his key; I went into the cellar; the prisoner Ellis was feeding the die, pushing in the farthing between

the die, and the other woman sat where they pull it from; she was pulling the fly: they jumped up directly, I told them not to stir: the two women were without their gowns.

Court. Was it dark when you got into the cellar? - They had candles burning, but Dixon went for two candles more.

Prisoners Counsel. How did you get into the house? - I lifted up the latch and went in; we found the press and the dies below; the women asked us to let them put on their cloaths, their hands were all black: I tried the key which I found on the prisoner Conner, to the door at Hamilton's house, in Goose-alley; it locked and unlocked both the two pair of stairs, and the garret.

- HAMILTON sworn.

I know the prisoner Conner, he had two rooms at my house in Goose-alley, at 10 l. a year; I saw the cutting out press, the day it was taken, it was in one of the rooms (in the garret) he took of me.

Prisoners Counsel. Do you know whether the prisoner Dunn was married to Conner? - Their connection together was as man and wife, whether they were married or not, I do not know.

Court. It is too late now I believe to make that objection, for she has pleaded as Mary Dunn .

- BULGER sworn.

I let the cellar and garret in Nag's-head court to Conner, about six or seven days before he was taken up.

RICHARD FRANKLIN (one of the moniers of the mint) sworn,

Proved the farthings to be counterfeits.

(The dies, blanks, and farthings, handed to the Jury.)

PRISONER ELLIS's DEFENCE.

Conner employed me, and gave me half a guinea a week: I am a poor widow, and have a child; I did not know what I was to do, he told me if I met any body, to say that they did not belong to him; and that they were button tops.

CONNER, ELLIS, DUNN,

GUILTY .

To be imprisoned twelve months in Newgate .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-77

77. JOSEPH CHERRY , JAMES SHARKEY , MARGARET HARRISON , and MARY FLOYD were indicted for that they on the 26th of October last, with force and arms, one piece of copper money of this realm called an halfpenny, unlawfully and feloniously, did make, coin, and counterfeit, against the form of the statute .

A second Count for that they on the same day, one piece of false, seigned, and counterfeit copper money, to the likeness and similitude of the good, legal, and current copper money of this realm, called an halfpenny, unlawfully and feloniously, did make and coin, against the form of the statute.

THOMAS GATES sworn.

I went to a house in Thames-street, opposite Vintner's Hall; it was the 28th of October, past eleven; my brother and a little boy went with me, I found the prisoners there: we looked into the cellar, and they were at work, but they put out the candles immediately: the cellar was hung round with cloth, except the back part, which was bare; one of the candles, the wick was not out when we got down; I saw the press and a parcel of halfpence just coined off, and the dies set, and this halfpenny between the dies: in the cellar I saw Harrison, Sharkey, and Cherry, the other woman came to open the door: Cherry endeavoured to come up, and I kept them down; I found these halfpence, and these blanks,

there was the press with the dies fixed in; the dies were warm, which is owing to the weight of the instrument, and the perpetual whirling; Sharkey said he was a watchmaker, and trade was dead; Cherry said the same, and that poverty induced him to do it; Harrison said she had not been at work, but the blanks were in the cellar, in her apron; Floyd said she was only a servant; there were no other persons in the house.

JOSEPH GATES sworn.

I went to this house with my brother, Floyd opened the door, we pushed into the cellar as fast as we could, we took the prisoners into custody; Sharkey and the other owned the fact, the woman said she only carried them some gin down; she had the appearance of being at work; I did not observe her hands; there was a gin bottle by the fly.

RICHARD FRANKLIN (one of the moniers of the Mint)

Proved the halfpence to be counterfeits.

Court. Could you observe, from their habit and their hands, whether they had been at work? - No doubt of it; from their appearance they had been all at work, all the three.

You do not include the fourth woman? - No, I do not.

Had Harrison, the tall woman, an apron? - Yes, she had a little dirty thing before her that was all in holes, and she sent for another.

