Old Bailey Proceedings, 3rd July 1782.
Reference Number: 17820703
Reference Number: f17820703-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY On Wednesday the 3d of July, 1782, and the following Days;

Being the SIXTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Hon. Sir WILLIAM PLOMER , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY , And Published by Authority.

NUMBER VI. PART II.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, Bookseller, removed from Bell-Yard into Holborn, the Corner of Leather-lane.

MDCCLXXXII.

[PRICE SIX-PENCE.]

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir WILLIAM PLOMER , Knt, LORD MAYOR of the City of London; The Hon. FRANCIS BULLER , Esq; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's Bench; The Hon. JOHN HEATH , Esq; one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; JAMES ADAIR , Serjeant at Law, Recorder; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Shepherd

George Fletcher

Charles Peach

Patrick Hearne

William Sewell

John Arnold

Robert Adams

John Wathen

Samuel Smith

John Grey

John Mexton

James Taylor

First Middlesex Jury.

Solomon Hudson

Nathaniel Darvin

William Greenhill

John Winstanley

James Elliott

Samuel Calderwood

George Manville

William Thompson

John Hobcraft

William Inwood

Thomas Giffard

William Lowe

Second Middlesex Jury .

Humanitas Jackson

Thomas Baker

Stone Tuppin

Francis I'Anson

Ambrose Bradley

William Everitt

Richard Perry

William Ricketts

Thomas Randell

Henry Harris

William Williams

James Fendon

Reference Number: t17820703-1

416, 417, 418. ANN DAVIS , ANN DELANEY , and CATHARINE WILSON , were indicted for stealing 18 yards of thread lace edging, value 13 s. the property of Henry Thompson and Francis Thompson , privately in their shop , May the 22d .

HENRY THOMPSON sworn.

I am a haberdasher in the Strand , in partnership with Francis Thompson. On the 22d of May, between the hours of six and seven in the evening, the three prisoners at the bar came into the shop, and asked to look at some thread lace edging; I was at the further end of the shop; one of them

bought something, and then they all went out together. Mr. Kendrick immediately stepped into the shop, and asked us if we had lost any thing; upon examination we missed two cards of lace; I followed them to the Black-Horse. When I got there, Davis pulled out of her pocket two cards of lace, and put them on the fire. This (producing it) I took off the fire; the other was burnt. I am certain this is our property, for there are marks in my own hand-writing upon it; I know it was in my shop that day. Delaney whispered to Wilson, upon which Wilson ran down stairs, and Davis ran up stairs, but Delaney herself staid in the room.

RICHARD THOMPSON sworn.

I am a shopman to the prosecutors. The three prisoners came into the shop, and asked to see some thread lace; I shewed them some; they asked the price; Delaney bought a yard and a half, and borrowed money of Wilson to pay for it; as soon as they had paid for the edging, they laughed, and went out: Mr. Kendrick immediately came in, and asked if we had lost any thing; upon looking over the lace, I missed two cards, which I had shewed them; I am certain this card, which has been produced, I had shewn to them.

THOMAS KENDRICK sworn.

I saw the prisoners looking in at the prosecutor's shop-window, which caused me to suspect them; I went in, and informed them of my suspicions.

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

I know nothing about the lace, or of its being put into the fire.

DELANEY's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent of the affair.

WILSON's DEFENCE.

I don't know any thing at all about it.

DAVIS GUILTY . ( Death .)

DELANEY NOT GUILTY .

WILSON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17820703-2

419. MARY THOMPSON was indicted for stealing 400 yards of silk ribbon, value 10 l. twenty yards of thread lace, value 20 s. twenty yards of black silk lace, value 20 s. - 200 yards of narrow silk ribbon, value 40 s. the property of Joseph Watridge , privately in his shop , June the 10th .

Second Count. For stealing 80 yards of other thread lace, value 3 l. and 140 yards of silk ribbon, value 3 l. the property of the said Joseph Watridge , privately in his shop , June the 11th .

JOSEPH WATRIDGE sworn.

I am a shopkeeper , in King-street, Covent-Garden . The prisoner has used my shop some time; I thought very well of her. On my return from the city, on the 11th of June last, I saw the prisoner in the shop; I spoke to her; my shop-woman, Ann Lloyd , called me on one side, and said she had reason to think the prisoner had stolen some lace; I looked at the prisoner, and she went immediately out of the shop; she had some things in her hand; she said she would return presently and pay for them; she went out; I followed her, and desired her to come back; I said, my shop-woman wanted to speak with her; she said she should soon come back: at last I told her she must go back with me. When she went back, we charged her with having stolen something, and said she must be searched; she went down into the kitchen, and my shop-woman with her; nothing was found upon her there; they came up again; I insisted upon her being searched thoroughly; they took her up into the dining-room, and soon after these three pieces of ribbon were delivered to me by Ann Lloyd as found upon the prisoner; they have my marks upon them. She confessed stealing some other things; we went to her lodging, and found the other things laid to have been stolen on the 10th.

Do you know that it was her lodging? - No.

Did you make her any promise of favor to induce her to make that confession? - I did.

Court. Then you must not mention her confession.

ANN LLOYD sworn.

I saw the prisoner secrete three pieces of lace; I told Mr. Watridge of it. When the prisoner was brought back, she was taken down stairs into the kitchen; she let me search one of her pockets; I did not find any thing in that; she refused to let me search her any further: she said she had but one pocket on. As I still persisted in charging her with having secreted some lace, Mr. Watridge insisted upon having her searched thoroughly; then we took her up into the dining-room; my master's mother, the maid servant, and myself, went with her; one piece of lace dropped from her up stairs, and we found the other pieces of lace under her stays, and the ribbons in her other pocket.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

GUILTY of stealing the goods laid in the Second Count, but NOT GUILTY of stealing them privately in the shop .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-3

420, 421. DAVID JONES and JAMES MAHEN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Martin Redman , on the 13th of June , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing two linen table-cloths, value 5 s. a cotton frock, value 4 s. and 50 pounds of bacon, value 20 s. the property of Martin Redman ; and a silver watch, value 3 l. two men's hats, value 4 s. a cloth coat, value 5 s. and a stuff waistcoat, value 12 d. the property of Thomas Dempsey , in the said dwelling-house .

ALICE REDMAN sworn.

I am wife of Martin Redman . On the 13th of June, my husband went out; not being well, I went to bed between nine and ten o'clock; I had put my children to bed; I did not go to sleep till after twelve o'clock; then I fell into a slum. I was waked about one o'clock by a noise in the kitchen; I was afraid to get up. About four o'clock, Thomas Dempsey , who lodges in my house, called me, and informed me the house was broke open; I came down, and found the back-window and the back-door open; a pane of glass had been taken out, and the window opened, and the door was opened; I am very certain they were safe the night before; there was not any crack in the glass. I found my drawers open, and the things thrown about. I missed the several articles mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); I described several marks on them before I saw them.

(The goods were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

ANDREW HOPKINS sworn.

I am a watchman. On Friday morning, the 13th of June, while I was on my watch in Church-lane, between two and three o'clock, the prisoners came into Church-lane; Jones had a stitch of bacon upon his back, the other had a bag of things; I followed them as far as the Rose-and-Crown, in Rose-and-Crown alley; I stopped them there, and said they must go to the watch-house: they said, if I suspected them to have stolen the things, they could fetch the person of whom they had them; and then first the one, and then the other, proposed to go and fetch the person, and they both endeavoured to run away; a watchman came to my assistance, and we secured Mahen, but Jones got off. We carried Mahen and the things to the watch-house; they were afterwards taken to the Rotation-office . I brought the things from thence to-day.

THOMAS DEMPSEY sworn.

I lost the things charged in the indictment to be my property (repeating them); the watch was in my breeches-pocket, lying by the bed-side; I went to bed about ten o'clock; I waked between three and four o'clock; I missed my breeches; I went down, and found them in the kitchen; my watch was gone; I found the back window and door both open; I am certain they were secure over night. Hearing the prisoners

were taken, I went to the watch-house in the evening, and saw Mahen and my things there .

(The goods were produced in court, and deposed to by the witness.)

JOSEPH FISH sworn.

I am a watchman . I assisted Hopkins in taking Mahen.

MOSES RATLAM sworn.

I live in Church-street, Whitechapel. On the 14th of June, between two and three o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise; I opened the window, and looked out, and saw Hopkins and the two prisoners. Hopkins said, they must go to the watch-house: they said, they would not go; they could produce the party they had the things of. The one said to the other, Do you stay here, and I will go and fetch the party. The other said, No; do you stay, and I will fetch the party . They then endeavoured to make their escape: Mahen was secured, Jones got off. I am sure Jones is one of the men.

JOSEPH LEVI sworn.

I belong to the Rotation-office. On Thursday night, the 14th of June, about half after two o'clock, Fish and Hopkins brought Mahen to the watch-house, with the bag of things, and the stitch of bacon. Mahen said Jones was concerned, and had the watch. In the evening, the prosecutor and Dempsey came to the justice's; she mentioned the marks of the things before she saw them. Dempsey said he had lost a blue great coat; I remembered Mahen having one on that did not seem to fit him; I went to the New Prison, and took the coat off his back. We took Jones at his lodging, on the Tuesday following. I asked him what became of the watch they took from the place where they got the bacon: he said it was gone to hell .

JONES's DEFENCE.

I was going to work early in the morning; I saw Mahen standing at the corner of an alley with the bacon and bag of things: he said he was going to Whitechapel. The watchman came up, and asked him, where he got that property; he said he found it: they stopped him, and I went to my work.

MAHEN's DEFENCE.

I got up early on Friday morning, to go to work; and in Farthing-fields, I found this bacon, and bag of things. I told the watchman, when they stopped me, that I found them. They said, I must go to the watch-house; I said, I would not, and ran away. They pursued me, and took me: Jones is very innocent of the affair.

BOTH GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER .

Reference Number: t17820703-4

319. WILLIAM STANLEY was indicted, for that he, in a certain field and open place near the King's highway, on the 19th of June , in and upon Letitia Lloyd , feloniously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person a pair of stuff shoes, value 2 s. eight dimity pockets, value 1 s. a linen apron, value 1 s. three linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and 9 s. in monies numbered , the property of the said Letitia.

LETITIA LLOYD sworn.

On Wednesday night, the 19th of June, I was going from Berkeley-street, Portman-square, to Highgate. I went to New Norfolk-street, and staid, as I intended to go in the stage; but I was too late for the stage, so I was obliged to walk. When I was walking along the second field from Kentish-Town, a boy, who was lying down in the grass, started up: he said nothing to me, but passed me, and ran fast up the field. He was dressed in a brown coat, and a brown linen apron; his hat was pushed back from his face, so that I had a perfect view of his face.

Are you certain the prisoner is the person? - I believe him to be the man; he is very much like the man . When I came to the middle of the field, the prisoner stood before me; he made a horrid noise, and then

he seized me by the throat with both his hands, and swore that if I was not quiet, he would kill me. He held me fast by one arm, and with the other he felt into both my pockets: he took out three handkerchiefs, and some silver; and he likewise took a bundle, which had in it four pair of dimity pockets, a linen apron, and 9 s. in money. He wa nted to take my cloak off, upon which I screamed out, and he ran away. (The wearing apparel was produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.) I saw these things a day or two after in Litchfield-street .

Do you swear positively to the prisoner? - It was a light night; I saw his face very plain: he kept me a great while; I believe him to be the person. I saw him afterwards at the office in Litchfield-street; he was in the parlour, along with other persons. I was desired to point out the man that robbed me; I pointed out the prisoner. I desired one of the people there, to ask him for a locket he stole from me; the prisoner immediately asked me, if it was wrapped in white lawn paper. I said, Yes. He said, he was sorry he had thrown it away; he said he was very drunk, and begged my pardon; but he appeared to be quite sober when he robbed me.

JOHN DIXON sworn.

I know the prisoner very well. As I was passing through Soho-square, in company with Macdonald, the next morning after the prosecutrix was robbed, we met the prisoner with a bundle; we stopped him, and asked him what he had got; he said, Nothing, but an apron and a petticoat. I insisted upon seeing the contents of the bundle; he resisted that. After some altercation, and giving him several blows, he submitted to let us search the bundle; we found in it the things which have been produced: we found this brown linen apron (producing it) in his pocket.

( Dennis Macdonald confirmed the testimony of John Dixon .)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A man came into a house where I was drinking in Leather-lane; he put the bundle upon the table, and went away and left it. I took the bundle up, and went to my lodgings; I was locked out, and so walked about all night. I met Dixon and Macdonald; they took the bundle from me. The next day they sent me to Chatham for a marine; the day after, the prosecutrix laid an information of her being robbed, and then they fetched me up again: they do it through spite.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17820703-5

421. JOHN MARTIN (a negro ) was indicted for stealing two cloth coats, value 20 s. a stuff waistcoat, value 1 s. and a pair of stuff breeches, value 2 s. the property of Stephen Turnbull ; and two cloth coats, value 10 s. two cloth waistcoats, value 5 s. two pair of cloth breeches, value 5 s. one cotton waistcoat, value 1 s. a linen waistcoat, value 1 s. a cotton petticoat, value 1 s. and a cotton gown, value 2 s. the property of John Turnbull , in his dwelling-house , May the 18th .

( Stephen Turnbull deposed, That he went up to the one pair of stairs room, and found the door wide open, and the prisoner in the room; that he went down stairs, and informed his mother of it; that the prisoner rushed by them in the passage, with a bundle under his arm: he was pursued, and immediately taken. The bundle, containing the clothes mentioned in the indictment, was produced in court, and they were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-6

422. THOMAS BARRETT was indicted for stealing two silver mugs, value 6 l. a silver waiter, value 12 l. two silver sauce-spoons, value 20 s. a silver wine-strainer,

value 10 s. and a silver stand, value 10 s. the property of William Thomas Lewis , in his dwelling-house , May the 10th .

WILLIAM THOMAS LEWIS sworn.

I live in Broad-court, Covent-garden . I went out of town on the 9th of May. I saw the plate, mentioned in the indictment, on the side-board, in my parlour, before I went out. I returned on the 10th of May. The plate had been missed just before I returned.

What was the whole worth? - I valued it at 20 l. I have never seen any of it since.

THOMAS BOWATER sworn.

I live at a house opposite the prosecutor's. On the day Mr. Lewis's house was robbed, I saw the prisoner walk by Mr. Lewis's door two or three times; and he made a full stop, and looked at Mr. Lewis's child, which was then sitting at the door. He walked to Cross-court, which leads into Broad-court; then he walked back to Mr. Lewis's, and looked into the window. He made a full stop; and then he pushed open the door, and went into the house. I never saw him come out again. I thought the prisoner might have been a sweetheart to one of the maids. In about ten minutes after I saw the prisoner, I heard of the robbery.

