Old Bailey Proceedings, 25th April 1781.
Reference Number: 17810425
Reference Number: f17810425-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS ON THE KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON; AND ALSO, The Gaol Delivery for the County of Middlesex; HELD AT JUSTICE HALL in the OLD BAILEY, On Wednesday the 25th of April, 1781, and the following Days;

Being the FOURTH SESSION in the Mayoralty of The Right Honble. Sir WATKIN LEWES , Knt. LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOSEPH GURNEY .

NUMBER IV. PART I.

LONDON:

Printed for JOSEPH GURNEY (the PROPRIETOR) And Sold by M. GURNEY, No. 34, Bell-Yard, near Temple-Bar.

MDCCLXXXI.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS UPON THE

KING's Commission of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, and Gaol Delivery for the CITY of LONDON, &c.

BEFORE the Right Honourable Sir WATKIN LEWES , Knt. LORD MAYOR of the City of London; The Right Hon. ALEXANDER Lord LOUGHBOROUGH , Chief Justice of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; The Hon. Sir JAMES EYRE , Knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; JAMES ADAIR , Serjeant at Law, Recorder; and others his Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

First London Jury.

William Hall

John Nicholls

William Alldrad

Harry Potter

James Barrett

William Tomlin

John Sharp

Corner Morris

James Waylett

John Knox

James Huthwaite

Edward Parry

Second London Jury.

Richard Marsh

James Cox

Thomas Pitt

Thomas Downs

Benjamin Bottomly

John Egerton

Stephen Ponder

Henry Quidingdun

William Pashly

Thomas Smith

Henry Penny

Giles Russell

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Stokes

John Shrimpton

John Chippenfield

John Fosbrook

William Rogers

John Bardin

John Edwards

James Martin

Samuel Kingston

William Butler

William Bacon

William Humphreys

Second Middlesex Jury.

Christopher Kimpster

Packer Oliver

Thomas Knowles

Joseph Newsham

Thomas Wallis

Robert Saunderson

Thomas Rowley

Thomas Simpkin

Porteus Smith

George Harrison

Robert Marriott

Thomas Sur

Reference Number: t17810425-1

192. JOHN JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Woodgate , on the 30th of March , at about the hour of three in the night, and stealing two pair of silver candlesticks, value 12 l. two silver gravy spoons, value 40 s. ten silver table spoons, value 6 l. nine silver dessert spoons, value 3 l. a silver soup ladle, value 20 s. four silver salts with glasses, value 30 s. four silver salt spoons, value 6 s. a silver cruet stand, value 6 l. four silver tops for castors, value 10 s. a silver wine strainer, value 20 s. a silver mustard pot, value 20 s. a fish slice, value 20 s. one time-piece, value 40 s. three pair of silk stockings, value

10 s. a silk stocking, value 1 s. and a pair of cotton stockings, value 4 s. the property of the said Robert Woodgate , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. ROBERT WOODGATE sworn.

I live in Golden-square . My house was broke open in the night of the 30th or 31st of March; I heard nothing of it till I was called up at a little after eight o'clock; I then came down stairs: I found the upper sash of the kitchen window was forced down; and it was so fast that it could not be got up again without sending for a carpenter; the window had an inside shutter, to which there was a slight wooden bar; a pane of glass was broke in the window, which enabled the person to undo the bar. I lost the plate mentioned in the indictment from the sideboard in the back-parlour; I found this odd stocking (producing it) in the drawer of my dressing-room, which is the place where my stockings are always kept; I understand the fellow stocking to this was found in the prisoner's lodging-room.

MARY HOUGHTON sworn.

I am cook to Mr. Woodgate. I came down between six and seven o'clock on the Saturday morning; I was the first of the family down stairs: when I came into the kitchen I found the window open, a pane of glass broke, and the bar outside the window; I did not then miss any thing out of the kitchen: I went up stairs into my master's office; I found a naked sword upon the writing-desk, and there was a mark at the corner of the desk, which was, I suppose, made by the sword in breaking it open: then I went into the eating-room; I observed the plate was all gone: I went down stairs again, and found there was a portmanteau broke open, which belonged to a gentleman's servant who was then upon a visit, and the clothes were taken away out of it.

At what time did you go to bed the night before? - At half after ten o'clock; I shut and barred up that kitchen window before I went up stairs; I left a man and woman servant in the kitchen when I went to bed.

JEMMETTA ROUNDAY sworn.

I am a servant to Mr. Woodgate: I went to bed at half past one o'clock the night before my master's house was broke open; I was the last person below stairs; I observed that all was safe then; the kitchen window was shut up and barred. I followed the cook down stairs in the morning, and found things as she has described.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

I have here three pair of silk and one pair of cotton stockings, and an odd silk stocking (producing them); I found them, on Sunday the 1st of April, in a room up two pair of stairs forward at No. 5, in Coventry-court in the Haymarket; they were all in a cupboard, except the odd stocking, which lay on the floor; I asked the prisoner who they belonged to: he said they were his property, and he begged I would leave them behind.

What was your business at this place? - There was an information came to the office against the prisoner and some others: I knocked at the door at about eight o'clock in the morning, and was let in; I went up to the two pair of stairs, I knocked at the door; a girl in her shift and under petticoat opened the door to me; I went into that room, and from thence into the back-room; there I found the prisoner a-bed: when the prisoner begged me to leave them behind, I told him I should take the stockings away, and if they were not owned he should have them back again: he was asked before the justice, where he got these things? he said he bought them of a Jew in Bishopsgate-street.

Are there different lodgers in this house? - There was only a woman with a child in the garret. I searched the rest of the house, but did not find any thing.

Was there any other person in the room besides the prisoner? - Only the girl that opened the door to me.

Who lodged in the room in which the stockings were found? - There was no bed in the fore-room; the bed was in the back-room.

Did you find the room forward open or

locked? - It was locked. The woman that was with him opened the fore-door, and then I went into the back-room, where the bed was; I made the prisoner get up, and come into the fore-room to dress himself. The back-room opens only into the fore-room; there is not, to my knowledge, any door from the back-room to the staircase.

Mr. Woodgate. This odd stocking I saw at the justice's, and it matches exactly with the stocking I have in my pocket; they are both marked with the initial of my name, W.

Do you know whose work the mark is? - I do not.

Can you take upon you to swear to the stocking? - Yes, and the other stockings too; they have been tumbling about my drawer these seven years; the other stockings are likewise marked, W; I am perfectly satisfied they are mine.

Did you ever find your plate? - No; I never found any thing but these stockings.

Mrs. MARSH sworn.

I live at No. 5, Coventry-court. Mr. Jealous came to my house on the Sunday morning: my servant came down into the kitchen where I lay, and waked me; she told me some men were making a noise at the two pair of stairs door: I ran up stairs.

Whose apartment was that? - The apartment of a woman called Margaret Hunter : she took the lodging of me on the Thursday afternoon; she came in on the Thursday evening, about nine o'clock.

Did she come alone? - I do not know; my servant let her in; I did not then see her.

You saw her on the Friday? - Yes; she came down into the kitchen to ask for such things as she wanted.

Did you see any person with her? - No.

Jones, the prisoner, was found in the room on the Sunday morning? - Yes, so I find; but I never saw him before.

Then you do not know that the prisoner was in the house before that Sunday? - I never saw him before. Hunter said she had an husband, or some acquaintance, who was a silversmith or something, I don't know what she called him; but I never saw the prisoner till he was taken up.

Did you know that any man was in that room? - I did not.

You know nothing about these stockings? - I saw them when they were taken out of the place, I never saw them before.

And upon your oath you never saw the prisoner before? - Never till the Sunday morning.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had a pair of stockings lying about the room: when he took the stockings up, I thought they were my own; but as to these other stockings, I know nothing of them: what I might say in my fright I cannot tell; but the lodging does not belong to me.

Jealous. He said before the justice, he bought the stockings of a Jew; Mr. Woodgate heard him.

To Mr. Woodgate. Did you hear that? - I did.

To Jealous. When did he say he bought them? - On the Saturday morning.

Prisoner. I have been to sea. I was an attorney's clerk. I was going down the Haymarket; this woman asked me to go home with her; I went home with her, and slept with her; in the morning Jealous came up, put a pistol to my head, and took me out of bed: I said I was ready to go with him. He searched the room, and brought these stockings out of the cupboard; I said, do not take any thing there, for they may be my stockings.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN GODFREY sworn.

I have known the prisoner from a child; I never knew otherwise of him but a very good character as to doing any thing of this kind. He has been at sea, and been rather wild.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-2

193. ROBERT DEALE and EDWARD FARRELL were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Aldridge , with intent the goods and chattels of the said Richard burglariously to steal .

(There was not any evidence to support the indictment.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810425-3

194. WILLIAM THOMAS HUNT was indicted for stealing ten guineas, in monies numbered, the property of John Boardman , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Davis , April 7th .

JOHN BOARDMAN sworn.

I am a gardener . I lodge at Mr. Davis's, in Gray's buildings, Marybone. On the 6th of April I had drawn ten guineas out of Mr. Davis's hands, to put them into the hands of a gentleman. I went to the gentleman's house, but I could not see him; so I brought the money back, and put it into a cupboard in my bed-room, about ten o'clock at night, just before I went to bed. The prisoner slept in the same room; but he did not come into the room that night, till after I had locked up the money, and had got into bed. When I got up the next morning, about nine o'clock, I looked into the cupboard, and saw the paper lying there, in which the money was wrapped up, just to appearance as I had left it over night; but I did not open the paper. The prisoner was in bed at that time; but he was awake, and saw me look into the cupboard. I went out to fetch some bread for my breakfast; when I came back, which was in about ten minutes, both the prisoner and the money were gone: he got up before I went out. He was taken on the Monday after, in a public house; he was very drunk: he had bought himself some new clothes, which he had on; and he had two guineas and some shillings in his pocket.

THOMAS DAVIS sworn.

John Boardman lodges at my house; the prisoner lodged there too. The prisoner absconded on the Saturday; he had not paid me for his lodging: he was taken on the Monday following. I was at home when Boardman went out to get some bread: he left the prisoner in his bed-room: after he was gone, I heard the prisoner walking about the room, and then I heard him go down stairs; Boardman came in just after he went out. As soon as Boardman had been up in his room, he came down, and told me he had lost his money. On the day before, the Friday, the prisoner came down to me, and said, When I have got money and victuals enough, I cannot eat; but now I have got neither money nor victuals, I am d - d hungry.

What was the prisoner? - He draws draughts for gentlemen, and throws water up out of a coal-pit. His father does that; but I believe the prisoner only grinds colours, and does such things. The prisoner had lodged with me about two months.

JANE DAVIS sworn.

I was at home when Boardman went out; while Boardman was gone out, the prisoner ran down stairs to me, and asked for some water to wash his hands; I gave him a dish of tea; I observed his hands trembled very much, and his face was very white; he went off, and in less than five minutes Mr. Boardman came in, and missed his money. I lent the prisoner a penny, and after that three halfpence, the day before, because he said he had not a farthing. He owed me for a fortnight's lodging, when he went off.

THOMAS KING sworn.

I was sent for to the Red-lion, to take the prisoner into custody; upon searching him, I found two half-guineas, a guinea, and 4 s. 6 d.: he was much in liquor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The money I bought the clothes with, and what I had about me, I received for the plans I have in my hand. The day I went from my lodging, I was obliged to go to Rickmansworth in Hertfordshire. I sent a letter to my landlord, that I should be back

in a few days. I had before left my lodging, and had sent a similar letter to my landlord, and returned at the time stated in the letter. I often borrowed halfpence and silver; not because I had not money, but because I did not like to break my gold. My witnesses are not here, because I did not expect my trial to come on so soon. Will your Lordship indulge me so far as to ask Mr. Davis how I behaved whilst I was in his house?

Court to Thomas Davis . What do you say as to that? - I cannot give him any good character. He kept very bad hours; and often came home drunk: sometimes he paid me, and sometimes not.

Court. Do you know any thing of his going to Rickmansworth? - No.

Court. He says he has left his lodging, and returned again? - He left his lodgings, and robbed me at the same time.

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-4

195. JOHN OKEY , otherwise OAKEY , was indicted for stealing a gold watch, value 20 l. a watch, the inside-case gold, the outside covered with dog-skin, value 14 l. and a gold watch, value 14 l. the property of Josiah Emery , in the dwelling-house of the said Josiah , March 19th .

JOSIAH EMERY sworn.

I am a watch-maker ; and live in Cockspur-street, Charing-Cross . On the 19th of March last, about eight o'clock in the morning, I was down in the kitchen, and I heard my servant girl scream; I ran up stairs; the girl said some man had stole some watches; the prisoner was brought back in about seven or eight minutes after: I know nothing of the fact.

ELIZABETH WESTON sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Emery. I was at the parlour-door; the prisoner came into the shop; it was a little before eight o'clock in the morning; the parlour is facing the shop; there was nobody in the shop at the time, except another man with the prisoner; I saw him take a watch off the hook at the window; I said, My God! he is taking some watches! he made to the door to go out; I followed him.

Does the shop-door open into a passage? - No; it opens immediately into the shop, only there is a little partition in the shop to break off the wind: when the prisoner went out, I immediately followed him.

What became of the other? - He stood at the door: I cannot say whether he went into the shop or no, I was so frightened.

Are you sure it was the prisoner that went into the shop? - Yes; for I had hold of his coat while he was taking the watch off the hook. When I came to the parlour-door, I made up to him; and when he got to take hold of the watch, I laid hold of his coat pocket, and said what I mentioned; he went out.

How did he get from you? - I can't be sure whether I had hold of him then or no; I cried out, That man has stole some watches! he ran as fast as he could; when he got off the pavement a little way, I saw him drop a watch; a person picked it up, and gave it to me; I cried out, Stop thief! he was pursued, taken, and brought back to the shop.

Are you quite sure that the man that was brought back, was the same you saw take the watch? - Yes; this is the watch (producing it) that was picked up, and given to me.

Prosecutor. This watch was in my shop: I had it left to repair.

From the prisoner. Whether you did not say the man that took the watch, had an apron on? - I never said any thing about an apron; but when he first came into the shop, I thought he had been one of my master's workmen.

THOMAS ADAMS sworn.

On the 19th of March, I was going along Cockspur-street, in the morning about eight o'clock; I heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran; I saw the prisoner throw two watches into an area; he was running; I

don't know whose area it was; but I was present when the watches were picked up, and it was in the same place where I saw him throw them.

WILLIAM WARD Sworn .

I was coming down St. Alban's street; I heard the cry of Stop thief! the prisoner was coming down; somebody went to stop him; he said, Don't stop me; if you do, I will hang your head about. A gentleman came up on horse-back, and said he saw him fling down a watch or two; I laid hold of his collar, and said, My lad, two can play at that as well as one: he had an apron on, a clean shirt, and his waistcoat open; I thought he belonged to some branch of business.

ANN BURLING Sworn.

I was at Mr. Emery's door, serving the maid with milk; the prisoner came to the door, and another was with him; he asked me, what my business was? I said he might see what it was: he thrust between me and the window, and went into the shop; I saw him have the watch in his hand; the other thrust me by, and bid me give him an halfpennyworth of milk; then he said, he wanted none. Mr. Emery's maid came up to take the milk; they pushed by me, and I afterwards saw the prisoner throw the watch down into the street.

JOHN THOMPSON Sworn .

I was coming from Spring-Gardens on Monday morning, the 19th of March; it wanted about five minutes to eight; just as I came by Mr. Emery's door, I saw the prisoner run out of the shop; the maid followed, and said, My God! that man has stole something out of the shop! I cried, Stop thief! but could not catch him; I saw him drop the watch just now produced, in the road; I thought, as he had dropped the watch, he had got no more, and I did not pursue him immediately; but he still kept running on; that rather gave me a suspicion that he might have more; I pursued him; he crossed over towards Mr. Nicholson's, and going upon the flag pavement, his foot slipped, and he was near falling down; he then crossed over towards Mr. Pinchbeck's, in Cockspur-street; I followed him then, and in St. Alban's street he stopped of his own accord; when I came up, he said, Who did you call stop thief after? I said, to you; I saw you steal the watches: I catched hold of his collar; he put himself in a posture of defence, and said, If you offer to stop me, I will cut or knock you down: I catched him by the collar, and brought him back to Mr. Emery's.

WILLIAM HEAD Sworn.

On the 19th of March last, about eight in the morning, I was in the kitchen; I heard a rattling, like the breaking of glass; I then heard the cry of Stop thief! and I found two watches in the area, under my snuff-shop; I took them up, and kept them till Mr. Emery called upon me. These are the watches.

Mr. Emery. They are my property; they are all three gold watches these were all I missed.

To Adams. Was it this area you saw him throw the watches down? - Yes.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I heard the cry of Stop thief! a man laid hold of me, and said I had stole the watches; he took me back to the shop. I am very innocent of it: I never was in the shop, nor near it. I am a breeches-maker.

For the Prisoner.

ROBERT BOAD Sworn.

I have known the prisoner and his family twelve years past. I have known him in several different situations, in which, while his mother was living, I believe he always was a very honest lad; I have known very little of him since. He was very honest, and lived in the capacity of a servant with several gentlemen, during the time I knew him.

- OKEY Sworn.

I am a brother of the prisoner's. I am a gentleman's servant. I don't know any thing that is bad of him.

JOHN ROSE Sworn .

I am a tide-waiter. I have known him from his cradle: he is a very sober, pretty-behaved boy; I never heard him accused of any thing before now. I would have entrusted him as well as any one of my own children: his family are as honest and sober as ever existed.

GUILTY ( Death .)

(He was humbly recommended to his Majesty's mercy, both by the Prosecutor and the Jury.)

Reference Number: t17810425-5

197. ANN WHITEHEAD , spinster , was indicted for stealing a linen sheet, value 2 s. the property of George Steward , March 7th .

GEORGE STEWARD Sworn .

I keep a public-house in Gray's-Inn-lane . The prisoner was my servant : I keep two maid servants. I had a boy in the month of March last: the boy had been ill, and went away. Some time about the beginning of March the prisoner took care of the bedding of the house. On the 15th of March, I turned her away, because she had grown lazy; she had been with me not more than three weeks. On the 17th of March, my wife missed a sheet that had been upon the boy's bed: the prisoner was found, and charged with taking the sheet; afterwards the other maid came to me, and desired three shillings upon the account of the prisoner at the bar; that the sheet had been pawned, and she wanted three shillings to redeem it. I gave the other maid three shillings, and I went to watch at a pawnbroker's; soon after the prisoner came there; she threw down the three shillings, and had the sheet, upon which I seized her, and charged her with stealing it: the sheet was pawned in my wife's name.

- BURDETT Sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of March, the prisoner brought a sheet to my house, and pawned it for three shillings, in the name of Margaret Steward , No. 4, Rose-court.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Though I took the sheet, I did not do it with intention to steal it, but to redeem it from pawn by getting some of my wages of my master; I was in great distress; there was some wages due to me.

NOT GUILTY .

(Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.)

Reference Number: t17810425-6

197. JANE SMITH , spinster , was indicted for stealing a watch, the inside case made of metal, the outside case covered with shagreen, value 20 s. the property of Ann Uphill , March 1st .

ANN UPHILL Sworn.

I keep a glass and china shop in Mount-street . On the first of March I went out, leaving a maid-servant, Ann Tucker , to take care of the shop.

ANN TUCKER Sworn .

The prisoner and another woman came when my mistress was absent, and asked to see some cups and saucers: I shewed them several; they did not buy any; the prisoner desired to go backwards into the yard; I let her go; she went through the parlour; she came back again into the shop; then she asked for a pen and ink to write a direction; I went into the parlour to give her a pen and ink; she followed me into the parlour; as she was well dressed I had no suspicion of her: she sat down to write at a table under a glass, and the watch hung under the glass; I turned about to look at and watch the other woman, who was left in the shop, where the goods were: after the prisoner wrote the direction, she went out of the parlour, and they went away; the prisoner said she should send a porter for the cups and saucers. In two or three minutes after they were gone out, I looked and missed the watch, upon which I called out Stop thief! they were not out of sight; the

prisoner and the other woman ran; I ran after them: a gentleman stopped the prisoner; and, when she was stopped, she likewise called out Stop thief! upon which that gentleman let her go: she was stopped afterwards by a person who had picked up the watch: when I came up to her, she said she had not got the watch.

THOMAS FETCH sworn.

I was in the street at the time; I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw a person running; I also ran; I saw the watch dropped by the prisoner; I was about ten yards behind her, and the other woman was on the other side of me; I was between them; I took the watch up; I made up to her, and stopped her.

(The watch was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into the shop with another person who was an old acquaintance of mine; she was going to buy some china for her mistress; she thought I was a better judge of it than herself, as I had been the mother of children: the young woman asked 7 s. for half a dozen cups and saucers; I said I thought it was too much: she said she would go home and tell her mistress the price. I asked to go backwards. I went into the parlour with this woman to write the direction; after I had wrote the note, I came out into the shop: we came out of the door: the person with me said she saw a gentleman pass that was a good friend of hers; she ran after him, and spoke to him; we ran together; I heard the cry of Stop thief! when this gentleman stopped me, he said, I believe you are the thief; I said, I do not know what you mean; if any thing is lost, pursue that young woman, as she has run away: then the gentleman let me go, and ran after the young woman; but whether he catched her or not I do not know. I put an advertisement in the paper, but could never find out the gentleman. I never knew her guilty of any thing of this sort before, if she is guilty now. I am above five months gone with child.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-7

198. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for stealing a linen gown, value 10 s. a mosella petticoat, value 20 s. three silk cloaks, value 5 s. two silk gowns, value 15 s. a pair of linen sheets, value 3 s. a mahogany tea-chest, value 1 s. and a cotton jacket and coat, value 5 s. the property of John Wilkinson , in his dwelling-house , April 16th .

ANN WILKINSON sworn.

I am the wife of John Wilkinson ; I live in Bedfordbury, Covent-garden . I went to take a walk after church on Sunday the 16th of April, and double-locked my door; when I came home I found my door open. and the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) gone: I went out about five o'clock, and returned about eight: it appeared to me that the doors had been opened by means of a false key, or a pick-lock.

Did you leave any person in your house? - Nobody in my apartment: I had one room on the first floor. I went to a pawnbroker's on the Monday, and the pawnbroker, who is here, told me he had taken in such things of the prisoner.

JOSEPH CLARKE sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Great Wylde-street. On the 17th of April, about nine in the morning, I received of the prisoner a linen gown, a Marseilles petticoat, and a black silk cloak; and in about an hour after, Mrs. Wilkinson came and described the things, and I shewed them to her; I was ordered to attend before Justice Addington; Mrs. Wilkinson swore they were her property, and I delivered them up: from that time till about six weeks ago I never saw the prisoner; then she came to demand the

gown, petticoat, and cloak, and I stopped her.

To Prosecutrix. You found at Mr. Clark's the linen gown, the Marseilles petticoat, and the black silk cloak? - Yes. The gown and petticoat were the property of a young woman going into the country to service, her name is Smith; I delivered them to her after a certain time, the justice ordered me.

Who did the cloak belong to? - It was mine: it was but an old one, and I did not bring it: the cloak had a D marked upon it; it was my own marking; I can swear to it.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

One Mary Collins told me she had some things in pawn; and, as she was going into the country, if I would take them out, I should have them: I went to enquire for them, and the pawnbroker stopped me; I know nothing of them; I did not pawn them.

To Clark. Are you sure she was the person who pawned them? - Yes.

If she had passed by, or come to pawn any thing else, should you have known her? - Yes; I had some suspicion of her, after I had taken them in, and took particular notice of her as she passed by the window.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-8

199. HENRY DRURY was indicted for stealing a crimson silk and worsted damask window curtain, value 30 s. the property of Richard Pitt , March 26th .

RICHARD PITT sworn.

I am an auctioneer in Rathbone-place; the curtain mentioned in the indictment I had in my possession for sale; I had a sale which began upon the 20th, and ended on the 24th of February, in Hanover-street; my clerk missed the curtain on the 1st of March; I made some enquiry on the Friday, but did not meet with success; I sent the advertisement to the paper to be inserted on Saturday, but it could not be in till Monday the 5th of March; the advertisement describes the curtain, and offers five guineas reward on the conviction of the party. Mrs. Graham came to me from Islington, and gave me some information, in consequence of which I went on the Tuesday to Islington; I got a constable, and took up Mrs. Mills; she lodged an information, that she purchased the curtain of the prisoner, Drury; my clerk, myself, and another person, went in pursuit of Drury; we found him coming out of his lodging on the Wednesday morning, the 7th; we brought him to the justices in Litchfield-street: they examined him where he got it; he said he bought it of a woman in Mr. Molding's house, who keeps the King of Prussia's Head at Islington; Mr. Molding came up in the evening, and contradicted all he said.

(The curtain was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

Prosecutor. There were three curtains of the same pattern; I have had them all in my possession since the sale.

SARAH MILLS sworn.

I live at Islington: I bought the curtain of the prisoner, Henry Drury , on the 26th of February; I gave him 27 s. for it; I had known him many years; he had been a servant to Mr. Skinner; I did not suspect but that he came honestly by it, as he was a broker who bought and sold at sales; he came two or three times to offer the curtain to me; I mentioned it to Mrs. Graham, who is a broker a few doors off, and she desired me to buy it for her.

Did not you think it very cheap? - I did not think it was worth that; my judgement did not tell me the value of it.

- GRAHAM sworn.

I keep a broker's shop at Islington, a few doors from this woman's house. I wanted a single curtain to match some chairs; I bought this of Mrs. Mills; I never saw it

till I had paid two guineas and a half for it; it was a pig in a poke; I found the right owner, and he had it; she had it a week in her possession before I had it of her.

She says you employed her to buy it of the person? - No such thing; I went to ask her for it; she said, more than that, after the woman had bought it, tell the woman now she has given two guineas and a half, it is worth 5 l.

How did you know it was Mr. Pitt's? - I saw it advertised; and I went immediately and let him know of it.

To Mills. You said that Mrs. Graham desired you to buy it for her? - The prisoner offered to sell me a curtain; I said it did not suit me. Mrs. Graham found he had been to me to sell it, and as I did not want it, she desired I would buy it for her; he would not sell it to her, she knew, so I laid out my own money to serve the prisoner, and to serve Mrs. Graham: she never came near me; he came to me on the Friday following, and asked if she had come for it; I said, no; he bid me not let her have it under two guineas and a half; she sent this cook's-shop woman for the curtain, and brought me two guineas and a half, and I sent the curtain by the woman.

What time of the Monday did she come for the curtain? - I think between eight and nine at night: she read the advertisement, and sent for the curtain. I was to account to him for the two guineas and a half when I sold the curtain.

You had not bought it of him, but given him 17 s. and he ordered you not to sell it under two guineas and a half? - Yes.

To Mrs. Graham. You had read the Daily Advertiser before you bought the curtain? - No; I had not; I was going to cut the curtain up, as it answered the purpose I wanted it for. My daughter said, O mother, don't cut it up, it is advertised.

To Mills. What reason had you to say she had read the advertisement? - Several of the neighbours in the One Tun heard her read that advertisement, and she said she had found a thing worth five guineas, and went to this cook's-shop woman, and desired her to buy the curtain for her, but said, Don't say it is for me.

THOMAS TOUCHING Sworn.

I live in Glanville-street, Rathbone-place, with Mr. Pitt. On Monday the 19th of February, the morning preceding the sale, I took these curtains down into the back kitchen, and put them by, as they were brought for another, that they might not be seen; the Thursday week after they were missed. Henry Drury was at the sale: they were not sold in that sale. This back kitchen was not open to any body: I had it nailed up.

JOHN MOLDING sworn.

I keep the King of Prussia's Head, Islington-Road. The prisoner brought the curtain to me about the latter end of February, and asked me if I wanted to buy one; I said, no: he wanted me to shew it to my wife; she was busy; he said he gave two guineas for it and some other things at a sale; I said he might leave it for her to see it, and I would give him a guinea; he did; he came in two or three days; my wife did not want it; he paid the guinea, and took it away; that was about four or five days after.

Cross-examined.

How long have you known the prisoner? - Three years: he is a broker: he always bore a good character.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am a broker. I wanted to buy a jack; he had two in the sale; I saw they would not do; I left the sale, and went about some other business: some time after, going to Islington (Molding's is a house I generally call at) there was a woman in the room facing the street had some things to sell, wearing apparel, and this curtain; she asked me a guinea and a half for it; at last we agreed for 22 s. I asking Mold ing to lend me a guinea, he did, and I left the curtain with him; I called on a Mr. Brown; he went with me; I called for the curtain; he looked at it, and bid me 18 s. for it: the

next day I called upon Mrs. Mills, and I sold it to her for 1 l. 6 s. 6 d. about a fortnight after that I was taken into custody.

To Molding. Did he buy the curtain of the woman at your house? - Not to my knowledge; I was in the bar.

Do you remember his borrowing a guinea of you to pay for it? - He borrowed a guinea in the way I mentioned: he brought it to the bar.

Do you remember the man coming to your house with him? - Yes; about two days after.

What did he offer him for it? - I think 16 s. or 17 s.

Was there a woman in the house at the time he brought the curtain to you? - I do not know; I did not observe.

Did you see him come in? - I do not know that I did; he might be in before I saw him.

(The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-9

200. RICHARD SHEERING and JOHN KING , otherwise READ , were indicted for that they, in the King's highway, in and upon William Griffenhoofe , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person five guineas, a half guinea, four shillings, and a silver watch, value 40 s. the property of the said William Griffenhoofe , March 8th .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoners.)

Mr. GRIFFENHOOFE sworn.

I was robbed on the 8th of March, between eleven and twelve in the forenoon, in the road going from Hanworth to Hounslow . Upon the heath I saw two men; one with a blue coat, a round hat, his own brown hair, or wig, mounted upon a dark brown horse, or mare, with a switch tail; the other was a lustier man, with a brown great coat, round hat likewise, and a brown wig, or hair, mounted upon a lighter brown horse, with a bald face remarkably white from his ears down to his nose: when I came within a few yards of them, they parted on each side; I was in a one-horse chaise; they bid me stop, and demanded my money; I think they both spoke together at the same time; the man in the blue coat told me they did not intend to use me ill, but they must have my money; I gave the man in the brown coat two guineas; he said, I had plenty of money, and he desired the man in the blue coat to search me; I then gave him the rest of the money I had, making in the whole five guineas and an half, and some silver; I told them that was all the money I had; then the man in the brown coat said I had a pocketbook; I told him I had none; he said I had, and he desired the man in the blue coat to search my pockets; the man in the blue coat stroked down on each side of my waistcoat; he then took out this box, a salvatory, from my pocket; I said it wou'd be of no use to him; he then said, your watch; I gave him my watch, which was a silver one; then the young man in the blue coat said, be was sorry they were under a necessity of taking my money, wished me a good morning, and said I might drive on; then I went away.

Then by your account the man in the blue coat behaved with great civility? - Yes.

Did you observe either of them, so as to be able to know their person or face again? - Yes; one I was positive of, the man in the blue coat; the other, when I saw him again, he had left his brown coat behind him, and his hair was powdered, which it was not when he robbed me; therefore I could not positively swear to him.

Then it was rather from your observation of the dress than the face that you knew the other? - I was certain to the other from his face; I had a better opportunity of observing his features, because he searched my pocket, and took out my salvatory.

How long after the robbery was it before you saw these men again? - I did not see

the men till the next day at Bow-street?

Which is the man that had the blue coat? - King.

When you saw them again at Bow-street, had you any doubt that King was one of the men? - Not in the least.

Have you any doubt now? - I am sorry to say that I have not.

Are you equally certain as to the other? - The other had a great coat on when I was robbed.

You are not equally certain to him? - I am not.

Do you believe him to be the other man? - I do, from his hat and from his voice.

Were you present at the examination of the prisoners at the office? - They were brought there for me to see them.

Did you hear them give any account of themselves there? - Not much; I don't recollect any thing particular: they did not confess any part of the charge.

Cross Examination.

Whoever they were, they spoke to you? - Yes.

Did one or both of them desire you not to be alarmed? - Only the man in the blue coat, King, told me they did not mean to use me ill; but they must have my money:

Afterwards he lamented that necessity obliged them to it? - After I had given them every thing I had, he very politely said he was sorry, but necessity obliged them to take my money; then he wished me a good morning, and bid me drive on.