PRISONER CHERRY.

The prisoner Sharkey and me were at work.

PRISONER SHARKEY.

I say the same, we will submit to the mercy of the Court; as to these two women, they are innocent.

PRISONER HARRISON.

I lodged in the house, and this other woman is my chair-woman.

The prisoner Harrison called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

CHERRY, GUILTY .

SHARKEY, GUILTY .

To be imprisoned twelve months in Newgate .

HARRISON, NOT GUILTY .

FLOYD, NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-78

78. JOHN JOHNSON and JOHN LAWSON were indicted for that they not being persons, nor either of them being a person employed in the Mint or Mints of our Lord the King, in the Tower of London, or elsewhere, nor being persons lawfully authorised by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury of our Lord the King, or the Lord High Treasurer for the time being, after the 5th of May, 1697, to wit, on the 21st of October last, with force and arms, one pair of moulds made of sand, each of which said moulds would then and there make and impress. the figure, resemblance and similitude of the head side of the lawful silver current coin of this realm, called a shilling, without any lawful excuse, or sufficient authority for that purpose, knowingly, feloniously and traiterously had in their custody and possession, against the duty of their allegiance, against the King's peace, and against the form of the Statute .

Another Count, for having in their possession another mould, made of sand, in and upon which then and there was made and impressed the figure, resemblance and similitude of the head side of the lawful silver coin of this realm, called a shilling.

THOMAS GATES sworn.

I went to a house in New-court, London-wall , the house is situated backwards from the street, and the door was open; when we went into the passage we left Mr. Miller at the door, and my brother and I went up stairs; the casement of the first garret that we went into was open; it is indeed only one garret, but divided by a thin partition of wood; I immediately ran to the window, and my

brother to the door; I saw the prisoners at a little ashen table, and they were rubbing something like a shilling, but it was not coloured; on my first coming to the window, one of them said, it is all up with us! and the prisoner Johnson immediately fell to scrambling up the money that had the resemblance of shillings, and threw them out of the window in a cloth; the good money, which were the pattern shillings, he left on the table: I called to Miller to pick them up, the cloth in slinging them down opened, and the shillings separated; then the other immediately fell to breaking the flask, he held up the flask, and I saw the pattern shillings lay under the table, they were in the flask, and he scrambled them out in his hands; then he tumbled the mould, and threw the sand into a little thing like a sink; I saw one side of them completely set; the shillings were put in it to make the impression, and upon this alarm he immediately scrambled them out, here is a part of the sand, he immediately jumped into the bed with his clothes on; the door gave way presently, and my brother came in, and this Lawson pretended to be fast asleep; the other (Johnson) stood in the middle of the floor in his shirt sleeves; I took him into custody, and my brother pushed him on the bed, on the other, and he wanted to move to get hold of a pair of tongs that was there; Lawson twice opened his eyes, and looked at me, though he afterwards said he was asleep; we found a pan with a kind of pickle, I believe it is aqua fortis tempered with water; we found a bottle of aqua fortis, a quantity of crucibles, and a quantity of metal; I am sure these are the same pattern shillings; here is every thing necessary for coining.

Prisoner's counsel. I understand your observation was instantaneous? - Two or three minutes.

Can you state with any accuracy at all as to the situation of the flask at that time? -

One half of the flask had the pattern shillings on it, which he scraped off with his hands on the table.

How many were there on it? - I cannot say positively.

Were they laid on it, or impressed into it? - I apprehend them to be impressed into it, they were dented in; most of these that were not thrown out have impressions on them, either on the one side or the other.

You cannot say that there was any impressions made on that sand? - I only say that the shilling was pressed into the sand, I cannot say what was imprinted on that sand.

Court. I wish you to explain to me a little more the situation. - The two windows are close together, one happened to be open, which was the window of the first garret, so that my head was close to them; the windows are parallel, the wooden partition did not at all take from the sight, the partition was so thin that my head reached beyond the partition; I was looking through that partition while my brother was breaking the door.