(Upon his cross-examination, he said he was at his master's garret-window when he saw the prisoner in Broad-court; that he saw the prisoner's face very plain; that he described the man's person, and his dress; in consequence of which the prisoner was apprehended some weeks after.)

MARTHA PUGH sworn.

I was at that time servant to Mr. Lewis. The plate was kept open, upon a side-board, in the parlour. I saw the prisoner go backwards and forwards past the house three times, and look into the parlour. I was up in the dining-room at the time. It was not above six minutes after the last time I saw him, before the plate was missed.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN DIXON sworn.

I was at the Office, in Bow-street, when Mrs. Lewis came with an information of the man who had robbed them. At that time another man was supposed to be concerned, from the description given by the servant. Somebody at the office said Barrett was the man.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17820703-7

423. JOHN WHITE was indicted for stealing a linen frock, value 1 s. a linen towel, value 6 d. and a horse-roller, value 1 s. the property of Robert Kilby Cox , Esq ; May the 28th .

(Mr. Cox's coachman deposed, that, on the 28th of May, he locked the stable, and went out; that he returned a short time after, saw the stable broke open, and met the prisoner coming out of the stable; that he stopped him; upon which the prisoner dropped the things mentioned in the indictment.)

(The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.)

GUILTY .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-8

424. ANN M'FARLAN was indicted for stealing five yards of printed callico, value 12 s. 6 d. the property of William Oddey , privately in the shop of the said William , May the 30th .

WILLIAM ODDEY sworn.

I am a linen-draper . The printed callico mentioned in the indictment was in my window, on the 3d of May. At about eight in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for some clear lawn. I observed, when she went out, that she had something which she endeavoured carefully to conceal. As soon as she was gone out, I missed five yards of printed callico. I pursued her, and saw her drop the callico. She was immediately taken into custody.

(The callico was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

What is the callico worth? - Two shillings and sixpence a yard; there are five yards of it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Another young woman and I went into the shop, and bought a piece of lawn. I know nothing about the callico.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 3 s.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-9

425. ANN BROWN was indicted for stealing a linen sheet, value 2 s. a pair of bellows, value 12 d. and a mahogany tea-board, value 4 s. the property of Edward Neal , the said goods being in a certain lodging-room, let by contract by the said Edward to the said Ann , June the 29th .

(There was not any evidence to affect the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17820703-10

426. ANN BROWN was indicted for stealing a copper saucepan, value 2 s. an earthen tea-pot, value 1 d. two earthen teacups, value 1 d. two earthen saucers, value 1 d. a half-pint tumbler glass, value 3 d. two woollen blankets, value 4 s. a cotton counterpane, value 2 s. and a woollen bed-rug, value 2 s. the property of William Baker , the said goods being in a certain lodging-room, let by contract by the said William to the said Ann , June the 27th .

( The evidence was not sufficient to prove a felony .)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17820703-11

427. ARCHIBALD LIVINGSTON was indicted for stealing 2 lb. and a half of beef, value 8 d. the property of John Lunn , June the 28th .

( There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17820703-12

428. GEORGE JACKSON was indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. the property of Dorothy Wright , June the 8th .

(The prosecutrix keeps the Four Swans Inn, in Bishopsgate-street. It appeared, upon the evidence, that the prisoner slept there on the night of the 8th of June; that he got up at seven in the morning, and went out: he was followed by a servant of the prosecutrix, who brought him back with the sheets upon him .

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER .

Reference Number: t17820703-13

429. MARY PARKER was indicted for stealing a pair of metal candlesticks, value 4 s. a copper coffee-pot, value 4 s. a copper lid of a saucepan, value 6 d. and a pair of steel snuffers, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Elizabeth Collings , spinster , May the 17th .

(It appeared, upon the evidence, that the prisoner being seen to come out of the house of the prosecutrix, in Fetter-lane , and being suspected, was immediately followed, when the things mentioned in the indictment were found upon her. They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

(The prisoner, in her defence, said, that as she was going down Fetter-lane, a woman came and desired her to hold these things for her, and then ran away.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-14

430. HANNAH SMITH was indicted for stealing a cheque apron, value 1 s. 6 d. a counterpane made of cotton and linen patches, value 6 d. and a linen cap, value 6 d. the property of John Fox , June the 4th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17820703-15

431, 432, 433. WILLIAM ROBERTS , GRIFFIN JONES , and GEORGE KING , were indicted for stealing 26 lb. of mutton, value 3 s. 5 lb. of lamb, value 2 s. 2 lb. of beef, value 6 d. an iron saw, value 1 s. a pair of iron steams, value 1 s. and an iron chopper, value 1 s. the property of Charles Hardmeat , June the 2d.

(The witnesses were not able to identify the meat.)

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17820703-16

434. FRANCES FIELDING was indicted for stealing two printed cotton gowns, value 20 s. a black silk cloak, value 2 s. a linen shirt, value 1 s. a linen shift, value 6 d. two cheque aprons, value 6 d. a linen handkerchief, value 1 s. and a linen table-cloth, value 12 d. the property of Francis Foster , June the 6th .

ELIZABETH FOSTER sworn.

On the 6th of June, I was called up a little before six in the morning. I found the prisoner in custody; and the things mentioned in the indictment, which were my husband's property, were in the passage.

JOHN EADES sworn.

Foster lodges in my house. I came down in the morning, before six o'clock. I found the door open. While I was sweeping the door, the prisoner came out. Upon my stopping her, she threw down a bundle in the passage. I secured her.

(The apparel mentioned in the indictment was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The bundle was given me in the street by a gentleman.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-17

435. MARGARET HAWKER was indicted for stealing nine groce of pewter buttons, value 10 s. the property of Alexander Bean , May the 25th .

JOHN RAFFAN sworn.

I was going up to the workshop at Mr. Bean's, on the 25th of May. I stopped the prisoner on the stairs. I insisted on having her searched: upon which she produced two groce of pewter buttons, which she had upon her concealed. I went for Mr. Bean. In the mean while, she produced the rest of the buttons .

MARY RANDALL sworn.

Raffan stopped the prisoner, and took her up stairs. There she produced the buttons.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A Mrs. Jones asked me to fetch the buttons for her.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-18

436, 437. ROBERT JONES and JOHN SAMPSON were indicted for stealing a silver table spoon, value 14 s. the property of Angus M'Kenzie , June the 12th .

ANGUS M'KENZIE sworn.

The prisoners came, on the 12th of June, to take the dust away. A table-spoon was missed out of the kitchen. The prisoners had no business in the kitchen: the dust lay in the yard. The prisoners were charged

with stealing the spoon: they said they knew nothing about it. A constable and I took down the back-board of the cart: there we found the spoon lying on the dust, slightly covered. When the constables were carrying them away, Jones said, it was the first time; and, if I would forgive him, he would do so no more. Sampson denied any knowledge of it.

( Ann Smith , servant to the prosecutor, deposed, that she had the spoon in her hand, in the kitchen, just before it was missed.)

( Ann Littlewood deposed, that she met Jones on the kitchen stairs.)

(The spoon was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JONES's DEFENCE.

The spoon was taken out of the yard, among the dust.

(There being no evidence to affect Sampson, he was not put upon his defence.)

JONES GUILTY .

SAMPSON NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-19

438. ANN AGER was indicted for stealing a hair trunk, value 6 s. the property of John Harrington , June the 20th .

(The prosecutor is a trunk-maker , at the corner of Southampton-buildings . Mr. Cooper deposed, that he saw the prisoner, and another woman, walking down Southampton-buildings: the prisoner had the trunk. Suspecting she had stole it, he stopped her, and sent to Mr. Harrington, who owned the trunk.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I saw the trunk in the street. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-20

439. ANN QUINES was indicted for stealing a pair of silk stockings, value 10 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a guinea and 4 s. in monies numbered , the property of William Whitcher .

( William Whitcher deposed, that, as he was coming through Catherine-wheel-alley, a woman came up to him, and pulled him into a room; that he lay there on a bed for some time; and that, when he awaked, he missed the things mentioned in the indictment; but he was so extremely intoxicated with liquor, as not to be able to give any account how he had been stripped.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17820703-21

440. CHARLES KEELING was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 8 l. the property of John Maylin , May the 13th .

JOHN MAYLIN sworn.

I keep a public-house , in Cursitor-street . The prisoner was at my house, in company with some other gentlemen, on the evening of the 13th of May. The prisoner staid about three minutes after the rest were all gone: then he came down stairs, and went out. I went up stairs directly, and missed the tankard. I had carried it up between ten and eleven o'clock. I have never seen it since it was stolen.

HENRY PEARCE sworn.

On the 13th of May, I went to the prosecutor's, to spend the evening with some friends. We had the silver tankard before us, and drank out of it several times. We all went away together, except Mr. Keeling. The tankard was before him, when we went away. We parted company at the end of Chancery-lane. Just as we had parted, Mr. Keeling overtook me. His coat was buttoned, and he had his hand in his pocket. I did not observe that he had any thing, as I had no suspicion. I never heard any thing amiss of him before.

- HOGG sworn.

I belong to the society at Maylin's . After the club was over, there were six of us staid. I was the last but one that left the room. Just before I went, Mr. Keeling asked me to drink some beer, which I declined. I left him with the tankard on the table before him.

( Francis Hearne confirmed the testimony of the last witness.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the tankard.

(The prisoner called several witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17820703-22

441. PHEBE BLANDON was indicted for stealing a watch, the inside case made of gold, the outside case made of base metal gilt with gold, and set round with stones, value 10 l. a gold watch-chain, value 40 s. a crystal seal set in base metal, value 12 d. and a gold egg trinket, value 2 s. the property of William Hogermoolen .

WILLIAM HOGERMOOLEN sworn.

(The prosecutor being a foreigner, and not understanding English, an interpreter was sworn.)

As I was coming from Hackney, on the 19th of June, a little on this side Shoreditch church, I stood against the wall, to make water. The prisoner, and another girl, much larger than she, came up to me, and asked me to go with them. I desired them to go about their business. As soon as I had said those words, the biggest girl gave me a push upon my stomach, and at the same time the little one took my watch out of my pocket, and gave it to the big girl. I took hold of the little girl.

Are you sure it is the prisoner? - Yes; I am. She struggled, and got out of my hand. I called the watch to my assistance.

What time was it? - The clock had struck twelve. In about five or ten minutes after I called Watch! the officer of the night came, and took the girl. When she was in custody of the constable, I left her at the watch-house, and went home about my business.

What sort of a watch was it? - A gold one, enamelled; the outside case was metal. I have never seen the watch since.

Was you at all intoxicated with liquor? - No.

JOHN GARDINER sworn.

I am a headborough. About twelve at nigh t, I heard the cry of Watch! I went up, and saw this Gentleman. He said he had been robbed of his watch, by a little girl. I went in pursuit of her, and took the prisoner. She was out of my sight, when I came first to the prosecutor. He charged her with taking the watch. She said, she had not got it, but a greater girl than she had got it.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17820703-23

442. PETER MONRO was indicted for stealing two yards and a half of linen cloth, value 3 s. the property of William Dolman , May the 30th .

ROBERT LOCKE sworn.

On the 30th of May, I saw the prisoner, in Chandos-street, with a piece of cloth in his hand. I heard a girl cry, Stop thief! upon which the prisoner ran down Castle-court. I pursued, and took him; but he had dropped the cloth. He appeared to be in liquor.

HANNAH BARNETT sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Dolman. I saw the prisoner come into the shop, and take the cloth off the counter. I ran out after him, and cried, Stop thief! and Mr. Locke stopped him.

(The cloth was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent. I never had the cloth.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17820703-24

443. JOHN PRESTON was indicted for that he feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit a certain note, in writing, commonly called a promissory note, for the payment of money , as follows.

". 20. Dartford, 7th March, 1782. Six weeks after date, I promise to pay Mr. John Preston , or order, twenty pounds, value received by me, John Jones , payable in London, at Messrs. Drummonds, at Charing-cross," with intention to defraud Richard Smith , and Richard Kinnersley .

Second count: For feloniously uttering the said note, as true, knowing it to be forged.

- WHITE sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Benjamin Smith , a brewer, in Oxford-Road.

Has he a partner? - Yes, Richard Kinnersley .

Do you know the prisoner? - I do; he dealt with us about three months, for twopenny, small beer, and ale. He paid me the 10 l. when I took my first bill, upon account; the second bill I took him, he gave me a note, drawn by John Jones , at Dartford, for 20 l.

What day was that? - I think the 8th of March last; this is the note: I received it of him for Mr. Smith. I asked him, who Mr. John Jones was. He said, he lived at Dartford; he was agent to Mr. Cook, who kept the lime-kilns at Dartford, and that he kept his cash at Mr. Drummond's, at Charing-cross. I took the note; and upon the strength of this note, Mr. Smith and Mr. Kinnersley trusted him with 30 l. more. Some little time before that, about a fortnight, I believe, I went to enquire at Messrs. Drummond's, whether the note was good or not. They said, they knew nothing of any such person.

Court. How do you know that to be the same note you received? - I saw the prisoner indorse his name upon the back of it. (The note read.)

Did the prisoner say he knew this Jones? - Yes, he said, Cook belonged to the limekilns, at Dartford; that Jones was his agent; that he dealt with him for 3 or 400 l. a year in breeze.

CROSS-EXAMINATION.

You are clerk to Mr. Smith? - I am.

Is there not an action now against the prisoner, in the Common Pleas, for this business? - I cannot say.

Has not Mr. Smith commenced an action against the prisoner, for the balance of his account? - He has commenced an action for his debt.

Do you know whether this note is included in that demand against him in the Common Pleas? - I believe it is.

Did you make out that bill? - I did; it was 50 l.

Was this note part of that account - Yes.

Is the action upon the note, or goods sold? - Upon goods sold.

Did he say, at any time, that he knew Jones, and that he was frequently in town? - Yes, he said, he dealt largely with him; very largely: he often came to his house, and he had been there the day before I called last time, to let him know where the note was.

WILLIAM NETTLEPOLE sworn.

Where do you live? - At Dartford .

How many lime-kilns are there at Dartford? - Two.

Are you the proprietor of either of them? - I am of one.

Do you know such persons as a Mr. Jones, or a Mr. Cook? - There is no such person there.

How long have you been proprietor of that kiln? - Nine years; my father had it nineteen.

