Old Bailey Proceedings, 12th September 1781.
Reference Number: 17810912
Reference Number: f17810912-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 12th of September, 1781, and the following Days;

Being the SEVENTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble. Sir WATKINLEWES, Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORTHAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY .

NUMBER VII. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar,

MDCCLXXXI.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir WATKIN LEWES , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; Sir HENRY GOULD , Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; The Hon. Sir WILLIAM HENRY ASHHURST, Knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of King's-Bench; The Hon. Sir BEAUMONT HOTHAM , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; JAMES ADAIR , Serjeant at Law, Recorder; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury

John Downes

James Shuckford

John Green

James Moffitt

John Wontner

James Clark

William Johnston

William Slater

Robert Carns

Joshua Gregory .

John Oakes

Alexander Anderson

First Middlesex Jury

John Heather

William Strickland

Edward Berry

John Birchell

Henry Bellamy

John Bakewell

John Royle

* William Foster

* Francis Stacey served part of the time in the stead of William Foster .

Francis Glassop

Thomas Sime

James Young

Robert Jefferson

Second Middlesex Jury

James Tregent

John Bird

Thomas Hinton

Ralph Steel

John Maclane

David Scale

Polling Rose

William Potier

Richard Turpin

William Wilshar

Thomas Standage

Roger Brackin

Reference Number: t17810912-1

464. MARY DOOLEY was indicted for stealing a tortoise-shell snuffbox inlaid with gold, value 6 l. the property of Henry Penton , Esq. August the 26th .

HENRY PENTON , Esq. sworn.

I was walking by Charing-Cross , on Sunday the 26th of the last month, in the evening, about a quarter before nine o'clock. I felt a person about my pocket; I immediately put my hand down towards my pocket, and felt that person's hand: I struck the hand, which was close by my pocket. I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner standing close to me: she was the only person that was very near me. I immediately charged

her with having stolen my handkerchief, which she denied. Upon putting my hand into my pocket, I found my handkerchief, but missed my snuff-box; this is it (producing it). I then told her she had not got my handkerchief, but had stolen my snuff-box. I seized her left-hand immediately, which I had before seized; she had drawn it from mine, and had put it behind her, under her cloak; she put her other hand behind her, and seemed to be shifting something. I laid hold of her right-hand, keeping the other fast in my hand, upon which I heard something drop on the pavement; I looked down, and saw it was my snuff-box: I kept fast hold of her. I called a hackney-coach, and get another person to go in the coach with me, and we carried her to St. Martin's watch-house. There was a croud immediately after I secured her, but there was no other person but the prisoner near me at the time it was taken out of my pocket.

Was it light? - It was so near the lamps that I had a perfect sight of the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know myself innocent.

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. and Imp. 6 months .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17810912-2

465. HENRY JONES was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon Ann Drake , widow , feloniously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person a watch, the inside case made of gold, the outside shagreen, value. a stone seal set in gold, value 20 s. a silk purse, value 1 s. and four guineas and one half-guinea in monies numbered, the property of the said Ann , July the 10th .

JEREMIAH JEFFERIES sworn.

I am coachman to Lady Drake. I was driving my mistress in the carriage in Bushy Park , on the 10th of July last, at about half past three o'clock. The prisoner rode up to me, and ordered me to stop, which I did, then he rode to the coach door, and demanded my mistress's money, watch, and purse; then he broke the glass. My mistress gave him her watch, the outside case is black shagreen, the inside case gold, and her purse.

Had he any weapon? - I can't say that he had any weapon; I did not see any. I am certain the prisoner is the man.

JOHN WRIGHT sworn.

I am footman to Lady Drake. I was attending my mistress at the time of the robbery. The prisoner came up, and ordered the coachman to stop, or he would blow his brains out; then he came to the carriage-door, and demanded my mistress's watch and money, and threatened to blow her brains out if she did not give it to him. My mistress gave him her watch and money, and he rode off. He was taken in about half an hour afterwards, about a mile from the place where the robbery was committed; I am certain he is the person.

JOHN BARNLEY sworn.

I am the keeper of Bushy Park. John Wright , the footman, gave me information that the lady had been robbed by a man in a brown coat with a flapped hat, riding a bay horse with a cropped tail, and that he was gone through Hampton-gate. Upon this information, I pursued the man: at Hampton-bridge, he seemed to make an attempt to go over the bridge, but he rode back. I heard of him at Hampton. He had put his house into a shed of a public-house: I saw him on foot, about fifty yards from that house, in Smokey-lane: as he was going towards the public-house where he had put his house, I secured him. The people at the public-house said there was a horse in the shed, but they did not know whose horse it was; I saw the horse; it answered the description the footman had given me. I took the prisoner to a public-house, and sent for a constable who searched him in my presence; I saw the headborough take from

him a gold watch in a black shagreen case, and four guineas and a half in a purse.

(The headborough deposed, that he searched the prisoner, and found a watch, and a purse with four guineas and a half, upon him.)

(The constable produced the watch and purse, and Mrs. Neale, the house-keeper to Lady Drake, deposed that they were Lady Drake's property.)

(The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence; but called Edward Watkins who had known him from an infant, Thomas Williams four years, Richard Patient two years, Edward Watkins six years, and Mary Williams three-quarters of a year, who all gave him a good character.)

GUILTY . ( Death .)

(He was humbly recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-3

466. JOHN STONEHILL was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon Edward Robinson feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a pistol, value 10 s. a swordstick mounted with silver, value 20 s. a leather pocket-book, value 1 s. and four shillings in monies numbered, the property of the said Edward , July the 26th .

EDWARD ROBINSON sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Bangs, of Lyon's-Inn, an attorney. On the 26th of July last, as I was going down Gray's-Inn-lane, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, just at Battle-bridge , a little below the rope-walk, I saw three persons coming towards me. I presented my pistol at them. One of them said, D - n your eyes! what have you got there? I thought it more prudent to make no answer, but to endeavour to get off. I began to run, keeping my eye upon them; and they, seeing me watchful, with the pistol in my hand, were fearful to come up to me; in a few yards two more men started up; upon that I thought it better to stop: I stopped, and then they surrounded me; they pulled my hat over my eyes, and threatened me if I looked up; then they took from me a pistol, a swordstick, and some money; I don't exactly remember how much, but I am positive there were four shillings. They were with me, while they were robbing me, for about three or four minutes. After they had quitted me, one returned to me, and asked me how much money I had: I told them I had a guinea and a few shillings. I had a new shilling in my fob. Then they went away. I believe the prisoner to be one of the first three that I saw; I had a full view of those three, during the time I presented the pistol at them, before they robbed me: they were then about the distance from me that I am now from the prisoner.

What sort of night was it? - It was rather dark.

I understand you don't mean to swear positively to the prisoner? - I will not be positive to him; but I believe him to be one of the first three: he was dressed much as he is now; his hair was curled round: I believe him to be the man, from his dress, and by his size. I had a strong suspicion of him when I heard him speak, when before the justice; I told the justice, I thought from his voice he was one of the three that spoke to me.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

Upon the 7th of August, I found this pistol (producing a small serew-barrel pistol) in the prisoner's room: I saw him come down the stairs of that house, and he ran across Holborn into a house in King's-Head court.

How do you know that was the prisoner's room? - I knew it to be his lodgings: there was a girl he lives with in bed in the room. When I took him up once before, he claimed some clothes that I found in that room.

Did you ever see any other man in that room besides the prisoner? - No.

Robinson. I know this to be Mr. Bangs's pistol.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The morning that Mr. Carpmeal took me, I came out from my father's, and went across Holborn. This pistol was found in the room afterwards; I never saw it before I saw it at the justice's.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17810912-4

467, 468. WILLIAM BLAND and JOHN WILLIAMS were indicted for that they, on the 22d of July , at about the hour of ten in the night, the dwelling-house of Ann Webb , widow , burglariously did break and enter, stealing a silk and stuff gown, value 3 s. and a silver spoon, value 6 s. the property of Ann Webb ; and three pieces of linen cloth, value 3 s. three linen caps, value 1 s. 6 d. two linen aprons, value 2 s. a pair of ticking pockets, value 3 d. a pair of cotton stockings, value 6 d. a pair of ruffles, value 6 d. and a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Mary Dodd , spinster ; and two dimity petticoats, value 2 s. a linen gown, value 3 s. a cotton gown, value 1 s. a linen shirt, value 1 s. two linen aprons, value 2 s. and a russel petticoat, value 2 s. the property of Aramintha How , widow , in the dwelling-house of Ann Webb , widow .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoners.)

ANN WEBB sworn.

I live in Rathbone-place . Upon the 22d of July, my house was broke open: I believe the thieves got in at the garret-window. I was alarmed between nine and ten o'clock at night; it was not dark, but light enough to see a man's face: I heard a noise up stairs; the maid and my sister went up, and found that some thieves had got into the house.

ARAMINTHA HOW sworn.

I am sister to Mrs. Webb; I live with her. Upon the 22d of July, a little before ten, I heard a noise in the dining-room; afterwards I heard a still greater noise, upon which the maid and I went up into the dining-room, and then into the two pair of stairs room; there I missed a gown and some foul linen: the maid then went up into the garret; she said somebody had been there: I ran down stairs, and sent out for the neighbours. There was an uproar in the street. Some people came in soon afterwards, and said a bundle of linen had fell from the house, and had hit a woman on the shoulder; and that two men were taken up. I lost the things laid in the indictment to be my property.

MARY DODD sworn.

I am a servant in the house. I went up with Mrs. Howe, and found the things had been removed out of their place, and all the things turned out of my box: I believe they got in at my garret window, as the sash was up.

ELIZABETH HALL sworn.

Upon the 22d of July, at about a quarter before ten o'clock, coming along Rathbone-place, a bundle fell from a house upon me; I don't know whether it was from No. 1, or No. 2. I knocked at Capt. Fremantle's door, and told them somebody was a-top of the house: they went up, and found the top of the cieling in the garret broke away, so that a man could come into the house, but there was nobody there. The servant looked at the things, and said they were not his master's property; I left my name and place of abode with the servant, and I took the bundle away with me. Mrs. Webb sent to me, and owned the things.

JAMES HARVEY sworn.

Upon the 22d of July, we were alarmed in Oxford-road, between ten and eleven o'clock, with the cry of Thieves! we got the watchman, and went up stairs. We found some tiles had been taken off the corner,

near a trap-door, of the next house to my master's, so that a man might put in his arm and unbolt the door; upon touching the trap-door, it fell down. The watchman went in, and said he saw two men: I went in and seized one of the prisoners, and the watchman the other; they were under the stairs. I saw this silver spoon sticking out of Bland's breeches-pocket (producing it). I asked him, how he came by it: he said, a man gave it him. Afterwards he said, If you will not hurt me, I will tell the whole truth. They were both without their hats and shoes.

JOHN SMITH sworn.

I was with the last witness; upon Williams I found this apron (producing it.)

(The spoon was deposed to by Mrs. Webb, and the apron by Mary Dodd .)

(The several articles found in the bundle thrown out at the window were produced, and deposed to by Ann Webb , Mary Dodd , and Aramintha How.)

WILLIAM BARBER sworn.

I found two pair of shoes, two pair of buckles, and two hats, in Rathbone-place, in a back-garret of the house from whence these bundles were taken. The prisoners, at the Rotation-office, acknowledged the hats and shoes to be their property.

THOMAS KING sworn.

The prisoners were brought to the watch-house about eleven o'clock; I searched Williams, and found these things between his waistcoat and shirt (producing a handkerchief, two small pieces of cloth, and a wrapper.)

(They were deposed to by Mary Dodd .)

WILLIAM GRAHAM sworn.

I found this bundle (producing it) upon the leads of Capt. Fremantle's house.

(The several articles were likewise deposed to by How, Webb, and Dodd.)

WILLIAMS's DEFENCE.

As I was coming down Rathbone-place, I heard an alarm of thieves given; there was a great mob round the door presently; we broke in, and all went up stairs: there were two or three lamp-lighters there; one of them said, Go up there; take my burner, and see if you can perceive them. I went to go up upon the tiles, but it was so slippery that I could not get up. They told me to take my shoes off: I did so, and laid them down, and my hat; the man said he would take care of them. Coming by some of the stacks of chimnies, I saw some things lying; I stooped to pick them up; some men came up and laid hold of me, and said I was one of the thieves.

BLAND's DEFENCE.

I was going for some butter for my mother: I saw the mob; I went up stairs; I went into a cock-loft; two men jumped out; they hauled me through a place, and brought me into another house.

BOTH GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not guilty of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHURST.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-5

469. JAMES HYATT was indicted for stealing a warrant, for the payment of 20 l. signed by Samuel Whitebread , Esq. the property of George Gipps , Esq .

GEORGE GIPPS , Esq. sworn.

I live at Canterbury. Upon Wednesday the 22d of August, I went to the races. I had a pocket-book, in which was a draught of Mr. Whitebread's on Messrs. Carey and Co. for. 20. In the afternoon I was upon the stand in the race-ground, and put my hand to my pocket and missed my book: I sent an express to the banker's to stop payment of the draught. I came up to London, after the prisoner had been taken up, and I was present when he was examined before the Lord Mayor on the Tuesday following. Upon that examination, he acknowledged having the draught in his possession, but said

he had received it of a person who had found it, and had given it to him to bring to London to receive the money: being asked, if he knew who the person was that he had it of; he said, he knew the person, but did not know his name.

Prisoner. Did not I say I knew the name, but did not know where he was? - He said, he did not know the man's name: the Lord-Mayor said, it was a strange thing for a man to trust him with a note, that he did not know. When I went back to the Compter, I understood a pocket-book had been found on a dunghill; I saw that book; in that, among other things, there were several memorandums that had been in my pocket-book, and in particular, a lottery-ticket with my indorsement upon it.

JOSEPH STEVENSON sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Carey and Co. On the 23d of August, between one and two in the afternoon, the prisoner brought a .20 draught for payment: he said his name was Hyatt, and he would write that name on the draught. I did not require him to write the name upon it, because that morning we had received an express to stop the payment of it: I went backwards with the draught to one of the partners, who came forwards, and had him secured and sent to the Compter.

(The draught was produced in court, and it exactly corresponded with the statement of it in the indictment.)

( Joseph Delvin proved, that the names Samuel Whitebread and Charles Sawkins were the hand-writing of those gentlemen, as stated in the indictment.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I took the draught, on the Wednesday, in Canterbury, in the latter part of the afternoon, of a person I had had dealings with; I had trusted him with a bag of tea; his name was Joseph Barnes ; he always went by that name. He said, he had a freightage to come to the water-side, and I should have a share in it, if I would go to London to get the cash, I said, I would not, without he indorsed it to me: he indorsed it to me, and I came to London with it. I did not think of being tried here; I thought I was to be tried in Kent.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-6

470. THOMAS BARNSLEY was indicted for stealing two pieces of woollen cloth, called harrateen, containing 48 yards, value 3 l. the property of Catharine Webb , widow , in her dwelling-house , July 20 .

FRANCIS WYCHELOW sworn.

I am porter to Mrs. Catharine Webb . On Friday, the 20th of July, at about eight in the evening, when I was going to shut up the warehouse, I saw a man take up two pieces of harrateen out of the passage that leads to the dwelling-house; they were put there to be given to the dyer. The street door was open. When I saw him take them up, and go out at the door with them, (my fellow-servant was behind me) I said, Do you see that? he answered, Yes, let us follow him. I followed him, and never lost sight of him till I took him, which was in about thirty or forty yards from the door. He had it under his arm; when I laid hold of him, he dropped it; at first he said he never saw them: my fellow-servant coming up, assisted me in taking him and bringing him back, and got a constable to take him into custody.

(The other servant confirmed the evidence of Wychelow.)

( John Godfrey , a constable, produced the harrateen, and they were deposed to by Thomas Lawford to be the property of Mrs. Webb, and that they were of the value of 3 l.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

As I was coming through the court where the gentlemen live, I saw the two pieces lying in the court, under the window; I very innocently picked them up, and the gentlemen

laid hold of me, and said I stole them. I have no witnesses.

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s. N. one year .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-7

471. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Davis , Aug. 3 .

ROBERT BECK sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Davis, pawnbroker . On the third of August the prisoner came to my master's house, and asked the price of a gown; my fellow apprentice told her it was 14 s. she said it was too dear, and immediately went out of the shop. My fellow apprentice went over the counter, and missed a gown which hung on the outside. He went out; I followed him, and saw him lay hold of the prisoner. I came up to her, and took the gown out of her apron. I know it to be my master's, by his mark which is upon it; I hung it up the same morning. She cried, and said a young woman gave it her, that she did not take it away.

Prisoner. Whether he did not take the gown from another woman, who was discharged before the justice? - When I took the gown out of the prisoner's apron, a woman came behind me and struck me, and asked me what I had to do with her; and by the help of the neighbours we took them both before the justice.

Mr. Davis. I was present at the examination; she said another woman gave it her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Mr. Davis said he would have my life if he could. The young man said his master made him swear to me.

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. and Imp. 6 M .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-8

472. WILLIAM TOWNSEND was indicted for stealing a man's hat, value 4 s. a pair of leather shoes, value 2 s. the property of John Wilford , the elder; and a man's hat, value 3 s. the property of John Wilford , the younger, July 14 .

THOMAS CALWELL sworn.

I was an apprentice at that time to Mr. Wilford. On the 14th of July, about six in the evening, I left the shop for a few minutes to seek for the errand-boy. There are two doors to the shop. When I came back to the glass door, I saw the other door open. I saw through the window somebody in the parlour that I did not know. I opened the door and went in, and saw the prisoner come out of the parlour. I saw one hat. I asked him some questions. I turned him about, and saw the other hat, and the shoes. I called the maid and Mr. Wilford, and secured the prisoner.

JOHN WILFORD the younger sworn.

I was called down to secure the prisoner; he then confessed the fact, and desired we would let him go to sea.

(The two hats and the pair of shoes were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutors.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to the shop for a halfpennyworth of Turner's-cerate; seeing the hats on the ground, I took them up, and put them on the counter.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-9

473. MARY SKAFE was indicted for stealing two linen aprons, value 5 s. and a German flute, value 3 s. the property of William Bailey , August 18 .

WILLIAM BAILEY sworn.

The prisoner lived four weeks with me as

a servant . We lost the things mentioned in the indictment.

(The pawnbroker deposes, that on the 16th of August she pawned a flute with him in her own name, which was produced in court.)

Prosecutor. From its appearance I believe it to be my property; but, upon her examination before the alderman, she voluntarily confessed she had taken this flute, and said it was the only thing she had stolen.

(The prisoner did not say any thing in her defence.)

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-10

474. RICHARD WILLIAMS and RICHARD MILLS were indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a brass watch key, value 1 d. a watch string, value 2 d. the property of Jonas Strem , privately from his person , July 27 .

JONAS STREM sworn.

On the 27th of July, about three in the afternoon, I was at my lodgings, the Ship, in Shadwell ; I found myself sleepy; I laid down on one of the benches in the taproom. The prisoners sat on the next seat; between sleeping and waking, Williams threw his hat down over me; he took it up again, and swore why did he throw the hat over me? I then went to sleep: when I waked, Mills was gone, and Williams sat on the bench. I missed my watch; there was a noise about it. Mrs. Mordant went out, and brought back Mills, and a constable was sent for. Mills, Mr. Mordant, and Forrester, went out together. When they came back, Mills had the watch in his hand: he gave it me, and said, There is the watch; take it. Nobody else was in the room when I went to sleep.

- MORDANT sworn.

I was in the house when the prosecutor complained of losing his watch, and charged Williams with stealing it; he denied it: I went out and got a constable, and my wife brought Mills back: they both denied it. Mills brought me out, and said he knew where the watch was; and, if he was not to be prosecuted, he would tell where it was. I promised he should not be prosecuted, and then he discovered it.

GEORGE FORRESTER sworn.

I was sent for, and came down to the house; and, after a great deal of enquiry about the watch, Williams said to Mills, Bugger the watch! let him have the watch. The prosecutor was present. This was before Mills went out with the landlord; the landlord was in the back-room. When he came in, I said he might make himself easy; I could find the watch; and then I went out with Mills for it.

To the Prosecutor. Did you hear this expression by Williams to Mills? - There was not any time after Mills was brought back that the constable, the two prisoners, and I, were left together. I did not hear Williams say any thing about the watch to any body, except denying he knew any thing of it.

MILLS's DEFENCE.

The watch had dropped underneath the bench, and I took it up.

WILLIAMS's DEFENCE.

The watch dropped under the bench; I know nothing of the taking it up.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-11

475. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 20 s. the property of William Quin , August the 22d .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.)

WILLIAM QUIN sworn.

On the 22d of August, between nine and ten at night, I went into a public house in

Pater-noster Row , with the prisoner and two more strangers I met with in St. Paul's Church-yard. After we had drank three pots of beer, I rose up, and said, I will go away: the prisoner laid hold of me, and said I should not go; so did one Spriggs, who is gone for a soldier; and Spriggs was in company with the prisoner when I first saw him. While Thompson held me by the right arm, Spriggs pulled the watch out of my pocket: I laid hold of the watch, and got it back again. Thompson denied having any knowledge of Spriggs, or his intention of taking the watch. (The Constable produces the watch.)

The Landlord deposes, That the prosecutor made an alarm that he had lost his watch; but that he did not know who had it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor asked me to go and drink part of a pint of porter. We went into a public house, and had three tankards of beer: when we were calling for the fourth, the prosecutor made an alarm, and said, the other young fellow wanted to take his watch out of his pocket; he went out, and gave charge of us: he wanted us to go for soldiers: the young fellow was willing to go, knowing himself guilty. I never saw him before: I know nothing of him.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-12

476. WILLIAM WHITAKER was indicted for stealing a gelding, value 6 l. the property of William Lowe , August the 3d .

WILLIAM LOWE sworn.

I lost a horse from a field of mine at Potter's Bar , at the time of the corn harvest. I did not take notice of the day of the month. I followed it to town on the Friday; and it was found in the market. I missed it on the Friday morning; I believe it was in the field on Thursday night. I found the horse at the George in Long-Acre.

CHARLES JELLOUS sworn.

On the 3d of August, Friday morning, there was a good many officers in Smithfield. Coming by the Rose and Crown, a man came up to me, and said, A young fellow has been offering a horse to me; I believe it is stolen: and he asked me to go to the stable and see it. I went and saw the prisoner, and asked him if he had any horse to sell: he said he had, and shewed me the horse: the prisoner was in the stable at the Rose and Crown in Smithfield, close behind the horse: it was a bay horse. I then asked him how he came by it: he said it was his own; his father gave it to him; that he lived at Honiton in Lincolnshire. I then searched him, and found this pistol upon him, loaded; my partner took another out of his other pocket.

What did he say that his name was? - I can't recollect now; but he gave a wrong name. We took him to the office, and he was committed: the same afternoon, Mr. Lowe came up, and owned his horse, which I had taken to the George, in Long-acre; I was present.

What time in the afternoon did he go there? - About five or six in the evening.

Was the horse led out and shewn him? - Yes.

How came Lowe to come there? - He went and enquired after the horse in Smithfield, and was told the man was taken up for horse-stealing; and he came to the office. I am positive the horse the prosecutor saw at the George was the horse found with the prisoner.

To Lowe. When you went to the George, in Long-acre, the horse was brought out to you? - Yes. I am sure it was mine: he had a black mane and tail, and a blaze in his forehead; he had black legs, with two white heels behind: I bred him from a colt.

Do you know any thing of the prisoner? did you ever see him? - I never saw him before that day.

Was the field shut or open? - It was an inclosed field; there were other horses with it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A man brought the horse to me to get it ready for the market, and desired me to take it to the Rose and Crown, Smithfield.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

(He was humbly recommended, by the Jury, to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-13

477. MARY HALCROW was indicted for that she, in the King's highway, in and upon John Barker feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a canvas purse, value 1 d. four guineas, and two shillings and eight-pence halfpenny, in monies numbered, the property of the said John , August the 22d .

JOHN BARKER sworn.

On Wednesday the 22d of August I paid some money at King James's stairs, Wapping. The prisoner saw me pull my purse out. I went to Old Gravel-lane, and then to New Gravel-lane. I supped there, and staid till nine o'clock. I went to St. James's-street : there the prisoner jumped along-side of me. When I came to the stairs, she took me round the waist, and jumped me. I got from her; and then I missed my money.

ELIZABETH HANNING sworn.

I went up stairs into the prisoner's room to lock her door, and I saw the purse. She took two guineas and a half, some odd halfpence, and some silver, how much I cannot say, out of it, and took it up. She rented a garret in my house, at 3 s. 6 d. per week. The purse was dropped in the room when I went up stairs.

Prosecutor. This is my bag I had my money in. I can swear that it is mine, if I was to die this minute.

JAMES BARTLEMEW sworn.

I have known the prosecutor forty years: he supped with me that night. I saw four guineas and 2 s. which he took out of a canvas bag. He came back, and said he was robbed.

GEORGE FORRESTER sworn.

I took the prisoner. A soldier followed her to the magistrate's. She acknowledged she had robbed the prosecutor, and gave charge of the soldier: she said he had had part of the money.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was in the country at work, and brought home three golden guineas. I never saw the man: I know nothing of him.

NOT GUILTY of the robbery, but guilty of stealing the money .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-14

478. EDWARD BOND was indicted for stealing 77 lb. weight of moist sugar, value 7 s. the property of persons unknown, July the 17th .

CHARLES WOOD sworn.

I am a watchman on the keys. The 17th of July, between one and two in the morning, I went to see if all the locks were safe in Dice-Key gate : I found one lock open; I called Berry, and we went down into the warehouse. I saw the prisoner go behind the hogshead of sugar. I asked him how he came there. He said, a person sent him to take something away. There was a hogshead broke open, and two handfuls of sugar near it. There were 77 lb. weight, which we delivered to the constable. The door of the warehouse had been fastened. I tried it twice before on that night.

( Thomas Berry confirms the evidence of Charles Wood .)

(The constable produced the sugar, and it was deposed to be the same found in the possession of the prisoner.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am innocent. The first witness was a custom-house officer, and has been dismissed. I think his oath should not stand.

GUILTY . N. 1 year .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-15

479, 480. CHARLOTTE BROOKE and SARAH HYDE were indicted for stealing a pair of women's callimanco shoes, value 4 s. the property of Richard Day , August the 27th .