JOSEPH GATES sworn.

I went up stairs first to the garret-door, there is a partition, I had several pushes at the door before I got it open; I caught Johnson in his shirt sleeves, and pushed him on the bed, the other was in the bed.

WILLIAM MILLER sworn.

I was there, I picked up some silver, I heard one of the Mr. Gates's call out soon after they went up, Miller, take notice! and instantly I saw a man, who I believe to be the prisoner Johnson, extend his right arm out as far as he could, and throw this cloth out, the cloth opened with the air, and I ran round and picked up the cloth, and as many of the pieces as I could; they appeared then to be fresh struck.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

Court. You have been employed about fifteen years for the Mint, be so kind to explain to us the process that these people use in coining of silver. - This spray is laid into the other, and by the side of this they fix any thing that is to be cast, and they are sometimes laid double, and that is filled full of sand, and crushed down, and that makes the impression; then they throw it to the other side; then there is what they call

facings, which is of a stronger nature, as the sand is of a porous nature: they make a little channel from each, (that is it) and they run it the same as I would dumps: if it was filled full of sand, I call it a flask or mould ready for casting, they are flasks till they are compleat to make the impression, then they are called moulds: (some shillings shewn to him.) these have been cast in sand, and filed round with scouring paper, and then they put them into aqua fortis: this is aqua fortis and water, which they are first put in: the aqua fortis being a strong body, it purges the silver on the outside, and leaves a stain; there has been metal put into this aqua fortis and water: here is sand, patterns, flask, aqua fortis, scouring paper, every thing is as compleat as can be; it only wants a fire to melt the metal: I did see a lump of metal in one of the pots that has been melted, here it is, this is silver and copper; there is a piece of white arsenic, this is a poison, and it has been proved in this court, that when they melt the copper, it is fluxed by this, then they throw it into water, and then it becomes almost like a tutenage.

PRISONER JOHNSON's DEFENCE.

I was afraid of being arrested, and I came to lodge with this other man; I told him I was in a dilemma, and he said I might stay there for a few days.

To Gates. Was there any lighted fire? - No there was not, there was a large quantity of charcoal, but it was not a-light.

PRISONER LAWSON's DEFENCE.

He says I opened my eyes; he stood over the bed with a hanger over me, it was enough to make a man open his eyes.

JOHN JOHNSON , GUILTY, JOHN LAWSON , GUILTY ,

Death .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17821204-79

79. JOHN SMITH the younger was indicted for falsely, deceitfully, and feloniously, personating John Smith the elder, and feloniously transferring 200 l. share in bank stock, the property of the said John Smith the elder; as if he was the real and true owner thereof, with intent to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England .

There were other Counts, charging this personating in a different way.

Mr. FIELDING.

Gentlemen of the Jury,

The indictment in this case states, that one John Smith the elder of Tottenham, in the county of Middlesex, gentleman, was possessed of 200 l. bank stock, which stock had been created by a variety of acts of parliament; and that afterwards, the prisoner at the bar John Smith , the younger, personated the said John Smith the elder, and transferred that stock in which he had the property, to a person of the name of William Plumley ; you will hear the case opened, and the evidence that will be laid before you; if from that evidence you are convinced of the guilt of the man, you will say so, and find your verdict accordingly.

Mr. SILVESTER.