During that time, has there any such person

as a Mr. Jones, or Mr. Cook, had the kiln, or acted as agents? - No, our business is not so large as to need agents; we do it ourselves.

Then you do not buy 3 or 400 l. worth of breeze a year? - No, we use no breeze; we use coals.

JOHN DORMAN sworn.

You are, I believe, proprietor of the other lime-kiln at Dartford? - Yes.

How long have you been so? - Six years; and I have known it thirty years.

Did you ever know, in that time, such a person as Mr. Jones, or Mr. Cook, as proprietor, or agent? - I never knew any such persons.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I took this note of one Mr. John Jones , who told me he was going to live at Dartford; he had value received for it, on my account. The goods this man has stated that I sold to Mr. Cook, is false, I always served Mr. Talbot. That gentleman knows Mr. Talbot.

Mr. Dorman. I do know Mr. Talbot.

Prisoner. This gentleman represented himself as a schoolmaster, going to live at Dartford .

Counsel for the prisoner, to Mr. White. Was not there an indictment preferred for this matter last sessions, at Hicks's-hall? - There was.

And it was thrown out? - It was, for some mistake.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN JONES sworn.

Did you ever give the prisoner a note, to the amount of 20 l.? - I did.

Did you receive value for that note? - I owed him the money.

CROSS EXAMINATION.

What are you? - I keep books for trades-men.

What, in London? - Yes.

You do not live in the country? - No.

You are in a great way of business? - No.

You don't deal for 3 or 400 l. a year, with any body? - No.

Pray who may be your banker? - I have none.

Mr. Child is not your banker? - No.

Nor Mr. Gosling? - No.

You have no cash there at all? - No.

Nor never said you had? - No.

What notes did you use to give; promissory notes? - I gave a promissory note to that gentleman (the prisoner.)

When? - I believe it was in March; it was about the 7th or 8th, I think.

Can you repeat the note you drew? - It was drawn a promissory note, for 20 l.

"I promise to pay Mr. John Preston , or order, twenty pounds, for value received."

That was the whole of the note? - Yes.

Signed John Jones , or James Jones ? - John.

John, at length? - Yes.

It was not drawn upon any banker? - No.

You have no cash at any banker's? - No.

Can you write? - Yes.

Be so good as just to write your name on a piece of paper. - (He does so.)

Then, if I understand you right, you never had, nor pretended to have, cash at any banker's; and you never lived out of town, or pretended it! - No; I did intend to live out of town.

But you are not proprietor of any brick-kilns? - No.

Nor lime-kilns? - No, I never was.

Counsel for the prisoner. Did not you tell the prisoner that you did reside, or intended to reside, at the place? - I did.

They do not call you Lord Jones? - No.

Court. Where did you intend to reside? - I meant to go down to Dartford, to keep school.

Look at that note. - That is my handwriting.

You write very differently to-day, to what you did then.

(The jury inspected the name he had just wrote, with the signature on the note, and the hands appeared to be very different.)

Jury. We wish the witness would write his name in a larger hand. (The witness did so.)

Court. Do you often give notes? - No.

Do you ever draw bills upon any person? - No.

You said just now, the note you gave the prisoner was not directed to any banker at all? - Yes it was.

How came you to say just now, before you saw it, that it was not? - I do not re- recollect that.

Yes, you did; the Counsel asked you the question, before he shewed you the bill. Who was it directed to? - Mr. Drummond; I intended to have had the cash there before the note was due. They arrested the man for the note, before it was due; and, not content with that, they now try to take away his life.

You told the Counsel you never kept cash there in your life? - I intended to have paid it in there.

Are you acquainted with them? - I know them.

Is there any body here will say, from Mr. Drummond's shop, that they know you? - I don't know that there is.

Where did you live at this time? - In Tottenham-Court Road.

Did you date your note from Tottenham-Court Road? - No, I intended to go and live down at Dartford, to keep school there.

THOMAS KEMP sworn.

I am a smith, and farrier, in Tottenham-Court Road.

Do you know the hand-writing of the last witness? - I believe I do, if I see it.

Do you know the hand-writing to that note? - I believe this to be the hand-writing of John Jones , of that same man that was witness here; I have a bill here of his writing.

Does Jones write out your bills for you? - He does, at times.

Then you perfectly know his hand? - Yes.

Is that his hand-writing? (shewing the paper he wrote his name upon) - The J is much like his hand-writing; but he might be intimidated here.

But you are sure that is his hand-writing? - Yes, they are very much unlike.

He never lived at Dartford? - I cannot tell; he might have lived at Dartford, for what I know of.

What is he? - He was recommended to to me as being a man decayed a little in business.

How long have you known Preston? - Fourteen or fifteen years, I believe, and have earned many a score pound of him.

JOSEPH CHINEA sworn.

Do you know Jones? - Very well.

Do you know his hand-writing, when you see it? - I am not a great judge of writing; but I have here a bill of his hand-writing, he wrote three or four months ago: he keeps almost all the tradesmen's books about us.

What is the general character of the prisoner? - I never heard any harm by him.

Counsel for the prisoner, to Kemp. What is the general character of the prisoner? - He always behaved well to me; as to his general character, they may give you a bad word, perhaps; they may give you a bad character, for what I know.

Has he dealt honestly with you? - Yes, and all that I had any connections with.

Farther Evidence for the Crown.

ALEX. SINCLAIR GORDON sworn.

You are a clerk in Mr. Drummond's house? - I am.

Is there any person of the name of John Jones , who keeps cash there? - There is, or at least there was, at the time that note was drawn.

Do you remember that note being tendered for payment? - Yes.

Does any John Jones , living at Dartford, keep cash with you? - No.

Was that draft ever tendered for payment? - Yes, and refused.

Do you know that man (Jones)? - No.

Do you know whether he ever kept cash at your house? - No.

Counsel for the prisoner. Does it not happen, in the business of a banker, that notes are drawn on a particular house; and that afterwards cash is put into the hands of the banker for the purpose of paying those notes? - I don't recollect any such thing ever having

happened since I have been in the business.

GUILTY. ( Death .)

(He was humbly recommended, by the jury, to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17820703-25

444. GEORGE WESTON , otherwise SAMUEL WATSON , and JOSEPH WESTON , otherwise JOSEPH WILLIAM WESTON, otherwise WILLIAM JOHNSON , were indicted for robbing the Bath and Bristol mail , Jan. the 29th, 1781 .

(The witnesses were examined apart)

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

You belong to the office in Bow-street? - I do.

In consequence of an information against the prisoners, you went in search of them? - I did. On Wednesday, the 17th of March, I apprehended both the prisoners; I went to a corner house in Wardour-street; after being there some time, and telling my business, the prisoners came down stairs, with their hands in their pockets: I was apprehensive that they were armed, at that time, and therefore I let them pass by me. As soon as they were got out into the street, I made a hue-and-cry; upon which they drew their hands out of their pockets, and then I saw they had a pistol in each hand. They were pursued, and taken. When we came to Bow-street, I searched them; I found, upon Joseph, four Bank post-bills, a 100 l. a 70 l. a 40 l. another, 33 l. 14 s. and a lottery-ticket, No. 28,257.

Did you search George? - I did not.

(The bills were produced in court, and read.)

JOSEPH LEE sworn.

I understand you are clerk at the post-office at Maidenhead? - I am.

Do you remember sending off the mail from Maidenhead, for Hounslow, on the 28th of January, 1781? - Yes.

What is the boy's name that set off for Hounslow? - He is dead: I knew him well, but I don't know his name.

What bags did that mail contain? - Every thing appeared in its usual state.

Was the Bath, Reading, or Bristol mail, contained in the general mail? - Yes; we took out the bag that contains the letters to Windsor.

The Bath and Reading bags, likewise, came in the same mail? - Yes, they did.

WILLIAM BROOKES sworn.

You are post-master at Hounslow? - Yes, I am.

Did you receive the mail from Maidenhead, on the 28th of January, 1781? - No.

What is the boy's name who ought to have brought it? - Samuel Walker .

What is become of him? - He is dead: he ought to have brought it on Monday morning, the 28th of January. He takes the mail down on Sunday morning, and brings it up on Monday morning.

What time does the mail generally come in, of a morning, to Hounslow? - Sometimes it comes in on Sunday night, at twelve o'clock, and sometimes at three, four, or five, on the Monday morning.

To Joseph Lee . What time was the mail sent out from Maidenhead? - At half after eleven o'clock.

JOHN FRODSHAM sworn.

You are clerk to the magistrates in Bow-street? - I am.

Was that the information (shewing the witness a paper) given by Samuel Walker , upon oath? - Yes, before Mr. Wrighte; it was made by Samuel Walker .

Was it read over to him before he signed it? - I read it over to him, before he signed it.

(The information taken before Justice Wrighte, on the 29th of January, was read; in which the informant faith, as he was bringing the Bristol mail from Maidenhead, to Hounslow, this morning, between two and three o'clock, he was stopped near the eleven-mile

stone, by a single highwayman, with a crape, or something black over his face, who presented a pistol to him, and then took away the mail; that the said highwayman said, that if the informant followed him, he would blow his brains out. That about a quarter of an hour before he was stopped, two men passed him on horseback, one of whom he verily believed to be the person who stopped him.)

RICHARD NEW sworn.

I live at Hounslow .

Was you employed to search for the mail? - Yes.

Where did you find it? - On the other side of Hanger-hill .

How far is that from the road leading to Hounslow? - Five miles and an half.

What did you find beside? Look at those two papers; have you seen them before? - Yes.

Did you find those two papers there? - Yes.

Where were those papers, when you found them? - Thrown about the meadow.

There were a great many other things there besides? - Yes.

Did you see Samuel Walker afterwards? - I went with him to the Post-office.

Where did you carry all the letters and papers to, that you took up? - To the Post-office.

Did you go with Samuel Walker to the justice of peace? - No.

Counsel for the Crown. These are the bills of charges, as they are called, both from Bath and Bristol.

(They were read.)

From Bath, 27th January, 1781, letters from London, 470, at 4 d. Unpaid letters, 7 l. 16 s. 8 d. - 25 l. 3 s. At 4 d. paid letters, 8 l. 7 s.

From Bristol, 26th January, 1781, letters from London, 577, at 4 d. Unpaid letters, 9 l. 13 s. At 4 d. paid letters, 1 l. 11 s. 9 d. William Fenn . - To unpaid letters, nothing; to paid letters, nothing.

GEORGE TURTON sworn.

Where do you live? - At Nottingham .

What trade are you? - I am a hair-dresser.

Look at those two men at the bar. Do you know either of them? - Yes, George Weston .

When did you see him? - I think it was on a Tuesday, in January, 1781.

At what o'clock in the morning? - It might be between nine and ten o'clock. He came to the Blackmoor's head, in a chaise, and sent to be dressed. I went and dressed him. He sent the waiter to a banker's, to get cash for a bill. The waiter came back, and said the banker would not give cash for it. He asked if there were any more bankers in the town. They said, yes, Mr. Wright. He said he would go down there himself, when I had done dressing him.

Mr. JOHN WRIGHT sworn.

Where do you live? - At Nottingham.

You are of the bank of Mr. Wright, at Nottingham? - Yes.

Was you there in January, 1781? - I was. George Weston came to my house.

How was he dressed? - In a naval uniform, with a white lappell. I was at breakfast when he first came into the counting-house. The clerk called me out, and said a Gentleman wanted cash for a Bank post-bill, but had refused to give the premium which we always have, which is a quarter per cent. He said, that if the master of the house was there, he thought he would not take it. He called me. I said it was what we always had. He said, If it is what you take; I must allow it you; as I am upon travel, and must have cash.

Should you know the Bank post-bill again, if you was to see it? - Yes: this is the bill: I know it from our own number that is upon it.

Bank post-bill, G 3, No. T 1062, London, dated 16th of January, seven days sight, to Matthew Humphries , Esq; or order, 100 l. sterling.

ADAM HAMILTON sworn.

You keep the inn at Enfield highway? - I do.

Do you remember either of the prisoners coming to your house? - Yes; George Weston,

came to my house: it was, to the best of my recollection, on the 2d of February, 1781.

How was he dressed? - In a midshipman's uniform.

What chaise had he? - He came in a chaise and four, and had a chaise and four from my house to London.

CHARLES FILLATT sworn.

I understand you are a partner with Messrs. Cam and Whitehead, bankers, at Bath? - I am.

Do you r ecollect, in the month of January, 1781, and upon what day in that month, forwarding any letter to town by the mail, and the contents of it? - On Saturday, the 27th of January, 1781, I forwarded to Messrs. Boldero, Carter, and Co. bankers, in London, I think, forty-four bills, under cover of two sheets of paper: they were directed to Messrs. Boldero, Carter, and Co. London, and inclosed in cover, directed to George Whitehead , London.

Please to look at that note, and inform the court and jury whether that was one of the notes forwarded by you to London by the mail? - This was a note forwarded by me to London, by the mail, on Saturday the 27th of January, 1781. This is No. T 1062, 40 l. There were three others, T 1060, T 1061, and T 1063, of the same date and tenour .

Please to look at this note, and see whether that is one you forwarded also? - I believe it is; but the number has been altered since.

What alteration has been made in the number? - Here is an addition of a 0 to it; the original number was T 1063; it appears now T 10630.

That alteration is made by putting a 0 after the figures? - It is.

Are you able to say whether it was one of the bills you forwarded to London? - I believe it is; but, the number being altered, it does not appear as before.

What reason have you for believing it? - I have a copy in my pocket, that I took of the bills, which corresponds with these. I believe I have left it in my great-coat pocket, in the other room. I have examined it, and every thing corresponds but the 0, which clearly is an addition.

What is there that induces you to think this was not 10630, when the bill was originally issued at the Bank? - Because the date and sum agree with the other, and the 0 appears to me to be added since the bill was sent from my house. My memorandum is, Bank post-bill, No. T 1063, dated January 16th, 1781, payable to Matthew Humphries , for 100 l.

It does not say how many days after sight? - I have put it a Bank post-bill; they are always drawn at seven days sight.

Look at that bill. - This is one I sent by the same post; I can speak to this very particularly. My copy says, A Bank post-bill, S 9864, dated January 8th, 1781, payable to Catherine Shelly , not signed; 33 l. 14 s. but I observe here is now a signature added to it, John Nixon .

You forwarded this by the usual course; you sent them to the post-office at Bath? - I did.

THOMAS ALDRIDGDE sworn.

You was, I understand, a clerk to Mr. Branscomb, a lottery-office keeper, in Holborn, in November last? - I was.