JOHN SPENCER Sworn.

I went out in the morning on the 8th of March; coming home, I saw the prosecutor stopped between eleven and twelve o'clock; he was in a one-horse chaise, I was on foot: I suppose I was about 100 yards distance; he was coming into Hounslow, I was coming the same way; I was upon the greensward, opposite the chaise.

Who stopped the chaise? - I saw two men, one upon each side the chaise; I saw one of them put his hand to Mr. Griffenhoose.

Did you observe whether they had any pistols? - I did not.

To prosecutor. Did you observe whether they had any pistols? - They did not produce any pistols.

Spencer. One was in a blue coat, the other in a snuff-colour'd coat.

How long might they stop Mr. Griffenhoose? - Between three or four minutes.

Were you near enough to see their faces? - I did not see their faces; I could not know them again.

EDWARD BORDMAN Sworn.

I belong to the 16th regiment of Light Dragoons. On the 8th of March last, I received orders from Capt. Gardiner to take one man with me and go up to the Red-lion, the upper end of the town, and there I should receive descriptions of the men, from a gentleman that was robbed; in consequence of these descriptions, I went in pursuit of the men: this is the written description of the men I received from the prosecutor (producing it).

Mr. Griffenhoofe. It is not my writing; it was written in my presence from the descriptions I gave.

Bordman. We met two men; they had mistaken their road, and were coming from Isleworth; as soon as I met them, a boy, John Peart , that I had with me for a guide, said he thought those were the two men, from the description; I said I thought he in blue was; I said to the man that was with me, lay hold of that man in blue; the man in blue bid me take care what I was doing, for he was a gentleman's son in the neighbourhood, about three miles off; the other immediately set off as hard as he could gallop; the boy and I pursued the other; my horse knocked up; I pursued him about half way between Twickenham and Isleworth before I gave up; I ordered the boy to keep after him; I waited till my comrade came up with the man in blue.

How were they dressed? - One in blue, with a round hat; and the other in brown clothes, with a slouched hat, I think.

That man in blue that your comrade took, was never out of your custody till he was committed? - He was not; that is, King.

Cross Examination.

You lost sight of the man that rode off some considerable time? - Yes: as soon as I lost sight, I gave him up, as I found I was not able to keep up.

JONATHAN SHAW Sworn .

You pursued in company with Bordman? - I did; we had a written description of the people we were to pursue. After going through Hampton-Court and other places the boy directed us, we met the two prisoners, riding slowly; I asked them if they had met two men riding fast; they said, no; the boy said they were, by the description, the two men; I then seized King by the collar; he told me he was a gentleman, and I should take care of what I did.

How was he dressed? - In second mourning: the other man rode off.

Cross Examination.

He made no resistance? - No: I asked him if he had any fire-arms; he said, no: I took this pistol out of his inside pocket (producing an horse-pistol.)

JOHN PEART Sworn.

I went with the two soldiers to direct them the road. We met with those two men between Isleworth and Twickenham; by the descriptions the gentleman gave, I thought they were the two highwaymen; I told the soldiers so; one of the soldiers rode up to the one of them, and said, You are my prisoner; he was dressed in a blue coat, striped waistcoat, and had a deep round hat on: I rode up to the other man to take hold of him, but he struck me, and rode away.

How was he dressed? - In a brown coat, and had a round hat: I immediately rode after him; he turned up a lane; I went to go by him, he struck at me, the horse leaped round, so I saved the blow, and got before him; he turned, and rode away another road; I turned my horse, and rode after him; when I came up to him, a gentleman and he were fighting with their sticks.

Did he ever get out of your sight? - No: I was close to him all the way: he got away again, and I followed him; just after that, I saw him throw the pistol away into a hedge in a lane between the Royal Oak at Isleworth and Twickenham; I told the gentleman of it; he got off his horse to pick it up, but could not find it; then he mounted his horse again, and rode after the prisoner, and the prisoner was taken between Isleworth pound and the turnpike.

Was he ever out of your sight, from the time he rode off first till he was taken? - No; he was in my sight all the time.

Who assisted you in taking him? - A serjeant happened to be in the George yard at Isleworth; I called out, a highwayman! the serjeant mounted his horse, rode after him, and took him.

Was the man whom you and the serjeant took either of the prisoners? - Yes; that man at the bar?

Was he the same man you met first in company with King? - I am sure he is: the serjeant bid me mind that he did not do any thing; I perceived him putting some money into his boot, or his stocking; I saw his boot, or his stocking, taken off afterwards, and there were four guineas and a half found in it.

Any silver? - No.

- GLOVER Sworn.

I joined this lad in pursuit of a highwayman, as he told me; I came up with him; I rode before him; I had my sword drawn; I told him if he did not pull up, I would cut him down; he said, he would, and desired I would not use him ill; I then bid him drop his reins, which he did; I bid the boy watch him; I took him to the George; in a few minutes the other was brought in; when they came in, they seemed to be strangers to each other. When the headborough came, he searched Sheering; he found a guinea and some silver upon him; I knew him as soon as I saw him.

Did you find any arms upon him? - Not any.

Where were the guineas and silver found?

- In his pocket. When we came to the office, he was ordered into confinement: he was sent from the office to the Brown Bear ; and, according to the boy's information, I acquainted Mr. Wright that I thought he had not been properly searched, but had put something into his boot: the justice sent one of his people; he pulled off his boot in my presence; and in one boot, or stocking, there were found four guineas and a half.

GEORGE WALKER sworn.

I searched King, and found some half-pence upon him; and I searched Sheering; in his boot on his right leg I found two guineas, and in the right thigh of his breeches I found two guineas and a half.

KING's DEFENCE.

The prosecutor, when we were brought up to the office in Bow-street, said that the two men that committed the robbery had the appearance to him of father and son returning from some fair; he supposed them to be graziers, father and son: the soldier that rode up to me desired to know if I had seen two persons pass that way; we were going over Richmond-bridge, which was the road the robbery was committed on; if I had been guilty of the crime, self-preservation would have taught me to have taken a different path from that where the robbery was committed; they asked me if I had seen two men pass, for a robbery had been committed; I said I had seen only one pass, and that lately; the boy came up, and said, This gentleman is dressed in blue, and the description of the person that committed the robbery was, that he was in blue; the soldiers came up to me; I said he need not collar me, I would go any where with him; they found a pistol upon me, which I was going to get repaired; they searched me, and found nothing else upon me.

Prosecutor. It was the idea that struck me before they stopped me, that they were two graziers.

SHEERING's DEFENCE.

When the serjeant took me, I asked him what he wanted with me, whether he had a capias against me; he said, no: I said, I know there is one out against me; I suspect you are after me for that; he said, No, I am afraid it is something else, Dickey.

For King.

JOHN PHILLIPS sworn.

I am book-keeper to the White Hart inn in the Borough.

Do you know King? - I know him that goes by the name of King; his name is Read; his father has been book-keeper above 30 years; I have known him from a child: I knew him when he served his King and country, and corresponded with him; I have always heard a good character of him.

WILLIAM WEST sworn.

I am in the coal trade. I have known Read ever since he was a child in arms; I never heard any thing ill of him before this affair.

How has he got his livelihood? - He was brought up well; he has been at sea; I have not known him very lately; he has been abroad.

What employment did he follow when he was at home? - He was with his father.

What age is he? - I suppose twenty-one, or twenty-two, or twenty-three.

- PETERS sworn.

I am a linen-draper. I have known him from an infant; I never knew any harm of him till this time; I know he went to sea: since he went to sea I know nothing of him; he bore an excellent character when I knew him.

ANN HARRIS sworn.

I have known Read 20 years; he lived with me as a servant some time: I did not know of this unhappy affair till I happened to be in court and saw him, which I am very sorry for: he lived with me about two years, partly upon trial as an apprentice; his turn was to go to sea; he behaved incomparably well while with me; I was going out of business, on account of my house

being repaired, therefore I could not indenture him; upon enquiry, I have always heard that he bore a very upright good character.

For Sheering.

- THORNE sworn.

I have known him for four months; I understand him to be a dealer in horses : I always took him to be a man endeavouring to get his living in an honest way; I never saw any harm by him.

BOTH GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-10

201. CHARLES HOLLOWAY was indicted for stealing seven ounces of Bologna silk, value 10 s. the property of Joshua Hopkins , April 4th .

JAMES BROWN sworn.

I live in Wheeler-street, Spital-fields , with Mr. Hopkins, a dyer ; I received thirty pounds weight of Bologna silk from Messrs. Adams and Ridall in Bread-street; I weighed it carefully, because there was a suspicion, while the prisoner was in the house; seven ounces were missing; the prisoner was challenged, and searched, and seven ounces, exactly corresponding with the quantity missing, was found concealed in his breeches.

THOMAS EMES sworn.

When the prisoner was detected, I saw this silk taken out of his breeches.

(It was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

(The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-11

202. EVAN PRICE was indicted for stealing a piece of linen cloth containing twenty-five yards, value 30 s. the property of Peter Mortimer , privately in the shop of the said Peter , February 23 d .

PETER MORTIMER sworn.

I am a linen-draper in New Bond-street . On the 23d of February, while I was sitting in my back-parlour, I heard the sound of a foot in the shop; I looked, and saw the prisoner going out with a piece of cloth under his arm; he walked gently out; I pursued him; then he ran: in turning a corner, he went with force against the corner, which drove him over the way, and he dropped the cloth; he was pursued by other people, and brought back: I am sure he is the man that dropped the cloth.

(The cloth was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I live in Marybone-lane. About the 23d of January I was going down Bond-street to Mr. Bolton's, the Golden Cross, at Charing-Cross, to agree to paint some carriages, about the hour of eight; there was an outcry of Stop thief! I saw a parcel of people running in Bond-street; I ran after them; I went up another street, leading to Oxford-Road; there was a man laid hold of me, and charged me with taking a piece of linen out of a draper's shop.

For the Prisoner.

MARY WILD sworn.

I have known him seven months; he always bore a good character.

GUILTY of stealing the cloth, but not guilty of stealing it privately in the shop .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-12

203. RICHARD PHILLIMORE was indicted for stealing three live cocks, value 3 s. - 17 live hens, value 17 s. and 9 live ducks, value 9 s. the property of Gilbert Park , April 16 .

GILBERT PARK sworn.

I live at Kentish-town . On Monday se'nnight, the 16th of April, my servant informed me early in the morning, that my poultry was stole. I soon came down stairs. I found my dog poisoned; four other gentlemen in the neighbourhood likewise had their dogs poisoned, and three of them are dead. On the Wednesday following I had an information that there were some poultry at one Mr. John Lee 's, in St. John's street; I took a constable and went there, and there I found four of my fowls alive, publicly exposed in the shop window to sale. I asked Lee how he came by them, and he told me he bought them of two men, and mentioned their names. I enquired respecting Lee, and found he had lived in the house twenty years, and had a good character. On the Friday following, Lee apprehended the prisoner; he was taken before Justice Girdler; I asked where he was on the Sunday, the day before I lost my fowls; he told me on the Sunday morning he was at Silbourne in Kent, and that he returned in a chaise, that night, to Gravesend; he got there at six o'clock, and came in the Gravesend boat to London, and got here by three in the morning. I knew he could not have come up in the Gravesend boat, because it was not stood till half after eight.

JOHN LEE sworn.

I am a poulterer in St. John's street. On Monday, the 16th of this month, about three in the afternoon, I was going to the sign of the Goat, about 100 yards from my house; the prisoner called to me, and asked me if I would buy any fowls; I looked at two of them, and said they were very old, I would not buy them at any price; there was a cock and three hens; I said I would not have the cock if he would give it me; he said I should have them all for 3 s. and I bought them for 3 s.

Did you know the prisoner? - Yes; he sold a great number of fowls in our neighbourhood; he said he used to buy them in the country; I do not know his name; they used to call him Dick the Waggoner. Mr. Park came to me on the Wednesday; I told him I knew the man; he desired me to look out for him; he used to lodge at the Goat when he was in town, I found him there; I charged him with it; he said, Very well, master, I sold them to you, and I will go with you to the Justice. He said he bought them in Newgate market.

SARAH WATFORD sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Park; I know the fowls to be my master's property; they were missing on the Monday morning.

(The fowls were produced in Court, and deposed to by the Prosecutor and Watford.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the fowls in Leadenhall market.

JANE ROWE sworn.

I have known the prisoner about a year or two; he often used to buy fowls of me in the market.

Jury. He did not buy these fowls of you? - No.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

See him tried for a similar crime, in a former Number, in this Mayoralty.

Reference Number: t17810425-13

204. MARY HUGHES was indicted for stealing a muslin gown, value 10 s. two blankets, value 6 s. three dimity waistcoats, value 10 s. four stuff bed curtains, value 10 s. three stuff window curtains, value 3 s. a copper stew-pan, value 1 s. 6 d. a damask tablecloth, value 1 s. a dimity petticoat, value 6 d. a linen shirt, value 4 s. and a flannel petticoat, value 6 d. the property of William Frederick Glover , March 29 .

ELIZABETH GLOVER sworn.

I am the wife of William Frederick Glover ; I live in Eagle-street , near Red-lion-square; I missed the things mentioned in

the indictment, about Christmas. I had been at Greenwich, with a lady who was ill, and left the prisoner in care of the house and my three children; when I came home, I found a four-post bedstead stripped of all the furniture except the vallens.

In what capacity was she in your house? - As a servant . I took her before Justice Addington; she there confessed stealing the things, and went with me to the pawnbroker's where they were pawned.

JOHN LIGHTFOOT sworn.

I am journeyman to Mr. Masters, a pawnbroker, in Holborn; I have three waistcoats, a set of stuff curtains for a four-post bedstead, a petticoat, a shirt, a table-cloth, a stew-pan, and two bed blankets; I took them in of the prisoner, supposing they were sent by the master.

In what name? - Mary Hughes .

Did she tell you where she lived? - We knew where she lived.

Had she been there before for her mistress? - Yes.

Had you known any other instance of her coming from the mistress? - Yes; the mistress has used the shop about two years; she sent things by different servants; we always put the things brought by the servants in the servants' name, though they came from the mistress; they were brought at different times, between July and December.

Did the mistress ever come herself with any thing? - I cannot say I ever saw her; I have lived there but about a year; my fellow servants have seen her at the shop.

- FITZGERALD sworn.

I live at the corner of Fetherstone buildings, Holborn; I have a gown pledged by the prisoner for 4 s. on the 6th of December, in the name of Mary Hughes .

Did you know her before? - Yes.

Did you know where she lived? - Yes; I understand the things were Mrs. Glover's; they were her's, and they were redeemed sometimes.

(They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the Prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I pawned the things for my mistress; I was sent with them by her.

To Prosecutrix. Where is your husband? - In the East-Essex regiment of militia, at Lynn, I believe.

When did you first miss the things? - Some time about Christmas.

The pawnbroker says you have sent things to pawn by your servants? - I have.

How were the family supplied in your absence? - I left them money, and sent them as they wanted.

Have you sent her with any things? - Yes, and valuable things.

Did she pawn these things without any authority from you? - Yes, she did.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-14

205. SAMUEL BAGNALL was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Darby , on the 25th of October, about the hour of 9 in the night, and stealing a cotton counterpane, value 14 s. the property of the said Thomas; a cloth coat, value 15 s. two dimity waistcoats, value 10 s. a pair of velvet breeches, value 10 s. a pair of leather breeches, value 15 s. a linen wrapper, value 2 s. and a pair of silk stockings, value 5 s. the property of Bannister Flight , in the dwelling house of the said Thomas Darby .

BANNISTER FLIGHT sworn.

I lived at Mr. Darby's, in Moorfields ; I went out on the 25th of October, I returned about 11 o'clock; then Mr. Darby told me the house had been broke open. I found the things mentioned in the indictment, were taken out of my portmanteau which was in my bed-room when I went out, which was at about 12 o'clock. To the best of my remembrance the portmanteau was locked, but I am not certain; when I came home, I found it open, and most of the things taken out; there was an advertisement from the office in Bow-street, that such things were found; I think it was three days after I was robbed. I went to the office

in Bow-street; there I saw the things I had lost (repeating them) as set forth in the indictment.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I am an officer belonging to the office in Bow-street. We had an information of the prisoner's lodging in King's-head-court, Shoe-Lane; we went there on Thursday, the 26th of October, about seven in the morning; we knocked at the door; the door was not opened to us, so I got down the cellar window, and got into the house, and then opened the door and let the other officers in. I went up into the one-pair-of-stairs room; there I found the prisoner in bed with his wife; we went up into the garret, and found the things Mr. Darby and Mr. Flight lost, tied up in a bundle, and there was a cutlass lying by it: there was another man in bed in the same room with Bagnall. I saw a counterpane hanging on the line; I asked who it belonged to; Bagnall said it was his; the garret was not inhabited, nor was there any person else in the house. We took the prisoner and the things to the office; there were no owners, till they were advertised there; Mr. Flight and Mr. Darby came and owned the things, excepting one of the counterpanes, that respects another fact.

Cross-Examination.

This man you found in the same room, was known? - Yes; he was tried here.

Are you sure then they were in the place where he lodged? - No; there was no bed in the garret.

MARY DARBY sworn.

On the 25th of October last, in the evening, a little before 9 o'clock, I was alarmed by a knocking at the door; the people said they saw two men get out of our window; we immediately went up stairs; and found the chamber door and dining-room door both locked; there were several neighbours about the house went to the watch-house, and got two watchmen, and they got in at the window and opened the doors; I went into the room; the first thing I missed was a white cotton counterpane off the bed in the chamber; the maid, who was with me, said she missed a light-coloured coat and dimity waistcoat, of Mr. Flight's, that hung over a chair just by the door; I immediately went to the drawers to see if they were locked; they were all safe; I went to Mr. Flight's portmanteau, and found it was emptied; we searched the house to see if any person was concealed, but found none. Two or three days after, the things were advertised, some of them with Mr. Flight's name at full length; we went up to Bow-street, and I saw the counterpane, and knew it to be mine: the room-doors were open about half an hour before, for one of the servants was in the room at that time.

JOSEPH LANGLEY sworn.

I keep a public-house in King-street, Moorfields. I was going by Mr. Darby's with a pot of beer, a little before nine o'clock; I saw a person standing on the pallisades, and another upon the pent-house over the door; the one-pair-of-stairs window was thrown up, and the man on the pent-house came on to the man's shoulder on the pallisades, and off his shoulder on to the stones, and walked off; I knocked at Mr. Darby's door, and told them of it: I set the pot of beer down, and ran half way down the street after them, but they got off.

You did not know the men? - No; it was quite dark.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am entirely innocent of what I am accused of; I was at home at my own house, all the evening Mr. Darby was robbed, with my wife; and, being so near a relation, I did not think it would be of any use to trouble the court with her: I let the garret to Edward Noon ; he was tried for this, and convicted; I did not know what way of life he followed; I am entirely innocent; I hope you will be convinced I am not guilty of it.

To Flight. You mentioned in your evidence, that you went out about twelve o'clock. Do you remember whether the window was open or shut? - To the best of my remembrance it was shut; I am pretty certain it was.

Do you remember waiting for the hairdresser? - Yes; and had the window open.

ALICE DICKINS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Darby; I went into the room between four and five in the afternoon; the window was wide open then; I I pulled it down, because the wind was so high.

Did you pull it quite down? - To the best of my remembrance I did.

You was examined upon this matter before; do you remember what you then said about the window? - Yes; I said I pulled it down.

You said you was not quite certain whether you pulled it quite down? - I am not certain whether I pulled it quite down.

Was you in that room again that night? - I was in the bed-chamber about eight o'clock that night.

(The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-15

206. RICHARD WISE was indicted for stealing a copper, value 15 s. a washing-tub, value 2 s. and a linen towel, value 3 d. the property of Ann Hawkins , widow , April 21st .

MARGARET BROCKET sworn.

I live in Hanover-street, Rathbone-place; I am servant to Mrs. Hawkins; at twelve o'clock on Friday night I locked the wash-house door; every thing then was safe in it; the copper and tub were in the wash-house; at seven I went in, and found the house was broke open; the area lock was knocked back; the copper and one of the tubs were missing; afterwards, at Mr. Snarey's house, in Peter-street, I saw the copper; I know it by two marks in it.

JOHN OLIPHANT sworn.

I knew the copper before; I went out to look for it; I measured the brick-work where it had been taken from, and found, besides my knowledge of it, that it fitted that measure; the house was broke open as before described; I went in search of the copper; after going to a number of places, I saw it at last at the door of the house of a Mr. Snarey, in Peter-street, near Berwick-street.

WILLIAM SNAREY sworn.

I keep a broker's shop in Peter-street. On Saturday, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner brought this copper to me; I bought it of him, having known him for twelve months, but did not know where he lived, only I had seen him at the publick-house; I gave him 6 d. a pound for it.

To Oliphant. What is the copper worth a pound? - Ten-pence.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I found the copper in the morning beyond the rope-walk.

(He called four witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY of stealing the copper only .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-16

207, 208, 209. EDWARD PRIEST , JAMES THOMAS , and JOHN GLADMAN , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eleanor Fell , widow , on the 23d of April , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, (no person then being in the said dwelling-house) and stealing a duffel cloak, value 10 s. a linen shirt, value 1 s. a black silk bonnet, value 1 s. a child's flannel petticoat, value 1 s. and a cotton handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of the said Eleanor.

ELEANOR FELL sworn.

I keep a house at Kentish-town ; my house was broke open last Monday, a little before eleven o'clock. The family consists of only myself and my maid. I was in the garden; my maid was in the wash-house: she came into the garden, and told me people were calling out, Thieves! and that the thieves had got into our parlour; I went into the house, and saw they had forced in the screw of the window, and so had got the sash up; I had screwed the sash down before I went into the garden; there was a hole quite through the sash, by which means they got at the screw, and shoved it in: I missed the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); they were taken off a chair in the parlour, near the window.

THOMAS HARRISON sworn.

I live near Mrs. Fell; I had been on an errand; coming home I saw Priest and Thomas leaning against Mrs. Fell's window; the other prisoner, Gladman, was sitting on a bank, about twenty yards from Mrs. Fell's house; the sash was up; I saw Thomas lean over the window, and take a bundle from a chair, and give it to Priest; then he took another bundle, and put it under his own coat; then they went away from the window; they went down town, down the road; Gladman went down the path.

Can you tell whether they joined company? - I did not see them join company, nor speak to each other; they walked off; Mr. Hale caught hold of Gladman by the collar, as he was walking on the path; then the other two ran away up an alley, with the bundles with them; they were soon taken, and brought back; when they were brought back, I saw them, and knew them again; I am sure those are the men.

THOMAS HALE sworn.

I am a butcher; I was in my shop; the boy,

Thomas Harrison , came down to me, and told me these three men had taken some things out of Mrs. Fell's house; Gladman was on the path; I catched him by the collar; upon which the other two turned back, and ran away as fast as they could; I saw they had something under their arms; I left Gladman in the hands of our minister, and ran after the other two; they were taken in about half an hour: I swear to them all three.

JOHN FREKE sworn.

I went in pursuit of these men; I found all these things in an hedge, except the bonnet, about four fields from Mrs. Fell's house, in the track we were pursuing these people in; when I first saw Priest and Thomas, they both were nearly upon the spot where I found the things; they were dressed just as they are now.

Mrs. Fell. These clothes are all mine, except the apron, which does not belong to me; they were taken out of the front parlour; they were lying upon a chair, which they could reach by putting their arm in at the window.

SAMUEL BENN sworn.

Upon Mr. Hale's crying Stop thief! I ran out, and saw Gladman in custody; upon which we ran up into the field; I saw this bonnet lie there; I picked it up about a field from the assembly-house; there was the trace of the feet in going to the hedge; I met two or three of my neighbours on horseback, who had got there before; there was a gate; they got off their horses; Mr. Hale ran in pursuit of them, and took Priest; I found a hat-band hanging on the hedge; I found one of the prisoners had no hatband; Priest was taken there; coming back, Mr. Hale hallooed out that he had taken Thomas.

(The bonnet was produced in court, and deposed to by the Prosecutrix.)

WILLIAM HALE sworn.

I heard a cry of Thieves! I joined in the pursuit; I overtook Priest in the fields, and secured him.

HENRY CROCKETT sworn.

I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoners.

- HAYMAN sworn.

I saw Priest and Thomas run into the fields with bundles with them; when they had got about 500 yards from me, I saw Thomas drop the bonnet.

PRIEST's DEFENCE.

I had nothing to do on Monday; I walked up in the fields; I sat down by the side of a pond; one of these gentlemen took hold of me, and charged me with this fact, which I am as innocent of as the child unborn. I am a watchmaker.

(Priest called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

THOMAS's DEFENCE.

I took a walk that way; that gentleman that swears to me took me at Copenhagen house, as I was walking down a narrow lane; I was not at Kentish-town that day. I make watch-movements.

(Thomas called one witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GLADMAN's DEFENCE.

I had been to Highbury of an errand for my sister; I sat down to rest myself; a gentleman seized me, as I was walking down the town, and said I belonged to the two young men; I did not; I was going home. I am a cushion-maker, and work for my sister.

(Gladman called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

To Thomas Hale . You seized Gladman? - Yes.

The others turned back? - Yes; they were in the road, much about 100 yards asunder, when I catched Gladman by the collar; when I took them, they pretended they did not know one another; but, after

they were taken, they talked together as knowing one another.

PRIEST and THOMAS GUILTY of stealing the goods, but not guilty of feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

GLADMAN NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Priest:Fine. See summary.] [Thomas:Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-17

210. EDWARD FENNELL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Hern , on the 9th of April , about the hour of one in the night, and stealing 27 yards of blanketing, value 3 s. and 4 d. a cloth coat, value 2 s. a serge waistcoat, value 7 s. and a linen smock frock, value 3 s. the property of the said Thomas Hern , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS HERN sworn.

I am a harness-maker , and live at Hammersmith . On the 9th of April my house was broke open, and I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them). On Tuesday morning, when I came down, and went into the back shop, I found the back door open, which led to the garden; it had not been locked over night; the lock was faulty, and the door was only buttoned: we thought it safe, as there is a high wall round the garden.

Do you know whether it really was buttoned the night before? - I am not certain whether it was buttoned. I found a large willow stick there, as large as a broom-stick. Here is part of the blanketing, which was cut off by the person who stole the blanketing; he left this behind.

What was the worth of the several articles you lost? - The blanketing cost me 15 d 1/2 a yard; the smock frock was worth about 3 s. the coat was rather old, it might be worth 2 s. the waistcoat was almost new, it was certainly worth more than 7 s. I had the things cried; in consequence of which the things were found, in possession of Mr. Litchfield, upon the 11th. I saw the prisoner on the Wednesday, at Justice Hyde's in St. Martin's street: I understood he had been taken up upon suspicion.

JOSEPH FRANCIS sworn.

I live with Mr. Litchfield, who keeps a a public-house. As I was going up to the lost, to get a bit of hay for the cow, the prisoner asked me if he should throw the cow down a bit; I said he might; he did throw some down. I went up into the lost about two hours after that, to throw some more hay down for the cow, and there I found these things (producing them); they were in a basket hid under the hay; I went and informed my master of it.

On what day was this? - I am not sure whether it was the Monday or Tuesday. The prisoner was not in the lost when I went the second time. The prisoner worked at the dung cart for my master two or three days; he used to go out with greens upon an ass, and he had a little cart and horse. He came into the house about eight o'clock; my master asked him how he came by these things; the prisoner said, he came honestly by them; my master said he did not think he did come honestly by them.

Where did the prisoner sleep at this time? - At my master's, in a back part of the house.

Was he at this time employed by your master? - Yes: with the dung cart.

Mr. LITCHFIELD sworn.

I keep a public house at Hyde-park-corner. My boy, Francis, came and informed me that he had found some things hid in the hay-loft; I had them brought down and locked up; these are them. I suspected the prisoner; I sent for a constable, and desired him to wait till the person came in; I suspected the prisoner; he came in the afternoon; I called him aside, and told him I had found some things, which I believed belonged to him; he said, they did; I asked him how he came by them; I told him, if he would say where he bought them,

I would send and enquire; and if he did not tell me, I would charge a constable with him: he would not tell me: I then charged the constable with him. In going to the round-house, he cried, and said something to the officer, but what I don't know. The next day, while he was in prison, I was informed these things had been cried: a man that lodges with me, informed them that I had the things in my possession: the prosecutor came; I shewed them to him, and he said they were his property. When we were before the justice, the prisoner told the justice, in my hearing, that he had sold the coat and waistcoat for 4 s.

JOHN MEREDITH sworn.

I am cryer and bell-man at Hammersmith. I cried the things; a man came, and informed me where they were; I went with Mr. Hern to Mr. Litchfield's, where we saw the things; they answered the description given me in the paper.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I know nothing at all about the matter: several people lodge in the house besides me.

NOT GUILTY of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but guilty of stealing the goods .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. BARON EYRE .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-18

211. ABRAHAM CLARKE was indicted for stealing a silver shoe-buckle, value 3 s. the property of Margaret Beveridge , widow , March 30th .

MARGARET BEVERIDGE sworn.

I was acquainted with the prisoner, and used sometimes to drink with him at a public-house. On the 30th of March, the prisoner came into my house, and asked if I would drink a drop with him; I said I had no objection; he gave me the money to fetch the liquor; I went out for it; when I came back, he was gone; I missed a buckle out of one of my shoes, which was standing in the window: there was a Mrs. Habbs I left with the prisoner in the room when I went out, and she was there when I came back; that woman is not here; went out to look after my buckle, and found it in a Mr. Prior's (a silversmith) shop, half an hour after it was missed; I believe he took it out of a joke; I should not have prosecuted him, but they hastily bound me over.

Did he acknowledge taking it? - No; he denied it.

- PRIOR sworn.

About half an hour before the prosecutrix came, I bought this buckle of the prisoner ( producing it); it was broke; he said his wife and he had been playing together, and had broke it.

Prosecutrix. I can't swear that it is mine.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never saw the shoes nor buckles: the prosecutrix asked me if I had taken them out of a joke.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-19

212. JOSEPH EPHRAIM was indicted for stealing thirty yards of woollen cloth, value 20 l. April 18th .

- CANNON sworn.

I am carman to Mr. Rivers; I was driving a cart from Messrs. Townsend's to Mr. Rivers's house; I was loaded with cloths; I met the prisoner and three more, who were walking together under the Artillery-wall; just as I came by the Red Lion, at the corner of the fields, the prisoner said, Old fellow, will you be three farthings towards a pint of beer? I told them I had no money.

Did you know them before? - I don't know that I did. One of them said, Poor old fellow, give him a pint of beer; the prisoner said, I will give him a pint of beer, if he will drink it; I said I would, and thank him too, for I had not had a draught of

beer that day; I said here is a public-house here, on the right hand, which is the Castle, if they would give it me here; they walked on, and took no notice of it; the prisoner kept close to me all the way, and the others kept company with me till I came to the King's Arms, which is at the top of the Tabernacle Walk; the prisoner went in there, and called for a pint of beer, and paid for it; I stopped my cart, and we drank the beer up; then they said, Will you have any more? I said, no; I would go home with my cart.

How near is the King's Arms to your master's house? - About 100 yards. I refused to have any more beer; the prisoner called for the beer, and paid for it; he stood within the house; there was another belonging to him stood at the door; he wanted to push me farther into the house; that made me suspect him; I went and stepped up into my cart; I saw this piece of cloth and another lying without any wrapper; I took hold of my horse's head, and led him along towards my master's; the cloth was all safe then; the prisoner followed me, and asked me for one George, a dyer, who he said was in the woollen way, and said he would be obliged to me if I could find him out; I suspected him then; I said, if I heard of him, I would let him know; I had not the presence of mind to turn my head round; this man followed to my master's door; he then said, God bless you, good-b'y'; when I got to my master's door, I looked at the end of the cart, and missed a piece of cloth; I called out, I have lost a piece of cloth; then I ran down to Tabernacle Walk; I saw one of them running with the cloth under his arm; the prisoner, I believe it was; I ran, and halloo'd out, Step thief! stop thief! one ran one way, and another the other; I could not tell which it was; when I took the prisoner, who was the hindermost, I knew him directly; the cloth was thrown down; I am certain this is the cloth; the other ran; I passed the prisoner; he said, it is in vain for you to run, for they have got a mile now: this was about six o'clock in the evening.