Gentlemen of the Jury,

The charge against the prisoner at the bar, is, that he personated another person of the same name and description as himself: it is by act of parliament, a capital felony for any person to transfer any stock, or receive any dividend, due on any stock in the bank standing in the name of another person; that is to say, any man who shall personate another, and by that means receive his dividend, or transfer his stock, shall be guilty of felony. Gentlemen, the facts to bring this charge home to the prisoner, are shortly these. In the month of January, 1782, a Mr. John Smith , who then described himself John Smith of Tottenham, gentleman, was possessed of 400 l. four per cents, he afterwards sold out of that stock 200 l. then there remained 200 l. the prisoner at the bar, whose name is likewise John Smith, and who it appears had taken a house or lodgings at

Tottenham, purchased likewise 200 l. in the same stock, in February, of one John Price ; the clerks of the bank, when they were posting their books, supposing that the two John Smiths were the same identical person, because their names and descriptions were the same; in making out their ledger, they placed 400 l. to the account of John Smith of Tottenham. On the 16th of April the prisoner came to the bank, and received his dividend; when he applied to the clerk of the bank to receive the dividend, the first question that was asked him was, what stock he had, he said 200 l. the clerk replied, then it must be a mistake, for says he, there is no person of the name of John Smith who is possessed of 200 l. says the prisoner I purchased 200 l. therefore it must be so; says the clerk, there is no such thing, you have more than that, no says he, I do not think I have more, yes, says the clerk you certainly have; upon which the books were looked into, and the clerk found a larger sum; says the clerk, Sir, this is some mistake, you have the appearance of a gentleman; as we do not know you, we will pay you the dividend, if you will produce some person that knows you; the prisoner went immediately to one of the other offices, and one of the clerks knew him; he came and said I know this man very well, and his name is John Smith , he lives at Tottenham: you know gentlemen it is all in one line,

" John Smith gentleman, 400 l." then the sum for the dividend, and he writes his name through; so that he could not help seeing there was 400 l. placed to his name: however he received the dividend and went away. The clerks had not the least suspicion that there could be any fraud in this man; he had been vouched for by one of the other clerks, and he got the money. Finding he got the dividend so easily; on the 11th of May he sold out 50 l. then he saw that in May there was 400 l. placed to his account; and on the 17th of May he sold out the 350 l. so that this man, knowing in the month of April, that he was entitled only to 200 l. in the month of May, comes and transfers all his right and property in the sum of 400 l. without the bank having the least suspicion of any fraud in this transaction. Some time after this, the first Mr. Smith came to receive his dividend of 200 l. When he came to the bank, why, says the clerk you have no money, you have not a farthing here; no says he, why I had 600 l. and I sold out 200 l. and then I sold out 200 l. more, and I have 200 l. left; no Sir says the clerk, the money was sold out such a day; if that is the case says he, then somebody must have personated me: now gentlemen, this being represented to the governors of the bank, who are the guardians of our property, they thought their duty required, that this man should be immediately taken into custody, because, if we trust our money in their hands, they ought to protect our property; to them we look for that money we intrust them with; to them Mr. Smith looks for his 200 l. Gentlemen you hear the case against the prisoner at the bar, and the court will tell you, whether the law will in this particular instance, bring him to justice; the charge against the prisoner being no less than that of personating this Mr. Smith.

Court to Counsel. Have you any evidence to shew that this man at the time he received the dividend, or sold out the stock, declared that he was John Smith the elder? and can you prove that he knew that a John Smith the elder had this Bank stock?

Mr. Silvester. My Lord, the only evidence that we have is this, that this man saw that 200 l. was placed to him more than he was intitled to.

Mr. Recorder. The case as you have opened it (and I attended very particularly to your opening) amounts clearly to this, that the clerks of the Bank made a mistake, and that mistake enabled them to offer this man more than belonged to him, and he dishonestly took more than belonged to him; but he, from the circumstances of the case, never personated any man: yet I think the Governors of the Bank have done perfectly right, as the Guardians of the property of the proprietors of Bank stock, every imposition

upon them they certainly ought to prevent.

Mr. Recorder to Jury. The fact that would have made this a matter to be left to you, Gentlemen, is that of the prisoner's knowing that a John Smith had stock in the Bank; in such case, personating him would have been a capital offence; at present there is no evidence to bring this matter before a Jury.

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17821204-80

80. PATRICK KILBROOK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of November last, one hempen sack, value 2 s. the property of John Davenport .