(The prosecutor and his witnesses were called, but not appearing, the court ordered their recognizances to be estreated.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810912-16

481. JOHN FREE , otherwise BOWMAN , was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon Anthony Joseph feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 40 s. a steel chain, value 12 d. a stone seal, set in base metal, value 6 d. and a base-metal watch-key, value 1 d. the property of the said Anthony , August the 16th .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.)

(The prosecutor being a Portuguese , and not understanding the English language, an interpreter was sworn.)

ANTHONY JOSEPH sworn.

On the 16th of last month I was sitting at my door, where I lodge, in White-yard . The prisoner and another man came up to me. The prisoner came close to me, and took the watch out of my pocket. At the same time another man came up to me, and put his hand to my mouth, while the prisoner took my watch. The prisoner then gave the watch to the other man, who ran away. I immediately laid hold of the prisoner. He pushed me, to get from me, when I laid hold of him.

Before the time they took the watch, did they make use of any kind of force? - No; only stood talking to me, before they took the watch.

Were they talking to you before they robbed you? - They did not say any thing particular to me, but they stood playing with me, touching the watch.

SAMUEL MOSES sworn.

I am a constable, in Wapping parish. I was sent for, on the 16th of last month, to take charge of the prisoner. I was told a foreign sailor, at the Three Crowns, in East-Smithfield, had lost his watch. I went to the Three Crowns, and saw the prisoner, and asked him if he took the watch. He said he did not. I searched him, and found nothing but a knife upon him.

To Prosecutor. Did you know the man before? - No; I did not.

What time was it? - About ten at night.

How can you be positive to the person of the prisoner from only seeing him at that time of night, not knowing him before? - Because I took him immediately, and never let him go.

ISAAC FLEMING sworn.

I live in the same place with the prosecutor. The prisoner took the watch from the prosecutor, at the door. As soon as he got it, he gave it to the other man, who ran away.

Was you there the whole time? - Yes.

JOHN FARRELL sworn.

I am a constable. The prosecutor applied for a search-warrant, to search the house for the watch. I went with a search-warrant. I found five or six watches, but not the watch belonging to the prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to get a pig's-foot for supper. This man came after me, and laid hold of me, and said I had robbed him. I know no more of it than the child unborn. The

other man came out with a pot of beer, and said, Me swear! me swear!

NOT GUILTY of the robbery, but guilty of stealing the watch .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-17

482. MARY ROSE was indicted for stealing four yards and a quarter of thread lace, value 24 s. the property of Francis Thompson and Henry Thompson , privately in their shop , July the 27th .

FRANCIS THOMPSON sworn.

I am an haberdasher , in Oxford-street , in partnership with Henry Thompson . On the 27th of July, the day of the execution of De la Motte, about one in the afternoon, when I came home, my shopman was shewing some lace to the prisoner. She bought some. Several other people were in the shop at the same time. As she was going out, the shopman came and told me he suspected her. I desired the shopman to follow her, and I ran to the door. I saw her a few yards off, looking over her shoulder. My shopman took hold of both her arms, and turned her round suddenly: then I saw her open her cloak, and take a card of lace from under her arm, and offer to give it to the shopman. She held me round the waist, and would not let me go, for five minutes, declaring it was her first offence, and she would pay me any amount for the lace. I had her searched, and there was nothing else found upon her. As she was carrying away in a coach, some persons rescued her. She was afterwards retaken. After she was retaken, I told her, if she cried out again, so as to have assistance to rescue her, I would prosecute her with the utmost rigour, and hang her. I know the lace to be my property.

( George Bailey , the shopman, confirmed the evidence of his master in every particular.)

ABRAHAM BARRIER sworn.

I took up the prisoner. When I had got about a hundred yards, the mob rescued her from me. She was retaken, and put in my custody again.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

When I went into Mr. Thompson's shop, I bought two yards of lace, which came to 7 s. at 3 s. a yard. After that, the shopman pulled out some cards, and shewed me three. I bought one to the amount of 4 s. a yard. He gave me change for the first lace, but had not given me the change of the other guinea. I had eight guineas in my pocket. He came out and scandalized me, and said I took the lace. I had a bill of parcels of the next shop, where I laid out 12 l.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 4 s. 6 d.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-18

483, 484. HENRY JONES and THOMAS DAVIS were indicted for that they, in the dwelling-house of Samuel Newport , in and upon Cook Trollope feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 40 s. a steel chain, value 12 d. a stone seal, set in base metal, value 6 d. two base-metal keys, value 2 d. and a guinea and 9 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said Cook Trollope .

COOK TROLLOPE sworn.

I know the prisoners. Jones robbed me of my watch, and the other pulled me out of bed by the ancles. I lodged in the same room with them, in New Prison , of which Samuel Newport is the keeper. Jones robbed me of a guinea and 6 s. 6 d. and a half-crown piece, and then went to the window. I lodged in the same room with them. I was committed for an assault upon a brother shop-mate, at the pay-table. They took it out of my breeches pocket: I was awake when they did it. The breeches lay under my head. Davis pulled me out of bed by the

ancles: he said to Jones, D - n me, let's set what he has in his pocket. Upon which he went to the breeches, and took them out. At about eight o'clock in the morning, I told the centry of it. I don't know whether they were searched, or what was done upon it.

Jury. Was you sober when you went there? - Yes; I paid 18 d. for a bed, and half-a-crown garnish-money, that same night.

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

There was another night-charge lay with him: he might have robbed him as well as us. When he came in, he said he had no money.

JONES's DEFENCE.

It was impossible we could rob him; for we were ironed. It was dark; and there was no candle in the room.

To Prosecutor. You all lay together in the same room? - Yes; they lay in another bed.

Jury. What time of night was it? - Between nine and ten o'clock, I believe.

Was you sober? - Yes.

Jury. How can you take upon you to say these were the two men, when the room was all in darkness? - No, it was not in darkness.

Was there any candle in the room? - There was a candle at first.

Jury. What made them go to the window, if you had a light in the room? - They knocked the candle out before they robbed me.

BOTH GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

(See No. 465.)

Reference Number: t17810912-19

485, 486, 487. JOHN WHITE JAMES CLARKE , otherwise MOULDY CLOAK , and FRANCIS WATERS , were indicted for that they, in the King's highway, in and upon Nathan Vezey feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person two guineas, two half-guineas, and 6 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said Nathan .

NATHAN VEZEY sworn.

I am a glazier . I was coming home, on foot, from Enfield, with an acquaintance. When we came to Ball's-pond turnpike , a man asked us where we were going? We told him, to town. My friend asked him what was his reason for asking us. He said, Why, may be you may be robbed; but I have doubled them.

What did he mean by that? - I do not know. It was not one of the prisoners who said that.

Was this man on foot, or on horseback? - On foot: we were on foot too. We said one to another, We will not be robbed, unless we are overpowered. We went on towards London. We walked about fourscore yards on; I was foremost, my friend was close behind me; when I was stopped by that man who calls himself James Clarke , or Mouldy Cloak. John White was by the side of him. I saw Waters; but he ran to the gentleman that was with me. I saw him plainly, at the same time when Mouldy Cloak stopped me. He said, Blast your bloody eyes, you bloody thief! your watch, your money! your money, your watch! I said, I should not be robbed, and I laid hold of him: I wanted to push him down, but could not. I wanted to get one of his buttons off, but could not. White said, D - n your eyes and limbs, let his guts out; for I know him. He had a rusty cutlass, with a brass guard. As I had hold of Cloak, White struck me on the arm; and it jarred all my fingers so, that I dropped my stick. They thought it was a tuck stick, and bid me drop it; but it was only a fishing-rod. Then they took my money out of my pocket, and were about my watch. My friend called to me; and then this man left me, and ran to my friend. He was engaged with Waters. I went back to my friend. Cloak told me not to look back; if I did, he would blow my brains out. I kept looking at him, and he drawed his hat over his eyes; but I kept stedfastly looking at him. I am sorry to say that I went to school with White. I begged them not to murder my friend, but consider his family. They were blasting and swearing, What do you hesitate for? Blast him, cut his throat; blast him, cut his head off.

How long is it ago since you went to school with White? - About twenty four years ago; but I have seen him since; and he knows me well. I begged of them to let me have my fishing rod; for they saw it lie upon the ground with my friend's hat. Waters picked it up, and brought it to me. I looked at him again, that I might be sure of the man. He said, Blast your bloody eyes, if you look back, I will blow your brains out.

You said they had a cutlass? - I think they had one, and a pistol too. The cutlass I am clear in. They then ran away, blasting their eyes and limbs, and said, Why did they not rip my guts out?

What time of night was it? - Nine o'clock, I suppose; not three minutes under or over.

Was there light enough to distinguish them? - Plenty of light to distinguish them very well; I was very particular in making my remarks on them.

White. My Lord, it was a very dark night.

How long might they stay with you? - I believe near three minutes.

The others you never knew before? - No; but I was very particular in observing them. We went to the Thatched-House, got pistols and cutlasses, and went back to take them; but could not find them. Then we carried back the arms, and went to Bridewell, and gave information of them. We searched till three in the morning, but could not find them: I went home at three. I got up at six, and went to the bottom of Chick-Lane: the constable and I waited there till ten o'clock, but saw nothing of them. They told me there was to be a sight at Mile-End, and I should be sure to find them there. I repaired there, and sat in the lobby of the Turnpike for some hours, till I saw them all come by. I saw them coming a good way before the turnpike, which was in the afternoon of the next day, at White-Chapel Turnpike. Cloak and White were in a little chaise-cart, and I saw Phillips and Waters. Waters was in a chaise along with two women. I know them to be the people, except Phillips: I could not swear to him; but he was very like the person that accosted us at the Turnpike; therefore we took him up upon suspicion. When I saw them there, I was sure they were the people who met with me, that they were the men. I took a coach, and told the coachman to follow that chaise-cart till we ordered him to stop. They went through White Chapel, down Houndsditch, into Long-Lane: there was a little stoppage there. We got out of the coach, and took them out of the chaise and the cart.

Are you now positive to the other prisoners? - I am, and do think Phillips was the other; but cannot swear to him. When they were taken into the public-house, before I went to the justice, Phillips said, If he was hanged for that robbery, somebody else should suffer. He was the only man that I could not swear to.

Cross-Examination.

You are a glazier? - Yes.

A master or journeyman? - I have been in business eleven years, and have served all Ward and Parish Offices.

When was this man taken up? - The next day.

Committed for further examination? - Yes.

They were examined and sent afterwards to Bow-Street? - Yes.

And then, the day they were fully committed, you swore to them? - Yes.

You had not positively sworn to them before? - No; I told the justice I would swear to them, but I wished rather that they should be prosecuted by somebody else.

You never told any body that either of them was your school-fellow before that? - Yes, from the first minute; that made me tender. I told the Justice at first I knew them, and would swear to them; but that one having been my school-fellow, I wished to have them examined again; and in the mean time advert sed, that some other persons might appear against them rather than I should.

WILLIAM RIMMINGTON sworn.

I was with Mr. Vezey on the 26th of August. As we came through the Turnpike, therestood a very tall, strait, decent young fellow: he said, Gentlemen, I wish you may not be robbed, or you will be robbed, I am not confident which. I immediately smiled to my companion, and said, I have nothing to lose; are you afraid? He said, No. The man said,

But we will give them the double. I had not the presence of mind to ask him which way he was going, or to ask him for his company; but he went towards Kingstand. I saw no more; but when we had got about an hundred yards, a man caught me by the collar and wrist, and swore, D - n your bloody eyes, I have you now. I said, Have what? He said, Your money directly, or I will blow your brains out. I told him, That he might easily have, for I had none, or very little, besides some change from what I had paid my reckoning with.

Had he any weapon? - I cannot tell what he had in his hand; I was too much terrified. He said, Give it me directly. I did not give it him immediately. He said, D - n your eyes, if you hesitate another minute, I will cut your head off. I called out Whiskin two or three times; he strived to stop my mouth.

Who was it that laid hold of you? - I am not positive. I turned my head round to resist as well as I could; and the little chap, which I verily believe to be that Waters, came and stooped under me, and said, D - n you, what do you hesitate about? cut his guts out; and immediately pulled his hat so, that I could see no more of his face. I believe that to be Waters from his stature; it was a little black fellow, but I cannot be positive to him. He immediately turned my breeches pocket inside out; there was nothing but half-pence in it. He pulled my watch out likewise. I held my watch with my left hand, and tried to get it into my pocket; but they got it away from me. Then they said, Go along. When they had got my watch, and had joined company, one of the three villains, I do not know which, said, They had done him. Said one, You should have cut his guts out; for I know him well. I had known White well for years.

You don't speak positive to either of them? - No.

But rather believe it was Waters that came to you? - Yes.

Was it a light night? - I observed it was a very pleasant fine evening as we walked from Enfield together.

Was it light enough to distinguish people? - Yes.

Cross-Examination.

How came it they were not fully committed the first time they went before the justice? - I believe it was a good deal owing to my timorousness: I said, if I should hear them speak some words, I should know them; but their voices differed a little.

Was it owing to the timorousness of the last witness? - No; he was positive at the first time. He swore positively to them at Justice Blackborow's. He said, the first time to the Justice, that he was positive they were the party.

When was the first time you heard Vezey say he knew one of them? - On the Monday they were all taken: he said, on Sunday night, before we came into Islington town, that he knew one perfectly well, but could not recollect his name, and that he could pick him out of two hundred persons.

THOMAS ISAACS sworn.

I am a constable. On the 26th of last month, at about half past ten in the evening, the prisoner and Mr. Rimmington came to me, and gave information that they had been robbed, and desired to know whether we could get somebody else to assist to go in search of the parties. I went to Kipping and Redgrave, and we went in search after them that night, according to the descriptions that he gave of them. We could not find any thing of them. We went the next morning to the sign of the Castle in Field-Lane: there we staid watching and looking to see somebody come from Chick-Lane, from the habitation where some of them lodge; but not seeing them there, we heard there was to be a sight at Mile-End: we proceeded from thence in the afternoon to this sight: we went to Mile-End. Mr. Kipping, Mr. Redgrave, and I, went into the Gun, and the prisoner went to the Turnpike-gate, and he said he should be certain he should know the men in case he saw them We never were with him from the time he went to the gate till he came and told us, that those men that were in that chaise and in that cart were the people who had robbed him. We immediately took a coach, and pursued them from thence to Long-Lane: there we took them. He said, from

the first, that they were the men that robbed him.

Did he describe the men to you? - Yes, as near as possible.

And when you took these people, did they answer that description? - Yes.

Did he describe their dress? - He said they were dressed in brown cloaths, as he thought. W hite had a brown coat on; Mouldy Cloak has now the same coat on he had then; and Waters likewise, the shortest, he said, particularly, had a mark upon his buttons.

Had he that mark on his buttons? - I believe the mark is now upon his buttons; that is Waters; it is something like a stag, or a bird, I will not be positive which. He told me this before they were taken.

( Jonathan Redgrave and John Kipping confirmed the evidence of Isaacs.)

WHITE's DEFENCE.

I leave it to the mercy of the court. We are as innocent as the child unborn.

CLARK's DEFENCE.

Mr. Rimmington said, it was between dark and light. He said, he could discern the person that came up to him, that he was taller than any of us: he said his mouth was away, or some of his teeth out.

Rimmington. I said the party could not speak plain that stopped me.

ALL THREE GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810912-20

488. ANN MURRAY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Duncan Ross , on the 3d of August , at about five o'clock in the afternoon (no person then being in the said dwelling-house), and stealing a green silk purse, value 6 d. a leather purse, value 1 d. and 8 l. 14 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said Duncan, in his dwelling-house .

JANET ROSS sworn.

I am the wife of Duncan Ross . My husband lives in White-hart-yard, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . On the 3d of August my husband's house was robbed. I went out at five in the afternoon: I left no person in the house. I locked the door; and the windows were shut down. I came back about six, unlocked the door, and went in. There was a large box in the corner of the house, which I had left a candle upon; but it was taken off. I was told by some children, that a woman had been in at the window, and come out again. It was a sash-window; any person may get in by lifting it up. The window-sash was shut when I returned. I looked at the box, and found it broke open: I missed 8 l. 14 s. which was in a green silk purse in the box; the gold was in that purse, and the silver in a leather purse, in which the silk purse was likewise put. I was told which way the woman went, and supposed she would go to Monmouth-street, to buy cloaths; as she was almost naked. I went to enquire. I heard a woman in a red cloak had been to bargain for cloaths at several shops. At last I found her at a pawnbroker's door, in Russel-court, all in new cloaths. A woman, who saw her come out of the window, and knew her, had told me who she was. I laid hold of her, and brought her to my own door. That neighbour came to my assistance, and laid hold of her. The prisoner d - ned me and the money too, and said she did not think she should ever go to gaol for my money. I asked her where the purses were? She said, I might go seek, if I was cunning enough to find them. She said, If I would let her alone, she would give me the money back; that she did not mean to keep it, but return it. When the justice asked her what became of the red gown she had on when she came out of the window, she said she had thrown it away in Drury-lane.

ROSE GRANT sworn.

I saw the prisoner coming out of the prosecutrix's window, with an old red gown on, and it hitched coming out of the window: she loosed it in a hurry, and ran away. I afterwards saw the prosecutrix, and told her it was the prisoner had done it.

(The constable who searched the prisoner found upon her 5 l. 2 s. 7 d. and a new red cloak, which he produced in court.)

Prisoner. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

(She was humbly recommended, by the Jury, to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-21

489. JOHN STEWART and CHARLES ATKINS were indicted for that they, in the king's highway, in and upon Arthur Shakespear , esq. feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a watch, the inside and outside case made of gold, value 20 l. a gold watch chain, value 5 l. a stone seal set in gold, value 40 s. a crystal stone seal, set in gold, value 20 s. a chain and a gold watch hook, value 3 s. and two guineas and five shillings in monies numbered, the property of the said Arthur .

ARTHUR SHAKESPEAR , Esq. sworn.

On Saturday, the second of June , as I was going in my carriage home to my own house, about one o'clock in the morning, near St. George's church the carriage stopped with a violent jerk. I was almost thrown against the blinds. I saw something of a flash. I thought one of my horses had fallen down. Upon hearing the noise of the people, it occurred to me that I was stopped; I drew my watch from my fob, and put it under my arm. The carriage door was opened, and there were two fellows, with cutlasses and pistols, demanded my money. I believe that man in green (Stewart) to be one of them. He had on, at the time he stopped me, a Bath great coat, and looked stouter than he does now; but I believe him to be the man, though I cannot positively swear to him: he came to me afterwards. The man who has been convicted I conceive to be the other man. They demanded my money; I gave it: they then demanded my watch; I said I had none. They called out to search me, and threatened to cut me in pieces, if I would not give them my watch; I said I had none. His comrade (the man who was convicted) put his hand into the carriage to search me. I very imprudently caught at his arm; and, in that struggle, the chain of my watch dropped from under my arm; upon which this man, Stewart, as I take it to be, took my watch. Upon that, the other door of the carriage was opened; and there were two other men, with cutlasses and pistols, threatened my life, for having refused to give them my watch. I took very little notice of the two that opened the other door; for I began to be much alarmed, when in that situation. They threatened much they would have me out, and cut me to pieces. It struck me that my best way was to keep my attention to the two men that first attacked me. I said, I beg you will not use me ill. They uttered horrid imprecations: They would cut me to pieces; and should not mind killing me more than a dog. That little man ( John Stewart ) appears, from the faint remembrance I have, to be much resembling the man: his voice struck me at the justice's to be something like his; but, to speak at all to him, I cannot. The comrade of that little man, that was the second man that opened the carriage door, begged his fellow robbers would not hurt me; he said, D - n you, as you have got all the gentleman's money, and every thing, do not hurt thim: he was a tall man, much taller than either of these men: they then desired the coachman to drive on. I went immediately to Mr. Sherwood's office; I could find nobody there: I then returned to the watch-house in Shadwell, and got one of Mr. Sherwood's runners, and the constable of the night, and went directly, with my carriage, back again; and went about Whitechapel, and Rosemary-lane, and all the houses I could think of. As the men were strong in my eye, I thought I might have an opportunity of meeting them; and it was much better to lay hold of them then, than trust it to my mind afterwards; but could not meet with them. A few days after, the

other men were taken up; and the other day they came to let me know that this man was taken up; and though I think I could speak positively to Stewart, I will not say it, because I will not say but that I was something alarmed.

Then you decline speaking positively to him? - I do.

You never got your watch again? - No.

JOHN AVERY sworn.

I was servant to Mr. Shakespear when he was robbed. At the bottom of Rosemary-lane, beyond the Toll-bar, between that and the sail-cloth manufactory, my master was stopped by four footpads. The first I saw was a flash from the pan of a pistol, which pistol did not go off. I was behind the carriage. As soon as I saw the flash, the carriage stopped; two men came to the off side, and opened the door. I am sure Stewart was the man who was on the off side of the carriage. The watchman was crying past one o'clock, as we came down Rosemary-lane. It was so light I could distinguish the colour of the clothes, and the men; the pistols, and hangers, and every thing of that kind. The off side of the carriage door was opened first; in a little time, the near side of the carriage door was opened. They demanded my master's watch and money. One man that was with him on the same side of the carriage, was tried last sessions, and he was found guilty. This Stewart is the man who took the watch and money, to the best of my knowledge.

Could you see from behind? - I was behind the chariot. I was as near almost as possibly I could be to them, at the time; and my attention was wholly upon this man; I could not tell so much about those on the near side of the carriage. I believe Atkins to be the last that run from the near side of the carriage; but I cannot tell so much of him, as to be so positive to him as to the other. Stewart shut the carriage door; he was the last that went from the off side of the carriage. As soon as he had shut the carriage door, a man on the near side of the carriage said, D - n you, drive on, coachman! as soon as he said that, Stewart said to me, D - n your blood, you bugger, I would have your watch and money, if you had got any! The coachman drove on; and he cut at me with a hanger, but did not hit me.

Do you undertake to say there was light enough to enable you to distinguish the counnance of Stewart? - Yes; I am clear of it.

How was he dressed? - In a rough Bath coat, of a dark colour, and a round hat: the other I can't be positive to.

Cross-Examination.

Did you know Stewart before? - No.

But his appearance was such as it is now? - No; his hair was not powdered or curled, but his hair is black or dark: he had a round hat on, and had a loose coat, which buttoned round him.

He did not look then a bit stouter than he does now? - He is the same man he was then: I know the man, I am very clear.

You did not know him before? - I never saw him before.

You could not see the watch and money given to this man? - I did not see it given.

How much reward had you last sessions? - None.

How much do you expect? - What is my share: I was at the taking him, and ought to have a share as well as other people.

If this man is convicted, you will expect some share of it? - I don't expect a farthing.

What makes you so generous in one instance, and not in the other? - Because I was at the taking of the last man, and had a right to it.

So you have a right to this: did not Jellous tell you this? - No.

What is the blood-money you set this man down at? How much do you reckon you shall have upon his life? - I wish there had been no occasion for it; I do it fairly and honestly.

How came you to expect it from Gough more than for this man? - Because I was at the taking of him. I speak truth.

This man you never saw in your life before: he had a loose great coat, a round hat, and his hair hanging about his head? - I know him by his dress, his voice, and person: he came up to me to the hind-wheel of the carriage,

as close as he could; when he found he could not rob me, he cut at me with a hanger.

Why could not he rob you? - Because a man on the other side the carriage told the coachman to drive on.

If they could stop the coach to rob the master, they could certainly stop the coach to rob the man. - They did not rob me.

How soon afterwards did you see this man? - I saw him at Bow-street.

How long after the robbery? - I cannot tell.

I believe it was the latter end of August? - I cannot recollect.

Who told you about these men? - I was sent for, to appear at Bow-street, to see if I knew the man. As soon as I saw him, I knew him.

They gave you a little hint? - They gave me no hint.

You had been drinking there a little with the servants? - Drinking you need not say any thing to me about: I speak the truth.

You understand drinking, I suppose? - Yes.

You had been drinking? - I suppose few servants go to Ranelagh without drinking.

That was your case; you was drunk? - No; I was not.

JOSEPH ROGERS sworn.

I am coachman to Mr. Shakespear. On the 2d of June, we were stopped, about 100 yards from St. George's turnpike, by four footpads. They attempted to fire two pistols, just before the horses; but the pistols flashed in the pan. I believe Stewart was the man who put his hand on the foot-board, with a hanger, and said to me, If you do not stand still, I will cut your throat. He went to the carriage: my master gave him his watch and money; and then they bid me drive on.

CHARLES JELLOUS sworn.

On the 28th of August, I searched the prisoner's room, in a court in Fleet-street, where I found a horse-pistol, a dark lanthorn, an iron crow, and a quantity of pick-lock keys (producing them).

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I found this cutlass (producing it).

- FARRELL sworn.

I assisted in taking Atkins.

STEWART's DEFENCE.

It was impossible for me to commit the robbery; I was at Gosport at the time.

( Stewart called John Wall and Sophia Thomas , to prove that he was at Gosport at the time, that he dined with him on Whit-Sunday, and that they saw him again on the Tuesday following.)

Jury to the Prosecutor. What is the character of Avery? - He staid out one night, and I discharged him. He lived with me more than a year and an half; he behaved very honestly; I would have trusted him with any thing. He would drink sometimes; but the night he was with me, he had not been drinking the least in the world.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[See the Trial of William Gough , No. 379, last Sessions.]

Reference Number: t17810912-22

490. JOHN HARFORD was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon Michael Leoni feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a leather pocket-book, value 3 d. a watch with a gold case, value 10 l. and eleven guineas in monies numbered, the property of the said Michael , August 25th .

Mr. MICHAEL LEONI sworn.