Do you remember any person coming to your office, in order to buy lottery-tickets? - On the 23d of November, in the evening, there came a gentleman about this ticket, (No. 28,257.)

Can you tell who the person was that came? - In the midst of business, we are very thronged; to the best of my recollection, it was Joseph Weston .

How did he pay for the ticket? - He gave me 100 l. Bank post-bill; I had not cash enough in the till, to give the change myself. I took it to Mr. Branscomb, and said, I wanted change for this 100 l. note. He gave me three 25 l. bank notes, and bid me make the rest up in cash, which I did.

Court. Had you ever seen the prisoner Joseph before? - Not before that night.

You must have a vast number of people come to your office, I imagine? - A vast many. In the course of a week or eight

days, the same gentleman came again, and wanted another ticket; I took one out of the till, the only one I had at the time. I said, I had only one ticket; if you are not partial to any number, this is undrawn: he said something, he was not particular about the number. He took out of his pocket a little red Morocco pocket-book, and opened it, but he did not take any bill out of the book. I happened to cast my eye upon him, and when he saw that I looked at him, he turned away from the counter, clapped his hand upon his thigh, and said, I have left my purse in some place he mentioned. He immediately retired from the office, and did not buy the ticket, nor did not offer me a bill at that time.

Are you sure he was the same person that you took the bill of? - I really believe him to be the same person; it struck me, the second time, that he was the same person.

Court. Are you now certain, or not, whether he was the person that came the second time? - I am sure he is the person that came the second time.

Court. Whether he was the person that came the first time, or not, you are not positive? - Not so positive; but I believe so .

You have looked at the ticket? - Yes, I know the ticket.

You are sure that ticket was sold at your office? - I am sure that is the ticket, because I indorsed it myself.

Mr. JAMES BRANSCOMB sworn.

You are a lottery-office keeper? - I am.

Was you ever possessed of that 100 l. bill? - I cannot be certain whether I was.

Have you no mark upon it? - I never made any mark; I received a 100 l. Bank post-bill, but I never made any mark upon it .

Have you any entry to inform yourself what you received it for, and when? - On the 23d of November, in the evening, my clerk asked me if I could change 100 l. Bank post-bill, and gave me a Bank post-bill to change; I brought him back three 25 l . Bank notes, but had not sufficient to make up the sum exactly. There was a clerk belonging to the Bank, who assisted us in the evening, Mr. Waldron; I gave the note directly to him, which I had received from my clerk, and desired he would get it accepted in the morning, or the cash for it, if he could.

JOHN WALDRON sworn.

You belong to the Bank? - Yes, I do.

Is that the Bank post-bill you received from Mr. Branscomb on the 23d of November? - It is the same.

Is there any thing particular upon it? - My name is upon it, as witnessing it.

Was it the same number when it was issued from the Bank, as it bears now? - No, it went out originally 1063; now it stands 10630.

Court. How do you know that the number was altered after it went from the Bank? - We never issue any Bank post-bills above the number 10,000. I referred to the books as soon as it came into my hand, and from thence I was certain it had been altered; and, in the last figure, the ink is very different from any ink we use.

Look at that Bank post bill for 33 l. 14 s. look at the name Nixon, at the bottom: do you know Mr. Nixon, and his hand-writing? - Yes, I do; and I am sure that is not his hand-writing.

Mr. THOMAS KEENE sworn.

I think you are a merchant at Bristol? - Yes, I am. On Saturday, the 27th of January, 1781, I inclosed sundry bills in a letter, directed for William, Henry, and James Hanson , London; it contained sundry bank-notes and bills to the amount of about 400 l. There was another letter in the same cover.

Look at this bill. - This was one of my bills, but the number is altered; there is a 0 added to it; it is now 174080, I believe.

Is that one of the bills you sent to Messrs. Hanson? - It is; it was K 17408.

It is your own number that is altered? - Yes; it is.

What is the Bank number? - That is the same as when I sent it by the post, No. 3304.

Please to look at the other bill. - This is one of my bills; the Bank number is not altered, nor is my own private number altered. I forwarded them by the post; my clerk, James Smith , is here, who put the bills into the letter, and carried them to the post.

Counsel for the Crown. This bill, No. 1333, for 40 l. was found upon Joseph Weston .

Court. Is that one of your bills? - It is; the Bank number is 1333, for 40 l.

JAMES SMITH sworn.

Did you, on the 27th of January, put the letter delivered by your master to you into the post? - Yes. This is the original letter; it was afterwards sent to Mr. Hanson, as directed.

Mr. HANSON sworn.

This cover was sent to me from the Post-office, on the 29th of January, 1781, in the condition it is in now, without any bills; upon which we went and stopped the payment of them all.

Mr. Keene. This letter is my hand-writing; it contained an account of the bills.

(The letter, addressed to Messrs. William, Henry, and James Hanson , London, containing the marks of the bills, was read.)

WILLIAM LEE sworn.

I live at Hackney.

Do you remember either of the prisoners, and which of them, coming to your shop at any time? - Yes; George Weston came to my shop on the 27th of November, 1781.

Did he purchase any thing of you? - Yes, a number of things, to the amount of 7 l. 12 s.

What name did he come to you by? - The name of John Ward .

Do you remember how he paid you for the goods he bought of you? - He gave me a 40 l. Bank post-bill.

Look at the bill. Do you know it? - This is the bill I received of him; he wrote upon the back of it, John Ward , at the Dun-Horse, in the Borough.

How came he to write that upon it? - I enquired where he lived, and what his name was; and desired he would indorse it. (The bill read.) Bank post-bill, No. S 3304, London, 2d Nov. 1780.

JAMES PERRY sworn.

I live at Draycot, in Staffordshire .

Do you know the prisoners at the bar? - Yes.

How long have you known them? - From their infancy.

What are they? - They were farmer's sons brought up.

Whose sons? - They are brothers. They are the sons of George Weston .

WILLIAM LYON sworn.

In the year 1780, you lived in Booth's-court, Wells-street, did you not? - I did.

You know the prisoners at the bar. Did either of them come to lodge with you about a quarter before Christmas? - George did.

What name did he then assume? - The name of Watson.

Did you ever see the other prisoner there? - Yes.

What name did he go by? - Johnson.

How long did George continue to lodge with you? - Twenty-four weeks.

Was he regular in coming home? - Very regular.

SARAH HAZELWOOD sworn.

I live in Norwich-court, Swallow-street.

Did you ever see either of the persons standing there at your house? - Yes; Joseph.

By what name did he go? - The name of Johnson.

When did he lodge with you? - He came about a week before Christmas-day, in the year 1780 .

During the time he lodged there, did the other person come to see him? - Yes.

What name did he go by? - The name of Watson.

GEORGE WESTON 's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say. I have not my

evidences to prove what I say; therefore my saying so is of no use.

JOSEPH WESTON 's DEFENCE.

Our evidence is not prepared. We had witnesses to prove where we were at the time the robbery was committed. I wish to ask the last witness a question. Whether you recollect that I ever slept out of your house during the time I lodged with you? - I believe, to the best of my knowledge, he slept out two nights.

Joseph Weston . Do you recollect when it was I slept out? - The first night was before Christmas; the other night I cannot swear to the time.

Counsel. How came you so particularly to notice the nights that Gentleman slept out, if he was nothing but a mere lodger who slept out of your house? - My maid lit the fire for him the next morning; and she said Mrs. Johnson was a crying, because Mr. Johnson had not been home.

You don't know that of your own knowledge? - No.

Joseph Weston to Lyon. Do you recollect my being from home the 27th, 28th, 29th, or 30th of January, 1781, my being out of your house? - No, I don't recollect it indeed. I recollect your being out of town about three days before Christmas.

Counsel. Do you recollect his being out of town after Christmas? - Yes, I do.

Do you think it was about that time? - To the best of my knowledge, it was not; it was more in summer. He left my lodgings the 7th of June.

BOTH NOT GUILTY ,

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17820703-26

445. GEORGE WESTON, otherwise SAMUEL WATSON , was indicted for feloniously forging an indorsement upon a Bank post-bill for 40 l. which indorsement was as follows, JOHN WARD , at the Dun Horse, in the Borough, with intention to defraud William Lee and John Bole .

Second count. For forging an acceptance to the said Bank post-bill, by writing the name of Richard Lateward (a person authorised by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, to accept their post-bill) upon the said bill, with the like intention.

Third count. For feloniously uttering and publishing, as true, the said acceptance, well knowing it to have been forged, with the like intention.

WILLIAM LEE sworn.

You live, I understand, at Hackney, in partnership with Mr. John Bole , and are an haberdasher there? - Yes.

Do you remember ever seeing the prisoner at your shop? - Yes.

Inform the court and jury of all that passed between you and the prisoner: when did he come to your house? - The 27th of November, 1781, he came to our shop about one o'clock in the day, and bought several articles, to the amount, I think, of 7 l. 12 s. 6 d. and he tendered this note for payment.

How do you know it to be the same note? - I know it by seeing him indorse it with the name of John Ward , at the Dun Horse, in the Borough; and farther, from our bill-book.

Did you take the bill of him, and give him the difference between that and the amount of the goods he bought of you? - I did; I gave him the cash.

Did he say where he came from? - When we asked him, he said, he was to be heard of at the Dun Horse, in the Borough. He told my partner, when he was tying on the goods on his horse, that he lived at German-Town, in Norfolk, and followed the business of a farmer and grazier.

(The bill read.)

No. 3,304. Bank post-bill.

"London, 2d Nov. 1780. At seven days sight I promise to pay this my solar bill of exchange to Mr. Thomas Atkinson , or order, forty pounds sterling, value received of Edward Burrough , for the Governor and Company of the Bank of England."

Entered, J. Padman.

Accepted, 23d Nov. 1781. Richard Lateward .

Indorsed, Tho. Atkinson , John Ward , at the Dun Horse, in the Borough, or at German-Town, Norfolk.

Cross examination.

You keep a considerable shop at Hackney? - In the linen-drapery way, we keep a shop.

You have a great number of customers coming into that shop, in the course of a day? - We have.

How have you so well refreshed your memory, as to be able to speak to the person of the prisoner? - I have positively sworn to him, and so has my partner.

But what induces you to be so clear as to his person? - He is the same man that passed the bill with us.

When did you see him before? - At the Rotation-Office .

At the time you discounted this bill, you had no suspicion, I take for granted, that it was a bad bill? - We had not.

Then, was there any particular cause which induced you to take any particular notice of the man's countenance or features? - As I did not before know the person, I took more particular notice of him.

Then your reason for taking more particular notice of him was, because you did not know him? - Undoubtedly, when a stranger passes a bill with us.

Do you think you could swear to the persons of half the people that come into your shop? - I can positively swear to that man, that he is the man who passed the bill with us.

Prisoner. I never was in that man's shop in my life.

ISAAC PADMAN sworn.

I am a clerk in the Bank.

Take that Bank post-bill into your hand; look at the acceptance of it; do you know Mr. Lateward? - Yes.

What is he? - He was a clerk in the Bank.

Do you know his hand-writing? - Very well .

Is that his hand-writing? - I am satisfied it is not.

Was that note issued by the Bank? - It was, but was not accepted by Mr. Lateward, nor any other clerk at the Bank.

Cross-examination.

You have seen Mr. Lateward write? - Yes, I fancy, a thousand times .

What induces you to swear that it is your opinion that this is not Mr. Lateward's hand-writing? - He wrote a very good free hand, and that is a stiff laboured hand.

Is there no similitude between this and the manner of his writing his name? - I cannot perceive that there is any in the cut of the letters.

Can you point out the difference? - Mr. Lateward wrote a free easy hand.

This appears to be a very free easy hand; is it not? - It does not appear so to me.

Then it is mere matter of opinion? - I am satisfied it is not his writing.

Don't you know, that men, writing sometimes with one pen, sometimes another, write more or less alike? - They may.

Is there any difference in this, as to the turn of the letters? - Mr. Lateward would have written a better hand with a worse pen, even almost with a skewer.

Can you point out a difference, as to the turn of any of the letters? - The N in Number is made different.

I am asking you as to the acceptance? - The letters may have the same turns.

You are of opinion that the letters in the name have the same turns? - They may.

Then all that induces you to swear as to the difference, is, that this is written rather stiffer than Mr. Lateward usually wrote his name? - A great deal.

Counsel for the Crown. Upon the whole of your observation, do you, upon your oath, believe it to be Mr. Lateward's handwriting or not? - I do not believe it to be his hand-writing.

WILLIAM JOHNSON sworn.

You are an officer in the Bank? - Yes, in the cashier's office.

Do you know the person of the prisoner? have you ever seen him? - I believe I have.

Look at that bill: do you recollect having seen that bill any where before? and relate to the court and jury the circumstances attending it. - This bill was presented at a lottery-office in Holborn, where I was at the last lottery, by a person that wanted to insure.

Do you recollect on what day? - No: it

was about the middle of the drawing of the lottery. I was standing near the person that he gave it to: I looked at it: I saw the acceptance was a forgery: I told him it was. I happened to look over that person he gave it to. Being acquainted with Mr. Lateward's hand-writing, it struck me immediately to be a forgery: I said so at the time.

Who was the person that produced that bill? - I believe the prisoner to be the man.

Have you any doubt about it? - Not much doubt; indeed, not any doubt.

Upon your making that observation, that the acceptance of Lateward was a forgery, what was said? - The prisoner seemed a little affronted, I thought, and told me, It was not. I told him, I was well acquainted with the hand-writing, and was positive it was. He said, If we did not like it, we were not obliged to take it; and he went away with it immediately.

Upon seeing it now, are you of the same opinion you were then, that this is not Mr. Lateward's hand-writing? - Yes, I am very clear that it is not.

Cross-Examination.

How long have you belonged to the Bank? - About ten years.

How comes it that you are so very conversant with the hand-writing of Mr. Lateward? - I did business with him for a long time at the same book.

Is Mr. Lateward's name upon that bill? - The name of Mr. Lateward is; but it is not his writing, I am certain.

Are not the letters there turned in the same kind of way that Mr. Lateward usually wrote his name? - There may be some similitude in the turnings: he wrote a very fine free hand: the initial letters he used to cast with a pen in a very free and easy manner.

How long did you belong to this lottery-office? - I assisted in the evening at a lottery-office in Holborn.

Then it was in the evening that the prisoner brought that bill? - Yes.

Is it an office where a great deal of business was done? - Pretty well: not so much as at many.

There were a great concourse of people continually coming backwards and forwards in that office, were there not? - It was only a small office. There were a good many customers. I was only there to assist in the evenings.