JOHN CLARK sworn.

On the 4th of November, in the afternoon, I stopped the prisoner in Water-lane with a sack, and some coals in it, the sack is Mr. Davenport's.

(The sack deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was at work for Mr. Lucas, and one of Mr. Davenport's people asked me to carry a sack of coals; I have a witness that heard him, and would have carried them if I did not, any person might have carried them, and earned the three-pence.

WILLIAM SELBY sworn,

Confirmed the above account.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-81

81. ANGUS MASTERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of October last, three pounds weight of brown sugar, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Taylor and Co.

EDWARD LINCOLN sworn.

I have the charge of the sugar on the keys belonging to the gangsmen; a hogshead's head was dropped out, and a board was over it; I was standing by the cask the 21st of October, the prisoner was on the other side pushing off the board, I bid him get away, and I went to push him away, and he said he would knock my eyes out; there came a great many round me, and they shoved the head off; I went for assistance to Thames-street, mean while the prisoner was taken.

WILLIAM SALMON sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner with a quantity of soft sugar in his coat pocket, he said he took it off the ground; the sugar was clean, and corresponded with that in the hogshead.

PRISONER.

I picked the sugar off the ground.

The prisoner being a soldier, called his serjeant, who gave him a very good character.

GUILTY .

Of stealing to the value of 10 d.

To be fined 1 s. and delivered to his officer.

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-82

82. THOMAS FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of November last, five pounds weight of brown sugar, value 2 s. the property of William Turner and others.

STEPHEN LEE sworn.

On the 23d of November, between twelve and one, I was among the hogsheads on the keys, and I saw the prisoner taking sugar out of a barrel, the head was out, I saw him searched, and there was five pounds of sugar on him in great pockets; the sugar was under my care.

PRISONER.

I found it on the ground.

The prisoner's serjeant gave him the character of a good soldier.

GUILTY, 10 d.

To be publicly whipped on the keys for one hundred yards .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-83

83. SAMUEL JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of November last, one metal watch, value 40 s. and one chain, value 6 d. the property of Edward Parr .

EDWARD PARR sworn.

On the 23d of November, between three and four in the afternoon, I was coming up Ludgate-hill, near the London Coffee-house , and I mixed with the croud to see Lord Rodney; I received a violent push, which I immediately suspected was intended to throw me off my guard, I looked down to my breeches pocket immediately, and I saw the prisoner standing by me, with his hand at my pocket, which he immediately withdrew, and I felt my watch go at the same time; upon this, the prisoner I thought attempted to get across the street, I laid hold of him about six yards off, and a person directly asked me if any body had lost a watch; I put out my hand, and received it, it was very dirty, the glass and chain broke; I am perfectly sure of what I have said, I felt the watch go very sensibly, it required a very great pull to take it.

Prisoner's counsel. There was, I believe, a very great croud? - Yes.

You was very much pressed upon by the people? - Yes.

You did not detect the prisoner in the very act? - Yes, I did.

Do you mean to say that you saw a hand before you felt any pluck from your pocket? - I do.

Can you undertake to swear whose hand it was? - I can very safely.

THOMAS WOOD sworn.

I tok the prisoner, there was nothing found on him.

THOMAS GODFREY sworn.

I picked up a watch on Ludgate-hill, I did not know who it belonged to; as I was going along a person pulled me by the leg, and immediately I looked down and saw the watch.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to the play, and there were a great many people waiting to see Lord Rodney, he came in two or three minutes, and they laid hold of me; there was a great croud; they searched me, and found nothing on me.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17821204-84

84. FRANCIS NICHOLLS was indicted for that he having been convicted of grand larceny, and ordered by the court to be sent and transported to the East-Indies for the term of seven years; was afterwards, to wit, on the 28th of October last, feloniously, without any lawful cause found at large within the realm of Great Britain, before the expiration of the said term of seven years, against the form of the statute .

JOHN OWEN sworn.