I was robbed on Saturday, the 25th of August last: it was, to the best of my recollection, at about a quarter after nine o'clock. I was on Kingsland-road ; I was going to my lodging. I took a coach from the stand in Whitechapel, to evade being robbed: I got upon the coach-box myself, and drove the horses. When I got about 150 yards beyond a house, the sign of which is the Black Horse, on Kingsland-road, a little man ran across the road, and laid hold of the horse by the bridle: I stood up on the foot-board of the box, and said, I will not be robbed: upon which I received several blows upon my right arm, and while they were hitting me -

Was there more than one? - There were four in all. One swore, called me by an opprobrious name, and said, We will make you stop when you are bid. I still made some resistance, till one, who was taller than the prisoner, came with a kind of a weapon, and levelled at my head. I held up my arm, and received the blow upon it; upon which my arm dropped, and the man who cut me came upon the splinter-bar, and laid himself across me to rifle my pockets. I begged him not to kill me; that he should have all I had. Then I put my hand in my right pocket, and took out very near twenty shillings in silver. Then he took my gold watch. He felt outside my left-hand breeches pocket, and felt something: he swore, and said, Come, Sir, make baste. He took a pocketbook out of that pocket, and a purse containing eleven guineas, a shirt buckle, and two medals of the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester; they were all in that purse. I said, I hoped he would be satisfied; for now he had got all: he replied, Very well, go on.

What have you to say against the prisoner? - He is the man that ran across the road, and laid hold of one of the horses.

Are you certain of that? - I am certain.

What sort of light was it? - It was not quite dark, it was dusk; but one might perceive

and know any face: he stood quite fronting me, at the horses' heads, and looked up; his face was directed towards me: I am perfectly sure he is the man.

Did you observe his dress? - Yes, a brown coat; I described him exactly before I saw him. I whipped one of the horses, and dragged him I suppose fifteen or twenty yards. When I said I would not be robbed, I kept whipping the horses; but he would not quit his hold. The prisoner was taken the next day. I refused seeing him that evening; it was then pretty near dusk, and the man who took him brought him to me at Kingsland, and wanted me to look at him then; he was brought to a house, the sign of the Fox, near where I lodge: I told the man that had taken him to keep him; for the next day I would attend Mr. Wilmot's office; I chose to see him at the justice's: I saw him there the next day; there were several people in the room with him; I pointed him out the moment I saw him. I said, That is the little man that laid hold of the horses' heads.

Have you found your money or watch since? - No; and what they ha d got they should have been welcome to: I should not have prosecuted them, but only for their cruelty to me: I had a cut an inch deep in my arm; but this is not the man that cut me.

From the Prisoner. What marks he swears to me by? - By his face.

Which horse did I lay hold of first? - You came on the right-hand side, and laid hold of the off horse first, and then to the other, and then never quitted your station till I was robbed, and the man left the coach-box.

WILLIAM RAY sworn.

I am a hackney-coachman. My coach was taken by Mr. Leoni in Whitechapel; he got upon the box before I came to the coach, and asked for the coachman: Mr. Leoni drove himself; I sat upon the box with him. Mr. Leoni set off along Houndsditch, Shoreditch, and Kingsland-road. Just as we came on this side the Fox, a little man catched hold of the horse's head, on the near side, and swore, D - n your eyes, stop! or I will blow your brains out. I did not see him lay hold of the horse on the off-side. He had a bludgeon, or pistol, or something in his hand; but I can't tell what. Mr. Leoni said, D - n your eyes! I will not be stopped by any body. He kept whipping the horses, and dragged the man twenty yards, I dare say: then a tall man got upon the splinter-bar on the off-side, and said, D - n your eyes! I will learn you to drive on when you are ordered to stop! The coach was stopped; then he began beating Mr. Leoni a-cross his thighs with a hanger, I believe it was, it looked like one; he hit him across his arm, and cut his arm very bad: then he laid across him, and began rifling his pockets; he pulled his watch out, as if he would pull his breeches all to pieces; I saw the watch, just as they drew it out: they made me look the other way, only I just cast my eyes a little that way.

How long did this continue? - About ten minutes: they went towards London from the coach; we set off the other way to Mr. Leoni's lodgings.

Can you speak to the prisoner? - I can't swear to never a one of them; it was pretty dark.

What was it o'clock? - About ten.

Why do you think so? - What makes me so positive in the time was, I was going to draw the horses into the yard.

You could not see the prisoner's face then? - I could discern what size he was, but not to swear to him: he seemed to be a shortish thick-set man. I was at Justice Wilmot's next day, and saw the prisoner there.

Was you there when Mr. Leoni came in? - Yes.

Did or did not Mr. Leoni fix upon the prisoner as soon as he came in? - I don't know; he was there before I was.

What did you say before the justice about the prisoner? - I said, I could not swear to him.

What time do you usually put up your horses? - Just as it happens.

Do you ever put up before ten o'clock? - Yes; I have put up at seven and eight several times.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This witness swore before the justice that Mr. Leoni was very drunk. I am innocent of the affair. At the time the robbery was done, I was at Clapton with this gentleman that is here; I slept there till five next morning; then he gave me a shilling, and I came away.

For the Prisoner.

ROBERT KNIGHT sworn.

I know the prisoner; he lived fellow-servant with me about nineteen months, at Mrs. Horton's, at Brook-house, Clapton; he was a very honest lad, and very willing to do his work: he left his place about two years ago. On the 25th of August, he came to me at Brooke-house, where I live, about ten minutes before ten, and slept with me till five next morning, when he departed: he had laid with me several times since he left his mistress's service; I cannot say how many times.

How came you to be so certain to Saturday the 25th of August? - Because he was taken up the next day, and I was told of it on Monday.

How came you to know the time to be ten minutes before ten so exactly? - Because he and I were talking at the gate some time, and then the clock struck ten. The place where this robbery is said to have been committed, is about two miles from Brooke-house.

Jury. Is there not a nearer way across the fields to come to it? - No.

What did you drink? - Small beer. He appeared tight and clean; he had the same coat on he has now, and he had no money in his pocket that I know of. I should have thought, if he had been guilty, he would have been in a terror; but he seemed the same as usual. He has drove for a livery-stable at London-Wall.

Jury to Ray. Whether Mr. Leoni was sober at the time he was robbed? - He seemed to be about half-and-half.

Court to Mr. Leoni. Was you affected with liquor? - I was not affected; I was sufficiently capable of knowing his face. The moment I was attacked, I had a diamond-ring upon my finger; I turned it back, and brought it home with me. I had been dining with some friends; and, to the best of my recollection, had not drank a bottle of Port wine; something better than a pint.

Court. Some people's heads can't carry much. - My Lord, I am sorry to say that I can bear a bottle of wine.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GOULD.

Reference Number: t17810912-23

491. EDWARD MITCHEL was indicted for stealing a cloth coat, value 12 s. a linen and cotton waistcoat, value 3 s. a pair of women's stays, value 9 s. a linen shirt, value 4 s. a linen counterpane, value 4 s. and a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 12 s. the property of William Whitehorn , August the 12th .

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

WILLIAM WHITEHORN sworn.

I lodge in the house of another person. On the 12th of August, between five and six in the morning, my wife and I heard a noise; and, getting up in bed, saw a man in the room: he had gathered the things mentioned in the indictment together, and put them on a chair close by the window: when he heard me stir, he looked round, and catched up the things in his arms, and jumped out of the window, which is thirteen feet from the ground. I got up, and looked out of the window, and saw the prisoner drop the things in the court, and take up some of them again, and run away; he knocked off his hat, and left it behind him in the court. I called out, Stop thief! and a Jew going past pursued him, and in about seven minutes brought him back, and some of the things with him; I am sure the man brought back is the same person that jumped out of the window: he had a brown coat and a blue apron: when he jumped out of the window, he looked up, and I saw his face.

DAVID SPINOZA sworn.

I was going past, and heard Whitehorn cry out, Stop thief! I pursued the man. I did not see him after he got out of the court. I saw a man running. I cried, Stop thief! Another man stopped him, and we secured him, and found in his possession several of the things mentioned in the indictment. We delivered the things to the constable. He was without a hat when we took him.

( William Miller confirmed in every particular the evidence of the last witness.)

( Solomon Davies , the constable, produced the goods, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found them in the court. I took them up. Somebody called out, Stop thief! and they laid hold of me.

(He called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s. N. 2 years .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-24

492. ELIZABETH STEVENSON was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a glass seal, set in silver, value 1 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Rudge , privately from his person , July the 30th .

JOSEPH RUDGE sworn.

I work at the Westminster wooden bridge, and am a ticket-porter . On the 30th of July, I was coming from Petty-France. I met a parcel of girls by the dead wall in Parliament-street , between eleven and twelve at night: the prisoner was one of them: I had seen her before several times. There were two or three of them knew me very well. They asked me to treat them; which I did. I did not drink any thing myself. The prisoner, seeing me in liquor, followed me, and asked me to give her something to drink. I said, I was going home, and could not stop: I had just treated her before. She came before me, asking me to give her something to drink, and took my watch and handkerchief out of my pocket. I missed them both in less than a minute afterwards. I did not see her doing it, nor feel her doing it, but missed them directly. Then I went home. I felt it in my pocket, after I left the others, when I came out of the public-house, before the prisoner overtook me. It was a silver watch. I heard of it next morning.

You was in liquor? - Yes; but I was sober enough to know that was the girl.

HENRY HENNING sworn.

I am watch-house-keeper of Covent-garden. On the 30th of July, about one in the morning, the watchmen going their rounds, met with this woman making a noise. They brought her to the watch-house as disorderly. Endeavouring to get away, she fell; and this watch fell from her bosom.

Did you see it fall? - No: it was given to me. The inside case was brought in first: I said, Where is the outside case? They said, they could not tell. I desired them to look for the other case about the place where she was. They did; and found it in an area.

NORTHEN BOBBETT sworn.

About a quarter after one o'clock, this woman and two more were making a noise and disturbance in Tavistock-street. I said, if they did not make less noise, I would take them to the watch-house. Going to take hold of the prisoner, she fell down, and the watch fell out of her bosom. I went to take her up, and found the watch on the pavement. I took it up, and delivered it to the last witness, in the watch-house. There was nobody within twenty or thirty yards of her, when the watch dropped.

Was the whole watch there, or the outside case wanting? - The body of the watch only: we found the outside case in an area in York-street, about ten yards from the place where she fell.

(The watch was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

JAMES LEWIS sworn.

I am a watchman. I went and found the case in an area, in the morning, by the desire of Henning.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

When I was taken up by the watchman, I was going home. I never saw the prosecutor before. I saw three girls quarrelling in Tavistock-street: there was a girl dropped a watch: they were in pursuit of her. The watchman came to me, and said, What did I do there? I said, I was doing no hurt. He said, he supposed I was the person that took the man's watch. He struck me, and cut me on the head. I know nothing at all of the watch.

GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not guilty of stealing them privately from the person .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-25

493. MARGARET BEALE was indicted for stealing nineteen guineas in monies numbered, the property of Charles M'Donald , in the dwelling-house of a person unknown , July the 30th .

CHARLES M'DONALD sworn.

I am a seaman . On the 30th of July, about eleven at night, I was up at Salt-petre Bank . I don't know whose house it was; but I got in company in the house. When I came out, the prisoner followed me, and robbed me of 19 guineas. I was something in liquor. I cannot say how long I was in the house, but not above an hour at most.

Had you any conversation with her in the house? - Yes; and I treated her with something to drink. I am sure it was the prisoner.

Where did you go, when you came out of the house? - Into the street. She got familiar with me in the street, and robbed me of 19 guineas, and a note I had of Capt. Stevenson, and a protection. She took them out of my waistcoat pocket. They were both found upon her.

Had she seen your money in the house? - I had the change of a guinea in my pocket. The guineas were in a purse: the silver was loose. I believe I hauled the silver out, to pay for the liquor, in the house.

How long was she with you in the street? - A mighty little time. As soon as she had got the money, she was gone like a shot. It was on Monday. I searched for her all Tuesday, but could not find her. I found her on Wednesday. She had a whole band of music in the house. I asked her her name. She said her name was Paul Jones . I said, What, you are the pirate that took the Serapis: I have caught you, have I? I went to her at the lock-up house, and told her, if she had eight or ten guineas left, if she would give them me, I would send her about her business; for I had not a farthing left to take me home to Liverpool. I am sure I had the money when I came out of the house. I have found none of it since. As soon as she was gone, I put my hand to my pocket, and missed the money. I did not know where to follow her. I abused her, being a little in liquor; and some men came about me (of her consorts, I suppose), and asked me what I abused her for. I heard a watchman coming: I called Watch! Robbery! and then they all flew from me. I told the watchman I had been robbed of 20 l. and went with him to the watch-house.

- WHITEWAY sworn.

I am a constable. I took the prisoner on the 1st of August. The prosecutor had stopped her on Salt-petre Bank: I was sent for to take charge of her. I found no money upon her; but I found these two papers, which the prosecutor swore, before the magistrates, were in the pocket he lost his money from (producing them).

Court. This paper appears to be a discharge of William Sutherland from the Bellona man of war.

Prosecutor. Sutherland gave it me when I came a-shore, and said, I was about his size; that would protect me.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never saw the prosecutor in my life till he laid hold of me, and gave this man charge of me, and I do not know what about.

GUILTY of stealing the money, but not guilty of stealing it in the dwelling-house .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Whipping. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-26

494. WILLIAM HARTINGTON was indicted for stealing nine pair of men's leather shoes, value 45 s. the property of John Gann , in the dwelling-house of the said John , August the 10th .

JOHN GANN sworn.

I am a shoe-maker . About five months ago, I hired the prisoner as a clicker ; that is, to cut out shoes, and to serve in my shop. In the beginning of August, I was taken ill with a fever. After I got better, I went into the country. While I was in the country, I had a letter sent me, that my clicker had robbed me of shoes; upon which information I came to town, and appeared before Justice Addington; and there I saw some shoes, which were produced by Thomas Brown , a pawnbroker: they were my property.

(Thomas Brown, the pawnbroker, produced the shoes in court, and they were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

To the Prosecutor. What is the value of the shoes? - Between thirty and forty shillings.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had no intention of wronging my master in the least. I told the pawnbroker I was distressed for money, and would fetch them again in a few days.

To Brown. Did he say so? - Yes.

Prisoner. I was in a little predicament; I was distressed for money to pay a bill. I was to receive 50 l. in a few days.

(The prisoner called four witnesses, to prove that he was to receive 50 l. in a few days; which sum was to have been paid him sooner, only for a debate concerning the form of the receipt.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-27

495. JOHN COLSTON , otherwise CONNER, otherwise ARMSTRONG , was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 20 s. a silk handkerchief, value 12 d. a linen waistcoat, value 12 s. two guineas and half-a-guinea in monies numbered , the property of Joseph Sewell , July the 22d .

JOSEPH SEWELL sworn.

The prisoner and I lodged and slept together on Garlick-hill , at No. 12. On the 21st of July, he and I went up into the chamber, to go to bed, at about 11 o'clock. I got into bed; and he pulled off his things, to get into bed: but he said he had to speak to some of the rest of the lodgers in another room, and so he put on some of his cloaths again, and took the candle, and went into the other room; and I never saw him after till the Monday following. I fell asleep soon after he went out. When I waked, I missed a coat and waistcoat, and two pair of Nankeen breeches; and two guineas and an half in gold, and some silver, and a silver watch, which were in my breeches pocket. My breeches lay in a chair, by the bedside.

Were your breeches gone? - Yes; but they were found in the dust-hole the next day. I lost a silk handkerchief, and a white dimity waistcoat. I got up, and went in search of the prisoner, with another young man, who found him the next day, which was Monday, between seven and eight o'clock. I understood he found him somewhere near Drury-lane; but the place I can't tell; I am quite a stranger in the town. We found the watch in his pocket: he had the white dimity waistcoat and Nankeen breeches of mine on, and a silk handkerchief of mine in his pocket, and two guineas and one shilling; but I can't swear that the money was mine.

Did you find him yourself? - Yes.

Did you search him? - No: Mr. Cross did.

- CROSS sworn.

I attend Mr. Triquet's office, in Hart-street, Bloomsbury. I took the prisoner. I found upon him this watch, two guineas, and a shilling, in his breeches pocket. He had this dimity waistcoat on, and this handkerchief.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the watch and the waistcoat in Holborn, at the corner of Red-lion-street. I sent for the man to come here.

GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Fine. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-28

496. ELIZABETH WOOD was indicted for stealing seventeen yards of carpetting, called Kidderminster carpet, value 25 s. the property of George Gill , August the 27th .

- DEVERELL sworn.

I was coming from the Maze-Pond, on the 27th of August: I came over London bridge . Coming by Mr. Gill's, which is the first house on this side London bridge, at about eight in the evening, I saw the prisoner stoop down, and take the carpet off the window of Mr. Gill's house, and conceal it under her cloak, and go away with it. I was about three yards from her. I instantly laid hold of her. She threw it down upon the very place she took it from. When I stopped her, I saw her throw it down.

How many steps did she go befor e you stopped her? - Three or four. She went off the curb stone. I laid hold of her, and took her into the shop. She first said she did not do it: afterwards she said to the constable, that it was her first offence.

JOSEPH ELLIS sworn.

I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. She denied the fact: I never heard her own it. I received the carpet from Mr. Gill's servant: he is not here.

(The carpet was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was stooping down to buckle my shoe. This man came and laid hold of me, and asked me, If I was going to steal any thing? I asked him what he meant by asking me such an impudent question; and then he shoved me down into the shop, and the servant said he would keep me till his master came home.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-29

497. SAMUEL LAMB was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 20 s. the property of John Barber , July the 17th .

JOHN BARBER sworn.

Upon the 17th of July, between twelve and one, the prisoner and another boy were calling Dust! in the street. My wife was in the shop, and I was busy. She called out to the maid, to bring the dust up. We have a back-door goes into St. Martin's lane . We desired her to set it down at the door, and watch the dustman. She did not; but went with the child to school. The dustman took the dust, and returned and carried the box down stairs. Just after, my wife went, and saw the mark of the dustman's feet on the stairs. She had some suspicion the dustman had been down stairs. The watch was always somewhere in the kitchen, for them to cook by: I had seen it on the shelf that morning. In less than two minutes after they had taken away the dust, the watch was missed. I went to the door. The dust-cart stood about fifteen yards off, on the other side of the street. I went to the prisoner, and said, Give me the watch you have taken out of our kitchen. He said, What watch? I said, Did not you take the dust from the back-door, out of that alley? He said, Yes. I said, Did not you carry the

box back? He said, No; the other boy did. I asked the other, if he carried it down? He said, No; the prisoner carried it down himself. I asked him then, again, if he carried the box back? He said, he did. I brought him back to the shop, and charged him with it. My wife said, If he produced the watch, she would send him about his business; but I said, if I found that watch upon him, I would prosecute him. I sent for a constable; and in the interim I shook his coat, and felt the watch between the linings. I held it till the constable came: he put his hand into the lining, and pulled out my watch.

( William Peasley , a constable, produced the watch, which was deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I took the dust up from the door, and put the box down again: I was not down stairs. I found the watch in the cart.

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. and Imp. 6 months .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-30

498. RICHARD BALDWIN was indicted for stealing 150 bricks, called grey-stocks, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Scott , Samuel Scott , John Scott , and William Scott , August the 24th .

DENNIS M'CARTY sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Scott, who has brick-fields at Hoxton . Richard Baldwin , the prisoner, was carter to Mr. Scott. Upon Friday, the 24th of August, I set the bricks to the carter, and the prisoner loaded his cart. To the best of my knowledge, he had 1000: I do not know how many more. He did not tell me where he was going to. Mr. Clarkson, the clerk of the field, gave him a ticket.

Do you always send 1000? - No; sometimes 750, and sometimes 500. If the cart is very full, it carries above 1000. He told me he was wanting in his number in the last cart, and he must have some over then.

JAMES CLARKSON sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Scotts.

Who are the partners? - Thomas, Samuel, John, and William. On the 24th of August last, I ordered the prisoner to go and load 1000 bricks, and to go to Mr. Haggard, at London-Wall.

Was he to take any more than 1000 in the cart? - Not that I know of.

What is the value of 1000? - 22 s.

EDWARD MILTON sworn.

I am a cabinet-maker. On the 24th of August, while I was sitting at my own door, I saw the prisoner carry a load of bricks to Mr. Burland. I saw him carry about 200 bricks to Mr. Burland's back-door. He then went away, and drove the cart against the wall, and shook the whole wall. I saw him afterwards unload the cart. I went back, and counted the number of bricks at Burland's.

JACOB UPSDELL sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Scott. I was at the taking-up of the prisoner. I charged him with selling 200 bricks, and asked him how he could be guilty of such a thing; as he was in constant work, and earned 17 or 18 s. a week, and had that week earned 24 s. He said, Burland had before seen him put down some bricks in Tabernacle-walk, and asked him, if he could not bring him some bricks, and he would give him something to drink; and accordingly, the first opportunity, he carried him some. He said Burland first gave him a shilling, and afterwards 5 d. He confessed that as soon as he was charged with it.

Did you make any allowance to Haggard afterwards? - Yes; he was charged 850 only.

(The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.)

GUILTY . Fined 1 s.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-31

499. MARY JONES was indicted for stealing 26 yards of thread edging, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Knott and

William Burtost , privately in their shop , September the 1st .

CHARLES CHARLERWORTH sworn.

I am shopman to Thomas Knott and William Burtost , who live in King-street, Covent-garden . On the 1st of September, about twelve at noon, the prisoner came into the shop. I was behind the counter. Two persons had been looking at some thread edging, which was in a box then upon the counter. The prisoner came behind the two people who were looking at it, and stood there a considerable time. I suspected her. I was at a distance, and could not perceive what she was about. She bought a yard of edging, of another person in the shop. She seemed confused, and went out of the shop. I suspected her, and followed her out. When she got about ten yards from the door, I laid hold of her, and felt the lace under her cloak. I brought her back to the shop, and charged her with taking a piece of lace. She then dropped it from under her arm. She was taken to the Office in Bow-street, and committed by Justice Addington. The edging cost 26 s.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into the shop, and bought a yard of lace. The gentleman followed me; and he said, I believe you have something more than your own. I was rather shocked. He brought me into the shop, took me up stairs, and sent for a constable, and gave charge of me.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

(She was humbly recommended, both by the Jury and the Prosecutor, to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17810912-32

500. DAVID JACOBS was indicted for stealing 66 yards of silk ribband, value 21 s. the property of Ralph Hall , privately in the shop of the said Ralph , August the 11th .

REBECCA DAVIS sworn.

I work in Mr. Hall's shop, as a millener, in King-street, Tower-hill . On the 11th of August, between six and seven in the morning, the prisoner came in, and asked to look at some ribband. I shewed him a box of figured ribband. He asked for two yards three quarters, and wanted me to abate him a halfpenny a yard. I told him I could not. He looked over the box a few minutes: he then went out of the shop; but returned again, and asked me if I had got any plain ribbands. I shewed him some. He asked the price, and wanted an abatement of a halfpenny a yard in them; and he looked over them a few minutes. I told him I could not abate; and shut up the box. He asked if I had any black ribbands. I shewed him some, and he wanted me to abate him something in them. I said I could not. While he was looking over that, the servant-maid came out of the parlour, and bid me put the box away, saying that he was a thief, and did not want ribbands. He said, he was no thief, and went out of the shop. I then looked in the box, and missed a piece of black ribband. There was a person sweeping the shop: I bid her go after him, and bring him back. The piece I missed was the only piece of the sort that was in the box. He had been looking at it. The young woman brought him back, and an opposite neighbour came over to her assistance. He came back close to the counter: he opened his clothes, his coat, waistcoat, and breeches, and the ribbands all rolled out from him into the black ribband box; but where they came from I cannot tell: I am sure they were not there before. He then said, he had not got any thing. I asked how the the ribbands came into the box; he said, he could not tell, and then attempted to go out. I stopped him; and he offered me a guinea, which he had in his hand: he did not say what he offered it for. There were four half pieces of coloured ribband returned into the black ribband box.

MARY BAILEY sworn.

I was cleaning the parlour. The prisoner was in the shop about a quarter of an hour.

I went into the shop, and he seemed quite confused: his eyes went like clock-work. He offered me a guinea, and desired me to get change. I made him no answer. I saw him put a handkerchief he had in his hand over a piece of five penny ribband. I then told the journey woman to take the ribband away, that he was a thief. He directly went out of the shop. The apprentice went out after him, and fetched him in again. He went up to the counter. His coat, waistcoat, and breeches, were loose. I saw him bring up the four pieces of ribband with his hand, within his cloaths, and put them into the box. Whether they came from his breeches, or coat and waistcoat, I cannot tell. He wanted to get away: we were hardly able to hold him.

( Betsy Fanton , the apprentice, who brought back the prisoner, confirmed the evidence of the two other witnesses.)

(The ribbands were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

(The prisoner called four Jews, who swore that he had been many years in a state of insanity.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-33

501. HANNAH CARRYL was indicted for stealing a silk purse, value 3 s. and five guineas and 8 s. in monies numbered, the property of John Morrison , privately from his person; also a bank-note for 10 l. the property of the said John, the money secured by the said note being then due and unsatisfied to him, the proprietor thereof , July the 16th .

JOHN MORRISON sworn.

On the 17th of July, at about three in the morning, I was, with an acquaintance, coming down Bow-street, Covent-garden. I met the prisoner: she and I went into the play-house passage , in the street: I talked to her for some time there; and at the same time there were two men had a quarrel in Bow-street, and a great mob gathered in Bow-street. These two men ran up Hart-street. Upon that, the prisoner went out of the passage, and I came out after her. She walked on in Bow-street. My friend told me to search my pockets. When I came down Bow-street, he stood on the outside of the passage. I searched my pockets, and I missed my purse, containing a bank-note for 10 l. five guineas, and some silver. It was taken from my right-hand breeches pocket. I had felt it on coming out of the White-hart tavern. I had been at a feast at the White-hart the day before: I went and spent the evening at Sadler's-Wells, and then returned to the White-hart, and staid till two o'clock. The waiter asked me for my money when I went in, and gave it me when I came out again.

Why did he ask your money of you? - Because it is a house bad women frequent.

Did you look to see what was in the purse when he gave it you back? - Yes.

Was you quite sober? - I was really sensible, but not quite sober. I followed the prisoner, and demanded my purse. She denied it. The watchman happening to come by, I charged the watch with her. She was carried to the watch-house, and searched. The purse was not found upon her: it was found in the watch-house by the beadle. There was not any thing found upon her. When I charged her with robbing me, in the watch-house, I told the number of the note, the sum of money in the purse, and described it particularly.

Was it found in your presence? - No; there was nothing found while I staid.

How long did you stay with her in the passage? - To the best of my knowledge, not above ten minutes.

During the time you were with her, might not your purse have dropped out of your pocket? - No; it did not.

Was not you in such a situation that it might? - No; I had no connection with her whatever.