What enables you to swear so positive to the person of this man? - I believe it to be him.

When you say you believe it, you mean to say you have a doubt? - No, I have no doubt; I believe him to be the man.

From what do you believe him to be the man? - I believe him to be the man: he wore a round head of hair; and I think he is the man.

Mr. THOMAS KEENE sworn.

You are a merchant, at Bristol? - Yes.

On the 17th of January do you remember to have dispatched any bills by the post? - On the 27th of January, I dispatched that bill, among many others, in a letter.

Was it then accepted by the proper person, whose name now appears to it? - I cannot pretend to speak positively to that; I do not recollect whether it was or not; but I believe it was not. I can swear that the name John Ward was not upon the back of it at the time it went from me.

JAMES PERRY sworn.

You live at Draycot, in Staffordshire? - I do.

Do you know the prisoner? - Yes.

How long have you known him? - From a boy.

Did you live in the same place with him? - Yes; I was born within a quarter or half a mile of him.

What is his name? - George Weston .

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I say I never had the bill: I never was in that gentleman's shop. I have not had time to subpoena my witnesses, or I could have proved by witnesses where I was when the bill was paid away. I never wrote that name John Ward , nor at the Dun-horse, in my life.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17820703-27

446. JOSEPH WESTON , otherwise JOSEPH WILLIAM WESTON, otherwise WILLIAM JOHNSON , was indicted for feloniously firing a loaded pistol at John Davis , against the statute , July the 12th .

(Mr. Reynolds produced the order of the court at last sessions, for Joseph Weston to remain in Newgate' till this session.)

JOHN OWEN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Akerman.

Was the prisoner at the bar at any time confined in Newgate? - Yes.

On Tuesday morning last, he, and his brother, and two more, came into the wine-room, between seven and eight o'clock; they had been there some time, and their wives came. The wives asked for a pen and ink; they had it, and Weston wrote some note.

Which Weston? - The prisoner at the bar. Afterwards, the women went away in a great hurry, as if they were going a journey; they wanted a coach, and desired me to get one. I looked at the stand; there was none: I went to get one, but they were gone before I returned. A little while after, as I was sweeping the passage, I heard a noise of violence; I turned round, and saw Mr. Lapierre, and George Weston , making at the gate.

Lapierre was in custody for high treason? - Yes. I tried to shut the gate, but missed it; upon which I jumped down the steps. I had the hair broom in my hand; I used some expression, I cannot remember what now, and made a blow at the Frenchman, which he received upon his arm; the broom broke. I made another blow at George Weston . In the mean time, as I was engaging George Weston and Lapierre, Joseph Weston and Francis Nichols ran out.

You did not pursue this man? - No, I pursued his brother; this man ran towards St. Sepulchre's church: I saw no more of him.

CROSS EXAMINATION.

How long have you lived in Mr. Akerman's service? - Between four and five years.

Have you been the keeper of the door all that time? - No, I have been all that time as the under turnkey.

You was upon duty, as turnkey, this morning? - No, I was not upon duty as turnkey; I was with the turnkey.

How many men were there at the door? - Only myself at that door.

How was it the prisoner got out of the wine-room, to the fore-door of Newgate? - I was not at that door; I know no more than what my fellow-servant said; there was a person called to him to be let out into the gaol, out of this wine-room.

Mr. Akerman. The stairs are in the gate.

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

I know the prisoner. I was coming up Cock-lane, with a sack of peas, from the market, about eight o'clock, on the 2d of July; I cannot tell within half an hour, over or under: I was going to Silver-street, with a sack of peas, from Fleet-market. I was going up Cock-lane; that Gentleman (the prisoner) was running down. Some people were making a noise after him; he turned his head, and said, a parcel of fools were making a noise after him. Then the people cried out, Stop thief; upon which I threw the peas down off my knot, off my head, and went up to him, and catched hold of him with my left hand. He said, Let me by, or I will blow your brains out; he took an oath of it. He had no sooner spoke those words, but the pistol went off, over my arm; I turned my head on one side, but it wounded my neck and chin. I held him' till the people came up, and a gentleman knocked the pistol out of his hand, and took it up.

What was you wounded with? - I apprehend, a ball.

What makes you think it was a ball? - Because it took me in one place.

CROSS EXAMINATION.

Was you loaded when you laid hold of him? - I throwed my peas down off my knot, and laid hold of him.

Was it not in consequence of your discharging yourself of that load, that Mr. Weston fell? - No, he was not down at all.

Where was the pistol? - He had it under

his coat; I don't know whether it was in his hand, or pocket. Immediately as I laid hold of him, it went off over my arm.

Do you suppose, at the time you stopped Weston, he had the pistol in his hand, or his pocket? - I do not know.

It might be an accident, this pistol going off? - No, he said, he would blow my brains out, if I did not let him go.

JAMES WALLACE sworn.

I am a broker. I heard the cry of Stop thief; I crossed the way. The prisoner was running; I made a catch at him, and had hold of his collar. He clapped a pistol to my forehead; I don't know whether it did not touch my forehead: with that, I turned myself round, and he got from me. He ran, and I followed him, 'till he was taken in Cock-lane by Davis; I was almost by Davis when he collared him. When Davis had hold of him, he took his hand up, and fired at him; whether any words passed I cannot say; he had it in his hand all the way he ran. I called to Davis, and told him he had a pistol.

Did he appear to fire at him? - Yes.

What report was it? - A very strong report, for so small a pistol. I came up, and knocked the pistol out of his hand; we secured him, and delivered him to the constable, Mr. Catchpole.

CROSS EXAMINATION.

At the time Davis met the prisoner, he had a sack on his back? - Yes.

The peas were on his back, and the collaring and firing were all at one time? - I cannot say that, whether he had thrown the peas off his back, or not.

Whether the pistol going off was not in consequence of the sack of peas falling upon the man? - No, it was not; the peas fell on the right-hand side.

Are you confident, at the time these two men met, the sack of peas was, or was not, on Davis's back? - I cannot tell.

Did it appear to you, the pistol did not go off accidentally? - No, by pulling the trigger.

Designedly? - Yes.

- CATCHPOLE sworn.

I am a constable. I had this pistol (producing it) from the hands of Mr. Wallace: on Tuesday morning last, about a quarter after eight, a messenger came to tell me a man had shot at a person in Cock-lane .

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The man struck at me, and knocked me down, and the pistol went off accidentally.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: t17820703-28

447. JOHN BLANC was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of John Henry Ford , June the 25th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17820703-29

448. SARAH BETTS was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 2 s. and a pair of cotton stockings, value 6 d. the property of Sir Alexander Crawford , June the 17th .

ELIZABETH DOWSE sworn.

I am Lady's maid in Sir Alexander Crawford 's family. The prisoner lived servant with Sir Alexander Crawford three months. Having missed several things, I got a warrant to search her box. I found a pair of stockings, and some other things not mentioned in the indictment. The stockings belong to Sir Alexander's eldest son, who is twenty-one years of age. The prisoner's sister had a handkerchief belonging to Lady Crawford. When she was taken up, she said that she had found the handkerchief; afterwards she said it was given her.

JOHN CROSS sworn.

I am a constable. I found the handkerchief at the prisoner's sister's. The prisoner

opened her box very readily, and said the stockings were a pair of cast-off stockings; that she thought they were worth nothing.

ELIZABETH BETTS sworn.

I had an handkerchief from my sister. I lent her one, to put a lettuce in; and she left this handkerchief. It was my sister's own handkerchief; it had been given her by her mother. I had before that time taken notice of that darn, a little distance from the oilet hole in the corner.

Dowse. I had lost one of my lady's handkerchiefs; she sent me to the prisoner's sister's, to see if I could get it. It is marked I. C. 36 in the middle of the handkerchief, and an oilet hole in the corner; it is easy to see the I. C. has been picked out: my lady's six handkerchiefs are all marked so (producing one like it.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My mother had the handkerchief of one 'Squire Gates, in the country, and she gave it me.

For the prisoner.

(Mrs. Johnson deposed, that Elizabeth Dowse told her, that her mistress's handkerchiefs were all new; that Lady Crawford had twelve, and one was missing; that she was obliged to swear to the handkerchief, or she should lose her place if she did not.)

( Elizabeth Dowse was called up again, and admitted that her mistress told her, that if she did not replace the goods, she should lose her place.)

(Mrs. Johnson, and two other persons of reputation, with all of whom the prisoner had lived servant, gave her an excellent character; and all said, that if she was discharged, they would take her into their service on the morrow, and trust her as they had done before.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17820703-30

449. JOSEPH RADFORD , and HENRY RADFORD , were indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Berry , May the 28th .

JOSEPH BERRY sworn.

On the 28th of May, about three in the afternoon, the two prisoners came into my yard. Joseph went into the privy; when he was in the privy, he took a sheet off the line, and put it into a pocket in the inside of his coat; then he went into the skittle-ground, and stood about fifteen minutes, and then came out again, and took the other sheet off the line, and put it in his inside pocket on the other side. Then I went down and stopped him, and sent for a constable; he said, he should make no kind of defence; I should do what I would with him. When we had him in custody, the other prisoner, Joseph, came out of the privy; he said, he had no concern in stealing the property; that he only came into the yard to make use of the privy.

THOMAS WATTS sworn.

I am a headborough. The prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoners; he gave me one sheet, which he had taken from Henry. I searched him, and found another in his pocket; they have been in my possession ever since.

(They were deposed to by the prosecutor, and by Sarah Marriott , the washer-woman, who had hung them up just before.)

HENRY RADFORD 's DEFENCE.

I went in to have a game of skittles. The sheets lay on the ground; I took them up, to carry to the owner: before I got out of the yard, the gentleman stopped me.

JOSEPH RADFORD 's DEFENCE.

I was in the necessary, and knew nothing of it.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

JOSEPH RADFORD NOT GUILTY .

HENRY RADFORD GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-31

450. JAMES THODIE , otherwise IVES , was indicted for stealing four silk gowns, value 5 l. a linen gown, value 10 s. a cotton petticoat, value 10 s. a silk apron, value 5 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. and a lawn apron, value 2 s. the property of Sarah Woodbine , in his dwelling-house , June the 11th .

SARAH WOODBINE sworn.

I keep a house in Marybone . On the 11th of June last, the things mentioned in the indictment, were stolen out of my house; I went out at eleven o'clock in the forenoon; I returned at about half after eight o'clock. When I went out, the things mentioned in the indictment were in the parlor, locked up; when I came home, I found five locks broke open, and I missed the wearing apparel mentioned in the indictment, from the places where the locks had been broke.

THOMAS ISAAC sworn.

I was in company with Mr. Redgrave. I met the prisoner in Turnmill-street, on the 12th of June, between the hours of eight and nine o'clock in the morning; I saw him come out of a house which lay under a suspicion of receiving stolen goods, with a bundle; I stopped him, and in the bundle I found this wearing apparel (producing the several articles mentioned in the indictment.)

( Jonathan Redgrave confirmed the testimony of Thomas Isaack .)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent of what they charge me with.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Reference Number: t17820703-32

451. JOB BAKER , and CHARLOTTE HODGES , were indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 20 s. and a cloth waistcoat, value 10 s. and a bombazine gown , the property of Mary Ford , and of Edward Ford .

EDWARD FORD sworn.

I keep a house in Bowling-green-lane, Clerkenwell ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, out of my house.

MARY FORD sworn.

I am the aunt of the last witness. I live with my nephew; my cloaths were left in the same room out of which my nephew's cloaths were lost. I missed them about nine in the evening; I had seen them the afternoon of the same day. I saw the bombazine gown at the house of James Lowe , a pawnbroker. I missed it on Saturday, the 18th; I saw it the Tuesday afterwards: nothing else was found.

(The gown was produced in court, and deposed to by the witness.)

HENRY CHELLISHOVERS sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Lowe. I remember Hodges coming to my master's house, with a bombazine gown to pawn; she said it was her own gown. When the prosecutor came to enquire about it, I found out Hodges; I had seen her about the neighbourhood; I enquired about her.

(There being no evidence to affect Baker, he was not put upon his defence.)

HODGES' DEFENCE.

I am innocent of it.

BAKER NOT GUILTY .

HODGES GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-33

452. EDWARD HARRIS was indicted for stealing a mare, value 10 l. the property of John Wells , on the 3d of May .

(The prosecutor and his witnesses were called, but not appearing, the court ordered their recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17820703-34

453. JAMES WEST was indicted, for that he, in a certain field and open place, near the king's highway, in and upon John

Swaine , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person four guineas, a half-crown, and seven shillings and ninepence farthing, in monies numbered , the property of the said John, June the 12th .

JOHN SWAINE sworn.

I am a taylor . On the 12th of June, about a quarter before ten o'clock, as I was coming through a field, near the New road, from my brother-in-law's, where I had been to measure him, I saw two men standing at a stile before me; they walked leisurely on, I walked on. When I came up to them, they each stopped on one side; I passed between them; I looked at each of them, and went on; they followed me over the next field; I thought they walked faster than they should do, upon which I mended my pace: then one of them ran, and overtook me; he seized me by my throat; threw me down, and then held me by my throat; the other put his knee upon my belly, and risled my pockets of what is mentioned in the indictment. Then one said to the other, Damn your eyes! come along; and pointed to shew me where my hat lay: they ran away. The prisoner held his hand to my throat, and his face was over me all the time they were rifling me. I had a better view of him than the other, but I should know the other if I saw him. I saw the prisoner next morning in a street in Ratcliffe-Highway . I went back that night, after I was robbed, to my brother-in-law's; we went to the field I was robbed in; we saw a man walking there; we asked him who he was: he said he was a friend; there was he and some more of Justice Sherwood's men. The next day we searched about, and saw a great many, but none answered the description; at last we saw three men walking on the other side of the street; they were all taken up; one I had no knowledge of, he was discharged immediately; the two others were carried before a magistrate; one of them was discharged, because I said I did not know the man. It was a light night; it lightened much: I could see distinctly the face of the person who stood over me; the prisoner I am positive is the man.

JONATHAN REDGRAVE sworn.

I am an officer. I asked the prosecutor if he should know the men: he said, he should, if he saw their faces. We stopped the prisoner and two other men: the prosecutor said directly, he knew one of the men.

For the Prisoner.

MARY CHARLTON sworn.

I live at No. 3, Stepney-causeway. My husband is a rope-maker. The prisoner is a rope-maker, and was in my house, in the same room with me, on the 12th of June, from a little before nine in the evening till the watchman went eleven. I have known him upwards of six months, and never heard any thing against his character.