I know the prisoner; he was convicted by the name of Francis Nicholls ; I was present at his trial and sentence; his sentence was to be sent for seven years to the East Indies; he refused the offer of going for a soldier.

How did he escape? - The same morning that the Westons got out: I was engaged with Mr. Lapiere that was discharged

to day, and the other Westor and he came out.

THOMAS JACKSON sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner upon information that he had broken out of Newgate the second of July: we were after him several nights.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was not convicted to be transported, I was to go as a soldier, the doors were wide open, and I walked out; when the door was open, I thought I had as much right to go out, as I had to be brought in there for a thing that I never did.

GUILTY , ( Death .)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: o17821204-1

Mr. BARON HOTHAM delivered the Opinion of the Twelve Judges in the Cases of Henry Lavell , for Forgery, and William Bass , for Felony, who had each been respited at a former Sessions till such Opinion could be taken.

Henry Lavell was brought to the Bar.

HENRY LAVELL ,

At the last September Sessions you was indicted, for that you feloniously did falsely make, forge and counterfeit, a certain order for payment of money, purporting to be an order for 10 l. 10 s. 0 d. directed to Drummond and Co. Charing Cross, by the name of Messrs. Drummond, Charing Cross, by which Messrs. Drummond and Co. were required to pay the bearer the said sum, and which said order was as follows:

"Messrs. Drummond, Charing Cross,

"25th August, 1782.

"Please to pay the bearer, or order, on

"demand, the sum of 10 l. 10 s. 0 d. and

"place the same to the account of me,

"H. H. Aston, No. 12, Seymour-street,

"Portman-square."

This was laid to be with intention to defraud the said Henry Harvey Aston : there were three other Counts all laid in the same way; the next for feloniously uttering the same, on the same day and year, well knowing the same to be forged with the like intention; the next, for forging it with intention to defraud the Drummonds; and the last for uttering it, well knowing it to be forged, with intention to defraud them. Upon the trial the forgery was fully proved to have been committed by you, and the Jury found you Guilty. A motion was afterwards made on Arrest of Judgment on this ground, that the indictment charged the note to be drawn on Drummond and Co. by the name of Messrs. Drummond, Charing Cross, whereas the names of the respective partners ought to have been mentioned. The judgment was accordingly arrested till the opinion of the rest of the Judges could be taken. The Twelve Judges have since met together, and have considered this case, and they are of opinion that the question must turn on the operation of the words, Messrs. Drummond and Co. Charing Cross; if the words and Co. are to be deemed words of surplusage, in which light they may well be considered, as Mr. Drummond, Charing Cross, would have been considered sufficiently explanatory without the words and Co. they will then certainly not vitiate the indictment: if, on the other hand, they cannot be rejected as words of surplusage, and being taken all together, they are insensible words, composing an unintelligible description, the indictment will certainly be bad: if, in truth, that is not the case, such a description is intelligible, and conveys a notification of the party intended to be defrauded; if it do, it is not necessary to state in the indictment with more particularity the party meant; for if any person is intended, it is sufficient, and who that party is, is matter of reference to be left to the Jury; nor is any greater certainty necessary in indictments, than that the party indicted is to know against whom he is to defend himself. - Therefore on all these grounds the Judges are unanimously of opinion, that the indictment is good, and of course that the judgment ought not to be arrested. We have

taken this earliest opportunity to inform you of it, that you may prepare yourself to receive the sentence of the law, which will be passed on you at the close of this Sessions.

William Bass was then brought to the Bar.