Was your breeches unbuttoned? - No; they were not.

Prisoner. Were not you fighting, and pulled off your coat and waistcoat? - No; I was not.

Prisoner. Did not you give me your coat and waistcoat to hold? - No.

AARON ADAMS sworn.

I was beadle of the night; and being in the watch-house, when the charge came in, she was searched. Nothing was found upon her: but the purse was found in the watch-house, about two or three hours after. There is a back-room we were in: it was found dropped down in a corner. There was another person brought in with her, and searched likewise. The prosecutor and the other man said they knew nothing of the other woman, only that she met them as they were coming to the watch-house; and she was examined, because she was in company, left the prisoner should have given it to her.

The young man did not give charge of her? - No; they said they did not think she had it.

What did the prosecutor say when he came to the watch-house? - He charged the prisoner with robbing him of a purse, containing a 10 l. note, five guineas, and some silver; that the purse had but one tassel.

Did he appear to be sober, or in liquor, when he came in? - I can't take upon me to say he was sober, nor that he was much in liquor. The purse contained what he had spoken of.

Had the prisoner been near where the purse was found? - I don't know: the room is very little. When I found the purse, I charged her with it again, and she declared she had not got it, but the other woman had it; and so she declared before the justice.

(The purse was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

( Richard Williams , who was in company with the prosecutor, confirmed his evidence.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing at all about the matter; nothing in the world. The gentleman came down to me in Clerkenwell, and said he would give me a guinea not to tell where he was in the quarrel in the night-house.

To the Prosecutor. Is there any truth in this story about a quarrel in the night-house? - None. I went to Clerkenwell, to see a friend of mine, who was there for debt. I asked for this woman. When I saw her, I asked her if she knew me? She said, No. I asked her how she would stand trial? She said, I should have my property again; she had given it up to the beadle. I said, Why did not you tell me, when you gave it to the beadle; and I might have made you an acknowledgement? I thought, if they had told me they had got the property, and given it me, there was no occasion to go before the justice at all.

(The prisoner called Elizabeth Eccles, who gave her a good character.)

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-34

502. MARY WOOD was indicted for stealing a stuff petticoat, value 6 s. and a pair of stays, value 18 d. the property of Sarah Lawrence , August the 5th .

(The prosecutrix was called, but not appearing, the court ordered her recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810912-35

503. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a ham, 20 lb. weight, value 10 s. the property of George Nokes , privately in the shop of the said George , July the 31st .

(Owing to the absence of a witness, the property was not identified.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-36

504. THOMAS MITCHEL was indicted for stealing sixteen linen handkerchiefs, value 24 s. two pieces of muslin, containing five yards and a half, value 40 s. a muslin neckcloth, value 18 d. a piece of printed callico, containing five yards, value 30 s. and a piece of gauze, called Scotch Lino, containing six yards, value 18 s. the property of Edward Stamford , in the dwelling-house of the said Edward , August the 5th .

EDWARD STAMFORD sworn.

The prisoner was my servant . He had lived with me about six months. On the 4th of August, at about ten o'clock in the morning, I missed him for, I suppose, the space of two hours. At about twelve o'clock he was brought home to my house by a Mr. Parker, a pawnbroker, in Prince's-street, Leicester-fields.

Where is your house? - In Castle-street, Leicester-fields . He was brought back by him, with a piece of linen handkerchiefs, containing ten in number, which had my own private mark upon them. About a fortnight after, I had reason to believe he had conveyed goods down to his father.

Upon these being brought back, had you him committed? - No; being a young man, and knowing his friends, I was willing to shew him all the lenity I could. I let him go down to his friends at Horsham. By the return of the post, I acquainted his friends with what had happened; I likewise acquainted several of my friends with what had happened. In consequence of some letters from friends of mine, I went down to Horsham. I applied to a magistrate: he granted me a warrant to search his father's house. Upon searching it, I found concealed on the bed-teaster, a callico gown, four yards of sprig muslin, and six yards of Scotch Lino, all of them with my private mark upon them. The offenders were carried before the magistrate, and all committed to Horsham gaol.

THOMAS PARKER sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, in Prince's street, Leicester-fields. On the 4th of August, the prisoner brought a piece of handkerchiefs, in the morning, to my shop: he wanted half-a-guinea on them. I asked him who he brought them from? He mentioned a person's name I don't recollect now; but he said a draper's, in Holborn. I stopped him, and sent to know the truth of it: I could not find any such person. I told him there was no such person, and desired he would inform me where he got them. He made some frivolous excuses: he first said he got them from one person, then from another. I said I could not give credit to that, and if he did not tell me, I would take him before a magistrate. Upon this, he confessed he had them from Mr. Stamford's; that he lived with him. I thought it was his first offence, and took some pity on him. I carried him to Mr. Stamford: I said I would leave it to him to do as he pleased about prosecuting. Mr. Stamford said he would consider of it, and consult some of his friends. I delivered the handkerchiefs to Mr. Percival.

GEORGE PERCIVAL sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Stamford. I received ten handkerchiefs from the last witness, with some handkerchiefs that he had pawned there before.

Parker. He pawned six handkerchiefs, and three neckcloths, at my shop, on the 19th of July.

Are you sure it was the same young man? - Yes. As soon as I brought them home, I delivered them to Mr. Stamford.

Did you examine them, when Parker delivered them to you? - Percival. Yes; they were my master's property.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by Mr. Stamford.)

THOMAS HONEYWOOD sworn.

I am a constable, at Horsham. On the 18th of August, Mr. Stamford came to me, and brought me a warrant to search the house of Thomas Mitchel , the father of the prisoner: there I found a gown, and a couple of pieces. I took them and the mother to a magistrate: she was examined; and then we went and took the young man; and they were all committed to Horsham gaol.

(The goods were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

To the Prosecutor. What is the value of the handkerchiefs? - The value of sixteen handkerchiefs is 24 s. the remnant.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say.

To Prosecutor. How old is the prisoner? - Sixteen, he told me.

How has he behaved the former part of the time he was with you? - Very well.

For the Prisoner.

THOMAS BLAKE sworn.

I keep the Smyrna coffee-house, Pall-mall. I have known the prisoner from a child. He has borne a good character, for all that I know. I never knew any thing bad of him before this affair.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

(He was humbly recommended, both by the Prosecutor and the Jury, to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-37

505, 506. JOHN BUCKLEY and THOMAS SHENTON were indicted for that they, in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, in and upon John Mawson feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10 s. a silver stock-buckle, value 2 s. a linen stock, value 1 s. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. and a half-guinea and 120 copper halfpence, in monies numbered, the property of the said John , August the 17th .

JOHN MAWSON sworn.

I live in Newman-street, and deal in cheese . On the 17th of August, as I was going to Pancras with some butter, I was detained at Mother Redcap's by a shower of rain for about three quarters of an hour. I got there about seven o'clock: then I came back by the George, where I staid about ten minutes. As I was coming home, in company with Mr. Andrews, within two fields of the new road that is by the gate-house of Lord Baltimore, we were met by two men; they attacked us both: the man who attacked me I have never seen since. He clapped a bayonet to my breast, and said, with an oath, Your money, or your life! He had on a soldier's waistcoat and breeches. I put the bayonet aside, and gave him my silver, about three or four shillings. He then wished me a good night; but just as he went off, I thought I had an opportunity of seizing him, which accordingly I did, and immediately called out to my friend Mr. Andrews, that I had got my man, and would keep him. In less than a minute after that, while we were struggling, the prisoner Shenton, and two others, came up; they rushed to me immediately, and ran a drawn bayonet smartish against my breast, and swore, that if I did not loose the man immediately, he would run me through directly! I was alarmed at this; I loosed the man, and ran away; they followed me; they soon came up with me, and knocked me down. When I was down upon my back, one of them set his foot upon my breast, and held his bayonet to my belly, and swore a bitter oath, and said he would do for me: I believe that to be Shenton: it was the same man that came to me, and ran the bayonet up to my breast. I begged for mercy: I told them I had a wife and a large family. Buckley, at this time, stood at my feet. He said several times, D - n him, run him through! I saw three or four bayonets drawn; but I don't know whether Buckley had one in his hand. They asked me for more money: I said I had two pockets of halfpence: they then asked me what my buckles were? I said silver; they took them: then they asked what my stock-buckle was? I said that was silver too; upon which they took them. I begged for my stock-buckle, as it had been given me by a relation; but they took it away with the stock. Then one came up, I believe it was the person I had originally taken, and asked them if they had got all? They said, Yes, they believed they had: then, said he, let him go for a fool. At

this time my friend Mr. Andrews came up to beg also for my life; they then gave me a kick or two on my side, and went away. This was as near as could be about nine o'clock: it was duskish; but there was light enough to see them; and I lay upon my back while they were doing all this perhaps for about six or eight minutes, while they were rifling me, and had a full opportunity of seeing them. I did not see any body else in the fields, nor indeed till I came to Tottenham Court turnpike. I am positive the prisoners are two of the men who robbed me.

JOSEPH ANDREWS sworn.

When we came into the second field the prisoner, Buckley, came up to me from a high bank that goes along the field: he caught hold of my breast, and pointed a bayonet at my breast, and said D - n your eyes, your life or your money! Mr. Mawson and I were walking by the side of each other: I saw Mr. Mawson seized by another of the men, not one of the prisoners; the same expressions were used to him. While Buckley was holding his bayonet to me, I struck him with my stick on the head; I then caught hold of him; I threw my arm round his neck, and hugg'd him close to me, and there kept him: I got the point of his bayonet in the hook of my stick, and kept it off; but he continued pushing at me, and pricked me several times in the side. The moment almost that the struggling was over, three other men came up; one came to me with a cutlass, and said, D - n your eyes, I will cut your head from your shoulders, if you don't let him go! Mr. Mawson at this had gone off: one of those three men struck me on the shoulder, and then shook hands with me, and bid me good night; and, upon seeing Mr. Mawson go off, they left me, and ran after Mr. Mawson, upon quitting me. Then I met two more people that I took to be of the same gang, in about twenty yards after: they asked the men that robbed me, whether I had been robbed, or no. I begged of them for my friend's life; they said he should not be hurt; I then deliberated for a moment what I should do, and I resolved to go back; I thought in my mind that if he was killed in the field, I would be killed also: I went back to Mr. Mawson; I found him lying flat upon his back, with three or four people pointing their bayonets to his belly, and swearing they would run him through. Buckley, who was one of them, said, upon my coming up, D - n him, is he come back again? One of them said, Yes; then he said, Search for his buckles; I told them they were not silver, but plated; they said, They would do for them. I am positive Buckley was one of the persons that were there; I am also certain that I saw Shenton with his bayonet pointing to Mr. Mawson's breast. When I came up, it was about nine o'clock, and there was light enough to distinguish their persons. Shenton had on a black coat, with a white waistcoat and breeches; Buckley was dressed as he is now.

WILLIAM WESTON sworn.

I was sitting with some company at the Maidenhead at Battle-bridge. We were informed that a coach had been stopped: we all went out to look for a watch, which had been thrown into the field. While we were looking for the watch, we saw the two prisoners and another: they seemed as if they were looking for the watch; but upon discovering that one had a hanger under his coat, we seized them; we took them to the Maidenhead; there they were searched; and in Buckley's pocket I found this knife (producing it). We did not find any thing upon Shenton.

( John Weston , John Lovegrove , and Daniel Collins , who were with William Weston , confirmed his evidence.)

Andrews. This is my knife: I was robbed of it at the same time.

BUCKLEY's DEFENCE.

I had been that evening to Spitalfields, to take a deserter: I could not find him; I was going home, and these men stopped me on the road, and took me into custody. I found that knife in the Broad Way, Westminster.

SHENTON's DEFENCE.

I never had any correspondence with Buckley. I never saw these gentlemen before

I saw them in the office. I was on the Bank piquet that same night.

BOTH GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17810912-38

507. JOHN BURROWS was indicted for that he falsely, deceitfully, feloniously and traiterously, one piece of base coin, resembling the current legal coin of this realm, called a shilling, did colour with materials producing the colour of silver, against the duty of his allegiance, and against the statute , September 8th .

Second count. For colouring counterfeit sixpences.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

On the 8th of this month, myself, and some more officers from Bow-street, went to a broker's shop in Crown-court, Knaves Acre . We got there about eight, or a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning. The broker was taking down the shutters of the shop. We asked if Mr. Burrows lodged there: he said, he had no lodgers in the house. I was not satisfied with that, but ran up stairs immediately. In the two-pair-of-stairs back room, the wife, I believe it is of the prisoner, was in bed: I did not say any thing to her; but she immediately jumped out of bed in her shift, and said, the man you want is in that room; that was the room opposite: she directly ran up the garret stairs. I thought what she was about, and ran by her upon the stairs. I went into the sore garret; there were there three, four, or five of the prisoner's children. Out of the garret on the left hand, there was a further room: there was a door-place, but no door. In that room, I saw the prisoner sitting at work, at a table at the further end of the room, with his back towards me; I could see him as soon as I got to the top of the stairs: he was in his waistcoat, without sleeves, and had a handkerchief tied over his head, and a green apron, or cloth, before him. I immediately ran towards him; he turned his head round: he had some scowering paper and a pair of knippers in his hand, which had either a counterfeit shilling or sixpence in it. I saw him fling it down, and there were three pieces lay together: I immediately catched hold of him as he was rising out of his chair, and then Prothero and Phillips came in. I held the prisoner's hands, and Phillips searched his pockets; he took some silver out of his left-hand pocket, and some colouring along with it.

(A great quantity of blanks and counterfeit shillings produced in court.)

Carpmeal. These were all upon the table he was at work at. They are all base-metal counterfeits of shillings and sixpences in different stages of the process: here are some that were rubbed with scowering paper.

(A quantity of utensils and materials produced.)

Carpmeal. Here are some of the filings of the base metal; here are cocks and sticks, which they smooth them with the last time before they put them into the liquor. We found some aqua fortis in the other garret, a pot with pickle in it, that is a composition made with aqua fortis; it makes a dampness upon the metal, and makes them have an old look.

Who was with you besides Phillips and Prothero? - Jealous and Macmanus. There was a neighbouring gentleman, Mr. Poole, came up into the room.

PERCIVAL PHILLIPS sworn.

I went with the other officers from Bow-street. Mr. Carpmeal and I went up stairs: Mrs. Burrows was in bed in the two-pair-of-stairs room: we went into the room: said she, the man you want is in the room opposite. We were going to look through the key-hole of the door: she ran by, and ran up towards the garret; Carpmeal and I followed her, and got before her. In the back garret I saw Mr. Burrows, just as he had got up from the chair. Mr. Carpmeal went first into the room: he took hold of him, and I searched his pocket; he was in his waistcoat, and had a handkerchief tied about his head; I searched him; and in his left-hand waistcoat pocket I found these five counterfeit sixpences

loose, and some stuff for pickling: and I found a half-guinea and a half-crown in his breeches-pocket, good money, which I returned him. In the same room I found this pipkin, with the stuff that is now in it: in the fore room I found two phials of aqua fortis.

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

I went with Carpmeal and Phillips to this house. When I first went into the shop, I asked the landlord of the house if he had any lodgers; he told me no; I said I was very sure he had: I desired Carpmeal to go up stairs; he went up, and in half a minute I followed him. When I got up stairs, they had got the prisoner in custody; he was close to the table. I saw all these implements there.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

You have been employed by the Solicitor of the Mint in most prosecutions for coining? - I have, for these fourteen years past.

Look at these blanks, and the implements produced, and give the Court an account of what they are. - These blanks are cast in flasks, upon a spray; then they are separated, and filed on the edges; then with scowering paper they take off the roughness the sand occasions; after that, they are put into aqua fortis, which forces the silver to the surface of the copper, and turns them white: then they are thrown into water; that mollifies the strength of the aqua fortis: then they are rubbed with sand and water, which takes off the stain left by the aqua fortis. Here is one sixpence in the rough; that is a blank: here is another finished, which is cast from the same pattern. These things produced are a complete apparatus for the colouring the metal. It is the custom now to cast them in the country, and send them up to London to be finished. Here is one sixpence found upon the table in the room, which is perfected; it is exactly the same impression of those found in his waistcoat pocket.

How much silver is there in one of these counterfeit sixpences? - To the value of 2 d 1/2 or 2 d 3/4 in a shilling.

Mr. REUBEN FLETCHER sworn.

I am one of the Moneyers of the Mint (cuts that sixpence). This is counterfeit.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my Counsel.

For the Prisoner.

ELIZABETH HAMILTON sworn.

My husband keeps the house where the prisoner lodged: he lodged with us fourteen months. He has a most worthy character: I never heard any other till the morning these gentlemen came to our house after Mr. Burrows.

Counsel for the Crown. You knew his name? - Yes, Burrows.

You saw these men come and ask for him? - I did not see them come in: I was just that moment gone down stairs: when I came up, they were all gone up stairs.

Prisoner. Was there not a great many old paint pots and some lumber in the room, belonging to the broker, when I took the room? - There were several paint pots and things, but I can't justly say what they were.

ANN BAGLEY sworn.

I have known the prisoner about nine months: I never heard any harm of him.

Jury to Elizabeth Hamilton . What part of the house did the prisoner rent of you? - The three pair of stairs.

Jury. Did the back garret belong to him? - Yes, he rented that also.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-39

508, 509, 510, 511, 512, 513. SHEDRICK DUNKLEY , JONAS WOOLDRIDGE , HANNAH TRUEMAN , widow , RICHARD WILLIAMS , ELIZABETH, the wife of Richard Williams , and REBECCA BROWN , were indicted for that they a piece of copper money, of this realm, called a halfpenny, unlawfully and feloniously did make, coin, and counterfeit, against the statute .

2d Count. For that they a piece of false, feigned, and counterfeit copper money, to the likeness and similitude of the current legal copper money of this realm, called a halfpenny, feloniously did make and coin, July the 27th .

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

On the 26th of July last, I went to Cumberland-court, a little court at the upper end of Southampton-buildings , and through a parlour-window I saw the prisoner Brown in the room, running out of the parlour. I called to Phillips to break the door. Then I ran into the house, along the passage; and at the top of the cellar stairs I saw Rebecca Brown coming up, within two stairs from the top. She tried to stop me from going down; but I pulled her up the stairs, and put her under the care of Senhouse. One of the officers passed by me, and went before me into the cellar: I followed him close. Just as we got into the cellar, I saw Hannah Trueman , with a candle in her hand. She put it out. There were two presses, and a candle at each. There was a quantity of halfpence coined, lying by each of the presses. They had their dies in them; and the blanks were lying by the cutting-out press. The three men prisoners, and one Benjamin Lees , who has been since shot in New Prison, were there: their shirt-sleeves were tucked up; and they were black, and very greasy. I did not see any of them in the act of doing any thing: I was something frightened at seeing Lees: but, however, they all behaved quiet and civil. Elizabeth Williams was there: by the appearance of her dress, she did not seem to have been so much at work as the others.

Court. She being in the presence of her husband, must of course be acquitted.

Prothero. There are three cellars, opening one into the other, and no doors to them, but only door-ways: there was a cutting-out press in the furthermost cellar, and there were a great number of blanks lying by that press: there was the cecil, out of which the blanks were cut, and this piece of copper (producing it) lying in this press. The other two presses were, one in the outer, the other in the middle cellar. I found a considerable quantity of halfpence, of two different dies, upon each of these two presses. The prisoners had no clothes on, except in a condition for working. Rebecca Brown was clean and neat, and did not seem to have been at work; but Hannah Trueman was in her working-dress. They desired leave to put their things on. I allowed them to put on their dress. The prisoner Trueman owned it to be her house, and said she was a widow.

JOHN CLARKE sworn.

I went down, and found the prisoners in the cellar. Lees and Elizabeth Williams passed by me; all these four were in a working condition; their shirt-sleeves tucked up: two had trowsers, I could not be positive which. Trueman was exceedingly black. She put out the candle. I got another candle, and lighted it by the candle that stood at the other press, which was not put out. The dies were fixed upon two large presses; one in the first cellar, the other in the cellar on the left-hand. There was a cutting-out press in the other cellar: there were great quantities of halfpence, and many of them were warm, which I verily believe were struck but two minutes before I came down: they were of two different dies, both the year 1775, one fresher than the other. There was a cecil, blanks, and copper, by the cutting press. I do not know that I saw Rebecca Brown , otherwise than in the parlour: I rather think she was a servant in the house: she was clean. The reason of seizing her was, there were some counterfeit halfpence taken out of her pocket by Senhouse. The pieces produced are in three states; some are the blanks, some have the impression on them, and the others appear to have been shook in a bag, to rub off the roughness. Lees came out of the cellar, and slipped under my arm. The presses were very large, and calculated for men to work; but the women may be useful, to put the blanks between the dies. These presses could not be worked with a less number of people than were in the cellar.

( Charles Jellous confirms the evidence of David Prothero and John Clarke .)

PETER SENHOUSE sworn.

I searched Rebecca Brown 's pockets, in the parlour, and found in them counterfeit halfpence in a paper, to the amount of half-a-crown.

Clarke. They are counterfeit, and correspond with those dies.

Mr. REUBEN FLETCHER sworn.

I am a moneyer of the Mint. All the pieces produced are counterfeit.

DUNKLEY's DEFENCE.

I am a carpenter. I was sent for there, to repair a window-shutter.

BROWN's DEFENCE.

I am a mantua-maker, in Ratcliff-highway. I was sent for to fetch a gown.

WOOLDRIDGE's DEFENCE.

I am a journeyman baker. My witnesses are not here.

(Brown called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

(Trueman called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

(Dunkley called three witnesses, who gave him a good character).

DUNKLEY WOOLDRIDGE TRUEMAN RICH. WILLIAMS

GUILTY .

ELIZ. WILLIAMS NOT GUILTY .

BROWN NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810912-40

514, 515, 516, 517. RICHARD MARSHALL , otherwise MOORE , SUSANNA MOORE , spinster , WILLIAM STEAD , and CATHERINE SHRODE , spinster , were indicted for that they a piece of copper money, of this realm, called a halfpenny, unlawfully and feloniously did make, coin, and counterfeit, against the statute .

2d Count. For that they a piece of false, feigned, and counterfeit copper money, to the likeness and similitude of the current legal copper money of this realm, called a halfpenny, feloniously did make and coin, July the 27th .

JOHN YOUNG sworn.

On the 27th of July I went into a house in London-street, Tottenham-Court-road , upon having an information. I knocked at the door. I saw Shrode looking out at the parlour window; she asked me What I wanted? I desired she would let me in; she said She would not open the door; upon which I went backwards, and was helped over a back wall by Grubb, who followed me, and he helped me into the back parlour window. I then went into the passage, to let Grubb in at the door; but, just as I got to the door, I saw the two men, and the other woman, coming up stairs, out of the kitchen. Marshall was without his coat and waistcoat; he had a leather apron and a night-cap on, and his sleeves tucked up. Stead was without his coat, and his sleeves were tucked up, but he had his waistcoat on. Susannah Moore was without her gown, and had a dirty apron on. I followed them up stairs, and took Stead on the landing-place. I called to Dixon to assist me: I told him that the others were gone up stairs, and bid him pursue them. I took Stead into the one-pair-of-stairs back room; where I found Susanna Moore , who was without her upper petticoat, but was in the act of endeavouring to put it on over the dirty apron which she had on, in order to hide it. After I had secured them at the round-house, I came back again to help move the things; and in the back kitchen, I saw the stamping-press; under the stairs, the cutting-press was fixed in the ground; and in the fore kitchen, there were several dies and halfpence, and some halfpence were in the press. Susanna Moore appeared to have been hard at work. Shrode was in the parlour when I came into the house; I saw her no where else.

CHARLES GRUBB sworn.

I heard somebody run up stairs before we got into the house. When we got in, I bid Young go up and secure them, and I myself went down into the kitchen. In the back kitchen I found the windows all blinded up; so was the chimney-piece: and in that kitchen I saw the stamping-press, and a candle alight, and a halfpenny just struck, which was between the dies. In the fore kitchen I found a great quantity of dies. The window of that kitchen was so blinded, that people could not see into it from the street.

We attempted to see, but could not. In the passage, under the stairs, there was a great quantity of blanks and copper, and a cutting-out press, and a candle also, lighted, by it. The men were stripped, and their hands were dirty. Catherine Moore was also stripped, and her hands were all over dirt and grease, as if she had just come from work. Shrode, the old woman, ran to a chamber-pot, and wanted to wash her hands; but I would not let her, for her hands had the appearance of having been at work. There was a great sack of halfpence hanging up on one side of the stamping-press. There were twenty-six dies (producing them, and two that were in the press.)

(Dixon produced a halfpenny that was then between the dies, and also some blanks and some finished halfpence.)

JOHN DIXON sworn.

When I went up in the one pair of stairs back-room, there was Susannah Moore , stripped: she was putting on her petticoat over her clothes. I found Marshall in the rock-loft, in his shirt, with a leather apron on. Stead was stripped, and his sleeves tucked up. Marshall, when he was taken, begged for his clothes. I went down, and found his waistcoat below stairs, by the cutting press; and his hat and wig, and coat, in the front cellar, where the halfpence were found. When he was taken to the office, he owned that the hat, wig, and waistcoat, were his; and he put them on. There was a candle lighted at both presses. Moore's hands were dirty: whether the others were or not, I don't know; but I saw her run to the water to wash them. There were twelve pair of dies, besides those now produced.

DENNIS MACDONALD sworn.

The old woman ran away, to wash herself.

Mr. REUBEN FLETCHER sworn.

I am a moneyer of the mint. All this is counterfeit money.

(Marshall called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

(Stead called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

( Susanna Moore called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

ALL FOUR GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17810912-41

518, 519, 520. WILLIAM STORER , MARY STORER , and THOMAS ORME , were indicted for coining halfpence .

(There was no evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners.)

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-42

521. WILLIAM WHITAKER was indicted for stealing a brown gelding, value 6 l. the property of Thomas Mainwaring , Esq ; July the 9th .

THOMAS MAINWARING , Esq; sworn.