Was you sober? - Yes; I had tasted nothing but small beer all day, except that pint.

Does it often happen that perfect strangers meet you, and ask you to drink? - I never met with such a thing in my life before; but it being holiday time, I thought they were some young fellows going out, making an holiday; I had some jealous thoughts of them after I had the pint of beer.

ANNE MILTON sworn.

I live in Tabernacle Walk. I was sitting drinking tea: I saw a man, with a piece of cloth under his arm, move quick; and he looked over his right shoulder, to see if any body was running after him; presently after, I heard Cannon say, Where shall I go to find my cloth? I told him what I had seen; and presently after, the prisoner was brought back; I believe he is the person I saw with the cloth, but I am not sure.

JOHN GATER sworn.

I am a taylor, and live in Tabernacle Walk. On Wednesday afternoon, the 18th, about six o'clock, I saw a piece of cloth, much resembling this, down by my window; a man in a brown coat and round hat picked it up: I live almost at the top of the walk, about twenty yards from Mrs. Milton's, and about 100 yards from Mr. Rivers's.

GEORGE POWELL sworn.

I am a packer. I was going to Mr. Rivers's on business; I saw Mr. Rivers's carter stop at the King's Arms, to drink with the prisoner at the bar: I went up to Mr. Rivers's about my business.

Did you see no person but the prisoner? - There were others; I did not take particular notice of them; I took notice of the prisoner, because he called for a pint of beer: when I came to Rivers's door, I saw Cannon draw up his cart; I went after him; I saw the prisoner taken, and saw the cloth on the ground, and I took it up; I did not see him drop it.

JOHN DUTTON sworn.

I am clerk to Messrs. Townshend and Co. Mr. Rivers is a cloth-worker. This

is a piece of cloth sent up to Rivers's to be cleaned: on Wednesday the 17th of April, it was put into the cart, about a quarter after five: I know the cloth by the mark and number; the makers never put the same number on two pieces.

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel. Gater said before the justice, it was a man in a light-coloured coat put the cloth under the window. - No; I described him to be in a dark-coloured coat and round hat; he took it from the window, and went away with it.

For the Prisoner.

ROBERT RAYMOND sworn.

I am a saw-maker. I live in Barbican; I was in Tabernacle Walk this day week, about seven o'clock. I saw a man with a piece of cloth under his arm; he was about the prisoner's height, in a dark-coloured coat; he passed me; he had not got thirty yards past me, before there was an outcry of, Stop thief! I saw him drop the cloth by the Tabernacle Gates, and many people ran after him; I among the rest; we ran down Rus-in-urbe Gardens; we lost sight of him; I came back, and then they had got this man in custody.

Court. Did you tell them that was the man? - Yes; I would have told justice Wilmot so, but he would hear nothing of it.

Cross-Examination.

Did you know this man before? - No: I knew nothing of him before.

You never saw him before? - I have seen him go by the door.

Did you see the carman? - No; not till the man was taken.

Did you tell the carman then this was not the man? - No; not till I came to the justice's: they were all positive he was the man.

How came you not to tell the carman of it? - I did not see the carman; when I came back, they had him at the door, and went in; they would not let me into the house: when they came out, I went with them before the justice.

Did you swear there that he was not the man? - No: the justice would not hear any body that would speak for him.

JEREMIAH STEEL sworn.

I am a child's pump-maker. I live in Rus-in-urbe Gardens, Tabernacle Row. I was in Tabernacle Row the evening this fact was committed. I heard the cry of, Stop thief! I was playing at skittles: I ran out of the Barking Dogs; the prisoner was standing at the door; I saw this Cannon running as hard as he could, crying, Stop thief! he lost the man; he turned back, and said, Where is the man? and laid hold of this man, and said, He was one of them; a boy came up; he said, I have got one of them; the boy said, No; this is not one: he let him go, and went towards the Barking Dogs; then he took another thought, and went after him again, and took him.

Cannon. I was sure of him; this man broke my hold of him at first.

Steel. It is no such thing.

Who is that boy? - A boy that ran after this man.

SARAH UNDERWOOD sworn.

I live in Tabernacle Walk; I was opposite the Barking Dogs, up one pair of stairs, at work; I heard the cry of, Stop thief! I looked out of window, and saw the prisoner standing at the Barking Dogs door; they cried, Stop thief! and ran past the prisoner; he walked away, and they came back; they laid hold of him; and a boy came up and said, It was a stouter man that had the cloth; then they let him go; presently after, they ran after him, and took hold of him again; he had several opportunities of going away if he had pleased.

ANNE NIGHTINGALE sworn.

I was at work at my window; I heard the cry of, Stop thief! I looked out, and saw the prisoner running up the walk; several men ran after him; they got before him, turned back, and seeing nobody else, they laid hold of him, and brought him to the Barking Dogs door: the people in general said he was not the man; then they let him go, and presently after they went after him

and took him again. The cloth lay beyond the place where I first saw the prisoner.

MARY HOOKER sworn.

I saw the prisoner at the bar standing at the door, a minute or two before they called Stop thief, looking towards the Tabernacle, where the cloth lay.

Did you see the cloth before you heard the cry of Stop thief? - No.

HENRY ALLSEY sworn.

I live opposite the Barking Dogs: I heard the cry of Stop thief! I locked out of the window, and saw the prisoner standing at the door of the Barking Dogs, twirling his stick round; I saw them run past him; I went down stairs; and when I came down, they had got hold of the prisoner; the people in general said that was not the man; they let him go; they soon after went after him, and took him again: I never saw the cloth till I saw it at Justice Wilmot's office.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-20

213. SAMUEL HORSEY was indicted, for that he, in the king's highway, in and upon John Crocket , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a man's hat, value 2 s. the property of the said John , March 4th .

JOHN CROCKET sworn.

On the 4th of March, between seven and eight in the evening, I was going along by the dead wall facing the Belvidere, near Islington : just by the New Road, I met four fellows; the prisoner was one; he passed me, the other three turned upon me; the prisoner turned round, and put his two hands into my mouth; the other three pulled me down.

Explain how he put his hands into your mouth.

All the fingers of both his hands: as they threw me down, I saw a knife just at my mouth, lying on the ground, open; I took up the knife, and threw it in the ditch.

What were the four men doing, when you took up the knife? - One pressed upon me, the others were trying to rob me, and this man had his hands in my mouth.

Had you your eyes and hands so at liberty as to see and take up the knife? - Yes; my face and my gums were swelled; I halloo'd out Murder! three times; the last time a gentleman, Mr. Savage, was coming up, upon which three of them ran towards Merlin's cave; the prisoner, to save himself, jumped into the ditch, with my hat in his hand; the prisoner got into the field with my hat in his hand; I told the gentleman that was the man that had robbed me of my hat.

Did they demand any money of you, or what did they say? - They did not demand any money, as I heard; they took nothing from me but my hat: they were with me about ten minutes.

What were they doing all that time? - Trying to rob me; one was searching my pockets, the others kneeled upon me.

Had you nothing in your pockets? - Yes; gold, silver, and my watch.

How came they to take nothing? - Because I had my face downwards, and they could not get at my pockets so well; I had my face downwards all the time they were with me.

Then how could the man have his hands in your mouth? - He had his hands in my mouth, and my face was downwards.

Were you sober? - Yes; I was quite sober.

Did you know the gentleman before that came up? - No; I never saw the gentleman that came up before: when I told him that was the man, he pursued him down the road, and caught him in the ditch; he knocked him down; I went to him, and the gentleman asked me if I could swear to him; I said I could swear to the man who had his hands in my mouth: we took the man to the Blue Lion in Gray's-inn-lane, and charged a constable with him; they asked me what I had lost; I said my hat;

two men went with a lantern, and one found the hat, and the other the knife.

Then you did not see the hat yourself? - I saw it in his hand, about twenty yards on the other side of the ditch.

How far were you from the ditch? - About 27 or 28 yards.

Was there any hedge? - No.

This was between seven and eight in the evening; was it light? - The moon was just rising; I could distinguish him from the rest.

Was it so light you could distinguish a man at the distance of 27 or 28 yards, with an hat? - Yes; I could.

When you was in this situation, lying with your face to the ground, could you distinguish this man so as to know him again? - Yes; I am sure that is the man; I have no doubt of it.

What did you observe him by? - His blue coat that he has now; I took particular notice of his face; he was the first person I looked at before I was pulled down.

What did the others do, when they attacked you? - They did nothing but hold my head down.

How came you to take notice of him? - I generally take notice of the first person I meet; I took notice of him, because I suspected they were upon no good.

Cross-Examination.

What are you? - A tallow-chandler; in business for myself.

You was perfectly sober this night? - Yes, as I am now.

The instant these men laid hold of you, they pulled you down? - I was down immediately.

You have heard of 40 l. reward? - No.

Did nobody tell you of it? - They told me of it at Sir John Fielding 's.

Do you mean to say you did not know there was 40 l. reward for a man convicted of a highway robbery? - No; I did not know of it till the Monday morning, when I took him to Sir John Fielding 's.

That made you very sure of him? - No.

Was your hat off your head, or no, when you was on the ground? - I do not know whether it was blowed off, or how it came off; it might tumble off, he took it up; I saw it in his hand.

You did not go after your hat yourself? - No; the gentlemen told me they found it about 20 yards from the ditch.

Did the men ask for your money, or watch? - I do not know that they did; I did not hear them; I was terrified enough.

You did not hear them say a word? - I did not hear them say any thing to me; they might, for what I know.

How could you see three people so as to be able to describe them when your face was down to the ground? - I did not describe three people.

Yes, you did; you say one had his hands in your mouth, the other was upon you, and three endeavoured to rob you? - Yes.

Court. What were the four doing? - Looking about to see if any body was coming.

How could you observe all this with your face to the ground? - I held my head up as well as I could.

How was the man pressing upon you? - He kneeled upon me.

JAMES SAVAGE sworn.

On Sunday the 4th of March, between seven and eight in the evening, I was coming down near the Belvidere; I heard the cry of murder; I immediately ran across the road; there was a young man got to the turnstile before me; I asked him what was the matter; he said he did not know, there seemed to be several people as if they were fighting; I made up to them as fast as I could.

Who was the young man you first spoke to? - I don't know.

Were the people fighting at some distance? - Yes; under the wall by the reservoir of the New River; when I came near, three men ran one way, and one jumped into a ditch that goes across the field. I saw the prosecutor appeared very bloody, and very confused; he could hardly speak; I asked him what was the matter, and after a very short time, he told me these fellows had robbed him; that the fellow was one who had jumped into the ditch, and at that time

had his hat in his hand; I think I saw a hat in his hand myself, but I will not speak positively to that; I think I saw something in his hand.

Had he a hat on his head? - I did not look; the prosecutor saying he had his hat in his hand, I looked, and ran after the prisoner immediately: the prosecutor had no hat; I ran round by the road to the end of the field; there was a ditch, and by the watch-box I saw this man, who appeared dirty, as if he had been in the ditch.

About how far did you go round to come to the road? - I dare say it was 200 yards, or more.

During that time was the man in your sight? - No.

What sort of night was it, light or dark? - Rather light; it was a very fine evening.

Was the moon up, or not? - I do not recollect that.

Was you near enough to the man who jumped into the ditch, to know he was the man you found at the watch-house, exclusive of his being dirty? - No.

What did you say to him? - I did not use any ceremony, but knocked him down, believing him to be the man.

Can you recollect whether that man had an hat on? - He had a round hat on at the time I knocked him down.

Was you near enough to see what sort of a hat the man had in his hand who jumped into the ditch? - I was not; when he got up, he attempted to get away; I struck him several times with my fist; a little man came up, and I desired him to feel in the man's pocket; he did, and said he had nothing; I felt in one pocket, but found nothing; when he found I had got the better of him, he said, I had knocked him down before, and had robbed him of two shillings; I kept him by the collar till the prosecutor came up; I asked him, if that was the man he wanted? He said, yes; that was the man that came up, and put his hands in his mouth: somebody came up, and struck the prisoner; I desired them to let him alone; I had got him, and would take care of him; I never let his collar go till I brought him to the Blue Lion in Gray's-Inn Lane.

HENRY SMITH sworn.

I was in the Blue Lion, Gray's-Inn Lane, on Sunday evening; when Mr. Savage came in he was very hot; he said, he had had a severe chace, and had taken a thief; he mentioned the circumstance of the hat; I proposed a party of us should search for the hat; I saw the hat taken up in the field, about ten or fifteen yards from the ditch; we went back to the Blue Lion; the prosecutor said it was his hat.

To James Savage . Where was the prosecutor when you saw him? - Under the wall.

Not on the side of the ditch the hat was found on? - No.

Jury. Did you examine the prisoner's hands, at the time you took him, whether they were bloody or not? - I did not; the prosecutor's mouth at each corner was a good deal torn.

The prisoner was examined in your presence at the public-house? - Not in my presence he was not; I went out in hopes of taking some of the rest.

JOHN CORDING sworn.

Coming up Gray's-Inn Lane, I saw a mob at the public-house, and this prisoner at the door, with Mr. Savage; two men proposed to go and see for the hat; I went with them; I was present when the hat was found; it was in the road, as we came along by the wall; I found the knife in the ditch.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This man swore before the justice, he found the hat in the middle of the field, and the knife thirty yards from it; Mr. Savage said before the justice, he found me in a ditch, with a great coat on, and believed I had changed my clothes.

To James Savage . Did you say so? - No; the only remark I made was, that he must have brushed his clothes, for they appeared

much cleaner than they did the night before.

Did you say he had changed his clothes? - No; I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-21

214. ELIZABETH HARRIS was indicted for stealing a blanket, value 4 s. a linen sheet, value 6 s. and a copper tea-kettle, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Clark , being in a certain lodging-room let by contract by the said Thomas to the said Elizabeth Harris and Mary Smith , March 3d .

THOMAS CLARK sworn.

I live in Bell-Yard, Temple-Bar ; the prisoner lodged in my house; she came some time last year, I do not know the day nor the month; Mary Smith lodged in the room with her some months; I missed the things mentioned in the indictment, on the third of March, out of the two pair of stairs back room, which was the room they occupied; the prisoner was in the lodging, the other was absent on some business I believe; my wife had occasion to go into the room, and missed the things.

- CLARK sworn.

I am wife to Thomas Clark ; I let the lodgings to the prisoner and Mary Smith ; I missed the things mentioned in the indictment, on the third of March.

WILLIAM GEE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Pharez, a pawnbroker in Fleet-Market; I have here a kettle and a sheet, which I took in of the prisoner; the blanket was taken in by a person before I lived there, in the name of Mary Nicholls , in October; the sheet came in February, and the kettle in December.

In what name did the prisoner pawn the sheet and kettle? - Elizabeth Nicholls .

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The other person was gone to receive some money, and then I meant to redeem them.

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-22

215. ELIZABETH HAYWARD was indicted for stealing half a pound of ostrich feathers, value 20 s. a pound of cock feathers, value 10 s. three linen bags, value 3 s. and a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Richard Berrow , March 26th .

RICHARD BERROW sworn.

I live in Piccadilly; I deal in feathers ; the prisoner was my journeywoman for two months; I had been robbed of feathers and other things; I had an information that caused me to suspect the prisoner; I charged her with it; she said I was welcome to search her lodgings; I went there; I found some ostrich feathers in the bed; and, in another room, there were some in the chimney; there was a board put before the chimney; there was a pocket handkerchief, which is mine, and three bags with cock feathers in them; the bags were my property, and I believe the feathers to be mine: she confessed the things were my property; and she said, she would pay for them, or do any thing to make it up.

Cross Examination.

Do you know her father? - No.

What is he? - I don't know.

Is not he a feather-maker? - By report he is.

Have not you, from time to time, trusted her with a great many feathers? - Not ostrich feathers unmanufactured.

Have not you heard she carried on this business for herself? - I have heard so from shops where she has sold them; but, from the price she sold them at, I should suppose they were not her own.

When you entrusted her with feathers,

they were in bags? - They were; I never trusted her with any in these kind of bags till within these two months; never before these three bags.

She used to work for you at her own house? - Yes; they were carried home in these bags.

JOHN MORRIS sworn.

I am journeyman to the prosecutor; I can only say the same he has.

FRANCIS BARR sworn.

I worked with the prisoner; I was to be with her two years, to learn the trade; I know nothing against her; these feathers were in the house; I do not know where they came from; she worked on her own account.

Do you remember the bags coming to the prisoner's house? - Yes; they came with work.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-23

216. THOMAS HAWLEY was indicted for stealing a picture in a carved and gilt frame, value 13 s. the property of William Mason , February 14th .

WILLIAM MASON sworn.

I am a broker in Brook-street , Grosvenor-square; I had a picture of fruit and flowers hanging up on the outside of my shop in the street for a twelvemonth; I had a fellow to it; I valued the pair at three guineas; on the 14th of February the picture was missing early in the morning; ten days after that, I had an information that led me to suspect the prisoner; and the picture was found in his lodgings.

WILLIAM GOODYER sworn.

Upon the 14th of February I was in my own house, which is opposite Mr. Mason's; I saw the prisoner take the picture from Mr. Mason's house; he walked up and down the street two or three times before he took it; then he walked away; I went to the boy, and asked him if he had sold the picture; he said, he had not; the boy and I pursued the prisoner, but lost sight of him; I believe he went into a court.

THOMAS KING sworn.

On suspicion of another charge, the prisoner's lodgings were searched about four or five days after he had been in custody; the picture was found in his room, over the chimney.

(The picture was produced in court, and deposed to by the Prosecutor.)

Prisoner. I leave my defence to my counsel.

(He called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-24

217. THOMAS HAWLEY was indicted for stealing fifteen yards of painted floor-cloth, value 50 s. the property of Charles King , February 6th .

CHARLES KING sworn.

I am a turner in Bond-street ; a piece of painted floor-cloth was at my door for sale; I went out, and came home again before twelve o'clock; then the cloth was gone; I heard no more of it for a fortnight or three weeks; then there was an advertisement from the public office in Litchfield-street, that the things were found in the custody of the prisoner; I went to the office and saw the cloth, and knew it to be mine.

(It was produced in court, and deposed to by the Prosecutor.)

- MURRAY sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Aldersgate-street; on the sixth of February this piece of cloth

was brought to my house, and pawned for half a guinea.

ROBERT LLOYD sworn.

I am a painter; I painted a piece of cloth like that which was sold to the prosecutor; but I am not positive to the cloth.

THOMAS KING sworn.

I found in the prisoner's room a duplicate of this piece of cloth, pawned in the name of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-25

218. PETER BOYCE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Inglis , on the 9th of April , about the hour of two in the night, and stealing a pair of silver shoe-buckles, value 20 s. and a silver top of a castor, value 2 s. the property of John Inglis , in the dwelling-house of the said John Inglis .

JOHN INGLIS sworn.

I live in Gerard-street . I came home on the 9th of April about twelve at night; I went to bed; about three in the morning I was called up by a nurse attending my wife, who was lying-in; she said there was somebody breaking into my house, or the next house; I had slept found; I rested a little; then I opened the window, and saw some persons were in the street; soon after, I heard a single tap at the street door, which I took to be a signal for persons in the house to come out of it. Upon this I got up, and went down stairs; I found the kitchen door wrenched off the hinges, and the kitchen windows had been forced; in the kitchen I found a dark-lanthorn; and, some time afterwards, there was a crow found in the area. In looking to see what loss I had sustained, I missed the buckles out of my shoes, which were standing in the kitchen, as I pulled them off over night; and there was likewise missing, a silver top of a castor; every place in the kitchen had been searched, but there was nothing in it but common kitchen furniture: the communication between the kitchen and the rest of the house was very secure; so that they could not get in, except by great force and noise, to make their way further. I was not disposed to enquire into these matters, not having sustained much loss, but I was acquainted by one of the neighbours of an advertisement. I went to the office; there I found the top of my castor, and there I saw the prisoner. I am very certain that at night every part of the house was fastened when I came in. I was let in by the boy, Joseph Francis , who sat up for me.

(The top of the castor was produced in court, and deposed to by the Prosecutor.)

JOSEPH FRANCIS sworn.

When my master came home, I bolted the doors after him. I know this top of a castor; I cleaned it; there is a dent in it, which makes me certain it is the top of my master's castor; I have seen it very often; it fitted the mustard castor. The outside window shutters were wrenched open, the wood of the inside shutter had been cut away, and a hand had been put in, by which means the bolts were undone.

CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.

At ten o'clock at night, on the 10th of April, myself, with some of the rest of the persons at the public-office, were coming up the Hampstead road. Near Mother Blackcap's, we passed the prisoner; I turned short and stopped him, for I thought I knew him; I found under his arm a brown bag, and an iron crow in it; and in his waistcoat pocket I found a flint and steel. (They were produced in court.)

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I was with Jealous; I found upon the prisoner this cutlass and tinder-box (they were produced); I secured him, and put him into the watch-house; Patrick M'Manus

directed the persons at the watch-house to observe if any person came to him, or he sent for any person. I was told soon after, that he had desired the wife of the man at the watch-house to go to Hannah Brown , a woman with whom he lived, and desire her to come to him; upon that M'Manus and I went to the watch-house; Hannah Brown came almost at the same time; I heard the prisoner say to her, Move off my things; I informed M'Manus of that; and M'Manus and Prothero and I went to the house where Brown lodged; when we got there, she was moving off some shirts, cravats, and wearing apparel; I found, in a drawer there, this silver top of a castor.

HANNAH BROWN sworn.

I am a misfortunate woman; I had the misfortune to be acquainted some time with the prisoner; I took him to be an honest man; he said he was an horse-dealer; he came to me several times; he had come to my lodgings about ten in the morning on the 10th of April; he staid there till five in the evening; then he went away; he was taken that day; he was likewise at my lodgings on the preceding day, about ten in the morning, and went away early in the afternoon; upon Tuesday, when he came to me at ten in the morning, he brought this silver top of a castor; he said, he brought it from his mother; I understood his mother to be a person that lived in a decent way; he said, that in coming he had broke the glass: he sent me a message, that something had happened, and he wanted a little money; upon which I came to the watch-house; when I came there, he desired me to move his things out of his lodgings, that something had happened with which I was not acquainted, and he wished I should not be hurt.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought that top of a castor of a peddling Jew.

GUILTY . ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-26

219. ELIZABETH, the wife of JOHN ANDREWS , was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 20 s. a steel chain, value 1 d. a base metal key, value 1 d. a silk gown, value 40 s. a silver spoon, value 12 d. a linen shirt, value 12 d. and four linen aprons, value 4 s. the property of James Simpson , December 26th .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.)

JAMES SIMPSON sworn.

I am a plaisterer ; I live at No. 2, Conway-court ; I lost the things mentioned in the indictment on the 26th of December; I was at work when it happened; when I came home, the things were missing; we had a suspicion this woman had got them; we said nothing to her for a day or two, thinking we should find the things; the prisoner was a lodger; she got out of the way; I could not take her for six weeks after; then we could not find any thing of our property but an apron she had pawned.

ELIZABETH SIMPSON sworn.

On the 26th of December I lost the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) out of the parlour; the prisoner had lodged with me eleven or twelve days; I let her the back parlour at half-a-crown a week at first, afterwards she agreed to go down into the kitchen: on the 26th of December she helped me set the room to rights, she put the watch into a cannister in the tea-chest; that afternoon I was going out; she wanted to persuade me to go on the Wednesday, but I went that day; she said, as I would go, she would go, and went out a little before me; she asked me, where she should meet me to help me bring home my child at night, and I told her; and she came about half after five, at the place appointed, to help me bring the child: we went home about half after six, or near seven; when we came in, the tea-chest was on the floor.

Who lived in the house? - There was a lodger on the first floor; my apartment was locked; I found it as I left it, when we

came in, and the tea-chest was on the floor; she said, Where is the watch? I am afraid you have been robbed; I looked, and the watch was gone: she bid me not be flurried; she dared say that was not all I had lost, and desired me to go and look in my drawers: I went and looked in the drawer where my gown that I lost was, under my husband's clothes; I saw my husband's clothes safe; I did not miss any thing: she said, I was flurried, and bid me look again, I should find I had lost more; I looked again, and missed my gown; the next day I missed three aprons out of the clothes-bag; I told my husband I was robbed; he said, it must be somebody in the house, and said he would have them searched; the prisoner seemed very confused; the next day she ran away: there is a door from each parlour into the passage, but they were both locked.

Can you form a judgement whether they were taken before you went out? - They were all there when I went out; I have not found any thing but one apron; I am almost positive it was in the room when I went out.

JAMES BOYD sworn.

I am servant to Townshend and Co. pawnbrokers, in Sherrard's court, Upper Brook-street. I have an apron the prisoner brought on the 22d of December, with other things; afterwards she had the other things, and left these the 28th of February.

(The apron was produced in court, and deposed to by Mrs. Simpson.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

This apron I pawned the 22d of December; she lent me this apron to fetch an halfpennyworth of sand; I was in distress, and pawned it; I meant to take it out again: I know nothing of the things that were lost out of the room; I never was in it.

Prosecutor. I never lent her the apron.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-27

219. THOMAS DUNCAN was indicted for stealing a child's drab cloth coat , the property of Ralph Steele , January 15th .

THOMAS STEWARD sworn.

I live opposite Mr. Steele, who keeps a clothes-shop. I saw the prisoner take a child's coat off the pin, and put it under his coat, and go up Porter-street; he came back, and went through St. Martin's court; I went in and told Mr. Steele, and Mr. Steele's man ran out and took the coat from him; I am quite sure the prisoner is the man who stole it.

(The prosecutor's man confirmed the testimony of Thomas Steward .)

(The cloak was produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Going through Cranbourne-alley, I picked up this cloak, and asked the people thereabouts whose it was; I went through St. Martin's court, and these people came after me; I have been three months in gaol; I have lost all my toes in the frost.

(He called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY , fined one shilling .

Reference Number: t17810425-28

220. JOHN STEVENS was indicted for stealing 200 lb. of hay, value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Rose , William Hatton , and Robert Lloyd , February 6th .

(The prosecutor did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810425-29

221. MARGARET MORGAN , otherwise WEBSTER , was indicted for stealing twenty yards of printed cotton, value 50 s. the property of Robert Warmesly , privately in the shop of the said Robert , April 5th .

WILLIAM BULLOCK sworn.

I am shopman to Mr. Warmesley, who

keeps a linen-draper's shop . On the 5th of April, between six and seven in the evening, the prisoner and a boy came into our shop; she said she wanted to buy some printed cotton for a bed-gown; I shewed her some; I shewed her three or four more pieces; she asked the boy what he had done with her garter? he said he had put it in her pocket; she said, she would put it on, but, she said, it was very rude to put it on before me; therefore I turned my head; in the mean while, she concealed this piece of cotton under her petticoat.

Did you turn round so as to see her do any thing? - No; I did not miss it directly; after that we bargained for three yards of this (producing it) she agreed to buy it, but had not money enough; she said she wanted a shilling; she bid the boy fetch her a shilling, and sent him out; a little while after the boy was gone, she said, she recollected she wanted four shillings instead of one, and she went after him to tell him she wanted four shillings; then I missed the cotton; I looked after her; and as she went from the door, I saw it hang about a quarter of a yard below her petticoat; I followed her as fast I could; before I got to her, I saw the watermen plying at Westminster-bridge, stop her, and take it from her: our shop is in Bridge-street, the third door from the bridge.

(The cotton was produced in court, and William Bullock deposed that it was Mr. Warmsley's property.)

WILLIAM SKINNER sworn.

I am a waterman, and ply at Westminster-bridge. While I was standing in the plying-place, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop; I said to my companion, What a pity it is that woman should be about the street, she is so bad with the foul distemper! when she came a little farther, I saw a piece of cotton hanging from under her petticoat; I said to my partner, That woman has been robbing the shop; the other men who stood in the plying-place, followed her and stopt her; I saw her stopt, and the cotton taken from her; it was printed cotton, dark colour.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say; I have no witnesses.

GUILTY of stealing the piece of cotton, but not guilty of stealing it privately in the shop .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[No punishment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-30

222. MARGARET MORGAN , otherwise WEBSTER , was indicted for stealing eight pair of worsted stockings, value 12 s. the property of William Layton , privately in the shop of the said William , April 5th .

WILLIAM SKINNER sworn.

My comrade stopped the prisoner; she was standing at this gentleman's back-door; they insisted upon opening her bundle, which was in her lap; they took these stockings out of her lap; the stockings were taken into the linen-draper's shop; I saw them taken from her.

SARAH LAYTON sworn.

I am the wife of William Layton . The prisoner came into our shop, and bought a pair of stockings for 1 s. 6 d. at about four o'clock on Thursday the 5th of April: she went away, and came again about six o'clock; she then agreed for a pair of white worsted stockings, and another pair; when she came to pay for them, she said, she had not money enough by 7 d. she had a little boy with her; she went out; I looked round, and missed half a dozen pair out of the window; they were tied up in a brown paper, which had my husband's mark upon it.

Should you know it again? - I should: this is the paper; it has the mark upon it.

SARAH GOSLING sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I live in Petty-France. I have two pair of stockings, which I took in of the prisoner the 5th of April, between seven and eight o'clock; she told me they were a customer's of mine,

that did not chuse to come themselves, and they must be put in in her name, for she was to fetch them out: they are new; they have no mark upon them; but I am quite sure the prisoner is the person who brought them.

(The stockings were produced in court)

Mrs. Layton. I cannot swear to them: I missed two pair of the same sort.

To Skinner. Do you know who these stockings were delivered to in Mr. Warmsley's shop? - No: there were five or six people in the shop.

To Layton. Who did you get the stockings from? - Justice Durden: I believe he had them from the woman, but not in my presence.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I bought the stockings of a man that sells them in the street.

To Layton. When did you see the six pair in the window? - I saw them in the window not ten minutes before she came in.

GUILTY of stealing the stockings, to the value of 4 s.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[No punishment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-31

223. MOSES LEVI was indicted for stealing a silver cream jug, value 7 s. two silver tea spoons, value 2 s. and a pair of silver tea tongs, value 3 s. the property of George Pagett , March 19th .

GEORGE PAGETT sworn.

I lost the things mentioned in the indictment, on the 19th of March. I had them at breakfast that morning; I know nothing of the fact.

ANNE WINGROVE sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Pagett. On Monday, about nine o'clock, I carried up the tea-things to my master to breakfast; I went down to butter the rolls; I was gone about five minutes; going up again, I saw the prisoner coming out of my master's parlour; I asked him what he wanted; at first he said, nothing; then he said, he wanted some gentlemen. I was going to take him up stairs to see who he wanted, but he slipped out at the street-door; there was not any person in the parlour.

Was the street-door open? - It was then on the jar; I do not know whether it was so when he came in; I went into the parlour, and missed the things mentioned in the indictment; the prisoner was taken immediately by the coachman; I met him as they were bringing him in.

Cross-examined.

Your street-door usually stands open? - Sometimes.

It was open that morning? - I cannot say whether it was or was not.

Have you lodgers in your house? - No: I never saw the prisoner before, till I saw him come out of my master's parlour.

SAMUEL COLLINGS sworn.

I am a constable. I was called about nine o'clock in the morning to go to Mr. Pagett's; I went, and found the prisoner in the house; I searched him, he had not the property about him; I was informed by a person there, that he had run into the coach-house; I went and searched the coach-house, which is close to the house; at the further end, behind the wall, I found the property.

JOSEPH LEGER sworn.

On that morning, a little before nine, I was in my stable: I heard a woman make a noise; I ran out, and heard her say, a man had robbed her master of some plate; a bricklayer in the yard said a man had run into the coach-house; I went into the coach-house, and took the prisoner; I brought him back to Mr. Pagett's house; the servant said, that was the man; I took him into the parlour; after that I went with a constable and another man to the coach-house; we found the plate in a corner among some wood.

GEORGE CROSIER sworn.

On the 19th of March, between eight

and nine, I saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards before Mr. Pagett's house, looking in at the window; I live directly opposite; Mr. Pagett's door was on the jar; I saw him open the door, and go in; in about five minutes, I heard Mr. Pagett's maid cry out, Stop thief! I went out; the prisoner had then turned up the passage towards the coach-house.