Court. Is your house near the New road, where this robbery was committed? - I cannot tell.

A Spectator. It is about half a mile.

Are you sure as to the time he came to your house? - It was at nine o'clock.

What makes you able to fix the time? - Nothing in particular.

What did he come to your house for? - To ask how my husband did; my husband being sick a long time, and upon the sick book of the rope-makers: he was a-bed up stairs, and we were down stairs.

How long was he at your house? - From nine till the watch went eleven.

Was any body with the prisoner? - Yes; Mary Street, a gentlewoman who lives next door to me, at No. 2, but nobody else: she is an acquaintance of mine: her husband and mine worked together in the same ground. The prisoner spent the evening, and had a pot of beer; he eat some cold leg of mutton; then we had another pot of beer, which my little girl ordered at the King's-Arms; and we passed the evening: by that time the clock went eleven, then he said he must go.

Who came in first, Mary Street, or the prisoner? - West came first, and went out first; and Mary Street went home to bed

immediately; she was up till eleven o'clock with us.

What were you talking about all this time? - Nothing but concerning work; they were talking whether my husband would be able to get up at six next morning to go to work.

(Mary Street deposed, that she was in company with the prisoner and Mary Charlton from nine o'clock till eleven on the night of the robbery.)

ROBERT TERRY sworn.

I keep the King's-Arms, in Ratcliffe-square . The prisoner was at my house on the 12th of June, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, to receive his pay. When he went away, he said he would go home. He turned on the left-hand, towards Mrs. Charlton's.

(The prosecutor ordered out of court.)

Court to Terry. How was the prisoner dressed? - In a white waistcoat.

Had he no coat at all? - None.

(The prosecutor called in again.)

Court. How was the man dressed that lay upon you, and held your neck? - In a blue or brown jacket over some other apparel, and the other man in the same apparel, and both had round hats.

Terry. He has borne an exceeding good character in the neighbourhood.

Court to Mary Charlton . How was the prisoner dressed when he was at your house? - In a white waistcoat.

Any thing else? - No; I believe not.

(The prisoner called John Gardiner and William Thomas , who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17820703-35

454. ELIZABETH JAMES was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 30 s. a steel watch-chain, value 12 d. a cornelian stone seal set in silver, value 12 d. a brass watch-key, value 1 d. and 3 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , the property of John Sankey , May the 21st .

JOHN SANKEY sworn .

On the 21st of May, I met the prisoner on London-bridge; she seemed to know me: she said I was her countryman, and asked me to give her something to drink, which I did. It rained very hard. She said she lived at Mile-end; that she had friends there, worth 40 l. a year every day in the week; and if I would take a coach, and carry her to Mile-end, she would make me amends. I took a coach, and went to Mile-end: we got out of the coach, and went into a public-house; being weary, I was about falling asleep; I felt my watch go out of my pocket; I opened my eyes, and said, What do you mean by that? She said, if I took the watch from her, she would swear my life away. I gave her all the good words I could to get my watch again: she said, if I would go back to Whitechapel with her, she would give me the watch. I did; and, when we came to Whitechapel, she endeavoured to make her escape; I called the watch, and gave charge of her, and then she gave charge of me. She had my watch in her bosom; I pulled at it, the chain broke off, and was left in her bosom.

(The beadle deposed, that when they were brought into the watch-house, he found the chain in her bosom.)

JOHN FULLER sworn.

I am a watchman in Whitechapel. When I was going my rounds, I saw this man and woman together, after eleven o'clock; he gave me charge of her for stealing his watch, and she gave charge of him; she had his great-coat on.

To the prosecutor. How came she to have your coat on? - As we were coming back, she desired me to lend her my coat.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

He pulled me about in the street; I cried out, Watch! and gave charge of him. I lost my cloak.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER .

Reference Number: t17820703-36

455. ELIZABETH BERRY was indicted for stealing a silk purse, value 6 d. and seven guineas, and seven half-guineas, the property of Morgan Thomas , privily from his person , June the 1st .

MORGAN THOMAS sworn.

On the night of the first of June, between Surry-street and Norfolk-street, at about one o'clock, or rather after, in the morning, as I was walking home, the prisoner laid hold of my arm, and asked me to go with her; I told her not, and desired her to go away. Then she asked me to lend her a shilling; I told her I had none: I was walking all this time. She laid hold of my arm, and, as I thought, put her hand upon my breeches pocket, and presently ran away; I was not sensible, at the time, that she had taken any thing from me, but, from her running away, I was satisfied she must have taken something. I felt her hand upon my pocket, but was not sensible of its being in my pocket; I had a notion she must have taken my watch, by her running away. I pursued her two or three hundred yards, and overtook her, with my purse in her hand. She opened her hand, and said, there it is, and delivered it to me. Then I took her to the watch-house.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say, nor any witnesses to call.

GUILTY of stealing the money, but NOT GUILTY of stealing it privily from the person .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-37

456. CHRISTIAN GLADDEN , otherwise COLLINGTON , was indicted for that she, in the king's highway, in and upon Richard Hopgood did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person, a silver watch, value 3 l. the property of the said Richard, May the 18th.

RICHARD HOPGOOD sworn.

About the 18th or 19th of May, I had been to see a friend in Moorfields. Coming home, as I was going across Cable-street, the prisoner catched hold of me, and asked me, if I would go along with her. I said no. She took my hat off my head, and took my watch out of my pocket .

Did she say any thing at the time? - No.

Did she use any degree of violence to you? - No; I gave the beadle charge of her, and he took the watch from her.

Prisoner. Whether I was the person that was in the room with him, or that brought him into the room? - I never was in any room with her, nor off the highway, nor with any other girl.

Was you drunk or sober then? - I was not sober, nor drunk.

CHARLES EARL sworn .

I am a beadle . I was in the watch-house; this man came, and said, he had been robbed of his watch. I went, from an information I had received, to a kind of a shed, where people sleep; there were three persons there, and the prisoner charged them all three with robbing him. From something that dropped, I understood that the prisoner was the person who had robbed him. We went to the prisoner's lodging, and when he saw her, he said, that was the woman who knocked him down, and robbed him. I asked her, where the watch was? She said, If you will let me off, I will produce the clicker; and, with a deal of difficulty, I got the watch from her .

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I came from Bow to an acquaintance, where I was taken. The prosecutor was several times in a room with this woman, and left his watch with her.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH .

Reference Number: t17820703-38

457. SUSANNAH STEWART was indicted for stealing two dimity petticoats, value 2 s. a linen sheet, value 8 s. a pair of dimity pockets, value 2 s. a linen shift, value 3 s. a cotton bed-gown, value 4 s. a cotton counterpane, value 10 s. and a dimity waistcoat, value 6 s. the property of Edward Rowland , in the dwelling-house of James Perry , June the 21st .

MARY ROWLAND sworn.

I am the wife of Edward Rowland . We lodge in the dwelling-house of James Perry , No. 13, Maiden-Lane, Covent-Garden : on the 21st of June, I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; (repeating them) they were in my room. I take in washing; some of them were folded for ironing.

What time of the day did you lose them? - Between two and three o'clock; I was in the room at the time: I was tired, and lay down to rest me about half an hour. In the mean time, the things were stolen; part of them were found by the constable the next day .

You don't know the prisoner at all? - No.

FRANCIS HUMPAGE sworn.

On the 22d of last month, as I was going up the King's Road, I saw the prisoner with two bundles. I followed her into a public-house, and asked her, where she got those things; she said, they were her own, that she had just fetched them out of pawn. I suspected they were not, and took her to Bow-street. I sent for the prosecutrix, and she said they were her property.

(They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The petticoat and counterpane are my own.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-39

458. SUSANNAH HOLLAND was indicted for stealing a pewter quart pot, value 18 d. and a pewter half pint, value 6 d. the property of John Frisbee , June the 21st .

JOHN FRISBEE sworn.

I keep a public-house in the Old-Bailey . On the 21st of June, the prisoner came into my house, and had a pennyworth of beer; a person informed me, she had put a pot of mine into her pocket. I pursued her, and took her in Fleet-lane, and brought her back. I found a quart pewter pot under her apron, and my boy took a half-pint pot out of her pocket.

THOMAS INGLE sworn.

I live with Mr. Frisbee. When the prisoner was brought back, I took a half-pint pot out of her pocket.

( William Marsh , the constable, produced the pots in court, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was very much in liquor: I know nothing of it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-40

458. RICHARD PAYNE was indicted for stealing three ingots of grain tin, value 18 l. 13 s. the property of John Townsend and Thomas Compton , June the 24th .

JOSEPH PELLETT sworn.

I am servant to Messrs. John Townsend and Thomas Compton , who are pewterers . The prisoner was a labourer at my masters'. While he was oiling some pewter, I saw three ingots of grain tin lie under the place where he was at work. When he went out, I missed them. I told the foreman, William Wakeland , of it. He followed him, and brought him back; and the three ingots were found upon him.

WILLIAM WAKELAND sworn.

I am foreman to Messrs. Townsend and Compton. Upon the information of the last witness, I followed the prisoner, when he went from work, on the 24th of June. I brought him back, and found three ingots of tin upon him. They were concealed under his apron.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am sixty-five years of age. I have lived in London thirty-eight years. I was never called in question for any thing in my life, I have no witnesses. I was always a clear man, thank God, before this time; and then I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-41

459. JOHN BURGESS was indicted for stealing seventeen yards of silk, value 4 l. the property of John Wilkinson , May the 25th .

WILLIAM WOOD sworn.

I am a shoemaker. On the 25th of May, between one and two o'clock, I saw the prisoner go to the prosecutor's window: he leaned over, and took a piece of silk, and concealed it under his coat. He went off. I followed him. When he got upon Ludgate-hill, he ran. I cried, Stop thief! He ran across to the London coffee-house. Some people attempting to stop him, he ran across the way again. I called, Stop thief! and he dropped the silk. Some people coming along, stopped him. He was never out of my sight before he was stopped.

JOHN WILKINSON sworn.

I am a woollen-draper, in Cock-court, Ludgate-hill. The last witness, Wood, brought back the prisoner, with a piece of silk, which was my property.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming through the court. I heard somebody cry, Stop thief! I went to get out of the way, as I had a bad arm. Somebody that ran by, dropped something; and they happened to lay hold of me.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-42

460. JOSEPH BARNESLEY was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of Amos Hayton , June the 29th .

AMOS HAYTON sworn.

On the 29th of June, as I was going along the street, I found the prisoner's hand in my pocket. On turning round, I saw a handkerchief in his hand, and saw him drop it. I took him instantly to the Compter. The handkerchief he dropped was my property.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have not a friend in the world. I hope your Lordship will let me go abroad.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-43

461. SARAH HOUSE was indicted for stealing a copper pot-lid, value 3 s. and a china dish, value 12 d. the property of James Nutched Rumney , June 11th .

(The prosecutor and his witnesses were called, but not appearing, the court ordered their recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17820703-44

462, 463. SARAH ROBERTS and ANN THOMAS were indicted for stealing a leather pocket-book, value 6 d. a linen handkerchief, value 12 d. and a guinea, a half-guinea, and 8 s. in monies numbered , the property of Thomas Edey , June the 7th .

THOMAS EDEY sworn.

On Friday the 7th of June, at three in the morning, I was coming from Butcher-row. The prisoners asked me to give them something to drink. We took a coach, and went into Holborn, and had half-a-pint of brandy. The coachman brought it out to us. From thence we drove to the Goose and Gridiron, in St. Paul's church-yard. There I got out of the coach. I went to pay the coachman, and missed my money, my pocket-book, and my handkerchief. The women were still in the coach. I was in liquor. I felt my money in my pocket before I got into the coach, and afterwards, when I paid for the brandy; and I think I felt it in my pocket at the end of Fleet-market. I charged the prisoners with robbing me, and told them, if they would give me my property again, I would let them go about their business; if not, I would call the watch, and give charge of them. They would not give it me again. I called the watchman, and charged him with the prisoners; and they were taken to the watch-house. As they were going along, I saw Thomas drop the pocket-book. I took it up, and said it was mine: and in the watch-house she dropped the handkerchief. She was searched afterwards, and my money and some more was found upon her.

JOHN COOPER sworn.

I was constable of the night. The prosecutor brought the prisoners to the watch-house, and charged them with robbing him of a pocket-book, a handkerchief, a guinea and half, and 8 s. I searched Ann Thomas , and found upon her a guinea and half, 16 s. and three pennyworth of halfpence. The pocket-book was brought in by the watchman, and the handkerchief was found in the watch-house by the side of Ann Thomas . There was nothing found on the other prisoner.

WILLIAM EDWARDS sworn.

I am a watchman . The prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoners. I saw Thomas drop the pocket-book, as she was going to the watch-house .

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

THOMAS's DEFENCE.

The money is my property. I never saw the pocket-book till I saw it in the man's hand. I think I saw one in his pocket: he dropped it in the coach, and the other girl picked it up.

ROBERTS's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of it.

THOMAS GUILTY .

ROBERTS NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-45

464. WILLIAM BROOKS was indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Fairweather , June the 10th .

(The prosecutor and his witnesses were called, but not appearing, the court ordered their recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17820703-46

465. ANN WARD was indicted for stealing three pewter quart pots, value 4 s. the property of Richard Brotheroyd , June the 27th .

JOSEPH GILL sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Brotheroyd, who keeps a public-house . The prisoner came into our house, and had a pennyworth of beer. When she went out, I suspected she had taken something. I followed her, and found a quart pot under her arm, and she had her cloak over it. When she was committed, I went up to her room, and found two quart pots there. Since that, a pan for melting, and some pieces of metal, have been found in her room.

(The pots were produced in court, and deposed to by the witness .)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As to the two quart pots, I know nothing of them: I never melted a pot in my life.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-47

466. SARAH RUSSELL was indicted for the murder of her female bastard child .

(She also stood charged upon the coroner's inquisition with the like murder.)

Mrs. LUCAS sworn.

Your husband, I believe, keeps the Sugar-loaf, in Bell-yard? - Yes.

The prisoner lived as a servant with you? - Yes.

How did she behave in your service? - Exceedingly well.

When did you first perceive her to be with child? - I had suspicions, but never was sure.

When did she leave your service? - On the 23d of May.

Where did she go to? - To her mother's, I believe.

Where did her mother live? - I believe in White's-alley.

MARY RANGER sworn.