I hired the prisoner, as a footman . On the 7th of July last, I sent him to Ashsted, near Windsor , and went down after him. On Monday following, the 9th of July, in the morning, I got up a little before seven o'clock, and went into the stable. I perceived that my brown gelding was gone. I came from the stable into the garden. I saw the gardener, and asked him if he had seen William. The gardener told me he had not seen him that morning; that he had seen the key in the stable; and, missing the horse, he thought he was gone to take a ride. As he had no orders from me to take the horse, I thought it extremely odd he should take that liberty. I walked about the garden, thinking he might return about the time he expected I should rise. I waited till nine o'clock. He did not return. Then I suspected something had happened. I was determined to come to town. I called for my boots: they were missing. I enquired after the prisoner's clothes: I found they were gone. I came to town, and immediately went to the office in Bow-street; and, pursuing such methods as they thought proper, to apprehend him, I advertised the horse several days. Some time after, the horse was found at the Queen's-head, in Gray's-inn-lane.

How long had the prisoner lived with you? - Five weeks. I had an exceeding good character with him, from a gentleman who knew his family. The horse was a brown gelding, with a star in his forehead, seven years old, fourteen hands and one inch high.

Did you see the horse in the stable overnight? - I did.

THOMAS NOWLE sworn.

I am hostler at the Queen's-head, in Gray's-inn-lane. The prisoner brought a horse to me on the 9th of July, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning. I had never seen him before.

To Mr. Mainwaring. How far is your house from London? - About 17 miles.

To Nowle. What did he say to you? - He desired me to give him a seed of corn, and he would come by-and-by for it. He had boots on: as for spurs, I cannot tell. The horse was there eight or nine days, before the prisoner was apprehended.

Did he say where he came from? - No. I asked him no questions. It was a brown horse, with a star in his forehead, and had two white feet behind, and two long saddle-marks under the saddle.

CHARLES JELLOUS sworn.

Upon Friday, the 3d of August, going across Smithfield, with some more officers, the person belonging to the Rose and Crown said, There was a man in the stable, he believed, had stole a horse, and he was well persuaded had a brace of pistols in his pocket. I went into the stable, and saw the prisoner. I took one pistol out of his pocket, and my brother officer another. There was something else, belonging to Mr. Mainwaring; but it is not proper to mention it on this indictment. We took him to Bow-street. We found he stood advertised by Mr. Mainwaring. Mr. Mainwaring was sent for directly.

(The horse was identified by Mr. Mainwaring.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of my master's horse.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17810912-43

522, 523, 524. ANN DAVIS , ANN CRISPIN , and MARGARET JONES , were indicted for stealing 18 silk and cotton handkerchiefs, value 41 s. 6 d. the property of William Habgood , privately in his shop , August the 8th .

EDWARD LEVERETT sworn.

I live with Mr. Habgood, a haberdasher , at No. 40, Wellclose-square . On the 8th of last month, at about five in the afternoon, the three prisoners came into my master's shop, Davis asked to look at some silk and cotton handkerchiefs. I shewed them some. They turned them about a great while. At last, while she was looking at them, a gentleman came in for some thread. I turned about, to get him some thread; and while my back was turned, the two little girls, Crispin and Jones, went out. Davis bid me something for the handkerchiefs, which I could not take; and then she went out. Before the gentleman was gone, a young man, who was at the door, came in, and said, he believed some of the people who were gone out had taken some goods out of the shop. I followed them down Ship-alley, and overtook them. I desired them to come back. One of them refused. A constable came up to them, and Ann Crispin dropped the handkerchiefs from under her cloak. She was the only one that had a cloak on, and it reached down to her heels. I picked them up, and bid the constable take charge of them all three.

THOMAS TAYLOR sworn.

I am a constable. On Wednesday, the 8th of August, at about five o'clock in the afternoon, I was coming by at the time the handkerchiefs lay on the ground. The prosecutor gave me charge of these three girls, and he took up the handkerchiefs.

(The goods were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor's servant.)

SIMON THOMAS sworn.

I was going down to Wellclose-square, on the 8th of August. Being early, I sat down at the next door to Mr. Habgood's. I saw Crispin come out of the shop with the handkerchiefs; they hung down below her petticoats. The two little ones came out first, and the other followed them. I turned into the shop, and told the gentleman I thought he was robbed of something; and he immediately followed them.

Leverett. They were loose when I picked them up.

Thomas. Davis, the biggest, came out immediately after the other two. The little one turned them up, and shewed them to Davis, and she d - ned her, called her an impudent bitch, and said why did she shew her them there?

( Margaret Thomas , the wife of the last witness, confirmed his evidence.)

DAVIS's DEFENCE.

I went into the shop, to buy a handkerchief. He asked 2 s. I bid 22 d. He would not take it. I went out; and he came after me, and laid hold of me.

CRISPIN's DEFENCE.

I went with Davis, to buy a handkerchief. The gentleman asked 2 s. She would not give but 22 d. When we came out, the gentleman came after us, and charged us with robbing him. I know nothing of it.

JONES's DEFENCE.

Davis took me with her, to buy a handkerchief; that is all I know. I am twelve years old.

DAVIS CRISPIN

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d.

JONES NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-44

525, 526. JAMES COLLINGFORD and WILLIAM COLLINGFORD were indicted, James Collingford for stealing seven swan skins, value 7 l. and 300 tails of squirrels, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of John Daniel Paul and William Paul , in a certain vessel on a navigable river, viz. the river of Thames , August the 6th , and William Collingford for feloniously receiving, on the 8th of August , three swan skins, parcel of the above goods, well knowing them to have been stolen by James Collingford .

(There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-45

527. THOMAS MARTIN was indicted for stealing six cotton bed-curtains, value 42 s. a cotton bed head-clothes, value 12 s. two cotton bed head-testers, value 10 s. twelve cotton bed head-valence, value 12 s. the property of Robert Chessey and John Pitt , in the dwelling-house of the said John Pitt , August the 27th .

ROBERT CHESSEY sworn.

I keep a broker's shop in partnership with Mr. John Pitt , who lives in the house. The prisoner was brought to our shop with the goods mentioned in the indictment upon him: I took them, and delivered them to the constable.

FRANCIS HUNT sworn.

I keep a shop opposite Mr. Chessey's. A little after seven in the evening of the 27th of August, while I was sitting at my door, I saw the prisoner come and take an iron chest from Mr. Chessey's shop; it was near the door. I do not believe he carried it ten yards. I seized him as soon as I could get across to him, and never parted with him nor the goods till I brought them back to the shop. I called Mr. Chessey, and he came forward with his man, and I delivered the things to Mr. John White .

JOHN WHITE sworn.

I am porter to Mr. Pitt and Mr. Chessey. Mr. Hunt brought the prisoner and the property to our shop; he delivered the prisoner to me; I did not see who he delivered the property to. I kept the prisoner till Mr. Burkett, the officer, was sent for.

(Mr. Burkett produced the goods mentioned in the indictment, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I should be very glad to go to sea. I never did such a thing before. I am going of fourteen years old.

To Prosecutor. Is the shop a part of Mr. Pitt's dwelling-house? - He dwells in the whole of the house; the shop belongs to us both: I pay half the rent of the whole premises.

Is there any separation between the shop and the rest of the house? - None.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 39 s. W . and Imp. 6 months .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-46

528. JOHN PHILLIPS was indicted for stealing a deal box, value 6 d. three earthen tea-pots, value 10 s. an earthen butter-boat, value 12 d. an earthen sugar-dish, value 18 d. an earthen pestle and mortar, value 2 s. the property of John Rogers , August the 1st .

(The prisoner was seen to take the box out of the Norwich waggon, in Bishopsgate-street , while the waggon was loading: the box was delivered by some person to the book-keeper; but there was not any evidence to prove that to be the box which had been in the prisoner's possession.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810912-47

529. ANN DENNETT was indicted for stealing seven linen shirts, value 23 s. a pair of velveret breeches, value 4 s. two pair of stuff breeches, value 9 s. two pair of silk stockings, value 7 s. four harrateen bed-curtains, value 14 s. a woollen blanket, value 4 s. a silk waistcoat, value 5 s. two cloth waistcoats, value 6 s. a silver table spoon, value 8 s. and a pair of tea spoons, value 5 s. the property of John Crockett ; a cloth coat, value 9 s. a pair of velveret breeches, value 4 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of Benjamin Crockett , in the dwelling-house of the said John , August the 14th .

JOHN CROCKETT sworn.

I have a little house at Hoxton , where I sleep; I have a house, where I carry on my business, at Snow-hill. On Tuesday, the 14th of August, I was at an annual meeting in the neighbourhood. At near eleven o'clock at night, a person came in, and told my nephew he was wanted at home; then I was desired to step home. I went home, and found this woman (who was my house-keeper) in great distress. She said, two men had come, under a pretence of bringing a hare from my house at Snow-hill, the one a short man, the other a tall one; that they rushed in, seized her, and put a pistol to her head, while another tied her hands behind her with a garter; that then they went up stairs, and had stolen she did not know what. I ran up stairs, and missed many things. I did not at all like her account; she seemed flurried; and I thought she was a party concerned. There was a constable in the croud; I charged him with her, and sent her to the watch-house: I desired him to sit up with her, and to take particular care of her. I desired her to confess if she was a party concerned; but she denied every thing. The next morning the constable came to me, and told me he had tried if he could make any thing of her -

Court. You must not tell what the constable said. Tell me what you lost? - I don't know that I can: I have not found the things she pretends I was robbed of. She told the constable, if he would go to such a place in my house, he would find some pawnbroker's duplicates; and, if he would get them out of my house, and bring them to her, he would be the best friend she ever had in her life. He came, and told me this; and we searched, and found the duplicates. We found, at different pawnbrokers, six shirts, two pair of everlasting bree ches; there were I don't know how many pair of silk stockings lost; two pair were found, four harrateen bed-curtains, the curtains of her own bed, two dimity waistcoats, a silk waistcoat, a blue coat and waistcoat, one table spoon, and a pair of tea spoons. After finding these duplicates, I found two nasty dirty rags upon the mantle-piece in the kitchen, behind the tinder-box; and they were as full of pawnbrokers duplicates as they could hold, by means of which I got a great number more of my things.

CHARLES COLE sworn.

I live with my father, a pawnbroker, in Brick-lane. I have a great coat, a handkerchief, a shirt, a sheet, a table spoon, and a pair of tea tongs: the great coat, the handkerchief, the shirt, and sheet, I received of Elizabeth Taylor , a witness in court; the tea-tongs and table spoon I believe I received from the prisoner, I cannot positively say.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prosecutor. They were in my house at Hoxton: I cannot remember particularly when I saw them.

THOMAS TOWNSEND sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, the corner of Bear-alley, Shoreditch. I have a blue coat and waistcoat I received, I think, of Taylor: I cannot recollect the person: it was the 16th of June.

(They are produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prosecutor. They were in my chamber: I do not know when I saw them there: I do not know whether I should ever have worn them any more.

SAMUEL PEPPERELL sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, in Hoxton town. I took in some shirts, waistcoats, and stockings, of Sarah Thompson . They have lately changed them into the name of Elizabeth Taylor . I never saw the prisoner but once in my life: she never brought any thing.

(The goods were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

FRANCES THOMPSON sworn.

I live next door to Mr. Crockett. His housekeeper, the prisoner, asked me if I would go and change any thing for her at Mr. Pepperell's, in return for other things. When Taylor was out of the way, they made use of my name unknown to me.

Are these part of the things you went to Pepperell's to change? - Yes; some white waistcoats, and shirts.

All the things you left at the pawnbroker's were at there quest of the prisoner, to change for other things? - Yes.

ELIZABETH TAYLOR sworn.

I live in Hoxton town, near Mr. Crockett's. I was employed there as a chair-woman. The prisoner sent me with things to pawn. I carried them, and brought her the money. I carried to Townsend a coat and waistcoat. She bid me put them in the name of James. I went once to Cole's, and twice to Mr. Townsend's.

Did you carry any thing else? - Yes; to Pepperell's. She used to send me with things to change; waistcoats, shirts, and breeches.

JOHN DEATHERIDGE sworn.

I am a constable. On the 14th of August, Mr. Crockett's nephew and I went to Mr. Crockett's house. I went up and down stairs, and found no person in the house but the prisoner, with her hands tied behind her with this garter. Mr. Crockett's nephew untied her. Mr. Crockett gave me charge of the prisoner. I searched her, and found this garter in her pocket, which she denied having got. I searched her pocket, and found a tin box, with a medal of Mr. Beckford gilt, and some duplicates. I went with her to the watch-house, and remained with her all night. She told me, in the course of the night, that when I went to Mr. Crockett's, I should find some things rolled up on the mantle-piece, by the side of the tinder-box; and if I would conceal them, and bring them to her, she would esteem me as a great friend. I told her I would. She said, Under the bason, on the shelf, I should find five or six sixpences, and desired me to bring them. In the morning, Mr. Crockett desired me to take up Taylor. In the night, the prisoner asked me, when I searched her room, if I found a gown. I said, No. She said, How could Mr. Crockett think she had planned the robbery, when she was robbed herself? When I took Taylor, she told me she had pawned the gown the week before: I believe it was pawned the 8th of August.

To Taylor. Did you pawn a gown of her own the week before? - Yes; she sent me the week before with it.

BENJAMIN CROCKETT sworn.

I can say nothing more than what my uncle has said.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not intend to make away with any part of this property: I had a person at Mr. Wilmot's that would have paid down the money.

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 4 s. 6 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-48

530. JOHN LLOYD was indicted for stealing ten pair of leather shoes, value 42 s. the property of Moses Isaac , privately in his dwelling-house , July the 31st .

MOSES ISAAC sworn.

I know nothing of the fact: I was in the synagogue: it was a fast.

JUDITH ISAAC sworn.

My father keeps a slop-shop and shoe-warehouse . It was a fast-day of ours, about six weeks ago, I took a nap on the table in the kitchen, behind the shop. A little girl came in, and asked me if I had sold some shoes to the boy that went out? I said, No; and went to the door, and saw the prisoner with a pile of shoes under her arm. I cried out, Stop! and I saw him catched, with the shoes under his arm, about twenty yards from our door. He was brought back to our shop. There were only three pair of shoes found. They were my father's property.

COLIN RECKLEHOUSE sworn.

I heard somebody call, Stop him! I saw the prisoner running, and saw him throw something over the wall into Tower-ditch; but what it was, I cannot tell. I stopped him. He begged I would let him go. I said, I was afraid he had stole something. When the people came up, they said he had stole some shoes from Mr. Bendick. Another lad got over into the ditch, and found three pair of shoes. I secured the prisoner, and I am very sorry for it; I had rather have been confined six months in the bay of Biscay; for I have been confined here ever since Tuesday.

JOHN BULLER sworn.

I got over the wall into the ditch, and found three pair of shoes in different places. I picked them up, and brought them to Mr. Bendick's shop. They call him Bendick; but it is Mr. Isaac's shop.

To Judith Isaac . Is the girl here that saw him take them? - Yes; Hannah Isaac .

( Hannah Isaac was called, but not understanding the nature of an oath, she was not examined.)

To Judith Isaac . Did you see the young man in the shop at all? - No: I was asleep. I saw him running afterwards, and called, Stop thief! He was about twelve yards from the door, when he was taken.

When you came out, could you see him, so as to know him again? - Yes: his back was towards me; but I saw him when he was taken. I am sure he is the person I saw run from the shop.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming along: I saw a mob; I ran to see what was the matter; and this gentleman laid hold of me and stopped me, and said I was the person.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-49

531. JAMES BURRELL was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value 5 s. a stuff gown, value 10 s. a cloth coat, value 5 s. a white cotton waistcoat, value 18 d. two muslin handkerchiefs, value 12 d. a muslin apron, value 18 d. a child's apron, value 2 d. a silk cloak, value 2 s. a silk hat, value 2 s. a linen cap, value 6 d. and a linen shift, value 18 d. the property of Samuel Cock , July the 21st .

SAMUEL COCK sworn.

I live in Warren-street, Tottenham-court road . The prisoner lodged at my house. To go to his room, he had to pass through another. The drawers, in which the things mentioned in the indictment were, stood on the left-hand side, within the door. The prisoner was taken on the 22d of July, and I found my hat upon him.

ELIZABETH COCK sworn.

The prisoner came in about ten o'clock at night, on the 21st of July. He had the key of the outer door; for we kept the room he went through locked always. I thought he was going to bed; but he came down again in about ten minutes, gave me the key, and said he was going out again. He did not return

again. I went up between eleven and twelve o'clock, and missed all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) out of my drawers. I had seen every thing in the drawers, in the afternoon, between four and five o'clock. I locked the room-door then, and kept the key. The next morning, my husband had intelligence where the prisoner was. He got a constable, and took him. I went to him: he said, he was very sorry for what he had done, and hoped I would excuse him. I asked him where my aprons and handkerchiefs were. He said, he could not tell me where they were; they might be shook out of the bundle, for what he knew: he did not know what he took. There are two aprons and two handkerchiefs missed, that are not found.

SAMUEL COCK sworn.

I found the prisoner at a house in Parker's-lane, about six in the morning. We found my wife's hat under the bolster of the bed. He told Mr. Wood where the other things were, and he went and fetched them.

JOSEPH WOOD sworn.

I am a constable. I took the prisoner. I found the other things by the prisoner's direction.

(The hat was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor desired me to tell where the property was, and said he would let me go about my business.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Fine. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-50

532, 533. THOMAS JONES and JAMES RIGBY were indicted for stealing three leather skins, value 20 s. the property of James Bocock , and 105 copper halfpence , the property of Jacob Green , August the 3d .

JAMES BOCOCK sworn.

I am a leather-seller . I sent a parcel of skins to Mrs. Moore, at Horton mills, by Colnbrook; and these three skins were some which she brought me, to shew me the quality of skins which she had to dispose of. They were put up in a hamper, and sent back by the waggon. I know they are the skins she brought to me, and shewed me.

JACOB GREEN sworn.

I am a waggoner to Mrs. Moore. I drive from Horton-mills to Barnaby-street. Upon the 15th of August, the two prisoners met me at Kensington, and asked me to give them a lift to Brentford. I took them up. When we came to the Pack-horse, on Turnham-green, they gave me part of two pots of beer. Soon after I went from that house, about 300 yards, I fell off the shafts, and fell under the wheel. I was very badly bruised, and insensible for two or three days after. When I was in St. George's fields, I saw the skins in the hamper, on the top of the waggon, and twenty-five shillings worth of halfpence. The skins and the halfpence were lost out of the hamper. After the accident, I was put on the top of the waggon, and carried home.

SAMUEL MASSEY sworn.

I am foreman to Mr. Brown, in Silver-street, Golden-square. Upon the 15th of August, between three and six in the afternoon, the prisoner Jones brought these three skins to Mr. Brown's shop. He said his name was Robert Jones . He asked if they would make him a pair of breeches. I looked at them some time, and told him I thought one of them would make him a good pair of breeches. He told me his father was a leather-dresser, and had sent him them out of the country. I measured him for a pair of breeches, and he went away. I saw him before the magistrate, and knew him again.

(The skins were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

To Green. Are you certain the prisoners are the two men that you took up into the waggon? - I am certain.

For JONES.

- MORGAN sworn.

I am a broker, at No. 17, in Long-lane, West-Smithfield. On the 15th of August,

I was at the Red-lion, in Piccadilly, between two and three o'clock. I saw the man in green (Jones) there. A countryman came in with three skins, which he said he had to sell. The prisoner asked him the price. He said he had them from his father, in the country: he said the price was 9 s. The prisoner said he would give him 7 s. if the breeches-maker would say they would make him a pair of breeches; and they went out together.

To Bocock. What is the value of the skins? - About twenty shillings, or a guinea.

Court to Morgan. What was you doing at the Red-lion? - Drinking a pint of beer. I had been at a bull-baiting at Putney. The prisoner was there before me.

Did you know him before? - I had seen him before.

Were you drinking together? - No; he sat in another box.

How long before the countryman came in? - Not long; for I was not there above a quarter of an hour myself.

Was any other person present? - I saw nobody else present, to my knowledge.

You were alone? - Yes; I was alone, and the prisoner was alone.

And the countryman came in alone? - Yes.

Were you three the only persons in the tap-room? - No; there were more people in the tap-room.

Did you see the skins? - I saw skins; I did not take notice of them.

How did the conversation begin? - He said he had some skins sent him out of the country, which he must sell, because he wanted money.

Who did he say that to? - To the company, not to any body in particular. The prisoner asked the price of them.

From the Jury. How came you to be found out, to become a witness? - The prisoner know'd something of me, and desired me to come.

Did he know your name? - I gave him my name. He pretended he had some stockings. I wanted some stockings. He had none with him that suited me. I told him I lived at No. 17, in Long-lane.

Did he give you his name? - No; I did not ask him his name.

To Green. Did the two prisoners come to you both together, or first one, and then the other? - Jones asked me first; then they both came together in company. Jones came first round the waggon. I did not see Rigby till they asked me to let them get up.

For RIGBY.

(These witnesses were examined apart).

ELIZABETH SHARPE sworn.

Upon the 15th of August, I was at the Roebuck and French-horn, in Turnmill-street, about ten in the morning. Rigby was there from ten till after twelve. I was in company with him and several more. I staid till twelve, because the dinner was dressed there.

Who else was in company? - Two more young men, and two young women who are gone into the country.

Did you know their names? - Yes; one Mary Strickling , and one James Ellis . I do not know ne'er a one of the young men's names.

Three women and three men? - Yes.

How came you all six to meet there? - It was my birth-day. The young women I know extremely well.

You came there to keep your birth-day? - Yes.

That is the way you came to remember the day so particularly? - Yes.

These two young women came with you to keep your birth-day? - Yes.

You began early in the morning? - Not very early; ten o'clock. We went in to have something to drink, and Mrs. Murray served us half-a-pint of gin.

When did the three young women come in? - After us.

Did they come in together? - Yes.

Did they come by appointment of any of you? - Yes, they did.

Whose acquaintance were they, yours or the other young woman's? - The other young man, James Ellis , I know very well. One of the young women's names was Mary Strickling : the other's name I don't know.

The other was a particular acquaintance: I know her Christian-name; I don't know her sur-name: her Christian-name is Susannah.

What is the young man's name? - James Ellis .

You made the appointment with Ellis? - Yes.

Did you desire him to bring the other two men? - No. Ellis brought these young men, and the young women, whose names I don't know.

Who brought the prisoner? - The prisoner came in with them.

The prisoner, James Ellis , and the young women with James Ellis came in together? - Mary Strickling came in with me: we went to the bar, and had half a pint of liquor.

You told me you and the two young women came in together, and that then the three young men came in? - No.

Jury. How old was you that day? - Twenty-one.

After the young men, and those other young women came in, they all joined company together? - Yes.

Did you dine there? - No. Up stairs in my own room where I lived, we had the dinner brought from that house.

You entertained these people on your birthday? - Yes.

What did you give them? - A roast leg of lamb, and French beans.

Any thing else? - No; not that I recollect.

Had you no pye or pudding? - No.

What did you give them to drink after dinner? - Only beer: I could not afford any thing else.

How long did they stay after dinner? - The prisoner went out soon after twelve, as soon as he had eat his victuals; he had it on a piece of bread; he went away directly. All the others staid till between two and three o'clock in the afternoon; then they went away together, and left me at home.

The prisoner was in a hurry, and went away at twelve? - Yes.

Did you ask him to stay, and have some beer after dinner? - He drank out of one pot of beer before he went.

Did you ask him to stay longer? - No.

Nor why he was in such a hurry? - No. It was no business of mine.

Yes, if you asked company to keep your birth-day. - I did not ask him, I asked Ellis.

This was one of the young women in company? - No. The landlady of the public house.

ANN MURRAY sworn.

My husband keeps the Roebuck, in Turnmill-street, Clerkenwell.

Do you know the prisoner Rigby? - Yes. Upon the 15th of August, between the hours of nine and twelve, he came with two young men - at about ten o'clock.

How long did he remain in your house? - Very few minutes; while they drank half a pint of gin, and called for another half pint, and I draw'd it.

Did he come in at any other time after that? - I did not observe any thing that passed after that.

Was he there at twelve o'clock? - I can't say: I should not have observed it then, had not these young men been with him.

Court. Who came in company with him? - Two young fellows that had been fixed, and imprisoned twelve months, and were that day released.

Were any others in company with them? - A young woman that has been examined, Elizabeth Sharpe ; she came in with Rigby and those young fellows.

Do you know her very well? - Yes; they came with these two young fellows, and another young woman with them.

Do you recollect whether they all five came in together, or came separately? - I could not say positively: I asked them to eat a crust of bread and cheese; she was then with them: I brought out the bread and cheese; they said they did not chuse any.

Was there any more in company than those five? - I believe there was a gentlewoman in a black cloak, and laced bonnet; I did not take particular notice of her: there were three men, and three women.

How came you not to mention the second woman, if she was in the company that came with Sharpe? - I did not know her.

Did you know the other young woman? - Her name was Strickling.

Did they come in with the young men, or did the young men come in before them? - I can't say: they drank the gin together; the two young men came together with Rigby, as near as I can say, between nine and ten.

Did the three young women come in with them, or come in afterwards? - I could not recollect whether the young men came in first, or the young women, or whether they came in together.

How long did they all stay? - Not more, I believe, than five minutes; no longer than while I served them; the young men and young women went away together.

And that was in a few minutes, and you saw nothing of them afterwards? - I could not positively say: I have a young family: I was backwards in my own kitchen; afterwards in the bar at times.

Did they come back and dine at your house? - That I could not positively say, for I am never present at dinner; my husband is generally in the way; I could not see what passed.

Do not you recollect their ordering dinner? - The young fellows had a leg of mutton, or leg of lamb, roasted at my house, but they did not dine at my house; it was carried home to their place of abode; I suppose, about two o'clock.

Where was it sent to? - One of the young women fetched it.

What young woman? - I cannot say.

What time was it ready? - A few minutes, I believe, past two o'clock.

You don't know the young woman that fetched it? - Not particularly; I have a young family to attend.

Were there any potatoes to it? - There was no garden-stuff of any kind dressed at my house.

Were there no potatoes? - No: they said they had French beans, as far as I can remember, at home.

Where was that home, where they had the French beans? - I forget the name of the court.

At whose lodgings? - The young woman, Strickling's lodgings.

Recollect, if you can, the name of the court? - I could not recollect the court.

Do you know Strickling very well? - I know her by sight.

At her lodgings they dined? - Yes.

They had French beans there? - They said they had French beans there, in the morning, when they brought the lamb.