(The plate was produced in court, and deposed to.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am entirely innocent. I met a young woman, who asked me if I bought old clothes; I told her I did; I said I would come on Monday, and see them; I went to this house, and found the door on a jar, and I went in; I met this young woman; I asked her if Mrs. Dixon lived there, for the woman told me her name was Dixon; she said, no: I went out; I never was in the parlour; I went up the court to go into Windmill-street; I found there was no thoroughfare; I went into the coach-house to ease myself, and the man came and took hold of me: I know nothing of it.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-32

224. 225. ELIZABETH BAYLEY and ANN FOBBS were indicted for stealing a silk gown, value 10 s. and a linen petticoat, value 6 s. the property of Robert Logan , March 2d .

SUSANNAH LOGAN sworn.

I am the wife of Robert Logan . The prisoners were in my room the 2d of March, the best part of the day: Ann Fobbs lodged in the next room; the other was a visitor to her. Fobbs asked me to let her stay in my room, because hers was very dull; they were there the whole day, till I went down about six o'clock: I returned in a quarter of an hour, and then they were both gone. At about nine o'clock, I missed the things mentioned in the indictment ( repeating them); they were found the next morning at a pawnbroker's; a person who had lived with me, advised me to go to Sir John Fielding 's: going by this pawnbroker's, I persuaded her to go in, and I found the things there.

- JONES sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I took in this gown and petticoat (producing them) of Ann Fobbs ; she was alone; she pawned them in the name of Logan.

FOBBS's DEFENCE.

I was at Mrs. Logan's room: she asked me to pawn these things for her; I did for half a guinea; I had the misfortune to lose the duplicate, and she flew in a passion, and afterwards charged me with stealing them.

To Prosecutor. Did you give her authority to pawn them? - No: they were in the room when I left the prisoner in the room. I went to Jones's, because the woman she lived with used that shop.

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-33

226. HANNAH GLASS was indicted for stealing a muslin handkerchief, value 3 s. a muslin shawl, value 3 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 12 d. and another stocking, value 2 d. the property of David Hughes , March 17th .

DAVID HUGHES sworn.

I keep a public-house in Goodman's Yard, in the Minories . The prisoner was drinking in the house between nine and ten at night: there was no company, only Mr. Irvin in the kitchen. The prisoner went away about ten o'clock: in about three minutes after she was gone, I missed the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them): she came again the next

morning about seven o'clock; she asked for a glass of gin; the servant served her; she said, she had been up all night with a sick person, and would go and lie down on the bed; I was not in the way at the time; a constable was sent for; I did not see her till the constable came, and was charged with her.

Mr. IRVIN sworn.

On the 17th of March, at night, the prisoner came into Mr. Hughes's house; Mrs. Hughes had been ironing; the different articles she ironed, she laid in a chair in the kitchen; the prisoner sat herself in another chair, near the chair the different articles lay in; I saw her put her right-hand under a cardinal she had on, and her left-hand she out in the chair, and with that she conveyed the things mentioned in the indictment out of the chair; I told Mrs. Hughes of it; the prisoner, hearing me tell her, got up, and went out immediately; the prisoner came the next morning; we sent for a constable, and detained her; she was searched, but there was nothing found upon her; Mr. Hughes was not in the room; she said, she never saw any thing of the kind.

How came you to let her go away the night before? - I did not know that I had a right to stop her without an officer; I told Mrs. Hughes of it.

To Hughes. You was not in the kitchen the night before, when the prisoner went away? - No; I never found my things. My wife is not here; she has been bad five weeks.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went to the prosecutor's house, they being civil and obliging people; I had been up all night; I asked to lie down; they sent for a constable, and gave charge of me: I know nothing of the affair.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-34

227. WILLIAM HUDSON was indicted for stealing a linen shirt sleeve, value 1 s. 6 d. and a linen shirt body, value 6 s. the property of Catharine Macdonnell , widow , April 6th .

CATH. MACDONNELL sworn.

On the 6th of April I was at the house of Mr. Walter, in Brook's-court, Brook's-Market ; his wife was taken ill between four and five o'clock; I was in the kitchen; I was called into the next room; the street door was open; I put my work on the dresser of the kitchen; I saw the prisoner come in, and reach his hand into the kitchen; I came out, and laid hold of him by the coat, and asked him what he wanted? I saw in his hand, which was partly under his arm, a sleeve of the shirt I had been working on: upon my laying hold of him, he threw the sleeve down, and catched up the shirt, and endeavoured to put it under his arm; I pushed him against the wall, and called out three times for Mr. Walter; the prisoner struck me, and got one of his hands loose; he then shoved me into the kitchen, shut the door, and locked me in; Mr. Walter came down, and ran after him.

ROBERT WALTER sworn.

I was at work up stairs; I heard a great noise, a screaming, and crying out Murder and Thieves! and I heard my name called; I ran down, and saw the prisoner run out at the door; I followed, and took him; I am sure he is the same man that ran out of the door.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I went into the house to enquire for a coachman; being in liquor, I might throw the shirt down; I went to pick it up; I do not know any thing of it.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-35

228. GOODCHILD ROOT was indicted for stealing a flitch of bacon, value 10 s. the property of Roger Innover , March 14th .

ROGER INNOVER sworn.

I lost a side of bacon, on the 14th of March, out of the stove where we dry bacon; the prisoner served his time with me, and he worked for me at this time.

ELIZABETH WHITEHEAD sworn.

Between five and six o'clock on Wednesday the 14th of March, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Innover's gate with a side of bacon on his shoulder; he carried it to the Two Brewers alehouse; he came back, and went in at the gate again; I told Mr. Innover of it the next morning; I did not think of telling of it till I had spoke to my husband about it, who worked for Mr. Innover; the bacon was never found; the publican said before the justice, that he never saw the bacon.

(The prisoner did not say any thing in his defence.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-36

229. ANN BARCLAY was indicted for stealing twenty yards of Manchester cotton, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Eyre , March 23d .

THOMAS EYRE sworn.

I lost a piece of Manchester striped cotton from my shop on the 23d of March.

SARAH BOGGIN sworn.

I get my bread in the street; I saw the prisoner go by Mr. Eyre's bulk ten or twelve times, at about three o'clock in the afternoon; it was five weeks ago yesterday; this piece of cotton was by a piece of carpeting upon the bulk of the window; at last I saw her draw it round, and take it off the bulk, and put it into a straw basket she had in her hand; and then she set off with it; I ran and took her when she had got about fifty yards from the place; I asked her, What she had there? She said, Nothing. I said, she had got some property of Mr. Eyre's; she refused letting me look inside her cloak; I took her back to Mr. Eyre, with the piece of cotton.

(The piece of cotton was produced in court.)

Prosecutor. There is no particular mark upon it, but I know I had such a piece upon the bulk, which was missing.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming by, and saw it lying on the pavement.

GUILTY . W .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-37

230, 231. SARAH ROBINSON and ELIZABETH CLARKE were indicted; the first for stealing, on the 11th of March , a silver watch, value 3 l. a pair of pinchbeck shoe-buckles, value 1 s. three guineas and eight shillings, the property of John Downs , in the dwelling-house of William James ; and the other for receiving the watch, shoe-buckles, and six shillings, knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute, &c.

JOHN DOWNS (a Negro ) sworn.

I live at Mrs. Williams's in Fleet-street. On Monday night I was at the sign of Sir John Falstaff , in St. Giles's: Sarah Robinson was there; she asked me to drink, and said she was very hungry; I gave her three-pence to get something to eat; she was very ragged; I asked her if she had no better clothes than those on her back; she said her clothes were in pawn: I gave her some money to get them out; she took me to her lodgings, at Mr. James's, in St. Giles's ; I paid her very fair; I staid all night. In the morning, about three or four o'clock, I got up, and missed the prisoner; she had got out at the one-pair-of-stairs window, for the door was bolted on the inside; the window was open. I missed my watch, buckles, three guineas, and about eight shillings. I had my watch in my pocket when I went to bed.

Was you sober? - I was not sober, nor I was not drunk; I was sensible; I am sure I had my watch when I went to bed, for I then looked at it, to see what o'clock it was; it was then between ten and eleven.

When did you count the money, before you lost it? - I never count money in my pocket; I received four guineas, and paid a little bill out of it.

Who went to bed first, she or you? - She was in bed first.

You suppose she got out of the room? - Out of the window.

What occasion was there to go out of the window? - The landlady told me that she came down; the door was fast; the landlady would not let her out. I told the landlady I was robbed; she said she would find the prisoner: some of my things were found again by the constable.

ELIZABETH JAMES sworn.

This black man came on Saturday night, between eight and nine, and asked me if I had a lodging; I said, yes.

What is your husband's name? - William. The prisoner, Sarah Robinson , was with him; he was very much in liquor indeed. I let him have a lodging; they

went up together: I told them there was a bolt to the door to bolt themselves in. At about twelve o'clock, Robinson came down stairs, and called me to open the door; I asked her where she was going; she told me she was going home to her own lodging; I said she should not go home till I waked the black man, to see if he was safe or no: I went up stairs with her, and shoved him about with my hand, but could not wake him; I persuaded her to go to bed with him till morning, and then I should see if every thing was safe; she did; I went down, and went to bed, and took the key of the street-door with me: after I was in bed, she got out of the window. The black man got up between six and seven; he knocked at the door; he said he wanted to speak to me; he said his wife was gone: I asked him what he had lost: I was present when the things were found at Elizabeth Clarke 's house; she produced them herself. I asked Elizabeth Clarke if Sarah Robinson was there; she put her hands together, and said, As God was her saviour, she was not there: I was informed she was, and desired the constable to search; we went up one pair of stairs; there we found her; I told her I did not mind my own loss, if she would only let me have the Black's things; she said she had nothing; Clarke said, As God was her saviour, she did not bring a farthing-worth there; she had my gown and apron on; I told her to pull my gown and apron off, and give me the Black's things, and I would forgive her as to my things; the Black might do as he pleased as to his: she pulled my gown and apron off, and said Mrs. Clarke had the watch and buckles; she said she had not got the money; she produced seven or eight shillings.

Was Clarke present when she said so? - No; she was going down stairs, and they called her up again. I said to Mrs. Clarke, The girl says, you have got the watch and buckles; she then said, she had, and would fetch them, and she produced the watch, the buckles, and seven shillings, and gave them to Mr. Hinksman; she said she took them to keep them safe, that the girl might not make away with them: we took them before the justice; the black man said he was sorry for what he had done, and gave the prisoner six-pence.

- HINKSMAN sworn.

I went to search the house of Mrs. Clarke for Robinson; Mrs. Clarke denied her being there; but I found her in the one-pair-of stairs room: she said her landlady had the things. When I told Mrs. Clarke she had owned having them, she said it was very right, she would go down stairs and fetch them up; she did, and said she gave her eight shillings.

Did you hear her deny having the property? - No; I was in the back room, examining the beds.

(The watch and buckles were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

ROBINSON's DEFENCE.

As I was going out Saturday afternoon, I met with this man; he asked me to go and have something to drink; I went with him to Mr. Martin's in St. Giles's, and staid till eight o'clock; then he took me to Mrs. James's, a disorderly house, and we went to bed: I took the property, and offered Mrs. James half to let me out; she would not; I went up again; she came up and took the eight shillings from me, and bid me bolt the door and go to bed.

CLARKE's DEFENCE.

The prisoner came and wanted to have a lodging with me that night; she gave me a bundle in a handkerchief to take care of for her till morning; that was on the Sunday, in the morning; she opened it; there was the watch and buckles and silver; I asked how she came by them; she said, honestly. When Mrs. James and Hinksman came, she asked if I had a lodger in my house that brought any quantity of wet linen; I said, no; they searched, and found the prisoner; and because she had a bed-gown and apron on, they took her, and then I produced the things immediately.

ROBINSON GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s. W . and Imp. 12 months .

CLARKE GUILTY , Imp. two years .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-38

232. JAMES PORTER was indicted for stealing a piece of Scotch carpeting, containing sixteen yards, value 16 s. the property of William Mitchel , March 3d .

( There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the prisoner, but a confession obtained under a promise not to prosecute him, which, on that account, could not be received in evidence .)

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-39

233. JAMES IRONMONGER was indicted for stealing a pair of men's leather shoes, value 12 d. the property of Thomas Allen , another pair, value 12 d. the property of Robert Allen , another pair, value 12 d. the property of Henry Curling , four other pair, value 4 s. the property of George Hills , March 15th .

GEORGE HILLS sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Allen; I left seven pair of shoes on a board in the wash-house over night; I missed them when I got up between six and seven in the morning; four pair were my own, a pair my master's, another pair my young master's, and a pair of Mr. Curling's, a gentleman who lives in the house: my master had the prisoner taken up, and he owned before the justice, that he had taken the shoes; he said, he had sold some, and pawned the others.

Was any promise made him, or threats, to induce him to confess? - No; I did not hear any; he owned he had taken them, as soon as it was laid to his charge: they were produced in the office by Edmund Wade .

EDMUND WADE sworn.

I took the prisoner up by the information of his master; before he went into the room before the justice, he told me, there were two pair of shoes pawned in Norton-Falgate, at one Dulfour's; I went with him, and found the shoes there.

(The shoes were produced in court, and deposed to by Hills.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

It is the first time I was ever taken up in my life; before the justice, Mr. Allen said he would give me two guineas to get me a place, and withdraw the prosecution, if it cost him 40 l.

To Hills. Had he been in Mr. Allen's service? - Yes; he was in it at this time.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-40

234. THOMAS PARROTT was indicted for stealing a piece of brown linen cloth, value 20 s. a piece of cloth called Russia Pocketing, value 40 s. two pieces of cloth, called Dublin Dowlas, value 4 l. sixteen yards of long lawn, value 3 l. four pieces of printed cotton, value 12 l. the property of John Clarridge , March 1st .

JOHN CLARRIDGE sworn.

I am a carrier . I had the care of the goods mentioned in the indictment. I drove my waggon to Bushey; there the waggon stopped; just after that, I found that a truss had been cut open, and several articles were gone out of it, for there was remaining but three pieces of coarse cloth; I had a suspicion of the prisoner, having known something of him before. When I came near Kilburn, I saw the prisoner walking by a hay-cart; I came up to him, and charged him with having taken these goods out of the waggon; at first he denied it; afterwards he said, the goods were in the cart; I then looked in the cart, and found the several articles mentioned in the indictment (repeating them); I then had the prisoner searched, and there was a half-piece of long lawn concealed in his clothes; these goods were brought to town, and carried with the prisoner to the office in Bow-street, where a clerk of Mr. Moore the linen-draper in Cheapside attended.

(Mr. Moore's clerk deposed, that he saw the goods in Bow-street, and knew them to be the property of his master; that a parcel in a truss had been sent the preceding day to the Windmill, Clarridge's, to go by that waggon to Layton Buzzard.)

WILLIAM MOSELY sworn.

On the first of March, about three in the morning, as I was setting off from Bushy with my hay-cart to London, the prisoner desired me to let him put some goods into the cart, which I agreed to. As we were coming to London, Clarridge stopped us at Kilburn; the prisoner very soon, upon being charged with the fact by Clarridge, owned that the things were upon the cart.

The book-keeper to the waggon deposed, that he booked a truss directed to go by Clarridge's waggon to Layton Buzzard.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am not guilty of the fact.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-41

235. EDWARD WARNE was indicted for that he, in the king's highway, in and upon Robert Duer , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 40 s. a gold seal, value 10 s. a silver seal, value 1 s. a gold ring, value 10 s. a silk purse, value 4 d. and 25 l. in monies numbered , the property of the said Robert, April 15th .

ROBERT DUER sworn.

I was commander of a recruiting party in Essex, in the 40th regiment. On Sunday was se'nnight, the 15th, about half after two o'clock, I was coming up from Ratcliff-highway; I turned up by St. George's church in the East; I missed the road, and went forward as far as Wellclose-square . I saw a tallish man behind me, in a light coat. I said I was wrong, and asked him where was St. George's church; he said I had passed it: I talked with the man; I stood considering which way I should take; then I heard something shuffling behind me; I looked about, and saw the prisoner and another; I spoke to them twice; they gave me no answer; at last I asked of them the best road to the London Hospital, Whitechapel; the other put his hand to his mouth, and said, Go in at the gate-way, the turnpike; I put my stick over my shoulder, and came away. I came to a cross road, which leads into Church-lane: I am a little dull of hearing; I saw nothing, but I heard people shuffling behind me; I looked about, and saw the two men that I had seen coming up to the turnpike, which were the prisoner and another man, coming up to me: the first man had a pistol in his hand; he poked it to my head, and cut my eye with it; the prisoner was on the other side; he had a pistol in his left hand; he poked it on the other side of my head; then there came up to me two men; I believe they were two others; one hit me with a stick on the nose; then one of them put a cloth or something round my neck; I thought he would choak me; then one of them went down on his knees to take my money out of my pocket; I pressed my belly down, that he could not get my watch out, and he struck me in the belly with his fist; and one of the others struck me over the head with a hanger, as I suppose it was, because it cut the loop off my hat, and my cockade; and the tall man I saw in Ratcliff-highway, was the last that came up; he said, D - n the bougre, why don't you shut his eyes? Then they put an handkerchief over my eyes; I went down on my backside, upon which they fastened my head down to the ground, and then took my money, which was upwards of 25 l. and a watch; they took a bundle of papers out of my pocket, that were the accounts of the regiment: none of my things were ever found again: then they let my breeches down, and walked behind me with their pistols in their hands; they made me walk with my breeches down, and said, If I looked back, they would blow my brains out; then they left me: I met with a watchman, who conducted me to Whitechapel turnpike. On Monday I made an information before the justice's at Whitechapel. On the Sunday I was unable to

get out of bed. The prisoner was taken up last Wednesday was week; I knew him again as soon as ever I saw him.

Had you ever seen him before the night you was robbed? - Not that I know of.

How did you describe him? - I said there was a little man with a cut wig and dark clothes; and another with his own hair, a round hat, and dark clothes; I am certain the prisoner is the same person.

Was it moon-light? - The moon did not shine, but it was star-light.

Cross-Examination.

This happened about half after two o'clock on Easter Sunday morning? - Yes; when I got up on my backside, I said, You have taken all I have; why don't you take my life also? upon that they gave me two or three blows. I bought that fairly, for I might have held my tongue.

JOHN DAN sworn.

I am the headborough of the hamlet of Mile End New Town. I took the prisoner at the Bull in Petticoat-lane, about nine o'clock in the morning: he was lying asleep on the table; we took him on another charge; we took him to the watch-house; the serjeant (the prosecutor) came with the beadle, and challenged him immediately.

Had he (the prisoner) any arms? - None at all.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am very innocent; I never did such a thing in my life.

For the Prisoner.

ELIZABETH HYDE sworn.

The prisoner lodges in my house; he has lodged with me a twelvemonth.

Where was he on Easter-eve? - In my house, a-bed: he goes through my room to bed; he could not go out without my knowing it: he was in from ten o'clock on Saturday night till eight on Sunday morning. He is a very honest man; he drives a horse and cart for his living; he sells fruit and potatoes: he has never laid out of my house a night since he has lodged there.

How came he to go on the other side of the water on the Wednesday? - Being holiday week, he said he would go to the Bull in Petticoat-lane, and have a pint of beer; he went out about eleven o'clock; he was at home on Monday and Tuesday: on the Wednesday he asked me to go with him to take a walk; I said I would come after him; and I did; I went about three or four o'clock in the afternoon, and he was taken up and put in prison then.

To Dan. What time did you go to the public-house? - Between eight and nine in the morning. Hyde came to him as his wife.

Hyde. I did not pass as his wife.

Dan. We went to the house between eight and nine in the morning: we had been to look for him several times before.

(The prisoner called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY ( Death .)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-42

236. CHARLOTTE WALKER was indicted for that she, in a certain wide and open place near the king's highway, called the French-horn Yard , in and upon Joseph Bowman , feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a leather pocket-book, value 1 s. eight guineas, half a guinea, and eight shillings, in monies numbered , the property of the said Joseph Bowman , April 18th .

JOSEPH BOWMAN sworn.

I live in Tottenham-Court Road. On the 18th of April, as I was returning from the city, (I had supped at the Horse-shoe and Magpie, and parted with my company) just as the clock struck eleven, in my way home, up Holborn, I met with the prisoner; she asked me for a glass of wine, and represented herself as perishing for want of a glass of wine; I said, if the glass of wine would

keep her from perishing, she should have it; I went into an open room, and ordered a bottle of wine; I paid for it, and went out; my way lay through the yard; going through the yard, she importuned me for a shilling; I told her she was impertinent, and would give her nothing; she said, D - n your eyes! you shall: she then gave me a violent push, in consequence of which I fell with my shoulder against the wall, on the right side, on some dung; she took from me eight guineas and a half, eight shillings, and my pocket-book out of my left-side waistcoat pocket; I missed it as soon as I got from her; I ran into the street, and called for the watch; the watch did not come; I went into the house, and asked if they knew the woman; the bar-maid said, yes; her name was Miss Walker: I told her I had been robbed of eight guineas and a half, eight shillings, and my pocket-book; I searched after the prisoner; I took up another woman, who said she knew her; the prisoner was taken the next morning; I knew her perfectly well to be the same woman: I never found my pocket-book nor money.

Had you drank freely that afternoon? - No: I was perfectly sober. She pushed me down, threw herself against me, and took the money out of my pocket by force; I struggled with her about three minutes before I could disentangle myself.

Prisoner. He said, the first time, I pushed him against the wall, he fell on one side, and I robbed him; the second time he said, as he came out of the door, I held him together by both his arms, and so robbed his Worship: I said I must have three hands to rob him when I had hold of both his arms.

Bowman. She spit in the justice's face, and beat the constables. I missed my pocketbook and money, when I got into the middle of Holborn; I ran as fast as I could into Holborn.

Did you relate the same story to the justice you have told me now, that she hit you a blow and knocked you down, and threw herself upon you? - Yes; and if the information is here, I dare say you will find it so.

WILLIAM PARRY sworn.

I keep the French-horn inn.

Do you know any thing of the prosecutor being with a woman at your house? - I did not see him till he came back and complained he had been robbed, which was before twelve o'clock; he asked me who the woman was that was with him. I called the bar-maid to know who it was; she informed me; he said he had been robbed by her; I said I would go immediately in search of her, thinking it a duty incumbent upon me.

SARAH KEATES sworn.

I am bar-maid at the French-horn inn. On the 18th of this month, about half after eleven, the prosecutor came into our house with the woman at the bar; they staid not quite half an hour; and above a quarter of an hour they were in the parlour, there was nobody there but the prosecutor and the prisoner; they were alone, but the door was not shut.

Do you remember his coming back? - Yes: he asked me if I knew her; I said, yes; I know her person and name: Mr. Parry went out in pursuit of her with him immediately.

In what condition was he when he returned to your house? - He seemed agitated on account of losing his money.

SAMUEL BOLTON sworn.

I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner; I found neither pocket-book nor money. An information was brought to Justice Girdler's; I brought her to the justice's, and the prosecutor said that was the woman; he charged her with robbing him of his money; he told the justice the woman knocked him down; that his foot struck against the kirb, and he fell down.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met the prosecutor in Holborn; he asked me to go and drink a glass of wine with him; I went with him to the French-horn; he went into a private room, and wanted a pint of claret; Sarah Keates said they had no

claret in the house; he told me to have what I pleased, and we had a pint of red port; he asked me if I would let him be concerned with me; I said, yes, if he would make me a present: he said he had no cash; we drank the pint of wine. Is it probable that I should knock a man down, who declared he had no cash about him, and I saw no cash? There was a coachman he knew; he came out and told him he had been robbed by somebody of eight guineas, but he could not tell how; he said he picked up a girl, and went into the French-horn, at three in the morning, and gave her half a guinea to be connected with her; that he wanted her to tell him where one Miss Mee lived, as he chose to lie with her above any other woman. There is a man in court he told, that he had said to me, he would give me a guinea, if I would tell him where Miss Mee was.

For the Prisoner.

JAMES GRAY sworn.

I am a coachman. I know Mr. Bowman. When I drove the stage from Pinner to Stanmore, he lived at Harrow-well Common. I was in company with him about ten minutes that night: he said he was robbed between one and two o'clock, at the Coach and Horses in Holborn; he was in company with three girls and two men; he came in with them, and treated them with drams; he treated me with a glass; when he had so done, the girls went about their business. He said, Gray, I have not money to pay; I said I would lend him some; then he put his hand into his left-hand pocket, and pulled out a handful of gold and silver, and paid for it; I said, I wish I had as much as you; afterwards he told me he had been robbed, but he said he did not know how; he asked me to go along with him; I told him I was very much tired, and begged to be excused; he said he wanted to go to the French-horn; the first girl he met, who stands here, he took her round the middle, and took her into the French-horn, into a private room; and I left them.

How long have you known this gentleman? - I believe five or six years.

Who did you see at the French-horn? - The landlord and landlady.

Was the bar-woman up? - I think I saw but one woman.

Was this man sober, or in liquor? - He seemed to be in liquor.

ANN SMITH sworn.

About half after two o'clock on Wednesday night, this gentleman asked me to go and drink a glass of wine at the French-horn: he met me within two doors of the French-horn: the last witness was with him. I went with him; he was in my company, I dare say, the space of an hour and better; he asked me if I knew such a name as Mee; I told him I knew such a name, but I did not know where she was.

Was any thing said about his being robbed? - No; he did not mention any thing of the kind to me. I went in about half after two, and I dare say I was more than an hour with him: when I went in with him, he called for a pint of wine; he asked me to be concerned with him, which I was.

To Parry. Do you remember seeing this man at your house this evening afterwards? - Yes; he came back with Ann Smith and the coachman.

Where had he been from the time lie complained he was robbed till he came back? - He had been seeking after this woman with me. We saw three women in Holborn go into a public-house; I bid him go in and drink a glass of something, and he would have an opportunity of seeing if he knew them; he did, and came out to me; I advised him to get some other woman, who might know where she lodged, and he brought in this young woman; I believe his business with her was to know who robbed him.

Then you don't believe what she has said? - No: I was in the room; he offered to give this woman half a guinea to tell where the prisoner lodged, and said that he had a particular attachment to her.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-43

237. SAMUEL BAGNALL was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Howell , on the 15th of October , about the hour of eight in the night, and stealing a cotton counterpane, value 15 s. the property of James Howell , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES HOWELL sworn.

On Sunday the 15th of October, I came home about ten in the evening, and was informed my house had been broke open.

ELIZABETH BULL sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Howell. On Sunday the 15th of October, I had been in the room up one pair of stairs about four in the afternoon; the sashes were all close shut down then. About eight o'clock the ladies who lodged in the room came home; they could not get in; the door was fastened on the inside; they called to the servant, and the servant found two chairs laid back to back to the door to keep it shut: the servant pushed the door open; I went up with the ladies; we went into the room, and missed a counterpane off the bed in the next room to the dining-room.

Whose counterpane was that? - My master's.

THOMAS CARPMEAL sworn.

I found the counterpane in the garret in the prisoner's house on the 26th in the morning, hanging on a line.

Did Bagnall say any thing about it? - He said it was his.

Prisoner. Whether, when Noon was tried, you said I owned the counterpane to be mine? - The judge did not go on with the evidence, but ordered the man to be acquitted, and tried on the other indictment.

(The counterpane was produced in court.)

Prosecutor. I cannot swear to the counterpane.

To Bull. Do you know that counterpane? - Yes; there are marks of ink on the corner: it is Mr. Howell's counterpane; the same that was lost off the bed the 15th of October; there is a mark across it, made by its hanging on a dirty line, which I know it by.

Did you find the windows open, when you went in at eight o'clock? - One window was quite up as high as it could be.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I am as innocent as the child unborn.

NOT GUILTY of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but guilty of stealing the goods .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-44

238. WILLIAM BRUCE was indicted for stealing five yards of printed callico, value 25 s. the property of Daniel Adams , April 25th .

DANIEL ADAMS sworn.

I am a linen-draper in the Minories . Last Wednesday night, about nine o'clock, I was writing at my desk. I heard the cry of Stop thief! I went out, and met my neighbour, Mr. Jackson, who gave me this linen; I know it to be my property, and that it was taken out of my shop.

CROFT JACKSON sworn.

I am a haberdasher, and live within two doors of Mr. Adams. Between eight and nine o'clock last Wednesday evening, while I was standing at my door, I saw the prisoner running, and two boys after him calling Stop thief! Before he came up to me, he turned off the foot-path, and I saw him throw down this piece of callico just before me; I picked it up, and he was immediately taken. I came back to my own door: Mr. Adams came up and said it was his property.

- FRANKLAND sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Slocombe. Going down the Minories, I saw the prisoner lurking about the prosecutor's door; I stopped to watch him; I saw him make one attempt to go into the shop, but he did not;

but the second time he went in, I saw him come out with a piece of cloth under his coat; I ran after him with the cry of stop thief! I saw him drop the piece, which this gentleman picked up, and he was immediately taken.

( Thomas Taylor confirmed the evidence of the last witness.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-45

239. SAMUEL JACOBS was indicted for stealing a deal box, covered with paper, value 18 d. the property of Alexander Tulloch ; and a silk gown, value 20 s. a silk petticoat, value 10 s. two gauze aprons, value 4 s. a pair of silk slippers, embroidered with silver, value 12 d. the property of Christiana Oliphant , April 17th .

A Witness sworn.

I am fourteen years of age, and am a native of the East-Indies. On the Tuesday before last I was sent by my mistress, Miss Oliphant, from the neighbourhood of Tower-hill, with a box to Mrs. Oliphant's in Cockspur-street, to get some thing; I had two or three errands to do; I set out to go home with the box filled with things at about seven o'clock; I grew tired; I set down my box at Bow-church to rest myself; while I was there, the prisoner came up, and said, How far are you going? I said, only to Tower-hill; he said, he lived in French Ordinary Court (which is in the neighbourhood of Tower-hill) and if I would let him carry the box for me, he would give it me again when he came to his own house. I said I was afraid he would not let me have it again; he said, I might depend upon it I should have it again, and he would carry it safe for me. He took the box, and we went together: we did not go up Lombard-street, which was the nearest way; we went up Cornhill; when we came to Gracechurch-street, he wanted to go up Leadenhall-street; I objected; I said, No; go down Gracechurch-street, that is the nearest way; we went on till we came to the steps at London-street, near Crutched Friars; I went down the steps first; the prisoner, instead of following me, slipped away from me; I sought for him, but could not find him: I then went home; I saw the prisoner again the next day in custody; I immediately knew him, and I am sure he is the man that got the box from me.

Cross Examination.

Had not the box a direction to it? - There was a direction.

MICHAEL LYON sworn.

I am a watchman. Last Tuesday se'nnight, at about eleven at night, I saw the prisoner running along Billiter-lane, with a trunk in his hand; I thought it was a suspicious circumstance, therefore I stopped him; he assured me the trunk belonged to his sister, and wanted to go to the place where his sister lived, but I took him to the watch-house; he endeavoured to get from me into Jewry-street, but I prevented him.

Prisoner. Whether there was not a coach passing, and I ran to avoid it? - There was no coach; the prisoner insisted the box was his sister's.

(The trunk was produced in court by the constable, who opened it.)

ALEXANDER TULLOCH sworn.

The box is my property; I have seen Miss Oliphant wear part of the apparel contained in it; the slippers have her name written inside them.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Coming along I met the boy; he seemed very tired; he asked me to help him carry his box; I carried it for him most part of the way. I was going down the steps at London-street; I happened to miss him; I came back again, and enquired after a black boy; nobody could inform me any thing of him: going across Billiter-lane, somebody called after me, Stop! I thought it was some people playing the fool; as I came into Leadenhall-street, they called Stop! Stop! I stopped presently; they asked me where I

was going; I said to my sister's; and they took me to the watch-house.

(He called four witnesses who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-46

240, 241. ANN CLARKE and ANN SMITH were indicted for stealing six linen handkerchiefs, value 9 s. the property of Samuel Potticary , April 14th .

SAMUEL POTTICARY sworn.