You are a midwife? - Yes. I was fetched on the 26th of May, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, by Mr. Wicks, the constable, who said I was wanted to a labour. When I came to White's-alley, I met the prisoner's mother coming out at the door. She turned back, and said the child was up three pair of stairs. I went up. There lay the child, dead, wrapped up in a dirty coarse apron. There was a mark under the throat, like two fingers and a thumb, and the thumb-nail had rather scratched it. I took it to the work-house. I did not see the mother till the afternoon. I washed it in the afternoon. I was fetched about five o'clock. There I saw the mother of it.

How did you know she was the mother of it? - I knew she was the mother of a child, that she had been lately delivered.

Court. How do you know it was that child? - She acknowledged it. I asked her whether it was born alive. She said she would not say. I asked her if she had pinched it, in helping herself. She said she did not help herself at all.

Might this have happened in the delivering herself? - It might have happened in that way; that made me ask her that question.

I suppose she was just brought to the work-house? - Yes.

Mr. JOHN CLARKE sworn.

You are a surgeon, and live in Chancery-lane? - I am.

You saw this child afterwards? - I did.

You examined it, I suppose? - Yes.

Were there any marks of violence upon it? - There was the appearance of a bruise on the forehead, and on each side of the windpipe.

What do you think was the occasion of that child's death? - The naval string was torn off, at a few inches distance from the belly of the child; it seemed to be torn, and not cut.

Upon the oath you have taken, do you believe this child got her death by violence? - I am not clear in it. It might happen, if the mother was delivered on the vault, by the child's falling, the naval string might break. I examined the lungs of the child; it was plain, by the appearance of them, that the child had lived.

I don't understand that that is a certain sign of the child's having been born alive? - If there are no signs of putrefaction.

You will not take upon you to say that this child received its death by violence from any person? - No.

Court. I have understood that that experiment upon the lungs has of late been held not to be conclusive: in one way, it has been held to be conclusive, if the lungs sink; but not to be conclusive, if they float: it is a common experiment, and, in that case, gives a degree of probability; if the lungs sink, it is conclusive? - Yes.

But I understand the floating of the lungs may be occasioned by other circumstances, than that of being inflated. The bruises upon the forehead, you say, might be occasioned by the fall? - Yes.

And the bruises upon the neck, you think, might be caused by the woman, in the agony of child-birth, endeavouring to free herself from the child? - Yes.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not know that I was so near my time, or I should not have gone to such a place; but I never intended to do the child any injury.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17820703-48

467. WILLIAM BRADBURY was indicted for stealing a Bank post-bill, for 20 l. a bank-note for 10 l. another note for 5 l. 5 s. the said notes being the property of John Baring and Company; and the said several sums payable, and secured by the said notes, being due to the said John Baring and Company, the proprietors thereof, against the statute , January the 1st .

Second count. Laying them to be the pro perty of Robert Gosling , and Francis Gosling .

CHARLES COLLINGS sworn.

I am clerk in the Devonshire Bank, at Exeter . The firm of the house is John Baring , Gregory Jackson , and John Shaw . I remember Gregory Jackson inclosed some notes in a letter directed to Robert and Francis Gosling ; the letter was put into the post-office on the 29th of December last.

(The notes were produced to the witnesses.)

These are part of the notes inclosed in the letter.

JAMES LOCKE sworn.

I am clerk at the post-office at Exeter. The letters put into our office on the 29th of December, were forwarded to London.

EDWARD BARNES sworn.

I am clerk at the post-office in London. The Exeter bag arrived safe, as usual, on the 31st of December.

ROBERT GOSLING , Esq. sworn.

This letter that was directed to you, did you receive it on the 31st of December? - No, I never received it.

AMY NOBLE sworn.

I live with my brother, who keeps a silver-smith's shop at Charing-cross. On Tuesday night, the 30th of January, the prisoner came to our house, and bought a pair of silver shoe-buckles, a gold shirt-button, and a pair of gilt buttons; he gave me a Bank post-bill of 20 l. and I gave him cash for it. I gave the bill to my brother that night.

RICHARD NOBLE sworn.

I keep a silver-smith's shop at Charing-cross. On Tuesday evening, the 31st of December, I received a 20 l. Bank post-bill of my sister; I sent it to the Bank the next morning, for acceptance.

Was it paid? - No. On Saturday was three weeks, the prisoner came into my shop to buy a pair of silver buckles; I shewed him some: he did not approve of them. He asked for some second-hand ones, I shewed some, and he chose a pair. Then he wanted a gold shirt-buckle; I shewed him one, he said, he had no cash by him; if I would change him a five-guinea bill, he would be obliged to me. He gave it me; I saw it was the same indorsement as the 20 l. note my sister had received. I suspected him; I asked him, if he had any other note: he shewed me a 10 l. note, indorsed in the same manner. I took them both, and told him, I would get change for one or the other. I went to my other shop, which is opposite, and desired a person to go to the door, and see that he did not get off, while I got a constable. I went to the watch-house, and got one, and took him in custody. As we were going in a coach to Bow-street, I asked him, how he came by the notes; he said, he found them in a pocket-book, either

in Fleet-street, or the Strand, I am not certain which. We asked him what he did with the pocket-book; he said, he threw it away. He was searched at Bow-street, and he had five guineas, and some silver, in his pocket.

Mr. ANTHONY PARKIN sworn.

I am solicitor to the Post-office. I attended the examination of the prisoner, at Bow-street, on the 17th of June. The three notes which have been produced here, were at that time produced: the prisoner was asked, where he got them; he said, he was coming along Cheapside, on a Friday or a Saturday evening, about six or seven o'clock, and he found a pocket-book, in which these three notes were contained; and also a 50 l. note, which he had put off at Windsor, a 100 l. note, which he had put off at Bath, and a 40 l. note, or bill, which he had put off at Mr. Tregent's, a watch-maker, in Leicester-fields. He said, he did not look at the pocket-book 'till the Sunday after he found it; and that in two or three days after his looking at the pocket-book, and its contents, he put off the 20 l. note at Mr. Noble's. He was also asked, if he told any body what he found; he said, No: he was asked if he had any acquaintance in the Post office; he said, he had an uncle who was a letter-carrier, who was dead. He was asked, if he had ever visited his uncle, in the letter-carrier's office; he said, he had.

To Collings. Did the letter that was sent from your house, contain a 100 l. a 50 l. and a 40 l. Bank-note? - A 100 l. two Bank post-bills, 50 l. each, a 20 l. Bank-note, and a 40 l. Bank-note.

JAMES TREGENT sworn.

I am a watchmaker, in Leicester-fields. On the 8th of January, in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop, to buy a gold watch: he asked for one of a low price; he said, he had had some prize-money; that all he had got, for a great many prizes they had taken, was a 40 l. Bank-note, which he would go home and fetch, in an hour. He came again, in about an hour, with the note; the watch came to fifteen guineas: I took the note, and gave him change. He said his name was Barnett. I never saw him before; I saw him afterwards at the Justices.

WILLIAM ELY sworn.

I am a letter-carrier to the Post-office. I have often seen the prisoner in the letter-carrier's office, at the post-office in Lombard-street; he used to come to his uncle, Solomon Barnett .

Do the letters that come from Exeter, and which are directed to Fleet-street, go into that office? - Yes, they do.

EDWARD POINTER sworn.

I am inspector of the letter-carriers. I knew Solomon Barnett very well; he was in the letter-carrier's office fourteen or fifteen years. He always bore an exceeding good character; he is now dead: he died about Lady-day last.

ISAAC PADMAN sworn.

I am in the Bank post-bill-office, the office for issuing Bank post-bills.

Look at that bill: is that the proper clerk's hand-writing? - It is.

Is that bill paid? - It is a cancelled note; I apprehend it is paid; it was accepted the 2d of January, 1782. I issue out bills, and pay them; I have two partners who pay bills when I am not there. I cannot say whether this has been paid or no.

Was it, on the first of January, unpaid and unsatisfied? - I am certain it was.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found a pocket-book on the last Saturday of the old year, in Cheapside; I put it into my pocket. I did not look at it 'till the Sunday after; then I found there were six notes in it: I put the notes into my pocket, and threw the pocket-book away. I went on Tuesday to Mr. Noble's, and bought a pair of shoe-buckles, a shirt-buckle, and a pair of buttons, and changed a 20 l. note.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-49

468. HANNAH CANTER was indicted for stealing three yards of figured muslin, value 18 s. the property of Elizabeth Laws , widow , privily, in her shop , May the 21st .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17820703-50

469. MARTHA COLE was indicted for stealing a woollen cloth great-coat, value 20 s. the property of William Bailey , July the 3d .

JOHN DAVIS sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Bailey, a perfumer . On Wednesday last, near seven in the evening, I was in Basinghall-street, sitting on the coach-box; I thought I found the coach to sway backwards and forwards; I looked over my left shoulder, and saw the prisoner come from behind the coach with my fellow servant's great-coat; she was wrapping it up in the skirt of her gown; my fellow-servant had left it hanging in the holders behind the coach; it is my master's property. I got off my box, pursued, and followed her from Basinghall-street to Wood-street; a person told me she was run into a public-house; I went into the public-house, and saw her sitting in the corner, with the coat in her apron. I asked her how she came by the coat: she said she picked it up. She gave it me, and said, There is your coat.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Coming along, the coat lay in the footway; I took it up, and put it into my apron, and went into a house in Wood-street; the gentleman came in, and said he had lost a coat, and I gave it him.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-51

470, 471. WILLIAM THOMPSON and WILLIAM MORGAN were indicted for stealing six cambrick handkerchiefs, value 6 s. four silk handkerchiefs, value 4 s. and six linen handkerchiefs, value 3 s. the property of divers persons unknown, June the 12th .

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17820703-52

472. RICHARD WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing eight canvas bags, value 8 s. and 800 lb. weight of biscuit bread, value 4 l. the said goods being in a certain vessel upon the navigable river of Thames , June the 4th .

(There was not any evidence of a felony having been committed.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17820703-53

473. ANN ANDERSON was indicted for stealing four guineas in monies numbered , the property of Robert Hardy , June the 29th .

(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17820703-54

474. JOSEPH SUTTON was indicted for stealing a mare, value 16 s. the property of John Smith , June the 17th .

(The prosecutor's son, who found the mare, not attending as a witness, there was no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17820703-55

475. HENRY JACOBS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Levy , on the 17th of June , at the hour of one in the night, and stealing a pair of worsted breeches, value 5 s. a pair of iron knee-buckles, value 2 d. eight iron keys, value 12 d. a gold medal, value 52 s. a silver cup, value 25 s. one other silver cup, value 10 s. two gold rings,

value 12 s. four linen shirts, value 20 s. and ten guineas in monies numbered, the property of the said David Levy in his dwelling-house .

(The witnesses were examined apart.)

DAVID LEVY sworn.

On Monday, the 17th of June, a little before twelve o'clock at night, I locked my door, and went to-bed; about one o'clock I was alarmed with a noise of some men coming up stairs in a hurry. After that, my room door was broke open, and the first man I saw come in was the prisoner, Jacobs, whom I was intimately acquainted with; I knew his person perfectly well; I saw him by a light which one of the other men who were with him had; I cried out, Murder! then Jacobs threw himself upon me, bid me be quiet or he would kill me, and I felt something sharp cut me in the face. They heard some people coming after some time, and they went off; but they took all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them). I called the watchman, and he went with me to Jacobs's house, which was only three minutes walk from me; we went and asked if he was at home; he was denied.

(Upon his Cross-Examination, he said the prisoner was his third cousin; that he had asked him to find bail for him a month ago, which he had refused; that in getting into the house they had broke the glass over the door, but he could not say but it might be so opened that a man might get through without breaking any thing; that they were about ten minutes in the room; that when he went with the constable a second time, he met Jacobs with two others, when he had him taken up.)

(He produced a pistol, which he said was found on his bed.)

JUDITH CASSOL sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Levy. I heard the door bursted open, and heard my master scream out, Mr. Lazarus! I heard a man cry out, Be quiet, or I will kill you. I did not hear him afterwards: I thought he was killed. I heard a voice saying, Be quiet, or I will kill you. I took that for Henry Jacobs 's voice, but I can't be positive to him; but believe it to be his voice. I saw a light over the hole of the door in my master's room. The window was whole before; it was quite broke in the next morning.

MARK SMITH sworn.

About two o'clock, I was alarmed with the cry of Fire and Thieves! I saw Levy standing in his shirt, at his own window. He cried out, that they were killing him. Several Jews were about the door: they were afraid almost to go in. It appeared that the light above the door had been broken in. Mr. Levy's face was all bloody. When I first went in, he said he had been robbed, and mentioned the name of Jacobs. When he went to dress himself, he had lost his breeches. I afterwards met two other men with Jacobs. Mr. Levy said, that is one of the men.

- ALLANBY sworn.

I am a watchman. Mr. Levy asked me to go with him to the prisoner's house. He said he was the man that had robbed him.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

For the Prisoner.

JUDITH JACOBS sworn.

I live at the corner of - Gardens. The prisoner lives in the gardens. On the 17th of June, at three quarters past eleven o'clock, he came to my door. After talking together, he went home. He had no curtains to the window of his room, or to his bed. I saw him afterwards in the room, and saw him going to bed about twenty minutes after twelve.

Did you ever observe him go to bed before? - I never observed him go to bed but that particular night. I saw the candle too near the window, as I thought. I was afraid of fire, and opened the window, and asked if the candle was safe. The prisoner opened the window, and said to me, that it was. My husband was just got to bed; for we

went up stairs together. When I was at the door, my husband was asleep in the parlour. I waked him, to go to bed. I cannot tell whether he was awake or not, when I got up to look at the light. I took notice of it when we went to bed, and told my husband that the light stood too close to the window. I then opened the window, and spoke to Jacobs; and Jacobs said the candle was very safe then.

( Jonas Nathan , who lives in the house of the prisoner, confirmed the evidence of the last witness as to his being at home at that time.)

DAVID SAMUEL sworn.

The prosecutor said he had no candle in the room, and he said he knew the prisoner by his voice; but afterwards said, there were two others, and he saw a light.

JOSEPH MOSES sworn.

I am a neighbour of Mr. Levy's. I went to the prisoner's house, about half after one. He got up, and opened the window. The prosecutor said he had been robbed; he took a watchman with him, and said he was going to the person's house, and if he found him at home he should think nothing of it; but, if he did not, he should have his suspicions. When we came back from the house, they said he was not at home. Then I went back with the watchman: he knocked, and said, For God's sake, look out of the window; there is a robbery committed, and they charge you with it. The prisoner immediately came to the window, undressed. He came down with another man, and said he would be at the prosecutor's house in five minutes. He came the minute we called at the window.

The WATCHMAN sworn.