Who paid you for this meat? - Nobody. They brought it to be roasted; they said the French beans they would do themselves.

Who brought it? - The young woman I mentioned.

Was you paid any thing for the dressing of it? - No.

Had they their beer from your house? - Yes.

And their punch? - They had no punch from our house.

Who paid for what they had from your house? - This young woman, called Strickling.

On what occasion was it they dined at Strickling's lodgings? - I can't tell: I asked them no questions.

ALICE POWELL sworn.

I keep a green-stall. Upon the 15th of August, I was coming home from market, with a load of goods on my head; Rigby and another person, were standing at the Roebuck door: I asked them to help me down with my load; the prisoner readily came and helped me down, then he went away: that was about ten o'clock; two other persons were with him: I went to my own apartment.

Did they help you up again? - No. It was at my own apartment, three doors from the Roebuck.

Did you see the prisoner, after he helped you with the load? - Yes: I came in and out at the door, and saw the prisoner at the place where I asked him to help me down.

How long was it before you lost him, so as to see him no more? - About twelve o'clock: I had a bit of a luncheon; I went into the Roebuck, and he and his wife were at dinner together, and two more men; but I can't say who they were.

Were there no more women? - I cannot say that there were.

Jury. What had they for dinner? - They had eels; they had the parsley from me.

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-51

534, 535. SARAH NUNN , and MARY ALLEN , were indicted for stealing a silver watch-case, value 42 s. a pair of silver buckles, value 30 s. a silver call, value 10 s. a hat, value 5 s. a blue jacket, value 8 s. a pair of trowsers, value 3 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of John Anderson , July 26th .

JOHN ANDERSON sworn.

I went home with these young women; I went to bed with them; I looked at the watch to see what was o'clock, before I went to bed; I was waked by a noise at the window; the girls were both gone, the breeches were taken from under my head, and all the things mentioned in the indictment, were gone. I went out, and found them both in the alley; I carried them to a publick-house, and had them taken up, and then they denied the charge: I heard my things were at Mr. Lowe's, the pawnbroker's.

( James Lowe , the pawnbroker, produced the things which he had taken in of the two prisoners, on the 26th of July, and they were deposed to by Anderson.)

BOTH GUILTY . W. & Imp. 12 Months .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-52

536. ANN READ was indicted for stealing five guineas in monies numbered, the property of John Williams , in the dwelling-house of John Davis , September the 14th .

JOHN WILLIAMS (a Negro ) sworn.

I am a sailor . On the 13th of September, I went to Deptford, to receive six months pay, due to me from the Greenwich man of war; after that, I returned between eleven and twelve at night; going along the Strand, I met the prisoner, near the New-Church; I returned back with her to Mr. Davis's, the One-Bell Inn; we went up into a room together; I called for some rum, which I paid for; she then asked me for a present; I gave her half a crown; we went to bed together; the candle was almost out; the prisoner bid me not put it out; I fell asleep in three minutes: I had put my breeches under my head.

Were you sober? - Yes: I had drank nothing but sixpennyworth of rum and water, and a pint of beer, when I went to bed: I had seven guineas in my pocket; I had counted it in my pocket, just before I met the prisoner. No person was near me, so as to have taken this money, nor was I in any situation afterwards, so that it could have fallen out of my pocket, between the time I counted it, and my going to bed. I was waked by the waiter, about two in the morning; he asked me if I had lost any thing, and he brought the prisoner into the room. I then examined my breeches pockets, which were still under my head, where I put them, and found that out of seven guineas, five were gone: I examined all round the bed, to see if any had dropped, but I found none. I told the waiter I had lost five guineas: the prisoner strongly denied the charge; the watchman was sent for, and she was carried to the watch-house, and there searched; and the five guineas were found concealed in her shoes.

Prisoner. When you took up your breeches, whether the money did not fly about the room? - It did not. No money flew out of my pocket.

SOLOMON GREENTREE sworn.

I am waiter at the One Bell: the prisoner came down about two in the morning, and wanted to go away: I stopped her, and enquired whether the man she had been with, was awake; she said he was wide awake: upon which, I insisted upon her going back, and took her back to the room, that I might be satisfied. I found him fast asleep; that

made me suspect her: I waked him, and asked him if he had lost any thing: he searched his pockets in my presence; he said he had lost five guineas: no money fell out of his breeches, as far as I could see.

PATRICK M'MANUS sworn.

I am a constable: I searched the prisoner at the watch-house. I found two guineas in one shoe, and three in another: they were in both shoes, concealed between the wooden heel and the heel-piece of the shoe.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had received the five guineas that evening, in Bishopsgate-street, from my husband's friends in Nottinghamshire, which they had sent to take me down to them: my husband has been enlisted for a soldier two years: my witnesses are now gone; they waited all day on Friday and Saturday.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

(She was humbly recommended, both by the Prosecutor and the Jury, to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-53

537. JOHN LUCAS was indicted for stealing six cloth coats, value 40 s. two cloth waistcoats, value 5 s. a Kerseymere waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of cloth breeches, value 1 s. and four yards and a half of narrow cloth, value 5 s. the property of Mr. Toe, August the 27th .

WILLIAM TOE sworn.

I am a working taylor . My apartment had been opened by means of a pick-lock key, and the things mentioned in the indictment, which had been there on Saturday night, were taken out between that and Saturday morning.

GEORGE CORNWALL sworn.

I am a salesman. This day five weeks, the prisoner brought all the things produced to my shop, to sell: I stopped him with them, and had him taken up: upon being questioned, at last he said they were Mr. Toe's. Mr. Toe was sent for, and came and owned them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My wife and I keep a clothes-shop. I bought these things of a Jew, in the street: they were exposed in the open street to sell.

(He called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Fine. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-54

538. SARAH HAWKINS was indicted for stealing fourteen yards of cheque linen, value 12 s. the property of Nicholas Gordelier , privately in his shop , August the 20th .

NICHOLAS GORDELIER sworn.

I am a linen-draper , in Somerset-street, Bethnal-green . On the 20th of August, between three and four in the afternoon, my wife called me down stairs, and said we had been robbed. I pursued the prisoner, and just as I turned the corner of the next street, about thirty yards from my shop, I saw her drop a piece of cheque linen: I had seen the linen in the shop in the morning: I brought her back to my shop, and a young man picked up the piece of linen.

- MARSHALL sworn.

On the 20th of last month, I was looking out of a window, opposite the prosecutor's. I saw the prisoner go into his shop, and presently after, come out with a piece of cheque: I went over, and told Mrs. Gordelier of it, and pursued the prisoner. I saw her drop the cheque: I picked it up. Mr. Gordelier, who was behind me, laid hold of the prisoner, and brought her back.

Mrs. GORDELIER sworn.

The last witness came in, and asked if I had lost any thing: I turned round, and said I had lost a piece of cheque: I had left it on the counter.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

My husband was pressed over night: I had been on board the tender: I had a little liquor: if I did any thing amiss, I did not know what I did.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 4 s. 6 d.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-55

539. JOSEPH LALLIMAN was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon Walter Redford , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 20 s. a steel chain, value 2 d. a brass key, value 2 d. and 8 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said Walter , September the 3d .

(The only evidence against the prisoner, was that the prosecutor having been robbed, the prisoner, upon the cry of Stop Thief, was stopped by the turnpike-man, because he was the first person he saw running; but the turnpike-man did not see him in the road; nor could the prosecutor swear he was one of the man who stopped him; and there were several other persons on the road.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-56

540. HANNAH WEBB was indicted for stealing a leather pocket book, with a silver clasp, value 12 d. the property of Archibald Strachan , and a bank-note of the value of 20 l. the property of the said Archibald, July the 25th ; the money secured by the said note, being due and unsatisfied .

PETER SENHOUSE sworn.

On the 26th of July, in the afternoon, I was told that a woman who had robbed Mr. Strachan, was at the Roebuck, in Bridges-street, and I went there: I found the prisoner there, and another woman: I took them both into custody: I carried them to the office: they were both charged with robbing Mr. Strachan of a pocket-book, with a 20 l, bank-note in it. On my offering to search the prisoner, she gave me the pocket-book: the bank-note was not in it; but I took two guineas out of her pocket, and they had bought clothes with the rest of the money: she said this was the book she took from Mr. Strachan; afterwards she said it was the book the note was in. The prosecutor since that is gone out of his senses, and is confined in a mad-house.

SAMUEL STRACHAN sworn.

Archibald Strachan is my father. I know nothing, but that he went out that day, that he had the pocket-book, and staid out till two in the morning: I don't know what was the pocket-book.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-57

541. SARAH HOLDIS was indicted for stealing a linen shirt, value 2 s. a pair of linen ruffles, value 6 d. a linen sheet, value 10 d. a cotton frock, value 2 d. a cotton skirt, value 2 d. a linen skirt, value 2 d. a linen shirt, value 2 d. and a linen cap, value 2 d. the property of William Nash , July 28th .

WILLIAM NASH sworn.

The prisoner was my servant ; she lived with me eight or nine weeks. I have lost the things mentioned in the indictment, at divers times; the last things I missed, were on the 28th of July.

MARY NASH sworn.

On Saturday, the 28th of July, I missed some trifling things: I challenged the prisoner with it: she said she knew nothing of them: I told her I would go to the pawnbroker's, and see if I could find them out, and at Walworth's, I found the things mentioned in the indictment; (repeating them.)

JANE WALWORTH sworn.

I took in these things ( producing them) of the prisoner, in the name of Mary Powell ,

at different times; the last time was on the 28th of July, I believe.

(The things were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I leave it to the mercy of the court. I am a distressed woman, and have got three small children. Mrs. Nash kept me without victuals, and I pawned some of them through distress.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-58

542, 543, 544. ANN JONES , otherwise MASON , WILLIAM JANES , and ISABELLA JANES , were indicted for stealing a callico petticoat, value 12 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 6 s. three linen aprons, value 6 s. a silk cloak, value 10 s. two linen shifts, value 5 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Letitia Jones , a silk purse, value 2 d. and 28 l. in monies numbered, the property of John Jones , in the dwelling-house of the said John , July the 17th .

JOHN JONES sworn.

I live in the King's-road, Chelsea . At twelve o'clock at night, on the 17th of July, when my lodgers came home, I fastened all the doors of my house, and also fastened my own room door, and went to bed. I waked at four o'clock in the morning; it was then day-light. I found my room door open, and the door into the road open. My breeches were pulled from under my pillow, and lay in the middle of the floor. The key of the bureau was taken out of my pocket. I missed a purse from my bureau, with nineteen or twenty guineas in it; and from another drawer I lost about 8 l. By the advice of my neighbours, I lay still, and did not stir in it for a week. Janes and his wife continued still to lodge with me. They had gone out that morning before I waked; but that was not usual. They came home that night, and continued to lodge with me. Mason had been on liking to me, as my servant, about a week, and went away about a fortnight after the robbery. About ten days after, on the information of a person not present, I had Mason taken up. There was a petticoat and handkerchief found upon her, belonging to my sister. Upon her information, I had the two other prisoners taken up, but nothing was found upon them.

LETITIA JONES sworn.

I lost the things mentioned in the indictment; among others, this petticoat and handkerchief, which were in the house the night before. I saw them myself upon the prisoner, after she was taken up. My name is upon the handkerchief.

(The constable produced a petticoat and handkerchief, which he found on Mason, and also some things found at a pawnbroker's.)

MASON's DEFENCE.

I was going a little way out of town, with some country people. Coming home, these people were coming after me; and they gave me these things. I did not know what they gave me, being strange to the place.

To Letitia Jones . Mason was with you a week on liking? - Yes; she came on her own accord. We took her in without a hat on her head, and bare of cloaths. We were busy. She staid about nine days, and went away of her own accord.

(Mason called her master, who gave her a good character.)

(The other two prisoners were not put upon their defence.)

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-59

545. WILLIAM CHEESEMAN was indicted for stealing three pair of thread stockings, value 4 s. the property of Michael Eaton , July the 21st .

MICHAEL EATON sworn.

I am a hosier , in Grosvenor-street . I know nothing of the fact.

WILLIAM DICKINSON sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Eaton. On Saturday, the 21st of July, between seven and eight in the evening, the prisoner came into our shop. I was serving a lady with some boy's brown thread stockings. The prisoner said he was in no hurry, and wanted to see a pair of silk stockings which were in the window, which he shewed me. I took them out, and told him they were fine silk. He said, he thought they were silk and worsted. I then told him we had some spun silk that would look well, and come cheaper. I turned my back, to get the bundle down. As I was coming down, I saw the prisoner shuffle with his hand in his pocket. I went to reach down some more; and, turning round, I saw him shuffle with his hand again. I came round, and missed the stockings off the counter. I looked very stedfast at the prisoner, and then at the stockings. He ran out of the shop. I jumped over the counter, and ran after him. He was pushed down by a man coming along: I then came up to him, and took three pair of stockings out of his pocket (producing them); they have my master's mark on them.

ELIZABETH GREEN sworn.

I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner take the stockings off the counter.

Prosecutor. I can't swear to the stockings. The paper has my private mark.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. & Imp. 1 M.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-60

546. JOHN JONES was indicted for stealing 80 lb. of pimento, value 20 s. the property of persons unknown, August the 1st .

WILLIAM GREEN sworn.

From the posture in which I first saw the prisoner, he seemed to have but just taken up this bag. He immediately dropped it, upon being called out to.

(He called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-61

547, 548. HENRY HEYLIN and WILLIAM FORDHAM were indicted for stealing eight bushels of coals, value 8 s. the property of Thomas Thruckston , April the 24th .

(There was not any evidence to affect the prisoners: they were both seen taking coals from a lighter, but who employed by, and whether lawfully or not, did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-62

549. WILLIAM HAYWOOD was indicted for stealing a wooden box, value 6 d. and 20 s. in monies numbered , the property of James Spence , August the 13th .

CATHARINE SPENCE sworn.

On the 13th of August, about eight in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for a pennyworth of tobacco. I served him. He gave me a shilling to change. I gave him sixpence in part, out of a box in which I kept the silver. I then went round to an adjoining room, to strike a light. Turning suddenly round, I saw the prisoner leaning over the counter. He ran out of the shop directly; and I saw him go into a publick-house opposite. I missed the box: there might be 20 s. in it; but I can swear I put in 6 s. I went over to the public-house. The prisoner was gone. Soon after, I was informed that Carpmeal had taken him. He brought him into the shop. 14 s. 4 d. and a pair of new pumps, were found upon him.

When he first came into the shop, he had a blue jacket on; when he was taken up, he had a brown great coat over that jacket. He afterwards escaped out of the cage, and was retaken. I had seen him before frequently, and knew him well. I had light enough to discern him. When he was taken, he denied having been in the shop at all.

JAMES SPENCE sworn.

In the morning, there were 13 or 14 shillings in this box.

ROSE HART sworn.

About eight o'clock, I stood at the corner of an alley, near Mr. Spence's, and saw the prisoner, in a blue jacket, come out of the shop, and put a little box into his bosom. He went into a public-house opposite, which has a back-door leading into another street.

SIMON JACKSON sworn.

I keep a public-house, opposite the prosecutor's. The prisoner came into my house. Rose Hart asked him how he could come there, after she had seen him come out of this shop with the box of money. He d - ned her, and held his fist to her mouth, and bid her hold her tongue.

JOHN MORGAN sworn.

I am a pawnbroker: I live at the top of St. Catharine's lane. About eight in the evening, on the 13th of August, the prisoner came to my shop, and took some things out of pawn, amounting to 3 s. and odd; amongst the rest, he took out of pawn a brown great coat.

(The prisoner called a great number of witnesses, who all gave him a very good character.)

GUILTY . W. & Imp. 6 M .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-63

550. MARY WARD was indicted for stealing a leather trunk, value 16 s. the property of James Season , August the 21st .

SHIRLEY FOSTER sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Season. On the 21st of August, this trunk stood in the window for sale. The prisoner came and stood with her back to the window. I saw the trunk was moved, and immediately perceived it gone from the place. I directly followed, and saw the prisoner with it in the Hay-market. I pursued her, and took her with it under her cloak.

JAMES SEASON sworn.

She was taken before the justice, and there voluntarily confessed the fact.

(The trunk was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had some people I work for here yesterday to my character: they are not here now.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[No punishment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-64

551. JOSEPH GEORGE was indicted for stealing 16 lb. of bacon, value 5 s. the property of Henry Collett , August the 15th .

SARAH COLLETT sworn.

The prisoner came into the shop, and said he wanted a piece of bacon. He took a piece up, and ran away as fast as he could. It lay on a butter-flat, near the door. I followed him, and called, Stop thief! My shop is at the end of St. Sepulchre's church . He ran down Snow-hill. I followed him, and picked the bacon up in the church-yard. I lost sight of him when he turned the corner.

How did you know the man that was brought back was the man that took the bacon? - I saw his back and his hat: I did not see his face till he was brought back to the shop-door.

A watchman sworn. I stopped him, running by the Saracen's-head inn. He said, D - n your eyes, do you think I am a thief? The people came up, and said, that was the

man; he had stole some bacon. I desired to look at his hands; he rubbed them on his breeches first, and said, There are my hands: are they greasy? I smelt them; they smelt of the bacon, as plain as could be.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent of the charge.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-65

552. ROBERT FOLIER was indicted for that he falsely, deceitfully, feloniously, and traiterously, one piece of current legal coin of this realm, called a half-crown, did colour with materials producing the colour of silver, against the duty of his allegiance, and against the statute , July the 20th .

2d Count. For colouring counterfeit shillings.

3d Count. For colouring counterfeit sixpences.

(The witnesses were examined apart at the request of the prisoner.)

DAVID PROTHERO sworn.

I went to a house in Doctors Commons , on the 20th of July last, at about seven o'clock in the morning: I saw a woman taking in some milk at the door: my informant, who stood by me, desired me, when the woman retired, to follow her: I went in, and went up to the one pair of stairs-room: I put my ear to the lock of the door; then the woman, who, as I found afterwards, was the landlady of the house, came up stairs after me, to know what I wanted: I desired her to be still: I could hear somebody rubbing something in the room, but could not tell what it was, as I could not see any thing: I thrust open the door, and sent it into the middle of the room: the prisoner was sitting by the window, by a little table, stripped in his waistcoat without sleeves, and he had this half-crown, (producing it) in his hand; I may call it a blank indeed; it is not completely finished: he had a pair of knippers in his hand, and a bit of scowering paper; he let them all fall together: I was close to him when he let them fall: if I had taken hold of his hand, instead of taking hold of his arms, I could have catched them in his hand, as I saw them all fall from his hand: there were aqua-fortis, files, scowering-paper, and sand; and every thing necessary for the colouring of money: I found in his waistcoat pocket, 20 s. and a 6 d. completely coloured; and a number of pieces of metal prepared for shillings, half-crowns, and sixpences, were found in a drawer in the room. The prisoner owned that the room was his lodging: I can't tell whether the room-door was locked or not: there was no pickle found there.

MOSES MORANT sworn.

I went with Prothero to this house, and went up stairs directly behind him: he first peeped through the key-hole, and then burst the door open: the first time he tried the door, it did not quite burst open; the second time I pushed against him, and it flew into the room. I saw the prisoner throw this cork, and paper, out of his right hand, towards the fire-place, as I went round him; in the chair behind him was this half-crown, a six-pence, and two half-crowns: there were five six-pences in the window in a paper behind the curtain, none of which were then coloured.

Cross-Examination.

Did you see him drop any thing? - I could not see the other hand of the prisoner, but Prothero might see it: I believe he dropped a half-crown, and a pair of pliers: Prothero picked them up.

Was there any body else in the room? - There was a woman in the room, that was not secured. I don't know who it was.

Why was not she secured? - I believe there was something said about her being a witness.

Prothero. Positively, I did not see her in the room. Her name is Rachael Lions : I knew her well. Morant did not know her: but I knew her.

Did the information come from her? - It might: I don't know of my own knowledge.

(Pereival Phillips, who was with them, confirmed the testimony of the two former witnesses, in every particular.)

JOHN CLARK sworn.

(Inspects the several articles produced)

Here are counterfeit pieces of money, finished in all the process, from the casting to the finishing.

Are they finished shillings, in a state fit for circulation? - After being scowered, they are thrown into aqua fortis; the water is to mollify the aqua-fortis; and then they use sand and water to take off the stain the aqua-fortis has left.

Prothero. The door went at once, but only it catched the sleeve of my coat; and Morant pushed against it to lessen it, and tore the sleeve of my coat.

To Clark. Whether those finished, and those rough, are the same cast? - There is not the least doubt of it: those who cast the pieces, that are finished, cast those that are in the rough.

Court. They immerse the piece in aqua-fortis, and afterwards in water? - Yes.

There must be a vessel to hold the aqua-fortis, and another to hold the water? - Yes. If ever we find pickle that has been made use of, we produce it. After the metal has been put into pickle, it loses the strength and turns green: that we have produced when we have found it, but we never produced the water.

Counsel for the Crown. The water, and stuff to blacken it, is only to lessen the colour of the silver, which the aqua-fortis gives it? - Certainly.

Court. From the things found in the room, which have been produced, the prisoner could not then be employed in the act of colouring, without the vessel of the pickle had been removed. Certainly.

RACHAEL LIONS sworn.

Do you know Robert Folier ? - Yes. He lived in Crown-court, in the Old Change, near Doctors Commons.

Have you been at his house? - I was there with him from the Sunday till he was taken up; he lived in the two pair of stairs room: it looked out forward: there is no back-room.

What was he employed in? - He scowered some half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences. After they were scowered, he put them into a bason, and put some aqua fortis over them. When they had been there some little time, he took them out, and put them into cold water, and then scowered them again with some house-sand. Then he rubbed them with a greasy cloth, and said then they were fit to lay out.

Had they that appearance? - Yes.

Look at that (shewing her a finished counterfeit shilling). - I have seen him do a great many like this.

When he first began them, were they like that? (shewing her a piece as it came from the casting) - Yes; he brought them to me several times as he had them from the casters.

Cross-Examination.

Are you the wife of the prisoner? - No.

You passed as his wife? - Yes, during the time I was there.

Was what you are talking of done in the day or night time? - Mornings and evenings, from six o'clock to nine or ten. Sometimes he would come home to tea, and go to work. I was not there all day.

I believe you are very well known in this court? - I never was here but upon a just cause.

You have been at this bar, I believe? - Not for coining.

But for several other offences? - No; not several other offences.

Court. You lived with this man as his wife? - Yes; he took the lodgings: I was with him.

Who did you give the information to? - To a relation of mine. I fell ill, and I was terrified at the thoughts of this employment, and I divulged it to my relations.

You were at the door, taking in milk, when the officers came? - I was not: I was up stairs in the room.

How long had you lived with him? - Five days.

You know him before? - Yes.

And lived with him before? - Only three days, at Battle-bridge. Then I sent to my relations, to fetch me away.

It was when you fell ill, you began to be

terrified at this employment? - Yes; I was only three days.

How long was that before the time he was taken up? - About three weeks.

If you were terrified with his conduct before, when you fell ill, how came you to go on that Sunday, and live with him five days after? - Because he was not to do any thing more of the sort, only a few he had then he was to finish.

Though he was to do no more of that business, to induce you to live with him, yet he continued to do it the whole time you lived with him? - Yes; night and morning.

Did you reproach him with his breach of promise? - He said, Nothing should happen to me: if he was taken, he could always clear me.

If you was terrified with his employment, what induced you to return to him again? - I really don't know what induced me: I was very ill, and really don't know. I happened to meet with him, and did not know how to get from him.

Upon your oath, did not you go back with him to have an opportunity of giving information against him, that he might be taken at work? - I did not.

How long before he was taken did you determine to give information against him? - Three days.

Prisoner. Did not you live with me at Windsor? - Yes; I was with him there three days: he went down to put off his bad money; about 10 or 15 l.

Whether you have not a husband, Tom Lions , in Clerkenwell bridewell? - I have not.

Do you know such a man? - Yes.

Did you live with him as your husband? - Yes.

When you lived with the prisoner, and determined to inform against him, did not you know there was a reward for the informer? - No.

Counsel. There is no reward for colouring.

Mr. REUBEN FLETCHER sworn.

I am a moneyer of the Mint. I have broke one of the shillings: it is base coin.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to your Lordship, my counsel, and the gentlemen of the jury.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

ELIZABETH LOVEGROVE sworn.

The prisoner lodged at my house. Mrs. Lions and he came together, and engaged for the room. He brought her on the Sunday evening, and was there till Friday. They left the key every night. They were out all the day, and always both came in together: they were never in in the day. They left the key in the kitchen when they went out, and I made their bed every day, except the Thursday. She brought in a parcel with her on Tuesday night.

You was there that morning the things were found? - I went up with them, to know what was the matter; for I was in a great fright.

Every day but Thursday you was in the room? - Yes.

Did you ever perceive any thing going forward like colouring money? - Nothing like it.

Cross-Examination.

How long have you been acquainted with this man? - Ever since the Friday before he was taken away.

Did you know what he was? - No; I was just endeavouring to find out what he was.

What was the parcel she brought on the Tuesday night? - I do not know; I believe it was china and glasses: I did not examine.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-66

553. JOHN SHEPPARD was indicted for falsely making, forging, and counterfeiting, and causing to be falsely made, forged, and counterfeited, an order for the payment of six pounds, six shillings, to John Atkins , with intention to defraud James Elliot .

2d. Count. For uttering and publishing; as true, the said order, well knowing it to have been forged.

JAMES ELLIOTT sworn.

I am a silver-smith , in Oxford-street . Upon the 31st of July; the prisoner came to my shop, and asked to see some silver buckles. I shewed him some. He chose a pair which came to four guineas. Then he asked to see some paste knee buckles. I shewed him some. He chose a pair which came to 38 s. and he had a little gold shirt-pin, for his shirt, at 4 s. Then pulling out his purse, as if he was going to pay for them, he said, I believe I have not cash enough about me; but here is a draught on a banker, which is the same thing as money; it will be paid when presented. I looked at the draught. I took it; the sum being so small, and knowing the house. He asked for a pair of silver spurs. I shewed him some. He said they were not the sort he wanted. I told him I had some in hand, which would be ready in a few days. He said, You must send me a pair. I took a little memorandum book, to take his directions. The draught lay upon the counter. I supposed his to be the same name as the signature to the draught, H. Turner. I wrote in the book, H. Turner, Esq. He looked over me at the same time. He desired me to add, jun. Noah's-row, Hampton-court. This was the direction where I was to have sent the spurs. He made some words about the price of the knee-buckles: I agreed to give him 2 s. out of it. He did not take the 2 s. He said, he would settle that when the spurs were sent to him. He went away. The next day, I sent the draught to the banker's, for the money. It was not paid, but was returned. I went to enquire at Green-street, from whence the bill was dated; but I could find no such name as H. Turner, in Green-street. The next day, I sent to Hampton-court; but there was no such name to be found there, nor such place as Noah's-row. Then I advertised the things, with a description of the person.