The prisoners came into my shop. Whilst I was serving another customer, they desired John Potticary , a lad in the shop, to shew them some handkerchiefs, which were in the window; he did so. As soon as they were gone out of the shop, the lad said the thin woman had got a bundle of handkerchiefs; I went after them to about three or four doors; I desired them to walk back into the shop; they asked me whether I meant to take their money; I said I did not know they had offered any; I desired them to walk back; I looked particularly that they should not drop the handkerchiefs: when they came into the shop, the thin one went towards the counter; I watched them particularly; I took hold of her, and drew her to the other side of the shop; then the other followed; I told them they had got some handkerchiefs; they said, they had not; one wanted to go away, and said, she would fetch a person to clear her character; I took hold of her to stop her; in searching her cap, a bundle of ribband fell from her head; I took them both to the back part of the shop; by that time John Potticary brought in the handkerchiefs from the door; the prisoners were farther examined; six or seven bundles of ribband were found between the cap and bonnet of one of them: I sent for a constable, and they were sent to the counter.

Cross Examination.

You did not find any thing upon either of them? - No.

JOHN POTTICARY sworn.

On Saturday the 14th of this month, in the afternoon, about three or four o'clock, the two prisoners came into the shop; they asked to look at same black silk handkerchiefs, which lay in the window; my brother bid me reach them; I reached them, and laid them upon several bundles of linen ones that lay upon the counter, and opened them; Clarke laid hold of the two opposite corners from me, and held them over the linen handkerchiefs, while I saw Smith's hand go under, and saw her draw it back again; when it came back, I saw a bundle of handkerchiefs in her hand, and saw her put them into her pocket; she observing that I suspected her, she shook her pocket, as if feeling for money; she took out some silver and a halfpenny or two, and counted it in her hand, and then put it into her pocket again; I said nothing about it then, because I thought she would drop the handkerchiefs, and then say they only dropped off the counter; I let them go out with them, and then told my brother of it; he went after them, and brought them back; I followed them into the shop, and picked up the bundle of handkerchiefs upon the step of the door; but I did not see them dropped.

- SHEPHERD sworn.

On Saturday in the afternoon, the 14th of April, I was out at my door; I saw Mr. Potticary overtake the prisoners; he said to them, I shall be glad if you will step back; I saw they rather changed countenance; Mr. Potticary seemed confused; I went towards Mr. Potticary's shop; I saw Smith go in first, Mr. Potticary followed her, and Clarke followed him; just as she was going into Mr. Potticary's shop, she dropped a parcel of handkerchiefs between the post on her right side and the step of the door; the brother immediately picked them up; the constable came; we took them into the back parlour, and my sister searched them; in one of Clark's pockets there was a remnant of ribband in a brown paper; I looked through the glass door the whole time, when she was stripped, as far as decency would allow; I desired my sister to look under the

crown of her bonnet; Clarke did not seem agreeable to that. When my sister pulled off her bonnet, four whole pieces of ribband were taken out of the crown of her bonnet; one whole piece was taken out of her pocket, and another whole piece she dropped in the shop.

(The prisoners both said they left their defence to their counsel.)

BOTH GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury, before Mr. BARON EYRE .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-47

242. THOMAS NORMANSEL was indicted for feloniously committing a rape on the body of Penelope, the wife of Richard Askew , March 15th .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the pri soner.)

PENELOPE ASKEW sworn.

I am the wife of Richard Askew . My husband is a miniature enamel painter. We live in Coy's Gardens, Tottenham-Court Road : we have lived there three months. The first I knew of the prisoner was about three weeks or a month before the 15th of March. He came to our house to sit for his picture: my husband had been acquainted with him many years. He sat about three times before the 15th of March: my husband told him he was connected with Mr. Parsons, a glass painter at Westminster; that they had a window to finish for Salisbury cathedral, and he could not therefore attend upon him in an afternoon. On the 15th of March my husband waited at home for him till near two o'clock, and then went out; after he was gone, the prisoner came, nobody being at home at Mr. Coy's, which was next door; I was washing in my passage, because they desired me, if any body came, to take in a message for them; there is no other house but that near ours; there was not any body in our house but myself. The street-door was open: Normansel came in, and said, Well, Mrs. Askew, where is Mr. Askew? I said, He was gone to Mr. Parsons's; he walked into the parlour, turned himself round, and said, I want to speak to you; I have got a picture for Mr. Askew to copy my hair from. I took the picture from him; in the interim he went out and fastened the street-door, and came back into the parlour: I was then sitting on a low chair, blowing the fire; he sat down across my lap, and began to pull me about and kiss me; I pulled his hair, and the powder scattered out amazingly about his clothes; he seemed discontented at my behaviour, because I struggled with him, and would not condescend; he got up in a hurry, ran to the window, and let down the curtains, and darkened the room; the curtains were not drawn on one side; then he came and caught fast hold of me again; he pulled me into another chair by the window, and wanted to pull up my petticoats, and he used me very bad; he then said, he had ill-used me, and if I would give him a comb to settle his hair, he would go away; I refused to get him a comb; but, upon his pressing me, I said, If he would let me shut the door, and fasten him into the parlour, to prevent his following me, I would get him a comb; he swore he would not use me ill, but that the door I should not shut; I told him, then I would not bring him a comb; he insisted on my bringing him one; I then said, I would go backwards into the kitchen, and get him one, thinking to fasten myself in, for we have no back-door; I was going by the stairs to the kitchen; he pulled me back, and desired me to go up stairs, and he would not follow me nor hurt me. Says I, Mr. Normansel, what do you mean? Do you mean to use me worse than you have done? He said, If you will bring me a comb, I will not molest you; but if you do not, I will make you suffer for it, for I will not go out in this situation: I said, Will you swear that you will not follow me, nor ill-use me? He said, no; he would not; but if I did not bring him a comb, he would not go out of the house. Then I said, I will bring you a comb, as you have so solemnly sworn you will not molest me. I went up stairs, by his forcing me to go up stairs.

Court. Persuading you? - He forced me to the bottom of the stairs; I went up; I did not know what to do; I was no sooner at

the top of the stairs; then he ran up after me; he had let me get to the top of the stairs; I turned, and ran against him, and insisted upon his going down stairs; he caught fast hold of me round the waist, and would not go, and I could not force him; he took me by main force to the bed-room door, which is about two yards from the top of the stairs; I laid hold on each side of the door, to prevent his taking me in, and cried Murder! I said what did he mean by using me in that manner? I said, If you use me ill, Normansel, I'll punish you for it; he said, If I am sure to be hanged for it, I will have my ends. He unclenched my hands, by force, from the door; he had his left hand round my waist, and with his right hand struck my left hand from the door, and loosened my hold from the door; then he took me off my legs, and rushed with me to the foot of the bed; then I cried Murder! he gave me, with his right hand, a stroke on the breast, and I lost my breath for some minutes. I had hold of the bed-posts; he threw himself against me, and threw me down on the bed; in falling, my left hand fell under me: it was a very good bed; being a light bed, I was just smothered with his weight, and I cried out, Murder! Askew! that is my husband: he said, D - n Askew, I don't care if he was here, for I am determined, if I lose my life by it, to have what I want: then he laid his whole weight down upon me; he deprived me of my breath, and then he had his ends of me; I was incapable of being of any assistance to myself. In struggling with him I turned from one side to the other, and crossed my legs, as much as I could, to prevent him; when he found me so very much gone, he laid his hand upon my breast; I suppose he thought he had killed me by his weight, and his smothering me to make me hold my tongue: then with his knees he began to get my legs open; he had the weight of his body down upon me, as much as he could, and held me fast; he got my left hand clenched in his left hand, behind my back; my hand being under me, he had full liberty with his right hand, and he unloosened his breeches, and had carnal connections with me, against my inclination and will.

Did he enter your body? - Yes, he did.

How long did you continue in that situation? - I suppose about five minutes; then he got off me, and I was quite incapable of getting up; he pulled me up by main force off the bed, and I fainted away, at the foot of the bed; I cried very much, and that brought me to myself a great deal. He said to me, Mrs. Askew, for God's sake, have mercy upon me: I told him I was determined to have no mercy on him, for his ill behaviour to me; he said, Well, then I am ruined. He took me off the bed, and rushed me to the room door, and desired I would go down stairs, and he ran down before me: I wanted to go out at the street door, but he stood between it and me, and made me go into the parlour. I was excessively ill; I sat down in the chair where he had ill used me before: I went up stairs; I cried very much, and he was begging at the same time that I would not acquaint my husband with it, for if I did, he was ruined; he made use of the same expression down stairs as well as above; I told him I really would inform my husband the very instant I saw him, or could get any person to fetch him; and would have him punished as the Laws of the Land would admit; he said, Mrs. Askew, you are not a bit the worse; Mr. Askew will know nothing at all of it; I will always be your friend: he said I never should rue it. I told him I always would, for I had no notion of a man like Mr. Askew, who had always behaved like a gentleman to me, to use him ill in his abstence. - While we were in the parlour, (I believe it was after five o'clock) a little boy, a nephew of mine, came and knocked at the door; I was going to the door; Normansel ran to the door, and prevented the boy from coming in; he bid the boy go and bring some beer; I said Bill, I will have no beer; Normansel said to me, D - n you, don't look back, for if you do, I am ruined; for he is a cunning arch dog, and will see you are crying, and have been very ill used, and there is nobody here but me, and I shall be condemned directly: he compelled me to sit down in a chair; he kept the boy out of the room; he desired me not to make a noise, or say any thing, if I did, it would be worse for me: the boy said, My Aunt never drinks porter; he said, Bring a pint of porter, and a pint of two-penny;

so the boy ran away, as hard as he could, for the beer. I forgot to mention, when I sat in the chair in the parlour, that he put money into my lap, and I threw it out; he said, Married women wanted money sometimes unknown to their husbands; that was after I came down stairs, before the boy came. The boy went to order the beer, but it was never brought; I said, Normansel, I desire you will not confine me in this room; when I insisted strongly on getting out, finding the boy was coming to my assistance, and he saw I would not be put upon by him, then he opened the door, and went out; I thought he was gone; I ran to the door to call the boy; I saw the little boy coming, and said, Don't bring any beer, Normansel is gone, and he has used me very ill; the boy was at a distance with the beer; Normansel ran to me, from the Grotto, which is at the front of Coy's house, and pulled me back into my house, and said to the boy, Go and bring me a pint of porter, you dog; and the boy ran and brought the pint of porter; while the boy was gone for the beer, Normansel said to me, you had best not say any thing to this boy; I insist upon it; or it will be worse for you: he said, he would not let him in till I had given him a promise that I would not say anything to my husband, nor to any body, about what had happened.

Did you promise him before you let the boy in? - No, I did not; the boy insisted upon coming in; the door was not, I believe, quite fast, only upon the latch; Normansel held me when he saw the boy coming; he said, If you say a word now, it will be the worse for you, for I will go and fasten all the doors, and confine you in, and the boy will think you are gone out: when the boy came, he stood at the parlour door, and took the beer from him, and I durst not stir, to look back, or to speak; the boy staid playing about the door, and in the passage. The boy had no notion he was such a villain as he is. The prisoner drank of the beer, and set it down on the table, and said, Good bye, Mrs. Askew, and went out. Then the little boy came in, and said, Lord, Aunt, what is the matter with you? with that Normansel ran in again, and said, Mrs. Askew, tell Askew I will be here to-morrow, at half past four, if not at two, and to wait for me; I will come certainly at that time; I said, Then, you villain, you may depend upon it, I will acquaint Mr. Askew of your behaviour; the boy was in the room, and heard me say this; then he went away directly, and left the boy with me.

How old is the boy? - I believe eleven years of age.

Is he here? - No, they threatened to send him to sea. Mr. Eccles swore he would stick at nothing.

(The counsel for the prisoner desired Mr. Eccles might be called into court; Mr. Eccles accordingly came into court.)

Court. Where is the boy? - I cannot tell; I believe they have sent him away; I cannot positively say they have, but they threatened the boy, and said they would send him to sea: the boy has been gone from me three weeks; I was not at home when he went away; my husband sent me into the country, as he said, because of the threatenings of Mr. Eccles. I have enquired after the boy; my husband sent a letter to a blacksmith, at Colnbrook, where the boy had been before he came to me; and at my sister's, and one Crowley's, in St. Giles's; but have never been able to hear any thing of him. I left the boy, and went to my sister, Elizabeth Macartey 's; I told the boy not to stir from the place; but, if his uncle came home, to tell him I was gone to my sister's, and to send him after me; and if he did not come to me, I should be home as soon as possible; that was between five and six o'clock. My sister lives in Parker's-street, Drury-Lane; she was ironing when I went in; I sat down in a chair by her; there was nobody with her that I recollect; she asked me what was the matter with me; I was not able to speak, I was so fatigued: I told her there was a man, one Normansel, who employed Mr. Askew to take his picture, came to our house within this hour and half, and has used me so ill, that I am not able to stand or go, with any propriety: I said, absolutely, he is more like a beast than a man; his treatment has been so vile to me, I cannot express it: she axed me, What has he done to you? I said, he has

used me in a very gross bad manner, he has pulled and hauled me about, and he absolutely deserves hanging: she said, I would bring an action against him; I said, an action is nothing, but, if the law takes place, I can hang him; for he has forced me, and lain with me, against my inclination. I said Betty, what had I best to do? I am determined to go to some justice, and complain against this man; but my husband not being at home, what can I do? If Mr. Askew comes home, I said, had I best tell him? for I am afraid of my life, for Mr. Askew is a man that absolutely does not like to have any such thing happen. If Mr. Askew does not condescend, and use me well, if I can do it of my own accord, I will go to a justice, if I am sure to want bread. She said, by all means, acquaint Mr. Askew of it. My husband staid out all that night. I staid at my sister's about an hour and an half. I went the next day to Mr. Parsons, to see for my husband; when I returned, which was three o'clock, he was come home, and was drunk; my sister was dressing some fish for dinner: he was very drunk; he went up stairs, and went to bed in his clothes: he lay four or five hours; then he got up; and I told him what had happened: it was too late to go before a magistrate then. I sent for my sister the next morning, that was Saturday; then my husband, my sister, and I went before Justice Wright, in Bow-Street, and obtained a warrant; and the prisoner was taken up the same day, and brought-before him, and committed.

On her cross examination, she said, the boy was not before the justice, nor had he been examined by any person: That her husband said, after such a heinous crime, and such a disagreeable affair, it was impossible ever to think of living with her; but that no instructions were given to Mr. Pitman to draw up articles of separation between her and her husband; nor was any mention made of getting money of the prisoner, and her having half of it settled upon her; that there was a talk about money, but that she never meant to have a farthing of his money; that she never said, money was wanting, nor did she propose any sum, nor her husband in her presence: that when she was under the prisoner, on the bed, she sometimes got her right hand at liberty, and defended herself with it, as well as she could, and slapped his face; that with his left hand he kept hold of her left hand; that he came to her house at four o'clock, and the whole of the transaction was over by five o'clock. - That she and her husband had been confined, she first said in the King's Bench Prison, but afterwards she said it was in Newgate, for false swearing, and an assault. That there had been talk of a separation between her and her husband, before this; but that she never meant it sincerely. That when the prisoner forced her to go up stairs for a comb, she had hardly got to the top of the stairs, before he came after her. That the room door was open, but she did not go into the room before he came up. Being pressed for a reason why she did not go in, and lock the door, and call out of the window for help, she said, that he followed her up the stairs, but did not lay hold of her till she was at the top; that, as there was a bed in the room, she was afraid to go into the room, for fear he should ill use her. That she believed she did say before the justice, that she went into the room to fetch the comb, and he met her as she came out; but that she did not recollect what she then said, she was in such a fright, and was afraid of her life; but she now said, she did not go into the room, nor get him a comb at all.

ELIZABETH MACARTEY sworn.

I am a widow, and live in Parker's street, Drury-lane. My sister, the prosecutrix, came to me on the 15th of March, between five and six o'clock; I was ironing some linen; I thought by her looks she seemed very unhappy, as if she had been crying; I asked her what was the matter with her; she told me, that about four o'clock that afternoon, Normansel came to her house, and asked for Mr. Askew; that she was washing in the passage, with the door open; that she told him Mr. Askew was not at home; that Normansel went into the parlour, took a picture out of his pocket, and called Mrs. Askew to him, and said, Mrs. Askew, give this picture to Mr. Askew, to take a copy from it to do my hair by; that she went into the parlour to take the picture from him, and she turned about to settle the fire under the

water to make it hot for her washing; that he seemed as if he had gone out at the street-door, and she thought he was gone away, but instead of that he made fast the street-door, and came back again into the parlour; that she was sitting in a chair, and he sat down in her lap, and began to be very rude to her; put his hands down her bosom, attempted to put his hands up her petticoats, and kissed her; and at last she forced herself off the chair, and he dragged her back to another chair that was on the other side of the parlour; that she struggled with him some time, slapped his face, and pulled his hair; that when she did that, he said, Mrs. Askew, I am sorry for what I have done; and if you will give me a comb to settle my hair, I will not offend you any farther; that she said she would give him none; that then he let down the window curtains, and made the place dark, and insisted upon her bringing him a comb; that she persisted against it, and said she did not know where there was one; that he swore if she did not give him a comb, he would use her with all the violence imaginable; but if she did, he would not; for how did she think he could go out in that manner? that she ran to the door, and he ran after her, and pulled her back to the bottom of the stairs, and swore she must bring him a comb, or he would use her with all the severity imaginable, and pushed her towards the stairs with all his force: she said she went up stairs to get this comb for him; that by the time she got at the landing of the stairs, he followed her; that when she found him following her, she ran down a step or two of the stairs back again to meet him, but that he forcibly pushed her up the stairs before him, and took her in his arms towards the room-door, and that she laid hold of both the jambs of the door with her hands; that he took her round the waist in his arms, and squeezed her, she said, to that degree, that she was incapable of helping herself; then he forced her into the room, and as far as the foot of the bed; that she cried out, Murder! but he gave her a blow on the breast that hindered her crying out any more; that she called her husband, and he said, D - n you and Askew too; then she said, I will hang you, if there was no more men in the world; he said, I will use you as I like, if I was sure I should be hanged directly. This, upon my oath, she told me; every word in my own house. That she laid hold of the bed-post with one of her hands, and that he gave her arm a blow with his hand, and knocked her hand off the bed-post, and threw her down upon the bed, got her right hand under him, and her other hand under her back, in one of his hands; and by that means, in that form, by struggling some time upon the bed, that he forcibly and against her will lay with her. She sat down, and told me directly every word I have mentioned; there was no other conversation in the world: I went before the justice, and told this story.

(On her cross-examination, she said she told her sister she was a great fool if she did not prosecute him according to law; that she understood at first that he had laid with her; that she shewed marks of violence to her; that the next day she went to her sister's about twelve o'clock, to see if Mr. Askew was come home; that she found her sister at home; that her sister left her in the house, and went to see after her husband; that he came home about half past two, very fuddled; that the dinner was dressed, but he could eat none; that he said he was sick, and she persuaded him to lie down; she said she was in the house from about twelve o'clock till he came in; that her sister came in about half an hour after; that she could not tell what they had for dinner that day; that whatever it was, she did not cook it; but that it was boiled meat; that it was on the fire when she came in; afterwards she said that it was not on the fire when she came in, but her sister set it on; that she did not know that it was fish; that her sister took the dinner up when she came in; that she never gave her sister any advice till she had told her the whole story, and knew what the prisoner had done to her.)

The Prosecutrix called into court.

Court. When you f irst went to your sister's house, you said you was very much

confused, and did not immediately tell her all that had happened to you? - No; I did not.

You told her at first that the man had pulled you about, and used you ill; what advice did she give you? - She said, I would not be pulled about and ill-used by any body; enter an action against him; I said, An action! if justice takes place, I can hang him. Hang him! said she; I would do my endeavour, as far as justice, to punish any body.

Then you told her he had lain with you against your consent?

How soon after that was it before you told her all the particulars? - The next day, I believe.

When did you shew her the marks of violence that were upon your person? - The next day.

When you went to look for your husband, your sister was then coming to your house? - Yes.

What did you desire her to get ready for dinner? - Some fish.

Who was to buy the fish? - She and I went out together to buy the fish. This is truth, upon my oath: she and I bought the fish together; I just stopped and paid for the fish.

Before you went into your own house? - Yes; and I desired her to dress it, while I went to seek for my husband.

Did the do as you desired her? - Yes.

Was it fryed or boiled? - Boiled.

What fish was it? - Barrelled cod: we had eggs and potatoes with it; she got them ready too.

(The counsel for the crown gave up the prosecution.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810425-48

243, 244. CATHARINE EVANS and VIRTUE WICKS were indicted for stealing two cotton gowns, value 12 s. a cotton bed-gown, value 6 s. a lawn apron, value 3 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 5 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. a stuff petticoat, value 2 s. a silk bonnet, value 3 s. four linen caps, value 2 s. a pair of linen sleeves, value 6 d. ten yards of black silk lace, value 10 s. and a yard of black silk mode, value 4 s. the property of Esther Haynes ; a looking-glass, in a gilt frame, value 6 d. a brass candlestick, value 6 d. and a flat iron, value 3 d. the property of Catharine Cox , widow , March 30th .

ESTHER HAYNES sworn.

I lost the things charged as my property in the indictment, on the 30th of March. I went out about nine o'clock in the morning on the 30th of March, and left them, some in my box, and others on my bed. When I went out, I locked my room, and left no person in it. The prisoners lodged in the next room to me. Between five and six in the afternoon, I was fetched home by Mrs. Harvey. I found my door unlocked, and my box was broken open. I had the key of the door in my pocket. Every thing I had was stolen, except what I had on my back. They were the same night at the White Swan, in Whitecross-street. Virtue Wicks had my bonnet, cap, and shift on; and Catharine Evans had on my green petticoat: they were rather in liquor, and were very abusive. The next day, before the justice, I told them, if they would confess where my things were, I would forgive them; and then they owned it.

THOMAS JAQUES sworn.

I had a warrant, and went in search of the prisoners: I found them at the White Swan, in Whitecross-street. Virtue Wicks had a bundle of things, and a green petticoat; Evans had one shift and a bonnet: Virtue Wicks had one belonging to the prosecutrix.

(They were produced in Court, and deposed to by the Prosecutrix.)

Wicks. She has a right to be sure, because she stole it. All the spite Jaques has against us is because we would not let him have a watch that was stole some time ago. Please, my Lord, to ask her where she bought the lace and mode. - I bought it at my basket, on a Saturday, of a gentleman's servant who buys oranges of me.

( John Burgess and William Clegg , two pawnbrokers, produced two gowns pawned by the prisoners, which were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

WICKS's DEFENCE.

I have nothing to say farther than what I've said already.

EVANS's DEFENCE.

I have nothing farther to say.

BOTH GUILTY .

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-49

244. JOHN RUGLASS was indicted for stealing a cotton handkerchief, value 12 d. the property of James Dixon , February 28 .

JAMES DIXON sworn.

Passing through John-street , in the Minories , on the 28th of February, about four in the afternoon, a gentleman stopped me, and told me my pocket had been picked. I had used my handkerchief not two minutes before; I found it missing. I pursued the prisoner; I was informed he had picked my pocket; I overtook him in the Minories; I stopped him, and took my handkerchief out of his pocket.

- WARREN sworn.

I am a constable; I saw the handkerchief taken out of his pocket.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I did not steal the handkerchief; I picked it up in the street, and put it into my pocket.

GUILTY .

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-50

245, 246. CHARLES GRIFFITHS , otherwise ALLEN , and SAMUEL TAYLOR , were indicted for stealing 27 lb. of cheese, value 7 s. the property of James Clark , April 11 .

(The prosecutor was called, but not appearing, the court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810425-51

247. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for stealing a piece of shalloon, containing 29 yards, value 25 s. the property of John Fisher and William Andrews , April 9 .

(When the prisoner was set to the bar, to take his trial, he confessed the crime of which he was indicted, and begged for the mercy of the court.)

GUILTY .

[No punishment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-52

248. MARY COXEN was indicted for stealing 9 s. in monies numbered , the property of Charles Smith .

CHARLES SMITH sworn.

I am a Jeweller . On Easter Tuesday, at near two in the morning, I met the prisoner in Golden-lane ; she asked me to go home with her; she directly put her hand to my breeches pocket, and catched at my watch, but she did not take it; then I felt in my breeches pocket, and missed my money, which was 9 s. it consisted of a half-crown piece, 6 d. and 6 s. Directly I called the watch; the prisoner then called out, and a man came up; and as soon as the watchman came up, two more men came up; I gave the watchman charge of her, for robbing me of 9 s. The men that came up said, Do not go to hurt the poor woman: when I told them what she had done, they said, You can do nothing with her; do not go to hurt her. I perceived her slip something under her cloak to one of those men; I suppose the half crown, for I did not see it afterwards. One of these men went into the watch house, and we found him whispering to the officer of the night. When the prisoner came there, she pulled out her money.

You was sober? - Yes.

Did you agree to go home with her? - No.

Prisoner. Did I attack you, or you me? - She attacked me: I did not speak to her first; she met me, and laid hold of me.

- WING sworn.

I am a watchman in Red-cross Street, Cripplegate. About two in the morning I heard the cry of Watch! I saw the prosecutor and prisoner; the prosecutor said she had

robbed him. When I was taking her to the round-house, I saw three men men at a distance: they came up to her; and she slipped something out of her hand into one of their hands, and he put it into his breeches-pocket. I asked him, what he had got? He said, Nothing; and slipped into the watch-house. When I came in, he was leaning over the table: he said, What are you going to do with this woman? The prosecutor gave charge: the officer would not take charge; he said, Every body must live by their calling.

What day was this? - On Easter Tuesday, the 17th. The officer's name is Coverly. The prosecutor would not go, without his charge being taken. Another person came in, and said it was wrong not to take charge of her; and he took charge of her.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was searched, and there was nothing found upon me; I am innocent of it.

To Prosecutor. Where do you live? - In Cradle-court, Red-cross street.

(She called one witness, who gave her a good character.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-53

249. EDWARD ROBINSON was indicted for stealing a trunk covered with leather, value 3 s. a woollen cloth coat, value 20 s. and three linen shirts, value 15 s. the property of John Fairfax ; a cotton counterpane, value 4 s. and a woollen cloth coat, value 4 s. the property of John Harding ; a pair of leather breeches, value 7 s. the property of Solomon Temple ; in the dwelling-house of John Wardell , March 6th .

JOHN GODFREY sworn.

I am a constable of Bishopsgate ward. Upon the 6th of March I was sent for to Mr. Harding's the Green Dragon, in Bishopsgate-street: they gave me charge of the prisoner; they charged him with taking a gentleman's things out of a room, and a counterpane off the bed belonging to the landlord; the prisoner owned this box and this basket (producing them); I asked him where the key of the box was; he said he had it in his pocket; he gave it to me; I opened the box, and found in the upper part of it the counterpane: Mr. Harding told me his name was upon it: I found also a pair of stockings belonging to Mr. Fairfax. When the counterpane was found, he said he was mad and drunk. The next day Mr. Fairchild said he should be glad to see him; I went with him to the compter; I then found this pocket-book ( producing it) under the prisoner's thigh, in the inside of his breeches; it contained fourteen pawnbroker's duplicates: I went to one Mr. Brady, a pawnbroker in Whitechapel, where I found a pair of buckskin breeches: none of the pawnbrokers are here. When I went the next day with Mr. Fairchild, who was his townsman, he told me where the things were, belonging to Mr. Fairfax.

Was any promise made to him to induce him to confess that? - No; he desired, as he was his townsman, he would tell him where the things were, and told him he would go to Mr. Fairfax, to see if he could do any thing for him: he told Fairchild and me, that if we would go to the Dolphin inn, in Bishopsgate-street, there he had left all Mr. Fairfax's things; I went there, and found this box (producing it), containing the things belonging to Mr. Fairfax: I took the goods before the Alderman at Guildhall; Mr. Fairfax there deposed to them: they were left at Mr. Philpot's.

(The goods were all produced in court, and deposed to by the several prosecutors.)

- PHILPOT sworn.

I keep the Dolphin inn. The prisoner came to my house on Monday the 5th of March, and bespoke a bed: we sat up till half after twelve at night: he did not come that night: he brought the trunk produced in court on Monday the 6th of March. The next morning the constable came to enquire after these things, and took them away with him.

JOHN HARDING sworn.

I keep the Green Dragon. The counterpane has on it John Harding , Green Dragon Inn. I can swear to Mr. Fairfax's trunk; his name is upon it in two places. I was present when the prisoner was examined before the Alderman: he did not say any thing; only he wanted to be sent for a soldier.

SOLOMON TEMPLE sworn.

Two days after the prisoner was taken into custody, I missed a pair of breeches: the prisoner said they were in pawn. I went with the constable, and found them there.

Godfrey. They were pawned at Brady's No. 82, Whitechapel; the duplicate of them was found in his pocket-book.

(The breeches were produced in court, and deposed to by Temple.)

Prisoner. I am guilty of the charge.

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 30 s.

Tried by the Second London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Fine. See summary.] [Military/Naval duty. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-54

250. JOHN HARDEN was indicted for stealing a wicker flat, value 3 s. and one hundred and fifty eggs, value 7 s. the property of Richard Davis , April 6th .

RICHARD DAVIS sworn.

I am book-keeper to the Bell inn, in Warwick-lane. On Friday morning, the 6th of April, between three and four o'clock, I was unloading the waggon at the corner of Hart-street, Warwick-lane, Newgate-street : I had put fifteen flats of butter, and three flats of eggs, at the corner of the street, as I usually do; I had a flat of meat I was going to carry to one of the salesmen; the things till delivered are in my care, and I am answerable for them: as I was going round one corner of the street, I saw the prisoner come running round the other out of the market; I had some suspicion, and ran after him; I was within about ten yards of him, and saw him take a flat, the top flat; he ran away with it immediately; I ran after him, and overtook him; I caught him by the collar; upon that he dropped the flat: I saw it opened afterwards; it contained 150 eggs.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was going to market; a man asked me to earn a groat by carrying this flat to the Mansion-house: as soon as Davis laid hold of me, the man that put it on my back ran away.

To Davis. Had the waggoner any directions to send away any things in your absence? - No; I always do it.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-55

251. PATRICK CROCKAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Ivey , on the 18th of March , about the hour of seven in the night, and stealing a silk gown, value 5 s. a stuff petticoat, value 5 s. three dimity bed-gowns, value 30 s. a coloured linen bed-gown, 5 s. a pair of striped linen pockets, value 3 s. eight muslin aprons, value 4 l. seventeen worked muslin handkerchiefs, value 40 s. three linen caps, value 6 s. two plain linen caps, value 2 s. nine linen aprons, value 9 s. a striped dimity pocket, value 6 s. twelve shirts, value 40 s. a linen stock, value 2 s. two linen table-cloths, value 2 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 20 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. two linen handkerchiefs, value 4 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. three linen shifts, value 6 s. four pair of linen shift-sleeves, value 3 s. a dimity stomacher, value 6 d. and a silk purse, value 4 s. the property of the said John Ivey , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN IVEY sworn.

I live in Leather-lane . On Sunday the 18th of March, at about half past seven o'clock at night, I caught the prisoner in my house, as he was coming into the kitchen where we were sitting. He had a candle in his hand: Mr. Braly and Mr. Brooks were with me: they came there to sit with me, because we suspected my house had been attempted before. The prisoner came as far as the door: we had a light in the kitchen; we heard a little noise about a quarter of an hour before, but we did not go to see what it was. When the prisoner came to the kitchen-door, we jumped up, and took him in the passage; upon which one or two men ran away. We found the street-door open at that time: they had opened it, for I had locked it about seven o'clock.

Had you taken the key out? - I had not taken the key out, nor indeed locked the door; it was only upon the single spring-lock; I suppose they got in by opening the door with a picklock-key. The kitchen-door had been kept shut; somebody opened it; we jumped up, and catched the prisoner in the passage near the door; there was an hair-cloth upon the passage, which I suppose prevented our hearing him when he came in. We picked up the scabbard of a cutlass in the passage: the prisoner was searched, but no arms were found upon him; but we found a picklock-key in his pocket, and a skrew-driver knife: there were three or four locks picked up-stairs; and we found the things mentioned in the indictment in the passage, in a bag as they now are.

(The goods mentioned in the indictment were produced in court by James Lee the constable, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

When we went up stairs, we found the drawers open, and entirely empty. The prisoner was brought into the kitchen; at first he appeared much frightened, and could not speak; he was in a faint sweat; he asked for a glass of water, which was given him; then he said, he heard a noise in the passage, and came in to see what was the matter: the next morning he said, he came in to avoid a press-gang.