We knocked a considerable time before any body came to the window; and there was time enough, if he had been dressed, to have undressed himself, before he appeared at the window.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17820703-56

476. CHARLES HALL was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 3 s. the property of Elizabeth Shaw , spinster , June the 21st .

GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-57

477. DAVID MORGAN was indicted for stealing 60 lb. of lead, the property of Joseph Ballard , the same being affixed to an empty house, belonging to the said Joseph , June the 21st .

(The prosecutor and his witnesses were called, but not appearing, the court ordered their recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17820703-58

478, 479. GEORGE LEE , otherwise CROUCH, otherwise BAKER, otherwise BALDOCK , and JOB BAKER, otherwise FILKIN , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Humphrey Pritchard , on the 27th of May , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing one cotton gown, value 10 s. one silk petticoat, value 10 s. one cotton bed-gown, value 1 s. one gold ring, value 4 s. one pair of paste knee-buckles, set in silver, value 5 s. one paste stock-buckle, set in silver, value 5 s. one pair of paste ear-rings, value 5 s. one pair of Bristol-stone sleeve-buttons, set in silver, value 1 s. three linen caps, value 1 s. one linen shirt, value 2 s. two muslin stocks, value 2 s. four linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. two yards of muslin, value 10 s. one silk handkerchief, value 2 s. and one pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 5 s. the property of Humphrey Pritchard ; and thirty-four yards of woollen cloth, value 15 l. seven yards of striped Orleans cloth, value 3 l. six ounces of silk twist, value 8 s. a large pattern-book, value 5 s. two accompt-books, value 5 s. a small accompt-book, value 6 d. a canvas wrapper, value 6 d. four linen table-cloths, value 40 s. a linen napkin, value 2 s. and one linen towel, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Jones , in the said dwelling-house .

HUMPHREY PRITCHARD sworn.

I live at the corner of Featherstone-buildings , in the City-road . I was sent for home, about five o'clock in the morning, on the 27th of May, and found my house had been broke open. I had been from home about a fortnight.

ANN BRITCHARD sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness. On the 27th of May, I went to bed about nine o'clock. At, I believe, between twelve and one o'clock, a man came into my room, and fell upon me, and covered my face. I screamed out. He d - ned me, and said, You are a dead woman, if you make any noise. I begged him to spare my life . He said, I will not hurt you, you bloody b - h, if you don't speak. He asked for my silver spoons, my Bank-notes, and keys. I told him I had no Bank-notes. The man that lay over me talked to another man. They broke open a box, but did not take any thing out of it. They took my ring off my finger . Then they tied my hands behind me, and said, If I stirred, in less than half an hour they would come back, and blow my brains out.

Did one man lie upon you all the time? - Yes; for about half an hour. When they were gone, I lay some time. Then I got up, and alarmed some of my neighbours, and sent for my husband.

(I lost all the things mentioned in the indictment, repeating them.)

There are two back-doors to the house; one goes out of the yard into the City-road, the other out of the kitchen into the yard: that door I bolted the night before. There is a window close to it: that I left secure. The door out of the yard into the City-road is usually kept locked, and the key hangs behind the street-door. On the next morning, the door out of the kitchen into the yard was open. The window was taken quite out . The door into the City-road, was locked, and the key taken away. My husband came home about five o'clock, and we sent for some of the Justice's men. They found on the kitchen dresser some brown paper, in which seven yards of scarlet cloth had been packed, which had been left in my care by a Mr. Jones. They had unpacked the truss, taken the cloth out, and left the paper behind them.

JOHN GREEN sworn.

I am a beadle of St. Luke's, Old-street. I have here some scarlet cloth, which was delivered to me by the watchman, (producing it). I had it advertised.

THOMAS PEASENELL sworn.

I am a watchman, in St. Luke's parish. John Wilson and I stopped these things upon Lee, near St. Luke's church, a little after one in the morning: they were all together in a bag. He had them on his shoulder. We asked him what he had got. He dropped the bundle, and ran away; and a brother watchman stopped him. We took him to the watch-house, and then took the goods to the beadle's house. When we took him, he said he knew nothing at all of the goods. I saw him drop them; I was very near; and John Wilson stopped him directly.

JOHN WILSON sworn.

About the 27th of May, a little after one o'clock, I took Lee, just as he had dropped the bundle. We asked him his name, and he told us four different names.

ROBERT GRUBB sworn.

I am a watchman. On the 27th of May, I was out on my beat, in Brick-lane, Old-street. Three men came by my box, with a bundle, about a quarter after one o'clock. I asked where they were going with that bundle. They said, to a waggon. I said, they must go to the watch-house, and give an account of themselves. They said, they would do that willingly. We went together till we came to the end of the street. Then one of them said to the other, Go on with the bundle, as fast as you can, to the left. I said, No, gentlemen, you must not go to the left; to the right is the way to the watch-house. Upon that, one of them stepped back, drew a cutlass, and struck me across the skull with it. He repeated his blow. Then he cut my arm through the first joint; and they left me for dead. I soon got up, and swung my rattle. I followed them till I met with these watchmen.

I called to them to stop the man with the bundle, for I was mortally wounded. Upon that, I saw him drop the bundle; and he was taken. I was carried to the hospital. My life was despaired of for a fortnight. I believe the man in blue (Lee) to be the man that had the bundle. I followed him from Brick-lane to the upper end of Mitchell-street . The other prisoner walked by me the whole length of the street. We had a good deal of conversation. From the whole of his appearance, his visage, his stature, and his voice, I believe him to be the man. When I was taken to the Office, I gave a description of the person by his visage and stature, and said I should remember his voice. Upon my description, he was taken up. I saw him eight days after, and gave the same account. I now believe he is the man, but I cannot swear positively to him.

THOMAS JONES sworn.

This scarlet and other cloth, which is produced, is mine; and this book which is packed up with it.

Q. to Ann Pritchard . How did that cloth come into your house? - My husband brought it from Mr. Jones: it was packed up in a truss, and left for want of a proper direction. It lay under the kitchen table the night the house was broke open.

JAMES CROUCH sworn.

I was the officer of the night. The watchmen brought Lee to the watch-house, and I took charge of him.

JOHN GIPPIN sworn.

I am a constable. I apprehended Baker. I broke open the door, and found him and his girl in bed. There was a little trunk in the room. I asked who it belonged to. He said, to him, and gave me the key out of his pocket. I found in it a silk handkerchief, and a pair of buckles. Mrs. Pritchard described the handkerchief before she saw it.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

WILLIAM SEASON sworn.

About the 27th or 28th of May, having an information, I went with some other officers, to take Baker. We broke the door open, and went in. There was a trunk in the room. Gippin asked him whose trunk it was. He said, Mine, and gave him the key; and he opened it, and found a silk handkerchief and a pair of buckles. Baker asked what he was apprehended for. I said, for cutting a watchman. He said, he wished he had cut his head off. He was dressing himself, and trembled very much at the time .

Was Gippin present? - Yes, but was searching for fire-arms, and might not hear that.

( Jonathan Redgrave , who was present at the taking of Baker, confirmed the evidence of the two last witnesses, and added, that when Baker found the charge was about the watchman, he seemed to express great sorrow that he had not killed him.)

JOHN DINMORE sworn.

I went with the other officers, to apprehend Baker; but was left below, to prevent an escape.

LEE's DEFENCE.

I know nothing about it. I belong to the Birmingham waggon, and was hired to carry the bundle.

BAKER's DEFENCE.

I was in bed with Charlotte Hodges ; it was her room: the box and every thing in it belongs to her.

(Baker called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

BOTH GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17820703-59

480. THOMAS WINTON , otherwise WINTER , was indicted for stealing a leather saddle, value 15 s. a leather bridle, with a plated bit, value 4 s. four ticken rollers, and three girths, value 2 s. the property of William Hanson .

GUILTY .

[Transportation. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17820703-60

481. ROBERT JACKSON was indicted for stealing three yards of muslin, value 12 s. two linen shirts, value 16 s. twelve linen table-cloths, value 54 s. one linen sheet, value 4 s. four yards of linen cloth, value 8 s. four yards of diaper cloth, value 4 s. seven linen towels, value 3 s. 6 d. a man's cotton dressing gown, value 5 s. a cloth coat, value 40 s. a silk waistcoat, value 10 s. a grey cambrick waistcoat, value 10 s. a dimity waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of black sattin breeches, value 40 s. a pair of stone shoe-buckles, set in silver, value 6 s. two plated candlesticks, value 20 s. two plated goblets, value 10 s. a metal watch, value 40 s. a steel watch-chain, value 6 d. a metal seal, value 2 d. and a brass watch-key, value 1 d. the property of Jonathan Waller , in the dwelling-house of the said Jonathan, March the 20th .

JONATHAN WALLER sworn.

On the 19th of March, I lost some things; on the 20th of March, I lost a great many other things. The prisoner lodged in my house: I was going out upon business; I told the prisoner, in the morning, I was going from home, and should not be back 'till late. The prisoner asked a great many odd questions, but did not raise any suspicions in my mind at that time: I went away. As I was returning home, I was told my house was robbed; I went home, and missed all the things mentioned in the indictment, and two trunks were gone, one of which, I am sure, was locked. While I was walking up and down in my room, I stepped upon two pawnbroker's duplicates; I took them up; they were of goods stolen on the 19th of March. I carried them to Bow-street; there, I was informed, from whence those tickets came. I went to Mr. Rochfort's, the pawnbroker; upon shewing them the tickets they said, they had got the goods, and they would enquire after the man: they afterwards found him in the Poultry Compter. I left the prisoner in my house, when I went out; when I came back, the prisoner, and all the goods, were gone. I gave 7 l. 10 s. for the watch; it was made on purpose for me.

WILLIAM VERE sworn.

I live with Mr. Rochfort, a pawnbroker. I received all these things of the prisoner, on the 20th of March; I lent him 2 l. 11 s. upon them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A bill came payable upon Mr. Waller, while I was with him; he asked me to come and stay, while I was out of place. The man who had the bill came, and said, he would trouble him, if he did not pay it. Mr. Waller desired me to take these things to Mr. Rochfort's, and pawn them, which I did: I passed as his nephew, and he as my uncle, in the court where he lived. When I took them to pawn, Mrs. Rochfort asked, if her man should go and speak with my uncle; I said, Yes. When she found I was willing that her man should go with me to my uncle, she was satisfied. I drank harder than I should do; I lost some of the money, and was afraid to return.

Court. What was the bill for, that was due?

Prisoner. I think it was 30 l. Mr. Watson, of St. Alban's-street, Pall-Mall, had the bill: the money was to be paid by Mr. Waller to Mr. Watson; Mr. Waller neglected going to Mr. Watson for three or four days, and it was he threatened Mr. Waller.

Court to the prosecutor. Was there any such bill? - When I first came to London, I missed a bill.

Court. Was there a bill of that sort? - He had nothing to say to that bill. I never desired him to pawn any thing whatever: I never pawned any thing in my life.

Jury. How came you to take that young man into your house? - I kept a house of lodgings; from the 5th to the 20th, he was in my house; I looked upon him honest: he told me, he was an honest young man.

Jury. How came you to let him pass for your nephew? - I cannot tell.

Jury. Was there ever any conversation between you and him upon that subject? - No.

Court. Did you ever give him leave to pass as your nephew? - No, never.

GUILTY. ( Death .)

(He was humbly recommended, by the jury, to his Majesty's mercy .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice BULLER.

Reference Number: t17820703-61

482. FRANCIS DOYLE was indicted for stealing 4 3/4 yards of printed velveret, value 24 s. 11 d. - 1 1/2 yard of printed velveret, value 7 s. 10 1/2 d, - 4 3/4 yards printed velveret, value 24 s. 11 1/2 d. - 1 1/2 yard of printed velveret, value 7 s. 6 d. - 2 3/4 yards of printed velveret, value 14 s. 5 d. - 3 yards of black velveret, value 10 s. 6 d. - 7 yards of olive sattinet, value 1 l. 6 s. 10 d. - 2 1/4 yards of black sattinet, value 8 s. 7 d 1/2. - 1 1/2 yard of white shag, value 12 s. 9 d. - 1 1/2 yard of pink shag, value 11 s. 3 d. - 1 1/2 yard of green striped shag, value 10 s. 1 d 1/2. - 1 1/2 yard of striped feather velvet, value 1 l. 3 s. 3 d. - 1 1/2 yard of orange feather velvet, value 1 l. 3 s. 3 d. - 1 1/2 yard of figured sattin, value 18 s. 9 d. - 2 1/2 yards of Florentine, value 15 s. 2 d. 1 1/2 yard of gold-spotted jean, value 11 s. 3 d. - and 1 1/2 yard of pink jean, value 12 s. 9 d. the property of David Davis , and Ellis Williams , in the dwelling-house of Robert Davis , June the 4th .

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice HEATH.

Reference Number: s17820703-1

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgement, as follows:

Received Sentence of Death, 11.

Joseph Weston , George Weston , Ann Davis , David Jones , James Mahen , William Stanley , James Thodie , George Lee , Job Baker , Robert Jackson , and John Preston .

Fined 1 s. and Imprisoned 16 Months. 1.

The Rev. Bennet Allen .

Transported for 7 years to America, 6.

John Burgess , Joseph Barnsley , Ann Thomas , Thomas Winton , John White , and William Bradbury .

Transported for 7 Years to the Coast of Africa, 1.

John Martin .

Imprisoned in Newgate 6 Months, 2.

Susanna Holland , and Ann Agar .

Imprisoned in Newgate 3 Months, 1.

Ann Macfarlane .

Imprisoned in the House of Correction 12 Months, 4.

Mary Thompson , Elizabeth Berry , Susanna Stewart , and Henry Radford .

Imprisoned in the House of Correction 6 Months, 8 .

Mary Parker , Ann Ward , Richard Payne , Martha Cole , Charlotte Hodges , Frances Fielding , Margaret Hawker , and Charles Hall .

Publickly Whipped, 2.

Robert Jones , and Peter Jones .

Reference Number: a17820703-1

++*++ In the First Part of this Sessions-Paper was published the very remarkable TRIAL of the Reverend BENNET ALLEN, and ROBERT MORRIS , Esq; for the Murder of LLOYD DULANEY , Esq; in a Duel, in Hyde-Park; containing the Evidence, and the Arguments of Counsel, &c. &c. at Large. Price One Shilling.

*** The Second Part contains the remarkable TRIAL of JOSEPH and GEORGE WESTON , for Robbing the Bath and Bristol Mail. Price Sixpence.


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