Was you present when he was taken? - No.

Look at the prisoner. Is that the young man? - Yes; he was taken the next day

after it was inserted in the paper. I saw him at the Office in Bow-street. He said very little there.

You are sure he is the same person? - Yes, I am.

(The draught was produced in court, and corresponded exactly with the statement of it in the indictment.)

Court. Who went with the note to the bankers, Messrs. Brown and Collinson's? - Andrew Kerr .

ANDREW KERR sworn.

I was sent by Mr. Elliott to the bankers, with this note. I tendered it for payment. It was refused payment. I went to Hampton-court the next day, and enquired for Mr. Turner. I could find no such place as Noah's-row, nor such person as H. Turner.

Did you enquire at Green-street, after the drawer? - No; I did not.

WILLIAM ENGLAND sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Brown and Collinson. The firm of that house is Brown, Collinson, and Tritton.

Who are the partners? - Mr. Brown is dead: Mr. Collinson and Mr. Tritton are living.

Are all your bills drawn in that form? - Yes; but there are no other partners, though Brown's name is continued.

Was you there when that bill was presented? - No; I was backwards.

Do you know whether there is such a person as H. Turner keeping cash at your house? - No; we have no such account.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

About six weeks before I went to Mr. Elliot's house, I went to Barnfield, for the recovery of my health, and boarded with one West, at the Salutation tavern. We used often to go to Kew-green, to a reputable house there, where was a billiard-table. I used frequently to play there. One morning a gentleman addressed me, and asked me to play a game at billiards for a gill of wine. I said I had no objection. When we were in the room, he proposed to play for half-a-crown. We played till I won 9 l. of him. He said, he supposed I should have no objection to take a draught on his banker. I looked at it, and saw it was on Brown and Collinson. I made no scruple to take it. I afterwards tendered it to Mr. Elliott, and he readily accepted it. I saw the advertisement tended to my person. I was at the Salutation. I said to a person, here is a note seems to tend to my person. I was invited to go down and see a gentleman, who said his name was Turner, at Noah's-row, Hampton-court; that he had a brother just come from Cambridge; that I must enquire for Mr. Turner, jun. I had a pair of spurs on, which he admired, and desired me to bring them with me when I came down to him. There was a marker present, at the time we played together. I have made enquiry after the marker, but could not discover any such person.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

(He was humbly recommended, both by the Prosecutor and the Jury, to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-67

554, 555. JOHN STEWART and JOHN VANDERSALL were indicted for that they, in the King's highway, in and upon Charles Mann feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person an iron cork-screw, value 2 d. the property of the said Charles , June the 13th .

CHARLES MANN sworn.

On Wednesday, the 13th of June, I had been to Deptford, to receive some money. In coming home again; I crossed the water. I came up Gravel-lane, to Ratcliff-highway. There I took a coach. Going up Cannon-street road, I thought it was a dangerous place. I put my money under the coach seat. When I got near Cannon-street turnpike , I saw three men running: one catched hold of the horses; the other two ran to the

coach-door. Stewart got in at the coach-door, on the off side: the other, I think, was Vandersall; but I cannot be positive to him, though I am to Stewart. Stewart said, D - n your eyes, your watch and money, or I'll blow your brains out! I said, I had neither watch nor money; I had been upon a party of pleasure, and had spent all. He said, D - n your eyes, that shan't serve your turn; I will search. I had in my left-hand pocket a cork-screw, and some halfpence: the cork-screw was taken, whether any of the halfpence were or not; I do not know the number of them. Stewart then lifted up the cushion of the fore seat, and searched under it. He said to me, D - n you, sit back, or I'll blow your brains out. I said, You have searched me; I have neither watch nor money; what money I had I spent upon a party of pleasure. They said they would search me, and bid me get up. I then took the money up in my left-hand. Stewart said, D - n you, you have bid it in your hand. Then I dropped it into my pocket, and with my left hand got hold of Stewart's right hand, in which he held his pistol. I struck him over the head, and threw myself down out of the coach upon him. I said, Jack Stewart , I will be robbed by none of you: I had known Stewart a great while. Upon my saying that, Stewart turned his pistol round, and shot at me. The ball just grazed my head, and took the skin and some of my hair off. Then the other came to the coach, and cried out, D - n you, now blow his brains out. He shot at me, but missed me. The third man then left the horse's head, and came and cut me with a hanger. These are the clothes (producing a coat with eight or ten cuts in the shoulders); I had wounds in my shoulders corresponding with these cuts. Stewart desired me to loose him; but I kept my hold. Upon this, I called to the coachman to come down, and said, I would take them. Upon that, they ran away. Stewart, I believe it was, left his hat behind him.

Was you sober? - I was very sober at the time I was robbed.

JOHN LABAR sworn.

I was driving the coach. Three men stopped the coach. I cannot swear to either of them.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I apprehended Stewart, for robbing Mr. Shakespear. I found, at his lodgings, a pistol, a dark lanthorn, some pick-lock keys, and an iron crow. When the prosecutor came to Bow-street, seven or eight other prisoners were in the yard. The justice desired him to go and see if he knew any of them. The moment he came into the yard, he said, There is Jack Stewart ; that is the man that robbed me.

For STEWART.

- WALL sworn.

I am a sailor. I live at Gosport.

You belong to the impress service, I believe? - I do.

Did you see Stewart at Gosport at any time? - Yes.

What was the day you saw him first? - The first day I saw him was the Saturday before Whit-Sunday. On the Whit-Sunday we dined together.

When did you see him after that? - On the Monday, the 11th of June, we went to Southampton fair together.

When did you see him after that? - The next day, the 12th, which was Tuesday; and I saw him on Wednesday. He told me he belonged to the Britannia.

The Britannia was at Portsmouth at the time, was she not? - Just about the time.

When did you see him after that? - I saw him on the 13th.

Court. What day of the month was Saturday before Whit-Sunday? - The 2d of June. I saw him on the Wednesday, and never saw any more of him till I saw him in this place; and I never saw such a place before in my life. I was at Southampton fair, which was the 11th of June. On the 5th of September we went to a bull-bait, which was about half a mile out of Gosport. After the 11th, I saw him on the 12th and 13th; and then I saw him no more till I saw him in this place.

What ship do you belong to? - The last ship I belonged to was the St.

Amonica: I was boatswain's mate on board her.

Jury. How long is Southampton fair after Whit-Sunday? - The next day.

Jury. It is opened the Saturday before Trinity-Sunday. The first day of the fair is Trinity Monday.

Prosecutor. My Lord, I saw this man fighting at the top of Old Gravel-lane. On Tuesday last three men came to my house, to know whether I had found the bill.

Did you know either of these men? - No. They said they came from John Stewart .

What have you to say about this man? - On the 13th of June, he stood fighting at the top of Old Gravel-lane, facing the White Swan, where the rendezvous is.

To Wall. Was you there on that day in Gravel-lane? - I do not know where it is.

You were not there on the 13th of June? - I was at Gosport. I never saw London till last Monday, and then I was subpoena'd by John Stewart , to come up to prove he was at Gosport at that time. I do not know Old Gravel-lane.

How long had you been acquainted with Stewart before you saw him in Gosport? - Never, till I saw him cross the ferry from Gosport to Portsmouth. He said he belonged to the Britannia. We fell into discourse, and went and drank together.

To Mann. Was any body with you when you saw him fighting? - No.

MICHAEL MOORE sworn.

I am a sailor. I have been wounded in the King's service.

Was you at Portsmouth any time in June? - Yes, from last February till about the 14th of June: then I came to London, to get into an hospital. I saw Stewart at Gosport coming a-shore one day upon the beach. I happened to meet him. He asked me what ship I belonged to: I said, I had been lately discharged from on board the Diligent. I asked him, before we parted, to have a glass of liquor. There were two horses standing at the door, one of the men booted and spurred, to go to the fair. It was at a house kept by Wall, this man's father. Afterwards I met him, and asked him what sort of pleasure he had at the fair. He said, very good. I saw him likewise on Tuesday, and on the Wednesday. I never saw him from that time till I saw him here.

RICHARD TRENOR sworn.

I remember seeing Stewart, on the 13th of July, at about eight in the morning. He told me he belonged to the - , I forget the name of the vessel; she is a three-decker. I was drinking with him from eight in the morning till eleven at night. I have never seen him since that night. He had a suit of white clothes on, a three-cocked hat, and his hair curled.

SOPHIA THOMAS sworn.

I keep a house at Gosport.

Do you know Stewart? - Yes, I have seen him before in London: I know him no farther than being an acquaintance.

Did you see him at any time at Gosport? - Yes, he was down the 8th or 9th of June, and lay at my house. Southampton fair was on the Monday, and I saw him about four or five days afterwards at Gosport.

Court. When was Southampton fair? - It began the 11th of June, and I saw him three or four days afterwards.

STEWART GUILTY . ( Death .)

VANDERSALL NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-68

556, 557. JANE FULLER , spinster , and ELIZABETH HATCHETT , spinster , were indicted for that they, in a certain field and open place, near the King's highway, in and upon Mary Brooke , spinster , feloniously did make an assault, putting her in corporal fear and danger of her life, and stealing from her person a wooden box, value 1 d. a yard and a half of blond lace, value 2 s. a cheque linen apron, value 1 s. two linen caps, value 1 s. a mock garnet necklace, value 1 s. a tin nutmeg grater, value 1 d. and a note of hand, under the hand of one Thomas Northey , for

the payment of 2 l. 10 s. the money secured by the said note being due and unsatisfied to the said Mary Brooke , the proprietor thereof .

Congreve. My Lord, the prosecutrix has been very ill, and has been out of her senses in the work-house.

Court. Then I will examine the other witnesses.

JACOB MICHAEL sworn.

I deal in Lemons. I was coming towards London, on the 27th of July : sitting at the door of the George, at Pancras, I saw the two prisoners come out of the house whispering, and laughing together, and looking over into the fields; soon after they went into the field where the prosecutrix was sitting. Upon seeing them go towards her, I drank my beer, and then went after them. I went round another field, and laid myself down behind the hedge facing her: there I saw one of the prisoners hold her hands fast, and the other taking things out of her pocket. Hatchett said, Now, d - n your eyes, you bitch, if you do not give me your stays, I will cut your throat. Upon that the prosecutrix called out, For the Lord's sake, leave me my stays; but they repeated that again; upon which she called out, Murder. Hatchett answered, If you squall out murder, d - n your eyes, you bitch, I'll cut your throat. Upon this, I jumped over the hedge to them, and said, You have been robbing the poor girl: upon that Hatchett came up with a pen-knife, and said, You Jew bugger, what is that to you? Upon seeing the knife, I ran away for assistance: I ran and fetched Mr. Congreve. Upon his coming up, he found them together.

- CONGREVE sworn.

The Jew came, and told me, they were robbing, and he was afraid would murder, a poor girl. I went there, and saw the two prisoners: they had cut the lace of her stays: we got help, and took her to the George.

To Michael. Can you particularize what they took from the girl? - I saw an handkerchief, and a handfull of things.

( Richard Dichfield produced a handkerchief, a smelling-bottle, a cap, and a mock garnet necklace, which were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

JONATHAN CRACKNALL sworn.

I saw Hatchett strike the girl several blows; then I saw her snatch her cap off her head, and deliver it to Fuller: they left her without a cap, and she put the hood of her cloak over her head, which was all over a gore of blood, from the blows she received.

Court. Now set up the prosecutrix.

MARY BROOKE sworn.

I was coming home from Hampstead. I sat down in a field to rest me, and the two women at the bar, came up and beat me, and robbed me. One snatched my cap off; then they took the things out of my bundle, and a note of hand for 2 l. 10 s. which has never been found since: they d - n'd me, and said they would cut my throat, if I did not give them my stays. They cut the string of my stays. I called out, Murder! upon which, the Jew came over, and spoke to them: then he went to the alehouse, and brought the other man, and they took them to the George Alehouse .

FULLER's DEFENCE.

When I met the prosecutrix, we had been to Battle-bridge, to get eight-pennyworth of meat: the other woman stopped her, and said, Here is a new whore; she shall give us some gin. We returned back to her: she said she had but 6 d. that she picked up a gentleman; that he took her to the George, and he had given her something to drink; and that it had made her head bad: that two girls had taken the gentleman from her: I said I would go, and get them to give her something: I went to them, and asked them, how they came to take the gentleman from her: and one said, that the gentleman had kept her: she reached, and was very ill, and this cap dropped out of her pocket, and they picked up this necklace and things in the house. The Jew said, if it was possible, for the sake of the reward, he would have our lives.

HATCHETT's DEFENCE.

She has spoke the truth, and nothing but the truth. I can say no more.

BOTH GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17810912-69

558. MARY BOND was indicted for that she, in the dwelling-house of Joseph Markess , in and upon William Bryan , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, stealing a silk handkerchief, value 18 d. a cotton handkerchief, value 10 d. and ten guineas in monies numbered, the property of the said William, in the dwelling-house of the said Joseph , August the 9th .

WILLIAM BRYAN sworn.

On the 9th of August, I came from Gravesend. I had been discharged out of the hospital: I was very weak and ill: between nine and ten at night, in Golden-lane , I met the prisoner, on the pavement; she came up to me; we were together about five or six minutes; then she pulled me into an entry. I said, this is Mr. Bennett's: she said, Yes; this is Mr. Bennett's: then she pulled me up stairs by the arm. When I came into the one-pair-of stairs room, she asked me for some money to drink: I gave her sixpence; when she threw me on the bed, having previously called out for another woman, by the name of Nancy Green, to come into the room. She then clapped her knee upon my belly: and then Green took hold of the handkerchief about my neck, and held me by that; then the prisoner took a handkerchief out of my waistcoat pocket, and threw it to Green: then they attempted to take out another handkerchief, which had ten guineas in it: I struggled for that: then she d - n'd my eyes, and said she would run me through with a knife, if I did not let go the handkerchief. Upon which I let it go, money and all, for I was in bodily fear: then they ran down stairs: I followed them, and went to a neighbour's I knew, and they were taken up that night.

Was you sober? - Yes. I had drank part of two gallons of beer between fifteen of us.

JOHN BRADBURY sworn.

Before ten that night, the prosecutor came to me, and said he was robbed. I went after the woman, and endeavoured to find her: when she was taken, after having said she had but one penny, which she would spend in gin, she dropped a guinea on the floor: we took her into another room, and there she dropped another guinea; while searching her, another guinea dropped out of her breast; that she took up, and swallowed: she had no smock on: I did not not search her further. Going to Clerkenwell, she said, D - n you, you have got two of the man's guineas; but I swallowed one, and if I had them, I would swallow them too.

( John Cass confirmed the evidence of John Bradbury in every particular.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going down stairs: that man met me at the door, and asked me to call down the woman that was in the front-room with him. I called her, and said there was an acquaintance of her's: she said she knew nothing of him. He said, he had been in her company the night before: he was very much in liquor: I went and sat down by the woman of the green-stall: I went home, and drank a pint of beer at the Fountain: when I went back, Bradbury came in first, and said nothing to me: then Cass and Bradbury came up, and I said, I was willing to go with them: I went to Bradbury's: Bradbury said, That is the man. I went to him, and said, Man, did I rob you? he said, No. It was that woman: which was Sarah Jones . When he found I had got some money, he said it was I that robbed him.

To Cass and Bradbury. Did you observe whether the man was in liquor? -

Both. I believe not.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Baren HOTHAM.

Reference Number: t17810912-70

559. THOMAS WESTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Martha Bockey , on the 9th of September , about the hour of eleven in the night, and stealing a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 18 s. a piece of a gold ring with garnets, value 6 d. and 27 s. in monies numbered, the property of the said Martha, in her dwelling-house .

MARTHA BOCKEY sworn.

I live in Aldgate High-street . My house was broke open on Sunday night, the 9th of September. I went to bed between nine and ten. I had asked Mary Davis to come to bed to me. She staying later than I expected, I went to bed without her, and locked the door. She came up about eleven o'clock, waked me, and told me I had been robbed. Then I missed the things. I told Mr. Matthews in the morning, and he afterwards took the prisoner. I am a lodger in Mr. Cox's house. The buckles and money were in my room when I went to bed.

JAMES MATTHEWS sworn.

Last Monday morning, I was informed by the prosecutrix she had been robbed by Thomas Weston , as she had been told by Mary Davis . She directed me to his mother's house: she said her name was Donne. I went to the house she had directed me to. Mrs. Donne came to the door. I asked her some questions. She said she did not live there, but lived two doors farther. I went there, and asked whether Mrs. Donne lived there. A woman came out, and said, No; she lived up those steps; directing me to the place I had seen her at before. I went back, and found the door was fast. I knocked, and told them, if they did not open the door, I would break it open. She made a very impudent answer. The prisoner hearing me so positive, got up, and opened the door. I said, I think you are the lad I want. He said, I heard of this last night: by which I suppose he meant the business I came upon. The prisoner desired me to stop till his mother fetched something to drink. I did so. I then sent for the prosecutrix. She came up into the room, and identified the person of the prisoner. I took him to the watch-house, and put him into the cage. The prisoner's father-in-law, who was in the watch-house, went up to the cage. I bid him come down. Then I shut the door, and took the prisoner out of the cage, and brought him into the watch-house. He put his hand in his fob, and pulled out two sixpences, a farthing, and three halfpence. I asked, Is this all? He said, Yes. I said, I shall search you farther. I put my hand into his fob, and pulled out a bit of a ring, and said, How came you by this? He said, at first, I do not know: at last, he said, she (meaning Mrs. Bockey) gave it me last night. I searched farther. I could not find any thing. At last, I searched his shirt-collar, and behind I thought I felt some money. The prisoner then offered to fight. I desired my partner to take the thing off his neck. He did. It was a handkerchief. He took it off, and took out two half-crowns and 5 s. 6 d. and gave it into my hand. I went to the prosecutrix, and asked what she had lost. She said, 29 or 30 s. in silver and halfpence, and a bit of a broken gold ring; that she could swear to a bad shilling and a bad sixpence. I asked what sort of a ring it was: she said it had a large red stone, and two small ones. She picked a bad shilling and sixpence out of the other money. I went up to see if her room-door was broke open: I found the bolt and the lock bent double.

(The things were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix)

CHARLES EARLE sworn.

I am beadle of Whitechapel. I know nothing more than the last witness has said.

( Mary Davis was called, but not appearing, the court ordered her recognizance to be estreated.)

For the Prisoner.

HANNAH BROWN sworn.

I walked the prosecutrix. I was going up the alley; that was the way I heard she was robbed. I went and waked her, and beat her most terribly over the head and shoulders, and said, Patty, they say you are robbed: and by all account it is not the first time she

has hid her necklace up the chimney, and took up a poor woman with a child at her breast.

SOLOMON ABRAHAMS sworn.

I saw the prosecutrix give Thomas Weston a bit of a gold ring; it was last Sunday afternoon, between four and five o'clock.

What did she give it him for? - I cannot say; I saw her give it him into his hands.

Where was it? - In Whitechapel, the corner of Petticoat-lane, by her own stall: she keeps a fruit-stall.

How long had you been in company with the prisoner and her? - Above an hour.

You had been with them in the street all that time? - Yes.

Does she keep a stall on a Sunday? - Yes; she makes it a common practice to set her stall out on a Sunday.

What was the conversation about before she gave it him? - I can't say: they were very much in liquor both of them; they were drinking together all the while. I did not take notice what they were talking about.

You only took notice of her giving him this bit of a ring? - Yes, and a bad sixpence.

How did you know the sixpence was a bad one? - She said to him, Here, Thomas Weston , if you can pass this sixpence for me, you shall keep it.

What good was that to do her? - I do not know. She pulled out all her silver, and gave it to me.

What are you? - A drover.

Where do you live? - In Houndsditch.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Reference Number: t17810912-71

560. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 50 s. the property of David Allen , in the dwelling-house of James Wilson , August the 2d .

DAVID ALLEN sworn.

On the 2d of August, I was at the Angel, a public-house, at the foot of Old Gravel-lane , at about ten minutes before ten o'clock at night. I was in the tap-room. The prisoner was there. I asked him to drink with me. He came and sat down with me, and I called for a pint of beer. I had often seen him in that house. We sat together about three quarters of an hour. I called the mistress of the house, and gave her a shilling to change; and took my watch out, and laid it down on the table. I looked over my right shoulder at the dial, and felt the watch go from under my left hand. I saw the prisoner take it up, and go out of the door with it. It being dark, we could not apprehend him: there were only women in the house, except another man, as infirm as myself. Three weeks after, he was taken, and I saw him before Justice Sherwood. I never recovered my watch. He said, before the justice, that he had it in his hand, and laid it down again. I saw the watch as he was going out at the door: the key was sticking out between his finger and thumb.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went out for snuff for him. The watch lay on the table. When I came back again, there was a sailor and he together: he was in liquor, half asleep and half awake. I shook hands with him, and wished him good night. I never heard it was lost till the next morning. I went to the prosecutor's house, to see about it. He was out: he had been out with his Moll all night.

Was you in liquor? - No. I paid two guineas and a half for the watch about a fortnight before.

GUILTY. 39 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice GOULD.

[Fine. See summary.]

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-72

561. MARY, the wife of THOMAS WALKER , was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Cotterell , September the 6th .

GEORGE STABLES sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Cotterell, a pawnbroker . Between ten and eleven o'clock on

Thursday morning, the 6th of September, the prisoner came into the shop, and took a counterpane out of pawn for 18 d. She came out of the box, and I went to the other end of the shop, and she came into the shop. She opened the door, behind which hung six or seven gowns; and about ten minutes after, my master, coming down from breakfast, missed the gown, and asked me where it was. The prisoner came back, and seemed much confused, and said she wanted a pair of wires, which is a pair of ear-rings. I served her, and then followed her to her lodgings. Between our house and the lodgings I took her, with the gown in her lap. She came back, and my master charged a constable with her.

THOMAS WARREN sworn.

I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner. The gown was on the counter. She declared she found it in the passage between the alley and the house, and seeing no ticket on it, thought somebody had been in for it, and dropped it.

(It was produced in court, and deposed to by Stables.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to redeem a counterpane, for 18 d. A woman came in to redeem a waistcoat. She went out first. As I went out, I picked up the gown, and seeing no ticket on it, I thought it was as much my property as another's, and took it home with me.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-73

562. JOHN WATTS was indicted for that he, in the King's highway, in and upon Henry Gimber feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and taking from his person a silver watch, value 15 s. the property of the said Henry , August the 6th .

(There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-74

563. SIMON GOWEN was indicted for stealing two lambs, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Rutter the younger, July the 24th .

(There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17810912-75

564. ANN HAULT was indicted for uttering a counterfeit shilling to Ann Wetherstone , knowing the same to be false and counterfeit .

2d Count. For uttering a counterfeit sixpence, August the 3d .

ANN WETHERSTONE sworn.

How old are you? - Sixteen. I live with Messrs. Sleath and Thurpp, in Cheapside . The first Friday in August, at about five or six in the evening, the prisoner came and asked to look at some lace. I gave her a pattern. She asked for a pair of stockings and a pair of pockets. She bought a pair of stockings and a pair of pockets. She bought the pockets first: she gave me a shilling, which I put in the till, where there was no other silver. Then she gave me 2 s. 6 d. The price of the stockings was 2 s. 3 d. I was to give her 3 d. in change. There was one sixpence I rather suspected, which I shewed to Mr. Steel, the shopman. He said, he must cut it. The girl said, she did not know it was bad, but she would fetch 3 d. and went away with the stockings and pockets.

Did she come back to the shop? - No: the next evening Mr. Steel saw her go into the next haberdasher's, and he brought her into our shop.

What became of the money, the shilling in the till, and the 2 s. 6 d. you received? - Mr. Steel took the shilling out of the till, to see if it was good: it appeared to be a very bad one. The other silver I had in my hand, which I gave to Mr. Steel.

JOHN STEEL sworn.

I am shopman to Messrs. Sleath and Thurpp. The prisoner came into the shop. She asked the last witness to let her see some pockets. She paid for the stockings. The money was put into the till. When she paid the other money, a sixpence was brought to me: it was a bad one. I said to the girl, Do you know what you are liable to? She said, Lord! Sir, is it a bad one? I said, Yes: I must cut it. She said, she would bring 3 d. and leave the sixpence as security. When she was gone, I thought the shilling in the till might be bad. I took it out, and looked at it, and the rest of the money; and found it was all bad, except one sixpence. The next evening, I saw her in the next shop. I said, You did not bring me the 3 d. She said, You owe me 3 d. I brought her into the shop. I asked her if she had a father. She said, yes; but he was drowned at sea. I charged a constable with her, and we took her to the compter. There she was searched. A guinea, and about 2 s. and something that made near half-a-crown, was found upon her. That was all good. We asked her how she came by the guinea. She said her mistress gave it her, to buy some things, or fetch some things out of pawn: the other money was her own. She would not tell where her mistress lived. There was a key: I asked her how she came by the key. She said she found it in Moorfields. We asked her what it was the key of. She said, any door. A man came in, and asked her something: she said, there was no occasion to answer their questions, and she would not answer them. On Monday, she was taken to the magistrate. Her mistress came to see her in the compter: she proved to be a Mrs. Lyney, in Hope-street, Spitalfields. The Lord-Mayor asked the mistress if she gave her any money. She said she gave her a guinea, to fetch things out of pawn, and gave her three shillings and two sixpences. I went to Hope-street, to enquire if Mrs. Lyney lived there. I found she did. The girl was committed for further examination. I gave the money this afternoon to the moneyer of the Mint.

That was the money you saw given? - Yes.

Mr. REUBEN FLETCHER sworn.

I am one of the moneyers of the Mint. I received some money this afternoon from Mr. Steel: these are the pieces. They are all bad: I am certain they are all bad.

They appear worse to the eye now than they would two months ago? - Yes.