WILLIAM BASS ,

You was at a former Sessions indicted, and found guilty of stealing a quantity of goods, of the value of 80 l. You was porter to the prosecutor who delivered to you a parcel, containing the goods mentioned in the indictment, to carry to a customer; in your way you was met by two men, who prevailed on you to go to a public house, where they persuaded you to dispose of the goods, to which you consented: you received eight guineas of the money, the goods were taken out of the package in which they were delivered to you, and put into a bag at the public house. The question reserved for the opinion of the Judges was, Whether these facts amounted to a felonious taking in you? and they are all clearly of opinion that you, standing in the relation of a servant, the possession of the goods must be considered as remaining in your master till the actual taking of them; he was to receive the money for them from the customer, and he could at any time have countermanded the delivery of them. Cases of this kind have frequently occurred, and they are of opinion that this is to be considered a Felony, and of course that your conviction was proper.

Reference Number: o17821204-2

Henry Lavell ,(respited at a former sessions)
Reference Number: o17821204-3

Transported to Africa for Life, 2.

Peter Airey , and James Davis , who were respited at a former sessions.

Reference Number: o17821204-4

Charles Thompson , (who was respited at a former sessions.)
Reference Number: o17821204-5

William Bass , (respited at a former sessions)
Reference Number: s17821204-1

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment as follows:

Received Sentence of Death, 20.

John Booker , Ann Taunton , Mary Walker , Francis Nicholls , William Hunt , Thomas Insell , William Sanders , William Smith , Thomas Crowder , James Thorpe , Barnard Manning Collins, Henry Hurford , alias Barker, Thomas Howell Wells , Margaret Hall, William Wood , and John Fitzgerald , and

Reference Number: s17821204-1

Henry Lavell ,(respited at a former sessions) and John Johnson , John Lawson , and Thomas Cope , (these three last to be drawn on a hurdle to the place of execution.) Mary Walker pleaded her belly and a Jury of matrons being sworn, returned their verdict that she was not with quick child.

Reference Number: s17821204-1

Transported to Africa for Life, 2.

Peter Airey , and James Davis , who were respited at a former sessions.

Transported to Africa for seven Years, 1.

John Stockton .

Transported to America for seven Years, 7.

Ann Goodiff , Samuel Jacobs , Thomas Smith , Joseph Smith , William Davis , William Fuller , John Knowles , and

Reference Number: s17821204-1

Charles Thompson , (who was respited at a former sessions.)

Imprisoned in Newgate for twelve Months, 8:

James Connor , Mary Ellis , Mary Dunn , Joseph Cherry , James Sharkey , Thomas Hay , otherwise Day, John Weeks , Samuel Toome .

Imprisoned for three Months in Newgate, 1. John Turner .

To be sent back to the Navigation for three Years from the expiration of his former sentence, 1.

John Mc. Neil.

To be confined to hard labour twelve months in the house of correction, 3.

Reference Number: s17821204-1

William Bass , (respited at a former sessions) Jeremiah Callnon , Susanna Kelly .

To be confined to hard labour six Months in the house of correction, 10.

Mary Floyd , Thomas Simes , (he is to be publickly whipped) Ann Baker , Catherine Webb , Jane Little , Elizabeth Knapp , Elizabeth Young , Ann Martin , Mary Bransby , Frances Whitehead .

To be publickly whipped, 2.

Thomas Simes , Thomas Ford .

N. B. Mary White remains for sentence, not being able to be brought up: and James Lapiere was discharged on his own recognizance.

Reference Number: a17821204-1

HODGSON's SHORT-HAND TREATISE, Price 2 s. 6 d. with an Explanatory Copper-plate, to be had of J. WALMSLAY, and S. BLADON.

TRIALS, &c. taken with great Accuracy by E. HODGSON, Writer of these PROCEEDINGS, No. 35, Chancery-lane.

N. B. SHORT-HAND taught on an improved Plan.

Reference Number: a17821204-2

HODGSON's SHORT-HAND TREATISE, Price 2 s. 6 d. with an Explanatory Copper-plate, to be had of J. WALMSLAY, and S. BLADON.

TRIALS, &c. taken with great Accuracy by E. HODGSON, Writer of these PROCEEDINGS, No. 35, Chancery-lane.

N. B. SHORT-HAND taught on an improved Plan.


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