(The witness, upon his cross-examination, said the first noise they heard, they judged to be the opening of the door, for they never heard it shut again; and for what he knew, it might remain open all that time, a quarter of an hour; that they found a piece of burnt coal in the passage, and a burnt match upon the stairs.)

( William Braly and John Brooks confirmed the evidence of John Ivey .)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I was coming by Leather-lane, in the afternoon, about seven or eight o'clock; some fellows ran by me with cutlasses, and there was a noise; I found the door open; I stepped in; upon which these men took hold of me by the neck, and dragged me along a long kitchen; they frightened me; I did not know what they meant; in a quarter of an hour after, they brought in a bag of clothes, and said I was up stairs; one of the men said he left the door open on purpose to catch somebody.

To Ivey. Did you say you left the door open on purpose to catch people?

When the kitchen door was open, Brooks jumped up and said, You are the gentleman we are waiting for.

Are you sure the street-door was s hut, and the bolt of the lock shut? - Yes; I am quite sure it was shut; I pulled it to. There is a passage goes to a neighbour's.

Does not the door of that passage generally stand open? - Yes; but I am certain the passage-door was shut, because I was at the door at six o'clok, and shut it when Mr. Braly came to me.

It might be opened afterwards for what you know? - Yes.

What state was the back-door of your own house in? - I am sure it was barred.

Jury. Was it usual for you to leave your house on Sunday? - No.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-56

252. JAMES MAHEN was indicted for stealing, on the 31st of March , three gold shirt-buckles, value 12 s. eight stone shirt-buckles set in silver, value 12 s. a silver stone sleeve-button, value 2 s. a silver seal, value 3 s. the property of James Wright .

JAMES WRIGHT sworn.

I am a jeweller in East Smithfield . My shop shew-glass was robbed on the 31st of March, about half after eight in the evening. I was at the next door; I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the mob picking up some of the goods the thief had dropped; I saw the prisoner in custody.

- BURDEN sworn.

I live opposite the prosecutor. I heard the glass break, and saw the prisoner take the things out of the shew-glass, and run away; I called out Stop thief!

- FERGUSON sworn.

I heard the cry of Stop thief! a person seized the prisoner, and delivered him to my care: all the things mentioned in the indictment were taken out of his pocket.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I heard the cry of Stop thief! I ran after the person; I fell down; this man came and picked me up, and said I was one of his companions: the gentleman took these things out of the fire place, and said I had them in my pocket.

(The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-57

253. MARY PRICE was indicted for stealing, on the first of April , two half guineas and two shillings, in monies numbered , the property of John Spence .

JOHN SPENCE sworn.

I am a cordwainer . I was coming from a customer of mine at half past ten at night. At the beginning of Holborn, I met with the prisoner; she asked me if I would give her a glass of wine, or any thing; I had no objection; we went into the Vine Tavern; I had eighteen-pennyworth of punch, and in a few moments I catched her hand in my breeches-pocket, and she pulled out two or three shillings, but she returned them to me again; she pleaded poverty and distress: she said she had a child, upon which I gave her one of the shillings back again; I put my hand into my pocket, and put the remainder of my money into my coat-pocket out of my breeches-pocket; in a few minutes after, I put my hand into my coat-pocket, and missed my money, which was two half guineas in gold, and twenty-one shillings in silver; I charged her with taking it; she strongly denied it; she said she had no more than that one shilling I had given her. I called the landlord; the landlord told her she had better deliver it me, for she had been guilty of such crimes in his house before; she still declared she had not; I then charged the watch with her; I took her to the watch-house, and charged the constable of the night, John Godfrey , with her; he found two half guineas, and twenty-one shillings in silver, upon her.

JOHN GODFREY sworn.

I searched the prisoner; I found two half-guineas and this silver (producing them).

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

That money is my own property; I had it when I went into the house; I had been to see my nurse, to pay her, that afternoon, for nursing my child; she was not at home; I had it in my pocket-handkerchief; the man saw I had it. He gave me first a shilling, and then half a crown. I said I would not have any connection with him for all the world, for he had the evil in his neck; then he pushed me; I pushed him again; he said he had met with such bitches as me before, and abused me.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-58

254. ELIZABETH WATKINS was indicted for stealing a cloth cloak, value 4 s. a silk bonnet, value 1 s. four yards of blue shalloon, value 4 s. the property of Michael Macdonach , March 12th .

(The prosecutor was called, but did not appear.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810425-59

255. WILLIAM COURT was indicted for that he, in the king's highway, in and upon Edward Williams feloniously did make an assault, putting him in corporal fear and danger of his life, and stealing from his person a silver watch, value 4 l. the property of the said Edward, March 6th .

EDWARD WILLIAMS sworn.

Upon the 6th of March, between nine and ten at night, I was going home to Little Wild-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields, from the Maze, on the other side of the water, being a little intoxicated: two men and a woman came up to me; one of the men was tall, the other short and stout; they said, Sir, you seem to be very much in liquor; which way are you going? I said I was going home to Little Wild-street; they said, you are going the wrong way, and they took me down Water-lane: there I was knocked down, and my watch taken from me. The next morning I went to the Public Office in Bow-street, and lodged a complaint, and advertised it on the Saturday following in the Gazetteer. Upon the 5th of this month I was sent for to the Office; there I saw my watch; it was stopped by the pawnbroker: I cannot swear to the prisoner.

ELEANOR SMITH sworn.

I live at No. 9, in Heydon-street: the prisoner came to me, the morning he was apprehended, and asked me to pawn that watch; he said he wanted clothes more than money: the pawnbroker stopped it, and sent me for the prisoner; I went and fetched him: he was taken into custody, and carried before the justice: the pawnbroker has got the watch; I should not know it if I was to see it again: the prisoner had been in service; I did not know but he might have a watch or two.

PERCIVAL PHILLIPS sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner; he told me he came from on board a ship, and bought the watch of a soldier in the fields from Deptford.

( John Edward , the pawnbroker, was called; but not appearing, the Court ordered his recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-60

256. ELIZABETH CRAMPTON was indicted for stealing nineteen yards of thread lace, value 20 s. the property of Jarvis Chambers , William Langston , and Luke Hall , privately in their shop , April 20th .

(The Prosecutors were called, but not appearing, the Court ordered their recognizance to be estreated.)

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810425-61

257. ANN THOMAS was indicted for stealing a silver watch, value 40 s. a steel chain, value 1 s. a metal chain, value 6 d. and a shilling, in monies numbered, the property of David Bartley , privily from his person , April 2d .

The prisoner being charged with stealing the watch privily from the prosecutor's person, and it appearing upon the evidence to be a forcible taking, which was not the offence described in the indictment, she was found

NOT GUILTY.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-62

258. ANN PARTRIDGE was indicted for stealing twenty-four yards of cotton, value 40 s. eight yards of silk, value 20 s. two silk gowns, value 30 s. two silk gowns, value 40 s. and two yards of callico, value 3 s. the property of Robert Rich , in the dwelling-house of the said Robert , Feb. 26th .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.)

ROBERT RICH sworn.

I am a taylor in Bunhill-row : my wife is a mantua-maker. The things mentioned in the indictment were lost out of the house; we suspected the prisoner, and had her taken up.

ELIZABETH RICH sworn.

I am a mantua-maker, and am the wife of the last witness. On the 26th of February, about five or six o'clock in the afternoon, the several things mentioned in the indictment were lying on the table in the parlour. I was at that time employed in washing. At about six o'clock, I went down stairs to iron; I did not come up again till one o'clock; then the things mentioned in the indictment were gone. The prisoner lodged in the house: we had a good opinion of her. She had been out between the hours of six and eight: she came back again, and was backwards and forwards in the kitchen, and remained by the kitchen fire, till I had done my ironing. She came up with me to go to bed: when I came into the parlour, I missed all the work. I was in great distress, on account of losing things which were not my own. All the lodgers came down, and endeavoured to pacify me. The next morning the prisoner came down, and said, Nobody

will blame you for it; and she said, she would be one of the first to help make up the loss. I said I would go to all the pawnbrokers: the prisoner set down the things I had lost. I went to a pawnbroker's, who had taken in a piece of silk. I did not suspect the prisoner at that time. The next day the prisoner went out, and took the key of her room with her. I expected she was to return that night; but not returning, I began to suspect her; I had the door of the room opened; and I missed the pillow bier off the pillow, and two flat irons out of the room. Then I suspected her: I went in search after her, but could not find her; at last I heard she cohabited at a fortune-teller's in Kingstand Road. I found her there three weeks after, with a silk gown on her back, which I had to turn: I was charged a guinea and a half for it. I took a constable with me, and we took her up and carried her before Justice Blackborow. First of all she owned to the officer, where she had pawned the things: in my presence, and in the presence of Mr. Bowman, she owned the things were pawned at five different pawnbrokers, and the officer took down the pawnbrokers' names. I asked what she had done with my black silk gown; she said she had lost it: I found it since at her lodgings, and I have it here to produce.

THOMAS BULL sworn.

I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner next door to a fortune-teller's in Kingsland Road, down an alley. I went in; I found her behind the door: Mrs. Rich came in, and said, that was the woman who had robbed her, and she would swear to the gown she had upon her back: the prisoner desired me not to expose her: I bid her come away quietly, and we came along arm in arm. I asked her to tell me where the things were pledged; she said she would tell me nothing till we came into an house; we went into the sign of Alderman Crosby's Head: I took her into a room, and there she told us the different places the things were pawned at, and I put it down in writing.

Did she acknowledge she had robbed Mrs. Rich? - Yes; and said, she was sorry for it.

WILLIAM BOWMAN sworn.

I went with the constable to Kingsland Road. We found the prisoner at a fortune-teller's, and took her away. Mrs. Rich owned to the gown she had on her back.

(The several pawnbrokers produced divers articles mentioned in the indictment, which were deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I have no defence to make, farther than that the prosecutrix offered to forgive me if I would say any thing about the things, and offered to make it up for money. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

(The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave her a good character.)

GUILTY ( Death .)

(She was humbly recommended by the Jury to his Majesty's mercy.)

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-63

259. WILLIAM OWEN was indicted for stealing four guineas, six half-guineas, and sixpence, in monies numbered; an inland bill of exchange, value 276 l. 5 s. 0 d. and a bank post bill, value 20 l. the property of James Neale and Joseph Wright , in the dwelling-house of the said James and Joseph; the respective sums, payable and secured by the same bills to the said James Neale and Joseph Wright , being unsatisfied to them the proprietors thereof , April the 1st .

JOSEPH WRIGHT sworn.

I am a linen-draper in Milk-street. I am in partnership with Mr. James Neale , who occupies the upper part of the premises

where we carry on our business; but the counting-house, which was broke open, is in the joint occupation of my partner and myself; is held upon the partnership account: Mr. Neale accounts to the partnership for a rent for that part of the house, and then the whole house is charged to the partnership account. On Sunday the first of April, early in the morning, I was informed the counting-house was broke open; upon examination I found the desks all broke; the key of the iron safe had been got at; the tin box, in which we keep our bills and papers locked up, was taken out; the hinges of the desk were broke off, and I missed a particular bill of exchange described in the indictment, a bank post bill, for 20 l. and upwards of 10 l. in money. The prisoner had been a servant in our house for a year and a quarter.

JOSEPH DAGGER sworn.

I am a porter to Messrs. Neale and Wright. The night before the counting-house was robbed, at about half past eight o'clock, as I was returning home, I saw the prisoner leaning against the warehouse shutter, looking in at the window; upon my ringing the warehouse bell, the prisoner went off into a little court, and as he entered the court, he turned back and looked at me. Upon the next day, Sunday, the 1st of April, I got up about a quarter before six o'clock. I sleep in the top of Mr. Neale's house, and am a servant of the partnership. I got a key of the shop-door from Mr. Perkins, another person belonging to the house: as I was going towards the cellar with a light, I saw the door of the lower warehouse open; I told Mr. Perkins of what I had seen; I examined, and found the chain of the fore door was down, but the door was locked and bolted; there were marks of the lock having been wrenched. I found the counting-house door broke open; two desks were broke open; the iron chest was standing open: all this I reported to Mr. Perkins, who immediately dressed, and came down; I then informed Mr. Wright; Mr. Wright, Mr. Perkins, and I, examined, and discovered what was lost.

JANE THOMAS sworn.

I am a washerwoman. I live in Upper Thames-street. The prisoner came to me upon the first of April, about seven in the morning; he had promised to breakfast with me. He looked as if he had been up all night; he said he had been moving. I did not examine what that meant particularly; but I observed he went to the ironing-board, and pulled out some counterfeit halfpence: he told me he had been at the other end of the town to receive a bad debt; he proposed to have coffee for his breakfast, and he had coffee; then he cleaned and dressed himself, and promised to come again the next day, which he did, and gave me his linen to wash.

- KIRBY sworn.

I live in Broad-street. The prisoner called upon me the afternoon of that Sunday; he owed me 2 l. 8 s. he paid me 1 l. 7 s. and promised to pay the rest in a month's time. I gave the money he paid to me to Ramsden.

- RAMSDEN sworn.

Amongst the money here is a piece (producing it) which seems to pass for 6 d. but is larger than a 6 d. it is base metal.

(That particular piece was deposed to by Mr. Wright.)

- JONES sworn.

I am a bottle merchant. The prisoner came to my house upon the first of April, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning. He had a trunk at my house: he went and staid a minute at his trunk; he then came out, and pulled some money out from his pocket; he paid me a guinea, and said, he was very glad he had it in his power to pay me. He went into the room again; he had some half pence: he said he had been at the other end of the town to receive a bad debt; he asked me to change the half-pence for silver, which I said I would do in a day or two. I saw him again on the Monday morning: he appearing to be doing something, raised my wife's curiosity; she asked me to go in and see what he was about. I saw him with a piece of paper in his hand;

I asked him what it was: he said a 20 l. bank post bill, or a 20 l. bank bill; I can't be sure which; I looked at it twice. Upon the same day, in the afternoon, I saw him again; he then had been in the fields, and one of his legs was dirty: he asked for some paper; I brought him a sheet of paper; I tore it, and gave him one half; what he proposed to do with it, I did not know; only he asked for a pen and ink; I said I had not one; he said then, Never mind, I can get one at the post-office.

ANN JONES sworn.

I am wife of the last witness. I saw the prisoner sold up that half-sheet of writing paper which my husband gave him, and I saw him seal it with a waser: whether he put any thing in it, or no, I cannot tell; it was not directed at my house; he said he would direct it at the Post-office.

Mr. NEALE sworn.

The very day after this transaction, I received, under a cover directed to Neale and Wright, the bill of exchange for 276 l. 5 s. which was stolen out of the iron chest: that bill is unsatisfied. Our suspicions originally fell upon the prisoner, in consequence of a report made to us by the porter, that the prisoner, who had been a servant in the house, was seen looking in at the warehouse window on the preceding night, for I had before been convinced that this fact must have been committed by some one that knew the house, and knew where we deposited the key of the iron chest, and knew the way of the house and the counting-house: the porter mentioning that circumstance, that occasioned our suspicion. The prisoner came on the Tuesday night about eight o'clock, with a gentleman's clerk, to our house.

- MILLAN sworn.

I am a clerk in the Penny-post Office, Coventry-street. This letter came from our office; it has the mark upon it.

JOHN SIMPSON sworn.

I live with Messrs. Neale and Wright. I know the hand-writing of the prisoner at the bar; I have often seen him write: I believe the direction of this letter, which Mr. Neale received, to be the prisoner's handwriting.

THOMAS ELLIOT sworn.

I am apprentice to Mr. Price in Postern Row, Tower-Hill. I happened to find the pieces of a bank-note of 20 l. in the Tower Ditch, upon Wednesday the fourth of April.

THOMAS ALLEN sworn.

I sleep with the prisoner. About this time (it was on the Saturday night, to the best of my remembrance) the prisoner did not sleep at home. I remember he was absent one night; I think it was that Saturday night.

(Mr. Ramsden produced half a sheet of paper in court, which he said was delivered to him by Mr. Jones; and Mr. Jones deposed that the half-sheet of paper which he delivered to Mr. Ramsden, was the very paper which he tore off from the paper he gave to the prisoner, which the prisoner folded up as a letter.)

(The half-sheets were compared together, and the edges, which were somewhat jagged, tallied exactly.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The last witness said I laid out on the 31st; I believe that was not the night the robbery was committed. I know nothing of it at all; I paid Kirby money, but can't tell what it was.

(The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY. ( Death .)

(He was humbly recommended to his Majesty's mercy, both by the Jury and the Prosecutor.)

Tried by the Second London Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-64

260. ROBERT EVANS was indicted for stealing a half guinea , the property of Marvel Hawkins , April 13th .

GRACE HAWKINS sworn.

I am the wife of Marvel Hawkins. I lodge at Mr. Rathbourne's, No. 145, Oxford-Road ; upon the 13th of April the prisoner and another man came to buy a jole of salmon; they wanted change for a guinea; I went into my bed room to get change out of my husband's pocket; my husband was lying on the bed; they came into the room after me; the prisoner hurried me, and wanted a half guinea first, to give to the other man; and then I gave the man four shillings and two half crowns, in change; he put the silver back into my hand, and bid me give him a guinea's-worth of silver; I told him I could not; he desired me then to change the two half crowns for five shillings; when I had the silver in my hand, I looked at the guinea; I thought it was light; I was going up to my landlord to weigh it, and the prisoner snatched it out of my hand, and ran away with it; they left the salmon behind them. I went from public-house to public-house in pursuit, and I found the prisoner at the Lamb and Flag, the corner of James-street, Oxford-road; when we charged him with stealing the half guinea. A friend of mine, who was there, went to take him, and he beat him in a violent manner, and knocked him down; another person came up, and he was secured.

( Sarah May , a servant to the prosecutrix, confirmed the evidence of her mistress.)

GEORGE GORE sworn.

The woman told me in what manner she had been robbed; I went with her to see after the person; when I went into the public-house, we saw the prisoner; she said, That was the man; I helped to take him; he was riotous, and used me ill.

WILLIAM HEATH sworn.

I assisted to take the prisoner.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never saw the house; I never was near the place. I am a joiner and carpenter.

For the Prisoner.

- JONES sworn.

I keep the Lamb and Flag; the prisoner came into my house between three and four o'clock; in about an hour and half after, the woman came into the house, and asked the girl, if that was the person; she said, I think it is; she said, That will not do; then she said, I am sure he is the man, I have known him about a twelvemonth. He bore a very good character.

ROBERT SHIRES sworn.

The prisoner lodges with me; he dined with his wife about twelve o'clock; it was past three in the afternoon when he came down into my shop, and had half an ounce of tobacco of me, and I saw him go out. My house is in Margaret-street, Oxford-market, about a quarter of a mile from the Lamb and Flag. He lodged with me above a twelve month. I know him to be a very honest sober young man.

(The prisoner called seven other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

To Prosecutrix. What time did these people come into your shop? - Between two and three o'clock. The landlord said, before the justice. The man came in about half after twelve, dined with his wife on a shoulder of mutton, and went out about two.

Are you sure he is the man? - Yes, I am.

To May. Do you know about what time the people came in? - Yes, it was between two and three.

What did you say when you was carried to the public-house? - I looked at him, and said, You are the gentleman that came to my mistress for a jole of salmon. I saw he was the man, else I would not have said it.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-65

261. FIELDING EMPSON was indicted, for that he, with a certain gun, loaded and charged with gunpowder, maliciously and feloniously did shoot at Richard Cook , in a certain close, called Willian's Field .

Second Count. That he, with a certain gun, did shoot at the said Richard Cook , he being in a certain close, called Willan's Field, against the statute, January 18th .

(The witnesses were examined apart, at the request of the prisoner.

RICHARD COOK sworn.

I have a small house near Mr. Willan's, in Mary bone-fields. near the Jews-harp. The prisoner, Mr. Empson, lived in my house; he was put in by another person, who took the house of me; I asked him for the rent a great many times; he set me at defiance: at last he said, I might get it how I could, I might take my own methods: so I was obliged to seize, and put a man in possession. I used to carry the man professions in the evening, because he could not get any in such a private place; he was there from the 16th to the 18th of January; upon that evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I went up to the gate, and asked for admittance; somebody stood at the door, but made no answer; I called Green, (that was the man's name who was in possession;) nobody answered; I called Green again, and nobody answered: then I got over the pales, as I had done the night before, for they never would give me admittance; as soon as I was over, I took up my lanthorn; Mr. Empson came behind me, with a sword; I saw him when I turned round; I was putting my hand through the gate to take up my lanthorn; it was on the other side: he beat me with the sword; he came behind, and said, You scoundrel, I will give it you, for seizing upon me! I turned round to him; I said, Mr. Empson, you ought to suffer for this, or pay for it, I don't know which. At first I did not know whether the sword was drawn, or not; but afterwards he stabbed me; You scoundrel! says he, I will murder you.

Did you say any thing then? - No, I saw the danger I was in; I got round him, and got hold of him, thinking the man in possession would come to my assistance; he did not come; but the Nurse, who was in the house, came, and took him by the arm, and said, Pray, Mr. Empson, do not murder him; I looked at the nurse, and asked her, where Green was; she said, He was gone; Mr. Empson said, I have paid him, you scoundrel, and he is gone. I disentangled myself from him as soon as I could, and got away; in getting away, I did not think proper to go over the place I had got in at; I thought he would follow me; I turned to the right, to go to another place; and it was lucky I did; for he came out with a gun, which he levelled at the place I came in at, and fired it off. I was about three or four yards from him, and from the place where he fired.

Was it a light night? - No, it was a dark night.

How could you see how he levelled the gun then? - There was a light from the door.

Where abouts was the place you had got over at? was it opposite the door? - Yes.

Where did you stand when you saw him do this? - I got on one side, in another part of the yard.

After you had disengaged yourself from him, did he go into the house? - Yes.

How long was he in the house before he came out again? - I do not believe he was a minute; I had not time to get out of the yard; I hurried all I could; I guessed he would be after me.

When he came out, did he say any thing? - He said something, but I cannot tell what it was.

If you was so near him as you say, you might have heard what it was. - Yes, but I forget what it was.

How long was it before he fired off the gun? - He fired as soon as he came out, instantly.

How far is it from the door, where he

stood, to the pales? - May be nine foot from the place where he stood when he fired, to the pales. I got my things, and I took up my provisions, and was going away from the place; he came out again, with something in his hand, I do not know what, and said, You scoundrel, are you gone? I was got on the outside of the pales then.

What was it he fetched out then? - My candle was out; I cannot tell what it was.

When he pointed the gun, he did not point it to the place where you was standing? - No, because he did not know where I was; he pointed it at the place where I came in. Going along, I found something run down my hand; I looked at it, as well as I could, and found it was blood. I went to the Jews-harp, and found myself wounded in two places in my arm.

Not with shot, or bullet? - No, I was stabbed. I got a warrant that night to take him up.

When you saw him again, did he say any thing about this business? - I had no discourse with him at all.

Have you no other evidence of the fact? - None.

Court. Gentlemen of the jury, there is no evidence of a shooting at the person of the prosecutor: there must be a shooting at the person, to constitute the offence charged in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-66

262. WILLIAM BLAND and MARY TIPTON were indicted, the first (together with James Collier , not in custody) for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Storr , Esq ; on the 10th of April, about the hour of nine in the night, and stealing two silver forks, value 20 s. five silver table spoons, value 2 l. 10 s. a large silver cup and cover, value 40 l. a silver coffee pot, value 10 l. a silver bread basket, value 10 l. two silver butter boats, value 10 l. an old silver cup, value 3 l. a silver wax-winder, value 20 s. two silver gilt spurs and spoons, value 3 l. a silver punch strainer, value 40 s. a silver soup ladle, value 40 s. four silver sauce boats, value 40 s. a pair of silver tea tongs, value 10 s. and two candlesticks plated with silver, value 10 s. the property of the said John Storr , in his dwelling-house ; and the other, for receiving part of the above goods, knowing them to have been stolen , against the statute, &c. April 19th .

(There was not any evidence to bring the charge home to the principal, excepting the testimony of an accomplice, unconfirmed by any other evidence.)

BOTH NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-67

263. WILLIAM ARCHER , and THOMAS ROBERTS otherwise JONES were indicted, the first, for stealing on the 8th of December , out of the Norwich mail, twenty-three bags of letters, against the statute ; the other, for receiving and maintaining the said William Archer , after the commission of the aforesaid felony, he well knowing the said William Archer to have committed the same felony .

The second, third, and fourth counts, stated several notes and bills of exchange, contained in the twenty-three bags of letters.

Mr. SHAW sworn.

I am Deputy-Comptroller of the Post-office at Dublin. On the 10th of January last, a letter was received by the Secretary of the Post-office in Dublin, from the Secretary of the London Office, setting forth, that a bank note for 50 l. which had been stolen out of the mail near Epping, had been transmitted by Mr. Latouche of Dublin, to their correspondents in London; in consequence of receiving that letter, I went, by direction of the Secretary.

to Mr. Latouche's bank, in order to make enquiry from whom this note was received by them; I left the letter there, in order to have the enquiry, and went a little further; by the time I returned, I met one of the clerks; he had in his hand a letter, directed to Mr. Latouche, and signed James Jones , which requested Mr. Latouche would send cash for a 20 l. bank note. [A letter shewn the witness.] This is the letter. Mr. Latouche's clerk informed me, that the letter was brought by the waiter of the Hotel at College-green: I went down to the Post-office, and informed the Secretary of the information I had received; then an Alderman of Dublin, myself, and one of Mr. Latouche's clerks, went over to the Hotel, and enquired for Mr. Jones; we were shewn into a room, the upper part of the house, in which were the two prisoners, and one Edward Sullens (the man who afterwards turned King's evidence;) the Secretary asked, which was Mr. Jones? the prisoner, Roberts, said, His name was Jones; he was taken into another room, by the Alderman and the Secretary; after being absent for about two minutes, the Alderman came back into the room, where I remained with the other men; he asked them what account they could give of Mr. Jones, the person in the other room; they answered that they had met him, and travelled with him from London, and they had lodged together in Dublin; and that was all they knew of him: the Secretary immediately replied, That Jones's account was so different from theirs, that he was certain they had been guilty of something improper, and he should take them into custody: two coaches were sent for, and they were brought up to the justice's office in Dublin; upon being brought there, the three prisoners were searched; from the pocket of him that called himself Jones, and that was found to be Roberts, a small pocket-book was taken, by the Secretary of the Post-office, in my presence; in it were four Bank-of-England notes.

Are these the notes? [Shewing four notes to the witness.] - I omitted, at the time, making any marks on the notes. The Lord Mayor came into the office just at the time; he had in his pocket The Hue and Cry of the 5th of January. These notes were compared, in my presence, with the description in this Hue and Cry, and two were found to correspond with two notes described there, one for 20 l. the other 25 l. I marked them down at the time, and I have kept this paper in my pocket ever since: two of these notes correspond exactly with them; these are the notes; the others I did not mark in any manner, so as to identify them. The two other men were searched, but nothing was found upon them, except twenty-two guineas: I think in the pocket of Sullens was a watch; and a watch, without any money, in the pocket of Archer; they had all three watches. [ Producing them.] It was judged proper by the Magistrate, and the Secretary of the Post-office, to have the men examined apart. The prisoners were sent into a separate room, while Sullens continued in that room, in order to be examined; when that was done, this advertisement, and this paper I have in my hand, were read to him; after a short time, upon shewing evident marks of a desire to make a confession, he was taken into a separate room from the Public-office, and there made a confession. Roberts had no money that I recollect.

Are the watches marked, out of whose pockets they were taken? - Not at the time they were taken from them, but were marked since; they were shewn to these persons in Newgate, and they acknowledged them to be the watches taken from them; Roberts also acknowledged that letter to be written by him, and that he had inclosed a 20 l. note in it; and he acknowledged receiving 50 l. at Mr. Latouche's, upon a former occasion, for a bank note.

What clothes had the prisoner? - Roberts's clothes were taken off him by directions from the Post office, after he had been some time in Newgate; they were, I think, claret colour.

[The Letter read, as follows.]

" SIR,

"I shall be obliged to you for to send me

"by the bearer cash for the inclosed banknote.

"I should have come myself, but

"am not well; so shall take it as a favour

"of you to send it by the bearer; for it

"will be less trouble to me to pay the exchange

"than send over to England for the

"cash.

"I am your humble servant,

" JAMES JONES ."

"To Mr. Latouche, banker."

(The bank-note inclosed in that letter was produced in court; it was No. H. 441. for 20 l. That, and the bank-notes for 20 l. and for 25 l. were read, and corresponded with the statement of them in the indictment. The 25 l. was 0. 13. dated June 8, 1780: the 20 l. was K. 80 l. dated 7th August, 1780.)

BENJAMIN PARVIN sworn.

I am a clerk in Mr. Latouche's bank. On the 19th of December-last, the prisoner, Roberts, came to our shop to get change for a Bank-of-England note of 50 l. I handed him over the money. He said his name was James Jones . This is the note (producing it.)

(The bank-note for 50 l. was read, and corresponded with the statement of it in the indictment. It was No. C. 11. dated 23d June, and was indorsed Halliday, Smith, and Co. - John Knowles , James Jones .)

Mr. JOHN KNOWLES sworn.

I live at Ely. I am concerned in receiving rents for the bishop of Ely. On the 7th of December last, in the presence of Mr. Smith, I put up in a cover four bank-notes, amounting to an hundred pounds, and delivered the letter to the post-master at Ely. I took down at that time the marks of the bills: I am satisfied that this note C. 11, for 50 l. and H. 441, for 20 l. are two of the notes I inclosed in the letter, and sent by the post.

Did you take a description of the note then? - Yes.

THOMAS SHATT sworn.

I am post-master at Ely. On the 7th of December last, about one o'clock, I forwarded all the letters put into the Ely bag to London: the mail was carried from Ely to Cambridge by Aaron Chevill .

AARON CHEVILL sworn.

I carried the mail from Ely on the 7th of December last, and delivered it to the postmaster at Cambridge.

Mr. - INGE sworn.

I live at Cambridge. On the 7th of December, I inclosed six bank-bills in a letter, and delivered them to Isaac Brown , to go by the post. I took down the marks of the notes; one was K. 801. for 20 l. dated 7th August, 1780: another, O. 13, for 25 l. dated June 8, 1780.

ISAAC BROWN sworn.

I live at Cambridge. On Thursday the 7th of December, I received a letter from Mr. Inge: I inclosed it under a cover to Giles Atkinson , Esq. member of parliament; I laid it upon the desk, and William Nichols took it to carry to the post-office.

WILLIAM NICHOLS sworn.

Did you take any letters on the 7th of December to the post-office? - I cannot recollect the fact, but from my making entries of them, I believe I did take them: it was my business to take them.

ROBERT GILBERT sworn.

I am Deputy Post-master at Cambridge. I receive all the bags that come into Cambridge: I received the Ely bag on the 7th of December; I put it into my bag; I put the Cambridge letters in myself upon the 7th of December, and sent the mail off.

EDWARD DILLESTON sworn.

I carried the Norfolk mail on the 7th of December last from Cambridge; I delivered it at the next stage, Saffron Walden.

- MACKENZIE sworn.

I am Post-master at Saffron Walden. I

received the Norwich mail on the 7th of December from the last witness: it came to me about half after eight, or near nine o'clock; I forwarded it to Bishop Stortford, the next stage towards London.

JOHN LOWE sworn.

I carried the mail to Bishop Stortford, and delivered it to Mr. Thompson.

RICHARD THOMPSON sworn.

I am Post-master at Bishop Stortford. I received the Norwich mail of Lowe between the 7th and 8th of December: I delivered it to George Watson ; I sent it off about twelve o'clock at night, which is the usual hour.

GEORGE WATSON sworn.

I received the mail from Mr. Thompson in the night between the 7th and 8th of December; I carried it to Epping, and delivered it there to William Crowfoot .

WILLIAM CROWFOOT sworn.

I am hostler at the Cock at Epping, which is the post-house. I received the mail on the 8th of December from Watson: I delivered it to William Burgess ; he went on with it at about half past three on the Monday morning.

WILLIAM BURGESS sworn.

I took the Norwich mail on Monday morning from Crowfoot at Epping, and carried it to the Spread Eagle at Snaresbrook: there I changed carts; the boy from London, Jacob Byner , took my cart, and returned to London; and I went back with his cart to Epping; that is the custom always.