They do not appear to the eye to be very obviously bad? - Yes.

You looked at them by day-light, from the difficulty of discovering them by candlelight? - I did. I have often taken bad money myself. by candle-light.

Cross-Examination.

With your skill of money, you thought it necessary to cut some of them by day-light, to be certain it was bad? - I was certain they were bad, before I cut them.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-76

565. ELIZABETH GREEN was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value 18 s. the property of Catherine Geary , spinster , August the 15th .

CATHERINE GEARY sworn.

I gave a gown to Jane Barber , to alter, on the Monday before it was lost.

JANE BARBER sworn.

I had a gown to alter. I left the prisoner in care of the room. Nobody else was in the room. When I came home, she was gone, and the gown was gone. She was taken up on Saturday, and owned she had pawned it.

- LIGHTFOOT sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. This gown was pawned at our house, on the 15th of August. I can't swear that the prisoner pawned it.

(It was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Jane Barber has been an acquaintance of mine many years. She asked me to go with her to the Borough, to see her aunt. I had not clothes fit to go in. She asked the prosecutrix to lend me this gown, which she did. I pawned my own gown. We were out together till all the money was spent, and she told me to pawn this gown; and then we had some words, and she has done this out of spite.

Barber. I lent her this gown on Monday, to go to my aunt's. She brought it back. I left it in my room, and she pawned it.

(The prisoner called Mary Wood and Mary Ward , who wer e prisoners in Newgate, to prove that Jane Barber came to her in the bail-dock, and said she was sorry for what she had done, and that she (the prisoner) should not want while she was in gaol.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-77

566. JOSEPH RANDALL was indicted for that he, with a certain offensive weapon, called a cat, made of hemp, in and upon Thomas Wooldridge , Esq ; feloniously did make an assault, with intent the monies of the said Thomas to steal , August the 5th .

Mr. Alderman WOOLDRIDGE sworn.

Do you know the prisoner? - I do. On Sunday, the 5th of August, I dined at Mr. Alder's, at Finchley. As I was coming to town, at about nine o'clock in the evening, when I had got to about fifty yards from what is called the Half-way-house between London and Kentish-town , I met three men: two of them came up to me, and demanded my watch and money. The man on my right hand had a pistol, and the man on the left hand had a cutlass in his hand. I said I would not be robbed. One of them said, We will cut you down; blast you, we will cut you down. They took hold of my bridle; upon which my horse reared. My saddle was covered with a goat's skin, which had the appearance of holsters. I had no weapon but a small whip, which my wife rides with, covered with silver for about four inches. I shortened it in this manner (describing it) under my arm; and it being bright, they took it, I presume, for a pistol. I presented it at the man's head who was on my left hand, and swore I would blow his brains out. The two men then ran. The roads divide, one to Gray's-inn-lane, the other to Tottenham-court-road: the two men took the left hand, and the third man the right hand road.

Was you coming along the Tottenham-court road? - I was on the Kentish-town road, beyond where it divides; beyond the house situated at the end of what they call Fig-lane. I thought it safest to pursue the one man. I called out, Robbers! and trotted briskly after that man, which was the prisoner; and I took him. While the two men were with me, he stood at a distance; he never spoke, nor made use of any threat whatever. When I charged him with being one of the men, he denied it. Upon taking him to the public-house, he was searched, and in his pocket was found this cat (producing it.) I sent for a constable, and delivered him in charge.

Did he appear to be in company with the other two men? - Most certainly.

Did he appear to be in conversation with them, or speak to them? - What he said to them before, I do not know: he never spoke or acted while they were with me. I am reluctantly the prosecutor; but the justice forced me to prosecute, against my will. The prisoner was examined the next morning before Justice Girdler. He was there asked to confess, and told that it should be better for him.

Court. We must not hear any thing that he said after that.

Mr. Wooldridge. In consequence of that promise, and in consequence of his information, the other parties were taken, who had robbed Mr. Rainsforth five minutes before. I wished very much, before the justice, not to have been bound over; but the justice let the man who was at my horse's head escape, against my will, and bound me over to prosecute the prisoner, who was not acting, and who did not put me in fear. The person who was at my horse's head, and who actually robbed Mr. Rainsforth, was permitted to escape. The prisoner is a lighter-man: he offered to go into the King's service; and he is very fit, and able.

Prisoner. I am a freeman and a liveryman of the city of London, and have a boat of my own: I should not chuse to go to sea.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-78

567. CHARLES ATKINS was indicted for that he, in the dwelling-house of Samuel Newport , in and upon William Lawrence feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 10 s. a man's hat, value 2 s. and four pods of carnation seeds, value 6 d. the property of the said William , September the 3d .

WILLIAM LAWRENCE sworn.

I keep the tap belonging to Mr. Scott's brick-field, the sign of the Cock and Greyhound, in Hoxton. On the 3d of September, I was sent with some money to one Baldwin, a prisoner in New-prison . I staid there some time. Some of the prisoners asked me for beer. Coming away, the prisoner, Atkins, came up to me, and pressed me to give him one pot of beer. I said, I did not mind one pot; he should have it. I ordered the beer at the tap. They delayed bringing it ten or fifteen minutes: during which time Atkins and I continued together, were talking together; and Atkins took hold of my handkerchief, and was playing with it. As I got up to go away, he laid hold of the silk handkerchief he had been playing with, which was about my neck, and dragged me across the yard, into a shed, where the prisoners eat and drink. The second person who laid hold of me was Trenter, who was shot afterwards. He laid hold of me immediately after Atkins. The other pushed me behind, and dragged me into the shed. When they got me to the shed, they pulled my hat over my eyes, so as entirely to prevent my seeing, and took my handkerchief off my neck. I kept one hand in my breeches-pocket. They cut my breeches across my thigh, and cut through: they cut my hand in my pocket, and cut my thigh an inch and an half long. They took out of my shoes a pair of silver buckles. One took out of my pocket four pods of carnation seeds, and then said, Let him go; we have pretty well sifted him. I put up one of my hands, to move my hat off my eyes, and they scratched the skin off the back of that hand. Then they let me go, and flung my hat over the gates after me. This was at the time of the riots in the prison. When they let me go, I saw a great many, but not so as to discern any of them in particular.

RICHARD BALDWIN sworn.

I saw the prisoner go in among the rest that carried Lawrence to the shed, but I did not see who first laid hold of him.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not one of the persons who committed the fact, but was at the tap all the time upon other business.

For the Prisoner.

(N. B. The witnesses for the prisoner were examined apart.)

THOMAS STEEL sworn.

I was committed for a rescue. The prosecutor and prisoner were together, by the hole of the tap-room. When the prosecutor was taken to the shed, I and Atkins staid at the hole; and Atkins was there when the

prosecutor came out of the shed. I saw him at the hole when the prosecutor was dragged away. He was left there. He was in company with the prosecutor before he was dragged away. When they dragged Mr. Lawrence away, he was left at the hole; he was not in the shed at all.

JOSEPH LAY sworn.

I remember seeing the prosecutor at the prison. I saw him dragged from the hole where they serve the beer. Atkins was with some of the prisoners at the hole: I do not think he was near Lawrence. Lawrence was with one set of people, Atkins with another: I do not think Atkins was near Lawrence: quite different sets, and not in company at all, and not together at all. I was with Atkins close to the hole, but Lawrence was about five yards off. When he was dragged away, Atkins and the people with him staid still in their places; and I was never off the bench. The prisoner never moved from that place; he was there when Lawrence was dragged away. I had no conversation with Lawrence before he was dragged away. I am sure Atkins had not left his station when Lawrence came from the shed, and did not carry the beer to the shed at all.

WILLIAM RANSMORE sworn.

I am committed for an assault. I saw the prosecutor dragged to the shed. He was standing very near the hole, within a yard or two, about half a minute before that. Atkins came to me with half-a-crown to change, for some beer. When Lawrence was dragged away, Atkins still continued to wait for his change, and waited three or four minutes. When he got the change, he went into the shed. It was just the time Lawrence came from it into the yard.

To Lawrence. Did you know the prisoner before that day? - No: what makes me so sensible of him, was, I talked with him for, I believe, fifteen minutes. I afterwards picked out the two men. As soon as Atkins came up to the place, I said, That is the man; then the two came out with the cutlass, and rushed at the turnkey.

Prisoner. The prosecutor was himself a runner at Justice Welch's.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-79

568. THOMAS EDWARD BUDGE was indicted for stealing a pair of Nankeen breeches, value 12 s. the property of Richard Worrell , September the 8th .

(There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17810912-80

569. JOSEPH PENTICROSS was indicted for stealing a linen purse, value 2 d. a wire purse, value 2 d. and 30 l. in monies numbered, the property of Richard Litchfield , in his dwelling-house , August the 13th .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.)

RICHARD LITCHFIELD sworn.

I am a publican , in Golden-lane, St. Luke's . On the 13th of August, I lost upwards of 30 l. from the bureau, in the bed-chamber. The door was locked, and the key was in Mrs. Litchfield's pocket. I went to bed first, on the night of the 13th. When I unlocked the door, I found a board, which was under the window, pulled down, and put on a table. I had not seen it down for two years before. I missed the money on the 14th. I went to the window immediately. I saw the pointing of the tiles disturbed. I had a suspicion of the prisoner. I went round to his master's, which was the next door, and found him there. I looked out of the window there, and saw another tile disturbed, which I could not see out of my own window. I told Mr. Wright, his master, that I had been robbed, and suspected

the prisoner. He was by. I pointed out the tiles to him and his master. He was taken into custody.

When you found the board down, did not you suspect you was robbed? - No: I thought my wife had taken it down, to dust or something. The key was in the bureau. I saw the money the day before.

Had the prisoner any access to your house at any time? - He used the house in common.

- WRIGHT sworn.

I am a founder. The prisoner is my servant . He came to work between four and five o'clock the afternoon before, and staid about two hours, but did not do half an hour's work. Upon Mr. Litchfield's saying he was robbed, I looked at the tiling. Our business makes the top of the tiles very black. The mortar was broke, and appeared white. I could trace a foot from my window to the prosecutor's.

Was there any other person that worked in that room? - Not that day.

CHARLES TERRY .

I am going of fourteen.

Do you know how serious a thing it is to take an oath? - Yes.

Do you know what obligation you are under to speak the truth? - Yes.

Why should you speak the truth? - To shame the devil.

(He is sworn.)

Upon the 13th of August, the prisoner came to work between four and five o'clock in the evening. I was in the room one pair of stairs above him, cleaning up the shop. The window of the shop where he works was shut when he came; but just before seven o'clock I missed him out of the room. I suspected he was in the necessary: but as I was going up, I pushed the door open; and he was then in the room, putting his coat on. He wanted to play with me all the afternoon, to drive me out of the room up one pair of stairs, where he was at work. I came down stairs again; and the prisoner came down and asked my mistress for 1 s. and went out. Then, when he was gone, I went in, and found the window was wide open.

JAMES BARNETT .

I am fourteen years old.

Do you know what it is to come and take an oath? - No.

Do you know what will become of you, if you do not speak the truth? - Yes, I shall go to the devil.

(He is sworn.)

I have not known the prisoner long. He works at Mr. Wright's. Upon the 13th of August, I saw him upon Mr. Wright's tiles. He got out of the window. I saw him getting out, and getting in again. I saw him near Mr. Litchfield's window. Mr. Litchfield's window was open.

Did you see him in Litchfield's window? - No; I saw him get out of his master's window, and get in again. It was about a quarter after five o'clock. I was going to speak to him, and he doubled his fist, and said, Hush! He was on the tiles, returning to Mr. Wright's window.

Where was you when you saw him? - In the yard where I live, three doors from Mr. Wright's.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This shed, that belongs to Mr. Wright, is situated near the window I generally used to work at. It is hardly to be thought a person, such as I, who have but one leg, should get out on the tiles.

To the Prosecutor. Could a man get from Mr. Wright's to your window without danger of falling? - Yes; there are but seven tiles from one to the other.

Do you know where the last witness lives; could he in the yard see a person go from one window to the other? - Yes, very plain; he could see a cat.

(The prisoner called a witness, who said it was dangerous going from one window to the other.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron HOTHAM .

Reference Number: t17810912-81

570. HENRY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of John Fackart , August the 9th .

JOHN FACKART sworn.

On the 9th of August, about ten in the evening, I met the prisoner, in Holborn. He asked me to let him carry my parcel, which I had under my arm. I refused it. We walked to the corner of Argyle-street . The prisoner asked, What was o'clock? I pulled out my watch. He took it out of my hand, and said, Let me look at it; and immediately ran away. I pursued him, and cried Stop thief! and he was taken in Princes-street, Golden-square; but the watch was never found.

WILLIAM NICHOLS sworn.

I saw the prisoner run off. The prosecutor cried, Stop thief! and I took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM HUNT sworn.

I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house. The prosecutor there admitted that he was a little in liquor when he met the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had that very day come from Deptford. I had not been from sea above three weeks. I am innocent of the affair.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Fine. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810912-82

571. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a cotton gown, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Greensword , August the 30th .

SARAH GREENSWORD sworn.

On the 30th of August, between six and seven in the evening, I was below in the kitchen. I came up, and saw the prisoner just going out of the door. I ran after her, and called out Stop thief! and Mrs. Davis stopped her. When she was stopped, she flung my gown in Mrs. Davis's face. Mrs. Davis took it up. I sent for a constable, and gave charge of the prisoner.

ELEANOR DAVIS sworn.

I was standing at my door. I saw the prisoner come by. Mrs. Greensword came out, and said she had robbed her. I ran after and catched her, and she threw the gown over her shoulder into my face. I brought the gown home to Mrs. Greensword's, and gave it her.

(It was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A woman came after me, and threw this gown down. A person came after me, crying, Stop thief! and I took up the gown, and threw it at her.

GUILTY . W . & Imp. 6 Months .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-83

572. MARY HANSOMBODY , widow , was indicted for stealing a pair of linen sheets, value 6 s. two childrens' linen jams, value 2 s. and a pair of worsted stockings, value 6 d. the property of John Taylor , August the 20th .

(The prosecutor was not able to identify the property.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-84

573, 574. JOHN WELCH and MARY BRAITHWAITE were indicted, the first for stealing 56 lb. weight of lead, value 4 s. the property of Richard Barfoot , the said lead being affixed to the dwelling-house of the said Richard , August the 31st , and the other for receiving the said goods, knowing them to be stolen, against the statute, &c .

(There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoners.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-85

575. THOMAS ROGERS was indicted for stealing two saws, value 12 s. the property of Samuel Winter , and two other saws, value 7 s. the property of John Thompson , September the 10th .

(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizances to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810912-86

576, 577, 578. JOHN JOHNSON , HENRY HERVEY , and THOMAS TAYLOR , were indicted, the two first for stealing two hempen sacks, value 4 s. and eight bushels of flour, value 3 l. the property of Jeremy Bowyer , and the other for receiving the above goods, knowing them to have been stolen , June the 28th .

(The prosecutor's barge had sunk with the sacks of flour; and those mentioned in the indictment were taken out of the river, as they were floating, by Johnson and Hervey, and sold to Taylor. The Court were of opinion it was not a felony.)

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-87

579. MARY HAMBLETON , spinster , was indicted for stealing a scarlet cloak, value 5 s. a linen shirt, value 3 s. a pair of trowsers, value 6 d. four linen caps, value 12 d. a striped linen bed-gown, value 18 d. a linen apron, value 12 d. three pair of worsted stockings, value 12 d. a flowered cotton waistcoat, value 4 s. four breast-buckles plated with silver, value 12 d. a canvas bag, value 6 d. and 27 s. in monies numbered , the property of Jonathan Bell , August the 18th .

( Jonathan Bell deposed, that his wife and he lodged in Broad St. Giles's ; that when he waked in the morning of the 18th of August, he found his room door open, and missed the things mentioned in the indictment.

Elizabeth Westcote deposed, that she received several of the articles mentioned in the indictment from the prisoner, who desired her to pawn them for her.

Robert Kinsman , a pawnbroker, produced several other articles which had been pledged with him by the prisoner.

The prisoner, in her defence, said a young man who had slept with her gave her the things.)

GUILTY . W . & Imp. 6 M .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-88

580. THOMAS HOUSE was indicted for stealing two linen shirts, value 8 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a muslin handkerchief, value 12 d. three pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. a linen stock, value 12 d. a Nankeen waistcoat, value 5 s. and a pair of Nankeen breeches, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Fortune , August the 27th .

(The articles mentioned in the indictment were tied up in a bundle, to be sent to wash. The prisoner was taken in the shop, in the very act of stealing them.)

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-89

581, 582. CATHERINE COX and ANN HANSLOW were indicted for stealing a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. and 6 s. in monies numbered , the property of John Wells , August the 22d .

JOHN WELLS sworn.

I am a hackney-coachman . I took up a fare at the Cheshire-cheese, in Parker's-lane, who ordered me to drive them to Peckham fair. I took them up about two o'clock.

Who were they? - Women of the town and pickpockets. I brought them back about seven at night. When I set them down, I went into the house to get my money, as I was to be paid separately. I got the money of two of them. I heard the coach move, and I ran out of doors. I

saw Ann Hanslow upon the box. I desired her to come down, or I would pull her down. She said, if I would not meddle with her, she would get down; and I went into the house again, to get my money, and left her on the box. I received money for one more; then I heard the coach move again. I went out, and took hold of her petticoats, to pull her down, and she dropped into the boot. While I was doing this, Cox came out of the house behind me, and took my handkerchief out of my pocket, and ran into the house. I let go Hanslow, and ran into the house after her. I was afraid to accuse her in the house, there were so many bad boys and men in it. I took her by the shoulder, and desired her to come out, to speak to her. She came out with me, and I charged her with having my handkerchief. She denied it; and then Ann Hanslow came down off the box, and they both jostled me; and Cox got her hand into my pocket, and took out 6 s. 6 d. or 7 s. I got Cox down, and sat upon her: the other I had across my knee: 1 s. fell on the ground, which Hanslow took up. I called out then, George! three times: that was for a man who is my fellow-servant, who rode behind the coach from Peckham fair. He and John Young , and some more, came to my assistance, and took the girl off my knee, and the girl that was under me, into the house, and searched them: there was nothing found upon them: the next day 2 s. were found in the kennel.

Was you drunk or sober at this time? - Very sober.

You conceive the people you brought home, and all the people, to be bad people? - Yes.

Are you sure you had the handkerchief when you went out to look at the coach the second time? - Yes; I had my hand in my pocket.

( John Young confirmed the evidence of the prosecutor.)

BOTH GUILTY . Fined 1 s. & Imp. 6 M .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-90

583. JOHN FORDE was indicted for stealing a silver tankard, value 6 l. the property of Robert Craike , July the 25th .

(The prosecutor keeps a public-house at Cow-cross . On the 25th of July, at ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the prosecutor's house, and called for a tankard of beer, and took an opportunity to run away with the tankard. He was pursued, but not taken till the next day. The tankard was never found again.)

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. & Imp. 12 M .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-91

584. GEORGE RAYNER was indicted for stealing a looking-glass, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Standage , July the 4th .

MARY STANDAGE sworn.

I keep a broker's shop, in Little Russel-street, Covent-garden . The glass was stole out of my shop, about five or six in the evening, eight weeks ago.

EDWARD EVANS sworn.

I saw the prisoner, with a glass in his hand. I stopped him under the Piazzas.

(The glass was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A man gave me the glass, to carry to the Black Prince, in Chandos-street.

GUILTY . Fined 1 s. & Imp. 6 M .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-92

585. MARTHA TAYLOR was indicted for stealing four guineas, four half-guineas, and 2 s. the property of Thomas Freeman , February the 12th .

(There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-93

586. MARY GREADY was indicted for stealing six yards of linen cloth, value 20 s. and a silk cloak, value 12 s. the property of John Walter , August the 3 d .

(There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-94

587. MARTHA HOSIER was indicted for stealing a cloth great coat, value 12 d. and a linen shirt, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Smith , July the 11th .

JOSEPH SMITH sworn.

On the 11th of July, I got up, and went to work, and left my shirt and great coat in the room.

WILLIAM SMITH sworn.

Joseph Smith lodges with me. I met the prisoner coming out of the house, about six in the evening. I pursued the prisoner, and took her in Shire-lane. I found the prosecutor's coat and shirt in her lap.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

GUILTY . W . & Imp. 6 M .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-95

588. MARY READ , otherwise MARY BENNETT, otherwise MARY JAMES , was indicted for stealing a dimity counterpane, value 5 s. two cotton bed-curtains, value 12 s. two harrateen window-curtains, value 3 s. three blankets, value 10 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 8 s. two pillows, value 2 s. a bolster, value 1 s. two pillow-biers, value 12 d. a copper tea-kettle, value 2 s. and a brass candlestick, value 18 d. the property of Catherine Phillips , July the 6th, the said goods being in a lodging-room, let by contract by the said Catherine to the said Mary Read , against the statute, &c.

(The prosecutrix deposed, that the prisoner took a ready-furnished lodging of her; that she went away, and left the door locked; and not returning, the prosecutrix had the door opened, when she missed the goods mentioned in the indictment.

William Wildman , a pawnbroker, produced several of the articles, which had been pledged with him by the prisoner.)

GUILTY . W . & Imp. 12 M .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810912-96

589. WADE PALMER was indicted for that he, with a certain pistol, in and upon Thomas White , on the King's highway, feloniously did make an assault, with intent the monies of the said Thomas to steal, against the statute .

Mr. THOMAS WHITE sworn.

On the 24th of July , as I was taking an airing from Golder's-green, on the Edgware road, at the end of Borough's-green , leading to Hendon, I heard behind me the cry of, Stop! I turned, and saw the prisoner, with a pistol, which he presented close to me. I struck him with my whip, and desired him to keep off. I then thought I had been rather rash, as I had two ladies in the phaeton, but that, having resisted, I must make the best of it. I struck at him again, and drove him to the head of my horses. I then heard the sound of horses and persons. I called out, A highwayman! Upon which the prisoner went off. I presently met two men: I told them the story; and after some persuasions, telling them he was badly mounted, they pursued him, and took him. I saw him at a public-house. I have no doubt of the prisoner's person.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had no intention of robbing them. I was very drunk, and rode near the carriage. The pistols I had for my own safety.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice ASHHURST.

Reference Number: t17810912-97

590. MICHAEL GREEN was indicted for stealing three guineas and an half in monies numbered , the property of Giles Long , gentleman , January 20, 1779 .

Mr. GILES LONG deposed,

"That,

"on the 20th of January, 1779, he met

"the prisoner and another man, between

"eight and nine in the evening, in the

"passage leading into Clare-Market ; - that

"the prisoner accosted him in a very familiar

"manner, called him by his name, and

"told him that he had seen him, the prosecutor,

"at his late brother's, who had been

"concerned for him, the prisoner, as an

"attorney: the prisoner mentioned the

"names of several of his brother's clients,

"and mentioned a circumstance of the prosecutor's

"having been in Essex, on a shooting

"party, with his brother. He said his

"name was Brown; that he was a farmer

"and grazier at Bilericay, in Essex; that

"he had made several enquiries after the

"prosecutor, wishing to employ him as his

"attorney; that he was then going to Westminster,

"to receive 40 l. of a butcher in

"town, and that if the butcher did not then

"settle the account, he would get the prosecutor

"to arrest him the next day, and

"requested the prosecutor to go with him:

"- That accordingly he went with the prisoner

"to a public-house in Westminster;

"that they went into a back room; that

"soon after two or three genteel looking

"people came in, and sat down at a table

"by themselves: they introduced cards, began

"playing, and requested the prosecutor

"and the prisoner to join with them, who

"both refused so to do: that upon pressing

"him to play, Mr. Long resented it, rang

"the bell, and asked what was to pay?

"That he took out three guineas and an half,

"and laid them down upon the table, while

"he felt for some silver: That the prisoner,

"who was then quarrelling with those men

"for behaving improperly to the prosecutor,

"said the prosecutor was an attorney:

"they said he was no attorney, and made

"use of very abusive language: The prisoner

"replied, the prosecutor was an attorney,

"and he would lay them five or ten

"guineas that he was so; and immediately

"took up the three guineas and an half,

"and ran out of the room. The prosecutor

"pursued him, but the prisoner

"escaped."

[The Prisoner, in his defence, called Mary Corbett , who swore she kept the public-house in which the transaction happened, and positively asserted that the Prosecutor lost in gambling the money he had charged the prisoner with stealing. - She first said she at present lodged at Lambeth, afterwards that she lodged at Whetstone, then that she lodged in Red-cross-street, in the Borough: And when the Court threatened to send to enquire whether she ever did lodge at Lambeth, as she had stated, she declared she would not swear that she had ever lodged there.]

GUILTY . N. two years .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

The Court committed Mary Corbett to take her trial for perjury.

Reference Number: s17810912-1

The Trials being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment, as follows:

Received Sentence of Death. 22.

William Whitaker , Thomas Weston , Mary Bond , Henry Jones , John Buckle , Thomas Shenton , Thomas Davis , John White , James Clark , alias Mouldy Cloak, Francis Waters , Ann Murray , Mary Jones , Hannah Carryl , Thomas Mitchell the younger, John Sheppard , Jane Fuller , Elizabeth Hatchett , John Stewart , Charles Atkins , Ann Read , Rob. Folier , and John Burrows .

( Robert Folier and John Burrows to be drawn upon a hurdle to the place of execution.)

Navigation, 3 Years. 2.

William Bland , John Williams .

Navigation, 2 Years. 1.

John Free , otherwise Bowman.

Navigation, 1 Year. 1.

William Townsend .

Fined 1 s. and Imprisoned 2 Years. 3.

Edward Mitchell , Tho. Jones, James Rigby .

Fined 1 s. 5.

John Colston , John Lucas , James Burrell , Henry Williams , Jacob Jonas .

Whipped, and Imprisoned 2 Years. 1.

Mary Rose .

Whipped, and Imprisoned 6 Months. 3.

Mary Halcrow , Elizabeth Stevenson , Margaret Beale .

Fined 1 s. and Imprisoned 12 Months. 2.

Ann Dennett , William Smith .

Fined 1 s. and Imprisoned 6 Months. 1.

Sarah Hawkins .

Imprisoned 12 Months, 1. Ann Davis .

Imprisoned 6 Months, 1. Ann Crispin .

Sentence was respited upon Mary Ward .


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