JACOB BYNER sworn.

I received the Norwich mail from William Burgess at the Spread Eagle at Snaresbrook, on Monday morning the 8th of December, at about five o'clock: I was to carry it to London: I stopped at the Coach and Horses in Mile End Road, between five and six o'clock; I might stay there five or six minutes; I did not stay longer; it was very dark.

Did you leave any body with your cart, to take care of it, when you went into the house? - There was nobody to leave with it: I did not miss the mail till I got to the post-office yard; then it was just getting light; then I missed it out of the cart. The mail is open in the cart: the cart is so secured that nothing could fall out by accident; it must have been taken out at the fore part of the cart.

Is there not a chain round it? - No.

Were there more mails than one in your cart? - No: it was all made up in one portmanteau: I am sure I had it when I came to the Coach and Horses.

How came you not to miss it when you got into the cart? - We do not sit upon it, as on some other roads; we sit upon a seat over it.

Did not you perceive your cart lighter? - No; and I thought nothing about it at that time.

JOHN GROVES sworn.

I am hostler at the Coach and Horses at Mile End. Byner called there, I think, between four and five o'clock: he stopped about five or six minutes. A man came in, and called for a pint of purl; he asked Byner to drink: while Harry Dial was drinking, the lad went to the door, and bid him make haste; he said he was afraid of losing his cloth off his horse: the boy was in and out four or five times, I believe during the time he was afraid of losing the cloth off his horse, which he had laid upon it.

Mr. - BRIGGS sworn.

I belong to the General Post-Office. On the 8th of December, I was at the Post-Office, waiting for the arrival of the Norwich mail: the cart came without the mail: it ought to contain twenty-three bags; amongst them the Ely and Cambridge bags. The boy came to the Post-Office about seven o'clock.

Is that the usual time? - Sooner sometimes: between the hours of five and seven, is the usual time.

CHRISTOPHER BOWLER sworn.

What age are you? - Twelve the 2d of

last January. On the 11th of December last I found a portmanteau, in Globe-lane, Mile End, in a grain-pit. Edward Fleet was with me.

Was there any water in the pit? - There was; I saw one of the corners stick up. There was a plate upon the portmanteau; it was NORWICH MAIL. I carried it to my master.

EDWARD FLEET sworn.

I was with Bowler on the 11th of December; we found the bag in a again hole, in Globe-lane, which is about 100 yards from the Coach and Horses, at Mile End; there was not any thing in it; there was upon it, NORWICH MAIL. We took it to school, to our master; it was afterwards carried to the Post-office.

GEORGE GLADWELL sworn.

I live in Wellclose-square; I am servant to Mr. Wright. I found some empty bags in a ditch, by the side of the road between Bethnal-green and Old Ford, about three quarters of a mile, or not so much, from the Coach and Horses; they were in a ditch of water; there was another boy with me; we went a shooting sparrows.

What day was this? - I do not remember neither the day, month, or week; it was before Christmas; there were, I suppose, a peck of brickbats in them, and a hole cut in the bottom, to sink them; I took them all out; there was a letter in one; I put it in again, and took them home to Mr. Wright. There was a plate of copper at the corner; there were twenty-three of them; I do not know them all; there was upon the different plates, Saffron Walden, Ongar, Cambridge, Ely; some had no marks. My master sent me up to the Post-office with them; I carried them there, and the letter too.

- CUMMINGS sworn.

I belong to the General Post-office; Gladwell brought the bags to the Office on the 14th of December. Here is a list of the bags which are contained in the Norwich mail.

EDWARD SULLENS sworn.

I live in Rose-lane, Spitalfields. On Friday morning, I believe it was the 8th of December, Archer came between four and five o'clock, and called me up; we went out, with intent to rob carts or waggons, or any thing we could; we went up Mile-End Road, almost as far as Bow; we met nothing to our expectation; we returned back to a watering-house; I fancy it was the sign of the Coach and Horses; it is an house the waggons and carts stop at; we staid there till almost six in the morning. I believe the mail cart came up.

Had you been in the Coach and Horses then? - No, we were waiting nearly opposite, about that time; the mail stopped, and the boy went into the house; Archer ran across the way; he was not gone, I believe, three minutes; five, I am sure was the most; he returned in five minutes, with the mail upon his shoulder; he carried it just across the road, and then flung it over the bank, which is close to the path-way; then I went over the bank with him; I am certain this is the mail bag; I said, We shall be both hung if we take this; he swore, D - n his eyes, he would take it, for there might be money in it; I said, I would not have any thing to do with it. I knew I was liable, being with him, to suffer as well as him. I went with him over the fields to Globe-lane; it was growing day-light, so that we could see over the fields; he said, It would not do to carry it home; we might be discovered; so we put it in a ditch, next to the lane; Archer staid there till I returned; I brought an hempen bag; I stood by the side of the rail-till he put the small bags into the hempen sack, and after that we threw the outside mail bag into a pit of water, in Globe-lane, called a grain pit, I believe; we flung bricks and stones upon it, to sink it.

Do you recollect how many bags were taken? - I was in so much confusion I cannot remember the number of small bags; there were a great many; they were put into the hempen bag, tied up, thrown across the horse, and then, mine being the nighest house, we consented to take it to my house. I went into the stable, with my horse, at the back of my house, the while he carried the sack into a front room of mine. We

cut the bags, and began to open the letters. I can't tell the number of small bags that were taken out of the mails; I did not tell them, but there were a great many. He said, He would burn the letters; they should not rise up in judgement against us; they were all burned; what we suspected to be notes or bills, all the small papers we found in the letters, we saved, and put on one side.

Could either of you read? - No, I could not; and I have heard him say, he could not. After we had burnt the letters, we put the small bags in an hempen sack, and took them in a cart to a place called Old Ford, near a hand-post, and flung them into a ditch; and I think there were some stones put into the sack to sink it.

Old Ford is near Bethnal Green? - Yes. It was between eleven and twelve o'clock when we got home with the cart; then we agreed between us to go to Roberts's, for him to look over the notes and the bills, to see which were good; we went over in the Borough, near the King's Bench; he was at work; when we got there, it was near one o'clock; we went to one Mr. Wood's, I think the sign of the George, a public-house where he lodged: we asked for Roberts; the man went to fetch him; Roberts said, He could not come over till he finished a piece of work he was about. We afterwards all threedined there off pork steaks; he enquired how the mail had been taken? and we told him all that we had done; he said, It was done very well, as it was done in that manner, and he would come over and look at them; he consented to go with us, and we proffered him an equal part with us of the notes. It was past three o'clock, I believe, when we returned from Wood's; we came to Rose-lane, to my house, just at dusk; before we went to Roberts's we put the notes in a pocket book, and buried them in a dunghill, at my house; when we got into my house, we fetched the pocket book out, and he looked over the notes; The Draughts, he said, were of no use to us, as it was war time, but, if it was not war time, he could go abroad with them. My wife and sister went for a Mrs. Moses, to get her to buy them. What he called the draughts were kept in one place, the bank notes in another: when she came, she said, The draughts were of no use to her, but the bank notes she would buy, but she did not not know whether they were good or not; she asked to have two of them, that her daughter might go to her son-in-law with them, to know if they were good. Roberts took two out, and took down the numbers upon a bit of paper, that they might not change them; she went, and was gone almost an hour and an half; in that time Roberts, Archer, me, old Mrs. Moses, and my wife, were in the house. I do not know who the son-in-law is; I never saw him, as I know of. When the daughter returned, she said, The notes were very good. Mrs. Moses, at her return, asked, What we would have for them? We asked 250 l. for 335 l. in value, as Roberts informed us; she said, She would give us 200 l. for them the next day; we waited till next day, eleven o'clock; she did not come; Roberts began to be uneasy; he said, He could lay them out as well as any gentleman in the city of London, without losing any thing by them.

What became of the bills and draughts all this time? - Roberts said, he would burn them; Mrs. Moses and I said, It is a pity to burn them; you say it is so much money, put them up in something, and I will go lose them, that the owner may come by them again. Roberts said, It would be no odds to the owners; it would be only writing backward and forward that they were lost. They were at last burnt. Mrs. Moses said, Don't burn them, let them be lost; it will be a lightening of the punishment if we should be found out. The next day, when Mrs. Moses did not come, Roberts and I proposed to go down to Rosemary-lane, to Mr. Downes's, I think it was: my wife came after us before we got to the bottom of Goodman's Fields, and told us Mrs. Moses's daughter was come for the notes; we returned to our house; she then said, Her mother could not afford to give any more than 100 l. for them, as they were not for herself, but another person; that she should only get 20 l. by them: we consented to let her have them at 100 l. she was to come at one hour and another; but she did not come: about three in the afternoon Roberts said, He would go

and lay out some of the notes that night, or else he would leave us. We went down to Mr. Downes's, in Rosemary-lane; Roberts went into the shop, and bought a suit of blue-grey clothes, and a great coat; he told us, He changed a 10 l. note there; we did not go in, we staid at the door. I saw a gentlewoman run over to a silversmith's shop, from Mr. Downes's, with a paper, and the gentleman I observed looked at it; it appeared like a bank note. Then we went up towards the Minories; into Leadenhall-street, I think it was; Roberts went into a stocking-shop, and bought half a dozen pair of silk stockings, at 12 s. 6 d. a pair; there, he told us, he changed another 10 l. note; there were two pair of light mottled stockings, two pair dark, one with clocks, and one without; we shared the stockings, two pair a piece, when we got from London. From thence we went over to one Davidson's, a pawnbroker, near St. George's church, in the Borough; Roberts bought two silver watches, a pair of silver shoe buckles, and knee buckles; there, he said, he changed a note, but I do not know whether 10 l. or what; just as he said, we went by; he said it was a 10 l. note: then he said, he knew another pawnbroker, in Barnaby-street; he went there, and bought another watch, and silver shoe buckles, and knee buckles.

What became of the three silver watches? - We had one a-piece; to the best of my remembrance this is my watch. [Looking at one of them.] There was a 10 l. note changed in Barnaby-street, as he informed us: then we proposed to go to our house, for Roberts said, Perhaps Mrs. Moses might get us apprehended. We went to my mother-in-law's, in Bishopsgate-street; my mother-in-law wondered to see so many men come there; we staid there, and had a pot of beer, and concluded to have some supper. Then we went to Archer's; there we staid all Saturday night. Archer and his wife went to bed; my wife and I sat up; Archer put the clothes on that he had bought, in my mother-in-law's room, after he returned from the Borough. We got up on Sunday morning; my wife pressed me to know where we were going; Roberts desired me not to tell her, for fear we should be upper-handed: after we came out, we proposed to go to Moorfields, and take a chaise; Roberts said, He thought that was too nigh, that people might find us out too soon. We went to Gray's-Inn Lane, to the Red Lion; and were driven to the Mitre, at Barnet; upon the road between Barnet and Dunstable, we agreed where we should go to; Roberts said, We must not keep a straight road, for that might be the means of our being upper-handed; we must cut out of the main road into cross country roads; he said, He had been a rider for his uncle sometime, and knew the roads. We agreed to go to Wales; he said he would go to Leicester; he changed a 10 l. note at the Peacock, at Leicester; then we went to Market Harborough; there, I think, we laid on Sunday night; the next day, I think, we travelled to Derby; he changed a note there, at the inn where we stopped; from thence we went to Manchester; there was nothing changed at Manchester, but between Derby and Manchester another note was changed: we went on to Holyhead, and from thence we went to Dublin, where we arrived the next Sunday after we set off from London. I went by the name of James Bolton , my wife's maiden name; Archer, by the name of William Pritchard ; Roberts went by the name of James Jones . We lodged in Dublin, at the Hotel on College-green. On the Tuesday following, Roberts went and changed a 50 l. note, with Mr. Latouche; and he said, He set his name upon the back of it, James Jones ; and that Mr. Latouche inquisited him a good deal about it; that he said he was a relation of Mr. Jones of Chester. The money was shared; I had 14 l. he 15 l. and Archer 14 l. he said, with the discount of the money, that made the difference. Roberts changed another 50 l. note with a gentleman upon 'Change; I do not know on what day that was. On the day before we were apprehended, we walked out all together; Roberts said, He as ashamed to go to Mr. Latouche again, as he wanted to change another note; he said, He would go home to his lodgings, and feign sick, and send a note by the waiter. I had not been returned home five minutes, before a gentleman came in, and

asked, Which is Mr. Jones? Roberts started off his seat; he said, I am. He said, A gentleman will be here, in a little time, and tell you the discount of the note. Shortly after, the gentlemen came in, and we were apprehended.

Do you know, of your own knowledge, whether that letter was sent with the bill, for the purpose of getting it changed at Mr. Latouche's? - The waiter went with it; I was not at home when he went; but he came back when I was there.

Cross Examination.

Have you, at any time, received his Majesty's pardon? - Yes, I have.

How long is it since you left your lodging upon the Thames? - This last March was a twelvemonth.

Have not you and Archer had some variance? - On the Thames?

No; have not you had some falling-out? - No; we messed together when we were on the Thames. Roberts was on the Thames too. I was all illiterate man; I used to give him a penny a letter to write for me; I have never had any quarrel with him at all, not since we came away; we had a little difference about messing, upon the Thames.

Do you recollect what time you went to Archer's lodging? - I never went to his lodgings in a morning, in my life; I never was twice at his house.

Which took the mail out of this cart? - Archer.

Where did you meet him that morning? - He called me up, to go upon what they call the Drag.

Are you sure it was Archer that took the mail? - Yes, I am as positive as that God is in heaven.

Did not you tell Archer, it was no felony to take the mail out of the cart? - No, I said it was; and advised him, after it was taken, to lay it where it might be found; he ran over, and took it.

Do you recollect, when you were in the road together, telling Archer, That it was no felony to take it out of the cart, it being under no person's care? - I never told him any such thing; I told him, I was sensible

it was death to take it away, when we were in the fields, and desired him to leave it.

You was present when Mrs. Moses was at the justice's? - I saw her there, but did not hear her say any thing. I was not present when she was examined.

Had Archer any of these notes at any time? - Yes, several.

Roberts. He says I was the person that advised him to do it; he was the acting party all through. Did I ever say, burn the notes? - Not the bank-notes, but to burn the bills.

Roberts. Did you ever tell me how you came by the notes? - We did.

Roberts. I never had any benefit from the transaction, had I? - He had it.

Roberts. Did not you come on Saturday morning to the King-and-Queen's Head in Gravel-lane, and send for me before I was out of bed? - Yes; we came to fetch him to keep him with us, for fear he should go and be an enemy against us. Archer came to me on Saturday morning, and we concluded to go to fetch Roberts, for fear he should turn from what he had said before we laid at a Mr. Goodges's in Gravel-lane, on Friday night; afterwards did not.

Roberts. What was the reason of not coming to where I lodged, rather than another house? - Because they should not suspect any thing.

Roberts. Whether you did not insist that you would not leave me till I went into the country? - It was his own proposal to go into the country; he said he could lay out the notes as well as any gentleman in the city, and he did not like to lose a farthing by them.

ELIZABETH SULLENS sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness. On Friday the 8th of December, Archer called my husband up between four and five in the morning: he went along with him; he came home again, in about an hour or two, for a hempen sack, and he took his great coat with him; he returned again between six and seven; the bell had rung six a good while: Archer came with him; they brought this hempen bag with some little bags in it, and he emptied them out; he untied one

little bag at a time, and turned out the letters in them; they were opened, those that had any thing in them. Archer took out what were in the letters, and laid them on one side, and the letters were burnt at my fire-side; Archer and Sullens saw what were taken out of the letters, and they were tied up in a pocket case; they took them out in the yard, but where they put them I can't say.

Were there a great many of them? - A great number of the leather bags were put into the hempen sack again, and Archer and Sullens took them away in a cart; I heard Archer say, when he came back, That they had been taken to Old Ford, and thrown into a ditch, or pond; that they throwed stones and brick-bats upon them, to sink them. They went out together after that to Roberts's lodgings; they returned in the evening, and Roberts with them. Archer and Sullens fetched the pocket-book case out of the yard; he brought the bills in, and put them upon the table; Roberts looked over them, to see which were good, and which were bad; for neither Archer nor Sullens could read: they were emptied out upon the table, and he looked over them; all those that were good, he laid on one side the table; those that were bad, he laid on the other side. Sullens wanted them to be dropped; Archer swore, They should not be dropped, as they should not be brought against him; then those were burnt in the same fire-place. Archer said, He should wish to have the good ones sold to a Fence, which is a cant name for a receiver of stolen goods. I went to Mrs. Moses; I told her Archer wanted her at Sullens's house: it was on the Friday night; she said, It was her sabbath; she should rather like to know before she went out, whether it would be worth her while. She put on her hat and cloak, and came to our house: they shewed her the notes; she said, She could not read them; but if they would let one or two of them go with her daughter, while she staid to let her son see if they were good, she would buy them. Roberts took two out, looked at the numbers to see what the numbers of them were, and sent them by Mrs. Moses's daughter to shew to Mrs. Moses's son, to see if they were good; her daughter returned again, and said, they were good: the mother said then, She would buy them, but could not give the money that night, but would give it next morning.

Were they all three together, when Mrs. Moses came? - They were. I met them that night at my mother's in Skinner-street, Bishopsgate-street: they did not stop long there; they went to Archer's lodgings, and sat up with them there all night; Archer and his wife went to bed. They went off in the morning; and I saw no more of them, nor my husband, till I was taken to Bow-street; but they were all together on Saturday morning, and breakfasted at my house, and Mrs. Moses's daughter. I went to fetch them back: Roberts was taking them somewhere to buy some clothes, and Archer and I brought them all back.

JOHN WOOD sworn.

I keep the George in Gravel-lane, Southwark. Roberts lodged at my house in December last.

Do you know the other prisoner? - I saw him at one time at my house, with the man they call Sullens. I saw them twice at my house: they came first and wanted to see Roberts; he was at work at Squire Lane's; I cannot recollect the day of the week.

Do you recollect when Roberts left your lodging? - It was a Saturday, very early. When they came to my house, they asked me to send for Roberts; I said, he was very busy, and, I believed, not to be seen; but I would go and see. One of them went along with me; I shewed him where he was at work; Roberts followed them to my house very soon after.

Did they dine at your house? - Not at that time; they did a day after.

Can you recollect the day when they dined at your house? - It is impossible.

After the day they dined at your house, do you recollect Roberts leaving your lodging entirely? - I cannot recollect exactly; but I think this was two or three days before Roberts left my lodgings; I think it was in the same week.

DAVID POWELL sworn.

Roberts worked with me in the beginning

of December last, at 'Squire Lane's, at Loman's Pond, in the Borough, Southwark; he went away from me on the 8th of December.

Did he ever return to work again with you? - No.

Did he stay for his wages? - No; I carried his wages to him, to John Wood 's; and never saw any more of him.

JOHN DOWNES sworn.

I keep a sale-shop in Rosemary-lane. On Saturday the 9th of December, Roberts came into my house, just at candle-light, and asked for a suit of clothes; my man took him up into the warehouse, and sold him a suit of clothes, and a great coat; a blue-grey lined with black, and a brown cloth great coat.

Whether these are the clothes you sold? - They correspond in colour; I believe them to be the clothes.

How did he pay you for them? - He gave me a 10 l. bank note; I gave him 4 l. 15 s. change out of it.

You took no account of the bank note? - I did not.

Mr. Shaw. These are the coat and waistcoat that Roberts had on when he was apprehended.

THOMAS BUTLER sworn.

I live at Mr. Babb's, a hosier, in Aldersgate-street. On the 9th of December last, about six or seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner, Roberts, bought six pair of silk stockings of me, which came to 3 l. 13 s. 6 d. I changed a 10 l. bank note for him.

WILLIAM DAVIDSON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, in the Borough, near St. George's Church. On Saturday the 9th of December last, Roberts came to my house about seven in the evening, and said he was going down to Buckinghamshire; that he dealt in lace, and wanted a new watch; he said, I must change it if it would not do. I shewed him several; he bought two; I should know them again; the maker's name of one, was Pagent; I don't know the maker's name of the other. This is one I sold him, [pointing at it.]

I suppose many watches go from your shop you can't identify again? - Yes; and I sold him, besides, a pair of shoe and knee buckles. I think all came to 7 l. odd; he gave me a bank note; I think a 15 l. it was above 10 l. I know; and I gave him change out of it.

- THOMAS sworn.

I live with Mr. Bertram, pawnbroker, in Barnaby-street. On the 9th of December, in the evening, Roberts came to our shop, and bought a silver watch, and a pair of shoe and knee buckles. Mr. Bertram gave him change for a note; I think it was a 10 l. note. This is the watch I sold him.

JAMES PLATT sworn.

I live at the Red Lion, Gray's-Inn Lane; I drove a chaise from thence to Barnet, on Sunday morning the 10th of December; I carried three men. I have seen that man with red hair before, but can't be positive that he was one of them.

ARCHER's DEFENCE.

I leave it to my counsel to call my witnesses.

(The prisoners witnesses were examined apart.)

JANE MONKSFIELD sworn.

I am a midwife, in Shoreditch, and have lived there many years. I have known Archer, and his family, many years; one Thursday night, I take it to be at the begining of December, about a week in it, called to his wife; the labour went off, so I went away between seven and eight in the morning; he was at home: when I went away she was not in labour, but she thought she was; she was but six months gone with child.

Can you swear to the day of the month? - Not for the world: if I had laid her, I should have set down the day; but she went afterwards to the Lying-in hospital

MARY COATES sworn.

I go out a nursing; my husband is abroad; I engaged to nurse Mrs. Archer; and she was taken very bad before her time.

Do you remember the day of the month she was in labour? - It was in December, but the day of the month I can't say; it was of a Thursday.

THOMAS ROBERTS 's DEFENCE,

As read by the Clerk of Arraigns.

My Lord,

With submission, I most humbly beg and pray your Lordship may be pleased to look over this, which I have here certified to be the truth, and the truth only; so help me God! viz. On Friday, the eighth day of December last, at about two o'clock in the afternoon, Edward Sullens came into the lead-yard of George Lane, Esq. Loman's Pond, Southwark, where I was at work, and said that he wanted to speak to me; when I made him answer, and said, that I could not then have time to speak to him; but told him, that about four o'clock I should have done work for the day; when Sullens said that he should wait until that time, at the house of John Wood , the George, in Gravel-lane. Between four and five o'clock, I done work, and went, as usual, to the said George, where Sullens and Archer were both in the parlour, drinking brandy and water: however, Sullens said to me, as I had not dined, that he had ordered some steaks to be done for dinner; when we all three dined; at the same time Sullens and Archer were saying to me, that they would be great friends to me, if I would leave my place, and be a servant to Edward Sullens , as they were a going into the country, and should be in want of a clerk to do their business, for they had got some bank-notes to pass. I asked them where and how they came by bank-notes; when Sullens answered, and said, we honestly got them; for this morning, between Stratford and Mile End, we found, laying in the road, a trunk, which we carried home, and found it contained several banknotes, which we are determined to make use of, as it will be the making of us for ever. I made answer, that it would be much better for them to keep the said notes until they should be advertised, as they would be sure of a great reward for finding the same. They replied, No; for it is all our own, and nothing but bank-notes, which is as good as cash; at the same time they both insisted that I should agree and be Sullen's servant, as he should pay me for my trouble, and said, It will be much better for you than to work for ten shillings a week. I then made answer, and said, that I would consider of it, and let Sullens know my determination some time the next day: No, said he, I must know this night, and you must go along with me home; I made answer, that I wanted to go that night into the city, and would accompany him part of his way home; accordingly we all three went out together from the said George: it was then between five and six o'clock o' Friday evening; and the same evening I parted with Sullens and Archer in Bishopsgate-street, with a promise that I should call upon Sullens some time the next day, Saturday. I was back at the said George by nine o'clock that same evening. The next morning, Saturday the 9th of December, before I was out of my bed, a person comes to the George, and said, that there was some one wanted to speak with me at the King and Queen; when I immediately got up, and went there, where I found Sullens and Archer were a drinking some purl: Edward Sullens said to me in this manner, By God, you must go immediately along with us, as we want to buy some things that is wanted for to go on our journey, as we are resolved to set out this afternoon, or to-morrow morning; so you must go along with us, and you shall be better paid for your time than work for ten shillings a week; with this they prevailed on me, and I went with them, and I bought what they desired me; at the same time Sullens giving me a banknote at a time to get it changed. By the time I had bought for them what they wanted, I believe it was near eight o'clock o' Saturday night; when Sullens insisted that I should go and stay with him all night at Archer's house, and to set out next morning for the country. I desired that he would let me go and settle with my master, and let him know that I was going into the country:

No, said Sullens, you shall not go from me, for I will not trust you out of my sight this night. The next morning, Sunday the 10th of December, by the desire of Edward Sullens we all three set out for to go to Liverpool; and when we arrived there, agreed for to go over to Ireland, as he, Sullens, said that he wanted to buy some Irish cloths. On the 17th of December we arrived in Dublin; and Tuesday the 19th, Sullens gives me a fifty-pound banknote, to go and get cash for it; when I went with the same to the house of Messrs. Latouche the bankers, and got the said note changed; immediately after I went with the cash to meet Sullens and Archer at the Elephant Tavern in Essex-street, where I paid Sullens the money, and he gave me fifteen guineas, and I believe to Archer the same. In a few days afterwards Sullens said to me, that I must get another note changed, and gave me a fifty-pound note; at the same time desired me to go upon 'Change, as some of the merchants would give me cash: accordingly I went, and met with a merchant, who gave me the cash for the fifty-pound note; and immediately went with the same to a house in Smock Alley, where Sullens and Archer was; and we all three went from thence to the Hotel in College-Green, where I paid Sullens the money, and he gave me fifteen guineas, and Archer the same. On Saturday, January the 6th, Sullens said to me that he must have some more notes changed, and that I had better go to the same merchant as changed me the last note, to get him for to give me cash for two or three notes accordingly I went to the said merchant's house, and asked him for to give me cash for forty or fifty pounds bank-notes, when the merchant made answer, and said, that if I would wait untill the Monday following, and meet him upon 'Change, at three o'clock, he would take my notes, and give me the cash: accordingly I promised to do so; and on Monday the 8th day of January, I met the said merchant upon 'Change, when he informed me that he wanted a draft of one hundred and twenty-four pounds, but could not get it that day, and on that account he could not take my notes. I immediately went and acquainted Sullens of this, when he made answer, and said, that I must go and get cash for them somewhere else, as he could not go from Dublin without some more money; at the same time gave me in all five bank-notes, value one hundred and five pounds. I then told him that I did not know where or how to get cash for them, unless Messrs. Latouche would change them; then said he, Go and ask them to do it, for you must see and get some cash. I told him then that I would either go or send to Mr. Latouche some time o' Wednesday, if that would do, and he agreeable, when he, Sullens, replied, and said, Do so; I am agreeable. The Wednesday morning, January 10th, I was not very well; and at about ten o'clock in the forenoon, I wrote few lines to Mr. Latouche, with a twenty-pound bank-note inclosed, desiring he would he pleased to send me cash for the said note by the bearer, who was the waiter where I lodged; the waiter comes back, and tells me that he was ordered to call for the money at twelve o'clock, as Mr. Latouche would not be in the way till that time; accordingly the waiter went at twelve o'clock, and returned to inform me that he was ordered to call for the money at two o'clock, as Mr. Latouche could not tell the exchange until about two o'clock; I said to the waiter, Very well, call for the money at that time. About one o'clock, Sullens and Archer comes up stairs in my room to shift themselves, when one of Messrs. Latouche's clerks came to the door of my room, and told me that I should have the money sent me for the twenty-pound note in about an hour's time; but in about half an hour's time, he returns to me, with the secretary of the Post-Office, Sir Thomas Blackhall , and others. The Secretary desired to speak with me; I said, by all means; and went with him into another room; when he began to tell me about a bank-note of fifty-pounds that I had changed with Mr. Latouche; also told me that he had an account of that same note being taken out of the mail in England. I made answer, that I did not know any thing about that, for honestly I had received it, as well as some more I had then in my pocket. However, he said, that I was in the hands of justice, and must go along with them to the Crown Office; accordingly we all three went to the said office, but not one question asked of me, and presently after sent me with Archer to Newgate. If I had the least suspicion of any ill consequences should ever attend, or that I had dishonestly come by any one of the notes, I should have hardly remained that day so many hours at the hotel, after hearing three different times from Messrs. Latouche, without the money; this would have been enough for me to go away from the hotel immediately, if I had been guilty of doing any thing amiss; instead of that, I was innocent, and remained there to be taken, knowing my cause was just and honest. Indeed I know'd not, nor no more than the child unborn, that Sullens and Archer had robbed the mail of the notes which Sullens gave me to pass. I am of opinion that any one then in my situation would accept of the same offer that I did from Sullens. Now I leave it all to your great wisdom and kind consideration, hoping, my Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, that nothing but justice, and what is lawful and right, may take place in this affair, as I here declare before God that I am an innocent man, and am brought into this unhappy situation by deceitful men, and which cares very little what oaths they make, to save their own lives.

May it therefore please your Lordship to consider my hard case, and shew me all the lenity that the laws of my country will admit of, for I am innocent, and hope your Lordship will be convinced of it, in the course of my trial.

(Signed) JAMES JONES .

Wednesday morning, April 25th, 1781.

ARCHER GUILTY ( Death .)

ROBERTS, otherwise JONES, GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

[No punishment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-68

264. CHARLOTTE WARE was indicted for stealing five pieces of silk ribband, value 50 s. the property of William Starzaker , privily, in the shop of the said William , February 27th .

WILLIAM STARZAKER sworn.

I am a stay-maker . The prisoner came to my shop on the 27th of February last. I was called down stairs: my wife was run out in pursuit of the prisoner; she and some of the neighbours brought the prisoner back to my shop. I searched her myself; I found a piece of ribband under her arm, and another in her bosom: the black ribband is my property, and the yellow one is not.

ELIZABETH STARZAKER s worn.

I am a millener. The prisoner and another woman came into my shop on the 27th of February, under pretence of buying ribbands: while she was looking at the ribband, some other people came in; I served them, and turned again to the prisoner; they both staid in the shop about ten minutes. When they were got about two doors, I missed the ribbands; I called my husband down, and ran after the prisoner; I overtook her in a passage facing the Five Bells Tavern: my shop is at the end of the New Church in the Strand. I got up with the other woman, but she struck me on the breast, and got away: I got assistance, and brought the prisoner back; I saw her searched, and the two pieces of ribband taken from her.

What is that piece of black ribband worth? - About nine shillings.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

The other young woman asked me to go along with her to buy a yard of ribband; I went into this shop with her; the lady and she could not agree: when we came out, and had got a few yards, the lady called out she had been robbed; the young woman put these pieces of ribband into my hand; I did not know where she got them.

GUILTY of stealing to the value of 10 d.

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-69

265. FRANCIS TIPPIN was indicted for stealing a silk cloak, value 5 s. a linen apron, value 1 s. a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. a linen handkerchief, value 6 d. and an half-guinea and an half-crown , the property of Hannah Gardiner , spinster , April 18th .

HANNAH GARDINER , spinster, sworn.

On last Tuesday was se'nnight, in the evening, the prisoner came to a Mrs. Gibbs's, next door but one to where I lived, and asked for a lodging; she would not admit him, unless he paid a shilling before he went into the lodging; he had not a shilling to pay: he asked the woman where I lodge, to have a pint of beer, and she asked me to go along with her.

What is that woman's name? - Gibbs. I went with him to the Blue Anchor in Snow's Rents, opposite where I live: we had two or three pints of beer. He took me from there, and would insist of my going with him into Tothill-street, into a very bad house I was not acquainted with. He pretended love to me, and that he would marry me. I went with him to the Chequers: we had three pints of beer there; we staid there about an hour and an half; we sat in the tap-room; he took me from there to a very bad place, a night-house in the Almonry.

How came you to go with him there? - He said he was going home with me; I desired him to set me home; I thought he was going with me.

How came you to go into that house? - I do not know indeed.

Did you think that was your own house? - Yes; I thought so indeed.

You must be much in liquor? - I am not used to liquor; he made me intoxicated; I did not know what I was about: he sent for half a pint of peppermint, and forced me to drink; we were there all night; the next morning he stripped me of my cloak, and a Barcelona and pocket handkerchief, my apron, a half-guinea, and two half-crowns.

Did he take them by force? - No; there was nobody in company with me all night but him, and in the morning they were gone.

Was he gone before you missed them? - Yes; I was in bed in the Almonry, in that bad house: when he left me, he told me he was going down to get some breakfast, and would come up again.

Did you miss the things before or after he went down? - I missed the money before he went down, and I asked him about it; he said he knew nothing about it.

Did you miss the other things? - Yes, directly; I got up, and had not a handkerchief or apron to put on; he never came up again.

Had you the money when you went to bed? - Yes, in my pocket.

How do you know you had it in your pocket? - I thought [ had; I can't swear to it.

Were the other things found? - Yes; I had him taken up the next day: there was found my black silk cloak, an handkerchief, and an apron: he could not say much for himself, but he swore he had not the money; he took the silk handkerchief and pocket handkerchief, therefore he must have the money.

SYLVANUS PRICE sworn.

I am a constable. I have a black silk cloak, an apron, and pocket handkerchief; I took them out of the lining of the prisoner's coat; he said nothing when I took them from him.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutrix.)

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I met this woman: she went and drank with me; she went home, and came out again, and walked with me; she said she was dry; we went into the Chequers, and had four pints of beer; I paid for two, and she paid for two: she wanted to go to bed, and asked me to go home with her; I was a stranger; I did not know the way to her home; she asked me to take her to somewhere to lie down; I took her to an house, and took a bed for her; I gave 1 s. 6 d. for it. When we went to bed, she said she had lost her money; I said I had no money but to pay for the bed; I went to bed with her; she waked at six in the

morning, and waked me, and said, she was vexed about her money; I said I knew nothing of it; she said, did not I promise to give her some over-night? I said, I did not promise her any money; I had none to give her; she said, what must she do to go home! and she gave me a cloak, an apron, and handkerchief, to pawn for her; I could not get what she wanted; I was bringing them back, and the man laid hold of me and took me up.

(The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.)

GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-70

266, 267. WILLIAM BLAND was indicted, for that he, together with James Colyer , (not in custody) feloniously did steal two large coppers, value 40 s. the property of John Norcot ; and CALEB GOATLEY , for feloniously receiving the said coppers, well knowing them to have been stolen , April 7th .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810425-71

268. SARAH GUNSTON was indicted for stealing a cloth cloak, value 5 s. a woman's black silk hat, value 1 s. a silk handkerchief, value 4 s. a linen apron, value 1 s. a muslin neckloth, value 1 s. a pair of thread stockings, value 1 s. a pair of women's stuff shoes, value 6 d. and a china teapot, value 4 d. the property of Charles Cotter , February 5th .

MARY COTTER sworn.

I am the wife of Charles Cotter ; the prisoner nursed me; she slept in the same room with me and my husband; I waked about seven in the morning, and saw the prisoner dressing herself; my hat and cloak were hanging up; the prisoner went out, and I missed the things mentioned in the indictment; I went after the prisoner, and found her; but I never recovered any of my things.

ELEANOR HIGGINSON sworn.

The prisoner came to my house, dressed in a hat and cloak, and handkerchief, that, by the subscription, were the same that Cotter had lost.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I lived with that woman about eleven weeks; I lived a very unhappy life; the man and she used frequently to quarrel, and fight, all hours of the night, not being married to the man, as they have both declared; she used to get up in the night, and pick his pocket, and it was laid to me. On Saturday, the next morning, I went out, and said nothing to them; going to my cousin's, in Bishopsgate-street, I met a young woman, that lives at the Seven Dials, who lent me a hat and cloak. They would swear my life away for a glass of gin.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Baron EYRE .

Reference Number: t17810425-72

269, 270, 271. ELIZABETH JACKSON , ANN ONION , and ANN SHAW , were indicted for stealing five yards of printed cotton, value 7 s. the property of Elizabeth Law , widow , privately in her shop , March 27th .

(The prosecutrix, and her witnesses, were called; but not appearing, the court ordered their recognizance to be estreated.

ALL THREE NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: t17810425-73

272. MICHAEL GRANT was indicted for stealing a pair of silver shoe buckles, value 20 s. the property of Robert Williams , privily from the person of the said Robert , April 15th .

ROBERT WILLIAMS sworn.

I am between fourteen and fifteen years old. On Easter Monday, between twelve and one o'clock, I was in the skittle-ground, in Tothill-street, with three coal-heavers; they gave me some drink, and I fell asleep; I saw the prisoner there; I was carried out of one place into another; I waked between two and three o'clock, and my buckles were gone; I saw them again last Saturday, in Mr. Mason's shew glass, who is a silversmith.

- MASON sworn.

I bought these buckles on Easter Monday, about two o'clock, of the prisoner; he came into my shop, and took them out of his shoes; they weighed five ounces; I gave him 20 s. for them. I believe the prisoner is the man. A neighbouring boy said, he knew who the buckles belonged to; I described the person I bought them of, and by that means the prisoner was taken.

ROBERT MASON sworn.

I was in the shop when the prisoner sold the buckles; there was not any person with him.

SUSANNAH GRACE sworn.

I was with the prosecutor when he bought these buckles, eight weeks ago.

(The buckles were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

A soldier asked me to sell these buckles for him; he shewed me a place where to sell them; he stood in the street. I went and sold them for 20 s. and gave him the money; I knew him by sight; I do not know where he is; I have never seen him since.

NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-74

273, 274. MARY RYAN and AMELIA GILBERT were indicted for stealing three linen shirts, value 5 s. a dimity waistcoat, value 1 s. a muslin neckloth, value 1 s. two muslin aprons, value 2 s. a linen shirt, value 6 d. a linen shift, value 6 d. five linen handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a linen gown, value 1 s. 6 d. two pieces of linen cloth, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Rogers , February 14th .

SARAH CHANDLER sworn.

Thomas Rogers brought me the linen mentioned in the indictment, to wash. I went out to a day's work, on the 14th of February; I left them wet; when I came home at night, they were all missing; there was a hole broke in the plaistering, large enough for a person to creep through. I lived in the fore garret; Mary Ryan had the room next to mine; there was another person likewise there; I could not tell who; they went away that evening; I suspected them by their absenting.

EDWARD TREDWAY sworn.

I am a constable. We went after Mary Ryan several days, but could not find her; on the 9th of March I took her, and another girl, in Parker's-lane; I charged her with taking these things; she said, Amelia Gilbert was concerned with her; that she threatened to knock her brains out, if she did not go through the hole. She went with me to the place where she had sold them.

ELIZABETH HAWKER sworn.

I live in Little Peter-street, Soho. The two prisoners brought these things home; I bought them for 14 s. I keep a clothes shop. Mary Ryan had the things, but I am not certain which took the money up about them.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by the prosecutor, and Chandler.

RYAN's DEFENCE.

Gilbert did not know how I came by them, when I sold them.

GILBERT's DEFENCE.

I know nothing of the affair; Ryan asked me to go with her.

RYAN GUILTY .

GILBERT NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-75

275, 276. THOMAS GEARING and JOHN COLLINS were indicted for stealing a pair of silver candlesticks, value 10 l. ten silver spoons, value 50 s. eight shirts, value 40 s. four linen handkerchiefs, value 10 s. six linen table-cloths, value 6 s. a mattrass, value 5 s. a pair of blankets, value 8 s. a quilt, two pillows, value 4 s. two bolsters, value 10 s. a pair of nankeen breeches, value 14 s. a pair of dimity breeches, value 4 s. and five pair of silk stockings, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Pritchard , Esq ; two linen sleeves, value 4 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. &c. &c. the property of Percival Johnson , April 21st .

THOMAS PRITCHARD , Esq; sworn.

The prisoner, Gearing, lived with me six months; he behaved so well that I placed great confidence in him: Mrs. Pritchard complained of missing a great number of things to a great amount; I suspecting the prisoner, he was sent for to the justice's by the justice's advice; when he was brought there, he was beginning to make a confession; having some regard for him, I was not willing to take his life; I stopped him from going on with the confession; he only confessed pawning a shirt, a tablecloth, and a neckcloth. I took him home, and promised him, if he would tell the truth, I would be as favourable as I could; I would spare his life. Several articles I had lost were found at different pawnbrokers.

THOMAS NASH sworn.

I am a pawnbroker in Holles-street, Clare-market. I took in a pair of silver candlesticks of Gearing last Saturday night; he pledged them in his own name; he told me they were his own; that he lived at Mr. Kitchen's, in Drury-lane: I lent him three guineas on them: he had been backwards and forwards to my shop some months. I took in some shirts from him at different times, some in the month of October; he pledged them all in his own name.

PHILIP LE MOINE sworn.

I took in some shirts and stockings, two table-cloths, and two or three handkerchiefs, of Gearing; I believe it was about the month of November.

(The candlesticks were produced in court.)

ANN BROWN sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Pritchard. To the best of my knowledge, these are my master's candlesticks; we have lost such: I do not know that there is any particular mark.

To Mr. Prichard. Do you know the candlesticks? - I do; there is a dent in one; and he has taken two wrong sockets, which I took notice of before I saw them; I can positively swear they are mine.

Brown. The table-cloths are not marked; we lost such. I know the stockings; they are marked T. S. P. To the best of my knowledge, these are my master's shirts; they are not marked they are like those we lost.

WILLIAM BAILEY sworn.

I keep a public-house. I bought a tablecloth of the prisoner about three months ago; he said he got it at a sale; he often attended sales; I gave him 18 s. for it.

(The table-cloth is produced in court.)

To Brown. Do you know that tablecloth? - Yes; we lost such a one; it is marked E. B.

Prosecutor. That is one that was my wife's before she was married; it is marked E. B. ( Elizabeth Burdet .)

JOHN HAINES sworn.

I went into the Feathers ale-house about a month ago; the prisoner, Gearing, was offering some things to sale; I bought a pair of nankeen breeches, a white dimity waistcoat, and a pair of white dimity breeches, for 7 s. 6 d.; I paid Gearing for them.

Have you the waistcoat and breeches here? - Yes. ( They are produced.)

Mr. Pritchard. I have lost such; I cannot swear positively that these are mine.

ALEXANDER DIXON sworn.

I am a pawnbroker. I live with Mr. Fleming, in Drury-lane. I took in a quilt, three shirts, four table spoons, a table cloth, and a neckcloth, of Gearing, at nine different times, since November last, in the name of Thomas Gearing . (They are all produced.)

Mr. Pritchard. I bought the table spoons myself; there is no mark, therefore I cannot swear positively to them; but I think these are the spoons.

Brown. We lost such a one; and it is marked E. B.

THOMAS SRUD sworn.

I keep a public-house. I have known Gearing upwards of three years. The two prisoners, and another person, came to my house, and sold me this bolster (producing it) for 6 s. 6 d.; I paid the money down on the table; I do not know which took it; it was six or seven months ago, I believe.

Brown. We have lost a bolster; I cannot swear to it.

Le Moine. I have a shirt and three handkerchiefs I took in of Collins in the month of December last, in the name of John Collins . (They are produced.)

Brown. I can't swear to the shirt; my master has lost one of the same sort: nor can I swear to the handkerchiefs.

GEARING's DEFENCE.

What I confessed was on a promise of my master not to prosecute me.

COLLINS's DEFENCE.

When I worked with the prosecutor, Gearing asked me to pawn a shirt for him; I went and pawned it.

To Mr. Pritchard. What led you to the evidence of Bailey, Haines, and Srud? - By the account of the prisoner, except Haines; he came of himself.

For Gearing.

JOSEPH LAWRENCE sworn.

I am constable of St. Clement Danes. Matthews came to me, and desired me to go to Mr. Pritchard of Clement's-Inn; I went, on Tuesday last, about nine in the evening; the prisoner was there; Mr. Pritchard told me the whole matter, and charged him with robbing him of divers things. He said, that, provided he would tell what he had taken from him, and tell who were his accomplices, he would not take his life.

When Mr. Pritchard gave you the charge, what did he charge him with? - Robbing him of divers things; and I was to take him to the watch-house; I have the charge-book; that is the charge, according to Mr. Pritchard's desire; - Mr. Pritchard charges Thomas Gearing , his servant, with improper behaviour: I was going to enter it in the common manner; but Mr. Pritchard desired to enter it in that manner, not to hurt the man.

To Mr. Pritchard. You had been at the justice's before this? - Yes.

For Collins.

THOMAS BECKFORD sworn.

I heard Thomas Gearing say, that Collins had pawned the shirt for him.

Did you hear Gearing desire Collins to do it? - No.

GEARING GUILTY . N. 2 years .

COLLINS NOT GUILTY .

Tried by the First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

Reference Number: t17810425-76

277. WILLIAM HEWETT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Darby , on the 21st of February , about the hour of seven in the night, and stealing a pair of sheets, value 15 s. a damask table-cloth, value 16 s. a linen gown and petticoat, value 15 s. a cotton gown and petticoat, value 25 s. two linen gowns, value 10 s. two cotton bed-gowns, value 4 s. two women's cotton waistcoats, value 3 s. two linen petticoats, value 3 s. a linen half-shift, value 3 s. eleven shirts,

value 15 s. five linen aprons, value 10 s. three muslin aprons, value 3 s. two linen aprons, value 2 s. a Marseilles petticoat, value 14 s. a corded dimity petticoat, value 5 s. a cotton quilted petticoat, value 2 s. a flannel petticoat, value 1 s. a child's linen jam, value 8 s. three pair of cotton stockings, value 3 s. twelve diaper clouts, value 12 s. a black silk cloak, value 25 s. a damask table-cloth, value 3 s. four pair of women's shift sleeves, value 3 s. two lawn caps, value 2 d. three linen night-caps, value 3 d. eight linen pocket handkerchiefs, value 4 s. three linen shirts, value 4 s. a pair of women's linen pockets, value 2 d. a worsted stocking, value 1 d. a pair of cotton cuffs, value 1 d. a pair of silver salts with glasses, value 21 s. a pair of silver tea-tongs, value 8 s. another silver salt, value 4 s. a silver table-spoon, value 1 s. a tortoiseshell and paper snuff-box, mounted with silver, value 8 s. a cloth coat and waistcoat, value 3 s. a dam ask napkin, value 3 s. a blanket, value 6 s. three towels, value 6 d, three linen stocks, value 6 d. two women's neck handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Darby ; four linen shifts, value 4 s. four linen aprons, value 6 s. two pair of cotton stockings, value 2 s. two muslin neck handkerchiefs, value 1 s. two linen nightcaps, value 2 d. and a silk cloak, value 6 s. the property of Elizabeth Darby , spinster, in the dwelling-house of the said Thomas Darby .

THOMAS DARBY sworn.

I am a carver and gilder , at No. 4, Doby-court, Monkwell-street . On the 21st of February, being Fast-day, I went out in company with a gentleman, in the morning, about half after nine: I left my wife and sister at home: I had previously agreed to meet them at my father-in-law's, in Jermyn-street. I met them there; and we returned home at about half an hour after 10 o'clock at night. We found the door on the single lock. I had a candle from Mr. Dell's, my next door neighbour. I went into the house, and missed the several articles mentioned in the indictment.

Had the house any appearance of having been broke open? - None; only the door being on the single lock. On the Saturday following I was informed, that there was an advertisement in the paper which answered to my things. By the direction of that advertisement, I went to Mr. Moseley's, at No. 100, in Bunhill-row: there I found the coat and waistcoat and shirt, and a pair of sheets; they were marked with this mark (producing it); I made it myself: there was likewise there my wife's Marseilles petticoat, and a gown and coat.

ELIZABETH DARBY sworn.

I am the wife of the last witness. I have a sister named Elizabeth Darby . On the 21st of February, the Fast-day, at about half past twelve, my sister and I went out together: I saw her double-lock the door. We came home between ten and eleven o'clock. My sister opened the door: I was with her: she made a stand on finding it upon the single lock. She opened the door: we went in, and I found the drawers all open, and missed all the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them).

ELIZABETH DARBY sworn.

I am sister to Thomas Darby . When we went out on the Fast-day, I double-locked the door. When we returned, I opened the door: I found it had been opened, for it was then only on the single lock: it is a spring lock; so that it would lock without a key.

( Charles Moseley , a constable, produced the articles mentioned by the prosecutrix, which were deposed to by the prosecutor.)

THOMAS WHITEFIELD sworn.

I am an excise officer. On February the 21st, between eight and nine in the evening, I saw the prisoner in Old-street-road, with a bundle upon his head: he was standing against the wall: from his behaviour I suspected he had got smuggled goods. He went into a yard, as if he was going into a house: he put the bundle under his arm. I told him I was an officer belonging to the excise, and insisted upon seeing what he had got. He asked me what I meant to search for: I told him run goods. He said if I searched for that, I might search; for

he had none. I untied the corner of the bundle, and put my hand in, and found it was linen. He went into a house, and up stairs; I followed him, secured him, and delivered him and the bundle into the custody of the constable.

SAMUEL DELLS sworn.

My boy was out in the court about seven o'clock, and said Mr. Darby's door was open. I went about a quarter of an hour after, and knocked; nobody came, and I pulled the door to; it was a spring lock. I did not go into the house.

SAMUEL DELLS , jun. sworn.

I found Mr. Darby's door open about seven o'clock upon Fast-day.

Did you see any body about the house? - Nobody.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I had these things of a man to carry to James-street.

For the Prisoner.

JOHN SIMMES sworn.

I am a carpenter: I live at No. 44, Brick-lane, Spitalfields. On the Fast-day, about 8 o'clock, in Old-street, I saw a man give the prisoner the bundle, and gave him a shilling to carry it just by Moorfields, to James-street.

Did you see him give him a shilling? - I heard the bargain as I was going by.

Did you know the prisoner before? - I might have seen him before, where he has been sawing; I never was acquainted with him before: I often employ sawyers myself. I knew him by sight these twelvemonths.

Whereabouts did you see him? - Just by Mr. Croker's brew-house.

Did you know the man that gave him this bundle? - No; I never saw the man to my knowledge in my life. I was making water when I overheard them.

Were they standing together, or coming along? - They were coming along talking together: the other man had the bundle under his arm, and gave it to the prisoner. I heard him say, I will give you a shilling to carry it to James-street, by Moorfields. They both went away together.

Did you walk the same way with them? - No, I did not, only just to the turnpike; then he crossed down Golden-lane.

To Whitefield. It was, I think, between eight and nine when you saw the prisoner? - Nearer nine than eight.

Whereabouts in Old-street-road? - About thirty yards from the turnpike, which is fifty or sixty yards from Mr. Croker's brew-house. He told me he took it up in Golden-lane: his words were, as near as I can recollect, a man gave him a shilling in Golden-lane, to carry it to Bayfield's: that was when I had him in the garret.

When you first saw him, he was standing still? - Yes, against the wall, making water, I believe; but I cannot say.

(The prisoner called two other witnesses, who said he was at the White-hart, Bunhill-row, on the Fast-day, till near eight at night.)

NOT GUILTY of burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house, but guilty of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s.

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-77

278. JOHN BLONDE was indicted for stealing three canvas bags, value 3 s. 450 pound of goats wool, value 50 l. 15 pound of red Vidonia wool, value 40 s. eighty-eight bow-strings for men's hats, value 4 l. two pieces of belerdine loopings, value 40 s. and 78 bands for hats, value 14 s. the property of John Harris , in the dwelling-house of the said John , March 13th .

Mr. NORMAN sworn.

I am a hatter, in Cannon-street , almost opposite Mr. Harris's. A woman came to me upon the 16th of March, and sold me forty hat loopings, what we call breed; I gave her 10 d. a piece: she said, her name was Ford; after I had paid her for the breed, I observed she had some bands in a paper; I asked if they were to sell? she said, they were not hers, they belonged to a lodger; but I might have them at 17 d. a piece; I said, we sold them in our shop for 1 s. I could not give but 10 d. I said, if

he did not like the price, he might have them again; I asked, where she lived; she said in the middle of Wheeler-street. When she was gone, I went over to Mr. Hartley, to ask what they were worth; he said, 26 s. a dozen; I said, I bought them for 10 d. he said, they must be stole. I went and enquired after her; I could not find her; she came again on the 29th; I sent then for Mr. Hartley; he asked her about these bands; she said one of her lodgers sent her with them to sell. My father advised me to send for a constable; she said, one Blonde, who lived in our neighbourhood, and was a servant to Mr. Harris, knew her; we sent for him; he seemed surprised, and began to abuse us; we said, she had brought things we suspected were stole; he said, she was a very honest woman, he would be bound for her; we told him we were going before a magistrate; he said he would go, and see her righted; he went home to dinner, and came back again; we went to the Mansion House; there was no Alderman there; we went to Guildhall; she said, she lived in Wheeler-street; and he said, he lived in Wheeler-street; they were examined separate; she said, he had been at her house four times; he said, he had not been there at all; he said, he lived at one Green's, a porter, in St. John's street; he was sent to the Compter; we went to St. John's street; we could find no such man as Green; we found, the next morning, that he lodged in Goswell-street, at one Mr. Cosby's, a snuff-shop. I went with a search warrant; I went up into the garret, where he lodged; there were two beds in the room; under the bed we found boxes, with hat linings and trimmings; and there were some hat bands; there was so large a quantity we were obliged to have a cart to take them away.

Was he present at the lodgings? - No, he would not go with us.

THOMAS HARTLEY sworn.

I am a glover, on Fish-street-hill; Mr. Norman shewed me two hat-bands on the 16th of March; he said, he bought two dozen, at 10 s. a dozen, of a woman; I told him, they were such as I gave 26 s. for; I asked, where she said she lived; he said, Wheeler-street; I went in the afternoon to enquire for her; I could not find her. On the 29th she brought some more, and Mr. Norman came for me; I went over; Mr. Norman sent for a constable; then the woman sent for the prisoner; he was very angry; he said, she was a very honest woman; he would go before a magistrate, and see her righted; we went to Guildhall; Mr. Townsend was there; I desired they might be examined separate; he said, he lodged in St. John's street; I went into St. John's street; I could not find any such place as he directed us to; I went afterwards to Goswell-street, No. 3, I there found hat-boxes, full of hat-bands and linings, so much there was a cart load of them.

JOSEPH SARD sworn.

I am a constable. Dinmore and I went to the lodgings of the prisoner, and saw the goods found; I have had the custody of them ever since.

(They were produced in court.)

JOHN DINMORE sworn.

These hats, (producing them) were brought to Guildhall by Mr. Fleming.

- FLEMING sworn.

I am a pawnbroker, in Drury-lane; I took in pawn thirty hats, at different times, of the prisoner; they are all new ones; I did not know him before he brought the hats; he told me his name was Fletcher.

(Some of the hats found in the lodgings were produced.)

JOHN HARRIS * sworn.

* Mr. Harris is one of the people called Quakers.

I am a hatter and haberdasher , in Cannon-street; the prisoner was my servant ; he lived with me sixteen months.

Have you lost any property? - Yes.

Do you know to what amount? - No, I do not.

Do you know these hats? - I do; there is my mark on every one I have looked at yet, (looks at the hats brought from the pawnbroker). These are lined; my mark is branded on the inside; I can only speak to the mark on those which have the linings cut out.

How many have the linings out? - Only three; they appear to be the same hats the three are, one out of each of the parcels pawned at different times.

What is the value of the hats found in the lodgings, and of those at Mr. Fleming's? - Those about 7 l. 10 s. what I sell for 5 s. a hat; there were 88 in his lodgings; I can't speak to the value of them, because they are of different prices. Here are two pieces of belerdine loopings: here is my roll, with my mark; I have had these two pieces of belerdine ever since I have been in trade; they were left by my father; it was bought, I suppose, twenty years ago; I have not been able to sell it, except a little piece at a time.

Can you say at what time the hats were in your shop? - No; I cannot.

There is a large quantity of hats? - Yes; and a large quantity of goats-wool; I know some of that to be my property.

What is your stock of hats? - Perhaps 1000 dozen in my shop and boxes some time last year, now perhaps I have not 50 dozen. I do not know I ever sold a Manchester hat without a lining; and some of those without linings are Manchester hats. The other articles in the cart I believe are my property, except a box and trunk which they are in: there is about 150 pounds of goats-wool.

How do you know that to be yours? - There is a particular sort amongst it, which I import myself; I believe no other person imports it; I have it cleaned at Leghorn. There is a box, which the red Vidonia wool is in. The bow-strings I can only swear to, because they are English-made strings, and I bought all the person had at the time.

WILLIAM YOUNG sworn.

I am servant to Mr. Keates, a pawnbroker, at the corner of Dove-court, Leather-lane. I have here six hats (producing them) which I took in of the prisoner, on the 21st of December last, in the name of John Fletcher ,

Mr. Harris (taking the lining out of one of the hats). This is my property; the others appear to be the same.

THOMAS COSBY sworn.

I live at No. 3, in Goswell-street. The prisoner, John Blonde , lodged at my house. I was present when the things were found; they were found in his own apartment.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

I never took any wool out of Mr. Harris's house. I have been so exceeding ill, I have not had time to send for any body. There have been things taken from me that would have supported me in the Compter.

To Mr. Harris. What opinion had you of the prisoner? - I looked upon him to be a very honest man, or I should not have kept him in the house. I had a good character of him. I placed such confidence in him, that I believe, if it had not been discovered as it was, it would have been worse for me.

Is your warehouse a part of the house? - Yes, it is underneath the dwelling-house.

GUILTY of stealing the goods to the value of 39 s.

Tried by the First London Jury, before Lord LOUGHBOROUGH.

Reference Number: t17810425-78

279. JUDAS SANDERS was indicted for stealing a wooden box, value 3 s. 6 d. a stone bottle, value 12 d. a wicker basket, value 6 d. 28 lb. of sulphur, value 8 s. 2 lb. of cordial confection, value 22 s. 12 lb. of salt petre, value 12 s. and 2 lb. weight of flake manna, value 10 s. the property of Richard Speed and Thomas Speed , February the 28th .

PHILIP PHILLIPS sworn.

I live with Messrs. Richard and Thomas Speed , who are chymists and druggists , No. 90, Cannon-street. I was carrying a box on the 29th of February, between seven and eight o'clock at night, to the Swan, in Holborn; I pitched it at the Bull's-head, in Bull-head-court, Newgate-street, on a pitching-block. There came a man up to me,

and said, My friend, you seem to have a heavy load; will you take part of a pint of beer? I said, I did not choose to go in, I was rather in a hurry to go: he went into the house, and I sat down under the pitching-block. In a little time I rose up with my back to the box: when I turned my face to the box, it was gone. I sat there for about five or ten minutes.

Did you drink there? - No; I went into the house after the man to see if he was there, and he was gone.

Is there another door out of the house? - Yes, there is. I went towards Newgate: I could not see any body with the box. I returned towards Cheapside: I turned up Bagnio-court, in Newgate-street: there I met the man that wanted me to go into the house, and the prisoner; the prisoner had the box on his back coming towards Newgate-street: I heard the other man desire the prisoner to slip down the box as fast as he could, and he said, here is the man, here is the man! so the prisoner slipped down the box, and both made away towards Cheapside. I called out, Stop thief! I pursued the prisoner, and never lost sight of him till I took him at the corner of St. Martin's le Grand. The other man got off, and has not been taken.

(The box was produced in court by John Colliton , a constable.)

THOMAS SPEED sworn.

I put the things mentioned in the indictment (repeating them) into the box.

JOHN HODGES sworn.

Going along Newgate-street, I heard the cry of Stop thief! I saw the prisoner coming towards me. I laid hold of him. Phillips came up directly.

PRISONER's DEFENCE.

Coming from Oxford-road up Newgate-street, they laid hold of me. I told them I was innocent.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-79

280, 281. WILLIAM WOOLCOT and WILLIAM FEARN were indicted for stealing forty-three bars of iron, 2,240 lb. value 18 l. the property of Godfrey Thornton , Esq ; April the 13th .

JAMES LEAVERETT sworn.

I am a smith, in Crown-alley, Moorfields. On Good-Friday, the two prisoners brought iron bars to me, above a ton weight, and wanted me to buy it. I stopped it, as I had a suspicion it was not honestly come by, as they asked under a market-price; they asked about 11 l. a ton; then they said they would take 10 l. I look upon it to be worth about 15 l. We inquired after the owner, and Mr. Finnemore said it was his master's property, he knew it by his mark. They said it belonged to a man that they were to meet at the sign of the Ship in Frying pan-alley, Tooley-street.

JAMES FINNEMORE sworn.

I am clerk to Mr. Jones, a wharfinger, at Allhallows, Thames-street. I went down to the wharf, at the Steel-yard, on Saturday morning, the 14th of this month. I was told there was some iron stolen out of the barge, and that these men were taken up on suspicion. I went to Mr. Leaverett's house; there I saw all the marks upon the iron, the same that was stolen out of the barge; there was none marked in that way but what was Mr. Thornton's property.

- JONES sworn.

I am a broker and wharsinger. As soon as I came to town, I went and examined the iron. I saw it was the same sort we had lost: it is a particular sort that comes from that country, of that mark. All that had been stolen was found at Mr. Leaverett's; there were forty-three bars.

Cross-Examination.

Did you inquire about this man in Frying-pan-alley? - No; I did not.

Was no part of the iron delivered? - No; we were landing of it: part of it was landed.

When was the iron missed? - On the Saturday after Good-Friday: we supposed it was taken away between Wednesday and Friday morning.

( Rebecca Meredith was called, but did not appear.)

(Woolcot called eight witnesses, who all gave him a very good character.)

(Fearn called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.)

BOTH GUILTY .

[Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-80

282. ELIZABETH NEWMAN was indicted for stealing ten pieces of lawn, containing thirty-six yards, value 10 l. 9 s. the property of John Tasker , March the 28th .

- ROBBINS sworn.

I was in the back parlour at tea: I saw a woman running out of the shop: I followed her: she ran away: I stopped her in Little George-street: she had a wrapper under her arm. I brought her back to the shop; I took from her the wrapper; I examined it; it contained eight pieces of linen; it had contained ten; it lay upon the counter with ten pieces in it (examining several of the pieces): these are my master's property; they have his mark.

- COLBATCH sworn.

I saw drop from the prisoner at the bar these two pieces.

(They were produced in court, and deposed to by Robbins.)

Prisoner. I have nothing to say, but to beg for mercy.

GUILTY .

Tried by the First London Jury, before Mr. Baron EYRE .

[Whipping. See summary.] [Imprisonment. See summary.]

Reference Number: t17810425-81

283. WILLIAM SHIELDS was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury , December the 6th .

NOT GUILTY .

Reference Number: s17810425-1

Tried by the Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

The Sessions being ended, the Court proceeded to give Judgment, as follows:

Received Sentence of Death. 9.

John Oakey , Richard Sheering , John King , otherwise Reed, William Thomas Hunt , Peter Boyce , Edward Warne , Ann Partridge , William Archer , and William Owen .

Navigation, 3 Years. 1.

Samuel Bagnal .

Navigation, 2 Years. 4.

Edward Fennell , James Thomas , John Brown , and William Hewitt .

Navigation, 1 Year. 7.

Thomas Parrott , Evan Price , Moses Levi , Thomas Hawley , Richard Wise , Joseph Ephraim , and William Bruce .

Whipped, and Imprisoned 1 Month. 1.

Elizabeth Harris .

Whipped, and Imprisoned 6 Months. 6.

Catharine Evans , Virtue Wicks , William Hudson , Mary Ryan , Elizabeth Newman , and Samuel Jacobs .

Whipped, and Imprisoned 3 Months. 1.

Charlotte Ware .

Whipped, and Imprisoned 12 Months. 1.

Sarah Robinson .

Twice publicly Whipped, and Imprisoned 3 Months. 1.

James Mahen .

Imprisoned 2 Years. 1.

Elizabeth Clark .

Imprisoned 12 Months. 2.

William Woolcot and William Fearn .

Imprisoned 6 Months. 4.

Judah Sanders , Jane Smith , Charles Holloway , and James Ironmonger .

Whipped. 4.

Ann Clark , Ann Smith , John Ruglass , and John Harden .

Fined 1 s. and discharged. 1.

Edward Priest .

Fined 1 s. and to serve his Majesty abroad. 1.

Edward Robinson .

Rescued. 1.

William Smith .

Sentence Respited. 2.

Margaret Morgan and Thomas Roberts , otherwise Jones.


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